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oiitmctfto1
9k

,

AND

MAGAZINE,

MERCHANTS’

HUNT’S

§Jkwi0pape*,

&

the united states.

representing the industrial and commercial interests op
'

(Filtered, according to aot

of Congress, in the year 1881, by Wm. B. Dana A Co., In tbe office of the Librarian of Congress,

Washington, D. C.]

that

CONTENT8.

861.

NO

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24, 1881.

VOL. 33.

general and miscellaneous freight is heavier than ever

before.
THE

CHRONICLE.
The Franchise

Railroad Earnings and Busi¬
ness Activity
090

An

Monetary

Modify a Lease? 700
Mr. Blaine and the ClaytouBulwcr Treaty
701
The Financial Situation
702
Can Directors

THE

BANKERS’

and

709

,

Range in Prices at the N. Y.
Stock Exchange

THE

j

704

English News

705

News

708

GAZETTE.

Ou<
Miotat ions of Stocks and Bonds
New York Local Securities
Railroad Earnings and Bank

Foreign Ex¬
change, II.S. Securities, State
Bonds

Commercial

and

But

England—

Commercial and Miscellaneous

Money Maikct.

and Railroad
Stocks

in

Important Change

.'

Returns

711
712

713

Investments, and State, City
710,
and Corporation Finances... 714

COMMERCIAL

TIMES.

Commercial Epitome

718 I Breadstufts

Cotton

719

723

I Dry Goods

725

^Ite (£1x1*0utclc.
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is issued every Saturday morning, ivith the latest news up to midnight of Friday.
^Entered at the Post Office, New Y#rk, N. Y., as second-class mail matter.]
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION-PAYABLE
For One Year (including postage)
For Six Months
Annual subscription
Sixmos.
do

IN ADVANCE:
$10 20.
6 10.

do

£2 7s.

in London (including postage)

1 8s.

do

do

Subscriptions will be continued until ordered stopped by a written
order, or at the publica tion office. The Publishers cannot be responsible
tor Remittances unless made by Drafts or Post-Office Money Orders.
A neat file cover is furnished at 50 cents; postage on the same is 18
«ents. Volumes bound for subscribers at $1 00.
London and

)

J

that have thus far

come

desirable to bring together,
month, the figures already in our
possession, in order that our readers may have some idea
what the entire month will show when made up.
Accord¬
ingly wre give below all the leading roads that have fur¬
nished us with statements of their earnings for the first
two weeks of December, this and last year.
It should be
understood that the great trunk lines do not make weekly
returns, and that therefore none of these are included
in the table ; also that the figures represent gross earnings,
and, while offering a true indication of the volume of
business being done, do not of course furnish a guide as
to the profitableness of that business.
we

think

it

especially

for the first half of the

GROSS EARNINGS. FIRST TWO WEEKS

WILLIAM B. DANA & OO., Pnblishers,
79 & 81 William Street, NEW YORK.
Post Office Box 958.

Name

of road.

RAILROAD EARNINGS AND

BUSINESS

ACTIVITY.
a

moment when

the

course

of stock values is down¬

ward, and there is a lack of confidence in affairs, it
is well to keep before us the favorable as well as the
unfavorable side .in the situation.
If crops are short,
their movement slow, the rate-war bitter, the expense
account increased—it is true on the other hand that

profitable, and that
railroad gross earnings are marvelously large.
These two latter conditions always go hand in hand.
Railroad earnings are the best possible index of industrial
activity. Both are now still on the rise, giving evidence
of growth and expansion everywhere.
Even under ordi¬
nary circumstances such continued gains as the roads show
general business is very active and

But when the gain is
diminished crop movement—it

would not fail to elicit remark.

maintained in the face of a
should he borne in mind that

on

many

roads the traffic

1680.

1881.

$
103,097

$ ’
85,456

337.100

302.54 4

Chic. & Eastern III—
Chic. A Gr. Trunk
Chic. Milw.ASt. Paul.
Chicago & Northwest
Chic. St. P.Mimi. AO.
Cin. Iml. St. L. A Ch..
Col. Hock. Val. A Xol.
Denv. A Rio Gramle..

80,800
70,681
806,000
852,700
188,306
90,922
126,487

63,581
56,571
658,821
683,700
138,743
88,224

306.657

Dubuque A S. City...
East Tenn. Va. &Ga.

53,554

& No.
Chicago A Alton
Burl. Ced. Rap.

...

At

in fail to confirm this belief, so

DECEMBER.

Mileage.

Gross Earning8.

and

WILLIAM B. DANA.

only important in themselves, but have an additional
since there are many who confidently believed
that certainly with December, the roads would exhibit a
decreasing business compared with last year. The returns
interest

Liverpool Offices.

The office of the Chronicle in Loudon is at No. 74 Old Broad Street
and In Liverpool, at No. 5 Brown’s Buildings, where subscriptions
advertisements will be taken at the regular rates, and single copies of
the paper supplied at Is. each.
■ifOHN G. FLOYD.

just at present the receipts of the railroads are

not

.

Flint & Pere Marq—
Great West’ll of Can.
Hannibal & St. Jos...
Ind. Bloom. A West.
Lake Erie A Western.
Louisville A Nasliv...
.

Milw. L. Sh. A West."
Mo. Kan. A Texas—

1880.

564
840
220

14,110

+ 147,179
+ 169,000

3,951
3,018

3,627

985
300
325

162.646

+49,563
+ 2,698
+ 22,000
+ 144,011

45,600

+ 7,954

142,730

150.274

74,622
195,693

67,697

—7,544
+6,925

209,485

-13.792

105,763

-17,523
+1,275
+ 6,113
+ 98,360
-8,438
+ 9,341
+ 93,674
+ 85,45 1

143
900
318
823
292
392
385

946
300
325
551
143
900
318
823
292
392
385

2,060

1,840

330
260

330
235

1,732

1,408

1,150
394
972
248
195
121
686
643
855
127
900

950
370
722
190
195
121
686
580
656
100
550

3,6d6
3,350

3,126
2,479

.

104,487

78,145

533,460
77,712
27,860

Memphis A Char’ton.

1881.

573
840
230
335

88,240
79,420
'52.918

.

rnci'euse or
Deci'ease.

46,805
435,100
86,150
18,519

-

+17,041
+ 34,5o0
+ 17,219
+

1,008

335

2,764

307,877

283,862
222,423

Engi’nd.

114,079

95,616

Northern Pacific
Peo’ia Dec.&Evansv..

161,302
26.716

A.AT.H. m.line.

40,489
29,630

110,498
15,608
40,466
40,754

330.494

296,688

137,523
234,452
19,744

113,618
143,805

166,675

1,314,536
676,113

133,190
1,043,786
499,151

8,226,125

6,639,750 + 1,586,375 32,497 28,263

Missouri Pacific
N. Y. A New

St. L.

Do do (branches).
St. L. Iron Mt. A So...
St. Louis A San Fran..
St. Paul Minn. A Man.
Scioto Valley
Texas A Pacific
Union Pacitie( 17 days)

Wab. St. Louis & Pac
Total.

This statement

■

377,536

tells

us

11.974

18,463
+ 50.804
+ 11,108
+ 23
—11,124
+ 33,800
+

+23.905
+ 90,647
+ 7,770
+ 33.485
+270,750
+176,962

that the thirty-four roads above

by the movement of the crops to market is usually increased their earnings from $6,639,750 in 1880, to $8,a
very large portion of the total traffic—there is the 226.125 in 1881, or about 24 per cent, and that during the
strongest possible proof that all our industries are pro¬ same time the mileage increased from 28,263 to 32,497, or
gressing at a gratifying rate, and that the roads are in a less than 15 per cent, so that the earnings per mile are $253
strong position as to earnings ; for such a gain shows this year, against $235 last year. It will be observed that

afforded




flattering directors of the New York and the Metropolitan unanTexhibits, and yet the receipts of flour and grain at Chicago mously concluded to accept a modification of their leases
and Milwaukee during the first two weeks of December each taking 6 per cent in lieu of the 10 per cent agreed
show a falling off of more than one-third.
In 1880 the upon. The details of the arrangement are so well known to
our readers that we do not repeat them, but recall the above
receipts of grain were 0,052,493 bushels, while this year
facts as they all bear more or less upon the question now
they were only 3,947,762 bushels ; of flour the receipts
issue.
were 378,404
barrels in 1880, and 2S7,154 barrels in at
In the first place it is seen by this recital, that even if it
1881.
That there should be a large increase in earnings
should be finally determined in the present litigation that a
despite the decreased amount of grain traffic, is due to an
submission to the stockholders was unnecessary to a change
augmented passenger movement and a decided expansion
of the lease, it would not follow perforce, that such a sub¬
in the volume of general and miscellaneous freight.
mission :s never required.
There is a very peculiar condi¬
But it will be said that though gross receipts are thus
tion here which would strongly appeal for relief to the
extremely satisfactory, and offer in this respect unmis¬
takable evidence of the increased activity that characterizes equity side of the court, and might result in a special con¬
That is to say—if we assume the directors had
all branches of our industrial system, net receipts are by struction.
no
righ; to modify—the ordinary remedy for a broken lease
no means equally encouraging.
That is undoubtedly true.
would be a restoration of the leased property to the lessor.
The fact receives new emphasis as each succeeding annual
But in this instance the lessor-stockholders took and used
return of earnings and expenses is made public. The latest
and sold to the public G4 millions of the stock of the
evidence is furnished by the reports of the Vanderbilt
If the lease is nullified, the Manhattan passes out
roads—Canada Southern, Michigan Central, Lake Shore, lessee.
and New York Central—given on another page.
These of existence, while the Metropolitan stockholder reaps a
reports will repay close inspection and make it more and large benefit at the expense of a corresponding loss to the
public. Under these circumstances the Court might hold
more evident that a bare statement of gross earnings offers
that this was a peculiar arrangement, not an ordinary lease,
less clue than usual to the net results of operation.
and that it could not enforce the forfeiture until the
Yet while not desiting to underestimate this circum¬
stance, it should be remembered, as we have often before company had made restitution.
Another fact in the situation of the Elevated companies,
said, that m the main the larger percentage of operating
which will greatly limit the application of a final decision in
expenses is due to special causes not permanent.
In the
the actions now pending, is that the Manhattan Company had
first place the severe weather last winter made very heavy
the roads in the

Northwest make especially

.

and no opportunity or possibility of ful¬
that time the flying newspaper reports and "Wall street filling the agreements it made except out of earnings of the
leased roads. We do not remember any other leased roads
gossip almost made us believe that the Northwestern roads
would have to pass their dividends, so severe was this tax that stand in this same position; so that a decision on the facts
before the courts in this case would not settle the right or
supon them.
They came through it 6afely, but it l.1 as left a
deep mark in the expense account all the year. i\noti er wrong of a similar change in a lease by directors of other
companies. . If for instance, the Pittsburg k Fort Wayne
cause of the smaller net, is the well-known rate-wa •, which
has resulted in the trunk-line roads doing through business directors should meet and reduce the rental because the Fort
disbursements

necessary.

It will be remembered thtt it

profit, and in many cases probably at an actual loss.
Both these are, however, temporary influences. The rate-war
must end sometime, and the winter of last year is not
likely to be repeated short of another ten-year cycle.
These facts we bring together, not as determining the
value of any given stock, but as conditions to be remem¬
bered while special prominence is being given to the
depressing circumstances of the moment.
at

little

CAN DIRECT OHS MOD1FT A LEASE t

no

assets of its own,

Wayne earnings had fallen off, it would be a pretty clear
case of bad faith on their part and of collusion, since the
Pennsylvania road is abundantly able to pay and fulfill its

had the legal
by injunction
their doing it, and if attempted would set aside

guarantee. Even therefore if the directors
right to modify the lease, the court would
prevent

their action

as

void ab initio; for fraud

vitiates every agree¬

^proceeding. Hence we see that this case is
a
peculiar one, and if the final decision should be in
favor of the directors, it has a very limited application.
ment

and

1

It is .further to be borne in mind that the new arrange¬
our courts in
ment between these Elevated roads was, under the circum¬
connection with the Elevated railroad contest have a wide
intejfest because of their supposed application to so many stances, a proper and wise one for each of the contracting
General attention has therefore been paTtieB to enter into. The company which fared the worse
other roads.
drawn to the subject, and it has been discussed on both was the New York road, as its earnings were large
sides with much spirit and feeling. Two decisions made enough to pay more than 6 per cent if the lease could
But as its stockholders had
be declared canceled.
thisrweek

questions that

The;

are

passing through

favoring the view held by the directors of the
Elevated companies bring the issue before the public received G£ millions of stock

again.

point in dispute is whether the directors of a leased
railroad can modify a lease without the consent of the
stockholders.
The Manhattan Company had, among other
things, guaranteed to the Metropolitan 10 per cent divi
dends on its stock. When the guarantee was made the
Manhattan had no property, and its only chance of paying
the dividend was in getting the money out of its two
leased roads; but it gave to the Metropolitan and New
York-companies 6J millions each of its own stock, which
was distributed among their stockholders.
The earnings
of the entire system proved insufficient to meet the engage¬
ments, and the Manhattan became insolvent and unable to
The

pay

and went into the hands of receivers.




possible claim against the company
to that amount growing out of such receipt; and further,
since receivers of the Manhattan had been appointed and
the Court had directed them to bring an action for the full
amount named, which would tie up the companies in the
courts for a long time, and possibly end in their being re¬
quired to pay the whole claim—these facta added to the
others we have stated above show the wisdom of the
arrangement, the good faith of the directors, and that the
action, if legal, cannot be impeached.
We have been led to make the foregoing suggestions in
view of the decisions of this week and of the many dis*
quieting assertions made, to the effect that if director#
and there

•

Thereupon the

from the Manhattan,

was

have the power

a

claimed, there is no safety for

the stock*

THE CHRONICLE.

?0I

other leased roads. It is seen that to adopt “any conflict on the American Continent altogether irresistible.” Very possibly this is true ; but is it not
Buch a belief we must first assume the management of a
posi¬
tively
offensive
it
to
state
under
the
circumstance.
given road is dishonest and in collusion with the lessee;
and second, that the courts would look on and permit the Remember this is not an effusive Fourth of July oration
carrying out and perfecting of such a fraudulent arrange* we are considering, but a thoroughly deliberate and well
ment. In conclusion, we would also add that the amount considered public document, addressed to a nation with
of security a final appeal to the majority of stockholders whom we are on terms of cordial good will.
In the same connection take also the statement near
would give, seems to us to be over-estimated. If directors
the cloee of the communication which
are determined to defraud the holders of their securities,
reads, that “it is
the fixed purpose of the United States to confine it”
they would find no difficulty in securing a majority of stock
toconfirm theirfiaud. We have not attempted to examine (that is the guaranteeing and defending the neutrality of
the legal question involved, as it is before the courts, has the canal) “strictly and solely as an American question,
to be dealt with and decided
been decided this week in favor of the directors, and is
by the American Govern.
ments.”
We have no objection to
being rapidly pushed to a final decision.
admitting, for the
time being, that such is the “fixed
purpose” of the
American people; but if so, would it be wise or in
MR. BLAINE AND 7IIE CL A YTON-BUL WER
good taste to assert it when asking a friendly power,
TREATY.
holders' in

“

'

“

“
“

especially in

first proposal, to modify a treaty. Must
Let us consider a moment Mr. Blaine’s state paper on not such a harsh, peremptory expression at this junc¬
the Clayton-Bulwer treaty. Examine it, if you please, ture in the negotiations hinder rather than advance
regardless of the outside arguments that might be urged tho object sought?
If Great Britain had rudely ro*
with reference to our interference in the Panama Canal pulsed us and refused to treat, then it would have been
project; That is to say, take the case simply in the way time to have notified her of our “ fixed purpose,” and
Mr. Blaine presents it; imagine the question a new one irr sistible army, &c.
But even then it seem3 to us that it
would
have
been
foolishness
unless we substantially sent
the-only
late
Secretary
wholly, and that'
object our
of
State had, was to induce Great Britain to modify an exist¬ with it a declaration of war as the alternative of refusal.
ing treaty. Remember also, since ho asserts it at the close Diplomats do not usually talk about their “ fixed
of his document, that the United States seeks this particu¬ “purpose” until every other resource has
failed, and they
lar occasion for the discussion, because at no period “since are ready to enforce that purpose.
A nation’s dignity
“the peace of 1783 have the relations between the British and self respect demand that at least.
Some may sug¬
“

and American Governments been

“

as

a

cordial and

friendly gest that Mr. Blaine entertained the thought or expecta¬
tion of intimidating Great Britain.
Such an interpreta¬
tion
of
his
is
words
Starting then, with the object sought by the p^per and
wholly untenable, for it presupposes
so

now.”

with

relations between the two Governments in

these

mind, is not the reader

little annoyed at tli3 style or
infelicity of expression used ? Does not even the sentence
above

a

quoted lack delicacy V

Of

course

that the date named marks the end of
when Great
second
are

him

about
so

Britain,

best.

To

to

much

as

between

us

is popularly supposed,

remind

a

negotiate that
Bince

everybody knows
a war

friend

with

you never
certain
time

came out
whom
you

before loved

extreme

innocence in the

writer, and no one would ever
charge that up >n the late Secretary of State. Ho understands full well that if we attain the
object sought, it will
not be by brag
and bravado, but either through the forco
of friendly argument or the power of the sword.
But we refrain from noticing further the unfortunate
spirit and tone which pervades this document from begin¬
ning to end. To be sure, at the same time it expresses
friendliness, for there is thi3 double character running
through it, sometimes puzzling the observer as effectually
as did the
conjurer McKabe, exhibiting here a few years

naming a
and he had a foolish fight in which you
punished him badly—would be pronounced oy all tho
world an unfortunate,
impolite reference, and a poor basis since, with his two faces. There is also another feature of
to start a new negotiation upon.
Diplomacy is even more the paper which surprises us, and which if we had space
exacting in the style of address, always requiring a rigor¬ we would remark upon. As for instance the very
ous
conformity to the strictest etiquette. We say then ungraceful way in which is expressed the fact that Cali¬
the reference made was
unnecessary and unfortunate. Of fornia bears towards us a relationship different from that
course Great Britain will not be disturoed
by it. -She will of India to Great Britain. To assert that the citizens of
smile, not frown, at the awkwardness and infelicity of the California are “our own blood and kindred” is w©U
expression.
•
enough, perhaps, but to add that they are “ lone of our
Turning to the opening portions of the communication, bone and flesh of our flesh ” may be democratic, but &S
we have some sentences which
might give color to the it covers the heathen Chinee as well a3 all other of our
idea that the reference to the war in
question, bore with naturalized countrymen, it is certainly in accurate,-beside®
it a hint of our
ability to enforce our pretensions. Now, sotmding a trifle eophomoric. Then, too, the mode of
we have no
question of that ability of course, but we say describing the extent of our Pacific possessions, must
it ia wretched taste and worse
logic to \»rite anything which excite a smile in any reader.
We wonder that
coulii suggest it at such a time. As
samples of the sent¬ the comparison should not have been made with Great
ences we refer
to, the reader has noticed probably the one Britain instead of the German Empire; it would
in which—after
seating how inconsiderable England’s have been only a shade more brusque, and not an atom
interest in the subject is—the late
Secretary “ hopes a more incongruous. But these latter are little matter*
readjustment of the terms of the treaty may be reached compared with the unfortunate spirit displayed in tho
11
ln a
spirit of amity and concord.” Why not be so paper as before noticed and we passed them over.
reached pray? What reason is there for
With regard to the reasons presented for changing thia
implying a
doubt of it, and
especially in the very first communica¬ treaty, we have less to say. They will probably appear
tion on the
subject ? Then a little further on Mr. Blaine forcible to those who are wedded to the “expandedn
tdds that “ the
military power of the United States as Monroe doctrine. To us they simply help to develop more
w
8^°^n by the recent civil war is without limit and in
clearly the undesirableness, nay more the positive folly of
date when you

.

tt




a

—

THE

702

CHRONICLE.

Mr. Blaine’s very first argument
covers a demand upon Great Britain to accord to us the
right to occupy and fortify the surroundings of all canals
built in Central America.
This is a bold announcement
and we must acknowledge that we are old fashioned
enough, to be actually disturbed as we read such a
demand in a State paper.
Are our people ready for this
change and for all that it implies? It has been up to this
the

policy advocated.

time

favorite

a

cause

fV0L. XXXIII.

TIIE FINANCIAL SITUATION
We have had
the

unsettled, exciting stock market during

an

Speculators for a decline have vigorously

past week.

another, and have
succeeded in sharply pressing downward many of the
most active specialties.
The fall in these properties has
had an unsettling influence upon the whole list, until
for congratulation that we are not even the most stable of the investment securities have
attacked

first

stock

one

and then

frequently in a boastful but yielded under the general demoralization in the market.
This situation would be impossible were there not cir¬
not offensive way, our situation in that particular has
been compared with Europe’s.
This is well, for words cumstances of considerable weight, favoring the operators
for a decline.
We have briefly referred to the more
can scarcely exaggerate the burden they bear and the
conspicuous ones in the opening to a previous article on
blessing of our exemption.
&
It will, of course, be said in reply that the difficulty we railroad earnings. But there is another condition which
look upon with misgiving.
We refer to the
anticipate is imaginary, as we shall need only a few hun¬
anomalous
standing of the rates of interest here and in
dred men to garrison the forts when built.
Even if that
Europe. Any amount of money can be borrowed in New
were true, the action proposed would compel a change in
York on Governments at 4(g4J per cent, while the bank
a traditional principle which has controlled the policy of

an

army-ridden nation, and

some

the nation ever since we

have existed as such;

and once

permitted, would find many occasions for repetition.
Besides, according to Mr. Blaine, this is to be no holiday
parade. He tells us its necessity grows out of the “ vast
naval establishment” of Great Britain, the like of which
in time of peace we shall never create.” To be of service,
therefore, our force stationed there must be large enough
to hold the entire district in the vicinity of a canal against
this “vast naval establishment.”
For of what use would
our forts be with a few companies of men against a nation so
powerful on the water, except as something to be gobbled
up on the first indication of war.
Remember that gov¬
ernments now-a-days contemplating hostilities do not wait
for the other side to get ready before they strike.
It is
not their custom to announce their “ fixed purpose,” as our
state paper does, far in advance.
The Prussian army had
almost reached Paris before France realized the serious¬
ness of the situation.
Our only safety then would be, in
keeping our forts well provisioned and full of men, if we
assume the task Mr. Blaine has laid out for us.
Furthermore is it not evident that the military occupa¬
tion of the canal, instead of being a source of strength in
case of a war with such a power as England, would cause
infinite embarrassment and be a positive weakness ?
Under Mr. Blaine’s assumption with regard to the relative
navies of the two countries, we would have no way of
communicating with our forces there, except by land,
until time enough had elapsed to build a navy, and in the
meantime England would either take the place by assault
or starve out our “ irresistible ” army.
And from that
moment, and during the remainder of the contest, our
enemy would have complete control and the exclusive use
of this highway to the Pacific.
Whereas if the neutrality
of the canal was guaranteed by the leading powers of^the

rate in

Europe is almost everywhere 5 per cent or higher
market rate very close upon the bank quota¬
If this were a temporary condition, it would be of

and the open
tion.

importance

no

“

reserves

“

ness

neutral through every contest.
have to defend it, and yet would be as
now, since the ships of neither belligerent

world it would remain
We should not

safe in

a war as

attack our Pacific coast Eng¬
Mr. Blaine’s words) “be re“manded to the voyage around Cape Horn,” while we
to defend it could throw enough men over our four rail¬
roads in a week to hold it against any power, and at the
could pass through it. To
would (we will use

land

same

time be in constant communication

there.
But it is useless to continue
"

our

with

our

forces

but in the present state of the gold
marked increase in busi-

activity in Europe the past few months, there seems

to be

of

;

of the world and of the

even a

more

of a speedy decline and a possibility
higher quotation wiien our crops begin 'to move

little prospect

freely.

Out of this fact

a

suspicion has arisen as to the strength

of the holdings of our securities at
London ; consequently the rumor this week of a free sell¬
ing in this market for European account was quickly

and

permanency

believed and had

a

decided effect

on

prices here, especially

accompanied by the report that the London
market was in a panicky condition. The cables on Tuesday
also contained a partial confirmation of this report as regards
London, but there appears to have been a prompt recovery
in the tone of the foreign market, and there has certainly
been no recurrence of the panicky condition referred to.
That any large amounts of stocks have actually been sold
here for European account does not appear probable, for
the reason that if this were so the tone of the foreign
as

it

was

-

exchange market would have been decidedly strong by
reason of the' demand for
bills to remit the proceeds of

has been dull and weak.
feeling in London can readily be accounted
for in the present condition of the loan market, when we
consider what must have been the effect there and on the
Continent, of the news of the sudden decline in Denver &
Rio Grande.
This stock had been liberally distributed in
Europe, the reports of earnings and progress made in
construction, accompanied by the declaration of regular
dividends, being regarded as establishing the character of
the stock as a fair investment property, and even the most
conservative of the foreign bankers could assign no valid
reason for discrediting the securities.
The decline in the
price during the summer and fall was not greater than the
shrinkage in stocky of a similar character, and if explan¬
ations were demanded they could readily be given., Sud¬
denly the stock drops 15 per cent, and the decline is
accompanied by the startling rumor that some of the pro¬

sales, whereas on the contrary it
An uneasy

moters

of the scheme have

sold out.

Without waiting to

investigate the truth of the report, Europeans appear to
examination of this have become alarmed with regard to the safety of other;

properties, and for the moment the pressure to
sell was so great that the decline could not be checked
will probably have in opening the eyes of our people to and the London market wras thrown into a condition of
demoralization which the cable characterized as “panicky.
the folly of enforcing, even if we could, the “ expanded
When the news was received that the Denver & h10
Monroe doctrine.
We are sorry to say that we cannot find
anything in it to commend, except it may be the effect it
state




paper.

American

ScJBMBER

mrnK'JMf

24, 1881.

THE

CHRONICLE.

has been more easily obtainable than for several weeks
Grande Company had declared the regular quarterly divi¬
dend the London market recovered, but since then it has past. Good borrowers with acceptable collaterals have found
no
difficulty in obtaining funds at reasonable rates, but
closely followed our own and has been more or less in¬
when the collateral was objectionable borrowers have been
fluenced by the course of the speculation here.
There are several stories current to account for the obliged to pay a commission in addition to the regular
rate of interest.
The heavy liquidation in the stock
decline in Denver & Rio Grande. The one more gen¬
market and its oversold condition have materially lessened
erally believed is that the stock was raided by Mr.
the demand while the supply has been more abund¬
Gould with the object of breaking it down to a
ant, the Sub-Treasury operations resulting in a loss of
point which would enable him to secure control. It is. not
unreasonable to suppose that Mr. Gould does not desire to $3,990,592 90, which is a gain to the banks. The domes*
tic exchanges at interior points continue to rule against
have too much company in his Mexican enterprises, and
this centre, with the single exception of at Boston, and
the Palmer-Sullivan grant interferes with the Mexican ex¬
tensions of the Southwestern system of roads. By obtain¬ the requirements at Chicago and St. Louis appear to be
ing control of the Denver & Rio Grande, Mr. Gould might urgent, drafts being made upon those cities from the
also obtain possession of the Palmer-Sullivan franchise. interior for crop purposes while a good share of the avail¬
Still another reason for his desire to secure the Denver able funds are being employed in carrying grain at
road is found by some in the fact that it is being pushed Chicago and cotton at St. Louis. The following statement
westward into Utah, thus paralleling the Union Pacific. will show the extent of the interior movement for the
If it should be completed by the present managers in this week ended December 22.
direction, it could readily be made a connection for the
Received.
Shipped.
Receipts al and Shipments from N. Y.
Chicago Burlington & Quincy, the encroachments of Currency
$1,508,000
$1,603,000
which upon the territory claimed by the Union Pacific Gold
610,000
1,128,000and Southwestern roads, have been ineffectually resisted.
Total
$2,213,000
$2,636,000
Therefore, by getting the Denver & Rio Grande, Mr.
As above stated, the Sub-Treasury operations have
Gould would defeat the purpose of the Quincy, and at the
resulted in a gain to the banks of $3,990,592 90.
This,
same time be in possession of the franchise for a new
with the movement of gold and currency in the foregoing
Pacific road.
It is .generally supposed that Mr. Gould
table, will indicate the following as the changes in the
has for a long period been endeavoring to secure
bank reserve, except so far as the result may be effected
the Denver road, and that he projected the Denver &
by including silver certificates which are not counted ^asNew Orleans to assist in that purpose, running the line
reserve.
parallel to the Denver & Rio Grande for about 200 miles.
Into Banks. Chit of Banks
Net Gain.
At all events, this threatened opposition has had an unfav¬
orable influence upon the stock of the company for some Sub-Treasury operations, net... $3,990,593
$3,990,593
$
.

time back.

Interior movement

2,213,000

*123,000

2,636,000

Total
$3,567.59S
$0,203,593
$2,636,000
depression during the week was
Loss.
in the preferred stock of the Northern Pacific Railroad
The Bank of America received $400,000 gold during
Company. This was attacked on Wednesday and vigor¬ the week from the associated
banks, for deposit in the vault.
ously followed up the succeeding days, and after a feeble
The only specie movements for the week have been the
resistance it yielded readily.
It is reported that this is withdrawal on
Saturday of £10,000 from the Bank of Eng¬
the work of a thoroughly organized pool who are seeking
land for shipment hither, and the arrival here on Saturday
to be revenged upon the present managers for ousting the
of $175,000 gold from Amsterdam.
The foreign ex¬
Billings management about a year ago. The decline in
Western Union, which was one of the features on Thurs¬ change market has been barely steady during the week,,
with the offerings chiefly of cotton and provision billsday, is attributed in part to the fact that the opposition of The
following table, showing relative prices in London
the Mutual Union commenced active operations this
and New York, at the opening each day, will indicate the
week. The fall in the trunk line shares is doubt¬
margin of profit for cable transactions.
less
chargeable to the continued unsettled
con¬
dition of business arrangements on those roads, and
Dec. 28.
Dec. 21.
Dec. 20.
Dec. 22.
Dec 19.
to the
heavy losses which the annual statements made
Lfnui'n N.Y. Lond'n N.Y. Lond'n N.Y. Lond'n N.Y. Lond'n N.Y.
prices* prices. prices.* prices. prices.* prices. prices* prices. prices* prices.
public this week show have been sustained by them. The
Vanderbilt properties were pn Thursday singled out for U.S.4s,c. 117-36* ns h 117-00* 116% 117-49* 118% 117-49* 118% 117 87* 11
103
102-44 102% 10244
102 44
102% 102-33 102%
Q.8.3%8 102 44 103
4247
42-96
40-86
43 08
42%
43-69
42%
43%
40%
43%
special attack, so stories were put afloat that the roads had Erie
99*52
99-42
100 01
99
2d
99%
99% 100-01
100% 100 01 100
not made
enough to meet dividends, and if any were (11.Cent. 132 05 131% 131-32 131% 13035 130 130 84 130% 129*2c 129
declared they would have to be paid out of the surplus. S. Y. C.. 135+5 135% 134 96 135% 13448 134% 134 96 134% 13313 134
67
33-25*
82-40
68
33 6 l-t
66% 33-49+
66%
Reading 33 98+
67%
What truth there was in these rumors may be seen
by ref¬ Exch’ge,
erence to the returns of these lines
4-85
cables.
485 %
4-85%
4-85%
4*85%
given on another page.
Expressed in their New York equivalent.
The Wabash stocks declined on
+ Reading on basis of $50, par value.
reports that the business
* Ex-interest.
of the road was
Note;—The New York equivalent is based upon the highest rate for
falling off, that the St. Charles bridge cable
transfers, which ordinarily covers nearly aU charges, such as
disaster was likely to be a serious loss, that the road was interest,
insurance and commissions.
There were only $440,100 bonds of the 106th call
suffering from the effects of the bad crops along the line
and that the next dividend on the
preferred stock would offered for redemption on Wednesday. Since then there
have to be passed.
have been redeemed $5,500 more of this call, and $200,800
We give all of these various rumors and statements that of the
105th, making the amount outstanding of the latter
the reader
may have before him the special unfavorable about $3,000,000.
Both individuals and corporations
influences, as well as the more permanent ones before appear desirous of keeping the bonds as long as they canr
noticed which have acted on the whole market and
helped finding it difficult to select reasonably safe property in
produce in conjunction with the others the general
depres¬ which to re-invest. By the maturity of the 106th call, if
sion.
not before, it is expected that nearly the whole of the
Money during this excitement and unsettling of values, outstanding balance will be surrendered. 1 here are always

The next most serious




*

„

con.

•

*

THE

704

CHRONICLE.

[vot. xjxm

of the year some temporary holdings of change is an enormous increase in the number of ocoa.
Government* which it i3 believed will l>e changed piers to be placed on the register of voters. The leading
after the 1st of January, and if this proves to be the feature of the new arrangement is that every occupant of
a
part of a house, where that partis separately occupied as
case there will then be more liberal offerings.
at

this

seasou

dwelling, will be entitled to the franchise as a houstAs the law has been understood and interpreted
since 1867 the “ lodger M was not entitled to tho franchise
extended 5s ortho 4J percents. This would hardly l>e unless bis unfurnished lodgings were of the clear annual
Now, as the separate occupier of the part
done to any considerable extent, we should think, as the value of £10.
Treasurer of the United S ates, in a circular order issued of a liouse^ he is a householder, and a3 Btich entitled to th«
about six months ago, required banks to surrender and franchise.
How this change was effected, it 19 of eomo important*
exchange their called bonds. Still ir must be becoming a
serious question with them whether they had not better that we should state in detail, and we are indebted to the
On two separate
retire their circulation. To replace their called bonds London limes for many of the fncts.
with 4^ percents at 114*54 (about the price io-da\), hav¬ occasions during tho last fif'y years tho question of
electoral reform has occupied public attention in England
ing only
years to tun, would net them, if redeemed at
to the exclusion almost of everything else.
The Reform
maturity, oniy ab< ut‘2£ ] er cent inteicst c n their purchase.

suggested that the national banks having these
bonds as security for circulation might conclude to retain
them, even after the calls mature, rather than buy either tho
It has teen

a

holder.

England return for the week shows a loss Bill of 1832—a bill the effect of which amounted to a
of £41,500 and a d< creaso of
per cent in the propor¬ revolution—was passed only after a struggle which for a
tion of reserve to liabilities. The Bank of France reports time convulsed tho Empire, and threatened civil war.
Tiie Reform Bill of 1SG7 was the fruit of a struggle which
again of 4,380,000 francs gold, and a loss of 700,000
It was tho opinion of
The Bank of Germany shows ?n increase had lasted some "thirteen years.
francs silver.
Lord
John
Russell
that
hia
bill
of 1832 wa3 a final
cf 6,800,000 maiks, indicating that her siqply of gold is
measure.
In 1854, however, he had so far changed hi*
probably being drawn from Russia as was suggested oil
page G0Q of the Chronicle December 3d. The London opinion as to make another format attempt to secure an
of the franchise ; but the public showed no
Ec n<nniat of the 10th repeats a rumor that some of the extension
treasure or tho war supply of the Empire held in gold may enthusiasm ; and the movement was brought to an end by
Tim Hank of

exchanged for an equal value in silver, and the outbreak of the Crimean war. Unsuccessful attempts
into the details of which we cannot now enter, were
that the Bank of Germany may have drawn hence an
opportune supply of gold when needed. Whether the repeated in 1859, in I860, and in 1866; but in the following
Bank is obtaining her supply from Russia or from year, the Tories having come into power, a new Reform

have been

Imperial stock is, however, not material. Tie
increase recently reported is assumed to be gold and not
the

Bill

was

liament.

successfully carried through both houses of Par¬
It was charged at the timo, and not unjustly,

that Mr. Disraeli had stolen Mr. Gladstone’s thunder. He
gold and part silver, hut as the accounts of tho bank
do not stato these coins sepaiately we are obliged to esti¬ had found tho Whigs bathing and had stolen their clothes.
Since that time there has been no fresh legislation on tho
mate the stock of bullion upon the basis heretofore used
The principal features of tho
in our table. The following exhibits the amount of bullion subject of the franchise.
act of 1867 were that it conferred the franchise on all
in each of the principal European banks this week and at
householders, within boroughs, who were rated for the
the corresponding date last year.
payment of poor rates, that it gave votes to “ lodgers”
I>e
2:^l 1880.
Dee. ?‘J. 18*1.
who had occupied, for a year, lodgings which unfurnished
tiitccr.
SDrer.
Gold,
(Md.
would bring an annual rental of £10, and that it con¬
£■
&
SL
£
verted the county franchise from a £10 rental to a £12
20.751.003
24,741,OOP
Bnnk of England
rating standard. There were other provisions ; but these
Hi 125.050 40.721.620 22,035,55: 19.062,532
Bank of Franco
B.742.-37 20.226,713
8.080,333 17.900,607 have
Bunk of CJeetmwy
proved the most important and the most abiding.
66.348.333
67,023,130
55,777,887
A difficulty has existed, from the first, as to the exact
Total t his week
53.618,890
»3.« 18.939 60.759, ’ 33 55.v-04.79I 07,320,610
Total pn-vlona wo«*k...
meaning to to attached to the word “dwelling-house.M
Tae uLove *oLi ami Ml ver ui vision ol'.tHu mock of coin cf tho Bjink
•1 <jcrm»uy is merely popular estimate,
tho Bank itself fclvets no And yet ill ? act of 1867 f-cems sufficiency e xplicit. It de¬
brfommikm
thi t point.
The payments by the Assay Office, through the Sub- fines “ dwelling-house,” in boroughs, as n including any part
of a house, occupied as a separate dwelling, and sepa*Treasury, amounted to $518,965, of which about $169,000
ately rated to the relief of the poor.” The rating quali¬
was for
foreign gold, and 1 lie receipts by the Assistant
fication
created confusion ; and in the Parliamentary and
Treasurer from the fhi*tom House were as follows.
Municipal Regulation Act of 1878 a new definition is
fl'>nnijdintj of—
Dale.
Duties.
given, evidently for tho purpose of removing any
Sil
Silrer
U. >\
Gold.
Dollars. Certificates.
Notes.
ambiguity which might bo supposed to attach * to
word.
In
the
last-named
act
“ dwelling*85.000 the
Vbr. 16
*418/00 $25,000 *
*561,108 C4
70.000
4 17,000
21.0(H)
1,000
17....
505.081 83
house ” ii made to “include any part of a house where
87,000
30....
15,000
635 583 11
433,000
“that part is separately occupied as a dwelling.”
The
84.000
17,0u0
1,01j0
20....
550/'00
651,078 99
69.000
14,000
21
392,000
later definition, it appears, is justified by one of the clauses
474,415 65

part

.

r

on

•

“

“

-

per

•«

......

44
44

...

44

22.

272,571 D2

235/.* 00

9/ 00

l.OOO

2S/C0

practically
resuscitated the compound householder by declaring that
the payment of rates by the ow’ner “ shall be deemed a
THE FRANCHISE IN ENGLAND—AN IMPORT¬
payment of tho full rate by the occupier for the purpose
ANT CHANGE.
of any qualification or franchise which as regards rating
Within the last few weeks a very important and in some
depends upon the payment of the poor rate.” In plain
terms the rights of tho occupier or “ lodger ” as regard!
sense radical change has
been effected in the-electoral
franchise in England.
It has been brought about so the electoral franchise are the same whether he pays his
silently that to the general public it partakes somewhat of poor rates directly or indirectly through tho owner of the
Tfttxl..

#3v«»OO,130 54

82.475.OTO $101.tWM'

of

the Assessed

*423.0* O

“

“

“

the character gf




a

surprise.

The immediate result of the

house.

