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Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee
Public Meeting
Monday, April 19, 2013, 9:30 AM
United State Mint Headquarters
801 9th Street NW, 2nd Floor Conference Room
Washington, D.C.
In attendance:
Erik Jansen
Gary Marks (Chair)
Michael Moran
Michael Olson
Michael Ross
Donald Scarinci
Jeanne Stevens-Sollman
Thomas Uram
Heidi Wastweet
1. Chairperson Marks called the meeting to order at 9:12 A.M.
2. The letters and minutes of the March 11, 2012 meeting were unanimously
approved.
3. April Stafford of the United States Mint presented the candidate reverse designs
for the 2014 Presidential $1 Coin Program.
4. After each member had commented on the candidate designs, Committee
members rated proposed designs by assigning 0, 1, 2, or 3 points to each, with
higher points reflecting more favorable evaluations. With nine (9) members
voting, the maximum possible point total was twenty-seven (27). The
committee’s scores for the 2014 Presidential $1 Coin Program:
Warren G. Harding Obverse:
WH-01: 0
WH-02: 1
WH-03: 15
WH-04: 0
WH-05: 0
WH-06: 4
WH-07: 21 (Recommended design)
Calvin Coolidge Obverse:
CC-01: 0
CC-02: 0
CC-03: 6

CC-04: 8
CC-05: 0
CC-06: 19 (Recommended design)
Herbert Hoover Obverse:
HH-01: 12
HH-02: 5
HH-03: 2
HH-04: 0
HH-05: 17 (Recommended design)
HH-06: 3
HH-07: 2
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Obverse:
FDR-01: 17 (Recommended design)
FDR-02: 11
FDR-03: 0
FDR-04: 0
FDR-05: 0
FDR-06: 10
FDR-07: 1
FDR-08: 0
5. April Stafford of the United States Mint presented the candidate reverse designs
for the 2013 First Spouse Gold Coin and Medal Program honoring Edith Wilson.
6. After each member had commented on the candidate designs, Committee
members rated proposed designs by assigning 0, 1, 2, or 3 points to each, with
higher points reflecting more favorable evaluations. With nine (9) members
voting, the maximum possible point total was twenty-seven (27). The
committee’s scores for the Edith Wilson reverse for the 2013 First Spouse Gold
Coin and Medal Program were:
Edith Wilson Reverse:
EdW-R-01: 1
EdW-R-02: 0
EdW-R-03: 0
EdW-R-04: 0
EdW-R-05: 26 (Recommended design)
EdW-R-06: 1
EdW-R-07: 10
7. April Stafford of the United States Mint presented proposed themes for the 2014
First Spouse Bullion Coin Program. Proposed themes included the following:
Florence Harding

•
•
•

Inventing the idea of paper routes for schoolboys.
Being the first First Spouse to be able to vote for husband for President of
the United States.
Supporting servicemen and veterans during World War I by visiting
wounded soldiers and sailors and addressing issues for servicemen and
their families.

Grace Coolidge
• Her work serving the deaf and hard-of-hearing.
• Her keeping of a number of pets at the White House including a raccoon
and a white collie.
• Promotion of several causes including Easter Seals, the Red Cross, Girl
Scouts and Boy Scouts.
• Her love for baseball.
Lou Hoover
• Being the first woman to graduate with a degree in geology from Stanford
University.
• Her early married years in China, including help rendered to hospitals
during the Boxer Rebellion.
• Her service as president of the Girl Scouts of the United States.
• For her invitation to the wife of U.S. Representative Oscar DePriest (the
first African-American to be elected to Congress since Reconstruction
from outside the South.
• Being the first First Spouse to give a public address by radio.
Eleanor Roosevelt
• Considered the eyes, ears and feet for her partially paralyzed husband.
• Her reporting directly to the President regarding her many trips.
• Her service as Delegate to the United Nations.
• Took many stands against injustice in the United States, including
resigning from the Daughters of the American Revolution in protest of the
denial of the request for the great contralto, Marian Anderson, to sing in
Constitution Hall because of her race.
• Visited the homeless on the streets and worked in soup kitchens.
• Held her own weekly radio addresses and spoke about the bombing of
Pearl Harbor before her husband addressed the nation.
• Wrote the popular column “My Day”.
• Started a business at her home that manufactured furniture to provide jobs
during the depression.
Committee members discussed the above listed proposed themes and provided
input.

