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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
L. B. Schwellenb ach, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ewan Clague, Commissioner

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS
Vacations; Holidays and Week-End Work

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1948

For gale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. - Price 15 cents




Letter of Transmittal

U nited S tates D epartment of L abor,
B ureau of L abor S tatistics ,

Washington, D. C., November 26, 1947.

The S ecretary of L abor :
I
have the honor to transmit herewith a report on vacation and holiday and
week-end provisions in collective-bargaining agreements. The report consists of
two chapters: (1) Vacations, and (2) Holidays and Week-End Work, and is
based on an examination of collective-bargaining agreements on file in the Bureau.
Both chapters were prepared by James C. Nix, under the direction of Harold
S. Roberts, Chief of the Collective Bargaining Division, Industrial Relations
Branch.
E w an Ciag ue , Commissioner.

Hon. L. B. S chw ellenbach ,

Secretary of Labor.
ii




Preface
As early as 1902 the Bureau of Labor Statistics, then the Bureau of
Labor in the Department of the Interior, recognized the growing impor­
tance of collective bargaining, and published verbatim the bituminous
coal mining agreement of 1902 between the Associations of Coal Mine
Operators of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois and the re­
spective districts of the United Mine Workers of America. Since 1912
the Bureau has made a systematic effort to collect agreements between
labor and management in the leading industries and has from time
to time published some of those agreements in full or in summary form
in the Monthly Labor Review.
The first bulletin entirely devoted to collective-bargaining agree­
ments was published in 1925 under the title “Trade Agreements in 1923
and 1924.” Similar annual bulletins were published in 1926,1927, and
1928. These bulletins analyzed only outstanding agreements affecting
certain industries and certain skilled crafts in which collective bargain­
ing has followed a more or less established pattern.
No bulletins in this field were published by the Bureau between 1928
and 1942—ra period during which collective bargaining first lost ground
in the depression and then made rapid strides following the enactment
of the National Labor Relations Act in 1935. The growth in tradeunion membership from fewer than 4,000,000 workers in 1935 to more
than 10,000,000 in 1942 not only resulted in a large increase in the
number of collective agreements covering industries hitherto not in­
cluded under collective bargaining, but also extended the scope and
area of bargaining in individual industries. In recognition of this
development, the Bureau’s 1942 report on union agreements (Bulletin
No. 686) dealt with provisions and clauses on particular labor-manage­
ment problems rather than with the agreements on each union or
industry separately.
The substance and character of collective-bargaining agreements
change continuously, and many of the clauses and provisions covered
in Bulletin No. 686 underwent significant changes during the war emer­
gency, as a result not only of the normal processes of collective bargain­
ing but of the decisions of the National War Labor Board. New
problems meant new clauses and new provisions. The Board also
gave added impetus to certain forms of union security, and to certain
practices, now deeply imbedded in the entire field of labor-management
relations.
ra



IV

PREFACE

The liquidation of the Board, and the renewal of emphasis on free
collective bargaining after VJ-day, led to a tremendous increase in
the demand for information on specific current provisions in agree­
ments. Urgent requests came from employers and unions, from the
U. S. Conciliation Service, and from mediators and arbitrators engaged
in settling or preventing labor-management disputes. It was largely
in response to these requests that the Bureau of Labor Statistics under­
took to revise and bring up to date the material on union agreements.
In this revision two significant departures have been made: (1)
Accumulation of data has made possible the use of a larger sample
than was possible heretofore. (2) The information will be presented
in a series of small bulletins, each stressing a major area of significant
problem of collective bargaining. This will permit the material for
each major problem to be published as rapidly as finished without
waiting until all of the subjects of collective bargaining are analyzed.
It will have the advantage of greater flexibility in handling specific
requests for material from employers, unions, and the public. Some
clauses are more or less stable and undergo relatively minor changes
even over a considerable period of time and therefore need only
occasional revision, whereas others undergo rather rapid change. Also,
as new issues develop, it will be possible to add new bulletins to the
series without revising those already published.
The clauses used are designed to facilitate, but not to condition,
the bargaining process. No special attempt has been made to deter­
mine the prevailing industry practice or the most frequently used
provisions. The clauses are presented, not as models, but as a source
of reference for those who participate in collective-bargaining nego­
tiations, by making available to them a wide variety of provisions on
the specific subjects under consideration.




CONTLNTS
C hapter 1.—V acations
Length of vacation in relation to service requirements_________________
Length of vacation same for all eligible employees: Clauses 1 -4 _____
Length of vacation graduated according to duration of employment:
Clauses 5-18_________________________________________________
Effect on vacations when holidays occur during vacation periods:
Clauses 19-26________________________________________________
Eligibility requirements_____________________________________________
Length of service:
Effect of absences in computing length of employment: Clauses
27-33___________________________________________________
Effect of quits, discharges, or transfers in computing length of
employment: Clauses 34-37_______________________________
Cut-off dates specified for completion of service requirement:
Clauses 38-40____________________________________________
Minimum work requirements: Clauses 41-45--------------------------------Effect of absences on minimum work requirements: Clauses
46-50___________________________________________________
Loss of vacation rights for disciplinary reasons: Clauses 51-55__________
Vacation rights of employees leaving the company: Clauses 56-69_______
Vacation rights of employees entering and returning from military service:
Clauses 70-85____________________________________________________
Vacations for part-time and seasonal workers: Clauses 86-93___________
Computation of vacation pay:
Specified number of hours7 pay for each week of vacation: Clauses
94-100_________________________________________________________
Vacation pay based on average weekly earnings over specified period:
Clauses 101-104________________________________________________
Vacation pay based on percentage of annual earnings: Clauses 105109 __________________________________________________________
Central fund financed by employer and administered by union: Clause
110 ________________________________________________________
Flat sum payment: Clauses 111-113________________________________
Basis of computation different for time and piece workers: Clauses 114115___________________________________________________
Other vacation pay provisions: Clauses 116-122_____________________
Pay in lieu of vacation: Clauses 123-130________________________________
Timing of vacation periods:
Vacation schedules: Clauses 131-146________________________________
Cumulation of vacations: Clauses 147-150__________________________
Split vacations: Clauses 151-154___________________________________
Combining vacation with sick leave: Clauses 155-157____________________




v

2
3
3
6
6

7
8
8
9
10
11
12
14
17

20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
25
27
28
28

VI

CONTENTS

Chapter 2.—H olidays

and

Week -E nd Work
Page

Observance of holidays: Clauses 1-18_________________________________
Limitations on holiday work: Clauses 19-31___________________________
Making up holidays: Clauses 32-37___________________________________
Holidays with pay: Clauses 38-49____________________________________
Computation of pay for holidays not worked: Clauses 50-58________
Eligibility for pay on holidays not worked: Clauses 59-69__________
Premium rates for work on holidays: Clauses 70-82____________________
Premium rates and limitations on week-end work: Clauses 83-104_____
Eligibility for premium pay on week-ends: Clauses 105-109____________
Index of clauses____________________________________________________




30
32
34
35
37
39
41
44
47
49

Bulletin 7no. 908-2 of the
£
United States Bureau of Labor Statistics

Collective Bargaining Provisions
Vacations; Holidays and Week-End Work
Chapter 1.— V acations
“The enjoyment of a vacation with pay has long been one of the
more important aspirations of American labor. It has been a goal of
labor, not only because it makes possible leisure and relief from every­
day cares and duties, but also because the right to a vacation with pay
is a mark of social status and a recognition of the worth and .dignity
of the ordinary laboring man.” 1
Paid-vacation clauses are now a standard feature of union agree­
ments in most industries. Although vacations for white-collar work­
ers have been common practice for many years, the extension of vaca­
tions to manual workers has been a relatively recent development. In
1940, only about 25 percent of all workers under union agreement were
covered by paid-vacation clauses; by the end of 1944, the latest year
for which figures are available, the proportion had increased to 85
percent.2
Paid vacations are least prevalent in seasonal and casual industries,
of which the building trades may be regarded as an outstanding ex­
ample. In these fields, work is irregular and the individual worker
may have a number of different employers during a single year. This
difficulty is sometimes solved by pooling employers’ contributions into
a central fund from which vacation allowances are paid to eligible
workers. Arrangements of this type are especially frequent in the
clothing trades.
The increased acceptance of the principle and practice of paid vaca­
tions for wage earners was due largely to the influence of the growing
trade-union movement, but the recognition by management of the
genuine benefits that workers and the industry as a whole derive from
vacations and the National War Labor Board’s policy of approving or
ordering vacations gave added impetus to the inclusion of vacation
clauses in collective-bargaining agreements.*
1 Report of the President’s Emergency Board in the 1941 railroad case.
* For inform ation on the prevalence of paid-vacation plans, by industry, and the details
of such plans, see Bureau of Labor S tatistics Bulletin No. 811, “Paid Vacations in American
Industry, 1943 and 1944,”




x

2

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

Unions base requests for paid vacations on the need to combat
fatigue and to maintain good health, and on the beneficial effect of
relaxation and recreation upon labor morale, productive efficiency,
and the standard of living of the workers concerned. It is also
contended that paid vacations reduce labor turn-over because they
act as a strong deterrent when an employee thinks of quitting his
job. In cases in which vacation privileges vary with seniority, the
deterrent grows stronger as seniority accumulates.
During the war, the National War Labor Board justified and ap­
proved paid vacations as a highly effective aid in securing maximum
individual and plant production. The general policy of the Board
was to approve or order 1 week’s vacation for 1 year of service, and
2 weeks for 5 or more years of service.3
The length of vacation allowed in relation to service requirements
is the major issue in collective bargaining pertaining to vacations.
In determining the length of service necessary to earn a specified
vacation period, a number of related problems arise. The parties
may wish to define “service” in order to make clear whether or not
breaks in service affect an employee’s vacation rights, and they may
spell out justifiable absences from work which have no effect on vaca­
tion privileges. Special groups of employees, such as veterans, parttime workers, and employees leaving the company, may be considered
separately and granted vacation rights different from those of other
employees. Problems arise over the computation of vacation pay for
different categories of employees, such as pieceworkers, hourly-paid
workers, and salaried workers. Other problems to be resolved con­
cern pay in lieu of vacation, and the time at which vacations are
taken.

Length of Vacation in Relation to Service Requirements
Practically all agreements with vacation provisions require em­
ployees to have been employed a specified minimum length of time
with the company in order to qualify for a paid vacation. In the
great majority of union agreements, the eligibility period for a
week’s vacation is established at 1 year, although longer or shorter
qualifying periods are sometimes specified. Prorated vacation
periods of less than 1 week are sometimes allowed employees who
have insufficient service for a full week’s vacation.
8 “ * * * However, it is our view that it is w ithin the discretion of the regional boards
to order or approve vacation plans providing for 2 weeks after 5 years of service even
though it is not shown that such provisions are the prevailing practice in the local area or
in the particular industry. We have therefore denied the appeal in this case, despite the
fact that there is no finding by the regional board that such a plan is the prevailing prac­
tice in the industry or the area. We have adopted this policy because of our conviction
that the practice of granting 2 weeks’ vacation with pay to employees of 5 years or more
service has increasingly become a normal practice in American industry throughout the
country.” (Fulton Iron W orks Company, 15 War Labor Reports 231.)




VACATIONS

3

In some cases, agreements allow a fixed length of vacation to
all eligible employees, regardless of differences in duration of em­
ployment beyond the qualifying period. More frequently, however,
the length of vacation is graduated according to length of service.
Length of vacation may be affected by holidays which occur during
the vacation period. In some agreements such holidays are added to
the length of vacation specified, either as an extra day or an extra
day’s pay; in others, the holiday is counted as part of the vacation.
LENGTH OF VACATION SAME FOR ALL ELIGIBLE EMPLOYEES

1. One Week's Vacation A fter 6 Months' Service
Commencing with the year 1944, all employees covered by this agreement
who have been employed by the company for at least 6 months prior to the
commencement of the vacation period, and who are employed at the com­
mencement of the vacation period, shall receive a 1-week vacation with pay
annually.
2. One Week A fter 1 Year
Employees who have been in the employ of the employer for 1 year or more
shall be entitled to 1 week’s vacation with full pay.
3. Two Weeks A fter 1 Year
All employees who have been on the pay roll of the employer for a continu­
ous period of at least one (1) year prior to June 1 shall be entitled to a vacation
of two (2) weeks with pay.
4. Two Weeks' Vacation to All Union Members; No Service Requirement
Specified
The employer agrees to grant all union members covered by this agreement
two (2) weeks’ vacation with pay or two (2) weeks’ pay in lieu of vacation.
LENGTH OF VACATION GRADUATED ACCORDING TO DURATION OF EMPLOYMENT

5. One Week A fter 6 Months, 2 Weeks A fter 1 Year
Employees who have been in service for six (6) months shall be entitled to
1 week’s vacation with full pay. Employees who have been in service for one
(1) year or more shall be entitled to an annual vacation of two (2) weeks
with full pay.
6. One Week A fter 6 Months Plus 1 Day Extra Per Month Up to 1 Year, 2 Weeks
A fter 1 Year, 3 Weeks A fter 5 Years
Each employee shall receive two (2) weeks’ vacation after 1 year’s employ­
ment; three (3) weeks’ vacation after 5 or more years of employment; one (1)
week’s vacation after 6 months’ employment and 1 day for each additional month
up to twelve (12) months. It is the intention of the above that employees
(except those employed five (5) years or longer) shall receive twelve (12)
working days of vacation per year.
7. One Week After 1 Year, 2 Weeks A fter 2 Years
All employees, upon completion of one (1) year of continuous service, shall be
entitled to one (1) week’s vacation with full pay based on full time weekly
pay in the 3 months prior to vacation time. After completing two (2) years’
service, employees shall be entitled to two (2) weeks’ vacation with full pa>
computed as above.
769415°—48-------2




4

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

8. One Week A fter 1 Year, 2 Weeks After 3 Years
Any regular employee who has been in the service of an employer continuously
for 1 year shall be given an annual vacation of 1 week with pay, and any
regular employee who has been in the service of the employer continuously for
3 years shall be given an annual vacation of 2 weeks with pay.
9. One Week After 1 Year, iy2 Weeks After 3 Years, 2 Weeks A fter 5 Years
All employees covered by this agreement who shall have been employed con­
tinuously for the period specified below shall receive the following annual
vacations with p ay:
1 year but less than 3 years_____________________________1 week
3 years but less than 5 years_________________________ 1 y2 weeks
5 years or more_____________________________________ 2 weeks
10. One Week A fter 1 Year, 2 Weeks A fter 5 Years
Employees having at least one (1) year but less than five (5) years of service
shall receive one (1) week’s vacation with pay, computed on the basis of 2
percent of his straight-time earnings for the preceding calendar year. Employees
having five (5) years or more of service shall receive two (2) weeks’ vacation
with pay computed on the basis of 4 percent of his straight-time earnings for the
preceding calendar year.
11. One Week A fter 1 Year, 2 Weeks A fter 5 Years, 3 Weeks A fter 15 Years
Each employee who has completed 1 year of continuous employment will receive
1 week’s vacation. Each employee who has completed 5 years’ continuous service
will receive 2 weeks’ vacation. Each employee who has completed 15 years of
continuous service w ill receive 3 weeks’ vacation.
12. Twenty-one Days A fter 1 Year, 10 Days After 6 Months
In view of the nature of operations, the company agrees that after 1 year of
continuous service, every member of the crew shall be entitled to an annual vaca­
tion of twenty-one (21) days with pay.
If any employee has 6 months’ continuous service, he may be granted a vaca­
tion of not more than ten (10) days with pay, but such period will be deducted
from the twenty-one (21) days.
Norn—
-This clause is taken from an agreement covering unlicensed personnel on
tankers.
13. Vacation Prorated According to Months and Years of Service (Additional
allowances made when plant is on 6-day workweek).
Any employee on the pay roll on May 31 of the current vacation year who prior
to June 1 of that year has had the length of continuous employment specified in
the table below, shall be entitled to the corresponding vacation with pay, at the
basic rate of pay. The word “days” means working days of eight (8) hours:
6 months but less than 8 months_________________________ 2 days
8 months but less than 10 months_______________________ 3 days
10 months but less than 12 months--------------------------------- 4 days
1 year but less than 2 years------------------------------------------ 5 days
2 years but less than 3 years___________________________ 6 days
8 years but less than 4 years----------------------------------------7 days
4 years but less than 5 years----------------------------------8 days
5 years but less than 6 years------------------------------------------ 9 days
6 years or over--------------------------------------------------------------10 days
So long as 6-day operations prevail, the above schedule shall be modified so
that employees with 1 year or over, but less than 6 years of continuous employ­
ment shall be granted 1 additional day of vacation, and employees with 6 years



5

VACATIONS

or over of continuous employment shall be granted 2 additional days of vacation
at straight time basic rates.
14. Employees W ith Insufficient Service for 1 Week's Vacation Receive 1 D ay for
Each 8 Months' Service (From an agreement which allows 1 week to em­
ployees with 1 year’s service and 2 weeks after 5 years).
Employees with less than one (1) year’s service shall be allowed a vacation of
one (1) day for each three (3) months’ service, with vacation pay computed on
the basis of one-fifth of one (1) week’s vacation pay for each day of vacation.
15. One Day for Each Year; Maximum of 10 Days' Vacation
All employees shall receive 1 day’s vacation with pay for each year’s service, as
of July 1st, with 10 days maximum, payable July 15.
16. Extra 2 Weeks' Vacation Granted Every Fifth Anniversary Year After 19
Years' Service
Each regular employee who has been in continuous service of the company for
1 year, shall be entitled to 1 week’s vacation with full pay. Each year thereafter
he will be entitled to 2 weeks’ vacation until he has completed 19 years’ continuous
service with the company, at which time he will be entitled to 4 weeks’ vacation
with full pay, and during each succeeding fifth year thereafter he will be entitled
to 4 weeks’ vacation with full pay.
17. Sex Differential in Service Requirement for 8 Weeks' Vacation
Employees who have received their first vacation are thereafter eligible to
receive subsequent annual vacations any time on or after January first. The
length of the vacation will depend upon the length of their accumulated service
and upon their se x :
One-week vacation annually until an employee’s accumulated service equals
five (5) years.
Two weeks’ vacation annually thereafter until a female employee’s accumulated
service equals fifteen (15) years and a male employee’s service equals twenty (20)
years.
Three weeks’ vacation annually thereafter.
18. Vacation Allowances Different for Hourly Paid and Salaried Foremen
All hourly paid supervisory employees shall receive paid vacations in conform­
ance with the following schedule:
L ength of service

