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MERCHANTS’ MAGAZINE,
tw&yapet,
INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

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SATURDAY. AUGUST 1, 1874.

VOL. ]9.

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111

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■■ —rnmmmm———•

NO. 475-

entirely the payment of double interest by
Treasury and avoids a temporary increase of the public
debt. The Treasury is to deliver bonds and to receive pay¬
ment therefor, as far as is required, in London, the expenses
attaching to such deliveries being borne by the contractors.
It is understood that the first call under this contract will
be made on August 1, for $25,000,000, Five-Twenties of
1862, to be redeemed on November 1, and that other
successive calls will be made at times to suit the conve¬
nience of the contractors, having reference to the condition
of the exchange and money markets here and abroad.
This negotiation of the new Secretary, which has brought
to his aid the most powerful combination of bankers that
has ever been united in the placing of the securities of our
Government, has grown out of rival propositions which
were made to him in the month of June—one by the Messrs.
Rothschild, with the First National Bank, and the other by
Messrs. Seligman, with their Continental associates.
Each of these proposals contemplated taking “ firm ” a
largo amount of the bonds, and the terms and conditions of
both were so much more advantageous than those of former
negotiations, and indicated so favorable a condition of the
heme and foreign markets, that the Secretary decided to
invite tenders, with the double object of avoiding even the
semblance of favoritism on the one hand, and, on the other,

ment

CONTENTS.

'

■

mm

1

REPRESENTING THE

1

HUNT’S

obviates

the
THE CHRONICLE.

Funded Loan
Civic Taxation and Fiscal Re¬
The Five Per Cent
form

Popular Fallacy
Financial Review of the Month
A

105
106

107

of July
Latest Monetary and

107

..

Commercial

108

English News

Commercial and Miscellaneous
.......

109

GAZETTE.
Banks, etc
.
Quotations of Stocks and Bonds

112
115

News

THE BANKERS’

Money Market, U. S. Securities,
Railway Stocks, Gold Market,
Foreign Exchange, New York

Local Securisies
Investment and State,

Banks, Boston Banks,
Philadelphia Banks, National
City

Corporation Finances

THE COMMERCIAL

116

City and

117

..

TIMES.

126

121 I Dry Goods....
122 Prices Current

Commercial Epitome
Cotton
Breaastufts

<

127

125

®i)c CljrontcU.
and Financial Chronicle is issued on Satur¬
day morning, with the latest news up to midnight of Friday.

The Commercial

TERMS OF

SUBSCRIPTION-PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.
Chronicle, delivered by carrier po city

The Commercial and Financial

subscribers, and mailed to all others (exclusive of postage):
For One Year (including a file cover the first year)

$10 00

6 00

For Six Months

The

Railway Monitor,

financial news

Journal of general Railroad Intelligence, supplementing the
contained in the Chronicle, is published monthly on Thursday

a

or

about the

fifteenth, of each month.

Subscription price per “year (including a

the fifteenth,

file cover the first year)

..

subscribers of the Chronicle
2 he Chronicle and Monitor will be sent to subscribers until ordered
tinued by letter. Postage is paid by the subscriber at his own post-office.
“

“

to

$5 00
3 00

discon¬

Advertisements

published at 25 cents per line for each insertion, but when definite orders
are given for one month, or upwards, a very liberal discount will be made.
Advertisements will have a favorable place when first nserted, but no promise
of continuous publication in a particular place can be given, as ali advertisers
must have equal opportunities.
The London Office

are

Friars, Old Broad street, where subscriptions are taken at
t)ie following rates:
Annual Subscription to the Chronicle (including postage)
£2 2s.
“
Monitor
“
1 0s.
“
**
“
Chronicle and Monitor together
2 14s.
william B. DANA,
WILLIAM B. DANA & OO., Publishers,
)

Is at No. 5 Austin

“

John o.

floyd, jr. j

79 and 81 William

Street, NEW YORK.
Box 4,592.

Post Office

made oy
is sold at the
bound for sub-

The Publishers cannot be responsible for Remittances unless
Post-Office Money Orders.
A neat file for holding current numbers of the Chronicle
o fflce for 50 cents; postage on the same is 20 cents.
Volumes

Drafts

or

gcribers at $1 50. The first and second volumes
by the publishers.

THE FIVE PER CENT
The
a

of the Chronicle are

wanted

FUNDED LOAN.

Secretary of the Treasury on the 28th inst. concluded
with the Messrs, Rothschild and associates (in¬

contract

securing for the Treasury the advantages of competitive
bidding.
In response to his circular, the Secretary received on the
23d inst. tenders aggregating some $20,000,000 from the
general public, in addition to a joint bid from the abovenamed parties for $55,000,000.
Of the $20,000,000 outside bids, some $10,000,000 were
at par and upwards, free of commission, and these the Sec¬
retary felt it his duty to accept, although the $55,000,000
bid was conditioned upon the exclusion of other awards.
The other $10,000,000 were coupled with conditions ren¬
dering their acceptance impossible if a contract was to be
concluded with the largest bidders.
It is understood that the Rothschild’s bid was conditioned

twelve months, but in the negotiations
opening of the bids this was to conform
to the wishes of the Secretary, ieduced to the 1st of Febru¬
man & Co. and associates (including their several houses
and a number of continental banks) tor the purchase of ary ; and the “ firm ” amount was reduced from $55,000,000
to $45,000,000 to provide for the award of the $10,000,000
$45,000,000 of the Five per cent Funded Loan, coupled with

cluding their several houses, Messrs. A. Belmont & Co. and
the First National Bank of New York) and Messrs. Selig-

upon an option of
that followed the

to the

public.
arrangement for deliveries and payments, as far as
may be required in Europe, will avoid entirely the disturb¬
of the loan, about $124,000,000 additional.
ance of the exchange market which would have grown out
The bonds are to be taken at par in gold and interest
of a restriction to American deliveries, and would have seri¬
accrued to the end of three months from ^ach purchase—
that is, to the maturity of the corresponding calls—less a ously interfered with the success of the business.
Of the $55,000,000 bid, $40,000,000 were on account of
commission of one quarter of one per cent. This arrange¬

option of purchasing, at any time prior to
February next, the whole or any portion of the

the




the 1st of
remainder

The

106

THE

CHRONICLE.

[August 1 1874,
■?

the

—•’* 1 — "

■

-'j;

Rothsclfflds,Apgust Belnjont <$c JCo., and the/Jlirsfc splitting .New York $nd Kpigs coun^^p^^kjl^'. year
$15,000,000 on account of J. <fc .)Y, .reported atyno' more -than $075,314,2301' S|n other words,

National Bank' and

<fetfco. and associates ;

and it is presumed,that the
145.000.000 embodied in the contract maintain the same
£>

the real estate ot New York

proportions.
*'
i.,f
*1;j
With the plethora

New York and Brooklyn.
A like disproportion is noticed

Seligman
'

.*

'

.

•

*\l.

r*.v.

of

-C ."V

A.

existing

jn the European
markets, it is fair to expect^thafr the remainder of tbeJSye
per eepts will be pjpeecl during ;the pendency of this con¬
tract; and,

now

although this rate of interest is too low for

lar American

investment, it is likely that an important

'amount of the

account, to be

popu¬

bonds

lodged

as

will

be taken for -National .bank

security at Washington.

122 millions piore

city is valued* for taxation ‘ at
than that of the whole State outside of

in the personal property
In New York city the per¬
sonal property was reported last year for .taxation at $306,.947,243, against" $172,971,192 in 1859. This^ shows an
increase of 77£ per cent, or $133,976,031. In the whole
.State, except New York and Kings counties, the personal
estate was assessed last year at $110,574,061, against $130,039,611) jn 4859, showing a decrease in thirteen years of
$19,165,549. lu other words,, we find that yvb.Ue jhe per¬
sonal property
of this city is now assessed for trxation at
134 millions more than in 1859, such property is assessed
(in the rest of the State at nearly 20 millions less than in
as

assessed for tax purposes.

■_C'?

C1VI(TTAX1TI0N AND FISCAL REFORM.
Of all the inductive sciences

is often
improvement. If in other depart¬
ments of that science the observation is true, it is especially
—
so in that part which has to
_do_ with taxation. It would be 1859.
From these figures we must infer one of two things.
difficult to find in any other country than our pwn a more
suggestive field in which to study the operation of bad fiscal Either the interior population of the State must have suf¬
principles. In discussing this subject some months ago we fered since 1859 a very severe impoverishment, or they are
promised to give further illustrations from the fiscal policy not so faithfuLin their assessment now as they were before
of this State. We are reminded of the promise by the the war. Elaborate statistics are cited by the Commis'
*•
*:
:
;
report just published from Mr. Wheeler, the President of sioners to show which of these two alternatives is true.
the Tax Department in this city. This report is for the For example, the census of 1870 is referred to as proving
year ending January 12, 1874, and is, therefore, on many the value of farm lands in this state, This value is repor¬
accounts of special interest.
First, it covers the whole ted at $1,272,857,766. In 1860 it was $803,343,593, show¬
period of the late financial crisis. By many persons it was ing an increase in the value of the firm lands of $469,514,predicted that the assessments on personal property would 473 in ten years* To represent this 469 millions with the
show an enormous decline this year. The general belief further increase since 1870, the assessment for this year
was shared by the Commissioners.
They declare that on gives an increase since 1859 of only 50 millions, or less
the 1st January, 1874, they would have been glad to than one-ninth of what it should be on this showing. Hence,
know that the decline would not exceed 50 millions. The eight-ninths, or more of the augmented value gained since
actua} results give 20 millions only. This comparatively the war by real property in this state, pays no taxation, and
small falling off, however, is explained by the Commissioners, the real estate in the interior is not assessed with the same
who say that it may well be doubted whether the figures fidelity as that of the city. This conclusion is supported
for 1874 adequately represent the actual diminution in the by other facts and arguments to .which we need not advert.
value of personal property in this city. Many small mer¬ We pass, therefore, from these proofs of the intolerable irreg¬
chants and manufacturers were swept under by the first ularity and inefficiency of our present methods of assess¬
"
waves of the revulsion
of last year, and did not present ment.
v;
Our space admits but two or three instances which are
themselves to adjust their assessments. Others were too
much “ confused ” to make any statement of their affairs, given in the report. One farm is mentioned which sold for
such as they could verify by oath as required by law. The $18,000 though assessed for no more than $4,000.
Another
report adds that unless there should be a marked revival piece of property assessed for $A2,500 sold for $125,000.
in general business the assessments of 1875 must be Another estate assessed at. $12,000 sold for $84,000.
awaited to reveal in full the consequences of the commer¬ Finally, a man held property valued at $35,000 and was
cial disasters of last year. This conclusion is similar to assessed at $6,000.
We have Hero a very old grievance, or rather a series of
that which we lately deduced from different
d^ta in discuss¬
ing the failures of 1873. A numbed of firms whose credit grievances, all jingled together in one mischievous system
receiypd a rnorjtal wound in the panic kept on their feet for of taxation. Many of our readers suppose that this system,
a
time, but nave perished since. A still larger number are which taxes real estate and personal estate upon its capital¬
•jlopfiMy struggl ng, apd bid fair to win the reward of their ized value, is a modern invention. A more accurate ac¬
courage. So far from expecting, with the Commissioners, quaintance with fiscal history would show that this is a
a decline next
year, we should infer ff,o pci these facts an in¬ mistake, and that the method, so far from being modern, is
crease in the
probabable valuation, if at least the present one of the oldest on record. Its wxnst feature* were bor¬
rowed by the Roman Empire from Asia during the.Jespotic
hopeful prospects of business shall be realized.
The same expectations of an advance, however true they sway of the later Crnsars. It is a crude system, which not
may prove as applied t) personal estate, may not be found only violates most of the sound principles of fiscal science,
so
applicable to real property in t^is city, in regard to the but is almost incapable of being harmonized with any of
observes
propane rise or fall of which there are many opinions that them. Montesquieu borne of such taxes that they are
too intolerable to be
except by free countries where
^ere ^^SCUSS* It is interesting to corppare the
^r^d
P^senf valuations with those madp prior to the >var. In the people, because of their popular institutions, submit to
18S9 the valuation of real estate in this
city amounted to piany grinding burdens, knowing that their taxes are not
$379,037,550. Last year the assessment was $797,148,665. the work of a despot but are self-imposed. Rome, however,
appears that the increase in the thirteen years, as Gibbon remarks, was au exception to this rule. Her
to
?9tate a? assessed for taxation, Ayas 110;3 citizens paid few taxes until they lost political liberty and
P®r cepl> °r *^418,111,115. Another suggestive fact is ti^at fiscal freedom together.
while the real estate in this
city is yalyed at 797 millions, r How our methods of State taxation came to be fir/st-

political

economy

said to be most in need of

_r.

.,

ilAI*

"

-

-

*•;

'•

-

*he

a8SCSse<J, vaI^0^




$¥ re*j

in fcfee

State,I g^blished has been often explained. Their defects of

inequality and irregularity are provocative of corruption
which has been growing for many years like a cancer in the
vitals of our fiscal system. All attempts to cure it in this
State have been heretofore baffled. In what way we can

cent commission, and. with an option to take the whole balance
$124,000,000 before February 1,1875.
The Railroad suits which arose under a recent law of the State
of Wisconsin, involved the question of the right of a State to reg¬
ulate the fates of railroads within its territory, or in other words,
to “ alter or repeal the charters ” of railroad corporations.
The

per
of

3
7
8
1
2
53
7
8
9
1
approach this pernicious-evil, so as to
cessfully, is a question we must leave for

best

107

TTO CHRONICLE

August 1 1374J

deal with it suc¬
discussion here

against the companies,
the important question in regard to inter-State com¬
after.
merce, and the whole matter was put in Bhape, by consent of
counsel to the entry of a formal judgment, to be argued at the
October term of the United States Supreme Court. It is not
A POPULAR FALLACY.
extraordinary that the present litigation was viewed with so deep
North Brookfield, July 27, 1874.
ah interest by bankers, capitalists and even small investors in
Wm. B. Dana, Esq.:
this part of the country, when it is considered that the point
Dear Sir—A recent Boston newspaper contained the following:
involved is that of lowering the freight and passenger rates of
Cheap food, the result of superabundant harvests here and railroad companies owned almost exclusively by residents far
abroad, will do more towards bringing the prices of all things distant from the State, many of them in Europe, and that the
back toward the old level than all the legislation that Congress
parties to vote on the question are those whose personal interests
can carry through, and will do more towards putting the country
into a healthy financial condition and bringing about resumption are wholly on the side of cheap transportation at whatever sacri¬
than all the schemes that all the financiers in the country have fice.
been puzzling their brains about so busily.”
Money was very easy during the month with the exception of
This is a very specious, but very injurious fallacy; because it is a few
days at the commencement, when the market was strength¬
one that misleads the public mind and paralyzes efforts necessary
ened by the calling in of loans to prepare for interest and divi¬
to restore the currency to par with gold.
Yet, the argument was dend payments.
made in good faith, and doubtless, without any idea of its unfavor,
Government securities during most of the month hung upon
able influence.
the probabilities in regard to the new loan, and towards the
How can cheap food, the result of a superabundant harvest,
close, when it was supposed that an amount of five-twenties of
bring about resumption ? Will great crops bring more gold into 1862 would be called in equal to the whole amount of the new
the country? Certainly not; because we have already enough fives
negotiated, the price of 1862’s fell off materially.
wherewith to pay the duties on imports and the interest upon the
PRICES 01* GOVERNMENT SECURITIES IN JULY, 1874.
public debt, and have no use for it for any other purpose. Why
-Coupon bonds.
then, should we bring it here ? Of what use would it be to ns ?
5s ’81 fund. 6s’81 6s’81 5-208 5-208 5-2Qs 5-20s 5-20s 5-208 10-40S 10-408 6§
1862. 1864. 1865. 1865. 1867. 1868. reg. coup. cur.
Should we board it up waiting for resumption? Would the July coup. reg. coup.
new.
1

Jnited States Circuit Court gave judgment

mt left open

“

individuals do this? Surely they
would not. We should continue, as we now do, to export all the
gold we produced at home, and all that came to us in trade from
Government, the banks, or

abroad.
We should increase our exports

of course ; because we

116

.....

a

all that

slightest. The fact would still remain that we had a redund¬
ancy of currency that must be cancelled before specie payments
could be safely attempted ; and certainly abundant crops would
have no tendency whatever to bring about that result.
The circiilating medium, being an arbitrary one, created by the fiat of

....

114

....

116* 117* 113* 116*

2

117* 113*

113* 116

in*xll6*x!17*ill7* ... 114 115*
116* 117 117* 113* 113* 116*
..

116*117*

Holiday

....118* ....lift*

..S

116*
115* 116* .... 113*
117* 112* 116* .... 115* lib* .... 113*
116* 116* 116 11** 112* i ts*
112* 115* 116*
115* 116* 116* 112*
115* 116*
112*
116* .... 112*
112* 7.7. 7.7.
115* 117
116* 112* li2*
: lie*
115* ....
s_,
116*
116* 116* 117
115* 117*
112* 117
115* 116* 116* 117* 117
112* 115* 117*
112* 117*
116*
116
117* 112*
li6* 7.7. 117* 112*
116
112*
’. 117*’
....

113* 116*
116

would

greater surplus to part with ; and our imports, because we
had greater ability to purchase foreign products; but
would have no influence whatever in favor of resumption ; not

have

1

9......
10
11
12

....

the

15.....

16.....
17..
18
19

116$

....

....

116

..

.....

113

....117* 117*

....

116

....

..S
117

116# 117*

....

116* 117*

....

113* .... ...
.... 1-17* 117*
116*
115* 117
116* 117* 118
22
116* .... 113
116* 117*
116* 118*
«:....
116*117*118
113 ' 116* 118*
116* 117*
113* 116* 119

21

....

112*

112*
112*

....

117

be diminished by the same power that called
117*
An excessive issue was forced upon the country by
being.
8
Congressional action, as a war measure, and the same action must
116* 117* 118*
117*
113* 117
118* 113* lift*
secure its withdrawal, or resumption will not take place.
116
117*
112*
115*
117
117*
112*
To look for relief in any other direction is idle. There is but
113* ....118*113* 115* 117
1Y!
116* in*
118* 111* 116
one remedy—contraction—and that can be brought about only by
116* 117* 118* 112* .... 117*
113*117*118* .... 115*
legislation.
118* 117* 116* 117* 117* 113* 114 -115*
Open’g 113* 116 117* 114
„The whole matter lies with the people, who may have resump¬ Hjgh’stllS* 117* 119 114 116* 117* 116* 117* 118* 113* 114 117*
Lowest 112* 115* 116* 111* 115* 116* 115* 116* 116
112* 112* 115*
tion if they choose to demand it, and hence the pernicious influ¬
Closing 113* 117* 118* 111* 115* 117
116* 117* 118* 112* 112* 117*
ence of paragraphs, like the one we have quoted, which divert
CLOSING PRICES OF CONSOL8 AND U. 8. SECURITIES AT LONDON IN JULY.
the public mind from the only policy that can secure the restora¬
Cons U. S.i
Cons U. S.
for
tion of specie payments.—I am, yours truly,
5-20, 5-20, 10-40
Date.
for
5-20, 5-20, 10-40
Date.
1867.

Congress, can only
it into

Amasa Walker.

THE MONTH OF JULY.
The month of July, though characterized at times by the mid¬
summer inactivity which always occurs in New York to a greater
FINANCIAL REVIEW OF

....

....

...

....

....

....

....

....

man.

’65 b. 1867.

mon.

Monday
2Q
Wednesday.. 1 92* 107*j 108* 105* Tuesday
2i
Thursday .... 2 92* 108* 108* 105* Wednesday.. 22
92*. 103* 108* 105*
Friday
3
Thursday ....23
Saturday
4 92* 1C8* 108* 104* Friday
24
Sunday
5
25
92* 108* 108* 104*| Saturday
Monday...— 6
Sunday
26
Tuesday.,;— 7 92* 108* 108* 104* j
Monday
27
Wednesday... 8 92* 108* 106* 104*
Tuesday
28
Thursday.... 9 92* 108* 108* 104* Wednesday ..29
Friday
10 90* 108* 106* 104* Thursday.... SO
108* 105
Saturday —11 92*
31
Friday
Sunday
12
105"
Monday
13 1 92* 108* 108* 105
Opening
Tuesday
14 i 92* 108* 1108* 105
Highest
Wednesday... 15 1 92* 108* i 109
Lowest
Thursday..*.!6 92* 108* !109* 105* Closing
Friday
17 92* (108* 1109* 105* High’t. ) Since
109* 105*
Saturday
18 92*
Lowest) Jan. 1.
Sunday
19

’65o.

92*
92*
92*
92*
92*
92*

108* 109* 105*
108* 109* 105*
108* 109* 105*
109
109* 105*
109
109* 105*
109
109* 105*

92*

109"

109* 105*

109* 106*
92* 109
still remarkable for two events o1
109* 105*
92* 109
109* 406
unusual interest in financial circles.
These were, the Unitec
92* 109
1C9* 106
92* 109
States Treasury five per cent loan negotiation, and the Railroac
|108*
92* 101* 106* 105*
decision in Wisconsin. The invitation of Secretary Bristow for
109* 106
92* 109
92* 107* 108* 104*
proposals for the balance, $179,000,000, remaining unsold of the
92* 109 1109* <106
five per cent loan, was issued by circular on the 3d of July, and
93* 110 1110* 106
91* 106* 1107* |103*
the proposals were opened on the 23d. It appears, in brief, that
|108*
the direct bids amounted to about $20,000,000 from home pur¬
The stock market showed a volume of business, which was
chasers, and of these $10,060,000 were accepted being afcor above
about equal to that usually done at this time of the year,
par in gold, but the balance rejected because they were made less with little animation.
There were few decided points for specu¬
a commission, generally of £ per cent.
The main bid, however, lative
operations, and priceB were kept within a moderate range
came from a syndicate of bankers composed of Messrs. August
of fluctuations, and varied according to the immediate influences
Belmont & Co. and the Rothschilds whom they represent, the
and rumors on the Stock Board. The failure of the Lake Shore
First National Bank of New York, and Messrs. J. & W. Seligman
Company to declare a dividend was the occasion
some
& Co., the representatives of several banking houses in Europe,
many
for the amount of $55,000,000 with a “ call” on the balance of the pointment to holders of that stock, though
anticipated.
....
...
whole loan. The terms finally agreed upofl^with the .syndicate
"Tie; foRowisg t^ble will show the
gave to them $45,000,000 of thB bonds at pa? i* gold lose f of ope

or

less extent at this season, was




-

but

of

disap¬

it had been
opening', highest, lowest and
by

108

THE CHRONICLE

closing prices of railway «md miscellaneous
months of June and July :
-June.-

Railroad Stocks—

Albany & Susquehanna.

Open. High. Low.
9?

93%
13%

Atlantic & Pacific pref..

stocks

during the

-July.
Open. High. Low. Clog.

Clos.
93%
16%

94
16%

94

94

13%
1

15%
16%
16%
Boston, Hartford & Erie
1% JV*
1%
1%
%
1% 108
Central of New Jersey.. 106% 108%
108
106% 108%
102
104
100
Chicago & Alton
104
104
104
do
93
93
scrip
do
pref.. 107% 107% 106
106
Chicago, Burl. & Quincy 102
105% 100% 105% 107% 107%
Chicago, Mil. & St. Paul 33% 41% 31% 39% 39%
39%
do
do pref. 53%
58
58
60%
51%
58%
do
& Northwest’n 40%
35
44%
43%
43%
43%
do
do pref.
58
53
61
62%
60%
60%
do
& Rock Island. 97% 102%
92% 101% 101% 101%
Cleve.,Col., Cin. & Ind.. 67
78
65
72
75
77
Cleve. & Pittsburg guar. 87%
87
87%
87%
88%
87%
Columb., Chic. <fclnd. C. 19
19
20%
19%
14%
19%
Del., Lack. <fc Western.. 109% 110% 106% 110
107% 107%
Erie
33
33*;
34%
26%
33%
33%
do

preferred

55

55

Hannibal & St. Joseph.. 26%
do
pref. 81%
Harlem
1^8%
Illinois Central
98%
do
scrip.... 92
Lake Sho. & Mich.South 74%

451763.48

Long Island
Cin., 1st pref
2d pref.
Michigan Central

65

Marietta <fc
do

55

2?%
32%

23%
29%

129

99%

....

8
73
18

125%

92

77%

67%

....

8

77%

•

•

125%

Spring Mountain Coal..
Canton
Cent. N. J. L. I. Co

69%
55
45

Mar’p’sa Land & Mng Co
do
pref
Quicksilver
do
pref
Adams Express
American Express
United States Express..

Wells, Fargo Express...

Del. & Hud. Canal
N. Y. Gas

4

73
55
45

4%

5

16

•

*8 ‘

8
72
18
93

107%
63%

6?
55

67

*■<

....

,

•

.

,

:oc

79%
117%
....

79%
119
....

123%
96%

124%
96%
72%

.

.

94%

125

97%
128

25
26

loo
128

23%

25%

45

48

39

39%

107%
80

25'

28

25

25
25

*

44%

15”

16

14%

75%

75%

60

60

70
60

43

44

41%

73%

....

....

....

70

70”

...

.

.

..

....

...

....

....

....

23

....

....

.

....

24

23

....

108
61
70

70

80%
119
140

24
....

,.

107%
60%

107%
60%
67
73
114
140

80%

119%
140

107%
61
67
73

114%
140

1874.

Lowest. Highest.

.S
CO
O

6

...

“

.

“
“
“

“

“
“
“

“

•

@.
@.

87%@.

9..4.87%©

10. 4

12

...

...

...

...

4.90
4.90
4.90

©
©

87%©.
@4 87% 4.89%©4.90
S..............
©4 87% 4.89%©4.90

14..4.86%©!
15..4.86%@4
16..4.86%©4
Range




“

“

“
“

4.90%©
4.90%©

“

“
“
“

“
“
“

....

87% 4.89%@4.90

87
87

4.89 ©4.89%
4.89%©....

days.

3

July 17..4.87%©....

....

S

1874.

60

4 90
4. 90

18..4.87%©....
19

20..4.87
21..4.87
22. 4.87

@4.87%
@4.87%
@4.67%
23..4.87 @4 87%
24..4.87%©4.88
25..4.87%@4.88
S.

•

•

“
“

@...
©....

•

89%@4!90 "

•

.

.

.

....

«

•

•

•

•

.

.

.

.

.

.

days.
days.

...

.

.

days.

Is. lOd.
Is. 10 d.
4s. Id.
5s. 7d.

•

•

•

.

.

,

.

.

.

25%

....

Is. 10 5-16<f.

....

Is. 10 7-16d.
4 s. 3 %d.

....

....

....

April

^

49

44%
25%
51%@51%

.

July 11.

....

•

25©25%

July 16.

4s. Id.

.

•

$4 87% per £.

....

May 27.
May 27.
April 27.
July 16.
July 13.

,,

•

27.65

....

60
90

July 17.

.

June 13.

....

Alexandria....

.

June 27.

....

Shanghai

•

.

60

Hong Kong...

•

short.

May 8.
.

Pernambuco..
Montevideo...
Calcutta

•

.-

.

Bombay

....

28,22%@28.27%

•

.

.

6.22%
118%

....

28.22% @28.27%

.

•

,

Valparaiso

28.

.

.

.

5s.

10%d.
52%

,

....

...

[From

our own

correspondent,]

London, Saturday, July 18,1874.
The weather has continued very fine for the
growing crops,
a few early localities
harvest-work has already been
It will not,

however, be general in the south until
Monday week. So far as wheat is concerned, the promise
good one, a full average yield of produce being anticipated.

is

a

Some of the farmers assert, nevertheless, that the magnitude of
the crop is exaggerated, though they are compelled to confess

yield will be larger than for some years past. In fact,
bear in mind that nearly all the conditions have been
favorable, we can scarcely he led to believe that there will be
any deficiency in the yield.
Throughout the season there has
been but one drawback to a healthy development of the wheat
plant, viz.* the untimely frosts of June. As these occurred at the
central period of the year, when the ears were peeping forth,
spme inj ury may have been done and the yield thus curtailed ;
but with that exception, the season has been unusually favorable.
In France, harvest-work has made rapid progress, and in the
south very little remains to be done as regards cereals. Around
Paris, wheat-cutting is in full operation, and in the north of
France it has also been commenced.
In Germany satisfactory
progress has also been made, while in Hungary the crops, though
late, promise to be more abundant than had been anticipated.
With the prospect of augmented supplies of wheat at an early
date, millers are just now restricting their operations as much as
possible. The tone of the markets remains dull, therefore, and
prices have further declined about Is. per quarter. The millers,
however, hold very short stocks, and it is obvious that when the
new crop arrives freely some desire will
be shown to make
extensive purchases.
A more cheerful trade may then he antici¬
pated, and though some anticipate a considerable decline in
prices, yet there are many who, looking at the fact that there is
no reserve of wheat in Europe,
think that any material reduction
is improbable.
In September, no doubt, the farmers will dispose
of a large quantity of wheat in order to provide their Michaelmas
rents and to meet their harvest expenses, but after that period
they will be more cautious sellers. In the coming season we are
not likely to have France a competitor in the foreign markets,
and this fact naturally suggests the idea that we shall be able to
make our purchases abroad on more advantageous terms.
The
quantity of wheat estimated to be afloat to the United Kingdom
is 951,210 quarters, against 1,087,230 quarters last year.
The
average prices of English wheat, barley, and oats in England and
Wales for last week, compared with the four previons years, are
when

as

.89%@4.90

we

follows:

89%@4.90
89%@4.90

1874.
s.

d.

1873.
s.

@4.90%
.90 @4 90%

Wheat

.60
60

9

Barley

.41
41

7
7

59
37

..29 11
.29

29

@4.90%
@4.90%

The

90

27..4.87%@4.88
28 4 87%@4.88
29..4.87%@4.88
30..4.87%©4.88
.

“

days.

S.

26

short.

....

that the

...

71%

60
44

....

.

li.15

about

42”

ie”

.

3 mos.

a

41

.

••

•

Rio de Janeiro

commenced.

45

mm

July 17.

3 mos.

.

.

.

•

Bahia
Buenos Ayres..

36%

..

days.
July 1..4.87%@4 88% 4.90%©4.91
2..4.87%@4 .88% 4 90%@4.91
@
4.90%©
.Holiday

.

...

28%

j Holt

3

.

Genoa.
Naples
New York....

33%

....

.

STERLING EXCHANGE FOR JULY,

.

....

25

m

days.

....

28%

Wednesday. iino%!iio% 110% 110%
...24 109% 109% 109% 109%
Thursday... 2 110% 1110% 110% 1110% Saturday
25jl09% 109% 110 109%
3 110% 110% 110% 110%', Sunday
Friday
261
Saturday.... 4j ..
day.
[Monday
271109% 109% |109% [109%
Sunday.
28 109% 109
| Tuesday
109% 109%
Monday
hliiokiiio" |H0% 110 Wednesday 29 109 109 1109% 1109%
7iiio%: ioii% 110% 109% Thursday... 30 109%|109%jl09%il09%
Tuesday..
91
Wednesday., 8109% 109% 1109% 109% Friday
31 109% 109 ! 109% j 104%
Thursday... 9 109%'109% i 110
109%
110
109% 109% 1110
Friday
July, 1874.
110% 109 ! 110% 109%
110
Saturday...
109% 110
1873
109%
115% 115
116% 115%
“
Sunday
1872
(113% 113% |115% 1115%
Monday
109% 109% 109%; 109%
1871
113% |lll%jll3%jll2%
Tuesday.... 14 109% ,109% 109% i 109%
1870
112% 111% 122% 120%
Wednesday.. .15 109% 1109% 109% 109%
1869
137% 134% 137%! 136%
16 109%,109% [109% 109%
Thursday...
1868
140% 140% [145% 145%
17 109%! 109% 110
110
Friday
1867
138% 138 140% HO
110
110
Saturday.
110% 110%
1866...., 154% 147
155% 149
Sunday
1865
141
1138% 146% J144
“
Monday
110% 110% 110% 110%
1864.... 222
222 ;285
255
Tuesday
110% no
1863
110% 110%
144% 123% 145 128%
“
.22 110
Wednesday.
109% 110%-109%
1862
109
108% 120% 115
Thursday... .23 109% 109% 110 1109% iS’ce Jan. 1,1874 110% 109 1114%
109%
60

.

38%

44%

short.

11.90
25.20
20.27
25.18

44

and in

Date.

...

—

RATE.

short.

July 17.

....

Paris
Paris
Vienna
11.32%@11.37%
Berlin
S.25%@ 6.26
Frankfort
119%@120%
St. Petersburg
32%@32%
Cadiz
48%©48% ,
Lisbon
90 days.
52%@52%
Milan
3 months. 28.22% @28.27%

Penang
Singapore

TIME.

DATE.

short.
11.17%@11.18%
3 months. 25.45 @25.50
20.57 @20.62
short.
25.15 @25.25
3 months. 25.42% @25.47%

....

ti

Date.

Hamburg

LATEST

BATE.

80

exchange were quiet drying the month, and nearly
devoid of speculative interest.
G^id declined towards the close
under the new loan negotiations.
The demand for exchange was
very moderate, and this appeared to be the principal cause for the
lower range in prices.
JULY,

Amsterdam...

Antwerp

92%

Gold and

COURSE or GOLD IN

TIME.

-

....

25

38%
28%

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.

112

92

80

....

....

125

....

80

•

:is%

•

...

....

....

•

93”

•

48
42
112
94

94

•

•

71

100%
129%
26%

41%
107%

16

....

...

45

....

69%

....

61
69
79

116%

.

71%

107%

G7
79

.

16

•

ON

....

70%

125

129%
26%

3
25
29

64

•

16

107%
32%
47%
27
31

95%

100

4%

3
25
29

69

47%

88%

25
31

75

93
125

55

87%
15%

....

73
55
45

45

108

99
71

16

75”

77
18
91

....

5
25
29

25
29

8*

....

.

....

38%
56%

76%

....

Mobile & Ohio
18
Morris & Essex
97%
97%
New Jersey
124% 124% 124% 124%
N. J. Southern
4
4
4
4
N. Y. Cen. &II.R
98% 101
96% 1C0%
do N.Haven & Hart. 132
133
127% 130%
Ohio & Mississippi
24%
26%
21%
26%
do
4S
40
pref. 40
44%
Pacific of Missouri
42
40
41%
41%
Panama
106% 111% 106% 111
Pitte., F. W. & Chi.guar 94
94
95%
93%
Renssalaer & Saratoga.. 110% 110% 106%
106%
Rome & Watertown....
80
80
80
80
St. L., Alton & Terre H. 10
10
10
10
do
30
27
pref 30
27
St. Louis & Iron Moun.. 28%
24
25
28%
29
Tol., Wab. & Western.. 37
39%
38%
Union Pacific
23
27%
29%
23%
Miscellaneous—
Atlantic Mail
%
%
%
*
Pacific Mail
43
45%
39%
44%
Am. District Tel
48
48
48
48
Atlantic & Pacific Tel... 17
17
17
15%
Western Union Tel. v.. 73
76
69
75%
American Coal
Consolidation Coal
43
40
43
41%
19
19
Maryland Coal
17
17
285
285
Pennsylvania Coal
2«5
285
....

S*
105
30

*

93

105%
35%

91

65

EXCHANGE AT LONDON—
JULY 17.

102%

103%
82%
61%

99

76%

1%

93

jJHonetarjj ctn!» Commercial (fuglis!) Nctos

RATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON, AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES.

106

102%

125%

99

76%

65
•

32%

14%

105

47%
27%
82%

27%

27%
31%
126%
98%

94
91

65

47%

55

94

Cattat

[August 1,1874.

31..4-87%§4-88

.4.88%@4.88% 4.89

Oats

d.
5
7
0

1872.
s.

58
33

23

d.
4
3
0

1871.
s.

d.

58 6
34 7
27 10

1870.
s.

50
30
25

d.
7
3-

S

following figures show the imports and exports of cereal
produce into and from the United Kingdom since harvest, viz.,
@4‘90% from Sept. 1 to the close of last week, compared with the
corresponding periods in the three previous years:
@4.91
@4.90%
@4.90%

80,465,160

12.357,689

Oats
Peas
Beans

10,216,650
1,297,629
2,290,079

1.142,683
3,384,655

Flour

6.878,822

able than had been

8,337,623

supply of stock, have bad a good effect. American Government
securities are rather less firm; but in the value of Erie shares an
improvement has been established. Other American railroad
bonds are firm in value. The following were the closing prices of
consols and the principal American securities at to-day’s market:

768.880

877,774

2,748,757

13,128,994

14,369.843

5,951,687

15,193,517
5,(70,072

Indian Corn

28.701,993

10,302,214
8,003,841

39,283,829

Barley

2,524,644

1,751.658
13,560,421
3,979,907

3,196,297

EXPORTS.

609.305

2,193,697

233,105

19,809

16.062

110.855

117,108

18.811

103,779

1,449,817

10.925
2.513

7,120

9.793

2.538

53,494
18,051

127,328
216,986

39,595
25,369

3,060
27,125

Wheat

Barley
Oats
Peas
Beans

Indian Corn
Flour

has been

1871-72.

1870-71.

1872-73.

1873-74.

British railway shares a considerable advance
established. The dividends declared are more favor.

and in the value of

IMPORTS.

Wheat

109

CHRONICLE

THE

August 1, 1874.]

65,317

1,846,964

81.343

market there has been no new {feature. Apart
improvement in the Stock Exchange, the demand has
been very moderate, and the supply of money being good, while
that of bills is small, the rates of discount remain easy. The
Bank return shows that the “other securities” have further
decreaned £1,442,482. The total* is now only £17,024,822, which
is smaller than for some years past.
It is anticipated, however,
that the supply of bills will soon increase, as trade is reviving in
some departments.
A stimulus will, it is thought, be given to
Ia the money

from the

anticipated, and these together with the short

Consols
United States 6 per cent 5-20 bonds, ex 4-0
„
...
1865 issue
do
do
1867 issue,
.
..
‘
5 per cent. 10-40 bonds, ex 4-0
do
do
5 per cent Funded Loan, 1871, ex 4 0
Atlantic and Gt West., 8 per cent. Debent’s,Bischoffsheicrs
Ditto 2d Mortgage, 7 per cent bonds.
Ditto 3d Mortgage...
Erie Shares, ex 4-0
do preferred
Ditto 6 per cent. Convertible Bonds
Ditto 7 per cent Consolidated Mortgage Bonds
Ditto 7 per cent Convertible Gold Bonds
Illinois Central Shares, $100 pd., ex 4-0
New York Central $100 shares
Virginia 6 per cent, bonds, ex 4-0

92%@ 92%
104 @104%

Ii8%@108%

109 @109%

1U5%@105%
xd. 103%@103%
ctfs.. 53%@ 54%
2s @29
13%@ 13%
80 @ 30%
46%@ 47%
92% @ 93%
89 @90
63 @ 64
83 @90
91 @ 92
35 @40

Cable.