Rates Act of

1869, which

"Down to the

rights of the “lodger” has been more or
pute, more or less doubtful; but the Judges

les3 in dis¬

have now

decided in the “lodger's” favor, giving the full
weight of their authority to tho definition of 1878. and
declined to allow further appeal. Tho question is now
finally decided; and universal suffrage has been virtually
established in the boroughs of Great Britain. It. is a
wonderful change—all ’ho more wonderful that it should
have been brought about without having been the subject
of a single debate in Parliament.
We can hardly believe that there was any intention on
the part of the framers of the bill of 1867 so to expand
the range of the franchise; but there Cin be no doubt that
tho decision of the Tudges is logically correct.
The new
household franchise i3 the legitimate outgrowth of the act
of 1867; and it is in perfect accordance with the spirit of
tho legislation of the year 18G9.
It is wonderful, indeed,
that bo many years should have been allowed to elapse
beforo the full meaning of the last Reform Bill was fully
perceived. It affords an illustration of the cautious and
finally

conservative character of tho English

people and of Eng¬

That the effect of the change will be

political life.

permitted to doubt. Its probable effects
may bo inferred from the fact that in one London parish
alone, the parish of St* Pancras, ten thousand names will
great we are not

be added to the

It will put

list of voters.

a new

and

mighty power into the hands of the Liberals; and it will
no doubt lend encouragement to the more extreme men of
that party.
One of the more certain

and immediate results of the

declaration of this interpretation

of the law will be the

lowering of the county franchise With manhood suffrage
in the boroughs, it will be impossible to preserve the £12
rating franchise in the counties. The injustice is too

England and Scot¬
land will demand their rights; and it will be difficult for
any Parliament longer to withhold them.
With this sur¬
prise sprung upon the people, it will not be wonderful if
questions of land reform and Church-disestablishment are
compelled to give place to the more vital question of the
The

manifest.

peasant classes all over

electoral franchise.

The enfranchisement of the peasantry

politics. Mr. Trevelyan,
champion of that class, has at last found his opportu¬
nity. It is difficult, indeed, to predict the consequences
which may follow from this new extension of the suffrage;
but we agree with tho London Times in saying that it is
‘‘very little to the credit of Parliament that it should have
“been accomplished by what—if we take the most charitable
“view of it—must be regarded as an act of pure inadver¬
will work

a

revolution in British

the

tence.”

HBtottetaras Commercial gnglisft sterns
BATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES.
XTCHANGE AT LONDON—Nov. 26.
On—

Time.

Amsterdam
Amsterdam

.

.

Short..
3 mos.

Antwerp
Hamburg

Rate.
12*2 ia

n 12*3
L2-5?4 @12*5 r*

*25*65
20*69
20*69
20*69
IS'’45

.Berlin... ./

Frankfort...
Copenbagcu.

Short.

3
3

Lons:.
Short.

25*23 *2
25*26
113*50

3

3 mos.

25*36

mos.

25*571e@2.V05
12*00
40 5$ @ 10

"’
Genoa
Lisbon
*
Alexandria

20*15

@26*25

517s@513i

New York...

Calcutta

..!!

Hong Kong..
Shanghai....




<»

u
II

^
40®g@ 4*»ia

Cadiz

60 clays1

25*27 *2
20*43
20*43
20*43

3

o

..

12*15

Doc.
Dec.
@12*02 ia Dec.

Short,

Bombay

3 Short.
Short.

Baris........
Madrid...

Rate.

3
3
3
3

Paris

8t.Petera*b"

Dec.

Time.

Is. 77gl.
la. 7 VI.

Doc.

Nov. 30 3 mos.
Dec.
3 Short.
Dec.
3 4 in os.
««
Dec.
3
o
3
Dec.
II
Dec.
3

4*80
Is. 83,0<l.
Is.

SV'L

3s- 93*1.
5s. l^ l.

•

-

* '

London. Saturday, Decembers. 1881. ‘ *
The arrangements in connection with the repayment

of the

completed, and a considerable amount<of
up, has been released. The more/
consequence assumed an easier appearance, and

Indian loan have be,m
money,

temporarily I*ck-(1

market, has in

the rates of discount have somewhat,

declined, the quo adon.

bills being 3>6 to 4 per
cent, but there h is been
a fair trade demand, and it will be observed that although
there has been some relapse in the value of money, an improve*
ment. is apparent compared with a few Weeks ago.
The open
market rate of discount has within the last few weeks been a*

in the open market f *r three months*
c^nt.
The Bank rate *vmains at 5 per

advance of about 1 per cent lias boen
quotation which will probably be main¬
tained, more especia’ly as we are now rapidly approaching the
close of the year, when numerous requirements will have to be
low

as

8 per

established

cent: but

on

an

that

satisfied.

there is more stability about
value has been established which

The fact, however, remains that
the

m >ney

market, and that

a

only likely to be supported, but which indicates that the
business of the country is by no means in an unsatisfactory
condition. It ha* always been maintained that a 4 percent
rate of discount, which is ab >ut the value obtainable L»r m >ney
at the present thn-\ is indicative of general prosperity,
Thera
is no reason for believing that the recent upward movement
has been due to causes other than of a sound and legitimate
character. New c-mpanLs and the fresh demand* upon the
public on the part of railway companies for tho construction of
additional works have undoubtedly contributed to the greater
activity which has pervaded the money market; but although
some of tlie new companies which have been introduced to pub¬
lic notice have met with little or nohsuccess, while others hava
not been fortunate operations, yet on the whole the majority of
schemes which have been brought forward promise satisfactory
results, and many are of a character whch will give a large
amount of employment to our working population. The con¬
struction of docks, wharves and railways requires much labor
and material, and as there are many new schemas under con¬
sideration for which the sanction of Parliament is certain to be
obtained, the fu ure promises to be decidedly fruitful ia
activity.
But it is not this country alone which seems about to partioL
pate in renewed commercial activity, as there are undoubtedly
indications of an extension of enterprise throughout the British
Empire, and in all countries having any claim to be called
enterprising. If the hopes which are entertained with regard
to future commercial prosperity are confirmed, our many indus¬
tries should be awaiting a virgorous future, for although there
is much, and increasing, competition to supply the world, yet
the world is annually becoming larger, and greater wants have
to be supplied.
The extension of commerce and of civilization
naturally enlarges the world’s wants, and we may feel sure,
therefore, that although the world’s progress has been, to some
extent, checked of late, the process cannot continue long in force,
as natural and reasonable aspirations in any community cannot
be long subdued. Our Australian colonies continue to borrow
money for works of importance and utility, and some are of
opinion that loans are being brought forward at too rapid a
rate.
Colonial government loans are, nevertheless, held by
investors with much confidence, and the colonial governments
are able to borrow money at a rate of interest which is certainly
very low, more especially when it is borne in mind that Aus¬
tralasia is a Continent of quite recent development and is
is not.

still in its infancy.

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.
Latest
Date.

Doc.
Dec.
•Dee.
Dec.

@25*70
@20*73
@20*73
@20*73

@18*48
247g @2 1 34
25*20 @25*30

Vienna ...!**

fFrtuu «><ir own correspondent. |

23d of November lust the question as to

tiie

lish

70i

THK CHllONLCIiK

24.18R1.J

PirfEinnn:

Sound credit and judicious enterprise

should exercise a very material influence
resources of Australia and New Zealand, and

in developing the
there is undoubt¬

that amongst the countries of the world in
be safely and remuneratively employed,
Australia will for a long time to come hold a high place.
A few years ago our trade was augmented by the foreign
loans which were brought forward upon the London money
market, which enabled certain governments to make purchases
of material for various purposes. Those governments had, no
doubt, a commendable object in view, but they were premature
with tlieir schemes, and were unable to carry oat the objects
they had at heart. The discredit which has recently been
attached to the foreign loan market is now passing away, and
foreign loans would attract some attention, if they were far
countries whose governments sought to utilize the proceeds ia
such a manner as to lead to the belief that works of a character
a firm belief
which money may

edly

CHRONICLE.

THE

706

likely to lead to beneficial and remunerative results were to be
^undertaken. The work of developing the world must continue
to progress, and as that work seems to be about to take a more
substantial form, the world’s activity should be proportionately
great.
The value of money has been declining somewhat during the
week, but the rates of discount are moderate, and are as fol¬
lows

:

Per cent.
5

Bank rate

•Ope n-market rates—
30 and GO da vs’ bills
lonths’ bills

The

following

37s® 4
37s3>4

quarters and 366,133 quarters ; the estimate for the who’
kingdom being 2,544,250 quarters, against 2,278,700 quarters
during the corresponding period of 1880 and 1,501,750 quarters
in 1879. Without reckoning the supplies of produce furnished
ex-granary at the commencement of the season, it is estimated
that the following quantities of wheat and flour have been
placed on the British markets since harvest. The visible sup¬
ply of wheat in the United States is also given :
672

Per cen'

Open market rates—

4 mouths’ bank bills
4
6 mouths’ bank bills
4
4 & 6 months’ trade bills. 4

a>418
'w 18}
@5

1881.

stock banks and discount houses for

deposits

.Joint-stock banks
Discount houses at call
do
with 7, 10 or 14 day.-,’ notice of

:
Per cen'.

38
38

33a

withdrawal....

received at the Bank of

1880.

17,400,805

1879.

1878.

3,190,752

21,010,954
3,233,893

14,459.731
1,897,262

11.025,100

9,874,315

G,507.503

13,516,000

Total
31,028,978
Deduct
exports
or
wheat and flour....
171,016

30,525,872

30,758,317

29,872,993

503,072

297,017

066,833

Result
30,557,932
A.v’ge price of English
wheat
meat:for season (qr.)
48s. 7d.
Visible supply of wheat

30,019,800

30,101,310

29,200000

42s. 4il.

48s. 41.

41--. 5u.

Imports of wheat.cwt.17,139,390
Imports of flour
2,80-4,488
Sales of home-grown

produce

the rate of interest allowed by the joint

are

ITol. XXXIII

England yesterday for
in the U. d.... bush.20,GOO,000 21,200,000
29,800,000 16,200,000
£1,930,000 in Treasury bills. The whole was allotted in three
The following return shows the extent of the imports and
months’ bills, tenders at £99 Is. lid. receiving about 60 per cent
and all above in full. The Government is paying therefore exports of cereal produce into and from the United Kingdom
about 35/& per cent per annum for loans.
during the first fourteen weeks of the season, compared with the
Annexed is a statement showing the present position of the corresponding period in the three previous seasons.
IMPORTS.
Bank of England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of con¬
1879.
1880.
1881.
1878.
sols, the average quotation for E lglish wheat, the price of
Wheat
cwt. 17,139,390 17,400,805 21,010,954 14,459,731
3,859,4o8
4,441.854
5,508,709
4,236,622
middling upland cotton, of No. 40 mule twist, fair second Barley
Oats
2,950,405
4,986,92 4
3,574,017
3,364,539
■quality, and the Bankers’ Clearing House return, compared Peas
688,589
843,059
589,570
582,280
Tenders

were

with the four previous years.
1881.

,

1878.
£

1880.
£

&

29,905,209
19,109,93 4

3.995.752
25,809,400
14,737,024
20,728,354

10,798,913 14,722,501

15,143,590

11,958,971

Coin and bullion in
both departments.. 20,588,703 25,941,586

27,733,240

26,3 J4,250

Other securities
Res’ve of notes &

Proportion of

com.

30-40
.*>

p. c.

9938

x

d.

45s. 4d.

Eng. wheat, av. price.
Mia. Upland cotton...

63]r,d.
105f3d.

IJo. 40 Mule twist....
Clear’g-house return .133,845,000

The

9d.
10%d.
91,932,000 123,564,000 105,829.000

Bank
rate.

51-2

..

....

58j

Hamburg

.

.

at the princi-

Open

...

.

Vienna.

•

,

•

T

.

t

•

4

48}
4*4
4^
4

Pr. ct.

Open
market
Pr. cl.

Madrid & other

Spanish cities
St. Petersburg...
Geneva
Genoa

Copenhagen
Bombay

4
6
6
5
4
6

5

68}
58}
5
4
....

The movements in

gold during the week have not been import¬
ant, but the export inquiry has been in excess of the imports,
and the supply held by the Bank would have fallen off con¬
siderably had there been no return of coin from Provincial cir¬
culation. The silver market has been very quiet, and fine bars
are quoted at ol^d. per ounce.
Mexican dollars have been
sold at 51d4d. per ounce.
The Bank of British North America has declared

a

dividend

of 25s. per share, being at the rate of 5 per cent per annum.
The Minas & Rio Railway Company invite subscriptions to

£400,000 debentures, bearing 6 per cent interest per annum, and
1 per cent redemption fund.
The price of issue is £102 for
£100 debenture.

Very little change has taken place in the value of wheat
•during the week. The trade closes with a somewhat steadier
appearance, but with no activity. We may expect the trade to
rule quiet during the remainder of the year. The following
are the quantities of produce afloat to the United Kingdom :
Wheat, 2,591,000 quarters; flour, 120,000 quarters; Indian
corn, 234,000 quarters.
The weather is remarkably mild, and
£reen food is very abundant. The consumption of bread is,
therefore, below the average, and there is some probability
that, owing in some measure to the mildness of the season, and
to the delay in closing Black Sea and Baltic ports, our stocks
•of produce at the close of the year will show a decided increase
compared with the last return. The weather has been very
favorable for autumn sowing, but colder weather is desirable
in order to keep vegetation in check.
During the week ended Nov. 26, the sales of home-grown
wheat in the 150 principal markets of England and Wales
amounted to 52,490 quarters, against 46,010 quarters last year
and 38,580 quarters in 1879; while it is computed that they
were in the whole kingdom 210,000 quarters, against 264,000
quarters and 154,320 quarters. Since harvest the sales in the
150 principal markets have been 636,061 quarters, against 569,-




cwt.

Barley
Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Flour

3,233,893

429,301

400,086

15,111
233,835

149,159

23,592
corn

11,107
57,411
4L.745

4,005
51,054
13,904
09,243
45.380

1879.'

259,382
5,049
15,178

30,779
11,004

299,133
37,655

1878.

640,340
51,481
35,495
5,483
2,368
86,996
26.493

London, Saturday, Dec. 10, 1881.

5d.

market.
Pr. ct.

434
5q

434,116

9,206,697
1,397,262

1880.

1881.
Wheat

94*4
3d

61316d.

rate.

Berlin

Frankfort

43s.

Bank

Pr. cl.
5

Paris

978a
46s. 7d.

money

770,800

0,198,043

5 p. c.

3 p. c.

28 p. c.
99 *4 x d.
44s. 5d.
63,3d.
1083d.

following are the current rates for
pal foreign centres :

Brussels
Amsterdam

10,34S,078

reserve

to liabilities
Bank rate
Consols

2,861,183

475.280

10,985.548
3,190,752

29.405,285

27,589,650
2.755,029

25,539,700 20,219,025
5,379.710
4.226,124
24,877,010 24 441,013
13,244,014 14,865,019
22,942,200 18,105,045

-Governm’t securities.

440,310
7,082,935

Beans
Indian corn
Flour

Money has been in good demand during the week, and the
market rates of discount show a moderate improvement, ‘
the quotation for three months’ bank bills being 4% to 4/£ per
cent.
Gold continues in demand for export, but the supply
held by the Bank of England has increased, owing to the return
of coin from provincial circulation. The position of the Bank
is an improving one, the proportion of reserve to liabilities
being 39/2 per cent. That ratio, however, of assets to lia¬
bilities does not by any means justify a lower rate of discount =
than five per cent, and it fully accounts for the increased
firmness of the open money market. The Board of Trade
returns issued this week confirm the general belief in an im¬
proved condition of our commerce. Oar export trade in Novem¬
ber was very satisfactory, and the tctal for the eleven months
compares very favorably with last year. Our home trade has
also improved, and has been more active than for some years
past. The year has also been fruitul in new undertakings, and
these have caused money to move about somewhat freely
during the year. Business is still believed to be very sound,
though profits are said to be small, and the present interest
rate is calculated to keep injudicious speculation in check.
During the remainder of the present year money will be
wanted. Some are of opinion that there will be a decline in
the Bank quotation early in 1882, but the probability seems to
be against such an expectation, as a year of activity is very
generally looked forward to.
The present year is closing
with many indications of life, and during the past week
several new schemes have been introduced to public notice.
The more important is a new railway share trust company
with a capital of £6,000,000, which has lor its object the pur¬
chase of sound British railway shares to the extent of the sup¬
port afforded to the committee by the public. Many schemes
of this description have been introduced of late years, and
they have met with a fair measure of success. The present
undertaking is expected to be well supported, though the
public are not so enthusiastic respecting an equalization of
interest as they were. Many investors prefer to lay out their
surplus capital in the same manner as is proposed by these
trust companies, but they do not care to entrust to others what
can
be safely undertaken by themselves.
In cases, those
inaugurating the trust have speculated largely upon it, and
such a course as that can scarcely promote confidence. The
control of so large an amount of capital as some of these trust
undertakings obtain gives an enormous advantage to the few*
but a large section of the public appreciate the idea, and diffi
open

707

CHRONICLE.

THE

24, 1881.]

December

Bank rate

.4 months’ hank bills
6 months’ bank bills
4 & 6 months’ trade bills.

5

-

°30and 60days’bills
The

stock
B

Exported to—

902,000
30,715,900
6.940,200
4,640,300,
3,515,100
2,617,400
5,620,900
606,900

1.878.400
42,197,800
5.109.100

4,790,600

4,8 44,000

4.603.400

2,673,700

1,985,600

2.200.100

37,451,600
5,922,800
72,443,700

61,5 90,100

6,244,100
101,447,700

55,288,8006.578.400
68.164.300

Straits Settlements

11,222,400

12,309,700

7,893,100

Ceylon

2,288,300
5,181,700
20,362,100

2,877,400

2.126.500
8,985,600
27.723.300

1,264,100
48,728,100
7,838,000

Peru
China and Hong Kong

Japan

6,433,500
2,451,600

Java

4^^458
4^ a>5 ^

Philippine Islands

1,401,400
1,742,600

Gibraltar
Malta

Per cent.

Africa

3

joint-stock banks

564,400

British North America
British West India Islands <fe
Guiana
British Possessions in South

by the joint-

following are the rates of interest allowed
banks and discount houses for deposits:

British India—

Bombay
Madras

the present position of the

Annexed is a statement showing
Bank of England, the Bank rate of

Bengal

discount, the price of consols,
the average quotation for English wheat, the price of middling
upland cotton, and of No. 40 mule twist, fair 2d quality, and the
Bankers’ Clearing House return, compared with the three previous years:

1881.

1880.

1879.

1878.

£

£

£

£

Circulation, exclud¬
in'.; Bank post bills. 25,445,386

6,209,917
24,3'1,173
14,365,019

Res’ve of notes & coin 11,089,657
Coin and bullion in
both departments.. 20,785,037

Other

Consols
Eng.

25,012,245

27,669,604

25 995,026

99*2X
44s. lid.

wheat, av. price

G^s l.

6^1 f5d.
1058.1.

Mid. Upland cotton..

97i0
46s. 7d.
71ed.

10^1.
mule twist—
Clearing-House, ret’n. 119,775,000 151,020,000
The following are the current rates of discount
No. 40

cipal foreign centres :

Paris

Brussels
Amsterdam...
Berlin
Frankfort—

Open

rate.
Pr. ct.
5

market.
Pr. ct.

5*a

54
45S

Hamburg

....

Spanish cities

....

45ft

at. Petersburg
Geneva
Genoa

.-•.

41*>

Copenhagen

33t

Bengal

4

Vienna

76,220,00a

at the prinOpen
market.*
Pr. ct.

Madrid and other

47t> a)5

.

...

4

5

6

6 34

6
5

5® 5*2

45ft
4

4

7

has been very quiet during the
There has not been much demand from any quarter.

-

The silver market

bars

quoted at 52d. and Mexican dollars at

are

week.
Fine

51%d. per

ounce.

Russian loan is spoken of.
finances of the Imperial Treasury i3 far
A

new

The condition of the

from satisfactory, and
experienced
great difficulty is
in obtaining money at home. It
is stated, therefore, that the Government of Russia are about
to

appeal to Europe for assistance.
returns have been issued this week,

The Board of Trade

and

they

are very

satisfactory.

They show the following

results.

£38,429,382
376,773,204

£34,343,388

November
eleven months
November
eleven months

..

..

The following figures
Novmber 30:

1881.

18S0.

1879.

Imports in
Imports in
Exports in
Exports in

326,806,185
17,051,955
174,927.552

18,864,700
204,595.737

relate to the eleven

£34,269,784

362.421,090
20,713,164
213.756,867

months ended

IMPORTS.

cwt.

*

1880.

1879.

cwt.

Cotton yarn
lbs.
Cotton piece goods....yards.3,399,399,009
Iron and steel.
tons.
2,639,549
Linen yarn
lbs.
15,943,000

Linen piece goods
Jute manufactures

yards.
yards.

Silk manufactures
£
British wool
lbs.
Colonial and foreign wool.lbs.
Woolen yarn
lbs.
Woolen cloths
yards.
Worsted stuffs
yards.
Blankets & blanketing..yds.

1,778,607
196,486,300

1,507,727
215,677,900

'

1881.

1,674,127
232,351,000

4,123,231,900 4,390,636,200

145,186,430
149,106,900
1,551,342

12,162,100

224,480,836
29,429,700

41,591,600
170,470,300

3,558,324

15,039,100
152,385,000
165,925,900
1,844,102
16,249,200

215,556,689
24,602,400
46,108,900
174,699,100
5,641,000
5,556,800
8,911,500

1,623,600

1,993,800

2,049,700

323,584,200

425,601,100

406,429,600

3,518,511

16,534,800
159,799,500
187,523,800
2,325,682
12,438,500

243,380,217
26,632,000
50.681.200
175,417,300
5,599,700

113,068,000

follows:
1881.
187,608
75,533

1879.
91,634
54,583

1880.
114,263
59,686

939,164

1,060,300

67.22 8

87,225

4,401,144

5,702.199

1,451,182
91.677

*

5,551,947

during the month of November
follows:

and in the eleven months were as

GOLD.

Imports
Imports
Exports
Exports

in
in
in
in

Imports in
Imports in
Exports in
Exports in

1879.

1880.

£

£

1881.
£.

713,889

1,494,209
8,661,199
2,634,234
9,109.213

563,474
12,926,770

November....
11 mouths
November
11 mouths....

4,165,371
15,500,103

9,560,544

1,144,110
14,812,002-

SILVER.

10,334,461

11 months....

513,412

578,970
6,009,699
658,464
6,892,178

612,702
9.769,970
1,010,552

November
11 months
November

6,341,727
557.572

6,611,596

TOTAL GOLD AND SILVER.

in November
1,176,176
2,073,239
1,227,301
in 11 months
22,690,740
11,670,898
15,902,271
in November
5,157,923
3,292,093
1,701,682
iu 11 months
25,834,564
16,001,421
21,423,598
There has been a little more animation in the trade for
this week, but the amount of business in progress
from extensive.
Prices have not materially
weather has been very mild until to-da3r, and there are now

Imports
Imports
Exports
Exports

wheat
has been far
varied. The

some

indications of winter.

The quantity of wheat afloat to

Kingdom is estimated at 2,671,000 quarters ; flour,
101,000 quarters ; Indian corn, 236,000 quarters.
Daring the week ended Dec. 3, the sales of home-grown
the United

and Wales

wheat in. the 150 principal markets of England
amounted to 47,132 quarters, against 44,286 quarters last year
and 38,428 quarters in 1879 ; while it is
were in the whole kingdom 188,530 quarters,
against 177,150

computed that they

quarters and 153,720

quarters. Since harvest the

sales in the

principal markets have been 683,193 quarters, against 613,958 quarters and 404,561 quarters ; the estimate for the whole
kingdom being 2,733,000 quarters, against 2,455,850 quarters
and 1,655,500 quarters in the two previous seasons respectively.
Without reckoning the supplies of produce furnished ex-gran¬
ary at the commencement of the season, it is estimated that
the, following quantities of wheat and .flour have been placed
on the British markets since harvest.
The visible supply in
150

also given

the United States is

13,534,252

12,975,275

11.233,263
EXPORTS.

Cotton

1881.

1880.

1879.

Cotton

29,183,000

291,311,900

91,496,100

The movements in bullion

9d.

rate.
Pr. ct.

44
...

j

Thread for sewing
lbs.
Other manfs.. not ennm’at’d£
Tot. value of cotton manfs. £

7,519,300
1,715.900
3,003,300*
1,183,800

291,276,400
132,420,900

235,464.500

£
..£

patent net
Hosiery of all sorts

Lace and

6.478.500

7,628,500

Other manufactures of cotton show as

4l3j6d.

Bank

Bank

...

5 p. c.
94 Rj
40s. lid.

3 p. e.

lO^d.
86,416,000

Grand total

4.484,391

13,982,775

3 p. c.
98 ^x
44s. 1 od.

:

Total unbleached or bleached
Total printed,dyed,or colored
Total mixed materials, cotton

31,248,175

19,009,748
15,550,654

39-59
5 p. c.

Bank rate

Australia
Other countries

predominating

26,369,995
14,737,024
21,346.856
9,740,851

15,610,459

20.136,119

securities—..

Proportion of reserve
to liabilities

27,058.950
3,645,438
28,627,365

26.029,470

4,905,611
22,855,801
Governw ’ t sc eu ri t ies. 13,243,961
21,315,031
deposits
0 tlier deposi t s

Public

1881.
Yards.

1880.
Yards.

1879.
Yards.

i

(jolty is seldom experienced in securing the necessary support.
uotations for money :
The following are the present
q
Per cent. Open-market rates—
Percent.

:

1873-79.

1879-30.

1830-81.

wheat.cwt.18,020,841 18,902,171
Imports of Hour
2,975,137
3,505,953
Sales of home-grown
!
Imports of

11,842,000 10,641,933 7,173,600 14,519,000
32,837,978 33,050,062 32,991,568 32,012,141

produce
Total
Deduct
exports
wheat and liour

of

504,036
32,333,892

Result

Av’ge price of English
wheat for season (qr).
Visible supply in Unit’d

45s. 4d.

bush.20,600,000

States

1877-78.

22,371,377 15,402,817
3,443,1:91 2,094,324

524,586

304,434

693,434

33,525,476

2,687,134

31,318,707

42s. Cd.

48s. 3d.

41s. 5d.

24,600,000 27.850,700 17,045,020

following return shows the extent of the imports and
7,429,200 exports of cereal produce into and from the United Kingdom
Carpets
yards.
6,091,800
9,020,100 during the first fifteen weeks of the season, compared with
The following were the quantities of cotton manufactured the corresponding period in the three previous seasons :
IMPORTS.
piece goods exported in November, compared with the cor¬
1877-78.
1S78-79.
1880-81.
1879-80.
15,402,817
22,374,377
18,902,171
responding month in the two preceding years :
Wheat
cwt .18,020,841
4,566,205
Flannels

yards.

Exported to—

,

Germany

5,132,100

4,918,700

1879.
Yards.
^

3,750,600

Holland

2,400,400

Frauce

3,6^1,200
3,883,500
4,144,200

Portugal, Azores*& Madeira!
Italy

Austrian Territories

£refce

£Urk(W
West Coast of Africa
United States
Foreign West Indies

Mexico
United States
(New

of”'Colombia

Granada)

n?zl1
Vl^ay
Argentine
wmi—




public

2,559,900
2.769.300
4.907.700
6.186.300

2,845,300
2.564.900
4,187,500
5,889,400
6.248.100
1,084,100

6,060,300
596,200

2.748.700

3.472.100
39,214,600
21,682,500
2.680.100
2.696.300
8,224,800
4.179.500

- ,519,000
1,567,800
3,202,200

5,278.600
3,152,400

2,789,700

20,021,100
R

1831.
Yards.

ROSLOOO

21,336.600

Egypt

1880.
Turds.

1,588.300
4,331,300

3,387,000

4,441,600
18,631,900
3.293.500
7,156,000
3.239.700

8.672,800

45,990,100
14.400.600
2,236,200
3,694,000
5.800.100

4,659,700

The

6.233.100

8,002,500

5,888,202
5,277,166

658,593
467,027

963,368
595,730

853,667

2,975,137

3,505,953

Pt£l8

Beans

7,989,854 11,342,806

Indian corn
Flour

.

769,072

460,399
17,803

cwt.

Wheat

Barley
Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian
Flour

corn

43,687

English
,

264,329
24,254
11,986
57,552

The daily closing

and for

265,402
5,715
15,674

665,448

5,573
168,360
54,570
14,374
77,996

31,083
11,858
301,993

40,032

48,954

Market Iteports— Per

53,094
35,963

5,684
2,483
90,143

27,986

&e., at London,

Liverpool, are

the week ending- December

*

2,090,324

Cable.

quotations for securities;

by cable as follows for

573,782
477,103
9,604,486

475,632

breadstuffs and provisions at

3,740,103

*6,491,385
3,443,591

EXPORTS.

4.182.900
23.804.600
2 979.100

4,938,490
3,754,803

4,085,110
3,153,138

Barley

Oats

23:

reported

THE CHRONICLE.

.708
Sat.

London.
Bilver, per oz
Consols for money

2.601—Tihne*

Illinois Central

1207s
4433

*8

New York Central

Liverpool.

“
**
“

Cal. white

“

10

10
10
10

new

51

517a
9'3,6

997,«
99*>,6
84*07*3 83*75
10.5*9
10,5*3
l 17*8
i 17*8
121
120*8
433|
433t
13 1
13 1*8
63 h
6 V
3 11.1
3 4
1 3 8 *.j
138*8

997^

3434
13)6,

13.1*8

O
7
8
10
7

345r

l red.

Tius.

s.

d.

s.

M
40
10
10
10

O
7

14

5 10*3
5
Oom, mix., West.
“
72
Pork, West.mess..f} bbl 72 0
Bacon, long clear, new.. 13 O 47
Beef, pr. mess, new,$tc. 91 O 91
Lard, prime West. $ cwt. 57 O
56

Cheese. Am. choice,

•M7a
993,6

Texas Trunk.—At a meeting of I he creditors of the
Trunk
Railroad of Texas, at Dallas, Messrs. W. M. Rogers,
Richard

Morgan and A. Nevvlin were appointed a
tain the indebtedness of the road.
After

committee to ascer¬
an examination
they
report that, the road owes $114,227 70, the creditors being prin¬
cipally in Dallas and Maufman, and the / think that there are*
other claims against the read enough to make its indebtedness
$125,000. The road has no money.

85*-jO
l 05 *8
1 1 7

•

*8

121

4238
1 33
63

34*6
133

Thors.

9

7
1 0
O

6
0
0

17
91
7*6
5 1

6

s.

d.

s.

1 t

0
7
3

14

10

10
10
8
10
3
10 6
5 10
72
0

8

54

6

d.
O
7

Fri.

10

10
10

8

6

5

O
O
O
6

10
10
10
40
5

9*2

<t.
0
7
8
8
6

.?.

u
10
to
10
10

d.
0
5
S
7
G

5 1 0
72
0

9*3

72
47

0
0

72

0

17

0

47

G

01
56
T> 4

0
0
6

01
55
54

0
9

ol

0

76

0

6

0 1

6

on

and after January 1, 1882.

—The attention of the cotton and

produce trades is called to
the card of Messrs. Hinson & Blount in to-day's C hronicle.
This firm is composed of young and energetic men with

ample
extensive acquaintance in the
South.
The firm is represented by one of its members in each
of the Exchanges—Cotton aind Produce —and gives special atten¬
facilities, besides having an
tion to

futures.”

first mortgage bonds will be paid on and after January 3,
by
Messrs. Post, Martin &Co. Also by the same firm the coupons

of the

National Banks.—The following national banka

have been

:

Chicago National Bank. Clnaago, Til. Authorized capital,
$3 iO,()i)0. John K Walsh, Pi crident; flemy II. Nash, Cashier.
National Bank of Stamford, N. Y. Authorized capital,
$.>0,00
Meander Fmleuburg, President; Seth W. Hubbard,
'ashier.

<

presentation

on

—Coupons of the Buffalo New York & Philadelphia.Railroad

©ummcvcial itiitU^UsccUatico us lie ius.
organized

—Attention is called to the notice that the East Tennessee
Virginia & Georgia Railroad Company, as lessee of the Memphis^
Charleston UR will pay the past-due coupons.at the office of
R.
T. Wilson & Co., this city, of the latter road which have not here¬
tofore been bought in by the lessee, and will purchase at the
par
or face value of same the coupons
maturing January 1, 1882
,

m

ft.

.

Flour (ex. State.. 100 lb. 14

99i 18

64 **j

Mon.

Sat.

517a

99lm
996.«

I2l)4i
1 4 h>
135*8
6 l *4

1 36 ‘‘2

65
3"*

51*316
3325
105 *6
117**2

t«>5 u,
1.1 7 *2

121

Pennsylvania
Philadelphia & Reading.

Wheat, No. 1, wli.
Spring, No. 2...
Winter, West., n

\

84*30

I17*a;

Fri.

51

9971B
34*80
10 ." 3-1

Thurs.

Tues.

9911(J

46*3
13634

stock

common

in*

99**i6

Consols for account
Fr’ch rentes (in Paris) fr.
U. 8. 5sext’n’d iuto3*3S
of 1891
U. 8.
U. 8. 4s of 1907

Erie,

5

d.

Wed.

Mon.

[Vol. xxxm,

2,G03.—The Manufacturers’ National Bank of Xoenah, Win. Authorized
capital, $65,0J0. Iliraui Smith, Pivriuont; K. P. Finney,

will

Jan. 3, 1882.
—The Metropolitan National Bank has declared a divi¬
dend of 5 per cent, payable January 9, 1382. Books will be
closed until January 10, 1882.

Cashier.

2,601.—The Winters National Bank of Dayton,Ohio. Authorized capi¬
ta!, $300,000. Jonathan II.' Winters. Pmsidout; Ja nos C.
Rebci, Cashier.
and Exports

Imports

Shares.

for tbs

merchandise) Dec. 16; also totals since January 1:
1878.

Gen’i mer’dise..,
Total
Since Jan. 1.

Dry Goods

Gen’i inerMise..
Total

30 Seventh Ward Nut. B'k. 93*3
BO National Park l».iuk..x161 *a
25 Nat.B’k of Oointu .*m*. x 1 4 6 *3
15 Metropolitan Nat.B’k.xlGG*^

1880:

1879.

!,5U0 Mechanics’ Nat. Brink.

48sl.

$1,102,860

$1,740,841

$1,532,504

$1,633,546

3,290,475

6,544,361

5.875.881

6.435,958

$4,393,335

$3,235,202

$7,408 335

$3,179,504

$74,068,324

$90,092,018 $117,830,451 $107,084,749

207,217,40 4

242,309,841

34^930,495

31

2,000 Grant Mining; 300 In¬

ternational Coal «fc Rail¬
way, Nova Scotia; 0,500
Essex & Diadem Minin or;
2.000 Deubo MLn’g; 1,011

4.500,08 4

Schoolcraft

(exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for thj
week ending Dec. 20, and from January 1 to date :
1878.

1870.

For the week...

$7,269,771

Prev. reported..

333,358,429

18 30.

$8,551,865
337,953.009

.$69*32.474

*$8,500,090

363,513,328

$15 p. ffh,

$4,400 Gaslight Co. of Balti¬

of

more

92

6s certificates

$7,000 Consol. G;>s of Balti¬
more

104*g

6s, due 1910

$5,009 La Ciede Gas of St.
Louis 8s, due 1888
Gas of

105

$830 La Ciede

St.

Louis Gs certificates, pay¬
able after 18^6
100

arifor$39

$3,750 U.S. Life Ins. Co. scrip 68*8

"Wn'wfy.'f'PWify mm,w

BANKING AND FINANCIAL.

1881.

397,413,656

10 > Jersey City Gaslight...163*a
50 Piieuix Natl >ual Bank.106*3
10 N. Y. Fire Ins. Co
107*8
10 Sterling Fire Ins. <o... 67
*2 Sterling Fire Ins. Co... 66*a
6 Star Fire In-*. Go
90
3*2 NT. Y. Gaslight Go ... ..109*a
21 Merchants’ Nat. B’k .xl3Q*a
5 Central Park North &
E:ist Rivei* RR
..136*8
8 Union National Bank.. 155**
59 Brooklyn Gaslight Co..125
399 Montank
Gas
Coal

Fire

shares
Homestead
Ins. Co
»

Mining Of*, certifle’es. for
$5
5 National City Bonk ....263

Bonds.

Michigan;
109 Denver
Mining;
200
Mariposa
Mining (certificate dated
1870); $6,009 Mariposa
bonds; coupons October,
1867, and since, on; 10

The following is a statement of the exports

WEEK.

Co.

Iron

Share*.
31 Sioux City & Iowa F ills
Town Lot Co
$11 p. fill.
1 Clinton Hall Asso’n
51
430 Ke.nawlia & Elk River
Petroleum & Mining Go.,
and $709 Little Kanawha
& Elk River Petroleum A

Co

409

Mining;

Jlolyoko

trade will be found the imports

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR TKK

xllOhi

ISO Home Fire Ins. Co. 1519150
loo U. S. Life Ins. Co
Ill
202 Iowa Falls & Sioux City
Railroad
83 h?
20 Mo. Valley Land Oo.$> p. sli.

$281,315,738 $332,401,862 $465,816.9 46 $421,534,830

In our report of the dry goods
*f dry goods for one week later.

xliS^aUOk}

•

10 Clinton Insurance Co..158*2
60 (Vnt/al Trust Co.
213*2
30 Continental. In*. Go
2 4S
8 s Cons, (las of Baltimore 39*3
233 Brooklyn Gaslight Co.. 123*3
412 Manhattan Gasl’ht Co.2ls*3
59 La Cleric Gas Co. of 8t.

Louis, Mo

FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW YOKE.

Dry Goods

Auction Sales.—Messrs. A. II. Muller & Son sold the follow¬

ing at auction this week:

Week.—The

imports of last
week, compared with those of the preceding week, show
an
increase in both dry goods and general merchandise.
The total imports were $3,170,504, against $6,5)05,043 the pre¬
ceding week and $7,270,404 two weeks previous. The exports
for the week ended Dec. 20 amounted to *$8,500,000, against
$4,911,093 last week and $7,100,090 two weeks previous. The
following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) Dec. 15 and for the week ending (for general

For Week.

Allegany Central Railroad.
the Indiana Bloomington & Western
the semi-annual dividend of 3 percent
be paid on the outstanding' income bonds on and after

—Notice is given by
Railroad Company that

Total sVe Jan. 1 .$341,128,200 $310,507,874 $404,016,130 $372,013,3 78
•Estimated. We have been uuable to procure the figurosrfrom the
Custom House.

OPENING OF A NEW TRUNK

CP* Til3

ATLANTIC SEABOARD

TO THE

WRIT is

LINE FROM THE

an

event of so much

The following table shows the exports and imports of specie
at the port of New York for the week ending Dee. 17 and since

importance that we have taken more than our usual pains to

Janaary 1, 1SSI:

information before

oar

lay the

customers and correspondents.

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF SPECIE AT NEW YORK.

We have just

Exports.

Imports.

Gold.

our

Week.

Since Jan. 1

Week.

Since Jan. 1

issued

a

pamphlet, oopies of whioh oan bo obtained

office, giving an acoount of the completion of the

OHIO RAILWAY to Newport News, and also
Great Britain
France

$1,000

Germany

$71,160
11.500
2,000

West Iudies -.
Mexico
South America
Ail other countries

$

$32,902,533

98.430

4

57,596

9,345.112

236.690
7,00o

3,257,301
389,360

133,956

253,706

800

759,729

102,700

170,940

2/217,512

LEXINGTON
between the

$1,000

”300

$441,066
2,237,523
2,074,469

$371,456 $53,095,533
3,018,013 64,237.559
513,995 75.814.231

and

$138,015 $9,562,552

46,094
3 x ,656

3,770

$ 138,015 $1<*,300,2 65

3.141

6,66 4

-

1879

20,065

211,735
899,990
1,1 67,” 16
174,278
29,281

10,204

Mexico
South America
All other countries

Total

$220,888

378.950
270,SO!)

West Indies

Total 1881
Total 1880

ffi

193,000
295.294

$13,575

6,041,639

$2,753,953

34,429

12..814.139

170,885

5,107,010
7,846,062

0i the above imports for the week in'18S1, $104,530
American gold coin and $4,769 American silver coin.




were

ELIZABETHTOWN

RAILROAD, forming the

Chesapeake & Ohio and its allied lines, West,

connection

Southwest

trunk line
millions of people west

Chesapeake & Ohio now enters the field as a through

as

of tho
Silver.
Great Britain
France

CHE SAPEAKE &

and Northwest.
Tho

Total 1881
Total 1880
Total 1879

& BTG BANDY

of the

at

tho shortest route to the seaboard for ton

Alloghanies, with very light fixed charges and a

rapidly-develop¬

ing local business.

bonds
of 1911, issued on tho completed road to Newport News. Price, par and
accrued interest. A description of the bonds will be found on pages 15
The company are now

and IS of the

ready to soil the $2,009,000 six per cent

pamphlet.
FISK &

HATCH, No. 5 Nassau

Street.

709

THE CHRONICLE,

24, 1881.]

December

Differ-nets fWm

1881.

The fihmkcrs7 (Saxctte.
«

I

V

*

l» K N

Name of Company.

Kail»*«>n<iy.

