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ante’ fectte, (Stommcwfal $imc$i,
1

A

-

|tailwat} ponitoy, and Bfnsnminc* journal.

WEEKLY

f

NEWSPAPER,

REPRESENTING THE INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

VOL. I.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1865.
CONTENTS.

ing

v
THE CHRONICLE.
The
The

Proposed New Loan
Supply of Cotton

257
253

Southern Reconstruction and the
National Debt
Commercial Facilities with the
West—Canals vs. Railways

,

The

259

260

261

Example of Ohio—Her Debts

and Taxation

262

Foreign Intelligence
Commercial
News

and.

264
Miscellaneous
265

THE BANKERS GAZETTE AND COMMERCIAL TIMES.

272
272-73

266

Dry Goods Trade

274.
275
276

Exchange

270

National, State, etc., Securities...

271

Prices Current and Tone of th®
Market

27S

tional Banks, etc
Sale Prices N. Y. Stock

Bread-stuffs

THE RAILWAY MONITOR AND INSURANCE JOURNAL.

Epitome of Railway News.
Railroad, Canal, and Miscellaneous

231
232-83

Bond List

Railway, Canal, etc., Stock List...

234

Postages to Foreign Countries....

285
286

Insurance and Mining Journal....

INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS.

Steamships

Ocean

= 287

| Bank Announcements, etc.

288

of sound government finance.
Now it is obvious that the general

principle is a good one
converting a portion of the shorter obligations of the
government into bonds having a longer time to run. But
of

$l)e CfjrontcU.

on

The Commercial
1

For

and

Financial Chronicle is issued every

the other hand

we

Satur-

cannot believe that any

government

day morning ivith the latest news by mail and telegraph up to negotiation of ten-forties is desirable at 93 or 94, which is
midnight of Friday. A Daily Bulletin is issued every morning their present market price without interest. The 172 millions
with all the Commercial and Financial neios of the previous
day of these five per cent gold bearing bonds which are now out
up to the hour of publication.
were taken last
year as a war loan at par, and it would be
TEEMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
equally mischievous to the public credit, and unjust to the
The Commercial and -Financial Chronicle, with The Daily
patriotic subscribers, if, with peace restored, we offered to
Bulletin, delivered by carriers to city subscribers, and mailed to all

others
$12 00
For The Commercial and Financial Chronicle, without The Daily
Bulletin
N
10 00
For The Daily Bulletin, without The Commercial and Financial
-

..

Chronicle

4 00

WILLIAM B. DANA &

OO., Publishers,
{Chronicle Buildings,)

Samuel Anable Staats,
GENERAL SUBSCRIPTION AGENT FOR THE U. S.

si
The

60 William Street, New York.

THE PROPOSED NEW LOAN.
is current that

fifty million loan is about
offered for public subscription. Influential persons have
certainly utged such a loan on the Secretary of the Treasury,
but as he is not in immediate want of
funds, and is supplied
by the Internal Revenue with more than one million of dol¬
lars a day, it seems doubtful whether he could be induced to
yield to the pressure, even were there no special difficulties
in the way. We understand the
proposal is to issue fifty millions
of ten-forty five
per cent bonds, and to receive in payment at
par and interest the compound interest legal tender notes.
The arguments in favor of this
project are that it would con¬
vert a short
government obligation into a long one; that
more ten-forties are wanted
by the national banks as a
security for the circulation; that the payment in compound
interest notes would diminish the
currency and check infla¬
tion ; and that the loan could be
negotiated without product
to be

i

any spasm

the outbreak of the Ketchum

•

Commercial Epitome
Exports and Imports
Cotton Trade

Money Market, Railway Stocks, U.
S. Securities, Gold Market, For¬
eign Exchange, New York City
Banks, Philadelphia Banks, Na¬

.

in the money market. It is also claimed that
panic, things were in such a
train that a loan of fifty millions on terms such as we have
stated was on the eve of being announced; and would have
been speedily followed, if successful, by a seconds loan of
equal or greater amount.
g
Now we do not wish to give too much credit to these
vague rumors; but as they have produced a certain im¬
pression in Wall street, and have raised the prices of com¬
pound interest notes while depressing the price of the tenforties, we propose to enquire how far such a loan as the one
proposed is required by the National Treasury, conducive to
the best interests of the country, and
agreeable to the laws
at

Revival of Southern Manufactures

NO. 9.

!




rumor

a new

sell similar bonds at
erous

forms

of

our

so

much lower

a

rate.

When the

federal securities become,

num¬

consolidated,

it is

probable that these very ten-forty bonds now so unpop¬
so much
depressed below their relative value, will
be the most widely held, and will form the nucleus of the
permanent funded debt of this country. However this may
ular and

be, it is believed that the whole National Debt will event¬
ually be funded at a rate of interest not above 5 per cent,
and that a long 5 per cent bond of the United States will
again be worth par, even after we have resumed specie pay¬
ments.
The necessity ought to be very clear and
impera¬
tive which, in face of these facts, would
justify Mr/ McCul¬
loch in offering ten-forties at 6@7
per cent discount;
But there is no immediate pressure on the
Treasury nor any
anticipated embarrassment from these compound interest
notes.
Of the 212 millions outstanding none have run half
their term, and the greater
part will not mature for almost
two years.
Hence no trouble can at present arise from them.
And judging from-the immense popularity of our federal se¬
curities both at home and abroad, we shall be in £.
position
before two years have passed, to fund these notes on better
terms than if we
exchanged them now, either for five per
cent or six per cent bonds.
So far, then, the project of fund¬
ing these compound interest notes does not seem necessary

258

THE CHRONICLE.

or

desirable.

to

the extent of 150 millions of dollars

Let

[August 26,1866.

THE SUPPLY OF COTTON. ‘
enquire whether, as is claimed, the
The interruption to the normal movements of
project would conduce to a contraction of the currency.
cotton, and
It is no doubt true that fifty or one hundred millions of the
changes in the extent of its culture, occasioned by the
compound interest notes could be withdrawn from the hands ! late war, have upset all the calculations of business men as
of the public without creating much derangement in the cur¬ to the
probable supply of that staple. Enormous speculation*
have in consequence' been induced, and
rency or trouble in the money market.
For the older notes
many have lost, and
us now

have almost ceased

many gained large fortunes by them.
On the 1st of March
held for investment at a premium. last the price of cotton in this market was 90 cents. On the
perform the functions of a circu¬ 15th it had fallen to 55 cents. This, of course, was the re¬
lating medium, these notes do not exert any inlluence to in¬ sult of the brilliant victories near Richmond, then both
flate prices.
And as they gradually lose the attributes of achieved and anticipated. The price of cotton continued to
paper money and become transmuted into an interest-bear¬ maintain itself at about this figure until it became known
in
ing investment, they tend to produce a contraction of the vol¬ official circles that the President intended to publish a
pro¬
ume of the circulation.
Indeed this very power of - con¬ clamation
removing all existing restrictions upon its sale
tracting the currency by gentle imperceptible degrees was and transfer, when it slowly fell, until the publication of the
one of the chief reasons
why compound interest legal tenders proclamation itself. It then fell quickly, and at one time
were authorized in the loan acts
of 3rd March, 18(13, and touched 40 certs. '
30th June, 1864.
It was then claimed that as the interest
That these great mutations in
price have not been owing
on the notes accumulated,
they would withdraw from active to corresponding changes in the value of the
currency is a
-circulation, and would be locked up in the vaults of the banks fact evident to every body ; for since the date of Lee’s
sur¬
or in the coders of individuals.
Coming out in cases of strin¬ render (April 7) the premium on gold has scarcely
changed
gency only, they were to act as a safeguard against sudden at all. Temporary fluctuations have at times
oecurred, it is
spasms and panics during our slow, painful and diffi¬ true, but as these fluctuations were not
accompanied by cor¬
cult progress towards a
healthy currency and a re¬ responding changes in the price of cotton, it is fair to infer
sumption of specie payments.. This skilfully contrived that they had little or no effect
upon it.
On the 7th of
machinery for contracting the volume of paper money, April, after the news of Lee’s surrender had been
received,
it was supposed, would be
sufficiently elastic and pow_ j the price of gold was 147 3-4. It has ranged
during the preerful in its operations to meet all the
trying and deli j sent week, from 143 to 144 1-2. During the same
period
cate exigencies of the case. And, it must be
confessed, that up j the fluctuation in cotton has been enormous. *
to the present moment the plan seems to
These fluctuations are, therefore, to be
bp working admir¬
mainly attributed
ably. The late fall in gold, though largely due to other to the actual or anticipated
supply of the article itself, the
causes, was in part'produced and continued by the fact that demand
always being a matter of very easy and safe calcula¬
one hundred and
fifty millions of our paper currency have tion as regards American cotton..
gradually ceased to perform many of their functions as paper
The supply of cotton is, therefore, the
question to be ex¬
money, and are almost as inoperative to inflate prices or to amined.
In 1850 the total amount of
promote undue speculation as the funded debt itself. If Mr.
ginned cotton raised in the
Chase, urged on by the pressure of necessity, left us an in¬ United States was 2,445,793 bales of 400 pounds each.
flated currency as a monument of his administration, it
In 1860 the total amount of
must
ginned cotton raised in the
be remembered that he also left us this
United States was 5,387,052 bales of 400 lbs=.
powerful and exquisite¬
each, or
ly contrived financial machinery for so calling in our redun¬ 2,154,S20,S00 pounds; This was the yearly
crop. As the
dant currency as to avert many of the mischiefs with
which, war did not begin until the following spring it is fair to infer
in other countries, all former methods of contraction have in¬ that the
crop of 1861 exceeded that of the previous year in
variably been attended.
accordance with the ratio of increase which had existed from
Moreover, it is easy to see that by calling in this trans¬ 1850 to 1860. This would have made the
crop of 1861 in
muted currency, and placing it in the
Treasury, we should round numbers about 6,500,000 bales.
not only fail
From this time forward each successive
^to diminish the amount of active currency
crop steadily di¬
afloat, but we should probably increase it. : For the loan act minished. The Southerners could not
carry on the war with
of 3d March, 1865, allows the issue of
compound interest j cotton unless they could exchange it for other things—muni,
notes to an amount
equal to those'withdrawn. On the very ; tions of war, clothing and provisions. But this, the effective
first exigency, the National
Treasury would avail itself of j blockade maintained by our cruisers, forbade, and with the
this privilege.
New legal tenders would be issued, and the j exception of the comparatively few cargoes run out
by small
new notes,
though bearing interest, would of course act for j and swift blockade runners, and the further exception of such
some time as active
currency. To absorb fifty millions of j of the staple as managed to find its way
into Mexico or up
inert compound interest notes
would, therefore, make room j the Mississippi, or through the military lines in the border
for the early addition of
fifty millions to the active circula-1 states, the great crop of the South was
obliged to remain
tion of the country ; and the result would therefore be an
j stored at home. This, of course, gradually put a stop to its
aggravation ot the evils of our paper money, instead of a j further production, while as a further
Consequence it became
remedy for those evils.
necessary for the Southerners to turn their attention to the
We conclude, therefore, that it is undesirable at
present cultivation of commodities more immediately needed, and
to
attempt to tund the compound interest notes, and j capable of being
directly used by their people,
especially undesirable to exchange them for the ten-forty five j
The cotton crop of 1864 is estimated at 1,500,000 bales,
per cent bonds.
YY hen Mr. McCulloch wants means, he could
j If this be accepted as true, the crop of 1862 and 1863 must
with ease negotiate fifty millions
of certificates of indebtedness, j have been respectively about 4,800,000 and
3,100,000 bales,
which are scarce and wanted.
But if the National banks We have thus the
following total product during the war:
want bonds as
security for their notes, there are six hundred Product of 1861..
6,500,000 bale*.
1862
millions of five-twenties, which are the bonds
4,800,000 “
originally in¬
1863
8,100,000 “
tended for the purpose, and are much the best
1864
j
adapted to give
1,500.000 “
the requisite security to the public.
Total product during the war.15,900,000 bale*




to

pass as money, and are
Now so far as they do not

-

..

“

“

“

“

“

“

.

....

V

August 26, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Now, how much of this found its way out of the South,

259

began to find its way to market in abundance. This unlookedUndoubtedly a very
supply was swelled by the large seizures of cotton made
at Savannah,
large portion. Enough, however, remains, we think, to keep
Charleston, &c., by Gen. Sherman, and the out¬
the markets-of the world supplied for some time.
If it be de¬ going ports soon began to be filled with cotton awaiting ship¬
nied that the crop of 1804 amounted to 1,500,000 bales,.then ment.
let us assurhe that it amounted to nothing at all.
The following is a
In that
summary of late exports foreign and
case, according to the law of progression the total product coastwise from New Orleans :
For the week ending
during the war, would sum up as follows :
Bales.
was

desroyed, it is impossible to

or

for

say.

•

.

Product of 1861
«

“

«

“

I

1862

18S3

“

“

June 16. 1865

6,500,000 bales.
4,300,000

“

2,200,000

1864

23',

“

80,

Total

7,

13,000,000 bales.

war

Assuming that the whole product of 1860

“

8,6i8
10,366

u

14,
21,
28,

“

product during the

«<
u

July
“

8,718
4,340

«

«

8348

«

12,962

a

Aug. 4,
10^910
successfully
11.
8,810
exported before the blockade was enforced ; and allowing for
the most liberal estimates of shipments, both open and secret,
Total for nine weeks
72,572
The following table exhibits the
by sea and by land during the war, a considerable portion,
exports from New York
perhaps an entire fourth of these aggregated crops of cotton during the months of May, June and July:
must yet bedridden in remote places* or remained buried in
May, ’65. June, ’65. July, ’65.
564
Exports of cotton, bales
4,912
10,340
underground caches throughout the South.
The stock on hand in New Orleans at successive dates was
The following statistics of stock on hand, importations and
consumption of American cotton in Europe during the years as follows :
Date.
Bales.
Date.
Bales.
186*2, 1863 and 1864, will furnish a practical guide to the June 16, 1865
17,259 July, 26, 1865
63,845
reader of the amounts that escaped one way or another dur-- July 6, “
.24,968
57,505
Aug. 1, “
20, “
40,825
17, “
88,000
those years from the South :
1862
1S63
1864
At the latest dates this accumulation was
increasing, for
Stock on hand Jan. 1
Bales
434,000
88,000
42,000
limited as are the means of conveyance from the interior of
Imported to 81st Dec. into:
the South to the shipping
ports, the means of conveyance
Great Britain
72,000
132,000
198,000
from the latter to the north and to
France
24,000
8,000
Europe are still more
15,000
Holland
11,000
10,000
The stocks at the various
9,000 limited.
shipping ports stood
1,000
Belgium
1,000
Was

“

*,

a

*

.........

'

,

“

“

,

•

Germany

5,000

Trieste
Genoa

Spain

li,000

6,000

i.

%..■

•

*

•

thus at

1,000
6,000

Bales.

12,000

132,000
38,000

168,000
19,000

241,000
21,000

•

•

•

shipments

Total imports into Europe
Add stock from above

Total supply
Deduct stock 31st Dec
Total deliveries

94,000

434,000

528,000

149,000
88,000

88,000

237,000
42,000

262,000
24,000

440,000

195,000

238,000

|

Turning from the consideration of what crop of cotton renow on hand
throughout the South, to the consideration of the probable future crop, candor compels us
to avow
that the prospect looks anything but
flattering. Involved in
this question is the much debated theme of
negro labor, and
this we have neither space nor inclination to enter
upon. But
mains

hand aod

Mobile,

on

New York, stock....,
Other ports, stock

“

“

Total

It is looked upon

shipboard
“

‘

88,000
65,000
85,000
45,000

283,000

by

some as

significant of future large

of cotton* that the stock at a recent date on hand and
shipboard at New Orleans should have been greater
than it has ever been before at a
corresponding period of
the year.
For example the stock on hand and on shipboard
at New Orleans
August 10 was as follows:
crops

on

Bales.

1865
1861.
1860.
1859.

81,568
9,865
54,158
31,411
34,584

1857.

But this

nothing more than that after being pent up
by blockade, war and other restrictions, cot¬
ton is now
The ne¬
coming to market at an unusual rate.
cessities of the southerners
compel them to sell, but that
they will not sell after tlie most pressing of these necessities
are relieved, unless
they obtain a price for their staple com¬
mensurate with the
prevailing fears that cotton culture is for
the most part ended in this country, is an
opinion entertain¬
ed by very many persons.
The southern goose is now
apparently laying the last of
its golden eggs, and a combination of
capitalists wealthy
enough to buy them all, and hold them for a time, would
undoubtedly realize a large profit from the operation.
means

for four years

apprehend that the culture of cotton in this country, un¬
less revolutionized by the introduction of suitable labor-saying machinery, will not soon be as extensive as it has
been.
f
The present ample supply of cotton would,
therefore, ap¬
pear to be but a temporary one, and the heavy arrivals we
have lately witnessed, would seem
destined, sooner or later,
to fall off
very seriously.
Before the executive proclamations of last
May and June,
removing all restrictions from cotton and cotton traffic were
promulgated, the supply of cotton at New Orleans, the great
receiving and Shipping port of the South, was limited to a
\
few thousand bales. Cotton found in the hands of “
=■— j
i
disloyal ”
persons was not only liable to immediate confiscation, but it SOUTHERN RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NATIONAL COMMERCE.
had to be sold to, and
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle has, and can
repurchased from, government agents
before it could make its
way to market.
In addition to this have nothing to do with political questions, in any of their
it was liable
j to a heavy export duty, levied by military partisan or sectional aspects. It is only where the move¬
order, and to hospital fees, and a variety of other charges, ments and the policy of parties are
directly connected with,
which alone amounted to as much as the
and have a positive and vital bearing upon the
staple was worth
great perman¬
before the war,
1 ent material interests of the country that it becomes our
we

.

on

“

220,000
42,000

Orleans,

“

•

“

Deduct internal

recent date:

At New

•

1,000
18,000

a

All these forfeitures and restrictions

were

President Johnson, and cotton for the first




abolished

time since

by duty to consider them, and to point out their tendencies to
1860 evil or to^good, according to the best
light that is in us.

v.




THE

260

possible, therefore, now to regard the political
re-adjustments of Southern society as less than vitally im¬
portant to the material prosperity of the whole nation, we
should be content to keep ourselves clear of the battle of;
opinions and passions over these re-adjustments. But this it I
is not possible to do. •
The way in which the Southern communities shall be dealt
|
with by the Federal government will exert a direct and de- j
cisive influence upon the immediate financial and cornmer-1
cial future of the republic.
Our .national finances have been
strained, we will not sav, to their extreme point of ten-j
sion, but painfully near to that point, by the war. The ;
system of taxation adopted by the late Congress is admitted j
on all hands to
be inadequate to our necessities, and ill-1
adapted to the genius and condition of our people. Our na-;
tional currency is in such a condition that prudent cornmerj
Were it

„

cial

undertake the revival of

[August 26, 1865.

CHRONICLE
would

eventually result from interference with these limi.

tations.

The negroes

being free, and making so considerable

a

part as they do of Southern society, it will be impossible
for the Southern people to deal unfairly or injudiciously

by them without serious losses and grave social disorders

bearing directly and retributively upon the whole fabric of
The power of the Union having broken down the false relation of master and slave,

Southern industry and wealth.

the true relations of the negro with the white citizen must be
left to adjust themselves, for no external force whatever can
possibly adjust them on any permanent reciprocally advan-

tageous and really equitable basis.

Meanwhile, whatever tends to revive the flow of capital
and to develop the markets, of industry at the South will tend

immediately to advance the real self-adjustment of all

social

j questions at the South. Whatever, on the other hand, tends
prevailed before the war, until the j to retard this return of health to the financial and cornmerelements of fresh enterprise shall be clearly seen to be com- j cial systems of the South, will tend inevitably11 to retard also
ing into existence and to be not remotely available.
;
j this real self-adjustment of all social questions.
men

cannot venture to

merce on a

scale such

our com-

as

question, therefore, which, as practical men, the ad-1 The. objections, therefore, which a just concern for the finanministrators of our public affairs have to settle, at this mo-;
an'-l commercial interests of both sections ot the country
ment, as it seems to us, is not the ideally desirable in the j, suo&es^s? t0 Lhe policy of a continued military domination,
way of reconstructing Southern society, but the really
ancl °f a sweeping confiscation at the South, apply quite as
ticable in the way of remitting the Southern communities j strongly to; that policy when viewed from its strictly politicat the earliest possible day to their normal relations of
j
or philanthropic aspects. ^
production and consumption with the rest of the republic. j
There can be no way so sure to make the late rebels of the
The

prac-1

! South lo-val men and 8'ood citizens as to turn their
j 10 the Pursnits of Peace’ a,ld the ^cumulation of wealth,
! And 110 one who cares for th® future of the negro race can 4
believe; nor, indeed, does it seem to be pretended that this 1 vise any Plan fof their Prote6tion alld improvement at dl
is the case, even by those who most eagerly
urge upon the | comparable to the legitimate action of the liberated interests
President modification of the very opposite policy which
| tdie sec<don *n which the) live,
That

protracted military occupation of the South, and
sweeping measures of confiscation are necessary to keep the
public peace in that region of the country we Cannot easily
a

a

he is well understood to favor.

COMMERCIAL FACILITIES WITH THE WEST—CANALS

The Southern

vs.

RAIL-

people would be unlike every other people
ROADS.
in the world if, after their crushing defeat in such a war as
The recent Commercial Convention at Detroit, manifestly,
they have just waged, and the complete disbanding of their
has rendered incidentally, at least, great public service. Its
organized forces, they could really be planning any other
convocation was itself an evidence that our men of business
policy just now than a policy of recuperation. It is, we think,
were aroused to the
importance of improved facilities of
plain that if they are suffered to reorganize socially, the
transportation. The four hundred delegates of the Boards of
Southern States will, for some time to come, treat
purely j
Trade,; and other commercial organizations of the United
political questions as secondary merely, and will devote them-!i
States and British Provinces, who assembled in July, were
selves to economical and industrial issues.
A
very
J

j.

.

,

r

.

o-eneral

C3

possessed of invaluable experience, the results of which they

c

■

disposition seems to exist among them to accept the extinc-! f
r
I hrv
had come Thirhnr* to chnro with each other.
thither to share with
The requiretion of slavery by the war as a “ fixed fact,”
or, as Earl Rus¬
I merits of the West, and of the States on the seaboard, the
sell phrases it, a “ finality.”
As for the right of secession j
J obtaining of stable markets, and of access to them, constituthat has been settled beyond peradventure, and no man
really
| ted the topics of their discussion.
meaning that his words shall have weight, either at the North
Of the transactions of the Convention itself, we have less
or at the
South, so much as wastes his time over it.
need to speak.
They were more Normal, and at the same
What objections, then, can be reasonably made to the
j time, less conclusive than the unrecorded utterances of the
President’s well-understood projects of speedy conciliation, to
j members. The speech of the eloquent and statesmanlike
,

A

non

paiyid

^

noon

ntnor

,

,

be advanced and attended by the return of the conciliated
States to their place in the legislation of the Union ?

So far

have yet

j President, General Hiram
Walbridge, delivered at the close

j of the

proceedings, indicated this. The convention, he de

been informed, the most powerful | dared, had accomplished much that was gratifying, and the
plea urged against these projects is the assertion that the* earnestness of purpose which characterised the delegates,
Southern people are not fainy disposed towards the
negro ! promised auspiciously for the future of our country,
population, which we have emancipated without their assent, i
The policy of the State of New York, it must be insisted,
and by force of arms.
It is undoubtedly proper that the has always been to promote the trade and interests of the
National government should prevent, so far as in it lies, the West.
Waiving that most wholesome principle that inter
infliction of injustice by one class of citizens in a State
nal improvements are not within the
upon
province of govern
another.
But the limitations, both of the
right and of the ment, the Legislature in 1817 entered upon the canal policy;
power of the National government in this direction, are clear but the time has gone by for the State of New York or the
and well-defined; they were established not
hastily, but United States, to construct works of internal improvement
after grave consideration by the founders of the
republic; and for purely commercial purposes. Whatever good reasons
it seems to us that there is
nothing, either in the history of existed half a century ago, when private wealth was less able
our
country or in the principles of progressive economical to engage in these enterprises, have certainly been since ,
science, to warrant the expectation that anything but evil obviated, Experience has shown that such undertakings are;.
as we

r; \
.

:r.

Y

■

\

j

,

•

V*VA. A- AAa'-'Vy-v
-

f£:

August 26j, 1865.]

261

THE CHRONICLE.
of the

Empire State will be no way behindhand in enter¬
useful and remunerative when in the hands of indivi¬
duals. Important as the trade of the West is to the com¬ prise, The City of New York is destined to remain the
mercial metropolis of New York the people of the State j emporium of commerce, and capitalists will not be backwill never consent to pay a tax of two or three millions of j ward in establishing all the lines of steamships necessary for
dollars a year to retain it and support the canals. The relief, j the carrying trade, to ply between this place and the other
if any is required, must come, we insist, from private enter- principal parts of the world.
r
m0re

prjse>

J4

canals already in existence in this State and the Bri-1
tish Provinces are ample for many times the amount ofj

The present Comptroller of this State, Hon. Lucius Rob-

member of the Assembly, in his celebrated
speech against the x>ro -rata freight bill of I860, enunciated
transportation Required 0f them. The favorite idea of some j the true doctrine in relation to this matter. “ Legislate as
business men that a ship canal is required, with capacity of| much as we may,” said he, “the trade will go where it can
bearing ships of fifteen hundred tons burthen, is chimerical, j go the quickest and cheapest. In doing so it obeys the laws
Only for a part of the year would such a canal be navigable, of trade, which are higher than any that we can make. Let
not forget that we live in a progressive and fast age and
It would fail of the very proper transporting commodities be¬
Commercial enterprise is running its competing
tween the Western States and Europe without breaking bulk. country.
lines all over the globe.
Railways are supplanting canals.
That season i of the year when there is the most occa¬
sion for hastening produce to market, canals, lakes and rivers Perhaps the brain is even now at work which is, to invent
are closed with ice.
We cannot expect government to ex¬ some power to take the place of railways. We can no more
pend resource# in this direction ; inevitable failure will be the stop or regulate these things than we can change the course
reward of suefy endeavors to divert trade from its legitimate ! of the planets.”
The

inson, when

a

us

outlets.

Besides, commerce demands sure and rapid agencies

for

Whatever may have been the feeling entertained by the
men tnat controlled the action of the late
convention at

of the opinion that the managers o£ our
natural avenues, and our railway corporations must give the principal railroads were impelled by it to redouble their
matter attention.
The New York Central Railroad Com¬ energy and efforts to provide the increased facilities for
transportation which were so authoritatively demanded. -The
pany has already taken the initiative, with their usual saga¬
stimulus thus given to trade, and thereby to productive
city and energy, proposing to open a continuous line of travel

transportation.

It also must be permitted to follow-its more Detroit,

we

are

transportation between the cities of New York and Cin- j industry, will be too beneficial to warrant any resentment,
cinati. A western journal gives the following details of the j for whatever unpleasant feeling may have existed and found
utterance in the speechef and resolutions of that convention.
project:
and

On Monday, the 18th of August, the leading officers of the New
York Central Railroad Company, with a number of Eastern Capitalists
“

passed through Urbana for Dayton and Cincinnati, with a view to select
a route for a through liue West, connecting at Buffalo with the Central.
result of this visit has been the selection of
and Toledo, Sandusky, Dayton and Cincin¬
nati, from Clyde to Dayton, and the new Air Line Roads, from Dayton
to Cincinnati. The latter is to be constructed under the auspices of the
New York Central Company, and operations will be commenced soon.
It will be several miles shorter than the Hamilton Road, reaching Cin¬
cinnati by tunnel through Walnut Hills. The Mad River Road will be
relaid and brought out as good as new. This new route east, which
will be known generally as the ‘narrow gauge,” will be a direct one

The result of their deliberations will be manifest in
rection of all
ment of the

We are informed that the
the Lake Shore, Cleveland

the4

cor¬

misunderstandings, aud the practical accomplish¬

objects for which the

cdfcvention

was

held.

?

REVIVAL OF SOUTHERN MANUFACTURES.

market of manufactured products
calls forth remark. It indicates
industry is reviving, and that there is ground for hope
with the rehabilitation of government there, prosperity
also return. This intelligence will be received every¬

Tiie reappearance in our
from the Southern States,
that

that

of the best cities in the States of Ohio, and will
Dayton, Springfield, Urbana, Tiffin, Sandusky,
where in the North with gratification.
Cleveland, Buffalo, Syracuse, Albany and New York.
*
A line of" railroad from Cincinnati to New York, taking
Before the civil war, considerable attention

and tokes in a majority
New York—Cincinnati,

had been paid
in the South to manufacturing.
The physical geography in¬
dicated that part of the country would at some day rival
New England in that department of industry. The numerous
streams issuing from the mountains extending from Pennsyl¬
vania to the southwest furnish water-power to an unlimited
extent.
Every other natural facility is possessed there in

important places in its way,, thus allowing freight
run by a continuous route without breaking bulk
or
being liable to detention by winter or summer, will afford
advantages to forwarders and others, far transcending those
to be derived from ship canals and other internal improve¬
ments that pertain properly to a former state of things.
Our men of.business cannot tail to perceive this;.and if this abundance.
In 1860 there were 350 woolen mills in the Southern States,
experiment of [the New York Central Railroad shall be suc¬
cessful, as wedhave no doubt it will be, it will, evidently, as follows : in Maryland, 25; in Delaware, 6; in Virginia,
lead to the forination of similar connections with other roads 69; in North Carolina, 22; in South Carolina, 8; in Georgia,
leading to the different commercial cities of the West. The 28 ; in Alabama, 15; in Mississippi, 9; in Texas, 9; in Ar¬
other companies will establish similar continuous lines of kansas, 8 ; in Tennessee, 59 ; in Kentucky, 92 ; in Missouri,
transportation/ so that the products of the West can reach 99. Capital invested 82,861,825; wool manufactured, 8,so

many

trains to

\y

the Atlantic seaboard in far less time than they

065,622 pounds; value of annual product $5,596,094. A
In the manufacture of cotton goods there were ISO mills
veyed by water, without breaking bulk.
It is also announced, we notice, that the Baltimore and
running in 1860; in Delaware 11, in Maryland 19, in Vir¬
Ohio Railroad; Company, to attract commerce by their route,
ginia 13, in North Carolina 36, in South Carolina 17, in
have established a line of ocean steamers to run between Georgia
32; in Florida 1, in Alabama 11, in Louisiana 2; in
Baltimore ancj_;Liverpool and have purchased four propellers Texas 1, in Mississippi 4, in Arkansas 1, in Tennesee 25, in
for that
purpose; also that the Pennsylvania Central Rail¬ Missouri 8, in Kentucky 4. Amount of capital invested
road
Company have in contemplation the establishment of a $12,362,400; cotton manufactured 55,367,122 pounds; value
line between Philadelphia and Liverpool, or London, and of raw material $7,223,859 ; value of annual product
are to be assisted in the
undertaking by the corporation! $11,285,775.
of
Philadelphia. These enterprises have our most cordialj But these are by no means the only staples which the
wishes. In the^event that they are warranted by a reasonable Southern States produced in manufactury. In steam machinery
prospect of success, we may be sure that the Railway Lords their product -was valued in 1860 at $7,620,467; their
can

be

con-

!

4
•A-'-n



-4

•

.

’ *

*\

-

THE CHRONICLE.

262
iron manufacture

85,486,158; lumber 84,830,122 ; flour and
854,664,326; leather 86,905,601, and in the four States
of Virginia, Louisiana, Tennessee and Georgia, the value of
boots and shoes manufactured was $2,129,327.
The total statistics of Southern manufacture in 1860,
approximated the following aggregates:
Number of manufacturing establishments, 27,954; capiital invested, $181,538,000; value of raw material, $158,065,000; help employed, 168,038 males, and 34,417 fe¬
males; value of annual product, $283,188,000.
These amounts show a flattering increase over the returns
of the census of 1850.
The revival of manufacturing will
now increase at a
greatly accelerated ratio. There will be a
greater demand for labor and for the products of manufac¬
ture; and we shall add in this connection, that already the
factories of the South, many of them, are changing owners.
Northern men accustomed to the business have gone South,
and will give a new impetus.
The Held is large and remun¬
erative. The general desire of Southern men is that more me¬
chanics and capitalists should emigrate to that part of the
meal

country.
There

is

the manufactures of the
leading place among the
products of the United States. It is an event to be de¬
sired.
The progress of the mechanical arts indicates the
refinement and culture of a people.
The importance of their
further development in those States where civil war has had
its ravages cannot be over estimated; and we hail with
pleasure the promise which has been already afforded.
no

South should

reason why
future take a

good

not in

eighteen millions of debt represented all her, old score of
go-aheadativeness and of folly, of unnatural activity and reactional paralysis; and from the moment Ohio fully realized
this fact she inaugurated a career of retrenchment and reform, of cautious progress and sufficient taxation, which to her
very great advantage she has continued to this day. She was
one of the
very few states that did not suspend payment of
the interest on her debt.
Mississippi, Indiana, Illinois, Mich¬
igan, Louisiana, Florid?, Arkansas, Maryland, and Pennsyl¬
vania—all these states either “repudiated” or suspended
pay¬
ment.
But Ohio stood firm, and by means of rigorous taxa¬
tion and rigid economy'emerged safely from the storm, with
tattered

sails, it is true, but with hull

tight

could be wished.

*

Ohio.

It

was

gathered from the statistics
concerning the State debt and taxation of

not until 1803 that the State

was

admitted in¬

to the

she

as

sound and water¬

debt of Ohio is seen to have di¬
This was in 1854, the year which
marks the final recovery of the country from the disastrous
etfects of 1831, as is evidenced by the banking
capital and
discount line, by the market prices , of
commodities, and by
the reinstatement of foreign capital in former
employments
and enterprises.
At this time the valuation of taxable prop¬
erty in Ohio, in proportion to her population p§r£apita, was
greater than it has ever been since. This iWluation was
$421.18; in other words, it was estimated that each inhabi¬
tant of the State possessed an
average of $421:18 worth of
taxable property. Of course this is not understood to be lite¬
rally true, because if all the capital at that time belonging to
capitalists in other states of the Union and in foreign countries,
doubt but that the valuation of native taxable

property

capita in the State of Ohio would have dwindled down
much smaller sum.
But w hether the
property of native
or
foreigner, it was alike subject to taxation, and this wras
sufficient for the purpose.
Out of this $421.18 the insignif¬
icant sum of 10A; mills
per dollar sufficed to pay State,
county, mid local taxation, which embraced not only the bud¬
get of current expenditures, but a gradual sinking of the en¬
tire debt outstanding.
From 815,218,980, or $7 54 per head in 1854, the State
debt receded under good management to
$14,016,446, or
$6 45 per head in 1856, and in the face of the panic of 1857,
fell by the end of that year, to $13,985,786, or $6 35
per
In 1860 it was $14,250,233, or $6 07
head.
per head.
This brings us to the commencement of hostilities in the
South. * The reader will, therefore, be prepared to find the
debt of Ohio enormously increase with each successive year
per

9

An instructive lesson is to be
furnished below

as

Ten years later, and the
minished to $15,218,980.

no

THE EXAMPLE OF OHIO—HER DEBTS AND TAXATION.

[August 26,1865.

Union, (with a population of 100,000 souls.) yet in 1860
possessed a population of two millions and a half, from

whom she raised local taxes

amounting to near!v-eleveil millions ot dollars, or over four dollars per capita.
But it is
from the statistics of her public debt that the best evidence
of the excellent management which has been bestowed upon
her finances is to be gathered.
In 1825 the debt of the State
was but $400,000.
From this it grew to be $4,520,000 in
1836, mainly under that policy of building public works at
the

to

a

.

public expense, which at that time was practiced very
generally all over the country, and which, were it barren of
any other consequences than the unquestioned benefits in the
shape of railroads, canals, Ac., which have done so much to of the war. She wras one of the first of the States to answer
populate and enrich the nation, could only lie in the highest the National call to arms, and she stinted neither men nor
sense commendable.
In 1831 the great financial revolution
money to support the government until the very end of the
occurred.
The public work system and the credit
system struggle w as reached, and the Federal authority fully rein¬
had been pushed to their last degree of endurance.
Vast en¬ stated all over the country. But instead of perceiving an
terprises only benefitting the capital and resources of old increase of debt since 1861, it will be found to have actually
and wealthy nations were on foot in every
direction; bank decreased, so that last year it amouted to but $13,500,751,
money was poised in enormous sums upon extremely limited or $5 54 per head.
resources; commercial credit was piled up to a great height,
This triumph of financial skill is well worthy of
closer in¬
while its base was confined to a small hoard of available
cap¬ spection.
In 1854 the valuation of taxable property to pop¬
ital. The inevitable result wras a grand
toppling over. The ulation per capita was $421 18. In 1856 it w^as $377 94,
circulation of all the banks in the United States in 1831 w^as and maintained about this
average until 1864, wffien, under
$149,185,890, while the specie was but $37,915,340. In the influence of an expanded currency, it rose to $413 50.
1844 the circulation was reduced to $75,167,646, and the
Upon these amounts 10£ mills per dollar wras levied in taxes
specie increased to $49,898,269. In 1837 the discounts w^ere in 1854; 11* in 1858; 13/* in 1861; 11* in 1862;
$525,115,702, while six years later, in 1843, they fell to and 16/* in 1864 ; so that the tax on capital is seen to have
$254,544,937.
been, with little exception, constantly increased. The same
It is not to be
supposed that Ohio passed unscathed through result attended the tax per capita. In 1854 the total
these exhausting vicissitudes.
From $4,520,000 in 1836, her yearly tax paid by each inhabitant of the State wras $4 31.
State debt increased to 818,004,526 in 1844. This was This fell to
$3 69 in 1856, and rose to $4 93 in 1861. It
mainly for improvements in progress prior to 1837, and for fell to $4 25 in 1862, and in 1864 had
again risen to $6 84.
losses sustained by the State during the great crisis,
These Under this treatment not only has the’ total amount of




•

,

August 26,1865.]

THE

CHRONICLE.

indebtedness steadily fallen, but the proportion of debt to

263

what it

is, but much of the popular dissatisfaction which now
population has j? fallen also. In 1854 it was $7 54 per head, prevails upon this head might have been prevented. While
and in 1864 but $5 54 per head, so that if each person pays the people would have been called upon to pay but a small
as much this ^ear as he did last, and the tax per head to
yearly addition per capita, vast sums in the aggregate would
The expenditures of the general govern¬
cover the expenditures of the current year does not exceed have been saved.
ment since the beginning of
$1 30, the whole debt can be extinguished by the termina¬
the war have been as follows:
tion of the fiscal year 1865.
The present population of Fiscal
Fiscal
Year.
Amount.
Year.
Amount.
Ohio being about 2,500,000 this amounts to saying: if the 1862
Actual
1474,744,778 1S64 ..Estimated ..$866,234,087
“
State expenditures for the current year do not exceed the 1863.... “
714,709,995 1865..
895,729,185
sum of $3,250,000, and her people pay as much per capita
This includes $145,000,000 for interest.
The taxes raised
in the form of State taxation as they did last year, that the during these years, assuming that the population of the loyal
entire State indebtedness of $13,500,751 will be paid off and states remained stationary at 20,000,000, was as follows :—*
-

..

f

extinguished,

Year.

following table furnishes the precise proportional
suits to which reference has been made :
The

Total Taxes.

1862.

re

1863.
1864.
1865.

111,899,760

Vtaluoi’n Populat’n, pcapeitr.

S
►>

i

capita.

Mills per

-

Co’ty.

$

Local. Total.

$

$

1863
1864
1865
1866
1857
1858

1859
1860

1861
1862
1863
1864

286 15
421 18
402 63
377 94
385 78
375 55
372 10
379 71
377 86
372 64
388 47
413 51

i

©«

!|

'

State.

(State. Co'ty.

Local.

Total.

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

46
43
29
21
18
32
32
50
71
90
85
19

1

1
1
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

09
29
29
03
09
27
39

1 33
1 36
1 16

f 11

l\ 22

$

$

1 11
1 46
1 38
1 31
1 47
1 50
1 52
1 67
1 61
1 19
1 73
3 29

!mU1s.

Mills.

!

3 77
4 31
4 19
8 69
3 94
4 36
4 57
4 62
4 93
4 25
4 92
6 84

5.10
3.55
3.20
3.20
3.10

3.SO
3.09
3.21
2.72
2.84
8.39
3.72
3.57
3.61
3.13

3.55
3.55
3.95
4.55
5.10
1 5.05
5.30

o' 3

3.89
3.49
3.42
3.46
3.84
3.89
4.10
4.16
4.25
3.20
4.46
7.96

2.89

2.96

13 80
10.25
10.40
9.76
10.21
11.60
11.89
12.18
13.06
11.40
12.66
16.48

344,512,389

13 03
17 22

“

are

The taxes of the fiscal year just
closed do not much exceed $200,000,000, while those of the

®

Cts

$
7 51
7 54
6 80
6 45
6 35
6 40
6 31

And again, the
population has increased, not only in the loyal states but by
the accretion this year of the entire population of the South.
To state the actual truth then, the tax per capita which has
been raised, and which will be raised this year by the Federal
CTOvcrnment, is as follows :
*
current year may

2.63
1 72
1.69
1.70
1.64
1.70
1.70
1.60
1 67
1.59
1.44
1.34

6 09
6 30
5 92
i 5 58
i 5 54

not be much greater.

.

Year.

Population.

;

1862

of the extra heavy burdens which her

1S64
1865

people are now called upon to shoulder in order that the
Federal debt may be carried, it is not to be apprehended that
the financiers of the State government of Ohio will put them

as

Tax per Capita.

20,000,000 Loyal st’tes only $2 59 actual.
“
“
5 43
20,600,000
“
21,000,000
“
“
“
10 00 estimated.
33,000,000 All
“
“
6 66

1863

Of course, in view

5 66

.;

much above the mark.
"sS

i

Mills. Mills.

|

m

3

!

dollar.

S

“

But the truth is that the estimates for 1864 and 1865

TAXES TO VALUATION.
>

Dollars per

Capita.
$ 2 59

260,632,717 estimated

ST’E dbt.to
TO POPULATION.

TAXES

Taxes per

$ 51,985,720 actual

Now, if this taxation had been the same in the other years
it was in 1864, or ten dollars per capita, the result would

this great task without better reason for it than the mere have been that at the termination of the current fiscal year,
satisfaction of balancing her books a few years in advance of our debt would not much exceed $2,000,000,000, and had it

to

been twenty dollars per capita
exceed $1,200,000,000,—perhaps,

the debt would scarcely
if the waste and extrava¬
gance be taken into -account, not even so much.
Pay as you go ” has always been found to be the best
motto for the merchant, and as Ohio has taught us, it is the
best also for the financier; and the surprising results of this
excellent policy can be no better illustrated than by the tables
now
presented to the reader :

the

appointed time; but the hypothesis is entertained in
order to show in the strongest possible light the extraordi¬
nary resources of the Buckeye State in wealth and yield of
taxes, that capitalists should not fail to bear them in mind
when opportunities offer for investments in Ohio.
Had the Federal government followed tne example of
Ohio in the management of its debt, not only would its sum
total have beenj at this day but a mere vulgar fraction of
PUBLIC

DEBT

OF

“

STATE

THE

OF OHIO.

i

Statement

■<

.

showing the amount of Foreign and Domestic Debt of the State of Ohio,
on

■

as it existed on
the \bth F’ouember,} 845-64.

the ls£ of January, 1844, and thereafter yearly
■

(Compiled from the Annual Reports of the Auditor of the State)
FOREIGN

© c
t- SC
so

DEBT

DOMESTIE DEBT OUTSTANDING.

OUTSTANDING.

© © ®
© ®
© © © oc © ©

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© ©

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alai

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T-t T<

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Gt

-S

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T-l

L-

yfj

C-l © ©
TJ> ^ t-

s

©

T-T

©'tjT

m

Tf ©

,t- © © t- © OO

© t”

i-Totf©

SC
© t-

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Gi © ©
© -rr ©

so

©-5
o ©~

TT

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§
cf

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Cl X O

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CO

oo ao go

a5

oo

£3

3

fci. 1850 68. 1850 7b. 1851 58.1856; 68. 1856
1844
1845
1846

400,000

400,000
400,000

1847 400,000

1848 400,000
1849 400,000
1850 400,000
1851
1852
1853
1854

1855
1856
1857
1858

4,100,000 1,500,000 150,000
4,018,659 jl,500,000 150,000
4,018,f 1,500,000 150,(tOn
4,018,(1 1,500-000 150,000
4,018,6
1,500,000jl50,0=0
3,285,1 1,468,200 150,0,-0
1,429,9S2 150,000
(1,429,982 150,000
150,000
150,1-00
150,0oii
150,00' •

2,469,^,90

85,350

85,.350
85,350
85,350

1859
1860

1,160|

1861

::::±

1863.. 4.,
1864..
£5V!U,

1,166:
1,16b!

3,514,638

3,365,779
3,365,779
3,365,779
3,365,779

3,365,779
8,365,7/9
3,365,779
3,365.770
3,365,779

3,292,133

2,769,9321
2,423,360

6s.

1860

5s- 1865 6s.

1868 6s.

If Stock iigued

1S70 6s. 1875 ‘6s.

1881 6s.

u**
1886

o

S3

6,862,781!
6,812,481!
6,812.481!

_

6.812,481! 1,025,900;..

..

6.413,325' 1,025,000'..
6,413,325 1.024,000..

...

JSl

CO

:£

©

*2 >2

Sgb

*

oi

©px
ccd

+-

© oj

g-B

g

p

a

■< s
Gs.var.

48,316 322,300
33,197 [298,685
33197 1298,695
33,197 298.685

6s.

var.

!6s ’65’71

340,333
272.857

18,004,52®
17,573,326
17.913.659
•..

175.191!

17,828,65s

17,717,774
16,869,362
16,509,694
17,050,639

155,783
154.483

151,983
151,083

15,619,757
15,574,582
15,218,980
14,541,837

105,908!

1,765 298.685
1,7651 298,685

1,529)
1,529

1,765 282,585

2,400,000
1,600 000...
2,183 532' 1.600,000
2,400,000
2,400,000
2.183,532, 1,600,000,
1 600,000!,
2,400,000
2,183,532
2,183,532 1,600,000]
!2,40>',000
2,183 532 1,600,000;4,095.309,2,4* 0,000
2,183,532 1,600,000 4, '<95,309 2,400,000
2,183,532 1,600.000 4,095,309.2,400,000

1,765 275,385

1,529
1,429

14,016,44ft
+13,985,'78«

558
^60
60
60

+14,334,915

2 183.532i

...

..

1,023,000,!..
1,025,000! 379.8G6
1.015,000! 379,866

1,015,000! 379.866
year

1,600,000
2,183532 1,600,000
2,183532! 1,600,000'...
2,183,5321 1.600,000
2,183,532 1,600,000!...
..

..

redemption of original stock due in the

: d ’

X

© 93 T"

2,183,532 1,600,000'...

1,025,000:..
1,025,000
1,025,000
1,025,000

2.183 532

...

1,025,000;..

var.

:

d
: o

rH

285,544 323,500
268,019 (323,500
254,801 323,500
250,890 323,500

1.367,063

6.812,481i 1,(1-25,000:..

6s.

o

•

•285 544 323,500
285544 323,500

667.063:
667.063
667.063
667.063
667.063

6,862.781'

6,413,325
6.413.325
6.198.325
1.608,905
1,262,279

28

829,063

6.901.781
6.862.781
6,862,781

6,812,481;
6,666,336
6,511,894
6,413,325!

•••2 IN

©

8

1,141,605 1,015,000; 379.866

r*wr




g*. so ■

S3

:o
Ci

A

dO

:s
:

•

•

.