EuglUh Market Reports—Per

gathered in, and a marked improve¬
The daily closing quotations in the markets of London and Liver¬
ment is looked forward to in our commercial transactions with
pool for the past week have been reported by submarine telegraph
the United States. The decrease in the supply of bullion is as shown in the following summary:
rather larger than had been anticipated • but this is due to the
London Money and Stock Market.—Ameiican securities have
requirements of the agricultural community during the harvest. ruled
quiet the latter part of the week, closing somewhat dull at
The quotations for money are as follows:
Per cent*
higher figures than a week ago.
Per cent.
4 months’ bank bills
2%@2#
The bank rate has been advanced to three per cent.
Bank rate....
2%
The bul¬
6 months’ bank bills
2%@2%
Open-market rates:
lion in the Bank of England has increased £718,000 during the
4 and 6 months’trade bills. 2%@3
30 and 60 days’ bills
2% @2%
2% <£2%
3 months’bills
past week.
The rates of interest allowed by the joint-stock banks and
Fri.
Thur.
Wed.
Mon.
Tues,
92%
92%
92%
92%
92%
Consols for money
92%
discount houses for deposits are subjoined :
92%
92%
Per cent.
92%
account
92%
trade

as soon as

the harvest is

“

1%@
1#®- .t%@ ...

Jointstock banks
Discount houses at call
Discount houses with 7 days’notice
Discount houses with 14 days’notice...

The

the leading

:

Bank

Bank

Open

rate.

Open

market

rate. market.

per cent, per cent.

percent, percent.

3%

4

3%

Brussels.

3%

3%

Turin, Florence

Berlin
Frankfort

4

Antwerp

3%

2%
2%
2%

Viennaand Trieste....
Madrid, Cadiz and Bar-

5

5

Leipzig

Paris
Amsterdam

Hamburg

7

5%

Annexed is

a

4

6
4

Bremen

6
7

statement

4%

bank post bills
24,704.289
Public deposits
5,670,324
Other deposits
19,808,575
Government securities. 12.597.779
Other securities
20,172,894
Reserve of notes and
coin
11,176,070

109

109%

109%

106

106

104%

104%

1871.

•

Mon.

sat.

8.

25
9
10

1874.

£
25,802.192 26,612.642-26.557.891 27,692,745
4,^36,781
5,740,777 5,734.935 3,825,205
27,135,017 21.488,7o0 18,611,878 19,929,496
15,545.781 13,385,646 13,278,154 14,225,691
18,256,278 20,780,087 18,211,179 17,024,322
£

£

16,918,389

11,493,198

23.017,779

2)4 p. c

92%d.

60s. 9d.
8%d.
*8%d.
la.l%d. *ls. 0%d.

lOd.

9d.

Is. 2d. Is. 2%d.
Is. 3%d.
return.100,930,000 122.823,000 135,894,000 133,613,000 111,837.000

Clearing Rouse
* Price July 9.

Wednesday at a reduc¬
£d. the rupee, and the silver market has, in consequence,
been very dull, on lower terms. Mexican dollars are also cheaper.
There is no demand for bar gold for export, but foreign gold coin
has been taken in small quantities for transmission to Paris. The
following prices of bullion are from the circular of Messrs. Pixley
The council bills on India were

sold

11
34
42

d.
0
9
6
9
9
0

d.

s.

25

8.

25
9
10
11

0
9
6
9
0
0

9
10

11
34

42

Thur.
d.
25 ‘0
9
8

Wed.

Tues.

34

42

d.
0
9
6
9
0
0

8.

10
11
33
42

Pork (mess) new

$bb!...

69

Mon.
8. d.
92 6
69 0
47 0

0

55

Lard (American)
Cheese(Amer’n fine)
...

61

62

6

70

0
0
55 9
62 0

47

6
0

61

6

.—Tallow closes at

per oz.

..per oz

per oz.

Spanish Doubloon;?

standard.

standard,

standard.
per oz.

s.
d.
s. d.
77 9 @ ...
77 9 @ ....
77 11 @
76 00 @77 00

@

....

3%@

....

....

76

SILVER.
s.

Bar Silver, Fine
Bar Silver, containing
Fine Cake Silver
Mexican Dollars

5 grs. Gold

Spanish Dollars (Carolus)




a

standard.
do.

peroz.
per oz.

...per oz..none

Five Franc Pieces.*

There has been

per oz.
per oz.

per oz..none

decided

here.

here.

Frl
d.
92 0
70 6
47 6
56 0
62 0

an

s.

advance of

Mon.
8. d.
6 3
17 0
9
8
38 0
37 0
26 6

“
Petroleumfrefined).... #
“

fine

“

vspnits;

Tues.
8. d.
6
17

38
37
26

3

0
9
8
3
0
6

Wed.
s. d.
6 3
17 0
9
8
38 3

Thur.
8.
d.

37
26

37
26

0
6

6

17

38

3
0
9
8

6
0
6

Frl.
d.
6 3
17 0
9
8.

8

38
3T

26

9
0
6

Oil Markets.—Calcutta linseed is 3d.
has advanced 3s.
oil

London Produce and

lower, while linseed

Lins’dc’ke(obl).# tn 11
'

‘

Linseed (Calcutta)....

Sugar(No.l2 D’ch etd)

spot, # cwt.....
Sperm oil....... tun 97
Whale oil
“
31
“
27
Linseed oil..
on

r.

5
59
“

Tues.

Mon.

Sat.

£

d.

0
6
"

£

11

25 0

s.

d.

£ 8. d.

5 0 11 5 0

59

6

59
““

9
"

25

0

25

0

Wed.
s. d.

£

Frl.

11 59 9 11 59 9 11 59 9
5 0
5 0
5 0
"

25

0

0 0 97 0 0 97 0 0 97 0 0
0 0 31 0 0 31 0 0 31 0 0
9 0 27 6 0 27 9 0 27 9 0

COMMERCIAL AND

Thur.

£ s. d. £ s. d.

25 0

25

0

97 0 0 97 0 0
31 0 0 81 0 0
27 9 0 27 9 0

MISCELLANEOUS NEWS.

....

per oz
peroz..

South American Doubloons
United States Gold Coin

42

quoted last week.

on

GOLD.

34

Thur.
s. d.
92 6
70 0
47 3
56 9
61
6

Wed.
8.
d.
92 6
70 0
47 0
55 9

Tues.
b.
d.
92 6

& Abell:
®

9
9
0

4
3
6
0
0

9
10
11

higher.

tion of

Bar Gold
Bar Gold, fine
Bar Gold, reflnable

3

Fri.
d.
25 0

8.

prices with one excep¬

Liverpool Provisions Market.—These
tion rule

11,309,610 10.833,624

20,440,515 26,972,139 22,663.433 22,411,200
2 p. c. 6)4 P- c. 4^ p. c.
'6)4 p. c.
90%.
93% d.
92%d
92%d.
49s. Hd.
58s. 4d. 59s. 5d.
58s. Od.

8%d.

(Red Winter).

the Bank

1873.

1872.

£

105%

104%

United States 6s (1862) at Frankfort were:
IT. S. 6s (5-208) 1862
97%
Liverpool Cotton Market.—See special report of cotton.
Liverpool Breadstufis 'Market.—This market has ruled quiet,
with lower prices quoted on -wheat at the close.

5

5

Coin

.

109

109%
105%
104%

4%

showing the present position of

£

English wheat
Mid. Upland cotton.,..
No.40 mule yarn fair 2d
quality

109

109%

Tb3 quotations for

6@7

1 Calcutta

1870.

and bullion in
both departments....
Bank-rate
Consols

109

109%
105%
104%

109%

1867

4

5

Genoa
New York

England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of Consols
the average quotation for English wheat, the price of Middling
Upland cotton, of No. 40 Mule yarn fair second quality,
and the Bankers’ Clearing House return, compared with the
four previous years :
including

109

5%
3%

of

Circulation,

92%

32%

(5-20s,)1865,old.. 109

44

5%

6

celona
Lisbon and Oporto....
St. Petersburg

and

Rome

’

U

1%@....

..

following are the quot ations for money at

cities abroad

U. S. 6s

4

4

d.

8.

10%@
10%@

....
....

price

no

@

....

no
no

improvement in the stock

d.

....

price,
price.

Imports and Exports for the Week.—The
show an increase both in dry goods

week

imports this
and general

merchandise.
The total imports amount to $8,740,543
week, against $6,358,478 last week, and $7,814,988 the
week. The exports are $6,661,788 tkiB week, against

this

previous
$5,308,096
last week, and $6,267,356 the previous week. The exports of
cotton the past week were 12,757 bales, against 2,765 bales last
week.

tbe imports at NeW York for week
July 23, and for the week ending (for

The following are

ending (for dry goods)

markets* general merchandise) July 24:

[August 1/1874.

ilo
TOKEION IMPORTS AT NEW YORK FOR THE WEEK.

1871.

1873.

1878.

1874.

Dry goods
General merchandise...

$3,475,014

$3,169,419

$2,756,867

$2,857,793
5,882,753

Total for the week..

$8,395,362

$8,535,341

$6,967,706

215,295,673

251,997,795

$8,740,546
230,434,477

$223,691,035

$260,533,136

4,920,318

Previously reported....
.

Since Jan. 1

In

our

4,210,839

5,365,922

239,465,170

.

$246,432,376 $239,175,023

report of the dry goods trade will be found the

importsof

dry goods for one week later.
The following is a statement of the exports (exclusive of specie)
from the port

of New York to foreign ports, for the weekending

July 2S:
EXPORTS FROM NEW

YORK FOR TUB WEEK.

1874.

1873.

1872.

1871.

$6,661,788

$4,277,0 1

$4,052,332

$5,764,323

132,806,971

124,277,797

157,131,573

163,943,315

$137,084,082

$128,330,129

$162,895,836

$170,605,103

For the week

Previously reported..

.

Since Jan. 1

The following will show the exports of specie from the port of
New York for the week ending July ‘Jo, 1874, and since the

the corresponding

beginning of the year, with a comparison for
date in previous years :

July23--Str. Ilammouia

Gold bars.

Gold bars.;
...Gold bars
One keg Am

.London

..,

$50,000

Silver bars

Liverpool

July 22—Str. Cuba

Paris

25,000
153,863
68,280

50,oOO

55,276
37,200

One hundred & forty-

Liverpool

July 25—Str. Adriatic

gold c’n.

Two boxes gold bars.
Two boxes gold and
silver bars

.Havre

July 25—Str. Vilie de Paris.

seven silver bbrs.
One box Amer’n gold

206.961

.

July 25—-Str. City of Chester.. ..Liverpool
July 25—Str. Oder
London

6,500

Nine silver bars

6,600
17,000

Gold coin

($676,680

Total for the week

32,162,324

Previously reported
Total since Jan. 1,
Same time in1873
1872

1874

$32,839,004

Same time in—

| 1869

...

<

53,162,750 |!186S

58,972,565

50,937,341 ] 1867
33,963,032 | 1866

1871
1870

The imports of specie at
been as follows:

this port during the past week have
Torto Prince

July 20—Str. Adriatic
July 21—Str. City of Panama

Li verpool
Aspinwall

,Silver

July 21- Str. South America
July 25—Sir. City of Havana

St. Thomas
Havana

-Fractional Currency.--, Leg. Ten,
Notes in
Circulation Eeceived. Distributed. Dislrib’d
835,700
412,900
648,000
345,315,504
650,000
549,500
1,022,000
345,640,919

Week

ending
July 26
Aug. 2..T.
Aug. 9

Aug. 16
Aug. 23
Aug. 30
Sept. 6
Sept. 13
Sept. 20
Sept. 27

.

Gold bars.
,Gold

1,701
25,t 00
2,502
2,786
2,883

Gold

Si 1 ver
Gold

1,396
1,760

Silver.....

347,574,263

350,030,448

Oct. 4...

347,840,038

OCt. 11
Oct. 18
Oct. 25
Nov. 1
Nov. 8
Nov. 15
Nov. 29
Dec. 6...
Dec. 13
Dec. 20
Dec. 27
Jan. 3
Jan.10
Jan.17
Jan.24
Jan. 31
Feb. 7...
Feb. 14
Feb. 21
Feb. 28
March 7.
March 14/.
March 21

347,919,548
348,191.900
348,229,680
348.350,949
348,420,225

2,6 0,122

Total since Jan. 1,
Same time iu—
1873
1872
1871

1870

$2,869,261
2,739.862
3,313,306
7,330,217

National Treasury.—The

ir

$2,725,674

1871
Same time in
1869
1868
1867

—

$9,767,172
4,065,006
1,743,560

following forms present

a sum¬

mary of certain weekly transactions at the National Treasury.
1.—Securities held by the U. S. Treasurer in trust for Nati )nal
Banks and balance in the Treasury :
Week

For

ending Circulation.
July 26.. 390,815,250
Aug. 2
390,855,250
Aug. 9 ..390,781,250
Aug. 16
391,025,250
Aug. 23
391,197,350
Aug. 30
391,565,450
Sept. 6.. 391,970,050
Sept. 13
Sept. 20.. 392,385,300
Sept. 27.. 392,610,800
Oct. 4.... 392,655,000
..

..
..

..

Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Nov.

Nov.
Nov.

Nov.
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.

Dec.

11..
18..
25..
1..
8..
15..
22
29..
6..
13..
20..
27..
3..
10..

Jan.
Jan.
Jan. 17..

Jan. 24..
Jan. 31
Feb. 7..
Feb. 14..
Feb. 21..
Feb. 28..
March 7..
March 14
March 21

April 4...

ForU. S.

Deposits.

r-Bal. in
Total.

15,860,000 406.675.250
15,680,000 406 535,250
15,660,000 406.441.250
15,665,000 406.690.250
15,615,000 406,812,350
15,715,000 407,280,450
407.690,050

15,720,000

15,759,000 408,135,300
15,750,000 498,360,800
15,715.000 408.370,000

392,711,000

15,665,000

15,753,000

392.852,100
392.910,100

79,782,700

408,376,000

403.383.100
15,873,000 408.562,000
15,834,000

7,987,335

82,611,204
89,966,119
87,213,539

9,126,418 43,964,600
10.238,705 43,513,300
10,413,676 43,947,700

89,031*470

46,947,300
47,365,019

11,629,519
14,716,742
83,623,595 14,864,091
84,026,280 14,751,988
81.430.360
4,689,256
80,082,107 4,348,676
80,552,863 3,215,239
81,868,513
8,164,530

30,948,400
29,147,400
29,147,400

409.826.900
409.856.900
409.747.900

79,081,477

79,936,397
81,820,600

3,548,514 28,558,680
3,298,661 29,037,080
3,250,000 28,850,000
’

83,256,940

556,099

30,117*500

84,759,929

568,175
693,602

31,309,200
30.037 800

409,75(5,400

85,970.440

89,314,097

1,525,478 32.850.800

409.344.100
408,856,000

85,360,*430

4,*8*71,996 42,908*966

85.867.361

408.771.100

85,949,553

3,705,405 45.661.800
2,261,022 45.406.300

409.156.400
408.950.400
408.824.400
408,781,150

81* 565,085

4,976,886

447852.400

80,689.404
86,580,377

4,124,197

44.330.700

2,868,609

408.901.400

84,246,933

3,234,362

40*569,200

409,018,400

86,240,743
87,817,545

8.002,629

..

..
.

408.814.500

16.465.200 409.435.900

86,801,529

16.510.200 410.257.400
16,570,000 409.439.200
16.535.200 409,444,300
16.535.200 426,066.000

87,759,000

40.627.800
40.705.700
4,086,124 37.176.100
3,781,554 35,613,500
3,658,803 34.931.100
3,021,874 33.705.300

89,031,885

7,977*.097* 85,2*55* 600

409.150.400
409.281.900

16.535.200 409,515,800
16.560,090 409,633.000

87,360,169

87.835,628

88.611,729
87.585,337

2,730,408

9,583,126 35.856 600
8,724,633 35,073.700
10,548,965 32.413.600

16.560.200 409.279.200 82,999,903
16.560.200 409.417.700 81,083,263 11.492,177
16 535.200 409.398.700
80,189.487 13,327,435
16.635.200 408.651.400 80,715,577 13,780,171
July 11. 390.111,800 16.595.200 406,707,0(0 70,827,601 12,443,075
July 18. 389,259,800 16.695.200 405,955,000 70,694,077 12,714,924
6.. 392,719,000
13 392,857,600
20 392,863,500
27. 392,016,200
.

July 25. 389,690,300 16.550.200 405.240.500 71,197,725 12,864,117

30.977.600
29.465.300
29.797.400

81,683,900
32.770.700

33,043,100

1,1*92,6*54

1,453*200

348,334,389
348,571,869
349,071.057
348,977,883
349,081.083
349.086,208
349,059,558

13
20
27

33.800

477,600
819,600
362.000

986,800
913,100
155,200
23,200

694.000
616.800

723,200

2,469,500
2.099,500
1,503,800
2,035,000
1,849,000

222,800

2,265,000
1,688,5(0
979,800
1,028,200

647,200

686,400

798.500

859, (iOO

998,800
889,600

410,000
485,200
644,000
462,800
891,400
438,700

860.000

770,000
1,105,609
1,055,000
1,054.200
1,196.300
326,900
353,560

-

357,000
357,000
357.000

82,600

1,298,060
1,384,000
980,800
914,000

634,300
566,200

958,200
541,100
830,300

1,015,500
1,486,000
761,500

356,400
628,900

972.500

1,017,500
816,500

942,200

1,380,500
1,198,500

667,200
528,100
683,500

889,500

1,070,000

979,100

749,000,

613,600

1,441.000
3,053,000
2,800,200

782.100

838,300
653.700

[579,600

Atlantic and Pacific Railroad.—The

1,021,000
1,292,000

709,800

672,000
466,900
548,100
604,800
690,900
878,500
916,300
623,000

350.620,062
348,908,079
349,237.821
34(>, 659.868

1 972.000

186,800

357,000

350,581,932

1,408,000
217,000
1,743,000

605,000
245.600

1,213,000

349,039,869

6

6,911,400
2,101,002
600,081)

365.600

978,800
815,600
786,800
812,800

348.858.598

349,132,276
348,911,683
348,778,733

2,782,800
15,709,370

1,486,880

1,247,000
1,187,000
1,050.000

348.603.188

348,637,504
348,583,468
348,648,605
348,586,000
348,695,954

811.500

1,413.576

1,167.900
1.116,800

318,525,547
348,662,175

July 11

Stock Exchange have
the Atlantic & Pacific
reports of the Com¬

admitted to the call the bonds mentioned of
Railroad Company.
The following are the
mittee on Stock List:

rACIFIC RAILROAD COT.
MISSOURI.)

OF THE ATLANTIC AND
RAILROAD OF

(PACIFIC

The Atlantic & Pacific Railroad Company make application for the ad¬
mission of live hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) of the first mortgage bonds
of the Pacific Railroad (of Missouri), Carondelet Branch, to the Stock List,

and, iu compliance with the rules
make statements as follows :

of the Stock Exchange, we beg leave to

September 74, 1872, the First Mortgage

On

Bonds $7,000,009, and the Second

Mortgage Bonds $3,000,000, and the stock of the comgany were placed on the
list. Since that date the Carondelet Branch of the Pacific Railroad has been
completed, adding fifteen and a half miles of main liue and extensive sidings,
as also connections with the system of iron furnaces recently erected on the
Mississippi River at Carondelet, and the steam transfer at that point, which

gives us connection* with all

the lines eastward from St. Louis. The Caron-

deh t Branch was constructed to meet the demands of the inc-easing iron and
live stock business of the main line, which it was not possible to do on the
main line within the limits of St. Louis. It intersects the main line at Kirk¬
wood Station, running thence southeasterly to Carondelet about fifteen and a
half miles, to and along the river front of the Mississippi, with

buildings, equipments and connections. It has added more than
the value of the Missouri Pacific property.
The liens on the property secured by mortgage are as follows:
$7,000,000 1st mortgage, six pur cent gold.
$3,000,000, 2d mortgage, seven per cent, currency.
$800,000, real estate in St. Louis, eight per cent, currency.
$500,000, 1st mortgage, Carondelet Branch, six per cent, gold.

The second mortgage has been reduced $127,000 by the
will he further diminished $66,000 in July next.
The requirements for interest on secured funded debt arc
Six per cent gold on $7.000,000
Six per cent gold on $500,009
Seven per cent currency on $2,873,000
Eight per cent currency on $800,000

Total
The net earnings of the Missouri Pacific liue for
31. 1873, were $1,401,044 42.
The requirements to meet interest on secured
*r

over

one-half of net earnings.

$715,110
the year ending December

indebtedness are hut little
least $1,600,000,
$7,000,000 of stock will

Rentals....
Dividend
Premium

Total

on

fts sidings,
$1,000,000 to

sinking fund, and
as follows:
$420,000
30,000
201,110
.
64,000

The earnings for present year indicate that they will net at
and payments for interests, rentals and dividends on
he as follows:
Interest on secured indebtedness
Interest on $1,500,000, incomrs seven pur cent currency
Interest on $700,000, St. Louis Co. loans, seven per cent currency

43,634,000

16.360.200
16,360.100
1G,360,200
16.320.200
16 511,200
16.210.200
16,220,200
16.265.200
16.245.200
16.215.200
16.270.200
392,916,700 16.365.200

392.983,900
392,515,900
392,410,900
392,494,300
392,645 200
392.740,200
392,604,200
392,515,9*0
392.656,200
392.773,200
392,830.200

.




36,194,700

34,225,300
34,142.700

393,211,900 16.365.200 409.580.100
392,985,900 16.360.200 409.346.100

April 11. 392,970,700
April 18. 393,747,200
AprP 25 392,869,200
May 2
392,909,100
May 9
409,530,800
May 16 392,980,600
May 23.. 393.071,000
June
June
June
June

43,406,100

408.686.100

15,884,000 408.794.100
393,087,600 16,600,000 409,687,600
393.215.900 16,611,000
393,245.900 16,611,000
393.211,900 16,536,000
393,241,200 16.515.200

Coin cer
tificates

Currency, outst.’d’g.

91,549,889

392,630,100
392.689.000

Coin.

Treasury

1,016,000
628,700

3 4 3,489,571

OFFICIAL STATEMENT

Previously reported..

1,078.000

348,435.328
348.575.178

April 4
April 11
April 18
April 25
May 2.
May 9
May 16
May 23
June
June
June
June

978,000

1.352.500

348,536,499

848,630.134
348,578,551
348,5M,729

675,000
851.500
1.120,900
833,000

605.600
716,200
790.600

702,400

1.311.500

348,444,659

$45,552

Total for the week

345,727,078
346,115,498
346,157,113
346,444,068
316,893,459

s

$7,524

Silver

July 20—Str. Claribel

2.—National bank currency in circulation; fractional currency
received from the Currency Bureau by U. 8. Treasurer, and dis¬
tributed weekly; also the amount of legal tenders distributed:

$715,110
105,000

49,000
135,500

350,000

50,000

gold

requirements from net earnings
$1,404,010
dated October 1, 1873. and are due twenty

The Carondelet Branch bonds are

from date. Jesse Seligman, of New York, and James Baker, of St.
are trustees. The par value of each bond is $1,000, and they are num¬
bered from 1 to 500 inclusive. Coupons are payable"' at the National Bank of
Commerce, New York, semi-annually on April kud October 1.
The Missouri Pacific property is under lease to the Atlantic & Pacific Rail¬
road Company for 999 years, from June 29,' 1872, and is managed exclusively
by the officers of the latter company.
years

Louis,

Dividends
the

National

Bl*»ke,

as

and
Park

Interest taxed in 1S70.—In the
Bank of New York agt. Marshall

Collector- of

Internal Revenue

for the

B.

XXXIId

Collection District of the State of New York, action was
brought in the United States Circuit Court to recover $3,591 09
paid under protest as & tax on a dividend declared by the plain¬
tiff on Dec. 16,1870, the plaintiff declared a dividend of $123,076 92

earnings, incomes and gains, accrued from July 1, 1870'
Dec. 31, 1870, inclusive, and the Assessor of Internal Revenue

from its
to

XXXIId Collection District of New York on June 20,1871,
assessed against the plaintiff a tax of 2£ per cent cn the foregoing
amount of $123,076 92.
for the

plaintiff claims that, under the act of July 14,1870, divi¬
and gains which were declared by
banks during the last five months of 1870, are not taxable. Judge
Shipman upholds the plaintiff's claim, and says : “ Let judgment
be entered for the plaintiff for the amount of taxes paid upon the
dividends and surplus earning as specified in the statement of
facts, with interest from the dates of payment."
In the United States Circuit Court, in the case of the Erie
Railway Company against William B. White as Collector of the
Sixth Collection District, in which action was brought to recover
about $38,000 paid under protest as a tax upon interest coupon
bonds, Judge Shipman gave a decision in favor of the defendant.
The interest on the bonds in question was paid for the period
between Jan. 1 and July 1, 1870, and the question was : During
that period, were corporations liable to pay any income tax on
interest coupon bonds ? Judge Shipman holds that they were,
and his decision is based upon that of the United States Supreme
The

dends of earnings, income,

18624.$5,3

of the act of 1866.
The Railroad Company was represented
Messrs. Williams & Thompson, attorneys.
It was claimed
them that the act in question applied only to roads traversing

Georgia Bonds at the Stock Exchange.—
following notices were posted at the Stock Exchange :

Missouri and

Committee on Securities,

New York Stock Exchange, )
New York, July 25, 1874.
j

This committee recommend that the bonds of the State of Missouri, dated
July 1, 1874, payable to bearer tweuty years after date, in New York, bearing

interest at six per cent per annum, with coupons payable Jan. 1 and July 1, in
New York, numbered 1 to 1,100, each for $1,000, issued under ‘*An act to pro¬
vide for the issue of funding bonds, for the purpose of paying the State

indebtedness, maturing during the years
30, 1874, be placed on tne regular list and

by
by

the

public domain ; that the right of way which had been condemned
and purchased l»y the Railroad -Company under State laws, was
the property of the Railroad Company, and, under the Fifth
Amendment to the Constitution, could not be taken without com¬
pensation.
Judge Drummond, in his decision, held that the act of July 24,
1866, limits the powers therein conferred to such military and
post roads of the United States as are owned or exclusively con¬
trols d by the Government; that the act does not include railroads
which have been designated as post routes by other acts of Con
gress, over which the Government exercises no control, but simply
contracts for the carriage of the mails of the United States ; that
neither under the act of 1866, nor under any other act, can Con¬
gress take or authorize the taking of the private property of a
railroad corporation lor the purpose of erecting and maintaining
a telegraph line without compensation for the franchise so sought

Court in the Stockdale cases.

The

111

IME GHiRKiWIGIlI/

August i, 1874.]

1874 and 1875, &c., approved March

to be

granted,—iV. T. Tribune.

—The Canadian Secretary for the Colonies has agreed to act as
arbitrator between British Columbia and the Dominion for the
settlement of the disagreement respecting the,terms of the union,

his decision as final.

provided both governments agree to accept
—A lumber convention was in session,
attended by a large number of delegates

July 30, at Ottawa, Qnt.,

from various parts of

Quebec and Ontario. Hon. John Hamilton, of Hawkesbury, was
elected President, and Mr. Lord, of Hull, Secretary. A resolution
was adopted recommending the formation of a Dominion lum¬
bermen’s association.
—We notice that the United States

Mortgage Company has

called Missouri sixes funding bonds, declared an interim dividend of three and a half per cent, payable
one in 1894.
Very respectfully,
Edward Brandon, Chairman.
on and after August 1.
Treasurer of the State of Georgia has notified the Fourth National
The
Bank (the agent for paying coupons) not to pay the seven per cent gold bonds,
issued under the act of Sept. 15, 1870, Nos. 796, 1145, 946, and 1,619, each for
BANKING AND FINANCIAL.
1,000. Said bonds are not a good delivery from this date.
Edward Brandon,

Chairman Committee of Securities.

stock of this Company has been
the Board list, and the lollowing statement was sub¬

New London Northern.—The

placed

on

mitted

:

London, Conn., to Miller’s Falls, Mass., 100
Connections—With Shore Line of the New York, New Ilaven & Hartford
Railroad; New York, Providence & Boston Railroad; Norwich & Worcester
Railroad ; Hartford, Providence & Fishkiil Railroad ; Boston, Hartford & Erie
Railroad ; New Ilaven, Middletown & Willimantic Railroad; Boston & Albany
-Railroad ; Ware River Railroad ; Springfield, Athol & Northeastern Railroad ;
Vermont & Massachusetts Railroad ; and the leased lines of the Central Ver¬
Length of Road—From New

miles.

Railroad, of which it forms a part.
Lease.—The road, in connection with a line of freight boats owned by the
New London Northern Railroad Company, is leased to and operated by the
Central Verniout Railroad for 20 years from December 1, 1871.
Terms of the Lease.—The Central Vermont Railroad Company pay an an¬
nual rent of $150,000. in quarterly instalments, on the first days of March,
June, September and December, and $1,500 each year for organization expen¬
mont

ses.
It is provided, however, in the contract, that whenever the gross earn¬
ings of the road for any year shall exceed by $100,000 the sum of $510,000 they
are to pay for every such $100,000 in excess an additional sum of $15,000.
As
collateral security for the faithful performance of this contract by the Central
Vermont Railroad Company, this company holds $150,000 of the Income and
Extension Bonds of the Trustees and Managers of the Vermont Central and
the Vermont and Canada Railroad Companies, which are secured by a first

lien upon all the property of these companies.
Capital Stock—The capital of this Company
.

$100 each

is 15,000 shares, of

Its funded debt consists of 1st mortgage six per cent bonds,
due in 1885, coupons payable April 1st and October 1st,
in New York
Second mortgage bonds seven per cent.,
coupons
June and December, payable in New York

due 1892,

COO,000

500,000

steamboats and equipment
the

income.

$150,000

1,5C0
475

organization expenses

IX

24
2

2

IK

2X
2X
24

2
2
2

IX

24

2

24

IX
ix

i*

24
2X
2X

2
2

')

ix

2

of the last number of

the Wall Street

lx

Reporter, containing a full

report of the operations of the past week, and explaining how large
are made in Btock speculations, with bat a small risk of loss, will be

profits
mailed

address.

STOCK PRIVILEGES.—J.

Hickling & Co., 72 Broadway, N. Y.,

negotiate

in 100 shares or any part of same at
Buy and sell all kinds of securities on commission. Send

Puts, Calls and Double Privileges
favorable rates.

for “ The Wall Street

Review,” P. O. Box 1535.

THE COUNTY OF VAN WERT, OHIO, proposes to borrow $80,000 for
public buildings, and the law authorizing the loan permits 8 per cent interest
and also that the bonds can be made payable where the taker desires. The
former bonded debt of the county was at 7 per cent and highly esteemed by
holders; the county at present has no debt. Communications addressed
to care of The Chronicle office will receive attention.

$151,975
COTTON CONTRACTS

expenditures.

Four two per cent dividends, paid January,
October
Interest on first mortgage six per cent bonds
General expense

April, July and

$120,000

Advances made on

18,000

8,000—141,000

earnings.

02

195,065 30
270,670 60

Bought and sold on Commission only
Cotton and approved Stock Exchange Collaterals.
R. M. WATERS & CO.,. 5fi Broad street.

$10,875

Yearly surplus

1865...$300,766 59
1866... 327,476 59
1867... 381,838 95

1868...$404,846 69
1869... 421,680 59
1370... 468,700 35

1871...$512,801 91
1872... 608,688 60
1873... 590,417 72

Telegraph Lines on Railroad Property.—A decision involv¬
ing important principles was rendered July 21, in the United
States Circuit Court at Chicago by Judge Drummond in the case
of the Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Company against the Chi
cago Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Company. The Telegraph
Company accepting the act of Congress of July 24, 1866, entitled
An act to aid in erecting telegraph lines, and secure to the
Government the use of the same for postal, military, and other
purposes," began the construction of a line along the route of the
Rock Island Railroad, between Chicago and Omaha. The Rail¬
road Company ordered the Telegraph Company to desist after a
few poles were set; therefore, the Telegraph Company applied to
the United States Circuit Court for an injunction restraining the
Railroad Company from interfering with the construction of their
lines, claiming that, as the Rock Island road carried the United
States mail, it was a post road, and came under the provisions




Distance
from Market

$1,500,000

Rent of road

t(

DOUBLE

Pkivilxoks.

IX
24
2X

i x
2*

Union Pacific
Western Union
Pacific Mail

copy

“CALLS.”
Above
Market
Price.

“PUTS.”
Below
Murket
Price.

Rates for week ending
August 7, 1874.
N. Y. Central
Lake Shore
Erie
......
Rock Island
Wabash
Northwestern..
Mil. & St. Paul
Ohio & Mississippi
C. C. & I c

free to any

Of these second mortgage bonds there have been negotiated $225,000, the pro¬
ceeds having been expended for the purchase of
for the road, and for permanent improvements ; and the rest of the $500,000
are to be appropriated in like manner according to the provisions of
con¬
tract with the Central Vermont Railroad Company ; the interest upon these
bonds is to be paid by the Central Vermont Railroad during the continuance
of the contract. There is no floating debt.
The annual income of the company and expenditures are:

Received for
Other rents

CO.t Stock and Privilege Brokers, 48 Broad street
York, having contracted with responsible parties, can, for the coining
week, negotiate Stock Privileges at the following distance from the market
price of the stock. A Put or Call on 100 shares, including commission, will
cost $106 25, and for a Double Privilege the cost will be $212 50. Privilege
Certificates for less than 100 shares will be issued at the same rates.
L. W. HAMILTON &

New

RAILROAD BONDS.—Whether you

wish to BUY or SELL, write to
Wall street, N. Y.

HASSLER & CO., No. 7

MONEY invested in Stock Privileges at the present time will be sure to
yield large returns during the next thirty days.
We are prepared to negotiate Puts and Calls on members of the. Stock Ex¬
change, or equally reliable parties, at a distance of 1 to 2% per cent from the
market on the active stocks, costing $100 for 100 shares. Double Pritdeges,
$200 for 100 shares, time 30 days. , Parts of 100 shares at same rates.
speculations are carried on v 1th privilege contracts by all the
opera¬
tors in New York, and has become the favorite system of operating. Losses
are limited to very small amounts, while the chance of profit is made more
certain. Parties entrusting us with their orders may rely on oar making the
most advantageous contracts possible. We wifi also make operations against

principal

contracts

negotiated by us, and hold contracts as

Stock

margin in place of cash.
Lake Shore, O. O.I
these
shall

Among the best stocks for privilege operations are Erie,
.
C.. Union Pacific, and Pacific Mail. All contracts the last 30 days on
stocks have proven profitable ventures. The indications are that we
continue to have an active market. Quotations and .full information will be
found in the “Week’s Doings in Wail Street,” containing the highest and
lowest

prices of stock* for the past ten years; with a general .review of the
prospective market. Copy mailed free to any address.
*
TUMBRIDGE & CO., Banker* and Broker*.
Wall
cornet Jftroadway, N. H

prosent and
v

112

THE CHR0N1CLR

Bankers’ (Sa^ette.

Qtlje

[August 1, 1874,

NATIONAL B ANKS ORGANIZED.

The United States

Comptroller of the Currency furnishes the
following statement of National Banks organized the past week :
2159—First National Bank of Kasson, Minnesota ; authorized

capital $50,000.
Paid-in-capital *35,910. David Anthony, Pies’t.; E. E. Fairchild,
Cashier. Authorized to commence business July *25, 1874.

period.
5s, funded, 1881, ..coup. ...Quarterly.
(is, 1881
reg. .Jan. & July.
6s, 1881
coup. .Jan. & July.
6s, 5 20’s, 1862
coup. .May & Nov.
6s, 5-20’s, 1864
coup. .May & Nov.
6s, 5-2t)’s, 1865....'.coup. .May & Nov.
6s, 5-201s,1865 new,coup. Jan.«& July.
6s, 5-20’s, 186?
coup. Jan. & July.
coup. .Jan. & July.
6s, 5-20’s, 1868
5s, 10 40's
....reg. Mar. & Sept.
5s, 10-40’s
coup. .Mar. & Sept.
*

Cent.

Vtatlroadg.
Connecticut & Passumpic Rivers.
Middlesex Central

3
3

Naugatuck

Books Closed.

Rutland, pref
Terre Haute & Indiana
Banka.
Corn Exchange
National Bank of Republic
Insurance.

1

Aug, 1
$3.50s Aug. 1
5
Aug. 10

.

Aug.

5
4

..
..

Gebhard Fire.

l'july 25 to Aug. 3

Aug. 1C

10
5

Broadway

Aug.
Aug.

l!,

3l,

attention of Wall street has still been concentrated

not

tion

on

—

even

at

date.

outline

the

now

of the whole

transac

no

indication of

a

turn towards

higher

Commercial paper is a shade easier,
for short date at 6@G per cent; prime 3 and
rates.

with a sharp demand
4 months’ paper sells
at 6(5)7 per cent.
The failure was reported on Thursday of Henry
G. Marquand, vice-president of the St. Louis Iron Mountain and
Southern Railroad.
Inquiry, however, elicited the information
that the rumor was false, and grew out of some misapprehension
concerning a draft on the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad. This
draft was for $3< ,000, and was held by a National bank in St.
Louis. It fell due on Wednesday, and the intention was to have
it extended for a brief period, but owing to some misapprehen¬
sion the extension
had closed.

affairs is

was

not

granted until

We understand that

now

being prepared

a

for

an

statement of the

submission to

company’s
the Stock

1674.
1873/
,
1872.
July 18.
Differences.
July 25.
July 26.
July 27.
Loans anadis. $285,315,000 $234.11.8.100 Dec. $1,146,900 $289,389,*.00 $295,136,900
Specie
27,755 300 26.648,700 Dec. 1,108,»00 31.249,300 2J,498,700
*

Circulation....

Net deposits..
Legal tenders.
United

25,727.500
25.767,600 Inc..
242.983,600 244,313,300 Inc..
61.853.700

States

63.714.800 Inc..

40.100

1,329.7( 0
1,861,100

Bonds.—The market

State and

-27,225,100
2 59.li8.300
49,957.000

has

*116%

1163*
117%

116%
117%
1183*

*118

*112% 112%
*113% *113%
*117% 117%

/

27,350.000

245,062.700
53,751,900

July

108%
!()’.•%
105%

103%

Since Jan. 1.
Highest.

r

Lowest.

31.

24.
109

109

109%
105%
103%

109%

106%
107%
103%
102%

106

104%

A pi. 22 110 Feb. 19
Jan. 5 110% June 10
July 30
Feb. 16 106
Jan. 15 105 May 28

Railroad Bonds.—Business in State

bonds at the

Exchange has been mainly limited to a few dealings in

Stock

In railroad bonds the principal

Tennessees and South Carolinas.

sharp advance in

feature has been the increased demand for and

The prospective
calling in of five-twenties and the popular character of these

prices of the Central and Union Pacific issues.

undoubtedly contributed to this
an advantage at this time in
holding their charters from the United States Government, and
not being sulject to State control and Grangers’ legislation.
A
stimulus has been given to Union Pacifies by the better prospects

Pacific Railroad bonds

have

The Pacific roads also have

result.

that the

incomes will

be

exchanged for the

new

sinking fund

mortgage bonds, and tlie report that large amounts have already
been exchanged, as also by the announcement that interest on
bonds and

presented for exchange will be
paid to-morrow, August 1, without rebate.
The following securities were sold at auction this week :
the

new

on

incomes

$50,000 South Side Railroad Company of Long Island, known as first mort
gage

extension and convertible bonds, with all the

coupons

attached, $1,000

each, 10.
A so, $180,000 more of the same in three lots, all bringing the same price.
$14,000 Brady’s Bend Iron Company first mortgage seven per cent bonds,
due 1876, interest February and August, with unpaid coupons from August 1,
1871, to Febjuarv, 1874, inclusive (hypothecated), *1,000 each, 50.
.50 dividend scrip ol Central New Jersey Land and Improvement Com¬
pany, 41%.
M ssrs. Ilassler & Co. say in their circular as to bonds in defftult for in¬
terest: “ When a bond is sold, all unpaid coupons.whether overdue or not. yet
matured, must accompany tlie bond or their fac^ value will be deducted from
the price named, and if the coupon calls for gold the premium on gold will
also he deducted from the price named, and if the coupons calls for gold,
the premium on gold will also be deducted. II coupons have been cut off

they should be pinned on and kept with the bonds. Bonds from which
coupons have been funded arc, as yet, mostly unsalable
even when accom¬
panied by the Scrip Certificate. This is caused by tlie uncertainty which
exists

as

to whether the roads now

under

a

cloud”

will be able to meet the

coupons when due. After the payment of one or two coupons from the
Funded Scrip it is quite probable that both tue scrip and the bonds ” ex¬
coupons will have a market.”
'
next

Closing prices dai I v,and the range since Jan. 1, have been:

hour after the bank

Exchange.
The following table shows the changes from the previous week
and a comparison with 1873 and 1872:
r

*1163*
117% 117%
*117% *118
11*% 112%
*113% *113%
*117% *117%

*118

July

17.

