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pnanrjal
nmmerfia
Supplement

Quotation

(Monw.i y
)

Investors Supplement (Quarterly)

SfreeLRailwaij5uppIement
State and City

[Entered according to Act of Congress, In the year 1900, by the William B.

VOL

SATURDAY, AUGUST

71.

Clearings

. .

.

London Agents:
Messrs. Edwards <fc Smith, 1 Drapers' Gardens, E. 0., will take subscriptions and advertisements, and supply single copies of the paper
at Is. each.

B.

DANA COMPANY,

Publishers,

Pine Street, Corner of Pearl Street,
Box 958.
new

YORK.

at—

New York
Philadelphia
Pittsburg

Baltimore
Buffalo

Washington
Albany
Rochester
Syracuse
Scranton

Wilmington
Bingham ton
Total Middle
Boston
Providence
Hartford

New Haven
Springfield

Worcester
Portland
Pall River
Lowell
New Bedford
Total New Eng..
Chicago
Cincinnati
Detroit

Cleveland

Columbus
Indianapolis

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.

Peoria
Toledo

The following table, made up by telegraph, etc., indicates Orand Rapids
Dayton
that the total bank clearings of all the clearing houses of the Evansvllle
Youngstown
United States for the week ending to-day, August 11, have Springfield, 111
Lexington
been $1,299,940,556, against $1,386,838,243 last week and Akron
Kalamazoo
Saginaw
Rockford

corresponding week of last year.

Springfield, Ohio..

CLEARINGS.
Returns by Telegraph.

Week Ending August
1900.

Canton

11.

1899

P. Cent

Jacksonville, 111...
Tot. Mid. West'n

San Francisco

New York

$556,373,485
81,231,410

$785,388,923
98,610,425

58,905.791

67,852,766

14.266,978
98.859,378
25.317,816

Boston.
Philadelphia
Baltimore
Chicago
St. Loui s
New Orleans

97,394,575

14 387,689

Lake

-24-3

Salt

-1T5

Portland
Los Angeles

-18-2
-0-9

+10
-49

City

Seattle

Spokane

Tacoma

+14-6

Helena
Fargo
Sioux Falls

$1,045,070,197
180,271,468

-19 6

Kansas City

+59

Minneapolis

$1,030,968,070

$1,225,341,660

-15-9

St.

208,972,486

255,672,617

-18 3

$1,339 910 556

$1,481,014,277

-16-3

5,500.000

26,631,935
4,800,889

$839,953,633
191,011,237

Total Pacific

8even
Other

cities,

Total

all cities,

All cities, 1

Total

days
6 days

cities, 6

6

days

day

all cities

for week..

Omaha
Paul
Denver
St. Joseph
Des Moines
DavenportSioux City

Topeka

'

'

NO. 1838.

il, 1900.

Milwaukee.

$1,481,014,277 the

In the office of the Librarian of Congress.]

The full details of clearings for the week covered by the
above statement will be given next Saturday. We cannot,
of course, furnish them to-day, bank clearings being made
up by the various clearing houses at noon on Saturday, and
hence in the above the last twenty-four hours of the week
have to be in all cases estimated, as we go to press Friday night.
We present below our usual detailed figures for the previous week, covering the returns for the period ending with
Saturday noon, August 4. and the results for the corresponding week in 1899, 1898 and 1897 are also given. In
comparison with the preceding week there is an increase
in the aggregate exchanges of seventy million dollars,
the gain at New York being twenty-nine millions.
Contrasted with the week of 1899 the total for the
whole country shows a decline of 15*0 per cent. Compared with the iveek of 1898 the current returns record
a gain of 282 per cent, and the excess over 1897 is 17*2
per cent. Outside of New York the increase over 1899 is 0-6
percent. The excess over 1898 reaches 38*5 per cent, and
making comparison with 1897 the gain is seen to be 29*6 p. c.

Wichita

Fremont
Hastings
Tot. other West.
St. Louis

New

Orleans

Louisville

Galveston

Houston
Savannah
Richmond

Memphis
Atlanta
Nashville
Norfolk

Augusta
Knoxville
Fort Worth

Birmingham

Macon
Little Rock
Chattanooga
Jacksonville
Total Southern..
Total all

Outside N. York.
Montreal
Toronto
Winnipeg
Halifax
Hamilton
St.

John

Victoria

Vancouver
Total Canada

4.

1900.
1900.

Terms of Subscription— Payable in Adrance:
For One Year
$10 00
6 00
For Six Months
13 00
European Subscription (including postage)
7 50
European Subscription Six Months (including postage)
£2 14 s.
Annual Subscription in London (including postage)
ao.
do.
Al lis.
SixMos.
do.
Above subscription includes—
Street Railway Supplement
The Quotation Supplement
State and City Supplement
The Investors* Supplement
Terms of Advertising—(Per Inch Space.)
Transient matter
$4 20 Three Months (13 times) $29 00
"
Six Months
STANDING business cards.
(26
).. 50 00
" ).. 87 00
Two Months
(8 times) . 22 00 Twelve Months (52

WILLIAM

Supplement (^w^

Wetk ending August

3?feje (Khvouitlz.
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.

Post Office

Dana Company,

(tanhmatf

1899.

782,061.789 1,029,869,475
88.447,837
85,807.866
31,516,335
25,639,491
19,641,220
17,475,827
5,057,317
4,441,290
2,405.355
2.201,982
2,570,666
2,350,052
2,079,889
1,860,706
1,038,603
1,151,973
1,243,263
1,060,677
980,664
959,065
172,900
421,300
935,510,349 1,173,212 208
109,900,232
126,608.349
5,539,100
8,411,200
2,352,229
2,680,520
1,315,003
1,632,152
1,800,717
1,448,533
1,113,627
1,217,255
1,019,607
1,606,180
666,851
735,187
498,840
400,421
3?6,266
438,175
124,069,975
143,078,272
125,794,693
123,566,478
13,944,200
14,172,850
8,827,370
8,631,704
11,068,994
10,706,826
5,710,400
4,892,737
4,964,700
4,408,200
3,080,651
2.518.514
1,774,291
1,839.152
2,401,674
2.423,057
1,095,276
1,016,017
1.027.998
992,822
648,e46
739,423
217,502
286,325
450,645
396.677
507,203
383,437
460,000
344,100
320,000
302.400

Publication suspended.
221.568
266,415
271,176
163,294

239,354
265,349
268,952
118,188

183,238,698

178,556.22(3

21,271,555
1,863,290
1,655,672
2.101.158
2.570.980
910,949
1,049,669
791,751
240,703
146.102

18.521.552
2,359,590
1,392,701
1.779,458
8,406,064
1.214,174
1,067,290
717,711
249,609
161,156

32 601.829

30,868,308
11,620.012
8,581,146
5,552,156
3.976.634
3,254.4 IS
3,680,282
1,254,858
1,016,696
705,076
486.677
472.181
104,142
109.766

18,985,981
9,007,075
6,678,682
4 675,647
4,713,890
3,742.821
1,327,116
1,088,870
770,000
837,785
486,516
116,871
173,979

46,604 682
28,457 887
6,950,234
8,452,319
2,318.000
2,425.000
3.400,000
3,169,014
1.663,317
1,292,362

.

729,236
644,000
323,167
400,000
193 301

-24.-1

+08
+22

9

+124
+139
+91
-10

2

+172

+22

+121
-20-3

-132
—18-6
-12-2
-19-4

—102
-8 5
-304
-9-4

+24-1
-23-3

-133

+18
-1-6
+28
+3-3

+167
+12-6

+22 3

-3-5
—0-8
+7 8

+3 5
-123
-13-6

+138
+32-3

+337
+5*8

-75
+0-02
+0 8

+09
+2 6

+14-8

—210
+18

9

+181

—24-6

-25
-1-7

+10 3

-3-6
-9*3

-5 6
+20-3

+50
+28
+17-6
+44'8
+4-5
+5*8

+7

1

+9-2
+72-1

+3
+11*6
+68-4

1,036,449;

8£31.22b
1,900.847
1.777,534

724,204
765,439
653.557
1,000.000
28.270,636

716,951,987
59,376,734
18,736,813
18,235,528
4,394,116
1,885.667

1,868,273
1,014,080
8CO,447
664.0/0
350.300

1,629.6*84

852,051,547
102.103.640
4.444,800
2,402,596
1,427,931
1,427,162
1,537,410

824,128,673
103,715,447
4,565,500
2,348,928
1,699,667
1,182.615
1,495,604
1,457,333
774,811
672,154
426,406

1,533,451

582.627
657,022
518,963
116,615,602
92,329,342
11,691,650
7,384,235
8,020.588
4,332.462
3,600,000
3,740,120
1,462,955
1,991.363
874,310
745,493
626,176
298,113
300,000
183,982
443,400
263,534

147,888
183,425
182,609

1,018,631
723,904
788,709

387,000

117,328,465
94,843,411
11,471,050
6,931,865
6,028,523
4,515,970
3,698, ICO
2,387,962
1,611,210
2.193.860
826,734
688,085

172.907

880 727
231.000
800,246
137.U84

162334
167.772

138,101,629
13.855,013
1,808,844
1,557,442
1,873,996
1,100,852
757,874
700,000
545,132
175.000
98,570

186 647,730

21,972,722
10,654,181
5,997,242
6,674,425
8,585.304

20.966,451

2,973,214
2.785,542
1.039,316
1,058,316

605.775
472,744
393.246
74,162
97,812

2 ,692,400
2 067,857
1 792,953
2 697,120
1 142,417
1 080.766
1 230,711
832,940

442.446
462,453
674.898
854.919
339,000
242,546
356,261
202.596

14.279,262
1.649,753
1,216,620
1,800 323
875.0C0
769.520
489,882
400,000
72,173
55,118
9,432,815
6,222,732
4,651,321
2,979.716
2,653,811
1,223,081
1,000,000
764,815
473,350
447,598
389,063
82.639
108.217
30.323.337

25,267,659
6,139,657
7,267.506
1,903.050
2,869.580
1,483,366
2.281.417
1.818.188
1.081,104
1,112 856
863.978
424,288
408.642
574.536

296 489
488,000
320,361

800 235
177 316

63.867,027
51 ,272.165
1,081 ,291.641 1,183,281.684

1,383.838,242 1.6 30,915,238

604.776,453
12,613 329

1897.

741,158,278
85,829,572
18,741,693
16,040,628
3,710,194
1,873,737

35 409.3581
24 ,363.458
6 401,215
7 004,192

64.458,262

1,217.153
1,162,719
718,090
450.182

1898.

+9-4

+1V8

40,718,967
3l.R92.980
5.916.767
8,177.579
2.436.450
3.419.074
2.089,869
3,127.875
1,413 492
1.367.925
1,294.156
1,101,580
719,308
555.070
805,169
524,180
420,000
262,838
817.052
145.408

64 812,709

P. Cent.

466,809.746

601,046.788
14 034.882
8.845 509
1.787,693

436 ,763.304
12 .500.000

1,480,000!
747.178i

1 ,552,742
675,000
681,345

1,553,354
1.626,678
668.469
696,401

24 667.167

22.786.466

7 ,704,665
1 ,550,415

675.233
522.015
1,005.726

29 098.238

-2-8

11,855 666

6686.808

THE CHRONICLE

258

Wednesday

[Vol. LX2I.

move hence

London, $3,211,328 14
going forward on that day; on Thursday there was an
THE FINANCIAL SITUATION.
An event of the week has been Mr. Bryan's speech export of $2,103.09115 to Paris; Friday there were withat Indianapolis on being officially notified of his drawals for shipment to London to-day of $3,325,099 45,
nomination. His remarks were chiefly noteworthy making total exports for the week $8,639,518 74.
to

to

what he omitted to speak about rather than for
The present era of prosperity in the railroad induswhat he did say. It was of course impossible for
what he calls Im- try is distinguished for nothing so much as for the
him to utter anything new about
perialism, to which subject he confined himself; all conservatism displayed in the matter of the distribution of dividends.
There have been many cases of
sides of that subject have been so thoroughly dis

for

cussed that his address, as a whole, seems quite
We are sorry— not for ourlabored and tame.
he should not have
that
selves but for him

—

new

or enlarged

dividends, but the action in practi-

cally every cas8has

only a very

been marked by great moderation,

small portion

of

the increased profits

what he pro- actually available being used for this purpose. As a
given the public even a
posed to do about silver. He knows that every result, our leading railroad properties are being raised
one who hears the name of Bryan in connection to a position of strength, security and efficiency,
with the Presidency immediately thinks of free silver where they will be better prepared to pass through
Yet all he tells an ex- a period of adversity, should it unfortunately
coinage on the 16-to-l basis.
pectant public is that if elected, as soon as inaugurated come,
than at
any previous period in the
Congress to declare the country's history.
In another article we review
he will call an extra session of
Nation's policy as tc— what? The Philippine Islands
the annual report of the Chicago & North Western
Keeping wholly in the dark his silver policy by omit Railway Company, and show that while of the enting to utter one single word on the subject. We say larged profits only $391,124 was paid out in extra
we are sorry, and we are so because such a performance dividends no less than $4,542,041 was appropriated
does not comport with the reputation he has held of for the acquisition of new equipment, second track,
The Reading
being a frank, honest man holding queer views to be sidings, buildings and real estate.
sure, but having none of the quirks of a pettifogger Company, in its action this week on the dividend on the 1st preferred stock, also gives
or the misleading ways of a trimmer.
Dividends on this
evidence of the same policy.
been stock were begun last March, a semi-annual payThe most prominent transaction this week has
Some
the prompt closing on Tuesday, within half an hour ment of 1£ per cent being then made.
of their opening, of the subscriptions, both at the parties had looked for 2 per cent in September,
Bank of England and at the banking offices in this but the managers have decided to continue payment
country of J. P. Morgan & Co., Baring, Magoun & at the old rate, thus placing the stock on a 3 per cent
The action is
Co., Kidder, Peabody & Co. and Drexel & Co., for the basis, instead of the full 4 per cent.
Exchequer generally commended as in line with the policy, so
£10,000,000 3 per cent three-year British
bonds. It is noteworthy that the subscriptions to widely being adopted by other important systems, of
these bonds by Americans were about $55,000,000, reserving a portion of profits to put back into the
or in excess of the whole issue, and that re- property. The Reading figures for the full fiscal year
quests for nearly this amount were received on to June 30 1900 are not yet available, but the
Monday ; belated applications, received after the monthly returns show that for the eleven months to
closing of the subscriptions, would, if added, have May 31 the surplus above charges had increased
On Wednesday $1,050,723, as compared with the corresponding eleven
greatly increased the aggregate sum.
it was announced that $28,000,000 of the bonds had
months of the previous fiscal year.
been awarded to American subscribers by the advice
Another illustration of the prevailing disposition in
of the Bank of England to the Chancellor of the Ex
the particular mentioned, is furnished in the step
chequer, thus accepting the offer made to the Chan- contemplated by the new managers of the Iowa Central.
cellor by .J. S. Morgan & Co. and the Barings early This road, as the reader knows, is now controlled by
The Bank pointed out that this was an the same interests as the Minneapolis & St. Louis. The
last week.
easy and a natural way to bring gold into England and Iowa Central has latterly been paying 3 per cent diviIt is understood it has
save exports to the United States in October. dends on its preferred shares.
Bank rate might have to be now been decided to discontinue dividends and to
the
Otherwise
or 6 per cent and extraordinary meas- apply the money to the purchase of new equipment.
raised to 5
ures be taken to increase the gold reserve. Among the Action is to be taken next Monday. It is stated that at
largest subscribers to the loan were insurance com
present the company is paying mileage on many cars
panies and other institutions who sought the bonds and is borrowing locomotives; that if new rolling stock
A three- year 3 per cent bond at 98 acquired were charged to maintenance of equipment
for investment.
yield about 3*70 per cent.
The transaction was the preferred dividend would not be fully earned, and
would
advantageous to the British Government not only for that, it is thought, the best way to make dividends
but also because it permanent is not to undertake to pay them until the
the reasons above noted,
placed a large amount of gold at its immediate road is in first-class, up-to-date condition.
disposal through agreement with the Morgans and the
The dividends declared the present week on the
the joint takers. At the same time the preferred stock of the Kansas City Fort Scott &
Barings,
Bank of England, with a view to encourage the move- Memphis Railroad and on the income bonds of the
ment of gold hence to London, concurrently with the Kansas City Memphis & Birmingham also belong in
acceptance of the American subscriptions offered to much the same category. In these inslances the balmake advances on gold at 3 per cent interest while it ances remaining are of course not so striking, the
was in transit. In response to this offer, and also be- roads being comparatively small ones. It is worth
cause of the above-noted agree ment, gold began on noting, though, how gradual the increase in these
hint

of

!

—

August

11

,

THE CHRONICLE.

1900.J

dividends has been, the rate being enlarged only
slowly as growth of revenues warranted the step.

Thus while the Memphis & Birmingham incomes

are

minimum

259

discount from 3 to 4 per cent.
The statement of the New York Associated Banks last
week showed an increase of $3,269,100 in cash, of
which $2,188,900 consisted of specie and $1,080,200 in
its

rate of

to receive 5 per cent in September, being the full
amount to which they are entitled, in 1899 these legal tenders. The loans were increased $2,596,200
same bonds received only 3 per cent, in 1898 only 2£ and the deposits were augmented $6,640,800, while
per cent and in 1897 but 2 per cent. In the case of the surplus reserve rose $1,608,900, to $39,144,875, or
the Kansas City Fort Scott & Memphis dividends on within $1,726,400 of the highest of the year. The
the preferred shares were suspended from 1893 up to specie and legal tenders are now at the maximum of
February last, when 5 per cent was paid out of the the year, while the deposits are within $1,287,700 of
earnings of the calendar year 1899. Now a dividend the highest. The applications for the exchange of
of 4 per cent is made payable "from the net earnings fundable bonds for the new 2 per cents amounted at
of the first six months of the calendar year 1900/' the close of business on Thursday to $325,592,750.
The report for the twelve months ending June 30 The Canadian Bank of Commerce has this week reshows that $100,000 was appropriated out of earnings ceived $450,000, the proceeds of Klondike gold deposited for their account at Seattle and at San Franfor improvements.
cisco, and the Bank of British North America has reThe report of the Agricultural Bureau at Washing- ceived $200,000 from this source. In addition to

ton on the condition of the country's crops on the 1st

these

movements from the

Pacific Coast the Sub-

August is somewhat of a disappointment in failing Treasury has cashed $2,700,000, representing the proto show the decided improvement expected over the ceeds of the gold which recently arrived at San Fran
previous month as the result of the better weather cisco from Sydney, N. S. W.
of

In this it is quite
daring July.
Money on call, representing bankers' balances, was
at variance with the tenor of private advices
In the not in the least disturbed this week by the current
change.
the
regarding the effects of
case of both spring wheat and cotton very much and the prospective exports of gold to Europe. Until
higher averages than the previous month were looked Thursday loans were uniformly made at 1£ V eT cen ^
for.
The Bureau makes only very slight differences and at 1^ per cent. On the above-named day and on
in favor of either for August, reporting spring wheat Friday the transactions were at 1£ per cent and at 1
76 '0, against 75 -8. per cent. The average for the week has been a frac56-4, against 55*2, and cotton
As concerns cotton there is, of course, still time for tion over 1^ per cent. Banks and trust companies
improvement, but in the case of spring wheat the generally maintain \\ per cent as the minimum.
damage done can not be repaired, as the crop is now There is a fair demand for time money, though almost
Outside of spring wholly for long dates, and some of the down-town
in process of being harvested.
wheat the figures show nothing discouraging in the banks have loaned at 4 per cent for four months.
situation.
The winter-wheat yield the present year, Quotations are 3 per cent for sixty days, 3£ per cent
so frequently pointed out in these for ninety days, 4 per cent for four and 4@4£ percent
as we have
than for five to six months on good mixed Stock Exchange
columns,
heavier
has
been very much
last
year,
the
harvest
in
Kansas and the collateral. The movement in commercial paper is
Southwest being of phenomenal extent and the quite slow, although some business is daily reported
increase here will go a great way towards offset
by dealers. It is, however, chiefly with out of-town
ting the shortage in spring wheat, so that the total near-by institutions. The supply is moderate and rates
wheat crop is certain to be a good average.
are firm at 4@4£ per cent for sixty to ninety day endorsed
The most important grain crop of all is corn. Here bills receivable, 4£@5 per cent for prime and 5£@6 per
there is as yet no cause for uneasiness. Very natur- cent for good four to six months single names.
ally much will depend upon the weather the present
month. If the situation in that particular should be
The successes which were reported last week in
adverse, propects might be seriously impaired.
Thus South Africa were this week followed by an unimportfar, however,
the promise remains good.
The ant reverse, the British garrison of Elands River,
Bureau makes the average
for
crop 2 consisting of about three hundred bushmen and
this
points lower than for July 1; but even at that Ehodesians, having been captured by the Boers.
A
figure
the
condition
being conspiracy to capture Gen. Roberts at Pretoria is
continues
high,
87*5,
which
89-9
compares
August reported to have been discovered. The allied army
with
in
of last year, but with 87
and 84-2, respectively, in China on Sunday engaged a superior force of
in 1898 and 1897.
The deterioration has been mainly Chinese at Peitsang and after a severe battle, attended
in Kansas, where there has been a drop from 93 to with a loss of 1,200 of the Allies, the Chinese were
71.
In the Middle Western States the averages are defeated, and retreated. On Monday, Yangtsun, at
very high— Illinois 96, and Indiana and Ohio both the junction of the Pei-Ho and the railroad leading
98.
In Missouri the condition is 99; in Iowa, 105. to Pekin, was captured by the Allies. Apparently
experienced

#

.

We

give

the

averages

in detail for the

different

the legations at Pekin are

still safe,

though the

of-

States in comparison with the previous month and fensive demonstrations by the Chinese Imperial troops
with previous years on page 301. The oats crop is continue. This has caused the presentation of a dealso certain to be large, the average of condition for mand by the American Government that the firing on
the whole country being reported 85*0, against 90*8 the legations shall cease and that the Imperial Governlast year and 84-2 in 1898.
ment shall co-operate with the relieving column.

The Bank

of

England minimum

rate of discount re-

There has been no change this week in the official mains unchanged at 4 per cent. The cable reports
rate of discount by any of the European banks.
The discounts of sixty to ninety day bank bills in London
Bank of Bengal at Calcutta has, however, advanced 4£ per cent. The open market rate at Paris is 2f per

.

:

.
.

.

THE CHRONICLE.

260

[YOL. LXil,

cent and at Berlin and Frankfort it is 4^@4f per cent. ever, the market grew easier for sight, in which there
According to our special cable from London the Bank was a reduction for actual business of one- quarter of
On Thursday the tone beof England lost £604,545 bullion during the week and a cent, to 4 88@4 88£.
held £30,428,905 at the close of the week. Our corre- came generally firmer again, though the market was
spondent further advises us that the loss was due to the not quotably higher. On Friday the tone was easier
export of £25,000 to South America and to shipments at a reduction of one- quarter of a cent all around.

and im- The following shows daily posted rates for exchange
ports of £184,000, of which £128,000 were bought in by some of the leading drawers
the open market and £56,000 were from Australia.
MOK., tubs.. Wm>.. Thttb., FBI..
FBI..
to the interior of Great Britain of £764,000 net,

Aug.

the British Exchequer loan
and the expectation that the subscriptions therefor in
this city would cause a sharp demand for remittance

The announcement

of

Magoun & Co..
Bank British
No. America,.,

Merchants' Bk.
of Canada

about a recession in rates for sight sterling and the
tone was easier on Wednesday, though it grew steady
to firm on Thursday, and was easy again on Friday.
There was a slight increase in offerings of commercial
bills after the middle of the week, chiefly drawn
against grain from the Southwest, and there were
likewise

some provision

These commercial
absorbed.

485
4 88*
486
4 88*
4 84*
488
485

89
85
89
85

Sight..

}

Sight...

60 days

Montreal.
1 Sight-.
Canadian Bank } 60 days
of Oommeroe. \ Sight...
Heidelbach, lok (60 days
alhelmer X Co, I Sight..
Lai ard Freres.., (60 days,
I

Sight,..

(

60 days

? Sight...

The market

Aug.

Aug.

7.

88*
86
89
86
89
86

488*
485
4 88*
485
488

88*

Aug.

9.

10.

86
89

86
69

85*

85*

85*

89
85
89
85
89
85
89
85
89
85
89
85
89

89

89
85
89

89

86*

85

Aug.

85

86
89

88*

8.

89
80
89
85
89
85
89
80
89
85
89
85
89

86

89
85
89
80
89

85
89
85
89
80
89
85
89
86

86
89
86

89
85
89

closed easy on Friday, with rates for

actual business 4

84@4

84£ for long, 4 87f @4 88 for

and 4 88^ @4 88| for cables.
Commercial on
banks 4 83|@4 83f and documents for payment 4 83
@4 84 ^. Cotton for payment 4 83 @ 4 834, , cotton for
acceptance 4 83^@4 83| and grain for payment 4 84

short

@4

84£.

but none against cotton.
The following gives the week's movements of
were, however, promptly
money to and from the interior by New York banks.
by the
as above noted,

bills,

bills

Influenced,

488*

60 days

(

London and the satisfaction through these
exports of the urgent demand for remittance brought

of gold to

(60 days
\ Sight...

6.

85
89

(60 days

Baring,

very decidedly influenced the foreign exchange market on Saturday and the tone was quite strong on
Then,
Monday, so continuing on the following day.
however, the offerings of bills drawn against exports

Aug.

4 84*
4 88*
4 85

<

\

Brown Bros

Bank of

3.

Exchequer loan, which
Received by
Shipped by
Net Interior
Week Ending August 10, 1900.
N. T. Bank*. N. T. Banks.
Movement.
payment of
caused the prompt remittance of gold in
Currency.
$4,922,000
Gain. 11,165.000
$3,767,000
the 5 per cent instalment thereon, and influenced also Sold
1.147,000
831,000
Gain.
316.000
by the inducement offered by the Bank of England
Total gold and legal tenders.
$4,688,000
Gain, tl.481,000
J6.069.000
of interest on the consignments while in transit, there
With the Sub-Treasury operations and gold exports
was an export of $3,211,328 14 in gold bars to London the result is as follows.
by the steamer sailing on Wednesday, $2,706,799 69
Into
Out of
Net Change in
Week Ending August 10, 1900.
being shipped by Baring, Magoun & Co. and $504,Bank*.
Banki.
Bank Molding*.

subscriptions to the British

528 45 by Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co. On the following day there was an export of $2,103,091 15 gold
bars to Paris, Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co. forwarding $501,582 58, Lazard Freres $1,001,907 63 and
Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. $599,600 94. On Thursday an advance by the Bank of England in the price
of American Eagles to 76 shillings 5 pence per ounce
and of gold bars to 77 shillings 10 pence per ounce induced Brown Bros. & Co. to arrange for the shipment
to London of $500,000 gold coin by the steamer sailing to-day (Saturday), and it was then announced
that Heidelbach, Ickelheimer & Co. would also make
a shipment of $532,981 77 and the City Bank $1,033,850 32 gold bars to London on that day. On Friday
the City Bank increased its withdrawal by $506,615 33
and Muller, Schall & Co. withdrew $751,652 03, making the shipment to London to-day (Saturday) $3,325,099 45. The amount of gold exported for the week
was $8,139,518 74 in gold bars and $500,000 in gold
coin, making a total of $8,639,518 74.
Gold received
House during the week, $16,566. The
at the Custom
Assay Office paid $883,057 67 for domestic bullion.

Nominal

exchange have been 4 85 to 4 85^
for sixty day and 4 89 for sight during the greater
part of the week. Rates for actual business opened
on Monday at an advance of one- quarter of a cent
all around compared with those at the close on Friday of last week, at 4 84|@4 84^ for long, 4 88£@
4 88£ for short and 4 88|@4 89 for cables, and on Saturday some bankers quoted the above rates for sight
and for cables. The tone was strong and it so continued on the following day. On Wednesday, howrates for

B inks

movement, as above

$6,069,000

Sab-Treas. oper. and gold exports..

26,300,000

$4,589,000
31.400,000

Gain. $1,481,0
Loss. 5,100,000

$32,369,000

$36,938,000

Loss. $8,619,000

interior

Total gold and legal tenders.

The following
in the principal

table indicates the

of bullion

European banks.
August

Bank

amount

9,

August

1900.

10, 1899.

of

Gold.

Total

*

Gold.

X

Silver.

J

Silver.

Total.

X

Sngland

80,428,905

'ranee

89,289,268 45,503,609 134,792,877 76,904,788 48,063,835 124,968,623
28,389,000 14,625,000 43,014,000 27,417,000 14,123,000 41,540,000
79,435,000 7,612,000 87,047,000 96,420,000 5,448,000 100,863,000

Germany
Russia
A.US.

Hung'y.

87,728,000

30.428.906 83,517,899

9,885,000

Spain

13,689,000 16,823,000

Italy

15,463,000

1,631,000

4,870.000

5,902,000

9,940,000

1,470,000

Netherlands..
N at.Belg

m

. .

33.517,899

47,613,000 30,478,000 10,609,000
30,512,000 12,960,000 13,589,000
17,094,000 15,683,000 1,766,000
2,748.000 6,052,000
10,772,000
4,410,000
8,065,000 1,538,000

41,087,000
26,629,000

17,299.000
8,785,008
4.598,000

fot-tnls week 302.232,173 103451609 405.683,782 298,038,e87 101158835 399,197,623
Tot. prev. w'k 302,295.669 103390907 406,586,573 296.803,975 101445792 398.249,767

POPULARITY OF THE BRITISH WAR LOAN
—REASONS FOR IT.
While the home security market has been especially
sluggish even for this dullest of dull seasons, it seems
that there is plenty of money here for investment in
foreign securities. We announced in our "Financial
Situation" last week that the Bank of England
would on August 7 receive applications for £10,000,000
3 per cent Exchequer bonds, repayable at par August
7 1903, and that J. P. Morgan & Co. and Baring,

Magoun &

Co. of

New

York, Drexel

&

Co. of Phila-

and Kidder, Peabody & Co. of Boston, were
authorized to receive and forward applications for
It now appears, from
allotments of these bonds.
delphia,

a statement of Sir Michael Hicks- Beach, Chancellor
of the Exchequer, made in the House of Commons

—
August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900, J

261

Under such circumstances, why should
August 7, that he "had received an offer from an nominal.
Anglo American house to place half the issue in not this movement materially grow ? Probably the
America" and that "this part of the issue was already financial vagaries now so prominent and prevalent in
taken" before subscriptions were opened in London. the United States will not again present a reason
The announcement has been since made that the for or stimulate the making of purchases. We look
American subscribers will get a little more than for such a positive defeat in November of Mr. Bryan
It is also reported here as to discourage for at least a good many years any
$28,000,000 of the bonds.
that the bids in the United States exceeded $55,- political party repeating his experiment. But our
000,000, or considerably more than the full amount of people having once become familiarized with this
foreign class of securities will, it would seem, find
the loan.
The question has been raised why was so much abundant reason for holding them in increasing
eagerness shown to procure these bonds ? According favor. No bond can be safer than the Government
why was issues of Great Britain and Germany. The former
to our view the more natural question is
not greater rather than less rivalry apparent ? We is likely to be the more widely adopted for obvious
should not have been at all surprised had the bids reasons. But either is as safe an investment as can
amounted to several times what they did. The bonds be made, and nets a very much larger income than
offered were particularly attractive to-day to an Amer- United States bonds afford.
But it may be asked, what is to be thought of the
ican having savings to invest. This is true for several
reasons.
Most important of all is the fact that large exports of gold which these bond purchases are

—

—

—

have not a suggestion of anything allied causing is not this movement to be deprecated ? We
to Bryanism associated with them and never can see no reason for anxiety on that account ; we are
On the other hand, all United States getting full value for it. Any natural export of gold
have.
bonds, if the silver advocates could have their from America to Europe is unobjectionable. So far
That is the spirit as we drive gold from us through a vicious currency
way, would be paid in silver.
which would control the silver party's administration it is harmful and disturbing, for the currency in
and would be carried out by it so far as it had or that case weakens or suspends natural influences
could acquire the semblance of authority for action. which in a normal state of affairs arrest the outflow
Even the election of Bryan carries with it the pre- when the condition or conditions occasioning it are
sumption of a shock to credit which would quickly satisfied. Hence, so far as the export movement now
empty our treasury of every dollar of its gold, and in progress is wholly caused by the bond purchase, it
would also deplete our banks in like manner if they is not regrettable. Moreover, as soon as our currency
did not suspend gold payments. Another reason for is put into a thoroughly scientific shape a gold movethe popularity of the Exchequer bonds was that ment either way will only occur when it happens as a
being short, they exactly filled a demand just at corrective of trade expansion or in return for what
the moment active. That is to say, they were the receiving country values more. Its export consein all respects well fitted to take the buyer's money quently is of itself of no greater importance than an
safely over the uncertainties our battle with silver export of breadstuffs or cotton.
The moving force
raises; moreover, while doing that they enabled him back of the export is what gives to the operation its
to get nearly 3f per cent for his money on a perfect mischievous character.
security, as good as the world offers; while even 3 per
MR. BRYAN'S SPEECH.
cent is hard to secure at this crisis in our affairs.
Finally, Great Britain's condition, because of its neThe public had been so discreetly prepared for the
cessities, present and future, growing out of the South fact that Mr. Bryan would confine himself, in his
African war and the possibilities of the disturbance in speech of acceptance, to the single issue of "imperialChina and the situation of the gold reserve in Europe, ism," that the fact of his exclusion of all other issues
has put its bonds abnormally low, and therefore the has attracted less attention than would otherwise
offer was unusually attractive.
have been bestowed upon it.
For ourselves, it has
The fact last mentioned is not by any means to be seemed that the natural question to ask, after reading
they

construed into a belief that the American buyer will
sell his holdings if the price of these Exchequer bonds
rises.

AVe see some such suggestion

cable to have been

made

by

writers in criticising the English

reported

by

London newspaper
Government for al-

lotting so large a portion of the loan to the United
States.

Our idea

is

ing British bonds
velop.

It is

situation

that this feature of Americans buy-

a permanent feature sure to deone of those clever forecasts of the security
is

which the banker who in March of this year
Bank of England in the United States

represented the

and forwarded

applications

for

allotments

British loan offered at that time has

of

a

been noted for

The continuing strength of the
movement lies, however, in the fact that for well-known
in his business life.

reasons United States bonds are no longer of use to
the general investing classes in this country. Being
quite limited in amount and enjoying currency,

and other privileges, our Government securihold in the market an unnaturally high value,
which makes the income they net the holder almost
trustee
ties

the candidate's address of last Thursday,

What

is

is this

the real meaning of Mr. Bryan's sudden sup-

pression of every other public question involved in
the vote of November?

We

can imagine only three motives for this very
unusual action. A candidate might give such exclusive attention to one part of the platform because
he disagreed with all the other " planks," and could
not, therefore, decently discuss them.
Nobody has
any reason to suspect Mr. Bryan of this motive. Not
only is he in no disagreement with his platform on
the pregnant issues of currency and coinage, for example, but he is so far identified with them that he
compelled an unwilling convention of his party to
write at his dictation the very clauses of the platform

which he ignored last Thursday. The idea that Mr.
Bryan ignores the declarations other than Imperialism
because he did not like them will not be seriously
entertained by any person.
It is also possible that a candidate might regard one
part of the platform as of such supreme and over-

THE CHRONICLE.

262

shadowing importance that it was hardly worth while
This was the printo waste discussion on the rest.
ciple openly adopted by Mr. Lincoln in 1860, when
the crisis of secession dwarfed every other public
We believe that even Mr. Lincoln gave at that
issue.
time some decent though brief notice to the other
portions of the platform, and did not, like Mr. Bryan,
turn them down in silence. Still, he undoubtedly
allowed his party to understand that all other issues
must give place to this one public problem. If Mr.
Bryan hopes to convince his audience that his view of
the present situation is the same, he will have to explain the curious incidents of July 5, when all reports
from Kansas City announced that Mr. Br van had
agreed to the insertion of "Imperialism" for
the paramount issue as a compromise with the
Eastern faction, which opposed the free-coinage
declaration.
It is no secret that, until this compro
mise was arrived at, every one of these Eastern delegates believed that Mr. Bryan was about to insist on
free silver coinage as the corner-stone of his platform.

Now, such

impressions would not be possible with re

gard to a

man whose

clusively given

up

heart was completely and ex-

to the principle thus

made

a toy of

convention intrigue. As a matter of fact, nothing that
Mr. Bryan has ever said or done has suggested that
he had more than a perfunctory interest in the question.
That he discovered, after his nomination, the
possible strategic value of this issue, as a matter of

[Vol.

LXXI

remained. It is not very surprising that Mr. Bryan
chose the third of these three courses.

These suggestions show, we think, Mr. Bryan's
speech of last Thursday to have been purely a political
manoeuvre. We are aware, however, that to say this
is not to answer his arguments on " Imperialism.'*
But it is no part of our purpose to prove that Mr.
Bryan is radically wrong in his series of statements
regarding the expansion policy.
On the contrary, we
do not hesitate to say that in many of his assertions

he is entirely sound.
Certainly we should not
think of attacking the propositions that a large
standing army is an evil unwarranted by our present
situation,

that

or

a

war for conquest

is

wholly

We agree with these propositions as
should agree with any other patent truth
which Mr. Bryan might choose to assert; and we have
never hesitated to express our own judgment in the

wrong.

we

We

do not agree with Mr. Bryan that the
Filipinos were ready for self-government in 1898 or are
ready now; and we should certainly regret to the last
degree to see this grave and weighty problem intrusted
to a young and untried politician, whose associations
are of the most disquieting character and whose
flightiness of judgment on public affairs has already been made manifest on half a dozen other questions.
Retaining the Philippines may be a troublesome problem; but withdrawing from them is by no
means the simple undertaking that Mr. Bryan's glib
matter.

campaign politics, will readily be admitted. But that programme of policy suggests.
For ourselves, if we were the most ardent of "antieven such a conviction should have led him, in all
Imperialists," we should still regard with the gravest
sincerity to toss aside as non-essential the questions on
which he had been haranguing the country during his misgiving the proposition to entrust the nation's forfour years of conspicuous public life is not reasonable tunes, even on that question, to such a man. That
to suppose.

There
discern.

only one other explanation which we can
A candidate may choose to suppress dis-

is

cussion of

certain pledges or

declarations in

his

the anti- Imperialists themselves fully share this misgiving was sufficiently proved by their declaration at
the Plaza Hotel on July 18, when they described Mr.

Bryan

—in

as

" a man with

hallucinations or a

demagogue

event a dangerous man."
As to Mr.
effect of his renewed endorsement of them on the Bryan's explicit promise to prepare for withdrawal
voters.
We are unable to escape the conclusion that from the Philippines in the event of his election, we
this is the true explanation of Mr. Bryan's singular cannot do better than quote the comment of Senator

party's platform because he

is

doubtful as to the

treatment of his platform. Speaking
professional politics, he has satisfied
his possible supporters by demanding
reassertion of the platform of 1896.

either

the language of Hoar, himself a,n "anti- Imperialist," who fought the
one section of battle against colonial expansion at a time when Mr.
the unequivocal Bryan was merely watching which way the popular

would move:

This is a "bid"
for the Populist vote.
Having apparently achieved
his purpose
in
that direction he now undertakes to attract another doubtful faction by a
forcible
arraignment of the expansion
policy
the
opposing
party
of
and to allay their
misgivings by ignoring the silver issue.
That
he had, with this purpose in view, good reason for
saying nothing in regard to the currency, must be
manifest to every one who has followed the recent
discussions of the " Anti-imperialist " party the very
faction which Mr. Bryan is now endeavoring to
When the first gathering of this party had
attract.
formally described a vote for l£r. Bryan as ,f a vote

tide

for free silver;

made

"He
extra
give

he is elected he will call an
session at once and propose to Congress to
says that

if

up the Philippines

to their

own

people.

He

must know very well that this talk is the idlest and
most ridiculous nonsense. He knows that he could
not expect either house of Congress to do this thing
until the people of the Philippine Islands have abandoned their opposition and have re-established an
orderly government under our protection."

—

further debauching of the
civil service; a packing of the Supreme Court by men
to be governed by the will of the Executive" is it so
a

still

CHICAGO

<C-

NORTH WESTERN REPORT.

annual report of the Chicago & North Western Railway Company for the previous fiscal year
If the

strength and prosperity,
that for the year which ended on May 31 1900 makes
Indeed, the outcome
a yet more impressive showing.
extremely favorable that if a few years ago any
is so
a striking exhibit of

very strange that, in his appeal to the voters represented by that gathering Mr. Bryan should resolve to one had ventured to suggest such results as likely in
say not a word of free silver, of the civil service, or of the near future, the prediction would hardly have been
the appointment of new Supreme Court judges ? To taken seriously even in the case of such a remarkably
re-state his opinions on these questions would have strong property as the Chicago & North Western.
The
people whom he wishes to conciliate, result shows the possibilities open to the railroad
heen to defy the
and except for recantation or silence, no alternative transportation systems in this thriving land, when

August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

263

the properties have been well managed and put in
condition to take advantage of trade activity and good
The Chicago & North Western admittedly has
crops.

be remembered that besides the 4-£
million dollars taken specifically from profits, there
were very heavy expenditures for betterments, im-

these requirements, its management having resisted the importunities to distribute among the stock-

provements and additions which were included diOperating expenses and taxes in
rectly in expenses.
1899-1900 aggregated $26,994,014, against only $24,828,714 in 1898-9, $23,746,485 in 1897-8 and bnt
$19,938,821 in 1896 7. Here is an increase in three
Of course the great
years of over 7 million dollars.
expansion in the traffic of the road necessarily enJust how much
tailed a large addition to expenses.
of the total augmentation in expenses is to be attributed to that cause it would be difficult to determine.
Moreover where expense accounts are known to have
been heavily charged with extraordinary expenditures
in all the years, the inquiry does not call for special

filled

holders a greater share of the profits (which profits
had been large even in years of indifferent trade and

and having at the same time
brought the property up to a standard of efficiency

traffic

conditions),

permitting the handling of

traffic

with steadily

in-

creasing economy, so as to offset the loss from the un
interrupted decline in rates.
Perhaps the best way to bring out the strikingly
favorable character of the

year's returns

is

to

say

It

must

also

all expenses and the rental, infund charges, the operations of the
terest and sinking
twelve months show a surplus balance of over ten consideration.

that after meeting

million dollars ($10,061,554), while the call for dividends, which were at the rate of 7 per cent on the

We shall cite figures

presently to show

that notwithstanding the prosperity which the property

has been enjoying the last few years, the attempt to
preferred shares and 6 per cent on the common shares, reduce the cost of moving traffic has not been relaxed,
was less than four million dollars $3,914,391. In other and that much success has attended the effort. As to

—

words, there has been a surplus on the business of the
twelve months over and above the dividends in the sum
The report does not state
of no less than $6,147,160.
the surplus balance at this sum, but in amount of
$1,605,119. This is so, however, only because $4,542,041 has been first deducted for a special appropriation
made by the board of directors for outlays for real
estate, equipment and other construction items ; $1,607,324 of that sum represents the cost of over 179
miles of second track, $430,593

new

the cost of 60 miles

the outlays for betterments included in expenses a

few illustrations taken at random from the present report will suffice to show what has been going on.
Thus the report tells us that on the more important
lines steel rails weighing 90 lbs. per yard are being
laid, while on the lines where the traffic is lighter 72
lb. rails are being laid
that during the year 50,285

—

tons of

new

rails

were

laid, replaci

new

ties

rails of lighter

pointed ont
were put in the track, against

weight in 414 miles of track.
that 2,037,284

ng

It is als

)

$1,039,869 the cost of additional
equipment, $597,300 the cost of buildings, furniture
and fixtures, and the rest various other similar out-

stated that 82 locomotives were purchased during the

lays.

tired or to be retired,

of

sidings,

1,347,755 in the previous year.

Furthermore,

twelve months in replacement of a like

it is

number

re-

and that their cost ($1,015,040)

In tractive
This large special appropriation illustrates and typi- was charged to operating expenses.
fies better than anything else the character of the power the 82 new locomotives are equal to 203 of
management. In previous years quite large expend- those they have replaced, the increase in such power
itures had been made for additions and improvements, being 147£ per cent.
Notwithstanding the heavy expenditures on mainwhich were charged directly to expenses or paid for
Through this means the tenance of way and maintenance of equipment, the
out of surplus earnings.
property was brought to its present efficiency and ratio of expenses to earnings has been reduced, and
strength.
Now comes a year of extreme prosperity for the late year was only 62-85 percent, against 65*31,
when, as the result of this previous wise policy, the 65*87 and 64*37 per cent, respectively, in the three
property is able to show profits of unusual amount. years preceding. Of course the mere increase in the
What does the management do? Does it distribute volume of business might make it possible to lower
the extra profits to the shareholders? Far from it. the percentage of expenses to earnings, but as showing
The dividend on the common shares is increased in what has really been accomplished in the way of true
the moderate amount of 1 per cent, raising it from a economy in operation, we need only refer to the steady
5 per cent basis to a 6 per cent basis,

the dividend

other hand, a

requirement

sum

only

and increasing increase

$391,124.

On

the

equal to more than ten times this

and exceeding by $627,000 the whole amount paid in dividends on both the
common and preferred stock ($3,914,394), is taken directly from profits and devoted to further enlarging
and strengthening the Chicago & North Western prop-

in

recent years.

the train load which has been effected in

For

this purpose,

we bring forward a

table presented by us a year ago.

extra dividend requirement,

erty.

It is

that the

evidence of the extent of the year's profits

company could pay

outlays of this

for $4,542,041 of special

show a surplus
amount of $1,605,119.

Tons moved
one mile.
1899-0... ...3,849,367,760
1898-9... ...3,229,327,820
1897-8... ...3,030,610,175
1896-7...
1895-6... ...2,372,365,483
1894-5...
1893-4... ...1,989,355,696

Miles run
by trains.
16,341,994
15,489,673
15,640,433
14,871,286
16,809,353
14,662,063
16,063,562

Train

Earns, per

load.

train mile.

235-55 tons
208-48 tons
193-77 tons
151-57 tons
141-13 tons
116-88 tons
123-84 tons

$1-96
1-82
1-73
1-51
1-46
1-34
1-33

description and yet

above charges and dividends in
However, even this does not quite tell the whole story
of the favorable character of the year's results, for the
surplus given is entirely independent of the operation
of the land department, the net receipts from which
were $599,387, and also does not include the results
of the business of the Fremont Elkhorn & Missouri

The foregoing shows that in the late year the company moved 3,849 million tons of freight one mile

Valley or trans- Missouri lines, where there was a profit
above expenses and charges of 1224,731.

of that fact are earning $1 96 per train mile, against

with a train mileage (16,341,994) scarcely larger than
the train mileage required in 1893-4 (16,063,562 tons)
to move only 1,989 million tons.
In other words, the
trains are now hauling an average of 235f tons against
less than 124 tons at the earlier period, and by reason

but $1

33, in face of a decline in the rate received

per

—

THE CHRONICLE.

264

[Vol. LXli.

ton per mile in the interval from 1*07 cent to 0'83

THE BRITISH IRON AND COAL MARKETS

cent.

The low

rate at which the road

is

—THE IMPORT TRADE OF INDIA IN 1899-1900*

now moving

Makchestek, August

mileage
of the North West, lies west of Chicago, and yet the
average rate realized we see was only 83 hundredths
of a cent per ton per mile, and the extremely favorable results for the year were obtained on the basis of
this low rate.
The great growth in traffic which has
All the

freight should not be lost sight of.

The

considerable further

1,

1900.

which has occurred
the American markets

fall

within the last three weeks in
for pig iron and several descriptions of finished iron
and steel has attracted a good deal of attention on
this side, although its influence upon prices has not

been at

occurred is reflected in the above table, showing an
addition during the last three years to the tonnage
movement one mile of 1,595 millions. Contemporaneously there has also been an increase in the passenger traffic. Total gross earnings in the late year fell
but little short of 43 million dollars ($42,950,805),
against not quite 31 million dollars ($30,977,243)
three years before in 1896-7. The freight revenues
rose first from $22,236,612 in 1897 to $27,035,105 in
1898, then to $28,155,676 in 1899, and now to

all

appreciable.

Recent

New York

telegrams

report large sales of pig iron, especially of Bessemer,
for Europe, and of billets and other forms of steel for

England.

The imports from

the United States so far
this year have not been important.
Indeed, the of-

show that the

statistics

ficial

receipts of

American

the ports of the Kingdom during the
six months of this year reached only 21,997 tons,

pig iron at
first

all

against 58,321
1899, 30,281

tons in the corresponding portion of

tons in 1898 and 44,597 tons in 1897.

The passenger revenues in- Similarly, the imports of American steel billets were
$32,008,684 in 1900.
creased from $6,963,578 to $7,256,299, to $8,067,626, only 21,173 tons, against 45,343 tons in 1899, 12,832
and to $9,002,687. As indicating the magnitude tons in 1898 and 22,825 tons in 1897. It is more
to which the company's business has risen,

we may than

note that the number of freight trains run per day
during the year averaged 623 and the passenger trains

likely, however, that during the current halfyear the figures will show a very substantial increase
upon those of the latter half of any of the preceding

number of trains per day 1,222. three years. Such, at least, is the conclusion to
We referred above to the amount of new second track which one is driven by a review of the condition and
built and paid for out of earnings.
The report points prospects of the markets on the two sides of the
out that with the completion of the second main ocean. Here the production both of the raw and the
track now under construction in Iowa the main line manufactured article is going into consumption as
of the company from Chicago to the Missouri Eiver at fast as it is produced, and there are no signs of ac-

599,

making the

total

Council Bluffs, a distance of 490 miles, will be doubletracked the entire length except a section of 67 miles

cumulation of stocks, whilst in America, according to
present appearances, the out-turn of raw material and
of most kinds of manufactured iron and steel is con-

between Maple River Junction and Missouri Valley,
and the total length of double track in the system will siderably in excess of the current demand. As the
time is approaching when, for several months, freights
be 713 miles.
The great increase in revenues which has oc- for these heavy materials will be low, since they can
curred has been made with a comparatively small be employed as ballast and as supplementary cargo by
addition to the length of road operated.
The aver- grain and cotton steamers coming from the States,
age number of miles in the late year was 5,218, much larger imports of them may be expected.
against 5,030 miles three years before, an increase of Whether or not these will come in sufficient quantity
to tell substantially upon prices here remains to be
less than four per cent. The company is, nevertheless,
building a large

amount

of

new

road.

of miles actually in operation at the

The number

end of the

fiscal

year was 5,303 miles, and this is increased to 5,562 if
the mileage just completed is added. Hence in the
last fifteen or eighteen months about 500 miles

seen.

On

main considerations are the scarcity
of iron ore and of coal and coke.
In all the iron
mine districts of the United Kingdom in Scotland,
in the northeast and northwest of England and in the
English midlands, the output, though large, passes at
once into the furnaces, and freights from Spain, our
chief source of foreign supply, are very high and have
this side the

—

have been added.
It is a noteworthy fact that
except for new roads acquired the funded debt
of the Chicago & North Western was not increased at all during the year. Even of the bonds of recently been advancing. Spanish ore is consequently
the new roads, $1,944,000 are held in the treasury tending upward, the current quotation at Middlesof the North Western.
Tae company's construc- borough being 21s. 9d. per ton of 2,240 lbs., and it is
tion charges during the year, including the new not easily obtained even at that rate.
Then, too,
roads, amounted to no less than $15,311,809, of which fuel remains at extreme prices generally, although
$4,542,041 was provided for by the special appropria- some slight easing off in the case of coke is occasiontion from earnings referred to above.

The

net addi-

ally

perceptible.

This,

however,

is

the temporary

bonded indebtedness, including the bonds result of the recent hot weather, which has interfered
outstanding of the new roads, was only $7,110,000. with the full working of blast and other furnaces.
At the same time the balance sheet shows operating The opinion seems to be very widespread that, high
assets of $10,246,905 (of which $4,587,539 was in actual as the price of fuel now is, it is likely to move furcash), against current liabilities of only $8,681,949, ther upward during the coming winter, and even
this latter embracing interest accrued but not due, householders, and the merchants who supply them all
and also the dividends paid in J uly. Truly the North over the country, are laying down stocks to an unWestern is a wonderful property and enjoying remark- usually large extent for this period of the year. So
tion to the

able prosperity.
says

It is

proper to state that the report

the company has now complied with

track elevation ordinances affecting

Chicago.

it

all

the

in the city of

extraordinary has the

demand

for house fire purposes

at a meeting of Lancashire colliery proheld yesterday in Manchester, the price of
prietors

become that
T~
,

.

.

* Communicated by our Special Correspondent

.

at Manchester.

—
—
August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.1

household coal was raised to the extent of Is. 5d. per
ton, a most unusual incident in the midst of hot summer weather. This anticipatory accumulation will of
course lessen the demand later on, but after all the

265

imports, Mr. O'Conor presents the following table
stated in index numbers of prices in India in Janu-

—

ary of this and the four preceding years, the average
price of 1873 being represented by 100.

household consumption of coal is a small matter in
shirtlnga
comparison with that of the manufacturing industries. Grey cotton yarn
GreyoottoQ
In this latter field there is no sign of diminished re- Copper sheathing
quirements except in the cotton industry, with its Iron rods, eto
Total
branches of bleaching, dyeing and printing, which

Here the scanty supply
of cotton will enforce a large reduction of work during the next two or three months, and a corresponding falling off in the demand for coal from the cotton
mills and works; but the most important absorption
of fuel is in the iron, engineering and collateral industries, and in this direction there is no sign of a
substantial decrease.
There were indications in the
second quarter of the year of a marked falling off
are extensive users of coal.

in the

orders

number

of

new

for

new

shipping, but during July a

contracts have been entered into in

Scotch and English shipbuilding yards which are
prcbably more than sufficient to counterbalance the

amount

tonnage launched from the
stocks during the month.
The demand for railway
and structural iron and steel, even at existing high
prices, continues heavy, and although some branches

very large

of

of engineering report a little slackening in the receipt
of fresh orders, the

works are

still

generally well em-

For the moment, therefore, the prospect of
sustained buying of manufactured iron and steel is
pretty well assured, and the fact that supplies of iron
ore and coal are only sufficient for actual requirements
seems to indicate that it will need a much larger increase of imports of American iron and steel than
there is at present any probability of our receiving
within the next few months in order to bring about a
serious collapse in the English markets.
This week I have received from Calcutta the "Annual Keview " of the foreign trade of India during
the year ended on March 31st 1900, prepared by Mr.
ployed.

Upon

1896.

i...

these figures the

1897.

1898.

1899.

69
77
85
Ill

70
66
85
110

64
61
90
111

57
87
111

1900
84
64
110
124

..342

331

326

317

382

comment

of the report

is

:

an increase of 15 per cent since 1897 in the
general level of prices of articles imported into India,
and of 20 per cent in the important item of cotton

"This

is

goods, which represents close on two- fifths of the
whole import trade." It is interesting to notice that

although there was a considerable decrease in the imports of iron and steel from 248,662 tons in 1898-9'
to 221,732 tons in 1899-1900— the quantity received

—

from the United States rose from 1,743 tons to 6,713
tons, the falling off having occurred entirely in the
imports from Belgium and Germany. With regard to
imports of cotton piece goods Mr. O'Conor says:
"During the last two years the trade has been active under the influence of the general prosperity
of trade, which affected Lancashire in particular so
powerfully that it has been said that such a good
time has not been known there for twenty years. The
imports in 1898-9 were larger than those in the preceding year, which, however, were depressed by the
occurrence of famine, and last year's imports were
again larger than those of 1898-9. But trade fluctuates
greatly, but it may be taken as certain and as being
in accordance with precedent that the large trade of
these last two years will be followed by a year of relatively restricted

hand are
any comment

trade until the stocks in

moved off." I do not venture to offer
upon this discouraging forecast of the Indian demand

goods during the current year. It
may be observed, however, that at the present moment there is a very fair inquiry from the Calcutta
J. E. O'Conor, the Director General of Statistics to
side, which but for the abnormal condition of the
the Indian Government. The tabular statement of
cotton market would certainly lead to an extensive
Indian trade for that year was issued several weeks
business.
Some of it even now is being put through,
ago, but some passages in the report of the experienced
for cotton goods are evidently wanted in Calcutta.
and well informed Director- General are yet of timely From Bombay, however, the demand is poor, in view
interest.
He states that the imports of merchandise of considerable stocks there and fears of another
for British cotton

Dependency in 1899-1900, a year—be it re- famine in Northwestern India.
It cannot be too
membered of famine and plague, largely exceeded clearly borne in mind that although a single famine
in value those of any previous year except that of
in India has little effect upon the consumption of im1893-4, "when the exceptional conditions which afported cotton goods, the occurence of a second or
into the

—

fected exchange, on the closure of the mints, gave a
speculative stimulus to the trade.
Only once before
that, in 1890-91, did the import trade approximate to

should be severe or extensive,
very likely to reduce the demand for them ap-

third, particularly
is

if it

preciably.

the level reached last year, and then also the conditions of exchange, following on legislation in the

United States, gave a speculative stimulus to the RAILROAD GROSS EARNINGS FOR JULY.
trade." Mr. O'Conor points out that last year no
All things considered, railroad gross earnings for
such adventitious influence was at work. The great July make a very satisfactory showing much better
increase of imports in 1899-1900 he ascribes largely to than might have been supposed possible.
At the
the fact that in the year before they had been same time there are not wanting evidences that in
"slightly curtailed" as a consequence of the large certain directions the great oxpansion in revenues
trade of 1897-98, and the Indian markets were conse- which has been in progress so long has come to an
quently in a condition to take abundant supplies of end, having been in some instances already succeeded
imported merchandise. He does not omit to notice by decreases.
that the rise of prices in Europe has done much to
Our table, covering 98,386 miles of road, shows
augment the value of the imports, but he adds that $2,847,040 improvement over the same month last
"in most important items of trade the quantities im- year. As compared with other recent periods this

—

ported materially increased." As an indication of
the rise of prices in India of the principal classes o

quite moderate, being not quite 6 per cent
5-86 per cent.
But bearing in mind that we have

is

9

.

THE CHRONICLE.

266

been experiencing a reaction in trade, that there has
been a heavy falling off in the grain traffic in the
West, also the live-stock traffic, and that the cotton
movement in the South has been of small dimensions,
the showing is certainly to be regarded as gratifying.
Another fact should not be forgotten. Comparison is
with very heavy earnings a year ago, July in 1899
having ranked among the very best months on record,
the improvement then haviDg reached (on the roads

the Western primary markets fell off over
million bushels, with a loss of four million bush els

ceipts
five

is our usual detailed statement of the
grain movement, and from this it will be seen that for
the four weeks ending July 28 aggregate deliveries of

wheat, corn, oats, barley and rye were 43,851,729
bushels in 1900, against 55,316,376 bushels in the corresponding period of 1899.
RECEIPTS OP FLOUR AND GRAIN FOR FOUR
JULY 28 AND SINCE JANUARY

1 to

Tear

Increase
or
Decrease.

Tear

Given.

Preceding.

Miles.

Miles.

97.351
100,859

96.571

$
41,617,094

99.445

44,954,350

95,586
99,281

95,061
98.160

41,432,712

52,184,486

18.386

July.
1896 (181 roads).
1897 (127 roads)
1898 (132 roads).
1899 (116 roads).
1900(105 roads).

Jan.

Tear
Preceding.

95,303

61,433,416

1
1
40.C07.082 Inc. 1,610,012
42,748,940 Inc. 2.206,410
728,467
40,709,245 Inc.

44,645,861 Inc. 7.637,626
48,686.376 Inc 2,847,040

94,293
98.838
95.089
97,784
95.303

95,076
100,302

;

95,5(14

98.905
98.386

266.648,160
2S9.501.390

250,354,317 Inc. 16,293,848
284,508,169 Inc. 4.998,201

292.8S3.731

268,060,290 Inc. 29.823,444
314,287,353 /nc.25,076,941
317.092.981 Inc 39 616.774

889,364,294
857.609.735

1.

important to point out that certain special circumstances affecting the comparison have operated to
make the aggregate increase larger the present month
than it otherwise would be. For instance, the Denver
& Eio Grande reports a gain of $246,100; but Colorado
It is

roads last year suffered from the ore smelters' strike,

and the Denver & Rio Grande then had a loss of $12,819.
So also the Buffalo Eochester & Pittsburg,
which now has $195,165 gain, last year suffered from
a strike of the coal miners along its line, and
then reported $67,572 decrease. We have stated
above that there was evidence in the returns that the
upward movement in earnings had in certain sections
ceased and was being succeeded by a reverse movement. In this we refer more particularly to the falling off in earnings reported by the roads in the springwheat territory of the Northwest, owing to the great
damage done in that part of the country by the long-

Wheat,

Corn,

Oats,

Barley,

Rye.

(.bbls.)

(buih.)

(bush.)

(.bush.)

(bush.)

(bush.)

Chicago—
i
1

wks.July, 1900
wks. July, 1899

443,688
365, US 6

UnceJan.1.1900 8,200,913
Since Jan.l, 1899

3,087,298

1.918,692
2,394.816
9.594,783
14,894.056

205.32f
10,555.911 5,602,696
81,891
2*4,610
115,137
13,877,686 8,151,775
66,533.092151.373.317 8,410.424 1.103.888
74,025,702 67,880,260 6,172.83fc 1,690,811

Milwaukee—
4 wks. July, 1900

wks. July, 18»9
Since Jan.l, 1900
Since Jan.l, 1899

4

St.

311,970
844,336
1,600,035
1,875.350

440,300
799,400
4,899,050
5,638,481

702.10C
895,950
3,134.800
4,469,100

94,576
79,740
901,390
721,190

3,685,329
1,791.609
6,229.263
4,669.5 '4

1.308,615
2,056,540
15.401.690
12,128,830

85,753
56,783
497,139
892,736

859,916
3,891,678
2,061,842
8,683,715

27,900
23,317
133,600
132,516

444,000

87.800
60,900
599.200
863,912

183,600
261,800
6,713,600

l.iei.eoc
6,390,601
8,135,70(

3,072,621

762,1<K

8.00C

Louis—

wks. July, 1900
wks. July, 1899
Slnoe Jan.l, 1900
Since Jan.l, 1899
Toledo—
4 wks. July, 1900
4 wks. July, 1899
Since Jan.l, 1900
Slnoe Jan.l, 1899
Detroit—
4 wks. July, 1900
4 wks. July, 1899
Since Jan.l, 1900
Sinoe Jan.l, 1899
Cleveland4 wks. July, 1900
4 wks. July, 1899
Since Jan.l, 1900
Since Jan.l, 1896
4
4

July 81

1896 126 roads)..
1897 1125 roads).
1898 (131 roads).
1899 (113 roads).
1900 (105 roads)

WEEKS ENDING

Flnur.

Earnings.

Tear

in oats.

The following

7£ million dollars, or over 17 per cent.
Here are the July totals for a series of years:

Given.

at

more in corn and over two million bushels

repoiting)

Mileage

[Vol. LXXI,

80,241
6.819
226,220
198,018

835,720
7,202,996
6,418,420

666.250
319.600

1,673,062
1.172.790
13.956,635
9,144,397

272.70C
201,405
1,781.138

29.800
£0.000

l,59l>,979

280.85C
473,600

24.820
48,616
69,434
004,410

224,78ti

868.776
150,746

1,012,990
1,706,012

1,876,702
1,719,608

156,489
76.978
1,018.630
689,880

3,600
336,830
114,03i

8,480
63.752
138,419

137,573
651,471
1.809,086
2,037,: 86

1,065,289
474.922
6,987,740
3.987,185

484,173
5.051,317
3,719,99*

48,720
34,700
491,520
211,703

40,800
29,260
275,3)0
263,300

8 8,300
1,676,650
9,098.800
9,907,450

790.000
699,800
6,417.100
4,806,700

13,600
13,500
782,60(
601,800

18,200
7,260
85,800
71,600

476,000
490.476
2,243,225
1,779,895

543,571
4,444,227
20,341,946
22,101,594

344,069
458,763
2,616,246
6,224,036

1,196
47.42P
69P.389
2,730,623

4.945
69,96
257,8
394,139

22,083
40,7*3
167,499
495,014

15,028
11,963
175,946
101,041

3,449.960
4,806.220
41.S57.940
44,394,966

411,770
341,990
3,085,390
6,665,320

984,710

37.88C

17,240

4,112,680
6,878,700

766,660
10.8C0

274.415

8,956,950
1,270,000
9,641,318
9,C9 J.460

748,200
744,000
5,627,120
4,758,260

189,000
128,000
1.625,106
1,306,000

48,127
115,378

160,289

774,808

Peoria—
4 wks. July, 1900

wks. July, 1899
Since Jan.l, 1900
Since Jan.l, 1899
iJuluth—
4 wks. July, 1900
4 wks, July, 1899
Since Jan.l. 1900
Sinoe Jan.l, 1899
Minn eavolU4 wks. July, 1900
4 wks. July, 1899
Since Jan.l, U00
Since Jan.l, 1898
4

1

520 940
3,900

Kansas City—
4 wks.July, 1900
4 wks. July, 1899
Since Jan.l, 1900
Since Jan.l, 1899

lotal of all—
4 wks.July, 1900 1.630.766 15,192,900 17,986,076 9,986.534
229.275
476,946
4 wks.July. 1899 1,296,199 20.202,8)6 21.887,538 13,305.818
683.37
286,794
Since Jan.l, 190i 12,862,041 16,723,668 128.196.61* 84.472,082 17.183,081- 2,600.172
Since Jan.l. 1899 7,801.222 113.7c8,92fl] 181.909.828193.505. 130 10.162.1H2 2.965.479

Taking the figures at Chicago for the even month,
continued drought in the spring. In the following
we find that the grain receipts at that point were
table we bring together all roads having losses or
19,705,613 bushels in 1900, against 27,335,847 bushels
gains amounting to $30,000 and over.
It will be obin 1899, but 13,570,785 bushels in 1898.
With referserved that there are five roads with losses for that
ence to the live-stock movement at the same point, it
amount, of which four may be said to be affected by
will be seen that the deliveries of hogs were 538,107
the impairment in the prospects of the spring- wheat
Incrop.
The Milwaukee & St. Paul is one of these, and head this year, against 703,146 head last year.
cluding all kinds of live stock we may say the delivreports $164,151 decrease.
eries were 20,057 car-loads in July 1900, against 21,918
PRINCIPAL CHANGES IN GROSS EARNINGS IN JULY.
car-loads in July 1899.
Increases.

Missouri Pacific

Denver

& Rio

Grande.

Northern Paciflo
Buffalo Roch. & Pitta..
Southern Railway
Norfolk & Western
Illinois Central

N. Y. Central
Choc. Oklah. & Gulf..
St. Louis & San Fran..

& Ohio...
Cieve.Cin.Chio.&St.L.
Central of Georgia
Chesapeake

Increases.
$287,807 Canadian Paclflo
$56,375
246,100 Rio Qrande Western..
55,000
243,139 Grand Trunk
44,513
195,165 Toledo & Ohio Cent...
43.723
192,310 St. Louis Southwest...
39,692
161,886 Chio. Great Western..
34,075
147,«85 Kan. C. Mem.& Birm..
32,169
144,640
134,000
Total (representing
130,307
28 roads)
$2,985,027
111,417

Wabash
Mo. Kansas & Texas..
Mexican National
Pere Marquette
Nash. Ohatt. A St. L..

Kan

O. Ft. So.

& Mem.

Hooking Valley
*

108.415
96.361
85.917
72,946
72,901
69,063
62,952
59,546
57,423

&

St. Paul..

Mexican Central
Burl. Ced.

Rap &

No..
Wisconsin Central....

IowaCentral

$164,151
52,377
37 962
34,679
32,614

Total (representing

5 roads)

$321,783

For three weeks only.

Not only

Since January

July.

1900

1899.

1898.

1900.

1899.

1.

1.

1898.

Wheat bush.

2,248,592

2.663,438

976,226

Corn... bush.
Oats... bush.
K,ye...bush.

11,079,814

16,084,386
9.280,756

156,912
147,876

1,697,882

1,464.398

226,470

122,208
285,060

1,101,832

Barley.bush.

Decreases.

Chic. Mil.

RECEIPTS AT CHICAGO DURING JULY AND SINCE JANUARY

8,430,374

5,188.204

6,272.876

8,080,596
91,141

9.724,533

14,967,189

12,694,160

6,949,951

67,066,992

74,478,702

71,464,443

6,339,819

61,731.238

57.999.690 66,094,307

Total grain 19,705.618 27,336,847
481,639
387,508
Flour ..bbls.

18,670,785 188,045,019 151,219,067 146,980,168
2,614,379
3.103,883
190,352
6,228,138

611
142
Pork.... bbls.
Cutm'ts.lbs. 18,740.586 20,872,596

1.908
9X
652
8,255
16,999,890 109.558,646 122.296.931 141,428,329
6,068,239 86,780,046 46,121,194' 47,986.964

Lard
lbs.
LlvehOKsNo!

4,686,001

688,107

9,156,407
703,148

645,768

6,000,233

As concerns the cotton movement

6.247,930l

4.969.568

in the South,

the Northwest, however, but at all
other points except in the Southwest, the grain move
ment underwent contraction. Kansas, as we know,
has raised a phenomenal crop of winter wheat

always small at this season of the year. From
the following it will be noticed that the receipts at

and

proper to say that the shipments overland
amounted to only 41,240 bales in July 1900 against
57,772 bales in July 1899.

this

ceipts at

is

in

reflected in heavily increased

Kansas Oity and

St.

Louis.

wheat

re-

Notwithstanding the gain at these points, however, total wheat re-

that

is

the Southern outports, though small, ran ahead of the
total for the same months of last year.
On the other

nand,

it is

).

.

August

.

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

267

EARNINGS OF MIDDLE AND MIDDLE WESTERN ROADS.

RECEIPTS OF COTTON AT BOOTH EBN POBT8 IN JULY, AND FROM
JANUARY 1 TO JULY 31, IN 1900, 1899 AND 1898.
Since January

1.

Port*.
1899.

1900.

~ 1,883

1898.

1900.
460,3e

_

2^74

7,331

24,811

12,70:

87

1899.

506,138
29,279

631,610
49,090

832,<<5f*

,147,210

64,633

135.346

119,312

61,327
327,234
128.446

1898.

1.049

720

12.028

1,732

4.823
1,290

1,931-

993
5,616

2,402

694

54,873
833,489
79,880
81,970
442,023
61,913
96,247

3

48

3,891

2,311

89
184

80

78.660

22.108

101,649
26,148
62,245

176

242

386

225,980
15,843

159,040

1,600

38,716
7.041

Florida
18.117

Savannah
Brunswick, 4o
Charleston
Port Royal, 4o

Wilmington
Washington, 4o

476

19,986

6,621

8.626

1,196

516

56,373

Norfolk

Newport News, 4c
Total.

We

69,074

23,170

"97,969

67,484

173,198

1.936

269,800

annex our usual

15,182

31,858 2,383,538 2.206,338 2,728.766

showing the earnings of

tables

the leading roads, arranged in groups, for July of the
last six years.

EARNINGS OF TRUNK LINES.
1893.

$

1896.

c

79,136

79,894
8,632,25'

2,815,000

687,762

507,234

1,264,7»

1,146.063

168,693
\

1.501,264

2.646,447

122,886

165,823

1,844,453

1,799,946

Peo.A-Eitst

G.T.of Can.

$
2,245,492
635,993
1,099,669
180,174
1,657,968

1

Hal. 4 Obio 2,648,447
587,762
B.4 O. S.W.
1,363,813
C.C.C.4StL

D.G.H.4M
N.Y.C.4Ht

1897.

1898.

$

1900.

July.

162,491

153,658

Kvansv.4Terre H.
Hocking Valley...

108,064
373,20t

115,118
816,788

Illinois Central *..

2.628,976

2.381,790

Elgin Jol.

Long Island
Lou.Bvans.4
X. Y. Ont.

Pitts

662.95

3,610,009

9.B91.972

8,420,748
1,079,211

970,635

12.184.357

10.171.022

10.362.0^6

10.^61,816

1,074,023

and Walkill Valley RR.

and after May

:

EARNINGS OF NORTHWESTERN AND NORTH PACIFIC GROUP.

t!91,118
266,657
150,670
71,804

352,50c

145,610

149,064

74,4 If

65,664

1
356.742

1
893,704

$
800.186

Pacific.

2.442,000

2,885,625

2.051,368

Ohio. Ot. West...
Chic. Mil.* St. P..
Duluth S.8.4 Atl.

620,575

486.500

891 126

8,220,826

3,384,476

2.635,193

244 427

288,438

173.926

Ca ladian

Groat Northern..

t2.268.847 t2.266.030 1 1,848,092

164,309
196.92S
136,386
Iowa Central
24»,'i88
Mlnn.4 8t. Louis
150,682
240,159
289,9^6
362,486
387,865
M.St.P.4S.S.M.
2,426,699 1,887,536
North 'n Pacific)
2,669803
j
162,815
126,4e0
Bt.PaulA Dal.
Bt. Jos.

102 431

166,511

1897.

1896.

$
»
816,170
316,184
2,107,002 1,803,676
334,067
882 508
2,713,393 2,646 227
194,896

169,411

1,778,819 1.7C0.711
134,421

121,688

179,4 37

1896.

$
292.857
1,643 544

8S3.457
2,289,841
164,547
1.421,417
123,495

Wlsoonsin

329,493
1,840,361

1,708,604

126,184

132,130

80,96^

84.379

68,471

406.795

432,822

428,995

138,830
43,265
434 607
8.657.068

10P.427

Cent'l.

451,164

I

si

Total

132,078
485,843

Includes proprietary lines in these years.
t In these years includes the earnings of Spokane Falls

&

152,4

ff

224 008
1496,375

Northern.

1899.

1900.

1898.

1897.

$

•

%

$

Alabama Gt. South' n
Atlanta Knoxv.&No.

Valdosta & W...
Buff. Rooh. APittsb..
Burl. Ced. R. &No...
Canadian Pacific.
Central of Georgia..
Chattan. Southern*
Chesapeane & Ohio
Ohio. & East Illinois.
Ohio. Great Western.
Ohio. Ind. & Louisv.
Ohio. Mil. <k 8t. Paul.
Ohio. Peoria
8t.L. >
St. L.Chie. & St.P. 1
Ohio. Term. Tr. RR..
Gulft.
Choc. Okla.
Cln. N.O. & Tex.Pac*

&

&

Clnn.Portsm'th &Va.
Olev.Cin.Ch.&St.L..
Peoria & Eastern
Olev. Lorain & Wheel.
Co". Sand. & Hook'g..
Den v. & Rio Grande
Dul. So. Shore & Atl.
Eaet8t. L. &Caron..
Elgin Joliet & East.
Evansv. & Indianap.
Bvansv. & T. Haute.
.

Ft. Worth & Rio Gr..
Gadsden & Att. Un..

*

$

140,338

153,332

137.90;-

142,479

Den.&RloQr.

922,600

676,401

721.272

Int.4Gt.No..

278.019
124.5S6

273,392

216,400

622,437
230,235

643 689
'205 556

365,039

342,472

698,376
219,287
370,223

866 886

334,208

Bt. L.

4

941,961

872,016

752,80.*

807,918

£07,069

760,271

2,543,000

2,256,193

2.100,444

2,010,970

1,744,455

889,900
6SS.466

83<,900

271,807

806,798

1,861,365
203,274

558,148

497,536

623,496

489,0

S. Fr.

8t.L. Southw.

t

473 348

340.613

821.298

412,174

402,180

6,892,128 ~6.893.661 5,473,415

5,226.008

428,143

869,20e

581,138

479,849

7,392,182

Total

208.674

19

467,835
685,416

6,493,174

voxas4 Pae

334,713
466,633

;

EARNINGS OF SOUTHERN GROUP.
1900.

1899.

Alabama Gt. So.
Cent, of Georgia.
Ohesap.4 Ohio...

526,063

$
157,066
428,702

1.162.572

1,061.165

Cln.N.0.4Tex.P.

•418,256

2.149.64C

397.663
116.979
92,301
2.166,220

483 200

480,70f

547.759

481,807

1.150,106

988.820

Georgia

Kan.CMem.4Bir.
Louts v. 4 Nash v.
Mobile 4 Ohlot...
Nash.Chat.4 St.L.
Norfolk 4 West..
Southern Ry.

Memphis Dtv :i
Total

.

.

t
148,941

119.970
124.470

C2.471.476 c2.279.166

9,801.452

8,642.978

1898.

1897.

$
t
183,857
131,911
369,149
449.625
961,589
967,700
400.639
312,602
116.844
100,492
74.311
88,966
1,827,667 1,795,457
323.356
299,144
519,531
480,277
885,271
892,409
c2.114.130

7.830.875

1896.

$
124.079
862,65f
840,05?
278,744

1896.

$

'

126,867
399,120
780,041
321.946

66,837
77,847
1,627,60) l,e82,943
268.125P
245,257
876,566
418,68?
763,349
8S8.724
1,486.938
< 1428,676
1.607,674
«
91,126
90,883

7.011.128

93,05*

83,10:-

8,493,603

Includes Montgomery Division In 1900 only.
figures for 1900, 1899 and 1898 include South Carolina 4 Georgia. Mobile
irmlncham and 161 miles of Atlantic 4 Yadkin and Atlantic 4 Danville.
,rur 8 are approximate, same as for 1900; actual earnings were larger.
i £
?
* ourth week not reported taken same as last year.
c

;

71,451

42,348

262,84*-

289,158
82,039
88,728
93.244
208,276
238,118
1,688,624 1,604,651
518.686
616,194
124,161
111,560
896,322
363,144
t467,818
t485,53)
285,012
292,867
167,431
177,98*
76,912
76,893
185,606
168,298
275.97P
309,306
128.53^
184,155
66,364
68,820
95,739

Mileage.

Kanawha & Mich
Kan.C. Ft. 8. AMem..
Kan. C. Mem. ABir..
Kan.Clty&N. W
Lehigh

& Hud. River.

Los Angeles Term'l.
Louis v. Evan s. &8t. L

& Nashville.
Macon & Birmlng'm.

Louisv.

Manlstlaue
Mexican Central
Mexican National.
Mexican Railway*.
Mexican Southern*..
Minn. & St. Louis
Minn.8t.P.&8.8te.M.
Mo. Kans. & Tex. svs
Mo. Pao. & Iron Mt.
Central Branch
Mobile Jack. & K. C.
mobile &Ohio{
Mont. & Mex. Gulf..
Nash. Chat. & St. L..
«».Y.Cen.&Hud.Riv..

Y.Ont. &West....
Norfolk & Western.
Northern Pacific
N.

Ohlottlver
Peo. Deo. & Evansv.
Pere Marquette
Plttsb. Bess. & L. E.

& Western. )
Plttsb. CI. & Tol. V

Plttsb.

38,821
15,106
463,838
355,742
2,442,000
525,063
6,258
1,162,572
407,647
520,575
315,638
3,220,325

90,174

115.814
236,000
274.418
35,423
1,363,213
168.698
167,893
96,381
922,500
244,427
12,645
152,491
24,607
108,084
28,123

Increase or
1900.
Decrease.

