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57th C o n g r e s s , } HOUSE O F R E P R E S E N T A T IV E S ./D oc. No. 377,
1st Session. )
(
Part 5.

BULLETIN

OF THE

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

NO. 42—SEPTEMBER, 1902.




ISSUED EVERY OTHER MONTH.

W A S H IN G T O N :
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1902.

EDITOR,

CARROLL D. W RIG H T,
COMMISSIONER.

ASSOCIATE EDITORS,

g

:

w

.

w

.

hanger

,

CHAS. H. V E R R ILL, G. A. W EBER.




CONTENTS.
Page.

Statistics of cities...................................................................................................... 881-1055
Labor conditions in C u ba......................................................................................
1056
Agreements between employers and em p loyees............................................. 1057-1068
Digest of recent reports of State bureaus of labor statistics:
Louisiana...........................................................................................................
1069
Maryland........................................................................................................... 1070,1071
New Jersey....................................................................................................... 1071-1075
Reports of State boards of arbitration................................................................ 1075,1076
Digest of recent foreign statistical publications................................................. 1077-1093
Decisions of courts affecting la b o r ...................................................................... 1094-1126
Laws of various States relating to labor enacted since January 1,1896___ 1127-1146




in




BULLETIN
OF THE

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
No. 42.

W ASH IN G TO N .

Septem ber,

1902.

STATISTICS OF CITIES.
By an act o f Congress, which was approved and became law July 1,
1898, the Commissioner o f Labor was called upon to make an investi­
gation annually into the statistics o f the cities of the United States
having over 30,000 population. The paragraph of the act referred to
is as follows:
The Commissioner o f Labor is authorized to compile and publish
annually, as a part o f the Bulletin o f the Department o f Labor, an
abstract o f the main features o f the official statistics o f the cities o f
the United States having over 30,000 population.
In accordance with this act a compilation was attempted from the
printed reports o f various cities, but owing to lack o f uniformity in
these reports, and in many cases to the lack o f reports themselves, it
was found impossible to make such a classification o f the various items
relating to the governmental, financial, and other conditions o f these
cities as seemed necessary fo r a satisfactory comparison. A schedule
o f inquiries was therefore prepared and the work taken up by the
special agents o f the Department. This required personal visits to
the various officials o f the cities coming within the scope o f the investi­
gation. These officials in many ways manifested the utmost interest
in the investigation, and contributed freely o f their time and labor in
compiling the data desired and in making the report a success. The
results were printed in the Bulletin o f the Department o f Labor fo r
September, 1899.
A s will be seen by reference to the language o f the law'which has
been quoted, provision is made fo r a similar inquiry each year. In
the second report, which appeared in the Bulletin o f the Department
o f Labor fo r September, 1900, an effort was made to enlarge somewhat
upon the first, and to change slightly some o f the inquiries in order to
881



882

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

secure fuller information on the subjects covered. The third report
o f the series was published in September, 1901, and while it was not
thought necessary to repeat the investigation o f the preceding year
relative to the nonmunicipal libraries, charities, etc., it was deemed
desirable to increase somewhat the scope o f some o f the inquiries and
m odify certain classifications in the interest o f a more ready compar­
ison from year to year o f the cities included in the report. The
report for the present year has also been expanded to some extent by
the inclusion o f additional data. In other respects, however, it is
similar to the reports fo r previous years, and no difficulty will be
found in making comparisons in regard to the subjects covered. The
thanks o f the Department are due to the officials o f the various cities
which were visited fo r their cordial cooperation in the effort to reduce
the official records to such form as seemed necessary for satisfactory
comparison. It is hoped that experience will render this task easier
each year.
The first report, contained in the Bulletin for September, 1899,
included 140 cities, this being the number in the United States which
were at that time believed to have a population o f 80,000 or over.
The results o f the Twelfth Census regarding the population o f cities
were not available when the data were collected for the second report,
which appeared in the Bulletin fo r September, 1900, but according to
the best estimates that could be secured the Department considered
itself justified in including but 129 cities. Joliet, 111., however, was
w rongly included, it being shown by the corrected census returns to
have less than 80,000 population; while several cities, which were
supposed, when the data for that report were collected, to have less
than 80,000 population, were shown to have more than that number.
This information, however, came too late to permit their inclusion in
the report. The follow ing cities were thus omitted: Montgomery,
A la .; Fitchburg and Newton, M ass.; Bayonne, N. J . ; Schenectady,
N. Y ., and Chester and Y ork, Pa. The third report included 135
cities—all o f the cities shown by the results o f the Twelfth Census to
have had a population o f over 30,000. In the report for the present
year two cities have been added— East St. Louis and Joliet, 111.—as it
is believed that their population now exceeds 30,000. These additions
bring the number o f cities included in the present report up to 137.
The titles o f the twenty-five tables embraced in the present report
are as follows:
T able I.— Incorporation, population, and area.
T able II.— Dates of ending of years covered b y the investigation.
T able I II.—Police, retail liquor saloons, and arrests, by causes.
T able IV .— Firemen, fire equipment, and property loss from fires.
T able V .—Marriages, divorces, and births.
T able V I.—Deaths, by causes.
T able V II.—Percentage of deaths from each specified cause.




STATISTICS OF CITIES.

883

T able V III.—Death rate per 1,000 population, b y causes.
T able I X .— Death rate per 1,000 population.
T able X .—Area of public parks and miles of streets, sewers, and street railways.
T able X I .—Care of streets, food and sanitary inspection, and disposal of garbage
and other refuse.
T able X I I .—Number and kind of street lights
T able X I I I .—Public schools.
T able X I V .— Public libraries.
T a b l e X V .— Charities: Almshouses, orphan asylums, and hospitals.
T able X V I .— Cost of water, gas, and electric-light plants owned and operated by
cities.
T able X V I I .—Building permits.
T able X V I I I .—Debt and legal borrowing limit.
T able X I X . —Basis of assessment, assessed valuation of property, and taxation
T able X X . — Receipts from all sources.
T able X X I .—Expenditures for construction and other capital outlay.
T able X X I I .— Expenditures for maintenance and operation.
T able X X I I I .—Summary of receipts and expenditures.
T able X X I V .— Assets.
T able X X V .— Per capita debt, assessed valuation of property, and expenditures
for maintenance.

These tables, which immediately follow the discussion o f the same,
will be taken up in order and a short analysis and explanation o f each
will be presented. A t the same time there will be given information
as to the changes from last year which have been adopted in the
preparation o f this year’s report.
Table I — Incorporation, population, and area.— In this table, as in
the remaining twenty-four tables, the 137 cities in the United States
having a population o f 30,000 or over are presented in the order o f
their population at the Twelfth Census, the largest being placed first.
The latest date o f incorporation o f each o f the cities under the present
limits o f territory is first given, followed by the population at the
Twelfth United States Census, June 1, 1900. This census popula­
tion is used only as the basis fo r arrangement and is followed by
the estimated population January 1, 1902.
This estimate, which
must be accepted as such, represents the closest approximation to the
actual population that could be secured after consultation with city
officers and investigation o f all available data. This table also pre­
sents information as to the area in acres o f each o f the cities, sub­
divided as to land and water wherever possible. Lack o f official
records as to area rendered anything but an estimate impossible in
some cities, but the greatest care has been exercised in such cases to
have these estimates approximate accuracy as closely as possible. No
subdivision o f the area o f cities into land and water was made in the
first two annual reports on this subject.
Table I I — Dates o f ending o f years covered by the investigation.— As
regards the dates o f ending o f the years covered by the investigation,
it is necessary to say that in most o f the cities investigated the various



884

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

departments o f the city government, such as fire, police, street, etc.,
made their reports for a different year, one department having Decem­
ber 31 as the end o f its statistical year, while the others had their
years end on other dates. It was thought important, in connection
with the study o f the data included in the various tables, to furnish a
statement as to the dates o f ending o f the years for which the informa­
tion is given. W here but a single date is given under this heading all
the various city departments close their year on the same day. Where
the year o f the various departments ended on different dates all the
necessary information as to the ending o f the same is furnished in this
column. A ll data in the tables (with the exception of those which are
noted) cover one year’s transactions, and that the last year for which
the facts were obtainable. It is interesting to note in this connection
that in but 11 o f the 137 cities included in this report have all o f the
various departments o f city activity had their business year end on the
same day. In all o f the other cities business years ending on two or
more different dates have been used. Not only would the labor of
collecting and com piling the data necessary to these reports be greatly
lessened in each city by the adoption o f a uniform business year by all
o f its departments, but it is believed that the accounts and transactions
o f the city itself would be much simplified thereby.
Table I I I — P olice, retail liquor saloons, and arrests, by causes.— This
table shows the number o f policemen in each o f the cities, the number
including not only patrolmen, but officers, such as sergeants, lieuten­
ants, etc. Persons employed as messengers, matrons, janitors, drivers,
etc.., are not included. In this table is shown also the number o f
licensed retail liquor saloons, together with the amount o f the license
fee, and, immediately follow ing, the number o f arrests. The licensed
retail liquor saloons reported do not include clubs, drug stores, etc.
The arrests are classified according to the causes for which persons
were arrested, as drunkenness, disturbing the peace, assault and bat­
tery, homicide, vagrancy, housebreaking, and larceny. The arrests fo r
other causes are given under 6 A ll other offenses,” which is followed by
6
a column showing the total arrests for all offenses. It was found that
there was no uniform classification o f offenses causing arrest in the
various cities, different cities entering a different charge for a similar
offense. Hence the follow ing statement is given to show what offenses
were combined in each item o f the classification in the table: Drunk­
enness includes “ common drunk,” “ drunk and disorderly,” and all
cases where drunkenness in any form was the primary cause o f arrest;
disturbing the peace includes all cases o f disorderly conduct not attrib­
utable to drunkenness; assault and battery includes all cases o f assault;
vagrancy includes arrest o f beggars, tramps, loafers, loiterers, and all
persons without apparent means o f support; housebreaking includes
burglary and all cases o f breaking and entering, and larceny includes
pocket picking, robbery, and all cases o f theft.



STATISTICS OF CITIES.

885

Table I V .— Firem en, fir e equipment, and property loss fro m fires. —
The number o f firemen in each o f the cities is given in this table,
classified as to whether they are regulars, call men, or volunteers.
These numbers include the officers o f the fire department in the differ­
ent grades, as well as the actual firemen, but do not include messen­
gers, janitors, etc. This table also goes quite fully into the equipment
o f the fire departments in the various cities, showing the number o f
steam, hand, and chemical engines, and o f combination chemical en­
gines and hose wagons, and the number o f hand fire extinguishers, fire
boats, hook and ladder trucks, hose reels and hose wagons, fire hydrants,
water towers, horses, and fire-alarm boxes. In addition to this infor­
mation, data are also given as to the total length o f ladders and hose
belonging to the various fire departments o f the cities investigated.
The table closes with statements showing the number o f fire alarms,
the number o f fires, and the total property loss from the same. The
number o f fire alarms does not include duplicate alarms sent in from
different points, and a first and second alarm fo r a single fire have
been considered one alarm. It should also be stated that two or more
buildings burned as a result o f one fire have been considered one fire.
Table V.— M arriages, divorces, and births.— This table is similar to
that used in the report fo r last year, with the addition o f a column
showing the number o f divorces granted. The table shows the total
number o f marriage licenses issued, number o f marriages, number o f
divorces granted, number o f male and female births, the total births
and birth rate per 1,000 population, and the number o f stillbirths.
The figures showing the birth, rate per 1,000 population are based on
the estimated population January 1, 1902, as shown in Table I. In
bringing the figures for the various cities into comparison it will be
noted that in some cities the number o f marriages is largely in excess
o f what might naturally be expected. This in some cases is accounted
for by the fact that the city is located near the border o f another
State in which the marriage-license laws are more exacting, and that
many persons consequently repair to the city for the purpose o f being
married in order to secure the benefit o f the more liberal conditions
offered there. The reverse o f these conditions accounts in some cases
fo r the small number o f marriages in other cities.
Table V I.— Deaths, by causes.— It was found during this investiga­
tion, by an examination o f the various city reports, that in almost
every city a different classification o f the causes o f death was used in
making the official statement o f deaths. It was apparent that these
classifications, differing so widely, could not be used, inasmuch as the
value o f the data concerning this feature o f city supervision consists
mainly in the comparison afforded as to the number o f deaths from the
same cause in each o f the cities investigated. In the first two reports
on statistics o f cities a uniform classification was o f course adopted,



886

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

but as this was not entirely satisfactory for the purpose o f comparison
with other collections o f statistics o f mortality, the Department last
year adopted a modified form o f the Bertillon classification, which has
been adhered to in the present report. This classification was officially
approved and adopted b y the International Congress o f Hygiene and
Demography in August, 1900, and is now being used by a number o f
cities in this country and b y some States in the classification o f their
mortality statistics. A s its more general adoption is probable, not
only in this country, but abroad, it has been deemed wise to adopt this
classification here. The full official nomenclature upon which the
modified form is based has been published as a supplement to the Pub­
lic Health Reports (Vol. X V , No. 49, December 7, 1900) by the United
States Marine-Hospital Service o f the Treasury Department.
The proportionately large number o f deaths in some o f the Southern
cities is undoubtedly accounted fo r by the fact that the population is
largely made up o f colored people, among whom the death rate is much
higher than among the white population. W hile no classification o f
deaths has been made as between white and colored in Table V I, it has
been found possible to do so in the follow ing series o f short tables
covering a number o f cities having a large colored population. In
these tables the figures fo r white and colored population upon which
the results are based are computed on the basis o f the proportion of
each shown at the date o f the Twelfth Census.
DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR.

B A L T IM O R E , M B .
[Population: White, 438,531; colored, 81,469; total, 520,000.]
Colored.

White.
Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

I ll
20
3
11
35
159
96
45
45
28
781
161
319
170
137
309
127
173
145
199
760
133
406
190
534
75

Cause of death.

Typhoid fe v e r ............................................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h .......................................
Diphtheria and. c r o u p ..............................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis............................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years) ..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or o v e r ).




Total.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

0.25
.05

31
15

0.38
.18

142
35

0.27
.07

.61
.03
.08
.36
.22
.10
.10
.06
1.78
.37
.73
.39
.31
.70
.29
.39
.33
.45
1.73
.30
.93
.43
1.22
.17

28
12
32
4
6
13
357
89
39
35
27
85
53
59
28
95
387
42
127
60
192
13 I
1

.34
.15
.39
.05
.07
.16
4.38
1.09
.48
.43
.33
1.04
.65
.72
.34
1.17
4.75
.52
1.56
.61
2.36
.16

3
11
63
171
128
49
61
41
1,138
250
358
205
164
394
180
232
173
294
147
175
533
240
726
88

.01
.02
.12
.33
.25
.09
.10
.08
2.19
.48
.69
.39
.31
.76
.35
.45
.33
.56
2.21
.34
1.02
.46
1.40
.17

Death
rate per
1,000.

887

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

B A L T IM O R E , MD.—Concluded.
White.

Colored.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis................................................ .
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases o f digestive system..........
Bright’s disease.........................................
Other diseases o f genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system ..................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other m alformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile d ebility............................................
S u icid e.......................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

79
39
49
261
461
138
44
47
24
18

Total..................................................

Cause of death.

Total.
Death
rate per
i .O O
O

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

0.18
.09
.11
.60
1.05
.32
.10
.11
.06
.04

11
9
8
46
149
44
11
24
9
5

0.14
.11
.10
.57
1.83
.54
.14
.30
.11
.06

90
48
57
307
610
182
55
71
33
23

0.17
.09
.11
.59
1 17
.35
.11
.14
.06
.04

15
645
328
53
381
102

.03
1.47
.75
.12
.87
.23

1
290
45
4
103
45

.01
3.56
.55
.05
1.27
.55

16
935
373
57
484
147

.03
1.80
.72
.11
.93
.28

7,856

17.91

2,623

32.20

10,479

20.15

N EW O RLEAN S, L A .
[Population: White, 218,331; colored, 81,669; total, 300,000.]
Typhoid fe v e r ......................... .................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping co u g h .......................................
Diphtheria and c ro u p ..............................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicaemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis.....................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system^___
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system .
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other m alformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
Suicide.........................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases.....................................
Total..................................................




.24
.06
.16
.25
.25
.08
.18
2.09
.22
.j
67
.44
.34
.82
.16
.13
.59
.32
1.21
.20
1.42
.44
.95
.33
.17
.08
.09
.68
1.23
.25
.10
.09
.06
.01

41
46
41
1
9
10
6
23
22
9
20
429
37
60
36
40
78
23
38
78
49
222
30
211
40
93
33
10
9
6
36
161
36
.10
10
10
4

0.50
.56
.50
.01
.11
.12
.07
.28
.27
.11
.25
5.25
.45
.74
.44
.49
.96
.28
.47
i 96
.60
2.72
.37
2.58
.49
1.14
.40
.12
.11
.07
.44
1.97
.44
.12
.12
.12
.05

141
116
52
1
62
22
41
77
76
27
60
886
85
206
133
115
257
58
67
207
119
485
74
520
137
300
106
48
26
25
185
429
91
31
30
23
6

0.47
.39
.17
.01
.21
.07
.14
.26
.25
.09
.20
2.95
.28
.69
.44
.38
.86
.19
.22
.69
.40
1.62
.25
1.73
.46
1.00
.35
.16
.08
.08
.62
1.43
.30
.10
.10
.07
.02

21
99
189
28
270
123

.10
.45
.87
.13
1.24
.56

11
50
96
4
158
105

.14
.61
1.18
.05
1.94
1.29

32
149
285
32
428
228

.11
.50
.95
.11
1.43
.76

4,037

18.49

2,441

29.89

6,478 1

21.59.

100
70
11

0.46
.32
.05

53
12
35
54
54
18
40
457
48
146
97
75
179
35
29
129
70
263
44
309
97
207
73
38
17
19
149
268
55
21
20
13
2

888

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT *OF LABOR.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

W ASH IN GTON , D. C.
[Population: White, 197,223; colored, 89,777; total, 287,000.]
White.
Cause of death.

Colored.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Typhoid fe v e r...........................................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h .......................................
Diphtheria and cro u p ..............................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis.....................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.........t............................
Senile d ebility..............I............................
Suicide.........................................................
Accident.....................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

I ll
21

Total..................................................

Total.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

0.56
.11

82
27

0.91
.30

193
48

0.67
.17

11
7
26
57
119
15
16
11
395
&
5
137
111
84
198
34
36
137
49
206
87
222
100
159
58
29
13
18
124
173
69
11
18
16
4

.06
.04
.13
.29
.60
.08
.08
.06
2.00
.18
.69
.56
.43
1.00
.17
.18
.69
.25
1.04
.44
1.13
.51
.81
.29
.15
.07
.09
.63
.88
.35
.06
.09
.08
.02

6

.07

48
29
62
17
7
8
476
27
57
34
23
108
17
57
46
66
291
50
167
45
211
12
11
10
9
58
108
68
8
18
15
13

.53
.32
.69
.19
.08
.09
5.30
.30
.64
.38
.26
1.20
.19
.64
.51
.74
3.24
.56
1.86
.50
2.35
.13
.12
.11
.10
.65
1.20
.76
.09
.20
.17
.15

17
7
74
86
181
32
23
19
871
62
194
145
107
306
51
93
183
115
497
137
389
145
370
70
40
23
27
182
281
137
19
36
31
17

.06
.02
.26
.30
.63
.11
.08
.07
3.03
.22
.68
.50
.37
1.07
.18
.32
.64
.40
1.73
.48
1.35
.50
1.29
.24
.14
.08
.09
.63
.98
.48
.07
.13
.11
.06

4
216
117
31
143
2

.02
1.09
.59
.16
.72
.01

4
205
60
7
83
7

.04
2.28
.67
.08
.92
.08

8
421
177
38
226
9

.03
1.47
.62
.13
.79
.03

3,430

17.39

2,657

29.60

6,087

21.21

121
15
2
2
3
6
53
50
37
8
5
423
39
109
64
89
121
105
82
56
95
332

0.56
.07
.01
.01
.01
.03
.25
.23
.17
.04
.02
1.97
.18
.51
.30
.41
.56
.49
.38
.26
.44
1.65

Death
rate per
1,000.

L O U ISV IL L E , K ¥ .
[Population: White, 173,895; colored, 41,105; total, 215,000.]
Typhoid fe v e r ............................................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h ........................... ..........
Diphtheria and c r o u p ..............................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis.....................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___




86
8
1
1
3
2
43
32
27
7
4
310
24
91
45
68
100
78
60
38
65
229

0.49
.05
.01
.01
.02
.01
.25
.18
.16
.04
.02
1.78
.14
.52
.26
.39
.58
.45
.34
.22
.37
1.32

35
7
1
1

0.85
.17
.02
.02

4
10
18
10
1
1
113
15
18
19
21
21
27
22
18
30
103

.10
.24
.44
.24
.02
.02
2.75
.37
.44
.46
.51
.51
.66
.54
.44
.73
2.51

889

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

LO U ISV IL L E , K Y .—Concluded.
Total.

Colored.

White.
Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases o f digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system..................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
S uicide.......................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

89
116
91
95
9
32
28
13
75
135
38
4
38
4
5

0.51
.67
.52
.55
.05
.18
.16
.07
.43
.78
.22
.02
.22
.02
.03

1
157
169
21
112
8

.01
.90
.97
.12
.64
.05

20
61
41
10
6
16
17
2
23
43
6
5
2
3
2
3

0.49
1.48
1.00
.24
.15
.39
.41
.05
.56
1.05
.15
.12
.05
.07
.05
.07

75
36
5
53
11

Total..................................................

2,562

14.73

935

Cause of death.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

1.82
.88
.12
1.29
.27

109
177
132
105
15
48
45
15
98
178
44
9
40
7
7
3
1
232
205
26
165
19

0.61
.82
.61
.49
.07
.22
.21
.07
.46
.83
.21
.04
.19
.03
.03
.01
.01
1.08
.95
.12
.77
.09

22.75

3,497

16.27

44
121
11

0.41
1.13
.10
.06
.02
.05
.35
.36
.10
.25
2.22
.20
.33
.29
.36
.27
.20
.26
.22
.23
1.40
.20
.46
.14
.85
.38
.10
.29
.17
.32
1.20
.06
.17
.06
.03
.01

M E M P H IS , TENN.
[Population: White, 55,032; colored, 52,468; total, 107,500.]
Typhoid fever.............................................
Malaria.......................................................
S m allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping cough........................................
Diphtheria and c r o u p ..............................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases o f nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic...................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years). . .
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction............
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system..
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor svstem ...................
Hydrocephalus.......... *..............................
Other m alformations................................
Infantile diseases......................................
Senile d ebility............................................
Suicide.........................................................
A ccident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases.....................................

26
44
7

0.47
.80
.13

6
1
5
12
18
8
15
89
13
16
17
21
18
8
1
12
4
65
9
33
8
65
22
5
17
16
19
74
3
6
4
1

.11
.02
.09
.22
.33
.14
.27
1.62
.24
.29
.31
.38
.33
.14
.02
.22
.07
1.18
.16
.60
.14
1.18
.40
.09
.31
.29
.34
1.34
.06
.11
.07
.02

3
18
24
15
83
51

Total..................................................

882




18
77
4

0.34
1.47
.08

1

.02

26
21
3
12
150
9
20
14
18
11
14
27
12
21
86
13
16
7
26
19
6
14
2
15
55
3
12
2
2
1

.49
.40
.06
.23
2.86
.17
.38
.27
.34
.21
.27
.51
.23
.40
1.64
.25
.31
.13
.49
.36
.11
.27
.04
.29
1.05
.06
.23
.04
.04
.02

6
2
5
38
39
11
27
239
22
36
31
39
29
22
28
24
25
151
22
49
15
91
41
11
31
18
34
129
6
18
6
3
1

.06
.33
.44
.27
1.51
.93

26
19
1
92
169

.49
.36
.02
1.75
3.22

3
44
43
16
175
220

.03
.41
.40
.15
1.63
2.05

16.03

1,044

19.90

1,926

17.92

890

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

AT LA N T A , G A .
[Population: White, 56,574; colored, 37,426; total, 94,000.]

Deaths.

Typhoid fe v e r ................................ ...........
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fev er...............................................
Whooping c o u g h .......................................
Diphtheria and croup................................
Grippe.................... .* .................................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer................................... ....................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 y ears)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases.........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
S uicid e.......................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...........................•
____
Total..................................................

Total.

Colored.

White.
Cause of death.

Death
rate per
1,000.

27
1
1
6
18
4
11
19
14
5
12
83

0.48
.02
.02
.11
.32
.07
.19
.34
.25
.09
.21
1.47

21
19
16
53
21
27
15
6
64
20
40
16
22
50
3
14
3
23
47
12
1
2
2

.37
.34
.28
.94
.37
.48
.26
.11
1.13
.35
.71
.28
.39
.88
.05
.25
.05
.41
.83
.21
.02
.03
.03

1
1
33
7
1
45
58
844

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

31
11

0.83
.29

12
2
11
13
18
13
4
13
135

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

.32
.05
.29
.35
.48
.35
.11
.35
3.61

58
12
1
18
20
15
24
37
27
9
25
218

0.62
.13
.01
.19
.21
.16
.26
.39
.29
.10
.27
2.32

.02
.02
.58
.12
.02
.80
1.02

13
28
17
19
39
36
13
23
179
8
52
22
49
38
8
12
1
31
17
11
1
3
1
1
1
1
50
10
1
41
98

.35
.75
.45
.51
1.04
.96
.35
.61
4.78
.21
1.39
.59
1.31
1.01
.21
.32
.03
.83
.45
.29
.03
.08
.03
.03
.03
.03
1.33
.27
.03
1.09
2.62

34
47
33
72
60
63
28
29
243
28
92
38
71
88
11
26
4
54
64
23
2
5
3
1
2
2
83
17
2
86
156

.36
.50
.35
.77
.64
.67
.30
.31
2.58
.30
.98
.40
.76
.94
.12
.28
.04
.57
.68
.24
.02
.05
.03
.01
.02
.02
.88
.18
.02
.91
1.66

14.92

1,087

29.04

1,931

20.54

0.29
.52

32
22

0.35
.24

35
11
44
19
14
16
161
111
47
32
36
76
63
42
53
42
185
84
103

.38
.12
.48
.21
.15
.17
1.75
1.21
.51
.35
.39
.83
.68
.46
.58
.46
2.01
.91
1.12

RICHM OND, V A .
[Population: White, 57,112; colored, 34,888; total, 92,000.]
Typhoid fe v e r ............................................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping cough........................................
Diphtheria ana c ro u p ..............................
G n ppe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
C a n ce r ......................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis.....................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................




22
4

0.39
.07

10
18

7
11
8
8
7
9
75
49
28
19
26
41
23
7
28
16
84
25
50

.12
.19
.14
.14
.12
.16
1.31
.86
.49
.33
.46
.72
.40
.12
.49
.28
1.47
.44
.88

28

.80

36
11
7
7
86
62
19
13
10
35
40
35
25
26
101
69
53

1.03
.32
.20
.20
2.46
1.78
.54
.37
.29
1.00
1.15
1.00
.72
.74
2.89
1.69
1.52

891

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

RICHMOND, V A .—Concluded.
Colored.

White.
Cause of death.

Total.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or o v e r).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
S uicid e.......................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

11
19
43
9
11
3
29
30
23
2
3
3
1

0.19
.33
.75
.16
.19
.05
.51
.53
.40
.03
.05
.05
.02

9
29
24
7
3
3
35
25
16
11
4
8

0.26
.83
.69
.20
.09
.09
1.00
.72
.46
.32
.11
.23

20
48
67
16
14
6
64
55
39
13
7
11
1

0.22
.52
.73
.17
.15
.06
.70
.60
.42
.14
.08
.12
.01

4
28
38
1
40
26

.07
.49
.67
.02
.70
.46

1
48
32

.03
1.38
.92

28
72

.80
2.06

5
76
70
1
68
98

.05
.83
.76
.01
.74
1.06

Total..................................................

871

15.25

1,036

29.70

1,907

20.73

37
26

0.46
.32

11
7
12
31
28
3
10
221
23
40
35
23
62
30
60
39
31
175
31
108
14
75
38
10
22
1
38
48
6
4
8
1

.14
.09
.15
.38
.35
.04
.12
2.72
.28
.49
.43
.28
.76
.37
.74
.48
.38
2.15
.38
1.33
.17
.92
.47
.12
.27
.01
.47
.59
.07
.05
.10
.01

Death
Deaths. 1rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

N A SH V IL L E , TENN.
[Population: White, 51,082; colored, 30,238; total, 81,320.]
Typhoid fe v e r .............................. .........
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping cough........................................
Diphtheria ana croup................................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis.....................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion.and hemorrhage—
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions o f infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and ch ron ic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia —
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years). ..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
A pppindip.it,is................................ ..............
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
puerperal
.
....................
Other pperperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus ................................... .
Other malformations............... .......... ......
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile d ebility............................................
■Suicide............... .........................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases.....................................

20
9

0.39
.18

ii
4
11
13
16
2
2
94
11
27
21
12
36
17
26
26
14
68
14
41
11
36
18
8
8
1
19
36
2
4
1
1

.22
.08
.22
.25
.31
.04
.04
1.84
.22
.53
.41
.23
.70
.33
.51
.51
.27
1.33
.27
.80
.22
.70
.35
.16
.16
.02
.37
.70
.04
.08
.02
.02

1
72
22
3
30
9

Total.................................................

«777




17
17

0.56
.56

3
1
18
12
1
8
127
12
13
14
11
26
13
34
13
17
107
17
67
3
39
20
2
14

.10
.03
.60
.40
.03
.26
4.20
.40
.43
.46
.36
.86
.43
1.12
.43
.56
3.54
.56
2.22
.10
1.29
.66
.07
.46

19
12
4

.63
.40
.13

7

.23

.02
1.41
.43
.06
.59
.18

70
26
3
28
15

2.32
.86
.10
.93
.50

1
142
48
6
58
24

.01
1.75
.59
.07
.71
.30

a 15.21

6810

626.79

c l, 587

C19.52

« Not including 76 deaths of nonresidents.
6 Not including 5 deaths of nonresidents.
cNot including 81 deaths of nonresidents.

892

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

CH ARLESTO N , S. C.
[ Population: White, 28,231; colored, 36,769; total, 65,000.}
White.
Cause of death.

Death
rate per
1, 000.

Deaths.

0.60
.42

31

12
5

.18

5
24
4
4
5
46

.18
.85
.14
.14
.18
1.63

18
6
1
37
15
3
17
10
19
6
4
35
4
44

.64
.18
.04
1.31
.53
.11
.60
.35
.67
.21
.14
1.24
.14
1.56
.07
.04
.11
.71
2.05
.25
.04
.21
.07
.07

Deaths.

Typhoid fe v e r ...........................................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h ......................................
Diphtheria ana croup................................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysenterv....................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases o f respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system..
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue. .
Diseases of locomotor system...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile d ebility............................................
S u icid e.......................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

17

2

1
3
20
58
7
1
6

2
2

493

Total

10
2

.21
.53
.60
.04
.35
.07
17.46

6

15
17
1

Total.

Colored.

Deaths.

0.84
.98

48
48

0.74
.74

.03
5
17
13
7
7
159
9
15
26
12
38
16
25
64
13
97
11
46
19
17
108
5
6
4
49
147

Death
rate per
1, 000.

6

.09

.14
.46
.35
.19
.19
4.32
.24
.41
.71
.33
1.03
.44
.68
1.74
.35
2.64
.30
1.25
.52
.46
2.94
.14
.16

10

.15
.63
.26
.17
.18
3.15
.14
.51
.48
.20
1.15
.48
.43
1.25
.35
1.78
.26
.77
.83
.33
2.34
.11
.11
.11
1.06
3.15
.29
.06

Death
rate per

1 , 000.

41
17

11

12
205
31
13
75
31
28
81
23
116
17
50
54
21

1.14
.44

12

3
8
12
2
3
43
60
28

1,232

152
7
7
7
69
205
19
4
14
14
4
3
49
75
45
1
52
18

33.51

1,725

26.54

.08
.22
.05
.08
1.17
1.63
.76

.22

.22
.06
.05
.75
1.15
.69
.02

.80
.28

SAVAN N AH , G A.
[Population: White, 29,842; colored, 32,158; total, 62,000.]
Typhoid fe v e r ............................................
Malaria.......................................................
S m allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h .......................................
Diphtheria and croup................................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms o f tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and ch ron ic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system ___
Organic heart disease................................




4
29

0.13
.97

2
46

0.06
1.43

6
75

0.10
1.21

7

.24

3

.09

10

.16

3
14
6

.10
.47
.20

5
52

.17
1.74

16
12
12
30
12
3
8
6
40
19
29

.54
.40
.40
1.01
.40
.10
.27
.20
1.34
.64
.97

7
5
5
1
11
141
1
1
19
1
28
21
28
26
18
81
20
41

.22
.16
.16
.03
.34
4.39
.03
.03
.59
.03
.87
.65
.87
.81
.56
2.52
.62
1.28

10
19
11
1
16
193
1
17
31
13
58
33
31
34
24
121
39
70

.16
.31
.18
.02
.26
3.11
.02
.28
.50
.21
.93
.53
.50
.55
.39
1.95
.63
1.13

893

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.
S A V A N N A H , G A .-C on clu ded .
White.
Cause of death.

Colored.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Total.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,0(X).

7
4
40
1
10

0.22
.13
1.24
.03
.31

Other diseases of circulatory system___
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases.........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
S u icid e.............................: ........................
Accident.....................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

13
3
24
1
4
4
28
41
5
2
3
4

0.44
.10
.81
.03
.13
.13
.94
1.37
.17
.07
.10
;13

3
38
20
8
28
8

.10
1.27
.67
.27
.94
.27

30
44
2
4
12
3
1
2
3
48
32
1
37
106

Total..................................................

544

18.23

893

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

.93
1.37
.06
.13
.37
.09
.03
.06
.09
1.49
1.00
.03
1.15
3.30

20
7
64
2
14
4
58
85
7
6
15
7
1
2
6
86
52
9
65
114

0.32
.11
1.03
.03
.23
.06
.93
1.37
.11
.10
.24
.11
.02
.03
.10
1.39
.84
.14
1.05
1.84

27.77

1,437

23.18

0.68
.60
.02
.02
.12
.10
.10
.58

L IT T L E R O C K , A R K .
[Population: White, 25,656; colored, 15,944; total, 41,500.]
Typhoid fe v e r ................ ........................
M alaria......................................................
S m allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fev er...............................................
Whooping cough........................................
Diphtheria and croup................................
firip pe......................... ...............................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases.............................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis.............................
Other forma of tuberculosis......................
Cancer............ ............................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis............ .............. ............... ......
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions o f infants.............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and c h ro n ic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or o v e r ).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis.................................... ............
Appendicitis, ___, ____________________
Other diseases o f digestive system ..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system..
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases o f the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases o f locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations....... .........................
Infantile diseases......................................
Senile debility....... ............ ......................
Pnicide r. . TT. .............................................
Accident.....................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................
Total..................................................

11
14

0.43
.55

5
1
2
13
6
12
50
13
5
14
23
5

17
11
1
1

.19
.04
.08
.51

1.07
.69
.06
.06

8
2
11

.19
.13
.69

28
25
1
1
5
4
4
24

.23
.47
1.96

2
2
70

.13
.13
4.39

8
14
120

.19
.34
2.89

3
g
4
9
7
5
5
5
40
9
9
11
11
22
4
2

.19
.51
.25
.56
.44
.31
.31
.31
2.51
.56
.56
.69
.69
1.38
.25
.13

7
7
1

.44
.44
.06

16
13
18
32
12
5
20
9
91
23
26
19
27
40
8
6
4
25
18
2

.39
.31
.43
.77
.29
.12
.48
.22
2.19
.55
.63
.46
.65
.96
.19
.14
.10
.60
.43
.05

2

.13

4
3

.10
.07

.51,
.19
.55
.90
.19

15
4
51
14
17
8
16
18
4
4
4
18
11
1

.59
.16
1.99
.55
.66
.31
.63
.70
.16
.16
.16
.70
.43
.04

2
3

.08
.12

3

.12

1

.06

4

a 16
5

a. 63
.19

a5
5

a.3i
.31

«21
10

18
25

.70
.98

28
33

1.76
2.07

46
58

1.11
1.40

a 431

«16.86

a 363

a 22.77

a 794

a 19.13

a Not including deaths from premature birth

•9398— No. 42— 02----- 2



.10
abi

.24

894

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

A U G U ST A , G A .
[Population: White, 21,740; colored, 19,260; total, 41,000.]
Total.

Colored.

White.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

9
29
1
2
2
2
3
12
6
2
2
84
1
10
29
10
20
17
11
15
5
58
13
23
12
17
40
1
11
2
26
12
8
4
1
2
2

0.47
1.51
.05
.10
.10
.10
.16
.62
.31
.10
.10
4.36
.05
.52
1.51
.52
1.04
.89
.57
.78
.26
3.01
.68
1.20
.62
.89
2.08
.05
.57
.10
1.35
.62
.42
.21
.05
.10
.10

.78
.05

1
47
6

12
31

.65
1.43

317

14.58

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Typhoid fever.............................................
M alaria.......................................................
S m allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fe v e r...............................................
Whooping cough........................................
Diphtheria and cro u p ................................
Grippe.................... t ..................................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases.............................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system ............
Bronchitis, acute and ch ron ic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases o f respiratory system .......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years) ..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction............
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system...
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue ..
Diseases of locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other m alformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
Suicide.........................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

6
14

0.28
.64

3
8
1
8
7
4
4
3
29

.14
.37
.05
.37
.32
.18
.18
.14
1.33

8
10

.37
.46

9
13
1
13
5
16
14
4
5
6
27

.41
.60
.05
.60
.23
.74
.64
.18
.23
.28
1.24

4
1
9
17
2

.18
.05
.41
.78
.09

2
2

.09
.09

1

.05

17
1

Total..................................................

Cause of death.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

.05
2.44
.31

15
43
1
5
10
3
11
19
10
6
5
113
1
18
39
10
29
30
12
28
10
74
27
27
17
23
67
1
15
3
35
29
10
4
3
4
2
1
1
64
7

0.37
1.05
.03
.12
.24
.07
.27
.46
.24
.15
.12
2.76
.03
.44
.95
.24
.71
.73
.29
.68
.24
1.81
.66
.66
.41
.56
1.63
.03
.37
.07
.85
.71
.24
.10
.07
.10
.05
.03
.03
1.56
.17

11
31

.57
1.61

23
62

.56
1.51

600

31.15

917

22.37

B IR M IN G H A M , A L A .
[Population: White, 23,301; colored, 17,699; total, 41,000.]
Typhoid fe v e r ............................................
Malarias.....................................................
S m allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h .......................................
Diphtheria and croup...................... *........
G n pp e.........................................................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and c h ro n ic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___




21
3

0.90
.13

17
3

0.96
.17

38
6

0.93
.15

1
11

.04
.47

2

.11

1
13

.02
.32

5

.22

8

.34

4
45
3
14
10
6
17
$
1
8
5
70

.17
1.93
.13
.60
.43
.26
.73
.26
.04
.34
.22
3.00

4
4
10
2
5
85
2
6
1
6
11
3
7
12
8
110

.23
.23
.56
.11
.28
4.80
.11
.34
.06
.34
.62
.17
.40
.68
.45
6.22

9
4
18
2
9
130
5
20
11
12
28
9
8
20
13
180

.22
.10
.44
.05
.22
3.17
.12
.49
.27
.29
.68
.22
.20
.49
.32
4.39

895

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

B IR M IN G H A M , A L A .- Concluded.
Colored.

White.
Cause of death.

Total.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

0.26
.73
.13
.13
.82
.04
.30
.13
.73
.82
.26
.13
.17
.09
.04

5
13
7
4
34
3
10

0.28
.73
.40
.23
1.92
.17
.56

15
4
9
2
7
2

.85
.23
.51
.11
.40
.11

.94
.30

30
8

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

6
17
3
3
19
1
7
3
17
19
6
3
4
2
1
22
7

Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years) ..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or o v e r).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases o f digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system .
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility...........................................
S u icid e ......................................................
Accident.....................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................

55
18

2.36
.77

Total..................................................

451

19.36

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

11
30
10
7
53
4
17
3
32
23
15
5
11
4
1

0.27
.73
.24
.17
1.29
.10
.41
.07
.78
.56
.37
.12
.27
.10
.02

1.69
.45

52
15

1.27
.37

62
44

3.50
2.49

117
62

2.85
1.51

557

31.47

1,008

24.59

28
26
3

0.72
.67
.08

7
1
3
9
8
7
14
157
1
26
17
1
35
18
39
49
11
51
13
51
8
11
29
6
13
2
28
83
9
3
9
3

.18
.03
.08
.23
.21
.18
.36
4.05
.03
.67
.44
.03
.90
.46
1.00
1.26
.28
1.31
.33
1.31
.21
.28
.75
.15
.33
.05
.72
2.14
.23
.08
.23
.08

T

m o b i l e :, a l a

.

[Population; White, 21,586; colored, 17,214; total, 38,800.]
Typhoid fe v e r............................................
Malaria.......................................................
Sm allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping c o u g h .......................................
Diphtheria ana cro u p ..............................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicaemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage . . .
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia—
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases o f circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Brighit’s disease.........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia............................ .
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases o f locomotor systpm...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations__________ _______
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
fluicidfi
__________________________
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases...................................
Total..................................................




11
6
3

0.51
.28
.14

17
20

0.99
1.16

7
1
2
4
2
4
5
59

.33
.05
.09
.18
.09
.18
.23
2.73

1
.5
6
3
9
98
1
6
7
1
13
11
31
30
7
35
7
31
5
5
17
2
9
1
11
33
6
3
6
1

.06
.29
.35
.17
.52
5.69
.06
.35
.41
.06
.75
.64
1.80
1.74
.41
2.03
.41
1.80
.29
.29
.99
.12
.52
.06
.64
1.92
.35
.17
.35
.06

20
10

.93
.46

22
7
8
19
4
16
6
20
3
6
12
4
4
1
17
50
3

1.02
.33
.37
.88
.18
.74
.28
.93
.14
.28
.56
.18
.18
.05
.79
2.32
.14

3
2

.14
.09

1

.06

1

.03

14
14
3
19
10

.65
.65
.14
.88
.46

39
19

2.26
1.10

15
17

.87
.99

53
33
3
34
•27

1.37
.85
.08
.88
.70

401

18.58

529

30.73

930

23.97

896

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR—Continued.

K N O X V IL L E , TENN.
[Population: White, 26,721; colored, 7,779; total, 34,500.]

Deaths.

Typhoid fe v e r ............................................
Malaria.......................................................
S m allpox....................................................
Measles.......................................................
Scarlet fever...............................................
Whooping cough........................................
Diphtheria and croup................................
Grippe.........................................................
Dysentery....................................................
Other epidemic diseases...........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.........
Pulmonary tuberculosis...........................
Other forms of tuberculosis......................
Cancer.........................................................
Other general diseases..............................
Meningitis..................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage___
Paralysis......................................................
Convulsions of infants..............................
Other diseases of nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and ch r o n ic .................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over)..
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system..
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases o f locomotor system ...................
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases.......................................
Senile debility............................................
Suicide.........................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases.....................................

13

2
2

Total.

Colored.

White.
Cause of death.

Death
rate per
1, 000.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1 , 000.

Deaths.

18

0.49
.07
.07

0.64
.26

21

.61

8
7

.23
.20
.06
.03
.03
3.71
.12
.29
.58
.17
.32
.35

.64

4

4
6
1

.15
.23
.04

4
1
1
1

.51
.13
.13
.13

1
69
3
8
6
6

.04
2.58
.11
.30
.23
.23
.37
.15
.11
.34
.26
1.24
.15
.67
.26
.37
.23

59
1
2
14

7.58
.13
.26
1.80

i
8
4
2
1
18
3
5
5
4

.i§
1.03
.51
.26
.13
2.31
.39
.64
.64
.51

1
2

.13
.26

6
4
2
3

.77
.51
.26
.39

6

3

.11

1

4

2

1
1
128
4

10

20

6

11
12

7
11
8
51
7
23

.12

.20

16
10
1
15
17

.60
.37
.04
.56
.64

9
5
1
9
19

13.44

206

2
6

.32
.23
1.48
.20
.67
.35
.40
.17
.03
.35
.12
.70
.55
.06
.17
.08

1.16
.64
.13
1.16
2.44

25
15
2
24
36

.72
.43
.06
.70
1.04

26.48

565

16.38

22
7
6

0.69
.22
.19

2
2
10
9
9
1
9
79
7
18
11
8
22
9
5
9
9
32
15
22
10
24

.06
.06
.31
.28
.28
.03
.28
2.47
.22
.56
.34
.25
.69
.28
.16
.28
.28
1.00
.47
.69
.31
.75

.04

Total.

2

1

4
18
15

.37
.15
.67
.56

10

0.52
.06

5

17

4
3
9
7
33
4
18
7
10

A,0 0
0.

2

.51

10

Death
rate per

12

14
6

1
12

4
24
19

CHATTANOOGA, TENN.
[Population: White, 18,075; colored, 13,925; total, 32,000.]
Typhoid fever.
Malaria..........
Sm allpox.......
Scarlet fever..........................................
Whooping cou gh ............... .................
Diphtheria and croup...........................
Grippe....................................................
Dysentery...............................................
Other epidemic diseases......................
Purulent and septicaemic infection...
Pulmonary tuberculosis......................
Other forms of tuberculosis.................
Cancer....................................................
Other general diseases.........................
Meningitis............................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage.. ..
Paraylsis......................................................
Convulsions o f infants..............................
Other diseases o f nervous system............
Bronchitis, acute and chronic.................
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia___
Other diseases of respiratory system.......
Organic heart disease................................
Other diseases of circulatory system.......
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years)..




9
1
1

0.50
.05
.05

2
1
7
4
3
1
5
29
3
12
9
6
18
3
2
3
3
15
10
13
6
16

.11
.05
.39
.22
.17
.05
.28
1.61
.17
.66
.50
.33
1.00
.17
.11
.17
.17
.83
.55
.72
.'33
.89

13
6
5 ,

0.93
.43
.36

1
3
5
6

.07
.22
.36
.43

4
50
4
6
2
2
4
6
3
6
6
17
5
9
4
8

.29
3.59
.29
.43
.14
.14
.29
.43
.22
.43
.43
1.22
.36
.65
.29
.57

897

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

DEATHS AND DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSE AND COLOR-Concluded.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN.—Concluded.
Colored.

White.
Cause of death.

Deaths.

Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or ov er).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction..........
Peritonitis..................................................
Appendicitis...............................................
Other diseases of digestive system..........
Bright’s disease..........................................
Other diseases of genito-urinary system.
Puerperal septicaemia................................
Other puerperal diseases...........................
Diseases of the skin and cellular tissue..
Diseases of locomotor system
.........
Hydrocephalus..........................................
Other malformations................................
Infantile diseases......................................
Senile debility...........................................
S u icid e.......................................................
Accident......................................................
Ill-defined diseases.....................................
Total..................................................

Death
rate per
1,000.

Total.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

3

.17

1

.07

4

.13

2
1
18
12
•
1
2
1
1

.11
.05
1.00
.66
.05
.11
.05
.05

5

.36

11
12
2

.79
.86
.14

7
1
29
24
3
2
1
1

.22
.03
.91
.75
.09
.06
.03
.03

15
14
1
18
21

.83
.78
.05
1.00
1.16

24
3

1.72
.22

21

39

1.51
2.80

39
17
1
39
60

1.22
.53
.03
1.22
1.88

292

16.15

293

21.04

585

18.28

MON TGOM ERY, A liA .
[Population: White, 13,600; colored, 17,900; total, 31,500.]
Colored.

White.
Cause of death.

Typhoid fe v e r ..........................................
Malaria.....................................................
Sm allpox..................................................
Measles......................................................
Scarlet fev er.............................................
Whooping c o u g h .....................................
Diphtheria and croup..............................
Grippe.......................................................
Dysentery..................................................
Other epidemic diseases.........................
Purulent and septicsemic infection.......
Pulmonary tuberculosis.........................
Other forms o f tuberculosis....................
Cancer.......................................................
Other general diseases.............................
Meningitis.................................................
Cerebral congestion and hemorrhage ..
Paralysis....................................................
Convulsions of infants.............................
Other diseases of nervous system ..........
Bronchitis, acute and chronic...............
Pneumonia and broncho-pneumonia_
_
Other diseases of respiratory system___
Organic heart disease..............................
Other diseases of circulatoxy system___
Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years) .
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years or over).
Hernia and intestinal obstruction.........
P eritonitis.:.............................................
Appendicitis.............................................
Other diseases o f digestive system.........
Bright’s disease........................................
Other diseases o f genito-urinary system
Puerperal septicaemia..............................
Other puerperal diseases.........................
Diseases o f the skin and cellular tissue.
Diseases o f locomotor system .................
Hydrocephalus........................................
Other m alformations..............................
Infantile diseases.....................................
Senile debility..........................................
S u icid e ......................................................
Accident..................................................
Ill-defined diseases.............................. .
Total.




Deaths.

Death
rate per
1,000.

Deaths.

0.29

Total.

Death
rate per
1,000.
0.22

.22

.39

.44

Deaths.

8

06

10

.22

.15
.22
.15

.06
.13
.19

2

48

.22

6

.15
.44

.22

.15
.81
.07
1.03
.07
1.32

61

.74
.81
.07
.16
.07
.96
.81
.74

8
3
175

22
2

3

2
22

19
10

.06
1.52
.19
.16
.26
.13
.16
.22
.19
.60
.13
.95
.26
.92
.70
.48
.06
.10
.06
.70
.60
.32

.03
.06

11

2

.26
.48
.06

381

12.10

8
15

.22

.37
.15
.59

19
20

.22
12.87

5
8
4
5
7
6
19
4
30
8
29
15

.07

2

0.26
.32

1

.07

3
5

Death
rate per
1,000.

206

11.51

898

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

The following table summarizes the results as to the deaths o f white
and colored persons in the cities investigated, so far as data were
obtainable. The entire lack o f record as to the color o f decedents
accounts fo r the omission o f many cities from this table.
TOTAL DEATHS, BY COLOR.
White.
Cities.

Colored.

27.46
1,927
New York, N. Y ........................................
19.58
68,793
20.62
Chicago, 111.................................................
687
23,719
13.43
1,654
Philadelphia, Pa........................................
17.72
25.03
22,483
St. Louis, M o .............................................
1,173
31.63
9,428
16.90
Boston, Mass...............................................
292
19.64
11,008
22.29
Baltimore, M d ............................................
2,623
32.20
7,856
17.91
121
Cleveland, O h io ........................................
5,713
14.89
19.40
22.74
Buffalo, N. Y .............................................
14.44
43
5,317
Cincinnati, Ohio........................................
466
5,689
17.51
30.81
Pittsburg, JPa.............................................
485
6,107
19.35
27.20
New Orleans, La........................................
2,441
4,037
18.49
29.89
Detroit, M ich .............................................
14.94
97
4,416
22.37
Milwaukee, W is ........................................
15
3,818
12.87
16.27
Washington, D. C.......................................
2,657
3,430
17.39
29.60
Newark, N. J ............... .............................
194
26.89
4,612
18.61
Jersey City, N. J ........................................
47
3,995
19.07
11.58
Louisville, K y ............................................
935
2,562
22.75
14.73
15
9.02
Minneapolis, M in n ...................................
2,495
11.98
148
28.69
Providence. R. I ........................................
3,296
19.07
Indianapolis, In d .......................................
2,242
337
19.57
13.56
Kansas City, M o ........................................
14.60
426
2,247
22.89
St. Paul, M inn............................................
27
11.25
1,778
10.61
Rochester, N. Y ..........................................
7
2,460
14.53
10.90
Denver, Colo...............................................
2,652
80
19.56
18.00
Toledo, Ohio...............................................
1,672
41
11.30
20.68
Allegheny, P a ............................................
119
2,306
17.80
34.75
Columbus, O h io ........................................
11.15
166
19.12
1,381
Worcester, M ass........................................
1,979
16.52
19
15.31
Syracuse, N. Y ............................................
14.42
1,557
13.10
17
New Haven, Conn.....................................
55
1,920
17.63
17.75
Paterson, N. J ............................................
1,775
33
16.71
24.59
Fall River, Mass........................................
2,132
20.00
11
26.63
Omaha, N ebr.............................................
975
60
9.18
15.78
Los Angeles, Cal........................................
1,869
116
17.75
24.58
Memphis, T enn..........................................
1,044
882
16.03
19.90
Albany, N. Y .............................................
1,736
23
17.58
18.21
Cambridge, M ass..................................... .
1,487
87
16.53
21.18
Atlanta, G a................................................
844
14.92
1,087
29.04
Grand Rapids, M ich ..................................
1,134
12.02
6
9.02
Dayton, O h io.............................................
1,165
13.48
62
17.24
Richmond, V a ...........................................
15.25
1,036
871
29.70
Nashville, Tenn..........................................
<>810
<>26.79
5777
515.21
Hartford, C o n n ..........................................
1,154
14.50
44
21.38
Reading, Pa................................................
1,341
16.47
18
31.69
Wilmington, Del........................................
16.62
1,138
266
26.54
Camden, N .J .............................................
1,236
16.69
120
20.17
Trenton, N. J ...............................................
1,177
16.17
54
24.46
Bridgeport, C o n n .......................................
15.82
1,197
27
20.39
Lynn, M ass.................................................
1,002
14.49
18
20.76
Oakland, Cal...............................................
1,009
13.90
39
16.03
New Bedford, M ass...................................
1,186
18.51
50
26.15
Des Moines, I o w a .......................................
713
10.47
27
14.28
Springfield, Mass........................................
911
14.26
22
19.57
Somerville, Mass........................................
829
13.10
2
9.35
Troy, N. Y ....................................................
1,644
22.06
18
34.29
Hoboken. N .J.............................................
1,154
18.97
3
17.75
Evansville, I n d ..........................................
610
11.61
135
17.59
Utica, N .Y ..................................................
1,020
17.66
11
43.48
Peoria, 111....................................................
776
13.27
15
9.91
Charleston, S. C ..........................................
493
17.46
1,232
33.51
Savannah, Ga.............................................
544
18.23
893
27.77
Salt Lake City, Utah.......... 1.....................
688
11.98
18
32.32
San Antonio, T e x .......................................
1,096
159
23.03
20.10
Duluth, M inn.............................................
12.94
719
6
13.45
Erie, P a .......................................................
808
14.76
3
11.49
Elizabeth, N .J ............................................
961
5
17.87
4.06
a Including 303 deaths occurring outside city limits.
b Not including 76 deaths of nonresidents.
c Not including 6 deaths of nonresidents.
< Not including 81 deaths of nonresidents.
*




Total.

Death
Death
Death
Number. rate per Number. rate per Number. rate per
1,000.
1,000.
1,000.
70,720
24,406
24,137
10,601
11,300
10,479
5,834
5,360
6,155
6,592
6,478
«4,513
3,833
6,087
4,806
4,042
3,497
2,510
3,444
2,579
2,673
1,805
2,467
2,732
1,713
2,425
1,547
1,998
1,574
1,975
1,808
2,143
1,035
1,985
1,926
1,759
1,574
1,931
1,140
1,227
1,907
<*1,687
1,198
1,359
1,404
1,356
1,231
1,224
1,020
1,048
1,236
740
933
831
1,662
1,157
745
1,031
791
1,725
1,437
706
1,255
726
811
966

19.73
13.56
18.08
17.82
19.70
20.15
14.96
14.49
18.10
19.77
21.59
«15.04
12.88
21.21
18.85
18.93
16.27
11.95
19.35
14.13
15.50
10.62
14.51
19.51
11.42
18.23
11.68
16.51
13.12
17.63
16.81
20.03
9.41
18.05
17.92
17.59
16.73
20.54
12.00
13.63
20.73
<*19.52
14.68
16.57
17.89
16.95
16.41
15.90
14.57
13.97
18.73
10.67
14.35
13.09
22.14
18.97
12.38
17.78
13.18
26.54
23.18
12.17
22.61
12.95
14.75
17.56

899

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
TOTAL DEATHS, BY COLOR-Concluded
White.
Cities.

Colored.

Total.

Death
Death
Death
Number. rate per Number. rate per Number. rate per
1,000.
1,000.
1,000.

Kansas City, K an s.....................................
Harrisburg, P a ...........................................
Yonkers, N .Y .............................................
Norfolk, V a ................................................
Fort Wayne, I n d ........................................
Youngstown, O h io.....................................
Houston, T e x .............................................
Covington. K y ...........................................
Akron, Ohio................................................
Dallas, T ex ..................................................
Saginaw, M ich...........................................
Lancaster, P a ...................... ^.....................
Lincoln, Nebr.............................................
Brockton, M ass..........................................
Binghamton, N. Y .....................................
Augusta, Ga................................................
Pawtucket, R. I ..........................................
Wheeling, W. V a ........................................
Mobile, A la .................................................
Birmingham, A la ......................................
Little Rock, A r k ........................................
Springfield, Ohio........................................
Galveston, T ex...........................................
Tacoma, W ash...........................................
Terre Haute, Ind ........................................
Dubuque, I o w a ..........................................
Quincy, 111..................................................
South Bend, I n d ........................................
Johnstown, P a ............................................
Davenport, Iowa........................................
McKeesport, Pa..........................................
Springfield, 111............................................
Chelsea, Mass.............................................
Chester, Pa..................................................
York, P a ......................................................
Malden, Mass.............................................
Topeka, Kans.............................................
Newton, Mass.............................................
Knoxville, T enn........................................
Schenectady, N . Y .....................................
Fitchburg, Mass..........................................
Montgomery, A la .......................................
Auburn, N .Y ...............................................
Chattanooga, T e n n ...................................
East St. Louis, 111........................................

682
679
a 786
468
628
684
503
963
471
628
607
582
390
517
749
317
662
650
401
451
431
383
403
464
667
441
557
493
647
519
618
554
560
465
449
474
505
429
359
603
468
175
412
292
411

14.33
13.45
a 15.76
15.07
12.39
13.97
14.98
23.51
10.60
15.95
13.60
14.31
9.37
12.27
18.50
14.58
16.38
16.71
18.58
19.36
16.86
10.77
18.48
12.00
17.40
11.80
15.53
11.74
16.32
14.42
16.85
16.47
16.25
15.28
12.42
13.87
17.08
12.01
13.44
16.16
14.67
12.87
11.98
16.15
12.51

176
40
22
607
3
17
359
84
8
244
4
10
16
6
6
600
5
33
529
557
363
75
172
10
30
3
52
10
10
11
34
68
17
70
15
12
109
5
206
3
1
206
14
293
28

25.49
8.85
19.59
25.34
9.01
16.50
21.87
33.11
14.41
22.96
10.72
12.64
17.90
15.87
11.49
31.15
23.92
29.86
30.73
31.47
22.77
16.85
27.77
7.58
18.01
24.79
24.33
14.22
27.78
21.61
41.31
28.89
21.04
15.34
17.54
24.74
22.07
8.21
26.48
16.48
10.75
11.51
22.88
21.04
13.08

858
719
808
1,075
631
5 701
862
1,047
479
872
611
592
406
523
755
917
667
683
930
1,008
5 794
458
575
5474
697
444
609
503
657
530
652
622
577
535
464
486
614
434
565
606
469
381
426
585
439

15.47
13.07
15.84
19.55
12.37
514.02
17.24
24.07
10.64
17.44
13.58
14.28
9.55
12.31
18.41
22.37
16.42
17.08
23.97
24.59
519.13
11.45
20.54
511.85
17.43
11.84
16.03
11.78
16.43
14.52
17.39
17.28
16.36
15.29
12.54
14.02
17.80
11.94
16.38
16.16
14.66
12.10
12.17
18.28
12.54

a Including 1 Chinese.
5 Not including deaths from premature birth.

Table V II.— Percentage o f deaths fro m each specified cause.— This
table is based on Table V I, and shows for each city what percentage
o f the total deaths during the year was caused by typhoid fever, what
by malaria, what by smallpox, and what by each o f the remaining
causes enumerated in Table V I.
Table V III.— D eath rate p er 1,000population, by com es.— This table
is also based on Table V I, and shows fo r each city the number o f
deaths per 1,000 population from each specified cause.
Table I X .— D eath rate per 1,000 population.— This table is based
partly on Table V I. The population o f each city as estimated by the
health department, which furnishes the basis o f the calculation as to
the official death rate, is given in the first column o f the table. This
is followed b y a column showing the official death rate o f each city as
calculated by the health officers o f the same. The estimated popula­




900

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

tion January 1, 1902, is next brought forward from Table I, and
immediately following this is given the death rate calculated on the
basis o f these figures. In most cases these do not differ greatly from
the figures used by the health officers themselves. Stillbirths are not
included in the calculations o f death rates. A s stated in connection
with Table Y I, the high death rate o f some Southern cities is explained
by the fact that their population consists largely o f colored people,
among whom the death rate is much higher than among whites, as
shown b y the series o f short tables given there.
Table X .— A rea o f pu blic panics and miles o f streets, sewers, and street
railways.—In this table is shown the area o f all parks and gardens
open fo r the free use o f the public, whether owned by the munici­
pality or by a private individual or corporation, and also the number
of miles o f streets in each o f the cities paved with cobblestones, granite
and belgian blocks, bricks, wooden blocks, asphalt and asphalt blocks,
macadam, and gravel. The number o f miles o f all other kinds o f
pavement is aggregated in a single column, and this is followed by the
total miles o f streets paved in each city and the miles o f streets
unpaved. There are also shown data relative to the number o f miles
o f sewers in each city, classified as to whether constructed o f brick,
tile, or other material, and the miles o f single track o f street railways,
together with the number o f persons employed by the companies oper­
ating the same.
Table X I — Care o f streets, fo o d <md sanitary inspection, and dis­
posal o f garbage and other refuse.— This table deals with the provision
made by each city fo r the care o f its streets and the disposal o f its
garbage. The table shows whether the streets are swept by hand, by
machine, or by both hand and machine, and the number o f square
yards o f streets swept per week. The figures given show the total
amount o f sweeping done per week measured in square yards, and
do not indicate, therefore, the total area swept, which would in most
cases be considerably less, inasmuch as many o f the streets are swept
more than once a week. Next follow columns showing the average
number o f persons employed in sweeping and sprinkling the streets
by the cities themselves and by contractors. The next two columns
show the number o f food and sanitary inspectors employed by each
city, while the two immediately follow ing show the tons o f ashes dis­
posed o f by the cities and by contractors. The table further shows
the tons o f garbage, dead animals, and other refuse sold, burned, or
otherwise disposed o f in these cities, the quantities disposed o f by the
cities themselves and by contractors being given separately. These
columns are followed by those in which are given the average number
o f persons employed in the removal o f ashes, garbage, and other
refuse.




STATISTICS OF CITIES.

901

Table X I I —Number and kind o f street lights.—This table shows
the number o f arc and incandescent electric lights, the number of
Welsbach and other gas lights, and the number o f vapor lamps and oil
lamps which are in use in the streets, alleys, and public parks o f the
various cities. Lights inside public buildings are not included.
Table X I I I — Public schools.—This table shows, first, the number
o f buildings in each city in which public schools are conducted, classi­
fied as to whether owned or rented by the city. Next is shown the
number o f schoolrooms—that is, the number o f rooms used for seat­
ing or recitation purposes— classified as to whether in owned or in
rented buildings. The number o f high schools is next shown, and all
such schools are included, whether conducted in a building used exclu­
sively fo r that purpose or in a building in connection with the other
public-school grades. These data are followed by the number o f teach­
ers and the number and average daily attendance o f pupils, separately
classified as to whether in high schools, in kindergartens, in other reg­
ular day schools, in night schools, or in other public schools. The
number o f pupils as shown here means the total number o f different
pupils registered during the year. A ll pupils that have been trans­
ferred from one school to another, and whose names consequently
appear on two or more registers, have been counted but once.
Table X I V .— Public libraries.— In this table are shown the facts
relating to public libraries owned and controlled by the various cities,
together with information as to the number o f volumes in the same,
the number o f volumes added during the year, the number o f volumes
withdrawn for home use, and the number withdrawn for use in the
reading rooms o f the library during the period covered by the report.
Libraries, the titles o f which are vested in self-perpetuating boards o f
trustees, etc., and which are practically free city libraries, have been
included. In the report fo r September, 1900, data were also given as
to libraries under other than municipal ownership and control. It has
not been thought necessary, however, to cover such institutions each
year, and data relating to the same have not been secured fo r the suc­
ceeding reports.
Table X V — Charities: Almshouses, orphan asylums, and hospitals.—
In the first annual report on statistics o f cities data on this subject
were presented fo r municipal institutions only; that is, those institu­
tions which were supported or controlled by the municipality itself.
In many o f the cities which were included in the report, however,
institutions o f a similar character were found under the control o f
and supported by the town, county, or State, or by private contri­
butions. In some cases such institutions existed in cities which did
not themselves provide such aid. In most cases these private or semi­
private institutions were open to those unable to support themselves
or secure proper medical aid and other attention. In many cases



902

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

private institutions were found in which free service was given to
those needing it, while in some instances a part o f the support o f each
institution was contributed by the city as a condition to furnishing the
necessary attention to its poor. In planning the second annual report
it was determined, in view o f the public service rendered by these insti­
tutions, to secure data relating to them similar to that secured for
the first report relating to strictly municipal institutions, and publish
the same in connection with those data. This plan was carried out and
that report contained data not only as to those institutions owned and
controlled by the city, but also those owned and controlled by the
county, town, or State, or by private enterprises, such as churches,
benevolent associations, etc. It was the purpose o f the Department
to include in that report all those institutions which admitted the
general public or a specified class o f the public either free or partially
free. It was not thought necessary, however, to duplicate that canvass
for several years, and the present report, therefore, like that for last
year, contains data relating to municipal institutions only. The table
shows the number o f almshouses and orphan asylums, with the average
number o f inmates, and the number o f hospitals, with the total number
o f patients treated during the year. The column relating to the num­
ber o f hospitals includes in some instances smallpox hospitals or pesthouses, which are not strictly charitable institutions, but are operated
by the cities fo r the protection o f the general public health. These
are in all cases designated by footnotes.
Table X Y I — Cost o f water, gas, and electric-light plants owned and
operated by cities.— In this table it is shown whether the waterworks,
gas works, and electric-light plants in the various cities are owned
and operated by the municipality. W here these public utilities are
municipally owned and operated further data are given as to the year
in which they were built or acquired by the cities, and the cost o f the
same. The figures fo r cost represent the cost up to the end o f the
fiscal year covered by the report, and include amounts expended for
extensions, etc., in addition to the original cost o f building and equip­
ping the plants. Additional columns show respectively the miles o f
water, gas, and electric-light mains.
Table X V I I .— B uilding perm its.— This table, which did not appear
in previous reports, shows first the number o f permits granted for
the construction o f new buildings and the amount o f proposed expend­
iture fo r same, being followed by the number o f permits granted for
repairs and extensions to old buildings, together with the amount o f
proposed expenditure.
Table X V I I I .— D ebt and legal borrowing lim it.—This table shows
first the amount o f the bonded, the floating, and the total debt o f the
cities included in the report. In this classification temporary loans,
unpaid warrants, etc;, have been regarded as a floating debt. The
data as to debt are followed by those as to the amount o f the sinking



STATISTICS OF CITIES.

903

fund o f the various cities, which deducted from the preceding column,
showing the total debt, furnishes the figures fo r the next column, rep­
resenting the net debt o f each o f the cities. This is followed by a
statement as to the legal borrowing limit. In several cities it was
found that the bonded indebtedness as given in the reports o f the
cities did not include some special bonds, such as school, park, or
waterworks bonds, or bonds issued for street or sewer construction,
etc. They were omitted b y the city officials because they were not
considered a city debt proper, they having been issued for one or
more o f the special purposes named, and charged, in some instances,
against the property along the street or in the locality in which the
expenditures were made. In such cases the city usually acts as an
agent through a board or commission in issuing and redeeming the
bonds, but disclaims all responsibility fo r their payment. A s most
cities include all such bonds in their statements o f indebtedness, it has
been deemed proper fo r purposes o f comparison to include them in
these cases also.
The fact should be noted in connection with this table that in some
cases the debt as here given does not represent absolutely all o f the
public obligations o f the property within the limits o f the city. In
certain cases where it has been desired to make improvements for the
benefit o f a territory larger than that o f the city, the State legislature
has provided for the formation o f a board or commission and fo r bor­
rowing money fo r carrying out the desired improvements. This bor­
rowed money represents an obligation, not o f the cities as such, but
o f the board or commission, although interest and principal as well as
all expenses o f maintenance and operation must be met by taxation
against the property within the limits o f the territory benefited. This
method has in many cases been employed because the debt limit fixed
by the State legislature prevented the necessary borrowing on the part
o f the city directly, and as it is desired to retain a low debt limit, spe­
cific permission from the legislature is required for each issue o f bonds
in excess o f that limit. W ell-known cases o f this sort are Chicago,
with its drainage canal, and Boston, with its metropolitan park, sewer,
and water commissions. In such cases as these no attempt has been
made to apportion to the cities involved the proper proportion o f debt
chargeable in each instance, as it was regarded as impracticable. Such
definite information, however, as was available has been presented in
the form o f footnotes to the table. W ith regard to the city’s share o f
the county and State debt the same principle has been followed.
The conditions in Washington are somewhat peculiar. Being the
seat o f the Federal Government and the site o f the vast properties
necessary to its central administration, Congress, which is the law­
making body o f the city, has established the rule that one-half the
municipal expenses shall be paid by the Federal Government and onehalf raised by taxation. The act providing a permanent form o f gov


904

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

eminent for the District o f Columbia, approved June 11,1878, specifies
that “ T o the extent to which Congress shall approve o f said estimates
[of the annual expenses o f government fo r the District o f Columbia]
Congress shall appropriate the amount o f fifty per centum thereof;
and the remaining fifty per centum o f such approved estimates shall
be levied and assessed upon the taxable property and privileges in said
District o f Columbia other than the property o f the United States and
o f the District o f Columbia.” The principle laid down in the forego­
ing act has, with very few exceptions, been followed by Congress in
making the appropriations fo r the expenses o f the District o f Colum­
bia. In any study o f the financial statistics o f the city o f W ashing­
ton, whether in this or subsequent tables, this peculiarity should be
borne in mind.
Table X IX \ — B asis o f assessment, assessed valuation o f property,
and taxation.— This table shows the basis o f assessment, represented
in per cent o f the full value o f real and personal property. Two col­
umns are given showing the legal basis o f assessment. It has been
found in some cities, however, that in practice the basis adopted is a
much lower percentage than that provided by law. Two additional
columns are therefore given showing the basis actually used in the
assessment o f real and personal property. In passing, attention should
be called to the possible, if not probable, inaccuracy in many cases o f
the basis o f assessment in practice. In some instances it applies to the
valuation at forced sale; in some to the market value as determined at
private sale; while in others it applies to the asking price placed upon
the property by the owners. Then follow three columns showing the
assessed valuation o f the real, personal, and the total property in each
o f the cities considered, while the remaining columns o f the table relate
to the tax rates fo r various purposes levied on such property. In most
cases a statement was secured as to the rate o f tax levied per $1,000 o f
assessed valuation by or fo r the State, the county, and the city, and for
other purposes. The value o f the data subdivided in this manner will
be seen at once.
Table X X .— R eceipts fro m all sources.— Practically no change has
been made in this table from the form in use in the preceding report.
The actual income is first given, classified as to the amounts received
during the year from the property tax, from franchise tax, from
liquor licenses, from other licenses, from fines and fees, from franchise
grants, from special assessments, from trust funds, interest, and divi­
dends, from waterworks, from gas works, from electric-light plants,
from docks and wharves, from ferries and bridges, from markets, from
cemeteries, from bath houses and bathing pools and beaches, from all
other sources, and the total actual income from all sources combined.
This detail and total o f actual income is followed by a column show­
ing the cash on hand at the beginning o f the fiscal year, and another



STATISTICS OF CITIES.

905

showing the amounts received as loans subdivided as to long-term
bonds (2 years or over), and temporary loans and short-term bonds
(less than 2 years). These items form no part o f the actual income
o f cities, but a final column is given under the caption o f “ total
receipts fo r fiscal year,” in which are combined the amounts given in
the table as “ total actual income fo r fiscal year,” “ cash on hand at
beginning o f fiscal year,” and “ loans.” The cash on hand at the
beginning o f the fiscal year, as shown in this table, does not include
the cash in the sinking fund, except where so noted.
Table X X L — Expenditures f o r construction and other capital out­
lay.— This table, together with Table X X I I , deals with the expendi­
tures during the fiscal year covered by the report. Table X X I deals
especially with those fo r construction and fo r the acquisition o f prop­
erty o f a permanent nature, and for other capital outlay. The items
fo r which separate amounts are shown in this table are: Police depart­
ment; police courts, jails, workhouses, reformatories, etc.; fire depart­
ment; health department; hospitals, asylums, almshouses, and other
charities; schools; libraries, art galleries, museums, etc.; parks;
streets; sewers; waterworks; gas works; electric-light plants; docks
and wharves; ferries and bridges; markets; cemeteries; bath houses
and bathing pools and beaches; sinking fund; and fo r all other pur­
poses. The total o f these items follows. The next column shows the
amount o f loans repaid, subdivided as to long-term bonds (2 years or
over), and temporary loans and short-term bonds (less than 2 years),
while the final column o f the table gives the total o f expenditures,
including loans repaid.
Table X X I I .— Expenditures f o r maintenance and operation.— This
table is very similar in form to the preceding one, and shows the
expenditures fo r the maintenance o f all the principal departments o f
city work, together with the total expenditures fo r maintenance and
operation.
Table X X I I I .— Summary o f receipts and expenditures.— This table
summarizes the results o f Tables X X , X X I , and X X I I , bringing into
one presentation the total o f receipts and expenditures shown in those
tables. A column showing cash on hand at the end o f the fiscal year
is also given.
Table X X I V .— Assets.— This table shows the estimated value o f all
property, real and personal, owned by the city at the end o f its fiscal
year, including cash in the treasury; uncollected taxes; cash and bonds
in sinking fund; trust funds; and all lands, buildings, apparatus, and
furniture belonging to it, fo r whatever purpose used, as the city hall,
police and fire departments, schools, libraries, art galleries, museums,
parks, jails, workhouses, reformatories, hospitals, asylums, almshouses,
docks and wharves, ferries and bridges, markets, cemeteries, bath houses
and bathing pools and beaches, waterworks, gas works, electric-light



906

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

plants, etc. The value o f streets and sewers, however, has not been
included. Investigation revealed the fact that but few cities keep any
record o f the value o f city property; hence the figures in this table are
largely estimates based on the best judgment o f the various city
officials who furnished this information.
Table X X V .— P er capita debt, assessed valuation o f property, and
expenditures f o r m aintenance.--This is the last table o f the series, and
shows per capita the net debt, assessed valuation o f real and personal
property, and certain o f the detailed expenditures for maintenance,
together with the total fo r the same. Am ong these detailed expendi­
tures are shown the per capita expenditures for maintenance o f the
police department, etc., the fire department, schools, municipal light­
ing, and streets except lighting. The per capita expenditures for all
other items o f maintenance are combined in the next column, and the
column showing the total per capita expenditure for maintenance is
the final one in the table.
It is deemed necessary in connection with the other explanations
relating to the general tables to refer to unusual conditions found in
some o f the cities covered.
In Paterson, N. J ., the data in many respects differ considerably
from those given in last year’s report. These differences are to be
accounted fo r mainly by the fact that the fire o f February 9 and 10,
1902, which destroyed a large section o f the city, also destroyed many
o f the records from which these data were secured. F or this reason
the figures for the present year are in many instances estimates,
but they are the most reliable that could be secured under the
circumstances.
In W heeling, W . Va., owing to a conflict in authority between
certain o f the officials o f that city, it was difficult to secure reliable
data relative to that city’s affairs. Estimates have been resorted to in
many instances as the most reliable data obtainable.
The population o f Galveston, T ex., was largely reduced by the
deaths and departures on account o f the destructive flood which
occurred there in September, 1900. It has been thought best, how­
ever, to include this city among the number considered in these reports.
Some difficulty has been encountered in past years by readers o f
these reports in not being able to refer readily to particular cities
concerning which they were interested owing to the arrangement o f
the data in the tables according to the size o f the cities included.
The arrangement o f last year has been adhered to in the present
report. It will be seen, however, by reference to the tables, that each
city has been given a marginal number. These numbers, taken in
connection with the follow ing table in which the 137 cities are
arranged alphabetically, will obviate the difficulty experienced in con­
nection with previous reports. F or example, should the reader desire



STATISTICS OF CITIES

907

to refer to the data in the tables relating to Lancaster, Pa., reference
to the follow ing table in which Lancaster is shown, in its proper
alphabetical position, furnishes the information that for this city the
marginal number used in the tables is 90. Reference to that number
in each o f the tables, I to X X V , will give the data fo r that city.
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF CITIES AND THE MARGINAL NUMBER ASSIGNED TO EACH.

Cities.

Akron, O hio............
Albany, N . Y ..........
Allegheny, P a .........
Allentown, P a .........
Altoona, Pa..............
Atlanta, Ga..............
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Augusta, G a ............
Baltimore, Md.........
Bayonne, N . J .........
Binghamton, N. Y ..
Birmingham, A la ...
Boston, M ass..........
Bridgeport, Conn. . .
Brockton, Mass.......
Buffalo, N .Y ............
Butte, M o n t............
Cambridge, Mass ...
Camden, N .J ..........
Canton, O h io..........
Charleston, S. C. .
Chattanooga, T enn.
Chelsea, Mass..........
Chester, P a ..............
Chicago, 111..............
Cincinnati, Ohio___
Cleveland, O h io___
Columbus, O h io ___
Covington, K y .........
Dallas, T e x ..............
Davenport, Iowa . . .
Dayton, O h io..........
Denver. C o lo ..........
Des Moines, Iow a...
Detroit, M ich..........
Dubuque, Iow a.......
Duluth, Minn..........
East St.Louis,111.. .
Elizabeth, N .J .........
Elmira, N .Y ............
Erie, Pa....................
Evansville, Ind .......
Fall River, Mass —
Fitchburg, Mass___
Fort Wayne,Ind . . .
Galveston, T e x .......
Grand Rapids, Mich
Harrisburg, P a .......
Hartford, Conn.......
Haverhill, Mass.......
Hoboken, N .J .........
Holyoke, Mass.........
Houston, T ex..........
Indianapolis, I n d ...
Jersey City,N.J —
Johnstown, Pa.........
Joliet, 111.................
Kansas City, Kans..
Kansas City, Mo —
Knoxville,Tenn . . .
Lancaster, Pa..........
Lawrence, Mass —
Lincoln, N e b r.........
Little Rock, Ark—
Los Angeles, Cal—
Louisville, K y .........
Lowell, M ass..........
Lynn, Mass..............
McKeesport, Pa —




Marginal
number
used in
tables.
87
40
27
113
96
43
134
94
6
124
5
54
92
8

132
41
52
131

68

135
117
118
2
10
7
28
86

88

114
45
25
59
13
107
72
136
74
112
73
64
33
127
83
102
44
77
49
104
63
82
85
21
17
111
137
76
22
125
90
57
91
100
36
18
39
55
115

Cities.

Malden, Mass........................................
Manchester, N. H ..................................
Memphis, Tenn.....................................
Milwaukee, W is ...................................
Minneapolis, Minn................................
Mobile, A la ...........................................
Montgomery, A la.................................
Nashville, T e n n ...................................
Newark, N .J..........................................
New Bedford, M ass..............................
New Haven, Conn................................
New Orleans, La...................................
Newton, Mass........................................
New York, N .Y .....................................
Norfolk, Y a...........................................
Oakland, C a l........................................
Omaha, N ebr........................................
Paterson, N .J........................................
Pawtucket, R. I .....................................
Peoria, 111.............................................
Philadelphia, P a ..................................
Pittsburg, P a ........................................
Portland, M e ........................................
Portland, O r e g .....................................
Providence, R. I ...................................
Quincy, 111.............................................
Reading, P a ..........................................
Richmond, V a ......................................
Rochester, N. Y .....................................
Rockford, 111..........................................
Saginaw, M ich......................................
St. Joseph, M o .......................................
St. Louis, Mo..........................................
St. Paul, M in n ......................................
Salem. M ass..........................................
Salt Lake City, Utah.............................
San Antonio, T ex..................................
San Francisco, Cal................................
Savannah, Ga........................................
Schenectady, N. Y ................................
Scranton, Pa..........................................
Seattle, Wash........................................
Sioux City, I o w a .................................
Somerville, M ass..................................
South Bena, Ind ...................................
Spokane, W ash.....................................
Springfield, 111.......................................
Springfield, Mass...................................
Springfield, O h io ..................................
Superior, W is........................................
Syracuse, N . Y ......................................
Tacoma, W ash......................................
Taunton, Mass.......................................
Terre Haute,‘' I n d .................................
Toledo, Ohio..........................................
Topeka, Kans........................................
Trenton, N .J ........................................
Troy, N . Y .............................................
Utica, N .Y .............................................
Washington, D. C .................................
Waterbury, C onn.................................
Wheeling, W. Va...................................
Wilkesbarre, Pa......................... ..........
Wilmington, Del...................................
Worcester, M ass...................................
Yonkers, N .Y ........................................
York, P a ................................................
Youngstown, Ohio................................

Marginal
number
used in
tables.
120
65
37
14
19
98
133
47
16
58
31
12
122
1
80
56
35
32
95
67
8
11
78
42
20
108
50
46
24
129
89
34
4
23
110
70
71
9
69
126
38
48
123
61
109
105
116
60
101
128
30
103
130
106
26
121
53
62
66
15
81
97
75
51
29
79
119
84

908

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able I.—INCORPORATION, POPULATION, AND AREA.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Population Estimated
Incoi
sorpo- at Twelfth population,
.ted.
ra1
Census,
June 1,1900. Jan. 1,1902.

Cities.

New York. N .Y .......
Chicago, 111..............
Philadelphia, P a ___
St. Lopis, M o ............
Boston, Mass............
Baltimore, Md..........
Cleveland, Ohio.......
Buffalo, N .Y ............
San Francisco, C al..
Cincinnati, O h io___
Pittsburg, P a ............
New Orleans, L a ___
Detroit, M ich............
Milwaukee, W is.......
Washington, D. C . . .
Newark, N. J ............
Jersey City, N. J .......
Louisville, K y..........
Minneapolis, M inn..
Providence. R. I .......
Indianapolis, Ind . . .
Kansas City, M o.......
St. Paul, Minn..........
Rochester, N . Y .......
Denver, C olo............
Toledo, O h io............
Allegheny, Pa..........
Columbus, O h io.......
Worcester, Mass.......
Syracuse, N .Y ..........
New Haven, C onn...
Paterson, N. J ..........
Fall River, Mass.......
St. Joseph, Mo..........
Omaha, Nebr............
Los Angeles, Cal.......
Memphis, Tenn.........
Scranton, Pa..............
Lowell, M ass............
Albany, N. Y ............
Cambridge, M ass___
Portland, Oreg..........
Atlanta, Ga....................
Grand Rapids, M ich___
Dayton, O h io...............
Richm ond,Ya..............
Nashville, T e n n ..........
Seattle, W ash...............
Hartford, Conn............
Reading, P a .................
Wilmington, D e l.........
Camden, N .J ................
Trenton, N .J ................
Bridgeport, Conn.........
Lynn, Mass...................
Oakland, C al...............
Lawrence, M ass..........
New Bedford, Mass___
Des Moines, Iowa.........
Springfield, Mass.........
Somerville, M ass.........
Troy, N .Y ....................
Hoboken, N .J ..............
Evansville, In d ............
Manchester, N. H .........
Utica, N .Y ....................
Peoria, 111.....................
Charleston, S. C............
Savannah, G a ..............
Salt Lake City, U tah...
San Antonio, T e x .......
Duluth, M in n ..............
Erie, P a ........................
Elizabeth, N. J ............
Wilkesbarre, P a ..........
Kansas City, K a n s___
Harrisburg, P a ............
Portland, Me..... .........

1902
1837
1887
1822
1822
1898
1836
1832
1900
1819
1816
1896
1883
1846
1791
1857
1871
1828
1867
1832
1891
1889
1854
1834
1893
1851
1840
1834
1848
1847
1784
1871
1854
1885
1857
1889
1879
1866
1836
1900
1846
1898
1874
1850
1840
1742
1883
1890
1784
1847
1832
1828
1874
1836
1850
1854
1853
1847
1867
1852
1872
1901
1855
1893
1846
1832
1892
1783
1789
1860
1870
1887
1851
1863
1871
1886
1860
1832

3,437,202
1,698,575
1,293,697
575,238
560,892
508,957
381,768
352,387
342,782
325,902
321,616
287,104
285,704
285,315
278.718
246,070
206,433
204,731
202.718
175,597
169,164
163,762
163,065
162,608
133,859
131,822
129,896
• 125,560
118,421
108,374
108,027
105,171
104,863
102,979
102,555
102,479
102,320
102,026
94.969
94,151
91,886
90,426
89,872
87,565
85,333
85,050
80,865
80,671
79,850
78,961
76,508
75,935
73,307
70,996
68,513
66,960
62,559
62,442
62,139
62,059
61,643
60,651
59,364
59,007
56,987
56,383
56,100
55,807
54,244
53,531
53,321
52.969
52,733
52,130
51,721
51,418
50,167
50,145

Area (acres).
Land.

3,583,930 209.218.00
1,800,000 115.164.00
1,335,000
83,340.12
595.000
39.276.80
573,579
26.247.00
520.000
19,290.24
390.000
21.040.00
370.000
26,884.54
350.000
29.760.00
340.000
22.560.00
333.500
18,171.17
(a)
300.000
18,474.64
300.000
297.500
14,205.71
287.000
38,419.20
255.000
8,058.45
213,577
8.053.00
215.000
12.800.00
210.000
11,357.60
178.000
182.500
17.792.00
16.640.00
172.500
170.000
i l S s . oo
170.000
140.000
18.284.80
150.000
4.800.00
133.000
10.400.00
132.500
21.172.80
121.000
10.498.00
120,000
14.340.00
112,000
5.357.00
107,587
26.240.00
107.000
6.208.00
103.500
15.580.00
110.000
110,000 527,647.19
10.240.00
107.500
(a)
103.000
7.215.00
94,969
6,913.70
100.000
94,084
4.016.01
94.000
94.000
95.000
90.000
92.000
81,320
90.000
81,619
82.000
78.500
80,000
75.000
77.000
70.000
75.000
65.000
66.000
70.000
65.000
63.500
75,057
61.000
60,200
57,687
58.000
60.000
65.000
62.000
68,000
55.500
56.000
55.000
55.000
5.824.00
52.000
3,109.12
54.500
6.690.00
55.000
2,590.32
52.000
11,680.00

a Not reported.
6 Not including 3,015 acres Pf park outside City limits.




Water.

7.076.00
1.593.00
1.004.00
964.48
150.00
5.715.00
47,760.00
1.247.00
(a)

225.36
213.49
5,900.80
3,898.30
2.370.00
348.00
320.00
(a)

332.00

(a)

19.20
400.00
1,827.20
309.00

100.00
49.50
746.00
282.90
166.47

(a)

350.00
400.00
107.00
2,050.00
110.00
1,029.00
555.00
670.00
300.00
>2.00
551.80
697.60
100.00
943.00
(a)
50.00

6.00

65.00
544.00

8
150.00
1,882.31

Total.
a
122,240.00
84,933.12
39.276.80
27.251.00
20,254.72
21.190.00
32,599.54
77.520.00
22.560.00
19,418.17
122,240.00
18.700.00
14,419.20
44.320.00
11,956.75
10.423.00
12.800.00
34,227.58
11,705.60
18,112.00
16.640.00
35.483.30
11.635.00
30.208.00
18.304.00
5.200.00
10.400.00
23,000.00
10.807.00
14.340.00
5.357.00
26.240.00
6.208.00
15.680.00
527,696.69
10.240.00
12,333.26
7.961.00
7,196.60
4,182.48
25.600.00
7.040.00
11.200.00
6.880.00
3.926.00
6.092.00
21.237.80

,

11 102.00

3.965.00
6.514.00
5.029.00
4.481.30
8.576.00
7,251.20

4^77.00
12.373.00
35.264.00
24,661.30
2.700.80
6.767.00

(a)

3.840.00
21.700.00
6.400.00
5.303.00
3.276.80
4.320.00
32.896.00
23.040.00
40.960.00
4,426.69
5.824.00
3,109.12
6.740.00
4,472.63
11.680.00

STATISTICS

OF

909

CITIES,

T able I.—INCORPORATION, POPULATION, AND AREA—Concluded.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Population Estimated
at Twelfth copulation,
Census,
Junel,1900. ran. 1,1902.

