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HUNT’S

MERCHANTS’

MAGAZINE,

& $r**fclg grwssppjer,
REPRESENTING

THE

INDUSTRIAL

VOL. 40.

AND COMMERCIAL INTERESTS OF THE UNITED STATES.

NO. 1,084.

SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1885.
CONTENTS.
THE CHRONICLE.

Clearing-House Returns

The Boston Post and Clearings 469

463

The Financial Situation
464
War ami American Trade
466
The Atchison Topeka & Santa
Fe System
467

and
Monetary
English News

Commercial
470

Commercial and Miscellaneous
News
472

404,205 as representing the exchanges otherwise arising, or a
falling off of 37*6 per cent. Outside of New York the week’s
total is $241,215,501, against $257,294,141 in 1884, or a decrease
of 6*3 per cent. April 4 the decline was 21*8 per cent, and the
previous six days 12*6 per cent. Below we give the details
for the different cities.

THE BANKERS’ GAZETTE.

Money Market, Foreign Ex¬

Quotations of Stocks and Bonds 475

change, U.S. Securities, State

Local Securities
476
Railroad Earnings and Bank
Returns
477
Investment and Railroad In¬

and Railroad
Stocks

Bonds

and

473

Range in Prices at the N. Y.
Stock Exchange
474

telligence

478

THE COMMERCIAL TIMES.

Commercial Epitome
Cotton...

482 I Breadstuff's

488

433

489

I

Dry Goods

(Entered at the Post Office, New Yorfe*, N.Y.,
Terms of

as

For One Year (including postage)
do
For Six Months
Annual subscription in London (including postage)
Six Mos.
do
do
do

$10 20

6 10

£2 7s.
£ 1 8s.

These prices include the Investors’ Supplement, issued once in two

months, and furnished without extra charge to subscribers of the

$416,524,824

-39*7

(1,019,693)
(255,900)
(51,086,000)
(33,163,000)

(950,124)
(566,500)
(44,728,000)
(89,900,000)

(+7‘3)
(-54-8)
(+14-2)
(-64-2)

(872,483)
(341,000)
(25,408,900)
(18,792,000)

(-45-3)
(-74*0)
(-40-5)
(-797)

$63,006,681
8,801,100
1,626,618
1,178,630
928,923

$65,350,564
3,898,400
1,615,202
901,058
897,455

-3-6

$50,034,493
3,253,300
1,355,874

-21*2

+22-0
+35

-232

Worcester

737,345

902,858

-18*3

Springfield

778,730
432,950

816,210
588,291

-20-4

834,491
921,969
650,403
617,322
300,747

$72,490,977

$75,030,038

-34

$04,034,599

-21*4

$45,742^859

+3A

$41,598,135

-28*2

-34-8

11,703,184

$44,874,289
11,499,785
11,018,641

5,743,907
10,880,473

-21-4

$64,947,468

$67,492,715

-3-8

$58,222,575

-298

$40,133,877
9,173,650
2,822,883
2,495,253
1,136,617
1,882,896
1,281,960
772,510

$48,540,409
8,001,450
3,543,179
2,443,378
1,307,657
2,182,070
1,350,028

-17-3

-19-8

024,280

+237

$40,983,703
7,842,000
2,800,271
2,229,101
1,07+814
1,722,000
1,411,820
923,384

$59,099,152

$68,599,111

-130

$58,988,413

-18-0

$15,739,969
725,198
7,027,052
4,695,310
8,002,287
1,024,479

$17,954,895
737,729
9,000,702
4,723,785
3,039,090
1,579,795

-123

-22 0

+20*5
+28-3

$13,883,902
745,242
5,899,522
4,970,550
3,443,393
1,450,858

$34,074,301

$37,101,990

-8-2

$30,393,530

$10,003,603

$9,070,281

+10-3

$11,702,805

+11-8

$642,749,993

$834,093,346

-229

$040,520,752

-345

(Stocks.... shares.)
(Cotton....bales.)
(Grain.. .bushels)
(Petroleum..bbls.)

New Haven

Lowell

Total N. England

Philadelphia
Pittsburg

7,501,425

Baltimore
Total Middle....

Chicago.....

The .publishers cannot be responsible for remittances unless made by
Dratts or Post Office Money Orders.
A neat file cover is furnished at 50 cents; postage on the same is 18
cents. Volumes bound for subscribers at $1 00.
Offices In England.
The office of the Commercial and Financial Chronicle in London
is with Messrs. Edwards & Smith, 1 Drapers’ Gardens, E. C., where sub¬

Cincinnati

scriptions and advertisements will be taken at the regular rates, and
single copies of the paper supplied at Is. each.
The office of the Chronicle in Liverpool is at B15, Exchange Buildings.
WILLIAM B. DANA 6c Co., Publishers,
WILLIAM B. DANA.

Peoria

-

JOHN G. FLOYD.

79 6c 81 William Street, NEW
Post Office Box, 958.

YORK.

Milwaukee
Detroit

Indianapolis
Cleveland
Columbus

Total Western...
St. Louis

...

St. Joseph
New Orleans
Louisville

CLEARING HOUSE RETURNS.

exchanges for the week under review record an increase
aggregate over April 4 of $2,223,241. This at first sight
looks like an improvement to that extent, whereas in reality
it is a less favorable statement, since the figures cover in all
cases six days, while last week’s totals included Good Friday,
which was a close holiday at some of the cities and at others
a half-holiday, the more important exchanges being closed
and business consequently greatly reduced.
In 1884 Good
Friday fell in the week with which comparison is now made,
and then, as in the present year, the total suspension of trans¬
actions at a few points and an interruption of business at
others had a similar effect on the exchanges. The decrease,
however, last year ($143,243,236) is too large to be wholly
ascribed to that cause; but in consequence of that large
decrease the comparison with that year leaves the percentage
of loss now only 22’9 per cent, against 34*5 per cent on April 4.
At New York the exchanges, owing to the very decided
decline in the total last year for this week, (being over $114, 000,000), show a loss of only 30*4 per cent, whereas on April 4
it was 39*7 per cent. The share transactions on the Stock
Exchange reached a total of 1,019,693, against 950,124 a year
ago, and covering a market value of $60,894,000 and $64,200,000 respectively in the two years. If, therefore, we pursue
our usual method of deducting double these values from the
total exchanges at that <city, we have $279,746,492 and $448,The

in the




Per Cent

1885.

-304

Chronicle.

Subscriptions will bo continued until definitely ordered to be stopped.

Week Ending Apr. 4.

$570,804,205

Portland

Subscription—Payable in Advance:

Per Cent.

Sales of—

Hartford

second class mail matter.]

11.

$401,534,492

New York

Providence

published in

1884.

1885.

Boston

GHxrmxitXc.
The Commercial and Financial Chronicle is
New York every Saturdag morning.

Week Ending April
a

Kansas

City
Memphis.
Total Southern..

San Francisco
Total all

-25

+0-7

-40

+0-7

+6-0
—20-8

+21
—131

-137.
-5*1

—1-7

-159
—•06

-20-7
-285

+43
-20-0

-105
-208

-48*0

-8-0

-34*1
-19-3
-80-4

-18*2

+ 7*1
+10-9

+1-0
-32-9
-172

+17*0
-230

-207

from the
leading cities outside of New York, and we give them below
in conjunction with that city, and estimate the exchanges for
the balance of the country on the basis of the latest returns.
An improvement is shown at almost all points, Boston and
Chicago recording increases over a year ago. Of the other
cities, New York and St. Louis have smaller percentages of
decline from 1881 than were exhibited on April 10.
We have received

our

Five

Days Ending April 17.

1885.
New York
Sales

of Stock (shs.)

Boston

Philadelphia
Baltimore

Chicago
St. Louis
Total

Balance, Country*
Total all

Outside New York

Estimated

on

usual telegraphic returns

1884.

$413,990,720
(1,147,273)
58,495,807
87,738,004
9,619,407
38,754,000
13,202,241

$547,.117,048

Per Cent.
-24*4

(1,716,151)
59,483,426
49,022,932

(-331)
+3-6

12,042,684

-201

30,381.000
13,819,007

+0*5

$571,806,899
54,078,931

$715,367,857
57,809,283

-20-1

$025,885,830

$773,230,040

$211,8=9,110

$225,618,99z\

-230

_4-4

Five D'ys

End'gApr. 10

1885.

Percent

$308,127,722
(955,117)
52,601,983
38,474,272
9,904,S57
32,404,000
13,275,177

-424

(+27*5)
-0-7

+14-0
+11-5
-233
—11*8
-34-2

$454,908,011
50,021,102

-18-0

—19-1

$504,989,113

-32*9

-01

$190,801,391

-90

-6'5

the basis of the last weekly returns*

THE CHRONICLE.

464
TEE FINANCIAL

with interest.

have been, first,
Crop advices up to this date afford a less satisfactory
more
a
pacific aspect of prospect. The Agricultural Department’s figures with
Anglo-Russian negotiations; the issuance of the Agricul¬ regard to winter wheat seem to confirm the unfavorable
tural Department’s April report for winter wheat; a
reports that have been current for some weeks, its infor¬
further material progress, and then a partial subsidence in
mation indicating a loss to the crop of about 100 million
the breadstuffs speculation; a gradual return of more spring¬
bushels; it adds however that that result in some measure
like weather, bringing with it a slightly improved demand
depends upon the reliability of present appearances and
for goods from interior merchants; a continued though less
future conditions of growth, &c. This was the outlook the
general increase in the earnings of some of our roads; and last of March. Outside reports do not as yet encourage the
upward turn in the speculation at the Stock Exchange. hope that later information will be more satisfactory; still if
The

h>

during future months, and they will be awaited

results

SITUA TION

[Yob XL,

:

leading features of the week
belligerent, and later a more

an

None of these events

mark however any special change

general situation, trade circles continuing to take a
hopeful view of the prospects for a steady improvement in
the distribution of goods, though the speculation in food
products is looked upon as excessive and foolish, while

in the

the state of the crops

increases somewhat the

solicitude

regard to the future.
A hopeful condition of considerable significance if it is
to continue, is the apparent progress making in the con¬
sumption of coal. The official report has this week been
published bringing down the figures of production to April
first
This return would not of itself attract special
attention, but when compared with last year and
the running figures since the
New Year began
with

the conditions of weather

should turn

very

favorable it

surprise if the outlook a month hence were
promising. As throwing a little light on the situation
and prospects, we give the following figures of condition
made up from the Agricultural reports for April and June
for four years, and the crops and acreage during the same
would be

no

more

years.
1885.
Winter Wheat.

1881.

1883.

1881.

April April June April June April Juno April Juno

Ohio

74

88

83

70

60

97

99

61

88

Indiana

78

92

04

73

67

105

85

67

Illtno s

62

82

76

80

51

102

1C9
99

67

43

Missouri

78

91

90

83

110

109

66

79

60

101

103

70

70
80

110

113

111

99

96

94

61

93

80

108

103

89

49

93

62

88

95

77

...

90

fnrnln

101

•

66

79

suggestive, For instance, on the first
81
84
103
63
100
93
94
97
New York
93
99
96
67
95
97
103
81
09
stock of coal at tidewater was 874,681 Pennsylvania
89
113
90
100
85
75
97
48
98
Tennessee
tons, while on the first of April this stock had been
88
109
84
100
96
99
92
59
102
Maryland
87
82
104
100
90
93
97
55
101
reduced to 431,424 tons, being a decrease of 443,257 Virginia
108
94
93
86
109
75
98
101
93
Texas
tons.
As production during the same three months had,
75
85
99
102
75
93
80
96
77
Av erage whole country...
compared with 1884, decreased only 238,421 tons, the
1883.
1884.
1888.
| 1881.
Crops.
actual consumption in 1885 not only took the entire
99,974,360
bush. 156,610,700 134,850.800 120JBI*T50
wheat.
production of the last three months, but was 204 ,836 tons Spring
956,253,200 285,303,700 883.972,750 263,306.890
Winter wheat
more than the larger production for the same months of
bush. 612,763,900, 420,154J»0 004.185.600 883.280,096
Total
1884.
But that is not the most reassuring feature of the Acreage
acres. 89,475,885 36,303,3ll4 97.007.124 87,709,020
It will be noticed that in no year hitherto have the con¬
figures, for it seems that in March the total production
was 144,328 tons more than in March, 1884, and yet the
dition figures for June been better than the April forecast
consumption made way not only with all of this increase, That, however, may not prove true this year, for the last
but also with 234,141 tons of old stock.
To make these month has been the coldest and therefore the most back¬
results plain we give in the following each month’s move¬ ward March in our record, and hence the plant has had no
ment for the two years.
test of its vitality except in the mildest districts.
Fur¬
thermore
in
California
1884.
1885.
they
have
had
much-needed
rains
Ooal Production, Consumption and Stocks.
748,330 since the Agricultural report was
874,681
Block
hand January 1
made up. Possibly also
1,899,573
1,641,803
Production in January
the higher prices now ruling for wheat may induce larger
2,647,903
2,516.484
Total supply in January..
2,009,916 planting of the spring variety.
1,679,380
Still, values at present are
Consumption in January...
637,937 a very uncertain factor, a mere thermometer of the varying
887,101
Stock February 1
1,392 686

it becomes very
of January the

102

Oregon

102

103

55

89
87

90

09

98

108

,

r

on

.

Production la Fobruary

Total supply in February.

1,707,707

2,604,811

news as

2,530,673
1,893,63 >.

it blows hot

or

cold from Russia.

How unreason¬

speculation is, we briefly showed in
632,04 l
665,565
this column last week.
To-day on a subsequent page we
Stock March 1
1,881,462
2,025,790
Production in March
further illustrate the same position.
A paying price for
2,513,503
2,691,355
Total supply in March....
our food products is within our reach now, if we choose to
1,925,274
2,259,931
Consumption in March
431,424
|
588,229 let them go ; or we can repeat the experience of 1883 by
8tock, April 1
The significance of the foregoing is that it shows a pro¬ keeping them and selling'them for less by and by.
Just what is the situation of the dispute between
gressive as well as a decided increase in consumption. Of
course, it will be said that the cold weather accounts for England and Russia it is impossible to say, and yet, not¬
this.
In some measure that is true, but the improvement withstanding the decided advance yesterday in consols, the
from month to month cannot be explained in that way. surface indications seem but little less warlike than they
Besides, we are comparing with pretty full figures, for it were a week ago. On the one hand, we still have the
should be remembered that during the first three months peaceful messages and aggressive attitude of Russia, and
of last year our industries were fairly active ; it was not on the other, the non-committal placidity of Gladstone,
until the May panic that the change began which resulted while on both sides preparations for war are progressing
There have been stories
in the large contraction in all branches of manufacture. with daily increasing vigor.
afloat
that
England, with the Ameer’s consent, is to cede
Still we would by no means assume that these figures are
a forecast of the future.
Cold weather in March accounts Penjdeh to Russia. That seems very difficult to believe.
is
too
near
India already, and to allow
for part of the increase, while we all know that coal may Russia
advance
a
her
to
day’s march farther, would
go into interior stocksand thus out of sight, without
later on, if
invite war
it averted it now. A
going into consumption. How far a movement of tha^
reasonable
more
supposition would be that England is
kind has been in progreesJ[can^only be determined by the
Consumption in February

J

l

“

^

<


I: i.


1,939,240

able this

excessive

April 18,

1885.]

THE CHRONICLE.

465

trying to gain time in every way to prepare for a severe pool traffic at St. Paul and Minneapolis. Milling-in-transit
means grain taken from the latter points to local points,
struggle. The richer nation can always afford better to
and at these local points made into flour.
The St. Paul
wait, and in this instance it seems especially desirable,
contends that this is not through business at all, but local
since England’s ambition being commercial and peaceful,
business.
Nevertheless, the other lines insist that it shall
mid not aggressive and military, the crisis would naturally
Finally, and perhaps most important of
find her unprepared to put forth her strength at once. In go into the pool.
the meantime, while actively and openly arming, perhaps all, is the war of rates that has now broken out between
the lines in the Iowa pool.
It is claimed that rates
her money is being secretly used too, for her representa¬
between Chicago and Omaha have been secretly “cut” for
tives, according to report, are industriously engaged nego¬
a
long time past, so on Thursday the St. Paul made an
tiating in Europe for advantages there, and Lord Dufferin
seems to be tampering with the princes of Asia.
If it open cut of large amount, reducing the tariff on
first-class freight from
90 to 50 cents, on fourth
should eventually turn out that Turkey was the ally of
class from
35
to
20
cents, and
the inter¬
on
Great Britain, or that Russia’s base of operations was a
mediate
classes
proportionately.
The outcome of
little less secure because English money had made friends
this move will be awaited with much interest. As regards
with some of Russia’s conquered Asiatic rulers, the pov¬
the disagreement between the Pacific roads and the Pacific
erty of Russia and the wealth of Great Britain would have
Mail Steamship Company, Mr. Gould has made the propo¬
had its first trial of strength and the delay have proved a
sition that the Pacific roads withdraw their steamship line
double advantage to the latter.
to China, &c., and guarantee the Pacific Mail from further
The first influence of the war upon us seems to be
coming rapidly, as indicated by a further advance in competition on that business, the Pacific Mail on its part
sterling exchange of a half cent per pound early in tlie agreeing to come into the trans-continental pool the same
week and another half cent yesterday.
If we should as if it were a railroad. It is not yet clear that the Central
Pacific will assent to this, but the other parties seem to
soon begin to send gold to Europe while we are sitting
find it satisfactory, and the Union Pacific directors have
down on our breadstuffs and provisions here, it might prove
a very serious experience to our speculators.
Wheat and formally approved the plan. The old subsidy to Pacific
Mail it is stated is to be continued for another month,
corn on passage to Great Britain and the Continent have
till June 1.
increased in one week, the former by 1,200,000 bushels
The prospects of a settlement held out by this latter
and the latter by 160,000 bushels, and .the visible supply
of wheat in the United States and Canada is now about 71 arrangement had a strengthening effect upon both Pacific
million bushels, against 47 millions a year ago.
The sight Mail stock and Union Pacific stock early in the week.
Union Pacific was also favorably influenced by the pay¬
rate of sterling exchange is at present within 2 cents per
ment Thursday of the full amount ($916,704) due in
pound of the figure at which gold can be profitably
settlement with the United States Government, as deter¬
shipped. Cable advices report discounts in the open mar¬
mined by the recent decision of the Court of Claims.
ket at London 2f per cent, while money on call is 1£,
Statements with regard to reductions of the company’s
having fallen from 2f during the week. This indicates
floating debt, have likewise constituted an element of
not only stagnation in trade, but a desire among capital¬
As to these
in the road’s situation.
ists to have their funds within reach in case of emergency. strength
Our stock market this week has been less under the reductions, however, too much should not be made

of them, lest later on disappointment be felt when the
European war news than heretofore. Home
large interest payments will in part offset them. The truth
rumors and reports of various kinds have furnished topics
for conversation, though many of them have had little or is, the company’s floating debt varies accordingly as the
effect on prices.
no
This may be said with regard to payments for interest are heavy or light, and the figures

influence of

for any given period are apt to be misunderstood unless
negotiations respecting pool arrangements which have
been almost daily reported.
It is now announced that the this fact is borne in mind. A circumstance that is helping
Union Pacific wonderfully is the great confidence felt in
preliminary steps have been taken for the formation of a
the new management, which confidence is not in the least
pool embracing the lines east of the Mississippi, and west
Not only does this result from the improved
of the western termini of the Eastern trunk roads, and misplaced.
results shown, but also from the openness with winch all the
meanwhile the present pool is to continue m force till June 1.
There are to be sectional pools at the leading interior opera'ions of the road are now conducted and the publicity
that the management give to its affairs. We are reminded
cities, and a clearing house is also provided for. It
of this latter fact by the appearance, just as we are going
remains to be seen whether all the roads will come into
to press, of the complete report of the road’s business for
the arrangement, and if they do whether an allotment of
the late calendar year.
We have not had time to examine
percentages can be made satisfactory to the different par¬
ties.
Also, whether the necessary co-operation from the fully into the report, but it seems to be an exhaustive
trunk lines can be obtained, so long as the existing diffi¬ document, and covers pretty nearly 200 pages of matter of
the size of this journal.
It will be very useful to all
culty between New York Central and West Shore con¬
stockholders and the public in studying and interpreting
tinues unsettled.
Still, though nothing definite appears to
the road’s position, and for reference will be almost
have been accomplished as yet, as far as practical results

the

invaluable.

concerned, the steps taken are hopeful in their nature,
Denver & Rio Grande affairs have attracted some atten.
and indicative of a less hostile spirit among managers.
tion this week, by reason of a meeting of consolidated
On the other hand, in the Northwest pool affairs have
not mended.
The dispute about the Chicago & North¬ mortgage bondholders to consider and approve the
of reorganization submitted by the foreign committee.
western’s Nebraska business remains an irritating circum¬
This plan was elaborated and printed some time ago, but
stance, and it is claimed that the road will refuse to put
has been held back, pending the determination of the
this business into the

are

plan

pool, notwithstanding the arbitration

Then the Northwestern Traffic Association, year’s earnings and whether it would be wise to make the
rate of inteiest in the new consols 3^- or 4 per cent.
The
covering St. Paul-Chicago traffic, is in a quandary about
final arrangement fixes the rate at 4 per cent.
The plan
the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul’s determination not to
is deserving of commendation because it brings the charges
allow “ milling in transit ” business to count as part of the
against it.




THE CHRONICLE.

466
within the limit of the 1884

earnings and does substantial

fVoL. XL,
April 16, 1885.

P

April 17, 1884.

justice to all interests involved. Particularly do we favor
Gold.
Silver.
Gold.
Silver.
it, because it seeks in no way to alter or impair the lien
£
£
£
£
of the 1st mortgage (of small amount, $6,382,500), and Bank of England
25,572,620
25,136,342
41,494,840 42,514,528 39,776,446 40,011,803
leaves the bonds unchanged as respects both principal and Bank of France
Bank of Germany
7,056,000 21,168,000
7,438,250 22,314,750
interest. A plan from Philadelphia (to which we alluded in
Total this week
74,123,460 63,682,528 72,351,038 62,326,553
our investment column last week) proposes to cut the rate
Total previous week
72,645,784 63,649,573 72,254,218 62,308,269
down to 6 per cent, and give new bonds of an issue of 10
The Assay Office paid $184,085 through the Sub-,
millions Class A (these 10 millions being part of a 30
Treasury for domestic bullion and $148,568 for foreign
million mortgage, the remaining 20 millions called Class bullion
during the week, and the Assistant Treasurer
B), in exchange for the present bonds. The reduction in received the following from the Custom House.
interest is, of course, a serious objection, because there is
Consisting of—
no warrant for it, but in addition there is the objection
Date.
Duties.
XT. S.
Gold
Silver Cer¬
Gold.
involved in a change of security, and, further, the car
Notes.
Certifies.
tificates.
trusts are to be placed on the same level with the first
Apr. 10.
$422,222 31
$2,000
$88,000
$180,000
$152,000
11.
22,000
205,645
90
49,000
84,000
50,000
mortgage. The advocates of this latter plan magnify the
13.
479,459 79
3,000
76,000
221,000
179,000
effects of the decision of Judge Hallett. giving the equip¬
14.
7,000
166,000
441,750 37
112,000
156,000
ment trusts a first lien on income (because the equipment
15.
1,000
45,000
242,802 29
73,000
124,000
16.
365,903 82
35,000
208,000
1,000
121,000
is essential to the operation of the road), and make that
.....

....

....

if

-

if

■

a

a

•

the

reason

for

the

equipment has
value, is of

favor shown

the

same.

But this

<

Total.

$2,157,784 48

$36,000

$405,000

$932,000

$782,000

greatly

deteriorated and depreciated
WAR AND AMERICAN TRADE.
a narrow-gauge pattern, and therefore
would be of very little use elsewhere, and could doubtless
We remarked last week that it would be quite easy to
be replaced for very much less money.
In case of fore¬ overestimate the effect upon American trade of a war
closure, the new company could elect, of course, either to involving two such countries as Great Britain and Russia.
the arrangement or let the holders take their We are aware that that is not the
renew
popular idea. At
property. In view of this, the proposition of the foreign present, as almost every one is watching the signs of the
committee to put the car trusts upon an equal footing times for some indication of
returning prosperity, the
with the consol bonds would seem the most the holders of
possibility of war is eagerly seized upon as a circumstance
the same can expect.
The new plan proposes some other which must give the ardently longed-for impetus to busi¬
changes, but as the old plan already has the assent of a con¬ ness. The general opinion is, also, that business once
siderable majority of the consolidated bonds—the only started will take care of itself ; hence it is little wonder
parties really that need to be considered—the new plan that men by no means of a blood-thirsty disposition secretly
seems a useless expenditure of energy.
hope that England and Russia will find it expedient to
Bankers’ balances remain nominally at 1@1£ per cent. have their
quarrel out now. In this view of the matter it
is
Chicago advices are to the effect that the active specula¬
decidedly worth while to inquire just what, effect a war
tion in grain at that centre has drawn large sums from
may be expected to have upon American commerce.
New York operators, and whether this money will remain
Let us first of all recognize the fact that it can have no
there depends in great measure upon the course of the direct influence
upon domestic trade, that is to say upon
home
grain market. The following statement, made up from
consumption, except as it may raise or depress the
returns collected by us, exhibits the receipts and ship¬ home
price of commodities in consequence of a heavier or
ments of gold and currency by the New York banks
lighter export movement of American merchandise. All
the results of war, so far as we are concerned, will spring
during the week.
from its influence upon the foreign trade.
Adopting,
Received by
Net Interior
Shipped by
Week ending April 17,1885.
N. Y. Banks. N. Y. Banks.
Movement.
then, the principle that an increase of that trade will be
$1,849,000
Piirrpney
$240,000 Gain... 81,609,000
beneficial, the only question to be decided is, whether or
Gold
in

.

not

Total gold and legal tenders..

..

§1,849,000

8240,000

war

will result in such.an increase.

Gain.,$1,609,000

Some indication of the answer to this question may be
in the bank holdings
from the history of the last two great wars in
of gold and currency caused by this movement to and from gathered
the interior. In addition to that movement, the banks have Europe—the Franco-German in 1870-1 and the RussoTurkish war in 1877.
The former war broke out in July,
gained $300,000 through the operations of the Sub-Treas¬
1870.
It had the effect to put up the premium on gold
ury. Adding that item, therefore, to the above, we have the
several points, but the maximum price of gold was reached
following, which should indicate the total gain to the
within a week after the declaration of war, and from that
New York Clearing House banks of gold and currency
for the week covered by the bank statement to be point it gradually fell back nearly to the price that pre¬
vailed in the spring and early summer of the year.
The
issued to-day.
prices of stocks had a slight flurry, but the excitement was
Week endtng April 17,18S5.
soon over.
Into Banks. Out of Banks. Net Change in
Upon the grain and provisions trade the war
Bank Holdings.
seems to have had
scarcely any effect. The exports of
Banks’ Interior Movement, as above
$1,849,000
$240,000 Gain. $1,609,000
The above shows the actual changes

Sub-Treasury operations
Total gold and

legal tenders....

5,200,000

4,900,000

$7,049,000

$5,140,000

Gain.

300,000

wheat and flour from the United States in 1869-70

were

larger by one and a quarter million bushels than they were
England reports a gain of £278,000 bul during the war year 1870-71. The exportation of corn
lion during the week.
This represents £214,000 drawn was proportionately increased very much, but the trade in
from abroad, and £64,000 from the interior.
The Bank that cereal was only begun at that date and the aggregate
of France, if correctly stated, shows an increase of 29,986,- of the
larger exportation was not important. Taking all
000 francs gold and of 1,126,000 francs silver.
The fol¬ cereals together, the increased export was only 7 million
lowing indicates the amount of bullion in the principal bushels, with an average price per bushel 13 cents less than
European banks this week and at the corresponding date in the previous year. In bacon and hams and lard the
last year.
increase was also comparatively large, but this was not even
The Bank of




Gain.

$1,909,000

April 18,

THE CHRONICLE.

1885.]

chiefly due to the war. The trade was then just becoming
important. The following shows the quantities of each of
these articles and the values of breadstuffs exported during

-

467

From these considerations it appears to us plain that
while war would cause something of an increase in the
demand for American food

products—more, however, for
provisions than for grain—the difference could not be
the three years beginning with 1869-70.
sufficiently great to justify any excessive hopes. The
1871-72.
1870-71.
1869-70.
effect upon our manufactures would be still smaller.
Breadstuff's exported— -•
hush. 53,900,780 52,574,111 38,995,755 England can spare an army and still have an ample supply
Wheat and flour
$1 45
$1 32
$1 27
Average value per bushel
of workmen to operate her mills, factories and workshops.
2,140,487 10,676.870 35,727,010
Corn and meal
hush.
$0 70
$0 79
$1 04
Average value per bushel
There is nothing of the class of manufactures which she
Total cereals of all kinds...hush. 56,610,750 63,819,573 75,899,033
$1 04
$1 09
$1 22
Average value per bushel
will need which she cannot herself supply, nor, if she
*1871-72.
*1870-71.
*1869-70.
Provisions exported—
lacked anything, would America be the source to which
I*ork
lhs. 27,555,982 45,728,823 57,686,164
*.
lhs. 27,202,800 43,816,589 29,271.906
Beef
she would look for it.
As for Russia, she might possibly
Bacon and ham
lbs. 32,970,826 96,216,539 263,939,539
Lard
lbs. 34,460,061 118,926,441 205,853.369
give our gun factories some orders, but arms are contra¬
Crop years ending with November 1.
band of war.
And in certain remote contingencies there
Very little, perhaps, can be deduced from the above facts, are some articles which Russia would purchase in the
inasmuch as the United States was not then in a favorable United States.
But manifestly such inconsiderable favors
in
situation, by reason of its bad currency and the still pre¬
the way of custom are no basis for any revival of busi¬
vailing exhaustion induced by the civil war, for taking ness.
advantage of good conditions, and yet the decline in the
Taking a long view of the matter, it cannot be for our
average value per bushel is a very significant circumstance. advantage that a great war should occur.
War is loss,
But a better example, and one more nearly parallel with and the loss must be made up after peace is declared.
the present situation, is furnished by the war of 1877. The cost to
England, which is our best customer, would be
:
First as to the effect of the Russo-Turkish war upon prices. felt in increased taxation and consequently diminished
It affected the stock market very slightly, but it caused
power of consumption.
We should perhaps sell, just at
the widest fluctuations in grain and provisions.
At the present, a few million more bushels of grain, and a few
end of the month before War was declared, on March 30, thousand more tons of pork products, and should get
1877, No. 2 flour was quoted at $4 60 to $5 15; No. 3 rather better prices for all we sell. But the expense of
spring wheat at$l 35to$l 42; and Western mixed corn the war would be just so much a drag upon England and
at 54 to 57 cents.
War was declared April 24. On April Russia, and indirectly upon us also. The nations of the
27 flour stood at $6 40 to $7 15; wheat at $1 70 to world are now so bound together
that what hurts one hurts
$1 77; and corn at 66 to 71 cents. A month later flour all. The relations between Great Britain and the United
was at $4 00 to $5 00;
wheat at $1 50 to $1 60; and States are peculiarly close, and it is impossible that a
Thus wheat was the only one of the wound to England should give Americans even a sense of
corn at 54 to 58 cents.
three articles which retained any of the advance, and that commercial
pleasure.
was due to the short crop of 1876 more than to the war.
And by the end of the year, with a better wheat crop in
1877, flour was down to $3 00 to $4 15; wheat $1 27 to THE ATCHISON TOPEKA & SANTA FE SYSTEM
$1 30; and corn 53 to 65 cents. The temporary and
The managers of the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe, in
exceedingly brief boom in prices stopped exports instantly, their report submitted this week, give evidence that they
but the decline caused them to be resumed.
Our exports
appreciate the situation that confronts them, and know
'for the three years from 1875-76 to 1877-78 compare as how to deal with it in an effective
way. The net earnings
1

*

*

-

-

’

follows.
1875-76.

'

-

1

■-

Breadstuff's exported—
Wheat and flour
Average value per bushel
Corn and meal

Provisions

exported—

Pork
Beef
Bacon aud ham
Lard

.

■

hueli.

74.750.682

1876-77.

57,043 936
on

1877-78.

93.139,296

l

$1 32
87,191,990
$0 57
$0 59
$-) 68
Average value per bushel
Total cereals of all hinds., .hush. 128.026.S29 135,964 071 191.210,923
$0 90
$0 85
$101
Avat'age value per bushel
<

*

lately fallen short of expectations ;
its future has been pictured in most gloomy colors ; its
policy condemned ; the course of the managers criticised ;
always subject to more or less hostility from without, it
of the

$1 24

bush.

50.910,532

*1875-76.

■>

72^152.611

*1876-77.

*1877-73.

57.838.184 68,819.874 77,161,961
lhs
lbs. 49.156.184 88,855,^08 93,158,771
lbs. 388,238,246 444,1.9,612 634,646,821
237,681,659 345,639,115
lhs.

Crop years ending with November l

has

property have

now

been attacked in the house

of its friends, and a

journal, hitherto famed for its advocacy of the
enterprise, has turned into a severe unfriendly critic. At
this juncture, too, some of the gentlemen who have been
property almost since its inception, are
to sever their active connection with it, and the new board
of directors therefore contains neither the name of

identified with the

Let them appreciate sufficiently to cover They have done what under the circumstances was the
such cost, with perhaps a small profit, and at once the sur¬ best thing they could do to clear up doubt and misunder¬
plus stocks in all producing countries which have been standing, namely, issue a report clear, full and explicit on
And all the points involved.
held back because of low values will find a market.
And here we would say that the reader must not make
there is more than enough, as we showed last week, to
supply the present demand, while outside of the United the error of supposing that the Atchison is hereafter to be
States crop prospects for wheat are up to latest dates in guided by new or inexperienced hands.
Notwithstanding
general very favorable. The notion that Russia is to be the recent changes, most of the old officers remain with
closed up so that her food supply will not be available is a the company, and Mr. W. B. Strong as president continues
mere deception.
With the price high enough to cover the the active head of the enterprise as in other more recent
extra transportation charges its surplus will readily find a years.
Without attempting to apportion between Messrs.
Strong
and Nickerson the credit for building up $he
^.market by railroad through Austria and Germany
of

production.

,

,




is!

Boston

encouragement whatever for our wild speculators is
to be found in any of these figures.
Notwithstanding the Thomas Nickerson, the former president of the company,
war, the year’s average price of wheat declined, of corn nor that of A. E. Touzalin, the Vice President of the
declined, and of all cereals declined. The result will differ road in recent years up till now. Well may the manage¬
somewhat on this occasion, should war result, but solely ment be anxious to have the affairs of the road properly
because breadstuffs values have been ruling below the cost presented to its security holders, and the general public.
No

m

H\

rl

THE CHRONICLE.

469

of

Atchison system, or m any way underestimate the value
Mr. Nickerson’s, share in the difficult task, it is due to the

5

Sift
It

.

security holders at this juncture in the company’s affairs,
and but just to Mr. Strong, to affirm that to him, none the
less than to Mr. Nickerson, the Atchison owes a great
deal.
He was Mr. Nickerson’s general manager—his
active lieutenant in the field—and as such did all the
hard and difficult work inseparable from the carrying on
of an undertaking of this description in a new and undeveloped country. It may be taken for granted therefore that
he understands

the system

thoroughly—its needs and re¬

quirements—and is competent to direct its affairs with ad¬
vantage, whatever difficulties may attend the future prog
ress

j:

of the road.

higher, to 172,800,000 bushels, and in
only a slight falling off, to 168,500,000
bushels. In the same interval the yield of wheat increased
from 19,900,000 bushels to 34,900,000 bushels. Of course
without this coincident increase in cereal production, the
great gains in earnings which the ‘Atchison has made in
recent years would have been impossible.
Yet obviously
the increased yield, although furthered by favorable
meteorological conditions, has been due largely to the devel¬
opment of, the country produced by the extension of the
company’s mileage. A fair inference from the large
production, however, would be that a material diminution
in the yield, or a crop failure in Kansas, would be a serious
1883

it went still

1884

there

This would follow even if the present drawback

further evidence to the same effect.
It is with regard to the road’s prospects and outlook, of
course, that critics differ.
As to that, although prophecy
is not our forte, yet a correct interpretation of past results
will be useful and assist greatly in forming a proper esti¬
report did not offer

[vou ru

corn.

was

the

to

road’s income—not

But that is

ities of the situation.

so

much wheat, as

important only as one of the possibil¬
It has not yet

occurred, and it should

critics
An interesting point in connection
are inclined to do.
with the Atchison’s growth of earnings is the fact that

not be taken

for

granted

as

likely to

occur as some

feature above any like other roads it has made its gains despite a constant
Thus in 1880 the average
other distinguishing the Atchison it is the marvellous suc¬ decline in the rates received.
cess that has attended its development.
From an experi¬ rate per ton per mile was 2*431 cents ; in 1884 it was
ment in an untried field—for such it was at the outset— only 1*882 cents, a falling off of nearly one-quarter.
In
it quickly attained a degree of prosperity almost unexam¬ the same interval the average rate per passenger per mile
mate

pled.
868

of the future.

If there is

one

The end of 1878 found it with a mileage of only
miles, and gross earnings less than four millions and

net less than two

millions.

Its funded debt

was

$14,175,-

declined from 3*347 cents to 2*648 cents.
But there is

value of the

comparatively little controversy as to the

The chief objec¬
against the spreading out of the road in

Atchison system proper.

$8,615,000rwith nothing being tions raised are
paid upon it. At the end of 1884—six years later—we the direction of the Pacific Coast. The Sonora purchase,
see it operating directly
2,375 miles, not including the the California Southern acquisition, the Atlantic & Pacific
As regards the Sonora
Sonora system, or roads owned jointly with other compa¬ alliance, are all found fault with.
nies, or the Atlantic & Pacific, which, if all were added, purchase, results have not justified it from a financial
would give a mileage of 3,600 miles; and on the 2,375 point of view at least.
The road entails a large annual
Its
loss.
utility, too, as a Pacific Coast connection has
miles directly operated the gross earnings were $16,291,883 and the net $7,315,907.
The funded debt on the proved visionary. But it should be remembered that it
was bought at a time when it was feared that the other
same mileage was $46,144,500, and the company had
$56,913,250 stock outstanding on which 6 per cent divi¬ outlets to the Pacific might be lost to the Atchison, and
dends were being regularly paid.
Could there be any that in that event the Sonora might prove of service. For
better evidence of a healthy, prosperous growth than the purpose for which it was purchased we doubt whether
But in an entirely dif¬
this? The field of operations, of course, has been enlarged, it will ever amount to anything.
The
and from being a purely Kansas road it has been practi¬ ferent way it may be made a valuable acquisition.
report tells us that between Guaymas, on the Gulf of Cali¬
cally extended to the Pacific Ocean.
Now what has occasioned this prosperity ?
If we can fornia (the southern terminus of the system), and other
get a clue to that, perhaps it may offer a key to the Mexican ports further south, a steamer put on by the com¬
future. And first of all it will be admitted, we think, that pany is at present being run.
Now, with the development
the Atchison system has been exceptionally well planned of Mexico under the increased railroad facilities introduced
and laid out.
Let any one take up a map, and observe in that republic, why could not a lucrative trade be built
how closely almost for its whole length the road follows up in this manner with the west coast of Mexico? Then,
the Arkansas River in the State of Kansas; again, down with the resumption of the subsidy payments by the Mexi¬
in New Mexico how the road hugs the Rio Grande all can Government, now suspended, the road might become a
the way from El Paso north to Santa Fe.
The same is source of gain, instead of loss, to the Atchison.
With regard to the Atlantic & Pacific, the position of
also true to some extent of the Atlantic & Pacific line,
000, and its stock was but

.