•

So

x © o t-h ©» so

o
-M

o

:

d

T3

o d

cc ©

:

4j

£ C3
OS C
£

*4

©_

OOTJ<

«»

-

CO

!
i

©

1- oo o at

tH

sc ©
C-©
<N

of isstfc,

+

,
"

»;
1,765] 275,385

1,765 275,385
1,765 275,385
1,765 275.385
1,765 275.385

1,765](245,785
1,7651

4000

Jnelnding $950,000,6’8 tfmppw hpaili

«

+14,33441?
14,250,233

831,273 14,897,27?
60j 580,673 14.141.660

60
60

281,213

679,713

13,464,80a

13,509,75W

264

THE

CHRONICLE.

that the agents here have no
money in hand to meet the amount due
the 1st of September next, nor is there the
slightest reason to
suppose that they will in future have any remittances for the pur¬

.foreign ^eioo.

on

GREAT BRITAIN.
LONDON AND LIVERPOOL DATES TO AUG. 12.

Monetary and commercial affairs continue

to be characterized by
period of the year. The
England, and the advance in
interest, added to the very unfavorable reports of the grain harvest,
have tended to great caution, and a decline in
nearly all kinds of
securities consols show a decline of three quarters
of a cent during
the week.
The reduction in other securities -has been
proportion¬
ate, although thpre is an entire absence of anything like
agitation.
The prospects of an extra demand for
money to pay for foreign
breadstuffs, in consequence of the deficient harvests, is regarded un
favorably in view of the narrow bullion margins in the Bank of
England. It is generally considered that any fresh demand for
money is likely to advance the rates of interest still more. The de¬
mand for discounts in London continues brisk with
large supplies of
money, but no tendency to do business at less than four per cent,
except in the case of first class paper at short dates, which is oc¬
casionally quoted at three and a half.
The advance in wheat during the week amounts to nine cents
per
bushel.
This movement in the
:grain market added to the high
prices of butcher’s meat indicates a scarcity of supplies, and a firm
if not stringent money market.
Tlie suspension has been announced of Mr. Baldwin Yon
Bartels,
of Pinner’s-court, Loudon, in
consequence of the stoppage of Messrs
Brandt, Sohn & Co., of Buenos Ayres and Montevideo, in which
house he is a partner. The liabilities are estimated at
£70,000, and
the assets are almost
exclusevely in Buneos Ayres and Montevideo.
The report thence by the last mail shows a dividend on
the claims
than the usual dullness that marks this
diminution in the specie at the Bank of

more

of about 70 per cent.

The shares of

Overend, Gurney and Co

,

2-J per cent.
The reports of

limited,

are

quoted at

the half-yearly meetings of the London Joint
Banking Companies show the extraordinary progress and
good standing of these institutions. The liabilities of the ten prin¬
cipal metropolitan banks amounted in round numbers to £85,000,000, nearly the whole of which is represented by
deposits. The as¬
sets on June
Stock

30th amounted to £99.904 912,
showing an apparent
balance of assets over liabilitiesf of
nearly £15.000.000 ; but this
sum will have to be diminished
by about £4 630,000, on account of
securities for acceptances and
preliminary expenses, so that the ac¬

tual surplus will be rather more than
£10,000,000, an ample guar¬
antee for the
security of the depositors. Taking the means of
these banks in the
aggregate, they have in cash rather more than
13 per cent of their liabilities; and of
government securities which
can be realised at
any moment, 8 per cent?in addition. The divi¬
dends that have been declared at the late

meetings have been

I

|

pose or for the sinking fund.
Letters from Bombay state that it is difficult for one who is
not
on the
spot to picture the blank dismay and the universal distrust
which prevail iu the Western
capital, and still more so to trace the
evil to its causes.
The lowest sum at which we can

fairly take the
profits made by Bombay in cotton during the four years of
the American war is fifty millions. The
popular estimate on the
spot I found to be eighty, but that includes the price usually paid
for cotton to the extent of seven or
eight millions, and the sums
said to have been sent into the
city from the interior by those who
had previously hoarded.
But the ablest merchant in Bombay, who
has travelied much in the agricultural
districts, and speaks the lan¬
guage of the people, assures me that no hoards were sent into Bom¬
bay. From the 50 millions which were available for other purposes
than legitimate trading we must deduct 10 as the amount of
extra
profit kept by the peasantry and middle men in the interior. This
will leave 40 millions for
speculation in the island of Bombay.
extra

What has become of it?

moment

leaves 30 millions, of which at least ten have been lost in redrafts

for cotton.
That is, in 1864, in full trust that the American
would continue,
sent

600;000 bales, each con¬
taining 4001b., to England at a loss of 8d per "lb., but drawing
against the cotton at the high prices which prevailed when it was
shipped. The failures which are now going on are partly due to
the return of these bills./ We are thus reduced to 20
millions, the
debris, as it were, of the ruin now taking place. The local estimates
of th£ liabilities of Bombay speculators for shares alone
vary from
1C millions to 30 millions.
That is, one part of the
community has
paid, or promised to pay to the other for shares in barren companies
at least 16 millions more than these shares are worth at
par. These
20 millions are still in Bombay, and will be available for
legitimate
trade, and the completion of the best of the reclamation works

when the crisis is over.
At present they have
simply changed
hands—changed, too, from a large number of small capitalists to
half-a-dozen large millionaires.
Six men may come out of the
crash now going on with very heavy purses; all the rest of the
island is insolvent.
Strange disclosures are made at the meetings

of

creditors, most of whom know that their turn of
insolvency is
say that these disclosures are not at all
flattering
to either Parsee or Hindoo, aud I trust that no
English merchant
will be led to the same sort of
repudiation, concealment, and im¬
moral struggling to be free of
disagreeable engagements which some
of the highest men in these communities are
guilty of. The Bank
of Bombay has been allowed
by Government to receive assistance

coming. I regret to

from the Bank of

riods

statement of the

;

P.

c.

dividends paid

during the two

per

P.

annum.

London and Westminster
London Joint Stock.
Union Bank
London and Couuty....
....

’W.
28

’65.
26

per

annum.

Bank of

London........

18

Gonsolidnted Bank

20

30

Alliance.

32

30

321

c.

pe¬

’64.
20

’65.
20

15
10

15
5

Bengal.

-

THE CONTINENT.

the

a

war

Bombay merchants

the

past six months has averaged rather less than 41 per cent. In
corresponding six months of the past year the average was 7
per cent, and consequently the returns would be more favorable.
Still on the present occasion there is one or two cases
an increase.

At least five have been sunk, for the

unproductive!)', in the various land reclamation companies,
including Port Canning to a slight extent ; and I believe that five
more have been taken to
England by Scotch merchants. Thi3

among the highest that have ever been realised in
ordinary times,
and are satisfactory, considering that the bank rate of
discount iu

Annexed is

[August 26, 1865.

PARIS DATES TO AUGUST 12.

The Bourse has been very dull during the week, the
majority of
the speculators being absent in the
country. Business, however,
has been active, with a continued steadiness in
prices. The trade
of Paris is good, and favorable accounts are received from
the

provinces.
M.

Hastrou, a banker of Poictiers, and formerly mayor of the
city, has suspended payment and fled. His liabilities amount to
nearly two million francs, the chief sufferers being petty tradesmen
and poor people.

Imperial...,.
8
8
City Bank
20
15
Metropolitan & Provincal
nil
The official returns of French imports and.
exports for the first
The traffic receipts of
railways in the United Kingdom amount¬ six months of the current year have been published. The value of
ed for the week
ending the 5th of August, on 12,154 miles, to goods taken out of bond was 1,261,16l.000f, whilst in the corre¬
766,285/, and for the corresponding week of last year on 11,801 sponding period of 1864 it was 1,182,415,0001V; of
1863, 1,144,miles, to 742,2051, showing an increase 'of 353
miles, and of 066,0001*.; and of 1862, 1,080,160,0001*.; and they show, likewise,
24,082Z.
that the value of exports ot French productions was
1,382,904,000f.;
in Ithe same period of 1864,
The prospectus has been issued of the London
1,452,636,OOOf.; of 1863, 1,208,274,(City) Baths,
Laundries, and Dwellings Company, with a capital of 50,000/ in 0001V"; aud of 1862, 1,052.953,OOOf. It appears from these returns
10/ shares. It is also
proposed to raise 10,000/ in debentures. The that the silver exported during the first six months of the last two
company has been formed for the purpose of purchasing substantial years exceeded the amount imported by 26,250 kilogrammes, while
and. commodious buildings recently erected in Golden-lane, con¬ the silver imported during the first six m mths of the present year
taining numerous baths, laundries, a spacious dining or lecture exceeded that exported by 336 597 kilogrammes. The gold im¬
hall, and dwellings for 80 families embracing all modern
improve¬ ported amounts to 235,491 kilogrammes, aud that exported to only
ments.
The locality in which these are situated is one
that has 171,392 kilogrammes.
hitherto been perhaps the most
The export of wrought silk has 'been
neglected in the metropolis, and
naturally affected by the
where the yresent accommodation is therefore more
high price of the raw material, and to this circumstance must be
essentially
needed.
-

.

A

.

attributed the low amount of 164,000,OOOf, the value of the

raw

silk

prospectus has been issued of the London Jute Works, with a exported during the first six months of the present year, against
capital of £200,000, half to be first subscribed in shares of £10. 220,000,0001* in the corresponding period of 1864 ; 180,000,0001' in
The object is to spin and weave
jute by steam power iu London, an 1863. The quantity of foreign wool imported continues to increase.
alleged advantage of 13 per cent existing in favour of London It amounted to 108,000,0001’during the first six mouths of the pre¬
against Dundee in the saving of expenses in the carriage ot raw sent year, against from 72,000 000f- to 89,000,OOOf during the cor¬
material, insurances, &q.
responding period of the four preceding years. The export of wool¬
len cloth has increased
It is understood that
negotiations have already been opened in first six months of that rapidly since 1861. It amounted during the
London for the
year to 83,000,OOOf, in 1862 to 91,000,OOOf
contemplated new Brazilian Loan of £4,000,000.
in 1863 to 123,000.000f, in 1864 to 163,000,OOOf, There has been a
There appears to be no
prospect of aoy further dividends being slight falling off this year to 151.000,OOOf.
paid upon the stock of the Confederate Loan, it
The value of the cotton cloth
being dnderstood
exported has likewise increased. -




August 26, 1865.]
It amounted

48,000,000f,
ton

famine.

THE CHRONICLE.

during the first six months of the present year to
nearly double what it was previous to the cot¬
It must not be forgotten, however, that the price of

cloth increases with that ot the raw material, so that in real¬
ity the sum1 of 48,000,000f does not represent a quantity of merchan¬
dise greater, than that exported in the year 1860.
The Royal Sardinian Railway Company have invited
subscrip¬
tions for 314,450/, in 10 per cent preference shares, being the bal¬
cotton

ance

of 600,'000Z authorised to be raised in that

The

manner.

profifs of the National Bank of Belgium for the first

The

265

following are the values of the exports from Boston, Balti¬
Philadelphia for the week ending August 8 :

more, and

EXPORTS

FROM

For week

ending—
August 18, 1865.

Funded Debt

BOSTON, BALTIMORE, AND PHILADELPHIA.

Boston.

Baltimore.

$121,695

Philadelphia.

Total.

$265,825

$122,895

$510,415

Rhode Island.—The following is an official
statement of the funded debt of this State, with the date of the
passage of the authorizing act, the rate of interest, time of
payment,
&c. The whole has been accumulated for war
purposes :
of

six
months of the present year amounted to 2,196,466f; in the same
,—Amount of debt.—.
Interest.
Principal
Date of act.
Authorized.
Issued.
Rate.
Payable.
payable.
period last year the profits were 3,152,700f.
August, 1861
6
$500,000 $500,000
May
Nov. Oct. 1, 1871
At Manchester the week opened with prices in favor of
buyers, August, 1862 1,200,000 1,200,000
6
Mar <fc Sep.
Sept 1, 1871
and some irregularity. The uncertainty respecting the supply of January,1863
6
300,000
300,000
Apr & Oct. Apr. 1, 1883
cotton from America rendered purchasers very timed, until the re¬ Juue,
1863 1,000,000 1,000,000
6
Jan & July Jan. 1, 1893
ceipt of American advices induced more confidence, and gave a May,
6
Feb & Aug. Feb. 1, 1894
1864 1,000,000 1,000,000
fresh impulse to the market. Producers were therefore led to ad¬ January,1865 1,000,000
6
Feb <fc Aug.
none
Feb. 1, 1895
vance their quotations slightly, but the
operation at once checked
There is no probability of
any of the la9t million being issued.
this demand, leaving a feeling of disappointment at the evanescent
The Hon. Samuel A Parker, General
Treasurer, through whose at
Dature of an improvement that could be checked so
easily. During tention we received the above, remarks : “ There has been no
the week there has been transacted a fair amount of
regular
business, in¬
duced mainly by the disposition of spinners and manufacturers to sinking fund provided for the extinction of the debt, but from a law
passed by the General Assembly, authorizing any surplus money in
meet the demand which had set in, although
at unremunerative the Treasury to be used for the
purchase of the bonds, it is thought,
prices.
and there is no doubt of it, that after another
year the State will
At Nottingham there is a reasonable amount of business
doing be in the market as a purchaser, and that before the time expires for
in the lace trade ; and in hosiery both branches are
fully employed. the payment of them they will all be retired.”
:At Birmingham the hardware and metal trades exhibit increased
German Railroad Dividends;—The following statement is of
vitality, and the orders coming, in both on home and foreign account
interest as showing the annual dividends
are better.
As regards the home markets there are more
paid in 1865 upon rail¬
encourag¬
ing reports at hand from all quarters, except the purely agricultural road capital in the German States :
districts, anc| the demand for hardwares for shipment is quite an
Per cent.
Per cent.
20
average. The South Staffordshire iron trade is more cheerful in Leipzig-Dresden
Breslau-Schweidnig
8 2-3
/

.

-

tone, and

Nurnberg Furth

pig iron remains firm in price.

The cutlery branches at Sheffield are so much
improved of late
that the workmen are generally agitating for an increase of
wages,
that is likely'to be conceded.
The advances, howeyer,

will not be
upon the prices paid in former good periods, but on the reduced
wages paid since the late depression.
The silver plating and
Brittania trade is languid, but all other branches are
moderately
active.

The demand for the American market is

16

Berg Mark
Hamburg railroad

7 1-2

Berlin Magdeburg....... 16
Book was (coal line)...... 16
Berlin-Anhalt
11 5-6

Crefeld-Gladbach

Hamburg-Bergedorf
10 1-S
Berlin-Hamburg......... 10
Upper Silesia railroad
10

Neisse-Breig
Aix la Chapelle Dusseldorf
Mecklenburg railroad....

.......

Eastern Bavarian railroad..

7
6 2-3
5

9 1-3

Mayeuce-Mannheira......

languid.

Chemiz

Oppeln-Tarnowitz

4 1-3
4 7-30
81-2
8 1-4

91-5

Kottbus railroad

2 1-6

...

A

COMMERCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.
The

following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(for dry goods) August 17th, and for the week ending (for general
merchandise) August 18th :
j
FOREIGN

IMPORTS

AT

NEW

YORK FOR

1862.

$2,054,104

Dry goods

1S6X

$1,902,226

General merchandise.

1,026,099 ‘

Total for the week... $3,080,203

THE

WEEK.

1H64.
.

2,394,042

$4,296,268

$1,093,337
1,749,304

$2,842,641

1865.

$2,632,704
2,443,876

$5,076,580

Previously reported 108,051,079 111,418,917 154,664,579 106,969,779
Since Jan, 1

Averaging in 1864, 8 63-100 per cent, in 1863
7 30-100
following Insurance and other stocks were sold at auction
by H. E. Denny & Co., 52 William street, on the 24th inst.:
The

75 Hamilton Fire Insurance
20

87

Exchange Fire Insurance

20 Fulton Fire Insurance.
115 Seventh Ward National Bank
50 Citizens’ Gas Light
60 Brooklyn and Coney Island Bank

64$
llo

.1

\

100$
119$
71$

The following statement is
interesting as showing the character of
the emigrants from Great Britain to this
country :
Of the 208.900 emigrants who left Great Britain last
year, no
fewer than 8.371 were infants, 14,780 were female children under 12
years of age, and 15,805 male children under 12 years of age.
Of
the female adult emigrants 25,990 could not be classified in
respect
to occupation, 326 were set clown as “
mechanics,” 10 were shop-

$111,131,282 115,715,185 157,507,220 112,046,359
report of the dry goods trade will be found the imports of
dry goods for* one week later.
The following is a statement of the
exports (exclusive of specie) women, 24,435 were married women, 1,126 were milliners, dressmak¬
from the port of New-York to
foreign ports, for the week ending ers, and needle-women, 950 were gentlewomen and governesses, and
14,250 were domestic and farm servants, nurses, &c. Of the male
August 22 and since January 1st:
adult emigrants 10,251 could not be classified in
EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.
respect to occupa¬
tion, but the remainder may be described as follows :—Agricultural
1863.
1864.
!
1865.
For the week
$2,011,205 $4,269,873 $3,395,622 laborers, gardeners, carters, &c., 2,213 ; bakers 272, blacksmiths and
ferriers 251; bookbinders and stationers 30 ; boot and shoe makers
Previously rep’ted
114,099,995 134,570,749
99,532,481
355; braziers, tinsmiths, &c. 194; biicis .makers, potters, &c.,59;
Since January 1
116,111,200 138,840,622 102,928,053 bricklayers, masons, plasterers, slaters, &c., 1,049 ; builders, 60 ;
butchers, poulterers, &c., 146 ; cabinet-makers and upholsterers, 70 ;
In the commercial
department will be found the official detailed
carpenters and joiners, 1,337 ; carvers and guilders, 25, clerks, 784 ;
statements of the imports and
exports for the week :
clock and watchmakers, 79 ; coach makers and
trimmers, 12 ; coal
The following will show the
exports of specie from the port of miners, 46 ; coopers, 120 ; cutlers, 47 ; domestic servants, 399
, dyerB
New York for the week
ending August 19, 1865 :
18 ; engravers, 31 , engineers, 212 ; farmers, 7,245
; gentlemen, pro¬
August 16—Steamer Columbia, Havana—
fessional men, merchants, <£rc.,.5,842 ; jewelers
and silversmiths, 54 ;
Spanish gold
$34,600 general laborers, 57.997 ; locksmiths, gunsmiths, &c, 14; millers,
18—Steamer Germania, Hamburg—
maltsters, &c.,101 ; millwrights, 19 ; miners and quarrymen, 3,266 ;
German silver
4,000 painters, paperhangers, plumbers and glaziers, 337 ; pensioners, 45;
Gold bars..;
8,300 printers, 138 ; ropemakers, 12 ; saddlers and harness
makers, 61 ;
American gold
24,202 sail-makers, 10 ; sawyers, 42 ; seamen, 379;
shipwrights, 26 ; shop¬
American silver
35,000 keepers, 797 ,
general smiths, 768 spinners and weavers, 1,157 ;
19—Steamer City of Boston,
Liverpool—
sugar makers, boilers, &c., 31
American silver and gold
surveyors, 17 ; tailors, 1,547 , tal9,720 low-chauders and
American gold
soap-makers, 2 ; tanners and curriers, 74; turn¬
129,543
ers, 18 ; wheelwright, 74 ; and woolcomber, 1.
In

our

1

'

“

,

.

Total for the week.

$245,365
18,972,016

Previously reported
Total

since Jan. 1,1865

Same time in

1864.
1863
1862.
1861
I860

1859

1858




£

$31,579,453
m
zaj

f
^

27,583,724
37,835,951
3,268,868

Same time in
1857

1856..'

$19,217,381
$31,827,097
22,638,616

32,432,153

1855
1854
1853

47,496,512

20,864,791
22,281,889
18,418,533

1852

16,755,072

17,061,229

Michigan Lumber Trade.—The number of saw-mills returned
in Michigan in May, 1864, was 1,073,
being an addition of 151
since 1864. Saw-mills operated by water power have decreased 95
in number in the last decenium, while steam saw-mills have
nearly
doubled in number
The number of feet of lumber sawed the
past

year, as returned by
more than in 1854.

194 mills, is 621,478,904, being 58.2 per cent,
Giving to 99 saw-mills making no returns, the
average amount sawed by those which were returned in May, 1864,
the production of Michigan lumber in 1864 would be
684,646,636
feet, or in round numbers 700.000,0000 feet. But this is short of
the real quantity. Nearly half of the 99 mills not
returning the

266

THE CHRONICLE.

number of feet sawed are located at the
and manufacturing and shipping
The annual amount of lumber sawed in
less than 800,000,000 feet.

pineries, having gangs of
annually millions of feet.
Michigan is probably not

saws

The Census

of

Large Cities —-The various States

are

1862.

—1S65
Gain.

Population.
ly2,264

Boston, Mass

Chicago, III
Cleveland, Ohio
Milwaukee, Wis
Providence, R. I
Rochester. N. Y

51.260

Albany, N. Y

these returns.
Last
from our own rocks.

to feed 612 blast

458

2,121
3,056

Worcester, Mass
Utica, N. Y

30,130

5,170

23,799

1,270

22,250

.20.385

12,701

2,181

Fond Du Lac. Wis

11,041

4.468

new

freights from Cincinnati, which took effect

New York
Boston

on

Sandusky
Detroit
Bell Air

....

2d class. 3d class. 4th class Flour-

lot)

Baltimore
Buffalo and Dunkirk
Cleveland.,
Toledo

.

120

65

130'

130

tity from

160

120

80
65

160

190

180

tons.

160
170
80

115

70

140

200

.

ing

130

65

ol 1859.

.60

35

130
70

95

50

35

25

35

25

50

35

25

50

60

55

40

SO

60

65

50

t>

5

25

50

85

75

58

5

70

120

110

7o

60

100

185
185
192

155
155

115

60

125

115

60

125

162

120

.75

90

75

55

£0

150
35

Pittsburg
Salamanca

.

RAIL

New York

AND
.

Albany, Troy and Schenectady

.

Boston
Buffalo and Dundkirk

.

a
*

WATER.

Maine Stocks—The folio wing tub! e gives
the principal stocks iu the Portland mar cet :
Description.
State of Maine Bonds
Portland City Bonds
Bath City Bonds
Calais City Bonds. :

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

.

<

•

-

,

f

,

100
50

Atlantic A St. Lawrence II R...
do do
do
do
Bonds...
And. A Kennebec R R Bonds..
Maine Central R R Bonds
do
do
do Stock

•

.

•

•

•

100

*

.

Androscoggin R R Stock
do
do
1st Mortgage Bonds.
Ken. A Portland R R old Stock
do
do new Stock
do
do
do
do Bonds.....
Portland and Forest Avenue R R

!

j
j

the managers

on

the q dotations of j and other countries.
j Lead and Silver.—There was an increase in our
Par
lead in 1664; 94,433 tons of lead ore, principally

Value.

Bangor City Bonds
Portland Company.
Portland Gas Company

The system of

mining which prevails renders it impera¬
of mines to use every effort to satisfy the share¬
holders by the regular payment of dividends, or, at all events, in de¬
preciation in the value of the shares by avoiding “call." To ob¬
tain this end tin ore has been raised, “dressed," and also in an
already glutted market at whatever price the smelter could offer.
Hence the value of the ore sold, £925,069, which was
upwards of
£38,000 less thau the money value of the block tin sold in 1663.
Copper.—From 192 mines in South-western England, andabouj.
30- distriouted over other parts of the United Kingdom, 214,604
tons of copper ore, producing 13.302 tons 13 cwt. of metallic
cop¬
per, were obtained.
In addition to this our smelters imported 67,283 tons of ore. 26 0S1 of copper regulus, 10,015 tons of bricks and
pigs, and 14 924 tons of copper bars, &c., from our own colonies

50

55

very deep mines.
This produced of metallic tin 10,108
The price of tin during 1864 was lower than it has been dur¬
any year since 1853. and more than .£14 a ton below the price

tive

50

50

1

obtained from five

Tin—The tin obtained from the mines of Cornwall and Devonshire
in 1864 was certainly in excess of that ever before
procured, al¬
though the tin mines and stream works of this, our only stannifer¬
ous districts, have beeu
diligently worked for more thau 2 000 years.
15.211 tons of tin ore were raised by the miners, the
largest quan¬

{Saturday,

170
..

was

year.

RAIL.

....

Albany, Troy and Schenectady
Philadelphia

1,767,950

"discovery of Mr. William Crookes, F.R.S., the well-known dis1
coverer of the new metal thulium, it is
expected that the production
of British gold will be considerably increased during the current

schedule for east ward-

19th inst., is as follows :

being

in Merionethshire ; 2 336 Tons of auriferous quartz were
crushed and treated by the amalgamating processes.
From this the
adventurers obtained 2 837 ounces of gold, the value of which was
£9.991.
By no improvement in the process of amalgamation, the

1,055

Covington, Ky
Newport, R. I

1st class.

988,729

1,158,750

Gold.—During 1864*this precious metal

21,197
20,862

ALL

2,620,472

mines

7,051
4,060

21,699-

Freights—The

..tons

Of pig iron we exported 565,951 tons ; all the rest was converted
into merchant iron. 'This was effected at 127 iron works, where
6.262 puddling furnaces were in activity, and 718 rolling mills
per¬
form their Herculean labors of producing bars and rails.

194

bound

1

The total make of (he Kingdom

10,844

6,070

bound

furnaces, which produced of pig iron—

16,006

30,757

Eastward

obtained 10,064.890 tons of iron ore
Even this large quantity was insufiici nt for
imported 75,194 tons more. This was employed
vear we

In England
In Wales
In Scotland, i

39,041

Lawrence, Mass
Salem, Mass
New Bedford, Mass

wants, and we

our

•>

Loss.

Troy, N. Y

.

2,351,342

Iron.—The extension of cur iron manufacture, and the increasing
development of iron ore-producing districts is strikingly shown by

now

Lowell, Mass

Springfield, Maes

1,524,849

1,786,713

1864

14,362
8,603
12,000

177,956
93,000
62,825
59,556
55,640
52,787

Buffalo, N. Y

.tons

1863

takiug a census. The following is a list of all the cities thus far
reported which have a population of 10,000 or upwards :
,

[August 26, 1865.

100
100
50
•

•

•

100

Of’red. A ek’d
96
94

95

‘.•7

!

| dressed, sold, and smelted.
» gave us 64l,088oz. of silver.

production of
galena, were
This produced 91,283 tons of lead, and

Of Zing Ores, nearly all being the sulphide of zinc
(commonly
called black jack), 15,047 {tons were mined, producing 4,040 tons of
j
94
96 | metal.
The total value, at the place of production, of the minerals obtain¬
100
104 |
ed in 1864 (exclusive of building stones, bricks, and the
58
60
like) was
52
65 ! £31,604,047.
The value of the metal smelted from the metallifer¬
=•
85
86
ous ores was £15.281,869, so that if we add to this the value of our
86 j coals at the
85
pit’s mouth, £23497,968, and £1,500 000, the estimated
60
85
value of the other earthly minerals, of which returns are given in the
•*
9
10
Mineral Statistics." we have as the aggregate value of mineral
worthless.
treasures £39 979,837.
$

i

96
96

94

94

“

75

90

worthless.

100

70
90

luo

95

90

£l)c Bankers’ ©alette.

100
100

The following facts concerning the products of mines and col¬
j We give in our Bulletin from day to day lists of bonds, &c., lost and tlie
lieries in Great Britain from records kept by Mr. Hunt in the Mu¬ dividends declared, with times of opening and closing books. These tables will
seum of Practical Geology are extremely
! be continued daily, and on Saturday
morning, such as have been published
interesting :
Coal.—There were at work during 1864 no less than 3,268 col¬ through the week in the Bulletin, will be collected and published in the
lieries in Great Britain and Ireland.
In 1853 there appear to have ; Chronicle.
Below will be found those published the last week in the
Bulletin.

beeD

only 2,397. The quantity of coal raised, sold and used during
from all these works was 92.787,873 tons. The largest
quunties were produced from the following coal fields :
last year

LOST

f NAME OF PAIilY

Tons.

Durham and Northumberland
Scotland

Lancashire
Staffordshire and Woscestershire...
South Wales and Monmouthshire

£3,248,367
12,400,000
11,530,000
11,425,350
10,976,600

BONDS AND CERTIFICATES OF STOCK.

WHOM

j

BY

j

ISSUED,

NUMBERS.

1

.

J
United States 7-30... |
do
do
do
|
U. States 10-403....

AMOUNT

United Slates 7-80..

,
D.lTED,

TO WHOM ISSUED.

I

92,42.1,

$500.
$100.

j-

1 Refer to Geoi W.

! Aug. 15, 1P61

Letter C,

...

1

j

FOR

V

lAug. 15, 1864 )
1

00 each

—

>

Jones & Co., Cin-

cinnati.
Refer to Thomas

Douglass, 70




I

) Beekman St.
Lake Superior Silver
8,£09,60u
i
Lead-Co
P60
25 shares.
..j
1 Col. C. B. ComThere was an increase in our exportations of coal to foreign
342
25 shares.
{ Mcndota Mining Co..!
f stock.
ports in 1864 ol .525,2l 8 tons, the quantity exported in 1863 being 1 United States Certifi-i
Due Aug. 9, 1 Refc'r to Towbridse
*1.050
1S65.
8,275,212 tons against 8,800.420 tons in lbG4. Fiom the coal¬ j ates of Ind ebtednessj 130,080
| Dwight & Co.,N. Y.
fields shipping coal the quantities sent to ports in the United
RAILROAD AND OTHER DIVIDENDS.
Kingdom amounted to 10,588,132 tons in 1863, aod in 1864 they
bad risen to 10,970,711 tons, the quantities of coal
am’t
WHEN
brought by
NAME OF COMPANY.
DIYID.
DUE.
WHERE PAYABLE.
BOOKS CLOSED.
railway and sea, within the London district, during the last three
Pacific Mail S. 8. Co... 5 q’tlv Aug. 30
Office of Company.
jfears, beiDg as follows :
j
Aug. 25 to Sep. 1.
Yorkshire

$3,000.

■

'

.

-

-

August 20,- 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.
Friday, August 25,1865, P.M.

The Money
the

United

now

fully

recovered its wonted tone.
Money is su¬
perabundant, and the strict rate of interest about 2 per cent
lower.
The large accumulation in the
Treasury at the begin¬
ning of the month has been since distributed, and since the
15th inst? about $10,000,000 has been
paid as interest on
Seven-thibty notes. Several millions have also been with¬
drawn from the
temporary deposits at the Sub-Treasury.
From these conjoint sources there has been

probably wellthrown into action or circu¬
lation within the last
twenty days; and the natural result is
that the supply
largely exceeds the demand, and the rates of
interest has fallen to the
point at which it stood before the
Secretary of the Treasury withdrew the amount of $80,000,000
of currency into the
Treasury. For the last two or three
days money has been literally hawked around the “ Street ”
at 4 and 5 per
cent; and considerable amounts have been
nigh eighty millions

returned to the

ot currency

Sub-Treasury

The discount market

Temporary loan.

on

States

Securities.—Government stocks have
firmness during the week. The successive
quotations showing a decline in 5-20's at London and Frank
fort have had little effect
upon the price here, owing to the
fact that the old issue has become
quite scarce, and has been
in demand from
parties disposed to hold them in expectation
of a rally in the
foreign quotations; the price has advanced
from 106£ to
106J. iThe new issue has been corresponding¬
ly firm, and closes at:104j. Ten-Forties are
again in active
demand, and have advanced from 97 to 97?.
Seven-Thirties,
notwithstanding that at the present price of gold their inter¬
est is much more valuable
than that of the
gold interest bonds,
continue firm and
active; there is reason, however, for be¬
lieving that the price is kept up by the operations of a
wealthy outside banker, largely interested in
sustaining the
current quotations.
A cotemporary gives the
following com¬
parison of the ratio of interest to principal, on the
leading
securities, which exhibits- the g ’eat disparity between the
price of Seven-Thirties and other stocky :—

Market.—The feverish caution excited
by exhibited
great defalcations of last week has subsided, and the mar¬

ket has

267

more

Market Price without

is

Price.
interest.
Rate of Interest.
quiet. There is no important 1 year Cere., new
issue....
98$ '
$1 on $11 40 principal
amount of bills
offering for sale; all good names are taken 5-20 Coup, new issue
102
1 on
104$
11 r7 2
“
6’s.l861 Coup
107
readily by the banks at 7 per cent; some of the
1 on 11 99
104$
"
private 5 20 Coup., old issue
104
1 on
107$
bankers are
11 95
“
10-40 Coup
discounting strictly first class names at
94
1 ou
97$
13 05
per
“
7-30’s, 2d Series
cent; lower grades range at S a 10 per cent. We
99$
1 on,-13 63
“
quote:
1
Per Cent.
The following have been the
’
Per Cent.
closing quotations for gov¬
Dry Goods
7 a 7£
Bankers
6
•

•

••

....

;

Grocers.... i

The rate

7

on

exceptions at 6
‘

Railroad

a

a

7$

Produce Commission..

“ Street’' loans has fallen
to 5 per

per cent.

8

.

6$

a

lu

cent, with

.

Miscellaneous Stocks.—The stock mar.
general recovery from the depressing effect

and

ket has shown

a

ernment

securities at the Stock

last six days
U.
U.
U.
U.
U.

S.
S.
S.
S.
S.

Exchange,

on

each of the

:

Aug.l9th. 21st.

6's, 1881 coup
5.20’s c., o. iss.....,
5.20's c., n. iss....

.

10.40’s coup
7.30 Treas. Note...
2d Series
U. S. 6’s certif. ii. iss

•

22nd.

23rd.
107

24th.

106%
106% 106%
104% 104%
97
97%

[

of the fraud excitement.

106%
106%
104%
97%

99%

99%

99%

99%

97%
99%

98%

98

98%

93%

25th

98%

106%
106%

106%
1(U%
97%

106%
106%
104%
98%
99%

98%

Gold Market.—Gold has been
The brokers exhibit a commendable
unusually steady during
disposition to conduct the week. The demand for customs has been
their business in a conservative
very large;
manner; one evidence of but the upward
tendency arising therefrom has been checked
which is apparent in the
adoption of resolutions by the Stock by the sales of the
^Treasury Department from its surplus
Exchange and the Public Board of Brokers, to
expel from coin. The partial reaction in foreign
their respective associations
exchange, disappoint¬
any member who directly or in¬
ing the expectation that there would have been
directly transacts business at the Evening
Exchange.
export of specie this wreek, has also tended to ai|
The recovery of
ke^p down the

important

confidence, and the abundance

and cheap¬
premium; and, to-day, this tendency is strengthened
by the
have promoted a general increase of
arrival of $955,000 of
activity,
gold from Aspinwall. j There has
resulting iman advance of prices throughout the list. There not been
so little
speculation in gold as at present, at any
is no general
speculative movement, riiany of the
leading period of the last three years ; and the premium is
operators being out of town ; but combinations exist for
regulated
sup¬ almost exclusively by considerations of
supply and demand.
porting certain leading stocks, with a view to extensive
The following have been the
spec¬
ulative movements after the summer
highest and lowest quotations
season.
Erie, Reading, for gold on each of the last six
and Cleveland &
days :

ness

of money,

Pittsburg

Erie has

under control of this kind.

are

advanced, during the week, from 82^ to 87£; Read¬ Aug.
Aug.
ing from 102J to 105J, and Cleveland &
Pittsburg from 67 Aug.
to
71£. The increased earnings of Milwaukee & Prairie
du Chien have created

r

Highest. Lowest.

19,.........
20....
21

144$
144fc

143|
144$

143$

148f

Highest. Lowe»t.

Aug. 22...
Aug. 23
Aug. 24
Aug. 25

14 3$
143$
143$
143$

I43f
143$
143$
148$

The export of specie from this
speculative demand for the stock,
port on Saturday last was
producing an advance from 49£ to 45£. Michigan
$139,263; there was no export by Wednesday’s packet.
Southern,
usually a favorite with speculators, is
The transactions for last wxek at the
Custom-house and
neglected, but the
price has advanced 1 ®. Quicksilver has
Sub-treasury wrere as follows : advanced J3£, dur¬
ing the week, and closes firm at 55£; the
Custom House.
-Sub-Treasury.prospects of the
Receipts.
Payments.
Receipts.
a

„

company
The
Stock

days:

are considered

unusually satisfactory.
following have been the closing quotations at
Exchange for leading stock on each of the last
Aug. 19th
38
52

Marip<
Cumberland

Atlantic M. S.
Ene

.

S.

£

.

...-

Hudson River.

.

.

.

ouuiui

—

40
135
91
82 %
—

102%
62%

Michigan Centra

106

Illinois Central

—

67

2i%

Island,


http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/
Federal IReserve Bank of St. Louis
L A

,.

*

106

94%

21st.

22nd
38

c-

64%

64%

—

—

39%

—

—

90%
84%

90%
83%
107%
102%

108%
103

62%

62
106
122

—

123

67%
27%
61%
106%

9*%

67%
.

23rd.

39

64%
11%

54%

150
91

42
151
92

84%
107%

75%
108%

103

103%
63%

—

107

121%

67%
61%

94%

95%

69%
27%
1

62%

107

95%

14...,
15....

$6,479,164

,
,

16....

360,434 77
424,502 91
366,709 53
336,379 77

17....
18.....
19.....

38%
65%

Total
Balance in

97

2,291,194 75
4,783,748 83

$5,611,579 60
1,164651 95

2,056,316 30

3,361,587 47

2,124,241 60

6,654,399 40
2,526,916 26

6,198,656 85
3,710,750 14

$2,072,490 15 $26,097,010 78
on morning of Aug. 14 th.

58,627,293 40

25th.
•

Sub-treasury

—

150

92%
87%
109%
105%
64
—

120%

27%
60%

106

24th

37%

Aug.
Aug.
the Aug*
six Aug.
Aug.
Aug.

,

Deduct payments
Balance
Increase

during the week.....

Saturday evening.
during the week

on

71%

84

26,097,010 78

$53,396,378 06
5,230,915 84

122

27%
62%
109%

$79,493,388

Foreign Exchange.—The
strong upward tendency of bills
on London and Paris noted
at the close of last week has
not
been sustained. Bankers have

nominally kept

up

these

quo-

buyers, and, in some cases,

tations, but have had few

Leather Manf.....

2,834,983
576 278
5.249.663
9.652.747

1S.3G1,S85

State of N. Y.
Amer. Exchange.
.

.

tation of

the rates

steady and large increase of cotton bills, and keeps
below the point at which specie can be shipped at

a

Mercantile.

Bankers’

are

Antwerp.....’

Sterling. 60

days..
Bankers’ Sterling,

Hamburg

110%© 110%
10S%© 108%
6.16% © 5.15
5.13%©5.12%

days

Francs, long date
Francs, short date....

'

.Swiss

109%©. 109 %

3

Merchants’

North Amer
Hanover

the closing rates to-dav

Amsterdam.
Frankfort

Bremen,

•

Prussian Thalers

©5.16%
5
5 16%©5 15
30%
30%
40% © 41
40%© 40%
78%© 79%
71
© 71%
20

Nassau.....

Bank per
and a Washington
“No

more

dispatch

says :

hundred millions.
The total amount of circulation issued to the National
Banks during the week ending Aug. 19
Previously issued
Total amounts issued
The whole number of barks authorized to
total capital of $890,000,0.00.”

22nd

Independence, Jackson i

173,107
80,969

1,544.374

of West Virginia, 1

*

Dry Dock

The deviations from

•

•

1,482,294

30i.23.3

015,034

11,501,023
1,1 SI ,693
9.3.54,564
12,*-'51,873

3,274,604

270,000
16,813
122,303
52,319

•

31,S41

19,609,636

467,967

1,358.097
943.159

14,119

36.S26
9.154

917.023
536,771

Bull's Head
Manufacturers’...

*

204,447
612,867
151,815

13,0-0
3.230

1,438
37,197
133,971 1,497,055
990.025
99,009
r

201.022
552.900

8,963,217
574,305

51,(33

207.655

232.111

1,094.223

1.637,152
993,461

50.954
23.568

8u,s;9
11,796
22,120
26,565
32,844

611.369
627.044
6uS 000
471,100
791,000

1,992,S91
3,1^6,761
1,00*-,940

10,556

67,131
64,842

353,014

296,512

2,551,000
2.0S2.959

25,760
112,293

44,421

1.666,817
12,439,677

834.378

511,454

2,948,360
3,007,505
592,687

1.649.940

.

20,100

2,>9,599
939 355

315,950

174,593,016

7,639,575

62,002

45,583,988

the returns of the previous

wreek

are

follows:

..Dec. $410,786
Dec. 1,145,159

Dee. $4,631,761 | Circulation
663,656 | Net Deposits
2,577,560 1
Inc.

Loans

Dec.

Specie

The Merchants’ National Bank

1530.

40,006

!10,S‘27,581

Capital $50,000.

County, Missouri.

63,880

297.522

1,747.000

992.807

180,533

274.207

168.721
765.559

1,912,640
2,198.249
1,334,746

321 461
73 465

12.032 567

authorized August ;

43.285
54.549

464.607

Second National.

as

The F irst National Bank of

5 008

1,435.703
i:0-9,793
1.636.067
12.652.081

..

:

1829.

17,953 -

'•

Man. and Mer.
Fourth National.

$172,664/460 \
Aug. 19th was 1,530, with j

following national banks were

The

26.475

1.603,479
1,123,162
4,623,452

....

169,598,960

234,776

3,004668

Fast River........
Mec. Bk. As.....
drovers
North River

§8,065.500

1,471.113
1.297,622
5,771,865

21,461

183,786

1,227,905

Imp. and Traders

636,127

9,769

2,; 66,470

Marine
Atlantic

new

3,622,SS5
1.705,088
1,193.486
2,101,067

54.233

3,025,707

704,859
241.239
9SG.2S3

6231

183,621
]

476,441

317.833

12,154

Oriental

banks will be entertained until Con¬
provision for increasing the amount of the currency,

applications for

27,110

56.533

1»

7,305
2.8lo,019
2,9S0,6'i6

T.977.000
1,656,311

1.526027
2.574.355
1,614.159

104.430

4.7S5
119,881

•

2 6

.....

gress makes some
which is now restricted to three

a

72,546
66.402
20,00$
196,.350
85.S51
45,279

1.451,909

4,395,078

S2.9;i6

Market
St. Nicholas..
Shoe and Leather.
Corn Exchange...
Continental
Commonwealth...

one

S19.312
10,742

1,960,5*28

6,775.010

1.321.063
2,255,169

......

Citizens’.

National
day authorized by the Comptroller of the Currency ;
scarcely

National Banks.—There is now'

998,600

2,336,513
1,491,933
8.3S 1,1=89-

..

Irving

Metropolitan

5,624,571
6,473,134

143.356

2,324.036
..

17,287

972,230

1.348,506

The follow ing

21.164

973.S09

1.619.173

Chatham.

profit.

a

506,949

643 595

1,987,('93
4,488,217

Republic.

88,764

59,228

5.421,051
1.919,1-81
8,966.512

Broadway.
()cean

872.076
4U2.941

2.427.019

196,847

Seventh Ward....

have

The large accumula-

asking rates.

sold much under current

[August 26,1865.

CHRONICLE.

THE

268

Legal Tenders

The

the decrease of $4,-

principal feature of the return is

Clarksburg, Harrison County, West Virginia. $100,000
631,761 In loans ; wThich is chiefly the result of the contrac¬
1531.
The Ilungerford National Bank, of Adams, Jeffer¬
tion consequent upon the discovery of the Ketchum frauds.
son County, New'York.
$125,000.
The legal tenders show7 an increase of 2,577,560, partially
The National Bank of Rhode Island, New'port, j
1532.
the result of the payment of interest upon Seven-Thirty
Rhode Island.
$100,000.
*
notes.
*
The Peoples National’ Bank, of Jackson, Michigan.
1533.
For the corresponding period of the^past three years the
$100,000.
1534.
The National Exchange Bank, of Lansingburg, same items compare
CirculaLoans and

as,follows:

New7 York."

The First National

Bank of Morristown, New Jersey,

has

designated by the Secretary of the Treasury as an ad¬
depository of public money.
The following comparison show's, the progress of the
national banks, in respect to number, capital and circulation,'!
ditional

685

736

“

782
815

.

Feb. 13, 1865,
Mar. 4, “

855
90S

.

it

18,

“

b

“
“

Apr.
it

22,

May

6, “
20, “
June 3, “

19,609,636

Capital.

.

973

.
.

1,04 L

*

1,117
1,172
1,212

u

.

78,724,520'

7..
14..
21..
28..

Jan.

83,058,200

Jan.

179,121,296

7,28^,8008’

Feb.

186,041,735

73,555,380
99,325,600

202.944,486
225,24 6,309
246,05 1,170

1

19,961,80'i

264,954,170
281,868,820
298,97 1,020

1

26.360,330

11

Jan.

Feb.
Feb.

4..
11..

15..

Feb. 25..
Mch. 4..
Mcb. 11..
Mch. 15..

104,7^)0,540
1,684.67 v

Mch. 25..
A pi.
1..
Apl. 8..
Apl. 15..
Apl. 22.

130,680,170
135,607,060

0,797,755 Apl. 29.’.’
310,295,891
1,297
17, “ .
6...
146,927,975 May
340.938,000
1,878
...31
.

14

tt

July

1, “
15, “
Aug. 5, “
12, “

.

1,447
1,504
1,523
1,530

it

19, “

.

.
.

.

364,020,756

154,120,015

377,574,281
379,781,701

165,794,440
169,598,960

390,000,000

172,664,460

the

following statement shows
condition of the Associated Banks of the citv of New

York, for the week ending at the
ness on August 19, 1805 :
Banks.
New York
Manhattan
Merchants
Mechanics
Union
America
Phonix

City
Tradesmen’s.
Fulton

Chemical
Mereht. Exchange..
National
Butch. «fc Drovers..
Mech’s & Trad’s....

Greenwich,.,,




commencement of busi¬

Loans and
Discounts.

of

Net

Circula-

Specie.

Deposits.

tion.
$43,702

"*

Legal
Tenders.

5,409,614

$1,5S4,994
1,330,1-1

4,f3l,366

1 326,166

$11,905,630

5,788.883

902.940
924.(32

15,063
24.4: ,7

867.117
312,043

22,(96

4,082 7 71

1.099,161

3.856.733

7.010,445

1,735.439

76i

3.562,109
7.397,332

2,353,277

3,613.304

230.394

2 907.124

63o,056

503,393
8,333,378
2,098.166

403,512
41,(>66

3,064.077

247,947
542.161

5.421,551

2.507,284
2,341,340

2,8S5,152
1,727,453

i.800,235

326.606
915.260

12,462
463,870
80,595

S9,993
37,017

3

*

19,172

894 932

336.001
26 157

2,167.189

22,690
17,863

5.701.183

703,-198

1,786,8.i0
1.234,294
1,922.5S8

440,704
447,619
202,487

1,483,431
701,084

513,226

1,29S,7?5

4.511
37.043

88,795

9,588

.

148,347,341
156,588,095
156,536,217
174;593,016

5^645,970
4*346,658
n:

\639,575

the totals of the Banks’

July 1..
July 8.-*.
July 15..
July 22..
July 29..
Aug. 5 .

Specie

195,044,687

20.152, S'

i

tion.

Deposits.

3,183.526

21,357,608 3,074,029

189,6SG,750

Tenders.