U. S. 6s, 5-20’s, 1865
U. S. 6s, 5-20’s, 1867
U. 8.5s, 10-40’s
New 5s

known is

for about

at this moment there is

117

117

116

116%

uiade at the Board.

was

July

new

substantially as follows : that direct bids
$20,000,000 were received from applicants within the
United States, of which $10,000,000 were accepted and the balance
rejected, because they were made at par in gold less a commission,
or were otherwise
objectionable. The syndicate arrangement as
finally agreed upon with Messrs. A. Belmont & Co.>
and
J.
&
W.
Seligman
&
Co.,
together with the
foreign houses which they represent, and to the First National
Bank of this city, gives to them $45,000,000 of the new bonds
direct, at par in gold less £ cent commission, and also the option
to take the whole balance of $124,000,000 at the same price, before
the 1st of February, 1875.
It was at first supposed that an equaj
amount—$55,000,000 of five-twenties of 18G2 would be immedi¬
ately called in, but it appears that a call will be issued August 1
for only $25,000,000, and subsequent calls will be issued therealter.
This is alleged to bo for the sake of convenience to the
Treasury Department when the bonds come in, but to the sceptical
it gave a handle for rumors that the amount negotiated had been
less than reported.
Money on call has been in great abundance at 2'a3 per cent, and
as

*116% *116%

116%
117&

Closing prices of securities in London have been as follows :
..

regard to the syndicate agreement

The

*117

ronr

The

having been known till Wednesday, and not officially

announced

*1155*

Amount July 1.
,
—Range since Jan. 1.
Registered.
Coupon.
Highest
117
5s, funded 1881.. ..coup.
Apr. 28 $178,472,450 $137,328,300
6s, 1881
reg. 1153a July
120% May 27 193,185,750
122
A pr. 29
6s, 1881
89,550,600
coup. 116% July
6s, 5-20’s, 1862
118% Apr. 29
16,641,400 151,013,300
coup
111% July
Jan.
25,974,150
33,(18,650
6s, 5-20’s, 1864
coup. 114
120% Apr. 29
Jan.
33,729,500 118,804,850
121% Apr. 15
6s, 5-20’s, 1865
coup. 115
56.885.050 145,778.050
126% June 23
6s, 5-20’s, 1865, new coup. 114% Jan.
87,822,5^0 222,f01 850
121% June 22
6s, 5-20’s, 1867
coup. 114% Jan.
Jan.
121% June 22
13.936,500
23,537,500
6s, 5-20’s, 1868
coup. 114
1153* May 22 141,214,200
5s, 10-40’s
..reg. 110% Feb.
116% Feb. 2S
53,353,100
5s, 10-40’s
coup. 112% July
£
nurrortOTT
23
64,623,512
o

Market and Financial Situation.

Government loan, the terms in

SI

in prices since Jan. 1 and the amount of each clasfl
bonds outstanding July 1, 1874, were as follows:

of

Friday, July 31, 1874—6 P. M.
The Money

119
*113

—.

1

Aug.

30.

113% *1133* 113%
117
117
*110% *117% 117%
118% *118% 118% 118% 118%
113 3* *113%
113% 111% ♦111
115% 115% 115% 116
115%

Lowest
111
Jan.

5%

Aug.

sale

July July

US* *113%

113tf
1163*

117%
11834
*112% *112%
*1133* *113%
.Jan. <fc July. *117
117%

This is the price bid, no

29.

The range

:

Whkk
P’able.

Pjer

Company.

reg.

July

28.

27.

,

6s Currency

recently been announced

25

.

DIVIDENDS.
The following Dividends have

July

July July

Int.

July July July
25

6eTenn., old.cxc
69 Tenn, new ex c
6s N. Car., old
6s N. Car., new

*5-1%
....

27.
55

54%
*13

28.

July
2s.

51

53%

July
30.

•

5iV

*53%

July
3!.

53%
•

*18
'12
*28
*52

*18

•18
*10
•28

.

+51% July 2 +63% June27
20% May i 29% Jan. 24
16
Jan.
6 21% Mch. 21

.

*18
*11
*;o

*28
*23
Virg., old
*28
52
coneolid
*51
•52
*52
do
deferred
do
*17
•17
*17
5s S. G., J. & J — *17
*i8% *13
9 4%
11
6b Mo. long bonds
*92%
•92% *02%
Cent, l’ac., gold
89%
89%
87%
85%
84
S (%
Un Pac.jst
*52%
83%
•=?%
82
SI
81
82
L’d Gr’t
do
80% *'0%
85
85
do
Income.
cl%
77% *77%
78%
li 3%
•p 2
Erie 1st M.7s
*102
*10>% *102%
*106
108
N. .J. Cen. 181 7s..
107% •106%
•102
Ft Wayne 1st 7s. *10’% *H3
*;03%
104% *103
Rock Isld 1st 7b... *103% 1UJ
*103% *103% *103% *113%

68

....

....

„

.

_

.

•.

•

•

*

....

*

Since Jan. 1.
,
Lowest.
Highest.
June 27
+53% July 29 +63
,

....

40

50

9
Feb- 17

dan.

10% May 13
7
Apr. 28
90% Jan. 2
87% July 27
81
duly? 15
75
May 21
73% Jan. 9

42

85
89
5 105
102% Feb. 3 109
103
July 22 107
101
Jan. 6 107

101

Jan.

Jan. 30

53% June 18
11% Feb. 13
20
July 7
98
May 25
96% Jan. 14
83
June 80
Mch. 31
Mch. 27

Apr. 7
Apr. 28
June 16
J une 25

This lathe price bid. no Dale was made at the Board,
materially been
t Range since June 27, 1874.
unsettled by the transactions pertaining to the new loan. When
Railroad and Miscellaneous Stocks.—The Stock market
it was ascertained that the Syndicate bid was accepted, and it was
has shown about the smallest volume of business of any week of
supposed that $55,000,000 of Five Twenties of 18G2, would be the season. Saturday and Monday at this time of year are some¬
called in, immediately the latter bonds declined sharply, carrying times almost blank days, with hardly enough business to estab¬
Notwithstanding the dullness, however, prices have
down some of the next issues iu sympathy. But to-day it is lish prices.
been upon the whole rather strong, and the general list shows an
announced that only $25,000,000 of the 1862’s will be called
improvement as compared with last week. Railroad earnings are
to-morrow, August 1, and after the numbers of the called bonds now smaller than last year on a majority of those roads which
are known there may be a better chance for the
others,, though so report their traffic, but a large Fall business is undoubtedly
long as other calls are impending the improvement can hardly be looked for with much confidence by all the Western companies.
The railroad question, we understand, will come up for argu¬
large.
ment before the State courts in Wisconsin on the 4th of August.
Closing prices daily have been as follows:
The daily highest and lowest prices have been as follows:




99%

...

do
pref
Rock Island...
St. Paul

nret

uo

At.*

99%

*.... 126

...

82
71%
8 %
31%
*54%

....

98%
35%
35
*23% 51%

93

85
\...

ees©

82%
72%
31%
38

55%
9>%
35%
54%

••••

93

Pac.,pref

•

...

•

•

....

•

•

•

...

This la the price

23570.

....

....

bid and asked

The entire range from

; no

May

12%
21%
Boston, Hartf. & Erie.
%
Central of New Jersey. 98
Del., Lack. & Western. 99

!0

107% 107%

107% 107%

73%
24

73% 73%
*24%

%

*24
27
27
23
26%
27 X 29%
U
15* U
i:%
112
112
•111
112

1'1%

18*

73%
•

•

•

24

•

3')

*27

*<;5

44% 44%
io*% *103% 10V* *108%
*60% 61
60% 61
«“%
6S
67% *67% 67*
*73%
44%

44%

44%

....

....

....

....

11

5

91

Nov.

Nov.

10

1
85

Feb.

Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

3%
109%
112%
34%
35%
32%

4.87 @4.87%
4.86 @4.66%

Antwerp

June

July 25....
27....

4

44

Feb. 11

44

6

6
1

4$

2

Feb. 7
Jan. 29
Jan. 8

754,484 18
646,042 70
6,250,868 75

870.504 11
302.984 05

1,972,313 96

Balance.

New York

2

Harlem

Erie
Lake Shore
Northwestern

The. Gold

m

1V4<3>2%

1%@2%

1%@%

responsible parties), at the following dis
Puts

below.
Rock Island

%@1

Calls
above.

@3
1%@2*
1%@2*
*>@1%
2

1%(3)2%

ISM
1 MU. & St. Paul. .. 1 @2%
1 @2
1%<&3
1l Wabash
XuAK 1 Ohio & Mississippi. &<&1%
3 i«« 4 % | Union Pacific
1 @2
2 <®)% i | Han. & St. Joseph. 1%@2
1
C. & I. C
C..
1%<&2
1%@3

Market.—The

*@1*

1%(3)2

principal feature in gold was the

-Quotations.
Open- Low- High- Clos¬

Saturday, July
Monday,
“
Tuesday,
**
Wednesday, “
Thursday,
41
Friday,
“

ing.

est..

est.

109% 109% 110

109% 109% 109% 109%
109% 109
109% 109%

28
29 ...109
.

109% 109%
109
109% 109% 109% 109%
31 ...109% 109
109% 109%

can




following

coin;

are

Total

Clearings.

$39,150,000
16.882,000
38.382,000
48,903,000
30,177,000
23,423,000

Balances.

,

1 .OOO.OtiU

5(0,000
4,000,000

Citizens
Nassau
Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe and Leather..
Corn Exchange

Continental
Oriental

Gold. Currency.
$2,278,777 $2,524,218
1,134,150 1,247,845
1.968.707 2,163,980
1.638 853 1,832.375
1,588,294 1,787,016
961,239 1,065,019

.*

..

109% $201,917,000
109% 118,957,000
109%

$

822.800

$

the quotations in gold for foreign and

905,223

Ameri¬

400,001)
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
1,00(1,000

1,000,000

2,000,000
300,000
400.000

Importers’* Trad’rs
Park:
Mech.

Bank’gAsso.

Grocers’
North River
East River
Manufact’rs’<fe Mer.
Fourth National....

Central National...
Second National....
Ninth National ....
First National
Third National
N.Y.National Exch..
Tenth National

1,500,000

2,000,000
500,000
300.000
400,000
350,000
500,000

5,000,000
2,000,000

300,000
1,500,(GC
50C/O3
1,000,000
500,000
1,000,000

4,210.800

2,829,000
11, .57,000

1,604,400
2.404,700

37

373,954 29

49
73
46

309.713 67

671,733 15

1,123,670 81

3,248,527 98

of New York City

shows
for tho

1874

business on July 25,
AMOUNT OF

:

18,851,800
6,471,600
1,871,000
6,614,000

2,000,000

Dry Goods

1,000,000

5,532.3)0
4,3.7,U0
1,393,500
1,998.000

190.100
881.400
2,387,100
98,300
6.400
26,200
27,500
1.400
7;2.500

69.700

2)0,000
660,400
459,490

1,124.000
1.288,000

5.18V00

2,196,800

11,5 >0

87,200

13,090
321,800
26,100

1,200

494,900
764,100

336,290
382,900

435.00

1,161,000

408.400

243.000

195,700
2,700
257.600
167,1 U0

3.3 n.200

643.100
241.600
2,316,300
1.441,600
6,191,500
811,iOC
591.400

1,018,900
4.630.900
8,6)4/00
9.621.300
3.311.100
3.323.300
1,9)4,500
8/61,000
2.721.800
1.308.400
2.218.100
4.192.400
2,104,000
10.1ST,(V0
1,381.000
2.215.600
:,«6l,3t0
1,0'0,000
8,018.300

779.000

563.300
651.100
283.100
291,000

1.246.200
322 1(0

350.800
290.6 10
623.300
551,000
211,(00
224.100
561.600
4,259,000

-

419.500

l,:-53,100
1.017,100

167.100

390,5)0

6 030

258,110

1.431.100
7.5.3.300
8.601.400
3.005,800

1,646,00)

53,600
821,600

488 500

3,411,200
7.157.600
4,069.600
4.7 6,000
1/05, 00

2,536,'•’00
126,5(0
806,000
; 484,800
495.5 »0
1.790.900
415,000

187,700
81,1(0
84,8)0

$835,0 00
9,7(H)
869,300

5,0 ,6, 00

1.702.900
1.301.800

1,326.000
38,900
51,590

917,900

tion.

Deposits.
$1,321,-09 $10,653,600
5.S94.01O
2.334.200
1,898,700
10,515,41)0

562.000

2,199,200
4,475,300
3.010,800
3,214,100
1,486,900
2,451,100
15 015,‘00
14,691.700
1,>41.500
791, SoO
1.016,090
1.063,900

Circula¬

Net

Legal
Tenders.

VO.Sl’O

2,938.9)0

250,000
200,000

Bowery National...
New Yo'k C'. Nat.
German American.

538.600

877.500

3,029,000
891,000

479,4.0
836.900

181,0)0
5,500
296,509
163.400

1,126,000
132,200
3,9(0
356,900
749,50C
793.400
4.900

1.855.800
1.990.800

588.100

4,000
489,000

3.419.100

1.176.600
2,467,000
16.7 9,600
16,611,2v)0

239.600

1,152,700

303.100

182.100
220.700
157.100

718.600

188.100
4.891.800
1,610,400
397,000
2.597.100

658.090

860.000
837.100

867,700

193,000

615.: 00

2,926,800
1/T2,0(0

16.01-.500

5,066 200

250,000
605,000

1,59 •,(XU

7.3 5,000

6,3I3,'00
6,323,2(10
907,800
1,012,700

216.300
392,590
292,0 0
297,0(0

1.253.200
215,390

306,210

?34.tX'U

896.800
2,983,409

224.0Q0

1,061.000
5.112.600
1.611.900

ls0,0r0

49,400

2»8,70O
874,200

Total
$32,135/200 $284,163,100 $26,646,700 $63,714,300 $241,318,300 $25,767,6(0
The deviations from the returns of previous week are as
follows:
Inc. $1,329,700
.Dec. $1,146,900 Net Deposits.
Loans
40,100
Inc.
Specie
Dec. 1,108,600 Circulation
Legal Tenders
Inc. 1,811,100
The following are the totals for a series of weeks past:

Legal

Loans.

281.587.300

May 16...
May 23... 2S2 814.400
280,558,100
May 29..
279.921.300
June 6
June 13... 281.242.8)0
279.067.500
•June 20...
June 27... 281.791,500
July 8... 2'7.422,200
July U .. 287.083.400
July 18... 285.315.000
...

Current week
109% 109
110
110
Previous week
109% 110%
Jan. 1,1874. to date...110% 109
114%

The

ing.
109%

Hanover

Irving
Metropolitan

Marine

weakening which took place on the announcement of tlie closing
of negotiations for the U. S. loan on the terms elsewhere men¬
tioned. The price then declined to 109, but subsequently the
purchases to cover short sales which had been made, had the
effect of stiffening the market, and an advance to 109f took
place on Thursday. To-day the range was 109 to 109£, closing
at 109f.
On gold loans rates to day were and 1 per cent for car¬
rying. At the Treasury sale of $1,000,000 on Thursday, the total
bids amounted to $2,055,000. Customs receipts for the week
have been $2,462,000.
•
The following table will show the course of the gold premium
each day of the past week :
,

087,138
108,346
308,067
3,282.023

AVKBAGK

Lapsley & Bazley, Brokers, 74 Broadway and 9 New street
$100 for 100 shares, 30 days; $150 to $200, 60 days (on
;!

1

following statement

City Banks.—The

the condition of the Associated Banks
week ending at the commencement of

....

Calls
above.

$323,400 11
443,995 95

$696,048 63
321,672 90

9,667,547 76 4,395,506 74 5,803,297 53
...$2,462,000
$43,677,495 88 $54,626,807 58
July 24.,
$52,541,746 06 $56,273,7S6 36
July 31...

.

Puts

41%
96%

Currency.

Gold.

...

Balance.

Jan.
6
Jan. 29

1,097,084 13
513,141 92

....

30....
31....

Total

$405,926 08

....

28...
29...,

Currency.
$381,788 44
436,972 43
930,9 43 75

Gold.

Receipts.
$248,000
525,000
483,0(10
384,000
480,000

.

below.
July 31, 1874.
Gold for % bonus.. % 7* %
1 % @2%
W. Union Tel
1
@2
Pacific Mail
Y. C. <fc Hud...
N.
*@’-%

96% @

-Payments.-

-Receipt?,

.

tance

41

41

-Sub-Treasury.-

Custom
House

4$

Feb.

12% @5 11%

5.12%@5.11%

41%'3 41%
41 @ 41%
96% @ 96%
95%@ 95%
72%@ 72%
71%@ 72
Tlie transactions for the week at the Custom House and SubTreasury have been as follows:

7

Feb.
Jan.

5

95%@ 95%

$4

Jan.

@4.90%

Frankfort
Bremen
Prussian thalers...

7

Feb.
Jan.

40%@

Hamburg

...

or

(&

4.88%@4 89
5.12%@5.11%

5.15%@5.15

Swiss
Amsterdam

Loans and
Jan.l to latest date.
earnings reported.1874.
1873.
Banks.
Capital. Discounts. Specie.
-1873.
1874.
New York
$2,U0U,00C $9,421.2(0 $1,219,500
$106,229 $109,323 $2,716,423 $2,754,110 Manhattan Co
456.700
2,050.001
5,102,000
88.733 2,539.178 2,611,268
86.027
Merchants’
3,000,000 10,511,600 2,489,400
562,825
503,718 Mechanics’
811,100
22,548
Bur.,C. Rap.& Minn. 1st week of July.
21,911
2,000,000
6,245,200
300.200
Centra! Pacific
Month of June. 1,380,000 1,301,203 6,407,026 6,325,403 Union
1,500,000
4,422,500
3,000,000
8,240,100 1.615,200
167,470 4,993,745 4,174,609 America
Chic., Mil. & St. P.. 31 week of July.
153,000
529.100
1,800,000
4,8^5,100
Cleve., Col. Cin. & I. Month of June.
330,754
403,721 1,955,692 2,441,819 Phoenix
City
1,(XX),000
6,095,500 1,806,100
Denver & R. Grande. 2d week of July.
9,550
7,656
31.800
Tradesmen’s
1,000,000
8,521,900
Erie
Month of June. 1,578,945 1,731,592 8,880,915 9,526,807 Fulton
288,900
600,000
1,686*400
Illinois Central
Month of June.
678,728
742,600 3,593,100 3,792,400 Chemical
850,000
300,000
8,141,500
881.579
747,424 Merchants’Exch’ge. 1,000.000
371.100
Indianap., Bl. & W.. 2d week of July.
26,607
25,659
4,156,800
763.700
Month of June.
316,319
312.614 1,519,681 1,643,735 Gallatin, National..
Kansas Pacific
1,500,000
4.4(9,800
43.700
800,000
2,579,m0
Michigan Central.. 3d week of July.
105,142
117,350 4,019,911 4,023,538 Butchers’&Drovers’
19,200
600,000
1,434,100
Mo., Kansas & Tex.. Month of June.
237,420
249,343 1,435,525 1,440,900 Mechanics&Traders
200,000
1,0)8,100
Mobile & Ohio.
Month of June.
120,407
148,691 1,081.271 1 398.607 Greenwich
572,000
600,000
3,370,100
Leather Manuf
Ohio & Mississippi.. Month of June.
294,838
290,470 1,666.909 1,850,658 Seventh Ward
69.900
500,000
1,301,300
737.544
615,402
482,000
St. L., Alton & T. II. 2d week of July.
19,019
20,035
State of N. York..
2,000,000
4.794,900
321,497 American Exch’ge.
1,063,700
276,3^3
10,247
11,338
do
branches. 3d week of July.
5,000,000 12.4i7.300
574.200
10,000,000 18,853,200
fet. L-, I. Mt.&South 3d week of July.
56,420
50,473 1,304,347 1,349,689 Commerce
162,400
684,318 Broadway
637,683
1,000,000
5,443,900
St. L. & Southeast
2d week of July.
16,741
17,187
113,500
Mercantile
1,000,000
4,097,600
372.649
301,021
St.P&S.C.&S.C&StP Month of June.
70,033
67,071
16.400
422,700
1,861,100
645,040 Pacific
602,348
19.460
31,834
Toledo, P.& Warsaw 3d week of July.
901,000
2,000,000
Republic
5,111,300
2,740,785 2,974,491
181.800
Tol., Wab. & West. 3d week of July.
100,633
96,193
Chatham
450,000
2,558,200
13.700
919,065 1,007,831 3,060,751 3,613,113 People’s
Union Pacific
Month of May.
412,500
1,40: ,400
123.100
469,249
1.000,000
North America
2,675,800
West Wisconsin
Month of June.
74,937
71,135
125.900

8tock Exchange
from the market.

72
1 06
1 0L
1 00

-

4.89% @4.90

5.!5%@5.15
5 16%@5 15

Latest

quote stock privileges,

93

4.90

London good bankers’ do...
London prime com. ster do
Paris (bankers)

Roads.
Atlantic & Gt. West. 3d week of July.
Atlantic & Pacific.
3d week of July.

Members New York

19%
4 85

3 days.

days.

4.87%tfM.83

38% Jan. 29
49% Jan. 24
12 10% Feb. 3
10 106% June 7

Jan. 8
Feb. 10
dan.
3
106
Feb. 101 79% Nov.
Jan. 2
52%
Jan. 12 15 Nov.
23% June 17
Hannibal & St. Jo
39%
Mch. 30 14% Nov.
Union Pacific
23 June 17
43%
Mch. 30 16% Nov.
Col., Chic. & I. C
14% June 17
130
Panama
101 Apr. 201118 Jan. 9 77% Nov.
94%
Apr. 24: 82% Mch. 25 43% Nov.
Western Union Tel.... 68
18
46%
22% Apr. 28 35%' Feb. 5 25 Sept.
Quicksilver
57
Nov.
do
pref
29 June 29 40% Feb. 9
Oct.
76%
Pacific Mail
37% Apr. 21 49% Mch. 27 25
100%
Adams Express
92% Jan. 13 109% May 28 76 Nov.
70%
American Express
58% Jan. 2 65 Feb. 9 41 Nov.
82
Feb. 9 44% Oct.
United States Express. 66% Apr. 27 73
86
Wells, Fargo & Co
69% Jan. 5 80% July 1 56 Sept,
The latest railroad earnings reported are as follows:

June 21

3

117% Mch. 11
62% Apr. 21
79% Jan. 21

Oct.
Nov.

21% Oct.

99

96
95

exchange have
4.8S for sixty days

Primebankers’ sterling bills

5 106% Feb. 4
90
Apr. 1
Sept. 19 140
35% Nov. 7 69% Feb. 4
97% Feb. 15
57% Nov.
75% Jan. 2
32% Oct.
85
Feb.
4
31% Oct.

Feb. lb
Id

follows:

77% Nov.

Jan.

22
36

Jan. 6
June 17

70
1 04

—

—

&
&
®
&

—

—

—

July 31

-Whole year 1873
Lowest.
Highest.

IS
15
16
16
9
9 53
9 80%
10 21%
74% Feb. ‘ 13%

94 @
93 @
18%@

4 80

Prussian thalers

60

Jan. 1,1873.to this date was as

N. Y. Cen. & Hud. R... 95% May 19 105% Mch.
Harlem
118% Jan. 7 134% Feb.
Erie
2(1% June 20 51% Jan.
Lake Shore.
67% June 19 84% Jan.
2!)
Wabash
June 17 55% Jan.
Northwest
34% July 15 62% Jan.
do
pref..,
53 June 17 78% Feb.
Rock Island
92% June 19 109% Feb.
St. Paul
31% May 18 49% Jan.

4S

106

27%
17%

- •

English silver

sale was made at the Board.

-Jan. 1, 1874, to date.—*
Lowest.
\ Highest.

do
pref..
Atlantic & Pacific pref.
Ohio & Mississippi

106

105V
27

par&%

-

sterling bills, and 4.90£ for short sight—these being the asking
prices of leading drawers. Actual business, however, has been
done at a concession, and to day the market was dull and heavy,
with transactions done in fact at 4.87| and 4.90. The demand for
exchange continues light, but the supply of commercial bills is
also moderate, the two influences to some extent counteracting
each other.
The Bank of Montreal and Messrs. Morton, Rose
& Co. have negotiated in London a five per cent sterling loan of
£800,000, at 97£ sterling, for the province of Quebec, Canada. It
is understood that the exchange against this negotiation will be
drawn in Canada.
Quotations are as follows :

.

106

106

8 15

6 70
3 90 @ 4 20

remained unchanged throughout the week, at

*

...

Fine gold bars ..
Dimes and hail dimes..
Five trancs
Francs

$4 92
3 92
8 00

Specie thalers
16 50 @ l? to
exican dollars
15 60 @ 15 90
American silver (new).. — 95 at — 96% I Spanish dollars
1 27%@ 1 28% 1
Fine silver bars
Fore gn Exchange.—Tlie nominal rates for

•

....

•

Napoleons
Gierinan X thalers
Prussian X thalers
G rinan Kronen
X guilders
Spamsh doubloons
Patriot doubloons

....

....

....

26
25% 25%
Ohio & Miss... *
1%
1%
1%
Bost., H. & E..
1%
106
105V
106
10.
*105
Centra) o; N.J. *105%
107% UJ7% 101% 107%
L.& West *107% 107% *107
Del.,
*25
*2>
*21% 27
Han. & St. Jos.
26% 21%
26Y
26% 26%
Union Pacific..
26% 26%
17
17% 17%
1% ”17% 11*
Col. Chic.* I.C. ‘17
110
*109^ 1U
111% 111% 111%
Panama
11U
72%
12% 12%
72% 72%
West. Un. Tel.
72% 72%
*21
*.... 23
Quicksilver
*.... 25
32
do
pref. *....
44%
44% 44%
43¥ 44%
Pacific Mail....
43% 13%
Adams Exp
107% 101% *108 108% *108 108% *103
61
*60% 6U% *60%
American Ex..
60% 60% *60
'67
67
*66%
67%
67
United States.. *-61
75
*74
*13% 74*
Wells, Fargo.. *74
•

,

,

$4 87 @
3 87 <9
7 85 &
8 00 @
6 50

Sovereigns

Friday
Tuesday, Wednesday Thursday
July 31.
July 3).
July 29.
July 23.
KX'%
:00% 100
99% 100% 100
91% 9**
12 % 124%
124
*121
L6
*124
:2>% 12 •
32% 32%
32% 32%
3 * 32
32% 32%
‘2* 7)
72% .3%
72% 73%
72% 72%
So
36 X
35 s 36%
3 ’ % 35%
36% 37%
38% 38*
3-% 39%
38% 39
31% 38%
56
5o% 57
57%
55% 55%
*54%
93
99%
99% 99%
99% 99%
98% 93%
25% 35%
35% 3%
35% 36%
35% 35%
55
?5% *54% 55
54% 54%
*53% 54%
14% '4%
14
14
2n% 23%
25% 25 X
25% 25*
*25%
1%
1%
*1%
1%
1%
1%

Mondav,
July 27.

Saturday,
July 25.
N.Y.Cen.&H.R. *99%
126
Harlem
•
Erie
31% 32%
Lake Shore....
71% U%
Wabash
35 % 351%
*31% 37%
Northwest

113

CHRONICLE.

f THE

August 1, 1S74.1

July 25„.

284/163,100

Specie.
27,301,600

Tenders.

Deposits.

231.913,3‘X)
232,722,4)0

2*3,7 >4.0 X)

44 4.838,497

26,671,800

376,616,465

227,6 9.500

26.652.100

401.927.482

26,511/300
25.863.900
25.923.700
25/27,500

428.231,306
426.905.576
444 5 8.341
836.300,415

25,767,600

353,796 ,075

27,755/00

62,923.200
63.660.500
61..335,100
61.853,700

232,92*.200
241,415,500
243,525.&)0
242,983.600

26,646,700

68,714,800

244^13*800

21,921.0 X)
19.934.200

19.714.300
21.931.300
27.375. J00

Clearings.
4*30.272.4 43
428 /05.641

236.395 000

25.517.400
24,3 2.100

Aggregate

26.9-23.900
26,800,90.9
26.7)7 500

57.100.3)0
59.853.400
61.456.70C
61.890.890
60,951,0'K)
61.833.600

26.022.300

Circu¬
lation.

234,243.300
232.41 4.300

835,139/52

[August 1, 1874*

THE

114

July 27, 1874:
Capital.

Bank*.

$750,000
1,500,000

Atlantic
Atlas*
•...
Blackstonc....
Boston
*.,

'

600,000
200,000

Boylsttm.
Broadway...
Columbian
Continental
Bitot
Everett

1,000,000

200,000

300,000

1,000,000
750,000

1,000,000
500,000

Market.

8oo,ooe

Massachusetts
Maverick
Merchants
Mount Vernon
New England
North

800,000

Old Boston

Shawmut
Bhoe A Leather.....
Btate..
Suffolk
Traders
Tremont

Third..,

Bank of Commerce
Bank of N, America
•B’k of Redemption
Bank of Republic...
Commonwealth

109.600

45.300

806.700
41.800

110,700
53.300
202.800

89.900

91.700
26.100

325.900

70.800
22.600

304.400
110.700

94.100

373.600

215.500
91,600
1,400
53.800
240,600

812.600
42.000

29,-00

3.892.400
8.375.100
1,441.800
8.504.400
2.006.500
4,819 6JU

4.748,300
1.319,4 )C

5.2.7.400
2.061.900
5.8V2.C00
3.096,000
8.245.500

1,500,000
500,000

2,0'.6,600
t .089.600

Union

1,000,000

Webster

1,500,000

25.800

2.509.400

Security

15.200

30,000

240,000
1,463,500

172.400
728.900
720.700
833.100
596,4(0
494 000

976.700

733.500
172.700
689.900
589,200
691.000
677.801

1.218,5(0
1.887/OC

169 10J

1,023,500
2.841600
592,600

652,1()0
573.700

795.400
300.000

2,345,6(0
586.800

437 200

797.300
1 ,**86,300
7 3'.,800
2.252.600
804.1(0

335.100
793,Ooo
765,3co
723,0,0
175(6oo

1.085.600

536.900

873,000

71.600
111.700

493.500

$49,350,000 $130,199,100 $8,561,800 f9,995.700 $50,575,400 $25,118,900
The total amount “due toother Banks.” as per statement of July 27, Is $26,072,100.

Total

•Not received—same

as

last week.

The deviations from last week’s returns are as follows

*

Loans

Decrease.

Specie

Decrease.

$215,200
1,000

Increase.

:

Increase.. $108,500
Decrease
42,800

326,500

Legal Tenders

The

following

are

Date.

Deposits
Circulation

125.949.600

May 18
May 26
June 1...
June 8

2.901,600
2.7! 9,300
‘J/'tf.lOO
2.180,900
2.176.100
2,070.000

125,450,700
125.259,000
1*6,G6-*.2O0
127.882.900
127.336.200
123.106.900

.

June 15
June 22
Jane 29....
...

LegalTender.
10.3L9.600

Specie.

July 6
July 13

127.881.200

July 20

130,114,3(0
130,199,100

52.26C.300

25.422,800

11,175.800

52.035,000

25,385.(00

10,026,800
10,934,700
11,015,100
11.427.SO0

52,651,600

25/65,5(0

52,869/00
50,615.100

25.244.200

51.691.700
53/72,200
52.380.700

25.200 400
25.1C2.000

50,466,900
50,575.400

25,161,-00

11.244.600
10,631/00
9,669,200
9/95,700

3JW4.400
3.562,SCO

129.490.600

Deposits. Circulation
53,283,600
25,439.900

10,681,200

2,122,500
2,571.200

25.221,600
24.563.500

25,118,90)
3,561,800
jaly 27....
Philadelphia Banks.—The following is the average con¬
dition of the Philadelphia National Banks for the week ending

Monday, July 27, 1874:
Banks.

Philadelphia
North America
Farmers and Mech.
Commercial.
Mechanics’

Loans.
4.875.000

810,000
800,000
500,000
250,000
250,000
500,000
400,000

2,095.070

78,219

Manufacturers’.... 1,000,000
Bank of Commerce
250.000
G,lrard.
1,000,000

2,881,000

Southwark

Kensington
Penn
Western

.

219.915

..

864.134

699,850
380,000

1*666

2,424.357

218.700
16-7/40
218.990

1,332,454

588,285

274

200,000
300,000

3,724.000
1,503.065
1,074.591
1.519,634

25,000
7/96
10,500

1,182,000
665,788
871.928

885

455.089

1,000,000

881,565
2,217.000
1.677,000
3.935.000
1.039,446
5n5,000
561.000

1,500
8.560
7,000
30,000
4,000

City

400,000
300,000
500,000
500,000

300,000
150,000
250,000

1,000,000
250,000

Security

426 000

1,577.000

1,033.000
531,000
119,000

•

645,000

$16,435,000 $59.402,W8

....

$445,687

210,550
450.0(i0

791.000

3.830.000
1,182.000
395,000

Specie....

The
.

,

90,100

nec.

.

following

T)ate.

M»y 25

are the
Loans.

totals for

58.759,720

•Jane 23
Ja

58,694,599

July 13
Juy2C......
July 27

59.556,600
59,614.311

59,049 626

58.927,603
58.987.103

15.946,635
15 516.-1 e'O

535,787

15,508,901

445.637

59,402.648

16,510,u;

Wash. Co. S. bonds, 7s, 1577
Chicago Relief bends, <s, 1877.
Perm. Imp., 6s, g. 1891
„

do

7.-, 1891

Market Stock bonds. 7s. 1892..
Water Stock bonds 7s, 1901....
do
do
1903....
Water Stock
do

87%

$11.469.1C9

27,203

91
100

6s, 1869
1874

5 year Cers., 7
ren year

8-10, 1875
Bonds, 6s, 1878
Fnnd. Loan (Cong ) 6, g, 1892..
(Leg). 6s. g, 1902..
Cern. of Stock C 828) 5e. at pleas

92%

do




(1843) 6s

do

18T7

Ask.

do

80

do

fIfi

.

1875...

90
S3
83
87

86^

34

89

67

•

•

v

Wilming. A Read.,lstM.,7,190(
do 2d Mort, 190*
do

1877....
1878....

.

Cin., Sandusky A Clev. stock
Concord
Connecticut River
Connecticut A PassumpsiCj
Eastern (Mass.)
Eastern (New Hampshire)
Fitchburg

8%

8

do
do
.

54%

Series.
O^ftlcates. 86:1877..., m
*

Norwich A W orcester
Ogdens. A L. Champlain
do
do
pref...
OldColony„....
A Portsmouth....
Port.,Saco
Rutland common

'

do
gold, ’97
Morris, 1st M.,6, 1876
do
2d M., 1876...
do
boat, ’85
•••
122'*! Pennsylvania 6s, 1910
48
49%: Schuylkill Nav. 1st m. 6s, ’97..
do
2d m., 6s, 1907
92%
do
m. 6s, c. ’95..
106V 107
do
6s, imp., ’80...
112
do 6s,boat* car,1913
do 7s, boat A car,1915
33"
do
Bcrlp
56
Susquehanna 6s,*94
fc8

123%
•

...

r

.

do
preferred
Vermont A Canada

....

Vermont A Massachusetts....

do

PHILADELPHIA.
8TATK AND OITT

BONDS.

....

do

75
...

41V

Huntington A Broad Top

14
42

...

44
17

-*r

68 %

90

91

76X

77

7a

85

12%

.

26*
""

Norristown

Northern Central
North P/ansylvanla.
OilCreik A Allegheny

oi

Pennsylvania

45

6%
50
,

^.-.i

....

....

do
3d M., 8,77...
do
Cin.. Ilam.A Ind.7s guar
Cin. A Indiana, 1st M., 7
do
do 2d M.,7,1877..

...j

*1*

.

50

Morris

124

do pref
Pennsylvania...

*6 ‘
12%

pref

do

Susquehanna

A Xenia, 1st M.,7, ’90.
44 V
Dayton A Mich., 1st M., 7 81..
do
do
2d M.,7,’84..
do
3d M., 7. ’88..
do
....j
do To’do dep. bds, 7, ’81-’94.
ouium.,

|

do
...

BelvldereDelaware.lstm.6,77

99
....

2d M. 6s,’85 85%
3d M. 6s,’87 84

e

...

99% i'JO
consol.,68,’94. ..
165'
Cam. A Atlan. 1st m, 7s, g. 1903 103“
do
2dm, 78.’80.. 95
85
Cam. A Burlington 6s, 13)7....
Oatawissa, 1st M. conv./82.... 100
do
chat. m. do
’88....
103% 104%
new 7s. 1900
do
....

60
...

99

_

ioi
1(5

60"

100
Lehigh Valley, 6s, 1898
do
do
do reg, 189S
do
do
do
7s, 1910 106%
-

r

Little SchnylkllLlstM.,7,1877. 101
.Northern Central 2d m, 6s, ’85.
do
do 3d m,6s, 1900 ..
do
con. m. g. 6s.1900 9i
Vm-thf, rn Pacific 7 3-108,1900.. 29%

do

BN con. 7B,’88.
%>• ’82..

65
98

do

!

do
do

j

1

}l

85

13
93
94
89
84
87
87

75
73
85
90
67
93
40
guar 102
95

st’k

6s, ’97 to ’98
Watei 6s, ’87 to ’8ft..
Water Stock 6s, ’97.
Wharf 6s

special tax.M of ’89.
3.AI.lstM.(lAM)7, ’81
do
do

do
do

2d M.,7.
1st M,,7,1906....

1

do
Loulav. Loan, 6/81.
7ash. 1st M. (m.s.) 7. *77..
i
do Lou.Loan (tn.s.16, fSU’87
do
-do
(Leb.Br.)6/86
_‘lsm.Bf)7,T0-?75.
do IstM. (Mem. Br)7
! do lstMJLe b.br.ex)7. ’80.’85
.ex)
do
do Consol. 1st M.,7,1898.

|

j

L

t-5
60
100

1

S3
91

If OX
10s
97
92

ICO
102
ICO
95
87
98
91

102
81
87
75
95
95
91
S6
89
PO
60

75
6
91
68

0

99

41
F4
99

81* 62 V
79% 80%
c0% S3
F0
81

30%
62%

81%

84
gfi
74
36
75
66
87
98
68
83
?S
89
81
90

85.
72
85

74
85
86
97
82

*8
80
59

....
.