(5-

?.

■

.

i

•

Vk

along the Rio the Atchison was in some respects peculiar. The connec¬
Puerco river.
The significance of this will be obvious to tion with the Southern Pacific at Doming, in New Mexico,
everybody. It means that the route has been laid out gave the road a trans-Continental route without the
But it was not a route under its own
to follow the water courses, the natural channels of trade. Atlantic & Pacific.
The Atchison was dependent upon the favor of
Water courses always mark the line of early settlements, control.
What that means will be under¬
and moreover the districts through which they run are the Southern Pacific.
almost invariably the richest and best in the territory, stood when we say that the road cannot even now, with
Thus the Atchison drains a very fertile section of coun¬ the Atlantic & Pacific in its own hands, get its proper
try, its projectors having kept in view the geographical allowance of through traffic from the California syndicate.
Moreover, the route via Deming was a round-about one,:
advantages of the country.
And in this connection it is proper to remark that a while the Atlantic & Pacific was a direct one, and sure to
We
very important element in the road’s prosperity has been get the bulk of the through traffic for that reason.
the wonderful expansion in the yield of cereals in the are not inclined to attach much importance to this Pacific
State of Kansas during the last three years, in which Coast through business.
Experience has demonstrated
that
it
been
has
State the road has no less than 1,4 72£ miles of road.
greatly overrated. But the through
In 1881 Kansas’corn production was 76,377,000 bushels, traffic was not the only point the Atchison had to look to.
in 1882 it almost doubled, being 144,452,000 bushels, in There was the local business, which the Atlantic & PaCiff
which for part of its distance stretches

1i

ri

r

I




By delivering that to the Atchison at
Albuquerque, the latter would get a haul on the traffic
of over 900 miles to either Kansas City or Atchison. Was
not that worth taking into consideration.
Was such an
opportunity for securing income to be lightly regarded, or
thrown away ?
But there was still another consideration
of equal importance, which the present report is to be
commended for bringing out. We refer to the allusion
that Mr. Strong makes to the probability that if the
Atchison had loosened its hold on the Atlantic & Pacific,
that road would in all likelihood have fallen into the hands
of the Huntington people, who would have pushed it east
from Albuquerque through the Indian Territory, thus
forming a parallel line antagonistic to the Atchison all the
way to the Missouri River.
This would have interfered
not only with the road’s through business, but cut very
seriously into the local business of the Atchison, for a
good part of which the new line could easily have become
a

sure

to

develop.

competitor.
It may still be claimed, however,

that the same exigency
the purchase of the Mohave
of the Southern Pacific, which Mr. Huntington
east to the Colorado River to a connection with

did not exist with respect to

extension
had built

Certainly that did
not threaten the very existence of the Atchison, as the
Atlantic & Pacific had.
And yet it is a question whether
the Atchison, having gone thus far, was not compelled to
go further.
Was it advisable to stop at the Colorado
River ? The through business, we have already said, we
do not esteem highly, but, nevertheless, having been built
to get a share of that business, there was no reason why
the Atlantic & Pacific.

the Atlantic &

Perhaps not.

Pacific should not have its proper propor¬

tion, and it is precisely this the Southern Pacific would
not allow the road.
Moreover, this question of an indepen¬
dent outlet to the ocean had to be settled some time.
The

management had already taken a long step
tion, and it seemed desirable that the issue

in that direc¬
should now be

"

-

"

To

sum

up

—

-

1

1

is

469

THE CHRONICLE

IS, 1885.J

1

April

" ■ —- "

the results, then, it would appear

that the

primary purchase of the Atlantic & Pacific was an aot
very much akin to self-preservation ; that the later acqui¬
sition of the Mohave line had no such urgent need to
commend it, but seemed necessary to carry out the
policy previously entered upon ; that the arrangement
with the California Southern followed naturally upon the
purchase of the Mohave line, and was needful to solve
finally the vexed question of a Pacific Coast outlet; that
the Sonora system has failed of its original object, but
may yet prove a feeder of some consequence.
With
regard to the liabilities on, behalf of these various pur¬
chases, we have not the space to say anything to-day. It
is just possible that if business depression should be pro¬
longed, these might for the time being prove burden¬
some.
But at any rate that will be merely a temporary
circumstance to the Atchison. In the end, the policy pursued

advantageous to it, for through these extensions
and acquisitions it will be placed in a well-nigh impregna¬
ble position.
Without them it might have gone to the
wall, and certainly it would invite decay.
With respect to the fiscal results of operations for the
late year, the figures in comparison with the previous
year are given in our investment column on another page,
and we need not repeat them here.
The falling off in net
earnings, it will be seen, is entirely the result of increased
expenses, the gross having been nearly $400,000 larger
than in 1883.
The remarks of the report on this augmen¬
tation in expenses and the extraordinary circumstances
that brought it about, are deserving of careful perusal,
and their bearing upon the results of the present year
should be closely studied. We commented last week upon
the diminished earnings for January and February this year,
and in addition to what was then said we may state that
corn shipments
have been much smaller than in 1884,
owing to the holding back of the cereal by Kansas farm¬
ers, who are in a position to do this, having had three
successive good crops.
The corn will of course have to
come forward some time, and to the extent that it has
been held back will the outlook for better earnings in
later months be improved.

must prove

squarely met. So the Atchison, joined by the St. Louis &
San Francisco, as in all the previous arrangements with the
Atlantic & Pacific, bought the Mohave extension of 242
miles, the consideration being a rental equal to 6 per cent
on $30,000 per mile,
or $435,600 per year. And in
connection therewith the value of the California Southern THE BOSTON “ POST» AN1) ITS CLEARINGS
It is scarcely necessary to say that we esteem our Boston
acquisition becomes apparent. With the purchase of the
Mohave line, the Atchison was given certain trackage and neighbors very highly. Celebrated, like all cultured people,
for their gentle bearing and evenness of temper, our readers
traffic rights, which it was supposed would take it to San
can easily understand that we would not for the world be
Francisco on even terms with the Central Pacific.
These guilty of disturbing the equanimity of one of them. Imagine
rights, it is now admitted, amount to nothing, and, shut therefore our surprise on taking up this week that model of
off at Mohave, on the Southern Pacific, the Atchison propriety the Boston Post, to find it giving loose to its bitter¬
would be no better off than it was at the Colorado ness after this manner, and ourselves unwittingly the cause.
An esteemed
but somewhat aged weekly contemporary in New
River.
The California Southern, however, when the con York, by name the Commercial and Financial Chr«.nicle and
Merchants’ Magazine, which we have been taught to
nection with the Mohave extension is made, will complete Hunt’s
1ihh within
believe the very impersonation of newspaper honor.
last, few months acquired the bad habit of stealing eaob
the remaining link in the line to the Pacific.
It is not sup¬ the
week the livery of
tlie JLJosion Post, with which to make itself
presentable to its patrons. To be sure the clearing house returns
posed that an outlet at San Diego is as good as one at which the Financial Chronicle regularly pilfers from these columns and
San Francisco, but the Atchison will be afforded an tries to pass off as its own production, are a week old w eo it takes
them up and watms them over for the delectation of its readers; yet the
excellent hold on the trade of Southern California, and theft in itself is fuliy as reprehensible as t hough it were committed oy an
esteemed local contemporary, the Boston Herald. Tne Heral«, tuough,
as for San Francisco traffic it
can compel the Central shows some enterprise in its buccaneering exploits, and during the week
usually gets ahead of the Financial Chronicle by a matter of four or
Pacific to make a fair allotment, for in the event of a five days. On Sunday, like a good Christian, it rests, filling its finan¬
cial columns w.th warmed-over excerpts from such anoteui classics as
refusal a steamer line between the two ports could easily the Financial Chronicle. Whi'e we are g ad to be able to furnish the
Financial Chronicle with something re dabie every week, aud we will,
be established and rates completely demoralized.
The expend both money and braius in accomplishing this yet we in ist ex¬
press our regrets that the lea ting financial pumi ati-m of Am mica in
Atchison would then be on equal footing with the Central its old age is compelled to adopt literary piracy as a mean of livelihood.
We trust the Post will pardon us the suggestion if it is not
Pacific, and consequently could exact equal treatment. More¬
correct, but our esteemed contemporary is so celebrated for
over, to make the connection with the California Southern,
its jokes, almost more than for its news, while the claim it
as well as put that road in a thoroughly first-class condition
makes is so utterly unjust, that we have thought perhaps it
its entire length, it is thought can be done for less than 2
really means its words to be taken in some humorous sense.
million dollars, entailing an annual charge of no more Let any reader compare the Clearing House statements in the
than $120,000, which th^ local business alone is expected Boston Post of Monday of last week and in the CHhONlCLE of
to provide without taking into consideration the through last Saturday, and he will readily see the reason for our skepti¬
cism. The two compilations are as unlike as possible, agree
business at all




470

THE CHRONICLE.

ing in

particular either of detail or result. Furthermore
all obtained, part by telegraph and part by mail,
directly from the Clearing House managers, except in two
very minor cases, and in those cases we receive the figures
indirectly, and in no instance from the Post.
Then, again, the conception or idea which led to the collect¬
ing and publishing of these clearings is not the Post’s, but is our
own property, for which we
paid. The system was originated
and elaborated, and all the machinery for the collection of the
figures was perfected, by Colonel Grosvenor for his newspaper
The Public, and published by him there from week to week for
quite a number of years, until he worked it into popular favor,
making it an important item of news, an indicator of no little
delicacy and exactness recording the variations in business
activity all over the country; and all this was done years before
the Post or any one else undertook a similar work.
To-day if
one needs to compare with
previous returns (and it is only the
comparison that lends to the figures their value) one must still
rely on those compilations in The Public. Now, to complete
the situation, add to the foregoing the
important further cir¬
our

.

no
facts

are

cumstance, well-known to the newspaper world, that the
Chronicle bought The Public, fulfilled all its obligations,
and thereby fell heir to all its “ideas,” its
only assets. Can
there be a doubt in view of such facts, that if
any one has the
right to cry stop thief, that right belongs clearly to us, for
Boston of all places will not deny that there is
property in
ideas.

Post

attempts to cover on Monday. But it should not be for¬
gotten that we also give at the same time the returns for five
additional days by telegraph, bringing the transactions down
to Friday noon.
Our leading table, though, is later, as stated,
and all because

unfortunate

to go to press Friday
night, and the weekly Clearing House figures are not issued
until Saturday noon. That is
certainly an advantage over us
that the Post has in using our “ idea ” without credit. It had
the same advantage over the Public when the Post first un¬
dertook to build upon Colonel Grosvenor’s work of
years ; and
if its figures were always what
they purport to be, that cir¬
cumstance might perhaps prove a considerable
advantage to
its readers also. But so long as it includes the New Orleans
figures for two weeks back (mixing results until they can be
used as an indication of no single week), and when it
copies
New Orleans from us, but fails to
copy correctly the per¬
centage of decrease (giving it at 37*9 per cent instead of 32*9
as we had
it), and in its total makes the per cent of falling
off 20*7, when
according to its own figures it should be 23-1
per cent* (not to mention other similar errors), we do not see
what value the Post’s compilation has for
any one.
Of this at
least it may rest assured, that until the
figures become more
accurate we shall never copy them.
*

we are so

See the table in the Boston Post of

of its

figures being “pilfered.”

as

Monday, April 13, where it speaks

IPforoetavsI @0raraevcii*l gufjlisft Hews
RATES OF EXCHANGE AT LONDON AND ON LONDON
AT LATEST DATES.
EXCHANGE AT LONDON-Apr. 2.
On—

Time.

Hamburg...

• 4

Rate.

Berlin

44

Frankfort...

<4

Vienna

44

Trieste

44

Antwerp.
St. Petersb’g

20*67
20 68
20*68

Paris
Paris
Genoa
Madrid

020*71
02072
020*72

12*56i4'Ol2*62ia
12*56iaOl2*62ia

it

25*60
24
25*55

...

4*

44

025*05

02414

'©25*621$

Short. 25*37*®25*47i$
44
25*75
025*80
it
4634'©4G38
44

Cadiz

Lisbon
Alexandria.

Constaut’ple
....

463|tJ'®465iQ

if

c

44
44
.

dem’nd

Calcutta
New York... 60 day 8
44

Hong Kong.

Shanghai....

.

.

.

m

m

Is. 61516d.
Is. 6ioud.

....

....

I From

our own

EXCHANGE ON LONDON.
Latest
Date.

Amsterdam. Sight. 12 l^t ®12,2C8
Amsterdam. 3 mos. 12 3ia ■012*4

Bombay

Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.
Apr.

Time.

Rate.

1 Short.
1
1 Short.
1
44
1
44
1
it
1

12*10

44

it

1
1 3 mos.
1 Checks
1
1 Short.
1 3 mos
44
1
44
1
44
1
44
1
1 tel. tsfs
44
1
1 60 days

1 4
1

mos.
4ft

*

20*48
20*45
2047

dispatch, it is generally believed to be pacific and
conciliatory in tone. The danger of an actual outbreak of
hostilities is evidently considerably reduced. The news
from
the Soudan also, suggesting as it does the
collapse of the move¬
ment under Osman Digna,
is'encouraginer, and at the same time
China is showing a stronger disposition to come to terms
with
France so soon as there is a French
ministry with whom to
negotiate. From these hypotheses it may be safely asserted
that the political outlook is
distinctly less bellicose than it was
a week ago, and
anxiety as_'to the immediate future is corre¬
spondingly lessened.
Owing to the Easter holidays, it is impossible to estimate
just now what will be the effect upon trade. Greater confi¬
dence will

doubt result, but so far there are no
signs of
extended operations. There is a certain amount of
activity in
the heavy branches of the iron and steel trades
engaged in the
manufacture of armor plates and the execution of orders in
no

connection with the warlike
preparations, .but the volume of
business transacted in the hardware districts is still small and
less than it was at this time last
year. That this is the case is

clearly evident from the continued falling off in the goods
receipts on those railways serving the iron districts. On the
other hand, those lines
connecting the metropolis with the

woolen and cotton districts are
publishing more favorable sta¬
tistics. For the moment, however, there does not
appear to be
any real life anywhere, and all that can be said is, appearances

brighter than they

were.

Tenders have been received

by the Bank of England for
£1,195,000 Treasury bills to replace similar amount issued at
the close of last December, and which were then allotted
at
an
average of £3 18s. 6d. This time the whole sum was again
disposed of on three months’ bills at an average of £2 4s.
per cent, showing a saving of £1 4s. 4d. percent, tenders at £99
6s. 3d. receiving about 42 per cent, and above in full. The bills
issued at the beginning of March wgre placed at
an average
of £3 Is. 9 per cent, and those in
February at an average of
£3 0s. 3^d. per cent.
4
Money has been very quiet. The demand has fallen off sen¬
sibly with the satisfying of the quarterly demands. No change
has been made in the Bank of
England rate, but it is doubtful
whether it will be long maintained at its
present level of 3)4
per cent. In a few days the dividend money will be distrib¬
uted, and there will also be a large addition to floating bal¬
ances by the payment of 10s. in the £ to the
creditors of the
Oriental Bank; it is understood that
something approaching
to £3,000,000 will be disbursed and the bulk of the sum
be
retained here. The revenue collections, also, are now
less effect, as only the arrears have to be

having

got in. There is
every indication, therefore, of the market being well, if not
over, supplied; and as the conditions of trade do not warrant
the expectation of a corresponding increase in the
inquiry,
it is but natural to suppose that quotations will
give way. At
present short money is unlendable, even at 2 per cent, and the
discount charge for three-months’ bills is about
% per cent
below the official rate. It is difficult,
consequently, to under¬
stand how the Bank rate can be kept up
at 3)4 per cent, and a
fall to 3 per cent at an early date
may be reasonably antici¬
pated. The last Bank return certainly showed a loss of nearly
£1,500,000 in the reserve, but that was due to passing influ¬
ences, and the deficiency may be expected to be gradually
made up. In spite of the low range in the value of
money
here, we are still attracting gold from the Continent.
The following are the present prices for money.

*

k

London

25*40

Feb. 27
Mar.
“

13

“

20

“

2458
lS.
Is.

62732(i.
62732d.
4*8431
3s. 6i$d.
4s. lO^d.

6

Apr.

27

3

for deposits by

Bank Bills.

Trade Bills.

Disc't Wse
Joint
At 7 to 14
Four
Six
Stock
Months Months Months Months Months Months Banks. Call. Days.
Three

24»8
25*351$
25*45
47*20

Interest allowed

Open market rates.

12*43

3%3

-

3*0

—

Four

3*0 3*0 3*03% 3%© 2%©S
2%©3
3 %© - 3 © 2%© — 2%© -

**

Six

3*0
3*0
3*0
2*0
3@

2%©

-

—

-

Thru

3%©3% 33*0

-

3*3 3*33%
8*nom
3*43%
3@- 2%©3

3*0 3%©3%
3*nom
3% 33*

3%©3*
3%©3*
3*03%
3*03*
3*03%
2*03

3

3

3*-3*

3

3

3*-3*

3

3

3*-S*

2*
2*
2*

2* 2H-2H
2* 2%-2%
2* 2%-2%

The

following return shows the position of the Bank of
England, the Bank rate of discount, the price of consols
and other items, compared with previous years:

correspondent. J

London, April 4, 1885.
The course of political events
during the past week has been
more suggestive of
peace. Although nothing definite has been
allowed so far to
transpire respecting the nature of the latest




Russian

are

And yet it is true, as the Post states, that our table is the
later one, and gives on Saturday the same week that the

[Vol* XL.

Circulation excluding
Bank-post bills
Public deposits
Other deposits
Governm’t securities.
Other securities
Res’ve of notes & coin

1885.
£

1884.
£

24,946,500
11,165,542
25,625,197
14,672,692
24,149,744

25,553,520

16,466,406

1883.
£
26,011,615

1882.
£

12,451,964
25,313,028

11,571,471
22,259,833
13,360,565
27,333,371

26.337,710
10,235,209
24.336.34L
13,395,643
26.288,119

15,548,364

11,679,516

12,729,717

10,500.532

24,259,339

April

Circulation exclvding

Coin and bullion in
both departments.. 25,662,906

Proport’n of reserve

25,351,884 21,941,131 23,317,427

3*9 p. o.

Eng. wheat, av.

93d.
32s. 7<L

price

363s

343s

44

2*3 p. o.
1023sd.
38s. Id.

3 p.o.
102 «4d.
42s. Od.

3 p. c.
101 \6.
45s. Id

513,6d.

5384.
9\d.

5H,6d.
iO%d.

5^d.
9*4d.

Mid. Upland cotton..
No. 40 mule twist....

9%d.

135,338,000 72,507,000 158,559,000
The Bank rate of discount and open market rates at the
chief Continental cities now and for the previous three weeks
Clearing-House ret’n. 138,175,000

have been as follows:
March 12.

March 19.

March 20.

2.

April
Bates of
Interest at

Bank

Open

Batik

Open

Batik

Open

Bank

Open

Rate.

Market

Rate.

Market

Rate.

Market

Rate.

Market

Paris

3

m

3

2%

5

5

5

3

5

3*

5

5

8%

5

3

5

3%

5

3%
3%
3H

2H
8*4

3

Berlin
Frankfort........
Hamburg
Amsterdam
Brussels

2%
8U

3

5

5

3H

5

2H

3

8

3

8

2%

3

Madrid

4*

4%

4%

Vienna

4

m

4

4

m
2%
4%
3%

3

3

2%
2H
4%
3X

4

2H
2%
4 *4
m

St. Petersburg..

0

6

6

0

0

0

0

0

Copenhagen

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

4

Messrs.

3

4%

Pixley & Abell report as follows on

3

4*

the state of the

bullion market:
Gold—A further order on Spanish account absorbed the greater part
of the arrivals of bar gold, but the Bauk has, nevertheless, received

sold £24,000 for South America.

£144,000, principally in coin, and has

has caused a fall in the exchange, and
further remittances to this country. The
Medway brought £26,000 from West Indies; Indus, £46,000 from
Australia; Olande Rodriguez, £40,000 from Central America. The
The political situation in Paris
has for the moment prevented

Brindisi takes £20,000 to Bombay.
Silver improved slightly on receipt of a special order, and the arrival
per Medway was sold at 49^d., but the price has since relapsed to
which we quote this day. The Medway brought £30,000 from
Indies, the Indus £15,000 from Australia, and the arrivals from the
United States amounted to £80,000. The Brindisi takes £156,000 to

49d.,
West

Bombay.

Mexican Dollars have remained steady at
arrivals per Medway were sold. She brought
Indies.

The quotations for
Price of Gold.

20dwts. silver.oz.

77

Price of

Afar. 20.

a.

s.

Bar gold, fine., oz.
Bar gold, contain’g.

48d , at which price the
£115,000 from the West

bullion are reported as follows:
2.

Apr.

9

l.

d.

77

9

Apr.

Silver.

2.

d.

d.

Bar silver, fine..oz.

silver,containlng5grs. gold..oz.

Mar. 20

49

49

49%
52%

49%

48

48

Bar

77 10%

77 10%

Cake silver

Span, doubloons.oz.

oz.

Mexlean dols...oz.

S.Am.doubloons.oz.

53%

scandal has come to light. It
is curious that these discreditable occurrences take place prin¬
cipally amongst that class of members supposed to be the most
highly established in the scale of commercial probity. The
absconding defaulter is Mr. George Bartle Goldsmid, and being
influentially connected, he had command of an extensive and
remunerative business. He appears, however, to have followed
in the footsteps of Mr. Blakeway, and to the dismay of his
trusting friends and relations to have absconded, leaving
behind him unsettled losses variously estimated at from
£100,000 to £200,000. It is a repetition of the old tale of stocks
and shares left with him, for safe custody being made away
with. At first there threatened to be some difficulty in offi¬
cially declaring Mr. Goldsmid a defaulter until next settling
day—April 13—but a check having been dishonored, he was
at once “ hammered,” and the Stock Exchange committee at
the same time ordered that all members who received differ¬
ences from him at the last settlement should at once return
them to the official assignee.
The Stock Exchange markets here are on the whole assum¬
ing greater firmness, although American railways have
at times been disposed to be weak.
Consols have rallied
fully one per cent, and are strong at the advance, and all
international stocks which were influenced by the war
rumors have rallied distinctly.
Considerable excitement has
been observed in the Grand Trunk market, and values have
sprung up from 5 to 8 per cent. The cause of the rise is a
Yet another Stock Exchange

statement that the directors have
account.

carried £60,000 to

In the face of the bad dividend just

a suspense

announced, this

report can hardly be credited, but if it should prove to be true
likely to produce considerable ill-feeling, as Grand Trunk’s

it is

than gambling counters,
subject to unusually violent fluctuations.
The revenue returns just published for the year are some¬
what conflicting, and not altogether satisfactory. It is true
have of late been very little better

that the revenue shows
vious years. But this is
taxes

came




an

increase of £837,926 over the pre¬

entirely due to the way in which the
and notably the income tax, in

in last quarter,

which there

was an

increase of £1,682,000.

The gross gain

the corresponding period of the previous
£2,533,227. Taking the statistics for the financial
year ended March 81, there is an increase of £620,000 in cus¬
toms, £305,000 in stamps, £80,000 in house duty, £1,282,000 in
property and income tax, £175,000 in post-office and £15,000
in telegraph service.
On the other hand, excise shows a fall¬
ing off of £352,000, land tax of £5,000, interest on advances
£168,778, and miscellaneous receipts of £1,113,296. In his
revised budget, Mr. Childers estimated the gross receipts at
£86,733,000, whereas the actual revenue was £88,043,000, the
excess being entirely due to the income tax, which has yielded
exactly £2,000,000 for every one penny, being £80,000 per
penny more than the estimate.
However, while the revenue
has increased, so, also, apparently has the expenditure.
The
revised estimate in November was £56,730,000 and the actual
expenditure, according to the quarterly statements, £58,066t-«
000, making, with £31,103,000, the permanent charges for the
debt and other things a gross expenditure of £89,169,000. From
these statistics it is clear that unless there have been savings
in the permanent charges, there is a deficiency of £1,126,000 ;
and not only that, but the arrears of income tax will probably
be much less prolific than in late years, owing to the energy
with which the tax has been collected during the past quarter.
According to Kemp's Mercantile Gazette the number of
failures in England and Wales during the week ended March 28
was 99, or 30 more than in the corresponding period last year,
making a net increase to date of 77. The number of bills of
sale published in England and Wales was 248, showing a
decrease of 13, and making a falling off to date of 46.
The
number published in Ireland was 14, or 4 less than last year,
the decrease to date being 29.
The wool sales have been interrupted by the holidays.
So
far about 140,000 bales have been disposed of. During the past
few days the tone has not been so good.
No actual decline
has occurred, but the tendency is now irregular.
In spite of the cold weather and the easterly winds, vege¬
tation is making fair progress, and the advent of spring isbecoming more clearly apparent. This has been a very good
seed time, and operations have been rather vigorously pushed
forward during the past week or two.
The growing crops
mostly look strong and well. Indian advices recently received
endorse the reports previously to hand respecting the satisfacon

44*56

liabilities

Bank rate
Consols

£

£

£

£

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

to

471

THE CHRONICLE.

18, 1885.]

the quarter over

year was

state of the crops.
That the grain trade

should be characterized by a return of
with Rus¬
sia was in part removed was a foregone conclusion, especially
when the limited effect wrought upon the market at the time
the dispute was in its most threatening and acute phase is
recalled.
Speculative buying was never stimulated, and
the extent of the advance was only about Is. per quarter.
The course of the trade during the past week has been
in a measure reversed.
Not only has the upward move¬
ment been checked, but in spite of the low range of prices
the tendency has again become adverse to holders.
This
is specially the case as regards Indian wheats, which
may be within 6d. to Is. per quarter easier.
Fine spring
weather and good crop reports naturally militate against a
display of firmness in the absence of any disturbing influences.
Buyers purchase for immediate wants only. Consumption
remains on an average scale and the stocks of grain must
have undergone further depletion since the beginning of the
year. The sales of home-grown produce in the principal
markets during the thirty weeks have exceeded those for the
corresponding period by about 60,000 qrs., whilst the aggregate
imports of wheat and flour have been fully 4,000,000 cwts,
less.
But one inference can be drawn from these statistics^
and that is that stocks must have been further appreciably
reduced. But the effect of that circumstance is in a great
measure neutralized by the large increase in the quantity on ’
passage and the considerable expansion in the American
visible supply.
For the next few days business will be inter¬
rupted by the Easter holidays.
The following return shows the extent of the imports of
cereal produce into the United Kingdom during the first
thirty weeks of the season, the sales and average prices of
home-grown produce for the same period, and other item^
compared with last season: IMPORTS.
heaviness

as soon as

the exciting element of a war

1884-5.
Wheat

owt. 27,271,638

Barley

10,152,178

Oats
Peas
Beans
Indian corn...
Flour

6,252,215
1,167,849
2,067,510
13,623,913
9,587,736

1883-4.

1882-3.

32,006,023
10,681,853
7,126,335
1,052,363
1,526,902
15,821,436

36,695,536
10,750,029
8,422,134
1,299.230
1,497,765
19,979,144

9,037,627

10,096,473

1881-2.

30,001,833
8,478,443
5,119,905
1,016,000
1,013,573
12,532,738
5,099,163

I

ill

d
*

Si

1

;ij

m

THE CHRONICLE.

472

Supplies available for consumption (exclusive of atook
dirty weew
1883-4.

Sept. 1) In

on

1882-3.

1881-2.

Imports of wheat.cwt.27,271,6:l8 32,006,023
9,587,736

36,695,536

9,037,827

36,001,883

10.096,473^

5,099,163

Sates of home-grown..27,705,928

26,729,652

25,872,670 23,048,3t0

64.585,302

67,773,302

72,684,679

1884-5.

Imports of flour
Total

64,149,346

The extent of the sales of home-grown wheat, barley and
oats in the

leading markets of England and Wales during the
first thirty weeks of the season, together with the aver¬
age prices realized, compared with the previous season, are
shown in the following statement:
1884-85.

18S3-84.

-

Av'ge

Sales.

Av'gc

Sales.

Price

RXPOHT8 AND IMP >KT« OF SPBOIR AT NSW YORK.

Exports.

Gold.

Week.

Great Britain
France

$6,300

Germany

West Indies
Mexico
South America
All other countries...

Total 1885
Total 1884
Total 1883

Av'gc

Sales.

Price

Price

d.

d.
3
5 2,915,663 32 6
9
267,371 19 8

s.

1,931,568 32
2,874,507 31
223,173 19

qrs

Oats.'.

6

s.

1,870,477 39

d.

8.

1,492,654 41 3
1,834,598 33 10
199,w50 21 0

^Converting quarters of wheat into cwts., the total s iles in
the whole kingdom during the above periods were as follows:
1883-4.

1884-5.
cwt. 27,705,928

Wheat

26,729,652

1S82-3.

1881-2.

25,872,670

23,018,300

Enjellsh market Reports—Per Cable.

4,140,832

o,700

212,047
14,900

8,000
2,000

137,875

1,360

98,546
2,971

21,688,74“

#•7,060
204.796

90,250

5o9,976

$4,648,010
533,039
4,705,025

$111,500

$3,689,208

$24,332

13,300

$24,332

145,396
58.677

77.400
*'4.380,469

fcfy cable

provisions at Liverpool,
follows for the week ending April 17:

as

76
473

4,235
316,524

78,241
154,466
76,343

335

$125,135
300,599

......

4,608

......

$4,3*9,434

$29,105

$338,066

4,507.147
5,032,644

69,155
4 ',855

1,371,137

273.059

1.691,062

above

imports for the week in 1885, $7,030 were
gold coin and $339 American silver coin. Of the
exports during the same time, $10,500 were American gold coin.
American

The daily closing quotations for securities, &c., at London,

and for breadstuff and

*

1,412,991
2,908,555

4,309

1883

Of the

$

115,394

Total 1885
Total 1884
Total

Since Jan.l.

440,500

$456,800
4,878,035

Silver.
Great Britain
France
German/........
West Indies
Mexico
South America
All other countries...

Week.

$14,300
9,562

....

Wheat,
Barley

Imports.

Since Jan.l.

1882-83.

r

t

[Vol. XL.

are

reported

Foreign Trade

of

New York—Monthly Statement.—In

addition to the
London.

Sat.

Mon.

Silver, per A
d. 481516 49%
95
Consols for money
95%
Consols for account
95
95%
Fr’ob rentes (in Paris) fr 77*20
77*60

U.J8. 4%s of 1891

114%

114%

U. S. 4s of 1907
124%
Canadian Pacific
37%
Ohio. Mil. A St. Paul.... 73%

124%
37%

Erie,common stock....
Illinois Central

129%

Pennsylvania..........
Philadelphia A Beading

York Central

new

12%
55%
7%
92%
Sat.

Liverpool.

8.

Flour (ex. State).100 lb. 10
7
Wheat,No.2,3pr*g “
7
Winter, West., n “
7
Cal., No. 1
•*
7
Cal., No. 2
“

“
Corn, mix., old..
Corn, mix., new.. “
Pork, West. mess.. £ bbl
Bacon, long dear
Beef, pr. mess, new, 9 tc
Bard, prime West. fJ owt
Cheese, Am. choice
-

&

4
59
31
87
34
60

d.
0
1
2
7
5

1

129%
55%

7%
93

Mon.

10
7
7
7

7
8% 5
11% 5
0
61
32
6
6
90
9
36
6J
0

Fri.

49»i6
973, a

49%

49%e

91%

95i3lfl

95%
95%

Tries.

d.

Thun.

49%

94%
9513l0
77*22% 77*0 5
114%
114%
124%
124%
37%
37%
74%
74%
13
12%
129%
129%
55%
55%
8
7%
92%
92%

75
13

8.

Wed.

Tuvs.

Wed.

d.
8.
d.
0
10 0
10 0
7 11
7 10
10
1
7 1
7 2
9
710
710
6
7 7
7 7
8% 5 8% 5 8%
0
5 1
5 2
0
62 0
62 0
0
32 3
32 6
0
90 0
92 6
6
36 6
36 6
0
60 0
60 0
8.

973ja
78*37%

77*90

foregoing tables, made up from weekly returns,
give the following figures for the full months, also issued
by our New York Custom House. The first statement covers
the total imports of merchandise.
we

IMPORTS INTO NEW YORK.

115

114%
124%
37%
75%
12%
129%
55%

124%
37%
74

12%
129%
55%

8

8

92%

92%

Thun.

Fri.

1885.

Months.

8.

d.

8.

10

0

10

7 10
7 l
7 10
7 7
5

5
62
32
92
36
60

January....
February .,
March
Total....

d.
8

Exports

for the

7 8
7 1
7 10
i
7
8% 5 8%
2
5 0
6
62 6
0
32 0
6
92 6
9
36 3
0
60 0

1882.

$2,451,401

goods

G$nT mer’dise..
Total
,Since Jan. 1.

Iiry ifoods

GeR’l mer’dise..

1883.

1884.

1885.

$2,086,483

8,641,015

$1,840,973
7,761,507

5,780,652

$1,869,725
7,732,092

$12,092,416

$9,602,480

$7,867,135

$9,601,817

$40,761,608
91,674,785

$33,278,712
79,736,739

$15,802,140
103,508,132

$43,645,427
93,425,888

Ttftal 15 weeks. fl49.310.272 $137,071,315 $132,436,393 $113,015,451

Th

report of the dry goods trade will be found the im¬
ports of dry goods for one week later.
fiiie following is a statement of the exports (exclusive o*
specie) from the port of New York to foreign ports for the
week ending April 14, 1885, and from January 1 to date:
our

3-

WKBK.

.

SXPORTS FROM NSW YORK FOR T9B
■

n

Fair the

1882.
week...

Prev. reported..
Total 15 weeks.

$3,296,139
88,883,231

1883.

1884.

1885.

$6,765,880
99,335,037

$5,018,570
80,302,023

90,875,0,4

*94,184.370 $106,100,917

$85,321,193

$90,658,425

$5,783,351

The following table shows the exports and imports of specie
at the

port of New York for the week ending April 11, and
1, 1885, and for the corresponding periods in

since January
1864 and 1888:




%

$
26,898.814

%
39,997,704
28,175,2)6 39,573,030
31,394,061 42,713,489

92,949,056' 36.316,142 85.968.081 123,284323

61,540,069

CUSTOMS RECBrPTS.
At New York.

Total Merchandise.

Months.

Months.
1885.

1

1884.

January

32,718,154

February

23,715,450 23,536,860
26,137,314 23,097,998

March

82,570,918

26,792.785

1885.

1864.

*
January .
February

10,299,908

$
11,762,029

10,456,958

12,064,811

March

11.217.042

11,436,786

32.033,908

35363326

$

Total

73,427.643

U. S. Sub-Treasury.—The following table shows the receipts
and payments at the Sub-Treasury in this city, as well as tne
balances in the same, for each day of the past week:

Week.—The imports of last

TORSION IMPORTS AT NSW YORK.

For Week.

dise.

13,598390
11,397,824
11,319,42-

EXPORTS FROM NEW YORK.

FT

week, compared with those of the preceding week, show
m increase in both dry goods and general. merchandise.
Tfc® total imports were $9,601,817, against’$8,046,546 the pre¬
ceding week and $7,537,134 two weeks previous. The exports
for the weekended April 14 amounted to$5,783,351, against
$6,450,710 last week and $5,824,232 two weeks previous. The
following are the imports at New York for the week ending
(few dry goods) April 9 and for the week ending (for general
merchandise) April 10; also totals since the beginning of the
first week in January:
i.

$
*
1
10,08,800 17,648,208 28,457,008
10,214,498 18,630,823 28,845,320
10,385,689 25,261,039 35,646,728j

Toted.

Merchan¬

Goods.

dise.

31.408,987

General

Dry

Total.

Merchan¬

.

®0mmerciaX and ipttscellaueows Heins
and

General

Dry
Goods.

Total

Imports

1884.

Balances.

Date.

Receipts.
$

Apr. 11.
“

13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

“
“
“

“

Total...
♦

615,390 29
1,133,294 75
927,677 19
694,607 31
756,830 69
740,014 y2
4,857.815 15

Payments.
$
781,366
1,300,750
1,596,809
1,131,409

Coin.

24
94
76
56

$
$
142,246,229 82 23,045,340 57
143,241,4)8 63 22,882,615 57
141,599,299 03 22,8 i5t683 60
111,144,880 67 22.8' 3 292 71

*1,171,979 65 140.822,173 62 22.770,856 80
976,229 78 140,073,769 83 22,083,045 71
6f95«,545 93

Includes $ LOO,000 gold certificates

-•

Shares.
Corn Exchange Bank....160*4

Imp. & Traders’ Nat. Bk.252%
Nat. B’kof the Republic.. 110
Nat. Bank of Commerce. 148%
Metropolitan Nat. Bank. 20%

11
18 Amer. Exnh. Nat. Bank.121
17 Com Exchange Bank.... 160
117
30 Home Insurance Co
33 Imp. & Traders’ Nat. B’k.251%
100 Metropolitan Trust Co...110

13
84
15
8
12
5
ll
36
30

Greenwich Ins. Co
256
Amer. Ex. Nat Bai k—120*4
Bank of North America. 100
U. B. Trust Co
435
Long Island Fns. Co
105
Bank of the State of N.Y.103
Fnhon Nat. Bank
116
Bank of Manhattan Co... 144%
1st Nat.B’k of Utica N Y.148
Con Gaslight Co. of N.Y. 8 3 St
Jefferson Ins. Co
125%
Nat. Fire Ins of Hrtfrd .119%
iEt 'a Fire Ins of Hrtfrd.224%
S andard Fire Ins. Co
94

45
7
40
20
40
200 Chrysolite Silver Minjl 41 lot
200 Con. BatooilasMin.pref.$76 lot
400
do
do
common..$30 lot

4,500 Iron &8ilver Min.95c. persh.
5o0 Alice Min’g Co.. $1 8*> per sh.
lOo

Barney Dump’g Boat Co.

15

148%
21 Bank of Commerce
10 Kankof New York
166*11
60 N. Y. A Texas Laud Co.. 131
50 Jefferson Fire Ins. Co....118%
20 U. S. Trust Co
467

-

taken out of cosli.