147,821,891
148.931,299

20,211,569 2.979,851 156.068,355
18,396,985 2,957.899 149,247,991
19,682,308 2,868,646 152,703,316
150.711,166
185,515,904 20.297.346 2,821.996
186,365,126 20,682.819 2,855.982 156,150,634
183.534,735 20,092,378 2,739.383 153,948,481
186.569.665 19,830.133 2,720,666 153.009,5S8
188,120,890 20,737.833 2,741.684 152,134,44S
211,486,651 22,256.596 4,662.505 174.479,357
207,677,503 22,066,524 4,457.162 106.956 508
204.458,355 20.584.668 4.833,980 173.3 0,491
204.153.S39 20.045.906 4.773.528 174.S50,1S5
206,503.095 19.533,734 4.757,862 177,815,945
204,723,196 19,122.233 4,700.210 184,244.399
204,277,573 19,049,913 4 600.659 193,188,733
212.172,277 20.038,399 4.SSG.937 200,46(5.785
218,502,9*0 23.553.281 4.8S9,562 203,369,8S6
219,S10,7S0 23,194.402 5,032,944 203,S54,72.»
212,445,121 22,063.929 5,066,693 197.081,017
210,416,543 21.346 493 5,323.082 186.935,680
208,392.655 18.480,620 5,402,758 185,509.953
203,944,311 16,6S0,377 5.647.944 189.947,334
213,59m,230 15906.313 5,7i'9.H70 187,5i 18,936
216,585.421 15.854.990 5,818,445 191,6515,773
187,060.586

655,828.878
661,814,434

136.117,375
185,639,790

218.541 975

19.100,594

6.001,774

193.199,005

Clearings.
535.055.071
5i8.7S0,682
611.194,907

584,179,409

518,305,222
481.028,121

511,361.387

26.713.408 412.302.403
33,645,014 625.799.238
35,295,153

604.796,728

42,989.382 509,148,691
46.424,957 4 S3.653,634
51,061,462 427.761,675
59.954 937

272.740.215

66,096.274 859,950.814
66,258.849 508.899.215
61,052 537 511.914.441
55,625,517 510,767,345

54,524,078 429,221,798
51.065,440
56,201.836

889.049.879
420542,766

62,567,344 542,07C,189
58,560.589 519,448.415
60.904.445 473.720,318
62.519,708

221,285,082 20.400.441 6.256.945 200,4‘20.2S3 60.054,646
222,960,305 20.332.903 6.5S9,766 193,790,096 52,756,229
222,341.966 20,773,155 7,085.454 186,766,671 46,956,782
219.102,793 19.400.380 7.656.370 178,247,674 43,561.973
215,4 9,342
20,163,292 . S,050 361 175,738,185 43,006,428
210,827,581 19.604.636 7,639,575 174,593,016 45,583,98

375.504.141
5.70 959,312

517,174,956

494,854,139
576,961,325
463.488,275

492,697,782

\

$6,70S, 726

4

3..
June 10..
June 17..
June 24..

12..
Aug. 19..

$6,226,883

6,172.069
5,021 031

June

Au 2.

Average amount

r"

May
May 20.
May 27..
.

New York City Banks.—Tiie

Deposits.

tion.

9;356,635

Circula¬

145.524,560
169,099,296

192,949,736

5

t

Statements for each wreek of the current- year: Legal
Jan.

Circulation.

20,794,268

following comparison shows

The

Loans.

Banks.

Date.

“

210,827,5S1

latest dates

Jan’y 7, 1S65,
21, “ .
4,

1865

1863

been

from January, 1865, to

35,5b8,486
31,520,499

1 S‘6 4

$154,885,701
175,713,139
1 So,998,407

1SG‘2

'.|

Specie.

Discounts.

605,939

163,737

Philadelphia

Banks.—The following comparative state¬

of the

condition of the leading items
Philadelphia Banks, for the past and previous week:

ment

shows the average

Aug. 15.

Capital Stock.
Loans

Specie
Legal Tenders
Deposits
Circulation

...

$14,442,350
54529,718

Aug. 22.
$14,442,350
51,920,580

1.153.931

20,845,048
44.561,748

6,989,217

following comparison show's the
adelphia banks at stated periods since
The

Dec
Inc
Dec

1.160,222
20,561,963

Dec

41,848,178

Inc

7,076,587

609,183
6.291

283,085
3,218,570
87,820

condition of the

1863 ;

.

Phil¬

Date.

Loans.

January 5,1863
July 6,1S63
January 4,1864
July 4,1S64
January 3, 1865
February 6, “
March 6,
April 3,
“
May 1,
“

$37,679,675

Circulation.

Specie.
$4,510,750

Deposits.
$28,429, lr 8

2,564,553
2,055,810

29.878.920

2,154,528

35,945,305

1,803,583

2,793,468

39,845,963

Ditto in the provinces
Dividends payable
Various discounts
Re-discounts

50,269,473
49.223,540

1,702,776
1.389,264

38,496,337

Surplus of receipts not distributed —...

50,522,030

1.343.223

51,726,389
53,095,683

1,262,253
1,258,782

4.393,173
5,346,021
3,893,626
6,441,407
6,717,753

35,936,811

<

35,693 803

40,918,009
48,059,403

'

4,360,745

4,158,535
8,9.v%S66

Accounts current at Paris

28,504,544

“
“
“

50,18S,778

1.137,700

6,758.585

6.986,662

47,762.100

54,529.718

1,154.005
1,153.931

Aug. 22,

“

51,920,530

1,160,222

t

V

41,344 053

54 357,695

6,989.217

41,348,173

Ohio Banks.—The

following is the quarterly statement of I
the banks of Ohio, showing the condition of the several incor- j
porated banking institutions of that State on the first Monday |
of August, 1865, as shown by their returns, made under oath |
RESOURCES.
Free
Banks.

Impendent
Banks

Branches
State Bank
Total of
of Ohio. ; all Banks.

$258, S67
446,782

$43,730
7S,ai2

525,622

16,697

1,523,239

1,731.438

14,677

1,752.171

191,501
297.279
1,510.465

93,926

736.971
531.714
92.925

1,362.611

115,665

76,563
33,540

2,948

So, 881

1,947

1,010.961

$156,615

$5,052,212

$3,768,867

$2,159,000

United States
Safety Fund and Bond and Mort¬
gages
Real estate and persanal praperty..
Checks and other Cash Items
Other resources

.

.

.

£

6,369

$905,000

$50,000

405,690

310.930,386 18

303,419,287 45

308,820,460 0
60,012,023 25
12,324,854 0
14,711,100 0

325,716,323
60,701,323
12,155,545
14,924,100
10,470,900
31,078,900

10,425,000
30,711,100

21,51S,380

Safety Fund Stock

Permanent Reserved Fund
Circulation
Due to banks and bankers
Due to individual depositors
Dividends unpaid

210,250
58 047

66,095

0

43,891

485.336

916

3,244,599

170,115
662.731

400

16,013

3,90S. 247

BANK
j

8,410,303 0
676,083 65
12,081,121 37

167.528

152,253

319,7S1

98.254

140.884

242,899

1,780
94,669

&c

1,780

94,669

$3,768,867

$8,977,669

3,760

$156,615

$5,052,212

Foreign Banking.—The

following are the returns of the
England for the week ending Aug. 9, 1865 :

Capital

•

•

•

•'*-+

•

DEPARTMENT.

Other securities

3,634,900

j Gold coin and bullion.

13,345,060
£27,995,060

£27,995,060
DEPARTMENT.

Government securities

Propriet’rs* capital... £14,553,000

including de’d weight
annuity'
£10,384,209

3,517,S79

Rest

Public

dep’its, including exchequer, sav¬
ings banks, commis¬
sioners of

,

Other securities
Notes.
Gold and silver coin..

national

21,341,857

5,972,930
878,330

debt and dividend

5,264,789

accounts

Other
Seven

deposits
day & other bills

y
f

553,527

Market.

1
'tr

■

od!

O 43

(Marked thus * are
! ■
National.)

1

j

Periods.

£ ] Am on t.

j

-

.

!

£3S,577,326

:

£628,100
60,362

of

6.454

Ap increase of other deposits of..*.

No change in Government
A decrease of other securities of.
A decrease of bullion of
A$? increase of rest of
A decrease of reserve of

securities.
327,961
.

‘

2.34,258
9,065

389,942

The

principal change in the above return is the decline in
the bullion, which is attributed partly to the shipments of
of gold to Brazil and partly to the demand for coin for the
harvest.

The reduction in the other securities indicates the

diminished demand for money.
Foreign Banking.—The

following is the return of the Bank
made up to the 10th August. The return for the
France,
previous week is added :
of

DEBTOR.

h

100!

America
American*
American Exchange*

132* 145

3,000,000:Jan. and July. .July

100;
500.000...
100; 5,000,000 May and Nov... May

.5

August 3 1865.

f.

Reserve of the bank and branches
New reserve
Notes in circulation and at the branches
Drafts drawn by the bank on the branches
of the bank payable in Paris or in the




r?

&

( n i u

•

I n f u n n *w n u i u /

I

;

c.

182.500,000

Capital of the bank
Profits, in addition to capital

113

116

300,000!Jan. and July... July
500,000!Jan. and Juty... IJuly

100
Atlantic*.
Atlantic (Brooklyn).
50

Bowery*

1,000,000-Tan. and July... jJulv
12 200
300,000;Jan. and July... ’July
Bull’s Head*
200,000; Quarterly. “... jJuly
3
25!
Butchers
Drovers'
800,000’Jan. and July
July
5120
Central*
100; 2,000.000‘May and Nov ..May
7106 106
50i
Central (Brooklyn)..
200,000 Jan. and July .iJuly
—
...
Chatham*
25;
450,000! Jan. and July I July
7129 180
Chemical*
100!
300,000!.. Quarterly
July
6
Citizens’
25!
400,000Jan. and July... July .5 & 5 ex. 185
100: 1,000,000’May and Nov... May
City
i
50;
City (Brooklyn)..:..
300,000!Jan. and July... July
Commerce*
100,10,000,000,Jan. and July... July
5 103X104*
99
Commonwealth*.... 100!
750,000|Jan. and July... July
5
93
Continental*
100 3,000,000! Jan. and July... July
4
Corn Exchange
100; l,000,-000|Feb. and Aug... Aug.
5 106XHO
100
Currency*
100,000; Jan. and July... July
30
200,000 ..Quarterly
Dry Dock
July
3
100
East River*
50;
259,150!Jan. and July... jJuly
4
100:
250,000!Jan. and July... iJuly *
5
Eighth*
Fifth*
100.
150,000’Jan. and July... IJuly .5 & 3 ex
First*
100!
500,0C0iMay and Nov... May
10
First (Brooklyn)*
!Jan. and July... July .7 & 5 ex.
99
Fourth*
100 5,000,000‘March and Sept March
5 95
26
50
50!

Broadway*
Brooklyn

.

..

...

..

..

...

f

..

30:
Fulton*
600,000jMay and Nov... |May
20
Far. & Cit.(Wm’sbg)
160,000jMarcliand Sept. March
Gallatin
! 100 U
5QO,OOOjAprilourl Vnvr6 ;April
and Oct...
OAH AAA Mor
Greenwich
j 25
200,000 May aud Nov... 'May
Grocers'*
1 50
300,000;Jan. and July... iJuly
Hanover*
100! 1,000:000 Jan. and July... July
50

Irving*

LeathcrManufact'rs*!

50;

Long Island (Brook.)

50'

50
Manhattan
j
Manufact’ rers’ (Wbg)! 30
Manufac.&Merch’nts 100;
30
Marine

100

Mechanics’
Mechanics’ (Brook.).
Mech. Bank. Asso.*.
Meehan. & Traders’*
Mercantile*

lio'
6
5
5 105
4 80
4
5
4
5

Nassau
j
Nassau (Brooklyn)..
National
>
New York*
:
New York County*.!

Ninth*
North America*
North River
Ocean
Oriental
Pacific
Park*

.....

—

0
2

7.044,776
22.105,750 14*
4.000,000 0
897,359,925 0

f.

c.

182,500.000 0
7.044,776 2
22,105,750 14
4,000,000

0

897,333,075

0

Phoenix*

‘

8,543,414

9

5
6

500.000'May and Nov,.. May
5 98
600,000j May and Nov... May .5 & 5 ex.
100 1,000,000] Jan. and July... I July
5
50! 3,000,000,June and Dec |June
5 108
..5
50; 1.235,0001Jan. and July.. .jJuly
100; 4,000,000|Jan. and Jufy... jJuly .5 & 5 ex li5
4 108
100;. 1,000,000:Jan. and July.. .jJuly
100j
300,000'Jan. and July... 'July
115
50 1,500,000 April aud Oct... j April
100 3,000,000|Jan. and July... 'July
100
200,000!Jan. and July... iJuly
100
300,000lJan. and July... iJuly
6
100 l,000,000[Jan. and July... jJuly
5 100
100 1,000,000!Jau. and July...iJuly
.5 & 5 ex. 107
50
400.000! Jan. and July.-.. July
6 130
50! 1,000,000! Feb. and Aug... Aug
4
5
50; 300,000!Feb. and Aug... 'Aug
50; 422,700;May aud Nov... |May
5 155
100! 2,000,000! Jan. and July... ' July .6 & 10 ex. 140
5110
25! 412,500Jan. and July... July
20! 1,800,000!Jan. and July... IJuly
5 93
6100
100! 2,000,000; Feb. and Aug.. Aug.
100; l,000,000jFeb. and Aug... Aug..

155
110

..

.

..

100: ‘

Sixth*
State of New York..
Tenth*
.....

Williamsburg City..

500,000Jan. and July... July

May
300,000;May and Nov
lOOi 1,500,000! April and Oct.. April
100;

Union

8,887*370 77

100
115

110
103
118

120

104
109
90

150*

......

,

St. Nicholas’*
Seventh Ward*
Second *
Shoe & Leather

Third*
Tradesmen’s*

500,000;Jan. and July... July
400,000iFeb. aud Aug... ;Aug

.

Peoples’

Republic*

.

..

i

NewYorkExchange*

500,000Jan. and July.. July
600.000! Feb. and Aug... Aug
400,000: Feb. and Aug... 'Aug
2,050,000 Feb. and Aug... |Aug
210,000;Jan. and July.. .iJuly

25
25

Merchants’*
Merchants’ Exch.*..

Metropolitan*

180

,5

1,000,000; Jan. and July...!July
6140
25 2.000,000 Jan. and July.. .July ...5&5ex
50
500,000!Jan. and July... iJuly
—

Market*

..—

Aug. 10, 1865.

provinces.

Bid. Ask.

Last Paid.

•

Importers &Traders'j 100' 1,500,000;Jan. and July... July

.
£38,577,326 |

An increase of circulation of
An increase of public deposits

decrease of

.

14,688,181

'Compared with the preceding week, the above, statement
shows

a

.

£27,995,060 I Government debt.... £11,015,100

BANKING

0
3
25

1,505,928,873 9

Dividend.

.

..

•

0
0
0
14*
91
0

LIST.

STOCK

Companies.

16,413

•-

Other liabilities

•

666,700
517,250
60,000,000
12,980,750
36,657,487
100,000,000
8,452,608
637,426
12,557,438

676,700 0
540,750 14
30,000,000 0
12,980,750 14
36.557.4S7 91
100,000,000 0

circulation of notes, and
in the deposits.
18,822,000f

235,250
1.300,310
j
699.343

1,176,168

profits

Notes issued

0
25
0

0
0
0
21,435,280 0

0
0

674,000f in the

208.5(H)

25.000

ISSUE

493,250,443 55
407,101 53

The above return, compared with that of last week, shows
a decrease of 6,883,000f in the stock of coin and bullion ; a
decrease of 9,385,000f in the discounts; a decrease of

3,277,313

B1LITIES.

Discount, interest,
Government tax

4S6.367.606 40
200,032 67

'

Sundries

Bonds of Ohio, other States and

.

1,505,928,873 9

CREDITOR.

$8,977,696

$1,144,000

N

1,488,031,121 57

108,411

undivided

10,403,105 92

1,427,623 17
752,993 86
11,614,951 63

1.055,4-18

$22,500
Eastern Deposits
Notes of other banks and United
States notes
Due from other banks and bankers
Notes and bills discounted

Contingent Fund and

752.993 36

Expenses of management

$325,097

497

2,790,831 89

1,427,623 17

Cash and bullion
Commercial bills overdue
Ditto discounted in Paris
Ditto in the branches
Advances on bullion in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on public securities in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto on obligations and railway shares
Ditto in *the provinces
Ditto on securities in the Credit Foncier
in Paris
Ditto in the provinces
Ditto to the State
Government stock reserve
Ditto other securities
Securities held
Hoteband property of the bank & branches

44,561,749

,016,o31

2,674,573 75

3,293,873 96

1,488,031,121 57

44,794.824
41.518,576

Aug. 7,
Aug. 14,

the Auditor of State :
'
'

30,028.948 0
2,267,866 75

38.816.S47

July 10,"

J

170.182,122 31

Sundries

38,391,622

“

144,919,196 24
179,439,442 81
39,593,694 0

148,176,877 17

Treasury account

$4,504,115

June 5,

to

269

THE CHRONICLE.

August 26, 1865.]

lOOi

..

200,000;May and Nov...
100! 2,000,000;May and Nov...
100: 1,000,OOOiJan. and July...
100 l,000,000|Feb. and Aug...
40! l,000,000;Jan. and July...

May
May

July
Aug.
July
60i l,500,000jMay and Nov... May
B0'
600,0001Jan: and July... July

104
100

.

.

4100
.

110

.

V.

.

5
.
.

:

.6 & 4

ex,

18

105

lis*

270

THE CHRONICLE.

[August 26, 1865.

SALE-PRICES AT THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
(REPRESENTED BY THE CLOSING SALE REPORTED OFFICIALLY ON EACH DAY OF THE WEEK ENDING
FRIDAY, AUWVST 23.)
SECURITIES.

fc’alur.

Mou

Tues.

Wed

rThur. f

Fri.

Mon.

Saiur.

SECURITIES.

I

Wed

Tue».

Tliurs

Fri.

I

'

American Gold Coin
National.
United States Gs, 18G7
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

,

143%'

j

143%

Railroad Stocks.

:

!

i
'

119%;

i

6s,
6s, 1S68
6s, 1881
6s, 1SS1
6s, 5-20s
6s, 5-208
6s, 5-208 (new)

Chicago and Alton.. *

1

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy

registered.
-106% 107

coupon.]

registered .\

1

do

107

!

106% 106%

do
do

do
do

do
do

...

'2d series.
.‘Id series.

6s, Certificates,(new.)

99%
99%
do
do
99% 99%! 99%; 99% 99%
j! ji Harlem
99% * 9938
99% 99%
do
preferred
98
! 9S% | 93%! 98% 88%
Hudson River...

99"
993

do

;i

1860

.—

Long Island
do
do

j

1862

ii

-do
1870
do 1877

—i

.

do
do

1st
2d

.

do

do
do
do

do
do

do

do

j: New York Central

Massachusetts 5s
Michigan 6s, 1873
do
63,1878
do
6s, 18S3
do
7s, 1868
do
7s, 1878
do
7s, War Loan..
Minnesota 8s

:

:

•.

St.

70%; 70%

:

.

1

70%.

Second

do
avenue

Sixth

100%

j

i

-—

j

;

;98%

avenue

1S71
5s, 1874

do
do

—|

—

—

-3—!
j

100:

60

—

.100; 125

j

100!
50!
50

:

60

——

.

—
—

:

do
do

—

1st mortgage

95%

Income.

Chicago. Burlington and Quincy; 8 per cent...
Chicago and Milwaukee, 1st mortgage........
Chicago and Northwestern, Sinking Fund....

—
■

1876

do
do
do
do

—
—

do
do
do
do

109% I

Interest...
Extension

78

1st mortgage

80%; 80%

2d mortgage

60%

Chicago and Rock Island, 1st mortgage

Cleveland and Pittsburg, 2d mortgage—
do
do
3d mortgage, conv..
do
do
4th mortgage, v
Cleveland and Toledo, Sinking Fund

—

...

do
-I

5s

coupon

72%

72% i

6s, Water Loan. .<
6s, Public Park Loan....

.

!; Michigan

93%
95

102

1102
02

,

Central 8s, 1869-72..,

do
do 8s. n *\v. 1882.,..
j
J! Michigan Southern, Sinking Fund

j!

do

do

do
do
Ij Milwaukee and
j

lOOj 135
100
100
100
..100
10(
50
50
1(X

-|

150

38

40

33

j

152

150

9% |

!

37%: 39

! —1

j

!

1 20

42

j

11%

Metropolitan Gas

do

285

5f

..100
iou

52
73

54% 54% 64%
73

;

—

—

97

2d mortgage,.7s

97

97

90

Goshen Line, 1868

do
do

;

2d

mort...;

3d mort...

95

95%;

St. Louis, Alton and Terre llaute, 1st mort...
do
do
do
2d,

—

Toledo and

100

do

do

!lll

112

Prairie du Chien, 1st mort
Milwaukee and St. Paul. 1st mortgage
.do
do
Income
Mississippi and Missouri, Land Grants
NewT York Central 6s, 1883.
do
do
6s,1887.........
do
do
6s, Real Estate.
do
do
6s, subscription
j
do
do
7s, 1876..;.;
:
!
do
do
7s, convertible, 1876........!
Ohio and Mississippi, 1st mortgage
|
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago, 1st mort.. |
do
do

New York Gas

Telegraph

?

,

•

Miscellaneous.

Nicaragua Transit
Pacific Mail
Steamship
Pennsylvania Coal
Quicksilver Mining

-102%

do
Consolidated and Sinking Fund
do
2d mortgage, 1868
Hudson River, 1st mortgage, 1869
:!
do
2d mortgage, (S. F.), 1885...
i i
do
3d mortgage, 1875
i!
do
convertible, 1867
; Illinois Central 7s, 1875
!
Lackawanna and Western Bonds...:
! j Marietta and Cincinnati, 1st mortgage

New York 7s, 1875...
do
6s, INTO.
do
6s. 1878..
do
6s. 1887..
do
5s, 1867..
do
5s, 1868...
do
5s. 1870...
do
5s, 1873...
do
Be, 1874...
do
5s, 1875...
do
5s. 1876...
do
5s, 1890...
do
5s. 1898...
do
5s,F. Loan,

Mariposa Mining

2d mort.

Harlem, 1st mortgage, 1869-72.

6s, Imnrovement Stock.

Canton, Baltimore

do

do 4th mortgage, 1880.
do 5th mortgage, 1888—
Galena and Chicago, extended
do
2d
do
mortgage
Hannibal and St. Joseph, Land Grants.

Municipal.

Central Coal...
Central American Transit
Cumber and Coal, preferred
Delaware & Hudson Canal.
Harlem Gas
Manhattan Gas Light

do

Erie, 1st mortgage, 1S68
do 2d mortgage, ISM
do 2d mortgage, 1879.
do 3d mortgage, 1883—

53

Wisconsin 6s
do
6s, War Loan

Atlantic Mail Steamship
Brunswick Land

94

Delaware, Lackawanna and Western, 1st mort.

Vermont 6s




‘

•

preferred.100;

Chicago and Alton, Sinking Fund

5*

Weitern Union

'

:

....

;qko

.

!

Tennessee 6s, 1868
do
6s, Long Loans

do
do

95% I 96
103% j 103%

1 24 | 23%

Atlantic and Great Western, 1st mort
do
do
2d mort
Buffalo, New York and Erie. 1st mort., 1877...

—

•

do*

| 24% j 24%

....

avenue

92%
J

24

Toledo, Wabash and Western
do
do
do
preferred.

—

•

!

do

135

!

i

100 94% 94% 94% 95j
50 102% 103 102% 103
33
.100!
—

Lotus, Alton and Terre Haute

Third

6s. 1875
6* 1377

Brooklyn 6s

92

100:
100:

100;

Railroad Bonds

Virginia 6s.

1 —
—| —
!
i
! —=
100 91
1 90% ; 90% i 91

—

100;

*

do

I
1

do

75

'

! 75

New Haven and Hartford..100:
Norwich and Worcester...!.
..100,
Ohio and Mississippi Certificates
,
do
do
do
preferred... J
Panama
100;

Reading.

New York 7s, 1870

Ohio Gs, 1868
do 6s, 1870
do 6s, 1875
do 6s, 1881
do 6s. 18S6
Rhode Island 6s
South Carolina 6s

75

41%

—

!

pref... 100
100;

Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago.

•

7s, State Bounty Bonds

42%

!

7

j

-

(Hannibal and St. Joseph RR.)...

6s, 1874

45%

pref...100j

Mississippi and Missouri
I Morris and Essex
!j New Jersey
*

Louisiana 6s.

44%

39%; 40

1001

1st
2d

i

Kentucky 6s, 1868-72

62%

preferred...

:

22

62%

,

guaranteed. ..100;

ij Milwaukee and St. Paul
87

90

100j 39
!
j 40
,.100 -—;
;10G
100 106
107
100 62% 62%! 62% i —

preferred
preferred

Michigan Central
Michigan So. and N. Indiana
do
do

—

do
5s
do
2+s
Iowa 7s, War Loan

5s

97

501
.100!

| Milwaukee and Prairie du Chien

,

—

War Loan

do
do

97

108%! —
j 120%! 121% 122

1122

50'
.100

..

'

!' Marietta and Cincinnati
1

123

100i

Indianapolis and Cincinnati

I

(lo

—
—

i 108%; 107%!

100]

:

Illinois Central

.

rln

100 j
50;
50;

"

—

■'

do

do
do

preferred

Joliet and Chicago.

6s,"coupon, *79, after

do
do
do

|
j

112

100;
100j

'

Illinois Canal Bonds. 1860.

Missouri 6s
do
6s,

100 99

preferred...

.

Georgia 6s

do

do

120
*96

100;

j Chicago and Milwaukee
-1
.coupon. 106% 106% 106% 106% 106% 106% !
Chicago and Northwestern
i
100 : 27% 27%; 27%
27% 27%
registered. 101%
105
-104%
do
do
preferred.......100’ 60% 61% 1 60% 61% 62% 62%
104% 104% 104% 104%;
104% ! Chicago and Rock Island
107
100 106
106%. 105
107
6s. Oregon War, 1881
1
;
! Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati
125
100
j
6s,
do.
do.
yearly).\
;
;
J
!
fj Cleveland and Pittsburg
50; 67 i 69% i 67% 67% 69% 70%
5s, 1S71
1 ——;
coupon.] —j
;100 i
j Cleveland aud Toledo
50:
5s, 1871..
registered.
i Delaware, Lackawanna and Western....
50;
5s, 1874
97
coupon.
I; Eighth Avenue
100i
5s, 1874.
registered.
j! Erie.........
100! S2%! 84% 83% 84% 85% 86%
97
! 97% 97% I 97% 97%: 98%
5s, 10-40s
coupon
82
: 84
83
jj do preferred
100;
82%
5s, 10-4)3
registered.
|i Hannibal aud St. Joseph
100|
7-30s Treas. Notes
1st series.
993
99%:
-

California 7s. large
Connecticut 6s, 1872

do
do

10
100;

i

State.

do
do

Brooklyn City

! Central of New Jersey

:

54% >5

do
do
do
do

do

do

-

Wabash, 1st mortgage

pref....!

2d, income.'

do
do
do

1st mortgage, <
2d mortgage...
Interest Bonds

do

Equipment....

;

86%

&

August 26, 1365.]

THE CHRONICLE.
NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL
|

Amount

1

INTEREST.

j

V

| Rate-j

.

I

.

j Princi j MARKET, j
;
pal
j
!
| Due. ! Bid- | Asked J

Payable.

American Gold Coin
National Securities.

9,415,250

1848.
do
I860.
do
1858.

coupon. 1

Jan. & July 1868

registered. (

1861.
do

7.032,000

coupon, i
registered. s
coujxm I

ido

„

8,908,342

1

coupon.

,

Jan. &

20.000,000

.

5

&

(10-403).
do,/

1881

Stq-te Securities.
Alabama—State Bonds

do
do
ta
do
Illinois—Canal Bonds
do
Registered Bonds
do
Coup
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
War
do

...

!

•'

!

State

•SOO.OtK)

2,000,000
516.000

3,192,703.

State Scrip

i
I

5

State Bonds
State Bonds
State Bonds
.j'
War Loan
Minnesota—State Bonds
!
Missouri--State Bonds
!
do
State Bonds for RR.. .f
do
State Bonds (Pag. RR)
do
State Bonds (H,&St.J)
do
Revenue Bonds
New Hampshire—State Bonds...
do
War Fund Bds
do v
War Fund N’ts
New Jersey—State
i
Scrip
do
War Loan Bonds,
.j
New York")'
do
do
do
General Fund...,
do
do
do
.

y
J
Bounty Bonds..
Comptroller’s Bonds.

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

1,200,0 0
6.50a,000
2,100,000.

*,000 7
750,0001 6
700,000 7
250.000
539.000

7,000,000
436,0!0

6

535,100 6
1,650.000! 6
2.500,000
' 95,000
731,000
„
700,000'
.180.780

500,000j

800.000
909.607

442,961
900.000

800,000

8
6
6

-j

do
do
do

Loan
Foreign Loan

Loan,
Loan
Loan
Loan
Loan

;

Foreign
Foreign
Foreign
Foreign
Foreign

j

6

■3

*-s
3

Union Loan Bonds
Union Loan Bonds
Pennsylvania- -State Bonds
do( f
State Stock,

379,866: 6
oiS3 53->!6
LmoOO 6

1,708.000
State Bonds
1,310,000
Bonds..
i
-TWVooo
do
Railroad Bonds. ’...! pj1799
000'
do
Improvement Bonds1" 2,871,000!!
’
ermont—State Certificates
175,000:
do
War Loan Bonds
2,000.000
do

6

6

\irginia—Inscribed Certificates.
18,264,642:
do
Railroad Bonds

‘W’lsrovfTV—State Bonds
do




War Fund Bonds...

.

•

'1881

800.000 0
1*800 000' 6

~

:

;1886

97

;

I

Jan. &

do
do
do
do

1
....

j 97# ;;;;

St.

1.400,000

2.0(H),000949.700
4.996.000

1.442.100
552.700
739,222’

CityBds.new
City Bds,old

,

Railroad

1,009.700 6
1.800.000 5
907,000 6
500.000

Bonds.;

ioi

Pacific RR
O. & M. RR
IronMt. RR

!:San Francisco, Cal.
do
do

1

ij
57#

'ti

600.000
500. (XX)
300.000

200,000
150,0001
260.000

-r
.

1.496.100 :
440,800
1,464.(XX)

j.
.

Water
Harbor...
Wharvec

100

do

.

do
do

^

6

1,500,000 6

City Bonds. ..j

Sewerage
Improaement..

°83 "93

^77 ‘88

490,0001

County B’ds

91

July 1810

6

102.000
895.570

Lhiion Del". L.
Vol. B’nty L‘11

Louis, Mo.— Municipal...

var.

’78;

7.898.717

500,000
154,000 <

Tonip.M'ket S!

Real Estate.

var.

l‘07

2,232.800

150,000

Pub. Edu. S’k.j

Railroad
si Sacramento, Cal.—City Bonds..
do

var.

S"85 ’93:

1

6
6
6
5
5
5
6
6
6
6
5
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
6

1.800,000!
2,748,000

Providence, R. I.—City Bonds..
do
Railroad B’ds;
do
Water Loan.. j
Rochester, N. Y.- -City Bonds... 1

i

-

I

600,000

Docks&SlipsS

do
do

1S75

•

12,624,600 6

do

1868

1

Real Estate B.
Croton W'r S.
Fl.D’t. F'd. S.
Pb.B.Sk. No. 3

2,500.000

Jan. & July "(»8 "9( j
do
11877
'1868

5
6
6
6

....

196”
I

5
5

S..
399,300 5
S.j■ 3,066,071' 6
S.
275,000' 6
C’.P.Imp.F. S.j 2.0t>),200i 6
C’.P.Imp. F. S.j 1,966.000’ 6

do
Railroad Bonds.!
Portland. Me.—City Bonds
j
do
Railroad Bonds,!

11870

Various.
var.
90
do
! var. ! 91
Feb. & Aug.‘1871 .100
I
1
Various.
71 "91
1

4,000,000j 6

74

190.000
402,768

S.

CityBds.new
Pittsburg, Pa.—City Bonds
|

j

vcir.

Bu.S‘kNo.394
Fire Indem.
Central P‘k
Central P'k
Central P‘k

l.(KK).OCX)

do
do
do

!

:

CrotonW’r S'ki
W’r S'k of ’49j
W'r S’k of *54:

Vol.Fam.AidL;

99

jl865
1866
1868
1871

*

CrotonW’rS’kj

.Philadelphia, Pa.—City Bds.old

j 98
i 99

.

Cj

May & Nov.jlSOS
do
j 1S71

23.209,000^ 5
3,000,000: 6

••••

i

do
do
do
do
do

«

6.168.000

•

98

:Jan. & July I860
* 1S65
do

TENNESSEE^-State
v

•

11876

!

279,213

do
1
Military L‘u Bds
Rhode Island—State
(War) Bds.
South Carolina—State Stock...!

•

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Vol.Fam.AidL
NewYorkC’nty.—C"t House S"k
do
do
Sol.Sub.B.R.B
do
do
Sol.S.&Rf.R.B
do
»do
Sol.B’ntvFd.B
do
do
Riot Dam.It.B

.

1

>>

400.000

;

|

1875

705.336! 6
1.015,000! 5

0 4(H).000

f

!

1874

cS

:

4,095,309 6

;

i

•-!

1866
1872
1873

9,129,585! 6
.

I

var.

f!1865

;

Ohio—Foreign

various.

-

195,000! 5
1.212,0001 5 "j
236,000 j 5
4.500,000| 5 'J

l

North Carolina

|j.

....

h

6
7
425.000, 5
150,000 6
150,000 5
200,000 6
3.000,200 5
2,141,000 5
900,000 5
100,000' 6
483,900! 5
1.878.900 5

City—Water Stock.. (
do
Water Stock..

'

98

-

6
.6
6
6

900.000

Bonds,

3.450,000
6,000.0002,250,000
500,000:

New York
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
i!
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Juiy

7
6
6
6
5
5
5
5

219.000
100.000

.

523.000
425.000
25-1.000.

484,000

239,000
163.0001
457.000

6
6
6
5
.7
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6

429,900: 0
....

City Bonds.
City FireB.
City Bonds.
C.&Co’tvB.

C.&Co’tyB.

C.&Go’tyB.
Ci&Go’tyB.

Various,

285,000 6
1,352.600 10
-

17S,500 10
829,0001 6

1,133,500 ; 0
800,000| 7

97

100

IOC-'

;

j’65’81;

do
465’75:
Jan. & July "77 ’83 92
!

Various.

6

; 6
10

!■ 8
911.500 4

.

94# i

..

..

.

July "71 ’78

Jan. &
var.
do
* i‘71 ’72
do
1S70
100
do
j
pleas.
do
' 1868 1
do
1878
:
do
pleas. \
jMav & Nov. 186S i
Jan. & Julv : 1875
90
do
1878 ;
Jan. & July 1895

743,000 6

4Canal

...

6

j 7

>

do
City Bonds
I .Milwaukee. Wis.—City, re-adj’d;
J'Newark, N. J.—City Bonds
.•
do
City Bonds
;
I |New Bedford, Mass.—City Bds.!
i :New London, Ct.—City Bonds...
.! Newport, R. I.—City Bonds,
J |New IIaven, Ct.—City Bonds

....

3,000,000 6

..

.'I

...

...

8
6
6
6

13.700.000

do
J!
Water Bonds
j iMaysville, Cal.—City Bonds

"81’97! 94

Jan. & JnlyilS71
! 87#
Various, i‘65’72;
Jan. & July’75’77,
Various, j’65‘80
!Feb. & Aug 1882 j
Jan. & July 1876
! June &Dec. ‘1883

118.000 7
650,000 9

!..

83

,‘65 ’79

Apr. & Oct. 1865

7

122,000

.

j

I860

1

375,000 6
.

..

.

125,000 6
130,000 ; 6
500.000 6

j

.

& Julvll868
!
do
j’73‘78
do
ilS7S
i
95do
j
|1SS3
....j
do
1866
i
do
1867
do
1SS3
71
72
!
do
i ’71 ‘89
i
do
; ‘71
"87j
do
!’71 ’85do
1S66
Feb. & Aug. 1876
i

70

400,000

|

•

98#
100

Apr.Oct.j

50,000 6
650.000 7
319,457- 8

.

Mar.&Sept.| 1865

1.000,000. 6

Railroad

.

Louisville, Kv.^-City Bonds
do
*
City Bonds

96

var.

iJan.

250,000; 7

256,368

do
Park Bonds
;
do
Railroad Bonds..!.
do
Water Bonds
j'
! Jersey
City, N. J.—City Bonds.
do
do
City Bonds.;
do
do
Water Bds. •

.

Quarterly rnr S 1100 i
tarjl00#,101
Quarterly :1S90 100
Jnu. & Dec.:"08 74. 96#!
do
j*65 80 ....!
Jan. A'

6.500.000

1.544,225; 6
7

do

do
do
do
do
do
do

Quarterly"!

Bonds.coupon.\ 1.727.00'11

Bounty F'dL’n.i

do

I

4,800,000.

)

War Loan

do

Hartford, Ct.—City Bonds

.)

Mar.&Sept. ‘66 ‘07 94 >
Jan. & July j "80 ’89: 91
-j
i

20.000

96

..

7
7
7
8
7

...

Dubuque, Io.—Citv Bonds

ioi

..

Jan. &-July: 1376 |
do
j "T9 "87i 97
1
do
j1SSS !
1895 ■ 89
•Jan. & July!
■
do
* var. ■;
do
1879
do
1890
i
do
11871 1
June &Dec.‘69 ’79|

6

Water Bonds...1

•

‘65’S2

| 6

City Bonds.....!
City Bonds
;

* | ’65 ’95

Apr. & Oct. lSSl

7

Water Bonds

do
do
do

....

5,398.000
532.000

913,000

;

|’72 ’73
j’68 ‘78!
July ’65 ’71,

........

299,000 7
571,000
360.000‘6

Sewerage Bonds.!
Detroit, Mich.—City Bonds

...

Jan. &
do
do
do

1,030,000 6

I [Cleveland, O—City Bonds

_

216.000

..;

Water Bonds

do
do

..

r

634,200
1,281,000.
121,540
5,550,<'00

,

•

j 99#

"65 ’851 98
•!"67 ’77

1,063.000

Water Bonds

do

.

.

City Bonds
Sewerage Bonds

r

1.949.711

i 'Cincinnati, O.— Municipal

.

•

3,942.000

Massachusetts—State Scrip,...

do
do
do
do

.

do
do
do

99

,65 ’82- 94
*’65 ’74
i"78’79!...

791,050!

I Buffalo, N.Y.—Municipal Bonds
do
-Municipal Bonds
! Chicago,
Ill.—City Bonds
j

100

....

j

j.,A,j.&o.iiaeoj j| ioi# 162
M.,J.,S,&D.»t) 100#

4.113,866

Pub. Park L'n.i
Water Loan...!

.

1870

July 1873
May & Nov 1875
Jan. & July 1886

74«»,000
583,205

,j|

166

8,171,91*2

MicniGAN-VState Bonds

do
do

.

.

l

4,S00,000

StateBds inscribed j'

^

,

|

do
Jan. &

197,700

Brooklyn, N.Y.—City Bonds.... i
do
Improved St'k

■;

■

.

Maryland—State Bonds

|

:

•

200,000

.......

% State Bds .coupon.

99% 100

.

800,00):

-

do
do
do

1 year

i

var.

J.,X;.J.&0.1870

554.000

: 9S#

!

2.058.173
1.225,500
200.000

.

84

1913

5,000,000

imn,i Debt.....
Railroad t
Boston, Mass.—City Bonds
...!
94
I 91#
do
City Bonds
do
99#: 99#
City Bonds
993 'C 99#
do
Water Loan Stg.
do
Water Loan......

98

.

5,325,500

do
c#do
do
do
War Loan Bonds
Iowa—State Certificates
do
War Loan Bonds
Kansas—State Bonds
Kentucky—State Bonds
do
State Bonds
do
War Loan
Louisiana—State Bonds (RR)....
do
State. Bonds (RR)....
do
| State Bonds for B'ks.
Maine—State Bonds
do
War Loan
...

Park.......-.....;

.

236.000
2.000.000

York&Cum.R.

do

‘

3,500,000
1,000,00 i

do

<

1,116,500
490,000

do

Water Loan...

B.&O.R.«>?//? i
B. & O. RR.. V

■Jan. & Julv 1S77 i
l
* ‘78 ‘80 : lie
do
in
do
1S72
Oct. & Apr. ‘72 ‘8-1
do
1S85
!
Jan. & July 18S0 i so ;
do
1872
!
|
Jan. & July 1870
do
‘70 '77j
.,
95
do
1860
95
98
do
'1862
98
6
do
1865
i
6
do
1870 <
1 ...
6
do
1877 i 97
100
6
do
1879
1
6
do
1879
j 97
5
Jan. & Julv pleas.' 87 !
do
2#
pleas. 70 j . . •
6
May & Nov. 1881 ’! 97 1
7
Jan. & July 1SS7
;
|
17
do
1877
i
i
7
do
‘76 ‘78
...
5
do
var. i
6
do
var. :
V01
i
6
dd
1871
.,1
6
uern. •
i
6
■....
‘67. .69 65 i 70

28.000

N.W.Virg.RR.’i

do

5
3,926,000; 7
803,000 7
8.000.000 6
2.000,000' 6
2.073,750 6
525,000 7
3.747,000 6
3,293,274, 6
1.700.900' 6
803.000 6

.....

Miscellaneous.

,m

Aaked

11879
•

do

lft,

ai

6
6

RR. Bds.

do
do

ji

:

J’65
I’70

6

ij

;

i’70’74
"69
’82

■

600,000
4.963.000
820,000
L500,000

.,

Bid.

Due.

300,(XX)

City Bds

Baltimore, Md.—Improvement..

ij

103

1S82,

!

:

!

do

•

S50.000

do

Maturity

!

-

!

TnUtr’idoai
July-18841 |i 104,l-i, 104Jgi Bangor, Me.—City Debt
#
Pg

'

.

106,706,000 6
3.423,000

California—Civil Bonds
do /
War Bouds.
Connecticut—War Bonds
do *
Tax Exempt. B‘ds.
—

?&

!

106# 106#:

300.000,000 7.30 Jun. & Dec. 1868
.230,000,000 7.30 Jan. & July 1808

i

Alleghany City, Pa.

Payable.

MARKET.

pal

*

jl

107
101

Mar.&Sept.jl904-j

•

.

■

Princi-

$90,000 5
225,000 6

.

Alb. Nor. RR...

do

300,000.000 7.30 Feb. & Aug. 11867

do
do
(3d series)
Debt Certificates (old)

/

do

....

106/s 107

May&Nov.

do

GEORGiA-^rState Bonds

Cl** 1

;

97

TQr,
Jan.

.

114

Jan. & July 18S1

|

dT.r'&jU&ed. f 514,780.500 G

.

\

3
July,18.4-, 92

1,016,000 6-j July

TreasuryNotes (1st series)
do
Xdo
(2d series)

1120

Jan. & July 1881

6

Municipal Securities.
! Albany,
N.Y.—City Scrip
do
City Scrip
(j.
do
Water Loan

115# 117

\

July 1S71

—

%

120

io-m

a.

Jan. &

.650

registered, f
OregonWar Bds (yearly) 1
do
do
(i yearly) f
Bonds (5-20s) of 1S62
coupon.

Jan

July 1807

INTEREST.

iOutstaudins
Rate

i

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

Amount

DENOMINATIONS.

.

;

I

'Outstanding.

SECURITIES’ LIST.

j

I

DENOMINATIONS.

271

do

May
Jaii.

95

var.

j var.
1887

se Nov.
& July;
-do

June &Dec. 1S94
Feb. & Aug ’70 ’83!

Jan. & July 1873 j
Apr. & Oct. ’05 ]84,
Jan. & July ‘67 "87;
Apr. & Oct.!’73 ’84;
[Jan. & July "70 "81
87
'May & Nov. 11870

do
!Feb. &
do

1880

Aug I860

;

HS90

:

iMay & Nov.!’75 ’79;
Apr. & Oct.: 1875 i
'May & Nov..’70 "73-

90

i 98
;
1

100

|

May & Nov! 1876

I
I

‘ 1S73

l66'
102

1883 !
;1S78 j 95
1866 |
‘67 ’76!

•

11873
Jan. &

87

i

do
’ (1868
Jan. & July 1898
do
: 18-87
do
1S98
-iFeb. & Aug 1887
do
do
do
do
do

90

;

July|'6o’

|
69;

May & Nov. 1864
do
1867
1
do
'1865
do
’60’73
do
'1890
do
1881
do
,1S82
do
’87 ‘93
do
|1S9S
Jan. & July ’65 ’81|
do
.’65’82
do
j’65 "93; 91#
< 65
do
’99! 91#
do
j. var. :
1913
do
!
Various.
"95 "83;
Apr. & Oct. 1866 1
do
"68 *701 94#
Mar.&Sept. 1885 j
Jan. & July 1876 ;
do
I1S93
Various, "65 ’821
do
"65 5S2j
Jan. & July "65 ‘76
do
1884 j
do
:1884 I
do
j'6o ’83:
’65‘90
’79 ’S8
‘71 ’87
’71 ’83
‘65 ’86
’67 ’81
do
I‘71 ’73
do
I ‘72 ’74
do
j’74 ’771
•

....

92

97

...

May & Nov. 1871
July 1866

Jan. &

do
do
do

jlS7o

18S8

!
j

...

...

...

!

’77’781

660,000, 7 Apr. & Oct.:i888
l.mooo! 7 iJan, & July 1884 • i

...

...
...

...

4 4 11

272

THE

CHRONICLE.

[August 26, 1865.

Beans, bushels
Butter, pkgs, etc
Cheese,
“

<£{)e Commercial ©imes.

5,992
13,564
5,853

Cotton, bales..
Corn
“

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
Friday

Meal, hhls
hags

States still

4,152,550

2,606,015

4(30

113

13^850

237
25
1.971

,

28475

*

109

86,775

173,825

38.805

.

1,427,500

1,550,100

293.650
59.911
4.740
4.534.545

417,010
51,976
9,040
4,517,500

865

2.850

16,230
296

:

,

3,130

-

Oil—Petroleum, hbls

place very little faith in these enterprises; and, as
for several weeks, the moment “ outside ”
support is withdrawn,

201,675

6,159,065

3,489
18,S51

.=.

a

New York and the Atlantic Cities of the Eastern and Middle

225,055

528,038
158
134

'

decidedly speculative. On all sides, Eggs, hbls
Flour, hbls
plethora of money seeking investment; and in the specu¬ Flaxseed, bushels
lations that are entered upon, simple mercantile considerations are Grease, bags
Hops, hales
lost sight of. Demand and Supply are given little heed.
Hemp, “
With a Ii Hides, No.
general disposition to operate for a rise, it is only necessary to pur¬ ! Lard, pkgs
j Leather, rolls
sides
chase a few days in succession, when a speculative furore
springs
j Linseed, hags
up, and prices advance as if by magic.
The principal support to ! Malt, bush
this state of things, continues to be derived from inland towns- Molasses, hhds.
Oil Cake, pkgs
there is

254,830
320,840
198,945

1,SSO,300

'...:

Cut Meats, bbls....

The tone of the market is

310.155

18,851
4,591
1,316

Corn, bush
Copper, hhls

Night, August 25th.

332,140
310,155

17,426

Oil—Lard.