Duration of vacation

Less than 1 month-------------------------------------- None
1 month but less than 2 months_____________ % day
2 months but less than 3 months----------------- 1 day
3 months but less than 4 months_____________ 1% days
4 months but less than 5 months----------------- 2 days
5 months but less than 6 months____________ 2% days
6 months but less than 7 months____________ 3 days
7 months but less than 8 months_____________ 3% days
8 months but less than 9 months-------------- 4 days
9 months but less than 10 months_________ 4% days
10 months but less than 2 years_____________ 5 days
2 years but less than 3 years----------------------- 7 days
3 years but less than 4 years----------------------- 8 days
4 years but less than 5 years________________ 9 days
5 years or longer----------------------------------------- 10 days

(4 hours)
(8 hours)
(12 hours)
(16 hours)
(20 hours)
(24 hours)
(28 hours)
(32 hours)
(36 hours)
(40 hours)
(56 hours)
(64 hours)
(72 hours)
(80 hours)

All salaried employees shall receive paid vacations in conformance with the
following schedules:
6 months’ service_____________________________________ 1 week
1 year or longer__^_,._,,______._________________________2 weeks



6

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS
EFFECT ON VACATIONS WHEN HOLIDAYS OCCUR DURING VACATION PERIODS

19. Additional Day's Pay Added to Vacation
When a holiday falls during an employee’s paid vacation, such employee shall
receive an additional day’* pay for such holiday.
20. Additional D ay of Vacation
In the event a holiday, as provided in this contract, falls during the period of
an employee’s vacation, such employee shall be granted an extra day vacation.
21. Additional Day Given Only to Those Meeting Minimum Work Requirement
If a holiday occurs during that calendar week in which the vacations are taken
by any of the employees, one additional vacation day shall be taken because of
such holiday by all individuals who are entitled to a complete vacation based
on fourteen hundred (1,400) hours worked, but no additional day of vacation
shall be granted to those who are taking vacations based on less than fourteen
hundred (1,400) hours worked.
22. No Allowance for Holidays
Holidays falling within a vacation period are to be counted as vacation days
and not additional to the vacation period.
23. No Extra Compensation for Holidays Occurring During Vacation Unless Em­
ployer Ordered Vacation at That Time
In the event an employee should elect to take his vacation during a week in
which one of the holidays set forth in this contract falls, then the employee
shall receive no extra com]sensation for the holiday.
In the event the employer shall order the employee to take his vacation
during the week in which one of the holidays set forth in this contract falls,
then the employee shall receive the compensation set forth herein for his vaca­
tion pay plus 1 extra day’s pay at straight time to compensate him for that
holiday pay.
24. Employer Has Option of Extending Vacation by 1 D ay or Paying Additional
Compensation for the Holiday
If one of the legal holidays for which straight time is paid as provided in
article IX falls within the vacation period, the company may either extend
the vacation by 1 day or may pay the additional compensation for the holiday.
25. Employee Has Option of Extending Vacation by 1 Day or Accepting Additional
Compensation for the Holiday
If a holiday occurs during an employee’s vacation, the employee shall have the
option of taking an extra day after the vacation or an extra day’s pay for
the holiday.
26. Holidays May Be Accumulated and Added to Vacation Period
Each technician shall receive 1 additional day off for each of the following
holidays: New Years Day, Decoration Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanks­
giving Day, and Christmas. * * * If the technician so desires, the holidays
may be accumulated and added as an extra week’s vacation to the regular vaca­
tion hereinabov3 provided, if written notice of his desire to do so is given the
employer on or before December 15 of the preceding year.

Eligibility Requirements
LENGTH OF SERVICE

Practically all agreements with vacation clauses require workers
to be employed a specified length of time before they are eligible for



VACATIONS

7

paid vacations. Often, the necessary minimum service must be com­
pleted by a specified eligibility date or before the end of the fixed
vacation period.
Many agreements provide that absences from work caused by per­
sonal reasons or temporary lay-offs do not break continuous service
for vacation purposes. On the other hand, absence in excess of a
limited period, discharge, or resignation generally causes a break in
service, the loss of credit for all previous service, and the forfeiture
of all rights based on seniority, including vacation rights. A few
agreements, on the other hand, credit part or all of previous service
to employees rehired after resignation or discharge.
Where agreements provide for the accumulation of seniority dur­
ing lay-off, time lost because of lay-off is not deducted from the em­
ployee’s service record, provided the lay-off is not of such length as to
constitute a break in service. Where time lost because of lay-off is not
credited in computing length of service, employees get credit only for
time actually worked in accruing the length of service necessary for a
vacation.
EFFECT OF ABSENCES IN COMPUTING LENGTH OF EMPLOYMENT

27. Time Lost Because of Lay-off, Sickness, or Leave of Absence Not Deducted
From Employee’s Length of Service
It is agreed, should anv employee during the course of the year prior to
June 30 of the vacation year be laid off because of lack of work or other reasons
beyond his control, or absent on leave of absence, or absent because of sickness,
[he] shall receive the vacation pay he had accumulated up to June 1st and
shall be given full credit of this absence as time worked in computing their
time of continuous employment.
28. Time Lost As the Result of an Accident Counts as Part of Continuous Service
For purposes of vacation “continuous employ” is defined as employment un­
interrupted by absence due to discharge, unless re-hired within thirty (30)
days, or due to voluntary severance of employment by the employee.
Time lost as a result of an accident recognized by the State Industrial Accident
Commission of Oregon, or the Department of Labor and Industries of Washing­
ton, suffered during the course of employment, shall be counted as part of
continuous employment.
29. Time Lost Because of Strike Not Deducted in Determining Length of Service
The company will permit days lost because of the strike ending June 17, 1946,
to be computed as days worked for the purpose of figuring vacations, but it is
understood that only those employees who return to work within 15 days from
the date they are requested to return to work and who work a minimum of 4
weeks after their return shall be entitled to such credit toward their vacation.
30. Leaves of Absence Up to 6 Months Included in Computing Length of Service
For the purpose of this section, time off the pay roll due to requested leaves
of absence in excess of six (6) months, shall not be counted in computing time
for vacation pay.
31. Lay-off Up to 6 Months Not Included in Computing Length of Service
If an employee s’ all be laid off for a period of over 6 .months, the part of
such period over 6 months shall not be included as part of his length of service
with the company.



8

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

32. Absence up to 60 Consecutive Working Days Does Not Break Continuous
Service for Vacation (Sixty-day allowance intended to cover only absences
due to sickness, lay-off, or other unavoidable causes.)
Continuous service in the vacation plan is defined as service of an employee
who has not been absent for a period of over 60 consecutive working days. This
60-day break is intended to include absence from duty because of sickness, lay-off,
or other unavoidable causes, and is not calculated to include any break in service
caused by the employee voluntarily leaving the service, or absenting himself from
duty without good cause.
33. Only Time Actually Worked Considered in Determining Length of Service
In determining length of service, only the time actually worked shall be con­
sidered. No credit shall be allowed while on leave of absence (except while in
the armed forces of the United States), while on strike, or while laid off.
EFFECT OF QUITS, DISCHARGES, OR TRANSFERS IN COMPUTING LENGTH OF
EMPLOYMENT

34. Employees Rehired A fter Quit or Discharge Receive No Credit for Service
Prior to Such Termination
Employees on the company’s roll during the current calendar year are eligible
for vacation with pay based on their total service with the company to and
including December 31 of the preceding calendar year, excluding any service prior
to a quit or discharge.
35. Allowance Made for Previous Service With Employer, Even if Interrupted
Employees who, on May 31 have had at least twelve (12) months of continuous
employment will be given full credit for all previous employment with the
employer, for the purpose of computing their vacation, even if such employment
has been interrupted. Employees who, on May 31, have had at least six (6)
months’ but less than twelve (12) months’ continuous employment will receive
a proportionate credit for all previous employment, up to five (5) years as
follow s:
If they have been continuously employed six (6) months but less than eight (8)
months, they will receive credit for one-half of such previous employment.
If they have been continuously employed eight (8) months but less than ten
(10) months, they will receive credit for two-thirds of such previous employment.
If they have been continuously employed ten (10) months but less than twelve
(12) months, they will receive credit for five-sixths of such employment.
36. Employees Rehired After Lay-off Given Credit for Service Prior to Lay-off;
No Credit for Previous Service if Rehired A fter Quit or Discharge
In calculating length of service, if an employee was discharged for cause or
quit without leave and was reemployed at a later date, the length of service will
be counted from the date of reemployment. If an employee was laid off for
lack of work and later reemployed, credit will be given for the service before the
lay-off.
37. Employees Transferred to Another Plant of Same Company Retain Service
Accumulated Prior to Transfer
An employee transferred from another plant or office of t h e ___________
company to t h e ----------------- plant will be given credit for his length of service
elsewhere with the employer for the purpose of computing his vacation rights.
CUT-OFF DATES SPECIFIED FOR COMPLETION OF SERVICE REQUIREMENT

38. Length of Service Required for Vacation Must Be Completed by Specified
Eligibility Date
All employees of the company who are in the employ of the company on
June 30 and who have been continuously employed by the company for 1 year or



VACATIONS

9

more prior to that date shall be entitled to 1 week’s vacation with pay- All em­
ployees of the company who are in the employ of the company on June 30 and
who have been continuously employed by the company for 5 years or more prior
to that date shall be entitled to two (2) weeks’ vacation with pay.
N ote : A provision of this type may be a hardship on an employee whose an­
niversary date of employment occurs shortly after the vacation eligibility date.
For example, an employee hired July 15 would not be entitled to a vacation the
following year because he would have only 11% months’ service by June 30; he
would have to work almost 2 years for his first vacation, although nominally the
agreement calls for only 1 year’s service.
39. Service Requirement To Be Completed as of Individual Employee's An­
niversary Date
Vacation period for eligibility will be computed as of anniversary date and if
an employee from his anniversary date is in continuous service of the company for
1 year he is entitled to one (1) week vacation during that year.
N ote : A clause of this type is preferable to the preceding clause from the em­
ployee’s viewpoint, in that there is no possibility of his having to work longer
than the specified length of service before receiving his vacation as might be
the case if there were a vacation eligibility date for all employees. ( See note on
preceding clause.)

40. Employee Allowed Vacation if Service Requirement Completed Between Two
Specified Eligibility Dates
Length of service shall be determined as of May 1 of each year. If an employee
shall complete 1 or 5 years of continuous service, as the case may be, on a date
between May 1 and November 1 of any year, he shall, after having completed
such service, be entitled to a vacation as though he had completed such 1 to 5
years of continuous service, as the case may be, on May 1 of said year.
MINIMUM WORK REQUIREMENTS

Service requirements for vacation eligibility refer to the length of
time the employee has been employed by the company. Some vacation
provisions, in addition, require that an employee must actually have
worked a specified minimum time during the preceding year in order
to qualify for a paid vacation. The minimum work requirement may
be expressed as a specified number of hours, days, weeks, months, or pay
periods to be worked during the year. Where the minimum time is
stated in days, weeks, months, or pay periods, the employees usually
receive credit for the entire time unit if they work any part of it.
At times, workers may be unable to fulfill the minimum work require­
ments because of reasons beyond their control, such as l^ -o ff, sickness,
and accident, and thereby may be deprived of paid vacations. To
cover such situations, many agreements make allowances for such
absences, up to a maximum amount, by counting such lost time as
time worked.
U n io n usually oppose minimum work requirements on the ground
that once an employee has accumulated sufficient continuous service to
entitle him to a vacation, he should receive that vacation as long as he



10

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

remains a company employee. Employers, on the other hand, con­
sider work requirements justified in order to withhold vacation from
employees who were absent many times during the year, either volun­
tarily or because of lay-off.
41. Minimum Work Requirement of 1,200 Hours During Year
All employees who on April 1, 1946, have been continuously in the service of
the company for one (1) year and less than five (5) years and who have worked
at least 1,200 hours during the twelve (12) months prior to April 1, 1946, shall
be entitled to a vacation with pay or vacation allowance of one (1) week (40
hours). All employees who on April 1, 1946, have been continuously in the
service of the company for five (5) years or more and who have worked at
least twelve hundred (1,200) hours during the twelve (12) months prior to
April 1, 1946, shall be entitled to a vacation with pay or vacation allowance of
two (2) weeks (80 hours).
42. Minimum Work Requirement of 88 Weeks During Year
Employees in order to be eligible for vacations must work at least a part of
each of thirty-eight (38) weeks in the fifty-two (52) weeks prior to June 1.
N ote : A work requirement of this type may be le s s stringent than one stated
in hours, since the employee need work only part of the week in order to receive
credit toward meeting the minimum requirement.
43. Earnings in 75 Percent of Pay Periods Required, as Well as Minimum Number
of Hours
Conditions of eligibility. In addition to the periods of continuous service
specified above, the following are conditions of elig'bility for a vacation with
pay:
(a) The employee must have actually worked at least 1,600 hours during
the qualifying year.
(b) The employee must have earned pay during at least 75 percent of the
pay periods during the qualifying year.
44. Alternative of 760 Hours or 95 Reports for Work During Year
Any employee who has 1 year of service on July 1, 1946, or who completes
1 year of service prior to January 1, 1947, shall receive 48 hours’ vacation; those
completing 5 years of service during the same period, shall receive an additional
48 hours. To qualify for vacation an employee must have worked 760 hours or
95 reports during the 12-month period prior to his anniversary date.
45. Differential in Minimum Work Requirement for 1-Week and 2-Week
Vacations
Any employee completing 1,350 hours in any one contract year shall be entitled
to one (1) week vacation with pay during the first three (3) consecutive years,
and two (2) weeks’ vacation with pay thereafter, during any contract year that
the employee completes 1,500 hours.
EFFECT OF ABSENCES ON MINIMUM WORK REQUIREMENTS

40. Time Lost Through Lay-off up to 90 Days Counted as Time Worked in
Determining Vacation Eligibility
Each employee shall be considered as having a year’s continuous service and
a year’s eligibility for vacation for each completed year, starting from the date
of his employment, in which he has worked at least twelve hundred (1,200)
straight-time hours for the company.
Any employee laid off through reduction of force, or any other reason beyond
the employee’s control and reemployed within ninety (90) days, shall be con­



VACATIONS

11

sidered as having been continuously employed and accumulating Straight-time
hours worked at the rate of eight (S) for each working day during such lay-off,
as regards vacation rights.
47. Minimum Work Requirement of 10 Months, but Exception Made for Absences
Beyond Control of Employee
To qualify for vacation pay an employee must have worked ten (10) months
of the 12 months immediately preceding July 1 of the vacation year, except in
cases beyond the control of the employee, such as sickness or accident.
48. Allowance of 50 Days for Illness or Injury in Meeting Minimum Work
Requirement
For vacation purposes actual absences from scheduled work due to illness or
injury up to fifty (50) days per calendar year shall be counted as days worked
provided that employees claiming such credit file with the company’s medical
department within ten (10) days after they return to work a written statement
signed by their attending physician certifying to the period of such disability.
49. Allowance of 35 Days9 Absence in Addition to Time Lost Because of Lay-offs,
Injury, and Illness
An employee who is enrolled on the active employment rolls of the company for
thirty-two (32) or more weeks in the year period immediately prior to the
vacation eligibility date and who has been enrolled on the employment records
for 1 year or more and whose absences from his regularly scheduled work, except
for lay-offs and time off because of work injury or proven illness in the year
immediately prior to the first day of the vacation period, have not aggregated
more than thirty five (35) days shall be entitled to a vacation of 1 week.
50. Employees Failing to Work 185 Days During the Year Receive Vacation Pro­
portionate to Number of Days Worked
An employee to be entitled to a full vacation period and having completed 1
year’s continuous service must have worked at least 185 days during the year
immediately preceding the vacation period. In the event the employee has not
completed 185 days of work during said year, he will and shall be entitled to only
such portion of the vacation as the ratio of the actual days worked during the
year bear to the required number of days to be worked in order to qualify for
the said vacation.

Loss of Vacation Rights for Disciplinary Reasons
A few agreements penalize employees for infraction of company
rules or unexcused absences by canceling their vacation rights, either
in whole or in part.
51. P artial Loss of Vacation for Failure To Report Accident
If an employee, subject to this agreement, fails to report an accident, charge­
able or otherwise, he shall forfeit fifty (50) percent of his otherwise earned vaca­
tion for the whole year period during which such failure to report an accident
occurred.
52. Absence Without Permission or Excuse Forfeits Vacation Rights
Any employee absent from work without permission or reasonable excuse for
seven (7) consecutive working days shall forfeit the vacation rights provided
herein.
53. Excessive Tardiness or Absence Without Permission Cancels Vacation Rights
Any employee who, during the stated period (1) has been late for work more
than 15 times, transportation delay excepted; (2) has been absent for a total of
769415°— 48------3




12

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

45 days; (3) has been absent from work more than 3 consecutive days without
permission of his foreman; (4) has been absent a total of 15 days without per­
mission of foreman, will not be entitled to the vacation with pay herein provided
for; provided, however, any employee who suffers an accidental injury in the
course of his employment, during the stated period, shall not be denied his vaca­
tion pay because of absence accruing from his injury provided he returns to work
at the end of his healing period or period of temporary disability.
54. Refusal To Work During Shut-Down Periods Disqualifies Employee
All employees who have been employed for a period of one (1) year dating
from the date of their entering the employ of the company shall receive one (1)
week’s vacation with pay provided that such employees have not refused to work
during shut-down periods.
55. Vacation Reduced One-twelfth for Each 80 Days’ Absence
The foregoing vacation allowance shall be reduced one-twelfth (%2 > for each
aggregate of thirty (30) days’ absence during the twelve (12) months’ period
for which the vacation allowance is granted.

Vacation Rights of Employees Leaving the Company
Many agreements grant vacation pay to employees who have ac­
crued vacation rights but are discharged or laid off, or who resign
prior to taking their vacation. Other agreements prohibit the grant­
ing of vacation allowances to employees leaving the company. A
compromise arrangement found in some agreements provides prorated
vacation pay to employees who leave before completing the require­
ments for a full vacation. I f an employee has earned a vacation but
dies before taking it, agreements sometimes require payment for the
unused vacation time to the employee’s next of kin.
56. Employees Leaving the Company Receive Pay for Vacation Earned
If any employee who is entitled to a vacation under this article, but who has
not taken it, should quit, be discharged, or whose employment is otherwise ter­
minated, he shall be paid his vacation money at the time of drawing his final
payment for services.
57. Pro Rata Vacation Allowance Given Upon Termination of Employment
Any employee who has qualified for vacations with pay, who is laid off or
discharged or who resigns, shall receive vacation wages prorated on the basis
of the period worked at the time of said interruption or termination of em­
ployment.
58. Pro Ratta Vacation Allowance to Employees With Less Than 1 Year’s Service
Any eligible employee who is permanently laid off, discharged, or inducted into
the armed forces of the United States, shall be paid for his accrued vacation
at the time of such lay-off, discharge or induction. Those employees who have
been separated from their employment through no fault of their own and who
have had less than one (1) year’s service, but more than six (6) months’ service,
and who have averaged at least one hundred (100) straight-time hours per month
shall be granted proportional vacations with pay hereunder in the same relation
that their number of months of service bears to 1 year of service.
59. No Pro Rata Allowance for Employees Ineligible for a Full Week’s Vacation
Earned vacation shall be allowed upon resignation; provided, however, that a
full week’s vacation or 2 weeks’ vacation, whichever the case may be, has been
earned.