1895
1845
1853
1873
1894
1868
1899
1834
1836
1899
1890
1818
1901
1881
1867
1798
1886
1867
1836
1897
1871
1875
1850
1901
1890
1870
1891
1899
1857
1895
1901
1836
1889
1864
1889
1851
1891
1840
1857
1901
1900
1882
1858
1873
1886
1872
1891
1798
1872
1889
1852
1864
1854
1888
1838
1848
1869
1863
1852

47,931
46,624
45,859
45,712
45,115
44,885
44,633
42,938
42,728
42,638
42.345
41,459
40,169
40,063
39,647
39,441
39,231
38,973
38,878
38.469
38.415
38,307
38.253
37,789
37,714
37,175
36,848
36,673
36,297
36,252
35,999
35,956
35,936
35,672
35.416
35.254
34,227
34,159
34,072
33,988
33,708
33,664
33,608
33,587
33,111
32,722
32,637
31,682
31,531
31,091
31,051
31,036
30,667
30.470
30.346
30,345
30,154
29,655
29,353
a Not reported.

9398—No. 42—02-----3




51.000
55.000
48,139
47,612
51.000
60.000
50.000
43.500
45.000
50.000
45.000
41,459
42.500
42.500
41.000
41.000
40,630
40.000
40.000
38,800
41.000
41.500
40.000
28.000
40.000
37,175
40.000
40.000
37.500
38.000
42,700
36,250
40.000
36.500
36.000
36.500
37.500
36.000
35,264
35.000
37.000
34,664
34.500
36,336
35.500
35.000
34.500
37.500
32.000
32.000
32.000
31,036
33.000
32.000
31.500
35.000
32.000
35.000
32.000

Area (acres).
Land.

2.086.5
3,615.3
9,848.68
3.100.00
6.144.00
6.500.00
1.495.00
7.456.00
5.120.00
2,^60.00
5.144.00
13.764.00
6.210.00
2.364.00
6,721.60
1,662.31
2.698.00
3.125.00
4,053.30
7.328.00
5.760.00
7.494.00
19.439.00
20,431.15
3,^0.75
7.040.00
3,653.8~
4.850.5
4.600.00
2,475.98
4.546.00
1,999.27
5.052.00
2.245.00
3.840.00
1.441.00
3,000.00
2.210.00
3.047.00
4.250.00
9.986.00
30.580.00
2.530.00
2.690.00
2.880.00
17.528.00
5,(
<&.00
32,000.00
4.350.00
1.350.00
1.792.00
2,(
472.00
3.840.00
2.472.00

Water.

615.32

200.00

.260.00

(«)
60.00
190.00
196.00
47.00
2,000.00
325.00
640.00
160.00
48.85

(a)

640.00
134.00
217.35
201.00
82.00
32.00

25.00
1.534.00
140.00
1.240.00
10.00
120.00
200.00
(a)

100.00

48.00

Total.
13.400.00
2,396.57
3,615.33
10.464.00
3.300.00
6.144.00
5.760.00
1.495.00
7.456.00
5.120.00
7,891.20
2.560.00
5.144.00
13.824.00
6.400.00
2.560.00
5,721.60
1,662.31
2,745.
6,125.
4,053.
7.653.
5.760.
8,134.
19,599.
20,480.
12,960.
3.440.
7,680.
3.653.
4,984.
(a)

I8 8 88 88 88 8S 88 S S 3 8 S 8 S 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

79 Yonkers, N .Y ....... .
80 Norfolk, Y a .......... .
81 Waterbury, Conn ..
82 Holyoke, M ass___
83 Fort Wayne, Ind ...
84 Youngstown, O h io.
85 Houston, T e x ........
86 Covington, K y.......
87 Akron, Ohio............
88 Dallas, T e x .............
89 Saginaw, M ich.......
90 Lancaster, P a ........
91 Lincoln, N ebr........
92 Brockton, Mass.......
93 Binghamton, N. Y ..
Augusta, G a............
Pawtucket, R. I ___
96 Altoona, P a ............
97 Wheeling, W. Y a ...
Mobile, A l a ............
Birmingham, A la ..
100 Little Rock, Ark ...
101 Springfield, O h io...
102 Galveston, T ex .......
103 Tacoma, W ash.......
104 Haverhill, Mass___
105 Spokane, W ash.......
106 Terre Haute, I n d ...
_
107 Dubuque, I o w a _
108 Quincy, 111.............
109 South Bend, Ind ...
110 Salem, Mass............
111 Johnstown, P a .......
112 Elmira, N .Y ...........
113 Allentown, Pa....... .
114 Davenport, Io w a ...
_
115 McKeesport, P a _
116 Springfield, 111....... .
117 Chelsea, Mass..........
118 Chester, Pa.............
119 York, Pa..................
120 Malden, Mass..........
121 Topeka, Kans..........
122 Newton, Mass........
123 Sioux City, Io w a ...
124 Bayonne, N. J ........
125 Knoxville, Tenn ...
126 Schenectady, N. Y . .
127 Fitchburg, Mass—
128 Superior, W is..........
129 Rockford, 111..........
130 Taunton, M ass___
131 Canton, Ohio..........
132 Butte, M ont.......... .
133 Montgomery, A l a ..
134 Auburn, N. Y ....... .
135 Chattanooga, Tenn.
136 East St. Louis, 111...
137 Joliet, 111.................

Inco]
rate

2,693.
4,747.
2,081.
5,052.
2,277.
3.840.
1.441.
3.000.
2.250.
3,072.
4.250.
11,520.
30,720.
3,770.
2,600.
3.000.
17,728.
23,335.
5,184.
32,000.
4.350.
1.350.
1,792.
5.760.
2,696.
3.840.
2,520.

910

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able II.—DATES OF ENDING OF YEARS COVERED BY THE INVESTIGATION.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34

35
36
37
38
39
40
41

Cities.

Dates of ending of years covered by investigation.

New York, N. Y .......... Schools, July 31,1901; libraries, June 30,1901, to Apr. 30,1902; all other
departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Chicago, 111................. Schools, June 30,1901; library, June 1,1901; all other departments, Dec.
31.1901.
Philadelphia, P a ....... Dec. 31,1901.
St. Louis, M o............... Health department, Dec. 31,1901; schools and school-fund items, June
30,1901; library, Apr. 30,1902; all other departments, Apr. 7,1902.
Boston, M ass.............. Police department, Nov. 30,1901; liquor licenses, Apr. 30,1902; health
department, Dec. 31,1901; schools, June 30,1901; all other departments,
Jan. 31,1902.
Baltimore, Md............ Dec. 31,1901.
Cleveland^ O h io......... Divorces, July 1,1901; schools and school-fund items, Aug. 31,1901; all
other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Buffalo, N .Y .............. Police and health departments, parks, streets, libraries, and public
works, Dec. 31,1901;(a) all other departments, June 30,1901.
San Francisco, Cal___ June 30,1901.
Cincinnati, O h io ....... Divorces and library and library-fund items, June 30,1901; schools and
school-fund items, Aug. 31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Pittsburg, P a .............. Fire and health departments, Dec. 31,1901; schools, Aug. 31,1901; all
other departments, Jan. 31,1902.
New Orleans, L a ....... Schools, June 30,1901; building permits, Aug. 31,1901; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
Detroit, M ich.............. Fire alarms, fires, property loss, street railways, and libraries, Dec. 31,
1901; all other departments, June 30,1901.
Milwaukee, W is......... Police department, Mar. 31,1902; schools and library, Aug. 31,1901: all
other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Washington, D. C....... June 30,1901.
Newark, N .J .............. Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Jersey City, N .J ......... Police, fire, and health departments, Dec. 31,1901; all other departments,
Nov. 30,1901.
Louisville, K y ............ Parks, Nov. 30,1901; schools, June 30,1901; school-fund items, public
works, and sinking fund, Dec. 31,1901; all other departments, Aug.
31.1901.
Minneapolis, Minn . . . Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Providence, R. I ......... Police, fire, and health departments, charities, and building permits,
Dec. 31,1901; divorces, Sept. 21,1901; schools, June 30,1901; all other
departments, Sept. 30,1901.
Indianapolis, I n d ___ Divorces, schools, and library, and school and library fund items, June
30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Kansas City, M o ......... Health department, Dec. 31,1901; schools, and library and school fund
items, June 30,1901; all other departments, Apr. 21,1902.
St. Paul, M in n ............ Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Rochester, N .Y .......... Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Denver, C o lo .............. Schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; all other departments,
Dec. 31,1901.
Toledo, Ohio............... Divorces, July 1,1901; schools, Aug. 31,1901; all other departments, Dec.
31.1901.
Allegheny, P a ............ Schools and school-fund items, June 1,1901; all other departments, Feb.
28.1902.
Columbus, O h io ......... Marriages and births, Mar. 31,1901; divorces, June 30,1901; schools and
school-fund items, Aug. 31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Worcester, M ass......... Liquor licenses, May 1,1902; divorces and health department, Dec. 31,
1901; all other departments, Nov. 30,1901.
Syracuse, N .Y ............ Schools, July 31,1901; library, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec.
31,1901.
New Haven, Conn___ Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Paterson, N . J ............ Health department and schools and charities, Feb. 28,1902; library and
library-fund items, Feb. 1,1902; all other departments, Mar. 20,1902.
Fall River, Mass......... Dec. 31,1901.
St. Joseph, M o ............ Police and health departments and charities, Apr. 15,1902; fire alarms,
fires, and property loss, Dec. 31,1901; schools and school-fund items,
June 30, 1901; library, Apr. 30,1902; all other departments, Apr. 21,
1901.
Omaha, Nebr.............. Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Los Angeles, C a l....... Schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; marriages and divorces,
Dec. 31,1901; all other departments, Nov. 30,1901.
Memphis, T e n n ......... Schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; library, Nov. 30,1901; all
other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Scranton, P a ..............‘ Police department, Feb. 1,1902; health department and library, Dec.
31,1901; schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; all other depart­
ments, Apr. 7,1902.
Lowell, Mass.............. Police department and liquor licenses, June 1,1902; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
Albany, N. Y .............. Police, fire, and health departments and public works, Oct. 31,1901;
liquor licenses, May 1,1902; schools, Aug. 31,1901; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
Cambridge, Mass....... Health department and schools, Dec. 31,1901; all other departments,
Nov. 30,1901.




a Not including 1 library, June 30,1901.

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

911

T able II.—DATES OP ENDING OF YEARS COVERED BY THE INVESTIGATION—Continued.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51

52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

67
68
69
70
71
72
73

74
75
76
77

Cities.

Dates of ending of years covered-by investigation.

Portland, Oreg.......... Schools, June 30,1901; school-fund items, Jan. 10,1902; all other depart-*
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
Atlanta, G a ............... Schools, June 10,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Grand Rapids, M ich.. Marriages, Dec. 31,1901; schools and library, Aug. 31,1901; school and
library fund items, Sept. 26,1901; financial statements, Apr. 19,1902;
all other departments, Apr. 30,1902.
Dayton, Ohio............. Divorces, June 30,1901; health department and public works, Dec. 31,
1901; schools and library, Aug. 81, 1901; all other departments, Feb.
28,1902.
Richmond, V a .......... Schools, July 31, 1901; financial statements, Jan. 81, 1902; all other
departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Nashville, Tenn......... Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Seattle, W ash ............ Schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; all other departments,
Dec. 31,1901.
Hartford, Conn.......... Liquor licenses, May 5,1902; divorces, June 30, 1901; health depart­
ment, Feb. 28,1902; parks, May 1,1901; schools, June 5 to 26,1901; (a)
waterworks, Mar. 1,1902; all other departments, Mar. 31,1902.
Reading, Pa............... Police, fire, and health departments, and building permits, Dec. 31,
1901; schools, Feb. 23,1902; all other departments, Apr. 7,1902.
Wilmington, D e l....... Fire department, May 15,1902; health department, parks, and water­
works, Dec. 31,1901; streets, sewers, and street railways, Jan. 31,1902;
library, Feb. 28,1902; building permits, Apr. 30,1902; all other depart­
ments, June 30, 1901.
Camden, N. J ............ Fire and health departments and library, Dec. 31,1901; schools, June
30,1901; all other departments, Jan. 31,1902.
Trenton, N. J.............. Health department, Dec. 31, 1901; schools, Aug. 31,1902; school-fund
items, June 30,1901; waterworks, Jan. 31,1902; all other departments,
Feb. 28,1902.
Bridgeport, Conn....... Liquor licenses, June 30,1902; divorces, July 1,1902; health department,
Dec. 31, 1901; schools, July 14, 1902; library, June 1, 1902; all other
departments, Mar. 31,1902.
Lynn, Mass................. Financial statements, Dec. 19,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Oakland, Cal.............. June 30,1901.
Lawrence, Mass......... Liquor licenses, Apr. 30,1902; schools, June 30,1901; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
New Bedford, Mass... Police and fire departments and public works, Dec. 31,1901; schools,
June 30,1901: all other departments, Dec. 1,1901.
Des Moines, I o w a ___ Health department and library, Dec. 81,1901; schools, June 2,1901; all
other departments, Mar. 31,1902.
Springfield, Mass....... Health department, Dec. 31, 1901; schools, June 28,1901; all other de­
partments, Dec. 10,1901.
Somerville, Mass....... Dec. 31,1901.
Troy, N. Y ................... Liquor licenses, Apr. 30,1902; schools in Lansingburg district, July 31,
1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Hoboken, N. J .......... Police, fire, and health departments, parks, streets, library, and public
works, Apr. 30,1902; schools, June 30, 1901; all other departments,
May 5,1902.
Evansville, I n d ......... Police, fire, and health departments, Mar. 31,1902; marriages, divorces,
street railways, and library, Dec. 31,1901; schools, July 31,1901; all
other departments, Aug. 31,1901.
Manchester, N. H ___ Schools, June 24,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Utica, N. Y ................. Police and fire departments, and police and fire department fund items,
Mar. 31,1902; health department, liquor licenses, parks, and streets,
Dec. 31,1901; schools, July 31,1901; library, June, 30,1901; charities,
and charity-fund items, Mar. 1,1902; all other departments, Oct. 1,
1901.
Peoria, 111.................. Parks and library and park and library fund items, May 31, 1901;
schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; all other departments,
Dec. 31,1901.
Charleston, S. C ......... Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Savannah, G a ............ Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Salt Lake City, Utah . Schools and school-fund items, June 30, 1901; library, May 31, 1901;
all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
San Antonio, T e x ___ Schools and school-fund items, Aug. 31, 1901; all other departments,
May 31,1901.
Duluth, M in n ............ Schools, July 31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Erie, P a ..................... Police and fire departments, and streets and parks, Mar. 31,1901; mar­
riages, divorces, street railways, health department, public works,
ana water-fund items, Dec. 31,1901; schools, June 26,1901; school and
library fund items, June 3,1901; financial statements, Apr. 1,1901.
Elizabeth, N. J .......... Health department- and building permits, Dec. 31,1901; all other de­
partments, June 30,1901.
Wilkesbarre, P a......... Fire and health departments, marriages, divorces, and building
permits, Dec. 31, 1901; schools and school-fund items, June 3,1901;
all other departments, Apr. 7,1902.
Kansas City, Kans___ Schools and school-fund items, June 30, 1901; all other departments,
Mar. 31 1902.
Harrisburg, Pa........... Schools, Junei, 1902; all other departments, Apr. 7,1902.




a Not including high schools, Mar. 31,1902.

912

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

Table IL—DATES OF ENDING OF YEARS COVERED BY THE INVESTIGATION—Continued.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
78
79
80
81
82
83
84

85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116

Cities.

Dates of ending of years covered by investigation.

Portland, M e.............. Health department, Nov. 31,1902; marriages, births, and divorces, Jan.
1,1902; schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Yonkers, N. Y ............ Health department and charities, Apr. 30,1902; schools, Aug. 31,1901;
library, June 30,1901; waterworks, Nov. 30, 1901; all other depart­
ments, Feb. 28,1902.
Norfolk, V a ............... Schools, July 31,1901; all other departments, June 30,1901.
Waterbury, Conn....... Dec. 31,1901.
Holyoke, M ass.......... Schools, June 30,1901; public works and water-fund items, Dec. 31,1901;
all other departments, Nov. 30,1901.
Fort Wayne, I n d ....... Marriages and divorces, June 30,1901; schools and school and library
fund items, July 31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Youngstown, O h io.. . Police, fire, and health departments, street railways, and charities,
Dec. 31, 1901; divorces, July 1,1901; parks and streets, Feb. 28,1902;
schools, Aug. 31,1901; waterworks, Mar. 31, 1902; all other depart­
ments, Mar. 17,1902.
Houston, T e x ............ Police department, Apr. 30,1902; schools and school-fund items, Aug.
31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Covington, K y............ Marriages and divorces, Sept. 15,1901; schools, June 30,1901; all other
departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Akron, Ohio............... Fire department and marriages, Dec. 31,1901; health department, Mar.
31,1902; schools, Aug. 31,1901; all other departments, Mar. 20,1902.
Dallas, T ex................. Schools, June 30.1901; all other departments, Apr. 30,1902.
Saginaw, M ich.......... Marriages and births, Dec. 31,1901; all other departments, June 30,1901.
Lancaster, P a ............ Health department, Dec. 31, 1901; schools, June 1,1902; all other de­
partments, Feb. 28,1902.
Lincoln, N ebr............ Births, June 30,1902; schools, June 30,1901; library, May 31,1902; ceme­
teries, Apr. 30,1902; all other departments, Mar. 31,1902.
Brockton, Mass.......... Schools, Sept., 1901; all other departments, Nov. 30,1901.
Binghamton, N. Y . .. Police and health departments, charities, public works, and building
permits, Dec. 31,1901; fire department, Jan. 31,1902; schools, July 31,
1901; all other departments, June 30,1901.
Augusta, Ga............... Fire department and financial statements, Dec. 31,1901; schools, June
15,1901; charities and public works, Nov. 30,1901; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 1,1901.
Pawtucket, R. I ......... Divorces, Sept. 21,1901; health department, Dec. 31,1901; schools, June
30,1901; all other departments, Sept. 30,1901.
Altoona, P a ............... Health department, Dec. 31,1901; schools, June 4,1901; all other de­
partments, Apr. 7,1902.
Wheeling, W. Va....... Schools and school and library fund items, July 31,1901; library, Apr. 5,
1902; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Mobile, A l a ............... Schools, Aug. 31,1901; health department and charities, Dec. 31,1901;
all other departments, Mar. 15,1902.
Birmingham, A la ___ Police department, May 1, 1902; schools and libraries, June 30,1901;
all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Little Rock, A r k ....... Park-fund items, Aug. 31,1901; schools and school-fund items, June 30,
1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Springfield, Ohio....... Fire department, Apr. 15,1902; divorces, June 30,1901; health depart­
ment, Dec. 31, 1901; schools and school-fund items, Aug. 31, 1901;
• library, Apr. 30,1901; all other departments, Mar. 3,1902.
Galveston, T ex.......... Schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; financial statements, Feb.
28,1902; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Tacoma, Wash.......... Schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; all other departments,
Dec. 31,1901.
Haverhill, Mass........ Schools, June 30, 1901; waterworks, Nov. 30, 1901; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
Spokane, Wash.......... Police department and schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901;
all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Terre Haute, I n d ....... Police department, Feb. 28,1902; schools and library, July 31,1901; all
other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Dubuque, Io w a .......... Schools, June 30,1901; school-fund items, Jan. 31,1902; all other depart­
ments, Feb. 28,1902.
Quincy, 111.................. Schools, June 9,1902; library, May 31,1902; all other departments, Apr.
30,1902.
South Bend, Ind......... Marriages and divorces, June 30,1901; schools and library and school
and library fund items, July 31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,
1901.
Salem, M ass............... Schools, June 30, 1901; all other departments, Nov. 30,1901.
Johnstown, Pa............ Police, fire, and health departments, Dec. 31,1901: schools and schoolfund items, June 4,1901; all other departments, Apr. 1,1902.
Elmira, N .Y ............... Liquor licenses, Apr. 30, 1902; health department, Dec. 31, 1901;
schools, July 31,1901; all other departments, Feb. 3,1902.
Allentown, P a ............ Liquor licenses, health department, and building permits, Dec. 31,
1901; schools and school-fund items, June 30,1901; all other depart­
ments, Apr. 7,1902.
Davenport, I o w a ....... Parks and streets, Dec. 31, 1901; schools, June 30, 1901; school-fund
items, Feb. 10,1902; all other departments, Feb. 28,1902.
McKeesport, Pa.......... Health department, Dec. 31, 1901; schools, June 4,1901; all other de­
partments, Apr. 7,1902.
Springfield, 111............ Schools and school-fund items, Aug. 31,1901; bonds and sinking fund,
Sept. 30,1901; all other departments, Feb, 28,1902.




STATISTICS OS' CITIES.

913

Table II.—DATES OF ENDING OF YEARS COVERED BY THE INVESTIGATION—Concluded;
Mar­
ginal
nmnber.

Cities.

117
118
119

Chelsea, Mass.
Chester, P a ...
York, P a....... .

120 M alden, Mass.
121 Topeka, Kans.
122
123

_
Newton, Mass_
Sioux City, Iowa.

124

Bayonne, N. J.

126 K noxville, Tenn.........
126 Schenectady, N. Y ___
127

Fitchburg, Mass

128

Superior, Wis

129 R ockford, 111..,
130

Taunton, Mass.

131

Canton, Ohio ..

132

Butte, M on t...............

133
134

M ontgomery, A la.......
Auburn, N. Y ..............

135

Chattanooga, T enn. . .

136

East St. Louis, 111.......

137

Joliet, 111....................




Dates o f ending of years covered by investigation.

Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Schools, June 4,1901; all other departments, Apr. 1,1902.
Police, fire, ana health departments, Dec. 31,1901; liquor licenses, Jan.
21, 1902; schools and school-fund items, June 1, 1901; all other de­
partments, Apr. 8,1902.
Dec. 31,1901.
Schools ana school-fund items, June 30, 1901; all other departments,
Mar. 31,1902.
Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Schools, June 8, 1901; library, Dec. 31, 1901; all other departments,
Mar. 31,1902.
P olice and health departments, parks, streets, and public works, Dec.
31, 1901; schools, June 30, 1901; library, July 31, 1901; all other de­
partments, Apr. 30,1902.
Schools, June 30,1901; all other departments, Jan. 22,1902.
Liquor licenses, May 1, 1902; schools, June 20,1901; all other depart­
ments, Dec. 31,1901.
Health department, Dec. 31, 1901; schools, June 30, 1901; all other
departments, Nov. 30,1901.
P olice and health departments, parks, streets, and charities, Dec. 31,
1901; schools and library, June 30,1901; all other departments, Sept.
30,1901.
Schools, June 30, 1901; library, June 1, 1901; all other departments,
Dec. 31,1901.
Health department and schools, Dec. 31,1901; all other departments,
Nov. 30,1901.
Fire department and waterworks, Mar. 1,1902; marriages and street
railways, Dec. 31, 1901; divorces, July 10, 1901; health department,
Feb. 28,1902; schools, Aug. 31,1901; charities, Feb. 28,1902; all other
departments.Mar. 17,1902.
Schools and school-fund items, Aug. 31,1901; library, Mar. 30,1902; all
other departments, Apr. 30,1902.
Sept. 30,1901.
P olice department, Nov. 30,1901; schools and school-fund items, July
31,1901; all other departments, Dec. 31,1901.
Schools and charities, June 30, 1901; building permits and financial
statements, Dec. 31,1901; all other departments, Sept. 30,1901.
Fire department, Dec. 31,1901; schools and school-fund items, July 12,
1901; library, May. 31,1902; all other departments, Feb. 28,1902.
Apr. 30,1902.

914

BULLETIN OB' THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.
T able III.—POLICE, RETAIL LIQUOR SALOONS, AND ARRESTS, BY CAUSES.

[In this table drunkenness includes “ com m on drunk,” “ drunk and disorderly,” and all cases
where drunkenness in any form was the prim ary cause o f arrest; disturbing the peace includes all
cases o f disorderly conduct not attributable to drunkenness; assault and battery includes all cases
o f assault; vagrancy includes arrests o f beggars, tramps, loafers, loiterers, and all persons w ithout
apparent means of support; housebreaking includes burglary and all cases o f breaking and entering,
and larceny includes pocket picking, robbery, and all cases o f theft.]
Mar­
gin­
al
num
ber.

Cities.

Licensed
retail liquor
saloons.
Po­
lice­
Drunk­
men.
en­
Num­ Amt. ness.
ber. of li­
cense.

Arrests fo r Dis­
turb­
ing
the
peace

As­
sault Hom­ Va­ House Lar­
and icide. gran­ break­ ceny.
ing.
bat­
cy.
tery.

All Total
other ar­
of­ rests.
fen­
ses.

New York, N. Y .. 7,233 10,821
71,573 28,515 10,338
629 6,976 1,896 10,403 3,419 138,749
Chicago, 111......... 62,974 6,740
032,482 (d) 6,020
819 1,831 6,776 21,844 69,809
37
Philadelphia, P a . 2,822 1,737 1,100 30,428 7,818 3,540
213 4,933 8,825 61,189
60 5,372
St. Louis, M o..
1,264 2,253
500 4,068 6,395
609
61 1,805
228 1,753 8,747 23,666
Boston, M ass..
980 («) 19,511
1,245
915 2,503
32
311
617 2,921 7,690 34,500
Baltimore, Md
250 10,225 5,220 3,910
947 2,095
21
351
1292,708 8,859 31,423
Cleveland, O h io.. /361 1,820
350 10,192
221
796 1,076
31
231 1,612 5,060 19,219
Buffalo, N. Y
500 11,289 4,113 1,100
0732 2,570
19 2,824
238 2,006 3,468 25,057
San Francisco, Cal.
586 8,052
84 14,742 1,907 1,300
55 2,127
246 957 6,028 27,362
Cincinnati, Ohio .
486 1,676
73 705 5,292 12,913
550
39 2,795
350 1,928 1,531
Pittsburg, Pa
572 1,100 15,040 1,319
497
194
25 1,370
28 229 4,862 23,067
New Orleans, La .
271 1,496 (A)
5,157 4,692
35 577 3,883 17,221
47 2,154
676
Detroit, M ich
492 1,252
61 799 2,114 7,795
622
5 259
500 2,043 1,892
M ilwaukee, W is..
314 1,869
51 408
200 1,901 1,207
481
5 883
824 5,260
492
W ashington, D. C.
607
12 2,196
400 4,072 5,647 3,383
179 2,485 *8,088 *26,062
Newark, N. J .......
240
238 583 1,485 6.399
360 1,283
250 1,630 1,648
548
27
Jersey City, N. J ..
357 1,0 2 1
217 654 1,128 7,343
13
285
250 3,197
625 1,224
887
Louisville. K y___
44
232
274 681 1,882 7,396
339
168
155 1,360 2,755
M inneapolis,M inn
212
351 1,000 2,090
241
2
70 423 1,391 5,292
579
496
Providence, R. I .
72 596 2,100 9,025
310
461
4
122
300
270
400 5,561
Indianapolis, Ind.
165 525
125 901 2,761 7,033
1,101
13
961
350 1,085
86
Kansas City, M o..
222
162 933 3,877 16,230
475
20 4,549
290
250 1,333 5,066
St. Paul, Minn . . .
314 1,000 1,614
177
45 327
336
823 3,881
199
536
1
Rochester, N. Y ..
193
506
500 V )
(/)
(J)
U )
W
(i)
Denver, C olo.
85
361
18 1,640 $ 3 8 % 2,702 7,678
880 151
600 1,621
Toledo, O h io.
130 659
343
5 111
31 285 2,143 3,437
350
360 159
A llegheny, Pa
123
190 1,100
5
94
14
965 1,596
37
608 3,372
53
Columbus, O h io.. *136
533
655
237
5
372
21 241 1,718 3,968
350
719
W orcester, M ass..
136
90
3,524 ' 115 317
6
62
58 272
647 5,001
Syracuse, N. Y . . .
394 %
1,321
129
51 517 1,234 3,676
362
147
1
43
New Haven,Conn.
162 405
2,544
68 442 1,193 6,229
6
5
198
773
Paterson, N. J ___
98
481
(J)
(J)
V )
( ')
Fall R iver, M ass..
120
98 (w)
64
96 %
$50 %
%
857 t t .
St. Joseph, M o___
63
155 1,000
704 612
43 230
106
3 248
970 2,916
Omaha, Nebr.......
93
220 1,000
69 363 2,598 7,615
2,559
459
376
3 1,188
Los Angeles, C al..
93
200
223
6
525
61 261 1,261 5,898
555
600 3,006
Memphis, Tenn ..
94
646
770 322
113 476 1,774 4,734
610
26
643
Scranton, Pa
P55
196 i % P i, 423 P191 P 37
P2 P113
Pl8 P62 P427 P 2,273
121 . 91
Low ell, M ass.
62 247
1
4,079
227
91
27
666 5.400
Albany, N. Y
158 413 (
Uo 1,005 571 257
61 246 451 2,954
3
360
Cambridge, Mass.
110
1
1,620
176
101 268 687 3,267
406
8
Portland, O reg. . .
59
269 400 1,419
137
239
4
23 274 1,340 3,803
367
a From $100 to $800.
6 Not including data relating to sanitary district of Chicago.
o Including arrests for disturbing the peace.
d Included in arrests for drunkenness.
e Innkeepers, $2,000; com m on victualers, $1,100; com m on victualers, second and third classes, $500.
/N o t including 24 park policem en.
f/N ot including 75 em ployed for 6 m onths.
h From $100 to $1,000, according to am ount o f sales of preceding year.
*Including 137 arrests for insanity.
/N o t reported.
* Including 8 detailed as sanitary inspectors.
* Innkeepers, $1,500; first-class saloons, $2,000; second-class saloons, $500.
>»For sale o f beer only, $200.
wInnkeepers, $2,500; first-class saloons, $1,800; fourth-class saloons, $1,500.
o Saloons, $50; in connection with other business, $35.
p For 9 m onths only.
a Innkeepers, $2,000; com m on victualers, $1,800.




915

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able III.—POLICE, RETAIL LIQUOR SALOONS, AND ARRESTS, BY CAUSES—Continued.
[In this table drunkenness includes,**com m on drunk,” “ drunk and disorderly,” and all cases
where drunkenness in any form was the prim ary cause o f arrest; disturbing the peace includes all
cases o f disorderly conduct not attributable to drunkenness; assault and battery includes all cases
o f assault; vagrancy includes arrests o f beggars, tramps, loafers, loiterers, and all persons without
apparent means o f support; housebreaking includes burglary and all cases o f breaking and entering,
ana larceny includes pocket picking, robbery, and all cases o f theft.]

Mar­
gin­
al
num
ber.

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82

Cities.

Po­
licemen.

Atlanta, Ga.......... «161
Grand
Rapids,
M ich .................
83
Dayton, O hio....... o89
Richm ond, Va . . . 100
Nashville, T en n .. 105
Seattle, Wash —
77
Hartford, C on n ...
98
46
Reading, Pa.........
W ilm ington, D e l.
87
Camden, N. J.......
99
Trenton, N. J .......
88
Bridgeport, Conn.
62
Lynn, Mass.......... 083
Oakland, C al.......
61
Lawrence, M ass..
62
New
Bedford,
Mass................... ft 85
Des Moines, Iow a.
59
Springfield, Mass.
69
Som erville, M ass.
55
Troy N, V
___ 124
92
Hoboken, N. J —
Evansville, In d ...
63
Manchester N. H
44
Utica, N. Y ..........
43
65
Peoria, 111............
Charleston, S. C .. 103
Savannah, Ga — m o
Salt Lake City,
U tah .................
33
San A ntonio, T ex.
45
Duluth, M in n ___
53
Erie, P a ...............
40
Elizabeth,N . J .. .
66
W ilkesbarre, P a ..
46
KansasCity,Kans. «65
Harrisburg, P a ...
37
Portland, M e .(c).
55
65
Yonkers, N. Y ....
75
N orfolk, Y a..........
Waterbury, Conn.
39
47
H olyoke, Mass—

Arrests for—

Licensed
retail liquor
saloons.

Dis­
Drunk­ turb­
en­
Num­ Amt. ness. ing
the
ber. o f li­
peace
cense.

23

2 2,439

211
37
1,081
1,344
258
475
(d)
1,360
799 1,144
72 2,136 1,958 1,433
600 1,020 1,797
153
/450 2,602
405 254
500
497
102
39
300 1,346
989 351
500 1,146
488 186
815 719 208
350
/450 1,036
159 454
1,500 2,904
155 263
400 1,333
156 119
2,500 1,321
115 197

82
2
348
1
9
162
20 2,405
8 1,139
149
1
122
136
3
3
10
190
2
65
2
17
3
60
25

119 ft$l,000
180
418
297
232
268
171
170
178
206
283
298
68
218
62

As­
sault Hom­ Va­ House Lar­
and icide. gran­ break­ ceny.
ing.
cy.
bat­
tery.

4,163 8,642

510
350

58
78
54

(<)
1,200

289
362
292

500
250
75

246
210

500
500

223

200

()
i

116 1,200
264 (m)
168 1,000
550
137
250
220
550
144
60

550

199
141
203
45

350
P250
/ 450
(*)

1,197
139
1,669
348
1,494
52
739
33
536 572
861
473
345 121
1,085
16
1,045
13
920 395
624 923
1,217 2,088

214
109
93
127
212
197
382
40
133
237
271
349

145
928
61
474
561
811
1,014
147 240
493 145
684
116
394 204
100
610 407
194
960 574
252
105
711
22
65
1,165
433 195 245
2,173 1,322 1,348
618 212
73
133
835
15

42

9
8
1
2
8
25

306
236
426
412

36
11
23
17
76
67
63

1
3
3
3

161
466
110
298
129
80
647
50
29
102
290
30
44

33
20
11
31
30
10
22
5
26
22
100
22
10

2
2
1
10
7
3
1

212 1,763 17,286

304 1,917
12 188
46 307 3,439 6,218
120 519 1,024 5,137
172 1,232 1,104 10,460
59 306 *5,315 *9,797
557 4,231
20 244
75
298 1,143
9
448 3,623
27 323
36 199
229 2,287
62 187
539 2,730
40 243
580 2,579
665 4,230
46 178
803 2,609
16 119
512 2,397
37 190

24
339
65
17
142
32
132

5
8
1
1

A ll Total
other ar­
of­ rests.
fen­
ses.

22
42
49
24

325 2,063
137
126 2,474 5,115
411 2,321
156
352 1,376
83
109
417 1,988
158
407 2,173
798 2,097
300
91 le 674 fcl,929
430 2,168
223
170
649 2,685
395 1,388 4,002
669
430 5,253
104 1,101
812
50
213
848
106 233
83 441
49
50
362 796
237
58
225 367
628
175
891 1,745
125 394
118
247

2,534
3,197
2,586
1,993
1,397
1,308
3,457
1,418
1,900
1,810
7,876
1,477
1,403

« Not including 22 supernumeraries.
b For sale of beer only, $250.
c Including 3 detailed as sanitary inspectors.
d First-class saloons, $250; second-class saloons, $150; third-class saloons, $100; fourth-class saloons, $50.
e Including technical arrests o f inmates of houses o f prostitution.
/ For sale o f beer only, $200.
gN ot including 11 special policem en,
ftNot including 20 special policem en.
i Innkeepers, $1,500; saloons, $1,100 to $1,400.
j Innkeepers, $1,800; others, $1,500.
ft Including 535 technical arrests o f saloon keepers.
i Including 24 paid by steamship companies.
m$25 for m alt, $150 for alcoholic liquors.
n Including 7 detailed as sanitary inspectors.
©Data are for 10months.
,
_
p And 5 per cent additional on rental value of buildings occupied; m alt liquors only, $300.




916

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

T able III.—POLICE, RETAIL LIQUOR SALOONS, AND ARRESTS, BY CAUSES—Continued.
tn
drunk,” “ drunk and disorderly,”
cases
£ othis table drunkenness includes “ comm on cause of arrest; disturbing the peaceand all cases
ere drunkenness in any form was the primary
includes all
cases f disorderly conduct not attributable to drunkenness; assault and battery includes all

o f assault; vagrancy includes arrests o f beggars, tramps, loafers, loiterers, and all persons without
apparent means o f support; housebreaking includes burglary and all cases o f breaking and entering,
and larceny includes pocket picking, robbery, and all cases of theft.]
Marginal
num
ber.

Cities.

83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125

Licensed
retail liquor
saloons.
Po­
Dis­
liceDrunk­ turb­
men. Num­ Amt. en­
ing
ber. o f li­ ness. the
cense.
peace

Fort W ayne, Ind.
Youngstown,Ohio
Houston, T e x ___
Covington, K y . . .
Akron, O hio.........
Dallas, T ex..........
Saginaw, M ich . . .
Lancaster, Pa.......
L incoln, Nebr___
Brockton, M ass...
Binghamton, N. Y .
Augusta, Ga.........
Pawtucket, R. I ..
Altoona, P a .........
W heeling, W. Va.
M obile, A la .........
Birmingham, A la.
Little R ock, A rk .
Springfield, O hio.
Galveston, T e x ...
Tacoma, Wash . . .
H averhill, M ass..
Spokane, W ash...
Terre Haute, I n d .
Dubuque, Iow a ...
Quincy, 111............
South Bend, In d ..
Salem, M ass.........
Johnstown, Pa___
Elmira, N. Y .........
A llentow n, Pa___
Davenport, Io w a .
M cKeesport, Pa ..
Springfield, 111___
Cnelsea, Mass.......
Chester, P a ..........
York, Pa...............
M alden, Mass.......
Topeka, Kans.......
Newton, M ass___
Sioux City, Iow a ..
Bayonne, N .J.......
K noxville, T enn..

207
37
250
40
51
253
185
48
165
45
46
208
147
43
c 21
78
35
15
34'_____
121
36
67
76
9 44
130
42
18
38
130
53
175
j 51
102
36
68
38
151
260
39
45
105
37
29
34
130
163
o 37
39
140
130
27
136
28
35
55
23
38
157
18
77
35
180
72
38
153
31
27
29
53
32
30
28
29
63
22
76
36
160
30
65

$200
350
(a)
100
350
(«)
500
550
1,500
350
200
(*)
m

650
(0
fc500
360
350
(a)
600
1,800
500
250
600
500
200
500
350
500
610
550
502
500
550

Arrests for—
As­
sault Hom ­ Va­ House
Lar­
and icide. gran­ break­ ceny
bat­
ing.
cy.
tery.

282
88
39
2,707
691
120
746 954 862
194 228
73
747
165 169
1,449
580 638
687
97
90
<*565 <*249 <*627
42
480
107
62
638
84
722
73
59
64
(«) /3,680
921
146
99
623
131
35
511
468 121
585 1,578
138
/3,649
861
( e\
914 1,098
118
407
258
187
418
581
519
1,050
390
39
1,094
43 201
1,237
355
76
144
658
154
63
546
49
164
188
18
424
3
150
528
29
73
752 210
98
84
489
47
413
35
71
33 268
124
1,376
37
17
722 1,537
205
342
13
92
549 153 326
244
14
12
290
51
31
644 229 129
59
458
63
840 873
74
118 832 267
855 318 243

i
21
1
10
4
1
2
1
5
4
20
3
1
3
2
3
2
1
1
3
1
2
5
3

115
49
850
20
233
956
76
<*178
340
6
69
77
178
68
79
1,258
1,042
22
609
335
406
10
884
109
87
88
38
7
63
100
116
258j
j
34
311
34
25

A ll Total
other ar­
of­ rests.
fen­
ses.

9
50 232
815
4 133 1,574 5,279
203 287 1,356 5,279
17 41 61,211 61,785
8 86
305 1 713
98 302 1,616 5,649
19 124 413 1,506
d 22 <*595<*1,093 <*3,329
31 125
567 1,696
6
78
315 1 189
19 137
257 1,337
40 323 1,182 5,368
25
97
147 1,613
1
36
179 1,074
11
71
718 1,984
46 247 1,470 5,326
143 1,277 3,487 10,479
15 193 2,666 6,029
28 137 531 2,158
41 158
380 2,435
24
70 *3,139 *5,118
30 129
325 1,834
44 185 1,361 4,145
13 127 0*1,552 w 2,759
8
41
25
819
16
15
76
566
25
63
763 1,466
5
64
118
825
9 120
44 1,296
15
94
170 1,002
19 257
910
494 1,315
9 128
38 221 1,725
30
37
930 3,777
48 101
310
906
15 162 292 1,534
24
71
390
9 43
202
626
23 170 1,320 2,671
8
52
148
800
13 178
195 2,392
29 144 205 1,657
25 465 280 2,410

8
153
2
10
900
2 217
1
250
61
2
222
200
a $25 for m alt, $150 for alcoholic liquors.
6 Including 509 pool-room cases.
e Not including 6 special policem en.
d Including alderm en’s cases.
« Included in arrests for disturbing the peace.
/In clu d in g arrests for drunkenness.
fl'Not including 20 special policem en.
h First-class saloons, $500; second-class saloons, $850.
2From $25 to $125.
j Not including 6 supernumeraries.
fcFor sale o f beer only, $260.
* Including 1,515 technical arrests of inmates of houses of prostitution and 1,100 of gamblers,
m Including 580 technical arrests o f persons applying for lodging.




911

STATISTICS Off CITIES,

T able III.—POLICE RETAIL LIQUOR SALOONS, AND ARRESTS, BY CAUSES—Concluded.
[In this table drunkenness includes “ comm on drunk,” “ drunk and disorderly,” and all cases
where drunkenness in any form was the primary cause o f arrest; disturbing the peace includes all
cases o f disorderly conduct not attributable to drunkenness; assault and battery includes all cases
o f assault; vagrancy includes arrests of beggars, tramps, loafers, loiterers, and all persons without
rent means o f support; housebreaking includes burglary and all cases of breaking and entering,
arceny includes pocket picking, robbery, and all cases of theft.]

K

Mar­
gin­
al
num
ber.

Cities.

Licensed
retail liquor
saloons.
Dis­
Po­
Drunk­ turb­
liceing
men. Num­ Amt. en­
the
ber. of li­ ness. peace
cense.

Schenectady, N. Y
Fitchburg, M ass..
Superior, W is.......
Rockford, 111.........
Taunton, Mass___
Canton, O h io.......
Butte, M on t........
M ontgomery, A la.
Auburn, N. Y .......
Chattanooga,
Tenn ...............
136 East St. Louis, 111.
137 Joliet, 111..............

126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135

a 22
34
30
19
34
30
44
35
20
42
39
33

Arrests for—
As­
A ll Total
sault Hom­ Va­ House Lar­ other ar­
and icide. gran­ break­ ceny of­ rests.
fen­
bat­
ing.
cy.
tery.
ses.

140
500
48 1,000
31 (&)
350
128
171
900
45 (d)
350
106

625
127
564
56
76
929
277 217
12
939
798 126
690
705
(«) /l , 176
453
76

108
42
41
49
64
87
197
285
37

84
200
500
160
105 1,000

1,121
647
1,310

280
161
41

168

$350

804
337
226

2
2

2
1
1
2
5

14

110
8
330
67
20
124
318
457
45

20
29
2
4
53
30
2

169
333 1,488
234
50
954
132
658 2,188
58 333 1,030
59
193 1,289
52
168 1,359
139 02,466 0 4,570
695 2,'925
281
67
73
754

213
141
411

11
23
33

280 873
162 1,165
38
207

Not including 8 special policem en.
Beer saloons, $650; others, $1,600 to $2,300.
Including 1,698 technical arrests o f inm ates of houses of prostitution.
d$401 within and $201 outside o f fire lim its; for sale o f beer only, $76.
e Included in arrests for disturbing the peace.
f Including arrests for drunkenness.

a
b
o




3,584
2,641
2,266

918

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OE LABOR.
T able IV .—FIREMEN, FIRE EQUIPMENT, AND PROPERTY LOSS FROM FIRES.
Equipm ent.

Firemen.

Fire engines.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

1 New Y ork, N .Y .........
2 Chicago, 111...............
3 Philadelphia, P a ___
4 St. L ou isjM o............
5 Boston, M ass............
6 Baltim ore, M d..........
7 Cleveland, O h io.......
8 Buffalo, N .Y ............
9 San Francisco, C al...
10 Cincinnati, O h io___
11 Pittsburg, P a ............
12 New Orleans, La.......
13 Detroit, M ich............
14 M ilwaukee, W is.......
15 W ashington, D. C___
16 Newark, N .J ............
17 Jersey City, N. J .......
18 Louisville, K y ..........
19 M inneapolis, M inn..
20 Providence, R. I .......
21 Indianapolis, In d ___
22 Kansas City, M o.'___
23 St. Paul, M inn...........
24 Rochester, N. Y .........
25 Denver, C o lo ............
26 Toledo, O h io ............
27 A llegheny, P a ..........
28 Columbus, O h io.......
29 W orcester, M ass.......
30 Syracuse, N .Y ..........
31 New Haven, C onn ...
32 Paterson, N .J ..........
33 Fall River, Mass.......
34 St. Joseph, M o..........
35 Omaha, N ebr............
36 Los Angeles, Cal.......
37 Memphis, Tenn.........
38 Scranton, Pa..............
39 Low ell, M ass............
40 A lbany, N .Y ............
41 Cambridge, M ass___
42 Portland, O reg .........
43 Atlanta, G a...............
44 Grand Rapids, M ich.
45 Dayton, O h io............
46 Richm ond, V a..........
47 N ashville, T en n .......
48 Seattle, W ash............
49 Hartford, C onn.........
50 Reading, P a ..............
51 W ilm ington, D e l___
52 Camden, N .J ............
53 Trenton, N .J ............
54 Bridgeport, C onn___
55 Limn, M ass...............
56 Oakland, C a l............

Combi­ Hand
Hook
nation fireexchem ­
Regu­ Call Volun­
tin- Fire and
lars. men. teers. Steam. Hand. Chem­ ical en­ guish- boats. ladder
trucks.
gines
ical.
ers.
and
hose
wagons.
2,555
1,157
844
516
707
408
426
(7486
457
334
416
302
495
' 837
252
234
190
241
306
246
196
194
198
200
122
135
110
188
122
138
#120
103
94
60
119
120
90
64
78
113
57
56
b b 108
128
108
68
drl 85
83
64
26
16
72
72
36
66
48

3,950
59

167
102
50
48
83
52
27
32
33
i 52
.......... 1
31
1 32
i
i
28
..........
28
23
16
22
15
18
22
9
11
8
15
8
8
80
8
H
14
7
107
9
11
9
6
97
2
4
13
9
6
71
6
97
11
60
8
68
82
180
*10
5
9
6
8
52
8
7
15
71
10
3,300
10
8
465
5
7
83
7
7
103
81
9

5
4

11
17
6
1
13
8
3
7
9
1
4
13
6
8
3
3
3
1
10
3
1
4
2
1

i
!
1
!
i
1

1
2
3
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
4
2
2

4
10
44
28
12
«26
2
4
1
6
1
8
2
2
10
3
8
9
2
1
1
3
10
1
5
1
3
3
1
2
10
1
2
a?2
8
7

11
3
3
2
2
9
1

2
2
1
2
2
2
1

ee

4
3

ee

1
3
1
1

c

580
23
149
70
142
46
27
76
50
40
170
6
74
50
«66
62
33
35
24
67
50
68
20
30
31
12
34
26
38
23
40
28
34
14
22
36
4
16
16
44
26
32
24
14
36
25
8
28
27
22
6
18
21
29
26
8

5
5
5
2
1
2
3
j 2

2
3

,
1

15
21
/I I
9
11
10
16
9
8
13
9
7
8
7
5
7
10
8
qS

i........
.........

1

a Also 117 cisterns.
b Including 1,380 p olice boxes.
e Including 64 furnished by fire department to 32 police patrol wagons, 2 on each wagon.
d Including 3 reserve trucks stationed outside city lim its.
e Including 3 com bination chem ical engines and hook and ladder trucks.
/N o t including 3 com bination chem ical engines and hook and ladder trucks.
a Not including 119 substitutes em ployed 2 months,
ft Not reported.
i Also 4 m onitor batteries,
i Owned and m aintained by State.
k Also 305 cisterns.
* Also 80 fire w ells.
m Also 661 cisterns.
«N ot including 50 Johnson hand force pumps.
©Also 670 cisterns.
p Also 164 cisterns.
Q Including 2 com bination hook and ladder trucks and hose wagons.




83
34
dVJ

8
7
4
5
4
6
4
3
4
3
4
2
4
4
1
2
1/4
4
3
6
3
4
4
8
2
4
3
3
2
3
// 3
2
gg 4
// 2

919

STATISTICS OE CITIES,
T able IV.—FIREMEN, FIRE EQUIPMENT, AND PROPERTY LOSS FROM FIRES.
Equipm ent.
Fire hydrants.

Feet
of lad­
ders.

24,731
11,153
3,750
4,170
7,904
4,008
2,955
3,960
3,170
3,401
2,038
1,461
3,602
3,000
3,023
24,000
1,711
1,248
1,891
2,800
2,020
1,030
2,500
1,800
926
1,400
765
1,915
1,324
1,049
1,240
783
1,372
787
1,141
652
462
432
1,324
1,258
985
1,000
600
1,119
1,828
768
799
958
650
516
508
485
390
700
1,465
700

Hose
Fire
reels
Wa­
Fire- alarms. Fires.
and Feet of
Not
ter
hose. Owned owned Total. tow­ Horses. alarm
hose
boxes.
ers.
by city. by
wag.ons.
city.

Property
loss.

411,700 20,230 1,127 21,357
4
981 2,372
9,327 8,424 89,816,365
8,094 6,136
202,695 al9,324
«19,324
2
481 b 2,788
4,296,433
2,657,099
105,000 13,000
1
1,239
326
3,191 3,049
185 13,185
7,764
2,572 2,363
97,650
7,676
2
2,932,268
976
247
88
7,638
7,958
2
2,225 2,076
121,611
374
1,830,719
633
315
2,673
2,673
1,498 1,443
74,969
2
447
188
1,464,120
6,462
6,462
1,499 1,400
46,050
1,032,723
1
876
165
(h )
1
96,250
4,853
1,083 1,039
1,576,128
258
572
(*)
(ft)
1,114 1,070
79,500
3,798
2
8,767
285
523,265
31
65,000 *2,695
*2,695
1
174
503 1,342 1,302
1,277,424
106,480
3,058
1,269,932
1
183
506 1,211 1,167
95 3,153
542
1
614
35,823
153
933,827
250
*1,706 1 1,706
899
76,360 m3,561
1
984
201
436
586,693
12 m3,573
(*)
62,375
736,874
2,545
1
175
387 1,403 1,154
(*)
57,000
628
2,031
1
251
710
285,677
138
55 2,086
676
543
38,000
253
359,700
2,202
109
40 2,242
25,929
639
567
2,236
2,236
77
136
422,527
30,050
821
0363
386
858
342,508
o363
1
107
(ft)
42,876
3,312
3,312
1
169
346 1,195
471,488
(ft)
33,000
362
791
1,941
738
344,596
1
90
w
1
42,000
1,055 1,010
296,000
106
237
Pi, 846 P i , 846
30,200
150 1,501 1,458
711,248
2,220
2
81
2,220
50,200
754
192
783
420,734
2,346
119
2,346
1
35,200
434
418
2,853
85
208
30 2,883
('0
17,000
164
595
573
364,131
67
3,300
1
3,300
588
547
441,115
32,000
263
i, 145
73
111
1,256
1
314
31,500
344
541
499,650
1,661
69
1,661
27,800 s i ,400
164
594
571
137,359
88
40 81,440
1
27,200
607
111,991
1,829
72
620
125 1,954
167
334
18,950
66
169
375
421,911
2,680
2,680
1
(ft)
23,734
121,930
59
«211
297
285
963
w
«142
396
7,200,000
15,000
1,187
52
380
1,187
(h )
(ft)
152
146
26,347
25,450
58
160
991
314
269
196,992
12,500
35
726
726
i
39
i
413
256,058
19,803
48
103
469
1,578
1,578
368
319
54
151,190
19,000
77
210
607
661
404
384,597
15,981
65 w m
51
69
493
w 801
l
205
75,096
8,000
562
52
99
188
540
22
398
28,150
1,106
125
186
248,230
75
54
1,181
i
13,500
651
153,959
838
57
161
651
823
15
291
286
76,438
14,250
978
19
997
37
126
204
254,704
22,900 aa 555
«a555
61
176
261
582
44
528
640,113
20,000 ocl,231
89
10 cc1,241
466
394
202,597
25,405
135
58
1,361
1,361
133,495
33,200
1,242
1,242
56
183
516
465
l
961,714
16,000
599
172
410
45
473
35
634
333
54
307
130,423
12,450
670
700
111
30
358
44
66
377
200,178
606
22,000
606
116
186
186
59,362
19,000
950
900
50
47
65,332
760
760
55
74
89
87
16,610
98
93
160,302
14,800
779
69
779
36
166
166
46,269
12,000
784
937
31
69
153
635
95
181
178
94,842
15,050
620
15
30
i
28,372
166
12,000
580
627
36
130
130
47
359
115
355
134,006
27,850
781
8
789 M l
50
(ft)
184
153
44,120
524
47
19,450
524
r Not including 2 com bination hook and ladder trucks and hose wagons.
s Also 52 cisterns.
t Not including 48 substitutes.
u Including 39 private fire-alarm boxes.
v Including 31 private fire-alarm boxes.
w Also 51 cisterns.
x Com bination chem ical engines and hook and ladder trucks.
i/N ot including 2 com bination chem ical engines and hook and ladder trucks.
z Also 1 battery,
aa Also 82 cisterns.
b b Not in cluding 6 supernumeraries.
c c Also 23 cisterns.
<ft*Not including 8 substitutes.
e e Combination chem ical engine and hook and ladder truck.
//N o t including 1 com bination chem ical engine and hook and ladder truck.
9 Q Not including 1 com bination hook and ladder truck and water tower.
M i Com bination hook and ladder truck and water tower.

170
115
14
25
48
18
32
30
56
45
26
27
19
23
19
10
15
17
18
12
21
r l7
18
13
14
9
17
11
17
7
8
9
12
14
12
10
8
12
13
13
7
11
9
12
3
6
9
9
8
7
7
7
7
9
11
11




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
16
17
18
19
20

21

920

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

T able IY.-FIREM EN , FIRE EQUIPMENT, AND PROPERTY LOSS FROM FIRES—Continued.
Equipm ent.

Firemen.

Fire engines.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
73
74
75
76
77
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115

Cities.

Lawrence, M ass.......
New Bedford, Mass..
Des Moines, Iow a___
Springfield, M ass___
Som erville, M ass___
Troy, N. Y .................
Hoboken, N. J ..........
Evansville, In d ........
Manchester, N. H ___
Utica, N .Y ...............
Peoria, 111.................
Charleston, S. C.........
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah.
San Antonio, Tex .. .
Duluth, M inn..........
Erie, P a ....................
Elizabeth, N. J .........
W ilksbarre, P a .........
Kansas City, Kans ..
Harrisburg, P a .........
Portland, M e.(ff)___
Yonkers, N. Y ..........
N orfolk, Y a ..............
Waterbury, Conn___
H olyoke, M ass.........
Fort W ayne, In d ___
Youngstown, O h io..
Houston, T ex............
Covington, K y .........
Akron, Ohio..............
Dallas, T ex...............
Saginaw, M ich .........
Lancaster, P a ..........
Lincoln, N ebr..........
Brockton, M ass.......
Binghamton, N. Y . . .
Augusta, G a..............
Pawtucket, R. I .......
Altoona, P a ..............
W heeling, W. V a ___
M obile, A la ..............
Birmingham, A la . . .
Little Rock, A r k ___
Springfield, O hio___
Galveston, T ex .........
Tacoma, W ash.........
H averhill, M ass.......
Spokane, W ash.........
Terre Haute, In d ___
Dubuque, Iow a.........
Quincy, 111...............
South Bend, In d ___
Salem, Mass..............
Johnstown, P a .........
Elmira, N. Y ............
Allentow n, Pa..........
Davenport, Iow a ___
M cKeesport, P a.......

Combi­ Hand
Hook
nation fire ex­
Fire and
chem ­
Regu­ Call V olun­
tin- boats. ladder
lars. men. teers. Steam. Hand. Chem­ ical en­ guishtrucks.
ical.
gines
ers.
and
hose
wagons.
34
44
74
73
31
56
65
63
33
65
57
45
5 81
38
54
87
44
26
/ 45
13
39
42
50
23
39
57
37
63
33
40
53
33
14

90

6
g

32
176

17
60
36
23
36
26
46
31
32
52
47
25
63
51
37
28
42
18
015
40
25
35
27

105
83

10
7
940

4
127

38

9
54

75

20
28

163
2
36
94

460
1,500

6
3
9
5
5
7
5
3
10
7
2
4
5
6
7
5
1
5
7

725

5
2
6
7
1
7
3
6
4
1
6
3
5
2
7
2
3
4
3
4
3
2
2
6
5
4
2
3
5

101

18
14
34
43
4

628

20
24

2
3
84

14
89
1

550
904

r

4
8
6
6

1

2
3
2
1

3

1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2

3
4
5
3
2
1

3
2
c2

1
1
1

4
2
2
51
5
c3
1
1
4
2
4

1
3
1
1
6
1

3

6

i
1
1
1
2

1

2
1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1

2

1

3
3

4
2
1

20
16
6
26
20
17
12
14
15
13
8
16
22
5
3
14
18
16
14
16

d 2

26
25

2
1
4
1
2
2
2
1
<*4
5

12

d 2

12

8
26
2
12
18
6
13
8
4
4
8
24
2
14
20
18
10
2
12
4
4
6
9
9
6
12
5
12
13
13
r8

a Not reported.
b Not including 6 supernumeraries.
c Including 1 com bination chem ical engine and hook and ladder trucx.
dN ot including 1 com bination chem ical engine and hook and ladder truck.
e Owned by members o f fire department.
/N o t including 4 substitutes.
0 Data are for 9 months.
h Com bination chem ical engine and hook and ladder truck.
1 Including 1 com bination hook and ladder truck and hose wagon.
JN ot including 1 com bination hook and ladder truck and hose wagon.




3
3
3
6
3
3
2
2
4
2
2
3

2
3
2
2
2
2
i 2
3
2
1
3
3
2
2
3
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
3
3
2
2
2
1
2
2
r 1
2
1
2
2

921

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able IV.—FIREMEN, FIRE EQUIPMENT, AND PROPERTY LOSS FROM FIRES—Continued.
Equipment.
Fire hydrants.
Hose
Fire Fires.
Wa­
FireFeet reels Feet of
ter Horses. alarm alarms.
and
Not
of lad­ hose hose. Owned owned
Total. tow ­
ders. wag­
boxes.
ers.
by city. by
city.
ons.

1,300
1,020
530
1,599
1,284
763
580
414
925
844
572
631
650
450
265
1,000
471
480
425
290
277
1,498
1,100
462
516
546
541
402
623
660
644
555
375
285
519
700
550
407
695
430
265
378
313
250
668
528
311
1,200
387
317
429
225
728
697
r 222
475
276
394
308

4
7
6
10
6
11
4
10
6
3
9
10'
10
4
6
10
8
7
4
5
9
12
14
6
5
6
8
2
5
5
J2
6
9
5
3
5
6
6
1
7
5
4
6
7
6
7
9
3
7
4
5
6
5
r l4
1
5
6
4

18,000
18,000
15,950
24,000
9,350
23,200
8,450
12,000
25,450
14,000
23,163
9,207
17,365
11,150
10^000
20,650
19,450
5,000
17,500
11,400
10,500
32,000
18,200
10,000
9,700
23,300
13,450
7,250
13,450
4,000
6,850
10,000
21,300
5,000
6,950
12,340
7,500
8,300
14,400
8,000
7,800
8,000
8,000
4,200
9,000
9,200
15,600
16,825
11,700
9,000
7,300
7,000
12,725
19,250
*•15,900
8,150
9,650
8,605
7,500

584
750
1,040
'964
926
959
237
580
753
764
604
975
497
632
300
242
639
599
858
247
301
536
698
588
330
fc350
432
750
543
463
650
726
675
566
452
442
654
277
516
485
391
o341
528
342
474
476
129
450
310
s342




173
(a)

91
43
59
25
(a)

65
1,067
'525
878

395
25
5
(a)

757

(a)

1,040
1,055
969
1,018
262
580

1

(a)

829
1,067
525
604
975
878
497
632
300
242
395
664
604
(a)

l

37
45
43
63
38
37
22
33
41
32
33
30
42
21
30
49
41
o 26
27
22
27
38
27
30
18
37
42
16
32
14
23
33
26
17
23
35
21
26
21
22
26
13
24
20
25
24
33
30
30
28
21
28
21
28
*•34
20
30
19
12

61
93
55
137
98
105
45
67
68
98
145
104
79
55
77
110
87
60
• 71
40
110
86
41
65
112
81
53
64
54
98
110
63
48
40
78
56
l 77
w96
58
71
57
56
35
112
54
59
62
42
70
53

169
193
455
236
246
290
157
246
197
156
373
151
263
154
165
225
180
109
107
346
84
168
193
219
124
195
203
230
306
180
167
356
269
48
153
222
106
169
127
266
230
224
335
«241
209
178
229
238
230
229
233
140
181
138
72
173
49
165
183

256
406
750
710
606
567
330
fc 390
40
432
750
543
463
656
1
6
734
8
675
(a)
(«)
500
48
442
937
283
284
7
316
316
516
485
391
5
o346
528
779
779
342
309
309
(P)
134
608
1 75
499
23
90
12
141
57
456
6
17
325
15
1
51
571
571
52
15
s357
56
k Also 19 cisterns.
i
Including 19 private fire-alarm boxes.
m Including 27 private fire-alarm boxes.
n Including 3 outside city lim its,
o Also 16 reservoirs.
p Telephone system,
a Paid by volunteer fire company.
r Owned by volunteer fire com pany,
s A lso 1 reservoir.
9
105
214
12
18
567

161
193
435
231
246
290
157
173
193
148
365
121
193
153
162
203
177
56
101
332
80
168
188
212
116
182
193
207
297
104
149
334
199
48
144
162
62
162
101
244
228
221
286
232
183
172
173
151
125
202
227
119
165
121
56
173
46
149
147

Property
loss.

$13,738
30,861
415,184
96,409
66,774
125,108
138,629
209,105
34,379
233,170
125,819
66,810
61,744
310,870
500,000
186,429
161,671
235,316
124,234
199,245
153,031
261,164
126,087
32,387
18,951
33,491
49,241
90,305
253,672
49,040
68,213
507,802
50,752
19,032
46,135
21,108
79,257
176,876
30,275
32,575
87,368
253,590
136,519
58,700
406,682
(a)

44,918
59,626
84,188
89,368

(a)

300,000
110,278
78,020
10,514
85,341
21,038
612,076
30,280

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115

922

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able IV.—FIREMEN, FIRE EQUIPMENT, AND PROPERTY LOSS FROM FIRES—Concluded.
Firemen.

Equipment.
Fire engines.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Springfield, 111.......
Cnelsea, M ass.........
Chester, Pa..............
York, P a .................
M alden, M ass.........
Topeka, K ans.........
Newton, M ass.........
Sioux City, Iow a . . .
Bayonne, N. J .........
K n oxville, T en n . . .
Schenectady, N. Y .
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior. W is..........
R ockford, 111..........
Taunton, M ass.......
Canton, O hio..........
Butte, M ont___. . . .
M ontgomery, A la ..
Auburn, N. Y .
Chattanooga, Tenn.
East St. Louis, 111..
Joliet, 111.................




Combi­ Hand
nation fireexHook
Regu­ Call Volun­
chem ­
tin- Fire and
lars. men. teers. Steam.
Chem­ ical en­ guish- boats. ladder
Hand. ical.
trucks.
gines
ers.
and
hose
wagons.

57
395
900

38
63

20
600
4
219

78
55
1
88
38

48

4
3
3
6
2
1
3
1
7
3
1
2
2
3
3
2

2
1
1
3
2
2
3
1

1

1
2
1
2
1

13
6

3
1
5

1
1

1

2

3

a
b

Also 8 cisterns.
18 hired as needed.

3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
.......... 4*
1
1
1
4
2
1

14
7
4
14
12
27
18
10
12
12
21
16
14
6
17
9
12
16
6
10
5

2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
3
2
2
3
2
2
2
1
1
1
1

923

STATISTICS OP CITIES.

T able IV .—FIREMEN, FIRE EQUIPMENT, AND PROPERTY LOSS FROM FIRES—Concluded.
Equipment.
Fire hydrants.

Feet
o f lad­
ders.

375
460
197
400
650
173
675
431
392
262
385
1,189
503
311
950
500
360
547
356
385
204
180

Hose
Fire Fires.
Wa­
reels
Fireter Horses. alarm alarms.
Not
and Feet of
hose hose. Owned owned Total. tow­
boxes.
by city. by
ers.
wag­
city.
ons.

4
6
3
2
3
6
8
5
10
4
4
5
7
1
8
5
4
5
4
2
4
5

7,500
10,100
6,000
8,500
12,350
8,000
17,589
9,700
6,000
5,450
8,400
14,000
11,950
6,350
14,100
7,000
8,250
6,300
6,350
9,000
7,550
8,100

305
263
320
400
946
257
339
c 544
428
391
794
340
292
488
232
243




18
14
151
13
18
a 322
25
12
15
252
15
84
585
(<*)
30
397
59
68
7
332

323
277
151
333
418
a 322
971
269
354
252
c559
512
585
391
(d)
370
397
351
556
239
332
243

30
18
14
22
22
18
38
21
(»)
14
14
20
24
19
26
20
15
16
12
23
11
22

c Also 9 cisterns.
dN ot reported.

83
72
49
90
47
142
37
33
46
31
69
110
52
89
65
54
34
38
58
29
97

1

212
152
87
55
103
190
172
179
57
167
121
102
108
144
127
133
140
152
75
230
150
176

190
150
86
55
101
184
152
162
57
152
115
65
97
136
120
124
138
140
63
225
142
127

Property
loss.

$63,306
21,864
30,000
24,473
37,878
19,380
74,814
162,808
75,000
60,876
54,892
15,274
32,492
10,356
66,859'
45,312
62,415
70,168
15,953
71,724
225,100
62,350

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able V.—MARRIAGES, DIVORCES, AND BIRTHS.
Larnal
lin­
er.

Di­
Mar­
Mar­ vorces
riage
licenses riages. grant­
issued.
ed.

Cities.

1 New York, N .Y ............
2 Chicago 111...................
3 Philadelphia, P a .........
4 St. Louis, M o.................
5 Boston, M ass...............
6 Baltim ore, M d..............
7 Cleveland, O h io..........
8 Buffalo, N .Y .................
9 San Francisco, Cal.......
10 Cincinnati, O hio..........
11 Pittsburg, P a ...............
12 New Orleans, L a..........
13 Detroit, M ich ...............
14 M ilwaukee, W is..........
15 W ashington, D. C .........
16 Newark, N .J ...............
17 Jersey City, N .J ..........
18 Louisville, K y ..............
19 M inneapolis, M in n ___
20 Providence, R. I ..........
21 Indianapolis, In d .........
22 Kansas City, M o..........
23 St. Paul, M inn..............
24 Rochester, N. Y ............
25 Denver, C o lo ...............
26 Toledo, O h io ...............
27 A llegheny, P a ..............
28 Columbus, O h io ..........
29 W orcester, M ass..........
30 Syracuse, N. Y ..............
31 New Haven, Conn.......
32 Paterson, N .J...............
33 F all R iver, Mass..........
34 St. Joseph, M o ..............
35 Omaha, N ebr...............
36 Los Angeles, Cal..........
37 Memphis, T enn............
38 Scranton, Pa.................
39 Low ell, M ass...............
40 Albanv, N. Y ...............
41 Cambridge, Mass.........
42 Portland, O reg............
43 Atlanta, Ga...................
44 Grand Rapids, M ich ...
45 Dayton, O hio...............
46 Richm ond, V a..............
47 Nashville, T enn..........
48 Seattle, Wash...............
49 Hartford, Conn............
50 Reading, P a.................
51 W ilm ington, D e l.........
52 Camden, N. J...............
53 Trenton, N. J ...............
54 Bridgeport, Conn.........
55 Lynn, Mass...................
56 Oakland, C al...............
57 Lawrence, M ass..........
58 New Bedford, Mass___
59 Des Moines, Iow a.........
60 Springfield, M ass.........
61 Somerville, M ass.........
62 Troy, N. Y ....................
63 Hoboken, N .J ..............
64 Evansville, In d ............
65 Manchester, N. H .........
66 Utica, N. Y ...................
67 Peoria, 111....................
68 Charleston, S. C ..........
69 Savannah, Ga...............

Births.
Male.

Fe­
male.

Birth
rate per
Total. l, 000 population.

33,447
817 41,096 39,639 80,735
a 18,312 016,684 ol,808 13,980 13,015 26,995
9,912
492 14,534 13,681 28,215
11,887
5,959
573
5,503
5,193 c l O , 705
(b )
6,312
7,009
446 7,954
7,654 15,608
4,902
4,890
170 4,509
8,795
4,286
454 4,122
3,204
3,199
3,915
8,037
3,448
a 88
3,323
6,924
3,601
3,716
3,656
846 2,527
2,346 <*4,875
3,539
3,518
o405
2,733
2,358
5,091
7,624
«7 ,910 3,443
o l 86
3,949
3,675
2,119
2,104
151
6,639
3,351
3,288
2,786
2,681
297 1,510
2,818
1,308
0225
7,415
«2,805
2,460
3,749
3,666
3,334
3,183
168 2,335
2,196
4,531
2,441
3,175
2,837 / 6,016
( e)
ib )
2,062
4,462
2,330
2,132
(b )
(«)
174
1,683
1,559
3,800
1,933
1,867
a2,172
ol80
2,221
1,883 9 4 ,105
(b )
1,875
1,979
327
2,484- 2,212
4,696
02,653 o2,608
o471
1,747
1,625 *3,377
a2,164 ol,704
o420
1,372 *2,989
1,595
ol94
ol,491 ol,478
1,638
1,589
3,227
1,492
ol56
1,744
2,914
1,170
ol62
01,937 al,918
(b )
(*>)
(b Y
1,114
1,102
0191
476
487
963
o7,910
970
o l 86
757
686
1,443
al,572 01,572
0148
o953
o875 ol,828
1,247
1,297
57 1,602
1,669
3,271
a 47
588
724
679 1,403
918
92 1,441
937
1,360
2,801
962
125
1,896
(b )
(«)
(b )
1,124
54 2,090
1,152
2,138
4,228
« 867
110
a 893
280
327
/611
1,006
1,003
206
857
822
1,679
al,917 al,818
o405
818
754 1,572
ol,991 al,838
a290
(*>)
(&)
(&)
o 1,801
320
o45
512
450
962
1,022
1,044
1,431
1,339
2,770
(b )
535
39
664
1,299
635
1,075
1,107
283
1,418
1,355
2 ,773
a 977
a999
al44
610
546
1,156
1,535
1,489
J53
487
434
921
1,043
1,041
180
663
627 1,290
ol,218 ol,216
ol35
806
793 1,599
752
816
53
376
353
729
ol95
ol,423 ol,352
804
736 1,540
ol,379 ol,351
o323
470
449
919
790
748
82
932
891
1,823
812
914
105
875
826 1,701
950
924
29
625
561 1,186
1,352
647
627 1,274
(e)
(b )
676
60
400
375
775
\e )
677
642
38
963
877 1,840
807
829
39
820
837
1,657
ol,396 o 1,340
ol43
534
954
420
818
816
1,093
799 1,892
(b )
738
776
36 1,398
1,067
2,465
o 1,075 a 1,000
ol33
454
862
408
626
642
84
736
695 1,431
671
693
808
743
1,551
475
23
343
316
659
884
40
855
805 1,660
(®)
695
671
120
498
486
984
617
611
49
829
834 1,663
317
066
568
530 1,098
o 120
0968
o967
(*>)
%
%
492
<*1,078
9l9
57
831
761
672 *1,436
a Data are lor county.
t>Not reported.
o Including 9 births, sex not reported.
^Including 2 births, sex not reported.
«N o license required except for nonresidents of State,
/In clu d in g 4 births, sex not reported.
9 Including 1 birth, sex not reported.
* Including 5 births, sex not reported.
£Including 22 births, sex not reported.
/N o t including 4 lim ited divorces,
ft Including 3 births, sex not reported.




22.53
15.00
21.13
17.99
27.21
16.91
20.61
18.71
13.93
14.97
22.86

22.13
9.39
24.92
15.79
23.59
20.89
17.67
19.55
26.38
18.50
17.33
18.98
17.14
(b )
6.42
10.85
013.80
27.03
11.69
25.01
17.62
39.51
5.90
15.26
14.29
(b )
9.34
29.17
12.99
29! 47
12.30
9 80
13! 58
17.77
7.92
18.94
10.21

22.34
20.74
15.11
15.93
10.33
23.90
23.67
12.72
29.11
37.35
12.31
22.02

24.43
8.78
27.21
16.35
28.83
18.93
(b )

16.58
23.16

L•
IS.

,750
,674
,288
686
576
672
328
387
264
425
505
442
365
328
524
324
285
249
259
216
112
119
102
158
98
204
172
45
136
58
135
123
193
21
67
48
156
94
142
118
111
39
210
56
85
210
131
66
62
68
73
80
67
72
55
41
80
75
19
49
62
82
90
45
86
57
47
192
187

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able V.—MARRIAGES, DIVORCES, AND BIRTHS—Concluded.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109

110

111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Mar­
Di­
Mar­ vorces
riage
licenses riages. grant­
ed.
issued.

Cities.

Salt Lake City, Utah ..
San A ntonio, T e x .......
Duluth, M inn..............
Erie, P a .......................
Elizabeth, N. J ............
W ilkesbarre, P a ..........
Kansas City, K ans......
Harrisburg, P a ............
Portland, M e...............
Yonkers, N. Y ..............
N orfolk, Va...................
W aterbury, Conn.........
H olyoke, Mass..............
Fort Wayne, In d ..........
Youngstown, Ohio.......
Houston, T e x ..............
Covington, K y..............
Akron, Ohio.................
Dallas, T ex..................
Saginaw, M ich ............
Lancaster, Pa...............
Lincoln, N ebr..............
Brockton, Mass............
Binghamton, N. Y .......
Augusta, Ga.................
Pawtucket, R. I ..........
Altoona, P a .................
W heeling, W. V a.........
M obile, A la...................
Birmingham, A la .......
Little R ock, A rk..........
Springfield, O h io.........
Galveston, T ex............
Tacoma, Wash..............
H averhill, Mass..........
Spokane, W ash............
Terre Haute, In d .........
Dubuque, Iow a............
Quincy, 111..................
South Bend, Ind..........
Salem, Mass.................
Johnstown, P a ............
Elmira, N. Y ...............
Allentow n, P a ............
Davenport, Iow a.........
McKeesport, P a ..........
Springfield, 111............
Cnelsea, M ass..............
Chester, Pa..................
York, P a ......................
Malden, Mass...............
Topeka, K ans..............
Newton. M ass..............
Sioux City, Iow a .........
Bayonne, N. J .............
K noxville, Tenn .......
Schenectady, N. Y ___
Fitchburg, Mass..........
Superior, Wis...............
Rockford, 111...............
Taunton, M ass............
Canton, O hio...............
Butte, M ont.................
M ontgomery, A la .......
Auburn, N. Y ...............
Chattanooga, Tenn___
East St. Louis, 111.........
Joliet, 111......................

a 1,172 «1,164
a 982
a 954
«1,038
(&)
540
519
321
(«)
a 2,479 <*2,479
a 1,060 <*1,027
468
463
434
449
408
543
522
/440
/440
452
452
a 674
a 654
438
411
a 931
a 913
a 881
a 874
490
517
a 1,841 a 1,291
487
480
330
330
468
451
492
484
585
630
503
420
454
338
(*>)
<*753
a 699
<*724
am
a 2,287 <2,210
*
a 1,220 <*1,216
490
490
<*561
<*549
a 755 a 691
389
320
a 781
a 720
472
466
a 500
a 412
a 308
a 269
<*600
a 589
382
288
412
( &)
437
<*950
210
<*592
am
a 7,910
186
a 814
a 818
439
448
224
240
411
396
392
363
« 624
a 606
345
355
a 617
a 566
259
(*>)
a 900
a 923
269
318
338
a 298
(* )
267
267
322
306
321
315
<*610
a 610
<*904
a 970
213
<*597
a 558
<*1,305 a 1,301
295
256

a 166
<*183
a 75
a 76
(&)

<*44
<*154
(&)

53
9
30
/ 39
14
a 119

a 57
a 215
«28
ol64
o 210
o 87
30
a 107
15
o 30
54
48

Births.
Male.

587
1,213
521
241
1,137
551
1,204
565
455
911
984
478
235
<*484
907
463
655
1,176
1,155
606
e810
410
/549 /1,275
813 1,698
692
334
472
960
242
505
658
297
466
ft 986

%

%

( &)

(&)

(* )

(&)

280

258

1,014
563
378
920
538

431
566




8.88

16.49
22.62
22.65
14.73
/ 26.49
35.66'
13.57
19.20
10.10

15.13
21.91
(&)

22.53
13.58
8.89
21.65
13.12

462
318
389
(&)

350
395
338
355
344

( &)

( &)

(b)

w

(

(b)

( )

904
914
528
729

452
210

340
(b)
266
384
322
291
279

(»)

(■ )
b

(b)

( b)

(* )

( &)

254
471
487
257
411
568

450
256
354
428
149
418

8

(&)

%

%

33
7
«114
9

( &)

954
1,132

254
452
437
252
404

552

480
277
322
458
142
386

616
779
660
646
623

*539
923
924
509
815

1,120
(*)

930533
676
886

291
804

23.48
28.30
23.30
22.29
12.72
18.23

15.40
20.95
16.50
16.15
16.61

b)

12.62
25.46
23.10
13.95
22.64

b
29.87
(b)

26.37
15.23
18.27
25.56
8.43
22.13

(b)

(» )

( b)

(b)

(

a 108
3

(*)

(* )

(*>)

(

b)

(b)

( &)

( )

(&)

(b)

(

(b )

(
(&
(

10

596

348
492
260

10

a 29
38
17
ol03
o89
a52
«30
o 103
70
47

(

440
417
280
277

(*>)

(b)
l b)

510
325
480
264
400

385
229
216
(6)
(b )

1,106
673
972
524
840

b)

802
509
493

b)
b)

a Data are for county,
ftNot reported.
cN o license required except for nonresidents of State.
a Including 11 births, sex not reported,
e Including 1 birth, sex not reported.
/In clu d in g data for township.
0 Including premature births,
ftIncluding 4 births, sex not reported.
* Including 31 births, sex not reported.

9398— N o. 42— 02------ 4

18.66
9.39
20.30
21.89
16.56
18.92

(*>)

523
566

(

o l 86
o ll6
52

( &)

304
180

259
198

10

b)
a 21
a 51
( b)

Birth
rate p e r ,
Total. 1,000 pop­
ulation.

626
280
586
639
456
506
238
444
521
549
399
/ 726
885
358
488
263
361
516

(b)24
a

91
ol65
ol94
60
o 103
a 99
34
ol49
145
a 47
o41
ol25

Fe­
m ale.

b)
b)

31.60
17.95
30.38
16.38

b
27.07
(b)

25.06
16.16
14.09

b)
(b)

(

b

49
39
46
43
48
34
49
44
48
75
84
52
15

'66

47
28
37
30
28
59
20

46
31
77
53
45
27
L14
82
'51
34
24
'36
55
32
27
22
24
57*
32
32
41
39
19
41
30
39
11
32
31
22
33
22
51
123
25
29
23
7
29
12
35
46
29
47
25

926

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able VI.—DEATHS, BY CAUSES (1).
Number of deaths from—

Mar­
ginal
numher.

Cities.

Other
Diph­
Dys­ epi­
Scar­ Whoop­ theria
Ty­
en­
ing
phoid Mala* Small­ Mea­
let
ria. pox. sles. fever. cough. and Grippe tery. dem ic
tever.
dis­
croup.
eases.
i

1 New York, N. Y ....
727
856
289 2,068
410
449 1,162
195
(a)
(a )
(a)
2 Chicago, 111............
(«)
(«)
662
444
3 Philadelphia, P a . ..
%
261
19
%
{%
220
4 St. Louis, M o..........
81
307
198
80
9
81
34
69
5 Boston, M ass..........
142
166
353
74
65
210
1
103
6 Baltimore, M d .......
142
128
35
171
11
63
3
7 Cleveland, O hio___
140
6
11
216
20
10
34
8 Buffalo, N. Y ..........
36
2
22
64
143
45
9 San Francisco, C a l.
14
57
97
70
61
3
27
13
109
20 Cincinnati, Ohio . . .
182
69
15
45
17
1
24
112
11 Pittsburg, P a ..........
4
165
416
3
66
115
117
12 New Orleans, La___
141
77
52
22
41
116
62
1
17
13 Detroit, M ich..........
62
47
11
1
15
10
49
14 M ilwaukee, W is___
75
1
21
100
17
16
15 W ashington, D. C ..
74
181
48
193
17
86
7
16 Newark, N. J ..........
10
71
25
57
13
29
103
23
17 Jersey City, N. J —
4
13
35
11
14
120
31
28
15
121
18 Louisville, K y.........
2
50
2
6
53
3
121
19 M inneapolis, M inn.
24
12
15
190
10
20 Providence, R. I . . .
2
2
47
87
64
3
13
9
Indianapolis, Ind ..
2
17
50
5
36
39
5
10
Kansas City, M o___
17
74
6
40
39
3
28
23 St. Paul, M inn.........
52
24
14
1
6
3
18
24 Rochester, N. Y ___
7
4
6
22
31
15
25 Denver, C olo..........
1
67
23
3
3
46
6
54
26 Toledo, O h io..........
62
3
5
45
15
23
10
27 Allegheny, Pa........
134
53
3
i
18
27
29
25
28 Columbus, O h io___
6
5
47
10
38
20
29 W orcester, Mass___
4
3
2
12
26
17
13
13
Syracuse, N. Y .......
1
18
7
1
23
3
3
New Haven, Conn .
103
12
1
0
22
61
30
6
Paterson, N. J .........
2
1
29
5
1
20
13
11
33 Fall R ivi r, Mass___
21
1
3
7
8
2
9
23
34 St. Joseph, M o.........
20
10
12
3
5
5
5
5
Omaha, Nebr..........
24
4
12
15
9
10
1
36 Los Angeles, Cal___
6
4
32
28
20
37 Memphis, T enn.......
11
44
121
38
6
2
5
38 Scranton, Pa............
31
1
42
8
27
5
12
39 Low ell, M ass..........
18
2
17
14
26
3
117
40 Albany, N. Y ..........
24
1
6
43
30
8
4
41 Cambridge, M ass. . .
3
10
1
10
8
59
49
11
42 Portland, O reg .......
3
4
23
26
34
43 Atlanta, Ga..............
12
1
58
18
24
20
15
37
44 Grand Rapids,M ich.
6
33
1
7
5
1
18
45 Dayton, O n io..........
1
23
1
3
2
18
8
46 Richm ond, V a .. . . . .
22
32
11
44
35
47 N ashville, T en n ___
11
7
26
37
12
31
48 Seattle, W ash..........
22
3
3
7
2
13
3
49 Hartford, C onn.......
25
6
3
35
13
12
1
50 Reading, P a ............
1
35
1
22
58
19
15
51 W ilm ington, D e l. . .
33
3
3
9
39
20
52 Camden, N. J ..........
13
1
6
7
60
11
53 Trenton, N. J ..........
14
2
1
2 !
* 10
12
10
54 Bridgeport, C onn. . .
13
10
4 1 14
12
20
30
55 Lynn, M ass..............
10
1
8
34
9
56 Oakland, C a l..........
10
1
2
2
1
11
10
57 Lawrence, M ass___
1
1
12
16
11
58 New Bedford, Mass.
19
6
2
10
14
6
59 Des Moines, Io w a ...
1
13
1
1
7
33
17
Springfield, M ass. . .
16
4
1
2
5
13
13
61 Som erville, Mass . . .
3
5
6
12
28
14
62 Troy, N. Y ...............
43
8
19
10
26
50
H oboken, N. J .........
14
6
6
10
1
30
64 Evansville, In d .......
1
4
16
4
8
7
65 Manchester, N. H ...
11
1
9
8
8
8
66 Utica, N .Y ...............
3
2
9
25
10
10
67 Peoria, 111...............
15
4
1
5
2
6
14
Charleston, S. C.......
48
48
6
10
41
Savannah, G a .........
75
10
10
19
70 SaltLake City, Utah.
20
4
2
22
2
46 i
15
a Data not obtainable.
6 Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.
e Including deaths from hydrocephalus.




348
(«)
68

(&
)
28
49
21

37
16
49
26
76
3
32
26
22

37
1

19

209
(<*)
79
51
4
51
27
18
50
1

139
27
29
23
19
15
8

48

20
6

11

14

6

10

3
6
20
12
10

3
35
17
25
3
5

7
7
17
3
34
7
10

4
20
1
210
1

6

3
5

39

11

11

4
2
6

27
9
25
19
28
4
1

4

5
7
10
10

9
7
2

14
3
6

9
3

8

2

3
4

2
8
1
2
1
2

5
5

2
6
1

3
5
8
6

9
8

5

3

3
1

4
6
8
1
1

8

3
7

11

11
1

17
5

4

927

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able VI.—DEATHS, BY CAUSES (1).
Number of deaths from—
Puru­ Pul­ Other
Cere­
lent
Other
bral
mo­ forms
and
gen­ Men­ conges­ Pa­
nary
of
septi- tuber­ tuber­ Can­ eral in ­
tion raly­
cer.
caemic culo­ culo­
dis­ gitis. and
sis.
in fec­ sis.
eases.
hemor­
sis.
tion.
rhage.
55
(«)
200
53
98
41
52
1
68
35
40
60
37
14
19
6
9
5
17
4
34
50
18
1
38
26
19
14
1
16
3
11
13
7
20
8
27
16
1
27
10
18
25
5
14
16
10
9
12
7
4
4
6
8
11
10
9
4
6
7
6
1
12
16
7

8,135

Other
dis­ Bron­
Con­ eases chitis,
vul­
of
acute
sions
and
of in­ nerv­ chron­
ous
fants. sys­
ic.
tem.

Pneu­
m onia
and
bronchopneumonia.

Other
dis­
eases of
respir­
atory
system.

1,254 2,463 1,554 1,163
9,168
814
243
805
981 2,152
2,540
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(«)
f a
2,577
2,946
775 a
302
751
380
385
942 f t
%
l%
1,128
345
995
ol47
139 <*160
373
286
197 /485
196 (*)
1,309
1,099
205 368 496 201
219
301
116
97
460 109
1,147
1,138
294
250 358 205
175
164
232 - 173
394 180
433
211
105 204
614
99
122
50
134
110
335
475
23 274
153 149
539
81
47
96
198
73
186
944
168 398
326
246
161
691
138
123
1
239
58
742
80 228
104 210
633
102
121
115
80
266
223
142
360
175
361
87
775
83
166
167
33
171
123
886
85
485
206
133
74
115
58
207
119
257
67
330
27
180
465
163
108
108
79
85
160
158
216
400
73
206
326
48
128
93
124
57
160
9
176
871
62
194 145
497
107
137
51
183
115
306
93
421
581
49
74
180
82
159
32
240
115
56
157
467
32
96
391
70
65 136
14
72
166
133
193
423
332
109
39
109
82
64
121
105
56
95
89
262
214
60 133
74
6
35
42
31
68
93
60
384
88
44
143
281
59
55
166
21
102
27
56
224
23
85
142
224
40
72
20
52
86
38
57
306
42
74
82
256
23
59
51
47
47
44
39
212
21
25
41
157
80
64
42
43
9
50
14
263
14
214
150
124
27
64
84
71
5
55
89
51
547
92
323
76
24
75
77
65
26
30
73
142
34
139
24
75
45
59
10
49
35
43
43
312
42
148
98
48
61
69
13
68
56
65
53
21
206
13
71
32
11
139
34
58
33
30
55
242
19
274
10
67
32
113
92
55
11
38
43
124
40
160
15
74
24
32
30
31
87
38
23
110
11
146
30
79
55
6
151
57
30
59
31
215
43
72
177
5
71
44
67
13
55
20
75
182
157
112
225
43
13
50
18
23
100
67
79
65
65
13
12
2
14
6
18
14
23
14
15
78
42
113
31
8
38
14
14
18
31
35
10
347
42
82
166
98
30
34
24
53
42
107
6
22
239
22
25
151
36
29
22
28
24
31
39
112
228
63
6
52
74
40
24
109
25
55
33
22
150
67
243
20
57
32
75
37
41
67
17
217
32 106
143
28
9
40
28
147
19
23
36
184
30
24
174
92
22
12
10
37
8
24
148
11
126
112
27
15
77
12
38
27
19
5
72
28
218
34
28
29
243
47
60
63
33
40
76
53
24
33
81
20
76
34
30
18
13
12
130
11
17
115
26
8
73
35
66
13
58
42
185
84
161
76
42
111
32
63
47
36
53
221
62
31
175
31
30
60
39
23
40
35
23
32
10
100
11
86
32
22
17
14
23
41
10
3
125
30
30
123
59
14
19
67
27
36
122
17
18
113
63
21
29
7
21
90
37
31
141
22
54
21
149
53
11
8
23
28
48
33
154
21
127
33
52
29
11
43
85
33
8
16
21
104
27
133
12
32
39
30
37
20
93
43
12
40
127
17
143
31
47
26
24
37
13
41
3
11
12
120
142
25
13
17
55
25
32
33
21
21
13
119
151
14
25
32
53
15
10
56
9
20
21
28
126
42
27
20
37
108
15
57
54
17
14
99
34
25
23
139
14
51
26
48
15
11
93
18
63
5
11
26
8
10
17
17
5
16
78
27
101
21
12
37
12
40
18
22
85
92
44 * 22
11
35
7
39
22
7
26
39
21
27
233
245
42
104
4
68
33
19
33
132
17
12
149
64
34
31
1
27
28
58
11
11
11
9
6
5
54
23
28
19
118
30
16
30
26
38
105
26
104
8
55
33
16
43
23
22
18
112
137
12
21
51
19
31
29
33
9
9
52
24
20
27
90
28
32
19
19
13
23
116
17
23
205
81
9
33
31
13
75
31
28
121
39
34
24
1
33
31
193
17
58
31
13
14
10
53
14
35
12
3
20
15
24
18
8
d Including deaths from encephalitis.
« Included in deaths from other diseases of nervous system.
f Including deaths from paralysis, but not including deaths from encephalitis.