Bra li A: Lynn . —
«fe Nebraska
Chicago It. Island At Pac. (quar.).
Denver As Rio Grarnlo (quar.)
Flint As Fere Marquette pref
I,ake Shore As Mioli. Sou. (quar)-..
Northern Central
Poston Revere
Cl»ic«T-'o Iowa

Old Colony--.

-

. -

providence At Woreester...
Bt. Louis As Ban Francisco pref...
Winchester & Potomac..

Per
cent.

Importers’ At Traders’ Nat
Irvin# National
Marine National

National
Medianics’ National
Metropolitan National
Mercantile National—
Merchants' Exchange National...
Mario t

Merchants’ National
National Rank of Comm. ice......

National Butchers’ &
National Citizen,’

Drovers'...

National Park.
National Shoo At Leather
Ninth National
St. Nicholas Nat ional
r

Third National

Tradesmen’s Na ionnl

3C2
$4
1 :T
l'ti
3
O

3
3

3*9
3

Jan.
IJan.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
.fan.
Jan.
Jan.
.fan.
Jan.

<

Legal tenders.

inrlnsice.)

Legal

16 to
Don. 3o to
14'Jan.
1 to
1 to
16 Jan.
1 Jan.
1 to
16
»>
Dc
17 t* >
2 Deo.

I

—

.

G

1.8 Jail.

18

Jan. 31

to

1!
n

3*2

Jan.

4
4

Jan.
Jan.

3D

31#

Jan.
r in.
Jau.
,1 an.

3‘
3 Dee.
!i I Dec.
r> Dee.
3, Deo.

5

Jan.

3

4

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

Dec. 25 to Jan.
3 Dec. 2 1 to Jan.
3 Dec. 28 to Jm,

4

4
5
3
3

51#

0».j
3D

<)

•

9'

.

..........

;jj

~l

to
to

O
u

<)

Jau.
to J an.

*_»

to .'an.
to Jau.
to Jan.

o

to

Jan.

O

to

Jan.

to

Jan.

to

4

$71,231 90(1 Deo.
70,960,700 lao.

o

D

•

•

•

o

......

Jail.
*21 to Jail,
*_4 to Jan.
‘_3 to Jiili•

2L

4

to

2
O
r>

G
...

.........

.

HD.O'Kt

1,317.500
*
1,900

in. 174.400
267.629,600

23.051,900
2iO.118.OCO

13,318,400

12,513,400

$329,375

$(>6,907,475

$01,529,650

361,400

68,996,200

63.380,300

.

.

$690,775

$2,083,725

$1,850,650

Exchange.—Foreign exchange is weaker the past day or two,

and leading drawers have reduced their rates }£c. on sterling
bills. To-day the actual rates for business were about 4
4 80 for
prime bankers’ 60 days sterling, 4
84 for

demand, with cable transfers at 4 84/£($4 85.
United States Bonds.—There has been a fairly active busi¬
ness in government
bonds without much change in prices. On
Wednesday at the Sub-Treasury only • 500,100 of bonds embraced
in the 106tli call were offered, and this seems to indicate that
the bonds will hereafter come in slowly.
The closing prices at the ISew York Board have been as follows:
17,

4s, 1907
is, 1907
6r, cur’cy,
Gh, cur’cy,
tie, cur’cy,
6s, cur’cy,

coup.

reg.
coup.

1895..re#.
1 896.. reg.
1897..reg.

1898.: reg.

Gh, cur’cy. 1899..reg.

Dec.
20.

Dec.
21.

Dec.
22.

Dec.
tw u

l oO*U 1 00*h *100*4 ♦lOOSi *100-%
102 7s *102.**4 *1023, 1023* *102^4
*
*
114
i l 4 D
1 14 D *ll43s hid
*
*11 ID G143f
*1 111*8 *114
1 i 1
C$.-Mai*. * 114
Q.-J an. 11 7 Dj 117*4 *i 17:V 1173s 117*- *117!%
u.-Jan.
1183a 1 1^4 118:*a 11838 *118^ * 1D>3*
*
1 25
I 26
*127
*125
*175
J. Az J. *127
*
*126
*127
*126
126
128
J. At J. *128
*127
*127
*129
*127
*128
J.
J. 129
*
*
*128
*128
129
1 30
1. «fc J * 130
"i 29 *130 *129 •M 29
*131
J. At J *131

6s, continued at 3*2.. J. & J. ♦100%
5s, continued at 3D.. vJ.-Fe b. 1027h
4D>h, 1891
reg. Q.-Mar. *114 D
4*28. 1891

Dee.
19

Dee

J uteres!

Periods.

r
“

*

-•

...

*

This is the price hid at the inoriiiiur no o-<t: mi

sa/e was made.

t>

State anti Railroad Bonds.—The business in State bonds has
been comparatively limited as the transactions in the stock mar¬
ket have absorbed much attention.
The Tennessee bond case is

3

to

O

>'

NEW YORK, FRIDAY. DECEMBER 23. 1SS1 -5 1*. 11

Def.$271.200 Inc

i)

!

3*2

20.127.800 l)eo.
28 1.927,600 Deo.
15,733.500 Duo.

O

,

Dee. 22

t>

8
2
2

Jan.
J in.
to Jau.
to Jan.
to Jan.

4.
4

4.

Surplus

—

Jan. 25
Jau. 14
Jau. 16
Feb.
3

Tier. 24
3 Dee. 21
3 <>er. 21
3 Dec. 13
Dec. 20
3 Dec. 21
t>
Deo. *21
>
Dee. 22
9 Dec. 24
•4 Dec. 17
31 Doe. *91
O
«->
Dee. 23

7
4

1879.
Dee. 20.

O

Drcllancoiis,

Brooklyn Trust
Central Trust.
Mei cuutile Trust

( Days

Jan.
Jan.
Jau.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jail.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

4
3

Insurance.

Montank Fire (Brooklyn)

.

reserve.
Reserve held.

4

N. B. A

Circulation...
Net deposits

Hooks ('tosed.

Payable.

1830.
Drc. 18.

Doe.$l.810.500 $293,372,000 $278,008,100
50,8 12.900
363,300
55,677,800
55,222,200 flic.

Specie

When

meek.

previous

Loans and dis. $312,978,400

» S

V auks

Bank of America
Bank of New York,
Hanover National

Deci 17.

V)

•

The Money Market and Financial Situation.—There lias
beer more excitement this week at the Stock Exchange than in

come up for hearing at Nashville on January 17.
Railroad bonds have generally been easier, particularly the
lower class bonds of those companies whose stocks have weak¬

ened

in the recent

flurry.

If the market does not speedily

it may offer buyei-s for cash a good opportunity to pur¬
chase bonds for investment.
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.—The stock market has
been pretty thoroughly shaken up, and a considerable amount
of stock held on slender margins has been thrown overboard. A
reference to the Denver & Rio Grande is made above, but th#
recover,

previous week for some months past. The decline in prices
time has there been anything like
a panic in stocks, and the support given to the market in these
periods of weakness confirms the opinion we have so frequently
expressed, that a large majority of the heaviest operators are
greatly interested in preventing any such decline in prices as precise nature of rke contest between Mr. Gould and the Rio
would break public confidence and put a check on the distribu¬
Grande parties, and the Palmer-Sullivan syndicate, is not yet
tion of new stocks and bonds.
known.
Next to Rio* Grande the Wabash stocks have been for
The first break of importance occurred on Friday last, 16th
some time among the weakest of the list, and the belief is pretty
inst., in Denver & Rio Grande stock, and it has since been re¬
that the company’s heavy liabilities for roads purchased
ported that Mr. Jay Gould made a raid against the stock for the general
and leased are pressing on it rather severely. Whether Mr.
purpose of buying it. However this may be, it is certain that Gould has been a
large seller, does not appear, but it is strongly
the rumor of difficulty in regard to the payments of the sub¬
suspected
he
that
has been within the past few months. Th«
scriptions to the Mexican National Construction Company annual statements of
the Vanderbilt roads were published to¬
(Palmer & Sullivan road) was used to depress the Rio Grande
and
the
of
loss
net earnings, owing to the disastrous effect*
stock. This company is building from Laredo on the Rio Grande day,
of the war in rates, is unexpectedly heavy.
to Mexico City, under a concession from the Mexican Govern¬
With each decline of 2@3 per cent, the market has generally
ment; and almost cotemporaneously with these reports of diffi¬ met with a
strong support from large buyers, and at the close
culty in collecting the subscriptions to their stock, appeared the there was a
sharp rally in prices.
circular of Mr. Gould, as President of the Missouri Pacific Rail-1
The following is a statement of the operations of the New
way, calling for subscriptions to the stock of the new construc¬ York
Central & Hudson River Railroad Company for the
tion company to build “ The Mexican Oriental Interoeeanic &
fiscal year ending Sept. 30 :
International Railroad," to cover the same main route ns the
Gross earnings—
1879-80.
1880-81.
Palmer-Sullivan road from Laredo to Mexico City.
From passengers
$6,958,038
$0,611,159
It is worthy of notice that this little shaking up which has From freight
1
22,199,905
20,736,749
4,365,787
4,653,608
taken place in the stock market began with these reports of From miscellaneous
backwardness on the. part of subscribers to a construction com¬
$3?,348,396
$33.175,913
Total earnings
19,404,786
pany in coming forward with their money. The consequences Expenses
17,84), 891
suggested by this action, or non-action, may have a more general
$12,883,610
earnings
--...$15,320,018
bearing on the financial situation than at first appears. The Net
4,990,783
4,750,799
construction companies now occupy a most prominent place on Interest, rentals and taxes
the financial horizon, and many of them have been profitable
$7,892,827
Profit
$10,659,219
I
7,138,343
7,141,512
beyond all ordinary limits. It is plain, however, that before the Dividend (8 per cent)
enterprises undertaken can reach a point where they make earn¬
$754,488
Surplu8.-T.-w
$3,427,703
ings, the support to their securities must come entirely from the
$8 82
$11 82
confidence of holders in their ultimate success It is necessarily a Profit per share
60*17
53*80
Expenses per cent
ease where faith precedes works, and if faith at any time should
become weak and a number of holders, however foolishly, begin
Included in the operating expenses for this year are 9,014
to doubt the wisdom of their subscriptions and ‘‘lie down" on tons of steel rails, 44 locomotives, 45 passenger cars and 478
them, as the Wall Street saying is, it is impossible to say how freight cars. Analysis of traffic earnings and expenses :
1579-80. 1880-81.
much harm they might do.
*78
The money market lias again been stringent for stock-bor¬ Earnings per ton mile on freight
*87
*56
Expenses
per
mile
on
freight
toil
*54
rowers, while the supply offering on government bonds has been
*22
larger than before, and some of tlie dealers have actually taken
Froflt
*33
1*86
Earnings
per
passenger
mile
on
passengers
1*99
money in large blocks at 3@3/£ per cent. On ordinary stock
1*22
-• 1*26
collaterals tiie rate for money lias usually been
per cent, Expenses pel* passenger mile on passengers
with commissions frequently "paid of 1-16 of 1 per cent; but to¬
*64
Profit
‘73
day 6 was the highest rate. Prime commercial paper is quoted
-Michigan Centrat.
-Lake Shore »£• Mich. So.1880.
1881.
1880.
1881.
a.t^6@G/£
per
cent.
$9,085,749
$8,986.COO
$18,749,161
The Bank of England on Thursday showed a loss for the week Gross earnings.. $17,970,000
5,738,751
6,752,000
16,418,105
11,286,000
of £41,500 in .specie, and the
(63 16)
(75*56)
percentage of reserve to liabilities Expenses
(55*56)
(62*80)
Percentage
was 38%,
against 39% last we.eek. The discount rate remains at
5 per cent.
$3,331,356 $2,184,000 $3,340,998
$6,681,000
The Bank of France during the week gained Net earnings.
1,586,410
1,093,000
2, oO,J'4
2,710,000
xuid
Int.
rentals.4,300,000 francs in gold and lost 700,000 francs in silver.
The last statement of the New York City Clearing-House
$5,580,982
$191,000 $1,760,588
Balance
$3,974,000
3,957,320 (2D) 468,455 (8)1,499,056
3,957,320
banks, issued Dec. 17, showed a decrease of $690,775 in the Dividends
deficiency below the legal limit, the whole deficiency being
Surplus
$16,680
$1,023,662
$22,545
$261,532
$271,200, against $961,975 the previous week.
Canada Southern shows for 1881 net receipts of $707,12$,
i’he following table shows the changes from the previous week
and a comparison with the two preceding years:
against $1,314,724 in 1880.
any

has been considerable, but at no




....

i

THE CHRONICLE.

710

EXCHANGE FOR THE WEEK, AND SINCE JAN. 1.

RANGE IN PRICES AT THE N. Y. STOCK
DAILY

HIGHEST

8 » cur da
Dec

Mondaj
lrtay,
Dec. 19.

v?:

Tuesday,
Dec. 20.

Wednesday,
Dec. 21.

KAII.KOADS.

Albany A Susquehanna

Boston A N. Y. Air-Lino
I)o
pref

66*4

Buffalo Pittsburg* Western

Burlington Cedar Rapids <fe No
Canada Southern
Cellar Falls * Minnesota
Central Iowa
Central of New Jersey
Central Paeilie

59 Hz

56*2

58*2

56 70

58

21

20

20

'38" *38”

21'
37
90 78

58*8
91 Hi
93*8
27
38 U

Chesapeake A Ohio
Do
Do

*81 *2

1st pref....
2d pref

29
132

Chicago & Alton
Do

pref
Chicago Burlington * Quincy.
Chicago Milwaukee * St. Paul
Do
pref
Chicago A Northwestern
Do
pref..
Chicago Hock Isl. A Pacific—
Chicago St. L. A New Orleans.
Chicago St. Paul Minn. A Oin.
Do
*
pref
Cincinnati Sandusky * Clev...

Cleveland Col. Ciu. A Ind
Cleveland * Pittsburg guar...
Columbia A Greenville, pref...
Columbus Chic. A lnd. Central

Danbury A Norwalk

Delaware Lackawanna * West
Denver* llio Grande

9330
94*«

92*4
*26 Hi
37Ha

27
39
29
132

28 Ha

131Ha

37
92 3.
90Hi 9258
9 3 30
00*2 93
27H> *26*4 27Hi
37Hi
37Hi 37 4
28
28 *2
28*4
131*2 *131*2 132 Hi

13634

138‘4

13630 137

104

105

104Ha 105 3.,

136Hi 137*2
104*4 10550

123*8 124 Hi

3.23*2 124 ^

i‘234 i'244

i'34" i'34'

i.33*

1.34

84
37*2

56 4
20 Hi

68

70 :,4

"1434 *15* 0

lnHs

2530

24

98

9G:,4

*-4

24

9734
114*2 115*4

1153|

.914

136

131 Hz 132
4 9 Hi 50

131 *-2 132
49 *0 49*8

42*4

42

42

42,4
119*4 120 Ha

119;js 120 Hi

105 *4 107 3;
77 Hi 77 H>
64 H
53
29

.

Northern Pacilic
Do

77
91
91 3g
483.
30 Hi
69
391

38 Hi
104
106*8

i‘2 2

Hi

Ohio Central
Ohio A Mississippi
Do
pref
Ohio Southern

1*22 H2

88 Ha
87
135 Hi 136
108
*107
44 Ha
44
90 34 91*4

77

78

53*2

53 )4

28

28

4
G'NU

24 4

24-4
964 9GH>
113*4 1144

42

118*4 120 Hz

48

48

*
'

102
76

86
135
107

534
28
16

107

4334
91^8 91;*8
43*4

170

79

38*4

36*4

108

*107

424
903,

*

These are t




1343, 13534
102*4 104

119*2 120
123*4 1244
138

138

125 4
68

1274

1*23*

1244

i‘25'14

1274

67

69

23 4
96

24 *4
96 :V
112*2 114*2

23
24
95 Ha 95 - y
110 Hi lllHa

129*4 130*2

1,200
2,654

1,408
660

7,814
153,942

39,360

300

9,550
4,500
2,200

11541174

199,211
200

49

*57**0
26

1014

112,830

74
' 77
52 34 54*8
23
23

9,320

500
800

1,969
73 *4
90 H.
88 Hi
48

72 Ha

73*4

71

73

84*4

89

86

884
47
30

8334
854

85
87*

45

46

100
33

102

46*2

121
83
133
107

36 4
100 4

13241344 133 4 1343^

83*4

28 3j

26
3734

27

27 4

56
37
76

57 4

3734

21

78
23*2

35Ha

36

82 4

86

*4034 *424
89*4
27*4

89
26

56
58 4
35 *s 37*4
72
774
22 4 23 4
35 4 36 4
104
104

n 14

66 Hi

71

*-j

37

32,100

84

870

210,830

3,442

:'*4 "27*2

31,275
13,910
10,620
204,864

55 *2

5634
35 H

683^
2134

733,

35

23
35 H<

23

64

67

43
165
159*2
26 34
25
47
41 Ha
60 Hi

41 Hi
63 H

36
66

3734

414
6OH3

42
6OS0

47

42*4

42*2
60 Hi

60

-2

*26**

*40 4 "4'i”

52'*4
17

117% 118*2
06 Ha

76

38Hi
78

.

107 Hz
47 Ha
162
43 7e
127

85*8

*47

4GHi

47 *2

40 *2 42 *2
126
127

1*0
85

45Ha

14

854
145
94
78

137

464

89

90

40

41:

57 Ha 60
105
105

26*

111
111
49 58

5256

’

2,800
8,987
„

„

_

'34*** *3434

6,700

66*4

34,200

38 34
37
158 Hi 160 34

15,225
12,375

63 :*6

67*8

38
160

40
] 66
160

154

22

25*0

6,110
900
15

154

2 3 Hi

24 Hi

88
88
40
40
57 Hz 57-%
105
105

86
39
55
103

86

200
300

39
57

1,950
2,250

103

295
200
400

2,290
106,088

111*4

111

50-34| 49

51

350

i'1'734 il834 lid" i 17 *2'
35 Ha

37 4

3534

714

7 6 *4

714

35

37

47
158
41

47
160

424
127

127

18*234 *85*2
-

44L

50
151
155
40 Ha 42
120
122

14
81

92

144
91

78
138

135

143Ha 1434
92
*77
*135

*

46

7634
42Ha
*35

1*8

824
144
91

7G34
135

106 4

41*4

42 s4

124

125

1

1

77^

82
145

145

91*2
75
134

914
75
135

45*2 45Hi
140*4 145*2
39
122

*143
90

79 *2

21*-|
*13
5 9 Ha
20

35

12Hi
58 5a

12 4

134

*18 34

3 5e|

3*4:

ices bid and asked—no sale was made at the Board.

2*2

27e

1244

414

Nov. 28 162
Dec.
22
Dec. 23 50
June
24 *2 Dec. 22 50*2 June
39
Feb. 28
77*2 Mav
86
July 19 14334 Mav
39
Mar. 24
55
June
55
Dec. 23
81*i June
90
Feb. 25 115H> June
26
Feb.
9 42Hi May
89 *2 May
70
Mar. 8
88 Hi Jan.
7 11334 Nov.

122

41*2 Jail.
15

Dec.

120
62 5s
51 Hz
112

6,325

35
30
14
1 *2

1,247
200

4,150

14,700

Jan.

Jan.
Jan.
Jan.

*204
43*2
42 34

1394
24

174
109

57*2
50
18

12*2
43
121

23 H

49*4

29*4
123
128

1554
127*4
51**
93 *s
180

324
20

36

67*4
284
44*2
5734 102

394
14
23

28*2

724
129
129

18
3
12

25
14

3
29
4

113*4
80
26*2 48
51*4 88*9

50
60
49
Aug. *2 25
190
Feb. 21 102
62*4 Feb. 18 27Hi
151
lau.
3 107 Hz
*2
2*2 Apr. 13
94
June20

74*4 Feb. 12
4 115*4 Mar. 7

5 153
6 98
4 79
4 14*2

Jan.
3
Oct. 15
Dec.
7

Dec. 20
34Jan.
4

1734 Dec. 23
32 *2 Nov. 23
12
Dec. 23
53
Jan.
5
18
Dec. 23
25
Apr. 27
1
Nov. 22

5*2 Sept. 17
*8 Nov. 9
18
Dec. 22
2
Dec. 23

230 Dec.
1 Hi Feb.
t Lowest price is ex-dividend.

91*2

127^

*20

‘25
12
4 73r,s June 14
23 38
May 13
25 13134 July 2
22 60 June30
23 96*4 May 16

Dec. 21

895sJan.

353
483
310
35

700
700

200

130**

27*4 Jan.
4 57*4 June22
50
Feb. 25 7434 Oct.
4
127
Jau. 19 142
May 17
130
Jan.
7 146
June 10
35
Oct. 10 80
June 23
99*2 Oct. 20 169*4 Dec. 20

Apr. 19

’

13

2®f

18
64
190

1

100
825
3 Hi

May 21
8 126
Oct. 12
37*-> June 10
83
Dec. 16
Dec. 23
Oct. 17 1200
Get. 13

9734 Jail.

30

800

14

64*8

802

20
35

*19*2

53
32 34

31

1,000

59*4

34** "3*4"

4()34
80*2
164*4
2034
23 Hz

77

-

59 *2
20 Ha

96

1,800
6,134

200

18 4
*33 Ha
13

3934 June 23
June 3
Dial. 21
Jan.
3
Feb. 15
Dec. 22 52% Jan. 15
J ulv 27 l 96Hi Nov. 29
June 13
Mar. 25 190
Dec. 23 I 43*2 Feb. 2
July 14 26*2 Nov. 14
Mnv *26
Aug. 26 70
Mai. 17
Jau. 13 51
88*0
June24
25
Jan.
Dec. 21
37% May *21
60
Dec. 23
Sept. 9

3,400

40

21Hi

1834
II434

Feb. 25 131
Jan.
6 102
Dec. 22 155
A ug. 25 130*2

162,853

”14 *'l-4
*33 Ha

160

Jan. 17
June 6
May 26

18*4 Feb. 26
118
63

2,390 120

73Hi 73*
*135
138
39*2

45

27*4
1594

5
7

Jan. 28 114*2 June 14

Jan. 15
Jan.
3
Dec. 23
Dee. 21
5
Feb.

1224

145
92

974
25 \
364

42
23

2,698 135
39
48,985

"

77 4

904

May 23 158
197
8 250
Jan.
June 18 4934
63
Feb. 26 106
12 4
Jan.
4 146*2 May 21
994
38 Ha A ug. 18
57*2 May 19
Jan. 10 30*4 June 2
14
41
Jan.
4
56
Jan. 27
Dec. 23
3 4
6534.111110 2
115 70 Dec. 23 I3534 Jail. 20
June30
44
63
June 4
Feb. 21
16*2 Jan. 26 38
June 23
42
June 22 48
79
Feb. 25 110*2 May 18
50
Oct. 27 117*2 June 11
15*4 Aug. 9 59 Hi Nov. 18
18
Oct. 10
59-30 May 26
9
Jan.
4 24
May 2
Jan.
6
7 15
May 21
41
Feb. 18
June 13
93
Feb. 14
7734 Sept. 5 126

105*2 Feb.
35*4 Dec.
69 34 Dec.
173,686

107

148415*1*4

117

57,209
74,550

11541174
38 4
35*4 37Ha
7334
704 73 4

31
35
1064 10634

10641074 106Hil07*4

143
145
95
*93
*77*4 78 Ha *77
138
*134
*135
45

50 4

66

159
25
24 Hi

i'll" ii*iK
50 34
16 Hi

67

34

si 4.

29
37

Feb. 17

Jan.
Jan.

120

814

May 23

367g May 14

35

rxl34*4 135

4 2 Ha 43
167
169
162
158
26
26
47

3*6-4

Jan. 14

June 20

156
153
182 Ha
129 *4
Oct. 12 140
Feb. 25 136

High

'*80 4

May 26

Aug. 20
140' Mar, 23
134:,4 Dec. 23
101 Ha Feb. 25

IIO34

37*

Nov. 14

Jan, 25

23
127

5,910

„

36 34 38
38’%
67 34 08 *>8
674 88
654 (38
137
*135
137
T35
*135*2 137
3 3 Ha

60
90
90

2034Jau. 19
32:,4 Jan. 12

21

’

38

71Hi July 13

June 18
337s May 14
48*4 May 14

13.883

60
23

5()34 Dec. 23

80.210 132 7s

90

33%

7

Feb. 26
Feb. 24

85

’

2734

Apr.

Dec. 14 100
Oct. 13

32,775

2,606

107
108
40 34 417(

904
175

5 135
7 30

59,095
1,470

13134

Jan.
Dec.

Low.

85% Dec. 23 1*20*2 Jan. 20
Mar. 22
64% June *2
Nov. 15
30 Hi Nov. 29
62*o Dec. 15 70^8 Nov.30
35 *8 Dec. 23 54
May 21

35.

121 4 1.23

*170

27*2

38
102*4

122 Hi
86

108
414 43
90 *« 90b4

21,886
4,940
95,020
1,400

69

*

120
25
45
37
69

Highest.

Jan. 19
130
131*8 Feb. 26 147 Hz Jan. 17
1464
Feb. 26 14Sne May 21 iOOV 204
2,505 129
550
40
Jan.
4
88
May 23 22
48
Jau. 22
33 Hi Dee. 23 51
14,210
91
Feb. 25 109*2 Jan. 24
19,233
800
4 1 Ha Feb.
1 68*4 .T une 22
81
Feb. 25 101 34 Mav 23
61
5,410
96*2
May 10 10634 129*2
127*4 Jan. 29 142
95 '0 Dee. 15
700
86
Dec. 19
8,345
1834 Aug. 20 32 % May 20 *9*2 *2*5*4
60
May 24 50
53
May 12 ^7
Mar. 9 68*2 110*4
Jan.
4 131
117,500 107
66
Dec. 17 113*4 June 7
443,231
61*2 86*2
June 14
60
76Hi Apr. 8 88
83
21
13
A
17,510
Sept.22
ug. 4
33
23
Dec. 23
6,600
Aug. 6
2,900
4434 .Ian.
Sept. 16 224 50 78
1 350
Feb. 26 121
9,300 94
Sept. 17 634 105

36*2

99

Lowest.

For Fall.

3*0

129
129-4
434 45

34

Range Since Jan. 1, 1881.

700
16
Jan. 18 40Hi
300
31
Feb.
5 45
159,610 -82Ha Jan.
4 112
96*940
80 Ha Feb. 25 102 78

525

166
1364
132 Ha 133

704

10234

*170

Mariposa Land A Mining

Cameron Coal
Central Arizona Mining
Deadwood Mining
Excelsior Mining
New Central Coal
Rolnnsou Mining
Silver Cliff Mining
Stormont Mining.

135Ha 1.36*2
102 Hi 104 Ha

100

26

43Hi
91*4

Homestake Mining
Little Pittsburg Mining

pref
Standard Consol. Mining

140

99 *6 103

<0

143
95

"

90 4
25 4
35
26 Hi
129 4

21,025

-

500

134°8 1354

77
254

EXPRESS.

Do

25
34
26

140

53

64b4

28
16

87

58 Hi
38 Ha

West.Union Tel., ex-certificates

Quicksilver Mining

917e

884

129

118»4

*v

1174 119

>r*7

13534

58
33

1

Ontario Silver Mining

88

25Hi 27
131*4 131*4

40

76

121Hi 121 *2
8 3 Ha 86 *2

60
39
80 30
26 Ha

Sutro Tunnel

Maryland Coal

35

37
116
49

40

38
39 Hi
374 384
39 :*4
104*4 105 5g U02H2 105Hi 101*2 IO234
35 Hi 35 Hi
36
36 Hi
3176 3.6

57

Pacilic Mail
Pullman Palace Car

United States
Wells, Fargo A Co
COAL. AND MINING.
Colorado Coal A Iron
Consolidation Coal

35

48

383;

29Hi

Oregon Railway A Nav. Co

American

90-4
91*4
26*4

45

40 Ha

1064

69

895e

27

Do
pref
MISLEDLANEOIJS.

Adams

88 58
894
25Ha

524
1934

•

42

69

88*0

30*4

Union Pacilic
Wabash St. Louis APacific..

American District Telegraph
Delaware A Hudson Canal
New York A Texas Land

70:,h

130*4 131 \ 12934 130 3*
47 Hi 48 Hi.
48 4 49*4

30Hi

903,

Rensselaer * Saratoga.
Rich.* Allegh., stock trust ctfs
Richmond * Danville

.

i*264

2334 24
96 4 06 4
11334 \l\5\

Panama, Trust Co. certificates

Richmond * West Point
t
Rochester * Pittsburg
Rome Watertown A Ogdensb’g
St. Louis Alton A Terre Haute.
Do
pref
St. Lotus * Sun Francisco
Do
pref.
Do
1st pref
St. Paul A Duluth
Do
pref
St. Paul Miuneap. A Manitoba
Texas A Pacific
Toledo Delphos A Burlington

5()34

67

144 *1*5 *2 *144 *144 *14** *14*4 *13** *14

Oregon * Trans-Continental..

Philadelphia * Beading
Pittsburg Ft. Wayne * Chic...

137

1194 120
123 Ha 12434
139Ha 139 4
183
133 4
84 4
*82
36 4
35
9934 10 L *4
55
54

127*4
68 -4 71*4

771-2
91 *2
89 Hi
48 Hi
29 *2

29

25*8
3734

Peoria Decatur* Evansville..

3734
2734
130

82

19

27 Hi

1034 10450

7'*2
79
9i'4

75

170

38*8
7 8 r',j

pref

l°4«d

"7 hi "7 '

pref..

Do
•
pref
New York Now Haven * Hart
New Yoi k Ontario * Western
Norfolk * Western
Do
pref

*80

*88** *88

Minneapolis A St. Louis

.

52Hi

**904

3G34
*27*4

64Hl

"!"*

‘204

87 4

130

64Ha
*804

*20"

pref

Missouri Kansas A Texas
Missouri Pacific
Mobile * Ohio
Morris A Essex
Nashville Chattanooga A St. L
New Yoik Central A Hudson
New York Elevated
NewY'ork Lake Erie A West.

83
57

89 4
*26 4

3*27** 1*2*6**

i 26

126
66

Shares.

*65** ‘*66*’
’**80**

133
132*2 133Hi
1334
80
81
81 Hs 81*2
*82 Hi 84
33 H? 36
36 Ha 37 *2
37 83 38
35*0 36*8
101
101 58 102 3h lOl^B 102
100-4 101-4 100 Hi 101 Hi
10134
50
53
54 *2 54-i
56
56
56
56
87 4 89
864 87*6
88 34 90
89
92
884 89
'134
*135
136
137
T3G
*134 Ha 136 Hi *134 Ha 136
86
86
20
‘19 4
20
20
1934 ‘20%
204 *26" 20 Hi

83 Ha
37

Memphis A Charleston
Metropolitan Elevated
Michigan Central
Do

m.

Dec

760
300
7

53

Milwaukee L. Sh. & West.,

Frida;

Thursday,
Dec. 22.

200

Long Island
Louisiana * Missouri River...
Do
pref...
Louisville A Nashville
Louisville New Albany A Chic
Manhattan
Manhattan Beach Co
Marietta A Cincinnati, 1st pref
Do
2d pref

Sales of
the Week.

126Ha 126*2

*140

Dubuque A Sioux City

East Tennessee Va. * Ga
Do
pref.
Hannibal A St. Joseph
Do
pref
Harlem
Houston * Texas Central
Illinois Central
Indiana Bloom’u A West., new
Keokuk A Des Moines
Do
pref
Lake Ei ie A Western
Lake Shore...'.

67

*82** *82*

*80

PRICES.

LOWEST

AND

STOCKS.

[Vol. xxxin.

9

281

67
43

Oct. 18 106*2 122
66*4
Nov. 15 54
55
Nov. 28 42
118
June 18 100
June

42H»
39*4
39
30*9
434
27

7

Jan. 15

29*4 Jan. 4
8*4 Feb. 7
9
Apr. 22
35

May 27

38*2
*21 *4
75*2
27
4 534

June 10

7
14
7

July
July

24*4
78*2
34

Feb. 17

May *26

*21 *9

Feb. 14
Jan.
Jan.

Apr. 13
Apr.

25*«
25*4
35

3
8

35*4 Feb. 9
137fi Oct. 29

7
4

39*4

7
7

13

2*4
2Hi

4%

7 1

CHRONICLE

THE

24 1881.]

December

quotations of state and railroad
bonds
and miscellaneous securities.
STATE
BONDS.
'

Os, duo 1882 or 1883...
6s, due 1886
!
6s, due 1887
6s, due 1888
’
6s, due 1889 or 1890
Asyl’ni or Univ.. due ’92
Funding. 1894-’95
Hannibal & St. Jo., ’86.

4s, 1906
6s, 10-20s, 1900

*6s,afSeO. 1899-1900...
iss.
7s, L.

Rock & Ft. S.

HR
HR

7s Hemp. & L.Rock
7s L. R.P.B.&N.O.

7s’,

Miss. O. & R-

R- RR-

Do
New York—

7s Arkansas Cent. RR.
Connecticut—6s, 1883-4..

6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,
6s,

Georgia—6s. 138b

78,en(Rn-8?a6i886.::.v::
gold, 1890
7b,

Louisiana7s,

7s,

consol., 1914
small

gold,
gold,
loan,
loan,
loan,
loan,

do

’87.

1893

New

A.&O
Do
Chatham Rlt

107
108

Special tax, class 1, ’98-9

65 *2
99

L.—lst,7s,gu 4120
West.—1st, 7s
C.Rap.Ia.P\& N.—1st,6s i *0*4 *
Buffalo&S.W.—M.- 8,1908 110
Minu.A St.
Iowa C.&

115

7s, ’99

m’y Id.

6s, currency, iut.

Chicago &

1908.

det.

def

Do

Do
Consol. 4s,
Small
Ohio—

99
!

81
52

...

1st, guar. (564), 7s,’94
2dm. (360), 7s, 1898..
2d, guar. (188), 7s, ’98

68
100

Oregon&Cal.—1st,6s,1921

105

119

117

113

....

113*2

Conv., assented, 1902... 4113
Adjustment, 7s, 1903... 106
107

Len.&W B.—Cou.g’d.as.
Am. Dock & Im.—Ass’d. 4139*2
101
5s, 1921
135
C. M.&St. P.—lst.8s,P.D. 132
123
2dm., 7 3-10, P. D., 1898 119
1st in.,7s, $ g., R.D.,1902 4120
121
lstra., LaC. Div., 1893..
lstm., I. & M., 1897.... 120
123
1st in., I. & D., 1899 .... 4120

lstm., C. & M., 1903.... 4125

*124
2d, consol., main line, 8s
2d, Waco & N., 8s, 1915
4------ *9*9*
Gen. mort., 6s, 1921
Ill.Cent.—Dub.& S. C\, 1 st 100
Dub. & S. C., 2d Div., 7s 108

123

1st, 5s, La,& Dav., 1910.
IstS. Minn. Div.,6s,1910
lstm., H. & D., 7s, 1910

97
107
117
110
98

106
4-

Cli.A Pac. Div., 6s, 1910

90

1st Cliic.A P.W.,5s,1921

93
Min’l Ft. Div., 5s, 1910.
C.& N.west.—8.1, 7s, 1885 4108*2

Reg., gold, 7s, 1902

97
......

Jinking fund, 6s, 1929..
reg

Sinking fund. 5s, 1929..
Iowa Midl’nd—1st m., 8s
Galena & Chic.—Exteu.
in., conv.
in..

Winona & St. P.—1st ni.
2d mort., 7s, 1907
C. C. C.& Ind’s—1st,7s,s. f.
Consol, mort., 7s, 1914..

St.L.&N.O.--Ten.lieu,7s
lstm., con., 7s, 1897

V. St. P.M.& 0.—Cons., 6s

C.St.P.&M.—lst.6s,1918
No. Wise.—1st, 6s, 1930.

i*2378

123

_

_

_

106*2
93

125
138
120

+

Bonds, 7s, 1900

7s of 1871-1901...

120

Tatm.,consol., guar.,7s
Oel.&H.C.—lstm./7s, 1884

123

^

107
xlll
7s, 1891
ext,, 7s, 1891. 4
coup., 7s, ’94. 116
116
reg., 7s, ’94...

1st mort.,
1st mort,,
1st mort.,
1st mort.,
1st, I>a. Div., cp.,7s,1917

115

118
128

128*2

4
117
106

1st,cons., guar.7s.1906 4125 1

Rens. & Sar.—1st, coup.
1st mort., reg., 1921
Uenv. & ri0 Gi-.—1st, 1900
lHt. consol.. 7s. 1 m 0




107 V

109
108
111

110

4124

124

?
120

101

Sandusky Div., 6s, 1919.
Laf. B1.& M.—1st, 6s, 1919

102

108 *

ili**2

J 104

So. Pacific of Mo.—1st m
Tex. & Pac.—1st,6s, 1905

Consol., 6s, 1905

126

Income & I’d gr., reg.

10*8
104

*9*8*2

..

3-6s, class B, 1906
1st, 6s, Peirce C. & O.
Equipment, 7s, 1895..

124
124
112
112

100
100

ibi) *.2
Extens’n, 1st, 7s, 1909 100
Mo. Pac.—1st consol., 6s 102
3d mortgage, 7s, 1906. 109*2
108
Pacific of Mo.—1st, 6s
4113
2d mort., 7s, 1891
St. L.& S.F.—2d, 6s, cl.A 4
90
3-6s, class C, 1906..,..

114

110
104

108
101

1*04*
95

102*2

10334
100

109*2
100

A

113

..

Pac.—G.l.gr.,lstcou.6s
I
Registered 6s, 1921 —
N. O. Pac.—1st, 6s,g.,1920
'Norf.&W.—ft.l.m.,6s. 1931

J And aoo. uel interest.

guar.,

109
99

120

*87**
121*2
111

107
100

71*2
87

1*01*2

493** 93**2

103 *2’

7s, 1898.

Pits.B’d.&B.—lst,6s,1911
Rome W.&Og.—Con., 1st.
Trust Co. certificates...
Roch.A Pitt.—1st,6s, 1921
Ricli.A All’g.—1st,7s,1920

Ricli.&Danv.—Cons.g., 6s.
Scioto Val.—1st, cons., 7s.
St. Louis & I. Mount.—1st
2d mort., 7s, 1897
Arkansas Br.—1st mort.
Cairo & Fulton—1st m..
Cairo Ark. & T.—1st m.

Gen.c.r’yA l.g.,5s,1931..

90
100

90*2

7134

17*4

18

Registered
Finding 5s, 1899
Do
u small
Do
registered

W.St.L.&P.—ContinuedNo. Missouri—1st, 7s.
West.U. Tel.—1900, coup.
1900, reg
N.W. Telegraph—7 s, 1904

1033*
101*2
116
108

101

1*17*2
110

108*2 109*4
109
86*2

114

pref., 7s, 1894.

^

INCOME BONDS.

(Interest payable if earned.)

Ala. Cent.—Inc. 6s, 1918.
A tl. & Pac.—Inc., 1910
Atlanta & Ch.—Inc., 1900
Central of N. J.—1908

100*8

Chic.St.L.&N.O.—2d, 1907
Col.Chic.&I.C.—Iuc.78,’90

100
72

lnd.Bl.A West.—Inc.,1919
lud s Dec.&Spr’d—2d me.
TrustCo. certificates...
Int. & Gt. North.—2d Inc.
2d assented, 6s, 1909

Lehigh & W.B.Coal—1888

85

...

1st, St. L. Div., 7s,1889
2d mort., ext., 7s, ’93..
Equipm’t bonds,7 s, ’83
Consol., conv., 7s,1907
Gt. West.—1st, 7s, ’88.
2d mort., 7s. 1893
Q. & T.—1st, 7s, 1890.
Ill.&S.I.—1st, 7s,1882

106
112

105*2 108

109

...

Naples—1st, 7s
St.L.K.C.&N.—R.e.,7s

105
100

Om.Div.—1st mort., 7s
Clariuda Br.—6s, 1919
St. Clias. Br.—1st, 6s..

113

53

*7*6’
72
95

91
50

Sand’ky Div.—Inc., 1920
Laf.Bl.&Mun.—Inc.7s,’99

449

Mil. L. S. & W.—Incomes.
Mob.& O.—1st pref.deben.
2d prof, debentures
,
3d pref. debentures
4th pref. debentures

91

100*2

Lake E. &W.—Inc. 7s, ’99

450

**9*5*

N.Y.LakeE.&W.—Inc.6s.

