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Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee
801 Ninth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20220

CCAC

November 25, 2013
The Honorable Jack Lew
Secretary of the Treasury
Department of the Treasury
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20220
Dear Secretary Lew:
A public meeting of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (Committee) was held on
Friday, November 22, 2013, at United States Mint Headquarters in Washington, DC. The
Committee reviewed proposed designs for the reverse of the 2014 American Eagle Platinum
Coin. The theme for this coin is “To Secure the Blessings of Liberty to Ourselves and Our
Posterity” and is the sixth in a six year series of themes for American Eagle Platinum coins
commemorating the core concepts of American ideals highlighted in the Preamble of the U.S.
Constitution.
The Committee recommended design AEP-R-11 showing a “Young Liberty” carrying the torch
of freedom high. A rising sun over a gentle landscape is shown in the background symbolizing
a bright future. The Committee felt the design was well executed and was emblematically
suited for the theme of “Securing the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity”.
Committee members also said they felt the design would matched well, from a design
perspective, with the previous five years of platinum issues, all highlighting the core concepts
of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution. Members felt the complete six-year set, with the
recommended design for 2014, would make an attractive assemblage.
The design garnered 23 of the 30 possible points through the Committee’s scoring process.
Members commented on the successful balance of image and negative space and that it would
create a beautiful and fitting image for the reverse of the coin.
Sincerely,

Gary B. Marks
Chair

Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee
801 Ninth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20220

CCAC

November 25, 2013
The Honorable Jack Lew
Secretary of the Treasury
Department of the Treasury
1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, D.C. 20220
Dear Secretary Lew:
A public meeting of the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (Committee) was held on
Friday, November 22, 2013, at United States Mint Headquarters in Washington, DC. The
Committee reviewed proposed obverse and reverse designs for the 2014 First Spouse Gold
Coin and Medal Program honoring Florence Harding, Grace Coolidge, Lou Hoover and
Eleanor Roosevelt.
For the coin and medal honoring Florence Harding, the Committee recommended obverse
design FH-O-02. The design received 23 of a possible 30 points through the Committee’s
evaluation process. Reverse design FH-R-06 garnered 28 of a possible 30 points and,
therefore, is submitted with a strong recommendation by the Committee.
Among the proposed designs honoring Grace Coolidge, the Committee recommended obverse
design GC-O-02. The design received 24 of 30 possible points. Reverse design GC-R-03
tallied a score of 29 of 30 possible points and is forwarded with the Committee’s strong
recommendation. The design honors Mrs. Coolidge for her work advocating for the deaf and
hard of hearing. The design depicts three hands finger-spelling the letters USA in American
Sign Language against the backdrop of the White House. Committee members felt the design
was interesting and well executed and addresses an important contribution by Grace Coolidge.
For the obverse of the coin honoring Lou Hoover, the Committee recommended LH-O-04.
The design received 20 of 30 possible points. Reverse design LH-R-04 earned the
Committee’s recommendation with a strong 28 of the possible 30 points. The design shows a
late 1920’s radio representing Mrs. Hoover’s first public address as First Lady, the first First
Lady to do so.
For the coin and medal honoring Eleanor Roosevelt, the Committee recommended obverse
design ER-O-04 by assigning it 21 of the possible 30 points. For the reverse design, the
Committee gave 27 of 30 possible points to design ER-R-03 and, therefore, forwards it with a
strong recommendation. The design pays tribute to Mrs. Roosevelt by highlighting her life’s
work and the global impact of her humanitarian initiatives. The design symbolically shows her
hand lighting a candle. A glowing light rises over a stylized graphic of the Earth’s curved
horizon. The design was inspired by Adlai Stevenson’s quote about Mrs. Roosevelt after her

death that, “She would rather light a candle than curse the darkness, and her glow has warmed
the world.”
Sincerely,

Gary B. Marks
Chair