*8*
do

do

102%

10
41

83*’
35

80%
71

8:%

hvi
>IJ]
ST. LOUIS-.
*91%
Louis 6s, Long Bonds
99
100
Ao
Water 6s gold
*97%
do
do
do (new)

=>3

sox

io"

8
40

30
25

common.

do
fle (of

do

20 M
is*- M.

M(

gld...

2d M. bds.

do

..

....

<%'1906

92%

32%

...

i11

102
107

.

mort. 78, 1903 42"

R?

do
do

....

Junction lBt mort. 6s, ’85
do
2d
do
1900

10s, chat. m-.V?

90
IOO

LOUISVILLE.

do

**"

8 p. c.
Miami stock
do

Camden A Amboy. 6s, *75
do
do
6 8/83
do
do
6s,’89
do
do mort. 6s, ’89...

Connecting 6s 1900-1904..,—
Dan., H. A Wilkes, lBt m.,7s,’&7
East Penn. 1st mort. 7s,’88... . IOO
El. A W’mspoi t, 1st m, 78. ’80.
do
do 5B,nerp 60
Harrisburg 1st mort.6e/83....
103
H. A B. T. 1st mort. 7s, *90
2d mort. 7s, ’75...,
do

94

S4
37
89
100
80

6, 1905.
A Laf., 1st M.,7
(LAC.) 1st M.,7.1888
1st

do

do

.

95

101

....

12%

.

pref

80
40

Cincinnati Soathern RR. 7s... 96
Ham. Co.,Ohio 6p.c. ong bds. 90
do
7 p.c.,1 toSyre. 97
do
do
do
Ig bds, 7 A i.SOp 100
Cin. A Cov.Brldge s'oek, nref 93

^4V

19

Chesapeake A Delaware
Delaware Division
Lehigh Navigation

91%

80
90
100

Cincinnati 5s
do
6s,...
do
7s
do
7-BOs

(8%
Philadelphia A Erie:
do '
Lomls, short
:5V 56
Philadelphia A Reading
do
53
bonds, lODg.
53% [
Phila., Wilmlng. A Baltimore. 125
Cin.,Ham. A D.,lst M.,7, 80...
United N. J. Companies
do
do
2d M.,7/85...
West Chester
do
pref
West Jersey
CANAL STOCKS.

89
93

CINCINNATI.

j

••••j

34
44
6
"50

River

IstM., 6,1889

do

90V! 90V

85% 87
90% i 92

.....

6

52
55

Nesquehoning Valley

do

1C4* 105%

West Md.lstM., endorsed,6.’90 99
85
1st M„ unend.. 6/90.. SO
do
30
100
2d M.,endorsed, 6/90. 99
do
168%
168)4
4(T Baltimore A Ohio stock
10
5
Parkersburg Branch
41
40
Central Ohio
8
1
42
40
do
preferred
13V

46

Little Schuylkill

Oil Creek A.
Oil Creek 1st m.Vb
Penn A N. Y.C AR

67*

)2%

13%
60V

pref.

Lehigh Valley

do

95 V

97 k

7s, 1902

-

Marietta A Cin., 1st M.,7,1891.
do
do
2d M.,7, 1896.
Norfolk Water 8s
North. Cent. 2d M., S. F., 4, ’85.
do 3d M., S. F.. 6,1900
do
do 3d M. (Y. A C) 6**77
do
1900
do Cons. (gold) 6,1
do
Pitts. AConnellsv. 1st M.,7, ’98
r.,
so

35

do
pref
do
new pref...—
Elmira A Williamsport...
Elmira A Williamsport pref..
East Pennsylvania
do

...

l66“

Catawlssa

do
do

95%
91 %

....

53
72
9i

Camden City 7s
Delaware State 6s
BAILBOAD STOCKS.
Camden A Atlantic
do
pref...
do

do

92*
100

.

...

7s.

5s
6s

do
do

9'
97*

104
)08
do
1890, Park 6s
99)4' 101
Baltimore A Ohio 6s of ’75
100
101
6s Ol ’80...
do
do
102
do
do
6s ol ’.85....
Central Ohio, 1st M.,6
92% 92 x

76

Alleghany City 6s.

97
85

BALTIMORE).
110
Maryland 6s, Jan., A., J. A O.. 100
do
106H 110
6s, Delence...
102 V 108%
Baltimore 6s of’75
103
108%
do
1884.
!03
102
- 68,1900
do

101

Pennsylvania 5s, coup
do
6s,’67,5-10,1st... 100 108
do
do
10-15,2d.., 10 % 111
do
15-25. 3d,,, 110% 103
do
102
Philadelphia 6s, clcl
101% 104%
do
6s, new
do

’77.
conv., ’82.
conv., g/94.

d-o

55

•

.

JL
95

90

37 V,

96V

44

123

....

66%

68

CANAL BONDS.

Chesapeake A Dela. 6s, ’82...
Delaware Division 6s, ’78
Lehigh Navigation 6s, ’31.....
do
RR,’97...

.

69

66%
66%
m

1376....

„

do
do

Water

83%
£3*

Series.

Certificates.Sewer, S’s, 1874..

84

sm

.

T

Spi

lb78

110

„

00

1876

do
do

.

.

.

do
3d m. cons. 7s,’95.
Ithaca A Athens g. 7s, ’90

Cers., Gen. Imp. 8s, 1874
do
1875......

j
I

.

....

Ches A O Can stk (’47) 6s,at pi.
Board of Public Works-

87k

Warren A F. 1st m. <s/96
K3H
West Chestercons. 7s, ’91
West Jersey 6s, ’83
94"
do
1st m. 6s,’96
do
' do
7s,’97...... 113
Western Penn.6e/93...
do
do
6s. p. b., ’96

.

do

[Bid.

91

69“

-

Alleghany Val. 7s, E. Ext.,1910

180,000

Deposits. Circulation
11,477 151
43,450,635
11,470,167
49,431/5*
49J229.480
11,445.383
11,433.096
43,485,382
11.440.151
45,210,233
11,439,714
47,782*763
48.622.903
11/27/63
11.417.016
47.943 806
11.441,962
48/40,332
11,469,159
48,757,028

Ask

85

.

93V

80

67k

Pltls., Cin. A St. Louis 7s
Sunbury A Erie 1st m. 7s, ’77.

Stansted & Chambly 7»
Verm’t Cen., 1st M., cons.,7, ’£ 6 17% 2’"
5
2
do
2d Mort., 7,1891
75
Vermont & Can., new, 8
Vermont & Mass., 1st M. 6/8!
131%
Boston & Albany stock
10% ioi
Boston & Lowell stock
Boston & Maine
D9%
Boston A Providence
61
Cheshire preferred
19-% 106
Chic., Bur. & Quincy

800,000

WASHINGTON, D. C.—PRICES.
[Bid.

....

PhiL.Wllui.ABui.,68, ’84

‘22%

BAILBOAD BONDS.

series of weeks past:

16 353.179

202.454
823.8*11
466.939

59.692.263

y

a

21*

Onion

Inc.

Circulation

Specie. LegalTender.
332,593
16,939,537
17.218,608
332,327
17.235.920
271,799
272,052
16/68,842
16,517*685
263,818

53,891,390

-Jane 1.
J.oae 22
15
Jane
Jnne 8

|

Inc.. 1,001,240

& Lake Ch. 8s..
Old Col. A N
Rutland, new 7s

575 000

$76/10,141 $77757/28

new conv. 7s, 1893
Phil.&Read. C.Al.Co.deb.7s’y2

OgdenBburg

Schuylkill Navigation

The deviations from the returns of previous week are as follows:
Loans
Dee. *214,723 J Deposits
..Inc. $416,696
Legal Tender Notes

.

219,350
285,400

313,000

79
99

94"

3-15,000
797.000
259.482
135,000

992.615
462,000

812,000

51,0(H)
11,453

4,332,000
2,107,000

760,000

1,054,376
553,959
2,251,000
1.418,000
3,744.000

147,183

2,000

b

210,275
600,0f0
158,233
270,000
351,561

897/68

811,000

997.000

275,000

.....

700.370

3.295,000
1.477,272

115.000
135,000
245,000

•

1,000,000
624,000
480,000
431,000
205,000

1/34,000
2,117,000
1,322.000
799,42$

283.458

Commonwealth....

79 (.000

5.230.100
1,763.000

546.000
301.000

3.000

827*593

onsolldatlon
Sradesmen’s
Corn Exchange....
Union....
First
Third
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Central
Bankof Republic..

3/83,000

,331,0U0
1/86,900
707,000
372,000
547,000

27,000
40/00
17,000
20/00
10, oco

$1,000,000

98

84><

7s. ’88

m.

102
101

■07
do
7s, ’93
deb. bonds/98 79V 51
104
g. m. 7s, c. 1911 1CS%
do reg/.91l 104%
6s, g., 1911..

do
do
do
do
do
do

""

Minehlll

L.

Specie.

6,177.200
2,435,000
2,321,000
2,513.000
I.S33.00U
1.00S,969
1,245,495

2,000,000

BanktN. Liberties.

6

Total net

Capital.
$1,500,000
1,000,000

.

Pittsburg 4s

the totals for a series of weeks paBt:

Loans.

Portland 6s

711.000

1,117 500
810.0,0

914.800
102.100

200

74.200

395.400

1,021,600
915.700
635.800

76.800
146.800
142.200
281.300

8.421.200
5.367.500
946,100
2.679.600

Hide ALeather*....
Revere

120.0.0

950.100

169,000

43,900
13.800
342,400

1.925.400

1,000,000
1,000,000
1 000,000
1,500,000
2,000,000
200,000

443.0(0
350.800

802/(0
1,109.9001,159,500

135.800
R87.100
198.700

99%

Cheshire, 6*
Eastern Mass., 7s

239.900

1,*17.000

831.900

279.000

348.600

4,341,300
341.900
781.700
l,465,6uU

170.100

37.100

2,983,000

851.009

Burlington & Mo. L. G. 7s....

.

2d

-

lak

Philadelphia A Reading 6s, ’80
100%

99

.

116,80)1

do

(01%

.

Municipal 7s

do

107

.

433,909

1.131.600
574,390

278.400
230.900
198. W0
78.200
233.200 i

23,990

Massachusetts 6s, Gold...
do
5s, Gold..
Boston 6s, Currency
do
gold
5s,

100

do
gen. m. 1910....
Pennsylva., gen.m., reg.r 191G 93%
Perkiomen 1st m.68 /97
90%
Phila. A Erie 1st m. 6s, ’81

99% 100

•

561.200
969.300
872.900
553.100
449.900
540,000

73.600
32.100
321.300
67.400

471.800
32.400

Maine.6s
New Hampshire,6s......
Vermont 6s

668.900

137.30C

35,290
81,600
31.100

£56.600
496.500
173/00
150.000
799 000

Pennsylvania, let M.,6,1F80...
no
2d M.,6, IK75...

1.241.100

57 900

69.200

605,300
2.623 ^00
3.297.4(0
2.081.9 JO
2.559,60C

....

Exchange

577.100
790.800

201,200

8,261,200

2,000,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

City
Eagle

760,400

2,000

1*259.500

1,500,000

Washington

89.200
71.100
157.700

1.607.600

600,000
2.000.000
750,000
1,000,000
1,600.000
300,000

First
Second (Granite)...

598.000
776.100

56,000

46,090

2.214.400

400,000
3,000,000
200,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
900,000
1,000,000
1,000,000
2.000,000

,

14.700
150.500
2,000
62.400

30,000
72.000

160.900

16,UU0

2,574,000
2.224.700
2,721 400
797.000
2.612.100
1,773.000
2,414 5(0
1,760,900
2.487.100
1.0*8,400

1,000,000

FaneullHall
Freeman’s
Globe
Hamilton
Howard
Manufacturers

782.700

40.200
67.700

1.779.100
835.700
686,800
251.100
561,500

267 100

33 600

Bid

8KOTTBITIS8.

Ask.

BOSTON.

76C 90J

1,037,700

500,000
1,000,000
1,000,000

Central

872.000

77.300
38,200

4.031,SCO
2.151.100
1.771.400
498,200

1,500,000
1,000.000

$71,700
51.4'iQ

$10*1,290

Bid

8KOUBITIKB.

Deposits. CIrcul
$426,603
$595,100

Specie. L.T. Notes.

Loans.

$1,573,900
3.175.500

BALTItlOKE, &t.

ftUOfiflUMS IN BOSTON, PUIUDKLPIIIA,

give a statement of tlie Bosto11
National Banks, as returned to the Clearing House on Monday,
Boston Banks.—Below we

do
g
do
do
’settle RR of Mo.
•And Interest.
•

48*

....

103%.

do F.AA
stock

39

72
3
49
60
40

chronicle.

th|?

August 1, L874.J

115

STOCKS AND BONDS IN NEW YORK.
Bonds ana active Railroad Stocks arc quoted on a previous page and not repeated here.
cent value, whatever the par may be. “ JV. T. Local Securities” are quoted in a separate
QUOTATIONS OF

Government

Bonds.
(Others quoted previously.) no*
5-298 registered, 1562
5-20 Called Bonds, 1862
114*
5-208. registered, 1364
114*
5-2;Js, registered, 1305
115*4
5-20s.registered, new issue, ’65 115*
5-2Ue, registered, 1867
U. S.

5-208, registered. 1S68
5s, registered, 1331
State Bonds*

114*
115*

Chic. A Alton

do
2d Mort.
do con.conv
Am. Dock A Improve, bonds.
Mil. A St. Paul 1st M. 8s P.D.

bonds

do
do
do
do
do

Michigan 6s,
do

Missouri
do
do
do
do

6p, due
do
do
do
do
do

in 1371....
1875

93

97 *

1876
1377

95*
93 *

1886
1887
Bounty Loan.reg.

New York
do
do

do

93

Iowa

do
do
do

6s, do
6s, do
6s, do

do
do
do
do

coup.l8»7.

no

Erie 1st
do
do 2d
do 3d
do 4t.h

do N. C. R.R. JAJ.,.
do do
A. & O...
do do coup ofT, J. A
do do off, A A <>
do
do Funding Act, 1866
do
186«
do
do new bondB, J. & J
do
A. A O
do
do Spec'l Tax, Class
do
Class
do
do
Class
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
no

Jan. & July.,

do
do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

2d
do
do
Cedar Falls A Minn.

Funding Act, 1866
Land C, 1889, J & ,J
do Land C, 1389, AAO

do

do

new series

Texas, lCs, of 1876
Virginia 6b, old
do
do new bonds
do
do con80l.bond«
do
do
do
2d series.
do
do deferred do

10*

Railroad Stocks.
{Active previously quoted.)
Albany &

Susquehanna

Central Pacific
Chicago & Alton
do
do
pref.
Chic. Bur & Quincy....
Cleve., Col., Cln. A Ind.......
Cleve. A Pittsburg, guar....

City

Dubuque A Sioux

pref

Erie

Hannibal & St. Joseph, pref.
Harlem pref
Illinois Central
Joliet A Chicago
Long Island
Marietta & Cln., 1st preferred
do
do
2d pref.

Ohio A Miss.,

.

49

92*

do

do

99

95*

96*

101

102

Nashville 6p, old....

RAILROADS.-

Quincy 7s —

do
do

pref.
pref

Toledo* Wab. a Western, prei-

25

Clave. A

d$

dtj

do
do

60
67

ConsoL S. F’d. 101
do
34 Mort
do 4tb Mort
.«.•

Pitta.

Central

•

Charleston A Savannah 6s,end.
Savannah ami Char., lstm., 7s.

60

60

71

East

7s..

Brunswick end. 7s...

Macon A
Macon A Western
Macon and Augusta
do
do
do
do

stock
bonds...
endorsed

.
.

Biock.
E. letM....
Mississippi Central, 1st jh.. 7s.
do
do
Memphis A Little

2dm., 8s...

do

Mississippi ATenn.,

lstm.,7s .

conaold.,8
Montgomery A West P..1st 8s..
do
do 1st end.
do

do

65

70

•

do Income

do

Mont.A Eufaulalst 8s, gld end
Mobile A'Mont.. 8s gold, end ..
Mobile A Ohio sterling
do
do
do ex ctfs.

interest....
8s

do
do
8s,
2 mtg,
do
do
do
do
stock
N. Orleans A Jacks.
do
do
N. Orleans A

2dM.8s.
Opelous,lstM.8B
Nashville A Chattanooga, 0s...
NorfolkA Petersburg lBt m.,8s
cert’s.8B.

100

75

do
7s
do 2d mo., 8s

do

do

Northeastern, 8.C., 1st M.8s....
do
2d M., 8s
Orange
40

Atch. A N. W. 7s, guar.
A Gal. 1st M., 10s..

and Alex., lsts, 0s
do
do
do

Kichm’d A

7s

A Texas 7s. gold....
8.A Gulf 1st. M, 10s
do
2d M.,10s

70

stock
Memphis A Charleston, 1st 78..
do
do
2d 7s..

2ds, 6s
SdB, 8s

4ths,8s

Peterb’glstm., 7s.

Rich.,Fre’ksb’g A Poto.fis—
do
do conv. 7s.
do
Rich, and Danv. 1st cons’d 6s..

COUPONS.
Tennessee State Coupons.....
50
Virginia Coupons
ao
Consol. C oup.......
Memphis City Coupons
. —..
42*
PAST DUK

Montclair 1st 7i, gold
R.. Ft.,

do

stock

stock
Greenville A Col. 7s, guar
do
do
7s, certif..
do

gld.
Monticello A P. Jervis 7s, gold
Mo.

end.Tenn
Ga., 1st M., 7s..

do
do
Georgia R. R., 7s

gold

7s....

Geoigia6s

Tenn.A Va. 6s

K.Tenn.,VaA

2d 7s
7s. equip....

Mo., Kan.

and Darlington

Cheraw

EastTenn. A

Leav Law.

2d Mort.
3d Mort.

do
do

95

8i”

do

do
stock
do
do guaran.
Georgia, 1st M.,78.....
do
do
consol. Mi is
do
do
stock
Charlotte, Col. A A.,1st m.,7s.
do
do
stock

40

2d m. 8s

Louisiana & Mo. Rlv. 1st m.
Logans., Craw. A S. W. 8s,
Michigan Air Line, 8s

20

end...
M.,78....
Atlantic A Gull consol
do
end. Savanb
do

Ala. A Chatt., 1st,M, 8b,
Ala. A Tenn.K.lst
2d M.,7b
do

Evansville, Hen. A Nasnv.7s..
Elizabethtown A Padu. 8s con
Evansville, T H A Chic 7s, gld
90
Flint A Pere M. 7b, Land Gr..
Fort W., Jackson A Sag. 8b...
Grand R. A Ind.7s, gold,guar.
do
do 78, plain
Grand River Valley 8s
Hous. A Tex. C. 1st 7s g old...
Indianap. A Vincen. 1st 7b,guar

Leav.,

N.C.,63gold
8s gold....

do

do

85*

Sinking Fund...
PacificR.of Mo. IstM
do
1st Carond’t E

7s, new

do

10b.

Income

consol.0s
bonds, 7s

*10s
to railroadB,6s

do

Wilmington,

34*
81*

do
do

do
do
do

Savannah 7s, old

Kal., Alleghan A G. R.8s,guar
Kal. A White Pigeon 7s .. ....
Kansas City A Cameron 10b,.,
Kan. C., St. Jo. A C. B.8s of ’85
do
do
do 8s of 1898
Keokuk A Des Moines 1st 7s ..
L. Ont. Shore RR. 1st m. gld 7s
Lake Sup. A MIsb. 1st 7’s.gld.

39

6s, new

do

Iowa

consol, sink. f...
Consolidated.... 88*
73

8s

Norfolk 6s
Petersturg 6s
Richmond 6s

Evansville A Crawfordsv.
Erie A Pittsburgh 1st 7s
do
do

2d M......... 98
7b guart’d by Mo... 103*
Pitts., Ft. W. A Chic., IstM..., 100

!

St, Louis Iron Mount. & South
Toledo, PeorlftA Warsaw




101
98*

Land Grants, 7b.

do
Pacific R.

Haute.

Belleville & So. Illinois,

98

Western Pacific bonds
Union Pacific 1st

special
Rensselaer & Saratoga

do

do

C.R.R....

Montgomery ts

100
kO

Detroit, Hillsdale A In. RR.8’s
Detroit & Bay Citv 8s
Det., Eel River A 111. Ss
Det..Lans. A LakeM. 1st m. 8s
do

end.,M. A

ao

20

8s. ...

Dntchess A Columbia 7s.
Denver Pacific 7s, gold
Denver A Rio Grande 7s,

new

do

IConnecticut Valley 7s
Connecticut Western 1st 7s....
Chic. A Mich. L. Shore —...
Dan., Urb., Bl. A P. 1st m 7 gld
Des Moines A Ft. Dodge 1st 7s.

99”

bonds,6s

do

Mobile5s

New Orleans 5s
do
do -

I Chic. Danv.A Vincen s 7s, gld
>Chlc. A Can. South. 1st m gl 7s
iCh., D. & V., I. div., 1 m gld 7s
Cleve., Mt. V. & Del. 7s, gold.

73

7s,bonds
Memphis old bonds, 6s

Dub. 8<

iChicago, Bur. &

Ga.,7s,bonds

Macon

Central 8s
Southweetern RR.7’s..
Chesapeake A 0.2d m. gold 7s
Col. A Hock. V. 1st, 7s, 30 yrs .
do
1st7s. 10 yrs..
do
2d 7s, 20 yrs...
do
do

{Chicago, C. &

40

Lynchburg 6s

American

86

gld
....

8e

Augusta,

Chi. A

93

85

Charleston stock 6s
Charleston, S.C., 7s, F.L. bds...
Columbia, S. C., 6e

Peoria A Hannibal R. 8’s.
Chicago A Iowa,R.8’s....

103*

2d
do
....
Central Pacific gold Bonds....
do
State Aid bds.
do
do
do

99*
99*

Trunk
Chic.,Dub. AMinn.,8s..

97

75

Columbus, Ga., 7s, bonds......

M’geBondg.

do
do

Michigan Central

_

6s

9S*
98*

7s..

Ga.,7s

do

R. Valley 8s.

Ill. Grand

bds.

ra 0*
consol.??

Mew

Morris A Essex

Rome A Watertown
St. Louis, Alton & T.

Quincy A Warsaw,

97*
Consol. 7s, 1902... 111*

York A N. Haven

Atlanta,
,

,

Falls A Sioux C- 1st tb. ..
N. ST. Central 6a, 1883
Indianapolis A St. Louis 7s....
92*
do
6s 1887
95
Jackson, Lansing A Sag. 8s...
89
do
6s real estate .
Jack., N.W.AS.E. 1st m gl s7
do
6< subscription.
Kansas Pac. 7s, Extension, gld
102*
do
7b. 1876
do
-7s, Land Gr., gld.
78, Crtnv. 1876 ...
do
106 It,
do
7s,
do new, gld
7b, 1865—76
do
73
do
6s, gld, Jun A Dec
104*
do A Hud. let mort .coup
do
6s, do Feb A Aug
104*
do
1st mort , reg..
do
7s, 1876, Land Gr.
104
49* Hud. R. 7B, 2d M. 8. F. 1885
do
7s, Leaven. Brch.
101*
do
7a, 8d Mort.. 1875
31
Incomes.No.il..
do
105*
Harlem, 1st mort.7s,coup..,.
do
No 16..
do
”
10.1*
do
do
reg
do
8tock
82*
North Missouri 1st mort
Kalamazoo A South H. 8s, guar
90*

Mo., Kansas* Texas....
New Jersey Southern
N. Y., New Haven & Hartford 128
Ohio A Mississippi, preferred
Pacific of Missouri..
92)*
Pitt*., Ft W. * Chic.,guar,
do

106

old bds.

do
1st M. 8b, 1882
New Jersey Southern 1st
do
do

,r,-

2dM,7’s,gld

O.O. A Fox

1st...
coup. 2d.,
reg. 2d....

Mich. Cent.,

52
38

99
99
99
99

lfit

Wisconsin Valley 8s
Southern Securities.
OITIBS. *

93*

98

50

47

Joseph,lst,6s, gld

1st7s,gold
West Wisconsin 7s, gold

iBtM,7’BgIa.

105

St.

Walkill Valley

Branch

104
115
104

C^ns.
do
Cons.
Marietta A ClnM 1st Mort

97

11

Si. Paul, 8s— ~
103* Carthage A Bur. 8s . —
Dixon, Peoria A Han., 8s.

Cons. reg.

do
do

cx coupon

do
do

do
Keokuk A

A T H.

Southern Central of N. Y.
Tebo A Neosho7b,gold...
Union A Logansport7s
Utah Central 6s, gold —
Union Pac.. so. branches,

div.)g.?s.

100

div
1st M....

new

100

Land G. 6s g

do

Central of Iowa.

Detroit,Monroe A Tol bonds.
Buffalo A Erie, new bonds ...
buffalo & State Line 7s
Kalamazoo A W. Pigeon, 1st..
Lake Shore Div. bonds
Cons. coup. 1st.,
do

Tennessee 6s, old
do ex coupon
do
do
do new bonds

do

do

do

of 18SS
do 7b
do nonfundable bds.

do

94

1875...

Cleve. A Tol., new bonds
Cleve., P’vllle A Ash.,

List.

Land M. 7s..
2d S.f do 7s..
3d fi.. do 8b..
4th S.,do 8b...
5th S., do 8s..
6th S., do 88..
Creston Branch

K. & M. (M.

75

do
2d guar
So’eastern lstlB.goiu

do
St. L. A
St. L.. A

do
6s, 2d M„ gld
Canada Southern 1st 7s, gold..
Central Pac. 7s, gold, conv

A W. 1st M
’.05*
do
do
2d M
99
Mich. So. 7 perct. 2d Mort
102*
Mich. 8. AN 1. S. F.7p.c....
19* Cleve. A Tol. Sinking Fund ..

20

bds

California & Oregon 6s, gold..
California Pac. RK.7’s, gld....

Indianap., Bl.

22

April A Oct..

St.Louis, Vandalia

M. ?6

Hurl. A M. (hi Neb.) 1st conv..
Cairo A Fulton 1st 7s, gold....

mort. gold bds..

Illinois Central 7 p. ct.,
Dub A Sioux O., 1st M

102

Bur., C.

91

Long Dock Bonds
Butt. N. Y. A E. 1st M.. 1877....
large bonds..
do
Ban. A St. Jo. Land Grants...
do
do 8b convertible m.

do
do
do
do
Ohio 6s,1875
do 6s, 1881
do 6s, 1886
Rhode Island 6b
South Carolina 6s

do
do
do
do

81

Construction
7s of 1871
Mortgage Extended .
Endoreed..
7b,1879
78,1883
7b, 1880
78, 1808-

do 5th
dO
7b, cons.

103
103

Tel. 1st M.7s..

do
do
do
do
do Chariton

do

do
do

do

do

do

M.

Morris A Essex, 1st Mort
do
do
2d Mort
Conv. bonds
do
do

loan.1883.
do 1891,
5b, do
do 1875.
do
5s, do
do 1876.
North Carolina 6s, old, J. <fc .1
do
do
A &O
do
*

F,

7b, conv.

do

do

.

2d M..

do

do

!

do
do

do
do

100

7s
St.Jo.AC.Bl. st M., 10s
do
8 p. c:
do
St. Jo. A Den. C.8s,gold,W D.
do
do 8s, gold, E. D
Sandusky, Mans. A Newark 7s

Atlantic A Pacific L G. 6s gld
Atchison, Top. A S. Fe 7s gld.
Atchison A Nebraska 8 p. c....

.

Milwaukee 1st Mort...

{Del., Lack. A Western, 1st

Canal Loan 1874
do do
1875.
6b, do do
1877.
1878.
6b, do do
6s, Gold reg. 1887.

do

Extended

ioj*
101

Arkansas Levee bonds 7s.
Atchison A P. Pk,6s gold

Midland, 1st mort.,8s... 103*

2d Moit...
Peninsula 1st Mort., conv. ...

6b,
6b,

uo

108*

Union

miscellaneous

■

92*
1st m
107* i Winona A St. Peters 3d m..
do
i C. C. C. A Ind’s 1st M, 78, S.

coup...

102*

do 7 3-10 do
do
78 gold R. D.
do
80
do !iBt Mort. LaC.D
1st M. I.A M.D.
do
;
1st M. I. & D..
do
1st M. I. A I...
do
73
1st M.H.& D.
do
1st M. C. & M.
do
2d M
do
do
114
Westtern 8.Fund...
do
Int. Bonde
do
Consol, bds 36*
Extn. Bds
do
100
1st Mort..
do
18*
do coup gld
do reg'd
do

Galena A Chicago
do

!Chic. A

92

.

Western

do

do

72*

1884
1837

L.I, 1st Mort.

South Side,

construe. Ss.

Southern Minn,

Canal 1st M.’91

do
do
RR 1st M
Nashville A Decatur 1st

do
do
Long Island

bds

do
do

1875
1W7S

do
do
do
do

do
do
do
dO

96*

do

1878

1830
92**
Long bonds due ’81 to '91 incl
Asylum or ITniv^rs,. due 18)2
Han. & fit. Joseph. <lue 1871
do

do
do
do
do
Jhic. A N,
do
do
do

1878-79

6s,1883
78,1878

do

1875.
..of 1910

Del. A Hudson

25

“

M.
Han. A Cent.Missouri 1st M..
Pekin,Lincoln A Decatur IstM
Cm.,Lafayette A .Chic. 1st M.

Sinking Fund.,

do
do

floating debi

do
do

88
8s
8b

do
do

It.

100
100

7b, Penitentiary....
6b, levee bonds

do

111. A So. Iowa. 1st Mort
Lafayette, Bl’n A Miss. 1st

50

do
1st Mortgage... 103*
95
do
Income
115
Joliet A Chicago, 1st Mort
LouleianaA Mo., 1st M. guar.
St. Louis, Jack. A Chic. 1st M.
Chic., Bur. AQ.8n c. 1st M... 1-3*
Chic. K. Island A Pacific
!09
Central ofN. J.,lstM., new.,

mi

Tol., 1st M., 1890—

Quincy A

do
do

do
7s, new bonds
do
7s,endorflel
do7s, Gold bonds
Indiana 5s
Illinois 68 coupon,’77
do
do
1879
do
War Loan

91*

2d M. 1898....

do

Guaranteed

do

78 *

Hannibal A Naples. 1st M
Great Western, 1st M., 1888....

101 *

Kaplds & Minn.1st7s,g
Chesapeake A 0.6s, 1st m
do
do
ex cour

California 7s
7b,large bonds...
do
Connecticut 6s
Georgia 6b

Kentucky 6s
Louisiana 6b
do
do new

102*

1C2
100

A California 7s, gold..
Oswego A Rome 7s, guar
Peori a.Pekin A 1.1st m
Peoria A Rock I. 7’s, gold —
Port Huron AL M.7s,gld.end.
do
do 7s, gold....
Pullman Palace Car Co. stock
do bonds, 88,1st series
Kockf’d.R I.A St. L.lBt78,gltl
Rome A Watertown 7s
Rome, W. A Ogdensburg 7s...
Kondout A Oswego 7s,gold...
Sioux City A Pacific 6b
South Pacific 6’s.gold
Steubenville A Indiana 6s 7s
“
2a

Oregon

57

do
do Consol. 7s..
Tol. A Wab’bu 1st Mort.
do
1st M. St L div.
do
2d Mort
do
Equip. Bds ....
do
l on*. Convert.

,

do
Bur., C.

co

RR.8’b

98

8’s.

D.
D..

ext’d.

Railroad Bonds.
Susqh’a, 1st bonds..
do
do
2d do ..
do
do
3d dr ..
Bost., Hartf. & Erie, 1st M. ..

Riv

gold,

BuH’o Div
2d M

do

do
do

Albany A

AN.O

do

43*

Maryland Coal

R

do new

Tol., Peoria A Warsaw, E,
do
do
W.

Pennsylvania Coal
Spring Mountain Coal

8s Mont A Euf’la R.
8s, Alab. & Chat. R.
8s
of 1S92.

do
do

114*

i.

Land & M. Co.... ..
do
do
pref..

do
do
Arkansas 6s, funded
do
7e, L. R. & Ft. S. Ibb
lo
7s, Memphis A L.
*0
7s,L.R.,P. B.
JO
7s, Miss. O. A R.
do
7b Ark. Cent R

•

Co.

Mariposa

86,1888

do

M.

2dM.

{Consolidation Coal of Iron...
Md
Cnmbtrland Coal and

iiix

N. J. Midland 2d 7s
N. Y. A Osw. Mid. 1st 7s,
do
do
2d 7s, conv.
do
West Extension 7s.
N. Haven, Middiet. A W.7s....
North. Pac. 1st m. gold 7 8-10s
Land Wan ants...
do
Omaha ASouthwestern

89

St. L. A Iron Mountain, 1st
do
do
102*
Alton A T. H., 1st M
89*
do
do
2d M. pref
70
do - 2d M.income.. 95
do
Bellev’le A 6,111s. R. 1st M.
81

Telegraph.

Water 1'ower
Co., Baltimore
Oent.N. J. Laud lmprov.
Delaware A Hudson Canal
American Coal

Boston
Canton

Alabama 5s, 1883
do
88, !S«6
do

Pacific

tlantlc &

A

do

40

81*

A Ind. C., 1st Mort.
2d Mort
do

Col.. Chic.

Tllscellaneoiift Stocks
American District Telegraph.

Ask

Bid

8XOT7BIT1X8'

Bid. Ask.

SKCOBITIXS.

Bid. Ask

8BOUB1T1XB.

Bid. Ask.

8XOURITIXS.

Pidces represent the per
list.

40

65

116

CHRONICLE.

THE

[August 1, 1874.' j

NEW YORK LOCAL SECURITIES.
Bank

Stock List.

Capital.

/

Marked thus (*) are
Par Amount. Periods.
not National.

America*...
American Exchange.

Bowery

Bail’s Head*
Butchers & Drovers

..

100
100
100
25

3,000 000
5.000,000
250,000

25
100
25
100

Chatham
Chemical
Citizens’

City

Dry Goods*
East River
Eleventh Ward*
Fifth
First
Fourth
Fulton
German American*..
German Exchange....
Germania*
Greenwich*
Grocers
Hanover
Harlem*

Importers’ & Traders’.
Irving
Leather Manufactrs...
Manufctrers’& Build.*
Manhattan*
Manut & Merchants*.
Marine
Market
Mechanics
Meeh. Bkg Asso’tion..
Mechanics & Traders..
Mercantile
Merchants
Merchants’ Ex

Metropolis*
Metropolitan
Murray Hill*
Nassau*
National Gallatin
New York
New York County
N Y. Nat. Exchange..
N Y. Gold Exchange*
Ninth Warn*
Nort i America*
Oriental*

Pacific*
Park
Peoples*
Phenix

100
1(H)
25
25
100
100
100
30
100
100
100
25

300,000

4<>(>:000

Republic

150,000

SUO/KX)

J. & J.
M.&N.
F.& A.
M.&N.
M.&N.
M.&N.
J. & J.
J. & J.
M.& 8.
J & J
J. & J.
J. & J.
F. & A.
J. & J.
F. & A.
J. & J.
J. & J.
.J. & J.
,J. & J.
M.&N.
M.&N.
M.&N.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
A. & O.
M.&N.
A.& ().
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
T & T
j. & j.
j. & j.
J & .T
J. & J.

422 70"

000.000

1

1

200.000
200,000
300.000
000.00(1
100,000
50 v Oil

'500.000

600.000

500,000
100/XX)
2 050,000

*5(X),000

600,(00

1,(XX) .000
B.t'OO.OCU

1,000.000
50",000
4.000,000
230,000
1.000,000
1,500.000

3,000,000
100
200,000
100
500,(XX)

and

500,000

200,000
1,000,000
400 (XX)

4’.2,5<X)
1,800 (XX)

2,(X)0.000
l.OCO, 000
500.000
300.000

1.0(0,000
200 000

2,000,0"0
l,(XX).0(O
1.(00,000

1,000,00"
1,500,(00
200,000

Askd

.Inlvl

12
7
10
10
8
12
’.0

4

.

7k

rt

7
12
16
12
10
7
8

12
12
12
10

7
8

9

8
6
10

6k
10
12

12
9
8

8

8
12
11
8

12
10
4

T

.

.

....

90

73... 5

Mav,

•

.

..

133

J

1

114

iis

116
„

„

,,

„

.

i30

t

120
-

-

.

T

124 k
*

-

.

.

do

25
20

2,000,000
1,200,000

J. & J.
A. & O.

Harlem

Jersey City & Hoboken....
Manhattan
Metropolitan

1,850.000
386,000
4,000,000
100 2,800,000
750,(XX)

F.&A.
J. & J.
J. & J.
M.& S.
J. & J.

do
certilicates...
Mutual, N. Y
Nassau. Brooklyn
do
scrip....
New York

50
20

ios
109

15

16

111
.

f

t

tt

137

100
25

1,000.000
500 ,('00
4,000,000

....

1* 0

M.& S.
F/& A.

Westchester Couutv

1,000,000
300,000

50

Williamsburg

1st mortgage

1,000,000
1.000,000

....

100
l 00
100

Broadway A Seventh Ace—stock.
1st mo i tgage
100c
:o
Brooklyn City—stock
1st mortgage
1000
100
Broadway (Brooklyn)—stock
Brooklyn A Hunter's Pt— stock... :uo
1st mortgage bon is
1000
Atlantic Av , Brooklyn— 1st mart. 50(1
2d
3rd

500
500
Central Pk, N. A E. River—stock 100
st mortgage
1000
2u
do
UXXi
Brook'n—ist mort 000
C'neu Island
l)ry Dock, E. B. A Battery—stock 100
2d mortgage cons’d
100
Eighth \venue—stock
1st mortgage
1000
42<i St. ift Grand St Ferry—stock.. 100
1st mortgage
1000
Grand Street A Newtowti—stock.
20
”.0
lark Avenue—stock
1st mortgage
1’JUI
! 00
ftinth Avetiue—stock
1st mortgage
1000
50
Second Avenue—sto *•>000
1st mort .rage
2a mortgage
10 0
3d morurave
1000
Cons. Convertible
1000
100
Sixth Avenue^-atock
1st mortgage
1000
100
Third Avenue—stock
1st mortgage
1000
Williatnxburg A llalbush—stocK. 100
1 *t raortg tge
1000
_

•This column thews last dividend




May 1 74.
Jau., 74

....

J. & J.
J. & J.

Jan., ’73.
Jan., ’74.

5
7

6X4,(XX)
2,100,000
1,600,000
2,000,000
300,000
200,000
40'i.OOO
8)0,000
115.000
100.000

164.000

J. & J.
J & J.
J. & D.

Q-F.

J. & J.
J. & J.

7
3
7
8
7
5

July, 74

70
68

18T2

95

I8lex
10J

102
17U

Jan., 74

F. & A.
M.&N.
J. & J.

7

18-8
lS'd
1834
1885

72>

82k

1,200,000
900.1 XX)

.

1,000,000
203,000
750,000
220,000

Q -F.
J. & D.
J & J
J. & J.
M.&N.
A.&O.
.

.

110 (XX)

7

7
2
6
7
4
7

.

May,'74
Jan.’74

M.&N.