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

928

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able VI.—DEATHS, BY CAUSES (2).
Number o f deaths from —

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Diarrh eaand
ente]ritis.

Cities.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19

Her­
Other
Other
nia
dis­
dis­
Organ­ eases of
and
Peri­ Appen­ eases of Bright’s
ic heart circula­ Under
2
intesti­ toni­
years nal ob­ tis. dicitis. digest­ disease.
disease. tory
2
ive
or
system. years. over. struc­
system.
tion.

New York, N. Y ......... 4,626
737 5,796
439
4,813
977
478
1,838
118
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
Chicago, 111...............
Philadelphia, P a ....... 1,898
128 1,147
130
502
195
409
%
St. Louis, M o..............
c m
427
<*786
15
/182
(*)
(«)
(«)
Boston, M ass..............
871
104
273
610
102
123
86
110
228
Baltimore, M d ..........
533
240
610
726
88
307
90
48
57
Cleveland, O hio.........
214 * 339
238
271
153
44
131
(«)
Buffalo, N. Y ..............
290
136
54
399
51
223
44
34
169
San Francisco, C a l. . .
260
42
529
302
49
194
42
271
38
Cincinnati, O h io.......
312
205
33
297
244
251
108
51
43
Pittsburg, P a ..............
154
205
209
503
67
41
62
38
220
New Orleans, L a .......
137
25
520
300
106
185
429
48
26
Detroit, M ich..............
275
83
61
35
183
290
169
30
76
M ilwaukee, W is.........
197
46
132
301
18
51
28
35
127
W ashington, D. C ___
389
145
27
182
370
70
40
281
23
Newark, N, J ..............
165
20
256
203
231
60
145
46
30
Jersey City, N. J .........
169
107
137
254
41
16
133
57
40
Louisville, K y............
132
177
178
105
15
15
98
48
45
M inneapolis, M in n ...
137
48
32
63
24
76
70
23
53
20 Providence. R. I .......
251
30
202
50
194
273
76
38
17
21 Indianapolis, I n d ___
52
57
9
85
220
89
9
115
1
22 Kansas City, M o.........
86
72
82
102
108
31
11
87
15
23 St. Paul, M inn............
58
21
26
50
105
108
4
13
104
24 Rochester, N. Y .........
22
45
119
260
78
59
40
14
43
25 Denver, C olo..............
73
26
110
74
100
64
25
24
38
26 Toledo, O h io..............
107
36
94
9
69
51
23
10
31
27 Allegheny, Pa............
31
125
4
60
195
35
51
81
19
28 Columbus, O h io.........
72
20
5
130
72
16
57
11
17
29 W orcester, M ass.........
191
7
20
31
96
119
9
15
30
30 Syracuse, N. Y ..........
78
1
87
128
48
38
27
13
48
31 New Haven, Conn___
37
12
4
107
126
156
12
13
58
32 Paterson, N. J ............
26
122
47
38
135
20
27
9
33 Fall River, M ass.......
12
22
4
42
38
67
30
20
7
34 St. Joseph, M o............
21
22
8
38
30
13
4
11
3
35 Omaha, N ebr..............
7
13
56
18
23
11
26
6
6
36 Los Angeles, Cal.........
74
112
97
4
43
14
66
13
31
37 Memphis, T e n n .........
15
91
49
41
11
18
34
129
31
38 Scranton, P a ..............
42
62
38
29
48
59
59
10
9
39 Low ell, M ass..............
24
41
37
197
185
15
6
41
18
40 Albany, N .Y ..............
141
74
22
46
19
15
45
144
8
41 Cambridge, M ass.......
32
18
130
56
18
35
6
6
3
42 Portland, O re g ..........
37
35
85
10
34
19
24
29
46
43 Atlanta, Ga.................
38
92
71
88
4
54
26
64
11
44 Grand Rapids, M ich..
31
87
35
13
52
17
7
38
8
45 Dayton, O hio..............
35
113
43
10
85
11
5
11
3
46 Richm ond, Y a............
20
48
67
103
16
14
64
55
6
47 Nashville, T en n .........
14
75
108
38
22
48
10
1
38
48 Seattle, W ash..............
20
67
18
14
21
7
24
39
29
49 Hartford, Conn..........
6
101
47
6
42
84
23
10
50 Reading, P a ...............
15
65
57
15
8
16
5
38
40
51 W ilm ington, D e l.......
41
90
87
3
6
17
1
39
47
52 Camden, N. J ..............
22
102
36
7
14
2
18
25
83
53 Trenton, N. J ..............
42
77
64
-31
6
9
38
19
Bridgeport, Conn.......
88
37
113
45
10
10
7
77
Lynn, M ass.................
38
89
35
4
11
18
31
22
6
56 Oakland, C a l..............
118
35
12
* 19
7
5
36
47
(«)
57 Lawrence, M ass.........
71
30
8
12
38
6
1
14
28
58 New Bedford, M ass. . .
112
24
48
95
14
11
2
14
1
59 Des Moines, Iow a.......
17
26
12
.19
10
6
2
40
32
60 Springfield, M ass.......
105
19
38
7
4
9
6
13
87
61 Som erville, M ass.......
74
10
21
18
2
10
5
30
23
62 Troy, N .Y ...................
32
110
24
77
15
14
5
44
80
63 Hoboken, N. J ............
74
25
65
23
1
3
3
30
55
64 Evansville, In d ..........
32
31
18
31
18
6
3
20
23
65 Manchester, N. H .......
28
70
119
28
14
5
35
46
66 Utica, N .Y ...................
26
71
21
33
23
4
42
52
7
67 Peoria, 111...................
52
20
22
5
1
13
9
19
41
68 Charleston, S. C..........
64
50
21
152
7
7
7
69
205
69 Savannah, G a ............
70
20
64
7
2
14
4
58
85
70 Salt Lake City, U tah..
12
47
4
20
8
6
7
15
29
«D ata not obtainable.
b Included in deaths from other diseases of circulatory system.
c Including deaths from organic heart disease.
d Including deaths from dysentery, diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over, peritonitis, and gastritis.
e Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.
/N o t including deaths from gastritis, o Included in deaths from other forms of tuberculosis.




STATISTICS OF CITIES,

929

T able VI.—DEATHS, BY CAUSES (2).
Number of deaths from—
Other
dis­
eases
ofgen itourinary
sys­
tem.

Puer­
peral
septi­
cae­
mia.

Dis­
Dis­
eases
Other o f the eases
puer­ skin
of
peral and
loco­
dis­ cellu­ m otor
eases. lar
sys­
tissue. tem.

MarHy- Other Infan­ Senile
Ill-de­ Total ginal
deaths num­
Sui­ A cci­ fined
dro- mal­ tile
ber.
ceph- form a­ dis­ debil­ cide. dent. dis­
ity.
alus. tions. eases.
eases.

1
1,822
1,231
713 4,152 2,230 70,720
(a)
(a)
(a)
2
(«) 24,406
(«)
3
823
152 24,137
146 1,275
1,831
4
734
580 143
17 10,601
30
16
*1,126
(9)
w
5
584
834
323
87
*38
48
18
117 11,300
W
6
484
16
373
57
147 10,479
71
33
935
7
7
15
16
606
289
56
281
181 5,834
8
334
12
39
309
5 5,360
65
9
206
53
9
4
18
2
6
302
191
3 7,008
43
150
416
262
2 6,155
10
46
13
250
296
17
7
73
11
43
5
11
25
266
63 6,592
10
70
636
45
12
285
32
30
23
32
228 6,478
149
6
428
22
60 w4,513
13
199
12
6
260
33
207
78
1
14
2
115
14 3,833
6
290
21
19
59
170
15
9 6,087
8
177
36
31
17
226
421
38
16
119
61 4,806
24
21
15
350
68
331
8
10
85
17
14
329
291
39 4,042
20
3
3
9
33
18
232
205
19 3,497
3
1
26
165
40
7
7
4
9
74
15 2,510
19
106
140
20
19
34 3,444
36
114
79
186
20
28
14
3
15
122
21
4
6
18
184
238
24 2,579
27
22
1
236
107 2,673
59
24
250
7
19
2
2
23
179
49
110
14 1,805
17
2
1
19
1
24
2
158
118
6 2,467
7
3
160
11
27
44 2,732
25
2
3
5
65
136
6
83
1
71
26
14 1,713
6
64
118
119
2
1
16
10
27
2
4
9
63
138
30 2,425
18
1
108
24
28
73
72
77
11 1,547
8
1
1
23
3
1,998
29
90
85
4
6
4
136
15
30
4
72
5
80
8
83
71 1,574
10
31
56
96
35 1,975
2
2
2
1
14
18
119
32
33 1,808
5
7
43
6
105
20
156
1
33
50
6
3
47
23 2,143
315
1
64
34
672
2
2
8
56
20
1
7
1
11
35
55
104
18 1,035
10
8
3
3
59
3
9
5
2
62
82
36
48 1,985
101
19
18
10
i
175
37
44
1
43
220 1,926
3
18
6
3
16
38
2
13
171
68 1,732
2
119
8
1
10
1
1
39
32 2,038
7
2
2
9
71
3
8
205
40
40
86
5
2
50
25
8 1,759
9
10
1
1
56
41
59
4
42
34
10
8
3
1
98 1,574
7
1
42
52
118
2
6
1
1
8 1,172
50
43
5
2
86
2
1
2
2
17
156 1,931
3
83
44
4
55
5
1
2
50
16
19 1,140
3
83
45
2
42
7
60
4
1
1
85
23 1,227
7
46
68
98 1,907
7
11
1
76
70
1
13
5
1
1
8
47
142
48
6
58
24 wl,587
4
1
1
48
3
21
876
4
61
36
16
19
49
9
8
46
53
26 1,198
92
2
6
114 1,359
50
112
75
1
1
3
29
51
102
54 1,404
4
31
4
3
1
113
6
16
52
4
58
47 1,356
3
6
147
8
30
3
3
2
22 1,231
5
94
74
53
9
8
27
5
3
1
7
15
7
54
7
68
50
3 1,224
6
6
3
55
4
48
2
47
37
27 1,020
1
4
2
56
34
46
3 1,048
60
3
16
57
6
4
2
35 1,118
1
204
7
29
37
3
13
58
4
31
12 1,236
1
2
2
116
2
50
6
34
740
59
6
1
1
3
55
24
6
55
3
1
933
60
2
2
42
4
50
15
5
6
73
3
61
21
5
6
7
831
3
3
47
27
62
35 1,662
2
2
27
11
7
5
66
55
6
9
7
17
22
11 1,157
63
50
26
88
11
1
1
745
64
3
59
13
40
17
3
65
3
2
5
33 1,131
3
3
15
35
8
101
2
31
27 1,031
66
6
10
2
27
8
2
55
4
11
21
6
2
2
57
48
791
67
31
3
4
14
14
52
68
4
45
18 1,725
3
49
1
75
114 1,437
6
15
7
2
52
65
69
9
1
6
86
706
4
39
9
70
9
3
10
49
3
1
53
h Included in deaths from infantile diseases.
i Including deaths from other m alform ations.
J Included in deaths from other m alformations.
* Including deaths from hydrocephalus.
i Including deaths from diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over.
m Including 303 deaths occurring outside city lim its.
« Not including 81 deaths of nonresidents.
1,299
(a)

1,174
370
483
182
18
109
156
165
41
91
54
64
137
88
98
44
68
117
26
32
6
27
60
31
24
10
15
8
25
40
64
13
33
42
6
11
58
13
65
22
23
24
18
39
6
5
7
18
24
14
45
9
32
19
15
69
6
9
30
24
2
35
10
15
5
19
7
26

244
(«)
23
15
31
55
21
58
21
29
32
31
22
28
19
27
27
9
13
11
1
2
2
5
2
6
7
6
18
8
13
1

192

404

%

%




431
(«)

140

(a )2
6
6
23

%

930

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.
T able V I —DEATHS,BY CAUSES (1)—Concluded.
Number o f deaths from —

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

71 San A ntonio, T e x ..
72 Duluth, M in n .........
73 Erie, P a ...................
74 Elizabeth, N. J .......
75 W ilkesbarre, P a ___
76 Kansas City, Kans.
77 Harrisburg, P a .......
78 Portland, M e..........
79 Yonkers, N. Y .........
80 N orfolk, V a ............
81 Waterbury, Conn. (a)
82 H olyoke, M ass.......
83 Fort Wayne, In d . . .
84 Youngstown, O h io.
85 Houston, T e x .........
86 Covington, K y .......
87 Akroru O h io .'.........
88 Dallas, T ex..............
89 Saginaw, M ich .......
90 Lancaster, P a .........
91 Lincoln, N ebr.........
92 Brockton, Mass.......
93 Bingham ton, N. Y ..
94 Augusta, Ga............
95 Pawtucket, R. I ___
96 A ltoona, P a ............
97 W heeling, W . V a ...
98 M obile, A la ............
99 Birmingham, A la ..
100 Little Rock, Ark . . .
101 Springfield, O hio. . .
102 Galveston, T e x .......
103 Tacoma, W ash.......
104 H averhill, M ass___
105 Spokane, W ash.......
106 Terre Haute, I n d ...
107 Dubuque, Iow a.......
108 Quincy, 111..............
109 South Bend, In d . . .
110 Salem, M ass............
111 Johnstown, P a .......
112 Elmira, N. Y ..........
113 Allentow n, Pa.........
114 Davenport, Iow a .. .
115 M cKeesport, P a ___
116 Springfield, 111.......
117 Chelsea, M ass.........
118 Chester, P a ..............
119 York, P a .................
120 M alden, M ass.........
121 Topeka, K an s.........
122 Newton, M ass.........
123 Sioux City, Iow a . . .
124 Bayonne, N. J .........
125 K noxville, Tenn . . .
126 Schenectady, N .Y ..
127 Fitchburg, M ass___
128 Superior, W is..........
129 Rockford, 111..........
130 Taunton, M ass.......
131 Canton, O hio..........
132 Butte, M ont............
133 Montgomery, Ala ..
134 Auburn, N. Y .........
135 Chattanooga, Tenn.
136 East St. Louis, 111 ..
137 Joliet, 111.................




Other
Ty­
Scar­ W hoop­ Diph­
Dys­ epi­
phoid Mala­ Small­ Mea­
let
ing theria Grippe en­ dem ic
ria. pox. sles. fever.
and
fever.
cough. croup.
tery.
dis­
eases.

23
41

43

1

8

l!

15
18
43

1

7

2

21

2
2
2
21

1
10

13
6

32
15
7
16
59
26
17

1

3

3
1
1

17
13

5
60
5
5
33
5

10
12
6

___
2

2
2

12

23
15
6
11

38
28
38
28
8
10
11
10

19
27
7
23
19
4
40

9
40

43
3
1

26

7

10
1
1

3
1
1
2

4
1
2

3
3
1

5
5
1
1

5
i

25

1

8

6

1
1

1

3
2
2

1

2

22

19

6
6
2

2

1
22

5

6

1

4

1

3

5
3

1

3

1

1

7

2

9
l
2

3

3
4

9
5
10
1
6
12

18
13
7
14
2
6

4
9
8
8
22

14
7

15
26

16
5

10
11
12

2

4
3

23

11

13
9
4
16
19
18
11
21
11
21
20

1

24
3
9
4
13

5

3

8
11

2
1
-1 0
1

14
5
13

7
13
5
4

8
2
1

16

2

6
1

4

1
6
6

4

2
1
1

17
5
14
1

3

5

1
2

3

1
2

i

1

3
1
2
1

6
8

1

1
8
1
1

4

7
3

21
1

3

1

1

3

10

6
2

1

1
2

19
7

1

7
4
3

2
1

4

2
2
1
1
2
2

1
2
11

3

Including data for township.

2
2
6
12

23
18
15
6

16
25
18
18
11
11

4

11
2
1

3
3
i
2
2

4

2
2
2
1
2

13
3

16
45

4 ,

13

4

2
1 i

2

23
19

13
17

8

6
1

11
12

5
3
4

17

7
14
14
9
15

6

6
2

1

10

8

3

5

1
1

23
5
5

4

2

11

20

27
9

1
6

29

1

19

2

1

3

6

6
2

7

3
4
9
18
4

1

1

1

12
1

1

7
24
4
4
9
27
2
10
11

5
2
12
10
12

3

6
2
2

3

19
16

10

2

8
2
8

17
9
4
24
7
3
4
19
7
17
4
2
11

13
2

19
4
5

4

18
2
10
1
2

3
2
1

5
7
6
1

4
8

3

4

3

11
8

6

29

5
5

9

1
6
6
12
2

3
10
10

5

2
7

4
3
3
3
6

3
1

i
4
4
4
5
3
ii
i
6
1
2

7

2
8
1

3
1
2
1

3
1
2

13
1

3
2

4
2
2
2
2
1

2

3
1

3

2

12

7

7

2

4
8
8

6

2

3
2

1

4

4

2

12
8
8
1
2

2
6

4

5

6
1

6

9
7
3

3

3
1
1

9

1

1
2

1

931

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able VI.—DEATHS BY CAUSES (1)—Concluded.
Number of deaths from—
Other
Puru­ Pul­ Other
Cere­
Bron­ Pneu­
Con­ dis­ chitis, m onia
Other
bral
lent
mo­ forms
gen­ Men­ conges­ Pa­ vul­ eases acute and
and
Can­ eral in­
of
of
brontion raly­ sions nerv­ and
septi- nary
sis. of in­ ous chron­ chocsemic tuber­ tuber­ cer. dis­ gitis. and
culo­ culo­
pneufants. sys­
hemor­
eases.
infec­
sis.
sis.
ic.
m onia.
rhage.
tion.
tem.
11
10
7
2
11
1
6
1
1
7
4
10
8
6
5
13
7
2
6
2
5
3
5
14
9
14
9
11
10
1
2
1
4
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
5
4
6
ii
4
1
2
4
2
8
2
2
9
2

292
66
57
113
46
100
76
118
95
136
70
87
63
43
118
105
29
112
50
46
29
59
54
113
67
46
55
157
130
120
39
46
48
74
51
60
37
59
54
65
46
44
54
53
35
78
60
48
36
45
62 i
42 I
38
56
128
58
38
26
43
60
33
20
48
46
79
28
39

21
18
12
23
5
3
18
4
11
8
2
6
41
4
3
3
5
3
8
1
8
9
1
5
2
3
1
16
1
3
2
8
6
35
1
9
7
1
17
4
6
10
5
2
6
10
5
4
3
2
11
3
4
6
3
7
5
1




26
29
28
23
21
28
26
37
23
24
10
26
32
16
26
13
22
19
25
22
24
21
33
18
22
17
31
26
20
16
19
21
18
28
30
26
26
23
17
24
14
25
13
24
16
13
24
13
16
22
11
22
17
13
10
13
26
13
17
10
12
8
5
17
18
8
8

13
12
29
17
11
13
17
21
12
39
34
27
16
18
20
40
12
25
12
7
8
15
18
39
5
17
12
17
11
13
12
7
17
12
21
21
8
23
13
17
12
17
15
14
8
20
16
9
11
7
11
12
12
3
20
13
9
9
21
15
3
8
8
13
11
7
2

27
35
7
22
11
25
12
41
34
14
17
51
10
23
7j
38
10
6
7
6
11
16
4
10
24
20
18
1
12
18
10
10
9
12
18
14
17
12
6
19
35
12
13
6
15
8
17
12
7
10
5
10
15
19
6
14
11
15
29
9
7
11
4
9
8
10

18
21
39
42
42
21
36
62
40
52
31
15
23
17
17
23
22
17
16
51
21
6
42
29
38
20
25
35
28
32
34
18
16
27
9
18
21
28
13
27
8
26
55
25
6
12
17
21
30
25
11
38
20
24
11
32
14
10
9
38
15
6
5
37
22
8
9

15
5
18
6
6
13
15
28
4
28
6
10
19
14
17
15
12
16
18
3
18
4
19
30
8
18
16
18
9
12

2
10
5
13
11
8
9
10
8
7
10
9
6
16
7
15
20
7
19
5
31
4
12
4
8
2
15
32
12
3
7
9
7
5

18
17
17
29
25
9
14
9
13
40
10
14
8
21
18
17
20
5
20
18
10
6
12
5
32
7
39
8
5
10
6
8
6
6
2
15
5
12
4
29
6
17
19
41
14
12
14
9
8
7
5
5
19
7
11
4
11
7
8
4.
6
6
3
5
4
9

32
2
23
11
14
24
16
12
9
17
7
15
12
13
24
25
11
16
14
7
11
20
83
28
7
10
5
49
20
20
5
20
9
19
4
19
13
29
3
30
8
7
7
13
2
17
24
9
7
18
42
10
8
5
11
8
5
7
11
29
11
6
19
6
9
5
15

21
19
21
18
13
11
7
11
25
17
54
31
19
16
7
27
8
18
15
11
2
8
10
10
23
14
13
11
13
9
20
7
3
5
14
7
10
14
13
14
14
9
7
17
16
14
14
4
8
13
1
9
12
10
8
12
11
14
13
12
1
6
4
6
9
16
6

58
57
73
88
88
105
50
58
91
72
99
82
45
84
56
86
39
99
54
72
33
68
77
74
74
75
64
51
180
91
41
26
37
48
35
46
22
55
28
62
49
64
55
'20
94
39
35
50
54
60
47
37
37
79
51
71
47
40
46
50
33
70
30
41
32
94
46

Other
dis­
eases of
respir­
atory
system.

8
9
11
16
15
10
9
13
19
7
20
17
24
2
13
18
6
10
20
5
4
20
5
27
7
15
12
13
11
23
7
6
7
5
4
7
3
18
17
31
8
5
8
12
5
4
4
6
10
6
6
7
22
7
19
2
3
2
12
5
8
8
9
15
5

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

932

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able VI.—DEATHS, BY CAUSES (2)—Concluded.
Number o f deaths from —
Diarrh eaand
ente ritis.
Other
dis­
Organ­ eases of
ic heart
2
disease. circula­ Under years
tory
2
or
system. years. over.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

San Antonio, T e x ___
Duluth, M in n ............
Erie, P a ......................
Elizabeth, N .J............
W ilkesbarre, P a .........
Kansas City, Kans___
Harrisburg, P a ..........
Portland, M e..............
Yonkers, N. Y ............
N orfolk, Y a.................
W aterbury, Conn. (« ).
H olyoke, Mass............
Port Wayne, I n d .......
Youngstown, Ohio___
Houston, T ex..............
Covington. K y............
Akron, O h io...............
Dallas, T e x .................
Saginaw, M ich ..........
Lancaster, Pa..............
Lincoln, N eb r............
Brockton, Mass..........
Binghamton, N. Y ___
Augusta, G a...............
Pawtucket, R. I ..........
Altoona, Pa.................
W heeling. W .V a .......
M obile, A la.................
Birmingham, A la ___
Little R ock, A rk.........
Springfield, O h io.......
Galveston, T e x ..........
Tacoma, Wash............
H averhill, M ass.........
Spokane, W ash..........
Terre Haute, In d .......
Dubuque, Iow a..........
Quincy, 111.................
South Bend, I n d .......
Salem, M ass...............
Johnstown, P a ..........
Elmira, N .Y ...............
Allentow n, Pa............
Davenport, Io w a .......
M cKeesport, P a .........
Springfield, 111............
Chelsea, Mass..............
Chester, P a.................
York, Pa......................
M alden, Mass..............
Topeka, K an s............
Newton, M ass............
Sioux City, Iow a.........
Bayonne, N .J..............
K noxville, Tenn.........
Schenectady, N. Y ___
Fitchburg, M ass.........
Superior, W is..............
R ockford, 111..............
Taunton, Mass............
Canton, O h io..............
Butte, M on t...............
Montgomery, A la.......
Auburn, N. Y ..............
Chattanooga, T enn. . .
East St. Louis, 111.......
Joliet, 111....................




a
b

38
23
52
48
43
39
52
81
44
76
27
- 26
17
55
35
65
38
23
53
46
15
41
35
27
72
23
46
51
30
26
30
27
63
36
36
46
33
19
14
40
47
39
39
39
18
21
70
33
23
43
26
32
27
4
23
23
55
17
19
37
31
16
29
27
22
9
11

28
17
11
44
4
27
6
10
31
13
23
12
18
7
11
44
4
16
6
14
6
8
13
17
6
21
9
8
10
19
1
5
11
10
9
10
11
9
16
26
8
15
4
14
6
4
20
12
16
14
9
10
4
17
12
12
7
3
12
6
2
2
6
10
6
1

92
66
49
85
46
9
39
28
45
41
79
84
19
35
49
29
16
29
21
16
10
9
13
23
47
22
c 30
11
7
27
7
21
4
29
12
30
17
24
31
12
42
20
12
21
39
17
6
37
35
17
16
26
14
49
14
45
31
46
18
42
11
24
22
14
24
11
23

15
5
10
14
3
19
4
11
63
11
10
5
9
15
7
3
12
5
22
3
13
1
67
13
13
(<*)

29
53
40
3
14
5
4
6
6
1
5
3
28
25
5
6
32
9
31
4
10
10
6
5
8
8
6
9
6
3
3
11
15
10
4
3
3

Other
Hernia
dis­
and
Periintesti­ •toni- Appen­ eases of Bright’s
nal ob­ tis. dicitis. digest­ disease.
ive
struc­
system.
tion.

1
6
10
5
6
4
6
3
7
15
11
5
2
5
4
4
3
5
11
4
4
2
1
6
2
11
6
4
8
1
3
2
5
4
11
2
6
2
3
6
3
6
5
6
5
10
2
2
7
5
4
1
10
1
4
6
5
4
4
2
1
8
4

10
11
9
6
13
18
7
12
7
10
2
8
17
6
7
15
7
7
12
2
3
5
12
15
1
9
7
13
17
6
6
4
8
3
11
16
7
8
9
4
7
6
5
6
18
9
5
6
3
4
6
3
11
8
12
10
7
4
4
5
3
7
3
8
7
4
4

Including data for township.
Not including deaths from premature birth.

8
9
9
1
4
5
5
4
7
8
5
6
2
4
3
1
11
9
3
2
3
11
3
2
2
4
2
3
4
3
6
6
2
10
5
3
4
2
3
6
5
3
6
2
7
1
2
13
2
3
4
3
6
6
4
2
6
2
4
1
2
1

44
13
26
17
16
26
22
18
25
41
24
31
26
21
42
27
14
47
26
17
15
28
20
35
21
19
35
28
32
25
10
24
8
9
19
26
18
21
15
16
13
20
14
11
20
27
16
17
13
10
24
10
16
23
24
10
11
6
14
6
11
11
22
17
29
7
6

52
31
33
51
36
31
22
76
44
34
33
22
33
33
29
21
25
20
22
13
8
32
29
28
25
21
83
23
18
40
66
17
20
17
10
20
23
19
9
15
36
26
13
6
30
21
10
15
14
8
12
10
23
19
18
5
12
3
18
13
27
19
22
24
8
13

933

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able VI.—DEATHS, BY CAUSES (2)—Concluded.
Number o f deaths from—
Other
dis­
eases
ofgen itourinary
sys­
tem.
8
2
10
15
1
13
14
13
24
28
22
14
21
18
3
74
4
4
9
7
3
20
19
10
9
3
23
9
15
2
3
13
4
14
4
17
4
12
11
15
9
24
1
6
7
9
19
1
14
16
20
15
9
2
14
11
2
6
15
1
13
10
7
3
3
7

Puer­
peral
septi­
cae­
mia.

7
5
9
4
3
6
6
3
2
11
1
3
1
5
6
4
1
2
4
2
7
3
3
6
1
1

Dis­
Dis­
Other eases eases
Hy- Other
f the
puer­ oskin
of
dro- mal­
peral and
loco­ ceph- form a­
motor alus. tions.
dis­
eases. cellu­ sys­
lar
tissue. tem.
6
2
4
6
3
6
3
4
5
2
2
4
1
2
14
2
4
4
2
5
3
5
1
2
9
11
4
1
3

3
8
5
1
7
1
2
1
1

3
2
5
1
1
5
4

6
4
2

1
1

3
1
1
6
2
1
6
3
5
2
5
6

2
3
1

3

3
6
1
3
3
1
6
2
1
4
1
2
1
1

4
2
2
1
8
2
6
5
1
2
3
2
5
3

2
1

4
1
5
2
2

1
2
2

1
1
2

3

4 !
1 !

1

2

4

2

4
1
3
3

1

;
2 i
1
1
1

1
2

1
1
2

2

1

1
4
2
4
3
4
3
1
1
4
4
2
5
3
3
4
2
8
3
5
1
3
2
5
2
3
2
1
2
2
1

1

1
3
2
i

3
3
1
1
5
1
2
1

1
4

2

1
1

1
2
1

2
2
1
2
1
3
1

1
2
i
1
3
1
1

1
2

1

i
4

1
1
1
1
1

2
2
7

1
2

1

2

5

1

2
1

1
3

2

2

1

2
c
d

8
1

2

1
1
1

Mar­
Ill-de­ Total ginal
Infan­ Senile
Sui­ A cci­ fined deaths num­
tile
ber.
dis­ debil­ cide. dent. dis­
ity.
eases.
eases.

64
26
66
80
59
40
72
49
48
86
82
88
37
635
50
57
39
49
39
45
22
30
33
64
58
49
28
53
52
6 21
34
35
6 26
26
23
69
33
29
58
23
59
32
49
22
39
19
40
39
31
39
5
23
30
44
25
34
67
48
25
38
14
33
8
43
39
19
30

28
16
25
25
33
20
39
45
12
15
18
17
26
24
20
51
13
16
34
32
12
19
45
7
22
41
27
33
15
10
38
14
11
21
19
57
36
48
19
17
16
17
14
44
9
48
23
17
18
14
35
21
9
6
15
15
28
23
19
41
17
11
15
20
17
15
16

12
11
8
7
6
3
1
2
3
1
1
6
6
8
6
12
1
8
3
2
7
3
6
5
6
5
3
2
2
11
9
10
8
5
9
2
2
4
6
4
8
5
4
2
1
2
3
6
3
4
2
1
2
3
5
6
10
2
2
1
3

69
80
38 .
68
67
59
55
39
44
50
41
38
41
63
76
52
40
72
35
22
30
6
38
23
23
37
46
34
117
46
18
44
44
27
29
42
26
39
25
13
61
29
21
30
74
34
20
57
22
16
49
23
40
46
24
45
24
57
15
16
10
62
19
21
39
61
28

Including deaths from diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over.
included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.




39 1,255
725
12
7
811
966
17
746
36
858
60
719
23
878
13
11
808
16 1,075
31
895
22
876
631
17
23 6 701
862
32
13 1,047
479
36
872
90
4
611
7
592
406
29
9
523
755
53
62
917
667
3
12
628
1
683
930
27
62 1,008
58 &794
10
458
575
60
17 6474
3
547
476
8
7
697
444
5
27
609
18
503
10
630
15
657
1
568
39
530
16
530
44
652
622
71
677
13
14
535
19
464
4
486
614
112
7
434
17
446
21
581
36
565
37
606
2
469
21
475
422
23
5
560
288
9
486
36
20
381
8
426
585
60
35
439
365
26

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

934

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (1).

Mar­
ginal
number.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

10

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66

67
68
69
70

Cities.

New York, N. Y .......
Chicago, 111..............
Philadelphia , I n ...
St. Louis, M o............
Boston, M ass..........
Baltim ore, M d........
Cleveland, O h io___
Buffalo, N .Y ............
San Francisco, C al..
Cincinnati, O hio___
Pittsburg, P a ..........
New Orleans, La___
Detroit, M ich..........
M ilwaukee, W is___
W asnington, D. C ...
Newark, N .J ..........
Jersey C ity,N .J —
Louisville, K y .........
M inneapolis, M in n .
Pnm aence, R. I ___
Indianapolis, In d ...
Kansas C ty M o___
St Paul, M inn.......
Rochester, N. Y .......
Denver C o lo ..........
Toledo Ohio............
A llegheny, P a .........
Coiumbus, O h io ___
Worcester, M ass---Syracuse, N. Y ........
New Haven, C onn..
Paterson, N .J..........
Fall River, M ass___
St. Joseph, M o .........
Omaha, N ebr..........
Los Angeles, Cal___
Memphis, Tenn.......
Scranton, Pa...........
Low ell, M ass..........
Albany, N .Y ..........
Cambridge, M ass...
Portland, O reg.......
Atlanta, G a ............
Grand Rapids, M ich.
Dayton, Ohio..........
Richm ond, V a.........
N ashville, T enn___
Seattle, W ash.........
Hartford, Conn.......
Reading, Pa............
W ilm ington, D e l. . .
Camden, N .J .........
Trenton, N .J ..........
Bridgeport, C onn...
Lynn, Mass..............
Oakland, Cal..........
Lawrence, Mass___
New Bedford, Mass.
Des Moines, Iow a ..
Springfield, M ass...
Som erville, M ass.. .
Troy, N. Y ...............
Hoboken, N .J .........
Evansville, I n d ___
Manchester, N. H ..
Utica, N. Y ..............
Peoria, 111...............
Charleston,^. C ___
Savannah, G a.........
SaltLakeCity,U tah.

Ty­
Scar­ W hoop­
phoid Mala­ Small­ Mea­
ing
let
fever. ria. pox. sles. fever. cough.

1.03 0.28
(«)
(«)
1.84
.08
1.87
.75
1.26
.01
1.36
.33
2.40
.10
1.85
1.00
.20
2.96
.24
6.31
.06
2.18 1.79
1.04
.24
1.64
3.17
.79
.21
1.19
.87
.32
3.46
.43
4.82
1.36
.06
1.94
.66
2.77
.(54
1.33
1.26
2.45
.04
2.63
.17
5.53
.12
3.04
.32
1.30
.15
1.14
.06
5.21
.51
1.60
.05
.98
.14
2.98
.45
2.32
1.61
2.28 6.28
1.79
.06
.88
.10
1.38
.11
.64
.06
1.96
.62
3.00
2.89
.53
1.87
.08
1.68 1.15
2.33 1.64
2.51
2.08
.50
2.58
.07
.21
2.35
.96
1.14 *\*i6*
1.06
.82
.98
.10
.95 ~ .10
1.07
1.54
1.76
.13
1.72
.43
1.44
2.59
1.21
.54
2.15
.97
.09
.87
.51
1.90
2.78 2.78
.42 5.22
.
2.83 .

0.58

0.63

(a)

(a)

.65
.09
.65
.34
.04
.04
.02
.05
.80
.02
.03
1.48
.10
.06
.06
.08
.22
.06
.11
.04
.20
.11
.05
1.49
.39
.57

.19
.05

.34

.07
.08

.11
.32
.91
.03
.17
.41
.38
.73
1.00
.02
1.09
.44
.28
.27
.27
.06
.40
.09
.19
.33
.28
.22
.29
1.11
.10
.06
.61
.05
.33
.74
.05
.46
.83
.34
.64
.34
.93
.09
.08
.34
.25
.07

...

.i<j
.33

.52

.19
.09
.16
.13
.11
.36
1.14
.52

.13

.29
.63

.49
.13

...
.

1.64
(«)
.91
.65
1.86
.10
.58
.84
.19
.39
1.77
.96
.33
.42
.11
.48
.69
.09
.48
.26
.39
1.05
1.00
.16
1.98
.58
1.20
1.29
.65
.19
.30
.61
.09
.74
.97
.30
.31
.29
.15
.45
.51
.26
1.04
.61
.24
.69
.80
1.09
1.62
.21
.44
1.14
.78
.19
.81
.95
.21
.60
.48
.86
.13
.80
.19
.25
.35
.70
3.12

0.41
(a)

1.08
.76
.57
.60
.19
1.19
.87
.28
1.74
.34
.22
.55
1.21
.60
.35
.17
.60
.38
.19
.11
.17
.24
.11
.88
1.03
.39
.60
.19
1.11
.72
.42
.74
.87
.20
.10
.69
.69
.23
.70
.78
.09
.16
1.84
.44
.23
.08
1.40
.64
.52
.81
.98
.10
.09
.54
.72
.60
.09
.54
.71
.97

....

Other
Diph­
epi­
theria Grippe. Dys­ dem ic
en­
and
tery. dis­
croup.
eases.

2.92
(«)
2.74
2.90
3.12
1.63
3.70
2.67
1.38
1.12
2.50
.63
1.37
2.61
1.41
2.14
2.97
1.52
7.57
2.53
1.40
1.50
2.88
.89
1.68
3.62
2.19
.65
.85
1.46
1.52
1.11
1.07
1.79
1.16
1.01
.26
2.42
5.74
2.44
3.75
2.22
1.24
1.58
1.47
.58
.76
1.48
2.92
4.27
2.78
4.42
.81
1.63
3.33
1.05
1.43
1.13
4.46
1.39
3.37
1.57
2.59
1.07
.71
2.43
.76
.58
.70
6.52

*57 * *28
28*
a Data not obtainable.
b Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.
o Including deaths from hydrocephalus.




1.21
(a)

.81
.76
1.47
1.22
.67
.81
1.77
1.70
1.19
.38
1.96
2.97
.52
.77
1.43
.96
1.86
1.51
1.46
.78
.61
.84
1.34
.74
2.46
.65
.45
3.09
.28
.37
.74
1.45
1.41
1.97
1.56
1.27
1.71
3.11
2.90
1.92
.44
.65
2.31
1.95
.34
1.00
1.10
1.42
.81
.97
2.45
.88
.95
.98
.49
2.30
1.39
1.69
3.01
.94
.71
.97
1.77
2.38
1.32
2.12

0.49

%
%

.47
.36
.69
.23
.80
.39
1.17
.08
.53
.54
.54
1.06
.04
.55
.77
.22
.78
.41
.11
.35
.83
.78
.50
.19
1.77
.94
1.17
.45
.48
.30
2.03
.63
.20
.13
.51
1.40
.79
2.04
1.00
1.76
.46
.08
.29
.57
.37
.41
.29
.38
.18
.49
.13
.32
.60
.48
.52
1.21
.71
.49
1.01
.99
.76
.71

0.30
(«)
.33
.48
.04
.49
.46
.34
.71
.02
2.11
.42
.64
.38
.39
.37
.23
1.91
.43
.26
.33
.28
.62
.17
1.40
.45
.50
.25
1.01
.05
9.80
.15
.29
.25
.57
.29
.34
.40
.64
.85.47
.61
.16
.73
.19
.69
.75
.22
.14
.22
.16
.25
.10
.19
.09
.16
.41
.11
.48
.30
.26
.13
.09
.29
.89
.64
.07
.57

935

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (1).
Other
Puru­ Pul­ Other
Cere­
dis­ Bron­ Pneu­
Con­ eases chitis, m onia
Other
lent
bral
m o­ form s
and
and
gen­ Men­ conges­ Pa­ vul­
Can­ eral in­
of
of
septi- nary
tion
raly­ sions nerv­ acute bronand
csemic tuber­ tuber­ cer. dis­ gitis. and
sis. o f in­ ous chron­ chopneufants. sys­
eases.
hemor­
in fec­ culo­ culo­
ic.
sis.
sis.
m onia.
tion.
rhage.
tem.

Other
dis­
eases of
respir­
atory
system.

12.96
1.15
3.04
1.39
3.48 2.20 1.64
1.14
3.59 0.34
(a)
(a)
(a)
(«)
(«)
(«)
ft 10.68 1.60
3.21 ft 3.11
3.90 1.60
ft &
ift
3.52
9.39
2.70
1.86 /4.58
10.64 c l. 39 3.25 1.31 <*1.51
1.85 (e)
1.03
9.73
1.94
2.66
1.81 3.26 4.39 1.78
.96
.86
11.58
4.07
10.95
1.67
2.81
2.21
1.65
10.86
2.39 3.42 1.96 1.56
3.76 1.72
10.52
1.70
5.74
1.89
.86
7.42
3.62 1.80 3.50
2.30 2.09
10.06
1.51
3.69
1.36
1.79
8.86
.43 5.11 2.86 2.78
.88
3.47
9.86
1.97
3.51
2.30
13.47
3.41
.83
2.40 5.68 4.65 1.75
.01
1.66
10.28
4.32
1.97
12.05
1.30 3.70 1.69 3.41
3.62 1.30
1.87
1.26
11.76
2.52
2.59
1.87
5.46
2.65 2.15 5.48 1.32
.50
2.53
1.14
7.49
1.84
1.03
1.31 3.18 2.05 1.77
3.20
13.68
3.97
.90
1.88
10.30
4.79
3.50
.60 3.99 3.61 2.39
3.55 2.39
1.75
7.31
1.25
8.50
3.23
4.59
10.44
1.90 5.37 3.34 2.43
1.49
4.17
.23
2.25
8.16
1.89
1.53
1.02 3.19 2.38 1.76
5.03
.84
3.01
14.31
1.54
8.76
1.02 3.74 1.71 3.31
2.39
3.27
1.16
12.09
4.99
.67
1.73
9.67
3.29
11.55
.79 2.38 1.61 3.36, 4.78
4.11
1.78
.35
2.34
2.72
9.49
3.12
1.12 3.12 1.83 2.54
1.60
3.46 3.00
12.10
8.52
1.23
1.39
2.39
10.44
1.67
2.39 5.30 2.95 2.71
3.70
.24
1.28
8.16
.78
2.96
2.55 4.15 1.71 1.60
1.63
11.15
4.82
.61
8.68
3.33
2.21
1.47
2.02
8.68
.89 3.30 1.55 2.79
5.51
.77
9.58
1.57
1.91
1.65
1.46
11.45
.86 2.77 2.21 1.76
3.07 1.76
1.16
8.70
2.33
11.74
1.38 4.43 2.27 2.38
.78
3.55
.50
2.77
8.68
1.09
2.88
2.23
3.61
10.66
.57 6.08 2.60 3.41
5.03
.20
11.82
2.78
.88
20.02
1.10
2.67
1.87 3.37 2.75 2.82
.95
2.38
8.29
1.99
.58
2.86
2.04
2.51
1.40 4.38 2.63 2.51
3.44
8.11
1.73
12.87
2.80
6.10
4.04 1.98 2.52 2.31
.54
2.68
2.19
2.85
8.99
1.36
1.94
13.32
.84 4.59 2.20 3.56
.71
3.75 2.07
2.13
.50
13.71
2.15
.55
1.90
4.61
12.11
.95 3.35 1.60 2.75
5.66
7.88
2.54
2.41
1.46
.95 4.70 1.91 1.97
2.03
5.53 1.53
10.17
7.39
1.52
5.57
7.65
2.89
.56 4.00 2.78 1.52
.30
1.57
2.99
9.79
2.38
.72
3.04
2.43
11.89
.28 3.98 3.93 4.15
1.11
3.70
7.32
10.50
5.22
8.49
.84 3.69
4.66
3.13
2.01 2.33
.61 1.07
9.67
1.93
2.08
9.67
.89 2.68 2.08 2.23
3.42 1.79
.30
2.08
10.92
2.99
1.74
.97
7.54
4.06 1.35
3.38
.77 3.67 2.99 4.25
8.36
2.12
1.21
17.48
.30
1.71
5.39 1.51
4.13 4.94 2.67 2.12
7.84
1.14
1.25
1.30
12.41
1.14 1.87 1.61 2.03
1.45
1.51 1.14
13.16
3.64
4.27
1.44
6.47
.35 2.31 1.39 3.18
3.00 1.91
6.29
11.92
1.08
3.29
.98 2.80 1.57 3.29
3.68 1.82
.83
7.36
2.01
1.59
8.13
1.59
12.34
1.82 6.03 1.31 2.05
1.08
8.36
.51
2.27
11.05
1.91
2.35
1.52
11.69
1.52 5.85 1.40
.76
.64
9.40
.51
9.56
2.30
.43*
10.75
1.28 6.57 1.02 3.24
.94
2.30 1.62
12.58
1.45
1.45
11.29
1.50
1.76 2.43 1.71
3.73 3.11 * 3.26
7.11
3.51
1.14
2.89
2.63
6.67 ***i.*75 6.67 2.98 1.58
4.65 2.11
.98
9.37
1.39
2.85
.90
2.12 5.38 1.06 4.73
.65 5.95
10.60
4.40
9.70
5.82 2.46 1.68 1.89
2.20
2.78
2.20
8.44
3.99 3.30
11.03
1.95
2.46
1.95
1.45 2.52 2.21 1.45
3.78
13.93
3.91 1.89
11.42
1.26
1.14
1.14
1.60
9.82
3.65 1.94
2.63 4.68 3.65 2.51
.25
10.27
2.50
5.59 2.25 3.01
1.59
2.50
4.93 1.17
10.43
8.98
1.33
6.62
1.25
4.64 1.55
2.13
.88* 8.32 **“ .*52' 2.72 1.55 2.28
10.04
1.57
2.35
1.50
3.85 3.78
.78
.50 10.61
.57 1.64 1.99 3.42
9.37
2.43
2.43
1.55
.81
6.27 2.14
.30 11.36
.59 3.17 1.18 3.83
8.45
2.19
2.44
1.71
3.17
.33 10.80
.97 3.01 1.62 2.60
7.55 3.49
10.38
1.39
3.35
3.27
2.53 3.84 2.12 1.96
3.02 1.06
.98
.49 11.68
1.18
11.76
1.08
1.27
1.67
.29 5.39 2.45 3.14
3.23 2.45
13.92
11.35
2.00
.95
1.24
2.00
1.34 5.34 2.39 3.05
.76 14.41
5.06 1.43
11.27
1.79
2.50
.80 3.76 1.34 5.10
3.31
1.88
2.42 1.79
9.66
8.01
1.38
2.02
4.37
1.13 4.13 2.10 3.88
2.75 1.13
1.86
.89 11.25
12.57
2.43
1.35
1.49
.68 2.30 1.49 2.30
1.35
8.51
3.51 1.08
2.03
8.36
2.89
1.72
1.29
2.25 4.29 1.93 1.29
3.97
.54
.96 10.83
2.65
4.21
10.23
.84
1.32
.84 4.69 3.13 2.65
5.30 2.65
11.07
1.14
14.02
1.99
6.26
1.26
1.63
.24 14.74
1.14 4.09 1.99 2.53
.24
11.41
1.47
2.94
1.04
2.68
.52 12.88
.09 2.33 2.42 5.53
.95
5.01
7.25
3.09
.80 1.48
.67
15.84
1.48 4.03 2.15 1.21
3.76
2.55
2.65
9.28
1.41
3.36
.62
2.92 2.30
2.30
.71 3.80 2.03 4.86
9.20
13.29
1.75
.87
4.95 1.84
3.01
2.13
.58 10.86
1.16 3.20 2.04 2.81
1.14
1.64
11.38
2.53
3.41
3.54 4.05 2.91 2.40
.13
6.57
3.03 2.40
6.72
.99
1.62
4.70
1.33
.52 1.91 1.80
75
4.35 1.80
.70 11.88
8.42
2.71
1.67
.07 1.18 2.16
.90
2.16
2.37
13.43
4.04 2.30
1.11
7.51
1.98
1.98
1.42
.99
1.70
4.96
.43 2.83 2.12 3.40
2.55 1.13
d Including deaths from encephalitis.
e Included in deaths irom other diseases of nervous system.
/In clu d in g deaths irom paralysis, but not including deaths from encephalitis.

0.08
(«)
.83
.50
.87
.39
.89
.02
.97
.57
.01
.93
.82
.37
.31
.12
.22
.14
.68
.12
1.32
1.87
1.00
.04
1.39
1.52
.78
.91
.05
1.02
.15
.61
.61
1.04
1.93
.40
1.40
.92
.05
1.54
.64
1.54
1.30
.44
1.14
.84
.63
1.03

11.50

1.77

%




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
•39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
61
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

936

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able V II.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (2).

Mar­
ginal
number.

1

2

3
4
5

6

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
•40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

66

67
68
69
70

Cities.

New York, N. Y .........
Chicago, 111.................
Philadelphia, P a .......
St. Louis, M o..............
Boston, M ass..............
Baltimore, M d............
Cleveland, O hio.........
Buffalo, N .Y ...............
San Francisco, Cal___
Cincinnati, O h io .......
Pittsburg, P a ..............
New Orleans, La.........
Detroit, M ien..............
M ilwaukee, W is.........
W ashington, D. C.......
Newark, N. J ..............
Jersey City, N. J .........
Louisville, K y ............
M inneapolis, M in n ...
Providence, R .J ........
Indianapolis, I n d ___
Kansas City, M o.........
St. Paul, M inn............
Rochester, N. Y ..........
Denver, C olo..............
Toledo, O h io .............
A llegheny, Pa............
Columbus, O hio.........
W orcester, M ass.........
Syracuse, N .Y ............
New Haven, Conn—
Paterson, N. J ............
Fall River, Mass.........
St. Joseph, M o............
Omaha, N ebr..............
Los Angeles, Cal.........
Memphis, T e n n .........
Scranton, Pa...............
Low ell, M ass..............
Albany, N .Y ..............
Cambridge, M ass.......
Portland, O reg ..........
Atlanta, Ga....... .........
Grand Rapids, M ich..
Dayton, O h io..............
Richm ond, Y a............
N ashville, T en n .........
Seattle, Wash..............
Hartford, C onn..........
Reading, P a ...............
W ilm ington, D e l.......
Camden, N. J ..............
Trenton, N. J ..............
Bridgeport, Conn.......
Lynn, Mass.................
Oakland, C a l..............
Lawrence, M ass.........
New Bedford, M ass...
Des Moines, Io w a ___
Springfield, M ass.......
Som erville, M ass.......
Troy, N .Y ...................
H oboken, N. J ............
Evansville, In d..........
Manchester, N. H .......
Utica, N .Y .................
Peoria, 111...................
Charleston, S. C..........
Savannah, G a ............
Salt Lake City, U tah..

Diarrhea and
Her­
enteritis.
Other
Other
nia
dis­
dis­
Organ­ eases o f
and
Peri­ Appen­ eases of Bright’s
ic heart circula­
intesti­ toni­
2
Under years nal ob­ tis. dicitis. digest­ disease.
disease. tory
iv e
2
struc­
system. years. or
system.
over. tion.
6.54

1.04

(?)
7.71
5.09
4.65
5.41
7.55
5.07
3.11
8.03
6.09
5.14
6.39
4.22
4.18
5.06
5.46
7.29
8.53
4.04
5.98
10.54
4.03
6.25
5.15
8.40
9.56
8.13
6.38
7.47
3.13
5.66
5.41
4.89
2.55
3.41
9.67
8.02
8.26
7.25
4.76
7.63
9.21
5.40
6.81
7.65
8.43
4.78
6.41
7.52
6.26
7.19
8.73
11.26
6.35
9.06
3.51
11.25
8.91
6.62
6.39
4.16
6.19
6.89
2.53
2.90
4.87
6.66

0 6 .98

%

2.42
2.29
3.67
2.64
3.71
3.33
2.34
2.11

1.84
1.20

2.38
3.43
2.65
3.77
1.91
1.45
2.21
3.22
3.21
1.83
2.67
2.10
1.28
1.29
.35
4.96
1.87
1.44
.56
1.19
.68
3.73
.78
2.42
1.18
4.21
1.14
3.16
1.97
2.72
2.85
1.05
.88
2.28
.50
1.10
2.92
1.62
3.41
3.02
3.73
3.34
2.68
1.94
2.30
2.04
1.20
1.93
2.16
4.30
2.48
2.52
6.57
3.13
1.39
1.70

8.20

1.38

ft

ft

tf7.41
5.40
6.93
15.81
7.44
.70
4.08
7.63
4.63
6.43
7.85
6.08
4.81
6.28
3.00
2.79
7.93
3.45
1.16
5.76
2.39
2.34
5.49
8.04
4.65
5.96
3.05
7.90
6.75
1.40
4.47
1.74
.20
4.73
3.00
9.08
2.62
3.56
.85
3.68
3.07
3.50
2.52
4.73
2.05
3.92
4.19
6.20
2.66
5.20
9.23
3.43
H.81
3.40
7.69
2.57
4.07
2.17
4.63
5.62
2.42
10.52
3.20
2.78
1.22
.49
2.83

(«)
.76
.84
(«)
.95
2.77
1.75
1.02

1.64
1.35
.47
1.15
1.25
1.41
.43
.96
2.21
.35
3.25
.22
1.62
.91
1.34
3.34
.71
.45
2.41
.61
1.49
.93
1.93
.58
2.17
2.13
2.19
1.82
1.25
2.03
2.99
4.56
1.14
.90
3.51
2.39
2.40
.50
1.10
.2 i
.52
2.52
3.68
.39
(«)
.72
3.88
1.35
.75
2.53
1.44
1.99
4.16
2.48
2.04
.13
8.81
4.45
.57

0.68

.90
.8 6

.75
.82
.54
.70
.62
.74
.67
.91
.66
.96
.99
1.37
.91
1.10
.04
.56
.72
.57
.88
.58
.78
1.10
.75
1.72
.61
.50
.33
.60
.58
.65
.57
.58
.74
.45
.38
2.05
.57
.70
.41
.84
.63
.80
.59
.43
1.33
.49
.82
1.08
.67
.54
1.13
.81
.43
.24
.84
.26
.80
.44
.68
1.64
.41
.14
.71

0.17
(«)
1.25
(e)
.97
.46
2.25
.64
.60
.83
.94
.40
1.68

1.33
.38
.62
1.01
1.29
2.11
.49
4.46
2.69
1.16
1.74
1.39
1.81
1.44
1.03
1.50
.83
.66
2.10
1.03
1.64
2.22
1.56
1.61
1.67
.88
1.08
1.14
2.90
1.35
1.49
.90
.73
1.39
2.74
1.92
1.18
1.21
1.03
.73
i.76
1.15
1.07
.89
1.62
.96
1.20
.90
.09
2.42
1.24
2.23
.63
.41
.97
1.13

0.62

%

.14
.92
.54

1.01

.60
.54
.58
.39
.78
.73
.44
.42
.40
.43
1.27
.87
.35
.41
1.44
.89
.95
.53
.17
.32
1.00
.06
.20
.19
.45
1.06
.71
.93
.52
.29
.85
.19
1.62
.21
.61
.24
.31
.06
1.60
.84
.37
.07
.15
.57
.59
.48
.09
.16
.27
.64
.60
.30
.26
.40
.39
1.14
.41
.28
.99

2.60
(«)
1.69
/1 .7 2
2.02

2.93
2.62
3.15
4.31
3.96
3.34
2.86

3.74
3.31
2.99
3.02
3.29
2.80
2.51
6.86
2.02
3.07
2.77
3.16
2.71
4.03
2.47
3.68
1.55
3.05
2.94
1.11
1.96
3.13
2.51
3.33
1.77
2.77
2.01
2.56
2.22
2.47
2.80
4.56
.82
3.36
2.39
3.31
3.51
2.80
3.35
1.84
1.54
.82
3.04
3.44
2.50
1.13
5.41
1.39
3.61
2.65
2.59
2.68
8.09
4.07
2.40
4.00
4.04
2.12

6.81
(a)
4.04
4.03
1.09
5.82
4.08
4.16
3.87
4.82
3.17
6.62
4.06
3.44
4.62
5.33
3.39
5.09
3.03
5.63
3.30
3.81
5.82
4.82
3.66
2.98
2.10
4.65
4.81
3.53
5.42
2.60
1.77
3.27
1.26
5.64
6.70
3.41
2.01
8.19
.38
3.92
3.31
3.33
6.93
2.88
3.03
4.45
7.01
2.94
2.78
6.12
3.09
6.29
2.16
4.48
1.25
.08
4.33
9.33
2.77
4.81
4.75
3.09
4.07
5.04
6.18
11.88
5.91
4.11

«Data not obtainable.
^Included in deaths from other diseases of circulatory system.
c Including deaths from organic heart disease.
d Including deaths from dysentery, diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over, peritonitis, and gastritis.
€Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.
/N o t including deaths from gastritis,
a Included in deaths from other form s o f tuberculosis.




STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (2).

Included in deaths from infantile diseases.
Including deaths from other malformations.
J Included in deaths from other malformations,
fcIncluding deaths from hydrocephalus.
l Including deaths from diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over.
m Including 303 deaths occurring outside city limits,
n Not including 81 deaths of nonresidents.
h
i




937

938

BULLETIN OF THE DEPAKTMENT OF LABOB.

T able VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (1)—Concluded.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

71
72
78
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

San Antonio, T ex . . .
Duluth, Minn..........
Erie, P a ...................
Elizabeth, N. J.........
Wilkesbarre, P a ___
Kansas City,' Kans..
Harrisburg, Pa
Portland, M e ___
Yonkers, N. Y .........
Norfolk, Va..............
Waterbury.Conn (a)
Holyoke, Maes.........
Fort Wayne, Ind . . .
Youngstown, Ohio..
Houston, T ex..........
Covington TTy.
Akroih Ohio /_.........
Dallas, T e x ..............
Saginaw, Mir»h
Lancaster, Pa..........
Lincoln, Nebr __ ..
Brockton, Mass.......
Binghamton, N. Y ..
Augusta, G a ............ |
!
Pawtucket, R. I .......
Altoona, Pa..............1
W heeling,W .Ya ... 1
Mobile, Ala..............
Birmingham, A la ...
Little Rock, Ark___
Springfield, O h io __
Galveston, T e x .......
Tacoma^ Wash.........
Haverhill, M ass___
Spokane, W ash.......
Terre Haute, In d ...
Dubuque, Iowa.......
Quinev, 111..............
South Bend, In d ___
Salem, Mass............
Johnstown, Pa. __
Elmira, N. Y .
Allentown Pa.
Davenport, I o w a ...
McKeesport, Pa
Springfield, 111.........
Chelsea, Mass..........
Chester, P a ..............
York, Pa...................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, K a n s.........
Newton, Mass..........
Sioux City, Iowa___
Bayonne, N. J ........
Knoxville, Tenn___
Schenectady, N. Y . .
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior, Wis
Rockfom, 111..........
Taunton, Mass____
Canton, Ohio..........
Butte, M ont............
Montgomery, A la ...
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn.
East St. Louis, 111. . .
Joliet, 111.................




Other
Diph­
epi­
Scar­ Whoop­ theria
Dys­
Ty­
phoid Mala­ Small­ Mea­
let
ing
Grippe en­ demic
and
tery.
dis­
fever. ria. pox. sles. fever. cough. croup.
eases.

1.83 3.43
0.14
5.65
.1.2
.99
1.55
.10
2.41
.82
.23
5.01
2.92
.28
1.48
.23
.11
.74
.25
1.24
2.98 1.95
.34
1.68
.80
.11
.32
2.54
.16
8.42
.71
3.02 6.96
.81
1.62
.48
2.51 1.04
1.95 3.78
2.13
.82
.1.6
1.69
.49
2.96
.38
1.15
3.05
.11
1.64 4.69
.45
.90
1.75
.15
.15
5.56
.32
3.01 2.80
.59
3.77
.13
3.53 3.15
1.75
1.04
1.74 1.39
2.32
.18
1.83
.42
3.99
3.87 **.*86
.45
.45
1.58
.33
3.78
.20
3.78
.79
.63
6.09
1.76
3.21
. .19
2.08 .
4.45
.16
1.29
.48
1.21
2.62
.56
.19
3.02
.21
1.85
.98
2.44
.23
1.38
.23
1.57
.67
.17
.34
.34
.35
.71
3.19
.16
2.15
I .21
1.49
2.95
.47
.36
1.07
.35
1.39
1.85
2.10 2.63
.26
1.88
1.02
3.76 1.20
3.19
.91
.46
.82
1.92

0.72

0.96
.14
.37
.41
1.21
2.10
.56

...

4.93
.10
.40
1.17
.14
.11

0.56
.14
2.34
.21
.35
.83
.80
.12
2.05
1.45
1.94
.32

.25
.28
.11 *’ *.*67*
.23
.11
.79
.32
.43
.57
.12
.46
.10
.86
.10
.42
.12
.46
.34
.16
.33
.51
.51
.99
.74
i.72*
.19
.66
.53
.66
1.09
.33
.54
.15
.15
.96
.16
1.76
.88
.73
.75
.11
1.29
.10
.63
.50
.13
.22
.22
.87
.17
*i. 27* 1.05 ’ * *63*
.37
... .37
.84
.21
1.15
.43
1.43
.45
.22
.83
.20
.40
.20
2.54
.16
.16
1 1.22
.15
.18 !_____
2.99
.76
.15
.80
.52

i
I
|
1

.94 ■
2.15
.16
.52

.94
.15
.32
.52
.19
.43
1.44
.49

.22
.21 ! .21
1 1.30
.23
i.*35 j .22 ’ *‘ *.*45*
.69
1.03
.17
' 3.72
.i.6 i .49
.1.6
.64
.42
.42
.21
.24
.71
.71
.18
.69
3.91
.62
1.84
.23
.23
*23
.34
.34
2.51
.46
.46
.82
.55
1.10

o Including data for township.

1.03
0.48
1.59
1.83
3.72
.28
.96
.69
.25
1.11
.25
.25
.52
.21
2.28
.73
.54
2.55
.80
.13
1.28
.70
.23
1.81
1.67
.28
2.62
.34
.34
.46
.12
2.35
.37
1.49
.56
.28
1.40
.56
1.79
.67
2.90
5.14
1.14
.23
.34
1.27
.79
1.74
.16
3.28
1.71
.29
.12
1.28
1.39
.81
1.24
.95
.38
2.29
1.88
.83
.83
.46
1.38
.46
.46
.82
2.62
.49
1.47
1.01
3.21
4.56
.51
.49
4.43
.49
2.10
.38
1.91
2.68
2.78
1.46
.40
.13
1.20
2.07
1.09
.66
3.15
.60
.15
2.40
.32
1.27
3.18
3.51
2.49
.29
.29
.32
.75
.97
.86
.89
.20
.40 • 1.78
3.02
1.01
.50
2.84
.22
1.53
.44
1.39
.52
.52
1.74
2.32
.21
.84
.21
2.56
.37
3.47
.21
1.05
.42
1.47
1.87
2.44
.43
.68
.45
.45
.90
.33
.16
.33 ' .16
1.19
.99
.40
2.19
1.91
2.06
2.06
1.11
3.50
.91
.30
.15
3.17
3.34
.18
2.83
.75
.38
1.13
.57
.94
.94
2.45
.77
.31
4.02
.64
.64
3.12
.35
1.39
.35
3.36
1.49
.37
2.37
.86
.43
.65
2.26
1.64
.41
.21
.65
.49
.16
2.54
.69
.90 **‘ .*67* ... *’ .45*
1.89' 1.03
.52
1.42
1.24
.18
.35
4.79
.66
.33
2.56
.85
.43
1.90
2.53
.42
1.05
1.90
.24
1.42
1.07
1.43
.54
.54
.35
2.08
.35
2.47
.41
.21
.52
1.05
i.58
.71
1.41
.23
1.71
1.54
.17
1.54
2.28
1.59
.23
.82
.27
1.37
.55

939

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

Table VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (1)—Concluded.
Puru­ Pul­ Other
Cere­
lent
Other
bral
mo­ forms
and
Pa­
nary
Can­ gen­ Men­ conges­ raly­
of
tion
septi- tuber­ tuber­ cer. eral in­
sis.
dis­ gitis. and
caemic culo­ culo­
hemor­
eases.
infec­
sis.
sis.
tion.
rhage.
1.67
23.27
2.48
9.10
1.48
7.03
2.38
11.70
.67
6.17
.35
1.28 11.65
10.57 ....
. i i 13.44
2.23
.74 11.76
.37
.09 12.65
7.82
1.23
.11
.91
9.93
.80
.32
9.98
.63
6.13
1.43
.70
.93 13.69
3.92
.57 10.03
.83
6.06
1.04
.34
1.49 12.84
.49
8.18
1.15
.84
7.77
.34
.74
7.14
1.48
1.53
.38 11.28
7.15 .
* " ’ .*54* 12.32 ”’i*
.i
’
1.20
.45 10.04
7.33
8.05 *’ i.*32*
*’ *’ . 73
’
.11
1.51 16.88
.50
.89 12.90
1.76 15.11 ....
.44
8.52
1.96
.52
1.92
8.00
.21
2.11 10.13
2.92
.18 13.53
.21
.42 10.72
.43
.14
8.61
.45
.90
8.33
1.31
9.69
‘ *6 10.73 1.19
”’6 ’
5.56
10.32
.15
.15
7.00
1.58
.18
7.75
.57 10.19
1.32*
.19 10.00
.15
5.37
12.54
2.73
.69
.17 10.40
1.12
8.97
2.15
7.76
1.08
9.26
1.03
.82
.33
.98 10.10
9.68
1.38
8.52
2.24
2.47
9.64
.86
.69
.71
.18 22.65
.49
.33
9.57
.43
8.10
2.32
.84
5.47
.71
10.19
10.71 ....
” ’ ’ *69’ 11.46
4.12 ” ” ’ 82’
1.65
.52 12.60
1.58
.71
.47 10.80
1.20
1.54 13.50
1.14
6.38
.46
.... 10.69 ....
0.88
1.38
.86
.21

2.07
4.00
3.45
2.38
2.82
3.26
3.62
4.21
2.85
2.23
1.12
2.97
5.07
2.28
3.02
1.24
4.59
2.18
4.09
3.72
5.91
4.02
4.37
1.96
3.30
2.71
4.54
2.80
1.98
2.02
4.15
3.65
3.80
5.12
6.31
3.73
5.86
3.78
3.38
3.81
2.13
4.40
2.45
4.53
2.45
2.09
4.16
2.43
3.45
4.53
1.79
5.07
3.81
2.24
1.77
2.15
5.54
2.74
4.03
1.79
4.17
1.65
1.31
3.99
3.08
1.82
2.19




1.03
1.65
3.57
1.76
1.48
1.52
2.37
2.39
1.48
3.63
3.80
3.09
2.54
2.57
2.32
3.82
2.51
2.87
1.96
1.18
1.97
2.87
2.38
4.25
.75
2.71
1.76
1.83
1.09
1.64
2.62
1.22
3.59
2.19
4.41
3.01
1.80
3.78
2.58
2.70
1.83
2.99
2.83
2.64
1.23
3.22
2.77
1.68
2.37
1.44
1.79
2.77
2.69
.52
3.54
2.15
1.92
1.90
4.98
2.68
1.04
1.65
2.10
3.05
1.88
1.59
.55

2.15
4.83
.86
2.28
1.48
2.91
1.67
4.67
4.21
1.30
1.90
5.82
1.59
3.28
.81
3.63
2.09
.69
1.15
1.01
2.71
3.06
.53
1.09
3.60
3.18
2.64
.11
1.19
2.27
2.18
1.74
1.90
2.19
3.78
2.01
3.83
1.97
1.19
3.02
5.33
2.11
2.45
1.13
2.30
1.29
2.95
2.24
1.51
2.06
.81
2.30
3.36
3.27
1.06
2.31
2.34
3.16
6.87
1.61
2.43
2.26
1.05
2.11
1.37
1.59
2.74

1.43
2.90
4.81
4.35
5.63
2.45
5.01
7.06
4.95
4.84
3.46
1.71
3.65
2.43
1.97
2.20
4.59
1.95
2.62
8.61
5.17
1.15
5.56
3.16
5.70
3.18
3.66
3.76
2.78
4.03
7.42
1.39
3.38
4.94
1.89
2.58
4.73
4.60
2.58
4.29
1.22
4.58
10.38
4.72
.92
1.93
2.95
3.92
6.47
5.14
1.79
8.76
4.49
4.13
1.95
5.28
2.99
2.11
2.13
6.79
5.21
1.23
1.31
8.69
3.76
1.82
2.47

1.19
.69
2.22
.62
.80
1.52
2.09
3.19
.49
2.60
.67
1.14
3.01
2.00
1.97
1.43
2.51
1.83
2.95
.51
4.43
.77
2.52
3.27
1.20
2.87
2.34
1.94
.89
1.51
.44
1.74
1.05
2.38
2.31
1.15
2.03
1.64
1.59
1.11
1.52
1.58
1.13
3.02
1.07
2.41
3.47
1.31
4.09
1.03
5.05
.90

.
.

2.12
.66
1.71
.42
3.55
5.71
4.17
.62
1.84
i.64*
1.59
1.37

Other
Pneu­
dis­ Bron­ monia Other
Con­
dis­
chitis, and
vul­ eases acute
of
sions nerv­ and
bron- eases of
respir­
of in­
cho- atory
ous
fants. sys­ chron­ pneu- system.
ic. monia.
tem.
1.43
2.34
2.10
3.00
3.35
1.05
1.95
1.02
1.61
3.72
1.12
1.60
1.27
3.00
2.09
1.62
4.18
.57
3.27
3.04
2.46
1.15

2.55
.28
2.84
1.14
1.88
2.80
2.23
1.37
1.12
1.58
.78
1.71
1.90
1.85
2.78
2.39
2.30
1.83
2.29
1.18
2.71
3.82
10.99
1.31
3.05
.75
1.05
5.10
1.59
1.02
.73
4.19
5.27
.79
1.98
2.52
.63
2.18
1.09
1.04
3.48
1.90
1.69
3.47
1.10
.84
1.26
.29
2.73
2.93
3.38
.82
4.43
2.39
.60
4.76
.63
4.41
1.22
1.06
1.23
1.32
3.21
2.45
3.59
.31
6.29
2.73
2.25
2.08
4.16
2.62. 1.68
1.94
1.51
1.64
3.70
1.14
6.84
2.30
1.15
1.12
1.79
3.27
.86
1.95
1.24
1.32
1.82
.85
1.07
2.32
1.47
1.66
2.61
1.43
5.18
3.82
1.39
1.23
1.23
1.58
4,99
.71
1.41
.85
1.54
.91
1.14
2.47
4.11

1.67
2.62
2.59
1.86
1.74
1.28
.97
1.25
3.09
1.58
6.03
3.54
3.01
2.28
.81
2.58
1.67
2.06
2.46
1.86
.49
1.53
1.33
1.09
3.45
2.23
1.90
1.18
1.29
1.13
4.37
1.22
.63
.91
2.94
1.00
2.25
2.30
2.58
2.22
2.13
1.58
1.32
3.21
2.45
2.25
2.43
.75
1.72
2.67
.16
2.08
2.69
1.72
1.42
1.98
2.34
2.95
3.08
2.14
.35
1.23
1.05
1.41
1.54
3.64
1.65

4.62
7.86
9.00
9.11
11.80
12.24
6.95
6.61
11.26
6.70
11.06
9.36
7.13
11.98
6.50
8.21
8.14
11.35
8.84
12.16
8.13
13.00
10.20
8.07
11.09
11.94
9.37
5.48
17.86
11.46
8.95
4.52
7.81
8.78
7.36
6.60
4.95
9.03
5.57
8.25
7.46
11.27
10.38
3.77
14.42
6.27
6.06
9.35
11.64
12.35
7.65
8.53
8.30
13.60
9.03
11.72
10.02
8.42
10.90
8.93
11.46
14.40
7.87
9.62
5.47
21.41
12.60

0.64
1.24
1.36
1.66
2.01
1.17
1.25
1.48
2.35
.65
2.23
1.94
3.80
.29
1.51
1.72
1.25
1.15
3.27
.84
.99
3.82
.66
2.94
1.05
2.39
1.76
1.40
1.09
2.90
1.53
1.04
1.48
.91
.84
1.00
.68
2.96
3.38
4.92
1.22
.88
1.51
2.27
.77
.64
.69
1.12
2.06
.98
1.38
1.57
3.79
1.24
3.14
.43
.63
.47
2.14
1.74
1.65
2.10
2.11
2.56
1.37

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

940

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

T able VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE (2)—Concluded.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Diarrhea and
Her­
enteritis.
Other
Other
nia
dis­
dis­
)rgan- eases of
Peri­ Appen­ eases of
and
heart circula­
intesti­ toni­ dicitis. digest­ Bright’s
2
disease.
isease. tory Under years nal ob­ tis.
ive
2
struc­
or
system. years.
system.
over. tion.

Cities.

San Antonio,Tex ...
Duluth, Minn.......... .
Erie, Pa......................
Elizabeth, N. J ..........
Wilkesbarre, P a .......
Kansas City, Kans...
Harrisburg, P a ........
Portland, M e .......... .
Yonkers, N .Y ............
Norfolk, V a...............
Waterbury, Conn, (a)
Holyoke, Mass..........
Fort Wayne, In d .......
Youngstown, O hio...
Houston, T e x .......... .
CovingtonjKy..........
Akron, O h io.............
Dallas, T e x ...............
Saginaw, M ic h ........
Lancaster, Pa............
Lincoln, N e b r ..........
Brockton, Mass........
Binghamton, N .Y ...
Augusta, G a ............ .
Pawtucket, R. I ....... .
Altoona, Pa...............
Wheeling, W .V a___
Mobile, A la...............
Birmingham, Ala—
Little Rock, A rk___
Springfield, O h io _
_
Galveston, T e x ....... .
Tacoma, Wash.........
Haverhill, M ass___
Spokane, W ash....... .
Terre Haute, I n d _
_
Dubuque, Io w a ....... .
Quincy, 111............... .
South Bend, I n d ___
Salem, Mass............ .
Johnstown, P a ....... .
Elmira, N .Y ............ .
Allentown, P a..........
Davenport, I o w a _
_
McKeesport, Pa.......
Springfield, 111.........
Chelsea, Mass..........
Chester, P a ..............
York, P a...................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, Kans..........
Newton. Mass..........
Sioux City, Iow a___
Bayonne, N. J ..........
Knoxville, Tenn___
Schenectady, N. Y ..
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior, W is..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass.........
Canton, O h io.......... .
Butte, M o n t............ .
Montgomery, A la ...
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Chattanooga, T enn.
East St. Louis, 111_
_
Joliet, 111.................




3.03
2.23
7.33
3.17
2.34
9.10
6.41
1.36
6.04
4.97
4.55
8.80
5.76
.54
6.17
4.54
3.15
1.05
7.23
.83
5.42
9.23
1.14
3.19
5.45
3.84
5.57
7.07
1.21
3.81
3.02
2.57
8.83
2.97
1.37
9.59
2.69
2.85
3.01
7.85
1.00
4.99
4.06
1.28
5.68
6.21
4.20
2.77
7.93
.83
3.34
2.64
1.83
3.33
8.67
.98
3.44
7.77
2.36
2.70
3.69
1.48
2.46
7.84
1.72
1.53
4.64
1.72
1.72
2.94
1.85
2.51
10.79
.90
7.04
3.66
3.34
3.50
6.74
1.32 c4.39
5.48
.86
1.18
2.98
.99
.69
3.27
2.39
3.40
6.55
.22
1.53
4.70
.87
3.65
13.29
2.32
.84
6.58
1.83
5.30
7.57
1.89
2.52
6.60
1.43
4.30
7.43
2.48
3.83
1.64
1.31
3.94
2.78
3.18
6.16
6.35
4.13
1.91
7.15
1.22
6.39
6.87
2.64
3.52
7.36
.75
2.26
7.36
2.64
3.96
2.76
.92
5.98
3.38
.64
2.73
12.13
3.47
1.04
6.17
2.24
6.92
4.96
3.45
7.54
8.85
2.88
3.50
4.23
1.47
2.61
7.38
2.30
5.99
6.06
.90
3.14
.69
2.93
8.43
4.07
2.12
2.48
3.80
1.98
7.43
11.73
1.49
6.61
3.58
.63
9.68
4.50
2.84
4.27
6.61
1.07
7.50
10.76
.69
3.82
3.29
.41
4.94
7.61
5.77
6.34 ” *i.’ 4i* 3.29
3.76
1.71
4.10
2.05
1.37
2.51
3.01
.27
6.30

1.19
.69
1.23
1.45
.40
2.21
.56
1.36
5.86
1.23
1.14
.79
1.28
1.71
.o7
.63
1.38
.82
3.72
.74
2.49
.13
7.31
1.95
2.07
(<*)
3.12
5.26
5.04
.65
2.44
1.05
.73
1.26
.86
.22
.49
.60
4.44
3.81
.94
1.13
4.91
1.45
5.37
.75
2.15
2.06
.98
1.15
1.79
1.38
1.06
1.48
1.28
.63
1.04
2.26
3.94
2.35
.68
.68
.82

0.08
.83
1.23
.52
.80
.47
.83
.34
.87
1.40
1.23
.57
.32
.71
.46
.38
.63
.57
1.80
.68
.99
.38
.11
.90
.32
1.61
.65
.40
1.01
.22
.52
.42
.91
.84
1.58
.45
i.i9
.32
.46
1.06
.57
1.13
.77
.96
.87
1.87
.43
.41
1.61
1.12
.69
.18
1.65
.21
.84
1.19
.89
1.39
.82
.52
.23
1.82
1.10

0.80
1.52
1.11
.62
1.74
2.10
.97
1.37
.87
.93
.22
.91
2.69
.86
.81
1.43
1.46
.80
1.96
.34
.74
.96
1.59
1.64
.15
1.43
1.02
1.40
1.69
.76
1.31
.70
1.69
.55
2.31
2.30
1.58
1.31
1.79
.63
1.07
1.06
.94
1.13
2.76
1.45
.87
1.12
.65
.82
.98
.69
2.47
1.38
2.12
1.65
1.49
.84
.95
.89
1.04
1.44
.79
1.88
1.20
.91
1.10

Including data for township.
5 Not including deaths from premature birth.

a

0.64
1.24
1.11
.10
.54
.58
.70
.46
.87
.74
.56
.69
.32
.46
.29
.21
1.26
1.47
.51
.49
.57
1.46
.33
.30
.32
.59
.21
.30
.50
.65
1.04
1.27
.37
2.10
.72
.68
.66
.40
.48
.91
.88
.57
1.13
.31
1.13
.17
.41
2.12
.46
.67
.71
.49
1.26
1.42
.71
.69
1.23
.62
.94
.17
.46
.27

3.51
1.79
3.21
1.76
2.14
3.03
3.06
2.05
3.09
3.81
2.68
3.54
4.12
3.00
4.87
2.58
2.92
5.39
4.26
2.87
3.69
5.36
2.65
3.82
3.15
3.03
5.12
3.01
3.17
3.15
2.18
4.18
1.69
1.64
3.99
3.73
4.05
3.12
2.98
2.54
1.98
3.52
2.64
2.08
3.07
4.34
2.77
3.18
2.80
2.06
3.91
2.30
3.59
3.96
4.25
1.65
2.34
1.26
3.32
1.07
3.82
2.26
5.77
3.99
4.96
1.59
1.65

4.14
4.28
4.07
5.28
4.83
3.61
3.06
8.66
5.45
3.16
3.69
2.51
5.23
3.83
2.77
4.39
2.87
3.27
3.72
3.20
1.63
4.24
3.16
4.20
3.98
3.07
8.92
2.28
2.27
8.73
11.48
3.59
3.66
3.57
1.43
4.50
3.78
3.78
1.43
2.28
6.34
4.91
2.45
.92
4.82
3.64
1.87
3.23
2.88
.49
2.77
2.24
3.96
3.36
2.97
1.07
2.53
.71
3.21
4.51
5.56
4.99
5.16
4.10
1.82
3.56

941

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

Table VII.—PERCENTAGE OF DEATHS FROM EACH SPECIFIED CAUSE ( 2
)—Concluded.
Other
dis­
eases
ofgenitourinary
sys­
tem.
0.64
.28
1.23
1.65
.13
1.62
1.95
1.48
2.97
2.60
2.46
1.60
8.33
2.57
.35
7.07
.83
.46
1.47
1.18
.74
3.82
2.52
1.09
1.35
.48
3.37
.97
1.49
.25
.65
2.26
.84
2.56
.84
2.44
.90
1.97
2.19
2.38
1.37
4.22
.19
1.13
1.07
1.45
1.21
3.55
.22
2.88
2.61
4.61
3.36
1.55
.35
2.31
2.34
.42
1.42
2.68
.35
2.68
2.63
1.64
.51
.68
1.92

Puer­
peral
septi­
cae­
mia.

0.56
.69
1.11
.41
.40
.83
.68
.37
.19
1.23
.11
.48
.14
.58
.57
.46

....
...
.25
.38
.44
.30
1.11
.44
.32
.50
.22
.17

Dis­
eases Dis­
Other of the eases HyOther Infan­
Mar­
Ill-de­
puer­ skin
of
drotile Senile Sui­ Acci­ fined Total ginal
peral and loco­ ceph- mal­
forma­ dis­ debil­ cide. dent. dis­ deaths. num­
dis­
motor
ity.
eases.
ber.
eases. cellu­ sys­ alus. tions. eases.
lar
tem.
tissue.
0.48
.28
.49
.62
.40
.70
.34,
.49
.47
.22
.23
.63
.14
.23
1.34
.42
.46
.66
.49
.66
.33
.75
.16
.29
.97
1.09
.50
.22
.52

.55
1.68
.72
.22
1.15
.20
.32
.15
.18

.55
.42
.72
.22
.16
.99
.63

1.13
.61
.32

.19
.15

.56

.52
1.12
.22

.21
.16
1.38
.45
.17
1.06
.49
1.07
.42
1.19
1.07

.53

.49*
.69
.22
1.03
.33
.21
.95
.35
.41

.34
.68
.27

.17
.23

0.32
.28
.25
.10
1.07
.23
.831
.571
.12
.19
.34
.23
.79
.43

0.64
.14

.38

.19

.10
.23
.23

.14
.11
.25

.34

.45
.11

.14

___ ___
.46
.16
.51
.74
.13
.44

0.16
.14

.12

.23
.10
.21
.12

.25
.38

.17
.25
.38

.22

.11

___ ___

.32
.59
.32
.40 *’ \io*
.38
.22 ’ **.*44*
.17
.84
.73
.37
.42
.72
.29
.22
.68
.49
.40
.79
.32 .. ..
. .
1.22
.15
.53
.53
.19

.11

.46
.67
.34
.21
.42
.47
.18

.47
.17
.55

.19
.43
\ i6
.22
.52
.18
.16

.25
.11
.34
.32
.14

.34
.49
.17
.25
.96
.11
.32
.15

.50
.17
.21

.17
.42
.18

.45

.14
.68

.79

.40
...

.19

.19
.61

.77
.16
.56
.43
1.03

0.32
.14
.62
.21
.27

. is
’
.35

.2i
.16
.22
.17

.42

.46
.45
1.21

.21

.18
.69
.26

.52

.27

.35
.21
.23*

5.10
3.59
8.14
8.28
7.91
4.66
10.01
5.58
5.94
8.00
9.16
10.05
5.86
64.99
5.80
5.44
8.14
5.62
6.38
7.60
5.42
5.74
4.37
6.98
8.69
7.80
4.10
5.70
5.16
62.65
7.42
6.09
6 5.49
4.75
4.83
9.90
7.43
4.11
11.53
3.65
8.98
5.63
9.25
4.15
6.98
3.06
6.93
7.29
6.68
8.02
.81
5.30
6.73
7.57
4.42
5.61
14.29
10.11
5.92
6.79
4.86
6.79
2.10
10.09
6.67
4.33
8.22

2.23
2.21
3.08
2.59
4.42
2.33
5.42
5.13
1.48
1.40
2.01
1.94
4.12
3.42
2.32
4.87
2.71
1.83
5.57
5.40
2.96
3.63
5.96
.76
3.30
6.53
3.95
3.55
1.49
1.26
8.30
2.44
2.32
3.84
3.99
8.18
8.11
7.88
3.78
2.70
2.44
2.99
2.64
8.30
1.38
7.72
3.98
3.18
3.88
2.88
5.70
4.84
2.02
1.03
2.65
2.48
5.97
4.84
4.50
7.32
5.90
2.26
3.94
4.70
2.91
3.42
4.38

0.96
1.52
.99
.73
.80
.35
.14
.23
.37
.09
.11
.69
.95
1.14
.70
1.15
.21
.92
.49
.34
1.72
.57
.80
.75
.96
.73
.32
.44
.35
2.32
1.64
2.10
1.15
1.13
1.48
.40
.32
.61
1.06
.75
1.51
.77
.64
.35
.19
.43
.62
.98
.67
.69
.35
.16
.43
.63
1.19
1.07
2.06
.52
.47
.17
.82

5.50
11.03
4.68
7.04
8.98
6.88
7.65
4.44
5.45
4.65
4.58
4.34
6.50
8.99
8.82
4.97
8.35
8.26
5.73
3.72
7.39
1.15
5.03
2.51
3.45
5.89
6.74
3.66
11.61
5.79
3.93
7.65
9.28
4.94
6.09
6.03
5.86
5.42
4.97
2.06
9.29
5.10
3.96
5.66
11.35
5.47
3.47
10.65
4.74
3.29
7.98
5.30
8.97
7.92
4.25
7.43
5.12
12.00
3.55
2.86
3.47
12.76
4.99
4.93
6.67
13.90
7.67

3.11
100.00
1.65
100.00
.86
100.00
1.76
100.00
4.83
100.00
6.99
100.00
3.20
100.00
1.48
100.00
1.36
100.00
1.49
100.00
3.46
100.00
2.51
100.00
2.69
100.00
3.28 5100.00
3.71
100.00
1.24
100.00
7.52
100.00
10.32
100.00
.66
100.00
1.18
100.00
7.14
100.00
1.72
100.00
7.02
100.00
6.76
100.00
.45
100.00
1.91
100.00
.15 *100.00
2.90
100.00
6.15
100.00
7.30 5100.00
2.18
100.00
10.44
100.00
3.59 5100.00
.55
100.00
1.68
100.00
1.00
100.00
1.13
100.00
8.87
100.00
3.58
100.00
1.59
100.00
2.28
100.00
.18
100.00
7.36
100.00
3.02
100.00
6.75
100.00
11.42
100.00
2.25
100.00
2.62
100.00
4.09
100.00
.82
100.00
18.24
100.00
1.61
100.00
3.81
100.00
3.61
100.00
6.37
100.00
6.11
100.00
.43
100.00
4.42
100.00
5.45
100.00
.89
100.00
3.13
100.00
7.41
100.00
5.25
100.00
1.88
100.00
10.26
100.00
7.97
100.00
7.12
100.00

c Including deaths from diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or oyer.
Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.

d

9398— N o. 42— 02------ 5




71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

942

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
Table

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

vm.—
DEATH

Cities.

New York, N .Y ....
Chicago, 111............
Philadelphia, Pa ..
St. Louis, Mo..........
Boston, M ass.........
Baltimore, Md.......
Cleveland, O h io. . .
Buffalo, N .Y ..........
San Francisco, Cal.
Cincinnati, O hio...
Pittsburg, P a .........
New Orleans, L a ...
Detroit, M ich.........
Milwaukee, W is. . .
Washington, D. C ..
Newark, N .J .........
Jersey City, N. J . . .
Louisville, K y .......
Minneapolis, Minn
Providence, R. I . . .
Indianapolis, In d ..
Kansas City, M o...
St. Paul, M inn.......
Rochester, N. Y ___
Denver, C o lo .........
Toledo, O h io .........
Allegheny, P a .......
Columbus, Ohio ...
Worcester, Mass. . .
Syracuse, N .Y .......
New Haven, Conn.
Paterson, N. J .......
Fall River, Mass...
St. Joseph, M o .......
Omaha, Nebr.........
Los Angeles, C al...
Memphis,Tenn . . .
Scranton, Pa..........
Lowell, M ass.........
Albany, N . Y .........
Cambridge, Mass..
Portland, Oreg.......
Atlanta, Ga............
Grand Rapids, Mich
Dayton, O h io.........
Richmond, Va.......
Nashville, Tenn . . .
Seattle, Wash.........
Hartford, Conn___
Reading, P a ..........
Wilmington, Del ..
Camden, N. J .........
Trenton, N .J .........
Bridgeport, Conn..
Lynn, Mass............
Oakland, C a l.........
Lawrence, Mass . . .
New Bedford, Mass
Des Moines, Iow a ..
Springfield, Mass..
Somerville, Mass..
Troy, N .Y ..............
Hoboken, N .J .......
Evansville, Ind___
Manchester, N. H ..
Utica, N .Y ..............
Peoria, 111..............
Charleston, S. C___
Savannah, G a .......
70 Salt Lake City,Utah

RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (1).