VACATIONS

13

60. Pro Rata Vacation Pay to Laid-off Employees Who Have at Least 6 Months9
Service in Current Year
Any employee who has had six (6) months or more of continuous service in the
current vacation year shall receive proportionate vacation pay in the event he is
laid off for an indefinite period.
61. Laid-off Employee Receives Vacation if Reemployed Within 12 Months
Any employee who is eligible for a vacation and who is laid off prior to De­
cember 31 of that year will receive his vacation if he is reemployed by the com­
pany within twelve (12) months of the date of his lay-off.
62. Vacation Allowance More Generous for Employees Laid Off Than for Em­
ployees Quitting or Discharged (Allowance given at the time of lay-off to
be deducted from any vacation payment made after recall).
Employees who voluntarily quit or are discharged will forfeit accumulated
vacations for the current year but will be entitled to vacation allowance earned
in the previous year.
Employees who are laid off after completing twelve (12) months’ continuous
service shall be paid for vacations earned during the previous year plus any
vacation earned during the current year.
Employees recalled during the same calendar year in which they were laid
off shall be credited with the total hours worked during the calendar year and
shall receive a vacation based on the above schedules less any allowance made
at the time of lay-off.
63. Employees Who Resign or Are Discharged Receive Pay Only for Vacation
Which Has Been Postponed
An employee who is entitled to a vacation and whose vacation has been
postponed at the request of company, union, or the individual, and who resigns
or is discharged shall be paid the vacation-pay allowance. This applies only to
the vacation which has been postponed and does not apply to any proportional
parts of subsequently accrued vacation.
64. Pro Rata Vacation Pay if Employer Disposes of His Establishment
In the event any employer, party hereto, should sell, lease, transfer, or assign
his plant or establishment, he shall pay to each of his employees upon his pay
roll the day of such sale, assignment or lease the pro rata portion of the vacation
pay earned by each employee hut not received for the then-current year.
65. In Case of Death, Accrued Vacation Pay Given to Employee's Estate
If an employee shall have earned a vacation in accordance with the schedule
provided and shall die before taking his vacation, his vacation pay shall be paid
to his estate.
66. Accrued Vacation Pay Given Upon Termination of Employment Even Though
Employee Does Not Give Notice of Resignation
If any employee who has not taken his vacation earned by his service leaves
(regardless of whether he gives notice) or is separated for any reason other
than dishonesty, or goes into the military service, he will receive his vacation
pay at the time of leaving whether he had planned to take pay in lieu of racation
or to take his vacation.
67. Employees Discharged for Cause or Who Quit Without Notice Forfeit Vaca­
tion Pay
Employees eligible for vacations who have not received their vacation or vaca­
tion pay and who voluntarily quit after giving 1 week’s written notice and em­
ployees entitled to a vacation who are laid off permanently shall receive their
vacation pay. Employees who quit without giving 1 week’s written notice or




14

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

employees who are discharged for stealing, sabotage, or insubordination, shall
not be entitled to vacation pay.
68. Termination of Employment Forfeits Vacation Rights
An employee whose employment with the company shall be terminated before
taking a vacation in any year shall not be entitled to any vacation pay for that
year.
69. Employees Discharged for Cause Granted Vacation Pay, Those Quitting
Voluntarily Forfeit Vacation
Employees who voluntarily leave the service of the employer prior to the
designated vacation period, will forfeit all vacation rights and privileges.
Employees who enter the armed forces of the United States, or who are dis­
charged for cause, during the term hereof and prior to their vacation assignment
date, shall be granted vacation pay, provided they have otherwise fulfilled the
requirements for a vacation with pay.

Vacation Rights of Employees Entering and Returning from
Military Service
During the war, induction into the armed services created a problem
concerning the vacation rights of employees who were inducted.
Many agreements allow employees leaving for military service vaca­
tion pay either in full or in proportion to the time worked before induc­
tion. In some cases, agreements having minimum work requirements
waive such requirements for inductees.
In a recent study of union agreement provisions relating to veterans’
rights,4 the Bureau of Labor Statistics found that about one-fifth of
the agreements examined made certain modifications in vacation
eligibility requirements for veterans in the year of their return from
military service. Generally, these agreements state that a veteran
otherwise eligible shall be given a vacation in the year of his return,
even though he has not fulfilled the requirement of having worked a
specified minimum number of hours during the year. Agreements
often specify that time spent in the armed forces is to be counted as
part of the service necessary for vacation eligibility.5 In some cases,
such employees must return to the company before a specified eligibility
date in order to receive the vacation allowance; employees returning
after the eligibility date may receive a partial allowance.
Computation of vacation pay for returning veterans raises special
problems. Where vacation pay is computed as a percentage of annual
earnings, veterans who have worked only a part of the year may receive
4 “Veterans’ Rights Under Union Agreements,’’ Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington.
D. C., October 1946. Mimeographed.
8 The Selective Service Act has no provision covering this point directly, but an inter­
pretation issued by the Selective Service System states that the veteran’s ri'rht to vacations
upon reinstatem ent is determined by the rules relating to employees on leave, in effect when
the veteran entered m ilitary service, and “when such rules and practices provided for a
consideration of length of service with the employer in determining eligibility for such
benefits the veteran is entitled to have the time spent in m ilitary service added to his length
of service w ith the employer.”




VACATIONS

15

very little pay for tS eir vacation tim e; some agreements meet this prob­
lem by guaranteeing the veteran a minimum amount of vacation pay.
In other agreements the rate of vacation pay is calculated from the
average of the department or occupational group to which the
employee returns.
70. Two Weeks* Vacation Pay to Inductees with 6 Months9 Service
For the duration, any employee who is going into military service shall
receive two (2) weeks* base pay in lieu of vacation if he has completed six
(6) months of service.
71. Inductees and Veterans Receive Full Vacation Pay
All employees with a record of 1 year’s standing (June 1, 1945, to May 13,
1946) shall receive as compensation for the above-mentioned vacation period
the sum of one hundred dollars ($100), with the following exception: Employees
who entered the armed services and those who returned from the armed services
to their jobs during the qualifying period shall receive $100 vacation pay­
ment.
72. Vacation Allowance Graduated According to Length of Service at Time of
Induction
It is agreed that full-time employees who have entered the armed services
of the United States on or after May 27, 1945, and who at the time of such
entry had been continuously in the service of the company for a period of 1 year,
shall receive 1 week’s vacation pay. All such employees who had been in such
employ for 5 years or more at the time of entry into the armed services shall re­
ceive 2 weeks’ vacation pay. Payment of vacation to the eligible employees
in the armed services shall be made during the week May 12 to 18, inclusive, 1946.
73. Inductee Receives Vacation Due Him or Which Would be Due Him Had He
Worked Until the Eligibility Date
Any employee who volunteers or is inducted for military service on or after
January 1 and before receiving his vacation during the then current calendar
year, shall receive, at the time of enlistment or induction, full vacation pay for
vacation then due him or which would be due him for that calendar year had
he remained in the employ of the employer until June 1 of that calendar year and
would then be qualified by the necessary years of continuous service with the
employer.
74. Pro Rata Vacation Pay to Inductees
Employees entering the armed forces of the United States for military training
and service who meet the requirements with respect to 12 months’ cumulative
service in the employ of the company shall, on entering such armed forces, be
entitled to a vacation proportionate to the time that they have worked in said 12
months* period, with proportionate pay.
75. Minimum Work Requirement Waived for Inductees
No employee who has actively worked for the company less than an accumula­
tive 1,200 hours during the calendar year 1946 shall be entitled to such vacation
bonus or any part thereof; provided however, this shall not apply to employees
who have, because of compensable accident or occupational disease, contracted
while in the employ of the company, or who has been laid off because of lack
of work for the company, or because of having entered the armed forces of the
United States, been unable to complete 1,200 working hours of work during the
calendar year 1946 * * *.
76. Minimum Work Requirement Modified for Inductees and Veterans
Employees who enter military service shall be considered as complying with




16

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

the ruling that they must have worked in sixty (60) percent of the pay periods
in the fiscal year beginning July 1 if they have received earnings in sixty (60)
percent of the pay periods between July 1 of the concerned fiscal year and the
date ordered to report for induction.
Employees returning from military service after July 1, 1944, who, because
of continuous service, are eligible for vacation or vacation allowance, shall be
eligible for vacation during the fiscal year in which they return if they have
received earnings in sixty (60) percent of the pay periods between the date of
their return to employment and July 1 of that year.
77. Minimum Work Requirement Waived for Veterans
Years of service for vacation purposes -shall be computed as of June 1. To
be eligible for vacation, an employee must have completed 1,400 hours of work
during the year period prior to June 1, 1946.
Employees returning to the service of the company from a military leave of
absence prior to June 1 shall have the 1,400 hours requirement waived for
this year.
78. Minimum Work Requirement Not Waived for Veterans
Following reemployment after a military leave, no employees will be given
credit for “time lost” during their absence on such leave in satisfying the “hours
worked” requirement of the vacation plan.
79. Time Spent in Armed Forces Counts as P art of Continuous Service for
Vacation
For the purpose of determining future vacation eligibility, war service ol
employees returning to employment shall be considered as actual time on pay roll.
80. Returning Veterans Qualify for Vacations 6 Months A fter Their Return and
Receive Seniority Credit for Time Spent in Armed Forces
Returning veterans who were formerly in the employ of the * * * corpora­
tion will qualify for vacation as soon as they have completed 6 months’ service
with the corporation after their return. They will have their seniority accumu­
lated as if they have worked continuously with the corporation, and their vacation
pay will be calculated with a rate taking into account this total seniority.
81. Date of Return From Military Service Determines Amount of Vacation Pay
(Full vacation benefits to employees returning prior to specified date;
partial allowance to employees returning after specified date).
An employee who by reason of service with the armed forces of the United
States is not on the active employment rolls of the company in the year imme­
diately prior to the vacation eligibility date, but is reinstated on such records as
a full-time employee during the vacation period shall be entitled to vacation
benefits for the vacation period during which he is reinstated in accordance with
the following:
(1) If he is reinstated prior to June 1 of such vacation period, he shall be
entitled to the full amount of such vacation benefits as he would have been
entitled to had he been enrolled as a full-time employee on the eligibility date
for such vacation period.
(2) If he is reinstated on or after June 1 of such vacation period, he shall be
entitled to one-half of the amount of vacation benefits he would have been entitled
to had he been enrolled as a full-time employee on the eligibility date for such
vacation period.
82. Vacation Pay for Returning Veteran Based on the Average of the Depart­
ment to Which He Returns
A returning service man or woman shall be entitled to the vacation with pay
according to their accumulated seniority, if they are on the pay roll of the
company on July 1.




VACATIONS

17

The vacation pay for returning service man or woman shall be calculated from
the average of the department to which he or she returns.
83. Vacation Pay Based on Percentage of Earnings in Year Prior to Induction
Any employee returning from military service and reemployed before June 1
shall receive a vacation according to his seniority date prior to entering mili­
tary service, with pay amounting to the appropriate 2 percent or 4 percent of
the employee’s earnings for the calendar year prior to entering military service,
including overtime but excluding vacation pay.
84. Computation of Vacation Pay Different for Veterans
The amount of vacation pay will be calculated as follows: 2 percent of the
money paid each eligible employee during the full period of his employment
subsequent to April 1,1945, and prior to April 1, 1946. * * *
Former employees returning to work from the armed services prior to July
1,1946, will be considered as continuously enrolled and shall receive vacation pay
allowance of not less than forty (40) hours’ pay at their pay roll hourly rate
as of July 1,1946, for each week of eligible vacation.
85. Employees in the Armed Forces Owen Vacation Pay as Bonus
1. It is intended that employees inducted into the military, naval, or merchantmarine service of the United States who are eligible at the time of induction
for vacation pay as provided in section VII of this agreement, shall continue to
receive this vacation pay as a bonus, during each year of such service, until dis­
charged or until the first opportunity for discharge.
2. Eligibility for this bonus shall be determined in accordance with all the
provisions of section VII of this agreement excepting only that the requirement
for earnings in 13 of the pay periods during the year preceding payment shall
be waived.
3. The basis of calculation of the bonus, governing hours and rate of pay,
shall be in accordance with the provisions of section VII. The rate of pay shall,
in all cases, be the current job rate of the last job on which the employee worked
or the straight-time average hourly rate for the position or group under a tonnage
plan for which no occupational rate might exist. Such average rate shall be
the average rate used for vacation payment to active employees in that year.
4. Where it is established that an employee on military leave is deceased, pay­
ment will be made to his estate for that vacation year. Such payment shall
finally terminate the company’s obligation under this section of the agreement.
5. Payment of this annual bonus shall cease :
(a) With the individual’s discharge from the armed forces, or his first oppor­
tunity for discharge, or
(&) With the signing of an armistice with our enemies in all theatres of war,
if such takes place before July 1 of the vacation year. If such armistice takes
place after July 1, payment for such year shall finally terminate this plan.
(c) It is understood, however, that an individual discharged from service after
such armistice year may, 60 days after reemployment, apply for this bonus for
each subsequent year of military service upon proof that his final discharge
was, in fact, his first opportunity for discharge.

Vacations for Part-Time and Seasonal Workers
A few agreements provide vacations for part-time or seasonal em­
ployees. In rare cases such employees may receive the same vacation
as full-time employees, but more frequently their vacation is in pro­




18

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

portion to the length of their workweek and the length of their service
with the employer.
Pay for part-time employees’ vacations is usually calculated in the
same manner as for full-time employees, except that it is reduced in
proportion to the length of their scheduled workweek. In cases in
which vacation pay is based on average weekly earnings with a mini­
mum amount guaranteed, the guaranty does not apply to part-time
employees.
86. Permanent Part-Time Employees Receive Same Vacation as Full-Time
Employees
All full-time or permanent part-time employees who have completed 6 months’
employment during the months of June, July, August, or September shall be
entitled to three continuous days’ vacation with pay in advance. All full-time
or permanent part-time employees who have completed 1-year’s employment
during such months shall be entitled to 1 week’s vacation with pay in advance.
87. Extra Employees Subject to Minimum Work Requirement for Vacation
Eligibility
Extra employees working as much as thirteen hundred and forty (1,840)
accumulative hours shall be included in the vacation clause.
88. Vacation Allowance Proportionate to Average Number of Hours Worked
Per Week
Part-time workers regularly employed shall receive proportionate vacation
allowances (or accruals as the case may be) on the basis of the average number
of hours per week they are employed.
89. Compensation of Part-Time Employees in Proportion To Their Regularity
Scheduled Workweek
Pay for the vacation of an employee who is a part-time employee as of his
vacation eligibility date shall be proportionately reduced. For example, an
employee who is regularly scheduled to work six (6) days per week, four (4)
hours each day, will be entitled to one (1) week’s vacation with pay for twentyfour (24) hours at the employee’s base rate of pay.
90. Pay for Eligible Part-Time Employees Based on Average Weekly Earnings,
Without Minimum Guaranty
Part-time employees—Persons who are employed and known as part-time
employees, who have received earnings from this company in at least 6 percent
of the pay periods during the 12 months’ period immediately preceding May 1
of each year, shall receive a vacation pay allowance in lieu of vacation. Such
an allowance shall be an amount equal to his average straight-time weekly
earnings for the 12 months’ period immediately preceding May 1 of such year
without the application of the minimum guaranty of 40 hours per week.
91. Pay for Part-Time Employees Computed in the Same Manner as for Full-Time
Employees
Part-time union members shall be granted vacations, in proportion to their
weekly schedule of hours, and payment for such vacation shall be computed in the
same manner as is employed in regard to full-time members.
92. Two D ays’ Vacation for Eligible Seasonal Employees
All employees covered by this agreement who are employed only during the
racing season, as defined in article V of this agreement, shall receive two (2)
days’ vacation with pay at the straight-time hourly or daily rate if such employees
have worked each day of the racing season and have completed the racing season
in good standing with the employer and the unions. Absence due to bona fide



VACATIONS

19

illness or other good cause, at the discretion of the employer, may be considered
as not disqualifying an employee from receiving vacation benefits. If the number
of racing days is less than fifty-five (55), this article is void and subject to
negotiation.
93. Workers Employed by Two or More Employers During the Year Receive Vaca­
tion Pay From Each in Proportion to the Time Employed (This agreement
covers an employers’ association).
The vacation pay of carvers, hand polishers, and tool sharpeners who by the
specialized nature of their work are employed by two or more employers in the
course of the year shall be paid by each employer in proportion to the time he has
employed the specialist.

