View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

HUNT’S

MERCHANTS’

MAGAZINE,

& WfdUtj §jkw0pnpt¥,
representing

the

industrial

and commercial interests op the united states.

[Entered according to act ot Congress, in the year 1831, by W.u. B. Dana & Co., in the oilico of tlie Librarian

VOL. 39.

of Congress, Washington, D. c.(

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1881.

NO. 1,018.

At New York the

CONTENT8.

exchanges for the week exhibit a loss of
per cent from the same week of 1883. The shares of stock
disposed of on the Stock Exchange have reached a market
value of $114,070,000 and $106,517,000 respectively in the two
years, and after deducting double these values from the total
clearings there remains $329,911,047 and $403,448,599 as the
exchanges otherwise arising, or a loss of 23*8 per cent. Out¬
side of New York the total is $202,045,055 against $284,147,279
a year ago and
representing a decline of 7*8 per cent com*
pared with a loss December 13 of 10‘3 per cent and the pre¬
vious week of 12*5 per cent.
The details for the different
cities, presented in our usual form, are as follows ;
29/9

THE CHRONICLE.
he Investors’

Supplement
Clearing-House Ileum,h

...

719 I Monetary
and
719 j
English News

Commercial
724

The Financial Siiuation
7v.O I Commercial and Miscellaneous
How RR. Dividends Compare. 722 |
News
726

She Chrcrwicle.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION-PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
$10 20

For One Year (including postage)
For Six Months
do
Annual subscription in London (including
Sixmos.
do
do
do
WILLIAM B. DANA.
JOHN O. FLOYD.

s

6 10

postage)

£2 7s.
£1 8s.

HILLUM B. DANA Sc €o., Publixliers,
79 Sc 81 William Street, NEW YOBK.
Post Office Box 958.

TTVck
1884.

THE INVESTORS' SUPPLEMENT.

Sales of—

With the

present number of the Chronicle is issued the
usual
of 100 pages of closely printed matter.
This number of the
Supplement also contains the yearly article upon railroad
dividends, with a table showing the dividends paid in each of
the past seven years on all railroad stocks sold at the Ex¬
changes in New York, Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
The railroad maps in the Supplement continue to grow in
favor, and the officers of the great railroad “systems” are
realizing more and more, how useful it is to give in this way a
clear view of the territory occupied by their extended lines.
A general railroad map does not answer the purpose, as it is
simply impossible for bankers or investors to pick out on a
general map the complicated lines of such systems as the Chi¬
cago Burlington & Quincy, Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul or
Chicago & Northwestern.
In the present issue, twenty important railroad maps will be
found, including new maps of the Baltimore A Ohio, the

Indianapolis St. Louis &

Chicago.

(1,915,659)

bales.)
(Grain., .bushels)
(Petroleum, .bbls.)

(513,090)

Providence

4,305,400
1,234,271
1,10.’,800

Han ford
New Haven
Portland

December 13 of 21*4 per cent and December 0 of 22 o per cent.
The statement as a whole is less satisfactory than previous
ones, but not

materially s6. The volume of clearings present a
decrease which is natural, as clearings other than speculative
generally decline with the close of the year, since all merch¬
ants strive to c irry over as small stocks of goo Is as possible.
Of course the
holiday trade during the later weeks of Decem¬

(-207)
(-190)
(+13*0)
(-9-9)

$07,799,713
4,580,500

+1*8
—2P3

.

Baltimore
Total Middle....

Chicago
Oincinnat i
Milwaukee
Detroit
It

dianapolis

Cleveland
Columbus

St.

Joseph

New Orleans
Louisville
Kansas

City
Memphis
Total Southern..

San Francisco
Total all

PerCcnt

$558,094,373

-25-8

(1,801,401)
(1,000.900)

-1ST

(05,809,717)

(-19-e;
(+74-7>
(~39-6>

(30,009,000)

(-31-5>

$71,926,013
4,509,200

+1*4
+3-A

+50

1,339,874
1,103,302
793,512
602,481
695.043
407,275-

$78,084,253

+(j0'1

$81,497,360

+003

$49,302,550
6,817,280
11,794,949

$59,900,908

-177

9,480,800

-284

—so-e

13,502,730

-127

$42,414,609
7.077,580
11,557,059

-17-0

$07,974,785

$82,950,521

-18 1

$01,<49,248

-21T

$15,930,939
9,081,500
3,879,595
2,314,875
1,410,235
2,040,928
1,483,159
680,015

$48,279,30!
10,275,100
3,740,790
2,005,193
1,931,800
2,012,937

—49

$49,300,417

-5-8

—121

+3-7

9,381,150
3,817.817

—22 0

2,475,839

—18-0

-20-7

1,497,692

-22-7

+1*4

2,171,451

—4-2

1,30.8,851

-11-4
-30-5

$07,439,840

$78,391,343

Philadelphia
Pittsburg

-01

1,508,802
1,102,015

501,370

England

|

-29 9

(2,416,320)
(631,300)
(29,348,000)
(58,281,000)

Lowell
Total N.

i

Ending Dec. 13*

1884.

1

Springfield

Worcester

Per Cent.

$790,482,599 j

1,009,878
705,187
770,714
474,814

St. Louis

The exchanges for the week under review record a decline
from the figures of last year of 24*1 per cent, against a loss

1883.

827,018
718,557
682,031

Total Western...

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.

(33,120,000)
(52,511,000)

$69,019,827

Boston

Peoria
'

$55S,05l,047

shares.)

(.Stocks
(Cotton

Investors’ Supplement for December, consisting as

Southern Pacific and the Cincinnati

|

New York

1 Week

Ending December 20.

-51
+ P9
-12‘2

1.410,882

+2-5

1,004,035

—310

70! ,274

$71,059,104

-5 9

$70,719,991

$14,412,594

$10,2’8.091

—11-2

551,258

73',258

-24'J

$15,574,451
592,601

11,459,597
4,018,540
3,GS0,9l)8
2,228,001

15,187,244

—20*1

1,557,108

$30,344,958

$11,894,123

■

-6 ft
—2-9

—240>

—IPS
-17*4
-SSvfc

—2125

-9-2
—126

—

100

—15-0
-17-4

+245
+434

14,533,1"S
4,140,181
3,904,514
2,190.233

+22-0

$40,950,652

-11*2

$41,001,223

—39

$10,490,457

+133

$9,704,314

-27*2

$820,090,70 ? $1,080,029,8; 9

—241

$823,020,599

—21*4

4,289.701

-

2,955,050

03

+30
—13-9

+35-7

We have received by telegraph the returns from a few lead¬
ing cities for the five days ended with this (Friday) evening.
the purchases for it by jobbers have been made
previously and The figures, of course, cover but four working days, and in the
the purchases of gifts by individuals are mainly pai l for in
easily aggregate do not indicate quite as favorable results in com¬
or else
they go into bills which are not presented until after the panion with last year as last week’s returns did.
first of January. The falling off from last week is only
Five Days Ending Dec. 20.
five D'ys End'g Dec. 19
$3,930,807, but for the same time in 1883 the increase was
!
1884.
Per Cent.
1-8+4.
$32,738,078. This better showing of last year is, however, due
PerCent
j
1883.
entirely to New York, for in the balance of the country ihe j Now Yur-f
$335,546,085
$511,514,274 —34-4
-30-9
$470,333,200
(871,068)
(1,370,211) (-30-7)
(1,654,169) (-13*9)
week’s figures are only $1,987,081 behind Dec. 13 ami in the ! Sales of Stock (shs.)
Not received
Boston
$57,97 ,710
+00-3
total of a year ago there is a decline of $10,278,090. The New !
—17-4
$27,620,340
Philadelphia..
$33, J 76,920 -17 5
42,628,}- 90
-0-8
-7-8
7,73(5,051
England section exhibits an improvement over Dec. 13 of 0'1 Baitimore.
8,301,121
10.075,091
—12-8
—10-4
10,313,597
11,821,481
12,081,217
Per cent, the Middle gains 3*6 per cent and the West 4*7 per St. Louis
Total
32-5
-26 ^
$381,217,276 $505,113,79 5
$55 9,094,110
esat. The South, on the other hand, loses 9*4 per cent.

ber does not

a fleet




ihese

figures to

any

considerable extent,

as

...

•.

-

THE

720

CHRONICLE.

[Vol. XXXIX.

of,

Reading finances, the appearance of a hostile force
seeking the appointment of a third Receiver, and ulti¬
The events affecting Wall Street have not been of a mately the foreclosure of the mortgage, made a state of
favorable description this week.
In the main, however, chaos in the company’s affairs apparently imminent. This,
taken in connection with the rumored sales of coal much
they are merely incidents in the development of previous
well-known conditions.
Under their influence prices have below schedule prices, and the poor prospect as to earn¬
fluctuated, but the tendency has been downward, the ings those rumored sales encouraged, resulted in the low¬
result being a considerable decline in many leading stocks. est prices for the stocks of Reading and Jersey Central,
THE FINANCIAL SITUATION

retrograde movement the coal roads and the coal
have figured most prominently.
We noticed last
the sales of Delaware & Lackawanna by a leading

In this

which have been

touched for the former since

July 1880,

and for the latter since

April, 1879. It now appears, how¬
ever, as if the committee, organized as stated, was only
week
speculator, and the withdrawal of the support so long given advisory, that its purpose in seeking the appointment of a
to that property, by the combination he represented.
The third Receiver was simply to fill a vacancy with a repre¬
sentative of the bondholders, and that its object is rather to
general public has all along had little interest in the stock
of the road, as it has been artificially held up, and hence secure harmony in any plan of reorganization than to dis¬
has only partially shared in the general decline which has turb it.
Another influence adverse to the market was the publi¬
taken place.
Besides, no reports of the company’s business
are ever published, and
though semi-official rumors have cation of the reports of Lake Shore and Michigan Central
been abundant that the road was more than earning its for the full twelve months of the calendar year, and later
dividend, no proof of the statement has appeared, while the of the Pennsylvania road for November. We comment on
condition of other roads by no means favors such a belief. these figures below, and need only say here that the effect
It was only natural, therefore, in view of these facts, and of them was to give an unfavorable impression with regard
of the present condition of the market, that the with¬ to all trunk line business, but more especially that of New
Respecting the Pennsylvania return it
drawal of the support of so prominent an operator, and York Central.
the flood of floating stock thus let loose, should have should be added that the month of November was probably
the poorest for general business that has been experienced
broken the price materially.
But just at this juncture the new disturbance in the not only this year but since 1877, the election excitement,
coal trade came in, to help on the decline not only of that added to the depression in business prevailing previously,
stock, but of the securities of all the coal roads. Pacts having almost put a stop to mercantile'transactions for the
have developed within a week which made it apparent that month preceding November 15th, there being in fact no
the new arrangement limiting the production of coal to marked recovery until the first of December. A favorable
30 million tons, did not limit in any degree the price at circumstance to be remembered at the present moment is
which sales of coal might be effected.
The facts referred the better returns now being received for the weeks of
Business is some¬
to were the reported large contracts for delivery of coal December from many leading roads.
what
improved and the crops are moving freely and rates
to large consumers at a very decided decline from last
are generally
more nearly maintained, so for the time
year’s rates ; from which it was concluded, and the con¬
clusion appeared to be wholly reasonable, that the coal being at least, the comparison of earnings is less unsatisfac¬
market was to be left entirely to natural influences for tory.
This change ought to be apparent in trunk line
fixing prices and absorbing the supply.
Naturally earnings also, but probably with some of them it will be
enough it was believed that such a change of policy seen to a much smaller extent, as the contest between the
would bear heavily on coal carriers, affecting the Central and West Shore still continues and is likely to
earnings of
all these roads and therefore their remain as it is, until a further move is made in the fore¬
ability to pay interest and dividends ; hence the closure proceedings of West Shore, which will probably
reported sales not only worked against the prices of these take place soon after the'first of January.
A circumstance which is undoubtedly operating with in¬
securities, as already stated, but affected the whole market,
it sympathizing more or less in the decline.
Now, how-, creasing force, unfavorably to the roads of the northwest,
and particularly to St. Paul, is the extension of the Wis¬
ever, there seems to be some uncertainty with regard to
the sales made, the claim being, that one of them was old consin Central to St. Paul, which, it is announced, will be
stock “ deteriorated ” in value and that the other was Cum¬ completed soon after the first of January.
Of course it is
berland coal.
Furthermore, it is stated that the coal com¬ impossible to say what effect on earnings this new candi¬
panies intend to maintain old prices, and confidently believe date for St. Paul and Minneapolis business will have. After
that they will be able to do so. As we write there seems no its completion there will be four lines instead of three to
divide the.traffic centering at that point among, and ob¬
way of definitely determining the truth or error of these
various assertions, but a plausible view would seem to be, viously that must have some effect on the revenue of the old
as 30 million tons are to be mined, that it will be marketed;
companies. The greater fear is that before a settlement is
if trade improves so as to absorb it readily at old prices made a cutting of rates will prevail for a time, late experi¬
(this year it is supposed that 281 million tons were so ence showing that a division of business is generally
taken), well and good; but if as the year progresses stocks reached in that way. This latter idea found some encour¬
agement in the reports on AVednesday of trouble in the
accumulate, sales will be forced with the natural result.
Reading has also had its special trouble, further dis¬ Northwestern traffic association accompanied by rumors of
turbing the value of its securities. Apparently a misun¬ cutting of rates out of St. Paul.
Other than the foregoing, nothing of ■ importance mater¬
derstanding gave this influence its adverse character; for
it was the result of rumors connected with a new confmittee ially affecting the values of securities has transpired dur¬
formed in Philadelphia to supervise the interests of the gen¬ ing the week.
The injunction obtained against the pay¬
eral mortgage bondholders. It was reported here that the ment of the New York Central dividend, is presumed to
purpose of this committee was decidedly belligerent; that be a mere speculative move, and besides can have little
its special business was to foreclose the property, and in effort, ns a late statute of the State permits the pay¬
general to act adversely to the interests and plans of Mr. ment of the dividend to be made, on the company’s filing
trade

Gowen and his friends,




hi the present

disordered condition security to make good any damages

which the

plaintiff

December

721

THE CHRONICLE

27, 1884.J

finally show has been done him by its payment. The ag-dnst $1,804,769 m 1883, $1,932,665 in 1882, $1,621,675
at the time of the railroad war in 1881, and even $1,726,completion of the Commercial Cable Company and the
709 way back in 1879.
This, however, comprises the
opening of its lines to business, is an event of considerFor the eleven
able moment to the public as it has resulted in the operations of one single month only.
the
months of
year the comparison is less unfavorable, in¬
lowering of the cable rates to forty cents a word.
There was an effort made to depress Western Union on asmuch as the net result, though below that of the four
years preceding, is at least above that for 1879.
The loss
this announcement, but with little effect.
Pennsylvania, Michigan Central and Lake Shore state¬ as compared with 1883 is $3,156,000 on the whole system,
ments of earnings and
expenses,
issued this week, of which nearly two-thirds occurs on the Western lines.
With such a showing by the Western lines of the Penn¬
have already referred to as one
we
of the influ¬
ences upon the market.
The Pennsylvania exhibit, as sylvania we ought not to be surprised at the poor returns
stated, covers the month of November, while the Mich¬ made by the Vanderbilt Western lines for the current cal¬
endar year.
The exhibit submitted this week shows that
igan Central and Lake Shore statements cover the
the
Lake
Shore
in the twelve months failed to earn the
full calendar year, the closing month, December, being of
course estimated.
The showing is in each case decidedly dividend paid in the first nine months, so any dividend
unsatisfactory, which indeed was expected, but very likely for the last quarter was of course out of the question. The
not in the degree now developed.
The Pennsylvania three quarterly dividends paid foot up 5 per cent, while
The
makes perhaps the worst comparison of all, inasmuch as the only 4-02 per cent proves to have been earned.
falling off in earnings is very large and the return falling off in income that has taken place in one single
The gross earnings
comprises the business of but one month. The road year is something remarkable.
have
declined
over 34- millions, and the net over If mil¬
suffered of course from the same combination of
The influences at work
responsible for this
unfavorable circumstances that afflicted the business lions.
marked
change are well understood, and we need not
of the other trunk lines, and, besides, must have suffered
dilate
upon them here.
But that the reader may see at a
even more than these from the industrial depression pre¬
vailing, as there is no other section of the country appar¬ glance the course of the company’s business, both up and
ently where manufacturing has been involved in deeper down, we present the following record of its operations for
gloom than in the terrrory traversed by its lines. The 15 years.
SHORE & MICHIGAN SOUTHERN’S INCOME.
war on passenger rates between West Shore and New York
Share of
Dividends %
Central did not, as is known, extend to the Pennsylvania,
Sl<)0.
Fixed
Net
Gross
Operating
Years.
which has and is maintaining full rates, so the road was
Cha)gcs.
Earnings. Expenses. Earnings.
Paid.
Earned.
affected by that circumstance only so far as the lower rates
$
*
s
*
8
$
on other lines served to divert passengers, and this it has
8 00
9 60
1,828,897
1870
8,:U38,821 5,140,415
13,509,236
8 00
8 37
2,121,164
been stated was of inconsiderable importance. So the dim¬ 1811
9.779,800 5,118,643
14,898,449
8 00
8 55
2,201,459
1872
17,699,935 11,839,526 5,860,409
inution in earnings would seem to be the result chiefly of 1873
6 10
4 00
2,654,500
19,414,5011 13,746,598 5,667,911
may

LAKE

>er

the

bad state

of trade, intensified

this feature

as

was

during November. The loss of earnings, both in gross
and net, is larger than in any other month of the year.
It amounts to no less than $522,000 in the former and

Pittsburg, and
(which report merely the surplus or

$382,000 in the latter on the lines east of
on

the Western lines

17,146,131
14.434,199

1874
1815

13,949,177
13,505,159
13,979,7(93
15,271,492
18,749,461

1876
1877
1878
1879

1880

17,971,391
18,225,639

1881

1882

18,513,656

1883

11,152,371 5,993,760
10,531,501 3,902,698
9,574,836 4,374,341
8,963,966 4,541,193
8,486,601 5,493,1(35
8,934,524 6,336,968
10,418,105 8,!131,356
11,278,429 6,692,962
11,057,807 7,167,832
11,001,854 7,511,802
9,1(30,500 5,741,500

3,008,193
2,810,294
2,759,989
2,775,657
2,718,792
2,754,988
2,750,374
2,725,375
3,027,000
3,498,806
3,753,611

6 04

3 25

2 20

2 00

3 26

3 25

3 57

2 00

5 61

4 00

7 24

6 50

11 28

8 00

8 02

8 00

8 37

8 00

8 11

8 00

5 00
4 02
14,902,000
below fixed charges) there is a further 1884
loss of $265,000, making a total loss in net on the entire
This record is significant chiefly as demonstrating that
system in one month of $647,000. In view of this heavy
the Lake Shore has gone through a similar period of de¬
falling off, it becomes important to know whether the
showing last year (with which we are comparing) was not pression before, with the same general results. The loss in
1884 can be compared with the loss in 1875, when net fell
perhaps unusually good, and for this purpose we give
below the gross and net result, both for November and the off a full two millions. Business depression accounted for
the change then, and it does for that this year, with of
eleven months ended November 30, for six years past.

deficiency above

or

course

Lines East of

Pittsburg.

1884.

1883.

1882.

1881.

1880.

1879.

$

*

I

$

t

*

November.

3,131,997

1,394,076

1,346,449

3,950,937
2.475,226

4,473,479
2,616,302

4,373,825
2,771,463

Net earnings...
Western lines

1,475,711

1,857,177

-317,969

-52,408

1,602,362 1,460,344
+330,303 +161,331

+344,827 +380.260

1,157,742

1,804,769

1,932,665

1,738,903

Result

3,840,215
2,379,871

3,574.913
2,180,837

expenses.

Gross earninKS

Operat’g

1,621,675

1,785,548

1,726,709

Jan 1 to Nov. 30.
Gross earnings. ... 44,797,583 47,842,734 44,922,657 40,392,427 37,712,240 31,166,351

Operat’g

expenses.

27,853,911 29,089,861 27,675,083 24,181,246 22,203,467 18,440,867

Net earnings... 16,943,672 18,152,873 17,247,574 16.211,181 15,508,773 12,725,484
Western lines.
-836,005 +1110,803 +1911,284 +2740,008 +2859,562 +1082,278
..

Result

It will be

16,107.667 19,263.676 19,158,858 18,951.189 18.368.335 13.807.762
seen

that

on

the Eastern lines- the result last

the additional unfavorable feature now

of the com¬

with the past,
depression of
1874-8 did not represent a normal state of affairs and that
with a revival in general business the company’s earnings
went up even more rapidly than they had previously gone
new lines. Apart from this analogy
the exhibit is noteworthy as showing that the

petition of

down.

This offers at least this

much encouragement, that

before, there is sure to be recovery
now, though no one is prophet enough to indicate the time
from which the change for the better is to date.
These remarks apply to the Michigan Central equally
The Michigan Central is shown
well with the Lake Shore.
by this week’s exhibit not only not to have earned anything
for the stock, but actually to have had only $80,000 sur.
plus above fixed charges.
In 1883 the surplus was
$1,834,000, which, however, was very much larger than in
either 1882 or 1881. rThis is only the second year of the
confederation with the Canada Southern, but comparison
as

there

was

recovery

unusually good, so much so that there had been
gain over 1882 in net of $255,000, to the largest Novem¬
ber total of any year in the table.
But the same was not
true of the Western lines, which, after losing $382,000
last year, have now lost, as stated above, $265,000 more,
making altogether a change on these line3 of $647,000 in
the short space of two years. Thus it happens that, after with previous years can be made by adding the figures of
allowing for the deficiency on this Western system, the the two roads together and this we have done to get the
Pennsylvania had a net result of only $1,157,742 this year, figures in the following table. They do not call for any
year was

a




THE CHRONICLE.

722
The loss from last

particular comment.
marked than in the
to

over

case

Years.

Gross

Earnings.
1878,

$9,472,081

1879

10,410,795

1880

12,791,128

Iftftl

1883

12,303,591
12,457,991
14,009,707

1881

11,721,000

1882.

is

no

less good demand for

of the Lake Shore and amounts

millions in gross

COMBINED EARNINGS OF

year

and

over

1^ millions in net.

MICHIGAN CENTRAL AND CANADA SOUTHERN.

Operating
Expenses.
$0,437,497
7.147,683
8 213,092

9,404,443
9,08,908
9,741,039
9,001,000

Net

Interest and

Earnings.

lie itals.

$3,0 15,134
3,233,112
4,570,330
2,899,148
3,189,085
4,208,128

$3,003,297
2,013,155
1,9P4,210
2,371,551

2,720,000

[vou xxxix.

Surplus.

the

2,480,602

7C8.483

2,433,410
2,640,000

1,843,712
80,000

money for packing and also for tobacco,
which is said -to To the largest ever known.

The

following statement, made up from returns collected
by us, exhibits the week’s receipts and shipments of gold
and currency by the New York banks.
Week Ending Dec. 20,

$1,031,837

1,249,957
2,582,126
527,597

trade in

1884.

Rexeivedbv

Shipped by

N.Y. Bmiks.

N.Y. Banks.

$1,125,000

Currency
Sold
Total gold and legal tenders

*$1,091,000 of this

was

$1,125,000

*300.000

Net Interior

Movement.
Sain

*1,111,000

Loss..

$825,000
1,111,000

$1,411,000

Loss..

f286,000

.

transferred in the shape of silver certificate®

Our

foreign exchange market does not appear to have by a deposic of gold in the Sub-Treasury.
been affected as yet by the disturbance in financial affairs
The above shows the actual changes in the bank holdings
at Vienna, which are steadily becoming more involved. On of
gold and currency caused by this movement to and from
the contrary, during the week exchange here has been the interior. In addition to that movement, the banks have
freavy in the absence of demand, and it is not now likely lost $100,000 through the operations of the Sub-Treas¬
that the inquiry will be very urgent for the remainder of ury. Adding this to the above, we have the following,
the year, it being too late to make remittances in settle¬ which should indicate the total loss to the New York
ment of accounts due on or about the 1st proximo.
The Clearing House banks of gold and currency for the
fall in rates on Monday brought those for actual business week covered by the bank statement to be issued to-day.
within a little less than two cents per pound sterling of the
Into Banks. Out of Banks Net Change <a
Week Ending Dec. 26, 1884.
gold importing point, but bankers did not feel inclined to
Bank Holdingi
speak positively of an immediate further reduction because Banks’ Interior Movement, above.. $1,125,000 $1,411,000 Loss. $288,000
Loss.
100,000
100,000
As we anticipated two weeks ago, Bub-Treasury operations, net
of the Vienna crisis.
Loss.
Total gold and legal tenders
$1,125,000
11,511.000
$886,000
when the Bohemian mortgage company’s failure was first
The cable figures of the European banks, owing to the
-announced, this disturbance seems already to be affecting
European money markets to some extent. For instance, intervention of the holidays, have readied us in only one
this week the

cable

announces

that £‘200,000 has been

instance—that of the Bank of France—and
omit

usual

we

therefore

comparative table. The Bank of France
during the week lost 3,140,000 francs gold and gained
This withdrawal led bankers to look for a rise in the 1,000,000 francs silver.
The Assay Office paid $88,718 for domestic bullion and
open market rate for money at London and suggested the
possibility of a further advance in Bank rate if, as now $56,976 for foreign bullion during the week, and the Subseems probable, the Vienna market should
call for addi¬ Treasury received the following from the Custom House.
tional sums of gold.
The latest advices state that the
Consisting of—
panic is increasing and more failures are expected. The Date.
Duties.^
Silver Cer¬
U. S.
Gold
Gold.
-crisis began with Ihe failure of the Bohemian Land &
Notes.
Ocrtiflc’s.
tificates.
Mortgage Company, its gravity w^as made more evident Dec. 19. $208,150 53
$112,C0>
$54,000 $33,000
$4 000
6,000
20.
4.000
33.000
44,000
80,702
>0
by the defalcation and suicide of the director of the Lower
22.
23,000
135,006
7,000
91,000
262,388 8 4
Austrian discount bank, and on Wednesday came the news
23.
254,000
4,000
410,895 44
22,000
131,000
2 4.
210,000
of the suspension of the Bohemian mortgage bank at
3,000
152,000
23,000
393,125 48
25.
Holi day
Prague, which was caused by the collapse of the Lower
Total
$755,000
$22,000
$166,00* $117,000
$1,361,263 14
Austrian.
It is impossible now to say where this trouble
will end, and if English financiers are correct in their state¬
HOW RAILROAD DIVIDENDS COMPARE.
ment that the Austrian Government unduly encourages
unsound banks thus inducing reckless speculation, the crisis
Naturally in this year of depression railroad dividends
have
been neither so large nor so numerous as in previous
may be as severe as that in Paris two years ago
when the Union Generale collapsed.
By the latest mail years. Indeed, some marked changes and reductions and
it
advices
appears that London financiers were congratu¬ suspensions in them have taken place. The Lake Shore
lating themselves that the 5 per cent Bank minimum had & Michigan Southern, the New York Central, and the
caused an increase of £1,514,000 in the stock of gold, Pennsylvania have all reduced their yearly rate of distribu*
although this wa)s not wholly drawn from abroad, and it tion from 8 to 6 per cent—in fact, the Lake Shore on
was still
regarded as of importance that the foreign Wednesday decided to omit the next quarterly payment.
exchanges should be so influenced as to cause gold to con¬ The Central Pacific and Union Pacific have both passed alto¬
tinue to flow to the Bank.
Then the points to be guarded gether, and the Oregon Bailway & Navigation Company
were America and France, and it is presumed that
there from paying 10 per cent per annum, now pays only 6 per
cent.
The Central New Jersey has defaulted on fts last quar¬
was not the least expectation of a demand from any other
quarter. Now, however, there comes an urgent inquiry terly payment under the lease to the Reading. The St. Paul
from Vienna, and the extent of this will be closely watched Minneapolis & Manitoba also has come down to a 6 per cent
by foreign bankers because of its possible influence upon basis, and the Pullman Palace Car Company, which of course
is closely allied to, and dependent upon, the railroad indus¬
our market.
There is no change to note in bankers’ balances, which try, has paid no extra dividend beside its regular 8 per cent,
still rule at l@l£ per cent, and there is no material altera¬ while the Illinois Central no doubt will likewise have'to
tion in the rates of domestic exchange on this centre. Tiie forego anything extra out of 1884 earnings, leaving 8 per
inquiry at Western centres is chiefly for pork packing and cent on the year’s business against 10 per cent out of the
very light for moving grain.
In this connection it may 1883 earnings. So not to mention a host of minor roads,
be stated that estimates claimed to be reliable indicate that we have here quite a number of prominent lines that have
.about 85 per cent of the wheat has been already moved been forced to alter their rate of distribution as a direct
out of the extreme Northwest.
At Louisville there is a result of poor traffic and rates, and unpropitiou3 times.
withdrawn from the

Bank of

England for shipment to

our

Vienna.




“

“

“

tt

«

....

..

123

THE CHRONICLE.

'December 27, 18*4.]

Though this list, however, comprises roads in all parts stated, at the rate of but 6 per annum now) shows a smaller'
certain sections have, as a whole, suffered figure than in 1883, and its position, moreover, is some¬
much less than others or have suffered not at all in this what different from that of other roads in the same sec¬

of the country,

respect, and therefore in reviewing the results for the year tion, inasmuch as it has lost business both because of dim¬
the only correct way of studying the figures is to take inished immigration into Manitoba and because of the
each division of the country by itself.
In this way also a opening of the Canadian Pacific. All the other roads hafvecomparison with previous years becomes more instructive kept up their former figures, which figures, it will be
and useful. So we shall follow the plan pursued in former noticed, are as high as either 7 or 8 per cent in every
years of arranging the leading roads in groups, and pre¬ case. The reason why this section has done so well is that
senting each in order. We should say that the compilation the crops have been exceptionally good and large, that
of our usual list of dividends in extended form for the business distress has not been so severe, and that manu¬
Investors’ Supplement, issued herewith, has furnished the facturing is not carried on there on any extensive scale.
material on which this article is based. It is not of course The influence of the movement of wheat upon the roads
our intention
here to give more than a general idea or transporting that cereal chiefly, has been something won¬
summary of results, using for this purpose a few well- derful, as we have more than once taken occasion to show.
known roads in each section, and details as to minor roads Of the roads in the list the Chicago & Northwestern is one
therefore are avoided. For particulars as to these, reference that has been losing very heavily in earnings of late, btrt
We will its dividends have not yet suffered any reduction thereby.
can be made to the list in the Supplement.
Next to the Northwestern roads, the roads running
begin by taking first of all the leading East-and-West
Here is the exhibit these

trunk lines.

are

able to make

for nine years.
Company.
New York Central

1876.

1877.

8

8

1878. 1879.
8

8

1S81.

1880.

8

8

N. Y. L. E. & W., pref...

Pennsylvania
Baltimore & Ohio
Lake Shore & Mich. S...

8

4

2

10

8

8s.

314

2

‘Michigan Central
Can°da Southern:

*8

1883.

1884.

8

8

?4

6

0

6

«4

84

7

7

8

9

10

10

10

10

+10

8

8

7

«4

5

3

24

2

2

3

54

8

2

34

8
.

*4 per cent of tliis iu stock,

,

44

1882.

t Increase due to change of dividend

period.

changes in the case of such staunch dividend-payers as
Pennsylvania, New York Central and Lake Shore are
more significant.
Our table, giving, as it does, in every
case, the dividends actually paid each year, does not
the

full

measure

of

reduction that

taken

has

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

188*.

Chicago & Alton
Do
pref

8

74

7

6

64

8

8

8

+ 10

8

74

7

7

7

8

8

8

+10

Illinois Central

8

4

6

6

6

7

7

*8

10

14

6

fl'Y
*

7

7

7

rm

Missouri Pacific
St. I.. A S. Finn. 1st

Wab. J*t. Jj. A Pa

c.

pref.

7

7
7

6

pref..

And 17 in stock.

1 Increase due to

The Illinois Central

All the rest have diminished

their percentages. Michigan Central and Canada Southern
dividends have always been more or less transient, but

1876.

Company.

only the Baltimore & Ohio lias

maintained its former rate.

from

Chicago (into Missouri and Kansas, or
connecting with those States) are distinguished for an un¬
impaired record, as will appear from the annexed exhibit.

*

The above shows that

show

Southwest

paid

an

change of dividend periods.

extra dividend of two per

early in the year (out of the earnings of 1883), but
has been losing heavily in earnings all through 1884,
the extra dividend, as said above, is not likely to be re¬
peated in 1885. The Chicago & Alton paid 10 per cent
in the year, owing to a change in its dividend periods from
semi-annual to quarterly, but its rate of distribution is 8
per cent, as in former years.
This road has been affected
to some extent by the depression in manufacturing and'
general business, but not in the same degree as the Illinois
Central, and the good crops in Missouri and Kansas have
helped it considerably no doubt. The latter were also afavoring circumstance with the Missouri Pacific, the St.
Louis & San Francisco, and the Atchison Topeka & Santa
cent
as

it

place, but, as stated above, both the Central and the
Pennsylvania are paying now only 6 per cent per
year,
and the
Lake
Shore
has
entirely
sus¬
pended for the time being.
The G per cent divi¬
dend on Erie preferred was, of course, paid early in the
•year, out of the earnings of the fiscal year 18S2-3, there
Fe (included among the trans-Continental roads further
having been, in the late fiscal year, a deficit in meeting even
The Wabash St. Louis & Pacific of course was
interest charges. So, too, the dividends on Canada South¬ below).
an interloper, and
never had any legitimate place in the
ern and
Michigan Central were paid out of the earnings
dividend
list.
of 1883.
The poor showing made by these trunk
From these roads we pass naturally to those running
lines is easily explained and well understood.
In¬
tense competition for traffic among the roads, a greater still further West, comprising the Pacific or trans-Conti¬
number of lines to divide it among, demoralized rates, a nental lines, and here the exhibit is far from satisfactory.
diminished amount of merchandise traffic because of bus- We have placed the Atchison within this group, because of
iness depression, and a reduced amount of through traffic its trans-Continental position, but it is to the good agricultural
because of a diminished export trade—these are the cir¬ outturn in Kansas, and not to the state of Pacific traffic*
It is the only one among
cumstances that account for the falling off of dividends on that its success must be ascribed.
these roads that has kept up its old rate of distribution, all
these lines.
We pass next to the roads running west and northwest the rest being now with one exception on what may be calledthe retired list.
The exception is the Oregon Navigation
from Chicago.
Here the exhibit is almost entirely favor¬
able, and this section presents better results, as a whole, which paid 6£ per cent during the year and is now pay •
than any other. This is seen in the following.
ing 6 per cent. Some of the others paid something early
in the
year, but the later dividends have all been
1876. 1877. 1878. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884.
Company.
passed.
The causes at work to produce these tin
7
6
6
7
7
5
5
Chicago & Northwestern
8
7
7
7
7
7H
8
Do
favorable results have been the multiplication of new
pref
24
34
Chic. Milwaukee A St. P.
7
7
7
7
7
23-£
lines and opening of new routes, and the consequent reduc¬
7
7
7
7
Do
7
7
pref
34 104
*34
8
CMc. Burl. A Quincy
8
8
8
8
9
8
10
+9M
tion in rates and division of business ; the collapse of the
Chic.
8
7
7
7
8
10
7
*

•

Rock Isl. & Pacific.