Oats, bushels
Peanuts, hags .7
Peas, bushels.
Pork, bbls.!
Rice, tes and bbls...
Rosin, hbls.
Rve, bushels
“
Seed,
Sugar, hbls
Stearine, pkgs

38,011
975

*

600
prices begin to decline. But each decline has been followed by a
179.600
8,291
263,880
new and
30
9..358
stronger moVement for a rise; and it must be observed
56.011
4,011
11,157
that confidence in these speculative
prices is increasing ; the whirl¬
31.705
156,610
86,400
539
pool of speculation is felt each day iu new branches of trade, so
1,089
that the more thoughtful look forward with increased alarm to the
72
Syrup, bbls
200
Tar,
“
•' 74
period when a collapse must come.
Tallow, pkgs
51
10,575
19,360
The speculation in Breadstuff's shows no
signs of abatement, and Tobacco, hhds
3.935
cases, etc.
3,648
begins to receive some support in this market. In Cotton all
Domestic, pkgs
82,555
176,280
22,905
15,800
buoyancy is wanting, but it is impossible to seriously depress prices
Turpentine—Crude, pkgs
6,081
1.S00
14,731
Provisions, with less speculation, show great firmness ; it is be¬
8.364
Spirits, “
\.
612
5,632
Wheat, bushels
466,690
4,181,980
8.240,290
lieved the Cattle disease in
Europe will lead to a greatly increased Wool, pkgs
51
bales
6,929
demand for cured meats from this side;
hog products ” are too
Domestic, hales
63.470
108,965
33.210
82,440
high to expect any.great export demand at present, a large decline j
Whisky, hbls
460
38,990
249,630
(iu gold prices at least) must take place before any iinpurtant ship- j Whalebone, lbs
472,100
567,750
ments can take place; but beef is
Below will be. found a statement of the Imports of a few
relatively low, and in cheese an
impor¬
advance has already been produced.
tant foreign articles for the week,
together with a comparative
The grocery trade has been active4, and
prices have mostly ad- statement.
For
Same
For
vanced.
In Coffee the sales foot up some 25,000
Sam
bags, and prime I
the
Since
time
theSince
time
Rio advanced a half cent in gold.
1S64.
week, Jan. 1.
week. Jan. 1.
1864.
Sugars have also been active* ! Coal
tons 10,103 170,309
94.465 Sugar. ..boxes
and we estimate the sales of the week at 14,000
hhds, 5,000 bxs j Cotton. .hales 435 38,923 40.545 and bags
2,731 253.165 157,658
Coffee.... hags
558,741 Teas
and 17,000 bags.
Molasses has been active, and closes at some ! Molasses, .hhds 23.059 421,967 89,875 Tobacco pkgs 1,164 316.S46 550.275
J .031 111,296
1,650
1,056
22,781
Wool
bales
advance on prime grades. The sales amount to about 1,800 hhds. Sugar....hhds,
217
35,511
95,899
bbls & tcs...
7,127 260,114 172,412
Rice has advanced one cent per pound for
Carolina, and Rangoon
The exports from this port of some of the leading articles of do¬
is more active and firmer.
Teas and spices have done better.
mestic produce have been as follows i
Metals have been without essential
change, except an advance in |
Same
Same
-

..

.

“

“

“

“

“

.

....

Zinc.

Hides and Leather have been active and firmer.
has been more active for refined with limited

Petroleum

supplies. Whiskey !

has been active.

Past
week.
4.564
29.549

j

A partial failure of the apple crop has
become apparent, and at the West much speculative excitement has
sprung up relative thereto, with a large advance in prices.
All
foreign fruits have brought full and rather hardening prices. Fish
has been without essential change.
East India goods have been
very firm, and Calcutta Linseed has advanced ten cents in gold per
bushel. This is owing to reports of the partial
failure of the crop
of domestic flaxseed.

.

Naval stores continue to

come

pentine has declined, but

*

-

forward

R-zsin and

freely, and Spirits of Tur¬
Tar are very firm and

wanted.

The auction sales of wool have barely
supported prices, and have
not called out so much demand us was
anticipated. A sale of 1,200
bales is announced for next week, which will
the

Bacon, 100 lbs
Lard
Cheese
Butter

1,S59
1,448

267,826
173,496

30.779
564

251.28-1
71.698

,.

.'.

Ashes—Pots,
casks
Ashes-Pearls
casks
Beeswax..lbs

Since
Jan. 1.

1,454
5

427
127,296
253,430
2,770
105,686
81,868
19,430 2,322,123 2.S78.511
j

..

11,91)7

17,139 Wlialeb’e.lbs

are

788

i.

28,972

5,66“ i

bags

i97

423,822

10,995

Seed—Clover

Staves.... M
773 Oil Cake, 100
367.682 ^ lbs.

following

330

5,709
25

71,609 Oil—Laid...

566
146.168

.....

647

16

59,982 1,028,640
429,814 Oil—Whale..
11.804
370.917
263,168 Oil—Petrol.. 415,490 6,139,76611,519,676

6,774

2,626

12,609

time
1864.
906

gallons

28

for the week

21,794
10,981

9,345

(^
y

11,955
....

;

412.501

331,028
183,305

401,382

detailed statements of the exports and imports

:

1

-

EXPORTS
(EXCLUSIVE

OF
is

SPECIE)

PORTS

probably settle

FOR

FROM
THE

THE

WEEK

PORT

OF

ENDING

NEW

AUG.

YORK

TO

FOREIGN

22, 1865.

DANISH WEST INDIES.

There has been renewed excitement in Crude Whale and

Sperm

Oils, iu consequence of the depredations of the Shenandoah. Stocks
are
mostly withdrawn and held for extreme prices.
Freights have uot been active, but to the leading British ports
rates for cotton and grain are firm,
especially by packet.
At to day’s markets the speculative
feeling we havafnoticed was
without abatement, but only in wheat and corn was
any material
advance established.

give below a comparative statement, showing the receipts
of a few leading articles, per all
routes, for the week, since Jan.
1st, and for the same period lust year :
NEW

YORK

OF

DOMESTIC

SINCE JAN.

Ashes, pkgs
Barley, etc., bushels
Bacon, etc., pkgs
Beef, tcs ana bbls

Quan. Value.
138

Perfumery, bxs.50
Sugar, bbls

1, FOR

PRODUCE

FOR

THE

For
the week.
223

Since

Jan. 1, 1865.

12,570
634,690
92,835

23

-

77,805

Since

Jan. 1,1864
11,065
718,145
240,240

64,910

Quan. Value.
75
20
...

100

322

Butter, lbs. .1,386

8,858

Cotton press.. ..1

Corn meal,
bbls

Quan. Value.

430

754

Rye Flour,bbls.55
Flour, bbls..1.000

Cheese,

.

90

25

Total

140

$10,907

HAMBURG.

Segars, cs...
Furniture, cs ..15
Clocks, bxs.. ..04
Cavair, pkgs. ...4
Manf. tobacco,
lbs

1,000

..70
Fruit, bxs... ..36
.891
Rosin, bbls
Effects, cs... ...1
..

4,072
1,770
1.331
100
250

2,090
750

5,627
300

Sewing machines,

Spermaceti,

lbs
Staves..

8.441
..14,003

2,532
2,300
208
3,955

bales..

50

730

Tobacco.hhds.104
Cotton, bales-. .30
Machinery, .cs..3

16,629
5,228

Flour, bxs.... 100

Pimento, bags 100

420

Roots, bags
6
Tobacco, bis..113
.30
Jute, bales
...

.587
cs.. .719

21,929

Tobacco,

33,983

Tobacco,

cs.. .931

43,667

150

Potashes,bbls. .25
Potashes,bbls. .41
Cedar, logs.... 69 4

boxes

Sarsaparilla,
Hardware, cs.. .17
Shoe pegs,bbls.62
Melado, hhds.. .6
Champagne,

Extract logwood,
boxes... .2,000

WEEK, AND

TWO YEARS.

4-

Bean's, bags

lbs.:. .600

13

Gum, cks....

We




..

197

Hops.. .bales
The

794,4311

0

market.

RECEIPTS AT

Past
week.

Cotton, bales
bbls
45,540
Flour
bbls
880,186 1,502,984 Spirits TurCom meal...
81.130
2,427
94,843
pent'e.bbls
Wheat, bush 67,016 1,301.24510,057,161 Tar
Com
190,836 1,256,OSS 624.654 Rice
tcs
104.280
Rye
Tallow..pkgs
i Tobacco
Beef, tcs. &
bbls
1,466
67,0241
“
lbs.
67,325
Pork.. ..bbls
1,896
100.749 Oil— Sperm,
86,386
.

Fruits rule very firm.

j
time 1
1864. 1
24,402 Rosin

Since
Jan. 1.

10,933

baskets

188

1,418
650
215
186
1,179
486

Mahogany, lgs.265 15,581
Locust, logs."...70
400
Total

1,150

.

$137,152

BREMEN.

Tob stems,
hhds

.920

Mahogany, lgs 800
Plank, No.... 404
Tobacco,hhds ..38
Ship knees.,. 20
.

6,080
1,802

3,964
6.703
100

Shoe pegs,
bbls
266
Shooks & hoops,
cases
3
Clothing, cs
1

1,374

10,775
•

1.064
350

200

Tacks, kegs.. ..44
Tobacco, bales.52
Rosin, bbls...500
Miscellaneous
Total

...

924

2,180
3,500
125

$82,808

August 26, 1865.]
i

-

THE CHRONICLE.

273

ROTTERDAM.

•

Quail. Value.

Gin,pkgs.. ;...40
Potashes.. 4J. .131
Corks, bales.. .65

1,190
4,579
227
5,529

Tobacco, cs... .48
Pearl ashes, j
bbls
...28
Lead ore, cks... 7

1,622
161

CUBA.

'

Quan. Value.
Tobacco steams,
hhds

64

2,823

Beef, bbls
100
Copper, plates 142
Quercitron bark,

6,016

hhds

1,200

Quan. Value.
Staves

logs
Miscellaneous

500

1,500
1,650

Salt, sacks.. 1,150

4,000

12,000
Chickory, cks.. 45
Cedar wood,

Bread, pkg

Shooks

h .837

ana

Potatoes,Sbbls. .70
10
Codfish, qtl... .40

25

Onions, bbls.. 100

66

2,400

Mahogany, lgs 319

3,28S

Total

Oilcake,
lbs ....1,140,988 28,331

Books, cs

$36,160

.......

*'

Quan. Value.
,500
775
Lard, lbs...30,000 11,171
358
Cutlery, cs
1
160 Bacon, lbs.. .1,864
Harness, bxs.... 1
125 Vinegar, bbls .. 50 - 456
Furniture, cs... .2
300 Rice, bags ... .200
2,385
40
Machinery, cs... 1
239 Miscellaneous
Sugar, bxs
2
73
Total
Coal oil, gal.2,000
$22,891
1,328

Quan. Value.

Hams, lbs.. .3,000

2,021

Pkl fish, bbls .200
Corn meal, bbl 250
Corn meal, sek.25

2,190
2,223
180
48
220
220
‘100

-

LIVERPOOL.

Cotton,balesf4,439

708.719

Corn,bush.136,242 120,584
..'.70
Lard, lbs.. .5 6,362
Cheese,
Flour, bbls

600

.

6,830

PORTO

Starch, bbls... .80
Forks, cs
.7
Leather, offal,

Petroleum,

bxs

68

Bones, pkgs
.89
Dry goods, cs.. .9
..

Clocks, bxs... .24

Whalefots,

galls.... 123,910
Steel, cs.... ....1

74,450

lbs

385
2.500
4,786
265

3,558

Staves

4,700

11,000
Mahoganv.lgs. 11S
Ising-glass. cs.. .5

7,446

Sew mach. cs.209

7,997

188

Tobacco, cs
4
Cheese, lbs345.481

525

» i

Tobacco,hhd s 214
Beef, tcs.... ..200

72,394

'

Hogs hair, bis. 130
Clocks, cs... ....4
Beef, tcs.... .526
Wheat, bush 7,3S5
Tobacco.hhds. 102
Drugs, cs... ..126
Perfumery, cs..16

17,320
10.266

31,363

1,272
627

Raw silk, cs ...4

2,000

Photographic

ma¬

15.346
1.76S
500

,

lbs.... 2,700,030 410,593
Butter,lbs. .81,500 23.841
Bacon, lbs. 160,123 25,660
600
Jewelry, cs. ....1
100
Models, cs.. ....1

12

terials, cs
2
Sponges, cs. ..16
Beeswax,bxs 2626
Lampburners,ce 4
Furs, bales
2
3,940 Rags, bales.... 14
8.429 Machinery, cs.. 81
347 Shoe pegs, bbls 50
1,200 Drugs, cs
2

434

cases

Tobacco.cs
Miscellaneous

2
...

Total

180
408

Flour, bbls.... 100
Cheese, lbs.. 7,475
Lard, lbs. .10,000

1.310

255
3,175
753

•

52,071

Oilcake,bxs39,489
Books, cs
4
Staves No.. .6,480

9,661
800
700
880
13.375

100

Turpent’e, gal. 100

44

Flour, bbls. .2,126

1

Staves

Total

Rum, pipes...249
Wine, pkgs
45
Segars, cs
2
Tobacco, hhd.. 25
cs

..

.7

9.000
500

Flour, bbl... ...25

721
12.248
233

Lard, bbls

.100,125

Petroleum,gal. 100

.16
.2
.325

bush.23,000

900
65,020
3.937

Flour, bbls. .1,000
Bacon, lbs. .14,500

10^448

170,150

Staves

.58,080

Total

7,502

Pickled codfish.
bbls
350

2,975

Larcl, lbs... „S.000

Codfish.qtls. 1,158
Haddock, qtls. 109

8,338
466

Pork, bbls

Rice, bags
250
Flour, bbls.. 1,100

6,500
2,300

$181,124

3,070
8,800

Wheat, bushels

18,000

17,000

Flour, bbls
.350
Potatoes, bbls .50
Ouions, crates .20

20.000

1.5S5

33,644

Sugar, bbls.... 10

440

Paper, bdls
^0
Hams, lbs.. ..607
Hardware, bxs. .8
Cutlery, cs
10

CORK/

Petroleum, barrels
BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN COLONIES.

pkgs

20

Com, bush.... 200
Onions, bbls.. .50

2.170
3,233
562

1,564
88
200
150

Petroleum,
gallons.... 3,416
Manf. tobacco,
lbs
9,912
Marble, cs
3

1,S53
2.180
160
2,108
96
21

Tobacco,hhds.. .7
Cement, bbls.. .60
Pitch, bbls
6
Varnish, bbls...l
.1
Whisky, bbls

Pork, bbls

..814
Machinery, cs. 45
Soap, bxs
15
Candles, bxs.. .30
Stones, tons.. .90
JoavIs, bbls... .30
.

Miscellaneous

...

19.S83
4,500
150
108
900
750
175

150

1

Shooks

1,600
Flour, bbls..3,022
Com,bush.. .1,530
Hams, lbs.. 1,034
Bricks

10,000

8,837

23,558
1,728
258
100
3 307

Bread, pkgs... 730
Pork, bbls
.303
Beef, bbls
88
Peas, bush. .1,160

2,337

Tobacco, hhds..7

2,436

Oil coal, gls.2,000
Cheese, lbs 13,322

1,268

...

9,624
1,450
1-230

1,330
Beans, bbls.... 30

Drugs, pkgs

1,574
216

4

309

4
ments, cs
Lumber, ft .12,021
Soap, bxs
6
Candles, bxs. .512

1,400

Musical instru¬

287
62
1,772
1,112
232

Butter, lbs..4,070
Peas, bush
45
Oil meal, punch¬

Total

$136,031

125
174
220
185
352
921

Lard, lbs.. ..6,512

D’d fish. bxs. .100
Matches, cs.... 10
Wine, cks
10
Oil meal,
lbs....... 14,000

Horses, No ....19
Manf d tobacco,
lbs

1,547
55
1.33
250

364
2.850

Bread, pkgs.. .350

403

Potatoes,bbls.. 100

425
616

BRITISH

Cheese, lbs. .1,500
Potatoes, bbl..300
Total

243

Pcrfumerv,

findings,
2
700

cases

Boards..

1
Candles, bxs. .100
Lard, lbs.. .14.991

Carriage

437
120
480
437

galls..

.3.920

Potatoes, bbls. .50

Tacks
19
Mfd Avood, pkg420
Coal oil, gall52,S40
Agl iinplts... .342

Woodware, pkg37
Hose, bals....
Pumps, cks.. ..29
Shoe pegs, bbl 100

$23,880

2
Plated ware, cs 1
Dry goods, cs.. .1
.

Clothing, cs
Skins, cks

1
6

287
801
200
250
150

Furniture, cs\516

286

Ash, pcs
153
Oars, No.. ..1,653
Preserves, cs ..70

1.400
2.270
387

Glassware, cs.103
Notions, pkg. .468
658 Clocks, bxs... .84
1,327 M fd iron, pkg. 265

5,781

4,383

37.071

7,020

1,187

Sad irons, cs. ..35

350
666

Lumber, ft 121,929

3,658

Sew mach, cs. ..3
Ess oil, cs
..1
Bronzes, cs... ..1
1
Lamps, C3
.

7,718

Miscellaneous

...

Total

6,173

5.200
1,536

4,524
10

$146,213

222
225
200
100

Horses
6
Cotton, bales... 95
Machinery, cs... 1
Effects, cs
3
Total

6.700

Furniture,

Scav mach,
Pork, bbls

.72
75
.30
20

cs.

Beef, bbls

Pitch, bbl
Perfumery, cs.. 25

.816

.27,000

2

(OTHEE,

352

2.484
121

Lumber, ft 12.500
.

Glassware, cs.. .3

8,789

Miscellaneous.

986

...

1,001
140
359
97
449

*

310
1.881
315

.155

32,655

Total

1,603
54,400

Flour, bbls .5,130
Lumber,

3,971

.

2.100
760
135
275

feet

120,444

Segars,

3,08®

Miscellaneous....

94,504

Total

3,680

.2

1.348

cs.

140*

Chimneys,bbls. 10

4,350

Glassware, cs.. .1
Paper, rms..6,750
Type, cs
4

3,155

41

.

Pkgs

REPUBLIC.

Lumber,ft .70,487
.

R. R.

1,350
2.420

36

cars

43,162

$3,395,622

WEEK

.6,000

112

128,837
3,200

18, 1865.

96

.124

Acids
GO
Arrow root... .30

Barytes
20
Brimstone,ts.220

17,2331

j

Felting
Furs

Metals, Ac.—

30
77

211:
251;

29,600
7,2:lo|
7,139|

Gums, crude. .50

275

Lemons
Nuts

‘102
.10
152

Oil,

ess
:. .14
Oil, olive.. .1,200

Sponges....

22

.

.54

Sumac
782
Vanilla beans.. 1

Vermillion.,... 3

270:

12,900:
11,023
545|

Pineapples
Plums
Raisins

676

5,037,

Sauces.and pre..
913 Instruments—

1,211

Mathematical. .5

1.177
8.46S

24,968;
435:

Musical.

Nautical
Optical..
655 Jewelry. &c.—
1,997: Jewelry

4,3571
1,179

45

1
10

251,

3,392,

_

Leather
do

3,990

Ale

152

331
1.651

Brandy

393

97?»

15

5,056

.14
36

Iron, railroad
bars
1,266
Iron, sheet,
187

tons

5,410
2,318
41,565
2,136
7,465
7,720

4,409

405

21.976

Lead, pigs. .1,789

22,302

tons, a

Metal goods
Nails
Needles
Nickel
Old metal
Platina

.

.64

8,152
902

11
10
4

2,867

.2

3,928

1,668
6,253

1,214
Percuss’ncapslO
701
Saddlery
3
Steel....... 1,396 24,862
Tin, J>xs.. .afl.129 63,704
Tin, (slabM28,)
lbs
8,402
34,000
Wire
G6
1,115

ns

Cassia

1,015 Liquors Wi nes, Ac.—
,

Cordials

77

Guns
Hardware

Iron, other,
i

21 120.145
1,426: Watches
44 101,537:
5,806;Leather, Hides, Ac.—
1
6,712 Bristles
414;
(PIS;
1,444} Boots A shoes.3
347: Hides,dres’d.264 67,818}
820i Hides,undressed 123,491!
420:
40o| Horns

2,048}

Brass goods.. .45
Chains & anch.80

Cutlery

Bananas

1,506

Lie. root
Albumen
Oils

756

37,730:

4,308; Fruits, Ac.—

Chalk
303
Cream Tartar.30
Cochineal
.18

Soda, bicarb. 180
Soda, caustic. .14
Soda, ash
63

6,666

6,125 Furs, Ac.—

Drugs, Ac.—

34,527
800

*

.

Glassware
Glass plate..

Potash, hyd.. .15
Potnsli, Prues. .4

MALAGA.

.66,200

AT THE PORT OF NEW YORK FOR THE

AUO.

..

Shellac

62,979

SPECIE)

ENDING

[The quantity is given in packages when not otherwise specified.]
Qua n. Value
Quan. Value.
Quan. Value
Rum
10
307
China, Glass, & E’ware—
3,407
Saltpetre
94
Bottles.... 1,057 $2,247
3,476 26,702
Turpentine .14
1,069 Wines
Tumeric
100
514
China..,
109
4,497
Champagne,
Other
baskets .1,896 15,276
5.049
Earthenware. 521 14.162

Gum arabic..,18

CADIZ.




171

Manf tobacco.
lbs
3,421
Wheelbarrows .20

1.298

cs

Hams, lbs 3,795
Paper, pkgs ...14
Soap, bxs... 1.000
Butter, lbs.. ..900

3,490

THAN DRY GOODS AND

Indigo
211
Leeches
16
Lie paste ....100

MARSEILLES.

Staves, No

8,153

Total

Grand total

132,037

Staves

88
184
180

51,282

Paints

Totel

Petroleum, galls

pcs...422

Miscellaneous....

'

Car Wheels.... 50

R. R. turn ta¬
bles
Total..

1,200

$37,749
..

Staves

plein'ts,pkgs. 4

142
170

.30

...10
Wheat, bush ..160
Lard. lbs.. .33.385

galls
22,500 14,011
Hoop skirts, cs.13 4,698,

19.585

BORDEAUX.

Tobacco, hhd.

Boards,

8,909

Drugs, pkgs.

....

3

83
500

“

6,048

HAVRE.

Books, cs
Bells, cs

cs.

Flour, bbls..

Kerosene,

675

AUSTRALIA.

Nails, kgs... 1,180

Agricultural im-

IMPORTS

800
100
200

cs..

166*
363

VENEZUELA.

Leather

$71,129

963

606

2,000
.9
8,824
691
Drugs, cs
2.040
Oysters, bxs.. 285
364
Tracks, cs
9
200
Shipchand, cs.. .2
4,050
Prep com, cs.. 900
5,208
Carriages
143
158
Books, cs
1
Sew mach, cs... 1
75
Hardware, cs..732 31,807
1,545
Edge tools, cs..78

Machinery,

44,952

Total

117

-

..

ARGENTINE

5,036

Total

Lard, lbs.... 6,000
Preserves, cs 20
5,480 Furniture, cs.. .13
1,400
..

100

..

BRAZIL.

424

Woodw’re,pkg200

2,900

180

Miscellaneous....

Butter, lbs.. 1,068
Bread, pkgs. ....2
Candles, bxs ..100,
Turpentine,
.80
galls
Trunks, pkg s.,20

Petroleum,

Miscellaneous....

eons
30
Pickled codfish,
bbls
100

9,794
1,682

Shingles
20,000
Lumber, ft. .10,000

Coal oil. gals ..200

4,300

BRITISH GUIANA.

100
Beef, bbl
Pork, bbl
354
Peas, bags....250
Flour, bbl
716

350

2,123
10,500

galls

250

BRITISH WEST INDIES.

Com meal.
bbls

7,000

Butter, lbs... .500
Kerosene,

-

38

..

Mill stones

Tobacco, bals. .40

.3,700

MEXICO.
..

1,800

Soap, bxs

7

21.951

'....407
Beef, bbls
180
Butter, lbs. 12,853
Cheese, lbs. .4,200
Leather, sides. 217
Woodenware,

2,500

Total

DUBLIN.

bbls

5,002

...408

Oak, pieces.

21,000

Corn, bush.

92,602

160

HAYTI.

,

BELFAST.

Flour, bbls.13,805
Corn meal.

170,000

MARSALA.

GLASGOAV.

Corn,

3,985

Total

$71,227

7,700

47*

Total

Books, cs
Tobacco, hhds.

15,000

50,563
7,476

..500

VENICE.

56,227

300

..

Butter, lbs.. ..250

Tobacco, hhds.

$165,654

Quicksilver, flasks.

Staves
8,400
Tobacco.hhds.138
Tallow, lbs.42,662
Wheat,bush7,467

11‘

cs

Tar, bbl

252
186
133
118
92

Bread, pkgs. ...10

-

5.2S0

3P

Wine,

Total

CRONSTADT.

Lard, lbs.. .26,000
Cheese,lbs 350,837
Butter,lbs .24,500
Beef, tcs.. ....242

6

16
Lamps, cks
2
Lumber, ft. 19,876

150

2,400

PALERMO.

25

Total.

Total

AGHWAY.

538

Petroleum, gallons.

12°
300
700

1,000

425

1,500

...

Candles, bxs. .200

150

7.000
100

Bacon/lbs.. ,3,5S4

Rve fiour, bbls.50

OPORTO.

150
330

5

Miscellaneous

.

..

10,000

Hardware,
Corn, bush.. 7,863

Paper, reams.. 300

675
330
396
175
556

.

Wheat, bush 6,428
Rosin, bbls
63

$1,566,166

Hay, tons
Jewelry, cs

RICO.

2,000 Butter, lbs
2,500
1,438' Hams, lbs... 1,373
675- Bread, pkg.. ..99
S50l Oats, bbls...
.50
1.084 Onions, bbls ..202
2,400 Potatoes, bbls.400

1,950
200

LONDON.

Clocks, bxs

Suan .Value.

,9

1,884

f

1,153 Ginger
1,498.Stationery, &c.—
225

Books

56

1,019

18,86*

v._

274

.

THE CHRONICLE.
*

c

Quan. Value.
Engravings.... 12
6.533
8.5.34
Paper
96
Other
45
5.911
Woods—

-

Cork

\
1,014

WToods—
Fustic, lbs

14

16S

2,294

1,572

7,001

Mahogany

598

Other

Miscellaneous—
Baskets
Boxes
Buttons

129

Building stores.

6,517
4,592
1,252
33,967

107

1.257
6.451

Cigars
Coal, tons. 10,103

23,730

Cheese

Cotton, bales.435
Clocks

19

Cocoa, bags.,117
Coffee,

bags

Lignum vitae....
Logwood,
lbs

Quan. Value. 1

Corks

22,871

5.164!
14,739!

5.366j
2.255!

23.069 396.503;

Feathers, bags.3

1,816

Fancy goods.... 120,1361
Flax..?.
228 12,30 6i
Fish
27.S97|
ITair
61
11.681i
Hair cloth
13
5.7>1:
233
Hemp
2.817!
India rubber. .29
1.5211
Machinery
11
883!
Molasses.. .1,031 55.568|
Oil paintings. .26 15,639,
Plaster
"
947!

Perfumery
Pipes

1

...

.33

Rice
Salt.

19,365
3,665

.

Statuary.. ....22
Seeds

2.736

1,638

Linseed,

bags

...

Soap

18,640

72.847

...907
2,713
Sugar, hhds, tes
and bbls ..7.127 301,914
Sugar, boxes and
bags .. .2.731 141.09S
Tea
.1,164 32.048
...452 16.092
Toys
Tobacco.. .1.050 23,126
Waste
...368
10,491
Wool, bale s..217 21,126
Other..
2,020
...

..

2.HSj
7,915]

London Trade.—Jl London circular of
reports :

Quan. Value. | 2 363
f..

Total...

...$2,443,876

Friday the 11th August

[August 26, 1865.

^

bags Mauritius

mostly disposed of at 6d per cwt decline;
good ditto, and 33s
| 6d a 35s 6d for low to mid yellow semi-crystalised. 261 bags BenI gal sold at 33s 6d a 36s for low to good white Benares. 7,166
bags
i Madras were realised at 24s a 26s 6J for brown and yellow
date,
I 25s a 25s 6d for common Jaggery, and 26s 6d for
grainy ditto.
2,249 bags Penang were withdrawn. 4,080 bags Mozambique were
about half placed at 30s a 31s for good browu
to low yellow, and
32s 6d a 35s 6d for low mid to good
yellow. Privately 3,0'JO bags
Mauritius have been sold at 36s 6d a 36 s for in id to' good
yellow
-semi-crystalised, and 40s 6d for fine ditto, and 200 bags good yellow
Gurpattah Date Bengal at 34s. Afloat five cargoes have been
bought, two Havana, 3,500 boxes No. 12J at 25s, 1,100 boxes stg.
No. 12 at 25s, both fully insured ; three Cuba Muscovado,
together
1.455 hhds 401 barrels.Ill tierces 92 boxes at 22s
landing weights,
:

26s 6d

a

were

28s 6d for low to mid brown, 29s for

and all for U. K.
In Tallow a considerable business has been done at stiff

prices.

We quote St. Petersburg Y..C. 42s 6d ou the
spot, and 43s 9d for
the last three months.
*
Tea market quiet, with but little business doing,
except in green
teas suitable for America, for which there is a
sales have been 1,079 casks 101 barrels 1G9
good demand at ex¬
bags Plantation Ceylon treme
at 76s 6d a 78s 6 for fine,
prices. Good common Congou lid a Is per lb.
fine ord. 79s 6 a 84s- for low mid to mid, !
and 84s 6d a 85s 6d for mid
Tin—Blocks, 93s. Bars 94s. Refined 96s. Foreign: Straits
colory; 371 casks 2,179 bags native
Ceylon at 65s 6 a 66s 6d for good ord in the casks, and 67s a 68s 89s Gd ; Banca 94s.
Havana Markets.—A circular of Aug. 19th
in bags ; 124 bags Cannon’s
report:

Cocoa—950 bags Trinidad at auction were realised from 68s a
76s for mid to good red, with fine to
superior from 8Is G a Ills.'
Coffee meets with less
enquiry at a decline of Gd a Is. The

Mysore at 93s Gd a 99s; 115 bags i
Sugar (clayed).—The general
: 1(:0 hag’s Calicut at 74s Gd ; 31
j much since our previous report. tone of the market has not changed
casks 27 barrels 18 bags Jamaica at 64s a 72s for
The pretensions of holders a large
good to fine ord, {
and 77s a 87s for low mid to good mid. Of
number of whom are speculators, do not
floating cargoes the
imany way correspond to
following have been sold, one Santos 1.790 bags at 56s 9d, fully in the views of buyers.
cured, for a near pert ; and three Pin, 2.927 bags channel firsts -at
We may almost say that our European houses have
entirely with¬
52s, 2,680 bags very ord at 45s 6d, both for a near
drawn from the market, which is solely
supported by the moderate
port, and 2,200
but improving demand existing for the American
bags good firsts at 59s l^d for the Mediterranean.
market, this, how¬
Copper quiet—Tough cake and tile £86. best selected
ever, chiefly embraces the lower grades for refining purposes.
£89, sheath¬
The market closes with additional firmness, on the
ing £91, Y. M. sheathing 8pl.
part of holders,
Corn—With a continuance of unfavorable weather, the
.at our previous quotations.
No. 12 at 8f rials per arrobe, 40s.
price for
English wheat has advanced 2s per qr, though the business has been Freight and 15 per cent premium of Exchunge=27s 3d stg. per cwt
moderate. Foreign is Is a 2s dearer.
Average price of English ! free on board ; and fcs. 31.25 ems per 50 kilos (without freight),
wheat lor the week
ending 5th inst was 42s 6d on 54 864 qrs re- | exchange on Paris at 3 per cent P.
turned.
White American wheat -Ids a 46s ; winter red 41s a 44s
Last year at this date No. 12 being at 9£ rs,
freight 52s 6d and
; i
exch. 11 per cent-stood in at 30s per cwt. f. o. b.
spring 41s a 43s per qr ; American flour 2.4s a 27s per barrel.
Spelter £22 2s Gd, cash.
Of the actual stock here, scarcely 70 m. boxes are in first hands.
Hemp firm. 850 bales Manila have changed hands at
The quantity still to arrive from the
£32 5s. !
country is estimated at about
for good current and Sorsogan
quality. Of 270 bales Sunn two- j 20 in boxes.
thirds sold from £19 15s. a £20 15s. for
The total export from Havana and Matanzas, from 1st of Jan. to
good common to fair.
Jute—Of 16 150 bales, about half sold the fair to
date compare thus :
good quali¬
ties at steady prices, £ll a £21 15s. for common to
1S65
1SG4
1563
good, with fine United States
at £23 5s., and
816,795
110,161
68,857
rejections at £10 15s..
Great Britain
Iron—Welsh quiet; Rails and Bars £7, f. o.
376,182
502,406
455,908
b., in Wales. North Europe
Scotch Pigs 54s. 6d cash, for mixed Nos.'on
63,846
46,082
72,1*21
Clyde.
France
200,938
178,740
146,145
week amounts to 29.309 qrs., all from
Linseed—Import for the
Spain
227,663
218,868
195,327
the East Indies. A good business has been done in
Calcutta on the South Europe
17 074
15,816
15,935
spot at 56s. 6d. a 56s. 3d., and for Bombay 58s. has been
accepted. Other Parts
24,508
24,498
23,889
For arrival about 2,000 tons Calcutta,
chiefly May and June ship¬
ments, have been told at 57s., sound bags, and a June
shipment of
1,227,506
1,078,530
996,223
Black Sea at 57s. Cd.
Imports since 1st January 339,340 qrs.,
against 317,222 qrs last year.
Stocks in—
1S63
1865
1864
Linseed Cakes dull. Best New
205,1 1 1
253,656
209,470
York, in bags, is sold at £9 Havana
17s. 6d., ex-ship, and in barrels at £10 2s. Gd.
Matanzas
24,476
27,854
29,304
Molasses—Previous prices, art maintained. 45
puns. Antigua
Bxs
brought 16s., and 10 Dominica 14s. 6d.
229,987
237,324
282,960
Naval Stores—French Spirits
Molasses.—A purchase has been made among different dealers
Turpentine have declined to
46s. 6d. on the spot, and 44s. Gd. for this month’s
shipment. Pe of a cargo of clayed for New Orleans, at 34 a 4 rs. Muscovado is
troleum—2s. 7d has been paid for
American Refined Pennsylvania very scarce and held at 5 rs.
In Mantanzas and Cardenas the
now
ready for delivery ; for delivery during the months of October stocks are very small. Prices are likely to be well sustained.
to December next there are
Rum—is scarce—of 21° in chestnut casks it is held at §28
buyers at 2s 4d.pand sellers at 2s. 5d.
per
Crude Pennsylvania £20.
pipe.
Oils—Fish: There is more inquiry for
IIonet.—There being no stock on hand, the price is nominal at
Sperm at £89, but no
sellers under £90 ; pule Southern
quiet at £44 pale Seal £40 ; 4£ rs. per gallon.
Cod £50. Linseed
Tobacco.—The stock of desirable sorts
sleidy at 32s. Rape very firm foreign brown
being very small, the
is in demand at £44 10s, Refined £47 i ow
sales have been confined to 3 a 400 bales of
ready for delivery.
partido and 2nd da S3
Olive is inquired for at £48 for
Mogadore, £49 10s a £50 for Se¬ Vuelta Abajo on reserved terms, supposed to be on the average ba¬
ville, £51 lor Malaga, and £54 lor Gallipoli. Cocoa Nut—A fair sis of 20 a §35 per bale, according' to class,
quality and weight.
amount of business
passing in Ceylon at 43s, and Cochin at 45s. The demand for choice is pretty active, but common and mid¬
Palm firm at 37s.
dling are entirely neglected, in fact they aje almost unsaleable.
Rice is very firm, and 14 000
We hear of no transactions in fillers.
bags have been sold at 9s 3d a 9s
9d for Necranzie, and 9s 6 1 a 9s 9d for
Segars.—There is little enquiry for common and medium sorts.
Rangoon, and 16s for fine
white Beugal of new
crop.
A floating cargo Arracan, 1,054 Conchas, Londres, &c of 2nd and 3rd rate factories can be had at
toDS, has also been bought at 10s 6d for the Continent.
easier rates, but first class brands are held firm at
previous prices.
Rum steady. The sales li.We been 300
Several factories have stopped
puncheons Wrest India at
working, old tobacco Doing in arrear,
Is 8d for Leewards, Is
8pi a Is lOd for good middling to fine and new not yet in a fit state to manufacture. >
Demerara, 3s 4d a 4d for Jamaica; 160 hhds Mauritius at Is 7d a
Is 7Rl, and 40 puncheons
Penang at Is Gpl. '
COTTON.
Saltpetre fiat. 50 tons
Bengal now landing have been placed
The market has been excited and feverish
at 24s unrefracted.
throughout the week.
With unexpectedly favorable
Spices—Black Pepper: market quiet: 2,300
intelligence from Liverpool, on Mon¬
bags Singapore
were
only partly realized at 3pi ; 130 bags shot Malabar were; day an advance to 46c for middling wras realized, and this ad¬
held for 4id.
White: 170 bags Singapore sold from
5fd a 5]d. vance was partially supported until Wednesday, when a decline of
Ginger: 400 bbls Jamaica sold steadily from 62s a 78s for ord to one cent took
place under the heavy receipts. .The spinning and
mid, with good mid from 80s a 83s; 150
bags Aliiean were held
for 37s.
export demand have been pretty good, throughout the various fluc¬
220 cases Cassia
Liguea brought 83s a 84s for seconds.
tuations of the market ; but the confidence of
Sugar—With a dull market on the spot, the
speculative holders
quantity offering has
been moderate, and the transactions have
been at a decline of about was rather weakened, and on each rise
they have offered freely*
Gd per cwt. Of British West India
2,280 hhds have been sold. On Thursday morning, with a
telegram advising an advance in New

Neilgherry at 79s 6.1




a

82s Cd

,

,

.

.

,

,

,

August 26, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

Orleans, and private reports of

275

slight falling off in the receipts at although holders evinced more
disposition to concede to the brokers,
activity, and the market ruled firm, we heard of no sales, Tuesday some new lots changed hands at
without quotable advance. Domestic cotton goods have been do¬ 38 a 39 for middling, but the transactions were very limited, and
were not
reported until the next day. Wednesday, holders being
ing better, and spinners have bought with more confidence. The
willing to meet the demands of buyers for still further'concessions.
deliveries at this market from New Orleans are les3 liberal, but The
market was entered more
freely, and considerable business was
from the Atlantic ports they are increasing, so that the
done on the basis of 36 a 38e. for
large esti¬
middling. The sale3 of the two
mates for August are thus far fully realized. Holders, however, days summed up 700 bales.
Prices were somewhat irregular Thurs¬
are confident that they will not be
compelled to make any material day, but the demand still continued, aud we heard of sales of 600
a

that market, there was renewed

bales.

concession in price.

It is asserted that the deliveries at the ports
will rapidly fall off after September, but the
probabiliy is that the
southern railroads will then be more serviceable than now.
The sales for the week have been about 14.000 bales.
ket

to-day steady, with

The following are

bales.

The

mar¬

good general demand, and sales of 2,300
closing quotations :

a

N.O.

Upland. Florida.

Ordinary, per lb
Good Ordinary,

32

33
38

37

Middling

44

Middling
Middling fair

47

Good

Receipts for the week have b^en
Bales.

New Orleans

7,552

Mobile

I,g89

Apalachico1*.

895

Jacksonville
Savannah

363

2,569

Charleston

676

Beaufort.

as

Mobile.
33

45

33

45
48

50

follows

& Tox.

38

48

•

49

From

!

51

:

Fiom

Wilmington
Amboy R. R.

Cam hen tfe
Erie R. R,

445

.

Miscellaneous

435
183

sources...

70

Total nc-'ipts for the
Since July 1
Same time last year

week

Export for the week

:

1S,851

..

132,610

'

only 300 bales,

lower grades are. and have been, almost
entirely neglected through¬
out the week, and are
hardly quotable. The market closes quiet at

the following quotations :
Ordinary
33 ; Middling 35 a 36 ; Strict

23

32c, Low Middling 32
Middling 37 a 38 ; Good Middling

a

a

nominal.
The sales of the week have been 1800 bales.
A Savannah date of the 18th
says :
Since our last issue, the
Upland Cotton market has sustained a
further decline of 1 to 2 cent3. All stocks of
good Cotton for sale
on the merchants* floors were withdrawn
otv
Saturday and yesterday
Sea Islands are dull, and we have-not heard of
any material trans¬

give

York,

Bales.

QUOTATION'S.

95
89

Hamburg
Total exports for the week
Since July 1
■Same time last year

Sea

L'plands.
16}

Ordinary
ordinary.... 174Middling.... 18}
21,104 !
19
2,7S9 Middling
j Good Middling.... 19}
follows :
( Middling Fair.....

'

estimate the stock of cotton

on

the market

as

Bales.

At New York.
At New

Oileam

85.U00

-

16-}
15

Islands.
—
30

1H
—

m
m

19
34

—

—

i
—

—

xrrr

—

—

-

—

—

—

—

—

i2

—

—

SALES.

Trade.

American.

SpeculaExport.

Total
this #eck

tiun

Total
this Year.

Same time
1S64.

The

6300

910

360

760U

( East Indian.21180
'
250,000
j Brazilian.... 4810
about 45,000 bales weekly, j Egyptian ... 7180

Total

8480

1320

30980

213780

152970

813260

242510

2S4590

297430

1877450

1728620

7 90

350

7 360
9830
9500

12S60

4490

65270

This Week

1 American
; East Indian

187730
8479SO

10938

3193

Total

j

|

1337363

1379459

STOCKS

j American

I

186104

85246

.

Other Sorts

!

512124
202965
274797

131694
592418
147442
248207
256698

15816

1 Egyptian

1

This

Day.

-cotton at SEA-

1834.

This Year.

24360

....

East Indian,..
Brazilian

174960

493000

41640
62510

10530

Piculs.

ing middling fair.

)

50190 V
92600

1864.
•

189080

Egyptian

)

12000
....

•••••

420000
Piculs.
144000
*«••••

352640

BREAD STUFFS

The

1864.

161373

53182

Brazilian
'

This Year

1787

Other Sort3...,
A New Orleans
paper says :
‘•The first bale of new crop cotton from Texas was
Total
received!
yesterday, and sold on Gravier street at 51} cents per pound, class¬

“The weather continues favorable for
picking the opening cotton I
on the
Mississippi river. We may expect. several bales this and
the next week; and after the first of
September, no doubt, it will
be received
i

190550
875270

IMPORTS.

than

'

870

1590

Total.... 47920

stock

•

1680
1060

1

Our mail dates from New Orleans are to the
morning of the
17th. (We had telegraphic intelligence,
last week, one day later

this.) The stock of cotton continued to accumulate. Tne
on
Saturday, was 83,740 bales. The receipts for four days
were 11,023 bales.
Stock Aug. 16th, 86,149. The
telegram of the
of the 17th gave the stock at 88,000 bales. The latest
evening
telegram from New Orleans is to the 22d, and quotes middling 42

..

j Other 8\orts. 8150

receipts at the same markets are
and the shipments for Europe now amount to about 20,000 bales
weekly; so that, deducting 10,000 bales weekly for home eonsump
tion, the stock is increasing about 10,000 bales weekly, and on the
first of October next will exceed 300,000 bales.
The course of the
market from that date, will be
subject to many considerations, res
which judgments vary, and information is contradictory..
pecting

43c.-

17

'19}

—

Orleans.

18}

19

1

40,000
40,000

At other markets

16}
17}

—

■—

j Fair

85,000

At Mobile

Texas.

Good
Low

4,564

—

a

of

consequence

The bulk of the ?ale3 which
were made at 35 a 36 for
middling. The

4,438

Havre

now

depressed, in

quoting middling upwards 48c they entered the market more freely,
sales averaging 10 to 12.000 bales
per day at former rates.

.

Liverpool

We

still further

arriva-Uof the steamers, with dates to 29th uit from New

S1,858

^

To

was

from New York.

a basis for quotations.
The following are
upland Ordinary 23 a 3d ; Middlings 34 a 36 ;
Good Middlings 38 a40. ' * •
Liverpool, August 11th.
The market was dull in the early
part of the week, and a decline
generally submitted to, as the sales were small; spinners and ex¬
porters keeping out of the market, expecting larger shipments from
America, and probably lower prices there ; in the latter
they have,
for the moment at all events, been
disappointed; on and after the

2,273
1,741

Foreign ports.........

reached

accounts

action that would
the quotations for

Bales906

Newberne

To-day the market
unfavorable

speculative movement1 noted

i

last

week

lm

continued

j throughout this, an^ has been attended with a further advance in
by hundreds of bales.
prices/ The basis of the movement is. however, somewhat
Cotton continues to go freely
from Vicksburg up the river for 1| changed. The assertion of short crops at the West is very much
Cairo and other
points. Boats take from 300 to 500 and 800 |
| modified—in the extreme Northwest the crop of Spring Wheat is
bales frequently.”
proved to be good, far better than last year ; but the advance in
The following denotes the course of the Mobile market
for the !
the Liverpool market, and the
week ending the 12th :
progress of the cattle disease in
Europe, have given renewed stimulus to speculation. At the
Cotton.—The receipts during the past week have been
7,930
“

bales as follows : From the Alabama
river 4,703 bales, from
bee 755, Warrior

607, and by Railroad, 1 865.

Big- j
'The exports have j

been 6,715, viz.: To New York
5.856. and to New Orleans 859
bales. The stock on hand and on
shipboard not cleared is 34,424
bales.

Western markets the advance has been much mare decided than at
this market*; and prices at
Chicago, Milwaukee, Toledo, Buffalo,

and

Oswego,

uniformly above this market. The Eastward
is pretty large ; but such is the ease of the
Qnr last report left the cotton market quiet at 40c for
Money market, that little difficulty is experienced in supporting
middling.
Saturday the same dullness prevailed, and 200 bales only were sold, prices. The accumulation of Flour and Wheat at this market
but without
change in prices. Monday was still more dull, and is very large for the season ; say 100,000 bbla
shipping Flour and
_




are

movement of the crops




276

THE CHRONICLE.
1

'

'

"

'

'

1 ""

-

■

.

[August 26, 1865.

■■

1,000,000 bushels Wheat, and prices are so high as to almost stop the fact that the season was well
advance^ has caused this
shipments, but we can discover very little desire to sell-; in fact, it activity.
is evident that, with a slight decline, speculators will
The market was, however, so bare of goods that the semi
again become
panic
free purchasers.
Corn and Oats have been in large consumptive which has prevailed the
past week, has cleared it of almost all
demand, and prices have improved, leading to some speculative
leading and standard kinds of domestics, while the market has
folly
feeling. Eye has been in demand for the Continent, and the mar¬ recovered the concession in
prices made a week ago.

ket has ruled firm.

Prices

At

to-day’s market there was a further general advance, with
large speculative business iu Wheat.
The

following

Flour,

are

the closing quotations

Superfine State and Western.

do
do
do

:

...per

Extra State

*■

bbl.
.

Shipping Roundhoop Ohio
Extra Western,

common

to

good

do
do
do
do
do

Southern, supers.....*.
Southern, fancy and extra
Canada, common to choice extra
Rye Flour, fine and superfine
’ Corn
meal, Jersey and Brandywine
Wheat, Chicago Spring
per bushel
do
do
do

5 50 @

Rye,

1
2

@
@
91 @
@
@
@
10 @
97 @
10 @
63 @
@
@
00 @
50 @

20

96^
97

..

..

i

North River

1

Oats, Western
do
do

95
15

25
50
60
60
10

..

Western

do

6
5
1
1
2
2

5 00 @
1 55 @
1 55 @

Red Winter
Amber Michigan, &c
Western Mixed.
Western White
Western Yellow
Southern Yellow
Southern White

do
do
do
do

$6 70 @ $7 40
7 65 @
8 20
8 90 @ 9 20
7 75 @ 11 00
-9 *20 @ 10 40
10 50 @ 14 00
7 85 @ 11 00

Milwaukee Club

Corn,

a

State
Canada

••

1 12
1 00
1 12
64

..