Computation of Vacation Pay
Little uniformity exists in the basis on which vacation pay is com­
puted, although computation is generally made in such a manner that
the employee receives an amount approximating that which he would
have earned had he worked during the vacation period.
Normally the computation of vacation pay involves 2 factors: the
number of hours to be paid for and the pay basis, i. e., the regular rate,
straight-time hourly earnings, average earnings, etc.
For workers paid on an hourly rate, vacation pay is generally com­
puted on the basis of the regular or straight-time hourly rate in effect
at the time vacation begins multiplied by the scheduled weekly hours.
I f an employee is employed at the time of vacation at a rate different
from the rate at which he worked most of the year, some agreements
provide that the predominant rate is to be used.
For workers paid on a piecework or other incentive basis, vacation
pay is usually computed on the basis of weekly earnings averaged over
some specified period prior to the time of vacation. Some agreements
which base vacation pay on average weekly earnings provide a safe­
guard to the effect that no less than 40 hours’ pay and no more than
48 hours’ pay will be given.
Where hourly workers and pieceworkers are covered by the same
agreement, different methods of computing vacation pay for the two
types of workers are usually specified.
Another method of computing vacation pay applicable to both time
and pieceworkers is to allow each employee a specified percentage of
his earnings for the year preceding vacation—generally 2 percent for
a week of vacation leave and 4 percent for 2 weeks’ leave. The basis
for computation may be either straight-time earnings or total earn­
ings including overtime and other premiums. Since this method of
computing vacation pay might result in very small allowances to
employees who worked irregularly during the year, some agreements
guarantee a minimum amount of pay for each week of vacation.
Vacation pay based on scheduled weekly hours gives workers a full
week’s pay and does not necessarily reflect actual hours worked, which
769415°— 48------4




20

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

may be less than scheduled hours because of shut-down, illness, or
voluntary absence. Computation of vacation pay on the basis of
earnings, whether average weekly earnings or a percentage of annual
earnings, reflects actual hours worked and increases or decreases vaca­
tion pay accordingly, i. e., vacation pay fluctuates in direct proportion
to earnings.
Under some association agreements, vacation allowances are drawn
from a central fund to which each employer makes weekly contribu­
tions on the basis of his total pay roll. Under this plan workers who
transfer from shop to shop and are seasonally unemployed for short
periods still receive their earned vacation credits.
A few agreements give a flat sum to all employees, regardless of
difference in hourly rate or individual earnings.
Most agreements require vacation pay to be given the employee
before he takes his vacation.
SPECIFIED NUMBER OF HOURS’ PAY FOR EACH WEEK OF VACATION

94. Forty-four Hours’ Pay Per Week at Employee’s Regular Rate
Those employees receiving vacations shall be paid forty-four (44) hours per
week straight time at their regular wage rate.
95. Forty Hours’ Pay at Hourly Rate Averaged Over 4-Week Period
The amount to be paid for one (1) week’s vacation shall be the average hourly
rate he received during the four (4) weeks preceding such vacation, multiplied
by forty (40), or in the case of the two (2) weeks’ vacation, taken consecutively,
the average hourly rate he received during the four (4) weeks preceding such
vacation multiplied by eighty (80), except in departments where the employees
are on official schedule of more than forty (40) hours per week, then the vacation
pay will be governed by the number of hours in the official workweek. * * *
98. Forty Hours’ Pay at Employee’s Present Rate or Rate at Which He Has
Worked Most Time During Year, Whichever Is Higher
Employees will be paid for the vacation period on the basis of forty (40) hours
per week. They will be paid at the rate of pay for the job on which they are
working or the rate at which they have worked the greatest number of hours
during the preceding twelve (12) months, whichever is higher.
97. Vacation Pay Based on 40 or 48 Hours, Depending on Length of Prevailing
Workweek
A week’s vacation pay shall be based on 48 hours if, in the majority of week&
during the 3 months prior to the vacation period, the plant has operated 48 hours
or more. Vacation pay shall be based on 40 hours if the work schedule of the
plant does not qualify employees to receive 48-hours’ pay.
98. Allowance Made for Overtime Employee Would Have Received if He Had
Worked During His Vacation Period
Vacation pay shall be figured on the basis of forty (40) hours per week at the
employee’s regular rate except in the case of those employees who are not sub­
ject to the 40-hour limitation. These are to be paid on the basis of their normal
workweek. Employees who would have earned more pay remaining at work
because of overtime pay earned by the rest of the gang during their absence on
vacation will be paid upon their return to work the difference between the pay
already received and gang time at their hourly rate with overtime.




VACATIONS

21

99. Allowance Made for Shift Premium
During the summer of 1946, the company will grant to each employee who has
twelve (12) months of service with the company as of July 1, 1946, one (1)
week’s vacation with pay—forty-five (45) hours at straight time, together with
shift allowance.
Employees having five (5) or more years of seniority with the company as of
July 1, 1946, will receive two (2) weeks’ vacation with pay—ninety (90) hours
at straight time, together with shift allowance.
100. Six Days' Pay for Each 7 Days of Vacation
Vacation pay shall be for forty-eight (48) hours at straight time for seven
(7) days’ vacation and for ninety-six (96) hours at straight time for fourteen
(14) days’ vacation; provided, however, that if for any reason, an employee’s
workweek should be reduced below forty-eight (48) hours, vacation pay will
be reduced proportionately.
VACATION PAY BASED ON AVERACE WEEKLY EARNINGS OVER SPECIFIED PERIOD

101. Average Weekly Earnings for 18-Week Period
The vacation pay shall be the average weekly earnings for the first thirteen
(13) weeks actually worked in each calendar year.
102. Weeks in Which Lost Time Occurs Excluded in Computation of Average
Weekly Earnings
Pay for employees entitled to 1-week’s vacation shall be computed on the
basis of the total money earned from the closing date of the previous calendar
year, to the date of the vacation, and divided by the number of weeks worked
since the closing date of the previous calendar year, to the date of vacation.
In the event an employee has lost time since the closing date of the calendar
year, the earnings of such weeks in which lost time occurs, including holiday
weeks, and the number of weeks, shall be excluded in the computation. Pay
for employees entitled to 2 weeks’ vacation will also be computed on the fore­
going basis, except the amount will be multiplied by two. Pay for employees
entitled to 3 weeks’ vacation will likewise be computed on the foregoing basis,
except that the amount will be multiplied by three.
103. Maximum and Minimum Hours' Pay at Average Earnings, Basis of Average
Weekly Earnings
Each week of vacation pay shall be computed on the basis of an employee’s
average straight-time earnings times the average number of hours worked dur­
ing the 6 months prior to July 1. In no event shall a week’s vacation pay be
for more than 48 hours or less than 40 hours. Days lost because of industrial
accidents in the employ of the company will be counted as days worked in com­
puting vacation credits.
104. Average Weekly Hours Worked by All Multiplied by Individual's Average
Hourly Earnings
The vacation pay for each week of vacation shall be computed by multiplying
the average weekly hours worked by all employees in the preceding calendar
year by the individual’s average earned rate per hour in the preceding calendar
year.
VACATION PAY BASED ON PERCENTAGE OF ANNUAL EARNINGS

105. Two Percent of Gross Annual Earnings for Each Week of Vacation
The basis of one (1) week’s pay shall be two (2) percent, and of two (2)
weeks’ pay shall be four (4) percent of the gross earnings for the previous fiscal
year.




22

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

106. Minimum Guaranty Specified When Pay Is Based on Percentage of Annual
Earnings
Vacation pay will be 2 percent of his gross earnings for the preceding calendar
year with a minimum of $15.
107. Vacation Pay Computed as 2Ys Percent of Annual Earnings, Excluding Over­
time Pay
Every employee who has been on the pay roll and working 1 year on June 1
next shall be entitled to receive two and one-half (2y2) percent of his annual
wage for the preceding twelve (12) months, excluding overtime pay, as vacation
pay at the time of taking same.
Every employee who has been on the pay roll and working 5 years on June 1
next shall be entitled to receive five (5) percent of his annual wage for the pre­
ceding twelve (12) months, excluding overtime pay, as vacation pay at the time
of taking same.
108. Pay for Week of Vacation Varies From 1 to 8 Percent, According to Length
of Service
Employees who have 1 or more years seniority at the vacation period shall
receive 1 week’s vacation with pay computed as follows: 1 to 2 years’ service,
1 percent of yearly w age; 2 to 5 years’ service, 2 percent of yearly w age; 5 years
or over, 3 percent of yearly wage.
109. Two Percent of Previous Year's Earnings or 48 Hours' Pay, Whichever Is
Greater
Factory employees shall be given one (1) week’s vacation with pay after com­
pleting one (1) year’s service, providing they have worked six (6) months between
May 1, 1945, and April 30, 1946, and are on the pay roll May 1, 1946. (Shall
receive vacation pay on forty-eight (48) hour basis or 2 percent of previous
year’s earnings, whichever the greater; e. g., for 1946, 48 hours’ straight pay,
July 1, 1945, rate, or 2 percent of 1945 earnings.)
CENTRAL FUND FINANCED BY EMPLOYER AND ADMINISTERED BY UNION

110. Two Percent of Employer's Weekly Pay Roll (From an agreement covering
an employers’ association, illustrating a method of vacation payment useful
in industries characterized by a high degree of labor mobility; i. e., where
employees may work for several employers in the course of a year).
The employer f hall pay weekly to the union a sum of money equivalent to 2
percent of the total we,kly pay roll including overtime (before deductions for
taxes) of the employer’s workers covered by this agreement, toward a vacation
fund to be established, maintained, and administered by the union for the benefit
of its members.
FLAT SUM PAYMENT

111. Flat Sum Regardless of Differences in Individual Wage Rates or Earnings,
but Graduated According to Service
During May 1946, the corporation will make a payment in lieu of vacation wT
ith
pay* for 1946 of fifty-two dollars and forty cents ($52.40) to all eligible hourlyrate employees who have at least one (1) year’s and less than five (5) years’
seniority on May 1, 1946, and a payment of one hundred four dollars and eighty
cents ($104.80) to all eligible hourly-rate employees having five (5) years’ or
more seniority on May 1, 1946. * * *
112. Flat Sum Payments to All Employees with 1 year's Service; Pro Rata Pay­
ment to Employees W ith Less Service
All employees with a record of 1 year’s standing (June 1,1945, to May 31,1946)
shall receive as compensation for the above-mentioned vacation period the sum



VACATIONS

23

of one hundred dollars ($100). * * * Pro rata payments for the months they
are on the pay roll shall be provided for those * * * workers who are given
employment during the qualifying period and those who leave their employment.
113. Ten Dollars Per Day, Graduated Vacations
Operators with a seniority of 1 year or more, but less than five (5) years, shall
receive 1-week’s vacation of six (6) consecutive days in each 12-month period
with pay, at the rate of $10 per day; operators with seniority of five (5) years
or more shall receive 2 weeks’ vacation of 12 consecutive days in each 12-month
period with pay, at the rate of $10 per day.
BASIS OF COMPUTATION DIFFERENT FOR TIME AND PIECEWORKERS

114. Time Workers Paid at Regular Hourly R ate; Pieceworkers on Basis of
Average Hourly Earnings
Vacation pay for a time worker shall be 40 times his regular hourly rate of

pay.
Vacation pay for a pieceworker shall be 40 times his average hourly earnings for
the eight busiest consecutive weeks in the season prior to the vacation period,
but excluding, however, any and all overtime pay.
115. Regular Weekly Rate for Week Workers; Average Weekly Earnings for
Pieceworkers
Vacation pay shall be paid in one lump sum prior to the vacation period, and
vacation pay for pieceworkers shall be based upon the average weekly earnings
of the said pieceworkers for the period from the date of the execution of this
agreement to the time of the commencement of the vacation period. The vaca­
tion pay to be given to week workers shall be at the regular weekly rate of pay.
OTHER VACATION PAY PROVISIONS

116. Regular Rate Used in Computation When Temporary R ate is Lower
If on the date as of which an employee’s vacation pay is computed, he is tem­
porarily employed at a wage rate lower than that at which he is regularly em­
ployed and which he received during the major portion of the preceding year, his
basic hourly rate for the computation of his vacation pay shall be the latter
rather than the former. Disputes under this paragraph may be considered un­
der the grievance procedure of the contract.
117. Rate Used in Computation Depends on Percentage of Time Worked at That
Rate
If an employee from January 24, 1946, to the time he takes his vacation works
from 25 to 75 percent of his time on a higher rated job in the promotion
sequence, his vacation pay will be 50 percent at the lower rate and 50 percent at
the higher rate. If the employee works 75 percent or more on the higher rated
job, his vacation will be 100 percent at the higher rate. * * *
118. Commissions Considered in Computing Vacation Pay (This agreement covers
sales personnel in a department store).
Vacation pay shall be computed on the basis of the union member’s basic salary
and the average commission earned during the previous year.
119. Vacation Pay Includes Special Bonus in Addition to Regular Base Pay
First pilots shall be paid their regular base pay stipulated in section 3 of this
agreement plus an additional amount of $150 for their 2 weeks’ annual vacation
period.
120. Employee To Be Given Vacation Pay Prior to Vacation
Vacation pay shall be paid to employee ( in addition to his or her regular earn*
ings) during the week prior to the beginning of his or her vacation period.




24

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

121. Premium Payment If Employee Works Sixth or Seventh Day of Vacation
It is agreed that if an employee is called in to work on the sixth or seventh
day of his vacation he shall be compensated at the rate of time and one-half in
addition to his regular vacation allowance.
122. Vacation Pay Equals Amount Employee Would Have Earned by Working
Regularly assigned drivers will be paid same earnings as they would have
earned, had they worked their regular assignment, during the period of their
vacation.

Pay in Lieu of Vacation
Although the objectives and principles of provisions for paid vaca­
tions are predicated upon the beneficial effect of actual time off for rest
and relaxation, some agreements permit a vacation bonus to be given
to workers in lieu of vacation. In some cases this is done at the option
of the employee, in other agreements at the option of the employer, and
in still other cases, by mutual consent. During the war, the substitu­
tion of a bonus for vacation became a prevalent practice in many indus­
tries because of the need for maximum production, but many current
agreements specifically prohibit the practice of giving extra pay
instead of time off; and in a few cases, employees are paid premium
rates if required to work during their scheduled vacation periods.
123. Payment in Lieu of Vacation Prohibited
Employees entitled to vacations will not be allowed to take money in lieu
thereof.
124. No Bonus in Lieu of Vacation Except in Emergency by Mutual Consent of
Company and Union
Vacations shall be mandatory; however, in the event of an emergency, vaca­
tions may be waived by mutual agreement of the company and the union. In
the event vacations are waived, as herein provided, the vacation bonus as above
specified shall be paid as of the date said vacations are waived.
125. Payment in Lieu of Vacation if Operating Conditions Do Not Permit ShutDown
Should operating conditions not permit a shut-down for vacation, the vacation
pay, nevertheless, will be granted and employees continuing to work will be paid
at their regular rates.
126. Employee May Not Be Compelled To Accept Pay in Lieu of Vacation (Full
week's salary is guaranteed employees recalled to work before their vacation
period is over, vacation permitted at a later date).
Employees shall not be compelled by the company to forfeit their vacations for
additional pay from the company unless they so desire. In case of recall before
vacation period is over, the employee is to receive full week’s salary. In either
case, the employee is not to forfeit the vacation due him or her.
127. Pay at Premium Rate in Addition to Vacation Pay if Employee Required To
Work During First Week of His Vacation
If there is a scheduled vacation general shut-down period and staggered vaca­
tions are not arranged, an employee eligible for a vacation shall be paid in addi­
tion to his vacation wage, time and one-half for all hours he may be required to
work during the first week of such scheduled vacation general shut-down period
and shall be paid, in addition to his vacation wage, straight time for all hours he




VACATIONS

25

may be required to work on any additional scheduled vacation days. This shall
not apply if time off for vacation is taken by an employee prior or subsequent to
the employee’s regular vacation period.
If there is no scheduled vacation general shut-down period and if staggered
vacations are arranged, an employee eligible for a vacation shall be paid, in
addition to his vacation wage, time and one-half for all hours he may be required
to work during the first five (5) days of his scheduled vacation and shall be
paid, in addition to his vacation wage, straight time for all hours he may be
required to work on any additional scheduled vacation days. This shall not
apply if time off for vacation is taken by an employee prior to or subsequent
to the employee’s regular vacation period.
128. Pay in Lieu of Second Week of Vacation Optional With Employee
Employees entitled to receive 2 weeks’ vacation pay shall have the privilege
of taking 1 week’s vacation with pay and cash to the amount of 1 week’s vacation
pay instead of taking the second week of vacation.
129. Pay in Lieu of Second Week of Vacation Mandatory (This agreement allows
1 week’s vacation to employees with 1 year of service).
All employees with a record of 5 or more continuous years of service up to
and including June 29, 1946, are entitled to receive an additional week of pay,
but not an additional vacation week.
130. Pay in Lieu of Vacation if Employee Is Prevented From Taking Vacation
Because of Illness
If eligible employees are prevented from taking their vacation because of
illness they shall be granted pay in lieu thereof within thirty (30) days after
they return to work, provided such illness does not extend into the following year.

Timing of Vacation Periods
Agreements often specify the time when vacations shall be taken,
usually during the summer months. Employees may be allowed their
choice of vacation time during the specified period, often in order of
seniority, but in many cases management reserves the right to schedule
vacations so that there is no interruption of production. Some agree­
ments provide for the shut-down of the plant in order that all em­
ployees may take their vacations at the same time.
Agreements usually specify that the vacation must be taken in the
year in which it is earned, although a few permit a limited amount of
accumulation of vacation time from year to year, especially when
employees postpone their vacations at the request of the company.
Splitting of vacations into nonconsecutive periods is sometimes per­
mitted, particularly when employees are entitled to two or more weeks,
although some agreements which mention this subject specify that the
entire vacation must be taken at one time.
VACATION SCHEDULES

131. Bummer Months Specified; Exception Perm itted at Discretion of Company
Normally the vacation period shall be confined to the period between June 1
and October 1, although individual exceptions may be made at the discretion
of the company, upon request.