8

Chic. St. P.M. & 0., pref.
St. Paul M. & Manitoba..
*

And 14 per cent in bonds,

*84

7

7

7

7

3

§9

8

74

t And 20 per cent in stock. J And loO per
§ Change of dividend periods swelled the total this year.

mining industry at some points, which had yielded profita¬
ble returns to the roads at onetime; and general industrial'

depression, which prevented a growth in business in a
Only the St. Paul Minneapolis & Manitoba (which ratio with the increased carrying capacity. Subjoined
though it paid 7-J- per cent in the year, is paying, as already are the roads embraced in this category.
Wnt in stocks




r
Sr

[

»

t

i-

;

f

1870.

Company.
L

At,eh

1878.

1877.

North

8

Pacific

8

1881.

0

*0

0

0

0

4k

ik

0

0

3

8

8

5k

t And 10 scrip.

0

0

m

3k

7

7

by themselves. Of these, as
Reading is in receivers’ hands and the Central New Jersey,
after paying just four quarterly dividends of -l-£ per cent
under the lease, defaulted in December, as already stated.
The Delaware Lackawanna & Western, and the Lehigh
Yalley, on the other hand, have continued to pay full 8
per cent, and the Delaware & Hudson 7 per cent. Whether
these rates can be kept up under the allotment plan and
the reduction in the price of coal, it is not the province
of this article to discuss.
As far as the past is a guide
to the future
(and it may not be any) the annexed exhibit
will serve to throw light on the matter.
1870.

9

Central of New Jersey..

5

Philadelphia A Reading.

2k

i

i

!

1879.

*

18,80.!

1881.

rm\

r>4

8

4k

7

5k

0k

i

4

5k

4

-1

.!

'

'

.

few

(of

prominence) that

any

|

s

7

|

7
4k

k

q

divi¬

dends, and this year fewer than ever. Neither the Louis¬
Nashville, the Richmond & Danville, the Cincin¬
nati Southern, the Norfolk & Western, nor the Columbia
& Greenville, all of which have been on the dividend list
ville &

time

another within the last

three years,

dis¬
anything for 188-1. Short crops of cotton in 1881,
1883 and 1884, no doubt account in part for the change.
The Wilmington & Weldon and Wilmington Columbia &
Augusta, however, are to be singled out as favorable excep¬
tions, the former having actually increased its dividend to
8 per cent.
The Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis made
merely a moderate distribution, as heretofore, but is the
only one besides the Wilmington & Weldon that has an
unbroken dividend record extending through the whole
nine years.
The following is the list.
at

one

or

tributed

i

1870.! 1877.

Company.
Cin. N. O. & Tex. Pac

|
1879.'

Louisville A Nashville..
3

Ik
Ik

;

3

4

2k

3

Danville...1

I

Wilm. Col. A Augusta...

Wilmington A Weldon..
*

And

100^

per

7

:

1882.

;

i

7

0

(5

*8

0

8

2

3

cent in stock,

'

i

;

i

'

3

3

i

3

:

5

3

'

1884.

3

O

2

Ik
i

i

!

i

1883.

Ik

i

Norfolk A West., oref...
Richmond A

1881.

i

I

Col. A Greenville, pref..

1880.

i

!

—

Nash. Chat. A St. Louis.

1878.

4

+3ks.

7

i

0

j

0

0

1

0

0
8

t Out of 1 883 earnings.

There remain

only the New England roads to be touched
These have a much more stable business than roads

upon.
in other
are

Time.

Rate.
*

Amsterdam.
Amsterdam.

Hamburg..

Antwerp.

Short.
3 mos.

12 2i2

©123k
12*478 ®12 53q
2070
2071
20-71

.

Berlin
Frankfort...
Vienna

it

it

©20*74
©20*75
® 20-75

tt

iDec.

[Dec.
,Dec.

12-47k'S)12-52L) Dec.
25-5S%2>25-63% [Dec.
cli’quee 25-32k®25-37k Dec.

...

3

mos
If
i 4
•

Naples

ft

Madrid

ft

Lisbon
Alexandria

If

25,51:14'S>25-56j4
2 Us® 2 4^8
20-70
20-70

I

Cadiz

46:q0'©46»ift

New York... 60 days
Bombay.... dem’nd
Calcutta

Hong Kong.
Shanghai

....

1215

Short.

12 3 mos.
12 Short.
»l
12
ii
12
hi
12
12 Checks

20-50

20-28%
20-50
12-38
25 34.

2534%

•

Dec.

12

3

47-40

mos.

51^ 2)51%
Dec.
Dec.
iDec.

.

••

...

12

®25‘75
©20-75

Constant’pie

-

Dec.

a

Paris
Paris
St. Petersb’g
Genoa

Is
Is.

71,6d.

71iad.

iDec.

10 3 mos.
12
12 cables.
ii
12

Dec.' 121
iDec.
Dec.

12
12

•95%
109 87
4-86

ii

4 mos.
f

*

Is. 678d.
Is. G7gd.
3s. 7d.
4s. lid-

House bills.

London, Saturday, Deo. 13, 1884,

might be expected, now that the close of the year is so
hand, business, with scarcely an exception, is very
quiet, and the events of the past week have been few, unin¬
teresting, and not very encouraging. The trade of the coun¬
try continues not only depressed but very unprofitable. The
railway traffic returns also show a considerable diminution
compared with last year, and itaeems to be tolerably certain that
the dividends for the current half-year will compare adversely
with those for the corresponding period in 1883.
It is, how¬
ever, satisfactory to notice that the important failures which
have taken place during the last two months have been few,
and this fact naturally produces encouragement.
That a
sounder condition of things exists is admitted by many, and
the hope is in consequence entertained that early in the new
year the improvement will become more distinct.
To what
extent this hope will be realized time alone can show, but the
somewhat steadier tone which has recently been apparent
seems to justify the greater confidence which prevails in re¬
gard to the future course of things. It would, however, be
premature to anticipate any real activity in business, either
on the Stock Exchange or in commercial circles.
The state of the money market and the condition of
the Bank of England are two of the prominent reasons
for greater confidence.
The apprehensions which were felt
regarding the future course of the value of money have re¬
cently been dispelled to a considerable extent and it is not
regarded as probable that the present Bank rate of 5
During the remainder of the
per cent will be exceeded.
year and during the early part of 1885 money will, as usual, be
much wanted, and full rates will be obtained ; but this demand
will be of a temporary character and not attract much atten¬
tion.
The inquiry has already been assuming increasing pro¬
portions and the open market rates of discount have had an
upward tendency.
A feature in the money market during the week lias been an
advance in the rates of interest for deposits allowed by the dis¬
count houses of '4 per cent, the quotations being 4 per cent at
call and 41q per cent if with notice of withdrawal.
Some few
years ago this would have been regarded as unusual and there¬
fore serious, but no such views are entertained now'. The
discount houses raise or lower their allowance of interest for dedosits according to the state of the supply of floating capital
and the extent of the demand for loans.
An additional de¬
As

near

pay any

Latest
Date.

1 From our own correspondent.J

S’

1

Rate.

Time.

EXCHANGE QN LONDON

1884.

•

i

!

i

1883.1

1882.

roads, there is little to be said, because

Of Southern
are so

1878.

9

.

T.elr'gli Valley

there

ls77.

~k

—

EXCHANGE AT LONDON-Dec. 12.
On—

naturally belong in a group
is known, the Philadelphia &

Delaware A Hudson...

AT LATEST DATES.

\ And 50 per cent in stock.

The anthracite coal carriers

Del. Lack. & Western

p&0t*jetargs ©oramjerctal guglisTx

0k

10

8

...

Company.

•

0

8

scrip.

+8

2

Union Pacific

In

0

[Vol. XXXIX.

RATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON AND ON LONDON

Pirn

Oregrm Trans Cnnl.’l.

1884.

1883.

1882.

*11-1

Pacific, prpf...
Orogon TIh.11 way A Nav..

*

1880.

1879.
3

Top. A Santa Fe...

Central

CHRONICLE.

THE

724

sections, and the fluctuations in their dividends
therefore much less important.
Tn the table below,

the

at

changes, with one exception, are for the better. The
exception is the Fitchburg, which has reduced its semi¬
annual instalment from 3 to 2^ per cent.
The Boston &
Lowell and Maine Central, on the other hand, have
increased their rate of distribution, and the Rutland has
again paid one per cent on its preferred stock. There are mand for money may now be safely anticipated, and each
some minor roads
that have made changes either up or
institution is naturally desirous of attracting an adequate sup¬
down, but these are detailed in our article in the Supple¬ ply of capital to meet the requirements of its customers.
ment.
Below are the figures for the leading companies.
The return of "the Bank of England is more satisfactory than
had
been anticipated and the proportion of reserve to liabili¬
1870.
1877.
1878. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 18811. 1884.
Company.
ties
has
risen during the week from 38T8 per cent to 41*20 per
9
Boston A Albany
8
8
8
8
8
8
*8
8
4
4
Boston A Lowell
4
cent, or to the extent of rather more than 3 per cent. The.im¬
0
5
0
0
8
'

*>4

Boston A Maine

•K1&

7k

8

8

8

last year,
proportion was nearly 42 per cent, is not altogether
satisfactory.
But if a comparison is made when, early in
October the Bank rate was advanced to 3 per cent, it will be
recognized that the results of four and five per cent have been
substantial. The proportion of reserve to liabilities was on the

Boston A Providence....

8

«

o

0k

8

8

8

8

8

provement is important, although a comparison with

Fitchburg

8

(5

7

0

6

7

0

0

r>k

wdien the

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

0

0

0

6

ft

0k

ik

2

Maine Central
N. Y. N. H. A Hartford..
Old

Colony
Rutland, pref
*

And 10 in stock.




l

2

5U

ft

~

10

10
7

7
i

THE

27, 1884.]

December

CHRONICLE.

eighth of October only 32% per cent, so that an improvement
has been established. The reserve of notes
and coin was at its lowest on November 5, when it was only
£9,517,237. Since that date, it has increased to £12,117,638,
while the supply of bullion in the same period has risen from
£19,298,157 to £20,811,698. Bearing in mind, the restricted

To and

of about 8 per cent

character of our trade, and the present absence of any demand
of an important character for gold for exportation, the present

position of the Bank of England may be regarded

as

Imports
Imports
Exports
Exports

Interest allowed

for deposits by
Bank Bills.

Trade Bills.

London

Disc't ITse

Joint

-

Four

Three

At 7 to 14
Stock
Months Months Months Months Months Months Banks. Call. Days.
Nov.

14

“

21

“

28

Dec.

4^@4 H
4 H® 3*6® l%® 4}4® -

7

“

5

12]

“

-

Six

Three

Four

Six

4^noiu 3*fnom 4*6@4J^ 4*6® - 4 @ 4>4nom 4 nom’4J4@l^ 4>6® -.4*® 3*6® - 3 VM - m® — 3W® 4J4 nom 3J4nora 4**@ — 4 nom 414110m
-

z-mm 3^@3)64*6®
4M<3 - 3*8® -\h®

-

4

-

1)4®

-

4

®

3H
3*1
3*6
314
314

3*6
m
3*
3*1
3*1
3H

-

4

3*4-4
-4J4
3*p 3*4
3*4-3*4
3*4-3*4
414-41-4

following return shows the position of the Bank of
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols
and other items, compared with previous years:
1884.

1833.

1882.

1881.

£

£

£

£

24,832,150

25,338,630

7,260,073
22,138,770
14,462,798
19.755,161

4,998,961
22,005,732

25,292,970
5,658,265

Circulation
Public deposits
Other deposits

24,444,060
6.36 4,214
22,874,39 4
Govemm’t securities. 13,162,619

Other securities
21,779.315
Res’veof notes & coin 12,117,638
Coin and bullion in
both departments.. 20,811,698

Proport’n of

22,390,013
13.243,961
21,409,979

11,381,002

12,984,561

22,197,962
11,262,759

11,249,870

22,066,711

20,851,389

20,792,840

43 78
3 p. e.

4138
5 p. c.

reserve

to liabilities
Bank rate
Consols

41-20
5 p. e.
99 5*x. d.
•30s. lOd.
513 if, d.

Eng. wheat, av. price
Mid. Upland cotton..
No. 40 mule twist
Clearing-House ret’n.

lOOqx. d.

100%x. d.

40s.

93id.

92,456,000

94,309,000

44s. 9d

5l31Gd.

.

lOd.

1034d.

97,743,000 100,423,000

The Bank rate of discount and open market rates at the
chief Continental cities now and for the previous three week 8
have been

as

follows:
December

Rates of
Interest at

11.

December

4.

November 27.

Open

Bank

Open

Bank

Open

Bank

Open

Rate.

Market

Rate.

Market

Rate.

Market

Rate.

Market

2*6
3*4
3*4
314
2*6
3*6

3

3

4

214
314

4

3

3

...

433,780
in Nov
in 11 mos. 11,305,648
...

.

The

682,327
8,136.5-47
528,579
8,205,075

3

2*4
3*4
3*4

2*4
314
314
314
2*4
3*4
414

To and from United States.

1884.

1882.

1883.

1884.

£

£

£

£
490,952

898,530
7,359,099 10.218,781
750,035
997,^40

0,099,783
38,000

8,222
142,200

1,354
5,000,744
553,195

0,342,405 11,490,149

71,439

827,705

2,183,630

09,012
1,750,030

200,280

2,067,082

192,771
2,270,058

48,650

8,282

733,457

840,180
8,707,900
514,076
9,275,144

8,594.901

775,435
8,488,820

exports of silver to British India

520

In November
In II months

£367,408
5,653,695

40

2,500

28,120

were :

1882.

1883.

1884.

£107,800
5,778,122

£362,900
7,097,718

It is stated that the

attempt which was being made to estab¬
lish a society with a view to form conclusions regarding the
position of American railway and other undertakings intro¬
duced upon the London market, has met with but partial suc¬
cess; but it is understood that efforts will be made at an early
date to ventilate tlie scheme, with a hope that those who are
interested in those securities will be induced to become sub

-

scribers.
The Board of Trade returns for November and the eleven

months ended with November have been issued this week, and

they show very unsatisfactory results. In our imports there is
falling off of nearly £6,000,000 and in our exports of £2,350,-

a

These

000.

are

worst returns which

the

have been issued

throughout the year, and they have had a discouraging effect*
The following are the totals:
1883.

1884.

£36,526,437

£30,752,453

391,615,801
20,034,698
220,858,642

336,689.579
17,704,213

1882.

Tniports
Imports
Exports
Exports

£34,901,910
iu November
in 11 months
376,431,902
20,292.948
in November
in 11 months.... 223,305,605
....

215,087,472

Exports of Colonial and foreign merchandise:
1883.

1882.

£1,060,000
60,881,000

In November
In 11 months

The

following
exports :

are some

1884.

£1,097,000

£1,092,026

: 58,610,000

57,248,942

of the leading items of imports and
IMPORTS.

November.--1883.
1884.

Cotton—
From United States.cwt. 1,076,237
All countries
cwt.1,534,010
WheatUnited States—
Atlantic ports
ewt.1,168,446
Pacitic ports
cwt. 543,530
All countries
cwt.4,771,672
FlourUnited States
747,923
All countries
1,198,957

November 20.

Bank

Paris

£

e

99qx.d.

41s. Sd.

578d.

9^1.

393*

5 p.

£

453.005
in Nov
in lljmos. 13,951,030

Imports in Nov.
Imports in 11 mos.
Exports in Nov...
Exports in 11 mos.

4

The

1883.

SILVER.

strong.

Open market rates.

1882.

Great Britain's

adequately

But it is also a well-known fact that we are by no
means likely to receive gold in any abundance from foreign
countries, and hence it is reasonable to conclude that a five per
cent Bank rate will remain a necessity.
^ The following are the present prices for money.

from all Countries.

GOLD.

EXPORTS TO

1,170,435
1,534,704

11
1883

months.
1884.

9,523.320

13,415,354

9,061,408
13,289,117

705,976 13,157,379 13,594,021
7,604,150
68,132 11,498,627
2,612,397 60,917,848 44.138,148
855,233
1,197,209

10,290,170
14,950,567

9,376,558
13,802,025

UNITED STATES.

Cotton piece goods..yds.4,093,800
Linen piece goods...yds.5,871,300
Woolen fabrics
yds. 429,800
Worsted fabrics
yds.3,213,700

2,326,800 57,680,100 49,687,800
3,423,300 71,428,900 64,864,300
5,007,500
325,400
5,048,900
1,905,400 33,360,200 33,292,200

The

approaching close of the year usually brings quietness
trade, as well as_to that for other cereals. The
4
4
4
Hamburg
4
314
314
feature is, however, that notwithstanding the quietness which
Amsterdam
3
3
3
3
2*4
2*4
has prevailed, the recent small advance on the quotations has
Brussels
4
4
4
4
3*4
3*4
Madrid
414
4H
414
414
been supported.
414
414
414
Fine white English wheat is now worth 37s*
Vienna
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
and
red
33s.
per
imperial
quarter. The deliveries at the prin¬
8t. Petersburg..
6
6
6
6
6
0
6
0
cipal
markets
of
the
kingdom
are moderate, but are not much
5
5
Copenhagen....
5
5
5
5
5
5
in excess of last year's; but the quality and condition are good,
The state of the bullion market during the past week is and farmers find but little difficulty in disposing of their pro¬
duce at the low prices current.
From tlie figures given below
thus descril>ed by Messrs. Pixley & Abell :
it will be seen that the lowest average for the season has been
Gold continues without demand. The amounts to hand have been re¬
30s. 5d. per quarter.
At the commencement of the season it
ceived entirely from the Continent, and the total, £109,000, has been
was 34s. 3d. and the latest average is 30s. lOd.
In the corres¬
sent into tlie Bank of England. The only withdrawal has been
£25,000,
in sovereigns, for
ponding
last
the
varied
from
41s. 8d.
period
of
year
average
Egypt.
Berlin...

4

Frankfort

4

4
4

4

1

Sliver—The price lias continued to decline since onr last, under tlie
influence of an unsettled feeling here and in India, caused by the intro¬
duction of a bill in the States for the suspension of silver coinage for a
period of three years. Congress, however, adjourns in about a fortnight,
until March next, and we are inclined to think that such an
important
subject will not be so speedily settled. Our last quotation was 497sd.,
but the rate lias gradually fallen, and now
per oz. is the nearest
price we can give, with a quiet market. We have received £43,200
from New York, £47,000 from River Plate, and £65,000 from Chili.
The P. and O. steamer has taken £103,000 to Bombay.
Mexican Dollars—The only arrivals during tlie week reached us from
New York, and, owing to the unsettled condition of affairs in China, the
price gave way to 49d., and is now perhaps a shade lower ; but with
none on the market, and
awaiting the arrival of those by tlie St. Nazaire, we are at present unable to give a firm quotation.

The quotations for bullion

are

reported

as

follows:

to tlie wheat

and 4ls. 9d. at the commencement of the season down to 40s.
for last week.
The fall this season has, therefore, been much

greater than in the same period in 1883, it being as much as 3s.

quarter, while last year, on higher averages, it was
than Is. 8d. per quarter. The Continent is still a
buyer of low-priced wheats, and will probably continue to be
a customer for them for some time to come.
Many consumers
in the country districts on the Continent no doubt prefer an
5d. per

not

more

inferior loaf made from wheaten flour to one made from rye
The cheapness of wheat is quite likely to diminish to a
flour.

considerable extent the cultivation of rye, if wheat can
produced at its present very low price. The
following particulars relate to home-grown wheat:
very

continue to be

AVERAGE

Price of Gold.

Dec. 11.

Dec.

4.

Price of Silver.

Dec. 11

Dec.

Week
Bar gold, fine.,
Bar gold,

oz.

8.

d.

8.

77

9

77

9

77

1014

77

1014

d.

eontain’g.

20dwts. silver.oz.

d.

Bar silver.fine..oz.

49%

S.Am.doubloons.oz

tng 5 grs. gold..oz.
Cake silver
oz.

49*6
5314

5014
53*4
49 1-10

Mexican dols...oz.

After

being very cheap for many weeks, the Indian money
markets are showing more firmness, and the Bank of Calcutta
has raised its rate from 3 to 4
per cent.
The Bombay rate
remains at 4 per cent.
The movements in the




precious metals have been

as

follows:

Per Qr.
s.

d.

4914 ‘

Bar silver,contain-

Span, doubloons.oz.

ending—

Pept. 6
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Sept. 27
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.

4.....
11.

18
25

The

d.

34 3
34 0
33 10
33 0

32
32
32
32

HOME-GROWN WHEAT.

PRICE OF

1884.

4

4
2
4
4

1883.
Per Qr.
d.
s.
41
41
41

41
40
40

Week
Nov.

ending—

1884.
Per Qr.
s.
d.

1

32
32
31
31
30
30 10

Nov.
8
Nov. 15
Nov. 22
Nov. 29
6
Dec.

40
40

Average

32

4

1883.
Per Qr.
d.
8.
40 3
40
40
40
40
40
40

8

following quantities of wheat, flour and Indian corn

estimated to be afloat, Baltic supplies not being
At present.
Last week.
Last year.
Wheat..
1,823,000
qrs. 1,790,000'
1,765,000
are

Flour
Indian corn

186,000

152,500

142,000
113,000

232.000

263,000

included:
1882.
2,135,000
215,000
90,500

THE CHRONICLE.

726
The

tVOL. XXXft.

following return shows the exteht of the sales of home¬

In our report of the dry goods trade will be found the im¬
in the 187 principal markets ports of dry goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exOlusrteflf
with the average prices real¬
ised, during the first fourteen weeks of the season, compared specie) from the port 6f New York to foreign ports for the
with last season:
week ending Dec. 23, 1884, and from January 1 to date:

grown wheat, barley and oats
of England and Wales, together

sales.

Wheat
i Barley

970,722
1,415,597
42,161

984,685
1,538.924
37,321

qrs.
.

Oats....

1882.

1881.

694.550
818,224
71,511

670,503
614,368
84,442

1883.

1894.

AVERAGE PRICES.

Wheat

-Barley
'Oats

3

19

1881.
8. d.

40 8
33 0

41 4
34 11

48 Q
34 8
2l Oi

8.

4
0

32
32

perqr.

d.

-1882.
8.
d.

'1883.

1884.
8.
d.

9

20

19 10

Converting quarters of wheat ihto cwts., the sales of home¬
kingdom during the fourteen weeks

-grown wheat in the whole
are

estimated to have been

IMPORTS.

Wheat.

6,3(5,165

-Oats

3,373,070

-Peas.....
'Beans
Indian corn
Flour

1,018,466
4,877,H9
4.137,583

20,751,462 18 021,841
*,093,137
4 08% 110
3,741,214 - 3,113,138

658,593
467,027
7,989,854
2,875,137

493,381
383,670
3,177,509
4.059,476

397,917
746,310
7,84%029
S3,991,544

677.568

Supplies of wheat and flour available fo^consumptionin fourteen weeks»
etohks Sept. 1 not being included:

t

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

Imports Of wheat, cwt.l 4,451,467

18,731,695

4,137,583

3,991,544

18,021,941
4,059,476 ' 2,875,137

14,223,230 14,021,500

12,125,540 11.622,100

Imports Of flour

'Bales of

home-grown

produce

Total
32,812,280
Av*ge price of English
Wheat for season.qrs.
32s. 4d.
Yisible supply of wheat
In the IL S
bush.39,200,000
Supply of wheat and

flour afloat

to

20,755,462

The

40s. 8d.

41s.

48s.

4d.

following table shows the exports and imports of specie
New York for the week ending Dec.. 20, and
1, 1884, and for the corresponding periods la

1883 and 1882:

21,200,000

20,600,000

1,897,000

2,143,000

2,719,000

U. K.

1,860,000

qrs

English Marhet Reports—Per Cable.
The daily closing quotations for securities, &c., at London,
and for breadstuff a and provisions at Liverpool, are reported
by cable as follows for the week ending Dec. 20 :
Mon.

Tuts.

Silver, per oz
49916
d. 4fl9,o
993q
99%
Console for money
Consols for account
99%
99%
Frioh rentes (In Paris) fr 78-4712 78-65
116%
U. S.4%s of 1891
11630
126
U. S. 4s of 1907
12550

49916
»9%o

London.

Sat.

46
761o

Canadian Pacilio

Chic. Mil. & St. Paul

Erie, common stock....
Illinois Central

-

122 %

53%

11%
89*14
Sat.

Liverpool.

8.

d.
9

Flour (ex. State).100 lb. 10
Wheat, No. 1, wh. “
0
9
Spring, No. 2, n. “
9 8
winter, South, n “
6 10
Winter, West., n
“

“
“

“

1478

5314

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia & Reading
wAw York Central

Cal., No. 1
Cal., No. 2
Corn, mix., old...

7630

1470
122%

7
6
ft
5
60
32
82
36

Corn, mix., new.. “
•Pork, West, mess.. # bbl
Bacon, long clear
’Be^f, pr. mess, new,# te
Iiard, prime West. # cwt
62
Cheese, Am. choice

89%

10

9
6
5
O

9
6
7
6
ft
5
60

0
0

32
82

0

36
62

O

0

d.
9

s.

10

Wed.

d.
9

s.

10

9
8
6 10
7 0
6
ft
5

9

60
32
82
36
62

0

5%
4%
0

0
0
3
0

6

6
9

9
6

.1

4%
3%
0
0
3
0

•

6
5
5
60
31
82
36

$772

4,352,824
1,6-0,420
3,859,577

128,345
2,321

Silver.
Great Britain
France

7.800

2,800

874.105

8,943

3,450

789,542

30,186

$9,450 $38,061,638
21,30!-7o5,179

33,937.454

$143,181 $22,807,238
10,903 14,637,763:
247,455
4,331;565

$383,500 $12,416,472

$2,480

92,517

8,525

$404,535 *13.9 <-9,741

Total 1884
Total 1883
Total 1882

54< i,616

14,925,232

88,o00

10,94^,445

coin.

Foreign Trade of New York—Monthly Statement.—In
addition to the foregoing tables, made up from weekly returns,

give the following figures for the full months, also issued
New York Custom House. The first statement covers
the total imports of merchandise.
we

by

our

IMPORTS INTO NEW YORK.

1883.

General

Dry
Goods.

Merchan¬

X

January....

February

..

March

1

Thurs.

Fri.
;
1

«s

June

July
August
September.
October....

•

November..

!
>

April
May

J

Goods.

c

11,520.643
10,798,870
10,198.073

6,517,903

114,454,314 321,174,646

42,182.701
37,090.484

80,889,7^0
43,078,581
36,9i2,815
42,445,019

85,101,506
40,024.051
38,412,074

435,628,060

CUSTOMS RECEIPTS.
At New

Total Merchandise.

n

Months.

Months.
18S4.

January....
February..,

0

imports of last

March

....

,

April
May

1883.

26,792,785 28,891,932
23,536,860 28,420,360,
23,097,998 32,094,094!
23,835,838 28,101,404
24,063,269 27,237,663'
29,464,029
31.258,112 28,805,455!
28,957,053 34,417,712

27,857,0111

June

July

November.

29,220,557. 27,618,151
29,855.052j 29,197,165
26,0*0,363 28,422,662

Total...

296,111,510 321,070,809

September
...

January
February..,
.

.

March

April
May
June

York.

1884.

1883;

11,702,029
12,064,811
11,436,786
9,840,822
0,299,287
9,455,248

12.57&88

12,101#»
12,438,001
9,1H®8
8,148,813

13,0UM

July
August.....
September,

13,108,338 l4,02t,OO8

October

10,362,133 11,0O9,0»
7,712,428 8,924,053

12,825,196
11,987,908

...

November.

119.855-046

Total...

13,286#8
12.0447S9*

128,600,91^

U. S. Sub-Treasury.—The following table shows the receipts
and payments at the Sub-Treasury in this city, as well as
balances in the same, for each day of the past week:
.

thft

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YORK.




13,645,297

40,470,727

0

0
6
0
3

1883.

6,063,886

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK.

111

4%)
3%

41,260,81?

27,915,300
26,749,010
29,854,387
20,142,398
29.213,457
36,114,695
25,267,518
30,925,006
24,302,726
29,825,978
31,864,171

13,345,312
13,730.717
12,328,374
7,948,036
7,426,:*.03

c3

the preceding week, show

Balances.
Date.

1881.

1882.

$2,174,684

$2,030,452

8,011,946

5,370,000

$1,905,711
8,448.815

3,495,363

“

22.

$10,516,630

$7,400,452

$10,354,526

$4,314,539

“

$109,559,433 $129,399,803 $120,012,917 $110,531,934
322,542,027 358,3)3,523 333,453,723 300,052,803

“

23.
24.
25.
26.

tel ftl weeks. $432,101,460 $487,753,326

dise.

t

$
$
28,898,814 39,997.704
28,175,206 39,573,030;
31,394,061 42,713,439
9,798,203 25,759,735 35,557,933
5,754.403 32,710,823 38,471,220
6,31*'>,040 28,012,098 34,3-2,133
12,493,703 25,979,743 38,473,500
11,945,261 21,102,928 33,048,189!
12,065,979 21,676,101 33,742,030:
0 755,140 20,072,436 32.827,582
0,570,145 22,024,119 28,594,204i

Total.... 108.009,082 289,312,064 397,321,146

>>

^first week in January:

'

Total

Merchan¬

dise.

$
13,598,890
11,397,824
11,319,428

c

W

(for dry goods) Dec. 18 and for the week ending (for generalmerchanaise) Dec. 19; also totals since the beginning of the

Dry goods

General

Dry

Total.

r:

ceding week and $6,603,640 two weeks previous. The exports
for the weekended Dec. 23 amounted to $6,421,539, against
$7 ,845,104 last week and $9,456,220 two weeks previous. The
following are the imports at New York for the week ending

BenTmer’dise..

$3,424,781
5,921,335*
3,172,982

$6,451
140.269
103,177

Of the above imports for the week in 1884, $57,574 were
American gold coin and $1,257 American silver coin. Of the
exports during the same time, $9,450 were American gold

October

■Total
Since Jan. 1.

3,127

76,613

...

343

1,072,913:
1,864,861
272,374
04,520

3,324

211,117

South America
All other countries...

August

Dry goods

*

46.590

168,74ft
6 >,337

German.
West Indies
Mexico..

decrease in both dry goods and general merchandise,
The total imports were $4,314,539, against $8,133,942 the pre¬

GsnTmer’dise..

24.657
356,134

914,940

12,510

a

a

For Week.

$7,114,739*
3,739,692
6,21&7#8
5,3234)62

6*600

100,000

Fri.

Commercial anti miscellaneous perns
week, compared with those of

$26,487,370

South America
All other countries...

>1

9
8
10
0
9

Imports and Exports for the Week.-r-The

$

Germany
West Indies

Months.

d.
9

62

Since Jan. 1.

........—

Total 1884
Total 1883
Total 1882

Since Join. 1.

Week.

Week.

1884.

........

9
8
10
0
9

Great Britain
France—.

99%,3
9>5,«

••••«•••

6

Thurs.

Imports.

Exports.

4934

jVues.

Mon.
8.

Wed.

999,0
78-62% 78 72%
116%
11630
125%
125%
4 5 70
4ft78
7470
75%
14%
14%
12230
122%
53
53%
9%
10%
88%
( 88%

46

IMPORTS OF 8PECIE AT NEW YORK.

Gold.

01.

32,300,000

315,202,660

at the port of
since January

32,519,078

36,940,178

36,748,739

$321,683,0ifr

333,544,607

Mexico

1881.

1882.

18,735,691
6,816,191
3,741,263

...cwt. 14.451,467

Barley

$370,654,879 $341,399,730 $350,930,214

$7,855,123

366,041,747

EXPORTS AND

following return shows the extent of the imports of
Cereal produce into the United Kingdom during the first four¬
teen weeks of the season, the sales and average prices of
home-grown produce fo rthe same period, and other items, com¬
pared with last season:
1883.

/$6,421.$9>

$4,613,132

Previ reported. L

The'

1884.

$8,241,372
342,688,842

For the week...
fotal 51 Weeks.

1804.

1883.

1882.

11,622,100

12,125,510

14,021,500

1881.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.
cwt. 14.2.3.230

Wheat

follows:

as

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR TUB WEEK.

1884.

$819,176

$153,466,640 $410,584,737

Receipts.
$

Dec. 20.

“

“

Total...

934.660 78

1,320,287 14
1,394,244 42
1.096,527 35

Payments.

Coin.

Currency•

$
$
$
1,045,861 66 124,320,106 29 14,396,780 45
1,067,014 54 124,202,507 9J 14.767,627 41
856.75 < 91 124,044,324 12 14.863,30173
1,007.771 71 124,439,260 21 15,157,121 28
nod

1,376,775 36

747,421 51

6,122,495 05

4,721,853 36

124,40*2,903 13

15,822,83228

December 27,

THE CHRONICLE

1884.]

Qaotfttions In Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore.
Bid.

SECURITIES.

BOSTON,

A

„

I

Providence—7s

|

117

117*4

Chat. M., 10s, 1838
New 78, reg. & coup
Connect’# 6s, cp., 1900-04

119
100
100
40 ~8
40 Jo

0*3
83

94*3

N. Y. A N. England—6s..
7b
...
N. Mexico A So. Pac.—7s

95

104 *3 105

Ogdensb.A L.Cb.—Con.6s
income

Pueblo A Ark. Val.—7s..

Sonora—7 s
STOCKS.

Atchison & Topeka
Atlantic A Pacitic
Boston A Albany

Bpeton A Lowell

122

108*3
114

Harrisb’g—1st, 6s, 1883..
H AB.T -1st.

7s,

g.,

1890

112

Cons. 5s, 1895
Ithaca* Ath.—1st, gld.,7s

82

Leh.V—lst,6s,C.AR.,’98 $119*3

2d, 7s, reg., 1910
Cons. 6s, C.& R., 1923..
N. O. Pac.—1st, 6s, 1920.
No. Penn.—1st, 6s, cp.,’85

133
122
59

134*3

—-

A Maine

Boston A Providence....

Boston Revere B. & Lynn
Ombrid. e
Cheshire, preferred
Chic. A West Michigan..
Cinn. Sandusky & Cleve.
Concord

PJUla. Newt. & N.Y.—1st
Phil. * R.—1st, 6s, 1910..
2d, 7s, coup., 1893

168

Connecticut River

$73

Conn. A Passumpsic
Cennotton Valley

Bet. Lansing & No., pref.
Eastern, Mass

Cons., 7s, reg.,.i911 —
Cons., 7s, coup., 1911..
Cons., 6s, g., 1.R.C.1911
Imp., 6s, g., coup., 1897
Gen., 6s, g., coup., 1908
Gen., 7s, coup., 1908—
Income, 7s, coup., 1896

48
108

Fitchburg

Flint A Pore Marquette.
Preferred
Fort Scott A Gulf

19
89

88
85

preferred

75
39
18 *y

Iowa Falls A Sioux City.
Kml C. Springf. A Mem.

little Rock A Ft. Smith.
Louisiana* Mo. River..

24

$20

Conv. 7s, cp.off, Jan.,’85
Phil.Wil.* Balt.—4s.tr.ct
Pitts. Cin. &St.L.—7s
Pitts. Titus. & B.—7s,cp.
SliamokiuV. & Potts.—7s
Shen. Val.—1st, 7s, 1909
Gen’l 6s, 1921

Manchester A Lawrence.
17

Preferred

Metropolitan
Mexican Central

'

,

°2*3
9*y
2

Nashua A Lowell
N. Y. A New

...

Norwich A Worcester
Old Colony
Portland Saco A Portsm.
Rutland—Preferred
Summit Branch

150

10
116

England
Northern of N. Hampsh.

443

eo
11
18

Worcester & Nashua....
Wisconsin Central
Preferred

144

70
20

PHILADELPHIA.
RAILROAD STOCKS, t

Allegheny Valley.

Ashtabula A Pittsburg.
Preferred

5ne

Preferred
Camden & Atlantic.