Min’l Div.—Inc.
Ohio So.—2d Inc.,

7s,1921
6s, 1921

Peoria D. & Ev.—Incomes
Evansv. Div.—Inc., 1920
Iioeh. & Pitts.—Inc., 1921
St. Louis I. Mt. & So.—

Sterling Mtn. R’y Iue.,’95

St.L.A.&T.lI.—Div. b’nds
Tol.Del.& B.—Inc.6s,1910

99
86

50
30

Dayton Div.—6s, 1910..
Tex.&St.L.—L.g.,ine. 1920

Miscellaneous List.
(Timber's Quotations.)

Bost. liar. & E. new stock
Cin. Ind. St. L. & Chic.—
1st mort., 6s, 1920
Des M.& Ft. Dodge—1st,6s

Galv.H.A Hen.—7s, g.,’71
Gr. Rapids & Ind.—1st, 7s
1st mort., 7s, guar
Ex-laud grant
Stock
Kansas & Neb.—1st mort..

2d mort
.

N.Y.&G’nw’d L.—1st,7s,n
2d mort
St. Joseph & Pac.—1st m.
2d mort
St. Jos. & West’n—Stock.
Tex. & St. L.—1st, 6s,1910
Utah Central—1st mort..
Utah Southern—1st mort.
Wis.Ceut.—Istseries, new
2d series, new

Southern Securities
(Broker’s Quotations.)

413s 42*2
Va. State— New 10-40s...
113
fllO
Atl. & Gulf—Consol.7s,’97
109
Atl.A Charlotte—1st, 7s.. 107*2
90
95
Income, 6s

Stock
1st, Dayt. Div., 6s, 1910
Car. Central—1st, 6s, 1923
1st, Ter’l trust, 6s, 1910
87*2 8734 Cent. Ga.—Consol, ra., 7s.
W. St. L. & P.—Gen. m., 6s
Stock
86*2 87*2
Chic. Div.—5s, 1910
100
Charl’te C.&A.—Consoles
Hav. Div.—6s, 1910
2d mort., 7s.
ToLP.&W.—1st, 78,1917 41153s ;i6*2
93
Stock
Iowa Div.—6s, 1921
PJ.
Tenn.Va. & Ga.—1st, 7s
Ind’polis Div.—6s, 1921.
Georgia Railroad—7s
Detroit Div.—6s, 1921..
6s
Cairo Div.—5s, 1931.
Wabash—Mort. 7s of ’09
Tol. & W.—1st, ext., 7s

4*10*5

2d mort

111

107
85

123*2
118*2

Spring Val. VV. W.—1st, 6s
Oregon RR.&Nav.—1st,6s 109*2 112

104H 104*2 Long island—1st mort..

116
St.L.Aiton & T.H.—1st 111.
4108
2d mort.,
2d mort., income, 7s, ’94 100
Belleville&S. Ill.—1st in. 4115
St.P.Miuu.& Man.—1st,7s 111*2 11178
4105
2d mort., 6s, 1909
1*0*6**
Dakota Ext.—6s, 1910 ..
9*5
St. P. & Dul.—1st,5s, 1931

4 No price Friday—these are

73
73

10734

1st, 7s, pret.int accuin.
72
2d, 6s, int. acc’mulative
87*2 S t’g I. & R’y—Ser. B.,iuc.’94
Plain Income 6s, 1896..

109
64
110
111
107
110

Memph.&Char.—1st,cons.
1st, consol.. Tenn. lien..

Miss. Central—1st m.,
2d mort., 8s
N. O. & Jackson—1st,

110
114

ibi

80
96
116

143
110
114
101*2

140

65*2
*115

tl24
tllO
112

*68*

117
126
112

114

1*1*5*

101
108

8s.

112

106
111
114
119

Northeast.,S.C.—1st m.,8s
2d mort., 8s
South w. Ga.—Conv. 7s, ’86

116
125
118
110
120

S.CarolmaRR.—1st m., 7 s 1108
40
Stock, assessment paid.
78,1902, non-enjoiued .. 125
70
Non-mort. bonds
Western, N. C.—1st. 7s... 104

latest quotations made this week.

81
97

7s.

Certificate, 2d mort., 8s:

Stock

Hau.&

102’*2 10*3**

72
71*2

Ogdensb.&L.C.—lnc.1920
100

81*2
1063a Tex.Cen.—lst,s.f.,7s, 1909 4106
Tol. Del. & Bur.—Main. 6s 4
72

4109*2
Morgan’s La.&Te.x,lst,6s
Nasn.Chat.&St.L—1st, 7s 117*78
2d, 6s, 1901.....
102H
N. Y. Central—6s, 1883
110
6s, 1887
4102
6s, real estate, 1883
6s, subscription, 1883.. 4102
N. Y. C. & H.—lstm.,cp. 136*2
1st mort., reg., 1903 .. 136 *2
Huds. R.—7s, 2d, s. f.,’85
Canada So.—1st, iut. gu.
98*4
Harlem—1st m., 7s, cp.. 4135
1st mort., 7s, reg., 1900 4135
N. Y. Elev’d—1st, 7s, 1906 119
N. Y.Pa.&O.—Pr.l’n,6s,’95; 4100*2
N.Y.C.& N.—Gen.,6s,1910
N.Y.& New Eng.—1st, 7s. 4120*2
4109*2
1st m., 6s, 1905

m..

*2

110*2 N.Y.P.&O.—lstine.ac.5-7
N.O. M.&Tex.—Deb.serip
114^2 Ohio Cent.—Income, 1920

90

......

......

H. & Cent. Mo.—1st,’90.
Mobile & O.—New m., 6s.

„

110*2

10*3*2

A tcli.C.&P.-1st,6s,1905
At. Jew. Co. &W.—1st,6s
Utah So.—Gen., 7s, 1909

2d

S.& N.Ala.—S.f.,6s,1910
Leban’n- Kno x.—6 s, 1931
L. Erie & W.—1st, 6s,1919

1Z

105*2 110

_

1*14

1st,Rio G.Div.,6s,1930
Pennsylvania RR—
Consol., coup., 1st., 7s 131
95
Pa.
Co’s guar. 4*2« 1st c.
4125
Consol., reg., 1st, 7s...
Registered, 1921
Consol., coup., 2d, 7s.. 123
140
Pitts. Ft, W.&Ch.—1st m
Consol., reg., 2d, 7s ... 124
135
2d mort., 7s, 1912
Louisville. & Nashville—
13*6*
4128
119*2 121*2
3d,mort, 7s, 1912
Consol., 7s, 1898
130
Clev.&Pittsb.—Cons.,s.f
2d mort., 7s, gold, 1883. 100
116
112
4th mort., 6s, 1892
Cecilian Br’cli—7 s, 1907 108
130
Col. Ch.& I. C.—1st, cons
N.O.&Mob.—lst,6s,1930 100
2d con., 7s, 1909
98
E. II. & N.—1st, 6s, 1919
1*2*6*
102
1st, Tr’t Co. ctfs., ass’d 115
Gen’l mort., 6s, 1930.. 101
104
2d, Tr’t Co. ctfs., ass’d 115
Pensacola Div—6s, 1920
1st,Tr’t Co.ctfs.,suppl. 118*2
St. L. Div.—1st, 6s, 1921 jibs'’
’*5*6*
St. L. V. AT. H.—1st, g. ,7 s
4
2d mort., 3s, 1980
2d mort., 7s, 1898
110*4 118*2
Nashv. & Dec.—1st, 7s.

IN.

..

*Pnces nominal.

107

_

106

122
134

m.

Reg., 7s, 1917

.

.

N. Y.—1st,7s
Syr.Blug.&
Moms

Alb. & Susq.—1st m., 7s
2d mort., 7s, 1885

.

123'8 Louisv.N.Alb.&C.—1st,6s 102 *2
108*8 109
Mauhat.B’cli Co.—7s,1899
4100
N.Y.&M.B’h—1st,7s,’97 ribd"
99
Marietta & Cin.—1st, 7s..
102
1st mort., sterling........
Metrop’lit’n El.—1st,1908
90
162*4 1*03*2 2d mort., 6s, 1899
4120
Mich.Cent.—Con.,7s, 1902 123 *2
i*26
1st mort., 8s, 1882, s. f.. *
41*08
Equipm’nt bonds, 8s,’83
120
6s, 1909
98
124
i*27
Coupon, 5s, 1931
121
Registered, 5s, 1931.... 498
117
Jack. Lan.& S—6s, 1891
117*2 i*20
Mil.&No.—1st,4-5-6S,1910
Mil.
L.S.&W.—1st 6s,1921 4100
99*8 99^
80
103
Mo. K. & T.—Gen.,con., 6s
Cons., assented, 1904-6. 106
70*4
2d mort., income, 1911..
lo9 110

8t.P.&S.C.—1st, 6s, 1919
Chic.A E.111.—lst.s.f.,cur.
«ol.& Green.—1st,6s,1916 4
2d, 6s, 1926
4
Del. L. & W.—7s, conv. ’92
Mort. 7s, 1907
126
.

_

Ga, Aet Mar. 23. I860)
lion-fundable, 1888.. \
Brown consol’n 6s, 1893
Tennessee—6s, old, 1892-8
6s, new, 1892-8-1900
6s, new series, 1914
»
Virginia—6s, old
6s, new, 1866.......
6s, new, 1867
6s, consol, bonds
6s, ex-rmiilived coupon..
6s, consol., 2d series
6s, deferred

Cent. Ia.—Coup.deb.certs. 4
Cliic.St.P.&M.—L.g.ine.Os
103 *2 Chic. & E. Ill.—Inc., 1907
E.T. Va.&G.—Inc.,6s, 1931
52*4

...

Interest bonds, 7s, 1883 4102*4
132
Consol, bonds, 7s, 1915.. 4129
Extension bonds, 7s, ’85
109
l8tmort., 7s, 1885

Coupon gold, 7s, 1902...

.

109

1st m., 6s, 1896
Den. Div.,6s,ass’d,’99
1st cons., 6s, 1919...
Cent. Br. U. Pac.—1st,6s
Funded coups., 7s, ’95.

1*053*

......

4102

8.W. I)iv., 1st, 6s, 1909. 4107

.

.

Lake Shore—Div. bonds 4122

125

1st, 7s, I.& I). Ext.. 1908

Lake Shore & Mich. S.—
Mich. So. & N.I. s.fd. 7s
Cleve. & Tol.—Sink.id..
New bonds, 7s, 1886..
Cleve. P. & Ash -Is—
Buff. & Eiie-Newbds.
Buff. & State Line- 7s..
Kal. & W. Pigeon—1st.

Det.M.&T.—181,78,1900

.....

124

Consol. 7s, 1905
2d mort., 7s, 1884

106*2

......

1*19*2

Ask.

SECURITIES.

& Miss.—Consol, s.

Panama—S.F. sub.6s,1897 4
Dong Dock bonds,7s. ’93 4115
Peona Dec. & Ev.—1st, 6s 106
B u tt. N. Y.& E.—1 st, 1916 121*2
Evans. Div.,1st, 6s. 1920 100
1*0*6**
N.Y.L.E.&W.~New2d,6 489*2 100
Pac. Rlts.—C.Pac.—G.,0s. 115
114
1st, consol., fd. cp., 7s.
San Joaquin Branch.. 108
2d, consol., fd. cp., 5s. 497 **4
102 s8
Cal.& Oregon—1st in.. 104
116
Ev. & T. H.—1st cons., 6s 4100
115
State Aid bonds,7s,’84
Fl’t&P. Marti.—M.6s, 1921 4
106
Land grant bonds, 6s.
102
Gal.Har.& S.Ant’o—1st,6s
West. Pac.—Bonds, 6s i*i2
82
2d mort., 7s, 1904 ...
So. Pac. of Cal.—1st, 6s. 4
109*4
Cult Col. & S. Fe—7s, 1909
110
Union Pacific—1st mort. 117
1*2*3
llan. & St. Jos.—8s, conv. 108
113 •
Land grants, 7s, ’87-9. 112*2
103 *2
Consolidated 6s, 1911...
115
Sinking funds, 8s, ’93
Houston & Texas Cent.—
113
114
Registered 8s, 1893... 4
1st mort., 1. gr.. 7s
109
Collateral
4
'2
119
trust, 6s
1st mort.. West. Div., 7s
Kans. Pac.—1st, 6s,’95 4110*2
1st mort.,Waco & N., 7s 114

—

Central of N.J.—1st m.,’90
1st consol., assented, ’99

_

117

128

107

Bid.

>

District of Columbia—
3 65s, 1924
Small bonds

iid”

126

.

Essex—1st
2d mort., 1891..

10
87

f. 119 ><2
Consolidated 7s, 1898... 4119*2
123
2d consolidated, 7s,1911
118
1st 111., Springfield Div..
Ohio Cent.—1st, 6s, 1920.
98*2
100
1st m., Ter’l Tr., 6s, 1920
1st Min’l Div.—6s, 1921
Ohio So.—1st M., 6s, 1921.
91*2 *93*

....

&

9

109*2

MISCELLANEOUS

103*2 Ohio

......

Ist.consol., gold, 7s,1920

...

.

......

82*2

6s, 1886

Jliss.R.Br’ge— lst.s.f. 6s
117
Ced. F. & Minn.—1st m.
C. B.&Q—8p.c., 1st m.,’83 4106 *2
131 1 Ind.Bl.& W.—1st, pref.,7s 4123
Consol mort., 7s, 1903..
91
94
1st mort., 3-4-5-bs, 1909
58, sinking fund, 1901..
2d mort., 3 4 5-6s, 1909
80*2!
Iowa Div.—S.F.,58,1919
87
Iowa Div.—S.P\,4s,1919
Indianap.D &Spr.—1st,7s 104*a
1*07*4
127
*2
Int.&Gt.No.—lst,6s
gold
C.R.I.& P.-6s,coup.,1917
90
93
127 *2
Coupon, 6s, 1909
6s, 1917, registered
j
105
Keo.& lies M.—1st, g.,5s
Kent’xy Cen.—M.,6s.1911

C

1910

******

La. & Mo.—1st m., guar.
2d mort., 7s, 1900
St. L. Jaek.A Ch.—1st 111 4114

Chicago & Mil.—1st

6
9
9
9
83

class 2
class 3

Rhode Island68, coupon, 1893-99

AND

......

20

*

Incoine 7s, 1883
Sinking fund, 6s, 1903.. ; 111
Joliet & Chicago—1st m.

Peninsula—1st

bonds, J.&J., ’92-8

-

Alton—1st m.. 4119

Jinking fund,

1868-1898.

Do

SECURITIES.

South Carolina—

115
115
10
10
20

off, J.&J.
off, A.&O.

114*2
117 *a

BONDS

Erie—
1st mort., extended
2d mort., ext’d f>s, 19193d mort., 7s, 1883
4th mort., ext’d, 5s, 1920
5th mort., ext., 7s, 1888.

101
114

Pac.—1st,6s, 1910
Balt.&O.—1st, 6s, Prk.Br.
Bost. H. & E.—1st mort..
Bur. Ced. R.& No.—1st, 5s

Atl’c &

6s, gold, series A,

coup,
coup,

Ask.

....

(Stock Exchange Prices.)
Ala. Central—1st, 6s, 1918
Atch. T. & S. P'e—4 *2,1920

6s. gold, ser. B, iut.

Do
Do

135

112

102.

Central Iowa—1st,
Cheasp. & O.—Pur.

A.&O

Funding act, 1866-1900.

108
108
102
118
119
120

1883
1891.
1892

I)o
109*2
1U)*2
111 Ha

i

reg., 1887
coup., 1887

RAILROAD

Railroad Bonds.

33
33
135

old, J.&J.
6s, old, A.&O
No. Carolina RR., J.&J.

104
120

Missouri—

Class C,

Bid.

SECURITIES.
N. Carolina—6s,

MichiganOs, 1883
7s, 1890

Alabama—
Class A, 3 to 5,1906....
Class A, 2 to 5, small....
Class B, 5s, 1906

Ask.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

SECURITIES.

110
44
130
75

107

CHRONICLE.

THE

712

(flotations in itoston, Philadelphia an:! Baltimore.

New Turk J.nrnl Securities.
Insiirunco Slock Liftt.

i

|Tot,, xxim.

Bid

skouhitikh.

[Qiiotatinns by W. H. Baii.ey, Broker,

Hank Ktock Lint.

Nn.

•

Pine Street

,

]

-**'!

BOSTON.

llurlud thus (*) are

Exchange

Ibrwevy

Bra dwitv
Butchers’ & Drov’iV
Can ral

f/hase
Chat hum

Ohemlca
Citizens’

City

O»innit*rco
Com inentkl

First...,
Finn th
'

Gallatiu
terra

in

Ameiican*.

(jenimn Exchange*.

1
...

i'ss

IlD

,

130

(Deeiiwkih*

flanover
Imp. and Traders’...
Island City*
lx* ther .vinnuttrs’.
Manhattan*
Murine
M«rkot—;

Mechanics’
Mechanics’ Assnc’n.
Mechanics'&Tr*urs’
Mei-CMiitbe
Merchants’

Merchants’ Kxch'ge
Mb»ropo is*
Metropolitan

100
50

100
100
25
50
25
100
50
50
100
100

Ninth
North America*
North River*
Ortentul*
Pacific*

•

,

.

,

•

•

•

•

•

•

....

•

•

.

•

•

•

•

•

•

133

•

•

Phenix
Produce*

Republic
fit. Niclio'aa
Seventh Ward

Second
fihoe and leather.
Sixth
State of New York..
Third
Tradesmen's
Union
United states
West Side*
.

Ga* and

ivette

(Br’klyn).

National
New York Equitable
New York Fire
New York A Boston.

.

,,,,

.

•

•

•

•

York < ity
Niagara
North River
Pacific
Park
P«»er Cooper
New

....

115
...

..

•

•

102

.,

•

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

•

•

p.

People’s

•

•

Phenix
Relief

.

X

1 0

•

•

..

Republic
Ruggers’

•

•

....

....

.

Standard

«*

—

Star

1*0
•

.

40

50
100
100

•

•

Tr\l’r.>

Moivauk (Brooklyn)
Nassau (Brooklyn)..

....

•

.

Sterling—
ft'tuvveftant

.

•

.

,.

Tradesmen's
Uniced states
Westchester
Wil iamsburg

103

..

151 }i
lOO

,

!

•••

1*0

....

100
120
1)0
108
1 5
lv 5

100
100
50

1:5

125
20
H5

P>5
If. 5
05
!*0

too

.

...

<

700

50
50

Manhattan
Ooch. A Traders’...
Mechanle>’ (B’ulyn)
.Mercantile
Merchant s’

....

’.37

40

loo
15

..

,,,,

•

....

Lenox
L m Islana (B klyiu
Liriliard
Ma i •fsc’rs’A Build.

....

171

ion

V40
22 •

10

• .uraar

io^j

.18

50

1(S)

•

Ea

Ijj

80
25
50
100
25
20
50

2 0
1 p-0
!3 '
158
70

50
50

City..

115

100
80
20
40

Kings C* tin’ y (Bkn.)
Knickerbocker

1 t.s

.

0>

10'
155
V-8
140
0)

17

lrvm,'....
Jefferson

.

•

113

20 )
18)

50
25

importers’

iro
131
113 m. 13-4
14S
if.0
23

ragnt

offm in
Home
Howard

•

...

70

People’s*

.

•

•

..

*00
100
100
100
100
100

Park

•

...

•

1

Germania
Globe
Greenwich
Guar linn
If’imiPon
Hanover
*

•

104

25

80.
ft)

German-American..

...

.

.

100

‘to

Flre » pft’n
Firemen’s ?’ru-t
Fr n- lin t Emp

•

133

1,0

•

Nassau*
New York
New York Countv...
N. Y. Nat’l Exehfge.

•

60

Vimm archil

F,
•

Mount Morris*

Murray Hill*

City
Cilnt<>n

Eagle
Hn pire • Isy
Exchange. I

•

....

KO
50
?»
100

•<>5
1(U)
100
50
ro

•

•

i.j

.

1 ro

25
17
20
70
l(K)

Co’nmbia

...

Lot

.

Br'>a Inray.
llronklvn
( i (sens’

•

104

100

1

....

125
*0JJ

ge

it >wery

....

25
25
100
100
100
1(H)

Geirusnlii*

Ame-icin E’xcira

..

.

100

Corn Exchange*
Enst River
Eleventh Wurd*
Fifth
Ftfth Avenue*

Fulu.n

100
100
25
25
100
100
2*
100
25
100
1(K)
J00

Ask.

f>o

JC'
U1

14 •
120

loo

Bid.

A$k.

Rid.

■

Par.

Companies.

Par.

net NntionnK

Am.

1*11 CK.

PK i CK.

Companies.

'

50
100
25
50
25
100
100
25
50
50
50
50
50

1

a

CO
00

vreorge

do

Npl'l ,6ft

do

Vebr. 'ft

C nm tt

Brooklyn Gas Light Co
Citlxens’Gas Co (Bklvn)

25
20

bouds

1,000

Hirlem
J rsey City A Hoboken
Manhattan

50
20
60
100
50> •
100

do

M«tr«j^ollUn..
do
bonds
M lUrai'N. Y
do
bonds

1,000

Nassau, Brooklyn
do

2f>
Va
100
10

scrip

.

K«w 7ork

Poop e’s (Brooklyn)
Bondi
Bonds

1,000

2,000,000
1,200,000

315,000 A. A

120
u

I

8i!V
V.
1 0

1,850 000 F.A A.
4,000,000 I. A .J.
V700,(XKt f.A H.
1.000,000 F.* A
5,0 X).000

Quar.

1,000 00)
1,000,000

F.A A.
Var

700,000
4,000,000
1.000,000
875,000

t. A J.
M. AN.
125,000 Var.
406,000 F.A A.

Var.

Cjntrai ot New York
do

60
50

bonds

1 nnn rwm

1,000 1,000,000

Metropolitan, Brooklyn

Municipal-

100
100

do
bonds
Fulton Mnnlclpal

100

.

)‘uly,

.

\1.AN.
M. AN.

A.A O.

1,000,000 M. AN.
3,000,000
760,000 M. AN.

ftfWJ.000

...

...

i

Broadway (Brooklyn!—Stock
Brooklyn Crosetown.—St’k

..
...

10O

1,000
100

1,000
10

1,000
100
100

900,000
691,000
3,100,000
1,500,000
2,000,000
800,000
300,000
400,000

J. A J.
J. A J.

Q-F.

A. AO.
300.000 J. A J.
500,000 J. A J.

1,000

1,800,000 Q—J1,000 1,200,000 J. A D.

Christopher & Tenth 8t.—Stock
Bonds
1st mortgage, consolidated

..

Eighth Avenue—Stock
1st mortgage
42d St. A Grand 8t. Ferry—St’k
1st mortgage
Central Cross Town—Stock
1st mortgage
Iloust.West 8t.& Pav.F’y—St’k
1st mortgage
Second Avenue—Stock
8d mortgage
Consol, convertible
Extension
6ixtli Avenue—Stock
1st mortgage
Third Avenue—Stock .....‘
1st mortgage

Twenty-third Street—Stock.
1st mortgn ge
_

%

Tins c

100
100

100

1,000

iiuan




100

500AC
100

1,000
100

1,000
100

1,000
100
500
100

1,000

..

650.000 F.A A
250,000 J. A J.
1,200.000 Q F.
900.000 J. AI).
1,000,000 (i—J.
203,000, J. A J.
748,000 VI. AN.
230,000 A. AO.
600,000
200.00) M.AN.

2
7

2%
7
4
7
3
7
6

?
•

J’lv.1900
Oct.,
June ’84
Nov., *81
Nov., So
Oct., S’.
Oct., Si
1888
July, SI
oci.. SI
Dec. 1902
Aug ’81
1898
Nov., SI
,

June,

125

151
115
70
70
101
112
225
126
200
120
16 1
90

KSchbure...
Flint A Per"

7

M.AN.
M.& 8.
M.AN
■1 «te J
•

2,000,000 ii-F.

on

,000,000 J A J.
000,0)8'J F. A A.
250.000, M.A N.

110
141
120

i-evere Beach A Ly.iu
Ve niuUt A .uaadacuufcetts

’93 114

Nov.1901

65
105

•

4

p

v-

Iuhv.

S3 P >5

27 A

93
19

91

...

.

02 A
•

•

.

....

65
108
.

.

•

120

63*
IIP
95
170
222
160
K9
>9
105
75
101

•

...

...

129
110
....

134
59

•205^ i 20X
*•

cf

*

CITY BONDS.

APeeher.y

C unden cc
ao

111

104
73
200
110
75

Atlantic—.
pref.
do

....

97^

no
250
119

14-<

....

....

26

I

27

01

}!

. • • •

50%

corn....

pref.

...

71

pref

United N. J. Companies
West Chester consol, pref....

01M
S2«

ISO

57

j'108
57>4

j-00
‘i

lb?

West Tereev

Weifc Jersey &

CANAL STOCKS.
........

165

Pennsylvania

Schoylklll Navigation

210
115
70
110

do

pref...

RAILROAD BONDS.

Allegheny Val..73-1‘Jb, i‘‘96... 133Jii--do
7s. E. ext.,i9lC
12)
do
inc. 7s, end..’94
52
Belvldere Dela. !6t m.,6.ft.l Ml. 1 15

id

140

2d

e

do

110

Sd

Camcjen <3zAin t
do
do

270

m.

m.

6s. ’S')..

’.00

6b, *S7.. 100

.-...odp/s?
ti, o

i<*:i
105

1 *\i
mort.60, Si.
Cam. A Vtl. let in 7s. g., P93 115
do
2<l in. car. 7h, ip7 '..
Cam. A Burlington Co.6s,‘97.
Catawissa Iri , 7r. ronv., ’ cl,,,
...

■

,

*

In default.

j1**-

Stony Creek 1stm. 7s 1907...
Sunb. Haz. A W..lst m.,5ft.*2s
Stl m.6i.

OH..

Sjrra.Gen.A Loru'. ,lftt,76,l'ftft
Texas A
do
do
do

1st 'ti..6r, p..l90r>
R o G ande D v..

t ac.

25

106

mi

jlOl

m..6s,g.,19U5
lnc.A 1. gr ,7s 1915
cons.

Union A Tltusv. 1st m. 7s. ’9t.
United N.,J. con8.m.6s,’94
113

io:

West Chester cons. 7s,’91
West Jersey 6s, deb.,coup.,*8:.
121
4
1st tn. 6s, cp., ’96.
do
126
do
1st ill. 7a, ’99
H •
do
cons. 6s, 1909
108^2
W. Jer*ey& Ati.l-tm 5s, cp.
Western Penn. KR. 6R,cp.’ft.<. iii
do
6s P. B.,’96
oo

1883 106^
Lehigh Navlga. m.,«Rt reg.,’8i 110
do
mort. HR., rg .’9'.
do mort. gold,’97....
do cons. in.7s, rg ,191!

ii6&

Pennsylvania 6s, coup., ’.910..
ScUuylk. Nav.lst m.68.rg.,’97.
do
2d m. 6s.reg., 1307
BALTIMORE.

87

Maryland 6s, defense, J.A J..

108

do

6s, exempt, 1887.....

do

6?, 1890, quarterly..

do

5b, quarterly

t Pec sharo

105

Baltimore 6s, IS9J, quarterly.
1O0V4
do
6s, .886, J.A J
114
114X
do
6s, 1890, quarterly... 113* 114
do
6s, park, 1890,Q.—M.
do
6s, 1893, M. AS
i‘22 m
do
fis.exempt/J&.M.AS 120
do
6s, 1900, Q — J
do
68.1902, J.A J
121*
do
5a, 19i6, new
131
Norfolk water, 8b
railroad stocks.

Par.

Balt. A Ohio
100 195 210
120
co
1st pr«f
12J*
do
2d pref
l
do
Wash. Branch.100
do
Rarkersb’g Br..50
52*
Northern Central
;.5G
10*
Western Maryland
50
40
Central Ohio common. ...fO 44
Pittsourg A Uonneiisvule..50
railroad

Atlantic

Lehigh Navigation.

id

stocks, but the date of maturity bonds.

50
40

*57

do

do

120

l>i

Pitts.Cln.&St
;St. L. 7e,cou..lfiOC;;.;f
do
do
7**,.reg., 19 '(
ft'ch.A Danv.con?.int.«.-,l9'5 c.v
Shaiuokm V.& Pottsv. 7s, 1901 110
Steubenv. A lnd. 1st, 6s, 188*.

•

...

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia A Erie.... ....
Pulladeiphla A Read ng
Philadelphia A Trenton
Phlla.Wtluilng. A Baltimore,
et. Paul A Duiuth R.U. Com

135

74

Morris, boat loan, reg., 1885..

North

175

15.j
112

•

NorrlRtown

140
100
210
110

115

•

Schuylkill

Norfo k A Wortem.
do
d

ao oonv. 7s, It. CM 1393*
do
7s. coup, off, V
Phll.AR.Coal&lr’n dch.7s..'2*
do
deb. 7b. ciib.ofl
do mort., 7s. 1892-3
Phlla.Wllm.A Balt.6s,*84....

CANAL BONDS
Uhes. A Del.. 1st m., «>s,

20
•

Huntingdon A Broad Top...
do
do pref.
Lehigh Valley...

30
115

llj

133

130

do
pref.....
do
new pref
Delaware A Bound Brook....
East Pennsylvania
Elmira A Williamsport..
.
do
do
pref..
Har. P. Mt. Joy A LancaRter.

90
70

1

....

OatawlsBH,....

42
107

1

118

,ra ley

Pltli. & West rn....
do
pref.

97

...

Penna.
g’d, nt •r"*f •‘>r cbdo
5a, t o i.t l 82-18)2
1V7
do
5ft.new. reg.,i3tfA-i9c<i
do
68.10-15. reg.. 1-77-’82
15*25, reg.. S82-*92. U2
do
do
4ft, r* g., 1*64-1904

Buffalo

i

< 0

25*

.

do 6b.n..rg.,pri .rto’95
do 4ft. v.»ri u .
railjo»ai> -tocki-4

125:4

129

id)

PhUadeipbtH,.)H re*.

10(1

"v'6

‘«8

62
105
65

mo
w
120

Plill.A li. iotui.«R,ex.;iUs519 (>■
do
d»
mo:
do
2d in.. 7g, '-p. "3,
do
cons. m..7F,''p.J lft l
do ion .m.fi ,g.l tC19il
113
do lnK .m.,6
J. !“•'
do gen. in 6
g .C.1'0
do J a. ni., :s,‘ onr,„ L96
do d b. com , ’ 08*
< 0
c up. off, htJ
do
do tcrip, 188r

30)4

PHILADELPHIA.
'

!(•»

loo

Iftt m.l

P'nPa., xewt'e A

133
23

85

comm >»>

<U

zi'A

95

Rutland nreferred

...

102!* 105
110
130
118
92
100
23)

-1 uly. ’94 105
7
2V» July, 81 135
7
Apr., ’85 V 3
7
‘ct., si KS
t
Sept. si 135
5
Oct.. si 200
7
J III V
n-H) HO
5
SI 20)
N o ’v
7
July, ’90 11)
4
I Aug ,S1 150
>•*

...

.

Iowa F 11 * A 9ioux 11 y
Llli .e cock j6 Fortnnnth ...
Man* bem-.»*« <v mu’wii!'- ..
Mar. Ho gh. AO t
Mar. Ilo tgli. & O t.. pref...
won
?<atift *. *»
New York <* New England...1
Northern of N. Hampshire...
Norwich A Worcester
Ogdensn. A L.Cuauipiain ...
do
pref..
Old Colony
...
Portlana Saco A Portsmouth
Pulhoan P-»h‘**e car

153
160
90
70

*84

3)

P'ef
Fort Scott A Gu f. i»r> 1..

;

....

•

22

.Marq

n

•

30

do

Minehlll

Oct., SI 200
Jan., S3 100
Nov., SI 200
Apr., ’93 110

-it

•

•

Concord
■•••
Connecticut River
Conn. <V P“' au">oRtc .... ,
.
oum tt n V they;
..
Eaatert. i Maftb...
Eastern (New Hampshire*...

00

500,000 J .A-T.
1,199,500 J. A J

100
1.000

shows last <iividona

2X

1*9

i«8

chi .W. Michigan
Cm. Sanau. ky
*o«v

155
b5

.

03 X
159%.
104

03)6

Cheshire nrefe"v«d

Little

20
113
137
104
200
102
160
125

do
aren. m. 6S. ig.,19’0.
do
cous.m 6
rg., 1905
do
Cone. ra. 6s. cp^ 1905.
do
> o
51
Penn. Co , 6s reg
do
do
4’-4^
o
do
co p. 19 0,
oerku men 'mm.ii-.e <> .j
Phl’.Wilm A la t .Ib.Tr.cem-l
Phila
Erie 2d s<. 7-. p.,’S« |
i'o
CO.iB. mo t. 6s, '10
105
\0
do
6", 920

iu 1! C

:59

Nesquehoulng Valley

250,0001

150,000
1.0)>0 1,050,000
00 AC
200,0)0
loo , 750,000
1,000
500,0(K>
lot)
1.0(8)

7
3
2
7

Q-t.

Central Pk. N. A E. Kiv.—Stook

Dry Dock K.B.A Batt’ry—Stock

3^;

M.AN.

1st mortgage bonds
Bffhwick Av. (B’klyn)—Stock.
Consolidated mort. bonds

7
2
7

Q-J.

1. A D.

117

IOO

ti-iV

Fennsylv.,gen. m. Rs. cp.. 19;o

"

....

Atchl'Ott & Topeka
Bo-tou A Albany
Boston A bowel
Boston & Maine.
Boston & Providence

i:v

*

% July. >'l

"i26:t4

....

3f;>oKh.

[Quotations by H. L. Gba.xt, Broker, 145 Broadway.]
Bleeoker fit. A Fult. Ferry—St’k
1st mortgage
Broadway * Seventh Av.—St’k
1st mortgage..
Brooklyn <City—Stock
lft mortgmre

jiOSJJi

<

Bid. Ask.

Feb.

•

....

Old Colony, is
»11 t’olony.Os
.v
Fuehlo *v Ark. Valley, is —
Uutlan l 6ft.l>*1 mort
Vermont .v. Mhhh. >’K.. ♦»».
Vermont
* anada, new 8s

21 »
00
1J6
t-0
7 •

8

#

..

N>i»*him
WUcon In Ce »t a

61
M>5

•

..

\\f

»7*< 93
SI 160
Nuv., ’81 219
'Gti Aug. ?81 155
3
105
’ol
81
Utt
104
1882
S’*
3
Mept VI 72
3^ Nov., ’8: 98
4
Nov., ’81 110
3^y -Jan., ’76 38
7
1897
105
6
1900 Ac 23
8
July, ’80 to
1 u (Jf*t
SI
rf
1900
101
si
70
2H July,
5
Get. ’81 195
*
0
105
1S8S
09

750,000 I. A J.

ioo

...

160
75
us
120

100

’80

..

...

12)

1898

..

*

.

155
37^ 115
150
35
IO ;
100
05
100
05
100
190
50
1< 0
25
215
25
120
100
I9D
20
115
50
153
50
85
50
70
100
145
25
125
50
100
85
100
00
125
25
U,0
25
135
25
115
10
50
210

Nov., 'HI 124

7
3
7
5

.

Hft* new.

*

•

5
130
P

12<»

2% Aug.,

().

■*

•

...

do reg.,
do
do 2 ‘ m. 7s. reg., 19H* {131
do
con. m..«M,re.,lfl23[120>^
do
do
121
«s, p..ld S ...
Little cohuylkli\lrt in.
N. o. P c.. l tm.. 6ft. HiBO

mx
'*

#

123
70
141
i) 3'

*

5

Var.
Var.

115

104U 1(5

•

118
00
133
«&
M0
145
75
120

Date.

Amount. Period

117

...

.

8ft, IS 5
87
IthHeaA Athenelst g i. Js./k.
’unction lit morr. fls, ’S2
do
2<1 mort. 6s. 19 <t
l^hlgh Valiev, tst^ft.cp.. 18W>,120
cons. in.

o

1
do
7C
1
lid
Fort Scot* A Gulf 7s
67
do
2d ra. ;«,cp..’96.
<hirt'ord *v Krie7a...,
n 4
do gen. m. 7k, cp., lftOK.
K. « tty Laweure -.v "0. 4*...
<
do gen. rn. 7m, reg., 90'
vftv.iiitv. -t. .To.A'YB. '.
H3
\mi....
•'o op.w loan ft.re r
Mttle R'k *> Ft. -* . lfh.78.1'' i'12
88
87 y
No f’k Wc *t , ;cn. n:.,‘*b 1 31
Mexican Ce tra ,'t107*4 ui. i.ieel' iftt m. is,coup.,’s
’.< 7
,%o*»
» orJ*
ac» Kii*. o
17-^
fittsn. Tltusv. A B.,7ft.ci».,’'.M) Ibl
L7*
do
*a
114 >4
do
Scrip ...
\ew Mexico & so. Pac. *:>...
09
90
Pa.AN.Y.C.A RK.7s
..CiiBL/ul ’.
;
»• Liuaij Lii ^
do
1909
I o
Ii.o

H. Prentiss. Broker, 1? Well Street.}

Par.

do
Hopti
Enftvt *• Amhoy, 54
Hai 'ishuijj 11*1 uinr' bi', ’l*
H.A B. T. lRt m.7e. e dd.’lkt.

••

•

Val ey 7s

t>

Mv Aft.,
itc.hbi Jg lift
«.

STATB AND

Gas Companiks.

Kftftt P-mn. tst mort. 7r, W ..
El.A W’msport, ist in..7s,*iii.

8ti

4

120

.

...Ex

..

• ’•

td

.»

City Railroad Stock.** aud Hoads,

[Has Quotations oy

Nehr.ift

iOp, *S8

Deliiwti'e mort.. Cm, • anoiift..
'
t»*l A- Bound Br., iftt.'s ilk If. i24

127

Chicago Burl. & Qul »cj

125
InC

71

l fi

do

utito

65

•

...

84

to»ton & Lowell 7s
fift
d
.......
...
Ofcton & Providence 7-*
uri. «V Mo., laud grant 7ft. •

(’alawlt a,'-hat. m..
new 7s
o

..

■

7«

AOMiuy

>>\»<*u>n «

250
2'0
95

10* 1

5

Atl^ut’c A Taoifl .fr>.
o
tiiccmo
.iosuiu & Maine 7s ...

KM. Ask

KITI Kft.

c*inuw:tlru.» fis. BH.KM904..
v’hnrti ra Val., 1st m.7'.(.‘.,190

do

*•5
1 0
1U)

»rh. A Topeka lftt in.'s
land grant.T»do
*•«« • Inc. *<«..

'

bonds.

Balt. A Ohio 6b, 1885,A.&O. .. 100
N. W. Va. 3d m. .guar.,*85,J A J
Pittsb.A Conp.3llBV.7st’98,.rA.J 12504 1-5*
110
Northern Central 6s, ’85, -»&J 10(
6s. 1900. A.AO. 117
do
iis
do 6s, glu, 190i), .J.A J.
100*
Cen. Ohio 6s, 1st m.,’90.M.A 8. ioi
W. Md.6s. 1st m.,gr.,’S0,J.AJ.
do
1st m„ 1890, J. A J... iii?
do
2d m.,guar., J.A J — 115X
do
2d m.,pref
| .. lib
do 2d m.,gr. by W.Co.J&J If 8
do 68.3d in., guar., J.A J.’....
ieo
Mar. A Cin. 7s, *92, F. A A ...
10334
do
2d, M. A N
o'*M
do
S®, 3d, J. A J
Union liR. 1st, guar., J. A J..
120
d.-T
C-n 1 on endorsed.

Lii'A

Consolidated Gas
Do

bonds

....

Pecemrkr

Jt'iiiriKitl E u*nioT3 —T!i*
railroad pawing* aid the
trttal^ from January 1 to la'csfc date are given below. The
Statement include** the grose naming* of ill railroads from
Second cOiumn:,—1Attest earning* reported—»
Week

nr

8«78.‘212
$73,242
.277,000
A tell Top. At 8. Fe.NtiVfiiibor. 1.277,000
Bost.’ifc N.Y.Air-L.O< tob r... 26.USO
'
Bnr,0.Hftu.«kNo..2d wk Dc. 52.473
12.230
Oftiro iV bt. Louis. 1st %vk Deo
(?
Bouthern. November.

1880

1881.

$583,05G

$700,600

•22.999

210.30 2

*239,292

42,035
1 1,210
74,5-9

2,131.022

1.945,521
387.28 4
409,6 43

-

•

•

.