8. April Stafford of the United States Mint presented the candidate designs for the
Code Talker Recognition Congressional Medal Program (Muscogee Creek
Nation).
9. After each member had commented on the candidate designs, Committee
members rated proposed designs by assigning 0, 1, 2, or 3 points to each, with
higher points reflecting more favorable evaluations. With nine (9) members
voting, the maximum possible point total was twenty-seven (27). The
committee’s scores for the Muscogee Creek Nation Code Talker Recognition
Congressional Medal were:
Obverse-01: 14
Obverse-02: 5
Obverse-03: 22 (Recommended design)
Reverse-01: 13
Reverse-02: 24 (Recommended design)
Reverse-03: 9
Reverse-04: 1
10. After Mr. Marks reviewed the contents of the Committee’s Fiscal Year 2012
Annual Report, a motion was made by Mr. Moran and seconded by Ms. StevensSollman to replace the recommendation in the FY2012 Annual Report for a
commemorative coin program honoring fallen firefighters in 2017 with a
commemorative program honoring the 150th anniversary of the acquisition of
Alaska by the United States. The motion was unanimously approved.
11. The Committee discussed Resolution 2013-01; a resolution proposing an
American Liberty Commemorative Coinage Program. Mr. Moran said the
program envisions the introduction of a circulating commemorative dime and
quarter and a numismatic half dollar; each bearing new images of “Liberty”.
Each year, one denomination, either the dime or quarter, would be issued with a
new image representing Liberty, alongside the regular presidential design for that
denomination. The series is proposed to begin with a Liberty Dime issued
alongside the Roosevelt Dime in 2015. At the end of that year, the Liberty Dime
would be retired as a one-year issue. In 2016, a Liberty Quarter would be issued
alongside the Washington Quarter. As with the Dime, the Liberty Quarter would
be retired at the end of the year and the Washington Quarter would continue on as
the regular quarter dollar design. The process would begin again in 2017 with the
introduction of a new one-year Liberty Dime (bearing a new Liberty design) that,
once again, would be co-issued alongside the regular issue Roosevelt Dime. In
2018, a new one-year Liberty Quarter would be co-issued and the process would
continue on a perpetual basis into future years.
12. After members had discussed the American Liberty Commemorative Coinage
Program, and Chairperson Marks had read Resolution 2013-01 into the record, a

motion was made by Mr. Moran, and seconded by Mr. Olson to approve the
resolution as presented. The motion was unanimously approved. Subsequently, a
motion was made by Mr. Moran, and seconded by Mr. Jansen, that Chairperson
Marks appoint an American Liberty Commemorative Coinage Program
Subcommittee to report periodically to the Committee on the progress of the
Liberty coinage effort. The motion was unanimously approved.
13. Chairperson Marks recessed the meeting at 12:08 p.m.
14. Chairperson Marks called the meeting back to order at 1:36 p.m.
15. April Stafford of the United States Mint introduced a discussion on proposed
themes for the Fallen Heroes of 9/11 Congressional Gold Medal. Liaisons from
the three 9/11 sites, inclusive of the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania,
the National September 11th Memorial and Museum in New York, and the
Pentagon Memorial at the Pentagon, were present at the meeting and offered
comments and insights regarding the medals to be produced through the program.
The Liaisons included Sandy Felt, Laurie Laychak, Megan Sullivan, Carole
O’Hare, Paula Jacobs and Kathy Dillaber.
16. Members of the Committee commented that the designs for the 9/11 medals
needed to bring dignity to the subject matter and use iconic images that speak to
the subject at a higher level than merely illustrating images from photographs.
Committee members suggested that artists be allowed to travel to the 9/11 sites
and experience those locations as a means of gaining insight and inspiration.
Members suggested themes that convey valor, honor, taking action, unity,
resilience and going beyond.
17. There being no further business, Chairperson Marks adjourned the meeting at
2:19 p.m.