35
15

Preferred
..

l||t preferred
3d preferred

576

50

49*3

50

40
64

I«Wgh Valley
Preferred

58*3

Preferred

5734

68

Nefcguehoning Valley....

49

49*u

RAILR’D STOCKS. Par
Atlanta A Charlotte...
Baltimore A Oliio
100

Norfolk * Wegt’n—Com.

17 *e
61
51

Erie

PhllA Ger. A Norristown
PJUla. Newtown A N.Y..

United N. J. Companies..
Vest Chester—Cons. pref.

190

We* Jersey
wdtfc Jersey A Atlantic..
.•nCANAL STOCKS.
Ltttigh Navigation

38*9

fWUwvlvania
fiOhuylkUlNav., pref

7 b, E. ext., 1910
lac. 7s, end., coup., ’94

45fieb. * Pittsb.—1st,6s
_A*t, 6s, reg., 1908
"Svm’e Del.—lst,68,1902
’"Ves, 1885....;.
&6a, 1887
Pa Gap-1st, 7b, 1893.
Ut, 6s, 1905

9

11

21

102*3

Per ah

*8*6"

117
95*3

*13*3
105
81

—The firm of Parker &

Stackpole, in Boston, has been dis**
Jan. 1, 1885, the new firm of Stackpole & Ely,
bankers and brokers, will commence business at No. 7 Ex¬
change in that city. They will deal in investment securities
and transact all regular commission business in stocks and
bonds on margin.

107
108
80
97
62

on

DIVIDENDS.
The following dividends

have recently been announced:
Per
Cent.

Delaware Lick. A West. (quar.)..
Flint A Pete Marquette, pref.. ..
Granite
Holvoke A Wesitield
St. Paul A Duluth, pref
Vermont VaLley

When,

"
108*3
64

*9

29*3

30*3

96

97

58*4 62
102*4
117
117*3
116*3
102*4
......

i*21**' 122**

O

3*2

Jan.

3*2

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

B wery

5
3
5
3
5

National

Central National

4*2
4
4
6-40

3*2

Leather Manufacturers’ National.
Market National

Mercantile National
Merchants’ Exchange
Merchants’ Na’lonal

National

7
5
5
4
4
3
3
3

..

3*2
4
10
4

Murray Hi l (quar.)
National Broadway
National Batch* rs’ A Drovers’..
National Oitiz* ns’
National Park
National Shoe A Leather
Ninth National
North River National

3*2
4
4

3*2
4
5
5

oriental

Peoples’....

3
3
3
5

Phenix. > uoual.
Seventh Ward National
Tradesmen’s National
West Side
Insurance.
Franklin A Emporium Fire.......
Hamilton Fire”...
-

Feb.
Jan.
Jan.

2
4
3

1

Payable.
Ian.

$1 50
Ranks.
Bank of New York, N. B. A
Bank of North America

Mechanics’ National
Mechanic-,’ A Traders’

8s

Last

capital
$100,000, give3 attention to collections and all regular bank¬
ing business.

Importers’ and Traders’ National.

15*4

—

W.Md.—6s, 1st, g., J. A J.
2d, guar., J.AJ
2d, guar, byW.Co.,J. AJ.
6s, 3d, guar., J.AJ
vVtlm. C, A Aug.—6s......
Wil. A Weiaon—Gold, 7s.

secured by guaranteed Iowa mortgages.
The Merchants National Bank of Des Moine=», with a

Irving National

RAILROAD BONDS.
Atlanta A Chari.—1st...
Inc

Virginia A Tenn.—5s

This company sells carefully
on farm property in Eastern
Also sell 6 per cent debenture bonds

Chatham National
Continental National
East River National
Eleventh Ward
Fourth National
Hauover National

171
L35

60
Western Maryland ....50

No.Central—6s, ’85, J.AJ.
0s, 1900, A. A O
6s, gold. 1900, J.AJ
5s, Series A
os, Series B

England Mortgage & In-

Moines, la.
mortgages

Railroads.
Chic. St. P. M. A Ora. pref. (quar.).

64

50

2d
Cin. Wash. A Balt.—lets.
2ds
3ds
Columbia* Greenv.—lsts
2ds
1

—Attention is called to the New
vestment Co. of Des
selected real estate
Kansas and Iowa.

Name of Company.

103*3

50

Pittsb.ACon’ells.—7sJAJ
Union KR- 1st,gua.JAJ
Canton endorsed

103

WtiBoi.,66, 1913
B®f N.Y.& Phll.-l8t.6s

t

38 7«

117 *v
10

78

120

Balt.AOhio—0s„’85A.AO
Ohio.—6s, 1st,M.AS.
Chari. Col. A Aug.—1st..

mouths to come.”

105

82
88*3
lot *9
114*3
117
118*3
86
88

9

Cen.

These

98

106*4
106*3

50

Pref,

9*8

Reading
«Ula. Wilm. A Balt
juttsb.CLn.A St. L.—Com.

E'AILROAD BONDS.
dUegh. Val.—7 3-10s, ’96

j

bonds which have been in the treasury since their issue.
are the first of this class of bonds which have been put
on the market,
the syndicate with whom the bonds were
originally placed never having made any attempt to sell them.
The bonds sold to the Berlin Bank are said to have brought
in the neighborhood of ninety.
It is seldom that the second
mortgage bonds of any American company have been so well
placed in Europe recently. Their sale, as has been said, places
the company in a decidedly easy condition, financially, for
gage

Chicago R. I. A Pacitic (quar.)

1st pref

17 *3!
2d pref
62
Parkersburg Br
5i *s Central Ohio—Com

106

A

120

BALTIMORE.

52*3

.Preferred
Northern Central

94

58 »4

little Schuylkill
Minehill A Sch. Haven...

Northern Pacific.—The Philadelphia Press says: ‘‘The
Northern Pacific Railroad is said to be in most excellent finan¬
cial condition.
All the fixed charges have been fully pro¬
vided for and the company sees its way clear to complete the
Cascade Division. Some of the money necessary has come
from the sale of first mortgage bonds on the completed por-r
tion of the road. The Deutchse Bank of Berlin has purchased
from the company $1,500,000 of the $4,000,000 of second mort¬

solved, and

103

_

North Pennsylvania

38

93*3

6s, P. B., 1896
Gen., 7s, coup., 1901—
Lehigh Nav.—6s,reg.,’84.
Mort. RR., reg., 1897
Cons., 7s, reg., 1911
Pennsylv.—6s, cp., 1910..
Schuylk. Nav.—1st,6s,rg.
2d, 6s, reg., 1907

City Bonds.—Comptroller Loew has opened the

proposals received for the new issue of $1,050,000 3^ per cent
bonds of the city of New York. The bonds are of twiT classes—
$700,000 dock bonds of 1915 and $950,000 assessment bonds of
1890.
Fifteen proposals were received, ranging from par to
$102 50 on the dock bonds and from par to $101 78 on the
The State Comptroller put in a proposal
assessment bonds.
for $360,000 worth of either class of bonds at par.

of

113

..

Elmira A Williamsport..
Preferred
Hontingd’n A Broad Top

68 ~8
81

55

Cons. 6s, 1909
W. Jersey A Atl.—1st,6s,C.
Western Penn.—6s, coup.

CANAL BONDS.
Ches. A Del.—1st, 08,1886

122

Delaware A Bound Brook
East Pennsylvania

68
78

114

1st, 78,1899

18
51

105

6s, cp.,’96

W. J ersey—1st,

Bell’s Gap
Buffalo N.Y. & Phil

115
118
117

iiu‘*v

Income, 6s, 1923
Income, 5s, 1914....
Sun bury & Erie—1st, 7s.
97
Sunb. Haz. & W.—1st, 5s
64
2d, 68,1938
Syr.Gen.A Corn.—1st, 7s.
Tex. A Pac.—1st, 6s, 1905 103
76
Consol., 6s. 1905
Union & Titusv.—1st, 7s.
United N. J.—Cons.6s,’94
Cons. 6s, gold, 1901
Cons. 6s, gold, 1908
Gen., 4s, * old, 1923
Warren & F.—1st, 7s,’96 100*4
West Chester—Cons. 7s.. 115

17 **

Vermont <fc Mass

119*3

Scrip, 1882
Conv., 7s, It. C., 1893..*

45
98

Marq. Hought’n A Onton.

118
114

Cons. 5s, lstser.,cu1922
Cons. 5s, 2d ser.,cM 1983
Conv. AdJ. Scrip, ’85-88
Debenture coup., 1893$

80

Preferred
Mldne Central




New York

Del A Bound Br —1st, 7s
East Penn.—1 st, 7s, 1888
Easton A Amb’y—5s, 1920
El &Wmsp’t-l st,6s, 1910

102*4
122*3
2d, 7s, cp. 1896
127
*3
Gen., 7s, 1903
Debenture 6s, reg
107
Norfolk * West.—Gen.,6s
N. R*Div., 1st, 68.1932
92
118*u 119
99
N. Y. Phil.* Nor.—1st, 6s
100
Inc., 6s, 1933
9734 Oil City* Chic.—1st, 6s
80
Oil Creek—1st, 6s, coup..
76*4 77
124
Pennsylv.—Gen.,
6s,
reg.
8
122
Gen., 6s, cp., 1910...
170
168
120*3
Cons., 6s, reg., 1905.
106
120*3
Cons., 6s, coup., 1905... >
167
167*3
*102*3
Cons., 5s, reg., 1919
169
122
Pa. & N. Y. C.—7b, 1896
98*
125
7,1906
75
99
Perkiomen—1 st, 6s,cp.’87
99*3
56
Phil. &Erie—2d,7 s,cp. ,’88 111*3
44
48
Cons., 6s, 1920
11
10*3
104*4
Cons., 5s, 1920
10 8
118*4

Old Colony—7 s

SW, 7s, 1908
<*ur6s.mi
Tr. 6s, 1922
*
Ex-dividend,

120

$4,500,000 of the old indebtedness was funded before the
expiration of the original act on F bruary 1, 1884. There is
now about $1,000,000 still
outstanding, which, it is thought,
will be funded into n?w bonds of the taxing district as the
interest 011 the new bonds issued by the taxing district has
been paid with promptness.

117*3

5s, perpetual

Scrip

,

109

Delaware—6s, rg.A cp.,V.

•

116

Income

Phlla.

104 V,
108
115

jCor.Cowan* Ant.,deb.6s,

—

Mexican Central—7s

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia A

Ask

Cam. & Burl. Co.—6s, ’97.
I'Catawissa—1st, 7s, con. c.

Eagt’rn, Mass.—6s, new..
Fort Scott & Gnlf—7s—
K. City Lawr. & So,—6s..
1L CitySt. Jo. & C. B.—7s
Little R. «fe Ft.-8.—7s, 1st
K. City Sp’d & Mem.—6s

Cat&Wissa

Ambov—6s, c.,’89
Mort,, 6s, 1889
Atl.—lst/< s,g.,’93
2d, 6s, 1904
Cons., 6 p. o

Cam. *

Burl. A Mo.—Ld. gr., 7s.
Nebraska, 6s. Exempt
Nebraska, 6s.Non-ex’pt 106
Nebraska, 4s
<jonn. A Passumpsic—7s.

Boafon

Bid.

'Cara. A

Lowell—7 s

Cojinotton Valley—6s

SECURITIES.

Memphis’ City Debt.—At a meeting of tlie Legislative
a resolution was unanimously
adopted to petition the
Legislature to extend the time for the funding of the out¬
standing indebtedness of the old city of Memphis. About
Council

Bnff.Pitts.A W.—Gen.,6s

121

uMu A Topeka—1st, 7s.
Land giant, 7 s
Boston A Marne—7s
Boston A Albany—7s ....
69
Boston A
08...
Boston A

Ask.

727

20
2
2Q
15
1

IS

tons

iJLosed.

(Days inclusive.)
Jan. 1
Dec. 30
Jan. 1
Deo. 25

Jan. 22
Jan. 20
to Jan. 20
to Jan. 15

to

to

1 Dee. 21 to
1 Dec. 21 to

Jan.
Jan.

18
1

1 Dec. 20 to
2 Dec. 21 to Jan.
4
2 Doe. 25 to Jan.
1
2
2 Dec. 25 to Jau.
5
X
2,Dec. 21 to Jan.
5 Jau.
1 to Jan.
4
2
2 Dec. 24 to Jan.
1
2 Dee. 2 8 to Jan.
I
2 Dec. 24 to Jan.
1
2 Dec. 25 to Jan.
1
2 Doc. 20 to Jan.
1
2 Dec. 21 to Jam
1
2 Dee. 21 to Jan.
1
1 Dee. 17 to Deo. 31
2
2 Dee. 20 to Jan. is
2 Dec. 20 to Jan.
1
2 Dec. 25 to Jau.
2
2
2 Dec. 21 to Jan.
1
2 Dee. 21 to Jau.
1

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jau.
Jan.
Jau.
Jan.
Jau.
Jan.
Jan.

Jan.
Jan.

Jan.
Jau.
Jan.

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

Jau.
Jan.
Jan.

2

2 Dec. 25 to
2 Dee. 2 t to
2 Dec. 23 to
2
2 Dec. 21 to
2 Dee. 27 to
Dec. 25 to
5 Dee. 27 to

Jan.

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jau.
Jan.
Jan.

1
4.

Jan.

2
2

5
5

Tan.
fan.

2

5
4
4

Ian.

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

X
X
X

Jan.
Jau.
Jan
Jau.

X

X

X
4

O

miscellaneous.
IQS
117

price this week.

Central Trust
Mercantile Trust,

Wells, Fargo A Co

>

Jan.

r

m.

O

1

J

Dee. 17 to Jan.
D. C. 27 to’ Jan.
Jan.
1 to Jan.

2
l

THE CHRONICLE,

728

[You ytttt

cial bills and the limited

^he jankers7 ©axette.

demand, and the market has latterly

been firm at the reduced rate.

To-day the rates on actual business were as follows, viz.;
days’ sterling, 4 80} @4 804; demand, 4 84}@4 84}.
NEW YORK. FRIDAY, DEC. 'Z6. 1884. -5 P, M.
Cables, 4 85@4 85:}. Commercial bills were 4 78}. Conti¬
The Money Market and Financial Situation.—The past nental bills were: Francs, 5 25@5 25} and 5 21}@5 22}-;
week has shown little to encourage the holders of stocks, and reichmarks, 94}@94| and 94}@95; guilders, 39} and 39}@40.
The following were the rates of domestic exchange on New
the advantage for the time being is evidently with the bear
York
at the under-mentioned cities- to-day : Savannah, buying
side.
For some time past, it has been commonly accepted as
true, that the leading railroad capitalist of the country and his } discount, selling 4 discount @ par; Charleston, buying 3-16
immediate
following were practically bears on the situa¬ discount, selling par @ } premium; Boston, 35@40 premium;
tion, in looking for lower prices, even if they did not go short New Orleans, commercial, 50@75 discount; bank, 100 pre¬
of their own stocks; then it was announced last week mium; St. Louis, 25 premium; Chicago, 25@50 premium.
The posted rates of leading bankers are as follows :
that the principal supporter of the coal stocks had sold out,
and with him, no doubt, many of the chief bulls on the coal
Sixty Days Demand.
December 26.
properties. These are merely influences bearing directly on
4 85
4 81
Prime
hills on London
the market—they do not make or mar the actual value of stocks Prime bankers’sterling
4 79%
commercial
4 7914
commercial
as investments; but
their effect in letting prices down cannot Documentary
5 2178
5 2438
Paris (francs)
40
40*4
be ignored, particularlv at a time when the business outlook is A msterdam (guilders)
94is
951b
Frankfort or Bremen (reiclmfferks)
so generally unsatisfactory.
Coins.—1The following are quotations in gold for various
One remarkable fact in regard to the course of stocks in this
market is the extreme fluctuations which take place, even in coins:
par.
Sovereigns
$4 84 ®$4 87. Silver %s and %s. — 99
stocks of acknowledged permanent value, when the earnings Napoleons
Five francs
92
— 94
3 85 -® 3 90
Mexican dollars..
84*2a> — 85*3
X X Reichmarks. 4 74 ® 4 78
make a bad showing for a single year.
Do uncommerc'l.
83%a> —
Take Lake Shore, for X Guilders
3 96 ® 4 00
Peruvian soles....
77
— 80
8.>an’h Doubloons. 15 55 ®15 70
instance, selling to-day at GO}; this stock earned and paid Mix. Doubloons..15 55 ®15 65 English silver
4 78 -a 4 84
dividends of 8 per cent in each of the four years 1880 to 1883 F ue silver bars
1 07^8® 1 0S3s U. 8. trade dollars— 86 -3 — 88
par.
Fine gold bars....
par d *4 prern. U. 8. silver dollars — 99%®
inclusive, and earned about 4| per cent net in the pessimist Dim°>s<fe % dimes.
99%® par
year 1884, though actually
paying 54 per cent.
Then
State and Railroad Bonds.—The only transactions re¬
as to the future, 44 when this cruel war is over” (and that will
ported in State bonds were $5,000 Tennessee compromise bonds
be when the magnates are ready to have it over), a rational view at
48} and $20,000 Ohio Os, 1880, at 100.
of the prospects for this stock would give it a dividend of 5 to
Railroad bonds have been very dull all the week and even
8 per cent every year.
With such a record and such prospects, the most speculative classes have been comparatively inactive.
Dividends will be. found on

the preceding page.

Bankers' 00

....

—

—

—

—

—

....

..

—

in what other market of the world would

a

similar stock sell

The general list has been irregular.
Erie 2ds have been about
The steady and East Tennessee 5s active and irregular. Erie 2ds
inas¬ close at 504, against 57-$ last Friday; West Shore 5s at40},
much as a large volume of stock is carried on margin, and the
against 41}; East Tennessee 5s, after considerable fluctua¬
Ifiews taken of the market are necessarily very short views.
tions, close at 48, the same as last Friday ; do. incomes at
Rates for call loans during the week on stock and bond col¬
11}, against 12; Fort Worth & Denver City lsts at 66,
laterals have ranged at 1@1} per cent and to-day at the same
against 04: Cincinnati &.Springfield guaranteed lsts at 112,
figures. Prime commercial paper is quoted at 4}@5} per cent. against 110}; Denver A Rio Grande lsts at 81}, against 83;
The Bank of France lost 3,140,000 francs in gold and
Ne.v Jersey Central
consol, assented at 100, against 101;
francs
gained 1,000,000
in silver.
Metropolitan Elevated lsts at 110, against 1094. Philadelphia
The New York Clearing House banks, in their statement of
& Reading general mortgages have declined sharply in Phila
Dec. 20, showed a decrease in surplus reserve of $1,505,875, the
delphia on the prospect of a default in the January interest and
surplus being $40,080,025, against $42,252,500 the previous the talk of a possible foreclosure.
week.
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.—1The stock market
The following table shows the changes from the previous
week and a comparison with the two preceding years in the has presented a decidedly holiday appearance during the past
week ; business has been very dull, and on Wednesday was
averages of the New York Clearing House banks.
almost entirely suspended after 11 A. M., owing to the indul¬
1882.
Differ'nces fr'm
1883.
1884.
Prices have been
gence in the usual ante-Christmas hilarity.
Dec. 23.
Previous Week.
Dec. 22.
Dec. 20.
very weak and have further declined, each class or group
having its own particular bear movement. The evidences of‘a
Loans and dis $294,342,400 Tnc .$4,116,500 $323,072,100 $309,774,100
59,148,90 > decided effort to depress prices are also apparent from the
86.8 52.200 Inc.
60,691,700
809,600
Specie
18,163,100
Circulation
11,686.300 Inc.
43,700
15,424,3 0(
various false minors circulated and the rejoicing over bad news.
Net deposits..
335,413.100 rue. 4,489,100 321,757,800 290,848,90-3
The coal shares, as usual lately, have been the leaders in
26,639,500
18,835,500
37,695.2 >0 Dee. 1,253,200
Legal tenders.
Legal reserve $83,860,775 rue .$1,122,275 $80,439,450 $72,712,225 activity and weakness ; Lackawanna fell off again and the im¬
Reserve held.
87,334.200
77,984,400 provement of the latter part of last week has been lost, al¬
443,600
124,547,400 Dee.
$5,272,175 though the quarterly dividend of 2 per cent was declared to-day.
$0,894,750
$40,686,625 Dee.$1,565,875
Surplus
The forming of the combination for next year had only a tem¬
United States Bonds.—The business in Government bonds porary effect on the coal stocks, and the report of a contract to
deliver coal for half a year to the Pacific Mail Steamship Co.
has been only moderately active.
The depression in the stock at
$3 00 a ton had an unsettling effect.
New Jersey Central
market, or the outlook at Washington, seems to have had an and Reading have suffered a severe break, traceable principally
effect on the 4s and 4}s, as they have developed considerable to the uncertainty about the dividend on Jersey and the interest
on the Reading general mortgages ; alsq from the appointment
weakness since our last report.
of a bondholders’ committee in Philadelphia.
The closing prices at the N. Y. Board have been as follows:
The grangers showed a slightly stronger tone early in the
week,
but they, too, have since weakened, and St. Paul has
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
Interest Dec.
26.
25
23
22.
Periods.
20.
been active and declining, started by a sensational rumor from
It is also
112% Chicago about the resignation of President Mitchell.
;
11270
4*»s, 1891
reg. □.-Mar. *11330 *11330 113
113
;
reported in this connection that there has been a considerable
41*8,1891
ooup. Q.-Mar. *113 30 *11330 *11330 *1127e
12130
*121%
12230 *l22q *122
reg. Q.-J&n.
4s, 1907
short interest in Chicago on the granger stocks.
£
122%
4s, 1907
ooup. (J.-Jan. *12330 123ie 122% 122%
1
Among the Vanderbilts, Lake Shore led the decline, touch¬
01
!2
*101%
*10130
*2
*1-01%
3s, option U. 8
reg. Q.-Feb. *101%
*125
*126
*126
*L26
6s, our'ey, *95
reg. J. & J. *126
ing
the lowest point reached since 1878. The action of the
*126
*128
*128
*128
«
6s, eur’ey, ’96—reg. J. & J. *129
directors in passing the quarterly dividend was a surprise to
*127
*129
tfs.cor’oy, ’97—reg. J. & J. *130 *130 *130
*129
*131
*130
*131
some, but the publication of the annual statement of earnings
63,oar’cy, ’98
reg. J. & J. *131
*131
*131
*133
*133
and disbursements is justification for their action, and on this
6a,cur’ey. ’99.. .reg. J. & J. *133
the stock should now mle better than if a dividend had been
This 1b the price bid at the morning board; no sale was made.

down to 60}, except in the height of a financial nanic?
causes for extreme fluctuations in New York are obvious,

>

..

,

*

0

*

JExchange.—The market for sterling has been very dull and
without

fsst«w of iutcrest.

.

m

auccd




On Monday

« il

■

.1...

I

declared.

To-day there

jested rates were re- Hn)Ugu pvivc*
M

.

}c., in consequence oi me aounuant offering

-

of commer¬

was

wors

very

little strength shown at any

weakest in the afternoon and

closed near the lowest

figures.

time,

generally

THE CHRONICLE

27, 1884.]

December

729

YOltK STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES BOB WEEK ENDING DEC. 20, AND SINCE JAN. 1, 1884.

NEW

HIGHEST
STOCKS

RAILROADS.
Albany <fc Susquehanna
Boston A N. Y. Air-Line, pref.
Burlington c’ed. Rapids A No.
Canadian Pacific
Canada Southern
Cedar Falls A Minnesota

Saturday

Monday,

Doc. 20.

Dec. 22.

*44^
*291-2

PRICES.

Tuesday,

Wednesday,

Dec. 23.

Dec. 24.

*44Vi

...

-

Cleveland Col. Cinn. A Ind
Cleveland A Pittsburg, guar..
Delaware Lackawanna A West
Denver A Rio Grande
Dubuque A Sioux City
East Tennessee Va. & Ga

94 4

96%
87e

*8;<y

pref.

Sales of I
.the Week

Thursday,

Friday,

117 Vj 117 Vj

72 >4
105

118 Vj 118 Vj
72 V* 73*4
104 Vj 104 V

741

84 7g 80
fi*>4 85 7h
123
123 4 ’123
1231-2
lU7 Vj 10734 108
108
*0 Vj
*7
7 *4
9
*15
18
25 7e 257,
254 25 4
*80
88
*87
88
00
33

*92** *94 4

0 Vj
35
*3
•

11834

1164 1173ri
723f 727(

115 Vi 110 V70 34 72 Vj
103
103

104
104
84 Vj 85 4
122 Vj 122 34
107
107 Vl

83=8

*14" *14*
*101-5

0314

Hi
04

*15
25 Vj
*86
*32 Vj

24 Vj

80
32 Vj

92=8
8'-«8

84

20

32 Vj

9

3 78
*0

xG8 4

081-2

334
191
40

3

*30
119

....

7*
04

*2

T18

12*4 *12*4

13 Vj
*10 *4
02 34

13 Vj
11 Vj

*1014

03=8

027g

114
03 Vj

25 Vj

25 78

*03
25 78

25 78

08

08 Vj

pref.

08

01

300

prof.

7=8

11 Vi 11^
175
175
12 Vi 12 4

*204
174
40V3

..i

*63
25 Vi

9

034

004

64

04
25 Vs

25=8

67 Vj

68

294

* 29 Vj

*91

0G34

....

57 Vj

*10

10
*25

*2514
15 7a
90U
*0 Vj

5,700
050
20

June30
5
J uue27
9 Vs June 20

1

28

June 27

52
Oct. 25
3 Vj May 14

534 Dec. 11

30

Oct. 25

3Vj Dec. 3
July 11

400
100

9
0l%
04

107,900

254

2,020

11

07
11

90

90

554

554

*1578

16*4

90 Vj

90 Vj

74

74
120

8*4 4 ‘86"

758
87 Vj

14ie

llV

*10**

10 V*
28

L15

115

87 Vj

300

88
14 Vj

1,711
150

1,000
500

250
300

15 Vj 1534
90 Vi 90 Vj
*7
’115
120
*34
39
83 78 8434
4 Vj
44
*7 V-

*14** *14*

2", 1.7*6
5,800
100

185
20
110
70
9
6 7g

1214

12

12

20 Vj
*17

20 Vj
17 Vj

17

4ui4

407e

40j4

14

14
19 Vi

1
18 Vj

*1814
10
15
13 7a

15

Oregon Short Line
Oregon A Trans-Continental...

1334
*12i4

Peoria Decatur <fe Evansville..
Philadelphia & Reading
Pittsburg Ft. Wayne A Chic...
Rich. A Alleg., st’k trust ctfs..
Richmond A Danville
Richmond <fc W’t P’t Terminal
Rochester A Pittsburg
Rome Watertown A Ogdensb..
8t. Louis Alton A Terro Haute
Do
Dref.
fit. Louis & San Francisco

*1234
19 Vj

22

10
15

14=8
13 Vj
21

*20

*15”
14 Vi
*12 Vj
18 78

17 Vt
41 Vj
14
18 Vj

16:*8

163a

*20
16 Vi

40

40 34

39=8

lVt

lVi

1*4

1534
1434

13=8

13

22

15 Vj
13 Vj
12 Vj

14 Vj

*17 * 'lShi

20 Vi

22

200
110
32

3,035

62
May 24
22 Vj Jun© 24

*2 34

3

34

2,010

2 34

4,805
100
100
516

20

204

3934

40 >4
80

*83

prof

fit. Paul Minneap. A Manitoba
Texas A Pacific
Union Pacific
Wabash St ' ouis A Pacific....
Dc
pref.

12^

13

48 V»
*5

4834

*12V2

13 4

534

*20 Vj
*40 Vj
*84 Vj

21 Vj
41 Vj
85 Vj

*18 Vj
*37
*83

814
124
47*8

82 Vi
12 "a
48 Vj

*5
*12 Vj

13 Vj

81 »4
12 Vj
48
*5 Vi
*13

534

MISCELLANEOUS.

Americati Tel. & Cable Co
Bankers' A Merchants' Tel....
Colorado Coal A Iron
Delaware A Hudson Canal....
Mutual Union Telegraph

*18
*38
83 Vj

56

*18
*38
*83

8iS

82

81

12=8

1278

48 Vj
5 Vj
15

47 Vj
*5 Vj
12 Vj

48 V

124
404
*5 4

5 Vj
13

*12

56

55
*2
*8

4

Pacific Mail
Pullman Palace Car Co
Qtdcksilver Mining
Do
pref
Western Union Telegraph
EXPRESS.

21
09 Vj
50 i8

72

*8

107

57 4
108 V*

21
69 Vj
56 34

55

70

55

5034

56

1o8Vj 108 Vj
*3

12

615
100

*

_

.

t564

Adams

128
90
*52
108

5614

5834
132
90
55

109

*128
*87
53
107

56 V4
132
92
53
110

56 V

57 Vi

129 Vj 129 Vj
90
90
53
53
*107
110

125

*51

91
54

108

109

r

June26

178 July 24
14
18
70

Oct. 18
June 27

July

3

13 4

300

55

742

49 *

4

1

10

7
70
10

7,721

21
71

21
71

245
388

*125
90
*52
*107

134
157
116 Vj 127 V4

IOVj

22

33
30
91

57*4
65

1134
84

Feb. 15
Feb. 15
Jan.
7
8Vj Feb. 8
200
Mai-. 18
Jan.
4
Feb. 13
Mar. 6

J an.
5
Jan. 7
Mar. 4
784 Mar. 15
Slag Mar. 4

92

4 Vj

114

114

23
75
10 7a
200
82 Vi
148
84 V4

45
5

190
50
124
77
17 Vj 35Vi
13 Vj 334
92 34 1147a
68

40%
30
38
80
38

054
100 Vi
18

48Va
30*4
68 Vi
34 7a

1067*
19Vi
129 V4

647*
1294
15Vi
35

894
407*
83

3

524

17VjApr. 4

42
Feb. 15
27
Jan.
7
57 =8 Jan.
7

44 Sept. 5
25 7* Mar. 17
11'4 Oct. 7
24

183

1

7
6
Feb. 28
184 Feb. 16
12 4 Nov. 3

Mar. 22

68
63 7a
90
53
30 %
55

Feb. 16
Feb. 14
Apr. 12
28% Jan. 5

May
164 Jan.

86*4
58*3

47*

14
10
32

7
19

21*4
18

234
49*4
2
21

29%
8*8
49*4
63 Vj

90»a
144

36*4
14*4

32

32
16 4
24
60

Feb.15

Feb.

4

Mar. 21
Mar. 17
Feb.
6

96
29 4 Aug. 22
60
Mar. 18

964 Apr. 10
32a4 Jaa
9
90
99

Jan. 26
Jan.
7

223b Feb. 11
84=8 Feb. 16

21
14
15
35
80

39
23
34
85
103

204

3614
594
1004
407,

40
87
33
90
94
17 4

704

97*4
1694
43
104 34

1934JaB.

7

16

364

32

5

294

574

Jan.

57
614 Jan. 8
69*s
12734 Apr. 16 1184 1404
14
393,
174 Mar. 17
Dec. 26 114
Feb.11 1024 1124
25
15
May 16 174 Jan. 10

May 16

Oct. 17
J ane 27

122 Vj Jan.

7 170

Feb.

9

55

125

56
914
834 June 28 65 4 Jan. 7
159
90
June 26 112 Jan. 28
28
44*4
May 16 574 Dec. 20
90
May 24 117 Jan. 7 1124 134
3 *4 J uue 30
5
94
64 Feb. 11
20
June20 34
30
Nov. 29
464
49
May 14 784 Feb. 16
71*4 884
60 34
31

29,550
10

5
30

56

128

77

Mar. 10

184

2,000
5,210
58,440

74

5434

56 4

125

23*4
35Vj

82
8 Vi
14 Vj
51

7

July

814
12=8
474
04

70

*3
*20

5 Vj

13
23

54

Mar.

IIVj June 26
24 Vj June 30
70
May 15
15
June30
65
J uly 11
76 Vi Oct. 20
5 Vj June 27
28
June30
4
June27
9
May 20

54=8 55 V4
*106 Vj 10734

90
88

34=8 Jan. 7
294 89
300
7
28
Juno20 173i Aug. 20
12
23,905
1678 Dec. 26 604 Feb. 23
464 61 Vi
100 119 Vj Dee.
1 135
Apr. 14 1294 188
2 4 May 24
5
4
Jan. 11
15ia
‘*20*6 32 J uly 3 61 Feb. 14 47
72

..

72
50

61

69 Vj Mar. 14

71

834Aug. 8
6*4 June 26

19,520

700
550
40

8134
12 7e

Feb. 12

June 27
J uue 24

14=8 May 14
6
Juuel2

*20

pref.
1st pref.

leb.
leb.

Mar. 14
Mar. 13

June 27
Doe. 19
GVj Dec. 19
10
Jab. 29
17
Nov. 2.'
14
June27
37 4 June 27
1
Dec. 19

100

27,534

2 34

71*4
17Vi

10
684

14*4 27
137V*
115*4 129*8
91*4 108 J*
16 115
1224
12 115V 140Vl

Juuo26i 58
Nov. 7 122
Dee. 16 10 Vi
Dec. 15 2034
.June 26
94*0

114June 27

200

2 a4

86

65Vl

Feb. 16
Jan.
3

Nov. 11 35
Jan.
4
40
Jan. 22 67
Aug. 26
82
Jan. 21
93 Vj Apr. 7
42
Jan. 23 65
Aug. 21
79
GG34 Dec. 26
Aug. 22
10
Mar. 18
Aug. 20 24
23
J uue 27 40
Jan. 11
85
J uue 30 105
Apr. 16
6134 June 27 94VjMar. 4
10
Feb. 11
10
7
Jan.
31
Oct. 22 44
Apr. 10
7 Vj June 23
IBVjJan. 7
17
June21
36 Vj Feb. 11
9 Vj June 27
234 Jan. 5
63 Vj May 20, 100 June21

20
8
.75
7
2

10
000

10%

1G78

12634 126 34

84*4

487*
474

64June20 133iMar.24
June271127 Jan. 29

55,402

40
1;Vj
15 Vj
1334
12 Vj
17 Vi

18
11
10
6734
15
2
28
11
17
7
140 Vi Feb. 5

June26 51
June23 140
July 8 86
J uue21
20 V4
June 27 1934
604 Dec. 26 IO434

116
30
83 Vj
4
7 V4
83

**390

1

Ohio & Mississippi
Ohio Southern

American
United States
Wells, Fargo A Co
inactive stocks.
Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe
Chicago A Alton, pref
Joliet A Chicago
Louisi ina A Mo. River
New York Elevated
Ohio A Mississippi, pref
Rensselaer A Saratoga
South Carolina Railroad
Texas A New Oneans
Virginia Midland

30

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Jan.

135

1254 June 24 141 Apr. 1 124 Vj 142
90 Vj May 26 133Vs Mar. 1 1114 131 Vj
1,500
6% June 23 25 =0 Jan. 3
214 51Vj

pref.

New York A Texas Land Co
Oregon Improvement Co
Oregon Railway A Nav. Co

I

584
78

67
12
90

Jan. 10
J an. 18
Feb. 11

127
78
75

2 8 i* 08*4

118

"14*

oi^s

08
10 Vj
29 V

57 Vj

10 Vs 13
25 Vi 27
15 78 16V*
90 Vi 90 Vj
*7
9
*115
120
*34
39
85 Vs 80 >4
*4 Vi
5

14

..

Do
pref.
New York Lack. A Western...
New York Lake Erie A West.
Do
pref.
New York
New England....
New York New Haven A Hart.
New York Ontario A Western.
New York Susg. A Western...