•

-

•

391.134
475,532

-

•

•

1.000
October. . 1,267.000
2,109,40*1 21.8U.094 18.602,867
Outrai Pacific... November.
2 i l .820
2,268.522 2,215,505
Ches. At Ohio
< banner... 237.303
177.379
150,797 7.255,781 7,140.046
Chicago At Alton .2.1 wk Deo.
,031.001 1,934.763 17,451,332 17.034.610
Ohlc. Burl. At Q...October...2,Oil.001
3 1.836
29,847
Cbie.if East. 111..2 I wk Deo.
31.830
23,418
36,303
Ohio. AtG.Trk.Wk.end.Dee. 17
310,311 15,977,000 12.3 47,025
416.000
Cbic
P 2d wk Deo. 424,900 327 200 20.787,594 18.621.807
01 lc. At North w.. 2d wk Deo.
69.372 3.705,404 2,949.007
90.6^1

Carolina Central

...

.

fiiii.St.P.MiiiAr0..21 wk Deo.
Oiie.iSr W. Mich..Septemb*r.
<3ii.liul.St. DAtC.2d wk Doc.
oLu. A Springf. -..2d wk Get.
Otev. Col.Cin.At 1.2d w< Oor.
Clev. Mt.Y\ At Del. 1st wk Deo
G()l.<R4Iook.V.,Atc.2d w«£ DiW.
Denver At Kit* Ur .id wk Deo.
DeaM.AtPt.Dodve.! st wk Dec
Dot. Bans. iV No .2 i wk Do •.
DubUfjuiuVH.Citv 2 1 wk Dec*.

44,112

24.833
93.628

26.277

4)9,419

3.196,7*19

7,732
50,075

39 4,833

3.4K2.099
401,783

4)0.323
6,78!)
21,735

6 034.020
374.590

3.371,329

24,366

1.091,542

1,050,327

150.27 4
32.955
162.2)6

1,70 4,056

1,513,533

107,293

5,025,699

4,956,933

23.811

Dec.Hi

At Mmn.l st wk Oct,.
Quit Col. A: 8 Fo. November.

flr’n Kay

HanuibrilAiSt.'Jo 2d wk l) x'.

Houat.E.AtW.Tex,November.
Roust. At Texas C. Sente mb’r.
Illinois Ceil. (III.).November.

Do
(Iowa) November,
tlndiana HI. At W.2 l wk D *o.

lad. Dec. At Ho.. .Novi-mlier.
lnt.&(it. North..2 l wk iXiO.
Iowa Central
Novemt'er.

Lake ErioAt *Vest.2 t wrk Dec.
Louisa. AiM<». R .Bept inbY.

75,727
42,545
7.575

29 4,918

........

2,138,830

2,387.519
89,316
2,387.200
0.000.180

381.517

409.3* H

535.826
102.109
36.019
39.634
70 066

606.905

143.«87
2,058,655
6.1 -17.090

176.214

1,686.698

1.624,872

39,566
33,654

405.0 LO

391.299

2,633,481

l,S15,4c‘4

85.889

62.516
96.895

25.172

23,426

1.316,026

•

•

•

•

.

1,128,463
3 40.696

355,411
43,464
216,600 10,733.034
:
10 4,079
4 4,723
1,17.5,403
226.885
5.679
571,310
8.919
Ca. !),)(> 1,073.49 4
146,276 7,606,329
111,214 6,402.663
251,367 2.127,198
182,037 1,902,129

134,742

Uarq. H. At Oul’n.Septcmb’r.
Memp. Ar Chari. ..2 1 wk Dee.
Meicp. Pad. At No. 1st wk 1 oo
MILL. 8b.At West.2d wk Deo.
Minn. At St. Louis.3 vvksNoV.
fjlo. Kans.At Tex.2d wk *eo.
Ilissouri Pacific .2d wk Dec.
Mobile At Onio
Novemlxjr.
Nash v. Ch. At St. L. November.

734.343

6.37 l

52,16 4
263,830

Nashv 2d wk l>'o.

m

2,302,155

8,346
27,005
142,730
33.272
128.110
4)7.531
8.713
131,424
43,783
18.437

m

2.195.215
759.643

153.830

BastTenn.V. At G.2 wks Deo.
Flint At Pere Mar . 2 l wk Do *.
GaUIar. fc S;iu A.O -toiler ...

Louisv At

81,7-0

46,089

8,70.>

.

(Jr’t Western. Wk.end

9* ,177

57,075

37.115
5.789
13.820
82.2 46
191.151

8.977,201
...

...

1,097,102
201,682
387,657
717,78 4
5,79 L 094
5,133.326
1.986,249
1,873.427

158.830
252.434
152.059
.734,200 1 ,786.418 15,291,569 14,065,332
44.370
52.057
508.32 4 4,493.323 4,3 41,235
N. Y. Pa. At Ohio..October... 455,277
209,047 2,0 47.981 1,882,4 4!)
Norfolk At West... November. 216,439
512.918 4.479.914 4.097,022
Northern Central October... 419,664
55,219 3,771.547 2,519,215
72,700
Northern Pacitic .2(1 wk Dee.
81.631
Ohio Central
Octobi r...
8.631
ObicSouthern
2d wk D -c.
3.988.535 3,180.431
Oreg’nlt. Nav.Co. November. 458.300 324.305
51.237
37,558
403,027
365,551
Pad. AiElizabetlit.November.
.

Pennsylvania ....October ...3,672.071 3,882,714
PeoriaDec. At Ev.2d wk Dec.
13,655
Philadel. At Erie..October... 292,392
Phila. At Reading.October ...1,990,948
BtX.Alt.AtT.H, ..2d wk Doc.
18.315

16,770

(broils). 2d wk Dec.

Do

8,072
367.082
1,746,299
20,233

Bcioto Valley
2(1 wk Dec.
Boutli Carolina. ..29 dye N’v,
Texas At Pacific.. 2d wk Dec.

36,552.212 34,137.327

427,376

656,084
2,887,450

79,401
6,668

9,753

114,831
66,595

116,965
85,017

1,325.514

1,356,178

703,554

687,276

4,585,149

3.006,395

415.747

304,237

3,707,026

2,552.289

11,554
1,043,7x6 26,499.363 22,622,496
Wab. St. L. At Jt*ac.2d wk Dec. 352,786
259,682 13.863,819 11,878,108
Vluciuding leased lines.
t Including Ohio Division.
Exchange.—Quotations for foreign exchange are as follows,
the outside prices being the posted rates of leading bankers:
15,140
XoLDelp. Ac Burl.2d wk Dec.
Onion Pacific.... 17 dy s Dec. 1,314.536

ViernhantH....
vlechanicsV
Union.
America
Plioontx

..

........

290.31

City
Tradesmen ’a
Fulton
Ohemicul

Mercirnts* Kxcb
Uallutin Nation’
Butchera’ADrov
Mechanics’ & Tr.
Ureenwich........
Jjeatiicr Alitn’f’r.Soventh Wurl...
State of N. York.
American Exoh..
Commerce

Broadway

Mercantile
Pacitic

London.

Paris (francs)
Amsterdam (guilders)

......

Frankfort or^Bremen(reichmarks).....
:KjUKjaA I UHsjUI

•

ihd payments at

J

4
4
4
5

..

931e®4 84^
x2£j2)4 83
82
®4 82^
21^4^5 1930
397s» 40^8
947s» 95*6

Oat/lU DUG »»*J OUG A

AUU LGUG VI

•

4
4
4
5

79^^4 89%
78^2)4 79
78
78LJ
2614®5 24%
39^
94
ft
9414

the Sab-Treasury in this city, as

well as the

Balances.
:

Dec. 17..
“.j
19..
“
«
4<
“

Total

*

920,140 90

15,186,859 63

Coin.

$

$
1,109,347 33
1,422,633 62

20..
1,510.933 01
21
1,273,18 4 83
22
*8,950,119 95

23!!

Payments.

Receipts.

1,856.9 >3
2.747.263
2.048,324
1,25 4,449
9,237,OSo
1,2 )5,394

59
51
43
02
92
63

r

$
86.172,118
85.009,703
8 4,561,079
84,555,459

Currency.

$
4.6 42,205 1 7

03
12
89
31

4,509,859 24
4,420,122 05

84,215.225 23
84,015,332 59

4.448.6 44 68
4,363,233 59

13,399,672 10

4.4 45,377 57

....

one

account

on

the books to another.

Coins.—The following are quotations in gold for various coins:
Silver Us and lys. —
ptr.
Sovereigns
$4 82 vz>j>4 86
Napoleons
3 81
XX Relcfnnurka. 4 73
X Guilders
3 96

a» 3 86
7o 4 76

3 97
15 70
Mex. Doubloons.. 15 50
«>15 00
«nesilver bars-.. 1 12Uft 1 12\
Fine gold bars—„
par
prom.
Dimes At
dimes.— 99 A2 ft par

opan’h Doubloons. 15 55




ft
a

Five fr.tncs
Mexican dollar*’..
Do unco nuicrc’l.

English silver

....

Prii.i. silv. thalers.
U. S. trade dollars
U. 8. silver dollars

—
—
—

92

88
86

—

—

—

—
—

95
SO
r>7

ft 4 **0)
— 69^1
— 993e
99T8t£> par.

4 70
—

ft
ft
'ft

(>719^

the

Dec 17.

k2.Oi-)'4

Net

Legal

Specie.

Republic

iMM),(XX)
»X).0<X)

Importers’ At Tr..

tXXhOGO,

800,(XX)
800,0X1
5,(HX),(XX)
5, (XX), 000
1,000,00)
l,OX),(XM)

4.6 3.400
7.7 5.000
8.3 iO .000
7.2 0,200
2.502.100
1,754.30)

207.000

5.5->5.U:)('.
3.2 4S.3')(i
1.100.501*
2,( 33.5iX.‘
8.107.100
2.-2.5,00..
18,5'.I.00i)
2.078 I DC

..

Germania
U. 8. Nat

3.170..3IX)
3.4 14,5)0
1.7:3.00)
2.69n6ihi
7.9 JO,O X'
8,)' 1

7.200.4(X:

1.000.5)0

189. D41

31.00')

562,1.00

361.NX)
227.0)»

5 43'.00u

13>.6i x)

4.C27.000J

1.031. l(X)

118.001)
86.000
15 •(.''00

17.3 i 0.2.K*

3.9-3 700

8.271.000
3,271.0 )0
B.OiiU.O Kj
j 4.211.0 >0

554,000
559. '00

3.37.300
70.0),
108.06
134.0(1,
H9S,li«i
J .30U.i)()o

172 ('00
45’,0 X72. <"()

t ,838,100

4.270.3 X'
l,S34.O)0
1.312.4 Oil
1,214,0(X,>
4,2b?,40'J

1.1 '6,2 JO
33 8.100
15.200
93 000

108 600

4J129.700

91,803

1 552.0 10

156.0JO

55,222,200(15.738 5 u, 2S4.927.G-3o 20.127,806

previous week are as follows :
>1,817.5##
W8.60#

Dec.
Dec..

#

weeks past:
Circulation.

Deposits.

L. Tenders.
S

,

^

-.,

.314.7K9.9iXJ

1381.
Dec. 5..

12..
19..

a

20.236.40 )

51.658.900

15.740.4C0

2-(6,2 45,KX)

55.222.200

13,738,500

.2 3 *,927,600

Boston Banks.—The

banks for

following

are

052 3SV5G6

20,127^300 798,662.2 >f

the totals of the Boston

series of weeks past:
Deposits* Circulation. Ago. Clear.

L. Teniers.

Specie.

Loans.
S

149,997.900

7,813,490-

149.7.38.100

8,165.300

143,899,200

8,033.400

03.310,100
05.8 *0.8 K)
05,211,3)0

4. '93,890
J .4)6.090
4.477,209

Loans.

L. Tenders.

Deposits.

#

#
1 7,994.091

*
G*.662.364
64.319.72 i
64.7o6.823

5

78.067.607

13
19

74.251.53o

82,196,000

70.413.73#

82.03 {.609

71.537.260

32.160,009

71,238,3#<i

other banks.”

Philadelphia Banks.—The totals of the
follows:

*

*

*

#

Including the item “ due to

“

266.700
£25.000
180,000

253.401,
4 5,5(.K;

393.300 I Circulation
1.990 i
totals for a series of

Specie.

17....312.978.400

■O'*

436.90#

1,49-’..*200
2.088.500
4 817.100
1.0 io 3 0
1.509.6IX;

“0,1*11.
161,»0

803,690
1.265 0 O
270')0#
£96.10#

Agi. Clew,
* $
..330,497.400 59.643.200 14,739.300 308.518.100 19,839,100 758.155,051
2
19,867.10)
11.31.052,486
(8,897.000
..326.123.990 56,531,400 14.8.36,-00
..818,34 s.990 5*.M)7.209 15.171.590 290,618,300 19,896,109 975.722.717
286.64 5.3 >0 19. *19.0 )0 053.830.1^5
15,208.700
58,339.41)9
l,3:n,.300
.309,2')4,r>00 61.038,100 15.05.\ 400 288,038.100 19.918,00.) H81.124.243
5
3»3,95(»,9 X) 69 913.500 15,2:1,80) 292.0 >2.590 20,0 >8.403 1021,8->2,159
00,788.990 14.S33.090 290,67/.39!) 20,043.10 ) 796.664.256
12....313.123.800
.815,1*9,390 59,U 19,700 13.276,0)9 23U"88.509 1 (.9 >a 499 892.319.707
20.0' ’0.200 803,475,503
20 ...314.758.s00 57.03 ', 100 15.592.6)9 2'6.5 >6.4 )0
.‘{....315.321,100 55,916.800 15,86 i,700 286.437.500 29.13S.200 082.S59.VO2
Loans.
t

1881.
Oct.
1.
“
8.
15

Dec.

8,3<4.b(Kf
5,9467, Hi
15 514,()(),>
5.619 2-X)

2O8."00

the

223.000

897.8X,

1.722.800
1,583, 70 :

Deo.

are

4*5,000
1.103.100
45,o0»

16,468 NX!
6.010.000.

Dec. #1,819.500 1 Net deposits

following

4^00

763^00

6 N.O(X!

M92,<kX)

Inc.

4l5.3’)t*
450,000

1,005 .4 H)

112,* 1)0

1,221,300

789.400
435,100
2.2 M), 000
200.400
3.9U#
450,000

3.6'>0 0i»|.
20,510 8)0
21.6:9 7()i;

451 IK

2’.S0t277,400

5.400

6.80 i.200
1 88!.3,);)

'147,400

2.405,500

45.LKW

S;Xi
2,428.7()f,
l.9.5.80C
2.-28,(-o<,
2.469.4. xi

328.70.1
219 8)0

3.171.10?
0*4.100

o,517.0()0
1.5 W.lDOl

1,119,400

2.2 12.80'(

2*0.0

1,19,330

89*1.1(10

10,482.00.,

1.805.1 (w»

>'(,800
005.500

9

-

3.153.000
18,518.200
18.234,clKI

Leiral tenders

“

240.1i):l
223.200
:9'.5(x)
2t)7,- O’*
058,?k) l

400,000

Specie

Dec.

2 581.100

:

The deviations from returns of

Nov.

793,390

k56. (X)

:*0)0to

Loans and discounts

The

DS5.8(i6

23y.7iX)
l *3,809
115.0a.
31.100
lOi.ik)-)
129.0(H)

U.162,700 312.078,4 ):'

Total

45C7(X)

3.555, <00
<M8».3<X>

320.530
211.4
503.70'*
40/.0J.I
012,')00
271.00J

0

32 9>i0

45.0CT0

1)0,1<X)|
39-,5(Xj

2,0(6 005

3,7ts7.40

1.913 70'1
1.3 8.900

1.UO.bO'
8i)3.l*0G
2.75 '.800
990,900
3.1.(3.700
9.456.000

420,(XKI|
4'J6.20 1

29 9i)i)
3 O.OiK

8.020,000

250,000
200,00:l
750,000
800,000
100,0(Xi
20 i,000
21X1,000
500.000

.

.

16-1, (XXI

42 *,O0li

731,70#
781.400
247,7- HI
l i 4.00#
2,00#
476.309

3.269,100;

l(55.1(Xi
4S.NM)

993,700

799.836

1.357.3(X(
1.293,201

11. (ol.-clX

1-3,900
63^l(X)
13 J.OlM)
102, (X)

fxl »..S(X>
140, K*)
3 7.000

2,013.IOC
2,947,0|)(5
2.263.700

1,500.00
2,(XX),00>*

Bowery National
N. York County..
Oerm’n Americ’n
Chase National..

7,890.101

151.200

101.10)
056.3 *0
1.948.O0O
8.4.3 (,S(K»
043,0()0
l,lt»(',7i H>
368,000
417.HIX,

1,1 m

267,00#

2.8S*4K)<

824,5'Xj
29 (,50b

20.000
475,! O')

800,000

5.1-40.91X1
8,610,000
4,871^0'

*4, i(X)

287,000
.274. >Oo
174,00<J

I
495 ,om

B.1K8.000
5.520.900
§.2.>0.700

213.000
291,800874,5<>'
439,000
479,400
20,0iX)
IbO.OtXr,

431.8.x:

Circ«7«tion.

than 17. S

5m).. ((X)

2.7.'7.(i(X;
302,100
2.6,80)
2.805.3 00

0.5 2,rKH)
2.112.VKX)

i.000,0X1
500.000
3,(XM).OX>
(i(K),0(Xj
1.0X1,000
500,(XK>
5 ;0,<X> *
500,0\)0
1,000,000
l,i»0 ),0 0

.

655,200
(2i7,0lK)

5.240,ri0u

Park
Meeh. Bku. Ass’n v 500.000
240,000
North Kiver
East River
250,00)
Fourth National. 8,2'X),0()0
2,000.000
Central Nat
3(X),(X)0
Second Nation’1
Ninth National..
750,000
500,000
First National..
Third National.. 1,000,000
»X),00(^
N. Y. Nat. KxchJ

Fifth Avenue..
Gorman Exch.

807,500
1.0;k(.00()

024,100
2.913.100
1,0 »J,500
3.4 SO, K)C
12.852. i *<K •
l »,'i05.000

2tXJ,(XX)

20 t,000
700,01 X)

Cltiaens’
Nassau
Market
St. Nicliolsis
3hoo & Leather..
Corn Exchange..
Continental......
Oriental
Marine

5.571.400
7.231.000

1,930,000

People's

Irvinit
Vlotrop ditan

784.000

4.121.800
4.112.11*0
1.527.300

450.OX)

North Aimu-iea..
Hanover

1.801.000

7.21S.5 0

dtjpt's

other

Tenders.

0.044.00(1

tl.KU7.S0G

422,700
1,500,(MX)

1881.

Prime bankers’ sterling bills on
Prime commercial
1
Documentary commercial

2,000,000
2,050,000
2,000,000
2,000,000
1.200,000
3.000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
600,(XX)
S(X),(X)0
1,(XH),000
1.U0».0(K>

Chatinim

are as

Demand.

Sixty Days.

December 23.

•Vlunhattan Co...

3,120,848

23,460
148,344 6,940,740 5.905.334
59.461 3,009,853 2.584.334

161,852
69,454
Bt.PJS41nn.At.Man.2d wk Dee. 105,435
Bt.L.Ifon Mt.At 8.2d wk Deo.
Bt.L. & Ban Fran.2d wk D o.

Loans aiui
discounts.

»
N’ew York

$01,150
SS7.153

on

Average anwant of

Capital.

Banks.

r-Jan. 1 to Latest date.—

1^80.

1881.
1381.

1/n.

of business

week ending at the commencement

The cola inns under the head¬
furnish the gross earnings from
and including, the period mentioned in the

to,

th«

>e*v Vor* Oily Umks.— 1'he following stateiawnt shows
condition of tho Associated Banks of New York City for

which return* can be obtained.
ing “ January 1 to latest. date/'
January 1

71a

THE CHRONICLE

24, 1881.1

74.064.739

17.923,228
17,498,526

Philadelphia banks
Circulation.

Aog. Clear.
>

♦

61,083.87S

11,132,070
11.146.270

50.868.609

11.136.720

51.123.393

Bon.lL—The following are the re¬
for securities that are not *• listed ” at the

Unlisted Stocks and
ported quotations
itock Exchange:
Am. Cable Constr.

Bid. Asked.

Co.

Railway Imp. Co
Atlantic At Gt. West..

Am.

Do
pref
Dost. H. At E.. new st’k
Do
old stock ...

*38
*145
4
J4
5 :4
4J4

....

....

314
‘2
1

Continental Constr.Co
Central Railway C011struct’n Co.(D. L.W.) 23
Ciu. At Georgia subs
Deuv.At R. G..W. sul>s. 70
Do
uul’d consols. 10034
Denv. At N. Orleans
Edison Electric I*. Co
Gr. B. Win. At St. P.st’k

11
Grand Rapids A: lud.. IO
Hml.Riv. Contract Co.105
Intern at, Imc. Co. ex¬
bond At stock div§
Iron Steamboat stock.
Do
1st murt. bds

50
01
Tndianap. C. At L. old.
1 kj
lud. Dec. At Sp. com... 20
Do
2d ni. 5 p.e.m
Int. Ocean Tel. Co
Kan. At Neb. 1st mort.

101
H(>

Lebigli At Wilkcsbarre

33

*

Premium.

I Discount.

Bid. A sIced.
Mid.RR.of N.J.ass.8tk. 30
34.
Do
A bonds.... 152®
ifii#
B bonds
Do
10
12
...

^lexicanNat.jhibs.,ex

....

bonds, ex...
—
Marklar.d EJ/ac. L.& P.$I 00
North River Const. Co. 13*2
N. Y. Ch. At St. L. subs
Oregon Imp. Co. 1st ex
Do
stork
Do.

Or^g. Short Line subs.

97

Ohio C..subs.,$300pd. $U0
Pitts. & West
22
Rocirr At Pitts’g Coal. 20
Rich.it Dan.Ter. riglus 15
liich.At Al. subs
$880
S. Carolina RR. 2iiM..127
Selma Rome AD. 1st M
Do
2d M. stamp
4
Do
2d M., clean
Do
incomes
Do
stock
SL Jo. Ac West, stock. 12
St. Jo. At Pacific 1st M 1)2
30
Do
2d mort

U5
55
$110

U41#
137 )a

89

*79'

t>8

$460
21

21

20
$920

130
4ki
3

1^
1

37

1)5

35

SIhj
fit)100
Co. 140
155

Texas,St.LouisKit sub SO1^*
T(*xas A' Cd. Imp
U. S. Electric Light

Yioksb.Mer’n eoie.st’k 10

12 _J

714

I HE

CHRONICLE.
ROAD AND

Juwjestmjeuts

Miles owned
Miles l’sd A contr’d.

STATE, CITV AND CORPORATION FINANCES.

complete exhibit of the
of the Stocks and Bonds
of Railroads and other Companies. It U published on the last
Saturday of every other month—viz., February, April, June,
August, October and December, and is furnished without extra
charge to all regular subscribers of the Chronicle. Single copies
are sold at $2 per copy.
a

Total

Richmond & Danville Railroad.

(For the

ending Sept. 30, 1881.)
The stock of this company having come into prominence as
one of the leading speculative novelties on the New York Stock
Exchange, the annual report for the fiscal year ending Sept.
30 will be read with

year

more

phlet report just out

we

than usual interest.

From the pamr

have the following summary of the

income account:
Net income Richmond A Danville and Piedmont railroads
Net earnings North Carolina Railroad

$711,203
282,388

Total net revenues
Deduct interest on funded debt Richmond A Dan¬

$993,591

ville Railroad
Deduct interest on floating debt Richmond A Dan¬
ville Railroad
Deduct rental of Piedmont Railroad
Deduct rental of North Carolina Railroad.

Balance excess of revenues
forthe year

The total increase

over

in net

expenses and

$245,234
16,484
60,000
260,000— 581,718
liabilities

$411,873

earnings

over

the year 1879-80

$177,922.
The report says of the Atlanta & Charlotte Air-Line
Railway,
that since the 1st of April last this road has been in successful
operation under the direct management of this company and
as a part of its through line to
Atlanta, Ga. Its traffic for the
«ix mouths from the date of its
acquisition to the end of the past
fiscal year, though embracing the inactive months of the
year,
from April to September inclusive, shows a
large increase in its
gross earnings over the corresponding period of the previous
year, the total earnings for that period being $458,130, against
$368,494 for the same months of the previous year, being a
gain of 24*3 per cent. The impaired and inadequate condition
of its equipment at the time of its transfer has rendered its
working expense a large one for the time being, which, how¬
ever, is being gradually remedied.
The betterments required
under the contract have been fully made for the current
year,
this company being well indemnified, therefore, in
the valuable
securities, amounting to about $260,000, transferred to this
company along with the railway.
was

RICHMOND & WEST POINT TERMINAL RR.

& W. CO.

“

In accordance with
authority conferred by the stockholders
at their meetings in December and October
last, the board of
directors have caused subscriptions to the
capital stock of the
above-named company to be made on behalf of this
company
to the aggregate amount of $1,510,000,
that being a majority
of the whole capital as at present authorized. Under the
action and direction of the board these
subscriptions have been
paid and proper certificates delivered therefor. The Terminal

Company, by recent purchase of the controlling stock of the
Virginia Midland Railway Company, has secured the direction
of that important line, which
brings it into satisfactory
co-operation with your main lines South, thus developing an
all-rail line of reduced mileage to Alexandria and
Washington,
and thence north to
all

1878-9.
152
297

1879-80.

449
55
57
7 83
51

449

450
62
58

*450

952

1,098

operated..
•

Pass.JnailAexpr.cars
Freight cars
All other cars

1880-81.

153
297

55
59
775
62

153
297

65
65

60

60

*

These are the miles on which the
earnings
R. A I>. controls a much larger
mileage.

below

are

based; hut the

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

1877-8.
181,329

Passengers carried..

REPORTS.

1877-8.
152
297

Locomotives

Operations—

ANNUAL

EQUIPMENT.

•

AND

The Investors* Supplement contains
Funded Debt of States and Cities and

[VOL. XXXIII.

1878-9.

193,5*0
12,976,914
505,753

1879-8Y

earnings
1,474,493
Operating expenses—

i,699,094

256,584
15,828,768
627,9 41
59,571,874
$
508,395
1,275,888
14*,577
1,932,860

382,273
299,848
247,608

306,710
317,307
275,605

288,779
501,574
289,256

Passenger mileage.. 11,464,316
Freight (tus) moved.
380,158
Fr’ght (tns) mileage. 33,902,598
Earnings—
$
Passenger
401,308
956,632
Freight
Mail, express, Ac
113,553

47,008,589
$
432,414
1,145,373
121,307

Total

Mainten’e of way, Ac.
Maint’ce of equipm’t

Transp’tion exp’nses
Miscellaneous
Total (iuel. taxes.
Net earnings

17,039,792

481,275
70,103,314
$

527,033
1,437,016

-

55,290

57,599

66,858

985,019

957,221
741,873

1,146,467

489,474

18S0-81
305,324

*

224,464

2,188318
374,565
433,029
334,328
82,278
1,224,200
964,318

780,393

INCOME ACCOUNT.

1877-8.

Receipts—

$
489,474

Net earnings
Prem. on bonds
Bonds R. Y. R. & C
Bonds A st’k A. A C
Nete ir’gs R.Y.R.AC
Miscellaneous
Interest
p}}

on

$
786,393

1880-81.
$

9647318

*

42,542

28,100
90,000

259,730
13,656

11,120
29.125

22,108
22,740

21,248

103,441
30,054

531,248

806,589

8 5 4,180

1,489,299

320,000
214,570

320,000
245.234
115,992
16,484
5,475

3,997

/<?

Rentals paid
Int. on funded debt..
Dividends
Int.

1879-80.

$

.

741,873
19,868

1,529

Total income
TVoTilt vqp >)i

187S-9.
-

floating debt.

Miscellaneous

Total disb’nts
Balance

320,000

320,000

252,4 40

246,444

18,995

10,60 4
1 0,45 1

9,7 45
63,005
642,635
587,499
637,320
703,185
Def.111,387 Sur.219,090 Sur.216,860 Sur.786,114
51,200

GENERAL BALANCE AT CLOSE OF EACH FISCAL YEAR.

1877-8.
Assets—

$

Railroad,build’gs,Ac. ?
5,879,853
Equipment
5
Stocks A lxls. owned.

BillsAaec’tsreceivTe
Materials, fuel, Ac..
Cash on hand
Piedmont Railroad..
In trust
Miscellaneous
Frolit and loss

Total assets

1878-0.
$

1879-30.
$

1880-31.
$

5,879,033

5,879,033

6,114,450

360,085
92,861

317,731

84,877
47,575

318,467
162,186

55,384
58,764

1,128,401
495,661
298,791

1,668,402

1,665.835
94,250

312,227

93,136

8,445,880

8,266,918

8,363,610

10,096,907

3,866,400
3,623,400

3,866.400
3,607,300

3,866,400
3,637.500
80,180

3,866,400
3,891,100
588,604

167,667
428,638
64,502

356.465

102,785

158,206

89,113
1,667,355
94,250

86,892

1,663,419
206,998
102,295

Liabilities—

Stock,

common

Bonds(seeSuFPLEM’T)
Bills payable
All other duesAaoe’ts
Due State of Virginia
DueN.Car. RR. (rent)
Profit and loss

Total liabilities....

142.553

73,165

240,539

1 47,005

508,486

508,4*6

64,502

64,502

123.723

8,445,880

8,266,913

Boston &

420,000
64,502
909,836

8,368,610

Albany.

(For the year ending September 30, 1881.)
This important trunk line has much the largest
earnings of
any railroad in New England. The annual report for the year
ending ^September 30 shows a considerable increase in traffic
and an increase in gross earnings, but a decrease in net earn¬
ings, owing to the lower rates for freight and passengers.
The President’s report says:
The increase in number of tons of freight and
passengers
moved one mile over last year is 13 09-100
per cent, while the
gain in receipts is but 1 05-100 per cent. This greatly-in¬
creased volume of traffic has not been carried without
large
“

points reached by the extensive systems
railway emanating from those points. This removes effectu¬
ally the only material cause of apprehended conflict with your
principal interests, and supplies a needed auxiliary line of great additions to the
expense account.
The increase of gross
positive strength, offering connections and a new traffic both expenses during the year is $439,911, or 8 4-10 per cent, and
is
important and inviting. Under recent action of the board of
owing in part to the extremely severe weather of the past
directors of the Terminal
Company an option to take $750,000
of 6 per cent income bonds of the Virginia Midland Railroad winter, and the increase in taxes, but chiefly to the great
increase in the volume of traffic.”
*
*
*
Company, with $325,000 of its common stock, has been offered
“Notwithstanding the large increase in expenditures, it is
to this company, being its proportion of the same with
other gratifying to find that the cost per ton and
passenger per mile
Stockholders of the Terminal
of

Company.’*
“Through the agency of the Terminal Company the con¬
nected and auxiliary lines now
constituting important and
valuable portions of your general system are
being successfully
completed and improved, and brought into harmonious and use¬

ful relations with your main lines.”
“In July last the board of
directors, as authorized by law,
entered into a contract for the lease of the Richmond York
River & Chesapeake Railroad,
extending from Richmond to
West Point, upon the terms and stipulations set forth in the
copy herewith submitted for the information and action of
the stockholders.
Under this contract this company
acquires
also a controlling ownership of the
steamship lines between
West Point and Baltimore, and between Richmond & Baltimore
via James River, comprising six steamers in effective

working
condition, and regarded as a valuable and productive
prop¬
erty.”
The following have been compiled for the Chronicle :




has fallen from 872-1000 cents in 1880 to 827-1000 cents in 1881.
“
It will be noticed that the receipts for
freight have fallen
off about $200,000, while the tonnage
has increased 283,000.
The loss in receipts is partly owing to the fierce
competition
between the trunk lines for business between the seaboard and
the West, which has reduced the rate on
through traffic to a

point
tion

never before dreamed
of about one-sixth in

effect

January 1.

of; but

more

to

a

general reduc¬

the local tariff, which went into
The effect or these reductions was to reduce

the rate per ton per mile on all the freight
moved by the com¬
pany to 1 04-100 cents, against 1 207-1000 cents in 1880.” * *
“
The rate received from passengers and freight in 1880

applied to the traffic of 1881 would have yielded
*
*
*
$8,729,594.”
The expenditures at East
“

a revenue

of

Boston for additional store¬

houses and sheds to accommodate the

steamship traffic at this
point, amount to $79,231. This sum, together with all other
outays for side track, new buildings and other improvements,

charged to the expenses of the year. The extraord¬
of this-1nature aggregate
traffic
ic, $414,351.”
expenses, earnings
The following tables show the
years.
*nd net income for four
TRAFFIC STATISTICS.

have been
inary expendituresx
-

-

u

-

1877-78.

1879-80.

' 1878-79.

Freight (tous)
nn? mile

Canada

INVESTMENT NEWS.
1881.

2,675,853
10,673

Receipts from other sources.
Less interest oil

one

bonds.

1880.

$1,299,337
15,386

$696,452

Av

Passeuters

.

$3,705,679
2,406,341

$3,372,305

earr’d. 2,642,555
can’d

is made

Southern.—The following official statement

1880-81.

2,738,096 3,310,539 3,593,923
.....329,708,573 325,484.799 375,452,804 417,108,612
ratep.tonp.mile.
113c.
1207c.
ld)78c.
104c.
Passengers carried..
5,200,641
5,199,160
5,993,297
6,799,178
carried
mile
101,221,955 101,248,321 113,154,374 135,421,102
Av.ratep. pass. p. m.
2-24c.
l*97c.
2*14c.
2*08c.
The following table shows the expenses, earnings and net
"income for three years ending September 30 :
AN1) EXPENSES.
Freight (tons)

GENERAL

$707,126
678,624

$1,314,724

$28,501

$906,924

Balance

407,799

Cape Fear & Yadkin Talley.—A, dispatch from Raleigh,
December 21, says that the Commissioners have resolved
EARNINGS
to accept the offer of the New York & Southern Railway Con¬
Earn hi as.
$2,668,044 struction Company to buy the interest of the State of North
Passenger departm’t $2,275,351 $2,165,099 $2,361,498
4,328,905 Carolina in the road. The company offered to pay the State
3,721,436 3,588,839 4,530,914
Freight department.
878,334 $55,000 and to provide for the floating debt, about $100,000.
All other sources
636,746
672,924
848,706
The company proposes building a line from Cincinnati to Wil¬
$6,633,533 $6,427,463 $7,741,118 $7,875,285 mington, of Which this road is to be made part \ The road is
Total...
Expenses.
$920,290 now in operation from Fayetteville, N. C., northwest about 50
$818,069
$549,769
Repairs of road
362,396 miles, and is graded for 70 miles further.
368,465
245,321
Repairs of engines..
6o3,o45
616,872
283,523.
*fc freight ears..
Buildings, Arc
Trans.& gen. exp’us’s

Puss.

502,819
3,249,358

$1,413,997 $3,723,324 $5,248,500 $5,688,412
$2,219,536 $2,703,638 $2,492,618 $2,186,873

Total
Net income

DISPOSITION OF NET INCOME.
-

Rentals
Int. on

303,996
3,140,196

136,496

2,508,715

$75,000
485.158

funded debt.

1,600,000

Dividends.
Added to surplus

59,378

Improvement fund..
$2,219,536

Total...

New York

$75,000

$2,703,638

$75,000

470.000
1,600,000

470,000
1.600.000
108,638
450,000

47,618

$75,000
470,000

l,60u.O00
41,873

300,000
.

$2,492,618

$2,186,873

Providence & Boston.

ending Sept. 30, 1881.)
This company, commonly known as the Stonington Railroad,
makes its annual report for the year ending
Sept. 30.
The President, Mr. S. D. Babcock, remarks that no revenue has

in the steamship company
the Rhode Island early in Novem¬
ber last, following so closely on that of the Narragansett the
June previous, has prevented the payment
of any divi¬
dends by that company; but it is expected that they will be
resumed during the coming year. “After several years of fierce
competition between the existing lines, during which both pas¬
been derived from the investment
the past year, as the loss of

rates were reduced to the minimum, and
prolonged conferences on the subject, we
pleased to report that in January last an agreement was

senger and freight
after frequent and

York and Boston,
fair and equitable
the lines and to
special agreement was made
lines for a division
to both, which is
working satisfactorily.”
“Under authority given by the stockholders at the last
annual meeting, a mortgage on the road from Stonington to
Groton has been executed for $500,000, and of the bonds repre¬
sented thereby, bearing 4 per cent interest and due in 1901,
From the proceeds
entered into by all the lines between New
under which the rates were restored to a
basis, with, as we believe, equal advantage to
the public. At the same time a
between the Stonington and the Fall River
of the through passenger business accruing

less broker^
has been reimbursed for t

$300,000 were sold at par,
the company

e.

.e

following items:

$50,000
67,151
63,679
$181,133

Extension road bonds, due 1880, paid off
Warwick Branch Road, construction account
Harbor Junction1 Wharf
Total

„

floating debt is now entirely
construction account open; and there

“The
no

extinguished ; there is
remains from the bonds

sold $118,866 available for further outlays.
“A lease of the Pawtuxet Valley and Pontiac
has been taken for five years from Jan. 1, 1880, at
they were opened for traffic by
company.
the line lias been satisfactory, and will probably

Branch roads

which time
steadily in¬

The business of

this

crease.

The traffic for the year was as
Passengers carried

follows:
1880-81.
932,936
22,862,036
351,628

Central of

1879-80.
859.843

steamship line from
Central road of
stock dividend to repre¬
What this stock
settled—possibly

Georgia.—The stock in the

Savannah to New York is all owned by the
Georgia. It is now proposed to issue a
sent the value of this steamship property.
dividend will amount to is not definitely

twenty-five to forty per cent. Mr. Wadley, the President
objected to this dividend, but the stockholders are inclined to
take it, as they hold a different view from Mr. Wadley.
Central Iowa.—The following circular has been issued by
Messrs. Taintor & Holt, bankers and brokers. 1

“New York,Doc. 16, 1881.
inquiries received by us relative to the extension
of the Central Iowa Railway, we beg to state :
“The bonds to be issued ou the new line will be til? Central Iowa Rail¬
way Company first mortgage 6 per cent bonds, at the rate of only
OOo per mile, and secured by a first mortgage on said new line.
All classes of stockholders, first and second preferred and common,
are entitled to the privilege of subscribing under the terms of President
Cate’s circular of Dec. 10, receiving with each $1,000 bond $800 of
In answer to many

“

{For the year

are

N. C.,

$12,-

“

common stock.
“1 he first and

second preferred

stocks cannot be increased

in any way.
stockholders, under the terms of

“All bonds not subscribed for hy the
the circular of Dec. lo. have been sold.
“With this new acquisition the Central Iowa
of completed road. Its total
“Its net earnings, above operating expenses

will have about 430 miles

bonded interest will be $430,000.
and taxes, upon only 190
miles, for the year ending December, 1880, were $498,000; so that the
earnings upon 100 miles for that year were sufficient to pay the interest
upon the entire bonds ou 430 miles. The surplus earnings for the past
two years have been expended in steel rails, ballasting and other better¬
ments.
When the new line is completed, the mortgage indebtedness will
average about $15,000 per mile, with no second mortgage; and. in the
aggregate, the road will be capitalized at the small sum of $35,000 per
mile, with an absolute charge ou $15,000 per mile.
The new line traverses the oldest and most thickly settled and
highly cultivated portion of the State, and gives the Central Iowa the
command ol a large business from ils present territory, and an addi¬
tional haul of about 115 miles east to the Mississippi River, where it
will connect with two or more lines to the East, and interchange through
“

“

east

and west bound

traffic.

$2,250,$1,000,000 net
than $500,-

present rate of earnings per mile, the road will earn
000; and allowing 55 per cent for operating, leaves over
earnings, which, deducting fixed charges, would give more
000 applicable to the stock.
Respectfully, “
Taintor & Holt.”
“At the

“

With the bonds at par
worth $9 60.

and new stock at $30

Chesapeake & Ohio.—This company

the rights are

has begun to run a

Ky.,

regular train through from Richmond, Va., to Lexington,
559 miles, a car from this train going through to Cincinnati by
the Kentucky Central from Lexington, while close connection
is made through to Louisville also.
The company has also
begun to haul West Virginia coal to Louisville
The distance from Richmond to
miles and to Louisville 653 miles.
C

and Cincinnati.

Cincinnati by this line is 658

—The Cleveland
reorganized December 1,
bondholders. The following
York; J. M. Adams,
Akron; J. H. Horsey, New York; G.

leveland Mount Yernon

& Columbus

Mount Vernon & Columbus Road was
under the direction of Holland
directors were chosen: C. J. Canda, New

Cleveland; W. H. Upson,
A. Jones, Mount Vernon;

J. H. Russell,

Cleveland, and C. W.