Auction Sales.—The following were sold at
by Messrs Adrian H. Muller & Son.
68
27
19
20

Currency.

auction lately

Shares.
50 Central Trust Co
50 Hayward Rubber
20 Or.ental B oik
Bonds.

313-314

Co

40
148411

$500 City of Savannah 5s, due
1909
$210 Jefferson Ins. Co.

88

scrip. 40

$3,0<>0 Louisville Water Co.
of L’viLe, Ky., 6s, due ’89..107
$1,0, 0 Cin. Rieh. A Chic. HR.
C >. 78. due July 1. 1895
108%
$1,000 Lehigh A Wilkesbarre
7s
Coal.Co.
con., due 1900. 94%
$50 Ches. A Ohio JRR. Co. 1st
pref. scrip
8
$3,850 Texas & Pacific HR.
inc. land grant bond scrip. 31!
$1,000 Barney immp'g Boat
Co 6s, due 1880
70
$1,000 Cedar Falls A Minn.
RR Co. Ist7s, due 1907...114
$ LOo Hobokeu City 7s Volun¬
teer bountv b’d. due 18*7..104
$4,000 Charlotte Col. A Aug.
RR. Co. 2d 7s, due 191
91
$12,000 Cldc. Cin A l/ville
RR. Co. 1st 7s, due 18<7... 94%
$1,000 Iuteruat. A Great No.
RR. Co. 2d 6s. due 1909.... 66%
$12,000 N.Y.A Ter. Land ser. 51%
$15,000 The Freehold A N Y.
RR. Co. 7s due July 1, ’n8.
July, 1*8 !, coupons o t $100U>*

$7.0U0Clevela» dCity 7s Park
107% Ain*.
bds., due 1887

%iiz Hauliers7

(Jiaxetle.

Prime bankers’sterling
Prime commercial

Per
cent.

Railroads.

When

Books Closed.

Payable.

{Days inclusive.)

5

May

Railway <fe Nav. (quar.)...
Bt. Louis Alton & T. H. pref
Bt. Paul Miun. A Man (quar.)

1%
4%
1%

June

May

1
1
1 April
1 April

pacific Mali (quar.)

1%

May

1

Oregon

Miscellaneous.
NSW

The Money

YORK,

May

26 to June 1
19 to May 1

April 23 to May 1

P. M.

Situation.—Both the

4
4
4
5

Amsterdam (guilders)
Frankfort or Bremen (reichmarks)

86%
84%
83%
21%
40%
94%

4 88%

5 20

40%
95%

Coins.—The following are quotations in gold for various coins:
84 84
3 85

Sovereigns
Napoleons

FRIDAY. APRIL 17, 18S5-5

Market and Financial

bills on London

Documentary commercial
Paris (francs)

dividends have recently been announced:

Name of Company.

Sixty Days Demand.

April 17.

DIVIDENDS*
The following

473

THE CHRONICLE.

18, 1885.]

April

X X Reichmarks. 4 74
X Guilders
3 96

Span'll Doubloons. 15 55
.uex. Doubloons.. 15 55
F ne silver bars
Fine gold bars....
Dimes & % dimes.

..

«$4 87% Silver %s and %s.
3
4
4
®15
to\b

fS
to
to

90
78
00
75
65

—

Five francs

—

Mexican dollars..

—

Do uncommero’l.

—

Peruvian soles....

—

99\to par.
92 to — 94
84%9 — 85
«3%*> — —
77% 9 — 78

English silver.... 4 78 to 4 84
84 to — —
par.
— 99% 9
par»% pram.

1 07%®
—

99\to

1 08

U. 8. trade dollars
U. 8. silver dollars

par

United States Bonds.—The government bond market con tinues without feature of interest, and dealings have been on a
limited scale, though prices are strong and have

and Stock Exchange presented a more
advanced,
especially
for
the
four
per
cents.
animated appearance early in the week, when operators availed
The closing prices at the N. Y. Board have been as follows:
themselves of the warlike news to push up the prices of their
April
Interest April April April
16.
17.
Al?‘ April
14.
ipecialties. Afterwards the whole aspect of affairs in London
il.
Periods.
became more pacific and the price of wheat in our markets
*112% *112% *112% *112%
reg. Q.-Mar. 112% *112%
4%s, 1891
*112% *112% *1)2% *112%
dropped sharply, while stocks also drooped and receded some¬ 4%s, 1891
coup. Q.-Mar. *112% *112%
121% 121% 121% 121%
48,1907
reg. Q.-Jan. 121% 121%
what from their highest prices.
121% *121% 121% 121%
*121%
*121%
4s, 1907
coup. Q.-Jan.
101% 101% *101% *101% *101%
101%
Q.-Feb.
In stocks, however, there were some new points which held 3s, option U. S—reg.
*125
*125
1*127
125
*125
*125
6*,cur’oy, *95
reg. J. & J.
•129
*127
*127
127
*127
*127
J.
J.
A
up certain stocks, and thus influenced in a degree the whole
6s,our*oy, ’96—reg.
*131
*129
*129
Kl29
*129
*129
J.
&
J.
’97
reg.
*133
*131
*131
*133
market.
The new proposition for adjustment between the 63,our’cy,
*133
J.
&
J.
6s,our'cy, ’98—reg.
*133
*135
*133
*134
*134
J.
A
J.
Pacific railroads and the Pacific Mail Company was an un¬ 6s.nr»r*ov. ’99.. .resr.
This is the price bid at the morning board; no sale was mad*.
expected one to the market, and if carried out would be an im¬
State and Railroad Bonds.—The sales of State bonds were
portant negotiation. Also the coal situation has developed some limited to $4,000 North Carolina consol. 4s at 86$; $3,000
points of strength in the large distribution of the first three Louisiana consols at 75$; $16,500 Tennessee compromise
months of the year and reduction in stocks since the 1st of bonds at 54, and $1,000 North Carolina 6s, Chatham Railroad
January. Railroad traffic at the West has also been heavy, and issue, at 2$.
The railroad bond market has been quite active and generally
except for low rates on the trunk lines, profits would be
strong, some conspicuous advances having occurred, while a
•atisfactory.
few issues have been weak.
West Shore 5s developed consid¬
The Union Pacific annual report, just out to-day, is a docu¬ erable weakness after the stormy meeting of bondholders Mon¬
ment worth noticing, as one of the most complete railroad day evening, but have since reacted a little and close at 29$,
against 29$. The various issues of Missouri Kansas & Texas
reports ever issued by any company. Mr. Adams has now bonds
have advanced quite sharply; the general mortgage 5s
opened to the stockholders a mine of information about their close at 58, against 55$; do. 6s at 72f, against 70; consol. 7s
property never before explorable by them, and in the long run at 105$, against 105; Erie 2ds close at 54$, the same as last
the stock of this company, as of other large corporations, Friday; Atlantic & Pacific incomes at 15$, against 14$;
& Wilkesbarre consols at 95$, against 92$; Texas &
ought to be worth about 20 per cent more to hold, if its affairs Lehigh
Pacific Rios, coupon off, at 50, against 47$; Metropolitan
can always be open for inspection, than if it had a secretive
Elevated lstsat 108$, against 107$; New Jersey Central consol,
management, from which the true state of the company could assented, coupon off, at 99, against 96; Chicago & Eastern Illinois
consol, at 100, against 96$, and Midland of New Jersey firsts at
never be clearly ascertained.
82,
against 78.
Rates for call loans during the week on stock and bond
Railroad
and Miscellaneons Stocks.—The buoyant tone
collaterals have ranged at $@3$per cent, and to-day at 1@3$
given to the market the latter part of last week by the news of
per cent. Prime commercial paper is quoted at 3$@4$ per cent*
impending war in Europe was continued, and prices were
The Bank of England weekly statement on Thursday showed strong
with an upward tendency during most of the week,
with only slight reactions, the market closing at a material
a gain in specie of £278,000, and the percentage of reserve to
liabilities was 48, against 47 last week; the discount rate improvement over the close of last week. This strength has
been due to a variety of causes, but partly to a determined
remains at 3$ per cent.
The Bank of France gained 29,986,000 effort of the bulls in certain stocks to force up prices, which
francs in gold and 1,126,000 francs in silver.
was rendered the more easy by the large outstanding short
The New York Clearing House banks, in their statement of
produce Exchange

*

interest.

April 11, showed an increase in surplus reserve of $1,279,275,
Union Pacific and Pacific Mail have shown the greatest
the total surplus being $48,405,125, against $47,125,850 the
activity, and advanced quite sharply after the meeting, when it
previous week.
was stated that the Pacific Mail directors had declared their
The following table shows the changes from the previous
dividend, and had agreed to join the Trans-Continental pool
week and a comparison with the two preceding years in the
provided the Pacific roads would abandon their China line of
averages of the New York Clearing House banks.
steamers in their interest.
This was accepted by the Street as
a
1883.
1884.
practical settlement of the difficulties, but when is was found
1885.
Differ’ncesfr’m
Previous Week.
that Central Pacific had not agreed to it, those stocks (Pacific
April 14.
ApHl 12.
Apinl 11
Mail and Union Pacific) reacted somewhat.
Loans and dls. $302,098,000 Dec. $659,100 $348,421,000 $310,222,600
Several other stocks have also been sharply advanced, the
53,062,800
63,364.200
luc.
1,570,900
10*1,055.300
Specie
16,496,800 most
9,700
14,339.400
10.963.500 Tnc.
Circulation
conspicuous of which were Manhattan consolidated and
Net deposits.. 354.415,100 Inc. 1,730,900 344,352,300 284,149,000
& Hudson, due principally to a slight squeezing of
Delaware
17,685,100
25,840,300
141,100
30.953,600 Inc.
Legal tenders.
the shorts.
Jersey Central also advanced on the prospects
[no. $432,725 $86,088,075 $71,037,250
Legal reserve $88,6)3,775 Tnc.
that
70,747,900
89,704,500
1,712,000
April
obligations
would be met.
137,008,900
field.
Reserve
The grangers have participated somewhat in the advance,
$3,616,425 df. $289,350
$49,405r125 Ino .$1,279,275
Surplus
being stimulated by a rise in wheat early in the week. ’Hie
Exchange.—The inquiry for sterling exchange is limited, Vanderbilts have at times shown some improvement, though
and the market continues very dull in tone, though the scarcity the strength in them has not amounted to much.
The market was treated to a little sensation this week when
of commercial bills caused an advance of $ cent in the posted
Mutual
Union Telegraph rose rapidly from 17 to 81, due to
rates on Monday, and to-day another advance of £ cent in
the
fact
that stock had been sold by various brokers on fraudu¬
bankers* 60-days’ sterling.
lent orders, and the stock could not be had for delivery as
To-day the rates on actual business were as follows, viz.:
Bankers’60 days’sterling, 4 85$@4 85$; demand, 4 87$@4 87f. there is little of the old stock of that company outstanding.
Cables, 4 88@4 88$. Commercial bills were 4 83@4 84. Conti¬ As there was apparently a conspiracy, the authorities of the
nental bills were : Francs, 5 21$ and 5 20 ; reichmarks, 94$ Stock Exchange ordered dealings in that stock to be temporarily
suspended.
@94$ and 95$; guilders, 40 @40$.
To-day, Friday, the market was dull, and prices generally
The following were the rates of domestic exchange on New
declined
in the morning, but in the last hour there was a firmer
York at the under-mentioned cities to-day : Savannah, buying
tone,
and
closing prices were in some cases near the best of the
4 premium, selling $ premium; Charleston, buying 8-16@$
day.
The
rumors of to-day included one of embarrassment in
discount, selling $ premium; Boston, 5@10 discount; New
Lake Erie & Western finances, and another that Mr. Garrett
Orleans, commercial, 125 premium; bank, 200 premium; St.
had had transferred to his name a considerable amount of
Louis, 100 premium ; Chicago, 50 premium.
Jersey Central stock.
The posted rates of leading bankers are is follows :




.

..

THE CHRONICLE.

474

EVol. XU

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES FOR WEEK ENDING APRIL. 17, AND SINCE JAN. 1, 1885.
HIGHEST AND LOWEST PRICES
STOCKS.

Saturday,
April 11.

Tuesday,
April 14.

Monday,
April 13.

Sales of
the Week

.

Thursday,
April 16.

Wednesday,
April 15.

Friday,
April 17.

(Shares).

37

*29%

37is
30%

36 7s

62
*36

36 7h
*29 Hi
*10

36%
10%

10%

36

35 34

36 34

32

31

3L%

5

4

4

36-% 38%
31
3234
*3%

912
7

8%

8%

37

Cedar Falls <fc Minnesota

10

10

*934

1012

Central of New Jersey
Central Pacific

35 *8

35 7s
32

35%
32
*4

62
37

62

*934

10%

10%

36%

*934

36%
”
10%

36

37%

35

36

313,

32%

31%
*3%

31%

*30

1,700

31

200

tft

31^
*3 *2
*8

lstpref....

Do

«,

912
*5

*135^ 13612

pref.

Chicago Rock Island & Pacific
Chicago St. Louis <fe Pittsburg.
A/U

I' ^ K-'X •

Chicago St. Paul Minn. & Om.

pref.

Do

7

*8

137

*15

2412
84i2

*30

33

*15

2412
85

i*4(j

*15
*24
84 34
*30

19

2412
85 !4

25
85

85

33

*30

*15

36% Mar. 27
29% Jan. 31
934 Mar. 23

11

7
31

13% Mar 12
41% Mar. 9

Feb. 18
Mar. 25

7

84

84

84

1

150

6% Mar. 31
1 fi

1,675
2,622

*31%

1 7

Tun

105

-

Bast Tennessee Va. & Ga

pref.

Do

Green Bay Winona &
1H arl Am

1061*

»634

714

*3 3s

3^4

*5»4

6i4

*3

134

*87
*12

3i2

*12
126
*87
*12

89
13

13*2

1312

Lake Shore

58 7s

603s

Long Island

7134
3114

72

Louisville & Nashville
Louisville New Albany <fe Chic.
Manhattan Elevated, consol...

78*2

WfAmphis <fr. FharloKton
*104
MA^mpnlifAn Rlnvut^il
Minhfgim Pmitral
Mil. T/. Shnrft.fr. Wfisfriij pref..
12
Vlifn^apnli!) <fr. St,. T,nni&
27
f)0
prof

17 7s

9114

New York Central & Hudson..
New York Chic. & St. Louis...

317s
80

15
*37
*106

6
48

3%
534

*3%
*534

*3

Sis

15

17
126
89
13

15

•

18%

9134

8814

8814

12 34

13

prof.

17 34

91%
122
*38

90%
*214
*512
88
12 7s
17 7s

6%

7

3%

3%

3%

6

6

6

*3
198
17
126

3%

126

126%

*12

13

200
14% 15%

58%

59%

58%

26%
82%

59%
71%
32%
26%
83%

71

71

71%
31

313s 31%
2534 2534
80% 85

126% 126%
85% 85%
12
12%
12% 12%
5834 59%
71% 713,

12%
834
58%
*71%
3°34

32
27
83%

31%
*26
83

3%
198
17
126

*25

12%
11

69%
72

31%

-

83%

10,846

40

200
956

56

100

629

15

39

39
*106
*55

40

40

40

40

59

*108
*55

40
*110

59

*

*

33%

59
33

12

12

17%

17%
91%

*30

1814

917s

91%
*6

12%
*27%

12%

17%

18%
933s

2%

6
88
13

5

*87 %
12 34

17 7s

*17 x4

8%

6 34

*li34

12%

*2%
5%

2%
5
89

89

12%

1234

18

234
5%
89
12 34

18

1234

*26%

18

18%

92%

93%

17%

92
*6

9

X

234

40
*110
56

*27

92

*121% 123% *121% 123%
40
39
39%
89
90%
907s
89% 90%

122
40

12%

.

122
39

27

4

30,349

39

1,200
51,446

*38

5%
*87%

9034
2a4
5%
88%

12%

12%

"2

6,031
190

39

90%

595
200

18%
93%
9

122%
89%

90%

2%
5%

2%
5%

88% 88 x4
12% 12%

8

18

320
800
443

2,040
600

8%

*6%

734

714
2D

*2

*7

•734

aw

Pacific.....*

1734
39;,a

pref

1734
403s

Ohio Central
Ohio <fc Mississippi

'8

21
17 34

3934
%

21

20

20

17%
40%

1734
39%

40

•y

%
13x4

14

1034

1034

12
13

12 %
13

1734

7%

7%

6

6

300
550

18

1,150
25,978

19

19
*17%
39 %

1734
40%

*17%
39%

1234

%
1234

*12

a4

18

*17 %
39%

40%

*%

%

3934

*%

%

13
10

'

•

ioi4

1,030

Peoria Decatur A Evansville..

117s

12

13 >2

13%

151.2

Philadelphia & Reading
Ptt.tahnrg Ft. Wayne ,fr fihie.

1534

1534

IO

11%

12%
......

16 % 16%
127 % 127 %

%

127 % 127 %

11%

12%

13
16

13

16%

11%
13%

■Rensselaer «fr,

140

Saratoga

16
128

1134
-12%

13%
16
128

16

12

13%
10

128% 128%

140 e

4,515
1,500
2,130
253

25

23%
*234

2312
3

22 34
2 34

234

22 34

*22 34

2%

*234

*22 34

23

‘3%

2%

2%

*2%

..

Oregon Improvement Co
Oregon Railway A Nav. Co
Pacific Mail
Pullman Palace Car Co

Quicksilver Mining Co

19 >2
33
82

19%

3314
*78

si

82

32%

32%

80 %

79%

81

62
22

Jan.
2
Jan. 16

11% Jan.
65

6

Jan. 15

11 Sc .Tan

a

27% Jan 15
On

.Tan’

as

Rfth

978
42%
*334
*10

54
*2

103i
83
80
17

89

8914

10%

10 Hi
43 %
4

44

412

90 *2
10 34

89

10x4
43%

443s
4

334

11

*10

55
3
10 7s
83

813s
17

64i2 65 7s
51 is 5214
115
115 »a
*3
5
*25^ 31
57
5814

55

55

1034

5 434
*2
11

84

84

84%

8II2
17is

8314

1034

6634
517s
115

-

89 34

89%
10%
44%

8934

*88

10%

11

10%

43%

4734

46 %

11

io

4
11

5434

54

84%

*2
*10
83

3:’4

3
11

rr

81%

83%

82 34

26%

26%
66%
53%

28%
66%
62%

2%

90

10%
47%
3%

200
200

67

7s

66%
51%

*114
115
*4
*4
512
*26
*2512 31

85%

83 34

*2

3

10%

500

84

84
84 a4

3,130

Do
pref....
Western Union Telegraph
5712 6814
EXPRESS.
*133
Adams
135
*133
135
American
91i2 9112
91is 913s
United States
54% 54%
5414 64 34
*110
Wells, Fargo A Co
110i2*109i2lll

57%

*4
30

67 34

5%
30

*25%
57

59%

13334 13334 *133
92

92

*54

65

110% 110%

135
92
55
110% 110%
92
*53

700
67

53%

67
55%

*■114% 115%

*4

*25%

5
30

*25%

58%

59

57%

133% 133%
*91% 92
*53
111

55
111

15,325
1,100

*4

135

92

54%
*109

6
30

58%

T?fth

135
92

54%
111

12
16
90

37%
30
5

67%

9%

15
28

fi lo

17

*

35

16%

33

33

8634 133%
6% 25%
52
8
434
30

82

8%
14%
51

3%

8%

14

28

26

59% 104%
62
78%

61%

22%

35
64% 79
24
10
40
23
105
85
10

94%

5134

4434
18%
'86%

31

7%

1‘2

.Tn.n

175

Jan

634 Apr.
47c, T«in

15

20
71%
17
8
18
17%
Apr 15
184
2 182% Mar" 17 175
7
1634
14 12% Jan." 6
a
Vnh 98
6
13.
97
8
901
41i>
18
9r«3, Vftli 90
42
17
27
14
17 19% Feb. 26;
Mar. 16'
29 44
37% 57%
1
4%
l31Jan
2
31
19
Jan 14]
14% 25 7a
1134
12
51 nr T 0
5
91
8 3. 24
16
Jan 15|
fi

Jan.

36% Jan.

% Mar

10% Apr. 8
12% Jan. 22
13% Mar. 30
1 1 (flo

~

1 7

’

;Tan

8

14% Jan! 2
15% Feb. 271
19

Jan.

1 981.-,

O 199

Afar

1 a<tIn Tan

30

“

Anr

Af

ar

2
1 7*

90*

90 142% Alar 13

2% Jan

“

17!

9*

6%
7

34%
17%

16% 60%
119% 135
138

2%

146%
5
61

44% Jan 19

54

19
Jan
2
2% Mar. 11
17
Jan
2

2f5% Mar. 11

32
12

M ar. 6
Feb 20

14

24

Feb. 26

18

Feb. 95

11%
24%

50
96
29
60
96%

4

Feb

Mar

79% Apr. 15
Feb

26

77% Feb
7
7934 Jan. 2
9% Apr. 8
41
Mar. 21
2% Apr. 16
10
Apr. 15
10
51
8
80

Mar 28
Jau. 27
3
Jan.
Mar 21

66% Jan. 22
14% Mar. 21
21

-Tan.

a

8

87% Jan. 10
24
Feb. 27
80% Mar. 18!
90% Mar. 10!

13% Feb. 26
51% Feb. 10
5% Jap. 7
14

Jan. 12

11% Mar. 26
Mar. 11
56
4
Jan.
8
1334 Feb. 24
94 34 Mar. 12
86% Apr. 15
31
34

Apr. 13
Feb. 20
Jan. 10

5934 Jan. 29 73
4634 Mar. 21 62% Mar. 9
638 107 % Jan. 2 115% Apr. 11
4 % A pr.
43* Mar. 30
7
30

60 130
Jan.
«71oTun
298
95
48 ” Jan!
240 104% Jan.

70
15
65

32

16%

32%
90

76%
5%

99

28
4
9

84%
1934

49
1
7

61%
12734

67

114

10

834

22%
32

17%

17%
65%

60% 112
31
57%
90

3»4

117

0%

30 " Jan. 30
63 34 Feb. 10

20
49

2 135

Jan. 28

a1

Tun

13

125
87

187
102

Apr.

~7

45
98

115

Jan. 30

53% Jan.

1%
70

1,485
184,920

63,445

8
11

'

90

2% Mar. 19

10%

58*4
k'ttI

17
29% Feb 20
9% 23
14% Jan. 22 18% Mar. 3
63% 100%
89% Mar. 21 97% Feb. 10
9% Feb 25
6% 13
7% Jan
7
11434 Jan. 2 122% Apr. 16 115 127%
58
30
33
Jan.
7 42% Feb. 27
84% Jan. 19 95% Feb. 25
83% 122%
4
10%
5% Jan. 8
134 Mar. 31
4
Mar. 25
7% 20
934 Feb. 17
83
94
89
84% Jan. 2
Apr. 15
11% 28%
11% Feb. 2 14 34 Jan. 6

1,415
3,700
226,700

*2
*10

56

Feb"

90

3
11
84
86 x4

25
31
27
20

3434 Feb 26

*89

1,530

2

sn

100

5534

cm

50 39
243.

200
24 185
20
61
14
140
14 110
17
70
86
9
20%
24
fi
% 19*4
21

93 34 jan ‘ 30
64 % Feb 24

80

51%

3

9

80

54
3
11
84

54%

67% Feb!
73% Mar.
33% Feb.
27% Feb.
85
Apr.
15% Mar

3934 Jan.

630

19

AT nr 90

9

54

56

Mar.

31% Apr.

64%

llfilo

8
fi9

555
59

31

62

FAh

4% Mar. 10

*30
*78

11

28%

fifi

91

1,300

97

Jan. 15

6

10% 10%
45% 46%
2%
2%

97

10

2

*10

2834

.Tan

18

11

28%
67%

90

20% Jan!

11

83%
84%

Feb. 25

13

21

*88

VaV»

430

*18

19%
33%

2%

10

25
80
20
33
82

*

*17
32 ’2
*78

23

1 QIC

80%

9

29

19
25

v.O 1
•

Do
pref..
Do
1st pref.
Bt. Paul & Duluth
Do
pref
Bt. Paul Mlnneap. A Manitoba
Texas A Pacific
TJnion Pacific
Wabash St. Louis A Pacific
Do
pref.
MISCELL 4 NEOUS.
American Dist. Tel
American Tel. A Cable Co
Bankers’A Merchants’Tel....
Colorado Coal A Iron
Consolidated Gas Co
Delaware A Hudson Canal
Mutual Union Tel

10

134 Feb 28

Bt. Louis Alton A Terre Haute
Do
pref.
Bt. Louis & San Francisco*.

6

58% Apr. 15

190

Rich. & Alleg., stock trust ctfs.
Richmond A Danville
Richm’d & West P’ut Terminal
Rochester A Pittsburg
Rome Watertown A Ogdensb’g

8

Jan

14.7a Af :ir

12%

126

11634 Mar. 14 100% 126%
9
6
Mar. 6
13%

234Jan. 15
4% Jan. 23

777
600
300

-

Oregon Short Lino
Oregon & Trans-Continental...

Anr

200
3
Jan. 6
3%Jan.
111 190% Jan 20 200
Mar.
740
14
Jau.
Mar. 26 30
735 119% Jan. 17 127
Mar.
20
84
Jan 16 88% Feb
589
11% Jan. 19 14% Feb.
4,050
17
Feb

26
85

High

14YUj
118
125% Mar. 14 107
127%
76% Jan. 12
58% 94%
108
Mar. 27
95% 119
9834 Apr. 13 81% 124
134
Feb. 26 117
149%

Q

6% Apr.

800
200

123,210
1,297
12,150

1 fi

82% Jan. 22 109% Mar. 9

'

-

Western, prof

Do

*2%

3

*12
15%
126
126
*86
90
12
12
12 34 13

Newport Sns([. ,fr. Western
Northern

*3%
*5a4

334
6%

3

3%

27 D

”5%

pref.

N^W^ork <fr, Now England
PfflwYnrk Now 11 a von ifr, Hart;.
New York Ontario & Western.

■Norfolk .fr

7

200,653
2,455

S7D Tan

12ift

122
*38% 40
89 7s 90 7s
*2 is

New York Lack. <fe Western...
New York Lake Erie *fe West’n
Do

3%
6 34

3%

59is 6014
7114 72
3112 31%
2512 26
80is 8012

*120

Nashv.Chattauooga & St.Louis
Do

3is

17

T.akft KtHa A WftfttftTO

Kansas & Texas
Pacific
Ohio
Essex

6 34

106%

55

3%
*534

125i4l25i4

Indiana Bloomingt’n & West’n

7

10834 107% 105

200
*12

Houston & Texas Central
Illinois Central

Missouri
Missouri
Mobile &
Morris &

7

48

St. Paul.

106 x4 1073s 106% 108%
7
6%
7%
6%

106% 107

.Tun

Low.

21% 38%
91% Feb. 25
8034 100
A nr
7
38
Rfth 94
28
69%
Jan. 31 140% Apr. 11 125% 141

•14. In .Tan

Delaware Lackawanna & W est.
Denver & Rio Grande

K

23% Apr. 17
82% Jan. 2
an

144

140

12% Feb. 26
137

10,018 115% Jan. 2
194,872
68% Mar. 25
2,695 102 Jan. 28
174,043
84% Jan. 2
1,783 11934Jan. 2
2,757 105 Jan. 2

12

Feh. 25
634 Feb 10

7

Apr.

Feh!

36

26% Jan. 33

450

122%

72
72%
106% 106%
96% 97%
132% 132%
114% 114%
*7
8%
*15
18%
23% 2334

19
24
85

2334

24%
853s

24%

100
210

9

121

.

19

7,265

Feb

*5

*14
24
84

18

23,985

6
133% 136%

*5

122% 123% 122% 123
72% 73%
72-4 73%
106% 106% 106% 106%
97% 98%
97% 98%
133% 133% 133% 133%
115
115% 114% 115%
*7
8%
8%
8%

140isl40i8

Cleveland <& Pittsburg, guar...

9

12312 12412 123 123%
72 34 733s
72*8 73%
707s 72%
105
103
106
106
106
106%
97 7e 9834
97 34 98%
95^4 97 34
133
133
13212 133
132% 132%
114
115
11412 115
115%
13*5%
8
0
9
*712
812
*6%
121% 124%

Chicago Burlington & Quincy.
Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul
Do
pref.
Chicago & Northwestern
Do

136

*5 *4.

9
*5

*3%
*8%

Highest.

9 130
Mar 21
Mar 25 Ofla, RftTi’ a
Feh
4
Feb
4 65

124
88
19
57

62
37
31

*29%

30%

Lowest.
•

RAILROADS.

For Full
Year 1884.

Range Since Jan. 1,1885.

2

Q3

21

55
2 111

Anr. 16

34

78%

61%

INACTIVE STOCKS.

Atchison Toueka A Santa Fe..

67 % Mar 20 78
147 ” Jan. 29 152

Chicago A Alton, pref
Cincinnati Saudusky A Cleve..

Columbus Chic. A Ind. Centr’l

22

*%

1»2

*%

1*2

1%

Danbury A Norwalk

*%

1»4

*%

1%

1% Mar. 10
pO
.Tan. H

Keokuk A Des Moines
Louisiana A Missouri River...
New York Elevated

22% Mar.

*123

*123

Virginia Midland
Canton Co

135

135
46

Consolidation Coal
Homestake Mining Co

46

135

Standard

122

.Tan. 22

100

15
40

Jan. 10
Feb. 13
Feb. 9
Jan. SO

19
10

.




•

7% Apr.

„

Mining....T

These

are

the prices hid

100

18is 18is

and asked;

no

sale was made at the Board.

4

22

Maryland Coal."

New Central Coal
Ontario Silver Mining

Feh.27

fi

0 ”Feb. 7
17
Feb. 7
1% Mar. 20

62
8
.Tan.
Mar. 19 142

2234 Feb. 27
l%Feb. 5
50

.Tan.

8

6
26
135
18
46

Feb. 17
Mar. 17

20

Feb. 27

Apr. 17
Mar.

3

Apr. 15

IO3!* Mar. 10
8 " Mar. 25
7

Feb. 25

18% Apr. 11
1% liar. 26

80%

162 "
23% 24
2
1
50
50
5
5
19% 24
130
115
21
15
39% 40
23%
18
11
8
IS
7
10
5
20
14

1M

7%

April

THE CHRONICLE,

18, 1885.]

APRIL. 17, 1885.

QUOTATIONS OF STATE AND RAILROAD BONDS,
STATE

Ask.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

90

87
102
85
106

Alabama—Class A, 1906.
Class B, 6s, 1906
Class 0,48/1906

68,10-908,1000....

Bid.

Louisiana—7s, eons.,1914

74

Ex-matured coupon....
Missouri—6s. 1886

ioF

15
15

8

BONDS.

Ask.

SECURITIES.

Bid.

Ask.

Del. L. it W.—Contin’dMorris it Essex—1st, 7s.

Railroad Bonds.
(Stock Ex-change Prices.)
Ala Central—1st, 6s, 1918

Alleg’y Cent.—1st, 6s, 1922
Atch.T.&S.Fe—4 Has, 1920
Sinking Fund, 6s, 1911.
65
70
Atl. & Pac.—1st, 6s, 1910.
117
Balt.it O.—1st, 6s,Prk.Br.
Bur.C. Rap. & No.—1st, 5s 107%'108
96
Consol., 1st, 5s, 1934
135
Minn.itSt.L.—lst,7s,gu.*
Ia. City & West.—1st, 7s *112
C. Rap. I.F.& N.—1st, 6s 107
96
1st, 5s, 1921
40
Buff.N.Y.&P.—Cons.,6s *30
General, 6s, 1924
Can. So.—1st, int. guar. 5s
98 Ha 99
69
2d, 5s, 1913
68
Reg., 5s, 1913
102
Central Iowa—1st, 7s,’991 *100
East. Div.—1st, 6s, 1912 *58
IU. Div.—1st, 6s, 1912.. *50
Char. Col. & Aug.—1st, 7s.
Chesapeake & Ohio—
Pur. money fund. 1898.. 109
6s, gold, series A, 1908.
64
64%
6s, gold, series B, 1903
17% 18%'
6s, currency, 1918
*
i
86
Mortgage 6s, 1911.
...

Ches.O.&S.W.—M. 5-6s...

67

118%
La. & Mo.

Riv.—1st, 7s
2d, 78,1900

*121
*121

St. L. Jack. & Chic.—1st

116

1st, guar. (564), 7s, ’94
2d, (360), 7s, 1898
2d, guar. (188), 7s, ’98
Miss.R.Br’ge—rbt,s.f.6s
Chic.Burl.& Quincy—
Consol. 7s, 1903
5s, sinking fund, 1901..
5 s, debentures, 1913....
Ia. Div.—S. fd., 5s, 1919
Sinking fund, 4s, 1919
Denver Div.—4s, 1922..

116

125

....

Plain 4s, 1921
C.R. I. & P.—6s, cp., 1917.
6s, reg., 1917
Ext. &

132
104

107%

Col., 5s, 1934....

106

1st,cons.assent.'78,1899t
Conv., assented, 7s, 1902
Adjustment, 7s, 1903...
Conv. debent. 6s, 1908..
Leh.&W.B.—Con.g’d.as.

99
99
105

South Carolina-

Os, Act Mar. 23, 1869 >

non-fundable, 1888. i
1893 107 Ha 108 Ha
46% 48 Ha
Tennessee—6s, old,1892-8
Brown consol’n 6s,

6s, new, 1892-8-1900

.

„

_

90

129%

1*08

1
|

!

......

.

118
!
121
122%
i
3 17
1
127
122
Consol. 7s, 1905
123%
i
1st, 7s, I.it I). Ext..1908 120
120
ii2 j
1st, S. W. Div., 6s, 1909. *111
*111
99
1st, 5s, LaC.itDav.,1919
lst.S. Minn. Div. ,6s, 1910 111%
j
120 j
119
1st, H. it D., 7s, 1910
114%
Chic.it Pac. Div.Os, 1910
...

.

.

95

1st,Chic.it P.W.,os,1921
Min’l Pt. Div., 5s, 1910.
C.it L. Sup. Div. 58,1921
Wis.ife Min. Div.5s, 1921
Terminal 5s, 1914
Chic. A Northwest.—

Sinking .Fund, 7s, 1885.
Consol, bonds, 7s, 1915.j
Extension bonds, 7s, ’85

95%'
|

90 %!

102 V
i

1

1’.

96 Ha

Bid.

SECURITIES.
Penn. RR.—ContinuedPa. Co.’s 4Has,Reg., 1921

Pitts. Ft,W.& C.—1st,17s

139

7s

1912

Clev. & Pitts.—Con's*, s.f d.

4th,

2d, 6s, 1901

—

Rome W.&

80

IO8H1

Og.—1st,7s,’91 *108

74%
Con., 1st, ext., 5s, 1922.
Roch.it Pitt.—1st, 6s. 1921 107%
Consol.. 1st, 6s, 1922
—

Rich.it Alleg.—1st,7s,1920
Rich.it Danv.—Cons.,g.,6s
Debenture 6s, 1927

Scioto

Val.—1st,

St. L. it Iron

cons.,

7s.

75 %

**5*4*

100

Atl.itCh.—1st, nr.,7 s,’97 *iio‘
*82*2
Incomes, 1900
*

101
64

85"

65
112 % 113
109

Mt.—1st, 7s.
£d, 7s, 1897
Arkansas Br’ch—1st, 7s 10*9**; 110*9
Cairo «t Fulton—1st, 7s. 107
Cairo Ark & T.—1st, 7s. 104Ha 10*5* “
72
Gen. r’y & 1. gr., 5s, 1931
St.L.Altomt T. H.—1st,7s ii'a*
2d, pref., 7s, 1894

2d, income, 7s, 1894

102%
103
135

130%

fd.. 6s, 1892

2d, 7s, 1898
2d, guar., 7s, 1898
Pitts.B.&B.—1st, 6s, 1911
Pitts. Cleve.it Tol.—lst,6s *107
Pitts. June.—1st, 6s, 1922

134 Ha
134 Ha1

Deb., 5s, 1904
Hud.Riv.—7s,2d,s. f.,’85
Harlem—1st, 7s, coup
1st, 7s, reg., 1900
N.Y.Elev’d—1st, 7s, 1906
N.Y.P.ifeO.—Pr. l’n, 6s,’95
N.Y.C.itN.—Gen.,6s,1910
Trust Co. receipts

s.

140
140

136
129
125

St.L.V.&T.H.—1st,g.,7s 118

105
105

N. Y Central-68, 1887...
Deb. certs., ext’d 5s
N.Y.C.& H.—1st, cp., 7s
1st, reg., 1903

*97

118%

2d, 7s, 1912

—

Ask.

Pitts. C.&St.L.—1st, c. ,7s
1st, reg., 7s, 1900

3d

Coupon, 5s, 1931

Registered, 5s, 1931

..

110

! iio"

!

2d, 5-6s, 1909
F.astern Div.,

72%

>

6s, 1921.. !

ndianap.D.itSpr.—1st,7s j
1st, 7s, ex fund, coups. |
1

2d, 5s, 1911

iiv:
'73%*
55

*75"
85

103*8

—

*99

101

Bellev.it So. Ill.—1st, 8s, *112
St.P-Minn.«t Man.—1st,7s* 111

78

Int.&

122

..

..

.

..

.

No prices Friday; these are latest quotations

made this week.

«■

Railroads—
Central Pac.—Gold 6s

Joaquin Br.—6s

129%

ib*<T
117”
100
81

90%

90

*82%
69
75

79%
82

*9*0%

92%

101*4 102

1 Pacific

..

111% 112%

St.Chas.Rge.—1 st.Os

105

100
1

5s. 1907

110*4

1st, consol., 6s,1919.
C.Br.U.P.—F.c.,7s,’95
At.C.&P.—1st,6s,1905
At. J. Co.it W.—1st, 6s
Oreg. Short-L.—1st, 6s
Ut. So.—Gen.,7s, 1909
Exten., 1st, 7s, 1909
Mo. Pac.—1st, cons., 6s.
3d, 7s, 1906
Pac.of Mo.—1st, 6s...
2d, 7s, 1891
St.L.it S F.—2d,6s, Cl. A
6s, Class C, 1906
6s, Class B, 1906
1st, 6s, Pierce C. & O
Epuipment, 7s, 1895..
Gen’fmort., 6s, 1931..
So. Pac.of Mo.—1st, 6s
Tex.&Pac.—1st, 68.1905
Consol., 6s, 1905 t
Income <t id. gr., reg..
Rio G., 6s, Aug. op. on
Do
ex Aug. cp.
—

Gen. mort. it Ter. 6s..

Pennsylvania RR.—

Pa.Co.’s gnar.4%s,lst,cp

t Coupons off.