Northern Pacific
Do
pref
Ohio Central

2434June27
8
May 22
38^ Dee. 24

i

4

118

*12

04

29
*90

*90
*55

New York Central A Hudson.
New York Chic. A St. Louis...

pref.

j

Aug. 19

I004Juno23 12634 leb. 11
0
Sept.20 13 Vt Jan. 5
IOVj Nov. 18 35. Jan. 11
1,209
214 J uue 20 33 4 Aug. 20
118
8034 June 27 100 Aug. 20

37

119

IO1-2
01

Norfolk A Western

39

1

June 27

For Full
Year 1883.

Low. High

Jan. 30

90
80

4,347

50

0 Vj
35

3 135

July

j 80 Vj Mar. 27
!
56 June28

10

Nasliv.Chattanooga A St.Louis

Do
Do
fit. Paul A Duluth
Do

8UU

*84

Milwaukee L. Shore A West’n

Do

18
25 Vj

'*9*1*4 ■*9*3*4

93 4

*4

04

....

Do

8 Vj

Highest.

100 !
6 Vs Nov. 17
190 118
June23
4,989 107 June27 12734
219,314 58 Vi J line 27 944
320
957e June 27 119
01,842 81 Vs June23 124
985 117
June 23 149 Vj

*

*63
25 7e

Do
common.
Do
consol...
Manhattan Beach Co..

Do

84=8

122 Vj 122 Vs
106 34 1074

*04

923s yysy
*838....

8 Vj

578

119

550
000

*200

*34

....

Do
Missouri Kansas A Texas
Missouri Pacific
Mobile A Ohio
Morris A Essex

Lowest.

*

*4 *

119

44 Vj
*30

45

1,700

191

Long Island
Louisville A Nashville
Louisville New Albany «fc Chic.
Manhattan Elevated
Do
1st pref

Minneapolis A St. Louis

Range Since Jan. 1,1884.

(Shares).!

Doc. 26,

Dec. 25.

18*894

*"3 7s
*31

Evansville & Terre Haute
Green Bay Winona A St. Paul
Harlem
Houston & Texas Central
Illinois Central
Do
leased line 4 p.c
Indiana Bloomingt’n A West’n
Lake Erie A Western
juake Shore

Memphis A Charleston
Metropolitan Elevated
Michigan Central

LOWEST

126

Central of New Jersey
Central Pacific.
Chesapeake A Ohio
Do
1st pref
Do
2d pref
Chicago A Alton
1181-2
Chicago Burlington A Quincy. 118
7334 7434
Chicago Milwaukee A St. Paul
Do
pref. c10f>
83=8 9012
Chicago A Northwestern
1231-2
Do
pref. 123
108
108V
Chicago Rock Island A Pacific
Chicago St. Louis & Pittsburg.
Do
pref.
26
20
Chicago St. Paul Minn. &O111..
86
87
Do
pref.

Do

AND

101,002

130
90

125
87
45

54

110

98

Dec. 24 137
June24 102

Apr. 24 1264 135

Mar. 26
88
944
May 17 614 Feb. 7
554 654
May 26 115 Feb. 13 113 128

.

Canton

Co

*115

130

*115

130

130

**91*"

*91

*91

*91

*91

....

Central 1
t&rio Silvar

oil
Miuiiug

*17

25

94
...

.

94

are

the prices bid and




1100

.

»#••••!

These

’115

i‘40" 142*

CofceoJiiiaUon Coal
flomesta** Mining Co
New

*

130

asked;

no

sale

was

62
June23
142
Jane 13
137
Apr. 12
19 Vj Dec.
1
115
June 24
45
May 15
138
June 18
9
Dec. 1
90 Vj Nov. 22
15
July 29
39 Vj Nov. 28
18
Juno 10
Mar. 25
8
Nov. 18
5
14
May 10
64
Feb. 19

»••••• k-

made a,t fbe

B<?ard>

t Lower

prbtf

ex-dlvidend.

80»4 Jan.
152
145
24
130
90

7

Feb. 16
Mar. 4
Oct.
6
Jane 13
Jan.
9

1464 Apr. 18
11

93

May 24

784 184
140
138
13
90
96

25*4
105

1124
1394 1454
224 274

Feb. 11
Jan. 24
20
Nov. 21
50
Jan. 29
24
Jan. 4
8
9
104 Jan. 31
18
294 Jan. 29
264
Feb. 19 260
21
40
23
11

150
138

*31*4
60

274
19
14

364
2804

THE

730

CHRONICLE.

QUOTATIONS OF STATE AND RAILROAD DONDS.
STATE

[VOL. XXXIX.

DRCE5I3£R £S#

1834.

BONDS.

1

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Ask.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Ask.;

SECURITIES.

Ask.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Bid.

Ask.

'

83
101
82
105
3
10
10
10
10

Alabama—Class A, 1900.
Class B, 5s, 1900
Class C, 4s, 1906

09,10.20s, 1900
Arkansas—6s, funded
7fl, L. Rock & Ft. S. iss.
7b, Memp.&L.Rock RR
7s, L. R.P.B. A N.O.RR
7s, Miss. O. A R.R. RR.
7s, Arkansas Cent. RR.

Missouri—0s, 1886
8s, due 1889 or 1890
Asyl’m or Univ.. due’92
;
Funding, 1894-95
1
Hannibal A St. Jo., ’80.
New York—6s, reg., 1887
6s, loan, 1891
6s, loan, 1892
6s, loan, 1893
N. Carolina—6s, old. J.<fc J.
!
Funding act, 1900

9

101

Georgia—6s, 1886
7s. 1886

105

7s, gold, 1890

111*5

74
64

Louisiana— 7s, r*ons..l914
Ex-matured coupon....

v

N. Carolina—Continued—
New bonds, J.AJ., ’82-8

<2

I

103V

Special tax, all classes..

110
110
115
110
106
112
115
117
30
10

Do
Wil.C.ARu.R.
Consol. 4s, 1910

6s, 1919

Ohio—6s, 1886

1869 (
non-fundable, 1888. \

1893
Tennessee—6s, old,1892-8
6s, new, 1892-8-1900
Brown consol’n Gs,

...

Bid.

Ask.

Del. L. A W.—Contin’d—
Morris A Essex—1st, 7s

Railroad Donds.
AUeg’y Cent.—lst.6s,1922
Atoh.T.AS.Fe-4Vs.1920
Sinking fund, 6s, 1911..
78
7‘Ji<
AtL & Pac.—1st, Gs, 1910.
Balt. A O.—1st, 0s, Prk.Br. *118
ioT*
Bur. C. Bap.& No.—1st, 5s 101V
Consol., 1st, 5s, 1934...!
Regisicred
I-----Minn.ASt.L.—lst,7B.gu. *20
la. City. A West.-1 st. 7si
let. 5s, 1921
!
Buff. N.Y. A P.—Cons., 0s;
General, Gs, 1924
j
CatL

Registered, 7s, 1894
1st, Pa.Div., cp., 7s, 1917
1st, Pa. Div., reg., 1917.
Alb. A Susq.—1st, 7s ...

*01

2d, 7s. 1885
lst.cous., guar.78,1906

Registered

------

98*5

!

------

....I 60

2d, 5s, 1913
Reg., 5s, 1913

Central Iowa— 1st, 7s. ’99
East. Dir.—1st, 6s, 1912,

Ip. Div.—1st, 6s, 1912.J
Char. Col. A Aug.—1st, 7s;
Chesapeake A Oliio—
Pur. money fund,1898..
6s, gold, series A, 1908
6s, gold, senes B, 1908
6s, currency, 1918
.

.

1st, cons., gu., 6s, 1906
Registered
Rena. A Sar —1 st. cp.,7s
1st, reg., 7s, 1921
Denv.A Rio Gr.—1st, 1900
1st, consol., 7b, 1910
Pen.So.Pk.A Pac.—1st, 7e
Den.A RioG.West.—1st,Gs
Det.Mack.AMarq.—1 st.Os
Land grant, 3 Vs, S. A...

o

100

113

7434 E.T.Va.AGa.—1st,7s,1900
20

Chicago A Alton—1st, 7s.
Sinking fund, 6s, 1903..
La. A Mo. Riv.—1st, 7s.
2d, 7s, 1900
St. L. Jack. A

1930
1930
Eliz.C.AN.—S.f.,deb.,c.,6s
1st, 6s, 1920

118
119

i*19*

V

Eliz.Lex.A Big Sandy—6s
Erie—1 st, extended, 7s...

2d, extended, 5s, 1919 ..
3d, extended, 4 Vs, 1923

Chic.—1st,*11" Hi

1st, guar. (564), 7s, ’94j*116*u 118
2d, (360), 7s, 1898
1 125
2d, gnar. (188), 7s, ’98 *119

Mfcm.R.Br’tre— 1st. s.f.Gs
C.B.& Q.—Con sol.7s, 1903

131

4tli, extended, 5s, 1920.
5th, 7s. 1888
1st, cons., gold, 7s, 1920
1st, cons., fd coup., 7s..
Reorg., 1st lien, bs, 1908
Long Dock b’nds, 7s, ’93

132

5s. sinking fund. 1901..

96
5s, debentures, 1913—
la. Div.—s. fd.. 5s, 1919!
Sinking fund, 4s, 1919
Denver Div.—4s, 1922.. *9134

97

*93 V1

1921
1
C R.I.A P.-6s, cp., 1917.1 1*2*7*"
6s, reg.. 1917
!
Keok. A Des M.—1st, 5s 104
Central of N. J.—let, 1&90 113 V-*"
Plain 4s,

lstconsol.aHsented,1899
Conv., assented, 7s. 1902

Adjustment, 7s, 1903...
Conv. debent. 6s, 1908..
Leh.AW.B.—Con.g’d.as.
Am.D’k A Imp.—5s, 1921

117
K131

118
132

b

131*4
103*5 10334
125

ICO
90
101

Chic. Mil. A St. Paul—

Collat’l trust,6s,1922.
Buff. A S.W.—M.,6s,1908
:Ev. A T. H.—1st, cons., 6s

!

Mt.Vern’u—1st, 6s, 1923
Fargo A So.—1st. Gs, 1924
Fl’tA P.Marq—M.0S.192O
Gal. Har.A S.Ant.—1st, 6s

2d, 7s, 1905
\\ est. Div.—1st, 5s
lol 34
2d, 6s. 1931
1
Gr’nBay W.ASt.P.—lst.Gs
92
[Gulf Col.A S. Fe—7s. 1909
85
2d, 6s. 1923
Hann. A St. Jos.—8s,conv.
Consol. 6s, 1911

2d, 7s, 1891
S’thw.Ext.—1st, 73.1910
Pac. Ext.—1st, 08,1921.

T.-Gen’l,6s,1920
General, 5s, 1920...

Mo.K.A
.

45 V
80
36

8

1st, Extension, 6s, 1927
Morgan’s La.A T.—1st. 6s

112

49*5 Nash.Chat.A St.L.—l8t,7s
2d, 6s, 1901

93

N. Y. Central—Gs, 1887...
Deb. certs., ext’d 5s.....
N.Y. C.A If.—1st, cp., 7s
1st, reg., 1903
Deb. fs, 1904

82 \
121

i().'-34
102*4
103
100

...

119*4
114*5

i07*
.

.

Trust Co.

57
l

‘*99*5
89

ii*4*

st, 6s, 1905

N.Y.C.&St.L.-l st,0s,1921
2d. 0s, 1923

Registered, 5s, 1931

115* * N.Y.Susq.AWest.—1st, 6s
100
‘

ii3

1

receipts.

V

Debenture, 6s, 1897
N.J.—1st, 0s

Midland of

Ij
«4**11
79
!!

113 *4

;1
86*5 !
103*8 103 Vi
115
il
112

..

110*2
i

Registered, 0s, 19

§P.

.,6s

90 V

Now River—1 st, 6s,1932
lliioA Miss.—Consol, s.fd.

1*02*
1*05
118

Det.M.A

«-

2d, 7s, 1907

117

T.—1st,78,1906

Lake Shore—Div. bonds
Consol., coup., 1st. 7s.

Consol.,reg.. 1st, 7s...
Consol., coup., 2d, 7s..

119
127

iii*5

*1*2*9
125*5
110
......

...

......

*

No prioes Friday; theae are lateat quotations




made this week

93*4

40 Hi'

4034

>5*7*

!*.***■ 1*75*4
103 V 103V
1

62
95

119
119
111

2d, 7e, 1898
2d, guar., 7a, 1898
Con., 1st, ext., 5s, 1922.

6s,1921
Consol., 1st, 6s, 1922—

Roch.A Pitt—1st,

’ooria Dec. A Ev.—1st, Gs

81

Evans.

Div.—1st,6s,l920

Central pac.—G., 6s
San Joaquin Br.—6a..
Cal. A Oregon—1st, 6s
Cal. A Or.—Ser. B, 6s.
Land giant bonds, 6s.
West. Pac.—Bonds, 6s

98 ig
'94

110V

Pac.—1st, 6s, ’95

90

95*5

96

53

55

Incomes, 1900
L. A Iron Mt.—1st, 7s 113
103
2d. 7s, 1897
Arkansas Br’ch—1st, 7s 105
Cairo A Fulton—1st, 7s
Cairo Ark. A T.—1st, 7s
68 34
Geu’lr’y A bgr., 5s,1931
St.L.AltonA T.H.—l8t,7s 115
109
2d, pref., 7s, 1894
*101
2d, income, 7s. 1894
Bellev.A So. III.—1st, 83
St.P.Minn.A Man.—lst,7a 110
109
2d, 0s, 1909
Dakota Ext.—6s, 1910..
103*5
1st, consol., 6s, 1933
1st. cons., Gs, reg., 1933.
i'os”
Min’s Un.—1st, 6s, 1922
St. P. A Dul.-lst.5s, 1931 100
o. Car. RV—1st, 6s, 1920
2d, 6s, lifel
Shenand’hV.—1 st,7s,1909
*38
General, Gs, 1921
97 3*
Tex.Cen.—1st, s.f.. 7s,1909
97 hi
1st mort., 7s, 1911
Tol. Del. A Burl.—Main,6s
1st, Davt. Div., 0s, 1910
1st, Tei-’l trust, 6s, 1910
Tex. A N. O.—1st, 7s, 1905
Sabine Div.—lst.Gs, 1912 ::::::
Va. Mid.—M. inc., 6s, 1927

114
108

69*4
110

111

100**

......

104

—

103 V

.

*98

"8*6"

******

Chic. Div.—5s, 1910
Hav. Div.—6s, 1910
Tol. P.AW.—1st, 78,1917
Iowa Div.—6s, 1921

'

*38"

7i*4

72

"80'*5

81V
65

Ind’polis Div,—6s, 1921
Detroit Div.—6s, 1921..
Cairo Div.—5s, 1931
*64
Wabash—Mort. 7 s, 1909
Tol. A W.—1st, ext., 7s 104*4'
90*5 100
ltft, St. L. Div., 7s, ’89
93 V
2d. ext., 7s, 1893
25
Equipm’t bda, 7s, ’83.
76
Consol, conv., 7s, 1907
GtWest’n—l8t, 7s, *88 103 V 105 V
93
2d, 7s, 1893
83
Q.A Tol.—1st, 7s. 1890
Han.A

Naples—1st, 7s

So.Ia.-l8t.ex., Gs
StL.K.C.AN.—R.o.,78
Omaha Div.—1st, 7b
Ill. A

ioo v ioiv
101V104

Clar’da Br.-6s. 1919
75
79
St.Chas. Bge.—1 st,6b
10l*g
No. Missouri—1st, 7s. 110*5 111V
108V
West.Un.Tel.—1900, coup. *mmm
112 V 112 v
1900, reg
103
104*q N.W. Telegraph—7s, 1904
102
67
98
08
M u t. U n .Tel.—0. f d, 6s. 1911
99

ioo'* i*o*‘i**

..

1st, 6s, 1896

88*3
48*5

••.ttr

69

108
110
110
No. R'way (Cal.)—1st, 6s *108
90*5
So. Pac. of Cal.
lst.Gs
So.Pac.of Ariz’a— 1st, 6s
So.Pac.of N.Mex.-lst.Gs
114
113
Union Pacific— 1st, 0s
Land grants, 7s, ’87-89 106*4
Sinking funds, 8s, ’93. *117
118
Reg 8s, 1893
Collateral Trust, 6s...
do
5s. 1907
Kan s.

73*9
107*5 108

Rich.A Danv.—Cons.,g.,6s
Debenture Gs, 1927
Atl.A Ch.—lst,pf.,7s,

111

_

104
67V 60
60

110

‘80**

Og.—1st,7s,’911 i*09
71

—

Is, 1884.

110*8 112
108
108*8

Denv.Div.Gs.as’d, ’99 105
92 hi
1st, consol., 6s. 1919
C.Br.U.P.—F.c..7s, ’95 100
*84
At.C.A P.—1st,6s,1905

Consol., reg.. 2d. 7s
Long I si. RR.—1st, Ts, ’98 118
*101*5
At-J. Co.A W.—1st, 08
1st, consol., 5s, 1931
Louis. West.—let, 0s
O.C.C.AInd’s—lst,7s,s.fd. *119**
Oreg. Short L.—1st. 6s
122
Louisv. A N.^Consol., 7s.
115*5
Consol. 7s, 1914
Ut. Sq.—Gen., 7s, 1909
OobboI. sink, fd., 78,1914
Cecilian Br’ch—7s, 1907 *88*5
Exten., 1st, 7s, 1909
79
General consol., 6s, 1934
Mo. Pac.—1st, cons., 6s.
N.O.AMob.-lst,08,1930
Chlo.St.P.Min.A Om.—
2d, 6s, 1930
3d, 7s, 1906
98
96
Consol. »>e, 1930
110*5 112
E. H.A N.—rial, Lis, 1919
Pac. of Mo.—1st, 6s...
86
C.St.PAM.—1 st,68,1918 110*5
General, 6s, 193U
...
2d, 7s. 1891
No. Wis.—1st. 68, 1930.
Pensacola l)lv.—6s, 1920
St-L.A S.F.—2d, 6s, Cl.A
St. L. I)iv.—1st, 6s, 1921
SCP.A 8.C.—lst.6s.1919 i*16**5
3-6s, Class C, 1906....
*40* *
Chio.A E.IU.—lst.s.f.,cur. 108
108 V
2d, 3s, 1980
3-6a, Class B, 1900
*115
Chto.St.L.A P.—lst,cou.58
Nashv. A Dec.—1st. 7s.
85
1st, 0s, Pierce, C. A O.
Ciie. A Atl.—1st, Os, 1920
S.A N. Ala.—S.f.,6s, 1910
Equipment, 7s, 1895..
Louisv. C.A L.—6a. 1931
Gen'fmort.. 6s. 1931..
2d, 68,1923
Trust bonds, 6s, 1922...
77*5
Chic. A W.I nd.—1 Bt, s.f., 0s
So. Pac. of Mo.—lst,6s
Gen’l mort., 6s, 1932
*1*0*6*
10-40 Abjmt. 6*, 1924..
Tex. A Pac.—1st, 6s,1905
Col.A Green.—1st, 6s, 1916
L.Erie A W.—1st. 6s, 1919
Consol., 6s. 1905
2d, 6s, 1920
Income A Id. gr., reg..
Sandusky Div.—6s, 1919
aoI H-Val. A Tol.—1st, 5«
80
65
Laf.Bl.A M.—1st, 68.1919 *
Rio G.,081Aug.cp. on..
D»*l. L.A W.—78,conv.,,92
90
Louisv.N. Alb. AC\—1 st,6s
89
do exAug.coup.
86
•*i*s6‘*
General mort., 6s, 1914. k
Mortgage 7s, 1907
Pennsylvania RR.—
87 V 89
i*2*5
Pa.Co.V eruAr.4^o8,i»t,cp
I-ou. N. O. A Tex.—1 at, 6a
Syr. Bing. A N.Y.—lst.78 123
<

36
35

,

Mil.A Mad.-lst.68,1905
0< t. C.F.A St. P.— 1 st.r.8

.

34 V
34
*108
*90
92 34

70
Del-eu uvea,

132

St.

132*4 133^
131V 132 hi

60

118

108
76

130

122*5

Scioto Val.—1st, cons., 7s.

102 34 103 V

!<

1
i

76

105

1*0*4'

*66

98

*109
St.L. V.A T.H.—lst,g.,7s 117

Rome W.A
120
120

119

50

97*a

130

3d, 78. 1912

’97

!q

H

110*5

Ask.

i 3*8 -5 *1*39"

2d, 78,1912

54a4

59

Hiio

102*4'

i*o*4v

"

7s

Rich.AAlleg.—lsfc,7s,1920

90V

1st, Springfield Div., 7s
Central—1st, 6s,1920
1st, Term’l Tr., 08, 1920
1st, Min’l Div., 6s, 1921

113

.

.

reg.,

Wab.St.L.APac.—Geu’l 6s

Consolidated 7s, 1898.„.
2d consolidated 7s, 1911

t

**’**■

•

.

1st,

112 *2 113
102’-2 103 V
70 V
08

—

/

.

Penn. RR.—Continued— I
Pa. Co.’s Reg., 1921 ....J
Pitt.C.A St.L.—1st, C.,7b'

Pitts.B.A B.—lst.Gs, 1911

..

13*6

-

50*5

8

Bid.

SECURITIES.

95

85

102
10234
Registered
j Hud.Riv.—7s,2d, s.f.,’85 101 hi 102
1
Harlem—1st,7b.coup... 128
1st, 7s, reg., 1900
128
I1
N.Y. Elov’d—1st, 7s, 1906 119V 120
N.Y.P.A O.—Pr.l’n, 6s, ’95

io*2V

..

•

100

Cons. 7 s,
56
Cons. 2d, income. 1911..
H. A Cent, Mo.—1st, ’90 lul
Mobile A Ohio—New 6s..;*100V
Collater’l trust, 6s, 1892

>

37
55

49*4

42

54
5

“

1131.D*
110

Funding 5s, 1899

122125
104
!

1904-5-6....... 1*04*4

81
47

79

38

*

113*4

3-65s, 1924
Registered

2d, 78,1913

100
Minn.A St.L.—lst,7s,1927 116
lowaF.xt.—1st, 78,1909 111

isov 1

130
1st, 8s. P. D
Houston A Texas Cent.—
2d, 7 3-10, P.D., 1898... 119*2 122
1st, 7s,$g.. R.D., 1902. 1201-2
1st, M. L„ 7s, 1891 .... 109*5
119
1120
1st, LaC. Div., 7s, 1893.
1st, Western Div., 7s ... 103*5
111
119V
120
let, I. AM., 7s, 1897...
let, Waco A No., 7s
1st, I.AD., 7s, 1899-.-- *118 I
2d, consol., maine line,8s 111
lst, C. A M., 7s, 1903... 127
2d. Waco A No., 8s,1915
122 ;123
Consol. 7s, 1905
General, 6s, 1921.
Honst.E.AW.Tex — 1st,7s
1-t, 7s, I.AD.Ext., 1908 *120 hi 123
110
!
1st, S.W. Div., 6s, 1909.
2d, 6s, 1913
Ill. Ceu.—Spd. Div. —Op. 6s
lax, 6s, LaC. A Dav.,1919 *90 V
1091a
llO8#
Middle Div.—Reg., 5s... *106 V
Ist.S.Minn.Div.,6s, 1910
1201a
1st, H. AD, 7s, 1910... 120
C.Ht.L.A N.O.—Ten.l.,7s
*121*
Ohio. A Pac.Div.,08,1910 I13ia 116
let, consol., 7s, 1897
I 96V
lst,Chlc.A P.W.,5s,1921
2d, 6s, 1907
M|nT Pt. Div., 5s, 1910.
1*04*4
Gold, 5a, 1951
k
O.A L.Sup. Div., 6a, 1921 *904
Dub. A S. C.-2d Div., 7s
95 4
Wis.A Min.Div..5s. 1921
Ced. F. A Minn—1st, 7s
Terminal 5b, 1914
Ind. Bl. AW.-l st pref., 7s **115
Chic. A Northwest.—
74
i 1st, 4-5-Gs, 1909
104
Sink, fund, 7s, 1885
00
2d, 4-5-Gs. 1909
Consol, bonds, 7s, 1915. 134 |134ia! ! Eastern Div. 6s, 1921..
78
104
Extension bonds, 7s, ’85 103ia
1 'Indianap.D.ASpr.—1st,7s
105
104
1st. 7s. 1885
i 2d, 5s, 1911
Coupon, gold, 7s, 1902.. 1251a 126
Int.AGt.No.—1st, 6s, gold
75
I
Reglst’n, gold, 7s, 1902. *12414
Coupon, 08, 1909
Sinking fund, 6s, 1929.. '111
Kent’ky Cent.—M.6s.1911
Sink, fund, 6s, 1929, reg *110
i'io34 I .vtamped, 4 p. o., 1911
Sinking fund, 5s, 1929.. *103
LSbore.-M.S.AN.I.,s.f.7s ioi*7e
Sink, fund, 5s, 1929. reg
Cleve. A Tol.—Sink’g fd. *104
*95**5
Sink’g fd. deb., 5s, 1933
New bonds, 7s, 1886.. *104
25 years deb. 5s, 1909..
94
Cleve. P. A Ash.—7s— 115
118
Buff. A El io—New bds
•Registered
Escanaba A L.3.—1 st,6s *114”
Kal. A W. Pigeon—1st..

Dee M. A Min’ap.—lst.7s
Iowa Midland—1 at, 8s.. 128
Peninsula—1 st, conv. 7h *115
i
ChlO.A Milw’kee—lst,7s 123*5
Win. A St. P.—1st, 7s, ’87 108
109

93 V

..

112**4

BufLN.Y.A E.—lst.1916
N.Y.L.E.AW.—New2d6

1

>10134:

110
93
*10

1st, 6s, 1884-1913
I Mil.L.S. A W.—1 st,6s, 1921

|

139V

48*5

.

Jack.Lan.ASag.—6s,’91.

111 *8

1st, couh., 5s,
Divisional 5s,

Mortgage 6s. 1911

Chee.O.A8.W.—M. 5-6s...

6s, ex-matured coupon.
03, consol., 2d senes
6s, deferred

Manliat. B’cli Co.—7s,l 909
N.Y.AM.B’h—1st, 18.’97

135

—

101
73 *9
25 V

'

47
38
38
50

District of Columbia—
107
109
41*5
41 *5

—

--- —

So.—1st,lnt. guar. 5si

i

C’mp’mise,3-4-5-08,1912
Virginia—6s, old
6s, new, 1866
6s, consol, bonds

....

,

C.Rap.I.F.AN.—1st, 6s

!

Bid. 'Ask.

SECURITIES.

*113*5
2d. 7s, 1891
Metropolit’n El.—1st,1908
Bonds, 7s, 1900
2d, Us, 1899
12L
!
Mex.
7s of 1871,1901
Gent.—1st, 7s, 1911.
122
1
1st M., 7s, ex-cp., 6,7A8
1 Bt, consol., guar., 7s..
N.Y. Lack.A W—1st, Gs 119*4 120 i -lich.Cent.— Crnis.7s, 1902
97a4
Consol. 5s, 1902
Construction, 5s, 1923
Del. A Hud. Canal—1st, 7s
6s, 1909
1st. ext., 7s, 1891
Coupon, 5s, 1931
1*17^8
Registered, 5s, 1931....
Coupon, 78, 1894

( 8tuck Exclianae Priceit.)
Ala. Central -1st, 6s, 1918

2*5
82V
105*5 108
106

BONDS.

|

Ask.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

41*-j

....

4
4

South Carolina—
6s, Act Mar. 23,

RAILROAD
SECURITIES.

1 Tennessee—Continued—
.„|
0s, new series, 1914

18
2*5

87

84*5
84
88

95
90
105
102
105 V 105*a

1101-2
100

98*g 99*s
9834 100

Alleg’ny Cent.—Inc., 1912
Atl. A Pac.—Inc., 1910...
Central of N. J.—1908
Cent. la.—Coup. deb. certs.

mmmrn

1734

1678

—

Ch.St.P.AM.—L.gr.inc—Gs
Ill.—Inc., 1907
DesM.A Ft.D.—lst,inc.,Gs

Chic. A E.

Det. Mack. A

Mafq.—Iric.

E.T.V.AGa.—Inc.,08,1931
Nor.—2d, inc.

Ti" liV

Elizab. C. A

Gr.BayW.A St.P.—2d.inc.

Ind. Bl. A W.—Inc., 1919

1*5"

** *
*10
20

Trust Co. certificates..
L6b. A Wilkesb. Coal-’88
Lake E.A W.-Inc.,7s,’99

**3*6'*

Saud’ky Div.—Inc., 1920

Laf.Bl.AMun.—Inc.,78,’99

Mil. L. Sh.A W.—Incomes
Mob. A O.—lst,prf., deben.

2d, i>ref., debentures
3d, pref., debentures—
4th, pref., debentures

'

so"
58
30

55
25

rnmrnmmm

..

N.Y.Lake E. AW.—Inc. 6b
N.Y.P.A O.—1 st.inc.ac.,7 s
Ohio Cent.—Income, 1920
Min’l Div.—Iuc.,78,1921
Ohio So.—2d inc., 09,1921

Ogdens. A L.C.—Inc., 1920
104
105*4 PeoriaD.AEv.—Inc., 1920
Evansv.Div.—Inc., 1920
103*a
75
Peoria APek.Un.—Inc.,08
37*5 39*5 Roch.A Pittsb.—Inc., 1921
533e 53*5 Rome W. A Og.—Inc.. 7».
51
51*5 80.Car.Itor.—Inc., 0s, 1931
o tiL. Al.Mt.—lst,7a^>r.l.a.
98
6t. L.A.A T. H.—Div. bda.
95-*8

.m

INCOME BONDS.
(Tnt-rrext payable 1/ turned,.)

Consol., inc., 6s, 1921...
93*5 Ind’sDec.A Spr’d—2d,inc.

98 V 100
93 hi

ioi**

Spring Val. W.W.—lst.Gs

.mmm^rn

4
-

......

»T

21

22V
•••••a

*20
*20
...

—■»

35
..•••a

45

35
30
-----

December 27,

KA1LKOAI)
Latest

EARNINGS.

Earnings Reported.

Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

Roads.

KL.RCk&Ft

1884.

1883.

1884.

$

9

IS

Aeiv York City Banks.—The following statement snows the
condition of the Associated Banks of New York City for the
week

ending December 20:

1883.

Average Amount of—
Banks,

S

Loans and
Discounts.

108.838 1,007,761
122,944
jJ*.Gt.Sonthern
962,834
October.., 1,742,060 1,549,834 13,594,87* 13,060,427
Atob. T.& 8-Fe
November.

Atlantic & Pao. October...
Boat. H. T. & W. :d wk Dec.

Bur.Ced.R. A No. 2d wk Deo.
Canadian Pacific 3d wk, Dec.

Central Iowa

...

Central Pacific.
Chesap. & Ohio.

.

8,183
69,354
105.0 JO

2d wk Dee.
30,984
November. 1,797 000
2 wks Dec.
146.305

$

326.932
7,220
427,647
65,144 2,651,13?* 2.720.665
5,758.010 5,180.021
67,00*
35,097 1,366,382 1.257,09 1
2,104,639 20,463,131 22.875.962
141.575 3,388,245 3.741,983

New York
Manhattan Co....
Merchants’
Mechanics’
Union

Chicago & Alton
Chic. Burl. A Q.
Chic. A Eaet. Ill.

Fulton
Chemical
Merchants’ Exch.
Gallatin National..
Batchers’ A Drov..
Mechanics’ A Tr...
Greenwich
Leather Mannf’rs.
Soventh Ward....
State of N. Y..
Americ’n Exch’ge.
Commerce

Oh.8t. P.Min. AO
Chic. A W. Mich.
Cln.Ind.St.L.AC.
'On. N. O. AT. P.

725,078
24.500
6*6.073
30/016
70,910
50,197 1,308.806 1,255,441
id wk Deo
175,634
200,013 8,371,045 8,453,572
October... 2,6*3,597 2,742,480 21,189,42? 2 i ,376,677
2d wk Dec.
29.567
32,201 1,489,111 1,591,670
3d wk Dec.
505,000
467,521 22,812,000 23,002,595
3d wk Dec.
396 10© 22.802.8:8 24,557,221
421,300
3d wk Dec.
94,600
99,800 5,653,398 5,39 -.098
2d wk Dec.
20,151
23,40* 1,122,983 1,488,775
2d wk Dec.
42.930
40.110 2.313,640 2/385,649
November
2-5.263
234,425 2,362,710 2,361.508
3d wk Nov
37.475
39,139 1,569,173 1,726.927

Oto.Wash.ABalt.
dev. Akron A'o! 2d wk Dec.
Clev.Col.C.A Ind October
Connotton Val.. September
Danbury A Nor. October...
..

Denver A Rio Or. 2d wk Dec.
Den v. & R. G. W. 2d wk Dec.
Dee Mo. & Ft. D. 2d wk Deo

Det.Laus’gA No.
JJub.ASiouxCity

3d wk Doc.
2d wk Dec.

JCastern
B.Teun.Va.AGa.
‘Rvansv. A T. H
Hint & P. Marn

October...
November

iFlor.R’way & N.

Pt. Worth & Den.
"■Gal.Har.A S.An.
Grand Trunk..

Gr.BayW.&St.P.
..Gulf Col. ASanFe
Hous.E. A W.Tex
HI.Cent. (Ill.)...
Do
(Iowa)
Ind. Bloom.& W.
Ft.S.A Gull
Kan. C. Sp. A M.

2d wk Dec.
2d wk Dei*,.
2d wk Dec.
November.
October...
vVk Dee. 13
2d wk Dee.
N rveinber.
October...
2d wk Dec,
2d wk Dec.
2d wk Dec.
2d wk Dec.
2d wk Dec
2 whs Dec.

7.869

8,026
388.024
32,782

350,596
29,174
21,973
94.957
23,650

21,109
130,90 i

8,128
15,443
19.957
323,09;
380,181

9,0 >r>
23,458
21,162
339.178

459.576

500.194

3,137,915

3,626,161

1*60,5*5 £

178.425

5,708,218

6,578,758

340,507

327,266

1,292,978

1,553.514

862,581
3,020 977
3.616.819

1,050.033
3,079,96 7

409.665
3,769,330
13,492
701.038
721,332
48,339 2,162,500 2,450.4*4
26,*06
931,436
908,357
433,418
43,391
355,627
436,112 2.320,280 2,998,119
357,88 2 16,33 ,8 « 18,415 085
39 1.005
8,955
311,216
1,92*.817
236,925 1,620.24
37,428
266,337
218,316
302.673 9.910.540 10,597,529
42,771 1,631,313 1,948,877
46,228 2,544.373 2,82 ,99*

13.819

40,723
27,593
36.273

335,241
328,761
6,035
158.952
23.830
305,30c

40,200
43,27b
45.500

46,354

2/279,91c
1,144,760

1,881,237

29,503
148,374

880.882

809,923

Smith October...
63,022
L-Rk.M.Ri v. A T. October...
49.318
42,615
3
1
wk
Dec.
33.208
41,988
Long Island
La. & Mo. River September
70,665
70,004
Louisv.dc Naaliv. 3d wk Dec.
283,370 307,80 >
2d
wk
Dee.
Mar.Hcugh.de O.
3,775
3,642
Mempli. £ Chari. October...
126,245
139,183
Mexican Cent... 3d wk Dec.
78.500
Mex.Nat., NoDd let wk Dec
12,326
Southern l)iv. let wk Dec
14,914
Other lines e.. 1st wk Dec
2/)50
Milwaukee & No 2d wk Dec.
r 9,3)0
9,340
MU. LBh.de West. 3d wk Dec.
20,<*80
17,470
Minn.de St. Louis October...
151.576
171,746
Mobile de Ohio
November.
280 0 ?2
255,«00
Mash. Ch.de St.L. N veiuber.
1 Si6,0 >1
205.660
N.O. A Northeast November
91,124
38,362
305,992
N.Y.ANewEnn October..
365,877
October...
N.Y.LErieAW.p
1,511,159 1,983,46s
N. Y. Pa. de O , Ociober...
524,408
628,939
November.
F.Y.Susq. deWest
97,275
86,783
N. Y.Ont. de W.. October...
170,390
170.340
2
wks
Norfolk A West
Deo.
133,213
122,924
ShenandoahV 2 wks Dec.
26,804
37,274
Northern Centr’l November.
474,805
536,094
Northern Pacific 2d wk Dec
198,781
191,100
Ohio Central.... 'dwk Dec.
14,923
16,713
Ohio A Miss
hi wkNov.
96,085
88,686
Ohio Southern
November.
48.333
32,656
October...
115,593
131,310
439.914
333,448
regon Imp. Co «: )ctober...
Pennsylvania... November. 3,950,937 4,473.179
Peoria Dec.AEv 2d wk Dec.
14.375
11,397
October...
Fhila. de Erie
391 0.:7
432,439
Phila.de Read’gA October... 2,910.541 3.5U.43 >
Do
C. A Iroi. October... 1,729.623 1.873,592
BlchnTd ADanv. November.
363,704
371,276
Ch. Col.de Aug. November.
8 >,773
82,021
Columbia A Gr. November.
89,548
70,158
72,406
51,191
Georgia Pac.. November.
Va. Midland.
November.
122,715
147,046
West. No. Car. November.
36,132
40,218
20.317
20,116
(Boch. de Pittsb’g 3d wk Dec.