President, and
changed
13,098,143
will
The earniDgs for the year were as follows:
1880-81
details
Passengers
$522,763
Freight
366,071
Maih&c
57,503
held
11,378
Valley Branch
appointed
Div.
& Stonington S. 8. Co
of tht
Total..
$957,717
William
Thaw,
Expenses
602,472
.Philadel¬
$349,096
earnings
$355,245
phia ; Charles W. Kohlsaat and P. P. Dickinson, New York.
The income account for 1880-81 was as follow**
Construction Companies—The profits of some of the rail¬
$65,229
previous year
6.277
road and telegraph construction companies have been enor¬
Adjusted accounts with leased roads
7,000
Pawtuxet Valley Co., for stock surrendered
This fact has led to the organization of a number of
957,717
Earnings of road
these corporations for the construction of new railroads, and
306,000
New
cent bonds sold
great is the confidence of the public in the ability of such
companies to sell the railroad stocks and bonds which they
Total
$1,336,224
Expenses
$602,472
receive in payment for building, that many of their stocks rule
Interest
79,304
at
high premium in the open market. The companies make
Dividends.
cent..,
240,000
New
extension of Warwick Branch..
31,063
reports, they are emphatically close corporations, and it is
196,000 *
gills payable paid
impossible to get precise information about their affairs, but
Balance, cash assets
187,414-$!,336,224

Passenger miles
Tons freight
Ton miles

carried

Net Pawtuxet
Providence

Schaap, Louisville, Ky. C. J. Canda was elected
C. W. Schaap, Secretary. The name of the road was
to the Cleveland Akron & Columbus. The general offices
be moved to Akron. New arrangements will take place at once,
1879-80.
$419,300 but Receiver Jones will continue in charge till further
344,444 and transfer are arranged.
25,935
Columbus Chicago & Indiana Central.—At a meeting
64,392 in New York, December 20, the income bondholders
$854,072 the following committee to confer with the trustees
504,976 mortgage inr> * «rd to the affairs of the road :
Pittsburg; A. L. Dennis, Newark ; John P. Green,

22,167,232
303,096
11,290,326

Net

if

Cash assets from

mous.

4 per

so

„

and discount
8 per
wharf and




a

no

THE CHRONICLE.

716

the subject demands attention on account of the large amount
of capital represented, and the following brief account has
been obtained from brokers who d*-al more or less in the.se

stocks, Mr. A. E. Hachfield, of 17 Nassau Street, having fur¬
nished to the CimoxrcLE many of the facts here stated. From
the difficulty of obtaining official information, it is evident that
there is

a

possibility of mistakes occurring, and the publishers

would esteem it a favor if any of the Chronicle readers would
inform them promptly of errors coming under their notice.
The prices given in each case are the approximate quotations
of Dec. 23.
American Cable Construction Co.—Subscription, $10,000,000 ;

paid, in, 70 per cent. Two cables are to be laid across the
Atlantic (one of which is finished); contract price, $6,000,000
for both. It is also contemplated to lay cable to South
America. No division has yet been made among the subscrib¬
Price,
@38 prem.
American Railway Improvement Co.—This company built
the New Orleans Pacific Railroad, which is now consolidated
with the Texas Pacific. Subscription, $2,000,000 ; paid .in, 80
ers.

cent, and so far 50 per cent of Texas Pacific stock and 30
cerit of New Otleans Pacific 1st mortgage bonds have been
divided among subscribers. Price,
to 143 prem.

per
per

I Vol. XXXIII.

Oregon .Short Line'Railway Company is to connect
the
Union Pacific Railway at Granger with Biker City,
Oregon
about GOO miles.
Capital, $15,000,000; 30 per ceut paid in*
Each $1,000 subscription is entitled to $1,000 first
mortgage
bond and five shares stock. Price, 97@100.
Ohio Central Railroad ^-Richmond &
Alleghany—Atlantic
& Northwestern.—These roads are consolidated under the name
of Richmond Alleghany & Ohio Centtal Railroad. Each
100
shares of Ohio Central is entitled to subscribe $2,000, and
each
100 shares of Richmond & Alleghany to $4,000, for which
80
per cent fiist mortgage, 80 per cent income bonds and 100 per
cent stock in the consolidated road will be given.
Price, 20®
15 discount.
Pensacola & Atlantic R. R. Co.—This is an offshoot of the
Louisville & Nashville system, the stockholders of the latter
road being entitled to subscribe pro rata to its $3,000,000
capi¬
tal, all paid in. Each $950 subscription gets $1,500 in bunds
and 4 shares of stock. Price, bonds 90@92; stock, 45@48.
Scranton Construction
Co. — This was
formed
with
$2,000,000 to construct a road from the terminus of the Mid¬
land Railway of New Jersey to Scranton and the coal fields.
The road so built, with the former Midland Railway of New

Jersey, forms a consolidation und«r the name of New York
Co.—Subscription, $5,000,000, paid in Susquehanna & Western. Seventy-five per cent has been paid
50 per cent. This company builds the Delaware Lackawanna
in.
Price, 2 prem.@G prem.
&
Western extension from Binghamton to Buffalo.
Texas & St. Louis Railroad.—Subscription, $10
No
000.000,
division has been made. Price, 23 to 20 pivm.
20 per cent paid in.
Another instalment (No. 2) ot 10
Central Construction

Continental Construction & Improvement Company.—Sub¬ per cent is called from the subscribers, payable on De¬
scription $10,000,000, of which $3,000,000 remains on option to cember 27. Line of road in two divisions (narrow guagej,
be taken up any time within two years. Paid in, 60 per cent. Texarkana to
Waco, and Cairo to Texarkana, connect¬
This company will build a road fr<>m Hoosac Tunnel to Buffalo ing with Cairo & Sr. L<»uis to East St. Louis.
Subscribers will
(W. L. Burt, Bosh n, ('resident), and owns in fee the Boston & get 100 per cent 1st mortgage bond, 50 per cent incomes and
Hoodie Tunm l Railroad and the Syracuse Chenango & N. Y. 50 per cent stock. Price, 80@S1^&.
Railroad. Five per cent is now called, additional to GO per cent
Texas & Colorado Construction Co.—Subscribed capital,
$5,000,000, 10 per cent paid. Builds the Fort Worth & Denver
already paid in. No dividend yet made. Price G8 to 70.
Cincinnati & Georgia Blocks ($2*2,500 each) and East Ten¬ City Railroad from Fort Worth to Canadian River and will con¬
nect at Canadian River with the Denver & New Orleans RR.,
nessee Virginia & Georgia Subscriptions are both intended to
extend the East Tennessee Virginia & Georgia tystem of building from Denver. See Chronicle, v. 33, p. 384. Sub¬
roads.
Each block of Cincinnati & Georgia is entitled to scribers will probably get $20,000 1st mortgage bonds and 200
$20,000 East Tennessee Virginia & Georgia first mortgage shares of stock for each $10,000 paid in, but terms have not yet
consolidated five per cents, $15,000 income bonds, 6 per cent, been settled. Price, 99@par.
Dallas & Wichita.—At the annual meeting in Dallas, Tex.,
non-cumulative, 150 shares preferred and 250 shares common
stock; while each $10,000 subscription of East Tennessee Vir¬ December 10, it was resolved to transfer the road to the Mis¬
ginia & Georgia is entitled to $5,000 first mortgage, $12,000 souri Kansas & Texas Company, and to authorize the issue of
income bonds, 120 shares preferred stock and 240 shares com¬ bonds at'the rate of $20,000 per mile, to provide for all the
mon stock.
Most of the securities have already been divided. present debt and for the extension of the road. It is in opera¬
Price of Cincinnati & Georgia blocks, 29 to 32 prem. Price of tion from Dallas to Denton, 39 miles.
•
East Tenn. Virginia & Georgia subscriptions,
to 75 prem.
Denver & Rio Grande.—The Gunnison News reports that
Hudson River Contracting Company.—This company (an
every mile of the main line of the Denver & Rio Grande from
offshoot of St. Louis Iron Mountain & Southern, see Chronicle, Gunnison
through to Salt Lake City is now under contract; and
vol. 33, p. 275), is building- a road from Knobel, Arkansas, to the
camps of the contractors are strung along the route like
Ashley County, Louisiana, on the Arkansas State Line, being a beads on a string. The main object of the company now is to
part of a direct line fr< m St. Louis to New Orleans. Twenty get this line to Salt Lake finished by the time the Chicago
per cent of subscriptions paid in.
No dividend has been made Burlington & Quincy road reaches Denver, which will be some
as yet.
Price, 105 to
time in August or September next, and every energy is being
International Improvement Company has a capital of $5,- bent to the
consummation of that purpose.
The road will then
000,000, of which GO per cent has been paid. The company will have a direct eastern and western outlet over the C. B. &
Q. and
call no more assessments, and has so far divided 30 per cent in the Central Pacific.
So important is this move considered by
general mortgage bonds of the Missouri Kansas & Texas Rail¬ the officers of the company that they have decided to suspend
road and 25 per cent of Missouri Kansas & Texas stock. It was all work on the various
branches of the road until it is accom¬
originally intended to go to Mexico City, but w ill not be built be¬ plished. The grading from Salt Lake City this way is nearly
yond Laredo. A new company, called the Mexican International completed to the Colorado line, and the
track-layers are laying
Interoceanie & Oriental Railway Company, (see Chronicle, vol. tliD rails
as fast as they can be procured.”
S3, p. GS7) has just been formed to take up the work at Laredo
Grand Rapids Sc Indiana.—This road is to be extended
and build to Mexico City. Price, 84 to 87.
northward
from its present terminus, Petoskey, to the. Straits
Inter-State Improvement Company was organized to extend
of Mackinac. The contract for the extension has been let toL.
the. Indiana Bloomington & Western Railroad to Springfield, A. Rose, of Bronson, and McDonald Brothers, of Grand Rapids.
Ohio. Subscription $3,000,000; 20 per cent paid in. No divi
The terms of the contract are that the road is to be completed
sion lias been made as yet.
Price, 85 prem., bid.
The Mexican National Construction Company intends to by the 1st of June, 1882. A line of steamers has already been
build from Laredo to Mexico City, with $7,500,000 subscription contracted for b}r the company to make the line of travel a
continuous one to The northern extremity of the Straits, to con¬
capital, of which only a part lias been taken up, 80 per cent
being called, but not in all cases paid in. The company gives nect with the Detroit Mackinac & Marquette Road to Marquette
for $1,050 cash subscription $1,000 first mortgage bond and on Lake Superior.
ten shares stock.
Indiana Bloomington & Western.—The managers propose
GO per cent securities have been divided.
Price, offered at 16 discount. (See Chronicle, of December 24, to extend the Indianapolis Decatur & Springfield Road (just
p. —.)
acquired by lease) from Decatur to St Louis.
Mexican Central Construction Company.—A Boston ec rporation
Kentucky Central.—M. E. Ingalls, President of the Ken¬
building from City of Mexico to El Paso, with branches. The tucky Central, left for record at Covington a mortgage for
first mortgage bonds cf the railroad were taken thus : $5,000 $6,600,000. This is a
supplemental mortgage for that given by
with $1,000 income bond and 40 shares of stock for
$4,500 cash. the company in May, 1881, to George F. Bliss and Isaac K.
Price,
to
Gates, trustees. In the first mortgage the railroad company
New York Chicago & St. Loui3 Construction Company.— did not include the
Maysville & Paris Division or the Paris®
Subscription originally $10,000,000, raised to $13,333,333. Is Lexington Division. The two latter branches of the Kentucky
building from Buffalo to Chicago. Each $13,333 (on which Central are included in the present mortgage by consent.
$10,000 is paid) will be entitled to $10,000 first mortgage 6 per
Lake Shore Sc Michigan Southern.—A quarterly dividend
cent bonds, 200 shares
preferred and 200 shares common stock. of 2 per cent, payable February I, was declared by the board
Price, 33@36 prem.
on the 23d.
The following is the official statement for the. year
North River Construction Company is an offshoot of the
1881,
was presented at the meeting (^December being
which
New York Ontario & Western Railroad
Company. Subscription
$10,000,000, 20 per cent paid in. Road will be built, using some partly estimated):
1880.
lines already in operation, from Weeliawken to
Gross earnings
$18,749,461
$17,970.n00
Schenectady,
10,418.105
and thence to Buffalo, and it is known as the New York Operating expenses and taxes
11.2S6.0UO
.

s

B
ft

.

r

.

West Shore & Buffalo road. Notice was issued Dec. 15 that an
instalment, of 10 per cent on each share of the increased

Percentage of earnings

capital stock (instalment No. 2) was called, payable on Jan. 5
1882. The books for transferring tlie shares on which
twenty
per cent has been paid will be closed on Thursday, December 22
1881, and the transfer books will be reopened on January 6,
1882, on and alter which date only shares on which thirty per
cent has been paid wifi be transferred.
Price, 13@14 prem.

Interest, rentals and dividends

m




(02 80)

Net earnings

teed stock

Balance

Equals per share,
Dividends, 8 per cent
Leaving.

.

$3,081,000

"$3,331,356

2,710,000

2,750,374

$3,974,000

$5,580,982

o:r guaran¬

3,957,320

($11 28)
3,957,320

$16,680

$1,023,062

($S 03)

December

THE CHRONICLE.

24, 1881.]

The passenger, mail and express business shows a gain of
about half a million dollars.
While the freight, tonnage

the reduction in rates caused a
falling off of over a million and'a quarter of dollars in earnings
therefrom. Had the freight rates of last year been obtained
for this, there would have been a gain of about half a mi lion
increased about eight per cent,

717

leases, except ns t.lioy arc modified, are in force. The mort¬
gage bonds, the issue of which U sought to bo restrained, are to be issued,
it appears, under the tripartite agreement and the leases and
to resolutions passed before the agi o *ment of October 22, and their pro¬
ceeds are to be used in perfecting the sfcm Hire and equipment of tho
roent and

pursuant

Metropolitan and in securing the safety of those who travel on theromL.
injunction is d ni d.**
stiff, the morion for injunction is also denlol.
In the cases of Noah Content against the Metropolitan Rail¬

The motion for
In the Gillett

dollars in gross earnings instead of the loss of over threequarters of a million now shown, and the net result would way Company and the Central Trust Company of New York,
decision was given by Judge Lawrence in the Supreme Court in
have been increased by the sum of these two amounts.
The opinion says: “Mr. Content
Upon the same basL, expenses would have been somewhat favor of the companies.
under 50 per cent of earnings. This would be about 3 per cent asks for a peremptory mandamus to compel the railway and
trust companies to issue or cause to be Issued to him cer¬
more than last year, and is due to anadvance in the price of
labor and of most material, such advance being common to all tificates for 300 shares of the capital stock of the Metropolitan
Elevated Railway, which shall'respectively bear date on the
the railroads.
The road and equipment has been fully maintained at. its best respective days on w hich his sutrendered certificates mentioned
Standard. Expenses include the cost of 11,000 tons of steel rails. in the alternative writ bore date, and shall contain that restate¬
Manhattan Elevated.—A special meeting of the stockholders ment of the old guarantee of the Manhattan Railway Company
of the Manhattan Railway Company was held at. the office of without cancellation, change or mutilation which was contained
in th^ surrendered certificates, and shall in all respects con¬
the company, No. 71 Broadway, on Wednesday, to take action
form to said certificates. In my opinion there are two con¬
on the proposed issue of $13,000,000 additional stock to take up
clusive reasons for denying to the relator the relief which he
the stock of the New York and Metropolitan companies under
the agreement of November 14, The following were present: seeks. In the first place, the fact appears from the paper*
ganmel Sloan, Chairman ; 1). W. McWilliams, Secretary ; D D. before me that in two cases in which all the companies involved
Field, E. 11. Bacon. C. W. Field, Jay Gould, Jl. Sage, S. Sloan, in this proceeding, except the trust company, which is a mere
George S. Scott, It. M, Gallaway, S. II. Kneeland, John II. depository, were heard or appeared as parties, judgments have
Hall, E. N. Bigot, E. M. Field and George J. Gould. The fol¬ been pronounced, one by this court and the other by t he Super¬
ior Court of tills city, affirming the validity of the new
lowing preambles and resolution were adopted by a vote in
pers m or by prosy of 02,083 shares, being more than two-thirds arrangement, entered into a-* a coirior unise of existing difficul¬
ties between tho Manhattan, the New York Elevated and th«
in amount of all tire stock :
i Metropolitan Elevated railway companies.
(See the judgment
Whereas, \n agreement was entered into between thn company, tlio
New York Elevated II lilroad Company and tlio Metropolitan Flo vot'd I of Mr. Justice Westbrook of the Supreme Court and of Judge
Railway Fompany on tlio 1-itli day of November, 1B1, in flic words and Truax of the Superior Court. )”
The other reason is that the
tiiiim h follow inji:
plaintiff
has
a
remedy
by
suit
for
damages, and therefore a
Whereas, the present capital clock of this company-is incnfileimt for
of

Constriiriiuir and operating its roads under the said agree-ment ; and
Whereas, The amount of inerease required for the purpose aforesaid ir
$13,000,0'O, making with the cx sting stock $2(5,000,OOO of capita’/
Itorlc in all ; and
Whereas, For the purpose of obtaining the sanction of the stockholders
to such increase this meeting lias been called by the directors by notices
gent and published as required by law; and
Whereas, The said agreement is approved and ratified by the stock¬
holders now assembled, it is now on motion of Mr. CJ alia way, seconded
by“ Mr. Cyras W\ Field,
Resolved, That tin stockholders of this company do hereby sanction
and authorize the increase <4 the capital stock of this com tony »>y $13,000,COO, making with the existing capital stock a total of $2(5.000,000.’'
Mr. Sylvester H. Kneelatid voted 500 shares against the resolutions,
all the rest of the 02,583 shares represented being voted in the affirma¬
tive.

—Judge Blatchford rendered

a

decision Wednesday in the

United States Circuit Court, in the suit of George S. Fltgg

against the three elevated railway companies fora
preliminary "injunction against carrying out the tripartite
agreement. The injunction was refused, and Judge Blatchford
said in his opinion:
and others

“The principal grounds urged in support of the motion are that the
agreement of Oct. *22 impairs vested rights of stockholders of the Metro¬
politan; that each stockholder lias for himself such vested rights, and
that those rights cannot be impaired as to him without hi« consent. It
is urged that al ter the Metroj olitan lease was executed there was no prop¬
erty left to It upon which anything in the nature of a dividend-paying
stock could be based, except the revenue to be derived from the terms
of the lease; that the value of the capital stock consisted wholly in such
revenue; that the $1(32,500 to bo paid quarterly to the Metropolitan was
the oniy.profit which investors in the stock could hope to realize from
their investment; that the stock is Btock of a special character, emitted
to an agreed portion of a rental to bo paid by tho Manhattan ; that tiie
agreement of the Manhattan is truly expressed in the memorandum on
the certificates'; that by the whole transaction the Metropolitan agrees
to distribute such portion of the rental as a dividend among its stock¬
holders; that the Metropolitan, therefore, cannot surrender the guarantee
of the Manhattan; that such guarantee must be regarded as a promise to
the Metropolitan for the benefit of its stockholders, and that they are
entitled to prevent the Metropolitan from diverting the fund or impair¬
ing the contract out of which the right to it comes.
It is undoubtedly trim that the object of the provisions of the lease
in regard to the 10 per cent per annum on $(>.500,0( 0 to be paid by the
Manhattan to the Metropolitan was to enable the stockholders **f tho
Metropolitan to have, if possible, during the continuance of the lease, a
quarterly dividend of 2 b per cent on their stock. But I fail to see any
*•

oontract to that effect between the Manli ittan and the individual stock¬
holders of the Metropolitan, or between such stockholders and the

Metropolitan Company. There is no agreement, either by the Manhattan
or the Metropolitan, that these sums shall be paid to the stockholders of
the Metropolitan. The case, therefore, is not one of any vested rights in
the stockholders of the Metropolitan to tlid 10 per cent payments, but it
depends upon the general power of the directors of a corporation to
make and modify its contracts. That power is well established in this
State. No statute or authority is referred to which makes it necessary
to the validity of the agreements of Oct. 22 that they should have been
approvi d by any one or more stockholders. Tho leases of the tripartite
agreement and the agreement of Oct. 22 were made under the authority
of the acts of April 23, 1839. There is nothing to impeach the validity
of that statute.
The instruments referred to are contracts by tho Man¬
hattan and by the other companies for the use by the former of the ro-uls
of the latter, on terms satisfactory to each of the latter, as determined

votes of their boards of directors. The evidence satisfactorily
allows that the roads of the Metropolitan Company were not earning
Ouougli net money over expenses, repairs and taxes to pay the interest

by the
On its

mortgage bonds, and-time the New York Company’s road was
earning at least 0 per cent net and enough more to make reasonable the
preference given to it over the Metropolitan Company in the new
arrangement. By that arrangement the claims of tho Manhattan Com¬
pany for the. $13,000,000 are released. But whatever conclusion now a
udicial tribunal would come to on proofs as to whether the new arrange¬
ment was a wise and proper one for the Metropolitan Company to make,
it is sufficient to say that in the evidence as
presented as to what was
before the directors of the Metropolitan Company and as to their action,
they had the right, and thought in good faith that they were doing what
was most judicious for their stockholders, and they did what they did in
good faith.
It is claimed that
“

mandamus cannot issue.

Mexican National.—In connection with the decline in Bea¬
& Kio Grande stock on Saturday, 19th inst., it was rumored
that there was some delay in the payment of subscriptions
made to the stock of the Mexican National Railway Company,
which is controlled to some extent by the Denver & Rio Grande
ver

parties. The New York 8un reported the following facta in
regard to this rumor.
“The fact that. Mexican National Railway subscriptions
declined to 1G discount and Mexican National Railway con¬
struction stock

was

offered at 12 discount and 20 discount bid

strength to the rumor. The two are one enterprise,
which is practically an extension of the Denver & Rio Grande
Railway from Laredo, on the Rio Grande, to the City of Mexiocr,
and from there westward to Manzanillo, on the Pacific Coast,
and Vera Cruz, on the Gulf. The Mexioan National Railway
Company was organized about a year ago under the auspices
of the capitalists most largely interestecTin the Denver & Rio
Grande Railway. Its capital stock was fixed at $7,500,000, and
bonds for a like amount were to be issued. Every subscriber
of $1,050 in cash, to be paid in installments as called for, was
to receive $1,000 in stock and a bond of $1,000.
The construc¬
tion company was formed for the purpose of building the road.
Its capital was $5,000,000, of which $1,000,000 was common
stock, and was issued to Messrs. Palmer and Sullivan for the
concession from the Mexican Government bearing their names.
gave

Gen. William J. Palnur is President of the Denver & Rio
Grande Company, and he and Mr. Sullivan constitute one of

Tho
and
should be paid

the largest railroad-building firms in the United States.
other $4,000,000 was preferred stock, to be fully paid

entitled to a dividend of 7 per cent before any
on
the common stock. There have been eight instalment*
of 10
per cent each called on both the subscription*
to the railway company and to the construction company.
These instalments amount, as follows : On the railway com¬

about $6,000,000, and on the construction company
a total of $9,200,000.
As the securities of both hav«
sold at a discount almost from the inception of the enterprise,
the instalments have not been paid promptly. It is understood
that the arrears of the instalments due the construction com¬
pany amount to $350,000, while those due the railway company
amount to about $800,000.
It was reported several days ago
that suits had been instituted to recover these arrears of instal¬
ments.
Officers of the company deny that, this is the case, but
say that notices have been sent to the subscribers requesting’
them to pay up.” - *
*
*
“For the $8,000,000 of instalments paid in, the Mexican
National has forty miles of completed road running south from
Laredo ; about 150 miles erraded from Mexico City north on the
mainline; the road from Corpus Christi to Laredo, a narrowguage road of about 1G0 miles, purchased for the purpose of
transporting material for construction; the grading of a small
portion of the line between Mexico City and Manzanillo, and a
large quantity of supplies and materials and some rolling stock.
“At the Windsor Hotel last evening it was suggested that a
large operator interested in the enterprise mentioned had be¬
come embarrassed in consequence.”
Nashville Chattanooga Ac St. Louis.—Statement of receipt*
and expenses for the month of November and for five month*
ending November 39, 1881, compared with same periods Iasi
pany

$3,200,000,

receipts.

year:

V/.t'cthber.
1880.
1881.

fictitious necessity was created and that the
stockholders of the Manhattan would have come forward to extricate it
from its difficulties. I t-ee no evidence of this. The directors of the

Pnasasc

$M.8«6

wetropj litau Company had this question before them necessarily,

Freight

95,170

,

a

and

Mail
passed upon it and acted in view of it.
The concurrent testimony is that the Manhattan Company is now
Renta ami
entirely solvent—made so, it is true, by the new arrangement, but still
•olvent. It ia out of the hands of the Receivers. Tho tripartite agree-1




-

privileges

3,623
S. iOO

$152,059

,

$10,190
i

/

Five months.
1880.

1‘8I.

$232,059

16,114
6 >5,367

127.380

5*9,850
18.119

I,s76

21,977

17,64»
9,017

$182,087

$822,107

$848,747

3,623

[VOL. XXilli.

THE CHRONICLE.

718
EXPENSES.

Maintenance of ears....

Conducing tiausporta’n
General expenses

...

-Five months-—
1880.
1881.

1881.

1880.

$25,921

$33,020
27,837

26,657
12,323
24,139
7,509

$96,541

$136,565

$165,573

123,578
57,936

8,383

134,686
60,*31
137,990
37,516

122,895
35,586

$108,345

$507,590

$505,570

12,397
26,708

£he Commercial 'Pimcs.
COMMERCIAL

EPITOME.

Friday Night, December 23, 1881.

unseasonably mild, and certain branches
unfavorable influence. Congress has ad¬

The weather has been
of business feel its

for the holidays, and the only important business
report by the Senate Committee on Finance of a
bonded debt
194,933
223,213
39,460
45,422
bill to appoint a commission to revise the whole question of
$148,243
$92,103
$34,281
$10,095
import duties and internal revenue, with a view to their reduc¬
New York New Haven & Hartford.—The report of the tion. A semi-panic on the Stock Exchange was felt to some
business for the year ended Sept. 30, 1881, will
presented
benAmnorii/1
at extent in mercantile circ'es. There has not been much spirit to
1 CQO
uiifli
The Tribune gives the the speculation in merchandise, and prices generally showed
depression; but .yesterday wheat and lard made important
following :
18«1.
1880.
advances on a revival of confidence caused by a liberal export
Tear ended Sept. 30-

Surplus over operating
expenses
Interest on

....

$55,517

$73,741

$315,316

$343,176

journed

over

has been the

Tnnnaim

Gross earnings

from ti
.

.$4,252,814
2,599,249

$4,946,146

3,293,102

$1,653,044
Add receipts from

41,421

81.172

.$1,694,986

$1,734,210

130.000

143,333

interest.

demand.
Provisions have been generally dull and all values declined
early in the week. On Wednesday afternoon and Thursday
morning lard was very active for export; some ten or twelve
thousand tierces were taken, and prices recovered fromlODOc. for

prime Western to llT5c. To-day, however, the market is tamer,
prime Western closing at 11T2^@L1T5c. for January,
1,550,000
1,550,000
@11 35c. for February, ll-40@ll'50c. for March and ll*57^c.
$1,693,333 for April, and refined for the Continent on the spot lP40c.
$1,680,000
Bacon on the spot may be quoted at 9@9^c. for long clear,
$40,883 but is
$14,980
Surplus for the year
quiet. Beef and beef hams are dull. Butter and cheese
The report states that the increase of expenses during the have ruled firm but rather quiet. Tallow has advanced to 7%@
past }7ear is due principally to the higher price of labor and 7%c. for prime, and stearine to ll>ic. Pork-packing at the
materials and the large addition to the number of men West is about one million swine, or 25 per cent behind last sea¬
employed to keep the road and rolling stock in good order, and son. The following is a comparative summary of aggregate
to operate the increased number of trains, while about $250,000 exports from Nov. 1 to Dec. 10:
18*0.
Increase.
Decrease.
1881;
has been expended for additional grounds, peimanent improve¬
Pork
lbs.
8,174,800
9,120,000
051,200
ments and new equipment,
Bacon
40,400,421
lbs. 04,840,570
111,340,000
Now York Susquehanna & Western.—A press dispatch Lard
57,8»7,I21
Ibs. 32,474,123
25,312,098
from Scranton Dec. 21 said that some indignation was felt
Total
178,353,12 L
72,554,610
lbs. 105,789,502
among the capitalists and coal men over the negotiations pend¬
dull
of
Rio
colfee
has
been
late
and
merely
nominal
at 10/2C.
ing between the Delaware Lackawanna & Western Railroad
for
fair
cargoes
;
mild
grades
have
continued
to
meet
with a
Company and the New York Susquehanna & Western Road.
fair
have
ruled
at
a
demand
and
steady.
Tea
sold
fractional
By t he terms of the pending negotiations the new road would
not come any nearer to Scranton than Spragueville, which is decline at the only important auction sale of the week. Rice
forty-eight miles distant, thus leaving the Delaware Lacka¬ has been steady with a moderate trade. Spices have been dull
wanna & Western Company in possession of the field.
Mr. and weaker. Foreign dried fruits have been quiet and have
price. New crop New Orleans has
Frederick K. Potts, of the New Y'ork Susquehanna & Western, further receded in
said to an American Exchange reporter that it was true that been in better demand, and, o wing to a steady advance
the company was engaged in negotiations with the Delaware j at the South, 65c. has been touched for fancy ; foreign
Lackawanna & Western Railway Company for a continuation of lias been quiet and steady. Raw sugar has been only fairly
its new road over the latter’s tracks, or rather for the business of active at any time, and within the past few days rather dull;
the former to be carried on over the latter’s rails at a fair and prices, owing to a diminished trade in the refiners’ product,
equitable rate from Scranton to Spragueville, as the cost of have been to a great extent nominal at 7%@7/5>c. for fair to
constructing that distance of road as a rival line would be very good refining.
Hhds.
Boxes.
Melado.
Bags.
great. The people of Scranton wanted a rival line to be con¬ Receipts since December 1
8,433
.3,090
255,038
20
structed to that place, but in a railway point of view an agree- .-ales since December 1
24,411
2,954
389,728
20
ment.between the companies would be more advantageous to Stock December 21, 18*1
.31,245
7,850
309,952
51
23,830
1,001,700
8,020
2,753
both, while the Scranton people would reap the benefit of the Slock December 22, 1880
extra facilities.
It was not a question of raising money so
Refined has been quiet latterly, and closes at 9>ic. for
much as one of policy in a railway consideration. He expected crashed, 9,4c. for granulated, 9>i@9^c. for powdered and 8%
the agreement would be entered into and the Midland Railway @'Vbc for standard soft while “A.”
of New Jersey brought into connection with the coal fields of
Kentucky tobacco has been quiet, and prices are nominally
Pennsylvania by means of the proposed arrangement.
unchanged; sales for the wTeek 300 hhds., of which 200 for
Business in seed
Oregon Short Line.—The Philadelphia Press says : “ The export and 100 for home consumption.
Oregon extension of the Union Pacific to Baker City will be leaf has been fair, aggregating 1,500 cases, as follows: 800 cases
about 600 miles of road, upon which it is now proposed to issue
$12,000,000 of 5 or 6 per cent bonds ($20,000 to the mile) and
tanro iuuo i i
vmu,
j
v/ukjvu
The Union Pacific Wlapprioj a tj lytt/ utiL. y
$12,000,000 of Oregon extension stock.
treasury will retain one-half the stock and give each 100 shares 1879 crop, Ohio, private terms, and 300 cases 1880 crop, Wis¬
of the Union Pacific stock the right to subscribe to $2,000 of consin, mostly Havana seed, at from 8/2 to 15c.; also 650 bales
bonds, with a bonus of 50 per cent, or ten shares, of Oregon Havana at 85c. @$1 20.
Strained rosin, owing to a considerable decrease in the sup¬
extension stock. The road is almost an assured success from
the start, and its bonds may sell in the neighborhood of par; ply, has been very firm latterly at $2 25@$2 30.
Spirits tur¬
but if the public does not at present estimate the new stock at pentine has advanced to 55>2@56e. American pig iron has
25 the ‘ rights’ are worth but $2 50 per share.
If the new been quiet but steady, but Scotch, owing to a decline in Glas¬
stock is considered worth $50, the * rights’ will be worth $5, gow, has been dull and rather weak, though without
and this is probably the maximum.”
change. American steel rails have been dull and unsettled in
Toledo Delplios & Burlington—Toledo Cin. & St. Louis.— value ; sales are reported at as low as $56. Irpn rails have
The Missouri Republican of Dec. 18 said:—“ A meeting was been dull and nominal. Lake Superior ingot copper has
held yesterday at Charleston, Cole County, Ill., of the stockhold¬ advanced on large sales to 20%c. cash. Western spelter has
sold freely at 6%}@6Mc. Pig tin, owing to'a decline in London,
ers of the Tol. Del. & Burl. RR., and of the Tol. Cin. & St. Louts
RR. for the purpose of voting on the question of consolidating the has latterly been dull and weak at 24/2C. for straits ; tin plates
two roads under the name of the Toledo Cincinnati & St; Louis have b3en depressed by large receipts and a decreased demand.
Railway. The first-named road is 181 miles long, and extends Hops have been quiet, and were at one time weak,
from Kokomo, and the object of consolidating is to make one about steady at the close. Hides have been quiet but steady.
continuous line from Toledo to St. Louis, and a branch from Leather has sold less freely. Wool has been quiet but firm ;
Delphos to Cincinnati and from Dayton to Wellston, in the coal woolen goods have sold so well of late that holders of wool are
firm. Refined petroleum has remained dull ail the week at
region, and all under one management. The vote on consoli¬
dation was a mere matter of form, as most of the stock is held 7Ysc. ; there has been a brisk speculation in certificates,
by a syndicate. Mr. W. J. Craig, the President of the con¬ closed to-day at 83%@S3^c. Clover seed is dearer, with sales
struction company, went over to Charleston yesterday to at 8%c. for prime.
Ocean freights have shown more activity in grain room, which
attend the meeting. The main line will have trains rurning
from Toledo to Neoga,«Ill., very shortly, and it is expected to has been taken to the extent of about l/£ million bushels, from
have trains running from Toledo to St. Louis by May 1. The this and near ports, mainly at 2^2@3d. to Liverpool, 5/2@6%d.
work is being pushed with great force, and all work that can be to London, 3^4d. to Glasgow and 4s @4s. Od. per quarter to
done advantageously in the winter time is being done. The Irish ports, closing at the top rates. The shipments of cotton
to Liverpool have been large, amounting to about 20,000 bales
company are paying out about $200,000 per month on con¬
struction account. All the bridging is going on extensively. by stcain at 5-32d.@3-16d. for compressed. Petroleum charters
Mr. H. S. Hopkins of St. Louis is building ten Howe-truss have been fairly active for cases to the Levant and beyond at
and to China ports aoout 40c; crude to Dunkirk,
bridges, and the Smith Bridge Company of Toledo is building 21@23c,
3a
nrul nanhtha. to London from Philadeluhia at 3s. 7/2d.
the big one of five spans over the Wabash, near Eugene, Ind.”
Deduct-




11’32^

.

quotable

though

which

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also give
the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not cleared, at
the ports named. We add similar figures for New York,

COTTON.

us

Friday. P. M., December 23, 1881.

The Movement op the
from the South to-night,

Crop, as indicated by our telegrams

is given below. For the week ending
this evening (Dec. 23), the total receipts have reached 201,855
i>ales, against 236,578 bales last week, 233,341 bales the previous
week and 216,170 bales three weeks since; making the tota
receipts since the 1st of September, 1881, 2,941,458 bales, against
3 257,664 bales for the same period of 1880, showing a decrease
since September 1, 1881, of 316,206 bales.
Mon.

Sat.

Receipts at—

Mobile

2,708

1,585

8,403 14,979
3,947
l,79i

4,059
1,319

7.364

5,866

.ITlnriflfl

4,691

Savannah
Brunsw’k, Ac.
Charleston
Pt.

....

....

3,055

2,549

Royal, &c.

Wilmington ....
Moreli’d C.,ifcc

1,035

Norfolk
City Point,Ac.
New York

4,175

979

5,437
1,909

1,637
2,079

Boston

Baltimore

1,795

*100

Phiiadelp’a, &e.

637

....

1,051
....

....

3,836

3,878

3,121
1,418

1,331
2,711
....

40

....

....

222

118

118

3,039

17,848

459

459

753

5,936

1,038

1,038

4,704

26,743
1,291
12,113
11,173

2,413
1,265

1,539
1,905

162

1,110
31.698

1,291

....

....

....

540

....

3,222

....

....

578

....

....

....

4,663

16,985
128

1,431

....

....

2,522

59,947
12,039

....

....

....

Total.

128

3,731

2,252

Ft'i.

3,365 13,785 15,356
1,552
1,144
2,283
1,110
3,49b
5,486
4,795

....

—

....

2,837

....

....

....

....

Thur8.

Wed.

Lues.

4,917

2,416

Galveston
Indianola, &c.
New Orleans...

719 1

THE CHRONICLE.

21,1881.]

December

578

....

2,651

1,587

which

prepared for

are

our

special use by Messrs. Carey, Yale &
,

Lambert, 60 Beaver Street.

Shipboard, not cleared—for

On

Leaving

Dec. 23, at—

Great
BHtctin.

Coast¬
wise.

Other

France.

Foreign

Stock.

Total.

30,119

20,207

13,815

2,019

66,190

235,050

Mobil©

7,800

6,331

None.

None.

14,131

41,022

Unarleston
Savannah
Galveston.,..
New York....
Other porta....

6,000

4,710

6,566

2,0 0

19.276

12,100
9,548
3,500

1,400
3,325

8,100

5,600

27,200

87,538
90,643

8,126

8,368

700

None.

29,367
*4,450

79,632
225,315

4,100

None.
None.

2,400

2,700

9,200

163,256

73,167

35.973

39,707

20,717

169,814

New Orleans..

.

.

Total

!

*
Included in this amount there are 250 bales at presses
ports, the destination of which we cannot learn.

for foreign

speculation in futures has dragged somewhat the past
The effect of the Bureau report was but short-lived,

The

week.

and yet
of the

it unquestionably had some effect in modifying some
highest crop estimates. The large visible supply, the

disappointing foreign advices, and other influences of a less
tangible character, have operated to defeat the efforts to pro¬
mote a further advance in values.
A failure on the Produce

Cotton Exchange, through rumors of
speculative complications. Yesterday (Thursday) prices gave
For comparison, we give the following table showing the week’s
total receipts, the total since Sept. 1,1881. and the stocks to-night way rapidly, under pressure to realize on account of the large
and the same items for the corresponding periods of last year.
To-day. there was a variable and
accumulation of stocks.
Stock.
1880.
1881.
unsettled market, closing without much change from yester¬
Receipts to
Since
This
Sep. 1881.
S'nee Sep.
Th is
1880.
December 23.
day. Cotton on the spot was quiet and unchanged until yes¬
Week.
1, 1880.
Week.
1, 1881.
Totals this week 28,929 45,560 25.260

26,156 35,119 40,831 201.855

Exchange was felt on the

>

12S

10,043

618

New Orleans

59,947

788,185

Mobile

12,039
1,110
31,698

180,662

62,504
2-3,644

Indianola, &c-..

Florida

Bavannah
•Charleston
Port

459

Royal, Ac.

26,743

11,412
390,231

1,291

34,538

City, Ac

Norfolk

City Point, Ac.
New York

8,010

573

2,651

30,034

897

11,173

Baltimore

Philadelphia, Ac.

1,502
3,255
1,924
29,972
9,822

50,729
108,013
16,606

12.113

Boston

24,800

93.440

5,936
1,038

56,827
99
16,923
5,086
589,066 117,843 119,225
3,809
434,400 106,814 97,647
435
245
36,551
92,137 18,560 16,289
20,951
452,644 77,517 49,662
135,962
43,355 229,765 142,614
2.388
5,200
55,308
35,059
52,581
12,124
18,939 23,254 11,737

56

5,984
372,177
14,376

17,848

Wilmington
M’kead

523,842

55,153

232,123

5,983

1,054

*

201.855 2,941,458 237,980 3,257,664

Total

......

......

914.182

h* 1,147,320.
In order that

comparison may be made with other years, we
give below the totals at leading ports tor six seasons.
1880.

1881. ~

Galvest’n,&c.

17,113

29,123

15,573

New Orleans.
Mobile

59.917

62,504

69,841

12,039

23,644

19,636

Savannah....

31.698

31,956

Charl’st’n, Ac

18,907
6,974
28,03 4

26.302

30,458
19,603

39.794

3,880
28,603

27,743

19,478

201,855

237,930

Wilm’gt’n, &c
Norfolk, Ac..
All others....