1

1

1 30
170

day it cleared up and has been warm and bright since, up to yester¬
day.
At Monday’s market considerable excitement was
manifested in
the trade owing to the unsettled state-of the weather and the
re¬
ported injury to the wheat crop from the late heavy rains. English
-

iu

good demand at an advance of 2s to 3s per quarter,
se’nnight. In American and Canadian
an
improvement of 2s from last Monday.
Barrels Sre in good consumptive request at an advance

from the prices of this
day
a fair business was done at

Flour.

of 6d to Is.
The floating

grain cargo trade. Wheat has been in active re¬
quest at the extreme advance of last week. For forward shipment
a
large business lias again been done at fully late rates, 40s per 492
lbs being paid for Odessa Ghirka.
Maize is firm at the decline of
last week, at which buyers are
more numerous.
Ibrail has been
sold at 28s per 480 His, and Galatz at 29s 3d
per 492 lbs.
At to day’s market the trade was rather excited
owing to the
heavy rain since yesterday, and factors ask Is to 2s per qr. advance
on
Monday’s prices for English and American wheat.
At Glasgow, on the 11th. a
very large busimss was done at 21s
3d to 21s 6d, for choice amber
spring wheat. Flour sold freely at
23s 6d for prime extra State, and 24s to 24s fid for
superfine
Canadian. Indian corn also found
ready buyers at 17s fid ex ship.
At Liverpool, same date, the unfavorable
change in the weather
caused some excitement, and an extensive business was
done in
wheat at an advance of 4d
per cental on Tuesday’s quotations.
A
large trade was also done in French flour at an improvement of Is
to Is 6d per sack, and barrels were fid to Is dearer.
There was
more
inquiry for Indian corn, at prices rather in favor of sellers.
The farmers deliveries of wheat for the week were
54,804 quarters,
at 43s fid,
against 44s Id same time fast year.
quotations.

Flour.

|

Extra State

a.

..(per barrel)

do
Philadelphia and Baltimore..
do
Ohio
do
Canadian
do
Sour and Heated
Wheat. Chicago and Miiwaukie
do
Amber Iowa
do
Red and Amber Winter
do
White—Western
Indian Corn. Yellow
do
Mixed
Peas.
Canadian.

Oatmeal,

do

....•

do

.
-

do
do
do

(per 100 lbs.)
do

„

-

dc

do

(per 480 lbs.)
do

(per 504 lbs.)
(per 240 lbs.)

d.

s.

d.

23 6 @ 24 6
24 0 @ 25
0
24 0 @ 25
0
23 6 @ *26
0
19 0 @ 21
0
8 8 @ 9 0
9 0 @ -9 4
8 10@
9 3
9 3 @
9 9
31 6 @ ....
31 3 @ 31
6
87 0 @ 88 0
22 0 @ 22 6

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.

The past
Joods trade.

the

quite active, and
supply of fine qualities is very limited. They are taken from
agents as fast as received, at an advance of from lc a 2c from

last week

in

most

Stark A,

Indian Head, Lawrence C,
Appleton A, and Indian Orchard, are held by agents at 32; 44
Graniteville 28 ; | do 27 ; 4-4 Augusta Factory 31, $ do 28
; Appletons 39 for B, an advance of lc, 28 for C, and 29 for 1), a^c
each higher ; Newmarket E E 33, do A 32, and 33 iu do
281; 44
Medford 30; Massachusetts A 29, do B 31, and 4-4
Nashua
cases.

extra 31.

The London Market.—A circular of the 11th
August, reports :
The weather this week has been on the whole favorable for harvest
work.
On Monday morning a good deal of rain Cell, but about mid¬

was

Brown Sheetings and Shirtings have been
the

..

Barley
Barley Malt

wheat

at the old

figures and goods scarce, with a great prob¬
ability that the demand will be beyond the supply for the present,
It is understood
generally that the cost of manufacture is much leas
than the present prices, and that every available means is
taking to
increase the present product, a fact which will
materially lessen the
price of all domestics in a few weeks at most. Some houses go so
far as to predict the crash which is to follow.
The agents^report “ no go'ods ” in almost
every instance, and
consequently no prices. Certain it is that the activity among the
jobbing houses cannot long continue without sweeping off all goods
In first hand, though the principal activity has been
with the
jobbers thus far.
are

week has been

one of unusual activity in the Dry
The fall trade commenced with great briskness dur¬

ing the last days of last week, and has kept up with increased
vigor to the present time. The slight concessions, and above all

Bleached Sheetings

and

Shirtings

are

still very scarce and

sold ahead of

supply. With the present excited state of the mar.
an
impossibility to give exact prices, as 4 a cent or
1 cent a yard would be of no
consequence if the goods were to be had.
Prices are lc a-2c above last week, arid
advancing. Wamsutta
ket it is next to

delivered at 46, 9-8 do 54, 5-4 do 58; York Mills
49.
Wauregan water twist are held at 46, do X X 41, Forestdale42,
Masonville 421, do X 44, Slaterville 7-8 at 34, Bartlette 40 for

4-4

are

44,

37 for 7-8, and 38 for 33-inch ; Lonsdale sell at 43, White Rock
44,
Drills are scarce and prices advancing, as is the case with all
domestic

goods of fine qualities. Laconia sells at 35, Iudia and
Pepperell 33, Stark H 28, and Augusta 32.
Corset Jeans are in better demand, and
prices stiffening, though
without perceptible change in figures. Indian
Orchard, Bates, and
Androscoggin sell at 25c for bleached and colored ; Naumkeag 35,

and Satteens 36.

Canton Flannels

=

are

in fair demand, and

prices firm, although
activity in these goods. There is a good supply on
hand. The Nashua and Conestoga sell for 39 a 40c;
Naumkeag
and Manchester 43 for brown ; Slatersville 45, and Good
Hope 35.
there is less

Stripes

and

Checks

are

in moderate demand at last weeks

prices.

Haymaker’s medal 45; Whitteuton 35 for C, 37A for B. B., 55 for
A. A.,

and 45 for A.

Denims

and

Cottonades

are more

active, and prices are firm.

Amoskeag denims sell at 67-1; Sprague’s and Haymaker’s medal
52^; and Providence 28. New York mills double and twist cottonades bring 75, and Indigo blue camlet jeans 50.
Print Cloths have been moderately active at firm
prices. The
sales at Providence for the past week foot
up a total of 87,000 pieces
at following terms : 10.000
pieces 64 x 64, 134c, up to January;
17,000 do. 64 x 64, 19c, up to January ; 14,000 do. 64 x 64, 20c,
to be made ; 15,000 do. 64 x 64, 204c, to be
made; 1,000 do. 60 x
64, 21fc, on hand ; 5,000 do. 64 x 64, 22c, on hand ; 13,000 do. 64
x 64, 224c, on hand ; 12,000 do. 64 x
64, 23c, on hand.
Prints have been very

active, and the market is nearly bare of
goods, while prices have again advanced to those of ten days ago.
Agents have few or no goods on hand, and it is becoming more a
question of goods than prices. The reduction of last week was the
signal tor large calls from country merchants and Western buyers,
and the demand is still great, although prices
are much above the
actual cost of production. The small
supply held by the jobbers is
almost wholly distributed, and with the
present briskness of trade
and scarcity of goods prices are
likely to be further advanced.
There has been less advance iu prices
by agents than by the jobbers,
as in some instances
jobbers were selling below agents prices. Mer¬
rimack now sells by agents at 32 for W, 30 for D, and 32 for frocks;
American Print Works are quoted At 29 j
Sprague’s 29 regular fo*

V;

~?

* -

: v-:

-.

.......

WITHDRAWN

and white ;
28 ;
for frock .
Arnold’s 27 regular. Richmond 28 net for fancy, 29 for pink and
rple, and 27 for mourning. Garner’s are 31, Amoskeag 30 for
pinks, 29 for purple, 28 for fancy and shirting, 27£ for mourning,
patekess B 26, Lowell 26J, Wamsutta 25, and dusters 25.

fancies ; 30 for pinks, purples, and shirtings ; 30 for blue
31 for blue and orange ; national 24£ for light; mourning
Allen’s 27 net for fancy ; 29 for pink and purple, and 28

WAREHOUSE

FROM

Manufactures of wool... 1619
476
do
cotton..
do
silk
231

$1,198,967
1,176,262-

1024
3821

Total th’wn upon mark’t.6996

$2,375,229

4S45 $1,108,125

flax

739

$260,499

<

65,406
31,657
2,954

103.404
54,600

Total
Add ent’d for

710

$253,899

consumpt’n.3S76

1,176,262

L

....

Total entered at the

Dote.

i

demand, and firm notwithstand¬

consid¬

catalogue of silks, dress goods, &c., &c. The principal feature of
was a large assortment of Saxony dress goods, of the
manufacture and importation of Messrs. Chas. F. Schmeider &
Co. The offering was very attractive, and the competition among
the bidders for these desirable frabrics was quite active, and prices
were well sustained, many choice styles bringing an advance on the

the sale

quotations of the season. 20 inch bleached linen toweling
brought 17 a 24c ; 16 in. fine Russia crash 22c ; 26 in. fine linen
grass cloth 23c ; 7 4 bleached damask 39c; 3?4 bird’s eye diaper
39 a 44c; 8-4 damask table cloths, all linen, $2 a $2.70 ; 9-11
brown do $1.40 ; huckabuck towels 23c ; vdo larger and finer 26 a
344c ; damask towels 60c ; extra large buck do, all linen, 31 a 35c,
extra size and quality blue bordered do 45 a 50c ; 8*4 brown dam¬
ask 60 a 624c ; 10 4 do 73 a 82c ; fine all wool filling high col¬
ored Alambras, 34§c ; neat plaid Luzeas 33^c , do Corriuuas, 33c ;
do poll de chevres, 34 a 35c; do poil de chevres, black and white
check, 404c; do Cornelias 33 a 35c; poplin satanella in plaids
and checks, 39c ; satin stripped flora raye, 56fc ; lama quality Eugenias, 43i ; Scotch Firalda, 44c ; satin stripe Valadoras, 37^c;
plaid Olgas 384c ; Cleopatra *'raye, 40£c ; silk plaid Alexandria a
sole, 48£e; silk plaid Orpheas a soie, 514c ; silk pamette plaids,
and silk broche dots, 50£c ; silk stripes Granada a soie, 55e ; silk
troche stripes Camelia a soie, 72c ; Turkish silk do, double width,
84|c; red and black all wool check, 64c ; new Scotch do GO a 61c;
super do in black and white checks, 60c ; French silk and wool pop
fins, 55 a 69c ; plaid mourning do 60c ; silk striped do 42£ a 63c •
double fold do, 84c ; silk crepe check 384 a 63c ; all wool French
white merino, 89c; black Coburgs, 35 a 40c ; colored English do
44 a 56c; double fold black craps, 45^c ; mohair figured alpaca,
60c ; black alpacas,
a 42c; figured plaid mohairs, 32|c ; col.
ored baratheas, 35c ; gross grain silks, $1,974 a $2.10 , better do
§2.15 a $2-25; 26 inch Lyons black taffetas, $1.95 a $2; army
earlier

prices quite satisfactory.

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Hose
Merinoes
Worsted y’n

Emb’d mus’n
Velvets
Laces
Braids & bds.
Handkereh'fs

$94,705

.313
Cottons
.109
Colored
32
Prints
8
Ginghams..
6
Muslins....
....

31.710
8.191

.

1.947
3.096

..

.

Silks

.136
3
9
Plushes
Velvets.,... 22
Embroideries 8
Total.

.989

$226,958

5

6,737

3,795

..

3,157

14,-169

.

9,951

MANUFACTURES

Linens
Laces
Total

.

.

101,511
59,022

.3876 $1,176,262

3821

‘ $668,610

4411

$1,714,759

361
972
221

....

....

*

$293,129

43

7,431

Spool
Hose

57

2S3

16,058
52,305

915

$238,771

6,207
4,231
3,595

•

Total

SILK.

33.557

2,441
640

49,018

OF

6,212
7,916
27,060
1,914

Braids & bds. 6
Silk & wors’d 10
Silk & cotton. 36
Silk & Linen. 2

52,091

39
19

Hdkfs
Thread

Gloves

5,763

64
Ribbons
30
Laces
Gloves....... 3
3
Cravats
35
Raw

$223,751

Crapes

.

367

$438,572

61

7,695

FLAX.

Hemp yarn

73,999
5,052

..

-—

1,113 $270,441
3II3CELLANEOU3.

Leath gloves.
Kid gloves...

Matting
Clothing

14 $16,371 Embroideri’s. 19
3,436 Millinery
2
4
1,215 Corsets ...... 26
84
3,242 Straw goods. 25
17

MANUFACTURES

..

Carpeting

..

.

Blankets...
Shawls

..

..

35
28
55
26

15,316

8

3,638

Total ......255

$69,255

Susp & elast.

395
7,731
4,042

WAREHOUSE.
OF WOOL.

Pkgs.

Pkgs. Value.

Pkgs. Value.
Woolens.. ..171 $80,272
Cloths

Feath & flow. 56

13,869

FROM

WITHDRAWN

o
Gloves.... :.
Worsteds... .339
6
Delaines
12
Worst, vara
16
Hose

16.101

7,303
7.059
13.354

..

698

149,603
2.427
4.433

33
Cottons
29
Colored....
Emb'd mils'll- 2
1
Velvets....

$8,374

34

$75,431

20
1
8

6.629
233

°27

$57,979

o

357

45,05T
.

—

Total... .844 i

5,216

1
3
1
6

Laces
Gloves
Braids & bds.
Handkereh'fs

COTTON.

288
518

Spool

4

Hose

1

835
345

Total.... 81

$22,025

2.125

...

13,470

Merinos
28
Braids & bds.
1
Cot & wos’d.125

i

OF

MANUFACTURES
..

9.014
870
395

..

..

150

1,236

—

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks

..

Pongees....
Crapes
Plushes....

..

..

..

5,269

12
9
2
Silk & worst. 4

Velvets

Ribbons
Laces

9.877
8.791
1.312

Silk & cotton.

4,707

7
—

Total

-

97!

4,307

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

Linens
Laces
Total

3

Handkfs

1,271

Thread

12

2,844

—

144
MISCELLANEOUS.

Leath.

1

...

..

$821

6

gloves

Matting
“Total

246

Straw

goods..

Carpeting

29
1
29

FOR

1,585
2,124

5

Susp. & elas.

2,510

—

23

$7,286

Pkgs.

Value.

WAREHOUSING.

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

Pkgs. ValnO.
Woolens..... 04
5
Cloths

3
8

Clothing..

ENTERED
.

$26,475

Blankets

Pkgs. Value.
62
6

1,660

Shawls

6,384

Worsteds... .101

7,528 Cot. &wors’d 1

220

Total....268

$88,769

1

162
431

2,411

44,091

Manufactures of cotton.

$162
10.634

5

Prints

Gloves
1,070 Hose/

1,657

3

Laces

2

41 $14,119

-

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks

Velvets

.33 $86,033
2
1,702

7
3

Ribbons
Laces

Tetal

Linens

$697,720

silk
flax




77§

1761
915
367
1113
225

114,422
261,239

4.127

7
15
11
17
14

MANUFACTURES OF

i

546

Value.

87,586
70,354
189,581
27,960

$740,068

527

697,729

Total.... 1.761

4,147 Silk & cott’n. 2
1,794
2,541
————
47 $96,277

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

-1865.

Pkgs.

651
6.529

32

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.

24.

330
99
2532
82

1795
cotton..

Total.

-1864.Value.

9,997

2

.

Cot. &wor’d.277

5.639

28

....

.

24,808
102,489

254,993“ Braids & bds. 50

Worsteds
642
Delaines....!. 10

..

Value.

Pkgs.

Value.

Pkgs.

Pkgs. Value.
Woolens.... 346 $175,597
38.402
74
Cloths
40.928
Carpetings.. .172
14
Blankets..
2,279
41
17.5S2
Shawls
Gloves
70
17,831

*

Pkgs.

CONSUMPTION.

FOR

ENTERED

'

-1863.Value.

5418 $2,010,994

5352 $1,134,640

Total

importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending
Aug. 24,1865, and the corresponding weeks of 1863 and 1864, have

Pkgs.

668,610

following is a detailed statement of the movement the past
ending Aug. 24, 1865 :

Colored

NEW YORK.

ENDING AUGUST

$296,235
1,714,759

1007
4411

$466,030

The
week

The

THE WEEK

1531
3821

STATEMENT.

DETAILED

Cottbus

and

follows:

14,823

.

ing very large importations. The market sympathises to a
erable extent with the activity in domestics, but the changes from
last week are not material.
There have been a number of sales at
anction since our last. On Tuesday Messrs. Haggerty & Co. sold a

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR

14,119
.96,277
72,722
24,343

32,639

port.4595 $1,430,161

.

as

$88,769

$97,073
56,818

.

been

5700 $2,270,195

SAME PERIOD.

3v
r

....

aud Laurel Glen 62|c.
Flannels and Blankets are in active request, but prices nom¬
inally the same as last week.
Linens are in steady demand, with no variation in prices to

$555,436
1,714,759

1289
4411

668,610

Manufactures of wool...
do
cotton.,
silk
do
do
flax
Miscellaneous dry goods.

Standard 30c ; and Union

IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF

,,

$439,515

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING THE

Valley $1.25.
Kentucky Jeans are in active demand and sell quickly at firm
prices. Washingtons are held at G5q ; Richmonds 60c ; Common

cassimers, &c., was well attended,

22,025
116,556
64,214
7,286

34,184
68,783
35,164
14,135

Total
3120
Add ent’d for consunpt’u.3370

#

Miscellaneous dry goods.

Lower

blankets $2.05 per pair.
Another sale of cloths,

$345,360

$287,299

55

do

•

yard. Glasgow sells at 33. Lancaster at 34.
Mouslin de Laines arc in active demand at firm prices.
Stand¬
ard styles are £ a lc higher, selling at 33 a 34c.
Woolen Goods are hardly so active, although [prices remain
steady and firm. Fur cloths, Utica all wool beavers bring $3.25 ;
cotton warp No. 1, $2,65.
For Cassimeres, Dightons $2 .50 ; Mil.
ville, all wool $2.75 a $3.00; Satinets, Tip Top No. 1, $1 30, and

Goods are in increased

660
106'
90
137
31

123,749
258,706
161,510
33,14S

per

Foreign

SAME PERIOD.

$631,854

....

DURING

MARKET

THROWN INTO THE

AND

THE

and in good demand, at an advance of lc a

Ginghams are scarce
9c

277

THE CHRONICLE.

August 26, 1865.J

238,771
438,572
270,441
69.255

$68,636 Ilaudk'fs

....

2

2,068 Thread

22

570 $72,722

Total
MISCELLANEOUS.

goods
Leathej^gtpves
Straw

Total

1,968

..

..

5

$22,371
2,077

79

$24,318

74




276
I—

'

1

'

THE CHRONICLE

'*"

'

11

jii.r.....,,'

.....

1,000,000 bushels Wheat, and prices are so high as to almost stop
shipments, but we can discover very little desire to sell ; in fact, it
is evident that, with a slight decline, speculators will
again become
free purchasers. Corn and Oats have been in
large consumptive
demand, aud prices have improved, leading to some speculative
feeling. Rye has been in demand for the Continent, and the mar¬

the

fact that the

~

•
A«..r

[August 26, 1865.
1

■■

season

was

well

activity.

advance^, has

-»

caused thig

The market was, however, so bare of goods that the serai
panjc
has prevailed the past week, has cleared it of

which

almost all

leading and standard kinds of domestics, while the market has
fully
recovered the concession in prices made a week
ago.
ket has ruled firm.
Prices are at the old figures and goods scarce, with a great
prob.
At to-day’s market there was a further
general advance, with a ability that the demand will be beyond the supply for the
present.
large speculative business in Wheat.
It is understood generally that the cost of manufacture is much
leas
The following are the
than the present prices, and that
closing quotations :
every available means is taking to
Flour, Superfine State and Western. ...per bbl.
$6 70 (a) 17 40 increase the present product, a fact which will materially lessen the
do
Extra State
7 65 (lb
8 20 | price of all domestics in a few weeks at most.
Some houses go so
do
Shipping ltoundhoop Ohio
8 90 @ 9 20
far as to predict the crash which is to follow.
do
Extra Western, common to good
7 75 @ 11 00
do
Double Extra Western and St. Louis
The agents report “ no goods ” in almost
11 25 @ 14 00
every instance, and
do
Southern, supers
9 20 @ 10 40 consequently no
prices. Certain it is th?*t the activity among the
do
Southern, fancy and extra
10'50 (a) 14 00
do
joboing houses cannot long continue without sweeping off all goo^3
Canada, common to choice extra
7 S5 @ 11 00
do
in first haud, though the principal
Rye Flour, fine and superfine
5 50 @ 6 25
activity has been with the
do
Corn meal, Jersey and
Brandywine
00 @ 5 50 jobbers thus far.
5
Wheat, Chicago Spring
per bushel
1 55. @ 1 60
Brown Sheetings and Shirtings have been
do
Milwaukee Club
;
quite active, and
1 55 @
1 60
do
Red Winter
the supply of fiue qualities is very limited.
1 95 @
2 10
They are taken from
do
Amber Michigan, <fcc
2 15 @
2 20 the agents as fast as received,,at an advance, of from lc a 2c
from
Corn, Western Mixed
91

do
do
do

Western White
Western Yellow
Southern Yellow
Southern White

do

Rye,

..

i

Western

do

North River

1

Oats, Western
do
do

10 @
97 @
10

@
@
@
@

63

State
,

Canada

..

Barley
Barley Malt

1

96£

@

@
@
@

00

last week

in

most

cases.

Stark A,

Indian Head, Lawrence C,

97 Appleton A, aud Indian Orchard, are held by agents at 32; 4.4
Graniteville 28; | do 27 ; 4-4 Augusta Factory 31, £ do
28; Ap1 12
pletous 39 for B, an advance of lc, 28 for C, and 29 for D, a jc
1 00
each higher ; Newmarket R R 33, do A 32, and 33 in do
3 12
281; 44
64 Medford 30; Massachusetts A 29, do B 31, and 4-4 Nashua
..

extra 31.

@

1 30

1 50 (d

1 70

The London Market.—A circular of the 11th
August, reports :
The weather this week has been on the Whole favorable for harvest
work.
On Monday morning a good deal of rain fell, but about mid¬

day, it cleared up and has been warm and bright since, up to yester¬
day.
At Monday’s market considerable excitement was
manifested in
the trade owing to the unsettled stale of the weather
and the re¬
ported injury to the wheat crop from t he late heavy rains. English
»

wheat was in good demand at an advance of 2s to 3s
puiyquarter,
from the prices of this
day se’nnight. In American and Canadian
a fair business was done at an
improvement of 2s from last Monday.
Flour.
Barrels tre in good consumptive
request at an advance
of 6d to Is.
The floating grain cargo trade.
Wheat has been in active re¬

Bleached Sheetings

and

Shirtings

are

still very scarce and

sold ahead of

supply. With the present excited state of the^mar.
an
impossibility to give exact prices, as a cent or
1 cent a yard would be of no
consequence if the goods were to be had.
Prices are lc a 2c above last week, and
advancing. Wamsutta
ket it is next to

delivered at 46, 9-8 do 54, 5-4 do 58; York Mills 49.
Wauregan water twist are held at 46, do X X 41, Forestdale42,
Masonville 421, do X 44, Slaterville 7-8 at 34, Bartlette 40 for

4-4

are

44,

37 for 7-8, aud 38 for 33-inch ; Lonsdale sell at 43, White Rock 44.
Drills are scarce and prices advancing, as is the case with all
domestic

goods of fine qualities. Laconia sells at 35, India and
Fepperell 33, Stark H 28, aud Augusta 32.
Corset Jeans are in better demand, and
prices stiffening, though
without perceptible change in figures. Indian
Orchard, Bates, and
quest at the extreme advance of last week. For forward shipment
a
large busiuess has again been done at fully late rates, 40s per 492 Androscoggin sell at 25c for bleached and colored ; Naumkeag 35,
lbs being paid for Odessa Ghirka.
Maize is firm at the decline of and Satteens 36.

last week, at which
sold at 28s per 480

buyers are more numerous. Ibrail has been
Canton Flannels are in fair demand, and
prices firm, although
lbs, and Galatz at 29s 3d per 492 lbs.
there is less activity in these goods.
At to day’s market the trade was rather excited
There is. a good supply on
owing to the
heavy rain siuee yesterday, and factors ask Is to*2s per qr. advance hand. The Nashua and Conestoga sell for 39 a-40c ; Naumkeag
on
and Manchester 43 for brown ; Slatersville 45, and Good
Monday’s prices for English and American wheat.
Hope 35.
At Glasgow, on the 11th. a
very large business was done at 21s
Stripes and Checks are in moderate demand at last weeks
prices.
3d to 21s fid, for choice amber
spring wheat.
Flour sold freely at
Haymaker’s medal 45; Wbitteuton 35 for C, 371 for B. B., 55 for
23s fid lor prime
extra State, and 24s to 24s fid for superfine
A. A., and 45 for A.
Canadian. Iudiau corn also found ready buyers
at 17s fid ex ship.
Denims and Cottonades are more active, and
At Liverpool, same date, the unfavorable
prices are firm.
change in the weather
caused some excitement, and an extensive business was
done in Amoskeag denims sell at 67^ ; Sprague’s and Haymaker’s medal
wheat at an advance of 4d per
cental on Tuesday’s quotations. A 52|; and Providence 28. New York mills double aud twist cot¬
large trade was also done iu French flour at an improvement of Is
tonades bring 75, and Indigo blue camlet jeans 50.
to Is fid per sack, and barrels were fid to Is dearer.
There was
Print Cloths have been moderately active at firm
more
inquiry for Indian corn, at prices rather in favor of sellers.
prices. The
The farmers deliveries of wheat for the week were
54,804 quarters, sales at Providence for the past week foot up a total of 87,000 pieces
at 43s fid,
against 44s Id same time last year.
at following terms : 10.000
pieces 64 x 64, 13Jc, up to January;
QUOTATIONS.
17,000 do. 64 x 64, 19c, up to January ; 14,000 do. 64 x 64, 20c,
's.
d.
s.
d.
to be made ; 15,000 do. 64 x 64, 201c, to be made; 1,000 do. 60 x
Flour.
Extra State
..(per barrel) 23 6 @ 24 6
do
do
64, 21fe, on band ; 5,000 do. 64 x 64, 22c, on hand ; 13,000 do. 61
Philadelphia and Baltimore.
24 0 @ 25
0
do
Ohio
.’24 0 (d 25 0 x 64, 22lc, on hand ; 1-2,000 do. 64 x 64,
23c, on hand.
do
Canadian
.

.

23 6

do

5

Sour and

Heated

@ 26
19 0 (d 21
8 8 @
9

0

Prints have been very

active, and the market is nearly bare of
goods, while prices have again advanced to those of ten days ago.
do
Amber Iowa
9 0 (d
9
4 I
Agents have few or no goods on hand, and it is becoming more a
do
Red and Amber Winter
8 10(a)
9
3
do
j question of goods than prices. The reduction of last week was the
White—Western
9 3 (d
9
9
Indian Corn. Yellow
.(per 480 lb9.) 31 6 (5)
signal tor large calls from country merchants and Western buyers,
do
Mixed
do
31 3 (d 31
6
and the demand is still great,
Peas.
Canadian
although prices are much above the
..(per 504 lbs.) 87 0 (d 88 0
do
Oatmeal,
..(per 210 lbs.) 22 0 (d 22 6 actual cost of production. The small supply held by the jobbers is
I almost wholly distributed, and with the
present briskness of trade
THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
and scarcity of goods prices
are\ likely to be further advauced.
The past week has been one of unusual
activity in the Dry There has been less advance in prices by agents than by the jobbers,
oloods trade. The fall trade commenced with
great briskness dur¬ as iu some instances jobbers were selling below agents prices. Mer¬
ing the last days of last week, and has kept up with increased rimack now sells
by agents at 32 for W, 30 for D, and 32 for frocks;
vigor to the present time. The slight concessions, and above all American Print Works are
quoted at 29; Sprague’s 29 regular fo*
Wheat.

Chicago and Miiwaukie...., .(per 100 lbs.)
.

....

..

....

0

0

and white
mourning 28
28 for frock
Arnold’s 27 regular. Richmond 28 net for fancy, 29 for pink and
purple, and 27 for mourning. Garner’s are 31, Amoskeag 30 for
pinks, 29 for purple, 28 for fancy and shirting, 27^ for mourning,
Dutchess B 20, Lowell 26R Wainsutta 25, aud dusters 25. ,

fancies ; 30 for pinks, purples, and shirtings ; 30 for blue
31 for blue and orange; national 24£ for light;
Allen’s 27 net for fancy ; 29 for pink and purple, aud

and in good demand, at an advance of lc a

Gingham3 are scarce

yard. Glasgow sells at 33. Lancaster at 34.
Movslin de Laines are in active demand at firm prices. Stand¬
ard styles are 4 a lc higher, selling at 33 a 34c.
Woolen Goods are hardly so active, although fprices remain
steady and firm. Fur cloths, Utica all wool beavers bring 33.
For Cassimeres, DightOns $2.50 ;
cotton warp No. 1, $2,65.
ville, all wool $2.75 a $3.00 ; Satinets, Tip Top No. 1, $1 30|

2c per

Valley $1.25.
Kentucky Jeans are in active demand $nd sell quickly

Washingtons are held at 65c ; Richmonds 60c ;

prices.

Flannels and

aud Laurel Glen 62 lc.

Blankets are in active request, but

inally the same as last week.
Linens are in steady demand, with ,no
Goods are in increased demand,

123,749
258,706
161,510
33,14S

Co'

Total
.3120 $1,198,967
Add ent’d for consunpt’n..3870
1,176,262

1024
3321

Total th’wn upon

4845

...

1619
476
231
‘739
55

mark’t..6996 $2,375,229

variation in prices to
and firm notwithstand¬

quotations of the season. 20 inch bleached linen toweling
brought 17 a 24c ; 16 in. fine Russia crash 22c ; 26 in. fine linen
grass cloth 23c ; 7 4 bleached damask 39c; 3-4 bird’s eye diaper
39 a 44c; 8-4 damask table cloths, all linen, $2 a $2.70 ; 9-11
brown do $1.40 ; huckabuck towels 23c ; Mo larger and finer 26 a
34£c ; damask towels 60c ; extra large buck do, all linen, 31 a 35c,
extra size and quality blue bordered do 45 a 50c ; 8-4 brown dam¬
ask 60 a 624c ; 10 4 do 73 a 82c ; fine all wool filling high col¬
ored Alambras, 34fc ; neat plaid Luzeas 33^6 , do Corriuuas, 33c ;
do poil de chevres, 34 a 35c; do poil de chevres, black and white
check, 404c ; do Cornelias 33 a 35c ; poplin satanella in plaids
and checks, 39c ; satin stripped flora raye, 56|c ; lama quality Eugenias, 43i ; Scotch Firalda. 44c ; satin stripe Valadoras, 37£c;
plaid Olgas 384c ; Cleopatra *'raye, 40Jc ; silk plaid Alexandria a
soie, 48£c; silk plaid Orpheus a soie, 514c ; silk pamette plaids,
and silk broche dots, 5(4c ; silk stripes Granada a soie, 55c ; silk
broche stripes Camelia a soie, 72c ; Turkish silk do, double width,
844c; red and black all wool check, 64c ; new, Scotch do CO a 01c;
super do in black and white checks, 80c ;.French silk and wool pop
lins, 55 a 69c ; plaid mourning do 60c ; silk striped do 424 a 63c;
double fold do, 84c ; silk crepe check 384 a 63c ; all wool French
white merino, 89c; black Coburgs, 35 a 40c; colored English do
44 a 56c; double fold black craps, 454c ; mohair figured alpaca,
60c ; black alpacas, 354 a 42c; figured plaid mohairs, 324c ; col.
ored baratheas, 35c ; gross grain silks, $1,974 a $2.10 , better do
$2.15 a $2-25; 26 inch Lyons black taffetas, $1.95 a $2; army
cassimers, &c., was well attended, and

prices quite satisfactory.
PORT OF NEW YORK.

importations of dry goods at this port for the week ending
Aug. 24,1865, and the corresponding weeks of 1863 and 1864, have
follows:

-1863.,
Value.
Pkgs.

Manufactures of wool... 1795
do
do
do

Miscellaneous

flax....
dry gooas.

Total




-

$740,068

P77S

330
99

$293,129
87,586

114,422
261,239
101,511
59,022

2532
82

189,581
27,960

3876 $1,176,262

3821

$668,610

527
361
972

cotton..
silk

-1864.s.
Value.

221

70.354

$555,436
1,714,759

5700

$2,270,195

263
41

$88,709
14,119

47

•96,277
72,722

561

$260,499

110

32,639

42
149
2S

65,406
31,657

95
735

103.404
54.660

2,954

30

14,828

Total
Add ent’d for

719

$253,899

1531

$466,030

consumpt1n.3S76

1,176,262

3821

668,610

port.4595 $1,430,161

5352

$1,134,640

....

....

Total entered at the

570
79

24,348
$296,235
1,714,759

1007
4411

5418 $2,010,994

STATEMENT.

DETAILED

following is a detailed Statement of the movement the past
ending Aug. 24, 1865 :
CONSUMPTION.

FOR

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.

74

Worsteds
Delaines
Hose
Merinoes
Worsted y’n

38.402

Carpetings.. .172

40.928

Blankets..
Shawls
Gloves

14
44

17,582

70

642
10
28
2

17,831

Cloths

.

.

.

.

.

Value.

Pkgs.

Value.

254,993

Braids & bds. 50
Cot. & wror’d.277

102,489

Pkgs.

Value.

Pkgs.

2,279

....

5.639
9.997
651
6.529

32

.

24,803

697,729

Total.. ..1.761

-v-

MANUFACTURES OF COTTON.

Cottons
.313
Colored..... .109
Prints
32

31,710
8.191
1,947
3.096

.

Ginghams...

8

.

Muslins....

6

.

Emb’d mus’n
Velvets
Laces
Braids & bds.
Handkerch'fs

$94,705

....

4,127
5,768
6,207
4,231

715
11
17

.136
3
9
Plushes
22
Velvets
Embroideries 8
Total.

.989

$226,958

5

6.737

Crapes

.

.

.

Cravats
Raw

.

38.557

2,441

Hose

640

OF

16,058

52,306
.

Total.. ....915

Braid9
Silk &
Silk &
Silk &

$238,771
6,212
7,916
27,060
1,914

& bds.
6
wors’d 10
cotton. 36
Linen.
2

49,018

39
19

Hdkfs
Thread

7,431

43
57
....283

....

....

.

367

$438,572

61

9

MANUFACTURES

Linens
Laces
Total

Spool....

SILK.

52,091

64
30
3
3
35

Ribbons
Laces
Gloves

$223,751
3,795
3,157
14,469
9,951

Silks

Gloves...

3,595

14

MANUFACTURES OF

7,696

FLAX.

73,999
5,052

Hemp

yarn

..

—

...1,113 $270,441

.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Leath gloves
Kid gloves..

.

Matting
Clothing....

.

....

.

2

Millinery

3,436
1,215
3,242

26
Corsets
Straw7 goods. 25

MANUFACTURES

Pkgs.
..

..

..

..

16,101

7,303
7.059

13,354

33
Cottons
29
Colored..
Emb'd mus'n 2
...

..

..

Velvets....

..

.

1

.

$8,374
9.014
870
395

Total

..

$69,256

255

....

WAREHOUSE.
Value.
698

149,603
2.427

OF

Pkgs. Value.

«■

5,216

•

Merinos..
28
1
Braids & bds.
Cot & wos’d.125
...

4.433

.

MANUFACTURES

8

—

OF WOOL.

Gloves— :.
2
Worsteds:... 339
Delaines
6
Worst, yarn.. 12
16
Hose

$80,272

Susp & elast.

7,731

Pkgs.

Value.

15,316
3,638

Feath & flow. 56

4,(442

FROM

WITHDRAWN

’Woolens.. ..171
35
Cloths
28
Carpeting .
55
Blankets...
26
Shawls

13.869
395

Embroideri’s. 19

$16,371

14
4
84
17

.

13,470
357

45,05T

—

Total. ...844 $345,350
j

COTTON.

Laces
Gloves..
Braids & bds.

1

288

Spool

3
1

518
150

Hose

Handkerch'fs

6

1,236

835

4
1

...

....

815

—

Total. ...81

$22,025
-

MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks
...

..

..

Plushes....

34
20
1

$75,431

8

5,269

007

..

Pongees
Crapes

$57,979
2,125

..

6.029
233

9.877
8.791

Velvets
12
Ribbons
9
Laces
2
4
Silk & worst.

Silk & cotton.

1,312

4,707

7
—

97

$116,556

Thread.... ...12

2,844

Total

...

...

4,307

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

Linens
Laces
Total

o

1,271

3

Handkfs

—

.

..144

$64,219

MISCELLANEOUS.

Leath.

1
6

glov<03

Matting

...

..

$821
246

1,585
2,124

Clothing..-.. 3
Straw7 goods..
8

Susp. & elas.

5

...

ENTERED

FOR

2,510

—

Total

23

$7,286

WAREHOUSING.

MANUFACTURES OF WOOL.
»

Woolens...
Cloths

Carpeting..

Pkgs.

Pkgs. Value.

ValuO.

..

64

29

Blankets
Shawis

62
6

7,528

1.660

..

6,1384

Worsteds... .101

‘44,091

$26,475

MANUFACTURES

1

Colored

29

$162
10,634

Prints
Laces

Pkgs. Value.
Cot. & wors’d

2,411

1

220

—

Total. ...268

$88,769

OF COTTON.
162
1
434
2
41 $14,119

1,G57 Gloves

5
3

1,070 Hose

Total
MANUFACTURES OF SILK.

Silks
Velvets

33 $86,033
2
1,702

24.

Ribbons......
Laces

1,794
4,147 Silk&cott’n. 2
—
2,541
47 $96,277

7
3

MANUFACTURES OF FLAX.

-1865.Value.
Pkgs.
1761
915
367

1289
4411

56,818

Tetal

AUGUST

668,610

$97,073

The

THE WEEK ENDING

244
23

324
176

Cottons

ENTERED FOR CONSUMPTION FOR

22,025

116,556
64,214
7,286

Manufactures of wool...
do
cotton.,
do
silk
do
;
flax
Miscellaneous dry goods.

Woolens.... 346 $175,597

earlier

as

$345,350

81
97

34.134
68,783
35,101
14.135

ENTERED FOR: WAREHOUSING DURING '

prices nom¬

catalogue of silks, dress goods, &c., &c. The principal feature of
the sale was a large assortment of Saxony dress goods, of the
manufacture and. importation of Messrs. Chas. F. Schmeider
Co. The offeriug was very attractive, and the competition among
the bidders for these desirable frabrics was quite active, and prices
were well sustained, many choice styles bringing an advance on the

beeu

$631,854

ENTERED

consid¬

IMPORTATIONS OF DRY GOODS AT THE

DURING

844

$287,299

660
106
90
137
31

Manufactures of wool..
do
cotton,
do
silk...
do
flax
Miscellaneous dry goods

week

ing very large importations. The market sympathises to a
erable extent with the activity in domestics, but the changes from
last week are not material.
There have* been a number of sales at
auction since our last. On Tuesday Messrs. Haggerty & Co. sold a

blankets $2.05 per pair.
Another sale of cloths,

MARKET

THE

THE SAME PERIOD.

The

a|

note.
Foreign

THROWN UNTO

WAREHOUSE' AND

FROM

WITHDRAWN

Lower

Standard 30c ; and Union

277

THE CHRONICLE.

August 26, 1865.]

$697,720

1113

238,771
438,572
270,441

225

69.255

4411 $1,714,759

Linens

546 $68,63G

Total

Handk'fs

22

2,068 Thread

2

1,968

570 $72,722

.

MISCELLANEOUS.

74

Straw goods.
Leather gloves

Total

5
*

$22,271

2,077

79 $24,343

278

THE CHRONICLE.

[August 26, 1865.

r

PRICES CURRENT.

i^aguayra
St,

WHOLESALE.

Sheathing, new
Sheathing, Ac., old
Sheathing, yellow

ft)

22

Gum
Gum

ISb

©

.

..

..

Braziers’.
Baltimore

..

30

\

Detroit

..

Cordage—Duty,

Ipecacuanna,

Jalap

30*

32

the expense and risk of
the owners of said

Corks—Duty,
Regular,

Short

quarts..

22* ©
..

50

..

gross

Peppermint,

pure

40
52
10

©
©
@
©

52
41
54
50

nnd
Dyes—Duty, Alcohol, 40 cents ^
gallon ; Aloes, 6 cents
lb ; Alum, 60 cents
100 lb ;
Algols, G cents ^ lb ; Arsenic and
Assafcetida, 20;
Antimony, Crude and Regains,

10; Arrowroot,
val.; Ba’sara Capivi, 21; Balsam Tolu,30 ^
3u;

50
50
70
48
24
40

23
35
30
9
.9

«,

1 00

80
2 75
5 00
5 50
5 00
6 00

(cash)

Phosphorus.

Prussiate Potash

Quicksilver

(gold)

Rhubarb, China

Rose Loaves
Salaratos

Colton—See special report.

©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

.

(sold)

Oxalic Acid.

50

;.

Tapers.'.

Mineral
Phial.

cent‘ad

Oil

a 16

3 00
40
45

.

......

Opium, Turkey

cent ad val.

r

„

Oil Bergamot
Oil Lemon

..

IS
20

40
1 00

>

Oil Anise
Oil Cassia

23*

@
@
©

...

•

,....

Brazil

Licorice Paste, Greek
Madder, Dutch
.'
Madtier, French, E. X. F. F.(gold)
do
Manna, large flake
Manna, small flake
Manna. Sorts
Nutgalls Blue Aleppo..

45
45

©
@

3 06*©
5 50 @

I.iccorlce, Paste, Sicily
Licorice Paste, Spanish Solid...

tarred, 3; untarred Manila,
2*;
$ lb.
lb

30
85

flakey...
and English.

Lac Dye. good and fine
Licorice Paste, Calabria

other unt-arred,
3* cents

Manila, Arner. made
Tarred Russia
Tarred American
Bolt Rope, Russia

Sorts
white

Iodine, Resublimed

30

©
©
©
©

..
-

Tragacanth,

Tragacanth,

Hyd. Potash, French
(gold)

45
25

©
©
©

.

Pig, Chile
Bolts,

merchandise, and if exported directly from said cus¬
tody to a Foreign Country within three
years, shall be

the
growth or produce
of
Oood Hope, when imported
from places this side of
Cape of Good Hope, a duty of 10 por cent, ad val. the
is
levied in addition to the duties
imposed on any such
articles when
imported1'directly from the place or
of their growth or production ; Raw Cotton andplaces
Raw
Silk excepted.
The ton in all cases to be 2,240 ft).

©
©

and ingot, 2*; old copper,
lb; manufactured. ;i0
ing copper and-yellow metal, in ^ cent ad val.; sheath¬
sheets 42 inches long
and 14 inches
wide,
toot, 3* cc-nts %-! tt>. weighing 14 © 34 oz. $ square
All cash.
"

regulations as if originally imported there;
any goods
remaining in public store or bonded warehouse be¬
yond three years shall be regatded as
abandoned to
the Government, and sold
under such regulations as
the Secretary of the
Treasury may prescribe. Mer¬
chandise upon which duties have
been paid may
re¬
main in warehouse in
custody of the officers of the
customs at

andxmcrchnndisc, of
if Countries East of the Cope

21
171

Uopper—Duty.pig, bar,
cents

2

All goods deposited in
public stores or bonded
warehouses must be withdrawn
therefrom, or the
duties thereon paid within one
year from the date of
the oricinnl importation, but
may be withdrawn
by
the owner for exportation to
Foreign Countries, or
may be transhipped to any port of the
Pacific, or West¬
ern Coast of the
United States, at
any time before tjre
expiration of three years from the date of the
original
Importation, such goods on arrival at a Pacific or
Western port, to be
subject to the same rules and

entitled to return duties,
proper evidence of such
merchandise having been landed abroad
to be furnish¬
ed to the collector
by the importer, one per centum
of said duties to be retained
by tao Government.
In addition to the duties noted
below, a discrim¬
inating duty of 10 per cent, ad val. is levied on all
imports under flags that have no
reciprocal treaties
with the United Slates.
£5§?“ On all guods, wares,

...

Domingo.

(cash)
Sal Ammoniac,
Refined... ..(gold)
Sal Soda, Newcastle
!
Sarsaparilla, Hond

Sarsaparilla,

90

©
© 7 50
©
© 5 50
© 6 25
©
65
©
©
41
2 00
15

..

Mex..

Seed, Anise
do Canary
do Hemp

25

(PK

©
©
©
10
©
3* ©
40
©
25 ©,
24 @
4 75 ©
2 25 ©
18 ®

*

H

$ ft)
26
$ lb; Calisaya Bark, 30 $ cent
$ bush.
val.; Hi Carb. Soda, i*; Bi Chromate
25
Potash. 3 cents
ft>; Bleaching Powder, 30 cents
5')
do Caraway
100 ft> ; Refined
$ ft)
Borax, 10 cents $ ft>; Crude
do Coriander
19
Brimstone,' $6; Roll
Brimstone, $10
ton ; Flor
17
do
©
Mustard, brown, Trieste
Sulphur, $20
ton, and
©
Ashes—Duty: 15 <j9 cent ad val. Produce of 15 $ cent ad val.; Crude < amphor, 30; Refined Cam¬
18
do
do
California, brown.
the British North Ameiicau
phor, 40 cents $ ft).; < arb.
do
@
18
do
Provinces, free.
Ammonia, 20
cent ad
English, white
val.; Cardamoms and
©
20
Seneca Root
Pot, 1st sort.
Cantharides, 50 cents ^9
50
60 @
@ 7 62* Castor Oil, $1
Pearl, 1st sort.....
gallon; Chlorate Potash, 0; Caustic Senna, Alexandria
62* © 7 75
Soda, 1|; Citric Acid,
24 ©
10; Copperas, *; Cream Tartar, Senna, East India
18 ©
10; Cubebs, 10 cents $
22
Shell Lac
Anchor**—Duty: 2* cents
lb.
lb; cutch,
50 ©
Flowers, 20 39 cent ad val.; Epsom Ifi; Chamomile Soda Ash (80
Of 209 ft> and upward
62*
Salts, 1 cent
cent)
i9 ft*
12 ©
(sold)
2 75 ©
ft); Extract Logwood, Flowers
Sugar Lead, White
Benzola and Gam¬
39 ©
boge, 10 39 cent.; Ginseng, 20;
40
Susar Lead, Brown
Gum Arabic, 20 39
Beeswax—Duty, 20 cent ad val,
cent ad
40
©
val.; Gum Benzoin, Gum
American yellow....
Kowrie, and Gum Sulphate Quinine, Am...,. $ oz.
Damar, 10 cents per S»; Cum
40
i9 ft*
©
©
50
Myrrh, Gum Senegal, Sulphate Morphine
Gum Geeda and Gum
8 10 ©
Tragacanth, 20 39 cent ad val.; Tartaric Acid
Bones-Duty, on invoice 10
(gold)
ft)
cent
Hyd. Potash and Resublimed Iodine, 75
60
©
Verdigris, dry arid extra dry
Rio Grande shin
; Ipecac and
(gold)
29 ©
Jalap, 5o; Lie. Paste, 10; Manna,
80
©
25; Oil Anis, Oil Vitriol, Blue
13
Lemon, and Oil Orange, 50
©
cents; Od Cassia and Oil
Bread.—Duty, 30
cent ad val.
Bergamot, ^1 39 ft* 5 Oil Peppermint, 5u
Pilot
Duck—Duty, 30 $ cent ad val.
val.; Opium, $2 50; Oxalic Acid, 4 cents 33 cent ad
©
5* phorus, 20
Navy
3? cent ad val.; Truss. Potash.39 lb; Phos¬ Ravens, Light
$ pee
16 00 © 18 09
©
4*
Crackers
Raven?,
Red do, 10;
Yellow,
22 00 ©
9 ©
Rhubarb, 50 cents ^9 ft* : Quicksilver, 5; Scotch, Heavy
14
15
Gourock, No. 1.........
39 cent ad val.; Sal yEratus, 1* cents
26 00 ©
Brcadstuf Is—See special report.
39 ft* 1 Sal Soda,
Cotton,No. 1...
* cent 3^ lb ; Sarsaparilla and
$ yard
95 ©
Senna, 2o 33 cent ad
val.; Shell Lac, 10; f-oda Ash,
Bristles—Duty, 15 cents; hogs hair, i
*; Sugar Lead, 20 cents
lb.
Dye Woods—Duty free.
33 lb ; Sulph. Quinine, 45 33 cent ad
val.; Sulph. Mor¬ Camwood
American, gray and white...ft>
45
phine, $2 50 39 oz.; Tartaric
@ 1 50
Acid, 20; Verdigris, 6
..(gold)
$ ton 130 00 ©150 00
cents 33 ft*', Sal
Fustic, Cuba
Blitter and
Ammoniac, 20; Blue Vitriol, 25
82 50 © 85 00
Cliecse.—Duty: 4 cents. Pro¬ cent ad val.; Etherial Preparations
33
duce of British North American
Fustic, Tampico
7
and Extracts, $l
Provinces, tree.
© 2» 00
33 lb; all others quoted
Fustic, Tabasco
below, frkf,. Most of the
Butter has been only in moderate
21 00 @ 22 00
demand during articles under this head are now sold for
the week.
21 00 @ 22 to
cash. (All
The State daries are
.(goll)
nominal )
steady for homo
do
consumption and the California trade. Western
©
Acid. Citric
bat¬
.(gold)
ter, chieliy for export, is dull and but
©
62
©
little activity is
Alcohol
shown. We quote :
20 00 ©
.(gold)
4 30 ©
39 gall.
4 40
Aloes,Cape
19 00 ©
..(gold)
Butter—
33 lb
25
Aloes, Socotrine
26 00 ©
.(gold)
85 ©
Orange & Sussex—fr. pails.$ lb
Alum
40
14 50 © 15 50
45
©
Kalf-iirkin tubs
4* ©
An 11ato, fair to
Logwood, Jamaica.
37 ©
14 50 © 15 50
prime.>
40
fill @
Welch tubs
7o
31 ©
Antimony, Regulus of
6U 00 © 65 00
35
.(gold)
.(cash)
12* ®
Firkins, New York State
35 ©
Argols, Red..
30 00 ©
36
:.. .-.(gold)
.(gold)
Firkins, Western
in Sapan Wood, Manila.
Argols, Refined
25 ©
47 50 © 50 oi
29
27 ©
(gold)
Grease, Butter
15
Arsenic, Powdered.
16
©
7
3 20 © 3 30
Western, common
Assafcetida
22 ©
Feathers—Duty: 30 39 cent ad val.
25
25
Cheese—
40
©
Balsam Capivi
Prime Western
(gold)
^9
77 @
Factory made dairies
©
Balsam Tolu
78
do Tennessee
16
©
Farm dairies
70
©
Balsam Peru
@
14
15
©
Balsam Peru, 50

ad

cents

..