432,001
270,092
2,724,621

Kentucky Cent’l

Lake Erie A W.. September

32.297

31,207
146,090
76,828

..

8regonA Cal...
..

.

Borne Wat.de Og. September
St.Jolmsb.de L.C. September
St.L. Alton deT.H. 2d wk Dec.
Do

(br hs.) 2d wk Dec.

StL. Ft. S.de W.
BtL.ASan Fran.
St. Panlde Dul’th
SkP.Min.de Man.
South Carolina

2d wk Dec.
3d wk Dec
3d wk Dec.
Noveuibei
November.

184,786
31,080
17,626
14,150
7,587
81,600

172,848
30,048
32,780
17,599
8,963
96,800

27,754

19.647

878,255
133,831

845,514

Bo.Pac.Cal.,N.D. Septembei

150,011

124,820
127,374

September
September
September

334.952

338,717

148,691

October...
October...
lstwk Dec
October...
October.
November.
November.
November.
1st wk Dec
O' tober...
d wk Dec.

81,015
49,940
40,898
24,570

201.428
70,504
132,217
78,353
26,742
19,211

.

Do So. Div.i.
Do Arizona.*.
Do N. Mex.L
Texas AN. Orl’s.
Louisiana W’n.
Tex.de St. Louis..;

Tol. A.A. AN.M

Union Pacific...

Utah Central.

..

Vicksb’rg A Mer.
Yieksb.Sn. dePao.
Wab. St. L. de P.
West Jersey....
Wisconsin Cent’l
*

d

.

63,392

591,382

420*262
311,193
2.667,902
404.436

13,251,902 13,798.304
888.764
803,7*9
994,468
1,114, >43
2,876.207
519,857
720,024
240,555

4*0,819
1,077,939
1,497.029

459,488
1,040,950

1,877.413

1,977.396
2,118 895

2,161,170
439,771
2,753.502

1.308,435

119,987

3,101,743

13,907,571 17,252.80 t
4,679,300 5,73 >,192
929,832
946,524

2,58 2,779

2.693,3 >5

710,755

828,676

5,079,603

5,678,979
1.053,326

1,173,506
3,658,138

4,095,866

421,886

328,385

2,838,341 3,413/282
44,797.583 47,242.7.^4
729 363

3.052,73

683.3 45

3,474 875

21,993,975 21,34 7.640
13.740,574 14.212.445

3,507.014

3,510,512

693,650

750,937

606,311

672,327

1,474,4*5
402,070
1,119,134
1,257,992

1,5)7,749

1,241,006

348,253
642,209
1,22 i. 288
207/531
1,412,495

707,140

791.326

461,17^

264.716

214,616

4,534,301
1,292.141
7.449,094

1,102,093
1,069,9)7
2,674.629

1,365,967
510,717
691,932
370,191
9o5,o 4 7
193.403

3.772,392

1,299,056
7,695,120
1,198,100

960,315
3,114,361
1,887,647
602,480

962,712
491,757

160,9*8*3

55,133

21.443

370,816
88,232
26,286

92,860
28,564

236,116

1,153.672
1,366,418

119,343
1,071,156
1,333,177

Not including Utah lines after July 1.

Corpus Chrlsti to Saltillo, 397 miles;

to May embraced only
236 miles, Laredo to. Saltillo.
e Only 136 miles now, but prior
,w May represented 297 miles.
g Not including earnings of New York
Penn. & Ohio road.
h Not i lciuding Central New Jersey in either
year prior to June 1.
i Included in Central Pacific earnings above.
7 Embracing lines in Missouri, Arkansas and Texas.




up

M.K

...

$

1,583,000
593,000
1,025,600

11,450.000
8,811.000
7.519.200

950.000
284.300

8,420,000

344.000

819,000
186.800
163,000
1,035,700
926.300

320.900

460,000
232,000
114.000
223.900
305,000

255,000
96,100
451.500
278,000

tion.

t

450,000

844,60*6

3.800.700
12,003.000
2,203,000
16.628.400
*2,044.600
1.576.400
18.691.400
2.755.200
3.605.200
1,060,700

1,229,900

274.900

Circula¬

$

$

907.300

704.000
746.700
2.765.500

1.100
256,000

32,00*6
292,500

592,000
299,300

862,000

*‘2*066

876,100
2.160.400
1,096,300
4.000,900
12,697,000

522.800
29,500

179,600
976,000
409.700
2,724,000 1.243.600
12,287.000 4,331,000 1,882,000
17.683.300 0.116.300 2,6p9.100 17,751,700
446.400
4.867.400
5.782.100 1.186.600
013.700
8.563.500
6.477.700 1.204.100
23 4,100
700.900
2,030,700
1.990.600
370.400 1,072,400
4.750.700
5,088,900
649.700
466.700
3.632.300
3.397.700
219,100
138,000
1,747,600
1.460.300
217.500
S.400,000
583,000
3,091,400
702,700.
9.312.800
8.156.900 2.423.500
472.900
655,000
2,784,000
2.524.500
348.100
763.400
3.255.900
2.435.100
115,000
306,000
2,459.000
2.112.300
60
465,40b
4,.>Q0
2,074,000
2.725.500
78.000
300.100
1.930.200
2.137.600
7 1.0,000
233,000
2,927,000
2,724,000
207,000
452,000
3,91*9,500
5,006,000
700,200
6.306.700
3.802.300 1,52; ,600
105.200
1,999,80*1
520,000
1.906.100
17,431,700 6.404.100 1,980,100 22.643.100
1.0
0,900
21.724.100
16,415,200 5.303.500
14,000
232.000
1,589,000
1,633,000
147,000
181.700
926,700
1,036,900
12,676,400 6,235,300 1.378,500 16.432.100
8.420,000
6,945,000 1,208,000 1,752.000
426.000
308.000
2,320,000
1,908,000
1,264,400
582.800
5.155.900
4,344.200
16,042,300 4,142.000 1,010,600 17,301,900
5.597.000
812.800
4.818.600 1,119.000
210.200
199.100
1.182.800
1,258.50 0
317.700
237.700
2,075,600
1.920.900

Mercantile
Pacific

Republic

Chatham

Peoples’

North America
Hanover

Tenders.

2,242,000
2,369,000
1,695,700
2,358,000
672.300
3.691.800
321,000
9,172,000
343,000
1,093,900
6.473.800

0,949,800
8,108,000
4.313.500
10.829.300
2,565,000
8,027.400
2/248,700
1,035,300
14,503.600
2,698,000
4,951,000
1.627.900

Broadway

...

Irving

Citizens’
Nassau
Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe A Leather..
Corn Exchange ...
Continental
Oriental

Importers’* Trad.

Pii’ k

North River
East River.
Fourth National..
Central Nation.il..
Second National..
Ninth National...
First National....
Third N ational
N. V. Nat. Exch..
...

Bowery
N. Y. County

G rmau-.Vineric’n.

Chase National...

Fifth Avenue
German Excli’nge.
G. mania
United States

Lincoln
Garfield
Firth National....
B’k of the Metrop..

1.933.600

320.000

2,040,500
3,035,700
2,394,000
1,643,000
1,879,800
3,054,900
1,390,400

525.800
612,>00

315,000
180.100
265.500
159.9 <0
4 48.000

801.800
102.000
261.500
808.000

1,012,800

423ft*0*6
45,000
6,400

306*00*6
325,500
205,000

442,7*00

442,00*6
82*466

1,3*49*90*6
45,000

566

22 L

380,000

297,600

46.000

45,000

449.900

mood

2,308.000

225,000
180,000

2.621.500
3.490.500

45*66*0

2.198.500
2.317.200
3,420,000
1.572.300
889,500
1,155.100
3,382,000

251,100

176.400
187.300
193.500
090.800

147.400
336.300

1.118.700
2.338.500

854,000

2,730,800

143.300

248,000
11,200

843.900
900,000

180

boo

44,100

180,000

135,000

294,342,400 86,852,200 37,695,200 335,443.10«i 11.636,300

Total

The following are totals for several weeks past:

1884.

Dec.
“

Loans.

Specie.

L. Tenders.

Deposits.

$

$

$

$

Circulation Agq.

$

Clear'gs

$

288,014,800 96,494.600 38.270.400 329,8:0,200 11,587,200 580.370,418
06,042,000 38.948.400 330,934,000 11,642,000 558,994,372
86,852,200 37,695,200 335,443,100 11,68 >,300 558,051,047

0

13 290/225,900
20 294,342,400

“

Boston Banks.—Following are the totals of the Boston banks:

1884.

D’c.

2,661,746 2,948.058 21,032.3 9 23,767,8-8
107/267
962,618 1,081,260
94,105
460.6.97
54,037
59,009
441,867
371.000

Tradesmen’s

~

7,988.000

Net Deposits
other
than U. 8.

Legal

Specie.

10,960,000

America
Phenix

City

Chic. A Northw.

•

150,000

Eliz.Lex.AB.S. 2 wks Dec.
Chea. 0.&8.W.. 2 wks Dec.

Chic.Mil.ASt.P

?31

IHE CHRONICLE.

1884.]

“
“

Loans.

Specie.

$

$

6 144,453,200

1
144,9 ">5,900
20 1 45, 40.000

L, Tenders.

Deposits.*

Circulation Agg. Clear'gs

$
$
6,841,400 99,809,200 23,020,800
6,055,400 101.083,600 23.0b6.400
0,017,400 99.077.000 23.O9W.U0O

9

$

7,456,000
7,547,800
7,425,901

74,423,562
71,926,013
00.019.827

Philadelphia Banks.—The totals of the Philadelphia banks

are as

follows:

Loans

Lawful Money.

Deposits.*

$

$

6

$
73.004.417

13
20

73,203,638
73.238,198

23,363,299
23,339,942
23,485,3.0

70.502,385
70,910,190
70,853,973

1884.

Dec.
“
“

*

Circulation. Agg.

Clear'gs

$

7,902,593
7.877,257
7.89?,314

$

52,140,792
42.414,009
49,362.356

Including the item “due to other banks.’’

Unlisted
week past:

Securities.—Following are latest quotations for a

Securities.

Bid.

Am. Bank Note Co
Atlantic A Pac.—Stock....
Cent. Div., 1st., new
Incomes

00
8

B’klyn Elev.—Ass’tpd
1st moit., ass’tpaiu..

Ask.

Securities.
North. Pac.—Div. bonds..

18
03

11

INew Jersey A N.Y.—Pref
Ohio Cent.—Riv. Div., 1st
incomes

Pensacola A Atlantic...

..

95

77i

Old

Bost. H.T.A West.—St’ck
Debentures
Buff. N. Y & Phila
Trust bonds, 6s
Cent, of N. J.—Debent—

Continental Const.Imp.co
Donv. A Rio Grande—Con-.
Deuv.A itio (ir. W
Den. R. G. A W., 1st M.,
Guar, by D. & R. G
Edison Electric Light

Georgia Pac.—stock
1st mort., 6s

47
5

*56’

23

37
65
9
90

92
40
9

Kecly Motor
Louisv. A N.—AdJ. bonds

67

17

18*i

9
30
38

1st mort

Pittsburg A Western
1st mort
Postal Telegraph—Stock.
1st mort., 0s
Postal Tel. A Cable—Stock
Southern Tel.—Stock...
1st mort
State of Tenu.—Set’m’t.3s

8*a
L5*a

1*8
55

30

78
23 *«

37*>4

*4

St. Joseph A Western ....
St. Jo. A Pac., 1st mort.
2d mo:t
Kans. A Neb., 1st mort.
2d mort
Texas A Pac.—Scrip ls84.
Old scrip
New scrip
Tex. A St. Louis—
M. A A. Div., ass’tpd...
M. A A. Div., 1st nmrt..
Ai.A A.Div.,incomes,a« p
6s, 1st mort., in Texas..
Gen. lHt.id.gr.Ainc.asp.
U. S. Electric Light.
Vicksburg A Meridian...
1st mort
2d mort
Incomes

26

55
98

Settlement, 0s

5

2d mort

Mexican National
Pref.
1st mort
Mut.Un —St’ck trust ctfs
Mo. Pacific—Old stock
AT.—Income scrip..
N. Y. M. Uu. Tel.—Stock.
N. Y. W. Sh. A B.—Stock.

7
50 »a

11

*22 i*

78

iNorth Riv. Cons.—100 p.c

7*8

Bank. CiMerch.Tei.—1st M
Gen. mort
Bost. H. A E.—New stock

Bid• l Ask.

•9*3
88
30
87
30

it

35
90 »a

84
34

31
37
J

1

24
50

8*6*
49
10

6
27
15

26*

•

CHRONICLE

THE

732

[VOL. XXXIX,

agreed to the resolutions, with the express understanding that
there should be no moral or legal obligations on them arising
from such assent.
AND
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, however,
is not a very important factor in the pool, because it mines
and ships comparatively little coal.
aiIx0axl
The N. Y. Ttmes says : “ The old allotment plan which went
into effect in 1880 was based on the production of several pre¬
The Investors’ {Supplement contains a complete exhibit of the
vious years, and the percentages awarded to the companies rep¬
Funded Debt ofStates and Cities and ofthe Stocks and Bonds
resented were as follows: Philadelphia & Reading, 28*06; Le¬
of Railroads and other Companies. It is published on the
last Saturday of every other month—viz., February, April, high Valley, 19*08; Central Railway of New Jersey, 12*09;
Delaware Lackawanna & Western, 12*07; Delaware & Hudson
June, August, October and December, and is furnished vnthCanal Company, 12 05; Pennsylvania Railroad, 7*06, and Penn¬
out extra charge to all regular subscribers of the Chronicle.
Extra copies are sold to subscribers of the Chornicle at 50 sylvania Coal Company, 5*09. The production in 1878 was
17,605,000 tons, but in ti e following year it took a jump to
cents each. and to others than subscribers at $1 per copy.
26,143,000 tors, which was agreed upon. The restriction plan
was its successor, and in that method of curtailing production
ANNUAL REPORTS.
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company refused to join the other
interests. Officials of the Reading Company say that adherence
to the restriction plan this year cost the company $4,000,000.”
Boston & Loivell Railroad.
Baltimore & Ohio.—The Baltimore Sun predicts that a
(For the year ending Sept. 30, 18S4.)
new route will be formed from New York to the Southwest
The annual report remarks that the net income was about
over the new Pennsylvania Southern and the Baltimore &
the same as last year. Extensive improvements have been Ohio lines. It
says the new route will be via the Reading
made and charged to current expenses, costing more than
Railroad to Harrisburg, thence by the Harrisburg & Potomac
$50,000 in excess of those of the previous year. No charges Railroad to the Baltimore & Ohio road.
have been made to construction account, except for purchases
The plan as at present outlined calls for the construction
of real estate, and such improvements at East Cambridge and
of a line of road twenty miles long from Cherry Run, on the
Mystic Wharf as have resulted in the acquirement of land and line of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, to Hagerstown, where
the filling in of fiats in those localities.
a connection will be made with the Western Maryland rail¬
A dividend of
per cent was paid July 1 from earnings for road.
The Baltimore & Ohio lias at present a connection with
the six months ending March 31, 1884, and there has been
by the branch road from Wolverton, but the con¬
Hagerstown
declared a dividend of 3 percent, payable Jan. 1, from the struction of the line from
Cherry Run would save thirty-four
six months’ earnings ending Sept. 30, 1884.
Larger might and a half miles. The Baltimore & Ohio tracks are already
have been paid, but in view of the hard times it was thought
connected with the Western Maryland railroad tracks at
best to hold a good reserve.
Hagerstown, and the new line would follow the line of the
New leases have been negotiated with.the Wilton and Stony
Western Maryland branch road to Shippensburg.
Brook railroads.
June 1 the corporation assumed control of
“The Harrisburg & Potomac Railroad, of which Col. Ahl of
the Northern and Boston Concord & Montreal roads, under the
Newville, Pa., is President, was projected to extend from Haristerms of the leases, and the financial statement includes the
burg to Cumbe rland, paralleling the Cumberland Valley road
operations of these roads for four months. The result of the It has been, built as far as Shippensburg in one direction and to
operations thus far has been to confirm the opinion expressed within six miles of Harrisburg in the other direction,” * * *
by the directors in recommending the leases. The litigation ‘The gap of six miles between the eastern end of the Harrisburg
commenced in New Hampshire has prevented the realization &
Potomac road is to be built as soon as possible.
The con¬
of all that was expected, for had there been none there would
tract was given out last week, and the road is to be finished by
have been many opportunities to expend money with great
May 1.” *
* * “The line of road thus formed may be said
benefit to the corporation.
to parallel the line of the Pennsylvania road from New York to
New contracts have been made with the Concord Railroad
Harrisburg and Hagerstown. It will not be a passenger road,
for a continuance of business of each road over the road of the
but will be a competitor for freight traffic, and the Eastern
other, and for the operation of the Nashua Acton & Boston business of the Baltimore & Ohio express, which was crippled
and the Manchester & Keene railroads.
by the action of the Pennsylvania road in refusing it facilities,
The earnings for the year were as follows :
will be re-established by the new route.
The new line will
1883 84.
1882-83.
bring
markets
which
it has been the
the
Cumberland
coal
into
4.979,943
3,822,833
Passengers carried
61,343,056 policy of the Pennsylvania road to reserve for the Clearfield
Passenger miles
Not only will the Cumberland region have a direct all¬
Tons freight carried
1,447,058 coal.
1,326,822
rail route to Philadelphia and New York, but it will be brought
The earnings for the year were as follows:
into direct competition with Clearfield coal at many points in
1883-84.
1882-83.
Southeastern Pennsylvania.”
$5,382,144
$1,094,746
Freight
1,301,113
922,650
Passengers
California Southern.—Of the $3,100,000 California South¬
62,844
95,811
Mail and express
Miscellaneous
48,521
85,056 ern bonds, holders of $2,750,000 have assented, and $2,450,000
have been deposited in favor of the contract with Atchison.
Total
$2,864,124 Unless the balance assent, it will be necessary to go through
$2,128,761
1.922,601
1,393.459
Expenses
the form of foreclosure in order to discharge the mortgage

% ti w

&s

t m jc ti t

%tttjcIIiflcticc.

*

“

„

Net earnings

$735,302

The income account for the year was as follows:
;.
Net earnings as above
$735,301
Disbursemoits—
Rentals paid
Interest paid

New equipment

bought

issued.

$941,463

under w’hich the bonds

$941,463

special to the San Francisco Chronicle from San Bernadino, Dec. 24, said: “The California Southern Railroad has

were

A

$128,613

$323,406

239.934

251,859

118.675

151,631

$487,123

$726,896
$214,567

ordered the extension of its road to connect with the Atlantic
& Pacific Road at Daggett; five hundred men will be at once
set to work.”

Chicago & Eastern Illinois.—The earnings for October and
for four months

were :
/

$248,178
Surplus for the year
From this surplus one dividend of
per cent was paid
July 1, and one of 3 per tent has been declared payable Jan. 1.
1885, making 5J4 per cent for the year. The same amount was

18*4.

$156,577

Gross earnings

Net earnin?s

$589,357

1883.

$582,001

80,229

309,471

277,313

$04,792

$279,886

$304,688

Cincinnati & Indianapolis.—The

trustees in London furnish the following
the nine monthsending Sept. 30 :

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.

July 1 to Oct. 31.-n

1884.

93,328

Columbus

Cleveland

$145,021

mos.

$03,249

Operating expenses

paid in 1882-3.

October.--—, —4
1883.

traffic statement for

/—Jan. 1 to Sent. 30, 9 mos.—>
3 884.
1883.

Anthracite Coal Combination.—At a meeting in Phila¬
delphia, Dec. 19, there was a large representation present of
those connected with the production, transportation and sale

Net

of anthracite coal.
Samuel Sloan, President of the Delaware
Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company, presided, and

2,250,836

$2,787,349
2,084,826

$987,301

$702,523

487,385

576,642

$3,239,137

Total earnings
Operating expenses

earnings

Interest, taxes, etc

Joseph S. Harris, President of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation'4
Company, acted as Secretary. After some discussion the fol¬
lowing resolutions were adopted :

Balanc e to credit of income

499,916

Additions to

294,124

125,881
205,530

$205,792

Def.$79,649

Resolved, That it is the judgment of this meeting that for the future the
total output of authracite coal required or taken by the market should
he divided among all interests in proper monthly or yearly ouotas.
Resolved, 'J hat a committee of three he appointed by*the Chair to pre
pare and present at an adjourned meeting a plan for such distribution,
■with the proper quotas to be alloted to each interest.
Resolved, That each interest be required to prepare and submit to said
committee, its claim for quotas, with such other suggestions as it may
desire to present for the consideration of the committee.
Messrs. Hoyt, of the Pennsylvania Coal Company, Harris,
of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company, and Gowen, of
the Philadelphia & Reading Company, were appointed the
committee to prepare a plan of distribution and the proper

lies Moines & Fort Dodge.—This railroad company asks
its first mortgage bondholders to fund the four coupons due in
1885 and 1886.
One half of the interest due January 1, 1885,

quotas to be allotted to each company.
tne

The representative of
Pennsylvania Railroad Company stated that his company




property

Total net

balance

will be paid in cash, and the balance will be paid in the com¬
pany's note bearing 6 per cent interest, due January 1,1888.
The

same course

will be followed with other coupons.

This

funding is necessary on account of the constant lowering of
rates in Iowa, which in spite of increased tonnage has re¬
duced net earnings below fixed charges. The large bondhold¬
ers

J

have consented.

East Tennessee Virginia & Georgia.—Earnings for Novem¬
ber and for fivejnontlis of the current fiscal year were as
lows :

fol¬

December 27,

THE

ibt-4.]
November.
JL884.
1833.

/

/

%

CHRONICLE.

July 1 to Nov. 30.

1884.

1, 1886.

$330,180

$409,0*65

Operating expenses 230,535

225,810

$1,752,540
1,027,931

$1,934,040
993,373

$183,810

$721,609

$940,667

Gross

earnings

Netearnings

$149,645

next coupon on

■>

IS83.

733

the first mortgage bonds, and all other interest due Jan.

It is believed that these receipts in 1885 will be much
greater than at
present, aud there is reason to expect such development of business
that from and after Jan. 1, 1886, the net
earnings and subsidy will pay
the full interest of all the
company’s obligations.

meeting of the directors of the East Tennessee Vir¬
ginia & Georgia Railroad a committee was appointed to
investigate the financial condition of the company and advise
concerning the payment of interest on the consols. The com¬
mittee includes Messrs. Lyman, Martin and Shethar, and they
are expected to report soon.
At a

Lake Shore &

PROPOSAL.

For $900 in cash, payable as follows, 20
per cent Jan. 20, 1885, 20 per
cent Feb. 6, 1885, 20 per cent March 10, 1*85,
20per cent April 8,1885,
20 per cent May 20, 1885, the
company will deliver seven shares of
capital stock at its par value of $100 per share, $200 in its 3 per cent
income bonds (scrip being given for fractions), and
$1,000 in its 10 per
cent

MichiganSouthern.—At the meeting of the

directors of the Lake Shore &

of

.

$14,902,000
9,160,500

$7,511,802
3,498,803

$5,741,500
3,753,611

Gross earnings
Operating expenses aud taxes

Surplus
-3 to Michigan Central,

2,473,325

to Canada Southern.

$485,436

following statement of Mr. E. D. Worcester, Treas¬
accompanies the figures: “ In the statement issued upon
the declaration of the dividend payable on the first of August
last, the belief was expressed that although the first half of
the year showed a deficiency, the second half would make it
good, such having been the case in preceding years. But it
was, nevertheless, deemed judicious to reduce the rate of divi¬
dend to 6 per cent.
“The conditions that affected the first half of the year have
continued, however, and with increased intensity during the
second, so that, even with the reduced dividend, the lookedfor effect for the year lias not been realized.
“
Under the circumstances the directors have decided not to
dividend for the

“

quarter ending with the 31st inst.

While the utmost practical economy has been put in
op¬
eration in all departments, the road,
equipment and property
have been fully maintained.
“The

part of any premium
earnings above stated.

the

“

on

E. D.

bonds sold

are

included in

Worcester, Treasurer.”

From this report, and the quarterly returns which have
pre¬
ceded it, the following is made up for the
quarter ending De¬
cember 31:
For

quarter ending Dec. 31.

Gross earnings

Operating

,

expenses and taxes

Net earnings

Deduct interest, rentals, «fcc
Balance

This shows

a

decrease in the net

$475,769 from the quarter of 1883.

1833.

1884.

$1,754,247
2,669,801

$3,911,603

$2,084,446
874,702

$1,608,677

$1,209,744

$618,933

2,302,926
989,744

earnings for the quarter of

Mexican Central.—The following circular has been sent to
the stockholders of the Mexican Central under date of
Boston,
Dec. 23, 1884:
The cost of the mainline and equipment exceeded the
money raised
for that purpose about 10 percent, the amount of the

over $3,000,000.
* The entire unfunded

Collateral trust
next

notes

deficiency being

indebtedness of the company is as follows:
and interest on same, due in Februarv

:

$1,150,000
1,000,000

Floating indebtedness

$2,150,000
The company lias the following surplus assets:
First mortgage bonds (exclusive of guarantee of $300,COO
deposited in Mexico)
$6,075,000
Income bonds.;
811,000
Stock
3,145,100
Subsidy certificates earned of the Mexican Government, now
on hand and in
process of immediate delivery, over
16,000,000
Of the latter, there have been pledged as
security for the 10 per cent
coupon notes given to the first mortgage bondholders, $5,760,000,
being
150 per cent of said notes,
leaving over $10,000,000 of said certificates

unpledged.
The

more

increasing business of the company will soon render necessary
equipment, additional buildings and other improvements.

To take up all the unfunded

indebtedness and for the general pur¬
poses of the company, the directors have decided to offer a
subscription,
as specified below,
to the stockholders; each stockholder of record Dec.

22,1884, having the unassignable right to subscribe for

one

block, and

assignable rights to subscribe for one additional block under this circu¬
lar for each 100 shares
standing in his name.
The company will issue debentures of $1,000 each, dated
January 1,
1885, bearing interest from and after April 1, 1885, at 10 per
cent per

annum, payable semi-annually October 1 and April 1 of each year, as
per coupons annexed. These debentures will be
payable April 1, 1895,
cut redeemable at
par and accrued interest on aud after April 1,1890,
at the
company’s option, upon 30 days’ notice by public advertisement.
The debentures will be secured by
deposit with the Boston Safe Deposit
and Trust Company, trustee, under an indenture made for
the purpose
of the
following collateral:
For each $l,0i'0 debenture, $1,000 first
mortgage bonds, with all
unpaid coupons, 2,000 subsidy certificates.
The directors expect to raise $2,700,000 under this
circular, and if
their expectations are met, all floating indebtedness will
be paid, and
the
company will have in its treasury over $500,000 cash, $3,000,000
first mortgage bonds, $200,000 income
bonds, $1,000,000 stock aud
$4,000,000 subsidy certificates.
The present monthly receipts from net
earnings and subsidv collec¬
tions will Aeet all|the interest which will fall
due m 1885, including the




$14,009,767

$11,721,000

9,741,633

9,001,000

2,433,416

$2,720,000
2,640,000

$1,834,713

$80,000

1,724,292
$110,421

Total

$55,670

The

a

i paid m L8S3—6 per cent to Mieli
Cent, and 4 percent to Can. South.

$1,937,889

urer,

declare

'—Years ended Dec. 31.—.
1883.
1884.

1884.

$18,513,656
11,001,854

3.957,320
Deficit..

Michigan Central and Canada Southern.—Atthemeetic

ending Dec. 31.

Dividends paid, 8 per cent for 1883 and|

Surplus.

*

was

LAKE SHORE fy MICHIGAN SOUTHERN.

1883.

*

Michigan Central and Canada Southern directors no dividen
declared, and the following statement for 1884 was sub¬
mitted, December being partly estimated:

Michigan Southern, held Wed¬
nesday, Dec. 24, the result of the company’s business for the
year to end Dec. 31 (the business of the month of December
being estimated), was presented as below. The quarterly divi¬
dend, payable in February next was passed.
Year

debentures, above described.. *

$80,000
$53,333
26,667
$80,000

N. Y. Central & Hudson.—A suit has been begun by John
Newton to prevent by injunction the payment of the dividend

of

1^2

cent declared

the capital stock of the New York
Company on Dec. 8, and
made payable Jan. 15 next.
Mr. Newton lias brought his suit
in the Superior Court, as the owner of six debenture bonds,
put upon the market by the company in October. His ground
of complaint is that the dividend has not been earned.
The
suit is alleged by the friends of the company to be of a specu¬
per

on

Central & Hudson River Railroad

lative character.

New York Lake Erie & Western.—A circular has been
addressed to the holders of the Car Trust of New Y"ork by
E.W. Clark & Co., of Philadelphia, in which they say: “Refer¬
ring to the default on the Car Trust of New York, series F, we

would say

that

we

understand the Erie Railroad Company

intends to default on series G on January 1 and probably on
the earlier issues as the interest matures. We propose to put
the matter in the hands of our attorney, Mr. John C. Bullitt,
for the purpose of enforcing promptly the rights of the certifi¬
cate holders.
We understand that the company proposes to
offer long bonds, with interest not exceeding 4 per cent
per
annum.
The large holders whom we have consulted are will¬

ing to accept this settlement, and

we should be pleased to learn
the matter and have you join with us in the
legal proceedings we are about to commence.” The holders
are also asked to agree to the
appointment of a committee to
take the necessary measures in their behalf, to consist of Mr.
Samuel R. Shipley, of the Provident Life & Trust Co., Mr.
W. C. Allison, of the Allison Manufacturing Co., and Mr. E.
W. Clark, of E. W. Clark & Co., bankers.

your

“

views

on

New York & New England.—The Boston Journal says :

The

new finance committee of the New York & New
Eng¬
land Railroad appear to have set to work in a business-like

way to arrange the financial affairs of the company.
It is un¬
derstood that the January interest upon the first
mortgage
bonds will be provided for, and as regards the coupons on the
second mortgage bonds, the Commonwealth and
parties in
New York owning several hundred thousand of them have
consented to take a year’s interest in second mortgage bonds.
This lea ves the bonds here in control of Col. French and others,
several hundred thousand dollars in amount,to be provided for,
but there is no doubt they will be magnanimous with the other
holders of these bonds.” Assuming these arrangements com¬

pleted the Transcript remarks: “This practically dispels
danger of a foreclosure for a year at least, as the first mortgage
interest can be readily taken care of. The remaining problems
to be grappled with are the car trust, high rental of leased lines
and miscellaneous floating debt.
If some temporary or per¬
manent arrangement can be made for these, so as to reduce
net charges, the question before the management will resolve
itself into the development of the road’s earning capacity. The
earnings are increasing, and to increase, if popular management
can compass that end.”
New York Ontario <fc Western.—The annual statement of
the New York Ontario & Western Railroad for the year ending

Sept, 30, 188-4, was sent to the Railroad Commissioners this
It is substantially as follows :

week.

Grose income

Expenses, including all taxes, 88’05

per

cent

Rentals and other charges against income.

Surplus

$1,992,868
1,754,634

$238,234
218,191
$19,743

AS8ETS.