7

800.000

Q.-F.

io
10
10
11
20
10
16
10

io

85.087

250.706

176,0 = 3

rOO.OOO

327,584

20
12
18
16

111,467
255,6V4
131,379
184,417
96,107
183,209
11,631
57,8SS
15,7l|9
165,316

350,000
200,000
200,000
150.IXK)

150,000

1,000,000
200,000
300.0(H)
200,000
2(H),roo
2(><\000
150,000
200,000
200,000

47.'79
33.235

66,279
32,8 3
43,417
131,409
62,186

200.000

200,000
150,000
250,000
250,000

216.767

158,628

io
10
16
10
12
12
11
12
10
10
16

io
10
10
10
10
14
14
10

.,

....

.

11.840

850,000
200,000
150,000
315,000
750,000
250,000
2/00,000

J. & D.
F. & A.
A.&O.
M.&N.
M.&N.
J. & J.

2,000,000

Nov.’73

7

J. & J.

ioo
60

70

7

65

135

ioo

ico
45

•

ctocto, also date of maturity of touts.

55

7

10

r

10

10

p

July, ’74 .7

95
200

165
210

85

70
105
no

115

218

210
100
80

“85
90

‘i05“

80

75
100
80
90
95

95'

120
250
67

70

145
95

ioo*

70
100
75
100
100

97^
65

97
95
80
ISO
135
140
106
75
85
115
65
100
90
170

140

*90*
90

95*

"80"
160
65
170
! 80
90

70
190
95

17"
150
65
1(0

70
102
112

190*
145

150

190
140
98
75
77
65
170

10O
85
85
70
175
'

*95*
103
60

“84

80
140
105
140
125

Price

var.
var.

7

Water loan
1852-67.
do
1869-71
Sewerage bonds
1866-69.
1668-69.
Bergen donds
Assessment bonds... 1870-71.

7
7
7
7

Jersey City:

[Quotations by N, T. Rkkrs,
Jr., Broker. 2k *v all st.]
Brooklyn- Local Improvcm’t
City bonds
..

Bridge bonds
Water loan

do

#

do

And interest.

do
do

do,

do

do
do

..

*

86

90
96
83
96
96

1884-1900
1907-11
1874-98
1S74-95
1871-76
1901
1878
1894-97
1873-75
1876
1889
1879-90
1901
1888
1879-82

do
do
do

do
do
do
do
do
do
do

-

18771899-1902
18T2-79
1874-1900
1875-91

do
do
do

Jan., May, July & Nov.

1875-80
1881-95
1915-24
1903

January & July,
do
do
do
do
do
do

May & November,
do

89

1890
1883-90
1884-1911

January & July,
do
do
do

Ask.

1870-80
1875-79

May & November.
Feb.,May, Aug.& Nov,
May & November,

do
do
do
do
do
do

do
Park bonds
WTater loan bonds

City bonds'
Kings Co. bonds

6

do
do
do
do

May & November.
Feb., May Aug.& Nov

do
do
do

7

do

do
do
do
do

do

6

Bid.

Payable.

Feb., May Aug.& Nov

7

V'

imp. stock'

Months

6

var.

.

-rt*

1890

1860.
1865-68.
1863.
1863.

5
6
5
6
6
7
6
5
6
5
7
6

1860.

(o

..

Feb. 1 ,*74
1890

M .& S.

New York:
Water stock
1841-68.
do
..1854-57.
Croton water stock.. 1845-51.
do
do
..1852-60.
Croton Aqued’ct8tock.l865.
do
pipes and mains
do
reservoir bonds
Central Park bonds. .1858-57.
do
do
..1853-65.
Dock bonds
1852.
do
1870.

do

1890

2
7

Rate.

Consolidated bonds

Feb.71
1877
1876
1885
18S8

on

20

10
17
10
5
10
5
11
8 k 8k
20
20
10
10
10
10

14
10

iis*

Bondsdue

Street
do

1878

7
2
7
7
7
7
5

125.0X)

14
10
11
10
18
20
10
4

260.705 ie
74,410 10
18,336 10
87,540 20
26,10!
137,1'86 11

210,000

14

6

20
20
isk 7
14
14k Mk 20

53.082

200,000

Feb.,*74. Id
July, ’74.10
July, ’74..5
10
July, ’74..5
10
July, ’74..8
20
July ,’74.. .5
20
Ap
’74.15
10
Ju'y, ‘74 .5
1
Uly, ’74. .5
7
July, ’74. 5
5 ; Julv, ’74..8
5
10
July, ’74. .5
io io io July, ’74..5
5
10
10
Aug.,’74. .5
4
Julv, ’74..5
10
10
10
July, ’74..5
11
12k 12k Julv.’74.7k
28
24
20
July, ’74.25
10
8k
July, ’74..5
15
17k 20
July,'74.. 10
10
10
Julv, ’71. 5
8k
10
July, '74..5
io
5
July, ’74. .5
10
5
July, ’74..5
9k
<k July,'74.. .5
5
10
io
July, ’74..5
J uly, ’74. .7
io io io Mch.,’74 31+
10
10
10
July. ’74.10
20
15
20
Jnly, '74.10
10
10
July, ’74..5
July, ’74. .5
io io io July, ’74. .5
15
14
15
July, ’74. >
.July, ’74. .5
io July, ’74. .5
Jul\, ’74. .5
is 26 20 July, ’74.10
10
10
10
July, ’74..5
5
11
5
July,’74..5
20
7
20
July, ’74.10
4
.ni'y. '74..5
20
16
12
July, ’74.19
20
20
25
July, '74.10
12
6
Julv, ’74..5
20
20
30
July, ’74.10
13
16
16
Feb.. ’74.10
July, ’74..
io July, ’74. .5
3k
12 1 A pi., ’74. .6
18
10
20
23
20
July ’-71.20
13
11
14
July, ’74.10
30
12
16
Aug.,’71.10
12
12
11
July, 74.10
Ju y, *74..5
10
12
10
5
11
10
Julv,’74 5
10
9k 'uly ,’74. .5
3k
July, ’74 5
16
20
20
Aug.,*74.10
)
July, ’74..5
10
io 10 Aug.,’74. .6
7
Julv, ’74.10
i3k 6
10
5
10
July, ’74. .5
10
10
10
Feb. ,’74.. 5
10
IS
12
July, ’74..9
14
10
14
July, '71. .5
14
14
14
July, ’74. .7

150
125
80

13
20

147,7(5 14
85,438
77,573

200.0(H)

130

15
16
20
20
33 k 13

98,640
20,34"
27,093
50,131
137.974
391,016
69,113

190,248
46,539

July,’74.8k

20

93,874 20
59,418 5
22.533

200,000

190

20

123,827 10

250,000
200,000
150,000
200,000
200,000
300,000
150,000
200,000

Aug.,’74.10
July. ’74.20

20

33.329

2 0.000

Jmy, ’74. .7
JiPy, ’74. .5
July, ’74. .5
July. ’71. .5
June,*74.10

10
5

20

227.832
193.894

65
80
145
100
60
90
180

10

238,988 io
9,930 r*
62,187 12
57,210 10
4,520
244,672 io

200,000
150,000
200,000
300,000

July,’74..5

17
12
10

13
12

112,555
137,544

oo.ooo

Improvement stock.... 1869

85
85
161
100

1878

July’70

J. & J.

S(X), 000

r

3k July, ’74..5

10

24.653

200,000
200,010
150,000
280,000
150,000

10
5
14

Interest.

Soldiers’aid fund
do
i do

May.’74

300,000
797.000
167,000

Q-F.

Askd

[Quotations by Geo. K. Sistare.]

Market stock

1882
1800
1877

2

254,000

Paid. Bid.

City Securities.

Floating debt stock

1,161,000
550.000
600,0 0
214.000

10

36,872

io!)

1884

May.‘74

7
7
7
7

s

15,285
6,598
200.533
45,287
15,193
48,788
318,257
10,462
214,850
224,865

3b,766
74,204
21,755
70,493
15,645
1 t8,*-,'t8
257,122
80,6L0
2(7,874

200,(HU)

no
85
98
100

83
93
90
KX)
ICO

61
•

1870 1871 1812 1873 Last

Over all liabilities, including re-insurance, capital and profit scrip.
126 per cent In scrip and 5 per cent, in cash.

82^

1880

J & */
A.& ().
A.& O.
J. & J.

1874.*

*

90*

110
97

•

900,UOU

do
do

‘

85

Nov. 1,73

s

Price.

Dividends.

:3U

7
5
4

Q-F.

50
37 k
35
New York Fire
100
N. Y. & Lonkers.. 100
Niagara
50
North River
25
Pacific
25
Park
100
Peter Cooper
20
50
People’s
Phenix (B’klyn) ..
50
Relief.....
50
100
Republic
Resolute
•00
25
Rutgers’
Safeguard
;.
100
St. Nicholas
25
50
Standard
Star
100
100
Sterling
25
Stuyvesant
Tradesmen’s
25
United States
25
Williamsburg City. 50

300,000
200,000
200,000
200, (K'O
204,000
150,000
150,000
200,000
1,0(0,000
500,000
20" ,000
200,000
200,000
150,000
400,000
200,000
2,500,000
150,000

225*

Mch. 16,74

ios.

,

40 ",000

50

Bleecker St. A Fulton Ferry—stock

216
163
100
183

Ian.. 74.
Mch., 74.

....

M.&N.

10

serin.

.July 21,74
July 15,74

213
160
97
130

Askd

5 (XXI.OOO

People's (Brooklyn)
do
do
bonds.
do

Bid

Feb., 74.

:-0
50

...

.

Last
diviuend.

7
5
5
7
5

25
50
50
50

(B’klyn)..,
National
N. Y. Equitable....

137

Rate
3W

Lorillard
Manuf & Builders'.
'Manhattan
Mech.&Trad'rs’....

Nassau

5

Q-F.

3OO.(»0O

certincates.

50
25
100
100

Metropolitan
Montauk (B’klyn).

City It.It. Stocks and Bonds.
Par Amount. Periods.

100
25

Mechanics’(Bklyn)

Julv !. 71...7

July l.'74-.4g
July 1.74.. .5
May 1, 74.. .5

50

Lamar.. \
Lenox....

Mercantile
Merchants’

100
112

110

July 2. ’74. ..8

July 1,74... 6
July 1, 74.. .4
May. 9.7L. 4
Jan.274.2kg

20
40

Longl8land(Bkly.)

.«

.

50
50
30

Knickerbocker

Lafayette (B’klyn)
129\

uly 1,74.. .6

Feb. 9,74...4
Feb.9.*74.. .4

50
100
25
50

Kings Co. (B’klyn)

106k

_

3

luly 1.74...5
July l,’74.3k

15
50

Jefferson

120

*74 91^
*74

25

100

Importers’* Trad..
Irving

..

July 1.74...6
up-

100
10('
50
50

Howard
.

73. .3
Julv 1, 74 ..4
A

50
17
10
10

Hope

Jan.,

.Tnlv:

100
30

Firemen’s
Firemen’s Fund....
Firemen’s Trust...
Gebhard
German-American
Germania
Globe
Greenwich
Guardian
Hamilton
Hanover
Hoffman
Home

Apr. 1 74

July I,’74...7
July 1,73... 3

40

Eagle
Empire City
Exchange

....

July
71...5
July 1,74... 5

4
May.11.74. .4
Ap". i0,*74.. .4
July 1,74... 5

Commercial

Continental.,..,...

195

10J741.

Q

8
8

.

.

190
125

Julyl, 71..4
July 6,74. ..5

4
8
8
10
14
6
5

City
Clinton
Columbia
commerce Fire—

.

•

.

J ly
!4
Feb. lu,'74 5
Jan. 10,’73... 4

io

8
8
10
15
7
5
9

««**_*•

74 3k

6

.

Citizens’.

f

100

May 1, 74...4
May 1J74.-..5
May 1,74 ..,5
July 1. 74.. .4
Julv 1,71...4

10

.

Farragut

Julyl 74 5
.Inly 1.71...6

8
.

.

......

7

6
.

.

83

.4

12
10
10
8
10
10
8

10
8
10
10

.

......

May 1,74
7
May, 1,74.. 10
May 1,74.. in
July 1, ’74.. .5

Feb 12

Broadway
Brooklyn

102

’74..f§

Mch. 1,’74
Julv 1 ’74

119
95

•

200

July 1, ’74.. 4
May 1,74.6k
Feb. 1,

•

Brewers’ & M’lst’rs

.

.......

Julv 1. 74.. rS

3

14
8
12
7
10
10

8

Bowery
,

.....

•

25
200.000
100
200,000
50
400.000
100
200,000
25
250.000
50
200,000
25
8C0.000
100
200,(K0
25
200,000
17
153,000
20
300,000
70
210,000
:oo
250,000
so
300,000
100
2(0,000
50
200,000
100 1,000,000

Adriatic
./Etna
American
American Exch’e..
Arctic
Atlantic

......

•

Jan. 1,

......

A

Jul vlU,’73.3k
July 1,’74.. .4
Julyl, 74.3k
July 1. 74.2k

10
20
10
8

12

’7!

•

.

-

14
15
9
10
8

8
4

Par Amount,

[Quotations by Charles Otis, 47 Exchange Place, and other brokers.)

Brooklyn Gas Light Co
Citizens’Gas Co (Bklyu...

Net Sur|
plus,

Capital.

112

....

7
8
7

7
20
10

J. & J.
J. & J.
.T. & J.
F.&A.
F.&A.
J. & J.
J. & .T.
J. & J.
J. & J
M.&N.
J. & J.
J. & J.
J. & J.
M.&N.
J. & J.

2,000.000

*

10
12

8
7
14
20
8
10
8

Q—F.

'600,000
’2(0,')"0

400,000
1.(XX) .000
2 000,000

2(1
100
100
100
100
100
1(H)
100
100
100
40
50
100

10

Q-J.
Q—J.

500 (X)»

000,000

*

24
16
10
8
12
100
10
20
8

20
3
7
10
16

.t

**

6k

200,000

9

-

—

Xr. .1

July !,*74. ..5
May 1.-74...4 iii
July 1. ’74..6
July 1, 74..12
Oct.. ’73... 4
July 1, 74...5
99
Jnly 1,*7«.. .4
July 1. 74...5
July 1, *74.. 15
July 1, 74...5
Aug.',’74...5 300
July 6, 74..-4
Juiy 1. 74.. .4
Feb. 2. 74...5 120

10
8

24
20
10
8
12
36

J. & J.
J. & J.

’500,000

100
100
100
100
50
25

r

Q-J.

n

850;000

103
100
25
50
25
100
50
50
100
100
100
100
50
10C>

10
8

l.oooiooo

100

.25

St. Nicholas
Seventh Ward
Second
Shoe and Leather
Sixth
State oi New York....
Tenth
Third
*.....
Tradesmen’s
Union
West Side*

1(10 (XHl

Bid.

Last Paid.

1873

Companies.

J. & J.
J.& J.
ev. 2 mos
J. & J.
M.&N.
J.& J.
J. & J.
F.&A.

450/XX)

4(1

100
100
100
30
100
100
100
50

50
10"

«a»

.1

1,000.000
100 10,000.000
100 2,000,000
100 1,000 000

Commerce
Continental
Corn Plxchange*

1872

J. & J.
M.&N.
J. & J.
J. & J

1,000,000
25
300,000
25
800,000
100 2,000,000

(Quotations by K. S. Bailey, broker, 65 Wall street.)

Price.

Dividends.

I

Companies.

Insurance Stock Lint.

do

1915
'

1902-1905
1881-95
1880-83

1875*80

95
05
65

’■.04
95
86
05
96
'104
96

T«*
88

96

97

■§!*

•103

104

93

99
101
96

’100
95

'108

1C4*

95

95

’102

i03

85
•96
*96
*96

86

106 X

101*

•101X

103

•103

103*
103 V

*102k
94V
93

*102)4
98

103

SK
‘SS*

2

n

117

THE CHRONICLE

August 1, 1874.]

ROAD AND

vestments

Main Line— Pittsburg, Pa., to Oil City,
Eastern Extension—Red Bank (64 m. N.

AND

STATE, CITY AND

EQUIPMENT.
Pa
Pbg),Pa., to Driftown, Pa.

(Plum Creek—Junction (9 m. N. Pbg), I’a, to
I Coal Works, Pa
8.0

CORPORATION FINANCES.

Branches:

^ Sligo—Junction (—m. N. Pbg), Pa., to Slitro, Pa . .10.5
Bostonia—Junction
(ext’n 19

&T

“ Bank¬
to each

Total

the periods of interest payment, size or denomination of bonds, and
numerous other details, are given in the U. S. Debt statement published in
The Chronicle on the first of each month.

Louisiana Funding

Bill.—It

appears

usual edition and furnished
that since the Superior

Court decided that the fiscal agent elected by the funding hoard
was not entitled to the deposit of the funds of the State applica¬
ble to the payment of the interest on the consolidated bonds, the

funding board has refused to issue the new bonds, and will not
issue the same until this question is decided, and so the funding
bill lemains for the present virtually inoperative and of no effect.
Massachusetts Loan.—The State Treasurer and Finance Com¬
mittee of the Executive Couueil awarded the loan of $700,000 as
follows: Troy and Greenfield 5 per cent twenty years gold loan,
1| to 2 per cent premium ; harbor improvement loan, 5-20 5 per
cent gold. 8-10 to
per cent premium. It was mostly taken
by New York parties.
Texas Bonds.—The following explains
Editor of the Journal of Commerce :
In your issue of to-day you copy

itself

New

:
York, July 24, 1874.

from the Galveston News. which “ learns

“
freight

1,139; coal, ore and stone cars 54 ; and oil cars 409.

Telegraph Line—Pittsburg to Oil City and Driftwood 242 miles.
FISCAL RESULTS.

OPERATIONS AND

Car

Mileage -Passenger

cars

1,529,749, and freight cars 13,515,601 miles.

15,045,350 miles.

Total

Passenger Traffic—Passengers carried—through 11,691 and local 849,548, or a
total of 861,239; passengers carried one mile 17,789,555.
Average fare 3X
cents per mile.
Proximate cost per mile 2.45 cents.
Freight Traffic—Freight moved—through 41,375 and local 1,737,263, or a total of
1,778,638 tons ; freight moved one mile 80,782,866 tons. Average rate—through
freight 2.42 and coal 1.35, and local, freight 2.82 and coal 2.41 cents. Prox. cost
p. m. 1.89 cents.
Classification—Bituminous coal 436,650; petroleum and other oils 860.770 ; iron
—pig 45,615, railroad 13,217, and other or castings 22,227 ; iron and other ores
77,127: stone and lime 143,912 ; agricultural products 23,11S : merchandise and
manufactures 99,259; live-stock 816; lumber 51,243, and other*articles 4,631
tons.
Total (as above) 1,778,638 tons.
Gross Earnings—Passenger $562,527 : freight $2,007,391; mail and express
$2,628,471
$23,280; use of cars $16,400, and miscellaneous $18,873. Total
Operating Expenses—Roadway, machinery and transportation
1,844,445
Nett Earnings—Profits from operations
Interest paid
Construction and equipment during year

$784,026
287,187

$1,678,909.

(DEC 31, 1873.)

FINANCIAL CONDITION AT CLOSE OF YEAR.

Capital Stock, 10,000 shares at $50p. share; paid in

$2,256,400
$37,000
8,000
3,889,000— 3,934,000
1,280,691

First mortgage 7 p. c. bonds due July 1, 187-5...
Second mortgage 7 p. c- bonds, due Oct. 1, 1893
General Mortgage 7.30 p. c. bonds, due Mar. 1, 1896

that Colonel Moody, the Texas State Agent,
bonds, but borrowed $50,000, hypothecating
bonds,” &c. Please allow me to contradict this statement.
I am authorized by the State of Texas to sell her bonds to the amount of
$1,900,000. I have not, during any period of my agency, borrowed one dollar
on Texas bonds; on the contrary, have declined to do so.
The Galveston
W L. Moody,
News has been misinformed.
Financial Agent State of Texas

Floating debt

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal.—The Chesapeake and Dela¬
ware Canal Company, which
line suffered so severely by heavy
rains in August last as to require $92,103 for repairs, declares uo
dividend for the year ending June 4, 1874. The repairs were
made and operations resumed 27th September.
The revenue for
tolls was $278,600 70, which, with other receipts for the year,
including a balance of $156,099 56, aggregated $441,905 53.
The expenditures were $363,875 37, leaving a balance, after de
ducting five months’ accrued interest, of $28,188 08.
Lehigh Coal & Navigation.—The Fidelity Insurance & Trust
Company, of Philadelphia, gives notice than it has received
$2,058,000 from the sinking fund to be invested in this company’s
7 per cent bonds. The Lehigh & Wilkesbarre Coal Company has
paid in $728,000 of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company’s
convertible gold bonds in part payment for its purchase of coal
lands, which bonds have been cancelled.

Main line (miles)
Eastern extension
Branches

from a private New York letter
could not negotiate the Texas

'

335.7

6; baggage, mail and express cars 10; caboose cars 28;

fourteen pages, requires the issue of a

all regular subscribers of The Chronicle.

262.5 miles.
73.2 “

length computed on basis of single track
Rail (all iron) 60 pounds.

cars, house 339 and truck
Total of all cars 2,C08.

Miscellaneous Stocks and Bonds
last Saturday in each month. The publi¬

supplement, which is neatly stitched in with the

“

Equipment—Locomotive engines (33 to 38 :ons) 73. Passenger cars, 1st class 23
and 2d class

Railroad and
three

to

2.5— 20.5

Guage of track 4 feet 9 inches.

3. City Bonds, and Bank, Insurance, City
Gas Stocks, with quotations, will usually be published the first
weeks of each month, on the page immediately preceding this.
4. The Complete Tables of State Securities, City Securi¬

ties, and Railroad and

E. Red B’k), Pa.,

Total length of main and branch lines
Second Track 12 and side, &c., tracks 61.2

will be

ssue,

will be regularly published on the
cation of these tables, occupying

m.

to Bostonia, Pa

f

EXPLANATION OP STOCK AND BOND TABLES.

1. Prices of the most Active Stocks and Bonds are given in the
ers’ Gazette,” previously.
Full quotations of all other securities
found on preceding pages.
2. Government Securities, with full information in regard

132.0 miles.
110.0 “

Total liabilities (not inch State loan
Construction and Equipment
COMPARATIVE

$3,500,000

1869.
131.0

1871.

132.0

132.0
•

....

....

•

•

.

1872.
132.0

1873.

8.0

•

132.0
110.0
20.5

•

•

•

132.0

23.0

132.0
4.0
30.9

5.0
39.9

140.0
12.0
50.8

262.5
12.0
61.2

154.0

166.9

•

•

•

•

cars

202.8

335.7

35

40

48

73

19
5

Passenger cars
B iggage, mail, <fcc., cars....

176.9

32

engines

22
7

24
7

29
10
28

....

425

Freight, box and track cars
cars

....

cars

Total of all

1870.
....

131.0

Equivalent single track....

Oil

Equipment.

....

Side, «fec., track

Coal, &c.,

$7,471,091

$12,332,317

«...

Total miles of Railroad....
Second Track

Caboose

surplus earnings)

STATEMENT FOR FIVE YEARS.

Road and

Locomotive

nor

244

731

1,087

1,390

....

488

....

812

....

....

449

cars

214

32
9
20
930
83
316

1,478
54
409

2,008

orations and Fiscal Results.
1869.

1870.

858,282

Passenger car mileage
Freight car mileage
Passengers carried
Merchandise (tons) moved..
Bituminous coal (tons)mov’d

1,063,497
8,064,492

5,418,988

.

1871.

1S72.

1873.

1,431,567 1,529,749
8,9*34.911 10,199.385 13,515,601
779,959
578,084
861,239
3-4.90S
210,703
400,156
396,589
436,650
435,222
1.212,181

Allegheny Talley Railroad.—
433,387
607,157
The Allegheny Valley Railroad Company was chartered April
133,276
183,243
14, 1851, and authorized to construct a railroad from Pittsburg
250,319
343,390
other oils
Petroleum and
to the State line of New York, a distance of about 176 miles.
330.3-86
453.616
260,203
860,770
179,927
(tons)
The company organized February 12, 1852.
Construction was Iron, pig,moved
71,120
77,443
81,059
44,141
68,720
rail, &c.(tns)mov’d
commenced March 17, 1853. The largest share of the capital
$
$
$
$
$
427,302
562,527
395,154
576,219
309,838
stock required was voted by the City of Pittsburg, Allegheny Passenger earnings
720,030 1,244,952 1,275,979 1,548,050 2,007,391
Freight earnings
County, and the counties of Armstrong and Jefferson, the Miscellaneous
58,553
27,731
22,477
67,220
15,517
same being paid for in 6 per cent, bonds.
Individual subscrip¬
1,045,385 1 662,683 1,731,012 2,191,489 2,628,471
tions were very limited in amount
The total subscribed by
712.831
843,822 1,083,616 1,257,133 1,814,445
Operating expenses
corporations was $1,693,000, of which $1,300,000 was paid in
the total by individuals was $380,000.
784.026
On the proceeds of the Nett earnings
647,396
934,356
818,861
332,554
284,019
305,417
289,922
287,187
280,326
foregoing and of $400,000 iu bonds issued under date of July 1, Interest on bonded debt....
1855, the road was completed and opened for traffic January 23,
357,474
650,337
27,137
538,535
496,839
1856 to Kittaning 44 miles, at an approximate expenditure of Surplus
Condition at Close of Each Year.
$1 ,500,000. In 1859 the road was extended from the depot in
1871.
1872.
1873.
1869.
1870.
Pittsburg to the canal side The Company issued a second
$
$
$
$
$
2,169,550 2,256,350 2,256,400 2,256,400 2,256,400
mortgage bond dated March 1, 1866, and with the proceeds of
3,955,000 3,983,000 3,961,000 3,939.000 3,934,000
this extended their road—in 1866 to Mahoning, in 1867 to Red Funded debt.
502,437
886,203 1,280,691
295,319
441,937
Bank, and in 1869 to Oil City, the present Western terminus of
the main line.
In 1872 the Plum Creek Branch was constructed,
6,566,487 6,515,169 6,719,837 7,081,603 7,171.091
7.913,532 8.316,617 9,747,216 10,653,411 12,332,317
and in 1873 the Sligo and Bostonia branches were built. At
their session of 1868 69 the Pennsylvania legislature, by special
Atlanta & Richmond Air Line.—The committee of the first
enactment, consented to exchange $3,500,000 of the Sunbury mortgage bondholders of the Atlanta & Richmond Air Line Rail¬
and Erie bonds belonging to the Commonwealth sinking-fund
way Company give notice, in pursuance of the provisions of the
for an equal amount of this company’s second mortgage bonds
bondholders’ agreement,” that there will be a meeting of the
for the purpose of aiding the Company to complete their roads, subscribers to said
agreement, in New York, at the office of Lan¬
pay off their floating debt and construct their eastern extension caster, Brown & Co., on Friday, the 7th of August, for the pur¬
from the main line at Red Bank to the Philadelphia and Erie
pose of ratifying an arrangement or settlement of the claims of
Railroad at Driftown.
The same act authorized the issue of said bondholders, without resorting to foreclosure proceedings,
$10,000,000 first mortgage bonds, secured by the road from the upon terms which the bondholders’ committee consider advisable.
mouth of the Mahoning, eastward.
On the proceeds of these Bondholders who cannot be present may be represented by proxy
bonds the intents of the act were accomplished; but as relates to
Central of Iowa*—At a meeting of the first and second mort¬
the eastern extension expenditures no returns have been made
gage bondholders of the Iowa Central Railroad held at No. 20
public. We only know that the line is in operation. It has Broad
street, July 30, about $1,000,000 of first mortgage bonds
been built entirely outside of the general account, and so far as
and $500,000 of the second were represented.
The following re¬
earnings and expenses are concerned no record appears. The solutions were
unanimously adopted:
winter of 1873 stopped the work at the great tunutd
The
Resolved* That the chairman appoint two committees of three members
tunnel was completed and the last rail laid March 23, 1874; and
each, one from the first mortgage, bondholders and the other from the second
the road formally opened for traffic May 4, of the same year. It
mortgage bondholders, to confer with the Board of Directors, and also to take
each step* in reference to the foreclosure as they may deem expedient, and to
is operated under the name of the “ Low-grade Line,”




.

.

“

{August l, 18*4.

THE 0HR-0N1GLB

118

Company as they may
bondholders.
Resolved, That this meeting does not approve of the filing of the bill in the
Circuit Court of the United States in Iowa in the names of Leynde and others;
and in the opinion of the meeting it is inexpedient that proceedings should be
recommend such

plans for the reoreanizatiau of the

think.for the interests of the

further continued in that suit.

FINANCIAL CONDITION AT CLOSE OF YEAR.

(MARCH 31, 1874).

«■

$4,156,000 CO
90,867 43

Road and its outfit
Real estate for road
Real estate.,

32,352 93

123,220 36

-

Resolved, That the committees be

instructed to invite the bondholders to

participate in the action of this meeting.
The following are the names of
the chairman:

the committees appointed by

35,000 00

Banking-house and lot
Material on hand
Income acconnt (details above)
Notes Macon and Augusta R.R.

65,447 17

1,232,336 06
30,105 06

..

Co. for 2 locomotives

Louis Railway Co
65,000 00
148,937 00
Mortgage Bondholders—Richard L. Asliurst, Philadel¬
Atlanta and West Point Railway Co
400,000 00
phia ; Thomas B. Reed, Portland ; Edmond Wetmore, New York.
Macon and Augusta Railway Co
70,00® 90
Second Mortgage Bondholders—T. H. B. Leatrobe, Baltimore ;
Montgomery and West Point Railway Co
:
102,540 00
Western of Alabama Railway Co
:
37,500 00
George T. Davis, New Ycrk ; Peter Storr, New York.
New York and South Carolina Steamships
40,000 00
Cincinnati & Baltimore Railroad.—The capital stock of the Bonds, Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta R.R. Co
17,500 00
Atlanta and West Point R.R. Co
* 48,000 00
Cincinnati & Baltimore Railroad Company has been increased
Macon and Brunswick R.R. Co
12,750 00
$450,000, to make the full amount $1,250,000, for tbe purpose of
Western of Alabama R.R. Co
57,900 00
of Baldwin County
:
-.
33,000 00
completing the road and paying off its indebtedness.
38,000 00
City of Macon
Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad.—A large number of Ameri¬ Miscellaneous Stocks and Bonds
17,824 67
v
can bondholders held a private meeting in Detroit, July 20, and
Damages paid Washington St. property holders
8,524 55
18,835 87
decided to at once commence proceedings to foreclose their mort¬ Port Royal R.R. Co
Western R. R. Co., of Alabama..
16S,026 20
gage, and secure, if possible, the appointment of a receiver,
Notes of Western R.R. Co., of Alabama
20,000 00
188,026 20
Georgia Railroad & Banking Company.—
Macon and Augusta, R.R. Co
86,619 23
On December 21, 1833 the Georgia Legislature, by a special
Atlanta and West Point R.R. Co
24,589 86
31,305 95
act, incorporated this company with a capital stock of $2,000,- Bills receivable
207 50
000, and vested them with authority to construct a railroad from Assessment on stock..
Suspense account
639 56
Atlanta tp Augusta, Ga., a distance of 171 miles. In 1836 work •Cash
65,152 01
was commenced, and in 1839 that portion of the main line from
Less their own notes on hand
36.263 52
28,888 49
Augusta to Greensboro, together with branches from Camak to
Warrenton, and from Union Point to Athens, were opened for
Total assets'.
$7,118,697 53
business.
In 1840 the road was completed to Madison, and in
Liabilities.
1843 the whole road from Augusta to Atlanta was opened. The
Capital stock
$4,200,000 00
branch from Barnett to Washington was completed in 1845. Bonds
‘ 608,000 00
1,712,245 41
Soon after the company had started it became evident that the Income account (details above).
Unpaid dividends
47,669 94
capital stock of $2,000,000 was insufficient, and application was Due to other corporations, &c
4,568 19
made to the legislature for power to increase it, which was soon
Interest on bonds of Baldwin Co
1,015 00
71,000 00
after granted. This power gave them authority to increase it to Completion of Macon and Augusta R.R
Bank notes
116,072 40
$4,200,000, and at the same time conferred banking privileges Less on hand
35,35 7 27
80,715 13
upon them.
Since its organization the company has passed
office
1,350 00 :
through periods of great depression, such as the financial crisis Transpn.band change bills
Less on
8S6 25
of 1837, the war of the rebellion, and the severe monetary panic
463 75
of last autumn, yet, in every case lias it recovered, and its finan¬ Profit and loss.
393,020 11
ces are to-day in as good a condition as ever.
The lion. John
Total liabilities.
.$7,118,697 53
P. King who has been president of this company for the last 38
COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR FOUR YEARS.
years has, by his judicious management, no doubt, largely contri¬
Road and Equipment.
buted to this result.
The Port Royal connection has not added
1870-1. *1871-2.
1872-3.
1873-4.
Stocks, Nashville, Chattanooga and St.
Rome Railway Co....
“

First

“

.

“
“

“

“

u

“

...

“

.

“

.

..

.

'

much to its business

as

the benefit to be derived therefrom de¬

pends mainly upon facilities that may be offered for ocean trans¬
portation between Port Royal, the eastern cities and transAtlantic ports ; and in this direction as yet very little has been
done.

The Atlanta and Richmond Air Line was opened towards the
close of last September, and has added one more to the list of

competitors for through freight.

232

Miles of road owned
Total equivalent single track..
Roads leased or controlled....

232
263

74
306
53
40
594

.74
306

256.7
74
306

Total milos operated
Locomotives

Passenger train cars
Freight train cars

609

Operations and Fiscil Results
Locomotive engine mileage..
910,753
971,050
1,103,551
$375,339
$395,153
$368,638
Passenger earnings
940,045
1,222,788
1,082,120
Freight earnings
Other earnings
22,825
25,329
25,329

earnings for the past year show a decrease of $51,671, which is due to the panic, as the earnings for the first six
months show an increase of $37,640 while for the last six months
Total gross earnings...,
1,623.456
1,500,098
1,334,012
976,830
832,559
806,235
Operating expenses
a decrease of $89,311 is shown; on the other hand the net earn¬
Net earnings
646,626
667,539
537,777
ings show an increase of $36,383.
Dividends on stocks 8 p.c..
336,000
336,000
332,480
The track of the company is not in as good a condition as at
Income Account— Cashier's Statement.
1,740,563
1,401,066
the time of the last report, the work thereon having been delay¬ Income of road
Interest & dividends
76,043
38,958
45,338
ed by the incessant rains this spring. But as the weather since
then has been fair this has probably been remedied before now,
Total
1,607,018
1,440,024
1,846,000
and the track placed in its usual good order. Forty miles of Road expenses
1,228,243
1,008,594
1,231,452
Interest on bonds} «fec
50,977
52,365
46,958
new iron are needed for the main line, and eight for the two
Taxes
9,647
2,236
10,349
branches which will be furnished as soon as the financial interests of the company will permit.
1,284,848
1,069,920
1,286,053
The motive power, and the
Financial Condition at Close of Each Year.
equipment are at certain seasons of the year entirely inadequate,
1870-1.
1871-2.
1872-3.
as was the case last fall, when, but for the relief afforded by
4,200,000
Capital stock
4,195,600
4,200,000
681,000
722,500
676,500
securing 100 Green Line Cars, transportation would have been Funded debt
1,607,018
1,440,024
1,816,606
greatly delayed. The rent of these cars has added considerably Income account
Circulation
86,469
91,607
83,202
The gross

r.

to the expenses.

ROAD

AND

m. w.

4
18
39

Warrenton, Ga....
Washington Ga...
of Augusta) Ga., to Athens, Ga....

U

U

263
263

equivalent single track owned

<<

4

u

Guage 5 feet; weight of rail 56 lbs to the jTard.
Roads Leased— Macon and Augusta R.R.,'Warrenton,Ga., to Macon, Ga 74 miles
Ga 74 miles
*t

306
operated, owned and leased
Equipment— Locomotives 52 ; passenger cars 27 ; baggage, mail and express 18;
total of all passenger train cars, 45; freight train box cars 506; platform
129; stock 35; coal 28 ; all other 48. Total of all cars of freight trains 746.

Total of miles

Grand total of all cars, 791.
OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.
TjOcomotive engines mileage 1,140,055 miles.
Ft eight moved inter alia—Cotton 273,293 ; grain 1,107,382 bushels;

barrels, and

guano

1,571,785.02
887,450.99

684,334.03
336,000.00
1,685,392.52
26,852.89

1,712,245.41

1,183,860.09

46,025.00
2,450.97

1,232,336.06
1873-4.

4,200,0 0.00

608,000.00

T,712,245.41

103,725
288,429

54,038
322,680

80,715.13
124,710.88
393,020.11

7,510,446

6,841,147

7,153,026

7,118,697.53

1870-1.

1871-2.

1872-3.

1873-4.

Road and outfit
Real estate, banking-house,<tc
Income account
Stocks and bonds
Materials ana cash on hand...

$4,156,000

$4,156,000

$4,156,000

$4,156,000.00

149,979
1,284,848
1,318,980
280,895

151,459
1.069;920

1,088,951.67
94,335.66

Advances, bills, accounts, &c.

'321,144

1,038,852
304,565
120,351

159,582
1,286,053
1,031,452
30S.899

211,040

388,853.78

7,510,446

6,841,147

7,153,026

7,118,697.53

Total liabilities

It

232
232
31
31

length of road owned
Sidings and other tracks

Total

Total

1,140,055

$307,047.23
1,239,336.69
25,401.10

171 miles

Main Line—Augusta, Ga., to Atlanta, Ga
Camak (47 in. w. of Augusta) Ga., to
Branches
Barnett (57 in. w. of Augusta) Ga., to
owned
Union Pt.

(76

746

115,382
819,839

Other accounts and liabilities.
Profit and loss

EQUIPMENT.

56
44
682

232
263
74
306
52
45

flour 123,209

Total property

and assets.

Hoosac Tunnel "Railroad.—The

158,220.36
1,232.336.06

Governor and Council of

Massachusetts have appointed the following named gentlemen
Trustees of the Hoosac Tunnel Railroad ; Hon. A. H. Bullock,
Worcester; Hon. Samuel C. Cobb, Boston ; A. W. Beard, Boston ;
Hon. P. A. Chadbourne, Williamstown; Hon. S. M. Crosby,

Northampton.

39,171,240 lbs.

Indianapolis Bloomington & Western.—This Company pro¬
bonds secured by first and second mort¬
$212,044.76; engines and cars
to deposit with a trustee the interest
$409,960.64: transportation expenses $265,445.59. Total (being 66
per cent of gross earnings)
887,450 99 coupons from sa’d bonds, due July 1, 1874, Jan. 1,1875, July 1,
1875, Jan. 1,1876, and July 1,1876, (being five coupons from
Net Earnings over operating expenses
684,334 03 each bond), and to receive from the company, in exchange for the
Expended lor new equipment, etc
157,755 74
coupons, “ certificates of indebtedness,” payable in seven years
Net Profit
$526,578 29 from July 1, 1874, with interest, payable semi-annually, on the
Income Account—Cashier's Statement.
first days of January and July in each year; both principal and
Income of road $1,685,392.52; dividend on stocks $25,268.12; interest
interest payable in United States gold coin.
The coupons depo¬
$1,584.77
$1,712,245 41
sited in trust are to be held by the trustee until after the pay¬
Road expenses $1,169,074.72; incidental expenses and salaries
$14,785.37; interest on bonds $46,025.00; tax to State of Georgia
ment of the principal and interest of such certificates of indebt¬
$2,450.97
1 232,336 06 edness, after which time all the coupons so held la trust are to
Balance.
W9,m 35 be cancelled by the trustee and surrendered to the company; but
Gross

Earnings.—Passenger $307,047.23; freight $1,239,336.69; mail

$25,401.10. Total
Operating expenses -Maintenance way




$1,571,785 02

poses to the holders of its
gages on their extension,

principal of the

in case of the non-payment of any interest, or the
certificates, or the coupons from its mortgage
maturing on
and after Jan. 1,1877, the coupons which may have been depo¬
sited with the trustee are to be returned to the original owners

bonds

thereof

on

demand, with all their rights to proceed

company upon

M9

mrcHHOKMfjE.