1899.

$
157,066
120,384
34,286
10,209
268,673
393,704
2,385,625
428,702
4,68f-

1,051,155
386,078
486.fi

00

330,202
3.384.476
103,658
100.680
102,000
253,825
28,540
1,254.798
165.823
148,186
73.770
676,400
238,438
11,920
153,6*8
30,361
115,143
28,631

1,411

1,096

119,970
96,177

116,979
92,852

1,844.458

1,799,945

1,723,399
366,256
174,192
373.206
2,528,975
278,019
218,000
164,309

1,819,263
274,245
172.522

547,759
4,580,047
443,440
1,150,106
2,669,808
122,42?
74.357
633.358
247,165

315,783
2,381,790
273.392
212,600
196,923
5,403
44,279
365,039
92,301
27.348
40,618
569,801
17,242
147,003
53,488
2,166,220
4.492
9.974
1,374.541
536.123
234,700
40.780
240,159
387,865
872,015
2,155,136
100,057
6,406
480,700
102,088
484,807
4.435.407
422,96^
988.220
2,426.669
98,947
75,244
564.295
225,900

330,964

42.540

4 845
66.371
424.585
124.470
31,553
38.751
562,957
19,505
153,454
55.374
2,149.640
6.940
10,727
1,322.164
609,024
242,300
42,535
241,538
362.486
914,961
2,418,000
125.000
10,515
483,200
115,381

$
-8.12?
+3,783
+4,53
+4,897
ft

+ 195.165

29i

228
114
472

-37.962 1.170
+56,375 7.438'
+96,361 1,6*1
105
+1,569
+111,417 1,445
711
+21,569
930
+34,075
—14,564
547
—164,151 6,376
—13,484
292
102
+15,134
632
+134,000
336
+20,593
111
+6,883
+108,415 1,838
352
+2,875
192
+19.707
273
+22.611
+246,100 1,673
589
+5,989

+725

13

—1.167
—5,754
—7,079

194
146
174
146

-508
+315
+2,991
+3,325
+44,513
-95.864
+92,011
+1,670
+57,423
+147,185
+4,627

+ 5.400
—32,614

—558
+22,092
+59,546
+32,169
+4.205
—1,867
—6,844
+2,263

+ 6,451
+1,886
—16,580

+ 2,448

+753

4

38 9.900

106,427
8.051

1899.

810
292
228
71
338
1.136
6.952
1,524

105
1,445

648
930
537
6,154

292
93
282
336
111
1,838

352
192
273
1,673

589
13
194
146
167
146

11

11

307
285

307
285

3.707

3,707
4,549

4,598
353

262
346
3,996
775
555
546
20
172
973
276
174
90
379
50
372
166
3.033
97
59

—52,377 2,054
+72,901 1,266
321
+7,600
227
+1.755
508
+1.379
-25,379 1.272
+72.946 2,208
+262,864 4,938
388
+24,943
50
+4,109
876
+2,500
390
+13,293
935
+ 62,952
+144.640 2,829
481
+20,474
+161,886 1,551
+243,139 5,372

304
262
346
3,671

775
555
509
20
172
973
278
174
90
379
50
372
166
2,988

97
59
2,016
1,266

321
227
508
1,195
2,197
4,938

383

50
687
390
935
2,826

481
1,561
4,962

+ 23,475

224
254

224
254

+69,063
+21,235

1,830

1,789

203

203

311,328

+ 19,636

343

343

32,855
334,900
132.078
9 001

+9,685
+55,000
—25.651

180
610
312
44

180
584
812
•*

—887

.

Pa.& Fair.
Rio Grande South'n.
Rio Grande Western
St. Jos. &Gr. Island..
St. L. KenDett & So.

310

Plttsb.

t
tf

Central
Internat'lA Gt. No..
Interooeanio (Mex.)*.
Iowa Central
Iron Railway
.....

Louisv.Hend.& St.L.

Galveston Houston 4 Henderson Included for this year.
July, 1900. not reported taken same as last year.

July.

Central..

Illinois

147,811

Mo.P.4Ir.Mt.
R. Gr. West

& Florida

Eastern of Minn..

1895.

1896.

148.941
124,16';

Trunk of Can. . .
Det.Gr.Hav.&M. )
at. No.— 8. P. M. & M

147,811

101.9AM..
Mo. K. 4 Tex

278.229

99,208
291.719
812,676

taken same as last year.

1900.

ar.

Midland.

Col.

;

of Road.

Montana
f

69,800
182,937

I

104,182
318,337
809,281

Gross Earnings.

Name

Oa. South.

EARNINGS OF SOUTHWESTERN GROUP.
July,

177,738
257,331

t449,964
277,667
115,874

1896

GROSS EARNINGS AND MILEAGE IN JULY.

.

167,688
811,973

.

Gr.

t

7.681.61'- 7.081.200 6.107.980 5 801.268 5.692 26^ 5 676.974
Total
* Includes the operations of the St. Louis Alton 4 Terre Haute for all the
rears. The Chesapeake Ohio 4 Southwestern and Ohio Valley are included for
900. 1899, 1898 and 1897, and Chicago 4 Texas for 1900, 1899 and 1898. Results
on Yazoo Branch are not included for 1900, 1899 and 1898.
t These figures are simoly the totals on the Chicago 4 West Michigan. Detroit Grand Rapids & Western, t lint & Pere Marquette and Saginaw Tuscola 4

.

13.042,648 13.187,125 10,377,687 10,594,448 9,815,159

4

1896.

•
100,414
336,657
278,876
303,294
90,55
109,500
156,986
1,984,075
536.926
124,824
407,986

113,166
60,982

202, (

.

Bnrl.Ced.R.4 No

294,646
100,268
99,633
193,980
2,052,074
535,999
125,591
349,887

664,295
811,328
168,323
87,000
174,291
339.859

Atl.

1898.

147,003
422,966

443,440
633,868
330,964

110,769
836,245
821,008

1897.

91,816

1,264.185

1899.

669,301

;

4 West.

Pittsb'g4 « ert'n.
rol. 4 Ohio Cent.
Tol. Peo. 4 West.
Tol. St. L. 4 K. C.
West. N. Y. 4 Pa.
Wheel. 4 L. Brie.
Clev. Can. 4 So..

162,990

4,415,407

1900.

830.202

158,454

1,533,875

1,350.102

July.

268,678
886,07*

519,221

136,402

4.580,047

t Includes after July 1, 1898, the Beech Creek RR.
1, 18{W. the Fall Brook system.
July, 19u0, not reported taken same as last year.

120,384

1

St.L.

Pere Marquette...

$

1.587,013

«

4 Bast..

4

Bnff.Roch.

1,162,134

12.620.717

Total

$

Chicago 4 Bast 111.
Chlc.Ind.4 Louisv.

Ann Arbor

1,910.804

1,068,154

1898.

I
124,167
463,898
407,647
316,638

Huron.
Fourth week not reported

1895.

1
2.1S8.298
497,108

85,009
3,454.335
1,045,499

Wabash....

1899.

1900.

July.

July.

bales
Qalveston
Sabine Pass. 4c.
New Orleans
Mobile

5

)

. ...
)..
.
.
.
.

.

-950

.

)

. ).
. ..
)....
.

.

.
.

.
,

THE CHRONICLE.

268
erott Earning*.

Name

of Road.
1900.

& 3. Fran..
Louis South wes'n
T. H...
Santa Fe Pres.& Phx
Ban Fran. & No. Pao
So. Car. & Ga. Ext..
Southern Railway..
T. Haute & Iodlanap.
8 1. Louis

683,455
467,835
157,702
84,785
103,625
18,742
2,471,475
12 2,924
T. Haute & Peoria.,
38.597
Texas Central *
20,884
Texas & Pacific
585.416
Tol. & Ohio Central
202,051
ToL Peoria & West'n.
102,431
Tol. St. L. & K. City
109,823

Bt.

BtL. Van. &

Wabash

1.350,102

...........

West. N. Y. & Penn.
Wheel. & Lake Erie.
Clev. Canton & 8o
Wisconsin Central..
Yazoo & Miss. Yal.

Total (105 roads).

352,500
J 45,510
74,416
451.164
296,423

Mileage.

Increase or
Deereate. 1900.

1899.

558,148
428,143
157,901
72,195
99,644
15,720
2,279,165
132,749
47,702
13,612
581,133
158.328
87,000
127.603
1,264,185
339,859
149,064
65.554
485,813
321,463

1899.

+130,307
+39,692

1.402
1,258

1,385
1,258

+12,5^0

158
224
165
182

158
224
165
182

—199

+3,981
+3.022
+192,310
—9,825

6,435

80
174
215

—9,10
+7,272
+4.283 1.517
371
+43,723
248
+15.431
451
—17,780
+85,917
+12,641
—3,554
+8,862
-34,679
—25,040

2.357

Name

of

[Vol.

Road.

1900.

Terre Haute & Peoria..
Texas Central*
Texas & Pacific
Toledo & Ohio Central.
Toledo Peoria & West'n.

269,033
176.497
4,633.593
1,424,231

615,803
965,729
9,141,434
2,075,556

& Kan. City*.
Wabash
West.N.Y. A Pa
6,277 Wheeling & Lake Erie.
Olevel'd Canton & 80.
80
174 Wisconsin Central
176 Yazoo & Miss. Valley..
Tol. St. L.

1,492
371

248
451
2,326

642
247
210
937
955

644
247
210
937
1,001

51,433.416 48.586.376 +2,847.010 QO 3»ft QS-Min
98,386 95,303
l

1,106.779

467,498
3.046.648
2,609,863

1899.

228.357
145,021
4,321.160
1,057,747
545,858
1,038.170
8.259.037
1.938,058
907,659
403,782
2,96 3,393
2,4 Z3.724

Increase

LXM.
Deereate.

40,676
31,476
312.433
366.484
69,945
72,441
88V.39"
137,498
199.220
63,716
81.249
136,133

Total (105 roads)... 357,609,735 317,992,961 39.756,001 139,227
3P.6 6.~74
increase
For three weeks only In July.
Figures from June 1 are results of railroad operations only.

Wot.
*
t

ITEMS ABOUT BANKS, BANKERS AND TRUST CO'S

—The auction sales of bank stocks this week aggregate 436
shares
An item not included in this total is a sale of 37
shares of stock of the Metropolitan National Bank, on which
63 per cent has been paid in liquidation, for $23 the lot. No
sales have been made at the Stock Exchange. No transactions in trust company stocks have taken place this week.
.

*

For three weeks

t

Earnings are for railroad only.

t

Montgomery Division included

in

1900 but not in 1899.

GROSS EARNINGS FROM JANUARY
Name
Alabama

of Road.

1900.

1899.

TO JULY
Increase.

&

North'n.
Atl. Knoxv.
Atl. Valdosta
West..
Buff. Roch.
Pittsburg

&

&

Burl. Ced. Rap.

& No..

Canadian Pacific
Central of Georgia
Chattanooga Southern"
Chesapeake & Ohio

& East'n Illinois.

Great Western. .
Ind. & Louie v
Milw. & St. Paul..

& St. L..
& St. P. J
Ohio. Term'l Transfer..
Choc. Oklah. & Gulf t
Gin. N.O. & Texas Pao."
Clnn. Portsm'th & Va..
Olev. Cln. Chic. & St. L.
Peoria & Eastern ....
Cleve. Lorain & Wheel
Col. Sand. & Hocking.
Denv. & Rio Grande
Dul. So. Shore & Atl
East St. L. & Carondel..
Elgin Joliet & Eastern.
Evansv. & Indianapolis
Evansv. & Terre Haute.
Ft. Worth & Rio Gr'de..
Gadsden & Atalla Un
Peoria

St. L. Chic.

. .

. .

Georgia
Ga. Southern

& Florida,

©rand Trunk

>

* Milw..
Great No. St. P. M. & M.
Det. Gr. H.

1,139,224
960.241
234,871
122,479
3,197,901
2,593.437
16,609.798
3,451,837
54,367
7,696,346
2,876,043
3,748,058
2,332,844
22,518,668

1,053.568
895,389
211.735
54,737
2.065,161
2,559,378
15,073,987
3,042,344
40,850
6,802.295
2,603,649
3,382,293
2,039,478
21,364,760

Decreast

85.656
64,852
23.136
67,742
1,132.740
34,059
1,535,811
409,493
13.517
834.051
272,394
365,765
293,366
1,153,908

798,248
736.166
1,314 435
2,793.336
210,570

685,407
717,922
880.168

112.841

9,493,354
1,367,046
1,249,603

644,732
5,851,225
1,486,713
93,945
1,144,195
180,794
782,016
256,967
8,599
944,7!-

690,690

12686,934

Montana Central....
Hocking Valley
Illinois Central

& Great Northern.
Interoceanio (Mex.)*...
Iowa Central
Iron Railway
Kanawha & Michigan.
Kansas C. Ft. S.& Mem.
Kan. City Mem. & Bir..
Kansas City & North w.
Lehigh & Hudson River
Long Island RR
Los Angeles Terminal..
Loulsv. Evansv. & St.L..
Loulsv. Hend. & 8t. L..
Louisville & Nashville.
Int.

,

Macon & Birmingham..

Manistique
.
Mexican Central
Mexican National
Mexican Railway*
Mexican Southern*
Minneapolis & St. Louip
Minn. St. P.& 8. Ste. M.

Mo. Kan. & Texas svs.
Mo. Pacific & Iron Mt..
Central Branch
Mobile Jack. & K. Ciiy.
Mobile <fe Ohio

Monterey & Mex. Gulf.
Nashv. Chat. & St. L...
N. Y. Cent. & Hud. Riv..
W.Y.Ontario & West'n.
Norfolk & Western
Northern Paoiflc
Ohio River
Peoria Dec. & Evansv..
Pere Marquette

& L. Erie.
& Western..
Pittsb. Cleve. &Tol. [
Pittsb. Paines. & F.

Pittsb. Bess.

2,474,3

>4

169,239
8,190,912
1,089,833
979,009
425,430
5.073,768
1,274,220
79.493
1,016,322
195,87)
765,550
261.930
5.383
892,885
560,089

&

.

Grand Island.
Bt. Jos.
South..
Bt. L. Kennet

&
& San Fran
Southwestern
St. Louis Vand. & r. H.
Santa Fe Pres. & Phx..
Ban Fran. & No. Paoiflc
So. Car. & Ga. Ext
Boumern Railway
T. Haute & Indlanap.
.

36.662
678.009
9,512

4.C8.434

433,813
102.322

1.086,741

590.820
5 8,628
147.125

513,990
126,259

17,770.221

15,723,231

902,751

807.980

19t0— 100
1899— 205

banks of the different cities are
in the matter of charging for

New York

then the experiment of charging for the collection of checks

"3,21*6

258,5^5
1,961.143
740.305
52,939
3,050,870
994,161
510,447

—

Jan.
Dec.

810,187

"4",963

will be tried.

1,527,593
646,463
13,638

—At a

829,132
2,663,253
41,638

74,900
13,397
8,131
102,145
505,139
160,800
35,930
21,456
174,115
35,717
l,724.f9d
12.467
22.666
1,558.163
658,036
42,600
55,366
58,166
456.508
495.256
1.460,945
88,235
34,372
617,223
83.258
412,582
2.457,054
105,024
1,429,864
2.311.246
172.43
60,212
469,435
351,064

2,6 12
92,58<

80,373
14.K32
20,866
2,046,990
94,771

meeting last week of the stockholders of the
National Webster Bank of Boston, Mass., Henry Whitman
and Francis A. Peters, who had previously been elected to
eerve on the Board by the directors, were also elected by
special

the stockholders.

—The Wisconsin

State Bankers' Association

is

to hold

its

Annual Convention on August
5,058

"14,232

.

Rio Grande Southern.
Bio Grande Western

Aug. 1900— 335
June 1900— 278
Feb. 19«>0— 145%
July IP 00— 170^
128
Apr. 190

51,905
130,601

15,077

16,466

295.167
2,639,152
749,817
55,551
4,517,247
3,153,192

PlttBburg

131
170
124
97
201

Last Previous Sale.

May 1900— 460

A

777,457
212,493
14,452
127,873

362,212

4,66^250

450ia
337>a
268*4-271

the collection of out- of town checks. The Louisville Clearing House is the latest association to take the matter up.
meeting was held last week, when the proposition was carefully considered. There appears to be one large institution
which is opposed to the idea, namely the Bank of Commerce.
According to the statements in the Louisville papers this

219 302

1.911,044

977,992
213,439
278,267
2,491,178
86.672
1,112,461
363,121
15.764.599
47.773
74.921
10.302,138

with

Price.

bank will not enter into an agreement of that kind, no matter what the other banks may do. On account of the opposition of that institution, it is found necessary to amend the
constitution of the Clearing House Association. A resolution was passed amending that instrument so as to make it
possible to dissolve the Association at any called or regular
meeting, provided three- fourths of the members vote aye on
the proposition. It is expected that the Clearing House will
be reorganized without the Bank of Commerce, and that

2,278.256

3,193364

—One after another, the
falling in line

1,302,442
277,213
270,594

2,603.200
494,266
1,557.437
2,756,308
6,450.110
16,172.032
728,518
73,662
3,374,194
812.108
3,780,669
30,611,329
2,728.508
8,301,716
16,433,4
759.857
524.544
4,435,115
1,203.962

12,242,461
2,026,449
1.096,444
2,579,798
18,759,978
1,991,344
2,286,900
1,225,527
41,135
462,667

Banks— New York.
19 America, Bank of
20 City Bank. National
132 Commerce, National Bank of..
3i Continental National Bank....
25 Fourth National Bank

Shares.

20 German-American Bank
171 Mechanics' & Traders' Bank...
15 North America, Nat. Bank of..

18.244
434,267
319,082
41.331

11,876,747
10,714.868
1.379,986
1,08^,756
1,750,664
16,096,725
2,033,032
2,212,000
1,212,130
33.004
360,522
2,688,225
817,192
177,509
283,325
2,476,946
65,216
938,346
3*7,404
14,039,903
35,306
52.255
8,743,975
4,011,214
2,560,600
438,900
1,493,271
2.299,800
5,9a4,854
14,711,087
640.28
39,290
2.756.971
728,850
3,368,087
28.154,275
2,623,484
6,874,852
14,122.224
587,425
464,332
3,965,680
852.898

5

Eastern of Minnesota.

Bt. Louis
St. Louis

31.

$
Gt. Southern.

Ann Arbor

Ohio.
Chic.
Chic.
Chic.
Chic.

1

14 and 15 at Milwaukee. F*
G. Bijelow, President of the First National Bank of Mil.
waukee, and President of the Association, has sent out a

stirring notice inviting a large attendance.

—The multiplication

new banks

West

not being
confined to the national institutions, as we have several times
recently taken occasion to point out. Three Western States
have this week furnished tabulated statements for the 1st of
July, and a striking feature in each instance is the growth
disclosed in resources and deposits. State Auditor Merriam
of Iowa reports that on June 30 there were 226 savings and
214 State banks, and that the aggregate individual deposits
of the two classes of institutions were $91,147,056, against
only $77,405,558 on June 30, 1899. On June 30, 1896, four
years ago, individual deposits were no more than $43,966,In the four years the number of banks has increased
793.
from 370 to 440 and the capital stock from $16,411,400 to $18,054,900. Aggregate resources in the interval have risen from
of

in the

is

$64,628,481 to $114,392,424.

In the case of the Nebraska banks, Secretary Hall of the
State Banking Board reports general deposits now (June 30,
1900,) $25,256,035 against but $13,207,338 four years before, on

June

This expansion is the more noteworthy as in
80, 1896.
the interval a number of weak institutions have been eliminated and the capital is now only $7,005,450 against $8,770,590 in 1896. The banks, however, are in very much stronger
condition, as is evident from the fact that surplus and undivided profits foot up $2,104,794 as against $1,924,230 in 1896.

.
.

August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1800. J

In the case of Wisconsin there have been one or two
changes of large institutions from the State system to the
natibnal system, the most important being that of the Wisconsin Marine & Fire Insurance Bank of Milwaukee. Never-

269

FAILURES BY BRANCHES OF TRADE.

We take from Dun's Review the following statement
showing the failures in the United States by branches of
trade for the month ending July 31 in each of the last

compared with last three years
FAILURES BY BRANCHES OF BUSINH88.
January, and very decided expansion as compared with
three or four years ago. State Bank Examiner E. I. Kidd
July.
makes aggregate resources of the State banks and private
1900.
1899.
theless, the exhibits

banks
total

now

show increase

$66,976,955.

was only

as

:

In June, 1897, the corresponding

$43,062,139.

No.

Manufacturers

—

Simpson Africa, President of the Union Trust Company of Philadelphia, died on Wednesday of this week. Mr.
Africa was one of the best-known men in the State of Pennsylvania, having early in his career been very prominently
identified with the Department of Internal Affairs of that
State— first, as Deputy Secretary back in 1875, and several
years later as Secretary. He was one of the incorporators of
the Union Trust Company of Philadelphia in 1882, and remained continuously on the Board up to the time of his
death. He had been President of the institution since 1887.

Iron, foundries

and

nails..

J.

He was also a Director of the First National Bank of Huntingdon and of the Fidelity Mutual Life Asso. of Phila.

—Among the distinguished visitors to this

on Wednesday were Prince Iwakura of Japan, Captain H. Hiraoka of
the Japanese General army staff and Nagatane Soma of the
Yokohama specie bank, all of whom arrived on the Teutonic
from Europe. Mr. Soma is on business connected with his
bank, and he paid a visit of inspection to the Clearing House,
accompanied by J. Edward Simmons, President of the
Fourth National Bank.
city

—The Board

of Directors of the Fourth National Bank of
Nashville, Tenn., last Saturday advanced Mr. G. W. Pyle,

paying

teller, to

same time Mr.

the position of Assistant Cashier.

J. S.

McHenry was moved up

UabUiUe*.

At

the
from individual

bookkeeper to paying teller, and Mr. D. H. Donnan made
individual bookkeeper.
The Fourth National Bank is a
progressive, wide-awake institution, quick to recognize
merit. Mr. Pyle has been with the bank for a good many
years and the promotions are all certain to redound to the
advantage of the institution. We see it stated that the bank
has never passed a dividend. It is also worth noting that it
is in very strong condition, as with a capital of $600,000 it
has smrplus and undivided profits of $367,278, making a combined capital and surplus of almost $1,000,000. Samuel J.
Keith is President, J. H. Fall, Vice-President, and J. T.
Howell, Cashier.

—Wyckoff, Barstow & Co., dealers

Wool'ns.c'rp'ts&knltgoodB
Cottons, lace and hosiery.,
Lumb'r.carp'nt'raA coop'rs
Clothing and millinery. ...

Ohemicals, drugs

&

paints.

Printing and engraving....
Leather, shoes
aiasH,

&

harness

earthenware & brick

Total manufacturing...

6
14
I

"27

1
914,542
1,771,488
600

iaea

UaMHUts. No.

No.

LiabitUitt.

•
8

87.000
68.900

8
1
2
26

8(1,000

160,328
516.482
127,683
14.00o
88,000
33,500
160.0H4

9
8
16
4
a
17
17

301,000
&24.400
53,500
25,000
269,000

19
8
6
10
11
12
6
2
63

987.868
111,600
35,50
81,771
61,325
160,368
92,276
39,340
87,000
894,198

6
3
33

63,022
11,697
667,968

183

5.177,682

116

1,903,644

208

4.30 .',665

65
132
26
65
61
42
20

34<*,078

62
114
26

106.956
431,432
116,813
279,835
216,167

71
169
26
87
43
99

14
1

2
4
13
1

68,9 13

...4

8

15
19
*?

'58.006
153,100
861 5E9
184,913
148,392
1&6.900
1,700,958

lrader*.

Groceries, meats

and

flsh

.

Hotels and restaurants ....
Clothing and furnishing.

.

8hoes, rubbers and trunks.
Furniture and crockery.
Hardware, stoves & tools.
.

14

166.719
85.628
166,092
66,047
41,725
11.000
2,084
370.115

98

826.090
471,346
216,113
883,724
135,611
866.0S5
222.625
118,084
111.H06
126,884
66,124
11.700
16,000
860.328

457
18

2,254.622
713.931

645
29

3,371,414
2,426,376

691

4,872,197

882

10.101,455

360,651
76,517
313,507
439.5C0
504,760
129,130
157 347

65
36
24
24
7

112,000
517,776

2
52

650
BO

3,824,366
1,269,727

793

Total trading
Brokers and transporters.

20
19
13
8
2
88

9,771,775

176,9(16

1H

56,082

2«5.0('9

28
6

74.1 S8
7,865

2
•

89
14

22
32
9
4

2

Note.— Iron, woolens and cottons inciuae all tne orancnes ot muse manu.
factures; machinery Includes implements and tools; lumber Includes saw
planing, sash and door mills, carpenters and coopers; clothing includes millinery
and furnishings; hats include furs and gloves; chemicals include drugs, fertilisers, paints and oils; printing and books include engraving and maps; milling
includes baking; leather and shoes include makers of harness, saddlery, trunks
and rubber goods; liquors include tobacco, wines, brewers and beer; glass includes earthenware, pottery, brick, lime and cement; groceries include meats
and flsh; hotels include restaurants; dry goods include carpets and curtains:
furniture Includes crockery; hardware includes stoves and tools; and jewelry
includes clocks and watches. Brokers include all real estate, note, insurance
or produce dealers whose main business is not the handling of actual products,
and transporters include all except incorporated railway companies.

[From onr own correspondent.]
London, Saturday, July 28, 1900.
Uncertainty regarding the outcome of the China crisis
continues the dominant feature both in the political and
financial world. As your readers are aware, various reports
have been this week in circulation regarding the safety of at
least some of the representatives of the great Powers in
Pekin. These rumors have received little credence, but at
the same time there has been a revival of hope that some of

in investment securi- their lives may have been preserved. It is admitted on all
Broadway, are now members of the New York Cot- hands that the German Minister has been murdered; but as
ton Exchange, Mr. George E. Barstow Jr. of that firm this may have been due to the savagery of thb mob, it would
not necessarily discredit the Government of China; but if
having just purchased a seat on that Exchange.
the Government has authorized or connived at the massacre
—The savings banks of New York State, which in their of the whole or any part of the foreign representatives of the
statement last January for the first time reported aggregate great Powers, it will be impossible for any civilized government to treat with it upon any terms whatever. As such a conresources of one thousand million ($1,000,209,099), now in
tingency would involve the setting up of some s >rt of govtheir statement for the 1st of July show a further increase of ernment having the approval of the great Powers, it is difover 37 million dollars, the total being reported $1,037,869,- ficult to see what complications might ultimately arise; and
these considerations are weighing upon the stock markets
160.
The deposits considerably exceed
ties,

71

900 million dollars,
Last January the deposits were
$887,480,650. On January 1, 1897, they were only $718,176
888, so that in the interval since then there has been an increase of over 200 million dollars.
The Savings Bank Commissioners of Massachusetts have

being reported $922,081,596.

as well as causing anxiety in every Chancollary of Europe.
The war in South Africa continues to drag on slowly to-

wards

There is a certain amount of impatience
the inordinate length to which it has been prolonged;
but perhaps we do not make sufficient allowance for the enormous distances that have to be traversed and the great
length of the line of communication which has to be mainalso compiled figures for June 30, 1900, this being a special tained.
have had this week two small reverses and the
report made for the United States Comptroller of the Cur- capture of two convoys; but on the other hand, our troop3
have achieved successes neutralizing the effect of these rerency. Here also the results show steady growth, though in
verses. With the occupation of Pretoria the main resistance
not quite so striking a way as in the case of New York. The of the Boer army is of course broken but it had been hoped
totals run well above half-a-thousand million dollars aggre
that the war would be virtually at an end by this time.
As a result of the prolongation of the war and the emergate resources June 30, 1900, being reported $568,674,400.
gency whifh has arisen in connection with the crisis in
The annual report of the Massachusetts Commissioners is alChina, the Government announces that it will be necessary
ways for the year ending October 31. Comparing with the to raise a further 11^ millions sterling for the army estifigures at that date in 1899, we find that the total then was mates. This statement has naturally had a very hardening
$550,534,731.
The deposits now are $533,845,789, against ffect upon rates in our money market. The reserve of the
EUnk of England, although slightly better this week than
$518,202,048 last October, and $488,642,923 on Oct. 31, 1898.
last, is still well under 20 millions sterling; and at a time
Mr. D H. Chandler was recently elected Vice-President when the country is actually engaged in w-tr, when we are
also sending out an expedition to China, when trade is very
of the Vineland Nat. Bank, of Vineland, N. J. to succeed the
active— although not quite so active as it has been— it is genlate James Loughran. Mr. Chandler is a prominent shoe manu- erally felt in the money market that such a reserve is quite
facturer and has been a director of the bank for the last ten inadequate. The Bank of England has at last taken measures
really
years. The bank has lately moved into new and very spac- to make its official rate of discount at 4 per cent a
effective rate; and for all practical purposes it nny he said
ious and commodious quarters. Myron J. Kimball is the
that it is impossible to negotiate bills below that figure. In
President and C. H. Anderson Cashier.
the short-loan market— that is, for day-to day money and for.
its close.

felt at

We

;

—

—

,

THE CHRONICLE.

270

loans up to 10 days or a fortnight—from %\i per cent to tyi
per cent may be quoted in the case of borrowers of first class
credit; but even in the short-loan market the Bank rate is
about the figure for all except the favored few.
One of the most remarkable settlements that has ever occurred at a time of absolute stagnation in the stock markets
was completed on Thursday on the Stock Exchange. Within
the fortnight included in the accouut jast ended, there was a
greater fall in prices in the higher class of investment securities and in home railway stocks than has occurred since the
memorable Baring collapse just ten years ago. Bearing in
mind that the account open in any market was so small as
hardly to be of any importance, had the fall in prices not actu
ally occurred it would have been difficult to persuade any one
even connected with the markets that such a break was possible.
"We have witnessed a fall in the price of consols, the national
war loan, British and Irish corporation stocks, county council stocks, home railway debenture and preference stocks,
and a veritable collapse in home railway ordinary stocks.
So far as those securities bearing a fixed rate of interest are
concerned the fall in prices has been due to realizations on
the part of bankers, financial houses and investors generally
in preparation for further government and municipal borrowings, and in order to employ their money more profitably
in lending and discounting at the present rates ruling in the
money market. The fall
home railway ordinary stocks
must be attributed to a somewhat different cause. It was at
first believed to be due merely to "bear" selling on the unfavorable dividends which have been the feature of the last
fortnight. The settlement, however, affords very little evidence to support this view. That there was a "bear" account, and is still, is proved by the fact that a small amount
of investment buying caused a very sharp recovery; but had
the fall in prices been merely due to the existence of a huge
"bear" account, the fact must have been disclosed at the settlement, which has not been the case. In reality, bearing in
mind the present value of money, prices of home railway
stocks have lately been inordinately high.
Lord George Hamilton, the Secretary of State for India, in
qis budget speech on Thursday night, dealt almost exclusively with the famine and its terrible effects upon the Indian population. One point of special interest to the banking
world Lord George Hamilton mentioned, and that was that
owing to the falling off in the revenue it would he necessary
to raise a sterling loan. For some weeks past there has
been a rumor current in the London money market that a
sterling loan was about to be raised for India. Bearing in
mind that the Indian Government had only three weeks ago
raised a rupee loan of three crores, this was discredited in
many quarters; but it turns out that the rumor was perfectly correct. Lord George said
"I propose to raise a
loan of three millions sterling. For some time past I have
made arrangements for inviting tenders and these will be
asked for on Friday next." He went on to explain that this
loan forms part of the unaccepted balance of the loan for
which the Secretary of State obtained powers three years
ago. Last night the issue of three millions of India three
per cent stock was announced at the price of £95 10s. per cent.
The applications for the 20 lacs offered for tender on Wednesday by the India Council reached 166 lacs, but only %% lacs
were sold, at prices averaging about Is. 3 29 32d. per rupee.
The following return shows the position of the Bank of
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols, <&c

m

:

1899.

1900.
July 25.

Circulation
Public deposits
Other deposits

government

securities

Other securities
Reserve of notes and coin
Coin A bullion, both departm'ts
Prop. reserve to

B*nkrate.
Consols,

July

28.

81.639.676

38%

44&

ib%

5j%
2^*

lO^e.SJ'e

percent.

8k

4

87&d.

28678088
25!462'657
86 618'462

111

112 16-16

V>%\.

27M4.
150,697,000

153.022,000

7.7«4.^e
42.148.138
18,786 8*?

2*

106 9-18

97 9-16

26«d.

128.733,000

and open market
have been as follows:

rate of discount

ohief Continental cities

July

27.

27.965.90S

2H per cent.

The Bank

July

29.

Messrs. Pixley & Abell write as follows under date of
July 26:
Gold.—The rise In the Bank rate has had the effect of moving tho
foreign exohanges In a favorable direction, and with dearer money
here the Bank has had £98,000 offered her in bar gold, all of which
has been taken.

Inoluding the above, the total received at the Bank.
of England is £293,000, of which £195.000 is in sovereigns from
Australia.
The sole withdrawal is £7,000 for South America.
Arrivals— Australia, £115,000; Chile, £1,000; total, £116,000. Ship,

ments— Nit.

Silver.— There have been unusually large transactions in silver
during the week. The price slightly improved to 28 h«<i- on a better
Eastern inquiry, but with realizing sales, ohiefly on New York account,
the prioe dropped to 28kd., and yesterday, with largely increased
sales, 27 %d. was touched. The demand from the Straits was sufficient
to absorb all that was offered, and for forward delivery 27 7ed. was
freely paid. To-day the tone is steadier and the Eastern inquiry has
again been sufficient to take all amounts offering. The Indian rate Is
Rs 71% per 100 Tolahs. Arrivals— New York, £193,000; Australia,
£14,000; Chile, £7,000; total, £214,OCO.
Shipments— Bombay,
£70,000; Caloutta (last week), £22,890; total, £92,890.
Mexican Dollars.— Business in these coin has been restricted owing
to the Mexican Exchange being unfavorable for their export; the
nearest price is 27^.
;

The quotations

July

Bank

Open
Rate. Market

Paris
Berlin

Bank

Open
Rate. Market

3

Frankfort

2 15-18

118.644,01 c

rates at the

Gold.

July

July

SlLVEB.

26.

19.

London Standard.

s.

Bar gold,

fine
oz.
U. S. gold coin., .oz.
Germ'n gold coin.oz.
French gold coin.oz.
Japanese yen
oz.

4

5

3«
Brussels

4

St. Petersburg.

*K
5k

3k
4

3t3

3)4

6

6

6

July

4

3k
3%

Open
Rate. Market
3

2%
4k
4k
4X

5k
5k
5k
3M

314

3«
*k
6k

4

4

3«

4«
6k
3«

6

6

6.

Bank

*H
6k
3k

6k
3k

sk

4

4

4

6«
3k

4

5
3

3%
3«

m

5

4
4
4

S

3H
3H

Open
Rate. Market
3

6

4

Bank

6

6

London. 1

1
June

29 8

July

e 8
is 3
20 4
27 4

••

"
"

Bank

314

6

3 Months.

4 Months.

2k

2)4

9tmm

6 Months.
8

3Mos.

18-1602%

Bills.

4 Mo*.
8

3
3

3® 3 >4

8Jtf«Sft

4>4<am iHQ Hi

26.

d.

8.

19;

d.

d.

Bar silver, fine. .oz. 27%
Bar silver, contain'

283,,

.

do 5
do 4
do 3

k

grs. gold.oz. 28
grs. gold.oz. 28ii 6
grs. gold.oz. 27*8

28U 1fl
Z8k
^85,„

29'f 16 3038
dollars. oz. 2758
27*8

IMPORTS.
1897-8.
1896-7.
1899-00
1898-9
Importsofwheat,owt.57,536,76o 58,303,250 59,056,310 60,566,350
Barley
14,370,400 21,683,943 19,147,504 20.069.5C0
Oats
17,278,700 13,744,120 13,585,990 16,339,680
Peas
2,355,440
2,174,150
2,162,755
3,025,435
Beans
1,469,020
1,904,670
2,240,270
2,497,180
Indian Corn
51,482,500 51,145,560 48,570,600 53,134,260
Flour
19,440,900 20,437,805 18,476,170 18,363,120
Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of stocks on
'

September

1):

1899-00.

1898-9.

1897-8.

1896-7.

Wheat imported, owt.57,53 6,700 58,306,250 69,056,310 60,566,350
Imports of flour
BaleB of

19,440,900

20,437,805

home-grown. 29,741,593 32,010,269

Total

106,719,193 110,754,324
1899-00.
1898-9.
Aver.prioe wheat, week. 29s. Od.
25s. 5d.
Average price, season. 26s. Id.
26s. 2d.

18,476,170
12,923,073

18,363,120
23,000,000

90,455,553 101,929,470
1897-8.
Id.

38s.
36s.

1896-7.
28s.
28s.

Id.
8d.

The following shows the quantities of wheat, flour
maize afloat to the United Kingdom:

and*

This week.

Wheat.
qrs... 2.183,000
Flour, equal to qrs... 247,000
Maize
qrs... 815,000

Last icee/c.
2,000,000
310,000
195,000

5d.

1899.
2,335,000
305,000
665,000

1898.
2,025,000

205,000
610.000

Kngllsb. Financial Markets— Per Cable.
The daily closing quotations for securities, etc, at London
are reported by cable as follows for the week ending Aug. 10,

London.

Sat.

Silver,

per ounce

d.

Consols., new, 2% p. ots.

Mon.

Joint Oie'tH't.
Stock At 7-14

28 k

Tuts.

28k

97 8
98*8

For account
Fr* oh rentes (in Paris) fr.
Spanish 4s.

0022k 00-22k 10020
71

Anaoonda Mining

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

93, e

28

98i8
983a
00-22 %
70*8

281,6

38
97l»u

97ii, 6

97iB 16

10025

70%

9ifl

9ig

98H»

00-30
70*8
9

Atoh. Top. & Santa Fe..
Preferred

2738

273s

27k

Baltimore & Ohio
Preferred

72

713s

27%
72k

761*

71 '8
76

76

76 k

8213
89i8
2814

82k
89k
27%

82k
89k

82%

Canadian Pacific
Chesapeake* Ohio
Den.

&

&

Paul...
Bio Gr., com....
do Preferred.

Chlo. Mil.

St.

common

1st preferred
2d preferred
Illinois Central
Louisville & Nashville..
Mo. Kan. A Tex., com..
Preferred.
N. Y. Cent'l & Hudson..
N. Y. Ontario & West'n

Norfolk

Do

& Western

Northern

8938

o
5
w
u
X
w
W

28k
114

fc

fe

H
ac

<
9
O

<

Preferred
Wabash, pref erred.
Deb. "B"
Prioe per share.

10

1118

16%
119k
72%
10

313*

31%

131%

131k
21k

213s

Paoiflo, com..

w

33

72ia

o
o

{H

*Phila. ARead
'Phila. &Read.,lst pref.
•Phlla. «fe Read. . 2d pref.
Southern Paoiflo

11»«
333s
17ia

w

5
o
H
SQ
*H

Pennsylvania

68%

118%

pref.

Preferred

I9i«

68 '8

a
M
w

o

O

do

114

19*4

O

Jouth'n Railway, com..
Preferred

Interest allowed
for deposits by

Trade

Bills.

July July

The following shows the imports of cereal produce into the
United Kingdom during the forty-seven weeks of the season
oompared with previous seasons:

Onion Paoiflo
Open Market Rates.

d.

77 9ia 7710
76 4k 76 5
76 4k 76 5
76 4k 76 5
76 4k 76 5

Mexican

Do

13.

5

3

5
5
5

Hamburg

July

20.

for bullion are reported as follows:

London Standard.

Erie,

July 27.

Rates of
Interest at

[Vol. LXXI.

1897.

27,916,485
6,956.178
4«,242,460
13,791,630
83,366.898
24,166,661
85.283.046

liabilities.. p.c.

Clearine-House returns

1898.

28.e07.925
8,418,991
39,690,862
18,(88,622
31,807,623
21,869,018
33.178,948

80,118,240
9.766.559
89.862,417
20,4l a ,645
28.154,842

Silver...

Madrid
Copenhagen

g

'

.

34%

34*8

113*8

18k
68k
ilk
32%
16%
119k
72k

9%

S0%
131k
21k
34 k

28 k

114
19
68

Ilk
32 k

16%
119k
72*8
10
31

131%

21k
34k
80

52*8

52%

52«8

73
65 »8

73

73 k

888

X

80

65%

o

80

8»8

80

53i«
73ia

303a

30

1478
343s

34 19

11*8
52i8
61ia
77»a
18ia

33%

I4ia

Hie

5338

61
77ia

18*
3314

65%

65%
Sk

858
29*8

30 k

14k
34k
ilk

14k
34k
Ilk
53k

603s

60 -^

77k
18k

7:58

52 '8

33 k

18k
S3

Banks Oall Dayi

IX
Ik
Ik
2H
2k

ui~

U4
Hi

«k
*k

8*

National Banks.— The following information regarding
is from the Treasury Department.

national banks

..

.

August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

NATIONAL BANKS ORGANIZED.
Certificate Issued July 30.
5,522—The Farmers' National Bank of Plain

271

The first statement covers the total imports and exports of
merchandise and the Customs receipts for the seven months

City, Ohio.

Capital.

two

of the last

seasons.

William Atkinson, President; Cephas Atkinson,

$25,000.
Cashier.

Certificate Issued July 31.
5,523— The First National Bank of Celina, Ohio. Capital, $25,000James H. Day, President; Charles H. Howiek, Cashier.

MERCHANDISE MOVEMENT AT NEW YORK. CUSTOMS RECEIPTS
at niw York.
Exports.
Imports.

Month.

Capital,

W. Cox,

Cashier.

Certificates Issued August 2.
5,525— The Anna National Bank, Illinois. Capital. $25,000. David W.
Karraker, Predident; John B. Jackson. Cashier.
5,526— The First National Bank of Lewisville, Indiana. Capital,
$25,000. David M. Brown, President; L. F. Symons, Cash-

1900.

January...
February...

66.961,5<il

April

45,925,244

1
30,349,978
41.406,582
50,697,058
43.849,067

May

44,480,441

June

35,873,932
40,233,198

ier.

Pennsylvania.
First National Bank of Manchester. Tennessee. Capital,
$25,0 CO. W. P. Hiokerson, President; T. B. Clark, Cashier.

close of business July 31. 1920.

Approved August

4-

July 30. 1900, to take

effect

immediately.

—

Imports and Exports for the Week. The following are
New York for the week ending for dry goods
Aug. 2 and for the week ending for general merchandise
Aug. 3 also totals since beginning first week January.

Dry Goods
Gen'l mer'dlse
Total
Since Jan.

1896.

1897.

$1,945,100
6,241,276

$1,839,925
6,028,245

$1,961,902
5,629,642

$1,253,957
4,679,409

$7,591,544

$7,868,170

$8,186,376

$5,933,366

$73,998,165
254,934,913

$61,643,138
247,137,040

$57,064,104
205,391,170

$90,789,515
236,786,765

Gen'l mer'dlse

Total 31|weeks $328,933,078 $308,780,178 $262,455,274 1327,576,280

The imports

of dry goods for one week later will be found
in our report of the dry goods trade.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the

week ending Aug.

6,

Imports.

1897.

$12,763,719
348,190,154

$6,136,474
269,739,256

$7,635,530
287,651,061

$7,483,644
236,004,936

Total 31 weeks $360,953,873 $275,875,730 $295,286,591 $243,493,580

The following table shows the exports and imports of
specie at the port of New York for the week ending Aug. 4
and since January 1, 1900, and for the corresponding periods
in 1899 and 1898.
EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF SPECIE AT

NEW TORK.
Imports.

Gold.

Great Britain
France

Germany
West Indies
Mexioo
South America

$6,760
1,100
6,500
2,340

,

All other oountries.

Total 1900
Total 1899
Total 1898

Since Jan.

1,

$3,652,400
15,655.574
4,500,709
1,883,908
93,760
3,703,728
175,526

$16,700 $29,665,605
10,000 25,793,312
4,689,597
Exports.

Week.

SineeJan.1.

$4,418
9,623
23,156
5,650

$93,996
254,760
325,884
219,126
199,674
377,155
68,275

$42,847
571,603
329,979

$1,538,870
8,688,734
69.331,686

Imports.

Silver.

Week.

Great Britain..

Germany
West Indies....
Mexloo
South America

$1,357,855 $29,703,880
428,556
4,100
1,500
280,642

Week.

Since Jan. 1.

$59,514
2,628

55,314
14,180

142,929
1,694,666
560,161
190,808

$1,366,655 $30,486,672
551,490 28,594,887
941,512 26,523,460

$328,993
45,727
60,083

$2,651,671
2,290,230
1,487,192

7,300

Foreign Trade of

Imports.

1000.

1900.

1899.

$
2.560,238
1.232,710

5.166,071

1,484,074

1.192,669

$

Exports.
1900.

1
831.823
1.720,896

$
4,107.866
4,126.966

1,638,052

•

4,664,686
3,429,674
4,987,509

620.398
818.911

March

212,525
219,964

l,067,84f

1.026,382

264,103
723,738

714,495

1.706,312

1,103,581

2,054,018

144,752
222,338
165,963

1,566,034

10,352.80/

1.321,495

1,060,518

938.887

19,846,388
791.444

1,231.917

4,348,788

885,342

7,968.098
2,246,381

1,7£ 3.877

3,769.647

1.904,841

8.456,055

29,657,620

25,581,913

10,320,026

29,423.725

...

Total...

Reports of Non Member Banks.— The following is the
statement of condition of the non-member banks for the
week ending Aug. 4, based on averages of the daily result.
We omit two ciphers (00) in aU cases.
BANKS.

Capi-

Sur-

(00s omitted.)

tal.

plus.

Deposit, with

Loans &

Net

Other Deposits
Notes. Agent. Bks.Au

Invest- Specie

&, S'fc.'

ments.

Borough of
Manhattan,

Clear'g

100,0
300,0
100,0
100,0
200,0
200,0
250,0
200,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
200,0
100,0
200,0
100.0
100,0

$
112,5
212,7
126,5
68,0
16,4
109,1
61,8
134,1
46,0
162,6
126,6
199,4
52,5
67,1
337,7
188,1
25,0

1226,4
lis
1773,0
97,0
1057,7
71,8
1207,0
48,1
677,2
4,6
1389,0
66,9
1731,5 103,4
1271,2
36,2
1183,6
20,9
1830,0
45,0
950,5
14,2
3045,1
197,0
1132,0
19,6
868,1
48,4
2119,5
51,9
1569,9
81,2
34,6
4,5

35,7
45,6
90,0
92,3
114,9
105,9
145,0
54,4
76,2
99,0
59,0
153,0 103,0
69,5
99,7
213,2 382,6
102,8
77,7
72,0
19,4

Merchants'
Borough of
Richmond.
Bank of Staten Isl.
lstNat.Statenlsl.

150,0
100,0
300,0
100,0
100,0
150,0
252,0
500,0
100,0
300,0
300,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
200,0
100,0
100,0
100,0
100,0

121,4
164,0
168,8
43,3
63,6
61,6
492,0
405,6
203,6
693,8
592,7
120,9
130,2
64,4
75,1
233,0
54,9
58,0
45,7
12,3

1103,6
1366,1
1325,8
312,0
662,6
733,3
2412,5
2800,3
883,3
3789,0
2686,0
760,0
850,1
543,9
433,2
1093,8
476,8
610,7
646,5
434,2

76,1
101,4
45,8
25,8
27,0
27,3
100,2
176,8
64,0
321,0
251,0
64,2
45,0
28,7
34,1
10,0
30,2
38,6
17,7
44,9

148,9
43,8
51,3
70,3
535,2
154,3
90,6
704,0
372,0
34,8
57,8
63.7
63,4
229,0
89,0
67,5
47,4
36,3

25,0
100,0

67,2
81,2

573,2
665,5

17,1
20,0

83.7
182,6

Other Cities.
1st Nat., Jer. City.
Hud. Co. Nat., J.O.
2d Nat., Jer. City..
3d Nat., Jer. City..
1st Nat., Hoboken.
2d Nat., Hoboken.

400,0
250,0
250,0
200,0
110,0
125,0

817,3
546,6
863,2
222,4
457,4
102,4

I

Colonial...,

Columbia
Eleventh Ward...
Fourteenth Street.
Gansevoort

Hamilton

Mutual
Nineteenth Ward.
Plaza
Riverside
State

Twelfth Ward
Twenty-third W'd.
Union Square
vorkvUle

Washington
Borough of

New York—Monthly Statement.— In

addition to the other tables given in this
department, made
up from weekly returns, we give the following
figures for
tue mil months, also issued by our
New York Custom House.

,

Fifth Avenue...,
Kings County....
Manufact'rs' Nat'l.

Mechanics
Meoh's'

Traders'
Nassau National..
National City

North

<fe

Side....

People's

Schermerhorn
Seventeenth Ward
Sprague National.
Twenty-sixth W'd.
Union
Wallabout

I

$
86,1
68,0
56,4

I

I

284,9
149,0
316,3
274,1
27,0
153,7
327,6
204,9
190,3
85,0

1425,1
458,0 2167,0
1367,3
1465,0
7'7,"5
718,8
1546,3
61,0 2306,9
25,0 1844,9
1,3 1649,0
1901,5
915,4
127,0 3309,0
82,5 1641.0
135,7 1106.0
2652,3
65,0 1602.2
146,9
157,0

15.6
11,7
81,5

159,4

100,0
6
86,3
20,0
22,9
71,0

15,0
31,3
38,0

296,7
194,7
11,8
212,0
136,0
14,3
34,9
19,5
7,9

105,5
7,9

27.4
37,4
5,1

15,5
29,2

4469,9 225,6
1941,1

1255,8
966.1
1979,9
753,2

67,6
66,8
30,2
111,8
61,0

..49,8

56,5
24,0
107,0
813,9
132,8
74,4
72,7
8,5
1.2

8,5

113,4

36,0

1239,1
1515,5
1389,4
291,1
615,6
704,0
8019,9
2975,0
873,5
4327,0
2931,0
1481,1
975,7
670,0
442,6
1001,0
512,4
643.5
718,4
413,5
652,4
720.9

177,2 867,5 1059,7 5987,2
56,8 274,6
81,2 1719,0
1005,8
21,1 172,9
896,5
2"i,9
54,1 138.9
21.4 150,8 144,6 1841,8
910,5
54,8
65,9
79,8

Totals Aug. 4.. 7362,0 8468,8 59512,6 2813,7 3614,8 8047,1 4296,6 67630,1
Totals July 28.. 7262,0 8443,8 59453,5 2843,0 3832.7 8371,9 4128,3 67917,2
Totals July 21. .17262,0 8443,8 59863,2 2843,33881,4 8124.9 4617,9 68859.2

New York City, Boston & Philadelphia Banks.— Below
we furnish a summary of the weekly returns of the Clearing
House Banks of New York City, Boston and Philadelphia.
The New York figures do not include results for the nonmember

965
$16,809
106,586
45.874
159.724

All other oountries.

Total 1900..
Total 1899..
Total 1898..,

SinceJan.1.

SILVER— NEW VORK

January...
February-

Brooklyn
Eighth Ward

1898.

Week.

silver for the seven

Exports.

1899.

1000.

Broadway

1899.

Exports.

40,824,221

Gold Movement at New Fork.

Bedford

1900.
Prev. reported

10,763,532
11,327,791

Brooklyn.

and from January 1 to date.
EXPORTS FROM NEW TORK FOR THE WEEK.

For the week..

18,654,702

11.891,031

84.568.F81

Mount Morris

1.

Dry Goods

13.922,220

37,477,254
37,180.335

New York City

1899.

1900.

18.477,208

42.060,954

13,435,073

39,003,434

;

For week.

33,396,871

«
12,617.204
12,108,003

89,«29,051

MONTH.

the imports at

FOREIGN IMPORTS.

14,810,389

:

June...,

The Chehalis National Bank, Washington. Capital. $25,000. Conversion of Chehalis State Bank. M. L. Holbrook, Cashier.
LIQUIDATION.
3,647— The Linooln National Bank of Chioago, Illinois, has gone into
voluntary liquidation by resolution of its stockholders dated

38.140.094

87,032,04?

45,476,218
39,634,942

1

2,489— The City National Bank of Canton, Ohio, until the olose of
businees August 4, 1920
APPLICATION FOR CONVERSION TO NATIONAL BANK APPROVED.

*

The imports and exports of gold and
months have been as follows

Certificates Issued August 3.
5,529—The First National Bank of Madison. Kansas. Capital, $25,000. A. Wehrman, President; J. F. Steintorf, Cashier.
the

1809.

1000.

t

317,015,433 299,417,170 313.0)4,183 287,029,775

5,528— The

CORPORATE EXISTENCE OF NATIONAL BANKS EXTENDED.
2,491—The First National Bank of Los Angeles, California, until

1809.

t
42,752,562
40.286,701
49,306.867
44,721,055
46,642,462
47.425,588
42,929,955

11,625.239
11,682,400
11.205,469
11,683,484

July
Total...

5,527— The Jeannette National Bank. Pennsylvania. Capital, $50,000. J. R. Morrow, President; Charles O. Spillman, Cashier.
Conversion of the Merchants' & Farmers' Bank of Jeannette,

1000.

1899.

<
49,553,629
43.983,408

March

Certificate Issued August 1.
5,524- -The First National Bank of Russiaville. Indiana.
$25,000. Robert C. Klnoald, President; Lowell

Banks.

banks.

Capital &
Surplus.

Loans.

Specie.

N. Y.*
$
$
July 14.. 165,257,7 801,235,0 1697006
"
21.. 165,267,7 797,853,9 1713817
*'
28.. 165,257,7 801,101,7 1743975
Ang. 4.. 165,257,7 803,697,9 1765864
Hon.*
July 21.. 57.651,9 184,403,0 15,152,0'
"

28..

57,651,9 184,225,0! 15,104.0

Legals.

DepositsA Circ'l'n. Clearings

$

$

71,131,8 883,489,123,478,6
73,243,7 882,174,0 24,225,7
75,098,9:887,841,7 25,268,0
76,179,1 894,482,5)26,645,7
9,421. 0|204,900.0

9,592,0 203,849,0

Aug. 4.. 57,651,9 186,248,0 14,662,0! 9,121,0 207,683,0
fhila.*
July 21.. 35,345,4 153,164,0
188,100,0
58,948,0
"

28..

Aug.
•

t

4..

35,345,4 163,690,0
35,345,4 153,896,0]

67,599,0
58.474,0

1186,983,0
188,041,0

$
865,930,9
785,678,1
753,779,5
782,061,3

5,214,0 108.725,1
5,306,0 99,482,8
5,481,0 100,900,2
7,603,0
7,651,0
7,713,0

86,242,9
80,397,3
86.447,8

We omit two ciphers in aU these figures.
.
„
,_
,
Including for Boston and Philadelphia the item " due to other banks."

6

:

.
.

«

,

THE CHRONICLE.

272

New York City Clearing House Banks.— Statement of
condition for the week ending Aug. 4, based on average of
daily results. We omit two ciphers (00) in all cases.
BANKS

Re-

Deposit*

Legal*.

Specie

sirvt

P.C.

$

Bank of N.Y....

2,000,0
2,050,0
2,000,0
2,000,0
America
1,500,0
Phenlx
1,000,0
City
10,000,0
Chemical
300,0
Merchants' Ex..
600,0
Gallatin
1,000,0
Butch. <fc Drov's'
300,0
Mech.A Traders'
400,0
Greenwich
200,0
Leather M'f'rs..
600,0
Seventh
300,0
State of N. Y.~. 1,200,0
American Excb. 5,000,0
Commerce
1 0,000,0
Broadway
1,000,0
Mercantile
1,000,0
Paolfic
422,7
Republio
1,500,0
Chatham
450,0
People's
200,0
North America
1,000,0
Hanover
3,000,0
Irving
500,0
Citizens'
600,0
Nassau
500,0
Market* Fulton
900,0
Shoe <ft Leather 1,000,0
Corn Exchange. 1,400,0
Continental
1,000,0
Oriental
300,0
Imp't'rs'&Trad. 1,500,0
Park
2,000,0
East River
250,0
Fourth
3,000,0
Central
1,000,0
Second
300,0
Ninth
750,0
First
500,0
N.Y.Nat'lExch.
300,0
Bowery
250,0
N. T. County....
200,0
German Ameri..
750,0
Chase
1,000,0
Fifth Avenue...
100,0
German Exch...
200,0
Germ aula
200,0
Lincoln
300,0
Garfield
200,0
Fifth
200,0
Bank of Metrop.
300,0
West Side
200,0
Seaboard
500,0
Western
2,100,0
1st Nat., B'klyn.
300,0
Liberty
500,0
N. Y. Prod. Ex.. 1,000,0
New Amsterdam 250,0
Astor.
850,0
Hide Leather
600,0

Manhattan

Loans.

Capital. Surplus

Co...

Merchants'
Mechanics'

,

&

14,966,0
25,697,0
16,255,5
368,0 13,105,0
2,117,e 25,667,2
5,076,0
199,0
6,601,0 120,721,7
3,275,3 25,080,0
5,454,3
622,0
7,443,3
941,8
1,013,2
62,4
2,297,0
228,0
887,4
173,4
207,2
3,831,6
4,720,8
464,1
424,1
3,613,2
1,914,0 20,996,9
6,648,2 62,423,7
415,6
5,703,2
1,486,3 13,862,2
569,6
3,338,3
1,849,0 22,112,6
961,2
6,287,8
677,6
2,767,7
1 066,7 15,365,9
2,887,7 50,002,4
660,6
4,726,0
209,1
3,278,9
277,8
3,129,7
598,3
7,054,9
276,'*
4,363,0
2.970,0 22,869,2
547,4
6,998,7
421,0
2,041,0
1,791,0 26,997,0
5816,0 68,053,0
148,6
1,355,2
2,124,6 24,612,8
1306,0 14,844,0
651,0
9,472,0
826,7
2,831,0
1,847,3 40,295,7
'267,6
3,161,6
333,0
3,351,0
381,7
3,985,9
260,1
3,421,8
3,947,1 47,202,7
320,3
9,663,1
744,4
3,050,0
483,7
4,349,5
1.260,9 10,454,7
308,6
6,943,0
154,5
2,205,4
484,8
7,167,8
389,0
2,868,0
2 224,0 13,623,0
2.519,6 46,893,4
964,0
4,844,0
375,0
6,152,4
887,3
3,500,1
1,165,7
6,040,8
353,0
4,163,2
79,1
1,867,1
1.454,0
3,013,0
1,706,7

2,158,8
2,203,6
1,205,4
2,293,0

14,797,0 2,554,0
19.924,0 5,981,<
13,236,7 2,998,1
12,032,0 3,708,0
22,08^,8 4,674,6
4,822,0 1,121,0
95,837,0 86,115,6
24,100,0 4,520,4
4,794,8
841,9
8,908,b
928,3
1,058.8
227,6
2,160,0
228,0
944,3
106,2
3,823,8
983,6
645,2
3,589,3
240,2
4,395,8
27,536,0 3,168,0
62,962,0 6,631,1
6,564,3
839,7
13,216,9 2,306,4
2,805,9
169,7
19,750,9 4,185,6
716,6
6,088,3
136,7
2,164,1
13,680,8 2,794,6
43,226,0 12,120,7
4,352,0
668,9
3,084,2
618,8
2,737,7
391,6
6,417,9 1,381,8
3,885,S<
862,9
19,229,0 2 980,0
989,1
4,955,9
l,993,i
193,0
24,228,0 7,584,0
46,538,0 10,977,0
1,252,6
225.0
23,521,8 3,819,6
11,135,0 2,788,0
8,621,0 1,736,0
2,266,2
747,6
39,833,6 8,200,0
2,950,2
667,5
400,0
3,280,0
3,022,6
763,4
607,3
3,443,6
38,396,4 8,673,6
8,517,4 2,186,9
187,6
2,630,1
401,6
3,076,1
9,482,6 1,116,1
6,149,8 1,428,0
432,2
2,135,9
6,738,1 1,159,8
334,0
2,553,0
10,942,0 1,583,0
37,518,6 9,614,1
4,042,0
712,0
6,024.7 1,315,8
498,6
3,935,9
5,128,6
375,1
750.0
3,837,4
2,455,4
526,5

3,011,1

274,0
5,278,6
6,964,<

228,6
1,860,6
89,4
114,8
176,3
606,6

223,6
636,6
2,848.6
7,029,3
1,647,8
1,232,8
493,9
1,143,2
1,000,7
325,2
659,6
6,014,1

467,0
420,5
274,8
1,020,0
211,2
1,840,1
610,6
406,6
6,150,1
3,306,2
162,9
2,376,0
539,9
799,0
162,8
9,117,0
103,0
708,8
375,8
350,1
1,994,6
1,287,0
614,7

802,0
890,1
1,073,5

859,1
963,6
409,1
748,7
1,696,4
628,3
636,8
374,9
411,0
231,8
302,1

26-7
35-0

289
31-1
26-4
26-0
34'6
31-0
26-8
25-1
27-6
19-8
31-6
31-0
23-4
18-3
24-2

253
220
27-3
22-1

The exports from the several seaboard ports for the week
ending Aug. 4, 1900, are shown in the annexed statement:
Wheat,
Exports from— bush.
flewTork
525.t92
Sotton
Portland, Me.
Philadelphia..

Baltimore

The

3.116,790 4,712,948

Flour.

Week

Exports for
week and sinu
Sept. 1

Aug.

4.
bbls.

to—

Oontlnent.

America.

C.

Wett Indies

40,262
21,073
14,994

Br.N.Am. Colo's

765

ither countries

Total
Total 1898-99...

21-3
28-0
26-1
26-0

——
bbls.

346
27-4

252
25-3
26-3
32-4

7.033

10,411

31,629
63,755

88,168
16,467

818.928

week and
Week
Aug.

bush.

since

— Cern.

— <

1899.

1,

97,645

Since B*pt.

4.

1, 1898.

*>«|h
bush.
2,116,839 83,107.681
1,8*7.434 95,448.854
12,235
308,31*
32 182 1,086,441
16,061
498,982

510,665

1,707,373

1,501,004 81,888.336 3.562.761 182,248.046
8,116,790 122,423,464 4,712,946 167,164 478

Corn,

Philadelphia
Baltimore
New Orleans

Galveston
Montreal
Toronto-

busk.
233,00b

53*6*000

*

144,100
363,000

13,000

30,000
'"6,000

13,000

432,000

755.000

534,66b

"io.odo

156,000

Do

Barln,

bush.
144,000

630,000
6.000
654.000

177,6*00

"3,00'e

11.000

10,884,000

2.697,660

1,457,6*66

325.000

1751666'

"2,0(0

Buffalo

156,000

7.000

'83,6u«

afloat..

Toledo

...

Do
Do

.

afloat

Detroit
afloat

Cbleago

Do
Do

afloat

Milwaukee

930,000

122,000

11,000

afloat

gt.Wlirm&Pt. Arthur
Onluth

Do

1,219,000
8,468,000

893,000

73,000

'

33,000

46,66*0

afloat

Do

'

8O8.606
12,000

'

184.000
12.000
107,000

"s.Oo'o
238,000

"id.«*A"h

10.000

6,000
1,000

909,000
25.000

2.664.*006

378.666*

'iV.coo

886,000

28,000

1900" 47.635,000

12,320,000
11,692,000
10,343,000
17,920,000
16,611,000

5.685 000
6,602.000
4 511 000
8,362 000
6,661.000

9.786,000
2,510,000

'53,66*6

1,524,000
7.000

Minneapolis
8t Louis

71.000

7,6"o'6

n'.boo

3,000

afloat

Kansas City
Peoria
Indianapolis

450.000

On Mississippi River.
OnLakes
On oanal and river.

.

. .

Total
Total
Total
Total
Total

Ryt,

Oats,
bush.
616,000

bush.
847.000
9,000
488,000
605,000
1,305,000
678,000

bush.
762.000
308,000
1,643,000
741,000
2,124,000
420,000
22,000
2,076,000

26-4

••••••••
..

.

7.333

872

Wheat,

In store at—
Boston

252
279

••••••••
....

The visible supply of grain, comprising the stocks in
granary at the principal points of accumulation at lake and
seaboard ports, Aug. 4, 1900, was as follows:

34-5
28-9
27-6
24-1
27-6
25-1
37 9
24-9

22-9

14,191

1,197,004 50,465,639
304,000 30.891.W70
19,690

330,511 14,623,170
371,213 16,321,827

1.937,000

266

4.

78,234

..

••««••••

••••••••

Bine* Sept.

bush.

Barltv
bush.

6.029
.

Wh* svt.

Week
Aug.

9,617,376
2,196,284
1,031,675
1,316.895
180,170
281.870

New York
Do
afloat..

28-7
25-3
26-7
25-9
30-6
20-3
22-6
25-0

d»lo

'

,--

1,1809.

256
300

264
218

006.761
046,576

Sines Sept.

United Kingdom 253,427

4

20,000
', «0
loo.ooo
158.750

o*^*j %

P«M,
buth.

destination of these exports for the
1, 1899, is as below:

September

3.

bush.
130.754
147.307
19,883

330,511
371.213

Total week.. 1,601,004 8.682.761

Jame time '90.

Ry«,
bush.
24,2:6

Oats,

bbls.

61,889
67.686
7.619
68,600
79,762
1.878
85.306
7,872

639,214
712,968
6.019
119.908
669,632

Sew Orleant.. 72.) 00
Sewp'rt Newt 24,000
Montreal
297.401
Qalveston
206.COO

26-6
29-4
25-1

300
260
252

Hour,

Corn,
bush.
842,405
583,435

06,007
41.004
132,000
16,000

250

74,222.7 91,035,0 803,697,9 1765864 76,179,1 894,482,5 28-2

Total.

[•l. LXXI

Aug.

4,

July 28, 1900* 45,869,000
Aug. 5, 1808+ 37,042 000

Aug.
Aug.

6,
7,

1808+ 8,254,000
1807+ 17,650,000

000
000
000
000

405 000
618 6CCV

1.642,000

831,000

eo7
657
693
487

416 000

208 0(0

Bread stuffs

Figures Brought from Page 302.—The
statements below are prepared by ns from figures collected by the New York Produce Exchange. The receipts at
Western lake and river ports for the week ending Aug. 4,
and since Aug. 1, for each of the last three years have been:
£««i»U Bt-

Wheat.

Flour.

OaU.

Corn.

Barlty.

Bbll.WOlb; Bush.OOlb. Bu»h.6fllb> Bush.32lbs

Ryt.

Bush.mb> Bu.66 V

116,689

2,059,700

60,650

73,710

105,700

151,300

88,400

34,860

61,450
8,400

195,527

64,451

2.064

563

10,163

8,763

1.036,830

32 35'

108,610

7.670

4,980

14,906

.

1,641.150

110,000

Mllwaakee

1,049.250

367,833
21,494

303,633

56,400

5,000

8,800

49,990

45000

Minneapolis.

6,800

Cleveland
Bt. Lonli ....

9.698

80,204

366.409

29.780

1,194,342

653.070

128T219
641,910

166,451

650,800

. .

11.961

7,850

Kaniai

City.

1.740.000

122.000

10,209
1,530

5,400

84,000

...

Tot.wk.1900

872.106

3,663,123

110,233

431,19?

6,756,660
4,749,951

3,629,808

Same wk.'OO.
Same wk.'»8

4,847,64*

4,875,824

193.C84

281,061

2.866.E0-

3,345.838

2,703,417

40.465

Since Aut.

00,382
94,659
237,459

1.

1900
1899
180S

372,196

5,755.660

8,529,803

3,668,123

110.233

431,193

4,749,961

281.061

2.8H«.8<17

4,847,642
3.R45.H38

4,876,824
2,703,417

103,084
49.465

The receipts of flour and grain at the seaboard
week ended Aug. 4, 1900, follow

09.382
94,660
237.459

•Includes stocks in private elevators at Milwaukee.
+ Stocks in private elevators at Milwaukee not included.
1. 1899, the New York Produce Kxchange has changes
its Visible Supply Statement by including stocks at New Orleans, Galveston,
Ft. William and Pt. Arthur (previously omitted) and leaving out Albany
Osweg* and Cincinnati, formerly included.

Note.— Beginning July

Auction Sales.— Among other securities the following, not
regularly dealt in at the Board, were recently sold at auction,
By Messrs. Adrian H. Muller & Son.
Slocks.

Stocks.

127 Central N J. Land Imp.
Co. and $134 50 scrip. 5 k20 Ger.Amerioan Bank
124
5 Globe & Rutgers Fire
Insurance Co
52*3
6 Hy. R. Worthington. pf. 105*2
100 Southern Cotton Oil Co.
$51 per Bh.

By

Messrs. R. V. Harnett

&

337>«
20 National City Bank
171 Mech. & Traders' Bank. 97
117 Nat. Bank of Com. 268*4-270
10 American Bank Note Co.
$51 50 per eh.
Bonds.
$10,000 Pitts. 8bawmut &
Nor. RR. 1st 5s, '49, F&A.. 92%

Co.

Stocks.

15
34
15
19

Stocks.

Nat. Bank of No. Amer.,201
Continental Nat. Bank. .131
Nat. Bank of Commerce.27l
Bank of Amerloa
450*9

gatxMtifl

ports for

25 Fourth National Bank.. 170
37 Metropolitan Nat. Bank
(68 p.o. paid in liquida-

$231ot

tion)

and

Iftuauctal.

the

JPmut,

Rusipts at—

Hew York
Boston
Montreal

Philadelphia

Baltimore

bbls.

186.0P3
50,(80
23.403
42,188
74,206

Richmond

New

2.(61

Orleant*

14.435
36, t08

Newport New •

Oalveiton
Portland, Me
Total week..

Week

1809

Wheat,
bush.

Corn,
bush.

Oats,
bUSh.
B88.800

642.325 1,473,900
203.841
670,618
333.SH1
616,001
276.554
504,061
388,056
662,173
15.640
34.684
225.800
76,000
24.0J0
110,868
168.'
4,000
41,004

3P4.451
481.317

2.218.481
2.714.479

4,160,335
6.010,081

from Jan.

bush

46,100

1,600

7,884

'"$807

1 J,62U

150

61,029
100,000
6,000
19.833
1,600.419
1,667,631

16.700
166,508

1 to

Mtw

••••••••

4,

compare

1808.
11,001,801

NEW YOBI

INVESTMENT SECURITIESY. Stock

Exchange

67.278.112
ll?,6C0,78d

62,«05,r48

Moffat

1897
0.784,673

30,476004
110.2<K),221

68.4Pfl.660

"

112.277.011
44.114,272

7.614066

3,1

07,468

130,730, 31H
60.200, 1«4
8,044.017

"

1,686,475

3.876.1I-6

9.112,362

7,002.739
6,453,897

210,029.282

235,639.410

265,722,807

198.26S.814

Total grain....

-

Branch

Office. 67 State St..

Albany

albxandbb M. Whtt», Ji

Gbobqb Barclay Moffat.
1800.
12,368,629

4H,62«,4 9H

Co.,

a*

butu

*ye

PINE STREET,

Members N.

Aug.

Trask &
BANKERS,

Transact a general bankinv business* act as Fiscal
Agents for corporations, and negotiate security
Execute
issues of railroads and other companies.
commission orders and deal in

12.341
46,751

Wheat
Barley

29

Orleant tor forelcr

12.397,750

••••••••••••••

&

_j

.bbli

Oatt

21

••••••••

flour
(jo r iv

Spencer

1,910
'

46668

•Receipts do not lnolade grain patting through
eortt on through Milt of lading.

Total receipts at ports
follows for four years:
1900.
Receipts Of—

bush.

B6.460
126 523
216,337

1

(

7.610

Barltv

<&

White

BANKERS,

45.13503

Members New York Stock Bxobange,

No.

1

NEW
INVESTMENT SECURITIES.

NASSAU STREET,

-

YORK.

A

)

Avavfft

:

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

%rmktxtf
>

I

Louis, 50c. per $1,000 premium; San Francisco, 10c. per
$100 premium.
Posted rates of leading bankers follow:

©it^jette.

IDENDS.

V

273

August 10.

Name

of

Per
Oent.

Company.

When
Payable

Railroads (Steam).
Chestnut
Cleve.
Del. &

<fe

Hill (quar.)
PittHb., guar (quar )...

Sept.
Sept.

l%

Aug.
Aug.

2
4
3

Bouud Brook, guar, (qu.).
K. C. Ft. Scott & Mem., pref.t.
Phlla Germ. &Norrlstown (qu).
Reading Co., 1st pref

Sept.
1*2 Sept.

Street Railways.
Ohioago City (qnar.)
Metropol. W. 8. El. (Ohioago), pf.
Worcester (Mass.) Traction, pf..

Books closed.
(Days inclusive.)

4 Holders
l Aug. 11
20 Holders
18 Holders
4 Holders
10 Aug. 25

of rec.
to
of rec.
of reo.
of rec.
to

3

Sept. 29 Sept.

16

to

2
3

Aug. 31 Aug. 16
Aug. 1

to

American Cereal (quar.)
American Radiator, pref (quar)

2

Aug. 20 Aug. 16
Aug. 10

to
to

Iron, pref
Consol. Gas (Pittsburg), pref....
Glucose 8ugar Ret'g, com. (quar.)
'
"
pref. (quar

8

Sept.

3

Aug.

irila'-ellaneons.

Colorado Fuel

1* Aug.

&

Niles-Bement-Pond, com
•«
"
pref. (quar.)
Ohio & Ind. Nat. & 111. Gas (quar.)
Pittsburg Brewing, com. (qu )
.

Sept.

pref. (qu.)..
Shelby Steel Tube. pref. (quar.).
Standard Oil (guar.)

Aug. 10
Aug. 9
8
Sept. 10
Aiiir.

I

1%
%
1

8

Also

Ha

4 89

5 18V3>18i« 5
Paris bankers' (francs)
40 "»40i 1P
(guilders) bankers
Frankfort or Bremen (reiohmarks) b'kers 949 a® 945s

Amsterdam
•

Less Ma.

15*®5 15»8
40 14®40E> le

95^®953 1f

.

—

,

Aug. 15

following.

5

Holders of reo July 25
to
Aug. 31
to
Aug. 31
to
Sept. 20
to
Aug. 20
to
Aug. 31
to
Aug. 20
Aug. 20 Aug. 15 to
Aug. 20
15 Aug. 11
to
Aug. 15
Aug.
15 Holders of rec Aug. 15
Sept.
1

&

per cent payable Deo. 20.

WALL

STREET. FRIDAY. AUG. 10. 1900.-5 P. M.
The Money Market and Financial Situation.—While the
developments of the week pertain chiefly to matters the
possibilities of which are more than ordinarily far-reaching,
the effect in Wall Street is increasing apathy and indiffer-

We see

no evidence that any one has been led to
take other than a hopeful view of the general prospect.
There is no apparent disposition to sell securities, and in
two or three cases efforts to buy a certain issue of stocks or
bonds has resulted in a sharp advance. This is notably true
of Chicago & North Western shares, of Brooklyn Wharf &
Warehouse and other bonds. On the other hand, there seems
to be almost no desire to add to present holdings, except in
a few isolated cases, including those mentioned, and the
result is a week of such inactivity as has not been known
ence.

Prime bankers' sterling bills on London. 4 85 a>4 85**
4 83^®4 833*
Prime commercial
4 83 ®4 84^4
Documentary oommerolal

United States Bonds. Sales of Government bonds at the
Board include $5,000 3s, coup., at 109} £ to 109^; $19,000 4s,
Aug. 31 coup., 1925, at 131% to 133; $3,500 4s, coup 1907, at 114% to
The following are the
II514 and $12,000 5s, coup., at 113^.
daily closing quotations; for yearly range see seventh page
Aug. 20

t On oontracts for preferred stock of the Kansas City Ft. Scott
Gulf and Kansas City Ft. Scott & Memphis railroad companies.
t

1

1*3 Sept. 1 Aug. i9
1% Sept. 1 Aug. 19
liflj Sept. •20 Sept. 11
li^ Aug. 20 Aug. ^6
1 .Sept. 1 Aug. 16
Aug. 20 Aug. 15
1

"

-

I

Aug. 20

Demand.

Sixty days.

for a decade or more
Some of the events of more or less importance were the
starting of the allied forces in China for the relief of
Europeans and Americans shut up in Pekin advices from
;

South Africa which apparently foreshadow an early termination of the Boer war; announcement that the new
British war loan had been largely over-subscribed, more than
half of it by American investors; progress of the political
campaign in this country, and lauge shipments of gold from
this city to London. The shipments, including $3,^25,099 engaged for to-morrow's steamers, amount to $8,639,518, the
late shipments of which were stimulated by an advance in

Interest
Periods.

1907
48,1907
48,1925
4s, 1925
58,1904
5s, 1904

reg.

ooup.
3s, 1918, small.reg.
3s, 1918, small..o'p.
4s,

t

eoup.
reg.

coup.
reg.

coup.

Aug.

Aug.

Aug.

Aug.

6.

7.

8

9.

10.

*103i2 *103ifl 'IO314
*100 *100
'100

*100
1*100
*109i4 *109i4 *109i4 •109 *109
1
*109H*109 4 IO914 109 is *109

Mch. *100

«•««*«•

reg.

Aug.

*103ifl *103is

2s, 30-year, ref'd'gt
- - TcK-Bt

38,1918
38,1918

Aug.
4

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Q.- Feb.

'108%
109 la

•iofi" *io9™ *i"09" *i"09" «i08ifl doaifl

11514*115

*115

*114%

*U4% *114H

*115i4 *115
1151s *114% *114%
*1325s *132*8 *1325g *132Br, "132
*l32t>8 132*e *132
*132Ss 133
-113 1*113 '113 *112% *112%
*113 *113 *113
11318 *112%

114ifl

131%
131%
112%

112%

the price bid at the morning board no sale was made.
Prices are quotations in "Unlisted Dep't" for bonds "when issued."

This

is

;

State and Railroad Bonds.— Sales of State bonds at the
Board are limited to $46,000 Virginia 6s deferred trust receipts at

6%

to 6Jg.