...

..

..

...

..

....

..

..

.

..

..

.

..

..

..

..

..

-..

,

.

.

.

*

'

.

....

.

..

do

do

common

11

English dairy
Vermont dairy

©
©
©

13
10

Candles—Duty, tallow, 21;
and

8; stearine

adamantine,

spermacet
5 cents
lb.

Sperm

ft>

Sperm, patent,

Refined sperm,

Stearic
Adamantine

35
45

...

city

35
30
25

Cement—Rosendale

Bark,

13
14
14

and

Bird

Peppers—Afiican,
Leon,

Bird
Bleat

40
50

©
©
©

hing Powder....
Borax, Refined
’

.«,

€

,

1 60

Cliaius- Duty, 2* cents
$ ft).
ft)

9

©

$1 25 Q ton of
80 tt> to the
28bushels,
bushel; other than bituminous, 40 cents
$ 2d bushels of tiO lb Q bushel.
v
ton of 2,240 ft)

Liverpool House Cannel
Nova Scotia
Anthracite

Cocoa—Duty, 3

6 50
9 00

©
©
©
©

7 01)
9 50

©
©

35
60
20

cents

^9 ft*Caracas
(gold).(iu bond)..
ft>
Maracaibo .(gold)..
do
Guayaquil .(gold)
do

Para
St. Domingo

.

.......

31
GO 00

Cochineal, JV1 exican..7
/‘Copperas, American

......

do
do

©
©
©

Cuttlefish Bone

.

..

,

.

.

Logwood
Flowers, Benzoin
Flowers, Arnica.
Folia, Buchu
Gambier

Gamboge

•

18

36

Gum, Myrrh, Turkey
Senegal

Gum

cents

Cob,

@

19
©
©

39"oz.

60

bales

40

39 ft*

..

95

Fruit—Duty

4

Almonds, Languedoc
do
do
do

,

70

Sardines

H

do
do

1 00

©
65
22

(gold)
«-

©
@
1 00 @
23 ©
19 @
36 ©
©
70 ©
©
,

.

..

92*

.

•

•

55

Shell
box

25' ©
15 ©

$ ft)

Blackberries

Black Raspberries
Pared Peaches
Unpealed do

Cherries, pitted,

©
©
©
©
50 ©
27* ©

17* ©
12 ©

Driui Fruit—
N. State
Apples

.

@
13* ©
©
©

23
50

39 hr. box
_.^9 qr. box
$ ft)

—

Brazil Nuts

.

40

Shelled

Filberts, Sicily.
Walnuts, French

25
34

©

..

Provence

Sicily, Soft

Figs, Smyrna

85

20

39 ft)

Citron, Leghorn

12
80

82* ©

15

24 f>o
16 0!)
11 00
•-

..

..

52*
42*
7 00
20

:

Currants

26

©
©
©
©

50
40

©
@
©
©
©
©
©
©
©

Raisins, Currants, Figs, Plums and
Prunes, 5; Shelled Almonds,
10; Almonds, 6; other
nuts, 2; Dates, 2; Pea Nuts,
1; Shelled do, 1*, Filbers
ai.d Walnuts, 3 cents
$ lb;
Ginger, 50; Green Fruits, 25 Sardines, 50; Preserved
$ cent ad val.
Raisins, Seedless
fi cask
@ 10 50
do Layer
7 00 @
^ box
do Bunch....
6 40
6 50

i:'u

,

$15 $ ton.$ ft*

15 00
13 00
10 50

^ bbl.

Flax—Duty:

34

©

No. 1

Herring>pickled

(16

©
@

1.

3

Salmon, Pickled

Herring,

© 8 25
©....-

..

^9 bbl.
*

Salmon, Pickled
39 tcsShad, Connecticut,No. l.$) hf- bbl.
Herring, Sealed
.,.^9 box

85

©

cwt.

:od

Mackerel, No.

36*
5*
1

1

Mackerel, No. 1
Mackerel, No. 2

35

12)

lb

Pickled

1 00
1 70
19
3 40
3 30

©

Produce of the British North

fiuk.

Dry Scale

4*

©
©
©

39 100 lb.

Americon Colonies,
Dry Cod

32
© C2 50

97* ©
©
H ©
33 ©
45 ©

(gold)
7....
(gold)

.....

Gum ( opal Cow
Gum Gedda
Gum Damar..
Gum Myrrh, East India

■

3 15
3 25

Ginger, Jamaica, bl’d, in bbls
Ginseng, Southern and Western..

Gum Arabic, Picked....
Gum Arabic, Sorts
Gum Benzoin

•

95

Cutch

Epsom Salts

42*
3*

55

©
6* ©

•

Extract.

.

When imported direct in Ameri¬
or equalized vessels
from the place of its
growth
or
production; also, the growth of countries this side
the Cape of Good
Hope when imported indirectly
in
American or equalized
vessels, 5 cents
lb ; all other
10 $ cent ad valorem in
addition.
Rio, prime, duty paid
..gold.
21 ©
do good
21*
20 ©
do fair
20*
19 ©
do
19*
ordinary..'.
17
IS
©
do fair to
good cargoes
18* ©
20
Java, mats and bags
25 ©
26
Native Ceylon
©
Maraeaibo
19 ©
22
.

Tartar, prime
Cubebs, East India

30

Fisl»—Duty, Mackerel, $2;
$3; other pickled, $1 50 ^ Herrings, $1; Salmon,
other Fish,
bbl.;
Pickled, Smoked, or Dried, in smaller on
pkgs. than bar¬
rels, 5(>

1-75

-•

Carbonate Ammonia, in
bulk...7
Cardamoms, Malabar
Castor Oil, City
39 gallon
Chamomile Flowers
33 ft>
Chlorate Potash.
(gold)
Caustic Soda
(gold)
Cobalt, Crystals.. .in kegs. 112 lbs
Cochineal, Honduras.
(gold)

•Cream
30
55
18

Coffee—Duty:
can




23
40

Cantharides

Coal—Duty, bituminous,

Liverpool Orrel..|9

Sierra
(gold)

Crude
33 ton
Am. Roll
33 ft*
Brimstone, Flor Sulphur
Camphor, Crude, (in bond)
Camphor, Refined

27

©

©
©

10

Brimstone,
Brimstone,

31

2 GO

22

.....

bbl

One inch and upward

bags

Peppers—Zanzibar.,

©
©
©
©
©

'

Bi Carb. Soda,
Newcastle.
Bi Chromate Potash

wax.

©
©

Calisaya

Berries, Persian

ne-vr.,,

©
©

14

26
32
24

52
23
30
16
18
14

10
15

30
20
15

©

30

©

35

^

August 26, 1865.]

THE CHRONICLE.

and Skins—Duty, 10 $ cent
**Maranli«n,Bfy Salted Ox and Cow
the British North American Provinces* Pernambuco,Dry Salted.

Furs

product of

Prices—Add premium

Gold

leaver,

Dark
Tale

do

on

gold for

.

-

.

Wild

Cat,

do House...

...

Fisher, Hark
Fox, Silver
do Cross
do
do

:

Red
Grey

Lynx

Marten,

Dark

*

Opossum
Raccoon

SkuDk, Black

Striped
White

do

do

...

do
do
do
do
do

?

No. 1........ $ lb

Goat, Curacoa,

Buenos Ayres

35

VeraCruz
Tampico*

©

Matamoras

Payta

85
85

©

do

Madras

Cape

•

Shins, in merchantable order.

Deer

Beer, San

Juan and Chagres

©
47* ©
©

...

Glass—Duty, Cylinder

or

foot; above that, and not exceeding 24x60 inches, 20
cents $ square foot; all above that, 40 cents $ square
foot; on unpolished Cylinder, Crown, and common
Window, not exceeding 10x15 inches square. 1*; over
that, and not over 16x24,2; over that, aud not over
.21x30, 2*; all over that, 3 cents $ lb.
American Window—1st,

2d, 3d, and 4lh qualities.
(Subject to a discount of 45 @ 50 $ cent.)
6x 8 to 8x10
$ 50 feet
5 50 @ 7
gxlltolOxlo
6 00 @7
6 50 @ 9
11x14 to 12x18.. *.
7 00
12x19 to 16x24.
@ 9
18x22 to 20x30.
7 50 @11
9 00 @14
20x31 to 24x30.
24x31 to 24x36
10 00 @ 16
25x36 to 30x44.
11 00 @ 17
80x46 to 32x18
13 00 @ 18
32x50 to 32x56
14 00
@ 20
Above
15 00
@ 24
English and French Window—1st, 2d, 3d, and

25
75
25
50
75
50
00
00
00
00 *
00

4th

qualities.

qualities).......
do)

per cent.
6 00 ©
6 50 @
7 00 ©

©
©
7 50 @
12 00
@
13 00 @
16 00 ©
18 00 @
21 00
@
9 00 ®
©

.*

Gunpowder—Duty, valued

7 75
8 25
9 75
••

..

10
15
16
20
24
26
16

50
50
50
50
00
00
00

or

at 20 cents or less

$3 B), 6 cents $3 lb, and 20 $ cent ad val.; over 20
$ lb, 10 cents $3 lb and 20 $3 cent ad val.
Blasting (A)
$ keg of 25 lb
© 6 50
Shipping and Mining
© 6 50
50 @
Sporting, in 1 lb canisters... $3 lb
43 @ 1 15
fbee.

Bio Grande, mixed, .(gold).
$ ft
Buenos Ayres, mixed
Hog, Western, unwashed...
.

io

Hay—North River, in bales $
100 lbs, for
shipping

North

River,

new

©
©
©

22*
21
32

®
©

S5
65

Hemp—Duty, Russian, $40; Manila, $25; Jute,

$15; Italian, $40; Sunn
Tampico, 1 cent $ lb.
American, Dressed
do

Undressed

Russia, Clean

Sisal, $15 $ tor; and

$3 ton

210 00

@285
200 00 @210
350 00 @400
175 00 @190
10* @
15 @

....

*.

™la

(gold)

Sis*l

Hides—Duty,

10

aud

$3 cent ad val.

$ft

00
00
00
00

all kinds, Dry

or Salted, and Skins,
of the British North

American Provinces free.
(Nominal.)
There has been considerable

activity in the market
anring the weet, and prices have remained firm.
D

B. A., 20 @
26 ft selected...
Rio

Grande, 20 @

S*. G,*R*A.
Bio Nunez..:

$3 a

23 a, selected.
Green Salted Cow.

i

san

Juan, etc

Bavanila,

etc

Maracaibo, Salted
Dry




/—Cash—Gold—>
lr* @
20
@
yi
9
@
94
J, @
19
19 @
2u
i6* @
n
..

Gambia and Bissau

*

10

..

,

14
12
16

North American Provinces, free.

13*
14*
If
14
12

15

14*
12
12

17*

12*
9

11*
9*
10*
11

(duty paid)

@
©
©

1 20

$ gall.

:(in bond)

Horns—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

India

,.

1 25

©
©

40
20

do of 1864

60
50

©

Produce of
@18 00
@ 15 00

13 00

$3 lb

67* @
57* @
47* @
@
50 @
@

East India

70
61
50

do

.

53

..

..

do

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

..

50

@

75

@
@
14* @
18 @

20

17
v

..

Mansanilla

.45
15

@
@

55
20

@

14

18
15

5

@
@
@
@
©

2 50

@

(American

..

Mexican
Florida

do

10

...

Bahia

..

Molasses—Duty: 8 cents $ gallon.
$ lb

1 30

80

Kurpan

.

Madias
Manila

Guatemala
Caraccas

@
@
@
@
@
@

1 00

„

@

1 00
1 50
80
rO

2
1
2
1
1
1
1

50
30
00
20
25
40
25

Iron—Duty, Bars, 1 to 1* cents $ lb; Railroad,
$ 100 ft; Boiler and Plate, 1*

cents
Sheet, Band, Hoop, and Scroll, 1* to l£ cents
Pig, $9 5(9 ton; Polished Sheet, 3 cents $ lb.

$ lb;
$3 lb ;

Pig, Scotch, Best,No l(cash $ ton
Pig, American, No. 1
Bar, Swedes,assorted sizes (in gold)

15
12
11

@
@
@

15*
12*
ll*

12

@

12*

45 00
41 00
..

@ 47 00
@ 42 00
@ 92 00

/—Store Prices—,
155 00 @165 00
Bar, English and American,Refined 110 00 @112 00
do
do
do
do
Common
90 00 @100 00
Scroll,
• 125 00
©130 00
Ovals and Half Round
180 00 @140 00
Band
135 00 @140 00
Horse Shoe
135 00 ©140 00
Rods, 5-8 @ 3-16 inch..
112 00 ©ISO 00
Hoop
:
145 00 @,-00 00
Nail Rod
lb
9* ©- 4 10*
Sheet, Russia
24 @
25
Bar Swedes, assorted sizes

Sheet, Single,Double and Treble..
Rails, English. .(gold)
$ ton
.

do

American

...

57 00
60 00

©
8*
@ 58 00
@ S2 00

New Orleans
Porto Rico
Cuba Muscovado
do Claved

$3 gall.

East India, Prime
East India, Billiard Ball

$3 lb

African, West Coast. Prime
African, Serivellos, West Coast..

8 00
4 50
2 75

1 75

© 4 00
@
@ 8 75
@ 2 75

Eatlis—Duty, 20 $ cent ad val.
Eastern

$3 ill

2 35

@

2 40,

IiCad—Dufy, Pig, $2 $3 100 lb ; Old Lead, 1* cents
$ ft; Pipe and Sheet, 2* cents $ ft.
Galena

Spanish

$100 ft
r

10 CO
..

German

..

English

...

$ lb

Pipe and Sheet

..

..

@
©

9
@9
© 9
©
©

Leather—Duty: sole 35, upper 30 $ cent ad
There is an active demand for oak and
hemlock,

prices have advanced *@1 cent.
Oak, (slaughter,)light...
$ 1b 't
do

middle

do

heavy

do

crop

’

41
42
40

Hemlock, middle, R. Grande & B.
Ayres
do
middle, California
do
middle, Orinoco, etc.
do
light,R. Grande & B. Ayresdo
light, California
o
do
light, Orinoco, etc
do
heavy, R. Grande & B.
Ayres
do
heavy, California
...

do
do
do
do

heavy, Orinoco, etc
good damaged
poor damaged
upper, in rough, slaughter.
Oak, upper, in rough, slaughter...

Lime—Duty; 10 $
Rockland, common
do
heavy

34

cent

50
12
13
val.

and
33
45
45
58

©

©

36

35*
34
os OS *=•133
31

©

35* ©
30 ©
23
21
25
SO

25

@
©
©

©

•

87
36
82
31
23
28
33

&d val.

S0
45
38

Clinch'..
Ilorse shoe,

..

@
©

1 35
1 75

1 10

90
65

@
@
@

Copper

6 50

forged (3d).

$ lb

@
@
©
@
@

..

?

..

Yellow metal
Zinc

...

..

43

7 00
80
50
35
20

Naval

Stores—Duty: spirits of turpentine 30
$ gallon; crude turpentine, rosin, pitch, and
$ cent ad val. Tar and turpentine, product
the British North American Provinces, free.
(Ail

cents
tar. 20

of

cash.)

$ 280 ft

Rosin.

7 25

©

8 00

Tar...
Pi teh.

© 9 50
© 8 00
© 10 00

6 25
15 00
..

$ gall.

©
27* ©

1

Oil Cake—Duty: 20 $ cent ad val.
City thin oblong, in bbls
$ ton

..

do
Western thin

Oils-

in

bags
oblong, in bags

52 00
....

51 00

Duty: linseed, flaxseed, and

7 50

17 00
1 40

@ 55 00
@
@

rape

seed, 23

and salad oil, in bottles or flasks, $i:
burning fluid, 50 cents $ gallon ; palm, seal, and cocoa
nut, 10 $ cen- ad val.; sperm and whale or other fish
(foreign fisheries.) 20 $ cent ad valorem.
Olive, 13 bt ttle baskets
4 10 ©
^4 12*
.do in casks,...$ gall.
1 95 @ 2 00

Palm, (duty paid)
Linseed, city
r
Whale, South Sea.*.
do

$ lb
$ gall

refined winter.

Sperm, crude
do

2 25
2 30

winter, bleached

do

do

10* @
1 30 @
1 20 @
1 70 @

unbleached

..

Lard oil, spring and winter
Red oil,-.citydistilled
Straits
Paraffine, 28 — 30 gr. deodorized..
Kerosene
(free)...

..

1 00
1 20
..

..

@
©
©

@
©
@
©
@

11

1 SI

2 50
2 40
..

55

72

Euisils—Duty: on white lead, red lead, and
litharge, dry or ground in oil, 3 cents $ ft; Paris
white and whiting, l cent $ ft ; dry
ochres, 56 centa
$ 100 ft: oxides of zinc, 1J cents $ ft ; ochre, groun d
$ I 50 $ 100 ft ; Spanish brown 25 $ cent ad val*,*

China clay, $5 $ ton; Venetian red and
25 $ cent ad val.; white chalk, $10 $

vermilion,

ton.

Lithrage, American

Lead,

fed,

American

$ ft

do
do

white, American, pure, in oil
while, American, puie, dry.
Zinc, while, American, dry, No. 1.
do white, American, No.J, in oil
Ochre, yellow,French,dry $ 200 ft
do
ground in oil...
$ lb
Spanish brown, dry... ..$ loo ft
do*
in oil.$ ft
ground
Paris white, No. 1.
.$ loo fts
do
do Am
$ 100 fts
Whiting, American—
Vermilion, Chinese.... :
$ft
—.

.

do
do
do

13
13

..

Trieste
American..
....

,

American, common...
Venetian red, (N. C.)..
$ cwt
Carmine, city made....
$ ft
China clay
Chalk

@
@
©

13
8
9
3 00
9
1 50
8
4 00
3 50
2 50
1 75
90
.

90

....

$ bbl.

8

3 00

Nail«—Duty: cut 1*; wrought 2*; horse shoe 5
cents $ lb
(Cash.)
Cut, 4d.@6il
'..$100 a
5 60 @ 7 00

in oil,

©
@

35 ©
34* ©
83 ©
31* ©
31* ©
30 ©
3o

25

11

-

1 00

cents; oi.ve

Ivory—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

20

s 25

15

Mexican
Honduras

..$ cubic ft.
Rosewood, Rio Janeiro
$ ft

..

00
00
00
00
00

Rosewood—Duty

Mansanilla

do

55
75
60
40
80

@ 70 OO
@130 00
@110 00
@ 70 00
@ 60 00
@125 OO
@ 90 00
@ 55 00
@ 85 00
@ 70 00
@ 40 00
@120 00

..

wood)
Cedar, Nuevitas.

free.

Bengal.....
Oude

„

22 OO
55 00
28 00
26 00

@160 00
@130 00

..

....

Port-au-Platt, crotches.
Port-au-Platt, logs
Nuevitas

do
do
do

do

.

Carthagena, etc
Guayaquil

50 00
70 00
50 00
35 00
75 o0

Mahogany, St. Domingo, crotches,
$ foot
do
St. Domingo, ordinary
logs
do
do

©
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@

45 00
21 00
24 00
65 00

HEADING—white oak, hhd.

Rubber—Duty, 10 $ cent ad val.

Indigo—Duty

.

IHaliogany, Cedar,

©

..

*

Para, Fine
Para, Medium
Para, Coarse

70 cents

do
pipe, heavv
White oak, pipe, light..
do
pipe, culls..
do
lflnl., extra..
do
lihdv, heavy
do
hhd., light
do
hhd., culls..
do
bbl., extra..
do
bbl., heavy.
do
bbl., light...
do
bbl., culls..
Red oak, hhd., heavy
do
hhd., light

free.

^9 C

18 00

.

free.

Hops—Duty: Scents $ lb.
Crop of 1865
$ lb

Ox, Rio Grande. .•
Ox, Buenos Ayres

<{>3 M feet

Southern Pine.......
White Pine Box Boards
White Pine Merchant. Box Boards
Clear Pine
Poplar and W. wood R’ds & Pl’k.
Cherrv Boards and Plank
Oak and Ash
Maple and Birch.
Black Walnut ......-.
STAVES—
’
White oak, pipe, extra
53 M.

.

Honey—Duty, 20 cents $3 gallon.
Cuba
do

Spruce, Eastern

..

@

...

Product

S*
11
9
10

Manila Buffalo
Calcutta Buffalo
Calcutta Kips, Slaughter
Calcutta Kips, Dead Green

Bar
80
60

11*
11*
17
12

City Slaughter
City Slaughter, Association...
;
Penang Cow.,

less

cents

Hair—Duty

and’Port-au-PlattDry

California,Green Salted (currency)
Dry Western
Green Salted Country and West’rn

..

$ square yard, 3; over 10,4 cents $ lb.
Calcutta, standard
yard
22* @

14

Liinnber* Woods, Staves, Etc.—Duty,
Lumber, 20 $ cent ad val.; Staves, 10 $ cent ad val.; /.
Rosewood and Cedar, frfe. Lumber and Timber ol/
all kinds, unmanufactured, product of the
British^

12

...

Gunny Rag's—Duty* valued at 10 cents or less,
$ square yard, 3; over 10, 4 cents $ lb
Calcutta, light and heavy $ pee
29 @

Gunny CSotli—Duty, valued at 10 cents

11*
14*

the British North American Provinces

Window Polished Plato

(Single Thick) —Discount 35 @ 40
6x 8 to 8x10
$ 50 feet

13*

Singapore

52*

47

,*

Curacao,
California, Dry..
California, Dry Salted

CO I—

not over 10x15 inches, ‘<4 cents $ square foot; larger
and not over 16x24 inches, 4 cents $ square foot;
larger and not over 24x39 inches G cents $ square

8x11 to lOx 15
11x14 to 12x13
16x26 to 20x30, (4
36x50 to 30x60, (3
12x19 to 16x24
10x31 to 24x30.
2‘x31 to 24x86
80x45 to 32x43
82x5.1 to 32x56
Larger sizes do
21x30 to 24x30
8.'x43 to 84x50

Truxillo
St Domingo

47*
37*

35
55
50
50

..

Bogota

50

50 ©
32* @
52* ©

lb

per

Bolivar City
do Honduras
do Sisal
do Para
do Missouri
do

11
15i
12
11

?

Vera Cruz
Porto Cabello
Minoz
Rio nache

37*

©
©

13*

Dry Salted

Tampico

©

47* ©
45
©

do

do

© 2 50
© 2 00
@ 10 00
© 6 oa
70
©
75
©
20
©
6
©
00 @ 20 00
00
® 5 00
50
© 2 00
25
70
©
50
© 2 00
00
© 5 00
3 ©
10
80 ©
60
30 ©
50
15
35
©
2
8
©
86 ©
37*

Cubs

do

Badger

Matamoras

00
50
00
00
10
10
10
4

$ K>

Black

Bear,

currency

@
@
@
@
@
@
©'
©
@
©
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
©
©
@
©
©
@

..

12

Bahia, Dry
do
Dry Salted

FREE.

279

20 00
35 00

4 5Q

©
@
©
©

14
14
14
00
#

#

12
8 50

©
@
©
©

10
2 00
10
4 50
© 4 00
© 3 00
© 2 00
© 1 00
35
@
@ 1 00
@ 4 50
@ 25 00
@ 38 00

@

3 09

280

THE CHRONICLE

August 26, I860.
‘m..

■petroleum—Duty:* crude, 20 cents; refined, 40

Brandy, J. & F. Martell.... .(gold)
do

cents

$ gallon.
Crude, 40 @ 47 gravity
Refined, free
do

$ gall-

..

81*
70
52

in bond

Naptha, refined

43

Residuum

$2 bbl.

Plaster S*aris—Duty:
$0 %} cent ad val.
Blue Nova Scotia
White Nova Scotia

Calcined,

4 50

luii

*44

s 00

©
.

3 50
2 40

©
©
©

.

.

Provisions—Duty: cheese and butter,

2 50

pork, I cent ; hams, bacon, and lard, 2 cents
Produce of the British North At erican Pro¬

$ ft>.
vinces.

Free.

quiet

Beef is

week.

Lard has been in moderate demand.

more

steady but prices remain
bbl.

mess

do mess, extra,
do prime mess
do India
do India mess

Pork,

mess,

do
do
do
do

(new)

mess, Western
prime,West’n, (old and new).

23 00

mess

....$ lb

kettle rendered

50
50

.........

•

Beef hams

j

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do

24*
24*
23

21*
16*
14*

•

75

©
S 50

City colored

11

Canvas

10* ©
4* ©.

Country mixed

$ lb.
...^ 100 lb
10 75

Continental
Meder's Swan
Cabinet.....

.

.

,

,

..(gold)

,

.

Rvnban’s P. A...... ..(gold)
St. Nicholas.
..(gold)
Clover Leaf
New YorkCider Brandy. Jersey.

.

.

,

,

W

hisky Jack Mt
Whisky, Dom

2 19

gals.

©

^ bush.

@)| *55*

..

..

..

..

..

fine, Marshall’s

..

bbls.

2 25

...2l0lbbgs.
$ bush.

1 65
35
42
40

$1 pkg.
bgs.

2 75
2 50

240 lb

lb

©
©
10* ©
II? @
12 ©
12* ©
.

•Cuba, Muscovado
do

fair refining
do
good refining
do
fair to good
grocery
Havana White
do
Yellow and Brown
Manila

2 50
1 75

36
45
42
3 00
2 75

12 ©
11,. @
11 ©

Brazil, brown
Melado
Loaf

8

„

@

©
©

..

Crushed

14

©

..

..

15

©

6

..

Ground
White coffee
Yellow coffee

..

Crude

Nitrate soda

Sumac—Duty: 10

6* l

Seeds—Duty; linseed, 16 cents; hemp, £ cent $
lb; canary, §1 $ bushel of 60 lb; and grass seeds,
30 $ cent ad val.
Clover
$ lb
©
Timothy, reaped
$ bush.
5 00 @ 5 25
Flaxseed, Atner. rough
2 40 @ 2 55
Linseed, American, clean.^ tee
@

j

f? ton

Tallow—Duty: 1

@
@
©

14
1I*

12*
9*
19?

a

175 00

American,rough.^ bush

2 25

Calcutta

(at New York)
Bombay (at New York).

®

@
©

..

Shot—Duty; 2* cents $ lb.
Drop and Buck
^ lb

Tea—Duty

2 50
3 35
3 35

do
do

14

©

15

10 50

Canton, re-reeled, No. 1 @ 2

13 00

Japan, superior

13 00

do

usual reel

No. 1 © 8
China thrown

10 50
IS 00

-@ 11 00
© 13 25

© 13 50
© 12 00
© 21 00

Soap—Duty; 1 cent $ lb, and 25 $Dcent ad val.
Castile

’

$ ft>.

17

do

:....$ fi)

domestic

Spices—Duty;
cassia and

cloves,

10*©
@

mace, 40
20; pepper

ginger root, 5 cents ^ lb.
Cassia, in mats
Ginger, race and African

nutmegs, 50;
and pimento, 15; and
(All cash.)
$ lb
SO
©
..

17
1 15
1 25
33
24
33

Nutmegs, No. 1
Pepper
Pimento, Jamaica
Cloves

Spirits—Duty: Brandy, first proof,
liquors, $2.50.
Brandy, Jules Robin
6 00
(gold)
do
5 00
Otard,Dupuy & Co.(gold)
do
4 80
Pinet, Castil. & Co. (gold)
other

Renault & Co

Ldo Leger Freres
Hennessy
do




(gold)

(gold)
(gold)

5 00
5 00
5 00

©
©
@
@

©
©
per

20

1 20
1 27*
33*

24j

..

90

...

...

Ex fine to finest...

..

do

Ex fine to finest

Souchong & Congou, Com. to fair.
do
do
Sup’r to fine.
<lo

do

Ex f. to finest

Orange Pecco, Common

cents;

Mace

do

11

10*

Superior to fine

..

©

10

Common to fair

...

Spelter—Duty: in pigs, bars, and plates, $1 50 $
Plates, foreign

.....

made..
do
do Com. to fair
do
do Sup, to fine.
do
do Ex f. to finest
H.Skin &Twankay, Canton made
do
do
Com, to fair..
do
do
Sup’r to fine..
do
do
F.x f. to finest.
Tincolored Japan, Coin, to fair
do
do
Sup’r to fine
do
do
1- x f. to finest.
Oolong, Common to fair.
,
do
Superior to fine

none.

do

1 40
1 55

Ex fine to finest

1 30
1 CO

Gunpowder <fc Imperial, Canton

...

medium, No. 3 © 4....

..

Superior to fine
do
do
do

to

fine...

..

1 20

1 50

©

1 10

©
@
@
©
©
©

1 50
1 65

©
@
©

1 70

1 20
1 50
1 80
1 30
1 60
1 SO

©
@
60 ©
- 70
75 ©
80
85 @
90
95 ©
1 05
1 10 © 1 17
1 20 @ 1 25
SO ©
'90
1 00 ©
1 25
1 40 ©
1 75
55
©
65
75 @
90„
..

1 00
75

@

©

1 50
78

English

(gold)
"(gold).

lb

(gold)
Plates, charcoal I. C.(gold)^ box
„

do

I. V. coke

28* ©
©
@

27
24

9 10
10 00

gallon,

© 9 00
© 8 00
© 5 00
© 12 00
© 10 00
© 10 00

Tobacco—Duty: leaf38cents $ lb

factured, 50 cents <j9 fi).
Virginia
Kentucky
Mason County
St. Domingo in bond

Cuba
Tara

Havana, fillers and

wrappers

;

$ $
7
7
6

70
75
85

and
©
©
©
©
©
©

©

30
25

15
80

90
: 1 15

•

2 75
2 50
m

, |#

1 50
2 00

2 00
1 00
1 00
@ 30 00
© 15 00

©

©
©

Champagne, pipes, Heidsick (gold)
do
Widow Clicquot.(gold)

5 00
20 00
24 50

66

@
©

•

-w

Wire-Duty: No. 0 to 18, uncovered, $2 to $3 50
$ 100 lb, and 15 ^ cent ad val.
No. 0 to 18
No. 19 to 3G

25 $ ct. off list.
35 $ ct. off list.

‘

'

Telegraph, No. 7 to 11 Plain. ^ H>

S

Wool—Duty: costing 12 cents

@

-9

less % lb, 3
cents ^ 5>; over 12 ana not more than
24,6 cents;
over 24 and not over
32,10, and 10 $ cent ad valorem;
over 32,12 cents
$ lb, and 10 $ cent ad valorem ; on
the skin, 20 $ cent ad val. Produce, of the
British
North American Provinces, free.
American, Saxony fleece
70 ©
75
^ lb
do
full blood Merino
65 ©
70
or

....

do
do

i and ? Merino

* Merino...

60
60

unwashed...

67
65
50
87
20

native and

Extra, pulled
Superfine, pulled
No. 1, pulled.
California, fine, unwashed
do

common,

Peruvian, unwashed
Chilian Merino, unwashed
do
Mestiza, unwashed
Valparaiso, unwashed
S. American Merino, unwashed
do
Mestizo, unwashed
do
common, unwashed

65
70
67
55
42
25
45

‘

©

35

85

32
18
40

45

35
27
37
34
23
42

Entre

do
do

Creole, unwashed,

27

Cordova, washed..

©
©
©
©
©
@
©

45

Rios, washed

Cape Good Hope, unwashed

35
35
15

East

India, washed
African, unwashed

1

washed

Mexican, unwashed

45
25

©

do

85

30
47

37

20

25
©
Nominal.
22 ©
25
45
@
25 ©
27

Texas
washed

Syrian, unwashed

Zinc—Duty: pig
2* cents $ lb.

65

©
©
@
@
@
©

82
26

..

do

©

©
©
©
©
©

35

or

block, $1 50

100

H)

lb; sheet

13

©

13*

I’relg-litsTo Liverpool
Cotton
Flour
Petroleum

:

'...3p ton

,.

.

Corn, bulk and bags
Wheat, bulk and bags

$ bush.

..

.

$ tee.
$ bbl.

d.

s.

©

5-32

1
© "5

3

© 10

.

©

.

@15
©

.

4
4*

©

.@19
..@13

;

Heavy goods

..

Oil
Flour

Beef
Pork
Wheat
Corn
To Glasgow
Flour
Wheat

$ ton

..$ bbl.

Petroleum

1

© 16

$ tee.
^ bbl.

3

@ 20 25
@ 1 7*
5
@
..@36
.

»..

..

..@29
@
4*
4*
.©

bush.

..

..

:

bbl.
>.

Corn, bulk and bags."

Petroleum

.1

..

$ bush.

..

..

.'^7777^ bbl.

^

5

ton

..

20

^ tee.
$ bbl.

..

4

.

3

..

© 1
@
©
@
® 17
© 25
@
@

9

4*
4*

$

■

Beef and pork
$ bbl.
Measurement goods
$ ton
V heat, in shipper’s bags.. $ bush.
Flour
$ bbl.
Petroleum
...\
Lard, tallow, cut meats, etc ^ ton
Ashes, pot and pearl
To Melbourne (Br. ves.) ^ foot
To Sydney, N. S. W. (Br. ves.)..
To San Francisoo, by clippers:

Measurement goods

Coal

...

..

Oil

Heavy goods

..

bbl.

Heavy goods

Beef
Pork
To London

d.

s.

$ lb

Hops

manu¬

.

25

24*

40

.

•

in 12 bottles

27*

@ 9 25
@ 13 00

,

sweet

Oil
Beef
Pork
To Havre:
Cotton

29

,

8 00
8 00

©
©
@
©
@
©

(gold)

Heavy goods

Ti 5?—Duty: pig, bars, and
block, 15 $ cent ad val.
Plate and sheets and terne plates,
2* cents
lb.

Banca
Straits

,

Sheet.

25 cents per lb.

Young Hyson, Canton made

Silk—Duty : free. All thrown silk. 35 ^9 cent.
Tsatlees, No. I @3
13 50 @ 13 75
$ lb
11 50
Taysaams, superior, No. 1 © 2
© 12 00
do

:

Hyson, Common to fair

© 10 00

1 50

Smyrna, unwashed

....

, ,.

(g51d)
Claret, low'grades. .(gold).$ cask

cent ^ lb.

Product of the
British North American
Provinces, free.
American, prime, country and city
^ lb
12* ©
IS*

..

do
do
do

do

do

110 00

,

Malaga, dry

19*
19*
18|
17

cent ad val.

Sicily

j

121I2f
17

15* ©

—

Saltpetre—Duty: crude, 2§ cents; refined and
partially refined, 3 cents; nitrate soda, 1 cent $ lb.
Refined, pure
f? lb
©
22

15*
14*

8 00
8 00
3 00
2 00

Red
Marseilles maderia
do
port

S

12

^ gall.

j Sicily

13

-

-

cents <j£ gallon and 25
cent
$1 $ gallon, $1 $ gallen and 25 $

Burgundy port

12*

@

..

;

over

Lisbon

#

New Orleans
St. Croix
Porto Rico

@^3 00

©
@
@
@
@
©
©

@
7* ©
6 @

Molado, 2* cents ^ lb.

on

@
© 2 00
© 3 75
@»- 3 00
@* 3 00

..

Liverpool, ground
^ sack
go
fine, Ashton’s
do
fine, Worthington’s
do
fine, Jeffreys A; Darcy's

12

"

100, 50

over

Port

Suffnr—Duty: on raw or brown sugar, not above
No. 12 Dutch standard, 3; on white
or'clayed, above
No. 12 and not above No. 15 Dutch standard, not refin¬
ed, 3£ ; above 15 and not over 20, 4; on refined, 5; and

100 lb; bulk, 18

cents

$ 100 D).

Turks Islands
Cadiz

American, spring,,

@12 00
© 10 00

0 tO

-...(gold)

....(gold)

*:

@ 1 80
@
@ 1 90
@ 2 00

ine»—Duty: value set over 50 cents ^ gallon 20
gallon and 25 ^ cent ad valorem ;"over 50

Madeira

50
60

@

1 75
..

Sherry

2 20

65
45
60
cent ad

1 35
1 95

valorem;

do

©

..

lb

Ochotsk
Polar

cent ad val.

©
©
©•
©
©
©
©
@
©.
@
©

’

55" ©
40
©
40
©

common...

South Sea
North west coast

ad

75
60
60
00
25
00
75
60
75
12

60
80
60

Whalebone-Duty: foreign fishery,

3 50

2
2
2
3
3
3
2
2
2
1

40
40

X pounds

8 00

©

.

50
©
©
25
©
70
©
55
45
©
©
45
75
©
© 1 00
©
80

val.

W

© 3 00
© 12 00

.(gold)
..("Old)

..(gold)

Telegraph

do

©
©

.

Ge.mnn

cents

Salt-Duty: sack, 24

F. F....

.

6
4
60
50

do No. 1
do medium

©

Grape Leaf
J.II.J.Notel’s Im.Eag lo(gohl)

English, cast, ^ lb

Rice—Duty: cleaned 2* cents $ lb.; [paddy 10

cents, and uncleaned 2

do
do
Solar coarse
Fine screened
do

., .

...

do
do
do
do

cents
and not

Steel—Duty : bars and ingots, valued at 7 cents
5) or under, 2* cents; over 7 cents and not above
II,
3 cents f? lb ; over 11 cents, 3* centt
$ fi> and 10 ^
cent ad val.

•1*
U
10*
4?

1* ©

com. fine
do
do

cases

do
Scotch.

00

10* ©
4* ©

Seconds

Carolina

@

4 30
9 (0
S 50

©
14 00 c@ 25 00
8 00 © 15 00

Irish.

White, city

East India, dressed

Dewdmp.

do

Rags -(Domestic).

Onondaga,

@
©
©
@
©
©
@
©

Gin, Dewdrop

© 24 00

2i| ©
23* ©
21
©
20 ©
16
@
©
23 00 © 30

....

Hams, pickled
do
dry salted
Shoulders, pickled
do
dry salted....

do

©

•

nominal.

Lard, in bbls

cents

©

,

nominal,
nominal.
31 50 © 32 00
26 50 © 27 00
30 00 © 30 50

mess

do

last

as

9 00
@ 11
11 00
© 14
nominal,

(new)

prime
thin

©
@

.

Pork has been dull and heavy during the week. The
transactions have been limited and the market closed

Beef, plain

do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
do
Chatenet, Je
.(gold)
do
J. J. Dupny
.(gold)
do
A. Moreou
(gold)
do
A. Lambert & Co..(Told)
do
Vivandiere.
..(gold)
do
Camille .“’eignette .(gold)
do
Dularr, Bell’y & Co.(gold)
do
Viney'd Prop. Cog’ c.(gold)
do
American
Cum Jamaica, 4th proof...
do
St. Croix, new crop. .(gold)
do
New England, pure..
.

4 cents ;

beef and

9 00
8 50
8 0'»
00
50
50
25
25
25
25
00
00
00
00
60

©

.

^ bbl.

Calcined, city mills

72

5-’*

free; calcined,

,

ton.

eastern

("old)
Sazarcc
(gold)
Vine. Prop’rs’ Co., .(gold)
Fh. Goddard p &
c.(gold)
Pellevoisin
(gold)
Albx. Seignette...
(gold)
P. Levuque
:(gold)
A. Bast can
.(gold)
Arzac Seignette
(gold)
Paul Seignette
(gold)
United Proprietors (gold)
II. L L. Chatenet. .(gold)

32

©
@
©
©
©

Seed leaf, Conn, fillers & wrappers
do
Ohio, Penn, and N. Y...
Manuf. No. 1, 5’s and 10’s
do
medium, 5’s and 10’s
do
cormntin, 5’s and I0’s
do
common, 6’s and S's
do
twist in kegs, med., No. 1.
do
lbs., extra lino

© 11 00

Marett & Co

"-vr''

foot
.

.& fl>
$ ton

1
0

..

©

©
©
©
5 6 © 6
©
8 00 © 10 00
30 @
32*
37* ©
.

.

.

..

50
1

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55

U

'•

■

1865/

August 26,

$■-;

THE CHRONICLE.
^

4’’

f

r

v.

281

,

tg

®l)c Uailroatj ilTonttor.

Houston and Henderson

8

Railroad, from Galveston to Houston, dis¬

tance 50 miles.

Texas and New Orleans Railroad, from Houston
to Beaumont, distance G5 miles.
Besides these, there is a railroad

Union Pacific

Railroad, E. D.— It is stated that the Pennsyl¬
iu running order from
Shreveport, La., to Marshall, Texas, distance
vania Railroad Company, in connection with other interested cor¬
40 miles.
A railroad is now
porations, have purchased a one-half interest in the Union Pacific Brownville, distuuce about 30 being built from Brazos Santiago to
miles, and one from Indianola to Vic¬
Railroad Company, E. D., leading from Wyandotte, Kansas,
toria, distance 40 mile3.
through Lawrence towards the west. The object is to secure a
Feeding on the Road.—A gentleman
travelling on the contin¬
through connection between the Union .Pacific Railroad, via the ent sends to
the London Times a note
regarding a plan adopted at
Pacific and Messenaw, the Ohio and Mississippi, the Little Miami,
Vesoui; a railway station in France, which he recommends to the
the Columbus and Pittsburg, and the Pennsylvania railroads to
restaurants at British stations, and which
might, perhaps, be copied
Philadelphia.
;
with advantage in this country. Trains do not
stop long at Vesoui*
Foreign Connections.—The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
but “ M, M. the travellers ” are informed
by plentiful advertisements
Company have established a line of ocean steamers to run between that if
they wish either to breakfast or diue they will find hot meals
Baltimore and Liverpool, and have already purchased four propel
in baskets at the buffet. The meals are
composed of three dishes,
lers for the enterprise. The Pennsylvania Company have in contem¬
half a bottle of wine, bread, aud desert.
The passengers leave the
plation the establishment of a line between Philadelphia and Liver¬
empty basket and dishes half an hour later at the next station, and
pool or London, and are to be assissted in the undertaking by the
pay two francs fifty centimes, or about fifty cents in American cur¬
corporation of Philadelphia. We are not aware that any of the rail¬
rency, for their leisurely and comfortable repast. The number of
road companies having their seaboard terminus at New York propose
cases of
dyspepsia which would be avoided by the adoption of some
to impress ocean steam navigation in their service, nor, indeed is it
such plan iu this
country can scarcely be computed. On through
desirable that they should attempt competition with the

lines

many

trains

already in existence.

on a

few of

railroads there

our

are

refreshment cars, which

enable travelers to

satisfy their appetites without frauctie haste,
Indianapolis and Cinncinati Railroad.—This
company is but such institutions cannot
always be fnade to “ pay.” On a few
pushing its line up the White Water Yalley towards Brookville. great lines, such as the
Pennsylvania Central Railroad, ample time
It is also surveying for a line along the Ohio River to Louisville.
is given for meals, and
every traveller wTho has stopped at Altoona
Its depot arrangements in Cinncinati are rapidly approaching com
ren embers the fact with
gratitude, but as a general thing the eating
pletion, and in a few months they will be the city entrance to some arrangements on most of our
great routes ot travel are wofully
five or six other lines.
deficient.

Ithaca
construct

and
a

Towanda

Railroad.—The company formed to
Y., to Towanda, Pa., wa3 or¬

railroad from Ithaca, N.

ganized on Tuesday, 15th inst, and the construction is at once to be
commenced. This road will be about 50 miles in length, and will

Rome

and

Oswego

Railroad.—Operations

this line have
has already

on

been in progress for several months, and track
laying
reached Pulaski, to which place trains will commence

running im¬

mediately.

open to Western New York new and rich fields of coal, particu¬
Railroad Earnings.—The August
earnings of railroads con¬
larly the same bituminous or steam coal, so much desired for rail¬ tinue to exhibit the same increase over last
year as the previous
roads, steamboats and manufacturing purposes.
month of 1865 have shown. They are quite in excess of the calcu¬
Railroads in Texas.—Th% railroads
already constructed and lations of their managers, who, in many cases, are surprised to see
now in running order.in this State are the
Houston Sc Texas Cen¬ such steady and large gains
upon the heavy traffic of last season.
tral Railroad, from Houston to Millican, distance 80 miles.
Wash¬ The reason for this is obvious ; the war is over and the
country is
ington County Railroad, from Hempstead to Brenham, distance 30 again free to pursue its development and
industry without fear of
miles. Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railroad from Harris¬ drawbacks.
Had the case beeu otherwise, railroad stocks which
burg to Alleyton, distance 80 miles.
Houston Tap and Brazoria have stood so firmly under
the recent perturbations of Wall street

Railroad, from Houston to Columbia, distance 45 miles. Galveston

COMPARATIVE
Chicago and Alton.-

1863.

1864.

(281 m.)
$109,850
101,355
104,372
122,084
132,301
145,542
149,137
157,948
170,044
170,910
156,869
153,294

(281 m.)

1,673,706

<

965,294

1,024,649
1,035,321

252,015

...Dec..

2,770,484

'

245,858
236,432
238,495
236,453
206,221
193,328
215,449
808,168
375,488
339,794
306,186

Railway.
1801.

8,168,065

1865.

1864.

(182 m.)

$140,024

$158,735

$305,554

467,710 .April.
568,901..’.May..

126,793

..

..

.

130.225
122.512

175,482
'»

688,171. ..July
..Aug..

519,306

Sep..

210,729

..

705,496

...Oct...
Nov..