26

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

132. Company Has Final Decision in Scheduling Vacations
It will be left to the judgment of the corporation as to when the most opportune
time will be to grant vacations to individual employees; however, the corpora­
tion will, so far as operating conditions permit, endeavor to comply with the
requests of the employees for the time designated by him as to when he desires
to take his vacation.
133. Employer Schedules Vacations but Must Give Employee 1 Week’s Notice
The time allotted to such employees for vacations will be established by the
company and the vacation periods will be such as will cause a minimum of inter­
ference with the plant operations. Every eligible employee will be notified of
his vacation allowance and period one (1) week in advance, but the company
reserves the right to make changes in the vacation periods at any time when
such action is considered necessary.
134. Company and Union Jointly Determine Scheduling of Vacations
The management and the union jointly will determine the time that each
employee is to take his vacation within the vacation period.
135. Company Required to Confer with Union Before Making Up Vacation
Schedule
Vacations shall be scheduled during the period between June 15 and September
30. The vacation schedule shall be determined by the employer who shall, how­
ever, confer with the union before making it up.
136. Seniority the Determining Factor in Allotment of Vacation Dates
The employee will be allowed to take his vacation at the time he chooses dur­
ing the vacation period, unless another employee with longer seniority chooses
the same period, provided his services are not absolutely essential for the efficient
operation of the plant. If his services are essential, he shall be permitted to
take his vacation at some other time. In cases where a number of employees
choose the same vacation period and all of them cannot be spared for that
period, seniority will be the determining factor in the allotment of vacation time.
137. Senior Employees Get First Choice of Vacation Periods but Must Make
Selection Before Specified Date
Senior employees will have first choice for vacation date, providing that they
make their selection before May 1.
138. Vacation To Be Taken at a Time Mutually Agreeable to Employer and
Employee
Vacation shall be taken at a time mutually agreed upon between the employer
and employee individually, but shall, as far as practicable, be taken between
May 1 and September 1.
139. Employees Entitled to 2 or More Weeks May Take Vacation at Any Time
Employees who are entitled to two or more weeks of vacation may take their
vacation at any time during the year in which the required service will pre­
sumably be completed.
140. Not More Than 10 Percent of Employees in Any Department May Take
Vacations at the Same time (Seniority considered in scheduling vacations).
In order to curtail production as little as possible, not more than 10 percent
of the employees in any department may take vacations at the same time.
Any employee entitled to and desiring vacation with pay shall submit to the
company written request for vacation, stating when he desires it. The company
will prepare a vacation schedule based on the applications and the necessity of
maintaining production. In the event that more than 10 percent of the employees
in any department request vacations at the same time, the schedule will be




VACATIONS

27

prepared having consideration to the seniority of the employees concerned; how­
ever, the company shall have final determination as to when vacations shall be
taken.
141. All Employees Take Vacation at the Same Time During Specified Week
It is agreed that the first week in July shall be the vacation week for all
plants.
142. Vacation Week To Be Designated by Company
Vacations shall be taken during a week designated by the company during
either July or August of each year.
143. I f Plant Shuts Down for Any Reason, Company May Designate Such ShutDown as the Vacation Period
A shut-down for any reason covering a specific period of a week or longer
may be designated as the vacation period, provided the shut-down shall be
between July 1 and September 1.
144. Industry Shut-Down at Specified Time for All Except Maintenance Employees
An annual vacation period shall be the rule of the industry. From Saturday,
June 29,1946, to Monday, July 8,1946, inclusive, shall be a vacation period during
which coal production shall cease. Day men required to work during this period
at coke plants and other necessarily continuous operations or on emergency or
repair work shall have vacations of the same duration at other agreed periods.
145. Vacations To Be Taken During Slack Season as Far as Possible
Vacations, as far as possible, will be assigned during the inventory period.
146. Employee May Request Vacation During Temporary Lay-Off
Any employee eligible for a vacation will be entitled to receive it at any time
when he may be temporarily laid off, or when he is unable to work and desires
to receive his vacation allowance and pay.
CUMULATION OF VACATIONS

147. Cumulation of Vacations Prohibited
All vacations must be taken before the end of the present calendar year. Vaca­
tions may not be postponed beyond the end of the present calendar year and any
vacation not taken will be forfeited.
148. No Cumulation Unless Vacation Postponed at Employer’s Request
Vacations must be taken during the calendar year, unless, due to emergency, the
management finds it necessary to request postponement. Vacation pay will be
paid in advance.
149. Cumulation of Vacation Periods for 2 Years Permitted
An employee may forego his vacation in 1 year and add it to his vacation in the
next following year, provided that company gives him its approval thereto. In
no event shall an employee defer his vacation longer than 1 year, or be permitted
to take more than the total of two (2) vacation periods in any one calendar year,
or take a vacation in advance of the year in which it is due. If an employee de­
fers his vacation under the provisions of this section he shall take it at the con­
venience of company and at such time as not to interfere with the regular vacation
schedules of other employees.
150. Cumulation of Vacation Time up to Maximum of 4 Weeks Permitted
Vacations shall be cumulative, if mutually agreed upon, but in any event not in
excess of 4 weeks and shall be allowed only at such times as may be convenient
to the operating necessities of the service.




28

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS
SPLIT VACATIONS

151. No Split Vacations Unless Mutually Agreeable to Company and Employee
All vacation periods shall run consecutively unless it is mutually agreed to split
the period by the company and the individual.
152. Two-Week Vacatiovis May Be Split Into Weekly Periods
One week’s vacation must be taken in a continuous period, but 2 weeks’ vaca­
tion may, if the employee and management agree, be divided into two periods of
1 week each.
153. Vacation Split Into Summer and Winter Periods
The company will grant 1 week’s vacation in the summer and 1 week’s vacation
in the winter to employees who have been continuously with the company 1 year
or longer prior to the date of the respective vacation periods.
154. Employee Has Option of Taking Vacation at One Time or Spreading It Over
the Year
A vacation may be taken all at one time or spread over the year, provided that
in either instance it is planned well in advance with the department head and
does not interfere with the efficient operation of the department concerned.

Combining Vacation With Sick Leave
In some agreements employees are given a specified amount of paid
leave, with the option of using it either as vacation or sick leave.
Other agreements allow employees to add unused sick leave to their
vacation time.
155. Employee Has Option of Using 96 Hours9 Paid Leave as Vacation or Sick
Leave
Each employee who has completed 1 year of service shall be entitled to vacation
or sick leave of 2 calendar weeks with 96 hours’ pay at the employee’s regular
hourly rate of pay in effect when vacation or sick leave is granted.
156. Unused Paid Sick Leave May Be Added to Vacation Time
An employee with less than five (5) years’ seniority on his vacation eligibility
date shall be entitled to one (1) week's vacation with pay. In addition thereto
each such employee who has not used all of his sick and injury leave during the
year of service preceding his vacation eligibility date shall, at his option, be
entitled to one additional week’s vacation with pay, for such unused sick and
injury leave, or to pay for such unused sick and injury leave without an addi­
tional week’s vacation.
157. Vacation Time May Be Used as Sick Leave
Absences because of illness may be used as vacation, provided employees make
application, on forms provided by the company, before the end of the pay period
following return to work.




Chapter 2.— H olidays and W eek -End W ork
The observance of basic religious and patriotic holidays is generally
considered desirable as a factor in promoting spiritual growth and
good citizenship, as well as affording an opportunity for rest. The
importance which the American people attach to their holidays is re­
flected in the fact that nearly all union agreements have some provi­
sion relating to the observance of holidays.
The number and type of holidays observed is determined by national
and local practice, religious and racial considerations, and the relative
bargaining strength of unions and employers.
The question of pay for holidays not worked is a major issue. Paid
holidays have traditionally been granted to white-collar workers, but
until relatively recent years, most agreements covering production
workers merely allowed time off without pay. However, the extension
of paid holidays to production workers is proceeding rapidly and
is more and more frequently an objective of unions in the negotiation
of new agreements.
Regardless of whether pay is allowed for holidays not worked,
nearly all agreements provide for the payment of special penalty rates
when work is required on holidays, on the theory that work on a holi­
day implies a sacrifice on the part of the worker and deserves special
reward and that the scheduling of work on holidays should be dis­
couraged.
Other important considerations relating to holidays are the com­
putation of pay and eligibility for pay on holidays not worked, limita­
tions on holiday work, and making up time lost on holidays.
In order to give employees regular days of rest and an opportunity
to attend religious services, agreements often have provisions de­
signed to discourage work over the week end. In some cases Saturday
and Sunday work is prohibited altogether; more commonly, week-end
work is permitted, but must be paid for at a penalty rate of time and
one-half or double time. However, for workers on continuous opera­
tions, in the service trades, and in employment in which Saturday and
Sunday work is essential to the public convenience and safety, such
penalty rates usually do not prevail.
In most industries, a regular Monday through Friday workweek
is prevalent; week-end penalty pay provisions usually apply to work
of an emergency, temporary nature. This is substantiated by the fact
that many agreements which require week-end penalty rates for pro­
duction workers exempt such employees as watchmen and maintenance
men whose regular schedule includes Saturday and Sunday work.




29

30

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

During the war, premium pay for Sunday and Saturday work, as
such, was prohibited by Executive Order 9240 which, however, per­
mitted payment at time and one-half for work on the sixth consecutive
day in any regularly scheduled workweek and required a double-time
rate for work on the seventh consecutive day.
Many agreements have retained the sixth- and seventh-day premium
pay provisions as well as relative practices and interpretations worked
out during the war. Such interpretations define what can and cannot
be counted as time worked, for purposes of determining the sixth and
seventh day, prohibit the pyramiding of overtime rates, etc.

Observance of Holidays
The number of holidays observed varies considerably, as few as 3
being specified by some agreements, and as many as 20 by 1 agreement.
The number most often specified is 6—New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.
Other holidays often mentioned are Armistice Day, Washington’s
Birthday, Election Day, Columbus Day, and Lincoln’s Birthday. In
rare cases, agreements state that all legal holidays will be observed.
Holidays of local importance, such as State Admission Day and
Jewish or Catholic religious holidays are often recognized; Emanci­
pation Day is sometimes designated as a holiday for Negro employees.
An increasing number of agreements make some provision for the
observance of a holiday celebrating the end of World War II, if such
a holiday is officially declared.
Since premium rates are usually paid for work on holidays, the
question of when the holiday begins and ends is important. To pre­
vent misunderstandings, agreements sometimes specify the hours
which mark the time limits of the holiday.
Holidays falling on Sunday are usually observed on the following
Monday, although a few agreements require the holiday to be observed
on the calendar date on which it falls. When the holiday occurs on
the employee’s regularly scheduled day off, he may be given com­
pensatory time off later. Agreements which allow pay for holidays
not worked sometimes specify that no pay will be given an employee
whose regular day off coincides with the holiday.
1. Six Holidays To Be Observed
Employees covered by this agreement will observe the following holidays: New
Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day,
and Christmas Day.
2. Seven General and IS Religious Holidays Observed
All employees shall be granted the following holidays with p ay: New Year’s
Day, Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day, one-half day on Election Day.




HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

31

Jewish holidays: Passover, 2 days at beginning and 2 days at end; Shevuoth,
2 d ays; Rosh Hashonah, 2 days; Yom Kippur, 1 day; Succoth, 2 days at beginning
and 2 days at end.
3. Holiday of Local Importance May Be Substituted for One of National
Holidays
The following shall be considered as holidays: New Year’s Day, Decoration
Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Armistice Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas,
and Washington’s Birthday.
By local agreement it will be permissible for a holiday of local importance to
be substituted for one of the above-mentioned holidays.
N ote.—This clause is taken from an agreement covering plants in several States.
4. Local Practice Determines Whether Certain Additional Holidays W ill Be
Observed
The following full holidays shall be observed by the employer in Massachusetts:
New Year’s Day, Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Independence Day,
Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. In those communities in
which the principal competitor of the employer observes April 19, October 12, and
November 11 as full holidays when they fall on days other than Saturday, the
employer will, in such communities, observe such days as full holidays.
N ote.—This clause is taken from an agreement covering a number of cities in
one State.

5. All National and State Holidays To Be Observed
The following holidays are to be observed: New Year’s Day, Decoration Day,
Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Armistice Day, and Christmas
Day, or any other day declared a legal holiday by the United States Govern­
ment, or any holidays observed by the State of Illinois, with no work on Labor
Day. When holidays fall on Sunday, the following Monday shall be observed.
6. Racial Interests Considered in Designating Holidays To Be Observed
The following days shall be recognized as holidays: New Year’s Day, Independ­
ence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and San Jacinto Day
(for white employees), and Emancipation Day (for Negro employees).
7. Religious Holidays Observed at Employee’s Option
Religious holidays may be observed by the union members. Such religious holi­
days and any other day on which the store is closed, except Sundays and holi­
days, shall be counted as the union member’s day off.
8. Victory Day To Be Observed if Declared a National Holiday
There shall be no work on Sunday, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. When and if Victory
Day is declared a national legal holiday it shall be made a part of this article.
9. World War II Holiday, if Officially Declared, Substituted for Armistice
Day
In the event that a national legal holiday is officially declared during the
contract year, to celebrate the end of World War II, this holiday will be sub­
stituted for Armistice Day, November 11,1946, and thereafter.
10. Holiday Offering Longer Week End Observed
The following holidays shall be declared standard for the company: New Year’s
Day, Washington’s or Lincoln’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Independence Day,
Labor Day, Armistice Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day.
Washington’s Birthday shall be designated as the holiday in February except
when the observance of Lincoln’s Birthday would provide a longer week-end,
in which case Lincoln’s Birthday shall be declared the holiday.



32

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

11. Time Limits of Holiday Defined
There shall be six (6) holidays per year, namely: New Year’s D ay/E aster
Monday, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
The arrangement regarding holidays will be as follow s: The holiday will officially
begin at 11 p. m. and end twenty-four (24) hours later.
12. Shift Schedule Determines When Holiday Begins and Ends
The following holidays shall be recognized:
New Year’s Day (from start of evening shift at 3: SO p. m. December 31 and
including the evening shift finishing about midnight January 1) ; May 30 (from
start of day shift May 30 to start of day shift May 31); July 4 (from start of
graveyard shift at 11: SO p. m. July 3 to start of day shift July 5) : Labor Day
(from start of day shift Monday to start of day shift Tuesday) ; Thanksgiving
(from start of day shift Thursday to start of day shift Friday) ; Christmas
(from end of day shift December 24 to start of day shift December 26).
13. Holiday Falling on Sunday Observed the Following Monday
If any of such named holidays fall on Sunday, the following Monday shall be
considered the holiday.
14. No Premium Rate for Work on Monday When Holiday Falls on Sunday
In case any of said holidays falls on a Sunday, that day shall be recognized
as the holiday and no holiday rate shall be payable on account of work performed
on the Monday following.
15. State or National Practice Determines Day To Be Observed When Holiday
Falls on Sunday
Should any of the above holidays fall on Sunday, the day observed by the
State or the Nation shall be considered as a holiday for the purpose of this
section.
16. Holiday Falling on Saturday Observed on Preceding Day
When a holiday falls on Saturday, the preceding day shall be the celebrated
holiday.
17. Employee Granted Compensatory Time Off When Holiday Falls on His
Regular Day Off
It is further agreed that if any holiday herein named shall fall upon any
employee’s regular days off, he shall be granted an additional day off, which shall
be given within the following 3-week period.
18. Holidays Occurring on Day When No Work Is Scheduled Shall Not Be
Considered Holidays
Should one of the four holidays mentioned in paragraph (b) above fall on a
day on which the plant generally is not scheduled to work, such day shall not be
considered as a holiday except that where all employees of a department are
notified to report for work on such day, it will be considered as a holiday for such
employees and they will be paid in accordance with the provisions of this article,
and except further that when one of such holidays falls on Sunday (or the seventh
day from the beginning of the work schedule of an employee assigned a work
schedule in accordance with section 1 (e) above) the following day (but not
both days) shall be considered as the holiday.

Limitations on Holiday Work
In some cases, holiday work is prohibited altogether; in other cases
permission of the union must be obtained before the employer can
schedule work on holidays. More commonly, however, agreements
require only that a reasonable effort be made to avoid scheduling work



HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

33

on holidays or that only necessary maintenance and repair work be
done.
Some agreements which have no specific limitations on holiday work
do require that employees be given several days’ advance notice if work
is scheduled for a holiday.
19. Work Prohibited on Specified Holidays
There shall be no work done on the following legal holidays nor on the days
on which said holidays are observed: New Year’s Day, Decoration Day, Labor
Day, Thanksgiving Day, Washington’s Birthday, Independence Day, Election
Day (one-half day), Christmas Day, and Columbus Day.
20. Work Prohibited Except by Agreement Between Company and Union
The following shall be considered as holidays on which there will be no produc­
tive work unless agreed to by the company and the union, namely: Christmas
Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, New Year’s Day, and
Labor Day.
21. Work Perm itted, with Consent of Union, on Holidays Other Than Labor Day
The following shall be recognized as holidays: New Year’s Day, Independence
Day, Thanksgiving Day, Labor Day, Memorial Day, and Christmas Day.
No work shall be performed on these holidays unless by permission of the
union, except on Labor Day, on which no permission shall be requested or granted.
22. Sunday and Holiday Work K ept at Minimum Consistent W ith Satisfactory
Service to Public
Work on Sundays and holidays shall be kept at such a minimum as is consistent
with the proper operation and maintenance of the company’s facilities in
efficiently and economically providing continuous and satisfactory service to the
public.
N ote : This clause is from an agreement covering an electric utility company.
23. Company to Avoid Scheduling Work on Holidays
A reasonable effort shall be made by the company to avoid scheduling work
on holidays.
24. No Holiday Work Except in Cases of Necessity
No work shall be performed on these holidays except in cases of emergency, by
mutual agreement, or for the protection of life and property. The exception to
the foregoing is as follow s:
Any major maintenance or repair work which is necessary to prevent material
curtailment of employment of a substantial number of employees.
25. No Employee Required To Work on Holiday Unless a M ajority of Employees
in Designated Unit Are Required to Work
Any employee required to work upon any holiday mentioned in paragraph (b)
above and who does not report to work, shall receive no compensation for such
holiday. No production employee or employees will be required to work on any
holiday, unless a majority of employees in his department, or within his section
of his department are also required to work.
26. Failure To Work on Specified Holidays Not Deemed Violation of Agreement
The following legal holidays shall be observed: Decoration Day, Independence
Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, New Year’s Day, and one-half
of Election Day. All workers shall be paid for such holidays as follows: (a)
Pieceworkers shall be paid for the holidays on the basis of their straight-time
hourly earnings for that week. Time workers shall be paid for the holidays on
flie basis of their actual hourly or weekly earnings for that week.




34

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

Refraining from work on May 1 and Columbus Day shall not be deemed a viola­
tion of this rgreement.
27. No Work Performed on Labor Day, Except bp Maintenance Crew
There will be no work performed on Labor Day under any circumstances. This
paragraph does not apply to firemen and maintenance men whose presence in
the plant is necessary to maintain the plant over any holiday.
28. Only Continuous Process Operations May Be Performed on h olidays
The following days shall be considered holidays during which days there shall
be no regular production work, except in cases of continuous operation, o n : New
Year’s Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas, Memorial
Day, and Armistice Day.
29. Employees to Receive 8 days9 Notice When Required to Work on Sundays
and Holidays
Members whose regularly scheduled work does not require them to work on
Sunday and holidays will receive at least 3 days’ notice when required to work
on such days except in cases of extreme emergency.
30. Employees to Receive 25 Hours' Notice When Required To Work on Saturday,
Sunday, or Holidays
Except in the case of employees whose regular workweek includes Saturday,
Sunday or the holidays hereinafter designated, employees required to work on
Saturdays, Sundays, or the holidays hereinafter designated shall, whenever
practical, be notified at least 25 hours in advance of such Saturday, Sunday, or
holiday.
31. Equal Distribution of Holiday Work
Holiday work will be distributed as equally as possible among the employees
competent to handle same.