110

,

109% 110%

Denv. Div.6s.a88.,’99

94

106

*92%

84% 85*
i*o*6*
*
95%

*105
93 %
*106%
*

32 %
*52%
48%
*44%

98%

101

I

I 82%
t 60

76%
111

80

jlll%

115%'117

*7*6%! *70%

INCOME BONDS.

(Interest payable if earned.)
Atl.it Pac.—lne., 1910....
Central of N.J.—1908

15%

15%

....

E.T.V.&Ga.—Inc.,6 s,1931
Gr.BayW.it St.P.—2d,inc.
Ind.Bl.itW.Inc.,1919

16

Consol., inc., 6s, 1921...
Ind%Dec.it Spr’p—2d,inc.
Leh. it Wilkesb.Coal.—’88
Lake E.& W.—Inc., 7s,’99

Sand’ky Div.—Inc.,1920

94% Laf.Bl.&Mun.-Inc.,78,’99

*90

94%
109%
104*4
*108
100
99%
99%

No. Missouri—1st, 7s..
West. Un.Tol.—1900, coup
1900. rog
N.W. Telegraph—7s, 1004

99%
108*4 Mut.Un.Tel.-S.fd,68,1911

No.U’way (C’al.)—1st, 6s 103 I....
93%' 94
So. Pac. of C’al.—1st, 6s.
So. Pac. of Ariz.—1st, 6s
So. Pac.of N.Mex.—1st,6s *93%::::
Union Pacific—1st, 6s.. 113%113*4
Land grants, 7s, ’87-89 105*4 106
Sinking fund, 8s, ’93.. 118%
118
119%
lteg., 8s, 1893
Collateral Trust, 6s...

Kans.Pac.—1st, 6s, ’95
1st, 6s, 1896

St.L.K.C.it N.—R.e.,7s
Omaha Div.—1st, 7s.

Clar’da Br.—6s, 1919

103

..

|

I

Cal. & Oregon—1st, 6s
Cal. <t Or.—Ser. B., 6s.
Land grant, bonds, 6s.
West. Pac.—Bonds, 6s..

Do

126
116
116

1

Evans. Div.—1st,6s,1920
’eoriadi Pek. U’11—lst^Os.

San

—




iio'

2d, 7s, 1913

Jack.Lan.it Sag.—6s,’91
Milw.it No.—1st, 6s, 1910

85
87
124Ha
107 *e
102 103
105
107 Ha
114 114*4

1st, 7s, 1885
Coupon, gold, 7s, 1902..
Regist’d, gold, 7s, 1902.
Sinking fund, 6s, 1929..
Sink, fund, 6s,1929,reg.
Sinking fund, 5s, 1929
Sink, fund, 5s, 1929, reg
112%
Cleve. P. »t Ash.—7s
Buff.it Erie—Newbds,7s 119
Sink’gfd. deb., 5s, 1933.
97 Ha’ 98%
25 years deb. 5s, 1909
Kal. & W. Pigeon—1st
96% 97
Escanabait L. S.—lst.Cs
Det.M.it T.—1st,7s,1906
Des M.ifeMiu’ap.—1st,7s
Lake Shore—Div.bonds. 120
Iowa Midland—1st, 8s.. 124** 130
Consol., coup., 1st, 7s. 128
125
*115
Peninsula—1st, conv.,7s
Consol., reg., 1st, 7s
*125
i*30
Chic.it Milw’kee—1st,7s *125
Consol., coup., 2d, 7s.. 115*4
Win.* St. P.—1st, 7s,’87i 106%
Consol., reg., 2d, 7s... 115
106
126
2d, 7s, 1907....
126 128
Long Isl. RR.—1st, 7s,’98 120
105
Mil. <&M ad.—1 st,6s,19051
1
1st, consol, 5s, 1931
Ott. C. F.it St. P.—lst,5s 10114 101 Ha Louis. West.—lst, 6s
Louisv. <t N.—Consol., 7s. *ii*6%
C.C.C.& Ind’s—1st, 7, s. fd 124
Cecilian Br’ch—7s, 1907 *90
Consol. 7s, 1914
80%
N.O.it Mob.-lst,6s,1930
Consol, sink, fd, 7s, 1914
65
General consol., 6s,1934 *95
100
2d, 6s, 1930
Chic. St. P. Min. & Om.—
E.H.&N.—1st, 6s, 1919. 100
Consol. 6s, 1930
General, 6s. 1930
112*4 112%
Pensacola Div.—6s,1920
C.St.P.&M.—lst6s,1918 120%
St.
L. Div.—1st, 6s, 1921 *96%
No. Wis.-lst, 6s, 1930
|
*42%
St.P.* S.C.—lst,6s,1919 117*4 H734
2d, 3s, 1980
Nashv.it Dec.—1st, 7s.. 119%
Chic.<& E.I11.—lst,8.f.,cur. 113
115
S.&N.Ala.—S.f.,6s, 1910 *
Consol., 1st, 6s, 1934
99
Louisv. C.& L.—6s, 1931
Chic.St. L.&P.—lst.con.5s
73% 78
80
Trust bonds, 6s, 1922...
Chic. A Atl.—1st, 6s, 1920
10-40, 6s, 1924
2d, 6s. 1923
L.Erie itW.-lst, 6s, 1919
Chio.it W.Ind.—1st. s.f.,6s
Gen’l mort., 6s, 1932
'105%
Sandusky Div.—6s, 1919
78
Laf.Bl.it M.—1st, 6s, 1919
Col.it Green.—lst,6s,1916
1
96
Louis v.N .A lb. A C,—1st, 6s
2d, 6s, 1926
'
General mort., 6s, 19t4.
CoLH.Val.it Tol.—1st, 5s
75 I 77
Lon. N. O. it Tex.—1st, 5s *00
Del. L.<t W.—7s, conv.,’92;
Manliat.B’ch
Co.—7s,1909
Mortgage, 7s, 1907
1 132 ,135
N.Y.&M.B’h—lst,7s,’97
Syr.Blng.itN.Y.—Ist,7s 126 I
.

59
128

*

122

Gt.No.—1st,6s, gold i 106% 107
66
102*8 103
Coupon, 6s, 1909
129*4
Kent’fey
Cent.—M.Gs,
1911
1
Stamped, 4 p. c., 1911
129*4
L.Shore-M.S.&NI.,s.f.,7s 103 *4
113
Cleve. it Tol.—Sink’g fd 102%
*
'112Ha
New bonds, 7s, 1886
102 i 103

102 Ha

Cent.—1st, 7s, 1911.
58
1st M., 7s, ex-cp.,6,7,& 8
Mich.Cent.—Cons. 7s, 1902 *127
107
Consol., 5s, 1902
6s, 1909

124% 125

113

3-65s, 1924
Registered
Funding 5s, 1899

....

-..7]

91%
90%

Ask.

Metrop’lit’n El.—1st,1908 108% 109*4
*97
2d, 6s, 1899

'

54

39
39
72
40
50
4

112
2d, 6s, 1909
114
Dakota Ext.—6s, 1910..
105
106
11834
1st, consol., 6s, 1933
116*8
1st, consol., 6s,reg.,1933
39
*40*
122
Min’s Un.—1st, 6s, 1922 d*0*8**
38
N. Y.L.E.<tW.-New2d6s *55
39% St.P.it Dul.—1st, 5s, 1931 *103
So. Car. R’y.—1st. 6s, 1920 102% 103
N.Y. & N. Engl’d—1st, 7s 114Ha
Collat’l trust, 6s, 1922.
105
2d, 6s, 1931
Buff.&S.W.—M.,6s,1908
!
1st, 6s, 1905
*9*5*
78*4
?8% Shenand’hV.—1st,7s,1909
Ev. &T. H.—1st, cons., Gs 103
!10334 N.Y.C.itSt.L.-lst,6s,1921
General, 6s, 1921
93 j 94 | 2d, 6s, 1923.
Mt.Vern’n—1st, 6s, 1923
53
N.Y.W.Sh.it Buff.—Cp.,5s
2*8%
Tex.Cen.—1st, s.f.,7s,1909
'
Fargo & So.—1st, 6s, 1924;
iat 7s ion
53
Fl’titP.Marq.—M.6s,1920j 112% 114 j Registered, 5s, 1931
53”
Toi. Del.& Burl.—Main, 6s
N.Y. Susq.it W.—1st, 6s.f
Gal. Har.it S.Ant—1st, 6s
100
I Debenture, (5s, 1897t...
99-8
2d, 7s, 1905
1st, Dayt. Div.. 6s, 1910
"""
91 **4 92Ha
82*' 82 *21 1st, Ter. trust, 6s, 1010.
Midland of N. J—1st, 6s
West. Div.—1st, 5s
N. O.—1st, 7s, 1905
Tex.it
110*4
2d, 6s, 1931
;N.Y.N.H.&H.-lst.,rg.,4s *109%
75
G r’ n Bay W. <t St. P.'—1 st .6s
Nevada Central—1st, 6s..
I
M Sabine Div.-lst,6s,1912
68
106
Gulf Col. & K.Fe-78,1909 *104
N.Pac.—G.l. gr.,lst, cp.,6s; 104Ha. 104%; Va. Mid.—M. inc., 6s, 1927
I
Wab.St.L.<t Pac—Gen., Gs
2d, 6s, 1923
---i*
*104
Registered, Os, 1921
Chic. Div.—5s, 1910
78*4
N.O.Pac.—lst,6s,g.,1920t
56
Iliiv. Div.—6s, 1910
Houston it Texas Cent.—
I
SNorf.it\V.—Gen., Gs. 1931] 90V 92
74
Tol
.P.
New
River—
itW.—1
7*6%
st.7
8,1917
1st,6s,1932 *
1st, M. L.,7s, 1891t
84 185
j 95
116
60
Iowa Div.—6s, 1921
73*4
1 Ohiot Miss.—Consol, s. I'd
1st, Western Div., 7s t..
Ind’polis Div.—6s, 1921.
Consolidated, 7s, 1898.. 116%
1st, Waco it No., 7sr— *72Ha
61%
2d consolidated, 7s,1911| 109% 110*4
Detroit Div.—6s, 1921..
2d, consol.,main lino, 8s *58
Cairo Div.—5s, 1931
1st, Springfield Div., 7s' 98%
2d, Waco it No., 8s,1915
62
1
Wabash—Mort.
Ohio Central—1st,6s,1920
7s, 1909
General, 6s, 1921
*30
40
108%
Tol.it W—1st, ext.,7s.
H oust.E.itW.Tex.—1st,7s
1st, Term’l Tr., 6s, 1920,
L.
Div.,
7s, ’89.
1st,
Min’l
1st,
St.
Div.,
6s,
1921
2d, Os, 1913
I 90 j
Ohio So.—1st, 6s, 1921
2d, ext., 7s, 1893
,
Ill.Cen.—Spd.Div.—Cp. Gs*113
i
I
Middle Div.—Reg., os.. 104
Kquipm’t bds, 7s, ’83.
Oreg’mt Cal.—1st,6s,1921 i
71 %‘ 75
Consol, conv., 7s. 1907
C.St.L.&N.O.—Ten.1.,7s -•
Or.itTransc’l—6s,’82-1922. 72% * 72%
81
Gt.West’n—1
st, 7s, ’88 105% 107
|
1
Oregon Imp. Co.—1st, OsJ
1st, consol., 7s, 1897.. 124 (126
91 |
2d, 7s, 1893
Oreg’11 RR.&Nav.—1st,6s 111*4 111%'
•2d, 68,1907
1
iio
Q.it Tol.—1st, 7s. 1890
Gold, 5s, 1951.1...
ioi 1
Han.it Naples—1st, 7s
Dub.it S.C.—2d Div.
j*115
103 I
Ill.it So.Ia.—1st,ex.,6s
Ced.F. & Minn.—1st

96 V

*9*7 1

Bid.

Mex.

I

46Ha
33%

,

|

1
Uh.M.it St.P.—lst,8s,P.D. 1 130
1
2d. 7 3-10s, P. D., 1898 1 118%
1st, 7s, $ g., R. 1)., 1902. 129*4 120%
1st, LaC. l)iv., 7s, 1893.
1st, I. it M., 7s, 1897
1st, I. it 1)., 7s, 1899....
1st, C. <t M., 7s. 1903..

46H>

...

SECURITIES.

140

Ask.

BONDS.

Ask.

!

121
96
114
113
115

....

95
Coupon, 7s, 1894
1st, 6s, 1884-1913
Registered, 7s, 1894
1st, Pa. Div., cp.,7s,1917 131
Mil.L.S.&W.—1st,6s,1921 103%104
133
Mich. Div.—1st, 6s, 1924 *100 ilOl
1st, Pa. Div., reg., 1917. 131
Alb. it Susq.—1st, 7s— *109 Ha 110 Ha Minn.it St.L.—1st,7s,1927 120 Ha1
Iowa Ext.—1st, 7s, 1909
*101 I
2d, 7s, 1885
2d, 7s, 1891
1st, cons.,guar.7s,1906 126 |131
S’thw.Ext.—1st, 7s,1910
1st, cons., gu., 6s, 1906 111 Ha' 112
Pac. Ext.—1st, 6s, 1921.
Rens. it Sar.—lst> cp.,7s *
140
M0.K.& T.—Gen’l,6s,1920
1st, reg., 7s, 1921
Denv.it Rio Gr.—1st, i900
90 % 91 *4
General, 5s, 1920
1st, consol., 7s, 1910
Cons., 7s, 1904-5-6....
50% 51 Ha
Den.So.Pk.&Pae.— 1st,7s.
65
75
Cons., 2d, income, 1911.
H. <t Cent. Mo.—1st, ’90
Den.itRioG.West.—1st,6s
39% 40
Mobile & Ohio—New 6s..
Det.Mack.&Marq.—1st,6s
55
Land grant, 3 Has, S. A...
Collater’l trust, 6s, 1892
1st, Extension, 6s, 1927
E.T.Va.&G.—lst,7s,1900t H3
1st, cons., 6s, 1930
47
48
Morgan’s La.it T.—1st, 6s
Divisional 5s, 1930t
92
1st,
7s, 1918
95
Nash.Chat.it St.L.—1st,7s
Eliz.C.itN—S.f.deb.,c.,6s

..

100
100
107
65
GO
94% 96
84

•

Construction, 5s, 1923
Canal—1st, 7s
1st, ext., 7s, 1891

Del.it Hud.

1st, 6s, 1920
Big Sandy—6s
1*2*3
Erie—1st, extended, vs...
2d, extended, 5s, 1919
3d, extended, 4 %s, 1923.
4th, extended, 5s, 1920.
5th, 7s, 1888
1st, cons., gold, 7s, 1920.
1st, cons., id. coup., 7s
Reorg., 1st lien, os, 1908
Long Dock b’nds, 7s, ’93
132%
Buff. N.Y.&E.—1st,1916

110% 111%

k

N.Y. Lack.& W.—1st, 6s

Eliz.Lex.it

100%
*107
94
*94
87
129

Keok. & Des M.—1st, 5s
Central of N.J.—1st, ’901.

Am.D’k&Imp.—5s, 1921

! 70

2d, 7s, 1891
Bonds, 7s, 1900
7s of 1871,1901
1st, consol., guar., 7s..

139
114

Wil.C.&Ru.R.

6s, 1919
Ohio—6s, 1886

Bid.

SECURITIES.

Os, new series, 1914
C’mp’mise, 3-4-5-08,1912
Virginia—6s, old
*86 Hi 87 Ha
6s, new, 1866
108 Ha 109 Ha
6s, consol, bonds
6s, ex-matured coupon.
6s, consol., 2d series—
6s, deferred
3%
Distriot of Columbia—

Consol. 4s, 1910

13

Bid.

18
3%

bonds, J.itJ., *99-8
Special tax, all classes..
1)0

SECURITIES.
Tennessee—Continued-

New

66

RAILROAD
SECURITIES.

Ask.

Bid.

N. Carolina—Continued-

6s, due 1889 or 1890.... no
Asyl’m or Univ., due ’92 116
-120
Funding, 1894-95
Hannibal <t St. Jo., ’86. 105
New York—6s, reg., 1887 106
113
6s, loan, 1891
115
6s, loan, 1892
117
6s, loan, 1893
N. Carolina-68, old. J.&J.
80
10
Funding act, 1900

8

4
Arkansas—6s, funded—
12
7s, L. Rook <t Ft. S. Isa.
12
7s, Memp.A L.Rock RR
12
78, L. R.P.B. * N.O. RR
12
78, Miss. O.&R.R. RR.
3
7b, Arkansas Cent. RR.
101
Georgia—6s, 1886
78.1886
104*4
110
7s, gold, 1890

SECURITIES.

475

95
111

100
100

Mil. L. Sh.<t W.—Incomes
Mob.it O.—lst,prf.,deben.

50

2d, pref., debentures—
3d, pref., debentures—
4th, pref., debentures...
N.Y.LakeE.&W.—Inc.,6s
Ohio Cent.—Income, 1920
Min’l Div.—Inc.,7s,1921
Ohio So.—2d inc., 6s, 1921
PeoriaD.A Ev.—Inc.,1920

23%

Evansv.Div.—Inc., 1920
Roch.&Pittsb.—Inc.,1921
Rome W. & Og.—Inc., 7s.

45

So. Car. Ry.—Inc.,6s,1931
St.L.A.it T.H.
Div.bds
FREE LIST.

94%
104% Cin.itSp.-l8t,C.C.C.«tI,7B

24%

34%
25

25%

1st, guar.,L. S.& M.S.,7s
ConBOl. Coal.—Conv.08,’97 104
Cum. & Penn.—1st, 6a,’91 *103
*103
2d, 6a, 1888
Col.C.&Ir.Co.—1st,con.,6s
Des M. & Ft. D.—1st, 6s..
Ft. W. <t Denv. C.—1st, 6s *63
99% Jefferson RR.—1st, 7, *89. *92

110

112%
105

65

THE CHRONICLE.

476

Quotations in Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore.

New York Local Securities.

[Prices by E. 8. Bailey, 7 Pine

Marked thus (*) are;
not National.

Par.

Exchange...
Broadway
Butchers’ A Drov’s’
Amor.

Central
Chase
Chatham
Chemical

American

160
121
245
146

100
100
25
25
100

America*

Exchange...
Bowery
Broadway
Brooklyn

Amer.

......

109*3 111^

Citizens’

100
150
2300
110
250
149
108
169

25
100
25
100
100
100

Citizens’

City
Commerce

Continental

100

Corn Exchange*....
East River

Fifth Avenue*

25
25
100
100

Fourth

100
100

Eleventh Ward*....
Fifth

Garfield
German American*.
German Exchange*
Germania*

Leather Manuf’rs’..
Manhattan*
Marine

Murray Hill*
Nassau*
New York
New York County

.

g.inth
Y. Nat. Exch....

.

• •

r

150
100
140
250
152
145

120
20

J efferson

129

Kings C’nty (Bkn.).
Knickerbocker
Long Isl’d (B’klyn)
Manufac. A Build.. 100
25
Mech. A Traders’

1*2*6
135
90

80

Nassau

(Bklyn.)

...

National
21

15

120
160
1*0
100

N.'Y. Equitable
N. Y. Fire

Niagara

North River

Pacific
Park
Peter Cooper

......

110

100

30 110
25 140
60 147
Pacific*
100 142
Park
25
People’s*
20
Phenix
50
Produce*
100 109
Republic
112
100
SuNicholas*
100 108
Seventh Ward
100 112
Second
100 127
Shoe A Leather...
State of New York* 100 104
100
Third
97
40
Tradesmen’s
60 165
Union
100
United States....
50
Wall street
100
West Side*

People’s
Phenix

North River*
Oriental*

Rutger’s

155

Standard

144

Star

...

112

120
125
30
230
245
80
100
108
85
50

60
100

117
120
55

205
90

100

112
50

105
40
70
55

50

50
100
50
100
50
50
145
37*0 80
35
140
70
100
-50
120
25
90
165
25
100
100
20
140
50
100
50
130
25
110
95
50
100
40

85
63

105
107
150
87
150
80
125
105

175
108

50
100
120
120
215

150
110

135
118
100
55
55
120
127
125
225

......

.....„

108

130

25
20

Brooklyn Gas-Light ...
Citizens’ Gas-L.(Bklyu)

Co., Brokers, 49 Wall Street.]

Rate

Period

250,000 A. AO.

Date.

Bid.

*

N’r 10, ’84 130
5
3
Jau. 1,’85 82
103
5
83
7*3 Jau. 1, ’85 145
110
1902
3

35,430,000
20
756,000 J.A* J*.
700,000 F.A.A..
1,000
100
3,500,000 Qnar. 2*3 Apr. 10,’85 128
103
1902
1000
1,500,000 MAN. 3
April, ’85 119
26
1.000,000 Var’s 2
Var’s
700,000 M.AN. 2*3 Nov. 1.’84 93
10
1,000,000 J. A J. 1*3 Mchl5,’85 79
400,000 M.AN. 3*3 Nov. 1,*84 105
1,000
Var’s
100,000 J. A J. 3 Oct. 1, ’84 98
50
1,000,000 Quar. 2*3 Jan.20,’85 135
106
1900
1,000,000 A. AO. 3
1,000
100

Jersey City A Hoboken.

Metropolitan—Bonds...
Mutual (N. Y.)
Bonds

Nassau (Bklyn.)

Scrip
People’s (Bklyn.)
Bonds

Bonds

Williamsburg
Bonds

100

Metropolitan (Bklyn.)..
Municipal—Bonds...
Fulton Municipal

1,000

100

...

Boui.s..............
100

Equitable
Bonds

1,000

*

1,000,000
750,000 M.AN
3,000,000
300,000 J. A J
2,000,000

1,000,000

A. AF

-

-

Jan. 1,’85 93
105
1888
3*3
3
Apr.15,’36 147
103
6
1900
107
1900
105
6

Ask.
131
84
105
85

il4
125

105
121
95
80
110

101
140
110

96
110

1st mort

Br’dway A 7th Av.—St’k.
1st mort
2d mort

100

1,000
100

1,000
1,000
10

Brooklyn City—Stock

1,000

1st mort

Bklyn. Crosstown—Stock
1st mort. bonds..
antral Crossiown—Stk.
Sashw’kAv.
(Bkln>—St’k
1st
mort

100

1,000
100
100

1,000
100

Cent.Pk.N.A E.Rlv.-Stk
1,000
Consol, mort. bonds
100
Ohrist’ph’rAlOtb St-Stk
1,000
Bonds
100
DryDk.E.B.A Bat’y—Stk

consol
Scrip
Eighth Av.—Stock
1st mort.,

Scrip
424 A Gr’nd

SLF’ry—Stk

1st mort

500Ac.
100
100
100
100

1,000
100
500
100

Houst.W.St.AP.F’y—Stk
1st mort
Second Av.—Stock
1st mort
Consol
Sixth Av.—Stock

1,000
1,000
100

1,000

1st luorif

100

Third Av.—Stock

1,000

Bonds

Twenty-third St..—Stock
*

Aina




coin mu shows

1

900,000 J. A J.
700,000 J. A J.
2,100,000 Q.-J.
1,500,000 J. A D.
600,000 J. A J.
2,000,000 Q.—F.
800,000 J. A T.
200,000 A. AO.
400,000 J.AJ.
500,000 Q.-F.
600,000 Q.—J.
250,000 M.AN.
1,800,000 Q.-J.
1,200,000 J. A D.
650,000 Q.—F.
250,000 A. AO.
1,200,000 Q.—F.
900,000 J.A D.
1,200.000 F.A A.
1,000,0001 Q.—J4
1,000,000 F A A.
748,000 Q.—F.
236,000 A. AO.
250,000 Q.-F.
500,000 J. A J.
1,862,000 J. A J.
400,000 M.AN.
1,050,000 M.AN.
1,500,000 M.A S.
500,000 J. A J.
2,000,000 Q.—F.
2,000,000 J. A J.

’85
% Jan.,
July. 1900
April 1,’85
June. 1904

2
5
5

7
Oct., 1898 110
2*3 Feb., ’85 190
7
June, ’93 114
6
Feb., 1914 104
2*3 Ap il 1/85 240
0
Feb.. 1914 105
4
April 1/85 245
7
April. ’93 112
2

7
5
5
7
5
7
6

7

100

600,000 F.A A. 4

nno

250 OOO M.AN.

last dividend on stock*,

24*4

112
169
104
102
1914
3*3 Feb.,
’85 214
6
Jau., 1802 108
4
April 1,’85 168
7
Jan., 1888 105
2
Feb.,
’85 162
1** Apri’i 1/85 155
Nov..1922 110
6
2
April 1/85 143
7
Dec., 1902 121
1*3 Feb., ’85 132

7

7

Feb.,
J uly,
Jan.,

’85 140
’94 111
*85 181

Income
Old Colony—7 s
6s
Pueblo A Ark.

Feb.,
May,

’90
’85
’90
’85
’93

20

§15

Rutland—6s, 1st
Sonora—7 s
STOCKS.

m

-m

m

mmm

§102

......

96

95

Cambridge

Chic. A West Michigan..
Cinn. Sandusky A Cleve.

Concord
Connecticut River
Conn. A Passumpsic .
Connotton Valley
Det. Lansing A No., pref.
Eastern, Mass
Fitchburg
Flint A Pere

Marquette

Preferred
Fort Scott

A Gulf...—

I55"

23

*96**
20

177e
116
160

9

Champlain

Rutland—Preferred
Summit Branch
Worcester A Nashua
Wisconsin Central
Preferred

10*4

12*13
15

Gap

l7i

41

preferred
preferred

1st

60
40

56

Preferred
Preferred

Preferred

25*3
113*3

Norfolk A Wes t’n—Com.
Preferred

172
105

Northern

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Philadelphia A Erie

North

54*1*
19

Phila. Ger. A Norristown
Phila. Newtown A N.Y..
Phila. A Reading
Phila. Wilm. A Balt
Pittsb. Cln.A St. L.—Com.

112*3

United N. J. Companies..

145
123
137

West Chester—Cons, pref
West Jersey
West Jersey A Atlantio..

116
193

CANAL STOCKS.

Lehigh Navigation

116*3
105

Pennsylvania
Schuylkill Nav., pref...

6s, P. B., 1896

8is

122

121*3
108
124
134
93
112

112 34

10534 107
120
114

119**
119*3
108
74 78

75*4
81
39
36

28*a
18

19
40

22

97%
120

101*3
79*4

80%

i*o*0%

71%

71
35

8%

pref

Inc

Balt.AOhio—6s,,’85 A. AO
Cen. Ohio.—6s, lst,M.AS.
Chari. Col. A
2d
Cin. Wash. A

40*3

Aug.—1st..

42

.

8%

Allegh. Val.—7 3-10s, ’96
7s, E. ext., 1910
Inc. 7s, end., coup., ’94
Ash tab. A Pittsb.—1st,0s

Del.—1st,6s,1902
2d, 6s, 1885
3d, 6s, 1887.
Bell’s Gap—1st, 7s, 1893.
1st, Os, 1905...
Consol., 6s, 1913
Buff. N.Y.A Phil.—1st,0s

13

ColumbiaA Greenv.—lsts

No.Central—6s. ’85, J.AJ.
6s, 1900, A. A O
119*8
68, gold. 1900, J. A J
5s, Series A
5s, Series B
Pittsb. ACou’ells.—7sJ A J
Union RR.—lst,gua.JAJ
Canton
8s...-.

103*3
no
100

95

......

1 Per share.

endorsed.

Virginia A Tenxu—5s

101

......

108%
81%
108
118

67
180

117

1*25*”

—

67%
195
130
122

5

49%

*13”

14

111%
111
83*3 83%

1003*
1063* 107%
107
90

23

9

120

l

57

2ds

RAILROAD BONDS.

113
106
106

Balt.—lsts. 101

2ds

3ds

41*3

114
123

BALTIMORE.

Parkersburg Br
50
64
50
Central Ohio—Com
50
54i*
Pref
1934 Western Maryland... .50
RAILROAD BONDS.
109 *s
Atlanta A Chari.—1st
61i*

115%

Pennsylv.—6s, cp., 1910.. ’*82*3
Schuylk. Nav.—lst,6s,rg. 107
82*4 84%
2d, 68, reg., 1907
RAILR’D STOCKS. Par
Atlanta A Charlotte....
100
Baltimore A Ohio
1st pref
—

193

i

Nav.—6s,reg..’84.

Mort. RR., reg.. 1897 ..
Cons., 7s, reg., 1911....

2d

603*

Central

220
112
176
112
167
160

8
15
61

60
50

Nesquehoning Valley

W. J erseyA Atl.—1st,6s,0.
Western Penn.—6s, coup.

Lehigh

126i*

Elmira A Williamsport..

1st, 7s. 1899
Cons. 6s, 1909

Gen., 7s, ooup., 1901
CANAL BONDS.
Ches. A Del.—1st, 6s,1886

20
64^9
51*3

Delaware A Bound Brook
East Pennsylvania

Ex-dividend.

2

313

Preferred

Cons. 6s, 1921

ShamokinV. A Potts.—7s
Shen. Val.—1st, 7 s, 1909
Gen’l 6s, 1921
Income, 6s, 1923
Income, 5s, 1914
Sunbury A Erie—1st, 7s.
Sunb. Haa. A W.—1st, 5s
2d, 6s,1938

West Chester—Cons. 7s..
W. Jersey—1st, 6s, cp.,’96

Catawissa

*

Scrip, 1882
Conv., 7s, R. C., 1893..4
Conv. 7s, cp.off, Jan.,’85
Phil.Wil. A Balt.-4s.tr. ct

126*3

gold, 1901
gold, 1908—
Gen., 4s, told, 1923— 100*a
Warren A F.—1st, 7s,’96

Buffalo N.Y. A Phil
Preferred
.'
Camden A Atlantic

Belvid’e

Cons. 5s, 1st ser.,c.,1922
Cons. 5s, 2d ser.,0.,1933
Conv. AdJ. Scrip, ’85-88
Debenture ooup., 18931

i*3S ■

128

Cons. 6s,
Cons. 6s,

Preferred

2d

7,1906
...
Perkiomen—1 st, 6s,cp.’87

19*3 Syr.Gen.A Corn.—1st, 7s
Tex. A Pac.—1st, 6s, 1905
*8*6
Consol., 6s, 1905
..
Union A Titusv.—1st, 7s.
United N. J.—Cons.6s,’94

PHILADELPHIA.
RAILROAD STOCKS, t
Allegheny Valley
Ashtabula A Pittsburg..
Bell’s

is*

Pitts. Cin. ASt.L.—7s
Pitts. Titus. A B.—7s,cp.

14

Portland Saco A Portsm.

66

hut date of maturity of bond*.

363*

154

Little Schuylkill
Minehill A Sch. Haven...

113*3

69
70
70

§85

601*

265
108
255
117
150

Cons., 6s, reg., 1905—
Cons., 68, coup., 1905...
Cons., 5s, reg., 1919....
Pa. A N. Y. C.—7s, 1896.

150
...

93

166*

Cons., 6s, 1920
Cons., 5s, 1920
1*68* Phila.
Newt. A N.Y.—1st
76
Phil. A R.—1st, 6s, 1910..
2d, 7s, coup., 1893.
Cons., 7s, reg., *911.....
46ia 46 7g
Cons., 7s, coup., 1911 ~
§117i* 118
Cons., 6s, g., I.R.C.1911
13
Imp., 6a, g., coup., 1897
82
Gen., 6s, g., coup., 1908
92
Gen., 7s, coup., 1908....
Income, 7s, ooufl., *896

17**

60

128
105
92

Phil. AErie—lst,7s,cp.’88

*10

13*8

126*

’96. 1*24*

Pennsylv.—Gen., 6s, reg.
Gen., 6s, op., 1910

40

Preferred
Iowa Falls A Sioux City
Kan. C. Clin. A Springf’d §65
§66
Kan. C. Springf. A Mena.
36
Little Rock A Ft. Smith.
Louisiana A Mo. River. i
Preferred
§95*
Maine Central
Marq. Hough t’n A Onton. §
Preferred.

England

127
135
125

Inc., 6s, 1933

§56

preferred

cp.

111

114*3
100
102
111
82*3

Gen., 7s, 1903
Debenture 6s, reg
Norfolk A West.—Gen.,6s
N. R. Div., 1st, 68.1932
N. Y.Phil.A Nor—1st, 6s

Atchison A Topeka
7%
Atlantic A Pacific
176*3
Boston A Albany
107*3
tl07
Boston A Lowell
175
Boston A Maine
175
Boston A Providence....
Boston Revere B. A Lynn 107ia
73

Cheshire,

7s,

125

Oil Citv A Chio.—1 st, 6s..
71% Oil Creek—1st, 6s, coup..

71*3
7%

Lehigh Valley.

103%

No. Penn.—2d,

-----

Val.—7s..

126
120

121

Delaware—6s, rg. A cp.,V.

Huntingd’n A Broad Top

185
106
1IO6
290
no
115
290
300
111
113
195. 208
114
112

Chat. M., 10s, 1888
New 7s, Teg. A coup—
Connect’g 6s, cp., 1900-04

Cor.CowanA Ant.,deb. 6s,

109
108

105
1910
May,
’88 105
Nov., ’84 250

luly,
Feb.,
Jan.,

89

149
105

[Quotations bj H. L, Grant, Broker, 145 Broadway.]

Ml’oker St.A Fult.F.—Stk

L.Ch.—Con.6s

Ogdensh.A

Ogdensh. A L.

and Bonds.

2,000,000 Var’s
1,200,000 Var’s

1,000

Bonds

Consolidated Gas

r

Amount.

Par.

107

108

K.

Northern of N. Hampsh.
Norwich A Worcester...
Old Colony

[Gas Quotations by Geo. H. Prentiss A
GAS COMPANIES.

Mass.—6s, new..1

N. Y. A New

City Railroad Stocks

118i*

120

Metropolitan
Mexican Central
Nashua A Lowell

,

Gas and

117

Cons., 6 p. o
Cam. A Burl. Co.^6s, ’97.
Catawissa—1st, 7s, con. c.

106
111

City Lawr. A So,—6s.. 326"
El. AWmsp’t^l8t,6s, 1910
City St. Jo. A C. B.—7s
5s, perpetual
Little R. A Ft. S.—7s, 1st 108 %
K. City Sp’d A Mem.—6b §1081* IO8I3 Harnsb’g—1st, 6s, 1883..
66i* 56% H. AB.T.—1st, 7s, g., 1890
Mexican Central—7s
15
15i*
Cons. 5s, 1895
Income
91ia
IthacaAAth.—1st, gld.,7 s
Scrip
89
89
7e
Leh.V.—lst,6s,C.AR.,’98
Debenture, 10s
105
2d, 7s, reg., 1910
N. Y. A N. England—6s.. 104*3
113
112
*a
Cons. 6s, C.AR., 1923..
7s
w.
119
N. O. Pac.—1st, 6s, 1920.
N. Mexico A So. Pac.—7s

67^

180
80

1st, Tr. 6s, 1922
i
Buff. Pitts. A W.—Gen..6s
Cam. A Amboy—6s, c.,’89
Mort., 6s, 1889
Cam. A Atl.—1st,7s,g.,’93

120ia Del. A Bound Br — 1st, 7s
East Penn.—1 st, 7 s, 1888
Fort Scott A Gulf—17s.... §118*3
110
EastonAAmh’y—5s, 1920
K.
East’rn,

124
53
125

Buff.N.Y.AP.—(Cont’d)—

2d, 6s, 1904

Nebraska, 6s.. Exempt
Nebraska, 6s.Non-ex’pt 106
88
Nebraska, 4s

Ask

Bid.

SECURITIES.

122Vt

Conn. A Passumpsic—7s.
Connotton Valley—6s

116
220
125
110
260
67
108
125

40
117

Ask.

BOSTON.
Atch. A Topeka—1st, 7s.
Land grant, 7 s
Boston A Maine—7s
Boston A Albany—7s
68
Boston A Lowell—7s
6s
Boston A Providence—7s
Burl. A Mo.—Ld. gr., 7s.

170
145

110
212
120
105
230

100
Sterling
25
Stuy veaant
25
United States
m
Westchester
Williamsburg City. 50

102

150
102
140
180

70
75
104
75
30

..

Mechanics’ (Bklyn)
Mercantile
Merchants’
Montauk (Bklyn.)..

......

Ask.

220
230

50
50
25
100
15
50
100
50
100
30
20
40
50

255

......

95

17

100

Irving

......

140
140
100
112
132

100
60
100
40
100
30
60

.

Howard

......

115

German-American

Hanover
Home

......

70

10
100

Guardian
Hamilton

......

140
130
170
155
135

.

Greenwich

......

Bid.

50
100
25
25
17
20

Franklin A Emp..
Germania
Globe

......

70

North America*..

Farragut
Firemen’s
Firemen’s Trust....

......

100
25
26
100
60
50
100
100
100
60
100
100
100
100

Metropolitan

Exchange

115

50

Metropolis*

Eagle
Empire City

112

100

Market
Mechanics’
Mechanics’A Trade’
Mercantile
Merchants'
Merchants’ Exch...

150

155
125
100

100
100
50
100

Irving

Commercial
Continental

525

25

Imp. A Traders’

Clinton

11*6’'

100
100

Greenwich*
Hanover

City
......

******

30
50
100
75

Gallatin

Par.

COMPANIES.

Ask.

Bid.

St.]

PRICE.

PRICE.

COMPANIES.

Bid.

SECURITIES.

List.

Insurance Stock

Bank Stack List.

[VOL. XL

96*4
64%

108

101%
60
29

96%

101

117*3 119
116

i04%
108

122
115

100** 101
125

127

W.Md.—6s, 1st, g., J.AJ. 104
2d, guar., J. A J
2d, guar, by W.Co.,J.AJ. 104 *s
6s, 3d, guar., J.AJ
112
Wilm. C A Aug.—6s
Wil. A Weiaon—Gold, 7s

t In default.

i Last price this week.

April 13,

THE CHRONICLE.

1885.]
RAILROAD

The latest railroad earnings

EARNINttS

and the totals from Jan. 1 to

The statement includes the

latest date are given below.

New York City Banks.—The following statement shows the
condition of the Associated Banks of New York
City for the
week

1 to, and including,
period mentioned in the second column.

furnish the gross earnings from January

Latest

Earnings Reported.

Jan. 1 to Latest Date.

Roads.
WeekorMo

1883.

1884.

1885.

$

Chic. Burl. A Q.
Chic. A East III
Chic. Mil. A St.P.
Chic. & Northw^
Ch.St P.Min.AO.
Chic. & W. Mich
Cin. Ind.8t.L. AC.
Cin. N O. AT.P.
Cin.Wash.&Balt.
Clev.AkronACol
Clev.Col.C.A Tud
Connottou Val..

February

.

1st wk Apl
id wk Apl.
1st wk Apl
\ st wk Apl
1st wk A»»l
1st wk Apl
Mar, b
4th wkMcli
let wk Apl

January
February..
Danbury A Nor. February..
Denv. A Rio Gr. 1st wk Apl
..