Other
Diph­
Dys­ epi­
Scar­ Whoop­ theria
Ty­
Grippe. en­ demic
ing
phoid Mala­ Small­ Mea­
let
and
tery. dis­
fever. ria. pox. sles. fever. cough. croup.
eases.

0.203 0.054
(a)
(«)
.014
.134
.248 .002
.273 .067
.359 .015
.268
.200 .040
.535 .044
1.247 .012
.470 .387
.157 .037
.212
.673 .167
.224
.164 .061
.563 .070
.576
.264 .011
.274
.429
.141
.182
.479 .007
.300 .020
1.008 .023
.355 .038
.215 .025
.150 .008
.920 .089
.270 .009
.196 .028
.193 .029
.218
.291
.409 1.126
.301 .010
.189 .02J
.240 .020
.106 .011
.245
.617 .128
.347 .063
.256 .011
.348 .239
.455 .320
.244
.306 .073
.427 .012
.420
.162
.187 .026
.169 .130
.143 .014
.133 .013
.185
.288
.186 .014
.246
.189
.573
.230
.266 .066
.191 .017
.155
.250 .067
.738 .738
.097 1.210
.345

0.125
(a)
.019
.057
.015
.180
.129
.006
.051
.026
.059
.005
.077
.009
.132
.003
.198
.009
.003
.173
.163
.003
.057
.003
.059
‘ .*278* .051
.019
.051
.009
.009
.048
.017
.011
.027
.011
.035
.006
.041
.043
.021

0.324
(a)
.165
.116
.366
.021
.087
.122
.037
.071
.351
.207
.050
.054
.024
.090
.131
.014
.057
.051
.055
.162
.106
.024

.007

.203

.033

.017
.008
.107
.009
.065
.048

.218
.151
.107
.025
.054
.102
.019
.048
.091
.054
.056
.049

0.114

%

.019
.009
.097
.102

.011

.009
.078
.179
.060
.106
.043
.191
.010

.011

.033
.037
.012
.012
.013

.091
.014

.016

.026
.052
.027
.015
.030
.014
.015
.047
.253

.052

.034

.085
.032
.213
.074
.033
.136
.078
.159
.268
.038
.075
.182
.114
.027
.152
.100
.031
.079
.107
.164
.017
.156
.035
.033
.092
.161
.379

0.081
(«)
.196
.136
.113
.121
.028
.173
.174
.050
.345
.073
.033
.071
.258
.114
.066
.028
.071
.073
.027
.017
.018
.035
.021
.100
.188
.045
.099
.025
.196
.121
.084
.048
.082
.036
.019
.116
.147
.040
.117

0.577
%

.516
.615
.329
.554
.386
.277
.203
.495
.137
.207
.336
.300
.404
.562
.247
.905
.489
.197
.232
.306
.129
.329
.413
.398
.075
.141
.192
.268
.186
.215
.116
.109
.182
.046
.408
1.232
.430
.627
.277
” . i60* .255
’
.189
.010
.022
.200
.120
.380
.148
.086
.144
.022
.429
.012
.232
.707
.115
.497
.760
.087
.133
.133
.260
.156
.486
.147
.246
.015
.212
.471
.200
.077
.441
.095
.133
.346
.492
.016
.066
.133
.139
.139
.172
.431
.100
.154
.161
.793

*’.*6i3*

a Data not obtainable.
6 Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.
c Including deaths from hydrocephalus.




0.239 0.097 0.058
(a)
! o59
.147
.136 (|)
.086
>
.289 .049
.007
.246 .094
.098
.054
.069
.097 .100
.049
.163 .046
.143
.321 .144
.003
.336 .078
.417
.257 .253
.090
.057
.097
.252 .010
.631 .112 . .080
.098 .102
.074
.145 .103
.070
.233 .172
.037
.114 .005
.229
.360 .107
••
••
.214 .110
.060
.226 .035
.041
.082 .082
.035
.088 .059
.041
.164 .021
.122
.153 .040
.020
.135 .150
.256
.287 .091
.053
.107 .083
.083
.058 .025
.033
.545 .312
.179
.046 .158
.009
.075 .234 1.963
.048 .029
.010
.136 .045
.027
.255 .054
.045
.353 .363
.102
.262 .107
.049
.274 .042
.074
.300
.070
.521 .021
.106
.362 .064
.106
.394 .287
.096
.053 .095
.074
.089 .278
.022
.152
.478 .207
.381 .344
.037
.033 .044
.067
.147 .012
.110
.183 .049
.037
.255 .102
.025
.137 .062
.037
.160 .067
.026
.390
.039
.129 .043
.014
.133 .053
.027
.169 .031
.015
.091 .091
.030
.243 .014
.043
.200 .046
.015
.221 .079
.063
.666 .107
.067
.098
.049
.116 .149
.017
.139 .139
.017
.172 .086
.052
.233 .133
.117
.631 .262
.169
.307 .177
.016
.259 .086
.069

943

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table VIII.—DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (1).
Puru­ PulCere­
lent
Other
bral
Con­
mo- Other
and
forms Can­ gen­ Men­ conges­ Pa­ vul­
nary
septi- tuber­
of
eral in­
tion raly­ sions
csemic culo­ tuber­ cer. dis­ gitis. and
sis. of in­
culo­
infec­
eases.
hemor­
fants.
sis.
tion.
sis.
rhage.
0.015
(a)
.150
.089
.171
.079
.133
.003
.194
.103
.120
.200
.123
.047
.066
.024
.042
.023
.081
.022
.186
.290
.106
.006
.271
.173
.143
.106
.008
.133
.027
.102
.122
.068
.182
.073
.251
.155
.010
.270
.106
.191
.266
.053
.156
.174
.123
.100
.146
.089
.050
.053
.078
.107
.167
.143
.138
.053
.098
.121
.103
.016
.185
.258
.121

2.270

Other
dis­
eases
of
nerv­
ous
sys­
tem.

Bron­
chitis,
acute
and
chron­
ic.

Pneu­
monia Other
dis­
and
bron- eases of
respir­
chopneu- atory
monia. system.

0.350 0.687 0.434 0.325
0.709 0.068 0.225 0.274 0.600
0.227
2.558
(a)
(a)
(a)
(a)
(«)
.020 A
.292 A
%
.226
.288
%
1.930
A
%
c.247 .580 .234 <*.269
.627
.329 («)
.331 /.815
1.672
.481
.357 .642 .865 .350
.802 .190
.625
.382
.202
.169
1.916
.481 .688 .394 .315
.565
.337
.758 .346
.... .541 .269 .523 .344 .313 .446 .333 .282 2.206 .254
.859
.128
1.574
.062 .740 .413 .403
.197
.535
.503 .127
.259
1.457
.219
.480 1.137 .931 .351
.460
.683 .003
.166
1.974
.394
.703
.235 .671 .306 .618
.782
1.862
.656 .235
.356
.300
.338
.525 .426 1.082 .261
.498
.501 .099
.513
2.324
.369
.249
.283 .687 .443 .383
.397
.857 .193
.223
.690
1.617
.247
.090 .600 .543 .360
.720
.533 .360
.527
.283
.263
1.550
.245 .692 .430 .313
.592
.538 .030
.417
.192
1.096
.161
.216 .676 .505 .373
.401
1.732
1.066 .178
.324
.638
.477
.192 .706 .322 .624
.941 .125
.616
.451
.220
1.651
.290
.150 .449 .304 .637
.904 .066
.623
.777
.337
.328
1.831
.181 .507 .298 .414
.442
.563 .488
1.544
.507
.381
.260
.286 .633 .352 .324
.443 .029
.286
.148
.167
.200
1.019
.494 .803 .331 .309
.247
.933 .118
.152
.573
.315
1.579
.126 .466 .219 .395
.312
.778 .110
.208
.285
1.227
.471
.133 .429 .342 .272
.244
.475 .272
.255
.226
1.484
.296
.147 .471 .241 .253
.082
.247
.124
.924
.376 .053
.294
.082 .882 .377 .494
.418
.729 .029
.324
.524
.159
1.259
.364 .657 .536 .550
.464 .186
.522
.171
.214
2.307
.543
.160 .500 .300 .287
.233
.227
.393 .066
.327
.287
.947
.737 .361 .459 .421
.511
.519 .098
.398
2.346
.316
.489
.098 .536 .257 .415
.083
.158
.438 .241
.226
1.049
.249
.157 .554 .264 .455
.355
.934 .091
.314
.760
2.264
.083
.125 .617 .250 .258
.317
.333
.725 .200
.267
.192
1.033
.098 .705 .491 .268
.509
.527 .054
.277 1.348
1.304
.268
.046 .669 .660 .697
.511
.186
.409
1.645
.400
.623 .121
.402 .467 .168 .738
.122 .215
.935
.626 1.047
2.103
1.467
.135
.058 .174 .135 .145
.222 ,116
.019
.135
.628
.126
.073 .345 .282 .400
.164
.382 .127
.091
1.027
.282
.318
.745 .891 .482 .382
.054
.218
.309
.382
.973 .273
1.509
.205 .335 .288 .363
.233
.270 .205
.260
1.405
.223
.205
.058 .388 .233 .534
.718
.505 .320 1.058
.243
2.214
.612
.210 .600 .337 .706
.432
.705
.790 .390
.179
2.559
.232
.320 1.060 .230 .360
.280
1.470 .090
.400
.190
1.430
.280
.255 .978 .234 .085
.393
.128 .106
.255 1.573
1.850
.319
.160 .819 .128
.287 .202
1.192
.287
.... .362 .500 .404 .766 .638 .670 .117 .063 2.585 .298
.351
.308
.298
.211 .800 .358 .189
.3^7
.558 .253
.137
.316
.8o3
.421
.289 .733 .144 .644
.122
.189
.089 .811
.389
1.278
.133
1.207 .511 .348 .391
.456
.826 .685
.456
.576
2.011
.913
.283 .492 .431 .283
.763 .369
.381
2. lo2
.738
.480
.381
.256 .456 .356 .244
.111
.356 .189
.111
.156
.122
1.111
.821 .331 .441
.233
.723 .172
.368
1.507
.368
.037
.085 .451 .256 .378
.207
.768 .256 1.098
.354
1.488
.2x9
.102 .293 .357 .611
.268
.688 .675
.420
.140
1.796
.280
.137
.100 .538 .200 .650
1.063 .363
1.588
.413
.263
.413
.280
.160 .493 .267 .427
1.240 .573
.520
.400
1.387
.360
.403 .610 .338 .312
.519
.480 .169
.532
.156
1.649
.221
.043 .786 .357 .457
.157
.243
.471 .357
.186
1.714
.171
.187 .747 .333 .427
.280
.707 .200
.133
.173
1.587
.280
.138 .646 .231 .877
.415 .308
.569
.431
.323
1.939
.308
.212 .773 .394 .727
.818
.515 .212
.379
.348
1.500
.258
.071 .243 .157 .243
.371 .114
.157
.143
.214
1.329
.257
.323 .615 .277 .185
.569 .077
.185
.246
.415
1.200
.110 .614 .409 .346
.693 .346
.110
.173
.551
1.339
.346
.253 .906 .440 .559
1.386 .053
.440
.280
.360
3.104
.253
.016 .443 .459 1.049
.951 .180
.557
.197
.508
2.164
.279
.183 .498 .266 .149
.100 .183
.083
.465
.316
.382
.897
.139 .745 .399 .953
.572 .451
.451
.277
.659
1.820
.520
2,362
.207 .569 .362 .500'
.534
.379
.879 .328
.155
.310
.467 .534 .383 .317
.217
.333
.450
.400 .317
1.500
.150
.138 .508 .477 .200
.354
1.154 .477
.431 1.246
.262
1.785
.016 .274 .500 .210
.387
1.952
.935 .532
.500
.548
.629
.052 .345 .259 .414
.172
.310 .138
.241
.914
.207
.241
d Including deaths from encephalitis.
e Included in deaths from other diseases of nervous system.
/In clu din g deaths from paralysis, hut not including deaths from encephalitis.

2 .^
1.896
2.282
2.189
1.110
1.284
2.697
2.182
1.079
2.953
1.100
1.344
3.035
2.278
2.187
1.967
1.248
2.157
1.227
1.774
1.247
1.547
3.907
.927
1.113
1.555
2.000
1.333
.982
1.998
1.701
.628
.709
3.155
2.223
1.087
1.579
2.170
1.956
1.340
2.319
.800
1.445
1.750
2.718
.956
1.531
1.378
1.898
1.925
1.774
1.857
2.029
2.014
1.662
2.106
.900
1.554
1.449
3.264
2.443
1.960
1.803
1.931
.867
3.154
3.113
.604




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

944

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T abus

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

VIII.—DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (2).

Cities.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

Diarrhea and
Her­
enteritis.
Other
Other
nia
dis­
dis­
Organ­ eases of
and
Peri­ Appen­ eases of Bright’s
ic heart circula­
intesti­ toni­
2
Under years nal ob­ tis. dicitis. digest­ disease.
disease. tory
ive
2
struc­
or
system. years.
system.
over. tion.

New York, N .Y .......... 1.291
0.123
1.343
0.206 1.617 0.273
0.513
0.133 0.033
(a)
(a)
(a)
Chicago, 111.................
(«)
Philadelphia, P a ....... 1.422
.097
%
%
.306
%
%
.146
%
(b)
(«)
St. Louis. Mo...............
c l. 244 cf1.321
.025 /.306
.718
Boston, M ass.............. 1.519
.214
.181
.476 1.064
.192
.398
!l50
.178
Baltimore, M d............ 1.025
.462 1.396
.110
1.173
.092
.690
.169
.173
Cleveland, O h io.........
.695
.610
.549 l. 869
( c)
.392
.113
.336
.784
Buffalo, N .Y ...............
.146
.603
.368 1.078
.092
.138
.157
.119
San Francisco, Cal___ 1.511
.774
.743
.120
.554
.120
.140
.109
.863
Cincinnati, Ohio.........
.918
.873
.603
.097
.150
.738
.318
.718
.126
Pittsburg, P a ..............
.614
.114
.626
.462 1.508
.201
.123
.186
.659
New Orleans, La......... 1.733
.457 1.000
.083
1.430
.353
.160
.087
.617
.917
Detroit, M ich..............
.277
.117
.610
.967
.100
.253
.563
.203
Milwaukee, W is.........
.662
.155 1.012
.094
.444
.118
.171
.427
.060
Washington, D. C....... 1.355
.505 1.289
.094
.979
.139
.080
.634
.244
Newark, N .J ..............
.796
.647
.078
1.004
.906
.180
.118
.569
.235
Jersey City, N .J .........
.791
.641
.501 1.189
.075
.187
.192
.267
.623
Louisville, K y ............
.823
614
.828
.070
.488
.070
.223
.209
.456
.652
Minneapolis, M in n . . .
.162
.362
.229
.114
.109
.333
.252
.300
Providence, R. I ......... 1.410
.281 1.534
.169
1.090
.427
.213
.095
1.135
Indianapolis, I n d ___ 1.206
.312
.049
.466
.488
.049
.006
.630
.285
Kansas City, M o.........
.626
.499
.064
.591
.180
.504
.087
.417
.475
St. Paul, M inn............
.635
.341
.612
.153
.618
.024
.076
.124
.294
Rochester, N. Y .......... 1.530
.265
.082
.235
.253
.129
.700
.347
.459
.786
.522
Denver, C o lo ..............
.714
.186
.457
.179
.271
.171
.529
.714
Toledo, O h io ..............
.340
.240
.060
.627
.153
.066
.207
.460
Allegheny, P a............
.940
.233 1.466
.030
.383
.609
.143
.263
.451
Columbus, O h io .........
.981
.151
.038
.543
.121
.543
.083
.128
.430
Worcester, Mass......... 1.579
.058
.793
.074
.124
.165
.983
.248
.256
Syracuse, N .Y ............ 1.067
.650
.725
.008
.400
.317
.226
.108
.400
New Haven, Conn___ 1.125
.330 1.393
.955
.036
.107
.107
.116
.518
Paterson, N . J ............ 1.255
.242 1.134
.437
.251
.353
.186
084
Fall River, Mass.........
.626
.112
.355
.187
.038
.280
.065
.206
.393
St. Joseph, M o ............
.367
.077
.213
.029
.290
.126
.106
.203
.039
Omaha, N ebr..............
.509
.064
.100
.118
.164
.056
.209
.236
.056
Los Angeles, C a l.......
.882
.673
.127
1.018
.391
.118
.282
.600
.036
Memphis, T e n n .........
.456
.140
1.200
.381
.102
.167
.847
.288
.316
Scranton, P a ..............
.573
.408
.573
.505
.369
.097
.282
.087
.466
Lowell, Mass.............. 2.074
.253 1.948
.432
.390
.063
.432
.158
.189
Albany, N. Y .............. 1.410
.740
.220
.190
.150
1.440
.460
.080
.450
Cambridge, Mass....... 1.382
.191
.032
.064
.064
.191
.372
.595
.340
Portland, Oreg..........
.904
.394
.372
.202
.362
.489
.106
.255
.309
Atlanta, G a ...............
.979
.404
.681
.117
.755
.936
.277
.043
.574
Grand Rapids, Mich .
.916
.326
.084
.137
.179
.074
.368
.547
.400
Dayton, Ohio.............. 1.256
.389
.122
.122
.944
.056
.033
.111
.478
Richmond, Y a............ 1.120
.217
.174
.728
.152
.065
.598
.522
.696
Nashville, Tenn......... 1.328
.172
.012
.922
.467
.123
.271
.590
.467
Seattle, W ash............
.745
.222
.233
.078
.267
.322
.200
.156
.433
Hartford, Conn.......... 1.237
.073
1.029
.073
.282
.123
.576
.515
Reading, Pa...............
.793
.183
. 464
.183
.098
.195
.488
.695
.061
Wilmington, D e l....... 1.147
.522 1.108
.038
.076
.217
.013
.599
.497
Camden, N. J ............ 1.275
.275
.087
.225
.175
.025
.450
1.038
.313
Trenton, N. J .............. 1.027
.560
.853
.080
.120
.413
.253
.507
Bridgeport, C o n n ___ 1.143
.480 1.467
.584
.130
1.000
.091
.130
Lynn, Mass................. 1.271
.543
.057
.157
.257
.314
.500
.086
.443
Oakland, C al.............. 1.573
.467 *.253
(c)
.093
.627
.160
.067
.480
Lawrence, Mass......... 1.092
.462
.123
.092
.215
.585
.185
.015
.431
New Bedford, Mass .. 1.697
.364 1.439
.727
.212
.167
.030
.015
.212
Des Moines, I o w a ___
.371
.243
.271
.171
.029
.457
.143
.086
.572
Springfield, Mass....... 1.616
.292
.108
.062
.092
1.339
.585
.138
.200
Somerville, Mass....... 1.165
.158
.362
.032
.284
.331
.158
.079
.472
Troy, N. Y ................... 1.465
.426 1.026
1.066
.320
.186
.200
.067
.586
Hoboken, N .J ............ 1.213
.410 1.066
.377
.902
.049
.016
.049
.491
Evansville, I n d .........
.515
.531
.382
.615
.299
.100
.299
.050
.332
Manchester, N. H ___ 1.213
.485 2.063
.485
.087
.797
.243
.607
Utica, N .Y ................. 1.224
.448
.362
.121
.569
.397
.069
.897
.724
Peoria, 111...................
.333
.867
.367
.016
.217
.083
.150
.684
.317
Charleston, S. C ........
.769
.831
.323 2.338
.108
.108
.108
1.062
3.154
Savannah, G a............ 1.129
.323
.032
.113 1.032
.065
.226
.935
1.371
Salt Lake City, U tah.
.810
.207
.345
.069
.086
.121
.138
.259
.500
o Data not obtainable.
b Included in deaths from other diseases of circulatory system.
c Including deaths from organic heart disease.
d Including deaths from dysentery, diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over, peritonitis, and gastritis.
e Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.
/ Not including deaths from gastritis.
o Included in deaths from other forms of tuberculosis.




STATISTICS OF CITIES,

Included in deaths from infantile diseases.
Including deaths from other malformations.
Included in deaths from other malformations,
fcIncluding deaths from hydrocephalus.
I Including deaths from diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over.
m Including 808 deaths occurring outside city limits.
n Not including 81 deaths of nonresidents.
h
i
j




945

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Table VIII.—DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (1)—Cob

larLnal
nm-

Cities.

>er.

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

87
88

89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99

100
101
102

103
104
105
106'
107
108
109
110
111
112

113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

San Antonio, Tex ..
Duluth, M in n .........
Erie, P a ...................
Elizabeth, N. J .......
Wilkesbarre, Pa___
Kansas City, Kans .
Harrisburg, Pa........
Portland, Me..........
Yonkers, N. Y .........
Norfolk, V a ............
Waterbury, Conn (a)
Holyoke, Mass.........
Fort Wayne, Ind .. .
Youngstown, O hio..
Houston, T e x .........
Covington, K y .......
Akron, Ohio............
Dallas, T ex..............
Saginaw, M ich .......
Lancaster, P a .........
Lincoln, N ebr.........
Brockton, M ass___
Binghamton, N. Y ..
Augusta, Ga............
Pawtucket, R. I ___
Altoona, P a ............
Wheeling, W. V a ...
Mobile, A l a ............
Birmingham, A la ..
Little Rock, Ark . . .
Springfield, Ohio .. .
Galveston, T ex.......
Tacoma, Wash.........
Haverhill, Mass___
Spokane, Wash.......
Terre Haute, In d ...
Dubuque, Iowa.......
Quincy, 111..............
South Bend, Ind . . .
Salem, Mass............
Johnstown, P a .......
Elmira, N. Y ............
Allentown, Pa.........
Davenport, Io w a .. .
McKeesport, P a ___
Springfield, 111.......
Chelsea, M ass.........
Chester, P a ..............
York, P a .................
Malden, M ass.........
Topeka, K an s.........
Newton, Mass.........
Sioux City, Io w a . . .
Bayonne, N. J .........
Knoxville, T en n . . .
Schenectady, N. Y ..
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior, W is..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass.......
Canton, Ohio..........
Butte, M ont............
Montgomery, A la ..
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn.
East St. Louis, 111...
Joliet, 111.................




Ty­
Scar­ Whoop­ Diph­
phoid Mala­ Small­ Mea­
let
ing theria
ria. pox. sles. fever. cough. and Grippe
fever.
croup.

0.415 0.775
0.162 0.216
.732
0.018
.018
.145 .018
.727 .055
.273 .018
.018 .073
.346
.058 .173
.789 .129 .037 .183 .330
.382 .036
.018 .073
.250 .038 .019 .019
.118 .039 .196
.039
.582 .382
.055
.312 .062
.021 .125
.147 .021
.021 .042
.314 .020 .039 .039 .098
1.180 .100
.080 .060
.520 1.200 .140
.080
.391 .115
.023 .023
.267 .111
.044
.340 .660
.060 .080
.289 .111 .022
.022
.241
.072
.282 .047
.071
.141 .047
.023 .212
.561
.122 .122
. 6 1.049 .024 .122 .244
36
.148 .074
.025 .025
.275
.025 .150
.950 .025 .025 .125 .300
.722 .670 .077
.180
.927 . 146
.024 .317
.675 .602 .024 .024 .121
.200
.025 .100
.357 .286 .214
.036
.275
.150 .125
.269 .027
.054
.475
.050
.100
.675 .150
.075 .200
.187 .053 .053
.053
.605
.053
.132
.445 .023
.023 .023
.110 .138
.028 .441
1.000
.200
.274
.027
.472
.302
.027 .110 .137
.773
.027 .373
.222 .028 .083 .139 .028
.198
.085 .085
.400 .028 .086
.378
.027
.260
.029 .029 .029
.435 .174
.232
.165 .027 .027
.027
.197
.084 .169 .028
.057 .029 .057 .171 .114
.522 .058 .116
.609
.347 .026
.026 .080
.219
.031
.437
.063 .063
.062
.031
.193 .065
.129
.121 .030
.281
.594
.254 .317 .032
,222
.229
.029 .029
. 8 .219 .187
68
.062
.400 .114 .057 .057 .314
.219 .094
.062 .094
a Including data for township.

0.126 0.361 0.415
.018 .482 .089
.346 .164 .036
.036 .400 .091
.365 .116
.055 .202 .110
.109 .218 .036
.135 .442 .077
.020 .372
.400 .109 .273
.270 .332 .540
.357 .945 .210
.039 .157 .216
.460 .240
.020 .220 .140
.207 .299 .552
.200 .089
.020 .080 .080
.044 .356 .200
.072 .458 .651
.094 .424 .047
.259 .235
.098 .512 .268
.073 .268 .463
.517 .394
.500 .050
. s .600 .425
io
.026 .077 .232
.219 .098
.096 .096 .578
.025 .325 .175
.286 .107
.075 .275 .100
.054 .377 .511
.025 .126 .175
>250 .325 .425
.027 .053 .107
.053 .053
.047 .141 .258
.028 .331 .359
.025 .575 .050
.466 .493 .521
.417 .111
.137 .164 .137
.027 .427
.056 .695 .111
.085 .510 .227
.028 .514 .229
.054 .297 .108
.202 .317 .231
.087 .116 .087
.303
.056 .113 .084
.029 .314 .171
.232 .203
.026 .774 .053
.094 .375 .125
.031 .281 .375
.094 .031 .250
.032 .193 .258
.182 .030
.061
.094 .375 .062
.064 .127
.029 .086 .171
.062 .313 .281
.057 .286 .200
.125 .156 .094

947

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able VIII.—DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (1)—Concluded.

Other
Puru­ Pul­ Other
Cere­
dis­ Bron­ Pneu­
lent
Other
Con­ eases chitis, monia Other
bral
mo­ forms
dis­
and
gen­ Men­ conges­ Pa­ vul­
nary
of
of
acute and eases of
septi- tuber­ tuber­ Can­ eral in­
tion
cer. dis­ gitis. and raly­ sions nerv­ and bron- respir­
csemie culo­ culo­
sis. of in­ ous chron­ choinfec­ sis.
eases.
hemor­
fants. sys­
pneu- atory
sis.
ic. monia. system.
tion.
rhage.
tem.
0.198 5.261 0.378 0.469
.321 .518
.178 1.179
.218 .509
.127 1.036
.036 2.055
.418 .418
.885
.096 .404
.202 1.835
.055 .514
. 1.382 ___ .473
.712
.019 2.269
.353 .451
.118 1.863
.073 .436
.018 2.473
.228 .208
.021 1.454
.168 .546
.147 1.828
.039 .627
.078 1.235
.320
.200 .860 __
.120 .520
.160 2.360
.942 .299
.138 2.414
.089 .489
.111 .644
.060 .380
.260 2.240
.067 .556
.155 1.111
.121 .531
.048 1.110
.071 .565
.141 .682
.188 .494
.047 1.388
.805
1.317
.024 .439
2.756
.122
.197 .541
.074 1.649
.425
1.150
.225 .775
.125 1.375
.026 .670
.361 4.046
.122 .488
.219 3.171
.386
.337 2.892
.225 .975 *“ .050* .475
.107 .750
.393 1.643
.025 .450
.250 1.200
.430 .753
.027 1.990
.025 .750
.050 1.275
.075 .650
.025 1.500
.053 .693
.107 .987
.210 .605
.026 1.653
.141 .398
.070 1.265
.966 .662
1.793
.025 .350
.025 1.150
.247 .685
.027 1.206
.361
.083 1.500 ....
.192* .658
.027 1.452
.027 .427
.933
.472 .361
2.167
.113 .681
.028 1.702
.171 .372
1.372
.270 .433
.135 .973
.144 .635
.115 1.298
.058 .319
.174 1.797
.165 .605
1.156
.282 .479
.310 1.071
.143 .371
.114 1.600
.116 .290
.029 3.710
.080 .347
.053 1.547
.062 .813
1.188
.344 .406
.125 .812
.094 .531
1.344
.322
1.933
.364
.061 1.000
.250 .625 ***.*1.25* .250
.190 .159
.064 1.524
.086 .486
.057 1.314
.219 .563
.281 2.469
.143 .229
.800
.057
1.219
.031 .250




0.234
.214
.527
.309
.212
.238
.309
.404
.235
.709
.706
.567
.314
.360
.400
.919
.267
.500
.267
.169
.188
.353
.439
.951
.123
.425
.300
.438
.268
.313
.300
.250
.425
.323
.525
.525
.213
.605
.304
.469
.300
.466
.417
.384
.213
.556
.454
.257
.297
.202
.319
.330
.338
.086
.580
.347
.281
.281
.656
.483
.091
.250
.254
.371
.344
.200
.062

0.487
.625
.127
.400
.212
.459
.218
.789
.667
.255
.353
1.071
.196
.460
.140
.874
.222
.120
.155
.145
.259
.376
.098
.244
.591
.500
.450
.026
.293
.434
.250
.357
.225
.323
.450
.350
.453
.316
.141
.524
.875
.329
.361
.164
.400
.222
.482
.343
.189
.288
.145
.275
.423
.543
.174
.373
.344
.469
.906
.290
.212
.344
.127
.257
.250
.200
.312

0.324
.375
.709
.764
.808
.385
.655
1.192
.784
.945
.644
.315
.451
.340
.340
.529
.489
.340
.356
1.230
.494
.141
1.024
.707
.935
.500
.625
.902
.683
.771
.850
.286
.400
.726
.225
.450
.560
.737
.304
.745
.200
.712
1.528
.685
.160
.333
.482
.600
.811
.721
.319
1.046
.564
.686
.319
.854
.438
.312
.281
1.225
.455
.187
.159
1.057
.688
.229
.281

0.270 0.324 0.577 0.378
.089 .303 .036 .339
.327 .309 .418 .382
.109 .527 .200 .327
.115 .481 .269 .250
.238 .165 .440 .202
.273 .255 .291 .127
.538 .173 .231 .212
.078 .255 .177 .490
.509 .727 .309 .309
.125 .208 .145 1.122
.210 .294 .315 .651
.373 .157 .235 .373
.280 .420 .260 .320
.340 .360 .480 .140
.345 .391 .575 .621
.267 .444 .244 .178
.320 .100 .320 .360
.400 .444 .311 .333
.072 .434 .169 .265
.424 .235 .259 .047
.094 .141 .471 .188
2.025 .244
.463
.732 .293 .683 .244
.197 .123 .172 .566
.450 .800 .250 .350
.400 .175 .125 .325
.464 1.005 1.263 .284
.219 .195 .488 .317
.289 .121 .482 .217
.050 .250 .125 .500
.357 .214 .714 .250
.125 .200 .225 .075
.350 .161 .511 .134
.275 .150 .100 .350
.200 .050 .475 .175
.240 .400 .347 .267
.263 .132 .763 .368
.187 .281 .070 .304
.193 .110 .828 .386
.250 .725 .200 .350
.247 .164 .192 .247
.167 .472 .195 .195
.439 .521 .356 .466
.187 1.093 .053 .427
.417 .389 .472 .389
.567 .340 .681 .397
.200 .400 .257 .114
.514 .243 .189 .216
.144 .231 .519 .375
.898 .203 1.217 .029
.138 .275 .248
.113 .141 -.225 .338
...... .543 .143 .286
.348 .203 .319 .232
.107 .293 .213 .320
.250 .125 .156 .344
.063 .344 .219 .437
.469 .219 .344 .406
1.031 .258 .935 .387
.364 .121 .333 .030
.094 .187 .187 .187
.222 .190 .603 .127
.086 .171 .171
.281 .156 .281 .281
.200 .114 .143 .457
.156 .281 .469 .188

1.045
1.018
1.327
1.600
1.692
1.927
.909
1.116
1.784
1.309
2.057
1.722
.882
1.680
1.120
1.977
.867
1.980
1.200
1.737
.777
1.600
1.878
1.805
1.821
1.875
1.600
1.314
4.390
2.193
1.025
.929
.925
1.291
.875
1.150
.587
1.447
.656
1.435
1.225
1.753
1.528
.548
2.507
1.083
.993
1.429
1.460
1.731
1.362
1.018
1.042
2.257
1.478
1.894
1.469
1.250
1.438
1.611
1.000

2.188
.952
1.171
1.000
2.686
1.438

0.144
.161
.200
.291
.288
.183
.164
.250
.372
.127
.416
.357
.471
.040
.260
.414
.133
.200
.444
.121
.094
.471
.122
.659
.172
.375
.300
.335
.268
.554
.175
.214
.175
.134
.100
.175
.080
.474
.398
.855
.200
.137
.222
.329
.183
.111

.113
.171
.288
.174
.165
.197
.629
.203
.507
.062
.094
.062
.387
.152
.250
.254
.257
.469
.156

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
•110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

948

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.
TABLE

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

vm.—
DEATH

Diarrhea and
enteritis.
Her­
Other
Other
nia
dis­
dis­
Peri­ Appen­ eases of Bright's
and
Organ­ eases of
intesti­ toni­ dicitis. digest­ disease.
2
ic heart circula­ Under
years nal ob- tis.
disease. tory
ive
2
or
system.
system. years. over. struction.

Cities.

San Antonio, T e x ___
Duluth, M in n ............
Erie, P a ......................
Elizabeth, N. J ..........
Wilkesbarre, Pa.........
Kansas City, Kans . . .
Harrisburg, P a ..........
Portland, Me..............
Yonkers, N. Y ............
Norfolk, Y a ...............
Waterbury, Conn. (a).
Holyoke, M ass..........
Fort Wayne, I n d .......
Houston, T e x ............
Covington, K y ............
Akron, Ohio...............
Dallas, T e x .................
Saginaw, M ich ..........
Lancaster, P a ............
Lincoln, N ebr............
Brockton, Mass..........
Binghamton, N. Y . . .
Augusta, Ga...............
Pawtucket, It. I .........
Altoona, P a ...............
Wheeling, W. Y a.......
Mobile, A l a ...............
Birmingham, A la ---Little Rock, A r k .......
Springfield, Ohio.......
Galveston, T ex ..........
Tacoma, W ash..........
Haverhill, Mass.........
Spokane, Wash..........
Terre Haute, I n d .......
Dubuque, Iowa..........
Quincy, 111.................
South Bend, In d .........
Salem, M ass...............
Johnstown, Pa............
Elmira, N. Y ...............
Allentown, P a............
Davenport, I o w a .......
McKeesport, P a .........
Springfield, 111............
Chelsea, Mass..............
Chester, P a .................
York, Pa......................
Malden, Mass..............
Topeka, K a n s ..................
Newtonj Mass..............
Sioux City, Iowa.........
Bayonne, N. J..............
Knoxville, Tenn.........
Schenectady, N. Y —
Fitchburg, M ass.........
Superior, W is..............
Rockford, 111...............
Taunton, Mass............
Canton, O h io..............
Butte, M o n t...............
Montgomery, A la.......
Auburn, N .Y ..............
Chattanooga, T en n ...
East St. Louis, 111.......
Joliet, 111....................




KATE PEE 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (2)—concluded.

0.685
.411
.946
.873
.827
.716
.946
1.558
.863
1.382
.561
.546
.333
i.ino
!700
1.494
.844
.460
1.178
1.110
.353
.965
.854
.659
1.772
.575
1.150
1.314
.732
.627
.750
.964
1.575
.968
.900
1.150
.880
.500
.328
1.103
1.175
1.069
1.083
1.069
.480
.583
1.985
.943
.622
1.241
.753
.881
.761
.114
.666
.613
1.719
.531
.594
1.192
.939
.500
.921
.771
.688
.257
.344

0.505
.303
.200
.800
.077
.495
.109
.192
.608
.236
.478
.252
.353
. 140
.220
1.011
.089
.320
.133
.338
.141
.188
.317
.415
.148
.525
.226
.206
.244
.458
.025
.179
.275
.269
.225
.250
.293
.237
.375
.717
.200
.411
.111
.384
.160
.111
.567
.343
.433
.404
.261
.275
.113
.486
.348
.320
.219
.094
.375
.193
.061
.062
.171
.313
.171
.031

1.658
1.179
.891
1.546
.885
.165
.709
.538
.882
.745
1.641
1.765
.373
.700
.980
.666
.356
.580
.467
.386
.236
.212
.317
.561
1.157
.550
c.750
.284
.171
.651
.175
.750
.100
.780
.300
.750
.453
.632
.726
.331
1.050
.548
.333*
.575
1.040
.472
.170
1.057
.946
.490
.464
.716
.394
1.400
.406
1.200
.969
1.437
.563
1.353
.333
.750
.698
.400
.750
.314
.719

0.270
.089
.182
.256
.058
.349
.073
.216
1.146
.228
.210
.098
.180
.300
.161
.067
.240
.111
.531
.071
.306
.024
1.634
.320
.325
(<*)
.748
1.293
.964
.075
.500
.125
.108
.150
.150
.027
.132
.070
.772
.625
.139
.164
.853
.250
.879
.114
.270
.288
.174
.138
.225
.229
.174
.240
.187
.094
.09i
.344
.476
.286
.125
.086
.094

0.018
.107
.182
.091
.115
.073
.109
.058
.137
.273
.228
.105
.039
.100
.080
.092
.067
.100
.244
.096
.094
.047
.024
.148
.050
.275
.156
.098
.193
.025
.107
.050
.134
.100
.275
.053
.iii
.055
.075
.164
.083
.164
.133
.167
.142
.286
.054
.058
.193
.141
.114
.029
.267
.031
.125
.156
.161
.121
.125
.064
.029
.229
.125

0.180
.196
.164
.109
.250
.330
.127
.231
.137
.182
.041
.168
.333
.120
.140
.345
.155
.140
.267
.048
.071
.118
.293
.366
.025
.225
.175
.335
.415
.145
.150
.143
.200
.081
.275
.400
.187
.210
.211
.110
.175
.164
.139
.164
.480
.250
.142
.171
.081
.115
.174
.083
.310
.229
.348
.267
.219
.125
.125
.161
.091
.219
.095
.229
.219
.114
.125

alncluding data for township.
&Not including deaths from premature birth.

0.144
.161
.164
.018
.077
.092
.091
.077
.137
.145
.104
.126
.039
.080
.069
.022
.220
.200
.072
.047
.071
.268
.073
.049
.050
.100
.052
.073
.096
.075
.214
.150
.054
.250
.125
.080
.105
.047
.088
.150
.137
.083
.164
.053
.194
.028
.058
.377
.055
.084
.il6
.080
.187
.188
.129
.061
.187
.064
.114
.031
.057
.031

0.793
.232
.473
.309
.308
.477
.400
.346
.490
.745
.499
.651
.510
.420
.840
.621
.311
.940
.578
.410
.353
.659
.488
.854
.517
.475
.875
.722
.780
.602
.250
.857
.200
.242
.475
.650
.480
.553
.351
.441
.325
.548
.389
.302
.533
.750
.454
.486
.851
.288
.696
.275
.451
.657
.695
.267
.344
.187
.437
.193
.333
.344
.698
.486
.906
.200
.188

0.937
.554
.600
.927
.692
.569
.400
1.462
.863
.618
.685
.462
.647
.660
.666
.467
.500
.444
.531
.306
.188
.781
.707
.689
.625
.525
2.139
.561
.434
1.000
2.357
.425
.538
.425
.250
.534
.605
.445
.248
.375
.986
.722
.356
.160
.833
.596
.286
.405
.404
.087
.330
.282
.657
.551
.480
.156
.375
.094
.580
.394
.844
.603
.628
.750
.229
.406

949

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table VIII.—DEATH BATE PER 1,000 POPULATION, BY CAUSES (2)—Concluded.
Other
dis­
eases
ofgenitourinary
sys­
tem.
0.144
.036
. 182
.273
.019
.238
.255
.250
.471
.509
.457
.294
.419
.360
.060
1.701
.089
.080
.200
.169
.071
.471
463
.244
.221
.075
.575
.232
.366
.048
.075
.464
.100
.377
100
.425
.107
.316
.258
.414
.225
.658
.028
.164
.187
.250
.198
.543
.027
.404
.464
.550
.423
.257
.058
.373
.344
.063
.188
.483
.030
.407
.317
.200
.094
.086
.219

Puer­
peral
septi­
cae­
mia.

Other
puer­
peral
dis­
eases.

0.126
.089
.164
.073
.058

0.108
.036
.073
.109
.058
.110

.109
.115
.059
.036
.228
.021
.069
.020
.100
.138
.080
.023
.047
.098
.049
.175
.075
.077
.122
.025
.036
.081
.200
.125
.027
.184
.023
.055
.025
.027

.058
.078
.091
.042
.042
.078
.020
.040
.322
.044
.080
.089
.047
.122
.073
.123
.025
.050
.232
.268
.096
.025
.107
.081
.050
.125
.027
.026
.117
.110
.082

.164
.107
.056

.027
.027

.086

.085
.171
,027

.029
.029
.165
.056
.029
.174
.080
.156
.063
.156
.193

.087
.083
.028
.171

Dis­
eases
of the
skin
and
cellu­
lar
tissue.

0.072 0.144
.036
.018
.036
.018
.164
.037
.037
.109
.038
.096
.020
.036
.062
.062
.042 _____
.098
.020
.060

.03i
.028

.018
.018
.019
.039
.083
.021

.046

.080
.022
.072
.071

.020

.040
.023
.022
.020

.023
.047

.024
.023
.047

.049

.024

.024
.098
.050
.100
.077
.098
.072
.026
.036
.100
.108
.050
.125
.080
.079
.094
.055
.200
.082

.024
.050
.054
.050
.027

.026

.036
.025

.053

.047
.025
.082
.027

.086
.054
.144
.055
.084
.057
.031
.063
.062
.032

.057
.031
.062

0.072
.018
.091
.036
.038

.039
.021
.063
.039
.020

.060
.067
.024
.023
.118
.024
.050
.025

.096

.138

.036
.050
.027
.025
.080
.047
.025
.055

.027

.133
.028

.030
.062
.062
.086
.031

0.036
.018

.092

.053
.031
.125

Dis­
eases Hy- Other
of
mal­
loco­ dromotor ceph- forma­
alus. tions.
sys­
tem.

.027
.107

.028
.054
.029
.028
.086
.029
.026

.029
.029
.028
.029

.063

.055
.056
.200

.031

.032
.061
.032

.031

.064

.030
.031
.029

Mar­
Infan­ Senile
Ill-de­
tile
Sui­ Acci­ fined Total ginal
dis­ debil­ cide. dent. dis­ deaths. num­
ity.
ber.
eases.
eases.

1.153
.464
1.200
1.455
1.135
.734
1.309
.942
.941
1.564
1.703
1.849
.726
6.700
1.000
1.310
.867
.980
.867
1.085
.518
.706
.805
1.561
1.427
1.225
.700
1.366
1.268
5.506
.850
1.250
5.650
.699
.575
1.725
.880
.763
1.358
.635
1.475
.877
1.361
.603
1.040
.528
1.134
1.115
.838
1.125
.145
.633
.845
1.257
.724
.907
2.094
1.500
.781
1.225
.424
1.032
.254
1.228
1.219
.543
.938

0.505 0.216
.286 .196
.455 .145
.455 .127
.635 .115
.367 .065
.709 .018
.866 .038
.235 .059
.273 .018
.374 .021
.357 .126
.510 .118
.480 .160
.400 .120
1.172 .276
.289 .022
.320 .160
.756 .067
.772 .048
.282 .165
.447 .071
1.098 .146
.171
.541 .123
1.025 .150
.675 .125
.861 .077
.366
.241
.950 .050
.500 .071
.275 .275
.565 .242
.475 .250
1.425 .200
.960 .133
1.263 .237
.445 .047
.469 .055
.400 .100
.466 .164
.389 .111
1.206 .219
.240 .133
1.333 .111
.652 .057
.486 .028
.487 .054
.404 .087
1.014 .174
.578
.254 .084
.171 .114
.435 .058
.400 .026
.875 .062
.719 .094
.594 .156
1.321 .193
.515
.344 .313
.476 .064
.571 .057
.531 .031
.429
.500 .094

1.243
1.429
.691
1.237
1.288
1.083
1.000
.750
.863
.909
.852
.798
.804
1.260
1.520
1.195
.889
1.440
.778
.531
.706
.141
.927
.561
.566
.925
1.150
,876
2.854
1.108
.450
1.572
1.100
.726
.725
1.050
.693
1.026
.585
.359
1.525
.795
.583
.822
1.974
.945
.567
1.629
.595
.462
1.420
.633
1.127
1.314
.695
1.200
.750
1.781
.469
.516
.303
1.938
.603
.600
1.219
1.743
.875

0.703
22.613
12.946
.214
14.745
.127
17.564
.309
14.346
.692
1.101
15.743
13.073
.418
16.885
.250
15.843
.216
19.545
.291
18.592
.644
.462
18.399
.333
12.373
.460 614.020
17.240
.640
24.069
.299
10.644
.800
17.440
1.800
13.578
.089
14.279
.169
.682
9.553
12.306
.212
18.415
1.293
22.366
1.512
16.416
.074
15.700
.300
17.075
.025
23.969
.696
24.585
1.612
1.398 619.133
11.450
.250
20.536
2.143
.425 611.850
14.714
.081
11.900
.200
17.425
.175
11.840
.133
16.026
.711
.422
11.780
17.379
.276
16.425
.375
15.562
.027
14.722
1.083
14.521
.439
17.387
1.174
17.278
1.972
16.362
.369
15.286
.400
12.541
.514
.115
14.020
3.246
17.797
11.944
.193
12.563
.479
.600
16.600
1.043
16.377
.987
16.160
.062
14.656
14.844
.656
13.188
.719
18.044
.161
8.727
.273
15.188
1.125
12.095
.635
12.171
.229
18.281
1.875
12.543
1.000
.813
11.406

c Including deaths from diarrhea and enteritis 2 years or over.
^Included in deaths from diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years.




71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
no
111
112
113
114
116
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
181
132
133
134
135
136
137

950

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able IX .—DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION.

Mar­
ginal
number.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69

Cities.

Population Official death Estimated
estimated by rate (not in­ population,
health
cluding still­ Jan. 1,1902.
department.
births).

New York, N. Y .......
Chicago, 111...............
Philadelphia, P a ___
St. Louis, M o ............
Boston, M ass............
Baltimore, M d .........
Cleveland, O hio.......
Buffalo, N. Y ............
San Francisco, C a l..
Cincinnati, O h io ___
Pittsburg, P a ............
New Orleans, L a ___
Detroit, M ich............
Milwaukee, W is.......
Washington, D. C ...
Newark, N. J ............
Jersey City, N. J .......
Louisville, K y..........
Minneapolis, M inn..
Providence. R. I .......
Indianapolis, Ind ...
Kansas City, Mo.......
St. Paul, M inn..........
Rochester, N. Y .......
Denver, C olo............
Toledo, O h io ............
Allegheny, Pa..........
Columbus, O h io.......
Worcester, Mass.......
Syracuse, N. Y ........
New Haven, Conn ..
Paterson, N. J ..........
Fall River, M ass___
St. Joseph, Mo..........
Omaha, Nebr............
Los Angeles, Cal
Memphis, T e n n .......
Scranton, P a ............
Lowell, Mass............
Albany, N. Y ............
Cambridge, Mass___
Portland, Oreg.........
Atlanta, G a ..............
Grand Rapids, Mich
Dayton, O h io ..........
Richmond, Y a .........
Nashville, Tenn.......
Seattle, W ash..........
Hartford, C o n n .......
Reading, Pa..............
Wilmington, D e l___
Camden, N. J ............
Trenton, N. J ............
Bridgeport, Conn ...
Lynn, Mass...............
Oakland, Cal............
Lawrence, Mass.......
New Bedford, Mass..
Des Moines, Iowa ...
Springfield, Mass___
Somerville, Mass___
Troy, N .Y .................
Hoboken, N. J .........
Evansville, I n d .......
Manchester, N. H ...
Utica, N. Y ...............
Peoria, 111.................
Charleston, S. C .......
Savannah, G a..........

3,536,517
3,583,930
20.00
1,758,025
1,800,000
13.88
1,321,408
1,335,000
18.27
598,000
595,000
17.73
573,579
573,579
19.70
518,000
520,000
20.23
390,000
390,000
14.96
365,000
370,000
14.68
360,000
350,000
19.47
336,250
340,000
18.30
333,858
333,500
19.74
305,000
300,000
21.24
305,000
300,000
«13.80
295,000
297,500
12.99
278,880
287,000
21.83
250,000
255,000
19.22
211,177
213,577
19.14
215,000
215,000
16.27
215,000
210,000
11.67
178,000
178,000
19.35
185,000
182,500
13.94
200,000
172,500
13.37
170,000
170,000
10.62
162,608
170,000
*14.67
150,000
d 17.89
140,000
150,000
150,000
11.42
130,000
18.65
133,000
140,000
132,500
11.05
121,064
121,000
16.50
108,374
120,000
*14.25
112,000
112,000
17.63
107,857
107,587
16.76
107,000
107,000
20.03
105,000
103,500
6.40
110,000
9.41
110,000
120,000
/16.14
110,000
110,000
107,500
17.51
102,026
103,000
16.98
94,969
94,969
21.46
100,000
17.59
100,000
94,084
94,084
16.73
100,000
94,000
011.43
135,000
14.30
94,000
90,000
12.67
95,000
90,000
90,000
13.63
100,000
92,000
19.07
81,320
M9.52
81,320
110,000
90,000
7.96
80,000
81,619
14.98
82,000
82,000
16.57
77,000
78,500
18.23
80,000
80,000
16.95
75,000
16.41
75,000
72,000
77,000
17.00
70,000
14.57
70,000
75,000
*13.64
75,000
65,000
65,000
17.20
66,000
66,000
18.73
75,000
70,000
9.87
65,000
14.35
65,000
63,000
13.19
63,500
75,057
22.14
75,057
61,000
18.97
61,000
65,000
11.46
60,200
56,987
19.85
57,687
56,000
18.41
58,000
60,000
13.18
60,000
65,000
26.54
65,000
56,000
62,000
25.66
a Not including 303 deaths occurring outside city limits.
6 Including 303 deaths occurring outside city limits.
cNot including 82 deaths from premature birth.
<*Not including 49 deaths from premature birth.
«N ot including 80 deaths from premature birth.
/N o t including 48 deaths from premature birth.
aNot including 29 deaths from premature birth.

* Not including 81 deaths of nonresidents.
i Not including 25 deaths from premature birth.




Death rate on
basis of esti­
mated popu­
lation, Jan.l,
1902 (not in­
cluding still­
births).
19.73
13.56
18.08
17.82
19.70
20.15
14.96
14.49
20.02
18.10
19.77
21.59
615.04
12.88
21.21
18.85
18.93
16.27
11.95
19.35
14.13
15.50
10.62
14.51
19.51
11.42
18.23
11.68
16.51
13.12
17.63
16.81
20.03
6.49
9.41
18.05
17.92
16.82
21.46
17.59
16.73
12.47
20.54
12.00
13.63
20.73
619.52
9.73
14.68
16.57
17.89
16.95
16.41
15.90
14.57
13.97
17.20
18.73
10.57
14.35
13.09
22.14
18.97
12.38
19.61
17.78
13.18
26.54
23.18

951

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able IX .—DEATH RATE PER 1,000 POPULATION—Concluded.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Salt Lake City, Utah
San Antonio, T ex___
Duluth, Minn............
Erie, P a ....................
Elizabeth, N .J..........
Wilkesbarre, P a .......
Kansas City, Kans...
Harrisburg, P a .........
Portland, M e ............
Yonkers, N . Y ..........
Norfolk, Y a...............
Waterbury, Conn___
Holyoke, Mass..........
Fort Wayne, I n d ___
Youngstown, Ohio ..
Houston, T ex............
Covington. K y..........
Akron, O hio..............
Dallas, T e x ...............
Saginaw, M ic h .........
Lancaster, Pa............
Lincoln, N ebr...........
Brockton, Mass.........
Binghamton, N. Y . . .
Augusta, G a ..............
Pawtucket, R. I .........
Altoona, Pa...............
Wheeling, W. V a ___
Mobile, Ala................
Birmingham, A la___
Little Rock, Ark.......
Springfield, O h io___
Galveston, T e x .........
Tacoma, Wash..........
Haverhill, M ass.......
Spokane, W ash.........
Terre Haute, I n d ___
Dubuque, Iow a.........
Quincy, 111.................
South Bend, Ind.......
Salem, Mass..............
Johnstown, Pa..........
Elmira, N .Y ..............
Allentown, P a..........
Davenport, I o w a ___
McKeesport, Pa.........
Springfield, 111...........
uucxbcu, muss.........
Chester, P a ............
York, Pa.................
Malden, Mass.........
Topeka, Kans.........
Newton, Mass.........
Sioux City, Io w a ..
Bayonne, N .J.........
Knoxville, T enn...
Schenectady, N. Y .
Fitchburg, Mass. . .
Superior, W is.........
Rockford, 111.........
Taunton, Mass.......
Canton, O h io .........
Butte, M o n t..........
Montgomery, A la ..
Auburn, N .Y .........
Chattanooga, Tenn
East St. Louis, H I..
Joliet, 111...............




Death rate on
basis of esti­
Population Official death Estimated mated popu­
estimated by rate (not in­ population, lation, Jan. 1,
cluding still­ Jan. 1,1902. 1902 (not in­
health
births).
department.
cluding still­
births).

uo,om
60,000
54.500
53.500
51,721
60,000
55.000
50,145
50.000
55.000
48,139
45,712
50.000
54,428
50.000
43.500
47.000
65.000
45.000
41,459
43.000
40,063
39,647
40,441
40.630
40.000
38,878
38,469
38,415
40.000
40.000
28.000
50.000
37,175
48.000
40.000
37.500
40.000
41.000
36.000
39.000
36.500
36.000
38.000
36,000s
36.000
34,072
35.000
35.000
33,664
38.000
33,590
40.000
35.000
35.000
39,101
31.631
32.000
35.000
31,036
36.000
40.000
31.000
35.000
35.000
35.000
32.000

«9.01
22.69
12.08
14.88
18.06
14.42
14.30
13.07
17.51
16.16
19.55
b 18.59
19.16
12.62
cl2.88
17.24
24.07
d 9.83
13.42
13.58
14.28
9.44
13.05
19.04
22.68
16.42
15.70
*17.25
24.18
26.24
*19.85
11.45
20.54
*9.48
14.71
9.92
17.43
11.84
/15.83
12.27
17.50
16.85
15.56
14.72
13.95
18.11
17.28
16.93
15.29
13.26
14.44
16.16
12.92
11.15
16.60
16.15
15.50
14.87
14.84
/12.26
18.04
8.00
d ll. 73
12.29
a ll. 94
16.71
12.54
11.41

a Not including 30 deaths from premature birth.
b Including data for township.
* Not including deaths from premature birth.
dNot including 17 deaths from premature birth.
«N ot including 12 deaths from premature birth.
/Inclu d in g stillbirths.
a Not including 8 deaths from premature birth.

58,000
55,500
56,000
55,000
55,000
52,000
54,500
55,000
52,000
51,000
55,000
48,139
47,612
51,000
50,000
50,000
43,500
45,000
50,000
45,000
41,459
42,500
42,500
41,000
41,000
40,630
40,000
40,000
38,800
41,000
41,500
40,000
28,000
40,000
37,175
40,000
40,000
37,500
38,000
42,700
36,250
40,000
36,500
36,000
36,500
37,500
36,000
35,264
35,000
37,000
34,664
34,500
36,336
35,500
35,000
34,500
37,500
32,000
32,000
32,000
31,036
33,000
32,000
31,500
35,000
32,000
35,000
32,000

12.17
22.61
12.95
14.75
17.56
14,35
15.74
13,07
16 88
If. 84
19 55.
& 69
IS..
18,40
12.87
*14,02
17.24
24.07
10.64
17.44
13.58
14.28
9.55
12.31
18.41
22.37
16.42
15.76
17.08
23.97
24.59
*19.13
11.45
20.54
*11.35
14.71
11.90
17.43
11.84
16.03
11.78
17.38
13.43
15.56
14.72
14.52
17.39
17.28
16.36
15.29
12.54
14.02
17.80
11.94
12.56
16.60
16.38
16.16
14.66
14.84
13.19
18.04
8.73
15.19
12.10
12.17
18.28
12.54
11.41

952

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X .—AREA OP PUBLIC PARKS AND MILES OP STREETS, SEWERS, AND STREET
RAILWAYS.
Public parks (acres).
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.
Owned by
city.

New York, N .Y .........
Chicago, 111.................
Philadelphia, P a .......
St. Louis, Mo...............
Boston, M ass..............
Baltimore, M d............
Cleveland, O h io.........
Buffalo, N .Y ...............
San Francisco, Cal___
Cincinnati, Ohio.........
Pittsburg, P a ..............
New Orleans, La.........
Detroit, M ich..............
Milwaukee, W is.........
Washington, D. C .......
Newark, N .J ..............
Jersey City.N. J .........
Louisville, K y ............
Minneapolis, M in n . . .
Providence, R. I .........
Indianapolis, ln d .......
Kansas City, M o.........
St. Paul, M inn............
Rochester, N. Y ..........
Denver, C o lo ..............
Toledo, O h io ..............
Allegheny, P a ............
Columbus, O h io.........
Worcester, Mass.........
Syracuse, N .Y ............
New Haven, Conn___
Paterson, N . J ............
Fall River, Mass.........
St. Joseph, M o ............
Omaha, Nebr..............
Los Angeles, C a l.......
Memphis, T en n .........
Scranton, P a ..............
Lowell, Mass..............
Albany, N. Y ..............
Cambridge, Mass.......
Portland, Oreg..........
Atlanta, G a ...............
Grand Rapids, M ic h .
Dayton, Ohio..............
Richmond, Y a ..........
Nashville, Tenn.........
Seattle, W ash ............
Hartford, Conn..........
Reading, Pa...............
Wilmington, D e l.......
Camden, N. J ............
Trenton, N .J ............ .
Bridgeport, C o n n ___
Lynn, Mass................
Oakland, C al.............

Other.

Miles ol streets payed w ith-

Granite
Wood­ Asphalt
and
Cobble­ and Bricks.
en
stones. belgian
blocks. asphalt
blocks.
blocks.

0.08
21.00
1.00 218.20 449.23
6,837.60
2,185.82
30.84
57.28 737.98
2.29
43.96 360.26 134.81
4,005.96
1.88
32.89
64.87
2,183.39
.22
.87
90.24
2,620.00
(«)
2.34
.01
321.35
32.36
1,284.34
1.50
91.70
1,438.19
9.15
.01
99.84
1.049.00
.06
91.22
20.23
1,197.43 1,607.00
.60
40,00
539.00
47.00
69.00
95.30
39.20
910.00
6.95
220.00
25.93
38.19
522.66
24.85 222.64
85.36
1.14
2.05
1.199.00
3.20
48.45
8.34
503.00
.52
27.69
11.01
.98 3,596.27
4.45
312.50
49.53
12.50
19.99
.05
76.76
22.20
20.00
32.30
17.53
9.11
1.350.00
9.91
10.80
57.31
1.581.01
.42
30.12
4.70
640.00
26.54
15.77
'24*66
1.00
1.235.00
.52
37.85
2.24
J1,896.91
19.81
5.41
1,204.42
.71
7.35
30.87
670.50
2.29
521.00
12.72
26.20
57.67
809.00
27.38
13.37
360.00
16.63
912.00
75.88
8.69
9.48
196.00
.22
.02
11.88
386.89
7.94
274.26
1.71
4.16
5.85
.13
1.100.00
.84
6.70
1.14
96.42
.01
8.28
89.32
1.10
6.16
27.00
592.44
25.15
11.57 *i2.*65
1 3,720.04
1.28
.46
8.35
v 781.81
3.19
6.08 **i.*67
4.82
3.19
100.00
1.51
68.50
16.40
.20
19.87
267.66
30.98
18.35
.15
485.85
6.07
1.08
(«)
1.70
4.20
206.02
.90
.30
««155.00
2.00
50.71
5.04
10.43
.76
• 134.38
1.58
8.00
12.66
12.00
25.00
* 376.00
.10
3.64
8.40
2.34
682.40
.18
470.00
3.17
14.44
1,040.00
.57
.75
4.00
197.79
10.84
10.99
269.68
13.08
9.05
4.50
10.80
1.82
.55
63.55
6.00
7.78
288.63
1.24
1.45
2,463.75
3.50
.13
182.00
& 00

a Not reported.
b Including 22 miles o f road outside city limits.
c Including 31 miles of-road outside city limits.
d Including road outside city limits, mileage not reported,
e Including 14.05 miles of road outside city limits.
/In clu d in g 98 miles of road outside city limits.
a Including 7.78 miles of road outside city limits.
^Including 223.80 miles o f road outside city limits.
i Including 105.14 miles of road outside city limits.
/In clu d in g 65.97 miles of road outside city limits,
fcIncluding 19.50 miles of road outside city limits.
i Including 1,350 acres outside city limits,
m Including 9.34 miles of road outside city limits.
« Including 23.63 miles of road outside city limits,
o Including 21.94 miles o f road outside city limits.
1?Not including road outside city limits.
q Including 8 miles of road outside city limits.
r Including 80 miles of road outside city limits.
* Including 34.99 miles of road outside city limits.




298.71
109.18
321.27
12.47
19.17
17.00
12.61
224.91
82.70
26.50
92.47
26.27
24.39
17.55
140.97
47.25
14.83
18.85
13.04
4.61
43.59
106.77
17.40
45.87
19.41
25.28
27.67
17.82
.44
30.95
3.27
3.35
.13
7.6
33.92
12.02
11.80
2.20
9.53
3.13
3.29
6.87
17.42
.50
6.53
8.66
6.25
.26
17.09
3.30
1.49
6.50

953

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able X .—AREA OF PUBLIC PARKS AND MILES OF STREETS, SEWERS, AND STREET
RAILWAYS.
Miles of streets payed
with—
Total Miles of
All
other miles of streets
un­
streets
Mac­
kinds paved. paved. Brick.
adam. Gravel. of
pave­
ment.
760.34
403.95
226.12
249.53
295.26
.86
.73
3.51
176.42
192.00
10.32
12.73
237.73
45.88
10.80
17.33
77.65
8.16
150.46
4.04
37.70
11.58
25.26
5.57
15.29
5.62
39.44
62.57
61.98
30.00
33.00
1.92
4.10
.46
19.90
3.17
41.65
43.90
3.00
5.87
6.50
189.95
1.65
79.64
51.75
17.68
1.72
5.50
75.00
48.45
145.00

17.86

81.85
5.00

4.00
45.35
15.00
1.05
36.72
114.00
15.29

90.86

55.00
211.59
54.34

73.79
50.62
134.37
160.00
60.00

Miles of sewers.

Tile. . OtheA

Street railways.

Total.

MilesLof
track.

Mar­
Num­ ginal
ber of num­
em­
ber.
ploy­
ees.

1,765.42
761.99
1,543.32 1,236.68 25,692
4.88 1,346.40 2,816.71 58&?00 8W?00 ' $ 8 6
1,500.86 1,030.00 10,386
1,126.69
40.27
919.12 &480.00
413.31 919.12
7,381
93.74
445.38
12.30
432.66 228.44 263.47
4,982
c 321.00
(a)
(a)
8.60
496.90
90.45
O/O. xo
213.68
5,000
(«)
378.92
3.90
61.30
9.16
28.60
41.66 d 353.00
2,670
198.84
92.30
76.63
1.25
374.16 229.05
306.93 e 218.05
1,919
337.42
300.00 140.16 280.91
421.07 / 293.00
1,788'
23.00
370.63
383.00 110.97 175.90
309.87 0258.76
3,161
391.00
12.00
6.00
234.00
52.28 168.00
226.28
208.00
2,200
250.04
12.75
172.41
130.00 42.09 253.06
295.15
1,955
204.77
63.08
495.23
175.90
1,991
2.20
290.00
276.03 347.61 160.29
507.90 h 379.45
2,235
315.27
207.98 100.78 239.70
340.48 i 219.97
2,437
241.07
90.21 328.18
79.11
418.39 j 208.51
1,798
94.12
124.53
64.94 119.55
184.49
89.68
1,500
108.97
92.76
66.04
42.23
108.27
61.37
675
(a)
(a)
166.65
10.16
59.50
99.45
817
122.00
(«)
686.34
31.11
3.89
92.72
37.74
103.11
161.57 *131.00
984
.47
227.50
13.28 125.10
67.50
192.60
1,850
81.00
48.00
203.94
215.00
108.00
60.00
110.00
870
254.92
185.08
44.25 134.50
178.75 m 139.50
1,300
375.00
31.21 123.44
20.66
68.66
14.46
175.31 n 127.23
734
88.32
126.33
195.91
8.46 131.98
228.76 ol05.60
799
30.53
844.00
3.26
9.91 250.00
259.91
827
144.03
37.42
137.06
234.24 126.81
.05
164.28
782
102.00
70.62
85.05
91.60
.40
26.36
97.38
472
J>52.04
199.24
78.28
69.22
117.49
147.50
a90.00
503
142.86
35.42 118.69
42.61
3.38
157.49 r 140.00
1,000
32.05
61.36
40.60
246.00
89.28
182.69
8 99.72
570
.41
127.42
43.81
15.22
76.39
40.03
99.06
55.00
425
51.06
67.34
139.62
3.33
21.75
72.81
49.19
110
94.02
37.06
40.97
19.79
1.28
58.13
39.24
225
49.70
48.41
'".'50*
11.50
1.25
93.00
62.45
40.00
250
85.21
99.36
296.69 31.19
130.55
2 71.70
615
7.84
237.29
315.00
8.00 154.90
162.90 u 285.50
1,710
74.22
153.34
.13
1.37 168.84
.75
170.96 to 100.80
350
21.32
164.84
60.70
2.97
63.67
*76.66
589
86.04
.16
37.86
40.00
45.61
85.61
V 69.71
350
81.90
45.76
52.00
17.51
27.95
91.22
27.55
700
122.74
36.42
70.00
5.11
111.53
39.22
952
122.05
17.60
12.73
87.67
.36
/O. 9 0
100.76 * 119.00
570
79.62
137.00
4.09
63.39
14.01
93.63 bb 145.00
1,350
163.87
119.93
.53
23.48 108.94
1.73
134.15 cc 52.97
350
191.66
.75
40.00
21.00 107.00
128.75
72.00
543
92.10
25.00
28.30
27.00
3.00
55.00 bb 118.00
940
37.38
1.40
14.83
4.21
197.33
90.48
56.42 <**64.00
350
(a)
(a)
12.00
23.53
116.50
73.90 cc 90.00
512
39.86
88.87
30.61
52.00
1.00
92.86 / / 76.51
315
62.42
10.00
72.58
70.56
185
(«)
33.00
(«)
(«)
(a)
(a)
39.02
54.28
1.43
(a)
0066.50 **62.00
233
.50
56.74
112.18
16.26
51.20
51.70 **67.00
428
23.61
.48
12.00 25.00
101.39
7.00
44.00 j j 39.30
260
5.10
64.90
79.18
69.28
70.00 **90.40
455
62.92
52.08
18.75
41.10
59.85
41.90
240
178.00
151.50
85.00
178.00 ** 130.00
700
t Including 3,015 acres outside city limits.
u Including 128.50 miles of road outside city limits.
v Including 594.81 acres outside city limits.
w Including 30 miles of road outside city limits.
* Including 43.16 miles of road outside city limits.
v Including 32 miles of road outside city limits.
* Including 35 miles of road outside city limits.
a a Including 6 acres outside city limits.
bb Including 25 miles of road outside city limits.
cc Including 6.04 miles of road outside city limits.
d d Including 17 miles of road outside city limits.
ee Including 7 miles of road outside city limits.
//In clu d in g 41.51 miles of road outside city limits.
00 Including 7.34 miles of private sewers used by city.
** Including 28.64 miles of road outside city limits.
4i Including 28 miles of road outside city limits.
J j Including 15 miles of road outside city limits.
** Including 54.70 miles of road outside city limits,
zt Including 70 miles of road outside city limits.




1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56

954

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X .—AREA OF PUBLIC PARKS AND MILES OF STREETS, SEWERS, AND STREET
RAILWAYS—Continued.
Miles of streets paved with—

Public parks (acres).
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
' 69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

Lawrence, Mass.........................
New Bedford, Mass _ ..............
Des Moines, I o w a ......................
Springfield, Mass........................
Srmnerville, Mass.......................
Troy, N. Y ...................................
Hoboken, N. J ...........................
Evansville, I n d .........................
Manchester, N. H ......................
Utica, N. Y ..................................
Peoria, 111...................................
Charleston, S. C .........................
Savannah, Gar.............................
Salt Lake City, U tah.................
San Antonio, T ex.......................
Duluth, M in n ............................
Erie, Pa........................................
Elizabeth, N. J.............................
Wilkesbarre, P a .........................
Kansas City, Kans......................
Harrisburg, P a ...........................
Portland, M e ..............................
Yonkers, N. Y .............................
Norfolk, V a..................................
Waterbury, Conn........................
Holyoke, Mass.............................
Fort Wayne, I n d ........................
Youngstown, Ohio......................
Houston, T ex..............................
Covington, K y .............................
Akron, Ohio................................
Dallas, T e x ..................................
Saginaw, M ich ...........................
Lancaster, Pa..............................
Lincoln, N eb r.............................
Brockton, Mass...........................
Binghamton, N. Y ......................
Augusta, G a ................................
Pawtucket, R. I ...........................
Altoona. Pa..................................
Wheeling. W .V a ........................
Mobile, A la..................................
Birmingham, Ala........................
Little Rock, Ark.........................
Springfield, O h io........................
Galveston, T e x ...........................
Tacoma, Wash.............................
Haverhill, M ass.........................
Spokane, W ash...........................
Terre Haute, I n d ........................
Dubuque, Iowa...........................
Quincy, 111..................................
South Bend, Ind.........................
Salem, Mass................................

Owned by
city.

129.33
.255.00
521.48
490.03
52.10
26.00
9.00
129.67
153.00
15.00
350.00
j 468.65
72.35
110.00
327.47
290.00
10.37
20.42
39.26
14.30
42.21
113.00
11.00
95.00
88.31
23.71
95.74
46.30
14.13

Other.

0.75
15.13

30.51
5.80
20.00
34.66
217.66
25.00
698.00
258.30
48.25
20.00
4.35
106.56
25.67
61.00

3.15
4.42

4.69

2.40
5.90
25.71
17.00

7.70
.70
115.00

5.73

(d)

.15
.25
2.80
.82
4.45
7.81

6.93
.11
7.59
16.00

.92
6.80
.25
.71
.08

96.00
13.00
61.89
10.00
1.50
100.50
23.00
238.00

Asphalt
Granite
Cobble­ and Bricks. Wood­ and
en
stones. belgian
blocks. asphalt
blocks.
blocks.

.39

25.00
40.00
.13
6.00

16.10
1.70
.25
9.96
2.42
9.60
2.25
2.50
.38
.21

1.25
1.40
8.43
1.20
5.73
.94

3.60

42.66
46.00
94.23

.73

2.01
.75
.57

35.00

hh42.20

2.61
6.03
.33
16.66
2.07
(*>)

.79
.13

14.66

Including 10 miles of road outside city limits.
&Not reported.
c Including 34.24 miles of road outside city limits
d Included in unpaved streets.
cNot including cobblestones and gravel.
/In clu d in g cobblestones and gravel.
g Including 128.22 miles of road outside city limits.
h Including 18.63 miles of road outside city limits.
i Including 16 miles of road outside city limits.
3 Including 442 acres outside city limits.
Jc Including 12 miles of road outside city limits.
l Including 2.50 miles of road outside city limits.
m , Including 8 miles of road outside city limits.
n Including 6 miles of road outside city limits.
©Including 272.46 miles of road outside city limits.
p Including 58 miles of road outside city limits.
q Including 3.60 miles of road outside city limits.
» Including 28 miles o f road outside city limits.
•
« Including 5 miles of road outside city limits.
t Including 40.15 miles of road outside city limits.
a




60.88
3.37
.11
8.74

0.25
.09

24.55
.37
24.10
.12
3.28
.08
.97
9.24
.47
8.00
31.08
.54
.63
2.20
1.33
1.46
13.87
2.50
7.32
.70
16.52
.62
5.68
3.50
14.49
3.38
.57
.14
1.04
23.00
.25
1.64
2.10
6.99
.25
.60
.50
4.42
5.00
22.25
20.80

2.60
20.07
5.71
2.14

9.13
3.36
11.56
15.22
4.53

0.33
.48
1.57
.44
3.10
4.64
4.80
2.12
2.19
34.21
8.85
.73
5.72

Slo
11.57
1.85
8.38
11.21
3.99
6.07
8.60
.27
.76
10.16
9.03
3.60
3.34
2.42
2.43
6.82
1.00
1.59
5.03
.87
.06
6.49

2.50
.02
8.00
2.00
.25
.05
.91

.10
.50
1.64
5.50
3.64
3.93
1.70

955

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

Table X .—AREA OF PUBLIC PARKS AND MILES OF STREETS, SEWERS, AND STREET
RAILWAYS—Continued.
Miles of streets payed
with—

Miles of sewers.

Total Miles of
All
other miles of streets
streets
un­
Mac­
kinds paved. paved. Brick.
adam. Gravel.
of
pave­
ment.
19.50
58.64
.15
39.30
20.00
3.00
.10
4.00
15.63
.24
.96
2.50
70.42
23.61

38.14
58.00
85.00
10.00
(d)

3.00

6.79
3.24
55.72

.66

15.37
3.43
31.60
8.66
55.50
4.59
3.57
5.43
1.55
28.80
3.00
20.00
6.83
27.00

2.16
8.87

11.00
32.57
5.88
2.70

.52
1.50
8.31
24.00

12.85

66.54

.18

18.64
15.20
1.30
6.70
1.00
46.96
9.11
13.21
.06

8.30
61.44
.50
3.00
1.50

.37
.12

7.50
85.45
11.48

5.00

54.75
41.84
4.80

4.50
10.20

15.00
51.90

37.75 **42.00

.08

Tile.

Other.

61.12
136.67
62.85
130.60
43.80
c 42.09
21.90
33.82
20.68
43.65
35.06
33.41
30.99
4.50
76.00

Street railways.

Total.

54.85
35.35
30.88
19.50
64.41
(b )
(b )
(■ )
b
47.62
68.94
21.32
450.00
31.22
40.80
96.40
13.00
24.38
80.08
30.00
23.00
50.08
49.14
/ 57.91
(*>)
(*>)
(*)
2.00
14.00
8.90
12.00
12.50
22.50
97.00
10.00
56.94
6.00
162.73
8.97
71.91
43.45
77.37
64.00
27.47
6.45
50.60
70.80
115.00
20.20
33.44
56.98
23.54
35.04
55.91
68.51
115.18
12.60
31.00
38.00
7.00
275.00
60.50
72.00
348.00
11.50
56.95
47.57
10 1.10
9.38
210.46
56.32
44.89
27.74
77.90
11.43
46.62
59.74
40.27
55.48
13.12
86.32
25.67
67.25
2.14
84.18
19.52
30.75
48.11
111.89
11.23
19.27
25.00
38.30
36.13
19.03
2.91
39.96
58.39
19.54
100.46
15.52
11.26
22.19
37.16
42.44
64.62
3.70
46.00
46.00
44.80
38.20
31.35
.36
36.22
4.51
8.69
39.50
17.74
1.61
13.02
32.37
41.57
35.25
47.37
15.94
33.24
63.31
175.25
19.22
102.14
35.22
17.86
16.00
28.85
.44
21.92
173.82
3.41
32.70
32.84
24.00
10.00
(b)
(*>)
(b)
2.69
129.12
52.37
59.79
23.44
4.73
56.08
125.29
52.53
37.31
3.55
41.41
.10
62.69
167.86
21.18
43.25
17.50
27.50
56.75
51.00
10.00
41.32
38.50
2.82
22.01
150.00
25.50
22.50
88.00
20.00
3.00
27.04
35.59
8.41
8.55
116.59
45.83
20.50
25.33
29.95
60.08
38.96
46.68
7.72
52.39
82.69
33.32
46.81
13.49
10.40
76.33
30.80
34.00
3.20
31.20
38.70
67.70
67.70
10.25
90.00
53.07
65.06
50.71
115.17
11.99
17.88
17.88
66.71
171.79
8.94
54.74
2.87
11.81
63.13
5.85
8.11
2.26
12.81
130.19
69.55
.25
69.30
19.24
110.87
29.80
36.60
11.10
135.00
6.80
15.00
255.00
15.00
21.00
60.21
190.00
8.00
30.00
38.00
200.00
30.46
.34
34.80
4.00
91.29
56.87
5.82
20.98
26.80
33.73
94.10
19.97
30.35
10.38
25.85
35.03
40.03
1.00
**95.45
(» )
« Including 74.86 miles of road outside city limits.
v Including 0.25 mile of road outside city limits.
w including 37.70 miles of road outside city limits.
* Including 66.62 miles of road outside city limits.
y Including 3.64 miles of road outside city limits.
* Including 9.90 miles of road outside city limits.
cmIncluding 16.50 miles of road outside city limits.
b b Including 9.08 miles of road outside city limits.
cc Including 40.09 miles of road outside city limits.
< Including l i miles of road outside city limits.
**
e e including 47 miles of road outside city limits.
//In clu d in g 1 mile of road outside city limits.
g g Including 8.10 miles of road outside city limits.
M including 40 acres outside city limits.
4i Including 3.67 miles of road outside city limits.
J J Including 35.04 miles of road outside city limits.
** Including unpaved streets.
1 1 Included in streets paved with gravel.




4.66

Miles of
track.

a 24.26
21.43
42.43
c 73.63
29.48
26.20
0 140.56
24.66
34.50
*29.97
*56.00
*40.00
54.00
81.00
1 4 5.17
m42.49
«28.00
o301.11
J>80.00
340.00
r51.00
29.84
* 26.77
29.00
10.00
17.40
*63.00
«101.92
o39.00
w 51.70
*95.25
#40.34
*34.10
13.55
<*40.00
35.00
<< 41.69
**
b b 21.61
23.52
15.25
00 53.73
<**36.00
oc97.80
//22.00
38.70
35.35
67.00
9 9 29.70
35.00
16.60
i i 20.50
17.00
JJ50.00
18.50

Mar­
Num­ ginal
ber of nu m ­
em­
ber.
ploy­
ees.
136
180
375
460
500
500
1,500
170
130
258
247
180
275
285
225
278
140
2,720
400
375
200
200
170
250
142
200
475
242
175
431
450
227
175
61
140
225
250
258
105
155
310
264
750
150
294
170
400
118
131
160
120
129
140
126

57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

956

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X .—AREA OP PUBLIC PARKS AND MILES OP STREETS, SEWERS, AND STREET
RAILWAYS—Concluded.
Public parks (acres).
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

in
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.
Owned by
city.

Johnstown, P a ...........................
Elmira, N .Y ................................
Allentown, P a ...........................
Davenport, Iowa.........................
McKeesDort. P a .........................
sp rin ^ e id iu : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :
Chelsea, Mass..............................
Chester, P a ..................................
York, Pa......................................
Malden, Mass..............................
Topeka, K a n s.............................
Newton. M ass.............................
Sioux City, I o w a ........................
Bayonne, N. J .............................
Knoxville, T e n n ........................
fifthenectady, N. Y ......................
Fitchburg, Mass.........................
Superior, Wis...............................
Rockford, 111..............................
Taunton, Mass.............................
Canton, O h io..............................
Butte, M on t................................
Montgomery, Ala........................
Auburn, N. Y ..............................
Chattanooga, Tenn....................
East St. Louis, 111........................
Joliet, 111.....................................

23.00
99.69
3.00
46.00
8.50
33.00
34.00
81.84
18.00
49.80
102.91
160.00
25.70
15.00
1.00
3.00
121.60
22.80
8.00
7.50
136.00
50.00
.75
P14.00
6.00
s80.00

Other.

Miles of streets paved with—

Granite
Wood­ Asphalt
and
Cobble­ and Bricks.
en
stones. belgian
blocks. asphalt
blocks.
blocks.

8.50
1.28
5.63
7.30
1.00
30.32
60.30
33.50
119.00
300.00
5.00
30.00

1.19

2.37
4.19
.52
2.39

e




1.93
1.14
5.00
5.86
1.00

2.20
3.70
.48

1.00
3.92

.10

3.71
2.30
2.21
.60
2.21
2.00

12.92

.88

6.27

3.80

Including 4 miles of road outside city limits.
Including 4.50 miles of road outside city limits.
Including 113.70 miles of road outside city limits.
d Including 31 miles of road outside city limits.
«N ot including road outside city limits.
/N o t reported.
a Including 18 miles of road outside city limits.
h Including 8 miles of road outside city limits.
i Including 17.16 miles of road outside city limits,
i Including 7 miles of road outside city limits.
a
b

9.01
2.95
.31
23.00
13.93
23.76
.25
2.73
2.25

6.59

4.80
1.60

3.00
3.55
1.85

14.45
33.82
.03

1.98

17.10
4.65
1.00
3.98
18.00
3.29

.05
3.53
.61

3.61

957

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X .—AREA OF PUBLIC PARKS AND MILES OF STREETS, SEWERS, AND STREET
RAILWAYS—Concluded.
Miles of streets paved
with—

Miles of sewers.

Total Miles of
All
other miles of streets
streets
un­
Mac­
kinds paved. paved. Brick.
adam. Gravel. of
pave­
ment.
0.33
5.16
10.73
20.62
.58
6.20’
3.00
15.00
5.00
.44
71.01
.24
9.20
59.00
2.40
7.09
31.75
(/)
.20

46.68

22.70

3.14

43.00
79.20
1.57
.50

9.00

(/)
30.00
5.72

45.00
2.95
4.00
18.28

7.77
1.00

.51

17.84
58.00
12.18
43.62
19.56
29.34
31.52
20.11
18.25
48.52
22.90
159.21
17.00
13.50
62.00
25.10
11.49
33.82
35.61
m3.81
47.30
2.30
12.58
46.65
20.95
25.00
25.79

48.10
62.16
80.00
84.00
102.00
85.00
(/)
54.99
47.75
49.00
170.00
38.59
612.00
64.10
54.00
32.00
118.59
62.07
94.65
170.00
39.00
42.00
30.25
35.35
59.05
65.00
46.61

1.62
6.39
3.74
3.74
3.02
43.18
10.00
24.68
.75
(/)
4.91
13.05
3.31
10.30
2.30
4.37
20.75
8.35
12.47
77
(/)
9.61
.50

21.

Tile.

22.89
24.79
32.80
21.21
4.05
24.00
3.98
3.50
(/)
49.17
78.03
44.97
16.00
22.70
41.50
26.94
27.44
25.60
13.09
19.76
18.21
38.40

Other.

6.00
2.36
.75

(0
.62
1.10
.20
.13

2.45
(/)

25.50
18.00

5.66

Street railways.

Total.

24.51
37.18
6.10
37.29
24.23
47.23
34.00
28.66
4.25
44.60
54.08
91.08
48.90
27.40
25.20
41.50
31.31
48.32
25.60
21.44
32.23
20.66
60.17
62.50
36.65
26.00
23.00

fc Including 24 miles of road outside city limits.
* Including 14 miles of road outside city limits.
Not including macadam and gravel, not reported.
n Including 6 miles of road outside city limits.
o Including 2.50 miles of road outside city limits.
p Including 12 acres outside city limits.
a Including 50 miles of road outside city limits.
r Including 53 miles of road outside city limits,
s Owned by city, outside city limits.
t Including 25 miles of road outside city limits.

m

9398— N o. 42— 02------ 6




Miles of
tracK.

a 23.10
625.50
126.99
<*55.00
e 14.25
32.00
11.17
17.00
g 29.25
13.75
6 28.50
*43.36
42.00
10.31
i2 5 .00
*35.00
16.00
26.50
*36.00
43.48
0 28.00
«2 5.00
«1 9.00
<>13.44
367.00
r72.60
*45.00

c

Mar­
Num­ ginal
ber of num­
ber.
em­
ploy­
ees.
100
150
633
180
190
140
150
100
70
230
102
325
165
100
115
250
125
94
82
124
150
121
92
60
359
347
170

I ll
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

958

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X I.—CARE OF STREETS, FOOD AND SANITARY INSPECTION, AND DISPOSAL OF
GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE.

Inspectors.

Streets.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Square yards swept
per week.
Swept
hand
or ma­
chine.
By city.

Average
persons
employed
in sweep­
ing, sprink­
ling, etc. Food. Sanitary.

By
By con­ _
By contractors. city. tract-

T
Ashes, garbage,
and other
refuse.

Tons of ashes
disposed of.

By city.

By
contractors.

36
318 2,344,000
New York. N . Y ......... Both.. 154,684,828 9,659,500 4,358 «35
15
800
31
(d)
9b
47
469,213
56,847,000
Philadelphia, P a ....... B oth..
865
41
225
1
200
Hand. 22.500.000
St. Louis, Mo...............
(*)
(*)
2
Boston, M ass.............. B oth.. 10.500.000
425 <138
21 346,265 16,000
30 100,643 98,000
5
271
6 Baltimore, M d............ B oth .. 5,027,922 6,027,922
13
3
20
225
7 Cleveland, O h io......... Both.. 1,500,000
(h)
m5
1
75
i25
30,513 7
(9,}334
8 Buffalo, N .Y ............... Both.. 3,611,951 11,030,448
(h)
7
5
5,944,673
220
9 San Francisco, Cal___ Both..
(*
15
24
87,000
267
10 Cincinnati, Ohio......... Both.. 6.250.000
3
425
"(h ) '
18
11 Pittsburg, P a .............. B oth.. 9.500.000
(*)
24
15
12 New Orleans, La......... Hand. 3,009,633
ol75
w
4
60,000
20
3318
13 Detroit, M ich.............. B oth.. 8.068.000
4
425
12 140,000
14 Milwaukee, W is......... Both.. 2,307,873
115
3
17
s 14,267
208
15 Washington, D. C ....... Both.. 7,957,020 4,824,837
21
1
16 Newark, N .J .............. B oth.. 2,191,030
300
(t)
’i,*566*666
100 ( 0
17 Jersey City, N .J ......... Both..
(3
(d )
136
K ; 3
18 Louisville, K y ............ B oth.. 2,2 0 0 ,0 0 0
(h )
2
412
8
19 Minneapolis, Minn .. . Both.. 9,023,076
(h)
1
1
87
20 Providence, R. I ......... Both.. 1,651,017
(h)
1
8
21 Indianapolis, Ind....... Both..
2,573,888
137
(h)
2
8
22 Kansas City, M o......... Both.. 11,960,000
95
2
1,503
62
80
7
23 St. Paul, M in n ............ Both.. v 3,227,000
680,000
2
99,790
150
90
5
24 Rochester, N. Y .......... Both.. 4,083,500
(h )
1
8
25 Denver, C o lo .............. Both.. 2,938,640
86
\h)
2
12
150
26 Toledo, Ohio............... Both.. 2,536,160
1
6
60
27 Allegheny, P a ............ Both.. 3.250.000
(h)
1
£8
C
103
28 Columbus, O h io ......... Both.. 4.100.000
(h)
2
5
V 797,500
40
30
29 Worcester, M ass......... Both..
(h)
51,700
*41
3
i 135
1
30 Syracuse, N. Y ............ Both.. 4,120,671
4
625,979
7
31 New Haven, Conn___ Both..
46
7*f
<*}
1,000
32 Paterson, N .J.............. Both..
600,000
120
1,050
1
415.000
30
33 Fall River, Mass......... Both..
27
34 St. Joseph, M o ............ Hand.
330.000
1
(*)
(h)
30
2
35 Omaha, N ebr.............. Both.. 1,548,518
1
’W
6
2,800
2,025,870
65
135
3
36 Los Angeles, C a l....... Both..
(/)
27,413
750.000
43 aa 9
3
13
37 Memphis, T e n n ......... M ach.
6&62
2
1
38 Scranton, P a .............. Hand. 1,048,451
(h)
"(h)"
24,842
4
325.000
75
1
39 Lowell, Mass.............. Both..
4
26
1
65
40 Albany, N. Y .............. Both.. 1.500.000
"(h )"
41 aa 46
1
3 i^OOO
41 Cambridge, Mass....... Mach.
725.000
2
56
42 Portland, Oreg.......... Both.. 1,789,600
"(h )"
(h)
2
6
24
43 Atlanta, G a ............... Mach. 1.710.000
If)
8
44 Grand Rapids, M ich.. Both.. 1, 0 00,000
ol00
2
lh)
"(h )"
21,483
1
*3
39
45 Dayton, Ohio............. Hand. 1,623,840
4
5,000
46 Richmond, V a .......... Both.. 5,432,220
65
dd 95
28,175
3
6
47 Nashville, Tenn......... Both..
683,600
aNot including 60 persons employed by New York Street Sprinkling Association and 60 other per­
sons who sprinkle streets by contract with adjoining property owners.
b Including 30,000 tons removed under permit without cost to city.
cNot including 80 persons who remove garbage under permit without cost to city.
d Included in garbage.
e Including ashes.
/ Not reported
9 Not including 4 State inspectors.
h Disposed of by householders.
i Employed in sweeping only.
JTons not reported, 19,734 dead animals.
h Employed for 5 months only.
l Employed for 7 months only.
m Not including 2 for 5 months and 5 plumbing inspectors.
nTons not reported; 5,965 dead animals.
o Sprinkling done by private persons.
//Including ashes and dead animals and other refuse,
a Including persons employed in removal of ashes.