August 1,

indebtedness

the surrender of the certificates of

which had been issued in

against the

exchange.

Junction & Breakwater Railroad*—A correspondent of the
Baltimore Sun gives the following account of the final sale of
this road :
“The controlling portion of the Junction and
is owned by Messrs. Read, Slieaff and Baumgardner, who
have been negotiating with Messrs. Ball & McCready, agents
the Old Dominion Steamship Company, New York.
These nego
tiations culminated a few days ago in the sale of the stock ownec

Breakwater stock
recently
ol'.

by these three gentlemen to the steamship company, and
day (July 21) at a meeting of the railroad directors held at

Assets.

equipment to July 1, 1868
7,423,905 11
Bridges, stations, machinery, Ac, July 1. 1868
1,520.530 22
Locomotives, passenger and other cars. July 1,1868
810,225 85—9,750,661
Outlays from July, 1868 to Dec. 31, 1873—Road-bed, buildings,
new iron, Ac., including extension expenditure
5,459,160
Construction and

27

1,453,520 35

Rolling stock

285,000 00
253,486 04

Tool shop, machines and material on hand
Right of way, transfer boat, stations, Ac

65,000 00

Real estate and other assets
Total property

$17,266,836 84

and assets

New Bedford Railroad.—The stockholders of this company
an issue of $400,000 first mortgage bonds for the
of funding the floating debt and making certain improve¬

have authorized
purpose
ments

on

the road.

New Orleans Jackson & Great Northern Railroad.—
The New Orleans Jackson & Great Northern Railroad Com¬

yester

Lewes

18

incorporated by the Legislature
consolidated with the Canton
& Jackson Railroad Company, chartered in 1845, but retained its
corporate title. The charter obtained from the Louisiana Legis¬
trips between New York and Richmond.”
lature was granted in 1853, and the road was opened for busi¬
Lake Shore & Tuscarawas Railroad*—The Lake Shore
ness in 1859.
The extension, through New Orleans to the Gas
Tuscarawas Valley Railway has been placed in the hands of
works, and on the Mississippi River front, including
Company’s
receiver, E. B. Thomas having been appointed to such office July warehouses and depot property, was completed at a cost of about
17 by the United States Court.
$1,000,000. On July 1, 1874, the New Orleans Jackson & Great
Northern Railroad wras consolidated with the Mississippi Central
Logansport Crawfordsville & Southwestern.—The coupons Railroad Company under the title of the New Orleans St. Louis
of the interest certificates of this company, due August 1,1874
& Chicago Railroad Company. Consolidated stock is to be issued
will be paid at the office of the Farmers' Loan and Trust Com
in the proportion of one for three of the Mississippi Central and
pany in New York.

the sale of the road was completed and consummated. As soon
as the new owners take possession of the road the steamers o:r
the Old Dominion line will make Lewes a stopping point on their

pany as originally organized was
of Mississippi in 1848.
In 1852 it was

New Orleans Jackson & Great Northern
The consolidated road extends from New
Orleans in Louisiana to Cairo in Illinois, a distance of 548 miles.
The roads have practically been under one management since
two for three of the

Mississippi & Missouri Railroad.-Notice is given to Missis
sippi & Missouri Railroad Company stock holders that a fina'
dividend will be paid on the assented stock, on presentation anc
surrender of the Union Trust Company Certificates for same, at
office of Riggs & Co., No. 56 Wall street.
Mississippi Central Railroad —
This company is a consolidation of the Mississippi Centra!
Railroad Company of Mississippi, incorporated’ by the Legisla¬
ture March 10, 1852, and the Mississippi Central & Tennessee
Railroad Company of Tennessee.
The former was chartered to
build a railroad from Canton, Miss., to the Tennessee State line,
and the latter to construct a railroad from the Tennessee State
line to Jackson, Tenn.
The two companies were consolidated
in 1854 by concurrent acts of the Legislatures of the States in
which the roads wrere located.
On June 25, 1868, the road, with
all its property, was leased to the Southern Railroad Association,
and on July 1 of the same year passed into their hands.
The
lease provided that the lessees should retain possession during
the full term of sixteen years, beginning with September 1,1868,
paying therefor an annual rental of $1, and the following obliga¬
tions when and as they matured: of the first mortgage bonds
$1,246,000, and of the second mortgage bonds $1,540,000; the
mortgage debt of the Mississippi Central & Tennessee Company
not exceeding $28,0(30, and income bonds $5,000; also all interest
on the
above debts that fell due after May 1, 1868, and the
interest and sinking fund contributed on the Tennessee State
loan.
They wore also to pay the floating debt of the company
amounting, principal and interest, to $850,000; or, if exceeding
that sum, the excess was to be repaid by the company, with 8 per
cent interest from date of payment.
The company were allowed
$8,000 per annum for the purpose of keeping up their organiza
tion, and for that purpose could draw $26,000 the excess over
$8,000 to be repaid with interest. The extension of the road
from Jackson, Tenn. to Cairo, Ill., was opened for business on
January 1, 1874. The Jackson branch from Durant to Kosciusko
was opened for traffic June 4, 1874.
To defray the cost of the
extension of tlio road to Cairo bonds dated May 1, 1872, and pay¬
able in gold, May.1, 1#12, bearing interest at the rate of 7 per
cent gold per annum, were issued
Theamount authorized was
$8,000,000 but at the close of the'fiscal year there had been only
$3,708,500 ifcsued. The balance unissued is to be applied to the
redemption of the first and second mortgage bonds and the Ten¬
nessee

State debt.

The arrangements for the consolidation
New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern

of this road, and the
were completed

R.R.

July 1, 1874, and the consolidated company assumed
the New Orleans, St. Louis, and Chicago R.R.
HOAD AND

1870.
ROAD AND

Main Line.

Cairo. 350 miles.

EQUIPMENT.

206 miles.

Miss

New Orleaus, La., to Canton,

21

Sidings, &c
Total equivalent single track, owned
Gauge, 5 feet; weight of rail, 56 to 64 pounds to

“

231 miles.
85 “

road owned and In operation

Total length of

“

4

Branches owned—Durant to Kosciusko
St. Joseph street extension

266 miles.

the yard.

Equipment—Locomotive engines, 57, and 1 dummy engine. Passenger ears,
31; postal, baggage and mail cars, 15. Total of all passenger train cars, 46.
Freight train ears—box, 553: flat, 271; stock, 25; caboose and dump, 86.
Total of all ears of freight trains, 985. Grand total of all cars, 981.
OPERATIONS AND FISCAL

Earnings
Operating Expenses (being 55T3 per cent of gross

RESULTS.

Gross

earnings).

Nett Earnings over operating expenses
FINANCIAL CONDITION AT CLOSE

$1,790,489 38
987,228 77
— $803,260 61
—

(DEC. 31, 1873.)

OF YEAR

Liabilities.

Capital stock

$8,000,000, consolidated 1st mortgage
gold bonds, due 1912, to provide for the following:
1st mort. 8 p. c. bonds, due 1886
2d mort. 8 p. c. bonds, due 1890
For improvement and equipment,
Reduction of floating debt, &c
Floating debt
Funded debt,

Profit aud loss account—balance at

7 per cent

$4,731, 000

00

$3,000,(KM)
1,500,000
3,000,000
500,000— 8.000,000 00
1,176'.019 67
3,027,390 15

credit derived from earnings.

$16,937,409 82

Total liabilities

Assets.
Construction and equipment.
Other assets, including cash, balances

Total

due, and valid claims

property and assets

$15,279,041 71

1,658,368 11
$16,937,409 82

New Orleans Mobile & Texas.—The United States Circuit
Court in the case of Frank M. Ames vs. New Orleans Mobile &
Texas Railroad Company, New Orleans & Texas

Railroad CoraT.
sale, of the seventy

pany, and Wm. P. Kellogg, lias ordered the
miles of railroad, inclusive of cars, engines and
a

the title of

EQUIPMENT.

Miss, to the Mississippi River opposite
Sidings, turn-outs, &g
J
Total equivalent to singlo trarkowned

Railroad Company.

day to be designated by advertisement,
Oil Creek &

appurtenances, on

prior to December l.

Alleghany River Railroad.—

The “ Oil Creek and Alleghany River Railroad is
the consolidation of several railroads in the “ Oil

the result of
Region ” of

Western Pennsylvania. These were then known as the Oil
40 “
Creek, the Farmers’, and the Warren and Franklin Ilaiiroads.
390 “
The “ Oil Creek R.R.” was chartered in 1801, and opened from
Gauge 5 feet: weight of rail 56 to 60 lbs to the yard.
Equipment—Ijocomtxvti engines 63; passenger cars 28; baggage, mail express Corry to Titusville early in 1862, and extended south to Shaffers
cars 13; total passenger train cars 41.
Freight train cars—box 500, caboose Farm in 1863, and to Boyd Tavern, its terminus, at the date of
and other 156, and platform 201; l otal 857. Total of all cars 898.
Main Line.—Canton,

OPERATIONS AND FISCAL
Gross Earnings...

Operating Expenses—Being 57 per cent of gross
Nett Earnings ovqr operating expenses

RESULTS.

earnings......

$1,442,524 71

823,830 84

619,193 97
* That portion of the road from Jackson to Cairo is not included ip the
operations, as it was not opened till Jan. 1, 1874.
FINANCIAL CONDITION ATr CLOSE OF YEAR (DEC. 34, 1873.)
Liabilities^

Capital stock

...

...

Funded debt—1st mortgage 7 per cent bonds due
2d
“
’ 8
“
“
Tennessee State loan due 1886

Consolidated 7 per cent mortgage bonds due
Balance, due Southern Railroad Association

Total liabilities.




■

r.;

Nov. 1, 1884

1886

$5,435,534 60
1,012,500 00

2,000,000 00
1,279,000 00

May 1912 (issued)... * 3,708)500 00
3,831,302 21

I7i206j836

consolidation in 1864.
The “Farmers’ R.R.” was chartered in 1862. Construction,
was commenced early in 1864, and the road completed in Nov¬
ember of that year. Its length [Petroleum Centre to Oil City]
was about 8 miles, with a branch up Cheny Run of 3)£ miles.
The *• Warren and Franklin R.R.” was chartered in 1861;
commenced in December, 1865, and completed from Irvineton to
Oil City, 50 miles, in July, 1866.
In August, 1867, the Warren &

Franklyn Company purchased

majority of the Stock of the Farmers’ R.R., and in November
of the same year that road was merged into and consolidated
with the said-Warren & Franklyn Railroad.
In the winter of 1867-68 negociations were commenced and
concluded for the consolidation of the Oil Creek, and the Warren
a

84<*& Fraaklyn Railroad® under the 0*1

Alleghany

/

120

THE CHRONICLE.
r

—

River Railroad, forming a continuous road through the “Oil
Regions” from Irvineton via Oil City to Corry—in length, in¬
cluding branch 98
miles. The act of consolidation went into
effect March i, 1868.
In the act of consolidation it was provided that the njew com¬

Locomotive

After due deliberation the Directory decided
to pny in stock, and for this purpose 4,000 shares of stock ($200,000) were purchased with the proceeds, 190 consolidation bonds
sold ($190,000), and paid to the Trustees of said railroad. The
track of this road was immediately taken up, and the iron used
chieflv in laying or relaying a third rail along the road between
Oil City and Corry, 45 miles.
The laying of this third rail
adapts ihe road to the use of either broad or narrow guage cars
they micdit elect.

Total of all

(Titusville to Union City) 25

afterwards leased to the Oil Creek and
Alleghany River Company, the latter assuming its bonded debt,
in amount $500,000.
The road now virtually belongs to the
This road was shortly

consolidation,

Company’s commencing business, March

1, 1868, though at that time the railroads involved required large
reniw ils arid repairs, an *
much additional rolling-stock, the
results of their operations have been very favorable. Up to Janu¬

able to pay, in quarterly dividends, 10 per
the capital stock. In July, 1872, the com¬
pany paid 4 per cent, and in January and July, 1873, each 3 per
In January, 1874, again only 3 per cent was paid.
per cent.

ary, 1872, they were
cent per annum on

The reduction of the dividends to semi-annual at low figures
shows that the roads are not now as productive as formerly,

1870.
31

1871.
32

1872.
32

19

315
339

17

16
5
314

294

314

316

338

1873.
32

19
5
328

335

cars

352

5

5

-

19
•5

Operations and Financial Results.

Passenger train miles....
160,096
Freight train, miles
245,914
Passengers carried
449,970
Freight (tons) moved, viz.:—

162,113
488,268

185,577

574,889

204,126
545,543

711,314

569,290

559,926

182,178
642,891

186,544
469,473
157,485

179,519

107,032

353,869
143,112

291,649

219.895

443,401
445,707

Coal
Petroleum
General freight

111,503
447,315
98,221

Passenger earnings
Freight earnings..

246.681

384,526

$
317,095

1,728,433

2,299,920

1,326,935

$
314,999
932,796

39,313

43,256

40,978

37,759

800,682
31,499

2,014,427
1,091,862

2,718.702

1,327,156

1,675.008
1,023.606

1,285,554
872,240

1,067.734
724,906

922,565

1,391,546

651,402

413,314

342,738

$
257,600
347,162

%
257,600
297,567

34,161

45,086

4,959,450

4,959,450
1,500,000

$
Miscellaneous

miles, was organized, July 2, 1870, and opened early in 1871.

From the date of the

1869.
23

engines

Passenger cars
Baggage, &c., cars
Freight and caboose cars

pany should purchase and pay for the Reno and Pithole Rail¬
road (Roussville to Plumer, 12 miles) the sum of $200,000, in
bonds of the consolidation, or in their capital stock, at par, as

running on connecting roads.
The “ Union and Titusville R.R.”

[August 1, 1874

...:::=zz=:

Total Gross

Operating
Nett

earnings..

expenses.

earnings

159,427
$

Interest on funded debt..
Dividends on stock...

$
219,475

224 000

425,945

Construction, &c

425^945

%
222,250
425,945

122,800

466,606

217,721

$

157,865
%
235.553

jFinancial Condition at Close of Each Year.

Capital Stock

4,259,450

4,259,450

4,259,450

Bonds (OilCreek R.R.)..
1,500,000 1,500,000 1,500,000
Bonds (Warren & Frank.RR)
580,000
580,003
580,000
Bonds (Farmers’ R.R.) Ists,
due June 1,’71
200,000
...
200,000
Bonds (Farmers’ RR.) 2nds,
due Nov. 1,’71
71,000
71,000
Bonds (Union & Titusville
R.R.)
’1
Consolidated Bonds
819,000
819,000 1,100,000
..

....

....

1,506,000
580,000

580,000
....

500,000

500,000

probably from competition, or from the hostile action of con¬
1,100,000 1,100,000
necting railroads.
The fact, however, is patent. In the last Floating Debt
249,105
four years the transportation of coal has fallen off* from 186,544
Total liabilities
7,429,450 7,429,450 7,439,450 8,639,450 8,888,555
to 107,032 tons; of petroleum from 642,831 to 291,649 tons, and
6,830,158 7,166,836 7,336,386 - 8,554,547 8,615,633
of general freight from 159,427 to (1872) 143,112 and (1873) 157,- Cost of railroad, &c
Cost of Equipment
830,232
960,160 1,0( 8,331 1,008,331 1,008,331
865 tons. The gross earnings in 1870 were $2,718,702; in 1873
only $1,067.734; and the nett earnings in the same years $1,391,- Railroad and Equipment. ..: 7,660,390 8,126,996 8,344,717 9,623,964 9,623,964
546 and $342,738 respectively.
On application of the trustees under the consolidated mortgage,
In 1871 the Company paid off the bonded debt of the Farmers’
Railroad Company, viz.: 1st mortgage $200,000, and 2nd mort¬ on which bonds the May interest is unpaid, the Pennsylvania
Circuit Court has appointed David McCargo, of Pittsburgh"’
gage $71,000; payment being made in consolidated bonds.
receiver, and bars placed him in possession of the road. It is,
stated that the intention is to foreclose the mortgage
ROAD AND EQUIPMENT.
and reorgan¬
...

Oil City (132 m. N. Pbg),
Oil City (132 m. N. Pbg),
Plum Creek Branch
Union and Titusville R.R.—'Titusville,

Main Lines.

Pa., to Corry, Pa:...
Pa., to Irvineton, Pa

45 0 miles.
50.0
“
“
3.5
25 0
“

ize the company.

Plymouth Kankakee & Pacific.—Samuel T. Hanna and other
Plymouth Kankakee & Pacific Railroad Com¬
pany have filed a bill in the United States Circuit Court,in behalf
Total length of main and branch lines
-..t
123.5 miles,
of themselves and any others who might join against the aboveThird rail 45 in.
22#, and sidings, &c., 33.2
55.7 “
named company, to foreclose a mortgage given in 1871 on the
Total length computed as single track
179.2 miles whole of the road, to secure bonds to the amount of $3,600,000,
Gamrc 4 ft. 9 in., and (45 m.) third rail, 6 feet, Rail 60 pounds.
with 10 per cent interest, payable in gold.
Ir, is alleged that
Equipment—Locomotive engines (22 to 32 tons) 32. Passenger cars, 19; bag¬ none of the interest for the
Pa., to Union City, Pa..

bondholders of the

=»

gage,

mail and express cars, 5; freight (box and truck)

cars.

14.

cars,

Total of all cars, 339.

301; and caboose

Telegraph Line—Oil City to Corry and Irvineton, 95, and Titusvile to Union
City, 25 miles. Total 120 miles.
OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.

Train

Mileage—Passenger Trains

run

total of 663.296 miles.

219,895, and freight trains 443,401,

Passenger Traffic—Passengers carried 445,707; passengers carried
6,928 035. Average fare 3# cents i proximate cost per passenger
cents.

or a

one mile
per mile 3

Freight Traffic—Freight moved 556,546 tons; freight moved one mile 20,034,124 tons.
Rate per ton per mile—through 1# cent, and local, merchandise 5
and coal 4 cents. Average cost per ton per mile 3 cents.
Classification—Anthracite and bituminous coal 107,032; petroleum and other
oils 291,649; iron castings 11.210; stone lime 1,154; agricultural products
9,420; merchandise and manufactures 36,398; lumber 50,775 and miscellane¬
ous

48.908 tons.

Total (as above) 556,546 tons.

years 1872 and 1873 has been paid ;
appointed receiver of the road for
Indiana by authority of the Circuit Court of that State ; that the
road is not finished, and that it has practically been abandoned.
Wherefore a foreclosure is asked, and the usual account.

that P. M. Kent

has been

Queen Anne’s & Kent Railroad.—The sale of the Queen

Anne’s & Kent Railroad took

place at Centreville, Md., on the
six miles long, and with a
first-class engine, was bid in by the agent of the bondholders
for the sum of $75 000, this being about one-sixth of its
original
cost.
The road has been doing a good business, and has paid off
all its floating debt, but having been unable to meet the interest
on its bonds, has
changed its owners.
14th inst.

The entire road, twenty

Rockford

Rock Island & St. Louis Railroad. — In the
of Ihe Union Trust Company of New York against the Rock¬
ford Rhode Island & St. Louis Railroad, brought in the United
States Court at Chicago, Ill., to foreclose $9,000,000 trust deeds
„

Gross

case

Nett Earnings -Profit, from year’s business
Interest on funded debt
Dividends July, 1873, 3 per cent

against the company, and for the appointment of a receiver,
Judge Blodgett dismissed the bill, on the ground that the ne
cessary number of bondholders had not joined in the request to
foreclose as ti former defaults in interest; also, that the bill was
prematurely filed, as to default of Feb., 1872.

jEtarninps—Passenger $235,553; freight $800,682; ma'l and ex¬
press $24,204, and < ther $7,294.
Total.
$1,067,734
Operating Expenses —Roadway and structures $232,455: engines, cars,
and shops $111,709. transportation and general $352,278; miscellane¬
ous $23,331 and State taxes $5,223.
Total
724,996
$342,738
1

$257,600

406,384

148,784—

Residuary deficit
FINANCIAL

$63,646

CONDITION AT CLOSE OF YEAR.

(DEC. 31, 1873.)

Capital Stock. 99,188 shares at $59 per share
..$4,959,450
First, mortgage (Oil Cr. R.R.) 7 p.c. bonds, due Feb. 1, 1896..$1,500,000
Fir t mortgage (W.&F.R R.) 7 p.c. bonds, due Apr. 1,1882..
580 000
First mortgage (U.&T.R.R.) 7 p. c. bonds, due Ju y 2,1890..
500.000
Consol, mortgage 7 p.c. bonds, due May 1, 1888
1,100,000 -3,680.000
Floating debt
249,105
Total liabilities

$8,888,555

Cost of road and appurtenances...
Cost of Equipment (engines, cars and
.

Total cost of road,

machinery)

1,008,333

equipment, &c

$9,623,964

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT

Road and
Main line (miles
Branch lines (miles)
Main and branch lines ('miles)
Th’rd rail 45 — 22# m

Sidings and other tracks
Equivalent single track(milaa)




$8,615,631

..

Equipment.
1870.
95.0
3.5

1871.

98.5
22.5
21.5

98.5
22.5
26.8

123.5

142.5

147.8

95.0
28.5

1872.
95.0
28.5

1873
95.0
28 5

31.8

123.5
22.5
82.7

123.5
22.5
83.2

14Li

178^7

1-5!

22.5

months, to Jan. 1, 1874, showing the earnings to be $1,135,662 13 ;
expenses, $799,256 23 ; net earnings, $335,895 90.
Resolutions
modifying the Central Vermont leases and reducing the rental
from that corporation to the Rutland Railroad were unanimously
adopted. A resolution approving the action of the directors in
purchasing an interest in the Central Vermont Railroad Company
was also unanimously adopted.
The Board of Directors was increas¬
ed from seven to nine.
John B. Page was elected President, Joel M.
Haven, Treasurer, and B. B. Smalley, Clerk. A dividend of $3 50
per share was voted to be paid in scrip to preferred stockholders

Aug. 17.

FOR FIVE YEARS.

1869.
95.0
3.5

Rutland Railroad.—At the adjourned meeting of the Rut¬

land Railroad Company, bald in Rutland, July 29, ex-Gov, Page,
the President, submitted the report for the period of thirteen

Syracnse Northern Railroad.—The road is now in charge
of the officers of the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg
Company.
The second and third mortgage bonds now owned by that com¬

pany and the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western have been placed
in the hands of a trustee, with instructions to collect the 18

months’ interest now due on them, or in default of
payment to
foreclose the mortgages at once. The latter course will

be taken and the company

re-organized.

probably

August 1,1874]

Exports or Leadtiix Article* lroui New York..
The followingtable,compiledfrom Custom House returns,shows
the exports of leading articles from the port of New York since

&l)e Commercial Cimeo.

January 1,1874, to all the principal foreign countries, and also tne
totals for the last week, and since January 1. The last twro lines
show total values, including the value of all other articles besides

COMMERCIAL EPITOME.
Friday Night,

July 31, 1874.

It is difficult to describe in general terms tbe state and condition
of trade during tbe past week.
There has been in one direction

speculative activity and buoyancy, in another extreme dullness
depression, and in still another much uncertainty and fre¬
quent fluctuations. Some changes in the premium on gold have
been a disturbing influence.
The weather has been more toler¬
able but it is yet too early, notwithstanding cooler weather, to
expect any general return of business men from summer resorts.
On the whole, however, improvement may be noted, and a favor¬
able circumstance is that the early future is regarded as full of
promise.
In provisions prices have been almost uniformly advancing, and
for most descriptions of “hog products” extreme prices have
been paid. The speculation has of course been mainly in mess
pork and Western lard. Mess pork yesterday advanced to $21 75
@21 SO, seller August, and $22@22 12$, seller September; and
prime Western lard sold largely at 13@t3$c for August, and. 13$
@13$c for September, closing at the outside price. On Thursday,
lard sold for December at 10$c.
Bacon has been in demand at
11c for long clear, and there has been a large business in pickled
meats at 10f@llc for rib bellies, and 14$@15c for hams.
The
advance in these articles is generally regarded as purely specu¬
lative, not favored to any considerable extent by legitimate influ¬
ence, and, taking place at this time, threatens packers with serious
embarrassment during the forthcoming season.
The exports of
provisions from New York from Nov. 1 to to July 28, inclusive,
for three years, have been:

those mentioned in the table.
®

Pork, bbls
Beef, bblB. and tea
Lard, lbs
Bacon, lb*
Butter, lbs

139,075
80,272
144,531,198
272,622.641

169,5*5

92,383

124,492,226

212,531,237
2,431,655

'..

1871-72.

1872-73.

2,678,882

Cheese, lbs

54.339,984

53,397,407

Tallow, lbs

48,515,401

42,777,355

123,918

79,378

134,483,609

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13 814

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109,608

2,047

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In Singapore pepper we
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23,346

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dry Buenos Ayres sold at

26$c. gold, and Texas at 22c. currency. Linseed oil steady, at
85@87c. Crude fish oils quiet. New store mackarel have been
sold at $15@16 for No. 1 and $10@10 50 for No. 2. Layerraisins
quoted at $3 10; Turkish prunes, 11c., and currants 6$c.




ot x O', r 0 m
o* — 00m — —

of 1,000 bags, to arrive, at

consumption and speculation.

300 bales Havana at 80@$1.
Hides have been quiet but

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8.388

Freights have been dull, with vessels on the berth, and rates
have declined ; but in vessels for charter there has been a pretty
good business. The firmness with which wheat and corn have
been held have checked exports of those staples.
The business
yesterday embraced grain at 6$@6$d per bushel by steam to Liv
erpool, 5s 9d@6s 3d per quarter by steam to the Continent (two
steamers chartered), and 5s Od by sail to Cork for orders,with petro¬
leum at 5s 9d for refined in barrels to Stettin, 26c in cases to Con¬
stantinople, and 4s 9d@5s lor crude jn bulk to a French port.
To-day, the Liverpool steamers took about 65,000 bushels grain at
G$@6fd ; a vessel with grain to Cork for orders at 5s 3d.
Rosin has declined and is only moderately active, closing at
$2 15 lor strained. Spirits turpentine has continued to droop,
until at the close there was a lair business at 34c. Refined petro¬
leum has been depressed owing to the increased production, sell¬
ing at one time at life for July, but closing steadier at life for
early August; crude in bulk remains steady at 5c. Wool has
been rather quiet, but generally steady, manufacturers holding
off' lor further developments and refusing to pay the advance
asked. There has been a decided break in ingot copper, with a
Tair trade.
Lake closes at 20@22c cash; the failure ot the largest
house in the city, holding about 8,000,000 lbs, has bad a
copper
most depressing effect; Straits Tin also is lower at 2^fc gold.
There is some speculation in the Hop market, baaed on the dam¬
age done to the growing crop in England.
American yearlings
Lave been shipped in order to supply the demands of the English
brewers; State 1873 quoted 15@25c.
Kentucky tobacco has been active, mostly for speculation, and
is higher; lugs quoted at 6^@10c., and leaf ll@17c. ; the sales
for the week embrace 3,000 hhds., of which 600 were for ex¬
been in fair demand ;

.lOCOWOKr-Gifl

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port and 2,400 for

.

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215,588

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150,732
103,681

Sales for week
Stocks July 30
Stocks. 1873

ot c*

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.

Melado.

7,966

Receipts for week

Boxes.

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Hhds.

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35,362,458

19f(a2lfc.; Maracaibo, 18$@22c., and Java, mats, 25@28c.,
The stocks yesterday morning were 92,713 bags Rio,
18,800 mats Java, and 4,595 mats and 39,155 bags of other descrip¬
tions.
Rice has been firm, with a stock of 23,400 bags Rangoon.
Molasses Las been quiet and unchanged, with a stock of 5,700
hhds. and 3,000 bbls.
Sugars have partially advanced, and close
at 7|@8$c. for lair to good refining; No. 12 clayed, 8$-; Centri¬
fugal, 8$@9$c., and standard crushed, I0$c.

•

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178,903,865
3,761,045

To-day, the market was strong, with sales of new mess pork at
$22 for August, and $22 25 for September; of prime Western
dard at 13$c., spot and August, and 13$c. for September and Octo¬
ber, and lOfc. for December; light rib bellies, 11c,, and long clear
bacon, 11c., but prime closed weak. Cheese is firmer at 10£@13c.
for factories.
Tallow, 8@'8$c. Coffee has sold very fairly, but,
under late Rio advices, prices have given way ; Rio, fair to prime

CWr«Ol?<|S,l'OOr'-^C> UU C*
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The exports ior the week ending this evening reach a total of
14,527 bales, of which 14;527 were to Qreat Britain, none to
F’ra.nce, and none to rest of the Continent, while the stocks as

Imports of Leading Articles.

table, complied from Custom House return s
iuipdrfcs ol leading articles at this port Bine
1, 1874, and for the same period of 1878 :

The following
shows the foreign

Jan.

[Tho quantity is given in packages when not otherwise

Jan.1,’74.

Jan.1,’74. time 1873

made up

this evening,

176,319 bales.

are now

week of last

Stock

Exported to—

Same
time 1873

Week enfllna

July 31.

2,528
1,72,
188,582

Cutlery

EarthenwareChina
Earthenware.
Gass
Glassware
Glass plate
Buttons.

6,478

10,963;

20.425

.

31,33;

16,592
5,443
3,722
25,047
15,395
921,849
2,214

Coal, tons
Cocoa, bags..

Coffee, bags
Cotton, bales

Spelter,
Steel

Tbs

Total this Samew’k
week.
1873.
Contin’t

France

G. Brit.

2,937

Cochineal
Cream Tartar...
Gambier

931

7C6

Gum, Arabic....
Indigo
Madder

424

20,306
1,164

40,854

39,170

40.641

29,193
6,400

35,351
5,377
4,143

3,778

96,824
34,346

464.084

1,160,527

625,114

33,675

Ivory
Jewelry, &c.—
Jewelry

33,713!

1.216

India rubber

1,850

51.104

|

567

Pepper
Saltpetre
Woods—
Cork
Fustic....

645

471,959

341,381!

83,850

82,6451

Molasses.

'

Ginger

2,197

1,777

Watches
Linseed

490,668
235,718
46,451

Cassia

7,300j;

650,854

824,801
616,122
1,085,575
8,111,005 7,600,737

1,100 j Spices, &c.—

4,986

Hides, dressed..

63,077
399,999
240,250

70,155

201,241

276,705
63,019

158.353
15,944
161.353

Logwood

176,319

155,707

2,605,744

261,998
79,367

Florida
No. Carolina
Norfolk
-Other ports ..
Total this year

3764,153

New York

....

.

Total last year

624,789
198.891

412,399

1136,672
lS2r19l

i90,431
169,297
193,027

48,406
30,514

269,875
451,546

246,733
423,301

65

....

12,959
45,230
418,666

....

619
889

28,500

....

610,716 2779,569

363,679

1805.174

7,007
10,483
5,985
105,507

96,785

6,326
21,729
91,196

7,233
20,058

22.S49
5,918

223,-36

....

....

368

5>95S
14,496
71,033

....

263,914
S7,f‘?8
41,837
161,068

Stock.

Porta.

....

....

1410,231

187,707

2592,913

1455,417

169,687

•

i

1817,783

3563,093

....

Total.

7,245
39,667
35,522
22,578
8,633

226,711

wise

Forfgn.

249,969

87,668
165,189

1231,684
327322,
3^4,339
606,924
333,652
158,585
12,031
55,583
412,634
£9,989

296,019
432,973
613,525
867,7o6
196,076
12,959
51,586
499,532
50,3:5

....

Coast¬

Other

Great
Britain. France.

7872.

1212,944

.

.Galveston

Rice

932

Bristles

New Orleans

796,467
..

12,831

14,527
2.794,096

SKPT.l.

lft3.

1,296,079

Nuts

82,024
25,000

SXPOKTSD SINGS SKPT.l TO—

KKCEIPTS

Mobile
Charleston....
Savannah

109,002

Oranges

101,644
26,000

than they were at this time a year ago. The
usual table showing the movement of cotton at
from Sept. 1 to July 24, the latest mail dates.
SUltCS

846,465
195,746

558,577

Raisins
2,464
80,539 Hides, undressed..

2,659
120,114

all the ports

by

Lemons...

168

8,989

12,756

610,7 6

103,773

Fish

|

10,464

our

PORTS.

....

368,679

1,664

4,189

more

following is

28,612

jFruits, &c.—

1.8211

625

Hemp, bales
Hides, &c —

20,612 halos

$1259,4121 $1381,638
47,143
87,670

Fancy goods..

11,077
3,857

6,444
10,010

.

From the foregoing statement, it will be Been that, compart d
with the corresponding week of last season, there is an increase in
the exports this week of 1,696 hales, while the stocks to-night are

110,076

Corks

505

.

yyy

i

14,527
1,819,701

Total
Since Sept. 1

76,590

27,130

30,449

Soda sal
Soda ash
Flax
Furs
Gunnv cloth......
Hair

Articles reported
value —

447

580

Oils, essential..
Oils, Olive
Opium
Soda, bi-carb....

12,156

2,759

Wines, &c—

6,900
Champagne, bks.
Wines
2,456
2,889 Wool, bales

•

f,77i

Other portB.

2,490

2,277

25,867
3,025
2,805
1,488

•

1,771*

58.605

•726,387

19,908
20,047

4

••

338,270
670,813
786,265
45,250

488,365
796.384

bbls.

8,091

22,121

22,861
5,201

....

648,000

.1873.

1874.

.

8,674

Mobile
Charleston...
Savannah
Galveston
New York...

6,926,078 3,132,715
73,135
72,695

730,991!

19,955
16,260

2,031
404,490

615.277

Tiu, boxes
Tin slabs, lbs...

.

Drugs, &c—
Bark, Peruvian..
Blea. powders...

4,211

201,024
130,693
1,199,157 4,413,109
66,039
138,311

Lead, pigs.......

329,961
24,318
6,705;
3,349
46^400
20,3731

255,781

.

Hardware
Iron. RR. bars...

the

are

aeason :

NewOrleans.

Glass and

Below

exports and stocks for the week, and also for the corresponding

specified.]
Since

Same

Since

China,

f August 1,4874.

THE T 0BB0N1COE.

122

250,968

1

494,162

The market the past week for cotton on the spot lias been firm,
with some improvement in the demand for consumption. Specu¬
lation has been the main source of strength ; holders, in view of
the rapid reduction which is now going on in stocks of American

have been inclined to look for a recovery in prices,
especially as the rains have continued in some of the Atlantic
States; consequently, they have not been free sellers. The con¬
Receipt* of Domestic Produce.
centration of supplies at this market puts them under easy con¬
The receipts of domestic produce since January 1, 1874, and for
trol.
To-day, the market was quiet, and with the decline in gold
the same time 1873, have been as follows :
was scarcely so firm.
For future delivery, the market, though
subject to frequent fluctuations, has on the whole been tending
Since
Same
upward, especially in the later months. This is due entirely to
Jan.1,’74. time 1873 speculation based on wliat are termed “the chances
that is,
that buyers, even admitting that the situation is now against
114,652
Oil cake
93,859;
Ashes
pkgs.
5,475
4,170
pkgs.
I.362
them, declare that it is “ too good to last,” and that any misad¬
1,723
Oil, lard
Breadstuff's, »&c.—
63,907 venture to the growing crop, or such a revival of speculative
Peanuts
22,592
Flour
bbls. 2,290,443' 1,756,698|
bags.
bush. 25,191,57? 10,492,8321 Provisions—
Wheat
confidence as seems to be anticipated, will operate in their favor,
445,511
Butter
487,739
Corn
.pkgs.
17,532,633 9,351,765
and secure to them a profitable advance.
Yesterday, while Sep¬
875,405
Cheese
861,699
Oats
5,472,522 6.042.155!
397,901 tember and October were active, there was nothing done for
232,931
Cutmeats
434,723,
534,4861
Rye
313,217
330,044
668.793,
749,117 ! Eggs
Barley. &c
August except a few-“ short notices.” This would indicate that
86.537
1(2,067
Pork
Grass seed.bags.
59,686 i
34,584'
17,111 cotton is not wanted for early delivery, but the buying for the
15,734
Beef
Beans
bbls.
23,308,
40,2 44,
66,470

Mahogany

cotton,

:

...

326,619

Peas
C. meal
Cotton

bush.
bbls.
bales.

Hemp

bales.

2,327',

Hides

No.

329,511*

bales.
Leather. ...sides.

9,839

134,223,
541,897

Hops

.

Lard
Lard
539.807 Rice
3,749 !Starch
408,048 Stearine

12.589

7,677

181,055

13,575

II,970
1,118

284

681

22,597
118,833

29,714
97,816

67,793
117,875
47,050
106,793

108,014
51,717
93,812

bbls

0,605 Sugar

8,409

bbls.

41.981,
272,905;

Rosin
Tar
Pitch

37,984,
2,803

6,060

19,017

206,844

Tobacco

Spirits turpen...

274,017

171,902
24,521

kegs.
pkgs.

2,124,002 1,548,234 Su^ar
hhds.
23,406
22,653 Tallow.:. ...pkgs.

Molasses., .bbls.
Naval Stores—
Or. turp.

96,390!
116,253

hhds.

Tobacco

38,518 Whiskey
bbls.
bales.
330,747 Wool
j Dressed Ilogs.. No.
26,698
1,236

79.1)51

shows that holders must till then continue to

next two months

carry

A feature of the business of the week

stocks of cotton.

has been a moderate amouut of transactions at 1G 17-16c.@164c.
for January, and 16£@16fc. for February.
To-day, the market

fairly active, but at a decline of l-16@£c. from the highest
figures of yesterday, and the transactions for August mainly
short notices.” The total sales for forward delivery for the
week are 105,900 bales, including
free on board.
For
immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week 4,260 bales,
including
for export, 4,078 for consumption, 182 for specu¬
lation, and
in transit. Of the above,
bales were to
arrive. The following are the closing quotations :
was

“

COTTON.

Upland and

Friday, P. M., July 31,1874.

By special telegrams received to-night from the Southern ports
we are in possession of the returns showing the receipts.exports
&c., of cotton for the week ending this evening, July 31. It
appears that the total receipts for the seven days have reached
4,542 bales against 5,660 bales last week, 9,154 bales the pre¬
vious week aud 8,751 bales three weeks since, making the total

1873,3,768,697 bales against
3,575,348 bales for the same period of 1872-73, showing an in¬
crease since September 1, 1873, of 193,349 bales.
The details of
the receipts for this week (as per telegraph) and for the corres¬

Middling

follows:

l$ew

Orleans
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah
Galveston

.