The volume of business in railway bonds was even smaller
and the market more featureless than last wetk, which, as
we tben noted, was the dullest period in recent years.
Transactions at the Exchange averaged about $735,000 par
value per day and the principal noteworthy feature was
Brooklyn Wharf & Warehouse 5s, which advanced 3 points
on the purchase of less than $10,000, face value, of the
bonds. Keokuk & Des Moines first 5s also sold over 2 points
above the last quotations. Missouri Kansas & Texas, St.
Louis & Iron Mountain and Southern Pacific issues were
strong features. In addition t*o the above the active list
includes Atchison, Baltimore & Ohio, Norfolk & Western,
Northern Pacific, Reading, Southern Railway, Union Pacific and Wabash bonds, which were generally steady.
Stock and Bond Sales.—The following shows the volume
of business in stocks and bonds on the New York Stock Exchange for the past week and since Jan. 1
Sales at
Weekend Aug. \0.~.
Jan. 1 to Aug. 10.
N. T. Stock Exch.
1899.
1900.
1900.
1899.
Government bonds..
$39,500
S66.800
$5,354,210
$7,201,820
State bonds
48,000
1,574,900
1,687,800
RR. and misc. bonds.
3,9 <7.500
8,688,000
811,964,800
609,528,600
,

,

by the Bank of England for bars and
American coin.
Total
14,025,000
$8,704,800
$318,4«3,910
$617,478,220
The open market rates for call loans on the Stock Exchange Stocks— No. shares
719,522
78,49Y945
2,103,619
113,413,899
Par value
$70,431,950 $199,664,750
$7,060,938,463 $11,004,788,000
during the week on stock and bond collaterals have ranged Bank shares, par value.
$75,660
$317.95$
from 1 to \% per cent. To-day's rates on call were 1 to
We add the following record of the dally transactions:
1% per cent. Prime commercial paper 4 to 5 per cent.
Weekending /—
Railroad, Ac. State
Stocks.
U.S.
The Bank of England weekly statement on Thursday Aug. 10, 1900. Shares. Par value.
Bonds.
Bonds.
Bonds.
91,993
$9,054,600
$380,000
3howed a decrease in bullion of £604,545 and the percent- Saturday
Monday
176,806
16,914,100
745,000
$35,000
$1,000
age of reserve to liabilities was 36'10, against 35*39 last week; Tuesday
134,580
644,000
13,154,000
6.80)
114,645
827.000
11.198.500
23,000
24,000
the discount rate remains unchanged at 4 per cent. The Wednesday
Thursday
90.851
9,039,100
726.000
Bank of France shows an increase of 22,900/'00 francs in Friday
111.644
11,071,650
805,600
9,000
gold and 2,325,000 francs in silver.
Total.
719.622
$70,431,950
$3,937,600
$43,000
189,500
The New York City Clearing-House banks, in their stateThe sales on the Boston and Philadelphia Exchanges were:
ment of Aug. 4 showed an increase in the reserve held of
-Boston.Philadelphia.$3,269,100 and a surplus over the required reserve of
Listed Unlisted Bond
Listed Unlisted Bond
$29,144,875, against $27,535,975 the previous week.
shares, shares.
sales.
shares. shares.
sales.
the price offered

>

Saturday

1900.

Aug. 4

Monday
Differen'sfr'm
Prev. week.

1899.

Aug.

5.

1898.

Aug.

6.

Tuesday

Wednesday
Thursday
Friday-

74,222,700
.
Surplus
91.035.000
joans (fedlsc'nts. 803,697,900jIno
"Circulation
26,6 45,700 lino
*et deposits
894,482,500 Ino
Jpeole
176,586.400 Ino
jegal tenders.... 76,179,100 Ino
Reserve held
252,765,500 Ino
-legal reserve
223,620,625 Inc
,-apttal

58,922,700
77.382.600
753,080,500
13,755,800
849,903,200
165,574,800
55,011,600
220,586,400
212,475,800

59,022,700
75,292,300
649,499,800
14,273,800
757,051,600
168,988,000
60,167,900
229,155,900
189,262,900

Total

6,169
13,797
6.634
6.80a
8,110
3.828

3991

$7,000

3,889
4,044
3.896
3,831
5,707

38000
19.120
26.642
15,500
52,000

3.079
9.926
8.630
3,702
6,092
6,339

1,940
6.330
3,797
2.692
2,438
1,973

$98,100
117,500
58,100
179.100
265,000
423,400

45.147

25.348

158,262

35,809

19,218

1,141,200

Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.— Extreme dulness
has been the most prominent characteristic of the stock
market this week. Less than 176,000 shares were traded in
,2,188.900
on Monday and from this there was a steady decline to a
1,080,200
little over 90,000 shares on Thursday, the smallest aggregate
3,26%100
1,660,200
for a lull day in several years.
The railway list has been unusually steady, and although
Surplus reserve 29,144,875 Inc.1,608,900
8,110,600 39,893,000
the prevailing tendency was towards weakness, changes
Kotb.— Returns of separate banks appear on page 272.
in quotations are in most cases fractional.
Chicago &
Foreign Exchange.—The market for foreign exchange has North Western was exceptional in an advance of 5 points
continued steady and is without change in general features. on the appearance of buying orders.
New York Cen2,596.200
1,387,700
6,640.800

,

The offerings include

bills drawn against gold shipments.
To-day's actual rates of exchange were as follows: Bankers' sixty days' sterling, 4 84@4 84^; demand,
4 87^(3)4 88;
tables, 4 88%@4 88%; prime commercial, sixty days, 4
83^@
83%; documentary commercial, sixty days, 4 83@4 84^;
prain for payment, 4 84@4 84^ cotton for payment, 4 83
|4 833^; cotton for acceptance, 4 83^@4 83%.
The following were the rates of domestic exchange on
sew York at the under-mentioned cities to-day: Savannah,
mying 1-16 discount, selling 1-16 premium; Charleston,
luying par, selling
premium; New Orleans, bank, $1 00
•reinium; commercial, 25c. discount; Chicago, par; St.
\

;

^

Pennsylvania, Illinois Central, Missouri Pacific and
the Atchison issues were relatively strong. The local traction issues were notably weak; Metropolitan Street Railway
and Brooklyn Rapid Transit declined about 2 points, but retral,

covered somewhat to-day.
American Sugar Refining was the most active of the miscellaneous list, but fluctuated within narrow limits. Colorado Fuel & Iron, Pullman's Palace Car and National Tube
were strong features. United States Rubber was erratic,
covering a range of over 4 points.
The tobacco stocks
showed a tendency to advance, but Consolidated Gas was

weak.

t

. .,
,...
. .
,.

.

.

THE CHRONICLE-STOCK PKIOES (2 pages)

274

New York
Monday,

•40*
2894

•60

H04
49

•15

15

18
43
27

40*
2694
6994
7394

40*
3694

120

88* •88* £0* •87
49

88

49%
103*

4894

87

87
49

48*

87* 3744 2794 28
188% 187% 126* 1273$
95
186

•83
•51

112

135

11

1094

85

•82

17094

7094

•32*

11294

70

'130

•88

85
70
34
34
54

•32*

95

1125*125*

35
24
53

10% 10% 1094

•83

•33

18

•40*

43
37

43
87

8694

110

114
180

•10
•82

no"
33
58*

11

58%
106
•80
•64

33
59
106
SO
68

114

'105
1

64

ii
83

59*
107
30
68

95
125

120

11* 1094

83* 33

51

54

22* 22*
54

110
160

114
180

(9

9

160

95
125

51094

120

1094

•21* 23

51

4k

9*

31
131
31
58* 59* 58%
105 107 105
20 30 20
64 68 64

107
30
68

pref.

Do
Do
Do

4 p.o. debentures.
6 p.o. pref. "A"..
4 p.o. pref. "B"..

•

3*

84

11

^

54

Do

Do

163

Loulsv..

4k

6*

694

694

4k St.

Paul

•40* 43

38

4k

108

•80

30
68

64

Cler. Oln. Ohio.
,

DS

4

St.

pref.
L.
P ref
.

.

-

Cler. Lorain 4k Wheeling..
Do
pref.
Colorado Mid., rot.tr. otfs.
Do pref. Tot. tr. otfs.

8*

6*

20
153

152

162% 153* 152

153* 151*158

152

Ft. W. 4k Den. C, stamped
t. Worth <k Rio Grande.
Great Northern, pref.

153

153

. .

r'nB.4kW.,deb

•84*

3594
6294

•61

lie* lien
1994

1994

44

47

•14* 16*
•15

16

»•••••

• * •

• • • • •

•2*
•14*

4

15*

•26
•92
•809
•60

28
95

70

71*

7094

91
155

91

S

13

•94

94*

•18* 30
•68* 60

»*

994

30* 31*
51
37
189

5094
137

•185

18894 12894
•11
11*
•70
79
•80
38
•i'8a" 183'

•810

314

31* 21*
8894

34

•76* 79
5194

5294

78% 78*

62*

62
11694116% 117
19* 19* 19
44 47
44
63

163

14*
•15*

16

«•••»

117

19*

2*

•

2*

4

14*
27
92
209
60
71

14*

70
71

9C%

3%

15*
37*
e4*

27
93

209

,

65

70

7094

•81
13

1294
394

9*
»* 9*
•30*
30* 81
60*
5094 5194
•11*
•70
•30

138
310

7194

82
12

•8*

93* 94* 9394
19 20 18
50
58
58
39

2*
•92
6694
7094

89
189

394

56
9394

UP
37*

21

60

9*
31

•38* 39

•185

81

• • • • i

60

9*

5094
»38

189
129

185

20
60

81
12

13

•3%

39t

394

»105

'57
94
80

•70
•30

79
34

•70
•88

135
815

•132
•310

135
815

310

79
84

58

•9*

i°>
80

5094

51*

38

.

39
185 189
13894 139

185

70
30

79
34

138
210

185
815

79
87

pref.

4k 8. 8.

30% 30%
6094 51*

38

Do

Mexican Central. .........
Mexloan Nat'l tr. reots...
Mlohlgan Central

39
189

Minn.

St.

P.

Louis..

3d

Do
Mo. Kansas

4k

pref.

Marie.
pref

Texas

Do

pref.

Mobile* Ohio
Morris* Bssex

,

*
NT. Central St.Hudson
Y.Ohio.
Louts...
4k

Do
Do
New York*

N

1st pref

2d pref
Harlem..,..

81

8194

20% 20V

3394

34

34
78

34*

8894

78

77

51*

* Western.
New Haven * Hart
2094 31
3094 21
N. Y. Ontario * Western..
34% 83* 83* 533% 33% Norfolk * Western.
•75
78
76
578* 78*
pref.
Do

51J(
729t

5194

5194

57194

•133

310

•71* 72*

135
315

51* 51*
73

72

5194

Y. Laok.

. .

N. Y.

64
90
64

13894189

M%

•5

el*
88
60
55

•88
•55
•50
80
•

8

81

15194

•53

6194

18194

6I94

•58
•88
•83

54
90
64

89
63

87* 87*

x71% 71*

Do

pref.

128* 139* 128* 128* 128*129
1% 3
53
1% a
3
•5

•82
•56
•50
•78

7*

•5

33*

33

7*

•56
•50
•78

23*

59
65

59
55

•56

58

•33
•55

a*

sales

81*

1

78'

81

Street Railways.
NBW YOBK CITY.

were made on

Ask.

Bid.

iMOk St * Ful F— Stock.

38
Istmort 4s 1950... J 4.1 100
'way * 7th Ave— Stook 882
lstmor 5s 1904... J 41 j 5103
Idmor 5s 1914.. ..J*J 110
Oon 5s 1943— See Stock Hxob
'way Bur 1st 5s gu. 1934 {115
Id 5slnt as rental. 1905 5103
Central Crosstown— Stock 255
M4N {125
1st
6s 1922
Cen Pk N 4 B Rlv— Stock 198
-n.nl •>- 1009
.I*D 106

38
108
340
105
118
1

54*
81

1st.

117

106*
180
300
107

•85

62

13894

1%

7*
28* •22

•5

OUT8IDE SECURITIES

i

188*

90
64

•5

Bid and asked prices

M

Do
53* •52* 54

•58
•85
•83

54
90
64

"ii"
this day.

I*
7*
28*
58
53
81
I

pref., vot. tr. otfs.

Paoiflo Coast Co

Do 1st
Do 2d

90
64

pref
pref

128* 128* Pennsylvania
194
•5

22
55
•50
78

1%
7*

,.,,

Peoria Deoatur * Bvansv.
Peoria * Eastern

83* Pere
68
55
81

80

Do

*

St.

Jan 39

55*Jan

pref.

?lttsb. Oln. Ohio.

114*Deo l«9*Feb

3994Jan 15
35 Deo 6394Apr
109 Mar 27
5994Jan 100*8ep
124 Jan 5 11 2* J an 13828,5
15* Apr 2 lOfiDeo 8094Jan
89 Feb 1
82 Deo 103*Anf
.

7894Apr 3
43 Mar 31

50*Jau

85*AuS

38 J'ne
7«4Jan

Apr 16
63%Apr 4
39

44948ep
19 Nov

31 Jan
4 113 Deo
21 165 Deo
22 141*Jan
28 188 Jan
28 100 Deo
31
91 Feb
3 170 Jan
37
7*Jan

* •

Marquette...........

Do

84

85 Feb 94 Nov
97 Jan 18694N0T
3394May ,?!?«>••

9

3

Deo 137 Apr

30*Mar .52 "<>
May 103 Dee
8494Mar 99*May
46*Deo 70 Jan

54

L.

700

pref.

31

J'ly 85

78 J'ne 85

29*Mar 27
Mar
80*Jan
94 Jan
68

31

8
8

43
80

May

88

JM

Feb

Less than 100 shares.

(Given at foot of 7 consecutive paces).— SIREET

Street Railways.

Bid.

Chrtst'p'r410th 8t-Stook 175
Col4 9th Ave 5s-Sm Stock Bxohl
Dry D B B 4 Bat— Stook.
130
1st gold 5s 1933... J4D 1115
Scrip 5s 1914
F4A 98*
Blghth Avenue— Stook... 893
Scrip 6s 1914
105
43d 4 Gr St Fer— Stook..
398
42d St Man 4 St N Ave..
64
Istmort 6s 1910.. M48 118
3d Income 6s 1916. J4J
98

Lex

61

85*Not

69

93 Feb 26
183*J'ly 5

33%Apr
133%Apr

gag

43%J'n<
67*J'ne

AM

6194 Nor. Pao. By., vot.tr. otfs.

Or.RR.4N.Oo.vot.tr.ofs.

•53
•84
•63

17 Ma}
5094Jan

2

n

Missouri Paoiflo...

815
2094 31

76* 77*
51% 53*
72* 78*

jSKS

14
3«

2

.

etropolltan Street
Side m. (Ohio.)

20
60
10

•18

30

pref.

4k St.

128* 128^
129* 129
139 129*
1194 '11* 11*
11* 11* •11* 11* 11* 1194
79
32

Apr
May

Mar 26

am

. .

Lake Sh. 4k Mloh. South.
Long Island...,,,

56* Minneapolis
Do
94*

66
94

•70
•80

189

18

•

31* Met. West

79

58* 59*

10*
30*
Si*
39

Do

70

'30

81
13

3%

Lake Brie 4k Western.

80
95

15494 15494

3lfc

55*
9394
18

1.)

1.).

. .

154

11*

pref. (w.

70% 71* Louisville 4k Nashville.
90* 9094 Manhattan B1ev.,consol

71*
89* 90*

198

94*

28
94
809
60

94

79

56* 56*

Highest.

.

•2*
4
Keokuk 4k Des Moines
•14* 15*
Do
pref.

15!,

560
7094

12*
3*

30

Kan. City Southern (w.

,

87*

6694
7094

512*

93
18
58

pref.

Illinois Central..,
owa Central.

43 45
Do
pref.
•14* 16* Kanawha 4k Mlohlgan
15* 16*
an. O. P. 4k Gulf Ir.reo.

4

94
309

79*

106

Valley.

Do

•8*

4

94

209

117

18% 19*

•*•••

90
90* 90
90*
9194
156* 153* 154* 151*153* 153
30* 32 30* 81* •30
33
80

117

ofs,

"B"..

iltil •••••>

15* •14* 15*
•28* 27*

27
93

106
106
56* 56* 66

185
129

4

otfs.

3894 35 Hooking
•6a* 6294
Do

35*
62*

11694116% 116*117
19
19
19* 19*

.,••411

t t » • t

33*
62

62

42
42* 42* 542
16* 14* 16* •14* 16*
16* •15* 18* •15* 16*

••*!

•

35*

63

Deb.

44

14*
15*

16*

156* 155
•30* 81* •30
•78* 7994 78
512
12* 13

66* 56*

34* 35* 34

•34* 35*

»

EDo

152

for preti-

ous year (1899).

108*J'ne 85 13694 Apr
136*8ep
187 169* Jan 18 174*Mar
179 Sep
5,310 150*J'ne 25 167* May
173 Sep
180 195%May 9 200 Mar
310%8ep
13,966 108 J'ne 35 11494Mar
123*Jan
110 113 May 12 123* Jan
136*8ep
178 Feb 8 175 Mar
185 Sep
13
9 Jan 9 1394Apr
35*Mv
115 30%J'ne 85 3994Apr 37 31*Deo 56*Mar
810 55 J'ne 19 6694Mar 30
43*Jan 6494NOT
45 103*J'ne 1 lll*Mar 29
94 May ion Dee
14*Jan 10 28 Apr 27
9 J'ly
1694Jan
72 Apr 19 37*J'ne 49*D«4
46 Jan 2
9 Jan 4 1294May 3
5 Oot
ll*Des
81 Jan 5 29%Mar 31
15*J'ly 87 Sep
1,945
7%Mar 33
5%Jan 29
494Sep
8%Jan
605 3894 May 15 47*Mar 27
35 Deo 58*Mar
185 14* Jan 6 20*Mar 21
13*Deo 35 Mar
2-15 110 J'ne 86 119*Mar 28 106*Jan 18594Apr
75 174 Jan 11 186 Feb 20 157 Jan 194*Oot
1,450 16%Jan 10 24*Mar 26
16%Deo &***"
530 64* J'ne 18 76*Mar 26
63 Deo 80 Apr
% *
80 19 Mar 26
18 J'ne
12*Deo 83*Jan
100
4 J'na 13
6*Mar 5
3 Apr
8 Nov
300 13 J'ly 5 17*Mar 5
794Jan
17*Nov
60 1094J'ne31 1494Mar 27
10 Deo i6*7an
320 31* Jan 9 43*Apr 4 37%Deo 48 Jai
16 1594 Jan 10 83%Apr 4
15*Deo 88*Ju
40%Jan
5494Mar 15 36 Mar 46*Nov
84 J'ly 18 94*Apr 19 70 Jan 98*8ep
14* Apr 4 15*May22 14 Aug 35 Jan
15 J'ne 1 19 Apr 3
14 Feb 30 Mar
1,220 14494 J'ne 38 174* Jan 3 142*Jan 195 Mar
53*Mar 7 58 Mar 29 49*Jan 61*Jan
5*J'ne 36
8 Mar 27
5 May
9*Oot
• t • e e
30* Jan 10 41*Apr 21 32 J'ly 87948cp
635 58 Jan 8 67%Apr 5 53*Deo 66*8ep
2,220 110 J'ne 35 120*J'ly 23 105*Deo 17.3 Jan
700 ll%Jan 12 30*J'ly 30
10*Mar 15|4Anf
235 43*Aug 8 58 Mar 30 40 Deo 63*Au«
10 Jan 2 18 May 4
15 Mar
794Jan
7%Jan 31 31*Mar 37
510 J'ly 80 17* Apr 19
..... .m
35 J'ly 7 43%Apr 3 • e e e » *
3*May 84 S* May 24
fit
8 May
15 Feb 2 17*Mar 27
15 Mar J.*,
480 20*Mar 16 34*Apr
1494J'ne 34 Del
300 83*Feb 2 100 Apr
60 Jan 85 Deo
•
• • *
5197 Jan
3 2 12* May 28 196* Jan 808 Jan
820 47* J an 4 89 May 5
45 Deo 85 Apr
6,550 70*Au« 1 87%Apr 2
63 Mar 88940ot
8,940 84 J'ne 25 101 Feb 14
85*Dec 13 3* Apr
6,617 144*May 14 182 Feb 13 147 Deo 269 Mar
24*Jan 29 37*Apr 5 13*Aug 29*Nov
76 Feb 27 82*Feb 14 44*May 83 Nov
1,785 10*Jan 8 14*Apr 18
17*Apr
6 Jan
115
3% J'ne 25 5 Mar 17
8*8ep
1 Jan
5104 Jan 22 5112 Feb 3 110 Oot 116 Jan
500 45*J'ne 18 6994 Mar 28
35*Jan 78 Aug
830 87* J'ne 18 97*Apr 6 73*Jan 99*Nov
15 Jan 2 27 Apr 24
894Jan 37*Msy
300 50 Feb 5 69 Apr 24 39 Feb 72 May
4,700
9*Aug 4 1394Mar 28
9*Deo l4%Jan
2,330 88*J'ne 25 40*Apr 17
88%Deo 45*Aof
17,460 38% Jan
61*Apr 16 33 Deo 52*Apr
110 85 J'ne 25 48*Apr 2 32 Jan 62 Aug
5183*Janl9 5189*May 4 176 Jan 5187 Nov
2,359 12594J'ne 25 13994Apr 4 130 Deo 14494Ma?
250 11 J'ne 20 14%Mar 29
ll*Deo 1994J*n
75 J'ne 29 85 Jan 31
65 Mar 85 Oot
29 J'ne 20 40*Mar 29 89 Deo 41 Jan
5400 May 16 5420 J'ly 13 5360 Jan 5390 Mar
5130 Jan 18 5135 Mar 10 129*Jan 5138*Mk
5210* J 'ne20 521 594 Jan 3 5198 Jan 5883 Apt
4,150 18* J'ne 20 26* Mar 28
1894Jan 88'
3,140 8294 Jan 10 40%Apr 18
17*Mar SSj
1,140 67 Jan 8 81 Apr 38
61*Jan '*/
67 Aug
81,705 48 J'ne 22 6 394 Apr 4
4894Jan
3,183 6994J'ne 25 78*Mar 88
68 Deo 81 J*n
83 J'ne 58 JM
6894J'ne 7794 Sep
80 46 May 18 54 J'ly 28 88 May 54 NOT
100 83 May It 87*Jan 4
84*Apr 90 T«»
80 57 May 10 6694Jan 2 68*J'ly 88MNOV
7,809 185 J'ne 27 14294 Apr & 182*Jan 148 Jan
79<No»
650
4 May 1
1 Jan
194 Aug 10
7%»«T
4 May
5 J'ne 19
9*Mar 26

North Western.

Do

34
59
105
30
68

J*

•15

Range
Lowest.

48 Apr
2994Apr
7494Apr

2i*,305

.

pref.

Chloago

t e •

1694
541

8

40*J'ly 84
8
1894 Jan

45*Jan

pref.

11191 Chloago Mllw.

171*

x59

5894 5894
107
1107

20
64

Chlo. Indlanap.

.

694 Colorado 4k Southern
694
694
Do
1st pref.
41* •41* 48* •41* 42*
42
41* 43
42
do
•16
16 17 16 17
Do
•16
17
3d pref. do
17
16* 16*
•16
17
112 113 •112 118* 112 112 110* 118 •113 113* Delaware * Hudson
•118 113*
175 178
ol. Laok. 4k Western. .
•176 178 5178 178 •176 178 1177 177 •175 178
1894 1894 18* 1894
18* 18* 18* 19 Dearer 4k Bio Grande. , . .
•18* 19* 19
1994
67
67
Do
66* 67* 567 67
•67
pref.
67* 6794 •8794 7
69
•13
13 15 13 15 Des Moines 4k Ft. Dodge.
•18
? «» •13
15
•18
15
15
•394
394
494 Dal. So. Shore 4k AU
894
•894
394
494
494
494
4* 4*
12
18
•12
•13
pref
12* 12* 12
111
no..,..
H94 11* •1094 ii ill 11 •1094 11 38 "ii"
,
•1094 11
38 33
33
Do
32* 3394 •31* 38*
1st pref.
•82* 33*
32* S2*
15* 17 •15* 17*
Do
3d pref.
•15* 17* •16* 17* 115* 45* •15* 17
•43* 45
42* 45 43* 46 B vans v. 4k Terre Haute ..
42* 45 *42*
•42* 45
80 84 80 84 80 84 80 84
Do
80
•80
84
pref.
84

6*

1900

Highest.

9194Feb 26
340 115 Jan 6
24 J'neSS
H9%Jan 10
37 Apr 35
100 88 Jan 31
80 120 Jan 17
355 10 J'ne 18
200 81 J'ne 19
846 69 Aug 7
300 30 J'ne 83
450 14 Jan 15

19994
Do
pref.
10694 Chloago Book Isl. 4k Pao.
112*112* Chlo. St. P. Minn. 4k Om...
160 lbO
Do
pref.
•9* 11 Ohio. Terminal Transfer.

112
180

9*

11

33*
58%

Lowest.

3,940
19,819

.

Do

•10% 11* Ohloago Great Western.

51

54

105
160

112
180

for year

16*Mar
26,660
48,620
14,240

Santa Fe

Chioago Consol. Traction.
Chloago 4k Bait. IlllnoU.

95
125

95

•

•51

Range

On basis of ioo-sh're lots

.

120

11*

85
69

>'•••••

" 6*

"•6"'

Atoh. Topeka

83* 84*
88 85 82 85
68* 69* 89* 69* 68* 69
69
34* 33*
30 34
31* 32* 30* 34
•21
83

•51
11194 11294

LXil

[Vol.

70* 7094
Do
pref
58*Jan 11
3
69%
74* 7494 Balt.40hio,vot.tr.oertfs.
55*Jan
89%Apr 19
74
SO* 80*
928 7294Jan
Do
90 Apr 16
pref.
5<0%
44,630 49 J'ne 25 80*Apr 10
56* 57* Brooklyn Rapid Transit.
5594 56%
67 70 Buffalo Booh. 4k Pittsburg
100 52 Feb 27 70*Mar 29
70
70
Do
104 120 •109 180
92 Jan 18 115 Apr 26
pref.
"510 85*J'ne 25 9994Feb 13
•8694 8794 Canadian Paoiflo..,.
87
87
•46* 49*
810 4794Feb 27 58*Apr 7
anada Southern
4894 49

173
160

•110
•160

Ann Arbor....,.,,. pref
Do

7C94
749*
809*

111*11194 111*11194 111*1119* 111
5171* 172* 171 172 170* 172 1170* 170* 5171
'157
159
157* 157* 1158* 158* 158*16194 180%
•158
199*
199
1199
106» 107* 10694 107* i'05* i0694 ib*594 106* 106* 108* 106

171

of the
Week.
Shares

.

95

•

1.

Railroad Stocks.

15

•**•»• »•••••

•180

N.

Aug. iO.

18

STOCKS.
Y. STOCK EXOH.

103* Capital Traction
103*
108* « ..
129* 129* 129 130 Central of New Jersey....
130* 129* 130
27* 27% 27* 27* 27% 2794 27* 2794 Chesapeake 4k Ohio.
126 126* 125% 12694 125* 18694 125% 12894 Chloago BurL 4k Qulnoy.

102*
103* •
1180* 130* 12994 12994 {139

•

««.«*•

Sales

Friday,

Wednesday Thursday,
Aug. 9.
Aug. 8.

7094
70*
Zl* 74* 180% 74*
80
80*
80%
5694 67*
56* 56*
•67
66 71
71
'104
120
120 104

70*
74* 75*
81*
57* 58*

49

18
43

70

181

130

588*
49

7.

26* 26%

2796
71

3694

57% 58
....

15
40%

18
43

•10*

81

*ee
•107

Aug.

6.

•15

18
43
2?

70% 70«
74« 75
•80

Tuesday,

Avg.

Saturday,
Aug. 4.

Page

Stock Exchange— A Daily, Weekly and Yearly Record.

8TO0K8— HIGHEST AND LOWEST SALE PRI0S8.

•15

.

.

Av4 Pav F 5»-8«« Stk Bxohl

Ninth A venue— Stook ....

195

Ask.
185
1st.

136
118
101
400
109
405
70
116
100
1st.

305

Street Railways.

Bid.

195
Second Avenue— Stook.
1st mort 5s 1909. .MAN {107
Gonsol. 5s, 1948. ..F4A 1117*
Sixth Avenue— Stock. .... 305
Sou Boulev 5s 1945.. J4J Mil
So Fer 1st 5s 1919. A40 $108
Third Avenue— See Stook Hxoh
P 4 M 5s.l988 108
Tarry
105
Yonkers St BR 5s
38th 4 29th Sts 1st 5s. '96 sua
Twenty-Third St— Stook. 400
J4J 105
Deb 5s 1906
Onion By 1st 6s '48.FAA 113
.

Ask.
203
109
119
220
115

.

W

.

list.

no

107
114
410
108
116

RAIL WA YS, dc

Street Railways.

Bid.

Westohest 1st 5s '4S..J*J Jill

Alt.
114

BBOOKLYN.

110
Atlan. Ave., 5s 1909. AAO 4107
AAO 113* USX
Con 5s g 1931
Impt 5s— See Stook Exo h list.
103*
B. B. 4W.B. 5s 1933. AAO 1102
Brooklyn City— Stook.... 931* 983
list.
Cons 5»— See Stock Exo banM

BklynCrosstn5s 1 908 J 4J 106
BklnHRtslsl 5s 1941A40 103 107
B'kyn Q Co. 4 Sub— See St ok Bx. list.
Bklyn Rap.Tran.— Set 8to Ok Bx. Lift
.

.

.

.

August

THE CHRONICLE -STOCK

11, 1900.]

8T00K8-HIGHE8T AND LOWEST 8ALB PRICES.
Saturday,

Aug.

4.

Monday,
Aug. 6.
17*
60*
28* 29*
59*

•17

17*
59* 6C*
•38* 89*
52*
•
90
*8*

17

59

7

7

43

•11*

41*

49
15

•9
•68

U*

65

97

83* 31*
10* 10*
59

14*
1111

58*
15
111

70

33*
10*
38*
33*
10*

70

9

33*
10*
27*

•a*

10*

11

36* 26*

m

10* 10*
52* 53*
1«* 14*

3

•109

110

35
46

60*
76*
e* 6*
18
18*

•••«••

»«*

35
45
53*

••••••
••••••

45

••*•

59* 59*
75* 78

59* 80*
75* 76*

6*

7
18

lit prer., Tot. tr otf§.
2d pref.. rotlng tr otf i.

15
111

•

60
78

7

9*
67* 67*
33* 33*
9*

38

52
14* 15
•109
111

59* 60*
78* 7e*

15*

••••it
••••••

35
45

28
83

Bio Grande Western

7*
43

16*

9*
70

34*
10* St. LoaU South western...
pref.
Do
88*
33* Southern PaolfloOo.......
Southern, voting tr. otf i.
Do pref., vot. tr. otf
62

Do

6*

6*

7

17* 18* •17* 18* 118 18
18
18* 18*
3* 9
8* 9
9* 9* 8* 9
9
e*
9* 9*
46 48 •16* 48 46* 48
48
•18
«»5* 45* •48
48
23* 23* 33* 23*
•83* 83* 23* 23* •33* 23* 23* 23*
13 11
13
14
14
14
•18
14
•13
14
18 14
•38* 39* 37* 37* 38
39*
•37* 39*
89* 89* 137* 37*
125

1125

•15* 15*
•82* 64
34
84*
•88* 91
•35
28*
•154

153

•155

70

158

36* 36*
68

167

155

158

90
32*
77*

67

•80

95

23* •33* 23
78* •77* 79
92* 93* 93* 93*

138 133
45* 45*
188 173

•138

133

45* 45*
•168

175

57*

34*

34
•115

13*

125
15

7*
36*

85
135

125
•13* 15

178* 178* 176* 177*
94* 21* 94* 24*
76 77
78* 77

155

1135

Central. . .

•125

158

11* •10*
54*
58* 54
•3*
4*
4

•31

City Rapid Transit.
pref.
••
Union Paolflo By

Do

...pref.

Wabaih
Do

pref.

A L.

Wheeling

Do
Do

B.,

new

. .

lit pref.
3d pref.

Wlscon. Central,

new

'536

ll*J'ne26
8*J'ce36

140
730
700

Do

34*
66* 66*
76* • I 6 *

S3

133

133* 138

•52
•99

53
100

102

132
53
99* 100
1108
108
53

33* 28*
65* 65*

23* 23*
65* 66*
39* 29*

39* 39*
•8*

•74
•96
•14
•81

4

5
•74
•96
•14

78
100
17

78

100

merioan Car A Foundry

1
4* Amerioan Malting
pref.
Do
21* 21*
86
36* Amer. Smelting A Refining
38*
88 88*
pref.
Do
II*
88* 88
•18* 18* 18* 18* Amerioan Steel Hoop
19
pref.
•68
68 67
Do
67
67
33
83* 33* 38* Amer. Steel A Wire (new)
pref.
Do
73* 74*
74
II* •73

17

30

38

15
•6

138

195

15*

•15

*}*

i°>
36

;

17

•14

•••••€

86
186

128

15*
7
81

33

128

13

18

12

31*

31
188

31

81

6

69
•15
•11

*19*

64*

5

5*

70

1°6*

15

180

98
198
80

19*
64*

69* 70*

89*

88* 88*
17* 18*
90* 94

20

94* 95
535
95
83* 85

11*
!!*

45* 48*
90* 91*

!•* 33

198

136

35
187

45

47

10* 10*
68* 68*
36* 87
194
'199

94

138

6

7

7

25

35

84

980
950

1,847

SI*
10*
88*
26*
94
•123

•BldandMkedprioest no

65

Street Railways.

69*

47

45

47

10*

10
10*
•68* 69

13
11* 11
64* 586* 66*
69
30
94
188

6*Mar

66*Deo 84*Jan
6*Deo
8*Jan
19 May 85*Apr
7*Dec 13 Aug

16

57

3

J'ly

Apr

45

Deo

64 Jan

21*Deo 32*8ep
13*May 31 Not
15 Deo 59 Aug

2

31*Jan
43*Feb
93 Mar 24
50*Feb 6

l8*J'ne 87
34*J'ne 18
85 J'ne 35
17 J'ne 35
66 J'ne 26
28*J'ne 25
69*J'ne 25

24

» <

133

Bid.

Ask.

Do

35

National TubeUo.

Do
pref.
New Cent.Coal (new stock)

6

103

100
114
100

117'

109
80
114
88
105

117*

...,
...

Ontario Silver
Paolflo Mall
,
eop'1'sGas-L.AO. (Ohio.
Presied Steel Car
,

80*
99*
40*
73
185

Do
Pullman Company

pref.

Republic Iron

. .

79* 79* 579*

Leo than

80

79*

lOOsharci.

80

est.

t Ex 100

p.

a stock div.

*

30

23 J'ne 21
79*J'ne 18

17* Aug
90*Aug

18*May
40*Feb
96

Railway.

Bid.

Ask.

OTHER

CITIES.

100
Buffalo Street Ry— Stock
1st ooniol 5i 1931. FAA
1108
Deb 6s 1933
Stock.. 347
Chioago City
24*
Indianapolis Street Ry....
100
Cleveland City Ry
Cleve City-lst 5s '09. JAJ 102*
87
Cleveland Bieotrio Ry . . .
..MAS 103
Con 5s 1913
97
Columbus (O) St Ry......
88
Preferred......!........

RR—

MAN

me*

14
5
1

150

J'ne 23

79*J'ne 28
40*J'ne 25

23
7

illtll

101

104
88
108
99

80

J'ne

9

Feb

17*Jan
lll*Apr
1,815 8 9* Aug
58* Jan
1,310 71* Aug
88*Jan
2,749 176 J'ne 25 189* Jan
8*J'ne 25 37*Feb
3,370
1,449 49 Ang 1 70*Feb
5 9* Jan 16 60*Mar
19* J'ne 26 28*J'ne
100
330
4,785

300
360
990
30
9,545
190
26,831

865
10

715

9
3
6

59*J'ne 25

4*Mar

6

7

15*Mar 26

11

Jan

9
3
9

17
17
19
6

May 99*Aug

Oot 13 Jan
Deo 230 J'ly
6*Jan 17*Nor
6 Mar 10*Apr
35 Deo 55 Jan
90*Deo i29*Apr
44*J'ne 61 Aug
75 Deo 91 Sep
156 Jan 3 07*Oot
16*Dec 33*Sep
36
110

60*Deo
58*Deo

79 Aug
65 Apr

6*Sep

6

8
15

15*N0T

65*J'ly 88

10*Jan

3

63 J'ne 36 104 Feb 2
36 Jan 136 Sep
13* J'ne 19 16*J'ly 11 11 Nov 15*Jan
10 J'ne 18 35 Feb 7
17*Deo 15 Mar
56*May 9 77* Feb 2 71 Deo 89 Mar
Mar 12 5 49*Mar 31 {15 Deo 80 Jan
5 45
7*J'ne 25 19 Jan 3
5*J'ne 40*NOT
65 J'ne 25 77 Jan
81*Deo 84*NOT
21 J'ly
6 44 Jan
37*Deo 57 Apr
90 Feb 37 104*Jan
99*Dec 181 J'ly
130 J'ne 1 (129*Feb
120 Deo 185*8ep

77*J'na 32

88*Jan

I

82

Dec

Bid.
hila.

Ask.
list.

RAIL WA YS,

Street

Railway.

20

Orleans City By...
Preferred..,.
.<

A»*.
22

96* 98
900

304

108* 109
93
83
116
105

«

•

&e.

«iu.

New

H

'

S9*Ja

Ex rights.

Crosit'wn— lit 5s....... 1108
110
O Hob A Paterson
16
17
North Chicago— Stook.
Nov 1 1949. .MAN 79* 80
g
JAJ
1st 5s 1906-16
Kansas City El 6s.... .... 1108
North Jersey St.— 8took.
Guar 4s 1998
JAJ i 88
Bonds
• 000
Lake St (Chio)Blev-Stook
9* 10* Pat Ry oon 6s 1931 .JAD
deb 5s 1928
AAO
JAJ 93
GenSi 1914
91
Loulsv St Ry— 5 p o bonds 5118* 119* Prov A Pawt'ok-lst 5s '33
Common.
78
loohester Ry
79
.,
Preferred..,,,,,
AAO
Con 5s 1930
sues 110
LynnABos-lst 5s '84. J AD {113
..JAD
3d 5s 1933
Mlnneap St Ry-5s 1 9. J AJ {108* 110
{ Buyer pays accrued
J

111
265

85

88*May

Railway.
Ry— Con 5i.— 8ee P

Street

5

31

35 May
200 115 May
300 13*Jan
8*J'ly
906 25*J'ne
92 Mar
2,710

9,231

20

1C
10

(Givbn at foot op 7 oonsbotjtivb pages).— 81REET
Street

Feb

39 Apr
Deo 63 Jan
7
89 Deo 107* Jan
5
22*Deo 10*Jan
20 103* Deo 115 Jan
6
31* Deo 63 Apr
8

7

28*Feb
106*Feb
53*Feb
97 Feb 6
54*Apr 6
92*Apr 4
37 Apr 80

Pnlon Telegraph

Col St

108

ar.Bt.ANew lit5i'06AAO
Ct'P't A Lorlmer St lit 61.
105
Klngi Co. novated
lit 4s 1949
80
KaiianEiecpref
75
•1944
110
.....AAO
lit 411943
JAJ 85
MowWmb'gAFllitex.lUs 100
Bt«lnwaylit6il992. ..JAJ I

95
130
5

20,983

pref.

National Steel

16* 16*
91
91*

33

........

pref.

Do

••••••

6* Jan

.

38* 30*

92

on thli day.

326

5s '39. JAJ

5*

IV

sales

Coney Island A Brooklyn.
lit 5s 1908
JAJ

B'kCANew

65

15*

OUTSIDE SECURITIES
908.JAJ

e •

pref.

Do

National Lead.

10*
A Steel.
53
Do
pref
82* Sliver Bullion Certlfi.
loss-Sheffield S. A I ...
19* 20 19* 20
Do
65 86 65 66
pref
5
Standard Rope A Twine.
5
5*
5*
70* 70* Tenn. Coal Iron A RR
69* 69*
15
Texas Pacific Land Tiust
15
14* 16
11
10* 11 Union Bag A Paper
Do
84 65* 61 85*
pref.
17
United States Hxpress
(17
147
17
10* 10* United States Leather.
10
no
Do
pref.
88* 69* 88* 89*
87* 28* 37* 28* United States Rubber.
Do
pref.
'21* 93* 594* 91*
183 128 5125 125
Weill, Fargo A Co

•19* 20

•14*

79* 79* 580* 80*

Is oertf s ladbtl

58*Not
25*Mar

43 111 Jan 2 1130 Apr 30 5108 Jan 5119 Feb
2,035 12*Jan 15 18 Feb 7
10*Dec 3l*May
590 57*J'ce23 67*Apr 2 51 Deo 68*Sep
785 30 J'ne 35 37*Apr 7 30 Deo 46 Not
90 Jan 8 100 Apr 5
88*Jan 97*Oot
24*Jan 4 33* Jan 22 30 Oct 52*Mar
97 5142 Mar 6 159 May 9 133 J'ne 5160*Au
2,710 27*J'ne 26 49*Apr
31 Deo n*8ep
69 60*J'ne 19 78*Feb
72* Deo 85 Sep
420
9*J'ne 23 16*Feb
8* J'ne 16*N0T
655 49*J'ne 85 60 Feb
14*J'ne 61 Dec
100
3 J'ne 12
7*Jan
6*Dec 37*Jan

1,946
191
3,860
2,971
1,185
764

138* 136* N.Y. Air Brake.....
15* 15* 15* 15* North Amerioan Co.

15* 15*

6

19

18

15

13

65*

20
66
5

15

185*

17*
10* 10*
»«8* «8*
86* 96*

98

71*

11*

19

65*

45

188

80
68
~5 *

14*Oot

.

Manhattan Beaoh Co
National Blioult........

16
31

99

•19* 90
•64* 68

18*Aug
40*Aug
44*N0T

I

»31*

99

Oot

l4*Feb
75*Jan
44*Jan

.

31
31
81* 30*
131* 81* 30*
99*
99* 98* 98* 9i* 98* 98* 99
89* 82* 40* 40* 40* 40* 40* 40* 10* 10* 10*
71*
73
78
x71* 71* 71
73
78
73
572* 72*
183* 183 1183 181 183 186
185 187* 186* 187* 185
9* 10* 10* 10*
9
9*
9* 9* 10* 10* 10*
•50* 53
59
53
50* 51* 50
50* 51* 51* 50*
•61*
61* 63* 61* 62* •61* 63* •61* 62* •61*

81* 31*

99

Jan

18

i

6

•6

44*Jan 10

70*J'ne 83

37

55

242 Feb
Jan 29 Apr
Jan 15 Deo
Jan 73 Apr
Jan 111 Feb
38*J'ne 51*Deo

60* Apr 4
78* *pr 4
9*Apr 87
2,340 17 J'ne 85 34*Apr 37
610
8 J'ne 18 ll*Mar 26
15 46*J*ly 13 58*Apr 2
400 2l*J'ne 18 33*Mar 26
100 18 J'ne 87 20*Mar 31
810

Jan]

68*Apr
88*Mar
44 Not
90*NOT
7*Dea

20
35
68*Jan 24 38
2 143 Apr 12 118

136 Jan
383
7,167
300

25

. .

33
15* 15

35
140

2

• • • e • *••#••••
••••!*•*•••••
61* J'ly 5

77",

Highest.

3',

31* 31* 31*
•85
•85
88 89* •85
90
•19* 91
19* 20
19* 19* •19
96 97
97
97
96
97* 96*
84 95 I 35 95
24
24* 21
84* 84* 585* 85* 83* 84* 83*
•5
47
45* 46
45*
89* 90
90
89* 90* 89* S8*» 90
136

10* j'ne 35
49*J'ne 25
13*J'ne25

45*Mar

Lowest.

Deo 87*Jan
30 Deo 59 Apr
77*Deo 94*Apr
88* 88
765
21 May 48*N0T
19
19
400
86 Feb
70 May 86* Sep
•ee
67
10,625
59*Apr
32 Deo 73 Mat
33* 33
800
95 Feb
81 Deo 106*Mar
73* 73
125 Amerioan Sugar Refining 111,475 95*Mar 3 187* Jan
H4*Deo 182 Mar
121* 133* 192*
121* 121 122
pref.
Do
116 118 1117 117* 118 117
95 107 Mar 2 118 J'ly 14 110 Jan 133 Mar
118
90 95 Amerioan Teleg. A Cable.
•90
•90
590 J'ly 83 5 9 8* Jan 13 594 Deo 105 Apr
95
95
•90
95
32* 23* Amerioan Tin Plate
1,120 18 J'ne 25 36*Feb
20 Deo 53*Apr
22* 23
22* 23
38
33
pref.
Do
70*J'ne 25 84*Apr 9 74 Deo 99*Feb
77 79 76 79 76 79* 78 78*
Amerioan Tobaooo.
84*J'ne 25 lll*Feb 14 t78*Deo 229* Apr
6,800
98* 93* 92* 93* 93* 98* 93* 93*
128 133
pref.
Do
128 May 17 140 Feb 15 121 Deo 150 Mar
31*Dec 70 Apr
9 85 37*J'ne 85 5 4* Apr 3
44* 41* 43* 43* 13* 14* Anaoonda Copper
44* 45
140 Jan
175 May 31 130 Deo 160 Mar
167 174 165 174 165 173 Brooklyn Union Gas
167 173
*7
runiw. DookAC.Imp't.
9*May 20*Au«
""id
6* J'ne 25 16* Jan 25
•7
7* 7
7*
7*
5*Apr
l*May 7 2*Apr 10
l*Jan
Colorado Coal A I. Dev't
35 35* olorado Fuel A Iron.
7,780 99*J'ne 18 51* Apr 2
30*Feb 64 Sep
35* 534* 35*
85* 35* 35
pref.
Do
125 130
135 130 125 130
100 120 J'ne 8 181*Jan 17
88 Jan 130 Deo
'122
130
6*Feb 2l*Sep
11* J'ne 23 21 Apr 2
13* 15 13* 15 13* 16 13* 15 Col. A Hook. Coal A Iron.
6,197 U70*A'gl0 199 Jan 3 163 J'ne 223*Mar
174* 175* U70* 170* Consolidated Gai (N. Y.)..
174* 176* 174* 175
6,700 21*May 21 38 Jan 3
20 Deo 65*Apr
31* 25* 25* 35* 25* 25* Continental Tobaooo
24* 25
Do
pref.
77*
2,030 70 May 13 89*Jan
3
71 Deo 10 3* Ang
77* 77* 77* 77
76* 76* 77
Detroit City Gai
900 90* Aug 2 98*J'ne 14 63 Jan 101 Aug
90* 90*
Brie Telegraph A Teleph.
101 Jan 3 123*Feb 23
92*Jan 130*Oot
10,840 2S*J'ne 35 57*Feb 6
39* Deo 75 Apr
83* 38* 39* 33* 3<* 33* 33* 33* Federal Steel
Do
pref.
1,132 60*J'ne 26 77*Feb 6
67 Deo 93*Apr
66* 66* 565* 66*
85* 65* 66* 66
Gas & Klec. of Bergen Co.
64 May 17 81 J'ly 17
700
•• ttlri •••
78* 78* 76* 76* 76* 76*
95*Jan 132 Not
1,230 120 Jan 10 140*Apr 19
132* 132* 131* 131* 131* 131* General Hleotrlo
131 131
54
37 Dec 76*Mar
3,265 44 May 15 58*Feb 5
454* 54* Gluoose Sugar Refining.
54* 54* 53
53
53
Do
pref.
215 98 Jan 2 l0l*Feb 1
95 Deo 110 Jan
99 101 99 101 4100* 100* <)9 100*
H. B. Clan In Co
5108 108
103 ....
20 106 J'ne 25 115*Jan 11
97 Jan 117*J'ly
103
108
22 23 International Paper.-.
33 23
800 14*Mar 6 25*Jan 3
17 Deo 68*Jan
22* 32* 32* 82*
Do
65 64 65 66
pref.
400 58 Mar 8 70*Feb 6 62*Deo 95 Jan
66
65* 65* 65
International Power
700 24 J'ne 30 80*J'ly 14
99
39
89* 39* 99
28* 29
1 29 International surer
4
•4
5
4
3*Aug 3 10*Jan 26
100
5
5
9 Deo 36 Feb
5
Knickerbocker loe (Ohio.)
24 J'ne 29 40 Feb 13
30 Deo 63*Feb
Do
pref.
52*J'ly 21 66 Feb 8
70 Nov 81 Feb
74 76 74 76 78 75 73 76 Laolede Gas (St. Louis)
65 May 10 80 Jan 5
51 Mar 85 Deo
Do
pref.
98 100 •98 100 98 100 98 100
96 Jan 11 100 Jan 4
95*J*ly 10 3* May
30

20
37

31* 31*

31*
87*

21'*J'ne33
30*J ne 18

•••••I
lll*|«

• «

39* 34*
65* 68*

J'ly 12

31*J'ne28
8*J'ne 20

1,285
8,271
2,610
3,910

pref.

Adams Bxpreis..,.

188

15* 16

66

IUlacellan's Stocks.

157* 156 158 American Hxpreii. ........
•••••
38
33* 35* Amerioan loe
68 69
pref.
Do
69
U* •10* 11* Amerioan Linseed pref.
Do
54* 54* 54*

•3*

May 24
38*May 26

MMIi

pref.

Jan 16

100

Range for previous year (1899)

21*Apr 4 15*Deo
6 8* Apr 5
4 2* Dec
35* Air 5 22*Deo
60 Mar 8
25*Jan
93 Mar 22
66 Jan
7 Aug 6
3*J'ne
49*Jan 2 38*May
16* Feb 5
9 J'ne
12 Mar 31
8*Deo
72*Mar 30 61 May
39 Mar 30
28*Deo
13* Mar 26
6*Jan
34* Apr 16 17 Jan
43 Mar 27
27 May
15* Mar 27 10 May
6l*Mar27 40*Jan
31 Apr 17
12*Deo
135*Jan 3 117*Deo

J'ne 20
9
9

Jan
Jan

5

310
10

pref.
•31
Do
63
62*
•33* 31 American Cotton Oil
34
33* 34
pref.
Do
88* 90* •88* 90*
90*
28* Amerioan Dlitriot Tel ....
38* 25
28* 35

67
70
11* 10*

85

125

15*
25* 63
63

15*

36

70

11*

95

128

36* 36*

36* 36*

11* 11* 11*
154* 54* 54* 54* 154*
4
•3*
4
•3*
4
19 20
30
19*
30
36* 36* 536* 36* •36*
88* 83* 88* 88* 88*
•18
30
19
16* 19
67* •88
67* 67* •86
32* 34* 38* 84* 38*
•73
74* 73* 73* 73*
129 123* 121* 123* 130*
*118 118 $115* 116* •118
•11

125

125

1135

15* 15* 515* 15* 515*
61 63 183*
63
63
•33* 34* •38* 34* 33*
88* 90* 88*
•25
28* 25
28* •36

38* 38*
•87

129

125

A Ohio

Highest.

43*Jan 27

828

Paolflo
<
-L hlrd Avenue (N. Y.)...

69* 59*
76
76*

76

16

49
98
80

Texas A

Toledo

for year 1900.

Lowest.

300

pref.
vot.tr. oti.
St. J. AG. 111.
lit pref.
Do
3d pref.
Do
8. Fr., rot. tr. otf •
8t. L. A
lit pref.
Do
3d pref.
Do

275

2.

On basis of 100-sh're lots

Do

90

Twin

59*

8*

7

68*

Do

59
76

Range

1,300
19,050
2,960

17

•95

43

•41

11

•25
•45
•JO

•95
•45

7*

•6*

34

52

Reading, Toting tr. otf i.

N. Y.

Page

(2 pages)

of the
Week.
Shares

Friday,

• • • • t

*

PRICES

,

STOCKS.
STOCK EXCH.

Aug. 10.

58* 59
68*
28* 38* 28
*
59* 22*
90
90
••••••
6* 7* *6* 6* 6*
43 13 42 43* •42
•14* 15* 14* 15* •14*
9*
9* 9* 9* 9*
•68
68
167
67* •66
33* 33* 83* •33*
33*
10* 10* 10* 10* 10*
26* 26* 26* 26* •38*
33* 33* 33* 33* 33*
10* 10* 10*
10* 11
52
52
51* 51* 51*
14
14* 14* 14*
109 ili* 109
111
109

90

. .)
.
.
..
..
.
.
.

Sales

16* 17* 16*

•16* 17*
16* 17
68* 58*
58* 59
88* 37* 98
38
59*
59*

16* •15

19

9*

83* 33*
10* 10*
97

90
7
44

Wednesday Thursday,
Aug. 9.
Aug. 8.

Tuesday,
Aug. 7.

,
.
,

{

94

83*

15* 17*
14
14*

1107*

••••••

88

85

Inter sit.

.

N
N

.

1

THE CHR0N1CLE.-B0ND

276

BOND8
T.Y.STOCK EXCHANGE El
Week Ending Aug. 10. if

Price
Friday,

Range or

Aug. 10.

Last Sale.

Bid.

Alabama Cent. See 80 Ry. M-N
labama Mid 1 at *u g 1 «28
Albany A 8usq. See D AH.
Allegheny Val. SeePennCo.
Am Dock A I. See Cen of N J.
1995
Ann Arbor l»t g4i
Atoh T A 8 Fegen g 4s. .1995 to'

Week's

Ask Low. High. No.
108

.

91* 92*
101

84

1995 A-O
1995 Novt
1995 Novt
Registered
1902 J-J
Equip traer Ag 5s
ChloA 8t Lou 1st 8s.. 1915 M-S
Atlanta A Char. See Sou Ry.

Aug'00
101*
99»4 May'Ou

Bale

262

101

83*
84* 155
79*Dec'9w

117*

J-D

- j

108

108

94%

94*
98* 103
99
100*
78* 80

94*

98

123

PJunAMDlv

lstg
Registered
Monon RlT lstgug 58.1919

111
111

1990

Boonev Bridge.

See

86

91
•••»••

111

113

May'00

let

W

113* 113* 113*
103
129
124

•126

•184* 127

109

114*

189
134

113*

181

Apr '97
J'ly'00
J'ne'00

124*

100

Nov*99

106*

112*
106*

106*

117
115
105

....

117

117

1 106
25 115

US

May'00

109

117*
110

Jan.'99

108*
108*

J'ly'00

104

Apr'00

88

J'ly'00

87* 90*

92*

Sale

103

lstg 4s.l948 J-D
Central Ohio. See Bait A O
OenRR A B of Ga—Col g 5s' 37 M-N
Cent of Ga Ry— 1st g 5s. 1945 F-A*
1945 F-At
Registered
1945 M-N
Consol gold 5s
1945 M-N
Registered
1st pref lnoome g 5s . 1945 Oct.*
Sd pref lnoome g 5s... 1945 Oct.*
3d pref lnoome g 5s... 1945 Oot.*

DP

87

90

90

......

116*117*
92
44

.

J'ly'OO
J'ne'00

91
92*
118*120

106*

105
106
104

12*

119

108*
109*
104

45
Sale

7

6
95

Sinking fund 5s
Ohio A Iowa Dlv 5s. ... 1 905
1922
Den? Dlv 4s
Illinois Dlv g 8*s ...1949
Registered
1 949
Iowa Dlv sink fd 5s ... 1 919

F-A
F-A
J-J
J-J
A-O
1919 A-O
4s
Bxten 4s. ... 1 927 M-N
Nebraska
1927 M-N
Registered
Southwestern Dlv 4s.. 1921 M-S
1903 M-S
Convertible 5s
1913 M-N
Debenture 5s
Han AStJos oon 6s.. .1911 M-8
OnloABIU. lstsf our 68.1907 J-D
Small
1907 J-D
lstoong 6s
1984 A-O
1937 M-N
Gen oon 1st 5s.
Registered
1937 M-N

4s

Un'd TrABleo(Prov)-St'k

MAN

Woroester (Mass)Tr-Com
Preferred

1

II

»«*
12
00

10B*

May'00
May'00

120
120
120
140
109
109
110
107

123
Sale

120
140
109
109

117

119*

107

117
116

107

109*

U3*

116*119
lib*

128*'

98

100* 101*

Coupons oft

100*

1*0*3*

100

106*

99*

186*
185
140

i

107

102

Auk'00

108*112

J'ly'OO
J'ly'OO

119
112

122
116

133* 188

May'00

116*

112
115

117

108

108

•

97*

•••••

* •

* s

Oot.'97

113* 114

98*

102
99

1

t

•

93

*

•••IS
1

• • 1 •

98

100* 104*

May'9U

83

98*

94

13

J'ne'99
J'ly'OO
J'ly'OO

Nov'99

105* AprV0*6

115* 116*
135* 136

128*

J'ly'OO

128* 187

1*0*8*

COCA

100

115* J'ne'00
185* Aug'00

1936
1936

''99*

Feb

87*

87*

106*

84* 93*
84*
109*

28

J'ly'OO

108*

J'ly '00

24
106

May'00

128

75
75
83

180

79*
71* 80

68

S

6

87

82

14

I

115

H

105*112

113

97

Clev A Marietta. 8tt Pa RR.
Clev A Mahon Val g 6s.. 1988
1938
Registered
Clev A Pitts, flee Penn Co.
Col Mldl'd— lstg 3-4s... 1947
1947
lstg 4
1929
Col A Sou 1st g 4s
3o A 9th At. 8*4 Met 8t Ry.
Solum A Greenv. See So Ry.
Val. See Hook Val.
Col A

102

120* 132

J'ne'99
Jan-'OO

1

120

97*

Peo A Bast 1st eon 4s. 1940
1990
Income 4s....,
CI Lor A Wh oon 1st 5s. 1933

108*113

» • * 1 •

118

Apr'00

4s. 1940
6s.. 1920

W

1*15** 117*

J'ne'00

107

100*100*
103

i

Registered
Cln S A CI oon lstg 68.1928
CC OAloonsol7s ...1914
1914
Consols! 7s
Gen oonsol gold 6s .. 1 93
1034
Registered
178.1901
CAS 1st M
1st pf 6s.. . 1 938
O Ind A

10?* 113*
101
102*
104* 104*
100* 102*

•••*•

•

Aug'99

St L Dlv 1st ool trg 4s. 1990
1990
Registered
Spr A Col Dlv 1st g 4s. 1940
I

126

115
110
110

lift

132*
92* 97*

J'ly '00

93*

1993

lstg
WW ValADlvoons
C St L C

96

86* 86*

132
140
127

OinWAMDlvlstg4s.l991

101*102*

Jan. 00

137* 134

96

181

Cairo Div 1st gold 4s. 1939

115* J'ly'OO
105* J'ly'OO

Sale

105*107

114

1937

Geng4s

182*

08 103* 108*

107

,

100
106

12

134

110

1921

100
101
93

103

106

129
127

Oct.'99

1

May'00

"38

9H*

110* 110*
102* J'ne'00
101* Apr'00
102* J'ne'00
102* 103

....

19 106

86* Aug'00
98* May'99
112* 112*

Ry 5s. 1 921

lstg 4s

103
126
110
122
114

135* 189*

122*127*
189*189*

Aug'00
Oot-99

General gold 6s
Ohio A West Mich

111*
122*

J'ly'OO

1923

T A S Fe

J'ly'OO
J'ly'OO
J'ly'OO

12

117*

105* J'ly'OO
102* J'ne'O
108* Feb '99

Sale

112*112*
110
120

May'00
May'00

A-O 109*
A-O

1st 5s. .1923

Small
Chio A St L See Atoh

112* 112*

May'00

96

9tt

87* 89

103* 108*

932

101* Apr'99

113*114

Conn A Term, flee NAW
111*117
Conn A Pas Rlvs 1st g 4s. '43
80. SeeCMA8tP
100 107
Dak A Gt Waoo. SeeM KAT
tllas A
113 116*
*DueNov. Due June. TDue Jan. IDueMay. aOpUon sales. bDue Aug. c Due
Onl

114

Ask.
100
96

18*
08

111

99* 100
102
80
106

110*114*

Apr'00

119

D A 1 1st gu g 5s.. .1941
115*119* CIStLAC. SeeCCCAStL.
115* 121* Cln SAC. See C C C A St L.
117 117
Clearfield A Mah. SeeBRAP.
95* 100* CI AkACeq A 2d g 6s... 1930
96
93
C C C A St L—

103

120

90* 21
88* 67
84* B6*
109

123

180*
122*

111* Feb '00
117* 118
118* J'ly'OO

Cln

105*.
111* 111 J'ly'OO
111* J'ne'99

115*

Keok ADesM

103

i'0'6"

118*

115

103
115

J'ly'OO

108
116

and asked this week. tBonds due July.

99

117*117*

112*115* ChAWestIlstsfg6s..l919

Ill

•

1905 J -J
1905 J-J

117*

99*

116

J-J •102
J-J 118

Bid.

,

....

118

120
117
18 118

118* 119
114* Apr'00
137* J'ly'99
127* J'ne'00
109* 109*
166* J'ly'OO

a88 117* 120
Nor Wisconsin 1st 6s.. 1930
46 116 122*
St P A 8 City 1st g 6s. .1919
130 130
Chio Ter Transfer g 4s. .1947

J'ne'00

96
100

Outside SECURITIES
(Chio)— Stock.
8rraeuseRap.Tr., 6s, 1946
Union Trao (Ohio) Com.
Preferred
United Rys (St L Transit)
Preferred

109

J'ly'OO
J'ly'OO

ChioStLANO. See 111 Cent.
Chio St L A Pitts. See Pa Co.
100 100
Chic St P M A O oon 6s. .1 930
107* lit*
Ch St P A Min 1st 6s. .1918

J'ne'00
J'ly'OO

117

<00*
102*

•

8*s

115

116*
117*
116*

102

126
109

1st

2dgold4*s

110* Sale
1901 A-O 102* 103

Bl

110*
Feb'98

CbocOklaAGgengOs.1919
1905
Cln H A D oon s f 7s

1903 J-J

latest bid

188 178*
112*116*:

117*Jan.'00

.1886-1926

Extension 4s

101*

101*

.

West Chicago si.
Oon a 5s 1936

32* 45*
9* 14*
4* 7

11

.

103
Con ext guar 4*8.. .1910 Q-Ml
Cent Paolfio See So Pao Co
Charles A 8av lstg 7s.. .1936 J-J
Ones A Ohio—
,.1908 A-Ot Mil"* 118
G6s ser A
1911 A-OT U7*
Gold 6s
1939 M-N
IstoongOs
1939 M-N •116*
Registered
99* Sale
1992 M-S
Gen gold 4*s
1992 M-B
Registered
Craig Valley lstg 5s. .1940 J-J
R A A Dlv 1st oon g 4s 1 989 J-J 105* 10594
1989 J-J
8doong4s
Warm Spr Val lstg 5s 1941 M-S
EllzLex A BSgug5s.l902 M-8 103
Ohio A Alton sink fd 6s.. 1908 M-N •106
Lou A Mo Rlv 1st 7s .1900 F-A
1900 M-N
2d 7s
Miss Rlv B 1st sfg 6S..1912 A-O

Bo Side

88* 96

38

. .

•Noprtoe Friday;

...

DesMAFtDlst4s...l905 J -J

40

92
91*
97* Oot.'99
45
43*
13
12*
1* J'ly'00

Pale

1946 J -J
95 Deo '99
MANDIvlstgOs
102 J'ne'99
Mid Ga A Atl Dlv 5s. 1 947 J-J
105 May'00
Mobile Dlv lstgOs.... 1948 J -J
107* May'00
Cent of N J-lst oons 7s. 1902 M-N 107*
1987 J-J 122 122* 122* Aug'00
General gold 5s,
Registered
1987 Q-Jt 121* ..... 121% 121*
130 J'ly'OO
Convertible deb 6s. .1 908 M-N
112* J'ly'00
Am Dook A Imp Co 5s.l921 J-J 114*
J-J
LeAHud Rgeu gug 5s.'20
100 Apr'00
1912 M-N
Leh A W BC 5s

Refunding g 5s
1947
Louisv N A A Ch 1st 6s. '1

Aug'00
Aug'00

.

108*
116*

CRIaFAN. SeeBCRAN

Ohio A Ind C Ry 1st 5s 1936 J -J
Chicago A Brie. See Brie.
Oh In A Louis— Refg 6s. 1 947 J-J

172*172*
188*172*

. .

Garb A Shawn. See 111 Cen.
Car Cent. See Seab A Roan.
Carthage A Ad. SeeNYCAH.

Con 7s

168* 169

Apr'00

120
117

119

189
109

L.

J'ly'OO

J'ne'00

J-D 109
F-A
May'00
F-A
Mar'00
1987 M-N
Gen Gold 3*s
109* 109*
1987
Registered
103 Nov'98
Sinking fund 6s.l879-1929 2:8
118 May'00
Registered. ...1879-1929 A-O
115* May'00
Sinking fund 5S..1879-1929 A-O
109 J'ne'00
Registered. ...1879-1929 A-O
105* Mar'99
25-year debenture 5s. .1909 M-N •108
107* J'ly'OO
Registered
1 909 M-N
105
Deo'99
30-year debenture 5s.. 1921 A-O •
U8* 117 J'ne'00
1921 A-O
Registered
117* Feb '98
Sinking fund deb 0s. 1933 M-N '120* 120* 119
J'ly'OO
1933 M-N
Registered
119*Deo'98
Des Mo A Minn 1 at 7s 1 907 F-A •118*
BscanAL8uplst6s..l901 J-J 102
103* Feb '00
Iowa Midland 1st 8s... 1900 A-O 108
103 Nov'99
1905 M-S •113
Mil A Mad 1st 6s
112* Apr'00
North Illinois 1st 6s... 1910 M-8 •113
112* Apr'00
OttCFAStPlst5s..l909 M-S •112
111* Apr'00
Winona A St Pet 2d 7s 1907 M-N 122*
122* J'ly'OO
MllLSAWlstg6s...l921 M-N 136 138 185* May'00
ExtAImpsfg5s...l929 F-A 121*
124
124
Mich Dlv 1st gold 6a 1924 J-J 189
140 Deo'99
Ashland Div lstg 6s 1925 M-8 137
139* Apr'00
Convertible deb 5s. .1907 F-A 105*
106
106
1911 M-N
Inoomes
112 Nov'99
Chic Rook Isl A Pao— 6s. 1917 J-J 129 131
129* J'ly '00
1917 J-J 128 131
Registered
128* J'ly'OO
1988 J -J 106* 107
General gold 4s
106* 107
Registered
1988 J-J
107 Apr'00
Registered

Y A Brie. See Brie.
1937 M-8
BnffRAPgengSs
1 947 J-J
Debenture 6s
ClAMah 1st gug5s... 1943 J -J
Booh A Pitts 1st g 6s. .1921 F-A
1922 J-D
Consol 1st 6
Buff A Southwest. See Brie.
BuffASusq lstgold5s..l913 A-O
1913 A-O
Registered
BurCRANlst5s
1906 J-D
Con 1st A col trg Ss.... 1934 A-O
1934 A-O
Registered
CRIFAN Wlstg5s.l921 A-O
MA8tLlstgug7s....l927 J-D
Canada South 1st 5s... 1908 J -J
1913 M-8
2d 5s
1913 M-8
Registered

<0f>*

J-D

1902
1902
Registered
1888-1926
Extension 4s....

Gold 7s

Met 8 Ry

A Q—

1913

ChloAN'west—Con 7S..1915

J'ne'99

Bklyn A Montauk. SeeLlal.
Brans A West. See Say FA

Ohio Bur

J-J

1st consoles

See Illinois Cent..

.

167
187
167
167
112

1

Southwest Dlv 6S..1909

sine*

Jan.

AsK. Low. High. No. Low. High

WIsAMlnnDlvg 5S..1921 J-J U7*
MllANolstM L 8s. ..1910 J-D •116

Y C A H.
SeeMKAT.

BwayA7thAv.

A-O

86* 91*
••••

n

1

101

*13

J-J

1910

,

1*

Last Bale.

10.

lstIADBxten7s
1908 J-J 187
1st La Crosse A D 5b.. 1919 J-J 117
Mineral Point Dlv 5s..
J-J •110*111
1st So Minn Dlv 6s. ... 1910 J-J *U7*

97* 102*

181

96*

86*

CenOhloRlatog4*Bl930 M-8

Cen Branch

Bid.

Week
Range or

Registered
1989 J-JJ
Chic A L 8u Dlv g 5s. .1921 J-J 117
....
Chio A Mo Rlv Dlv 5s. 1926 J-J 180
Chic A Pao Dlv 6s
1910 J-J 117
ChloAPW lstg 5s... 1921 J-J '118*119
Dak A Gt Bog 5s
1916 J -J "113
Far A Sou assu g 6s.
1924 J-J
lstHastAD Dlv 7s.. .1910 J-J 128*

92* 97*
100

'

Buff N

Price
Friday,

Aug.

LXXI

[Vol.

. .

5s

94*

Bale

1925 - j
1948 A-Ot 100 Bale
99% 100
1948 A-Ot
100* J'ne'00
Registered
96*
96*
Bouthw Dlv lstg 3*s. 1925 J -J 86* Sale
1925 J -J
Registered
S*sl925 M-N "8*6 " "86*

A Car.

1.

166*
172*
170*
167*
112*
Gen gold 4s series A. 1 989 J-J! •1C9* 110* 110*
Registered
1989 Q-JS
105*
Oen gold 3*s series B. 1 989 J-JI

A gold RD.... 1902 J -J
1903 J-J
lstCAM7s
Chic Mil A St P oon 7s.l905 J-J
Terminal gold 5s
1914 J-J

105*106

Apr'00

Registered

WVaAPlstg4s

Week Ending Aug. 10,
Low. High
Chio Milwaukee A St Paul—
103*105
MAStP— lst7s«gRD.'02 J-J

••••• !••••

Sold 4s

Bel

M
St

N. Y. BTOCK EXCHANGE

Page

. . .

Austin A NW. See. SoPac.
Bat Creek A S. See Mich Ceo

Beech Creek. See N

BOND8.

since

Jan. 1.

90

9J»

Bale

Registered

altAOpriorlg3*s.l925

J'ne'00

Range

(5 pages)

1st 7s

Adjustment g 4i

Atl KnoxA No 1st g 58.1946
Atlan A Danv See South Ry
Atlan A Yad. See South Ry

h

PRICES

•

108

80*

1

(Given at foot of

<Sii» Securities^.

Bid.

7

consecutive pages).— QAS

Hu

Ask.

NEW

YORK.
Gas— 1st 0s
Oon Gas (NY)— Stook—
Cent Union

Deb

5s 1908.

Bqult GasCon. 5s 1982
Mutual Gas
N.

MAN
MAS

{108

108

YStk Bioh
83

89

{118

116

1st.

oonsol 5s

Bid.

OTHBR

112
:06
104
126
146
118

CITIB8.

Bay State Gas—

5105*

105J,

Y.Stk.

Bxoh

Gold 5s— See N. Y. Stk. Bxoh.

List.

1*

Buffalo City Gas— Stook.
1st 0b Bonds

4
1

84

4*
66*

:>

V

dc.
Bid.

Ask_

dto ok Hi ok.

Coke
Gas L A Heat—Com..

Preferred. « M

....

199* 900
44

50

70

78*

1933
JAJ flOS* 106
93
90
Gas (N J)— Stok
JAT
1st 6s 1930
80* 88
Omsol Gas (Pitts).... 60
1st 5s

O

nsolld

Pref

1*

Boston DnltedGas Bonds •Bos to nLii

Securities.

inloago Gas— 8w>
inolnnatl Gas A
lol

iOaeOet,

SECURITIES,
Hut

Ask.

YA

Baltimore Consolidate— Se eBalt. Lis

Amsterdam Gas—

NY Bleo Lt Ht A Pow—

Securities.

Bast River Gas—
JAJ {110
IstOs 1944
JAJ 104
Consol 5s 1945
Nor Dn 1st 5s 1927. .MAN 109
Standard Gas— Common. 190
140
Preferred
MAN 1116
1st 0s 1930

N

April.

""

00

Bonds 6s
rainm Gas

(J

City)—8U

1st 6s

|And

Interest

MAN

t60

109
(104

....«•

118
106
106

tPrtoe per sh are.

1
1

Aug.st

.

1

THE CHRONICLE —BOND

ll, 1900.]

Price
Friday,

BONDS.
N.T. BTOCK EXCHANGE
Week Endihg Acq. 10.

Aug.

Wcek'M

.angc

Range or

10.

Ask Low. High.
Del Lack A Western 7i.. 19 07 M-S •134*
133* Apr T00
Morrli A Bssex 1st 7s. 1014
1871-1901
7i
1915
litoonguar 7s
1915
Registered
N TLaoksW 1st 6s. .1981
1923
Construction 6s

Term A lmpt
Syr Blng

A NT

1933
is
1st 7s.l906

1900
Warren 80 7s
A H— 1st Pa D1t7s.1917

Del

M-N
A-O

140

•«•.

138

.

141* 140
18694 133

J'ly'00

119
105
183
108

May'00

13S
117
• • •

120

••

•145
•

•

-

• •

DetMATol.
Det * Mack

M

Set L 8 A
So.
lit Hen g 4s. 1995

J-D
J-D
A-O
A-O

Dnl RedW AS Iitg5s.l938 J -J
Dul So Shore A At g 5s. 1937 J -J
East of Minn. SssStPMAM.

•

I • • • I

1947

M-N

. .

J

'

108* 100*

mmm

•

J'ne'00

188*
117*
183*
109*
188

....

seetsi

Sale

"as"

"H"

69

118*
193* 133*
187" 148"
113*4

• » * * • *

140

37* 03
87" "76*

is

"9

69

iiiiii

'99

e

1

•

te

109

Oot'98

Bale

119

119

•

•••«.

109* 10S*

Apr'00

1

•

10*4*

Sale

.

ice"

s • » • 1

•

a

• e • •

1

•

tattt

104

31

tttut

109

Itttt lllllt

130
103

110

It lit tttttl

100

180
103
105
•

108

183*
10S*
110

...... ««....
...... • «•••
••••• • ••••

•••

Ittt

70
65

74*4

103

104*4

89

eo

89

09* 00*

Col

AH V

W

B A T 1st g 5s.l933
A Tex Cen. SmSoPCo.
Pinots Central-

Ho-as

Registered
1st gold

3*1

Registered
lit gold 3s sterling... .1951
1951
Registered
Coll Truit gold 4s..... 1952
1952
Registered
L
A Tex gold 4s.. 1953
1953
Registered
Cairo Bridge gold 4s. .1950
1950
Registered
Louisville DIt g S*i 195 1
1953
Registered

NO

Middle Dlvreg 5s
8t Louis Dlvg 3r

1921
1951
1951

Registered
*

J-J 100* 100% 100
100*
J-J
107" 104 J'ne'00
A-O •105
M-N 104
104* J'ly'00

1951 J -J
1951 J -J
1951 J-J
1951 J -J

ist gold 4s

No price Friday

;

115

116

114*

N Y Bxo

ssex A Hudson Oas
Fort Wayne (Ind)

Bid.

1

Ask

h. list.

"86"

40
45

80
100
Grand Rapids— Stock
FAA 1103
1st 5s 1915
Hartford (Ct) Oas L... 85 t 48
Hudson Co Gas
35
5sgl949....
108
Indiana Nat A IU Gas—
1st 6s 1908
MAN 61
80
Indianapolis Oas— Stock.
lit 6s 1930
MAN 90*

65

lit 6s 1935

JAJ

114

108

106
51

40
103

05
90
101

108
105

11a

113* 113*
101* 106
.....
.....

• •

1

10

••••«

100

•

these are latest bid and asked this week,

Sai Seen rl ties.

108
100

J'ne'00

M-8 •t eta linn
M-8 m seeees
A-O '103*106 108 J'ly'00
A-O
104*4 Jan.'99
M-N 108 103 101* J'ly'00
M-N
98 Jan.'00
J-D
J-D
J-J 100
101* J'ly "00
J-J
F-A 119* .... 138 May'99
J-J 90* 90* eo* Aug'00
J-J

OUT8IDE SECURITIES
Detroit (ia»— See

08* 103*

20

113* Mar'00
105 Aug'00
108*Apr.'98

105

•

tttttl

mmm

i-i

v00

ttttt

114

111

•••»•

•Ml

119* 131

Aug'00
Nov'9H
May'00
Dec'99
Feb '00

•••••• ••*•*#

195
•

126H

•••11

100

mm
10s

..»••
i«i«*

atttM

•
•

•

••it

it

tlttt

108* Ang'99

104

i'0'4"

103

Sep" 99

103*

i'0'3" ;;;;;

103*

109*

10
I •

a

109*

L03H 10i
im mill
10a* 110*

•

I

•

119*181*

130* Aug'CO
87* J'ly'00
55* May'00
118* US*

88
55

m

••»*•
.

Sale

••mi

94

87

55* at
111

115

68

71

Bet Brie.

tlttt'

60

A Ohio.

2d gold

Ry.
W litSet So 937 J -J
g

73

73

J'ly '00

1041
North Ohio lit gu 6s. .1045

LehVal(Pa)

oollg 5I..1007

Registered 6s

1097
Leh V N Y 1st gug4*s.. 1940
Registered
1940
Leh V TerRy lstgu g 5|1941
Registered
1941
L V Coal Co lstgu g 5s.. 1938
Registered
1938
Leh A N Y lit gn g 4s. ..1946
Registered.......
1945

A N 1st g

Gold guar

120*
120* Aug'00
116*117*
110*113* iff*

5s. 1

5s.

Istpf6s.l914
...1914

J-J
A-O
M-N
M-N
J-J
J-J
A-O
A-O
J-J
J -J
M-S
M-S
A-O

A

6s.

con g 4s
General gold 4s
Ferry 1st gold 4*
Gold 41,..,.,,,,

•10E*

Unified g 4s

Debenture gold 5s.
.1934
Bklyn A Mon lit g 6s. 1911
1st 5s
1911
NYARBlstgS
1927
oong5s..l935
Nor Sh b lstoon g gu 5s '32
LaAMoRlT. Set Chi A Alt.
. . .

118

I * I I • 1
1

• e t

ttttt'

•

110
t

tie

106

niif

••••It itttt

101
08

104
98

100

103*

...... •«•••»
•••••• ....•«

J'ly'00

01* 03*

101*8ep.'99

...... »..»«
...... *•»*••
..... ...«••

181*

J'ly'00

130

•mi

'titii

93*

•

ttttt etttti

15»1

1

103 a Nov'99

94

- • •

iiiik

104
100
103
07

.

...

•

101

101

1(j5

105

100

1S9

•••I •••£•«

06

103

102* May'00
94*
t4*

98*
100
117
109
•107
108
106

Hi*

.... ««.«*•

tt

03
>

113

J'ly'00
Oot.'90

109

Mini

106*110*

94>t

101
J'ne'00

97* 105

110
106

110
105
107
108

110
109

M-8
General gold 81 ..... .1980 J-D
Sold 6s
......1937 M-N
Unified g 4s
1940 J-J
Registered
1940 J-J
Coll trust g 5i
1931 M-N
Col tr 5-30 g 4s.. ..1903-18 A-O
Cecel Br 7s
1907 M-S
B H A Nam lstg 6a... 1919 J-D
LOlnALexg 4*i.. ,.1931 M-N
Nash A Deo 1st 7s
1900 J-J
NO AMlstg if .,,,,1030 J-J
Id gold «
1930 J -J
Penaaoola dlv gold 6s 1920 M-8
sni A Atl 1st gu g 61.1921 F-A
8tLdlTlstg6s.
1081 M-8
SdgSl
1980 M-8
8ANAoongug5s....l986 F-A
Sink fd (SAN A) g 6s.. 1910 A-O
Kentucky Cent g 4s. 1987 J-J
LANAMAMlstg 4*s.l945 M-S
NFlaA81stgng5l ..1937 F-A
LA Jiff Bge Co gug 49.1945 M-S
LNAAO. SssOIAL.
MahonOoal. Sss LB AM 8.
anhattan By con4s.l990 A-O
Registered
1990 A-O
MetropolBl Istg6i...l908 J-J
Man 8 WOoloniigSs..i9S4 J-D

Aug'00
May'00

1C6
105

Jan.'0H

-

May'00

105

10t

63

NYBAMB

General gold 4s

110*118*
•III! Itttt*

1C8* J'ly'00
108* NoV99

115

Jl

M-8
J-D
M-S
J-D
M-e
M-8
M-S
A-O
y-o

lie* IBs
108*119

in***

M

1981
1938
1932
,1982
1949

lit

3
10

Aug'98

104

O

J'ly'00
J'ly'00

81

71

6*

1943

A Nashville.