1

2 Chicago, 111................. Both.. 10,000,000

3
4
5




959*

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X I.—CARE OP STREETS, FOOD AND SANITARY INSPECTION, AND DISPOSAL OF
GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE.

Ashes, garbage, and other refuse.

Tons sold.
By
By con­
city. tract­
ors.

Tons burned. Tons otherwise Tons sold.
disposed of.
1 By
By 1 concity. , tractj ors.
7,639

By
city.

(A)

P

!
1,751

P

(A)

(A)

(A)

(A)

(*)

(A)

(A)

</)
(*)

11,280
10,389

('0
(*)

18

18
20,124

iof&oo

(A)

165,642 b 105,000 1,114 c 644
18,000 6,523
500
(/)
(A
(/)
(/)
(/)
89
%
17,600
61,235
168
6,500
640
75
19,000 14,034
*>179 1 191
21,200 42,300
U)
125
30,320
123
67
8,500 17,500
123
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
64,000 %
%
5,000
1,500
40
53,777
151
0d )
350 (r)
18,497
45
135
225
30,359
9,816
24,769
463
148
e749,955
55,000
126
60
«30,000
00
88
90,666
(«*)
3
(A)
n,ooo
64
14,964
104
18,876
50
12,800
20
1,145
32
5,405
50
150
(/)
(>)
240
2
(A)
W 10,950
18
(<*)
9,000 .......
290
31
275
26
24
9,828
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
(A)
90
9,920
64
5,720
16
(>)
750
75
32
1
3,744
31
20
$00
2
200
2
14
(/)
(/)
(/)
(/)
1^992 (/)296
30
75
3
(cc)
5
445
42
65
2
(A)
(A)
37
(/)
(f)
(/)
(/)
(/)
(/)
ccl44
2
135
120
198
cc22
6
48
34
3
100
34
4, ioi
750 (r)
is

(%
<*)

18

4,500

<*)

ccl4,180
40,208
ccl3,624
14,290
2,500

(/)

S3

| (A)
|

$

(8

(8

18

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

By
By
con­
By con­
tract­ city. tract­
ors.
ors.

2,313 225,770

17,000j 30,724
i
(A)
4,603
45,000

Tons
burned.

By
By
By
con­ By con­ By con­ By
tract­ city. tract­ city. tract­ city.
ors.
ors.
ors.

e 666,960

252,238

(A)

Average
persons
employed
in removal
of ashes,
Tons other­
garbage,
wise disposed and other
of.
refuse.

Dead animals and other refuse.

Garbage.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

Included in persons employed in sweeping, sprinkling, etc.
s For 11 months; disposed of by householders 1 month.
t Six, each acting as both food and sanitary inspector.
n Tons not reported; 1,755 dead animals.
v For 7 months; no sweeping for 5 months.
w Including dead animals and other refuse.
* Policemen act as sanitarv inspectors.
v For 8 months; no sweeping for 4 months.
* Employed in sprinkling and flushing streets.
o a Emploved in sprinkling only.
b b No sprinkling done; streets flushed with hose.
c c Removed by householders; burned by city.
^ In clu d in g persons employed in removing garbage, but not including chain gang, which averaged
27 persons.
r




960

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X I.-C A R E OF STREETS, FOOD AND SANITARY INSPECTION, AND DISPOSAL OF
GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE—Continued.

Inspectors.

Streets.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Seattle, W ash ..........
Hartford, C o n n .......
Reading, Pa..............
Wilmington, D e l___
Camden, N. J ..........
Trenton, N. J ............
Bridgeport, Conn___
Lynn, Mass...............
Oakland, Cal............
Lawrence, Mass.......
New Bedford, Mass..
Des Moines, I o w a _
_
Springfield, Mass___
Somerville, Mass___
Troy, N .Y .................
Hoboken, N. J ..........
Evansville, I n d .......
Manchester, N. H . . .
Utica, N. Y ...............
Peoria, 111.................
Charleston, S. C .......
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah
San Antonio,Tex . ..
Duluth, M in n ..........
Erie, Pa......................
Elizabeth, N .J..........
Wilkesbarre, P a .......
Kansas City, Kans...
Harrisburg, P a .........
Portland, Me. (<) —
Yonkers, N . Y ..........
Norfolk, Va...............
Waterbury, Conn___
Holyoke, Mass..........
Fort Wayne, I n d ___
Youngstown, O h io ..
Houston, T ex............
Covington, K y..........
Akron, O hio..............
Dallas, T e x ...............
Saginaw, M ic h .........
Lancaster, Pa............
Lincoln, N e b r..........
Brockton, Mass.........
Binghamton, N. Y . ..
Augusta, G a ..............
Pawtucket, R. I .........

Average
persons
Square yards swept employed
Tons of ashes
per week.
in sweep­
disposed of.
Swept
ing, sprink­
by
ling, etc. Food. Sani­
hand
tary.
or ma­
chine.
By
By
con­
con­
By city. By con­ By tract­
By city. tract­
tractors. city.
ors.
ors.
Mach
2,420,437
Both.
945,058
Hand.
Both.. 1,234,873
403,333
Both..
Both.. 1 , 000,000
375.000
Both..
352.000
Both..
Mach.
150,000
100,000
Both..
145.000
Both..
Both.. J 1,229,787
Both.. 1,133,793
350.000
Both..
Both.. 4,446,000
944.000
Both..
Both
670,000
Both..
125,000
Both
3,209,680
Both.. 1.300.000
B oth..
677,310
B oth.. 3,929,111
Mach.
539.000
645,372
B oth..
Both..
1400.000
Both..
450.000
Both..
200.000

10

45
43
22
i 30
35
25
j 30
33
34
270
45

599,188
196,096
1, 200,000

930.000
151,492
959,473
387,200
290.000
0,000

(*)

(«).

2

26
14

28
51
20
110
18
25
28
30
(r )

(r)25
14
26
42
40
22
40
20
50
V 3
27

2

2
3

20

(r)

Botli.
B oth..
B oth..
Hand
Both..
Both..
Both..
Both.
Both..
<*>_
Hand.
Hand
Both.
Both.
Both..
Hand
Hand.
Both
Both
Both..

4
3
1
4
3
/4

51
37
16
30

1
3
1
2
4
2
1
2
2
8
4
6
1
fl 4
5
5
3
1
s 7
2
1
4
4
1
1
4
to4
6
4

200,000

430.000
1,650,000
120.000
712,752
762,000
963,475

23
35
9
& 10
&
24
30
4
153,630
25

a Not reported.
b Disposed of by householders.
0 Collected by contractor; burned by city.
d Removed under permit without cost to city.
eOne State inspector.
/In clu d in g health officer who also acts as sanitary Inspector.
0 For 7 months only.
h For 5 months only.
1 Employed in sprinkling only.
J For 7 months; no sweeping for 5 months.
* Removed by householders; burned by city.
l Included in garbage otherwise disposed of.
m Including dead animals and other refuse.
n Including ashes and dead animals and other refuse.




Ashes, garbage,
and other
refuse.

2
1
2
1
2

5
1

(*)
(»)
27.000
15.000
17,200
I^OOO
$2
13.000
8,500

33,500
(*)
3,500
( 6)

()
b
8
10,000

15,000
(*>)
925
! b)
b)
o)
b)
b)
b)
(*>)

(o)

8
(*>)
(6)

1

961

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able X I.—CARE OF STREETS, FOOD AND SANITARY INSPECTION, AND DISPOSAL OF
GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE—Continued.

Ashes, garbage, and other refuse.

Tons sold. Tons burned. Tons otherwise Tons sold.
disposed of.
By
By con­ By
city. tract­ city.
ors.
(*)

(*)

(*)
O7,877
1,900
3,800
<*7,500

6,400
(*>)

(b )

By
con­
tract­
ors.

By
city.

(b)

(*)

(*)

3,250
2,600

(*)

2,248

(a)

(*>)

<*150
(&
)

(*)

(a)

(a)

(b)

(6)

w88,800
7,000

8

8

I

8

(«)
(«)
6,552
(*)
P 20^948
P 19,690!............
5,067

8
8

8

7.000
2.000
(«)
(*>

(a)

(*)

f t .

(*)

(«)

100
86

m

(b )

( b)

(»)

(*)

2*8^76

A

I t ).

it) it)

(«)

(«)

(«)

?)

(*>)

$
(u)

(*)

(*)

(6)

(&
)

(*)

(*)

(*)

(*)

(*)

550

(«a)

2,6i6

110

<*)

125
109
229
(b)
rb

)

(o)

lb )

(5)
(6)

(M )

(«)

(a )

15,750
(*)

8.

3,307
(*)

( b)

( b)

(*)

(*>
(a)

(6 )2
4
6




a

1
j
l
15
|
7

7i
5

(*)

1

10

(*)
(«)

%

Included in garbage.
Including ashes.
AIncluding 2 for 3 m onths only.
rB y property owners.
s Policem en act as sanitary inspectors.
* Data are for 9 months.
mDisposed of by police department.
v Included in ashes.
wN ot including 2 em ployed tem porarily,
a No sweeping done; streets flushed with hose.
v Sprinkling done by private persons.
* One acting as both food and sanitary inspector.
o a Tons not reported; 500 dead animals.
b b Not including citizens working in lieu o f payment of poll tax in cash.
o
p

> 1

25
4
3
17
17

( 0)

ii!

$

40
15

65

(b)

' *12
18

40 <>>2
9
15
2
17
18
40
69
20
2
8
20
4
27
3
39
24
10
20

(O)160
14,430

15
(&
)

53
9
18

(bL

(«)

(6)

(b )

400

5
14

24

it) it)

5
*12

( 6)

8 lii L i 8 8
s u

$

(«)

(«)

(«)
(*)

2
10
10
g 17

1,800
(i-)

(«)

2*6,500

7,095
*3,700

7,500

(o)

(«)

w35,000

1

180

(a)

(*)

Ur it) it) it)

8

(6)

3,150

2*6,748
?)

(b )

By
By con­
city. tract­
ors.

(«)

<
*8
20

1,750
w7,200

(a)

(b )

By
con­
tract­
ors.

(«)

13^500
<*7,000
2,750

350
(*>)
10,240

Tons
burned.

By
By
By
con­ By con­ By con­ By
tract­ city. tract­ city. tract­ city.
ors.
ors.
ors.

4,650

(&
)

Average
persons
em ployed Mar­
in rem oval ginal
o f ashes, num­
Tons other­
garbage,
wise disposed and otner ber.
of.
refuse.

Dead animals and other refuse.

Garbage.

%

10

48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
67
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81

82

8a
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95

962

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X I.—CARE OF STREETS, FOOD AND SANITARY INSPECTION, AND DISPOSAL OF
GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE—Concluded.

Inspectors.

Streets.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

96
97
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109

110
111

112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121

122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Altoona, Pa.................
W heeling, W .V a .......
M obile, A la .................
Birmingham, A la.......
Little R ock, A rk.........
Springfield, O h io.......
Galveston, T e x ..........
Tacoma, W ash............
H averhill, M ass.........
Spokane, W ash..........
Terre Haute, In d .......
Dubuque, Io w a .........
Quincy, 111.................
South Bend, In d.........
Salem, M ass...............
Johnstown, P a ..........
Elmira, N. Y ..............
Allentown, Pa............
Davenport, Iow a.......
M cKeesport, P a .........
Springfield, 111..........
Chelsea, M ass............
Chester, P a ..,............
York, P a ....................
Malden, M ass............
Topeka, K a n s............
Newton. M ass............
Sioux City, Iow a .......
Bayonne, N. J ............
K n oxville, T en n .......
Schenectady, N. Y . . .
Fitchburg, Mass.........
Superior, W is..............
R ockford, H I..............
Taunton, M ass..........
Canton, Ohio..............
Butte, M ont...............
M ontgomery, A la ___
Auburn, N. Y ............
Chattanooga, T en n ...
East St. Louis, 111___
Joliet, 111....................

Ashes, garbage,
and other
refuse.

Average
persons
Tons o f ashes
Square yards swept em ployed
per week.
disposed of.
in sweep­
Swept
ing, sprink­
by
ling, etc. Food. Sani­
hand
tary.
or ma­
chine.
By
By
con­
By con­ By con­
By city. tract­
By city. tractors. city. tract­
ors.
ors.
B oth ..
B oth ..
Hand.
B oth ..
M ach.
Hand.
Hand.
B oth ..
B oth ..
M ach.
B oth ..
Hand.
B oth ..
B oth ..
Both.
B oth ..
B oth ..
B oth ..
B oth ..
B oth ..
Both.
B oth ..
B oth ..
(*
*)
M ach.
B oth ..
B oth ..
B oth ..
H and.
H and.
B oth ..
B oth ..
M ach.
B oth ..
B oth ..

415.000
50,100
169.000
558,474
66,880
289,569
647,280

*

20,000

270.000
204.000
834,512
176.000
140.000
462,684
284,700
228.000
*635,000
110,000
*589,948
165.000
*234,000
148.000
150.000
15.000
550.600
34.000
677,274
50,200
119,250
365.000
100.000
«« 75,000
670.000
40.000

(hh\

M ach.
B oth ..
H and.
B oth ..
B oth ..
H and.

26,000

«c^ 4 0 0
1,686,341
125.000
376.600
300.000
466,210

a One acting as both food and sanitary inspector.

14
12
/3 0
16
k 6
30
17
10
47
16
41
18
6
J>30
8
8
*12
40
*38

(«)

(*)
8,350
(«)

(a)

(b)
(b)

(°)

(o)

(6)
(&)
(*)
1,200

<•).
1

9

(*)
(*)
*16
12
46 r 22
16
45

aa 9

(cc)

24
21
ec43
//1 4
15
18
17
**14
15
//2 0

V

1/6
2
2

22

%

s

v2

(m)

u>l

*21

(M)

( 6)

r9

8

(*)

a
*12,750
(*)

1
6
1
1
1
1
dd 2

20,000
5,500
(*)

(m)

400

2
5

ool
(hh)

(a)

1
1
1
4

w i
1

(*)
"(b)"

Disposed o f by householders,
c Ten for 13 days; 1 for 22 days.
Collected by contractor; burned by city; not including 1,094 tons rem oved by householders,
e Removed by householders; burned by city.
/ Not including chain gang.
0 Included in garbage,
ft Including ashes.
*Including dead animals and other refuse.
J Included in ashes.
k Em ployed in cleaning only; sprinkling done by private persons; not including chain gang, which
averages about 6 persons.
1 Sprinkling done by private persons.
w N ot reported.
« Including area flushed.
©Two, each acting as both food and sanitary inspector.
P Sprinkling done by private persons; including persons em ployed in rem oving dead animals and
other refuse.
a Included in persons em ployed in street cleaning.
b

d




963

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able XI.—CARE OF STREETS, FOOD AND SANITARY INSPECTION, AND DISPOSAL OF
GARBAGE AND OTHER REFUSE—Concluded.

Ashes, garbage, and other refuse.

Tons sold. Tons burned. Tons otherwise Tons sold.
disposed of.
By
By
By con­
city. tract­ city.
ors.
(b)

(b)

(b)

By
con­
tract­
ors.

By
city.

(b)

d 4 ,722
h

9,336

Tons
burned.

By
By
By
con­
con­ By con­
By
tract­ city. tract­ cUy. tract­ city.
ors.
ors.
ors.
(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

1,295
(b)
(b)

(b)

(b)
1,914

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

W

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)
(b)
1,160
(b)
(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)
$

ft

ft
3,873

(*)

(m)

ft

ft

(b)
(m)

(b)

ft
(m)

ft

$

(b)

(m)
6,660
ft
(b)

ft

(b)

ft

(b)

(0)

(b)
(m)

(b)
300

w i %
7
3
17
(b)
ft
(b)
12
24
(b)
ft o o
(\
(»)
w
1
w .
(m)
<»)
1,060
9

(b)

(b)
<b)
45

<
b>

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

ft

(b)
(b)

ft

ft

(b)

(b)

(b)

ft
(b)
(*)•
(m)

?!
(m)

(b)

3,000
1,200
(b>

(b)

9^008

(b)
*
(m)

5^020
(m)

100

(m)

225

(m)

ft

ft

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)
(b)

(b)

ft

?!
ft

i

I

a

,

ft

?!
ft

ft
4
1
(w)
13
21
4

ft

(b)

(b)
(b)
«196

(b)

?!
5,340 (b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(b)

(6f>20

(b)
20
10

8

(b)

ft

a .

11
12
83 6619
2
(b)
(b)
12
w .
(b)
(6) 6
H
3
2
m
(b)
(b)

(mU

ft
(b)
1,034
(b)
(b)
3,600

2

(b)
ft
:

(m)

(4 )8

(b)
?!

By
con­
tract­
ors.

(b)

5,000
130

(b)
(b)
(b)
(b)
6,500
(b)

By
con­
tract­
ors.

140

(m)
8,208
(b)

(b)
(b)
2,950
(b)
h
ft

(b)

ft

(b)

2^25

Average
persons
em ployed Mar­
in rem oval ginal
o f ashes,
Tons other­
garbage, num­
wise disposed and otner ber.
of.
refuse.

Dead animals and other refuse.

Garbage.

30

16
15
%

10
: ( b)

96
97
100

101

102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121

122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
334
135
136
137

r Employed in sprinkling only.
s Health officer acts as both food and sanitary inspector.
t For 40 weeks; no sweeping for 12 weeks.
uFor 9 m onths; no sweeping for 3 m onths.
v Including 1 for 3 m onths.
w Not including secretary of board oM iealth, who also acts as sanitary inspector.
x For 7 months; no sweeping for 5 months.
^Including 5 sanitary policem en.
2 Swept by volunteer fire department; paid for by householders.
a a Also em ployed in rem oval o f ashes; not including 10 persons em ployed on Saturdays; sprinkling
done by private persons.
66Including the 9 persons also em ployed in street cleaning.
c o Included in sanitary inspectors.
d d Including 1 who also acts as food inspector.
ccF or 6 m onths; no sweeping for 6 months.
//E m p lo y e d in cleaning only.
9 0 Policem en also act as inspectors.
h h Paved streets flushed every 2 weeks by street laborers.
a Em ployed in cleaning only; 2 extra persons em ployed during hottest weather for sprinkling.
j j Small animals only, large anim als rem oved by soap factories.




BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
table

X II.—NUMBER AND KIND OP STREET LIGHTS.
Number of lights.

araal
imer.

1

Cities.

Arc.

22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
67
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77

Incan­
descent.

Welsbach.

Other.

8,168
33,559
4,158
11,
11,000
13,224
6
20,573
Philadelphia, P a .......
9,
10,086
1,354
733
St. Louis, M o...............
164
8,961
28
Boston, Mass..............
3,
6,153
Baltim ore, M d.......... .
1,
2,650
3,117
Cleveland, O h io.......
158
21
5,660
B uffalo,N .Y ..............
4,698
San Francisco, C al...
1,222
877
Cincinnati, O hio....... .
Pittsburg, P a ............
New Orleans, L a.......
Detroit, M ich ............
2,410
M ilwaukee, W is.......
W ashington, D. C ___
«6,836
714
178
2,074
Newark, N. J ..............
9
100
Jersey City, N .J .......
Louisville, K y ..........
M inneapolis, M inn ..
Providence, R. I .......
792
1,935
162
Indianapolis, In d ----2,065
Kansas City, M o.......
St. Paul, M in n ..........
4,483
Rochester, N .Y .........
142
Denver, C o lo ..............
1,082
Toledo, O hio..............
1,450
A llegheny, P a ..........
877
Columbus, O h io ....... .
713
W orcester, M ass.......
479
1,264
Syracuse, N. Y ..........
540
New Haven, C on n ....
323
1,008
742
Paterson, N .J............
437
723
Fall River, M ass.......
180
*420
St. Joseph, M o .......... .
335
Omaha, N ebr............
950
946
25
Los Angeles, Cal.......
358
Memphis, T enn.........
684
Scranton, Pa..............
501
160
1,111
Lowell, Mass..............
670
Albany, N .Y ............
550
449
Cambridge, M ass___
"*285”
740
635
Portland, Oreg..........
740
445
Atlanta, G a...............
544
Grand Rapids, M ich .
431
Dayton, O h io............
307
804
558
Richm ond, V a.......... .
565
382
N ashville, T en n ....... .
539
148
Seattle, W ash............
1,300
787
Hartford, C onn.........
Reading, P a ..............
540
481
272
534
W ilm ington, D el.......
519
510
198
Camden, N .J ............
208
291
377
598
16
Trenton, N .J ............
497
Bridgeport, C onn----136
289
Lynn, M ass...............
1,200
688
Oakland, C a l............
322
Lawrence, M ass.......
210
46
New Bedford, Mass..
675
358
Des Moines, Iow a___
527
792
836
61
Springfield, M ass___
449
410
Som erville, M ass___
604
Troy, N .Y ..................
250
237
Hoboken, N .J ..........
71
270
468
Evansville, In d ..........
Manchester, N. H ___
488
73
692
Utica, N .Y .................
569
Peoria, 111...................
113
Charleston, S. C .........
878
512
Savannah, Ga............
460
Salt Lake City, Utah.
332
San A ntonio,T ex . . .
Duluth, M in n .......... .
317
449
Erie, P a .................... .
152
Elizabeth, N .J ..........
950
372
W ilkesbarre, P a ....... .
123
284
190
Kansas City, Kans_
_
53
Harrisburg, P a ..........
417
a Not including 89 Collis lamps used to designate streets.
New York, N .Y .........

2 Chicago, 111............... .

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

Gas.

Electric.




,

Vapor
lamps.

3,564
5,309
14,355
2,835
2,142
1,038
2,600
766
3,233
657
1,130

2,001
287
1,454
2,423

526
1,169

553
*882
400
*i03'

124
*295*

100

10
278
420

965

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X II.—NUMBER AND KIND OP STREET LIGHTS—Concluded.
Number o f lights.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Electric.

Cities.

Arc.
Portland, M e..........
Yonkers, N. Y ........
N orfolk, V a.............
W aterbury, C onn ...
H olyoke, Mass........
Port W ayne, Ind ...
Youngstown, O h io..
Houston, T ex..........
Covington, K y .......
Akron, O h io............
Dallas, T e x .............
Saginaw, M ich........
Lancaster, Pa..........
L incoln, N eb r.........
Brockton, M ass.......
Binghamton, N. Y ..
Augusta, G a ............
Pawtucket, R. I .......
A ltoona, Pa..............
W heeling, W. Va . . .
M obile, A la..............
Birmingham, Ala ..
Little R ock, A rk___
Springfield, Ohio . . .
Galveston, T e x .......
Tacoma. W ash.........
H averhill, M ass___
Spokane, W ash.......
Terre Haute, In d . ..
Dubuque. Iow a.......
Quincy, 111...............
South Bend, In d ___
Salem, M ass............
Johnstown, Pa.........
Elmira, N .Y ............
Allentow n, P a.........
Davenport, Io w a . . .
McKeesport, Pa.......
Springfield, 111.........
Chelsea, Mass..........
Chester, P a ..............
York, Pa...................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, Kans..........
Newton, M ass.........
Sioux City, Iow a—
Bayonne, N. J..........
K noxville, Tenn—
Schenectady, N. Y ..
Fitchburg, M ass___
Superior, W is..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass.........
Canton, O h io..........
Butte, M on t............
M ontgomery, A la ...
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Chattanooga, T en n .
East St. Louis, 111. . .
Joliet, 111.................

'
1
1
1

1
|
'
!
l
!
'
I
i
!

302
326
331
268
261
294
389
363
95
353
813
281
308
192
263
344
348
375
221
507
275
225
218
316
176
335
196
225
386
376
336
298
301
258
387
170
425
304
a 490
220
194
316
105
342
191
80
139
297
292
302
162
416
247
271
175
275
384
224
165
281

Gas.

Incan­
descent.

Welsbach.

641
597

Vapor
lamps.

8

432

609
25

811
150

267
203
161

143
117

97
#
450
3

663
218

308

9
1
287
516
387

208
419

8

1,028
1,044
772

210

948
886

62

9

20

50

31

71

420
490

47
6

a Including 30 lamps furnished by Chicago and Alton Railway Company.




33

27

231
54

Oil
lamps.

126

343
1,592

40
6

Other.

60

966

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Table

X III.—PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Public schools.

Number of school
buildings.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Number o f school
rooms.

Teachers.

Num­
In
In
ber of
In
other
build­
high
Owned Rent­
In
ings Rent­ Total. sch’ls. high kin- regu­
derby
lar
ed. Total. owned ed.
city.
sch’ls. garday
by
tens. sch’ls.
city.

1 New York, N .Y .........
567
« 415
171 10,589
656 a 471 «10,133 5428 ol0 ,561
19
2 Chicago, 111...............
354
177 5,681
346
679 4,449
15
333
346 4,795
3 Philadelphia, P a ___
194 3,118
192
75
328 2,752
5
253
126 2,878
4 St. Louis, M o..............
78
298 1,323
2
124
126 1,381
2
10 1,391
5 Boston, M ass............
(d)
224
157 1,620
218
47
265 1,726 (d)
12
6 Baltim ore, M d..........
24
1,560
87
95
119 1,433
5
98 1,631
7 Cleveland, O h io.......
72
1
49 1,178
73 1,115
119
30 1,145
5
8 Buffalo, N .Y ..............
85 (d)
82
3
19 1,175
81
2
(<*)
1,215
9 San Francisco, C al...
72
823
72
52
747
36
4
783
10 Cincinnati, O hio.......
10
63
77
916
53
860
12
872
3
11 Pittsburg, P a ............
85
931
85
994
63
49
994
3
12 New Orleans, La.......
62
8
663
70
702
40
37
43
3
745
13 Detroit, M ich ............
111
773
70
70
48
831
831
3
14 M ilwaukee, W is.......
55
«81 «752
88
731
c81
c752
3
15 W ashington, D. C ___
143
996
21
137
62 1,005
61
116
943
5
16 Newark, N .J ............
4
47
701
49 »
53
777
18
103
1
795
17 Jersey City, N .J.........
562
29
21
29
512
4
512
1
18 Louisville', 'K y ..........
52
17
604
67
535
69
37
641
5
19 M inneapolis, M in n ..
2
103
747
68
60
968
5
973
4
20 Providence, R. I .......
1
564
569
96
48
97
98
1
4
570
21 Indianapolis, In d ___
3
88
604
578
57
60
5
609
2
22 Kansas City, M o.......
5
113
509
54
12
i5
49
550
562
4
23 St. Paul, M in n ..........
79
432
59
44
19
63
565
19
584
4
24 Rochester, N. Y .........
42
583
3
40
81
37
600
6
606
1
25 Denver, C o lo ............
560
88
51
54
5
59
550
15
565
6
26 Toledo, O h io ............
15
442
41
40
470
40
470
2
27 A llegheny, P a ..........
376
23
18
30
30
450
450
1
28 Columbus, O h io.......
417
76
38
38
446
446
4
29 W orcester, M ass.......
486
26
73
550
101
73
550
/ 4
30 Syracuse, N. Y ..........
42
28
399
39
8
12
47
386
398
1
31 New Haven, C onn ...
54
28
362
5
48
356
53
30
386
2
32 Paterson, N .J ..........
15
336
23
019
019 0 240
0240
1
33 Fall River, Mass.......
6
23
359
53
53
273
273
1
34 St. Joseph, M o..........
190
24
3
28
215
5
31
220
2
35 Omaha, N ebr............
811
55
50
52
52
369
369
1
36 Los Angeles, Cal.......
i 376
J41
JS3
56
448
56
448
2
37 Memphis, Tenn.........
14
201
3
185
i4
26
29
199
2
38 Scranton, Pa..............
41
28
7
309
10
51
324
10
334
1
39 Lowell, M ass............
25
1
54
278
1
30
249
53
279
1
40 Albany, N .Y ............
21
21
304
28
21
258
304
1
41 Cambridge, M ass___
60
25
328
326
39
39
326
3
42 Portland, O reg.........
4
21
29
29
315
277
319
1
43 Atlanta. Ga...............
22
204
205
24
2
3
26
207
2
44 Grand Rapids, M ich.
40
369
26
318
36
3
39
5
374
2
45 Dayton, Ohio............
12
39
28
339
7
380
30
37
392
1
46 Richm ond, V a..........
224
21
35
241
4
18
3
245
2
47 Nashville, T en n .......
204
218
18
18
18
218
2
48 Seattle, W ash............
12
23
2
239
23
3
239
26
251
1
49 Hartford, C onn.........
24
12
1
278
39 (*)
1269
290
25
1
50 Reading, P a ..............
322
20
302
322
47
47
2
51 W ilm ington, D e l___
245
237
1
25
28
29
238
1
2
52 Camden, N .J ............
314
4
14
3
290
29
4
33
318
1
53 Trenton, N .J ............
200
210
4
32
16
28
8
208
1
54 Bridgeport, Conn___
224
19 (*)
1 227
26
4
10
234
30
1
55 Lynn, Mass...............
249
29
232
46
46
249
2
56 Oakland, C al............
39
205
19
1
19
261
261
2
57 Lawrence, M ass.......
24
235
32
195
5
29
200
3
1
58 New Bedford, M ass..
6
230
209
16
25
25
209
/ 2
59 Des Moines, Iow a___
26
307
47
296
49
49
307
5
34
21
256
60 Springfield, M ass___
38
318
13
33
331
2
1
42
61 Som erville, M ass. . . .
8
231
25
230
25
230
2
18
262
62 Troy, N .Y .................
270
11
25
26
3
273
1
i
182
7
63 Hoboken, N .J ..........
14
151
17
168
9
7
7
1
64 Evansville, In d .........
21
6
214
234
2
23
2
25
236
2
24
126
129
65 Manchester, N. H . . . .
24
129
16
1
24
186
66 Utica, N .Y .................
22
26
219
10
17
4
229
1
21
67 Peoria, 111.................
265
265
18
18
230
1
a Including College o f City o f New York and Normal College.
5 Including College o f City of New York.
c Including College of City of New Y ork and Normal College, but not including vacation schools.
d Not reported.
e Including 301-room m ovable houses.
/ Including 1 night school.




967

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X III.—PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
Public schools.
Teachers.

Pupils.
Number.

Average attendance.

In
In all
In
In
In
In
In all
night other
In all
kin­ other
In
In
kin- other
In
In
other
schools. public high
der regular night public
der- regular night other
high
schools. schools. garday schools. public schools. garday schools. schools.
schools.
tens. schools.
tens. schools.

263
502
76
231
63
34
84
104
49

cl73
60
96
17
14

44
67
112
52
26

33
1
6
23
15
66
27
35
56
47

19

6

7
4
3
80
125
14
65
4
3
j

22

10
31

30

19,013
10,565
5,641
2,349
6,519
3,039
3,575
3,016
1,390
2,221
1,836
916
2,810
1,666
3,314
1,255
987
1,906
2,584
1,976
2,603
3,602
1,818
1,022
2,383
1,102
647
2,134
3,704
1,613
1,277
7*650
669
i 815
1,552
1.439
527
725
871
761
1,320
827
665
1.439
1,072
1,170
506
756
872
637
689
316
562
616
794
1,216
581
410
1,301
781
1,064
297
279
771
422
500
585

9,850 530,355 62,202 0 6,640
9.104
8,253 243,032
888
14,959 166,013 19,304
378
9,925 76,925
3,438
5,572 79,705 11,997
168
2,034
80,376
52,216
1,8
1,579
286
55.617
3.105
34,494
2,624
42,064
1,999
1,245 44,481
886 29.617
328
1,789 36,067
1,255
171
62
6,501 33,483
3,311
1,643 42,274
200
4,462
6,590 30.019
5,165
623 33,057
2,818
25,791
1,153
34.968
1,815 28,749
4,126
24,731
840 23,838
1,979 21,899
3,696 18,713
1,238
2,415 24,581
58
400 19,914
421
249
466 20,104
574
16,721
369
667 20.019
1,207
1,009 16,795
855
1,087 15,302
1,205
*7*900 7*17,130 7*2,500
7*56
209 15,801
3,737
49,724
7 222
2,036 15,387
409
2,419 17,505
285
10,413
131
1,684
250 15,128
3,434
779 11,042
575
1,107 11,028
313
13,859
1,479 *i, 059
11,847
322
10,836
126
13,095
1,<
1,165 11,545
219
70
10.969
11,717
100
87 11,232
711,310
2,324
1,459
(*)
13,698
411
10,330
95 12,411
9,278
1,069
710,398
352
32
(*)
9,356
1,217
50 10,395
595
6,943
1,451
188 8,793
2,543
1,068 11,463
90
823
9,970
1,527
396 11,039
804
404 8,150
78,878
14
7,610
219
6,386
388
1,047
7,318
172
8,664

12,439
9,218
4,327
1,781
5,096
1,856
3,080
2,525
1,022
1,970
1,762
788
2,152
1,329
2,691
1,108
558
1,506
2,388
1,630
1,996
2,880
1,566
901
1,925
914
551
1,837
2.123
1,232
1,067
7*450
588
655
1,253
1,184
446
704
770
627
1.123
687
562
1,106
970
827
439
. 611
729
551
504
275
485
551
675

1,001

557
322
1,025
657
947
264
221
577
354
409
501

3,602 381,887
3,996 194,076
5,320 123,365
5,597 58,128
3,258 63,250
50,784
1,400 42,738
455 40,053
27,027
34,723
926 33,732
553 23,437
799 27,913
3,323 27,008
914 32,875
3,155 23,989
156 21,851
19,269
28,740
784 18,135
19,341
408 17,798
1,545 17,743
1,659 15,618
3,170 16,204
265 15,966
373 15,282
13,861
410 15,259
918 13,510
676 12,575
7*600 7*13,500
104 12,048
6,661
1,170 12,358
1,203 13,351
7,552
205 12,123
347 8,609
566 9,027
509 11,:
9,110
9,230
1,124 10,179
662 9,692
9,064
9,176
8,266
78,713
<*)
9,661
7,972
7,r ~
50
6,818
79,048
(*)
7,
35 7,454
6,513
6,588
532 8,434
348 7,841
147 8,256
198 6,503
76,755
(*)
136
6,135
3,773
619 5,884
6,751

20,376 0 5,673
792
4,771
372
9,713
1,926
144
4,358
1,684
246
850
1,305
1,929
1,129

1,434
2,330
840
592
1,990




1

2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

21

22

306
15
127
351
154
667
396
420
7*650
2,101
79
124
78
67
1,168
1,844
136
561
110
64
128

286

7*40

273
*694

62

50
*309
105

1,181

648
67
396
130
1,006
1,214
50
552
271
200
189
69

Not including 3 buildings burned.
7 Records burned; the figures given are estimates.
*
i Including transfers.
j Not including 21 special teachers, whose tim e is divided among the different grades.
* Included in other regular day schools.
7Including kindergartens.
g

106
167
47
192
3,065

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

12

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
80
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

67

968

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR*
T able X III.—PUBLIC SCHOOLS—Concluded.
Public schools.
Number o f school
buildings.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
318
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Charleston, S. C.........
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah.
San A ntonio, T ex___
Duluth, M in n ..........
Erie, P a ....................
Elizabeth, N .J..........
W ilkesbarre, P a .......
Kansas City^Kans...
Harrisburg' P a .........
Portland, M e............
Yonkers, N .Y ..........
N orfolk, Y a...............
W aterbury, Conn___
H olyoke, M ass..........
Fort Wayne, I n d ___
Youngstown, Ohio ..
Houston, T ex............
Covington, K y..........
Akron, O hio..............
Dallas, T e x ...............
Saginaw, M ich .........
Lancaster, Pa............
Lincoln, N eb r..........
Brockton, Mass.........
Binghamton, N .Y ...
Augusta, G a..............
Pawtucket, R. I .........
A ltoona, P a ..............
W heeling,W .V a . . . .
M obile, A la...............
Birm ingham ,Ala . . .
Little Rock, A rk.......
Springfield, O h io___
Galveston, T e x .........
Tacoma, W ash..........
H averhill, M ass.......
Spokane, w ash.........
Terre Haute, In d ___
Dubuque, Iow a.........
Quincy, 111...............
South Bend, In d .......
Salem, M ass..............
Johnstown, P a .........
Elmira, N .Y ..............
Allentown, Pa..........
Davenport, Io w a ___
McKeesport, P a .......
Springfield, 111.........
Chelsea, Mass............
Chester, P a ...............
York, Pa....................
M alden, Mass............
Topeka, Kans............
Newton. M ass..........
Sioux City, Io w a ___
Bayonne, N .J ..........
K noxville, T e n n ___
Schenectady, N .Y ...
Fitchburg, M ass.......
Superior, W is............
Rockford, 111............
Taunton, M ass.........
Canton, O h io............
Butte, M on t..............
Auburn, N .Y ............
Chattanooga, T en n ..
East St. Louis, 11 1....
Joliet, H I...................

Teachers.

Num­
In
In
ber of
In
other
build­
high
In
Owned Rent­
kin- regu­
ings Rent­
sch7ls. high derby
lar
ed. Total. owned ed. Total.
city.
sch’ls. garday
by
tens. sch’is.
city.
6
9
24
16
32
18
10
20
22
25
35
14
12
18
18
16
21
15
7
17
13
26
19
18
28
16
10
28
12
12
11
6
15
17
8
20
37
18
18
14
13
10
20
24
11
15
16
12
<U4
12
22
22
19
25
26
<124
8
13
7
19
11
17
33
15
7
7
14
7
12
24

a Not including 6 rooms not in use.
6 Including 1 night school.
<*For 3 months only.




Number o f school
rooms.

3
3
5
1

1
i
1
7
6

1
3

2

3
5
2

,3
1

i

2

8

2
4

6
12
27
21
32
19
10
20
22
25
35
15
12
18
19
17
21
22
13
17
13
26
19
19
28
16
13
28
12
12
11
8
15
17
8
20
37
18
21
19
13
12
20
24
11
15
16
15
<U5
12
22
22
20
25
26
<124
10
13
7
19
19
17
33
15
7
9
14
7
16
24

81
109
276
119
302
164
130
183
175
188
220
183
88
a 166
175
141
165
107
94
174
128
217
120
152
148
194
87
141
151
145
73
78
a 82
150
88
175
144
140
171
114
100
108
108
152
135
119
168
148
«118
116
124
146
151
160
148
/161
124
82
76
138
138
122
131
136
105
67
112
98
101
115

31
33
10
2

2
1
2
14
6

3
11

12

14
11
2

6
3

i

8

15

7
5

81
140
309
129
302
166
130
183
175
188
220
185
88
a 166
176
143
165
121
100
174
128
217
120
155
148
194
98
141
151
145
73
90
a 82
150
88
175
144
140
185
125
100
110
108
152
135
119
168
154
e 121
116
124
146
152
160
148
/161
132
82
76
138
153
122
131
136
105
64
112
98
106
116

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
62
1
2
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1

13
9
24
9
20
19
19
17
19
22
28
16
8
18
22
11
15
19
6
22
9
29
14
32
21
22
8
22
10
12
11
10
9
18
9
19
18
18
23
14
9
12
17
10
16
10
16
8
17
20
13
12
22
20
28
16
8
12
12
24
13
16
12
19
19
7
12
*10
10
22

24
7

12
10
13
3
12
8

30
14
8
15

1
2
16
13
10
12
6

11
32
(0)

5
24

< Not including 1 building not in use.
f
e Not including 2 rooms not in use.
/N o t including 1 room not in use.

2
2

85
128
277
127
232
184
125
159
159
179
193
166
78
169
154
140
151
116
88
160
112
180
106
119
164
166
91
129
146
133
67
85
78
147
73
176
139
135
153
114
109
102
.111
136
135
113
168
125
123
118
125
118
147
133
134
145
ft 143
78
76
79
120
130
126
124
99
57
109
J87
114
122

STATISTICS OP CITIES,

g
h

Inciuded in other regular day schools.
Including kindergartens.




i
j

Not including 1 supernumerary.
Not including 5 supernumeraries.

969

970

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.
T able X IV .—PUBLIC LIBRARIES.
Volumes.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
8
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
28
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

6
6

67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74

Cities.

New Y ork, N .Y ..................................
Philadelphia, Pa................................
St. Louis, M o .....................................
Boston, Mass.......................................
Baltimore, M d...................................
Cleveland^ O h io................................
Buffalo, N .Y ......................................
San Francisco, Cal............................
Cincinnati, Ohio................................
Pittsburg, P a .....................................
New Orleans, La................................
Detroit, M ich .....................................
M ilwaukee, W is..................................
W ashington, D. C..............................
Newark^ N. J .....................................
Jersey City, N. J ................................
Louisville* K y ...................................
M inneapolis, M inn.............................
Providence, R. I ................................
Indianapolis, In d ..............................
Kansas City, M o................................
St. Paul, M inn...................................
Rochester, N. Y ..................................
Denver, Colo.......................................
Toledo, Ohio.......................................
A llegheny, P a ...................................
Columbus, O h io................................
W orcester, M ass................................
Syracuse, N. Y ...................................
New Haven, C onn.............................
Paterson, N. J ...................................
Fall River, M ass................................
St. Joseph, M o...................................
Omaha, N ebr.....................................
Los Angeles, Cal................................
Memphis, Tenn..................................
Scranton, Pa......................................
Low ell, M ass.....................................
Albany, N. Y .....................................
Cambridge, M ass..............................
Portland, Oreg...................................
Atlanta, G a........................................
Grand Rapids, M ich.........................
Dayton, O h io.....................................
Richm ond, Y a...................................
N ashville, T en n ................................
Seattle, W ash.....................................
Hartford, C onn..................................
Reading, P a ......................................
W ilm ington, D e l..............................
Camden, N. J .....................................
Trenton, N. J .....................................
Bridgeport, Conn..............................
Lynn, M ass........................................
Oakland, C a l.....................................
Lawrence, M ass................................
New Bedford, Mass...........................
Des Moines, Iow a..............................
Springfield, M ass..............................
Som erville, M ass..............................
Troy, N. Y ..........................................
H oboken, N. J ...................................
Evansville, In d ..................................
Manchester, N. H .............................
Utica, N. Y ........................................
Peoria, 111..................................................
Charleston, S. C ................................
Savannah, G a ...................................
Salt Lake City, Utah.........................
San Antonio, T e x ..............................
Duluth, M inn.....................................
Erie, P a ...............................................
Elizabeth, N .J ...................................
« Not reported.




Number
of
m unici­
pal
libraries.

Number.

W ithdrawn.
Number
added
during the For home For use in
reading
use.
year.
rooms.

14
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1

1,447,048
321,031
239,183
170,855
812,264
211,449
171,592
239,494
136,395
251,309
140,507
54,280
174,425
147,236
22,811
78,798
75,053

127,926
14,430
4,962
20,855
30,887
7,751
1,469
10,610
8,343
18,887
21,187
4,280
8,631
6,550
3,871
1,572
4,505

4,750,698
1,772,741
1,915,687
778,507
1,483,513
635,021
809,515
966,450
711,409
686,561
488,126
90,356
511,921
495,376
123,555
314,874
421,279

1

122,460

7,698

535,853

1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

92,454
61,800
54,550
34,641
78.000
49,153
62,758
82,928
135,762
52,855
60.000
37,759
61,561
22,180
57,864
67,355
20,539
41,336
62,618

4,605
11,800
4,251
893
1,000
2,892
2,877
6,363
4,476
5,227
7,967
1,031
2,225
1,301
2,214
7,707
3,356
4,724
1,582

279,179
229,031
172,855
136,054
378,323
231,303
156,549
320,859
224,552
173,468
292,666
134,375
158,289
96,806
204,408
472,543
64,799
125,518
139,514

(a)
(a)

i

60,759

1,796

186,322

(«)

i
i
i

19,481
58,132
49,873

5,698
1,730
4,038

22,500
197,936
138,632

i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
l
l

20,684
70,200
11,717
49,028
6,811
16,281
38,140
62,041
31,868
52,745
77,700
30,001

10,406
6,187
2,076
5,738
1,096
8,281
1,927
3,223
2,348
1,560
2,406
2,475

118,777
218,700
79,718
203,890
5,300

i

52,157

5,019

264,227

i

24,410

1,797

114,011

12,710

i
i
i

47,278
31,666
78,911

1,415
3,223
5,000

72,298
133,955
174,945

28,404

i

15,822

2,448

73,349

i
i

38,800
23,747

3,800
5,653

90,161
135,828

&Not including 2 libraries not reported.

c

149,216
166,708
152,973
110,464
112,849
141,031

1,448,751
600,000
(a)

208,757
406,593
120,753
£39,488
231,514
(a)

461,563
7,160
654,293

(a)

1)
a
(a)

69,534
(a)
(a)

46,606
(«)
18,000
181,056
46,798
65,140
364,008
119,131

(a)

(a) .

35,000
38,619
191,296

(a)

3,201
15,356

35,200
5,490
52,946
(a)

3,500
(«)

(a)

(«)
22,696
94,963
497,437
28,463

(a)

28,745
16,762

( a)

(«)
48,266
(a}

«)
\/

H eld in trust for city.

971

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X IV .—PUBLIC LIBRARIES—Concluded.
Volumes.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92

Cities.

W ilkesbarre, Pa ................................................
Kansas City, K an s............................
Harrisburg" P a .................................
Portland, Me......................................
Yonkers, N. Y .....................................
N orfolk, V a ........................................
W aterbury, C on n ..............................
H olyoke, M ass...................................
Fort W ayne, In d ................................
Youngstown, O h io............................
Houston, T e x .....................................
Covington. K y ...................................
Akron~ O hio. I.....................................
D a l l a s , T ex..........................................
S a .g in a w , M ich ...................................
T ia n e a s te r , P a . .....................................................
Lincoln, Nebr.....................................................

93

94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
1 .9
91
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

A n g n a t a , G a . .......................................................

Pawtucket, R. I .................................
Altoona, P a ........................................
W heeling, W. V a................................
M obile, A la ........................................
Birmingham, A la ..............................
Little Rock, A rk ................................
Springfield, Ohio................................
Galveston, T ex...................................
Tacoma, W ash...................................
H averhill, Mass.................................
S p o k a n e Wash...................................
Terre Haute, In d ................................
Dubuque, Io w a ..................................
Quincy, 1 1 1............................................................
South Bend, In d ................................
Salem, Mass..........................................................

Number
of
m unici­
pal
libraries.

Number.

W ithdrawn.
Number
added
during the For home For use in
reading
use.
year.
rooms.

1
1

« 50,519
16,150

a1,217
1,259

<*68,4i2
69,627

1

11,728

737

45,646

1
1
2

20,357
11,000
20,583

1,623
11,000
822

59,530
c42,413
<*40,657

1
1
1

11,637
37,078
13,806

2,348
3,475
596

92,145
123,270
72,600

ol3,519
(*)

(» )

(6 )

(b)

6,456
7.000
7.000

1

19,762

712

50,234

1

18,486

758

62,904

e2

9,600

(* )

(*)

1
1
1
1
1
1

19,453
7,000
22,000
70,000
7,600
18,275

965

72,615

2,864
5,000

89,736
146,529
62,641
64,103

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

1
1

26,950
9,450
41,994

1,137
552
1,771

57,389
34,584
111,099

1
1

49,131
17,503

4,079
906

103,423
74,498

98,793
5,824

i
1
1
1
1
1

5,820
39,913
20,993
61,423
15,297
11,040

529
2,780
3,642
2,034
1,094
399

9,976
135,387
82,476
160,935
56,612
43,545

(b )
7,727
(*)

1
1
1
1

39,228
14,021
36,830
49,680

1,759
186
1,804
1,697

77,181
43,216
105,603
86,981

1

29,439

1,128

94,245

47,109

1
1

16,795
18,428

1,676
1,870

49,402
73,271

2,957
10,263

gi

(*>)

(*>)

(*)

14,139

8,000
(*>
)

6,720

5,Q17
(* )

6,203

J o h n s to w n

P a ..................................................
Elmira, N. Y ........................................................
Allentown, P a ...................................................

Davenport, Iow a................................
McKeesport, Pa..................................
Springfield, 11 1 ...................................................
Cnelsea, M ass.....................................
Chester, P a ..........................................................
York, P a .................................................................
Malden, M ass.....................................................
Topeka, K q n s .....................................................
Newton, Mass......................................................
Sioux City, Iow a ..............................................
Bayonne, N. J .....................................................
K n o T r v iB c , T f l n n .............................................
S e h e n e .e t a .d y , N. Y .......... ...............................
Fitchburg, M ass ..............................................
Superior, W is .....................................................
R ockford, 111........................................................

Taunton, M ass...................................
Canton, Ohio......................................
Butte, M ont........................................

iP)

(6 )

224
6,564
iP)

23,660
(*)

M o n t g o m e r y , A l a . ...........................................

Auburn, N. Y .....................................
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n .......................................
East St. Louis, 1 1 1 ............................................
Joliet, 111.................................................................

Data are for 9 months.
6 Not reported.
c D ata are for 6 months.
d Data are for 10 months.

a




« School libraries open to public.
Net loss, 150.

f

0 Owned by library association, controlled by

city.

972

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.
T able X V .—CHARITIES: ALMSHOUSES, ORPHAN ASYLUMS, AND HOSPITALS.
Almshouses.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19.
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
61
62
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67

Cities.

New York, N. Y .............................
Chicago, 111...................................
Philadelphia, P a ...........................
St. Louis" M o..................................
Boston, M ass..................................
Baltimore, M d................................
Cleveland, Ohio.............................
Buffalo, N. Y ..................................
San Francisco, C a l........................
Cincinnati, O h io ...........................
Pittsburg, P a ..................................
New Orleans, L a ...........................
Detroit, M id i..................................
M ilwaukee, W is.............................
W ashington, D. C .........................
Newark7 N. J ..................................
Jersey City, N. J.............................
Louisville", K y................................
M inneapolis, "Minn........................
Providence. R. I .............................
Indianapolis, I n d .........................
Kansas City, M o.............................
St. Paul, M inn................................
Rochester, N. Y .............................
Denver, C olo..................................
Toledo, O h io..................................
A llegheny, Pa................................
Columbus, O h io.............................
W orcester, Mass.............................
Syracuse, N. Y ..............................
New Haven, Conn.........................
Paterson, N. J ................................
Fall River, Mass.............................
St. Joseph, M o................................
Omaha, N ebr..................................
Los Angeles, C al.............................
Memphis, Tenn..............................
Scranton, Pa...................................
Low ell, Mass...................................
Albany, N .Y ...................................
Cambridge, Mass.............................
Portland, Oreg................................
Atlanta, Ga.....................................
Grand Rapids, M ich......................
Dayton, O h io..................................
Richm ond, Y a ................................
Nashville, T e n n .............................
Seattle, W ash..................................
Hartford, C onn..............................
Reading, P a ...................................
W ilm ington, D el.............................
Camden, N. J ..................................
Trenton, N. J ..................................
Bridgeport, Conn...........................
Lynn, M ass.....................................
Oakland, C a l..................................
Lawrence, M ass.............................
New Bedford, Mass........................
Des Moines, Iow a...........................
Springfield, M ass...........................
Som erville, M ass...........................
Troy, N. Y .......................................
Hoboken, N. J ................................
Evansville, In d ..............................
Manchester, N. H ...........................
Utica, N .Y .......................................
Peoria, 111........................................

Hospitals.

Average
Number
Average
Number. number Number. number Number. of pa­
of in­
o f in­
tients
treated.
mates.
mates.
3
4
1
2
1
1

1,677
767
732
1,248
366

1
1
1
1

952
840
597
120

1
1

237
208

1

325

1

c

3,646

99

0l

108

1

382

1

238

1
1
1

375
185
173

1

429

1

83

a ll
61
2
<24
4

53,991
276
14,603
e 14,491
42,168

<23

1
/ 5
1
61

1,658
56
15,723
5,475
81

6*i
2
<
22
1
1
2
<
22

iii
903
1,489
1,980
2,433
2,162
1,678

1
<22
<22
61
<22

1,657
2,971
2,319
20
730

61
<22
61

22
28
522
26

61
<22
1
61
22
1

137
600
557
165
il,34 0
2,393

61

24
194
29
2,305
93
6
840
1,530
( l)

k2

1
2

363
233

1

238

61
<2
2
61
1
2
1
61
61

1
1
1

52
187
103

61
61
2
«2

m44
8
1,773
212

1
1

225
85

1
61

250
37

1
1

163
37

61

40

1

a Including 2 idiot asylums.
6Hospital for contagious diseases.
c Including 3 almshouses in charge o f overseers
o f poor in old townships o f Germantown, R oxboro, and Lower Dublin.
d Including 1 hospital for contagious diseases,
e Including 1,084 insane persons.
/In clu d in g 2 hospitals for contagious diseases.
g Owned join tly by city and county.




Orphan asylums.

8

61
61
1
61

194
331
60

h Rented hospital for contagious diseases.
i One hospital for contagious diseases and 1
em ergency hospital in connection w ith the police
department.
/In clu d in g 1,278 em ergency cases.
Jc Temporary contagious hospitals.
l Not reported.
wData are for 3 m onths.
n Hospitals for contagious diseases.

973

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X V .—CHARITIES: ALMSHOUSES, ORPHAN ASYLUMS, AND HOSPITALS—Concluded.
Almshouses.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Charleston, S. C..............................
Savannah, G a ................................
Salt Lake City, Utah......................
San A ntonio,'T ex.........................
Duluth, M in n ................................
Erie, P a ..........................................
Elizabeth, N. J ..............................
Wilkesbarre, P a ............................
Kansas City, Kans.........................
Harrisburg, P a ..............................
Portland, Me. ( c ) ...........................
Yonkers, N. Y ................................
Norfolk, V a ...................................
Waterbury, Conn...........................
Holyoke, 'Mass..............................
Fort Wayne, I n d ...........................
Youngstown, O h io ........................
Houston, T ex .................................
Covington, K y ..............................
Akron, O h io .'................................
Dallas, T e x ....................................
Saginaw, M ich ..............................
Lancaster, P a ................................
Lincoln, N ebr................................
Brockton, Mass..............................
Binghamton, N. Y .........................
Augusta, Ga...................................
Pawtucket, R. I ............................
Altoona, P a ...................................
Wheeling, W. V a...........................
Mobile, Ala.....................................
Birmingham, A l a .........................
Little Rock, A r k ...........................
Springfield, Ohio...........................
Galveston, T ex..............................
Tacoma, W ash..............................
Haverhill, Mass.............................
Spokane, Wash..............................
Terre Haute, Ind ...........................
Dubuque, Iowa..............................
Quincy, 111.....................................
South Bend, I n d ...........................
Salem, Mass...................................
Johnstown, P a ..............................
Elmira, N. Y .................................
Allentown, P a ..............................
Davenport, Iow a...........................
McKeesport, P a ............................
Springfield, 111..............................
Chelsea, Mass................................
Chester, Pa.....................................
York, P a ........................................
Malden, M ass.......... .....................
Topeka, K ans................................
Newton. Mass................................
Sioux City, Io w a . .*.......................
Bayonne, N. J ................................
Knoxville, T e n n ...........................
Schenectady, N . Y ........................
Fitchburg, Mass............................
Superior, Wis..................................
Rockford, 111..................................
Taunton, M ass..............................
Canton, Ohio.................................
Bntte, M ont...................................
Montgomery, A l a .........................
Auburn, N. Y ................................
Chattanooga, Tenn.......................
East St. Louis, 111................................
Joliet, 111................................................

2

144

1

2

Hospitals.

1
«1
al
62
«1

1,205
160
191
850
421

58

al

10

152

ai
1
al
al

124
147
48
80

1

95

1

135

1

245

ai

1

al

16

ai
al
b 2
1

193
895
(<*)

a1

1

26

1

1

87

114

120
2
296
1,368
27
6i
/442

1
1
1
al

44

(e)
kj 1
63
al
ai
1

1

576
349
1,039
30

al

i47

ai
91

a

1

32

1

22

i

57

1

45

(*>

1

ai
al

168
169

ft 2

112

62
al
al

327
402

al

8

al

13

i2

644
742

al

Hospital for contagious diseases.
&Including 1 hospital for contagious diseases.
cData are for 9 months.
d Not reported.
e Hospital for contagious diseases located at
almshouse.
/N o t including pay patients.
a

9398— N o. 42— 02


Orphan asylums.

Average
Number
Average
Number. number Number. number Number. of pa­
of in­
tients
of in­
mates.
treated.
mates.

7

9 Owned by city under private management;
not including 1 new hospital not yet occupied.
ft Including smallpox hospital, but not includ­
ing new hospital, completed and moved into
April, 1902.
i
One hospital for contagious diseases and 1
hospital owned jointly by city and county.

BULLETIN OE THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
ble

X V I.—COST OF WATER, GAS, AND ELECTRIC-LIGHT PLANTS OWN]
OPERATED BY CITIES.
Waterworks.

irlal
m-

Cities.

ir.

1
2
3
4
5

6

7
8
9

10
11

12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61

New York, N .Y .......
Chicago. I ll..............
Philadelphia,Pa . . .
St. Louis, M o............
Boston, Mass............
Baltimore, M d .........
Cleveland, O h io___
Buffalo, N .Y ............
San Francisco, Cal..
Cincinnati, Ohio----Pittsburg, P a ..........
New Orleans, La—
Detroit, M ich ..........
Milwaukee, Wis —
Washington, D. C . . .
Newark, N . J ..........
Jersey City,N.J —
Louisville, K y .........
Minneapolis, M inn.
Providence, R. I ----Indianapolis, In d ...
Kansas City, Mo —
St. Paul, M in n .........
Rochester, N .Y .......
Denver, C o lo ..........
Toledo, Ohio............
Allegheny, P a .........
Columbus, O h io ----Worcester, Mass —
Syracuse, N. Y .........
New Haven, Conn..
Paterson, N .J..........
Fall River, Mass---St. Joseph, M o .........
Omaha, N ebr...........
Los Angeles, Cel—
Memphis, Tenn.......
Scranton, Pa............
Lowell, M ass..........
Albany, N .Y ............
Cambridge, Mass . . .
Portland, Oreg.........
Atlanta, Ga..............
Grand Rapids, Mich
Dayton, O n io..........
Richmond, V a.........
Nashville, Tenn —
Seattle, Wash..........
Hartford, Conn.......
Reading, P a ............
Wilmington, Del —
Camden, N .J ..........
Trenton, N .J ..........
Bridgeport, Conn. ..
Lynn, Mass..............
Oakland, C a l..........
Lawrence, Mass —
New Bedford, Mass.
Des Moines, Iow a...
Springfield, Mass .. .
Somerville, Mass .. .
Troy, N .Y ...............
Hoboken, N .J .........
Evansville, Ind.......
Manchester, N. H . . .
Utica, N .Y ...............
Peoria, 111...............

Owned
and
operated
by city.
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
N o ...
Y es..
Y es..
N o ...
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..

ves..
e
Y ()

Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
N o ...
N o ...
Y e s..
N o ...
N o ...
N o ...
N o ...
N o ...
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y e s..
Y e s..
Y es..
N o ...
Y es..
N o ...
Y es..
Y es..
N o ...
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
Y es..
N o ...
N o ...

Year
built.

Year ac­ Miles of
quired
by city. mains.
1,668.43 8123,012,020
35,310,099
1.890.03
37,971,959
1.379.03
669.00 21,551,600
15,782,617
719.60
15,035,835
626.20
563.82
10,735,867
9,424,404
490.00

1801
1835
1848
1808
1857
1860
” i840'
1872

(d)

571.53
359.98
/ 421.28
304.50
212.62
244.00
273.12
329.09

“ i824
1872
1863
1890
1854
1860
1868
1871
1895
1874
1870
1873
1889
1873
1847
1871
1845
1829
1874

445.49
343.50

(d)

252.00
348.37
42.00
177.06
150.00
182.00
178.18
169.58
90.30

(<
*)

1873
1799
1856
1857
1874
1874
1870
1830
1832

h

<&

1865
1827

129.37
131.60
124.29
178.00
124.17
145.18
122.20
103.41
79.04
162.92
131.15
101.21
106.20
110.00

126.37

1<
8
*’ i870

(<*) • m 131.81

*'i874
1866

(<*)

*(“ )*
1868
1833
1857
1900
1873

o
d)

)

146.30
84.50

d)

79.16
23.00
72.00
100.23

(d)

i

d)

d)
d)

80.41
94.89

Four plants: 1842,1852,1874,1897.
Four plants: 1 acquired in 1857; 3 built by city.
Slot reported.
Built by city.
3wned by city, but leased to private company.
including 18 miles of conduit and 21 miles of mains owned by United States Gove
including 87,985,730 expended by United States Government,
including 31 miles from source of supply to city limits.




975

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

Table X VI.—COST OF WATER, GAS, AND ELECTRIC-LIGHT PLANTS OWNED AND
OPERATED BY CITIES.
Gas works.
Owned
and
operated
by city.
No.......
No.......
M(*>
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
Y es___
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
N o ....,
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......

Year
built.

1836

1891

1850

Year ac­ Miles of
quired
by city. mains.

Electric-light plants.

Cost.

Owned
and
operated
by city.

Year
built.

Year
ac­ Miles of
quired mains.
by city.

No.......
( d)
Y es. . . .
(<
*)
No.......
No.......
N o.......
N o.......
N o.......
N o.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
( d)
Y e s ....
1895
N o.......
N o.......
N o.......
N o.......
N o.......
N o.......
No.......
N o.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
N o.......
'(d)
1,150,000 No.......
93.00
(d)
Y es___
1890
(d)
Y e s ....
(c)
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
Y e s ....
1889
(<
*)
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
N o.......
N o.......
Y es___
1899
(<
*)
No.......
1851
994,132 N o.......
79.61
No____
No.......!..............
N o.......1
..............
No.......1
..............
No....... 1
..............
No.......1..............
No.......1
..............
No.......i________
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
i
No.......
|
No.......
. . J .................... N o.......
i Two plants: 1885,1900.
iT w o plants: 1 acquired in 1889; 1 built by city.
fcTwo plants: 1 in 1899; 1 not reported.
l Two plants: 1 built by city; 1 acquired in 1870.
m Including 19.03 miles outside city limits.
« Three plants: 1864,1873,1890.
o Three plants: 1 acquired in 1872; 2 built by city.
( d)




1,230.50 $37,402,821

850.00

Cost.

$2,234,642

481.00

851,655

269.16
(«)

406,812
68,911

109.00

98,752

101.70

193,309

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1

2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

67

976

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

T able X V I.—COST OP WATER, GAS, AND ELECTRIC-LIGHT PLANTS OWNED AND
OPERATED BY CITIES—Concluded.
Waterworks.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

N o.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
No.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
N o.......
Y e s ....
No.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
N o.......
Y e s ....
No.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y es___
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
N o.......
N o.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
Y e s___
Y e s ....
N o.......
Y e s ....
No.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
Y es___
No.......
Y es___
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
No.......
N o.......
Y e s ....
N o.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
(d)
N o .....
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
N o.......
Y e s ....
Y es___
Y e s ....
No.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
No.......
N o.......
Y e s ....

Charleston, S.C.........
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah.
San Antonio, T e x ...
Duluth, M in n ..........
Erie, P a ....................
Elizabeth, N. J .........
Wilkesbarre, P a........
Kansas City, Kans ..
Harrisburg, P a .........
Portland, Me............
Yonkers, N. Y ..........
Norfolk, V a ..............
Waterbury, Conn .

90
91
92
93
94
96
96
97
98
99
100
101
102

103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
315
116
117
118
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Fort Wayne, I n d .. .
Youngstown, O h io .
Houston, T e x .........
Covington. K y .......
Akron, Ohio............
Dallas, T e x ............
Saginaw, M ich .......
Lancaster, Pa..........
Lincoln, N ebr.........
Brockton, M ass___
Binghamton, N. Y .
Augusta, Ga............
Pawtucket, R. I . . . .
Altoona, P a ............
Wheeling, W. V a ...
Mobile, Ala.............
Birmingham, A la ..
Little Rock, A r k . ..
Springfield, O h io...
Galveston, T ex.......
Tacoma, W ash.......
Haverhill, Mass —
Spokane, Wash —
Terre Haute, I n d ...
Dubuque, Iow a.......
Quincy, 111.............
South Bend, Ind___
Salem, Mass............
Johnstown, P a .......
Elmira, N .Y ............
Allentown, Pa........
Davenport, Iowa ...
McKeesport, P a ___
Springfield, 111........
Chelsea, Mass..........
Chester, P a .............
York, Pa..................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, K a n s ........
Newton. M ass....... .
Sioux Gity, Iowa ...
Bayonne, N. J ........
Knoxville,Tenn ...
Schenectady, N. Y ..
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior, W is..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass....... .
Canton, O hio..........
Butte, M on t.
Montgomery, Ala .
Auburn, N .Y ........
Chattanooga, T enn.
East St. Louis, 111. . .
Joliet, 111.................




Owned
Year
and
operated built.
by city.

Cost.

1853
1874

83

60.44
150.00

31,061,110
4,403,572

1896
1868

1898
(«)

49.22
110.63

1,784,126
1,821,099

1840

(«)

46.14

713,248

1874
1872
1866
1873
1880
1872

(1873
(a)
(a)

84.66
58.66
57.84
82.90
86.97
65.11

1,640,561
1,232,813
1,470,908
1,295,308
790,109
735,209

1869

(«)

1878
1872
1836
1885
1880
1867
1859
1876
1860
1834
1899

1882
(a)
(°)
(a
\

188i
1894
1883
1891
1885
1872
1873
1869
1865

(aj
(a)

(a\

v*)
(°i
(a )

1872
$

8
1893
8
1900
["1
i869

1882
1866
1867

(a)
(a»

1869

(a )

1876
1885
1884

(a )

1873
1875
1876
1869

44.00

1,212,653

203.00
86.00
87.30
53.01
68.75
74.75
55.26
148.62
558.25
42.00
97.21

1,287,259
909,895
872,022
411,103
943,516
771,644
834,902
1,866,445
697,865
803,092
658,350

60.50
49.05
68.04
76.81
70.60

707,577
1,656,688
1,243,623
1,376,519
1,326,761

62.00

556,953

57.97
65.00

457,974
1,925,869

46.93

426,374

45.75
62.50
38.45

445.000
852.000
488,204

8

81.54

1,093,881

137.90
60.04
34.83

2,089,285
463,587
299,757

45.17
67.65

8

(e )

1,236,610
437,775

62.75
79.21
63.00

642,468
1,288,129
646,472

1885
1865

1898
1894

54.28
67.00

596,539
584,122

1883

1889

34.50

325,000

Built by city.
M ncludmg 11 miles outside city limits.
o Not reported.

a

Year ac­ Miles of
quired
by city. mains.

STATISTICS OP CITIES,
COST OF WATER, GAS, AND ELECTRIC-LIGHT PLANTS OWNED AB
OPERATED BY CITIES—Concluded.
Cas works.

Electric-light plants.

Year ac­ Miles of
quired
by city. mains.

34.20

1875

40.00

Cost.

Owned
and
operated
by city.

No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
$1,780,971 No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
409,716 Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
Y e s ....
No.......
Y e s ....
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
Y e s ....
No.......
No.......
N o.......
No.......
No.......
No.......
No.......

Year
built.

Year
ac­ Miles of
quired mains.
by city.

larnal
im.
er.

68

1892

(«)

65.00

$135,221

1888

(«)

43.00

35,557

1894
1887

1893

8

65,000
502,230

69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109

110

1890

1900

(*)

(«)*

(«)

66.00

77,800

1897 | («)

65.00

158,242

1888
i
i

dCity owns distributing system only.
«T w o plants: 1871,1894.
/T w o plants: 1 acquired in 1885; 1 built by city.




Cost.

111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X VII.—BUILDING PERMITS.
Building permits granted.
arlal
lm5r.

1
2
3
4
5

6

7
8
9
10
11

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

21

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58

Cities.

For new buildings.

For repairs, extensions,
etc., to old buildings.

Proposed
Proposed
Number. expenditure. Number. expenditure.
New York, N. Y .......
Chicago, 111...............
Philadelphia, P a ___
St. Louis, M o............
Boston, Mass............
Baltimore, M d .........
Cleveland, O hio.......
Buffalo, N. Y ............
San Francisco, C a l..
Cincinnati, O h io ___
Pittsburg, P a............
New Orleans, L a ___
Detroit, M ich............
Milwaukee, W is.......
Washington, D. C ...
Newark, N. J ............
Jersey City, N. J .......
Louisville, K y ..........
Minneapolis, M inn..
Providence, R. I .......
Indianapolis, Ind ...
Kansas City, M o.......
St. Paul, Minn..........
Rochester, N. Y .......
Denver, C o lo............
Toledo, O h io ............
Allegheny, P a..........
Columbus, O h io.......
Worcester, Mass.......
Syracuse, N. Y ........
New Haven, C onn...
Paterson, N. J ..........
Fall River, Mass.......
St. Joseph, M o..........
Omaha, Nebr............
Los Angeles, C a l___
Memphis, T e n n .......
Scranton, P a ............
Lowell,Mass..............
Albany, N. Y ............
Cambridge, Mass___
Portland, Oreg.........
Atlanta, G a .............
Grand Rapids, Mich
Dayton, Ohio............
Richmond, V a ........
Nashville, T enn.......
Seattle, W ash..........
Hartford, Conn........
Reading, Pa.............
Wilmington, D e l___
Camden, N. J ..........
Trenton, N. J .......... .
Bridgeport, Conn—
Lynn, Mass...............
Oakland, Cal............
Lawrence, Mass.......
New Bedford, Mass..

7,657 8136,051,679
34,962,075
6,053
54,273 c 22,880,730
2,713
11,420,657
1,332
1,304
4,^763,768
e 6,232,882
1,831
679
3,732,097
(a)

548
3,705
01,706
2,276
989
1,660
972
655
1,451
1,244
793
0 2,501
1,805
01,373
493
1,214
(«)

0661

01,139
434
325
175
(a)

2,813,215
19,138,680
c 2,247.192
5,353,500
4,282,308
5,156,658
8,933,227
2,685,836
1,755,505
5,212,737
4,028,575
e 3,744,969
5,193,485
e 4,261,400
1,868,571
3,693,265
«1,^4,000
e l, 934,827
1,773,492
1,406,439
1,429,285
(a)

266
700
364
1,932
1,158
490

898,850
718,129
1,119,699
3,798,366
2,557,897
el, 776,768

5249
292
0746
1,030
484
01,006
213
04,741
3,566
728
627
237
250
268
331
233
246
262
238

(«)
2,800,620
el, 538,095
2,553,720
1,058,180
149,100
847,323
4,218,449
2,370,900
905,075
585,902
§6,760
1,104,107

(3

1,082,800
976,125

6,005
6,863
52,597
1,103
2,117
563
1,205
379
(a )

2,121
790
(*)
488
495
i 1,340
213
426
434
2,073
501
2%07
339

i296

401
85
(«)
133
119
276
798
1,199
114
52,039
275

(A)

1,665
316

(A)262
(A)

2,303
134
319
231
281
105
64
244
330
69
208

314,020,960
(a)
d

4,997,365
1,455,500
/)
606,484
(«)
662,000
431,794
123,900
742,387
J868,230
191,700
203,818
137,410
808,230
860,575
(/)
949,153
(/)
336,773
318,681

i!

249,980
218,004
244,725

(a)

141,420
11,002
507,605
300,832
307,398
(/)

{t528,160
%98,428

277,243
(«)
15,000
120,805
351,279
120,600
(«)
423,812
(a)

139,612
86,150

©65,000
76,450

t reported.
t including permits for heating apparatus, elevators, fire escapes, etc.
t including $631,277 proposed expenditure for heating apparatus, elevators, fire escapes, etc.
t including $1,010,338 proposed expenditure for heating apparatus, elevators, fire escapes, etc.
iluding proposed expenditure for repairs, extensions, etc., to old buildings.
jluded in proposed expenditure for new buildings.
iluding permits for repairs, extensions, etc., to old buildings.
iluded in permits for new buildings.
t including 2,199 permits for minor repairs, awnings, fire escapes, and elevators,
t including $169,182 proposed expenditure for minor repairs, awnings, fire escapes, and ele-




979

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able XVII.—BUILDING PERMITS—Continued.
Building permits granted.
Mar­
ginal
number.

59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120

Cities.

For new buildings.

For repairs, extensions,
etc., to old buildings.

Proposed
Proposed
Number. expenditure. Number. expenditure.
Des Moines, Io w a ...............................................
a 676 681,658,987
Springfield, Mass................................................
(0
(0
969,530
Somerville, Mass................................................
277
Troy, N. Y ..........................................................
Hoboken, N. J ....................................................
200,000
21
111,935
Evansville, I n d ..................................................
107
Manchester, N. H . .............................................
160
CO
Utica, N. Y ..........................................................
Peoria, 111............................................................
411
997,983
Charleston, S. C ..................................................
177,280
70
Savannah, Ga.....................................................
396,750
176
944,800
Salt Lake City, Utah..........................................
426
869,635
San Antonio, Tex.
..........................................
833
6955,864
Duluth, Minn.......................................................
a 570
607,504
Erie, Pa.................................................................
a 746
Elizabeth, N. J .....................................................
705,701
163
Wilkesbarre, P a ..................................................
423,054
170
TTflOsaa City, Kans...............................................
297,680
176
Harrisburg, P a ....................................................
738,292
420
Portland, Me. ( g ) ................................................
170
(f)
.
\ f)
Yonkers, N .Y .......................................................
245
Norfolk, Va..........................................................
* 520,000
308
Waterbury, Conn................................................
Holyoke, Mass.....................................................
CO
Fort Wayne, In d ..................................................
469,546
Youngstown, Ohio...............................................
61,428,925
a 545
Houston, T ex.......................................................
588,834
456
CovingtonsK y ................................................ .
6153,125
a44
a 685
Akron, O hio.........................................................
if)
1,200,903
Dallas, T e x ..........................................................
732
311,787
Saginaw, M ic h ....................................................
96
Lancaster, Pa.......................................................
90
CO
Tiineoln Nehr
_________ ___________
404,315
134
Brockton, Mass....................................................
336,050
107
( /)
Binghamton, N. Y ...............................................
203
530,799
Augusta, G a .........................................................
360
664,155
Pawtucket, R. I. { h ) .............................................
500
6412,500
Altoona, Pa..........................................................
a 197
Wheeling, W. V a .................................................
£52,157
106
Mobile, A la..........................................................
Birmingham, Ala................................................
1,297,500
538
9
75,200
Little Rock, Ark..................................................
(/)
Springfield, O h io.................................................
56,200
Galveston, T e x ....................................................
( / ) 13
711,843
363
Tacoma, Wash.....................................................
208,000
Haverhill, M ass..................................................
58
6624,570
Spokane, W ash....................................................
a 523
287,847
286
Terre Haute, Ind ................................................
Dubuque, Towa...................................................
Quincy, 111............................................. 1...........
(/)
434
^753,500
South Bend, I n d ................................................
160,343
71
Salem, Mass.........................................................
(/)
Johnstown, P a ....................................................
(/J
(/)2
Elmira, N. Y .......................................................
760,000
A l l e n t o w n , Pa __.........„......................................
236
DaV^P^U Tmya.
..........
. ............
1,082,730
178
(/)
McKeesport, P a ..................................................
/
Springfield, 111....................................................
( 'l
(V)
' 69
Chelsea, Mass......................................................
173,450
51
•Chester, Pa..........................................................
428
York, P a ..............................................................
if)
300,344
109
Malden, Mass.....................................................
a Including permits for repairs, extensions, etc., to old buildings.
b Including proposed expenditure for repairs, extensions, etc., to old
c Included in permits for new buildings.
d Included in proposed expenditure for new buildings.
cN o permits issued except for plumbing.
/N o t reported.
g Data are for 9 months.
h Data are for 6 months.




(c)
89

(d)
(e)
817,800

260
65
101

25,000
13,832
CO

558
212
421
130
1,052
(c)

69,493
102,000
219,720
130,025
117,155
(<*)
174,424
20,607
26,860
2,725
44,780

116
12
37
65
52
96
131
(0
1,118
(c)
^ 221
69
70

if )
if)

165,000

95,250
(<
*)
85,494
(d)
CO
256,341
20,652
if)

187,500

125
159
713
63
(*)

66,461
42,505
(<*)

106
251
26

53,660
111,544
26,240

333
60

(\ l 2 9
115,283
30,000
(<*)
64,008

%

W187
( / ) 98
80
( / ) 36
(/)
if)

72
40
62
141
buildings.

if )

if)

85,275
57,930

if)
if)
if)
if)
\f)
if)

33,125
if)

28,200

980

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X VII.—BUILDING PERMITS—Concluded.
Building permits granted.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

For new buildings.

For repairs, extensions,
etc., to old buildings.

Proposed
Proposed
Number. expenditure. Number. expenditure.

121 Topeka, Kans.....................................................
122 Newton. Mass.....................................................
123 Sioux City, Iow a ................................................
124 Bayonne, N. J .....................................................
125 Knoxville, T en n ................................................
126 Schenectady, N. Y .............................................
127 Fitchburg, M ass.................................................
128 Superior, Wis.......................................................
129 Rockford, 111.......................................................
130 Taunton, Mass....................................................
131 Canton, Ohio.......................................................
132 Butte, Mont.........................................................
133 Montgomery, A la ...............................................
134 Auburn, N. Y ......................................................
135 Chattanooga, T e n n ............................................
136 East St. Louis, 111...............................................
137 Joliet, 111..............................................................
a
b

a 470
116
(«>
119
(«>
(e)

98

(e)
(e )

b

$641,622
(e )
(e )

(C) 73

449,957
(•)

(e )M
(«)

166,700
(«)

(e)

(e )
(e )

a 410
a 354
79

5481,389
b 728,866
447,180

259
528
(e)

332,039
1,520,000
(•)

46

\e )

( e)
(c)
«
305
700
(*)

Including permits for repairs, extensions, etc., to old buildings.
Including proposed expenditure for repairs, extensions, etc., to old buildings.

c Included in permits for new buildings.

Included in proposecLexpenditure for new buildings.
« Not reported.
m

d




Kj
(e )

$40,312
(«)
42,000

(e)
(e )

M

89,173

177,524
(«)

981

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able XVIII.—DEBT AND LEGAL BORROWING LIMIT.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Debt.
Cities.

New York. N. Y ----Chicago, 111..............
Philadelphia. P a . . .
St. Louis, M o..........
Boston, Mass.......... .
Baltimore, M d.........
Cleveland, Ohio___
Buffalo, N. Y ..........
San Francisco, C al..
Cincinnati, Ohio . . .
Pittsburg, P a..........
New Orleans, La . . .
Detroit, M ich..........
Milwaukee, W is___
Washington, D. C ..
Newark, N. J ..........
Jersey City, N .J .. ..
Louisville, K y.........
Minneapolis, M inn.
Providence, R. I . . .
Indianapolis, I n d ..
Kansas City, Mo—
St. Paul, Minn.........
Rochester, N. Y ___
Denver, C olo..........
Toledo, O h io ..........
Allegheny, Pa.........
Columbus, Ohio___
Worcester, Mass___
Syracuse, N. Y .........
New Haven, Conn..
Paterson, N. J .........
Fall River, Mass___
St. Joseph, Mo.........
Omaha, Nebr..........
Los Angeles, Cal___
Memphis, Tenn.......
Scranton, P a ..........
Lowell, Mass..........
Albany, N .Y ..........
Cambridge, Mass. . .
Portland, O reg.......
Atlanta, Ga...............
Grand Rapids, Mich
Dayton, Ohio..........
Richmond, Va.........
Nashville, T en n ___

Bonded.

Floating.

Total.

Sinking
fund.

Net debt. Legal borrow­
ing limit.

$426, 174,823 $6,306,472 $432,481,295 $121, 340,920 $311,140,375
b 22, 459,692 14,478,182 b 36,937,874
534,341 b 36,403,533
59, 932,895 1,441,606 61,374,501 13, 615,842 47,758,659
18, 916,278
18,916,278
653,866 18,262,412
e 79, 954,972
« 79,954,972 /32, 802,887 (747,152,085
40, 164,683
40,164,683
9i 315,978 30,848,705
16, 511.550 1,391,353 17,902,903
3, 177,480 14,725,423
16, 874,302 1,475,192 18,349,494
612,466 17,737,028
517,776
738,394
488,394
220,618
250.000
*32, 494,511
*32,494,511
413,256 *27,081,255
23, 278,702 1,143,454 24,422,156
825,363 18,596,793
17,902,808
17, 344,510
558,298 17,902,808
4,885,024
6,946,102
2,061,078
15,000
6, 931,102
6,860,686
6,860,686
621,186
6, 239.500
15, 068,350
220,182 15,288,532
153,880 14,134,652
19.731.000
928,561 14,802,439
17, 585.000 2,146,000
19, 411,129
484,653 16,205,526
279,050 19,690,179
8,332,834
10, 057.000 394,000 10.451.000
118,166
6,683,897
8 561.000
8.561.000
877,103
291,615 14,029,846
497,461 17,321,461
16, 824.000
P 4,051,735
J>3, 855,735
196,000 P 4,051,735
a 6, 477,066
a 6,477,066
401,291 a 6,075,775
8,630,887
9.337.500
706,613
8, 001,100 1,336,400
8, 889.000 1,802,849 10,691,849
445,831 10,246,018
r 2, 017.300
25,682 r 2,042,982
153,890 r 1,889,092
7, 689,691
6,932,051
7,764,691
832,640
75,000
6,696,121
7, 853,733
157,612
7,853,733
5,410,635
7, 601.900
7,684,900
274,265
83,000
5,553,893
9, 859.000
174,936 10,033,936
480.043
9,136,896
9.187.792
50,896
6, 906.000 2,281,792
3,823,594
3.884.500
60,906
455.000
3, 429.500
3,922,673
715.000
4.050.500
127,827
3, 335.500
643,071 *3,719,267
5, 275.000 s 87,338 1 5,362,338
1,717,451
11,277
1,781,827
1, 770.550
64,376
6,588,349
6.638.792
5, 637.900 1,000,892
50,443
Ml, 389,175
«1, 389,175
243,852 Ml, 145,323
654 w 3,371,154
u>3, 370.500
131.043 w 3,240, 111
1,055,808
161,225
1,463,225
1, 302.000
407,417
3,108,626
21,939
3,777,929
669,303
3, 755,990
s 4, 660,600
s 4,660,600
492,041 * 3,168,559
6,374,916
8.374.500
999,584
8 374.500
aa 5, 722,618
98,854 «a 5,637,260
13,496 ao5,736,U4
3.545.500
3,369,749
175,751
175,000
3, 370.500
2 032.000
1,863,097
2.032.000
168,903
2,991,411
3,511,129
52,129
519,718
3, 459.000
6,610,582
7,227,423
7, 227,423
616,841
3,517,300
9,473
3,507,827
3, 517.300

,

,
,

10 per ct. (a)
5 per cent.
7 per cent.
5 per cent.
24 per ct. (*)'
No limit.
7 per cent. (?)
10 per ct. (*)
No limit.
7 per cent, (c)
(*)
2 per cent, (a)
5perct. (m)
No limit.
No limit.
10 per ct. (a)
5 per cent, (o)
30 per ct. ( o )
2 per cent, (c)
5 per cent. M
No limit.
10 per ct. (i)
3 per cent, (a)
No limit.
7 per cent, (e)
No limit.
2| per ct. (ft)
10 per ct. (<)
(*)
10 per ct. (c)
24 per ct. (ft)
5 per cent. ( c )
10 per ct. (e)
15 per ct. (v)
2 per ct. (*)
24perct. (v)
10 per ct. (a)
24 per ct. (ft)
(*)
7percent. ( o )
No limit.
No limit.
18perct. (i)
No limit.

a Of assessed valuation, not including water debt.
b Including $4,163,575 special assessment bonds, against private property,
aOf assessed valuation.
d Of assessed valuation; m aybe increased by vote of people.
e Including $3,499,000 county bonds.
/In clu din g county sinking fund.
(/Including net county debt.
ftOf average assessed valuation for 3 years.
4Of assessed valuation of real estate.
J Controlled by vote of people, but not to exceed 15 per cent of assessed valuation.
*Including $961,434 improvement bonds.
I Controlled by legislation.
m Of average assessed valuation for 5 years.
» Controlled by Congress.
oOf assessed valuation, plus sinking fund.
Including $856,209 assessment bonds.
^Including $1,216,166 park certificates of indebtedness.
»*Not including $1,660,365 bonds against private property.
8 Trust funds.
t Including $87,338 trust funds carried by the city as a floating debt.
wNot including bonds against private property for street improvement, amount not reported.
v O t assessed valuation, but not to exceed $2,000,000, except for waterworks or sewers.
w Including $60,000 market-house bonds, secured by mortgage on market house, and $250,000 park
bonds, secured by mortgage on park property,
a?Of assessed valuation; may be 7 per cent by vote of people.
i/Of average assessed valuation for 3 years, not including water debt,
z Including $674,600 certificates of indebtedness against private property
aa Including $331,118 improvement bonds against private property.




982

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X VIII.—DEBT AND LEGAL BORROWING LIMIT-Continued.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
48
49
50
51
-52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67

Debt.
Cities.

Bonded.

Floating.

Total.

Seattle, Wash.......... a$5,001,041 $1,250,000 a $6,251,041
4.791.000
5,276,635
Hartford, Conn.......
485,635
1.505.500
Reading, P a ............
1.505.500
2,232,393
70,994
Wilmington, Del___
2,161,399
2,812,375
Camden, N. J ..........
140,800
2,671,575
4,007,736
Trenton, N. J ..........
728,673
3,279,063
1,983,800
28,800
1.955.000
Bridgeport, Conn_
_
4,809,450
4,309,450
Lynn, Mass..............
500.000
/441,195
421.000 / 20,195
Oakland, Cal..........
2,302,682
2.096.500
206,082
Lawrence, Mass___
4.181.000
3.706.000
New Bedford, Mass.
475.000
9 1,171,500 9 103,348 9 1,274,848
Des Moines, Iow a...
2,907,921
Springfield, Mass. . .
53,021
2,854,900
Somerville, Mass___
1.761.000
1.461.000
300.000
2,103,950
2,103,950
Troy, N. Y ...............
Hoboken, N. J .........
1.430.500
1.424.000
6,500
2.171.000
Evansville, Ind.......
2.155.000
16,000
1,860,709
Manchester, N. H . . .
1.845.000
15,709
412,126
664,085
Utica, N .Y ...............
251,959
j 762,800
j 968,964
Peoria, 111................
206,164
3,799,150
3,799,150
Charleston, S. C.......
Savannah, G a .........
3,154,650
3,154,650
3,506,216
16,216
Salt Lake City, Utah
3.490.000
2,542,827
San Antonio, T e x ..
2.271.000
271,827
6,035,371
Duluth, M inn..........
5,997,250
38,121
954,000
954.000
Erie, P a ....................
3,198,960
Elizabeth, N. J .......
3,198,960
608,703
601,100
7,<
Wilkesbarre, P a ___
2,584,248
136,382
2,447,866
Kansas City, Kans .
Harrisburg, P a .......
ol,284,800
7,000 ol,291,800
2,772,750
2,772,750
Portland, Me. («) . ..
3,881,843
Yonkers, N. Y .........
3,857,123
24,720
4,812,745
Norfolk, Y a ............
4,713,550
99,195
1.570.000
1.570.000
Waterbury, Conn ..
2.125.500
Holyoke, M ass.......
2.275.500
150,000
r 632,933
624,800
8,133
Fort Wayne, Ind .. .
745,914
712,914
33,000
Youngstown, O h io .
Houston, T e x .........
3,098,800 861,627 s3,160,427
2.081.000
Covington, K y ....... '
2,095,550
14,550
637,972
10,272
627.700
Akron, Ohio............
11,489
Dallas, T ex ..............
1,929,989
1.918.500
3,884
1,363,734
Saginaw, M ich .......
1,359,850
Lancaster, P a .........
1,269,958
1,269,958
294,845, 1,861,833
1,566,988
Lincoln, N ebr.........
270.000
Brockton, Mass.......
2,285,080
2,015,080
694.000
73,635
Binghamton, N. Y .
767,635
223.000
Augusta, G a............
1,749,300
1,972,300
666,796
4,100,000
Pawtucket, R. I ___
4,766,796
Altoona, P a ............
12,075
1,088,575
1.076.500
569,054
Wheeling, W. Y a ...
483.700
85,354

Sinking
fund.