Cost of road and equipment
Cost of other lines owned or leased

Investments—$1,273,000 first mortgage bonds and $2,360,000 capital stock ot the West Shore & Ontario Terminal
Company; also, other investments costing $11,000

Cash on hand
Cash assets
Due from railway corporations

$53,153,268
6,592,640

884,851
3,803
470,606
616,164

THE CHRONICLE

7*4
Fuel and supplies on hand
Other assets, floating equipment,

rvou XXXIX.

present committee is the result. The junior security holders*
ns well as the general mortgage bondholders, are represented'
Total
$62,218,469 in the committee, while Mr. Twombly does not represent anybonds at all, but represents the Vanderbilt interest in theThe total liabilities of the company are $62,218,469, including stock of the company, and Mr. Wanamaker represents the
$58,113,982 of common and $2,000,000 pref. capital stock; $100,- business interests of Philadelphia. He was named at the
000 6 per cent debenture bonds, $468,280 balance of income request of Mr. Vanderbilt, who thought that the merchants of
Account, and an unfunded debt of $1,536,206. The number of Philadelphia should be represented in such a committee. Mr.
miles of road owned is 296, and the number of miles operated Borie said that the committee^ first action would be to
tryta
is 878. The company now owns 1,933 cars.
secure the appointment of Mr. Wharton to the vacant
placein the board of receivers, and after that it would attempt toNorthern Central Railway Company.—The comparative
formulate some plan for tne re-organization of the company
statement of gross earnings and expenses for November and
by which all interests would be protected, and he added that
for the eleven months ended November 30, is as follows:
this was not the work of a day. a week, or a month.
He said
November
<--11 mos. ended Nov. 30.— that a foreclosure of the
general
mortgage
was not contem¬
1884.
1883.
1881.
1883.
Gross earnings
$474,804 $536,094 $5,079,608
$5,678,979 plated. On th^ other hand, a press dispatch from Phila., Dec.
24 [authority not given], stated that it was discovered that the*
Operating expenses.... $238,866 $276,039 $2,758,519 $3,051,852 majority of this committee is composed oc junior security
Sxtraordmary expenses
42,4 iO
94,348
356,824
3-9,981 holders, and that a general mortgage bondholders’ committee*,
Total expenses
$281,307 $370,387 $3,115,344 $3,441,833 to be composed of no other class of securities, is now forming*,
and will be announced on January 1.
Net earnings
$193,497 $165,706 $1,964,263 $2,237,145
—The N. Y. Times reports : ‘The ReadingR. R. managers at
Ohio River & Lake Erie.—This company has filed a mort¬ a special meeting to-day [Dec. 19] ordered that W. H. Vander¬
bilt be paid $826,000, the balance due him on account of the deal
gage in the Recorder’s office at Meadville, Pa., for $1,500,000,
Mr. Vanderbilt’s son-in-law, Mr. Twombly,.
to secure the first mortgage bonds of the company’s road, now in Jersey Central.
in course of construction from Sharpsville, Mercer County, was in town and received a check for the amount, which ha
took to New York.
It is understood that the money wasthrough Crawford and Erie counties to Erie.
raised by the friends of Jersey Central and Reading, and that
Oregon & California. — At Portland, Oregon, Dec. 22, as a matter of fact,* it is merely a shifting of the loan. The
the directors of the Oregon & California Railroad decided new loan is for one
year and it is secured by the same col¬
to transfer the road to the Central Pacific and increase the lateral as was held
by Mr. Van lerbilt. There was some sur¬
stock.
prise that Mr. Vanderbilt should insist upon the payment of
Oregon Improvement Co.—The October exhibit of the this large sum at a time when the Reading Company is in
such a tight place that it will have to default on its January
Oregon Improvement Company is as follows:
1884.
1883.
interest, and it was argued that he must have lost some of
Gross.
Net.
October.—
Net.
Gross.
the interest he manifested in the welfare of the company last¬
Steamship
$316,323
$2*3,738
$60,635
$101,102
spring,
when he advanced $3,500,000 on the Jersey Central
Railway
29,093
19,896
20,589
3 3,*38
Improvement
100,615
30 840
103,002
66,665 stock. I'he fact is that this was purely a business transac¬
tion, and that Mr. Vanderbilt has insisted on having his cash,
Total
$333,443
$111,391
$139,914
$161,405 and, like other creditors of Reading, lias been
disappointed on
Since December 1, 1883 —
AUdlvisious
$3,109,821
$706,139 $3,705,109 $1,194,124 several occasions when he was promised a settlement.”
Sodus Bay & Southern.—It is reported that the SodusBay
Oregon & Trans-Continental.—A press dispatch from & Southern
road, leased the past summer to the Northern
Phila., Dec. 24, said: ‘‘Messrs. Drexel & Co. state that the
Central,
will
fund its $500,000 6s into 40-year 5s.
Oregon & Trans-Continental Company having obtained sub¬
Telegraph
Combination.—The Boston Herald has a Chi¬
scriptions to the extent of $5,000,000 to their new loan of
$10,000,000, they have taken $2,500,000 of the loan with an cago special to the effect that Messrs. Mackey, Bennett and
option upon the remaining $2,500,000 until February 1.” This Robert Garrett, together with the Bankers’ & Merchants’ bond¬
it is said will give the company ample means to meet their holders, have agreed to combine interests with 200,000 milesof wire.
The first move will be to pay $1,000,000 due by B. &
notes maturing on Dec. 31.
M.and $300,000 in filling a gap to the South.
Pennsylvania Railroad.—The gross and net earnings for
—The new Bennett-Mackey cable is open for business, and
November and for eleven months are specially compiled for the cable rates have been reduced to 40 cents
per word.
Chronicle in the tables below. The result of the operation
The
of all the lines east of Pittsburg and Erie for the month of
Huntington Railroads.—The official earnings and
November was a decrease of $381,466 in net earnings and for the expenses in the month of October and since Jan. 1 have been t
1881.
1883.
eleven months a decrease of $1,209,202 this year, compared with
Net.
October.—
Gross.
Gross.
Net.
the same period in 1883. On the lines west of Pittsburg there
Texas & New Orleans
$81,014
$38,451
$78,381
$134,247
was a decrease in net profits of $263,562 for November and a
Gal. Harrisburg & S. A... 335 210
175,015
436, LL2
220,529
decrease of $1,950,109 for the eleven months, as compared with Louisiana Western
49,939
24,154
7a,35 J
42,802
$294,150

202,082

<fcc

»

,

.

<

.

<

.

<

1883:
LINES EAST OP PITTSBURG AND ERIE.

Gross

,

Earnings.

1884.

,

1883.

,

Net
1884.

Eaniings.
' 1883.

«

$24,352,579

$8,112,242

4,130.950

1,391,116

1,492,734

4,775,380

2,142,022

4,447.547

4,634.998
4,875.318

2,151,507
1,887,395
1,925,702

3,950,937

4,473,479

1,475,711

1,857,177

First 6 months. $23,333,249

July

3,9:9,085

August
September....

4.617,894
4,458.871

October

$8,518,826
1,922, *65
2,219,150

Jan. 1 to date —
Texas & New Orleans
691,932
Gal. Harrisburg & 3. A... 2,3.0,280
Louisiana Western
370,191
,

*

<

253,157
622.9

9

151,665

962,712

505,964

2,993,119

1,144,441

91,757

203,937

4

Virginia Midland.—The annual meeting of the stockholdersof the Virginia Midland Railway was held in Baltimore Decem¬
ber 20.
Mr. Barbour declined a re election and Col. A. S. Bu¬
ford was elected, with the following directors: John

Barbour, George F. Baker, C. M. Blakeford, C. S. Brice,
Joseph Bryan, Win. P. Clyde, R. A. Coghill, II. C. Fahne¬
Total 11 mos. $44,797,533
$47,242,734 $16,943,673 $18,152,874 stock, C. G. Holland, J. O. Lovell, John McAvery, J.
Maben, George Parsons, M. H. Payne, G. S. Scott, A. D.
As to the lines west of Pittsburg and Erie, the monthly
Shepard. Tne following resolution was adopted: ‘‘That a com¬
reports issued in 1883 and for the current year show the results mittee of five members of the board be appointed by the chair¬
bel iow.
The company’s returns, however, state a loss since man to consider the
expediency of creating a general mortgage
January 1 in the present year, compared with the same period to secure an issue of 5 per cent bonds for such amount, not ex¬
in 1883; of $1,946,808.
ceeding $12,500,000, as will be sufficient to secure and provide
LINES WEST OF PITTSBURG A ERIE.
for the entire bonded obligations of "the company, including itsNet Surplus over all Liabilities.
income bonds; and if, in the opinion of such committee, the1883.
Dec. in 1884
1884.
same is deemed expedient, that they report their views of this
First 6 months
Def. $7*4,490
$182,931
$907,421
subject to a meeting of the stockholders to be called by the
3.168
126,759
123,59
July
August
18,954
247,490
228.536 President.” Messrs. Buford, Fahenstock, Barbour, Baker arid
September
52,845
318,522
265,677 Bryan were appointed on said committee.
October
131,487
292,801
161.314
There are three changes in the director.
Mr. Barbour
Def. 317,969
November
Def. 54,407
263,562
changes place With Mr. Buford, and M-ssrs. Fahnestock and
November.

..

.

—

..

Total 11 months. Def. $836,005

$1,114,096

$1,950,109

Maben succeed Mr.

Capron of Baltimore.

J. A.

Garland of

New York and Mr„

Mr. John S. Barbour read the repo t showing the gro»
Philadelphia & Reading.—The Bondholders’ Committee
B. Wright, H. McK. Twombly, earnings for the year ended Sept. 30 t» have been: On account
Bone, A. J. Antelo, Wharton of freight, $778,749; passengers, $582,034; express, $77,171;
Barker, S. R. Shipley and E. B. Comegys. The committee mail, $78,813; Manassas rental. $89,250; miscellaneous, $19,8llr
met in Philadelphia Dec. 24.
All the members were present, total, $1,625,830. The op< rating expenses were $999,217, leav¬
and Mr. Twombly declining to act as chairman, Mr. Whelan ing net earnings $626,612. The gross earnings ' ere $38,87$
was chosen to that position.
less than 1883, and the operating expenses were $43,022 more
Charles Bone and other members of the committee said that than in 1883. The net earnings in 1884 were $81,896 less than
in 1883.
a good deal of mistaken information regarding the compo¬
The decrease in the gross earnings was due to A
sition and purposes of the committee had been circulated. falling off in the through freight revenues. The local freight
The committee does not, as has been reported, represent espec¬ revenue whs only $508 less than in 1883.
The passenger
ially the general mortgage bondholders, and is not in any sense business showed an increase of $29,908. Two thousand five
hostile to Mr. Go wen or the present management of the com¬ hundred tons of steel rails ha^e been put in tne main lino
pany. Such a committee was contemplated at one time by during 1884, making 155 miles of steel, and 1 aving 78 miles of
of the general mortgage bondholders, but before iron still in the track. A new iron bridge 757 feet in length
a few
anything was done all interests were harmonized, and the has been constructed over the James River.

consists of E. S. Whelan, Chas.
John Wanamaker, Chas. L.




THE

December 27, 1884.]

CHRONICLE.

735
COTTON.

3^hje Commercial jinxes.

Friday, P. M., December 26, 1884.

’

COMMERCIAL

EPITOME.

Friday Night, Dec. 28, 1884.

holiday

The

has diverted less than the usual atten¬
tion from business, and trade has been fairly active through¬
out the week.
Confidence is very strongly felt that the new
season

year will bring a marked improvement in mining and manu¬
factures, and there is a disposition to act in anticipation of it;

feeling in nearly all the leading staples is the result.
It is believed that, starting on the safer plane of cheaper raw
materials, cheaper labor, cheaper transportation and modified
views regarding profits, the situation is a promising one.
Failures have been fewer and less important; but attending
the severely cold weather, destructive fires have been unusu
Ally numerous and inland navigation is wholly closed for the
a

firmer

season

at the North and West.

The

speculation in lard futures has been rather dull for the
week under review, and prices were somewhat depressed to¬
day, under free offerings for February and March, and at the
close bids were reduced to 6*90c. for Jan., 6*93c. for Feb.,
>6-99c. for March, 7*04c. for April and 7*12c. for May. Spot
lard has been active and at times dearer, but declined to-day,
closing at 6 80c. for prime City, 6*95c. for prime Western and
7*30c. for refined for the Continent.

Pork has been

steady and
closed firmer at $12 50@$12 75 for mess and $15@$16 for clear*
Bacon remains dull at 614@ 7c.
Pickled cutmeats have been
less active but firm at 6@6J^c. for bellies, 5^c. for shoulders
and 8%@9c. for hams. The slaughter of swine at the princi¬
pal points of the West for the season numbered *8,310,241
against 2,388,572 for the corresponding period of last season.
Beef remains nominal.
Beef haras are quoted $18 50@$19.
Tallow has been dull at 6c. Butter has shown an upward
tendency, and creamery is quoted at 20@32c. Cheese is firm
at 9@13c. for State factory.
The following is a comparative
summary of aggregate exports from October 27 to Dec. 20.
Fork. lbs...
Bacon, lbs

Lard, lbs
Total

18S4.

18*3.

7,150,600
f9,545,086
41,813,583

9,318,400
78,163,625
47,377,936

118,569,269
134,859.961
been very dull the past

Brazil coffees have

The Movement of the Crop, as indicated by our telegrams
from the South to-night, is given below.
For the week ending

Doc. 2,167.800
Dec. 8,618,539
Dec. 5,564,353

Dec. 16,350,692

this evening (Dec. 26), the total receipts have reached 207,893
bales, against 258,340 bales last week, 289.457 bales the previous
week and 276,300 bales three weeks since; making the total

receipts since the 1st of September, 1884, 3,537,441 bales, against
3,416,350 bales for the same period of 1883, showing an
increase since September 1, 1884. of 121,091 bales.

Receipts at—

Sat.

Galveston

Mon.

1,419

Indianola, &e.

....

New Orleans...

8,668

Mobile

2,065

Florida
Savannah

4,040

Charleston

Moreli’d C.,<fcc
Norfolk

....

4,418

2,959

....

3,600

2,262

Thurs.

4,609

....

3,576

3,000

1,927

16,016
351

86.518

2,278

14,749
3,560

....

3,006

....

3,500

.

1,771

....

4,013

.

1,590
3,560
3,149

2,500

....

....

....

....

....

303

351

421

307

275

22,335

161

163

1,685
1,107

17,861

140

1,8100

...

1,107

400

400

2,559

5,057

3,844

3.945

1,609

156

160

114

249

54

1,037

850

1,582
1,128

15,164
844

17,170
1',164

1,103

1,099

....

;

Boston

Total.

8,711 12.256 20,664

.

.....

....

....

....

West Point,&c
New York

Vri.

351

.

....

....

...

Pt. Royal, &c.
Wilmington....

1,768

14,533 21,686
3,363
3,682

4,790

Brunsw’k, &c.

Wed.

....

:

....

Tues.

Baltimore

....

....

39

Pliiladelp’a, <fcc.

....

17

Totals this week 24,640

....

43

....

89

3,003

2,132

5,217
2,132

159

347

....

....

36,319 40,116 26.457 27.170 53.191 207,093

For comparison, we give the following table showing the week’s
total receipts, the total since Sept. 1,1884, and the stock to-night,
and the same items for the corresponding periods of last year.
1884.

Receipts to
December 26
Galveston

...

Ind’nola,&c
New Orleans.

Mobile

1883.

Stock.

This

Since Sep.

This

Week.

1, 18S4.

Week.

Sep.
1, 18S3.

24,213

452,143

189

7,616

16,016
351

378,666
9,356

86,518 1,047,083
14,749
167.918

Since

87,371 1,063,302

11,921

194.002

3,560

58,660

929

22,335

594,323

25,329

Br’sw’k.&c.

163

Charleston...

17,861
1,107

8,627
432,068
4,339

10,211

23,913
536.727
6,522
331,977

795

10,728

1,523

75,360

450

9,688

Florida

Savannah....

Pt. Royal, &c

Wilmington..
M’headC.,&c
Norfolk

1,800
400

1884.

50

82,133
7,752

1883.

56,596

115,450

424,744

i 72
481,765
66,197

53.296

6,040

••• •••

102,245

1201710

70,167

81,512

1,721
16,493

1,583
20,434
•

••»«»•

17,170

425,427
420,781 16,218
73.993
77,012
week, but fair
W.Point,&c. 15,164 231.363
152,452
7,614
8,731
cargoes of Rio are still quoted at 934C. Options have been inNew York...
19,565
3,003
40,986
273 984
191,935
5,058
-active, with prices showing more depression, the close to-day Boston
49.872
5,217
66,010
7,829
6,310
6,185
being with sellers at 7'95c. for Dec., 8c. for Jan., 8*20c. for Baltimore
2,132
22 91*2
6,155
1,610
7,372
25,703
Feb. and 8*40c. for April. Mild coffees have been moving Fhiladera.Ac
347
316
18,754
7,095
12,245
10,399
very fairly, considerable lines of Java going at 143^@15l^c.
Total
207.8913,537,441 201.686 3,116.3)0 1,047.428 1.283126
Raw sugars have become quite dull, and close nominal at
In order that comparison may be made with other
year*, we
04%c. for fair to good refining, with refined in much the same give below the totals at leading ports for six seasons.
iposition, at0J4@6%c. for crushed and d^c. for standard4* A.” Receipts at—
1834.
1883.
1882.
1881.
1830.
1879.
The speculation in Japan teas, noted last week, has been very
Galvest’n.&c.
16,367
24.402
32,484
IS,063
22,S29
8,763
quiet this week, but pi ices are pretty well supported.
New Orleans.
86,518
87,371
67.233
85,963
50.471
68,422
Kentucky tobacco has ruled quite firm since the announce¬ Mobile
14,749
11,921
10.025
17,009
16,730 f 13 928
ment of the Spanish contract, but the close is dull; lugs 7@8c.,
Savannah....
22,333
29,879
25,235
25,329
26,759
19.421
leaf 8@10^c. Seed leaf has be n much less active, business be¬ ChaiTst’n, &c
11,036
18,968
15,909
20,716
10.163
18,652
ing small even for a holiday week, amounting to only 950 cases Wilm’ct’n, &c
2,203
5.052
6,308
1,973
3,087
1,203
asfcllows: 250 cases 1883 crop, Pennsylvania, 8@25c.; 200cases Norfolk, <fec..
32,334
23,862
35,079
27,717
24.604
26,013
1882 crop, Pennsylvania, Gi£@12o.; 150 cases 1881 crop, All others....
14,422
15,792
30,084
25,741
13,9 43
25,759
Pennsylvania, 5j^(g)llc.; 100 cases 1883 crop, Wisconsin H i- Tot. this w*k.
207,893 201,636 251,923 201,624 196.435 154,806
vana, private terms; 100 cases 1883 crop, New England, 13@
30c., and 150 cases sundries, 5@28c.; also, 300 bales Havana, Since Sept. 1. 3537.441 341«.3'0 3 461.462 3233.113 3454.099
3166,955
'70@$1 15 and 150 biles Samatra, $1 30@$1 GO.
Galveston includes IndUuola; Charleston incud as Port
;
Royal,
The speculation in crude petroleum certificates has been Wilmington includes Morekoad City, &o.; Norfolk includes West Point,&0
Ao.
The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
■comparatively quiet and prices have lost the advance noted
inourlast, dropping to-day from 75 to 73f£c., the closing >f 134,906 bales, of which 90,079 were to Great Britain,
5,618
figure. Refined quoted at
for standard test, and to France and 39,212 to the rest of the Continent, while the
naptha 74£c. Spirits turpentine was drooping early in tin* stocks as made up this qvening are now 1,047,428 bales. Below
week, the price yielding to 30%c., and rosins have remained are the exports for the week and since September
1, 1884.
very dull. Wool is firmly held, although some recent closingWeek
From
Ending
Dec.
20.
i'epl. 1,1884, io Dec. 20,18&4.
out sales were at low figures.
Exported to—
Exported to—
Metals have continued dull, but there is something of
Exports
* feature
Oreat
ConH- Total
Or eat
Conti¬
in a firmer feeling for pig iron. At to-day’s
from—
Total.
Brit'*.. France neat.
Week. Britain. France
nent.
Exchange pig iron was quiet and steady, bid*, ranging from
5,899
$16<a$16]^, with $lGJa(r6$17 asked. Tin dull and heavy at Galveston..
5,899 107,00 i
4,935
51,til
103,112
16*20(6) 16*40c. for both spot and futures. Tin pi ite neglected. Now Orleans.. 21,724 2,069 i 3,284 37,677 297,(44 !00,828 188,879 641,751
5,344
^Copper flat, nominally ll^c. a*ked. L*»ad nominal at 4 60c. Mobile
5,344
Florida
for foreign.
Spelter quiet at 4*70@4*90c. for foreign.
0.219
1,900
3,040 11,759 120,518 11,0-19 175,055 300,022
Ocean freights, though fairly active early in the week, es- Savannah
Charleston*.^.
0,820
10,801 23,621
113.513 17,487
243,410
112,460
PjB^ially in the master of grain shipments from this part and Wilmington...
1,105
1,105
86,900
10,127
47,337
Baltimore, have been generally quiet, and close dull, with Norfolk*
25,499
25.499 211,408
23 ,920
17,009
2,-43
rates showing more or less depression.
Tne grain shipments New York
12,938
1,049
2,340 10,333 20*1,230 23,148
88,424 817.868
were at 6from Baltimore to
Liverpool and634d.@7d henc* Boston
1.837
1,827
203
57,094
•7,957
to Liverpool; also, hence to London 6d.; and the
878
7,762
grain oharters Baltimore...
8,010
80,025
28,183 111,868
8,050
fiaye been at 4s. Gd. from Baltimore to B istol Cnannel and Philadelp’a.Jtc 1,388
31,331
1,158
2,540
3,810
35,154
43. 9d. from the same
port to Cork for orders. There have
Total
90,076
5,018 89,212 134,900 1,207,860 223,290 071,227 2,102^3
keen liberal engagements of flour and
provisions to British and
Total 1883.... 83.701 28,850 29,850 142.441 1,038.091 258.079
518,319 1
'Continental ports at full rates. Petroleum charters have been
Includes exports from Port Royal, 4c.
TO©*, refined to Londor, 2s. 3 J.
t Includes exports from West Point, 40.




•

...

\

_

...

......

•

•

•

•

......

......

.

•

.

••••••

......

......

•

•

*

«■>

: t
t

CHRONICLE.

THE

736

•

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also give
the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not cleared,
at the ports named.
We add similar figures for New
which are prepared for our special use by Messrs. Carey, Yale

us

Yo

[VOL. XXXIX.

The Sales and Prices of Futures are shown by the following comprehensive table. In the statement will be found the
daily market, the prices of sales for each month each day, and
the closing bids, in addition to the daily and total sales.

& Lambert, 89 Broad Street.
On
Dec.

26, at—

Great

66,496
20,050
7,300
8,900
19.863
23,656
2,500
6,000

Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Galveston
Norfolk
New York
Other ports

Total

1884.

Shipboard, not cleared-for
Fi'ance.

Britain.
New Orleans....

'

Foreign

Total.

2.664

124,252

None.

700

6,200

20,950

2,000

12,200

3,000

None.

8,400
2,366
3,014
4,500

2,600

689

39,351

® Cl © 03

cc,

B-® ® p,
P ® *
x

JS c*-

£!

19,606

None.
None.

a> ©

Stock.-

35,486

1,176

154,765

Coast¬
wise.

Other

1211

211

Leaving

2,000

2,704

24.500
19.900
26,109

550
None.
None.

27,909
7,000
8,000

17,718

52,786

Qi’OOD®

O^ODP

©

o

P

00 © ©
tT® oa cx,

2L

42,814
28,514

144,176
169,598

37,513

11,677

52,149

14,375

1,046.946
696,345

236,180
264,636

7©®

speculation in cotton for future delivery at this market
has been fairly active, but the tone has been feverish and un¬
settled, with wide fluctuations.
Saturday closed slightly
dearer, after an early decline, and Monday, after a struggle
with the “bear” party, closed at a smart advance.
Tuesday
opened at a further improvement; but then some of the “bull”
party became sellers to realize profits, and it began to be as¬
serted that the forthcoming deliveries on January contracts
are to be very heavy, which checked the d isposition to pur¬
chase until the effect of these deliveries slial have been, tested
—influences which caused a decline of 13@15 points from the
morning figures, and the advance of Monday was fully lost at
the close.
On Wednesday the course of the market for Tues¬
day was repeated in a modified degree, with the execution
that the interest in January contracts, which had been a lead¬
ing feature, almost wholly disappeared, and February became
a prominent month.
To-day business was very slow, and the
changes in prices quite unimportant until near thd close,
when there was a sharp advance, and, as compared with last
Friday, December is 10 points dearer and other deliveries
3@6 points dearer. Cotton on the spot has been dull and
unsettled. Quotations were advanced 1-16c. on Monday and
again on Tuesday; but were reduced 1-1 Cc. on Wednesday.
To-day the market was quiet and nearly nominal, middling
uplands closing at 11 l-16c.
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 447,500
bales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week
1,392 bales, including
for export, 1,372 for consumption,
20 for speculation and — in transit.
Of the above, — bales
were to arrive.
The following are the official quotations for
each day of the past week.
The

Sat.

Ordln’y $lb

8%

Moil Tue»

813,a

Str.L’w Mid
Middling...
Good Mid
Str. G’d Mid
.

10^8
11

123s
Wed

Ordin’y $ Jt>

ldke
like
1113n
127l6

8i3ie

Good Ord.. 10i,6
Str. G’d Ord 10LB
Low Midd’g 10*\
Str.L’w Mid 101&1G

■

as

o

Middling...
Good Mid..
Str. G’d Mid
Midd’g Fair

Hhe
11716
lUalfi

•

Fair

l^ie

j

w

Ilk

;

9ke

Wed

Til.

Th.

11 k

Uk

91,0

9k

9k

9k

9k

9k

ionia
n

1015,6 113,0
mm U&10
Ilk

11710 1111,6
111316 121,6
127,6 121i]6
Sat.

^ lb.

Low Middling
Middling

u

©

1 ©6

to©

©

cc

©

o

w

11

113,6
U516

113,6
115,6

Uk

Uk

'C
o
.

K

•

Mon Tues Wed

8k

87,’e
9k

8k

©©

J ro

9i5ie rH
109,6 ** X

113l6
11°16
Uk

Th.

Fri.

HoU-

9k

87,0
9k

11

915,6 day.
10916

Sat..
Mon
Tues.
Wed
Thurs
Fri.
.

.

.

Total.

j Oon-1 Spec-

verv dull
Dull at i,6

17
204

adv
Quiet at i,6 adv.
Dull at 1,6 dec...
Dali

...,

....

20

424|
145;
!
•

•

•

•

....

582j
1,372!

....
....

Holi

20

FUTURE8.

Sales.

Deliv¬
eries.

17 83,000
224 91,400
424 139,600
145 96,800

300
400
400

582

36,700

400

....

1,392 447,500

1,500

The dailv deliveries given above are actually delivered the day
previous to that ou whiou they are reported.




M M

MM

Cm©

**

M ©

**

t0

W©

©

M M tO
M M ©

—

M

©

66°6

O©

QD

© O'

»-M

t>

©

M

®

n

<i

o»

Mr-*

^

7*7*

<

CO

®

©

MW

M

M

hhc7
o

M M

O'M

Mil

oE*©m
oc^j

l5M
M©M

m

>

<

77

<

®

to to

®

MM^.^
I ©*-*:

©©
MM

<1

occo
-J CO

w

*5

MM

®

00»3

®

COCO

"t

M©

WM
QM
C0M©C0

0000

o*

tv©

M

M©

MM

>

MM

>

MM

®

MM

**

M O*

MC0
to©

M

JS.

pj

I ®os:

M

£. © M
CO

|frOi©i^

M

CO to

<y»oo

co

M M

>>

:
•
■

:
M

©

MM

OX

MM

77
6x6x
MM

c?*©cj*

©

MM©M

MM
MM

<
®

<

77

®

CJ'Oi

®

©C

*1

© C0

•-»

M©

M
M

HHoH

i ®o«:
MM~WM

<

*-<

M M

a©©©

00©

o< O*

©

MM

MM

© ©
wto

^

MM

^

®

©©

^

-4©

®
^

I

l

d*©© d*
0D©

©

MM

MM

77*

◄
®

MM

^

© ©

**

®

wto

•5-4

9to:

i

00<|

4

I

MMmM
M m © M

MM^M

M

*5 © -I

©oo©-b

M M
© M
-M©vl

co

00©

©©

-4-4
O©

>

M M

M M ©

-^©

<
®
*1

M

©

M M

<

-j-4

®

ob-00

Ox

M

m

©M

MM
M M

obob

<J©
'

1 ©

1 ©w:

MM

M

MM

-J0U©Q0
to
-J©

-4 ©

© ob

crcr.

©ob

00©

00

©©

co

M

>■

9'
©

<
®

00

*1

w7
.

.

©

CO

y m©m

MmCOM

MMr.-M
©

M

Mm

O' V*

(V) M

d*©©©

M

Ox

MM
MM

| qm;

I «m:

i
M M ©
M M ©

C»M

©

1

CO

©OO

d*©©©

§ »s

MO*

M

tO-4

I -4?°

MmmM
MM©*CC CO © CO

Cl*

M M ©

M

®

mm©m
pt o*
CO CD

mm©*7
© U* © d*
©

^

WOm4
I ®m;

“

H4 H* o ^

M
Ox

%

Men M
oM

MM

tfi.4©co

MM

COCO

I

d*M ©

M©

%

®
m

Mm^M
M M o M

(**•

>

<1

l

M
MMqm

©o*

Jfc I
Si

CC

MM

M

m

£6 ®
©©MH

®

M M

M

©

MM

^

MM
MM

^

H4

toco© do

©

©to

HmqH
to to ©to
MM

^
I 95”:

I ®to:

I ®to;

:

5

co co io

MM
M M

M M qo

©

M

MM

®

!

M

ob ©to

to

M M

I ©or

N.

77

©<l

%

©

M—

00 M

mm

77©7

tc to
®
00 Woo ■*

M

©00

tjr

MM

t>

too*

to

MM

I

Ox

MM

mm'kjM

©to

--COM
MMqM

<,<,

MM^jM
M M Q M
toto©to

to to
Ox or

M

©

Mm©m

MM

I ®«0.
M M

77©7

to

M

MM

®

Mr*yM

M

M

7y

%

66

OvlH*1
I

m

m

M

MM

I ©ao:

mm

^

MM

®

I

M

00 I

Zj©

«
©
©

( ®

®: :

©
©

**

0*0*

©

■

II

:

MMqqM
M M

© M

M M Q

M

-1 jo

00-4

<y*

M

d* © d*

MM©M

I i

I 1

i ©

I ®

O

►

<
®

I

■

|I

| ®

:

§S I I.:

:

e)9: :

I

,od

*
Inoludes sales in September, 1884, for September, 158,200; Septem¬
ber October, ior October, 421,800; September-Novembor, for November,

582,200.

,

We have included in the above table, and shall continue each
tveek to give, the average price of futures each day for each month. It
frill be found under eacn day following the abbreviation “ Aver.” The,
average for each month for the week is also given at bottom of table.

Transferrable Orders- Saturday, 11 -05o.; Monday, ll-10c.; Tuesday*
1105c.; Wednesday, 11* 10c.; Thursday,
o.; Friday, 11-150.

The

day..

....

M

©

MMoM

9

Ti'anTotal.
sit.

<j
®

©6

MtcOg.

t

915,6
109,6

glance how the market closed on same days.
Ex-

>

MM

<

MM CO M

**

SALES OF 8POT AND TRANSIT.

>
®
8
*

i

\

? A

■

87,fl

The total sales and future deliveries each day during the
Veek are indicated in the following statement. For the con¬
venience of the reader we also add a column which shows at a

port. sump ul'Vn

©O

-

©
mM

PHo7

c*

market and sales.

SPOT MARKET
CLOSED.

-i

» a s

I ©tP

1111,6
121,6
12U,0

1111,6 lUke
12k« 12kn
1211,6 1211,6

:

2l16
978
10k

11

,0-Hbw

Mh^IM

105,«
10Ik«

105,6 10J16
1011,0 10H1(;

cS

I

Ml-*

®

MM
00 w

119,0

Fri.

o,^
OM

M

PSIWp

■

<

e|f

m
Woo-J

©

ym

11%
12k
12%

9ke

lOiie I05ie

..

FrI.

Wed

like

1 ©

:

g®

00©*

QCO*

©M

99,6
10k
10%

1 qi
*-*

®M'-<1

MM

1>

1

©

MM

M M C

9k

9k0

ilk

©

I ®

9k0

107,6
10%

©o

M M M

81316

STAINED.

Good Ordinary ...
Striot Good Ordinary

9k0

9

9ke

FrI.

J
J

Strict Ord..

9k

9k
9k
99,6
97,r
10k
105.6
105,6 10 k
10>h
10k
1011.6
lOiko 10%
like 1015,6 11
10131h 1016ie 11
11
ilk
U310
113,6 Uk ilk
Uk
ilk
115,6
ilk
H610 Uk
119,6 117,6 Uk
like 117,6 Uk
Ilk
Uk
ilk
lUke
lUke 11%
12
12
12ke
li7e
121,6r 12k
12k
12k
12k
1211,6
1211,6 12%

Til.

So,

©

Mon Toes

Sat.

10k

10k
10 k

113,fl Hk
11^8
Uk«

Midd’g Fair 113*
Fair

878

©

1 $
MM(jM

1

9

95,0

9k
Strict Ord..
93,«
Good Old.. 10
lOke
Str. G’d Ord 10^8
10ke
Low Midd’g 101l16 10\

Moil Tues

Sat.

©

©

©©
©o

©

TEXAS.

NEW ORLEANS.

UPLANDS.

Dec. 20 to
Dec. 26.

©

go

©

7 |

<
®
^

<
®

<*©5

©
M

►

S?

ffi

72
r
©©■

•

9

m

cc crj

-i

£ m£2

©

M

o

•<

c cc

2
qdO-

|

•

® •

S3

©

©

to
S*: <=>

£2.® oo S'

©<

7 |
M 1

sag

~;

a*

o

m on

W

•

•

782,808

L_

srs* ®

S£©
^ro

sp

•

Total 1883
Total 1882

•P O
SC e+

■
to
M
I

*3
cc;

B •©©R
—

a

o

p,.
P
c*.
.® !

©

£

vyi
Jzcf«

O

®

i

82,345
30,487
46,084

264,020

I

^

QO

®

2

a> © ®

® © ft

ffi O'

Ef ® 0D p

■

300,492
26.346
45,667

184,935
66,452

S.2.0D

CC Q

P 00 - Q.
Cf5
ert
,rO Cvi
S3 mT5

cc

g

nJ

following exchanges have been made during the week;

•01 pd. to
•47 pd. to
•22 pd. to
•12 pd. to
for Jan.

exch.
exch.
exch.
exch.

100 Mar. for April.
200 Feb. for June.
500 Jan. for April.
100 Dec. s. n. 24th
jJWtf

.

•15
01
•06
T1

pd.
pd.
pd.
pd.

to exch.
to exch.
to exch.
to exch.

100 Feb. for Mar.
500 Feb. for Jan.
800 Dec. for. Jan.
1,000 Jan. forMar.
ItL l BijHCE

THE CHRONICLE

1884.]

December 27,

The Visible Supply of Cotton to-night, as made up by cable
and telegraph, is as follows. The Continental stocks, as well as
those for Great Britain and the afloat, are this week’s returns,

European figures are brought down

and consequently all the

787

bales less than at the same period last year. The receipts at
the same towns have been 22,500 bales more than the same
week last year, and since September 1 the receipts at all the
towns are 76,336 bales less than for the same time in 1883.

Thursday evening. But to make the totals the complete
Quotations for Middling Cotton at Other Markets.—
figures for to-night (Dec. 26), we add the item of exports from In the table below we give the closing quotations of middling
the United States, including in it the exports of Friday only'.
cotton at Southern and other principal cotton markets for each
We have received no figures by cable to-day, either from the day of the past week.
Continent or from Liverpool, so we leave Iasi week’s figures
CLOSING QUOTATIONS FOR MIDDLING COTTON ONunchanged.
Week ending
to

Btookat London

529,000

45,000

?

611,00*0

1882.
663,000

47,800

76,800

688,800

739,800

2,000

525,900
22,000
42,300
11,800
390
2,090
119,000
3,700
21,500
5,000
3,790
231,570

1883.

1884.

bales.

Btoek at Liverpool

1881.

Dec. 26.

484,000
41,900

Satur

Galveston
New Orleans.
Mobile
Savannah.

Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock
Stock

Stook

574,000

4,000
32,100
41,000
600
1,400
181,000
4,000
40,000
6,000
6,000

1,500
3,500
128,000
7,000
42,000
9,000
8,000

4,300
25,300
7,900
3,800
800
145,000
3,900
45,000
9,200
6,000

316,100

307,200

251,200

at Hamburg
at Bremen
at Amsterdam
at Rotterdam
at Antwerp
at Havre
at Marseilles
at Barcelona
at Genoa
at Trieste

Total Continental stocks

60,200

46,000

..

Charleston.

.

890,100
71,000
659.000

996,000
119,000

Egypt,Brazil,Ac.,attt for E’r’pe

39,000

66,000

Stock in U. 8. interior towns..
United States exports to-day..

339,879

381,574

31,000

18.0J0

991,000

Stock in United States ports ..1,017,428 1,283,126

3,077, i()7 3,404,700 3,039,961 3,056,335

Total visible supply

Of the above, the totals of American and other descriptions arc as follows;
A

1tt 6VLCCL Th

—»

Liverpool stock..

bales

395.000

418,000

336.000

351,000
146,000
109.000
611,000
507,000
960,991 1,212,702
416,363
332,580
39.400
11.800

Continental stocks
195,000
222,000
American afloat for Europe...
659,000
541.000
United States stook
1,047,428 1,283,126

339,879

l.

381,574
18,000

31,000

Liverpool stock

193.000
45,000
121,100
71,000

..

London stock
Continental stocks
India afloat for Europe...,

..

..

39,000

223,000
17,800
85,200
119,000
06,000

469.100

511.000

Egypt, Brazil, Ao., afloat.

10%
1030
10*4

268,000
76,900
105.200
90.000

133,000
41,900
122,570
1 12,000

65,000

39,000

Receipts

which

..