.

. .

VGA

Houst

RR.

Louisville

See So Br.
Gila
Nor. See 80 Pao Co.
Grand Rap A Ind. See Pa Co.
Gray's Pt Term See 8t L

oon g 4*s.l999
1999
1st ext g 4s. 1948

Jefferson

Itttt

125* L B A St L Oon ong 6s Tr oerti

Pacific.

1st

8d gold
1081
Iowa Central lstgoldSs.1938
Iowa Midland. 844 Ch A N W.

. .

,

,

Mill

lie* 130
107* 111
98
99*
93
97*
108* 118

,

Registered

1010
1000

5s.
4s.

1

•Itttt

J'ne'00
J'ly'00

118

105

• 1 1

108*

99*
95*

93
118
• » e « •

131
HO
136*4
135
108

* e •

• ••• e
esse*'

119
108

Nor—

J'iy

•••

••in

•

99

J-J
A-O 109*
M-N •120
M-S 88
M-S 60
J-D 113

Leh AHud R. SesCen ofN J.
Leh A Wilkesb. See Cant NJ.
114 117* Leroy A Oaney Vat. Sis Mo P.
Lex At A P F. 8ee Met St Ry.
iVe* iso* Long Dook. Bee Brit.
Long Island—
•• !••*••
lstoong 6s
1931 Q111111
it

•

Hock Val

la 1st ref g 5s. .1948

1st gold 81

8d gold

•eeee iiiik

1st g 6s. 1933
oon 6s
1921

8W
HanAStJ. AtCBsQ
oasatonlo. 8et NYNH AH.

A

A

Great

Kl

til III

Feb

116* Aug'00
106 Deo '99
186* J'ne'00

'117'

J-D

119*119*

87*
88*
93* May'9w

tlltK

11s
•105
133

116* 118

'98

Deo

113*

•

•••••

107*118

117* J'ly'00
119* J an. '00
116* J'ne'00
183* Mar' 00
106* Apr'99
188* J'ly'00
143

87*
•188
•105

J'ly'00

F-A
68
NOT'97
Ev A T H
J-J 123 183* 183
183
1st general gold 6s. ...1943 A-O •105
107* 107* 107*
1933 A-O
Mt Vernon 1st 6s
Bull CoBr'oh Istg6s..l930 A-O 11*111 ••••!
BvAIndlstcongug6i..l926 J-J •
108
105 J'ly'00
Fargo A 80. SssGhMAStP..
A Pere M g 6s... .1980 A-O 133
Filnt
133* J'ne'00
1st oonsol gold 6s.. ..1939 M-N 104*
105* 106*
Pt Huron DIt 1st g 5s. 1939 A-O IC5 108 107* May'00
Fla Cen A Pen 1st g 5s. 1918 J-J •104
101 Mar'99
1st land gr ext gold 5sl930 J-J •100
1943 J-J
Consolgold5s.v
fc8H •••••<
ttt
•• e*
Ft 8 A V B Bge. Ss* StLASF.
Fort St U D Co lstg 4*sl941 J -J 108
105 Mar '98
Ft W A D C— 1st g 4-6s. 1921 J-D
71* 73
71*
71*
Ft W A Rio Gr 1st g 3-4s.l928 J-J
67
69
68 Aug'00
Bar ASA. S«8P Co.
Gal
alHAHof '821st5s.l9l3 A-O 103
103* J'ly'00
Ga A Ala By 1st pf g 5S.1945 A-O
106 Deo'tf8
1945 J-JH
1st oonsol g 6s
97«« 89
Feb '00
5s.l929 J-J 103
Ga Car A No 1st gn g
99* Jan.'00
Georgia

111

Int

1935

LBAMS. 8w NY Cent.

'118*

iiiii

• •

Slim KansasMld. Set St L A 8 *
Kentucky Cent. Set L A N.
lio" 114* Keck A Des M. SssCRI AP

98* Feb.V99

109*

05

99* 108*

00t.'99
Dee '00

•

J

Eureka Springs
1st

Ind

Lake'Brle A

Ill

101*

I I • | •

I • • • I I

IZalAAGR. SssLSAMS.
IVan A Mloh. See Tol A O C.
"76* "88* K C A MBAB 1st gu g 5i. 193U A-O
E C PAG trots 1st g 5s..... A-O
107 110
Kan O A Pao. See M K A T
•till ill

J'ne'00
J'ly'00

114*

lstguarg 6s

Knoxrille

W—

WUkABaslstgug5sl942
Brie A Pitts. 8ee Pa Co.
BscanALSnp. SetOANW.

30

U2*

2deitgold

W

•••«#>

*

aitTVaAGa. Sss.SoRy.
JolAB 1st g 5s. ..1941 M-N
Ells Lex A B 8. SmOAO.
Elm Cort A No. S#«LebANY.

1919 M-S
5s.
3d ext gold 4*s
1933 M-8
1920 A-O
4th ext gold 6s
5th ext gold 4s
1938 J-D
1920 M-S
1st eonsol gold 7s
1st oonsol gold fd 7s.. 1930 M-S
Erie lstoong 4spr bds.1996 J-J
Registered
1996 J-J
1st eon genlltngti.... 1996 J-J
Registered
1996 J-J
Buff N Y AHrte 1st 7s.l916 J-D
gold 6
1908 J-J
Buff A 8
Small
1908 J-J
Chic A Erie 1st g 6s. 1982 M-N
Jeff RR 1st gu gold 5s.l909 A-O
Long Dook oon gold 6s. 1 93 5 A-O
Coal A RR 1st gn 6i.l922 M-N
Dock A Imp 1st our 8i. 1913 J-J
N 7 A Green Lgug 5s. 1946 M-N
Small
1946 M-N
MldRRofNJ 1st g 6s.. 1910 A-O
1st ref 5s.l937 J -J
N T 8A
2dgold4*s
1937 F-A
General g 5s. ...... ..1940 F-A
Terminal 1st g 5s. ... 1943 M-N
Regis 96,000 eaon. 1943 M-N

108* May'00

X.

Lem.Eigh

High.

101*
101*

A Car 1st 6s. ... 1923 J-D 180
Carb AS lstg 4s
1083 M-8 •100
Ohio St L A N O g 5l. 1951 J-D 124*

103* 104*
96* 99*
107 107*
101* 106

101* J'ne'00

eeetaa

Lovo.

Bellev

148* 148*

107

Itttt

Atk

•

AW

00

Jan.

Last Sale.

103

J-J 100
J-J
J-J •••III
J-J
F-A 111*
F-A

Gold 8*s

•

104* Apr'00
9S*
97»4

•••I

120
108
183

rinec

or

Ill

iesi J-D
146* 148
Gold 3*
1951 J-D
118" 130*
Registered
1951 J-D
Mem Dlr lstg 4s.... 1951 J-D
•••si nun
Registered.
1951 J-D
113*116
St L Son 1st gugls... 1931 M-S
112* 113
lstg 5s... .1935 J -J
147* 148*4 Ind Deo

148J1 J'ly'00

83
109

••see

lia igc

Wcek'e

Range

10.

Bid.
Cen. St. L. DIt. (Con)
1951
Registered
1951
Spring Dlr lstg 3*s.l951
Registered
1951
Western Line lstg 4s. 1951
Registered
1951

277

2.

.

J'ne'00
J'ne'9»
11854 J'ne'00
113 J'ne'00

107

Aug.

Registered

May' »7

96
86
110

Elgin

Erie 1st ext g 4s

Feb
Aug'98

J'ly'

14*

138
119
105
133

146* May'00

93
83
108

1995
Gold 4
Dul A Iron Range 1st 5s.l937
1937
Registered
1916 J -J
3d 6s

•

'00

148*

107*
141*
mill
137*

138

Mar' 00

143
118
133

138*

104*4

OOk'BS

1917
e e e
• t >•••».
119
Alb * 8-islstoongu7sl906
1906
Registered
117
1906
Guar gold 6s
US*
1906
Registered
118*
1921
Bens ASar lst7s
148* •sees*
1921
Registered
ttttt • • • e
Del lit v RR Bge. Set Pa RRDen* BGr 1st gold7s.. 1900
1936 J J
1st eong 4s
98 Sale
lit con g 4*s
1936 J -J 106* esee
Improvement gold 6s. 1928 J-D 101 eeee.es
Des M A Ft D. SmOBsIP.
Des M 4 Minn. S«Ch4NW.
Des M Cn Ry 1st g 6s. ..1917 M-N 109
Registered

183
188

J'ne'00
J'ly'00
J'ne'00

106* 105*

J-D
J-D
J-J
F-A
M-N
A-O
A-O
M-S
M-S
A-O
A-O
A-O
A-O
M-N
M-N
M-N

140

E

Low. High

,

'138

•
.

Price
Friday,

3

N. Y.

Jan. 1.

Bid.

Pa&e

(5 pages)

BOND8.
BTOCK EXCHANGE
Week Ending Aug. 10.

tine*

Last Sale.

PKICES

1

118

118
Aug'00

118

Sale

111*
88*

111

-•••• ••••••

4*
116

8
13S

107* lit*
41
06* 101*

III*

98*

107*
98*

,

,

105

,

112*

110

132
113
108
109

»8*

109%

J'ly '00

9iH

98*

106* 100*
96* 100

10a

NOT'07

...... ••«•«

1C3
103
127
117

Sale

Jan.'98

...... ••••••

U2* Aug'00

111*114*

May'00

102*103

J'ly'00
Feb.'OO

187
117

189
117

109* Nov'99

no*

J'ly '00

110*

HIM

121

133

138

186*

80
107

66

Apr'00
Deo '99

107*

107

111

113

107%

107*
96*

,...., ......

96* 98
107* 107*
109 110*

96* J'ly'00
107* Jau.'OO
109* J'ly'00

110

107

96*
101* 101*

101*

99

105

114* J'ly V00

118

117

78

J'ly '00

70

35*
12*

J'ly'00

Itttt

100

Oot.'99

ttitei

IK*

1145*

MtS'ptABV. SssPMoKAY
Metropolitan El. Sis Man By.
Uex Oent oon gold 4s. .1911 J-J

Ittvtt

80

.

lstoon Income g 8s. ,.1939 J'lyl
td oon Income g 3s . , , , 1 939 J'lyl
IU17 A-O
6s
lex Internat 1st con g 4s.'77 M-S
i sx Nat 1st gold 6s
1937 J-D
td lnc 6s A Cp stmpd. 1917 M-8i
td lnoome gold 6s B..1917 An.f
'ex North 1st gold 6s.. 1910 J-D
Registered
1910 J-D

25*

Sale

13

quip A coll g

•Ill liens
mil, unit

•
i

26

8C

29

stm Hboi
84* K88
•ati

108
81
19
105

103* Apr'OC
Apr '00
81
13* J'ly '00
May'00

105

tl
•

86

86

M01
•

•

Kee-

ls

lilchCent. Set N Y Cent.
aid of N J. SeiErle.

4L8AW. SesChloANW
A Mad. See Chlo A N W
«il A North. 8ee Ch M A St P
* A St P. SMChMAStP
•411

"so" "98*
t

11

Bonds dne August.

*

Dae

April.

I

Dae January.

1

Dae

October.

(Given at foot of 7 consecutive pages).— &AS, TEL.

Gas Securities.
100
Kansas City Oas
AAO
5s 1922

Bid.
i

99*

Ask.
40
101

Laolede Gas— N Y Stock Bxoti.
40
48
Lafayette (Did) Gar..
MAN 61 65
1st 6s 1924
Loganspt A Wab Val08
JAD 60
1st 6s 1925
75
Madison (Wis) Gas— Stck 70
AAO ,'105 107
1st 6s 1936
1139
•eeee*
Newark Gas 6s 1914..
Newark Oonsol Gas ..100 66
JAD i'.oa 103
5s 1948
New Bng Gas A O— 3f«Bo stonL 1st.

Gae Seen rl tie*

Bid.

Ask.

Ohio A Ind Con Nat A 111-

28
64

88
58

6s '26 J AD
Peoples Gas A Coke— N Y Stock
Philadelphia Co— 8et Bos ton L
Providence Gas.
60 t 94*

OhloAInd— 1st

StJoseph (Mo)
5s 1937
S: Paul Gas— Stock

Bxoh
lit.

JAJ

i

83
93
46

30
95
58

Oonsol 5s 1944... .MAS
Syracuse Gas—Stock....

t

70*

81

10

13
00

Iit5il946
JAJ
Western Gas (Mllw)

«s— See N Y

8t

Hi

list.

87

93* P4*

1

I

Dae Jmly. a Optional

A TELEPH.,

<*c

Bid. Ask.
Teles, dk Teleph.
Veiea. oV i'ii«i«.
Auertoan Dist Tele— NT Stock SxU
112* ti eft
Bell Teleph. of Buffalo.
106
103
Central A South Aner.
70
atk
60
Caes A Poto Teleph—
•• sit
JAJ 104
5s 1009-80
•

•

..

.

•

O

immerolai Cable.

.

.

.j.

.

165
110
75

170

115
G lmmer Union Tel (NY).
tillll
B-plreABay8tateT«l
Brie Teleg A Telep— Set 8 tekBx List
48
43
Franklin
iiiV"
{And interest. tPriee per sh a e.

.

.
.

.

THE CHRONICLE -BOND

•?7r

Price
Week's
BONDS.
Friday,
Range or
STOCK EXCH ANG E It Avg. 10. Last Sale.
W. Y.
Weekending Aug. 10
Bid. Ask, Low. High
149 May'00
Minn A St L— lit g 7i .1927 J-D
Iowa ex lit gold 7i. 1909 J-D
122*6 May'00
J-D 127
127 Jan.'99
South Weit ex litg7i.'10
..... 125
Paclflo ex lit gold 6l 1921 A-0
188 May'00
19S4 M-N 112
114
lit com gold Si
118
97
lit and rotund. 4s. ...1949 M-8
97%
97*<
Mln * 8t L «u. SwBOBiN
M & P lit 5l It 4i int gu..'36 J-J

Range

No. Low. High
143*6 151
122*6 123*6

138

.

128

111)6 116*6
98
9954

1990
1944

2d goldii
1 st exten gold 5i

F-A

••»••«

A-0

1921
192c

lstoollgc':d 53

Registered

F-A
F-A
F-A
J-J

.

GenoonryAldgrtg5s'3J
Gen oon stamp gtdg 5i'3i
1929
Unif Aref g 4s
Verd VIA W litg Si.. '26

Miss BIT Bdge. Be* Ohio A Alt
Mob ABlrm prior lien g 5i.*45
Small
194f

Mortgage gold 4i

1945

Small

94
92
98
80

Deo '99
88
92*4

93*6
9894

76

83

102
112

108
116*6

11494

94

181%
101%

90

9856

Aug'00
Aug'00

10S% Aug'00
118

J'ly'00
116*4

Sale

11656
9654

.••..a .....
......

"94"

106
110

10554 Jan.*00
112*6 Apr'OO

90

*

&7
92*6

98*6

110*4 Sale

11G%

110

79

J-J
J-J
J-J
J-J

10

92

.....

1

Sale

*•••••

Kill

J

WOO
now

"»a" "94
10594 10594
112*6 113

108 109)4

J'ne'00
"68
79*4
7854
1

110

11094

84%

7794

110)4

110*4 J'ly'00

H3H

HOM

••••••

126

120%

....

84

'

85

F-A

107%
90

SmNYCAE
Monongahela B1t. See BAG
Mont Cent. Sm St P M A M

120

12854 Aug'00
120*6 J'ly'00
845*
8454
1C6*6
106>6

•

••••

128

120*6 126

14
1

94

187

1901 J-J
1928 A-0
1917 J-J
lltBlTAPb
1917 J -J
lit eiMoMMWAAl.
lit gold 6s Jasper Boh. 1928 J -J

131

188

lltl*

106
110
110
112

SmLAN

NewHAD. SmNYNHAH
N J Juno BR. See N Y Cent.
New ACin Bdge. flMPennO'*
N O & N B prlorllen g 6s 1 915 A-Ol
N T Bkln A Man Bh. St* L 1.
N Y Cent A SB lit 7i.. 1908 J-J
Registered
1903 J-0

126

1C0*< J'ly'00
105*4 J'ne'00
111
Deo '99

100%

2d 6l
oon gold Si

•

» • • 1

«•••••

113

128

• • •

129

100M
104% 107%
100*6
*

• o • • •

« • •

• •

1997

•••••• •••••

•

108*6
108*6

J-J
J-J

111 May'00
108*6 J'ly'00
109*6 ' 109*6

109

109
14

112*6 Apr'99
107 J'ly'00
106*4 May'00
109*6 S«p.'97
101% J'ne'00
10494 reb.'99
102 J'ne'00
108*4 J'ly'00
96*6
96%

112

108*6 111
111*6

108

g 3%i 2000

2000

Beglitered

108

105!

B W AOgOon

g Si. .1915

M

127
106
108

j -j

J-D
M-N
M-N
A-O
F-A

107%

101% 10396
101

10396

99
98
98
97

96*6

96
95*6

94
108

118

I

Bid.

Bonds

Hudson River Telephone
Internatlon Ocean...,,...
exloan Telegraph.

M

,

Mexican Telephone— See
Mew Btng Telep— Sm Bost
Northwestern Telegraph

MY AN J

Telephone...

MAN
•1930
A Atlantic
ProTldenee Telephone.
Southern A Atlantic
Pacific

. .

General gold

1937

5i.

1st g 4s
1901
Bt* So Pao Co.
Ore Ry A Nay See TJn Pao
Ore
A NaT See Un Pao
Ore Short Line See TJn Pao
Oswego A Borne. 8*t N Y C
O O A St P. Set A N

•

4

110
139
ISO

•

8854

118

117

114%
188
133

90% 99M
97% 87%

••»•

Feb '97
101

98

18

10456 167

Aug'00

65*
6f%
66% May'00
131% May'00

Sale

132

110

10

1

A-O

93
75

J-J

95
76

107%

102

102

110
110

100%
10096

111%
111)4

109%

110%
119

1940

"65

10S

108% 105%
101

65

lOSfl

69

66% 68
131% 188%

J'ly '99

•••••• ••••*

May'00
Aug'00

117

180

109
95
60

110

8894

J'ly '00
Feb '00

Apr'OO

8894

9*

77

N A CBdgegengug 4%s.'45
Oln A St L lit 71.1900
Beglitered
1900
P C O A St L oon gn g 4%sSerieiA.

1940
1942

Sertei Oguar
1942
Serlei D 4i guar
1945
Series B guar 3%s ..1949
Pltti Ft
A O lit, 7i. 1912
*U • •• eeeeeeeee •••<•• *lv\ /d

»•

1H12

<•

100

• e •

188

Jan.'98

1st

g

1936

4s..

. .

J'ly'00

181

108% Mar'00
117% Feb '00

103

101% May'00

101% 101%

101

Apr'OO
109% Apr '97

101

101

11694 Aug'00
11656 J'ne'00
113 Not* 98

114

117

109

106% 109
100 101%
135 139%

Not'98

J-J
J-J ••MM
A-O*
M-N
J-J

• » 1 i » .

131

108%
117% 1178

,

•

• • • e • •

« »

• • « •

J-J

•

• • e •

* *

ei

•

•

•••••

136
131
10S

••••• ••••*«

113% 117

Apr'OO

101% J'ly '00
139% May'00

1S6
131

186
134

108
109

Mar'00
J'ly'00

111

May'97

138

189%

1997

Beglitered

A

Sar. B*»

D A H.

Not'97

May'00

117

117

May'00
100% Apr'OO

100
99
33

101

101

33

Q-F 187
M-N » 98
J-D

133

107%
••••I

90
116

100
100

J-J
J-J

Oot_'98

•

•

. .

t

Due Jan.

*

Due July.

I

Due June.

I Due May.

88
T

MM*
MM*
90

•tie

J'ne'99

116% J'ly'00

118% 116%
9996101

.....

8794 Jan-'OO
100 J'ly '00
101% J'ne'00

8796
8496

Teleph.

A Cable— See
Weit'n Union Teleg— N Y

Bid. Ask.
Phlla lilt.
Stook Bxoh

166
170
41
45
Coniol Hleotrio Storage.
IB
30
Bddy Hleotrio Mfg Co.. 25 t
14
Bdlion HI ni Co NY— N Y Stook Bxoh
Bdlson HI III Co Brk— N Y Stook Bxoh
Hdlson Ore Milling Co...
9
11
Hleotro- Pneumatic Trans
8M 294
Fort Wayne Hlec Go. .95
• •
••••••
Sertei A
86
48
• •

%

Electric Companies. Bid.
General Hleotrio Co— N Y Stook Bxoh
Do pref.— See Boston L tat.
Hartford (Ct) HleoLt Co. 160

Mo Hdlson
Do

Hleotrio
preferred.

,

Narragan. (Ptot)H1Co.50
Bhode Island Hlec ProCo.
United Hleotrio of N J.
.

17
63

19
58

87% 139

I)

Hi Co.

25

83

"»6%

94%

10'

86

t

FERRY

Ferry Co "-nit "lee.
Ferry Companies*.
Brooklyn Ferry-Stock
Bonds 5s— Set Stook Hx
Metropolitan Ferry 6s.

—

Kit

18

80

list.

106

106
65
i 94
67

ist oe ...,..,,.,,,,..««,.

1110

. ,

Oon. os

Ana

,,.

interest.

do

Bid.

N Y A N J Fottt— Stock.
1st 5s 1946
JA.1
N Y A H B Ferry— Stook.
119
19%
Bonds 5s of 1983. MAN
n Jboken— Stook
'V6" 78
I

8

a These are option sales.

t 9194

4s 1999
United Hleo LtAP Co pref SMBal to list
4%s 1939— Sm Balto 11 St.

Wooniooket (B

99%101%

Dec '99

98%
98%
88% Mar'00

11*
93

Dae Not

Ask.

••lit* ••••••
••••• ••••*

••••••
••••••
••••••

• • • •

8756 Sale

104% 108% Rio Gr Weit lit g 4s. .1939 J-J
103% 105
Utah Cent lit gu g 41.1917 A-Ot

«

18094 13094
93
98

NOT' 98

••••••

138
188

100%

NOT'97

131

Bloh A Dan. S*» South By.

Aug'98

Jan. '00

13094 Mar'00
J'ne'00

98
137

A-O

'

aeadlngCogeng4i...l997

103

117

M-N

. .

11394

106

M-8

MoKee A B V lit g 61. 1918 J-J
Pitts P A F lit g 5s
1916 J-J
10S 105
Pitts ShALBlitgSi.. 1940 A-O
1943 J-J
lstoonsol gold Si
116% 115% MttiAWeit Iitg4i...l917 J-J
J P M A Co oertfi
Pltti Y A Aihlitoon 611937. M-N
126

til
Aug'00
11394 Mar'00

J -J

1922 J-J
Juno lit g 61
A L Brie— 8d g Si 1 988 A-Ot
MoK A Yo— lit gu 61. 32 J-J
tdguar 6s
1934 J-J

Pltti
Pltti
Pltti

Apr'99

,

111% 116%
111% lUjJ

108
181

•••••

,,,„

A-O 116%
A-O 116%
M-N 111
M-N 105
F-A 99

101

116*<
Jan.*00

(Given at poot of 7 ookseoutive pages).— TEL., BLEG.
dfc

103

116%
111%

GrBAIexlitgng4%i.l941 J-J
01 A Mar lit gu g 4%s.l935 M-N
DBBBABgelltgu4ig.'36 F-A
AUegh Val gen gug 4i.l94 2 M-8

115% PeniaoolaAAt. 8eiL, A Nash
114
Feo DecA B litg 6str reo.'20
Irani DIt litg6itrreo.'20
103%
3d g 61 tr reo lit pd.. 1926
102%
116% PeoABait. SmOCOA BtL
11496 Peo A Pek TJn litg 6i. 1921
«dg4%i
Feb., 1921
11196
110% Mne Greek reg guar 6s. .1932
PittiOlnAStL. Set PennOo.
181
POOAStL. Sm Penn Co.
Pltti OlOT ATol litgBs. 1922
12994 PlttsFtWACh. SMPennOo.

10254 10494
119*4 121

^07*4
107*4
105 May'00

Telex,

104% 110

Aug'00

103% May'00
••••••

J-J 100
J-J
F-A mill
F-A

UN J BR A Can gen 4s. 1944 M-S

105% 10994

KlectrSc Companies.
Allegheny Co Light Co..
Brush Bilectrlo Co

100

rieAPlttgug3%sB.19lO J-J

.

12994

190
118
835

...

A-O 103%
M-N
J-J 116%
J-J
M-8
A-O 1*1
A-O
M-N
Gengug4%ner'iA.l942 J-J
Series B.
1942 A-O
Series C 3%s
1948 M-N 104%

pun A Lewis

••••••

Teleg Telep

187
168
113
100

109% 109

108

lstif g 4%i....l917

W

110%

10694

Ask.
117

nllst

W

T

Pao OoaitOo— litgSs. 1946 J-D
acof Mlisouri. 8** Mo Pao

fteniielaer

107

OUT8IDE 8ECURITIE8
115
90
115
116
315
Boito
on list
138
160
109
75
95
96

••

104

88% 98
*

••
•

••«•.!

Ooniterllngg 61
1905
Oon currency 8i reg.. .1905 Q-MII
Cong 5s
1919 M-8
Beglitered
1919
Cong 4s
1943 M-N

these are latest bid and asked this week,

T«l«g. At Telo»ra.
GoldABtook

Sale

,...804?

.

•

9756
97% 140
8756 J'ly '00

108% 104% 104%
65%

• •
•

133
117% Aug'98

101
101

104

•MM

133

* •

Oi BlTerBB lit g 5s 1936 J-D
hlo

•CI

Deo '99
Jan'OO

115% May '00

.

;

114% J'ne'00
130% J'ly'00

•••§•>

106
100

M-N

StPANPgeng6l...l923
Beglitered otfi
192:.
Wash Cent lit g 4s. 1948

PennBBlit real es g 4i.l983

124*6 188
J'ly '99
126*6 Sale 126*6
136*6

M-N
RWAOTR
J-J 107
Utlca A
V Y Ohlc A BtL lltg 41.1937 A-O •107%
1937 A-O 106
Beglitered
No price Friday

101

J'ly '99

114

9756 Sale

8047

SerieiBgnar
60
8

'

lstgug 51.18
Btt BIT gu g 4i '22

*

101

106

183

101%Not'98

113
131
125
130

iw,

Begiitered
General lien g 3s
Beglitered

Pitti

BY* North litg Si.. 1927 A-O* •120
litext5i.'22
Oswe A B 2d gu

SmCMANW

106

189%

185
183

Jan.*00

:oe

W

SerlesO

102

.

N Y A Harlem

litg 61. ...1988
ImprrmtAext g 81... 193?
N A By litoong 4|.1996
Beglitered
1996
Small
199'
OOATli gug5l....l922
Solo VAN Blitgug4i.l989
North nilnoii.
North Ohio. SMLHrleAW
Northern Pacific—
Prior lien r A 1 g g 4i. . 199';

18594 191

189
Apr'OO

114
113

....
....

HO

1910
PennOo— Gu litg 4%i.l92l
Beglitered
1921
GtdS%iooltrnitreg.l937
O StL A P litoong 51.1932
Beglitered
1932
OeT APitti oon 1 f 7s. 1900

•

Beglitered
4l
Beglitered
Bat O A St 1st gn g 3s. '89

114

Oet.'97

19t

191

MMI 189

» » I

Sfsubsidyg6i

Deo '99

M-8 107%
M-8 107*
M-8 t07%
J-D 102)?
J-D 102*6
M-N 10256
M-N 10S56
Lake Shore ool g 3%i. 1998 F-A 96*6 Sale
1998 F-A *
95% 95
Beglitered
95
Mloh Cent ooll g 3%s..l998 F-A 95
95*6 98
J'ly'00
91
Beglitered
1998 F-A •
95 J'ly'00
Beeoh Ork lit gu g 4i.l938 J-J 109 .... 109*4 109*4
Reglitered
1936 J-J
106 J'ne'98
2dgugold 5s
1936 J-J
Reglitered
1936 J-J
Cart A Ad lit gu g 41.1981 J-D
Clearfield Bitum Coal Corp
98
lstifl*itgug4nerA.'40 J-J
J'ly '98
Small bondi series B. .'40 J -J
Gout A Oswe lit gu g 5i.'42 J-D
Moh A Mai lit gu g4i.l99l M-8 '107*6
107*6 J'ly'00
NJJunoBgu lit 4l .1986 F-A 105
102 Feb '00
Beglitered
1986 F-A
NYAPutlstoongug4s.'93 A-O •••••• •••
Nor A Mont litgugSi.'ie A-0
112 11194 112
West Shore lit 4s gu. 2361 J -J
Beglitered
2361 J-J
IDT 11156 Aug'00
Shore oon lit7i. 1900 J-J
Lake
108*4 J'ne'00
Beglitered
1900 Q-JI
101*4 May'00
1908 J-D 112 115
Comol2d7i
118 J'ly'00
1908 J-D
Beglitered
11194 J'ly -00
1997 J-D ibo" WW, 110
Gold 3*1
110
1997 J-D
Beglitered
110*6 Mar'00
108%Deo'97
ClnA 8 litgLSAM87i'01 A-0
Det Moa A Tol lit 7ll906 F-A 117
119*6 J'ne'00
KAAGB 1st go 51.1938 J-J •126
MahonO'l BR lit 51.1934 J-J
130*6 12994 Apr'OO
Mloh Cent— lit oon 7il902 M-N 107
105*6 J'ly'00
1902 M-N 103
103 J'ly'00
1st oon 5s
1909 M-8 180 ...... 181 Aug'00
6i
1931 M-S
128 May'00
5s
1931
1940
1940

t •

138

New BlTer

Panama

.

,

Low. High

BB

SmSPOo.
A Essex. Sm Del LAW
Chat A St L lit 7|.'1S J-J
Nash

Beglitered
1997
Debenture 5iof. 1884-1904
Beglitered .... 1884-1904
Beg deb Si of ...1889-1904
Debenture g4i.. 1890-1906
1890-1905
Beglitered
Debt oerU ext g 4i .... 1 905
Reglitered
1905

•

NYAPnt. SmNYOAH.
NY ABB. Sm
NYSAW. SeeLong III.
Brie.
NY Tex AM. Sm 80 Pao Co
Nor A South lit g Si. ... 1941 M-N
Norf A Weit— Gen g 61.1931 M-N

Om AStL
Ore A Oal.

Morris

G8%i

I.

IndAW. SMOOOAStL.

87

83

106*6 109*6

Morgan's La AT.

Nash Flor A Shef.

104%

A-0 189

Nor Pao Ter Co lit g 6i.l93?
Nor By Oal. 8t* So. Pao.
NorWli. SwCStPMAO.
Nor A Mont. Sm N.Y.Oent.

MohawkAMal.

lit

Ask. Low. High.

NYNHAHartlstreg4i.'08 J-D

.

Mob A Ohio new gold 6i..'27 J-D 124
.

90%

65
89

10056 Nov'99

••••

Sale

97

A-0
A-O
J-J
M-S

1st extension gold 61.1927
J*
1938 M' 8
General gold 4i
Montgom DlT lit g 5i 1947
St L A Cairo gn g 4s . .1931 J -J

90

113%
116%

LeroyAO V AL litg5i'26 J-J

PacBoJMo litexg4i.'38
2d extended gold 5i 1938
St Louis A Iron Mount—

67

88*6

54
13

»'&

91*6
66*6

10314

1906 M-N
1930 M-fJ
1917 M-B1
1917 M-81

1st eon g 6s
Tiust g Si
Registered

t

81

tint*

Jan.

NY Lack AW. 8m DL AW
NYLHAW. Sm Brie.
NYANH. SmNYNHAH

NYANHlit7

9156 Bale
66^6 Bale
90 Sale

MKATofTlltgug5i.'42 M-f* 92
8her8hA8oulitgug5s.'48 J-D
KO APacl»tg4o....l990 F-A 79
Tebo ANeoiho lit 71.1908 J-D 105
5s... 1942

Week's

gH

J-D

M-N
BooneTBdkOogug7i..'06 M-N
DaliWa lit gu g Si. 1940 M-N

Mo K AB lstgug
MoPac— ld7i

Last Sale.

Bid.

Small certn«100
Houiatonlo B oon g Si.1937 M-N
A Derby oon Si. ..1918 M-N
1905 J-J
lit 6s....
98%
1905 J-J
70*6 N Y A North. Sm N Y O A H
95% N Y O A W. Bet lit g 4sl992 M-S"
Begli 15,000 only... 199i M-8:
«

MBtPA88Moong4slntgu'S8 J-J
Minn Un. Sm St P M A M

Rang*

Range or

Aug. 10.

N Y A Greenw Lake. 8ee Brie
NYAHar. fljMNYOAHud.

OonTert deb oerti 91,000

M S8MAA lit g 4s lnt gu.'26 J-J

[Vol. LX3I,

3.

Price
Friday,

exchange II
Week Ending Aug. 10 it

n. y. stock

Jan.l.

. .

Page

(5 pages)

BONDS.

since

.

Mo KanATex— Iitg4».l990

PBICES

<

• •

••

99

107
AS
97
70

US

98%

tPrioe per sb are

A

,1

August

E

THE CHRONICLE -BOND

11, 1900.]

Price
Friday,

BONDS.
M. Y. BTOCK EXCHANGE i!
Wbbk Ending au< 10,
;

Aug.

.

Roch A

Atk, Low. High,
• e ti
105 Not'99
78
77* Ang'00

Low. High

> *

71 "

"H"

BR*

P.
See NY Cent.

Pltti. See

•ige

"ice
Jan. 1.

Last Sale.

10.

Bid.
102
77

Bio Gr Juno lit gu g 6S.1939
Klo Gr So lit g 3-4i. ....1940

Week't

Range or

Rome Wat. * Ob
Salt LakeOletgsf 0s. .1918 J -J
UoAGIlitg S-4s...l947 J -J
St L * OaL See Mob A Ohio.
8t L * Iron Mount. See M P.
Bt L K O A N. See Wabaih.
gtLMBr, SeeTRRAofStL
St Louis A 8an FranolsooM-N

>saaet

•

••••

«

89

82*

J'ly'00

*•••<

• • • i

81

8d

W

112
112
112

••••••

110
112

111*

J'ly'00
J'ly'00

ioe"

104

108*

108*

104

81* 81*

79

100
93
105

108*
Apr '00

118*

111

111*118*

89

Sale

18
• • • •

79

J'ly'00
J'ne'00
J'ly'00

84

98* 100
95

91

OOU'97

58*

D

* *

• a a • • •

•

f I • • •

ASF

PA

*118*

J-D
J-D

tP AS'xOlty.SeeOStPMAO M-8
B

lePiw A Ph

120
110

48

Feb '99
Apr'00

111*
97* 100*

109

100* J'ly'00
117* J'ly'00
137* 137*
137H Feb '99
114

98*
53* 65*
85

01

121
12

112*116*

114

106*Mar'98
118* May'00
103
103*
104

148*

187

118* 131*
102* 106

Jan.'99

108* Apr'00

108* 108*

MMt
••••••

sea***

•*•#•

198

Apr'00

* • • •

188

131

J'ly'00

• • • •

129* 134*

115

Apr'97

118*

J'ne'00

ISO

» • • »

lstg 5I....1938
1938
Reglitered
Nor Pao. See Nor Pao
St

89*
59*

89

58* 59

. .

Wll!

Apr

128

BAA A P. 0MBoPao.Oo. J
B FAN P 1st if g 58.. .1919
A-

100

112

A-0
J-J
J-J
W
Scioto ValANB. SeeNorAW
1926 J-J
lit 5i
Beab A Roa
Oar Cent lit oon g 4i. 1949 J-J
Bher Shr A So. See M K A T
Bod Bay A So lit g5s. 1924 J-J

123

109
•

US

118

Deo'99

May'00

125* 126*

93

85

85

78*

F-A
F-A

Sale

98*

J-Dt

Sale

79
Not'99

55

98*
98*
99* J'ne'00

6fi

85

F-A 107
110 May'00
J-D 106 110 104* 104*
MezAPaolstg....Ss'3l M-N
99
HouiAT01stWAN7s.'03 J-J
111
1937 J-J
110
110
litgSilntgtd
1912 A-O 111
112 J'ly'00
Oong6ilntgtd
84
1921 A-O
Geng4i lntgtd
84* J'ly'00
Morgan'sLaATlstg0s.'2O J -J ii»*
120* Feb '00
lit 7i
1918 A-O
134 Not'99
NYTAMexgulitg4i.*12 A-O
99* 98*
Ore A Oal lit gtd g 5a. 1927 J-J
08*
76
SAAAPaailitgug4i.'43 J-J 75
75*
76*
1905 F-A
T«xAN01st7s
116 Deo '98
BablnedlTlstg8i..l9l2 M-S 105
106* Not'97
Oon g5i
1943 J-J 102* Bale 102*
102U
BoPof Argu lstg6s.'09-10 J -J
112* J'ly'00
BPof Oal lit g6i.. 1905 A-O 109*
109* Aug'00
lat gold 6s ler B. .1905 A-O 109*
lit gold 6s
1906 A-O 111*
111* J'iy'OO
1912 A-O 118
lit gold 6s
119 J'ly'00
lstoonguar g 5s. .1937 M-N
105* Jan-'OO
1905-37 M-N 106* 107
Stamped
106* 106*
A AN Wilt gug Ss.1941 J-J 98 Sale 97*
98
78* 79
B P Coast 1st gn g 4s.. 1937 J-J
8 Paoof N Mex 1st g 6i.'ll J-J 116
iie" Aug'bo
Gila V GAN lit gng 5s 1924 M-N 105
106* 105* J'ly'00
NoofCal 1st gug 9i... 1907 J-J
Guaranteed gold 5s.. 1938 A-O
106 Aug' 99
Southern—
1994 J-J 108* Bale 108* 108*
1st oon g 5a
Registered
1994 J-J
108 Aug'00
Mem DlT lstg 4-4*-5sl996 J-J 107*
109* Apr'00
Registered
1996 J-J ••»••• ttttt •KIM
•••»»•
Ala OenR lstg 6s. ...1918 J-J
112*Aug'97
At) A Ch Air Line lno. 1900 A-O
Atlan A Dan 1st g 5s. 1950 J-J
108 May'00
Col A Greenr 1st 5-0S.1916 J -J
115 Jan-'OO
BTVaAGalst7s....l900 J-J
103* May'00
Dlrlslonal g Ss
1930 J-J 115*...
117 May'00
Oon 1st gSs
1956 M-N •118*116* 115* 116M
B Ten reor lien g 4-5s. 1938 M-8
111* Jl'y'OO
Registered
1938 M-8
Ga Pao By 1st g 0a. ..1922 J-J 182 194 191* 191*
Knox A Ohio lit g 6s 1925 J-J '120*
194 May'00
Rich A Dan oon g 6i .1915 J-J 120
120* J'ly'00
Bqulp sink fund g 51.1909 M-8
101* J'ly'00
Deb 5s stamped
1927 A-O
103 Deo'99
Bo Oar A Ga 1st g 5s. 1919 M-N 104
105
105
AtlAYad lstg gn 48.1949 A-O

9

and asked

this week,

OUT3IDE SECURITIES
.

Ask.
05
108
34

97*

83* 87
120* 120*
98* 99
80*

73

t

110

111*118
117*119
105* 105*
6 104* 109*
29 95
99*
116*

116
100

110

118*
107* 108*
108* 109*

99 106

«••••• as tt*

99* 103
115

115

• • • •

101* 108*
114* 117

tt ••

"95 114
a • e

ISO
108* 118

•

"*3

119* 184*
194
190

118
119
101

101*

109

J-J U7*

MM

tttttt •••••!

109
108
87

L M BgeTergug 58.1930
Tex A N O. See So Pan Co.
TexAP By B dlT lstg 6s. 1905
Bt

2d gold mo.

Kng

5s,

2000 J-D
Deo... 2000 Moh.

Co otfs
TolAOC litgSi
1935
dlT 1st g 6a... .1935
West'n
trust

1935

General gold 5a

Kan A M

Tol Peo

1st gn g 4a. ..1990

AW

lstgoid 48.1917

TStLAKO

Istg6str.l916

n Pao— BR

1047

111

Aug'00
HI*
111* 113
68 May'00
•••.,
51* Not'99
113 115 118 Aug'00
111
113 118 J'ly'00
99* 100
96* Aug'00

105

106

t

105

107

See

21

58

MM

• 1

90

82

81

105
105
95

78
110

82

97* 131* J'ne'00

90

09
•»••••

114*
118

108*

84* 90

J'ne'00

88

110*110

84

130*

100

99

Aug'99

106

J'ly'00

Sale

105*
105*

105* 245 101*100*
103* 105*
J'ne'00

110

Ang'00
103

105

J-J
J-J •109
J-D 102*
F-A 125*
J-J
J-J
J-J 113

102*
128*

Sale

121
102

110
66

J'ly'00

Mar'99
May'97

110

100* 104*
126* 180
••III tttttt

112*

112*
106

•tt ••••••
108 107

12

110* 116*
100

J'ne'00

100

75* Oou'99

Pa R

W

Debenture series

A.

.

.1989

Series B,
1939
lstg 5s DetAOh Bxt.. 1941
Des Moln DlT 1st g 4s. 1939
StOhas Bridge lstgBa.1908
Warren BB. See Del

LAW

M-N lie*
116* 118*
F-A 101 Bale 101
101*
92* J'ne'00
J-J
32*
J-J 32
33* 32*
109* 109*
J-J 110
90
91 Apr'00
J -J
111 May'00
A-O 111*

Wash Cent See Nor Pao
Wash OA W. See Southern

1st g 5s. 1937

118*
98* 104
94*
83
80
48*

113
21

88
5

108

112

98*
109*118_
91

118* 119* 118* 119* 112 110 180*
77
9S*
94
93* 94
22* 85
80
32* J'ly '00

113
88

M-S
A-O 108*
J-J
F-A 98

J-J 88*
8TRBBT RAILWAY BON DS.
BklynRapTrgSs
1945 A-O 103*
Atl At Bklyn imp g 5sl934 J-J
BkClty lstcon 5s.l916.'41 J-J
BkQ Co A Soon gng 5s. .'41 M-N 99
Bklyn Un Bl 1st g 4-5sl950 F-A
91*
City A 8 Ry Bait lstg 5s 1922 J-D
Den Con Tr Co 1st g 5s. .1933 A-O
Den Tram Cooon g 6s.l9l0 J-J
Met Ry Co 1st gu g 6s.l91l J-J
Lonli Ry Oo lstoon g5s.l930 J-J
Karket BtO Ry lstg 08.1913 J-J
Uet Bt Ry gen e tr g 5s. 1997 F-A '117

109

Jan-'99

89*
110*
99*106
98* 100

88
107

J'ly '00

108* Aug'00
102

98*

J'ly'00
J'ly '00

45

88*

87

Bale

88

104

103*

Jan.'99

100
98

110
110
98
95

J'iy'OO

08
92

95

J'ne'00

95

109

98*

Mar'98

101* 106*

104

Not'99
99

10

1*0
120
J-D 120
J-D
185 J'ly'00
M-S 185*.
M-8
Lex At A P F 1st gn g 5s.'93 M-S '184*
185 J'ly '00
Registered
,,..., M-S
MetW8El(Chio)lstg.4s.l938 F-A "96* 97* 98* J'ly'00
Registered.
1938 F-A
411 UlRyA LSO-yr g Ss.1920 F-A
100 Oct-99
Ry 1st oong 5s. 1919 J-J
\flnn St
109 Oct»'99
a 5s. 1937 J-J
It Paul City Oab.
115 118* 113*
Guaranteed gold 5s... 1987 J-J
Third At 1st gold 6s. ... 1937 J-J 182 184* 124 J'ne'00
Un HI (Ohio) lat g 5s. ..1945 A-O 108*
109* Deo '99
WChlo8t40-yrlstour5s.'28 M-N
•*••* a* •• ettttJB
••••••
40-year oon g 6s
1936 M-N eaeat)* #••••• 99 Dte'97
GAB A BLBCTRIO LIGHT BON D8.
Atlanta G L Oo 1st g 5s. 1947 J-D
Bos U Gaa tr otfs s f g 5s. .'39 J-J
91* Oot.'98
Bklyn U Gas 1st oong 5i..'45 M-N
115* 115* 115*
ChGLACCo. SeePGACCo
Oolnmbus Gaa 1st g 5a. 1938 J-J
Con Gas Co. SeePGACCo.
Detroit City Gaa g 6s.. ,.1983 J- J
94
94
93* 95
Det Gaa Co oon lstg 5s,. 1918 F-A
99* Not'99
Sd HI 111 Bkn. See K Co BLAP
Bd Bl 111. See NYG A BL HAP
'87
Kings Co Bl LAPgS

97*

117*180*

117* Aug'00

.

BwayA7th AtI stc g 6s. 1943

104
97

118* 183*

Registered

1943
00lA9thAT 1st gn g 5s. 1998
Reglitered
1993

128
128

'

196

185

"OS* "9*8*

111

115

117* iseia

.

•

t

IMM

tttttt
•till tttttt

<

10

114

118

10

94

100

.

Purchase

mon 0a ..... 1997
.

lltg 5i

97*

1940

111

Oet.'99

May'99

Beglstered

Bonds due

A ag.

I

Due July.

Preferred

Ask.
60

Bid.

Miscellaneous. Par.
Chicle Co

55
70

••<

75

I

Due March.

1

Due Jan. IDs* Not.

.

Miscellaneous. Par,
Amerioan Surety

50
Amer Strawboard...,100

.10 t 11

Bonds 0b
FAA
Am Typefo'rs— Stock.100

18

Amer. Woolen—Com....

American Ginning.......

Amer Graphophone..

114*114*

*•••••
eeaee-

Ore ShortLln* 1st g 6s 1923
120
1908
Utah A Nor lat 7
Gold 5s
1926
...<..
On 8h L— lit oon g 51.1946
Non-oum lno A 5a. . .1946 Sep.* •102*
Non-ou lno B A ool tr 1 946 Oct.*

OnlNJRRACOo.

117

111

1

OreRyANaTlst s f g 6sl909
Or* RR ANaT oong 4s. 1946

117

J'ly'00

Jan-'OO

A gg 4s 1947 J-J 105*

Registered,

87

114* 119

111

J-D

Tor Ham A Buff 1st g 4s.l 946 J-Dt
Ulster A Del 1st O g 5s . 1 928 J-D

111

112* J'ne'99
114* J'ly'00

• • •

J-J
A-O
J-D
A-O
J-J

111*

•••••• »»••••

A-O 113*
F-A 113
A-O •*••••
M-8 105

'Per A Of St L lltg 4*s. '39
1 lstOOngoldSs.1894-1944

117

Bd BlIlBkn-lstcong4e.'39

Am erlcan

Amer

CStOt List
Amer Bank Note Co... 50 t 40
60
Amer Bicycle—Com
6*
Preferred.
83
30
Bonus 5l
MAS
81

61. 1939

(Gtivbh at foot op 7 oonsboutivb pages).—

Preferred

si

104*
114*

33 101
110
109

10

Amer Mutoscope

Miscellaneous.
Aoker.Mer A Con 6s 1903
98
Amalg. Copper— See Boat on Lis

Am Agrioul Chem— See

t

111*

111* 113

.

Bid.

Spok FalliANor lstg

WlsOent50-yr lstgen4s..'49

.

23d Sts Ferry
70
1st mort 5s 1919.. JAD {105
Union Ferry—Stook
33
lit 5s 1920
MAN { 90

L A N.

W YaOentAP lstg 6s. 1911 j-j

109

.

A

• • • ******
•aaott •••*••
•••tt*

.....

...

104* 106* WllASlouxF. SeeStPMAM
98* 102* WlnonaABtP. SeeCANW

.

Ferry Companies.

See

97* 100* Wneel'g AL H 1st con 4a.'49
1986
99* 99% 1st g 5s
Wheel DlT 1st gold 5a. 1988
81
86*
Bxten A Imp gold 6a. .1930
110 110* Wilkes A Bast. SssNYBAW

85

II

luth

OoU'99

...*•• ......
<»«•»» ...... i'0'9" Jan.''99

West Shore. See N Y Cant.
85* WVaAPltts. SeeBAO.

78

82

89

Registered
Gal Har AS A 1st g 68.1910
1905
Sdg7a

latest bid

SAN

Ala.

J -J
1943 A-O
Income 5a.... April. 1943 Not.
West No Car. See South By.

78*

81* 89

J-Dt
1929 J-Dt

j

102

1.

Low. High

W

West N Y APa
GengS-4s

1*1111

•• tt tt

. .

prioe Friday

Atk. Low. High.\No

110 J'ly'00
1936 M-N 110 111
5s
1936 -M-N •110*110* 110
110
Gtd stamped,
88
87 J'ly '00
1st oy gu 4s.l924 F- A
93
OA
117* J'ly'00
West N Cist oon g 6s. 1914 J-J 115*

Sea Mo P.
IrginlaMid. See South Ry.
1939
Wabash lit g 5a
Sd gold 5s
1989

104*Feb.'98

A Ga. See Southern.
Southern Pacific Oo—
Gold 4i Cent Pao coL.1949 J-Dt

No

since

Jan.

VerVallndAW.

So Car

*

Last Sale.

Week't

Central. See Bio G
Utah A North. See Ore 8 L.
DtioaABlaokR. See NY Cent

J'ne'00
Jan-'OO

85

W

126*

122

lit oon g 6i. 1934
Bar F A
1934
lltg 5a
Bt John's Dlv lit g 48..1934
1st gn g 4s. 1938
Brans A

Registered... .,..1949
ref gn g 48.1949
1949
Registered
Mort guar g 3*s.... 1929

5s

118*118* Utah

'99

106* Not'99

lit g Bi.1942

CPao lit

5s

F

1st gold 5s

1

•

K

Series

A 68.1906 M-8
1911 M-S
1916 M-S
1921 M-S
1921 M-8
1926 M-S
1926 M-S
1931 M-S

128" 125" Sunb A Lew— See Penn RR.
106 113* Stat III By 1st gu g 4*s.l943 J -D
Syra Blng A N Y. See DLAW.
103* 104

li'i" J'iy'OO

A Duluth 1st 5s. 1 9 3 F-A *i'22*!!!!!
1"
A-O •112*
1968 J-D '100*
lit cog 4|
116
Bt Paul M A Man 3d Bi.1909 A-O
1933 J-J »••«•• 14i*
lit eoniol told 6i
1933 J-J
Reglitered
Reduced to gold 4*s 1983 J-J 114 114*
1933 J-J
Reglitered
Dakota ezt gold 6i. .. .1910 M-N 118*
Mont Bit 1 it gold 4i 1 937 J-D 103
1937 J-D
Reglitered
MlitdiTlitg5i.,.1908 A-O 108*
1908 A-O IIMII ••••••
Reglitered
Nordlv lltg 4a.... 1940 A-O
«»••!
1940 A-O
Reglitered
Minn Union lit g 6a.. .1922 J-J
180 131
Mont O lit gu g 0s.... 1937 J-J
1937 J-J
Reglitered
1937 J-J 115*
lit guar gold Si
1987 J-J
Reglitered
Pan
8d 5i

Small

W

Not'99

122

J!

Gray's Pt Ter litgu g 5i*47

Bt

Aug. 10.

Range

Range or

Gen

•N

.

6s

C 6s
SerlesD4-5s

85

.

Bo. See Illlnoli Cent.
lit g 4i bdofl.1989
8
% 4i lno bond otfi. 1989

B

Series
Series

279

4.

Price
Friday,

Bid.

Southern— (Con)
Virginia Mid ser

Small

StLASF RRg4t....l996 J-J 100
BonthwDlT lit g 51.1947 A-O
96
Cent DlT lstg4i. ..1929 A-0
Ft 8* V B Bdg lstg 6l. 1910 A-O
Kansas Mid lit g is. .1937 J-D
L
L

Pagb

(5 pages)

3 -8
BONDS.
STOCK EXCHANGE II
N.T.
Week Ending Acq. 10.

Series

1906
8d gold 6iClasi A
1906 M-N
9d gold 61 OlaiiB
1906 M-N
3d gold 6i OlaiiO
lstg 6s Pierce O A 0..1919 F1931 J-J
General gold 6i
1931 J-J
General gold 5i
1987 A-O
lit trait gold 5i

Bt
Bt

PKIOBS

Press AssoCn. .100
250
American Screw
Amer Shipbuilding... 100
100
Preferred
Am Soda Foun—Com. 100
100
1st preferred
100
2d preferred

t

• •

• a •

i

30

70

85

15

25
100

Preferred....

Pref

85

8

FERRY &

Bid.

Ask.

200
80
100
54

805
31

58

18* 18*
69* 70

Amer Wringer oom,..100 107
Amer. Writing Paper....
Preferred

,.

5s

48* Asphalt
10*

of

Amer.

8m P

118
S
17
78

a These are option

18
75

hlla.ll St.

MISCELL'8.

Mlacellaneons.

Par.

Bid.

Ask

A 8m Car
Preferred
Bergn A Bug Br 1st

100
100

90

16
98

Barney

6s...

96

Company —Com.. 50 "ijm 79
50
62*
Preferred
Bond A Mort Guar... 100 310 315
11* 11*
British Columbia Ooppar
Bliss

93
100
17
Oent Flrew'ris—Com. 100
5»
100
Preferred
t Price p er aha
{ And interest,
Celluloid Co.

4

sales.

90
90
00

re.

5. 9
.
3

1

.

,

,

.

THE CHRONICLE -BOND

280

Price
Friday,

Week's

tinee

Last Sale.

Atk

Bid.

EqGasLNYlstcong5s..'32 M-8 120
EqG&Fuel. SeePG ACCo.
Gas ABlec BergCo con g 5s'49 J-D
Gen Bleo Co deb g 5s... 1922 J-D 115*

HapGLCo lstg 5s. .1915 F-A
K C Mo Gas Co 1st g 5s. 1922 A-0

Jan.

Low High

Low. Utah. Ho.
115% Aug' 00

,

1.

115% 115%

103*110%

M07

111

Iron Steamboat Co 6s... 1901
Mad So Gard lstg 5s.. .1919
Man Bch
gen g 4s. 1 940
ATlstsf g 5s.l918

103* 110
10

F-A 100
ColCAI DevCogug5s..l909 J-J 50
Coupons off.
lx?S
10»
Col Fuel Co gen gold 6s. 191 M-N
91%
Col F A I Co gen s f gj5s. 1943 F-A
De Bardel C A I. See T C * I.

103*

.

107
103* 106
180* 127
107

TennCoalTDlv Istg6sl917

Blrm D1t 1st con6s. 1917
Can C M Co 1st gu g 6s..'22
De Bar C A I Co gu g 6s. '10

WhLB APCCo lstg5s.'19
INDUSTRIAL
MAN'F'G A

Am Cot
m

98

.

Mfglstg 6*1915

Am Thread 1st col tst 4s 1 91
6s ..1942

101

<••••• »•••••

A Gamb 1st g 6s. .'40 J-J
Stan Rope & T 1st g 8s.l946 F-A
1946
5s
Procter

UB BnvelCo
8 LeathCo

J'ly'00

Miscellaneous. Par,

105

89% 89%

105

Apr '97
107*

105

10

87* 95

104% May'00
113M J'ly '99
69

104% 103

18*

114

110

84

68

J'ly'00

9* 24

10

104* 104

104

30
13

104*

76*

4a.

Oheaebrougb MfgCo.100
Chicago A Alton RR 3s...

ChlcAAl Ry3*s

w.i.)
Com stock ( wh Issued)
Issued)...
Pref (when

80
JAJ 85
lstg 5s 1917
50
Oonaolld Car Heatlng.100
10
Oonaol Firew'ka-Com.100
100
55
Preferred
5
Oonaol Rubber Tire.
30
Pref
Corbln Cabinet Lock. 100 225
Corbin (P. A F.) Co.. ..25, t 80
75
Orampa' Sh A En Bldg.100
Diamond Match Co. .100 120
4
Distill. Co. of America.
19*
Pref
15
Bleotrlo Boat
80
Preferred
80
Bleotrlo Vehicle ..........
40
Preferred
.

60
15

60
7
35

B rle A Western Trans 50
Fidelity A Dep (Bait).. 50
.

80
122

A*
20*
18

too*

4%

General Carriage....,
100
General Chemical
100
Preferred

95
110

100

0*
68
100

65

Gorham Mfg Co-Com.100

120

Preferred

9*
„s* 40
88

Havana Commercial
Preferred
Heok-Jones-J Mill-Pf.100

r,5

MAS
1st 6s 1922
Her'g-Hall-Mar(asst p'd)
Preferred (asst p'd) 100
Hoboken Land A lmp't

76

85
10

20

110
106
Bleo Veh Trans. 1 t
Illinois
1*
International Elevat.100 • • • • •
5b

I

Pump—Com.

Preferred
Internat Silver— See Stk.
do
pref
Do

do bonds

Inter-Stato Oil
iron Bteaniboat.

19
68

.

100

JAJ

John B Stetson— Com. 1 00

1%
80*

67

Bxoti.

list.

35

37
98

I

93

68*
2*
40
95
115

00

Preferred

100
Preferred
8
Journeay A Burnham.100
80
100
Preferred
10
Lanston Monotype.... 80
100 105
Lawyers' Surety
Lawyers' Title Ins. ... l oo 150
Lorlllard (P)— Pref.. .100 100
Madison 8q. Garden— 100
MAN 40
2d 6s 1919
Markeen Copper
8*
Max Nat Construot'n, pf d
118
Minneapolis Brew 1st 7s

1.

109

High. No
80
85

Low High
40

10

Oot.'99

*••••

•

95*Jan.'97
110

•

Nov'90

113

••••• •••••
••ft* *«»••

• •

•

• • • • •

•

• • •

inn

••••

stttl

••••
* 1
•••• •••«*t
•

•

••••* ••••••

J-Jl

M-N

112
90

Nov'99

HIM

Oot»'9P

-

.

|« «|

L Ter

Cupples Station A
Prop Co lstg 4*s 5-20 yr'17 J-D
8 Yuba Wat Co oon g 6s. .'23 J-J
101
8p Val Wat Works 1st 6s. '06 M-8
113*
Vermont Mar 1st s f 58.1010
West Union— Ool tr cur 5s.'38 J -J •110* 113 110%
Fd and real est g 4*. .1950 M-N 106* 106% 106*
Mut Un Tel s fa 6s. ..1911 M-N
109
Northwestern Tel 7i. . .'04 J-J

ir«b '07

J'ly'00

113*113*

Aug'00

109* 11«U
105* 106%

'U

%

May'00

109

113

.

U

8

U8
US

8.

GOV. SECURITIES

(For daily

2s 30-year refunding!...
2s registered.. ..Optional
3s registered
1918
3s coupon
1918
3s reg small bonds. 1918
3s oou small bonds. 1918
4a registered
1907
4s coupon....,
1907
4s registered
1925
4s ooupon
1925
,
5s registered
1904

U8
U8
U8
US
US
US
U8
U 8 5s ooupon

1904

+ Prices art

made in

Tew*

*et

seventh va ge v receding.)

103* 104* 104 May'00
q-'m 100
100* Apr'00
Q- F 108% 109* lio J'ly'00
109* Hal* 100* 109*
Q- F

103* 105
100* 100*
108% 118
109 112*

108* J'ne'00
115% J'ly'00
115* 115*
13?% J'ly'00
131% Sale 131% 133
112% 113* 113% J'ly'00
112% 113* 113* 113*

108* 111%
117*
118~
132% 137
19 131% 137
112*116
12 112* liei

Q- F
Q- F 108* 109*
Q-Jt 114* 116*
Q-Jt 114* 115*
Q- F 131% 138*

Q-F
Q-F
Q-F

114
8 114

Dnli sted Devart/m ent " for bond 8"lC hen issued.

the

FOR'GN GOV. SECURITIES.

Mexico s f g 5s of 1899 Q-J
596*
96*
b These are prices on the basis of Ave dollars to the pound.

U S of

STATB 8BCURITIBS.
Alabama—Class A 4 to 5. 1906 J-J •109
Small
Class

110

109*

J'ly '00

Aug'98

111

105
108
108

Sep.'98
Jan.'00

102

108

121

Apr'00

121

131

107%
109*

J'ly '00

106* 108*

Feb.'99

,

B

1906
1906

5s

97*

698

•100

Currency funding 4a. ..1920
Dlst of Columbia— 3-6 5a. 1 9 2
Louisiana— New oon 4S..1914

•108*

Small
Missouri— Funding. ..1894-95
Nortn Car— Consol4a...l910
Small
L
1919
6s
So Carolina— 4*s 20-40.1933

106>fe

108* 116*

107% •

,

Tenn— New settlem' 1 3s

.

106*

J'ne'00

128

Feb

120

104

'187*
115

Mar'00

106* 106%

'«8

180
94

95* 96* J'ne'00
96% .r'ne'00
"90
39%
89% Aug'CO
""6* " 7
««
6%

191

Small

.,

,

Virginia fund debt 2-38.1991
Registered
,
6s deferred cents

180
961
96*
03}

01

85
46

6*

10

66* Nov'99
**•••• ••••••
64* Nov'99
Kan City So 3s (wh issued
66 J'ly '00
66
70
Due May. I Due April. Bonds due January. T Due August. aThese are option tales.

53%
130
•

• •

30
18
110
170
101

7
6

10
115

•

I

10*
40*
42
100

16

78*

17
81

"7l"

Preferred

Gramophone.

Ask

41

100
Stamping

24
75
40

35

. .

30
43
64
Preferred
65
100 150
National Surety
180
National Tube See NY Stk Ixch list.
62
National Wall Paper. 100
75
4
N. E. Blec. Veh.Trana..l0
4*
100
70
N Y Loan A Imp
85
NYBisoult6s 1911. MAS 113*
New Jer Zino A Iron.. 100
N. Y. El. Veh. Transp.100
7* 8*
Nicholson File Co
50
64
Otis Elevator— Com...
28* 29
Preferred
86
87*
Peok, Stow A Wilcox.. 25
87
50 410
Pennsylvania Coal
50
21
Pitts Bess
88*
Pittsburg Brewing
50
23% 23%
50
43
Preferred
44
100
Pittsburg Coal
23% 84
100
Preferred
19
80
100
Pitts Plate Glass
150
Compress ..100
10
Planters'
20
Pratt A Whitn— Pref . 100
45
50
Procter A Gamble. ...100 430
450
Preferred
100 202
410
1st 6s— See Stook Bxoh list.
RoyBakPowpf
90* 92
Rubber Goods Mfg
87
27*
Preferred
76* 77*
Russell A Brwin.
25 t 66
78
Safety Car Heat A Lt.100 115
125
8e»ooast Packing Co
25
Preferred
B0
Simmons H'rdw-Com.100 100 115
Preferred
100 140
ISO
2d preferred
100 100
Singer Mfg Co
100 525 80 0"
Standard Oil of N J.. 100 533
536
Stand Und'rg'dCable.100 180 180
Sloss-Sheffleld See Stock Exch . list.
Southern Cotton Oil. . .50 t 53
StandardCoupler.com. . ,
40
50
Preferred
138
Stat lsl R T lat Oa'ISAAO 107
2d 5a 1926
JAJ 95
Stlllw-Bierce A 8m-V.100
50
65
Storage Power
15
16*
Swift A Co
100 101
101*
lat 5a 1910-1914.. .JAJ 108
108
Susq Coal 6s 1911. ...JAJ 115
131
Texas A Paolno Coal. 100
76
85
1st 6s 1008
AAO *107*
Title Guar A Trust... 100 400
407"
Trenton Pott—Com.. 100
8
7
Preferred
100
40
08
Trow Directory-New. 100 SO
60
Union Copper
8
Union Bteel A Chain
8

ALB

35
83
60

35
50

t
1....

10*
40*

J

90

*

Bid

Coal.

.100
National Saw— Pref.. 100
National Salt

11

S

Steel

84
111

'20

Sale

N T A Ont Land lstg 68.1910 F-A
No Westn Teleg. See West. Un.
St

tine*

Jan.

1

Monongahela Water... 25
100
Moaler Safe Co
100
National Carbon

Nat'l

45
90

.

Preferred

tfYANJTel gen g 5s oy

Atk, Low.
89

29

UNLISTED BONDS.
Atoh Col A Pao 6s tr otf a.
101* 103* Atoh J Co A West 6s tr otfs

Due July

Preferred

70^

Common— See St. Ex. list
A Hock Ccal A I, "fd.

Newpt News SAD D 58.1990

Bid

A-O
J-J
A-0
J-J
M-S
M-N
J-J
M-N
M-N
M-N

(Given at poot op 7 consecutive pages).— BANKS

27* Nat Enamel'g A

Col

S6* 87%
71
111

Miscellaneous. Par-

108
103

100 101

Id preferred

t

Monongahela River

102* 103*
91%
23
63

105

102

Last Sale.

Rang*

Week's

.

80
365

(H B)-lst prer.100 10

15

78
Apr'00

75
111

116*

113

101* May'00
104 Feb .'98

17

70
358

3

86* J'ne'00

81%
75

114

114

SeeWnDn.

ClassC4s

Jan.'99

87* May'00

95

8

Ait
45

Bid.

'

b» 1901

K6

Ja'n.'o6
Feb '00

99
70

68

'

Ohateaugay Ore A Ir 6s 1
Ones A O Grain Bl— Inc.

Do

85

68
«»••••

••••••

105

OUTSIDE SECURITIES

Internat'l

100*104

101

•Mo prioe Friday; these are latest bid and asked this week,

Empire

105
101
32

101
Jan.'OO

89%

113
110
105
109
38

1st s f g6sl918 j'-j'i

M-N
f deb g 6s. 1
MISCELLANEOUS BON DS.
Adams Hx—Col tr g 4s.l948 M-8
mDkAImpSs. SeeCenNJ
BMnFerryCo lstcong5s'48 F-A
k'nWAWHlst5strctfs.
Ss.1915
Chic Jo AStYd coi g.... 1 907 J-J
J-J
Non-cum Ino 5s
Com Cable Co 1st g 4s.. .2397 Q-J
2397 O-J
Registered

Glariln

95*

108
103

Aug'00

105

Bar 4 8 Car Co 1st g
Grameroy Sug 1st g 6s.. 1923 A.-0
1910 J -J
111 Steel Co deb 5s
Non-conv deben 5s... 1913 A-0
Int'l Paper Co 1st con g 6s.' 18 F-A 105
Kntck Ice (Chic) lstg 5s. 1928 A-O • 92
Nat StarchMfgColstg6sl920 M-N 105

Incomes

J'ly '00
Feb '00

101
69

101

M-8
J -J
J-J

100* 103*

...

58

32

HAL
MetT
uttJnTelOo.

U.

103

91*

He id B Co 1st s f g 6I...1931
UoiokenL A I g 5s
1910

US

May'97
May'97

101

J-J

deb g 8s. . 1900 Qu-F

Oil

Spirits

105*

105* 105*

58

105
106
105

105

109
103
105

103
18
90

107
80

1926 J-D
2dg5s
RochAPitCAIpurm5sl946 M-N

109*

107
105
103
103

'00

Feb

91*

92

110

117% 120

Jan.' 00

58

103

J-D
J-D
A-Oll
J-J
J-D
F-A

59

J'ne'00

94*

91
108

i

1st g s f 6S..1912

AC

106

•

Bun Ck Coal

MAM

Haok Wat Reor lstg 5s. 1926

107
NTGBLH&P..g5s.l948 j-n 10C 107% 107
194? J-D
Registered
91
91% 919<
91%
Purohase mon g 4s.... 1948 F-A
108%
Hd ElIlllstconTg6«..101O M-8 118 109M 108% J'ly'00
11*% J'ly'00
....
J-J
latoong5a
j"-J®?5
•••••• 107
J'ly'00
PeoGaaAOlatgng6a..l904 M-N
1904 J-D 108!* 104% 104 Aug'00
2dgtdg6a..
128* J'ly'00
1843 A-0 180*
lstconsolg6s
106 Deo '98
1947 M- 8
Refunding g 5s
.194/ M-8
Registered
Ch G-LACke lstgug 5s 37 J-J •107 109 107 J'ly'00
ConG Co of Ohlstgug 5s'36 J-D •105 107 105 J'ly'00
May'00
EqGA FCblstgug6s.'05 J-J •102 104% 103 J'ly '00
103
Mu Fuel Gas 1st gu g 5. 1 947 M-N
103 Deo '99
Trenton G & HI 1st g 5S.1949. M-8
105* J'ne'00
Westn Gas Co ooi tr a 5«... 33 M-N
COAL A IRON BONDS.
Can Coal Mln. SeeTCIAR
learf BltCoal. SeeNYCAH
Col O * 1 1st con g 6s. . 1902

Aug. 10.

Id gr 3*s S A.1911
Brie TAToeltrgaf 5s... 1926
Gr air Coal
lstg 6s. 1919

120*

107

Range or

10.

113

Mut Fuel Gas Co SeePeopGas

JeffAOlearOAI Istg5sl926

Det

.
1

.
.
.
.

[V ol. lxxi.

5.

Price
Friday,

BONDS.

Webs Ending Aug.

u

8

Page

N. Y. STOCK EXCHANGE

106%

109

.

(5 pages)

108% J'ne'00
116* 116*

Gr

Lac Gas-L Co of Stlilstg 5s' 19 Q-F*

PRICES

Range

Range or

Aug. 10.

BOND8.
K. Y. 8TOCK EXCHANGE
Week Ending Aug. 10.

3
«

.
.

.
.
.

Miscellaneous. Par.
Union Steel A Cham pref
Union Switch A Signal. 50
Preferred

,50

lat preferred... ...,100

100

Banks.
Broken'

Bid.

Gu

••

U

39*
67* 73*
27* 88*
39

109
118

4%
33

Bank*.

Aak.

Brokers'

otati ons.

Aak.

Bid.

Qu

otatio

•

170
400
Peoples'* .... 280
100
475
Prod Bxoh*.. 135
Republic .... 315
Riverside*... 310
Seaboard .... 290
800

Commerce.

.

468*

t-271

Continental $131
Corn Exch*.. 345

Domes. Exoh ..- .1 103
Bast River. 140
11th Ward*. 150

Shoe

Fifth Ave*.. 2400 3900

Fifth
First

14th Street*.

Fourth

......

Gallatin
Gansevoort*.
Garfield

German Am*
German Ex*.
Germanla*.
Greenwich*..
Hamilton*...
Hano'rlnew)
.

HideAL'ath
Imp A Trad
Irving

Leather Mfr.
Liberty
Lincoln

* •

•

Mechanics'.. 190

Mech A Tra* *97

190
Mercantile
Merch Bxoh. 185
Merchants'. 170
Metropolis*, 560
Mt Morris*.. 180
•

•

*

Manhattan*
Market A Ful

•

• • • • 1

•

•••

180
180

1

State of NY* 120
12th Ward*.. 100
23d Ward*... 100

Union

West

Bq*....

Int.

90

200
ISO
130
'•«•»!

no

YorkvlUe*..

385

Broadway*

.

Hamilton*...

no*

•

• •

••

230
85
110
300

Side*..

t Prioe per share.

Bowl'gGreen

ttfll

BAT

250
300
Central Tr'at. 1950 3050
City Trust.
850
300
Colonial
335
Continental 375
Farm Ln ATr 1400 1485
Fifth Ave Tr 425
Guaranty Tr 535 875"
Ctl.Rlty

.

Manhattan

.
350
Mercantile
800
Merchants'
300
Metropolitan 425

MortonTrust
N Y L I A Tr
N Y Sec A Tr
North Amer.
Produce Ex..

•

(Mil

450

445
1375 1485
760
806"
800

135
Heal Est Tr't 300
StandardTr't 210
Tr.Co.of Am. 304

145

Unit. States.. 1600

16C0

207
Tr.CcofN.Y.
800
Union Trust. 1300 1400
U 8 Mt* A Tr. 400 475

Washington

Brooklyn Tr. 480
natbush .... 160
Franklin..... 300

385
340
L lsl L A Tr. 200
307
Manufaot'rs.
185
Nassau
330
People's
Hamilton.
Kings Co....
. .

3651, 370
170

105
Soherm'rh'n* 150
17th Ward*. 110

805
800

N. Y. CITY.

BR'KLYN.

.

People'a* _.

AtlantioTr.. 300
Bankers' Tr.

.

Kings Co*.... 100
Manufaot'ra. 860
Mechanics*.. 300
Mech A Tra*. 370
Merchant*
100
285
North

180

.

115

245

Brooklyn* ... no
8th Ward*...
5th Ave*.... 100

105

Kniok'rb'ok'r 100

106

BR'KLYN.
Bedford*.... 310

mt.

otati

200
140
135

.

180

385
415
385

110

Trust Cos.

Side*.. 375

Banka marked with an aateruu

accrued

180
100

182*

Union*.....,

300

325
3500
145
165
*170
400
60
1600
*124
J 60
375
160
145
••
485
130
••••
515 580
182
100
210
••••••
310
• • •
••
775
265 280
330
216
•

A Le'th

Ou

.

19th Ward*.. 100
SO
North Amer. *30l
Paclflo*

6
40

Bid.

Sprague
26th Ward*

York.... 255

Oriental*.... 185

•

55
87
34

Wallabout*

140

Nassau*

New

Bid.

Bank*.
Brokers

'IS.

175 ,
New Amst.*.. 675
New York Co. 1500
N Y Nat Ex.. 185

N. Y. CITY.
America*.... 400* *
Am Bxoh.... 180
500
Aator
290
Bowery*
Broadway.... 240
345
Butoh'aADr.. 85
170
Central
• • ••
500
Chase
Chatham .... 300 310
3950 4050
Chemical
140
Citizens'
150
337* *
City
Colonial* .... 275
•
Columbia*... 190

Par.

Envelope— Com.. 10

Pref
100
83
S Glass— Common. .100
33
Preferred
100 105
Va. Coal Iron A Coke.100
5
5a 1049
MAS 36
Westlngh Air Brake... 50 tl75
Worthing. Pump, pfd.100 105

111

87

S

U

122

8*

U. S. Cast Iron Pipe.
Preferred

,

-

t

Union Typewr— Com. 100
2d preferred

t

• •

Miscellaneous

Aak.
36

Bid.
•

& MISGELL'8.

805
150

Wllllamsb'gh 185

•

•••

338
200

are State bankf. i Purohaser also pay*
Dale at Btoek Bxol? . or at auction una week
(*)

.
.

August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900. J

Saturday,

Aug. 4
39
215
•148
•843
•18S
187
•185
•123
30
187

••

189
127
138
136
30

•

135

•HH.

8*
80

•14%
80

8*
80

78* 78*
87*
16)4 16*

•87

03
89
•23
76
8

89*

8%

8%

89*

29 9-ia

n% u%

60*

89*

88
33
76

31
76

i

TI

•••••

136
•125

136
127
'29* 30

30

•39%

137

•22* 23

•24*

Shares

•11*
12
86* •86*
51* •51*
•71*
•70* 71

304

804

204

304

61*

61% 64*

7-16

98
98
8 5-16 8%

98

98

98

8*

"
"

Un. Stook Yds.

Preferred

....100
....100
Gulf.. (Phlla.K... 50
"
.... 50
(Boston).. ..100

*

Chootaw Oklahoma

8*

•8*
8* Heading Company
39* 39*, 29* 29 5-18 29% 29 7-16 1st preferred
•14
14* 3d preferred
14* •14
14* •14

59* 59*
75% 76*
87

59*
75%
36%
16*

87

•16
*•••

16*

37

78
87

16*

16% 16%

33* 92
•83
•25

8%

78

2%

59* 69*
76*

69*
76*

•93

92*

93%

28
76

38
1,311

490
1,945
8,450

"
"
(Boston).. ..100
Dnlon Paolflo
•
"
....100
Preferred
Union Traotlon, f 17% paid. (Phlla.).... 50
(Bait.) .... 50
United Ry A Bleo. Co
"
.... 50
Preferred
(Boston).... 50
West Bnd Street

180
2,559
1,210
1,988

917
151

436
615
156

1%

"

Preferred !

3

American Alkali
Preferred, *10 paid

....100

50
50

(Phlla.)....

"

....

61* 65

65
745

•96
8 ail

16% 16*
53% 53%
•41
43*

53

38*
63%

9

9*

31

16*

1691

54

54

41

43
96

98
33

97
81

•96

97

715

745

745

745

18* 16*
63* 63*
•41
41*

•••«•

••••c

83*

60
745

63
745

63
740

63

63

740

743

16* 16*

18* 18*
54
41

40

98

97

•96

84

84

3394 33%

54

96

98

33%
53% 53*
3 494

8* 8%
8% 8%
894
8%
97*
97% 97* 97* 07* •97
97
97
124
134* 184* 131* 121% 124* 181*
134 •
183*
•18* 19* •18* 19* •19
19*
19* 19*
1894 19
a% s%
3* 2*
8* 2%
3* 2«
2% 29$
2* 8*
116 116
115
115
114% 114* 114 114
itHM
•18
•18
19
19
19
19
18% 18%
18J4 18%

8%

8%

9%

8«

•as* 98

•98* 98

<

•15
46
•63
......
64
• Bid aril aikedorlnes

x45

45
61

INACTIVE STOCKS

•45
63

48
6294

Bid.

Ask
10.

"

100 300
aostonAProv.
"
16
100
Central Mass...
62
"
100
Pref
Conn * Passum " 100 160
Odnn River.... " 100 270
OonsolTr Pitts! (Phil) 50
50
Fla.(Balt)100
"
100
lit pref
"
100
8d pref
Pass(PhU) 50
iSTmant'n

MAT"

50
50
Pref
"
100
Inds Street
Ft S*M.. (Best) 100
"
100
Pref
Little Sohuylk.(PhU) 60
Mains Central. (Bost) 100
Mlnehill ASH. (Phil) 50
50
Nssqnehon'g Y. "
60
North Penn.... "
Pare Marqu'te.(Boit)100
"
100
Pref
PhU Germ & N.(PhU) 50
"
Ryi Co General!
Seaboard w.i. (Bait)

EC

Prefw.

i

"

United N J.... (PhU)lOO
25
UnPow* Trans "
United Tr of P.
Pref

35
94
69
148
40

306
17
65

70

ieo'

90
88
16*1*

58%
55

105*
82*
57*

23
59

154

I*
8*
34
270

8%
24%

50
50
West Bnd pref. (Bost) 50
West Jer 4 8 8. (PhU) 50
50
WeitNYAPa. "
Wli Cent, new. (Bost) 100
"
Pref
100
Wor Nash A R. " 100

51*
113

113%
65

25

1

14
89
130

1%

794

19%

25
25
Beth Steel
(PhU) 50
Boston HlecLM Bost) 100
Cambria Iron.. (Phil) 50
Oanton Co
(Bait) 100
Centen Mining. (Bost) 25
"
Central OU
Con. Lake Sup. (PhU)
Pref
"
Danv. Bessemer "

80%

3*

95
25

4

23
20

24
22

15

170

172

4494

70
17

18

15

1594

99
6
1

Diam State St
8%
Domln Coal pf. (Bost) 100 110 113

BdlionBl 111... "
100 205 208
lee Co of Am!. (PhU) 50
894
Tranklln Min'g. (Bost) 85
14%
1391
"
fisneral Blect..
100 181
133
Prsf
"
100 138% .39

8enHlAuto-Ml(Phu) 60

Ind-Bgyp Com!(Bost)100
tntButHASM "
10
UleRoyale!.... "
85
Mannfac Rub.. (Phil) 60
Pref
50
Mary landBrew. ( Bait ) 1
"
Preferred.,,
100
Msrgsnthaler ..
v«r Telnnhnn*(Bost) 100
"
10

28

1%
•

»

•

» •

3
186'
3

10

NewHavIA 8. (PhU)
SoAmG Dredg(Boit)
"

.