Denv. A R. G. W March
Des Mo. & Ft. D. 1 st wk Apl

Det.Lans’gANo.
Dub. ASioux City

1st wk
1 st wk

Apl
Apl
E.Tenn. Va.AGa. February..
Evansv. & T. Hr 1st wk Apl
Flint A P. Marq. 1st wk ApL
Flor. R’way A N. 1st wk Apl
Ft.Worth A Den. March...
Georgia Pacific. March
Gal.Hnr.A 8. An. January...
Wk Apr. 4
Grand Trunk
Gr.BayW.ASt.P. 2d wk Meh
Gulf Col. A 8. Fe February..
HI. Cent.
wk Apl
Do
(Iowa) 1st wk Apl
Ind.Bloom.A W.t 1st wk Apl
K.C.Ft. 8. A Gulf 4th wkMeb
...

(III.)...11st

Kan. C. Sp. A

M.'4thwkMcb

Kentucky Cent’l 3d wk Meh
Lake Erie A W.. 3d wk Meh
D.Rk.A Ft Smith February..

D.Rk.M.Riv.A T. February..

Dong Island

2d wk Apl.

D’a A Mo. River. January
L’a Western
January
Douisv.A Nashv. let wk Apl

Mar.Hough. AO. 4thwkMch
Mexican Central 1st wk Apl
Hex. N.. all lines March
Milwaukee A No 1st wk Apl

Mil.L. Sh.A West
Minn. Ast.Louis
Mobile A Ohio..
Nash. Ch. A St.L.
N.O. A Northeast
N.Y .L.Erie A Wo
N. Y. Pa. A O.
N.Y. ANewEng.
N. Y. Out. A W.

2.076,378

3,594,39)'

3,619,233

411,957
5,882,00*

370,444
5,52 5.264

5,235.40*'

5,199.658

1,193,900
274,610

1,275,652

25,736

539.859

230,550
57,558

645.839
620.037
474.326

222,292
54,085
8,878
256,09 i

8,978
272,313

112,710
256,093

22,104
13,489

19,6 20

42,272
27,650

113.341

69,100
5,9 28
21.337
16,324
311,894
16,109
36.16 4
20.296
31.127

57,024

211,097
301.051
6,695
89.102
211,336

30.303
48,198
63.814
48.741

15,623
23.163

44,985
31,004
51,957
45.163
39,828
278.430

8.392
69,200
139,121
12.467

32,532
4\705

13,541
103,770
62,131

Average Amount of—

83.u5 5

325,030

17,401
320.H92

205,301

229,959

*599,220

638,380

44,033

468.224

640*319

19.626

282,789

279,056

29,600
44,r.04
254,134
318,621
6,685
12 4,959
197,033

78.364
170.246

84.420
140.908

211,097

254,134
4,241,674
67,716

37,021
25,638

47,100
51,211
50.6H6
262,470
8,785
145,143
10,462
22,835

66.103

31.921

185.275

2wksMch.
February..
March

26,252
389.049
686,427

lstwkAp;

11,397

14,7i23

2d wk Meh
Ohio A Mins
Ohio Southern.. February

97,216

106,921

43.540

28,122
225,133

.

212,050
Oregon Imp. Co. February
Pennsylvania... February.. 3,075,7u0 3,426,733
12,988
Peoria Dee. AEv. 1st wk Apl
10,881
208.200
246,065
Phila. A Erie
February..
Phiia. A Reading February.. 1,79 4,645 2,002,342
956.779
Do
C. A Iron February..
969,622
RIchm’d ADanv. March
356,129
360,562
68,232
Ch. Col. A Aug March
75,578
.

69.062

ColumbiaAGr. March

Georgia Pac... March

Va. Midland.. March
West. No. Car. March
Rooh. A Pittsb'gl 1st wk Apl
Rome Wat.A Og. February
fit. Johns. A L.C. January...
St. Jo. A West’n. 1st wk Apl
fit.L. Alton AT. H. 1st wk Apl
Do (Branches) 1st wk Apl
fit. L. F. 8. A W.. 1st wk Apl
St.L.ASan* Iran. 2d wk Apl.
fit. Paul ADurth 4thwkMok
fit.P.Min A Mau. March
South Carolina.. February..
Texas A N. O
January...
Tex. A St. Louis. 4th wkMoh
.

..

-

Tol. A.A. AN. M. March
Union Pacific
February .
Utah Central... February..
Vicksb’g A Mer. March
Vicksb.Sh.APac. March
Wab. St, L A P. 4thwkMch
West Jersey
February..
Wisconsin Cent’l March
....

«
*

57,024
121,135

38,586
21.145
93,010

17,810
25,428
18.997
11,787

11,615

438,065

611,349

595,192
567,977
199.238

647,004

458,355
163,400

148,811

,

97,951
64,646
572,767
45,163

59.767

81,470
58,012
537,609
51,2 LI

39,8 18

50,666

3,793,182

3,504,956

60,358

63,795
670.859

406,100
142,532
295,630
257,514

413.663

127,344
296,669
236,193

560,59
546,612
183,302

525.786

2,190.214
730,665
456.516

2,505,740
820,387
495,649

139, iVo

128.195

670,671
110,673

700,331
142,563
808,459

604,306
106.814

793.265

9 36,773

216.539

188,341
140,908
336,068

106,513
271,80 i

240,5-48

207.405

190.730

17,810

12,640

26,023

317,973

39 7,752

14,769
7,356
82,00u

209,26
131,334
1,171,412
212,193
1,433,750
241,106
65,075

221,399

95,349

22.4 <:9

129.694

17,879

238,2365,2* 0

1,561,9 i9 1,540,754

3,23S,898

3,072.448

140,375
114,971

126.528

65.075

15,884
25.500

144,054
94,98b

14.408

55,306

75,433

36,498
32,237

38.921

45 J ,675

56,944
132,988

Receiver took possession.
t Not including Ind. Deoatnr A

9,019
364,<>54
67 186

138,156

88,133
3,773,061
127,064
332,938

150,716
38,947

3,585,363
130.486

360,671

Pennsylvania A Ohio road.
January, preceding time when

Springf. in either year.

6^7 f>0,100
8.187,000

2,017.700
2,9859*00
9 42,800
3.645,600

1.296.100

793,000
10.7 44.290
371.700
955.900
7.909.100
653.000
1.5 44,000

162.300

7.974.200
8.sp 1,000
3.640.400
11,086 800
2,256.000

2,967,000
7,0? 1.400
2,088.600

2.814.200
4,8 i0,500
1.712.500

720.000
139.600
8P6.890

1,292.000
103.100
141.400

1.557.100
285.900
524.400
132.900
102.000

414.800

1.088,000
1,004,700

Commerce

17,391,590

7.696.200

2,184.300

Broadway

6.484.800

Pacific

6.173.400
2.417.300

Republic

6,495,890

667,000
1.806.500
227.400
1.447.500

Chatham

3.755.500
1.461.700

807.300
121.400

3.116.100

693.500

760.700
431.500
4 11,200
861.900
344,4 00
123,000
G36.000

7.570.900
2,416.000

3.370.300
1.104.300

475,000

2,58 4.500

363.900

2,212.000
2.989.400

408,100
442,POO

1.827.400

322.600

M.K&T—Income

2.668.600

1.136.700

Mercantile

Peoples’

North America
Hanover

...

Irving

2,919.000
4.989.900
4.228.300
1,840,000
18,062.800

...

60

268,100

777,000
208,000
145.600
149.300

3.278.200

268,300

260,000
170,000
637.700

3,029.000

1.213.800
4,037.900

57,600

454.100

1.584.700

1,594,000
1,080,000
1,079.200

2.874.400
1.317.300

following

402.800

i03i5*(j6
989,906
45,000

1,7J0.0<>0

2*23*766

939.800
18.197.600
8.857.000

180,000

297,000

5,312,10**

38.000
45,000

925.100
312.700

19,211,900

414.900

271,200
95,000

1.227.700
2,098,600
2.683.900J

222,100
180,000

4.384.900

45’666

397.700
120.300
242.000
289.2 *0
640.000

180,000

2,961,000
6.743.900

179*4*66

2,343,800’
3.145.600

2,50/,200
2.040,200
180,000
43,700
176,400

2.565.500
1.874.600

1,065,600

134,200

totals for several weeks past:

are

Loans.

1884.

4*50,666

302,098,000 106055300 30,953,600 354.415,100 10 963,500

Total

The

1,087.600
606,000
241.000
2.7.700

8*86*606

5.443.700
1.675.800
23.171.400
23,398,800

77,700
151.400
137,800
214.500
485.500

1.914.690

109.400

45,000
5,400

4,099.500

787.300
150,000
196.300
730.600
384.300
186.200
187.700
868.500

6,074,500
1.109.100

1,668 500
211,000

423*000

1.702.400

1.505.700

16,639,200

1,621,700

809,000

2.437.300

2.860.800

4,922.000

391,000

741.800
892.900

2.853.300

2.708.400
1.774.600
1.783.600
2.350.200

7,205,000
2,279,000

‘*2,600
45,000

2.584.700

13.221,900

175,500

1.135.800

G. riuan-Aiueric’n.
Chase National...
Fifth Avenue
German Exch’nge.
Germania
United States
Lincoln
Garfield
Fifth National....
B’k of tho Metrop..
West Side

1,591,000
1,073,800

299.800
693.800

490,000

1.983.500

17.414.100

265]odd
*89,20*6

1,029.100
2.367.100

Bowery
N. Y. County

Importers’* Trad.

*T,i*66

3.984 300
12.531.000
18.484,500
4.253.200
6.707.600
2.765.200
C.547.600
4.117,000
1.609.100
3.921.800
9.461.400
3.077.000

323.400

634.200

358,400

1,143,000

15 i,500

5,000

$

450,000

16,6 5,2 )0
1.759.700
1.505.600
20,773,200
2.713.300
4.009,200
1.763.900

1,245.900
178.200
6.837.100
5.958.200
33.000
226.200
7.719.700
2.5 33,000
750.000
1.025,400
5,472.400
1,476.000
3 43,300
552.400
355.500
414.200

L. Tenders.

Specie.

Deposits.

Circulation Agg. Clear’gt

$
$
$
M’h28 300.981.200 104752800 32,029,900 353.443,900 10,899.700 437,169,555
Apr.
4 302,757.100 104484400 -50,812,500 352,684,200 10,953,800 416,524,824
“
11 302,098,000 106035300 30,953,600 354,415,100 10.963,500 401,534,492

$

S

$

Boston Banks.—Following are the totals of the Boston banks

1884.

M’h28

Loans.

Specie.

$

$

142,077,200

Apr. 4 143,282,100
11

144,091,300

L, Tenders.

Deposits.

Circulation Agg.

Clear’gs
$

8,408,400
8.994,60**

$
5,510,000
5,219,100

$
$
97,542,600 22,537,400
99,242.700 22,470,800

52,680.628

8,286,100

5,074,000 101,632,801) 22,585,100

63.006,681

66,634,493

Philadelphia Banks.—The totals of the Philadelphia bank

are as

follows:

April 4

996,105
237,165
2L1.716

9,.*83 000

3.401.500
12,454.000

488.518
7,000,966
202,226
462,265

1,935,79)

505.000

176.900
56,000
366.600
1,448,000

445,174
6,353,222
187,252

1,814,411

2,7913*00

1**53)00
102.300
851.400
295.300
819.700
4.476.000

Meh. 28

4,193.1 42

12.752.000

1.155.600
14.993.100

65,095

794,075

$

1,347,000

10.200.500

...

$

2,725,000

4.27 8.800

Circula¬
tion.

other

than U. S.

11,905,000
8.520.000

Fulton
Chemical
Merchants’ Exch.
Gallatin National..
Butchers’* Drov.
Mechanics’ & Tr..
Greenwich
Leather ManufTs.
Seventh Ward....
State of N. Y...
Americ’n Excli’ge.

88,649

170,246

24,929
700,l'i0

Tradesmen’s

2,113,144
259,544

430,217
3.641,011

...

City

l,8u9 973
254,500
788,439

325,044

44,604
119,363
31,054
18,938
109,696
12,640

Manhattan Co
Merchants’
Mechanics’
Union
America
Plienix

"

1,232.981
198,857
1,556,53 3
262,899
94,986
182.959
47,461

82,80 J
24.145
575,377
121,494

Not including earnings of New York
Not including the first six days of




379,923

55,7244 1,028,558

129,072
64,140
51,656
27,919
398,613
978,9*6

Shenandoah V.
Northern Cent’l.
Northern Pacific
Ohio Central....

2,929 093

263,373
2,681.913

19,548

February.. 1,139,740 1,233,409
386,742
341,005
February..
226.096
252,603
February..
51,569

181.434

32,751
48,161
59,421
24,814
14,811

206,819

68,505

3,794,641
52,251

$
New York

Net Deposits

Legal
Tenders.

Specie.

Discounts.

Pai k
North River
East River
Fourth National..
Central National..
Second National..
Ninth National...
First National
Third National...
N. Y. Nat. Exch..

91.681

16,086

Loans and

Citizens’
Nassau
Market
St. Nicholas
Shoe A Leather..
Corn Exchange
Continental
Oriental

257,363

186,737

N.Y.Susq.AWest February..

195,126

Banks.

573,493
437,37 4
109.508
272,343
,42.813
25.737
1.233,384
163,315

5,776

109,591

143,765

1,412,175

38 5,768

26,849

127.438
195,140

Norfolk a West. 1st wk Apl

321.231

4,507,756
711,547
145,137

865.859
35",3ol
4,325.040

315,447

February..

March

1,431.311

68 4,926

2,0 >0,070

23,940

March
March

759,617

273,746
2,339,368
91,785

756,328
133,948
262.366

2d wk Apl.
March

2,180.446
93,557

1,601,915 1,971,013
26,504
30,333
442, *H>
461,728
456.500 426,200
129,100
102,000
45.411

1884.
$

300,544

97.303
96,157
Ala. Gt. South’n March...
Atcli. V. A S. F
February •. 1,064.748 1,167.020
Bost. II. T. & W. March
43,492
35,983
51,752
Bur.Ced R.ANo. 1st wk Apl
60,992
140.000
Canadian Pacific 1st wk Apl
67,<>no
26.00 5
1st wk Apl
Central Iowa
22,405
Central Pacific.. March.... l,540.0'»<i 1,472,684
65.538
70.428
Chesap. & Ohio. 3d wk Meh
Eliz.Lex.AB.S 3d wk Meh
12,729
15,367
Ches. O. A S. W. 3d wk Meh
29,226
29,155
137,173
138,533
Chicago A Alton 1st wk Apl

ending April 11, 1885:

gross

earnings of all railroads from which returns can be obtained.
The columns under the heading “January 1 to latest date”
the

477

Loans.

1885.

“

*

11

Lawful Money.

Deposits.*

Circulation. Agg. Clear’gt

$

$

$

$

$

74.472,677

72.953,918

72,452,733

7,667,620
7,690,390

42,872,783

74,987,741

25,038,585
23,-01,083

75,0-0,901

24,055,465

73,148,024

7,7**5,216

45,742,859

41,598,134

Including the item “ due to other banks.”

Unlisted Securities.—Following are latest quotations

for a

week past:

Bid.

Securities.

Atlantic * Pac.—Stock....
West. Div., 1st mort
Incomes
Cent. Div., 1st, old

7^3
15

69V

Am.K’way Imp.ex-bdsstk
liank.&Merch.Tel., IstM.
Gen. mort
Bost. H. & E.—New stock
Old
Bost. H.T.& West.—St’k.
Debentures
Buff. N. V.& Phila
Trust bonds, 6s
Cont. Cons. Imp. Co
Deuv.& Rio Gramie— *jons
5s
Denv.* Rio Gr. W
Den. R. G. A W., 1st M.,
Guar, by D. & R. G
Edison Electric Light....

95

5*4
*
40

31*
10V
47

-

534
37
50

*9*5 V

2d mort

Keely Motor

Louisv. & N.—AdJ.
Mexican National
Pref

bonds

1st mort
M >. Pacific—Old stock

Cowdry ctfs

Mut-Uu.—lst’ck trust ctfs
scrip
N. Y. M. Un. Tel.—Stock.

6 \
65
2V
10 V
21

2V
7
10

37*4
49V

Securities.
N. Y. W. Sh. & B.- Stock.
North. Pac.—Div. bonds
North Riv. Cons.—100 p.c
Ohio Cent.—Riv. Div., 1st
incomes
Pensacola & Atlantic
1st mort

Pittsburg* Western

Bid.

77

9%
16

Ask.

Tv
10 v
16V

IV
3V
60
6
49

70

1st mort
2
Postal Telegraph—Stock.
18*
1st moi t.f 6s
19V
4V
4
Postal Tel.* Cable—Stock
4
Southern Tel.—Stock
38
17
19
1st mort
58V
49 V State of Tenn.—Set’m’t.3s 67
20
settlement, 5s
94*i 96
7
Settlement, 6s
18*9 19V
St. Joseph * Western
120
St. Jo. & Pac., 1st mort. 114
60
2d mo. t
49V
Kans. A Neb., 1st mort. 10 7
12 V
49 V
2d mort
96 I
4*a
42 V Tex.&Cf 1. Imp.—60 p. c..
32
Texas & Pac.—Scrip ie84.
8
32
New scrip
70
Tex. & St. Louis—
25
M. & A. Div., 1 st, mort..
20
22
Valley RR.of Ohio
IV
Vic so. * Meruuan
4
Pref
w
*9
90
93
1st mort
2d mort
60
54
40
w
Incomes...
51

V

..

Georgia Pac.—stock
1st mort., 68

Ask.

6
45

*3J

THE CHRONICLE

478

For

% t* xr t s t m t n t

purchase of S. C. D. & P. RR

$848,000- $3,346,000

Total...
Redeemed fn 1884.

AND

%VLilxtiviiL

[VOL. XL.

Ittljellt flittcs.

$34,683,000
357,500

Outstanding Dec. 31,1884
*

*

complete exhibit of the
Funded Debt of States and Cities and of the Stocks and Bonds
of Railroads and other Companies. It is published on the
last Saturday of every other month—viz., February, April,
June, August, October and December, and is furnished with¬
out extra charge to all regular subscribers of the Chronicle.
Extra copies are sold to subscribers of the Chronicle at 50
The Investors’ Supplement contains a

*

$34,325,500
#

*

*

*

*

“The $2,500,000 of Atchison Company’s six per cent bonds
issued in 1884 were partly for indebtedness incurred in 1883 on
account of construction, and to provide for a part of similar

expenditures in 1884. These bonds and a further issue of
$2,500,000 in 1885, have been successfully placed by Messrs.
Kidder, Peabody & Co. on the London market through Messrs.
Baring Brothers & Co. Although second mortgage bonds are
cents each. and to others than subscribers at $1 per copy.
included in the collaterals deposited in the hands of the
trustees to secure the six per cent bonds, the trust deed
ANNUAL REPORTS.
requires that they shall not exceed, with the first mortgages,
$25,000 per mile.” *
*
* “ Including all the outstand¬
Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe.
ing bonded indebtedness on Dec. 31, 1884, amounting in the
aggregate to $50,884,500, the rate per mile for 2,798*80 miles
(For the year ending December 31, 1884.)
of road was $18,181; and the ratejfor the entire capital stock
The annual report for 1884, just issued, is a very full docu¬
and outstanding bonds on the same date was $38,516 per mile.
ment.
It mentions the mileage owned at the close of the year
as

follows:
“I. The parent road and

its auxiliaries, called the ‘Atchison
System,’ with a mileage in Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, New
Mexico and Texas of 1,867*76 miles.
“II. The ‘ Southern Kansas System,’ all situated in Kansas,
of 506*93 miles.
“III. The ‘ Sonora System,’ lying in the Territory of Arizona,
and in the State of Sonora, Republic of Mexico, 350*19 miles.
“IV. The lines owned jointly with other companies in Kan¬
sas,

half mileage, 73*92 miles.

February, 1884, the Southern Kansas System
was brought into direct connection with the main line of the
Atchison at Emporia by the completion of the Kansas City &
Emporia Railroad (56*42 miles) and the two systems became
interwoven with each other, so that for the year 1884 the earn¬
ings, expenses and other statements relate to the two systems.”
On the 1st of

*#**?«■***
*

“ Had it not been for the pool balances of 1883, then unde¬
termined, amounting to $211,668, charged against the receipts
for 1884, the surplus for the year would have been $1,055,650.
The undetermined pool balances for the year 1884 are estimated
to be less than $25,000. It should further be noted that the sur¬
plus is after deducting $269,716 for the sinking funds paid in
1884, which decreased the company’s indebtedness by reducing
the amount of the bonds previously outstanding, and does not
include the profits of the Atchison land grant department,
which for the year amounted to $829,101 over and above
expenses, taxes and interest on the land grant bonds, and cost
of $80,500 bonds purchased and canceled.”
EARNINGS.

SURPLUS ACCOUNTS DEC.
Income accounts
Canceled bond accounts

31, 1884.

$6,883,640
1,874,500

Total

Which is

$8,753,140

represented by the following:

Permanent investment in construction in excess of stocks
and bonds outstanding
Materials and supplies on hand
Advances to Atlantic & Pacific RR. Co., of which $1,217,256
is secured by hypothecation of Atlantic & Pacific lands,
and $160,000 by Central Division first mortgage bonds..

Mortgage bonds, sundry securities and investments, cash
on hand, and accounts receivable In excess of vouchers,
accounts payable, accrued interest toJDeo. 31,1884, and
dividend payable Feb. 16, 1885
Total
Less—
Amount due land grant trust (secured)
$1,498,026
Amounts to credit of renewal andflre ins. funds.
615,012
Nominal liabilities on sundry book and sus¬

pended accounts
Net

$4,105,669
1,595,734
*"***
1,723,214

4,067,856
$11,492,474

591,294— 2,731,333

surplus

$8,758,140
LAND DEPARTMENT.

“

The operations of the Land Department during 1884 were
follows: 353,090*76 acres were sold, at an average price of
$3*36 per acre, for the sum of $1,186,027, The cash receipts of
the department during the year were $1,209,717; the total
disbursements for the year $$149,894. The net results of tho
operations of the year were therefore $1,059,822. In addition
to this there was received from interest, les3 sundry expensesof the trust, $51,261, making a total of $1,111,084.
Of this
amount there was paid for interest on land grant bonds.
as

$188,281, and $93,702 for $80,500 land‘grant bonds purchased
general condition of business throughout and canceled, leaving a balance for the year of $829,101.” The
the country and the special circumstances affecting the lands unsold Dec 31,1884, were 1,114,585 acres, estimated to be
Atchison Company’s lines, the business of the year cannot but worth about $1,400,000; the outstanding land contracts were
be regarded as satisfactory; and, had it not been for the low $1,346,484.
SONORA RAILWAY.
prices of grain which have prevailed the last few months, the Sonora
(Mexico)
—
Railway
earnings would have shown a much larger increase. Among
From Nogales to Guay mas, 262 41 miles—
1883.
1884.
the special circumstances which the company has had to Total earnings (U. S. currency)
i
$197,616
$220,500
contend with during the year were the coal strikes and wash¬ Operating expenses (U. S. currency)
230,740
314,001
outs. The Rockvale mines (in Colorado) were closed for nearly
Loss (U. 8. currency)
$33,123
$93,495
seven months, and the mines in New Mexico for two months.
There
has
been
expended
on
construction
It is considered as a moderate estimate that the gross earnings
account of the
Sonora Railway during the year $64,916, against $206,531 in
were decreased at least $250,000 by this cause.”
1883. The deficiency of the earnings of the Sonora Railway
OPERATING EXPENSES.
during 1884 and previous years, including the expenditures for
The large increase in the operating expenses for 1884 as
construction, for miscellaneous expenses and for interest on
compared with 1883 calls for special explanation. A detailed its outstanding first mortgage bonds, has been met by the issue
comparison shows that the largest increase, $673,342, is in to the Atchison Company of the balance of the first mortgage
repairs and renewal of track.
Of this amount, the wash-outs bonds of the Sonora Railway Company limited, which were
and freshets caused an expenditure of $330,386 in excess of the reserved for this
special purpose, and therefore the deficiency
corresponding expenditure in 1883. * * * The charges has not been charged to the Atchison Company’s income
for repairs and renewals of track also include $249,573 for account.
stone ballast and riprapping, while the cost of similar work
“The total amount of the SonoraCompany’s bonds now owned:
done in 1883 and previous years was charged to construction.
by the Atchison Company is $1,098,009.”
*
*
*
“Of
The entire cost of replacing 110 miles of iron rails with steel, the
subsidy due from the Mexican Government—namely,
and replacing light steel with steel of heavier weight, amount¬
$2,570,530 (U. S. currency)—there was received prior to 1884
ing to $297,407, has likewise been charged to operating ex¬ $1,092,775; but nothing has been received since. There is
penses against the cost for 33 miles in 1883. Of the main line still due to the company $1,477,754 (U. S. currency), and it is
of the company from Atchison and Kansas City to Pueblo, believed that within a reasonable time the Mexican Govern¬
Doming andtEi Paso, and from Benson to Guaymas, having a ment under President Diaz will be able to resume the pay¬
mileage of 1,692 miles, 1,543 miles are laid with steel rails, ments to the Sonora Company. All receipts from this source
and, of the auxiliary roads, 214 miles are laid with steel. will of course be available for the obligations of the Senora
The other principal increase over 1883—namely, $336,947—is
company.”
in the repairs of rolling stock and engines.
In 1883, the
ATLANTIC & PACIFIC.
expenditures for these repairs were not kept up to the full
A very full statement is given in the report of the relations
standard, so that in 1884 the charges to this account were
with the Atlantic & Pacific, from which the following is
largely increased.”
condensed :
“In view of the

“

“

CAPITAL STOCK AND BOND ACCOUNT.

There has been no material change in the capital stock
account. “The capital stock of the Atchison Company controls
all its various auxiliary companies, as their capital stocks are
owned either directly or indirectly by the Atchison Company,
except a very small amount in some of the Kansas companies
held by townships and counties. For the mileage given

(2,798*80 miles}, the capital stock is at the rate of $20,335

per

mile of road.

Tbe bonded debt of the Atchison and So. Kansas Compa¬
nies on Deo. 31, 1883, was
Add A. T. & S. F. RR. Co. 6 per cent sinking fund secured
bonds, issued in 1884—
For cash
$2,500,000




$3!,335,000

“The present

relations of this company to the Atlantic &
originate with the present management, which,
has simply aimed to carry to a successful issue the policy
initiated five years ago and ever since pursued.”
Referring to the alliance with the St.'Louis & San Francisco,,
which has become a matter of railroad history, it is remarked
that these two companies “ from time to time, to pay for
construction and meet first mortgage interest, made advances
to the Atlantic & Pacific, for which they required and have
received security so far as it was practicable to give it
July
1, 1884, the amount due the Atchison on account of such
advances and for which it had no security amounted to
$238,122. For the sum of $150,000 it was secured by $184,000Pacific did not

April

THE CHRONICLE.

18, 1885.]

479

of Central Division first mortgage bonds.

And there pletion, substantially without cost to the Atchison, will
accomplish two important objects. It will enable the Atlantic
& Pacific to command a considerable
portion of the large and
rapidly increasing business of Southern California. In the
by a sale and conveyance of Atlantic & Pacific lands to a event of any disturbance of existing arrangements, it will
trustee. This, then, was the situation in the summer of 1884. enable the Atlantic & Pacific to retain its fair share
of
The scheme initiated by the Tripartite Agreement of 1880 had business to and from San Francisco and California
points
to
been so far carried out that about five hundred and sixty miles the northward, transportation
by steamer from these points to
of road had been completed between Albuquerque and the San Diego
involving but small cost and but little loss of time.”
Needles, and the title of some fourteen millions of acres of
Statistics of operations and earnings for two
years, and the
land along its route had become indefeasible. The St. Louis income account and
general balance for 1884, compiled in the
& San Francisco, being now free from Southern Pacific usual form for the
Chronicle, are as follows, these statistics
influences, was both able and willing to act for its own interest. embracing the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe and So. Kansas
The question for the two owners of the property was what to systems
combined, but nothing of the Sonora or Atlantic &
do next.”
*
at par

also due to it the further sum of $1,217,256, which, being
advanced and applied to pay first mortgage interest, including
the interest due July 1, is now secured and adequately secured
was

*

*

Pacific.

-

“The

ROAD AND EQUIPMENT.
only remaining course, and the only one really avail¬
1883.
able, was the one actually adopted—the purchase of the South¬ Total
miles operated
2,219
ern Pacific Division between the Needles and
Mojave on such Locomotives
374
terms as to secure to the Atlantic & Pacific a practically inde¬
Passeger, mail and express cars
266
pendent right of way beyond Mojave to Oakland and San Freight ard coal cars
9,933
Other
cars
23
Francisco, as well as the use of the extensive and costly ter¬
minals already constructed at those places. After prolonged
OPERATIONS AND FISCAL RESULTS.
Operations—
negotiations the end was at length accomplished. The result
1883.
Passengers carried, No
was embodied in four instruments, each
1,072,169
bearing date Aug. 20, Passengers carried one mile
120,411.659
1884. By the first the Atlantic & Pacific bought the Southern Rate
per passenger per mile
2-909 cts.
Pacific Division between the Needles and Mojave, 242 miles of Freight (tone) moved
2,240,130
Freight
carried
(tone)
one mile
road, for $30,000 per mile, and, until such time as title could
582,176,176
2-009 cts.
be given by the discharge of the mortgage upon it, took a lease Rate per ton per mile
Earnings— '
$
of it at an annual rental equal to 6 per cent on the
purchase Passenger
3,502,950
price, the purchase price being payable (when the title is given) Freight
11,699,194

1884.

2,374
377
281

10,096
26
1884.

1,502,485
135,412,096
2-648 cts.

2,725,191
634,711,316
1*882 cts.

$

-

one-sixth

in

cash and the remainder in

Pacific first mortgage

cash

or

bonds, and said bonds,

in Atlantic &

Mail, express, &c

3,583,018
11,946,453
762,412

707,297

well as the
Total gross earnings
15,909,441
16,291,883
rental, being guaranteed as to one-half part thereof by the
Operating Expenses—
Atchison and St. Louis & San Francisco respectively.
Maintenance of way, &c
2.216,574
2,861,236
By the second 'instrument the Atlantic & Pacific secured Maintenance of equipment
1,124,949
1,461,896
expenses
3,227.352
trackage and traffic rights and facilities between Mojave and Transportation
3,560,610
Miscellaneous
673,722
'
670,856
Oakland and San Francisco, as well as the use of the terminals Taxes
410,319
421,378
at the latter points, on equitable terms; it being
further stip¬
Total operating expenses
ulated that, upon twelve months’ notice, at the
7,652,916
8,975,976
option of the
Net earnings
Atlantic & Pacific, it might run its own trains between
8,256,525
7,315,907
Mojave
Per cent of operating expenses to taxes
and San Francisco by paying a rental of $1,200
48-10
55*09
per mile, and
that its rights under the contract should pass to the Atchison
INCOME ACCOUNT FOR 1884.
and St. Louis & San Francisco, or either of them, in the event
Receipts—
Lisbursements—
that either or both of them succeeded to its rights under the Net earnings
$7,315,907 Rentals paid
$37,098
Rentals, dividends, &c..
28,488 Interest on At. Top. & 8.
contract of purchase and lease of the road from the Needles to Other
F. and So. Kan. bonds. 1,812,544
receipts
142,014
as

“

Mojave.
“

The third instrument contained

From land grant trust’s.

agreement by the
Atchison (a like agreement being executed by the St. Louis &
San Francisco) to buy from the Pacific Improvement
Company
first mortgage bonds and other securities of the Atlantic &
Pacific of the par value of $3,096,768, at the actual cost to the
Improvement Company, to wit, $1,524,356, payable in six
instalments in the course of two years and a half. This con¬
tract was part of the consideration for the purchase and lease
made, and for the trackage and traffic and terminal rights and
facilities conceded under the two instruments first named, and
was the more
readily entered into for the reasons that the
securities could

hardly fail to be ultimately worth the pur¬
price; that it was expedient to have them in friendly
control, and that they supplied the means of performing the
guarantee to the trustee of the first mortgage, if such per¬
formance should be required.
The fourth and last instrument simply amended the tri¬
partite indenture of 1880 by explaining clauses of doubtful
meaning and by adding others, so adapting it to the altered
state of facts as to carry out the original
purpose and object of
chase

Interest

Sinking funds
Paid to other roads....
Total income

57,674,690

$343,983
GENERAL BALANCE

Assets —

$

RR., bldgs.,equip.,&c.
Leased roads (see con¬
tra)
Stocks & bonds own’d
Accounts receivable..
At. & Pac. RR. acc’nt.
U. 8. Government
Cash and bank bal's.
Materials & supplies..
Miscellaneous items..

executed

of Aug. 20, 1884,
* * *
“The foregoing statement, from which all minor details have
been necessarily excluded, ^presents in brief the origin,
progress and present condition of the Atlantic & Pacific enter¬
prise. It should be added that from July 1, 1884, to January
1, 1885, the Atchison Company advanced $107,835, for which
it holds the Atlantic & Pacific Company’s unsecured notes,
and $10,000 secured by $25,000 at par of Central Division first
mortgage bonds. The interest due Jan. 1, 1885, was paid by
the Atlantic & Pacific from the proceeds of the sale of one
as

million acres of land sold to the Aztec Land & Cattle Com¬
pany, fcr which the Atlantic & Pacific Company received in
cash $500,000.
The Atchison Company, through a trustee,

invested $150,000 in the Aztec Company, for which it received
like amount of

capital stock ; and the investment will, with¬
profitable one. The St. Louis & San Fran¬
cisco Company under the able and friendly management of
Gen. E. F. Winslow has throughout made the same advances
as the Atchison
Company.”
out

doubt,

prove a

CALIFORNIA SOUTHERN.

“It

proposed that half of the capital stock of this com¬
pany should be transferred to the Atchison without cost to it;
that the existing first mortgage bondholders should sur¬
render their bonds in exchange for income bonds ; that a new
mortgage of $10,000 a mile should be placed on the whole
road—210 miles—from the proceeds of which the seventyeight miles of extension could be built and the whole put in
thorough order, leaving about $500,000 of first mortgage bonds
in the treasury to meet contingencies and fixed
charges until
the road should be self-sustaining. This offer,
made with sub¬
stantial unanimity by the owners of-the property, was
accepted by this company; and the work of building the
extension has already made considerable
progress. Its com¬
was




31, 1884.

Liabilities—

Stock, At. Top. & S. F.
Stock So. Kansas RR.
Bonds (see Supplem’t)
Acc’ts, <fcc., payable..
Coups.,gold prem.,Ae.
Contingent liabilities.

11,819,000
54,418,352
2,317,557
1,723,214
356,418 Dividends
1,112,482 Fire insurance fund..
1,595,734 Renew. & impt. ace’t.
194,903 Suspended accounts..
Income balance

*122,481,366

Total liabilities...

56,913,250
13,759,900
34,325,500
2,397,867
903,755
11,819,000
869,620
145,012
500,000

591,295
1,498,027
1,874,500

6,883,640
122,481,306

*

became operative the 1st of October following.”

a

48,943,706

DEC.

Land grant trust
Canceled bonds

Total

269,716

241,677

Total disbursements.. $6,830,707

Balance, surplus

“

that agreement.
“
These several agreements,

Interest paid as rental..
866,655
on land bonds..
188,281
Dividends
3,414,736
Rate of dividend
6

188,281

an

The above assets are exclusive of the bills receivable for sales of land
to Deo. 31,1834, amounting to $1,346,485, and the value of 1,114,586
acres of unsold lands.
t Southern Kansas stock is ell owned by the At. T. «fe S. Fe. Co. through

the K. C.

Top. & W. RR.

GENERAL INVESTMENT NEWS.
Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe.—At Topeka, April 16, the
stockholders elected the following directors: I. T. Burr, B.
A. Cheney, C. R. Codman, C. K. Halliday, S. A. Kent, A. W.

Nickerson, E. B. Purcell, Warren Sawyer, L. F. Percy, Geo.
O. Shattuck, Alden Spear, W. B. Strong and W. F. Wharton;
Messrs. C. R. Codman and W. F. Wharton take the places of
Thos. Nickerson and E. A. Touzalin, retiring. They also

authorized the consolidation of the Kansas Southern Railway
Company, Kansas City & Emporia Railroad Company and the
Southern Kansas Railway Company into the “Southern Kan¬
sas Railway Company.”
The directors elected officers as fol¬
lows : W. B. Strong, President;. E. Wilder, Secretary and
Treasurer; A. A. Robinson, General Manager and Chief Engi¬
neer; J. P. Whitehead, Comptroller and General Auditor.
Central Pacific—Southern Pacific Company.—An official
copy of the recent lease of the Central Pacific Railroad by the
new Southern Pacific Company has been obtained this week.
It is satisfactory to have this important document published,
as all railroad contracts ought to be, after the negotiations are
finished and the matters settled, so that secrecy is no longer
necessary, unless the managers desire to conceal the terms of
the agreement from their stockholders and the public.
The reasons for consummating the Central Pacific lease are
stated at length in the preamble.
Some attention has been
called to the terms by a recent telegram to London from the
President of the lessor company, which stated that the rental
might be used toward the extinction of the Central Pacific
floating debt, which was about $10,000,000 on January 1,1885,

THE

460

CHRONICLE.

subject to deduction of quick assets. More than half of this
amount has since been funded into the new thirty-year deben¬
ture bonds, with a probability that more will be funded during
the year.
A portion of the outstanding floating debt consists
of current balances, uncalled for dividends and interest, and
the like which accrued prior to the lease, and which it belongs
to tne Central Pacific Company to pay before it distributes
anything in dividends to its stockholders. Parties connected
•with Central Pacific, however, think that a good partof the $1,200,000 rental due May 1, 1886, may be applicable to dividends.
Omitting the formal parts and legal verbiage as far as pos¬
sible, the essential points of the lease are as follows :
This agreement, made and entered into this srventeentli (17th) day of
February, lsbo, between the Southern Pacific Company, a corporation,
duly organized and existing under the laws of the State of Kentucky,
and now doing business in tlio State of California, and the Central
Pacific Railroad Company, a corporation duly formed and existing
under tin* laws of the State of California and the United States,

[Yol. XU

outstanding bonds of the series issued Jan. 1, 1880, and
payable Jan. 1, 1910, bearing interest at 7 per cent, in all about
$655,000, will be redeemed at 102% on the 1st day of July,
1885, at the office of Messrs. Lee, Higginson & Co., Boston;
interest on said bonds will cease from and after that date.
Messrs. Lee, Higginson &Co. give notice that they will receive
on behalf of the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Iiiilway Com¬
pany the above-named 7 per cent bonds, taking them at 102%
per cent, and interest to July 1, 1885, and giving in exchange
the Dubuque Division 6 per cent bonds of the Chicago Mil¬
waukee & St. Paul Railway Company, ex-coupon July, 1885,
at 108% per cent, flat.
Chicago & Eastern Illinois.—President Stevens, for the
Chicago & E istern Illinois Railroad Company, offers to buy at
par and accrued interest any of the outstanding car trust bonds

the

■witnesseih, <Vo, <kc.
*
*
'
Now therefore. to accomplish the purposes

of the company.