$597,593
84,632
155,843
1,451,899
343,973
1,336,535
401,290
925,653
73,438
711,033
25,416
97,934
53,975
350,899
195,000
950
350
91,775
138,629
234,425
477
15,689
149,366
1,414,873
361,498
443,670
74,877
630,571
18,738
11,509
14,374
80,816
200,523
65,832
565,000
49,407
360,696
50,000
666,022
116,153

borrow­
Net debt. Legal limit.
ing

a $6,251,041
4,679,042
1,420,868
2,232,393
2,656,532
2,555,837
1,639,827
3,472,915
/ 441,195
1,901,292
3,255,347
9 1 , 201,410
2,196,888
1,761,000
2,078,534
1,332,566
2,117,025
1,509,810
664,085
J 773,964
3,798,200
3,154,650
3,505,866
2,451,052
5,896,742
719,575
3,198,483
593,014
2,584,248
ol,142,434
1,357,877
3,520,345
4,369,075
1,495,123
1,644,929
»*614,195
734,405
s3,160,427
2,081,176
557,156
1,729,466
1,297,902
704,958
1,812,426
1,924,384
717,635
1,972,300
4,100,774
972,422
569,054

1£ per ct. (b)
No limit.
7 percent. (<*)
(d)
No limit.
(d )

2£ per ct. (e)
15perct. (o'
2£per ct. ( e
2£ perct. (o'
5 per cent, (c)
21 perct. (o)
21 perct. (e)
10 per ct. ( c )
(<*)

2 per cent, (c)
5 percent, (h)
10 per ct. ( t)
5 per cent, (c)
8 percent, (fc)
7 percent. \c)
4 percent. (G
8 per ct.(c)
5 p erct.(c)
21 per ct.(m)
No limit.
2 per ct. (n)
No limit.
7 per ct.(p)
5 per ct. (c)
10 per ct.(i)
20 per ct.(o)
No limit.
21 per ct.(o)
2 per ct.(o)
No limit.
21 per ct.(c)
10 per ct.(«)
7 per ct.(i)
No limit.
7 per ct.(p)
No limit.
21 per ct.(e)
No limit.
7 per ct.fc)
3 per ct.(M)
7 per ct. M
5 per ct.(c)

a Including $531,041 local improvement bonds against private property.
&Of assessed valuation; 5 per cent by three-fifths vote of people; 5 per cent additional for water­
works and lighting plants.
oOf assessed valuation.
d Controlled by legislation.
eOf average assessed valuation for 3 years.
f Not including $25,584 in litigation.
gNot including debt of 1 school district not reported.
h Of assessed valuation, not including water debt.
i Of assessed valuation of real estate.
j Including $148,300 assessment bonds.
fcOf assessed valuation; may be increased by vote of people.
I Of assessed valuation, and 4 per cent additional for water, sewers, and light.
mOf assessed valuation; may be 7 per cent by vote of people.
»*0f assessed valuation of real estate; may be 7 per cent by vote of people for general city purposes,
also an equal amount for school purposes.
o Not including $43,100 street improvement bonds.
pOf assessed valuation for general city purposes, also an equal amount for school purposes.
< Data are for 9 months.
1
**Not including bonds against private property for street improvement, amount not reported.
s Not including $118,000 in litigation.
t Fixed by charter at $2,000,000.
a Of assessed valuation, plus sinking fund.
a Of assessed valuation of real estate for general city purposes, also an equal amount for school
purposes.




983

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table X VIII.—DEBT AND LEGAL BORROWING LIMIT—Concluded.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Debt.
' Cities.
Bonded.

Floating.

Total.

Mobile, A l a ..............
<
*$876,500
*
a $876,500
Birmingham, A la . .. c 2,124,000
$27,113 <2,151,113
?
Little Rock, A r k ___
d 212,407
d 118,000
94,407
Springfield, O h io___
938,846
893,846
45,000
Galveston, T e x ........
4,225,752
282,752
3,943,000
Tacoma, W ash......... / 4,256,494
215,433 / 4,471,927
Haverhill, Mass.......
1,881,563
1,857,200
24,363
Spokane, Wash......... i 2,178,389 J 662,386 Je 2,840,775
m351,000
m 345,000
Terre Haute, In d ___
6,000
1,566,918
Dubuque, Iow a.........
1,312,615
254,303
1,071,300
24,329
1,095,629
Quincy, 111...............
South Bend, I n d ___
0 796,387
o769,090
27,297
Salem, Mass..............
871,702 P 101,384
P 973,086
Johnstown, P a .........
534,500
534,500
Elmira, N. Y ............
1,132,855
19,855
1,113,000
Allentown, P a .........
826,843
6,543
820,300
Davenport, Io w a ___
*<441,920
29,788
u 471,708
745,100
154.076
899,176
McKeesport, P a .......
1,021,624
Springfield, 111.........
122; 924
898.700
1,639,200
Chelsea, M ass..........
1,639,200
Chester, P a...............
812.700
901,200
88,500
York, P a ...................
8,159
460,659
452,500
1,644 800
Malden, M ass..........
1,905,937
261,137
1,110,390
Topeka, Kang..........
l ,l l t 90
6,008,413
Newton, Mass..........
5,611,, 76 396,637
Sioux City, Io w a ___ v 2,147,362
77,760 v 2,225,122
2,076,600
Bayonne, N. J ..........
1,964,600
112,000
Knoxville, T e n n ___
1,421,673
1,391,500
30,173
Schenectady, N. Y ..
1,248,926
933,000
315,926
Fitchburg, Mass.......
1,877,200
1,677,200
200,000
Superior, Wis............
1,549,023
1,546,623
2,400
Rockford, 111............
291,800
204,163
495,963
Taunton, M ass.........
1,939,425
1,891,575
47,850
1,017,069
Canton, Ohio............
969,189
47,880
Butte, M ont..............
w 260,000
351,267
u> 611,267
Montgomery, Ala . . . 01,974,865
64,638 02,039,503
649,772
Auburn, N. Y ..........
649,772
Chattanooga, T enn ..
101,520
932,520
831,000
a a 977,800
50.000 aa 1,027,800
East St. Louis, 111—
Joliet, 111...................
196,800
184,800
12.000

Sinking
fund.

Net debt.

<*$876,500
2,151,113
d 187,113
938,846
3,114,049
/ 4,427,688
1,407,010
fc2,840,775
m 318,299
1,534,382
973,830
o751,558
P 676,914
439,174
1,132,855
728,330
u471,708
619,154
1,021,271
1,205,725
832,078
455,115
1,610,794
1,101,120
4,199,227
v 2,220,430
1,853,600
1,409,354
1,112,092
1,454,785
1,301,009
495,963
1,426,938
1,003,289
w 593,848
#2,039,603
649,772
931,553
aa 1,020,600
196,800
o

$25,294
1,111,703
44,239
474,553
32,701
32,536
121,799
44,829
296,172
95,326
98,513
280,022
353
433,475
69,122
5,544
295,143
9,270
1,809,186
4,692
223,000
12,319
136,834
422,415
248,014

x

512,487
13,780
17,419
967
7,200

Legal borrow­
ing limit.

7 per ct.(6)
7 per ct.(o)

()
e

No limit.
(«)
5 per ct.(flr)
2i per ct.(A)
5 per ct .(I)
2 per ct. ( n j
5 per ct. ( n j
5 per ct. (nj
2 per ct. (w)
2£ per ct. (q )
2 per ct. (r)
10 per ct. (&)
7 per ct. ( n
5 per ct. M
2 per ct. M
5 per ct. (n)
2 \ per ct. («)
2 per ct. (rl
2 per ct. (**)
2£ per ct. ( q )
No limit.
2£ per ct. (a)
5 per ct. (n )
3 per ct. (w)
No limit.
10 per ct. (nj
2 \ per ct. (a)
5 per ct. ( n j
5 per ct. (n)
2£ per ct. (q)
No limit.
3 per ct. (nj
7 per ct. (6)
lO perct. (zj
(e )

5 per ct. («)

a Including $65,000 street improvement bonds, but not including $2,241,379 debt of old city placed
in hands of trustee on reorganization of city.
b Of assessed valuation, provided that there shall not be included in the limitation temporary loans
not exceeding one-fourth of the general revenues, payable within 1 year; bonds to be issued for the
purpose of acquiring, providing, or constructing schoolhouses, waterworks, and sewers; also bonds
issued for street improvement where cost in whole or in part is assessed against the abutting property.
0 Not including $72,500 improvement bonds to be paid from improvement assessments.
d Not including the bonded indebtedness of 22 special improvement districts for which no report is
made to city.
e Controlled by legislation.
/In clu din g $123,494 local improvement bonds against private property.
a Of assessed valuation; 5 per cent additional for waterworks ana 2 per cent additional for schools,
ft Of average assessed valuation for 3 years, not including water debt.
1 Including $248,389 special assessment bonds against private property,
i Including $1,287 special assessment warrants against private property.
* Including $249,676 special assessment bonds and warrants against private property.
l Of assessed valuation; 5 per cent additional for waterworks and lighting plants, by vote of people.
wNot including $87,318 local improvement bonds,
n Of assessed valuation.
o Including $479,601 street and sewer improvement bonds against private property.
pNot including $164,532 trust and endowment funds regarded as a liability by the city.
q O i average assessed valuation for 3 years.
r Of assessed valuation; may be 7 per cent by vote of people for general city purposes, also an equal
amount for school purposes.
sOf average assessed valuation of real estate for 3 years.
t o t assessed valuation of real estate for general city purposes, also an equal amount for school
purposes.
wIncluding $83,920 improvement bonds against private property.
v Including $291,724 improvement bonds against private property.
w Including debt of school district extending beyond city limits.
x Including sinking fund of school district extending beyond city limits.
v Including $95,815 street paving bonds payable by property owners.
z O t assessed valuation of real estate.
a a Including $170,800 special assessment bonds.




984

BULLETIN OE THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X IX .—BASIS OF ASSESSMENT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND TAXA­
TION.
Assessment of property.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Legal basis, per Basis inpractice,per
cent of full value. cent o f full value.
Real.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

New York, N . Y ..............................................................
Chicago, 111......................................................................
Philadelphia, P a ............................................................
St. Louis,‘M o....................................................................
Boston, M ass...................................................................
Baltimore, Md.................................................................
Cleveland, O h io..............................................................
Buffalo, N .Y ....................................................................
San Francisco, C a l.........................................................
Cincinnati, O liio ............................................................
Pittsburg, P a ...................................................................
New Orleans, La..............................................................
Detroit, M ich...................................................................
Milwaukee, W is ..............................................................
Washington, D.C............................................................
Newark, N. J ...................................................................
Jersey City, N. J ..............................................................
Louisville, K y .................................................................
MinneapoliSjMinn.........................................................
Providence. It. I ..............................................................
Indianapolis, I n d ...........................................................
Kansas City, M o..............................................................
St. Paul, M i n n .......................................................................................
Rochester, N. Y ...............................................................
Denver, C o lo ...................................................................
Toledo, Ohio....................................................................
Allegheny, P a.................................................................
Columbus, O h io ..............................................................
Worcester, Mass..............................................................
Syracuse, N. Y .................................................................
New Haven, Conn..........................................................
Paterson, N. J ...................................................................
Fall River, Mass..............................................................
St. Joseph, M o .................................................................
Omaha, N ebr...................................................................
Los Angeles, Cal..............................................................
Memphis, Tenn...............................................................
Scranton, Pa....................................................................
Lowell, Mass...................................................................
Albany, N. Y ...................................................................
Cambridge, Mass.............................................................
Portland, Oreg.................................................................
Atlanta, Ga......................................................................

Personal.

(an
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
(V)
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

100
20
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
(*)
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
90
100
100
100
100
60
100
100
100
100

(* )

(* )

100
20
80
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

(V )
K

100
100
100
100
100
100

100
100
100
100
100
100

Real.
70.
20
80
66$
100
80
50
100
60
60
(V)

100
70
60
75
100
70
80
60
100
66$
40
60
80
100
60
(t,>60
100
100
100
100
100
50
40
50
60
33$
100
100
100
30
66$

Personal.
100
20
100
66$
100
60
50
100
60
60
100
100
70
60
100
100
70
60
60
100
66$
40
60
80
100
60
90
50
100
100
100
30
100
50
40
50
60
33$
100
100
100
30
100

a Including $1,157,400 liable for taxes for State purposes only, and $211,334,194 franchises.
b Including $112,410,244 exempt from taxes for State purposes.
0 Including $1,157,400 liable for taxes for State purposes only, $112,410,244 exempt from taxes for
State purposes, and $211,334,194 franchises.
d Included in county.
eIncluding State, varies in different boroughs from $2.79 to $3.37.
/V aries in different boroughs from $20.38 to $22.01.
a Varies in different boroughs from $23.17 to $25.38.
h School, $21.38; sanitary district, $3.68; library, $0.55.
1 Not including park'hoafd tax of $2.82 to $5.20, except in Jefferson Township, lake-shore protective
tax of $1.37 in North Chicago, and a boulevard and town-bond tax of $1.18 in West Chicago.
$ City rate; suburban rate, $12.33; agricultural rate, $9.25.
Not including State tax of $4 on mort­
gages, securities, stocks, bonds, etc.
* School, $4; library, $0.40.
i School.
m School, $3.07; court, $0.63; street opening, $0.06; sinking fund, $1.63; interest on debt, $3.10; police
department, $3.33; city poor, $1.36.
«City proper;, suburban districts, $6; securities, $3.
oSchool, $8.10; library, $0.80.
Plncludmg $13,396,848 special franchises,
a Including State.
r Lamp.
a Included in city.
t Including county.
^School, $3.93; library, $0.40.
v City proper, 100; suburban districts, 66f; agricultural districts, 50.
toNot including ward school tax of from $0.14 to $7, and State tax of $4 on mortgages, securities,
stocks, bonds, etc.
o No legal basis.
s
v Levee.
* School, $3.60; police, $1.77; highway, $0.67.




985

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X IX .—BASIS OF ASSESSMENT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND TAXA­
TION.

Real.

Personal.

Total.

a$3,237,778,261 *>$550,192,612 c$3,787,970,873
115,325,842
259,254,598
374,580,440
1,649,799
919,706,697
921,356,496
342,325,544
52,470,160
394,795,704
227,468,334
1,152,505,834
925,037,500
258,304,425
175,039,397
433,343,822
143,323,490
53,130,155
196,453,645
J>242,349,138
221,405,290
20,943,848
289,682,092
123,417,901
413,099,993
170,173,990
44,476,630
214,650,620
4,596,755
352,157,335
347,560,680
37,594,075
108,079,794
145,673,869
175,766,620
71,481,880
247,248,500
134,135,624
31,089,263
165,224,887
a a l2 567,084
aal92 901,725
180,334,641
129,832,105
28,753,530
158,685,635
86,241,745
9,360,817
95,602,562
90,200,000
33,900,000
124,100,000
80,129,845
22,082,661
102,212,506
151,533,940
41,267,920
192,801,860
94,935,180
34, °49,770
129,184,950
59,001,060
20,775,781
79,776,841
71,067,159
15,890,170
86,957,329
**107,303,311
9.145,662
116,448,973
134,364,115
(**)
(**)
49,401,580
14,658,830
64,060,410
95,829,425
1,374,450
97,203,875
51,180,860
14,333,540
65,514,400
88,054,200
26,223,935
114,278,135
jpp8 1 , 045,860
6,058,243
87,104,103
88,175,138
11,327,480
99,502,618
40,960,583
8,141,402
49,101,985
46,198,000
28,356,380
74,554,380
16,696,460
8,650,280
25,346,740
29,244,215
7,129,971
36,374,186
62,300,365
11,077,565
73,377,930
32,714,389
37,872,757
5,158,368
21,818,895
1,535,151
23,354,046
56,248,745
15,425,843
71,674,688
W 61,360,400
8,108,838
69,469,238
78.568,300
96,216,875
17.648,575
43,360,537
(**)
(**)
43,565,385
57,202,574
13,637,189

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Tax rate, per $1,000.

Assessed valuation of property.

State.
( d)

$5.00
2.50
.70
1.70
2.89
(<*)
4.80
2.89
6.00
2.43
3.59
(•)
4.25
1.60
1.65
2.97
2.50
2.83
1.03
4.10
2.89
2.89
.35
1.03
(ll)
.25
2.50
7.38
6.01
3.50
(«j
1.20
.51
10.96
3.34

County.
(«)
$5.90
.90
3.51
£4.85
(•)
3.82
2.00
i.5 i
2.87
5.46
5.32
2.70
2.92
3.73
3.60
4.75
2.35
13.00
4.16
1.50
5.85
.78
2.42
(ll)
1.17
4.00
17.20
7.99
4.80
7.50
(*)
4.90
.93
3.54
6.06

City.

Other.

Total.

(/)
(?)
*$52.61
$16.10 *$25.61
/18.50
/18.60
*4.40
19.50
12.60
*2.77
14.90
10.53
t»13.18
nl9.85
4.97
©8.90
26.70
11.40
r. 73
23.72
18.14
15.56
U 0.76
24.82
13.78
«4.33
10I 7 .O
O
15.00
id. 00
22.00
29.00
*6.04
19.64
9.66
13.33
12.67
22.46
*>*>15.00
*>*>15.00
£15.94
21.40
cc21.07 <**1.61
28.00
11.70
*3.30
21.95
16.52 ec8.82
29.86
9.75 //4 .6 0
16.00
7.50 ££5.30
19.50
11.00 **13.30
30.40
15.43
*3.89
26.90
//15.66
**19.04
mm32.40
15.30
*7.65
30.40
15.70
13.50 r m Z . 80 00 I 8 . 8O
*6.60
28.50
13.16
15.27
16.40
24.76
21.30
9.75
*3.00
12.75
(ll)
(ll)
25.00
16.78
18.20
29.50
15.00
18.00
58.58
27.50
16.50
rr26.50
££12.50
(K )
U
(88 )
**6.70
13.40 tw16.50 mw37.40
18.60
a»18.60
21.00
14.90
16.90
**.76
14.70
28.00
7.00 aaa6.50
*2.10
24.00
12.50

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43

aoNot including $1,395,061 gross receipts of street railways taxed at the rate of 4 per cent.
** City rate; agricultural rate, $10; gross receipts street railways, $40.
>>
cc Including city schools,
e s t a t e schools.
ee School, $6.59; State university, $2.23.
//In terest and sinking fund.
o o School, $5.10; township, $0.20.
h h School, $10; park district, $3; township, $0.30.
a Including $4,339,436 franchises.
//E x ce p t wards 15 and 16, where rate varies from $12.93 to $15.34.
fcfcExcept wards 15 and 16, where rate varies from $16.31 to $18.72.
l*Not reported.
m m Not including district school tax rate of from $6 to $25.
nwSchool, $3; county road, $0.50; sewer, $0.30.
ooNot including ward school tax of from $0.60 to $5.60, and State tax of $4 on mortgages,
securities, stocks, bonds, etc.
jpp Including $3,146,100 franchises.
m City proper; annexed districts, $10 and $10.30.
rr city proper; annexed districts, $24 and $24.30.
8 8 $18.50 in 8 wards; $13.40 in 3 wards; $12.10 in 11 wards.
t t School, $2.20; special sewer, $2.50; special street improvement, $2.
« m$33.50 in 8 wards; $28.40 in 3 wards; $27.10 in 11 wards.
vv School, $13; poor, $3.50.
«no Not including State tax of $4 on mortgages, securities, stocks, bonds, etc.
xx Including State and county.
w Including $1,780,030 franchises.
** Metropolitan sewer.
aaa School, $2.90; park, $0.20; library, $0.40; road, $1.50; port of Portland, $1.50.




986

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

T able X IX .—BASIS OP ASSESSMENT, ASSESSED VALUATION OP PROPERTY, AND TAXA­
TION—Continued.
Assessment of property.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Legal basis, per Basis in practice, per
cent of full value. cent of full value.
Real.

44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
67
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93

Grand Rapids, M ich.......................................................
Dayton, Ohio...................................................................
Richmond, V a.................................................................
Nashville, T e n n ..............................................................
Seattle, Wash...................................................................
Hartford, Conn...............................................................
Reading, P a....................................................................
Wilmington, D e l............................................................
Camden, N. J ...................................................................
Trenton, N. J ...................................................................
Bridgeport, Conn............................................................
Lynn, Mass......................................................................
Oakland, C al............................................... *..................
Lawrence, Mass..............................................................
New Bedford, Mass..............; .........................................
Des Moines, Iow a.. : .......................................................
Springfield, Mass............................................................
Somerville, Mass............................................................
Troy, N. Y ........................................................................
Hoboken, N. J .................................................................
Evansville, In d ...............................................................
Manchester, N. H ............................................................
Utica, N . Y ......................................................................
Peoria, 111........................................................................
Charleston, S. C ..............................................................
Savannah, G a .................................................................
Salt Lake Citv, Utah.......................................................
San Antonio, T e x ...........................................................
Duluth, Minn.................................................................
Erie, P a ...........................................................................
Elizabeth, N. J ..............................................................
Wilkesbarre, P a ............................................................
Kansas City, K ans.........................................................
Harrisburg, Pa................................................................
Portland, M e .................................................................
Yonkers, N. Y ................................................................
Norfolk, V a ....................................................................
Waterbury, C on n ..........................................................
Holyoke, Mass................................................................
Fort Wayne, Ind............................................................
Youngstown, O h io.........................................................
Houston, l e x .................................................................
Covington K y................................................................
Akron, O h io...................................................................
Dallas, T e x .....................................................................
Saginaw, M ich...............................................................
Lancaster, PaJ.................................................................
Lincoln, N e b r...............................................................
Brockton, Mass..............................................................
Binghamton, N. Y .........................................................

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
70
100
20
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
80
33j
100
100
100
100
33*
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
75
100
100
100

Personal.
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
(J)

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
70
100
20
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
80
33i
100
100
100
100
331
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
75
100
100
100

Real.
100
65
75
80
60
75
100
100
100
66f
100
100
60
80
100
25
90
100
100
70
100
70
80
10
50
75
70
66f
60
75
100
50
331
66f
100
70
66|
331
100
70
40
664
66f
60
50
100
75
75
100
100

Personal.
100
65
100
80
60
75
100
(J)

100
50
100
100
60
80
100
25
100
100
100
50
100
70
80
10
50
75
70
66f
60
75
100
50
331
66f
100
70
66f
331
100
70
100
66|
66f
60
50
100
75
50
100
100

School.
Not including $14.73 tax on bank stock.
School, $2.50; turnpike, $1; interest and sinking fund, $1.
dOld limits, $11; new limits, $10.
e Old limits, $31; new limits, $30.
/ City rate; agricultural rate, $6; not including school district tax rate of from $1.75 to $5.
firSinking fund.
h Not reported.
^Not including State tax of $4 on mortgages, securities, stocks, bonds, etc.
iN ot assessed.
le Included in city.
1 Including State and county.
m City proper; annexed districts, $10 and $10.83.
n City proper; annexed districts, $22.50 and $23.33.
o Park.
pN ot including school tax, which varies in different districts from $18.60 to $33.60, not including
rural districts.
q Metropolitan sewer.
r Including $1,179,100 franchises.
s Varies in different districts from $12.30 to $18.58, including schools.
t Varies indifferent districts from $17.56 to $23.84, including schools.
wNew city, $14.20; old city, $15.90.
«New city, $21.20; old city, $22.90.
w School, $4.60; poor, $0.30 to $1.20.
«From $27.50 to $28.40.
v Including $964,350 franchises.
* Including county.
a
b

0




987

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X IX .—BASIS OF ASSESSMENT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND TAXATION—Continued.

Assessed valuation of property.

Real.
$41,494,010
33,911,100
42,608,869
29,982,740
35,236,279
52,831,862
(*)
43,784,990
26,552,660
27,448,537
56,183,524
42,638,505
37,979,854
31,469,325
36,170,900
11,213,950
57,394,710
48,721,800
r 49,958,227
26,089,800
18,959,110
26,847,180
1/28,019,268
9,247,975
12,397,928
28,162,084
24,909,749
24,361,460
20,626,465
(*)
16,150,555

Personal.
$18,462,719
11,453,200
28,508,738
8,803,100
7,744,645
7,021,954
(h )

2,101,550
6,253,729
7,053,447
9,529,510
6,244,314
9,185,433
28,341,091
2,966,900
16,944,217
5,202,400
6,966,372
2,132,600
7,387,080
4,796,332
4,735,324
3,142,742
5,111,973
11,429,128
8,782,569
6,401,545
4,343,844
2,^038,342

(h)

8,514,390
27,000,000
31,981,350
35,124,400
24,861,200
(*)
29,658,610
18,482,865
13,948,220
21,698,215
17,512,825
14,493,770
17,448,625
12,911,800

00

3,^029,110
1,309,155
14,233,210
3,086,830
3,130,880

00

10,293,320
5,632,625
5,265,170
5,836,056
6,192,725
5,930,910
6,636,275
8,768,928

Total.
$59,956,729
45,364,300
71,117,607
38,785,840
42,980,924
59,853,816
43,942,981
43,784,990
28,654,210
33,702,266
63,236,971
52,168,015
44,224,168
40,654,758
64,511,991
14,180,850
74,338,927
53,924,200
56,924,599
28,222,400
26,346,190
31,643,512
32,754,592
12,390,717
17,509,901
39,591,212
33,692,318
30,763,005
24,970,309
19,657,488
18,188,897
18,137,409
M il, 543,500
28,309,155
46,214,560
38,211,230
27,992,080
12,800,287
39,951,930
24,115,490
19,213,390
27,634,271
23,705,550
20,424,680
23,984,900
21,680,728
17,018,459
20,139,854
28,680,853
19,208,203

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Tax rate, per $1,000.

State.
$2.56
2.89
4.00
3.50
7.87

i.60
1.61
(fc)

.30
4.98
(*)
.56
2.90
.41
.25
1.21
1.60
2.97
.09
^7.60
5.00
5.00
5.44
8.00
3.47
2.83
2.71
5.88
(fc)

2.10
4.00
.31
2.97
2.89
3.43
4.75
2.89
3.47
2.76

County.
$1.17
4.56
3.00
6.63
2.50
8.00
5.00
6.38
(fc)
.43
7.52
<*)
1.42
9.20
.73
.70
4.05
5.40
6.83
.13
(aa)

10.00
1.50
3.25
7.20
6.03
3.07
2.50
5.53
4.75
8.92
4.00
(*)
3 .3 3

.70
4.73
6.91
6.00
6.00
3.91
4.60
2.43
3.50
17.60
1.05
w7.80

City.
$7.54
11.00
14.00
15.00
(<*)

/16.50
8.00
11.00
7.20
13.51
*13.90
17.07
m 11.70
1 15.60
15.42
37.30
12.86
14.18

Other.

Total.

a $6.05
<*8.35

b $17.32

c4.50
<*5.50
91.00
<*4.00
<*4.00
a 5.80

04.00

9.77

( s)

(u)
(to)
12.80
19.58
17.45
24.00 bb 41.20
30.00
a 4.00
a 4.31
14.50
8.50 cc 8.50
14.70 <**2.50
18.00
<*6.00
13.50 e e S . O O
21.36
11.00 'ff 9.00
13.00 a 15.50
«6 .00
7.00
*18.00
12.69
05.59
**16.00 5 5 1.00
25.00 o l5 .00
15.19
10.0 0
H 4.10
10.40 mmlO. 20
20.00
03.25
16.75
10.40
a7.60
(0 0 )
ol.5 0
m

(r r )

26.80
18.00
26.00
(«)

/17.50
^14.50
23.00
19.60
21.50
13.90
17.80
n 24.20
15.60
17.40
JP53.40
14.00
15.90
(*)

(«0

(x )

19.80
25.05
80.20
40.50
27.50
32.20
26.70
29.90
*24.00
29.60
*24.75
43.30
*17.00
18.00
23.71
**21.00
40.00
16.20
21.80
30.40
29.43
30.75
24.80
(» )
(ss)

(h)
*17.50
o5.00
9.00
55.10
10.00 a 20.00
4,^119,504
16,020,350
7.50
tt .85
20.70
18.26
24,856,105
3,824,748
.54
(uw)
23.00
15.20
1,380,600
17,827,603
a a in eluded in State.
bb School, $27.50: township, $1.70; town railroad, $0.30; bridge, $6; park, $5.70.
c o School, $7.40; township, $1.10.
<<School, $2; railroad subsidy, $0.50.
**
e e School, $7.48; library, $0.52.
f f School, $6.50; poor, $2.50.
00 Not including $766,500 railroad property, real and personal.
h h Not including $766,500 railroad property.
** Except Atlantic City Ward, $12.
5 5 School, $0.50; sidewalk, $0.50; except Brambleton ward.
k k city proper; Atlantic City Ward, $17; Brambleton Ward, $20.
I I School, $3.70; township, $0.40.
m m School, $9; township, $1.20.
m Not including sewer tax, which varies in different districts from $0.50 to $3 on assessed value
m
property fronting the sewer laid.
o o East Dallas, $14.50; old city, $15.
l?pEast Dallas, $24.07; old city, $24.57.
3a East district, $8.86; west district, $11.01.
™*Road, $0.91; school, east district $5.73, west district $5.21.
ss East district, $20,69; west district, $22.32.
t t Overlay tax, $0.25; grade crossing, etc.,$0.60.
tmIncluded in county.
v o Including State.




91
92
93

of

988

BULLETIN OB' THE DEPARTMENT OB' LABOR.

T able X IX .—BASIS OF ASSESSMENT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PKOPERTY, AND TAXATION—Concluded.
Assessment of property.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Legal basis, per Basis in practice,per
cent of full value. cent of full value.
Real.

94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
116
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Augusta, Ga....................................................................
Pawtucket, R. I ..............................................................
Altoona, P a ....................................................................
Wheeling, W. V a............................................................
Mobile, A l a ....................................................................
Birmingham, A l a ..........................................................
Little Rock, A r k ............................................................
Springfield, Ohio............................................................
Galveston, T ex...............................................................
Tacoma, W ash...............................................................
Haverhill, Mass..............................................................
Spokane, Wash ..............................................................
Terre Haute, I n d ............................................................
Dubuque, Iow a...............................................................
Quincy, 111........................................................................
South Bend, Ind..............................................................
Salem, M ass....................................................................
Johnstown, Pa.................................................................
Elmira, N .Y ....................................................................
Allentown, P a .................................................................
Davenport, I o w a ............................................................
McKeesport, Pa...............................................................
Springfield, 111.................................................................
Chelsea, Mass...................................................................
Chester, P a ......................................................................
York, Pa...........................................................................
Malden, Mass...................................................................
Topeka, Kans...................................... ...........................
Newton. Mass...................................................................
Sioux City, Iowa..............................................................
Bayonne, N. J ...................................................................
Knoxville, Tenn..............................................................
Schenectady, N. Y ..........................................................
Fitchburg, M ass..............................................................
Superior, W is...................................................................
Rockford, 111....................................................................
Taunton, Mass.................................................................
Canton, O h io.......... .......................................................
Butte, M o n t............ 7......................................................
Montgomery, Ala............................................................
Auburn, N. Y ...................................................................
Chattanooga, T en n .........................................................
East St. Louis, 111............................................................
Joliet, 111.........................................................................

100
100
100
100
100
(e)

(6)
60
(«)
100
100
100
100
(mJoo
100
100
100
100
100
(r)
100
20
100
100
100
100
100
100
25
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
20
100

Personal.
100
100
100
100
100
(«)
(e )
' 100
(<0
100
100
100
100
(m)
100
100
100
100
100
100
(r)
100
20
100
(«)
100
100
100
100
25
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
20
100

Real.
75
100
75
66f
50
60
50
60
66§
•80
100
60
66f
(*)
20
66|
100
66f
100
80
(r)
66f
20
100
66
75
100
331
100
25
66
60
80
100
60
20
100
60
60
66f
100
65
20
20

a School.
&Not reported.
cNot including State tax of $4 on mortgages, securities, stocks, bonds, etc.
d School, $2; special, $7.60; Confederate relief, $1.
eNo legal basis.
/S chool, $1.50; Confederate relief, $1.
0 School, $6.25; township, $0.49.
h First district, $14; second district, $12.20.
1 First district, $34.87; second district, $33.07.
i Included in city.
fc Including State and county.
* School, $6.70; township, $0.20.
mFor city tax, 100; county, 25.
* City, 66f to 75.
o School, $16.40; interest, $8.40; sinking fund, $10.
p School, $6.40; poor, $0.20; library, $0.20.
q Including $692,570 franchises.
rFor city tax, 50; county, 25.




Personal.
100
100
75
100
50
60
50
100
66f
80
100
60
66f
(W)on
20
66f
100
66|
100
80
(r)
66f
20
100
< ) 75
M
100
331
100
25
10
60
100
100
60
20
100
60
60
m

100
65
20
20

989

STATISTICS OF CITIES.
Table

X IX .—BASIS OF ASSESSMENT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND TAXA­
TION—Concluded.

Assessed valuation of property.

Real.

Personal.

$13,709,383
29,732,240
(b )

18,210,498
11,456,339
(*)
12,383,171
11,940,020
17,858,446
16,965,840
20,726,799
17,766,606
15,360,730
16,581,693
8,673,691
10,510,650
19,042,100
13,813,000
0 16,638,053
21,876,940
9,662,695
15,955,346
4,713,392
21,312,050
14,939,104
17,153,766
24,108,000
w 7,917,530
46,213,300
4,517,565
13,817,102
(b )

z 12,081,909

19,056,250
13,565,589
4,411,097
15,388,005
8,922,260
(b )

9,288,070
//1 3 ,060,466
(b )

4,644,814
2,853,523

$6,219,084
5,710,660
(b )

6,148,484
5,005,584
(b
)
7,260,185
6,105,266
3,568,974
4,612,432
5,588,003
2,849,523
5,559,956
7,192,540
1,965,837
5,975,580
9,106,643
250,000
604,900
64,235
7,731,910
1,983,919
1,951,979
2,198,720
8i6,685
3,338,600
to 1,882,405
13,142,780
1,330,539
885,019
(*>
)
1,826,476
4,977,239
1,919,794
1,754,887
6,917,175
3,772,120
(b
)
3,391,930
1,041,249
(b )
769,105
967,500

Total.
$19,928,467
35,442,900
17,350,000
24,358,982
16,461,923
17,695,690
19,643,356
18,045,286
21,427,420
21,578,272
26,314,802
20,616,129
20,920,685
23,774,233
6,629,528
16,486,230
28,148,743
14,063,000
17,242,953
21,941,175
17,394,605
17,939,265
6,665,371
23,610,770
14,939,104
17,970,451
27,446,600
*9,799,935
59,356,080
5,848,104
14,702,121
12,089,278
13,908,385
24,033,489
15,485,383
6,165,984
21,305,180
12,694,380
19,601,560
12,680,000
14,101,715
13,679,570
5,403,919
3,821,023

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Tax rate, per $1,000.

State.

County.

$5.44
1.80

$4.60

3.60
5.50
5.50
5.75
2.89
3.47
8.67

4.50
6.00
4.50
4.50
9.25
3.62
7.50
7.20

(J)

8.25
1.87
3.20
5.00
2.97
.27
.50
2.50
3.70
5.00
1.76

.27
5.20
.58
2.90
1.64
3.50
(< < )
**
1.13
2.60
5.00
.55
2.89
2.50
5.50
1.18
3.50
5.00
5.00

(J)

6.75
4.83
9.80
7.50
3.23
.54
3.00
4.50
4.00
6.80
4.00
7.50

3.50
4.75
.72
10.30
1.05
15.10
5.40
2.70
666.80
.63
10.20
6.30
2.00
6.01
5.00
5.00
7.82
5.50
7.50
5.00

City.

Other.

$12.50 <*$2.65
14.70
7.50
<*6.00
6.00
<*4.40
6.00 <*10.50
10.00
/2.50
6.00
<*5.00
06.74
9.85
15.00
<*2.00
<*5.00
(*)
*17.40
13.00
<*7.00
10.80
*6.90
10.50 <*13.00
20.50 o 34.80
12.50
1*6.80
17.19
6.00
<*7.00
16.30
3.79
<*5.66
14.50 a 17.00
8.60
*9.50
20.00 *36.52
11.45 - <*4.60
10.00
<*6.00
7.00
<*5.00
9.80
*>6.61
17.00 016.50
15.17
31.70 023.30
19.76
13.00
06.60
13.20
17.44
13.14
o8.76
16.60 c c 22.66
15.85
12.00 <«8.40
12.00
06.50
11.25 **2.00
15.11
14.50
03.50
26.80 0033.30
29.00 * * 3 8 . 5 0

Total.
$25.19
16.50
cl8 .00
18.90
26.50
22.50
26.00
23.10
27.97
(<)
17.40
35.00
24.40
36.50
67.80
25.50
18.00
o l6 .00
21.30
ol5.29
42.00
o22.00
69.02
17.80
ol9.50
016.75
17.30
48.00
16.80
73.00
26.80
25.80
20.00
19.20
34.70
50.56
18.40
29.30
26.00
23.75
24.11
27.00
72.60
77.50

s School, $4.80; sinking fund, $2.95; railroad, $1.75.
t Including school, $18.70; park, $4.70; court-house, $1.50.
«N ot assessed.
v School, $5.75; metropolitan sewer, $0.76.
wNot including $374,230 railroad property, real and personal.
a Not including $374,230 railroad property.
v School, $3; interest. $1; industrial school, $0.60; road, $1.50; sinking fund, $0.50.
* Including $240,760 franchises.
aa Included in county.
V b Including State.
c o School, $16.50; library, $1.16; road and bridge, $5.
d d School, $8; township, $0.20; poor, $0.20.
e e School, $1; Confederate relief, $1.
/ / Including $400,511 franchises.
o o School, $26.80; interest, $6.50.
h h School, $26; township, $6.50; road and bridge, $6.

93.98— N o. 42— 02------ 8




94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (1).
Actual income for fiscal year.
araal
im -

Cities.

er.

1

2

3
4

6
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33

Property
tax.

Fran­
chise
tax.

Liquor
licenses. cen^

Trust
Fines Fran­ Special funds,
and
chise assess­ interest,
fees. grants. ments. and divi­
dends.

$
$
*
*
%
%
f
5,048,788 4,151,709
New York, N. Y ......... 76,886,091 2,364,636 5,557,593 592,587 671,337
499,190 2,787,633
Chicago, 111............... 18,404,033 151,013 3,213,298 607,461 293,550
276,893
Philadelphia, P a ....... 18,317,731
291,696
1,742,175 355,539 558,710
St. Louis, M o.............. 6,480,602 205,109 1,051,969 655,175 280,104
415,720
124,249
Boston, M ass.............. 17,074,057
133,946
412,913
58,213 1,437,281 a 48,524 6245,362
Baltimore, M d ............ 5,857,230 304,159 408,798 79,467 121,503 36,432
77,437
601,028
Cleveland, Ohio......... 3,424,381
968,610
289,070
74,632 442.155 16,895 98,895
Buffalo, N. Y .............. 4,371,239
696,178
51,574 566,955 38,318 10,849
San Francisco, C a l. . . 7,695,559
3,295
9,463 266,557 193,843 182,734
Cincinnati, O h io....... 4,047,775
446,366
400,740 335,916 35,246
Pittsburg, P a.............. 5,051,954
988,732
778,767
515,723 100,037 45,677
New Orleans, L a ....... c3,359,393
1,127
15,708
151,500 269,547 67,451
Detroit, M ich.............. 3,876,175
119,121
337,916
28,125 273,889 16,520 26,317
Milwaukee, Wis......... 2,868,184 115,913 351,710 30,317 31,762
435,648
18,731
Washington, D. C ___ 2,958,719
118,300
239,493 106,385 30,132
Newark, N. J ............. 3,364,549
549,534
7,929
117,836
82,589 325,165 21,612
Jersey City, N. J ......... 2,473,112
267,832
7,382 34,937
111,404
2,328 253,079
Louisville, K y .......... 2,142,866 165,000 136,565 136,199
684 10,250 209,073
Minneapolis, M inn... 2,770,618
29,612
6,864
3,925 351.000 28,912 66,042
Providence, R. I ....... 3,049,578 117,509 d 120,826 52,307 33,743
110,170
55,261
Indianapolis, I n d ___ 1,482,142
537,649
57,045 177,988 67,014 12,686
Kansas City, M o......... 1,873,327
715,262
28,721
18,389 119,966 152,879 38,741
8t. Paul, M in n .......... 1,499,857
411,318
120,264
1,810 314.000 42,166 22,659
Rochester, N. Y ......... e2,008,750
81,421
9,882 690,539
1.692
6,553
182,751
(A
Denver, C olo.............. 1,379,568
6,643 18,000 810,962
214,685 93,226
7,190
Toledo, O h io .............. 1,320,779
267,781
8,603
125,260
117.156 23,740
Allegheny, Pa............ 1,583,083
12,782
18,787 181,512 27,024 30,391 17,192 109,045
Columbus, Ohio......... 1,265,632
433,369
32,530
8,296
86,291
8,513 12,921
Worcester, Mass......... 1,958,941
8,474
171,364
31,654 137.000 65,880
375,750
Syracuse, N. Y ............ c2,402,783
413
31,275
67,408
6.693 14,872
133,660
(/>
New Haven, Conn___ 1,443,567
26,308
7,684
150,288 14,171 19,413
Paterson, N. J ............ 1,199,467
51,702
385
4,447
128,230 11,140
8,572
3,091
Fall River, Mass......... 1,398,607
3,974
12,789 157,832
a Including $276 income of county.
* Including $144,659 income of county.
>
« Including tax for school district extending beyond city limits.
d For 7 months only.
e Including income from franchise tax.
/ Included in income from property tax.




991

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (2).
Actual income for fiscal year.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1

Cities.

Water­
works.

Gas
works.

Elec­
Docks
Ferries
tricand
and
light
wharves. bridges.
plants.

62,571,584 6780,949 6309,520
4,874
14,874
10,439
38,138
30,828
65,182
1,325 245,182 84,999 614,683
69,396
36,063
432
2,276 27,605 35,765
51,672

New York, N . Y ......... $8,050,900

2 Chicago, 111................. 3,399,030

3 Philadelphia, P a ....... 3.290.565 a 6426,842
4 St. Louis, Mo............... 1.756.566
5 Boston, M ass.............. 2,252,780
6 Baltimore, Md............
967,262
7 Cleveland, O hio.........
784,475
8 Buffalo, N .Y ...............
685,370
9 San Francisco, C a l. . .
10 Cincinnati, O h io .......
832,218
11 Pittsburg, P a ..............
863,057
12 New Orleans, L a .......
13 Detroit, M ich.............. &187,924
14 Milwaukee, W is.........
401,297
15 Washington, D .C .......
440,276
16 Newark, N .J ..............
810,821
17 Jersey C ity,N ,J.........
913,544
18 Louisville, K y ............
389,655
19 Minneapolis, M inn. . .
251,121
20 Providence^ R. I .........
614,989
21 Indianapolis, I n d ___
2,059
22 Kansas City, M o.........
494,468
301,938
23 St. Paul, M inn............
24 Rochester, N .Y ..........
407,251
25 Denver, Colo...............
26 Toledo, O h io ..............
173.888
2,169
27 Allegheny, P a ............
245,717
28 Columbus, O h io.........
195,050
29 Worcester, Mass.........
281.889
30 Syracuse, N. Y ............
253,632
31 New Haven, Conn___
32 Paterson, N .J.............
33 Fall River, Mass.........
1.68,034
a income from lease.




Mar­
kets.

Bath
houses
and
Ceme­ bath­
ing
teries. pools
and
beach­
es.

2,960
16,234
16,667

66,602

1,000

3,474

6,073

2,165
336

185
15

1,000

19,492
30,311
2,829
9,572
6,334
22,832
12,713
2,989

i, 268
b

1,478

17,476
42,342

3,227
229
4,225
15,260
200

12,689
51,536
193,616
8,459

67,684
2,906

For 6 months only.

24,977
219
41,119
9,850
24,823
12
ii,689

483

992

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Table X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (3).
Actual income for fiscal year.
Loans.

Mar­
gin­
al
num
ber.

Cities.
Other.

Total.

Cash on
hand at
begin­
ning of
fiscal
year.

Long­
term
bonds
(2 years
or
over).

Tempo­
rary
loans
and
short­
term
bonds
(less
than 2
years).

Total.

Total re­
ceipts for
fiscal year.

$
3
$
$
$
$
1
New York. N .Y ... oil, 754,902 «118,740,596 611,416,077 42,694,313 76,333,100 119,027,413 c249,184,086
Chicago, 111.......... 1,189,467 30,841,316 6,228,625
500,000 5,745,336 6,245,336 43,315,277
3 Philadelphia, P a . d 1,730,761 d 26,762,596 11,400,088 9,025,000 1,200,000 10,225,000 d 48,387,684
4 St. Louis, M o........
17,043,757
1,339,868 12,405,372 4,638,385
5 Boston, M ass....... «11.341,047 / 33.357,996 9 3,245,381 5,971,200 6,500,000 12,471,200 ft49,074,577
6 Baltimore, Md___
210,000 *10,227,940
*381,361 *8,933,042 1,084,898
210,000
7 Cleveland, O hio..
806,510 2,074,362 J13,809,910
J903,418 17,068,609 4,666,939 1,267,852
8 Buffalo, N . Y .......
1,828,795 fc9,592,036
fc521,839 fc6,993,994
769,247
(0
(0
9 San Francisco, Cal m l, 222,947 m 9,574,398 n823,974
010,398,372
10 Cincinnati, Ohio . 2,376,789
1,475,998 11,355,612
8,491,699 1,387,915 1,475,998
11 Pittsburg, P a .......
321,232 P 16,780,214
597,514
321,232
9,009,231 P 7,449,751
12 New Orleans, L a..
145,141 3,614,641 9.9,544,183
457.005 a 4,533,492 1,396,050 3,469,500
15,000
285,259 *7,617,574
13 Detroit, M ich.......
r 572,737 *•5,455,950 81,876,365
270,259
14 Milwaukee, W is..
. 934,926
6,653,722
14,181
934,926
4,267,743
451,053
220,183 w 10,669,221
15 Washington, D. C . u 4,772,604 «8,686,612 v 1,662,426
220,183
16 Newark, N . J .......
x 877,003 x 6,199,945
176,415 1,231,302 4,842,000 6,073,302 x 12,449,662
17 Jersey City, N.J ..
635,453 1,823,934 «« 7,257,365
V 670,886 1/4,738,729
z 694,702 1,188,481
217.000
18 Louisville, K y ___
855.000 P 4,605,324
638,000
218,813
3,424,550 P325,774
19 Minneapolis,Minn 66181,913 663,690,007
290.000 *>54,580,645
290.000
600,638
20 Providence, R. I ..
5,560,472
658,461 1,048,461
390,000
140.833 ’ 4,320,408
191,603
21 Indianapolis, Ind.
3,321,845
235,053
828,160
66,219
2,422,294
693,107
71.391
22 Kansas City, M o.. 352,230 3,824,513 c c 883,190 164,081
164,081 3 d 5,789,478
4,603,532
23 St: Paul, Minn . . .
1,296,500 1,296,500
2,837,308
120,467
469,724
24 Rochester, N .Y ... ee 332,220 ee 3,762,178 f f l , 104,525
34.000 3,517,000 8.551.000 9 9 8,417,703
76,954 ftft 3,104,851
25 Denver, C o lo .......
954
2,660,851 ftft 368,046
75.000
121.005
26 Toledo, O h io .......
75,000
831,189 **3,383,448
**89,295 **2,144,855
407,404
756,189
27 Allegheny, P a ___ JJ 155,424 JJ 2,413,336
1,495,663 JJ 4,169,177
260,178 1,495,663
28 Columbus, O h io ..
303,916
624,816
2,854,041
121,064
51,846
320,900
2,177,379
29 Worcester, Mass..
4,871,465
924,937 1,191,937
328,121
295,632
267,000
3,383,896
Me 6,753,797
30 Syracuse, N. Y ___
3,061,662 M e 142,256
147,442
899,500 2,650,379 3,549,879
1.255.000 1.255.000 **3,299,205
31 New Haven,Conn.
** 78,412 **1,739,843
304,362
32 Paterson, N . J ___
3,720,454
1,607,062
209,632
74.392
150,000 1.889.000 2.039.000
2,752,724
500,400
33 Fall River, Mass..
809,909
1,832,147
66,291
110,668
309,509
a Including $1,285,821 received from State for schools.
b Including $4,863,459 cash in sinking fund.
c Including $1,285,821 received from State for schools and $4,863,459 cash in sinking fund.
d Including $888,813 received from State for schools.
« Including $88,979 received from county.
/In clu d in g $233,814 received from county.
(/Including cash in county treasury.
ftIncluding $233,814 received from county and cash in county treasury.
* Including $303,335 received from State for schools.
J Including $154,357 received from State for schools,
fc Including $162,978 received from State for schools.
* Not reported.
m Including $316,715 collected for State.
« Including $167,669 cash in sinking fund and $6,625 cash in State fund.
o Including $167,669 cash in sinking fund and $323,340 State funds.
p Including cash in sinking fund.
a Including tax for school district extending beyond city limits.
r Including $163,847 received from State for schools.
« Including $822,787 cash in sinking fund.
* Including $163,847 received from State for schools and $822,787 cash in sinking fund.
« Including $4,427,068 appropriated from funds of U. S. Treasury as explained on pages 903 and 904.
v Including $348,756 trust funds.
w Including $348,756 trust funds and $4,427,068 appropriated from funds of United States Treasury.
x Including $164,494 received from State for schools.
v Including $241,626 received from State for schools and $16,671 received from county for elections.
z Including $72,306 cash in sinking fund.
a a Including $241,626 received from State for schools, $16,671 received from county for elections, and
$72,306 cash in sinking fund.
b b Including $116,922 received from State for schools.
c o Including $143,301 cash in sinking fund.
dd Including $917,694 special tax property sales and $143,301 cash in sinking fund
e e Including $82,108 received from State for schools.
//In clu d in g $637,200 cash in sinking fund.
9 9 Including $82,108 received from State for schools and $637,200 cash in sinking fund,
ftft Including $191,899 cash in sinking fund.
** Iucluding $51,934 received from State for schools.
JJ Including $88,687 received from State for schools,
fcfcIncluding $23,326 cash in sinking fund.
** Including $59,768 received from State for schools.
1

2




993

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (1)—Continued.

Actual income for fiscal year.
Larnal
lin­
er.

Cities.

34 St. Joseph, M o.........
35 Omaha, Nebr..........
36 Los Angeles, Cal—
37 Memphis, Tenn.......
38 Scranton, Pa............
39 Lowell, Mass............
40 Albany, N .Y ............
41 Cambridge, Mass . . .
42 Portland, Oreg.........
43 Atlanta, G a..............
44 Grand Rapids, Mich
45 Dayton, O h io..........
46 Richmond, V a.........
47 Nashville, Tenn —
48 Seattle, Wash..........
49 Hartford, C onn.......
50 Reading, P a ............
51 Wilmington, Del—
52 Camden, N. J ..........
53 Trenton, N .J ..........
54 Bridgeport, Conn. . .
55 Lynn, Mass..............
56 Oakland, C a l..........
57 Lawrence, Mass —
58 New Bedford,Mass.
59 Des Moines, Io w a ...
60 Springfield, Mass . . .
61 Somerville, Mass . . .
62 T r o y ,N .Y ...............
63 Hoboken, N .J .........
64 Evansville, In d .......
65 Manchester, N. H . . .
66 Utica, N, Y. (« ).........




Property
tax.

Other Fines
and
li­
censes.

$848,313
$500 $149,663 $22,950
1,228,115 13,243
239,000 27,538
919,225.............. 140.688 48,939
(a)
574,785
856,631.............
606,741.............
165,551
3,421
1,364,963 15,659
166,600 11,877
’1,348,684 (d)
141,946 5,049
1,641,311
83,998
46 4,922
476,755.............. 115,150 59,950
777,080 ..............
88,063 98,690
805,376..............
45,277 13,101
881,156
350 68,823 2,562
1,047,188.............
18,125 40,945
510,978
5,104
(a)
6102,311
578,531
8,128 125,010 41,751
1,328,518
10,550 75,180 3,124
553,886 ..............
67,660
2,430
520,861............................. 16,076
711,495.............. 113,774
4,563
831,554.............. 104,000
1,925
783,902.............. 126,000 13,578
988,029.............. 112,782
5,024
503,606
141 81,200 15,179
659,379
6,601 158,609 2,659
979,133
5,001 85,732 2,629
823,266
5,863 63,490 14,100
1,082,913
9,349 100,709 5,751
914,327..............
31
4,138
c746,510 (d)
107,783
646
633,332 13,955
90,500 6,576
704,491
4,075 20,445 9,148
754,831.............................
4,721
*527,579 (d)
83,348
326

Trust
Fran­ Special funds,
chise assess­ interest,
grants. ments. and divi­
dends.

$147,540
$17,596
175,631
4,973
19,892 $36,300
23,827 10,000 188,966
103,771
12,681
39,326
10,231
3,111 161,851
3,167
20,689
12,269
259,843
15,551
77,051
55,027
236,842
4,214i
349,667
6,088
5,788
4,!
17,679
1,000 515,081
56,379
36,066
6,988
17,601
4,108
31,151
5,675
4,879
114,737
6,546
28,817
1,686
20,375
14,402
5,301
18,511
6,475
3,200
6,613 10,614
1,620
19,145
35,446
6,936
33,979
5,452
52,343
260
6,093
4,813
42,683
3,260
55,079
195,644
6,620

a Included in income from other licenses.
b Including income from liquor licenses.
e Including income from franchise tax.
d Included in income from property tax.
e Data are for 11 months.

$8,846
7,774
2,077
16,068
71,991
30,819
11,705
2,973
4,528
28,184
7,550
1,813
29,074
200
3,243
19
44,857
4,530
22,115
323
17,853
3,726
2,852
13,172
100
3,460
2,297
2,594
1,087

994

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (2)—Continued.
Actual income for fiscal year.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66

Cities.

St. Joseph, M o ..............
Omaha^Nebr...............
Los Angeles, Cal..........
Memphis, Tenn............
Scranton, P a ...............
Lowell, M ass...............
Albany, N. Y ...............
Cambridge, Mass.........
Portland, O reg ............
Atlanta, Ga...................
Grand Rapids, M ich ...
Dayton, O h io...............
Richmond, V a..............
Nashville, T enn..........
Seattle, Wash...............
Hartford, Conn............
Reading, P a .................
Wilmington, D e l.........
Camden, N. J ...............
Trenton, N. J ...............
Bridgeport, Conn.........
Lynn, Mass...................
Oakland, C al...............
Lawrence, Mass..........
New Bedford, Mass___
Des Moines, Io w a .......
Springfield, Mass.........
Somerville, M ass.........
Troy, N. Y ....................
Hoboken, N. J ..............
Evansville, Ind ............
Manchester, N. H .........
Utica, N. Y, ( « ) ............




Water­
works.

Gas
works.

Elec­
Docks Ferries
tricand
and
light wharves. bridges
plants.

Mar­
kets.

Bath
houses
and
Ceme­ bath­
ing
teries. pools
and
beach­
es.

$2,937
2,468
7,255

$5,434
$201,122
287,717
335,347
281,233
140,288
109,554
92,872
153,245
150,820
227,361
258,857
172,962
194,330
168,307
128,006

$8,557
2,988

1,000
$390

6,732
21,415
17,505
10,589

$217,714

199,829
108,487
118,191
237,827
200,499
173,464
173,142
83,923
138,206
a Data are for 11 months.

944
1,494

2
500

1,444
152

100

7,725
2,859
204

9,188
15,179
12,624

27

28
2,485

$1,778

4,795
18,574

19,535

5,141
4,131

17,467

1,489

4,675
11,479
8,707

1,063

995

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X .—RECEIPTS PROM ALL SOURCES (3)— Continued.

Actual income for fiscal year.
Loans.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.
Other.

Total.

Cash on
hand at
begin­
ning of
fiscal
year.

Long­
term
bonds
(2 years
or
over).

Tempo­
rary
loans
and
short­
term
bonds

Total.

Total re­
ceipts for
fiscal year.

than 2
years).

8149,416 a 81,812,069
8255,012 8149,416
St. Joseph, M o ___ a $209,296 a $1,407,641
395,802 52,639,076
395,802
693,962 61,790,236
453,038
Omaha, Nebr.......
c 2,396,559
c 634,272 ©1,803,861 a 592,698
Los Angeles, Cal..
250,000
1,683,007
189,717 “ 250,'556
Memphis, T e n n ..
76,392
1,243,290
152,511 h 1,518,037
152,511
Scranton, P a .......
/ 985,592 g 379,934
/ 77,359
i 142,607
i 2,032,933
i 98,376 256,100 8925,000 1,181,100 fc 3,312,409
Lowell, Mass.......
498,325 1 2,868,064
498,325
1 2,072,202
Albany, N. Y .......
297,537
1 85,870
3,960,636
550.000 1,183,000
633.000
255,699
392,015
2,521,937
Cambridge, Mass.
42,000 n 1,872,115
42,000
Portland, Oreg. . . w 226,280 m 1,437,735 d392,380
625,012 0 2,268,932
175.000
209,885 * *450,*01.2
<>188,513 ol,434,035
Atlanta, Ga..........
Grand
Rapids,
153,933 q 2,017,841
153,933
M ich ................. J) 136,093 P i, 403,947 d 459,961
304,375 d 2,627,360
142,427
161,948
1,517,056 d 805,929
86,573
45 Dayton, Ohio.......
1,722,545
120,448
93,862
1,602,097
46 Richmond, Y a___
255.000 >•1,314,088
118,721 ” 255,’ 666
r 940,367
* 137,106
•
47 Nashville, Tenn..
223.000 8 2,380,718
73,000
150.000
371,549
8 229,621 81,786,169
48 Seattle, Wash.......
334,673 v 2,396,742
u 215,238
1 95,615
1 1,846,831
334,673
49 Hartford, C onn...
150,163 w 1,286,010
246,402 “ i50,*i63
w 889,445
w 70,596
50 Reading, P a.........
355,854 *1,214,907
105,566
250,288
46,189
*812,864
51 Wilmington, D e l.
* 3 9 ,3 8 0
106,500 222,576 V 1,471,786
116,076
157,207
52 Camden, N. J .......
2/88,966 1/1,092,003
357,250 z 1,896,647
2,000
355,250
138,330
* 169,442 z 1,401,067
53 Trenton, N. J .......
422,015 oa 1,581,057
407,715
14,300
128,456
54 Bridgeport, Conn.
« * 7 1 ,8 2 1 oa 1,030,586
607,792 552,186,887
503,792
104.000
63,896
55 Lynn, Mass.......... 66 13 3,10 8 661,515,199
c c 982,191
65,502
56 Oakland, C al....... oo 305,798 oo 916,689
1,707,914
607,000
540,000
50.910 “ *67,'666
1,050,004
57 Lawrence, Mass..
62,215
58 New
Bedford,
2,687,479
1,238,000 1,238,000
50.911
1,398,568
164,419
81,500 dd 1,279,532
81,500
224,877
59 Des Moines, Iowa. ^ 29,132 da 973,155
663,929
2,684,186
465,
198,929
326,664
1,693,593
201,490
60 Springfield, Mass.
896,000
2,269,546
750,
146,000
103,859
1,269,687
111,161
61 Somerville, Mass.
626,694
1,833,958
445,
55,614
181,694
1,151,650
67,156
62 Troy, N. Y ............
204,409 eel, 347,109
197,909
55,207
6
63 Hoboken, N. J ___ ee 154,407 eo 1,087,493
1,004,242
9,555
9,
95,701
898,986
13,211
64 Evansville, In d ...
1,361,992
240,709
240,
145,516
975,767
11,629
65 Manchester, N .H .
539,682! era1,466,521
78,422
461,
46,900
9 9 65,335
9 9 879,939
66 Utica, N.Y. ( // ) ..
a Including $198,506 received from State for schools.
5 including $42,415 received from State for schools.
0 Including $468,165 received from State and county for schools,
d Including cash in sinking fund.
e Including $468,165 received from State and county for schools, and cash in sinking fund.
/In clu din g $69,879 received from State for schools.
g Including $239,537 cash in sinking fund.
h Including $69,879 received from State for schools, and $239,537 cash in sinking fund.
1 Including $122,451 received from State.
/In clu din g $25,346 cash in sinking fund.
fcIncluding $122,451 received from State and $25,346 cash in sinking fund.
I Including $65,379 received from State for schools and charitable purposes
m Including $176,298 received from State and county for schools
n Including $176,298 received from State and county for schools, and cash in sinking fund.
©Including $41,530 received from State for schools.
P Including $79,205 received from State for schools.
« Including $79,205 received from State for schools, and cash in sinking fund.
r Including $117,897 received from State and county lor schools,
s Including $128,134 received from State for schools.
t Including $37,645 received from State for schools.
mIncluding $102,003 cash in sinking fund.
, s
v Including $37,645 received from State for schools and $102,003 cash in sinking fund.
w Including $65,103 received from State for schools.
* Including $22,516 received from State for schools.
v Including $84,348 received from State for schools.
z Including $95,717 received from State for schools.
a a Including $39,249 received irom State for schools.
b b Including $24,336 received from State.
cc Including $255,713 received from State and county for schools.
d d Including $23,069 received from county for schools,
cc Including $98,589 received from State.
//D a ta are for 11 months.
g g including $26,101 received from State for schools.
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44




,

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
Table X X .—RECEIPTS PROM ALL SOURCES (1)-Continued.
Actual income for fiscal year.
narinal
lum­

Cities.

67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103

Peoria, 111.................
Charleston, S.C.........
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah.
San Antonio, Tex . . .
Duluth, M in n ..........
Erie, P a .................... .
Elizabeth,N.J..........
Wilkesbarre, P a .......
Kansas City, Kans...
Harrisburg, P a .........
Portland, Me. ( c ) ___
Yonkers, N . Y ..........
Norfolk, V a ..............
Waterbury, Conn___
Holyoke, Mass..........
Fort Wayne, Ind.......
Youngstown, Ohio ..
Houston, T ex ............
Covington. K y ..........
Akron, Ohio..............
Dallas, T e x ...............
Saginaw, M ic h .........
Lancaster, Pa............
Lincoln, N e b r..........
Brockton, Mass.........
Binghamton, N. Y . ..
Augusta, G a ..............
Pawtucket, R . I .......
Altoona, Pa...............
W heeling,W .Va . . . .
Mobile, Ala...............
Birmingham, Ala . . .
Little Rock, Ark.......
Springfield, O h io___
Galveston, T e x .........
Tacoma, Wash..........

ber.




Property
tax.

3600,351
515,724
501,125
697,518
356,115
660,762
390,188
546,422
307,959
427,201
340,067
816,757
860,649
447,684
363,241
656,752
326,095
324,367
401,256
401,894
343,956
^350,537
405,812
227,141
318,974
679,534
333,585
246,680
. 561,952
236,816
282,457
95,809
211,106
120,835
315,851
ft437,149
407,570

Fran­
chise
tax.

Liquor Other
li­
licenses. censes.

Trust
Fines Fran­ Special funds,
and
chise assess­ interest,
fees. grants. ments. and divi­
dends.

35,729 39,037
3112,417
89,537
7,658
48,617 107,752
6,746
96.475 48,390 16,402 31,000 101,137
(«)
529,584
6,395|
500 143,649
167,000 11,631 19,6271
101,576
54.476
2,070
5,653
43,129
57,356
120,287
460 4,402
58,400
6,719
15,063
5,133
34,346 70,371
115,178
11,821
46,211
2,490 20,000
1,545
5,400
3,603
123,447
35,343 48,477 1,554 2,341
35,059 125,551
853
2,473
55,684
1,118
5,977
25,994
70,625
3,544
2,507
3,281
4,308
20,700
8,580
1,253
188,505
42,096 <*5,253
91,489
18,075
2,985 25^289
146,000
18,045 10,643
5,793
15,884
5,500
30.428
146 4,505
69,410
525,256 14,057 *3*625 32,706
(/)
32,877
2,491
4,205
4,726
31,004
5,851
1,584
500
42,000
3,352
2,289
48,839
'6,564
200 7,476
10,095
29,887
2,639
5,771
21,564
11,667
6,775
15,350 49,511 10,861
1,670 927,426
6,587
8,821
12,781
2,170
2,332
13,454
16,549
760
6,432
6,924
38,936
10,450 63,044
420
7,873
53,414 92,351 30,659
4,311
24,480 28,065 37,534
25,672
1,208
2,581
32,973
526,982
2,012
(/)
►
,400 12,242
a Included in income from other licenses.
5 Including income from liquor licenses.
oData are for 9 months.
d Including income from fines and fees.
'In clud ing income from franchise tax.
/In clu ded in income from property tax.
9 For 7 months only.
ftIncluding income from special assessments.

A

35,992
3,860
2,513
1,119
187
3,450
1,516
43,405
15,195
637
18,108
25,010
1,654

5,880
3,230
2,438
6,435
2,311
9,812
696

35,776
48,413

997

STATISTICS OF CITIES
Table X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (2)—Continued.
Actual income for fiscal year.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103

Cities.

Peoria, 111....................
Charleston, S. C............
Savannah, G a ..............
Salt Lake City, Utah ..
San Antonio, T ex.........
Duluth, M in n ..............
Erie, P a ........................
Elizabeth, N. J..............
Wilkesbarre, P a ..........
Kansas City, Kans.......
Harrisburg, P a ............
Portland, Me. (a )........
Yonkers, N. Y ..............
Norfolk, Va...................
Waterbury, C onn.........
Holyoke, Mass..............
Fort Wayne, I n d .........
Youngstown,Ohio . . . .
Houston, T ex...............
Covington. K y ..............
Akron, O hio.................
Dallas, Tex
. _
Saginaw, M ic h ............
Tjfl.ncaster. Pa...............
Lincoln, N ehr..............
Rrnckton, Mass............
"Binghamton, N. Y .......
Angnsfa, ft a ...............
Pawtucket., R. T
Altoona, Pa...................
Wheeling, W. Y a .........
Mobile, Ala...................
Birmingham Ala
Little Rock, Ark.
ppringfield, Ohio
Galveston. T e x .......
Tacoma, Wash..............




Water­
works.

Gas
works.

$3,101
13,996

$5,512

$93,370
"78; 934
127,756
135,390

Elec­
Docks Ferries Mar­
tricand
and
light wharves. bridges. kets.
plants.

4,160
$65,941

47

ii8 ,393

481
662

$2,000

131,773
130,109
122,044
96,255
62,378
77,461

882

79,188

191

84,271
46,689
92,700
42,127
81,ill
106,929
59,434
200,919
74.230
130,378
41,160

Bath
houses
and
bath­
Ceme­
ing
teries. pools
and
beach­
es.

$2,596
10,004
1,350

942
25
34,399

9,168

6,669

900

103,505

739

45,644
66,529
i,365
$80,485
128,460
a Data are for 9 months.

11,885
1,680

300

2,166

1,500

204
4,516

$1,200

7,187
11,455
3,494

2,358
6,746
1,433
390
8,485
9,559 • 4,693
3,360
2,342
441
8,509
140 1,165

1,544

998

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (B)—Continued.

Actual income for fiscal year.
Loans.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

67
68
69
70

Other.

Total.

Cash on
hand at
begin­
ning of
fiscal
•
year.

Long­
term
bonds
(2 years
or
over).

Tempo­
rary
loans
and
short­
term
bonds
(less
than 2
years).

Total.

Total re­
ceipts for
fiscal year.

Peoria, 111.......
$31,498
$851,698
$68,780
$20,700
$55,164
$75,864
$996,342
Charleston, S .C ...
25,218
641,238
29,350
670,588
Savannah, G a ___
78,091
857,805
14,311
872,116
Salt Lake City,
U tah .................
98,394
1,055,446
215, 952.
16,216
1,287,614
16,216
71 San Antonio, Tex.
a 76,907
0618,660
32, 858
300.000
99,453
399,453 a 1,050,971
72 Duluth, M in n ___
183,055
1,341,208 5391, 190
149.000
8,120 157,120 *1,889,518
c 53,025
73 Erie, P a ...............
0686,972
55, 193
33,415
c 775,580
33,415
74 Elizabeth, N. J___
<*72,935
<*803,643
115, 311
153,944 <*1,072,898
129,444
24,500
75 Wilkesbarre, P a ..
c437,834
e 43,431
/94, 393.
3,509
9 53o, 736
3,509
*21,986
76 Kansas City, Kans
*672,557
223, 324
351,559
351,559 *1,247,440
77 Harrisburg, Pa . . .
*598,278
i 57,780
i 82, 118
75,010
*755,406
75,010
78 Portland,Me. (? ) . m141,838 m l, 048,947
77, 607 .
250.000
250.000 ***1,376,554
79 Yonkers,N .Y . . . .
«40,580 *1.231,785
214, 946
223,955
571,728
795,683 *<2,242,414
80 Norfolk, Y a .........
o247,609 o1,005,712
194, 217
905.000
160,087 1,065,087 <>2,265,016
81 Water bury, Conn.
P 647,659
i>55,493
76, 890 435.000
50,000
485.000 P 1,209,549
82 Holyoke, Mass___
945,770
83,488
182, 497 .
525.000
1,653,267
525.000
83 Fort Wayne, I n d .
705,005 3195, 837
94,940
54,458
54,458
3955,300
84 Youngstown,Ohio
**564,636
**23,970
280, 475 280,510
33.000
313,510 **1,158,621
«710,272
s 104,782
85 Houston, T e x ___
193, 749
375,000
52.000
427.000 sl,331,021
41,165
86 Covington, K y ---581,483
151, 714 .
161,840
161,840
895,037
1 100,336
87 Akron, Ohio.........
*548,781
*<162, 595
122,741
50.000
172,741
v884,117
88 Dallas, T e x ..........
*o571,597
*»61,145
w 706,952
123, 866.
11,489
11,489
*546,165
*35,794
89 Saginaw, Mich . . .
42, 810; 104,140
2,906
107,046
*696,021
90 Lancaster, P a ___
0397,148
031,122
58, 062 .
0455,210
91 Lincoln, N ebr___
^539,223
*69,687
61, 380,
60,325
60,325
^650,928
92 Brockton, Mass.. .
891,622
100,710
34, 743
535.000
126,353
661,353
1,587,718
93 Binghamton,N. Y.
o«44,336 oo550,146
56,658
179, 606
24,697
81,355 «a 811,107
94 Augusta-, G a .........
75,747
482,860
18, 561
323.000
889,421
65,000
388,000
95 Pawtucket, R .I ...
5523,079 55854,793
2, 279 .
319,924
319,924 6*1,176,996
96 Altoona, Pa..........
0373,544
025,864
57, 489 .
o431,033
97 Wheeling, W. Y a .
582,377
3,371
c c 82,476
45, 630.
c c S 2,476
oo710,483
98 Mobile, A la..........
248,375
15,367
126,500
378,781
126,500
3, 906
99 Birmingham, Ala.
441,389
46,188
183, 792
100,000
725,181
100,000
100
221,186
Little Rock, Ark .
6,097
19, 142.
24,969
24,969
265,297
101
18,566
451,445
Springfield, O h io.
130, 335
77,000
121,040
779,820
198,040
102
Galveston, T e x .. . <*<*166,376 <*<*736,129
428, 840.
<**1,164,969
103 Tacoma, Wash___ ee 107,191
oo932,825 //126, 723.
331,059,548
a Including $51,278 received from State for schools.
6Including $131,776 cash in sinking fund,
c Including $37,792 received from State for schools.
< Including $53,789 received from State for schools,
*
e Including $34,488 received from State for schools.
/In clu d in g $5,832 cash in sinking fund.
{/Including $34,488 received from State for schools and $5,832 cash in sinking fund,
in c lu d in g $12,715 received from State and county for schools.
i Including $39,081 received from State for schools.
3 Including $6,555 cash in sinking fund.
fcIncluding $39,081 received from State for schools and $6,555 cash in sinking fund.
l Data are for 9 months.
*» Including $39,821 received from State for schools,
n Including $19,291 received from State for schools.
©Including amount received from State for schools,
p Including $27,243 received from State for schools and library,
gIncluding cash in sinking fund.
r Including $18,447 received from State for schools,
sIncluding $73,255 received from State and county for schools.
t Including $16,389 received from State for schools.
**Including $55,570 cash in sinking fund.
Including $16,389 received from State for schools and $55,570 cash in sinking fund.
*oIncluding amount received from State and county for schools.
^Including $28,634 received from State for schools and library.
0 lncluding $29,573 received from State for schools.
^Including $18,687 received from State for schools.
<*«Including $23,291 received from State for schools.
66 Including $11,202 received from State for schools,
cc including $19,368 orders in transition.
d d Including $88,449 received from State for schools,
cc Including $79,354 received from State for schools.
//In clu d in g $1,131 cash in sinking fund.
9 9 Including $79,354 received from State for schools and $1,131 cash in sinking fund.




STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table X X .—RECEIPTS F R O M /L L SOURCES (1)—Concluded.
Actual income for fiscal year.
VLarinal
um­
ber.

104
105
106
107
108
109

110
111

112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119

120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Property
tax.

Haverhill, Mass ...
8475, 832
455, 441
Spokane, W ash___
390, 821
Terre Haute, I n d ..
337, 318
Dubuque, Iowa___
308, 367
Quincy, 111............
291, 540
South Bend, Ind
520, 847
Salem, Mass...............
178, 758
Johnstown, P a ..........
941
Elmira, N. Y ..............
196; 508
Allentown, P a ..........
Davenport, I o w a .......
McKeesport, P a .........
261,
276,
Springfield, 111..........
439,
Chelsea, Mass............
224,754
Chester, Pa.................
“ 208
York, P a ....................
479,
Malden, Mass............
313,
Topeka, K ans............
1,008,
Newton, Mass............
243,
Sioux City, Io w a .......
433,
Bayonne, N. J ............
153,
Knoxville, T e n n .......
Schenectady, N. Y .. .
11
492,
Fitchburg, Mass.........
488,
Superior, Wis..............
250,
Rockford, 111..............
435,
Taunton, Mass..........
245,
Canton, Ohio..............
Butte, M ont............... a 465,
144,
Montgomery, A la ___
227,
Auburn, N. Y ............
Chattanooga, T enn ...
200,
East St. Louis, 111..
227,
Joliet, XU...............
224,

.

Fran­
chise
tax.

814,681
1,750

6,813

1,649
1,403
21,064
17,741

4,302
285
3,313
4,673
6,052
ioo
1,807

Liquor Other
li­
licenses. censes.

867,400
58,300
40,924
42,136
63,941
13,600
17
21,450
36,760
30,994
62,738
29,200
75,297

84,251
9,781
803
2,176
1,832
2,624
1,012
18,802
4,461
6,738
7,987
9,001
8,365
3,140
i.8,258
2,016
13,790
9,012
20
579
6,859
27
2,642
48,841
3,227
37,640
2,811
13,000 30,684
37,483
1,281
3,331
65,861
4,836
48,466
3,327
344
50,462
342
22,210
60,997 43,931
17,408 67,700
432
27,822
16,800 23,283
83,069 30,501
105,000 4,905

Fines
and

Fran­ Special
chise assess­
grants. ments.

85,000
29,815
3,836
5,606
1,703
2,623
3,148
6,002
2,181
3,258
15,313
6,469
9,010
3,641
4,451
522
1,586
11,278
4,036
25,572 84,102
4,816
5,262
4,454
2,768
8,152
3,625
1,256
2,738
17,615
10,558
1,234
4,772
1,426
252

a Including school district extending beyond city limits.




810,547
109,184
33,407
48,369
9,828
179,985
4,444
53,003
92,769
53,553
12,498
2,158
25,289
46,027
96,152
15,894
183,904
79,305
146,300
4,675
27,899
2,288
50,782
43,993
26,285
204,068
52,547

1000

BULLETIN OP THE DEPABTMENT OP LABOR.
T able X X .—RECEIPTS PROM. ALL SOURCES (2)—Concluded.
Actual income lor fiscal year.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

104
105
106
107
108
109

110
111
112

113
114
115
116
117
118
119

120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Haverhill, M ass___
Spokane, W ash....... .
Terre Haute, I n d ....
Dubuque, Io w a .......
Quincy, 111...............
South Bend, Ind
Salem, Mass............ .
Johnstown, P a ....... .
Elmira, N. Y .......... .
Allentown, Pa..........
Davenport, Io w a _
_
McKeesport, P a ___
Springfield, 111.......
Chelsea, Mass.......... .
Chester, P a..............
York, Pa...................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, K an s.........
Newton. Mass.........
Sioux City, Iowa
Bayonne, N. J .........
Knoxville, Tenn
Schenectady, N. Y .
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior. Wis..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, M ass.......
Canton, Ohio..........
Butte, M ont............
Montgomery, A la ...
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Chattanooga, Tenn.
East St. Louis, 111...
Joliet, 111.................




Water­
works.

Gas
works.

Elec­
Docks Ferries Mar­
tricand
and
light wharves. bridges. kets.
plants.

Bath
houses
and
Ceme­ bath­
ing
teries. pools
and
beach-

612.

6103,567
129,422

7,641.
6174

31,168
62,987
82,235

375
275
6500

68,084

61,645
320

59,261
64,531

2,394.

222.

4,592.

11,918.

17,560.
682

100,090

6,335.

116,233
60,270
116,837

569

93,302
67,659
61,607
50,072
70,302
73,353
27,874

503.
8,369
4,575.

629,747

2,172 .
964
*3,*52i

3,058.
1,378.

1001

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table X X .—RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (3)—Concluded.
Actual income lor fiscal year.
Loans.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

104
105
106
107
108
109

110
111

112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119

120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.
Other.

Haverhill, Mass
Spokane, Wash.
Terre Haute, Ind
Dubuque, Iow a.
Quincy, 111.........
South Bend, Ind
Salem, M ass___
Johnstown, P a ..
Elmira, N .Y ....
Allentown, P a..
Davenport, Iowa
McKeesport, Pa.
Springfield, 111..
Chelsea, Mass.
Chester, P a ...
York, Pa........
Malden, Mass.
Topeka, Kans.
Newton, Mass ..
Sioux City, Iowa
Bayonne, N.J ..
Knoxville, Tenn
Schenectady, N. Y
Fitchburg, Mass
Superior. W is ...
Rockford,111 . . .
Taunton, Mass..
Canton, O h io ...
Butte, M o n t___
Montgomery, Ala
Auburn, N. Y ___
Chattanooga,Tenn
East St. Louis, 111
Joliet, 111............

<*66,226
*$
<*76,266
3,101
63,049
5,724
/2 3 ,355
*122,428
/43,778
fclOO, 823
*36,445
o39,265
1?29,292
8,171
375,244
**30,655
•29,808
83,367
39,642
241,975
17,711
15,339
to57,154
22,198
*66,799
15,639
7,945
47,362
b b 16,291
co74,317
0025,877
M 91,235
**38,723
6,732
985

Total.

Cash on
hand at
begin­
ning of
fiscal
year.

Long­
term
bonds
(2 years
or
over).

$35,000
<*3817,646
151,057
<*869,959
480,533
11,994
529,996
393,789
101,926
/566,936
34,038
*750,805
183,060
J273,140
68,127
*581,157
190,402
*345,465
113,150
o603,469
P457,793
473,594
178,666
3623,383
r 306,826
31,101
8237,154
62,500
749,263
140,270
467,727
213,300
1,415,543
____
577,301
135,021
690,377
*0267,989
9i,217
318,883
095,564
82,500
*708,601
583,328 ool78,789l
13,196
14,657
391,498
151,500
637,999
! 101,300
66388,548
oc711,425 <6*97,156 ee 100,000
13,600
90,693
00368,777
66431,690
**284,464
40,454
553,310
417,408

Tempo­
rary
loans
and
short­
term
bonds
(less
than 2
years).
$200,000
60.500
35.500
18,069
407,000
45.000
12.000

69,209
455.000
212,500
1,000
300.000
850,666
30,965
111,000
48,250
221,728
552,800
200,000
362,800
56,761
50.000
16,101
50.000
32,000

Total.

Total re­
ceipts for
fiscal year.

$235,000 c$l,137,082
<*1,021,016
0629,177
662,540
72,494
481,818
35,500
6854,563
119,995
441,038 *1,205,578
J541,175
228,060
6783,032
80,127
**655,669
190,402
o869,510
113,150
1*581,733
607,812
69,209
633,000 31,379,202
**546,747
212.500
**309,849
32,101
1,177,789
362.500
v734,162
140,270
2,616,930
1,063,300
683,596
30,965
1,001,330
246,021
*0316,318
48,250
808,476
312,945
635,300 *1,439,465
<*0762,117
619,351
213,196
1,198,165
514,300
158,061
ee 100,000 //9 08,681
63,600 00523,070
16,101 66568,118
50.000 **349,449
692,083
40,454
557,751
32.000

o including $12,521 received from State.
b Including $5,100 cash in sinking fund.
o Including $12,521 received from State and $5,100 cash in sinking fund.
d including $59,404 received from State for schools.
e Including $30,435 cash in sinking fund.
/In clu d in g $13,725 received from State for schools.
0 Including $36,332 cash in sinking fund.
6lncluding $13,725 received from State for schools and $36,332 cash in sinking fund.
* Including $15,624 received from State.
/Inclu din g $24,197 received from State for schools,
fcIncluding $16,952 received from State for schools.
* Including $24,430 received from State for schools.
t n Including $57,937 cash.in sinking fund.
* Including $24,430 received from State for schools and $57,937 cash in sinking fund,
*
o Including $26,155 received from State for schools.
P Including $25,683 received from State for schools.
q Including $9,581 received from State.
* Including $24,930 received from State for schools.
*
* Including $26,816 received from State for schools.
* Including $9,093 cash in sinking fund.
mIncluding $26,816 received from State for schools and $9,093 cash in sinking fund.
v Including $9,256 cash in sinking fund.
*»Including $49,231 received from State and county for schools,
*
scIncluding $41,519 received from State.
v Including $95,331 cash in sinking fund.
* Including $41,519 received from State and $95,331 cash in sinking fund.
o a Including $36,332 cash in sinking fund.
b b Including $13,859 received from State for schools.
c c Including amount received from school district extending beyond city limits and $25,150 received
from State for schools.
. ...
d d Including $1,405 cash in sinking fund and cash of school district extending beyond city limits,
eeincluding income of school district extending beyond city limits.
//In clu d in g income of school district extending beyond city limits, $25,150 received from State for
schools, and$l,405 cash in sinking fund.
00 Including $8,724 received from State for schools.
66 Including $16,139 received from State for schools.
<* Including $28,075 received from State and county for schools.




1002

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (1).

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37

Hospi­
Police
tals,asy­
courts,
Libraries,
Health lums,
jails,
art gal­
alms­
Police workFire
de­
Parks.
leries,
depart­ houses, depart­ part­ houses, Schools.
museums,
ment. reform­ ment. ment. and
other
etc.
atories,
chari­
etc.
ties.

Cities.

New York, N .Y ............ #274,813 #292,208 #107,
Chicago, Til__________ 204,759
5,
Philadelphia, P a ......... 83,717
4,790 61,
St. Louis, M o ............... 25,053
2,
Boston, Mass................. 24,202 5234,912 79,
Baltimore, Md..............
500 36,
Cleveland^ O h io.......... 65,083
877 108,
Buffalo, N .Y .................
108,
San Francisco, Cal.......
30,347 39,
Cincinnati, Ohio..........
8,083 10,198
Pittsburg, P a ...............
82,
New Orleans, La..........
31,661 46,
Detroit, M ich............... 28,158
137,
27,
Milwaukee, W is..........
Washington, D. C ......... 15,897 23,212 72,
Newark, N. J ...............
87,823 46,
2,
Jersey City, N. J ..........
8,625
Louisville, K y ..............
22,253
5,
Minneapolis, M inn___
1,053
18,
Providence. R. I .......... 32,044
83,
Indianapolis, In d .........
762
77,
Kansas 6itv, Mo..........
St. Paul, Minn.............. 12,492
Rochester, N .Y ............
Denver, C o lo ...............
Toledo, O h io ...............
Allegheny, P a ..............
4,825
Columbus, O h io ..........
410
Worcester, Mass..........
600
Syracuse, N .Y ..............
New Haven, Conn.......
426
Paterson, N .J...............
Fall River, Mass..........
St. Joseph, Mo..............
Omaha, N ebr...............
Los Angeles, Cal..........
Memphis, Tenn............

#30,000 #299,205
3,978
97,833
14,843 259,772
24,102

11,334
4,336
20,378
119,804
10,808

46,879

310

79,860
78,945
550
*i8,*38i

39,080
“ 2*684
“ i'700
1,300

3,675

471,460 #1,043,956 #5,385,514
448,030
486,808
26,400
372,930
574,728
6,000
282,234
53,930
964,200
92,571
57,299
10,144
94,456
8,639
458,884
597.457
49,433
209,560
112,476
3,082
87,700
1,542
41,052
159,674
538,119
41,154
2,462
30,000
382,112
84,910
13,568
87,604
11,400
14,316
11,800
341.458
1,000
4,000
60,000
6,953
118,799
35,326
28,653
27,493
6,362
13,350
69,799
75,952
52,574
6,324
39,496
485,594
4,607
166,531
71,117
48,869
31,069
2,526
655
181,239
23,170
112,708
45,605
78,994
2,910
61,110
22,500
5,577
248,874
66,354
6,421
648
8,930
175,778
77,967
108,889
47,705
4,182
87,792
6,262
19,656
4,084
45,769
2,841
136,433
3,732
7,679
93,956
12,244
52,000
16,059
872
200,000
2,946

a Including #14,856 for College of City of New York.
5 Including #194,474 expended for county.




1003

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (2).

Mar­
gin­
al
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6

7
8

9

10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37

Cities.

Streets.

Sew­
ers.

Bath
hous­
es
Elec­
and
Water­ Gas tric- Docks Ferries Mar­ Cem­ bath­
and
and
works. w’rks light
kets. eter­ ing
ies. pools
pl’nts wharves bridges.
and
beach

$
New Y o rk ,N .Y .... 8,109,494 815,051 3,450,870
Chicago, 111............ 1,000,540 614,123 238,499
Philadelphia, Pa .. 2,249,664 713,345 1,825,626
St. Louis, Mo..........
496,270 12,213 697,500|
Boston, Mass.......... «2,494,069 660,987 259,2291
Baltimore, Md.......
78,296
93,786 26,247
Cleveland, Ohio . ..
555,107 709,623 634,059
Buffalo, N .Y ..........
417,287 20,141
70,790
San Francisco, Cal. d 42,811
Cincinnati, Ohio...
300,489 96*792 721,118
Pittsburg, P a .........
993.852 740,752 651,189
New Orleans, L a ...
109,733 (/)
9 661,328
Detroit, M ich.........
137,063 154,725 ft 74,9061
Milwaukee, Wis . . .
439.852 112,671
81,460
Washington, D. C .. 1,055,755 231,086 tt,107,733
148,740 109,439
Newark, N .J .........
437,160
Jersey City, N .J .. . 9 172,265 («)
Louisville, K y .......
209,073 43,989 182,710'
Minneapolis, Minn
217,870 94,323 138,514'
Providence, R. I . . .
70,557 200,306
Indianapolis, In d ..
254,056 26,823
ft 489
Kansas City, M o .. .
2 4,787
75,618'
St. Paul, M inn.......
34,565*
320,092 86,869
Rochester, N .Y ___
51,218
296,532 35,939
Denver, C o lo .........
186,637 76,915
Toledo, Ohio..........
749,694 70,966
58,239
Allegheny, P a .......
14,806 28,035 113,255
6,722
Columbus, Ohio . . .
60,060
72,724
Worcester, Mass
53,305 141,291 229,051
Syracuse, N. Y .......
81,009
166,562 74,368
New Haven, Conn.
245,464 49,954
Paterson, N .J.........
151,043 75,836
51,024
Fall River,M ass...
29,010
St. Joseph, M o .......
114,512 28,110
Omaha, N ebr.........
88,483 40,429
Los Angeles, C a l..
™17,758
( l)
Memphis, T en n . . .
53,949 112,980

$
3,322,938 4,458,739
215,242
4,584 361,789

$

$

64,323

(*>
)

2,354

22,330
3,350
65,914

382,214
5,760
119,382
c 24,933
83,432

. 25,147

$

33,843 62,459
*2,327

205 1,869
70,021
118,930

24,198

7,762

635

900

31,684 34,174

697
3,445

1,050
300

*30,‘ 4i4
6,756

18,«
7,772

86

5,562
8,539
6,819
800
3,000
30,343

a Not including $68,260 expended by board of directors of trust funds.
6 Included in expenditures for ferries and bridges.
c Including expenditures for docks and wharves.
d Including expenditures for sewers, but not including $235,658 expended by property owners for
streets and sewers.
e Included in expenditures for streets.
/In clu ded in expenditures for waterworks.
g Including expenditures for sewers,
ft For 6 months only.
i Including expenditures by United States Government.
iN ot including $180,643 expended by property owners,
ft Not including $69,306 expended by property owners.
l Paid for by property owners.
wNot including amount expended by property owners.