Jan.

May
May
Jan.

July

81%

Jan.

20
70

June 24

May
l%Aug.

80* Mar. 21
8

1

1%

9 137%
3 118
June 26 15u
May 14 1494
Jan. 18 330
Jan. 3 85%

May 89

June 28
Mar.

5

91

43

rights

5

Jan.

Mar.
Mar.

Jan.

i

Mar.
Jily
July
Mar.
July

6%

8

U07
14%
40
40

Jan. 10
Jan.
3
Jan.
4
Jan. 10

May 10

Feb. 5
Apr. a
Apr. 8
770 Feb. It
33% Feb. 9
62% June 18
51 Mar. 91
122 Feb. 23
5794 Feb. 6
54% May 18
13 Jan. 94

16 103*
16 140
14 24%
30
6%
May 16 160%
31 25
June
6 50
Jan.

135 96*
55 122
190 14
10,859
2

50
26

2

June 15

June 22
29% Ju ie 25

5,435

.

4

8

36

23

95

68

18

97% Apr.

2

36% Jane 25

115

5
2
2
5

.

43
231

.

Bx

Mar.

635

.

Jan. li
61
5
Jan.
t $50 paid in.

Mar. 97
Jan.
8
Apr. 4
Jan.
9
Jan. 11
2
Jan.

Mar. 37

48% Apr. 25
66 Mar. 88
$5 paid.

1

A fk.

%

40%
3*

NYANBnglst7s.'05J&J
Torrington 1st 5s 1918...

81
394
94

25
25
UnBILAPow pf.(Balt) 50
Un Shoe Maoh..(Bost) 25
"
Pref
25
....
US Mining.... " 25

1

32

29*
23

7%

USPHorseCol.(Phll) 1
Utah Mining.. (Bost)4-85
Warwick I AS. (Phil) 10

30%

• • • •

Balt&Plst6sml 1911A&0
.

9994
8394

8%
8994

3%
3994
i

{

3%
40

08% 100
09* 100

84
116
80
I'Ve" 50
117%
Ill6
107
{106
{100
{101
IowaDiv 41.1919 A&O 2103
113
Chicago June 5s. 1915 JAJ {110
£•••*•*

83
|ll4

98

86

{....
{

97

88
92
98

{110*
{111%
139%
{136* 139*

{137

IUin Steel conv 5s.'10 JAJ {
{

98

93*
99*

90
KCCA81st5sg.'25 AAO {
KCFtBAGlst7s.'08JAD {113 114
111
KCF S&Moon 6s.'28M&N {110%

08
66
{102
{

{

68
118*

79%
25* 96%
12* 13*
70

..1932

118%

.

108%

NorthCent4%s.l925AAO 116

A

PotomVal

8eab

119*
119*

1st 5s. 1941 JAJ

Beo AvTn(Pitti) 5i'34J AD
Sav Fla A West 5s '34AAO
8eaboard loan certf s

A Roan

5s.

1926 JAJ

UnEi LAPlst4%i'29MAN
Un Ry A Bl lst4s'40.MAS

96* 07
105
•sees

99%
7?H 71%

Income 4s 1949
J AD
VirgMldlst6s.l906M&8 112
. . . ,

2d series 6s. .1911 MAS
3d series 6s. .1916 M&S
4th ser 3-4-5i.l921MA8
5th series 5s.l928 MAS
(State) 3s new.'32JAJ
Fund debt2-3s.!991JAJ

Ya

Bdison Bleo 5s stk tr otf s.
Blec& Peop's Tr stk tr ctf b

•«••*>•

•

MM
•

•••

99* 100

Blm&Wilm

lit 6i.'10 J&J
Income 5s... .2862 A&O
111 Gas-L 1st g 58.1928
Hestonv M & F oon 5s.'24
H& B Top con 5s.'25 A 40

K

Chas City Rylst 5s '23J&J 104*
'07%
Chas Ry G & Bl 5s '99 M&S
97
CharlC&A ext5s.l910JAJ 105%
CityASub lst5s.l922JAD 116*
City&8ub(Wash)lst5s'48 105* 106*
Col&Grnvlst5-6.1917J&J 117
Consol Gas 6s. 1910 J&D
5s
1939 J&D iia' 112%
Ga &Alalstpf5sl945A&0
GaCar&Nlst5sg.l929J&J 103* 104
GeorgiaPlst5-6s 1922J&J 123
133%
GaSo&Fla lst5s.l945J&J 110
Greater Seaboard otf s
102* 103
KnoxvTrao IstSs '28A&0 98 100
Lake R Bl lstgu5s'42M&8 117%
'*67%
Maryland Brewing 6s
67
MetSt( Wash)lst 5s'25FA
New Orl Gas 1st 5s.. .Var

6s 1900
A&O
6s gold 1900.
J&J
6s 1904
J&J
Series
5s 1026... .J&J
Series B 5s 1026... .JAJ
Pitt Un Trao 5s.l997 J&J

tl

107%

Del & B Bk lst7s.'05 F&A
Bast&A 1st M 5s.'20 M&N 113*

Ry

4s.. 1933
C Sub B 1st 6s..'20
Lehigh Nav 4%s. .'14 Q-J

M&N

Norfolk St lit 5s "44. J&J

Cit's'8tRy(Ind)oon 5s.'33

Indianapolis

NewpN&OPlst5i'88M&N

{103*
•

.

Bxt & Imp 5S.1932M&S

l

Ch*NoMgu5s.'31M*N
Chi & W M gen 5s.'21 J*D
Con. of Verm't 4s.'13 J&J
Curr't Riv 1st 5s.'27 A40
D G R 4 W 1st 4s.'46 A&O
Domln Coal lst8s.'13MAS
Bast'n 1st M 6s g.'06 MA8
Ft HlkAM Y 1st 6s '33 end
Cnst'p'd lit 6s.'33 AAO

Bxt & Imp 6S.1901M&S

No BaltDlv 5s. 1943 J&D 117*
Conv'rtible 5il906M&N
Central Ry 6s.. .1912 J&J
5s.

• • •

116%

Bq

1st 6s tunnel 1911..J&J
Bal Trao 1st 5S.1939M&N

Consol

»•••

Adjustment g 4s.. 1995
Boston Term'l 3%s. .1947
Bos Un Gas 1st 5s. '39 JAJ
1939 JAJ
2dM5i
Bur* Mo Riv ex'pt 6s. J &J
Non-exempt 6s. '18 J A)
Plain 4s
1910 J&J
Ch Bur * Q 4s. 1922 F*A

4s g. .1911 JAJ
lit con lno 81 g non-oum
2d con lno 3s non-oum..

• •

Fundg Ss.1916 M&N 122
Exchange 3%s.l930J&J 111* 112

7%

Bonds— Boston.

5s.....

••••••

75

Colum 8t Rylst con 5s.'32
Con Trao of N J lsi 5s..'33 109%

Bait

88
88
2

••••••

"
100
"
100
"
50
Westm rel Coal
Winona Mlning(Bost) 25
Wolverine Min. "
95

KC&MRy&B5s.'29 A&O
KC8tJoACB7s.'07JAJ

• • •

• • • • •

. .

01%

BaltCPaslst5s.l911M&N 109%

"

KCMABlst4s..'34MAS

Anacostla & Pot
5s 101%
Atl & Ch 1st 78.1907 J&J 115*
AtlG-Lightlst5sl917J&D 102*
Atl Coast L ctf s 5s J&D
Bait Beit 1st 5s.l990M&N

9

Pref.. .«,»«•«•«

Debenture 5s.l913AAo

i

Bonds— Baltimore.

134% 136

MAN

Ter 1st 5s. 1926 JAD
99
BergABBrewlst6s'21JAJ
• •MM
B Boro Gas 1st 5s.'S8MAS
Cambria Iron 6s.l917 JAJ
ChesADCanlst5s.'16JAJ ••••••
ChooOk&Ggen 5s'19J&J 105 105%
Balls

{103

M&N
1914 M&S
1916 M&N
.

St 5s. '02

tr otf s

Atl City 1st 5sg..'19

I

West Bnd
4%s
Deb 4s

TelepTel AC. (Phil)
Tidewater St... "
10
Torrington "A"(Bost) 25

ATASFgeng4s.'95A&0

Asphalt Co 5s

{••tin

1st mort 6s.. ..1905 J&J {......
Rutland 1st 6s.. '03 M&N {103

41

• • • •

3%

..

(Bait.) . ..100
(Boston). ..100
..100
Brie Telephone
"
.
••
"
..100
Federal Steel
50
Lehigh Coal * Navigation. (Phlla.)
"
Marsden Co!
....100
Eng. Cotton Yarn, pref. (Boston) . . ,.100
New
"
New England Telephone....
....100
"
Old Dominion Copper !....,,
.... 25
Philadelphia Bleo.! 2% paid (Phlla.)
"
United Gas Improvement !.
.... 50
United States Oil
(Boston).... 25
Welsbaoh Light!
(Phila.)....
5
,
Westlngh. Hlectrio * Mfg. . (Boston) .... 50
"
Preferred
.... 50

SuiqneIAS!..(PhU) 5
8%
Tamarack Min. (Boot) 25 198 800

UnCopLAM'g

25
60

..

Jan.

•

5

10
25
Old Col Mining.
"
25
Osceola Mining.
Palmetto Co.... (PhU) 25
ParrottSUACop(Bost) 10
Penn Bleo Veh. (PhU) 50
"
Pref
50
50
Pennsyl Salt... "
Pennsyl Steel!. "
....
"
Pref!
100
Qulncy Mining. (Bost) 25
Rhode Isl Min. (Bost) 25
5
8anta Ysabel G "

Mex Cent

"
paid. ...(Phlla.)

Apr.

18
17
23
18

Bid. Ask.
Bid. A 8k
BONDS
BONDS
Boston— Conoluded.
Baltimore— Conolu'd.
Mill
1494 16% NewEng con gen5s'45JAJ I
West N C con 6s.l914 JAJ 117
N K CotYarn 5s 1929FAA 1103% 104% WeitYaCAPlit6g.*llJAJ 113
NB Gas A Cist 5i.. 1937 1 64% 65 Wil A Weld 5s.. 1035 JAJ
3*
4
New Bng Tele 6i.'99 AAO €•••••
Bonds— Philadelphia
AUeVyBext 7sl910 AAO 128
6s
1907 AAO
67% 68

Bid.

M1SCBLL,—Conoluded.

{
8%
28* LRookAF81»t7s.'05J& u {104
LB&StLlst5sl939....
MAS
Gen 4s 1943.,
4
Mar H A Ont 6s...'35 AAO J110

16
190

$4*

*

STOCKS BOND3

Income

9

46
63

88

AmBeilTel4s..l9Q8 JAJ
18
38
125

MISCELLANEOUS,

Allouei Mtning(Bost)
Amer. Cement"; (Phil)
Arcadian
(Bost)
"
Arnold Mining.
"
Atlantic Min'g.
"
Baltic Mining..

I

•45

46
63

*45
'62

Welsbaoh Com!
Pref!

"
•«

48
63

.

78%
"is
80

* • 1

"JewEngGsAC !(Bost)

165

Pref!., •••<•••

Heitonv

83

no sale w» made.

railroads.—Price* Aug.
Ati * Charlotte (Bait) 100 128
Bos * Maine pf.(Bost) 10C 160

9a South *

•4494

Steel,

•53* 51* Consolidated Gas
•41
43 Dominion Coal

July
July
145% Apr.
349 Apr.
303* Jan.
133* Apr.
142 Apr.
127 Feb.
35 Apr.
45 Jan.
139* July
29% Apr.
29 Feb.

254

Jan.
Jan.

94

10

..

.

16% Cambria

•1696

54
43
97

5394
41

Butte * Boston
744* Calumet * Heola
63

34%

Mar.
Mar.

17,37* 9?%
83 107
431 140
1,170
1394
335 351
1,526 42
35 695
3,331 14%
831 50

U

Highest

87
Jan.
14
Jan.
7994 Feb. 15
1094 Jan.
14* Mar. 10
82* June 38 100 Jan. 29
48* June 23 62* Apr. 4
70* June 35 77% Apr. 12
303 Jan. 13 209% May 1
63* June 37 71* Apr. 5
95 Jan. 3 99 Feb.
8 1-16 June30 10 9-16Apr 5
34 0-1 6 Jan. 10 33* Apr. 5
13 Jan. 10 1794 Apr. 9
4494 Jan.
9 60% Apr. 4
70* June 25 78 Apr. 4
35% May
40% Mar. 31
15% Jan. 8 19% Mar. 30
34 Jan.
37* May 8
91% May 20 94% Mar.

1,755

183* 181% 133% 120*13194 121 131% 13194 12394 183% 184% American Sugar Refining!. (Boston). ...100
116* 116* Preferred!
"
....100
116 116* 116% 11694 116 116* 117 117
117
142* 14894 Amer. Telephone ATel.Co.!
"
....100
143 144
14 J* 143* 143* 143
143 144
•143* 144
10* 10* 10% 10* 10* 10* 10* 10* Asphalt Co of America...... (Phlla.)lO paid
•10* 105*
10%
304 305
308 80 7* 306 308 Boston * Montana
(Boston). ,. 25
305 396
311
308
306 808

188
•116

84
•740

*

27
1,500

50
50
50

....
....
....

•

77

76

2

• •

Miscellaneous Stock*.
(Boston).... 100
88* Amalgamated Copper!
"
....100
25* Amer. Agricul. Chemioal!..

88
35

8394

3

87

"

Lowest.

117 43
48 238
302 1 95
10 241
9 187
1,959 119%
70 131
123
9 89
107 39
177 110
34* 23*
230 15
517 75

Preferred
Fltehburg, pref
(Phlla.) .... 50
35* Lehigh Valley
23
Massachusetts Bleot. Cos. !.(Boaton)....100
76
....100
"
Preferred !
12
....100
"
Mexican Central
(Bait.) .... 50
37
Northern Central
5194 Northern Paolflo
(Phlla.) ....100
73
"
....100
Preferred
204* Old Colony
(Boston)..., 100
(Phlla.).... 50
6494 Pennsylvania
98* Philadelphia Traction
"
.... 50

23
78

76*

*

Range of Sales in 1900.

Week.

Indicates unlisted.

137

25*

23

Chlo. Juno.

40*

•136

25* 25*

•33* 25
•75% 76

2%

135

39% 39%

88* 88*

89
34
76

8%

2

2

8

a

138

25* 25*

93* 93

•93

75*

76

98

59% 6o
75% 76*
76
•37
37*
37
16*
16% 18* •16

89

40
137

61* 64% 84* 84

78
37

•23

84

•29*

•71* 78

72

•97%

98* 93*

93

I

30
40
137

304

14*

80*:

80

•71*

84 7-18 64*
98
98
8 9-16 8*
39% 30 8-18

14* •14*

....

78* 76*
76* 76
•UK 13* »l'% 13 •11*
•87
•87
88
88
86*
51% 51% 51* 51% 61*

88
58* 63
52*
•71* 73
78*
804 804
98

23

33
76

185

•29*

25* 25*

25* 35%

138

•185
•125

187

137

137

137

64% 81%

9.

Friday,
Aug. 10

of the

*

,

<

40* •39% 40*

•87

•58%
•78%

* • » •

136
125
•89* 30

80

•a.**
•8»H4

•••

•185
'128

85* 35%
28*
83
75% 78* 78* 76*
•18
13% •11% 18*

>J05

Aug.

8.

Sales

ACTIVE STOCKS.

,

136
185

133

137

Aug.

7.

Daily and Yearly Record.

Railroad 8toeka.
•32
(Phlla.).... 50
83* American Railway* !
mil ••«••
..%*
....
848 248
(Boston). ...100
245% 34?
348 348
Albany
Boston*
"
....100
143* 113* •143* 141 1131^ 144 Boston Elevated, full paid..
143* 144
'242
343 315
....
348 813
•ii'i
"
Boston* Lowell
""JO
18*4* 183* 188*
183
....100
18S
•
Boston* Maine
188* 188* 188*
....100
136% 128 188% 126* 136* 135)4 126* Chlo. Burl. * Qulnoy
"
12(1*
137 187

38
345 346
143* 144
343 348
33

• (

•

Aug.

.

83
340
144

Wednesday Thursday,

Tuesday,

281

Exchanges— A

Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore Stock
Share Prices— Not Per Centum Prices.
day,
Monda
Aug 6.

.

120
122
110

112*
91

89% 00

110

75

J&D
112

1914 Q-F 106
RR4sg.
Gen M4%sg.. 1924 Q-F 106

Leh V C'l 1st 5s g.'33 J&J ins* 104
Leh Yal ext 4s. 1948 J&D 117
.

1910 M&S
1923 J&D

2d 7i
Consoles
Annuity 6s

130

123* 123
J&D 138*
New'kConGas5s'48J&D 108%
Newark Pass con 5s.l930
NYPhil&Norlst4s '39J&J
••«•
86
Income 4s. .1939 M&N 80
No Penn 1st 4s..'36 M&N
1903J&J 109%
GenM7s
Penn gen 6i r.. .1910 Var 136
•

.

Coniol6so....l905 Var 113
Consol 5sr... .1919 Var
91
Penn & Md Steel oon 6i.
Pa & N Y Can 7i..'06 J&D 117
1939 A&O 110%
Com 5i
1939 A&O
Com 4i

«•«••
.,,i<

Penn 8teel lst5i.'17 MAN
People's Tr tr oerta 4i.'43 107
Phila Bleo gold trust otf s
Trust certf s 4s

101

65%
PhAEr gen M 5g.'20 AAO 121
Gen M 4s g.. 1920 A&O 109
Ph & Read 2d 5s.'33 A&O 128

M 7s. .1911 J&D 129*
Con M 6s g... 1911 J&D
BxtImpM4sg.'47 A&O 106% 107
Con M of '82 4s.'37 J&.
Terminal 5s g.1941 Q-F 184* i'is'
Consol

P Wil & Bait 48.1917 A&O
Collat trust 4s. 1921 J&J 108%
Pitts C*8tL 78.1900 FAA
Read Co gen 4s, 1097 JAJ

•II

87% 88
108%

108
110

Rochester Ry con 5s. 1930
8ohRBSldelst5s g'35J AD
,
Scran Trao lst6s 32M4N
Union Term'l 1st 5s. FAA
United N J 4s. 1944 MAS 116
UnTracPitts gen5s'97JAJ 113%
.

tii-6^ paid,
lAnd interest.
Price includes overdue ooupo m.

.
.
.

.
..
.

THE CHRONICLE.

282

[Vol. LXaI,

nn& Railroad %uUlliQmtz.
RAILROAD EARNINGS.

Imrjestmjetxt

The following table shows the gross earnings of every Steam railroad from which regular weekly or monthly returns
oan be obtained. The first two columns of figures give the gross earnings for the latest week or month, and the last two
columns the earnings for the period from January 1 to and including snch latest week or month.
The returns of the street railways are brought together separately on a subsequent page.
Latest Gross Earnings.

ROADS.

Week or Mo Current
Tear.

May

Adirondack

Ala. Gt. South.. 4thwkJuly
Ala. Midland... May
Ala.N.O.ATex. Pao. June.

13,557
46,963
68,909

Jan. 1

to

Latest Date.

Previous

Current

Previous

Tear.

Tear.

Latest Cross Earnings.

Roads.

Tear.

14,123
49,636
6s,168

74.739
1,139,224
405,054

77,842
1,053.568

320,878

WeekorMo Current
Tear

A Ohio.... June . 3.095,628 2,556,307 17,822,347 13,896,123
Bal.AO.Sou'w. 4th wk J'ne 176,137 168,396 3,460,093 3,177,437
Bait.

May

107.032

Bath&Ham'nds May

1,814
3.934

Bang'rAAro's'k
Bellefonte Cen.

May

Benn.A Rutl'd. April....
Brunsw'kAW'st May

Buff.R'oh.&Pltt Istwk Aug
Buffalo A Susq. June
Bur.C.Rap.AN. 4th wk July
Canadian Pao. 4thwkJuly

Cedar Rapids
Garner A N'w. April
Cent, of Georgia 4thwkJuly

23,352
57,433
101,931
46.382
107,385
767,000
2,572
157,988
55,774

Central N. E....
Central of N. J.
Central Pacific
Oharlest'nASav
Chattan'gaSo..
Ches. AOhio....

June
June

Alton..
Chlo.
Chlo. Bur. AG..
Chio.A East. 111.

696,159
June
3,994,910
June
4thwkJuly 118,845
4thwkJuly 163,516
94,339
IthwkJuly
IstwkJAug 697,147
3,688,173
June
July
90,174
2.001,490
June
788,465
June
33,330
4thwkJuly

&

Chlo.Gt.West'n
Chlo.Ind.<S-L...

Chlo.Mil.&St.P.
Chio.A N'thw'n.

Chio.Peo.ASt.L
StL.C.ASt.P.
Chic. R'k LAP.
Chio.St.P.M.AO
Chlo.Ter.Tr.RR

May
May
3a wk July
4th wk July

1,353,217
1,420,707
63,957
2.438

407,390

236,000
Ohoo.Ok.&Guli July
93,11'2
Cin.N.O.AT.P. 3d wk July
Cin. Ports. &Vir. July

Ol.O.Ch.ASt.L. 4thwkJuly
Peo. & East'n. 4th wk July
Cl.Lor.& Wheel. 4thwkJuly
Col. Midland....
Colorado 80.

&

Col.New.&Lau.
Col.Sand'yAH.
Cornwall ALeb.

OumbTdVaDey

June
June
June
4thwkJuly
June
June

Denv.ARioGr.. IthwkJuly
DenverASo'w'n May
Det.&Mackinac May
DuluthS.S.AAtl 4thwkJuly
E. St. L. A Car.. July
ElginJol.AEast July

35,423
473,487
57,048
51,208
192,793
375,611
10,920
32,387
26,816
98,881
306,300
209,988
84,055
89,049
12,645
152,491

May

3,151,117
8,277
37,389
Evansv. &T.H. 4thwkJuly
Flnd.Ft.W.&W. June
7,700
50,157
Fla.Cent.&Pen. 3dwk Mar.
Erie.

Ev'ns.AInd'plis 4thwkJuly

Ft W. A Den.

C May

FtW.ARloGr.. 4thwkJuly
Gads.&Att. U..
Georgia RR
Georgia A Ala.
Geo. 80. AFla..
GilaVal.G.AN.

July

125,669
8,800
1,411

400,025
507,626
9,248
9,200
11,701
20,397
72,022
83,457
275.976
251,156
3,299,832 2,157,689
352,492
293,682
123,892 2,593,437 2,559,378
735,000 16,609,798 15,073,987
86,301
1,867
2,229
18,807
53,313
92.528
57,833

10,517
12,741
1,734
143,371 3,451,837 3,042,344
312,036
339,851
64,508
1,250,656 7,389,591 6,771,459
1,412,911 6,736,941 6,380,909
357,854
330,828
70,916
54,367
40,850
1,819
336,130 7,696,346 6,802,295
543,817
3.761,825 22.023.743 20,077,231
105,739 2,876,043 2,603,649
139,383 3,748,058 3,382,293
108,355 2,332,814 2,039,478
762,298 23,215,815 22,127,058
3,635,305 20,066,048 18,499,375
798,248
103,658
685,407
1,772,530 10,994,732 9,602,053
860.083 4,501,722 4,595,866
736,166
29,297
717,922

102 000

1,314,435

880,168

87,207 2,793,386 2,474,304
210,570
28,540
169,239
386,092 9,493,354 8,190,912
51,023 1.367,016 1,089,833
49,701 1,249,603
979,009
184,944 1,107,338
601,271
325,834 2,043,879 1,804,507
10,039
89,589
79,224
644,732
23,030
425,430
20,103
153.887
107,832
86,887
466,907
410,823
237,200 5,851,225 5,073,768
183.516 1,049,494
796,799
388,257
66,533
293,991
84,613 1,486,713 1,274,420
11,920
93,945
79,493
153,658 1,144,195 1,016,322
2,992,759 14,606,965 13,157,726
10,109
180.794
195,871
38,497
782,016
765,550
10,260
47,282
48,804
49,832
581,986
556,476
132,228
600.925
604,067
8,813
256,967
261,930
1,096
8,599
5.383
33,942
944,790
892,885
88,519
645,476
583,820
92,852
690.690
560,089
34,466
192,807
216.126
594,533 12,686,«31 11,876,747
21,335
505,769
503,135

4thwkJuly
38,781
93.236
June
96,177
July
37,303
June
Gr.Tr'nkSyst'm 4thwkJuly 6C0.216
Det.G.H.AM. bdwk July
20,697
GreatNorth'n—
1,723,399 1,819,263 12,242,461 10,714,868
St. P. M. A M.. July
366,256
274,245 2,026,449 1,379,986
East of Minn. July
174,192 172,522 1,096,444 1,082,756
Montana Cent July
2,263,847 2,266,030 15,365,354 13,177,610
Tot. system. July
22,571
25,675
G'lfB'mntAK.C May
109.473
113,223
86,975
74,570 2,666,771 1,825,234
Hooking Valley Istwk Aug
Hous.ATex.Ce11

May

Illinois Central.

July

Ind.Deo.

A West Maroh

Ind. lU.&Iowa. May
Im.*Gt.N*rtli'n Istwk Aug
tlnteroo. (Mex.) Wk July 21
Iowa Central... 4thwkJuly
Iron Railway... July

Kanaw'a&Mloli 4tHwkJuly
K.O.F.So'tt&M. 4thwkJuly
K.C.Mem.ABlr. 4thwkJuly
Kan. O.N. W... July
Kan. City A Om. ItliwkMay
Lehigh A Hud. July
Lehigh Val. RR. June
Leb. V.Coal Co. June
Lex'gton A East June.

234,320 231,710 1,339,161 1,268,497
2,528,975 2,381,790 18,759,978 16,096,725
59,846
46,416
161,126
129,490
99,535
86,102
496,906
425,121
68,763
58,205 2,0 SO, 107 2,091,237
71,300
72,100 2,286,900 2,212,000
55,122
63,642 1,226,196 1,212,131
4,845
5,403
41,135
33,004
22,593
15,150
462,667
360,522
143,432 127,492 3,193,364 2,688,225
40,640
28,591
977,992
817,192
31,553
27,348
213,439
177,509
7,855
6,252
97,350
92,586
38,751
40.618
27R.267
283,325
2,265,077 2,074,519 12,122,261 10,376.270
1,823,506 1,551.704 8,510,265 7,957,700
35,135
22,477
170,417
113,682

to

Latest Date.

Previous

Current

Previous

Tear.

Tear.

Tear.

t

LonglslandRR. July.,
Long Is. 8ystem 'uly...
Losing. Term July...
Louis.Ev.ASt-L 4thwkJuly
Lou. H. <fe St. L. 4thwkJuly
Louis. ANashv. 4thwkJoly

841.553
29,000
28,000 1,004,964
363,158
384,224
9,000
10,000
Ala.AVicksb. 2d wk July
333,897 Maoon A Birm..
327.629
9,000
9,000
Vicks.Sh.AP. 2d wk July
284.101
265,714 1,636,751 1,444,163 Manistique
Allegheny Val.. June
922,878 {Mexican Cent.
989,250
29 009
27,489
Istwk Aug
Ann Arbor
19,089 Mexicanlnter"!.
28,548
4.577
4,832
An.Was.&Bal.. May.....
60,938 {Mex. National.
48,925
7,393
7,485
Ark. Midland... June
3,846,136 3,219,914 22,703,880 19,425,868 Mex. Northern.
Atch.T.AS.Fe. June
712,420 {Mexican Ry...
852,350
173,394 158,159
Atlanta & Char. April....
211,735 Mexican So
234,871
38,821
34,286
Atl.Knox.ANo. July
297,675 Minne'p. ASt.L.
340,563
47,085
45,499
Atlanta AW. P.. June
54,737 M.St.P.AS.St.M
122,479
15,106
10,209
At.Vald'staAW July
53,094 Mo.Kan.ATex.
62,779
12,830
11,004
Austin AN'west May
58,503 Mo.Pao.AIr'nM
65,027
11,719
10,407
Bait. & Lehigh. June.....

N.O.AN.E... 2d wk July

Jan. 1

July...
July...

4thwkJuly
June
4thwkJuly

May

Wk July 21

3d wk July
4thwkJuly
4thwkJuly
4thwkJuly
4thwkJuly
Central Br'oh. 4thwkjuly
4thwkJuly
Total
Mob.Jao.AK.O. Wk Aug. 4.
Mobile & Ohio.. July...

Mont.AMex

G'f July...

Nash.Ch.A8t.L. July...
Nevada Central May...

562,957
639,849
19,505
54,450
19,924
687,700
6,940
10,727
426,409
439,468
183,890
56,240
84,000
12,475
77,632
108,892
326,080
944,000
51,000
995,000
2,635
e483,200
115,381
547,759
3,072

4,580,047
N.Y.C.AH.R.. July...
N.Y.Ont.AW.. 4th wk July 173,597
162,189
N.Y.Susq.AW. May

Norfolk & West.
North'n Central
North'n Pacific.
Ohio River
Ohio Southern.

4thwkJuly

369,256
652,102
4thwkJuly d893,631
4th wk July
30.890
April
58,405
794,186
Oreg.Sh.Llne... June
366,348
Pao. Coast Co... April
June
298,279
PaolfloMail
7,192,835
Pennsylvania^ June
Pere Marquette IthwkJuly 207,993
Peo. Deo. A Ev. 4thwkJuly
23,161
552,540
Phila. A Erie... May
2,329,242
Phila. A Read.. May
Coal Air. Co. May
1,817,801
June...

Tot.both Co's. May....... 4,147,043
1,018,217
Wilm.AB. June
1,528,787
Pitts.C.C.AStL June
70,010
Pitts.Bes.AL.E. Istwk Aug
17,139
Pitt. Ch.AYny. May
4,809
Pitts.Llsb.&Wn June
43,873
Pitts. 8ha.ANo. April
35,206
Pitts.AWest'n.. 3d wk July
20,002
Pitts. Cl.ATol. 3d wk July
10.110
Pitts. Pa. A F. 3d wk July
65,318
Total system 3d wk July
Phil.

RiCh.Fr'ksbAP May
Rio Grande Jot. May
Rio Grande 80. 4thwkJuly
Rio Gr"de West. 4thwkJuly
St. Jos. A Gr. I. 4thwkjuly
8t.L.Ken'etASo July
St.L.Van.AT.H. July
St.L.A8anFran. 4thwkJuly
St.L. Southwest 4thwkJuly
St.PaulADul... May
San. Ant.

A A. P. May

SanFran.AN.P. June
S.FePres.APh. 4thwkJuly
Sav.Fla.AWest May
8her.Shrev.A80 IthwkJ'ne
SiLSprs.O.AG. May
80. O.A Ga.Ext. July
So. Haven A E.. June
So. Miss. & Ark. June
So.PaoifloCo.6. June

May
May
Louis'a. West. May
Morgan'sLAT May
N.Y.T.AMex. May
Tex.&N.Orl.. May
So.Pao.ofOal. May
So.P'o.ofAriz. May
So.PacofN.M May
Cent. Pacific.

Gal.Har.AS.A

Southern Ry....
StonyCl.AC.Mt
TerreH.AInd..
TerreH.APeor.
Texas Central..
TexasAPaoitic.
Tex.S.V.A N.W.
Tol.AOhioCent.
Tol.P.AWest...
Tol.8t.L.AK.C.
Union Pao. RR..

IthwkJuly

May
July
July

3d wk July
4th wkJuly

June
4thwkJuly
4thwkJuly
3d wk July
June
Istwk Aug
Wabash
W.J'rseyASea'e June
W.V.Oen.APitt. May
Western of Ala.. June

West.N.Y.APa. 4thwkJuly
Wheel. A L. Erie Istwk Aug
Olev.C.&So.. iBtwk Aug
Total
Istwk Aug
Wisconsin Cent. Istwk Aug
Wrightsv.AT'n. June
YazooAMiss. V. July
York Southern.. June

123,040
40,394
13,974
145,800
35,755

569,801 2,491,178 2,476,946
641,260 2,634,120 2,625,502
17,242
86,672
65,216
53,560 1,112,461
938,346
363,121
15,685
327,404
687,330 15,764,599 14,039,906
4,492
47,773
35,306
9,974
74,921
52,255
486,131 10,302,138 8,743,975
381,459 2,672,02? 2,275,792
173,261 4,669,250 4,011,214
66,586
260,427
355,059
77,600 2,603,200 2,560,600
13,544
494,266
438,900
78,093 1,557,437 1,499.271
124,304 2,756,309 2.299.8C0
314,561 6,450,110 5,954.854
832,000 16,172,032 14,711,087
43,00(
728,518
640,283
875,000 16,900,550 15,351,370
1,481
76,297
40,771
e480,700 e3,374,194 e 2,756,971
102,088
812,108
728,850
484,807 3,780,669 3,368.087
1,698
12,765
8,791
4,435,407 30,611,329 28,154,275
154,404 2.728,508 2,623,484
970,207
183,647
932,001
305,645 8,304,716 6,874,852
584,502 3,799.894 3,148,194
785,972 dl6433470 14,122,224
25,535
759,857
587,425
299,049
54.323
253,394
711,182 4,158,620 3,604,864
407,334 1,462,306 1,493,519
296,113 1,942,820 1,815,303
5,766,735 40,821,311 33,148,911
177,791 4,435,115 3,965,680
524,544
25,610
464,332
454,476 2,074,923 1,658,296
1,899,702 10,699,751 8,989,929
1,449,570 8,916,958 9,087,149
3,349,272 19,616,709 18,077,078
945,817 5,439,111 4,995,011
1,457,389 9,383,514 8,116,259
57,804 1,273,972
909,270
76,534
18,196
63,008
29,003
4,088
22,854
179,692
38,388 1,184,679 1,038,675
21,104
688,914
542,358
10,662
263,246
223,143
70,154 2,154,651 1,810,180
112,505
436,307
378,115
192,143
37,963
136,297
11,478
295,167
258,505
138,700 2,639,152 1,961,143
42.609
749,817
740,305
85,551
52,939
9,001
157,901 1,086,741
994,161
184,152 4,517,247 4,078,434
138,210 3,153,19. 3,050,870
625,891
154,461
637,279
722,310
662,037
136,508
425,003
414,352
90,240
23,495
590,820
510,447
323,074 1,993,829 1,565,247
173,081
150,254
9,465
122,312
133,220
29,034
147,125
126,259
15,720
20,519
15,978
4,222
81,546
55.098
9,867
4,824,440 29,977.858 27,571,524

8,051
157,702
232,675
152,995
137,939
147,889
95,555
28,325
350,608
9,439
30,053
18,742
5,499
12,215
5,085,410
1,420,707 1,412,911 6,736,941
513,016 560,168 2,550.491
566,135
107,682 109,694
552,843 570,536 2,742,727
109,298
22,329
20,524
830,356
172,980 164,485
1,390,265 1,270,487 7,041,849
301,697 1,632,874
302,565
861,478
177,927
174,441
790,467 725,504 17,770,221
7.074
2,160
2,371
902,751
122,924
132,749
269,033
38,597
47,702
176,497
7,108
4,547
214,623 210,768 4,633,593
46,580
7,000
5,000
51,917 1,424,231
66,783
615,803
30,287
27,061
965,729,
37.225
42,036
1.898,383 1,762,754 10,531,82?.
315,936 298,4 65 9,457,370
326,324 294,124 1,401.152
592,667
133,714 116,004
364,382
19,634
54,045
114,100 119,000 2,075,556.
34,650 1,148,579'
41,800
489,974!
14,340
22,476
64.27P
48,990 1,628,031
114,105 3,149,924!
103,27 (i
79,594
10,462
11,455
296,423 321,463 2,609,863
42,774
6,415
7,43fc

j

6,380.909
2,350,257
597,625
2,815.317
102.669
798,058
5,903,129
1,454,500
824,501
15,723,231
6,427
807,980
228,357
145,021
4,321,160
28,660
1,057,747
545,888
1,038.170
9,296,184
8,557.502
1,224,252
515.639
323,293
1,938.058
942,209
418,122
1,360,331
3,079,504
62,ii';

2,473,724
37,200

Figures from June l are for the railroad only. | Mexloan ourrenoy. & CoverB results of lines direotly operated east ox mwaoui*.
Includes Chesapeake A Ohio So'weHtern, Ohio Valley and Chioago and Texas for both years.
b Does not include the Auntin A Northwestern, the San Antonio A Aransas Pass or Houston A Texas Central system.
« Rennltfl on Montgomery 1)1 vision are inolnde ' in 1900 but not for 1 H99
d Includes St. Paul A Duluth from July 1, 1900.
*
t

—

—

. .. ..
..

August

THE CHRONICLE.

1900.]

ll

>

—Gross Earnings.

Latest Gross Earnings by Weeks.— The latest weekly earnings in the foregoing are separately summed up as follows:
For the fourth week of July our statement covers 63
roads and these show 8-35 per cent increase in the aggre-

week

gate over the same

Current
Year.
(Can .O.

Increase.

1899.

Mem. 4

B. a. Juno

Jan. 1 to June 3o..

July lto June 30.... 1,703,433

last year.

1900.

week of July.

9
126,038
853,522

Roads.

Lehigh
A.th

283

& Hudson b—

Ann Arbor

•

--••

Baflalo Boon. A Flttsb «..
Burl. Ced. Raw. A North

Canadian Paoltlo
Central of Georgia
Chesapeake A Ohio......
Chicago A East. Illinois.
O iio. Great Western
Chlo. Ind'plls A Loulsv.
Ohloa«to Mllw. <fc St. Pan
Chlo. Term. Transfer...
0)»v. Oln. Chlo. A 8t. L.

Peoria

1,110024
33,:-!30

473.487
57.048
51,208
32,387
306,300
89.049

A Eastern

Clev. Lorain A Wheel'g.
Col. Sandusky A Hook'g

Denver A Rio Grande..
Dalath 80. Shore <S» A.tl
Evansv. * Indianapolis.
Evansv. & Terre Haute.
Ft. Worth A Rio Grande

8.27?
37,389
8.500
38,781

8-eorela-

Brand Trunk

AM

....

Det. Gd. H.
Hocking Valley
Intern'l A Gt. North'n
Iowa Central

Kanawha*

600,216
86,192
96.249
55,122
22,593
143,432
40,640
54.450
19,924
637.700
426.409
183,890

.

Mlohlgan..

Kan. City Ft. 8. & Mem..
Kan. City Mem. A Blrm.
Loulsv. Evansv. A 8t. L
Louisville Hend. & St. L.
Louisville

A

Nashville

..

Mexican Central. .... ....
Mexican National

Minneapolis A St. Louis
Minn. St P. A 8. Ste. M..
Mo. Kansas* T*xas....
Mo. Paciflo A IronMt...

77.63*.

108,892
326.030

110.729
223,671

53.914
112,970

54,021
112,008

35,135
170,417
312,177

22.477
113.6R2
257,691

14,255
68,602
121,245

8,582
35.380
85,389

35 n-"

""'466
15,412

Il2.506.522 11,542,500

Total (63 roads)

6,854

Tear.

Roads.

9

Allan. A West Pt.b June
Jan. 1 to June 30

July 1 to June 30....

Boston

953
4,780

16,681

9
45,499
297,675
606,663

APittbs.b.June

Jan. 1 to June 30

July 1 to June 30
Burl. Ced. R.& No. a June
Jan. 1 to June 30....
Chicago A Alton. a. June
July 1 to June 30
Chic A East. 111. b.. June
Jan. 1 to June 30....
July 1 to June 30
Colorado A South, b June
Jan. 1 to June 30
July 1 to June 30....
Gila Val.GlobeA No. June
Jan. 1 to June 30

2,471,963
4,632,153

2,404,524
4,544,073

491,145
2,734,063
5,012,135
S93.413
2,237,695
696,159
7,796,449
392,254
2,46*,396
5,148,t97
375.611
2,043,879
4,237,743
37,303
192,807

223,642
1,796,488
3,801,96!)

152,576

.

1 73,770
478,188
1 139,354

9

€0^,050

*122,165
*97.318
403,849
2,622,727
818,323
735,699
5,862,338 '2,038,203 "1,336,002

b Net earnings here given are before deducting taxes.
c Deduoting other expenditures for repairs, replacements and general
expenses, net inoome applicable to interest on bonds in June was
$141,855, against $118,288 last year, and from January 1 to June
30 $850,512, against $808,793. This is the result in Mexican dollars
treated (aooording to the company's method of keeping its aooounts)
as equivalent to 80 cents in United 8tates money— that is, depreciation
beyond 20 per cent has already been allowed for.
* After allowing for expenditures for betterments, net in Jane,
1900, was $97,415, against $74,477 in 1899, and from July 1 to
June 30 $1,752,211, against $1,653,250 in the previous year.
for repairs of steamers" surplus
t After deduoting "reserve fund
In June, 1900, was $33,551, against $44,655 in 1899, and from May
1 to June 30, 1900, $92,810, against $81,124 in 1899. The reserve
fund for depreciation and general and extraordinary repairs of
steamers has been Increased to the standard of the English companies, i. «., five per cent upon the value of the steamers.
Interest Charges and Snrplns.—The following roads, in
addition to their gross and net earnings given in the foregoing, also report charges for interest, &c, with the surplus

above or

deficit

below those charges.
—Int., rentals,

Net Earnings.
Current Previous
Tear.
Tear.

etc.

—

-Bal. of Net Earn' s.-*

Current

9

Roads,

Boston

Previous

Current

Tear.

>

Tear.

Tear.

Previous
Tear.

9

9

9

9

110,445
116,098
1,514,391
6,314

117,799
122,185
1,518,276
6,314

585,605
*34,855
*990,372
17,638

*43,116
*767,302
tl8,026

1,482,645

& Albany-

Apr. 1 to June 30
A E. IDtnois.. June
July 1 to June 30
Gila Val.Globe&No. June

657,833

10,958
103,057
267,705

13,486
97,612
238,128

695,550

775.6S 2
1,456.267

K*n.

1,403,226

*385,888

*67,744

111,611
654,593
1,360,575
86.391
569,715
154,506

196,446
197,743
Chat.&St.L June
150,123
152,131
July 1 to June 30
1,684,273 1,595,177
N. Y. Chic. A St. LouisApr, lto June 30....
302.452
302,060

*376,781
61,776
562,461

def.8.582

94,554

29,206

2,433,811

After allowing for other inoome reoeived.
After deduc'ing amount spent for bebterments, surplus in June
1900. is $6,186, against $17,902 in 1899..

1,209,945

243,657
1,243,488
2,123,525
97,008
639.366

384.C08
2,165,674
253,035
543,817
6,742,203 2,964,627
147,659
363,363
2,217.571 1,019.131
4,581,560 2,289,875
75,113
325,834
397,442
1,804,507
1,104,891
13,952
34,466
111,246
216,126
642,707
Illinois Central a .. June 2.77J ,759 2,328,795
Jan. 1 to June 30
16,231.003 13,714,935 4,220,395
July 1 to June 30
32,611,967 28,114,690 9,742,572
50,417
Iowa Central. b... June
190,242
186,453
213,748
Jan. lto June 30
1.061.888 1,015,208
638,891
July 1 to June 30
2,341,239 2,135,549
117.723
Kan. O. Ft. 8. A M.c June
432,402
395,124
882,331
Jan. 1 to June 30.... 2,768,779 2,323,186
July 1 to June 30.... 5,784,344 4,769,949 1,843,030
.

t62,666
469.188
tl51,010

25, 1900.

A Albanyb—

Apr. 1 to June 30
Jan. 1 to June 30
Bufl. R.

47,085
340,563
702,171

Tear.

136,977
708,893
1,376,053

a Net earnings here given are after deducting taxes.

4,900

1

116,818
635,130
1,548,565

.

Net Earnings Monthly to Latest Dates.— The table following shows the gross and net earnings of Steam railroads
reported this week. A full detailed statement, including all
roads from which monthly returns can be obtained, is given
once a month in these columns, and the latest statement of
this kind will be found in the Chronicle of July 21, 1900.
>

403,334
2,200,518
4,346,163

54,045
49.634
21,766
8,888
364.382
323,293
116,900
113,525
739,745
668.335
262,425
261.685
11,455
10,462
2,959
1,424
Wrijrhtsv. A Tenn June
62,116
79,594
22,322
15,663
Jan. 1 to June 30
113,798
169,494
55,553
38,203
July 1 to June 30
304,055
317,162
15,864
Yazoo & Miss. Val.a. June
42,019
590,449
556,443
Jan. 1 to June 30.... 2,313.440 2.152,261
5,300.890 4,576,350 1,905,176 1,257,334
July 1 to June 30

964,022

-Qross Earnings.
Current Previous

425,477
2,285.068
4,963,482

West.of Alabama.b. June
Jan. 1 to June 30....
July 1 to June 36

48.523
14.785
4,8:0
64 963
3,855
14.866
3,226
15,972

The next will appear in the issue of August

328,836
641,127

Pacific. b. June 5,085,410 4,824,440 1,820.107 1,873.921
Jan. 1 to June 30.... 29,977,858 27,571,524 9,437,672 9,294,542
July 1 to June 30... 63,268,408 55,972,897 22,345,134 19,947,883

30,202
5,013
2,496
7,10

1,116,593

383,917
757,570

Southern

2,449

'

296,113
1,815,303

1,529,302
3,162,868

420,289
8t.Louis So'west.b.June
Jan. 1 to Juno 30.... 2,685.357
July 1 to June £0.... 5,908,284

11,519
112,000
8,000
1,650
19,193
63,611
107,659
5,355

156 273

June
298,279
June 30.... 1,942,820
636,123
lto June 30....

May
59,722

1,081

1,583,683
3,313,721

Pacific Mail
Jan. 1 to

89i

4,239
301

154,401
305,645
785,972
25,535
25.610
177,791
70,011
11.478
138,700
42.€03
184.152
138,210
23,495
725,504
210.768
51.917
27.061
446.245
119,000
48.432
20,170

462 2i:

West. N. Y. & Penn
Wheeling A L,ake Krte.
Olevel'd Canton & 80.
Wisconsin Central..... -

(8

8,510
7,443
15,910
12,049

43,000

1 to

N. Y. Out. A West.a June
Jan. I to June 30
July 1 to June 30

13,319
501

10.629

22,245
186,873
373,921

N. Y. Chic. A St. L.b—
Apr. 1 to June 30
Jan. 1 to June 30

5,683

594,533
72,873
95,748
63,642
15,150
127,492
28,591
53.560
15,685
687,390
486,131
173.261
78,09?
124,304
314,561

139 392

A West'n.

-

Net increase

313
4,839

114.100
47,479
24.950

L. Erie..

Texas & Paoiiio...
Toledo A Ohio Central..
Wabash.

1,832
1,108

38.497
8.813
33,912

31,600
257,756
530,778

.

14,016

237,200
84 61?
10,109

111,887
724,891
1,433,294

'.

84,478
4,033
87.395
6.025
1,507
9,357
69,100
4,436

832.001

369.25t
893,631
30,890
23.161
207.993
75.024
13.974
145,800
35.75
232,675
152.995
28,325
790,467
214.623
66.78?
30.287

Rio Grande Southern
Bio Grande Western....
St. Joseph A Gd. Island
St. Louis A San Fran
ST. Louis South western
Santa Fe Pres. & Phoenix.
Southern Railway

Toledo Peoria

'16,497

1,025.546
29.29?
386.09?
51.0)3
49,701
23.031

Tear.

June 30....
779.282
675,447
Loulsv. A Nashv.b.Juno 2,177,312 2,188,293
Jan. 1 to June 30.... 13,614,959 11,873,686 4.215.683 3.857,831
Jhly 1 to June 30.. ..27,742,379 23,759,485 9.138,973 8,027,898
6.281 def 2,408
181
7,003
Maoon A Birmlng..June
30,«14 def. 6.014 def. 3,420
40,833
Jan. 1 to June 30....
9,879
65,598 def. 3,498 def 4,495
July lto Juno 30....
157,971
381,459
179,057
439,468
Mex. Internationa). June
Jan. 1 to June 30.... 2,672,027 2,275,792 1,083,240 1,015,308
682,454
576,999 C349.990 C268.404
Mexican National.. June
Jan. 1 to June 30.... 4,060,226 3,475,091 cl,945,875 cl,661,e03
15,114
12,789
7,321
5,910
Mexican Telephone. June
74,129
89,996
39,971
33,869
Jan. 1 to Juno 30....
59,717
50,300
25,787
21,846
Mar. lto June 30....
441,640
436,222
211,899
143.549
Nash.Ch. ABt.l.b June
783.872
Jan. 1 to June 30 ... 3,232,910 2.883,280 1,102,102
July lto June 30.... 6,487,317 6,081,766 2,246,734 1,982,060

32,000
14.617
71,260
13,10>
24,133

173597

.

A

i

123.882
735.000
143.371
336,130
105.73
139,383
103.355

Tear.

$

113,729
224,514

July

2,437
67,274

944,001
51.00<
2,731

Central Branch
Mob. Jackson & K. City
N. Y. Ontario A Western
Norfolk A Western
Nortnern Pacific..
Ohio River
Peoria Deo. * Evansv.
Pere Marquette
Pittsb.Bese.

2,653

40.391
86,6^8

—

Net Earnings.
Current Previous

A East. b. June
Jan. 1 to June 3o.._.

Decrease.

4\63t

—

Apr. lto June 30...
Jan. 1 to June 30....

Lexinx'n
46,983
42,828
153.942
107.385
767,000
15-\988
407,390
118.845
163.516
94,339

Gt. Southern.

Alabama

—

Previous
Tear.

144,870
978,744
2,083,950
89,311
500,700
24,340
149,163
636.876
4,108,906
8,552,428
74,980
316,951
639,872
124,037
694.850
1,465,233

Chic.

C. Ft. 8.

AM..—

July 1 to June 30

Kan C Mem.iBirJuly lto June 30
STashv.

'206,110

336,883

*
t

STREET RAILWAYS AND TRACTION COMPANIES.
The following table shows the gross earnings for the latest
period of all street railways from which we are able to obtain weekly or monthly returns. The arrangement of the
table is the same as that for the steam roads that is, the
first two columns of figures give the gross earnings for the
latest week or month, and the last two columns the earnings
for the calendar year from January 1 to and including such

—

latest

week

or month,

..
.
.
.

.

.

THE CHRONCCLR

2«4

STREET RAILWAYS AND TRACTION COMPANIES.
Jan.

Latest Cross Earnings.

Gross

Prev'us
Week or Mo Our'nt Year.
Year.

Earnings.

Year.

St.

4,465

Ry. .. April....
June

Atlanta Ry. & Power.
Ballston Terminal.
Bingham ton St. Ry.Br'klyn Rap.Tr. Co.
Chicago & Mil. Elec.
Chicago Union Tract.
Cln. Newp. <fe Cov.
City Elec (Rome.Ga.)
Cleveland Electric.
Cleve. Painsv. & E.
Col. 8p'gs Rap.Trans.

44 928

May

.

March...

June

630 893 653,812

June
June
June
Jane

.

73.947 63,141
2,754
3,005
172,542 t83,387
13,833 11 224
16,441 12,219
90.166
247.9
217,657
8,577
7,709
114,868 105.938
83,026 27,480
10,197
9,544

May

Columbus (O.) Ry.... June
Consol Trac (Pitts.) June
Dart. & W'port 8t. Ry June
Denver City Tram.. June
Detroit Citi'ns'St.Ry. lstwk Aug
Detroit Elec Ry».. istwk Aug
.

4c

Wayne

lstwk Aug

Belle Isle

stwk
Total of all
Det. Roch. Ro.& L.O. July
)

Dulnth St. Ry
Easton Oonsol. Elec
Galveston City
Grand Rapids Ry
Harrisburg Traotlon.
Herkimer Mohawk IIion&F'kfortELRy.
Houston Elec. St. Ry.
Internat'l Traotion—

50 623
45,893

462,676
43,232
602,390
896,585
322,797

39.098

569 637
787.094
254,807

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

15,7 6
,

June

,

iune

May
June

,

Maroh
,

July

,

June

,

June...

May
May
May

New Castle Traction.
New London St. Ry.. June
April
New Orleans City
Northern Ohio Tract. Jane

June
Norwalk Tramway
Ogdensburg St. Ry.. June
.

May
St. Ry
Omaha & Coun. Bluff

Olean

6 66*
5,814
9,480
4.621
7,345
9,654
17,228
514.774
114.374
837386
168,244
5,334
7,9*4
11,445
5.837
109.404
88.29H
8,080
2,140
4,318

June
June
June
June

19,871
154,263
13,928
19,016

June....
June....

6.561

66,802
85,839
28 583
36,446
58.774
23 131

99,664

ried.
16,637,841
Passenger mileage
454,614,457
Rate p. passenger per mile..
1-98 ots.

Gas& Ry

*

29,936 25,669
52,873 * 48,409
21,997 21,019
31,215 27,899
13.842 14 300
127.123 116 825

June
July

...

April...
July....
June....
Union (N. Bedford).. June....
United P. & Transp.. June. . .
.

United Traction—

Albany

)

Cit;
(Pitts.)
U.)

21,377

Ex DC

54.953
67,939
28.265
26,748
48,d99
22,445

June

S

Roads.

Lorain

& Cleve. Ry Juno

Jan. 1 to June
South. Ohio Tract,
Jan. 1 to July
Syracuse R. T b—
Apr. 1 to June
Jan. 1 to Juno

Year.

$

July
31

9,654
41,920
31,215
157,855

8,698
39,939
27,899
124,465

SO
30

1 39,975
282,833

123,371
244,018

30

...

Current
Year.

etc.

—

Previous
Year.

/toads.

*

54,444

62,557

After allowing for other lnoome received.

30,977,243

4,732,470
5,071,972
13,093,219
760,381
1,170,672

4 916,494
4,245.533
12,678,0 SO
1,102,606

4,143,017
3,033,188
11,001.471
699,413
1,061,732

26,994,013
15,956,792
62-85

24,828,714
13,187,600
65-31

23.746,486
12,304,075
65*87

19,938,821
11,038,422
64-37

785,177

773 803

1898-99.

1897-98.

$

$

$

1896-97.

$

13,187,600
543,977

12,301,075

529,790

456,935

11,038,422
336,790

16,486,582

on bonds
paidinadv'ce*
Dividends:
Sinking fund...
Appro'ted for
real est.

13,731,577

12,761,010

11,375,212

6,069,386

6,232,235

6,488,605

6,488,179

153,140
3,914,394
202,500

138 746
3,523,270
202,000

320,000
3,519,824
197,260

3,518,650
196,413

10,096,251
3,635,327

10,525,689
2,235,322

10,203,242
1,171,968

and

construction.

100,599

.

4,542,041

Tot.dlsb'm'ts.

14,881,461
1,605,121

Balance, surp..

* This is interest paid in advance of maturity on bonds refunded into
3^2 per cent bonds ot 1987.
; Pcid 7 per cent on preferred in all the years; on common 6 per cent
in 1899-00, 5 per cent in previous years.
U This is interest on bonds less dividend on "Omaha" stock and
balance to credit of ''interest and exchange."

GENERAL BALANCE SHEET MAT
1900.

r-JUal.of Net EartSs.-

Previous
Year.

$

*7,982 *def. 1,087

$

1899.

31.

1898.

&

1897.

$
ad & equipment.. 182,061,957 174,353,318 175,498,009 171,855,8f5
General assets —
Bonds, stocks and
--31,707,477 30,231,418 28,185,640 36,941,245
advances
Bills and accounts
Assets

R

receivable
Materials, fuel,

2,832,443
2,826,922
4,587,540
9,369,157

&c.

C-tshonhand
Sinking funds
Total
Liabilities

—

Stock, common
Stook, preferred

95

2,136.794
1.818,471
4,205,227
8,590,352

2,451,689
1,03=)

021

4,218,994
8,975,323

1,739.317
2,165,974

2,22\468
7,994,050

233,385,496 221,269,763 220,434,494 222,921,909
41,448.366 41,448,366 41.420,365 41,416,866
22,398,955 22,398,954 22,370,9 5 22,367,455
144,833,000 134,645,000 133,645,000 131,387,500

Bonded debt
Bonds on hand from
purchase of M. L.

&\V. Ry
Dividend d.clared..
1,565,285
Sinking funds paid &
acoretions thereto.
9,369,157
Current bills, pay5,179,399
rolls, etc
Uncollected coupons,
158,f84
&c.
Dr. 16,644
Consol. Coal Co

1,369,723

1,368,532

8,407,000
1,368,384

8,975,322

8,590,352

7,994,050

3,256,018

2,674,899

1,874,982

139,474
17,030

137,001
16.169

132,708
15,164

1,712,431

1,785,551

1,856,025

2.6.0.964
4,686,479

2,374,517
6,051,153

2,078,871
4,023,501

Accrued and accruinginterest

General

liabilities ..
Land income aco't..
RR. income acc't....

50,489
88,8oO

8yiaouee Rapid TransitApr. 1 to Juno 30

36,050,561

$

Inter,

Net Earnings.
Current Previous
Year.
Year.
$
$
5.657
4,988
21,271
20,259
18.154
14.112
74,172
45,334

$

38,016,314

15,956,792

55.138
77,772

Year.

1,777,053

Total

946,79i>

Ourrent

1,759,156

DisbltT'SBTYhOl ts~—
Net int. on debt IT

Interest Charges and Surplus.— The following Street
railways, in addition to their gross and net earnings given in
the foregoing, also report charges for interest, &c, with the
surplus or deficit above or below those charges.
—Int., rentals,

1,793,010

Investments...

124,465
48.147
716,692

60,427
112,687

6,963,578
22,236,612

Net earnings...

—

Year.

$

1899-00.

Street Railway Net Earnings.— The following table gives
the returns of Street railway gross and net earnings received
this week. In reporting these net earnings for the street
railways, we adopt the same plan as that for the steam
roads that is, we print each week all the returns received
that week, but once a month (on the third or the fourth
Saturday), we bring together all the roads furnishing returns, and the latest statement of this kind will be found
in the Chronicle of July 21, 1900. The next will appear
in the issue of August 25, 1900.
>

ots.

7,256,299
27,035,105

Receipts—

26, 1899.

Gross

2-04

INCOME ACCOUNT.

Plttston,

—CurrentEarnings.
Previous

cts.

1,219,604

P.o.exp.toeara.

May 1 cover Scranton Railway, Scranton &
& Carbondale and Carbondale Railway,

.

2 01

5,592,176
4,350,325
15,04^,731

Total

2i",945

June 1 to

1-94 cts.

42.950,805

Net earnings...

22.396

Strike in Cleveland from

311,108,883

$

General

Int. 132

"6,070

360,562,986

8,067,627
28.155,677

Taxes& stamps.

157,8 e 5

Figures rrom

Scranton
t

7.250
5,738

416,384,364

scs -~

1X

Maint. of equip.
Cond'gtr'nsp'n.

151,585
215,640

111,93V

13,821,065

1,939,433

Total earns,

879
116,787 110,436 633,760
605,630
171,244 148,182 910,375
784 013
211.347 175,617 1,076 642 919,614

United Tract.
June
United Tract. (Prov.) June
Winnebago Traction. May....
Woroester & Marl'b'h May....
*

20.413

004

14,036,388

$

&o

239 405 201,i<67 1,325,799 1,151,355
Inc. 23.

15,225,027

5,031.

9,002,688
32,008,684

Freight
Mail, express,

180,162
237,049

49 022
810,739

1896-97.

(tons)

Earnings—

Sacramento Electric
Scranton Railway ..
Southwest Mo. Elect.
Southern Ohio Tract.
Staten Island Elec
Toronto Ry
Twin City Rap. Tran

1897-98.
5,071

Operations—
Passengers car-

Passenger

4,913
8,5S L
4.740
5,852
'39939
41 920
8,698
48.897
37,891
13,014
462,167 2,275.682 2.017,426
921,033
11888V 7,108,431 6,520.686
795,598
156,858 839.067
4,874
27*886
30,980
7,668
38,098
46.112
12,033
22,243
21,548
6.774
434 929
108.123 489.4M
163.487
188,843
30,060
26.582
28,886
7,8 -<4
8,977
8,807
1,931
18,636
17,138
3,680
17,685
92,352 1,440,463
62,650
11,917
97,071
16,84*:

1898-99.
5,077

1899-00.
5,303

Miles op.May31

Maln.ofway.&o.
12 365
13 604

for the

moved
25,442,219
21,081,613
19,693,634
15,225,138
Freight (tons)
mileage
3849,367,760 3229,327,820 3030,610,175 2254,027,285
Rate per ton
per mile
0-83 cts.
99 cts.
87 cts.
089 cts.

915,297

14315

of President Hughitt will be found on pages

The comparative tables for four years, compiled
Chronicle, are as follows:

Freight

136,859 119,812
4,354
41,378 1,356,241 1,161,413

203,389 189,428 1,007,489

June

Ry. & Bridge
Philadelphia Comp'y
Pottsv'e Union Trac
Richmond Traotion.

58 248
60,42*4

The remarks

& North Western Railway.
the year ending May 31, 1900.)

291 to 294.

20,954
47,986

Maroh.

Ry

82'.520
72,797
2,596,194 2,437,526
19.? 87
53.187
4,182,179 4,091,542
369.9 8 325.592
12,570
19,203
964.519 824.489

25,944
48.947

4,177
17,456

June...

Mass. Elec Co.'s
Metro. (Elev. ) Chicago
Metrop. St. Ry.(N.Y.)
Montreal Street Ry..
Musoatine St. Ry

242,179

17,404
213,2 18

3,404
16,479

June

May.

Chicago

207,689
140,235

luoe

.

18.7

149,115
119,152
85,142
238,270
159,867

May

Lehigh Traotion
Lima Railway (Ohio)
LondonSt. Ry. (Can.)
Lorain & Cleve
Los Angeles Tract..

Previous
Year.

8,291
23 953 "i8.i88
23,830 24,766
18.545
48,885 44.241
31,248 31,752

Interstate Consol. of
North Attleboro.. . May
Johnstown Pass. Ry. June
June
Kingston City Ry
Lebanon Val. St. Ry. July

St.

4,617
47,840

Aug

June
June

(Buffalo)

Newburg

4,297

13.850

July

. .

Detroit Ft.

4.295
44,396

2,906
17,201 "f6",488

June

Date

('Report for

$

Amsterdam

ANNUAL REPORTS.

1 to Latest

Current

[Vol. LXXI.

1,778,681
242,893
136.222
6,291,598

233,385,496 221,269,763 220,434,494 222,921,909

Total

Consists of
C. & N. W. Ry. deb. of 1909. f 10,000; M. L. a & W. Ry. ext. i»<ui
impt. bond*. $40,000: Man. & New Lllm Ry. 1st M. b nds, *172.tOO; Minn. A
Dun. Kv. )«t M. bonds, $528,000; Boone Co. RJB. lei M. bonds, fl.ooo.oo,
N. W. Itv. 3^ per cent nen. M. bonds of 1087, $3.1 :<6,000; sundrr bo ids, fun
1st mort. bond
VV. Ky. 3^ per cent Kenerul M. bonds, $130,000;
for
<-. E. & M. V. HK, Co. tlepos'ted intrust as oo II. lor C. & N. \V.
By. * p. 0. •«*
bonds of 1886. $is.2i5,«i00; securities nud advances of sundry companies (nrtli
stuck ih. St. P. HiM.JP
Elk. & Mo. V. t\R.,|$l.U8l.f
J1H8.JB4; stock Fro.
Om. Ry $10,' 00,000; common stock and scrip C. & N. W. Ry. Co., «2,SSS.0W»
preferred stock and scrip C. «St N. W. Ky. Co., $3,795.
*

:

.

'

CAN.

;

,

FREMONT ELKHORN & MISSOURI VALLEY.
The earnings and income accounts of this road have been
compiled for four years for the Chronicle as below:

—
August

J

.

THE CHKONICLE.

11, 1900.]

EARNINGS AND EXPEN8E8.
1898-99.
1,363

1,3 63

Miles operated

1897-98.
1,363

1896-97.
1,363

$

1899-00.

2,255,415
331,903

7 o| fl38
''"'„?;?
3,025,622

2,745,561

361, *98

367,348

$
551,828
2,985,047
344,467

Total earn In gs...
Oper. exp. & taxes.

4,121.458
2,875,334

3,885,489
2,610,802

3,881,^40
2,643,392

3,051,982
2,258.143

Net earnings

1,246,124

1,274,687

1,237,948

793,839

1.007.338
1 3,541

1.007.368
1 3.540

1.007,401
13,540

j

Earnings fromPassengers
Freight
Mall, express, eto

Inferlst'"
Rentals 8. CAP.

Balance

-V.

772,580

^.SSl
RR-

Total dlsbiirsm'ts.

13,560

464,604

1,020,941
1,020,879
1,020,908
1,021,391
sur.224,733 sur.253,808 sur.217,040 def.227,102

285

Kansas City Memphis & Birmingham RR.
(Earnings for year ending June 30, 1900.
The earnings for the late fiscal year compare with previous
years as below. Interest on the income bonds for the past
year was declared this week, being 5 per cent, payable Sept.
as against 3 per cent paid Sept. 1, 1899.
1900.
1899.
1898.
1897.
$
$
Tears ending June 30—
$
$
1,705,433 1,43 ,294 1,399,168 1,241,393
Gross earnings
926,210
Operating expen. and taxes. 1,17 2.456 1,059.373 1,036.659
1,

annual report will

show

1397-8.

1898-9.

$

$

1896-7.

$

$

(3,740,474 3,761,190
)
^9,956,137^4,392,595 4.291,525
(1,191,966 1,188,853
)

Freight.

Mails.eto

3,814,025
4,194,320
1,176,279

Expenses

9,956.137
6.576,516

9,325,035
6,67 7,662

9,241,568
6,795,002

9,114,625
6,658,075

Net

3,379,621

2,647.373

2,446,566

2,456,549

78.000

w

78,000
337,980

2,000,000

2,000,000

Deduct—
Rental

)

on debt

Dividends

(S

«q,

fl
2|
855,9d.i£

33T9

\

2,000,000

per cent)

403 852
197,743

393,757
198,085

340.973
198,085

376,7 8

206,109
190,118

195 672
150,925

142.R88
126,745

(3 D. 0.)

(2i* p. o.)

(2 p. o.)

15,991

38,747

16,143

"

}

p c)
15,000

(5

44,918

Balance
69, p. 1346.

-V.

Louisville

&

The

-V.

2,415,980
30,587

2,415,980
231,393

2,855.932
523,689

compared with previous years,

results for 18991920,

EARNINGS AND EXPENSES.
1898 9.'
1897-8.
$
$
$

1899-0.

The

June

were

earnings, etc., for three years past

18,603,406

ses,

15.731,388

14,921,730

13,849,217

8,027,898

7,074,923

6,523,090

(66-21)

(67-84)

(67-98)

excluding,

Per cent of exp.

30, 1900. J

(67-06)

Inoome from

in-

vest., rents,

&o.

650,044

540,645

590,776

427,064

9,789,017

8,568,543

7,665,699

6,950,154

:

tB

1898 99.
$

1S97 98.
$

Gross earnings
Expenses

5,012,135
2,888,610

3,801,969
2,441,394

3,70^,104
2,366,415

Net
Fixed charges and taxes

2,123,525
1,133,598

1,360,575
866,905

1.33P.689
854,515

Net Income
Extraordinary expenses

989,927
115,244

493,670
103,719

485.174
132,853

874,683
Dividend on preferred stook....(4) 240,000

389,951
120,000

352,321
120,000

1899-C0.

Total income.
Disbursements

—

(4)2,112,000
Profit

(2)

(2)

232,221
634,683
269,951
Out of the |634,683 surplus for the year ending June 30,
1900, there has been charged $151,000, principal of car
trust paid off, and $157,707 construction and betterments,
leaving $325,976 to be carried to credit of profit and loss
account. Tne operations of the Allegheny
Western Railway Company are included in the earnings and expenses
from Jan. 1, 1900.— V. 71, p. 134.
Surplus

&

Chicago

(For

& Eastern

Illinois Railroad.

the year ending

June

785.568
4,838,446
158,167

735,330
4.814,^20
157,383
12,687
. - • •••
127,180
46,165
48,579
(3is)l,848,000

8,281,783
1,507,234

7,789,644
778,900

Georg. RR. loss...

Other roads loss..
8ink. fund (net)

To

8.

&

N.

3,641

130,270
20?,851
50,840

.

A

Total disburs.
Balance, surplus.
-V. 71, p. 81,84.

Gross earnings
Operating expenses and taxes

5,148,897
2,869,022

4,581,561
2,492,611

4,721,439
2,405,005

3,927,610
2,235,031

2,289,875
214,889

2,088,950
196,687

1,816,434

Int., rentals

2,504,764 2,285 637
and taxes.. .1,514,392 1,518,273

1,982,719
1,527,331

1,850,291
1,432,593

8urplus
45f\388
990,372
767,364
Dividends (6 p. c.) on pref. 349,842
349,*-42
289,842
Dividends on com....(4i2%)278,901(3i2)2 i6,923(2i2) 154,945

417,698
289,842

Balanoe

361,629
200,598
127,856
10,601
for 1899-1900, it will be observed, is equal to 6
per cent on preferred and 10-30 per cent on the common stock.
-V. 70, p. 1048.

The surplus

Kansas City Fort Scott

& Memphis

Railroad.

(Results for year ending June 30, 1900.

The following
June

1899-00.
.$4,963,482
3,414,917

-V.

166,285

1,692,579
157.712

Otker income

a combined statement for the year ended
the company and its associated lines— Kan.
Springfield Ry. and Current River RR.:
is

Netincome

&

Years ending June
Gross earnings
Operating expenses

Expenses

p. o.

30—

Total net income
Charges
Dividend on preferred

8urplus

1899.

1898.

1897.

$

$

$

$

5,784,344 4,769,948 5,083,372 4,613,4*4
3,941,313 3,304,715 3,f>09,367 3,160,095
of earnings.. (68-14)
(68-49)
(€933)
(6903)

Net earnings
Other income

Improvements

1900.

1,843,031 1,4^5.233 1,574,005 1,453,359
25,502
11,737

1,868,533 1,476,970 1,574,005 1,453,359
1.482,645 1,409.226 1,416,272 1,403.026
(5)137,500
100,000

50,333
157,733
In addition to the 5 per cent paid Feb. 15 last, shown
above, a dividend of 4 per cent on the preferred stock was
declared this week, payable Aug. 15, "from the net earnings
of the first six months of the calendar year 1900." The dividend just declared calls for $110,000.— V. 70, p. 328.

148,388

67,743

5,970,974

979,180

Ry.
30, 1900.

for the-

1898-9.

1897-8.

$4,316,163 $3,914,635
2,970,110
2,801,643

$1,822,257 $1,543,9"2 $1,195,942
963,233
920,255
795.542

Balanoe, surplus
70, p. 997.

$859,024

Fittsbnrg Bessemer

& Lake

$400,400

$623,717

Erie Railroad Company.

(Report for the year ending Dec.

31, 1900.

The earnings for the year 1899 show a large increase over
the year 1898. In preparation for a largely increased amount
of business offering for the current year, the company arranged for the leasing, under an equipment trust, of 400 steel
cars of 50 tons capacity, 400 steel cars of 40 tons capacity and
6 locomotives, at a total cost ot $1,035,000. The average
train load of revenue freight for the year 1899 was 781 tons,
as against 659 tons for the year 1898. Of the 3,492,163 tons
of freight carried in 1899 through ore contributed 2,426,476
an increase of 820,708 tons over 1898; coal and coke contributed 601,096 tons.
OPERATIONS, EARNINGS AND EXPENSES.

30, 1900, of

City Clinton

6,032,795
1,632,904

$1,548,5«^ $1,376,0*3 $1,112,992
273,692
167,919
82,950

Interest and rentals

Net

49,975
194,663
108.44O
20,947

The following statement of earnings and expenses
been compiled for the Chronicle:

1897-98.

$

25,44

12,480
162,007
56,472
26,375

late fiscal year has

1898-99.

1896-97.

162 620

(Statement for the year ending Jane

Net earnings
Otherinoome

30, 1900. J

640,249
589,516
4,815.998)
4,981,993
156,594 $

New York Ontario & Western

1899-00.

Gross earnings
Expenses..,

$

21,996,653 20,372,307

9,138,973

2,415.980
40,569

& Pittsburg Railway.

( Preliminary statement for year ending

1896-7.

23,759,486

GrofB earnings.. . 27,742,379
Operating expen-

71, p. 235,181.

Buffalo Rochester

30, 1900. J

were as follows:

.

Total
Surplus

Nashville RR.

(For the year ending June

78,000
337,980
2,000,000

Total

315,183
25,790

New equipment

results as follows:

1899-0.

Earnings—
Passenger

362,509
31,248

573,227
196,446

on in come

373,921
29,931

5

Balance, surplus
Interest

.„ „ 50

)

Netincome

& Albany

Railroad.
ending June 30, 1900. J
(For the year

Boston

Interest

530,977

Net earnings
Traf.guar.from K.C.F.S.&M.
Miscellaneous income
Interest on bonds

71, p. 28.

The

JJ
J

1

.
.

Tons of paying
do

freight,

do

1 £ 99
3,492,163
441,471,25s

No
one mile,

No

Receipts per ton per mile
Freight earnings per mile road
do
per train mile

-364 018.

$7,903
$2-842

Earnings—
Passenger

Freight
Mail, express,

1898.
2,467.373
306,370.103
-372

cts.

$5,e09
$2-455

$162,878

1,079,19

Net earnings
Per cent operating expenses

to earnings

$1,311,531
1,064,806

$774,568

Total

Operating expenses

1,140,383
36,645

$1,854,287

&o

$134,503

1,606,718
84,691

$246,645

58-23

8119

INCOME ACCOUNT.
...$614,439
Net earnings
$774,568 Interest on bonds
49,407
Interest on bonds owned.
2,106 Dividends pref. stoofe
Balanoe (defloit)
26,591 Interest and exchange... 106,197
Taxes, rentals, &o

Total

$803,265

Total

33,222

$803,265

:

J

:

THE CHRONICLE.

286
BALANCE SHEET DEC.
18P8.
*
21,710,946
2,211,531
39,801

1899.

Assets—
Cost cf load
Cost of equip

$
20,943,481
5!,9U8,151

Stk.&b'nds owned

39,000
25,185
23,033
474,262
8S.912
14,112
9S6.440

Cash
Accounts receiv.
Due by cos. & Ind.
.

Supplies & mat's.
Miscellaneous....
Profit

and

loss ...

.

Total

—V.

J

23,62ft

20,023
4-4,293
3-1,783

12,989
959.850
24,486.842

25,542,611

1898.

Liabilities $
Stock, common... 10,000,000
l,5on,oC0
Stock, prefeired

$
10,000,000

Funded debt

.

Wages & salaries.
Due cos. & indiv..

58.076

Net

10,642
71,989

11,235,222
3,050,747
66,253
50,904
24,392
7,124
52.20J

26,542,611

wood pulp per diem, one being at the [outlet of Tupper Lake, New
York, and the other at Bemis, Me., on the Bangeley Lakes. Your
company has purchased the Gardiner Sulphite Mill, at South Gardiner, Me., which manufactures about 30 tons of sulphite a day. Extensive alterations and additions have been made at Rumford Falls,
Me., and a sulphite mill is being erected there, which will largely increase the company's output of sulphite pulp, mechanical pulp and
paper.

24,486,842

Loans aud bills.
Accounts payable
.

.

13,351.417
4*2,562
8'3,090

27,9:'6

traffic bal'ces.

Interest aud divs.

Total

70, p. 687

Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway.
( Statement for the year ending June 30, 1900.
The following is an official comparative statement for two
years past
1899-00.

1898-99.

$6,487,318
4,240,581

Net earnings
Interest
Rentals

The earnings and balance sheet follow

$1,982,060
994.317
178,592
422,268

$'8,'0"7 ,635
Gross in come
Costof raw materials, manufacturing, etc. 15,531,759

1898-99.
$15,063,568
12,218,533

$3,125,876
842,302

$2,845,035
596,595

$2,283,574
1,344,402

$2,248,440
1,786,206

$939,172

$462,234

Taxes, insurance and interest.

Dividends*
Surplus for year)
*

p. c. on pref. in both years and 3 p. c. on common
Axcumlated surplus June 30, 1900, $1,809,999.

Dividends were 6

in 1898-99.

t

BALANCE SHEET JUNE

—V.

$386,883

$562,461

1899.
$39,706,757
3,906,909
4,264,793

3,223,244

3,417,493

.$55,864,805

$55,929,452

$17,442,800
22,406,700
9,865,617
3,236,500
697,291

$17,442,850
22,406,585
9,865,122
3,231,500
1,683,411

Southern Railway Company.
{Income Account years ended June 30, 1900 and 1899J.

The

results for tb.9 year 1899-00, still subject to final audit
certified accouatants, are made public as
follows:
1899-00.
1898-9.
1897-8.
I 1896-7.
5,377*50
4,806
Aver.miles operated. 6,30612
4,837

and approval by

<8
WM tw
$
$
$
Gross earnings
31,200,870 25,353,636 21.095,839 19.079,500
Op.expenses & taxes.21, 83 1,447 17,356,355 14,501,864 13,233,156

Net earnings

9,369,423

7,997,331

(69'77)

(68-45)

6,593,975

5,846,341

935)

318,805

328,469

(6874)
348,376

Total
9,688,228
Interest & rentals. ... 6,755,442

8,325,800
6,207,253
24,028

6,942,351
5,862,768
72,571

6,133,176
5,612,235
75,022

5,935,339
1,007,012
(1%)

5x1,800,000

6,231,281
2,094,519
(2%)
1,172,904

543,000

5,687,257
445,919
(1%)
543,000

Surp. over div... 1,117,252

921,615

464,012

def.97,081

Op.exp. to gross

405,898
1,809,999

379,156
870,828

.$55,864,805

$55,929,452

p. o.

Other income

Other deductions

Balanoe
Dividends on

pref.

stock

15,535
6,770,977
2,917,252
(3%)

>

l

(

286,832

x Includes dividend No. 5, 1*3 per cent, paid in April, 1900, and
$900,000 reserved for dividend No. 6, l^ per cent, payable in October.

1900.—V. 71,

183.

p.