Cincinnati Indianapolis St. Louis & Chicago.—The gross
earnings in February, and for the eight months from

and net

aforesaid, in consideration
herein, the said Central July 1, in 1883-84 and 1884-85, have been as follows :
said Southern Pacific
February.
,—July 1 to March 1.—*
1884.
1885.
1833-1.
1884-5.
Company, for the term of ninety-nine years, from the first day of April,
A. D. 1^85, the whole of its railroad, situated iu the Territory of Utah
Gross earnings
$122,086
$172,544 $1,617,695
$1,721,158
and states of Nevada and California, and known and designated as the
Operai’g expenses.
93,132
121,367
1,057,191
1,089,333
Central Pecifio Railroad, together with all the brauclies thereof,
$631,825
$560,501
$51,177
together w.th all the rolling stock, telegraph lines, steamboats,
Net earnings....
$29,554
399,126
50.000
401,001
Fixed charges
wharves piers, depots, workshops, and all other property, real arid
50,083
personal, now owned, held and possessed by the said central Pacific
Railroad Company and used upon, or in connection with, said railroad
Surplus
Def.$20,529
$1,177
$156,500
$232,699
and telegrat h, together with all the appur tenances thereunto belonging,
Denver
&
of
the
consolidated
Rio
Grande.—A
committee
with the right to possess, maintain, use and ( perate and enjoy the said
bondholders has been at work for some time perfecting a plan
proper ry, and to receive the rents, issues and pioflts tuereot
And the said Central Pacific Railroad Company hernhy assigns t,o the
of reorganization for this company.
In the meantime there
said Southern Pacific Company all the leases which it now holds of
was issued last week in Philadelphia a scheme prepared in the
railroads and other property situated m said State of California, and
lying and being north of the town of Goshen, in the County of Tulare, interests of the equipment-certificate holders (car-trust bonds),
with the light to take, hold, operate, maintain and enjoy said railroads
which has been widely published, and may easily have been
and other property in the same manner as the sma Central Pacific
mistaken for the regular bondholders’ plan.
Railroad Company holds, operates, enjoys and maiuta ns the same
The meeting of consolidated bondholders was held in New
under the said leases, and with the right to receive the rents, issues and
York on Thursday, April 16, pursuant to notice by the
profits iheieou
And the snid Central Pacific Railroad Company hereby releases the
mortgage trustees, and was adjourned for a week to take
Southern Pacific Railroad Company, a corporation formed and existing
formal action after a large amount of proxies shall have
under the laws of the United States and of the State of California, and
the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, a corporation, formed and
arrived from Europe.
At a meeting of bondholders held
existing under the laws of the Territory of Arizona, and the S uthern afterward a resolution was adopted that the following gen¬
Pacific Railroad Company, a corporation fo-med and existing under th-n
tlemen be appointed a committee of foreclosure and reorgan¬
law s of the Territory of New Mexico, and each of them, from all and
ization to co-operate with the trustees of the mortgage, viz.r:
every obligation under or by virtue of any aud every lease made by said
three latu mentioned railroad companies, or either of them, to the said
George Coppell, of Maitland, Phelps & Co.; Theodore Dreier
Central Pacific Railroad Company, and transfers and surrenders unto
the said 8 uthern Pacific Company the possession of all the property in (late of Naylor & Co.); John Lowber Welsh, of Philadelphia ;
The committee agreed upon a
Bald leases, or anv of them meuiioned or described, with tile right to R. T. Wilson, and A. Marcus.
receive the reuts, issues aud profits thereof, free from all claim of the plan of reorganization which had been already prepared in
said Central Pacific Railroad Company to the same or an3r part thereof.
substance, and the plan will be submitted to the meeting of
★
to
★
*
to
to
of the piemit-e* and of the mutual promises
Pacific Rah road Company hereby leases to the

to

'

x

,

/

to

^

Company hereby acre's to and with
the said Ceutral Pacific Railroad Company that, it hereby assumes aud
will discharge all the liabilities aud obligations of e ery kind (including
its obligations on leases now held by it) of the said railroad company,
except the obligation to pay the principal of said railroad company’s
ind* btedness. known as its “ Floating Debt,” and exc* pt the obligation
to pav the principal of the indebtedness of sa d railroad company,
khown as its “Bonded Indebtedness,” now outstanding and secured
by mortgage or deed ot trust, or which may be hereafter incurred under
the provisions of any existing mortgage or deed of trust, or of any
mortgage or deed of trust hereafter made with the consent of the
Southern Pacific Company, and except the principal or all indebtedn ss
the payment of which has lieietofoie been guaranteed by the Central
Pacific Railroad Company; and except the principal of the indebtedness
of the said central Pacific Rai r ad Company evidenced by bonds of the
United States, heretofore by the Government thereof loaned to the said
Central Pacitic Kailioad Company. That as to such excepted in ebtedness the said .southern Pacific Company will pay off and discharge at
maturity the interest upon the same, except the interest upon the bonds
of the United States, loaned as aforesaid, and that as to such bonds and
the interest thereon, the said Southern Pacific Companv will discharge
the annual obligations imposed upon said Octroi Pacific Railroad
Com; auy by exiting Acts of Congress, aud will, during the continuance
Of thisagie ment, fully comply with the terms of, peif-.rm all the duties
And the said Southern Pacific

prescribed in, and discharge alt the obligations imposed upon said
Central Pacific Railroad Company by the Act of Congress commonly

know i as the
lhurman Act.”
And the said Southern Pacific Company hereby agrees to and with
the said Centi al Pacific Railroad Company that it wilt well aud truly
perfo. m all the duties and obligations of said r rilroad company to the
United States and the Government thereof under existing Acts of Con¬
gress relating to the maintenance and operation of its railroad and to

bondholders next week.
The committee named above is

composed of business men

should

guaranty that

of high standing, whose reputation
be a
whatever scheme is adopted will be faithfully carried out.
The plan, as quoted below, seems to
a
one,
has a large amount of the security holders committed in its
favor. The Chronicle has no material criticisms to make

be

good

and already

probably as fair to all interests ad
the circumstances, saving and
excepting that in the case of this property, as of all others
similarly situated, the first mortgage bondholders should be
left untouched. It is most important that the idea should get
abroad and be established beyond a question that a small first
mortgage op a large railroad property will never be disturbed,
and that the priority and sanctity of its lien will in no way be
interfered with, whatever may happen to the junior securities.

upon the scheme, which is
it is possible to make under

An abstract of the proposed plan is as follows ;
THE OLD COMPANY AND THEIR CONVERSION

STOCKS AND BONDS OF

ISSUES OF NEW

COMPANY.

INTO

$6,382,500.— First Mortgage 7 per cent Bonds.—Settlement not to ex¬
condi* ions, otherwise bonds to remain as they are.

ceed the following

be set a«ide for their redemption
redemption at a high r rate of in
If interest is reduced to 6 per cent
com
ensation for the difference in interest, to be aiven at the rate of
$ :00 in new 5 p~r cent preferred stock for each $1,000 bond. Overdue
An

equal amount of new consols to

with power to issue these bonds for
terest, but not exceeding 7 per cent.

interest

payable in cash.

Mortgage Consolidated! per cent Bonds— ($360,000
transportation for said Government over the same as fully aud faith¬ in$19.740,500.—First
collateral for about $520,000 floating debt.) To lie exchanged dollar
as
said
is
to
do,
except
as
fully
railroad company
bound
otherwise for dollar of capital against new consolidated bonds which are to bear
hereinbefore pi ovided. * * * *
interest at the rate of 4 per cent per annum. (Coupons, including Jan¬
Aud the sddS nithern Pacific Company hereby agrees with the said
uary, 1h86, sei tied as below.)
The difference in interest is fo be com¬
Central Pam Me Railroad Company that dining the continuance of this
pensated as follows : for each $1,090 bond including coupons of Jan¬
lease it w ill annually, on the first Monday in May, pay to the said Cen¬
tral PaciHo Railroad Company, as guaranteed rental for said Cemral uary, 1886, aud precedin . If new bond at 4 per cent to receive $500
new 5 per cent preferred stock.
Pacific Railroad and other leased property for the year ending on the
$2,5tm,000.—General Mortgage Bonds—To receive for each
81st day of December next preceding that date the sum of oue milliou
with all unpaid c mpons. $pOO in new 5 per cent preferred stock, if not
two huudred thousand dollars ($ 1,200,o00j.
assessed. $1,000 in new 5 per cent preferred stock if holders pay 2
And the s>.id Southern Pacific Company hereby farther in this behalf
per cent cash assessment.
agrees with tne said (eutral Pacific Railroad'Company, tint if the
$3,600.00 '.—Outstanding Equipment Roads.—($182,000 held as col¬
earnings of the said Central Pacific. Railroad, and of the railroads situa¬
ted noith of Goshen now held by the said Central Pacific Railroad Com¬ laterals.) Settlement not to exreed tin*, following conditions: To receive
capital in new consols dollar for dollar. "To receive
pany under leas* 8, shall in auy year during the continuance of this
difference in interest per each $l,0()0. $100 in n« w 5 per cent preferred
agreement exceed all expenditures, payments and di-.l»uiseme ts of
stock if new consols at 4 per coat interest. In the settlement it shouldb®
everj kind made by the said Southern Pacific Company “for such year”
tried to have such series of equipment as is being used by the Denver &
in operating, maintaining, adding to aud bettering the same, aud of all
Rio Grande Western Railway Company, turned over to the latter com¬
exp nditures, payments and disbursements made by the said Southern
pany.
Pacific Company tor taxes, rentals, inteiest and in discharge of any of
$3-,000,000.—Capital Stock— To be exchanged dollar for
the obligations by said Southern Pacific Company incur'ed under this
per
new common stock, the old stock to pay an assessment of
agreement, as heretofore provided, including the said sum of oue against
share when depositing its stock, against which a ses-mient of e. ch $8 in
million twohu dred thousand dollars, then such excess for any such
•ash an issue oi $16 in new 5 per cent preferred stock of the company
vear not exceeding the sum of two millions four hundred thousand dol¬
be made.
lars shall ou i ho first Monday in May, us aforesaid, be paid to the said willTOTAL
AUTHORIZED STOCKS AND BOND8 OF THE NEW COMPANY.
Central Pacific Railroad Company, as additional leutal fur such
$ 30,Out),(>(><•.—First Mortgage Consolidated Cold Bonds.— 4 per cent.
year. * * * ■*
$ 5,500,000.-5 per cent preferred stock, non-cumulutivc with
And it is further agreed between the said Southern Paoiflc Company
power.
and the «aiu Central Pacific Railroa t Company, that if any legislation
$38,000,090.— Common slock, xoith voting power.
or governmental action i.ereafter be had which in the opinion of the
8ucli reductions of the requirements of preferred stock as may be
■aid Southern i acitic Company is In hostility • « the. said Central Paoitt
possible, either from some of the contingencies of the i»re eding
Railro. d Company, its rights, or the property hereby leased, ihe said
or from any change in i he settlements or from any.other causes,
Southern Pacific Company may. on notice to the said Central P cifle
be t ennanent, and no additional issue of prefer'ed stuck shall be mad®
Railroad Company, terminate this agreement, or raav submit t<* arbi¬
uv the new company, except by consent of the majority of each of both
trators, in tlie manner and with the effect hereinbefore provided, for
oi the common and preferred stock outstanding.
The total reduction In
changes huu r visions. * * * *
tin mnt of new preferred stock may amount to $2,526,500.
Any part of the $30,000,000 new consulida'ed bonds
Chicago Clinton Dnbuqne & Minnesota.—To the holders
of bonds of this railroad company notice is given that all of unused alter the reorganization of the company shall be canceled.




in
$1,000

compensation for

dollar
$3

voting

plan,
shall

remaining

d

A

April 18,

481

THE CHRONICLE.

1885.]

old stock and general mortgage by O. & W. of $700,000 for West Shore, on the endorsing of
into the hands of speoial trustees, with strict $250,000 North River construction notes, and the lending of
provisions for their application to payment of existing floating debt, $625,000 bonds to the New York & Ontario Terminal Con>
and of the expenses of foreclosure and reorganization, to betterments
and to equipment, as directed respectively by the Committee of Reor¬ pany, which are the main items of bad management.”
ganization and by the reorganized company. The Committee of
New York West Shore & Buffalo.—A meeting of bond¬
Reorganization is appointed with power to make the best possible holders of the West Shore Railroad was held at the Windsor
settlement with the holders of the first mortgage bonds and the equip¬
ment bonds, and to make such changes in the details of this plan as
Hotel, pursuant to the call of Messrs. Russell Sage, Henry
Clews and others, who were opposed to the reorganization
they consid r to be for the best interest of all parties.
If the negotiations now pending between the European committees of
plan. There was a large attendance at the meeting and great
first mortgage and of consolidated bondholders should result in such a
confusion. Mr. N. A. Cowdrey, who has been well known in
manner that the first mortgage bonds are to be exchanged for prior
lien bonds, then the issue of such prior lien bonds shall be provided for railroad foreclosure affairs, offered a resolution that a com*
in the reorganization plan, and this issue may also be increased up to
mittee of seven be appointed to protect the interests of first
ten millions of dollars for the purpose of providing equipment if no
mortgage bondholders^ &c., and the following committee was
adjustment with present equipment holders is reached.
FIXED CHARGES OF NEW COMPANY.
finally appointed, viz. : John A. Stewart, W. W. Osborn,
Charles R. Flint, Russell Sage, Henry Clews, T. B. Musgrave,
The maximum fixed charges, if interest on first mortgage bonds is not
reduced, will be as follows:
and S. S. Sands. It has since been stated in the newspapers
Seven per cent on $8,382,500 first mortgage bonds
$448,775 that Mr. John A. Stewart, President of the United States
Four per cent on $23,340,500 4 per cent consols
933,620
Trust Company, which is the trustee of the first mortgage,
The

proceeds of assessments upon the

bonds are at once to pass

$1,380,395

Total

Taxes

Georgia State Bonds.—At Atlanta, Ga., April 16, Gov.

$17,000,000 for Geor¬
gia’s issue of $3,500,000 of 5 percent bonds. The bids averaged
106. The highest bid was made by Fred Woltfe and was
above 108. The bid of Moses Taylor & Co., of New York,
makes the bonds about 4% per cent.
Houston & Texas Central.—A press dispatch from Galves¬
ton, April 14, said an important suit, brought by the Farmers’
Loan & Trust Company of New York against the Houston &
Texas Central Railway Company is pending here in the
United States Circuit Court. The plaintiffs sue as trustees
of the several mortgages named below. Their bill alleges t hat
they are trustees of the mortgage issued June 16,1873, covering
McDaniel opened bids to the amount of

of
mile ; also of the second or consolidated 8 per cent
mortgage issued Oct. 1, 1872, covering the main line and
Western Division and 3,840 acres of land per mile. The bili
embraces another mortgage, the consolidated covering the
Waco & Northwestern Division, issued May 1, 1875, covering
also 6,000 acres per mile of road completed. The fourth and
last mortgage sued upon is the general mortgage of 1881, and
covers all the lands of the Texas Central Railway Co.
The

the Waco & Northwestern

Division and also 6,000

acres

land per

plaintiffs ask for an accounting?and that a receiver be ap¬
pointed. This suit is distinct from that already brought against
the company by the Southern Development Co., under which
receivers have already been appointed and are now acting.
Massachusetts Central—Fitchburg.—It is understood that
the directors of the Central Massachusetts have offered to sell
their ro»d to the Fitchburg for $1,000,000 of Fitchburg stock,
which at present price? would be worth about $1,200,000. The

Fitchburg directors did not entertain the proposition, but they
expressed a willingness to operate the road and pay 22J4 per
cent of the gross

earnings.

Further negotiations

are

probable.

Missouri Pacific.—It is reported that a complete settlement
of the Marie-Garrison suit in the case of the Missouri Pacific
has been made for $1,000,000, and that the litigation will cease.
Nashville Chattanooga & St. Lonis.—The gross and net
earnings for March and for the nine months since July 1
have been

as

follows:

March.
1885.
1884.

Gross earnings
Operating expenses

*

r-9 m.

July 1 to fifar.31—

1884-5.

1883-4.

$1,760,142 $1,83’,212

$186,737
111,070

$20’,819

118,880

1,011,063

999,728

$75,667
56,844

$87,939
55,401

$749,079
513,193

$831,18 t
497,707

$18,823

$32,538

$235,886

$333,777

Net earnings
Interest and taxes

Surplus

New York Central & Hudson.—The Treasurer gives
that this company is prepared to redeem in cash the

notice

second
mortgage bonds of the Hudson River Railroad Company
maturing June 16 next whenever presented, with interest up
to the date of pre sentation.
—At the annual election in Albany, April
directors was re-elected, as follows : W. H.

15, the old board of
Vanderbilt, Corne¬

not consulted before his appointment on the committee.
During the meeting Russell Sage asked Mr. Stewart (the
lawyer) if it was not true that interest on the terminal bonds
had been paid out of receivers’ certificates.
Mr. Stewart
said : “ The interest on that proportion which the West Shore
agreed to pay as a consideration for the terminus at Weeha wken has been paid in certificates.
The amount used was
less than $400,000, the total issue at present being $3,100,000.*
Ohio Central.—At Toledo, April 15, United States Master
Commissioner Goods peed sold the main line properties of the
Ohio Central Railway to C. J. Canda representing the bond¬
holders of the main line, at $1,000,000, the lowest bid allowed
by the terms of the sale. No other bid was made. Terminal
property in Toledo and in Columbus was then offered, and
was knocked down to J. A. Johnson, representing the terminal
property bondholders for $75,000, also without competition.
This was also the minimum sum allowed by the terms of the
sale. The result of the sale was in accord with the plans of
reorganization.
Oregon & California.—The gross earnings of the Oregon
& California from Jan. 20, when Receiver Koehler took charge,
to March 1, were $111,568, and the operating expenses were
$83,269, leaving net $28,299.
Oregon Railway & Navigation.—The Executive Commit¬
tee of the directors of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Co.
met and determined to postpone the question of the quarterly
dividend for a month. This was done on account of the great
decrease of earnings for January, when the road was snowed
up.
The postponement is understood to simply defer the
quarter one month, and with the understanding that next
month the usual dividend will be declared.
Pacific Mail.—At a meeting of the directors of this company
a dividend of V/i per cent was declared, based on the following
report for the quarter ending Feb. 28 : Gross earnings, $1,114,049; expenses, $777,469; net earnings, $336,580; cash in
treasury, $487,788. Mr. Gould offered a resolution to the effect
that the Central and Union Pacific railroads be requested to
transfer to the Pacific Mail the business (but not the steamers)
now
carried on by the Occidental & Oriental Steamship
Company, plying between San Francisco and the Chinese ana
Japanese ports, and execute a contract with the steamship
company guaranteeing it for ten years, as far as possible, from
opposition. As an offset the Pacific Mail will engage to
become a member of the Trans-Continental Association m the
same manner as if it were a railroad between the Atlantic and
the Pacific, the percentage to be awarded the steamship com¬
pany to be arbitrated by a board composed of one member
appointed by the Pacific Mail and a second to be appointed by
the Commissioner of the Trans-Continental Pool.
This reso¬
lution was adopted without dissent, and is said to be accept¬
able to the Union Pacific management. Mr. Huntington of
the Central Pacific afterward spoke with some uncertainty as
to what his company would do about it.
was

Philadelphia & Reading—Central of New

discussion between counsel as to

Jersey.—After

the payments by the Phila¬

H. Rutter, C. C. Clarke, Chauncey M. delphia & Reading receivers to the Central of Nt-w Jersey to
Depew, Horace J. Hayden, William K. Vanderbilt, Frederick meet its April obligations, Judge McKennan entered an order
W. Vanderbilt, Samuel F. Barger, J. P. Morgan and C. W. authorizing the receivers “to make payments out of the rev¬
Field, all of New York ; William Bliss, Boston, and Sherman enues derived from the operation of the roads referred to in
S. Jewett, Buffalo.
the lease of the Central Railroad Company of New Jersey in
New York Ontario & Western.—Dow & Jones’ News Letter payment of obligations arising under the leas« to the extent
reports: “The full report of the meeting of Ontario & West¬ only of the net revenue derived from the operation of the
ern stockholders in London, April 1, is at hand.
In a long roads.”
After the action in court an officer of the Reading said that
speech the chairman made the following points : He told ol
from
the efforts of the committee in New York to modify agree¬
April 1 to December 1, 1883, the Jersey Central had
ments with the West Shore, which were successful.
Return¬ earned $1,000,000 over and above the interest charges and
ing to England, they received cables from President Winslow operating expenses ; that in the same months in 1884, which
was an exceptional year and characterized by almost unprece¬
that the majority of the new $4,000,000 bonds would be used in
dented
business depression, its earnings were $200,000 in ex¬
paying off floating debt. But it was impossible to float the
bonds, and only $200,000 were placed. The O. & W. director? cess of interest and operating expenses. He pointed out that
For this under the lease Jersey Central was carrying a larger amount
are more interested in West Shore than in O. & W.
of coal than ever before, and said that this year there was no
reason control must come to the shareholders before any
reason to doubt its earnings would be $500,000 at least in ex¬
is
Finally
bought
control
of
pre¬
money
advanced.
we
the
ferred stock at a fair price, and have decided to put $1,002,500 cess of the interest charges and operating expenses.
The recovers afterward announced their intention to pay
preferred stock wich $1,800,000 of bonds in a trust, and issu»j
over to tl e < fficers of Jersey Central the money earned as fast
against them collateral trust certificates to the amount of
$2,500,000. These certificates will be offered to common as it came in, and the Philadelphia Press remarks of this:
The resolution of the Reading receivers to pay the Jersey
stockholders. Interest on these certificates with good man
Central
interest due on the 1st inst. needs the explanation that
agement ought to be easily earned by a road which annually
earns $2,000,000 gross.
The offer to O. & W. in the Wes the receivers, under i he order of the court, will pay to the
Shore reorganization plan will be considered later. The stock¬ Jersey Central the net earnings of that road daily. The earn¬
holders cam take proper action later on on the expenditure ings of Jersey during April of the last three years have been
lius Vanderbilt, James




“

THE CHRONICLE.

482
■■

-

..

i—U-i—'.;-U-■

averaged and found to be from $450,000 to $490,000, and on
this showing the receivers send daily to New York say $20,000,
and will continue to do so, increasing the sum next month.
At this rate it will take seventeen days to pay up the charges
already due, or $848,000.
The principal of the car trust
$170,000, will not be paid, and it is expected there will be no
trouble about making a satisfactory arrangement with the
holders.”

-

..

'

—.

[v«uxu
•

—l-li.

Slue ©mtiwjerjcml Jinxes.
COMMERCIAL

EPITOME^

Friday

Night, April 17,1885.

The reports of the progress of affairs between Russia and
Great Britain, as they have been received from day to day by

«

Philadelphia it is reported that of Reading’s floating
debt holders, $7,000,000 have agreed to extend for three cable, have been the active influence in commercial circles,
years in notes bearing 6 per cent interest, no collateral to be stimulating speculation to an extraordinary degree and caus¬
sold except in default of interest. The consent of $1,500,000 ing wide and frequent fluctuations in prices. The early part
more will perfect the agreement by securing the required
of the week the advices looked very warlike, causing a sharp
—In

It is understood that the Bartol committee will
rise in food staples and a corresponding depression in cotton,
further negotiations with the Whelen committee
until the requisite consent of the floating debt security holders and weakness in coffee, sugar and teas. But on Wednesday
has been obtained for the proposed extension.
a more peaceful aspect depressed breadstuffs and
provisions,
Rome Watertown & Ogdensburg.—The gross and net earn¬ without, however, lending strength to other staples.
To-day
ings for February, and for five months from October 1 to March the prospects for the maintenance of peace are believed to be
1, have been:
good, with the effect of a further decline in food staples and
Oat. 1 to March 1.
nine-tenths.

not carry on

/

February.

Gross earnings....
Operat’g expenses.

s

>

/

1885.

1884.

$110,508

$93,745

84,316

88,218

$645,371
468,960

1884.

earnings
$5,527
$176,411
$26,192
Union Pacific.—The report of this company for

Net

1885.

$680,001
470,628

$209,373

1884 is just
out, and it is certainly one of the most complete railroad
reports ever published. It comes to hand too late for the
Chronicle to analyze or comment upon it this week, but in
the issue of April 25 the report will be considered.
The Union Pacific has paid over to the United States Govern¬
ment $916,704 in settlement of all claims of the Government
against the railroad company up to Jan. 1, 1885, under the

a fresh advance in cotton.
The weather was cold and unsea¬
sonable early in the week, but closes more spring-like. Plant¬
ing and sowing are much belated, but not sufficiently so to
threaten serious results. The chief labor event of the week
is the adjustment of matters with the hatters at Danbury,
who have been on a strike for several months. Troubles with
coal miners at the West still continue.
The speculation in lard futuresTias been more active, affected

largely by the foreign advices and the course of breadstuffs,
advancing and declining with flour and grain, but not to the
same extent.
To-day the speculation was quite dull, but
prices were about steady, closing at 7-22c. for May, 7*30c. for
June, 7*36c. for July and 7*44c. for August. Spot lard closes
Thurman act and the recent Court of Claims decision. Of dull and
nearly nominal at 7*10c. for prime city, 7*25c. for
this amount $633,000 will go to the sinking fund and $283,000
prime Western and 7’45c. for refined for the Continent. Pork
account of the interest
Union Pacific Company.

on

In

on

regard to the report

the bonds issued in aid of the

that a loan of $4,000,000 for

of the Union Pacific
said it is true that
negotiations are pending to fund the Union Pacific floating
debt, but nothing is yet ready for the public. Of course a
twenty-year loan is a great deal better than a call loan. The
company has $1,500,000 cash on hand, and might sell securities
in the company’s treasury.
All the collateral trust sixes,
$4,601,000, are outstanding, but of the collateral trust fives
$2,166,000 are held in the treasury of the company and $3,688,000 are outstanding and held mostly in Europe. The amount
of collateral trust sixes and fives is unlimited, except by the
amount of bonds which the company may have to pledge as
collateral therefor. The average rate which the Union Pacific
is paying upon its floating debt is less than five per cent.
The
company has $700,000 of its eight per cent sinking fund bonds,
worth above 117, which it can dispose of at any time.
Wabasli St. Louis & Pacific.—At St. Louis, April 16, Judge
Brewer, of the United States Circuit Court, delivered an
opinion on the application by the receiver of the Wabash road
for an order of the court allowing them to cease operating
certain now non-paying leased lines of the system after May 1.
The judge said that in no case are they to discontinue opera¬
tions on any road.
Receivers were appointed, he said, to
preserve and"keep the entire Wabash system as a “going con¬
the funding of the floating indebtedness
had been negotiated, President Adams

active and firmer early in the week, but lost the advance
and closes dull at $18@$13 25 for mess, $11 for extra prime
and $14@ $15 for clear. Pickled cut meats have been firmer
and much more active, but close quiet and barely steady at
was

6@6%c. for bellies, 5%c. for shoulders and 9%@ 9%c. for
Smoked meats nearly nominal. Beef firmer; extra
mess, $11 50(3)12 and packet $12@$12 50 per bbl., and India
mess $24@$26 per tierce; beef hams quoted at $20(3$20 50 per
bbl. Tallow is steadier but quiet at 6c.; stearine, 7%@7%c.;
and oleomargarine 7c.
Butter is firmer at 20@28c. for new
Cheese rather stronger at 7@ 12c. for State factory.
creamery.
The slaughter of swine at the West has made active progress,
amounting at nine towns to 473,000 head since March 1, against
309,000 for the corresponding period last season. The follow¬
ing is a comparative summary of aggregate exports from Oct.
27 to April 11:
hams.

1884-5.

Pork, lbs
Bacon, lbs
Lard. Ibs

1883-4.

25,366,600
220,708,161

19,973,600
183,690,228

138,296,328

94,357,280

Inc. 5.393,000
Inc. 37,017,933
Inc. 43,939,040

Brazil coffees were quite depressed early in the week. The
quotations for fair cargoes Rio was dropped %c. to 8%c., and
options declined even more; but the close to-day was steadier
at 7‘05c. for April, 7*10c. for May, 7'25c. for June, 7‘30c. for
July and 7’40c. for August. Mild coffees sold more freely,
but at easier prices.
Raw sugars have been offered more
freely, and wo quote at 4%@4%c. for fair to good refining,
Refined
cern.” In case there is any debt incurred in running tlie leased with large sales of English Islands to-day at 4@4%c.
lines the receivers must issue certificates to make up the sugars unsettled.
Molasses has been quite active at 17%c. for
deficiency. This can be easily done, as they are authorized to 50-degrees test. Teas have been depressed; two large auction
issue $2,500,000 of such certificates, and only $500,000 of them sales went off at lower prices, and speculative values are
have so far been issued.
The court directed an order to issue, reduced and nominal.
The market for Kentucky tobacco during the past week has
at the instance of the Cairo division, restoring it to its owners
and taking it out of the Wabash system, pending the fore¬ been more active; sales 550 hhds., of which 450 hhds.for export.
closure proceedings which have been brought by the first Prices remain firm; lugs, 6%@7%c.; leaf, 7%(®llc. It is
mortgage bondholders of that road in Illinois. The court reported that some 400 hhds. were sold for Spanish account.
overruled the application of the Central Trust Company for Seed leaf has been quiet; sales 750 cases, as follows: 250 cases
the appointment of Solon Humphreys and Thomas E. Tutt as 1883 crop, Pennsylvania, 8@12%c.; 100 cases 1882 crop, Penn,
receivers under the bill filed by them for a foreclosure.
sylvania, private terms; 150 cases 1881 crop, Pennsylvania, 6s.;
11c.; 50 cases 1883 crop, Wisconsin Havana, private terms;
100 cases 1883 crop, New England,11@ 14c.; 100 cases sundries,
“Burdett’s Official Intelligence,” 1885, has been
received from London. The book is issued under the sanction 5@28c.; 350 bales Havana, 65c. @$1 10; 150 bales Sumatra,
of the Committee of the London Stock Exchange, and is $1 20@$1 60.
Crude petroleum certificates have been quite sluggish. The
compiled and edited by Mr. Henry C. Burdett, Secretary of
interest has been diverted to other staples offering
speculative
the Share and Loan Department.
The completeness and gen¬ better returns.
Prices have latterly shown a downward ten¬
eral excellence of this annual are so widely known and appre¬
dency,
and
closed
Crude in barrels
this afternoon at 77%c.
ciated, that it is only necessary for us to call the attention of
the financial public in this country to the fact that the edition quoted at 7@7%c.; refined in barrels for export, 7%@7%c.,
and in cases, 8%@10%c.; naphtha 6%c. The speculation in
for 1885 is now ready.
A copy may be examined at the office
spirits turpentine has become more active, and to-day 300
of the Chronicle.
bbls. sold at 31c. for April and 30c. for July and August, but
—Attention is called to the proposals of the City of St. rosins are
again lower, with common to good strained quoted
Paul for the sale of $600,000 5 per cent bonds, having 30 years
at $1 03@$110.
to run. Of these bonds $400,000 are for water-works extension
Metals have attracted little speculative interest. At to¬
and $200,000 are for sewerage purposes. A chance will here
day’s Exchange pig iron certificates were nominal; bids $16@
be offered to purchase the bonds of one of the most flourishing
$16%, with $16%@$17 asked. Tin strong but not active at
cities in the United States, bearing a good rate of interest.
17*85@ 18c. spot, 17*65@17*80c. futures; 10 tons April sold at
Proposals will be received till noon of the 30th day of April inst. 17*85c. Tin plate dull at $4 35 asked. Copper strong at»
—The St. Paul Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Co. have 10’70c@llc., closing with further upward tendency and ad¬
declared a quarterly dividend of 1% per cent on the capital vance of 10 points; 10 tons Lake April sold at 10 95c. Lead
stock, payable on and after May 1st at the office of the neglected. Spelter quiet and nominal at 4*20@4*40c. do¬
mestic.
company, 63 William Street.
Ocean freights have been doing better; shipments of bread—The Homestake Gold Mining Co. has declared a dividend
of $31,250 for March, payable at the company’s office, San stuffs and provisions materially increased and rates advanced;
Francisco, or at the New York agency of Lounsbery & Co., but at the close the outward movement has received a decided
15 Broad Street.
check, and rates are unsettled and nominal.




THE CHRONICLE.

18, 1885.]

April

COTTON.

In addition to above exports, our telegrams to-night also
give
the following amounts of cotton on shipboard, not
cleared,
at the ports named.
We add similar figures for New York,
which are prepared for our special use by Messrs.
Carey, Yale
& Lambert, 89 Broad Street.
us

Friday, P. M„ April 17, 1885.
The Movement of the Crop, as indicated by our telegrams
from the South to-night, is given below. For the week ending
this evening (April 17), the total receipts have reached 23,728

bales, against 21,808 bales last week, 28,111 bales the previous
week and 28,810 bales three weeks since; making the total

On
April

17, at—

receipts since the 1st of September, 1884,4,624,818 bales, against

4,672,343 bales for the same period of 1883-84, showing

a

decrease since September 1, 1884. of 47,525 bales.
Sat.

Receipts at—

Mon.

114

Galveston
Indianola, &o.

•

New Orleans...
Mobile
Florida
Savannah

Tues.

66

•••

....

Thurs.

Fed.

Fri.

Total.

116

369

55

854

•

•

....

10

10

•••

2,8S6

1,097

2,841

1,099

1,494

1,335

10,752

10

90

20

14

12

80

226

170

170

458

3,174

9

9

....

....

900

Brunsw’k, &o.
Charleston
Pt. Royal, &c.
Wilmington....
Moreh’d C.,&o

....

1,180

...

....

456

119

....

....

.

.

.

.

61
....

Shipboard, not cleared—for

Great
Britain.

New Orleans....
Mobile
Charleston
Savannah

Galveston..
Norfolk

134
•••

48a

France.

Foreign

wise.

Leaving
Stock.

Total.

5,512

6,062

2,204

None.

26,964

None.
None.
None.
None.
None.

141,275

None.

None.

300
800

1,300

16,586
6,975
11,124
11,497

3,000

None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.
None.

23,076

5,512

....

4,690

New York

1,200

Other ports

Total 1884
Total 1883

Coast¬

13,186
1,000
None.
None.

Total 18S5.

Other

20,669
61,409

11,333

i

None.

800
None.

1,068

5,758

600

None.

1,800

500

None.

3,500

4,652
350,104
28,631

7,162

4,372

40,122

570,844

556,973
598,390

11,390

5,234

48,626

13,058 1 44.097

17.298

135.862

The

speculation in cotton for future delivery at this marke
continued^moderately active for the week under review, but
3
7
12
16
69
34
141
with an unsettled tone and at prices showing wide variations.
5
5
The affairs of Great Britain and Russia, the danger of war or
266
437
260
42
764
181
Norfolk
1,950
the
prospect of peace between these two great powers, have
West Point,&c
967
967
710
72
147
New York
57
598
1,584 continued to be the leading influence, all others being for the
1
142
Boston
276
25
6
450
moment more or less in abeyance. The short time or stoppage
Baltimore
1,231
1,231
of New England cotton mills, and the late planting season,
43
14
1
34
37
Philadelp’a, &c.
1,364
1,493
were little considered.
On Saturday there was a decline and
Totals this week
2,986
4,449
3,676
5,340
2,610
4,662 23,723 on
a
Monday semi-panic. A partial recovery on Tuesday was
For comparison, we give the following table showing the week’s due
wholly to a demand to cover contracts, quite natural after
total receipts, the total since Sept. 1,1884, and the stock to-night,
so sharp a decline as had taken
place, independent of all other
and the same items for the corresponding periods of last year.
considerations. A partial advance on Wednesday was followed
1884-85.
1883-84.
Stock.
by a sharp decline, from the fact that the bulls had overloaded
Receipts to
This
Since Sep.
This
Since Sep.
themselves.
Yesterday, upon the more peaceful aspect of the
1885.
1884.
April 17.
Week.
Week.
1,1884.
1, 1883.
foreign advices, there was a buoyant market, with considerable
Galveston
854
451,963
1,542
583,615
11,497
13,302 activity, and some recovery of confidence
among the bull
10
39
Ind’nola,&o
10,716
8,436
party.
To-day
there
was
an
early advance, but the specu
New Orleans. 10,752 1,486,136
7,305 1,488,271
168,239 176,424
lation was dull, and the close quiet. Cotton on the spot has
Mobile
226
227,306
1,520 243,990
16,586
10,039
continued dull.
Florida
170
315
77,272
2
519
42,455
Only a limited spinning demand can be
Savannah....
3,174
708,363
645,360
1,599
Stocks are well concentrated at this point, but do
11,924
7,366 noticed.
9
75
Br’sw’k,&c.
9,743
7,959
not seem to attract buyers.
Quotations were reduced %c on
Charleston...
690
671
508,354
411,615
8,275
8,232
Monday.
there
Yesterday
was an advance of l-16c.
To-day
17
Pt.Royal,&c
325
6,391
13,573
the market is quiet and steady at 11c for middling uplands.
111
195
Wilmington..
93,368
90,921
1,472
4,508
The total sales for forward delivery for the week are 653,400
5
M’headC.,&e
15
9,598
12,515
bales. For immediate delivery the total sales foot up this week
Norfolk
1,950 542,309
570,524
1,683
10,410
10,649 1,077 bales, including — for'export, 1,077 for
consumption,
967
W.Point,&c.
597
274,711
4
219,979
for speculation and — in transit.
Of the above, — bales
New York...
1,584
65,854
2,657
102,325
351,904 347,394 were to arrive.
The following are the official quotations for
Boston
450
79,446
163,130
5,239
6,310
6,720 each day of the past week.
226

75

....

39

....

•

mmmm

•

215

40

•••

•

....

•••

....

....

...

95

690

17

17

has

....

....

....

....

••••

«...

....

...

....

•

*

*

•••

.

.

.

.

...

—

Baltimore

28,613

1,231
1,493

...

PhiladeTa,&c

23.723*4,624,818

Total

2,001
4,496

.

44,675

30,274
w

23,301
39,344

4,672,3431

12,811
11,532
610,966

7,561
12,885

*

605,599
—

In order that

1885.

1884.

1883.

1882.

Galvest’n,&c.

864

1,581

7,791

3,891

New Orleans.
Mobile

10,752

19,069

Savannah....

3,174

7,305
1,520
1,599

Charl’st’n, &c

707

996

1,679
7,928
5,093

5,686
2,604
3,166
1,836

Wilm’gt’n, &c
Norfolk, &c..

146

210

800

427

All others....

2,917
4,937

2,280
14,783

9,805
14,362

Tot. this w’k.

23,723

30,274

66,527

226

1881.

we

I860.