ITot.this w’k.

5,179

1876.

1877,

1878.

1879.

Receipts at—

20,176

20,007

20,988

12,581

12,066

207,601

199,981

224,634

162,633

25,793
16,598
3,906

53,235
14,799

21,447

19,490
4,116
18,380

Since Sept. 1. 2941.458 3257,664 3012.549 2576,136 2332,915 2562,063
pKialvegtou includes Ludiauola; (Jiiarlestou includes Pore Royal, die.

Point. See
reach a total

Wiiudtgron includes Moreliead City, &o.; Norfolk includes City

IThe exports for the week ending this evening
bales, of which 46,640 were to Great Britain, 20,856 to
France and 18,591 to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as
tnade up this evening are now 1,147,320 bales. Below are the
eiports for the week and since September 1.1881.
of 86,087

Week Ending Dec.

23.

From

Exported to—
Oreat

Brit'n. France
05 6

Oalveston
New Orleans..

Mobile
Florida..
Savannah

Charleston

8,300

1,383
19,215

Total

Great

runt.

Week.

Britain.

1.621

3,934

141,762

15.578

124,528

3,490

•

•••••■

,830
7,200

3,442
#...

6,072

Wilmington...

1,621

Norfolk....
New York....,
Boston

3,034
13.97 >

••••••

258

1,345

3.490

Baltimore

9,272
18,272

1,300

1.8,0

Phlladelp’a.&c
Total

^Tntnl IRSO




ContiFrance

7,873
71,549
827,276 128,337
7,970
8,900
72,353 12,5r'5
87,3:4 14,331
29.399
1,430

12,904
21,716

20,850

18,514

107 711

18.972

.15 807 172 520

Ac.

•

•

'

J vWn

29,81 i
101,615

109,233
457,228
7,970
3,000

114.317

199.175

66,0 5

107,660

5,682

36.511

13,930
26,638

135,092

41,269

1

26,980

14.981

10,181

50

41,270
41,901
10.231

14,310

.205 207 2'6.691

For immediate delivery the

5,559 bales, including 1,612

1,291 for

165.478

373,030 1,4' 2,307
436 487

total sales foot up this week

for export, 2,656 for consumption,

in transit. Of the above, 300 bales
following are the official quotations and

speculation and

to arrive.

were

delivery for the week are 735,100

The

sales for ?ach day of

the past week.

Sat.

Mou Tues

9516

Ordin’y.$tt>

978
Strict Ord..
97s
Good Ord.. lOiiia lCiii6
11*8
8tr. G’d Ord Ills
Low Mid 1’g H9i« ll9ie
Str.L’w Mid lU3l0 ll13i0
12
Middling... 12
1230
Good Mid.. 1230
1250
Str. G’d Mid 1250
13i8
Midd’g Fair 1318
13 7s
Fair
1370

Ordin’y.^Tb

Sat.

950
95:6
97s
103.fi
10i!i6 11

HT1fl

11*8

119l« 1178
111316 12^8
1230
125s
1318
138

Th.

Frl.

Wed

95ie

95iq

9516

95s

97a
978
10316
Strict Ord..
978
Good Old.. 10U16 10H16 lOHie 11
Ills
H716
11*8
Str. G’d Ord 1110
Low Midd’g 119,6 ll»i0 11V; 1178

111316 1I13J6 11%' 121a
12
12
| 1-B16
12
123a
1211,6
1238
123g
12 5a
121516
1258
I25a
13*8
13l«
13716
Midd’g Fair 13*8
143m
1378
Fair
137s
137a

Str.L’wMid
Middling...
Good Mid..
Str. G’d Mid

Sat.

STAINED.

# lb.

878
978

-.

1.888.835

Mon. Tne*

Sat.

953

10316

95s
10316

958
103,0

933
103,0

11

11

11

11

11716

11716
1178

U710
ll^S

IJ716
1178

1178

1218

1218

1218

12*8

12&10
12Hi6
121516
13*i0
143,0

125,0 125ie
1211,0 12Hi«

9»8

1178
12 >8

12516

Fri.

Th.

Wed

10316

95a
938
10316 103jg

11

11

950

11

10316
11

11716

1215,0 1215,0
137,0 137,0
143,0 143,0
Th.

Frl.

950

958

if-

103,8

1218

1218

117I« 1171« 11716 ll7l« 1171«
U78
11 78
ll7g
1178
1178
,

112*8

12*8
125,6 !12516 125,«
12Hlrt 121110 12ltlfl
121o16 121516 12;5,e
137ie jl37l6 137ie
14»,« l143,fi 14316
12*8

Mon Tues Wed

87s

87s
97s

870
978

97o

io9,6 io9,6 109,6
H910 u9l« H»10

Low

Middling.
Middling

Mon Taea

12-16
12Hie 121'ifi 1211i6
12151B 121516 1215,6
137lfi 13716 13‘ie
143,* 143,6 14=<!«
125

12

Wed

Good Ordinary
Strict Good Ordinary

TEXA8.

NEW ORLEANS.

UPLANDS.
Dec. 17 to
Dec. 23

125,6 125,
1211,8 12Ui,

1215,0 1215,8
13718 il37is
143lfl 143lf
Th.

Frl.

S78
978

878
97s

109,6 10®16 10®,«
119,0 il»ia H»lf

MARKET AND SALES.
8ALES OF SPOT AND
8POT MARKET
CLOSED.

Ex¬

port.

Sat.. Nominal
Mon
Quiet
Tuee. Ask’g high’r pcs.
Wed
Quiet

ConSpec- Tran¬ Total.
sump. ul't’n sit.

.

112

.

Thiira

Quiet

Fri.

Dull

.

Total

1,612

....

The dally

252
915
417
310
404
358

200
40
373
..

14S
530

2.656 1,291

FUTURES.

TRAN8IT.

•

nent.

•

8 ’>0,491 178,786

86,087

,640

4

bales.

Sept. 1,1881. to Dee. 23, 1881.
Exported to—

Onnti-

2,015
2,201

The total sales for forward

19,100

25,885
84,070
22,955
29,106
21,649
5,998
24,390

19,386
73,650
19,484

considerable business for export. To¬
quiet at 12c. for middling uplands.

terday, when there was a
day the market was

9,534
744,073 351,240 290,537

3,478
31,956

17,471

118

Brunswick, Ac.

354,765 109,049 106,676

28,505

288,665

16,985

-Galveston

....

....

....

....

....

deliveries given above are aotnally
which they are reported.

Sales.

Deliv¬
eries.

452 179,100
1,067 138,500
790 118,400

1,206
600

1,100

74.100

1,000

2,052 113,700
888 111.300

1,000

5,559 735,100

5.800

310

900

deliver© l the day pre¬

vious to that ou

The Sales and Prices of

Futures are shown by

the follow¬

comprehensive table. In this statement will be found the
daily market, the prices of sales for each month each day, and
the closing bids, in addition to the daily and total sales
ing

THE CHRONICLE.

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•Includes saies in September, 1881. for September. 314,000: Scpternber-Ootober for October. 416.400; Septcmber-Nov ember for November,

511,200; also sales for Novemtter. 1882,3,700.
A Includes for November, 1882, 100 at 11-70.
B Includes for November, 1882, 300 at 11 *65.
C Includes for November, 18^2, 20o at 11*63'5>11 *65.
I> Includes for November, 1*82, 200 at 11*03@11*65.
E Inc udes for November, 1882. 20<» at 11 *60.
F Includes for November 1882. 300 at 11*57-011*59.
Transferable Orders—Saturday, 12*10;
Monday. 12 10; Tuesday,
12*15; Wednesday, 12*15; Thursday. 12; Friday, 12 05.
Short Notices for

110.096
45.299

103,900

43,000

59,000
41.000

79.719
45.804

436.580

320.260

....

125,00-9
4n Ot.O
4 6.750

50 1 ,3

l 096
15.000

e

285.750

,9 *5-

33

2,1^8.100

2.925.361 2.754,963 2,523,351 2.413.850
6*tj(-d.
G^md.

.

indicate

an

increase in the cotton in sight

to-night of 170,393 bales as compared with the same date of 1880,
an
increase of 402,010 bales as compared with the corres¬
ponding date of 1879 and an increase of 511,502 bales as com¬
pared with 1878.
At tub Interior Ports the movement—that is the receipts
and shipments for the week, and stocks to-night, and for the
corresponding week of 1880—is set out in detail in the following
statement:
Week

ending Dec 23. ’31.

Receipts. Shipm'ts
9,3.16

Augusta, Ga
Columbus, Ga...
Macon, Ga

5 581
3 143

Montgom’ry.Ala.

4,995
2,534

Memphis, Tenu..

17,684
2,423

Nashville. Term.
Dallas. Texas.

Jefferson, lex.
Shreveport, La..
Vicksburg, Miss.
Columbus, Miss..
Eufaula, Ala

December—Saturday, 12-OS; Monday, 12*05@12*0J;

Week

ending Dzc. 21,’80.

•2,301
1.967

Griffin, Ga
Atlanta, Ga
Rome, Ga
Charlotte, N. C..
St. Louis, Mo

20,742

Cincinnati, O....

14,247

...

3.874
3.550

1,407

Total,old ports.. 105,897

2,032

10,868

3.632
2,730
9,515
2,156

12,955
12,500

..•

103,333
17,431
4,500

2,173
16.69s

1,218

13,576
10,359

1.809
1.746

3,721
5,017

8,479
4,250
1,307
16,287
16,107

26.323

Receipts.
8.943

0,232

23,559

5,276
1.093
5,384
5,767
11),3.»5
3,190

23,224

2,718
3.657
5.593
21,205
3.267

1,471
2,296
4,675
6,792

1)79

14.210
5,603
4,731

2,250

10.506

1,460
5,765

6,211

7,112

4,079

3,345

3,794

2.269

1,872

3,4*26
6,600

19,118
14.969

83.351

1,541
4,888
4,412
1,300
1 4,985

6,763

22.110

96,774 10C,661

120,811

12,222
800

866

744

765

2,341
1,270

1.082

2,500
5,684
9.869
3,293

2,086

Louisville, Ky...
Little Rock, Ark.
Hreuliam, Tex...

2,276
1,013
1,187

760

920

2,442

Houston, Tex....

1G,069

15,488

Total, new ports

25,202

22,837

•

1,340

10,876
22,162

1,000
38,787

15,942

105.020 310,015
■.
w

658

393

3,003

3,171

730

546

614

1,580

2,001

1.168

1,317

fglg
1 ,.)S5

1,001

25.331

1,653
27,214

26.109

3,679
29,063

50,363

35,496

34,632

43,472

131,099 119,611 457,024
ve

9,548
86,

743

866

The ab

9,665
12.0.5

1,776

2,663
1,233

Total, all

Stock.

5.103

Raleigh, N. C ...
Petersburg. Va..

Newlicry. S C..

Sh ipm'ls

totals show that the old

L56,307 139,652 353,487

interior stocks have

in¬

during the week 9,123 bales, and are to-night 96,646
period last year. The receipts at
same towns have been 14,914 bales less than the same week

creased

bales 77107 e than at the same

Wednesday, 12*05.

exchanges have been made during the week:
I *20 pd. to exch. 400 ?ept. for Apr.
to exch. 200 Dec. for Jan.
to exch. 300 .Tan. for Feb.
| * 15 pd. to cxcl). 700 Jan. for Mar.

The following
*14 pd.
*24 pd.
*43 pd. to
*24 pd. to

exch. 50i> Jan. for Mar.
*24 pd. to exch. 500 Jan. for Feb. •
excli. 1,100 Jan. for Feb. | 1*10 pd. to exch. 300 Jau. for Aug.
*77pd. to exch. 1,500 Jau. for May. j
The Visible Supply of Cotton, as made np

980

31,701
,28,815

1,400
1.331
8,415

7,626

Stock.

8,005
4,149

2,123

707
480
3.240

..

F-* H-*

»-*

CO
o*

1

►-‘o
C

24,000 bales.
The above figures

.

1 ©

1 ft*

1 ft»

i 9

A

•—

to 10 c.

108.000
36,600
75,660

{^*The imports into Continental ports this week have been

Selma, Ala

1 ©*-*
ft

*-* t-O
C. 03©

totoo

—•

a

r*

©X

1

Total visible supply
Price Mid. Up).. Liverpool

-

A

to

*-*

Cn ©

g

CC w

to-o

©a

tc

-5 i)
to

ww

tc to

t-r

127,090
37,000
126,: 8)

2,48",781 2,434,703 2,1

fe;

—

cc co

I ft*

1

Total Kant India. <teo
Total American

“X

—

CUO

C to

O-,

-»u

k~» »—

Indmn, Hrazil, &c.-~

1 ft

1 ft 7:7
A
u.

1
*—

2,,488,781 2,431,703 2.186.356 2,128 1(10

Total American...

Q

wwS?

1 ft>
©

<—

—

204.261
15,000

033,6".8
310,015
49,000

—

►- —

•-J ©

C -j

361,926
300

East

to 1C o

*-*

S 8

CO

oj

110.000
659.0x0
S 10,829

ft

•-* —

—

til J
Oj

—

1 ft

0 M.*'20
852.01 O

Css

1

»3-j
ft

250 000

25,000

-a©

® to

.

—

follows

250,000

E^ypt, Bra/il, iVe..aib»at

C-O'CO

O-tOos
1 SO

CO

ft

arc as

06,000
08 *,000

C5

cr.co

Ci

fieaoriptixxs

357,000

T)

cf.

O- — a-

15,000

341.000

s

c. ©
C

toto

201.'81

0«>nrint-iiTa!>rocKs
102,000
American afloat for Europe
480.000
1,147.320
UniTeo Stater* stork
United Suites interior stocks.. 400.601
United stater* exports to-day..
8,800

Liver)MMil Hioek

1C to

©©

CtC ,3

49,000

2,925.361 2,754.963 2,52 J.3 j 1

London ritoek
CniitineitTai utoeka
India Mlloat for Kun>i»e

toto

d»

8,800

r.Ue totals of American and other

M

toto

O' o*

406,661

51,0)0
0 9 o«K)
15.000
8 10 329

*3
A

ft-

rc tc

-

900

41.000
933.633
310 015

1,117,320

Liverpool stock.

»-•

j*3

..

■

J metinm—

1 ©r
^

1

ronti’iiial pons.

390
2.090
7.900

9,3 '0
4,». no

Total viHible stijipiy

Olt-lie

»-»

v

tc o

1

R
a

X*

-

15.300

SXM'k Hi Duiteii St alert jHjrw

I1

1

to

t-

-*

.

I ft

2.000

228.580

||

2,300
19.400

Slock in IT. s. interim uorta..
Hiuteil Sit tor. ox potia »4 Miay..

I-* — ©

fi 355
1.8x0

8,750
4.000

n

1- 10 ^

ft 0*

© ©

©-!

O'

’

*"*

»“

O' ro

1 ^ ©

to

1 ft-01

1-'. ©

•—

t: io

-1

r—

rr©

toio

#»

1

C0-.

1 ft- 0J

33.3*0

l/>58

f— *—

1

95.250

9 1 3

4 3.-200

Bremen

at otuer

© 03

—

373 000

41.690

6 800

5,470

tn*

ki

too

ft *5

—

twtC

411.29^

1)0.000

26,000

«,i

Sun'k hi A’liMenlam
3r<H'k at Kixrpnlnm
Si^wtar Anrweru

c r

»-*

—

toto

4S.0(j5

DO 1.600

1,0X6

StiM'U

a

h- *3

w©

i: io

•—

—

*

toto

©

ft ft

:

•

1878.

325.04)0

45 299

1 1.500

S.

tre3?
i5

CC-M

•

*—

►— *—•

—

CD
•

c

X

b-n

cr

c *8
u©
1 * ft

»-*

ft-r o

ii©

© *

>—

i:
ft

c

C: T~. 7* r-

8

r

w

y

to

*fW

-c-g

a

£

tr/io

Ef r wq;

»-»

3

-ti

^

506.000
122,000
3.500
10,200
13.000

1873.;

3m> 009

10,550

r—

ft1

37,00)

7.000
2,500
5.250

w:

:

n

add the item of exports

1880.
405.000
36.600

47 UNTO

baieit.

4tm»k at 1 Jvt*rt>iM>l
Sr-ii'k »it, I^uiXon

we

—

including in it the exports of Friday only

TfJn 4-tr^M.t Britain. «T’*'°k
at Havre
nr Marseille*
111 BHm'llHIH
8t«M'k til Han mux

—

•

23),
1S81.

"5 •*

<7

Co

•

from the United States,

5-

hj

£ ; -J

:

l

L

•

.

*

*

cmnpVtH figures for to-night

Q — Cf-O

*

o

*3

<

I—©'*

*

©*

2

—

rr 2.
« je

7

—

© -r

-

to

n:
r;

:

i

TO

=

r •'s

-»■

:

Z

1-4

*

*

—

®

£©?

:

cr

-t-

=•

•

r+

•o

•

ZT9 * ©

*r X »-

'i

^

CB

r-7

i

t

7*

c X

*-

op

—

J!-

P
a.

rj

ft

74

bj cable and

the

last year.

Plantations.—The following table
prepared for the purpose of indicating the actual movement
Receipts

from

the

ia

each

outsorts are some¬
largely one year
We reach,
statement

week from the plantations.
Receipts at the
times misleading, as they are made up more
than another, at the expense of the interior stocks.
therefore, a safer conclusion through a comparative

telegraph, is as follows. The Continental stocks are the figures
of last Saturday, but the totals for Great Britain and the afloat like the
following. In reply to frequent inquiries we will adA
for the Continent are this week’s returns, and consequently that these figures, of course, do not include overland receipts of
brought down to Thursday evening; hence, to make the totals the Southern consumpCion; they are simply a statement of the




December

THE CHRONICLE

24, 1881.]

treekly movement from the plantations of that part of
which finally reaches the market through the oui-ports.

the crop being 68

Receipt• at the Petit.

eadlHV—
l

Get.

li

M
i<

81..

II

as

Nov.

4

13

11

«

181

U

..

...

....

n

2

...

0

O

issl.

1KH0.

P«,40h 1UC.004 ITO.ftin
:rti.7l4 ms«7 J85.05U
14.431 238 34

ltf

+

Stock at Interior Port, ller'ptM fr**n, Ptant*n*
1879.

18S0.

ISSI

IS 79.

ISm*

C8.1MH 103.080 132.1*73 180.1:4 223.44

.0*1.
IMS 449

8'^227 121,80 iso.tro 19 ,»*28 22 M70 321.212
95.ro 1*»2.7<I5 1141099 2 9.2 7 8 721) :■ 11.487

Sio.HIS 251.-HO 20U.241 11 -.7.15 179.S70 *tvw* 2rt t.3C5 2«<1,7»\ 2 5 290
225 0 7 »5l 78^ 2 0.S85 183.0(1.. 204.75.1 251.988 4 *,2 7 270.951 2:3 47 '
22U.2UV 215842 224.4211 ! 87.1.0 227,135 S5 40S
24.817 218.W98 242 3 « 303 7 8

21S. OS 2T,fl 818

73.1 7 238.218
f0 2 0

27I.H* > [246.1-7

325, 03 2 U 337 210.777 241 021
21H.l0r 2 IS.311 21<*,17(J 2'7. i09 24S,Eift 350 .354. 23». 9:1 an.vg'i 24 i%*t, >

321,S70 204.IsS

ai9.J « ‘gi'a.l n

23

Dee.

1879.

247.911

£11 8?'i 243.1S7 2IU.S11 317. 0S 2C"> 270 370

247|

and the lowest 48, and the rainfall reached one inch
forty-seven hundredths.
Savannah, Georgia.—We have had rain oh one day of the
past week, and the ba’anoe of the week has been pleasant.
The thermometer has ranged from 33 to 71, averaging 56, and
the rainfall reached nine y-four hundredt hs of an inch.
Augusta. Georgia.—The early part of the past week the
weather was dear and pleasant, but during the latter portion
we had light rain on two days.
Planters are sending their
crop to market free'y. Average thermometer 53, highest 6$
and lowest 31. The rainfall reached sixty hundredth« of an
and

KJCC1HFT8 FROM PLANTATIONS.

Week

m

205 v31 2 9 548 2 3 >27

sis.u::; Mx.45'0 9M. 78 3 3 53 204 224 397 5 6 2 14.94 2 7 U' :0?.8<7
•>»7 *V»I ir oso vOl.^f • 311/20 310 015 + i»l Oil 229 024 213. <71 •JDV7H

on<*

28379——-KCTKf.. 2109—Ej.aIwm

inch.

Atianto, Georgia.—Wo have had rain on three days of the
past week, the tainfafl reaching one inch and twenty-one hun¬
dredths. The thermometer has ranged from 23 to 74, averag¬

ing 49.

shows—
1. That rh»* total receipts from the plantations since Sept. 1 in
1881 were 3 312,584 bales; in 1880 were 3,546,780 bales; in 1879
were 3,370,174 bales.
2. That, although the receipts at the out-porta the past week
were 201.835 bales, the actual movement from plantations was
210,978 Imlea, the balance going to increase the stocks at
the interior ports.
Last year the receipts from the planta¬
tions for the same week were 253,771 bales and for 1873 they
were 229,024 bales.
-The above statement,

Telegraph.—Thera has boon rain in
most sections of the South during the past week, and the tem¬
Weather

Reports

perature has been

by

lower, but the rain has generally been lightf

(JHnrteston, Smith Carolina.—It has rained

on

three clays of

the past week, the rainfa-1 reaching
in h and seveuty-eight
hundredths. Average thermometer 55, highest. GO nud lowes 33.
Tile, following m a let tie i it vve have also received by telegraph*
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o'clock
December 22, 1681, and December .3, 1880.

Dee. 22 *81. Dee. 23. *8&
tec*. Ift&i.
J-tcL Intin

New Orlenni

Below high-water ms rk

.NCoiitpin*

Above low-wilier mark...

8
10

..

1

o

5

l*j

G
1

N;**liville

Above tow-water mark...

21

11

‘i

4

Shreveport

Aixtve Urw-wutcr mark...

12

lb

14

2

Vloltfcbnrir

Above tow-wnter in?u*k...

'zJ,

1

lb#

U

New Orleans

reported below high-water mark of 1871 unti4
SepL 9, 1874, when the aero of ga ige was changed t>o high-water
mark of April 15 and 16, 1874, which is 6-10ths of a foot abova

high for thfc? season of the year, except in 1871, or 16 feet above low-water mark at that point.
New York Cotton Exchange Membership. &o.—'Three new
Texas, where ice is reported in half the State.
members have been elected to tho New York Cotton Exchange i
GaloesUm, Texan.—It has rained hard on two days of the
Her man Koclil, New Orient!*:
past week, the rainfall reaching two inches and eighty-ore
'William MeGibwy, inow York City;
Leonard L Holuz, of Hentu & Co., New York City,
hundredths. Ice formed this week in half of the S:ate. Aver¬
and five applicants are still to be voted on. Seats continue in
age thermometer. 54, highest G3 and lowest 44.
demand, and $5,900, the highest price hitherto, has been paid
Indiauola, Texan.—We have had showers on three days of
for one.
the past week, bat as the week closes there has been a favorable
A proposal to close the Exchange, as usual at tlii* season, on
It
change in the weather. The rainfall reached forty, nine hun¬ December 24, 27 and 31, a-so on January 3, was defeatwd.
dredths of an inch. Thu thermometer has ranged from 40 to 04, would appear that operators consider ilie position of cotton too
uncertain to allow of the interruption of business, as had be¬
averaging 55
come customary in former years.
Now ir is requested to make
Vallas, Texas.—It has been showery on one day of the past at least Saturday. December 31. an extra holiday.
The names of the following visitois have been entered vinca
week, the rainfall reaching fifty-five hundredths of an inch.
December
1, the date of the visit being also stated :
The wheat planting has been very large. Ice formed this week
12- William Thom .mm. Toxa*.
O. Miller. Mobile.
in this vicinity on two nights. Average thermometer 45, highest
Limieu Cook, Fall River.
L. Sletf.H, Rionm-uid.

*ud the teuij>ernt,ure

04 and lowest 28.

Texas.—It has been showery on one day of the
past w^ek. The thermometer has averaged 49, t he highest being
G4 and the lowest 38. The rainfall reached fifty hundredths of
Vren/iam,

an

inch.

r

New Orl-ecsrut, LoutHana.—We have had rain on three days
of the past week, the rainfall reaching one inch and seventy-five

averaged 57.
Shreveport, Louisiana.—Telegram not received.
VickX'Hiry, Mississippi.—We hare had rain on three days
of the past week. The weather has been cool.
CoLambus, Mississippi.—We have had ruin on three days of
the past week, the rainfall reaching one i.ioli and forty-nine
hundred-Vs. The thermometer has averaged 53, ranging from
hundredths.

The theimometer has

40 to G8.

received.
Nasho<lie, Tennessee.—We have had rain on three days of
the past week, the rainfall reaching two inches and sixteen hun¬
dredths. The thermometer has ranged from 28 to 61, averag¬
ing 48.
Mobile, Albania.—It has been showery on one day and has
rainel severely on two days of tlie past week, the rainfall reach¬
ing two inches and thirty-five hundredths. Average thermome¬
ter 50, highest G8 and lowest 37.
Montgomery, Alabama.—We have had rain on four days
during the past week, on one of which it rained very hard, and
the balance of the week has been cloudy. The rainfall reached
three inches and and eighty-one hundredths. The thermometer
has averaged 54, ranging from 35 to 68.
Sdma, Alabama.— It has rainel on four days of the past
week, the rainfall reaching one inch and eighty-five hundredths.
The theimometer has averaged 49.
Madison, Florida.—Telegram not received.
Macon, Georgia.—It has rained on one day during the past
week. Planters are marketing their crop freely. The ther¬
mometer has ranged from 30 to 75, averaging 54.
Coiambus, Georgia.- -It, has rained on two days of the past
week. It is claimed that about three-quarters of the crop has
taen marketed. The thermometer has averaged 60, the highest
Little Rook, Arkansas.—Telegram not




C. U Johnston, Liverpool.
T. H. Mtlhuru, Memphis.
O. H. W. Llpke. Baltimore.
5— O’loucl 8. id. Thouipefrc-n, Tols-

eitiiti'i.i, Ala.

L. Ferguson, Liverpool.
8. P. Freeman, bouton.
Tioo. Hooper. Baltimore.

K. F. Hudson, Mi HisMppi.
I. ii. nods >n, Mississippi,
Dr. C. E. Fleming, S. C.
15—M. b. leylwr, Auuaaiit.
A. J. Tayl.ir. Alaoaimu
Gcu. R. F. Patleidiui, Mem pill#.

M.^jor G. W. Emmcb, iveutauky.
A. ‘V. Mayvr, Virginia.

1C— I. K. VVilnuti, New Orleans.

N. Weatherly. 9. c-

Dr. A. J. DofcbM:.lt, N. a
V. F. Jarrett, Hopkinsville, Ky.
R. Moore, Mobile.
8. b. William*. Utica, N. Y.
O. W. Smith. WoroeHfor.
IT. Loo. Ralciga. 3. C.
8. Parker. Jr.. Ciiicogtx
10—3. B. Guioii, LtverpooL
12—*. I.amhley, laverjiooi.
J. J. 1 ouglity, Augusta.
D. C. Glddiugs, Texas, j

R. J.

Hubbard, New Yoik.

17—Rusb. Taylor, Alabama,
Puiton. Louisville.
I. W. Rucker. Atlieus, Ga.

George I. Haines, HaVaiUtah.
k. T. Laoy, Virginia.
W. i‘. bheyooK, St, Louis.
Wadsworth, North Carolina.

H. C. West, St. Louis.
Hamtiul M ison, Jr.. Liverpool^ »
22—H. AT. WuJker, Liverpool.

&g.—There is not much demand fori
spot, but there is morn inquiry for fu> u> t delivery.
The market is rather steadier and holders are asking a shade
higher prices than at tho date of our last, and at the close
Jute Butts, Bagging,

parcels

ou

the quotations are 9o. for l%j lbs.,
standard grades. There have been
small lots for present wants. Jute

10c. for 2 lbs. and lie. for

sales of some 490 rolls in
butts are not very active,
but the e is a steady trade demand for small parcels, aud iu the
aggregate about 2,000 bales have been p'aced. There is no
change to note in prices, which are steadily held at 2>^c. for
paper grades au 13^3 l-lfij. for bagging quality.
Comparative

Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.—

Cv>mparison of the port movement by weeks is not accurate
the weeks in different years do not end oa the same day of
the month. We have consequently added to oar other standing*
tables a daily and monthly statement, that the reader majr
constantly have before him the data for seeing the exact relative
movement for the years named. The movement each montli
since September 1, 1881, has been, as follows:
A

as

Year

Receipt..

isbi.

Sspt'mb’r

422.05

1330.

Beginning September l.
1879.

1877.

1878.

453.478

333,64::

288,8+s

968,3 D

888,49
942.27.

639,26
779,235

OotobHr.

827.84!)

Novenib’!

93 7,57 A 1.006,601

.

5

1876,

.

98,4)1

236,868

i

075,260

822.493

901.392

INitHlyeai 2,137,134 3,433,297 2,161.407 1,757, J l, 1,199,517 1,813,520
Pero*rage >r tor. p»u
34 50
43*27
33 51
4142
cewipts Nov. 30
44*94^
..

722

THE CHRONICLE

1

Nov. 30 the receipts at the

This statement shows that up to

ports this year were 245,813 bales less than in 1880 and
23,077 bales more than at the same time in 1878-79. By adding
to the above totals to Nov. 30 the daily receipts since that time,
we shall be able to reach an exact comparison of the movement
tor the different years.

Tot.Nv.3(
Dec.

1..I.

44

2....

44

3....

«

4....

44

5....

44

6....

44

7....

44

8....

44

9....

44

10....

“

11....

44

12....

44

13....

44

14....

44

15....

44

16....

‘

18....

44

19....

41

20....

44

21....

14

22....

44

23....

3,187,48*1 2,433,297 2,164,407 1,757,349 1,499,517 1,813,520
8.
30,824
52.479
21,387
26,647
36,867
8.
39,978
21,089
45,332
29,216
30,886
8.
40,703
40,894
28,110
48,897
34,006
44,873
S.
27,179
25,675
23,532
30,346
S.
31,662
20,766
30,938
49,608
54,134
58,291
36,219
32,325
31,79i
63,166
36,046
S.
24,767
30,13(
28,111
25,563
36,174
8.
33,072
29,263
22,784
43,236
40,865
8.
58.561
42,404
34,502
26,981
25,055
8.
59.133
37,914
28,693
47,969
39,377
S.
42,863
35,846
30,836
33,164
41,993
S.
29,247
30,614
25,895
50,051.
50,014
39,011
29,426
46,024
30,942
42,522
37,733
S.
32.913
26,923
31,300
33,977
30,650
8.
32,893
35,642
36,960
33,332
45,251
8.
30,412
52,468
23,479
40,452
46,325
8.
50,328
33,308
28,929
49,541
32,588
34,519
S.
35,179
43,343
30,473
39,649
S.
38,346
31,246
42,450
25,930
45,560
31,074
23,675
30,037
31,874
25,260
43,275
S.
22,581
45,471
27,899
37,419
26,156
8.
25,931
31,722
46,158
25,775
35,119
8.
28,042
28,891
55,204
32,077
40,831

total movement for the week

ending Dec. 22, and for the threeyears up to date, at all India ports.
Alexandria Receipts and Shipments.—Through arrangements,
we have made with Messrs. Davies, Benachi & Co., of
Liverpool
and Alexandria, we now receive a weekly cable of the movements
of cotton at Alexandria, Egypt. The following are the receipts
and shipments for the past week and for the corresponding week
of the

previous two

Alexandria, Egypt,

1880.

1881.

Dee. 22.

Receipts (cantars*)—

1879.

120.000

160,000
1.817.550

Tliis week....
Since Sept. 1

150,000
2,290,000

1.505,500

This

Since

week.

Sept. 1.

This
week.

Since

Sept. 1.

This
week.

Since

Sept. 1.

Exports (bales)—
To Liverpool
To Continent

Total Europe
*

12,000 102,000
9,170 51,521

14,000 106,000
8,000 154,606
3,351 35,343| 11,000 79,850

21,170 153,521

17,351

141,3431

19,000 234,450

A cantar is 98 lbs.

This statement shows that the
Dec. 22
were

were

receipts for the week ending
160,000 cantars and the shipments to all Europe

21,170 bales.

•

Manchester Market.—Our report received from Manchester

co-night states that there has been no material change in prices
shirtings, and that the market is quiet. We give
the prices of to-day below, and leave previous weeks’ prices for
of twists and

comparison:
1881.

12,911,458 3,197,879 2,911,871 2,459,258 2,140,003 2,428,565
Percentage of tota
49 24
60 13
5822
55 29
54*44
port rec'pte Dec. 23
Total

This statement shows that the

receipts since Sept. 1 up to
to-night are now 256,421 bales less than they were to the same
day of the month in 1880 and 29,587 bales more than they were
to the same day of the month in 1879. We add to the table
the percentages of total port receipts which had been received to
December 23 in each of the years named.
India Cotton Movement from all Ports.—The

collected for

are now

years.

•

/ 17....
44

1876

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

[Vol. XXXHt

us,

figures which

and forwarded by cable each Friday, of

shipments from Calcutta, Madras, Tuticorin, Carwar, &c.,
e lable us, in connection with our previously-received report from
Bombay, to furnish our readers with a full and complete India
movement for each week. We first give the Bombay statement
for the week and year, bringing the figures down to Dec. 22.
the

BOMBAY RBCEIPT8 AND SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR TEARS.

Shipments

Shipments this week.
Conti¬
nent

Year 6breed

firit'n.

Total.

since

This
Week.

Total.

nent.

d.
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

9j8® 9% 6
9*80 9 VO

Nov. 4
a
11
a
18
a
25
Dec. 2
it
9
it
16
it
23

6
9k®10
6
9*4®10
930 0) 10^ 6

938®l()l8
938^10*8
9H»10
938 5)10

The Exports

6
6
6
6

8.

®8
@8

®8
®8
®8
®8
®8
®8
®8

Up ds

d.
0
0
0

lk
lk
lk
lk
lk!
0
0

d.

d.

6?i«
63s
67ig
6 k}

(>910
69io
6:ii«

Exported to—

Great

Conti¬
nent.

,

Total.

RANGOON AND KURRACHBK.

Shipments since January 1.
Great

Conti¬

Britain.

nent.

Liverpool

r

1879

3,000

2,000

5,000

i‘,606

4,000

5,000

1878

225,000
223,000
209,000
144,000

Tota*.

87,000
87,000
211,000
72,000

6
I

7

d.
0
0
0
0

d.

6%
6k}

7^a)7 10k
9
9
9
0
0

®-8
®8

67ig
6V

0
0
0

6! ho
611

Ik
lk

61318

63s

\l

6nis
an

Great Britain

to

Dee.
7.

216,000

the movement from
the ports other than Bombay is 5,000 bales more than same
week last year. For the whole of India, therefore, the total ship¬
ments this week and since Jan. 1,1881, and for the corresponding
weeks and periods of the two previous years, are as follows.
The above totals for this week show that

EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ALL INDIA.

Dec.
14.

5,892

i»,352; 6,118 13,975

Dec.
21.

i

5,892

9,951

Total
since

period
previ’u;

Sept. 1.

year.

121,120 144.220

3,40#

6,655

6,118 13,975 124,528 150,875

Havre
Other French ports

25

1,304-

258

14,310

19,514

Total French

25

1,304

258

14,310

19,514

247
250

559
300
500

1,145

13,204

Bremen and Hanover

....

1,045

Hamburg
Other ports
Total

to

101

North. Europe

1,146

497

200

200

2,440

18,017
14,042
4,092

1,359^ 1,345

25,901

36,151

737

460952

737

1,413-

10,257^

1

All other
-•

Total Spain, &c

200
7.238 10.473

312.00C

310,000
320,000

Same

ending—

s{w,

Grand Total

1881
1880

6
6
6
6

d.
8.
9
9
®8
9
9
@8

Nov.
30.

Other British ports

Spain, Op’rto, Gibralt’r,&e

’Britain.

8.

Uplds

Cotton from New York this week show

of

■'

Year.

d.

9q ivlO
9*4 a 97e
938 -a) 10
9% **>10
9 kiw 97e
95s w 10
9 r>8

6*10

Week

Total

According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show an
compared with last year in the week’s receipts of 17,000
bales, and an increase in shipments of 8,000 bales, and the
shipments since January 1 show an increase of 71.000 bales.
The movement at Calcutta, Madras, Tuticorin, Carwar, &c., for
the same week and years has been as follows.
Shipments this week.

Shirtings.

938 ?z)1018 6
930 @1018 6
9 x4 *2> 10
6

63s

GotVn
Mid

8 k lbs.

increase, as compared with last week, the total reaching 15,578
bales, against 8,781 bales last week. Below we give our nsual
table showing the exports of cotton from New York, and their
direction, for each of the last four weeks; also the total exports
and direction since September 1, 1881, and in the last column
the total for the same period of the previous year:

Since
Jan. 1.

increase

CALCUTTA, MADRAS, TUTICORIN, CARWAR,

" d. s.
9k 6

32s Cop.
hoist.

Exports of Cotton (bales) from New York since Sept. l. 1S81.

980.000 35,000 1,363.000
909,000 18.000 1,136,000
868.000
641.000 3.000
924,000
727,000 6,00o

1881 11,000 12,000 23,000 370.000 610.000
1880 7,000 8,000 15.000 375.000 534,000
2,000 262.000 379,000
1879 2.000
1878
3,000 3,000 323,000 404,000

@

Shirting 8.

Receipts.

Jan. 1.

Conti¬

Qi'eat
Britain

d.
9

GotVn
•Mid.

8*4 lbs.

32s Cop.
Twist.

Oot.21
i
28

1880.

The Following)

are the

Receipts

8.781-15.578 165,476 207,952
of

Cotton at New York,.

Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore for the past week, aud
September 1,1881:

since

Receipts
from—
N. Orl’ans
Texas....
Savannah
Mobile
Florida..
8. Carolina
N. Carolina

New York.

This

Since

week.

Sept. 1.

Boston.
This
week.

Since

This

Since

Sept. 1.

week.

Scjit. 1.

9,152 119,462
57.768

4,852 136,753

1,210

Philadelphia.

18,608

Baltimore.
This
week.

Since

Sept. 1.

“544 20,659 2,916 36*667

...

Shipments
Jo

all Europe

from—
Bombay
All other p’rts.
Total

This
week.

23.000
5,000

Since
Jan. 1.

980,000
312,000

9S.OOO 1.292.000

1879.

1880.

1881.
This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

909,000

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

310,000

2,000
5,000

320,000

15,000 1.219,000

7,000

961.000

Is,000

611,000

jL'hw last statement affords a very interesting comparison of the




712

5,il8

6,969

92,941
37,603

3,179

’*728 12,113

Virginia.. 13,832 106,200

2,323

1,631
50,729
1,468

9,992

30.220
84,651

8,010

59,309

North, pts
Tenn., &o. 12,113
188
Foreign..

42.2M

554,712ll3.€34

11.316

3,232

50,546

946

8,618

56

••••••

This year. 50,997 609,673 21,535 192,788
Last, vear

2,471 20,592

1.038

141,699

3,015 41,251

8,860 119,516

1,333 27.381

8,953 123.069

December

Shipping News.—The exports
States the past week, as per
138 903 bales. So far as

ot cotton from the United

latest mail returns, have reached
the Southern ports are concerned, these
are'the same exports reported by telegraph, aud published in
the Chronicle last Friday. With regard to New York, we
include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Wednesday
week:

of this
night
*

Total bales.