Boston Electric Light Co.
(Report for the year ending June 30,
President F. A. Gilbert says in part

The earnings make the following showing:
1E99-00.
$9f 0,797

Income
Expenses

1898-99.

1897-98.

1896-97.

$910,892
604,973

531,328

$=09,943
513,409

$759,644
485,499

$459,469
$305,919
$296,534
$274,145
91,958
63,523
70,393
63,242
(7%)184,724 (6%)143,910 (6%)102,000 (6^90110,500

Balanoe
Prem. on stock.

$182,787
253,295

$108,489

Surplus.

$136,082

$108,489

$124,141
7,313

1900.

$

Plant accounts
2,224.783 2,313,643
Real estate
1 ,279,550 1,198,699
Undergr'nd equip... 1,491,812 1,255,915
Supplies,

and
Cash

Accts.

& notes receiv

Total

-V.

1900.
1899
$
$
8.CO0.OOO 2,500,000
293.000
293,000

Creditor.

Capital stock

FirstM.Os
Consol. 5s

957,000

957,000

527,157

767,787

552,492

629,780

Notes and accounts

materials

tools

$108,146

30.

1899.

$

Debtor.

$100,403
7,743

$131,454

BALANCE SHEET JUNE

89,931
61,630
181,943

102,734
84,399
142,177

5,329,649 6,047,567

payable
Balance to credit of
profit

Total

and

loss

Securities of sundry corporations...
Land rights and water powers

Patents
Furniture and fixtures
Sinking funds

Cash
Accounts and notes receivable
Inventories of merchandise on hand and
advanoes for wood operations
Total

18N864
6,000
35,461

501,228
3,904,947

Liabilities.

Common

stock
Preferred stock

First

mortgage bonds

Divisional mortgage bonds

Acoounts payable (since paid)
Accrued interest, taxes and water rents
not due
Surplus
Total

-V.

70, p. 742.

Glncose Sugar Refining Co.
the year ending July 31, 1900. J
President Matthiesen, at the meeting on August 7, submitted the following for the year 1899-1900: "An exact
statement of earnings will be mailed to stockholders as soon
as our accounts have been audited and the books closed for
the twelve months ending July 31.
In the meantime a
careful estimate of last year's business, as compared with
that of the preceding year, gives the following results

(For

:

1900.

This statement shows, in comparison with the statement of last year,
an increase in gross business (exclusive of jobbing) of about lO 1^ per
cent, and a decrease in the ratio of operating expenses to gross income
from 63-8 per cent in 1899, to 506 per cent in 1900. The latter half
of the year the operating expenses were 48 6 per cent. During this
portion of the year all of the business was conducted from the new
statiOD, with the exception of East Boston. We have during the
past year completed the transfer of all business from the open arc to
the inclosed arc system. Our expectations of economy by use of the
inclosed series arc lamps and the new generating system have been
more than realized. The reduction in the percentage of cost for the
production of the current was more than we anticipated, in consequence of whioh we felt no hesitation in returning during the past year
to the old rate of 2 per cent quarterly dividends instead of 1^ per
cent, as previously paid. The company has three pieces of real estate
whioh are no longer needed for the uses of the business/and whioh at a
conservative valuation are worth $600,003 or $700,000.

Net
Charges
Dividends

Mill plants

Woodlands

70, p. 740.

30.

1900.
$40,153,339
4,403,173
4,462,456
97,488
6,000
45,845
19,500
244,176
3,209,584

Assets.

Balance, surplus

:

EARNINGS, EXPENSES AND CHAHGE8.
18991900.

$6,081,766
4,099,706

$2,246,734
1,034,120
227,885
422,268

Taxes

LX2I,

of

31.
1889.

Gross earnings
Operating expenses

[Vol..

.5,329,649 5.047,567

71, p. 237.

International Paper Company.
(Report for year ending June 30, 1900.
President Hugh J. Chiaholm says
The condition of your property has been improved during the year,
there having been expended upon it for repairs and maintenance over
$1,000,000. The output of your mills has been increased and the gen:

eral quality of the paper manufactured improved. It has never been
the intent of the company to oreate a monopoly in the business of

manufacturing news-paper, but rather that it might manufacture and
distribute under one ownership the aggregate tonnage of all its mills
cheaper thau any of the mills proportionately when running as a separate and independent plant. This has been fully jus titled from the

experience of the past year.
The company has also added to Its holdings of woodlands quite extensively during the fiscal year. Th6re have been ereoted two woodpreparing plants, each capable of handling aud preparing 100 oords

1899-00.
(Estimated.)

Earnings
Less repairs
Less c ew construction
Less accident and law fund.

Net profits
'Dividend on pref. stock.

. .

Approximate; not in

(Year.)

$

$

3,377,291

2,820,080

482,942
86,435
156,000

. .

675,378
2,701,916
(7%) 919,015

Balance for common
1,782,901
Dividends on com. stock. (6%) 1,4,41,637
*

189899.

offloial

415,139)
357,351V
772,490
2,047,589
883.351

1897-98.
(10% mos.)

$
2,461,309

598,152
598.152
1 863,152

772,931

1,090,226
1,164,238
(6%) 1,441,637

statement.

Daring the year the company acquired additional property
for which it issued in March, 1900, $1,019,030 of its preferred
treasury stock.
The directors on Tuesday declared the twelfth dividend of
\% per cent on the preferred and the eighth dividend of V&
per cent on the common stock, both dividends to be paid on
Sept. 1 to stockholders of record on Aug. 18. James B.
Vredenburgh has been elected a director, to succeed Judge
A. Q. Garretson, who resigned, having been appointed to the

Supreme Bench.—V.

70, p. 534.

New England

Cotton Tarn Company.

(Report for llj^ months ending June 30, 1900.)
The first annual statement says in part "Appended hereto
are comparative statements of assets and liabilities of July
18, 1899, and June 30, 1900, and also a statement of the disposition of the net earnings of the year. These earnings are
after charging off to operating expenses all salaries and general expenses, organization expenses and possible poor accounts, and leaves our cotton, stock in process and yarn on
hand at conservative valuations. Your directors feel that
the results are satisfactory." The statement of profit and
loss and balance sheets follow
Net earnings from manufacturing aooount after oharging
all general expenses, including management, organiza$1,393,70
tion of corporation and poor acoounts
:

:

Receipts from rents

5,285

$1,403,998
Total Income
__
Deductions—
* 5 Z'£°j!
Sinking fund
Dividend, 7 per oent on preferred stook
jJsZ'?™*
260,1^0
Interest on bonds
New machinery and buildings to perfeot and increase pro-

duotion
Set aside for additions not oompleted
Total deductions

Balanoe aooount oarried forward

ixvSi?
17Q,J«<

'V^o^iq
$h».js»

August

——— —
—

—

:

THE CHRONICLE.

11. 1900.]

BALANCE SHEETS OF JUNE
June SO,

30, 1900,

AND JULY

15, 1899.
Jwne30,'03 July 16,99.

'00. Jull/15,'99.

Plant, Rood-will.
13,049,488 14.008.251
etc....
1,12«,636
Cotton on hand.. 1,430,745
283.B!'7
386.S-W
Stock In process.
347,735
883,172
Finished yurn....
receivAccounts
687,681
lf»7,!<5;)
able
7H.H72
5
lft
Investments
-!l 2
2,092,851
472,738
Cash
30,742
Notes receivable.
.

18,528,929

IU.847,082

Totals

—

:

Liabilities—
Stock, preferred.
Stock, common..
First mort. 5s

Notes payable
Taxes due in Oct.
and November..
Organ, expenses..
Accounts payable

*5,646,<>(i0

650,000

«
5,000,000
6,000,000
6,700,000
2,680,666

30,760

24,524

12,977
117,625
270,347
119,383

137,798

...16,847,(82

18,522,929

Interest accrued.

Improvem't acc't.
ProHt and loss
Totals...

$
5,000,000
5,000,000

I

'

Retired during the year by sinking fund, $54,000.
with the
The company is operating 588,000 epindles
changes in process it will operate 620,000. The additions to
the plant, it will be observed, have been provided for out of
the earnings.—V. 70, p. 1294.
*

;

287

Columbus Marshall & Northeastern RR.—Suit.— Suit for
the sale of the property has been brought by John Seymour,
on a claim of $22,000. The line was reported last September
as graded most of the way from Marshall to Olivet, Mich.
V. 69, p. 333.
Dayton New Carlisle & St. Paris Traction Co.—Mortgage.
The company has filed a mortgage for $1,350,000.
Fitchburg RR. Dividend. Under the lease the Boston &
Maine RR. Co. will pay quarterly dividends of 1% per cent

—

on the preferred stock of the Fitchburg RR. on tne first day
of January, April, July and October of each year.— V.71, p.29.

RR.— Sale

Galveston City

Confirmed.—The

foreclosure

sale of the property on Feb. 6 to Charles E. Hotchkiss was
confirmed in the United States Court at Galveston on Aug. 4.

Mr. Hotchkiss bid $905,000 for the Galveston City road and
Gulf City property.—V. 70, p. 280.

$15,000 for the

Great Northern Ry. New Steamship Company for Pacific
Ocean.—The Great Northern Steamship Co., with $6,000,000
of authorized capital stock, was incorporated at St. Paul on
RAILROADS. INCLUDING STREET ROADS.
Aug. 3 to carry out President Hill's plan for a steamship
American Railways Co.— New Officers.— Samuel G. De line under the control of the railway company beCoursey, President of the Western New York & Pennsylva- tween the Pacific Coast and the Far East. The Nippon
nia RR., bas been elected President of the American Rail- Yusen Kaisha (Japan Mail Steamship Co.) has been operating
ways Co.. to succeed Archibald A. McLeod, who resigned. for several years past in connection with the Great Northern
William F. Harrity is Vice-President and C. L. S. Tingley is Railway, connection being made at Seattle.— V. 71, p. 135.
Secretary and Treasurer. The directors are:
Henderson Bridge Co.— Called Bonds.—Thirty ($30,000)
Samuel G. De Coursey, A. A. MoLeod, Samuel R. Shipley, Jeremiah first mortgage bonds have been designated by lot for redempShelmerdlne, William P. Harrity, Silas W.
J. Sullivan. William H.
tion at the office of the Central Trust Co. of New York on
Pettit, Edward J. Matthews, John S. Bioren and E. Clarence Miller.
at 105.— V. 69, p. 336.
in connection with the Western N. Sept. 1, 1900,
Mr. De Coursey's duties
Illinois Central RR.— Peoria Division.—The Peoria &
Y.& Pennsylvania bave been rendered nominal by the transfer
Mattoon RR. Co. was incorporated in Illinois Aug. 4, with a
of the road to the Pennsylvania RR. Co.— V. 71, p. 27.
stock of $4,500,000, to take over the Peoria division
Atlanta Ry. & Power Co.— Vetoed.— Mayor Woodward capital
ordinance granting the company of the Peoria Decatur & Evansville, Peoria to Mattoon, 120
on July 25 vetoed the new
miles. The Mattoon & Evansville RR. Co. was recently
a franchise to conduct an electric- lighting business in
vote of 10 to 3 organized to own the Evansville division from Mattoon to
Atlanta. On Aug. 7 the City Council, by a
the Indiana State line. The incorporators of both companies
sustained the veto. The measure was originally passed by a
are connected with the Illinois Central.
unanimous vote of both council and aldermanic board. V.
Extension. The company is building an extension from
181, 27.

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.

—

71, p.

Raltimore & Ohio

RR.— New Stock

to Receive

Dividend in

March 1901.—The

new common

directors have voted that the $6,398,900
stock to be delivered Oct. 1 shall participate in

the 2 per cent dividend payable March 1, 1901. In other
words, all the §45,000,000 common stock will be treated alike
as regards the distribution next March.
Mileage Included. As to the mileage upon which the
monthly earnings for the last two fiscal years was based,
General Auditor G. W. Booth says: "For the year ended
June 30, 1899, as per Annual Report, the number of miles
operated was 2,012-58. For the year ended June 30, 1900, the
number was 2,246-97, the difference of 234*39 miles being as
follows
31-20
12-70 Monongahela River RR
Salisbury RR
7 90
Berkley Springs & Potomac. 5*95 Smithfleld & Maeontown..

—

. .

Eastern Ohio

RR

17-26
Pittsburg.. 159-38

234-39
West Virginia &
Total increase
" The earnings of the West Virginia
Pittsburg are only included for the 10 months from Sept. 1, 1899, to June 30, 1900;
the Monongahela River RR. for 3 months from April 1, 1900,
to June 30. 1900, and Smithfleld
Masontown RR. from

&

&

about

May

1

to

June

30,

1900."—V.

71, p. 232, 235.

Beaumont Wharf & Terminal Co.— Bonds.— Application
was recently made to the Texas State Railroad Commission
for authority to issue $600,000 in bonds for terminal improvements and extensions.
Boston & Albany TUB.— Quarterly.— Earnings for the
quarter ending June 30 were
:

3 mos. ending June 30.

1900
1899

Gross
earnings,
$2,471,9o3
2,404,523

Net
earnings.

Int., taxes,
etc.

Dividends,

Balance,
surplus.

$-^4,605
$110,445 $500,000
157,834
£00,000
117,799
The figures for the year ending June 30 will be found on a
preceding page under "Annual Reports."— V. 71, p. 235, 181.

$695,0o0
775,633

—

Tutwiler, Miss., northerly 67 miles, via Riverside, to Lake
Cormorant, 21 miles South of Memphis, where connection
Mississippi Valley line into
will be made with the Yazoo

&

Memphis.—V.

71, p. 133, 135.

Indianapolis Street Ry. Earnings.—In response to a request of the Indiana State Board of Taxation, Ferdinand
Winter, attorney for the company, has submitted to the
board a statement of the gross receipts and expenses of the
company from May 3, 1899, to April 1, 1900, from which the
following is derived
BESULTS FOR 11 MONTHS, MAY 3, 1899, TO APRIL 1, 1900.
Gross

Operating

Net

receipts.

expenses.

earnings.

$982,371

$506,001

$176,370

Int.onbonds.
11 months.

Taxes,
1899.

Balance,

$330,000

$76,540

$69,830

The operating expenses include

surplus.

repairs, salaries, etc.

Other

disbursements for improvements, etc., are reported, making
an apparent deficit of $687,405.— V. 70, p. 945.
Iowa Central Ry. Dividend.— At the meeting of the directors on Monday it is understood that the usual semi-annual dividend on the preferred stock, payable in September,
was passed. The earnings, it is said, do not warrant continuance of dividend payments. V. 70, p. 1249.
Kansas City Fort Scott & Memphis.— Dividend.— The
directors on Tuesday declared a semi-annual dividend of 4
per cent on the preferred stock, payable Aug. 15 to stockholders of record Aug. 9. This distribution is to be made
from the "net earnings of the first six months of the calendar year 1900." Dividends on the preferred, previously 8 per
cent per annum, were suspended in 1893, but in February
last 5 p. c. was paid from the earnings of the calendar year
1899. The annual statement is given on page 285.
V. 70, p.

—

—

328.

Kansas City Memphis & Birmingham RR.— Interest on
Incomes. The directors on Tuesday voted to pay 5 per cent
on the income bonds Sept. 1, as against 3# paid a year ago,
2%% in 1898 and 2% in 1897. The statement of earnings, etc.,
for the late fiscal year is given on page 285.— V. 69, p. 1346.

—

Boston & Maine RR.— Officers.— Wm. J. Hobbs has been
appointed Comptroller and General Auditor, with immediate
charge of the treasury and accounting departments of the
company. Mr. J. W. Richards is Assistant General Auditor,
Kentucky & Indiana Bridge & RR. Co.—Successor Comboth with offices in the Union Station, Boston.—V. 71, p. 235.
Bradford Central RR. Proposed Consolidation.—See pany.—This company filed articles of incorporation in KenPittsburg Binghamton & Eastern RR. below.—V. 70, p. 279. tucky on Aug. 8 as successor of the Kentucky & Indiana
Bridge Co., whose property was sold under foreclosure last
Buffalo & Susquehanna RR.—CaZted .Bonds.— The follow- January. The capital
stock of the new company is $75,000
ing bonds have been designated for redemption:
in $100 shares.— V. 71, p. 29.
Series A, $1,000 bonds, Nos. 1130 to 1147, both inclusive; No. 1127,
Lehigh Valley RR. Consolidation of Subsidiary Comand Nos. 1070 to 1126, both inolusive.
panies.—The stockholders of the Lehigh Valley Coal Co. and
Series B, $500 bonds, No. 112, and Nos. 103 to 106, both Inclusive.
These bonds will be redeemed at par and accrued interest the Delano Land Co. have ratified the merger of the land
on Oct. 1, 1900, at the banking house of Harvey Fisk & Sons, company into the coal company.—V. 70, p. 1095.
No. 29 Nassau St., New York. Interest will cease on Oct. 1,
Louisville Evansville & St. Louis Consolidated RR.—
1900.— V. 69, p. 902.
Appeal.— Judge Woods, in the United States Circuit Court
Burlington Cedar Rapids & Northern Ry.— Purchase and at Indianapolis, on Aug. 7, granted the petition of holders of
Extensions.— See Cedar Rapids Garner & Northwestern Ry. consolidated and general mortgage bonds, permitting an apbelow. Track-laying is in progress on the new line of the peal to be taken to the United States Circuit Court of ApBurl. Ced. Rap. & Nor. from Germania, la,, northeast to peals from the decree of sale of the road entered on June 9
Albert Lea, Minn., 44 miles, and construction has also been last.— V. 70, p. 135.
commenced on the extension from Albert Lea to Faribault,
Manchester (N. H.) Street Ry.— Control— See Manchester
Minn., 48 miles.—V. 70, p. 684, 789.
Electric Co. under -Industrial," etc., companies below.—V.
<

Cedar Rapids Garner

& Northwestern Ry.— Purchased.—

This 18-mile road has been purchased by
Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway.

the Burlington

69, p. 1193.

Manhattan Ry.— Third Bail.—The work of equipping the
road with the third-rail electric system is making good prog-

—

—

:

,

THE CHKONJCLE.

288

[Vol. LXXI.

rese, and it is thought the Second Avenue Line will be ready
for trial of electric trains on or before Oct. 1.— V. 70, p. 1249.

Portsmouth (Va ) River Front Railway.— Mortgage.—
The company has made a mortgage to the Colonial Trust Co.

Metropolitan Street Ry. of New York City— Neio Stock.—
The State Railroad Commission has approved the proposed

The mortgage covers the proposed new
from a point on the Norfolk & Western Ry. 4 10 miles from the Dismal Swamp Canal to Norfolk, Va., 53 mles; alsotha Navy Yard Branch of the Portsmouth Street Riilway and the Gilmerton Branah of the
River Front Railway Co.

increase in the capital stock from $45,000,000 to $52,000,000.
Of the proceeds of the new issue about $3,00),0J0, it is said,
will ba required to meet the expense of changing the cable
lines

on Broadway.

L

xington Avenue and Columbus Avenue

to the underground trolley system, and to equip the Thirtyfourth Street Crosstown Liue with storage battery cars. The

stated, will ba used to pay the
floating debt, contracted ia the purchase of stock in other
York City. It is
street surface railroad corporations in
doubtful how soon the new stock will be issued.— V. 70,

remaining $4,000,000,

it

is

New

p. 1249.

Metropolitan West Side Elevated Ry. of Chicago.— Dividend.— The company on Tuesday declared a dividend of 2
per cent on the preferred stock payable Aug. 31 to stockholders of record Aug. 15. The first dividend, 2% per cent,
was paid Feb. 28. The present declaration places the preferred shares on a semi-annual basis.—V. 70, p. 945.

Mexican National RR.— Lease,—This company has leased
the Michoacan & Pacific Ry. for 25 years for a percentage of
the gross earnings. The road is 57 miles in length, extending
from Maravatio, a point on the Mexican National, to Zitacuaro. It taps a timber and coal section.—V. 71, p. 84.

New Orleans & Western RR.—Modified Plan.—The past
year's experience in the operation of this property having
demonstrated to the satisfaction of the reorganization committee that it is inadvisable to reorganize the property upon
the basis originally proposed, the committee modified the
plan of Aug. 1, 1899, as follows :
pur(1) By eliminating that part of the plan which provides for a
chase of the property by the committee at foreclosure sale and the
organization of a new company, and the issue of honds and stock for
cash and in exohange for the securities of the old company. The oommittee, however, reserves the right to bid or refrain from bidding at
the said sale, as it may deem best for the protection of the certificate
holders.

_

_

,

.

....

under foreclosure shall be proceeded with at the earliest
practicable day. In accordance with the decree of the Circuit Court of
the United States for the Eastern Distriot of Louisiana, made Feb. 17,
(2)

The

sale

1900, In the suit of the State Trust Co., complainant. The cash proceeds of such sale shall be distributed in accordance with the reorganization plan as now amended.
The holders of receipts for first mortgage' bonds are permitted, if they so elect, to withdraw their bonds on or before
Sept. 3, 1900, upon the payment of $100 per bond, being their
pro rata share of the expenses of the reorganization committee, including advances to the receiver, which are secured
by pledge of the bonds held by the committee. The holders
of certificates of deposit for second mortgage bonds are permitted to withdraw their bonds upon payment of $50 per
bond. Certificate holders who may withdraw their bonds
shall eventually be entitled to receivj on account of the
amount so paid their proportionate part of any amounts
which may be repaid to the committee out of the proceeds of
the sale on account of amounts advanced to the receiver.
Holders of bonds who have not deposited them with the
Colonial Trust Co. are requested to do so under the plan as
amended on or before Sept. 3, 1900. See also V. 71, p. 236.

of Philadelphia, as trustee, to secure $200,000 of thirty-year
5 per cent bonds.
line, to extend

City Ry.— Interest Payment.—
checks for interest due on March 12, 1900,
on the Guaranty Trust Co.'s certificates of deposit for nonpreferred bonds, will be mailed to the holders of record at
closing of books Aug. 6, 1900.—V. 70, p. 1150.
Reading Company. Dividend —The directors on Monday
declared a dividend of 1% per ceQ t on the first preferred
stock, payable Sept. 10, making with the first semi-annual
dividend paid last March 3 per cent for the year eaded June
30, 1900.
The present dividend is payable to holders
of voting trust certificates of record August 24. The payment of 3 per cent on the $23,000,000 first preferred calls for
$^40,000 and the payment to the sinking fund, it is supposed,
will require about $760,000. The statement of earnings for
the late fiscal year has not yet been issued, but for the
eleven months ended May 31 the results [on pages 130 and
131, Chronicle of July 21,] show a surplus over interest,
rentals, etc., of $2,380,122 in 1899-00, against $1,329,399 in
1898-99.— V. 71, p. 85.
Richmond (Va.) Passenger & Power Co.—Franchise.—
The Common Council of Richmond on Aug. 7 voted 17 to
8 to grant to the company conditionally the franchise approved Dec. 23 last. The conditions are embodied in an
amendment to the concluding section of the ordinance and
provides in brief as follows
The company shall Require title to the allied lines and shall deposit
with the Merchants' Trust Co. of Richmond $1,826,000 of the $2,000,000 bonds of the Richmond Ry. & Electric Co.; It shall also deposit
with the trust company $174,000 consolidated mortgage bonds of the
Passenger & Power Co., to be held for exchange for the balance of the
said $^,000,000 bonds. The city is further to be Indemnified by a
$ 20,000 bond against expense from any litigation which may arise
during the next year, or two year* if required.
This practically completes the plan of friendly reorganization and consolidation of the various properties formerly in
the Richmond Railway & Electric Co. system. It is not
likely that any litigation wilL arise, as the new company has
substantially complied with all the conditions of the thirtyyear franchise covering the various lines and streets. The
net earnings of the property for the first six months of 1900
are reported as about $17,000 greater than for the first half

Qnincy Omaha

On Aug.

& Kansas

13, 1900,

:

of 1899. -V. 71, p. 183, 85.

Saginaw Suburban (Electric) Ry.— New Third Rail Line.
Detroit "Tribune" of August 4 said:

—The

The International Construction Co. of this city received the contract
yesterday for building the Saginaw Suburban Railway Co., between
Flint and Bay City. The contract amounts to $80>,000 and the road
is to be completed and in operation by Sept. 15, 1901. The road will
be equipped with the Murphy third-rail system, whioh does away
with the overhead wires. Saginaw and New York capitalists are interested in the new road.

St. Johns & Lake Eustis RR.—Mortgage.— This company,
whose line extends from Astor to Lsesburg, Fia., 39 miles,
New York Ontario & Western TLy.— Quarterly.— Earnings with 9- mile branch, forming part of the Plant system, has
filed a mortgage to the Metropolitan Trust Co. of New York,
for the quarter ending June 30 were:

3 mos.

June
1900

to

30.

1899

The

Gross
earnings,

Net
earnings.

Other
income.

Interest,
taxes, etc.

Balance,
surplus.

$'61,479
$151,866
$67,295
$346,050
140,578
314,992
70,737
414.833
figures for the fiscal year ending June 30 last will be
$l,l72,2t>7

1,175,944

found on a preceding page under "Annual Reports."— V.
p. 997.

70,

as trustee, to secure $500,000 bonds. The proceeds will be
used to extend and improve the road.
Earnings.—The preliminary
St. Louis Southwestern Ry.
statement for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, is as fol-

lows:
Tear.

Gross.

Net.

Other
income.

Better-

Balance,

menis.

surplus.

$3,908,284 $2,038,209 $149,737 $285,998 $1,901,948
Peoria Decatur & Evansville Ry.— Official Notice.—Re- 1899-00
1898-99
3,802,338
1,836.002
14,908
182,753
1,668.158
ceiver E. O. Hopkins makes the following announcement:
From the balance as above are to be deducted charges, inThe Illinois Central RR. Co. took charge of the operation of what is
known as the Evansville Division of the Peoria Decatur & Evansville cluding interest on first mortgage bonds ($300,000 yearly)
Ry., except the New Harmony Branch, at midnight of July 31, 1900. interest on second mortgage incomes (4 per cent in 1899-0, or
The business of the Peoria Division from Mattoon to Peoria, as well as $360,000, against 2 per cent in the preceding year), rentals,
the New Harmony Branch (Stewartsville to New Harmony) continues
etc.— V. 70, p. 1292.
in charge of the undersigned. E. O. Hopkins, Receiver.
Schuylkill Traction Co. of Girardville, P'a.— Increase oj
See Illinois Central RR. above.— V. 71, p. 237.
Stock. The shareholders on Aug. 9 voted to increase their
Peoria & Mattoon RR.—Successor Company.— See Illinois stock from $1,000,000 to $2,000,000. The company, it is
Central RR. above.
stated, proposes to build under the eharter of the ShehanPeoria & St. Louis Railway.— Officers.— The following doah & Pottsville Ry. Co., incorporated Aug. 1, an electric
have been elected to the board of directors:
road from Pottsville to Shenandoah via St. Clair, Frackville
Nathaniel M. Jones, lawyer, of Chicago, Wm. D Marsh, of F. S. and Mahanoy Plane.—V, 71, p. 85.
James & Co., insurance, Chicago, 111.; Aaron B. Mead, of Messrs.
Tacoma- Seattle ( Electric i Ry.— Mortgage.—The company
Mead & Co., real estate, Chicago, 111.; Wm, Spooner, banker and
broker, Chicago, 111.
has made a mortgage to the Fidelity Trust Co. of Tacoma, as
Subsequently Nathaniel M. Jones was elected President trustee, to secure $1,000,000 of $1,000 5 per cent bonds, interand Wm. Spooner Secretary. The road, it is said, will now est payable semi-annually at the Chase National Bank, New
York. The mortgage covers the line under construction
be completed.— V. 69, p. 81.
Called Bonds.— The following from Seattle to Tacoma, 83 miles, its franchises, rolling
Philadelphia Traction Co.—
The "Tacoma News" says
4 per cent collateral trust bonds of 1917, viz Nos. 136, 142, stock, etc.
Muoh work has already been done by the contractors, Rydstrom &
158, 200, 207, 234, 414, 559, 568, 606, 634, 808, 840, 844, 938, 940,
Goerig, on the Seattle end of the line, in driving piles and building
983, 939, 1167, 1197 and 1227 have been drawn and will be trestle work, while at the Taooma end of the line traok has been laid
paid at 105 and interest, on and after Aug. 15, at the office of on Eleventh and A Streets, in aooordanoe with the requirements of
the Pennsylvania Company for Insurances on Lives and the franohise.
John Collins of Seattle is President and Henry Bncey of
Granting Annuities in Philadelphia.— V. 70, p. 280.
Pittsburg & Western Ry.— Sale Ratified.—The holders of Tacoma, Secretary. See item "Seattle & Tacoma Electric
Ry" in V. 70, p. 1096.
certificates representing preferred stock deposited with the
Trust Co. on Tuesday voted unanimously to
Knickerbocker
Texas & Pacific Ry.— Mortgages Released. The following
old mortgages have been formally discharged of record, all
sell the stock at $12 50 p^r $50 share to the Baltimore & Ohio
the bonds having been paid, viz.
RR. Co-See V. 71, p. 183.

—

:

:

—

—
A¥«UST

:

THE CHRONICLF.

11, 1900. J

flrBt mortgage Rio Grande division, issued Jan. 20, 1880.
General mortgage and terminal bonds. Issued Aug. 1, 1884.
New Orleans Pociflo Railway first mortgage, Issued July 31, 1890.—
V. 70, p. 947.

The

289

Quarter ended Tune 30, 1900
Quarter ended March 31, 1900
Total half-year ended
70. p. 1051.

June

$1,004,571
1,273,074
30,

1900

Spokane.— Purchase- — V.

Washington Water Power Co. of
New Stock.—The "Spokane Chronicle" says

Federal Steel Co.— Called Bonds.

:

A deal has practically been completed by which the company is to
buy the property of the Amsterdamsch Trustees Kantnor in Spokane
for $ i 00 ,000. The nrst payment will be made on the option on or
about September 1. To provide for this purohase the capitalization
of the Washington Water Power Co. will be inoreased by $500,000—
from $1,500,000 to $2,000,000.
The water power which changes hands when the last payment completes the purchase amounts to 10,000 horse power. The Washington
Water Power Co. already holds 20,000 horse power of the magnifioent
With its new holdings it will control very
falls of the Spokane River.
nearly all of the water power in this city. The above facts were confirmed through an officer of the Washington Co.— V. 69, p. 1248.
,

'

INDUSTRIAL. GAS AND MISCELLANEOUS.
Alabama Consolidated Coal & Iron Company.— Expert

—

Report on tte Property. Prof. Joha R. Procter, formerly
State geologist of Kentucky, and now President of the U. S.
Civil Service Commission, has made a report to the International Trust Co. of Maryland, Baltimore, on the properties of
Iron Co. These properties
the Alabama Consolidated Coal

&

are:

Gate City property, near Birmingham.
Mary Pratt Furnace, in Birmingham.
Gadsden Furnace & Ore property.
Clifton Furnace & Ore property, at Ironaton, Ala.
Prior & Hematite Brown Ore oropercies. Polk Co., Ga.
Standard Coal properties, in Tuscaloosa Co., Ala.
Mary Lee Coal Mines & Coke ovens, near Birmingham.
Copies of the report, which is very elaborate and full, may
be had at the company's New York office, 27 William St.
Prof. Procter says.
The consolidated oompany is now producing an admirable coke at
low cost from its own coal, of which it has an abundant supply; it

owns great

deposits of iron ores of exoellent quality favorably located
for cheap mining and convenient to its furnaces, and it has ample
railway facilities for reaching the great and growing markets of this
country, and pig iron can be delivered from the Birmingham dlstriot
to seaports on the Atlantic at less cost per ton th«n from any other
furnaces in the world to any other seaports in the world, thus giving
to the products of the Consolidated Companj's furnaces command of
markets in all the seaports of the world.— V. 70, p. 793.

American Tin Plate Co.— Consolidation Again Mooted.—
Plans for the merger of this Co., the American Steel Hcop Co.
and the National Steel Co. are again, it is stated, under consideration. Stock all common and a small issue of bonds are
said to be features of one plan suggested. V. 70, p. 843.
American Wood Working Machine Co.— In the United
States Circuit Court at Pittsburg on August 6 the Farmers' Loan
Trust Co. as trustee of bonds to the amount
of $3,000,000, the interest on which is in default, brought
suit for the foreclosure sale of certain property in that district.
The company was placed in receiver's hands in September, 1899.— V. 69, p. 646.

—

&

—V. 70, p.

$2,277,645

—See Johnson Co. below.

1252.

& Coke Co.— Purchase.— Mortnew company has purchased the plant of the
Findlay Gas, Light & Heating Co. for a sum stated as $300,The cfficers are:
010, and has made a mortgage for $250,000.
Findlay (0.) Gas, Light

gage.

—This

John M. Barr, President; D. T. Davis, Vice-President;
V. Coons, Secretary and Treasurer.

W.

Georgetown (Ky.) Waterworks & Electric Light Co.—
Sold.— At the foreclosure sale on Aug. 1 the property was
purchased by Mayor R. W. Nelson, of Newport, Ky,, for
$30,000.- V. 71, p. 185.

Harper & Brothers.— Sold.— The company's entire propas already described, was sold under foreclosure on
Thursday for $1,100,000 to Adrian H. Joline, representing
This committee, it is
the committee on reorganization.

erty,

stated,

represents

liabilities.

practically all of
the outstanding
will be reorganized per plan in V.

The company

V. 71, p. 87.
International Acheson Graphite Co.— Enlarged Company.—This company, incorporated in New Jersey last March
with $3,000,000 of authorized capital stock, and owning
"patents on the manufacture of graphite throughout all of
the industrial countries of Europe," has taken over the property of the Acheson Graphite Co., 'whose capital stock was
$1,000,000. The President is E G. Acheson, of Buffalo. The
plant of the company acquired is located at Niagara Falls.
President E. G. Acheson, replying to our letter of enquiry,
70, p. 383;

says
The present plant

using 1,000 horse power and the greater part
manufacture of electrodes to be used in
electro-chemical work, the oustomers being pretty evenly divided between Europe and America. Energetic experiments have been conducted for the past several months for the purpose of perfecting the
manufacture of fine flaked graphite, to be used in crucibles, lubricating and other trades. These experiments are now about completed
and the results are quite satisfactory, and it is expeoted that a considerable increase in the plant will be made in the very near future;
the present plant being largely occupied with the manufacture of
eleotrodes, it will be necessary to make enlargements In order to
place the other lines of products upon the market. An increase to
5,000 H. P. has been considered, although It is probable the first step
will not go beyond 2,000 H. P.
Of the $3,000,000 capitalization, $2,500,000 is common
stock and $500,000 is 7 per cent non-cumulative preferred
stock. An issue of bonds is not at present contemplated.
Of the preferred stock there has been only $50,000 issued, and
this has been sufficient for the construction of the present 1 ,000
H. P. plant, and on this two half-yearly "$% per cent dividends have been paid, the last one having been paid Aug. 1st.
The directors have authorized a further issue of $200,000 of
preferred stock, the proceeds to be used in the further extension of the plant.
is

of its business consists in the

Appleton (Wis.) Waterworks Co.—Settlement.— In the
United States Court at Milwaukee on Aug. 3 Judge Seaman
Johnson Co.— Called Bonds.— One hundred ($100,000) of
entered an order discharging the receiver. Herman H. Erb of the company's first mortgage bonds having been drawn by
Appleton. The property has been turned over to the New lot will be paid on or after Sept. 1st next at 105 at the office
England Water- Works Co. "Milwaukee Wisconsin" says: of the United States Trust Co., Trustee, 45 Wall St., New
The settlement as finally arrived at is an amicable one, the parties York City.—V. 69, p. 336.
having arrived at an agreement. The sum of $21,267, together with
an additional sum of $3,000, was turned over to B. K. Miller, who
[H. L.] Judd Co.— Bonds. This company, dealing in hardrepresented the trust oompany. Mr. Erb showed to the Court that he ware, has mortgaged its property at Wallingford, Conn., in
has transferred all of the property to the New England company and
to the
had reof ived his discharge. The Court retains jurisdiction of the New York City, and in Hamilton County, Tenn
property, however, in order to enforce, if necessary, the payment of Union Trust Co. of New Haven, Conn., as trustee, to secure
the receiver's compensation, which has not been fixed.— V. 69, p. 956. $262,000 of 6 per cent gold bonds, dated July 1, 1900, and
Arlington Copper Co,— Mortgage. The company has made payable $5,000 July 1 each year, 1901 to 1907, inclusive, $10,a mortgage on its property in Bergen County, N. J., to the 000 yearly 1908 to 1926 and $37,000 on July 1, 1927.
Hobart Trust Co. of Passaic, as trustee, to secure $400,000 of
Laclede Power Co. of St. Louis.— Increase of Stcck.— The
|500 bonds. Contracts have been let for the reduction plant. stockholders recently voted to increase the capital stock from

—

,

—

—V.

70, p. 330, 482.

$400,000 to $800,000, to provide for construction, etc.

Brooklyn Wharf & Warehouse Co.— Leased Property Surrendered.- Judge Walsh, in the First District Municipal
Court, on Thursday granted authority to the executors of
the Beard estate to resume possession of the Erie Basin property owned by the estate, on which the annual rental had not
been paid by the company.—V. 71, p. 237.
Cincinnati Leaf Tobacco Warehouse Co.— Successor Company.— See Cincinnati Tobacco Warehouse Co. below.—V.
71, p. 184, 136.

Lowell (Mass.) Electric Light Corporation.—New Stock.

—The

$100,000 of new stock, it is stated, is offered at par
to the stockholders of record May 23, 1900, subscriptions to be
paid Sept. 1.— V. 71, p. 238.

Manchester (N. H.) Electric Co.— Consolidation.—This
company, which some months ago increased its capital stock
from $600,000 to $1,000,000, and absorbed the New England
Electric Power Co., controlling the Manchester Street Ry.,
has now acquired by purchase the Merrimac Electric
Company. Light, Heat & Power Co. of Hooksett and the Union ElecReorganized

Cincinnati Tobacco Warehouse.
—This company, with $1650,000 capital

stock,

was

incor-

porated at Columbus, O., on Aug. 3, to succeed the Cincinnati Leaf Tobacco Warehouse Co. per plan in V. 70, p.
1252; V. 71, p. 184, 436.
At the auction sale on Aug. 7 the
property was bid in for $1,500,000. The officers are:
Officers— Bradford Shinkle, President; D. H. Gayle, Vice-President;
F. Albers, Secretary, and Henry Feltman, Treasurer.
Directors— D. H. Gayle, John D. Hodge, George W. Armstrong Jr.,
Robert Meier, J. M. Hutton, T. 8. Hamilton, Bradford Shinkle, Charles
E. Tabb and Henry Feltman.— V. 71, p. 184, 136.

Frank

Colorado Fuel & Iron Co.— Dividend.— The company has
declared a dividend of 8 per cent on its preferred stock, payable Sept. 5.
After this payment there will remain 16 per
cent in accrued dividends' due for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 18&9 and 1900. To pay 8 per cent on the $2,000,000
preferred stock requires $160,000.— V. 70, p. 1050.
Continental Tobacco Co.— Earnings.— The net earnings
after all charges and expenses for management, incorrectly
stated last week, are as follows:

tric Co. of

Manchester, thus uniting all the electric interests
Manchester and vicinity. The combined companies have
water-power plants at Hooksett, Greggs and Kelleys Falls, a
large steam power plant at Manchester and a 6,000 horsepower plant at Garvins Falls, the total water power being
stated as 13,500 horse power. The officers are:
of

W. A. Tucker, Boston, TreasurBrodie Smith, General Manager. Directors— G. Byron Chandler. Harry E. Parker, Roger G. Sullivan, Manchester; G. H. Hood,
W. Scott Fitz and Robert S. Bradley, Boston.
The united properties will furnish the power for the street
railway company, all the Manchester street lights, the arc
and incandescent lights used in commercial lines in the city
and vicinity, and power and light for the Manchester mills,
which, it is said, burn 8,000 lights. The companies purchased, it is understood, will be run as separate concerns,
though practically under one management.—V. 70, p. 483.
P. L. Saltonstall, Boston, President;

er;

J.

Massachusetts Breweries Co.— Consolidation.— This new
company, organized under the laws of Virginia, on Monday

—

:

—

—

——

V

THE CHKON1CLE.

290
took title to the properties
cated in or near Boston
American Brewing Co.,
H. <fc J. Pf aff Brewing Co.,
Continental Brewing Co.,

of the following breweries, lo-

:

Alley Brewing Co.,

Hanley

& Casey Brewery Co.,

Norfolk Brewery,

Elmwood Spring Brewery,

Revere Brewery,
Robinson Brewing Co.
The authorized capital stock is $15,000,000, of which, $7,500,000, it is stated, has been issued for the above named
breweries,
whose aggregate capacity is estimated as
500,000 barrels, being about 50 per cent of the total product
of Boston breweries. The new company has also made a
mortgage to secure $200,000 of 5 per cent 10-year bonds. The
officers, etc., are
Offloers.— President, Charles Pfaff; First Vice-President, Harrison
W. Huguley Second Vice-President, James D. Casey; Secretary, Edward Ruhl Treasurer, Frederick J. Alley.
Directors: Charles Pfaff, Harrison W. Huguley, James D. Casey,
Franklin Brewery,

;

;

Edward Ruhl, Frederick

J. Alley, I. R. Clark,

A. C. Ratohesky, Chas.

A. King and Rollin Jones.

The new company has been organized by Chas. E

Hellier

of the law office of Robert M. Morse, Esq., and the negotia
tions have been conducted chiefly by Walter I. Bigelow.— V.

People's

Power

Mr. Astor Not a Director.—The name
of J. J. Astor was mentioned last week as one of the incorporators of this company. We are now advised that Col.
Astor has no connection with the company and that the
name should be J. Jaster, Treasurer of the State Banking &
Trust Co. of Cleveland, Ohio.— V. 71, p. 239.
Missouri Smelting Co.— Payment of Preferred Stock.—The
$50,000 preferred stock will be paid at the office of the company, 203 Security Building, St. Louis, Mo., upon presenta-

McLean Arms

Co.

Co. of

Rock Island,

etc.,

111.— New Stock.

—This company, owning the gas and electric plants

of

Rock

Island and Moline, 111., proposes to increase its capital stock
from $300,000 to $600,000, to provide for additions, etc.

Pressed Steel Car Co. Negotiations.—The attempt to arrange a consolidation of the Pressed Steel Car Co. and the
American Car & Foundry Co., it is stated, has again been
unsuccessful.— V. 70, p. 1099.
Price, McCormick & Co.—Plan Operative.— Time Extended. -A large majority in amount of the creditors having
deposited their claims with the trustees under the plan and
rsadjustment agreement dated July 5th, 1909, the said plan
is declared effective.
Notice is given that the remaining
claims may be deposited up to and including Aug. 18th, 1900,
after which date claims will only be received upon such
terms as may be fixed by the trustees.
Sale.
The assignee's sale of the firm's personal property is
advertised to take place at 111 Broadway on August 23. The
securities to be sold include with others:
American Writing Paper Co., oommon stock
$160,800

—

.'.

do

70, p. 689.

[Vol. LXXI.

do

preferred
Philadelphia Co., of Pittsburg, stock

Rubber Goods Manufacturing
do
do

Co.,

310,600
765,806
101,428
71,352
154.4C0
125,000

common

preferred

Howard Nat. Bank, Boston, stock*
Market Nat. Bank, Boston, stock*
*

of

Including

all interest in

syndicate under consolidation agreement

September 26, 1898.

—V. 71, p. 139.
Standard Chain Co. Mortgage. The company has made
a mortgage to G-eorge W. Young and Arthur Trumbull, as
trustees, to secure $700,000 of 6 per cent $1,000 gold bonds
tion.
due in 1920, of which $608,000 are outstanding. The mortMonnt Yernon (111.) Electric Light Co.— Purchase by gage provides a sinking fund of $17,500 for the redemption of
City. The City Council was to meet on Tuesday, Aug. 7, to the bonds. The coupons due Aug. 15, 1990, will be paid on
consider plans for the purchase of the respective plants of and after that date at the United States Mortgage & Trust
the Mount Vernon Electric Light Co. and the Mount Vernon Co., 59 Cedar St., New York.— V. 70, p. 798.
Water- Works Co. and the consolidation of the two.
Standard Oil Co.— Dividend. A dividend of $8 a share,
National Gramophone Co. Dividend Passed.—The com- payable on Sept. 15, was declared on Tuesday, making $38 a
pany has omitted the payment of the August dividend in share so far declared this year, as against $23 a share in the
order, it is stated, to increase the manufacturing plant. V. same period last year. The fact that the present dividend is
70, p. 689.
2 per cent less than that for the last quarter, it is suggested,
New York Electric Vehicle Transportation Co.— Fifth is probably due to the fire at Bayonne early last month, when
Avenue Stage Line.—The Fifth Avenue Coach Co., con- the company lost property valued at approximately $1,500,000.
trolled by the Transportation Company, has received per- —V. 70, p. 850.
mission from the State Railroad Commission to extend its
Suburban Electric Co. of Covington, Ky.— Sale Sept. 25.—
route as follows:
The bankruptcy sale is advertised for Sept. 25 at Covington.
On Fifth Ave. from 89th St. to 135th St.; from Fifth Ave. along 57th —V.
69, p. 1151.
St. to Broadway, up Broadway to 72d St., thence westerly to Central
Park, and from Fifth Ave. along 110 th St. to Cathedral Parkway to
Susquehanna Electric Power. New Enterprise—Power
Riverside Drive, and along Riverside Drive, Joining the Broadway
for Baltimore. This company, chartered by the Maryland
extension by way of 72d St.— V. 70, p. 840, 844.
Legislature
arranging
in
is
1896,
New York (Bell) Telephone Co.—Increase of Stock.—The the Susquehanna River at Peach Bottom,to construct on
York Co., Pa., a
stockholders on Wednesday authorized the proposed inlarge power plant, which will supply Baltimore and vicinity
crease in the capital stock from $16,000,000 to $30,000,000.
lighting
A certificate filed at Albany respecting the increase states with electricity for Aug. 4 saidand power purposes. The
"Baltimore Sun" on
the company's paid-up capital as |16,000,000 and its debts and
The company is to have a capital stock of $12,000,000 and bonds
liabilities as

—

—

—

—

—

:

$3,156,640.— V. 71, p. 139.

Niles-Bement-Pond Co.— First

Dividend on Common
Stock. The company has declared a semi-annual dividend
of 3 per cent on the common stock, payable in two equal instalments, the first on Sept. 20, to stock of record Sept. 10,
the second on Dec. 20, to stock of record Dae. 10.
Earnings.— For the half-year ended Jane 30, 1900:

—

Net
earnings,

Reserve for

,

Dividends.

,

Balance,

Com. stock.
surplus.
$625,717
$46,361
(3%) $60,000
(3%) $150,000
$369,356
Previous surplus, $430,644; present surplus, $800,000
S36
Investors' Supplement, page 172, and V. 70, p. 1252
Norfolk (Ya) Ice Co.— Mortaage The company has
made a mortgage to the Citizens' Bank as trustee to secure
an issue of 300 $1,000 6 per cent gold bonds. The ice company was incorporated recently with $300,000 authorized
capital stock as a consolidation of the Citizens' Ice Co., the
Tidewater Ice Co. and the Hygeia Ice Co.
deprecia'n.

Pref. stock.

—

Oceanic Steamship Co.—New Vessels —The Sonoma, the
second of the three ships that the Cramps contracted to build
for the company was launched this week. The first of the
three, the Sierra, was launched in May, and the last of the
trio, the Ventura, will leave the ways in about a month. The
Sonoma is 400 feet long and of 9,700 tons displacement.—
69, p. 1106.

8

Page Wire Fence Co.— Receiver.—This company on Aug.
was placed in receiver's hands, the Union Trust Co. of

Pittsburg being the receiver for the Monessen plant and Leslie
B. Robertson for the Adrian plant. The cost of a steel rolling and wire mill erected about a year ago is said to have
had to do with the company's embarrassment.

Pan-American Exposition Co.— Mortgage.— This company
has made a mortgage to the Fidelity Trust & Guaranty Co.
of Buffalo, as trustee, to secure an issue of $2,500,000 bonds!
People's Co-operative Ice Co. of New York.— Stock Of/ered.-This company, just organized under the laws of the
State of New York, with $200,000 authorized capital stock is
oSering for subscription its $100,000 full-paid and non-assessable 8 per cent cumulative preferred stock, shares $5 each.
The incorporators

are:
Gen. Wager Swayne. Edward C. Rioe, Charles M. Preston, Henrv A
Rogers. En ward N. Gibbs, Charles J. Ferrin, Jr., Cornelius Van Cott'
W. B. M. Jordan, Henry Hall, Capt. E, L. Zalinski, Ira Bliss Stewart'
'
John King.
The office Is at 874 Broadway.

are to be issued ultimately for that amount. $4,000,000 of which,
however, is only to be issued at the present time for the first development. The other $3,000,000 is to be reserved for future development of the property. The first development will be made ne*r Peach
Bottom and will consist of a dam, head and tail races, fully
equipped with the most improved machinery of 40,000 horse power
for the generation of eleotrioity. One-half of this amount has already
been contracted for by the United Railways of Baltimore City under a
40-year contract.
The amount of revenue from this source will
guarantee the operating expenses and interest on the bonds required
to install the whole of the 40,000 horse power. In addition ro furnishing power for the operation and propulsion of cars, the United
Railways Co. will also be in a position to furnish to the citizens of
Baltimore cheaper electric lights and will also be able to furnish power
to small manfaoturers at low rates.
The financial details will be engineered through the Continental
Trust Co. of Baltimore, the President of which is Mr. S. Davies Warfield, who has taken an active interest in the development of this
property.

Susquehanna Iron & Steel Co.— Earnings.—The results
for the year ending June 30, .1900, were: Gross sales of all
plants, $2,658,866; net profits, $387,899; dividends, $270,000;
balance, surplus, $117,899.—V. 70, p. 798.
United States Wire

&

Nail Co.—Increase of Stock.—The

capital stock of this Pittsburg company was recently increased from $100,000 to $200,000 to meet the expense of extensive additions, including a rod mill and a large addition
to the wire nail plant.
The company was incorporated in
October, 1899, the incorporators including J. C. De Noon
(now Secretary and Treasurer) and I. N. Da Noon of Pittsburg, E. W. Palmer of Cleveland and others. The office is
at 919 Liberty Ave,, Pittsburg, and the works are at Shouae-

town, Pa.

Yicksburg (Miss.) Water Supply Co.— Injunction.— On
application of J. J. Mulligan, a stockholder, an injunction
has been granted restraining the proposed sale. V. 70, p. 1294.
Willlmantic (Conn.) Gas & Electric Light Co.— Purchase.
—Consolidation.—This new company has purchased the
property of the Willimantic Electric Light Co. and the
Citizens' Gas Light Co. for sums stated as $30,000 and $90,The capital stock of the consolidated
000 respectively.

—

company

is

$120,000.

&

—Messrs. Pfaelzer, Walker
Co. are offering for sale
$250,000 Ohio River Railroad general mortgage (partially
first mortgage) 5 per cent gold bonds at 100 and interest.
Complete data can be obtained by applying at their offices,
either in Boston, New York or Philadelphia.

:

August

,

:

THE CHRONICLE

11, 1900. J

tpoxts

291

Ku& ^tttummis.

CHICAGO & NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY.
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FORTY-FIRST FISCAL YEAR ENDING MAY
The business and operations of the Chicago & North
Western Railway Company for the fiscal year ending May
*
31st, 1900, were as follows
Average number of miles operated, 5,318 62.
:

-

Gross Earnings—

From Passengers
From Freight.
From Express, Mail and

Mlscel

$9,002,687 52
32,008,684 48
1,939,433 14

Total Gross Earnings
Operating Expense! and Taxes—
Operating Expenses, (60 01 per cent
of Gross Earnings)
$25,774,410 31
Taxes
1,160,550 78
Revenue Tax Stamps
59,053 01

$42,930,805

sidings and yard tracks, making a total mileage of all tracks
at the close of the fiscal year of 7,767-32 miles.
The usual tables showing the mileage of road in the various states will be found elsewhere in this report.

MILEAGE INCLUDING PURCHASED ROADS.
The mileage of the combined system, including proprietary
roads and the new lines added by the union of the properties at the last Annual Meeting in June, 1900, is as follows:
14
The Chicago & North Western Railway, including the
Winona & St. Peter Railroad -the latter embracing
the Dakota Central Ry., the Mankato & New Ulm
Railway, and the Minnesota & South Dakota Railway

26.994,014 10
$15,956,791 04
Other PaymentsInterest on Bonds and Interest
$6,069,386 37
(Note.— This being the net amount
after the usual deduction for div-

5,073-51 miles

(the two last named just being completed)
Miles of other lines added—
Boyer Valley Railway

Minnesota

86-10

& Iowa Railway
& North West. Ry.

119 10

Total mileage

4,542,04144
202,500 00

153,140 18
10,967,067 99

Add, Income from Investments.

$4,989,723 05
529,790 00

Dividends

$5,519,513 05
3,914,394 00

"

7-25
6-30

"
"

"

16-06

6002

"
"
"

CAPITAL STOCK.
There has been no increase or change in the amount of
Capital Stock of the Company during the last fiscal year,
and it remains the same as at the close of the preceding fiscal year, to- wit
Preferred Stook and Sorip outstanding
$22,395,160 00
Preferred Stook and Scrip owned by
3,794 56
theCompany

$22,398,934 56

Total Preferred Stook and Sorip

Net Income over all charges for the year
The Board of Directors of the Chicago

194-16

5,562-50

Total

To above should be added following proprietary lines
Princeton & Western Railway
St. Paul Eastern Grand Trunk Railway (Leased)

stock.)

"
"

5,486-42

(just being completed)...
Iowa Min.
Boone County Railway (just being completed)
Harlan & Kirkman Railway

idende received on O. St. P. M. &
O. Ry. preferred and common

Appropriated by the Board of Directors for Real Estate, Equipment and
other Construction Items (as see
table of items elsewhere herein)
Sinking funds
Interest paid In advance of maturity
on bonds taken up and funded into
3>9 per cent General Mortgage Gold
Bonds of 1987

81, 1900.

Common Stook and 8crip outstanding.$39,114,677 92
North Western Common Stook and Scrip owned by 2,333,688 05
theCompany
$1,605,119 05

&

Railway Company at its meeting held in the City of New
York on December 8th, 1899, adopted measures lookiDg to
41,448,365 97
Total Common Stook and Scrip
the union of all its lines of railway and Proprietary ComTotal Capital Stock and Scrip, May 31st, 1900.... $63,847,320 53
f>anies whose stocks are owned by this company and whose
FUNDED DEBT.
ines form a part of the North Western system.
The requisite measures to accomplish the union of said
Except in the case of new roads acquired, the Funded
properties with the Chicago & North Western Railway Debt of the Chicago & North Western Railway Company
Company were presented to the stockholders and bond- was not increased during the fiscal year ending May 31st,
holders at the annual meeting of the Company held at the 1900, but changes in the outstanding bonds were made as
Company's office in the City of Chicago on June 7th, 1900, follows, viz.:
and the adjourned meeting thereof, for their approval.
Bonds Retired.
Affirmative action was taken by unanimous vote to ratify
and confirm and perfect the acts and proceedings of the
Directors, the officers of the Company being authorized and
empowered to acquire title to said railways and railway
properties, and complete the union with this Company by
proper and sufficient conveyances.
The lines of railway and Proprietary Companies taken
over by the Chicago & North Western Railway Company at
said meeting by proper deeds of conveyance were as follows:
The Boyer Valley Railway, in Iowa;
The Boone County Railway, in Iowa;
The Harlan & Kirkman Railway, in Iowa;
The Minnesota & Iowa Railway, in Minnesota and Iowa;
The Iowa Minnesota & North Western Railway, in Minnesota and Iowa;
The Winona & St. Peter Railroad, embracing the follow-

ing

Iowa Midland Ry. First Mortgage
Eseanaba & Lake Superior Ry. First Mortgage
C. &N. W. Ry. First Mortgage (Iowa Division)
C. &N, W. Ry. General Consolidated Gold
Total Bonds retired

$185,000
94,000
552,000
1,190,000

$2,021,000

Bonds Issued.

& N. W. Ry. 3^% General Mortgage Gold
Issued in plaoe of above bonds retired

C.

Bonds of

IS 87,

$2,021,000

The annual saving in interest through the Issue of the
W£% General Mortgage Gold Bonds of 1987 (during the year)
in place of those retired, amounts to $57,845.
Besides these changes in bonds, not affecting the outstanding indebtedness of the Company, there were redeemed
during the year, with Sinking Fund payments, account of
the 5% and
per cent Sioking Fund Bonds of 1879, $134,000
of said bonds. Four thousand dollars of this amount and

H

$131,000 bonds of these issues on hand May 31st, 1899, were
Dakota Central Railway;
funded into $135,000 C. & N. W. Ry. %%% General Mortgage
Mankato & New Ulm Railway;
Gold Bonds of 1987, and the latter bonds are on hand in the
Minnesota & South Dakota Railway.
treasury of the Company. The remaining $130,000 of the 5#
three last-named railways, having already been ab- and 6% Sinking Fund Bonds of 1879 redeemed during the year
sorbed by the Winona & St. Peter RR. Co., form in this are also on hand and are likewise fundable into C, & N. W,
union a part of that road.
Ry. Z%% General Mortgage Gold Bonds of 1987.
The mileage of the respective properties purchased will be
The provision in the General Gold Bond Mortgage of 1987
found included in the statement of mileage of the Chicago for the Trustee to certify and deliver to the Railway Com& North Western Ry Co. the cost of the properties will pany $1,000,000 of General Mortgage Gold Bonds annually
appear in the General Balance Sheet under the head of Cost for an equal or greater amount of money expended for perof Road; the Bonded Indebtedness of the properties— all of manent improvements, additions to the property, including
which is assumed by the Chicago & North Western Ry. Co. equipment, and for which no bonds have been issued, has
—is embraced under the head of Funded Debt.
been availed of by the Company, and $1,000,000 of these
bonds have been taken over from the Trustee by the RailMILES OF RAILROAD.
way Company during the past year. All of said bonds are
The total number of miles in operation at the close of the
held as bonds of original issue, on hand, unsold, as an asset
fiscal year ending may 31st, 1900, were 5,303-31 miles.
in the treasury of the Company.
The average mileage operated during the past year is
Bonds Assumed by Union of the Properties in June, 1900.
141-73 miles greater than for the preceding year, arising
$1,440,000
from the operation of parts of the new lines completed dur- Boyer Valley Railway Bonds
1,904,000
Minnesota & Iowa Railway Bonds
ing the year. The total average mileage operated during Iowa Minnesota & North Western Railway Bonds
3,900,000
the year was 5,218-6* miles, and the statistics of this report Boone County Railway Bonds, covering railway and bridge
1,000,000
struoture (bonds not yet disposed of)
are based upon such mileage.
New Ulm
Of the foregoing, 5,097-57 miles, equal to 96-12 per cent of Mankato & in Sinking Railway Bonds ($244,000 of these
bonds are
Funds and $172,000 are not yet disthe total, are laid with steel rails.
4lo,ouo
posed of)
The Company also had in operation on May 31st, 1900, in Minnesota & South Dakota Railway Bonds (bonds not yet 528,ooo
disposed of)
addition to the above, 62429 miles of second main track, all
of which is laid with steel rails, and had 1,839-72 miles of
$9,188,000
lines, viz.:

The
The
The
The

.

;

:

THE CHRONICLE.

292

The bonds of the Winona & St. Peter Railroad and the
Dakota Central Railway Companies not stated above,
amounting to $17,343,000, which have for many years been
reported as obligations of the Chicago & North Western
Railway Company, are now assumed by said company in the
These bonds have by such purpurchase of the properties.
chase become available for refunding into C. & N. W. Ry.
General Mortgage Gold Bonds of 1987, and constitute a part
of the indebtedness for which the mortgage makes provisThe surion for funding or retiring at or before maturity.
& St. Peter RR. Co., including
plus income of the Winona
its Land Gratit Income, having been expended by that Company, is now dropped from the accounts.
SUMMARY OF BONDED DEBT.
The Funded Debt of the Company on May 31st, 1899,
$130,077,500
..
wan
To which add the amount of bonds Issued
upon the new lines of road amounting to. .$9,188,000
Less amount of New Road Bonds

LXXC

[Vol.

1898-1899.
1899-1900.
Increase.
$28,155,676 61 $32,008,684 48
$3,853,007 87
(Being an inorease of 13-68 per cent.)
Percentage of InTons of Freight Carcrease or Decrease.
ried
21,081,613
25,442,219 2068 Increase
Tons of Freight Carried One Mile
3,229,327,820
3,849,367,760 1920 Inorease
Average Earnings Received Per Ton
$1-34
$1-26 5-97 Decrease
Average Earnings Received Per Ton Per
Mile
-83 of a oent 4*60 Decrease
*87ofaoent
Average
Distance
Freight Earnings

Each

Ton

was

Hauled
Total Mileage of

»

153-18 miles

151-30 miles

1-23 Decrease

15,489,673

16,341,994

5-50 Increase

261,347,227
93,733,892

279,439,061
98,764,935

6-92 Increase
5 37 Increase

Freight Trains
Total Miles Run by
Freight Cars:

Loaded

Empty

Id Sinking Funds
$244,000
Lees amount of New Road Bonds
on hand, in the Treasury of the
Company
1,700,000

MAINTENANCE OF WAY AND STRUCTURES.
RENEWALS AND REPAIRS OF ROADWAY AND TRACK.
1,944,000

Rails Laid in Renewals—

New Road Bonds, outstanding.,

7,244,000

1898-99.
28,817 tons
20,053 "

New steel rails

laid
Usable rails laid

1899-00.

37,405 tons
12,880 "

8,588 tons Ino.
Dec.
7,173 "

$137,321,500

Less Sinking- Fund Bonds of 1879 redeemed with Sinking Fund payments, as heretofore explained

Bonds outstanding May

31st,

Total tons laid
Cost of raUs.

$137,187,500

1900

Comparative Statement of Earnings, Operating EXPENSES AND
Taxes for the Years Ending May 31st, 1899 AND 1900.
1899-

Operated,

Operated,
5,076-89.

Gross Earnings—
Passenger
$8,067,626 74
Freight
28,155,676 61
Express, Mail and
Miscellaneous....
1,793,010 53

Increase or
Decrease.

$9,002,687 52
32,008,684 48

$935,060 78

I.

3,853,007 87

1.

1.939,433 14

I.

146,422 61

$42,950,805 14

I.$4,934,491 26

Maintenance

of
Struc-

$4,732,470 21

$5,592,176 36

5,071,972 05

4,350,325 33

13,093,218 80

tures

15,046,731 14

760,380 99

785,177 48

$859,706 15

I.

of

Equipment
Conducting Transportation

General Expenses.

.

D. 721,646 72
I.

1,953,51 2 34
I.

24,796 49

.

$25,774,410 31 I.$2,116.368 26
1,160,550 78
1.48,350 19
5 ,05 3 01
58.47159
1.58142
1*

$24,828,714 23

$26,994,014 10 I.$2,165,299 87

Per cent of Operating
Expenses (excluding Taxes) to Earnings

$316,384 27
$5,043 22 Inc.
$719,759 76 $257,279 89 Ino.

$462,479 87

Ties Laid.

1898-99-1,347,755
189900.. 2,037,284
Inorease

689,529

Track Labor, viz.:
Laying rails & ties.

1899-00.

1898-99.

$232,087 58

$286,069 51

$53,981 93 Ino.

299,40108

501,21057

204,809 49 Ino.

229,783 65
1,504,720 93

17,690 07 Ino.
53,338 20 Ino.

Ballasting
ing

& ditch-

Removing

grass.

snow

$2,194.964 97 $2,524,784 66 $329,819 69 Inc.
Miscel.Track Mater'l.
5,174 06 Deo.
378,244 64
373,070 58
Total Charges for
Roadway & Track..$3,347,030 53 $3,933,999 27 $586,968 74 Inc.

OTHER ITEM8 ACCOUNT of MainteRenewals <£ Repairs of
Bridges <fi Culverts.
Renewals <& Repairs
of Buildings
Repairs of Docks and
Wharves
Repairs of Fences,

540,817 66

663,184 73

122,367 07 Ino.

566,360 73

639,886 16

73,525 43 Inc.

63,053 09

100,107 25

37,054 16 Ino.

175,094 97
40,113 23

208,639 99
46,358 96

33,545 02 Ino.
6,245 73 Ino.

$4,732,470 21

$5,592,176 36

$359,706 15 Ino.

Road Crossings and
Signs

62-23

Sundry Misc.Charges

6001

Per cent of Operating
Expenses (including Taxes) to Earnings

1899-00.

:

$23,658,042 05
1,112,200 59

Taxes

Revenue Tax Stamps.

Ino.

nance of Way &
Structures are

Total Operating
Expenses, or
an Inorease of

8-S5%

"

$838,456 20 $318,852 42 Ino.
232,855 70
15,760 97 Deo.

$311,34105

brush, weeds,

—

Operating Expenses

Maintenance

1,415

$768,220 45 $1,071,311 90 $303,091 45 Ino.
754,927 63
298,048 23 Inc.
456,879 40

Laid

Number

"

andice
212,093 58
General Repairs... 1,451,382 73

Total Earnings,
or an increase
of 12-98%... .$38,016,313 88

Way and

rails

Less value of old rails.

Ties

5,21862.

50,285

$519,603 78
248,616 67

Net Charge

If 00.

Average Miles

"

1898-99.

New steel rails
Usable

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT.
1898-1899.
Average Miles

48,870

131,000

Total Charges Account of Mainte65-31

nance

62 85

of

Way and

Structures

PASSENGER TRAFFIC.

As indicated in the preceding table of expenditures on
account of the Maintenance of Way and Structures, substantial progress has been made during the year in the substitution of new steel rails of heavy weight for those of lighter
weight in the main tracks of the Company, the cost of
From First class
which is included in the Operating Expenses. On the more
Passengers
$5,317,202 62 $6,157,972 69 $840,77007
1581 important lines of the Company steel rails weighing 90
From Second-class
per yard are being laid, while on those lines on
Passengers
18,075 83
41,63162
23,555 79 13032 pounds
From Round Trip
which the traffic is lighter rails weighing 72 pounds per yard
and Excursion
Decrease.
are being laid. The rails laid during the year, 50,285 tons,
Passengers
1,439,697 89
1,406,920 75
32,777 14
2-28 have replaced rails of lighter weight in 414-47 miles of track.
From CommutaIncrease.
will also be
tion Passengers. 1,253,283 90
1,356,398 16
103,114 26
8 23 In connection with the track expenditures it
From Parlor Car
noted that 2,037,284 new ties have been laid during the
fares
39,366 50
39,764 30
397 80
1 01
year, as against 1,347,755 laid during the previous year.
with crushed stone,
Totals
$8,067,626 74 $9,002,687 52 $935.060 78
11-59 13 3-10 miles of road have been ballasted
351-05 miles with gravel and 15 41 miles with slag and cinPercentage of InPassengers Carried—
crease or Decrease. ders, the entire cost of which is also included in the OperatFirst-class.
5,323,988
5,938,373
1
54 Increase ing Expenses for the year.
Seoond-class
4.V13
8,009 9010 Increase
Round Trip and Excursion. 1.P03.390
1,767,108 10 21 Increase

Details of Passenger Earnings and Traffic, compared with
the preceding year, may be stated as follows
Passenger
Increase.
Earnings—
1898-1899.
1899-1900.
Amount. Per Cent.
:

,

1

..

>

-

1

Commutation

8,293,436

8,924,351

Totals

15,225,027

16,637,841

9-28 Increase

MAINTENANCE OF EQUIPMENT.

7-61 Increase

Number of Passengers
Carried One Mile
416,384,364 454,614,457
Average Fare Paid by Each
Passenger
53 cents
54 cents
Average Fare Paid Per Passenger Per Mile
1-94 cents
198 cents
Average Distance Traveled
by Each Passenger
27 35 miles 27-32mlles
Total Mileage of Passenger
Trains
10,681,578
11,419,806
Total

9-18 Inorease
1-89 Increase
2

06 Inorease

OllDeorease

691

Increase

FREIGHT TRAFFIC.
Freight Traffic contributed 74 52 per cent, or $32,008,084 48,
of the gross earnings of the company. The particulars of
the business, in comparison with results for the preceding
fiscal year, may be stated as follows:

New locomotives were purchased during the year to replace others, as follows
$92,613 28
879,695 09
42,726 96

6 Passenger Locomotives
71 Freight Locomotives
5 Switch Locomotives

$1,015,040 33

Total

82

Charges for Replacement,
Renewals and Repairs
of Locomotives were as

1898 1899.

follows, viz.:

1899-1900.

Increase.

New

locomotives purchased to replace
others as described

above
General Repairs

$763,992 80 $1,015,010 33
1,258,737 14
1,134,697 13
$1,903,689 93

$2,273,777 47

«,„.-«»•
*M«.0" £3
1V4.040 01

$370,087 54

:

August

THE CHKONICLE.

11, 1900.]

1898-1899.
,

Brought forward

1899-1900.

$i,coj,6Sg 03

Amount

Increase.
Q37°,oS754

$2,273,777 47

received
from sale of old looomo-

Jess,

126,440 00

tiveB

-Deo.126,440 00

I

Netoharge
lep
Repairs

of

T
Caars

$1,777,249 93 $2,273,777 47
$496,527 64
Passenger
14
556,152
497,369 39 Dec.58,782 75

Repairs of Freight and
work Cars
2,190,998 40
Repairs of Sbop, Machinery and Tools
111,575 42
Superintendence
271,444 41
Sundry Miscellaneous
164,551 75
Charges

979,306 47 De.1211691 93
123,242 89
288,188 12

11,667 47
16,743 71

188,440 99

23,889 24

$4,350,325 33

$721,646 72

Decrease.

$5,071,972 05

2^3
Old Lines.
20

Locomotives
Oars
First-Class Passenger Cars.
Chair Oars
Combination Cars
Baggage and Express Cars.

New

Lines.

30

50
26
7
12
10
8

26
7
12
10
3

Mail Cars
Milk Cars
Box Freight Cars
Refrigerator Cars
Gondola Cars
Flat Cars
Stock Cars
Ballast Cars
Caboose Cars

Total.

6

6
2,300

1,055

1,245

250

250

l,00i>

1,000

250
500

250
500
254
25

254
25

3,334
1,309
4,643
Total Additional Cars
All the cars in passenger service are equipped with air
Of the cars in frei. ht and
brakes and automatic couplers.
other service 32.H79, or 77 46 per cent, are equipped with air
brakes andall (41,801) are equipped withautomatic couplers.

As shown in the foregoing table, 82 Locomotives have
been purchased during the year in replacement of a like
number of Locomotives retired, or to be retired, from service, and their cost, $1,015,040 33, charged to Operating
LOCOMOTIVE SERVICE.
Expenses. The 82 new Locomotives are equivalent in tractThe service p'-rformed by locomotives, together with comive power to 203 Locomotives of the classes they have reparisons with the preceding year's results, is shown in
placed, the increase in such power being 147^.
"Performance of Locomotives," included
Ninety-three new freight cars were constructed at the detail in the table
in the statistics accompanying the report. The results may
shops of the Company in replacement of cars retired from
follows, viz.:
3ervice. and their cost is also included in the Operating Ex- be summarized as
Percent-

penses.

1898 1899.

In addition to the Locomotives and Cars purchased and
built for replacements, the equipment of the Company was
increased during the year by the purchase of 50 Locomotives, 44 Passenger and 4,579 Freight Cars of various kinds,
and by construction at the Company's shops of 6 Milk Cars,
3 Mail Cars, 6 Baggage Cars, 3 Baggage and Mail Cars, and
i Passenger, Baggage and Mail Cars.
The total carrying capacity of the Company's freight car
equipment at the beginning of the year was 885,626 tons
and at its close 1,012,880 tons, the increase during the year
being 127,254 tons, or 14-37*.

CONSTRUCTION.
The Construction Charges of the Company during the
year amounted to $15,311,809 08, including the cost of New
Railways purchased.
A part of this amount has been
charged against Income as already stated, the balance being
charged to Cost of Property.
Construction Expenditures for Real Estate, Equipment and
Other Purposes During the Current Year, Charged
Against Income of thi6 Year.
On Account of Second Main Tracks, vis.:
Baraboo to Elroy, Wis
37-69 miles $127,517 04
Tama to Marshalltown, la
18-40 "
458,597 69
Harshalltown to La Moille, la. 7-75 "
113,300 10
La Moille to Ontario, la
34-20 "
366,224 97
Jntario to Boone, la
10-73 "
109,76172
Dgden to Jefferson, la
19-00 "
8.576 70
lefferson to Soranton, la
870 "
55,144 49
Soranton to Maple River Junction, la
21-30 "
13,308 23
Missouri

Valley

to

Council

Bluffs, la

21*52

"

$1,607,324 89
of Eltvating Tracks in Oily
of Chicago, vis.:
Chicago Avenue to Wrightwood Avenue.. $93,220 59
Chicago Cut Off south of Mayfair
20,317 80
3t. Charles Air Line, Chicago (H cost)
8,697 93

122,230 32
1,030 Gondola Cars, 250 Flat Cars, 500
Stock Cars, 25 Caboose Cars, 14 Standard Box Cars. 3 Chair Cars, 6 Milk Cars,
6 Baggage Cars, 3 Combination Mail and
Baggage Cars and 3 Mall Cars

1,039,869 64

Sundry Construction—
Right of Way and Additional Depot and
Yard Grounds
$246,281 63
Permanent Bridges (cost of new over old). 214,700 14
Buildings, Furniture and Fixtures
597,300 07
Shop Machinery and Tools
125 197 07
laid as Sidings (60-27 miles)..! 430!593 49
Miscellaneous
Construction,
including
Fences, Road Crossings, Interlocking
Switches and Other Items
158,538 19

8*53

Renewals,
Repairs and Supplies, including
vice.

82 Locomotives
bought & charged
to this account... $7,222,987

06 $3,724,602 64 $1,501,715 58 2079

Average cost per
18*53 cents

20 63 cents

2-10 cents

11-33

1,694,015
12,123

1,942,242
13,228

248.197

14-65
9-11

$145

$161

$0 16 11*03

$2 35

mile run
Fuel Consumed.

$2 39

$0 04

Tonsofcoal
Cords of wood
Average cost of
coalperton
Average cost of
wo»dpercoid. ..

1,105

1*70

LANDS.

Land Commissioner

for the year ending
the transactions of the land department for the year. From this it appears that the total
quantity of land sold amounted to 47,864 14-100 acres, and
2,055 town lots, the consideration received payable in cash
and in time instalments being $-!34,218 02. The acreage sold
from the respective grants was as follows

The report

May

of the

31st, 1900, gives

:

ConsiderA

Minnesota Grant
Michigan Grant
Wisoonsin Grant
Ashland Division Lands

ation.

(*,vp.s

$332,^89
45.782
62,349
10,272

...3J.932-99

Total acres sold ...
Lots sold, number 2,055
Miscellaneous Lands

5,61053
6.081*72
5,238-90

47,86414

32
08
28
64

Average
per Acre.
$11 39
8 16
10 25

196

$470,693 32
267,906 64
95.618 06

Town

amount charged against Income

$4,542,041 44

Additional Real Estate
$637,892
account of Second Main Tracks
418,834
account of Elevating Tracks in the City of Chicago.
2 1 1 ,024
Additional Equipment
1,574.373

75
01
83
63

Total Old Line Construction charged to Cost of
Property
$2,842,125 22
New Railroads.
Pn account of Mankato & New Ulm Ry. and Minnesota ]
is. So. Dak. Ry.— Brandies
of Winona & St. Peter RR.
Jn account of rowa Minnesota & North Western Ry..
3n account of Boyer Valley Rattway
^ $7,927,642 42
jn account of Minnesota & Iowa Railway
Jn account of Boone County Railway.
Jn account of Harlan & Kifkman Railway..".".'."."!"
I

I

I

J

Total

$834,218 02
gross receipts from land grants and town lots, deferred payments, interest on deferred payments, trespasses
and stumpage, were $795,488 10. The net leceipts, being
the amount after deducting expenses of operation and cost
of lands purchased for town sites, were $599,387 43. The
receipts of miscellaneous lands sold, not required by the
company, amounted to $93,615 92.
The total acres remaining in the several grants May 31st,
1900, amounted to 699,388 17-100, of which 98,517 3S-100 acres
were under contract for sale, leaving 600,870 79-100 acres
unsold.

-

Construction Expenditures Charged to Cost of Property.

Total

3,324,433

SECOND MAIN TRACKS.
The construction of Second Main Tracks, including the
improvement of the alignment and grades of the existing
track and the replacement of wooden bridges with steel
structures upon masonry, between Baraboo and Elroy, Wis.,
37-69 miles; Tama and Marshalltown, Iowa, 18 4 miles; Marshalltown and La Moille, Iowa, 7*75 miles; Ontario and
1,772,610 59 Boone, Iowa, 10-73 miles, and Missouri Valley and Council

Sew Track

The following additions have been
luring the year
Dostof equipment for old lines
^ost of equipment for new lines

age.

The

Additional Equipment—

for
For
For
For

42,294,123

Increase.

354.893 95

On Account

Total

1899-1900.

38,969,690

Total Miles run by
locomotives
Total cost of Ser-

Bluffs, Iowa, 21*52 miles, in all 96*09 miles (not finished
at the close of the last fiscal year) has been completed
during the year covered by this report. Similar work has
been undertaken and will be completed during the ensuing
Fiscal Year between La Moille and Ontario, Iowa, 34*2
miles: Ogden and Jefferson, Iowa, 19 miles; Jefferson and
Scranton, Iowa, 8 7 miles, and Scranton and Maple River
Junction, Iowa, 21-3 miles, in all £3-2 miles.
With the completion of the Second Main Tracks now
under construction in the State of Iowa, the main line of the
Company from Chicago to the Missouri River at Council
Bluffs, Iowa, a distance of 490 miles, will be a Double-Track
Railway, with the exception of one section, 67 miles in
length, between Maple River Junction and Missouri Valley,
Iowa, and the total Double Track Railway in operation will
aggregate 713 miles.
,

-

TRACK ELEVATION IN THE CITY OF CHICAGO.
The portions of the work of elevating the tracks of the
the equipment Company from Chicago Avenue to Wrightwood Avenue and
$10,769,767 64

made

to

$2,614,243 27
1,170,287 11
,

$11784,530 38

for a distance of 4,70Q feet south of Mayfair station, in the
City of Chicago, unfinished at the time the last Annual Report to the Shareholders was published, and referred to at
length therein, were completed early in the Fiscal Year

:

THE CHRONICLE.

294

[Vol.