Making Up Holidays
When holidays without pay are observed, the employee’s earnings
are naturally diminished during the week in which the holiday occurs.
In order to give employees an opportunity to bring their weekly earn­
ings up to normal, some agreements have provisions permitting em­
ployees to make up time lost on the holiday. Usually, make-up time
is compensated at regular rates when the holiday is made up at the
employee’s option.
Since not only wages but also production is lost on holidays, em­
ployers, in some cases, may require that holiday time be made up on
Saturdays at straight-time rates, provided, of course, that employees
have not worked the full number of hours in the normal workweek.
Other agreements, however, require payment of the premium rate for
make-up time, even if less than the normal workweek has been worked.
In some cases, agreements specify that employees will not be required
to make up time lost due to holidays or that holidays will be made up
only by mutual agreement of employer and union.
Make-up time, if permitted, is generally worked on Saturdays, which
is a regular day off for most employees.
32. Regular Rate Paid if Employee Elects to Make Up Time Lost on Holiday
Such employees scheduled to work on any of the above holidays but given the




HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

35

day off will be permitted to make up this time by working at straight-time rate
on a regular day off during the holiday week.
33. Employer May Require Holiday Make-up at Regular Rate
Any work performed on Saturday is to be paid at the rate of time and onehalf, except when a holiday falls on any work day during the week. The em­
ployer shall then have the right to have his employees work on the Saturday of
that given week at straight time, to make up the forty (40) hours.
34. Overtime Rate Required for Make-tip Time
It is further agreed that the holidays to be considered shall include New
Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and
Christmas, and there shall be no work on Labor Day. If any of these holidays
come on any day of the working week, the hours lost on said holiday shall not
be made up without payment on the basis of overtime as provided herein.
35. Employees Not Required to Make Up Holidays
Sundays and the following holidays shall be observed: New Year’s Day, Wash­
ington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving
Day and Christmas Day and any other weekday holiday recognized by the em­
ployer upon which the employer closes his store to the public. Employees shall
not be required to make up time for the said holidays.
36. Holidays May Be Made Up by Mutual Agreement
In the event such a holiday falls on a regular workday, the company may
operate on the following Saturday by the mutual agreement of the parties
hereto.
37. Employer May Request Employees to Make Up Time Lost Owing to Observvance of Religious Holidays
In view of the practice of the employer of closing its factories on the three
Jewish holidays of the year, namely, 2 days of the Jewish New Year and the
Day of Atonement, the parties agree that the employer may request the employees
to make up the time thus lost by working on 3 Saturdays and to so work at
straight time. The union agrees that it will not attempt to discourage any work­
ers from complying with such request. If, however, immediately preceding such
Saturdays and for three (3) or more consecutive Saturdays the plant has been
operating, in such event, the employer shall pay time and a half for such exchange
Saturdays.

Holidays With Pay
In the past, the prevailing practice regarding holidays for produc­
tion workers was to allow time off without pay on such days; but in
recent years the trend has been toward granting pay for holidays not
worked. A compromise arrangement found in a considerable number
of agreements grants pay for some of the major holidays and allows
the observance of additional holidays without pay.
Unions justify paid holidays on the grounds that the observance
of patriotic and religious holidays without the loss of earnings is an
important element of the American standard of living; that paid holi­
days improve worker’s morale with resulting increases in work effi­
ciency and continuity of employment; and that the granting of paid
holidays to salaried employees and withholding them from wage earn­
ers is an unjustified discrimination,



36

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

Employers, on the other hand, contend that they should not be
required to pay for time not worked and that paid holidays lead to
excessive absenteeism on the days immediately preceding and follow­
ing the holiday and result in an unwarranted loss of production.
In some cases, agreements list holidays to be observed without spec­
ifying whether employees not working on these holidays will or will
not be paid. Regardless of whether the holiday is to be paid or unpaid,
the agreement should be clearly drafted to cover the issue, thereby
avoiding any disputes on this question.
A relatively few agreements allow paid holidays to part-time and
seasonal employees, while other agreements exclude such workers.
38. Pay for Six Holidays Not Worked
Regular employees shall be paid for and shall not be required to work on the
following legal holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day,
Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.
39. No Pay for Holidays Not Worked
The following holidays shall be observed: New Year’s Day, Decoration Day,
Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. However,
employees shall not be paid for loss of time resulting from the observance of said
holidays.
40. All Legal Holidays May Be Observed but Only Four Paid Holidays
Union workers may refrain from working on May 1 and all legal holidays with­
out pay. However, union workers shall be paid for the following legal holidays,
without working, provided, however, that they must have worked during any day
of the respective week in which these holidays shall f a ll: New Year’s Day,
Decoration Day, Labor Day, and Thanksgiving Day.
41. Employees Allowed Six and One-half Paid Holidays With Option of One
Additional Unpaid Holiday
All employees in the cutting department shall be paid for the following legal
holidays, which shall be observed, to w it: New Year’s Day, Decoration Day,
Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and Election
Day (one-half).
Workers may refrain from working on Columbus Day or May 1, but without
pay.
42. Eight Holidays With Pay and Two Holidays Without Pay
No employees shall be permitted to work on the following legal holidays,
namely: New Year’s D ly, Lincoln’s Birthday, Washington’s Birthday, Decoration
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Election Day, Thanksgiving
Day, and Christmas.
Employees shall receive pay for the above-mentioned legal holidays, except
that Lincoln’s Birthday and Washington’s Birthday shall not be paid for.
43. Two Paid Holidays and Five Unpaid Holidays
All workers shall receive pay without work for the following legal holidays:
Labor Day and Christmas Day.
Work done on the following remaining legal holidays: Washington’s Birthday,
Decoration Day, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, and New Year’s, Saturday
or Sunday, shall be paid for at the rate of time and one-half.
44. Employer To Designate Any Two Holidays as Paid Holidays
Any work performed by employees covered by the terms hereof upon any of the
following holidays shall be paid for at the rate of time and one-half: Sundays,




HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

37

New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day,
Christmas Day, and any additional or other holiday the employer observes. The
employer shall designate any two (2) of the above days on which the plant shall
be closed and they shall be observed as a holiday and the employees shall be paid
at straight time for eight (8) hours when not worked.
45. Pay for Holidays Which Fall on Saturday
Should any of the foregoing legal holidays fall on a Saturday, the workers
shall nevertheless receive holiday pay computed on the foregoing basis.
46. No Pay for Holidays Observed on Saturday
All employees, regardless of their work schedules, shall be paid a holiday allow­
ance equal to 8 hours’ pay at straight time for the day of observance of each of
the following 8 holidays that are observed on Monday through Friday, except as
stated in section 2 below: (1) New Year’s Day, (2) Washington’s Birthday, (3)
Memorial Day, (4) Independence Day, (5) Labor Day, (6) Armistice Day, (7)
Thanksgiving Day, and (8) Christmas. In the event that the United States
Congress proclaims a national holiday to commemorate the end of World War II,
such date shall automatically be included as a holiday for the purpose of this
agreement and will, take the place of Armistice Day. No holiday allowance shall
be paid for any holiday observed on Saturday.
47. Pay for Holidays Occurring During Leave of Absence
An employee shall receive holiday pay for any holiday celebrated during the
first 30 consecutive calendar days of absence for any reason other than maternity
leave of absence or military leave of absence.
48. Paid Holidays for Part-Time Employees Who Work 20 Hours or More Per
Week
A part-time union member, who is scheduled to work 20 hours or more per
week, is to be paid an additional average day’s pay in any week in which the
store is closed because of a legal holiday, regardless of whether or not the legal
holiday falls on a union member’s regularly scheduled workday.
49. No Paid Holidays for Seasonal or Part-Time Employees
However, it is agreed that regular employees (this shall not include temporary
seasonal or employees working on a part-time basis) who are not required to
work, shall receive eight (8) hours’ pay at their regular straight-time rate for
each of the said holidays.
COMPUTATION OF PAY FOR HOLIDAYS NOT WORKED

In the case of salaried workers paid by the week or month, the
determination of holiday pay presents no problem, and there is no
need to have the agreement mention the method of computation. In
the case of hourly or piece-rate workers, however, it may be desirable
to spell out the computation of holiday pay. A great many agree­
ments fail to do so, thus providing an area of potential difficulty.
For hourly workers, holiday pay is most commonly calculated at
the employee’s regular hourly rate, multiplied by the number of hours
in his normal workday, usually eight. Pay for pieceworkers is most
often based on the employee’s average hourly earnings calculated over
a specified period prior to the holiday and multiplied by his normal
daily working hours; in a few cases, agreements specify the piece­
worker’s guaranteed hourly rate as the basis of payment.




38

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

Another method of computing holiday pay is to allow a percentage
of the employee’s total earnings in some specific period preceding
the holiday, iy2 percent of the earnings over a 3-month period being
most common^ specified. The use of a percent of total earnings, just
as in vacation pay, has the advantage of reflecting both the hourly
rate and the total number of hours worked in the base period. Just as
2 percent of total yearty earnings is approximately equivalent to 1
week’s pay, so the iy2 percent of total quarterly earnings is approxi­
mately equivalent to 1 day’s pay, depending, of course, upon the num­
ber of days worked during the base period. Where this method of
computation is used, there is generally a provision for a minimum
guarantee.
A few agreements provide for the payment of a flat sum to each
employee, regardless of differences in individual wage rates.
50. Eight Hours* Holiday Pay at Regular Rate for Time Workers and a t Average
Hourly Earnings for Pieceworkers
Time workers shall receive eight (8) hours’ pay at regular time, and piecework­
ers shall receive eight (8) hours’ pay at their average piecework regular hourly
earnings as established in the quarter immediately preceding the holiday.
51. Holiday Pay Determined by Number of Hours in Employee*s Regular Daily
Schedule
Holiday pay is to be eight times the individual employee’s hourly rate. How­
ever, if the employee would have been regularly and permanently scheduled to
work more or less than 8 hours on the day on which the holiday occurs, the em­
ployee is to receive as holiday pay whatever pay he would have received for work­
ing regularly scheduled hours on that day, had the day not been a holiday.
52. Eight Hours* Pay Regardless of Normal Scheduled Daily Hours
All hourly employees, regardless of the length of their normal working day,
who are off duty on a specified holiday, shall receive eight (8) hours’ straight pay.
53. Pay for Holiday Based on Percentage of Quarterly Earnings
Pay for the paid holidays shall be computed as follow s: Each employee em­
ployed for 30 days prior to a paid holiday shall receive as and for his pay on the
paid holiday, a sum equal to one and one-half (1 y2) percent of his total earnings
for the 3 months preceding the paid holiday.
54. Minimum Guaranty Made Where Pay Is Based on Percentage of Quarterly
Earnings
Each employee of the firm shall receive pay for each of the following holidays;
January 1, February 22, May 30, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas pre­
ceding which he shall have been employed by the firm for not less than 30 days,
his pay for each of said holidays to be a sum equal to one and one-half (1 y2)
percent of his total earnings during the social-security quarter prior to the holi­
day for which he is to receive pay and the same to be paid to him on the regular
pay day of the week within which the holiday falls. If an employee has been on
the pay roll of the firm for three (3) months or over he shall receive not less than
$4 for each paid holiday not worked.
55. Holiday Pay for Pieceworkers Computed at Guaranteed Minimum Rate
The following legal holidays shall be observed with pay: New Year’s Day,
Decoration Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas
Day. For the purpose of computing holiday pay for pieceworkers the minimum




HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

39

pay of sixty (60) cents stipulated in the minimum-wage clause shall be the
method of computing holiday pay.
56. Flat Sum Payment to Each Employee
The following holidays shall be observed and employees shall be paid $8 for
each of said holidays: New Year’s Day, Decoration Day, Fourth of July, Labor
Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.
57. Pay or Compensatory Time Oft at Employer's Option When Holiday Falls on
Employee's Regular Day Off
Any regular (full-time) employee whose regular day off falls on a holiday shall
receive an additional day’s pay therefor, or at the option of the employer shall
receive an extra day off within the holiday week.
58. No Pay for Holiday Not Worked if It Falls on Employee's Regular Day Off
All such employees not required to work on the above-enumerated holidays shall
be paid straight time for the holiday unless the holiday falls on the employee’s
regularly scheduled day off.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PAY ON HOLIDAYS NOT WORKED

In order to minimize absenteeism during the week in which a paid
holiday occurs and to insure that only employees on the active pay roll
receive pay for such holidays, many agreements require that employees
work on the days immediately before and after a holiday. Other
agreements require only that the employee work some part of the holi­
day week, while some require perfect attendance during the holiday
week. In a few cases, holiday pay is prorated according to the pro­
portion of the week worked. Employees who do not work during the
holiday week because of sickness or other excusable reasons are usually
not deprived of their paid holiday.
Another type of eligibility qualification is that which requires a
minimum length of service with the company prior to the holiday;
usually no more than 6 months’ service is required although a year’s
service is specified in a few cases.
Under the terms of some agreements, refusal to work on a holiday
when requested to do so forfeits the employee’s right to a paid holiday.
59. Holiday Pay Eligibility Based on Seniority, Work Schedules, Attendance
During Holiday Week, and Other Specified Conditions
Hereafter, hourly rated employees shall be paid for New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day (or one other such holiday of greater local importance which must be
designated in advance by mutual agreement locally in writing), Fourth of July,
Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day holidays providing they meet all
of the following eligibility rules, unless otherwise provided herein:
1. The employee has seniority as of the date of the holiday, and
2. The employee would otherwise have been scheduled to work on such day
if it had not been observed as a holiday, and
3. The employee must have worked the last scheduled workday prior to and
the next scheduled workday after such holiday within the employee’s scheduled
workweek.
Employees with the necessary seniority who have been laid off in a reduction of
force, or have gone on sick leave during the workweek prior to or during the
week in which the holiday falls shall receive pay for such holiday.



40

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

When a holiday falls on Saturday, eligible employees shall receive holiday pay
provided they have worked the last preceding scheduled workday within the week
in which that holiday falls.
When one of the above holidays falls within an eligible employee’s approved
vacation period, and he is absent from work during his regularly scheduled work­
week because of such vacation, he shall be paid for such holiday.
When an eligible employee is on an approved leave of absence and returns to
work following the holiday but during the week in which the holiday fell, he
shall be eligible for pay for that holiday.
Employees whose work is in necessary continuous 7 day operations, as covered
by paragraph (87) of the national agreement, shall receive holiday pay in the
event the holiday falls on one of their regularly scheduled days off, and they
meet the other eligibility requirements of this procedure for paid holiday tim e;
provided, however, that if the employee works a holiday which falls on his
scheduled day off or when such employees are scheduled to work on a holiday and
do work, they shall not receive holiday pay under this procedure but shall be
paid for time worked in accordance with the working hours section of the
national agreement for that type of operation. If they are scheduled to work,
they shall not receive holiday pay as provided herein if they absent themselves
from scheduled work on such holiday without reasonable cause acceptable to
management.
Employees who have accepted * * * holiday work assignment and then
fail to report for and perform such work, without reasonable cause acceptable
to management, shall not receive pay for the holiday.
60. No Holiday Pay Unless Employee Works Day Before and Day A fter the
Holiday
Straight time shall be paid to the employees if there is no work to be per­
formed on said holidays, provided the employees work the working day before,
and the working day after each such holiday.
61. Employee Qualifies for Holiday Pay by Working 1 D ay During Holiday Week
To be eligible for payment for a holiday, the employee must have worked at
least one full day during the pay-roll week.
62. Perfect Attendance During Holiday Week Required for Holiday Pay Eligi­
bility
All regular employees who do not absent themselves during the calendar week
in which a holiday occurs shall receive 8 hours’ straight-time pay.
63. Employees on Leave of Absence Eligible for Holiday Compensation
The company will normally grant time off on the following holidays: Christmas,
New Year’s, Fourth of July, and Labor Day. Employees to whom such holidays
are granted shall receive 1 day’s pay at straight time (not to exceed eight (8)
hours) provided they have worked at least the equivalent of one full regular
shift during the workweek in which the holiday occurs. It shall be considered,
however, that employee on a previously authorized scheduled vacation and/or
sick leave for 1 day or more during the workweek in which a holiday occurs
shall be considered to have worked one full regular shift during that workweek.
64. Excusable Absence Does Not Deprive Employee of Holiday Pay
To be entitled to the holiday pay as aforesaid, an employee must be employed
and report for work for the full day on the day preceding and the day subsequent
to the holiday in question, except in the case of sickness, death in family, or
other good cause.




HOLIDAYS AND WEEK-END WORK

41

65. Six Months’ Service an Eligibility Requirement for Holiday Pay
All employees who have been in the continuous employ of the company for at
least six (6) months shall be paid for the following holidays at their regular
rate of pay. Said holidays are: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence
Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas.
€6. Combined Service and Attendance Eligibility Requirement
Any employee covered by this agreement who has been engaged for at least
ninety (90) days prior to one of the holidays hereinafter specified and who
has worked three (3) days during the workweek in which any of the specified
holidays occur, but does not work on such holidays, shall he paid for eight (8)
hours at his regular wage rate for such holiday.
67. Eligibility Requirement Less Severe for Veterans Than for Other Employees
No employee shall be entitled to a paid holiday unless he shall have been on
the active pay roll of the company for at least 1 year preceding the particular
holiday. Veterans holding at least 1 year’s seniority and who are on the active
pay roll on a paid holiday shall be entitled to be paid for such holiday.
68. Holiday Pay Prorated According to Proportion of Week Worked
During the week in which a legal holiday occurs, employees working less than
a full week shall be paid for the holiday pro rata for the hours worked.
69. Holiday Pay Forfeited by Failure To Work on Holiday When Requested
To Do So
Employees who do not work on Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, and
Christmas Day shall be paid for eight (8) hours at their regular straight-time
hourly rate, provided, however, such employees shall forfeit their right to such
compensation if they are scheduled or needed in an emergency to work and do not
do so.

Premium Rates for Work on Holidays
To provide special rewards for holiday work and at the same time to
discourage the scheduling of work on holidays, most agreements re­
quire the payment of premium rates for work performed on holidays.
Time and one-half is the rate most commonly specified, although a
considerable number of agreements require double time.
In agreements which allow pay for holidays not worked, the pre­
mium rate for holiday work is usually higher than that specified by
agreements providing holidays without pay. Most agreements which
allow pay for holidays not worked specify the payment of at least
double time when employees are required to work on holidays, and in
a considerable number of agreements, the rate of payment is two and
one-half or three times the regular rate. Unions justify this on the
grounds that if an employee receives his regular rate for holidays not
worked, the payment of anything less than double time, if he is re­
quired to work, would result in a rate of pay for holidays of less than
straight time for regular hours of work. Moreover, the payment of
anything less than double time would not be an effective deterrent
against the scheduling of holiday work, since the employer must pay
the regular rate for the holiday, in any event.