6,497
21,445

5,082
9,694

2,712

1,716

6,130

6,774

2,740
1,597

346

403

4,504
7,686

5,923
10,891

7,215
8,267

29,800

60,713

36,714

Since Sept. 1. 4624,818 4672,343 5552,665 4393,136 5303,619
4603,009
Galveston includes Indianola; Charleston includes Port
Royal, &o.
Wilmington includes Morehead City, &c.; Norfolk includes WestPoiut.&c!

The exports for the week

ending this evening reach a total
of 35,057 bales, of which
23,289 were to Great Britain, 4,010
to France and
7,758 to the rest of the Continent, while the
stocks as made up this evening are now 610,966 bales. Below
the exports for the week and since September 1, 1884.
Week Ending April 17.
Exported to—
Great
BriVn. France

from—

Galveston

0,859

New Orleans..

Total
Week.

0,859
9,351

......

3,402

1,1884, to Apr. 17,1883.
Exported to—

nent.

5,689

Mobile
Florida

8avannah

1,528

Charleston*...

«

Wilmington...
Norfolkf
New York
Boston....

Baltimore...

•

*

«

......

......

......

561

Philadelp’a,&c

.

......

10,898
2,101
.

1,528

•

543

.

@

.

.

.

......

......

1,809

13,315
2.L01
561

......

1,342

1,342

Great
Britain. Fi'ance

7,470
155,798
631,370 275,003
43,130
3,585
179,903 11,099
103,087 22,259
51,197
303,020
6,375
371,042 33,740

100,722

112,909
51,932

3,050

Conti¬
nent.

63,193

Total.

199,250
152,005
14,040
25,670
134,068

8i3ie

Strict Ord.. 9^4
Good Ord.. lOiie

220.406
43 830

3,585
390,858
338,011
65,237
840,071
539.456

418

107,140

39,431
4,812

154,390
50,744

Total

23,289

4,010

7,758

35,037 2,179,301 360,202

941,100 3,480,009

Total 1883-84

23.043

5.198

7.809

80.110 2.154 527 443.889

&51 421 3.449 837

•

t

Includes exports from eon uoyai, &c.
includes exports from West Point, &c.




Mon Tues

8!Iit

She

8i5ie

815,6

9%

93s

93q

9%

9%

9I3ie

9i5ie lO3t0 10316

8tr. G’d Ord 1°716 110° g 10°ts 101116
109,0
Low Midd’g 10% :105s
11
105s
1078
Str.L’wMia 10*5,0 ioi310 1013x0 11 he Hh6
Middling... 11 ha 1015le 101516 11&10 11316
Good Mid.. 11%
11%
11%
11%
113s
Str. G’d Mid
115,0 113.6 11**10 119.6

Sat.

MonTaei

103l6
109,0
1078

9*18
9%

3*%*

815,0

9%

930

105,0 103,0
101Iie 109,0

103,0
103,0
10%
10%
11*16 H*J6

11*10 11%8
113.6 115,8 113,fl U3,q

113s

11%

1130

11%

HJis

119.6 11**16 U9l0 119J6
Midd’g Fair lll^iQ 11**16 mils 12*10 11*3,6 1115,0 121,0 11*3,6 1115,
Fair
127i0 12516 12516 121il0 129.6 129,0 12*1,6 129,0 129,0
Wed

Ordin’y.^lb 8»l.

Strict Ord..

9%

Th.

Fri. Wed

8%

8%

81510

9

9316

93s

9716

Str.L’wMid 101310 107s

Middling... 1015j6

Good Mid..! Ills
Str. G’d Mid; 11&10

Til.

9316

Good Ord..
10
Gl616 10
103l6
Str. G’d Ord 105,8 103s
103s
109,0
Low Midd’g lOSg
191 *16 lOHie 10%
11

10%
11

1138
11%
123s

ll15ie 12
129,0 125s

STAINED.

Good Ordinary
Strict Good Ordinary

Sat.

$ lb.

Middling
Middling

10%
105s

Fri. Wed
9

97,0
10%

10%
1015ie 1015,0
11%
11%
11*16
11*16 11% 11%
113s
H%6 U%0
119.6 11% 11%

11310 113,0

113s
Midd’g Fair lll*lf 11%
Fair
! 123,« 1230

12

12%

87i0

8516
9

8*5,0

9

9

97,6

97i0

103,0 10%
109l6 10%

85,6

10%
10%

10%
10*5,0 1015,0
H*16 11% 11%
11316 11% 11%
1130
11%6 117,0
119,0 11% 11%
12
11**16 12

129,«

9

Fri.

930

12%

Mon Tues Wed

9%

Til.

Tb.

12%
Fri.

83,0

830

8%

9

9L*e

9*10
9%

91*16 913le 9*3,0 913,0 9-8
10916 107,0 107,0 107,0 10%

10%

MARKET AND SALES.

The total sales and future deliveries each day during the
are indicated in the following statement.
For the con¬
venience of the reader we also add a column which shows at a

glance how the market closed

on same

days.

SALKS OP SPOT AND TRANSIT.
SPOT MARKET
CLOSED.

Sat.. Quiet
Mon
Dull at % dec....
Tues. Quiet
Wed
Steady
Thurs Steady at i,a adv
Fri.
Firm

Ex¬

port.

.

.

.

^

Sat.

TEXAS.

week

307,248 1,214,221
700

Ordin’y.$tt>

Low

From Sept.

Conti

Sat.

NEW ORLEANS.

Mon Tues

—-

comparison may be made with other years,
give below the totals at leading ports for six seasons.
'Receipts at—

UPLANDS.

April 11 to
April 17.

Total.
Tlie

....

Con- Spee- Tran¬
Total.
sump uVt'n sit.
53
83
277
89
352
223

....1,077

....

mmmm

....

....

FUTURK8.

Sales.

Deliv¬
eries.

53 70,400
83 166,800
277 104,000
89 98,500
352 106,500
223 70,200

20Q

1,077 652.400

2,000

800
300
300
200
200

daily deliveries given above are actually delivered tlie day
previous to that on which they are reported.

I
ri

VK1

?

Bi

8Hjf

mm■*

THE CHRONICLE.

484

Hi

Futures are shown by the follow¬

The Sales and Prices op

ing comprehensive table. In the statement will be found the
daily market, the prices of sales for each month each day, and
the closing bids, in addition to the daily and total sales.
as

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Beet*mberJanuary, for J nunry, 2.ll4,IoO; ScptemOer-Fettruary, for Februar3r,
1,959,200; Scptcmber-Marcb, for Marv it, 2.2 )4,100.
We
luettnieU in tUe above utoie, aiul shall continue each
week to *ive, the average price of futuret* each oajr for each month
ft
will <>e found .meter each dav fjllowiUK the aobreviatlou “ Aver. * The
average f”i ea.-!) menth for the. week n* aiau triven at bottom ot
!?!
Transferable Orders—-flaturilav, 11*0 .; M-mdav, 10 80c.; Tuesday,
10‘95c.; \V. Oiiemlay, 10 85c.; Thursday, il (me..; Friday, lL*00c.
Utt.c

for’April-Saturday, 1 lc.; Friday, 1 l-01c.
The following exchanges have been made during the week-.
•11 pd. to exch 1( 0 Mav for June, j -1
pd. to exch. Too June for Aug.
•01 pd. to exch. 1, >o-' Apr. for May | *< G pd. to exch. 500 t--ct. for Aug.
*12 pd. to excli. H) May foi June. I Id p.l. to t*x« h. 100 June for Aug.
*70 pd. to exch. 20c l>cc, for J uly. | -14 pd. to exch. 100 Sept, lor juue*

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I

Includes sales in September, 1834, for September, 15S,2(»0; 8f*pteraber-Ocuit’or, i"r October, 421,800; Sept* nti'cr-Noveiaber, for November,
582,200; Bepte 111 oer-December, for December. 907.800;


it


930,184

a

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Short Notices

O

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776,100

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758,200

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513.700

— —

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1 ft

99

47,000

321,000
61,000
99,184
400,000
49,000

..2,016,914 2,078,189 2,415,7a3 1,928,230

©. ft © <
3 — 3*
^ 7 )3

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7,000

63,400
105,300
307,000
39,000

7

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261,000

69,000
106,200
272,000

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I 1

O’

261,000

imports into Continental ports this week have been
26,000 bales.
The above figures indicate a decrease in the cotton in sight
to-night of 276,775 bales as compared with the same date of
1884, a decrease of 632,879 bales as compared with the corres¬
ponding date of 1883 and a decrease of 298,800 bales as
compared with 1882.
At the Interior Towns the movement—that is the receipts
for the week and since Sept. 1, the shipments for the week, and
the stocks to-night, and the same items for the corresponding
period of 1883-84—is set out in detail in the following statement :

S= so ft

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515,00)
73 4,252
191,341
20,200

The

<1
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586,000
100,000
402,000
667,672
157,558
15,000

748,000

207,000

..

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©

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199,184

..2,559,61 4 2,636,389 3,192.493 2,953,414
6 Died.
5°&d.
6^d.
515r(;d.

to
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ft

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312,300

227,000
29,000
103,700
177,000

afloat....

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03 J«

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99

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6,000
3,820

"

9®©9
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1,

Total East India, &o
Total Amerioan

^
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Egypt, Brazil, <kc.,

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..

Continental stocks
Tndia afloat for Europe

—-o-“

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..

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10

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to CO

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81

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Liverpool stock

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7,600

..2,015,914 2,078,189 2,415,793 1,928,230
East Indian, Brazil, die.—
London stock

M—

109,748
10,200

..

— co

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.

..

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9.900

790.000
319,000
271,000
605,599
69,590
3,000

797,000
286,000
202,000
610,966

>8

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CO*D

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425,200

3,110
36,000

2,559,614 2,836,389 3,l92,4y3 2,858,414
and other descriptions are as follows*

supply

Uaited States stock
United States interior stocks
Uaited States exports to-day.

to1-*
—
© —

03

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389,700

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American—

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to

4,000

60,000
10,000
4,000

8,000

Liverpool stock..

>

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83,000

.

6,500
66,000

.

Total visible

—o-r*^

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4.000

.

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101,000

.

5,000

254

Of the above, the totals of American

1 »©;

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-

1,900

.

.

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2,200

26,400
18,500

.

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to

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968,000

India cotton afloat for Europei.

—

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.1,053,000 1,123,000 1,074,400
3,300
3,300
6,000
41,000
71,600
53,400
32,000
54,000
48,000
400
2,400
1,000
1 600
900
3,300
142,000
216,000
181,000

61,000

.1.442,700 1,548,200 1,388,700 1,167,184
400,000
307,000
177,000
272,000
402,000
51-. ,000
e
271,000
202,000
49,000
33,000
e
7,000
47,000
E
667,672
734,252
605,599
610,986
Stbc
157,558
191,311
89,51:0
109,748
20.200
15,000
3.0J0
10,200
United States exports to-day.

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1892.

907,000

Total Continental stocks...

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?t)'ag

1883.

1884.

bales.1,024,000 1,054,000 1,011,000
69,000
63.400
29,000

Stock at Hamburg
Stock at Bremen
Stock at Amsterdam
Stock at Rotterdam
Stock at Antwerp
Stock at Havre
8tock at Marseilles
Stock at Barcelona
8toek at Genoa
Stock at Trieste

I

.

® •

p
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OS co

C

C*5

Thursday evening. But to make the totals the complete
figures for to-night (April 17), we add the item of exports rrem
the United State6, including in it the exports of Friday only.

to

1885.

|6£l m

st?

:

The Visible Supply op Cotton to-night, as made up by cabls
and telegraph, is as follows. The Continental stocks, as well as
those for Great Britain and the afloat, are this week’s returns,
and consequently all the European figures are brought down

Stock at Liverpool
8took at London

<

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too*
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8® cf t>

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9

g-.f'g.

8 «.pb

75

it! ?

05

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S'►“‘to®

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agSg' !§*! t-aEs
III

|3EIPi |3e2
jjj-S p |§8S*

_

r

[VOL. XIJ,

’0
ft © a © x — —

©
©

above totals

03

—— ©

03 — ©

©QDCO*)— — ©O’

00

ft) tO

©

to —

© 0.5

O' 03 C ©

*—

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C 03 -J H* ©.

show that the oid interior stocks
10,111 bales, and are to-night

decreased during the week

have

20,158

Apkil

THE

18, 1885.]

485

CHRONICLE.

Meridian, Mississippi.—Telegram not received.
the same period last year. The receipts at
Columbus, Mississippi.—It has rained on one day of the
the same towns have been 16,654 bales less than the same
\feek last year, and since September 1 the receipts at all the week, the rainfall reaching fourteen hundredths of an inch.
The thermometer has averaged 60, the highest being 80 and
towns are 204,392 bales less than for the same time in 1883-84
the lowest 38.
quotations for Middling Cotton at other Markets.—
Leland, Mississippi.—The early part of the week was
In the table below we give the closing quotations of middling clear and
pleasant, but the latter portion has been cloudy.
cotton at Southern and other principal cotton markets for each The thermometer has averaged 63, ranging from 42 to 92.
day of the past week.
Little Rock, Arkansas.—It has been cloudy on three days
of the week, with rain on Saturday, the rainfall reaching
CLOSING QUOTATIONS FOR MIDDLING COTTON ONWeek ending
eighty hundredths of an inch. Planting is progre-sing very
Fri.
April 17.
Thurs.
Weil ties.
Tues.
Mon.
Satur.
rapidly, and with ten days of clear weather will be nearly com¬
10%6
pleted. The thermometer has ranged from 43 to 81, averag¬
10%
10916
Galveston
J0?J6
JJ7W
10%
103a
10%6
bales more than at

...

New Orleans.
Mobile

1O01B
I0?i«

Savannah.

10%
10%

!0%6

1038

10?ie
lOSg

I05,6

10»16

1030

10%
1030
10%
10%

10%
105s
10%

10%
10%

10918

10916

Wilmington..

lo%

Norfolk

10%

Boston

10%
Ilia

10%
10%
10%
10%

in a

1L%

11

11

Baltimore...

lb-e

10»51#

10'Sie

10l3lfi

10%

Philadelphia.
Augusta
Memphis

11*8

11%

14%

11%

11%

lO'Jie

109,6

10%6

1030

1030

10%

105ie

1

10*16

10%
1050

10%

10%

10%

10%

..

Charleston.

.

1030
1033
10%
10%

1<»%
10*8
10%
103s

....

St. Louis

Cincinnati...
Louisville

1034
10%

...

Receipts from the

ing 61.

10&1Q

05^6

1(

3s

11
1015

10»1*®%

16

11%
10%
10%
10%
10%
10%

Plantations.—The following table is

Helena, Arkansas.—It has rained on two days, and the
remainder of the week has been pleasant.
Tne rainfall
reached sixty-nine hundredths of an inch.
Crop reports are
favorable. Average thermometer 61, highest ^83 and low¬
est 45.

Memphis, Tennessee.—We have had light rain on two days

of the week, the rainfall reaching thirty-one hundredths of
The weather has been very favorable for farm work,
an inch.
and good progress has been made with cotton planting.
The
thermometer has averaged 59, the highest being 81 and the
lowest 44.

Nashville, Tennessee.—It has rained on three days of the
prepared for the purpose of indicating the actual movement each week, the rainfall reaching ninety-seven hundredths of an
week from the plantations. Receipts at the outports are some¬
inch. The thermometer has averaged 54, ranging from 34
times misleading, as they are made up more largely one year
to 74.
than another at the expense of the interior stocks.
We reach,
Mobile, Alabama.—It has rained on one day, and the re¬
therefore, a safer conclusion through a comparative statement mainder of the week has been
pleasant. The rainfall was
like the following.
In reply to frequent inquiries we will add
inappreciable.
The
has ranged from 45 to 78,
thermometer
that these figures, of course, do not include overland receipts
averaging
62.
or Southern consumption; they are simply a statement of the
Montgomery, Alabama.—Telegram not received.
weekly movement from the plantations of that part of the crop
Selma, Alabama.—The weather has been warm and dry all
which finally reaches the market through the outports.
The thermometer has averaged 65, the highest
the week.
RECEIPTS FROM PLANTATIONS.

Week

Ending—
Jan. SO
Feb. 6
"

13

*

20

“

27

Moh. 6
“

*
“

13
20

27

April 3
**

10

Receipts at the Ports. St'kat Interior Towns. Rec'pts from Plant'ns
1883.

I 1884.

171,310 112,110
105,809 111,491
140,130 105,921
134,443j 05,013
135,3211 70,487
124,seo! 09,720
111,881 49,870
1C 5,062 42,635
86.999' 52,884

1885.

1883. I 1884. j 1885.

1883.

1885.

1884.
80,964
94,202
91,515
51,394
49,302
40,932
28,813

75,295 347,523 299,754 280,872 168,090
89,785 343.584'282,475 271,790 101,929

08,021 320,790'268,069 250.045! 129,342
54,324 321,424 254,450 234 231! 129,076
50.312 308,417 227,265 210,482 122,314]
50,806 804,621 205,477! 199,1791 121,030
42,581 297,173 184,414:181,132' 103,733
32,895 279,940 100,809 170,155' 87,835 19,030
266,971 141,236 158,175 74,024 33,311
78,70s! 37.091 28,111 257,152 125,394 144,998 08,889 21.249
72,935; 30,113 21,808 239.461 110,068 128,906 55.244 14,787
f 0,527 P0 274 23.723 213.029 98 960 117.823* 40.095 19,100

28,810|

58,087

80,708
62,870
32,510

32,563

39,503
24,534
21,908
10,830
14,934
5,710
12,640

being 80 and the lowest 40.
Auburn, Alabama.—It has rained slightly on two days of
the week, the rainfall reaching thirteen hundredths of an
inch. Planting makes good progress. We have had two
slight frosts. The thermometer has averaged 58 5, ranging
from 37*5 to 77*5.

Madison, Florida.—No rain

all the week.

The thermom¬

ranged from 44 to 83, averaging 64.
Macon, Georgia.—We have had no rain all the week. The
spring is very backward. Average thermometer 62, highest
80, lowest 42.
Columbus, Georgia.—There has been no rain during the
week. The thermometer has averaged 61, the highest being
eter has

72 and the lowest 44.

Savannah. Georgia.—The weather has been pleasant dur¬
ing the week, with no rain. The thermometer has averaged
the plantations since September 1, 1884, were 4.725,426 bales; 62, ranging from 44 to 80.
Augusta, Georgia.—We have had light rain on three dayB,
in 1883-84 were 4,722,147 bales; in 1882-83 were5,749,209 bales.
2.—That, although the receipts at the outports the past week and the remainder of the week has been pleasant. The rain¬
were 23.723 bales, the actual
movement from plantations was fall reached eleven hundredths of an inch. The weather h ie
12,640 bales, the balance being taken from the stocks at been favorable, with the exception of light frosts on two
the interior towns. Last year the receipts from the plantations nights, inflicting but little if any damage on either corn or
for the same week were 19,166 bales and for 1883 they were early vegetables. Corn is up and cotton planting is making
good headway. The thermometer has ranged from 85 to 85,
40,095 bales.
Amount of Cotton in Sight April 17.—In the table below averaging 57.
Atlanta, Georgia.—Telegram not received.
we give the receipts from plantations in another form, and add
Charleston, South Carolina.— It has rained on one day of
to them the net overland movement to April 1, and also the
the week, the rainfall reaching three hundredths of an inch.
takings by Southern spinners to the same date, so as to give The thermometer has averaged 59, the highest being 77 and
substantially the amount of cotton now in sight.
the lowest 43.
1882-83. | 1831-82.
1884-85. 1883-84.
Columbia, South Carolina.—We have had no rain during
toe we^k.
The thermometer has averaged 61, ranging from
4,398,136
17

The above statement shows—1. That the total

receipts from

Receipts at the ports to Apr. 17 1,024,818 4,072,343 5,552,605
Interior stocks on April 17 iu
196,544
excess of September 1
100,008
49,804

28 to 80.

Stateburg, South Carolina.—It has rained lightly on one
night,
the rainfall reaching five hundredths of an inch. We
Tot. receipts from planta’tns 4,725,425 4,722,147 5,719,209 4,532,092
have had one killing frost and two light frosts, and ic- farmed
5 V 0,3 28
394,473
556,182
572,32 4
Netoverlanu to April 1
2-i0,00o
217,000
190,000 on low grounds on one night; but no serious damage done.
230,000
Southern consumpt’n to Apr. 1
The thermometer has ranged from 34 to 80, averaging 56 2.
Total in sight April 17
5,498,008 5,484,476 6,561,533 5,117,465
Wilson, North Carolina.—We have had rain on <>ne tiny of
the week, the rainfall reaching thirteen hundredths of an
Northern spinners’ takings to
1.18^.176 1.9 10.156 1.496 100 1.310.011
inch. Average thermometer 52, highest 71, lowest 35.
April 17
The following statement we have also received by telegraph,
It will bo seen by the above that the increase in amount in slgl t
to-night, as compared with last year, is 14,133 bales, the decrease chowing the height of the rivers at the points named at 3 o’clock
from 1882-3 is 1,032,925 bales, and the increase over 1881-2 is 38 j.,113
April 16, 1885, and April 17, 1884.
bales.
134,856

i

Apr. 16, 8L A.r. 17

Weather Reports by Telegraph.—The weather has been
very

favoiable for farming operations at the South during the

Feet.
4
23
7
19
31

llirS
5
2
0
5

Ftei
l

84.

inch.
4
2
11
7
4

week, and excellent progress has been made with planting.
Galveston Texas.—The weather has been warm and dry all
the week. Average thermometer 69, highest 78 and lowest 60.
Indianola, Texas.—We have had warm and dry weather all
the week.
Corn is thriving. Farmers are giving increased land

N ^ Orleans

and planting is about completed in this
neighborhood. The thermometer has averaged 70, the highest
being 81 and the lowest 65.
Palestine. Texas.—There have been showers on two days of
the week, the rainfall reaching sixty-nine hundredths of an
inch.
Corn is flourishing, and cotton planting makes good
progrfss. The thermometer has averaged 65, ranging from

New Orleans reported below high-water mark of 1871 until
Sept. 9, 1874, when the zero of gauge was changed to highwater mark of April 15 and 16, 1874, which is 6-10ths of a foot
above 1871. or 16 feet above low-water mark at that point.

to cotton this year,

47 to 64.

Hew OiTeans, Louisiana.—We have had no
week. The thermometer has averaged 68.

rain all the

Shreveport. Louisiana.—R onfall for the week sixty hun¬
an inch.
The thermometer has averaged 65, the
highest being 88 and the lowest 49.
dredths of

Vicksburg, Mississippi.—Telegram not received.




Memphis
Nashville

Shreveport
Vicksburg

Below high-water mark
Above low-water mark.
Above low-water mark.
Above low-water mark.
Above low-water mark.

8

32
IS
17
45

India Cotton Movement from all Ports. — We have
re-arranged our India service so as to make our reports more
detailed and at the same time more accurate. We had found
it impossible to keep out of our figures, as cabled to us
ports other than Bombay, cargoes which
to
shipments from one India port to another. The plan now
followed relieves us from the danger of this inaccuracy and
keeps the totals correct. We first give the Bombay
for the week and year, bringing the figures down to April 16.

for the
proved only be

stat^m^nt

486

THE

CHRONICLE.

BOMBAY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR FOUR YEARS.

Shipments this week•
Tear Great Conti¬
Brit'n. nent.

Shipment« since Jan. 1.
Great

Conti¬
nent.

Total. Britain

1885 16,000 16,000 32,000 97,000
1884 16.000 26.000 42,000 250,000
1883 18,000 55,000 73,000 215.000
1882 41,000 11,000 52,000 457,000

213,000
310,000

European Cotton Consumption

brings

Receipts.
This
Week.

Total.

Since
Jan. 1.

310,000 52,000

411,000

560,000 83.000
626,000 71.000

239,000

696,000 82,000

462,000
780,000
899,000
912,000

According to the foregoing, Bombay appears to show a
decrease compared with last year in the week’s receipts of
81,000 bales, and a decrease in shipments of 10,000 bales, and
the shipments since January 1 shew a decrease of 250,000 bales.
The movement at Calcutta Madras and other India
porta for
the last reported week and since the 1st of January, for two
years, has been as follows.
“Other ports” cover Ceylon,
Tuticorin. Kurrachee and Coconada.
Shipments for the week.
Conti¬

Great
Britain.

Calcutta—
1885

3.000
3,000

1884
Madras—
1885
1884
All others—
1885

Shipments since January 1.
Great

Total.

nent.

1,000

4,000
3,000

39.000

10,000

72,000

25,000

Total.

4,000
10,500
1,000

2,000

3,000

1884
Total all—
1885

4,000
3,000

1884

3,000

16,500
13,500

7,000

8,500
3,000

59,500
96,000

3,000

18.500

78,000

28,000

124,000

The above totals for the week show that the movement from
the ports other than Bombay is 4,000 bales more than same
week last year.
For the whole of India, therefore, the total

shipments since January 1, 1885, and for the corresponding

periods of the two previous

follows:

years, are as

1883.

Shipments
to all Europe
from—

Bombay

The revised totals for last year have also been
are given for the purpose
of comparison. The
takings by spinners, in actual bales and pounds, have been as
follows:
From Oet. 1 to

Total.

For 1884-85.

Takings by spinners.. .bales
Average weight of bales....
Takings in pounds

1,834,000

1,723,000

3,562,000

443

438

441

815,462,000

756,864,000 1,572,326,000

,

For 1883-84.

Takings by spinners.. .bales

1,931,000

1,603,000

3,534,000

Average weight of hales....
Takings in pounds

431

435

433

832,541,000

According to the above, the

697,501,000 1,530,042,000

average

in Great Britain is 443

Oct. 1 to

1884-85.

April 1.

Bales of 400 lbs. each,
000* omitted.

Great

Conti¬

Britain.

nent.

1883-84.

Total.

Great

Conti¬

Britain.

nent.

Total.

Spinners’ stock Oct 1.

89,

124,

401,

409,

152,
233,

241,

Takings in October...

642,

372,

199,

Consump. Oct., 5 wks.

493,
360,

385,
325,

893,
685,

496,
360,

325,

1,096,
685,

138,

supply

600,

525,
571,

This
week.

Since
Jan. 1.

week.

Since
Jan. 1.

Spinners’ stock Nov. 1
Takings in November.

403,

60,
314,

193,
717,

337,

275,
312,

401,
649,

32,000

310,000

42.000

7,000

78,000

3,000

560,000
124,000

73,000
2,000

626,000
73,700

Total supply
Consump. Nov., 4 wks.

541,
288,

374,
260,

915,
548,

473,
288,

587,
260,

1,060,
548,

39,000

388,000

45,000

684,000

75,000

699,700

Spinners’ stock Dec. 1
Takings in December.

253,
331,

114,
415,

367,
746,

135,
248,

327,
301,

512,
549,

584,

1,113
548,

433,
288,

628,

1,061,
548,

This

of

Alexandria Receipts and Shipments.—Through arrange¬
ments we have made with Messrs. Davies, Benachi & Co., of

Liverpool and Alexandria,

we now

receive

the movements of cotton at Alexandria,
axe the receipts and shipments for the

weekly cable of
Egypt. The following
past week and for the

corresponding week of the previous two
Alexandria, Egypt,

1884-85.

April 15.

a

years.

1883-34.

1882-83.

Receipts (cantars*)—
This week....
Since Sept. 1

12,000

5,000

5,000

3,472,000

2,619,000

2,230,000

This
week.

Exports (bales)—

Since

Sept. 1.

This
week.

Since

Sept. 1.

This
week.

Since

Sept. 1.

Total supply

Total Europe

,

136,

Consump. Dec., 4 wks.

288,

529,'
260,

Spinners’ stock Jan. 1

Takings in January..

296,
376,

269,
340,

565,
716,

145,
444,

403,

513,
847,

Total supply
Consump. Jan., 5 wks.

672,
360,

609,
325,

1,281,
685,

589,
340,

771,
325,

1,360,
665,

Spinners’ stock Feb. 1
Takings in February.

312,
278,-

311,

596,
589,

249,
346,

446,
235,

695,
581,

590,
288,

595,
260,

1,185,
548,

595,
272,

681,
260,

1,276,
532,

302,
235,

335,
280,

637,
515,

323,
334,

421,
294,

744,
628,

615,

Total supply

Consump. Feb., 4 wks.
8pinners’ stock Mar. 1

Takings in March
Total

To Liverpool
To Continent

supply

284,

.

260,
368,

2,000 286.000
3,000 166,000

3,000 234,000
2,000 117,000

1,000 222,000
1,000 78,000

537,
288,

715,

260,

1,152,
548,

657,

Consump. Mar., 4 wks.

2S8.

260,

1,372,
548,

5,000 452,000

5,000 351,000

2,000 300,000

Spinners’ stock Apr. 1

249,

355,

604,

369,

455,

824,

A cantar is 98 lbs.

This statement shows that the

April 15 were
5,000 bales.

Continent.

Since
Jan. 1.

This last statement affords a very interesting comparison
he total movement for the three years at all India ports.

*

Great Britain.

April 1.

This
week.

All other ports.
Total

April 1.—The cable

April 1.

Total

1884.

to

to-day Mr. Ellison’s cotton figures, brought dowm to

received and

EXPORTS TO EUROPE FROM ALL INDIA.

1885.

U9

weight of the deliveries
pounds per bale to April 1 this season,
against 431 pounds during the same time last season. The
49,000
97,000 Continental deliveries average 438 pounds, against 435 pounds
last year, and for the whole of Europe the deliveries
average
4,000
10,500 441 pounds per bale, against 433 pounds last season.
Our
25,000 dispatch also gives the full movement for this year and last
16,500
year in bales of 400 pounds each.

Continent.

Britain.

[VOL. XL.

receipts for the week ending
12,000 cantars and the shipments to all Europe

A

striking comparison with last year is reached by
bringing together the above totals and adding the average
weekly consumption up to this time for the two years:
more

Manchester Market.—Our report received from Manchester

to-night states that the market is quiet but steady.

the
for

prices for to-day below, and leave
comparison.

previous

d.

Feb.13
“

d.

P6t6—8l5l6

20 8*4 -3 878
“
27 8M VS78
Mch. 6 84 a>878
“
13
“
20 83lfi®8%
“
27 83^^834

Apr. 3 83)fld8%
“

“

10
17 331k»8^

1884.

8H lbs.

Shirtings.
8.

5
5
5

5
5
5
5
5
5
5

d
d.
fi.
7 -®6 10^
6
®6 9*2
6
9*2
6 V6 94
5
5
6
6
6
6

®6
36
36
36
36

9
9
10
10
10
10

OotVn
Mid.

Upl is
d.
6
6

6*8
6
6
6
6

32* Cop.
Iwisi.
d.

d.

84 lbs.

Shirtings.
s.

5
5
5
5
5
89,a3 94 5
84 ® 94 5
8%, 3 94 5

84
84
84
84
84

3 9
3> 9
3 9
® 9
® 9

813jg ft 9^ja
515|rt 87e «93g

9

d.
s.
7 37
7
37
7 37

64®7
7
7

37
37

74®7
94 97
104®7

5 11

37

d.

24
24
24
24
24
24
34

Cott’n
Mid.

Up 14$
d

5i316
5i3ig
54

54
54

51&u
6




Total.

Great

Conti¬

Britain

nent.

124,
2,081,

401,
1,744,

525,
3.825,

Total.

2,045,
1,690,

3,562,

2,205,
1,836,

2,145,
1,690,

4,350,
3,526,

249,

355,

604,

369,

455,

824,

Spinners’ stock Apr. 1

241,

4,163,

Weekly Consumption,
00* omitted.
In October

January
In February

72,0
72,0
72,0
72,0
72,0

65,0
65,0
65,0

In March

72,0

65,0

In November

63ie

In December

64

In

effecting the reduction, the only obligation being that the amount of

nent.

Supply
2,121,
Consumpt’n 26 weeks 1,872,

5

stoppage between this date and the 1st of July shall equal four weeks.
This reduction, taken in conjunction with a simultaneous movement on
the part of the Rhode Island mills, will reduce the stock of
print cloths

Conti¬

3,925,

44

Fall River, Mass., April 15.—At a meeting of manufacturers held
this atternoon it was voted that the production of print cloths
he curtailed by a four weeks’ stoppage of the mills between now
and July 1. This action makes effective the provisions of the agree¬
ment which has been circulated for the signatures of the individual
mills. Each mill will use its own discretion about the method of

Great

Britain

1883-84.

152,
1,893,

64

“York

1894-85.

89,
Spinners’ stock Oct. 1.
Takings to April 1.... 2,032,

4

Reduction of Print Cloth Production.—The New
Tivies of Thursday, April 16, gave the following :

8 JO,000 pieces.

April 1.
of 400 lbs. each.

Oct. 1 to

Bales

000* omitted.

1885.
32s Cop.
Twist.

We give
weeks’ prices

65,0
65,0

137,0
137,0
137,0
137,0

72,0
72,0
72,0
68,0
69,0

65,0
65,0
65,0

137,0
137,0
137,0
133,0
133,0

137,0

72,0

65,0

137,0

137,0

The

65,0
65,0

foregoing shows that the weekly consumption in Europe
pounds each, against
137,000 bales of the same weight at the corresponding time
last year. The total spinners’ stocks in Great Britain and on
the Continent have decreased 33,000 bales during the month,
and are now 220,000 bales less than at the same date of last
continued in March 137,000 bales of 400

season.

THE CHRONICLE.

1885.]

April 18,

487

New York Cotton Exchange.—To prevent frequent losses day of the month in 1884 and 892,630 bales less than they were
by re-classification of cotton delivered on contracts for futures, to the same day of the month in 1883. We add to the table
it was proposed in October last vear that an inspector and a the percentages of total port receipts which had been received
classification committee should be appointed, in order to issue to April 17 in each of the years named.
certificates respecting grades, &c., which should pass from
Shipping News.—The exports of cotton from the United
hand to hand, and be a good delivery in fulfillment of all con¬
States the past week, as per latest mail returns, have reached
tracts for futures. Particulars of the proposed plan were
56,413 bales. So far as the Southern ports are concerned, these
are the same exports
reported by telegraph, and published in
xchange on Oct. 18, 1884. The proposition was discussed on the Chronicle last
Friday. With regard to New York we
Oct. 22, and at a ballot on October 24 was lost, there appear¬
include the manifests of all vessels cleared up to Thursday
ing 131 votes against and 103 votes in favor of the measure.
The Board of Management have now resolved to bring the night of this week.
Total balet.
subject, with some modifications, a second time before the New York—To Liverpool, per steamers City of Richmond,
members of the Exchange. It is to be discussed on Saturday,
2.196—England, 2,609—Nevada, 794
Plato, 589
Republic, 1,101.-...St. Ronans, 2,609
9,898
25th inst., and if finally passed it is proposed that it go into
To Hull, per steamer Galileo, 1,000
1,000
effect on Sept. 1, 1885. A meeting of the members has been
To Havre, per steamer St. Germain, 448
448
called by President S. Gruner on Monday, 20th inst., to con¬
To Bordeaux, per steamer Chateau Leoville, 100
100
To Bremen, per steamers Fulda, 797
Main. 115
942
sider the subject of making Thursday, April 30, a holiday, on
To Antwerp, per steamers Hermann, 398....Waesland, 320
718
the occasion of the opening of the new Exchange.
To Genoa, per steamer Arehimede, 109
109

f'.ven in these pages under the head of New York Cotton

East India Crop.—The

& Co.’s cotton

following is from Messrs. Wallace
report, dated Bombay, March 13;

To Trieste, per steamer Arehimede, 100
New Orleans—To Liverpool, per steamers Discoverer, 3,074
Pascal, 3,176
per ship Henry, 3,077
per bark

Melmerby, 5,100
barks Maitland, 2,531

“

Now that the Holi holidays are over, which have lately interfered
considerably with the movement of the crop in the interior, we quite
expect to see increased supplies arriving.
Oomrawuttee will, it is
expeoted, be coming down soon in larger quantity and of improved
quality, as the Jerry crop will now be coming forward. Some small
parcels of Broach have come to market of quality that promises well
for the bulk of the crop, and some lots of superior Dhollerah have also
been received, so that in a fortnight free arrivals of both may be
expected, but in addition to all descriptions being undoubtedly late, it
looks as if the producer was this year not very anxious to hurry his
goods to market, the feeling up-country being that better prices will be
ruling later on, and it may be that in this way more cotton will be held
over the monsoon this year than was the case last.”
Jute Butts, Bagging, &c.—There is only a light call for

100

14,427

To Havre, per

Niagara, 3,102

Ocean, 2,210
To Bremen, per steamer Stag, 3,750
To Barcelona, per steamer Cristobal Colon, 3,325
To Genoa, ner barks Bolivar, 1,700
Saint Anna,
Baltimore—To Liverpool, per steamers Caspian,

Eduardo, 917

7,893
3,750
3,325

2,117
1,149

Thauemore, 795

2,861

To Bremen, per steamer Hermann, 930
Boston—To Liverpool, per steamers Borderer, 1,710

lonia, 1,438

Norseman, 2,335

930

Cata¬

Venetian, 612

Total

3,817
"

6,095
56,413

,

The

particulars of these shipments, arranged in our usual
bagging, and the market is quiet. Buyers are taking moder¬ form, are as follows:
ate quantities, but it is difficult to place a large parcel.
Havre
Genoa
No
Liver<& BorBreAnt- Barce- and
change is to be noted in price, sellers continuing to hold stead¬
pool.
Hull, deavx.
men.
Total.
tcerp.
Iona. Trieste.
ily to the quotations, and we hear of no sales below 9c. for New York. 9,898 1,000
942
718
209 13,315
548
7,893 3,750
1% lbs.,9c. for l%lbs., lO^c. for 2 lbs. and 11c. for standard N. Orleans. 14,427
3,325 3,817 33.212
2,861
930
3,791
grades. Butts have been taken quite freely for paper grades, Baltimore..
Boston
6,095
6,095
and some transactions have been effected on a basis of l%c.
Bagging qualities are rather slow and we hear of only a few
Total
33.281 1,000 8,441 5,622
718 3,325 4,026 56,413
small parcels moving. The market is steady and at the close
Below we add the clearances this week of vessels carrying
paper grades are quoted at 1%@1?8C., and bagging qualities
cotton from United States ports, bringing our data down to
at 2@2%c.
the latest dates:
..

Comparative Port Receipts and Daily Crop Movement.
—A comparison of the port movement by weeks is not accurate,
as the weeks in different years do not end on the same day of

the month. We have consequently added to our other standing
tables a daily and monthly statement, that the reader may

constantly have before him the data for seeing the exact relative
for
movement
the years named.
The movement since
September 1, 1884, and in previous years, has been as follows;
Tear

Monthly
Receipts.

Galveston—For

New Orleans—For Bremen—April 13—Bark Meta Seeger, 3,484.
Savannah—For Liverpool—Apiil 10—Bark Osmond O’Brien, 1,528.
Boston—For Liverpool—April 13—Steamer Virginian,
April
14- Steamer Missouri,
.
Baltimore—For Liverpool—April 9—Steamer Mentmore. 561.
Philadelphia—For Liverpool.—April 10—Steamer Lord Clive, 1,342.