LXXI,

covered by this report. The Company has now complied
all the Track Elevation Ordinances affecting it thus
far passed by the Common Council of the City of Chicago.

and the road opened for traffic during the Fiscal Year covered by this report. This railway extends from an intersection with the Chicago & North Western Railway near
Wall Lake, in Sac County, Iowa, in a southwesterly direcSUNDRY CONSTRUCTION.
Extensive additions and improvements to the Shop Plants tion (24-80 miles) through the Counties of Sac and Crawford
to an intersection with the main line of the Chicago &
of the Company at Chicago, Illinois, and Clinton, Iowa,
undertaken during the present Fiscal Year, are now nearing North Western Railway at Denison, Iowa. It also extends
completion. To the plant at the Chicago Shops the follow- from an intersection with the above- described line at Boyer,
ing buildings, equipped with the necessary machinery and in Crawford County, in a westerly and southwesterly direction (61*30 miles) through the Counties of Crawford. Monona
tools, have been added
1 2-story Brick Upholstering Shop and 8torageB13g, 80 feet x302feet. and Harrison to an intersection with the Sioux City &
1 1-story Brick Storage Building for Wood Material, 40 feet xl40 feet.
Pacific Railroad at Mondamin, Iowa.
1 2-story Bricte Annex to Machine Shop, 100 feet xl50 feet.
Minnesota & Iowa Railway.
1 1-story Brick Addition to Tank Shop, 80 feet xl40 feet.
The construction of the Minnesota & Iowa Railway was
1 1-story Brick Boiler Shop, 120 feet x300 feet.
1 1-story Brick Power House, 100 feet xlOO feet.
also commenced during the previous fiscal year and was
In connection with this improvement an Electric Plant is completed and the road opened for traffic during the present
being installed which will furnish additional lighting facil- fiscal year. This railway begins at Vesta, in Redwood
ities for all the various buildings and grounds, and power County, Minnesota, and extends in a southerly and south(in place of steam) for the operation of the machinery in easterly direction 119*10 miles (intersecting the main line of
the Locomotive Department and Paint Mill, as well as for the Winona & St. Peter RR. Division of the Chicago &
the operation of Turn Tables, Transfer Tables and Traveling North Western Railway at Sanborn, Minnesota), through
Cranes used in the handling of heavy material.
the Counties of Redwood, Brown, Cottonwood, Watonwan
The water supply and sewer systems have also been much and Martin, to the southern boundary of the State of Minenlarged and improved, and the facilities for protection from nesota; thence continuing through the Counties of Emmet,
fire greatly increased.
Palo Alto and Kossuth, in the State of Iowa, to an intersecTo the Shop Plant at Clinton, Iowa, the following build- tion with the Chicago & North Western Railway at Burt,
ings have been added
Iowa.
New Brick and Stone EngiDe House, 48 stalls, 80 feet in length.
Boone County Railway.
New Brick and Stone Machine Shop, 60 feet xl60 feet.
The work undertaken by the Boone County Railway ComNew Brick and Stone Heating Plant, 26 feet xS2 feet.
Brick and stcne Passenger Station Buildings, conveniently pany, involving the construction of a Double-Track Railway
arranged, were erected during the year at Cly bourn Junc- 7*25 miles in length, intersecting the main line of the Iowa
tion (Chicago), Highland Park, Oconto, Jefferson and Deni- Division of the Chicago & North Western Railway at Boone
son, and less important structures at a number of other and at a point eight-tenths of a mile east of Ogden, Iowa
stations on the Company's railway; new freight houses of (including the Bridge across the Des Moines River), has
suitable capacity were erected at Boone and Wassau, a new made favorable progress during the year covered by this reOffice Building at Lake City and a new Elevator at the La port, and will be completed during the ensuing Fiscal Year.
Fox Sheep Yards.
As stated in the last Annual Report to the Shareholders, the
In continuation of the Company's established policy of completion of this railway and bridge will effect, as comsubstituting Steel Bridges on Masonry for Wooden Struc- pared with the present line via Moingona, a saving in distures, it has during the year erected 40 Steel Bridges, ag- tance of 3 miles, a reduction in the maximum grade from
gregating 1,319 feet in length and containing 2,000 tons of 79-20 to 26-40 feet per mile, and in curvature from 902 to 68
bridge metal. Wherever practicable, Masonry Arch and degrees.
Iowa Minnesota & North Western Railway.
Box Culverts and cast-iron pipes have been used, instead of
steel spans, in the replacement of wooden structures, and
The construction of the Iowa Minnesota & North Western
the openings filled in, thereby making a continuous solid Railway was commenced in the month of June, 1899, and
roadbed. The wooden structures replaced by permanent will be completed and the road opened for traffic during the
work during the year, exclusive of those replaced in con- month of August, 1900. The railway extends from an innection with the construction of Second Main Tracks, tersection with the Chicago & North Western Railway at
aggregate 10,602 feet in length. The larger part of the cost Belle Plaine, Iowa, in a northwesterly and westerly direcof this work is included in Repairs of Bridges in the Opera- tion, 194*16 miles, through the Counties of Benton, Tama,
ting Expenses of the Company.
Black Hawk, Grundy, Butler, Cerro Gordo, Worth and WinTo provide the additional facilities necessary to meet the nebago, to the northern boundary of the State of Iowa;
requirements of the Company's business, large expenditures thence through the Counties of Faribault and Martin, in
have been made during the year for additional right of the State of Minnesota, to an intersection with the Minneway, depot and yard grounds in the Cities of Chicago, Be- sota & Iowa Railway, heretofore described, at Fox Lake,
loit, Rockford, Oshkosh, Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, Clinton
Minnesota. This railway also intersects the Chicago St.
and other important points.
Paul Minneapolis & Omaha Railway at Blue Earth City and
The Company has also acquired the tract of land imme- Fairmount, Minnesota.
diately adjoining its Wells Street Passenger Terminal in the
Mankato & New Ulm Railway.
City of Chicago, formerly owned by the Chicago Railway
The construction of the Mankato & New Ulm Railway
Terminal Elevator Company, the cost of which is included was commenced in the month of June, 1899, and will be
in the construction expenditures for the year. A portion of completed and the road opened for traffic during the latter
this land, on which the Company's tracks have for a numpart of July, 1900. This railway extends from an intersecber of years been located, was held under lease from the tion with the Chicago & North Western Railway at ManElevator Company. Since the acquisition of the whole kato, Minnesota, to an intersection with that railway at New
tract an area of 7,860 square feet has been restored, thereby Ulm, Minnesota, 25-58 miles, and is located south of and
re-establishing the original dock line on the Chicago River parallel to the Minnesota River for the major portion of the
and making available for the purposes of the Company a distance between the two points. The completion of this
total area of 60,629 square feet of land.
railway will effect, as compared with the line via St. Peter,
With the view of opening up, enhancing the value of, and a saving in the distance from Mankato to New Ulm of 8*13
making more available to purchasers, the remainder of the miles.
Company's land grant lands in the States of Wisconsin and
Minnesota & South Dakota Railway.
Michigan (much of which is covered wita hardwood timber)
The construction of the Minnesota & South Dakota Railheretofore too remote from transportation facilities to be
way was commenced in the month of August, 1899, and will
advantageously disposed of, as well as to secure to the Combe completed and the road opened for traffic during the latpany's railway the hauling of the large tonnage of timber
ter purt of July, 1900. This railway extends from an interproducts and manufactures resulting therefrom, the consection with the Chicago & North Western Railway at Tyler,
struction of a branch railroad (referred to in former Annual
Minnesota, in a general northerly and northwesterly direcReports as the Wisconsin Northern Railway) was authorized tion (32-20 miles) through the County of Lincoln to the
to extend from an intersection with the Chicago & North
western boundary of the State of Minnesota; thence through
Western Railway near Big Suamico, in Brown County, Wis- the County of Brookings and into the County of Deuel, in
consin, in a northwesterly and northerly direction for a disthe State of South Dakota, to the town of Astoria.
tance of approximately 115 miles, its construction to proHarlan & Kirkman Railway.
gress at the convenience of the Company. Up to the close
The construction of the Harlan & Kirkman Railway was
of the fiscal year ending May 31, 1899, 4611 miles of this
branch, from Northern Junction to Wabeno, had been con- commenced during the month of August, 1899, and comstructed and opened for traffic.
During the present fiscal pleted and the road opened for traffic during the month of
year this line has been extended for a distance of 14-92 miles November, 1899. This railway extends from an intersection
north of Wabeno. In addition thereto the Company has with the Chicago & North Western Railway at Kirkman, in
undertaken the construction of a spur track, approximately Shelby County, la., to the town of Harlan, in the same
6-30 miles.
21 miles in length, extending from an intersection with its county,
Appended hereto will be found the usual statements, acmain line at Perkins, Michigan, in a general northeasterly
and northerly direction through its land grant lands, located counts and statistics relating to the business of the year and
1900, inin the Counties of Delta and Alger, in the State of Michi- the condition of the company's affairs on May 31st,
cluding those of the Fremont Elkhorn & Missouri Valley
gan, which will be completed during the ensuing fiscal year.
Company; also an outline map of the lin c s of the
NEW LINES OF RAILWAY CONSTRUCTED IN THE INTEREST Railroad including the new railways constructed in its inCompany,
OF, AND ABSORBED BY, THE CHICAGO & NORTH
fpT*PSt

with

:

WESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY.

MARVIN HUGHITT, President.
Boyee Valley Railway.
Office of the
The construction of the Boyer Valley Railway was com- Chicago & North Western Railway Company,
August, 1900.
menced during the previous Fiscal Year and was completed

.

Ao«*»t

.
.

THE CHRONICLE.

11. 1900. J

295

COTTON.
Friday Night, August

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
Friday Night, August

10, 1900.

changes have occurred in the general business
situation. The tendency ha3 appeared to be towards slightly
increased activity, still bnyers generally have shown extreme
conservatism in their operations, with the result that in
many branches of trade demand has been largely spasmodic
and of a hand-to-mouth character. Confidence in a good average fall trade has continued to be shown, and as a result

No radical

there has been no especial pressure from sellers to market
feature in the pig-iron market has been a
their supplies.
sharp curtailment in the production the past month; never-

A

theless the undertone is still unsettled.
in the

Weather conditions

West and South have not been reported

favorable for the

so generally

growing crops as recently noted.

A

fea-

ture in the grain trade has been a revival of the export demand for wheat, Liverpool in particular being a large buyer.
Considerable interest has been shown in the placing of part
of the British

war loan

in the

evening the total receipts have reached 4,515 bales,
against 16,692 bales last week and 27,954 bales the previous
week, making the total reoeipts since the 1st of Sept., 1890,
6,537,016 bales, against 8,400,252 bales for the same period of
1898-9, showing a deorease since Sep. 1 , 1899, of 1,863.236 bales,
this

at—

Receipts

25

......

......

193
47

354
6

Mobil©
Pensaoola, &o.

prime City. Refined lard has been but little better than neglected and prices have weakened to 7 '40c. for refined for the
Continent. Speculation in lard for future delivery has been
dull, and owing to the dulness of the cash trade and easier
prices for hogs, prices have weakened, closing dull.
DAILT CLOSING PRICES OF LARD FUTURES.
Sat.

Mon.

Tues.

7-12

7-15

Wed.
7-12

TKurt.

39

76

-••

......

2

361

126

Thurs.

Fri.

710

quiet, closing at 35c. for prime yellow.
Batter has been in
fair demand, and with limited arrivals prices have been well

maintained, closing at 17@20c. for creamery. Cheese has
fair demand and firmer for desirable grades, closing
at 834@10}^c. for State factory, full cream. Fresh eggs have
weakened slightly, closing at 15@15J^c. for choice Western.
Brazil grades of coffee have been unsettled, but under increased offerings from Brazil prices for the week show a
slight decline. The close was steady at 9%o. for Rio No. 7.
Business in West India growths has b?en quiet, as buyers
generally have continued to hold off, and prices have weakened to lO^c for good Cucuta. East India growths have
been firm and sparingly offered. Speculation in the market
for contracts has been moderately active, but the undertone
has been unsettled, owing to aggressive operations on both
sides of the market. The close was firmer on steadier foreign advices. Final asking prices were :
Aug
795c Nov
8-10o. Maroh
8'40o.
Sept
7-95o. Deo
825o. April
8-45c.
Oct
8 00o. Uan
8'50<»
8-30o May
Raw sugars have weakened slightly, but at the lower
prices the tone has held firm, closing at4^c. for centrifugals,

been in

I

I

96-deg. test, and 4^c. for muscovado, 89 deg. test. Ddmand
for refined sugar has improved slightly; prices have been unchanged at 6*100., last quotation for granulated. Teas have

been quiet.

Kentucky tobacco has been well held, but demand has
been limited. Seed leaf tobacco has been quiet and unchanged. Sales for the week were 500 cases, as follows 100
:

cases 1899 crop, New England Havana seed, 35@50c; 150
cases 1898 crop, Wisconsin Havana, 12c; 150 casas 1898 crop,
Pennsylvania seed leaf, 12^c, and 100 cases 1893 crop, Zimmers, Spanish, 143.; also 200 bales Havana at 60@90c. in bond
and 300 bales Sumatra at 85c. @|1 70 in bond.
Straits tin has continued to meet with only a limited demand and prices have sagged slightly, closing at $31 70@
31 85. Ingot copper has been steady at unchanged prices,
but business has been quiet, closing at 16^c. for Lake. Lead
has not changed, closing quiet at 4 25c. fcr domestic.
Spelter has weakened slightly to 417^@4 22^c. Demand
for pig iron has not improved materially, and" prices have
been unchanged at $13@17 50 for domestic.
efined petroleum has been steady, closing at 8 05c. in
.
bJ* -> 5 '50c. in bulk and 9 35c. in cases. Naphtha unchanged
ol s
at 9 55c. Crude certificates have been neglected. Credit balances have been lowered to $1 25. Spirits turpentine has sold
at lower prices, closing quiet at 42@42^c. Resins
have held
farm for the lower grades, closing at $1 55 for common and
good strained. Wool has had a limited sale at steady prices.
Hops have been unchanged and firm.

194
1,038

2

55

28

Brnnsw'k.Ao.
Charleston
Pt. Royal, Ao.
Wilmington....
Wash'ton.Ao.
Norfolk

......

......

......

......

135

77

News, Ac.

......

......

a

67

New York

Total.

41

49

N'p't

Fri.

......

9
•••••
2

41

56

1
1,325

1

1,566

......

1

4

......

......

......

.....BJ

3

11

......

......

......

134

1

97

......

......

......
......

......

......

......

......

•..a.

5

8

59

444
673
336
151

41

41

2.304

4,515

673

300

36

.....a

Baltimore
Phlladel'a,

Ac.

week

Tot. this

512

511

183

857

148

The following shows the week's total receipts, the total since
and the stock to-night, compared with last year,

Sept. 1, 1899,

1898-1899.

1899-1900.
Receipts to

Aug.

10.

Gtalveston...

Sab. P., &o.

705
Pork has continued to sell slowly and the tendency of
prices ha9 been in buyers' favor, closing at $12 75@13 50 for
mess, $15@15 50 for family and $14@15 50 for short clear.
Cut meats have been well held, but demand has dragged,
closing at 6>£@6%c. for pickled shoulders. 10@10Xc. for
pickled hams and 8^@10<3. for pickled bellies, 14@10 lbs.
average. Tallow has continued quiet and the price has been
quoted nominally at 4 7-16c. Lard stearine has been well
held, closing at 8@8J4c. Oleo stearine has sold at 7^c.
Cotton seed oil has weakened slightly and business has been

,

Wed.

Tuts.

4
Bab. Pass, Ac.
New Orleans...

United States.

715

Mon.

Sal.

92

Lard on the spot has had only a small sale, demand from
both exporters and refiners being flat; prices have been
easier, closing dull at 705c. for prime Western and 6 50c. for

August

10, 1900.

The Movement of the Chop, as indicated by our telegrams
from the South to-night, is given below. For the week ending

Since Sep.
1, 1899.

This
week.

194 1,701,386
87,345

1,033 1,859,145
55 198,697

P'sacola.Ao.

152,096
1
1,566 1,080,122
121,881
5 262,476
1,235
a.....
11 279,702

Savannah...
Br'wiok.Ao.
Charleston..

P.Royal.Ac.
Wilmington.
Wash'n, Ao.
N'port N.,Ac
New York...

Baltimore

Totals

118
500
492
143
21
......

2

407,684
34,348
80,471
118,961
101,589
49,079

41

4,515 6,537,016

2,943

7,801

32,406
4,251

135,586
5,494

7,788

6,285

2,005

5,763

3,030

9,173

1,244

76,370
2,209,951
250,023
243,577
1,081,472
274,429
371,189
23,424
291,693

799

444
673
336
151

.

Philadel.Ao.

1,775

1899.

1900.

469 2,299,763

......

New Orleans
Mobile

Stock.

Since Sep.
1, 1898.

Thii
week.

24,781

a

a a as**

....a.

1,351

......

686,230
34,724
120,487
316,608
66,595
52,363

38,603
2,000
2,846
2,173

138,274
4,700
6,752
5.745

8,065 8,400,252

99,707

350,354

1,397

78
18
888
1,976

188

412

In order that comparison may be made with other years,
totals at leading ports for six seasons.

we give below the
Receipts

at—

Qalves'n.Ao.
New Orleans
Mobile

Savannah...

1899.

1900.

194

469

161

1,038

1,775

1,329

55

118
492
21
2

276
236
405
619

1,566
5

1896.

1897.

1898.

2,436
3,377

22
95
19
12
26
79

4,633
9,284

133
1,222

444
673
529

1,397

N. News, Ao.
All others...

3,713

830

1,330

113
6
489
284
176

wk.

4,515

8,065

3,867

7,396

16,370

Obas'ton, Ao.

Wllm'ton, Ac
Norfolk

Tot. this

11

11

78

1895.

288
550
148
167
11
6

39
30
510
1,749

Since Sept. 1 6537,016 8400,252 8619,326 6692,404 5232,238 7869,576

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
of 33,286 bales, of which 20,179 were to Great Britain,
to France and 13,107 to the rest of the Continent. Below
are the exports for the week and sinoe Sept. 1, 1899.
Week Ending Aug. 10,
Exported to—

Exvorts

from—

threat

BrU'n.

France

Sab. Pass, Ao..

New

Orleans.

2,215

2,469

10,444

6,377

6,377

Mobile
Pensaoola

Savannah
Brunswick

275
1,407

New York
Baltimore

5,848
..•••

Philadelphia.

*••«.

3,843
......

6,720

*•••••

5,84?

......

Total

602,529 362,205
12,144
8,187
692,282 232,116
101,312

50,768
181,474

1«,247

Continent.

2ot«l.

522,494 1,487,228
52,821
67,152
728,511 1,647,939
31,692
133,004
65,390 132,426

506,279
15,625
112,847

727,081
83,291
178,906

44,659
30,429

230,079
9,233

274.738
39.662
28,197
644,635
148,4(8
192,682
7,043
187,725

39,328

25,890
221.469
144,859
62,853
10,398

2,177

285,770
3,629
187,852
177.327

13.107

20,179
9,140

2,307

37,396

7.043

9anFran.,Ao..

Total, 1808-09.

275
1,497

2,877

#

10,1000.

......

Wilmington...
<ko..

Aug

67,666
66,059

....

Charleston....
Port Royal....

N'port N.,

Sept. 1, 1890, to

Exported to-

...•••

7,975

From

Conti- lotal
Great
France
nent. Week. Britain.
143

2,072

1900.

100

33 286 2,311,851 691,656 2,876,886 6,8£0 196

8,870

18,110 3,515,355 500,589 2,977.278 7,293,162

.

.

.

THE CHRONICLE.

296

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also
give ns the following amounts of ootton on shipboard, not
cleared, at the ports named.
add similar figures for
Hew York, which are prepared for our special use by Messrs,
Lambert & Barrows, Produce Exchange Building.

Futures.
Futures at

We

bib

5.000
[None.

.

None.
None.
None.
None.

Mobile

1,200
2,000

Other ports
Total 1900..

None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.

wite.

200
None.
None.
500
None.
500
None.
None.

2.500
191

None.
None.
None.
None.
1.543
1,000

24,706
2.752
7,788
1,505

|7,700

*

s

p.

a

s

Si

©

o

a

odb

uu »™

Pa

9

1

>

3©»g
HB Q
C3

•(.SealS^gS^S

B

191
None.

500

4251

None.
500
2.743
3,000

8,200

None.

1,200

5,234

.

7,404
9.840

563
100

13,412
11,722

28 836
23,412

7,457
1,750

©
I

I

85,073

321,518
204,731

The downward tendency to prices was checked
Tuesday morning, and during the afternoon, subsequent to
the receipt of the weekly Bureau report, which was less
favorable than expected, prices advanced sharply on buying
by shorts to cover contracts.
Apprehension that the
monthly Bureau report to be issued on the 10th inst.
would not show the improvement in the condition of the
crop during July expected induced further buying by shorts
to cover contracts. There was no aggressive selling and
prices steadily advanced until Thursday afternoon, when
realizing sales by recent buyers caused some of the improvement, to be lost; private advices received from Texas saying
that dry weather was desirable for favorable crop development, and also from the Atlantic States saying that rain was
needed in the bottom lands, had a strengthening influence.
To-day there was a fairly active and higher market. During
the morning trading was easier; foreign advices were off-set
by less favorable weather conditions reported from Texas
and the Atlantic States. At noon the Bureau report was issued, placing the condition on Aug. let at 76, or much lees than
generally expected, and stimulated general buying, on which
prices advanced sharply. The close was v ery steady at a net
gain in prices for the day of 14@22 points. Cotton on the
selling.

spot has advanced, closing at 10c. for middling uplands.
The rates on and off middling, as established Nov. 15, 1899,
by the Revision Committee, at which grades other than
middling may be delivered on oontract, are as follows.
Fair
..o. 1*8 on Strict Good Mid. Tinged. o. 3 16 on
Middling Fair
% on Good Middling Tinged
Even
Strict Good Middling
?, 6 on Middling Tinged
^a off
5
Good Middling
ie on Strict Middling Stained....
H off
3 i6<>ft Low Middling Tinged
Strlot Low Middling
6,f. off
7, 6 off Middling Stained
Low Middling
'igofl
Strict Good Ordinary
% off Strlot Low Mid. Stained.. . 1 off
Good Ordinary
l 1 iaoflf Low Middling Stained
l?s off
On this basis the official prioes for a few of the grades for
the past week— Aug. 4 to Aug. 10—would be as follows.
Sat. l?Ion

Good Ordinary.

Tne*

Wed
8%

834

938

93a

87 la

Middling

8"8

9Me

Low Middling..

87 lfi

9he

94

9««
»'3, e

Good Middling.

104

Middling Fair..

GULP.

Sat.

9^

Itton

8U 16

Good Ordinary.

Low Middling..

96,«
9»4
loi,a

Middling
Middling..

10%

Middling Fair..

STAINED.

Sat.

Low Middling

9

10%

94
94

99 ia

98a

Frl.
93,6
913 16

9«16 lOMo 10M« 104

104

10n 1(

103g

,

IUou Tues

8%
91,6
94
9%

9

909

9%

9%

8%

Middling
Strlot Middling
Good Middling Tinged.

Tne* Wed Th.
8'8

io»,a

Tk. Frl.

9 ls ie 9l3, f 10
10*8
10% 105, a
109,, 109,6 1034

913 lt 19
10*4
107 16

94
9 7 18

1038
109,6
1013, f 1013,6

Wed Th.
87,8

938
99.8

9l*,«

913,„

87,e
93s
99, *

9'3,„

Frl.
888
99,6
9«4

for middling upland at New York on
eaoh of the past 82 years have been as follows.

1900. ...0.10
1899.
63s
1898.
She
1897.
8
1896.
8%
1895.
1894.
6 78

1892 ....0.
1891

1890
1889

1888
1887
1886
711,6 1885

74
84

1884. ...O.10l3 ia
1883
104
124
1882
13
115 16
1881
12
115, 8
1880
119,a
913,6 1879
113, e
94
1878
12
104
1877
114

MARKET AND
Spot Market
Closed.
Saturday Quiet at
Monday.... Quiet

1876....o.l25 I6
1875
143g

1874
1873
1872
1871
1870
1869

174
20

21^
1P4
194
834

SALES.

Futures
Makkkjt
Closed.

Sales of Spot

& Contbaot.

Ex-

Oon-

Oon-

port.

twnp.

tract.

Total.

4 dec.
B'rly steady.

Quiet at 3, e adv.
Tuesday
Wednesday Quiet at 4 adv. Very steady
B'rly steady.
Thursday Quiet
Q't&sfy.s^ad Very steady.

4,000
5,900
3,000

i'.oco

500

"74
417
67
52

500

610 12.900 14,010

. .

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I

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I

I

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5,974
3,417

67
552

I

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CO 30
If

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9

ww
if f

00

I

1

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MOD

000

Si

t^M
©00

0000

to en

I

0000

0000
toto

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Oco

Op»J

0000

00 00

mm 00<l
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00 OtO
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I

The Visible bUPPLY op Cotton to-night, as made up toy
cable and telegraph, is as follows. Continental stocks, as well
as those for Great Britain and the afloat, are this week's returns, and consequently all European figures are brought down
to Thursday evening. But to make the total the complete
figures for to-night (Aug. 10), we add the item of exports from
the United States, including in it the exports of Friday only,
1897.
1898.
1899.
1900.
Stock at Liverpool
875,000 616,000
bales. 315,000 1,016,000
6,000
5,000
Stock at London
10,000
8,000
Total Great Britain stook. 32\000 1,024,000
880,000 622,000
24,000
Stock at Hamburg
18,000
20,000
32,000
99,000
Stook at Bremen
187,000
103,000 213,000
2,000
Stook at Amsterdam
2.000
1,000
200
300
Stook at Rotterdam
200
200
3,000
Stook at Antwerp
4,000
5,000
3,000
112,000
Stock at Havre
182,000
165,000
94,000
5,000
Stock at Marseilles
3,000
6,000
4,000
70,000
Stook at Baroelona
81,000
62,000
87,000
35,000
Stock at Genoa
23,000
28,000
49,000
19,000
Stook at Trieste
19,000
3%000
6,000
Total Continental stocks.. 331,200 601. .200
491,200 369,200
Tetal European stocks.... 656,200 1,625,200 1,371,300 991,200
22,000
India ootton afloat for Europe
29.000
39,000
50,000
17,000
Amer ootton afloat for E'rope. 91,000
73,000
73,000
T
Egypt, Brazil,<feo., ant. for E pe
18,000
20,000
14,000
28,000
82,167
Stock in United States ports..
99,707 350,354 228,143
31,064
48,159 227,402
Stook In U. 8. interior towns..
115,541
430
3,682
United States exports to-day, _
4,367
1.001
Total visible supply
947.748 2,333,323 1,866,985 1,161,861
Of the above, totals of American and other descriptions are as follows:
.

American—
Liverpool stook
Continental stooks

Amerioan

10

The quotations
10 for

too
05©

co

35,866
7,461

Speculation in cotton for future delivery has been fairly
active, but the undertone has been unsettled, due to the extreme nervousness shown by traders. Early in the week the
tendency of prices was towards a lower basis. Crop accounts from the South were quite generally favorable and
weather conditions were satisfactory, prompting fairly free

UPLANDS.

I

744

14,634

MM •3M MM M<l
CC© coco cbab ccw
MW ©O <i© a©
9
9 Id
Id
*
M<1 MM MM MM
to to
to© to
CD to
ww oc to
w to 05
W© o© 00© -jw
MM
©M MM
©w CO CD
©to to to coco ©
tOM ©CO 00 00 If
to to

M»

I

I

Total 1899.
Total 1898..

Total

£•

I

g

Total.

I

.

»»

lowest and dosing prices of
the following table.

highest,

$tock.

Ooast-

Great
Other
Britain. trance. Foreign

Savannah

1893

— Ihe

Ltatint
at

New Orleans.

Aug.

1

[Vol. LXXI.

New York are shown in

«h

4-1

rS*

OK 8HIPBOAKD, NOT OLBABBD FOB—
Aug. 10

Good

1

.
.

1

bales.

afloat for Europe.
United States stock
United States interior stooks.
United States exports to-day..
Total Amerioan
East Indian. Brazil, tic—
Liverpool stook
.

Londonstook
Continental stooks
India afloat for Europe
Egypt, Brazil, Ac, afloat
Total East India, Ac
Total Amerioan
Total visible supply
Middling Upland, Liverpool..
Middling Upland, New York.
Egypt Good Brown, Liverpool
Peruv. Rough Good, Liverpool
Broaoh Fine, Liverpool
Tlnnevelly Good, Liverpool. .

The

221,000
299,000
91,000
99,707
48,159

935,000
528,000
73.000
350,354
227,402

3,6>-2

4,367

789,000
434,000
73,000
224,143
115.541
1,00

762,548 2,118,123 1,640.685

502,000
288,000
17,000
82,167
31,064

430
920,661

94,000
81,000
86,000 114,000
10,000
6,000
8,000
5,000
81,200
32,200
73,200
57,300
22,000
29,000
39,000
50,000
20.000
18,000
14,000
29,000
185.200 215,200 22b 300 241,200
762,548 2.118.123 l^iO^S 920,661
947,748 2,333,323 l,866.9d5 1,161,861

Si^d.

31B 33 d.

3i4d.

lOo.
6 'ad.

6»«o.

6'i«0.

8c.

6W.

53,«d.
6>4d.

7 ^id.
5H,6d.
4'sd.

5»b<1.

S"%d.
3», d.
3&, h d.

3>'ied.

4^ssd-

4*S«d

4--.vA
3h«d.
imports into Continental ports the past week have

been 20,000 bales.

The above figures indicate a decrease in the cotton In
sight to-night of 1,885,575 bales as compared with the same
late of 1899, a loss of 919,237 bales from the corresponding
date of 1898 and a decline of 214,113 bales from 1897.

.
.

August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

At the Interior Towns the movement—that is the receipts

for the week and since September 1, the shipments for the
week and the stocks to-night, and the same items for the

Quotations for Middling Cotton at Other Markets.—
Below are closing quotations of middling cotton at Southern
and other principal cotton markets for each dav of the week.

corresponding period of 1898-99—is set out in detail below.

Week ending
Aug. 10.

TiBOW^g©

•KfM-

I

o
2»
•"g-SS 8 - »°
'M
4?

II m g
R

CLOSING QUOTATIONS FOH MIDDLING COTTON

fj

Galveston...

*

5 -fcg
-.-EJSM

s

PEhEf
eo:
c*;

©•

—

£32
sga

Wilmington.
Norfolk
Boston
Baltimore

H

O
o

i

:

to;

co

oow&o«j.

mm
bSOO'

CO

f\

to<i:

:

os~jm

>-ltktOQD.

M»0. If-A'

O'COt—

Ol

Os'

to

CO

co:

M00;
:

M

•

1

^eoeoo;
WOtOU!"
CO

;

*©©

•

•

:

to;

to

Louis

M.

i-1

x
-j

•

I

cow

•

tO

CxtOM

*»•

«<wcO'

ex',

•

U|
OS

tO>

©tci*..
COCXOS-

to

I

S
•

*l

M
©

«
*•
*

.

'

*»

I

•

•

M;
w
to
x*»— ;w<i;m© m
to

i

<ltO(OOOSi -JO' MtJ-

-4W«o

to
w;;mos m*
;

•

00 OS

«*>

9f

K)

6
"
13
"
20
"
27
Aur. 3

tOMMM

8?

excxc/'COO'^jeococoxosM

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1o

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•

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;

cljS^J: Vjifc"

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if*

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tOMMtO

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Mt0O3<l

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WMAMMkO

;

I

1898-1899.

1899-1900.

Week.

Since
Sept.

1.

Week.

Since
Sept.

1.

Skipped—
Via

(St.

Louis....

........

VlaCairo
Via Paducah
Via Rock Island
Via Louisville
Via Cincinnati
Via other routes,

1,65?>

500

"155
578

<fco

Total gross overland
Deduct shipments—
Overland to N. Y., Boston, Ao..

856,988
227,209
11,686
12.810
212,009
135.554
320,525

2,888 1,776,781

2,515

384
2,783
107
1,629

943,341
407,564
20,280
42,967
210,450
179,824
219,907

7,418 2,024,333

Total to be deducted

528
243
625

850,100
78,296
97,841

3,070
1,723

55«,051
50,932
105,008

1,896

Between Interior towns.........

526,237

4,979

711,991

186

Leavlngtotal net overland*..
1,492 1,250,544
2,439 1,312,342
Including movement bv rail to Canada.
The foregoing shows that the week's net overland movement
this year has been 1,492 bales, against 2,439 bales for the
week in 1899, and that for the season to date the aggregate net
overland exhibits a decrease from a year ago of 81,793 bales,
1

1898-1899.

1899-1900.

Week.

8ince
Sept.

1.

Week.

Since
Sept.

1.

Receipts at ports to Aug. 10
8.06518,400,252
4,515 6,537,016
Net overland to Aug. 10
2,4391,312,312
1,492 1,250,544
Southern consumption to Aug. 10 82,000 1,493,000 26,000 1,284,000

38,007 9,280,560 36,501 10996594
* 1,314 U95.024
*3,211 123.293

Total marketed
interior stocks In excess

Came Into sight during
Total in sight Aug. 10

week

104

9 78

9 78

9h
94
94
8'8
94
958

94
94

ColumbU8,Mlss

9
9

Little Rock....

94
94

Nashville

95s

9i, a

Natchez

Eufaulii

Noni.

Raleigh

Montgomery...

—

1898.

1899.
20,58?

..

25,612

24,765

1900.

1899.

1898.

33,293

36,693
9,085,536

..

40,879

16,515

...

•zi.mi

7,372

..

16.892

..

4,5 15

7.031
8.065

9,989 103,220 273.423 150,391
9,121 78,876 261,310 145,766
7,«62 64,253 24S.810 132,382

1900.

1899.

1£98.

10

'

9,723 68,108 237,436 121,674
10,631 19,473 280,613 119,857
3.867 48,159 227,402 115.641

49
667

7,291

1,825

12.083

4.795

26,857

2,985

17,109

......

12.757

JOS

3,201

4,864

8,717

—

were 8,523,535 bales; in 1897-98 were 8,689,791 bales.
2.— That although the receipts at the outports the past
week were 4,51i bales, the actual movement from plantations was only 3,201 bales, the balance being taken from
Last year receipts from the
stocks at interior towns.
plantations for the week were 4,854 bales and for 1898
bales.
they were
Weather Reports by Telegraph. Telegraphic advices

—

to us this evening

from the South denote that the weather

has been only fairly favorable during the week. In a number of sections where moisture was needed beneficial rain has
fallen, but from Texas there are some complaints of too
much moisture. Along the Atlantic and in sections of Mississippi and Arkansas dry weather is complained of.
Reports
from Alabama, Mississippi and Florida indicate an improvement in condition of the plant. Rust and shedding are reported from some districts.
Galveston, Texas. There have been showers on five days
daring the week, the precipitation reaching two inches and
thirty seven hundredths. The thermometer has ranged from
72 to 90, averaging 81.
Abilene, Texas.— It has rained on four days during the
week, the precipitation being two inches and ten hundredths
of an inch. Average thermometer 79, highest 90 and low-

—

est 68.

Brenham, Texas. —Too much rain is injurious
The Mexican weevil is reported in abundance.

to crops.

We

have
had rain on four days of the week, the precipitation being
one inch and fifty- one hundredths, The thermometer has
averaged 81, the highest being 90 and the lowest 71.
Corpus Christi, Texas. We have had rain on two days during the week, the rainfall being one inch and thirty-six hundredths of an inch.
The thermometer has averaged 80,
ranging from 74 to 86.
r
Ouero, lexa8.—We have had showers on four days of the
week, to the extent of one inch and fifteen hundredths of an
inch. The thermometer has ranged from 72 to 95, avering 84.
Dallas, Texas.
We have had rain on three days during the
week, the precipitation being one inch and thirty-four hundredths. Average thermometer 76, highest !)3, lowest 67.
Henrietta, Texas.—The week's rainfall has been thirtyeight hundredths of an inch, on one day. The thermometer
has averaged 79, the highest being 94 and the lowest Ci.
Huntsville, Texas. It has been showery on three days of
the week, the precipitation reaching eeventy-one hundredths
of an inch. Thermometer has averaged 83, ranging from 71

—

—

In Sight and Spinners'
Taktngs.

9%
94

M

1898-99

MCOOCOk©iy>cOOiUi©MXtO"OOsb<WO>Oii-

August 10.

9?8

918
918,8

1.
That the total receipts
the plantations since Sept. 1, 1899, are 6,341,992 bales; in
from

©toww©; -«; ©©owoo^ycxomosocxM^MCoaw© M »?
tO
O tO tO QICP- CO *» ©lk'X©yi©MxeXMMCXM©©WtOCOCOO'. ©
The above totals show that the interior stocks have decreased dnring the week 1,314 bales, and are to-night 170,243
bales less than at same period last year. The receipts at all
towns have been 4,467 bales less than same week last vear.
Overland Movement for the Week and Since Sept. 1.—
We give below a statement showing the overland movement
for the week and since Sept. 1, as made np from telegraphic
reports Friday night.
The results for the week ending
Aug. 10 and since Sept. 1 in the last two years are as follows.
I

94

9 13 ic

9ia 16
lOi.e

94
8 78
94

94
94
8*8
94

94

The above statement shows:

;

mmi*! oio:®mcx©co: ©I

m

,

"

00

;

©, <i;»<i. cewcomoo-a^r ©.

MRj«
988

98s

9?8

13.708

July

2

m

•*»!•

915, 6

94

to

tn co to

Jirt Mto
^joeo-jsoictowi— i^O'i-oioiooa)»)OOoi*>».HGrci»tO r

CO;

9" ia

90s

94
94

;

woo.

m| MMeoxco^oc. co*»exM^ifkCoeoM^j©©w©»M«oos<y<eo©os<i

to
<>
|k

8 "re

9*8

1900.

•

ACXWe»XMCnC6M©O5^©WMMCXM00Weop^l©<l©©^-'Ol©*J

eo;
ca;

99,«

8^8

94
94

939

94
94

teceivts at the Portt St'k at Interior Towne. Rec'vtsfrom Plant'nt

B riding—

to
aol'ix.
u xe-.xxcoxMio.totocDO'oswd^^'istn
OS

9t>18

93e

94
94

Nom. Shreveport.... 9
Receipts from the Plantations. The following table
indicates the actual movement each week from the plantaThe figures do not include overland receipts nor
tions.
Southern consumption; they are simply a statement of the
weekly movement from the plantations of that part of the
crop which finally reaches the market through the outports.

051*.

*+

i

-

.

:

'

&*t

94

..

Columbus. Ga.

.

WA-

MOStOOO

•

.

Athens

Week
.-

94

9»16
9«18
9i«

.

Atlanta
Charlotte

*°.

li^w.

:

V©O#>.«aMt00SMt0M0S00C0MCOC0©C000
cows; MtDl <OCOOSl«».XCON)©XvltOO-©0»«>OOOro~JtO
m, wo©. «JCO- !O0Dl<^©~l© rJlCOaOt0©0D®©MMI^COM^je*
:

©•

94
94
94
9»8
9%
95s
94

The closing quotations to-day (Friday) at other important
Southern markets were as follows.

2

S»

94

S'

ev<C3MUOsxcc©ACcxoso©^co»coio.CDCnoosejicocoo9ootOi^

O

94

Fri.

Cincinnati
LoulsvDln

ifcltk

rf*

.

94

Wednei.

WE-

_-J

I

94

9»8

9%

Memphis

:

OBCO«fll^00XCOKiB*k©eD»a'i5e»OSlMO- ,

©

9

988
98e

Augusta

3^:

:

:

t»<kA00M®Me0»-t0©O>~JOSCOWl^-0SH"Cnil».O>O5©OSC0t0t»IOSOSi—

-J

9

9H»
!)%

.

MM M iM
W
00
f
*> <i co <i <1 o» oo © p ona *- * to © w w oo to co
to
es -4 S to -J os » © x ©
w y«V to eo © vilo x co oo cnl-* os colo oo w i» os 01 w a> to k> >«»*• co
<OC»M*«©©CO©WeO>lCO
Vl

8*8

9»8

9»8
9*4

Houston
OD.

8 '8

.„,,,

Charleston.

3t.

OS
I

Tuts.

8^8
9>a

9*8
9*2

Philadelphia

°s

£2.

Mobile
Savannah...

O

HobO

*b3 £1

New Orleans

o

H ^

ON—

Tkurs.

Mon.

Satur.

8

•OB, >CR
—. J;

a

297

11119877

North'n spinners tak'gs to Aug.10
9,193 2,239.572
2.180.975
* Decrease during week.
t Less than Sept. 1.
In 1898 the week's movement into sight was 23,912 bales;
in 1897 reached 20,446 bales; in 1896 was 27,435 bales, and
in 1895 was 10,411 bales. The totals since Sept. 1 in the same
years were 10,993,592 bales in 1897-98; 8,389,480 bales in 1896-7;
7,003,648 bales in 1895-96 and 9,750,588 bales in 1894-95.

—

ta 94.

Longview, Texas.— Rain has fallen on three days daring
the week, the precipitation being seventy -one hundredths of
an inch. Minimum temperature 70, highest 93, average 84.
Paris, Texi8.— Rain has fallen lightly on two days of the
week, the rainfall being nine hundredths of an inch. Average thermometer 84, highest 99, lowest 68.
San Antonio, Texas.— Rain has fallen on three days of the
week, the precipitation being one inch and twenty-six hun-

—
THE CHRONICLE.

298

dredthe. The thermometer has averaged 83, the highest
being 94 and the lowest 72.
Temple, Texas. We have had rain on three days during
the week, to the extent of forty hundredths of an inch. The
thermometer has averaged 79, ranging from 64 to 93.
have had rain on two days of
Shreveport, Louisiana.
the past week, to the extent of twenty-one hundredths of an
inch. The thermometer has ranged from 71 to 93, averag

For the Week.

from—

Great

Continent.

Britain.

Great
Britain.

1.

Total.

Continent.

Total.

Bombay—
1899-'00„
1898-99
1897-98..

ing 81.
Columbus, Mississippi.— Crop prospects are materially improved. There has been no rain the past week. The ther
mometer has averaged 84, the highest being 96 and the lowest 72.

Leland, Mississippi.—-There has been no rain during the

The thermometer has averaged

78

9,

ranging from

—
—

Greenville, Mississippi. The weather has been hot during
the week, with rain on one day.
Vicksburg, Mississippi. The Delta crop is doing fairly
well, but the weather is too dry for the hill crop. The army
worm is reported. There has been rain on one day during
the week, the precipitation reaching ten hundredths of an
Average thermometer 76, highest 92 and lowesc 64.
inch.
have had rain on two days of
Little Rock. Arkansas.—
the week, to the extent of fifty-two hundredths of an inch.

We

2.C00

7,000
3,000
6,000

9,000
3.000
6,000

7.000
15.000
14,000

104.000
528,000
442,000

111.000
543,000
456,000

1,000
3,000

1.000
2.H00
4,000

2,000
5,000
4,000

3,000
5,000
4,000

29,000
31,000
31,000

32,000
36,000
35,000

2,000

2,000

1,000

l'ooo

5,000
2,000
2,000

14,000
17,000
5,000

19,000
19,000
7,000

1897-98..

— We

66 to 92.

Since September

Exports

—

week.

LXXI

[Vol.

1,000
3,000
2,000

8,000
2O(>0
3,000

9.000
5,000
5,000

8.000
10,000
15,000

86.000
118,000
124,000

94,000
12 4.000
139,000

Total all—
1899'00..
1898-99..
1897-98..

4,000
6,000
2.000

18,000
7,000
14,000

22.000
13,000
16,000

23,000
32,000
35.000

233,000
694.000
602.000

.

Calcutta—
1899-'O0..

1898-99..
1897-98..

Madras—
1899-'00..

1898-99..
1897-98..
All others—
1899-'00..

189899..

256,000
726,000
637.000

j

1

According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show a
decrease compared with last year in the week's receipts of
11,000 bales. Exports from all India ports record a gain
of 9,000 bales during the week and since September 1 snow
a decrease of 470.000 bales.

84, the highest being 93 and
the lowest 75.
Helena, Arkansas.—There has been no rain during the
week, and it is said to be needed. The thermometer has averaged 84*2, ranging from 69 to 94.
Memphis, Tennessee. The weather has been dry and this
has been the hottest week of the season. There are some reports of rust and shedding, and moisture would be desirable,
but the crop generally continues to improve. The thermometer has ranged from 72'7 to 94, averaging 83.
Nashville, Tennessee. There has been no rain during the
week. Average thermometer 84, highest 97 and lowest 71.
Mobile, Alabama.— Crop advices are generally favorable.
Some open bolls are reported. Rain has fallen on four days
of the week, the precipitation being two inches and thirtynine hundredths. The thermometer has averaged 81, the
highest beiog 94, and the lowest 71.
Montgomery, Alabama.— The weather has been favorable
and the crop is improving. We have had rain on one day of
the past week, the precipitation reaching five hundredths of
an inch. The thermomtter has averaged 81, ranging from
64 to 98.
Selma, Alabama. There are some complaints from reliable
farmers of rust and shedding. We have had no rain the past
week. The thermometer has ranged from 68 to 9S, averaging

This statement shows that the receipts for the week
ending Aug. 8 were
oantars and the shipments to

82.

all

The thermometer has averaged

—

—

—

Alexandria Receipts and Shipments of Cotton.—
Through arrangements we made with Messrs. Davis,
Benachi & Co., of Liverpool and Alexandria, we now
receive a weekly cable of the movements of cotton at
Alexandria, Egypt. The following are the receipts and
shipments for the past week and for the corresponding

week

Alexandria, Egypt,

August

highest 99, lowest 70.
Savannah, Georgia, There has been rain on three days of
the week, to the extent of two hundredths of an inch. The
thermometer has averaged 82, the highest being 99 and the
lowest 69.
Augusta, Georgia. —There has been no rain during the
week and the crop is suffering from dry weather and excessive heat. The thermometer has averaged 83, ranging from

—

69 to ICO.
Stateburg, South Carolina. The very hot and dry weather
is unfavorable for farm produjts.
There has been no rain
during the week. Average thermometer 83-5, highest 101

—

and lowe st

67.

Greenuood, South Carolina.—The weather has been dry
all the week and rain is claimed to be needed.
Cotton is
said to be shedding and turning yellow. The thermometer
has averaged 83, the highest being 97 and the lowest 69.
Charleston, South Carolina.
We have had rain on two
days during the past week, to the extent of five hundredths
of an inch. Tbe thermometer has ranged from 73 to 96, averaging 82.
Norfolk, Virginia. Crop accounts are less favorable.
The following statement we nave also received by telegraph,
showing the height of the rivers at the points named at

—

1899-1900.

8.

This week
Since Sept. 1

August

1900,

9,

and August

Sept. 1.

Aug. 10/99.

Feet.

New Orleans
Nashville

Shreveport
Vloksburg

8,000 712,000 18,000 821,000

pounds.

in 1898-99.
t Of whloh to America in 1899-1900, 70,147 bales;
50.444 bales; in 1897-98, 52.863 bales.

Europe 10,000 bales.
Manchester Market.— Oar report received by cable

165

of cotton at
for the week ending Aug. 9, and for the season
to Aug. 9 for three years have been as follows:

Bombay

1,000

Since
Sept. 1.

906,000

Week.

Since
Sept. 1.

12,000 2,041,000

is

quiet for

both yarns and shirtings. The demand for India is good but
for China poor. We give tbe prices for to-day below and
have those for previous weeks of this and last year for
comparison.
1900.

8H

Twist.

A.

d.

July 6 "i^S «8 78
" 13 83, 6 9316 J6
" 20 S»4 99
" 2 7 8^ ©9
98 'a
Aug. 3 8

1899.

lbs. Shirt- Oott'n

32* Cop. ings,

common Mid. 32s
Uplds

to finest.

H

8

d.

5

527 32 5i3 16 -6U IS 4
4497 10
529 S 2 5i3 le -6ll 16 4
4^97 9
527 32 5i3 16 -6ii„ 4
4^97 9
4 97 8
5% 513, 6-611, 6 4
3 97 74 57 x * 513 lB-(jllj 4

5
5
5
5

d.

d.

d.

common

to finest.

s.

s.

lbs. Shirt- Oott'n

Cop. ings,

Twist.
d.

d.

s.

fl

s.

34»7
3497
3497
3497
4 97
4497

Mid.
Uplds

d

d.

14
14
9
14 3^
14 338
2

3»8

31& 3J
97 9
5 Si 7a "as*
2
4
Sea Island Cotton Movement. — We have received thi 8
(Friday) evening by telegraph from the various ports the
details of the Sea Island cotton movement for the week. The
receipts for the week ending to-night (Aug. 10) and since
Sept. 1, 1899, the stocks to-night, and the same items for the
••

5

10

4

ltf

corresponding periods of 1898, are as follows.
1899-1900.
Receipts to Aug. 10.

This
xoeck.

1898-1899.

Since
Sept.

1

This
Since
week. 'Sept. 1
\

Slock.

1900.

1899.

17

97,097

19

53,572
5,642

2,370

8,161

72.253
7,743
17,101

Charleston, &o.
Florida, &o

10

57
265
206

67,375

2,783

528

40.-S

from Sept.
1897-98.

Week.

Sines
Sept. 1.

1

—

The exports for the week ending this evening reach a total
bales were to Great Britain,
bales, of which
to Bremen, and the amount forwarded to
to France and
Northern mills has been 930 bales. Below are the exports
for the week and since Sept. 1 in 1899-1900 and 1898-99.

of

Movement from all Ports.—The receipts
Bombay and the shipments from all India ports

Week.

market

to-night from Manchester states that the

Total

3-5
7-3

1898-99.

Since
Sept. 1.

2,000 335 000 2.000 346,000
6,000 377,000 16.000 475,000

97

India Cotton

Receipts at—

Sept. 1.

10,000 818,000

A oantar is 98

'

5-1

Import Trade of India in 1899 1900.— la our editorial
columns to-day will be found an article under the above
caption by our special Manchester correspondent.

1899 1900.

This
week.

Feet.

Above zero of gauge.
Above zero of gauge.
Above zero of gauge.
Above zero of gat ge.
Above zero of gauge.

Memphis

6,514,000

Since

2,000 400.000
8,000 418,000

Savannah
9, '00.

5,586^000
This
week.

Since

Exports (bales)—

10, 1899.

Aug.

1897-1898.

1898-1899.

6,434,000
This
week.

—

3 o'clock

years.

Reoelpts (oantars*)...

—

Madison, Florida. Reports are somewhat more favorable.
Rain has fallen on two days of the week, the rainfall being
thirty hundredths of an inch. Average thermometer 86,

two

of the previous

—

—

—

Week Ending Aug. 10 Since

Sept. 1, 1899.

Xorth'n Mills.

Oreat Fr'nce
Oreat Fr'nce
Total. BHt'n.
Total.
die.
i£c.
BriVn.

Since
Week. Sept.l.

Exports

from—
Savannah...

•••

Charl't'n.&o
Florida, &o.

New

York..
Boston

Bait.,

...>

33,177
3,111
2",ib"6

3,257 36,431
3,111
i',516

6",616

930

0,163
1,346
16,994
...•*

..••

&o

Total
Total 1898-9

38,388

7,773 46,161

930 48,503

26,245

9,005 35,250

22 39,271

. .
.
.

. ..

August

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.J

Fall River Mill Dividends.—The

made by the

exhibit

Fall River mills for the third quarter of the year is quite
Thirty-three of the thirty-five corporations

satisfactory.

included in our statement have declared dividends duriDg
the quarter, the aggregate amount paid out being in excess
of the total for the corresponding period of last year, reaching $379,450, or an average of 1*81 per cent on the capital.
In 1899 thirty-one mills declared dividends in the third
quarter, the average rate of distribution being 1*49 hunIn 1898 the average dividend for the
dredths per cent.
third quarter was 0'55 per cent, in 1897 it was 0*48 cent, in
1896 it was 1'26 per cent, in 1895 it was 1*85 per cent and in
1894 reached 1*25 per cent.
Dividends 1900. Dividends 1899. Increase

third Quarter.
and

1900

Li " en Co
Mills
tJarnab> Manilla' t'K

$800,000

ArkwrigM

460,0-10
i'o...

Barnard Manufact'g
Border City Man'f'g Co.
Bourne Mills
Chace Mills
Conantcut Mills

Co...
.

Cornell Mills
Flint Mills
Granite Mills
Hargraves Mills
King Philip Mills
Laurel Lake Mills..
Mechanics' Mills

Osborn Mills
Parker Mill
Pocasset Manufact'g Co.
Richard Borden M'fg Co.
Robesnn Mills
Sagamore Mfg. Co
Seaconnet Mills
Mills
,

Stafford Mills

Stevens Manufactur'g Co
Mills

,

Troy Cot. & W. Mfg. Co..
Union Cotton M'f'gCo...,

Wampanoag Mills
Weetamoe Mills

$12,001
$12,000
1*
6,760 ..No dividend.
6,000
dividend.
1«
6,1*7
9,900
w3
2O.000
15,000
1*4
2
16,000
8,000
11,250
7,50(

400,000
No
2
495,000
•2
1,000,000
4
400,000
J*
750,000
2.40(i
i*
1,8
2
120,000
2
8,0"0
2
8,000
400,000
8,000
6,000
400,000
2
«4
8,' 00
11,600
580,000
2
1H
20,000
16,000
2
1,000,000
\Vi
12,000
12,000
800,000
1%
1H
15,000
1,000,000
15,000
1H
3.750
300,000
iv*
4,500
IH
l«
9.375
i*
11,260
750,000
..No dividend.
800,000
12,0
1*6
2.H80 ..No dividend.
1
288.000
a.ooo
2
400,000
8,000
1H
'£
600,000
12.000
9.000
1*
7,50i
800,000
IM
12,000
\x
600,000
9,000
9,000
ik
1H
-i
16,000
20,000
800,000
2^
117(
1,171
78.000
1H
1H
900,000
2
18,000
13,500
iS
9,000
600,000
9,000
1«
\U
8,25''
1
5 600
550,000
1H
247,500 ..No dividend. ..No dividend.
2O.0' '0
2
20,000
1,000,000
2
6.00c
2
2
350.000
7,000
10,000
7,500
500,000
2
6
18,000
5
15,000
300,000
2
15,000
l/iOO.OOO
24,000
ta
11,' 50
11,250
750,000
1*
1
550,000
8,250
5,500
1*

,

m

m

$20.P58.500

Totals.

vn

$379,460

1-49

$290,232

+ 8,000

and

1890.

+2,000
+2.900
+ 5,000

+750
+1,875

+ 12,000

American Linen Co
Arkwright Mills
Barnaby Manufact'g Co.
Barnard Manufact'g Co.
Border City Mauuf 'g Co
Bourne Mills
Chace Mills

$800,000
450,000
400,000
495,000
1,000.00'

5
3
3
6
6

$10/'00
13,500
12.000
29,700
60.000

4

9

bfl.0011

4

16,01 '0

33,750

4«
8H
5k

22,600
4.200
22,00
16,000

4
4

21',200

Cornell Mills

400,000
750,000
120,000
40O.0I0

Davol Mills

400,001

6

Flint Mills
Granite Mills
Hargraves Mills
King Philip Mills
Laurel Lake Mills
Mechanics' Mills

680,000

6
6

Conanicut

Mills

Merchants* Manuf *g Co.
Metacomet Manuf'g Co.
Narragansett Mills
Osborn Mills
Parker Mill
Pocasset Manuf'g Co
Richard Burden Mfg. Co..

Robeson Mills
Sagamore Manuf'g Co
Seaconnet Mills

Shove

Mills
Slade Mills
Stafford Mills

Stevens Manufactur'g Co.

Tecumseb Mills
Troy Cot. & W. Mfg. Co
Union Cotton Man'f 'g C
gCo

Wampanoag

Mills.

Weetamoe Mills..
Totals

...

1,000,000
800.000
1,000,000
300,000
730,000
800,000
288.000
400,000
600.000

S*
6

*bi

1*
4*
4*,
1

«

6H

7,200
24.000
24,000

84,800
60,000
36.000
45,000
1

3,500

33,750
86,100
v!,S8o

24,000
89,000
80,000
27,000

800.000
4H
600,000
4H
800.000
66.00.1
7
78,000
8,510
*X
900,000
7
63,000
600,000
33,000
5H
550,000 28
164.000
247,500 ..No dividend
1,000,000
60,000
350,000
6
21,000
500,000
30,001
6
300,000 +22
66,000
1,200.000 t23
249,000
750,000
41,250
6^
550,000
24,760
4k
$20,0 8.500 a7-01 $1.46P,590

oo
6,187

18,'

4*!

V*

40,000

4

40,000
36,00
45,000
6,760
96.250

4K
4k
2M
»k

.No dividend.
.No dividend.
3
3

12,000
18,000
21.250
24.00
36.(0

*a
4
4k
ik
3k

1,10

4

31,500
24.000

1

5,6'

No

6k
4
3
8-89

Including a special dividend of 25 per cent.
+ Including an extra, dividend of 6 per cent.
t Including an extra dividend nf 15 per cent.
a Exluding above extra dividends, the average dividend

Arkansas

91
86

.
.

90
89
79
74
78
70
64
81

78
78
76
74
82
96

i_

77
80

74
77
74
67
60
77
83
83

79
87
86
88
88

86
78
81

90
80

77

85

8i

90

80

8

••*

81
81

86
88
88
85
90
88
83
85
93
82
88

86
86
85

88
8*

78
79
93
82
8b
8r

87
86
84
86

89

76
.

89
91
89
89

96
90
96

93
87
90
K0
83
91
94
90
92
93
92
87
92
89

94

90
89
91
87
95
88
90
91
93
97

87
84

87

84
76

81

84
8"

89

83
77

835

81

80
93

82

80

90
86
85

80
85

82-5 75-8 76'0 85-7 87-8 84-0 89-0 91-2 41'2

75
84

88
78
91

87

81

9-

90
72

..

•a

1

90
98
94

94

Indian Ter..

Average
+2,000
+2,500
+8,000
+9,000
+2,750
+89,218

85

88
88

80
95
82
93

99
97
92
95
88
88
85
90
78
90
84
85
86
94

.

86-0 86-9

Tne August 1st averages in earlier years for all the States
were, according to the Agricultural Department, as follows:
80'1 in 1896; 77-9 in 1895; 91 8 in 1*94; 80-4 in 1893; 82 3 in
1892; 88'9inl891; 89-5 in 1890; 89-3 in 18»9; 873 in 1888;
93 3 in 1887; 81-3 in 1886, and 96'5 in 1885.

—

+13,600
—1.000

Government Weekly Cotton Report. Mr. W. L, Moore,
Chief of the Weather Bureau ot the Agricultural Department, made public on Tuesday the following telegraphic
reports on the crop in the Southern States for the week ending August 6:
North Carolina.— Crops making favorable progress toward
maturity; cotton weed small but heavily fruited; early bolls opening
in South.

Sodth Carolina.—Localities need
able; cotton beginning to

open

rain, otherwise weather favorin eastern counties; rust and shedding

increasing, but general condition more promising.
Georgia. Week g>- nerally hot and dry; most crops show marked
improvement; cotton below average.much complaint of rust, shedding
and premature opening; some picking done in few southern counties.
Florida.— Frequent rains in western and in portions of northern
and central districts unfavorable; cotton is shedding, suffering from
rust and opening prematurely; picking increasing on unland.
Alabama.—Warm, with scattered and generally insufficient showers;
rainfall somewhat excessive, however in extreme southern oounties;
ootton much improved; being laid by; fruitlug rapidly, eom i open.
Mississippi.— Too much rain fore part of week, but latter part
favorab.e; cotton improved; early fruiting well, late growing fast.
Louisiana.— Too much rain; oondition of cotton not good on hill
land, stalking and shedding on low land; grassy and yeliow; boll

—

+ 3,513
+20,000
+ 0,0(0 worms In many plaoes.showers
Texas.— Continued
+11,260
+3,000
+2,000

+ 8,000
+11.600
+20.000

+6,750
+7,500
'

36,00

+2.880
+12,000
+21.000
+14,750
+3,000

+ 20,000
+2. '40
+31,600
4-9,000

r 148,610

$718,257 +751,883

-

5 41 per cent.

following statement, showing the condition of cotton, was
issued by the Department of Agriculture August 10:
The monthly report of the Statistician of the Department of Agriculture shows the average condition of ootton on August 1 to have
Jjjen 76 as compared with 75*8 on July 1, 1900; 84 on August 1. 1899;
91-2 on August l, 1898, and 85*3, the mean of August averages of the
last ten years.
There was an improvement of condition during July, amounting to
nt ? in Texa8 a u<l Arkansas, 3 points In Georgia, 10 in Missouri
*£
} in Tennessee. On the other hand, there was a decline of »
,
points in North Carolina. 5 in South Carolina ana Indian
•Territory,
4 inMisBlsalppi, Louisiana and Florida, 3 in Ala,

71

Oklahoma

The Agricultural Department's August Report.— The

-

Alabama

+4,600

•

is

88
87
85
88

Florida

"1

«5

3>
**

1

1897.

1898.

1899.

'+2,760

+15,000
+6,000
+15,000
+30,000
«l,2f>0 +207,750
8",000 +11,250
16.600
+8,250

3

94
86
85
89

Virginia
No. Carolina
8o. Carolina

Tennessee.
Missouri

46,000
15,000
15,000
36,000

12

were as

Mississippi

Stales.

•t-V.OOO

dividend.

4k

6

1

Alabama

1900.

Mississippi.

+3,(00
+4,600

Augu3t

67 Tennessee
77
60 Missouri
84
17 Oklahoma
80
Louisiana
83 Indian Territory.. 81
Texas
Arkansas
83
Florida
The June, July and August averages, compared with the
June, July and August figures of previous years, are as
follows:

77
80
74
77
74

Virginia

North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia

Louisiana.

$84,000 +$l«,000

3

of the different States on

follows:

-1-2,000

Amount. Decrease

.No dividend.

figures.

The averages

+2,HhO

vr

C.

acreage

I

Dividends 1909. Dividends 1899. Increase

Amount. P.

There has been some abandonment of land planted to ootton, but
the area abandoned is somewhat less than was generally expected
one month ago, and the Department will not at present change Its

i

Capital.

P. C.

averages.

-t-eoo

Combining the foregoing results with those for the halfyear (published in the Chronicle May 19, page 971) we
have the following exhibit for the nine months. It is seen
that on a capitalization of $20,958,500 the mills have paid
out in dividends $1,469,590 in the nine months of the present
year, or an average of 7*01 per cent, against $718,257, or 3'89
per cent in the like period of 1899. In 1898 the average
dividend was 1*33 per cent, in 1897 it was 2 37 per cent and
in 1896 reached 4 80 per cent.

1900

below suoh average. Arkansas being 2, North Carolina 7, Louisiana 8,
Tennessee 10, Georgia II, South Carolina and Virginia VI, Florida 15,
Alabama 21 and Mississippi 26 points below their respective ten year

+3,750

*60 per cent dividend in bonds in addition.
+ Stock dividend of 6'i per cent and 16 per cent In cash additional.
a On capital of $19,608,500.

Nine Months.

baina, 2 in Oklahoma and 13 in Virginia. The impairment of
co ditions is due in the main to drought and the continued
lack of proper cultivation, but there are extensive sections where
heavy and continuous rains have wrought serious injury to the growing crop. While the oondltlon in Texas Is now 2 points above the
State's ten-year average, every other State still reports a condition

+6,750
—1,000
+3,713
+5.000

m

Merchants' Manufac'g Co.
Metacomet Man'f g Co.
Narragansett Mills

Slade Mills

1*
1«

Amount. Decreast

C.

m

Davol Mills

Tecumseh

Amount. P.

P. C.

American

Shove

or

Capital.

1899.

299

unfavorable for farming operations;
cotton generally two to three weeks late, promising in some localities,
especially in north portion; too rank growth and not fruiting well in
many seotions; some shedding; few complaints of boll w rm and Mexican weevil damaging crop in south portion.
Arkansas —Light local showers generally, heavy in few localities;
cotton, where cultivated, fruiting uiceiy and promises good yield;

shedding in

localities.

Tennessee.— Warm, dry weather favored growing and maturing
crops and farm work; well cultivated cotton developing well.
Missodri — Cotton doing well.
Oklahoma and Indian Territories.— Hot and dry; cotton in fine
condition and boiling well; webb and boll worms appearing.
These reports on cotton are summarized by the Department as follows:
Over the northern portion of the central and western distriots of the
ootton belt the oondition of oo ton has improved, and while an improvement is reported from the ijarolinas, the general condition of
the crop in Georgia, Florida and Louisiana is less promising, complaints of rust, shedding and premature opening being numerous.
In Texas the crop is from two to three weeks late, its condition in the
northern portion beiug promising, while complaints of rank growth,
shedding and ravages ot insects are received from the southern part
of the State.

—

New Alabama Cotton. The first bale of new Alabama
cotton was received at Selma on Friday, August 10. Last
year the first bale reached Selma August 2, or eight
days earlier; in 1898 the earliest arrival was on August 6,
and in 1897 on July 31, and in 1896 on July 26, all at Mobile,
la 1895 the first arrival was at Mobile on August 14. In
1894 Selma received the first bale on August 10, and in 1893
the first arrival was at Ozark on August 2.

—

Charleston's Fibst Bale. The first bale of new cotton
raised in South Carolina reached Charleston on Wednesday,
August 8, or one day later than in 1899. It graded fully
middling and came from Fairfax, Barnwell Co. In 1899 the
earliest arrival at Charleston was on August 7, in 1898 on
August 10, in 1897 on August 3, in 1896 on July 30 and in
1895 on August 31.

—

.

.

—

.

THK CHRONICLE.

300

New England Mill Situation.— Curtailment of Production —Fifteen corporations in Fall River are idle this
week under the curtailment agreement. The Pepperell, La
conia and York Mills, at Biddeford, Me., employing 5,000
hands, will close down August 18 and not resume until September 4. Mills in Rhode Island and in Massachusetts, other
than those at Fall River, are beginning to reduce production,
and it is reported that textile manufacturers generally
throughout New England will curtail during August and
September.

—

Jute Butts. Bagging, &c. The demand for jute bagging
has been decidedly moderate the past week at 7%c. for \%
lbs. and 8c. for 2 lbs., standard grades.
Car-load lots of
standard brands are quoted at 8@8^c, f. o. b., according to
quality.
Jute butts dull and nominal at l%c. for paper

new crop.
The Following are the Gross Receipts of Cotton.

quality and 2%c. for bagging quality,

New York.

PHILADELPHIA. BALTIMORE.

Boston.

Receipts

from—

Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.
A comparison of the port movement by weeks is not
accurate, as the weeks in the different years do not end on
the same day of the month. We have consequently added to
our other standing tables a daily and monthly statement,
that the reader may constantly have before him the data for

—

seeing the exact relative movement for the years named.
The monthly movements since Sept. 1, 1899, and in previous
years, have been as follows:
Monthly

Hear Beginning September

Receipts

[Vol. LKXL,

1898

1899.

1897.

Total.. 6,527,284 8,387,899 8,602,795 6,677,866 5.210,938 7,865,138
F'o't'ge of tot. port

9909

9915

97-97

96-59

99-78

1.

N.Orleans...

2.641

100
1,672

157,429
166,700

428

Since

This
week.

Since
Sept.l.

This
week.

Sept. 1.

This
week.

Since
Sept. 1.

314,357

Texas
Savann'h Ac
Mobile ..

1S.966

1

41

99,707

No. Carolina

251

64,594

14

163,425

76,037

10,804

So. Carolina

8,434

Florida...

499

15,990

661
2.148
711
145

98.5C5
126,113

517

13,959

8,439

188,046

11S.810
60.745

131

49,038

704

101,589

33,432

856.816

4.164

673,244

648

62,997

9,167

315,672

3,030 1,021,861

Virginia
North, ports
Tenn., Ac.

1.236

901.676

83

60,822

2,642

869,680

27,311
3,772

336

6,370

1894.

Sept'ber 800,866 697,784 786,702 912,486 383,886 518,762
Ootober. 1,131,065 1,735,660 1,424,907 1,468,516 1,202,460 1,622,664
Nov'ber. 1,091,662 1,861.619 1.776,907 1,286,251 912,759 1,607,662
Deo'ber.
919,290 1,565,770 1,534,948 1,256,000 987,899 1,497,560
January 759,021 929,538 1,114,873 635,878 548,118 938,197
Feb'ary. 769,637 435,561 737,080 404,976 441,776 533,398
March... 499,933 426,430 567,622 335,020 321,313 532,254
April
236,751 294,568 294,755 189,269 211,308 372,770
139,393 230,180 172,245 141.387 124,076 158,135
Jane....
65,051
61,441
136,476
97,845
30,603
54,434
July....
114,615
74,313
22,295
44,911
17,480
22,909

receipts July 31.

Since
Sept.

80.136

Foreign...

1.

1895.

1896.

This
week.

Last

year....

Shipping

News.— As shown on

a previous page, the
exports of cotton from the United States the past week have
reached 33,286 bales. The shipments in detail, as made up
from mail and telegraphic returns, are as follows:
TotcU baitt.

Niw York—To

Liverpool, per steamers

Bo vie, 2,069

Col-

umbian. 633

2,702

To Hull, per steamer Ohio, 163
To London, per steamer Europe, 12
To Bremen, per steamer Grosser Kurfurst, 1,885
To Hamburg, per steamer Patricia, 143
To Antwerp, per steamer British Trader, 60
California, 455
To Genoa, per steamers Archimede, 301

163
12
1,885
143
60

Werra, 512
Tartar Prince, 487
Liverpool—Aug. 4— Steamer Floridlan,
3,475. ...Aug. 8— Steamer Dictator. 4,500
To Hamburg- Aug. 4— Steamer Galicia, 65
To Antwerp— Aug. 4-Steamer Afrika, 300
To Barcelona— Aug. 6— Steamer Miguel M. Pinillos, 2.104.
Galveston—To Liverpool— Aug. 6—Steamer Bernard. 234
Aug. 9— Steamer Irada,
Aug. 7— Steamer Serra, 353

1,755

New Orleans—To

7,975
65

300
2,104

This statement shows that up to July 31 the receipts
at the ports this year were 1,860,615 bales less than in
1898-99 and 2,075,511 bales less than in 1897-98. By adding
1.485
To Hamburg— Aug. 9— Steamer Huntcliff, 143
to the totals to July 31 the daily receipts since that time we
Savannah—To Bremen—Aug. 4— Steamer Silverdale, 4.559...
shall be able to reach an exact comparison of the movement
To Hamburg— Aug. 4— Steamer Laura, 1,818
for the different years.
Newport News—To Liverpool—Aug. 2—Steamer

2,072

143
4,559
1,818

1,407

1,407

1899-'00.

1898-99.

1897-98. 1896-97.

1895-96.

1894-95.

July 31.. 6,527,284 8,387,899 8,602,795 6,877,866 5,210,938 7,865,138
Aug. 1
693
554
1,305
8.
1,305
73
" 2...
1.373
338
1,679
8.
306
479
" 3...
3,151
474
1,339
1,323
190
579
" 4...
512
175
2,057
1,486
554
8.
8.
O.
451
678
6,871
682
408
" 6...
511
8.
287
5,736
262
207
««
7...
183
342
8.
1,656
1,548
112
" 8...
148
8.
584
690
1,220
254
" 9...
829
857
770
1,175
8.
9ee
" 10...
785
2,301
1,006
1,842
145
1,785
. .

• •

Total.. 6,537,016 8,390,940 8,617,991 6,688,367 5,218,873 7.867,972
P'o't'geo f tot. port
98-12
96-73
receipt 9 Aug. 10.
99 33
9919
99 83

Norfolk—To Hamburg -Aug. 8— Steamer Matilda, 275
Boston—To Liverpool—Aug. 3— Steamers Ivernia, 4,150;
Wlnifredian, 1.046. ...Aug. 4— Steamer Michigan, 652. ...

275
5,848

.............
„ 33,286
of the foregoing shipments, arranged in
oar usual form, are as follows.
Great Frenen Qer- <—Oth.Wropt—* Mexico,

Total..................™

The particulars
Brit'n.

New York.

I

N. Orleans.
Galveston.

Savannah..

60 1,755
300 2,104

die.

Japan.

Total.

.....
.....

6,37/

1,407
5,848

20.179

......

......
......

6,720
10,444
2,215
6.377
L75

....a

65
143

.....

275

—

Total....

many. North. South.
2.028

......

Norfolk...
N'p't News

Boston

porta,

2,877
7,975
2,072

.....a

1,407
0,0*0

360 3,859

8.888

33,286

To Japan since Sept. 1 shipments have been 18,076 bales
from New York, 5,050 bales from Baltimore, 43,240 bales
from Galveston, 35,359 bales from New Orleans, 9,650 bales
This statement shows that the receipts since Sept. 1 up to from Pensacola, 14,352 bales from Savannah and 172,002
to-night are now 1,859,924 bales less than they were to the bales from Pacific Coast. To Cnina, 8,132 bales from New
same day of the month in 1899 and 2,080,975 bales smaller than York, &c.
they were to the same day of the month in 1898. We add to
Cotton freights at New York the past week have been
the table the percentages of total port receipts which had as follows.
been received to Aug. 10 in each of the years named.
Satnr.

The Exports of Cotton from New York

this week show
the total reaching

a decrease compared with last week,
6,720 bales, against 15,963 bales last week. Below we give
our usual table, showing the exports of cotton from New York,
and the direction, for each of the last four weeks; also the
total exports and direction since Sept. 1, 1899, and in the last
column the total for the same period of the previous year.
EXPORTS OP COTTON (BALES) FROM NEW YORK SINCE SEPT. 1, 1899.

Week EndingExported to—

July

Avg.

20.

Liverpool

July
27.

3.

Aug.
10

Total
aince
Sept. 1.

Same
period
previou$
year.

Liverpool
Havre, asked
Bremen, Sept

Hamburg

c.

c.
c.

.c.

Amsterdam

c.

Rotterdam
e.
Beval, v.Br-Hame.

Do
Do

2,702

850

175

159,215
62,254

226,021
84,572

Tot. to gt. Brit'n

9,739

5,532 12,196

2,877

221,469

310,593

465

36,147
1,249

30,511
2,261

465

37,396

122,297
20,827
46,312

25
30

25
35
40
35
33
33

25
35
40
35
33
33
40

S2ifl

30
33
33
40

40

Wednet. Thura.

25
35
40
35
33
35
40

25
35
40
35
33
35
40

25
35
40
35
33
35
40

v. St. Pet.c.

Genoa

c.

Trieste, asked... e.
c.

38940 38940 38940

38

38

38

31035

31035

31935

40
30

40
30

40
30

35
45
30

35
45
30

35
45
30

32,772

115,478
23,05^
35,543

lues.

v. Hull... e.

Antwerp

7,393
2,346

5,335 11,346

Otber British ports.

Mon.

Havre
Other French

197

ports.

Total French

—

Bremen

3,079

Hamburg...
Other ports.
TOT.TONO.EtJROPh
Spain, Italy, &o.

2,942

714
19

350

436

2,578

l,88r

'"524

143
60

3,102

2,088

174.07S

189,436

1,376

471

200

1,755

89,621

22,070

102,612
3,180

Total.... 14.927

—

200

1,756

111,691

105,792

9,731 15.963

6,720

544,635

638,593

week

July 27.

Aug. 3

Aug.

10.

20,000
1,000

19,000
2,000

19,000
1,000

17,000
1,100

17,000
5,000
48,000
334,000
242,000
20,000
17,000
39,000
29.000

16",000

15",006

5,000
38,000
318,000
227,000
•27,000
15,000
...
46,000
Amount afloat
40,000
Of whioh American
Including 3,987 bales Amerioan from Japan.

3,000
39,000
304,000
215,000
28,000
24,000
53,000
47,000

15,000
3,000
27,000
315,000
221.000
42,000
31,000
59,000
50,000

Sales of the

3,728

Allother

Grand

.

July 20.

3,812

~471
Total Spain, &o.. ^L376

36Lj
36ifl
S6i*
Ghent, v. Antw'p c.
36*9
86)«
36»s
Quotations are cents per 100 lbs. or fractions of a penny per lb.
Liverpool. By cable from Liverpool we have the follow s
ing statement of the week's sales, stocks, &c. at that port.

bales.

Of which exporters took...
Of whloh speculators took.
Sales Amerioan
Aotual export
Forwarded
Total stock— Estimated
Of whloh Amerioan— Est'd.
Total import of the week
Of whloh Amerioan

1

August

:

,

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900. J

301

The tone of the Liverpool market for spots and futures the verge of deterioration, but avertible by prompt rains ^
eaoh day of the week ending Aug. 10 and the dally closing Tne less favorable crop prospects have stimulated buying
there being a fairly extensive demand to cover short sales
prloes of spot ootton, have been as follows.
and there also have been some purchases for investment acMonday. Tuesday. Wed'day. Thursd'y Friday

Sat'day.

Spot.

Market,

Quiet.

)

1:45 P. u.\
•

Mid. Upl'da.

4,000

500

4,000

B

200

3,000

NKW

a
I

f.

51*32

6,000

o
Si

Futures.

1:45

5«8

5*16

Very
little

doing.

I

Bpeo. Aexp.

Market,

Harden'g
tendency. Harden'g.

P

g

i

«1

Barely
Steady at Irreg. at Steady at
2-64 ad6-64 ad1-64 desteady at
vance.
3-64 dee.
vance.
cline.

<

l

m.J
l

Market,

l

4 P. M.

Barely

Quiet but

1

steady.

1

Steady.

steady.

Stead;.

Theprloesof futures at Liverpool for eaoh day are given
below. Prloes are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling
clause, unless otherwise stated.
tW The prices are given in pence and 64,ths. Thus : 4 63 means
4 63-644.. and 5 01 meant 5 l-64d.

Mon.

Tuei.

Aug.

Sat.
Aug. 4.

Aug.

6.

7.

*

1:45 4
P.M. P.M.

t

•

f

Jnly

d.

July- Aug....

H
1
9
s

Aug. -Sept...
Sept-Oct....
Oct -Nov....

Nov. -Deo
Dee. -J an

...

d.

5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

fl

o

p.

&

J an. -Feb....

Feb.-Mch...

Moh. -April..

49
39
34
32
30
28
27
26

4 50
4 40
4 35
4 32
4 30
4 29
4 27
4 26

4
4
4
4

4
4
4
4

53
43
37
34
32
31
30
29

4 54
43
38
35
33
32
31

4
4
4
4
4
4
4

4 50
4 40
4 34
4 31
4 29
4 28
4 27
30 4 26

4 51

4 40

4 35
4 32

4
4
4
4

30
29
28
27

April-May..

May-June...

The demand

wheat flour has continued of very moderThere has been no general demand from

trade, as buyers, despite a stronger turn to values

have shown little if any disposition to purchase in advance of requirements. Mills have held for
slightly higher prices for lines, and this too has held Dusiness
in check, as the trade has refused to purchase supplies of
importance on a higher basis of values. The export business
has been quiet, shippers' limits being too low to interest
sellers.
Rye flour has been quiet, bat prices have held
about steady. Corn meal has weakened slightly in price,
but business has not improved.
Speculation in wheat for future delivery has been moderately active and the trend of prices has been towards a higher
basis. The principal new development has been an expanding export demand, a fairly large business being transacted
with shippers the past week. A considerable percentage of
the purchases has been of spring wheat and for Liverpool
account, indicating that English merchants at least were beginning to take a more apprehensive view of the reduced
yield of the spring-wheat crop. Millers also have been
reported as good buyers in the interior of
the new
crop of winter wheat. Foreign markets have been stronger
and less favorable weather conditions have been reported from Europe.
The movement of the winterwheat crop has continued free. Harvesting returns from the
Northwest are confirming the reports of the short yield of
the spring-wheat crop.
Advices also have been received
from the Pacific Coast reducing estimates of the yield of the
crop in that section. The spot market has been "active and
firmer.
Large sales have been reported made of wheat for
export both at the seaboard and in the interior.
To-day
there w as a quiet market, awaiting the Bureau report. It
proved to be rather poorer than expected, and on tne curb
for the grain,

made a

fractional

advance.