York—To Liverpool. n*r

New

steamers Adriatic, 787

City of Montreal, 1,563
Britannic. 1,864
....Egypt,' 1,5^9
Lake Champlain. 1,679
Lake Win¬
nipeg, ^,596
Menmon, 1.201
Nasmyth, 1,201

Alaska, 595
Servia, 900

Amerique, 133
St. Laurent, 125. A
Main. 1,145
Maas, 200
Orleans—To Liverpool, per steamers Bertha, 6,000
Bolivar, 3,900
Hector, 4,500
Legislator, 5,734
Pembroke, 4,563
per ship Gosoheu, 3,950—per bark

To Havre, per steamer
To Bremen, per steamer
To Rotterdam, per steamer

New

r>. H. WatJen, 4,000
To Havre, per steamer

5,917

Fiachat, 4,543
per ships Charles,
per
Foreningen, 3,567
He Martha, 4,665
Cedar Croft, 4,070
Islay, 2,671

barks
To Bremen, per steamer Clintonia, 5,750
To Barcelona, per bark Aurora, 195

brig Lola, 631 Upland
Texas—To Liverpool, per ship Alice M. Mmot,
barks Soridderen, 1,261 —Zanrak, 2,051

3,580

pet*

brig Johanna Kremen, 875..
Wilmington—To Liverpool, per barks Cathniea, 1,322
Fremtideu, 1,489
per barkentine Resolute, 1,618
.
To Bremen, per bark Star of Hope, 1,063
Norfolk—To Liverpool, per steamer Pedro, 3,104
per ship
Revolving Light, 4,860
per barks Avonport, 3,410
Nicosia, 3,710
Zcbina Goudov, 3,714
.'
To Barcelona, per steamer Jose Baro, 2,098
Boston—To Liverpool, per steamers Istrian, 570
Marathon,
To Bremen, per

13,975
253
1,145
200

Bre- Amstcrdam.
Havre, men.
13,975
258 1.145
3 2,6 47 25,433 5,750
pool.

New York
N. Orleans.

..

7,20)
2,901

Charleston....
Savannah

25,433
5,750
195

5,881
6,892
875

Texas

,

Wilmiugton...
Norfolk

6,892
4,429

1,560

87 V

1,063

......

.

.

.

.

......

......

9.809

5,881
......

10,342
7,767

......

5,492

2,098

18.798

Philadelp’a

..

20,896

Do

1,560

200 10,774

sail

sail

138,903

we

will have to be sold.

Dec. 14, for
A. M. of the
damaging it to the extent
of $20,000. The steamer damaged one of her outer plates aud is
leaking. She will have to discharge a portion of her cargo and
repair," necessitating her detention for a week. No damage to
cargo.
Caradoc, steamer (Br.), from Charleston for Reval, put into Dover,

Clintonia, steamer (Dr.), which cleared from New Orleans
Bremen, with cotton, soon after leaving the wharf
35tli, collided with the Valletta dry-dock,

discovered arouud
Malaga, after
being detained at Malaga six days, was sent to Port Mahon, Dec.
2, ti perform quarantine.
Explorer, steamer (Br.), from New Orleans at Liverpool, Dee. 1,
reported having encountered a terriAc gale Nov. 19, which contin¬
ued up to 30tn, aud had two boats damaged, saloon stove, after
wheel and all movable things about the deck swept away and
several sails blown away.
Guadalupe, steamer, from Galveston for New York, Nickerson, with a
cargo of cotton, hides, tallow, <fcc., for New York, in attempting to
the bar at Galveston, Dec. 15, drawing 13 feet of water,
encountered a rough sea, aud. her keel dragged on the bottom. On
getting into deep water she was discovered to be leaking badly.

7, for coal. After taking in coal a leak was
Aange of feed pipe.
Elvira, steamer (dp.), from Savannah for Barcelona and

cross

in critical condition,
Hex after bulkhead

.

632 ® *4

030 @ *4

632® *4

®32 ® *4

“32® ^

....

....

710

c.

the leaking compartment, where
made from coming in
bole was stopped
and the steamer proceeded
made in her bottom

....

....

....

....

h®9l6

1a®9i6
....

....

38

38

38

38

%

d.

....

....

....

710

....

....

•

....

....

710

L>S>916

hs;9i6

16

•

7i«

71S

716

•

....

....

....

•

....

....

....

•

716

716

....

•

•

1332*

1332*

716

716
•

....

.

....

....

....

.

1332*

1332*

716

'

....

.

.

....

c.

....

....

Compressed.

Liverpool.^—By cable from Liverpool, we have the following
week’s sales, stocks, &c., at that port:

statement of the

3ales American

Actual export
Forwarded

53,000
3,400
4,100
39,500

75.00U
4,500
8,200
57,000
6,100

week
bales.
exporters took ....
Of which speculators took..

Sales of the
Of which

..-

16.000
9,400

4,800

505,000
391,000

435,000

Total stock—Estimated
Of which American—Estim’d
Total import of the week
Of which American
Amount afloat
•.
Of which American

327,000
53,000
3 4,500

L40.O0O
116,000

193,000

225,000
183.000

141,000

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots
week ending Dec. 23, aud the daily closing
been as follows:

Saturday Monday.

Spot.
Market,
12:30p.m

id.
1

£

Firmer.

\

28,000
244,000
194,900

Firm.

Steady.

Steady.

,

27,500
280,000
227,000

and futures each day of the
prices of spot cotton, have
Thursday.

Firm.

2,800
7,200
471,000
344,000
59.000

Friday.
Fair bus.
at previ¬
ous

prices.

6’hB
61316

6**i«
6l3]tJ

61*16

10,000
1,000

10,000

10,000
1.000

10,000
1,000

10.000

Firm.

Firm.

Firm. *

Steady.

Easier

1,000

Spec.& exp

3.800

35,? Oo
9,800
8,000
487,000
374,001*
41,500

76,000
9,500
7,300
55,000

6**1*
6I31C

10,000

Sales

3,801-

Wcdnes.

6%

.Orl’ns

48.500

Tuesday.

65s

Upl’de

Dec. 23.

Dec. 16.

Dec. 9.

Dec. 2.

2.000

621iS
1,000

Futures.

Market,

{

12:30p.m.

j

Market,

l

$

DP.M.

Easier.

The actual sales of futures at
below. These sales are on the
unless otherwise stated.

Dull.

Steady.

Steady.

Quiet.

Steady.

Steady.

Liverpool for the same week are given
basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause,

Saturday.

d.

Delivery.
Dec
Dec.-Jan...
Jau.-Feb...

...61*16
•

62132®1116
62:132

Feb.-Mar..

Mar.-April.

d.

Delivery.

Apr.-May...

..67s@'-9vi
May-./unrt
June-July..
July-Aug. .. 63*32@7
@ 63132
..

d.

Delivery.
Mar.-Apr
A pr.-May

6*7^
62932 @ 7s

May-Juue. ..6i516® 3988

7

July-Aug

Monday.

62!32
61 he

Dec.-Jan...

Jan.-Feb...
Feb.-Mar...

63g

62732
Apr.-May ..
May-June. . .G78'®2;)32
June-July...
.

63132

July-Ang
Feb.-Mar

62538

Mar.-Apr

62532

6*3ie

Mar.-Apr...

Tuesday.

Dec.

She was then run upon the bar, where she lay
a
with five and-a-half feet of water in her hold.
is tight. A sa.il was placed under
a hole of about 8 inches was found, probably
coutact with an anchor lost on the bar. The
from the iu'idq by A. M. ot the 17th,
She had a hole
on the 18th for New York.
betweeu water tauk aud water tight compartments.

Fri.

c.

*2®9ig

sail

Thurs.

1S32*

Amst’d’m, steam.c.
Do
sail. ..d.

*

Wedncs.

....

710

Do

lues.

1332*

c.

Baltic, steam

Mon.

....

Hamburg, steam, d.
Do
sail ...d.

..

8,333

sail...d.

Do

3,09

give all ne ws received to date of disasters to vessels
carrying cotton from United States ports, etc.:
Albert, wrecking steamer, which was at Indian Harbor taking in
cotton siv. d from the wreck of the steamer Rochdale, from
Chariest >n for Sebastopol, was burned on Tuesday by the upset¬
ting of a lamp. One hundred and live bales of cotton were cousu ned, with everything els • on board.
Baum veld, steamer, ’from New Orleans for Reval, arrived at Reval
night of Dec. 1, with cargo of cotton damaged by Are. The Are
broke out i:i 'lit of Dec. 1 and was contained in the after hold. On
Dec. 2 nearly all the cargo had been discharged, and only 40 or
5o bales were left in the lmld. The Are was extinguished before it
had time to spread. The vessel has sustained no damage, but the
cotton in the hold at the time is damaged by Are and water, and
Below

Liverpool, steam d. &3*2® *4

1.99

3,000
91.835 25,691

Total

Satur.

1,063

2,600

1,994

Boston

freights the past week have been as follows:

4,429

Hotter- BarceTotal.
dam. Iona.
15,578
200
195 64.025

......

proceeded to Halifax.

Bremen, steam. ,c.

arranged in our usual

Liver-

I saved uninjured. If the weather continues fair, the steamer will
be got off. A steamer was sent from Halifax, Deo. 20,
\ probably
with materials to rep air the Roclulaie.
Later—The steamer Rochdale got off Thursday morning (22d inst.),

C

Havre, steam

....138,903
the.se shipments,

.

Do

32,647

reported, from Charleston to Sebastopol,

Indian Harbor, N. 8. The steamer Rochdale lies m a
sheltered cove ou a strong bottom. Two steamers had been sent
to her assistance from Halifax up to Dec. 17.' Three hundred bales
of cotton have been landed undamaged, part of whioh were
destroyed by lire ou board the wrecking steamer Albert (see above),
and the probabilities are that the balance of the cargo will be
ashore at

Cotton

18,798
2,098
3,085
Polynesian, 339
1,994
Philadelphia—To Liverpool, per steamers British Crown, 2,000
....Illinois, 1,000
,...
3,000
Total

Rochdalf, steamer, before

aud

barks Isabel CTaggs, 2,500 Up¬
land and 150 Sea Island.. Wild Hunter, 2,974 Upland and
271 Sea Island
per barkentine Heroine, 1,314 Upland..
7,209
2,600
To Barcelona, per ship Augelita, 2,600 Upland
Savannah—To Liverpool, per bark Kouonia, 2,901 Upland
2,901
To Amsterdam, per bark Ibis, 1,560 Upland
1,560
To Barcelona, per steamer Asturiauo, 5,250 Upland
per

Charleston—To Liverpool, per

The particulars of
form, are as follows:

728

THE CHRONICLE.

24 1881.]

61lift

Dec

Jan.-Feb
Feb.-Mar
Mar.-Apr.

6**ifi2)2.t32

...

..

Apr.-May

.

...63i@25.j2
.6253o m1310

..

6*3i0@273o

May-June..
June-July...
July-Aug...
July-Aug..

.

678®2932

Juue-Julv

63132

Aug.-Sept
Apr.-May
May-June
June-July

April-May..

..

63131

7132

62732
67s

6* he

Wednesday.

6uie
6ni6 jan.-Feb

Dec

Dec.-Jan
Jau.-Feb

- -.

62332

Mar.-Anr

6i3i6

Apr.-May
May-June

.67eS'2732
62932

July-Aug

63t32

Feb.-Mar
Mar.-Apr

May-June
June-July

G2i32®nifl

3) 2132

Dec.-Jan...

! Feb.-Mar

62332®%

6* he Apr.-May. ..6i316@2732
June-July
6*&ie
6%
7
62532 July-Aug

...67s

62932

6i°i6

6i5lfi July-Aug

Jurie-July

Dec

7

Aug.-Sept

Dec.-Jau

62133

Apr.-May

6*3ia

Juue-July

62232

Thursday.

Jan.-Feb
Mar.-Apr....

62132S>xlis Apr-May

67g
6**16 May-June
.634@26S2 June-July.. 62932®i;>jg

61316 Apr.-May

62T32

Friday.
The damage
6®8
Apr.-May
62332 Dee.-Jan
out.
Dec
6S8®*932
Jan.-Feb
62i32
May-June...613ie@2732
for Liverpool, with Dec.-Jan
OSsa*19^ June July
6^
Mar.-Apr
678@2732
on the southwest Jan.-Feb
62i32@
67a
June-July
July-Aug
02932
Dec. 15. The Hector Feb.-Mar
6* he
was got off after partially discharging, and was on her way to Key
6% 32332
Mar.-Apr
West A. M. of the 20th.
Palestine, steamer (Br.), before reported at Liverpool, Dec. 4, from
Boston, reports, Nov. 28, several seas broke on board, carrying
BREADSTUFFS.
away three boats, Ac., stripping the tarpaulin off No. 5 hatch and
doing other considerable damage.
Friday. P. M., December 23, 1881.
Rinzani, steamer (Br.), from New Orleans, at Bremen, Nov. 28, experi¬
enced strong westerly gales during the whole passage. On Nov.
The floor market has been exceedingly doll during the past
21 experienced a liurricaue which lasted six hours; a heavy sea
broke on board and washed one boat away, and did other damage
week, but there have been no important declines in
to deck load.
bdiitt
"

to cargo is very slight, and none was taken
Hector, steamer, Lax, from New Orleans, Dec. 9,
4,500 bales cotton aud other cargo, went ashore
end of the Marquesas Keys, Florida, prior to




value* yha

724

ME CHRONICLE.

business done was often at lower prices, but holders were iu
but light stock, and, feeling no great pressure to sell, maint&ined tl;e range of quotations very nearly as in our last. To¬

ports
years:

day there

F.our... ^...bMs.'

was no new feature.
The wheat market was depressed

and unsettled for most of

the week under review.

Receipts at the West made a better
oomparison with last year, and supplies at all points continued
large.
The etringeccy of the money market continued
to encourage the bears to make fresh attacks upon values, and
there were slight rednctions from day to day. Bat the low rates
♦f ocean freights (2^d. by steam to Liverpool) prompted ship¬
pers to avail themselves of it, and they have taken room to
various ports for fully a million bushels this week. Ademand
to cover contracts sprang up at tbeWest, and was soon respond¬
ed to here. Shippers became free buyers, and the result of it
all was that yesterday the declines early iu the week were near¬
ly recovered. In the statistics of the Treasury Department
subjoined, it will be seen that the exports of wheat from the

(Comparative shipments of flour and grain from the name
from Dec. 27, 1830, to Dec. 17, 1831, inclusive, for four

Flour.

Grain.

0

No. 2 sprit* "...1$ bbl. $3 40a 3 85
No. 2 winter
3 b()9 4 3»>
Winter supertine
4 7on 5 00
Spring sujiertine
4 25nr 4 7 •
BpriiiL' wh* at extras.. 0 00a 5 35

WllftAlr-

«io XX ar.d XXX...
Wls. & Minn. rye mix.
Winter whippy extras.
do XXnutlXXX...

White
Corn —Went, mixed.
West. No. 2.
Western yellow..
Wee tern white...

f> 50 w>

H :.«)

6 O0a> 6 50
5 20* 5 0!)

Patent*

f)7i»
6 50 *

City nhipj in.it extras,

6 903)

0 75
0 5o
7 25

Southern, bakers’ and

family brands

7 25
6 40
5 7:V<r 0 25
4 G5 <* 5 00

Soutli*n h! ipy extras.

Rye flour, superfine..
Corn meal —
Wpsteni.Ac
lyt'ine.
Buokwft flour, LOO lba.

SS.i9
HTb'/r

...

3 75
3 85

8 5 »S 3 00

*Vheat..... bush.
Oom

Barley
Rye
ToDal grain

$1 20

Spring, No. 2.new

1 20
1 27

Hi d winter
Red winter. No. 2

1

39q «1 41

1 30
00

Rye
Oats—Mixed
White

-91 S3
9i 28
u> 1 4 2
*1 40
9
70^

09%*

70

08
72
93
47
49

70
75
97

9

9
9
9
0

50

•

•

•

•

9

Buckwheat

1

bo

Receipts of flour and grain

at Western lake aud river ports
for tke week ending Dec. 17. 1881:
r

4

ku
Ohloattd

...;

..

Toledo
Illltvfnritee
Dot voit
CUevebeiri
Bt. Louis......
...

Fhtnr,

Wheal,

Corn,

bt:s.

Oats,

hush.

bush.

Barley,

Rye,

bush.

bush.

bush.

(190 the.)
43.705
6 “>,050
J.3 O
9.943
;
2,**40
.

.

<00 lbs.)
199.4s3
303,009
80.276

42,752

29.830

1 1 ,**75
142,356

801.020

1.350

5.025

207,450

.

Reorm........

10.24 X)

103.503
It.,* 2 2

.

.

(60 /be.)
052,408

31.0* 0

Dmltitb;
Total

144.174

•

785.170 1.418.403
247.140 1,698,227 2 219.021

..

..

gatu)> tfiue *80

.

(32 lbs.) <48 lbs.)

(50 lbs.
18 591
49,150 101.395 22,007
23.317
0.500
3 >00
0 491
29,411
12.890, 10.905
85.351 121,677
6.020
126.250 20,350 13.150

443,193 215.102

749,852 508.370
699,275 420,818

63,028
64 416

T#tal receipts at same porta from Dee 27,1SS0, to Dec. 17,
1661, jnciusiv*. tor four ▼ears :
flour..;.. ..bbls.
i

i

l

1980.

8.557,075

6,803.082

1979.

6.809.271

Oera.....
Oats,
Barley.
--

53 616,015

85.108.307

128,5 0.351

14M.K)1,o27

4o.355.-84
10 077.770

38.557,425

3,584,199

3,793,100

Tutal fraio ..i.. 237.093.125

i

i

.

nour..^. .-.bbls.

9 761.102

280.130 090

........

Oats...;

i.

Barley......... IRye....,
<

-

:

1880.

231.970,630

252.121
857.915
310.922

54,8 i0.390

39,778.759
13.022.531

39,263.529

7.070.915

2,406.815

2,705„510

6,923.100
910,486

141,772,016

120,176,820

118,466,613

16.558.942

Week
Dec. 21.

281.032

04»,574
195,007

180,903
45,273

45,850

4.382
129,660
15,824

1,647,131

1,437,013

1.201,537

1.599,043

;

Week

Flour.

Wheat,

Corn,

bush.

bush.

Nov. 20.. ..109.313

252.111
228.(> >5 :
395.275
540,790

1.131.821
1,322,2 >0
1,127,499

Tot..4 wks 477,857
4 w’ks’hO..800.331

1.332.811
1,230,520

OOlS.
eiunutfDoc. 1 /.. .121.311
Dee,, lo.. .1 i 2,0 43
1 >eo.
3.. .121.031

877.495

391,858
18

99.17 1

Reueiots af flour and

New York
Boston

Portland
Montreal

130.903
10 ■<. 705

191,410

4,504,4U 1.154.331
2,503.121 1,097,538

Wheat,

Corn,

Oats.

bbls.
78 320
3i,lh>
3. SO
7.175

hush.

bits’i.

207,082
47,375

207,078
200,100
05,212

hush.
123.9 >1

23.500
8,050
41,150
208,400

23.113
13.033

receipts at.

1

18 U17

31.568
59.712

130.336

40.858

O.'i.OOO

105,908

017.157 1,090,933
.589.032 1.123,ISO

same

1881, inclusive, for four

‘Parley,

00,7/9
8.300
3,220
40,7.5-►
25,000
22.5/8

280,70 >

10,000

Total wee k... 134,015
Oor. week ’80.. 30 >.539

Rye,

bush.
45,-73

603.003 177,4U
422,321 200,197

Flour,

Philadelphia.20,173
Baltimore
New Orleans...

922015

B trley.
hush.

grain at seaboard ports for the week

ended Dec. 17:
At-

O its.
hush.
311.922
30
265.993

Rye,

hunk.

hush.
4 9,500

37,390

18,590

2DO

3,200
40,800

1,009

5<)0

1,000

27. *.537 118.090
3*97.010 153,00i>

40.090
38,106

ports from Dec. 27, 1880, to Dec. 17,

years :

1881.

1830.

1879.

1878.

Flour.

bbls.

12,242.393

10,933,230

10.9J3.3l7

VUeat
Corn

bush.

87.920.230
10L.0-11.799
2*5.311,481
G.46 4.907
2,1 uO. 457

127.005,890
137,010,218

1 43,013 837
103,040.70 J

22.905,210
5,774.391
2,710.510

21,029.30.)

6.205,753
4,078.102

102.06 3,109
23.968,323
0,159 431)
5,239.335

223.4.90360

290.106,204

279.773.336

244,8)5.273

Oats

Barley....
Rye
Total

cram

9.GA7,l‘j?
107.373,020

Exports from United States seaboard ports and from Montreal

fot week ending Dec. 17, 1881:
l

From—
New York......
B MtfOJl
Portland
vfoutreai

Flour,
bbls.

Corn,

bush.

bush.

67,251
7,500

562,477

0J5

28,500

2.290
8.178
102

61,753

Philadelphia..
3 tliimotv

New Orleans..
Total tor w'h

Wheat,
18.081

Oa/8,
bush.

1!)0,3 H
145,084
05,212

Ri/c,

Peatt,

bush.

bush.
1,929

074
19

15.000

69.250
2O0

GUO

11,000

••••••

•••••»

'

8 09)51

090.811

48 4.090

1.493

17,529

Same time *89. 173,138

1.798,000

852.475

3,055

10,710 104 921

The visible supply of grain,

comprising the stocks in granary
flats of accumulation at lake aod seaboard
ports, and iu transit by rail and water, Dec. 17, 1881. was as

at the

principal

p

follows i

In surrt at—
New York
Do. afloat (684.)

Albany

,

Bnif.ilo

,

C?hio**o
Milwankee

Wheat,

Com,

Gate,

hush.

bush.

bush.

5,202.421
70 4,000
1.500
668.364

5,703,806
750,000

786,133

9.5,000
350,807

30 5oO

214.000

f.7.000
10,u59
873.538

091.309

3,000

15,705

240.769

98.777

42 613
37.950

15.064

\ 8.9*1

25,167
9"0.0<*0

40.000

1,039.177

200,514

0:?wetfo

6 0.050
175.000

3t. i»ui»..
Boston

80I.6S6
39.039

18.200
190.000
784,914

Misrt’pi.....

176.00 >
328,444

Rye,

bush.
140.497

5,807,080

Toledo

On rail....,

.

bush.
67.574
300,000

8,802,093
398.909

re

Barley,

10, *44
620,1 18

Dninfih

Detroit

58,000

2,031.072
•

.

.

m

*

605,000

243,337

-

.

700,703
54,015
538,674
159.350
142,800
73. 06
010.582
65,000

1.264,000

87.013
101.909

3.523
59.578
60 000

193,234
69.21.0

43,600

0

80.910
3,0-*5
12.030

23,463

35.896

••••••

3.565
-

-

*

0.073
♦ 0

1

*

79 264
8.973
241.331

..

....

-

158.964
18.300

8,071

-V-T

obo

369.000

196,703

48.873

Tot. Deo. 17, *81.. 19,240.598 17,932.263 2,589 090 2.854 627 1.323,911
D.-c. in, ’81
18 503.725 i8.399.904 2.7l:M»17 3.124 205 1.232." Jl
Deo.
3. *81
18.870.127 18.817.521 2.820,045 3,106.974 1.253 216
Nov. 2 i,*8l
19.8 6.2S4 20.634,056 2 912.1>0 4,339,027 1,399.000
N *v. 19, ’81
20.014.386 22.407.097 3.271,731 2,914.319 1,256,2l6
Deo. 18. *80
29.709 268 16,465,265 3,783,061 3.057.731
910.916
#

i

145.049

Rail and lake shipments from same ports for last four weeks:

Down

59.939.105

1«78.

299,731

Barley
Rye
Total

,

for the

570.250
370,35 L
127,209
58,014

844.000

52.153.013
5 *,218,779
20,530.013
7,4 58,306

i

bush.

391,011

24.192,59 5
yi,656,2,17
14,’ 02. 70

179,153.141

166,300

Ktqisas

2,713,104

j

215,185

11.194

3,004,335

192.321.331

3,714,551

124,311

Peoria
r*idianaiH>lls

1878.

4,172,304
3,059,940

bbls.

340.101

1879.

70,115.709
78,589,097
21,424.365
5.309,359

1879

Philadelphia

ports from

:77,393,707

Week
Dzc. 20.

122,394

same

6,003 000

Week
Dee. 19.

170.355

225.042 033

7,303.815

•81.153,075
21,194,079
i 5.531.592
4,0 40.923

30.909.704

*

1«7S.

1880.

Montreal

247.802,267

1879.

Vitek
Dec. 17.

Toronto

3,533.72)

106,322,299

195.974.227

30,229.103
9,851 017
4,909.705

88.813,37 »

3,439,824

6,980.488
2,584,812

....

9 i ,775 0-1

i

Totalfcatri—




1881.

63,289.543
125.479,139

30,034.599
10,109.652
4.078,051

:

Wheat.bush.
CvTQ.....

5,709,763

47.303.051
103.597.755
32.055,030
4.755.982
2,290,759

97.292.990
105.6 0.970

Comparative receipts (crop movement) at
August 1 to Dec. 17, inclusive for foar years:

|

1878

'

Wheat.... .bush.

Bye-.i

1881.

j

*f

Wheat
Corn.....
Chits

85

HI 02

5,328,425

Flour

52

9\ 10
al 15
a 10)

8.391,187

1881.

Barley—
Canaria No 1....
Canada bright...
Slate. 4-ii>wed...
State. ‘2-rowed..,

>

Rail shipments from Western lake and river
ports
weeks ended:

Total

Spring

(Fran the “ New York Fro tucc Ejccfuinye W<itkly.”)

)

*

1880.

1881.

United States in November, 1881, were much smaller than in
November, 18S3. To-day the export demand continued brisk,
but the speculation was easier; No. 2 red winter, §1 42% for

.February and $1 45% for March.
Indian com showed some depression early in the week, but
not so much as wheat, and as prices gave way the speculative
Interest increased, and generally there is no new feature to the
market. To-day the market was firm; No. 2 mixed, C0%c. for
January and 71 Me. for February.
Rye has been quiet, but prices remain about steady. Barley
has ruled steadier, several b*>at loads of No. 1 Canada selling at
$1 10
Barley malt firm. Buckwheat Hour dull.
Oats have declined, but at the reduction there were on Wed¬
nesday and Thursday very active speculations in futures. To¬
day the market was quiet; No. 2 giaded, 4S>2C. for mixed and
49/£c. for white ; and for future delivery, No. 2 mixed 49c. for
February.
The following are closing quotations:

[vol. xxnn.

The following statement, prepared by the Bureau of Statis¬

tics, will show the exports of domestic breadstuffs from the
undermentioned customs districts, during the month of Nov.»
1881, and for the eleven months ended the same, as compared
with the corresponding months of the previous year :

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good many orders for future delivery, and xnorw
activity is likely to be developed in this connection as soon as
jobbers have closed np the transactions of the year. Valued
are steadily maintained on all the most staple goods, and while
jobbers and clothiers are pretty well supplied for the present,
stocks in first hands are remarkably light, deliveries on account
of back orders having for some time past been large enough to
prevent any accumulation worthy of mention.
Domestic Cotton Goods.—There was a comparatively light
business in cotton goods, and the main features of the market
are unchanged.
Some fair orders for white goods, piques,
quilts, skirtings, &c , were placed with agents (for future de¬
livery), and considerable sales of clothing ducks and denims
were made to manufacturers; but otherwise the demand for
plain and colored cottons was strictly moderate, buyers having
paused in their operations because of the near approach of the
“stock-taking” period. Prices, however, are firm and without
quotable change. Print cloths were in moderate demand and
steady at 4e. less a small discount for (54x64 “spots’* aud
3 7-lC@3^c. for 56x69s. There was a fair movement in shirting
prints, but oth^r printed calicoes ruled quiet, aud cotton dress
goods were neglected. Staple ginghams met with fair sales, and
some orders were placed* for dress ginghams, although agents
are not yet prepared to show their new spring styles.
Domestic Woolen Goods —There was a steady movement in
spring cassiineres, suitings and worsted coatings in execution of
back orders, but the amount of new business in these fabrk*
was strictly moderate.
Heavy cassimeres were mostly quiet*
but fair sales < f both all-wool and cotton-warp makes were
made in exceptional cases. Stocks of men*s-wear woolens (bolli
light and heavy) are very well in hand, and values are firmly
maintained as a rule. Cloakings were generally quiet, and
there was a small business in satinets and Kentucky jeans. For
flannels and blankets the demand was chiefly of a hand-tomouth character, and bucIi was the case wkh worsted dress
goods, shawls, skirts, hosiery and knit underwear. Carpets
were mostly qui^t. but firm at the late advance.
Foreign Dry Goods have ruled very quiet with importers, as
usual at this stage of the season, and the jobbing trade was
restricted in volume. The auction rooms made no offerings of
special importance, and the sales for the season have b^en
brought to a close.
i

© 00

©

of dry goods at this port for the week
ending Dec. 22, 18SL and since January 1, and the same facta
for the ccnvupo iding periods of 1880, are as follows:
The importations

QO D ©. 1—

OO 05 —
W 00 — -1

X©X©
—

00 CO

00

—

*

^

a

Importations of Dry Good*.

O'

to

— —

J' 50

rO.

<3

CJ

rfs

CO

1D 1— to ID
c

»ob'b* ib*©.©© £.
© © © © -c :• - i x ©

i

booked

[139
SPJ9S?
»S?S
8?? i f.: ; :

725

THE CHRONICLE.

24,1881.]

December

—

xto

ft

1—03

D

-

r-,

‘Included iii tlie foregoing totals are the reports
New Haveu. l\>ri -tan t, Uioumoud aud Willamette, tlie

1881, being

ae

t—

-Os

Jlilwiitkrc.

iiusuols
Value

Pot'L
land.

New
JIaoen.

Rlthr
tnotui.

Will/PmetU.

r*

3

►—

©)*'-

1

00 (-*

© —‘O’

*3

©

e;

© c x

-

4- O’

© j<

bb

C0*^l ©

v-M
-40

.$

??
£C

CO © 05 W ©

X©

105

Buslielg

1-f —

CO 4*

Iw

w.

« —

rf*.

BuiaUels..

to

„’...$

©

Wheat—

>

S17.928
813,485

L

p?

»
XJ
^

Wheat flour—

152,770

2,^50

$

Total values—,

“M
-ax<-»

I **■©

X-l

o*

© (O'

O'

*©J ©

3),0JJ

0.005
3,747

r»38.010

6^.150

$1,051,007

62.9 vG

47,137
270,774

181,703

152,770 1,084.251)
242,707
43,037

910,741 1,049,124 4^99,565
1,480,244 l,tk>3.u72 2/265,734

'l

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DRY GOODS

TRADE.
M.. December 23,

is

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ESTABLISHED

AMERICAN
FINANCE COMP’Y,
NASSAU ST., NEW YORK,
ST., PHILADELPHIA,

5 A: 7

LIBRARY

Capital Stock,
SOUND

CHICAGO.

BLOCK,

PORTLAND

-

Gwynne & Day,

PROCURED for

Companies having lines under construc¬
and their Bonds purchased or negotiated.

securities.
Interest allowed on

NEGOTIATIONS conducted for
Towns and Cities, and for Railroad
Companies and other Corporations.
WILL CONDUCT THE FINANCIAL RE-OR¬
GANIZATION of Railroad Compan'es and other
Corporations whose property is in the hands of
Receivers or Trustees.
WILL BUY ANI) SELL
ITIES on

Cotnrais-don.

WILL BUY OR

STOCKS AND

COMMISSION.

plication.
JOII\
JDI1N

C.
C.

Farmer,

W.

W.

LOUISIANA.

MONROE,

50

Railroad Stocks and Ronds,
GOVERNMENTS A FOREIGN EXCHANGE.

Fi fsi cl ass Inv stments.
COMMISSION BROKER

AND

BANKER

OR 27

BROAD

No. 5

J

& CO.,

Vo

WALL STREET,

llltITIKS.

W.'FKKfciVr SIS

A

WASHINGTON, D. C

^

All
and sold on Commission.
Private Telegraph Wires to Philadelphia,
ton, Baltimore, Washington,
and New Haven.

Frank B. Beers,

Business

General Banking

STOCKS,

LOCAL

or on

always in

J. Kimball
8c Co.,
BROKERS,

R.
desirable bonds

hand.

BANKERS AND

Years’

Thirteen

solicited.

Street, New Yo k.
Membership in New York Stock

25 Nassau

No.

Con espondence

.

of

assortment

An

Exchange.

A. b. Lounsbeiiy, F. E. Ballard
Members of N. Y. Stock Exchange.

R.J. Kimball,

ADDRESS:

,

A. W.

BROADWAY. NEW

«6

J. S.
J

YORK.

STANTON,
DEALER IN

Company,

Cable Construction
Continental Constiuction and
American

Improvement Co.,
| North River Construction Company,
\ OhioCentr.il Subscriptions,
Richmond & We t Pt. Terminal & W’housing Co.
New York, Chicago & St. Louis Subscription, and
•

quotable Construction

all other

17

Stocks.

NASSUJSTKEET,

BASEMENT.

j

INVESTMENT As
^

TUI

YORK:

NEW

Beasley 8c Co.,

SECURITY IlEGIS-

M. to 4 P. M.
contract sys¬
and Unlisted
Securities, on a margin of one or more per cent as
agreed upon between buyers and sellers direct, and
at
reduced expense for brokerage. Contracts for
not less than 100 shares. Margins deposited
in
Tru6t Company.
JOHN L. HOBSON, Secretary

from 9 A.
HUKSDaY, Dec. 1,
dealings under the co-operanve
tem, in all active stocks. Investment
for

WEST THIRD

69

flN£ §T.

Purchase and sell on

-

IfcuuYORK

Commission

DEPOSITS, subject to check.




BANKERS AND

and sell.on commission all Securities dealt in
New York Stock and the New York Mining
Exchanges. Deposits received and interest
Buy

it the
on

allowed

balances.

Hatch,

Wm. B.

(KcvibaM,

Boardman,

No.

80

BROKER,

BROADWAY, Rooms 37
Office, Troy, N. Y..

& 38.

Fisk & Hatch.

Refer to Messrs.
Georgb

John f.

Stark.

George

Stark 8c Co.,

STREET, NEW YORK.
Buy and sell Investment Securities foi cash or on
commission. A specialty made of Western Farm
Mortgages bearing from 7 to 10 per cent interest.
Will undertake the negotiation of loans upen
33 NASSAU

No.

Western City

property in large or

small amounts.

Branch

Connected by Private

Wire.

dealt in at the New York Stock
and sold on commission and car¬
ried on a fair margin.
\.
INTEREST allowed on credit balances.
ALL securities
Exchange bought

H. Prentiss,

Geo.
No.

17

WALL

STREET, NEW YORK.

GAS STOCKS

GAS
STREET

RAILROAD STOCKS AND

BROOKLYN

KINDS OF

SECURITIES

DEALT
BEE GAS

BONDS

IN.

QUOTATIONS IN THIS PAPER.

William

Robison,

Exchange.

N. Y. Stock

Floyd-Jones 8cBROKERS,
Robison,
BANKERS AND

EXCHANGE

2

No.

COURT.

Bonds and all Investment
bought and sold [strictly on
Stocks,

margin.

City «fc Town

Bond* ot West. States*

Wisconsin Central Rtt. Old Land
St. Joseph & Western RR. Stock.
St.

Securities

commission] for cash

/bounty,

SECURITIES,
AND ALL

W. C. Floy d-Jones
Members of the

or on

AND

Stark.

BANKERS,

sell—on

and Miscellaneous

STOCK

WALL STREET,

O. BANKERS AND BROKERS,

STREET, NEW YORK.

Lansdale

Kkndall.

Stock Exch.

No. 31

commission—Government, Rail
Securities. Receive deposits
subject to check, and allow interest on balances.
Buy and

way

BROKERS,

New York.

3 Pixie Street,

w. c. McKean
Stock Exch’ge

and

paid on

Clark 8c Bacon,

Member N. Y.

Lloyd fit McKean,
34 WALL

GOVERNMENT

RAILROAD BONDS and STOCKS, and all
classes of Securities dealt in at the NEW YORK
STOCK BXCRANGE, or all reputable Securities
bought and sold in the OPEN MARKET. LOANS
and COMMERCIAL PAPER negotiated. Interest

H. B. Bacox

Clark

Alkx. s.

STREET

New York.

Brooklyn.

Member of N. Y.

(oLLijtfS.pouDEN SJen^ins,
25

YORK,

ST., CINCINNATI,

P. Lloyd.

Joseph

a

-BOrtKERS*

31 PINE

STREET,

COURT

16

BANKERS

BROADWAY, NEW

SECURITIES,

GAS

cKoXch Sc
Cecil,Zimmerman
8c
Co.
AND BROKERS,
74

BONDS,

MUNICIPAL

Wm. D.

W. P. Thomas.
W. M. Wilshire.

Ex.

Member N.Y. Stock
M. Zimmerman.

EXCHANGE.

(LIMITED.)
INCORPORATED, 1881.
40 NEW STREET, NEW YORK.
This Exchange will be opened on and after

CINCINNATI, O.:

Geo. W. Cecil,

Whitely,

BROADWAY, NKW YORK,
(Branch Office, 180 Fifth Avenue).
classes of Railway and Mining Stocks bought
64

Wilming¬
Boston, Bridgeport

Exchange.

Transacted.
Securities
bought
and
sold
on
commission
for cash
CORKESPO'DENC3 PROMPTLY A'i TEND 1 D TO.
margin.
JAMES
M T (i H E N ,
Advances made on approved collateral at the
market rate.
70 CEDAR STREET,
Deposits received subject to check at sight.
P. O. BOX 3413.
NEW YORK.
4 per cent interest allowed on all daily balances.
Orders executed at London, San Francisco, Bos
ton, Philadelphia and Baltimore Exchanges.
P. 8.—My New York Weekly Financial Report is
nisiled free of charge on application.
I WEST JI EAT SECURITIES.

IN U

I>. Prince, Jas. Whitkly, h. cuugeroaklet
Harry c. Logan,
Maynard C. Evre.
W. R. Travers, Special Partner.

Prince 8c

BROKER,

Office:

Branch

BATEMAN

Otto C. Wierum.

N. Y. Stock

Member of the

daily balances.
by mail or tele¬

graph.

YORK.

NEW

BROADWAY,

Exchange.
Interest allowed on
Particular attention paid to orders

Trowbridge,

F.

F.

Practices in the District,
Courts of the United States and
all classes of cases. Has no other
votes his personal attention and
sively to li;s profession. Refers to

Walker,

BKOKERS,
N"W YORK.
Buy and Sell on Commission, for cash or oh mar¬
gin. all Securities dealt in at the New York Stock

Brokers in

Exchange.

w. N. Walker.

4 IV D

BANKERS
No. 80

EXCHANGE PLACE,

CnAs. K. Randall,
Alember N, Y. stock

Exchange.

Rutter 8c

Randall & Wierum,

K*

Y. Stock Exchange.

Member of N.

C. M. Rutter,
Member of N. Y. Stock

NEW YORK,

STREET,

WALL

15

No.

.

N. Y. Stock Exchange.

SCHMIDT,

EDMUND P.

BROKERS,

Solicitor and Attorney.
Circuit and Supreme
of tiie State, in
business and de¬
all his time exclu¬
Bank of Monroe.

Conus lor,

Member of

Schley,

Groesbeck &

President.

NEW. Vice-President.
WATSON, Scc’y and Trea*.

P.

Win

SHORT,

investments.
furnished on ap¬

BROKERS FOR THE PURCHASE AND
SALE OF RAILROAD SECURITIES.
CORNELIUS W. OLLIFFE,

Members N.

INVESTMENT SECUR¬

convert them into interest-paying
Circulars and other information

SOLD ON

Grant b. Schley,
Groesbkck,
Y. Stock Exchange

Ernest

BROADWAY & No. 13 NEW ST.,

No. 72

BONDS BOUGHT AND

Bonds on Margin
Report issued weekly to our

OlIilTe fit Schmidt,

JYEIF YORK.

DEFAULTED BONDS or

SELL

Complete Financial
correspondents

NEW STREET,

BROADWAY AND 19

conducted in the

commission business
purchase and sale of Stocks and
or for investment.
A strictly

BROKERS,

BANKERS AND

8tates, Counties.

Y STOCK EXCHANGE.

MEMBERS OF THE N.

deposits.

BOYDS,

AND

STOCKS

Glazier, Kohn & Co.,
66

BROAD ST., NEW YORK,

No. 2*

carefully attended to.

Investments

Railroad

FINANCIAL

Coleman Benedict 8c Co.

No. 45 Wall Street
Transact a general banking and brokerage busi¬
ness In Railway Shares and Bonds and Government

furnished

Corporate und Private Investors.
CAPITAL FURNISHED OR

1864.

[Established 1854.]

§1.000,000

-

INVESTMENT SECURITIES

to

tion,

Financial.

Financial.

Financial.

434

[Vou XXXIII.

CHRONICLE.

THE

726

Joseph & Pacific HR.

City of St.

Cable Co.

Subscriptions.

RK. Securities.

Subscriptions.

of N. J. Securities.
Trunk RR. Securities.
Carolina RR Securities.

Midland Railroad
Chicago

8outh

Bonds.

Improvement Co.

Brooklyn Elevated
American

Bonds;

Joseph, Mo., Old

International

Grant Bonds.

& Grand

light by WM.
No. 31 PINE

it. irxuuaw*

_

STREET£NEWr Y ORE