Below we give all news received to date of disasters to vessels
carrying cotton from United States ports, &c.:
Sapphire, steamer (Br.), stranded at North Shoals, Nieuwe Diep.

Beginning September 1.

1883-84.

1882-83.

1881-82

Bept’mb’r 345,445 343,812 326,656
October.. 1,090,385 1,046,092
980,594
Novemb’r 1,122,164 1,030,380 1,094,697
Decemb’r 1,104,211 1,059,653 1,112,536
January
475,757 487,729 752,827i
February. 261,449 385,939 595,598
March...
482,772
163,503
241,514

1880-81.

429,777
458,478
853,195
968,319
974,043 1,006,501
996,807 1,020,802

487,727
291,992
257,099

.

571,701
572,729
476,582

1879-80.

333,643
888,492
942,272
956,461
647,140
447,918
264,913

Totalyear 4 562,914 4,595,118 3,345,670 4,290,640 5,075,110 4,480,842
Perc’tage of tot. port
receipts March 31

94-73

90-89

88-80

86-40

89-58

March 31 the receipts at the
ports this year were 32,204 bales less than in 1883-84 and
782,756 bales less than at the same time in 1882-83. By adding
to the above totals to March 31 the daily receipts since
that time, we shall be able to reach an exact comparison of

a

Tynemouth, steamer (Br.), advices from TerschelliDg, March 26, state
that 5 bales of cotton were recovered by divers that day from
stranded steamer Tynemouth. The cargo still looks well, and
with good weather it is hoped to save it all.

Cotton

freights the past week have been as follows:
Satur.

1883-84.

1882-83.

1880-81

1879-80.

Tot.Mr.31 4,562,914 4,595,118 5,345,670 4,290,640 5,075.110 4,480,342
'

Apr. 1
44

2....

44

3....

44
44
44
44
44
44

44
44

4....
5....
6....
7....
8....
9....
10....
11....

5,050
5,994
5,329
1,830
S.

.

3,111
4,998
2,829
2,415
6,625
4,449

5,344

8.

5,770
4,556
8,873
6,155

8,096

6,612
8.

15,534
12,239
13,597
13,354
15,310

9,772
7,048
4,022
9,512

4,507

8.

4.170

3,204
3,319
6,628
2,782

11,300
18,304
7,506
9,434
15,783
8,615

8.

6,300

.

7,501

8.

7,387
6,990

12...

44

13....

44

14....

3,676
5,340

6,101

44

15....

2,610

5,187

8.

3,592
7,299
3,879

44

16....

2,996

44

17....

4,662

4,003
2,351

13,264
9,431

5,513

Total

8.

5,922
8,298

8.

6,524

23,210

8.

13.035

8,237
6,338
6,243
5,264
4,717
5,156

9,980
13,656
14,912
9.678
8.

13,867

8.

3,791

8.

11,621
8,010
11,034
12,369
4,708
8.

9,905
7,353
5,606
4,746
6,054
6,299

4,624,818 4,670,198 5,517,446 4,377,728 5,247,609 4,577,594

Percentage of total
port rec’pts Apr. 17

96-28

91-65

92-74

89-33

91-52

This statement shows that the receipts since Sept. 1
up to
tonight are now 45,380 bales less than they were to the same




Fn.

784*

7e4*

764*

764*

764*

....

....

....

Havre, steam....c.

°32*

932*

932*

932*

932*

932*

• •••

....

....

....

....

....

3g*

3&*

38*

38*

38*

....

....

mmmm

....

932*

sail

c.

Bremen, steam..c.
Do

sail

~

•

• • •

—c.

....

Hamburg, steam.c.

933*

932*

932*

932*

932*

....

....

....

....

....

Do

sail....c.

Amst’d’m, steam.c.
sail.-.c.

Do

sail

c.

Barcelona,steam.c.
Genoa, steam—d.
Trieste, steam...c.
Antwerp, steam..c.
*

Compressed.

•••

45t

45t

45|
•

•

••*

....

....

451
•

451

...

732® *4* 732® *4*
....

• •••

....

mmmm

45t
....

732®14* 732® *4*

....

....

982*

932*
V

V

ia*

ia*

ia*

916*
j4'J932*

916*
*4®932*

9lfi*
14®9321

9ia*

•°16*
j4®932*

916*

932*

....

....

932*

932*

*4®932*

....

932*

*4®9sb*

t Per 100 lbs.

Liverpool.—By cable from Liverpool, we have the following
&c., at that port. We

statement of the week’s sales, stocks,
add previous weeks for comparison.
March 27.

April 2.

April 10. April 17

41,000
43,000
Sales of the week
hales.
39,000
45,000
3.000
Of whioh exporters took ....
3,000
-1,000
5,000
1,000
1,000
Of which speculators took..
2,000
33,606
29.000
Sales American
27,000
31,000
5,000
6,000
5,000
Actual export
5,000
12,000
11,000
Forwarded
11,000
9,000
Total stock—Estimated
1,005,000 1,008,000 1,025,000 1,024,000
797,000
797,000
781,000
788,000
Of which American— Estim’d
62.000
69,000
53,000
Total import of the week
54,000
44,000
44,000
40,000
Of which American
53.000
185,000
164,000
Amount afloat
172,000
192,000
116,COO
100,000
120,000
Of which American
140,000
.

44

8.

15,516
10,903

Thurs.

mmmm

Do

1881-82.

Wednes.

764.*

Reval, steam—d. 732®V
1884-85.

Tues.

sail-.-d.

Do

the movement for the different years:

-

Mon.

Liverpool, steam d.

Do

This statement shows that up to

of

By

diver 11 bales of cotton were salved March 28. As
soon as room was made under the deck the diver would try to
introduce dynamite into the vessel in order to blow her up.

means

1884-85.

Liverpool—April 10-Barks Alexandra, 3,015; Her¬

bert, 3,844.

Liverpool market for spots and futures each
day of the week ending April 17, and the daily closing prices
ef spot cotton, have been as follows:
The tone of the

12:30p.m.
Mid.

Mid.

Steady

£

In

but

]

5l5lfl

51516

Upl’ds
Orl’na.

6

6

Sales
pec. & exp.

12:30 p.m.

7 000

8.000

1,000

1,000

1,000

when wheat
began to decline it followed in its wake. White corn con¬
tinues scarce and wanted. The close was firm for mixed.

Firm.

5*8
51«>i6

51&te

10,000
1,GOO

8 000
500

6

(

Weak at
3-04. de¬
cline.

Steady at
Barely
1-04 ad¬
steady at

Steady at
2-tU de¬
cline.

1-04 adv/

vance.

Barely

Firm.

Firm.

Weak.

Steady.

Open High Low. Cl09.

Open High Low. Clos.

d.

Open High Low. Clot.
d

d.

d.

d.

A.

d.

A.

A.

d.

5 55

5 53

5 53

550

5 52

550

5 52

558
April
AprU-May.. 5 58
May-June.. 5 02

5 58

5 58

5 58

5 5S

5 58

558

5 55

555

5 53

553

5 50

5 52

5 50

5 52

5 62

5 02

550

5 59

5 57

5 57

554

550

554

5 56

6 02

0 02

0 02

0 02

503

5 63

5 01

5 01

5 59

5 01

5 59

5 01

000

006

6 03

0 03

6 01

6 01

5 03

0 01

5 03

6 01

000

606

6 10

0 10

610

0 07

0 07

6 05

0 05

003

0 05

0 03

0 05

0 10

June-July..

July-Au*...
An*.-9ept...
September..
Sept.-Oct...

....

• • ••

005

6 05

0 03

6 01

6 01

6 01

5 02

600

5 62

000

0 05
500

5 00

500

558

5 58

5 57

5 57

5 55

557

5 55

5 57

5 51

5 53

Dec.-Jan....

...

Jaa.-Feb....

...

....

5 57
....

....

....

...

....

....

...

....

553

.

..

a a & f°

g
~s
220's

sg||

g

....

....

....

....

? ® c* a*

Open High Low. Clot.
d.

d.

d.

A.

A.

A.

d.

5 57

5 01

501

5 01

5 01

0 55

5 57

5 01

5 61

501

5 01

5 54

554

5 55

5 51

5 54

5 55

5 57

5 59

5 57

55?

5 59

June-July.. 000

0 00

5 62

5 62

5 03

0 01

Jnly-Ang...
An*.-Sept... 608
September..

004

0 02

0 02

003

008

0 00

000

607

Sept.-Oct.. 004
Oct.-Nov~.. 5 00

0 04

560

558

550

550

554

...

....

Nor.-Dec...

Dee.-Jan

• e # •

....

...

Jaa.-Feb....

•

....

t

• •

....

0 03

...

....

558
5 54

5 59

5 00

563

563

5 02

6 02

0 01

5 03

6 01

6 04

004

603

6 03

0 05

0 03

0 05

008

008

0 07

0 07

0 08

007

6 08

612

0 12

011

011

500

....

....

6 02

d.

A.

5 55

•

....

0 04

0 03

•

0 04

0 07

007

0 00

606

5 01

5 01

500

500

558

5 59

558

534

555

5 54

555

...

....

....

....

•

•

•

•

....

....

*

•

# *

5 67

*

*

*

•*

5 50

5 57
....

....

...

•••*

*

*• * *

* *

*

’

.

s

408.137 5 7,156 41.086 10,49
© M —* **

btob

1885.

close of

active and buoyant down to the
Tuesday’s business, when prices showed an advance

of fully

10 cents a

© o.

JO
bo*MW *©
m'—o*

April delivery
...

advance being lost;

I—1

00 -I

...

...

...

2 RED WINTER WHEAT.

100%

•

•

•

•

10L
103

102*8

104%

101%

I0ti%

106%
108%

104%

Fh.

JiO
10U%

98%

102%
10*%

m

m

m

m

10u%

10^%
103%

I

•

•

.

•

.

©a
c<r h

•

;

GD-li

.

.

©o*

!

;

cx-i:

.

.

©if*.

100

101%

MCX©©(X.

if*M©

to 10 -1

*®»x. tv-* -)

MWMX-IC

p

CtO^MlC
^ tO CC tO O'

M

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t-kjotbecob

co<i;

—1

©CC •

t-*©MCC

©m!

X © o

Goto.

©©to#*-J-i

-ICX*tL©COO'

© -1

to O'©.

© poo-i

V© © V

c
©

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CD

to *-• ©

to*

-1 to O'-i

O' ©

a -t © O'
to co oi© -

O' © CO

if-X© c
I

•

tO ©

,

-

cx cc © ex
cc x* — r
cx co - < -1

tc1 co

©r*C0©©

MXrfL;
1 © * 1'
: * — *0;

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^

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to © r-

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to -1 r cc

v-

to -1 © w cx c

©©M-XJCtfL

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to CO X■

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c CC ©

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’•

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:

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O'* Vj* ©O'
0; to: oc
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MioX.CC *10_C"
X. M O' ©b © MM lo X. CO
CO — CJ*eCO©©-JCOO-

b’

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MXCWJ)
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© © •" —

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©

M

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—

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■JO

*

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*-i*-j

■

T-i *—© b

■*

© * -i x
© 0"J C

*

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:

:

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; O; w:
'© ■ -j :
: : 0: i»*: ®o
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03
jO -1 M —

to to co CC
33- ©CC

©b©
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© X to
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© x ©/

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to

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to •
oc ; ; co
©.
8:: "U*

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^©

tlie reports from Milwaukee
Falmouth, Richmond, Willamette and York*
details for March, 1885, being as follows:

Included in tlie

New Haven,

town, the

I a

©w^-

cob* © -loo to

m ©
x. * to * ot © ©
to 'O M © © ~1 *©

so

a.^

©tO-l**-.--©©-'J

a-oo~ — m

© © c
CO-1 ©If*

x
t 7. c

'->4-

ft

2

tO K

?-

o a

^tO — M-J©tO#.
—

3
s

©*—

M

b.

n V*

tt
m

—

ft

o"

-J^.JIM ©O’

to

©

<%

© X
K1

© JOb
® .7. * X* © X CO .7. © K
©
I CO CO CO © C 'C

lb'

cx.

O
po

-

to

©;

©©
If* ^

cc cx

.

-1.

"

;;;;;©; ©; m-J

—

* co cx at
-«jtO“
CC —. X* ©

c/.

©.

b

COCO: X.
CO
1
* a

to :©tv

-

iv

to

O to —I
•O JO X O'

—*

to
o

to^cr

l

©MW O'

To1

.t* cc
» X © M
© -1*00 — ■ •

a ©

■T CC U
O'

© CO © s
to co x a*
© —i —) *

©

**:

rojOMtO

co a

-—

r

-I -1 © X

ji

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l-

x-ib

to © © -i

aoto

©y. co-J
b*cc W

0

to

© *-

*©.

rU ©
-1
(C r-L k

£

K

M-

-

CO

00 ©00 -

C"

,

MM

M

r—

.

Dolars.

&

>-*

.

tC

CC© tC © X

xfr

.

© >~«•

to to

0

icb*

—J -»— -J
M © X CC

•

TO O'

if*©
M

—1 —I CO M

c

*—a,©©

1 O' M '1
* • V OC

Cl ©

M tO
-1 CX —

W © O'
CO-1 — I-

—

-1 O'

w'

it- O' M

c >-

©O'

OO^r 3. tf-C

Vc**)'

© to © ©
>-

cn*it*>-

tu

r'rf*r

90

9c%
98%

if-

-•©:

tv

M to

©#.*10 to
p. M 4* M to

MM

tOjf*
©7-

C i—“ M

<—

c

oo x © -l.

•

©b>

to;

96%

100

•

00«

© —j

•X-.

90

I

co

©; C
©bn• "x

W©
toot

-1©'

cx

©«:

GO,

99%
10189
103%

H*

•

to©
© co © tc

-1

fC
© >L- CO

give

Thurs.

00

—

to CO

00 M ©

uc »—*.—*

peaceful

Wed.

h*

00 ©00*-

derived
winter
lateness of the

luu
loo

»

•

a

there was some increase in the takings of shippers.
was caused for the most part/by the warlike aspect

...

•

t

to —

-i
©

cx©
<1 “ if*

bushel from those of the previous week.
mainly speculative, but millers were free

102

©mo* m•
© it* © M !
ao -i co **.

O',

CX

p-

-JO to 00; c

Mto;

w ©>x u
a to cn ©

relations between Russia and Great Britain, but
some support from the reports of damage to the
sown
wheat by the severe weather, and from the
But on Wednesday a
season for sowing spring wheat.
decline set in, under the influence of the more
character of the advices by cable, and with frequent fluctua¬
way
tions, and an excited speculation continued to




COM
K)tC 0-4

©To*

buyers, and

In elevator

•

•

WCX® 1to © M

O'

wheat market was

Tues.
It3

•

xiob©

Vo CC H

00

peaceful aspect of the cable advices checked the demand
and gave values a turn toward lower figures, which continued
throughout Thursday and to*day, in the course of which a
large portion of the recent advance was lost.

Mon.
lvl %

^

•

©
r-©*a.
© tf- O' O'

© —wtc

more

Sat.

if*. • ; ;
<0
©....#*

•

1

MM
if* CX M—J

* *

advanced,

PRICES OF NO.

•

•

*

O' —-JtC

improved in

DAILY CLOSING

;

© ©M

M

exceptionally active during the

yesterday and to-day, more than half the
but the close was steadier at the decline.

;

*b M

M.t April 17,

of the

M

© cs to c."

the

The rise

.

CUMIO

past week, prices varying widely.
The flour market was quite excited and buoyant during
first half of the week. Shippers and dealers were large
buyers, and there was some speculation. Prices
most cases 50@75c. per bbl., full lines of supers and common
extra being the favorites.
Rye and corn meal also
but not so much a3 wheat flour.
But on Wednesday the

The movement was

•

if* cx.

BREADSTUFFS.

The

sr

lf*CX.

00 00*
go go;

to

market has been

t—*

—

uoao;

The whole

i

:

com:

Cx<l

Friday, P.

s\

:

.

?8i
i
tao*: :

550

....

*

P 33 .

....

6 03

5 59

:

tOM

....

....

....

....

••

4

**:

5 55

555

89

4:

mm: :

A.

555
April
April-May.. 555
May-June.. 5 50

a*.

p,©.^cx

:
!

fs!
arts'.
a

A.

5 57

o:

©

GOOD

® 9

*

SO S5 *
<s >-»

Low. Clot.
Open High Low. Clot. Open High

A.

a

*

© OD

* '”

9 9

S'® 00 00

Fri., Apr. 17.

Thurs., Apr. 16.

15.

....

“ssPsSS’ob!9-rfOB S'a K

CO©

S3: :
Wednes., Apr

58

a a

....

....

....

....

5 51

554

554

5 55

5 55

5 57

54%
55%

57

....

....

©©^2

560

3 57

56%

54

o © © o

005

Oct.-Nov..
Nov.-Dee... 6 57

55*8
5o*8

52%
53%
53%
5414

53%

c+- m M e+

....

....

...

....

....

..

....

...

....

....

i

»

Fri.

advancing and then declining, as in the case of wheat
No. 2 for future delivery closed at 39c. for
May and 39;^c. for June.
Tine following statement, prepared by the B ureau of Statis¬
tics, will show the exports of domestic breadstuffs from the
undermentioned customs districts, during the month of March,
1885, and for the nine months ended the same, as compared
with the corresponding periods of the previous year:

5 55

5 62

-

•

5o*8
56%
57%

Thurs.
54

and Indian corn.

14.

Tues., Apr.

Dion., Apr. 13.

-

CORN.

Wed.
5 4%
54%
55%

has met with more demand at rather better prices.
has also had a better sale. Oats have been taken more
for export, and there has been a brisk speculation,

Rye
Barley
freely
prices

ami Qiths, thus: 5 02 means

Sat. Apr. 11.

d.

5 4*8

August delivery

opening, highest, lowest and closing prices of futures at
Liverpool for each day of the week are given below. These
prices are on the basis of Uplands, Low Middling clause, unless
otherwise stated.
CF" The prises are given in pence
5 62-64cf., and 6 03 means 6 3-64d.

54
55

55%

steady.

51%

54%
54%

but

steady.

Tues.

Jfon.

52%
53%

Quiet

The

d.

PRICES OF NO. 2 MIXED

DAILY CLOSING

Sal.

Barely
steady.

4 P. M.

5U>16

8 000

Quiet.

Market,

5*8

5l6le

1,000

{

(
£

5*8

7.000

Futures.

Market,

Harden’*
Harden’*.
tendency.

Pressed
for Bale.

buyers’

followed wheat in all of its leading features.
with a more

statistical position is stronger, and it meets
active and better sustained export demand ; but
Its

favor.

quieter.

Indian corn has

Friday

Wednts. Thursd'y.

Tuesday.

Saturday Monday.

Spot.
Market,

[VOL. XL,

THE CHRONICLE.

488

foreg»)ing totals are

Portland and

kee.

Bushels
Value .$
Indian corn—
Bushels
Value .$
Indian com meal—
Barrels
Value .$
Oats —
Bushels
Value .$

mond.

By adding this week’s movement to our previous totals we
following statement of exports this season and last

York
town.

Villamette.

Rick-

New
Portland <&
Eaten. Falmouth.

Milwau-

Barley—

489

THE CHRONICLE.

18, 1885.]

April

have the
season:

.

181,788
95,371

.

58,439
29,220

..

Aug. 85, to—

Aug. 85 to
Apr. 11.

.

.

Pounds
Value.. $
RyeBushels
Value .$
WheatBushels
$
Value
Wheat Hour-

Aug. 37 to

Apr. 12.

Apr. 11.

Apr. 19.

Buh.

Bush.

Bbls.

4,864,830 35,031,984 27,200,917 33,009.208 25.024,547

534,724
358,937

West Indies.
Brit. Col’nles

Oth. oonntr’s
Total

.

52,557

9,813
39,215

1,827
9,493

220,271

52,557

191,076

33,713

487,263

140,294

109,598

.

Mar.,’85.$
Mar., *81.$
9 months—
88,300
1885. .rS

086.201 3,326.074
962,499 3,521,616

43,697
691,296
44,744 1,794,491

501,380

1884...$

10,676

25,000
124,900

Value .$
Total values—

following are the closing

at the

ports,

91,705

1,217,408
779,813

In store at—
New York
Do afloat (est.)

quotations :
5 00

bbl. $2 90® 3 60 South’n oom. extras.. $4 00®
Superfine
3 20® 3 90 Southern bakers’ and
family brands
5 25 ®
Spring wheat extra-*. 3 85® 4 40
Bye Hour, superfine..' 4 25®
Minn, clear ami stra’t. 4 15® 4 85
3 25®
Fine
Wintershipp’gextras. 3 85® 4 25
Winter XX & XXX.. 4 50® 5 50 Corn meal—
Western, &o
3 15 9
Patents
4 85® 6 10
Brandywine, <feo.._. 3 35 9
Cfity snipping ex
3 60® 4 90

Do
afloat
Newport News...
....

6 10
4 50

Milwaukee
Duluth
Do
afloat

3 7j

3 35
3 4/

71

Bye—Western
85
94
96
84
90
51

Spring,per bash.
Spring No. 2
Bed winter, Wo. 2
Bed winter
White

39 ®
38 H *
401a ®
Bariev—No. 1 Canada. 83
®
No. 2 Canada
78 ®
State, six-rowed
68 ®

.

98

52k*

53h»
53*g

West, white

52

®

55

White Sour.hern..
Yellow (Southern.

60
5 L

a
a

65

Corn—West, mixed
West. mix. No. 2.

7,000

10,774

36,24.0

9,795
11,232

1.221,425

Toronto

46
39 Lj

Montreal

413»

Peoria

indicated in the

74,701

18.686

25,4*00
16 739
81.817

139,365

500

7,015

10,55 >
109,790

2,074

18,177

33,8 18

502,505
6 ,770

70.476

55.0U0

183,325

6,316

1,143.550

380,012

2.994

20,965

733,787

2,167,249

10,9 2 4
569,146

2

42.724.678 11.601,392 2.589.537
43,493.098 !0,450,948 3,034 071
26,1.73,093 16,573.605 1.138.5 *5
21,7o8.330 18,129,926 3,873,8 >4
11,200,229 8,126,325 1,775,252

DRY

Receipts at—

jBhl«.18d‘/*w Bush.bO lbs Buah.Snihs BfW'i.32 lb

/

BiuthAHIhn Bush.**

390.633

107,721

30,3.31

17,730

44,575

4.7S0

1,030,807
5,23 )

3,‘jyu

00,3X)
65,64 1

i

jhi*

73.652

..

1,HOO

20,0)0

14 233

83,003

15 4 4 1L

0,407

11,707

....

13,35 •
16,0)0
725.005

1.703

9,290

203,100

102,2/0

13,200

14,700

..

Toledo
..

.

leveland.
Peoria

-

10,051'

89,053

0

4 53 4

13,847

1 0)0

1,500

Tot. wk.

23,923
1.800
3.727

72,885

872,6)1

200 951

02 129

412.032

2,083,803
1,331,801

60S 020

183 7 31

901.4S3

223.885

82.103

yu.yio

440,393

1,020,812

600.7* 4

224,271

84,400

83.492,110 74,764.36'
00,110 003 87,535.12
04.587.027 00,000,204

41.185 715

15 310.329

40,410.2 2

15 046 7.50

4,147,910
6.160.194

70S

13.044.310

3.500.1.12

Same wk. 8^
Same wk.

8~0.158 335,353
1,030.303 395.125
1,181.2*4 1,-69.190
1,'92,149 1,637,107
7 72,007 037,183

GOODS TRADE

....

1882-3

7.200,546
0.001,2 53

1883-4
...

7.130 700

17.17

little occasion to

WhetU.

New York
Bostou.
Portland
Montreal
Pliiladel..
Baitim’re
N. Orl’ns
N. News.
.

Total w’k
8’me tiiUi
1884.

..

Bush.
3 >4.112

•

•

Flour.

B fifth.

Bb’s.

705,773
17 1,634

1 v>64
23.688
-

Corn.

31,036
•

•

•

•

•

68,07*1

OllS.

Hue.

Peas.

Bora.

Bush

Barb

163,674

by manufacturers’ agents, by means of exceptionally low
prices, and a slightly improved business in m
wear
woolens was done in tiie regular way.
The jobbing trade was
by no means active as a rule, but very low prices enable l some
of the leading jobbers to eff ect liberal sales of ce tain fabrics
—not strictly desirable in point of style, etc.
The feature of

m’s

auction sale of about 900 cases domestic
is, cambrics and flue bleached shirtings, manufac¬
tured by “The B rkeley Company.” The sale was l argely
attended by jobbers and first-class retailors, and its general
r* suits
were quite satisfactory to the
manufacturers, the
entire offering having been readily disposed of at prices which
fu ly realized expectations.
It is probable, however, that
milts derived no iuime liate profit from the sale, but the main
object was to secure lor the goods a more general
in trie trade, and this desire was successfully accomplished, as

12

.

10 »

57,167

2,s

9,000

l

0

•

the

164,756
530,303
209,527

19,429
16,7* S

747,83 4 1,813,564

162,127

172,774

61,272

4,579

472,772

109,098

4,211

156,121

19, 412

1 50,. >97
182.773
2 >,25 9

1,272,501

'580

introduction

they were
the

is as below. We add the
correspond'ng period cf last year for comparison:
The dastination of these exports

Exports
for week
to—

18-5

L884.

Week,

Week,
.4

Apr. 11

Bbts.

iibth

Un.Kirig.
Contiu’iii
S.&C.Au
W. Indie/
Brit.col’i-

12..629
2,..33
lk.S




1

.

58.158
0 2 li
18,916
/

f

i 3S 4
W.'P If

Apr. 11.

Apr 12.

Bush.

555,49 *
192,304

.

t«*/i

L8k5
Week,

Apr. 11.
Bush.

461.3

1.405,027

->u>.;o

383.4)9
9

3o

I'M!

1>- 4

W-‘f ■>
A nr 12
Bu«t<

319.566
123.31 1
6.5- O
13.8 7

1.1.0210 441

5.153
0,2 l *

7.2

1,02 b

1,1*4

1.03

>

2,127

109,098

1.81 >,564

4 72 77

2

6

717.303 1,27 ?,50

Goods.—The export? of
April 14 were 1,905 packiges,

Cotton

were

2

56<

buyers for all sections of

domestics for
rhe week ending
of wnich 1,223
shipped to Great Britain, 127 to Chili, 123 to Venezuela,
103 to II .yti, and sunder parcels to other mark ts. Tnere was
lade, if any, improvement, in the demand for staple cotton
goods at tirst hinds, transactions in bro*-n, bleached and

1 1.20 ’

13,4

Oth.e’n’L
Total...

12.

nr.

1885.
Week,

widely distriouted among

country.

Domestic

Com.

Wheat.

fi'laur.

week was an

white goo

2 179

61.272

The demand at first

out

the

Exports
from —

replenish their stocks.

chiefly restricted to small parcels of the most
desirable staple and fancy fabrics, but some good sized
“round lots” of domestics, prints, ginghams, etc., were closed

seaboard p >rcs for the week
shown in the annexed statement:

ending April 11, 1385 are

goods trade

hands was

from the several

The exports

April 17, 1885.

prevailing in

Since July 2

1884-5

15,819

light and disappointing the past week, the demand for
consumption having been confined within such narrow limits
(owing to the unseasonably cool weather still
many parts of tSie country) that distributers have had very

501

195.202

609

3,489
17,555

was

104,828

Duluth

5,220
44.529

....

wholesale branches of the dry

Business in the

Ibi

35/4,803

134,450
7,7*3

Icago
Milwaukee

8t. Louis

tiyo.

BarUy.

ouis.

2,500

3,134

Friday, P. M..
Corn.

Wheal.

Flour.

16,585

4,420

194,647

126.710
54,0 >0

6,065

3 321

1,772.706

THE

last three years:

150,853

.c3 576
12 8 »6

57,752
97.653
3 16,247
182.836
872.186
3,319
72,0 >0
568,883

T n. Apr. 11/85.
T k, Apr. 4. *85.
Pot. Apr. 12, ’84.
T
Apr. 14/33.
Tat. Apr. 15,’82.

the figures of tb.9 New
the receipts at Western
ake and river ports, arranged so as to present the compara¬
tive movement for the week ending April 11 and since Aug. 1

below, prepared by us from
York Produce Exchange. We first give

178,707
63,689

35 000

Baltimore

54

10.000

570,805
25,430

Indianapolis
Kansas City

81
72

6.439

66,910
‘26 000

1,001

736.637

Rye.
bush

100,201

100.0 »o

Philadelphia

90

188 581

.

2,414.295

40

statements

for each of the

7,537

5,161,708
6,406,508

Detroit

Bostou

941,012
201,*60
29,0 )0
3,226
280,761

2,241,508
1,761, >51
44,584

Toledo

76

bush

15,989,573
223,335

Djwh Mississippi.
Ou rail.....

of breadstuffs to market is

The movement

®
u

White....
No. 2 mixed..
No. 2 white..........

31 00
®
®

36

Oats—Mixed

97^

®

75

State

®1 01
95
®

Barley.

Oats,
bush.

36,500

3t. Louis.
Cincinnati

73

®

bush.

600
887,960

Oswego

GRAISI.

Com,

bush

2,147,452

Buffalo

Chieago

Wheat,

4,201,978
263,332

Albany

Pine

Wheat-

supply of grain, comprising the stocks m granary
principal points of accumulation at lake and seaboard
and in transit by rail and water, April 11,1835, was as

The visible

FLOUR.

Detroit

Bush.

Buah.

50,802

273.114
472.395

269,254
151,861

1888-4.

Aug. 85 to Aug. 27 to
Apr. 18.
Apr. 11.

5,038,013

3,848,011

Continent...
SAC. Am...

Barrels

The

Aug. 23 to

3,244,387 18,002.491 10,295.421 22,484.244 19,008501
5,871,990
0,248,870
258,250 16,359,873 10,000,409
1,170.983
020,332
1,200
48,303
430,043
279,001
277,554
32,211
1,000
534,154
111.783
59,941
8.010
146
369,979
76.319
115,375
17,507
83,071
22.064

CJn. Kingdom

.

1884-5.

1883-4.

1884-5.

Aug. 27 to

Bbl*.

Oatmeal-

.

1883-4.

1884-5.

Ex irts since

Com.

Wheat.

Flour.

i‘,3-2

colored cottons having bjen
character and light in tie

almost wholly of a hand-to-mouth

aggregate amount. Some

large

quickly sold by agents by
of piic ; con-.e-sions, and jobbed at correspondingly
low figures by l ,rge j > >b rs; but such c »ses were ex j-ptiona 1.
It is still a buyers m irket for many outside makes of plain
lots of

means

tickings, denims, etc., were

490

THE CHRONICLE.

and colored cottons, but the most desirable standard

goods
steadily held at current quotations, which are in most
instances exceedingly low and unremunerative to manufac¬
Print cloths were in fair demand and firmer (owing
turers.
to a determination on the part of the Fall River and Rhode
Island mills to stop production for four weeks before July 1st),
the market closing strong’at 3f£c. cash for 64x61 “ spots ” arid
“
near futures,” and 2%c. for 56x60s.
For prints the demand
was irregular, but a fair business was done in the best
styles
at regular prices, and some large lots of indifferent work were
closed out at very low figures. Ginghams and woven wash
fabrics continued in fair but diminished demand, and lawns
and piques ruled quiet.
are

Domestic Woolen Goods.—There

continuation of

a

the

Importations of Dry Goods,

importations of dry goods at this port for the week
ending April 16, 1885, and since January 1, and the same facts
for the corresponding periods are as follows:
1

:

Total Ent'd
the

N. W. Harris &
INVESTMENT
No. 176

,

To

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entire Issues receives special atten

if you wish to buy or sell.

COMPANY

(OF
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a

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Co.,

D. G. FONES, \ STATE BANK, ) C. T. WALKER
1 Incorporated 1875. j
President.
Cashier.

Bank,

ROCK, ARKANSAS.
-

-

-

$200,000

Prompt attention given to all business in

our

line.

N. Y. Correspondents.—Importers’ & Traders'
National Bank and National Bank of the Republio.

Sherman S. Jewett, Pres. Josiah Jewett, V.Pres

Cornwell, Cashier.

Bank of

Buffalo,

CAPITAL,

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©nromjetxial ©ards.

Brinckerhoff, Turner
&

Co.,

Manufacturers and Dealers In

COTTON SAILDUCK

BONDS,

12

PINE

And all kinds of

SATURDAYS.

SON,

COTTON

CANVAS,
FELTING
DUCK,
CAR
COVERING, BAGGING, RAVENS DUCK, SAIL
TWINES, &C., “ONTARIO” SEAMLESS
BAGS, “AWNING STRIPES.

STREET, NEW YORK.

(Equitable Building.)

Also, Agents

©arils.

UNITED

STATES HUNTING CO.

A full supply, all Widths and Colors, always in stock

Joy, Lincoln & Motley,

86 & 88 Franklin

St.,

$300,000
BUFFALO, N. Y.

This bank has superior facilities for making collec¬
on all accessible points in the United States,
Canada and Europe.
Liberal terms extended to
aocounts of bankers and merchants.

tions

Correspondents—New York, National Shoe St
Leather Bank;.Union Bank of London.

BAGGING.

15 Chauncey Street,
BOSTON.

WARREN, JONES & ORATZ,

Ocean Mills

Co., Atlantic Cotton Mills,
Chicopee Mlg. Co,, Peabody Mills,
Saratoga Victory Mlg. Co.,
Ellerton New Mills,
White Mfg. Co.,

ST.

LOUIS, Mo.

Manufacturers’ Agents for the sale of Jute

Uncasville Mfg. Co.,
Underwear and Hosiery Mills.

IMPORTERS

Bullard &

FOR

Geo. H. Gilbert Mfg. Co.,
Arlington Mills,
Freeman Mfg. Co.,
Renfrew Mfg. Co., James Phillips, Jr.
Fitchburg Worsted Co.,
George Whitney,
Continental Mills,

Lincoln Mills.

BOSTON, 31 Bedford Street.
vrr'Tjr vopv $ 58
& 60 Worth Street, and
NEW YORK.
$ 35 & 37 Tllomas Btreet.

Bagging

OF

COTTON

IRON

Brown,Wood & Kingman
SELLING AGENTS

William C.

©
Ol

M

to

00

AGENTS FOR

Defaulted Bonds of Missouri, Kansas and Illinois a
pecialty. Good Investment Securities, paying from
H to 10 per cent, for sale.

German National

B
to

M
M

Ol

*0

M

NEW YORK.

1871.

Dealers In Western Securities.

-

© © CC oo ©
*1 00 Oi if* ©

*
>
it

OD

If*

52

No. 109 Duane Street.

C. E. WELLESLEY,
General Manager,
Dallas, Texas.

STREET, ST. LOUIS,

Capital (Paid In)

I-1

w©
©1-

Europe.

F. Keleher &

LITTLE

woo

if*

c

o

©omtnxvcial

LONDON, ENGLAND),

OLIVE

M

If* © *1 *4 W
*4 © Oi W W

LIMITED,

ESTABLISHED

305

©

00 M

©

ft

general Financial and Agency Business in

New York Correspondents:
Blake Bros. & Co.,
Wall Street.




M

© w© © w

© W to tool

ON

No.

the State of Texas and

P.

if*

©m

to

K

H*© W©*4

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to

ADRIAN II. MULLER &

THE

Texas Land &

Z)<

*4

©

&

B
H

SALES of all classes of

State, County, City, Town, Schoo
and Car Trust Bought and Sold.

us

*J M

M

H

it*©

Undersigned hold REGULAR AUCTION

CHICAGO, ILL.

The
tion. Write

B
SS
H

H*

CL

Wol. Manufctres

Hi

If*

At Auction.
The

Silk
Total Flax Cot n

M

05

JmJCttOM JtaUS.

BANKERS,

Flax 81 k Cot n Wool

of—

Co., STOCKS and BONDS

DEARBORN BTREET,

BONDS,
funding of

Ent’dfor Total

of—

M

WAtsUvn fflmiktxs.

Total

on

1

©

by certain agents. Ladies’ cloths, tricots, wool suitings and
Backings and* worsted dress goods were severally less active
than of late, and there was a marked decrease in the demand
for Jersey cloths, while flannels and blankets ruled
seasonably
quiet.
Foreign Dry Goods were mostly quiet in first hands, and
the jobbing trade was light and irregular, the prevailing cool
weather having been unfavorable for the distribution of many
spring and summer fabrics. Plain silks ruled quiet, but a fair
business was done in summer silks by means of low prices.
Dress goods were lightly dealt in, and staple goods, as linens,
white goods, hosiery, laces, embroideries, fabric gloves, &c.,
were in limited demand, but steady in price.

Total

Flax Silk Cot n Wool

M
i
s
c
e
l
a
n
o
u
M
a
n
u
f
c
t
r
e
s
M
i
s
c
e
l
a
n
o
u
M
i
s
c
e
l
a
n
o
u
M
a
n
u
f
c
t
r
e
s
port. forcnsumpt.
market. consumpt
at

attracted

attention because of extra inducements offered

:
■

slightly improved demand for men’s-wear woolens devel¬
oped of late, but the volume of business in this department
was hardly up to expectations, because of the cautious
policy
still pursued by leading clothiers. Worsted coatings continued
to meet with considerable attention, and some very failorders were placed for leading makes of all-wool cassimeres
and trouserings, while cotton-warp cassimeres have shown
more animation in
some
quarters. Overcoatings were in
better request, and a steady business was done in satinets,
while leading makes of Kentucky jeans and doeskins have
more

'

The

M

was

[VOL. XL,

TIES.

Wheeler,

119 MAIDEN

JLANE,

NEW YORK.

BAGGING

AND

IRON

TIES,

(FOR BALING COTTON.)
Agents for the following brands of Jute Bagging,
Eagle Mills,’’“Brooklyn Cityf”“Georgia,’’“Carolma/’
“Nevlns, O,” “Union Star,” “Salem/’ “Horicon Mills,”
Jersey
Mills ” and “ Dover Mills.”
'
“

“

IMPORTERS OF IRON TIES.

ESTABLISHED

1855.

Bliss, Fabyan & Co., Eugene R. Cole,
New York, Boston,
Philadelphia,

SELLING AGENTS FOR LEADING BRANDS

BROWN Sc BLEACHED SHIRTINGS
AND

SHEETINGS,

PRINTS, DENIMS, TICKS, DUCKS, *0.

Towels, Quilts, White Goods Sc Hosiery
Drills, Sheetings, de., for Export Trade.

SEARS St COLE,

Successor to

STATIONER

AND

PRINTER,

Supplies Banks, Bankers, Stock Brokers and Cor¬
porations with complete outfits of Account Books
and Stationery.

fW~ New concerns organising will have their or¬
ders

promptly executed.

No. I

WILLIAM STREET,
(HANOVER SQUARE.)


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102