Business in the spot

market continued active, sales for export here and at out
ports amounting to 600,000 bushels.
DAILY CLOSING PBICBS OF NO. 2 BED WHITES IN
YORK.

NEW

Sat.

Cash wheat

1.

o.

b

Sept. delivery in elev
Deo. delivery In elev
Maroh.dellvery in elev

81»s

80 *8
8

7

8

Mon.
82
8OI3
82ia
85ia

Tues.

82^8
81*8
8314
86*4

Wed.
82is
805a
82 »8
855s

Thurs.

Fri.

82%

82»8
81i8

xlis
83i8
85ia

DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF NO. 2 SPRING IN CHICAGO.
Sat.
Mon.
Tues.
Wed. Thurs.

Aug. delivery in elev

Sept. delivery in elev....
Oot. delivery in elev

75
75 34

74!a
75ia

75ia
76i4

7414

7534

76i4

83

85%
Fri
75ia

7538
76
76 78
77
77
76%
Indian corn futures have been more active and firmer, the
principal bull factor being reports from the corn-belt, particularly Kansas and Nebraska, saying that the crop was
suffering from want of rains; in fact on Thursday a wellknown authority reported that a large area of corn was on

76 14

37!e

37%>

40%

42 hi

CHICAGO.

Wed.

Thurs.

Fri.

37*8

38 7s

39^

37%

38»8

39>«

38

39

37i«

NEW TORE.

DAILY CLOSING PBICBS OF OATS IN
SaL
Mon. Tues.
26
26
25^
NO. 2 mixed In elev
28
29
283s
No. 2 white In elev
DAILY CLOSING PBICBS OF NO. 2 MIXED OATS
Sat.
Mon. Tues.
21^8
August delivery In elev. 20'e
215a
22
21%
21%
Sept. delivery In elev...

10, 1900.

for

ate proportions.

prices

36*

IN

21L,

21%

22*4

Wed.

26
29

Thurs.

Fri.

26

26^

29*4
30
IN CHICAGO.
Wed. Thurs. Fri.
21^3
22
21&8
22i8
2238
21%
22is
22
22%

Rye has had a slightly better sale and at firmer prices.
Barley has been firm and sparingly offered.
Following are the closing quotations:

Friday, Aug.

home

—

Oot.dellvery in elev

BREADSTUFFS.
the

Oot. delivery In elev

40i*

Oats for future delivery at the Western market have been
firmer, but there has been only a limited amount of activity
to the trading. There has been some buying by the country
and country acceptances have been light; still the crop moveWed. Thnri. Frl.
full.
Sympathy with the advance in
Aug. 8. Aug. 9. Aug. 10. ment has been fairly
other grains also has had a bullish influence. Locally, the
1:45 4 1:45 4 1:45 4
spot market has been firmer, particularly for white oats,
P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. P.M.
and a moderate volume of business has been transacted for
export. To-day the market was firmer with other grains.
d.
d.
d.
d.
d.
d.
5 20 5 20 5 25 5 26 5 22 5 22 The spot market was moderately active and firmer; sales for
5 04 5 04 5 08 5 08 5 05 5 05 export were 120,000 bushels.

11 5 10
62 4 58
44 4 41 4
34 4 32 4
29 4 27 4
26 4 24 4
24 4 22 4
23 4 21 4
4 22 4 20 4
4 21 419 4

•

—

41
40%
413s
delivery in elev
DAILY CLOSING PBIOHB OF HO. 2 MIXED CORN
Mon. Tues.
Sat.
38*8
38
August delivery In elev.. 37
37%
38^
37
Sept. delivery in elev

May

J

1

Foreign advices have been stronger and this, too, has
helped the market. The spot market has been firmer and a
To-day
fairly large business has been transacted for export.
market was higher on an unfavorable report from Kanthe
The Bureau report was, if anything, slightly better
sas.
than expected. The spot market was quiet. The sales for
export were 80,000 bushels, all at outports.
YORK.
DAILY CLOSING PRICES OF NO. 2 MIXED OOBH IN
Wed. Thurs.
Fri.
Tues.
Mon.
Sat.
46%
44°8
45^8
44%
44
45*a
Gash corn t. 0. b
44?8
4418
43*8
4314
43 78
43
Hept. delivery In elev
42i*
41
40*8
40
39 7s
4«5a
Deo. delivery In elev

count.

Fine
Superfine
Extra, No. 2
Extra, No. 1
Clears
Straights
Patent, spring
(Wheat'flour In

FLOUB.
Patent, winter.... $4 00 ®4
$2 40 ©2 55
City mills, patent.. 4 50 ®4
2 50 ®2 70
Ryeflour,superflne 3 00 ®3
2 70 ®2 75
Buckwheat flour
2 50 ®2 90
Corn meal2 90 ®3 50
2 45 ®2
Western, etc
3 65 ®3 90
2 50 ®2
Brandywlne
Brandywine
4 10 ®4 75
sacks sells at prloes below those for barrels.)

GRAIN.
Corn, per bush.—
o.
0.
Wheat, per busn.—
Western mixed.
Hard Duluth, No.l 85 flue's
No. 2 mixed
N'thern Dul., No.l 83^8 ®85
Western yellow
Bed winter, No. 2. S0%'3>S258
Western white
N'thern N.Y. No.l. 81%®83i8
Bye, per bushOats— Mlx'd, p. bush. 2534 a>28ia
Western
29 1t>35
White
26%3>27ia
State and Jersey
No. 2 mixed
29*2®31
Barley—Western
No. 2 white
Feeding

0.

10
70
60

50
60

0.

44 ®46ia
44»a«46ia
45*8^47
465894813

51^*56
52 ®57
51

®53

39!a®47

—

Government Weekly Grain Report. Mr. James Berry,
Chief of the Climate and Crop Division of the U. S. Weather
Bureau, made public on Tuesday the telegraphic reports on
the grain crops in the various States for the week ending
August 6, as follows
Weather.—The week has been very hot in the States of the Missouri and Upper Mississippi valleys, and while there was a general
:

lack of rainfall over a large part of the country east of the Rooky
Mountains, excessively heavy rains fell in portions of the Gulf States
and over portions of the Central Missouri and Red River of the North
valleys. Rain is very generally needed in the Central Mississippi and
Lower Missouri valleys and in the Atlantic Coast States from the
Carolinas northward.
Corn —Corn, more particularly the late-planted in the States of the
Central Mississippi and Missouri vallej s, would be greatly benefited
by rain, but the early- planted In these sections is generally beyond
serions injury from drought. In the lake region and Ohio Valley and
generally in the Atlantic Coast distriots, the crop has made good
progress, but is beginning to need rain in the Middle Atlantic States.
Winter Wheat.—The general absence of rain has been very favorable to threshing winter wheat, which is nearing completion in nearly
all distriots.

Spring Wheat.— Spring-wheat harvest is nearly finished over the
southern portion of the spring-wheat region, where some threshing
has been done, and is well advanced In the northern portion. Portions
of the Dakotas and Minnesota received very heavy rains during the
past week. In South Dakota late spring wheat experienced very trying temperature conditions and a larger part of the crop is being out
for fodder than was anticipated.
Oats.—The week has been favorable for completion of the oat harvest and threshing, the reports indicating good yields generally,
especially in the States of the Ohio Valley.
Tobacco.—The tobaooo crop has made favorable advancement, and
its condition is generally promising, althoagh needing rain in Virginia. Some cutting has been done in Ohio, and cutting will soon
begin in Indiana.
Apples.— The persistent dropping of apples has materially reduced
the prospects in many important apple States in the central valleys,
although the outlook in Iowa is somewhat improved. The reports
continue very favorable, however, from New York and Pennsylvania,
and a good crop is promised in Minnesota.
Plowing.— Plowing for fall seeding has made very favorable progress, except in Missouri, where the ground is too dry.

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT'S REPORT OF CEREAL CROPS,
Agricultural Department issued on the
10th inst. its reports on the cereal crops for the month of

&c, August 1.— The

July as follows
The average condition of corn declined 2 points during July and on
Aug. 1 was 2*4 points lower than at corresponding date last year, but
0-5 points higher than on Aug. 1, 1898, and 13 above the mean of the

.

THE CHRONICLE.

302

August average for last 10 years. Condition in prinoipal States are
as follows Ohio and Indiana, 98 Illinois, 96: Iowa, 105 Missouri,
99; Kansas, 71; Nebraska, 8^. During July there was an improvement of 8 points in Ohio, 9 in Indiana, 4 in Illinois and 3 in Iowa,. On
the other hand, there was a decline of 2 points in Missouri, 8 in Nebraska and i 2 in Kansas.
Condition of spring wheat improved 12 points during July, but on
Aug. l it was 27 -2 lower than at the same time last year, 40 1 points
lower than Aug. 1 1898. and 27 8 below the mean of the August averages for the past 10 years. Conditions in principal States: Minn 58;
N. Dak.. 25: So Dak.. 4«; Neb., 64; Iowa, 91. During July there was
an improvement of 10 points in Minn., 5 in So. Dak. and l in la. On
the other hand there was a deodne of 5 points in No. Dak. and 2
;

;

:

.

,

cloakings business has been quiet without material change in
For dress goods of any description the call has been
light and tone of market easy. Flannels and blankets dull

and unchanged.
Domestic Cotton Goods.—The exports of cotton goods
from this port for the week ending Aug. 6 were 4,980
packages, valued at $172,871, their destination being to the
points specified in the tables below
:

m

Average condition of oats declined 5 points. During July and Aug.
1 it was 5"8 points lower than at the same date last year, but 8 points
higher than August 1, 1898, and 2-7 above the mean of past ten
years. Conditions in principal States are: New York. 83; Pennsylvania, 82; Ohio. 9^; Michigan. 101; Indiana. 94; Illinois, 97; Wisconsin. 77; Minnesota, 57; Iowa. 90; Missouri, 1^0; Kansas, 87, and
Nebraska, 78. During July there was an improvement of 2 points in
Ohio and Michigan, 9 points in Wisconsin and 8 in Minnesota and 1
in Illinois. Tbere was a decline of 3 points in Pennsylvania 5 In Indiana and Kansas. 1 in Iowa and 12 in Nebraska, while New York
and Missouri report no change. Proportion of the oats crop of last
ten years still in hands of farmers estimated at 68 per cent as compared with 6-9 of the crop of 898 in farmers' hands one year ana 6 *4
per cent of the crop of 1897 in farmers' hands two years ago.
i

The condition

of corn

the last three years

on July

1

and August

New York

shown in the following:
CONDITION OF CORN.
1898.

1899.

1896.

1897.

States.

$

3

. .

86
31
85
92

94
99
90
95
91

.

...

90

.

Av'geU.S

87-*;

3

91
82
S8
106

96
105
99
Missouri..
71
Kansas
98
Indiana
85
Nebraska.
98
Ohio
Mlohigan
98
98
Wisconsin
Minnes'ta 94
76
Texas ..
79
Tennessee
Kentucky 92
90
Pennsylv.

Iowa.

a>

5*

55!

98
87
76
73
93

895

89-9

93
85
89
85
84
84
83
80
85
8fi'5

82
75
92
90
83
82

72
92
86
69
86
85
89
83
96
102
104
98
97
82

83
100
78
83
94

96
95
89

93
78
87
70
92
84
85
85
90
77
83
90
92
82

87-0

90-5

84-2

90
90
94
99
95
103

?

s

as

76
80
80
70
101

90
87
74

106
103
85
109
103
108
105
96
101
95
38
96
102
104

829 P60

88
94
81
102
101
103
106
100
102
95
39
90
97
98

of the various crops on Aug. 1 is given below.
1897.
1896. 1895. 1894.
1899.
1898.
1900.
84-2
69-1
87-5
870
960 102-5
89 9
Corn
86-7
78'9
95-9
67-1
836
965
Spring wheat.... 56-4
84*0
79-8
93-7
76-0
898
880
89
Spring rye
77-3
76-5
842
860
845
908
850
Oats
82>9
87-2
93-3
71-6
793
875
698
Barley
77-9
94-8
87-7
93'0
83-9
88-2
74
Potatoes
91-2
80*1
84-0
869
91.6
77.9
760
Cotton
94-9
85'2
93-2
87-2
82.3
87-9
960
Buckwheat

For other tables usually given here see

paste

Week. Since Jan.

25

Since Jan.

fieek.

1,

14
21
253
10
To*5

239

1,375
1,191
138,450
8,407
23,259
2 641
16,887
1.9H8
7,587
27,472
5,616

269
525
93

2,980

234,873

1,628

267,068

,

Africa
West Indies

2

,

1,203

Mexico

1.

159,691
1,656
29.880
10,672
19,434
2,710
6,850
28,911
5,288

6

,

27
400

,

Central America.

South America..
Other Countries.

1,078

Total.

1,329

647

330
8

The value of the New York exports for the year to date has
been $10,060 646 in 1900, against |9,544.588 in 1899.
The reduction in prices of wide sheetings noted last week
has resulted in a fair volume of business being done, and at
the close available supplies are in limited compass.
For
bleached muslins the demand has been of an ordinary character, a fair number of orders coming to hand, but few calling for good round quantities. Prices are steady in all
grades. Brown cottons in heavy sheetings and drills are the
weakest feature of the market. The business doing is limited, and there is considerable irregularity in prices with a
downward tendency. Ducks and brown Osnaburgs are inactive and easy. For cotton flannels and blankets only a
limited call is noted, with no material chaDge in Drices.
Business in denims and ticks is on a restricted scale and
prices favor

272.

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.
New

Yobk. Friday, P. M., August 10, 1900.
The market shows a quiet but steady improvement in the
demand in some departments. There is no free individual
buying, and from the character of the orders coming forward
evident that absolute needs are increasing in a number
of directions and that stocks in second hands, which at the
opening of the season were heavier than usual, are being
worked down very materially. Developments iu the cotton
industry point to a curtailment of production on the part of
heavy- goods mills. Several of the largest Eastern mills have
announced that they will shortly stmt down for varying
periods, and private advices from the South show that in a
number of mills part of the machinery is already idle and
that several are on the point of closing down altogether for
the time being. The suspension of business with China is
the chief cause of this, but there are soma mills without an
export trade which are running out of cotton, and cannot
come into the market for raw material at present prices and
make a profit on their output. Fall River mills are still carrying out tbe arrangement to cut down production previously
reported. The woolen goods division of the market is not
satisfactory. The business doing does not come up to ex-

In other coarse

colored cottons the

fancies selling better at steady prices. Fine printed fabrics
are quiet. In ginghams an average amount of business has
been done and prices are steady. Regular print cloths have
sold to a small extent at 2%c. and tue market is firm for both
these and odd goods.

Foreign Dry Goods.— More business than of
been reported in plain dress goods

has

late

Fancies continue

dull.

Silks are selling indifferently and prices irregular.
Ribbons
Linens quietly steady. Burlaps firm with small supplies available.

slow.

Importations and Warehouse Withdrawals of Dry Goods
The importations and warehouse withdrawals of dry goods
at this port for the week ending Aug. 9, 1900, and since
January 1, 1900, and for the corresponding periods of last
year are as follows:

H
2sp5g.o

C"
B 5b &
- O;
£•
5 g: o>
2
O M
g

.

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•

*

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«f

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•

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.

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•

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till

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pectations and prices are irregular.
Woolen Goods Although there has been more business
reported this week than last, the general demand for new
light weights has been moderate and below expectations.
Staple lints have been the most disappointing. Bayers have evidently not yet made up their minds that the new-season prices
are stable and are awaiting further developments. There
have been some reductions openly made in serges from the
opening prices, and in other directions rebates are being
quietly conceded. Fancy worsteds in medium and fine
grades have fared comparatively well. One important concern is said to have sold the bulk of its season's production of
these. There has been no new feature of moment in the
re-order business in heavy- weignt woolens and worsteds. The
demand is moderate throughout and readily met at irregular
prices where there are stocks on hand. In overcoatings and

buyers.

market is slow and irregular. Business in prints has been
more enoouraging than for some time past, both staples and

•

—

6.

Great Britain....,
Other European.
China
India
Arabia

92-4

The condition

1

1899.

1900.

to Aug.

in each of

1

is

1900.

[Vol. LXXl,

prices.

Neb.

Illinois

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—

——
—
:

Auotst

—

—

:

—

—

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

Stats *nb

City

Jbtfmm&m.

Lexlngton Township 6% bonds Nos. 72 to
tion $l>

8,

Lexington Township

ti%

bond No.

81,

75,

dated Oct.

dated Aug.

3,

5,

1885.

1885.

Denomina-

Denomination

$l,i oo.

Sni-a-Bar Town-hip 6% bond No. 7, dated July 3, l^O". Denomination J1.CC0.
Washington Township 6% bonds Nos. 33 to So, dated Aug. 3, 1«80. Denomination * 1,000.

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
The Investors' Supplement

303

be furnished without
extra charge to every annual subscriber of the Commercial
and Financial Chronicle.
The State and City Supplement will also be furnished
without extra charge to every subscriber of the Chronicle.
-will

Interest ceased on

August

1

on the following

Lexington Township 6% bonds Nos. 82 to
1

ex ingto'n

Township 6* bonds Nos,

120,

1.

1885.

Denomlna-

Aug.

1,

1890.

Denomlna-

to 13, dated

1

:

dated July

Multuomah County, Oregon.— Warrant Call— Ralph W.
Hoyt, County Treasurer, has called for payment county warThe Street Railway Supplement will likewise be fur- rants, drawn upon the general fund that were presented
nished without extra charge to every subscriber of the and indorsed "Not paid for want of funds" from May 6,
Chronicle.

both dates ir elusive. Interest ceased
Interest also ceased July 26 on warrants,
Class " C," presented from Sept. 14, 1899, to Dec. 7, 1899.
1899, to

The Quotation Supplement, issued monthly, will

also be
furnished without extra charge to every subscriber of the

July

16,

June

10, 1899,

1900.

Chronicle.

TERMS for the Chronicle with the four Supplements
above named are Ten Dollars per year within the United
States and Thirteen Dollars in Europe, which in both cases
of Advertising— (Per Inch Space.)
matter (eachtime)$4 20 Three Months (1 3 times). .$29 OO
Transient
Six Months
(26times).. 5000
STANDING BUSINESS CARDS.
$22 00 TwelveMonths(52times). 87 00
Two Months (8 times)

Terms

—

Braddock, Pa. Bond Litigation. An injunction has been
asked for to restrain the borough officers from holding the
election on August 14 to decide on the issuance of $84,100
bonds. The election was originally set for July 12, but was
postponed. An amendment to the ordinance providing for
the bonds stated the purpose of the issue to be to complete
the new municipal building; it is claimed, however, that the
Council intends to use the proceeds to pay off vaiious obligations which are alleged to be illegal.
Macon, Ga. Bonds Erjdned. On August 1 the Mayor
and Council were served with an injunction restraining them
from selling the |35,000 sewer bonds which were authorized
on July 31. The ir junction was obtained by R. H. Plant of
Macon, who is interested in a claim against the city on

—

former sewer contracts.

Mandamus

— H.

C. Rogers of Pasto compel the
city to award to him the $30,000 of sewer bonds offered for
Mr. Rogers claimed that the party to whom
sale on June 11.
the bonds were sold did not comply with the conditions concerning the deposit, and that therefore the plaintiff's bid was
the highest. The petition was denied, Judge Allen holding
that the bonds were legally awarded.
Pratt County, Kan. Bond Compromise.—
are advised
by James A. Porter, County Treasurer, that the County
Commissioners have effected a compromise on most of the
bonded indebtedness of Pratt County by paying one-third of
the face value of past-due coupons and agreeing to pay twothirds of the interest on the remaining coupons as they mature. In other words, i.% interest will be paid hereafter inCal.

week have been as follows
Acquackanonk Township (N. J.) School District
Atlieuia).— Bond Sale.— On July *8 $2.5<i0 5% 10 to

this

:

includes postage.

Pomona,

Bond Proposals and Negotiations

Denied.

adena recently sued for a writ of

mandamus

We

(P. O.)
14-year

&

Fisher, New York,
school bonds were awarded to Penhale
Other bidders were W. Stanton
at 10266— a basis of 4'71£.
Denomination of the
Co., 102-50, and W. B. Arnold, 102.
bonds is $500, and the principal and semi-annual interest
will be payable at the Second ^National Bank, Pater son,

&

N.J.
Albion, Mich.— Bond Issue.—Bridge bonds to the amount
They will be of $l< denomination and bear 3%% interest, payable semi-annually.
Allegheny (Pa), Filteenth War,d School District.—
Bond Election. An election will be held in this district today (August 11) to vote on the question of issuing $25,000
bonds to complete the construction of the North End school
building. The School Board some time ago secured the
money needed to complete the building from a New York
firm in advance of this election, with the understanding that
if the bond issue is defeated a special tax shall be assessed
by the board.
Atlantic City, N. J. Bond Offering.— As stated last week,
proposals will be received until 12 M., August 27, by A. M.
Heston, City Comptroller, for $200,OCO 4% gold coupon water
bonds. These securities are in denomination of $1,000, dated
July 1, 19C0. Interest will be payable semi-annually at the
Hanover National Bank, New York City. Principal will
mature July 1, 1930. A certified check for $4,000, payable
The
to the City Comptroller, must accompany proposals.
legality of these bonds has been approved by Messrs. Dillon
& Hubbard of New York City. Proposals must be made on
blank which may be obtained from the City Comptroller.
of $14,010 are soon to be issued.

—

The official notice of this bond offering will be found elsewhere in this Department.
Beanmont, Texas.— Bond Elect ion.— An election will be
held on September 11 to vote on the question of issuing $115,000 of water, sewer and paving bonds. Securities, if authorized, will be 5% 20 40-year (optional) bonds. T. C. King is

stead of 6#. The total debt outstanding on Aug. 1, 1899, all
%% bonds, was $322,300.
Santa Fe County, N. Mex. Bond Litigation. The St.
" The suit of
Louis " Globe- Democrat" of August 4 says
Bird S. Coler and Elverton R. Chapman et al. of New York
against the Board of County Commissioners of Santa Pe City Secretary.
Belleville (N. J.) School District. Bonds Authorized.
County for $115,000 interest on county railroad bonds was
before District Judge McFie on questions a6 to the legality At a meeting held in this district August 2 an additional
issue of school building bonds to the amount of $2,500 was
of the bonds raised by District- Attorney
C. Gortner and
to which a demurrer had been filed. Judge McFie ruled that author zed. The bonds will be three in number and will
the bonds were res adjudicata at d sustained the demurrer. mature in 24, 25 and 26 years, respectively.
Berkshire County, Mass. Loan Authorized. The County
This action brings the case to trial on its merits and augurs
a decision against the county. The county's assessed valua- Treasurer has been authorized to borrow $5,000 in anticipation is only $1,750,000 and its Donded indebtedness is$900,00u." tion of taxes.
Big Horn County, 'Wjo.—Bond Offering.— Proposals will
Wisconsin. Constitutional Amendment. At the general
election on November 6 several amendments to the Constitu- be received until August 25 by the County Commissioners, at
tion will be submitted to the people, one of which, relating the office of Harry B. Henderson, State Examiner, Cheyenne,
Wyo., for $37,000 coupon funding bonds. Securities are
to the banking laws, we give in full
Resolved by the Assembly, the Senate concurring, that Article XI. of the issued in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 18 of
Constitution of tbe State of Wiscunj-iu be and Is hereby amended by substi- Title 10 of tbe Revised Statutes of Wyoming of 1899 and
tuting for sections * and 6 thereat a new section, to be known as Section 4 and
bear date of Sept. 1, 1900. They are in denominations of
reading as follows
Section!. The Legislature shall have power to enact a general banking law $1,000, $500 and $100.
Interest (not to exceed 5% per anlor the creation of banks and for the regulation and supervision of tne banknum) will be payable January 1 and July 1 at the Chemical
ing busmen, provided that he v.. te of two thirds of all the members elected
In each House, to be taken by yeas and nays, be in favor of the passage of
National Bank. New York City, or at the office of the County
such law.
Treasurer, at Basin, Wyo. at the option of the holder. Principal will mature as follows
10$ of the total amount issued
must be paid in ten years from date of issue and 10$ of the
Calls
total amount annually thereafter until all is paid.
All of
Arkansas.— Bonds Redeemed.— On August 1 the State the bonds are subject to call after ten years from date of
Treasurer paid the last 30 bonds of the $!60,0C0 which the issue. Proposals must be accompanied by a certified check
State owed to the Federal Government under the agreement on a national bank for 5% of the amount of bonds bid for,
of April 29, 1898.
The special fund created to pay the debt payable to the County Treasurer.
has been so successful that the bonds are redeemed a year
Billerica, Mass.— Loan authorized. At a town meeting
before the allotted time. The details of the agreement may on July 30 a loan of $1,510 for three years was decided on by
be found in the State and City Supplement of April 14, a vote of 100 to 1. The proceeds will be used for school1900, on page 175.
building purposes.
Harney County, Ore.— Warrant Call— The County TreasBiwabik, Minn.— Bond Offering.— Proposals will be reurer has called for payment all warrants of this county is- ceived by the Village Council until 8 o'clock, August 15, for
sued prior to Jan. 1, 1899.
$7,0l0 &% electric-light bonds. Securities are dated July 2,
Latajette County (Mo.), Lexington, Snia Bar and Wash- I9l0, are in denomination of $500 and mature $1,0U0 yearly
ington Townships.— Bond Calls.— Interest ceased on 'July 1 on July 2 from 1901 to 1907. Principal and semi-annual inon the following bonds
terest is payable at the Northern Trust Company, Chicago.
e
tOn TownsniD ^ Donds Nos 51 to 63, dated Aug. 8. 1885. Cenomina- J. S. Lutes is Recorder of the village.
tion «l0u.
Biooiniugton, 111.— Bond Sale.-On July 27 $40,000 4*
D
T ° Wn8bip6 ibOnds Nos Mt0 71 datea Sept. 16, 1885. Denomlcit?on »i00?
general improvement bonds and $15,000 4% funding bonds

—

:

—

R

—

—

i

,

:

Bond

and Redemptions.

—

:

-

'

'

<

—— — —

—

—

O

THE CHRONICLE.

304

[Vol. LXXI,

Danville (111.) School District.— Bond Election.— An
were awarded to Farson, Leach & Co. at a premium of $2,575
also to be furnished by election will be held to-day (August 11) in this district to
and accrued interest. Blank bonds
the firm at an expense not exceeding $125. This is a pre- vote on the proposition to issue $15,000 refunding school
of 4-91#. The following firms also bid on the issue
Trowbridge & Niver Co.^Chlcago.
Denison, Prior & Co Cleveland.
Devitt, Tremble & Co., Chicago.
First National Bank, Chicago.

mium

,

N.

W. Harris & Co..

Lamprecht Bros.

bonds.

:

I

Chicago.

Co., Cleveland.

Mason. Tiewis & Co., Chicago.
Rudolph Kleybolte & Co., Cincinnati.

securities are optional after 10 years and principal
interest are payable at the office of the City Treasurer.

The

and

Boone (Iowa) Independent School .District—Bond

Offering.— Proposals will be received until 12 m., August 13, by
this district for $40,000 4% refunding bonds. Securities are
issued pursuant to Section 2812, Code of 1897; they will bear

date of Aug. 1, 1900, and will be delivered about 30 days
after sale; interest will be payable semi-annually at the
Principal
office of the City Treasurer in current funds.
will mature in ten years, subject to call after five years.
These bonds were offered for sale on J»ne 23 as 3^ P e r
cents, but all bids then received were rejected.
Bradford, Ohio.— Bonds Defeated.— At the special election
held recently the proposition to issue $20,000 electric-light
and fire-department bonds was voted down, 130 to 106.
Brown's "Valley, Traverse County, Minn.— Bond Offering.
—Proposals will be received until 7 p. m., Aug. 31, by E. R.
Marshall, Village Recorder, for $8,700 5% water and light
bends. Securities were voted at the election held June 18.
Eight bonds are in denomination of §1,000 and one of
1900.
$700, and are dated Aug. 15, 1900. Interest will be payable
February 15 and August 15 and the principal will mature in
twenty years. These securities were previously offered on

Julv 21 and on August 4.
Buffalo (Texas) School District.— Bonds Registered.—On
August 2 the State Comptroller registered an issue of $2,400
bonds of this district.
Butler County, Mo.— Bonds Registered.—On August 2 the
Slate Auditor registered $3,408 Q% 2 20-year drainage bonds.
Canton (S. Dak.) School District.—Bonds Voted.— At an
election held July 31 this district voted to issue $5,000, bonds

new school house.
Carnegie, Pa.— Bond Election,— At the general election in
November the question of issuing from $40,000 to $50,000
additional improvement bonds will be submitted to the

for a

people.

—

Bond Sale.— The $195,840 of 4%% townCass County, Ind
ship gravel-road bonds were awarded on August 6 to Farfull description
Co., New York, at 102-071.
son, Leach
securities will be found in the Chronicle of August
of the

A

&

—

Delavan, 111. Bonds Defeated. At a special election on
July 31 the question of issuing $12,000 water-works bonds
was lost by a majority of 18.
Dickens County, Texas.— Bonds Approved.— a July 31
the Attorney-General approved $13,500 of bridge bonds.
Du Bois, Pa. Bond Sale. Refunding bonds to the amount

—

of $51,000

were awarded recently,

it

is

reported, to

Lam-

precht Bros. Co., Cleveland, at 101*66. Securities are 4%
18 to 30 year optional bonds.
El Paso County, Texas. Bonds Approved,— The AttorneyGeneral has approved an issue of $14,500 refunding bonds.
Bonds Registered The State Comptroller has registered
an issue of $49,000 of refunding bonds.

—

Elyria, Ohio.— Bond Sale Postponed.—-The sale of $310,000
water bonds which we announced last week was to take place
on August 28 we are advised has been postponed to September 11, on account of errors in the notice of sale, making it

necessary to re-advertise the bonds.
Esplen, Pa.—Bond Sale.—On August 2 $16,000 4% funding
and improvement bonds were awarded to the Real Estate
Savings Bank of Pittsburg at 106 "10. Securities are dated
Aug. 1, 1900, and the interest is payable semi-annually at
the office of the Borough Treasurer. The securities are of
the denomination of $500 and mature as follows: Nos. 1 to
15, inclusive, on Aug. 1, 1930; Nos. 16 to 29, inclusive, Aug.
1, 1920, and Nos. 30 to 32, inclusive, on Aug. 1, 1910.

Fairview School District, Sanpete County, Utah.— Bond
Sale.— On August 1 $5,400 6% 5 15-year (optional) bonds were
offered for sale. W. J. Hayes & Sons, Cleveland, were the
lowest bidders, nearly equal to par for 5% bonds. Other bidders
were Wells, Fargo & Co., Salt Lake City; C. H. Coffia, Chicago; Duke M. Farson, Chicago, and Trowbridge & Niver
Co., Chicago.
Ferry County (P. 0. Republic), Wash.—Bond Offering.—
Proposals were asked until 10 a. m. to-day (August 11), by
the County Commissioners, for $60,000 10- year county funding
bonds. Securities are in denomination of $1,000; interest will be
payable semi-annually. Principal will be payable at the fiscal
agency of the State of Washington in the city of New York.
This issue is for the purpose of retiring and canceling the
outstanding warrants of the county, together with the interest thereon, to date of said issue.
S. I. Spiggle is County
Auditor.

Findlay, Ohio. Bond Offering,—Proposals will be reSchool District— Bond Sale— The $6,000 ceived until 12 m., August 27, by Charles E. Watson, Mayor,
Centralla (111.)
for $5,000 4% Washington Avenue improvement bonds. Secu4% 5 15- year (optional) bonds which were voted recently were
rities are in denomination of $250, dated Sept. 1, 1900; interMerchants' State Bank of Centralia.
sold July 27 to the
Chelsea, Mass.— Bonds Proposed.— The City Council has est will be payable semi-annually at the Fourth National
under consideration the issuance of $200,000 bonds for a new Bank, New York City. Principal will mature one bond
each six month, April 1 and October 1, until all.is paid.
high school and a new fire station.
Cleveland, Ohio. Bond Offering.— At a meeting of the Bonds are issued pursuant to Section 2705, Revised Statutes
Park Board on August 1 Secretary Hoffman was instructed of Ohio, and to a city ordinance passed July 16, 1900. Proto notify bond dealers that the $500,000 of park bonds which posals must be accompanied by a sum of monev or a certiwere offered for sale on July 12 but not sold would be fied check on a bank doing a regular banking business in the
offered at private sale. Doubt is expressed, however, whether city of Findlay equal to 3$ of the amount bid for. Accrued
interest must be paid by the purchaser of the bonds.
the Mayor can be induced to sign the bonds.
Findlay (Ohio) School District.—Bond Ofering.— ProMo.— Bond Sale. — On August 7 the following
Columbia,
posals will be received until 12 m., August 17, by W. W.
bids were received for the $18,500 4% 5-15-year sewer bonds
Mississippi Valley Trust Co., St. Louis, $18,587 50; W.J. Shuler, President Board of Education, for $25,000 V/i high2
Hayes & Sons, Cleveland, $18,529 00; E. T. Rollins, Colum- school bonds. Securities are in denomination of $1,000 and
will be dated the day of sale; interest will be payable March
bia, for $2,000, 100K; for $2,000, 100%; for $2,000, 101; P.
Schweitzer, Columbia, for $1,000, 100% and interest. As the 1 and September 1 at the office of the City Treasurer. Prin$2,000 in
Council thought $17,000 would be sufficient for the sewer cipal will mature yearly on March 1 as follows
1915 and 1916. and $8,000 from 1917 to 1923, inclusive. Propurposes, it was decided to award that amount to the Missis
sippi Valley Trust Co. at a premium of $80 20, subject to ap- posals must be accompanied by a sum of money or a certiproval of the company's attorney. A full description of fied check on a bank doing a regular banking business in the
the bonds will be found in Chronicle of August 41900, p. city of Findlay equal to %% of the amount bid for, and the
purchaser will be required to pay accrued interest. Bonds
251.
Columbus, Ohio.— Bond Sale.— The $8,000 4% 10 year were authorized at an election held Dec. 19, 1899, and are
Chestnut Street improvement bonds recently authorized issued pursuant to the general laws of Ohio and to resoluwill be taken by the trustees of the sinking fund. A de- tions passed by the Board of Education Jan. 23, 1900.
scription of the bonds will be found in the Chronicle of
Fond Du Lac, Wis. Bonds Authorized. School bonds to
July 21, p. 148.
the amount of $30,000 have been authorized and will probColumbus Urove, Ohio.—Bond Offering.— Proposals will ably be offered for sale in September. The securities will
be received until 12 m. September 3, by Chas. Killen, Vil- be Z%% 20-year bonds.
lage Clerk, for $15,983 01 4$ High Street improvement bonds.
Fostoria, Ohio.— Bond Offering. Proposals will be reSecurities are issued pursuant to sections 2703 to 2707, in- ceived until 1 p. M., August 31, at the City Clerk's office, for
clusive, and 2709, Revised Statutes of Ohio, and resolutions $8,867 4$ 21-year refunding bonds. Seven of the bond^s will
and ordinances passed by the Village Council on and prior be for $1,000, two for $500 and one for $867. Interest will be
to July 16, 1900. They are in denomination of $800, dated payable semi-annually on March 1 and September 1, and the
Interest will be payable semi-annually at the bonds will mature S3pt. 1, 1921. Principal and interest paySept. 1, 1900.
Principal will mature as able at the Chase National Bank, New York. A certified
office of the Village Treasurer.
follows $788 01 Sept. 1, 1905, and $800 semi-annually from check for $500 must accompany each bid. Securities are
Sept. 1, 1905, to and including March 1, 1915. Bidders will issued under Title 12, Chapter 2, Section 2701, Revised
be rtquired to use the form of bid furnished by the Village Statutes of Ohio, and in pursuance of a city ordinance passed
Clerk and to furnish blank bonds. No bid will be considered July 31. Bids should be addressed to J. M. Schatzel, City
that is not accompanied by a certified check on one of the Clerk.
banks of Columbus Grove for 5% of the amount bid.
Fostoria (Ohio) School District. Bond Offering.—ProCumberland, R. I.—Loan Authorized.— The Town Council posals will be received until 2 p. m., August 25, at the office
has authorized a loan of $5,000.
of the Clerk of the Board of Education, for $15,000 4% school
Dallas, Texas.— Bond Offering.— Proposals will be received bonds. Securities will be dated August 25. 1900, and will be
until 12 m., September 10, for $100,000 water supply, $35,000 payable $2,000 each six months from March 1, 1905, to
street-improvement and $15,000 crematory 4% 40- year bonds. March 1, 1909, and $1,000 on Sept. 1, 1908. Denomination,
Principal and interest (semi-annually) will be payable in $1,000. Principal and semi-annual interest will be payable
Denomi- at the Chase National Bank, New York. Issued under secgold at the Seaboard National Bank, New York.
nation $1,000. The securities have been approved bv the tions 3991, 3992 and 3993, Revised Statutes of Ohio, and an
Attorney- General of the State.
ordinance of the Board of Education adopted July 18. Bids

4, p. 251.

:

:

—

,

—

:

—
August

———
—

—

:

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

305

must be addressed to A. J. Stack house, Clerk of the Board of water-works bonds and $10,000 electric- light bonds. The
Education, and must be accompanied by a certified check for water-works bonds were approved at an election held in
April (see Chronicle April 7). Securities will be 4% 40-year
$500.
Franklin, Venango County, Pa.— Bonds Defeated.— At a gold bonds. The Water Board has about determined upon
special election held July 24 this town voted against the the general plan to be pursued in constructing the system of
proposition to iesue $60,000 bonds for a high- school building. water works, and has also decided to purchase the plant of
Gloucester, Mass.— Bond Offering.— Proposals will be re- the Laurel Electric Company for the town.
Bond Offering.— Proposals will be
Laurens County, S.
ceived until 12 M., August 13, by the Committee on Finance,

C—

at the office of the City Treasurer, for $5,000 3}>{% 10-year
highway- improvement bonds. Interest will be payable semiannually. All bids must include accrued interest on the

received on October 1 for $15,000 4% 15-80-year refunding
bonds. These securities are authorized by the Legislature,
" Acts of 1900, page 538, No. 303, Section 88." Denomination

bonds.

will be $1,000

Greenwood, Miss.— Bond Sale — On August 7 the $15,000
5% 5- 20-year (optional) school bonds were awarded to the
Bank of Greenwood at par. The securities were originally
offered for sale on June 5, but were not awarded at that
time. Further description of the bonds may be found in the
Chronicle of May 19, p. 1009, and July 28, p. 199.
Haverhill, Mass.— Bonds Authorized. At a meeting of the
City Council on August 2 an order was passed authorizing
a bond issue of $5, COO for sewer improvements.
Homer, Mich.— Bond Election.— On August 13 a special

—

election will be held to vote on the question of issuing $10,000 of water- works bondp.
Howard County, Ind.— Bond Sale.— On August 8 $20,000
4%% Harrison Township gravel-road bonds were awarded to
Co. at 101*50. The securities are of the deFarson, Leach
nomination of $500, payable one bond every six months,

&

May

beginning

15, 1901.

Indianapolis, Ind.— Bonds Re- awarded.—The $100,000
V/ % funding school bonds have been taken by the Western
2
German Bank of Cincinnati at 104*50. These bonds were
sold in January to ft. Kleybolte & Co., but became the subject of litigation. They were recently declared valid and
Further information may be found
re- sold as stated above.
in the Chronicle of July 7, p. 45, and Feb. 3, pages 242

and 243.
Temporary Loan.— The temporary loan of $37,C00 authorized July 30 was negotiated on August 1 with the Capital
National Bank of Indianapolis at 3%% interest. The Merchants' National Bank bid %%% and the Fletcher National
Bank and the State Life Insurance Co. each bid 4%.
Inverness, N. S.— Bond Offering.— Proposals will be rebeived until September 1 by R. G. McLellan, Municipal
Clerk, for $60,000 railway-damage debentures and $7,000 refunding debentures. Interest at 4% will be payable semiannually at the Treasurer's office at Port Hood, Inverness.
Denomination of the bonds will be $500 or $1,000, at the option of the purchaser, and the principal will mature in 20
years.

—

Jackson, Tenn.— No Bonds to be Sold. The report in one
of the papers last week of a sale of $25,000 sewer bonds on
July 23 is, we are advised, incorrect. The last issue of bonds
by this city was about a year ago, when $25,000 4% 15-20-jear
water bonds were sold to J. H. Green of Jackson at 103j|.

Jackson County, Texas.— Bonds Approved.— On August 4
the State Attorney-General's department approved an issue of
$5,000 court house and $10,000 refunding court-house bonds
of this county.
Jasper, Ind.— Bond Sale.— On August 6 the $5,000 4%%
water bonds were awarded to the Dubois County State Bank,
Jasper, at 100*25 and accrued interest. W. J. Hayes
Sons
bid par, the town to allow $75 for blank bonds and other expenses. Frank X. Kunkell of Jasper offered a premium of
$5 for $1,000 of the issue.
Joplio, Mo.— Bonds Registered.— On August 1 the State
Auditor registered $10,000 4% 20-year building bonds. Securities are in denomination of $1,000.
King County (Wash.) School District No. 3.—Bond Sale.
—On August 1 $12,000 coupon school bonds were awarded to
Wm. D. Perkins & Co. of Seattle at 102. The following bids
were received
5%
6X%

&

:

& Co., Chicago (and Interest)...
Wm. D. Perkins & Co.. Seattle
R. V. Montague & Co., Kansas City
Morrison & Bshelman, Seattle
Mason, Lewis

Spokane & Eastman Trust
Duke M. Farson. Chicago
John W. Goodwin, Seattle
R. Kleybolte

&

Co.,

Spokane

Band'.

Bonds.

Bonds.

$12,305
12.240
12,125
12.101
12,000

$12,087
$12,125

12125

Co.. Cincinnati

John Schram, Seattle, also bid for $4,000 5% bonds. In
explanation of the award, it should be said that after considering cost of transportation, exchange, &c, the bid of the
Seattle firm, although apparently lower, was considered
better than that of Mason, Lewis
Co.

&

Kirkwood, Mo.

Bond

Offering.— Proposals will be

re-

ceived until 8 p. m., September 1, by J. G. Hawken, City
Clerk, for $17,000 4% 10-20-year (optional) electric light bonds.
Securities will be dated Sept. 1, 1900, and the interest will be
payable semi-annually either at the Bank of Kirkwood or at
a bank in St. Louis (to be designated by the City Treasurer),
at the option of the purchaser. The cost of the bonds is to
be borne by the purchaser. The present bonded debt is
$15,000; assessed valuation, $1,338,000; tax rate, $5 50 per
$1,000.

The

notice of this bond offering will be found
the advertisements elsewhere in this Department.
official

—

and interest will be payable annually on JanAlthough the bonds are optional after 15 years, we
are advised that " it is not probable that they will be called

uary

1.

before maturity."

Lawrence County, Mo.— Bond Sale.— On August

6

the

$50,000 4% 3-15-year court-house bonds were awarded to the
Bank of Aurora (Aurora, Mo.), Pierce City National Bank
(Pierce City, Mo.), Mt. Vernon Bank (Mt. Vernon, Mo.) and
the Farmers' Bank of Mt. Vernon, on their joint bid of 103,
For full particulars of bonds
including accrued interest.
see Chronicle July 7, p. 48.
Bonds Registered.— On. August 2 State Auditor Seibert
registered $50,000 4% court-house bonds.
Lead, S. Dak.— Bonds Voted.— At the election held August
1 the $45,000 sewer bonds were authorized by a large majorInterest will be at the rate of 1% and
ity of the votes cast.
the principal will mature in 20 years.
Leicester, N. Y. Bonds Voted.— On July 24 the vote on
the question of issuing $4,500 town-hall bonds was carried,
but we are informed by A. S. Eddy, Town Clerk, that the
money will probably be raised without a bond issue.
Lima, Ohio. Bond Offerina.— Proposals will be received
until 12 M., August 20, by C. E. Lynch, City Clerk, for $2,250
S%% Buckeye and Cherry Alley paving bonds. Securities
are dated July 1, 1900. Ten are in denomination of $200 and
ten are in denomination of $50. Interest will be payable
semi-annually at the office of the City Treasurer. Principal
will mature $250 each six months from Jan. 1, 1901, to Jan. 1,
1903, inclusive, and $200 from July 1, 1903, to July 1, 1905,
inclusive. Bonds are issued under authority of sections 2703
to 2707, inclusive, and 2709, Revised Statutes of Ohio. Proposals must be made on blanks prepared by the city and
which may be obtained from the City Clerk, and must be
accompanied by a certified check on a Lima bank for 5# of
the amount of the bonds bid for, made payable to the City
Clerk.
water loan of $75,Lowell, Mass. Bonds Authorized.
000 was authorized by the Board of Aldermen on July 31,
and the Mayor signed the ordinance a day or two later.
Lugonia School District, San Bernardino County, Cal.
Bond Offering.— Proposals will be received until 12 m., Aug.
27, by W. A. Boren, County Treasurer, for the $7,C00 5%
gold bonds of this district which were authorized at the election held June 30. Securities are in denomination of $1,000;
interest will be payable annually on July 16 at the County
Treasurer's office. Principal will mature $2,000 on July 16
in the years 1908 and 1909 and $3,000 in 1910.
Luverne, Minn. Bond Offerin g.— Proposals will be received uniil August 25 by the Common Council of the incorporated village of Luverne for the $10,C00 5$ sewer bonds
which were authorized at the election held July 10. Securities are in denomination of $1,000; interest payable at the
office of the Village Treasurer.
Principal will mature 20
years from date of sale. Securities are issued pursuant to
sections 1232 to 1238, inclusive, Chapter 10, and Section 1224,
Sub- division 11, Chapter 10, General Statutes of the State of
Minnesota, 1894. Assessed valuation of the village is $629,451; real valuation is reported as $1,888,353; population 1900,
estimated, 2,450, and the total debt, including this issue,
$52,500. The official circular states that the village has
never defaulted in the payment of principal or interest on
bonds, nor has the legality of any issue of the corporate
bonds ever been questioned. E. C. Schwartz is Village Recorder.
McKee's Rocks, Pa.— Bond Sale.—On August 2 the $15,000 4%% 30- year school bonds were awarded to Denison,
Prior
Co. of Cleveland at a premium of $825 and accrued
interest.
Purchaser also provides blank bonds. This is at
the rate of 105*50—a basis of 4-11%%. Following is the list
of bids received

—A

&

& Co.. Cleve. .$15,825 00 W. R. Todd & Co., Cincin..
& Mayer, Cin.... 15,600 00 R. Kleybelte & Co., Cincin.

Denison. Prior

8easongood

Lamprecht Bros.

Co.. Cleve.

,

..$15,110 25
.. 15.110 00

15,536 25

Madisonville (Texas) School District.— Bonds Registered.

—Bonds

of this district to the amount of $3,900 were registered on August 2 by the State Comptroller.
are
Manitowoc (Wis.) School District.— Bond Sale.—
advised that the $20,000 4% school bonds recently authorized
have been sold at private sale at par. Securities are in denomination of $*00 and mature $2,000 yearly.
Marshfleld, Wood County, Wis.—Description of Bonds.—
The $20,000 city-hall bonds mentioned in the Chronicle July
28 will be in denominations of $500 and $1,000. Interest will
be at the rate of 4%, payable annually on March 1. Principal
will mature one bond yearly on March 1, $500 from 1901 to
1920, inclusive, and $1,000 from 1921 to 1930, inclusive.

We

Massachusetts.— Temporary Loan.—The National Shawamong mut Bank
has loaned $500,000 to the State at 2'98£ for 90

Laurel, Md Bonds Authorized.—-The last Legislature
authorized the Mayor and City Council to issue $35,000

days.

Minnesota.— Loans from State Funds.— On August 3 the
State Board of Investment, which consists of the Governor,

—

—

:

———

THE CHRONICLE.

306

the Auditor and the Treasurer, authorized loans to various
counties, towns and school districts amounting to $27 650.
The largest single loan, $15,000, went to the town of Sruutz
in St. Louis County, and $4,000 was allotted to Meeker County; the balance was in small sums from $200 to $1,000.
Morgan County, Ind Bonds Refused.—The $28,000 4%%
Adams Township road bonds recently awarded to Campbell,
Wild
Co. of Indianapolis have been declined by that firm
on the ground of irregularities in publication prior to the
sale of the bonds.
Morrilton, At k.—Bond Offering.— Proposals will be received at any time for the $32,000 5£ gold water- works improvement bond 8 mentioned in the Chronicle of July 28.
Securities will be in denominations of $500 and $1,000, dated
July 1, 1900; interest will be payable at the office of Latham,
Alexander
Co., New York City. Principal will mature
part annually, beginning Jan. 1, 1902. Bonds are issued
pursuant to sections 5321-5388, inclusive, of the Statutes
of Arkansas, and to a city ordinance passed July 21. 1900.
Value cf taxable real estate to secure bonds is $279,710, this
being only 60$, it is stated, of its real value.
Murphy sboro (111.) School District .—Bond Sale.—The
$22, K0 5-20 year (optional) school bonds were awarded Aug.
1 to Radolph Kleybolte
Co., Cincinnati, for $22,575 for
A%% bonds. This is at the rate of 102 61%— a basis of about
3 98# if redeemed at the optional date, it allowed to run to
maturity the basis will be about 4'30#. Following are the
bids received
For i]4% Bonds
Premium.
Premium.
For i]4% Bonds (.Com.)

—

&

&

&

-

:

$6'5 Jno. Nuveen& Co., Chicago
R. Klevoolte & Co.,Cincin
G. M. Brtnkerhoff. Springfield .... 606 W.J. Hayes & Song. Cieve
Trowbridge & Siver Co., Chicago.. 467 Feeler. Hoizman &Oo..Cincin
Devitt, Tremble & Co., Chicago.... 445 C. H. Coffin, Chicago
Mason, Lewis & Co.. Chicago
418
For 4 Per Cents.
N. W.Harris & Co., Chicago
* Non-optional.

$401
*8l
275

l.oOl

I

Vol.

LXM.

provement bonds. Interest (not exceeding 4%) will be payable annually, and the principal will mature $5,000 yearly
from 1901 to 1904, inclusive.
Ottawa, Ont. Bond Sale —One hundred thousand dollars
of 3J/^ go year fire- relief debentures were recently awarded
to William Mackie of Ottawa at 99.
Interest is payable
semi-annually, and the bonds mature June 16, 1930. This is
considered a good price, as the last loan, it is said, brought
only

96.

Pelham
Sale.

(N. Y.)

Union Free School

— The $6,000 4% school

District No.

1— Bond

improvement bonds were sold on

7 to Geo. C. White Jr., New York, at 100'70— about a
3*65£ basis. Other bidders were Geo. M. Hahn,
York,
H'0-67, and W. J. Hayes
Sons, Cleveland, 100 65. For full
description of bonds see Chronicle Aug. 4, p. 253.
Peotone School District, Willi ouuty, 111.— Bonds Voted.
At a special election hetd July 28 the vote was 110 to 106
in favor of the proposition to isjue $6,800 school- building

August

New

&

—

bonds.

Piqua, Ohio.— Bond Sale.— On August 3 the $175,000 Z%%
25 year refunding bonds were sold to the Piqua National
and Citizens' National banks of Piqua at a premium of $300
and accrued interest— about a 3-48% basis. For description of
bonds see Chronicle July 14, p. 9tf.
Polk County, Iowa.— Bonds Nut Sold— The $400,000 $%%
court-house bonds offered for sale on August 1 were not
awarded, all bids being rejected. Following is a list of the
bids received
For i% Bovds.
N. W. Harris <S Co.. Chicago... $404,100
Farson, Leach & Co., Chic
403.553
Mason, Lewis & Co., Chicago.
402,376
Merchants' L. & Tr. Co..Chic. . 402,314

For i% Bond*.

W.J. Hayes & Sons. Cleve

$400,247

For a)4% B'.juls.
R. Kleybolte & Co.. Cincinnati. 884,000

.

28

For full description of bonds see Chronicle July 7, p. 49.
Port Clinton, Ohio.— Bond Offering. -Proposals will be
For description of bonds see Chronicle July 21, p. 149.
received until 12 M., August 27, by William Cleaver, Village
New Bedford, Mass.- Bond Sale.— The $200,000 'd%% 20- Clerk, for $2,750 5% (serial) coupon Jackson Street sewer imyear school bonds sold on August 6 were awarded to E. H. provement
bonds. Securities are icsued pursuant to Section
Rollins & Sons at 105-3956 and the $48 000 ty£% 30-year water
2267, as amended April 27, 1896 Ohio Laws, Volume 92, page
bonds went to R. L. Day & Co. at 107 196 a basis for both
341, and Section 2704, Revised Statutes of Ohio, and also to a
issues of 3 '13$. The following bids were received
They are in denominaFor $200,000
For $48,000 city ordinance passed July 23, 1900.
I

—

:

E. H. Rollins

R. L. Day

Adams &

&

&

Sons, Boston

Bds.
ln7-5i0

105296

&

107196

10&-.7K
104-780

Co., Buston
Co.. Boston
Co.. Boston

Blodget, Merritt

Water

School Bonds,
106-3956

106-650
106'670

tion of $275, dated Sept.

1

March

1

Interest will be payable
at the office of the Corporation
Treasurer, Port Clinton. Principal will mature on September 1 from 1902 to 1911, inclusive. Proposals must be accompanied by a certified check or the certificate of deposit of any
banking company of Toledo, Cleveland, Sandusky, Oak Harbor, Eimore or Port Clinton, payable to the Village Clerk, in
the snm of $300. The purchaser will be required to pay ac1

and September

,

1900.

For description of bonds see Chronicle Aug. 4, p. 252.
Newburgh, N. Y. Bond Sale. The only bidder on August
6 for the $3,*)
improvement bonds was the Newburgh Savings Bank, which bid par and $10 premium
The securities
were Z%% registered bonds due $600 yearly from Sept. 1, 1901 crued interest.

—

to 1910.

Interest payable semi-annually.

New Haven. Conn

—Bonds Authorized. — At

a meeting of

the Board of Finance on Aug. 2, an issue of $15,000 of pave
authorized. These bonds were voted by the
Common Council last December.

ment bonds was

New

Haven, Pa.— Bond Sale.— On August 7 $5,000 bonds
sold to the Yough National Bank of Connellsville at
par for 3 9% bonds. Other bidders were : Westmoreland
Trust Co., Greensburg, Pa., par for 44% bonds; LamSav.
precht Bros. Co., Cleveland, $69 50 premium for ±%% bonds,
and W. J. Hayes
Sons, Cleveland, $43 premium for 5%
bonds. For further description of bonds see Chronicle Aug.

were

&

&

4, p. 253.

Rochelle, N. Y.— Bond Sale.—On August 7 the $34,788
3)0 sewer bonds and the $50,000 3%s were awarded to Walter Stanton & Co. at 1037328 and 104-30, respectively, and
the $21,389 6% sewer certificates went to W. J. Hayes & Sons
at 101-711. Following are the bids received

New

:

$34,788

Walter Stanton & Co., New York
*eo. C. White Jr.. New York
Ceo. M. Halin. New York

W. J. Hayes &

Sons, Cleveland,

$50,000

Sewet 3^«.

8J*«.
$52,lfi0

$36,086 62

36,14800

$21,389
6 Ctfs.

5a.3S5
51,600

Se^OOO

86,868 00

21,766

&

Portland, Ore. Bond Sale.—On July 21 this city awarded
issue of about $4,800 improvement bonds to J. W.
Crutbers & Co., Portland, at 100 677.

an

—

Rhode Island.— Bond Election. At the general election to
be held in Nov<-inber the question of issuing the $700,100 additional State House bonds rec-ntly au horized by the State
Legislature will be submitted to a vote of the people.
Rochelle, 111.— Bonds Proposed. Arrangements are about
to be made to issue $11,000 5% bonds.

—

—

Santa Barbara (Cal.) School District.— Bond Offering.
Proposals will be received until 2 o'clock, August 17, by the
Board of Supervisors of Santa Barbara County for $10,000 5%
1

to 10-year serial bonds.

Securities are dated July

11, 1900,

and are of the denomination of $500. Interest is payable
annually on July 11 at the office of the County Treasurer,
and the principal will mature $1,000 yearly 1901 to 1910.
Bids must be unconditional and for not less than par, and
must be accompanied by a certified check for 10$ of the
amount bid. These bonds were approved by the district on
July 2 by a vote of 253 to 15.
Schenectady, N. Y.— Bond Sale.—On August 8 $75,000 4%
school bonds and $6 000 4% park bonds were awarded to Geo.
C. White Jr., New York, at 107 30 for the school bonds and
106*31 for the park issue.
Following are the bids received

In explanation of the award to Walter Stanton
Co., although a lower bid than that of Geo. C. White Jr., it should
School Bonds. Park Bds
be said that Mr. White's check was the cause. It seems it
10681
10781
was one which he had deposited some weeks previous, when Geo. C.White Jr., New York
106-fcO
100 90
Farson, Leach & Co., New York
105'47
10661
bidding for another issue, and it had not been returned to Dunscomb & Jennison, New fork
106-61
106-dl
New York
Sand
him, and Mr. White had been informed by the City Clerk Allen,Hayes & Co., Cleveland
10588
VV J.
& Sons.
10666
105-93
10v98
that the check would be applicable to this new issue. The The Lamprecht Bros. Co Cleveland
10600
li 5o0
W. R.Todd &Co., New York
other officials, however, thought otherwise.
1061ft
105 44
K. Kleybolte & Co., Cincinnati
For full description of bonds see Chronicle Aug. 4, p. 252
For description of bonds see Chronicle July 23, p. 202.
Newton County, Mo.— Bonds Registered.—O n Ang. 7 the
Shenandoah (Iowa) Independeut School District.— Bond
State Auditor registered $30,000 4% 15-year building bonds.
Sate.— On July 20 this district sold $10,000 school bonds to
The securities are dated July 2, 1900, and are payable at the
Co., Chicago, at par for a 4% bond. N. W.
Mason, Lewis
National Bank of Commerce, Kansas City.
Norwood, Ohio.—Bond Offering.— Proposals will be re- Hrris & Co., Chicago, offered par for a 4% bond; Geo. M.
ceived until 12 m., Sept. 6, by W. E. Wichgar, Village Clerk, Bechtel par and $10 premium at the same rate, aud Jno.
Principal will
Co., Chicago, par for a 4\£% bond.
at the office of W. R. Collins, room 505, Johnston Building, Nuveen
mature in ten years, subject to cull after five years.
Cincinnati, for $4,898 03 6% 110 year (serial) Elsmere Avenue
Sheraden School District (P. O. Sheridanville), Alleimprovement bonds. Securities are dated Aug. 1, 1900. Progheny County, Pa. Bond Offering Proposals were asked
posals must be accompanied by a certified check for hi of
yesterday (August 10) by the School Board,
the gro s amount of the bonds, payable to the Village Clerk. until 8 P. M.
(serial) school bonds.
Noxubee County, Ittiss.— Bond Sale.— On August 6 $20,000 Geo. F. Smith, Secretary, for $10 000
Securities are in denomination oi $1,000, dated Aug. 1, 1900,
5% 20-year bonds were sold to Duke M. Farson of Chicago.
Omaha, Neb.— Bond Sale. — On August 1 the $50,000 4% 20- and are iree of tax. Interest will be payable semi-annually
Principal maat the Diamond National Bank, Pittsburg.
year sewer bonds were awarded to Spitzer
Co., Toledo, at
$1,000 from 1905
tures part yearly on August 1 as follows
108'04— a basts of about 3-44£. Following are the bids
to 1913, inclusive; $2 00) in 1914, $1,000 ia 1915 and 1916,
108-i»2
Spitzer &Co., Toledo
Dentson, Prior A Co., Cleve
10VS52
10ft-83
$2 000 in 1917, $1,000 in 1918, $2,000 in 1919, $1 000 in 1920,
Kstabrook & Co.. Boston
Blake Bros. & Co., Boston
104-7M
105602 Farson. Leach & Co.. Chicago. .103 765 $2,000 from 1921 to 1928, inclusive; $3,000 in 1929 and $2,000
Geo. W. Uoofler, Omaha
For lull description of bonds see Chronicle July 28, p. 201. in 1930.
Oshkosh. Wis.— Bond* Authorized.— The Common CounSmith's Falls, Ontario.— Bond Offering.— We are adcil has authorized the issuance of $20,000 coupon street- mi- vised that proposals will be received at any time for the
:

.

-

&

&

—
H

&

:

:

.

.

—

—
August

—

—

THE CHRONICLE.

11, 1900.]

tion.

30,

Chronicle June 23, 1900.
Stowe Township (Pa.) School District.— Bond Offering.—
Proposals will be received by the School Board for $10,000
Securities will be dated
5-20 year (optional) school bonds.
September 1, 1900; denomination will be $500 and the interest will be payable at the Diamond National Bank, Pittsburg. Proposals may be mailed to Thomas McCoy and Edward Milligan, President and Secretary of the board, or to
N. W. Shafer, Attorney, 435 Diamond Street, Pittsburg.
Summit, N. 5.— Bonds Voted.— The vote on July 31 on the
question of issuing $130,000 sewer and $10,000 fire-department bonds was 358 for with 58 against the proposition.
are advised that the securities will probably not be issued
for some time.
Swanton, Vt. Refunding Bonds Proposed. Arrangements a ie being made to refund $75,000 4^railroad aid bonds
at a lower rate of interest. The new bonds will probably
be in the denomination of $1,000, maturing in 20 years.

:

8 25^

The

right to reject all bids

is

expressly reserved.

Address bids to the undersigned and for further
information write to the undersigned.

W. M. DRENNEN, Mayor,
Birmingham, Ala.
July

31),

leOt.

$18,500
MILTON, PENN.,
SCHOOL DISTRICT SCHOOL BONDS.
The President and Secretary of the Board of
School Directors of the Borough of Milton, Penna.,
Invite sealed proposals for EIGHTEEN THOUSAND
FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS of School District
Coupon Bonds bearing i% interest, payable semiannually. Purchaser to pay State tax.
Denomination |500. Suoject to call at the option of tbe
Board of School Directors. $1,000 matures January
1st, 1902, and $1,000 on January 1st of each year following. The right is reserved to reject any or all
proposals. Proposals will be received until 7 P. M.
August 15th, 1900. A certified check payable to the
President for 6* of the amount bid for must accompany

BCD D CANNON, Secretary.

By

Blodget, Merritt

&

Co.,

BANKERS

LIGHT BONDS.

order of the Board of Aldermen.
J. G. HAWKEN, City Clerk.

Investment Securities
FOR

SAVINGS BANKS and TRUST FUNDS

STATE, CITY & RAILROAD BOND*

JONES A

C.

YORK.

The City of Atlantic City will receive sealed proposals for $200,000 Gold Coupon Water Bonds In
denominations of $1,000, dated July 1, 1900, maturing July 1, 1930, without option, free from tax, with
interest at 4 per cent, payable semi-annually at the
Hanover National Barjk, New York City.
The City Comptroller will receive bids
bonds

until 12 o'clock

-

-

-

1

-

-

112 SO.

MONDAY, AUGUST

ST.

MUNICIPAL BONDS.
E. O.
121

STANWOOD &
BOSTON.

any

or all

THE LEGALITY OF THESE BONDS HAS
BEEN APPROVED BY DILLON HUBBARD,
St,

New

York, whose certificate as to legality will
accompany the bonds when delivered.
Particulars and blank forms of proposal furnished
on application to
A. M. HESTON, Comptroller.
of

Government

and

Municipal Bonds

BOUGHT AND SOLD.
APPRAISEMENTS MADE OR QUOTATIONS
FURNISHED FOR THE PURCHASE, SALE OR
EXCHANGE OF ABOVE SECURITIES.
1.ISTS

N.

ON APPLICATION.

W. HARRIS &

31

NASSAU

James

CO.,

NKERS.

ST. (Bank of Commerce Bldg.)

N.

Brown &

Co.,

Bankers, 62 Cedar Street,

Investment Bonds and Stocks
UNLISTED SEC URITIES.

MUNICIPAL BONDS
Securities Netting from

CO.,

BANKERS,
Devonshire Street.

27. 1900,

reserving, however, the right to reject
bids

DEALERS IN

CO.,

FOURTH

for these

M. of

HIGH-GRADE

NASSAU STREET.

-

J. f

WATER BONDS.

BONDS A SPECIALTY.

EDW.

LOANS.

City of Atlantic City, N.

BA

Congress Street, Boston.
Mew York.

N.

S200,000

County, Missouri,
-

Jose. Parker

NEW

LOANS.

SOtol.

PHILA.,

13 Wall Street,

102-057

4, p. 255.

Sealed bids will be received until 8 o'clock P. M.
1st, 1900, for Electric-Light Bonds, to be
issued by the City of Kirkwood, St. Louis County,
Missouri.
Bonds being of denomination of $1,000 each, aggregating $17,000. Interest i% per annum, payable
semi-annually.
Bonds will be dated September 1st, 1900, due
twenty years thereafter, redeemable at the option
of the Board of Aldermen after ten years.
Principal and interest payable either at the Bank
of Kirkwood, or at a Bank in the City of St. Louis
(to be designated by the City Treasurer) at the
option of the purchaser.
Cost of preparing, printing or lithographing and
registering to be borne by the purchaser.
Bids to be addressed to J. G. Hawken, City Clerk.
1 be Board of Aldermen reserves the right to reject
any or all bids.
The present bonded indebtedness of the
City of Kirkwood is
$16,000
Assessed valuation
$1,838,000
Actual valuation
$1,672,500
Estimated population
3,300
Tax rate for 1899
514 mills
Vote for bonds carried by a vote of more than

NEW

16

& Co., Boston. 102'057

DICKERMAN,
President.

B.

l'ds-so

Boston

September

b%
C.

Co..

^17,000
CITY OF KIRKWOOD,

all proposals.
Attest:

WILLIAM

100-005

Waynesville, Ohio.— Bond Offering.— Further details are
at hand relative to the offering of $22,000 water and $8,000
electric- light- plant bonds on August 18, which we noted in

p. 203.

ELECTRIC

time the same will be opened and acted on. Bidders
are requested to make offers for bonds bearing 5 per
cent interest, in which event a premium must be
•ffered; or the bidders must name the lowest rate of
interest be will take on a par valuation of the bonds.

St,

August

20.500 oO

Tbe Crty ef Birmingham, Ala., will receive sealed
bids for $269,0i of bonds of said City, in denominations of $1,')00 each, dated July 2, 1900, and running
80 years, principal and interest payable In gold.
Bids to be placed in the hands of the undersigned
by 12 o'clock noon on August 11th, 1900, at which

Par.

102035
& Co., Boston
W. Hariis & Co., New York. .101-625
Tne notes were sold on about a 3^- basis to a private party.
For further description of the securities see Chronicle of

i

St. Louis

10110
100-70

Springs School District, San Bernardino County,
Bona Offering.— Proposals were asked until 12 M. yes-

Blodget, Merritt

Adams

|

BONDS.

101-28

:

I

City of Birmingham,Ala.

10187

100-75

terday (August 10), by W. A. Boren, County Treasurer, for
$3,500 Q% gold bonds of this district which were voted June
Securities are in denomination of $100. Interest
9, 1900.
will be payable annually on July 3 at the office of the County Treasurer. Principal will mature $700 yearly on July 3
from 1901 to 1905, inclusive.
Watertown, Mass.— Bond Sale— The $20,000 3%% 10- year
coupon notes offered for sale on August 9 brought in the following bids
102619 Rstabrook & Co.. Boston
1020X5
R. L. Day & Co.. Boston

—

^269,000

Par.

Warm
Cal.

:

NEW

Par.
Par.

21, p. 151.

5% 10-year water and light bonds set for July 30 was deferred,
owing to a misunderstanding as to the assessed valuation of
the village. " The sale will be held as soon after the returns
are made by the State Board of Equalization, which meets
early in September, as we can properly advertise."
Urbana(Ohit') School District. Bond Sale.— On Aug. 6
the $20,000 5% school house bonds were awarded to the National Bank of Urbana at 113*31^ a basis of about 3 82^.
The following bids were receivea
The National Bank, Urbana. $22,655 00 Lamprecht Bros. Co., Cleve.. $21 900 00
P. S. BrlgKS & Co.. Cinctn
22/00 00 Seasonuood & Mayer. Ciucin. 21,200 00
a. Kleybolte & Co.. Cincin... 22.5UO00 N. W. Harris & Co., Chicago.. 2l.«00 00
W. R. Todd & Co..Cincinnatl. 22,400 00 New 1st Nat. B'k. Columbus.. 20,700 00

LOANS.

4*
Bonds.

The last-named bidder also offered 105 925 for bonds, with
principal and interest payable in gold, interest payable semiannually. For full description of bonds see Chronicle July

—

NEW

Bonds.

Sons, Cleve
Farson, Leach St, Co. N. Y.
Lamprecht Bros. Co.. Cleve
Jose, Parker St, Co., Boston
Ceo. C. White Jr., N. Y....

that

St,

3-66^

Bonds.

W.J Hayes &

the $31,982 96 5% paving bonds recently authorized have been disposed of at private sale.
Two Harbors, Mum. Bond Sale Postponed. We are advised by M. T. Harmon, Recorder, that the sale of the $5,500

|

8-50%

Bonds.

I.W.Sherrlll. Poughkeepsie.
Geo. M. Hahn, New fork..

District.— Bonds Voted.— This
bonds for an ad-

St,

3-4CJ*

Bonds.

Wappingers Savings Bank ..
Poughkeepsie Sav. Bauk. ..
F.W.Cole Poughkeepsie

—

Kuhn Sons. Cincinnati.. 22,000 00 Denison, Prior Co.. Cleve..
For fun description of bonds see Chronicle July 28,

3-30%

Bonds.

We

Toledo (Wash.) School

—

.

H

district has authorized the issuance of $2,000
dition to its school house.
Topefca, Kan.— Bond Sale.— It is stated

307

Vandergrift Heights (Pa.) School District.— Bond ElecA special election will be held on August 29 to vote
on a proposed issue of $3,000 school furnishing bonds.
Van Wert County, Ohio.— Bond Sale.—On August 4 $22,000 5% turnpike bonds were sold to Lamprecbt Bros Co.,
Cleveland, for $S20 premium, making the price K 3*727.
Wappingers Falls, N. Y.— Bond Sale.— The $15,000 3 to
17-year (serial) electric- light bonds were awarded on August
6 to the Wappingers Savings Bank at par for a Z\i% bond.
Following are the bids received

which were offered for sale on June
but which were not disposed of at that time. A full description of these securities will be found on page 1265,
$181,677 58 debentures

S.

J

&X

to 6?

ALWAYS ON HASJ.
Send for oar Investment

DUKE

M.

Municipal Bondi.

Clroular.

FARSON.

Banker,

115 Dearborn S tree

CHICAGO.

—

THE CHRONICLE.

303

the Chronicle last weefc. Proposals will be received by
Cbas. D. Reed, Village Clerk. Securities are issued pursuant to sections 2835 and 2837, Revised Statutes of Ohio,
and a village ordinance passed July 2, 1900. Accrued interest must be paid by the purchaser. Proposals must be
accompanied by an amount ot money or a certified check on
the Waynesville National Bank in the sum of $200.
Webster County, Iowa.— Bond Sale.— On August 1 the
$50,000 Z%% 10-year court-houBe bonds were awarded to
Denison, Prior & Co., Cleveland, Ohio, Securities are in
denomination of $1,000. Interest will be payable annually
at the office of the County Treasurer.
Wenatchee, Wash.— Bonds Voted.— At the election held
July 31 the people of this place voted to issue the $7,509
bonds for the construction of a system of water works.
West Plains, Mo.— Bonds Voted.—At the election held
July 28 the issuance of $27,500 water-works and electriclight bonds was authorized by a vote of 471 to 51.
Whitesboro, N. Y. Additional Information Relative to
Bond Issue —At a meeting of the Board of Village Trustees
held August 1 it was decided that the $40,000 sewer bonds,
for which proposals were asked until 8 p. m. last evening
(see Chronicle July 28), should be awarded on or about
Sept. 1. The securities were authorized at an election held
March 13, 1900. They will be registered or coupon at the
discretion of the purchaser, are free of tax, and are payable
in New York City or Utica in gold. Interest will be payable
annually on July 1. The official circular states that there is
no litigation pending affecting the issue, there never has
been a default in payment of the obligations of the village,
and bonds have never been issued or contested. Assessed
valuation is $738,239, and there is no bonded indebtedness
outside of this i-sue. Population estimated to be about
Tax rate $7 80 per $1,000.
2,000.
Wliitewright, Texas.— Bonds Voted.—This city has voted
in favor of issuing $7,500 4<g bond?.
Worth County, Mo.— Bonds Registered.- 0^ August 1 the
State Auditor registered $1,800 Q% 10-year building bonds of
this county. Securities are in denomination of $10».
Yakima County (Wash.) School District No. 16.— Bond
Offering.— Proposals will be received until 11 a. m., August
25, by W. B. Dadley. County Treasurer, for $5,000 coupon

[Vol.

LXM,

bonds of

this district. Securities are issued pursuant to sections 117, 118, 119, etc., of the Code of Public Instruction,
Laws of 1897, page 357 et seq. they will be in denomination
of from $100 to $1,000 at option of bidder, and will be dated
on the dav of issue or may be dated the first of some month
at bidder's option, and will be issued as soon as possible.
Interest (to be named by bidder— not higher than 5$) will be
payable annually at the County Treasurer's office, and the
principal will mature ten years from date of issue, subject to
call after five years. The district has no indebtedness outside
of this issue. Assessed valuation $4G6 734; actual valuation
estimated about $600,000: population about 700.
:

Yuba

City School District, Sutter County, Cal.— Bonds
district has voted in favor of issuing $15,000
school-house bonds.

Voted.—This

STATE AND CITY DEBT CHANGES.
—

J. C. Chaplin, Chairman Finance ComKnox, Clerk. Sewickley is in Allegheny County.

Sewickley, Pa.
mittee; J. A.

LOANS-

When Due. Bonded debt Apr.1,1900. $97,500
|

Strebt Imp. Bonds—

Water debt (included) ....

75,000
Floatingdebt
5,978
Total debt Apr. 1, 1899. 103,478
Tax valuation 1899
3,140,355

4^8, F&A, $3,500

Var.
(Subject to call at any time)

Street and Sewer Bonds.
1903

Assess't ab't 23 actual value.
City tax (per $1,000) 1899... $6-50
5s, A&O, $60,000.... Apr. 1,1903 Population in 1890 was
2,750
1905
Population in 1897 (est.).... 3,500
4s, A&O,
15,000
INTEREST is payable at the First National Bank of Sewickley.
CITY PROPERTY.—The borough owns a water plant and other
available assets amounting to about $150,000.

$19,000

4-9s

Water Bonds—

|

Upper Sandusky, Ohio.— T. P. Sylvan, Mayor; O. A. HalUpper Sandusky is in Wyandot County.

bedel, Clerk.

When Due.
LOANS—
Refunding Bonds —
Apr. 1, 1901
6s, A&O, $10,000
Apr. 1, 1902
8,000
6s, A&O,
Apr. 1,1903
6s, A&O,
6,000
Apr. 1, 1904
6s, A&O,
8,000
6s,
6s.
6s,
I

A&O,
A&O,
A&O,

Total debt Apr. 1, 1900.. $53,000
Sinking (and assets
3,815
Net debt Apr. 1, 1900...
49,185
Total valuation 1899
1,306,350
Assessment about 2-5 actual value.
Total tax (per $1,000) '99. .$32-00
Population in 1890 was
3,572
Population in 1900 (est.)
4,000

Apr. 1, 1905
7,000
Apr. 1, 1906
6,000
Apr. 1, 1907
8,000
NTEREST is payable at the Ninth National Bank,

New

York.

INVESTMENTS.
London and Paris Geo. D. Cook Company,
DENISON, PRIOR & OO.
INVESTMENT SECURITIES.
Exchange, Ld

INVESTMENTS.

,

DEALERS IN

High

Grade
SEND FOR

Bonds.

Bankers and Exchange Agents.
HE *D OFFICE:
24 Throgmorton St., London, E. C.
Business undertaken in all Securities
quoted on the London and Continental
Exchanges.

LISTS.

8 Exchange Place, Boston.

CORRESPONDENCE RE TERMS

238-240 La Salle Street,

CHICAGO.
New York Office, 52
The Lamprecht

121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland.

BONDS.

BANKERS,

Cleveland, Ohio,

DEALERS

New York City,

IN

VA.

No.

7

Congress and 31 State Streets,

BOSTON.

Legal opinion and price fu*n>shed.

Specialists in

Bonds,
31

New

Nassau Street,

Broadway

market bought

LAMPRECHT BROTHERS &

CO.,

Members New York and Chicago Stock Exchanges.

E. H.

ROLLINS & SONS,
BANKERS.

York.

T. B. POTTER,
MUNICIPAL and arikiriQ

BUIMU&,

CORPORATION

R0SENBERGER &

LI VERM ORE,
Southern and Western

55*

All securities having a Cleveland
and sold.

Members of Boston Stock]Exchange.

of

PORTSMOUTH,

197 Superior Street.

•

EASTERN BRANCH:

INVESTMENT BONDS.

ThirtyYearl4 Per Cent Funding Bonds

Co.,

AND OTHER HIGH-GRADE

ADAMS & COMPANY,
$50,000

Bros,

MUNICIPAL

INVITED.

WE OFFER

Broadway,

172 Washington Street,

CHICAGO,

•

-

ILLS.

•

LIST ON APPLICATION.

TROWBRIDGE
& NIVER

CO.,

MUNICIPAL BONDS,
Bank
CHICAGO.

Fir§t National

Bldg.,

John

&

Co.

INVESTMENT BANKERS,
1st National

19 Milk Street,

Denver.

[Members American Bankers'

San Francisco.

MASON, LEWIS &
ttonadnock Building.

MUNICIPAL
RAILROAD
CORPORATION

solicited.

CO.,

Reference, First National Bank, Ohieago.

Commercial Paper, Mortgage Loans,
Local Stocks and Real Estate.
Act as airams for nonresident property owners and

tf O Devonshire

investors.

St.

F.

BONDS.
***-***

Choice Issue*.
Street

Ass'n.l

DEALERS IN

BOSTON,

CHICAGO,

Bank Building, Chicago

Correspondence

DULUTH, MINN.

BOSTON.

BANKERS

MUNICI PAL BOND8.

Nuveen

Bonds for
A. R. M ACFARLANE&CO.
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
Permanent Investment

Railway and Oas Companies
LIST ON APPLICATION.

R.FULTON & CO.,
Municipal Bonds,

171

la salle street,

CHICAGO.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102