42

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

Some agreements designate one premium rate for the first 8 hours
worked on a.holiday and a higher rate for additional hours worked.
In a few cases, work on major holidays is paid for at double time,
while only time and a half is allowed for work on less important holi­
days. Also, in rare cases, the employer is given the option of paying a
premium rate or granting compensatory time off within a specified
period after the holiday.
In addition to premium rates for work on holidays, a minimum
amount of pay is sometimes guaranteed, such as half or a full day’s
pay, even though only a few hours are worked on the holiday.
Since company property must be guarded and a certain amount
of maintenance work performed, even on holidays, agreements often
specify that watchmen, firemen, engineers, and other maintenance
workers may be required to work on holidays without extra compensa­
tion. In some cases, however, these workers are paid a specified
premium rate for holiday work.
70. Time and One-half Paid for Work on Holidays
The following days shall be observed as holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and Labor Day. All
employees required to work on these holidays shall be paid at the rate of time
and one-half.
71. Double Time for Holiday Work
Work performed on the following holidays falling within the normal workweek
will be paid at a rate of double time: January 1, May BO July 4, Labor Day,
,
November 11, Thanksgiving Day, December 25, and a day which may be proclaimed
by the President as VJ-day, pertaining to World War II.
72. Regular Rate Plus Double Time for Work on Paid Holiday
It is further agreed that the employees shall be paid for and not required to
work on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and
Christmas Day. In the event of an emergency and the employer required the
services of an employee on any of the afore-mentioned holidays, the employee
would, nevertheless, receive payment for the holiday as though he had not
worked, plus double time for all work performed.
73. Double Time for Scheduled Holiday W ork; Two and One-half Times Regular
Rate for Unscheduled Holiday Work (30 days’ notice to employees scheduled
to work holidays).
Employees who are scheduled to work on such holidays shall be compensated
for hours actually worked at straight time in addition to the holiday allowance
provided for in section 1 of this article (8 hours’ pay at straight time). Em­
ployees who are not scheduled to work on such holidays and who are called in to
work shall be compensated for the hours actually worked as emergency overtime
at time and one-half in addition to the holiday allowance provided for in section
1 of this article. A list of employees scheduled to work on a holiday shall be
posted at least thirty (30) days in advance of such holiday.
74. Double Time for Work on Six National Holidays; Time and One-half on
Other Holidays
The company will pay time and one-half for all work performed on legal and
State holidays.




HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

43

The company will pay double time for all work performed on the following na­
tional holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.
75. jDouble Time for Work on Paid Holidays; Time and One-half for Work on
Unpaid Holidays
There shall be four (4) paid holidays which shall be Fourth of July, Labor
Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas. Employees required to work on these
holidays shall be paid as their total compensation at the rate of double time.
Should any of the above holidays fall on Sunday, the day observed by the State
or Nation shall be considered the holiday and paid for as such.
There shall also be two unpaid holidays which shall be New Year’s Day and
Memorial Day. Employees required to work on these holidays shall be paid at the
rate of time and one-half for seven (7) hours and double time thereafter.
76. Double-Time Rate for Work on H oliday; Triple-Time Rate for Work on
Holiday Falling on Saturday
Work on any of the holidays enumerated in paragraph VIII hereof shall be paid
for at the rate of single time in addition to the regular day’s pay when said holi­
day occurs during a workweek, and at the rate of double time when such holiday
occurs on a Saturday.
77. Time and One-half for First 8 Hours on Holiday and Double Time There­
after
All work performed on the above holidays shall be considered overtime work,
and the compensation therefor, for all work performed up to and including the
eighth (8th) hour of work shall be one and one-half times the regular rate, and
the compensation for all work performed on the above holidays in excess of
eight (8) hours shall be double the regular pay rate.
78. Employee Working on Holiday Has Option of Extra D ay’s Pay or Compensa­
tory Day Off
No pay-roll deductions shall be made for employees who do not work on the
following legal holidays: New Year’s Day, Decoration Day, Independence Day,
Labor Day, and Christmas.
Employees who work on said holidays shall receive an extra day’s pay at the
regular straight-time rate or a day off, whichever the employee may prefer.
79. Eight Hours’ Pay Guaranteed When Workers Called Out on Sundays or
Holidays
Employees required to work on a Sunday or holiday shall be paid double time.
No worker shall be paid for less than eight (8) hours when called out on Sundays
or holidays.
80. One-half Day’s Pay Guaranteed on Sundays and Holidays
Any regular employee may be required by the employer in its discretion to work
on any holiday or on Sunday of any week, which is not part of such employee’s
regular working schedule, and shall be compensated for services performed on
any such day at the rate of time and one-half for the hours of service so performed,
but in no event less than one-half day’s pay.
81. No Holiday Premium Rate for Maintenance and Plant Protection Employees
Any employees other than maintenance men, engineers, firemen, watchmen, and
others performing similar service, shall receive time and one-half for work per­
formed on the following legal holidays only: Sundays, Decoration Day, July
Fourth, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.
82. Premium Rate Required for Maintenance Woi k on Holidays
The following days shall be recognized as holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial
Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day;



44

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

and no employee shall be permitted or required to work any of such days, except­
ing, however maintenance workers, machine fixers and changers, who in cases
of necessity or emergency may work on such holidays, but shall be paid one and
one-half times their regular rates of pay for such work.

Premium Rates and Limitations on Week-End Work
Provisions designed to discourage the extension of work over the
week end are often found in union agreements. These usually stipulate
a premium rate for week-end work. However, some agreements pro­
hibit Saturday and Sunday work altogether. Others require the em­
ployer to avoid scheduling week-end work as much as possible, and in
some cases no work can be done on Saturdays and Sundays except with
the permission of the union.
During the war the payment of premium rates for week-end work
was governed by the provisions of Executive Order 92406 which
allowed no premium pay for Saturday and Sunday work, as such,
but permitted the payment of time and one-half for work on the sixth
consecutive day of the workweek and required double time for the
seventh day. Since the cancellation of Executive Order 9240 on
August 21, 1945, many agreements have reinstated provisions requir­
ing premium rates for work performed on Saturday and Sunday.
Time and one-half is usually specified as the Saturday rate and double
time as the Sunday rate. Other agreements make no reference to Sat­
urday and Sunday work as such, but require time and one-half and
double time for the sixth and seventh days, respectively, of the em­
ployee’s workweek.
Certain types of employees, such as plant-protection and mainte­
nance employees, who regularly work on week ends, ordinarily receive
no extra compensation for such work. Few agreements have special
provisions regarding continuous-process workers whose regular sched­
ule includes week ends, but rotation of shifts is common in such in­
dustries and Saturdays and Sundays are thereby distributed with
more or less regularity among all employees.
Occasionally, the question arises as to what constitutes regularly
scheduled Sunday work for which no premium rate is to be paid, and
a few agreements have provisions defining such work.
83. Time and One-half for Saturday, Sunday, and Holiday Work
For work performed on Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays, employees shall be
paid at the rate of time and one-half time.
84. Double Time for Saturday, Sunday, and Holiday Work
All work performed on Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays shall be paid
for at the rate of double time. A permit shall be obtained from the officer•
• For a more detailed discussion of Executive Order 9240, see article by I. Robert Feinberg
and Arthur H. Dadian, in Monthly Labor Review, August 1944, also reprinted as Serial
No. R. 1676.




HOLIDAYS AND W EEK-END WORK

45

of the local union when members are required to work on Saturdays, Sundays,
and legal holidays.
85. Time and One-half far Saturday W ork; Double Time for Sunday
Employees regularly scheduled to work Monday through Friday shall be paid
time and one-half for work performed on Saturday and double time for work
performed on Sunday.
86. Time and One-half for First 4 Hours of Saturday W ork; Double Time
Thereafter
All work performed on Saturday shall be paid for at the rate of time and onehalf for the first four (4) hours and double time thereafter.
87. Time and One-half for 8 Hours of Work on Saturday; Double Time There­
after
All work done on Saturdays by any employee during such employee’s normal
working hours shall be paid for at one and one-half times the regular straighttime rate. Any work in excess of 8 hours on Saturday or before or after the
employee’s normal working hours shall be paid for at double the regular
straight-time rate.
88. Time and One-half for Sixth Consecutive Day of Workweek; Double Time for
Seventh Day
An employee shall be paid at one and one-half times his regular basic rate
for all work performed by him on the sixth consecutive day worked by him in a
workweek, and at double his regular basic rate for all work performed by him
on the seventh consecutive day worked by him in a workweek. For purposes of
this section “day” shall be interpreted to mean a calendar day.
89. Premium Rate for Work on Saturday Only When I t Is the Sixth D ay of the
Workweek
Overtime for Saturday work will be paid only when Saturday constitutes the
sixth day in the regularly scheduled workweek on which any work was performed
by the individual concerned, in which event all hours worked will be paid for at
the rate of time and one-half.
90. Premium Rate for Saturday Waived if Absent During Week
Time and one-half shall be paid for work on Saturday, unless an employee has
been absent during the preceding five (5) days without approval of the super­
intendent.
91. Time and One-half for Sunday; Double Time if Sunday Is the Seventh
Consecutive Day
The company shall pay time and one-half for work performed on Sunday, unless
it is the seventh consecutive day worked by an employee, in which event the com­
pany shall pay double time.
92. Time and One-half for First 8 Hours on Seventh Consecutive D a y; Double
Time Thereafter
The seventh (7th) consecutive day worked shall be paid for at time and onehalf the straight-time rate for the first eight (8) hours and double the straighttime rate after eight (8) hours.
93. Time and One-half for Sunday Work, Except for Regularly Scheduled Shifts
AH work performed on Sundays shall be paid for at the rate of time and onehalf, except in the case of powerhouse employees and watchmen, and except in
the case of such employees engaged in continuous operation whose shifts shall
include a Sunday as part of a 5-day shift.




46

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

94. Premium Pay of 10 Gents Per Hour for Regularly Scheduled Saturday and
Sunday Work
Maintenance employees will be paid a bonus of ten (10) cents per hour on
Saturday and Sunday when these days are part of their regularly scheduled forty(40) hour workweek.
Overtime will be paid only on the sixth or seventh day worked in their regu­
larly scheduled workweek. When overtime is paid, the ten- (10) cent bonus
will not be paid.
95. Premium Pay of 10 Cents Per Hour for Regularly Scheduled Sunday Work
Premium pay of 10 cents per hour shall be paid to all employees who work
on Sundays as their regularly scheduled workdays.
96. No Sunday Premium Pay for Watchmen and Maintenance Men
Sunday being universally considered a day of rest, shall be observed as a
holiday and all work performed on that day shall be at double time excepting
watchmen, firemen, engine room, boiler room, fuel pile, and dry kiln attendants,
including transfer operators necessary to charge and discharge kilns and such
other work as union and company may agree upon.
97. Week-End Premium-Pay Provisions Do Not Apply to Watchmen and Boilerhouse Attendants.
Time and one-half shall be paid for any time after four (4) hours of work on
Saturdays, and double time on Sundays, provided, however, this will not apply
to watchmen and boilerhouse attendants.
98. No Premium Pay to Continuous-Process Workers for Saturday and Sunday
Work as Such
Employees working in process occupations who are scheduled to work on Satur­
days and Sundays shall work these days at straight time, provided these days
are not the sixth or seventh workdays in the workweek, in which case prescribed
overtime rates shall be paid.
99. No Sunday Premium Pay to Employees Whose Regular Shift Schedule In­
cludes Sunday
Employees whose regular shift assignment requires them to work on Sunday
shall receive straight-time pay for their regular Sunday hours and another day
shall be assigned as their regular day off and double time shall be paid for all
time worked on that day.
100. Definition of Regularly Scheduled Sunday Work
Regularly scheduled Sunday jobs are not subject to time and one-half ( l 1
/^)
payment. When work is scheduled for four (4) or more consecutive Sundays,
it will be considered a regularly scheduled Sunday job. Employees will receive
one and one-half (1%) times their regular rate for Sunday work which is not
regularly scheduled.
101. Saturday and Sunday Work Prohibited
Under no condition shall work be done on Saturday or Sunday.
102. Only Necessary Work To Be Performed on Saturdays
No work shall be performed on Saturday except in the case of necessity.
103. No Week-End or Holiday Work Except with Permission of Union
Work on Saturdays, Sundays, or holidays shall not be permitted except in
the case of emergency and with the permission of the union. The union shall be
sole judge of the existence of an emergency.
104. Sunday and Holiday Work To Be Distributed Among All Employees
Schedules shall be arranged so that all employees shall rotate on Sunday and
holiday wrork so far as is fair and practical.
N ote. This clau se is from an agreement covering building-service employees.




HOLIDAYS AND WEEK-END WORK

47

Eligibility for Premium Pay on Week Ends
I f premium rates are paid for the sixth and seventh consecutive
days of the regularly scheduled workweek, the problem of determin­
ing what constitutes the sixth and seventh day often causes confusion.
To prevent misunderstanding, the agreement might specify what ab­
sences, if any, shall be counted as time worked for the purpose of
determining the sixth and seventh day.
Unexcused and unjustified absences are usually specifically excluded
in computing the sixth and seventh days, and agreements which pro­
vide premium rates for Saturday work, as such, sometimes specify
that the employer may require unjustified absences to be made up on
Saturdays without payment of the penalty rate. Certain excused
absences are sometimes considered days worked in determining the
sixth and seventh consecutive days of work. Such excused absences
may include holidays on which no work is done, days on which em­
ployees report but are sent home for lack of work, absences owing to
illness, jury duty, and leave for union business.
105. Absences for Specified Reasons Counted as Time Worked in Determining
Sixth and Seventh Day of Workweek
Time and one-half the straight-time base rate on a regular workday shall
be paid for all hours worked on the sixth and seventh consecutive days, respec­
tively, worked in a workweek. Days or parts of days not worked due to any
of the causes specified below shall be counted as whole days worked for the
purpose of determining when the sixth or seventh consecutive days have been
worked in a workweek.
1. Jury duty responsive to a summons.
2. Holidays enumerated in this article.
3. R gularly designated vacation days.
4. Preinduction physical examination at a draft board.
5. A day for which call-in pay has been paid.
6. Death and funeral in the immediate family (wife and children, and mother,
father, brothers, and sisters).
7. A day on which an employee is sent home because of illness or an accident
in the plant.
8. Quarantine at the employee’s home.
9. Acting as pallbearer at funeral of another employee.
10. Time spent on grievances and arbitration.
11. Time spent in answering a subpena as a witness but not if the employee
is a party to the proceeding.
12. A regularly scheduled workday on which management provides no work­
ing opportunity.
106. Part Day Worked Considered Full Day Worked in Computing Eligibility for
Sixth and Seventh Workday Premium Pay
For the purpose of computing overtime pay on the sixth and seventh consecu­
tive days worked in the workweek a part of a day worked shall be considered
as a full day worked.




48

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING PROVISIONS

107. Maximum Allowance of 2 D ays9 Absence in Determining Sixth and Seventh
Days of Workweek
For the purpose of computing days of work in determining the sixth and
seventh consecutive day of work in any regularly scheduled workweek, days of
total or partial absence for the following reasons shall be considered justifiable
absences and shall be counted as days of w ork:
1. Absence due to illness or industrial accident which is reported immediately
to the personnel department and necessity therefor has been certified by the
company doctor or nurse;
2. Absence to attend draft board proceedings where the board requires the
employee to report during his regular working hour;
3. Absence because of serious illness, injury or death in the employee’s im­
mediate family which is defined to consist of the family group living together
in one house, and also the employee’s children, father, mother, brothers, and
sisters;
4. Days absent when the company has no work available for the employee.
No more than 2 days of total or partial absence in any 1 week for any one
or more of the above reasons shall be counted as days of work for any single
employee.
108. Unexcused Absence During Week Cancels Right to Premium Pay on Sixth
Day
Time and one-half for the sixth day, as such, shall not be paid to any employee
who is absent from work during the week for an unjustifiable personal reason.
109. Employer May Require Unexcused Absence To Be Made Up on Saturday
Without Payment of Premium Rates
Any work done on Saturday or Sunday shall also be paid for at the rate of
time and one-half.
All workers who lose time on their own accord and who are unable to give
a valid and justified reason for same, the employer shall have the right to have
such workers make up time on Saturday at their regular rate of pay.