1004

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (3).
Loans repaid.
Mar­
ginal
mimber.

Cities.

Sinking
fund.

$

Other.

Tempo­
Total, ex­ Long­
rary
loans and
clusive of
term
loans
short­
(2
repaid. bonds or
term
years
bonds
over). (less than
2 years).

Total.

Total, in­
cluding
loans
repaid.

8
$
S
$
$
<*20,365,757 <*53,451,000 16,506,532 68,528,100 85,034,632 0138,485,632
534,341
207,659 5,049,537 1,068,450 7,703,657 8,772,107 13,821,644
3 Philadelphia,Pa . . . 1,499,359
260,348 8,088,078 5630,000 2,352,237 62,982,237 611,070,315
4 St. Louis. M o ..........
421,591
574,037 2,663,087
2,663,087
6 Boston, M ass.......... c9,699,231 <*1,935,709 817,255,521 /17,000 6,500,000 p6, 6i7,666 623,772,521
6 Baltimore, Md......... 1,174,494
280,483 1,809,748
49,200
49,200
1,858,948
7 Cleveland, O h io___
602,505
3,939,137
331,980
557,824
889,804 4,828,941
8 Buffalo, N . Y ..........
148,455
749,860 1,870,155
662,957
2,684,352
814,197
151,240
9 San Francisco, C al..
*2,465,492 i % 687,144
*2,687,144
’
10 Cincinnati, Ohio___
867,599
1,001,300
2,076,150 i,66i,36o
3,077,450
11 Pittsburg, P a ..........
848,192
4,217,261
852,938
13,438
839,500
5,070,199
12 New Orleans, La___
30,000
2,905,102
304,387 1,941,847
963,255 1,637,460
13 Detroit, M ich..........
460,594
21,379 1,521,830
270,544
34,882
235,662
1,792,374
14 Milwaukee, W is___
14,402
909,017
571,750
571,750
1,480,767
15 Washington, D. C ... 1,219,970
i 4,278,826
14,278,826
16 Newark, N. J ..........
530,563 m2,163,719 m3,670,678
84,000 4,695,000 4.729.000 m8,399,678
17 Jersey City, N .J ___
188,748 «744,248 ©1,277,826
833,618 1,472,876 <>2,750,702
639,258
18 Louisville, K y .........
225,648
210,000
692,000
902,000
744,969
1,646,969
19 Minneapolis, M inn.
114,718
230,907
905,880 P51,000
336,456 P387,456 P i, 293,336
20 Providence, R. I ___
463,711 3352,721 31,279,492
639,305 31,918,797
637,305
2,000
21 Indianapolis, I n d ...
844,184
501,497
433,825
410,359
1,345,681
22 Kansas City, M o___
130,290
39,427
258,756
907,643
258,756
1,166,399
23 St. Paul, M inn.........
147,592
831,984
1,060,000 1.060.000
1,891,984
24 Rochester, N. Y .......
83,162
6,000
364,000 3,468,858 3,832,858
657,971
4,490,829
25 Denver, C o lo ..........
28,019
408,621
462,921
54,300
604,768
967,689
26 Toledo, O h io ..........
239,562
145,912
145,912
1,269,968
1,415,880
27 Allegheny, P a .........
368,124
326,287
326,287
870,486
1,196,773
28 Columbus, O h io___
618,197
754,852 **320,900 220,916 **541,816 **1,296,668
29 Worcester, M ass___
580,817 8320,689 sl,552,220
750,000 **750,000 v2,302,220
(*)
30 Syracuse, N. Y .........
76,896 *» 300,346 w 990,586 *122,000 2,657,033 *2,779,033 03,769,619
31 New Haven, C onn..
122,315
**39,702 s 581,972
1,000,000 1,000,000 *1,681,972
32 Paterson, N .J..........
62,618 n 396,845 <*o718,070
19,000 1,670,000 1,689,000 <*o2,407,070
33 Fall River, Mass___
212,580 55188,024 65533,479 cc46,500
500,400 cc546,900 <6*1,080,379
St. Joseph, M o .........
ee 412,180 ce711,398
ee711,398
Omaha, Nebr...........
20,931
288,700
256,210
149,186
437,886
694,096
36 Los Angeles, Cal___
101,944
211,605
89,925
89.925
301,530
37 Memphis, Tenn.......
32,500
32,431
475,233
33475,233
m
(//)
©Including $6,959,037 State tax.
5 Not including $3,387,600 paid out of sinking fund,
c Including $43,403 expenditures for county.
^Including $632,240 State tax and $688 county fines, etc.
eIncluding $632,240 State tax and $238,565 expenditures for county.
/E xpen ded for county; not including $7,628,357 city loans paid out of city sinking fund.
3 Including $17,000 expended for county, but not including $7,628,357 city loans paid out of city
sinking fund.
^Including $632,240 State tax and $255,565 expenditures for county, but not including $7,628,357
city loans paid out of city sinking fund.
^Including $2,337,988 State tax.
i Including expenditures of United States Government for waterworks,
fc$22,950paid out of sinking fund.
*Including expenditures by United States Government for waterworks, but not including $22,950
paid out of sinking fund.
mIncluding $792,567 State and county tax.
«State and county tax.
olncluding $744,248 State and county tax.
PNot including $125,000 paid out of sinking fund.
g. Including $311,442 Siace tax.
**Not including $338,500 paid out of sinking fund,
sIncluding $12*,597 county tax.
*$130,000 paid out of sinking fund.
"Not including $130,000 paid out of sinking fund.
^Including $124,597 county tax, but not including $130,000 paid out of sinking fund.
va Including $289,417 State and county tax.
*Not including $26,000 paid out of sinking fund.
v Including $289,417 State and county tax, but not including $26,000 paid out of sinking fund.
* Including $39,702 State and county tax.
<<Including $396,845 State and county tax.
**
b b Including $164,769 State and county tax.
ccNot including $40,000 paid out of sinking fund.
d d Including $164,769 State and county tax, but not including $40,000 paid out of sinking fund.
e e Including $329,933 county tax.
‘ //$20,120 paid out of sinking fund.
33 Not including $20,120 paid out of sinking fund.
1

New York,N. Y . . . .

2 Chicago, 111..............




1005

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (1)—
Continued.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70

Cities.

Hospi­
Police
tals,asy­
courts,
Libraries,
lums,
jails,
Fire Health alms­
Police workart gal­
de­
depart­ houses, depart­ part­ houses, Schools.
leries,
ment. reform­ ment. ment. and
museums,
other
etc.
atories,
chari­
etc.
ties.

Scranton, P a ...............
$14,279 $3,153
Lowell, M ass............... $7,230
13,973
Albany, N . Y ...............
Cambridge, Mass........
$10,000
Portland, Oreg..............
16,974
Atlanta, Ga..................
Grand Rapids, M ich. ..
457
9,701
Dayton, Ohio...............
7,608
32,122
Richmond, V a..............
1,000
1,482
$3,186
Nashville, T e n n ..........
7,000 32,510
Seattle, Wash...............
3,000
11,494
Hartford, Conn............
56
9,260
10,441
Reading' P a _________
2,257
Wilmington, D e l.........1
.............
Camden, N. J ............... 1
.............
2,232 8,000
Trenton. N. .T________ !_______
300
17,970
Bridgeport, Conn......... j 10,188
3,800
19,150
Lvnn. Mass..................
i
Oakland, C a l............... 1.............
18,380
_______
T.awren ne. Mass______ 1
; 2,500
'
512
New Bedford, Mass___
(«)
Des Moines, Iowa.........
4,791
Springfield, Mass.........
21,112
3,211
Somerville, M ass.........
737
26,851
Troy, N .Y ....................
Hoboken, N. J ..............
Evansville, Ind............
150
Manchester, N. H .........
1,098
Utica, N .Y ....................
4,215
10,430
5,164
Peoria, 111....................
16,985
Charleston, S. C............
6,600
1,700
5,200
Savannah, G a ..............
6,500
2,699
Salt Lake City, Utah...
400
a Supported by county.
i> For 11 months only.
t Supported by State and county.
*

9398— N o. 42— 02------ 9




$88,686
$2,700
34,276
60.452
102,325!...............
47.22«i________
17,689
54,041
5.239
4,360
37,360
17,254
10,201
17,441
116,486
139,922
2,320
30,324!
149,333
12,589
135, 111
69,936
65,324
20,414
3,814
17,587
54,292
18,537
1,409
119,969
3,436
98,5781
38,925
48,805
100,110
3,714
49,203
57,091
1,500
20,297
3,366
&2,307
&47,989
6,308
29,533
(c)
23,656

3,326

Parks.

$2,266
2,876
33,130
136,270
1,500
5,294
605
1,000
10,000
37,756
17,118
19,158
1,856
2,500
1,728
28,000
26,288
1,337
14,322
9,874
26,152
2,240

1006

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (2)—

Continued.

Mar­
gin­
al
um­
ber.

38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67

68

69
70

Cities.

Streets.

Sew­
ers.

Water
works.

Bath
hous­
es
Elec­
Cem­ and
Gas tric- Docks Ferries Mar­ eter­ bath­
and
and
w’rks light wharves bridges. kets. ies.
ing
pools
pl’nts
and
beach
es.

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
S
$
Scranton, P a .........
56,511 46,143
Lowell, Mass.........
43,832 58,274
49,960
Albany, N. Y .........
26,585
477,150 9,590
11,678
2,265
188,986
Cambridge, Mass..
32,199
39,015 9,740
Portland, Oreg___
195,044 60,457
29,765
310
62,909
Atlanta, G a ..........
61,054 20,703 149,413
23,209 1,605 1,816
Grand Rapids, Mich
1,267
172,584 48,223
7,001
Dayton, Ohio.........
3,313
25,216 46,781 170,321
800'_____
Richmond. V a ___
75,508 53,816
23,488 12,951
Nashville, T en n ...
49,141 12,454
125,877
7,506
i __________
Seattle, W ash....... a511,699
98,444
i __________
8,862
18,768
Hartford, Conn___
276
47,746 2^699 150,126
Reading, Pa..........
8,054 33,019
58,989
.........|
.........
Wilmington, D e l..
43,994 38,814 111,491
i
Camden, N. J .......
106,602 20,916
19,346
..................... 1
Trenton, N. J .........
20,160
10,914 31,856
Bridgeport, Conn .
105,156
1,941
40,647 26,443
21,084
Lynn, Mass............
458
8,327 23,962
Oakland, Cal.........
4,586
12,132
Lawrence, Mass...
63,} 496 28^75
97,152 18,205
New Bedford, Mass
22,449
Des Moines, Io w a .
5,000
8,115
<*33,176 <*4,900
12,704
Springfield, Mass..
137,363 88,448
914
19,206
Somerville, Mass..
92,739 37,809
17,012 1,172 193,552
Troy, N. Y ..............
4,116
107
10,139
Hoboken, N. J .......
3,000
18,930
840
Evansville, Ind . . .
69,465
38,545 6,100
Manchester, N. H .
20,194 16,539
29,326
4,516
Utica, N. Y ............
e3,227
e17,538 e8,523
Peoria, 111..............
21,283
Charleston, S. C . . .
21,349
Savannah, G a .......
2,445
103,498 76,291
Salt Lake City,Utah
290
23,725 19,977 131,780
a Including expenditures for sewers.
&Included in expenditures for streets.
c Paid for by property owners.
<*Not including $90,000 expended by property owners under supervision of city.
« For 11 months only.




1007

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (3)—

Continued.

Loans repaid.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Sinking
fund.

Other.

Tempo­
rary
Total, ex­ Long­
loans and
clusive of
term
short­
loans
(2
term
repaid. bonds or
years
bonds
over). (less than
2 years).

Total.

Total, in­
cluding
loans
repaid.

#330,419
#216,124 #108,429
Scranton, P a ............
#5,866 #114,295
#2,386
Lowell, M ass............
325,590
903,061 1,228,651 a 1,737,987
#43,300 a 255,615 a 509,336
e l, 119,557
d 189,000
Albany, N . Y ............
69,293 5242,679 c 930,557 d 189,000
1,527,005
725,000
802,005
Cambridge, Mass___
281,205
125,000
600,000
434,183
42,000
392,183
42,715
Portland, O re g .........
42,000
335,716
Atlanta, Ga...............
335,716
20,138
2,000
507,164
348,164
159,000
Grand Rapids, M ich.
17,727
159,000
872,101
498,732
Dayton, O hio............
163,232
373,369
45,683
335,500
273,804
273,804
11,045
Richmond, Va..........
72,274
/ 247,045
/ 76,735
25,621
170,310 / 76,735
Nashville, T e n n .......
775,232
775,232
Seattle, Wash............
6,668
fir680,319
133,291
Hartford, Conn.........
133,291
63,519 g 34,597 f i r547,028
fc 194,901
J 11,000
Reading, P a ..............
47,439
51,499 i 183,901 J ll, 000
1 487,340
Wilmington, D e l ---77,159 l 96,709
390,631 1 19,550
29,881
P 520,910
Camden, N .J ............
44,752 to184,023 « 398,460 ol9,450
103,000 ol22,450
(r )
1 889,099
Trenton, N .J ............
232,398 Q 325,396 3 863,199
25,900 s 25,900
«523,912
16,000
Bridgeport, Conn___
23,500 «189,493 u 507,912
16,000
v 919,804
525.000
Lynn, Mass...............
204,709 y112,363 v 394,804
525,000
179 472
43,500
135,972
Oakland, C a l............
43,500
38,449
494.000
w 871,779
Lawrence, M ass.......
34,043 tr 115,655 w 377,779
79.000
415.000
963.000 V 1,056,074 z 1,602,098
New Bedford, Mass..
101,590 * 176,102 *546,024 V 93,074
224,369
54,369
Des Moines, Iowa___
18.000
36,369
170,000
Springfield, Mass___
465.000 b b 482,200 eel, 175,204
141,066 aa 184,653 aa 693,001 b b 17,200
1,208,495
963.000
Somerville, M ass___
163.000
800.000
245,495
323,642 d d 46,182
Troy, N. Y .................
40,153
445.000 dd 491,182 dd 814,824
198.000 ee 420,677
Hoboken, N .J ..........
20,142 »»178,265 ee 222,677
2,000
196.000
31,708 //362,896
7,212 m 180,545 / / 331,188
31,708
Evansville, Ind .........
298.000 g g 578,789
Manchester, N. H ___
40,000
258.000
45,425 to 160,325 33280,789
733,096
537,525
551,342
195,571 h h 71,667 h h 465,858
66 Utica, N .Y .................
227,639
122,214
122,214
105,425
67 Peoria, 111.................
89,232
89,232
54,383
68 Charleston, S. C.........
41,700 ...............
41,700 i i 249,941
17,267 i i 208,241
69 Savannah, G a ..........
265,959
46,106
14,000................
14,000
251,959
70 Salt Lake City, Utah.
a Including #78,882 county tax.
b County tax.
c Including #242,679 county tax.
dNot including #247,850 paid out of sinking fund.
e Including #242,679 county tax, but not including #247,850 paid out of sinking fund.
/ Not including #565 paid out of sinking fund,
firIncluding #19,638 county tax.
h State tax.
i Including #1,499 State tax.
JNot including #114,500 paid out of sinking fund.
fcIncluding #1,499 State tax, but not including #114,500 paid out of sinking fund.
I Not including #29,900 paid out of sinking fund,
w State and county tax.
n Including #184,023 State and county tax.
o Not including #11,242 paid out of sinking fund.
P Including $184,023 State and county tax, but not including $11,242 paid out of sinking fund.
q Including $2*6,911 State and county tax.
**$97,300 paid out of sinking fund.
sNot including $97,300 paid out of sinking fund.
t Including $246,911 State and county tax, but not including $97,300 paid out of sinking fund.
mIncluding $12,312 county tax.
v Including $74,005 State and county tax.
w Including $33,335 county tax.
* Including $1j9,992 State and county tax.
y Not including $19,926 paid out of sinking fund.
z Including $119,992 State and county tax, but not including $19,926 paid out of sinking fund,
aa Including $±21,354 State and county tax.
56Not including $45,000 paid out of sinking fund.
c c Including $121,354 State and county tax, but not including $45,000 paid out of sinking fund,
da Not including #39,724 paid out of sinking fund.
ee Including $178,265 State and county tax.
//In clu d in g $180,545 State and county tax.
flr Including $160,325 State and county tax.
flr
W»For 11 months only.
iiN ot including expenditures of State and county for schools.
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65




1008

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (1)—

Continued.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Hospi­
Police
tals,asy­
courts,
Libraries,
lums,
jails,
art gal­
Police workFire Health alms­
de­
leries,
depart­ houses, depart­ part­ houses, Schools.
museums,
ment. reform­ ment. ment. and
other
etc.
atories,
chari­
etc.
ties.

Parks.

i
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117

San Antonio, T ex.........
Duluth, M in n ..............
Erie, Pa.........................
Elizabeth, N. J ..............
Wilkesbarre, P a ..........
Kansas City, Kans.......
Harrisburg, P a ............
Portland, Me. i « i .........
Yonkers, N. Y .............
Norfolk, V a..................
$7,121
Waterbury, Conn......... $6,442
Holyoke, Mass..............
Fort Wayne, J n d .........
Youngstown, Ohio.......
Houston, T e x ...............
Covington, K y ..............
Akron, O hio.................
Dallas, T e x ...................
28'............
833'______
Saginaw, M ic h ............
1 ........
Lancaster, Pa...............
890'.......... .
Lincoln, N e b r..............
Brockton, Mass............
|
Binghamton, N. Y .......
!
Augusta, G a .................
I
Pawtucket, R. I ............
!
Altoona, Pa...................
i
Wheeling, W V a .........
\
!
Mobile, A la...................
i
Birmingham, Ala.........
1
Little Rock, Ark..........
i
Springfield, O h io .........
1
Galveston, T e x ............
! _
Tacoma, Wash..............
Haverhill, M ass..........
115
Spokane, W ash............
_______
Terre Haute, I n d ......... ______ 1
Dubuque, Iowa............
220
............
Quincy, 111...................
i
South Bend, In d ..........
|
Salem, Mass.................
.
Johnstown, P a ............
Elmira, N .Y .................
755'______
Allentown, Pa.......... >.
Davenport, I o w a .........
2,000
McKeesport, P a ..........
Springfield, 111..............
1,731
Chelsea, Mass...............




$1,521
3,895
3,094
625
2,858
4,520
6,800
2,781
30,100
9,100

!

............!
______ !
$i,ooo!
0,468:
i
,
3,000 .......... !............ !
.......... 1
............ i
■
.
!
!
5,352
2,350
9,078
129
2,938
1,277
726
2,290
3,507
1,482
9,939
4,000

1,873
2,000

17,818

$8,718
$4,256
58,117
6,678
61,148
19,677
14 092
3lj 6741
................
3 ! non: ________
n . Kin1
________
' 82,248j
5,029
21,190
20,849
70,256
13,474
3,867
17,406
6,868
60,611
23,265
8,827
7,142
45,908
15,357
21,431

725
1,365
5,283
6,000
1,264
24,522
22,500

$1,500

9,047
17,494

« Data are for 9 months.
&
$23,733 expended by State and county,
c $10,691 expended by State and county.

7,286
12,693

1,834
5,873
642
52,188
3,470
543

13,284
16,852
1,909
(0)
58,000

1,213

1,095

1,225
572

310
3,787

(b)

250
1,649
948
5,462

$4,461
4,000

45,808
10,430
53,464
563
12,047
57,648
2,936
36,863
38,063
6,598
63,950
22,865
5,400

17,038
5,136
703
1,500
30,925
927
600
2,446

1,259
8,000
4,000
28
3,965
72
i , 822

560
16,000

9,790

6,808

2,382
1,385

5,005

1009

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (2)—

Continued.

Mar­
gin­
al
num
ber.

Cities.

Streets.

Sew­
ers.

Elec­
Water­ Gas tricworks. w ’rks light
pl’nts

$
$
*
93,836 3,423
San Antonio, Tex ..
Duluth, M in n ......... 105.297 20.926
Erie, P a ...................
33,234, 19,252
Elizabeth, N. J ....... 132,0371 26,486
Wilkesbarre, P a___
18,451, 30,176
Kansas City, Kans.. 185,414! 55,289
Harrisburg, P a .......
21,4541 6,143
62,585. 57,168
Portland, Me.(«) .. .
Yonkers, N. Y ......... 113,215! 44,733
Norfolk, V a ............ 214, O O 5,436
O!
Waterbury, C onn...
43,5 a 1 21,699
Holyoke, Mass.......
42,464! 6,858
99,666169,544
Fort Wayne, I n d ...
Youngstown, O h io. 132,740! 17,793
6. 730 199.101
Houston, T e x .........
Covington, K y .......
1 5,357
42. (>05! 76 914
Akron, Ohio............
23.552 11.520
88 Dallas, T ex .............
89 Saginaw, M ich .......
51,296 8,327
16,847 16,048
90 Lancaster, P a .........
33,718
91 Lincoln, N ebr.........
740
18.837 36.937
92 Brockton, Mass.......
39,744 14,694
93 Binghamton, N. Y . .
47.161 5.334
94 Augusta, G a............
5,624 6,913
95 Pawtucket, R. I ___
7,105 9,336
96 Altoona, P a ............
97 Wheeling, W. Y a ...
3,510
98 Mobile, A l a ............
99 Birmingham, A la ..
(&)
(ftj
5,441
100 Little Rock, Ark .. .
101 Springfield, O hio...
45,434
94,192
102 Galveston, T ex.......
19.357 47.741
103 Tacoma, Wash........
104 Haverhill, M ass___
7,767! 4,359
105 Spokane, Wash....... 102,184! 9,242
8,6511 19,432
106 Terre Haute, In d . . .
25 355 20.019
107 Dubuque, Iowa.......
2,000
218
108 Quincy, 111..............
109 South Bend, Ind___ 158,832 25,734
1,474 1,604
1 0 Salem, M ass............
1
19,631 4,909
111 Johnstown, Pa........
41,469 5,366
112 Elmira, N. Y ............
11,134 52,018
113 Allentown, P a.........
114 Davenport,Iowa ... 142,472 17,439
115 McKeesport, P a ___
25,000 20,213
21,793 10,387
116 Springfield, 111........
6,183 5,802
117 Chelsea, Mass..........
a Data are for 9 months.
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87




Bath
hous­
es
and
Docks Ferries Mar­ Cem­ bath­
eter­
and
and
wharves bridges. kets. ies. ing
pools
and
beach
es.

9

$

S

$

$
9
3,579 30,564

$

26,765 14,277
54,404

28,290
22,159

1,619
4,100
944

2,127 2,357

8,112

69,319
14,287
116,104
54,066
34,281
23,209

1,600

796

27,133
87,940
9,894
10,539
19,643
30,304
36,918
34,902
31.245
25,49b
45.246
17,067
26,815
2,233
28,164
79,260
62,890

600
............. |
......... 4,090
!
2,105

!_______
2,880
47

557
1,353
27,352
4

11,934
8,536 1,123
5,130
643 19,500

43,420
8,278
ii,297
26,i83
20,209
4,114

38
3,572

5,683

6 Paid for by property owners.

1010

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (3)—

Continued.
Loans repaid.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Sinking
fund.

Other.

Tempo­
Total, ex­ Long­
rary
clusive of
loans and
term
loans
bonds (2 short­
repaid.
term
years or
bonds
over). (less than
2 years).

Total.

Total, in­
cluding
loans
repaid.

71 San Antonio, T ex___ $143,649
$1,962
$291,713
$73,632
$73,632
$365,345
72 Duluth, M in n ..........
133,137
370,670
$ 86,000
43,258
499.928
129,258
73 Erie, P a ....................
67,465
8,161
253,436
10,000
263,436
10,000
74 Elizabeth, N. J ..........
70,851 «154,962 a 404,638
92,444
92,444
«497,082
75 Wilkesbarre, P a .......
15,016
80,524
14,500
21,963
102,487
7,463
76 Kansas City, Kans...
55,621
335,828
97,708
124,015
26,307
459,843
77 Harrisburg’ P a .........
65,246
31,814
162,747
c 162,747
(b)
78 Portland, Me.(d).......
41,742 e 121,837 e 308,813
250.000 2 ^ 0 0 0
e 558,813
79 Yonkers, N . Y ..........
38,141 / 210,703 / 626,215
217,000 464.000
681,000 /1,307,215
80 Norfolk, Va...............
51,270
20,469
831,121
343,817
682,050
149,071
1,174,938
81 Waterbury, Conn___
23,679
295,650
527,964
27,500
77,500
50.000
605,464
82 Holyoke, Mass..........
79,500
20,306
286,162
7,500 525.000
532.500
818,662
83 Fort Wayne, I n d ___
14,109
334,941
38,761
38,761
373,702
84 Youngstown, O hio...
112,601
311.035 0 95,573
28.000 0 123,573
0 434,608
85 Houston, T ex ............
3,912
228,584
57,982
57,982
286,566
86 Covington. K y..........
945
62,382
105.035
21,300
168,590
147,290
273,625
87 Akron, Ohio..............
40,221
100,954
231,323
150,954
50,000
382,277
88 Dallas, T e x ...............
41,481
2,882
197,270
£5,042
5,042
£202,312
(*)
89 Saginaw, M ic h .........
24,582
3,207
110,046
98, i
98,888
208,934
90 Lancaster, Pa............
25,000 J 22,082
3 97,658
60,000
60,000
3 157,658
91 Lincoln, N ebr..........
10,809
169,263
8,590
8,590
177,853
92 Brockton, Mass.........
33,213 *101,662 fc240,506
83,730
638,730
Tc 879,236
555.000
93 Binghamton, N. Y . . .
50,000
170,811
17,345
37,545
20,200
208,356
94 Augusta, G a ..............
1 92,904
65,500
345.500
1 438,404
280.000
95 Pawtucket, R. I .........
135,358 »»56,088 m 249,994
260,000 m 509,994
260,000
96 Altoona, Pa...............
27,734
96,457
13,000
18,025
5,025
114,482
97 Wheeling, W. Va . . . .
52,250
163,252
163,252
215,502
98 Mobile, A la...............
n 34,415
13,838
72,000
72,000
»106,415
99 Birmingham, Ala___
105,059
183,757
4,630
188,387
4,1
100 Little Rock, Ark.......
7,050
15,000
29,354
0 24,331 0 24,331
o53,685
101 Springfield, O h io___
81,724
64,589
185,629
121,040
267,353
102 Galveston, T e x .........
130,185
227,963
2,000
66,966
64,966
294.929
103 Tacoma, Wash...........
191,109
191,109
104 Haverhill, M ass.......
r 514,761
67,780 P i24,816 P 301,211 q 13,550
200,000 q 213,550
105 Spokane, W ash.........
3,968
241,882
79,955
79,955
321,837
106 Terre Haute, I n d ___
40,238
30,146
40,238
70,384
107 Dubuque, Iow a.........
88,598
189,895 s 11,224
60.500 s71,724
8261,619
108 Quincy, 111.................
75,639
89,943
28,100
63,600
35.500
153.543
109 South Bend, Ind.......
3,168
1,918
t 73,330
299,637 1 73,330
1 372,967
110 Salem, M ass..............
30,000 m97,587 w170,251
480,670
73,670
m650,921
407,000
111 Johnstown, Pa..........
12,272
113,474
33,799
101,200
146,720
45,520
260,194
112 Elmira, N. Y ..............
v 113,295 «177,394
58,200
68,200
v 245,594
10,000
113 Allentown, Pa..........
3,500
9,592
150,881
106,500
106,500
257,381
114 Davenport, I o w a ___
110,634
207,645
86,343
24,291
318,279
115 McKeesport, P a .......
33,943
169,289
4,000
4,000
173,289
116 Springfield, 111..........
81,874
97,669
81,874
179.543
117 Chelsea, Mass............
92,822
440,000
47,439
150,000
290,000
532,822
a Including $135,316 State and county tax.
b $57,700 paid out of sinking fund.
c Not including $57,700 paid out of sinking fund.
d Data are for 9 months,
e Including $116,098 State and county tax.
/In clu d in g $207,194 State and county tax.
g Not including $100,000 paid out of sinking fund.
*$54,000 paid out of sinking fund.
i Not including $54,000 paid out of sinking fund.
J Including $2,082 State tax.
fcIncluding $67,1586tate and county tax.
l Not including $23,733 expended by State and county for schools.
m including $48,407 State tax.
« Not including $10,691 expended by State and county for schools.
©Not including $7,050 paid out o f sinking fund.
P Including $38,515 State and county tax.
q Not including $70,000 paid out of sinking fund.
r Including4
$38,515 State and county tax, but not including $70,000 paid out of sinking fund,
s Not including $60,167 paid out o f sinking fund.
t Not including $3,168 paid out of sinking fund.
mIncluding $41,811 State and county tax.
v Including $112,725 State and county tax.




STATISTICS OF CITIES,
5 X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTI
Concluded.

uar•inal
lum­

Cities.

ber.

118
119
120
121
122
128
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Chester, P a ............
York, Pa.................
Malden, Mass.........
Topeka, Kans.........
Newton, Mass.........
Sioux City, Iow a...
Bayonne, N. J .........
Knoxville, T en n ...
Schenectady, N. Y .
Fitchburg, Mass . . .
Superior, W is.........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass.......
Canton, O h io.........
Butte, M o n t..........
Montgomery, A la ..
Auburn, N. Y .........
Chattanooga, Tenn
East St. Louis, 111..
Joliet, 111...............

Hospi­
Police
tals,asy­
courts,
Libraries,
lums,
jails,
Police workFire Health alms­
art gal­
de­
depart­ houses, depart­ part­ houses, Schools.
leries,
museums,
ment. reform­ ment. ment. and
etc.
other
atories,
chari­
etc.
ties.

$15,934
972
443
3,797
4,904
7,170
35,834
15,556
5,558

$1,322

915
2,250
6,293
4,754

$436
$27,115
6,342

$75,002
26,776
15.541
28,200
26,549
2,556
8,846

$168
5,257
400
3,788
834
305

37,478
27,889
40,952
6,175

2,022

1,000

431
887
1,345

a 18,316
2,082
54,129

14,362

61,804
26.000

1,461
1,338

a Including expenditures of school district extending beyond city limits.




1012

BULLETIN OF THE "DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able XXI.-EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (2)—
Concluded.

Mar­
gin­
al
num­
ber.

Cities.

118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Chester, P a ..............
York, Pa..................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, K a n s.........
Newton, M ass.........
Sioux City, Iowa .. .
Bayonne, N. J .........
Knoxville,Tenn . . .
Schenectady, N. Y ..
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior, W is..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass.........
Canton, O h io..........
Butte, M on t............
Montgomery, A la ...
Auburn, N. Y ..........
Chattanooga, T enn.
East St. Louis, 111. . .
Joliet, 111.................

Streets.

$40,928
2,950
10,527
142,826
56,647
9,575
26,831
6,096
91,672
64,276
56,370
108,800
30,297
50,124

Sew­
ers.

Bath
hous­
es
and
Elec­
Water­ Gas tric- Docks Ferries Mar­ Cem­ bath­
and
and
works. w’rks light wharves bridges. kets. eter­ ing
ies. pools
pl’nts
and
beach
es

$8,500
10,622
2,214
79,213
10,961
41,733
35^049
9,983
4,509
753
66,444
10,565
6,809
1,528
3,885

$765

$29,498

36,610
8,000

6,474
176,560
52,125 14,104

$1,018
60,ii6
5,494
9,757

18,111
19,469
23,301

$2,530
*

4,783

24,604
35,577
13,860

19,439

a Included in other street expenditures for maintenance and operation.




1013

STATISTICS OF CITIES.

T able X X I.—EXPENDITURES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY (S)—

Concluded.
Loans repaid.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

113
119
120
121
122

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Chester, P a ...............
York, Pa....................
Malden, Mass............
Topeka, ira n s..........
Newton, M ass..........
Sioux City, Iowa.......
Bayonne, N. J ..........
Knoxville, Tenn —
Schenectady, N. Y . ..
Fitchburg, Mass.......
Superior, Wis............
Roek ford, T il............
Taunton, Mass..........
Canton, O h io............
Butte, M on t..............
Montgomery, Ala___
Auburn, N. Y ............
Chattanooga, T enn ..
East St. Louis, 111___
Joliet, 111..................

Sinking
fund.

Other.

Tempo­
rary
Total, ex­
clusive of Long­ loans and
term
short­
loans
(2
term
repaid. bonds or
years
bonds
over). (less than
2 years).

Total.

a $12,306 a $178,555
$124,000 C$124,000
(*)
1,000
32,000
$31,000
1,000
47,603
42,986 e105,732 e 229,446 / 50,025
300,000 / 350,025
14
46,883
33,845
46,883
217.460
128,305 *172,173 h 557,703
895,000
10,000, 885,000
73,017
1,590
111.461 *95,382
39,453 i 134,835
66,000 J 93,293 fc253,935
211,000
137,000,
74,000
(m)
837
1 13,275
45,250 n45,250
20,000 P 32,879 3290,817
179,518
13,000
166,518
49,978 r 122,569 r 300,273
128,900
502,800
631,700
71,202
67,861
59,402
11,800
119,311
700
228,000
241,000
82,996
13,000
s62,970 *321,062
165,136
u 354,000 v 354,000
(*)
64,779
159,554
13,638
61,446
3,333
14,345
13,000
80,903
« 91,744
67,903
17,985
30,385
V 81,607
12,400
15,800
63,907
1,500
95,091
48,107
12,728
57,000
57,000
53,275
293,100
62,430
11,000
51,430
126,866*
3
i

Total, in­
cluding
loans
repaid.

$41,819

$302,555
79,603
579,471
264,343
1,452,703
i 246,296
*464,935
o 58,525
3470,335
r 931,973
190,513
323,996
675,062
224,333
a 172,647
s
V 111,992
158,998
69,728
293,100
189,296

d

g

h

Including $7,097 State tax.
$5,000 paid out of sinking fund.
c Not including $5,000 paid out of sinking fund.
d Including $7,097 State tax, but not including $5,000 paid out of sinking fund.
e Including State and county tax.
/N o t including $10,000 paid out of sinking fund.
g Including State and countv tax, but not including $10,000 paid out of sinking fund.
* Including $97,221 State and county tax.
i Not including $49,633 paid out of sinking fund.
j State and county tax.
k Including $93,293 State and county tax.
l Not including expenditures for sewers included in other street expenditures for maintenance and
operation.
m $9,000 paid out of sinking fund.
«Not including $9,000 paid out of sinking fund.
o Not including expenditures for sewers included in expenditures for maintenance and operation
and $9,000 paid out of sinking fund.
P County tax.
3 Including $32,879 county tax.
r Including $36,661 State and county tax.
s Including $47,580 State and county tax.
*$71,300 paid out of sinking fund.
uNot including $1,000 paid out of sinking fund.
«N ot including $72,300 paid out of sinking fund.
w Including $47,580 State and county tax, but not including $72,300 paid out of sinking fund,
a Including expenditures for school district extending beyond city limits.
;
v Including unpaid warrants which can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
a
b




BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION

Larnal
raier.

Cities.

Police
courts,iails,
workPolice
Fire de­ Health de­
department. houses, re­ partment. partment.
forma­
tories, etc.

New York, N. Y ___
$10,199,206 $1,310,411 $4,739,992 $1,162,256
Chicago, 111............
3,685,982
1,647,676
190,302
258,369
Philadelphia, P a . ..
1,101,090
3,036,264
250,809
1,240,279
St. Louis, M o...........
769,272
1,602,182
113,632
154,925
Boston, Mass..........
1,751,151 c l, 130,945
1,285,791
201,712
6 Baltimore, M d.........
509,763
967,823
94,715
122,431
487,383
7 Cleveland, Ohio___
98,502
417,932
116,087
8 Buffalo, N. Y ..........
689,425
793,294
47,415
24,049
658,258
9 San Francisco, C a l.
789,251
161,965
65,089
472,388
10 Cincinnati, O h io . ..
43,016
555,185
133,370
559,299
85,976
11 Pittsburg, P a..........
490,287
266,851
12 New Orleans, La___
231,374
37,073
44,708
542,049
556,567
13 Detroit, M ich..........
11,400
41,989
453,574
342,508
36,448
42,432
14 Milwaukee, Wis___
687,922
266,900
15 Washington, D. C ..
275,649
70,893
428,495
319,408
16 Newark, N. J ..........
41,109
75,787
421,616
241,187
17 Jersey City, N. J ___
8,465
230,036
273,615
106,475
18 Louisville, K y .........
8,208
216,698
325,507
19 Minneapolis, Minn.
24,887
33,981
371,875
355,074
20 Providence, R. I .. .
4,957
25,445
159,579
21 Indianapolis, I n d ..
181,029
15,754
2,635
_
22 Kansas City, M o _
255,850
248,344
25,212
31,551
St. Paul, M inn.........
184,539
199,915
36,208
10,624
23
240,644
24 Rochester, N. Y ___
198,471
16,072
28,106
160,605
25 Denver, C olo...........
11,339
155,420
25,672
110,650
21,550
116,523
26 Toledo, O h io..........
14,101
137,871
147,329
27 Allegheny, Pa.........
15,588
124,227
181,242
28 Columbus, O hio___
34,275
19,341
149,699
29 Worcester, Mass___
167,667
31,291
30 Syracuse, N. Y .......
137,809
13,624
175,796
31,601
197,584
31 New Haven, Conn..
21,267
143,573
7,874
124,335
32 Paterson, N. J .........
3,495
120,196
8,291
139,364
122,971
33 Fall River, Mass .. .
25,655
34 St. Joseph, M o.........
61,500
9,062
61,561
1,800
91,290
35 Omaha, Nebr..........
10,878
118,183
8,354
36 Los Angeles, Cal___
123,376
7,560
124,928
13,303
n 101,670
37 Memphis, Tenn.......
100,337
Jc66,437
(°)
58,172
38 Scranton, Pa............
3,741
57,143
8,519
136,500
39 Lowell, M ass..........
119,075
12,191
156,481
40 Albany, N. Y ..........
6,524
142,048
16,816
n 128,459
41 Cambridge, Mass . . .
91,120
18,500
(°)
42 Portland, O r e g .......
53,652
5,517
80,563
5,683
rt 141,600
43 Atlanta, Ga..............
117,768
” 98,887
(°)
44 Grand Rapids, Mich
84,796
13,678
122,518
16,646
45 Dayton, O hio...........
88,256
13,781
74,792
8,630
46 Richmond, V a.........
104,426
4,189
92,673
9,191
47 Nashville, T e n n ___
t 89,097
89,270
” 4,860
13,328
48 Seattle, Wash..........
85,691
9,429
97,377
14,702
49 Hartford, Conn.......
120,936
6,075
116,305
11,574
50 Reading, P a ............
51,956
42,022
4,842
51 Wilmington,Del . . .
81,950
36,510
3,100
5,130
52 Camden, N. J ..........
92,163
6,064
86,298
7,000
53 Trenton, N. J ..........
87,800
2,800
72,900
6,700
54 Bridgeport, Conn...
68,721
8,196
75,614
4,785
55 Lynn, Mass..............
80,557
96,740
11,839
66 Oakland, C a l..........
65,367
7,702
76,575
14,335
57 Lawrence, M ass___
65,113
59,536
14,720
(*)
( x)
58 New Bedford, Mass.
113,457
78,738
30,274
59 Des Moines, Iow a...
4,420
50,780
80,670
3,660
(X)
60 Springfield, Mass. . .
67,639
97,390
7,161
61 Somerville, Mass . . .
” 66,165
64,943
8,078
1°)
62 Troy, N. Y ...............
111,978
64,421
4,503
19,941
a In eluding $217,562 for College of City of New York and $185,411 for Normal College,
b In eluding expenditures for street sprinkling,
cln eluded in expenditures for street cleaning.
<*N )t including $160,000 expended by street-railway company and $14,110 expended
<
pect 3rs of trust funds.
e I n eluding $1,088,608 expended by county,
/I n eluding $152,723 for University of Cincinnati.
r
p F<> drainage system,
h P£id for by property owners.
i N >t including expenditures by United States Government for lighting of public parks i
<
Jin eluding other street expenditures.
fcli icluding expenditures for garbage removal,
H n eluded in other street expenditures.
1
2
3
4
5




1015

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (1).

Schools.

a $19,731,629
8,203,493
3,319,604
1,526,140
3,043,640
1,417,392
1,257,345
1,161,834
1,166,763
/ l , 126,631
843,648
478,025
869,713
764,968
1,182,916
830,081
500,332
512,947
736i 981
739,695
558,630
555,272
584,702
550,031
679,071
398,805
363,027
421,588
517,844
410,459
382,950
313,166
326,335
160,490
392,276
497,016
140,863
315,146
331,899
294,065
439,593
268,791
166,842
304,450
318,402
124,107
169,799
263,959
385,731
212,326
195,109
242,021
w 222,246
179,775
237,972
299,017
185,821
234,940
272,444
359,560
294,374
215,120

Libraries,
art gal­
leries,
museums,
etc.
$736,111
211,019
257,252
37,284
267,509
41,259
82,487
98,769
47,337
86,114
126,000
9,827
51,226
62,356
8,746
40,585
31,333
42,209
22,349
26,788
28,314
15,555
3,462
24,314
10,991
31,672
10,967
33,981
26,605
13,818
14,034
15,168
7,789
16,776
19,063
5,126
9,900
16,480
9,700
20,622
7,000
7,667
10,516
650
5,000
18,751
11,000
4,180
7,036
1,898
5,680
12,438
14,186
15,668
11,872
14,017
11,271
29,945
16,882

Parks.

Sewers.

Municipal
lighting.

Street
cleaning.

Street
sprink­
ling.

Other street
expendi­
tures.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

$1,367,086
759,332
449,963
115,370
419,903
208,158
77,358
200,257
166,876
45,651
162,784
8,867
108,713
53,346
81,502
3,890
11,303
46,588
68,763
47,298
61,452
97,650
57,168
34,178
70,248
44,946
28,302
11,602
22,509
30,743
21,794
20,000
1,904
8,999
20,623
61,873
2,942
4,256
11,346
45,103
21,375
12,749
13,595
23,276
2,719
6,800

$423,104
283,321
273,825
97,839
394,408
40,815
49,134
11,516
63,167
32,496
44,329
037,893
36,848
95,909
137,181
71,238
21,255
15,010
20,915
72,430
10,602
22,426
16,667
3,716
19,941
12,689
12,564
9,658
232,985
( l)
19,800
11,269
(*)
250
21,491
8,466
3,141
8,070
12,499
14,884
95,475
4,973
8,141
7,076
1,980
10,001

$2,734,276
475,687
1,234,236
585,900
770,425
327,600
259,228
351,154
254,577
340,463
306,374
216,281

$108,371
(c)
(c)
150,691
164,259
606

$4,399,078
296,563
<*448,535
294,072
1,641,552
187,764
47,982
118,559
110,111
118,244
168,909
15,831
348,799
153,693
370,791

19,821
33,334
13,902
10,646
1,541
14,862
19,143
9,091
5,258
7,149
23,012
30,226
23,110
9,610
2,355

11,772
14,267
33,376
8,768
4,528
4,538
8,488
9,438
4,345
17,292
7,647
11,784
13,272
10,167
6,574

$2,906,767
5605,201
5320,224
130,892
356,446
207,728
562,263
5143,918
178,368
233,369
5253,531
104,981
161,441
110,228
176,633
i 139,228
*67,529
108,999
40,641
59,807
55,939
90,652
3 151,267
90,360
41,593
44,571
534,023
572,422
41,767
81,839
40,200
34,323
23,300
9,013
522,923
35,543
10,191
P 15,895
28,300
12,360
30,000
539,253
( s)
43,770
18,446
34,400
(t>)
17,000
43,876
15,000
513,553
515,100
15,182
28,000
8,415
17,566
8,335
14,927
516,926
24,912
515,682
106,281

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

(*’)

210,276
1246,533
217,820
161,167
151,173
154,999
290,843
113,273
78,822
133,800
250,038
91,886
77,548
75,743
122,166
111,000
87,501
87,000
99,950
400
80,226
71,857
49,363
46,733
93,147
90,121
72,168
49,653
75,527
52,668
34,217
47,303
33,241
58,461
69,409
45,752
83,972
55,583
55,786
53,593
63,906
36,433
52,338
49,338
66,698
58,290
83,374

(c)

M

14,380
(o )
(*)
(*)
79,331
3,000
<*)
(*)
112,450
(h)

41,639
9,897
27,535
39,941
44,260
(c)

M

36,456
23,110
27,897
4,000
9,726
(«)
55,926
20,853
(«)
10,164
26,684
Is )

(*)

682
1,500
12,060
22,912
(A)

(<
0
(*)
(h)

7,474
21,577
14,980
11,665
(h\

M
27,100
(?)
7,679

(c)

155,227
*148,598
64,881
231,835
27,196
61,426
(«)
58,286
66,082
73,236
37,758
111,024
233,813
m76,378
81,095
40,958
m 124,968
60,538
44,509
101,764
97,839
50,715
54,389
66,211
159,969
10,519
93,848
12,486
19,011
65,508
51,560
30,935
122,563
42,220
37,368
28,938
15,244
54,715
79,693
22,876
30,267
56,129
10,490
81,648
83,554
11,180

m Including expenditures for sewers.
n Including expenditures for police courts, jails, workhouses, reformatories, etc.
o Included in expenditures for police department.
P Including expenditures for flushing streets.
a No sprinkling done; expenditures for flushing streets included in expenditures for street
cleaning.
r Including expenditures for street cleaning, street sprinkling, and garbage removal.
s Included in expenditures for health department.
t Including expenditures for police courts and jails.
mExpenditures for police courts and jails included in expenditures for police department.
v Included in expenditures for garbage removal.
w For 16 months.
* Supported by county.




BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION

arlal
mir.
1
2
3
4

6
6

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Cities.

Garbage
removal.

Interest on
debt.

Water­
works.

Gas works.

New York N. Y
........................................ $2,625,668 $13,693,155 $3,000,990
1,520,187
533,922
1,520,813
Chicago, 111.......................................................
1,412,668
Philadelphia Pa ...........................................
1,429,959
685,567
654,068
779.259
217,114
St. Louis* M o......................................................
612,387
Boston, Mass ..
..........................................
623,000 a 3,388,528
394,736
1,547,410
165,647
...........................................
Baltimore, Md
274,051
712,575
Cleveland, Ohio.................................................
102,511
436,431
662.259
117,035
Buffalo, N. Y ......................................................
14,730
San Franebco, C a l...........................................
480,058
1,737,285
Cincinnati, O h io ...............................................
26,583
231,821
948,462
Pittsburg, P a .....................................................
93.890
799,720 .
New Orleans, L a ...............................................
95,970
/ 56,803
332,378
Detroit, Mich.....................................................
65.000
152,069
315,829
Milwaukee, W is.................................................
181,858
h 323,185
Washington, D. C .............................................
121,807
(ff)
230,375
801,629
69,792
Newark^ N. J ......................................................
554,867
993,846
Jersey City, N. J .................................................
147,090
483,274
Louisville", K y ....................................................
$1,166
133,785
376,400
135,996
639,335
28.890
3,000 .
128,527
41,795
Indianapolis, I n d .............................................
187,323 ,
325,075
19,192
Kansas City, Mo.................................................
98,751 !
1 329,906
20,569
St. Paul, M in n ...................................................
102,507
Rochester, N. Y .................................................
106,714
523,773
3,862
134,161
Denver, C olo......................................................
67,457
326,055
12.000
Toledo, O h io......................................................
208,827
256,600
28,000
Allegheny, Pa....................................................
(m)
124,005
15,800
Columbus, O h io.................................................
50,783
430,655
l.1, ‘36
Worcester, Mass................................................
107,942
295,893
Syracuse, N. Y .................................................
(k , 000
161,268
New Haven, C o n n ............................................
5,949
152,415
Paterson, N .J ....................................................
30,000
52,076
231,524
30,300
Fall River M ass...............................................
75,034
St. Joseph, M o....................................................
3,120
259,611
2,947
Omaha, Nebr......................................................
69,210
Los Angeles, Cal.................................................
12,225
160,921
Memphis, Tenn..................................................
(®)
56,516
Scranton, Pa.......................................................
94,332
175,116
Lowell, Mass......................................................
33,500
123,534
217,887
Albany, N .Y .......................................................
418
79,239
325,302
Cambridge, M ass...................... - .......................
56,445
34,754
304,063
Portland, M e ......................................................
4,529
112,162
143,425
Atlanta, Ga.........................................................
(°)
59,402
Grand Rapids, M ich..........................................
90,990
6,219
40,974
Dayton, O hio......................................................
21,620
172,477
34,039
375,814
Richmond, V a....................................................
20,300
59,595
161,088
Nashville, T e n n ................................................
P 35,537
64,929
275,632
Seattle, Wash.....................................................
1,027
76,265
187,816
Hartford, Conn..................................................
24,850
44,474
17,188
61,466
Reading, Pa .......................................................
56,016
Wilmington, Del................................................
28,239
80,891
59,358
125,358
10,100
Camden, N .J ......................................................
48,791
Trenton, N .J ......................................................
18,459
145,385
71,753
26,507
Bridgeport, C onn...............................................
76,862
204,097
Lynn, Mass.........................................................
36,104
23,834
Oakland, C a l......................................................
98,127
89,768
Lawrence, Mass..................................................
30,000
36,108
155,545
23.972
New Bedford, Mass...........................................
Des Moines, Iowa...............................................
1,000
51,0?8
43,776
140,217
23,173
Springfield, M ass...............................................
48,838
51,831
31.972
Somerville, M ass...............................................
77,195
82,648 I
Troy, N .Y ..........................................................
29,730
luding $126,103 expended by county,
biding $1,214,711 expended by comity,
luding expenditures for ferries and bridges,
luded in expenditures for docks and wharves.
; including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
•6 months only.
1,235 paid out of sinking fund.
luding expenditures by United States Government.
luding expenditures by United States Government for waterworks, but not includ
of United States Government for lighting public parks and spaces and $574,235
g fund.




1017

STATISTICS OF CITIES.
Table X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (2).

Electriclight
plants.

Docks and
wharves.

$330,716

$863,729
22,680
13,287
58,029

Ferries
and
bridges.

$889,283
115,491
101,885

5,706
c 89,395
51,714
4,361
4,547
108,244

277
17,618
99
4,535
8,792

3,438

98,883
107

78

443,094
20,357
(rf)
7,943
6,695
35,545
23,374
45
7,985
60,860
13,472
3,828
25,075
30,193
5,563
6,394
42,763
23,264
24,583
617
1,306
21,112
14,322

Markets. Cemeteries.

$72,688
4,000
7,310
6,675
13,071
29,941
20,707
14,370

$ 1,200

1,870
67,892
29,108
167

13,312
12,126
4,000
7,355
7,034
20,992
720
9,306
2,880
2,349
2,906
6,255
5,577
9,052
7,203

24*898

34,352
9,748
24,854
1,253
20,318

24,093

500
7,217

23,568 ................. .
...........
338
|

2,578

I !!!!!!!!!!!!

15,000
4,809
9,841
4,718
21,346
8,398
1,247
5,233
11,401
4,301
49
13,651

5,834
8,090
5,874

7,332
90
16,223
1,990

1,854
7,806
2,819

8,019
18,150

2,031
5,132
6,708
2,409
1,145

12,395
16,527
9,032
4,490

28,935
10,723
32,403
8,095

Bath
houses and
bathing
pools and
beaches.

Other.




Total.

I
$89,895 $27,137,298 $102,946,573
1,565,446
16,443
22,260,661
2,805,450
10,200
19,106,707
761,821
8,715,821
3,955,881 5 21,898,291
155,929
1,005,474
8,064
7,613,756
478,684
4,805,717
796,377
3,114
5,865,286
1,935,320
5,891,297
493,873
6,215,866
903,386
5,406,446
1,887,072 e4,297,808
692,591 e 4,055,966
579,127
11,275
3,733,315
1,003,163 & 5,387,271
2,543
388,445 e 3,812,511
4,580
397,204 e 3,598,464
467,997 ! 2,774,987.
4,908
469,784
2,944,208
313,769 * 3,465,201
1,076
225,328
1,706,434
’ **405
663,409
2,751,935
431,933 1 2,368,991
2,870 i
844,475
3,238,368
323,741
1,889,983
199,624
1,574,315
1,639,540
155,038
208,722 «1,446,274
632 .
109,224
2,364,259
570,595
5,223 {
2,295,883
1,453,412
147,697
1,228,754
210,558
242,688
1,613,904
904,996
402.738
344,815
1,444,287
1,472,576
254,071
91,386
915,090
761,734
122,119
152,791
1,407,470
1,912 !
175,074
1,452,016
2,370
2,157,086
407.739
959,856
72,364
1,164,751
112,463
178,787 c l, 034,506
943,194
60,097
154,462
1,261,816
822,682
58,115
1,120,302
164,895
2,152
121,339
1,457,939
77,974
e 691,480
*325
60,016
671,113
836,568
61,609
e 799,650
65,361
782,711
87,276
139,781
1,218,846
731,181
89,372
810,371
54,756
813
69,627 e l, 017,982
742,465
120,600
800
1,162,739
97,013
635
1,036,717
235,538
101,362
86
1,015,681

1,214
720
235
Included in expenditures for street cleaning.
Included in other street expenditures.
Not including $74,206 paid out of sinking fund.
t» $342,547 paid out of sinking fund.
wNot including $342,547 paid out of sinking fund.
o Included in expenditures for health department.
p Including expenditures for sewers and street cleaning.
J

Jc
l

j

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

1018

BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (1)— Continued.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

63 Hoboken, N. J .............................
64 Evansville, Ind...........................
65 Manchester, N. H ........................
66 Utica, N .Y ...................................
67 Peoria, 111...................................
68 Charleston, S. C...........................
69 Savannah, G a .............................
70 Salt. Lake City, U ta h _________
71 San Antonio, "T e x ......................
72 Duluth, Minn r...........................
73 Erie, P a .......................................
74 Elizabeth, N. J ...........................
75 Wilkesbarre, Pa.........................
76 Kansas Cityj K an s....................
77 Harrisburg" P a ...........................
78 Portland, Me. (« )........................
79 Yonkers, N. Y .............................
80 N orfolk ,V a................................
81 Waterbury, C o n n ......................
82 Holyoke, M ass...........................
83 Fort Wayne, I n d ........................
84 Youngstown, O h io....................
85 Houston, T e x .............................
86 Covington, K y ...........................
87 Akron, Ohio................................
88 Dallas, T ex..................................
89 Saginaw, M ich ...........................
90 Lancaster, P a .............................
91 Lincoln, Nebr.............................
92 Brockton, M ass.........................
93 Binghamton, N .Y ......................
94 Augusta, Ga................................
95 Pawtucket, R. I .........................
96 Altoona, P a ................................
97 Wheeling, W. Y a .......................
98 Mobile, A l a ................................
99 Birmingham, A la ......................
100 Little Rock, A r k .......................
101 Springfield, Ohio........................
102 Galveston, T ex ...........................
103 Tacoma, Wash.............................
104 Haverhill, Mass.........................
105 Spokane, Wash...........................
106 Terre Haute, I n d ........................
107 Dubuque, Iow a...........................
108 Quincv, 111..................................
109 South Bend, In d .........................
110 Salem, Mass................................
111 Johnstown, P a ...........................
112 Elmira, N .Y ................................
113 Allentown, P a......................___
114 Davenport, I o w a ........................
115 McKeesport, Pa...........................
116 Springfield, 111.............................
117 Chelsea, Mass..............................

Hospitals,
Police
asylums,
courts,iails,
alms­
work­
Fire de­ Health de­
Police
department. houses. re­ partment. partment. houses, and
other
forma­
charities.
tories, etc.
6108,321
51,539
45,646
41,490
63,370
89,773
87,443
40,422
i 47,140
41,407
30,842
53,431
35,110
52,427
30,609
42,346
80,303
61,505
41,401
48,409
31,968
44,643
i 52,918
38,719
32,021
39,053
33,018
16,046
15,736
41,437
28,975
57,983
46,686
17,497
36,852
38,595
45,081
i 30,933*
29,790
i 40,133
35,256
33,017
36,091
30,275
27,830
21,153
21,115
38,543
17,664
i 35,040
i 12,994
26,223
i 34,969
32,269
35,104

S3,400
1,649
2,751
2,385
15,006
36
5,621

V)

13,946
1,786
700
1,036
5,226
8,620
47
4,816
3,013

(i)

7,195
2,830
5,787
2,746
1,500
1,800
5,519

(w )

691
6,232
1,116
14,195

(il

327

V)

2,767
6,037
1,000
5,464
600

682,856
60,406
88,791
75,665
62,419
48,200
76,812
43,051
43,973
87,775
62,752
25,688
35,937
40,251
20,039
60,815
48,657
46,411
34,777
73,330
55,811
35,324
63,749
33,530
40,505
50,071
30,131
15,297
29,039
54,665
26,512
52,973
38,430
24,058
42,347
23,914
38,345
28,742
27,645
51,724
46,934
48,953
67,185
39,983
32,361
28,499
33,648
35,305
10,200
54,343
18,744
25,046
33,498
44,617
34,408

66,712
2,210
12,931
c13,079
5,991
11,904
17,940
5,284
14,933
6,049
6,697
6,655
3,183
23,041
25,475
4,236
24,454
26,752
2,681
6,634
4,828
6,334
P 23,279
16,276
18
P 20,001
2,697
1,519
3,355
10,476
5,710
7,731

19,777
250
35,653
5,752
12,562
50,551
13,661
(9)

18,197
7,949
(9)
14,299
1,264
300
39,138
13,284
22,418
21,492

i.,945
4,193
2,303
1,983
9,927
3,495
5,823
1,928
7,945
3,457
9,689
bb 19,163
28,253
4,200
3,038
3,635
39,815
5,443
7,451
7,817
469
1,770
1,178
3,592 .......: .........
676
14,739
47,484
1,107
10,260
7,651
1,833
P i, b ll

3,296
2,249
16,808

« Including expenditures for street sprinkling.
&Included in expenditures for street cleaning.
c For 11 months only.
d Including expenditures for street sprinkling; for 11 months only.
e Included in expenditures for street cleaning; for 11 months only.
/In clu din g 61,000 contributed to Jacksonville fund.
(/Not including 669,493 expended by State and county.
h Supported by State and county.
i Including expenditures for police courts, jails, workhouses, reformatories, etc.
j Included in expenditures for police department.
k Included in other street expenditures.
l Including expenditures for parks, street cleaning, and street sprinkling.
w Paid for by property owners.
n Data are for 9 months.
o Including expenditures for garbage removal.
P Including expenditures for hospitals, asylums, almshouses, and other charities




615,402
2,274
20,682
17,105
22,805
/64,782
17,923
10,001
7,186
13,243

(9)

52,947

1019

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

Table X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (1)—Continued.

Schools.

$186,560
175,229
125,929
c 169,149
*
199,306
fir7,950

Libraries,
art gal­
leries,
museums,
etc.
$8,473
5,279
c 6,136
11,046
500

(h )

264,557
107,965
24lj 867
137,896
126,660
144,211
116,611
157,604
139,571
207,045
58,774
179,955
197,117
111,732
145,314
125,231
92,823
165,828
92,762
142,353
88,944
117,821
140,787
156,363

5,680
8,547
6,789
1,747
6,100
4,403
1,500
1,000
6,000
5,097
2,877
9,163
3,535
2,443
4,387
6,651
1,892

(V )

134,843
88,699
94,545
(*)
V 26,287
76,427
112,192
96,310
164,090
122,508
157,248
138,530
94,683
82,732
81,931
118,029
104,344
130,057
92,662
150,081
105,008
105,971
124,471

7,182
5,053

Parks.

$4,500
1,698
5,264
c6,956
28,493
9,349
8,712
7,821
12,706
8,628
3,692
(fc)
468
1,284
3,460
<240
23,640
9,774
3,783
7,442
10,636
1,539
1,900
1,682
2,8S0
526
100
3,210
936
236

2,000

1,807
4,093
3,624
8,515
177
6,354
7,387
5,704
2,117
1,047
6,308
2,936
6,300
1,530
6,679

394
3,000
2,968
3,896

(cc)
1,425

(*j
4,114
1,375
5,106
11,114
3,070
8,418
4,337
4,583
7,413

7,399

Sewers.

Municipal
Lghiing.

$5,718
3,999
4,179
c 3,821
5,229
7,222
4,865
3,465
3,359
8,649

$27,499
28,072
59,471
c 62,773
34,901
27,254
36,591
31,203

2,216
7,143
4,036
1,000
24^666
3,821
19,641
6,696
3.102
2,170
4,889
3,280
3,298
1,500
114
1,006
833
2,465
11,636
2,620
4,548
11,100
3,070
945
2,723
593
1,086
1,663
2,370
12,989
3,164
1,609
1,200
4,760
2,292
2,225
3,231
2,500
10,734
1,829
1,500
2,212
4,468

23,610
37,322
22,647
40,212
33,195
33,779
37,507
39,540
16,556
22,887
30,191
29,100
24,158
21,800
20,043
27,060
23,947
18,000
27,492
13,800
32,663
45,140
24,078
33,299
16,499
18,334
17,254
36,446
36,665
11,107
27,422
24,162
19,893
19,695
36,913
18,416
37,299
19,727
9,574
20,416
22,667
27,896

Street
cleaning.

a$16,010
15,499
8,639
d 23, 111
16,853
14,983
15,271
14,714
17,559
3,830
a 5,477
(fc)
(m)
a 13,510
3,395
18,995
16,867
0 35,755
9,750
8,455
10,537
20,216
(fc)
8,695
5,200
10,638
8,709
5,716
t 3,370
6,900
10,546
1,700
14,361
a 4,919
9,689
8 4,934
* <*)
(fc)

f
c

(<*)
(fc)
4,607
5,132
12,473
13,770
4,155
18,972
5,813
a8,147
3,744
1,505
9,624
a 9,000
a 13,858
4,999

Street
sprink­
ling.

Other street
expendi­
tures.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

(*>)
$7,109
3,619
(«)

$1,695
5,326
46,378
c 7,225
18,833
16,635
40,953
20,160
71,694
39,802
12,444
1 26,838
38,158
16,200
36,086
47,513
24,377
43,259
15,245
15,877
8,976
9,249
r 58,664
s 27,709

63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117

1,500
1,200
25,067
4,828
7,507
(*)
(fc)
(m)

(b)
(m)

7,403
1,113
(» )
9,115
145

5^447
2,894
(m)

W
9,993
675
2,110
8,622
(6)
(■ )

b
(m)

(m)

8,977
4,080
500
(m)
(m)
4,134
(*)
8,779
(b)

(*)
9,190

22,393
26,803
14,257
w6,709
80,006
20,048
5,695
24,356
13,132
1,023
26,471
r 29,805
* 11,727
•
o a 47,829
25,003
r 26,777
42,477
15,892
9,202
25,773
8,397
18,605
46,441
5,090
30,606
10,039
10,808
8,825
7,926
27,771

Included in expenditures for health department.
Including expenditures for street cleaning.
Including expenditures for street sprinkling and garbage removal.
t Including expenditures for street sprinkling, but not including $3,500, value of work performed
by citizens in lieu of payment of poll tax in cash.
« Not including $2,287, value of work performed by citizens in lieu of payment of poll tax in cash.
t>
$94,060 expended by State and county,
w Supported by State.
*
#$45,876 expended by State and county.
Including expenditures for libraries, art galleries, museums, etc., but not including $24,431
expended by State and county.
* Included in expenditures for schools.
a a Including expenditures for street cleaning and removal of ashes.
Including expenditures for street cleaning and garbage removal,
pc included in expenditures for waterworks.
q
r
s




BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
ble

X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (2)—Continued.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Garbage
removal.

Interest on
debt.

Water­
works.

Gas works.

63 Hoboken, N .J .........
$65,028
$160,379
$8,805
64 Evansville, In d .......
57,452
104,082
5,000
65 Manchester, N. H _
_
31,144
81,742
17,458
66 Utica, N. Y ...............
a 33,120
a 22,898
67 Peoria, 111............... .
51,407
600
68 Charleston, S. C........
155,793
23,650
69 Savannah, G a .........
28,397
157,765
42,018
70 Salt Lake City, Utah.
168,344
37,415
10,142
71 San Antonio, T ex_
_
13,958
(« )
72 Duluth, M in n ........ .
36,466
$35,079
283,125
73 Erie, P a ....................
38,482
62,806
74 Elizabeth, N .J..........
127,747
7,107
75 Wilkesbarre, P a ___
24,395
76 Kansas City, Kans...
142,137
77 Harrisburg, P a ........
57,511
600
28,856
78 P o rtla n d ,M e .(i)....
82,214
3,817
162,104
54,601
79 Yonkers, N. Y ..........
31,306
80 Norfolk, Va...............
248,405
63,490
(*)
81 Waterbury, C onn_
61,422
_
17,424
16,000
82 Holyoke, Mass..........
93,239
17,160
27,858
23, ‘ 07
83 Fort Wayne, I n d ___
24,004
7,193
84 Youngstown, O hio...
32,990
25,691
1,270
151,183
85 Houston, T ex............
18,508
(m)
86,824
86 Covington, K y ..........
40,710
21.387
87 Akron, O h io ............ .
108,709
32,876
88 Dallas, T e x ...............
1,693
56,540
25,614
89 Saginaw, M ic h ........
308
24,686
25,854
6,230
90 Lancaster, Pa.......... .
87,812
24,049
91 Lincoln, N e b r..........
480
16,201
92 Brockton, Mass....... .
8,016
91,885
29,165
93 Binghamton, N. Y ...
19,029
32,141
94 Augusta, G a .............
99,838
176,718
59,945
3,600
95 Pawtucket, R. I ........
21,062
37,808
96 Altoona, Pa...............
51,161
80,077
97 Wheeling, W .V a ....
8,593
26,293
23,044
37,185
98 Mobile, Ala...............
(*)
16,635
119,450
99 Birmingham, Ala ...
5,550
100 Little Rock, A rk.......
101 Springfield, O h io___
53,234
19,451
r2,662
29,502
102 Galveston, T e x ........
91,025
(s)
32,806
103 Tacoma, Wash..........
228,233
122,224
19,973
104 Haverhill, M ass.......
2,713
15,715
105 Spokane, W ash........
144,596
106 Terre Haute, I n d ___
5,331
21,276
1 40,780
19,385
107 Dubuque, Iow a........
2,219
108 Quincy, 111.................
48,605
2,481
109 South Bend, In d .......
37,020
27,889
no Salem, M ass.............
52,074
34,145
2,594
111 Johnstown, Pa..........
28,574
112 Elmira, N .Y .............
26,627
25,682
113 Allentown, Pa..........
3,000
31,522
114 Davenport, I o w a ___
4,723
17.388
115 McKeesport, P a .......
29,801
30,964
1,539
116 Springfield, 111..........
51,841
v 26,210
117 Chelsea, Mass............
9,175
15,696
57,463
aFo •11 months only.
5 Im hiding $1,000 contributed to Jacksonville fund, but not including $69,493 expended by State and
count r for schools.
cNo ; including amount expended by State and county for schools.
3,964 paid out of sinking fund,
a m
cNc t including $118,964 paid out of sinking fund.
f i n :luded in expenditures for ferries and bridges,
aim hiding expenditures for docks and wharves.
h No ; including expenditures for street cleaning and street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
i D a A are for 9 months.
3 No ; including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners,
fclm luded in expenditures for street cleaning.
Un< luding $44,099 expended for various purposes in Atlantic City and Brambleton wards, which
L can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
t




1021

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

Table X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (2)—Continued.

Electriclight
plants.

Ferries
and
bridges.

Docks and
wharves.

$1,526

$989
4,865
«11,236
7,709

Markets. Cemeteries.

$1,165

g

( / ) 725

23,217
551

i

2,031
316

471

1,717
1,585

300

211
1,814
494

5,498
8,983

756

8,085
85
9,215
1,902
3,370

673

24,356
8,446

33,220
117

$22,771

4,694

1,096
(/)

2,789
2,870

1,200

7,675
6,975
£63
2,116
3,799

1,156
9,866
23,448
69,251

5,746
2,452

2,760
210

3,554
1,644
800
5,877

1,398
3,946
2,126
1,083
335
1,850
412

2,599
3,892
180

181
2,365
559

5,811

1,189
a 2,068
173
563

$1,500
a 1,085

3,100
5,150

542

$5,022
12,376
12,491

Bath
houses and
bathing
pools and
beaches.

788
133
643
200

5,044
979
1,695
6,542
8,433

4,852
10,805

Other.

Total.

$120,934
61,142
54,025
a 152,268
150,857
55,139
69,741
88,012
72,372
123,048
44,724
55,044
40,345
91,976
49,406
152,864
81,589
1 185,631
5,632
195,195
36,346
44,764
132,449
76,684
53,123
49,469
42,841
21,215
35,451
81,718
76,952
99,205
76,171
44,279
43,192
33,532
64,213
20,040
37,625
45,607
58,101
65,445
67,084
90,368
50,630
37,367
31,718
90,367
24,065
101,777
15,397
61,407
62,747
47,141
234,058

$828,814
598,742
631,284
649,502
694,825
6537,734
c 616,857
789,942
e 417,673
1,006,551
442,985
474,510
h 372,229
550,042
448,155
j 694,289
829,422
843,462
j 423,469
791,951
363,835
415,932
686,392
470,810
375,527
466,822
419,033
J 249,353
n350,259
635,042
443,110
o431,617
664,189
275,085
438,783
P 232,510
3 388,551
j 198,953
407,480
456,150
698,354
575,685
547,336
401,415
« 341,216
276,387
j 306,262
552,354
223,237
471,127
233,105
342,644
344,563
375,040
659,775

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117

m Included in other street expenditures.
nNot including $2,287 value of work performed by citizens in street cleaning, street sprinkling, and
other street expenditures, in lieu of poll tax in cash.
oNot including $94,060 expended by State and county for schools.
pN ot including $45,876 expended by State and county for schools.
q Not including $24,431 expended by State and county for schools, and expenditures for street
sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
» Expenditures for removal of ashes included in other street expenditures,
•
s Included in expenditures for health department.
t Not including $23,873 paid out of sinking fund.
u Not including $23,873 paid out of sinking fund, and expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for
by property owners.
v Including expenditures for parks.

9398— N o. 42— 02------10




1022

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (1)—Concluded.

Mar­
ginal
num
her.

118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Chester, P a ..................................
York, P a.......................................
Malden, Mass..............................
Topeka, Kans..............................
Newton, Mass..............................
cSioux City, Iowa.........................
Bayonne, N. J..............................
Knoxville, Tenn.........................
Schenectady, N. Y ......................
Fitchburg, Mass.........................
Superior, W is..............................
Rockford, 111..............................
Taunton, Mass............................
Canton, O h io..............................
Butte, M o n t................................
Auburn, N.^?..............................
Chattanooga, T en n ....................
East St. Louis, 111........................
Joliet, 111.....................................

Hospitals,
Police
asylums,
courts,jails,
alms­
workFire de­ Health de­
Police
partment. houses, and
department. houses, re­ partment.
other
forma­
charities.
tories, etc.
$25,000
20,851
34,027
25,269
70,520
22,873
41,548
*22,332
19,967
33,934
25,919
15,836
40,040
23,957
60,304
*39,616
20,000
*32,610
32,764
*28,516

$2,177
1,546
801
(0
1,050
2,303
1,546
1,029
2,864
7,692
(0
1,500
(<)
2,518
(0

$15,699
14,037
34,391
28,303
56,222
29,631
13,893
22,636
20,086
30,247
37,575
27,669
27,385
36,534
38,940
27,130
20,516
35,120
27,277
29,097

$4,500
2,948
6,842
9,556
18,617
*5,299
6,521
1,773
15,156
4,467
8,904
1,816
4,050
4,140
12,511
9,542
3,065
a14,261
*4,982
4,471

$300
39,964
1,715
44,274
(/)
3,361
9,130
7,088
45,075
13,722
1,096
33,159
3,276
1,599
16,438
»*7,700
(/)
2,000

a Including expenditures for libraries, art galleries, museums, etc.
6 Included in expenditures for schools.
c Included in other street expenditures.
d Including expenditures for street cleaning.
e Including expenditures for hospitals, asylums, almshouses, and other charities.
/In clu d e d in expenditures for health department.
a Paid for by property owners.
* Including expenditures for police courts, jails, workhouses, reformatories, etc.
i Included in expenditures for police department.
j Including expenditures for sewers, street cleaning, street sprinkling, and garbage removal, and
expenditures for construction and other capital outlay for sewers.




1023

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION <!)—Concluded.

Schools.

$93,196
77,146
160,233
102,479
197,442
123,345
138,535
51,293
54,617
108,551
119,514
100,306
115,683
110,293
ol78,046
35,506
80,309
47,254
80,223
65,705
a

Libraries,
art gal­
leries,
museums,
etc.

(*>)

$9,900
6,085
15,863
2,584
4,295

Parks.

Sewers. Municipal
lighting.

$2,500
330
1,390
5,491
4,047
1,249

$2,000

395
2,622

2*960
4,958
1,788
3,473
3,461
6,956
294

6,790
4,276
6,112
5,779
2,391
12,147

681
1,100
2,391

2,000
550
5,837
3,794

4,207
5,348

727
1,372
4,245
7,397
2,500

(c )

430
2,583
1,412

$22,500
23,367
30,067
57,769
17,454
31,560
24,669
23,233
30,839
12,075
20,078
8,066
25,762
22,924
19,177
30,000
8 6,382
16,108
16,335

Street
cleaning.

Street
sprink­
ling.

$1,000
(«)
7,843
23,054
6,682
6,700
(«)
4,860
4,782
*18,637
9,077
8,500
(m )

10,700
*20,093
7,540
4,956
*39,507
6,805

Mar­
Other street ginal
expendi­ num­
tures.
ber.

ii,854

$12,153
15,901
d62,551
24,753
129,959
35,540
5,647
j 17,332
14,040
41,636
(*)
17,331
32,668
n 2,184
33,805

0!
251

i>18,964
19,795

$9,596
210
14,646
(0 )

1,840

(o)

1,000
4,229
(*)
(S')

(0

(l)

27,948

* Including expenditures for street sprinkling and other street expenditures.
Included in expenditures for street cleaning.
Expenditures for flushing streets included in other street expenditures.
Including expenditures for flushing streets.
o Including expenditures for school district extending beyond city limits.
P Including expenditures for sewers,
g Including expenditures for general medical aid.
r Expenditures for general medical aid included in expenditures for health department.
sFor 4 months only.

i
m
n




118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
182
133
134
135
136
137

1024

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

T able X X II.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (2)—Concluded.
Mar­
ginal
num ­
ber.
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Garbage
removal.

Cities.

$2,000
14,852
10,400
600
10,550
8,262
6,423
(0

Chester, P a .........................................................
York, Pa.
.................................................
Malden A ass
T
_________ ________________
Topeka, Kans......................................................
Newton, Mass.

................................ .......................

Sioux City, Iowa.................................................
Bayonne, N..T............................................_........
K noxville, Tenn .... ............................ ........_ _
Schenectady, N. Y .............................................
Fitchburg, Mass.................................................
Superior, W is......................................................
Rockford, 111......................................................
Taunton, Mass....................................................
Canton, O h io......................................................

2,719
1,745
1,040

Butte, M o n t ____________ ____________________ ___

Montgomery, Ala...............................................
Auburn, N .Y ......................................................
Chattanooga, T enn............................................ !
East St. Louis, 111...............................................
Joliet, 111............................................................

j

2,696
5,694
3,850
6,567
3,080

Interest on
debt.

c$18,616
19,868
49,083
51,770
264,726
c 24,411
98,430
73,508
33,721
80,535
91,783
23,183
80,806
41,112

Water­
works.

Gas works.

$35,291
17,955
23,729
11,522
34,275
30,236
27,783
23,641
34,721

J 3 4 , 171

106,730
21,824
48,453
42,500
8,097

53,133
19,547
14,828

a Not including $13,645 paid out of sinking fund.
b Not including $13,645 paid out of sinking fund, but including $5,597 paid out of sinking fund,
which can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
cNot including $79,694 paid out of sinking fund.
dNot including $79,694 paid out of sinking fund, and expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by
property owners.
e Included in other street expenditures.




1025

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able X XII.—EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION (2)—Concluded.

Electriclight
plants.

Docks and
wharves.

Ferries
and
bridges.

Markets. Cemeteries.

$150
$13,169

Bath
houses and
bathing
pools and
beaches.

$8,482

$376
259
412

10,524
$200
1,050
7,742
2,486
1,083
29,247

(/)
6,939

22
1,453
1,859

2,163
3,155
669

$452

Other.

$39,680
14,903
77,218
42,320
112,579
39,926
115,179
9 34,648
31,953
40,256
69,752
19,343
44,539
34,111
86,896
23,094
40,659
34,333
58,544
20,414

Total.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

$238,844
204,653
570,162
323,487
1,043,179
d 360,864
488,955
h 257,321
265,451
485,567
408,734
278,158
i 462,356
330,714
j 512,980
*345,922
i 286,881
264,728
312,843
237,850

b

/ Included in other expenditures,
p Including expenditures ior markets.
h Including expenditures for construction and other capital outlay for sewers.
i Not including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
i Including expenditures for school district extending beyond city limits.
fc Including unpaid warrants which can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.




118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

1026

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able

X X III.—SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES.
Receipts.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Cash on
Actual in­
come for the hand at be­
fiscal year. ginning of
fiscal year.

Loans.

Total.

«$118,740,596 b $11,416,077 $119,027,413 c$249,184,086
6,245,336
43,315,277
6,228,625
30,841,316
10,225,000 / 48,387,684
/ 26,762,596
11,400,088
17,043,757
12,405,372
4,638,385
12,471,200 J 49,074,577
5
*3,245,381
h 33,357,996
Q 10,227,940
210,000
<18,933,042
6
1,084,898
2,074,362 r 13,809,910
7
4,666,939
r 7,068,609
1,828,795
s 9,592,036
8
s 6,993,994
769,247
v 10,398,372
9
«823,974
*9,574,398
11,355,612
10
1,387,915
1,475,998
8,491,699
321,232 V 16,780,214
11
9,009,231 V 7,449,751
* 9,544,183
12
3,614,641
1,396,050
z 4,533,492
(ta5,455,950 b b 1 876,365
285,259 cc7 617,574
13
5,653,722
14
934,926
451,053
4,267,743
e e 8,686,612 //1,662,426
15
220,183 9 9 10,569,221
n
6,073,302 w 12,449,662
m 6,199,945
w
16
176,415
34 694,702
1,823,934 rr 7,257,365
17
PP 4,738,729
V 4,605,324
855.000
18
V 325,774
3,424,550
290.000 im4,580,645
19
600,638
« m3,690,007
6,560,472
20
191,603
1,048,461
4,320,408
3,321,845
21
828,160
71.391
2,422,294
22
164,081 yy 5,789,478
a* 883,190
4,742,207
4,603,532
469,724
23
2,837,308
1,296,500
c c c 3,762,178 d d d 1,104,525
24
3.551.000 eee 8,417,703
75,954 0003,104,851
2,660,851 9 9 9 368,046
25
H i 2 , 144,855
831,189 ***3,383,448
407,404
26
j j j 2,413,336
27
1,495,663 j j j 4,169,177
260,178
2,854,041
28
621,816
2,177,379
51,846
4,871,465
29
295,632
3,383,896
1,191,937
30
3,649,879 q q q 6,753,797
3,061,662 333142,256
31
1.255.000 nuu 3 299,205
304,362
m m1,739,843
u
32
3,720,454
1,607,062
2.039.000
74.392
2,752,724
33
809,909
1,832,147
110,668
oaaa 1,407,641
34
149,416 aaaa 1,812,069
255,012
c c c c 1,790,236
35
395,802 c c c c 2,639,076
453,038
a Including $1,285,821 received from State for schools.
b Including $4,863,459 cash in sinking fund.
c Including $1,285,821 received from State for schools and $4,863,459 cash in sinking fund.
d Including $6,959,037 State tax.
e Including $3,941,440 cash in sinking fund.
/In clu d in g $888,813 received from State for schools.
0Not including $3,387,600 paid out of sinking fund.
h Including $233,814 received from county.
* Including cash in county treasury.
j Including $233,814 received from county and cash in county treasury,
fc Including $632,240 State tax and $238,565 expenditures for county.
* Including $17,000 paid for county, but not including $7,628,357 loans repaid out of sinking fund.
m Including $632,240 State tax and $255,565 expenditures for county, but not including $7,628,357
loans repaid out of sinking fund.
n Including $1,214,711 expended by county.
o Including $632,240 State tax and $1,453,276 expended by county.
P Including $632,240 State tax and $1,470,276 expended by county, but not including $7,628,357 loans
repaid out of sinking fund.
q Including $303,335 received from State for schools.
r Including $154,357 received from State for schools.
s Including $162,978 received from State for schools.
t Including $316,715 collected for State purposes.
wIncluding $167,669 cash in sinking fund and $6,625 cash in State fund.
v Including $167,669 cash in sinking fund and $323,340 State funds.
™ Including $2,337,988 State tax.
x Including $193,118 cash in sinking fund and $23,223 cash in State fund.
v Including cash in sinking fund.
* Including tax for school district extending beyond city limits.
« « Including $163,847 received from State for schools.
b b Including $822,787 cash in sinking fund.
c c Including $163,847 received from State for schools, and $822,787 cash in sinking fund,
dtf Including $648,976 cash in sinking fund.
ee Including $4,427,068 appropriated from funds of U. S. Treasury, as explained on pages 903 and 904.
/ / Including $348,756 trust funds.
9 9 Including $348,756 trust funds and $4,427,068 appropriated from funds of United States Treasury.
Including expenditures by United States Government for waterworks.
**$22,950 paid out of sinking fund.
j j Including expenditures by United States Government for waterworks, but not including $22,950
paid out of sinking fund.
fcfcIncluding expenditures by U. S. Government for waterworks, but not including expenditures by
U. S. Government for lighting of public parks and spaces, and $574,235 paid out of sinking fund.
n Including expenditures by U. S. Government for waterworks, but not including expenditures by
U. S. Government for lighting of public parks and spaces, and $597,185 paid out of sinking fund.
m m Including $415,138 trust funds.

1

2
3
4

New Y o rk ,N .Y ....
Chicago, 111............
Philadelphia, Pa ..
St. Louis, Mo..........
Boston, Mass..........
Baltimore, M d.......
Cleveland, Ohio . . .
Buffalo, N. Y ..........
San Francisco, Cal.
Cincinnati, O hio...
Pittsburg, P a .........
New Orleans, L a ...
Detroit, M ich.........
Milwaukee, W is. . .
Washington, D. C ..
Newark, N. J .........
Jersey City,N.J .. .
Louisville, K y .......
Minneapolis, Minn
Providence, R. I . . .
Indianapolis, In d ..
Kansas City, M o .. .
St. Paul, M inn.......
Rochester, N. Y ___
Denver, C o lo .........
Toledo, Ohio..........
Allegheny, P a .......
Columbus, Ohio ...
Worcester, Mass ...
Syracuse, N. Y .......
New Haven, Conn.
Paterson, N .J........
Fall River, Mass...
St. Joseph, M o .......
Omaha, N ebr........




1027

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X III.—SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES.
Expenditures.
For construction and other capital
outlay.
Other than
loans repaid.

Loans
repaid.

Total.

For mainte­ Total exclud­ Total includ­
ing loans
ing loans
nance and
repaid.
operation.
repaid.

Cash on
hand at end
of fiscal
year.

$53,451, G O $85,034,632 d $138,485,632 $102,946,573 d $156,397,573 d $241,432,205 c$7,751,881
O
5,049,537
8,772,107
36,082,305
7,232,972
13,821,644
22,260,661
27,310,198
8,088,078 0 2,982,237 0 11,070,315
19,106,707
27,194,785 0 30,177,022 18,210,662
2,663,087
11,378,908
5,664,849
2,663,087
8,715,821
11,378,908
fe 17,255,621
1 6,517,000
m 23,772,521
0 39,153,812 P 45,670,812 i 3,403,765
n 21,898,291
9,472,704
1,809,748
755,236
49,200
1,858,948
7,613,756
9,423,504
3,939,137
889,804
4,828,941
9,634,658
4,175,252
4,805,717
8,744,854
1,870,155
8,549,638
814,197
1,042,398
2,684,352
5.865.286
7,735,441
w 2,687,144
w 2,687,144
w 8,578,441 x 1,819,931
5,891,297
w 8,578,441
2,076,150
1,001,300
9,293,316
3,077,450
6,215,866
2,062,296
8,292,016
10,476,645 V 6,303,569
4,217,261
852,938
5,070,199
5,406,446
9,623,707
963,255
1,941,847
2,905,102
7,202,910
4,297,808
2,341,273
5,261,063
1,521,830
270,544
1,792,374
5,848,340 d d 1,769,234
4,055,966
5,577,796
5,214,082
909,017
3.733.315
571,750
1,480,767
4,642,332
439,640
h h 4,278,826
j j 4,278,826
** 5,387,271 **#, 666,097 119,666,097 m m 903,124
(« )
oo3,670,678
4.729.000 008 ,399,678
3,812,511 oo7,483,189 0012,212,189
237.473
s s 1 277,826
1,472,876 ss 2,750,702
3,598,464 ss 4,876,290 as 6,349,166 t t 908,199
1,646,969
4,421,956
744,969
902,000
V 183,368
3,519,956
2,774,987
w 1,293,336
w 387,456
905,880
2,944,208
3,850,088 w 4,237,544
343,101:
w w 1,279,492
639,305 wtv 1,918,797
176.474
3,465,201 w w 4,744,693 w w 5,383,998
844,184
3,052,115
501,497
1,345,681
1,706,434
269,730j
2,207,931
907,643
258,756
1,166,399
2,751,935
3,659,578 z z 4,813,300 oaa 976,178,
831,984
1,891,984 6662,368,991 6663,200,975 6664,260,975
1.060.000
342,557
657,971
3,832,858
4,490,829
7,729,197 / / / 688,506'
3,238,368
3,896,339
462,921
2,857,672 h h h 247,179
504,768
967,689
1,889,983
2,394,751
145,912
2,990,195
1,269,968
393,253
1,415,880
2,844,283
1.574.315
2,836,313
1,196,773
1,332,864
870,486
326,287
1,639,540
2,510,026
754,852 ***541,816 kkJc 1,296,668 I I I 1,446,274 U Z2,201,126 m m m 2 , 742,942
111,0991
ooo 750,000 PEP2,302,220
m » 1,552,220
w
204,986
2,364,259 n r n 3,916,479 PPP 4,666,479
r r r 990,586 sss 2,779,033 t t t 3,769,619
688,295
2,295,883 rrr 3,286,469 tt *6,065,502
w v 581,972
263,821
1,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 w v 1,581,972
1,453,412 wv 2,035,384 w v 3,035,384
ivuno 718,070
w w w 1,946,824 w w w 3,635,824
1,689,000 wane 2,407,070
84,630,
1,228,754
58,441'
***533,479 y y v 546,900 *** 1,080,379
1,613,904 033*2,147,383 z z z 2,694,283
b b b b 711,398
66661,616,364
195,705;
6556711,398
904,966 66661,616,364
2,138,383
500,693
1,700,497
256,210
437,886
694,096
1.444.287

d

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2

3
4
5
6
7

8

9
10

11

12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

21

Including $164,494 received from State for schools.
Including $792,567 State and county tax.
Including $241,626 received from State for schools, and $16,671 received from county for elections.
q q Including $72,306 cash in sinking fund.
rr Including $241,626 received from State for schools, $16,671 received from county for elections,
and $72,306 cash in sinking fund.
a s Including $744,248 State and county tax
tt Including $172,252 cash in sinking fun*
m m Including $116,922 received from State for schools.
w Not including $125,000 paid out of sinking fund.
w w Including $311,442 State tax.
as*Including $143,301 cash in sinking fund.
y y Including $917,694 special tax-property sales, and $143,301 cash in sinking fund.
z z Including $894,966 special tax-property sales refunded.
oaa Including $109,291 cash in sinking fund.
b b b Not including $74,206 paid out of sinking fund.
coc Including $82,108 received from State for schools.
d d d Including $637,200 cash in sinking fund.
e e e Including $82,108 received from State for schools, and $637,200 cash in sinking fund.
///I n c lu d in g $445,831 cash in sinking fund.
0 9 0 Including $191,899 cash in sinking fund.
h h h Including $153,890 cash in sinking fund.
H i Including $51,934 received from State for schools.
j j j Including $88,687 received from State for schools.
k k k Not including $338,500 paid out of sinking fund.
1 1 1 Not including $342,547 paid out of sinking fund,
wwm Not including $681,047 paid out of sinking fund.
vnn Including $124,597 county tax.
ooo Not including $130,000 paid out of sinking fund.
p p p Including $124,597 county tax, but not including $130,000 paid out of sinking fund.
q q q Including $23,326 cash in sinking fund.
rrr Including $289,417 State and county tax.
a s s Not including $26,000 paid out of sinking fund.
t t t Including $289,417 State and county tax, but not including $26,000 paid out of sinking fund.
m m m Including $59,758 received from State for schools.
w v Including $39,702 State and county tax.
w w w Including $396,845 State and county tax.
x x x Including $164,769 State and county tax.
y y v Not including $40,000 paid out of sinking fund.
z z z Including $164,769 State and county tax, but not including $40,000 paid out of sinking fund.
aaaa Including $198,506 received from State for schools.
b b b b Including $329,933 county tax.
occc Including $42,415 received from State for schools.
nn
oo
pp




1028

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X III.—SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued.