Florida
North Carolina
Norfolk

Total this week
Total alnee Sept. 1

1,33?

1,769

163
572

bales

Tennessee, &c




1873.

1874.

2.3S3

364

231
607
5

512

1872.
332
21
5»2
897
67
456

4,055

1,463

839

202
705

1,039

1869.

393
113
187
310
52
319

806
705

1,500

7,988

29

17

209
801

62
470

26
278

10,472

6,612

1,690

3,575,848 2,708,090 1 8,977,820 2,8494)96

2,111,110

8,721

|f..

i33

1,086

2,173

4.542

13,255

2,117

8,768,897

1870.

2,439

941
596

23
229

184

1871.

250

....

18%®....

13%®....

15%®....
15 15-16

8«ir

16%®....
17%®....
1S%@....

16%®....
17%®....
18%®....

give the sales of spot and transit cotton and price of
Uplands at this market each day of the past week :
Below

we

PBIOB8.

SALKS.

Exp’t.

Consump.

Specula'n

245
761

Saturday
Monday
Tuesday

Wednesday

•

Thursday
Friday

.

•

957

•

•

£67

....

.

Good

Total.
245
816
843
957

,,,
•

•

•

•

,,,,

1,33 d

....
•

....

4,073

...

•

80

1,252

....

Transit.
....

55
47

296

Total

Received ibis week at—

18%®...

Good Middling

receipts since the first of September,

ponding weeks of the five previous years are as

«,

Texas.

Orleans.

18%®....
15%®....
15%®....
16%®....
17%®....
18%®....

13%®...
15%®....
15%®-...
16%®...
17 ®....

perlb.

Ordinary
Good Ordinary
Strict Good Ordinary
Low Middling

new

Mobile.

Florida.

182

....

....

567

4,260

Low

Mid

Ord’ry. Ord’ry. Mldl’g. dllng
13%
13%
13%
13%
13%
13%

15%
15%
15%
15%
15%
15%

....

....

17
17

16%
16%
16%
16%
16%
16%
....

17
17

17
17
....

The following will show the closing prices each day on the
basis of low middling uplands, for the several deliveries named:
Sat.

Fri.
On

spot
July

...

August

September
October........
November
December
Odd
lies shot

Sales future...

16%
16 5-82

16%
16%

16 5-32

16 7-32
16 9-16
16 9-16

16%
16 13-32
16 11-33
16 5-16

109%
4.84%

,

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

16%

16%

16%

,,

Thurs.
16%
16%

16 8-16
16 8-32

16 1-16
16

16

1«%
16%
16%

16 13-32

16 15-32

16%

1?%

16%
16 11-32
16%

16%

16 7-! 6
M 11-32

....

16%

16 7-76

16 13-32

ll‘»%

109%

109

16%
16%
16%
1ȴ

4.85
816

4.85

4.85

848

987

4.85
1.332

17.000

21.000

16,700

1&,3QQ

16%

449

4.85
245

83,200

16,500

Fri.
16%

16 7-16
16 13-32

109%

16*3-32

i#%
109%
4.85
567

15,900

002.1.780 1
37 3
.2 2
3.
0003.3
August 1,18?4.]

4.70

boari)

For forward delivery the sales (including — free on
have reached during the week 105,900 bales (all low middling
on the basis of low middling), and the following is a statement
the sales and prices :
bales.

For July.

bales.
200
200
100
100
100

cts.

16 1-16
1«J6
16 3-16
IS 7-32
16%

700 total

July.

For August.

800 s n.. ..15 31 32
100 s.n. lst.l531-32
15 31-S2
100
„600 s. n
16

16

2,900

500
600
000

1st..16 i-32
16 1-32
16 1-32

s n
8. n

l/xn

t

300

8.ii.

:o i-i6
3d..16 3-32

2,000

.

16 8 32

100 8. n 3d.... 16%

40C

16*6

a. n

The

16%

100 no not.
27th
16 5-32
100 no not.
till 1st....165-32

4.100*

16 5-32
16 3-16

16 13-82

16 7-16
16 15-32

9.700
4,500

16%

10J

16 19-32

7,900

9,700

14.7(H)
4.U 0
3,500
1,-100

46,900 total Sept.

l.'-'UO

300 total Jau.

16 116
16 11 82

16%

For
200

| 3,400 total Nov.

February.
16%
16%

400

16 13-32
18 7-16
16 15-32

100 new form
If passed.. .16%

I

700 total Feb.

made during the week:

following exchanges have been

-32c. pd, to
%c.
“

For January.
..16 7-16
16%

3e0
300

700
61.0

16%

100
200

For November.

300

16 15-82

4,600 total Dec.

26,100 total OCt.

16%
...16 13-32
16 7-16
16 15-32
16W
16 17-32
16 9-16
16 19-82

...16 7-16

100....

.For September.
300

cts.

16 5 16
.16%

400

16%
...16 17-32
16 9-16

24,100 total Aug.

16 13-31

1,700

16*7

700

4,000

16 7-32

bales.
200
1 800
900

cts.

]}ale8.

of

For December.

For October.

Ct8.

or

exch. 200 December for Septembe.i.
200 August for September.-

surveyed the hatches, the ship, and the cargo, and gave certificate
as to every one of those bales that they were country damaged.
The wardeU who made the survey and return was an experienced
shi]p master, and said he knew it was country damage, “ because
the ship did not take in a drop of water during the voyage, and the
bales were all covered with dry mud.” Yet, when the consignee,
who had shipped many cargoes at New Orleans, called the
warden’s attention to the visible fact that on every one of those
demaged bales on which ropes remained entire the dried mud
was impacted in and around every one of the rope knots that had
been tied in the press. The warden had to admit that the
damage occurred after the cotton was compressed, and
of coarse after
it was delivered
to the order of the
master who signed for it as in good order and condition.
Yet, the Warden persisted that his certificate was correct because
the damage occurred before the cotton went on board ship.
Sub¬
sequent inquiry developed the facts that soon after the ship
began loading a rain set in which continued many days ; the ship
was chartered to be at another.port on a day named, the Captain
became uneasy, and finally ordered the cotton from the press to
the levee when the latter was a sea of liquid mud (us described by
one of the mates and a passenger), into which the cotton was
dumped from the carts and through which it was rolled to be

on board the ship and stowed away. This actual case is
an extreme one, but it.is suggestive as allowing tile varying value

hoisted

:3Mf6ctobrrforSc“tembe?tev°<;'nSeptember'

*ad*n£ ?9d °J. Port w*':jlen s certificate, and
^rclblJ' 1,1.1"atratef tbe r“kles3 d,8re*.‘‘rd ?f be n«hts “f PP'-l>«>W
often exhibited when cotton to be treatedisworse than baled straw
in trausitu
eproper y.it beiug
Severally regarded that it
other packed commodity of a perisuable nature known to
the rights of owners should be vindicated in a test,
c?rrlud to the highest courts for if the damage could fall a
‘he real
few Alme8 be discontinued,parlies causing it, such recklessness
wou^
July Report of tiie ( oxreceived
which
should have
Mr. G. Mills,
oversight
omitted,
week, but by
the
ot the
intelligence, judgment
their preparation, and have value not only for
coin-

Weather Reports by Telegraph.—Tn some respects our 9^ a-^lea-n'>lP
a
telegrams to-night are decidedly more favorable, but in others the
opposite is true. The favorable fact is the cessation of the rains
in Texas and also to a very considerable extent throughout the
is
Gulf States; the unsatisfactory features are that along tlio or any
Atlantic there are points where they are still having too much commerce
wet weather, while in tl.e district tributary to Memphis the «ase
;
drought is thought to he doing much harm.
UP°“
Our Galveston correspondent telegraphs that he is glad to
800n
announce a change of weather; there has been no rain all the
Galveston Cotton Excitange
week ; rumors of the appearance of the caterpillars and of injury dition OF Crop.—The following report,
we
done by them are in circulation, but lie deems them of very little through the kindness of
A.
secretary,
importance unless there is a return of the rainy weather; if dry been given last
an
was
weather continues the crop will be large; considerable prepara- Although later, we make room tor it now, as
reports
tions are being made to attack worms should they appear again ; Galveston Cotton Exchange show great
planters are much elated at the prospect.
a
and industry in
At New Orleaus the weather has been warm and dry all the preseut use but also for future reference.
The committee is

week.
There has been no rain all the week at Memphis, but
have been warm and the nights cold ; our correspondent
lie believes that much damage is being done by the
forms are shedding seriously and rust is

posed of Jos. H. Metcalf, chairman ; J. D. Braman, J. S. Grinnan,
Vogel, and W. L. Thomas. The report is dated July 15,
says that a^d states that the committe.e received 139 replies from Cl coundrought; ties, embracing the period commencing May 27 and ending July
the days Theo. O

developing badly in 10,1874. The questions and answers are given as follows:
both corn and cotton 1st. What has been the character of the weather since May 27 h, and state
crons are less favorable
whether it lias been more or less favorable thm last year ? To this interroguxt
i
*ii
, I,
A •
tory 125 reply that the weather has been more favorable than during the
Jliey have nad two showers at Tsasliville, the rainfall reaching period’last year; 6 report less favorable, whiles report “about the same.
for the week seven-hundredths of an inch, and for the month of
2d. What effect has it had upon the cotton plant? In answer to this quesfi°u our rePlies «fi a^ree in saying that, during the period referred to, the
Julv two inches and sixty five hundredths.
„
of the weather has the growing plant has May 27th, and from what
A\
y V,
At Montgomery it i
has been warm and dry every day , our cor- effect How much land upon been abandoned sincebeen decidedly beneficial.
3d.
respondent hears rumors of caterpillars, but thinks them of very .cause? 136 report “no land abandoned,'’ and 3 report some few acres
little importance ; the crop is now developing promisingly ; the 1 turned out in consequence of not getting a stand previous to the rains in lat123
many

places; the reports, therefore, from
,

4

j

*

,

„

r

month’s rainfall has been three inches and. eighty-seven bun-***»
dredtlis of an inch.
It has also been warm and dry at Selma this week ; caterpillar
rumors are in circulation here also, b it our correspondent adds
that he thinks them of little importance.
There has been no rain at Mobile, but the weather ha? been
warm ;

the accounts about the crop are

quite conflicting, but less'

correspondent thinks that caterpillars have nctuactually appeared, though he states that the damage done is as
yet very limited, but the planters are very apprehensive.
At Atlanta one day of the week it rained constantly, and two
other days have been showery, the rainfall reaching two inches
and forty hundredths of an inch.
It has rained on two days at Macon, and the rest of the week
has been cloudy; our correspondents think they are having
father too much rain in that vicinity ; the week’s rainfall has been
one inch and fifty-two hundredths of an inch.
At Columbus it has rained on two days, the earlier part of the
week; the latter part of the week has been clear and pleasant;
the rainfall this week has reached one inch and five hundredths
favorable

of

an

; our

inch.

How
te£^arLof

are

the stands of cotton in your

neighborhood ?

report “good

r< port “poor and unpromising.”
5th. Is the crop earlier or later than last year?
“later.” and 26 “about the same as last year.”
6th. Do the laborers continue to woik well? 135 reply “working well;’
5 way “ not as well as usual.”
7th. Have you seen or do you know of any army worms
your
?
We have 22 replies in the affirmative, reporting the worm
but nowhere in sufficient numbers to damage the crop—yet great apprehension
exists that the Plant will he totally destroyed by this pest in these and many
other counties, should they have much rainy weather during the next
or
six weeks.
In the other 47 counties heard from there is no sign of the worm

stands;” 16

39 reply “earlier,” 74

in
county
in 14 counties,
four

as

yet.

poisons to destroy
answer to this
of the State subject to
tiie depredations of the worm, great interest is manifested in this subject, hut
they have so little confidence in the merits of any preparation heretofore tried
that they are unwilling to incur the expense and trouble of applying an uncer¬
tain remedy—and hence a large majority are making no efforts in this direc¬
tion.
9th. What is the present condition of the cotton crop in yonr county ? One
hundred and twenty-eight report the condition very good, nine report the
condition fair, and two report the condition poor and unpromising ; hut a
large majority of our replies clearly indicate that the average condition of the
crop at this time is better than it has been for several years.
Bombay Shipments.—According to our cable despatch received
to-day, there have been 2,000 bales shipped from Bombay to Great
Britain the past week, and 1,000 bales to the Continent,while the
receipts at Bombay, during the same time have been 1,000
bales. The movement since the first of January is as follows.
These are the figuiei of W. Nicol & Co., of Bombay, and are
brought down to Thursday, July 30 :

8th. Are the planters generally providing themselves with
the worms, iu the event they make th«*ir appearance? In
question, 16 say yes, while 123 say no. In that portion

Savannah, two of which were
local storms, the rainfall reaching one
and nine-hundredths of an inch ; the rainfall for the month of
July has been nine inches and twenty-nine hundredths.
From Charleston we learn that they have had five rainy days
with a rainfall of three inches and forty hundredths.
At Augusta it has rained on two days light, the rainfall reach¬
/-Shipments since Jan. 1—,
.—Shipments this week->
,—Receipts.—>
Great
Great
Ccning seventy-seven and nine-tenths inches ; the days have been
Con'lids
Since
Britain, tinent. Total.
Britain, linent.
Total, week.
Jan. 1
warm, but the nights have been cold.
2,000
1,000
3,000 743,000 359.000 1,102.000
1,000 1,200,100
The thermometer has averaged at Atlanta 80, at Macon 79, at 1874
1873
1,000
4,000 647,000 193,000 840,000
2,000 915,100
3,000
Mobile 84, at Columbus 82, at Memphis 83, at Nashville 83, at 1872
5,000
6,000 587.000 237,000 824,000
1,000 899,COO
Savannah 78, Montgomery 86. Galvesten 84, Selma 81, New
From the foregoing it would appear that compared with last
Orleans 84, Charleston 78, Augusta 73.
year there is a decrease of 1,000 bales this year in the week’s
Careless Handling of Cotton—Country Damage.—Much
shipments from Bombay to Europe, and that the total move¬
complaint is being constantly made of the carelessness used in ment since January 1 shows an increase in shipments of 262,000
handling cotton while in the process of shipment or re-shipment. bales compared with the corresponding period of 1878.
A correspondent illustrates this and the injury resulting to in¬
Gunny Bags, Bagging, Etc.—Bags continue dull and nominal,
nocent parties by a case which happened in the spring of 1859.
and we have not heard of a single parcel changing hands for
It seems that at that time a ship was laden with cotton for
some time past.
We quote, ll^@llfc. The demand for bagging
The ship had a pleasant voyage, was staunch and good.
Boston.
has been steady, though the transactions are not so heavy as for
There was no pretence of sea damage, for her ground tier came
weeks past. Prices are very strong, and there have been
out bright and in good order.
Yet, more than half of that cargo several
large sales in New Orleans at figures showing considerable mar¬
was badly damaged when landed, the bagging and even the ropes
had rotted, <and on many bales the cotton had rotted in places gin between that market and ours. The advance in domestic
from one to six inches or more in depth, The Port Wardens ^ cloth, which has taken place the past two months, has caused
It has rained

on

four days at

showery and two hard




....

[August 1,1874.

THE CHRONICLE

124

The above totals show that the old interior stocks have decreased
buyers to acain turn their attention to the long neglected foreign
kinds, and several sales of moderate sized lots have been made during the week 2,031 bales, and are to-night 817 bales lets
recently. The transactions during the past week are 4,000 rolls than at the same peiiod last year. The receipts have been 2,468
domestic bagging here and in Boston at 13@13£c. here, also 500 bales less than the same week last year.
rolls in Boston r.t 12$c., and 100 rolls here at the close at 13c. ;
The exports ot cotton this week from New York show a**
180 bales Borneo at 12-Jc.; 108 bales do. in lots at 13£c.; 300 bales
increase as compared with iast week, the total reaching 12,756
Gourripore at 12$@13c; very few if any lots now left on the
market, and 170 bales native at 10c. Jute butts have been taken bales, against 2,765 bales last week. Below we give-our usual
table showing the
quite freely by the bagging manufacturers, and the sales foot up direction for each of exports of cotton from New York and their
the last four weeks; also the total exports^
0.750 bales, on spot and to arrive, at 2f@2fc., cash, on spot, and
and direction since Sept. 1, 1873; and in the last column the
2£(a2|c., 00 days, to arrive ; we also hear of a sale of 1,000 bales, total for the same
period of previous year.
on spot, at 2f c., 60 days.
Visible Supply of Cotton as Made up by Cable and Tele¬
graph.—Below we give our table of visible supply, as made up

by cable and telegraph to-night. The continental stocks are the
figures of last Saturday, but the totals for Great Britain and the
afloat for the Continent are this week’s returns, and consequently
brought down to Thursday evening; hence to make the totals the
complete figures for to night (July 31), we add the item of exports
from the United States, including in it the exports of Friday

1873

Exports of Cotton(bales) from New York since Sept.l*
WEEK ENDING

Same

Total

time
prev.
year.

to

EXPORTED to

July

July

July

15.

22.

29.

3,131

5,879

....

Liverpool

July

8.

....

date.

Other British Ports

1,507

....

••

....

496,696

425,155

12.756

2.662

only.
Total to Gt. Britain

209,500

985,000
247,000

Havre
Other French ports

*... 1,061,000

1,057,500

1,232,000

164,250
15,000
75,000

154,250

217,000

14,250

20,000

Hamburg

45,000

Other ports

26.500

Total Great Britain stock

34,000
56,500
105,500

1873.
848.000

Stock at Havre
Stock

at

Marseilles

Stock at Barcelon
Stocic at

•

42,000

93,000

62,000
29,000
29,000
72,000
11,000
33,000
90,000

494,750

56^,000

1,555,750

1,625.500

1,795,000

526,000

377.000

86,000
56,000

62,000

176,319

155,707

99,060

23.571

24,338

1,000

1,C00

8,237
1,000

Stock at Rotterdam
Stock at Antwerp ...
Stock at other continental ports
Total continental stocks

Europe

*

American cotton afloat for Europe

Egypt. Brazils, &c., afloat for Europe....
Stock in United States ports
Stock in United States interior ports

United States exports

to-day

35,500
30,000

'

Total visible

Of the above, the

totals of American and other

2,498,357

2,325,595

2,419,640

supply

descriptions are

as

follows

American—

United States interior stocks

to-day

1,000

Europe

United States stock
United States exports

292,000
175,000
43,000

355,000

415,000
287,000
72,000
176,319
23,571

Liverpool stock
Continental stocks
American adoat to

248,000
86,000

99,060
8,297

155,707
24,388
1,000

523,000

433.000

118,000

209,500

207,750
526,000
65,000

Brazil, &c.—
Liverpool stock
.

Continental stocks
India atloat for Europe

.

20,561
4,043

18,383

3,238

8,329

27,842

•

•

....

784

Europe.

31,409

....

....

103

....

....

.

Total American

.

bales
supply
Uplands, Liverpool

Total visible

.

4,697

25

Spain,Oporto&Gibraltar&c
All others

Total

Spain, Ac

•

....

Grand Total

....

•

2,741

2,672

2,741

464,302

538,384

....

12,756

2.765

5,879

3.915

2,647

....

....

....

....

The following are the receipts of cotton at New York. Boston'
Philadelphia and Baltimore for the last week, and since Sept. 1,’73

320,000

693,000
247,0dU
388,000

377,000
56,000

490,000
62,000

1,414,750
974,890

2,419,6-40
8*d

BALTIMORE.

PHILADELPHIA

BOSTON.

NEW YORK.

rece’ts

PROM-

This
week.

This
week.

Since

Sept. 1.

This
week.

Since

Sept.l.

31

3,489

134,381

33 415

109
522

New Orleans
Texas
Savannah....
Mobile
Florida....
S’th Carolina.
N’th Carolina.

49,193
138,665
5,212

13,6871
42,037

..

....

17

..

606
211
336
104
5. *3
20

Virginia

•

138,145;
777

250,790

4

.

.

121

....

82,936

.

.

1,880,000
618,357

1,455.500
870,095

2,498,357
9%d.

2,325,595
8^d.

figures indicate an increase in the cotton in sight to¬
night of 94,045 bales as compared with the same date of 1873,
and a decrease of 78,717 bales as compared with the correspond¬
ing date of 1872.
These

15
73

...

give the movements of cotton at the interior ports—receipts and
BhipmeiUs for the week, and stock to-night and for the correspond¬
ing week of 1873 :
,-Week ending July 31, 1874—,,-Week ending Aug. 1,1873.—
Augusta

.

Columbus.
Macon

.

.

6,940

752

1,456

64
66
72

201

1,705
1,768

20

153

400

8,057
3,828

1,653

2,134

699

80

.

745

568

9,229
6,G30

3,372

4,428

24,388

590
200

256

589
365
166

1,624

9,424

2,200

Nashville....

44
20
87
377
207

Total, old..

903

3,425

23,571

Shreveport...

Cl
29
123
G28

70
54
214

239
612

Montgomery . .+
Selma

Memphis

.

Atlanta
St. Louis*
Cincinnati

...

Receipts. Shipments. Stock

948
281
143

732
199
121

188

634
456

41

109

1,524

1,041

4,882

8,480

558
160
309
942

841

new.

Total, all..

.

1,744

1,379

4,804

14,213

37,784

1,969
5,341

A count

of s'ock at St. Louis

'!



-

•

17,385

63,231
447

62

5.930

952.947

3,033 337,163

353

41,968

269

111,253

13.317

956.133

2,575 332,422

991

54,232

679

103,144

44

24,555

I

...

,

5,468

60

16,079

...

....

....

Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United States
tli6 past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached 23,538
bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these are the
Bameexnorts reported by telegraph,and published in The Chron¬
icle last Friday, except Galveston, and the figures for that port

With regard to New York,
Wednesday

back.

are

the exports for two weeks

include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to

night of this week.
Total bales.

City of
Liverpool, per steamers Ab3rssinia, 183
Cbester,170 ...Egypt. 938.
Minnesota. 398 ...Adriatic. 550—
per ships Viscount, 100
City of Montreal. 503
Marcia Greenleaf. 4.730 ...Astronomer, 100
per bark Vanguard, 5,084 .
New Orleans—To Liverpool, per steamer Cordova, 2,452 .. .per ship
Scioto. 2,434
To Malaga, per bark Rosario, 1 000
Charleston—To Havre, per bark Lord Palmerston, 1.693 Upland
Texas—To Liverpool, per bark Herbert, 3,025, and 178 bags Sea Island.
New York—To

.

The
are as

particulars of these shipments, arranged in our

10,544

34,932

7,098

^

...

.

,

increased the running count 491 bale*

4.886
1,000

1 H93

3,203

usual form

follows:
Bremen.

Liverpool.
...

Total.

Malaga.

12.756

12,756
5,886
1,693
3,203

...»

1,000
1,693

Charleston.
..

3,203

—

1,546

2,670

12,756

23,538

3,110

has shown that the actual stocks is less hy

8,"73 hales than the running count.
t Count of stock at Montgomery to-night

•

3,001

Total..

Below

..

we

1,693

20,845

23,538

1,000

give all news received, during the week,

&c., to vessels carrying cotton from

of disasters,

United States ports:

str., (Sp.,1 Besanez, from Baltimore July 9, for Liverpool (before
reported spoken with machinery disabled) arrived at New York July 23.
in tow of steamer Belgic (Br.), and reports : July 13 the condenser and
main pump gave out; 20th, lat 41.31, ion. 64, was taken iu tow by steam¬
ship Belgic, from London.
Energi, bark. (Ger.,' Horn, from New Orleans for Narva, which went ashore
at Narva June 10. has been got off and towed into Hungerberg July 23.

Tomas,

Cotton

freights the past week have been as follows :
Liverpool.

Sail.

Steam.
d.

Saturday.. >^^5-16
Monday... ^@5-16

Tnesday.. ,)^@5-16
»

•

2,256 101,745

Foreign.

,

Total,

•

12,159
196,579

Interior Ports.—Below we

Receipts. Shipments. Stock.

•

8,159

...

7,930

•

•

Total

Movements of Cotton at the

•

...

.

....

•

16,563

....

.

.

•

....

10,815

...

10

Since

Sept.1.

4,412
2,732

22,700

24,505!

•

....

-|

....

•

278

15,926!

....

•

This
week.

Since

Sept.l.

we

..

Total East India, &c

Price Middling

•

6,031

618,357

870,095

East Indian,

Egypt, Brazil, &c., afloat

Total to N.

1,000

974,890

bales.

London stock

•

...

8,633

103

....

M

Total American

....

784
@

43,000

85,000

46,000
86,750
27,000
12,250

Stock at Amsterdam

India cotton alloat for

Bremen and Hanover

6,031

1,701

....

....

....

....

498,203

490,000

72.000

i»rnbur<v>

Stock at Bremen

stocks

'total Frencli

...

...

...

12,756

2,662

5,879

563,000

i

Total European

3,131

425,153
6,932

1872.

1874.

943,000
118,000

Stock at Liverpool
Stock at London

Wedn’day.K@5-16
Thursday .^@5-1 (i
Friday.... X@5-16

d.

MX
MX
MX
.MX
.MX

■

.

■

.MX

r- Havre.-^.
Steam. Sail.

c.
...

...

...

...

c.

,

Brenien.
Sail.

Steam.
c.

X
X
X
X
X

.MX

X

..@x

.MX
.MX
.MX

>,-Hambt]
Steam.

%comp.
&comp.
%comp.
#comp.
% comp.
#comp.

fair

c.

c.

.MX

X

MX
.MX
.MX
.MX
..&x

X
X

c.

•

X
X

X

125

THE CHRONICLE

August 1, 1874.]

Minnesota, with No. 2 Milwaukee quoted at $1 32@1 83 and No
opened steady and closed quiet to-day. Sales of tlie 2 Chicago $1 28@1 30. The receipts of wheat at the principal
day were 12,000 bales, of which 2,000 bales were for export Western markets are smaller, but the
quantity that comes
and speculation.
Of to-day’s sales 7,000 bales were American. forward
through unaccustomed channels, is a great burden
The weekly movement is given as follows:
July 17.
July 31. to our market. To-day, the market was lower, with sales of
July 24.
July 10.
bales
Sales of the week
71,000
65,000
64,000
75,000
24,000 bushels No. 2 Chicago at $1 26£ in store.
of which exporters took....
8,000
13,000
5,000
8,000
of which speculators took...
7.000
5,000
7,000
Indian corn has for some days past been dull, irregular and un¬
4,000
Total stock
1,004,000
913,000
999,000
982,000
of which American
415,000 settled; speculation, except within nariow limits, appears to have
461,000
436,000
483,000
Total import of the week
70,000
23,000
71,000
43,000
subsided, and the export demand is much reduced. The sales of
of which American
9,000
9,000
10,008
30,000
11.000
Actual export
6,000 prime canal mixed have been in the range of 79 to 81c. afloat,
11,000
10,000
Amount afloat
439,000
442,000
447,000
471,000
with some in store at 78@79c. White corn continues scarce, and
58,000
55.000
of which American.
54,000
52,000
choice has brought 90c. No Southern corn reaches this market.
The following table will show the daily closing prices of cotton for the week
The receipts at the Western markets has fallen off*, and the enor¬
Fri.
Satnr.
Mon.
Tues.
Thnrs.
Wednes.
8
8
....@8*
...WX mous advance which has recently taken place in home, will prob.
Mid’g Uplands 8>6®81«C
do Orleans.
..©8% ....@8%
....@8X
...®8X
ably cause more corn to be fed out by farmers, instead of sending
European Cotton Markets.—In reference to these markets
it to market.
To-day, there was a further decline, with sales of
our correspondent in London, writing under the
date of July
prime mixed at 77c. in store, and 78j@79c. afloat.
18, 1874, Btates:
Rye has declined, with sales of new crop Jersey at 98@99c.
Liverpool, July 16.—The following are the prices of middling
qualities of cotton, compared with those of last year:
Samples of the new crop of barley have been shown, but no prices
<—Good &
Same date 1873,-Fair &
have as yet been^stablished.
( -anada peas are not plenty, and
Fine.—.
Mid. Fair. Good.
<—Ord.&Mid—>
g’dfair-N
Liverpool, July 31—3.30 P.M.—By Cable prom Liverpool.—

The market

c-

19
17

16
15

Sea Island

Florida do

24
19

22

18

26
20

38
24

22
19

19

17

30

rule firm.

22

There

has

been

extraordinary speculation in oats. The
receipts at the Western markets have for a considerable time
10
934
734
Upland... d}i
10
Mobile.... 6J4
934
734
been less than half as large as last year, and the visible supply
9
7%
N.O& Tex 6*
8%
9%
8
834
934
1034
has dwindled to minimum figures. The speculation began at
Since the commencement ol the year the transactions on specula65c. for No. 2 Chicago, in store, then they sold largely at 70c. and
.—Actual exp. from
Actual
75c., and yesterday, jumpe4 to 90c., at which price three loads
Liv., Hull & other exp’t from
afloat were sold. A few new crop Jersey oats have arrived, and
U.K.in
,-Taken on spec, to this date—.
outports to date—,
1873.
1872.
1874.
1873.
1874.
'873.
sold at 72@80c. To-day, there were sales at 87^c. for new crop
bales.
bales.
bales.
bales.
bales.
bales.
171.650
American.... 136,420
68,222
93,920
68,462
120,750 Jersey, and 95c@$l for mixed Western, but the close was
Ord. G.Ord.

Brazilian

L.Mid. :Mid. G.Mid. Mid. F. Mid.
8 3-16 834.
834
8%
7 38-16
7 13-16 8 3-16 8>4
8%
834

8,712

5 326

5,560

18,880
9,990

6,063
103,338

29,270
412,600

191,895

591,490

W. India, &c. 2,180
E. India &c. 42,630

840

40,120

198,730

6,937
153,576

212,190

148,170

487,880

246,061

2,250

6,040 *

Total.

The following statement shows
tor the week and year, and also
on

the sales and imports of cotton
the stocks of produce on hand,

Thursday evening last:

unsettled.
The

American.

j-

730

12,820

55,000
This
week.
American
Brazilian

4,060

-i
410

17,290

To this
date
1874.

To this
date

1873.

9,372 ,398,488 1.351,485
6,814 304,953 270,393
964
171,776
178,522
Egyptian
4
1.963
15,616
Smyrna & Gr’k
38,501
4,014
W. Indian
44,128
East Indian... 48,055
424,866
447,465
.

...

Total.
1873.

1,871,991
468,070
309,736
16,102
113,041

757,603

36,450
6,910
5,690

1,132,270

1873.

35,270
6,300
5,430

4

75® 5 10
5 50© 5 70

Extra State, &c
Western Spring
.

Wheat

<

do double extras
do winter wheat extras
and double extras

70.223 2 ,347,293 2,300,865

25© 5 75
85© 8 00

5 50© 8 75

City shipping extras.
City trade and family

5 65© 6 00

brands
Southei n bakers’ and fa¬

6 75©

..

spring,bush.$1 17@ l 20
spring
l 26® 1 82
l 33© 1 37
spring

No. 2
No. 1
Red Western
Amber do
White
Corn-Western mixed
White Western
Yellow Western

1 27© 1 30
1 32® 1 33
1

40® l 52
©
79
90
8-’X®
79^®
SO
®
96® 1 03
©
87^®
95
95© 1 00

77

Southern, white
Rye

193,810
154,6.30
8,220 I
1,020
53,590 (
446,690 10,600

1,390

7 50© 8 75

Oats—Black
Mixed
White

Southern shipp’gextras..

5 75® 6 75

Barley—Western

10,460

Rye flour, superfine..
Corn meal—Western, &c.

6 00© 6 40
3 75® 4 25

58,850

•

-Stocks.-

This

Same
date
1873.
363.450

mily orands

Corn meal—Br’wine, &c.

Dec. 31.

1873.
day.
148,690
460,600
62,510
162,470 116,480
91,850
63,490
77,830
11.210 1
1,900
1 ou
20,280 f
26,790
281,800
260,300 322.420

3,536,546 1,003,910

j

897,330

8 50

4 6C® 4 65

Canada West
State
Peas—Canada

nominal.
do.

1874.
,
Since
For the
week.
Jan. 1.

592,960

Since
Jan.
1, 1873.

Flour, bbls. 77,796 2,290,443 1,756,698
146,253
3,955
134,223
“
Wheat, bus. 421,793 25,191,577 10,492,832
989,740 17,532,633 9.351.765
“
Corn,
1,925
434,723
584,486
Rye,
“ .
*
25,500
668,793
749,117
Barley “
Oats ...“
41,600 5,472,522 6,642,155
C. meal,

.

follows

as

,

1874.
Since
For the
week.
Jan. 1.
41.995 1,291,023

2,747
118,355
390,576 22,609,666
965,869 12,817,403
522,451

1873.
For the
Since
week.
Jan.1.
767.721
41,114
109.757
6.200
,

8,750,258
7,458,861
283,042

699,796
319,365
21,710

40,040

.

.

B RE,A. D S TUF FS.
Friday P. M.,

1 30

1 10©

EXPORTS PROM NEW YORK.

-RECEIPTS AT NEW YORK./

do.

.....

The movement in breadstuffs at this market has been

.

Total

5
5

Wheat—No.3

1,970,210 60,670

518,020

5,110 '3,690 63,300 2 1,136,090
-Imports.-

1874.

Grain.

ern...

weekly sales

1873.

the closing quotations :

SuperiineStateand West¬

Same

period

are

¥ bbl. $3 75® 4 25

No. 2

extras

.

West Indian.,
Bast Indian..

following

Flour.

SALES, ETC., Or ALL DESCRIPTIONS.

Total
-Sales this week.
this
Ex- SpeculaTrade. port
tion. Total.
year.
720
1.29,180
3,220 33,120 :1,175,870
7,260
227,150
7,260
60
160
5,010
168,230
5,080
150
2.610
170
900
44,210

an

M.F.

11,760

82.080
31.840
3,580

18.100

Sgyptian, &c. 12,860

G.Mid.

73,842

580

19,227

1,534

In “Receipts” at New York includes also malt.
The following tables show the Grain in sight
ment of Breadstuff's to the latest mail dates:
*

July 31, 1874.

and the move"
only moderately active, with, on the whole,
downward tendency ; the close, however, shows some irregularity > RECEIPT8 AT LAKE AND RIVER PORTS FOR THE WEEK ENDING
JULY 25, AND FROM AUGUST 1 TO JULY 25.
flour from old wheat is not very plenty and is held with firmness ;
Oats.
Corn
Wheat
Flour.
Barley
Rye •
the past day or two good to prime lines of extra State have sold
bushbush.
bush.
bush.
bbls.
bush.
at $5 60@$5 70, and choice Wisconsin at $5 75; at the same time
(56 lbs.: > (32 lbp.) (48Ibs.) (56 lbs.)
(196 lbs.) <601bs.)
78.291
8,469
13,710
1,137,327
20,018
192,687
considerable parcels of low extras have sold at $5 25@$5 40. The Chicago...
22,090
3,220
1,905
Milwaukee
263,129
30,750
350
107,991
21,670
282,861
Toledo
extreme low grades, such as No. 2 and superfine, have been
1,767
Detroit
37,111
2,563
4,183
21.600
scarce, and though not in much demand, have ruled firm.
Flour Cleveland
2,500
34,950
*3,250
128,960
97,965
1,350
4,105
352,913
23,674
from new winter wheat has arrived more freely; and straight Ohio St. Louis
863
1,800
2,690
20,414
Peoria
5,720
8,720
15,005
brands of good quality have sold in round lots at $5 75@$5 85, Duluth*
2,875
while for poorer qualities and “ seconds *’ $5 35@$5 50 has been
17,169
294,192
20,430
1,186,376 1,512,032
Total..
7.015
274.710
5,782
78.114 1,075,257 1 719,627
Previous week..
accepted. Choice bakers’ brands of Tennessee flour from new Corresp’Lg week,’78. 81,680 1,118,925 2,505,532
11,973
9,068
626,125
264.017
’T'2.
8,800
45.876
20,343
wheat have sold at $6 65@$6 75.
420,719 1,627,422
Our quotations are exten¬
124,148
37,387
’71. 100.374 1,044,715 2,013.276 1,041,957
sively reduced for the better gardes. Rye flour has been more
21,120
18,587
’70
379,510
805,979
84,352 1,235,924
917.101
9,272
’69.
510,853
172,462
3,485
56,889
freely offered, but the late advance has been well maintained.
Total Aug. 1 to date. 6.119,287 83,256,335 63,028.915 26,295,764 4,977,618 1,747.26?
Corn meal has been rather slow of sale. To-day, the market was Same time 1872-73.
5,685,390 53,559,627 60,241,186 28.648,379 9,119,821 1,887,69*
Same time 1871-72.. 4,986,083 39.297,159 68,528,888 28,752,974 6,365,722 2,752,752
very dull and prices weak.
Same time 1870-71.. 5,671,065 47,553,385 45,628,995 20,281,718 5,288,965
811,24?
Wheat has been dull and depressed. The large visible supplies
Estimated.
at the commencement of a new crop year, and especially the large
Shipments of Flour and Grain from the ports of Chicago
stock in store at this point, have exerted a depressing influence,
Milwaukee, Toledo, Detroit, Cleveland, St Louis, Peoria and
to which some failures at Montreal and dull accounts from Liver¬
Duluth, for the week ending July 25, 1874, and from January
pool have contributed. A notable part of the week’s business 1 to July 25 :
Flour, Wheat,
Corn,
Oats,
Barley,
Rye.
has been in new red winter from the Ohio Valley, opening at
Weekending—
bbls.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bush.
bnsfcr
99,441
689,955 1,265,701
135,166
7,447
3,392
$1 35@1 36 and falling to $1 32. Owing to the drought in that July 25, 1874
July 18, 1874
16,966
187,459
899,920 2.051,042
232.587
4,356
section, this new wheat is extremely dry, and much of it has Corresp’ng week 1873 102,275
917,690 2,224,388
580,568
4,902
19,935
442,497 2,063,653
443,153
37,674
29,769
been taken for export. .The business in spring wheat has been Corresp’ng week 1872 56.376
SO,794
940,618 1,520,445
Corresp‘ng week 1871
342,402
21128
86,004
282,306
4,135
41,857
mainly at $1 38 for No. 1 Milwaukee and $1 33@1 35 for No. 1 Oorresp'ng week 1870 68,844 1,099,397 677,900
Flour has been




.

•

•

•

•

•

....

....

1ft

ftft

41

ftft

*

•

....

....

•

.

•

•

••

....

....

126

[August 1,1874.

tMt

Total Jan. to date.,.. 3.852,889 82,670,056 26,372,699 8,856,194 1.249,061
Same time 1873
3,319,882 20,452,465 24,232,060 12,604,651 lf558,214
Same time 1872
2,147,901 7,183:557 S6;*7tf,W0 10,209,156 1,1131,713
Same time 1871
2,229,630 16,419,191 29,314,871 4,976,993 590^02

2,877,20®
666.87**

691,835
887,439

RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN AT 8BABOARD FORTS FOR TEfE
WEEK ENDING JULY

25,

bbls.

At—
New Ye»k.
Boston

Baltimore
New Orleans

Barley,

bush-

bush.

bush.

1,198,038
62,203

16,850

73,100

94.603
122,603

....

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

•

..

.

...

....

....

*

1,500
••••

173,615

.

..

.

.

.

.

3,200
2,558

10,237
8,510
74.950

628,978
603,832

414,614
170,214

Estimated.