545,943

...Dee

.

.

Year

—

..

216.030

(708

,425.017
3136.802

$299,944

$•327,900

271.085

416.588

270.676

Jan
418,711. ..Feb.
424,870. ..Mar..

278,540

244,771
202,392

289,224

281,759
253,049

459,762
423,797

190,364

311,540. April.
351,759. May
310,049. June.

275,643

\ug..

219,561

July..

343,929

A Mg

511 305

‘640,179

..Sep...

478,576

295,750
484,550

273,726
306,595
361,600
340,900
340,738
597,552

406,373
510.100
423.578

Oet...
.Nov..

496,433
437,679
424,531

3.726,140

4,274,556

4,571,028

.Sep.

.•

..Oet..
.Nov..
.Dec..
—

.Year..

.

1865.

.

344,228. ..Mar..
337,210. April.
401,456. ..May..
365.663. June.

329,105. ..July.
..Aug..,
..Sep...
—

'

.

—
—

.

.

—

.

.

—

302.174

.

Dec

.

..

..Year

—

1S63.

.

271.553

26S.100

■

Mich. So. North and Indiana.

■,

(285 m.)
$306,324. .Jan.
‘-279,137. .Feb..

348,802
338,270

.

—

..

.

—
..

.

..Oet...
.Nov
..

.Dec...

Year

..

1864

(524 m.)
$256,600

(524 m.)

$248,784
230,508
257,227

268,613
204,835
241.236
189.145
238.012

308,106
375,567
332.360

318,048

3,392,511

304,415

407.992

1S0.40S

Year

—

..

*

|

.

—
—

2,512,315

—

1865.

1863.

1864.

1865.

(251 m.)
$38,203

(251 m.)
$774)10

53,778

(708 m.)
$546,410, ..Jan.
522,555. .Feb;
592,276. ..Mar..
491,21)7. April
454,604. ..May

74.409
89.901

(251 771.)
$98,112
86,626

CO. 540

64,306
35,326

590,061. .June.
527.888. ...8 nly.

40,706

.

.

.

.

.

/

96.908

68,863

...Oct...
Nov..
Dec..

Year

93,5-16

76,704

.

95,453

710,225

82,186
73,842
110,186
108,651

90,972
93,078

83.059

...Aug..
..'Sep..
.

.

58,704
52,864
77,112

1,038,165

•

.

93.503

72,389
S3,993
78.697
91,809

—

—

—

—

—

—

New York Central.

x

.Jan..
..Feb..
.Mar.
.

1S64.

1865.

(234 m.)
$102,749

76.132

(2?o/l83

115,135
88,221

(656 m.)
$920,272

(656 m.)
$921,831

(656 77i.)
$899,478
581,372

110.418

315,258

402,122. .June.

21.2.209

279,129

309.083.

111,260
71.587
09.353
155.417
205.055
138,312

..Jan..
Feb..
70.740. ..Mar..
106.689. .April.

139,547

July..
Aug*.
..Sep..

..

•

..Oct...
.Nov...
.Dec...
-

248.292

220,062
201,169

1S63.

83.177
106.967

4,120,391

ISO. 246
177.653

1865.

.April.
..May..

407,107
448,931
411,806

—

1864.

267.126

358,8(52

204,637 '

1863.

$363,986.

402.219

—

—

(234 m.)
$67,130

366,361.
413,322.
366,245.
353,191.

338,454
330,651

...Oct..
N o v..
.Dec..

-Mil. and Prairie du Chien.-

1865.

(524 m.)

334,687

226,047

202,857

-—Marietta and Cincinnati.—»

6,329,447

.

.

m .)

214.533

..

799,230
661,391
657,141
603,402

.

$525,936.

1864.

215,568

182,655
182,084

Illinois Central.
1863.

203,514

..Aug.,
.Sep..

3,095,470

(70S m.)

Jan..
886,039. Feb
1,‘240,626., .M »r..

352,061

—

$180,048

..

321,037

1805.

193,919

.232,728. ..July.

336.617

(150 m.)

(150 m.)
$458,953

110.879

.

307,874
375,800
324,865

1,950,267

(204 in.)

311.180. June...

.

224,980

196,435
201,134

(204 77?.)
$139,414

115.400
135 211
140.952

.

1864.

(204 m.)
$123,808

186.172'. ..April.
227,260. ..May

198,679
243,178

.Jan..

.

Pittsburg.

1864.

.

185,013

144.995

.

1863.

246,331 ...Feb..
“'289,403. Mar.

243,150

170,937
139,142
160,306

727 193 ..June

655,364
708,714

Cleveland and

1865.

186-1.

1,224,909
1,334,217



I ll«l

and Rock Island.—<

(150 m.)
$501,231
472,240
356,626

(724 in.)
$908,341.

(285 m.)
$252,435
278,848

RAILROADS.

(182 m.)

3,975,935 -5,902,383
1863.

low figure.

(182 m.)

-Hudson River.

1,222,568

3,970,946

..

very

PRINCIPAL

1.472.120.. April
1,339,279. May..
1,225,528. June..
1.152.803.. July.

(724 m.)
$984,837
934,133
1,114.508
1,099,507
1.072,293
1,041,975
994,317
1,105,364
1,301,005

265,780
263,244
346,781
408,415
410,802
405,510
376,470

Year

..

a

Jan..
481.165
.Feb..
506,290 .wMar..

482.054

299,607
473,186
551,122
435,945
404,1S3

.Nov..

—

1864.

$242,073

Aug..
...Sep..
.

-Michigan Central.
1863.
(285 m.)

359,888

OF
1863.

(502 in.)
$535,675

$273,876

275.506

280.209

have fallen to

-Chicago

1865.

317,839
390,355
371,461
466,830
565,145

240,051

Oct...

10,469,481 13,429,643
'

202.321

315,944. July
•

(502 «?.)

221,709

343,985. .June.

307.803

1863.

(502 m.)

.

206,090

1S64.

$232,208

EARNINGS

& Northwestern .-

1863

(281 m.)
$261,903. .Jan..
Feb.
252,583
288,159. ..Mar.,
263,149. .April.
312,316. ..May..

224,257
312,165
354,554
320,879

-Erie

(724 m.)
$845,695
839,949
956,445
948,059
848,783
770,148
731,243
687,092
816,801

-Chicago

1S65.

$100,991
154,418
195.803
102,723
178,786

MONTHLY

must

..Year..

41,925

112,913

1,247,258

186,747

.

936.587

1,059.028
1,105,664

146,943. ..May..

911.395
839.126

.June.

841,165

•July.
..Aug..

818,512

"224,838.

113,399
168,218

...Sep..

178,526
149,099
117,013

2,711,281

790.167

867,590

...Oct..
.

.Nov..

•Dec...
—

1.004,435
1.029,736

810,450

1,055.793
1,273,117

1.079,551
1,041,522

1,450,076

1,015.401
1,157,818

1,194,435
1,157,818

1,039,902

...Year.. 11,069,853 13,230,417

915,600

1,300,000
1,204,435
—

V*

■,>

•****.•..

4J

,J

V

282

THE CHRONICLE)-—^
RAILROAD, CANAL
INTEREST.

rc: ^

Amount
DESCRIPTION.

AND

MARKET. ;

.

Payable.

85

j

Railroad :
Atlantic and Gnat Western

1
:

2.0: HI. 000

,

Mortgage, sinking fund, <*V. Y.
.do

1

Mortgage, sinking fund, (Ohio)

do
Atlantic and St.
Hollar Bonds

088.000

484,000

=

Mortgage (S. F.)

of 1831
IS.10

1353

do
do

2,500,000

extended...

i

i

do
do

Mortgage
do
do
do

'

2.000.000
426.714
500. (XX)
200, (X HI

1.700.000

867,(XX)

Catawissa:

Mortgage

i

Mortgage
do

(Sink. Fund),

600,000

554,000!

convert

3,167.000
tiS0,000
;

2,000,000:

1.250.000!

1

!

!

1,307.000:

7

379,000!

Dayton

7
7

j 1,249,000

Cincinnati and Zanesville:
1st

Mortgage
Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati: 1 1,300.000:i
let Mortgage
j
510,000Cleveland arid Mahoning ;
let Mortgage...
j
850.000!
2d
do
...

Dividend Bonds

and Ashtabula

2d Mortgage
3d
do
convertable
4th
do
Cleveland and Toledo:

Toledo

Depot Bonds

Delaware:

1

j

!

iwAona and
lAtiLZ




1

*

l

X Jl

do
do

7
6
r*

Bonds
Louisville and Nashville:

18 40
1892

;

J'ne it Dec. :1876

:

161.000'
109,500

8

Ap'l <t Oct.

8

do

283,000 8
2,655,500! 8

fan. &
do

-1

612.000: 7

1

11X44
1904

Income

!

f

1881

7

18—

6

do

1875

7 Jan. <fe July 1875
7 M’eh & Sep. 1881

Oskaloosa

do
do
do
Morris and Essex:
1st Mortgage, sinking

900,000 % Vm, # JulyilSTl 1100

1

1st

.

W

,,,,,

do

100

1883

960,000

lApril & Oct

94

May & Nov.

ff

95#
95

;Jan. & July 1870

1877
85

86

1890

1,804,000

Feb. &

41,(XX)

300,560

do
do

1,691,293
1,000,000

do
do

1892
1892

do

April & Oct

1869
1882
1882

111
111

1885
do
1877
Feb. & Aug 1868

88
90

4,328,000
4,822,000
2,194,000
682,000:

Aug

1883
18—

18—

do

90

May & Nov.

Jan. &

July

Feb. &
do

Jan. &

July

113

96# 97
90

Aug 1893

3,500,000

\ do

98

1891

1893

do

May & Nov
do

1875
1876
1876
1877
1883

40

May & Nov.

800,000

Jan. &

450,000

Mortgage,
do

1873

691,000 7

fimd
Naugatuck :
1st Mortgage
N. Haven, N. London & Stonington:

105
,104

May & Nov.

400.000 8
688,556; 7
3,612,000 7

2d

18—

90

1872
1869

1,000,000; 7

1st Land Grant Mortgage

90

1870
1861
1862

290,000;

Mortgage, convertible
do
sinking fund
do

do
do
do

-

May <t Nov.
July

4,600,OOO!

f

Mississippi and Missouri River:
1st
2d
1st.

1883

;Jan. &

607,000, 7

1st Mortgage

July! 1867

do
do

-

do

2d
do
Goshen Air Line Bonds
Milwaukee & Prairie du Chien:
1st Mortgage, sinking fund
Milwaukee and St. Paid:

92341

do

2,230,500
215,000

.-

,

Michigan South. & Sorth. Indiana:
1st Mortgage,
sinking fund

1

903,000

225,000

.

do

Sink. Fund,

1861
1873

500.000

.

Mortgage

do

i
)

800.000, 6
j

4

Mortgage, sinking fund

sterling
Michigan Central:
Dollar, convertable

I

1873
101.3

li/ V/ 17

Sept
April & Oct

■

1st Lebanon Branch
Mortgage....
let Memphis Branch
Mortgage ...
Marietta and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage, dollar
c
1st
do

!

112

1866
1862
1858

1,300,000

,

Mortgage

112

1890

1,000,000

do

l«t

1st

1800

98

1870
1875

1,465(000

do

100

:

Mortgage, Eastern Division...

j Extension

Feb. it Aug 1880
do
1878

7

800,000
230,000
250,000

Mortgage
| Little Sch uylkill:
!
j

Mch &

500,000

Long Island:

j

600 ooo

Western

l!
'

!

162,500,

187,000
392,000

,,

.

let Mortgage
'Little Miami:

1S93

July

2d

102’

6S5,000 7 May & Nov. 1S81

do

|\Lehigh Valley:

1st

Jan. & Julv;18S5

let Mortgage, guaranteed
500,OCX)
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western:
let Mortgage, sinking fund
1,500,000
6d

do

c

!

100

250,000 6 M'eh <fc Sep: 1878

:

Mortgage Bonds

do

9(H). 000 7

! 1,802,000

Cumberland Valley:

do

78
SO

*

Mortgage

3d

4

500,000

1st

j]100# j

Feb. it Aug 1873
M'eh it Sep 1804
do
1875

1

,

2d

Tan. &

7

!

Sinking Fund Mortgage

Dayton and Michigan:
let Mortgage

:

95

102

1875

,

do
do
do

200,000

2d

80# | 80#

■102

Jan. & July 1866
do
1870

400,000,

Mortgage

do
3d
do
La Crosse and Milwaukee

do
do

500.000,

do

Chicago:
Mortgage, sinking fund:
\Kennebec and Portland:
1st Mortgage
=.

I

8

1,059.028

600,000 7
304,000 10

Joliet and

I

jFeb. & Aug

2,086,000 6

do

2d

do

2.590.500 0

Indianapolis and Cincinnati:
1st Mortgage
Estate

Feb. & Aug 1870
do
1869
J'ne & Dec. 1885
May & Nov. 1877
do
1867

7.975.500 7 April & Oct 1875

Indiana Central:
1 st Mortgage, convertible

!

100

:

.

Connecticut River:
1st Mortgage
Connecticut and Passumpsic River

do

110

July; 1898

do

i

648,200

1.160.000

Mortgage, convertible
do
Sterling

2d
Real

110,000 6

500,000 6

Indianapolis and Madison:
let Mortgage
Jeffersonville;
I let Mortgage

,

*

r*

|

Sunbury and Erie Bonds
Pittsburg;

90

S8

1894

:

Cleveland and

!

I

500,000 6

do

Central :

2d

6

1,840.000 7
1,002,000 #

Redemption bonds

98

!

7

214,2(K)

'

.

Cleveland, PainesviUe

!

|

Jjin. & Julv 1870
|
do
1867
May it Nov.; 1880

:

do

.

57

ij

do
j 1885
Mav A Nov.! 1803
do
1890
Feb. it Aug 1805

^

484.000:

:

and

59

j 95

Feb. it Aug 1885

i

7
7
0

2,000.000i

Extension Bonds

Jan. it

7

3.0i X). (XX!
750.0(0

Mortgage

Cincinnati, Hamilton
let Mortgage, i

JI

Aug 1883

1,037,500 7 Jan. & July 1876
1,000,000. 6

2.000,000 7

1st

VpT Sr. Oer

Interest Bonds

1st
1st

■

1

Jan. it July 1883
do
1SS3
M'eh A Sep 1890

:...

1st Mortgage
(consolidated)
Chicago and Sorth western :
Preferred Sinking Fund
let Mortgage

Mortgage

!i

93
....

Nov.1

S
8
7

467.000

inconvert..

Mortgage,.. .4.
Chicago and Milwaukee:

Chicago and Bock Island

90

95-'S0 90

7

2.100.000
1.100.000

income
Burlington and (fancy:

do

j| Illinois
2d
i

j

Mav A
1877
Jan. it Julv! 1892
ApT it Get.; 1882

sinking fund

Mortgage

1st

Feb. &

100

1883

| 3,890.000

.....

Huntington and Broad Top;

?....]!

•1

do
do

do

7

do

do

191,0001

jj Convertible

1

do

do

3d

!|

1882
!
Jan. it Julv 1876
do
57-62

0

2d

j

ApT it Oet.

4

7
7

|

[j 1st Mortgage
1st
do

....

!

sinking fund

1st Mortgage
j1 Hudson Ri rev

j

98

3,344,000
April & Oet 1881
822,000 7 Jan. & July 1883

661,000 6

1st Mortgage
do

100
95

:

j

i

-

let

2d

i

1,192,200

Bonds, (dated Sept. 20, I860)
Chicago and Great Eastern:

1st

i

; J9# 100

Feb. it Aug 1890
Mav A Nov 1890
M'eh it Sep 1865

4

|

New Dollar Bonds

j Hou so tonic:

w

450.000- 7

950.000
1.305.800

do

Chicago,
Trust Mortgage (S. F.)

let

"i

'65-' 70
do
Mav it Nov. 1875

7

800.000
890.000

Mortgage Bonds
Chicago and Alton:
let Mortgage
(Skg Fund), pref
let

do

88
99

1882

Mortgage

Convertible Bonds

Harrisburg and Lancaster:

2d

j

i

!

E. Div

do

11

....

93#

|Jan. & Jnly|1870

927.000 6

I

93

June & Dec 1888

1,000.000 10 April & Oct|lS68
1,350,000: 7 Jan. & Julv 1865

do

Hartford and Sew Haven

I

1

do
do
do
do

3d

!i

!

do

«

000,000'

Mortgage W. Div

2d

1

102

|102# 103"

1,981,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1882
1,336,000; 7 May & Nov. 1875
927,000; 6

East.

Land Grant

;;

i

Jan. it Julv! 1873
ApT it Oct. 1879

7

; 1.400,000

Income..
Cheshire :

let

141,000

95

i

Central Ohio:

2d

0

490,009 7
49;Uh)o 7

Central of Sew Jersey:

|

101# 102#

149,000; 7 Jan. & July 1870

Mortgage West. Division...
"

102#

1,002,500; 7

....

do

July 1873

i 0.000,000 0
do
1883
1
3,634,600 7 April & Del 1880

,

Hannibal and St. Joseph:

j

Oct.jlS88

Jan. &

3,000,000 7 May & Nov. 1868
4,000,000 7 M’eh & Sep 1879

j

1st

ApT &

1,000,000

Grand Junction:
II Mortgage
j Great Western, (111.):

!

Jan. & Julv 1872
Feb. & Augil874

598,000

Williamsport:

Chicago Union:
Mortgage, sinking fund....
2d
do
do

j!
:

j

Feb. A Aug 1883
Mav.it Nov. 1889
J'ne it Dec. 1893

4,209,400 6

do

2d

0

072,000

1st

99

11873

!
590,000

j j Galena and

i860
;
Jan. A Julv (>9-72
1810 S|
18TO
do
j

4

11864

Jan. & July 11863
do
,1894

000,000

11 Mortgage. >.

i

!

is 10
1889

300.000

....

1st Mortgage
Erie Railway:
1st
Mortgage
2d
do
convertible..
3d
do
1th
do
convertible
5th
do
do
Erie and Sortheast :

ApT A Oet.

*

do

34,0001 7 Feb. & Aug 1876

Sinking Fund Bonds

Elmira and

1

J'ne it Dee. 1877
May R. Nov 1872

1

4(H), 000

Mortgage

i

do

7
7

:

Mortgage

Cousoldated ($5,000,000) Loan
Camden and Atlantic:

1st
let
2d
3d
4th

do

400,000 6

Income
Erie and Northeast
Camden and Amboy:
Dollar Loans
Dollar Loan

let
2d

do

May & Nov. 1875

1,000,000 8

convertible

do
do
East Pen nsylvania:

I

Feb. it Aug 1805
1865
do
Jan. it Julv 1870

0

300,000

1st Mortgage
2d Mortgage

let

Mortgage,

-J

1871

May & Nov.

3<X).000- 4
200.090 0
250. (XX* 7
100.099 0

Sinking Fund Bonds
Boston and Lowell:
Mortgage Bonds
Buffalo, Sew York and Erie:

1st
2d

0

150,000

Boston. Concord and Montreal:

1st

100M

,'
I

J'ne A Dee. ISO 4
M'eh it Si>j) lss5
Feb. it Aug 1877

589.5WO 0

Mortgage Bonds

Buffalo and State Line

0

2,500,000: 7

uo

| Dubuoue and Sioux Ci ty:
;
1st Mortgage, 1st section.
J 1st
do
2d section..
|Eastern (Mass.):

80

1

Jan. A Julv 1875
! ss()
do
ApT A Oet. 1885

5011.009; 0

(

Blossburg and Corn ing :
1st
1st
2d
2d

!

*

l,0tX).(MX)

Mortgage, convertible

Feb. & Aug 1872
J’ne & Dec.4874

1

368.000 7 Jan. it Julv I860 :
422.090 1
do
10-‘79
110.090 4
do
is;o 1
650. (XX)
do
1870
317.000 7
do

<

1st

2d

j Detroit, Monroe and Toledo:
1st
Mortgage

'

do

Detroit and Milwaukee:
;

t

Belvidere he law are:
1st Mort. (guar. C. and A.)

$1,740,000
348,000

IncomeBonds

j

11879
It SSI
1876
1883

1

(. P. &C.)

2d Mort.
3d Mort.

3
0
0

1.128.500
700. UOU

Mortgage Bonds

1

1.000.000 0 Ja Ap J11 Oc 186 V

1355

o

Railroad:

i

! 1882

Payable.

Des Moines Valley:

!

j

do
do
do

do
do
do

ing.
«

93

ApT A Oet. I860
May it Nov. 1878

;

Beliefon taine Line:
1st Mortgage (B. it
L.) convertible.
1st
'2d
let
2d

0
0

-DESCRIPTION.

| ’

11882

*

rr

Lawrence:

and Ohio

do
do
do

do
do
4
do
777.500S 7
do
4.900.01)0 4
do
6.000.000 7 Jan. A Jill)
r*

400,(XX
l.OiXMXX

MARKET.

•—

Amount
outstand¬

!

Baltimore

‘

do

Sterling Bonds

INTEREST.

Ask’d

!

.

j

$2,500,000 7 ApT it Oct. 11879

2d
do
do
Eastern Coal Fields Branch..do
do

Bid.

1

'"A
1st Mortgage,
sinking fund. (Pa.)

1st
2d
1st
2d

MISCELLANEOUS BOND LIST.

outstand¬

ing.

[August 26, 1865.

M’chA Sep

July
t

t *

tnr » •

9 f *

?fU

August 26,1865.]

CHRONICLE.

RAILROAD, CANAL AND MISCELLANEOUS
INTEREST.

Railroad:
New Haven and
1st
1st

I

1

7

$500,000

6

,

i 6

Ferry Bonds of 1853
New iondtn Northern:
1st Mortgage
New York Central:

Premium Sinking Fund Bonds
Bonds of October, 1803 (renewal)
Real Estate Bonds
Snbscrip. Bonds (assumed stocks).
Sink. Fund-B’ds (assumed debts)..
Bonds of August, 1859, convert....
New York and Harlem :

Mortgage.,\
Shamokin

i 95

3d Mortgage
New York and New Haven:
Plain Bonds
».

102

402

do

IMay&Nov.
[Feb. & Aug

| June do
&

1893

1868
Dec

95

1866
1875

1,088,000 6 April A Oct

'

1.

Sinking Fund Bonds

.

.

:

Mortgage
Northern Central:
Sinking Fund Bonds

232,000 6 ;Feb. A Aug *73-’78!
.

Northern New Hampshire :

i

Plain Bonds

.

.

do

2,500.000 6 jJan. A Julv 1S85
500.000 6 JaApJuOc 1877
150,000 6 !
do
j 1866

York and jCumberl'd Guar. Bonds
Balt, and Susq. S'k'g Fund Bonds..

.

*
North Pennsylvania:
Mortgage Bonds
do

Mortgage

j

North-Western Virginia:

Mortgage (guar, by Baltimore).

do
(guar, by B. & O. RR.)
do
do )
( do
do
(not guaranteed)
do
Norwich and Worcester:
•.
General Mortgage...
Steamboat Mortgage —
Ohio and Mississippi :

360.000 10
1,500,000
1,000,000
500,000
500,000

i...

6

85

84%

|

97

95

1SS5
1885

1st

1st
2d

Mortgage (East. Div.)
do
do

750,000 7

Oswego and Syracuse:
1st Mortgage
Pacific:
Mortgage, guar, by Mo

7,000,000'

sterling.
do
do

do
do

1,150,000

,

Mortgage—

Philadelphia and Erie:
1st Mortgage (Sunbury & Erie)..
1st
do
(general)
Philadel.: Germant. & Norristown:
,

Consolidated Loan
Convertible Loan

do

do

Dollar Bonds of 1849
do
do

do
do

Sterling

1861

1843-4-8-9
Bonds of 1843

Dollar Bonds, convertible
Lebanon Valley Bonds, convertible

Philadelphia and Trenton:
1st Mortgage
Philadel., miming. & Baltimore:
Mortgage Loan
Pittsburg and ConnellsviUe :
let Mort. (Turtle Cr.

Div.)

Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne and Chicago:
1st Mortgage
2d
3d

do
do

Pittsburg and Steubenville:
1st Mortgage
2d

do
Racine and Mississippi:
1st Mortgage (Eastern
Div.)..;
1st
do
(Western Div.)

Reading and Columbia:
1st

Mortgage

Mortgage, sinking fund
do

3d

Mortgage

Sacramento Valley:
1st Mortgage...
2d

St.

do

1st

1st
2d

and Terre

Mortgage
do
do

Haute;

preferred
Income

Sandusky, Dayton
1st
2d
3d

Mortgage

do
do
Bonds and

and Cincinnati:

Scrip
Sandusky. Mansfield and Newark:

Mprigage.,,




Jan. &

575,000, 7

Aug i

1875

75
22

....

1S05

7

000'

July j

Feb. A

....

1

■

registered

i

Jan. A July : 1S73

554,908! 8 April A Oct i 1878

:

4,319,520 5 April A Oct l‘6S-'71 1
850. (MX i
do
1875 ! 08% |
1,000,000 ! 6 dan. A Jnlv *66-'7ti
150,000 1 8 •June A Dec D^n'd
1

....

1
596. (HH
“

6
6

200,000

[

1

76, (HX

0

Cent.):

(Baltimore) Bonds

.....

....

Mortgage

Jan. A Jnlv
do

1890
1890

1

86%

....

96

May A Nov

175.000 6 Mav A Nov.
25,000 6 •Jnn. A Julv
6

500,(XX)

....

!

1870
1871

‘

do

1877

87

July 1S76

408,000 5 Jan. & July!
182,400 5 |
do
‘;
2,856,000; 6 April & Oct:
106.000! 6 Jan. A July!
1,521,000,: 6 j
do
976.800 6 |
do
564,000 6 |
do
I
60,000, 7 I
do

1870

95

Preferred Bonds
Delaware
1st

812,000'

1st
2d

93" 94”

1871
1880

6

1880

500,000 7

do

j

680.000 8 Jan. &
758,000 8

do

|

July

^

250,000 7

140,000

7

;

•

do
do

1912
1912
1912

103
86

88

1

do

1875
1875

| 1863

.

Mortgage Bonds

Improvement
1

Jan. A

July

600,000 7 •June A Dec

90

1S78

1865

900,000 7 Mch A Sept 1S70
752,000 7 •Jan. A Julv

90

....

1805
1868

161,000

6

2,778,341

6

Mch A

1S2,000

6

Jan. A Jnlv

1876

750,000

6

April A Oct

*TS76

do

Sept 1870

93% 04

$ Oct 18W

90

Susquehanna and Tide-Water:
•Maryland Loan.. 1
do
Sterling Loan, converted
Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds, pref

....

!

200,000

i

5

do
do
do

993,000 6 j

227,569 8

1865
1878
1S64

May A Nov.!

2,500,000

6

450,000

6

i Jan.

750,000

Mortgage

Miscellaneous:
Mariposa Mining;
1st Mortgage*
2d

60

do

...

806,000 5 ■ •Jan. A July 1864
....

45

47

*

....

6

Jan. &

!

1883

‘

10% 29

:

A

July;

1878

j

Wyoming Valley:

90

80

78

West Branch and Susquehanna:
1st

....

:

1st. Mortgage

18% |

90

...

1,764,330 6 Mch A Sept! 1872
3,980,670 6 ! Jan. A Julv 1882
586,500 6 May A Nov. 1870

Union (Pa.):

j 1863

1875
1878

April

•

'

j

812,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1890
185,000
1866

1,800, 000

do

Sch uylkill Navigation :
1st"'
2d
do

2,200,000, 7 Semian’allv 1894
2,800,000; 7
* 1894
do
1,700,000 7 May & Nov. 1894

113,227

•

1,500,000 7
2,000,000; 7

,

1

July: 1878

ran. & July
Vpril & Oo

;

....

...

50

92

IS—
■8

•

....

Pennsylvania Coal:
1st

Mortgage

Quicksilver Mining :
1st Mortgage

600,000

7

500,000 7

1Jeb, &

c

Aug

1871

....

•ft

'

rune & Dec 1873

P00t000 TWrap. & July 1819

•

....

590,000 6 May & Nov. 1S76

400,000 10 Jan. & July 1875
329,00040 Feb. A Aug) 1S81

318,500

•

North Branch:

1881
1881

1880

do

do

Monongahela Navigation:
Mortgage Bonds
.

05% 95 %

I

937,500 7 ;
440,000: 7 j

6

1890
1S85

....

Morris:

123.0001 7 Mch A Sept: 1871
I

1

....

188S
1S76

do

do

6

800,000

Mortgage, sinking fund.
do

.

Ap Ju Oc 1870

:

1886

800,000: 7 Jun. A Dec. 1874
do
! 1862
200,000; 7

800,000, 7 1

1,699,500

1st Mortgage Bonds
Interest Bonds

1886

Aug

5,200,000 7 Semian’allv
do
*
5,160,000 7 1
2,000,000 7 April & Oct
I
1,000,000 7 Feb. & Aug

Ja

2.000.000 i 6
4,375,000 i 5

Erie of Pennsylvania :

6 Jan. A July

400,000

,

Delaware and Hudson:

6 May & Nov.

Feb. A

Divisiqq

Mortgage

.

!

Maryland Loan.’
Sterling Bonds, guaranteed

Lehigh Navigation:
Unsecured Bonds

258,000'

2,657,3-13 6 Jan. A July 1886

Chesapeake and Ohio:

....

1S67

1880

!

Chesapeake and Delaware:
1st Mortgage Bonds

....

1,000.000 7 April & Oct 1877 97
3,500,000 6 |Jan. A July *75-'78 94

I

8

Louis, Alton

G :Jan. &

990,52c

••••

!

1861
1867

^

..

Canal:

108
101

104

400

4,800,000! 7 Feb. & Aug 1863
"

do

2,000,00C 7 May & Nov.
1.135,001 ►1 7 jJau. A July

399.300 ,7

,

I

j

'

Mortgage (convert.) Coupon
"

|

jMch & Sept

4.980,000 6 Jan. A July
2,621,000 6 April & Oct
do
2,2S3,840i 6

1,000,000 7 Mch A Sept 1888

Convertible Bonds
Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburg:
1st Mortgage
(Potsdam & Watert.)
2d
do
(
do
do
)
1st
do
(Watertown & Rome)1,
2d
do
(do
do )
Rutland and Burlington:
1st

7

800,000 7 Mch & Sept 1879

Raritan and Delaware Bay:
1st
2d

| Feb & Aug.

.

900

do

!
1

1S95

April & Oct

k

Mortgage (guaranteed)

Guaranteed

....

119.800 6 Jan. & July 1865
292,500 6
do
1885

Philadelphia and Reading :
Sterling Bonds of 1836
do

7

1,000,000

..

f

1875
1872

Jan. & Jnlv

7

.

1

Mortgage
do '

do
.guaranteed
Worcester and. Nashua:
1st
Mortgage
York A' Cumberland (North.
1st Mortgage
2d
do

....

& Oct| 1S70

....

t

I
\

6

.

Albany and W. Stoekbridge Bonds.
Hudson and Boston
Mortgage
Maryland;

80

do

w

•

....

1

Western
1st
1st

....

; April

340,000

sterling
Philadelphia and Baltimore Central:
1st

74

l

60

1863
1867

*

Dollar Bonds.

so
80

i4

6

416.000

Pennsylvania:
1st Mortgage
2d
2d

1872
1875
1870

1

•

90
90
75
75

86
8(5
70
70

!

500.00C>i 6 :Jan. & July
do
180,001>6

Sterling (£899,900) Bonds,

v; *

311,50(1 7

Panama:
1st Mortgage,
do
1st
2d
do
Peninsula :
1st Mortgage

Jan. & July
do
do

2,050,000
850,000

(West. Div.)
( ‘do
do )

•

• • • •

j

1875
1865
1874

|Jan. & July

.

1

1SS5 |

do
do

.

600,000 7 May & Nov. 1875
650,000 7 |
- do
| 1883

do

Western (Mass.):

■

1st
1st
2d

7

1

Westchester and Philadelphia:

98

100,000 ( Jan. & July 1874
300,000 7 Feb. A Aug 1870

June & Dec

152,35o 7
600, m 7

:

Vermont and Massachusetts:
1st Mortgage
1
Warren :

108

108

6 Jan. A J un¬ 1873
do
6
1873

6

1st

2d

1S87

do
do

1.500.0(H)

I

Union Pacific:
1st Mort.” (conv. into U. S. 6s, 30
yr.)
Land Grant Mortgage
Vermont Central:

1

j 1861
I
2,500,000 6 April & Oct 1875

7

.

.

1

900.001 »! 7 Feb. & Aug 1S65
do
2,500.000 7
1865
1.000,0001 7 May & Nov. 1875

:

do

Oct! 1859

do

A,391,00C)*

Mortgage Bonds

l

1,494,900 7 April &
do
3,077,000 7

....

340,0(K if 7 Jan. & July 1870
j
i

do

Troy Union

!

I

Mortgage

....

94,000: 7 Mch & Sept 1806

.

..

.

-j

4

-

■

•••••

.

86% 87%

220,700 6 .April & Oct; 1874

Northern (Ogdensburg):

(

1,400,000 7 •April & Oct 1876

.

Equipment bonds
Trey and Boston:
Mortgage Bonds

.

<5

200,000 1 7 Jan. & July 1871
1

1st Mortgage, convertible
Third Avenue (N. Y.):
1st Mortgage,
Toledo. Ptoria and Warsaw :
1st
Mortgage
,»........
Toledo and Wabash:
1st Mort. (Toledo & Wabash)
1st do
(L. E., Wab, A St. Lo.).
2d
do
(Toledo and Wabash)...
2d
do
(Wabash and Western). i

102

912.000 7

1st

1st
2d
3d
3d

fl02

1,000,000 7

Mortgage Bonds
New York, Providence and Boston

Chattel

604,000 7 j

i «

700,000 7 Feb. & Aug 1872 j
i

Terre Haute and Richmond:

91
102

3,000.000 7
1.000,000 7

Consolidated Mortgage

1st
2d

do
I 1883
Feb. A Aug
400

M

1

:

Syracuse, Binghamton and New York
1st Mortgage

95

!

T3

’d

500,CKX 1! 7 June & Dec 1807

Staten Island:
1st Mortgage

....

i

Mortgage

1st

Valley and Pottsvillc
IstMortgage

:

j

2,925,000 G June & Dec: 1887 | 91
165,000 6 I May A Nov.j 1883 1
1,398,000 7

Princpal payble.

Payable.

Railroad:

t

July

663.000 6

!

MARKET.

►H

1st

....
..

6

mg.

<1

®

1809
1873

Aug

7 Jan. &

-

j

Feb. &

Description.

Second Avenue :

Jan. A July
do

i

New Jersey :

Amount
outstand-

X

Northampton:

(Hamp. and Ilamp.)..

'

Rate.

Payable.
•

Mortgage
do

|

INTEREST.

rc

1

I

(continued).

j

ing.

BOND LIST

MARKET.

j

Amount
outstand¬

Description.

283

•

•f.

284

THE CHRONICLE.
•

[August 26, 1865.

»TT-

RAILROAD. CANAL, AND MISCELLANEOUS
Dividend.

Market.

out¬

Last

Stock

p‘d. Bid. Askd

Railroad.
100

.

Brooklyn Central
100
Brooklyn City
10
Brooklyn City and Newtown.. .100

Buffalo, New York, and Erie.. .100
Buffalo and State Line

Burlington and

100
Missouri River. 100

Quarterly.

Aug. .1%

."

,

April and Oct Apr...4
April and Oct Apr.. .5
'
Feb. and Aug An

112

116%

'...:

july..l%

Quarterly.

June & Dec.

Jnrie.2%

June & Dec.

n%

June.3%

Jan. and July July. 4
Jan. and July July. .5
.

366,000
7
S50.000 Jan. and Juiy
2.200.000 Feb. & Aug.

1,000,000

13

95
11 2% iii’
124
125

July. .4% 124

126

Aug..3% 140
..

......

July..S%

126

.....

•

do

Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.100 3.000.000

Cincinnati and Zanesville.
100
Cleveland, Columbus. & Cmcin.100
Cleveland, Painesville & Ashta.100
Cleveland and Pittsburg
50.
Cleveland and Toledo
50

Columbus & Indianapolis Cent.100
Columbus and Xenia
100
Concord
50
Concord and Portsmouth
100

Coney Island and Brooklyn
100;
Connecticut and Passumpsic.. 100
do

do

Des Moines Valley
Detroit and Milwaukee
do
do
pref.

Dubuque and Sioux City
do

pref

Eastern. (Mass)

do

100
100

..

50
50
100
100

April and Oct Apr

500.000
392.900

100
100
100
100

126

Pittsburg

50

Fitchburg

.100

Hannibal and St. Joseph

U9%! 69
i 98

.5

100

Housatonic

100
100

do
preferred
Hudson River,

100,

100

63

1,982.ISO
3.155,000

72%

f

160

do

do

1(H)

pref.. 100:

Jeffersonville

50
100

Lehigh Valley

50

Lexington mid Frankfort
Little Miami
Little Schuylkill

jan. and July Julv. .3

Long Island

July..3
Aug. .2%
Jul v. .2% 59
_
*
Julv. .3% 99
86
Aug. .4
Aug. .3% 82
...

259-

| 46
148
;

«

2.350.000 Quarterlv.
Julv. .3
820.000
.*...
1.180,000' Jan. and July July. .4

*!
i

*

;122%'

Aug...l%
.....y 70

i 90
j...

-i

Quarterly. July. .2% 130
516,573 Feb. and Aug Aug. .2
2,981.267' Jan. and July Jufy. .5 113
2.646,100; Jan. and July July. .3
59
50 1*852,715! Quarterly. Aug. .2
SO
50 1,109,594 Feo. and Aug
Aug..2
‘

,

j...
115
61

IK)

5,605,834(May and Nov May ..4

do

'

\

10

,

.

I00i 3,452,301
50 3,00 » 00( Feb. and
Aug Aug. .39.

100
100
New Bedford and Taunton
100
New Haven, N. Lond., & Ston .100
New Haven and
Northampton..100

Naugatuck

New

Jersey

New London Northern




eo(T,oo!

100

85
116

738,536

602,152)

and Aug: Aug.

J

.5

-

2,360.700
501.890;
|
800,000 Jan. and July July. .4
1.774.175 Jan. and Julv July. .5

2,233,370;
,

2.300,000;
1,700,000!
1,700.0(H);
2.956,590

.

...

,

I

;135

1135

32

j

,May..7
.May. .7

Annually.

'60

....

862,571!
576.000 Jan. and

July July. .5

....

650,000 Apr. and Oct April —; 51
869,450;Feb. and Aug;Aug..3 -i

Quarterly, i

750.000

1,200,130

120

i

1.900.150 Jan. and

125

•••••!

••

July July. .6
July. .3

j

!.:—

!

Quarterly.

!

j

i

;

;
;

! 140

41

1 65
;.....

99% 100
43 j 43%
93% 95

:j
126

‘120%

60
139

61%
: 140

’317,050 Jan. and July July.'.l

........

,

and Raritan
100
and Susquehanna— 50

Jau. and
,

50
50!
100
100,

f

50

July July. .5

200,000
!
4.282,950 May and Nov May. .5
726,800
i
1,025.000 Feb.and Aug Aug. .4
1,175,000 Feb. and Aug Aug5
138,086
1
1 oos om
2.888.S05 Feb. and Aug Aug. .3%
2.050,070
:r
•

•

i

!

;

•■—

••••

’so”

i 75
1120

1

•

46

•

I 62

Atlantic Mail
Brunswick City.
Bucks County Lead

i

17
40
i

1
110
.

107

62%! 64%

iso !io0

•

Brooklyn Gas
Canada' Copper
Canton Improvement
Cary Iinjirovement

100

2,000.000; Feb. and Aug Aug,

5f
500,(X)0
100 5,000.000

j

Central American Trans
Central Coal
Citizens (Brooklyn) Gas.
Consolidation Coal, Md

’

-

..

38%
17

20^ 1,000,000 Jan. and July!July..4
100! 6.000,000
lOOj 5-.000,000 ■
!
25; l,000.00f) Jan. and July July. .4
50;
644.000;

100

2,800,000!

50

1,000,000;

.,

Pennsylvania Coal
Quartz Hill
Quicksilver

Saginaw Land, Salt and Min

20
50
125

j 40% 41%

175

11%

!

1,200,000!

170
11

j.......

1.000.000

j..,

10!
....100
50

1

..;

1,000,000 May and Nov May...
100; 1,000,000.Feb. and Aug!Aug. .5
100; 1,000,000
i

Nicaragua Transit

47%

500.000

50! 1.000,000
Jersey City and Hoboken Gas.. 20; 1,000,000;
Manhattan Gas
50 4,000,000; Jan. and July July. .5
Mariposa Gold
100 12,000.0001
j

Metropolitan Gas

39

12

600,000;
3,214,300;

100
100! 2.(K)0,000

Cumberland Coal, preferred
Farmers Loan and Trust

Minnesota
New Jersey Consolidated
New Jersey Zinc
New York'Gas Light
New York Life and Trust

1 62%

16%

,

50

ii

i84

25j 1,500.000 Feb. and Aug Aug .4
100
10
50 2.500.000!
100 4,000,000
Quarterly, july.25
100
5!
200,000,
!...

jiao’*

iie”

-

50

American Coal
American Telegraph

Pacific Mail

34

j

1 60

304.297 Feb. and Aug Feb..3

11

.270

{..-.
i...

109! 4.000.000

Quarterly. A’g5&259 280
;.. 50i 3.200.000;Feb. and
Aug;Aug. .5 ; 150
25: 1,000,000*
]
!...
.100 10,000,000! Jau. and July July
! 55
25 1.000,(H)0 Jan. and July July
.

285
160

55%

...

Uriion Trust

25
.100

United States-Telegraph
United States Trust
Western Union Telegraph...

Tune and Dec June.

1,010,000
100, 4,395,800 Feb.

junction.(Pa.)

Rutland Marble
78

1,000,00(
500.00)

92
j 50

-

100

_

—

Hampshire and Baltimore Coal. 100!
9

■

Morris and Essex...;
Nashua and Lowell

91
47

...

International Coal
!

2d

Mississippi and Missouri

Division
and Hudson

Harlem Gas

and Cincinnati
50
do
1st pref. 50

July.'.2

25 1,343.563
25 8,228.595
50 1,633,350 Feb. and Aug Aug. .3
100 10,000,000 Feb. and Aug Aug. 10
100
398,910
!

Ashburton Coal

2.022,481
6.205.401 Feb. and Aug Feb .0.9.
35
pref.. 50; 3,819,771 Feb. and Aug Feb .3-9
2S
Manchester and Lawrence
1001 l.OOQ.OOr lan. and July*
106
Michigan Central
100. 6.315,906 fan. and July Ju..4&6s
107 }
Michigan Southern and N. Ind..l00| 7.539,WX> Feb. and Aug AxV-z.psrf. 106%'
63%] 63)'8!i
do
do
guaran.100 2,183.60(, Feb. and Aug Aug. .5
126
Milwaukee and Prairie Du ChicnlOO!
i
2,988,078
43
431
do
do
1st pref. 100 2,414.50( Feb. and
Aug
.4 | 92% 93
do
do
2d pref.100 1,014.00( I line and Dec Aug.
J une. .3% I 75
80
Milwaukee and St. Paul
100; 1,000.00
do
preferred
100| 2,400.000 Feb. and Aug Aug. .3% 46
Mine Hill & Schuylkill Haven.. 50i 3.700.000 Ian.
and Julv Julv. .4
110
111
do
do

Quarterly.*

Miscellaneous.

!...
' 92

6,627,050

Louisville, New Albany & Chic. 100 2.800.000!
McGregor Western
l(X)
Maine Central..
109 1,050,860j ..."
Marietta

3.344,800

3,150,150
2,3:18,000 Jan. and Julv July. .4

J.
Susquehanna.100 1,000,000 Jan. and July July. .5
109%! Wy o m i ng Val ley
50
June. 4
700,000. Quarterly

;...

.*

r.. i

118

3.06S,400 June and Dec J une .3

,

Union
do preferred
West Branch and

I

Apr. ..4
412,000; Jail, and July July. .3
407.9(H) Jan. and Julv July. .4

Quarterlv.

114

Trov and Greenbush
.100
274,400 June and Dec1 June .3
Utica and Black River
100
811,560 Jan. and July July. .2
Vermont and Canada.
100; 2,250,000 June and Dec J une .4
Vermont and Massachusetts... .110 2,214.225 :.
Warren
.100, 1,408.300 Jan. and Julv July. .3
Westchester and Philadelphia.. 50
684,036
Western (Mass)
100 5,685,000! Jan. and July July-4
Worcester and Nashua.
.83j! 1,141.000 Jan. and J uly July. .3

50;
Schuylkill Navigation (consol.). 50;
do
preferred. 50
Susquehanna and Tide-Water.. 50:

103

:

1,015.907;

795 360'

July. .4
July. .3

pref.100 1,700.000!
j..
pref.100 1,000,000'
:
50 2.442,350 Jnncand Dec June.3
>
preferred. 50
984,700 June and Dec J une .3%;
100,
125.000 Jan. and J uly July. .3%
1(H)
607,111

Lehigh Navigation..
Monongahela Navigation

Aug..5

3,540.000 Jan. and July July. .3
-

Quarterly.
Quarterly.

1st
2d

Morris (consolidated)
do
preferred
North Branch

<

50

100

do
do
do
do
Toledo and Wabash.
do
do

Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
Lancaster

90

100
50

Louisville and Frankfort
Louisville and Nashville

59

Chesapeake and Delaware
Chesapeake and Ohio

.

.

Quarterly.

2,980,839;
1,508.000;

.100 1.170.000;
Toledo, Peoria, and Warsaw.. .100 1.700.0001

Canal.

256,500

Joliet and Chicago
1,500.000
Kennebec and Portland (new). .100;
i
Lackawanna and Bloomsburg.. 50j
do
do
pref. 50;
500,000!

Terre Haute and Richmond
Third Avenue (N. Y.).. -

Wrightsville, York & Gettysb’g 50;
.

6.218,0-42; April and Oct Apr. ..5
109)4
Huntingdon and Broad Top
50
617,500'........
do
do
pref. 50
190,750 Jan. and July July. .3% ' ’
Illinois Central
100 22.8S3.900 Feb. and
Aug Au5&10s 121
Indianapolis and Cincinnati
50 1,6S9,900 April and Oct
'
~1
100

Indianapolis and Madison

Raritan and Delaware

Tro.y and Boston.

952.350
1.751.577

92%

•

Tioga

1,550,000

100 1,900,000;
pref. ..100 5,253.836

do
do
Hartford and New Haven

126

406,132 Jan. and July July. .3
6,832,950 Jan. and July July.10

1.500,(XX)

92'

—

...