The above figures

indicate a decrease in the cotton in sight
to-night of 327,293 bales as compared with the same date of
1883, a decrease of 12,551 bales as compared with the corres¬
ponding date of 18S2 and an increase of 21,07.2 bales as
compared with 1881.
At the Interior Towns the movement—that is the receipts
for the week and since Sept. 1, the shipments for the week, and
the stocks to-night, and the same items for the corresponding
period of 1883—is set out in detail in the following statement.
>-3
9

p

~

K

i—>

i

-

,-x

w

o

l
\

10%

1

10%

«

10%

1

>-!

Pl antations. —The

from the

mw.:

Hecvipts at tin• I’urts. ;.sVk at Interior

Oct.

10

“

17

“

24

“

10%
10%
10%

following table is

1884.

1

1882. j 1.883.

Towns.'Ilec'pts from Pt/mOns,
1884.

j 1882. j 1883. ( 188-1.

68,108 224,949 256,270 223,924
92,65-1 271,093 295.3 U 266,895
285,112 139,317 236,980 129,511 256,016 286,861 321,909
211.921 277,470 175,092 276,734 156,05s1292,398 281,669 301,017
.202,251 267,604 257,011 211,740 313,249 171,996 293,899 304,119 275,979
269,114 244,133 343,929 193,970 291,537 272,758! 293,088
242,169 222,510 258,774 259,175 359.718 229.539 257.221 233,329 299,343
255,097 222,185 281,092 275,700 371,564 207.133 271,622 237,001 322,286
205.313

.

.

ll

28..
5

1883. !

95,075 104,915

242,289 125,039 202,970

21..
Dec.

18Si

.

1256,023

316,0191262,693

247,017 265,181 270 30) 291,370 386,177
277,397
262,015 281,161 289,457 j 209,528 410,240 335,451 270,167 304,932 308,880
258,1 70 217,733 ,258,310 330,993 423,577
363,H00j 295,635 201,064 286,755
251,923 201,086 207,893 379.85') 422,310 363.520 294.785 200,419'207,547

.

1 •>

19..
26.

325,186

The above statement shows—1. That the total receipts from
the plantations since September 1. 1884, were 2,883,746 bales;
in 1883 were 3,789,501 bales: in 1882 were 3,821,8 >2 bales.
2.—That, although the receipts at the outports the past week
were 207,893 bales, the actual movement from plantations was
207,547 bales, the balance being taken from the stocks at

the interior towns.
for the same week

o
>-i

10%
11%
10%
11%
10%
10%

finally reaches the market through the outports.

Ending—

3,089,9 >1 3,056.335
5%d.

Total visible supply
3,077,107 3,401,700
Price Mid. Upl., Liverpool...i
6d.
51%, d.

aj

RECEIPTS 1 ROM PLANTATIONS.

ol.

605,000
148.470
..2,608,307 2,863,700 2,494.961 2,607,865

Total East India, Ac..
Total American....

;
>>

prepared for the purpose of indicating the actual movement each
,veek from the plantations.
Receipts at the out port 8 are some¬
times misleading, as they are made up more largely one year
chan another at the expense of the interior stocks.
We reach,
therefore, a safer conclusion through a comparative statement
like the following.
In reply to frequent inquiries we will add
that these figures, of course, do not include overland receipts
or Southern consumption; they are simply a statement of the
weekly movement from the plantations of that part of the crop

•

•

10%
11%
10%
11%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%

10%
11%
10%
Ids
10%
10%
10%

10

....

St. Louis
Cincinnati...

..2,608,307 2,863,700 2,484,961 2,607,865

Total American
East Indian. Brazil, d.c.

11

•

IO71 ft

1°716

10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%
11%
10%
11%
10%
10%

;

757,470

112,000
90,000
611,000
507,000
65,000
39,000
960,981 1,212,702
416,363
332,580
39,400
11,800

541,000

11

10% (i %
11 %
10%

..

PhilsKlelphia.
Augusta
Memphis

10%,*

10%«
10%

Fri.

;

10%
10% ft 5>%
103ft
LO%
10%
10% ^)716 10%B®%
10%

10%
10%

Wilmington..
Norfolk
Boston
Baltimore.

10%
10%

10%6
1031,3

10316

10%«

Louisville...
Total European stocks ....
India cotton afloat for Europe.
Amer’n cott’n afloat for Eur’pe

10%

103ib

Thurs.

Wednes.

Tncs.

10%

...

Total Great Britain stock.

Mon.

Last year the receipts
were

from the plantations
200,419 bales and for 1882 they were

294,785 bales.
Amount
we

O

of

Cotton

in

Sight Dec. 20.—In the table below

give tiie receipts from plantations in another form, and add

to them the net overland movement to Dec.

takings by Southern spinners to the

M

,

© I

»I
W !
©

M

to

© © -1 x t o CC 00
© X © U 'if- X to
© X © X © <» 0)1

M

j CC

O

00

I-1

00

m

o

>-

-ICC ©

is*,

io

to V

(X)

-a 45-

to.

oi oo
© © © m to © tz w
<i
oe ©
to X O' tv X © © •“ X V- ©
X © X Ofl - 1 CO
C X © O' w> © © 4- to ©
—1 •'t --1 © to 0)1 <1 ©

rC
lO

to 10

substantially the amount of cotton

1
1

cobi ! a.?re

I

©

^

H
»

Oi

M 10 >-»

I c 1 i.cacciv^i»k
‘

©

©; x
00 j X

Oj
C*

H

%1

w

©

cc

I

|

|

.

—

to

©5c ©
ju

cc © co

‘
|

© to X

o

to
CO

to

b»
Si
°

to
% to co

^

►— to

!

IOC to On © M C-. tc © M

X

j C'p X~-t rO XM M CMC'
x to%^-x'TjrooiT-©tc

C ;

co

ao
w;cdi
r- rel --4

to ©

x ac
xto

I

C. tO

Cl0

M

X XXX
-• to
C- M
'
■si X C Cj w © M

Mi-*

CO

ro 4—

“4 ©

C 00 X)© — 0.0
1 1(4 ^4 .. MM © ©
1

1

©

Cl

X

Cn

£>
00

*o

to

**

©
4--

l**

!

l(4

m

'J

—

tv

I 8;
1
-S?

i

£» to

■—‘igC.1 CC

t 0 -"J CO

M to j
©T-*^ © i

*

w

’ ** f-*

X

r-

to

M >—

D

©

V*

CO © CO CO

CO

CC Cl 11. X X
*- Itk rc bi x ©

Tot. receipts from plantn’tns
Net overhaul to ib-eember 1
Southern eonsumpt'n to Dec. 1

x<*

$ ts
r7.ee

I &

I-1
-

w< X )-*©*-

to Oi -> ©

C tv T 05 C<

ClWOS4-i3*-jC'|Xi.

65,72

j-1 V5

o1 © © x © x co to

9*
X

0

Total in
*3

•

;

r.

V

►— i—i

Ol X

to to X

—

X <*- M o

Cl to to

-

X

«
•

<Sj

X

c?
o

to?r

—©

to

to

o

-4

CO

icek.

CO -4
‘ k:
X tO ~ . X tv C X O' tO © r- © X -AlC tv 10 X CC
v. © M v.
C - CO
© © Vi U C" © 1C 4- ^ 1 ©

M10

CO

i-1

M

i— © co © to »•* CO Kr x V»
co cc m
x Cr © ©
X C to U -a mX © ct J.
C« © CO X to rf* C» X X

b.

M H- © © © X X — O' X '4 Cl X CC CC: © © 'x.
oi'jtcffii. ci'C'I**occh t -, ic x - -I r.
© '4 © tc X tc iC © © )— © ■— CO to M JO © I— CI

This

1

ct

3
55

S.^5
M
v.

X

X)

M

M M

vj

>—*

-v

CO —*

X ©

C

© ©

i—>

©

'JIM

MIC CO tote CI CO

cc
cc * i cc co cji
^
© C C. —‘ © — *-* to M
© C M CC © © M X C* z © ■— C> —
- )

X

—

CO

10
UJ

9

Jc

■

.

i

*

—

cc cr. (Xj ic
-x J.

cwuttx;c©

U

c

-i

4- to

S’
Ci

x^

s

cc

a

!

a

M

CC

X'COX©tOM

M

c> > M
CO CO
O' X
© tO
— C
l
X ^1 4- M

c
‘J

.

x.

s

to o

tO

)—* M

f—

Cl to © CC Z.

>-

M © Cl

P-

.

to ©

-

1010

r-to

1 © CC -1 X

I—

g%

IsJ

S'

-

1

S be

co © co x © rc % co
© m x o» co © m -o*
M o:

ta
X

V?.

M

Ol

<1 X tv If* X M *. © CC X ;
a- to c xcc
c- © w
cc x c m © x — o: to ©;

a

M 1 X CC to
' 1 -1 tv © X

X
rj

CO

C © CC X

Tula year*.-, tig.ires estimated.

Tne above

totals show

that

the ol<I

interior stocks

decreased during the week 149 bales, and




are

1831.

373,154

346,30)

363,370

421,161

3,883,746 3,799.504 3,824,832 3,654,274
227,8551
78,000!

1

261,252
97.000

244,112
90,000

2c0,910

70,000

will be
as

seen

654,163

790,412

766,825

897,758

by the above that the increase in amount in sight

coin pared

with last year, is 51,915 bales
and with 1881, is 244,417 bales.

as

compared

with 1«82 is 30,657 bales,

Cb

<1©

M

It

Weather Reports
IO X M M M tv to
to7. © X to© X

|

takings to

by

>—

pm

M tO
00*10 44

1882.

sight December 26.. 4.189,601 4,137,756 4,158,944 3,945,184

Northern siunnei’H’

to-night,

•

r-

c

X

Interior stocks on Dee. 26 in
excess ol Seotember 1

Decemb(:r 26
— *■*

1S83.

re

.

S-

|

date,

Receipts at t he ports to Doe.26 3,537,441 3,416,350 3,461,462 3,233,113

M

f—•

£*•

X

r-fOCOMMtOM
©

»

O'-

.

CO W
** © .t* © x to x to
ca x
to O' C © ©. X X MX »f.OH

CC

Ol

© tc cc CO <J —
•vj M X to C* -1 ©

1

>-4

>—* m © cc

r

j

■

xx j m

M

X

j

to

—

"-- i

x ex'© 8 j x7- © ro © cc w m x © ao © xlo
© © -t © if* ~ — © © w. © -1 © © M to © X
© it- © to m © C fO r- — *4 © O’ © © © m CO CO

co •

i Ci
CO
w

O

'

<j

M10 to

re

..

M

89,650 23,928

—

M

W

M

©

00

>—»

©

I

©

CD

1

a

Gi

i—

M

<1

05| Cl
W

w
WWW

now

1884.

i

1, and also the
so as to give
in sight.

same

have

to-night 41,095

been low at the South

Telegraph.—The temperature has

during the week, falling to 1 above zero
Nashville, and ice is reported in many districts, interfering
at some points witli the movement of the crop.
Galveston, Texas.—It lias rained on four days of the week,
the rainfall reaching twenty-four hundredths of an inch.
Average thermometer 55, highest 73, lowest 32.
Indianola, Texas.—We have had rain on one day of the
week, the rainfall reaching eight hundredths of an inch. Ice
formed in this vicinity on one night.
About all the crop has
now been secured.
The thermometer has averaged 50, the
highest being GG and the lowest 25.
Palestine, Texas—It has rained on one day of the week, the
rainfall reaching five hundredths of an inch. Ice formed in this
vicinity on two nights. The therinoineterjli.is averaged 40
at

ranging from 10 to 57. ;

THE CHRONICLE

738

BOMBAY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR YEARS.

New Orleans, Louisiana.—It has rained on three days of
the week, the rainfall reaching three hundredths of an inch.
The thermomc ter has

averaged 56.

[Vol. xxxixj:

'Tear Great Conti¬
BriVn. nent■

Total.

Receipts.

Shipment« since Jan. 1.

Shipments this week.

Great
Britain

Conti¬
nent.

This
Week.

Total.

Since

Jan. I.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—Telegram not received.
1,649,000*
Vicksburg, Mississippi.—Telegram not received.
1884 ...Net receiv eil.. ..1521,000 686,000 1,207,000
1883
11,0001499,000 828,000 1,327.000 23.000 1.774,COO
Columbus, Mississippi.—It has rained on two days of the 1882 11,000
2,oOO 4,000 6.000 801.000 65 2.000 1,463.000 30.000 1,785,COO>
week, the rainfall reaching one inch and fifty hundredths. 18.81 6,000 7,000 13,000 376 00O 617,000 993 OP*' 28 00«* 1.391,000
Weather very cold.
According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show a
L'it'le Hook, Arkansas.—It has been more or less cloudy all —crease compared with last year in the week's receipts of
the week, with rain on two days, the rainfall reaching thirtybales, and a —crease in shipments of
bales, and
bales.
four hundredths of an inch.
The thermometer has averaged the shipments since January 1 show a —crease of
The movement; at Calcutta, Madras and other India ports for
24, ranging from l to 35.
the last reported week and since the 1st of January, for two
Helena, Arkansas.—It has rained on three days, and the years, has been as follows.
“Other ports” cover Ceylon,
remainder of the week has been cloudy.
The rainfall reached Tuticorin, Kurrachee and Coconada.
ninet3T-five hundredths of an inch. The river is full of ire
Shipments since January 1.
Shipments for the week.
and navigation is suspended. The thermometer lias ranged
Ore at
Conti¬
Great
from 12 (this morning) to 55, averaging 30.
Total.
Continent.
Total.
Britain.
nent.
Britain.
Memphis, Tennessee.—It has ra ned on three d:i3's of the
Calcutta—
week, the rainfall reaching forty-four hundredths of an inch.
42.700
82.500
125,200
1884
500
9,0 JO
5C0
90,100
99,100
1883
Receipts by river during the latter part of the week have been Madras—
56.500
56,500
1884
light on account of partial suspension of navigation by ice.
51,0 ;0
1,300
52,30D
1883
The thermometer has averaged 29, highest being 49 and the
Ill others—

lowest 8.

1884
1883.

80,300

44.500

124,800

78.500

61,800

140,300

Nashville, Tennessee.—We have had rain on two days of
Total allthe week, the rainfall reaching seventy-five hundredths of an
87.200
219,300
306,50(4
1884
500
219.600
291,700
72,100
"hod
nch.
The thermometer has averaged 27, ranging from 1 to 52.
1883...-.Mobile. Alabama.—It has rained oh three days of the week,
The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the rainfall reaching one inch and nine hundredths.
The the ports other than Bombay is
hales
than samo
thermometer has ranged from 20 to 78, averaging 50.
week last year.
For the wiiole of India, therefore, the total
Montgomery, Alabama.—We have had rain on four days shipments since January 1, 1884, and for the corresponding
of the week, the rainfall reaching eiglity-four hundredths of periods of the two previous years, are as follows:
EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ALL INDIA.
an inch.
Rainbow on the twenty-first. Average thermom¬
1882.
1883.
eter 47, highest 77 and lowest 16.
1884.
Shipments
Selma, Alabama.—It has rained on two days of the week,
Since
This
This
Since
Since
This
to all Europe
week.
Jan. 1.
week.
Jan. 1.
Jan. 1.
week.
from—
the rainfall reaching eighty-one hundredths of an inch.
The
thermometer has averaged 48, the liighest being 62 and the 8ombay
6.000 1,453,000
1.207,000 11,000 1,327.000
All other

lowest 30.

500

306,500

Not

ports.

Auburn, Alabama.—Telegram not received.
Madison, Florida.—Telegram not received.
Macon, Georgia.—It has been showery on three

1.513,500

Total

314.800

10,1001

2 01.700

receiv’d

16,100 1,767.800

11,500 1.613,7 on

Tins last statement affords a very interesting comparison of
days of the the total movement for the three years at all India ports.
week.
Average thermometer 45, highest 67, lowest 19.
Alexandria Receipts and Shipments.—Through arrange¬
Columbus, Georgia.—During the week the rainfall has ments we have made with Messrs. Davies, Ben ichi & Co., of
reached one inch and forty hundredths.
The thermometer has Liverpool and Alexandria, wTe now receive a weekly cable of
the movements of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt.
The following
averaged 44, the highest being 69 and the lowest 27.
are the receipts and shipments for the past week and for theSavannah, Georgia.—We have had rain on tlireo days, and
the remainder ot the week has been cloudy.
The rainfall corresponding week of the previous two years.
reached thirty-eight hundredths of an inch. The thermome¬
Alexandria, Eaypt,
1882.
1883.
1884.
ter has averaged 48, ranging from 27 to 72.
December 24.
'
Augusta, Georgia.—The weather has been cold and wet
tcantars*)—
during the week. It lias rained on five days, the rain1.all Receipts This
150.00D
150,004
Not received.
week....
1,486.000'
1,912,000
Since Sept. 1
l,~0o.0 0 1
reaching two inches and twenty-five hundredths. The ther¬
mometer has ranged from 23 to 74, a'v eraging 42..
Since
This
Since
Since
This
j This
week. Sept. 1.
Atlanta, Georgia.—Telegram not received.
week. Sept. 1.
week. Sept. 1.
Churl ston, (South Carolina.—It has rained on four days of
1
i
the week.
The thermometer lias averaged 46, the highest Exports (bales)—
147,000 10,000 129.000 !15,0f0 116.00D
i\> Liverpool..-being 05 and the lowest 20.
4,0u0 28,000
5?,0^0 10,000| 54,-00
To Continent
Statebu*g, South Carolina.—The weather has been too
205,000 -20,000|l 83,000 19,000 114,0002
Total Europe
cold during the week, except on one day, and ice formed on
three night--. We luue bad an uriu.su dly severe thunder
A cantar is 93 lbs.
storm and tornado, but no serious damage done.
Altogether
This statement shows that the receipts for the week ending
it has rained on three days, with a rainfall of one inch and
Dec.
24 were
cantars and the shipments to all Europe
eighty-nine hundre ths. The thermometer lias ranged from
■

*

17 to 68,

hales.

averaging 37*9.

Wilson, North Carolina.—We have had rain on three days
of the week, the rainfall reaching one inch and sixty-eight
hundiedths.
Average thermom* ter 35, highest 04, lowest 14.
The following statement we have also received by telegrapn,

Manchester Market.—We have received no report
Manchester to-night, hut give previous weeks’ prices.

Dec. 2 5. ’34

Below high-water mark

New Orleans

Above low-water mark.

Memphis

Above low-water mark.

Nashville
B

Above low-water mark
A Love low-watm* mark.

ireveport

Vicksburg

New Orleans

Feet.
11
9
13
10
ir>

Inch.
3 0
10
0
9

Dec. 2 7
Fen
9
10

33
13
13

0

Sk* lbs.

32s Cop.
Twist.

Shirtings.

83.
ho

/■

0
0
1
6
to

reported below liigli-water mark of 1871 until

Sept. 9, 1874, when the zero of gauge was changed to highwater mark of April 15 and 10, 1874, which is 6-10ths of a foot
above 1871, or 16 feet above low-water mark at that point.

1883.

1834.

showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o'clock
December 25, 1884, and December 27, 1S83.

d
s.
d. s. d.
d.
Oet.24 35u —SUL a 5 5*206 10*2
31 S-Dt,—813, ^[5 6*2*7 0
—-B13 j “5 6*2*7 0
Nov. 7
“
5 8
2)7 1
14
j H
9
“
5
9 07 2
21 3 l> a> 9
“
a7
2*2
23 89m* 9*8 5 9
Dec. 5 ■3» m a 9% 5 9 07 3
“
8
07 1
12 8’a 0 9*8 5
“
19 3*8 * 9
|5 7 07 0
“
N ot received
26 !
•

’

from

CotV u
Mid

Upl

e

->1

is

5Hl8

d.

d.

d.

s.

d.

5
5
5

7

07

1k>

6

6

07

5
5

6
7
7
7
8

07
07

1 H
lkj

6

6

8 'G

5‘h

7t)

9
9

*

9

*s

3*1 (t> 9is
56*16 8^*8 0 9*s 5
4
80, h 0 9
5*8
0 87h >
5i3]6
8^8 n> H7s 5

513IP

Vpldf

8^0 9
Bhn 0 9

d.

d

Oott'n
Mid.

8*4 los.
Shirtings.

32* Cop.
2 ictst.

3

'

s.

07

1 *2

5l0i6
57s

1 *2

51516
6

07

07
©7

1*2
23j:

51d ’6 Uki
5 *2 0 4 1 lta

578
51316
o

513ie

New York Cotton Exchange.—On the report of the
We have Supervisory Committee regarding the compl tint against John
re-arranged our India service so as to make our reports more M. Ewen, referred to on the 20th inst., tie* Bo ard of Managers,
detailed and at the same time more accurate. We had found 15 of the 18 members constituting the B >ard being present,
unanimously resolved, and had the decision posted on the
it impossible to keep out of our figures, as cabled to us for the
Exchange
as follows, viz :
&
ports other than Bombay, cargoes which proved only to be
At a meeting of the Board of Managers the following was
shipments from one India port to another. The plan now
followed relieves" us from the danger of this inaccuracy and adopted:
Resolved—That John M. Ewon he end is hereby expelled from the
keeps the totals correct. We first give the Bombay statement
New York Cotton Exchange. Signed, Wui, V. King, Secretary.
for the week and ye/ir, bringing the figures down to Dec. 25,
India




Cotton

Movement

from

all

Ports.

—

.

-

THE

December 27, 1884. ]

CHRONICLE.

Jute Butts, Bagging, &c.—The demand for bagging has
.continued quite active since our last report and parcels are

moving freely. Inquiries are in market for several round lots*
but they have not been closed as yet. Sellers are quite firm
n their ideas as to price, and little inclination is shown to
shade present figures, which are 8%c. for 1 y2 lbs., 9}^c. for
1% lbs., 10c. for 2 lbs. and 10c%. for standard grades. Butts
are only moving in a small way for present wants, but we
hear of few large sales. A few thousand bales have been taken
at 1%@1/6C* for paper grades and 2^ @2^c. for bagging

The Exports

comparison of the port movement by weeks is not accurate.
same day of
the month. We have consequently added to our other standing
^tables a daily and monthly statement, that the reader may
-constantly have before him the data for seeing the exact relative
movement for the years named.
The movement during
September, 1884, and previous years, has been as follows.
A

the weeks in different years do not end on the

as

Tear

Monthly
Receipts.

Beginning September 1.

1883

1884

1881.

1882.

'Sept’mb’r 345,443 343.812
•October.. 1.090,385 1.046.092

1880.

1879.

326,655

429.777

333,613

980,584
HovembT 1,122,164 1,030.380 1,094.697

853,195

888,492

‘.Total year 2,557 99

458,478
968,316
974,043 1,006,501

942.272

2,420,284 2.401,937 2,257,015 2,433 297 2,164 407

t

Perc’tageof tot. port
receipts Nov. 50..

49-90

39 90

47 81

41-42

43 27

This statement shows that up to Nov. 30 the receipts at the
ports this year were 137,710 bales more than in 1883 and
150,057 bales more than at the same time in 1882. By aiding
to the above totals to November 30 the daily receipts since
thal time, we shall bo able to reach an exact comparison of

•the movement for the different ye irs.
1883.

1881.

-

1862.

1881.

1880.

1879.

Tot.Nv.30 2,557,991 2,420,284 2,401,93’ 2,257,015 2,433,297 2.164.407
32 561
40,40b
51,376
36,867
26.617
52,479
44
2...
8.
34,792
51.332
30,6 3
29,216
30,886
“
3...
8.
31,4849,256
34.006
48,897
28.110
44
8.
4..
46,652
50,747
36,-573
25.675
30,346
5...

69,32-

“

6....

42,484

44

7....

44

40 832

54.134

8.

49.608

41,373
27,721

31 799

63,166

36.146

8.

49,583
35,316
52,11b

30.136

36.174

8.

8....

53 0‘26

54,197

55,741

29.263

43,236

“

9....

35,689

8.

40,2^6

25,055

31.502

“

10....
11....

29.964

57,783

8.

40,865
47,904
39,377

59,133

37,914

43,651

40 050

48,904

8.

41,1-93

12...

8 i,6 43

34,347

34,20-

8.

33,16 4
50,014

35.2

42,522

37,733

30,650
33,332
40.452

45,251

44
‘4<
44

13....

31.338

1

40 107

50,059
30,9; 2

*«

14....

8.

58.665

37,112

32,913

44

15....

56.658

40,736

63,396

36,960

44

16....

32,675

8.

36,531

51,325

44

17....

31.541

44.845

8.

28,929

44

18....

49.S69

19....

37,00 >
68,926

41,367

“

43.261

35 313

8.

30.412
32.588

8.

45,560

8.

42,450

20....

24 6B-

30,4 46

39.243

21....

H.

47,064

44

22....

36.-319

30,796

35,840
61,344

25,260
26,156
35,119

4‘

23....

40 116

8.

45,936

45.831

30.473

43,275

31,874

37.419

8.

25,775
32,077

28.891

46,158

44

24....

26,457

31,591

59,785

23,445

25....

27.17b

46,558
32,705

8.

44

50,258

8.

36,096

29.611

44

26....

53,19 i

21,523

3^,039

33 552

8.

42,619

3,537.111 3,319,24b .>,3 43,77 4 3,097,632 3,2 J5,760 3,012,519
Percentage of tola
..

6*105

port ree’nts Dec °6

This

statement shows

55-54

an

Exports or Cotton (balks) from New York singe Sept. 1.1884.

Week ending—

Exported to-—

Dee.
4.

Liverpool
to

Dec.
18.

Dec.
25.

period
previ’uB

Sept. 1.

year.

10.003 14.843
1,009 1.173

3.679 12,938 182,189 165,161
447
24, <47 15.927

Great Britain 11,012 16,016

4,126 12,933 206,236 181,083

Other British ports
Total

Dec.
11.

Same

Total
since

Havre
Other French ports

2,093

Total French

2,336

2,145

1.354
167

1.049

2,145

1,521

1,049

23,148

22,272

714

492

1,206

794
1.267

250

1,493

1,896

12,477
32.707
36,578

14.879
17,693
20.861

3,554

2,146

SI,762

53,433

200

1,100
5,262

2,967
2,109

200

6,662

5,076

238

Bremen

Hamburg
Other ports

2,033

1,646
3,311

Total to North. Europe

3,953

5,449

Spain. Op’rto,Gibralt’r,<fee
VI1 other

1,188

i, 0*9*2 1

Total

1,188

1,092

Spain, &o

Gr »ni> Total

18,489 24,702

22,463

22,272

685

......

9,201 16.333 317,808 261,869

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United
States the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached

184,099 bales.

So far

as

the Southern ports are concerned, these

the same exports reported by telegraph, and published in
the Chronicle last Friday.
With regard to New York we
are

include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to

night of this week.

Thursday

Total bales.
York—To Liverpool, per steamers Arizona, 1.520
Britannic, 1,00 '
City of Montreal, 3,15 * ...Pleiades,
1,34 1
Republic. 1,181
Seytliia. 2.210
Spain, 1,625 12,938
To Havre, per steamer St. Simon, 1,049
J,019
To Hamburg, per steamer Rmria, 2 >o
250
i o Antwerp, per steamers
Afghan, 897 ...Penulaud, 999...
1,896
To Genoa, per steamer In lipeudente 200
i:00
New Orleans—To Liv-rnool, per steamers Hays water, 4,0 so
Clare. 5, .00
Tli-.memore, 4,-<90
per ship Asiraeana. 4,038
18,303
To Havre, per steamer Dunedin, 5,105
per ship Tie Marilia. 1,248 ...per barks J dm Witt, 3,370 ...Nanny, 1,400 11,023
To Antw rp, per steamer Longhirsr, 4,9 >6
4,9 »6
To Barcelona, per sto.wuer Santiago, 2,250
2,250
To G-noa, per bark Jedanesti Dubrovaeki, 2,383
2,333
To Vera Cruz, par steamer Estab tn de Antutn.mo, 1,077
1,077
Charleston—To Liverpool, pei st» amers Maude, 3,9 >5 Upland
and 200 Sea Island
Para, 3,935 Upland and 2b0 Sea
Island ...per nark Fra ik Stafford, 3,7 0 Upland
12,146
To II tvre, per bark Hosten, 1,631 Upl uid
1,634
To Hr men. per steamer II island, 4,20J
Upland
per bark
Jr.uo, 855 Upland
5,055
To Barcelona, per bark Ydun, 1,785 Upland
1,785
...

49,541
39,649

44

'Total.

Cotton from New York this week show

New

Dec. 1

44

of

increase, as compared with last week, the total reaching 18,333
bales, against 9,201 bales last week. Below we give our usualtable, showing the exports of cotton from New York, and their
direction, for each of the last four weeks; also the total exports
and directions since September 1, 1884, and in the last column
the total for the same period of the previous year.

qualities, the market closing steady at these figures.
Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.

7

65-6 2

56-11

60-23

that the

receipts since Sept. 1 up to
to-night are now 188,105 bales more than they were to the same
day of the month in 1883 and 103,007 bales more than they were
to the same day of the month in 1832.
We add to the table
the percentages of total port receipts which had been received
to December 20 in each of the years named.

The Following are the Gross Receipts of Cotton at
New York. Boston, Phila lelphia and Baltimore for the
past
week, and since September 1. 1834.

Savannah—Co Liverpool, per shi > Regent, 4,333
E. T. G., 3,191 ...Tik mi, 2,0 >3
To Havre, per bark Condo-, 1,17'*.
To R emeu, per steamers Cbm Frazer, 5,977
5,960 ..Jos. Fe ens, 5,500
To Ghent, per bark Sleipner. 1,477
To Barcelona, per steamer Wivenlioe, 5,0 0
To

Corunna,

per

per

barks
10,187
1,175

Gleadowe,

17,137
1,477

5,01D

t»rig Baltic, 600

t>00

Galveston—To Liverpool, per st amors Empire, 5,217
Re¬
becca. 3,971
..per barks Fo.tuna, l,3o4
Go-la, 1,0-53
Moot hill, 1,400
Saga. 1 461
~
14,526
To Havre, per hark Norge. 1,400.
1,400
To Bremen, per steamers Acubu, 4,715
Ashford, 5,229
Victoria, 2,605
12,549
To Vera Cruz, per steamer Harlan, 425
125
Wilminoton—To Liverpool, per steamer Carn Marth, 5,0.0

bar.i Sidon, 1, 13
Norfolk—To Liverpool, per steamer Kingdom, 5,325
per
b irk R. Morrow, 4,300
To Bremen, per ste inter Halcyon, 4,355
To Gott-eub'irg. per bark Ami dd 1, l.s j?
West Point—To Liverpool, per bark Ashlow, 2,1 o
Baltimore—To Liverpool, per stcamcis Sannutian, 2.0J4
South Cambria. I,coo
To Biv,men, per steamer Nurnhe g, 2.3 O
Boston—' <» Liverpool, per steamers Borderer, 2.<90
Norse¬
man. 2,524
..Pavouin, 1,0 i5. ..*.
Philadei phi a—To Liverpool, persteamets British Crow
n, 2,0,9
....Indiana, 503
.

Total.

9,625
4,335
1,827
2,100

3,^99
2,300

6,353
2,514

13 4.699

The particulars of these

form,

6,523

are as

follows:

shipments, arranged in

our

usual

Am s'dam,
New York.

Receipts
from—
New Orleans.
Texas
Savannah
Mobile
Florida
Ho. Carolina..
No. Carolina..
.

..

Boston.

PHILADELPH’A

This

Si me

This

Since

To is

Since

This

Since

week.

Sept. 1.

week.

Sept. 1.

week.

Sept. 1.

week.

Sept. 1.

6,26!
10.969

8,«Jl
7g2

1

7,416

216
-

153,-03
113,241
4.9 L8

2?,010
o:jo

321

0.732

New York.
N. Orleans.
Charleston.
Savannah..

Galveston.

Wilmington
Norfolk
West Point
Baltimore..
Boston
...

2,060

8,891

335

7,484

11,950

4,120

37,362

2,112

19,289

ports

971

9S3

4,SS6

Tennessee,&e

8.003

2 1,565

0,125

Foreign

35,962
08,241

2,1 06

4f27rt

This

48,311

620,915

17,821

40,764

060.775

23,151

yeur...

35,376
806

13,409
120.115

Last year..

443

3,500

73.184

Virginia

*

......

4,1 'M

North’n

Anhrtrft, Ti^rcn-

Baltimore.




55

1,844

14,049
11,821

2,442

63,413

2,582

18.40;

176,154

5,350

51.903

4,7-y

127,635

184.765

4,254

47,839

6,881

121.760

2,200

20

Philadelp’a

Liverwont. Havre,
12,938
1.049

Bremen (Hind
if- Ilam- if- Got-

burg.
2oO

18,308 14,6i3
12.146
1,634 5,055
10,187 1,17.4 17.137
14, 26 1,400 12.549
6,523
*9,625
4,355
2,100
3,690
2,3 JO
6,359

2,544

ienb'g
1,-96
4.936

1,477

loua if
Go-

Vera

runna. Genoa. Cruz.
200

2 250
1,784

2,333

1,077

5,610
425

1,827

Total.
16.333

43.637
20,6-0
35,886
28,9oO
6,523
15.807
2.I0O
5.990

6,359
2,544

Total.. 98,946 19.881 41,946 10,196 9,645 2,583 1,502
184,699
Below we add the clearances this week of vessels
carrying
cotton from United States ports,
bringing our data down to
the latest dates:

I
THE CHRONICLE.

Galveston— For
Racer, 030

Liverpool—Dec. 10—Barks Observant, 711;

Ocean

8at.

-

Dec. 23—Bark Jacob. I,GOO.

For Bremen—Dec. 21—Bark Caledonia.
-.
New Orleans—For Liverpool—Dec. 20—Steamer
Dee. 22—Steamers Explorer, 4,786; Humaeoa,

Ship Excelsior, 6,730

Dec. 21—Bark Vallona,

Well field.
For Rotterdam—Doc. 23—Bark Forruna, 1,881.
.

For

19—Steamer Westergate, 4,365

Sebastopol—Dec.

Dec. 20-

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

d.

5 56

5 5G

5 56

5 56

5 58

5 58

5 58

5 58

5 82

5 02

5 61

5 01

Dec.-Jan....

5 56

5 56

5 50

5 5fl

5 58

5 58

5 58

5 53

5 62

5 02

5 01

5 01

Jan.-Feb—

5 58

5 58

5 53

5 51

5 60

561

5 00

501

5 03

5 03

5 62

5 62

5 02

5 62

!

5 62

Feb.-March. 5 62

0 00

0 01

0 00

001

6 03

6 03

6 02

0 02

0 Q8

8 02

6 02

3 02

6 02

: 6 04

ecs

0 04

0 05

6 07

6 07

6 03

April-May..

0 06

6 06

0 06

6 06

6 0S

6 09

6 08

6 00

1

0 11

0 11

0 10

610

May- lune..

6 10

6 10

0 10

0 10

0 12

0 12

0 12

0 12

!

6 15

0 15

0 14

0 14

June-July.. G 13
Tuly-Aujz... G 10
A u^.-Sept...
Sept.-Oct...

6 13

0 13

0 13

0 16

0 16

0 16

6 16

0 IS

0 18

0 18

618

0 16

6 10

6 10

6 19

0 19

0 19

0 19

0 22

0 22

0 22

....

....

....

....

Open High Low.

.

give all news received to date of disasters to vessels
carrying cotton from United States ports, &c\:

5 02

5 02

5 62

5 02

Dec.-Jan....

5 02

5 02

5 02

5 62

Jan.-Feb

5 62

5 02

5 62

5 64

Feb.-March. 0 02

6 02

0 02

0 02

0 00

6 06

0 00

0 00

0 10

0 10

0 10

0 10

0 14

0 11

0 14

0 14

6 17

6 17

0 17

0 17

0 21

0 21

021

621

Liverpool, steam d.

1:V

sail...r/.