The Visible

Supply

granary at tr.o principal
seaboard ports, in transit
York canals, was, on July

Grain, including the stocks in
points of accumulation at lake and
by rail, on the Lakes and on the New
25,1874:
of

Wheat
bush.
.

Chicago

..

store at Milwaukee
store at Duluth
store at Toledo.
store at Detroit

693,303
1,000
616,641

1,234,231

1,551,902
47,928

7,353
45,446
12,732

In store at Oswego*
In store at St. Louis
In store at Peoria
In store at Boston
In store at Toronto
In store at Montreal
In store at Philadelphia*
In store at Baltimore*
Lake shipments

•

“

298.4S9

..

610,706

1,128,837
136,864

“
“

“

.

10,000
26,894
8,114
44,463
6,164
13,737

55,600
115,000

110,000

June 27.’74 7,120,662

July 26, ’73 4,742,934

selling well in good styles, and fall patterns have been
opened by naarly all of the corporations. Colored cottons are
steady, with only a moderate demand. Canton flannels are selling
well in the more staple makes, at full quotations.

bush.
•

•

•

•

....

8,731
.

.

.

.

are

Woollen GooDS.^-There is

a

fair demand for cassimeres and

overcoatings for clothiers uses, and although sales are mostly of
small lots, the aggregate is very considerable. Flannels are
moving readily at satisfactory prices. Blankets are in moderate
request, but remain firm. There has been a better demand for
worsted dress fabrics, consequent upon the opening of full lines
of the productions of the different mills. Hosiery is also doing
better and knit goods are in fair request, with orders placing for
liberal amounts later in the

season.

Foreign Goods.—The

offerings of imported fabrics are not
very liberal as yet, but the stocks are increasing, and importers
are making arrangements for an early opening.
At present the
demand is very moderate. Tbe value of tbe imports for tbe
season is about equal to that of last year, but when the fact is
considered that nearly all kinds of goods are lower now than at
this time last year, it will appear evident that we are to have an
increased supply. Indeed, this fact is shown by tbe large excess
in tbe number of packages as compared with last year.
The importations of dry goods at this port lor the week ending
July 30, 1874, and the corresponding weeks of 1873 and 1872

....

have been

as

follows

:

400

138.053

40,850
539,622

“

“

.

11,669

104,752
35,459

5,940,741
transit July Id, ’74 6,604,785
July 11,’74 6,257,011
July 4, ’74 6,653,663

“

,

65,000

79,240

Total in store & in

\

•

61,427

1,912

.

•

5,000

125,182

102.538

Rail shipments

Barley,

115,099

948,639
3,114
274,994
34,586
48,000

.

Total

Oats,
bush.

112,709

store at Albany
store at Buffalo
store at

Corn,

bush.

1,988,791
1,9S8,791
14,500

In store at New York

Prints

400

•

1.004,510 1,665,384
158,861
4,115
129,754 1,378.019 1,855,906
4,200
293,554
413,992
153,998 1,846,841 2,072,881
7,675
158,859 1,903,502 1,669,286
378,610
5,855
896,543
950,330
122,277
9,675
489,788
1 to date. .5,337,803 35,659,870 31,794,843 9,933,710
729,220
1873
.4.878,435 16 137,472 23.902,449 13,369,350 1,138,524
1872
.4,243.299 6,800,900 42.850,020 12,875,940 1,309,952
1871,
.4,463,967 15,277,330 24,038,043 6,960,538
539,795
....

In
In
In
In
In
In
In

•

49,560
25,000
7,676

41,217

firmness, as Btocks are not very heavy, and the prospects are
favorable for a liberal distribution before the close of tlpe season.

1,300
4,115

1,000
1,000

144,226

77.200

Rye,

bush.

57.775

2,500
302,416

15,943

Total...
Previous week
Ween July 11
Week July 4
Cor. week ’73

*

Oats,

16,631

..

1 TO JULY 25.

Corn,

15.988
16 955

Philadelphia

Jan.
time
time
time

551,794

5,500

Montreal

Total
Same
Same
Same

hush.

76,324
26,274

Portland*

AND FROM JANUARY

Wheat,

Flour,

of

5,178,387+
7.286,872
8,003,986
7,467,710
7,128,543
9,967,876

.

•

•

•

530,233
819,768

1,350,880
1,384,945
1,812,002
4,035,790

30, 1874.

ENTERED FOB CONSUMPTION FOB THE WEEK ENDING JULY

500

•—-1872—

'

/
•

•••

1,457

2*666

35,000

20,000
25,186
119,980

.

165

20,135
13,531
8,651
15,498
62,810

Value.
$28,518
77,789
590,772

Pkgs.

Manufactures of wool—
83
do
cotton.. 284
do
silk
624
do
flax
1,188
Miscellaneous dry goods. 366

7,282

1873

^

,

Pkgs, Value.
1,934 $884,799
:1,180'
888.221

Pkgs.
Value.
1,156 $600,638
“

997
859

333,410

268,569

641

283,134

515

122,644

1,019

140,798

545

124,563

442

2,445 $1,069,011

Total

1874

,

3,572 $1,449,824

465,569
236,043
135,996

5,116 $2,110,62g

WITHDRAWN FROM WAREHOUSE AND THROWN INTO THE MARKET DURING THE
SAME PERIOD.

Manufactures of wool....

92,352

The visible supply of rye at New York i3 28,400 bushels; Chicago, 4,153.
Milwaukee, 1,333; Toledo, 40; St. Louis, 1,150; Peoria, 3,395; and by rail
shipments, 3,395, making a total of 41,868.

do
do
do

139
124
80
588
155

cotton..

silk
flax

Miscellaneous dry goods.

114,888
6,382

370

83,455
98,388

14,016

99

16,640

154

$663,080
1,449,824

1,731

$618,541

5,116

2,110,628

1.083

$308,999

1,069,011

96.234

3,572

8,528 $1,378,010

$868,363

1.609

2,445

Total

514

82,712

Total thrown upon m’k’t.

Estimated
+ Amount afloat at Buffalo and New York has not been included.

$234,840
96,536

125.367

31.220

Add ent’d for consumpt’n

*

513
340
210

719
£37
84

$55,684

5,181 $2,112,904

165.895

6,847 $2,729,169

ENTERED FOR WAREHOUSING DURING SAME PERIOD

Manufactures of wool —1,849

THE DRY GOODS TRADE.

$992,573

928

$463,076

1,526

077

327,679

474

125.S84

549

171,082

504,149

168
389

149,650
101,176

148
651

182.447

cotton..

do

silk

406
flax.... 1,173

do

Friday, P. M., July 31, 1874.

do

190,840

$672,168
145,469

The

42
104
20,309
75,149
22,711
package demand for dry goods during tbe current week has Miscellaneous dry goods. 238
been moderately active and tbe market has been without impor¬
Total
4,643 12,090,395
$860,095
2,001
2,978 $1,193,877
3,572 1,449,824
5,116 2,110,628
Tbe attendance of out-of-town buyers has been Add ent’d for consumpfn 2,445 1.069,011
tant feature.
steadily increasing, but their purchases are not so heavy thus far Total entered ai the port. 7,088 $3,159,406 5,573 $2,309,919 8,094 $3,304,50
as to give a tone of general
activity to tbe market. There is a
|We annex a few particulars of leading articles of domestic
healthy outlook for tbe fall business, but just at present buyers manufacture, our prices quoted being those ot leading jobbers:
are only making selections of a few of tbe more
staple descrip¬
Cotton Sail Duck,
tions of staple winter fabrics, and staple cotton goods are compara¬
Ontario and Woodberry
30
Woodberry and Druid •N» 7
USA Standard 28# in.
28
No. 8
Mills.
tively neglected. This is owing in part to some irregularity still
do
8 oz. 22
No. 9
26
44
existing in prices, and until tbe general market becomes fully set¬ No. 0
do
9 oz.
24
No, 1
42
do
26
10 oz
40
tled pucrhases will probably not be renewed with great activity. No. 2
Light duck—
do
12 oz.
31
Bear
......

•

.

At tbe

same

time it should be remembered that the trade have

already purchased pretty freely of cotton goods, and that their re¬
quirements for some time to come will be light. It is, therefore,
useless for sellers to attempt to force goods, and it would seem that
further reductions

on

standard lines of cotton fabrics

were

not

only

but damaging in their effect upon trade.
down to a very low point, and distribution of
goods can leadily be made at tbe current figures, while tbe uniim
portant reductions by increased discounts that have been made
on some lines
during tbe past week, more than offset tbe
slight inducements they offer for increased purchases in the sus¬
picions of weakness they are certain to raise in tbe minds of
buyers. Stocks, as tbe rule, are light, and there seems to be no
unnecessary
Prices are already

real

reason

for weakness.

Woollens

are

held with

more

firmness,

owing to tbe strength of tbe market for tbe raw material, and
tbe ready manner in which sales are being made.
Domestic Cotton Goods.—There is a steady call for small lots
of full packages from Weslern and Southern
buyers, but tbe
demand for brown and bleached fabrics does not open with as
much activity as bad been expected for tbe closing weeks of tbe
month. A few prominent makes of bleached goods have been
reduced by an increase of
per cent in tbe agents’ discounts, but
beyond this there have been no notable changes in the market
The range of prices is generally maintained with a good degree




(8oz.) 29 Id..
do heavy (9oz.)...

38

No. 3

38

No, 4

18
21

20

No. 5
No. 6

34
32

Mont.Ravens 29in.
do
40in.

Appleton
Amoskeag A

11#

Great Falls
Laconia

Brown

Boott.

28

Brills.
Mass D....
do G....

11#

11#,
Lyman H
11
11# Langley B

Augusta

do
15 oz.
38
Ontario Twls, 29m. 18
do
36in. 23
Ex twls'Telhem’B” 17

11#

Pepperell..

11#
,14 11#

.

Stark A..

10#
11#
11#

Cotton Yarns.

Pendleton

do

..

27

do
Sargeant
Fontenoy 6 to 12

12

Empress 6 to 12...

Eagle—

27

..
..

IXL

26r
27

6 to 12..
do

XXX

..

27
28

Stripes.
Anchor
American

Amoskeag
Arasapha

....

Cordis awning

.22#-25

Columbian....,

14

Amoskeag

10# j Ind.

Corset

12

Androscog’n eat.

Canoe River....
Hallowell Imp.
do

Hamilton

8#

brown

10#
11#
10

...—

best

....

I

do

sat....

KCarsage, sat....
Laconia
Nanmkeag sat..
Newmarket.....

|
!

225-2 50

9#

12#
12

....

14

I

I

do

11-12
17
....

Extra 3-ply

Pepperell, blea..
do

sat.

..

Pequot

10#

Rockport........

12#

Suftolk

10

1 42#

Imperial 3-ply.. 1 35
Superfine
1 10
Tap Brussels,
95'
CrortleyA Son’*!T0~ HO ji Med:super.....
do do A No 1.,

I

Jeans.

Orch.Imp..

Carpets,
I Eng. Brussels. 1 75-2 80
! Hartford Carpet Co :

Velvet, J. Crossley
& Son’s

I Thorndike A....

B
ITncasviile A...
Lewiston A....
16
do
B....
12# Union
Massabesic
14-15
| Whitienton A..
do
BB
Otis BB..
13#-14
j
do
O'...-

14-15
10#

Boston—

—

14-15

Hamilton

10#-11#

12#
12#
42#
10#
10#

Body Brns 5 fra. 1 90
do
4 do 1 HO
do

3

do 1 70

Bigelow BrusC-fr. 2 00:
do

4-fr. 1 90

-flHK
KiSiA

»

PRICES CURRENT.

” 7

ASHES-

Pot..;;

8
0 17
SO
1

28 50

...

(7e^i<3Ht>-3oAehdjaIe.....'t,.„
Aim.*!—Rockland, .common

Tntshlng.

‘

110
1 60

....

Lumber—Southern pine.
White pine bof hoerdf
White pine merchan. box
Clear pit no.
Oak and aah
'

i
%

...

1 35
1 35

_

29 00

00

0.W
@130
@ 26
@ 21

Blaokwalrint....
1 bo
.Spruce boards A planks........... 22 00
18 00
Hemlock boards <fc planks
...

00
00
00
00

“

CHEESE—
State factory, good to fine
GOAL—

of Scranton, July 29:
5,000 tons steamboat...
5,000 tons grate.
5,000 tons egg

Auction sale

5 00 @
5 00 @
5 27*@
5 77*@

5.000 tons stove

....

cargoes,60@90 days.gl d.
do
gold.
do
gold.
do
gold.
and bags
gold.

Java.mats
Native Ceylon
Maracaibo
Laroayra.....

80*0
21* @
25
19

gold.gold.

SYUoraihgO

gold.
gold.

Savanllla
Costa Rica

19
21
17
18

gold.

20

UOPPER-

0

21*

0

13

0
@

Braziers’(aver 16 oz.)

35
23

22*0

~

Ingot

Bar...,’..

“

.

...

"
'*
**
...IP ft.

17
2 35
37 00

27*

gal. .gold.

Castor oil, E.l,inbond,
Caustic soda
;epc
Chlorate potash

0

87*@

5 (K)

“

Cntch

....0

Southern

**

m
0

i
1 45

cur.

18

29

@

25,0

Sic
,

Madder. Fr enob.

...gol d

It:

lpXf

Nutgalls, blue Aleppo

Oil vitriol

@

J5@

Madder .Butcti*..

(63degree^)..........

...

.gold*
-cm*.
China,gotopr....|R ia.

....

Quinine

....

tills
60

...gold
• •

2 25

gold

10

85if
9

5*

*

5

25

I:®Gfer::c.::::: • !o

MadhefhL No. l,

Bay, tote catch... .id 00

,x—.

*

tth River....

8*

15

3

70
2 50
21

0

@

do

1"

@

jies,

Tujklsh

Sperm, bleached
Lard oil, present

o

do

,o

,

unpared, halves &■ nnarters

jkberrleB

.

.Nominal.

ma..{.v.....rv
sflES^r^ckxfiport. ufl^r




winter
make

.

standard-white..
N^pbtba.City, bbl*.,....on
=

‘f

i

■>

■

Cotton.

0
@
0

@

! 55
1 83

87
•

T

-

60
1 60
1 85
95

LlyfirnpO’ .vafio.ua sorta.,. ..V
SALTPETRE-—

10 00

•••«»

NWretesoda./.v...............
•;

.

5d

@ is
0 15

.

13

oh

@
\

•

^

2

' ’

’

7*@

8-7*®
26
82

00

!5
13 5-16

7A'@
1.

QU

27 00

14%

Cb

@
@

9*
8*
8

12*
80
35

0

sack.
b

••••!»«•

@

......

Turks Island
St. MartinJ..«v,
Cadiz^.....•

■!

0 22 12
@

l. 22 00

SALT—

>stn.uo

e

14

Rangvpn.to; bond....

Refrned, pure
Crude

11*
7*

20 00

Hams, pickled..^.
Lard ..........v;.*...
RICE—" 1
Oarolln-a, fair to choice
Louisiana, fair to prime
i

i.

....

Bftet^plaln mesp, fiew...
Bdefiextm mess,-new
Bqef jUiPTia, new,.,.,

T

1 10
70

11*0

.,.

<i

choicest

l 65

@

12*0
5*0

2*0

2 65
11

5*

'Ui

9*
9*

30
48
85

1 25
33
55

85

•

26

.0

73

13
30

@
@
0

25
70

@
@
0

Tn

20

7

40
1 10
25

<Jh

47
43
51

......

8Y

0
@

9
18
5

@
0
53

47

S3

35
31
25
82

2 9

0
0
0

36
83

V ft.gold.net
btk a m.—
s.d. v. a-

Corn.bnk A bgs. V bu.
•Wheat, bulk <te bags..
Beef
.39 tee.
VbbJ,
Pork,...

0
0

29

5-16

3=9 0
0
45 0 @
fi*®...
7 @....
6 0 «...
B @....

38
37
30

0
0
@

27
15

gold.

«...

40

27
2fi

medium..

Cotton..,.*....9 ft.
Flour
^ bbl.
Heavy goods. .V ton.

@

S3

Good Hope, unwashed

.

@
@
0
@
@
0
0

7

..¥ft

Smyrna,nnwashed

Oil

48
60
90

0
0

2l\

Texas, fine

To Liverpool •

27

0

21
.'it
10 00 @ io ro
9 25
9 03 0

nnwashed

FREIGHTS—

35
60
80
22

@

_

California. Spring ClipFine. unwashed

ZSheet

95

1 85

@
@
0
0

65

.

?5
55
85
35
65
85
1 30
45
70

0

3K

'. —

2

Pulled

Texas,

0
@
0
0
0

55
1 00
20

fillers.

Medium
Common
South Am.Merino

0
0
0
0
0

38
50
65
25
35

Extra,Pulled

Cape

3 1-16

65
20
24

Pennsylvania wrappers. '72
Havana, com.to fine.
Manhlkc’d, Tn honff, black wOrk.....
“
“
bright work........

No. 1,

8 1-16

g^.

WOOL—
American XX...
American, Nos. I *
American, Combing
-

io*

0

25
40
60
28
42
70
1 05
85
55
75
1 10
25

—--

“

~

u

u*
10*

45

English ;.
*
Plates. I. C.cbarcoal
“
Plates.char.Terne...
“
TOBACCO—
Kentucky Tugs,heavy, new crop....
“
*
“
leaf,
“
—
Seed leaf, Conn. * Mass., wrprs. ’72.
“
•*

5

Kefined.

Ex. fine to finest

Straits

'

PorkvM3i»=e.iu$ss city. v...

otBer,
d6
iches, pkped, poof stock..7........
;o

@
@
@

-

Crude, in bulk........
Crude in shipping order

...

do

quarters

..

Pork, new mess..
Pork,extra prime.....

nried^' 1873 crop * “ ''
"'
sliced,

mesttd
)les, State,
a

85
36
85

v*
..

43
1 20

@

PETROLEUM— •

17

twGi^r.^V.''V.'.>V/.V.¥i:W.
, ‘

47 50

59.

.

cur.

Banca

45 00

@

Whale,bleached winter

PROVi^KjliB--

cur.
"

0

45
1 15

crude

to fair

TIN“

cur.

W-hale, NpUhOM
Sperm, ernae .........

...................

dines, V hi.
dines, ♦ ar

10

..gold

NeatsiOOt..\.v».'-'v*v*.........
,

......
..

7^0

...V ft.

Menhaden,.Ptiwe.UgU1'

f«
@12=00

20
31

29
38

.

21*

0
0
@

....

caaks^ gMl,..,,
Linseed, casks and bbls

rants

ron,Leghorn

21

Tarragona
Ivica
.;
Shelled
Princess

..0
....@

7*@

Unco’cred Japan,Com. to lair
co
Sup’rtoflne
Ex. fine to finest
do
Oolong, Common to lair
do
Superior to fine
do
Kx fine to finest
do
Choicest
Souc. & Cong., Com. to fair
do
8up’rto line
do
- Ex. fine to finest

2 00
3 75
8 00
21

<&
@
@
@

....

Western

,

^c’atei..../.

Languedoc,..

OILS;•*
Cotton seed,

12
8

¥
ii”

11*0
10*0
10*0
10 @

do
Extrafine toflnest
Dyson Skill.* Twa»,. com. lo fair.
do
do
8up.to fine
do
do
Ex. fine to finest

ir

50%

1
2 25
2 85

Virginia; new...,.

OAKUM..
OILCaJIECity,bag,;.

...

Bnltai^a.......

do
do
do

5 50

u oo
10 50

0
:e*@

S*

7*0
8*0
7*0
10*0

Sun. to fine

<.o

Sll

8

Imperial. Com. to fair

7

10

hi

9*@

Gunpowder, uom to fair..
do
Sup. to fine
do
do

10*
m

8*0

Super.to flue
Ex.flneto finest
Choicest

do
do
do

12*

0

....

...

GreuDble

A’monds,

v . ... ..

Layer

'do

■

7

.1-25

.......

9*0

centrif...

Hyson.Com. to fair

Young

13*

0
0

9*0
10*0

.

Superior to fire
Extra fine to finest

do
do

35*

2*75

8*
9*

ft.

Hyson, Commoa

22a
3 85
2 50
5 50
7 10

....

Pecans ...
Peanuts. Tennessee.
do; J Wilmington, new..,

3|*

city,

Western, V ft

su
7*
10*

TATLOWPrime

9*

0

0
8*0

—vft

do
granulated
do
cut loaf
Soft white, A- standard
do
do
off A
White extra C
do
Yellow
Other Yellow

2 73
8 00
2 52*

....

Brazil nuts.—

as.

1 42
2 50

pale
extra pale

do

50
82

2 50
So

•Walnuts, Bordeaux
do
Naples

47*
19

@
@

0

2 30
4 CO
6 (X)

no

•

BinA»,8fid.d.iees.........

No. 2

Gilberts, Barcelona....
Sicily

47V

@
@
@

41
85
42
48
70
47

2 70

NO. I

•*

@
@

*S*

8

TEA-

Olive, in

'r^:

■

George’s Bank cod

@
@

20*0

.A.A-.v....

FISH—

0
&

.Orleans’.good ‘to prime.’..|i gal*.

••

•

Quicksilver

Sal suda, Newcastle.;.;
8hellac...
Soda ash
- •,
grugar of lead, white
Vitriol, blue.common..

86
30
40
42
40
45
40
SO

.vrbflnlng grades.
grades,........

Pitch, city

7W
Opium, Turkey,In bond
gold. 7 25
32
3i.3f0:
Fcossiate pota*b*,yeUow._...........

Rhubarb,

86

‘

73*
8*

4*0
7X0

.........

.

PeHned—Hard, crushed
Hard, powdered

35

Spirits turpentine............. V gall.
Rosin com. to good strain’d V bbl.

55

7

do
do
do
do

Manila

86*

grocery

•*

pr,.

12

@

7*0
8*0
8*0
8*0
8*@

do IS to 15
do 16 to 18
do 19 to 20
do
white
Porto Rloo.reflnlng, com. to,prime.
do' * grocery, fair to choice..
Brazil,bags. D. R. Nos. 8 to 12
Java, do. D.S., Nos. 10 to 12

....

17
11

0

7

Har’a.BoxsD. 8. Nos.7to 9...,
do
do
do 10 to 12

81

I"

9

ialrtogood grocery
tochoice grocery.,...,
do centr.hhds. & bxs, No. 8 to 13
Molasses, hhda & bxs

....

0
@
0

11*0

prime, refliYine..

do
do
do

10*
IS*
14*
14*
11*

0
12*0
...

do

21

0

...

do
do

80

NAVAL STORESTar, Washington
Tar, Wilmington

29
90

14

Cuba.lnl.to com. refining
do fair to good refining..

2S*
27*

English Islands

0

'8*0

...cur.

•••••••••

Lac dy«. «ot>d
Licorice paste,.
Licorice paste,

8*®

Porto Rico

25*

45: 0

“
“

$lnBeng\ Western*......

2 50

0

9*0

SUGAR—

5 80

9 @

............

MOLASSES—

5 12*

45

Cochineal

Ginseng,
Jalap

5 73 0

—

fexa8,crop

12*

0

lnras...,., ....
^
dean...•'
Cream tartar.......,

Cochineal,

Cuhebs,East India....

5

«*0

41

••••

&
0
@
0

17

Melado

*’

Oak. rough....

N

I 97*

0

American machinery
American German spring

I

h..m.&lu:ur.
California, h., m. <fe 1.. “
", Qrtut>co,Ac.„
;rflhghtf,.
•-v...,.,
“
Slaughter crop. —...;
“

3

0

t (3

...

spring

American cast

“

81*

1 95

0. 6 50

...

America^ cast, Tool

@ 60 00

LEATHERHemlock.Buen, A’res,

23

....0

“

refined.

Camphor,

22*1
29*0

8 ?5
S 26

English German,2d & 1st quality....

gold 6 87*@ 6 50

and mixed..

gold.
**

@ 15
@
0

SngHsh blister, 2d & 1st quality
nglish machinery..:..,

“

-

Tdo ' ' do

crude
Brimstone, Am. roll

*12

'

-

COTTON—See special report.

Bleaching powder..

@

neyVAdfcrican.,..J.

Sheetandpipe

85
S3

..-..a

Sheathing, new (over 12 oz;

Brimstone,

English, cast,2d*lst
English, 8pring,2d &

V. W I 11 #

Domestic.......

21*
21*

...,@
....@

Bolts

Argols,crude
Lrgols,refined
irsenlc, powdered
Bicarb, soda, Newcastle
BI chro. potash, Scotch

.20

00

o5

quality
f»lb
1st quality

25

'

00
Store Prices, each.

Ordinary foreign

29
22
22

cur.

@

“

‘

LEADrr-

m

0
@
0

A^lpohol (88 per ct) C. & W

00
(K)
00

18

75
45
15

8
3
3
8

liquors--Casb.

Domestic

"

gold,

DRUGS & DYESAlum, lump..

13*

160 00 @162 60
:... 90 oo @i2o oo
95 00 @150 00
assort
gold.
15*@
16
Sheet, single, double & treble, com.
4*@
5
lish
gold 50 00 @ 52 00
Ralls.new, English
Rails

Hlo ordinary
do fair,
do good,
do prime,

18*

0

Scroll
Hoop
Sheet, Ru?8ia, as to
_

45

Amerioan blister..

V4V.U4Vy,

11*
1 25
1 17

gold

Brandy, foreign brands
V gnV.
Rum—Jam.,4tb proof ........... **
St. Croix,3d proof
"
Gin,Swan and Swallow
*•

0

30 00 0 Si
28 00 0 80
25 00 @‘2S
33 50 @ 40

W

12

....0

SPIRITS—

Bar, Swedes, ordinary sizes

19
20
20 If

18*0
i9y@

'i4
11
18
17

3

W

.....

STEEL—

....
....

..v

25*

....@
....@
....0
1 15*0
12 0

do. stems

13

IR ON- Pig, American. No.-l
Pig, American,Lo.2
Pig, American Forge
Pig, Scotch

....

Penang

10

.*!fc

21*

21*

Cloves

i

«♦

'is

"

0 OFFER

gold

Cropoi 1873
Crop Of 1872.,
Crop of 1871
Crop of 1870......

4 72*0 ....
1100 @ ....
18 00 0 19 00

5,000 tons chestnut.....
Liverpool gas cannel,
Liverpool house oannel

stocic—CalcuttaVlauglit...

Calcutta, dead green,,.
Calcutta, buffalo.
HOPS-

12*
UK

is

0
11
16

Calcutta

Mace..,-.,....;.
N ntmegs, Batavia and
Pimento, Jamaica.;:

@

18" 0

cur.

do

19

0

18

.4

California

11*0
11 0

State dairies, fine...

..

•

Matamoras
Bahia
Wet Salted—Buenos AyreB
Para

E. /.

0
*

13

Chill........
Pernarubnco

....

.

19

0

27 *@

Batavia

do

0

6*

28*0
23*0

Ginger African

24

Rahia. .V.
a
Dm SqUed—^Idaraeaibo

white

Cassia, ChlnaUgnca

§ I

....

5 75
5 25
5 25

0

21
21

SlnKaiwre...

do

25* ‘

@
0
@
@

....©

>

do

, • • *

6*0

....

Pepper, Sumatra

27

0

Ml

Maracaibo..

BUTTERHalf fir’ tubs, per lnv.(NY,N.J.APa.)
Welsh tubs, per lnv.
”
Half Hr* tubs, per inv.'( Western)....

"Welsh tubs, per inv.,

26

gold

6 00
4 75
4 75
4 25

Domestic
•

1 ?5

110

@
@

■...

.

8PELTER—

Foreign

10*
3 50

10 0
3 S7*@
1 75 0

-Taatlee^ neireeled..
Taysaam, Nos. 1 & 2
Canton, tie-reeled No.l,

SPICES-

California

3 00
6 '5

6*
5*

3*0

Orlhdcdr.-.v........;.

-

VIC 00
2265 00

6*5

“
u

HIDES—
Drv—Buenos Ayres...
Montevideo ...
Corrlente8
Rio Grange ......T...

3 85

Nails—10@60d.com,fen & sb.19 keg 3 75
5 30
Clinch, 1 to 3 in. & longer.....
6 00
*dfln*.....
(Jut spikes, all sizes
4 00
Lead, white. Am, pure, in oil
Lead., wh., Amer., pure dry
Zinc, wh.,Amer. dry, No. I......
Zinc, wh.. Amer.,No.l.ln oil
Paris white,English, prime.,

'.../

Jute

0 35 00
0 25 00
0 30 00
0WOO

20 DO
boards. 24 00
65 00
*

Manila..;...:.,
Sisal..;..

50
40

Lihtfet#>3ailfcertadR 56ftgold (time).
SILK-'
V ft
Tsatlee,No.3

gold.225 00 @230 00
“ 285 00 @290 00
9*
“ r 8*@

Italian...,..,

75
00

3 73 &
14 00

Croton

90

....'

......

Russia, clean

BUILDING MATERIALS—
Bricks—Common hard, afloat

@

0

“•

««...^P ft.

Clover, Wuetorn
Timothy
Hemp, foreign
Flaxseed, rough...

4 25
3 75

HEMP AND JUTEAmerican aressed
223 00
American undressed..i..............
J...

BREADSTUFF8—Seespecial report.

Rockland,

@

Min. & Blasting.;

HAYNorth River.shipping..

6*@

...

Philadelphia.

SEED—

GUNPOWDER"
Shipping V 25 ttkeg....^.

GENERAL ~~

17

8*

0

8*

-SAIL

,—

s

d.

....

0

n

0

2 6
27 6
4ff|

0

20 0
85 0

,

d

8.

6

0
0

6

(ft

5 6

@
0

,,,,

♦ t

•

•

*

128

THE CHRONICLE

Commercial Cards.

Fabbri &
48 South

Financial

MERCHANTS,

Street, New York,

KENDALL

6c

CO.,

6c

PREVOST

LIMA AND

Messrs. JNO. W.

CO.,

CATER, SONS 6c CO.,

Consignments of approved mer¬

prepared to give

pedal attention to everything connected with the
purchase and shipment of
Nitrate of Soda.

JEWELL,HARRISON
COMPANY.

Salt.
Annuities and Insures Lives.

Moses

John

Taylor.

Taylor Johnston,

Wm. H. Aspinwall,
James Colles,
Jas. P. Kernochan,
Wm. C. Schermerhorn,
Lorl’d Spencer,
Robert L. Kennedy,

•

Trust

Capital Paid in

Co.,

THE

COMPANY.

STREET,

-

$1,000,000.

-

-

-

interest on
act as
and are a De¬

pository of Trust Funds.

MERCHANTS

COR. BROADWAY A

&C-, &C,f &C.

W. H. TILL! NGHAST,
WM. T. GARNER,
E. J. WOOLSEY,
W. F. DRAKE,
B. F. ALLEN, Chicago.
WM. T. HAMILTON^

VERMILYE,
BABCOCK,

WM. M.
S. D.

DAVID JONES,
SAM’L F. BARGER,
HENRY M. TABER,
WM. B. CUTTING.

Street, New York.

Philadelphia and Boston.

FABRIK

Special Partner.

J. Wilcox & Co.,
PRIME

BANKERS,
25

Brooklyn Trust Co.
Brooklyn, N. Y.
& Clinton sts.,

Cor. of Montague

NEW

STEARINE

LARD,
AND

LARD

OIL,

Washington, Vestry 6c

Accounts received

which may he

Is authorized by special charter to act
as receiver, executor, trustee or guardian.
It can act as agent in the sale or management of real
estate, collect interest or dividends, receive registry
and transfer books, or make purchase and sale of Gov¬
ernment and other securities.
Religious and charitable institutions, and persons
unaccustomed to tne transaction of business, will find
this Company a safe and convenient depository for

BEAVER

STREET,

NEW YORK.

66

State

No.

AGENTS FOR

HEARD

Olyphant
COMMISSION
Hong Kong,

6c

CO.,

of approved

&

mer

Co.,

Shanghai, Foochow 6c

Co., of China,
St., New York,

John Dwight & Co.,
MANUFACTURERS OF

SIPER-CARBOMTE




Pay Interest on

Platt K. Dickinson.

$1,000,000.

Deposits and Trust

Funds.
W. H. FOSTER, President.

JOHN T. BANKER, Secretary.

Exch’ge

Robb & Peet,
BANKERS
AND

GENERAL COMMISSION
5 8
The

MERCHANTS

STREET.

WALL

of Private Firms

Agency and Correspondence

Banks, Corporations and Individuals solicited and
interest allowed on balances.
Collections made and purchases and sale of Gold
Exchange, StockB, Bonds or Securities of any kind
_

carefully attended to.
Loans negotiated and

.

„

,,

„

Commercial Paper bought and

sold on commission.
We are also prepared to
and Produce Exchange's.

„

^

^

^

execute orders at the Cotton

Duncan, Mathews & Co.,
BANKERS,

BROADWAY,

CAPITAL,,

Cor. William
PROMPT

6c Pine Sts., N. Y.

COLLECTIONS MADE ON ALL POINTS.

Deposits received subject to check at sight, and In »
terest allowed on dally balances at the rate of four
per cent per annum.
Liberal advances made on

shipments consigned to
all the principal ports of Cuba.
A specialty made of attending to the business of
Banks, Bankers and Merchants out of the city.

their correspondents in

Commercial Warehouse Hilmers & McGowan,
Cash

104 Wall

of

SODA

AND

SALERATUS,
No. 11 Old

Indemnity Co.,

229

checked for at sight.

COMPANY.

Represented by

The Jobbing Trade

YORK

MERCHANTS,

Canton, China.

OLYPHANT 6c

NEW

Secretary.

Opposite the New Post Office.

OF CHINA AND JAPAN.
Advances made on consignments
Ctiandlze.

Alex. McCue,
A. A. Low,
S. B. Chittenden,
Edward Harvey,
James D. Fish,

Wm. R. BUNKER,

Loan &

Street, Boston,

AUGUSTINE

Chas. R. Marvin,
Adm. B. Baylis,
Dan’l Chauncey,
Josiah O. Low,

THE

,

Co.,

Everett &

Henry Sanger,

Alex. M. White.

John Halsey,

„

Vice-Pres’t.

Commission.

Member N. Y. Stock & Gold
Howard C. Dickinson,
Member N. Y. Stock Exchange.

TRUSTEES:

J. S. Rockwell,
W. C. Kingsley,
John P. Rolfe,
H.J. Cullen, M,D.
H. E. Pierrepont,

SALES OFFICE:

59

RIPLEY ROPES, President.

CHAS. R MARVIN,
Edgar M. Cullen. Counsel.

Stocks and Bonds

and Interest allowed on Balances,

J. B. Dickinson.

CAPITAL, $500,000.

money.

Greenwich Sts.

YORK.

Government Securities, Gold,

This Compauy

LEAF

Exchange Place,

Broad St., Cor.

bought and sold strictly on

The

Co.,

Dickinson &

Syracuse.
H. J. HUBBARD, Secretary.

ADOLF1 KKUTTROFF,iGeneral Partners

annum on

annum on

special Deposits remaining six months or longer.
Acts as trustee for estates.
D. R. MANGAM, President.
JOHN C. CRU1KSHANK, Secretary.

DIRECTORS:
C. T.

$1,000,000,

Pay8 FOUR PER CEN1 Interest per
Deposits subject to check at sight.
Pays FI VE PER CENT. Interest per

SMYTHE, President.
BOWEN, Vice-President.

F. BCHUCHARDT,

WARREN ST.,

Government Bonds.

Invested in United States

H. A.

CHEMICALS, COLORS, DYESTUFFS,

OP NEW YORK,

CITY

THE

OF

PAID-UP CAPITAL,

This Company receive deposits, allowing
the same, subject to check at sight.
Also

IN

Wm.

Wesley,
Geo. Cabot Ward,
Williams,
Wm. Butlbb Duncan,
J. H. OGILVIE, Secretary.

Charles G. Thompson. '

Trustees, Executors, Transfer Agents,

AND

BAD1SCHE AN1L1N & SODA

McLean.

HKNRy PARISH. President
TH<>MAS W. LUDLOW, Vice-President.

50 WALL

IMPORTERS

Branch Offices in

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:
Samuel Willets.
Hutton,
Wm. Whitewright, Jb.,

J. M.
B H.
E. B.
G. G.

J. J. Astor,
James a. Roosevelt,
Joseph Battell,
Frederic W. Stevens,

NEW YORK.

COMMISSION

WM. WHITEWRIGHT, Jr.,
Second Vice-President.

George T. Strong,
John Q. Jones,
Meredith Howland,
Henry Chauncey,
William E. Dodge, Jr.
Henry Parish,

New York State Loan &

Wm Pickhardt&Kuttroft

No. 23 Cedar

1RUSTEES.
Hamilton Fish,

Thos. W. Ludlow,
Wm. B. Astor,
Robert Ray,

PROVxblON DEALERS AND MANUFACTURERS
OF LARD OIL AND STEARINE.
ESTABLISHED 1841.

the
De¬

EDWARD KING, President.
J. M. McLEAN, First Vice-President.

JOSEPH R. KEARNY, Secretary.
WM. MEIKLEHAM, Assistant Secretary.

CLIMATES.

ALL

Per Cent. Interest on

4

or

FOR

PACKED

LARD

PURE

Otherwise.

OFFICERS

by Will

posits, payable after ten days’ notice.
Legal Depository for Executors, Trus¬
Grants

CO.,

LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND

&

Created

CAPITAL

Invested In United States Government Bonds.

tees, and Money in

Messrs. JNO. W. CATER 6c

chandise to the above houses.
Messrs. Prevost & Co., Iquique, are

ONE MILLION DOLLARS.

Owners.

Allows

BROADWAY,

STREET.

Manases Property as Agents lor

IQUIQUE, PERU,

Company

YORK,

Corner of Rector Street.

WALL

Trust

Accepts

LONDON, ENGLAND,

Advances made on

13

CHARTERED IN 1830.

VALPARAISO, CHILL
Messrs.

52

OF NEW

COMPANY,

TRUST
No.

Union Trust

AND

INSURANCE

LIFE

AGENTS FOR

Messrs.

Financial.

The New York

Chauncey,

COMMISSION

[August 1, 1874.

Slip, New York,

ONLY Supplied

Capital, $2,000,000.

RANKERS
6c
MERCHANTS*
BANKING OFFICE, 29 WILLIAM STREET,
Corner Exchange Place.
WAREHOUSES, ATLANTIC DOCK, BROOKLYN
CASH ADVANCES made on FIRST-CLASS SECU¬
RITIES on demand and time.
CASH ADVANCES made on all kinds of MER¬
CHANDISE stored In our own WAREHOUSES, on
FAVORABLE TERMS.
PAUL J. ARMOUR, President.
JOSE F. NAVARRO. Vice-President.

BAIRD, 2d Vice-President.
FELICIANO LATASA, 8d Vice-President.
Paul J. Armour, Wm. D. Bowerman, O. H. Delamater
*

BROKERS IN

FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND GOLD
54 Wall Street, New York*
(P. O. BOX 2,847.)

Special attention paid to

S. G. & G. C.
agents

JOHN

Jose F.Navarro, Feliciano
John Baird.

Latasa,

Juan J. Jova.

Tbom"jMr6LY§§?l£5$!

WILLIAM TOBIN Sup’t of Warehouses.

the negotiation of Com

mercial bills.

BARING BROTHERS 6c
52

Ward,

fob

COMPANY,

WALL STREET, NEW YORK,
38 STATE STREET

BOSTON,


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102