•
....

p'd. Bid. Askd

Ogdensburg & L- Champlain.. .100
33
34
Ohio and Mississippi..
100 21,250,000
:
24% 24%
do
preferred.. 100 2,979,000 Jan. and July July. .3% 60
Old Colony and Newport
100 3,609,000 Jan. and J uly July. .4
105% 107
Oswego and Syracuse
50
482,400 Feb. and Aug Aug.. 4
Panama
100 5,000,000; Quarterly.
July. .5 248 252
Peninsula.
.100
j
!
; • •
50 20.000.000,May and Nov May. .5
Pennsylvania
114% 116
Philadelphia and BaltimoreCentlOO
218,100;
'.
Philadelphia and Eric
50 5,013,054
! 46
i 42
Philadelphia and Reading
50 20,072,323 Mar. and Nov Mar
104% 104%
Phila., Germant'n, & Norrist'n. 50 1,358.100,Apr. and Oct Apr. .4 112
Phila., Wilmington & Baltimore 50 S,657.300 Apr. and Oct Apr ..5 130 135
Pittsburg and Connellsville..... 50 1,770,414!
i
Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne & ChicagplOO 8,181,126, Quarterly. July. .2% 95% 95%
Portland, Saco, arid PortsmouthlOO 1,500,000! Jan. and July July. .4
96 !.....
Providence and Worcester
1(H) 1,700,000 Jan. and July July. .4%
Racine and Mississippi
—100

,

•

50
pref. ..50 ,

do

121

...:

1,582.169

2,316,705

j 25

*

Feb. and Aug
500.000 Jan. and July
ir
500,000 Jan. and Julv
100 16.400.100 Feb. &
Aug.
...100 8.535.700 Feb. & Aug.
50
400.000 Feb. & Aug;

Williamsport

Erie
do preferred
Erieand Northeast
Erie and

'

1,490,800 Jan. and July July. .5
1.500,000 Jan. and J uly July. .3%
250,000 Jan. and July July. .3%

Eighth Avenue, N. Y
100 1,000.000
Elmira, Jefferson, & CunandagualOO
500.(XX)

Elmira and

Feb. and Aug Aug. .5
April and Oct Apr...4.
.5
Feb. and Aug An

pref. 100 1.255,200 Jan. and July July. .3
100 1.591.100 Jan. and Julv
July. .4

Connecticut River
Covington and Lexington
Day ton and Michigan
Delaware.
Delaware, Lacka., & Western

do

2.000.000

6,000,000
4.000,000
4,266,987
4,054,800

New York and New Haven
.100!
New York Providence & BostonlOO
Ninth Avenue
100
Northern of New Hampshire.. .100
Northern Central
50
North Pennsylvania
50
Norwich and'Worcester
100

Bay
.100
Reading and Columbia
50
Rensselaer and Saratoga
50
;
Rome, Watertown & Ogdensb'glOO
: 96
Rutland and Burlington... —100
96% St. Louis, Alton, & Terre HautelOO
May & Nov. May..6
11334'
do
do
pref.100
Sandusky, Dayton, and Cincin. .100
'
do
do
pref.100
90' j Sandusky, Mansfield & NewarklOO
27%1 27%1 Schuylkill Valley
50;
Jun
& Dec. June..3% 62% 62%:
Second Avenue (N. Y.).. .t
100
April and Oct Apr. ..5 106% 103 i Shamokin Valley & Pottsville.. 50
;
Sixth Avenue (N. Y.)
100.
May and Nov. May. .4
Syracuse, Binghamton & N. Y.100!

pref. .100 8,435,500

Last

......

...

Chicago and Rock Island
lpO 6,000.000
Cincinnati and Chicago Air LinelOO 1,106,125

Periods.

..

—

Aug..5

Camden and Amboy
100 6.472.400 Jan. and July July. .5
126
Camden and Atlantic
50!
378,455
do
do
preferred.. 50
682,607
Cape Cod
60
681,665 Jan. and Julv July. 3%:
Catawissa..'
50 1.150.000
| 24
do
preferred
50 2.200.000 Feb. & Aug. Aug..3%: 49
Central of New Jersey
100 5.600,000 Quarterly.
Julv..2% 120
Central Ohio
50 sd Mh. 28
*
Cheshire (preferred)
100 2,085,925
43
Chester Valley
/.
50
871.900'
•.
Chicago and Alton
100 1.783.100 Feb. & Aug.
Aug.,3%1 95
do
preferred —100' 2,425,200 Feb and Aug. Aug.. 3% 94

do

; standing.!

Niagara Bridge & Canandaigua. 100 1,000,(XX) Jau. and July July. .3

v

Jan. and Julv
492.150
1.000.000 Feb. and Aug

Chicago Burlington and Quiney.l00: 8.376,510
100
Chicago and Great Eastern
Chicago, Iowa and Nebraska... .100 1,000,000
Chicago and Milwaukee
...100 2.250.000
Chicago and Northwestern
-.100 11,990,520

Market.

|

New York and Boston Air Line.100
7SS,047|
!
New York Central
100 24,386.000 Feb. and Aug Aug. .3
New York^nd Harlem
50 .5,085.0501
do
preferred
50 1,500.000 Jan. and July July. .4

1,347.192

50 1,947.600
Alton and St. Louis
100
800.000
Atlantic & Great Western, N. Y.100
919,153
do
do
Pa... 100 2.500.000
do
do
Ohio.100 5,000.000
Baltimore and Ohio
.100 13.188.902
Washington Branch
100 1.650.000
Bellefontaine Line
100 4,434,250
Belvidere, Delaware
100
997,112
Berkshire
100
600.000
Blossburg and Corning. ■.
50
250.000
Boston, Hartford and Erie
100 8.500,000
Boston and Lowell
500 1,830,000
Boston and Maine
100 4,070,974
Boston and Providence
100 3.160,000
Boston and Worcester
100 4.500.000

Dividend.

out-

:

Albany and Susquehanna
Alleghany Valley

Companies.

!

standing.

Periods.

i

Stock

Companies.

STOCiTLIST.

100 3,000,000 Feb. and Aug! Aug. .4
.100; 1,000.000 Feb. and
Aug|Aug..5
.1001
j Quarterly. ' July..2

.

2,500,000;

}

Wilkesbarre (Consolidated)Coall00, 2,175,000
Apr. and Oct'Apr...5
Williamsburg Gas
50,
750.000 Jan. and July July. .5
Wyoming Valley Coal
50. 1,250.000
1

1..

.

65
165

100
72

hz

August 26,lSfc&L*

insurance anb
INSURANCE

THE CHRONICLE.

Jttinmg Journal.

TG2

prepared statement of the amount of insurance, alleged loss, and
paid. There are also references to special cases of interest.
The impression so common, that the number of incendiary fires
has much increased of late,, is incorrect.
During the last half year
there have been in all one hundred and seventy-six fires, of which
eighty-two were of incendiary origin—eight less than occurred in
the corresponding six Months of 1864. There were during the same
time thirty-nine arrests of persons on charges of arson, or attempts
to commit that crime.
Of this number two were indicted, tried, and
convicted of arson ; six discharged by the Grand Jury; eleven dis¬
charged by police magistrates; six indicted, and now awaiting trial;
four held to bail, (two of whom have fled the city, and forfeited their
bail, ten thousand dollars;) two discharged on their own recogni¬
zances ; one held as a witness, and seven committed
pending an ex¬

) 72%

amination.

sums

STOCK LIST.
DIVIDEND.

MARKET.

COMPANIES.

Periods.

Last

paid.

5
$300,000 Jan. and July. July
200,000
do
July.3% &30s.
Albany City
....100; 200,000’
50
American
200,000 Jan. and July. julv.3% & 50 s.
5
American Exchange.. *100
200.000 March and Sep March
50, 500.000 Jan. and July. July
Arctic
ps'd
Astor
5
25j 250,000 Feb. and Aug. Aug.
5
Atlantic (Brooklyn)
50; 300,000 March and Sep March
Baltic
25;
200.000 May and Nov. May.
Beekman
4
25; 200,000 Febr and Aug. Aug
5
25
Bowen’
300.000 June and Dec. June
Brevoort
50; loO.OOO Jan. and July. July
5
200.000 Feb. and Aug. Aug
fi
Broadway
25
153,000
do
Aug
10
Brooklyn (L. I.)
IT
Capital City (Albany)... 100
200,000
Central Park...
100; 150,000 Feb. and Aug. Aug
4
Citizens’
20 i 300.000 Jan. and July. July
10
4 p. sb
City
TO; 210,000 Feb. and Aug. Aug
Clinton
100; 250,000 Jan. and July. July
5
Columbian
100; 3,500,000
July
do
Commerce
1
100
200.000:
do
July
5
Commerce (Albany)
100; 200,0001
Commercial
50' 200,000 Jau. aud July. July
5
Commonwealth
100, 250,000 April and Oct. April
5
Continental
7
*100j 500.000 Jan. and July. duly
March
Corn Exchange
50 : 400,000 March and Sep
100 i
Croton
200.000 Jan. and July. July
*. .7%
Eagle
40. 300,000 April and Oct. April
7
Empire City...
100i 200,000 Jan. and July. July
Excelsior
50;
do
200.000’
July
.5
.Exchange
30; 150.000 Feb. and Aug. Aug.
....
Firemen’s.
o
1T; 204.000 Jan. and July. duly
Firemen’s Fund....
10;
150.000!
do
July.... ...3%
Firemen's Trust (Bklyn) 10;
150.000
do
July
.5
Fulton
25! 200.000!
do
Julyf
5
Gallatin
50 i
6
150,000 May and Nov. May
Gebhard
100;
200.000 Feb. and Aug. Aug
5
Germania
50 j
500.000! Jan. and July. July
5
Globe
50'
200.000'
do
5
July
Goodhue
100!
200.000
do
July
5
Greenwich
200,000!Feb. and Aug. Aug
7
25j
50
Grocers’
.5
j 200,0001 March and Sep March..
Adriatic
iEtna

...

>

85

25
50

94#
125
135

! 87%
101
100
i 130
.100
:

—

!107
135
210
100
76
230
134
95
102
105
125
139

.

171%
100
;ioo#
;

iiso#
125%
102%
i GO ”
|112#

59%
1104

....

,

110
85

.

90%

iis ’
85

15
50 i

Harmony (F. & M.)

50

j

Hoffman
Home

150,000' Jan. and Julv. July

400,0001

99

300,000|

100 j
200,000
100 2.000,000i Jan.

Hope

50 j

Howard
Humboldt

50

.100;
Importers’and Traders’. 50'
Indemnity

100;

International

100 i

Irving

251
301
Jersey City (N. J.)...... 50|
King’s County (Brook’n) 20!
Jefferson

Knickerbocker

......

and Julv. July

200,000!
300,000
200.000:
200.000!

Jan

do
do
do

Lamar
Lenox

...

150,000iFeb. and Aug.
1,000,0001 April and Oct.
200,000-Feb. and Aug.
200'000 March and Sep
150,000 Jan. and July.
150,000 March and Sep
280,000: Jan. and Julv.

50 j

150,000!

100;
25

Long Island (Brooklyn). 501
Lincoln Fund
Lorillard

50
25
100
100

,

July.
July
Jply..

do

40

Lafayette (Brooklyn)

Aug

5
.5
10
5
6

April
Aug

.

174#
100
10G
75
100
105
156

March.. ..’...8

5

July

5
5
300,000!
July..
.5
150.000; March and Sep September.. .5
200.000; Jan. and July. July
10

January, 1865....
February, “

No. of
Hires.
86

new

vocation.”

Alleged.

“

,...

“

....

paid.

$1,738,050

$713,168

1,993,525
2,954,900

263,131
112,487
180,086
155,906

189,604

477,100

14^077

$4,052,643

$8,100,825

$1,571,855

37

17

....

Insurance.

$791,445
321,156
210,002
217,862
2,322,674

26

“

fol¬

as

Amount

loss.

29

April,
May,

has not

,31

-

176

232,800

704,450

yet been settled.
PETROLEUM STOCK LIST.

98#
135
135
135
135
110
200

.

.

i

Adamantine Oil.....

130#

1141

80

ilGO
97#
106
100

101
88

r

112#
105
88

69#
125
120

1100
1(H)

87

1112
|126#

! 150
illO
jlffl#

shal Baker’s

twenty-second semi-annual report, embracing the period
between the 30th November, 1864, and the 1st of June, 1865, has
just been issued, containing a detailed account of all the fires and
fire alarms that have occurred
during that time, besides a brief nar¬
rative of the origin of each fire as traced in the
testimony taken, or
a

Black Creek.
Blood Farm

carefully

Asked.
4 00
15
2 00
1 00;
15 00
25

‘is oo'
3 10
13 00
1 85

Brooklyn
Buchanan Farm.
California
Cascade....'
Central

Go
18 00
s

,

127#
99#

New York—Marshal Baker’s Report.—Fire Mar¬

it; together with

15

Brevoort

120

j

Bergen Coal and Oil.
Bradley Oil

125

..

Allen Wright
Beekman
—

I 97#

155
120
90

05

Alleghany
Bennehoft' Reserve..
Bennehoif Run

1175
1

Market.
Companies.

Bid.

TOO

..

.

MAr.KET.
Companies.

!125

....




December, 1S64...

l,000,000i

other circumstances in connection with

his

—..

.

in

in

The great difference between the amount of alleged loss and the
amount of insurance paid, is partly accounted for by the fact that
a claim for $1,786,456 on bonded goods burned or
damaged at the
fire in April, in the warehouses Nos. 549 aDd 555 Water street,

March

.

Fires

hundred and

monthly statement of’fires, losses and insurances is

Totals.

july

do
do

The
lows :

March

106

.5
5

July

the successful exertions that lie made

....

137#

5

1,000,000!Feb. and Aug. Aug
5
500,000! Jan. and Julv. July
5
.10
200,000!
July
do
do
150.000.
July
5
200,000!
do
July
5
do
July.
3%
040,000:
J uly
200.000!
do
10
Metropolitan
.100; 1,000.000!
do
July.
5
Montauk (Brooklyn).... 50;
do
150.000!
July
5
Morns (and inland)’... .100!
200,000:
Nassau (Brooklyn)
50: 150.000! Jan. and July. July.. .-^y
7
National
do
37#! 200,000 ‘
July
.8
New Amsterdam
25;
300,000'
do
July
5
New World
50
200,000!
do
July
4
N. Y. Equitable
35j 210,000
do
8
July
N. Y. Fire
«..100! 200’000 Feb. and Aug. Aug
..G
Niagara
50 i 1,000,000 Jan. and July. July..; j
.5
North American
50! 1,000,000 June and Dec. June. .6 & 50s.
North River
25,
350,000 April and Oct. April
.4
Northwestern (Oswego). 50!
150,000 Jan. and July. July
.5
Pacific.
25; 200,000
do
July
7%
Park
do
100; 200,000;
July
5
Peter Cooper
..5
20j 150,000;Feb. and Aug. Aug.
People’s
20j 150,000 Jan. and July. July
j .5
Phoenix
50 i
July
5
500,000)
do
Relief
do
50! 200.000:
July
.5
Republic
100 i 300,000!
do
July. 3#& 20 s.
Resolute
:.
do
July
3%
lOOj 200,000 i
Rutgers’
25;
200,000!Feb. and Aug. August
.7
St. Mark’s
:
25
150.000:
do
Aug
5
St. Nicholas
25' 150,000!
do
Aug.
..4
Security
50 1,000.000
do
7
Aug;
Standard
50;
200.000 Jan. and July. July
5
Star
100! 200.000!
Sterling
100! 21X1.000’
Stuyvesant
25 j
200,000 Feb. and Aug. Aug..
Tradesmen’s
25i 150,000|Jan. and July. July.
United States
20
250.000j ’
do
July.
50
Washington
400.000;Feb. and Aug. Aug.
Williamsburg City
50
150,000; Jan. and July.- July.
Yonkers and New York. 100*. 500,000''
do
July.
Manhattan
Market
Mechanics’ (Brooklyn).. 50
Mechanics’ and Traders’ 25j
Mercantile (marine)
100,
Merchants’
•
50i

125
130
100

one

seventy six, being nineteen less than occurred during the correspond¬
ing six months of 1864, aud seven less than during the previous half
year. The aggregate of losses, however, i3 much heavier, there
having been several very destructive fires during the period. The
destruction of property on storage in the South and Water Street
stores, which caught fire from the heat of a burning cooper’s build¬
ing on the opposite side of the street, entailed the largest loss.
With regard to the new Paid Fire Department, the Marshal
says that “ it is curious to note that while we are resorting to the
English plan of paid fire brigades, there is a disposition on the part
of the English to imitate our volunteer system.
In London even
the heir apparent, and the leading members of the
aristocracy,’
make it their pride to run with the engine.
At the recent fire at
Marlborough House, the Prince of Wales distinguished himself by

Month.

‘66“

4
6
5

July
July

do
do

above, the total number of fires is

154#

..

200.000!

Hamilton
Hanover

*

As stated

j 88%

.

.

285

Cherry Run Petrol'm

19 00
22

Clifton ....'
Commercial
Commonwealth. ..._
Consolidated of N. Y
De Kalb
Dalzell
Devon Oil

22 00
23
5 00

So

,2 00

.

Maple Groye

Asked.

12 00
6 00

60*
4 00

N.York, Phila. and )
Baltimore Consol j
Noble & Delamater /
of

Philadelphia.. j

Noble & Delamater /
Rock Oil
f
Northern Light
;.
Oceanic
Oil City Petroleum.
Oil Creek of N. Y
Pacific
Palmer Petroleum...

People’s Petroleum..
Phillips

2 80
1 05

2 00
1 25

3 45

ses*
iooo**

50
9 95
2 00

70
7 00
0 50

‘5 06‘
75

Sherman & Bamsd’le
Southard
Standard Petroleum.

"56’

Story & McClintock.

3-1

1 00
40
4 55

20
a

66*

1 oo
1 35

...

Home
Inexhaustible
Johnson’s Fulton Oil
Knickerbocker Pet'in
Lamb Farms
McClintockville

Manhattan

Montana
Mount Vernon
National Oil of N. Y.

Rynd Farm

Everett Petroleum
Excelsior.
First National
Fountain Petroleum.
Fulton Oil..
Germania
G‘t Western Consol.
Guild Farm
Hammond..

McElhenny
McKinley

Maple Shade of N. Yr.
Maple Shade of Phil.

Pit Hole Creek
President
Rawson Farm
Revenue.;

Emp'e City Petrol’m
Enterprise

Heydrick
Heydrick Brothers
Hickory Farm
High Gate.

Bid.

*55
6 40

3 00
34

G 50
25

4 25

Success
Tack Petr’m of N.Y.
Talman
Tarr Farm

0 36
0 25

0 39

Terragenta
Titus Oil.
Titus Estate
L'nion
United PeTl'm F’ms.
United States
United States Pe- (
troleum Candle.. J

Venango

Vesta
Watson Petroleum
Webster

..

W.Virg. Oil and Coal
Woods & Wright {
Oil Creek
j
Working People’s (
Petroleum

j

10 00
27 90

2
25
1
28

00
00
00
00

286

THE CHRONICLE.

TABLE OF LETTER POSTAGES TO
FOREIGN
COUNTRIES.
where

cases

It is

cts.

prefixed, unless the letter be registered,
prepay¬
optional; in all other cases prepayment is re¬
quired.
ment is

Countries.

£ 0.

*38

hina, Brit,
*30
*60

mail..

mail from

do
do

39

45
30

via

Sth’mpt’n

39

45

via Marseilles and Suez...

50 102

by Bremen and Hamb’g
55

*30
•

•

28

•

mail

French mail

...

45

...

England,
mail, via London, by
by

5

by
21

by

Bogota, New Granada

18
34
45

Brazils, via England,
France, in Fell mail from
Bordeaux

*33 *66
*30

Bremen, Prussian closed mail,

do
do
do
when prep’d ....
28
do
Bremen mail
*10
do
Hamburg mail
*15
do
French mail
*21 *42
Brit. A. Am. Prov., except Canada and

jv^New Bruns w’k
do

do

do

not

3,000

m.

...

exceeding 3,000

m.

...

Brunswick, Prussian
do

do

by Brem.

do

mail
when
or

French mail

Buenos

over

prep’d
Hamb’g ml.

...
...

28
*15

*21 *42

Ayres, via England
via France by French

45

mail from Bordeaux..

30

Canary Islands, via England
Cape of Good Hope, Brit, mail, via

S3

60

*10

do

Southampton..

do

Brit,

mail

...

46

29

87

Fch, mail, via
Bord’x and Lisbon

80

60

do




do

in

63

and Pacific coast

do

Bremen

Hamburg mail

or

10

..

*30

*21 *42
*15
*15
21

42

French mail

open mail, via
American pkt

prepaid.;

Hanover, Prussian closed
do

„

by

Bremen

mail.
when prepaid

45

*21 *42

open mail, via

American

London, by
pkt.••
•

........

...

21

5
*10

Newfoundland

10

Granada, (except Aspinwall and
South

Panama,)

New

18

Wales, British mail, via

Southampton...

...

83

British mail, via
89

45

French mail.... *30 *60

by mail to San
Francisco

...

3

Zealand, British mail, via South¬

*30

*21*42

21

mail, via Lon.,

by British pkt

do
do

*15

Hay ti, via Eugland
Holland, French mail

open

do
do

Hamburg

or

mail
French mail....

60
28

steamer
from N. York.
5
French mail
*21 *42
open mail, via Lon.,

by Amer. pkt

do

5

28

...

French mail.... *21 *42
and
Hamburg mail.... 22

do

*2t *42
*30
...
28

45

by Bremen

Netherlands, The,

do

*10
*15

*21 *42

30

mail

Marseilles

...

Freiich mail

*16

Nassau, N. Prov., by direct

21

from New York
Bremen mail
Prussian closed mail
•
do
do when

do

do

do
do

London, by

do
do
do

do
do

do

New

Hamburg, by Hamburg’mail, direct

*30
28

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)

do

New

...

...

from Bordeaux

London, by

open mail, via
British pkt

p’paid

(Strelitz and Schwerin,)
by Bremen or Hamburg

New Brunswick.

>

when

Naples, Kingdom of, Prus. clos’d

Hamburg

or

34

10

French mail

*30*60

mail

*,,,

Montevideo, via England
do
via France,
by Frn’h mail

1
*25
*42

60'

mail

*35

by Bremen

do

do

pre¬

45

aud Schwerin,)
Prussian closed mail

24
...

39
30

Mecklenburg, (Strelitz

*15

...

(except Luxemburgh)
Hamburg mail

Greece, Prussian closed mail, (if
paid. 40c)

do

.

33
45

prepaid, 28c)

French mail
Bremen mail.

Great Britain and Ireland

do

c.

38

places excepted above

do

Gibraltar, French mail.
do
open mail, via London, by
Amn. pkt
do
open mail by British pkt..

do
do

to

...

prepaid

do
do
do

do

Marseilles,
C%pe de Verde Islands, via England

33

...

via Marseilles

Mexico, (except Yucatan, Matamoras

60

45

...

...

French mail

do
do

Guatemala
German States, Prus. closed mail
(if

45

via

do

French mail

do

*15 *30
*21 *42
closed mail....
*30
do
when

Gambia, via England
Gaudaloupe, via England

*15
*30

do

Canada

*10

v

21
5
*30 *60
...

Mauritius, British mail, via South’pt’n
do

*28

Prussian

do

•

Bolivia

30

21

Martinique, via England

Frankfort, French mail

*21 *42
*40
*30 *60

64

...

mail..

mail, via Lond.
by American pkt
op. mail, via Brit, pkt

do
do

72

34

do
do

French

29

open

do

40

.

Islands, via England

France

5

(if

36

Hamb’g mail,

or

*15

...

Duchy, Hamburg

do

5

Frenchmail

Ecuador
Falkland

21

...

Freuch mail

do

*15

do

*27

open
American

packet
do
open mail, via London,
Biitish packet.
Belgrade, open mail, via London,
American packet
do
open mail, via London,
British packet'.
do
by French mail,
Beyrout Prussian closed mail,
prepaid, SSets)
do

28

...

*21 *42
*21 *42

closed mail, via

do

Malta, Island of,

or

by Br'n

Duchy, Bremen

Madeira, Island of, via England....
Majorca and Minorca, British mail...

68

via Trieste

60

*30
...

21

Hamb’g mail, via
Marseilles and Suez....

do

mail
Grand
mail

...

tC

Br’n

53

30

Belgium, French mail

*20
*27 *54

closed mail, via Trieste..

5

...

Bavaria, Prussian closed mail

do

*21 *42

Grand
.

(Eng. possessions,) Prus.

by

Duchy, French

mail..

do

r

*35

French mail

do

*21

prepaid
Hamb'g mail

45

..28

Grand

’

*30

pre-

paid..

10

England

Trir

when

.

i

*30
* 15

closed mail
Grand Duchy, Prussian
closed mail, when

do

do

*15

...

*21 *42

Luxumburg, Grand Duchy, Prussian

5

21
.
5
*15 *30

Indies, open mail, via London, by
American pack’t
do
open mail, via London, by
British packet
do
Prussia
closed mail, via

29

Marseilles,

or

do

French mail

*42

mail

...

Denmark, Prus. closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 33cts)
do
by Brem. or Hmb’g mail

33

closed mail, (if

do

10

French

Curacoa via

*21

Bahamas, by direct st’r from N. Y.
Batavia, British mail via Southamt’n

do

by Am. packet
Brit, packet
mail,.....*

East

28cts)

by Bremen

mail
do

63
60

prepaid, 40c)
by Bremen or Hamburg

21

London, by
...

49
45

30

do

packet

Costa Rica

*15

Azores Island, British mail via Por.
Baden, Prussian closed mail (if prep’d

do
mail

do
do

Lombardy, Prussian

*32

...

Cuba

Italy)Fell.mail....

do
French

Corsica, British

35
...

do
via Marseilles
French mail
Liberia, British mail

*40

or Hmb’g mail.
mail, via London, by

open mail, via
Brit, packet

Eng¬

Japan, British mail, via Southampton
do

*30 *60

Corfu—see lonoan Islands
6

Co.) *30 *60
Hamb’g mail

Bremen or Hamburg
French mail

do

British mail, via
land

do

by Br’n
open

do,

3

hampton

do
do

Nicaragu,
do

33

British mail, via Mars’ls 39 45
French mail
*30 *60
Pacific slope, via Panama
10
Gulf Coast of
34
...

Norway, Prus. closed mail, (if p’paid,
do
do

45

*38
*30 *60

French mail

60

.

Freuch mail

Am.

33

York or Boston
Fch. mail (S'th Austr’a
or

do
do
do

72

39

Prussian closed

do
40
30

*25

Marseilles...;..
mail,
(if prepaid, 36c)

Islands,

55

Hmb’g mail, via

or

*35

Hamburg

or

mail.

Ionian

by mail to San Fran., thence
by private ship
Constantinople, Prus. closed mail, (if
prepaid, 38c)

45
10

...

Marseilles

by Beera.

by Br’n

5

Frenchmail..
*27*54
Honduras...
35
Indian Archipelago, French mail....
30
60
do
British mail, via

45
63

do

60

...

mail via Trieste
Austria and its States, Prussian closed
mail
do
do
Prussian closed
ml. when prp’d
do
do by Brem. or
Hamb’g
mail
do
do (except
in
prov.

do
do

45

by private ship from New

do

do
do
do

mail via
Southampton
do
Marseilles
do Br’n or
Ilmb’g ml.
via Trieste

<-

London, by

do

33
45
34

«

open mail, via

paid, 83c)
by Bremen

do

60

39

5

*15 *30
..
33

•

Marseilles

Marseilles and Suez

Bordeaux

do

do
do

do

do
do
do

3

Arabia, British mail, via Southampton
do
do
Marseilles..,.
Argentine Republic, via England
do
via France, in French

do

do

hili

mail, via England,
by Am. pkt....
open mail, via England,

Ascension, via England
Aspinwall
Australia, British mail

by
•

cts.

British pkt..
Holstein, Prussian closed mail, (if pre¬

mail, via London, by

Southampton

by British pkt.
Algeria, French mail

Holland,

...

30

open

de

cts.

10
21

...

American packet
open mail, via London,

do

Not Not
Exc. Exc.
4 o. * o.

Countries.

cts.

5

,

mail
French

Sloop, via Panama

open

do

£o.

Alexandria, Prussian closed mail (if
prepaid 86c)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg

do
do

Ceylon,

cts.

Acapulco

do
do

C. Am. Pac.

Not Not
I^xc. Exc.

Aden, British Mail, via

Exc. Exc.
io. i 0.

Countries.

B5^"*The Asterisk (*) indicates that in

[August 26,1866.

42c)
by Bremen

*46
or

Hamb’g mail,

...

*38

French mail.
*38 *66
Nova Scotia—see Brit. N. American
Provs

Oldenburg, Prus. closed mail, (if pre¬
paid, 28c).. f........

*30

August 26,1865 ]

THE rgHRONICLE.

;■

287

r

Not Not

CtS.

Oldenburg, by Bremen

*13
*21 *42

.

French mail

do
Panama

Countries.

CtS.

Hamburg

or

mail

10

Paraguay, British mail, via England.

...

45

...

Peru

*22

do

mentioned:

By French mail, via

Austria.... 21 *42
Island...
:
'
19
Tuscany, Pr. cl’d mail (if prepaid, 40c.) \ *42
do
Frenchmail
^
*21 *42
Turk’s

30

paid, 85c.)....

*37

do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail. ... *29
do
by French mail
*30 *60
Porto Rico, British mail, via Havana.
34
...

Portugal, British mail, via England..
do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail
do
by French mail, via Behobia

33
30
21
30

60

Prussia, Prussian closed mail

do
do
do when prep.
..
28
do
by Bremen or Hamburg mail ... *16
do
Freuch mail
*21 *42
Rom. or Pap. States Prus. closed mail ...
44
do
do
Frenchmail.... *27 *54
do
do
Bremen or Ham¬

burg mail
Romagna, Prussian closed mail (if
prepaid, 40c.)
Russia, Prussian closed mail (if pre¬
paid, 35c.)
do
by Bremen or Hamb’g mail
do

Sandwich Islands,
Francisco

by Bremen or Ham¬
burg mail

West Indies, British.*
do
not British
do
do

by

do

Frenchmail

do

Bremen

*37
*29

AND

21

...

5
*21 *42

Hamb’g mail

...

do when pre,

...
...

28
*15

*21

*42

Authorized Capital

^

CALIFORNIA.

William Chir,

J

MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY from Pan¬
ama to San Francisco.

do

do

do

do

do French mail.. *21 *42

do
do
do

do

by Brem.

m.

French mail

Schleswig, by Brem.
do
do

Ham.

or

*30
28
*15

Ham. mail

closed

do
do

do
*

open m’l via Lon.
Brit, packet

do

21

by
5

by Bremen or Ham¬

Singapore, Brit, m’l, via Southampton.
do

do
via Marseilles
French mail

...

Spain, Brit mail, by Amer. packet.....
do
do
by British packet.
...

21
6

21

42

30

42

do French mail
do by Bremen or
Hamburg
St. Thomas, by U.S. pkt., to

mail.
Kingston,

Jamaica

..

Sweden, Prus. cl’d mail (if prep’d, 36c.)
do
by Bremen or Hamburg mail
do

French mail.

do

French mail.

Switzerl’d,Pr. cl’d mail (if prep’d, 33c.)
do
do
do

...

...

18
84

French mail

twenty-five per cent of the net
profits, without incurring any liability, or in lieu
thereof, at their option, a" liberal discount upon the
premium.
All losses equitably adjusted and promptly
paid.
Scrip Dividend declared Jan. 10, 1855,
FIFTY PER CENT.
JAMES LORIMER GRAHAM, President.
ROBERT M. C. GRAHAM, Vice President.
EDWARD A. STANSBURY, 2d N ice Pres.
John C. Goodkidge, Secretary.

*40
*33

OFFICE of the

...

...

33

FIRE AND INLAND

Snsitnntre

-

Prussian closed mail

By Bremen or Hamburg mail
Open mail, yia Lon., by Am. pkt
do
do
by Brit, pkt




WITHOUT COMPENSATION,

they provide for death, if caused by accident; but in
case of injury
only, the insured receives no compen¬
sation.

CASH
28

*82
...

21
5

granted
WITH

COMPENSATION,

the full amount assured is payable to tho
family in
case of death caused
by accident and occuring within
three months from the date of
injury. Or, in case of

injury causing disability, the insured receives

a weekly
business,
such time not to exceed
twenty-six weeks. The policy
covets all forms of
Dislocations, Broken Bones, Sprains,
Bruises, Cuts, Gunshot Wounds, Burns and Scalds,
Bites of Dogs, Assaults by Burglers, Robbers, or Mur¬
derers, the action of Lightning or Sun stroke, the effects
of Explosions. Floods, and Suffocation by
Drowning or
Clioaking, and all other kinds of accidents.

compensation until he is able

;

Cumpntuj,

to attend to his

general Accident Policy for
TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS,
Weekly Compensation of

with

a

TEN DOLLARS,

TRAVELERS’ INSURANCE TICKETS

New

...

if

for any length of time, from one day to twelve
months,
are on sale at the various Railroad and Steamboat
Tick¬
et Offices and Agencies.

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL
...

Ifissued

.(COLUMBIAN BUILDING,)

Turkey in Europe, and Turkish
cept as herein mentioned:

given in

1 Nassau Street.

6C

ex¬

grace

TEN DOLLARS

45

80

French mail

made; also, thirty days’

secures a

*35
*19

Policy

granted, covering accidents of all descriptions, in¬

*40

*19

All the profits in this

rata among the

A loan of one-third of the amount of pre¬

cluding the travelers’ risk.

*30 *60
*21 *42

by Bremen mail
by Hamburg mail
Syria, British mail, via Marseilles, by
French packet
Islands in the Mediterranean,

in Gold, Losses will be paid

*33 *66

„

Smyrna, Prus. cl’d mail (if prep’d,38c.)

do

...

via Havana

plan.
pro

GENERAL ACCIDENT POLICIES
are

by Fire.
are paid

divided

paymen t of premiums.

This Company insures, at
customary rates of pre¬
mium against all Marine and Inland
Navigation
Risks on Cargo or Freight; also against loss or dam¬

If Pi'emiums

the Mutual

are

miums will be

1.400,000

in Gold.
The Assured receive

60

on

All

payments.

$1,000,000

45

30

do

Cash Capital
Assets July 1, 1865

age

53

LIFE AND ENDOWMENT POLICIES
issued

policies to be incontestable after five
years from date, and non-forfeitablo after two annual

Broadway, New York.

22

burg mail....
do

No. 108

Low,

Jones, Superintendent of Agencies.
Folger, General Railway Agent.

Holders.

METROPOLITAN INSURANCE CO.,

*42

open m’l via Lon. by
Amer. packet

do

do

*35
47

*21

Frenchmail.

...

E. II.
E. F.

department

MARINE AND FIRE INSURANCE.

A. A.

ASHER S. MILLS,
Secretary.
T. B. VaN BIT REN, Treasurer.
S. Teats, M.D., Medical Examiner.

Y.

(if

Sicilies, The Two, Prus. closed mail.

Dimmick,

EDWARD A. JONES, President.
WM. E. PRINCE, Vice-President.

are

*27 *54
mail

O.

Henry Clews,
Chas. Curtiss,
Albert Wright,
Asher S. Mills,
John A. Isklin,
Wm. H. Webb,
H. P. Freeman,
Henry J. Raymond,
Nfgiioi.as E.'Smith,
Silas C. Herring,
James It. Dow,
Samuel W. Truslow,
Richard A. McCurdy.

B. ALLEN,

General Agent of the Line,
No. 5 Bowling Green,4N.

*25

prepaid, 83c.)
do
do

D

*21 *42

Frenchmail...,
Prussian

...
...

m
when pre.

or

..

...

Aspinwall, by Railroad of the PANAMA

RAILROAD COMPANY from Aspinwall to

Panama, and by Steamers of the PACIFIC

when pre.
do Brem. or Ham¬

do

By the steamers of the ATLANTIC MATL
STEAMSHIP COMPANY from New York
to

Orison Blunt,
Howkll Smith,
F. H. Lummus,
Wm. E Pkinck,
Sylvester Teats,
JosKPn Wilde,

n

Glassky,
Buren,
Sylvester. M. Bkard,
Hob# rt Crowley,

*30
28

do

do
do
do

$500,000

Sa.mux l J.
T. B. Van

*16

...

do

Saxony, King, of, Prus. cl’d

.OFFICK, 243 BROADWAY.

TO

*23

by Bre. or Ham. mail

burg mail..

OF NEW YORK.

*15

...

•..

-

Travelers’ Insurance Co.

U B. Mail Line

*42

...

French mail

LIFE

DIRECTORS:

Frenchmail...... *21 *42

Saxe-Coburg-Gotba, Meiuingen and
Weimar, Pr. cl’d m.

GRINHELL, Pres't.
ANTHONY, Vice-Pres't
Walker, Secy.

Isaac H.

OCEAN STEAMSHIPS.

Savoy, District of
*15 *30
Saxe- Altenburg, Prussian closed mail
*30
do
do
do

$2,383,487 45

MOSES IL

NATIONAL

open mail, via Lon.,
in British packet
or

-

EDWARD P.

*15

do
when pre..
open mail, via 1 on.,
in American
packet.

by

-

Company insures against Marine Risks on
Vessels, Freight, and Cargo;
also, against Inland
Navigation Risks.
Premiums paid in gold will be entitled to a return
premium in gold.

(except Cuba)

do

-

This

Wurtemburg, Pr. cl’d mail

Sardinian States, Prus. cl’d mail (if

Ham. mail

ASSETS,Oct. 4, 1864

ampton

3

or

*30
*27 *54

Venezuela, British mail, via South¬

by mail to San

Brem.

60

prepaid, 28c.)

Frenchmail

WALL STREET*

DIVIDEND THIRTY PER CENT.

45

80

...

*80 *60

prepaid, 40c.)...

49

^

39

..

.

do
do

33

...

British mail, via
Marseilles
,B
do
French mail
Venetian States, Prus. closed mail (if
do
do

(INSURANCE BUILDINGS,)

60

45

Southampton.

do

*42

?

do
do

30

British mail, via England
Yan Diemen’s Land, British
mail, via

*28

French mail

COMPANY.

*28

...

do

45

*30

111 it tit aI Smutranrt

.....

42
42

do via Bord’x & Lis.

•

...

from Bordeaux*"/

63
60

...

Poland, Prussian closed mail (if pre¬

do

as

by Bremen or Hamburg mail
Uruguay, via France, by French mail

45

....

do

Turkey in Europe, cities of except
herein

British

Marseilles,...
French

c.
cts.

do

Southampton
mail, via

do

SUN

k

.

Philippine Islands, British mail, via
do

Not
Exc.

Jr

Countries.

York, July 1st, 1805.
-

-

-

$5,000,000.00

CAPITAL, paid in, & Surplus, 8S5,040.57

Policies of Insurance
against loss or
on the most favorable rrVi>\<‘

issued

B. C.

Wm. M. Whitney

,

damage by Fire

MORRIS, Pres't.
Secy,

MARINE RISKS AND SPECIAL VOYAGES.
Policies are granted insuring against death
by acci¬
dent while sailing.in steamer or
sailing vessels; also
for special voyages.
Full information, together with Tables of
Rates, &c.,
can be obtained at the Home
Office, or by application
to tho State Agent,

288
Government Agency, and Designated
Deposi- i
tory of the United States.
JOSEPH U. ORYI3, Pres’t.

;

i

City of New York,

BROADWAY, CORNER

OF FRANKLIN ST.

Terms for Banks and Bankers Accounts

Are

in

Interest allowed

not

your

The

paid

Capital of this Bank
DOLLARS, with a large surplus,
up

J. TJ.
J. T.
New

tion of

by writing to the

undersigned.

is ONE MILLION

and

Drafts and attend to other business with Goveminent.

P. C.

CAPITAL....

Certificates.

Government Vouchers

CALHOUN, President.

(

f

No. 6

WALL

J. W.

Agents

STREEP,

AT BEST

ON

ALL

per

cent

DEPOSITS, Subject to Check

Sight.

H.

.

J.

BANKER,
BROADWAY,

139

Seven-thirty Loan Agent
.

Gold Bonds and Stocks of all

and sold

on

TOR3EY, Cashier.

LEWIS &
JOSEPH

J.

LKWIS,

ceived

on

a

AMERICAN
No. 5 RUE

DE

C O.,

BANKERS,
LA

PAIX, PARIS,

and

No. 8 WALL

STREET, NEW YORK,

Issue Circular Letters of Credit for
Travelers in all
parts of Europe, etc., etc. Also Commercial Credits.

own.

IRISn LINENS AND LINEN
GOODS,
credit of four months, for
approved endorsed
Paper, for all sums of $100 and upward.

Box No.

5,660.

GERMAN AND ENGLISH HOSIERY AND
HO¬
SIERY GOODS.
Catalogue and samples on the morning of sale.

Judge Lewis’ experience as Commissioner of Inter¬
Revenue, and uharlton T. Lewis’ experience as
Deputy Commissioner, will be a guarantee of thorough

revenue laws.
Mr. Cox’s connection with the
Committee of
Affairs in Congress, and his

long

Francis & Loutrel,

OF

credit of four months, for
approved indorsed
notes, for all sums over $100.
on

THURSDAY, August 31,
10 o'clock, at the
salesroom,

a

LANE,

STATIONERS, STEAM PRINTERS,

the morning of sale.

At
credit of four months, approved indorsed
for all sums of $100 and
upwards.
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS,

On

45 MAIDEN

RIBBONS, MILLI¬

NERY, SILKS, VELVETS, &c..

Catalogues aud samples

Foreip

membership of the
National Legislature, insure a
thorough knowledge of
legislation and practice in the departments.

WEDNESDAY", August 30,

a

Espe¬

nal

At 10 o'clock, at the salesrooms.
LARGE AND ATTRACTIVE SALE

ETIENNE AND BASLE

Washington.

Internal Revenue business, and
foreign governments, as well as onr

acquaintance with the

OF

On

&

BROADWAY, P. O.

cial attention given to
to claims
against

ALSO,

ST.

MUNROE

g. S. COX

Attend to all business in the courts of
the United
States, and in the Departments at

TUESDAY, August 29,

LARGE AND ATTRACTIVE SALE

re¬

favorable terms.

JOHN




On

descriptions bought

Banks, Bankers, and individuals

COX,

CHARLTON T. LEWIS,

COUNSELLORS AT LAW,

of

commission.

Accounts of

Fare to

From Camden, take the West
Jersey Railroad for
Cape May and all parts of West Jersey.

liberal

At 10 o’clock, at the
salesrooms,
LARGE AND SPECIAL SALE

MESSENGER,
No.

and Tom's River.

NEW YORK CITY.

at*

RAILWAY STOCKS, RONDS, and other
Securities bought and sold at
Brokers’Board, at
the usual Commission.

m.,

daily, at 10:45 a. m. for Camden direct,
through
Fare, $2. Excursion tickets, good for

Stores Nos. 87 and 89 LEONARD Street.

allowed

a.

in five hours.
three days, $3.

No. 132

FOUR

CAMDEN,

Long
Branch, $1.
The splendid steamer JESSE
HOYT will leave as
above

By Kobbe & Corlies,

RATES, AT THE COUNTER.

TO

N. R., Daily, at 10:45

Bergen, Manchester

EDWARD L. CORLIES, Auctioneer.

Buy and Sell Government Securities and Specie.

SIJMMEB

connecting with trains for Red Bank, Long
Branch,
Manchester, Tom’s River, Barnegat and
and 4:15 p. m. for
Highlands, Middletown.Tuckerton;
Red Bank,
Shrewsbury, Eatontown, Ocean Port,
Long Branch, Shark River, Farmingdale, Branchport,
Squanmum,

PHILADELPHIA,' PENN.,
on

PLEASANT
TRAVEL.

NEW YORK

BANK,

terms.

And Government Doan

AND

From Pier 3,

Capital.

Attends to business of Banks and Banke
finess
Bankers

STREET,

STAIRS,

RARITAN AND DELAWARE BAY
RAILROAD.

1 $500,000

THE CORN EXCHANGE NATIONAL

READE

NEW YORK.

i

REED,

63

$2,000,000 | SURPLUS.... $1,200,000

A. G-. CATTELL, Pres’t.
/
A. WHILLDIN, V. Pres’t.

ST.,

NEW YORK.

UT

This Bank will issue Certificates of
Deposit bear¬
ing interest on favorable terms.
J. L. WORTH, Cashier.
New York, August, 21,1805.

B. Seaman. Cashier.

T. L. TAYLOR &

REMOVED TO G3 LEONARD

No,

OF NEW YORK.

!

We also collect

j

SEYMOUR & LACY,
Manufacturers of Ruches and
Nett Goods.

'THE NATIONAL PARK BANK
JL

529 Bonds.
1 Year

days'

Shawls, Dress Goods, & Scarfs,

CHEAP

Also,United States 10-49 Bonds.

Vice-President.
KAHL, Secretary.

E.

IMPORTERS OF

Bank, N. Y.
James Buell. Pres.
Imp. & Trad. Nat'l B'k, N. Y.
S. K. Green, Pres. 3d-av.
Savings Bank. N. Y.
V. L. Buxton. Irving
Savings Bank, N. Y.
Hon. George Op dyke,
Ex-Mayor, N. Y.
Hon. James Harper. Ex-Mayor,
N. Y.

Convertible, at Maturity, into
PER CENT.
GOLD-BEARING BONDS.

Do.

on ten

GARPJGUE,

GUITERMAN BROTHERS,

BROADWAY,

S. C. Thompson, Pres. 1st National
Bank. N. Y.
A. N. Stout, Pres. Nat'l Shoe &
Leath B'k, N. Y.
W. H. Johnson, President Hanover

DELIVERY,

U-S-7 3-ioTreasuryNotes

Do.

President.

of

quick dispatch.
Government and other securities bought
and sold.
Possessing every facility, will execute all orders
and commissions at the
very best market rates.
Refer by permission to

DEPOSITARY AND FINANCIAL AGENT OF
THE UNITED STATES,

surplus.

HILGER,

RUDOLPH
JOHN

notice, and
interest allowed the same as
deposits on call.
Collections promptly made and returned with

City of New York,
27 and 29 Pine Street.

6

MAURICE

>

Interest allowed on call
deposits at the rate of four
per cent; on deposits of three months and
over, five
per cent, and six per cent on deposits of six months j
i
and over.

*Any deposit maybe drawn

$500,000,

FIRE, ON FAVORABLE TERMS,

|

LUCKEY,
243

of the

FOR

abroad.

Dividends, Drafts, &c.
J. NELSCN

FOURTH NATIONAL BANK

SALE, READY

with: a Lmm

c

York, July 22, 1805.

FOR

CAPITAL,

THIS COMPANY INSURES PROPERTY OF ALL
KINDS AGAINST LOSS OR DAMAGE BY

on.

ORVIS, President.

Y.

use.

Banking and Collecting Office

HILL, Cashier.

HAVE

CASH

Deposits, subject to
Cheques at sight.
Prompt attention given to the Collec¬

less than SI,000. per
Express,
at market rates, and
bags of $50 1 cent and 2 cent,
and $30 3 cent coin, free of
charge.
The above is in
reply to numerous inquiries for
terms. Any further information
sums

London,

purchasers; and also to j
Circular Letters of Credit, on this

^Orders for Securities executed

so.

Bank, in

suit

STREET, N.

!

Government Securities, Stocks and
Bonds bought and sold on Commission.

rates..

at

to

Bank, for Travellers’

The United States 5 per
cent., one year, and two
Coupon Notes, received on de¬
posit from regular dealers, or those choosing to be¬
come

Fractional Currency,

sums

issue

year, and two year

new

No. 4 WALL

to

Union Bank of

4 S3 ct. disc’ll t
do
do
do
100
4%
do
do
do
do
1,000
4%
do
All classes of Government Securities
bought and
sold.
Redeems for National Banks, at
present, without
charge, using the Bills for the Army.
Receives National Currency at par,
put to credit ol
any Bank, or pays Sight Drafts for it.

Will deliver

prepared

draw Sterling Bills of
Exchange, at sight, or sixty days, on the

Revenue Stamps supplied—$-20 with

| ,7-30 Notes bought and sold at markets

INSURANCE CO.

NEW YORK,

j

Takes New England
money at 1-10 and New York
State 3sf per cent, discount.
Checks on Albany,
Troy, Boston, Philadelphia,
and Baltimore at par.
Interest collected, aud credited in Gold or
Curren¬
cy as directed.

FIRE

WALL STREET,

35

|

:

6MMJLMA

Bankers,

'

of the

[August 26, 1866.

L. P. Morton & Co.,

JOHN T. HILL, Cash’r

iii,
NINTH NATIONAL BANK
m

■y ■

THE CHRONICLE.

LITHOGRAPHERS AND
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS.

notes,

TAILOR¬
ING, and GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS, &c.
Catalogues and samples on the morning of sale.

"

All kinds of
Stationery, Paper and Account
Books for Business, Professional and Private use.
Orders solicited.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102