Do

sail

c.

....

Do

e.

-

sail..

-

....

he-11:;-/

..c.

Trieste, q^iim

.

)

‘•V/
V

h’
r,8

•~ri

r.

1:Ut'

1;vr

1;YT

.

*

h*

-

.3 4*

•
_

I Per 100 lbs.

Compressed.

Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool,
statement of the week’s sales,

add

V

•

we

stocks,

....

-..

have the following
at that port.
We

Bales of the week
bales.
Of wlii'-h exporters took
Of which speculators took..
Sales American
Actual export
Forwarded
Total stock—Estimated
Of which American—Estim’d
Total import of the week
Of which American
Amount afloat
Of which American

69,000
8,000
7,000

37,006
8,00C
24,000
430,006
247,000
93,000
78,000
262,000
216,000

17,00.
4,00;
3,000
29,006
11,000
39,000
428,000
250,000
87,000

71,006
321,000

307,000

Dec. 12.

Dec. 19.

45,000
5,000
5,000
27,000
1 0,000
4 2,000
503,000
316,000
163,000
1 30,000

296,000
284,000

37,000
3,000
1,000
24,000
11,000
39,000
529,000
336,000
108,000
78,000
3 28,000

307,600

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures each
day of the week ending Dec. 26, and the daily closing prices
of spot cotton, have been as follows:
Saturday Monday.

Spot.

Tuesday.

Wednes.

IlardenV.

On ml
demand.

Thursday.
*

12:30

(

p.m.)
Upills

Mid.
Mid. OiTns.
Sales

Spec. A exp.

Steady.

Harden’^.

57s

578

51^1,5

6

5,090
500

5L>i,)
6118

■

8,000

12.000

500

1.000

12:30

(

i'.M.)

Firm at
2-(i4 ad¬

Firm at
1-til ad¬

vance.

vance.

Market,

)

Quiet

5 P. M.

)

steady.

Steady.

but

Firm.

•

6

;

12,000
1,000

Barely

Dull but
firm tit

Quiet
but

steady

I

opening, highest, lowest and closing prices of futures at
Liverpool for each day of the week are given below. These
prices are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause, unless

otherwise stated.
The

prices

arc




yiren in pence ami

means

6 3-6 1/

tilths, thus:

•

•

....

....

1
;

-

!
i
!

1

J

1

j
1

•2

'

rS

rZ
■—H

O

r-t

;

j

!

\

j

i
i

;

1

!

i

j

1

Hr

j

H8

1

!

!
!

,

December 26, 1884.-

temporarily withdrawn from the
anticipation of better values after the holidays, but
the offerings at late prices have been quite equal to all de¬
mands.
Rye flour, corn meal and buckwheat Hour have
slightly declined. To-day wheat Hour was quiet but firmer.
The wheat market has shown some strength, speculation has
been comparatively slow, and -there is no considerable “short
interest” to- give rise to an irregular demand; but there has
been a very fair export movement from this port and from
Baltimore.

The Western farmers

seem

inclined to hold back

prices. Yet these in¬
confidence in an im¬
portant advance, proving adequate only to the prevention of
a decline to still
lower Jigures.
The export purchases have
included large lines of spring wheat for early arrival. To-day
there was a firmer but very quiet market.
DAILY CLOSING

I*RICKS OF NO.

April delivery

Indian

corn

80%

81

83

83 q

sr>q.
87-!s

85 to

RED. WINTER WHEAT.

Tucs.
83

89%
837s
85g
87 q

87%
89 q
OdbJ

89

May delivery
J .ne delivery

2

Mon.
8 3%

Sat.
83:!*

,Januarv delivery
February delivery
March delivery

89%

lias been variable.

Wed.
83
807m

89

90

90

The

irregular values.
changes have been the relief to the

Thurs.

83 q

85:)b
8738
89 q

'Zt
0
8—;

H-t

;

....

speculation has been
Tiie most important

pressure on
deliveries and the decline which has taken place

mixed in elevator.

Fri.
83

8iq

83

8'Ps
8?q
89q

fitful at uncertain and

December
in No. 2

The clearances hence to British ports are

quite liberal this week but do not promise to continue so long.
distant futures are somewhat neglected.
To-day the

The

whole movement

was

very

DAILY CLOSING

December

delivery

.January delivery
February delivery
March delivery
April delivery.
May delivery

some

The

5 62-tiid.. anil 6 03

•

0 22

sluggish.

TRICES OF NO. 2 MIXED CORN.

Mon.
53

Tucs.

Wed.

'53 82

5iq

52 q

52%

53

-18

48 q

4Sq

40%

47
47

47q
47
47
46%

.

,

-IG5*?

46%

51 q
487s
467s

Thurs.
;
r*
~

£
r“!

407q

:

«•

Fri.

51^

5iq
48
4G-53
4G5s
468i
4t>q

Rye has been quiet at the decline. Barley was much more
active early in the week, but at a decline of fully 5c. from pre¬
vious holding prices, there.-having been large sales of tworowed State at 5G^(Tto7e. per bushel.
Buckwheat has sold to

1-01 dec.

steady.

•

brands have been

Friday

Futures.

Market,

«

•

Frl., Dec. 26.

:

1

In elevator

dq

r?

|

Sat.

Market,

.

••••

•

been

fn elevator

Dec. 5.

.

•

!

j

...J
...

previous weeks for comparison.
Xoc. 28.

.

•

the remainder of their crops for higher
fluences do not appear to have inspired

-

.

;

h*

•V

Antwerp, steam, c.

he-11;;/

;

....

a,.-tram.c.

Grama, steam

H-t

....

r

55 f

0
•

.e.

-

....

551

•

market in

3g

55 f

551

•

only a holiday trade in Hour for the past
week, and of prices it may be said that although without de¬
cided decline" they are barely maintained.
It is true some
favorite

....

....

551

....

....

There has

....

-

<!. ho-11:;-/ Bia-31»2'

sail
;•

-

....

Friday, P. M

1

V
38

'sail—c.

Koval, steam
Barrel

;

q-

...

Amst’d’m. steam.e.

Do

l3fi4*

....

,,,,

•

8READSTUFFS.

:

itlamlmnr, ste a m.e.

I)<>

\

j

••

j
*

1

;*'i

*

sail

I»

Fm

....

....

the

on

Thurs.

1
....

V

Bremen, steam..e.

Wednes

....

1

i:qy

....

....

■

follows:

7:<2* ,3« 4“7:i2* 13<>4~732*

....

Havre, steam—c.
Do

r

...

fire at Savannah. Eight hun¬

Tuts.

•

...

•

...

•

Thurs., Dec.

d.' |

December..

Oct.-Nov....

dred and six-nine Irak's or cotton, damaged by (ire and water on
board the steamer Wilton (Br.), at Savaunah, were sold by auction
on Dec. 13 at $10 por bale.

Mon.

....

Clos.\

d.

Sept.-Oct..

steel hawser from the stunner. As the vessel curio oft" the shoal
the hawser fooled and, as it could not lie cut, the tug came iu col¬
lision with the vessel, knocking a hole in her side,
l'lie tug also
had her stern stove in.
Workmen were sent down on the 20th to

Satur.

j

24.

d.

June-July..
July-Amt...
Aug.-Sept...

was pulled off by tugs Constitution and Republic.
Li doing so,
however, the Republic parted an 8 inch h iwsor and bad to take a

as

....

d.

March-Apr.
April-May..
May-June..

Alexandre Bixio, steamer (Fr.i, from New Orleans, at Havre, Dec.
11 tli. reported having lost nine bales of cotton overb »ard.
Joseph Ferens, steamer (Br.), for Bremen, while on her way down the
river from Savannah Dec. 18 got ashore on the lower Hats. She

freights the past week have been

....

....

t

we

Cotton

....

....

.

Wednes., Dee

.

on

....

....

..

....

Dec.

Edin¬

.

Wilton, steamer (Br.), bofo”c reported

....

j

!

.

plate over the hole, and the vessel proceeded to sea

....

j

■

•

burgh, 6,435.

put a
2 2d

d

March-Apr.

Oct.-Nov..

West Point—For Liverpool—Dec. 22—Bark Elia Vose, 2,935.
Boston—For Liverpool—Dec. 17—Steamer Istriau, 1,827.
Baltimore—For Liverpool—Dec. 19—Steamer Barrowinore, 4,559
Dec. 21—Ste tmer Meiitmore,
For Bremen—Dec. 24—Steamer America,
Philadelphia—For Liverpool—Dec. 23— Steamer Lord Gough,
For Autwerp—Dee. 21—Steamer Nederland,

Below

Open High Low. Clot.

d.

....

Steamer Stella, 3,365.
Wilmington—For Bremen—Dee. 23—Bark Carl Max, 1,105.
Norfolk—For Liverpool—Dee. 20—Ship Ellen A. Read, 6,425
22—Steamer Harrogate, 4.900
Dec. 24—Ship Duchess of

Open High Low. Clos.

d.

.

Charleston—For Liverpool- Dec. 19—Steamer Troqueer, 3.565
Dec.
22-Bark Vesta, 1/ 02 ...Dec. 23—Bark Emilie, 1,350.
For Bremen—Dec. 19—Steamer Eustace, 4,079
Dec. 24— Steamer

Tues., Dec. 23.

d.

December.

Dec.

Mon., Dec. 22.

d.

.

2,609

Dec. 20.

Open High Low. Clos.

Enrique, 4,650
5,696
Dec. 23—

For Havre—D c. 20— Bark Inveresk, 2,669.
For Bremen- Dec. 19—Steamer Scots Greys, 5.250.
For Hamburg—Dec. 20—Steamer Glenista, 681.
Savannah—For Liverpool—Dec. 22—Bark Emma Marr,
21 - Steamer Sheluon,
For Havre—Deo. 20—Bark Sanvik, 1,900.
For Sebastopol—Dec. 23—Steamer Oakdale, 3,610.

[Vol. XXXIX,

.

740

5 62

means

extent at 48(d50e.

Oats

have not maintained the

speculative interest noted in

last, and values of the more distant futures have declined
slightly, while spot prices are barely maintained. - To-day the
market was firm but quiet, No. 2 mixed closing at 33]4'c. for
Jan., 33 Ye. for Feb. and 35c. for 51av.
our

Exports

following are closing quotations :

The

7 H

CHRONICLE

THE

1884.]

December 27,

from

—

Wheat.

Corn.

Bush.

Bush.
474,973

Flour.

Oats.

Ryt.

Ftas.

Bbls.

Bush.

Bush

Bush.

FLOUR.

Southern bakers' and

2 75
2 85
3 25
4 75
3 25
75® 5 00
25® 5 25
90® 4 25
00® 4 00

ft bbl. $2 15®

Fine

2
2
3
2
3
4
2
3

Superfine
Spring wheat extras.

Minn, clear and stra’t.

Winter shipp’g extras.
Winter XX.
Patents

City shipping ex
South’n ship’g extras.

family brands.
$4 25 ® 5 00
Rye flour, superfine.. 3 15® 3 40

35 ®
75 ®
50®
75®

Cora meal—

3 00®

Western, &o
Brandywine. <<10

®

flour per

Buckwheat
100 lbs

3 25
3 30

190® 2 10

00
05

Rve—Westbrn

Spring,per bUBh.
Spring No. 2
Red winter, No. 2
Red winter
White
Com—West, mixed
West. mix. No. 2.
West, white
White Southern..
Yellow Southern.

70

®

31
81
70
75

®
®
®
®
®
a
®
®
®

40

50
43
48
48

State

91
83
83
90
83
52
52
53
51

®

01

®

67

Oats—Mixed

32ia *

White
No. 2 mixed..
No. 2 white
Buckwheat
Bariev—No. 1 Canada.
No. 2 Canada

3412 ®
331a 2>

-..

5o

State, two-rowed
State, six-rowed

|

570.915

40,881

3514®
48

®

80
73
5 0

®

06

®

®

35
38
34
35 ^
5<>
83
70
58
70

breadstuffs to market is indicated in the
statements below, prepared by us from the figures of the Ne w
York Produce Exchange. We first give the receipts at Western
lake and river ports, arranged so as to present the compara¬
tive movement for the week ending Dec. 20 and since Aug. 1
for each of the last three years;

52,800

198.070

230,144

218,379

4,080
23,541

Total w’k.

994,486

941,543

211,768

3,390

49,548

S’me time
1833.

830,lSLi

659,995

2

3,175

127,743

The destination of these exports

Milwaukee

..

Toledo

Detroit

Cleveland.
St. Louis

..

111,856
2,392
1,223
3,931
28,273

803,849

4.800

178,574

27,423
27,617

881

500

19,250
9.72S

7,516

16,727

482

17,000
74,700

3,375

126,5-45

12,500
414,560

525

2,700

117,830

93,055

Peoria

Duluth

82,103
31.500

19,250

7-3,739

Exports
for week
to

-

1883.

1884.

Week,

1884.
Week,

1883.

Week,

Week,

Week,

Dec. 22.

Dec. 20.

Dec. 22.

Dec. 20.

Dee. 20.

1,249,151
036,150

523,565

357,948

2

909,47.3

4

1,987,214

840,635

263,830

149,028
25,215
3,613

3,281

211,768

205,7-4

991,486

63

74,660
169,811

18,217
377,083

'■xports since

Aug. 27 to

Aug. 25 to

Auq. 27 to

Dec. 20.

Dec. 22.

L*

4,280,186

2-80,605

261,807

140

30,875,315

5,002.298
2,30 2,023

Brit. Col’nies

49,316.781

31,273,695
23.54 4.065

11,107,411

4,307.115

O h. eountr’s

12,126

13,730

16,718

600

2.876,781

2.830,505

21,874.411

10,212,710

6,542,973

1,925,092

10,227,517

185.694

127.783

244,072
296,274

2 >2,474

11,595.165
31,845

232,629

Un. K ingdorn

1,852,010

Continent...
S & C. Am...

49

850.214

8.130,305

comparative shipments of flour and grain from the same
show

follows:

as

bids.

bush

1883-81.

1882-83,

I 881-82.

1890-81.

11, SIT,009

9,752,084

8,745.820

8.502.490

01.381.051
82.300,400

40,0.>1.149

104,120.1 !9

53,470.072
00.000.351

51.200.545

49.40!. 449

35.38 4.831

47,581,917
IO >,599,704
33.312.873

5.809.107
5,972,517

9.910.520

5.390.390
3,107.901

4 002.873
2 359.410

Barley
Rye

209,792,050

....

ports for four years:

Flour.«...
Wheat
Corn

.

bbls.

,

bash.

...

,

104,220,431

210,013,295

197,709.870

shipments from Western lake and river

the rail

are

5,814,443

13 S3.

4884.
T1 eel:.
Dee. 20

Week '
The. 22.

241,910

228,514

809.0 43
48 1,272
1 94,9.52

Barley
Rye

Dec. 2 1.
111.30 >

19 >33,950
4 >2,108
13 1 753

393.202

181,901
•11,145

13,094

Wee'.

283.01!)

378,379
1,080.!) 95

409,7!) 1

...

l -81

1.882.
Week
Dec. 23.
1 70.950

...

The rail and lake
weeks were:

In store at
New York

-

Week.
ending—
Dec. 20..
Dec. 13..
Dec. 0..

Nov.29..

bush.

bbls.

Oats.
bush.

Corn,

Alba ny
Bullalo.

.

bush.

219,910

409,791

1,021,003

271,829
259,707
310,397

220.993

240,220
921,033

1,070,750
1,029,0(37
1,933,923

Rye.

bush.

bus1-.,
18.091
17,028
24,17!)
39.300

572.2 40

191.952
132.201
172,107

409,500

180,499

439,30 2
551.503

bush
97,500

nb!s.

bush.

bush.

143,613

130,500
9,115
40,881

729.296
132,650
23,983

500

450

5,850

3.400

295,800
415,150

8 4.000

14,000

7,728

147.556

40,000

Total week... 266,841
Cor. week ’83.. 330,605

617,034 1,743,835
374,559
928,325

A t—

New York

...

Bostou

Portland

Montreal

53.634

5,500

?

Philadelphia...

9.103
19,367

Baltimore

27,394

154,200
275,888

unsn.

98,883
100,325

41,500

.

Cincinnati1'. ’
Boston
Montreal
Peoria

udianapolis
Kansas City
Baltimore
D >wl

1,207

343,863 157,000

347,533 150,350

9,081
52,650

1882-83.

1881-82.

1880-81.

bbls.

13,827,038

14,090,459

12,787,523

12,445.373

bush.

69,688,360
47,847,931

88,970,305
34,202,870

88,443,001

5,525,303

00,038,121
84,119.954
31,352,530
0,0,0.322
5,06 1,950

Total grain ...181,701,230

187,859,210

155,977,308

1883-84.

Wheat
Corn.

Oats

Barley

32,250,111
,

0,443,457

26,926.189

5,705,272
2,109,300

The exports from the several seaboard ports

ending Dec. 20, 1884,




are

shown in the annexed

21,000
108,000
1.122.1 14

103,115
2 20,751

233,334

08,000

152.000

14.503

11,000

332,* >00

28,000

388,061

48,633

90,332

12,070

97,433

11.349
....

22 938

9,‘:31
115,951

5,947

228.058

2,551,-02

3 10.520

54.529
92 989
177,9 >2
209.124

15,704
2 37,3 25
000
497

78.009
38 022
419,001

1,033,450

207,090

9,3iO

0.098

80,900

10,700

55,393

2,395
107.00-8
8 (5. .5 7 6

368

815,4 15

40,792
302,781
14.3.771

800

1.037,597

328.72 >

4,320,792
41,800,770 4,617,251
35.431.259 9,161,258
20,014.537 8,233,401
17,9 24,617 1 7,382,227

31 018

132,725
3!),070

1,026,365

43,068,151

5.042
570.2.59
5i,i 01
46,508

909

104,400
4,817
6,458

390,101

Bye
bush-.
65,4 41

-

•

-

„

«

#

03,770

407
2.500
43,354
10.193
2.385
1,100

3,674
1,119
2,000
1,376

41,135
19,114

635,036
675,649
0 .197,271 3,,409,350 2 ,712,188

2,,000.918 1 ,956,85 8
2. 913 865 2. 1 92,11 2
,

3,2(52,385 3,021,416 1,307,170
2.,754,109 2,,892,101 1,317,970

December 3 3.

THE

DRY

TRADE.

GOODS

Fridav, P. M., December 20, 1884.

week subsided into
quiet condition which usually precedes the holidays, and

The

dry goods trade has during the past

business in all the wholesale

branches

was

exceedingly light,

continuation of the improved feeling
lately developed. Local jobbers have practically suspended
purchases because of the near approacli of “stock-taking,”
and operations on the part of out-of-town buyers were chiefly
though there was a

The total receipts at the same ports for the period from Dec.
24, 1883, to Dec. 20, 1884, compare as follows for four years: .
Flour

375,070
196,198

17,0-7

Mississippi.

T >t. Dec. ‘20, ’84.
T *t, Dee. 13, ’84.
Tot. Dee. 22. ’33.
T »t. Dee.23,’82.
T >r. Dec. 24, ’81.

the
1.800

Newp’t News..

New Orleans...

hush

bush.

2,424
3,650

1,500

7,300

Barley,

bush
883 438

2,800.928
492.7 1 5

Toledo
Detroit
Oswego (rst.)...
sr. Louis

*

Tot., 4 w. 1091.909 1,801,049 0.252.419 2,145.071
730.149
99,2 *7
4w’ks’83.1051,799 2,109,733 4,304,301 2,696,28 t 1,152.775 243,933
The receipts of fiour and gram at the seaboard ports for the
week ended Dec. 20 follow:
Barley,
Oatt,
Rye
Corn,
Ftnur,
Wheat,

Oats,

bush

Chicago
13,075,401
3 1 6,907
Newport News...
3,300,5 11
Milwaukee
3,951 450
Duluth

Philadelphia

Barley,

Corn,

bush.

208,839
1,8 00
2.r> 80,o 00

On rail

Wheat,

Flour,

Wheat,

9,540,19“

afloat (est.)1

Do

140,891

shipments from same ports for last four

15,330.850

100,125

supply of grain, comprising the stocks 111 granary
principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard
ports, and in transit by rail and water, Dec. 20, 1884, was as

Toronto

1,730,230

1,831,470

2,070,092

1,913,753

11,042,867
2,895,497
450,409
102,104
73,848

The visible

1

Total

537

27 to

Dec. 22.

at the

215.919
938.399
380,414
42,057

20,704

Total.

■

10.111,526
0,070,505

A ug.

Bush.

21,538
8,010

ports from Dec. 24, 1883, to Dec. 20, 1881, inclusive, for four

Below

Bush.

West Indies.

1883

Total grain

A ug. 25 to
Dec. 20.

B ish.

Bush.

1883.

188-4.

Aug. 25 to

Bhs.

Bbls.

1883.

1884.

1883.

1884.

Aug. 25, to—

Corn.

Wheat.

3,252,834

1882

Wheat
Corn
Oats

659,995

9,213,771

4.610,073

Fiour

941,543

36.718,989 29.174,938

82,00-3

-

1884

years,

830,181

69.2SS.137
49.307.336

182,736

Jaly 23

The

11,991

4,957
3,058
1,495

By adding this week’s movement to our previous totals we
of exports since September 1,

•

Since

150,902
19.600

922

4,051,407
918,259
327,209
122,779
33,189
55,070

Same wk. ’83
Same wk. *82

Bush.

479,983

have the following statement
this season and last season:

Dec. 20.

3,074,433
1,646.737
1,238,637

326,016
179,247

315,233

3,253

18.014

!

Tot. wk. *81

Bush.
75 >.774

1,808

12,989

..

Bush.
501 288

8,674

9,474

Contin’nt
S ctC. Am
W. Indies
Brit, cbl’s
Oth.c’n’ts

1883.
Week.
Dec. 22.

Bush.
6 15,972

145,585
0,779
18.523
17.61 4
14,030

561,536

.

......

Bbls.

Bbls

160,S09

Un.King

9,627
1.000

18,852

Oom.

1834.

Flour.

78,000
12,000

16,57

We add the

is as below.

Wheat.

Flour.

Total

Bbti.imb? Bush.00 lbs Bush.fyOlbs Bush.32 lbs Bush .43 lbs Bush. 56-V.
167,407
34,573
315,503
614,391
1,287,620
89,7(56

Chicago

>5,784

4

corresponding period of last year for comparison:

Rye.

Bariev.

Oats.

Corn.

Wheat.

Flour.

12,84

Philadel..

..

3,731

40,4 8 "5
9,060

3,390

Baltim’re
N. Orl’ns.
N. News.

The movement of

Receipts at—

34,133
15,983

79,740

..

131,093
48.050
5,004

j

GRAIN.

Wheat—

New York
Boston.
Portland.
Montreal.

102,081,008
20,543,052
5,595,015
2,120,015

225,413,354

for the week

statement?

restricted to
connection
mission
more

a

placing orders for certain spring fabrics, in which
fair business was

houses.

reported by

The weather was

favorable for the development

of the com¬
cold and consequently

of

a

some

freer demand for the

consumption of seasonable goods, but retailers were apparently
able to

supply the wants of their customers without replen¬

ishing their stocks, and tiie

jobbing trade

was

therefore of

THE

742

CHRONICLE.

Importations of Dry Goods.

strictly moderate proportions. Accounts from most of ttie
Western, Southern and Southwestern markets indicate that a
fair business (for

importations of dry goods at this port for the week
ending Dec. 25? 1884, and since January 1, and the same facts
out¬ for the corresponding periods are as follows:

the time of year) is in progress, and.the
considered favorable; but the trade

look in these sections is

and near-by States is less satisfac’
than could be desired, for reasons that need not be re¬

aspect in the Northwestern
tory

capitulated.
Goods.—The exports of domestics for

Domestic Cotton

the week

comprised 2,868 packages, including 1,830 to Great

Britain, 380 to Hayti, 325 to U. S. of Colombia, 103 to
and a number of smaller lots to other destinations.
was a

less active

Brazil

There
demand for most kinds of plain and colored

reported of late, but the tone of the market con¬
tinued steady. Brown sheetings and drills were only in mod
crate demand, and bleached goods were less freely taken by
cottons than

jobbers and the manufacturing trade, while most descriptions
of colored cottons ruled quiet.
The advance lately noted in
fine bleached cottons was followed by some of the most pop¬
ular medium

makes of brown

3 3-16c.

“Fruit of the Loom,” &c., and certain
sheetings and denims are a trifle dearer.

grades,

Print cloths

were

plus

as

The

Total

I

at

H

cent for 64x04 “spots,” 3t^c. for 64x64 “con¬
13-16c. for 56x60s.
Prints were in irregular

fsss'ls

II Is;

the

port.

I!

OilC

CO
©

ton

F*

r

©©

3 15

SALES OF FUTURES.

Dull.

Wed’day.

Dull.

315

Quiet
and
stead v.

Quiet
and

Quiet
ami

steady.

Quiet
3-15

and
steauy.

Quiet
u i

cl

315

steady

February.

Price

Price

Sa.es

Sulcs

March.

©
Oi

-

Quiet.
>nd

steady.

-a

Transferable
c s-S unr lav. 3'3);
day, 3 20; Thursday,
: Friday. 3*20.

Total.

bb btto

1

to © F C

©

tow

©

wo

a © to h co

WH

ot

wto

F*

CO F

w

CC©

—

p

c ©

to 1—* I—• to
otFO>otao

|F
Ot

to to

»F

IF ©

w to

F»
to

QD W
© cO

bt

to to
O'

©

1

w©

F tO F F tO

ac -i f

C-Jl

tO W

tOX <J© tO

F* T. »i GCCC
'I F F tO W
F> <)
(X W

tOF

M
WW©F©

<x

W

00 ©

to r f

o'a

F

w

—

W

'

© -i

a

f

©

f

w

ot

i

I V

IF')

i

IF

X ©

CD F F* F W
w to a x a
O'
i * • © '1

|F

Ot

) ,
>•

©

W

cl A
I

-.

W

© X O' 00 —

© FF r F
'-l XI
W
© 00 to 1-0

qg

f

ot

WCO— (v to

C-

?’

-

i f

-

Of to

to

to©

©to

a

CD X

')

vl

© W
O' ©

O ' F o: H GO

►-

'1

w

CD W
to

OI

')

-

©, *o c h x

CC

©tO-FiO

w

t-1

©

1

F

-I

■

oo

to*-

© © F ©
F O' F vJ
1
H F © © F

w

—

'! F -X !'
F

Wto

M

©r-

F to F F to

<-

O' H

W to 10 O' w

OF ©XX
In. CC vv Iv cn

')

f

©

HtO

[ -X”-) \
1 woo 1 tow HOI©

©

xto
CO z*

O'©

M

O' 'J
'J —

i

oo. w o'*

i

v-

to

Oi

m cr f

©

to©

—

1 WWW©

rr

i

—

F
WtOFFtO

O' tO

CO pF W O' 00
© f* W © F
F • 0 >*- ©. F

to

ccto

j

Wto
©l~> !

Price 323: Price

Price

1,000 Sales

Suies

Sait

s

Price

Price

Price

Sales

Sties

Sa.es

Price

Price

Price

Sales

Sales

Sales

© !
©-) ,

oi aw to to
ot x a -i oi

}

tv F f ©j F

'/.

to

O')

F

9"**0

a
to

© a

') -• to © F
©
to — a •

a

tc

-•

/

-

c f w © a
ot a

CO
w

I -1 to

' 'i ro - j
CC C CC fr* CD

<j:

.

-

>- to
© t5 ©

to F

-4

bbb-iVi
Or |F
c © w © ©

iF O’ h—

f

lO l

•

a
«

to^

5* SB

l—J*

xg<
30 S'
F£

H H Oi O' Oi
© 01 © GO ©
ot
O'

'I

c : : © o> -i

toto-ww
I—> n— tO — ©

w
f ') a
W © W X
I

ot©

© '.OF©

Ot

—

co

© W to F'l

F

© F
c. ©

O. F
J
—
© a © © ©

Price

Price

Price

Sales

Sales

abb

©to

© ©

COt“XtO

boTX.ro*©

-

i

W tO -1 ©

H 01 © F O'

Articles of Domestic Produce.

1,000

following table, based upon daily reports made to the
Produce Exchange, shows the receipts of leading
articles of domestic produce in New York for the week ending
with Tuesday last; also the receipts from January 1, 1884, to
that date, and for the corresponding period of 1833:
New York

Dee.

Ashes
Beaus

2 i,

Since Jan.
1881.

1,

Monday,

3;20;

Flour, wheat

mpn’s-wear

4J39

1,484

64,334

61,835

bbls.

110,342
5,38 L

5,951,4-1

6,176,267

Oats

Bailey

bush.

Corn

bush.
bales.
bbls.
.bags.
..baits.

Peas

Cotton
lotton seed oil
Flax seed

<

Grass

Hides
Hides

Hops

Turpentine, crude

was a

Is from lirst hands, but

very

light

movement in

pretty fair orders
for British and Continental dress goods, white goo Is,
hosiery,
some

gloves, and other specialties, were placed for future
'delivery. Tie* jobbing trade ruled quid, transactions having
been chiefly confined to filling such small re-orders as were
daily jeceived by mail and telegraph. The auction rooms pre¬
sented no important features, a d the leading auction houses
have discontinued their regular sales until the
opening of the
.spiing season, some weeks hence.

8).

88

108.1)
3 10

48.2-5

1,0U

1

ltosin
Tar

Piit-b...
Oil cuke.

I8d)03,/.si3
8, J5 ,00L
v 0<»,27 2

18,8^5,606

1,013,001
a 9,5 20

1,332,924
63,016
349,848

0

pi.as.

110,107
3,0-, 108
36 J,o 43

hlids.
bbls.

8!,07 I

83,532

72

200

2.180
78,3*5
301.9 iS
23,580
I, -01
473, 71
5,842

2,7b0

97.217

85,307

105,477
33,774

146.552
3*,078

bbls.

5

3*0

1,308

pkifs.

0,0 >1

42

>

10 «

pkgs.

4,571

pk£s.

4

.pk^s.
pkjts.
pki?s.

Cheese
Kit its
Lard
Lard

21.517
22.3*7

keiUL

No.

3,2f.l

tes. A- bbls.

Ho£8, dressed

O

20,070
8.; 07
lo, m3
1,755

bbls.

984.916

8 43.529

354,sl4
18i,058
07,24 4

pktfs.

3,401

70.453

1,8 I I

121,0(>2

Stearin©

pifits.
bids.
hhds.

3,3.>0

plots.
boxes A* eases.

Whiskey

hhds.
bbls.

Wool

bales.

100

24 Os 8

1*04

14,658
10,4-4

0,703

56,713
130.806
105.9 >1
3 .9,232

y,Ov,o

15:>,505

8

85

1,052
1,370

452,449
7,695

1,546,081

slabs.

Tobaeeo
Tobacco.

2,752
10*,588
400.744
24,294
3,459

852.053

liiee

Smrar
l'allow

92,138

1,"h 8,732
2,4 4 8.42 L

Spelter
Suitar

231,958
135,369
65,353
73,6*8
2,88 J,783
510,594

32 4

bbls.
bbls.
bids.

bays.

Cutmeafs

250,506

2,>4s
32 348
11.100

—

Beef

7,709,148

...bales.

2.005

galls.

eanuts

5,022,854
35,322,067

3,725

bbls.

Oil, lard
Oil, whale,

Ie5.s27

26,035,901

No.
bales.

Turpentine, spirits... bbls.

Provisions
Pork

3,1 4
CL- .2ui

198,^32
30,3 1 o,000
4,2.7,102
io.w-,o.;o

loo, 4.8 L
19 .8 8
148,840
08134

sides

leather
Lead
Molasses
Molasses
Naval Stores—

i

10-».(>75

—

seed

5,468

51

bbls.
bbls.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.

Corn meal.
Wheat
live

Tuesday, 3 20; Wednes¬

Same time
last year.

bbls.

Breadstuff's—

Goods.— The market for

Foreign Dry Goods.—There

.

Week ending

iSales

-1 t0H X©

to W H F 00

a f

Receipts of beading

Butter

goo

S

F

E-r
z
©

© to lv — xtfi
© — © © F

-Ip O. -1
to*F a©to

to

nr.

X I

-

C K W © Ot

wh

IF

;

CJC>

F tO ©

F

W -1 rf-

©

©

bow —b

FF I

W'Q

tO tO to
‘■ItC-l-’O

QD |

it-© O'©

to

1

.

-•]

-

fF>f

|

C‘H

ouo

*0

F*

tCHUFH
F©F WF

a ot

»

to©

FlCW>Vl

w oo t: f f

to©

—

tv
-

J

a w h
CCi-vCX

to

•-‘bt

X
K-*

tv co

F Cl
CO f

XjJ.
xS

a ot

CO C*-

©->

to © H

F^J H

fee

JjS.

F€lb

-jrf-toa ©
c. to to co -4
oo o« w ©

F*

CO

F to tO W

f
©©00 O’F
F r- C. F O'

bi

© X ot JO 03
to © a x 'J

,

to w to

The

modern




©o

©

Sales

displayed very little animation, transactions in
both heavy and spring w-ighfcs having failed to realize the ex¬
pectations of holders. Fancy cassimerts ruled quiet, aside
from a few of the most popular spring goods, for which some
fair orders were placed by clothiers and the fine tailoring
trade.
Worsted suitings were relatively more active than,
other clothing woolens, and tnere was a stealv movement in
leading makes on account of back orders. Beavers and over¬
coatings continued quiet, and there was a limited business in
printed satinets. Some good-siz^d parcels of Kentucky j *ans
and doeskins were closed out by means of low prices, bur the
demand in the regular way was very light.
Ladies’ cloths,
tricots and sackings were mostly qui> t; hue a few pretty good
orders were placed for Jersey cloths bv cloak manufacturersFlannels and blankets were lightly dealt in, and shawls, skirts
and all-wool and worsted dress goods were
generally quiet,
while the demand for hodery and knit underwear continued

ifabric

x © a

to f OOD W

©bo

woolens has

imported

F O' O' © o
W FH © F

©FO’F©

QO -4

1,000

ex

to I
C I

f

©co
-4 a
00 CO

if*

©
©

Price
.

Total..

Domestic Woo

o* a cn wot
-4 t- — if* F
IF FF© tO

a

I ©

©i-*

.Holiday.

Thursday

Friday....

January.
Tune.

steaov.

'Tuesday.

©tOFtOtO
t-QOCRM

UO ’

©IF

©

Futures.

Dull.

M

r-*

MARKET.

Monday..

a

•

•

•

If

F*

315

.

.

•3:
WF

to a

Lull.

: : : :

•

1

»

•

© F ^ F to
©'HOOF
ot © F to ©

F* —

Saturday.

•

•

00

ro

Price.

§•Jill®
• ■ • • (S

cif

00

Tune.

•

s:

w©

Dress

Spots.

o

: : ®

o

CC

COTTON

; ;

CO

bt

EXCHANGE

•

a>

■

i—■

o;

ii

!

•

I:. 8: SSi dig

2 s»
•-j

•

makes of old

market during the week:

•

•

©

light fancies as could be had at low figure'! •
ginghams, chambrays, seersuckers, lawns and piques
were more fought after, and orders (for future delivery) were
placed with agents to a fair aggregate amount.
•
PitiNT Cloths.—The following shows the course of the

^

lllpi

P

!••••!>
'
1
I
•
I

© F I
1
ot ^
'1 ic |

demand, with most relative activity in shirtings, and such

o

priii

*3

quiet in demand, but firmer, closing at

per

tracts” and 2

[VOL. XXXIX.

2,441,849
726.919

470.067

310,894
47,188
68,119
130.980
19,033
2,035
12,056

7*,525

159.621


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102