Index
v a c a t io n s

Page

CO
CO
CO CO
^

T
jH
^
tftiQ
IQ IQ tO
COCO

coco




49

CO CO CO

Clauses
Length of vacation same for all eligible employees:
1. One week's vacation after 6 months' service_________________ __
2. One week after 1 year_______________________________________
3. Two weeks after 1 year______________________________________
4. Two weeks' vacation to all union members; no service requirement
specified_________________________________________________
Length of vacation graduated according to duration of employment:
5. One week after 6 months, 2 weeks after 1 year___________ ______
6. One week after 6 months plus 1 day extra per month up to 1 year,
2 weeks after 1 year, 3 weeks after 5 years__________________
7. One week after 1 year, 2 weeks after 2 years_______ ___________
8. One week after 1 year, 2 weeks after 3 years___________________
9. One week after 1 year, 1}i weeks after 3 years, 2 weeks after 5 years.
10. One week after 1 year, 2 weeks after 5 years___________________
11. One week after 1 year, 2 weeks after 5 years, 3 weeks after 15
years____________________________________________________
12. Twenty-one days after 1 year, 10 days after 6 months__________
13. Vacation prorated according to months and years of service___
14. Employees with insufficient service for 1-week's vacation receive
1 day for each 3 months' service___________________________
15. One day for each year; maximum of 10 days' vacation__________
16. Extra 2 weeks' vacation granted every fifth anniversary year
after 19 years' service_____________________________________
17. Sex differential in service requirement for 3 weeks' vacation____
18. Vacation allowances different for hourly paid and salaried foremen .
Effect on vacations when holidays occur during vacation periods:
19. Additional day's pay added to vacation_______________________
20. Additional day of vacation___________________________________
21. Additional day given only to those meeting minimum work re­
quirement________________________________________________
22. No allowance for holidays____________________________________
23. No extra compensation for holidays occurring during vacation
unless employer ordered vacation at that tim e--------------------24. Employer has option of extending vacation by 1 day or paying ad­
ditional compensation for the holiday_______________________
25. Employee has option of extending vacation by 1 day or accepting
additional compensation for the holiday_____________________
26. Holidays may be accumulated and added to vacation period___
Effect of absences in computing length of employment:
27. Time lost because of lay-off, sickness, or leave of absence not de­
ducted from employee's length of service..-------- ------------------28. Time lost as the result of an accident counts as part of continuous
service___________________________________________________

50

INDEX

Effect of absence in computing length of employment—Continued
Page
29. Time lost because of strike not deducted in determining length of
service___________________________________________________
7
30. Leaves of absence up to 6 months included in computing length of
service-----------------------------7
31. Lay-off up to 6 months not included in computing length of service.
7
32. Absence up to 60 consecutive working days does not break con­
tinuous service for vacation________________________________
8
33. Only time actually worked considered in determining length of
service___________________________________________________
8
Effect of quits, discharges, or transfers in computing length of employment:
34. Employees rehired after quit or discharge receive no credit for serv­
ice prior to such termination_______________________________
8
35. Allowance made for previous service with employer, even if
in te r r u p te d ...___________________________________________
8
36. Employees rehired after lay-off given credit for service prior to
lay-off; no credit for previous service if rehired after quit or dis­
charge___________________________________________________
8
37. Employees transferred to another plant of same company retain
service accumulated prior to transfer_______________________
8
Cut-off dates specified for completion of service requirement:
38. Length of service required for vacation must be completed by
specified eligibility date----- -----------------------------------------------8
39. Service requirement to be completed as of individual employee’s
anniversary date__________________________________________
9
40. Employee allowed vacation if service requirement completed
between two specified eligibility dates---------------------------------9
Minimum work requirements:
41. Minimum work requirement of 1,200 hoursduring year_________
10
42. Minimum work requirement of 38 weeks during year---------------10
43. Earnings in 75 percent of pay periods required, as well as mini­
mum number of hours_____________________________________
10
44. Alternative of 760 hours or 95 reports for workduring year_____
10
45. Differential in minimum work requirement for 1-week and 2-week
vacations________________________________________________
10
Effect of absences on minimum work requirements:
46. Time lost through lay-off up to 90 days counted as time worked in
determining vacation eligibility____________________________
10
47. Minimum work requirement of 10 months, but exception made for
absences beyond control of employee---------------------------------11
48. Allowance of 50 days for illness or injury in meeting minimum
work requirement_________________________________________
U
49. Allowance of 35 days’ absence in addition to time lost because of
lay-offs, injury, and illness___________________________
11
50. Employees failing to work 185 days during the year receive
vacation proportionate to number of days worked___________
11
Loss of vacation rights for disciplinary reasons:
51. Partial loss of vacation for failure to report accident. ........... ..........
11
52. Absence without permission or excuse forfeits vacation rights----11
53. Excessive tardiness or absence without permission cancels vaca­
tion rights________________________________
11
54. Refusal to work during shut-down periods disqualifies employee—
12
55. Vacation reduced one-twelfth for each 30 days’ absence________
12




INDEX

Vacation rights of employees leaving the company:
56. Employees leaving the company receive pay for vacation earned. _
57. Pro rata vacation allowance given upon termination of employ­
ment____________________________________________________
58. Pro rata vacation allowance to employees with less than 1 year's
service___________________________________________________
59. No pro rata allowance for employees ineligible for a full week's
vacation_________________________________________________
60. Pro rata vacation pay to laid-off employees who have at least 6
months' service in current year____________________________
61. Laid-off employee receives vacation if reemployed within 12
months__________________________________________________
62. Vacation allowance more generous for employees laid off than for
employees quitting or discharged___________________________
63. Employees who resign or are discharged receive pay only for
vacation which has been postponed_________________________
64. Pro rata vacation pay if employer disposes of his establishment__
65. In case of death, accrued vacation pay given to employee's estate. _
66. Accrued vacation pay given upon termination of employment
even though employee does not give notice of resignation_____
67. Employees discharged for cause or who quit without notice forfeit
vacation pay_____________________________________________
68. Termination ofemployment forfeits vacation rights____________
69. Employees discharged for cause granted vacation pay, those
quitting voluntarily forfeit vacation------------------------------------Vacation rights of employees entering and returning from military service:
70. Two weeks' vacation pay to inductees with 6months' service____
71. Inductees and veterans receive full vacation pay_______________
72. Vacation allowance graduated according to length of service at
time of induction_________________________________________
73. Inductee receives vacation due him or which would be due him
had he worked until the eligibility date_____________________
74. Pro rata vacation pay to inductees______________
75. Minimum work requirement waived for inductees-------------------76. Minimum work requirement modified for inducteesand veterans..
77. Minimum work requirement waived for veterans______________
78. Minimum work requirement not waived for veterans__________
79. Time spent in armed forces counts as part of continuous service
for vacation______________________________________________
80. Returning veterans qualify for vacations 6 months after their
return and receive seniority credit for time spent in armed
forces______________________________
81. Date of return from military service determines amount of vaca­
tion pay_________________________________________________
82. Vacation pay for returning veteran based on the average of the
department to which he returns____________________________
83. Vacation pay based on percentage of earnings in year prior to
induction________________________________________________
84. Computation of vacation pay different for veterans____________
85. Employees in the armed forces given vacation pay as bonus--------




51

Page
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
14
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52

INDEX

Vacations for part-time and seasonal workers:
86. Permanent part-time employees receive same vacation as full­
time employees___________________________________________
87. Extra employees subject to minimum work requirement for vaca­
tion eligibility____________________________________________
88. Vacation allowance proportionate to average number of hours
worked per week__________________________________________
89. Compensation of part-time employees in proportion to their regu­
larly scheduled workweek__________________________________
90. Pay for eligible part-time employees based on average weekly
earnings, without minimum guaranty________________
91. Pay for part-time employees computed in the same manner as for
full-time employees. _______________________________________
92. Two days’ vacation for eligible seasonal employees_____________
93. Workers employed by two or more employers during the year re­
ceive vacation pay from each in proportion to the time em­
ployed--------------------Specified number of hours' pay for each week of vacation:
94. Forty-four hours' pay per week at employee's regular rate______
95. Forty hours' pay at hourly rate averaged over 4-week period___
96. Forty hours' pay at employee's present rate or rate at which he
has worked most time during year, whichever is higher___ . . .
97. Vacation pay based on 40 or 48 hours, depending on length of
prevailing workweek______________________________________
98. Allowance made for overtime employee would have received if
he had worked during his vacation period______________
99. Allowance made for shift premium________
100. Six days' pay for each 7 days of vacation____________________
Vacation pay based on average weekly earnings over specified period:
101. Average weekly earnings for 13-weekperiod---------------------------102. Weeks in which lost time occurs excluded in computation of
average weekly earnings_________________________________
103. Maximum and minimum hours' pay at average earnings, basis of
average weekly earnings__________________________________
104. Average weekly hours worked by all multiplied by individual's
average hourly earnings__________________________________
Vacation pay based on percentage of annual earnings:
105. Two percent of gross annual earnings for each week of vacation.
106. Minimum guaranty specified when pay is based on percentage
of annual earnings-----------------------------------------------------------107. Vacation pay computed as 2% percent of annual earnings, ex­
cluding overtime pay_____________________________________
108. Pay for week of vacation varies from 1 to 3 percent, according
to length of service_______________________________________
109. Two percent of previous year's earnings or 48 hours’ pay, which­
ever is greater___________________________________________
Central fund financed by employer and administered by union:
110. Two percent of employer's weekly pay roll----------------------------Flat-sum payment:
111. Flat sum regardless of differences in individual wage rates or
earnings, but graduated according to service_______________
112. Flat-sum payments to all employees with 1 year's service; pro
rata payment to employees with less service_____ __________




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INDEX

Flat-sum payment—Continued
113. Ten dollars per day, graduated vacations_____________________
Basis of computation different for time and piece workers:
114. Time workers paid at regular hourly rate; pieceworkers on basis
of average hourly earnings________________________________
115. Regular weekly rate for week workers; average weekly earnings
for pieceworkers_________________________________________
Other vacation pay provisions:
116. Regular rate used in computation when temporary rate is lower.
117. Rate used in computation depends on percentage of time worked
at that rate____________________________ _________________
118. Commissions considered in computing vacation pay___________
119. Vacation pay includes special bonus in addition to regular base
pay----------------------------------------------------------------------120. Employee to be given vacation pay prior to vacation.________
121. Premium payment if employee works sixth or seventh day of
vacation________________________________________________
122. Vacation pay equals amount employee would have earned by
working_________________________________________________
Pay in lieu of vacation:
123. Payment in lieu of vacation prohibited______________________
124. No bonus in lieu of vacation except in emergency by mutual
consent of company and union__________________________
125. Payment in lieu of vacation if operating conditions do not
permit shut-down------------------------------------------------------------126. Employee may not be compelled to accept pay in lieu of vacation.
127. Pay at premium rate in addition to vacation pay if employee re­
quired to work during first week of his vacation____________
128. Pay in lieu of second week of vacation optional with employee.
129. Pay in lieu of second week of vacation mandatory___________
130. Pay in lieu of vacation if employee is prevented from taking
vacation because of illness________________________
Vacation schedules:
131. Summer months specified; exception permitted at discretion of
company________________________________________________
132. Company has final decision in schedulingvacations____________
133. Employer schedules vacations but must give employee 1 week's
notice__________________________________________________
134. Company and union jointly determine scheduling of vacations.
135. Company required to confer with union before making up vaca­
tion schedule____________________________________________
136. Seniority the determining factor in allotment of vacation dates.
137. Senior employees get first choice of vacation periods but must
make selection before specified date______________________
138. Vacations to be taken at a time mutually agreeable to employer
and employee_________________________________________
139. Employees entitled to 2 or more weeks may take vacation at any
time____________________________________________________
140. Not more than 10 percent of employees in any department may
take vacations at the same t im e ..- _______________________
141. All employees take vacation at the same time during specified
week___________________________________________________
142. Vacation week to be designated by company________________




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54

INDEX

Vacation schedules—Continued
143. If plant shuts down for any reason, company may designate
such shut-down as the vacation period_____________________
144. Industry shut-down at specified time for all except maintenance
employees_______________________________________________
145. Vacations to be taken during slack season as far as possible___
146. Employee may request vacation during temporary lay-off_____
Cumulation of vacations:
147. Cumulation of vacations prohibited________________________
148. No cumulation unless vacation postponed at employer's request.
149. Cumulation of vacation periods for 2 years permitted___ ____
150. Cumulation of vacation time up to maximum of 4 weeks per­
mitted__________________________________________________
Split vacations:
151. No split vacations unless mutually agreeable to company and
employee_______________________________________________
152. Two-week vacations may be split into weekly periods__________
153. Vacation split into summer and winter periods________________
154. Employee has option of taking vacation at one time or spread­
ing it over the year____________________________________
Combining vacation with sick leave:
155. Employee has option of using 96 hours' paid leave as vacation
or sick leave_____________________________________________
156. Unused paid sick leave may be added to vacation time_____
157. Vacation time may be used as sick leave__________________

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HOLIDAYS AND W EE K -E N D WORK

Observance of holidays:
1. Six holidays to be observed__________________________________
2. Seven general and 13 religious holidays observed_______________
3. Holiday of local importance may be substituted for one of national
holidays_________________________________________________
4. Local practice determines whether certain additional holidays
will be observed__________________________________________
5. All National and State holidays to be observed________________
6. Racial interests considered in designating holidaysto be observed.
7. Religious holidays observed at employee's option______________
8. Victory day to be observed if declared a national holiday_______
9. World War II holiday, if officially declared, substituted for
Armistice D ay____________________________________________
10. Holiday offering longer week end observed____________________
11. Time limits of holiday defined_______
12. Shift schedule determines when holiday begins and ends________
13. Holiday falling on Sunday observed the followingMonday______
14. No premium rate for work on Monday when holiday falls on
Sunday__________________________________________________
15. State or National practice determines day to be observed when
holiday falls on Sunday____________________________________
16. Holiday falling on Saturday observed on preceding day_________
17. Employee granted compensatory time off when holiday falls on his
regular day off____________________________________________
18. Holidays occurring on day when no work is scheduled shall not be
considered holidays_______________________________________




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INDEX

Limitations on holiday work:
19. Work prohibited on specified holidays________________________
20. Work prohibited except by agreement between company and
union____________________________________________________
21. Work permitted, with consent of union, on holidays other than
Labor Day_______________________________________________
22. Sunday and holiday work kept at minimum consistent with
satisfactory service to public_______________________________
23. Company to avoid scheduling work on holidays________________
24. No holiday work except in cases of necessity__________________
25. No employee required to work on holiday unless a majority of
employees in designated unit are required to work______ *____
26. Failure to work on specified holidays not deemed violation of
agreement ______________________________________________
27. No work performed on Labor Day, except by maintenance crew28. Only continuous process operations may be performed on holidays.
29. Employees to receive 3 days’ notice when required to work on
Sundays and holidays_____________________________________
30. Employees to receive 25 hours’ notice when required to work on
Saturday, Sunday, or holidays_____________________________
31. Equal distribution of holiday work___________________________
Making up holidays:
32. Regular rate paid if employee elects to make up time lost on
holiday__________________________________________________
33. Employer may require holiday make-up at regular rate_________
34. Overtime rate required for make-up time______________________
35. Employees not required to make up holidays__________________
36. Holidays may be made up by mutual agreement_______________
37. Employer may request employees to make up time lost owing to
observance of religious holidays____________________________
Holidays with pay:
38. Pay for six holidays not worked______________________________
39. No pay for holidays not worked______________________________
40. All legal holidays may be observed but only four paid holidays. _
41. Employees allowed six and one-half paid holidays with option of
one additional unpaid holiday_____________________________
42. Eight holidays with pay and two holidays without pay_________
43. Two paid holidays and five unpaid holidays___________________
44. Employer to designate any two holidays as paid holidays_______
45. Pay for holidays which fall on Saturday_______________________
46. No pay for holidays observed on Saturday____________________
47. Pay for holidays occurring during leave of absence_____________
48. Paid holidays for part-time employees who work 20 hours or more
per week_________________________________________________
49. No paid holidays for seasonal or part-time employees__________
Computation of pay for holidays not worked:
50. Eight hours’ holiday pay at regular rate for time workers and at
average hourly earningsfor pieceworkers____________________
51. Holiday pay determined by number of hours in employee’s regu­
lar daily schedule_________________________________________
52. Eight hours’ pay regardless of normal scheduled daily hours-----53. Pay for holiday based on percentage of quarterly earnings--------54. Minimum guaranty made where pay is based on percentage of
quarterly earnings------------------------------------------------------------


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56

INDEX

Computation of pay for holidays not worked— Continued
Pag«
55. Holiday pay for pieceworkers computed at guaranteed minimum
rate---------------------38
56. Flat sum payment to each employee__________________________
39
57. Pay or compensatory time off at employer's option when holiday
falls on employee's regular day off__________________________
39
58. No pay for holiday not worked if it falls on employee's regular
day off___________________________________________________
39
Eligibility for pay on holidays not worked:
59. Holiday pay eligibility based on seniority, work schedules, at­
tendance during holiday week, and other specified conditions-39
60. Nc* holiday pay unless employee works day before and day after
the holiday______________________________________________
40
61. Employee qualifies for holiday pay by working 1 day during
holiday week_____________________________________________
40
62. Perfect attendance during holiday week required for holiday pay
eligibility________________________________________________
40
63. Employees on leave of absence eligible for holiday compensation.
40
64. Excusable absence does not deprive employee of holiday pay___
40
65. Six months' service an eligibility requirement for holiday pay___
41
66. Combined service and attendance eligibility requirement_______
41
67. Eligibility requirement less severe for veterans than for other
employees________________________________________________
41
68. Holiday pay prorated according to proportion of week worked___
41
69. Holiday pay forfeited by failure to work on holiday when requested
to do so__________________________________________________
41
Premium rates for work on holidays:
70. Time and one-half paid for work on holidays--------------------------42
71. Double time for holiday work________________________________
42
72. Regular rate plus double time for work on paid holiday_________
42
73. Double time for scheduled holiday work; two and one-half times
42
regular rate for unscheduled holiday work___________________
74. Double time for work on six national holidays; time and one-half
on other holidays_________________________________________
42
75. Double time for work on paid holidays; time and one-half for work
on unpaid holidays________________________________________
43
76. Double-time rate for work on holiday; triple-time rate for work on
holiday falling on Saturday.________________________________
43
77. Time and one-half for first 8 hours on holiday and double time
thereafter___________
43
78. Employee working on holiday has option of extra day's pay or
compensatory day off_____________________
43
79. Eight hours' pay guaranteed when workers called out on Sundays
or holidays_________________________________________
43
80. One-half day's pay guaranteed on Sundays and h o lid a y s-._____
43
81. No holiday premium rate for maintenance and plant protection
employees________________________________________________
43
82. Premium rate required for maintenance work on holidays_______
43
Premium rates and limitations on week-end work:
83. Time and one-half for Saturday, Sunday, and holiday work____
44
84. Double time for Saturday, Sunday, and holiday work__________
44
85. Time and one-half for Saturday work; double time forSunday—
45
86. Time and one-half for first 4 hours of Saturday work; double time
thereafter_________________________________________________
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INDEX

Premium rates and limitations onweek-end work— Continued
87. Time and one-half for 8 hours of work on Saturday; double time
thereafter________________________________________________
88. Time and one-half for sixth consecutive day of workweek; double
time for seventh day______________________________________
89. Premium rate for work on Saturday only when it is the sixth day
of the workweek__________________________________________
90. Premium rate for Saturday waived if absent during week_______
91. Time and one-half for Sunday; double time if Sunday is the
seventh consecutive day________________
92. Time and one-half for first 8 hours on seventh consecutive day;
double time thereafter_____________________________________
93. Time and one-half for Sunday work, except for regularly scheduled
shifts____________________________________________________
94. Premium pay of 10 cents per hour for regularly scheduled Saturday
and Sunday work_________________________________________
95. Premium pay of 10 cents per hour for regularly scheduled Sunday
work_____________________________________________________
96. No Sunday premium-pay for watchmen and maintenance men__
97. Week-end premium-pay provisions do not apply to watchmen and
boilerhouse attendants_____________________________________
98. No premium pay to continuous-process workers for Saturday and
Sunday work as such______________________________________
99. No Sunday premium pay to employe 3S whose regular shift sched­
ule includes Sunday_______________________________________
100. Definition of regularly scheduled Sunday work_________________
101. Saturday and Sunday work prohibited________________________
102. Only necessary work to be performed on Saturdays____________
103. No week-end or holiday work except with permission of union_
104. Sunday and holiday work to be distributed among all employees__
Eligibility for premium pay on week ends:
105. Absences for specified reasons counted as time worked in deter­
mining sixth and seventh day of workweek__________________
106. Part day worked considered full day worked in computing eligi­
bility for sixth and seventh workday premium p a y __________
107. Maximum allowance of 2 days’ absence in determining sixth and
seventh days of workweek_________________________________
108. Unexcused absence during week cancels right to premium pay on
sixth day_________________________________________________
109. Employer may require unexcused absence to be made up on
Saturday without payment of premium rates________________




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