Receipts.
Mar­
ginal
number.

Cities.

Cash on
Actual in­
come for the hand at be­
ginning of
fiscal year. fiscal year.

Loans.

Total.

c$2,396,559
&$592,698
« $803,861
1,683,007
$250,000
189,717
1,243,290
i 1,518,037
152,511
h 379,934
0 985,592
1,181,100 m3,312,409
198,376
fc2,032,933
P 2,868,064
498,325
P 2,072,202
297,537
3,960,636
1,183,000
255,699
2,521,937
Ml, 872,115
42,000
1 1,437,735
6392,380
w 2,268,932
625,012
209,885
w 1,434,035
* 2,017,841
153,933
6459,961
V 1,403,947
62,627,360
304,375
6805,929
1,517,056
1.722.545
120,448
1,602,097
c e 940,367
255.000 cc 1,314,088
118,721
223.000 ce 2,380,718
ce 1,786,169
371,549
334,673 662,396,742
g o 215,238
//1,846,831
150,163 k k 1,286,010
k k 889,445
246,402
355,854 o o 1,214,907
oo812,864
46,189
222,576 341,471,786
331,092,003
157,207
357,250 mi 1,896,647
m i 1,401,067
138,330
422,015 W 1,581,057
1 1,030,586
/W
128,456
607,792 aaa2,186,887
a m 1,515,199
63,896
ccc 982,191
c c c 916,689
65,502
1,707,914
607.000
50.910
1,050,004
2,687,479
1,238,000
50.911
1,398,568
Mfe 973,155
81,500 6661,279,532
224,877
2,684,186
663,929
326,664
1,693,593
2.269.546
896.000
103,859
1,269,687
1,833,958
626,694
55,614
1,151,650
204,409 mmml,347,109
rawml ,087,493
55,207
1,004,242
9,555
95,701
898,986
1,361,992
240,709
145,516
975,767
539,682 3331,466,521
46,900
q q q 879,939
996,342
75,864
68,780
851,698
670,588
68
29,350
641,238
872,116
69
14,311
857,805
1,287,614
16,216
215,952
70
1,055,446
a Including $468,165 received from State and county for schools.
&
Including cash in sinking fund.
c Including $468,165 received from State and county for schools and cash in sinking fund.
^Including $243,852 cash in sinking fund.
c$20,120 paid out of sinking fund.
/N o t including $20,120 paid out of sinking fund.
0 Including $69,879 received from State for schools.
6 Including $239,537 cash in sinking fund.
1 Including $69,879 received from State for schools and $239,537 cash in sinking fund.
/Including $242,417 cash in sinking fund.
fcIncluding $122,451 received from State,
i Including $25,346 cash in sinking fund.
m lncluding $122,451 received from State and $25,346 cash in sinking fund.
n Including $78,882 county tax.
©Including $45,047 cash in sinking fund.
jpIncluding $65,379 received from State for schools and charitable purposes.
3 Including $242,679 county tax.
»*Not including $247,850 paid out of sinking fund.
©Including $242,679 county tax, but not including $247,850 paid out of sinking fund,
fIncluding $176,298 received from State and county for schools.
Mlncluding $176,298 received from State and county for schools and cash in sinking fund.
v Including $98,854 cash in sinking fund.
w Including $41,530 received from State for schools.
x Including $46,056 cash in sinking fund.
v Including $79,205 received from State for schools.
z Including $79,205 received from State for schools and cash in sinking fund.
aa Including $61,780 cash in sinking fund.
& Including $403,008 cash in sinking fund.
&
cc Including $117,897 received from State and county for schools.
dd Not including $565 paid out of sinking fund.
cc Including $128,134 received from State for schools.
//In clu d in g $37,645 received from State for schools.
?3 Including $102,003 cash in sinking fund.
M i Including $37,645 received from State for schools and $102,003 cash in sinking fund.
i i Including $19,638 county tax.
5 5 Including $123,593 cash in sinking fund.
k k Including $65,103 received from State for schools.

36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

Los Angeles, C a l___
Memphis, T e n n .......
Scranton, P a ............
Lowell, Mass............
Albany, N. Y ............
Cambridge, Mass___
Portland, Oreg.........
Atlanta, G a ..............
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Dayton, Ohio............
Richmond, V a .........
Nashville, Tenn.......
Seattle, W a sh ..........
Hartford, Conn.........
Reading, Pa..............
Wilmington, D e l___
Camden, N. J............
Trenton, N. J ............
Bridgeport, Conn___
Lynn, Mass...............
Oakland, Cal............
Lawrence, Mass.......
New Bedford, Mass .
Des Moines, Iowa . . .
Springfield, Mass___
Somerville, Mass___
Troy, N. Y ...............
Hoboken, N. J ..........
Evansville, I n d .......
Manchester, N. H .. .
Utica, N. Y ...............
Peoria, 111.................
Charleston, S. C .......
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah




1029

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table X X III.—SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued.

Expenditures.
For construction and other capital
outlay.
Other than
loans repaid.

Loans
repaid.

Total.

For mainte­ Total exclud­ Total includ­
nance and
ing loans
ing loans
repaid.
operation.
repaid.

Cash on
hand at end
of fiscal
year.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

8211,605
889,925
81,774,106 d8622,453
81,684,181
36
81,472,576
8301,530
475,233
292,684
/1,390,323
37
915,090
/ 475,233
1.390.323
(«)
J 425,884
216,124
114,295
1,092,153
38
761,734
330,419
977,858
« 509,336
1,228,651
0166,952
r 3,145,457
39
w1,737,987
1,407,470
«1,916,806
r 189,000
s 2,571,573
296,491
q 930,557
s i, 119,557
40
1,452,016
q 2,382,573
802,005
276,545
41
725,000
1,527,005
2,959,091
3,684,091
2,157,086
r 478,076
392,183
42
42,000
434,183
1,394,039
959,856
1,352,039
x 768,465
335,716
43
1,500,467
335,716
1,164,751
1,500,467
607,164
44
348,164
159,000
1,541,670 cm 476,171
1,034,506
1,382,670
bb 812,065
498,732
373,369
943,194
1,815,295
45
872,101
1,316,563
273,804
273,804
1,535,620
186,925
46
1,261,816
1,535,620
dd 76,735
da 247,045
992,992 dd 1,069,727
244,361
170,310
822,682
47
775.232
1,895,534
775,232
1,895,534
485,184
48
1,120,302
i i 547,028
133,291
U 680,319
49
1,457,939 **2,004,967 i i 2,138,258 j j 258,484
mm 1 1 ,0 0 0
r m 194,901
mi 886,381
U 183,901
l l 875,381
399,629
50
691,480
PP 487,340
PP 96,709
1,061,744 PP 1,158,453
390,631
56,454
671,113
51
rr 398,460
t t 520,910
8 8 122,450
114,308
52
836,568 rr 1,235,028 t t 1,357,478
ww 25,900
v v 863,199
889,099
207,898
53
799,650 w 1,662,849 x x 1,688,749
z z 523,912
274,434
54
** 507,912
16,000
782,711 ** 1,290,623 ««1,306,623
bbb 394,804
bbb 919,804
525.000
55
1,218,846 bbb 1,613,650 bbb 2,138,650
48,237
179,472
135,972
731,181
43,500
867,153
910,653
71,538
56
ddd 377 779
add 871,779
25,764
57
810,371 ddd 1,188,150 ddd 1,682,150
494.000
546,024 / / / l , 056,074 0 0 0 1,602,098
1,017,982 e e e 1,564,006 9 9 9 2,620,080
58
67,399
170,000
224,369
742,465
54,369
966,834
912,465
312,698
59
tit 693,004 J j j 482,200 IckJc 1,175,204
60
1,162,739 ***1,855,743 ***2,337,943
346,243
24,334
2,245,212
1,208,495
963.000
1,282,212
245,495
1,036,717
61
62
323,642 I I I 491,182
H I 814,824
3,453
1,015,681
1.339.323 I I I 1,830,505
r m n 420,677
828,814 m m 1,051,491 nnn 1,249,491
97,618
«w»222,677
198.000
63
ooo961,638
42,604
64
ooo331,188
598,742
.ooo362,896
31,708
ooo929,930
PPP 2 8 0 ,789
631,284
PPP 578,789
298.000
151,919
65
PPP 912,073 PPP 1,210,073
1,382,598
66
195,571
649,502
733,096
537,525
845,073
83,923
922,464
122,214
73,878
694,825
227,639
800,250
67
105,425
r r r 537,734
89.232
43,622
68
rrr 626,966
rrr 626,966
89,232.
sss 866,798
s s s 208,241
sss 249,941
5,318
69
sss 616,857
41,700
sss 825,098
70
789,942
1,041,901
1,055,901
231,713
265,959
14,000
251,959
11 Including 81,499 State tax.
mm. Not including 8114,500 paid out of sinking fund.
r m Including 81,499 State tax, but not including 8114,500 paid out of sinking fund,
oo Including 822,516 received from State for schools.
jjpNot including 829,900 paid out of sinking fund.
q q Including 884,348 received from State for schools,
rr including 8184,023 State and county tax.
8 8 Not including 811,242 paid out of sinking fund.
t t Including 8184,023 State and county tax, but not including 811,242 paid out of sinking fund.
m including 895,717 received from State for schools.
u
w Including 8246,911 State and county tax.
mw Not including 897,300 paid out of sinking fund.
s«c Including 8246,911 State and county tax, but not including 897,300 paid out of sinking fund.
^ In clu d in g 839,249 received from State for schools.
** Including 812,312 county tax.
cumIncluding 824,336 received from State.
bbb Including 8^4,005 State and county tax.
ccc Including 8255,713received from State and county for schools.
ddd Including 833,335 county tax.
ccc Including 8119,992 State and county tax.
///N o t including 819,926 paid out of sinking fund.
9 0 9 Including 8119,992 State and county tax, but not including 819,926 paid out of sinking fund.
hhh Including 823,069 received from county for schools.
m
Including 8121,354 State and county tax.
j j j Not including 845,000 paid out of sinking fund.
fcfcfcIncluding 8121,354 State and county tax, but not including 845,000 paid out of sinking fund.
1 1 1 Not including 839,724 paid out of sinking fund.
mmm Including 898,589 received from State.
w including 8178,265 State and county tax.
»m
o o o Including 8180,545 State and county tax.
p p p Including 8160,325 State and county tax.
q q q Including 826,101 received from State for schools.
rrrincluding81,000contributed to the Jacksonville fund, but not including 869,493 expended by
State and county for schools.
s s s Not including amount expended by State and county for schools.




1030

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X III.—SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued.

Receipts.
Mar­
ginal
number.

Cities.

Cash on
Actual in­
come for the hand at be­
ginning of
fiscal year. fiscal year.

Loans.

Total.

$399,453 a $1,050,971
a 3618,660
$32,858
ol,889,518
o 391,190
157,120
1,341,208
c775,580
33,415
55,193
«686,972
/1,072,898
153,944
115,311
/ 803,643
3 535,736
3,509
*94,393
h 437,834
223,324
351,559 m l, 247,440
m 672,557
D755,406
o82,118
75,010
*598,278
Ml, 376,554
250,000
77,607
« 1 ,048,947
*02,242,414
214,946
795,683
m
>1,231,785
1/2,265,016
194,217
1,065,087
V 1,005,712
*1,209,549
76,890
485,000
*647,659
1,653,267
525,000
182,497
945,770
aa 955,300
aa 195,837
54,458
705,005
280,475
313,510 col,158,621
cc 564,636
e e 710,272
193,749
427,000 oe 1,331,021
895,037
151,714
161,840
581,483
M 884,117
0 0 162,595
172,741
//548,781
j j 706,952
123,866
11,489
j j 571,597
U 696,021
42,810
107,046
l l 546,165
mm 397,148
mm 455,210
58,062
oo650,928
53,380
60,325
oo539,223
1,587,718
34,743
661,353
891,622
179,606
aa 811,107
81,355
Q Q 550,146
889,421
18,561
388,000
482,860
m
2,279
319,924 m l 176,996
« m854,793
57,489
1/431,033
V 373,544
tom710,483
45,630
ww 82,476
582,377
378,781
248,375
3,906
126,500
183,792
725,181
441,389
100,000
19,*142
265,297
221,186
24,969
779,820
130,335
198,040
451,445
oool,164,969
428,840
cco736,129
e e e 126,723
d d d 932,825
///1,059,548
M h 817,646
*U 84,436
235,000 3 3 3 1,137,082
oool,021,016
151,057
ooo869,959!
a Including $51,278 received from State for schools,
ft Not including $118,964 paid out of sinking fund,
o Including $131,776 cash in sinking fund.
d Including $138,629 cash in sinking fund.
e Including $37,792 received from State for schools.
/In clu d in g $53,789 received from State for schools.
0 Including $135,316 State and county tax.
ft Including $34,488 received from State for schools.
1 Including $5,832 cash in sinking fund.
3 Including $S4,488 received from State for schools and $5,832 cash in sinking fund.
fcNot including expenditures for street cleaning and sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
l Including $3,689 cash in sinking fund.
m including $12,715 received from State and county for schools.
n Including $39,081 received from State for schools.
©Including $6,555 cash in sinking fund.
P Including $39,081 received from State for schools and $6,555 cash in sinking fund.
Q $57,700 paid out of sinking fund.
*N ot including $57,700 paid out of sinking fund.
©Including $7,166 cash in sinking fund.
t Data are for 9 months.
mIncluding $39,821 received from State for schools.
v Including $116,098 State and county tax.
w Including $19,291 received from State for schools,
a Including $207,194 State and county tax.
v Including amount received from State for schools.
* Including $27,243 received from State for schools and library.
aa Including cash in sinking fund.
bfi Including $18,738 cash in sinking fund.
c o Including $18,447 received from State for schools.
d d Not including $100,000 paid out of sinking fund.
e e including $73,255 received from State and county for schools.
J J Including $16,389 received from State for schools.
g g Including $55,570 cash in sinking fund.
A Including $16,389 received from State for schools and $55,570 cash in sinking fund.
ft

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87

San Antonio, T e x ..
Duluth, Minn........
Erie, Pa..................
Elizabeth, N. J .......
Wilkesbarre, Pa ...
Kansas City, Kans.
Harrisburg, P a ___
Portland, Me. (<)..
Yonkers, N .Y ........
Norfolk, V a............
Waterbury, Conn..
Holyoke, Mass.......
Fort Wayne, In d ...
Youngstown, Ohio.
Houston, T e x ....... .
Covington, K y.......
Akron, O h io..........
Dallas, T e x .......... .
Saginaw, Mich___
90 Lancaster, Pa....... .
91 Lincoln, N e b r.......
92 Brockton, Mass_
_
93 Binghamton, N. Y
94 Augusta, G a ..........
95 Pawtucket, R. I ___
96 Altoona, Pa............
97 Wheeling, W .Y a...
98 Mobile, Ala............
99 Birmingham, A la ..
100 Little Rock, A rk ...
101 Springfield, Ohio ..
102 Galveston, T e x ___
103 Tacoma, Wash.......
104 Haverhill,Mass ...
105 Spokane, W ash_
_




STATISTICS OS1 CITIES,
table

1031

X X III.—SUMMARY OP RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued.
Expenditures.

For construction and other capital
outlay.
Other than
loans repaid.
$291,713
370,670
253,436
0 404,638
80,524
335,828
162,747
v 308,813
*626,215
343,817
527,964
286,162
334,941
311,035
228,584
105,035
231,323
197,270
110,046
nn 97,658
169,263
PP 240,506
170,811
r r 92,904
v v 249,994
96,457
52,250
a* 34,415
183,757
29,354
81,724
227,963
191,109
kick 301,211
241,882

Loans
repaid.
$73,632
129,258
10,000
92,444
21,963
124,015
(«)
250,000
681,000
831,121
77,500
532,500
38,761
dd 123,573
57,982
168,590
150,954
kk 5 ,0 4 2

98,888
60,000
8,590
638,730
37,545
345,500
260,000
18,025
163,252
72,000
4,630
55524,331
185,629
66,966
III

213,550
79,955

Total.
$365,345
499,928
263,436
0497,082
102,487
459,843
r 162,747
v 558,813
*1,307,215
1,174,938
605,464
818,662
373,702
dd 434,608
286,566
273,625
382,277
kk 202,312
208,934
nn 157,658
177,853
PP 879,236
208,356
rr 438,404
w 509,994
114,482
215,502
** 106,415
188,387
55553,685
267,353
294,929
191,109
m m m 514,761
321,837

Cash on
hand at end
of fiscal
year.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

&$709,386
0 $783,018
$267,953
1,377,221
1,506,479
d 383,039
696,421
706,421
69,159
0879,148
0971,592
101,306
k 452,753
1 61,020
*474,716
885,870
1,009,885
237,555
610,902
r 610,902
s 144,504
v 1,003,102
v 1,253,102
123,452
*1,455,637
*2,136,637
105,777
1,187,279
2,018,400
246,616
951,433
1,028,933
180,616
1,078,113
1,610,613
42,654
698,776
737,537 bb 217,763
d d 850,540
726,967
308,081
972,958
914,976
358,063
575,845
744,435
150,602
757,804 i i 126,313
606,850
kk 669,134
664,092
37,818
529,079
627,967
68,054
i m 347, Oil
nn 407, Oil
48,199
519,522
528,112
122,816
VP 875,548
PP 1,514,278
73,440
613,921
651,466
159,641
t t 624,521
t t 870,021
19,400
w 1,174,183
w 914,183
2,813
389,567
371,542
41,466
654,285
491,033
56,198
z z 338,925
z z 266,925
39,856
aaa 576,938
aaa 572,308
148,243
bbb 252,638
228,307
12,659
489,204
674,833
104,987
684,113
751,079
413,890
889,463
889,463 000170,085
nnn 46,636
kkk 876,896 m m m l 090,446
789,2181
869,173
151,843

71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105

For mainte­ Total exclud­ Total includ­
ing loans
ing loans
nance and
repaid.
repaid.
operation.

5$417,673
1,006,551
442,985
474,510
k 372,229
550,042
448,155
694,289
829,422
843,462
423,469
791,951
363,835
415,932
686,392
470,810
375,527
466,822
419,033
249,353
350,259
635,042
443,110
ss 431,617
664,189
275,085
438,783
y y 232,510
aaa 388,551
198,953
407,480
456,150
698,354
575,685
547,336

a Including $80,816 cash in sinking fund.
j j Including amount received from State and county for schools.
** Not including $54,000 paid out of sinking fund.
U Including $28,634 received from State for schools and library.
m m Including $29,573 received from State for schools,
nn Including $2,082 State tax.
o o Including $18,687 received from State for schools.
l? P Including $67,158 State and county tax.
q q Including $23,291 received from State for schools,
rr Not including $23,733 expended by State and county for schools,
ss Not including $94,060 expended by State and county for schools.
11
Not including $117,793 expended by State and county for schools.
m including $11,202 received from State for schools.
u
w Including $48,407 State tax.
w w Including $19,368 orders in transition.
a* Not including $10,691 expended by State and county for schools.
y y Not including $45,876 expended by State and county for schools.
z z Not including $56,567 expended by State and county for schools.
a a a Not including $24,431 expended by State and county for schools.
b b b Not including $7,050 paid out of sinking fund.
c o c Including $88,449 received from State and county for schools.
d d d Including $79,354 received from State for schools.
e e e Including $1,131 cash in sinking fund.
///I n c lu d in g $79,354 received from State for schools and $1,131 cash in sinking fund.
000 Including $7,213 cash in sinking fund.
h h h Including $12,521 received from State.
m
Including $5,100 cash in sinking fund.
j j j Including $12,521 received from State and $5,100 cash in sinking fund.
ickk Including $38,515 State and county tax.
111
Not including $70,000 paid out of sinking fund.
m m m Including $38,515 State and county tax, but not including $70,000 paid out of sinking fund.
mm Including $10,746 cash in sinking fund.
o o o Including $59,404 received from State for schools.




1032

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X III.—SUMMAEY OP RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES—Concluded.
Receipts.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

106
107
108
109

10
1
11
1
12
1

113
114
115
116
117
118
119

10
2
11
2
12
2

123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Cash on
Actual in­
come for the hand at be­
ginning of
fiscal year. fiscal year.

Terre Haute, I n d .....................................
Dubuque, Iow a........................................
Quincy, 111................................................
South Bend, Ind .......................................
Salem, M ass.............................................
Johnstown, Pa..........................................
Elmira, N .Y .............................................
Allentown, Pa..........................................
Davenport, I o w a .....................................
McKeesport, P a .......................................
Springfield, 111..........................................
Chelsea, M ass..........................................
Chester, P a ...............................................
York, Pa....................................................
Malden, Mass...........................................
Topeka, K a n s..........................................
Newton, M ass..........................................
Sioux City, Iowa.......................................
Bayonne, N .J ..........................................
Knoxville, T e n n .....................................
Schenectady, N .Y ...................................
Fitchburg, Mass.......................................
Superior, W is............................................
Rockford, 111............................................
Taunton, M ass........................................ !
Canton, Ohio............................................
Butte, M o n t............................................. !|
Montgomery, Ala.....................................1
i
Auburn, N .Y ............................................ I
Chattanooga, T enn..................................1
East St. Louis, 111..................................... !'
Joliet, 111..................................................

$480,533
529,996
393,789
/ 566,936
ft 750,805
m 273,140
**581,157
P 345,465
*603,469
u 457,793
473,594
v 623,383
w 306,826
<**237,154
749,263
467,727
1,415,543
577,301
690,377
r r 267,989
318,883
OCX 708,601
583,328
391,498
637,999
k k k 388,548
***711,425
*** 368,777
***
***431,690
n u u 284,464
553,310
417,408

<*$148,644
60,050
52,529
0 167,632
13,735
39,975
121,748
q 119,802
152,891
123,940
65,009
122,819
27,421
e e 40,594
66,026
ftft 126,165
138,087
75,330
64,932
79
176,648
V V 95,564
c c c 178,789
14,657
45,866
129,729
m m m 97,156
90,693
120,327
14,985
98,319
108,343

Loans.

$72,494
35,500
119,995
441,038
228,060
80,127
190,402
113,150
69,209
633,000
212,500
32,101
362,500
140,270
1,063,300
30,965
246,021
48,250
312,945
635,300

nnn

213,196
514,300
158,061
100,000
63,600
16,101
50,000
40,454
32,000

Total.

«$629,177
662,540
481,818
**854,563
ft 1,205,578
m541,175
* 783,032
r 655,669
*869.510
*<581,733
607,812
v 1,379,202
*<>546,747
//309,849
1,177,789
ftft 734,162
2,616,930
683,596
1,001,330
**<•316,318
808,476
«* 1,439,466
ccc 762,117
619,351
1,198,165
k k k 676,338
ooo908,581
r r r 523,070
***568,118
m m349,449
m
692,083
557,751

a Including $30,435 cash in sinking fund.
Mncluding $32,701 cash in sinking fund.
cNot including $60,167 paid out of sinking fund.
<*Not including $23,873 paid out of sinking fund.
«N ot including $84,040 paid out of sinking fund.
/In clu d in g $13,725 received from State for schools.
a Including $36,332 cash in sinking fund.
ft Including $13,725 received from State for schools and $36,332 cash in sinking fund.
* Not including $3,168 paid out of sinking fund.
/Inclu din g $44,829 cash in sinking fund,
ft Including $15,624 received from State.
i Including $41,811 State and county tax.
*» Including $24,197 received from State for schools.
n Including $16,952 received from State for schools.
0 Including $112,725 State and county tax.
j? Including $24,430 received from State for schools,
a Including $57,937 cash in sinking fund.
*’ Including $24,430 received from State for schools and $57,937 cash in sinking fund.
&
Including $57,813 cash in sinking fund.
t Including $26,155 received from State for schools.
mIncluding $25,683 received from State for schools.
v Including $9,581 received from State.
w Including $24,930 received from State for schools.
« Including $7,097 State tax.
v Not including $5,000 paid out of sinking fund.
« Including $7,097 State tax, but not including $5,000 paid out of sinking fund.
a a Not including $13,645 paid out of sinking fund, but including $5,597 paid out of sinking fund
which can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
W Including $7,097 State tax and $5,597 paid out of sinking fund which can not be traced to the
>
various items of expenditure, but not includiug $13,645 paid out of sinking fund.
cc Including $7,097 State tax and $5,597 paid out of sinking fund which can not be traced to the
various items of expenditure, but not including $18,645 paid out of sinking fund.
d d Including $26,816 received from State for schools.
e e Including $9,093 cash in sinking fund.
//In clu d in g $26,816 received from State for schools and $9,093 cash in sinking fund.
g g Including $2,944 cash in sinking fund,
ftft Including State and county tax.
1 i Not including $10,000 paid out of sinking fund.
//In clu d in g State and county tax, but not including $10,000 paid out of sinking fund,
fcfcIncluding $9,256 cash in sinking fund.
** Including $9,270 cash in sinking fund.




1033

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
Table X X III.—SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES—Concluded.
Expenditures.
For constnaction and ot her capital
outlay.
Other than
loans repaid.
$30,146
189,895
89,943
299,637
1 170,251
113,474
0177,394
150,881
207,645
169,289
97,669
92,822
x 178,555
47,603
h h 229,446
217,460
m m 557,703
111,461
q q 253,935
3 s 13,275
w w 290,817
aaa 300,273
119,311
82,996
e e e 321,062
159,554
P P P 91,744
3 8 8 81,607
95,091
12,728
293,100
126,866

Loans
repaid.

Total.

$40,238
c71,724
63,600
i 73,330
480.670
146,720

68,200

106,500
110,634
4,000
81,874
440,000
1/124,000
32,000
i i 350,025
46,883
895,000
w 134,835
n

211,000

ft 45,250
179,518
631,700
71,202
241,000
/ / / 354,000
64,779
80,903
30,385
63,907
57,000
62,430

m

$70,384
c 261,619
153,543
* 372,967
'
l 650,921
260,194
o245,594
257,381
318,279
173,289
179,543
532,822
* 302,555
79,603
i i 579,471
264,343
m 1,452,703
m 246,296
w
q q 464,935
M 58,525
M
wm?470,335
aaa 931,973
190,513
323,996
g g g 675,062
224,333
P P P 172,647
8 3 8 111 992
158,998
69,728
293,100
189,296

For mainte­ Total exclud­ Total includ­
ing loans •
nance and
ing loans
repaid.
repaid.
operation.

$401,415
341,216
276,387
306,262
552,354
223,237
471,127
233,105
342,644
344,563
375,040
659,775
aa 238,844
204,653
570,162
323,487
1,043,179
oo360,864
488,955
v v 257,321
265,451
485,557
408,734
278,158
h h h 462,356
330,714
P P P 512,980
8 8 8 345,922
286,881
264,728
312,843
237,850
d

$471,799
$431,561
e 602,835
531, 111
429,930
366,330
i 679,229
605,899
1 1,203,275
1722,605
483,431
336,711
716,721
o648,521
490,486
383,986
660,923
550,289
517,852
513,852
554,583
472,709
1,192,597
752,597
00541,399
b b 417,399
284,256
252,256
b h 799,608
i i 1,149,633
587,830
540,947
m 1,600,882 mm2,495,882
P P 607,160
oo472,325
q q 953,890
q q 742,890
tt 315,846
270,596
w w 735,786
toto 556,268
aaa 785,830 aaa 1,417,530
599,247
528,045
602,154
361,154
i i i 1,137,418
H i 783,418
555,047
490,268
P P P 685,627
P P P 604,724
e s s 457,914
3 8 8 427,529
445,879
381,972
334,456
277,456
605,943
605,943
427,146
364,716
d

0

m

Cash on
hand atend
of fiscal
year.

$157,378
59,705
51,888
i 175,334
2,303
57,744
66,311
165,183
208,587
63,881
53,229
186,605
10,945
g g 25,593
28,156
t t 146,332
121,048
76,436
47,440
472
72,690
b b b 21,935
debt 162,870
17,197
60,747
121,291
q q q 222,954
89,764
122,239
14,993
86,140
130,605
b

8

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

106
107
108
109

10
1
11
1
12
1
113
114
115
116
117
118
119

10
2
11
2
12
2
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

mm Including $97,221 State and county tax.

«n Not including $49,638 paid out of sinking fund.
oo Not including $79,694 paid out of sinking fund.
PPNot including $129,327 paid out of sinking fund.
qq Including $93,293 State and county tax.
r r Including $49,231 received from State and county for schools.
S 3 Not including expenditures for sewers included in expenditures for maintenance and operation,
ft Not including $9,000 paid out of sinking fund.
m Not including expenditures for sewers included in expenditures for maintenance and opera­
u
tion and $9,000 paid out of sinking fund.
v v Including expenditures for construction and other capital outlay for sewers,
towIncluding $32,879 county tax.
x x Including $41,519 received from State.
w Including $95,331 cash in sinking fund.
« « Including $41,519 received from State and $95,331 cash in sinking fund.
aaa Including $36,661 State and county tax.
b b b Including $1,315 cash in sinking fund.
cco Including cash in sinking fund,
d Including $3,186 cash in sinking fund.
efer
eee Including $47,580 State and county tax.
f f f Not including $72,300 paid out of sinking fund.
ggg Including $47,580 State and county tax, but not including $72,300 paid out of sinking fund.
h h h Not including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
H i Including $47,580 State and county tax, but not including expenditures for street sprinkling,
paid for by property owners.
j j j including $47,580 State and county tax, but not including $72,300 paid out of sinking fund and
expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
k k k Including $13,859 received from State for scnools.
I 1 1 Including $25,150 received from State for schools and income of school district extending beyond
city limits.
mmm Including $1,405 cash in sinking fund and cash of school district extending beyond city limits,
nnnIncluding school district extending beyond city limits.
ooo including $25,150 received from State for schools, $1,405 cash in sinking fund, and income of
school district extending beyond city limits.
.
p p p Including expenditures for school district extending beyond city limits.
q q q including $17,419 cash in sinking fund and cash of school district extending beyond city limits.
r r r Including $8,724 received from State for schools.
s s 8 including unpaid warrants which can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
t t t including $16,139 received from State for schools.

uuuincluding $28,075 received from State and county for schools.




1034

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (1).
City hall.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

1 New York, N .Y.........
2 Chicago, 111...............
3 Philadelphia, P a ___
4 St. Louis, Mo..............
5 Boston, M ass............
6 Baltimore, Md..........
7 Cleveland, O h io.......
8 Buffalo, N .Y ..............
9 San Francisco, Cal..
10 Cincinnati, Ohio.......
11 Pittsburg, P a ............
12 New Orleans, La.......
13 Detroit, M ich............
14 Milwaukee, W is.......
15 Washington, D. C___
16 Newark, N .J ............
17 Jersey City,N .J.......
18 Louisville, K y ..........
19 Minneapolis, M in n ..
20 Providence, R. I .......
21 Indianapolis, Ind___
22 Kansas City, M o .......
23 St. Paul, M in n ..........
24 Rochester, N. Y .........
25 Denver, C o lo ............
26 Toledo, O h io ............
27 Allegheny, P a ..........
28 Columbus, O h io .......
29 Worcester, Mass.......
30 Syracuse, N. Y ..........
31 New Haven, C onn...
32 Paterson, N .J............
33 Fall River, Mass.......
34 St. Joseph, M o ..........
35 Omaha, N ebr............
36 Los Angeles, C al.___
37 Memphis, Tenn.........
38 Scranton, P a ............
39 Lowell, M ass............
40 Albany, N . Y ............
41 Cambridge, Mass---42 Portland, O reg.........
43 Atlanta, Ga...............
44 Grand Rapids, Mich.
45 Dayton, O h io............
46 Richmond, Y a ..........
47 Nashville, T en n .......
48 Seattle, Wash............
49 Hartford, Conn.........
50 Reading, P a ..............
51 Wilmington, D e l___
52 Camden, N .J ............
53 Trenton, N .J ............
54 Bridgeport, Conn—
55 Lynn, Mass...............

Cash in
treasury.

Uncol­
lected

Cash and
bonds in
sinking
fund.

Trust
funds.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

$3,810,441 $63,380,438 $121,340,920 $4,079,549 $6,603,000 $1,500,000 $8,103,000
300,000 2,017,588
534,341
1,717,588
7,232,972
18,210,662 2,623,520 13,615,842 32,000,000 25,000,000 1,500,000 26,500,000
70,536 1,626,887
1,556,351
653,866
1,301,334
5,664,849
105,000 1,855,000
e3,403,765 3,280,177 32,802,887 1,977,924 1,750,000
250,000 2,271,135
2,021,135
9,315,978 1,190,101
755,236 1,611,821
48,000
48,000
3,177,480
344,441
4,175,252
h 1,693,080
30,342 /l , 693,080
612,466
(9)
1,042,398 1,432,057
i 7,500,000
220,618
150.000
1,603,590
(9)
(0)
100,000 1,863,441
350,500 1,763,441
5,413,256
497,238
2,062,296
955.000
80,000
875.000
5,825,363
478,206 1,463,700
180.000
30.000
150.000
2,341,273 4,222,908
10.000 2,130,430
2,120,430
2,061,078
160.000
1,120,258
100,000 1,200,000
1,100,000
439,640 2,476,562
415,138
1,153,880
(9)
(9)
594,674
487.986
571,152
50,000
521,152
11,300
4,928,561
237.473 1,038,324
750,000
25,000
725,000
3,484,653
735,947 4,273,650
530,000
75,000
455,000
2,118,166
178,538 1,274,516
fc1,306,122
1,306,122
1,877,103
561,813
(/)
343,101
50.000 1,170,780
3,291,615
432,403 1,120,780
25,522
176.474
9,440
9,440
286,534
269,730
15.000 1 390,000
1 375,000
401,291
26,139
866,887
fc750,000
750,000
706,613
428,927
342,557
(J)
50,000
385,000
335,000
445,831
242,675 2,421,827
25.000 q 250,000
<225,000
Z
153,890
251,223
93,289
29,445
29,445
832,640
209,136
393,253
550,000
50.000
500,000
1,157,612
516,922
1,332,864
6,408 J 101,408
>
2,274,265
20,000 P95,000
49,261
111,099
38,000
628,000
590,000
4,480,043
399,680
322,436
204.986
Z453,500 n 17,000 8 470,500
50,896
688,295 1,692,601
18,000
258,755
240,755
60,906
338,743
574,770
263,821
445,700
23,700
422,000
127,827
84,630 1,387,895
13,500
423,500
410,000
1,643,071
87,338
287,735
58,441
2,500 *147,500
64,376
1,665 *145,000
95,832
195,705
634,675
42,000
592,'675
50,443
500,693 2,531,190
8,930 1/315,285
1/306,355
243,852
274,173
378,601
5.000
5,000
131,043
201,641
292,684
8.000 *258,000
*250,000
407,417
60,000
183,467
26,495 d 410,000 d 21,477 d 431,477
537,262
121,905
669,303
fc 470,000
1,492,041
470,000
141,104
296,491
(9)
29,800
301,800
272,000
1,999,584
25,000
474,554
276,545
a a 675,000
25,000 a a 700,000
98,854
379,222
110,477
30,000
71,365
41,365
175,751
112,394
722,409
25,000
325,000
300,000
168,903
371,087
414,391
40,000 66265,000
66225,000
519,718
64,271
409,057
1,401,650
616,841
(9)
78,368
186,925
15,000 *400,000
*3^,000
9,473
350,000
244,361
6,995 1 106,995
1 100,000
485,184
77,279
14,082
511,582
497,500
135,376
597,593
214,940
134,891
3,000 *38,000
*35,000
84,632
54,633
399,629
4,000 l 82,253
2,000 1 78,253
56,454
60,000
<*6,000 d 146,000
1,000 d 140,000
155,843
218,358
114,308
10,000
85,000
75,000
1,451,899
697,230
207,898
2,500
152,500
150,000
343,973
274,434
49,790
15,000
330,000
315,000
15,033
1,336,535
527,723
48,237

a Including $1,356,000, College of the City of New York, and $1,500,000, Normal College.
6 Including $204,000, College c f the City of New York, and $100,000, Normal College.
0 Including $1,559,000, College of the City of New York, and $1,600,000, Normal College.
d Including jails.
€ Including cash in county treasury.
/In clu d in g $803,700, investment of county.
g Not reported.
h Including $803,700, investment o f county, but not including apparatus, etc., not reported.
1 Including libraries, jails, hospitals, asylums, and hall of justice.
/In clu ded in other assets.
fcNot including apparatus, etc.
I Including land and buildings for police department and jails.
»»Included in land and buildings for city hall.
n Including apparatus, etc., for jails.
oNot including land and buildings, but including apparatus, etc., for jails.
jpIncluding land and buildings for libraries.
q Including land and buildings for jails and fire department headquarters, and quarters for 2 fire
companies.




STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (1).
Police department.
Land
and
build­
ings.

Appa­
ratus,
etc.

Total.

Schools.

Fire department.
Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

i

Total.

]

83,716,850 8970,000 $4,686,850 $10,654,650 $3,923,150 $14,577,800 a$56,590,172 6$2,733,314 c$59,323,486
958,970 2,006,345 21,370,537 3,287,920 24,658,457
< 884,520 <*426,372 <*1,310,892 1,047,375
*
500.000 10.425.600
9,925,600
735.900 3,588,603 4,324,503
925,600 3,386,720 4,312,320
6,338,352
266,500
6,071,852
887.280
415.200
183,574 35,053
472,080
218,627
600.000 13.072.600
657.000 2.332.000 12,472,600
900.000 112,000 1,012,000 1.675.000
3,243,697
375,459
2,868,238
800,997
418.499
382,498
372,797 103,500
476,297
5,140,659
287.300
4,853,359
887,560
408,116
479,444
458,400
503,030
3.880.024
503,617
3,376,407
648,08'" 1,110,724
462,637
426,505
357,025
5.415.200
422.000
4,993,200
1.756.000
100,000
(9)
(9)
00
4,292,668
206.000
4,086.668
709,525 1,278,775
& ,250
201,000
160.000 41.000
4,469,170
60,000
4,409,170
<*203,382 <*13,900 <*217,282
789.674 242.500 1,032,174
1,300,654
110,000
1,190,654
165.000
409,009
244,009
14.500
7,500
7.000
3,560,765
3,430,275
130,490
631,660 1,177,221 1,808,881
325,452 20,859
346,311
3,216,596
187,952
3,028,644
539,153 1,037,337
498,184
<*132,227 <*110,000 <*242,227
4,963,632
317,066
4,646,566
497,146
191.201
305,945
164,692
144,667 20,025
2.632.900
200,000
2.432.900
840.000
175.000
665.000
150.000
100,000 50.000
1,692,811
116,961
1,575,850
312,935
171,035
141.900
150.000
118,000 32.000
1,413,193
110,000
1,303,193
498.280
283,2o0 215.000
35,493
25,493 10.000
&2,991,270
2,991,270
fc435,450
435,450
*93,052
93,052 V )
V )
V)
2,796,768
97,401
2,699,367
643,792
238,144
405,648
422,192
340,302 81,890
1,970,241
250,555
1,719,686
381.000
191.000
190.000
158,850
112,000 46,850
2,448,835
266,175
2,182,660
(m)
294.000
122.000
172.000
07.500
n7,500
2.663.200
352,200
2.311.000
635.000
237.000
69,492
398.000
52,492 17.000
175.000 Pi, 950,000
500.000 P i, 775,000
100.000
400.000
<*75,000 < 15,000 <*90,000
*
2,735,983
119,503
2,616,480
206,000 *834,000
*65,000 *128,000
n 65,000
1,552,898
428,160
1,124,738
332,741
162,066
170.675
d 112,000 <*46,080 <*158,080
2,570,688
125.000
2,445,688
272,850
87,850
185.000
26,383
5,383
21,000
2,481,154
168,774
2,312,380
499,736
192,079
307,657
<*52,000 <*8,203 <*60,203
2,731,881
373,016
2,358,865
550.703
154,232
396,471
*
<*83,949 <17,225 <*101,174
1.569.900
185.000
1.384.900
274.000
(m)
95.000
179.000
28.000 *28,000
1,734,609
101.300
1,633,309
364,515
201,915
162,600
195.000
185.000 10,000
884,500
70.000
814.500
199.000
103.000
96,000
48.000
36.000 12,000
1,352,450
61,800
1,290,650
131,737 *131,737
u298,800 *20,047 *318,847
820,219
66,245
753,974
120.000
45.000
( 75,000
40.000
38.000
2.000
2,050,415
95.000
1,955,415
166.704
73,704
93.000
<*50,000 <*13,00u <*63,000
1,314,326
80,880
1,233,446
253,380
126,350
127,030
<*118,489 <*3,807 <*122,296
468,348
18.000
450,348
211,672
82,672
129.000
<*50,000 <*8,866 <*58,866
1,745,384
135.000
1,610,384
143,857
(m)
91,787
52,070
o4,430
«4,430
1,723,259
72,259
1.651.000
397,209
121,709
275,500
107,577
75,500 32,077
1,136,186
115,186
1.021.000
405,573
157.600 247,973
76,300
57.000 19,300
1,938,865
138,565
1,800,300
248,309
78,509
169,800
<*22,100 <*16,948 <*39,048
1,178,800
41.000
1,137,800
355,750
150.000
205,750
<*25,000 <*5,000 <*30,000
784,489
65.000
719,489
253,600
65.000
188.600
157.000
125.000 32,000
1,198,639
60,890
1,137,749
219,249
104,144
115,105
87,980
66,457 21,523
1.406.024
58,311
1,347,713
452,100
172,100
280.000
*37,400 0 37,400
468,250
25,750
442.500
176,720
105,320
71,400
% 600
00
470,872
26.000
444,872
(c c )
226,825 8 355,825
*4,000 8129.000
4,000
960.000
60,000
900.000
240,639
170,139
70,500
*12,955 ol2,955
286,700 2,845,700
2,559,000
271,820
145,420
126,400
<*101,000 d 9,060 d 110,060
1.010.200
50,800
959,400
205,000
105.000
100,000
* 1,200
1,200
931,985
144,468
787,517
*46,000 046.000
782.000
143.000
639.000
81.000
49,699
130,599
18,775
8,775
10.000
716,289
67,562
648,727
90.000
66,850
156,850
<*39,000 <*17,500 <*56,500
1,031,615
71,724
102,450
130,319
232,769
*
<*135,181 <*7,425 < 142,606
1,080,500
(9 )
148,400
77,812
226,212(9)
*
<*45.000 <*8,378 < 53,378
*N ot including headquarters and quarters for 2 fire companies, included in land and buildinj
jity hall.
s Including jails, and land and buildings for police department.
* Not including land and buildings.
« Including land and buildings for fire department.
.
v Including land and buildings for fire department, and apparatus, etc., for jails.
w included in land and buildings for police department.
x Including markets.
v Including land and buildings for library.
z Including land and buildings for police department.
o a Including land and buildings for art galleries, museums, etc.
b b including markets and land and buildings for police department and jails,
cc included in land and buildings for fire department.

$




tr­
ial
mr.

1

2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

20
21
22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (2).

tr­
ial
mjr.

Art galleries, museums, etc.

Libraries.
Cities.

1 New York, N. Y .......
2 Chicago, 111..............
3 Philadelphia, P a ___
4 St. Louis, M o............
5 Boston, Mass............
6 Baltimore, M d .........
7 Cleveland, Ohio.......
8 Buffalo, N. Y ............
9 San Francisco, C al..
10 Cincinnati, O h io___
11 Pittsburg, P a............
12 New Orleans, L a ___
13 Detroit, M ic h ..........
14 Milwaukee, Wis.......
15 Washington, D. C . . .
16 Newark, N. J ............
17 Jersey City, N. J ___
18 Louisville, K y..........
19 Minneapolis, M inn..
20 Providence, R. I ___
21 Indianapolis, Ind ...
22 Kansas City, Mo —
23 St. Paul, M in n .........
24 Rochester, N. Y .......
25 Denver, C o lo ............
26 Toledo, O h io............
27 Allegheny, Pa..........
28 Columbus, Ohio.......
29 Worcester, Mass.......
30 Syracuse, N. Y ........
31 New Haven, Conn ..
32 Paterson, N. J ..........
33 Fall River, M ass___
34 St. Joseph, M o..........
35 Omaha, Nebr............
36 Los Angeles, Cal___
37 Memphis, Tenn........
38 Scranton, Pa............ .
39 Lowell, M ass.......... .
40 Albany, N . Y .......... .
41 Cambridge, Mass_
_
42 Portland, O reg ........
43 Atlanta, Ga...............
44 Grand Rapids, Mich.
45 Dayton, O h io..........
46 Richmond, Y a..........
47 Nashville, T e n n ___
48 Seattle, Wash.......... .
49 Hartford, Conn........
50 Reading, P a ............
51 Wilmington, D e l_
_
52 Camden, N. J ..........
53 Trenton, N. J ..........
_
54 Bridgeport, Conn_
55 Lynn, Mass..............

Land and Books,
buildings. apparatus,
etc.
$4,050,000
2,076,076
233,839
3,194,800
350,000
44,485
560.000
cl, 200,771
65,000
373.000
1/800,000
418.000
268.000
351,626

Total.

Land and | Apparabuildings. j tus, etc.

$231,000 $4,281,000 $22,743,000 $1,890,000 $24,633,000
397,336 2,473,412
293,101
293,101
|
( &)
(b )
(6 )
133,800
367,639
I
,
2,057,000 5,251,800
243,121
593,121
190,454
234,939
(0
843,265
283,265
c 160,000 cl, 360,771
117,500
52,500
551.000
178,000
220,813 0l, 020,813
25,000
25.000
505.000
87.000
354,630
86,630
(*)

l

351,626

111,628
144,585
129.000
35.000
56.000
72,716
150.000
60,974
103.000
80.000
52.000
35.000
70.000
40.000
c 153,732
87,558

264,378
384,585
429.000
<35,000
<154,000
202,716
650.000
<60,974
278,935
<143,000
162.000
135.000
370.000
146,500
c 316,717
i 87,558

42,400
62,500

186,000

66,000

CO

147,187

<147,187

30,000

15,700

45,700

()
b

()
b

(*)

(/)

(/)

CO

(»)

10,000

(*)

252,000

50,000
69,641
71,360

CO

202,400
262,500

200,000
w 52,000
500,000

CO

152,750
240.000
300.000
(r)

s 98,000
130.000
500.000
175,935
s 63,000
110.000
100,000
300,000
106,500
c 162,985

(n)

160,000
200,000

37,090

x

250,000
121,641
571,360
37,090

25,500

23,750

49,250

*5,000
115.000
200.000
250,000

10,000
30,500
40,000
184,113

aa 15,000
145,600
240,000
434,113

a Included in police department.
5 Included in parks,
c Including art galleries, museums, etc
<<Not reported.
e Included in city hall.
/In clu d ed in libraries.
{/Including land and buildings for art galleries, museums, etc.
h Included in land and buildings for libraries.
<Not including land and buildings.
/Inclu ded in asylums, almshouses, etc.
* Included in other assets.
<Not including apparatus, etc.
m Including bath houses and bathing pools and beaches.
n Included in land and buildings for city hall.




Total.

<10,000

1087

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (2).
Parks.
Land and
buildings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Workhouses, reformatories,
etc.

Jails.

Total.

Land and Appara­
build­ tus, etc.
ings.

$306,035,025 $437,865 $306,472,890 $5,998,500
(a)
62,000,000 1,863,030
63,863,030
026,751,144 c 654,000 c 27,405,144 1,690,368
6,497
8,152,086
8,158,583
582.000
53.275.000
(<*)
(<*)
22.153.000
18^000
21,968,000
150.000
7,936,884
7,916,884
20,000
3.829.312
3.817.312
12,000
(d)
(d)
13,000,000
(d )
1,021,070
1,019,570
1.500
3,647,009
3,637,509
9.500
243*000
50.000
3.708.000
3.658.000
6,298,622
6,233,622
65.000
2,629,219
10.000
2,619,219
311.800 '
311.800
W
5,073,734
5,073,234
500
519,435
935
518.500
1,078,600
20,000
1,058,600
4,592,738
21,550
4,571,188
1,615,066
36,209
1,678,857
1.059.000
1.058.000
1,000
m 5,000
m 4,300,000
w 4,305,000.
(»)
(d)
571.000
503.800
509.800
6,000
<*8,000 <•2,567,500
02,559,500
( )
2.292.313
4.000
2.288.313
(«)
2,353,684
2,350,684
3.000
333,200
1,700
331.500
878.000
66,000
812,000
1,587,710
1,575,300
12,410
8
451.000
474.000
23.000
1.500
10,000
266.000
267.500
(d )
474.500
40,000
(d )
1.000
160,000
161.000
(«)
(d)
2,086,492
750.000
751.000
1,000
901.000
900.000
1,000
(«)
200.000
11,000
210.000
10.000
507.500
1,200
506,300
(•)
1,280,579
11,133
1,269,446
3,832,405
3,828,905
3.500
727.000
732.000
5.000
20,000
1.050.000
1.070.000
343,294
350,710
7,416
640,600r.
1.000
639,600
(d)
862,470
(d )
10,000
10,000
493,226
10,670
482,556
488,644
8,159
480,485
500.000
(d )
m 516,056
m 51^, 056
1,000
(")
b b 95,000
b b 95,000
(<)
201.000
6,000
195.000
(«)
453,856
2,000
451,856
358,328
23,828
334.500

Total.

Total.

$20,000 $6,018,500 $3,738,900 $130,000 $3,868,900
49,653
908.000
957,653
136,516
22^258 ., 915^626 800.000
936,516
7,408
3.500
368,420
375,828
585,500
1,380,000
1,006,000
(«)
(d )
(<*)
10,000
160,000
22,204
318,079
340,283
(«)

(d )

(a)

150,000

393,000
(a)

$

(-0

(o)

(P)

877,000

24,000

901,000

43,500
175,000

5,000
70,000

48,500
245,000

364,374
150,000

8,000

35,500

372,374
185,500

550,000
186,955

(a)

25,000
(*)

575,000
U86,955

3,000

78,000
(«)

75,000
(d )

2

$

Land and Annflrfl_
build- tus, etc.
APPa^ings.

(d )

30,000

50

10,050
HO, 000
(”)
«)
(«)

5,000

35,000

*74,*781

*7,076

*8i,*857

v9,500

t>500

v 10,000

100,000

32,500

132,500

27,000

200

‘ *27*200’

(a)

1

11,000
(«)

(«)
(«)

(3

<
2>

(p )

Kd )

(a)

5,000

(«0

(p )

{a)

Included in apparatus, etc., for police department
Included in city hall and police department.
« Included in hospitals.
r Included in land and buildings for schools.
s Land for site only.
t Land for site, and books, apparatus, etc.
« Included in workhouses, reformatories, etc.
v Including jails.
10 Land for site only; library now located in city hall.
x Land for site, and books, apparatus, etc.; library now located in city hall.
y Included in land and buildings for fire department.
z Buildings only; land included in land ana buildings for parks,
aa Not including land.
b b Including land for library.
o
p

9398— N o. 42— 02----- 11




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1

2

3
4
5
6
7
8
9

10

11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

03:

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X XIV .—ASSETS (3).

Asylums, almshouses, etc.

Hospitals.
arnal
Lin­
er.

Cities.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

1 New York, N. Y . . ; . . . . 1.303.000 $585,000 $9,888,000 $4,205,025 $155,000 $4,360,025
2 Chicago, 111..................
204,085
16,067
188,018
3 Philadelphia, P a ......... 270.000
180,000 1.450.000 1,883,000 192,200 2,075,200
4 St. Louis, M o ............... 199,487
413,140
246,605
390,000
23,140
47,118
(«)
1,400,000
5 Boston, Mass...............
3.205.000
(«)
6 Baltimore, Md..............
25j)00
225,000
1 200,000
500,732
201,102 | 481,275
7 Cleveland, Ohio.......... 181,067
19,457
20,035
31,165
*8 Buffalo, N. Y ...............
31,165
(«)
(a)
9 San Francisco, C a l___
(«)
(<
*)
(«
430,000
350,000
80,000
10 Cincinnati, O h io......... ,210,000
48,400 1,25^400
74,500
696,623
11 Pittsburg, P a...............
622,123
86,000
7,500
78,500
12 New Orleans, L a .........
5,000
90,000
85,000
30,000
13 Detroit, M ich...............
2,000
28,000
14 Milwaukee, Wis..........
93,360
5.000
88,360
332,305 Ifir356,355 g 10,806 9 367,161
15 Washington, D. C ....... 311,942
20,363
25,000
380.000 I 150,000
175,000
16 Newark, N. J ............... 300.000
80,000
55,300
17 Jersey City, N. J ..........
5.000
50,300
295.000
110,000
20,000
130,000
18 Louisville, K y.............. 270.000
25-000
5 279,235
19 Minneapolis, Minn___ 279,235
(*)
20 Providence, R. I .........
*373,*894' *i5,’ io6' *388*994*
21 Indianapolis, I n d .......
181,200
28,700
152,500
22 Kansas City, Mo.......... 56,000 11,000 67.000
(a)
(a)
(a)
m 188,000
23 St. Paul, M in n ............
(a )
(*)
24 Rochester, N. Y ..........
1,500
1,500
32.000
25 Denver, C o lo...............
6,000
27,000
26 Toledo, O h io...............
452,292
27 Allegheny, P a..............
2,000
7, 000 416,292
36,000
5,000
28 Columbus, O h io..........
40,032
129,410
169,442
29,550 *49L
29 Worcester, Mass.......... 462,075
700
30 Syracuse, N. Y ............
35,000
32,862
31 New Haven, Conn.......
243,913
276,775
32 Paterson, N. J ..............
10,500
1,000
28,
147,000
157,500
27.000
8,541
55,041
33 Fall River, Mass..........
46,500
70.000
7,161
77,
34 St. Joseph. Mo..............
500
5,000
5,
35 Omaha, Nebr...............
1,500
15,
13,500
(a)
36 Los Angeles, Cal..........
1,
37 Memphis, Tenn............ 100,000
,511
107,
38 Scranton, P a ...............
27,962
39 Lowell, M ass...............
227,962
200,000
40 Albany, N . Y ...............
q 140,000
500 «140,000
(«
41 Cambridge, Mass......... r 10,000
19,750
59,750
s 10,000
40,000
8
42 Portland, O reg ............
2,500
2,500
43 Atlanta, Ga................... 100,000
10,000
110,000
44 Grand Rapids, M ich ...
500
12,000
12.500
45 Dayton, O h io.......
10,000
500
45.500
1.500
45.000
11,500
46 Richmond, V a___
2,500
45.500
37,500
2.500
40,000
43.000
47 Nashville, T e n n ..
20,000
60.000
80,000'
48 Seattle, Wash.......
3,000
3,000
(u)
_
49 Hartford, Conn_
v 127,000 v 16,000 v 143,000
(«)
(*)
50 Reading, P a .........
51 Wilmington, D e l.
52 Camden, N. J ....... .
2,699
10,000
12,699
53 Trenton, N. J ....... .
300
4.000
5,000
40,000
4,300
35,000
54 Bridgeport, Conn.
2,000
10,249
100,549
10,500
90,300
8,500
55 Lynn, Mass.......... .
1,500
10,300
7,500
119,925
6.000
130,125
t reported.
duding cash in county treasury.
t including apparatus, etc., for city hall, not reported.
duded in city hall.
duded in ferries and bridges.
duding docks and wharves.
duding jails.
stributing system only.
duded in other assets.
t including apparatus, etc.
duding apparatus, etc., for city hall, police and fire departments, schools, libra
s, reformatories, etc., and hospitals.




1039

STATISTICS OF CITIES.
Table X X IV .—ASSETS (3).

Ferries
and
bridges.

Markets.

$45,248,821 $8,556,900
6,340,242
18,000,000
162,000
644,600
546,600 2,089,800
2.500.000 1,000,000
4,909,382
169,312
1,944,551
583,240
100,000
746,850 1,000,600
2.560.000 1.156.000
250.000 1.500.000
375.000
300.000
118,600
/ l , 281,450
113,383
3, C O 000
O,
500.000

,

1,447,
888
883,
40,
2,809,
1,000,
500,
652,
144,

322,700
75,000
34,174
10,000
500.000
400.000
96,400
32,800

410,000
70,000

tP)

215,170
230,342
416.000
625.000

1,745
140,000

530,621
648,500
330.000
140,159
520.000

170,000

86,605
( P)

262,000

350,000
32,150
761,729

( P)

(*)
4,000
358,616

Bath
houses
and
Ceme­
teries. bathing
pools
and
beaches.

Water­
works.

Gas
works.

Electriclight
plants.

Other.

Total

$38,100 $387,985 $123,012,020
$27,890,218 $908,490,531
$2,234,642 6,493,978 155,712,996
50,013 35,310,099
2,000 95,000 37,971,959 $25,000,000
4,705,989 232,977,982
21,551,600
3,156,224 52,443,955
5,100,000 125,300 15,782,616
8,609,000 5158,000,069
42,300 15,035,835
15,154,172 77,128,690
302,327
279,351 40.338.101
4,000 10,735,867
225,865
23,870
224,350 c25,539,864
8,449,915
580,000
520,000 30,945,408
34,625,000 70,837,446
13,500,000
5,858,155
684,453 31,989,906
60,000
825,850 17,211,194
63,000
6,220,
721,862
16,180
602,965 26,627,383
69,778
5,068,
401,300 19,442,513
65,000
cl5,800,404
500 h 2 , 935,
15,500
30,000 15,000,
1,438,250 33,762,694
5,100,
3,670,532 21,199,893
25,000
6,184,
1,216,063 16,052,342
19,375,038
4,557,
Jc 351,039
316,889
3,296,
1,334,564 16,852,350
5,853,823
27,
40.000
4,175,
50.000 13,609,237
(*)
6,513,
o]15,000 16,255,280
350,000
15,410,762
16,000
7,463,
9,016,837
160,
1,709,952
1,912,
9,572,953
130,*666'
50,000
330,000
14,246,573
3,349,
406,812
9,652,864
2,381,
68,911
381,059
588.000
3,729,
6,086
1,701,139 17,406,475
102.000
6,000,
10,200
246,500 12.932.102
5,625,381
493,487
4,072,989
297,387
6,928
7,798,423
1,717,400
701,274
1,978,549
98,752
1,500
8,677,244
261,915
2,500
4.111.086
150.000
4,824,747
76,640
3,729,338
87,383
112,608
548,717 10,674,663
39,500
26,422 0 8,463,536
*64,*500*
1,633,692 *17,390,601
1,500
9,371,103
25.000
15,000
7,787,557
203 636
258,296
5.285.047
23,077
193,309
500.000
7,020,830
36.000
7,561,446
1,012,951
242,783
25.000
5,447,608
25,877
75.000
7,559,603
102,835
20,309
187,480
9.612.086
7,858
4,605,161
to 324,855
3.796.047
25.499
*(*)’ *'
20,000
4,330,532
120,950
200
6,070,166
62.500
1,941
3,438,149
40.000
85,000
154,342
7,274,397
2,487,371

Included in parks.
Including workhouses, reformatories, etc., and asylums, almshouses, etc.
Included in hospitals.
©Including apparatus, etc., for city hall.
p Included in land and buildings for city hall,
a Land only; buildings owned and almshouse controlled by county.
r Land only.
s Land only; not including apparatus, etc., not reported.
* Not including apparatus, etc., for hospitals, not reported,
wIncluded in asylums, almshouses, etc.
v Including hospitals.
w Including markets.
« Included in land and buildings for parks.
I

m

n




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

10
11

12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21

22

23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55

1040

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (1)—Continued.
City hall.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Cash in
treasury.

Uncol­
lected
taxes.

Cash and
bonds in
sinking
fund.

Trust
funds.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

(a)
(a)
*$500,000
$39,450
$71,538
Oakland, C a l..........
115,277
$4,000
$3,637 $111,277
256.814
25,764
$401,290
Lawrence, Mass----142,966
1.500
117,100
141,466
94; 034
925,653
New Bedford, Mass.
67.399
5.000 e 70,000
e 65,000
318,452
73,438
Des Moines, Iowa_
_
312,698
131,789
13,789
118,000
196,426
Springfield, Mass . . .
711,033
346.243
72,250
10,000
5,000
62,250
342,008
24,334
Somerville, Mass
350.000
50.000
38,500
300.000
39,734
25,416
T ro y ,N .Y ...............
3,453
16.000 c 126,000
cllO, 000
Hoboken, N. J .........
75,000
97,934
97,618
60,000
10,000
50.000
42,604
118,078
53,975
Evansville, Ind.......
174,149
4,149
170.000
Manchester, N. H ...,
67,524
350,899
151,919
158.000
30.000
128.000
81,618
83,923
Utica, N . Y ..............
/ 30,000 *259,500
0 229,500
195,000
73,878
Peoria, 111...............
60,000
10.000
50.000
43,622
10,579
Charleston, S. C........
950
42.000
2.000
40.000
Savannah, G a .........
9,597
5,318
50.000 *615,127
k 565,127
350
Salt Lake City, Utah
29,253
231,713
/7,641 *217,641
g 210,000
San Antonio, Tex
91,775
267,953 1,214,750
8,911 *108,911
1100,000
Duluth, M in n ..........
152,645
244,410
138,629
m 125,000
7,597 m 132,597
Erie, P a ...................
28,450
234,425
69,159
o45,000
/ 5,000 P 50,000
477
Elizabeth, N .J.........
101,306
139,523
11,800 *141,800
*130,000
15,689
Wilkesbarre, P a ___
57,331
11,813
22.000
20.000
2,000
Kansas City, Kans..
475.000
237,555
6,000
6,000
27,400
149,366
Harrisburg, P a .......
137,338
5.000 *205,000
113,547 *200,000
123,452
219,113
Portland, M e ..........
1,414,873
140.000
15.000
125,000
731,112
361,498
Yonkers, N . Y .........
105,777
Norfolk, Va..............
443,670
246.616
124,111
17^,000
(^,000
i$ ,o o o
Waterbury, Conn
74,877
180.616
76,929
**454,000 »*12,000 t*466,000
630,571
42,654
156,443
Holyoke, Mass.........
7*95,000
7 *5 ,0 0 0
r 90,000
18,738
Fort Wayne, I n d _
_
199,025
36,261
5,000
5.000
11,509
308,081
12,000
Youngstown, Ohio .
15.000 *415,000
s 400,000
Houston, T ex..........
358,063
350.000
271.000
14,600
256.500
150,602
14,374
Covington. K y .........
342,196
19.500
5.000
14,500
45,497
10,000
80,816
Akron, O hio............
115,719
6,119
109,600
243,418
200,623
Dallas, T e x ..............
37,818
180.000
10.000
170.000
68,054
65,832
257,101
Saginaw, M ic h .......
31.500
1.500
30.000
1,720
48,199
13,285
565,000
90 Lancaster, Pa..........
/5,000 *45,000
0 40.000
606,454
122,816
49,407
91 Lincoln, N e b r.........
w 352,000 /15,000 x 367,000
282,190
360,696
73,440
92 Brockton, Mass....... .
*175,000 *12,000 *187,000
159,641
7,030
50,000
93 Binghamton, N. Y ..
6.000 *16,000
16,744
*10,000
19.400
94 Augusta, G a ............
52,774
21,609
31,165
666,022
19,156
24,466
2,813
95 Pawtucket, R. I .......
4,800 *105,900
*101,100
85,674
116,153
41,466
96 Altoona, Pa..............
100,000
5.000
95.000
66,198
39,058
97 W heeling,W .Va . . .
j 2,690
2,690
39; 856
37,500
98 Mobile, Ala..............
aa 225,000 5*4,000 co 229,000
3,014
148.243
99 Birmingham, Ala ..
2.000 *27,000
*25,000
25,294
19,002
32,659
100 Little Rock, Ark—
15,000 d d 240,000
d d 225,000
104,987
11,143
101 Springfield, O h io ...
ee 100,000 *61,500 //101,500
413,890
430,693
1,111,703
102 Galveston, T e x .......
/4,559 *349,980
fir345,421
44,239
162,872
368,756
103 Tacoma. Wash.........
f 6 , 0 0 0 **116,000
51,730 g g 110,000
184,830
474,553
35,890
104 Haverhill, M ass----2,364 i i 126,364
a 124,000
510,164
151,843
105 Spokane, W ash.......
5.000 *37,500
132.500
32,701
Terre Haute, Ind_
_
124,677
58,198
106
<*6,500 <*41,500
<*35,000
32,536
93,512
59,705
107 Dubuque, Iowa.......
5.000 *105,000
*100,000
121,799
79,235
51,888
108 Quincy, 111..............
2.000 mml7,000
** 15,000
44,829
130,505
13,963
109 South Bend, Ind
<*9,000 <*94,000
<*85,000
296,172 164,532
185,991
2,303
Salem, Mass............
110
a Not reported.
* Including police department and jails,
c Included in city hall.
< Including iails.
*
e Including land and buildings for jails.
/In clu d in g apparatus, etc., for jails.
g Including land and buildings for police department and jails.
* Including jails and land and buildings for police department.
i Included in land and buildings for city hall.
JNot including land and buildings.
* Including land and buildings for library.
i Including land and buildings for police department.
m Including land and buildings for police department and headquarters for fire department.
7 Not including headquarters, included in land and buildings for city hall.
1
o Including markets and land and buildings for police department and jails.
P Including jails, markets, and land and buildings for police department.
q Included in other assets.
t Including police department.
*
8 Land only, building destroyed by fire; including land for markets.




1041

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (1)—Continued.

Police department.
Land
and
build­
ings.

Appa­
ratus,
etc.

Total*

(a)
(«
<*$47,000 <*$10,095 <*$57,095
82,410
71,376 11,034
21,000 / 5 , 000 / 26,000
94,552
78,600 15,952
57.000
3.000
54.000
82,400
80.000
2,400
28,350
3,350
25.000
<*30,000 <*4,000 <*34,000
75,750
7,250
68,500
40.000
30.000 10,000
3.000
i3,0Q0
(*)
60.000
50.000 10,000
65.000
50.000 15.000
*
<*734 < 22,734
<*22,000
(i
i 1,363
1.
16,077 j 16,077
j 7,639
7,639
J 1,500
1.500
j 5,114
5,114
<*6,500
<*500
6,000
15.000
15.000
i 1,000
1.000
<*120,000 <*13,500 <*133,500
(«)
(«)
(«)
12,000
19,500
7.500

< 8,600 <*10,000
*
<*60,000 <*3,500
(a)
(«)
4.000
<*14,900 <*1,233
<*15,000 <*4,0^3
10,500
8.000
1.500
►
$ 2,000 1,000
(*)
2,000
(*\
,100 11,076
6,6o0
(*)
1,000
1.500
<*25,000 <*2,400
(<0
2,000
01,200 <*5,800

$
<*18,600

<*63,500
m12,000
4,000
<*16,133
<*19,073
18,500
Jl,500
53,000

Schools.

Fire department.
Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

$54,900
110,400
141,965
150,144
189,543
154.000
260.000
81,000
80,000
145,548
61,700
106,000
46,900
50.000
55,768
41,050
139,700
m57,950
49.500
73,4^0
31.000
40.000
60.500
155,000

$77,820
76.050
85.050
70,590
140,596
82,549
104,400
51,970
85,150
104,092
96,411
64,600
87,285
123,595
26,672
54,074
106,500
82,377
51.000
65,710
28,183
28.000
119,650
85,000

$132,720
186,450
227,015
220,734
830,139
236,549
364,400
132,970
165.150
249,640
158,111
170.600
134,185
173,595
82,430
95,124
246,200
*140,327
100.500
139,180
59,183
68,000
180.150
240,000

^ ,2 3 0
115,260
65,470
39,400
50.000
50.000
107,500
57,446
48.500

47,082
68,148
61,400
35,300
77,351
40,000
38,100
34,232
37,205

%5.500

_J, 267
65,726
40,000
41,123
66,319
39,592
72.500
10.250
55,878
24.500
40.250
50.250
88,874
58,925
50,973
35,352
42,045
32.500
38,605
46,283

132,312
183,408
126,870
74,700
127,351
90.000
145.600
91,678
85,705
73,924
67,767
119,876
131,790
83,692
157,631
86,576
122.500
36.250
105,878
30.000
106,250
92.250
174,537
137,275
A* 79,073
92,685
101,229
72,500
63,992
127,983

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

$923,250
1,037,149
1,042,109
997,150
1,798,118
1,186,261
813,300
376,500
712.000
740,056
642,590
876.000

$46,100
28,120
77.000
51,563
158,490
105,101
43,033
75.000
50.000
37,049
41,574
28,500

$969,350
1,065,
1,119,
1,048,
1,956,
1,291,
856,
451,
762,
777,
684,
904,

56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

1,

57,706
15,172
65,430
81,780
35.000
40.000
60.000
42,468
40,546
105,000

1,117,
331,
1,869,
954,
' 365,
590,
485,
819,
636,
996,
(«)
820,
955,
465,
754,
512,
226,
850,
354,
v 705,
565,
473,
517,
1/480,

70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87

316,018
1,804,081
873,200
320.000
550.000
425.000
776,988
596,110
891,848
80,292
876,600
431,250
699,892
500.000

v

820.000
331,708
610,950
490,792
426,876
499,100
442,874

40,558
%

78,868
34,100
54,114
12,000

(
s$,ooo

22,887
v 94,614
75.000
46,147
18.000
38,000

66

67

88

89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

54,150
V
71,790
42,569
612,
38,870
573,647
91,312
541,
509,100
32.000
46,984
801,
786,909
15.000
50.000
26.000
v 318,500
r 302,000
v 16,500
50.000
362,479
29,237
333,242
5.500
J 2 , m
390.000
15.000
375.000
<*7,000
66.000
525.000
500.000
25.000
42.000
(°)
892,336
58,144
834,192
>,000
85,663
6,000
577,407
31,057
546,350
300
78,3o0
*7,550
5,2o0
738,746
48,676
690,070
/17,320 j j 17,320 **28,100
499,112
10,405
488,707
67,333
J2,500
2.500
380.000
24.000
356.000
59,184
3,000
4,500
1.500
355.000
15.000
340.000
40.000
j 1,000
1,000
(*)
443,750
405.000
38,750
25,387
9,266
540.000
494.000
46.000
11,244
81,700
10,000 1,244
t Not including buildings destroyed by fire, but including land for markets.
mIncluding iails and workhouses, reformatories, etc.
v Including libraries.
w Including land and buildings for libraries and jails.
x Including iails and land and buildings for libraries.
v Including land and buildings for libraries.
z Included in markets.
a a Including land and buildings for police department and land for jails.
b b Including apparatus, etc., for police department.
co Including police department and land for jails.
<< Including markets.
**
e e Including markets and land and buildings for police department.
//In clu d in g police department and markets.
g g Including police headquarters and land and buildings for jails.
b h Including jails and police headquarters.
i i Including 1 fire station and land and buildings for police department, libraries, and jails.
5 i Including apparatus, etc., for jails, but not including land and buildings included in city hall.
fcfcNot including 1 fire station, included in land and buildings for city hall.
**Land only.
mm Not including buildings.
*2,000
47,176
i6,650
2,500
<*27,400
(«)

flic




BULLETIN 01? TfiE BEBARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (2)—Continued.

aarinal
um)er.

56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

Art galleries, museums, etc.

Libraries.
Cities.

Land and Books,
buildings. apparatus,

Oakland, C a l.......... .
Lawrence, M ass___
New Bedford, Mass..
Des Moines, Iowa_
_
Springfield, Mass___
Somerville, M ass_
_
Troy, N. Y .................
Hoboken, N .J .........
Evansville, Ind....... .
Manchester, N. H _
_
Utica, N . Y ...............
Peoria, 111 ................
Charleston, S. C........
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City, Utah.
San Antonio, T ex_
_
Duluth, M in n ..........
Erie, Pa....................
Elizabeth, N .J..........
Wilkesbarre, P a ___
Kansas City, K ans...
Harrisburg, P a ........
Portland, M e .......... .
Yonkers, N . Y .........
Norfolk, Va..............
Waterbury, Conn_
_
Holyoke, Mass.........
Fort Wayne, Ind ___
Youngstown, Ohio ..
Houston, T ex .......... .
Covington. K y ..........
Akron, O hio............ .
Dallas, T e x ...............
Saginaw, M ic h ........
Lancaster, Pa.......... .
Lincoln, N e b r..........
Brockton, Mass....... .
Binghamton, N .Y ...
Augusta, G a .............
Pawtucket, R. I ....... .
Altoona, Pa...............
Wheeling, W. Va . ...
Mobile, Ala...............
Birmingham,Ala ...
Little Rock, Ark.......
Springfield, Ohio —
Galveston, T e x ........
Tacoma, Wash..........
Haverhill, M ass.......
Spokane, W ash........
Terre Haute, I n d ___
Dubuque, Iowa........
Quincy, 111...............
South Bend, Ind.......
Salem, M ass.............

$75,000
131,839
198,000

$40,000
40,891
61,497
54,000

Total.

Land and
buildings.

$115,000
40,891
193,336
252,000

42,000

25,000

67,000

75,000

50,000

125,000

65.000
50.000
86.000

30.000
42.000
115,000

95.000
92.000
201,000

(d)

25,500

* 25,500

94,000
*141,500

50,452
*32,378

144,452
*'173,878

91,000
(*)

26,413
20,000

117,413
* 20,000

14,000

15,000

29,000

60,000

16,834
6,500
(”)

66,500
(»)

14.000
26,470
17.000

100,000
*26,470
*17,000

30,458

30,458

28,844

28,844

{ n)

86,000

$

(n)

loo,*666*
a8,064
58,600
(<
*)
6,000
s 46,925
43,500
44,750

(n)

V )

(tt)

27,725
2,500
21,709
36,631
8,922
25,000

127,725
2,500
*•29,773
95,231
*8,922
31,000
s 46,925

8,500
45,424

52,000
90,174

a Not reported.
* Included in city hall.
c Included in police department.
d Included in land and buildings for city hall.
^Included in apparatus, etc., for police department.
/In clu d ed in city hall and police department.
tfNot including apparatus, etc., not reported.
* Not including land and buildings.
i Including art galleries, museums, etc.




Appara­
tus, etc.

(J )

Total.

STATISTICS OP CITIES,
T able X XIV .—ASSETS (2)—Continued.

Parks.
Land and
buildings.
$275,000
529,350
186,541
439,231
613,279
464.500
214.000
410.000
146.000
659,700
73,300
605.000
295.000
650.000
350,145
406,961
516,803
200.000
114.000
460.000
150.000
78.000
350.000
1 180,000

Apparatus, etc.

$221
8,100
6,269
39,897
(«)
700
1,000
354
60,000
5,000
775
800
5,000
1,580

108.500
237,286
60.000
175,000
33,750
(«)
24.000
27,400
27,500
20.000
93,966
75.000
500.000
190.000
350.000
58.000
150.000
368.000
192.300
93,750
28.000
100.000
230,000
40,000
201.300

Total.

$275,000
529,571
194,641
445.500
653,176
0 464.500
214.000
410,700
147.000
660,054
73,300
665,010
300.000
650,0C0
350,920
407,761
521,803
201,580
114.000
460,100
150.000
78,800
351.500
1 180.500
( 70,000
158,830
111.000
237,786
61,500

(68,\)00

1,000
(«)

176,000
34,740
25,000

1,000
500
1,350
1,000
427
250
21,000
1,000
500
100
506
2,500
307
1,000
1,000
1,000
16,000

Workhouses, reforr
etc.

Jails.
Land and Appara­
build­
tus, etc.
ings.

(^i
" (tff

(a)
ic )

(«)

Total.

P
i
(/)

(<
*)
ic )

(*0

(«)
(*>
)

Pi

$1,000

( *)

(b)

(*>)
$15,000
(«)
(*)
(» )

ib )

$600

ic )

(o)
(m )

Land and Appara­
build­ tus, etc.
ings.

ip)

$50

40,000

2,0C0

(«)
(*)
$15,600
(o)
(m;
n

(a)

(«)

25.000
27,900
28,850
21.000
94,393
75.000
500,250
211,000
351.000
58,500
150,100
368,506
194,800
94,057
28.000
101.000
231,000
41,000
217,300

200

l
50,000 |

5,000

j Included in libraries.
fcIncluded in land and buildings for parks.
I Including land and buildings for libraries.
m Included in other assets.
n Included in schools.
©Included in land and buildings for schools.
Buildings only; land included in land and buildings for city hall.
q. Land for site only; library now located in city hall.
»*Land for site, and books, apparatus, etc.; library located now in city
©Building in process of construction.




iarnal
lmer.

56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
i>
4
15
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (8)—Continued.

Asylums, almshouses, etc.

Hospitals.
larnal
nm>er.

56
57
68
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86

87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100

101

102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

Cities.

Oakland, C a l...............
Lawrence, M ass..........
New Bedford, Mass___
Des Moines, Iow a.........
Springfield, Mass.........
Somerville, M ass.........
Troy, N. Y ....................
Hoboken, N. J ..............
Evansville, Ind............
Manchester, N. H .........
Utica, N . Y ...................
Peoria, 111....................
Charleston, S. C............
Savannah, G a ..............
Salt Lake City, Utah. . .
San Antonio, T e x ...
Duluth, M in n .........
Erie, P a ...................
Elizabeth, N .J.........
Wilkesbarre, P a ___
Kansas City, K ans..
Harrisburg, P a .......
Portland, M e ..........
Yonkers, N .Y ..........
Norfolk, V a..............
Waterbury, Conn. . .
Holyoke, Mass.........
Fort Wayne, Ind . . .
Youngstown, O h io..
Houston, T e x ..........
Covington, JCy.........
Akron, O h io............
Dallas, T e x ..............
Saginaw, M ich.........
Lancaster, Pa..........
Lincoln, N e b r.........
Brockton, Mass.......
Binghamton, N. Y ..
Augusta, G a ............
Pawtucket, R .I .......
Altoona, Pa..............
W heeling,W .Va . . .
Mobile, A la..............
Birmingham, A la ...
Little Rock, Ark___
Springfield, Ohio .. .
Galveston, T e x .......
Tacoma, Wash.........
Haverhill, M ass___
Spokane, W ash.......
Terre Haute, I n d .. .
Dubuque, Iow a.......
Quincy, 111..............
South Bend, Ind .. .
Salem, Mass............

Land
and
build­
ings.

$17,000'
2,500

Appara­
tus, etc.

$1,000
1,850

Total.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

$18,000
4,350

$122,574
98,000

$17,500
10,170

$140,074
108,170

124,470
44,500

18,017
1,426

142,487
45,926

10,500

2,000

12,500

**5*666'

*‘ *266*

**5*266*

1,098 ft140,240
68,000
15,500
200,000
115,000
5.000
1,600
64,706
3.000

(/
50.000
14.000
107,534
5.000
1.000
61.000
2,500

1,098
18,000
1,500
7,466

5,500

500

6,000

6,500
10,600
44,500
(«)

1.500
3,405
1.500
(«)

5,700
1,200

(c)
6,000
20,346
500

600
3,706
500

(*)
250
(o)
9,401

200

9

12,545 ft 152,785
9,444

209,444

15,000

3,000

18,000

14,005
46,000
(«)

30,000

24,500

54,500

5,700

*37*830'

’« 2*375

»

3 25,475

33,375

328,850

16,234

4,818

21,052

41,300

13,281

64,581

8,000

m

(«)

(«)

(«)

46*205

*“ i,'450
7.000
6.000

29,747
700

300

400

700

4U()00
43,000

7^500
7,000

48^500
60,000

2,000

40,000

300
1,000

2,300
41,000

25.000
25.000

5.000
3.000

30.000
28.000

1,058

*3*308

1,500
*2 250
,*

1,500

7,200 ft 142,200
1,0 00
f/ 1,0 00 ^135,000
(/)
Included in other assets,
ft Including ferries and bridges.
c Not reported.
d Not including ferries and bridges, not reported.
cNot including apparatus, etc., for parks, not reported.
f Included in land and buildings for asylums, almhouses, etc.
a Not including land and buildings.
ft Including land and buildings for hospitals.
i Included in city hall.
j Not including other assets, not reported.
a




1045

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (3)-Continued.

Ferries
and
bridges.

Markets.

*300,000
<«)
500,000
(4

Bath
houses
and
Ceme­
teries. bathing
pools
and
beaches.

Water­
works.

$1,500
1,600
1,938
2,000

$40,000

63.000
25.000

12,000
8,000

200,000

Electriclight
plants.

$1,579,623
2,517,058

20,000

52,000

$48,064
194,077
60,000

Gas
works.

2,005,411
785,690
1 , 000,000
260,000
2 , 000,000
1,524,999

335,986
65.000
25.000

261,040
10.000

2,000

125,000

116,370
56.000
365,000
65.000
225,900
154,500
52.000

64,914
37,500
496
(*)

60,000
127,699
12,500

5u, 000

(a)

2,021,852
2,357
32,315

(«)

302,200

2,875
15,000

138,796
75,000

2,065,300 $1,780,971
1,755,810

56,666
200

8,127

1,502,445
4,403,572

1,659,527
1,232,813
1,454,804
1,295,308
1,560,000
1 , 000,000

(o)

10,000

600
60,000

2 , 000,000

8,000

73,398
23,500

1 , 000,000

1,212,653

6,000

200,000

4,596
125,000

135,000

4,000
r

360,734
125,000
290,000
82,685

20,666

17,965
100,000

s 103,600
25,000

22,000
10,000

235,000
101,089
150.000
303.000

3.000
15.500
61.500

$
2,834

5.000
3,325
36,225

20,000

6,130
62.400

20,300
6,390
79.400

909,895
895,000

943,515
1.500.000
1,034,902
1,866,445
1,340,166
803,092
1.017.000

410,000

$135,221
35,000

707,577
1,550.000
1,204; 830
1,377,575
970,988
556,953
457,973
1.925.869

65,000
450,000

Total

$1,000 $2,134,058
4,861,959
92,640
6,160,589
119,671
52,837
3,382,310
220,260 <*6,802,624
362,150 « 3,753,769
3,186,436
1,846,772
8,700
29.300
3,733,157
322,278
5,200,226
1,544,016
27,900
88,800
2,643,778
370.000
1,323,780
2,972,955
325.000
625,710
7.684.210
2,951,841
68,585
7,583,409
249.000
3,838,054
17,343
1,055,914
169,608
9,442
1,552,069
1,804,438
4,000
3,479,612
83,400
J 3,667,593
(«)
5,049,877
25.300
fc964,292
3,063,502
3,054,888
50.000
4,268,572
28,910
48,804
2,705,048
2,463,132
40.000
12.000
2.048.210
200.000
2,609,325
1,559,247
11,332
3,207,399
2,535,924
21,000
36,000
2,383,920
2,569,065
163,275
2,986,812
2,951,419
2,020,000
3,423,738
3,711,512
85,311
121,300
2,444,958
40,712
3,025,534
1,843,746
22,700
36.000
1,245,820
1,426,434
410,000
2,034,182
8,000
622,200
5,069,836
657,940
4,847,469
91,203
3,551,950
137,558
3,141,343
24,100
966,698
112,801
1,580,661
1,367,722
25.000
1,301,748
15,950
3,983,568
53.000
b

20,000

113,579

Other.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

56
67
58
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110

Jc Including city hall, police department, fire department, schools, parks, jails, hospitals, asylums,
almshouses, etc., markets, and cemeteries.
l Included in apparatus, etc., for asylums, almshouses, etc.
m Not including apparatus, etc.
n including apparatus, etc., for hospitals.
o Land for markets included in land for city hall.
.PIncluded in asylums, almshouses, etc.
a Including hospital for contagious diseases.
Including $60,000 city’s share in viaduct, owned jointly by State, city, and railror
s Including land and buildings for city hall.
t Included in land and buildings for city hall.




1046

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (1)—Concluded.

City hall.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Johnstown, P a ___
Elmira, N .Y ...........
Allentown, Pa.......
Davenport, Io w a ..
McKeesport, P a . . .
Springfield, 111___
Chelsea, Mass....... ,
Chester, Pa............
York, P a ...............
Malden, Mass.........
Topeka, K ans.......
Newtonj Mass.......
Sioux City, Iow a ..
Bayonne, N. J .......
Knoxville, Tenn ..
Schenectady, N .Y .
Fitchburg, Mass...
Superior, Wis.........
Rockford, 111.........
Taunton, Mass___
Canton, Ohio.........
Butte, M ont..........
Montgomery, A la ..
Auburn, N. Y .........
Chattanooga, Tenn
East St. Louis, 111.
Joliet, 111...............

Cash in
treasury.

857,744
66,311
107,370
208,587
63,881
53,229
186.605
10,945
22,649
28,156
137,062
121,048
76,436
47,440
472
72,690
20,620
159,684
17,197
60,747
121,291
5205,535
89,764
122,239
14,993
86,140
130.605

Uncol­
lected
taxes.

$24,586
42,776
75,977
122,735
46,088
37,548
179,524
50,334
19,500
194,255
22,536
412,628
75,000
450,000
27,056
177,018
138,580
736,742
41,205
11,216
3,933
43,159
4,583
138,*902
41,388
32,528

Cash and
bonds in
sinking
fund.

Trust
funds.

$95,326

$50,000
«150,000
o48,000
ft 75,000

" *95,*513
280,022
353
433,475
69,122
5,544
295,143
9,270
1,809,186
4,692
223,000
12,319
136,834
422,415
248,014
512,487
13,780
017,419
967
7,200

Land
and
build­
ings.

$15,000
15,500
200
44,375

41,908

*65,000
100,000
*75,000
44.000
102,000
63,200
*100,000
« 55,000
*30,000
n35,000
60.000
( ')

Appara­
tus, etc.

$10,000 $60,000
«17,964 a 167,964
<*3,000 c 51,000
ft 5,000 ft 80,000
5.000
5,000
10,000 *75,000
fc100,000
U )
3.000 *78,000
825
825
5.000
49.000
7,250
109,250
4,400
67,600
20,000 *120,000
a 10,000 <*65,000
1.000 *31,000
n5,000 n 40,000
10,219
70,219

70.000
15,747
6,297 m 38,000
P 59,300
*100,000
c 26,500
35.000
250,000

a Including police department and jails,
ft Included in city hall.
e Including land and buildings for police department and jails.
< Including apparatus, etc., for jails.
*
e Including jails and land and buildings for police department.
/In clu d e d in land and buildings for city hall.
o Not including land and buildings,
ft Including iafls.
* Including land and buildidgs for library.
JNot reported.
ft Not including apparatus, etc., not reported.
* Including land and buildings for police department.




Total.

( h

U)

2,3(
2,369
10,000
80.000
2,000 m 40,000
<*3,000 362,300
<*3,500 m103,500
<*5,500
32,000
4,700
39,700
35,000
285,000

1047

STATISTICS OF CITIES
Table X X IV .—ASSETS (1)—Concluded.
Police department.
Land
and
build­
ings.

Appa­
ratus,
etc.
$600

(b)

(P)

950
<r>
$14,200
1,300
*20,000 *1.5,000
*24,000 *7,000
82,000
(J)
1,000
(f)
1,000
5,212
1,000
m 17,000
1,000
68,775 12,745
*40,000 *9,000

Total.

$600

(*)950
0
15,500
*35,000
*31,000
*82,000
01,000
1,000
6,212
m 18,000
81,520
*49,000

Fire department.
Land
and
build­
ings.
$8,000
91,000
80,332
50,000
38,000
(J)

104,500

*2,463

(*)
0500
(*)
*45,463

41,400
100,774
64,000
162,800
35,500
83,000
*41,100
41,500
91,905

1,906
1,000
2,500
11,800
7,000
/)
500
</)
14,000
1,500
*20,000 *2,000
*7,000 *7,344

(-0
4,439
11,000
26,000
011,800
0 7,000
0 500
15,500
*22,000
*14,344

*33,149
150,000
20,000
r 47,500
v 14,000
34,325
40,050
60,000
30,000

(*>)
/)
(*)
*43,000
V)

2,533
10,000
23,500

(/)

(*)
6oo

(*)

(J)

(J)

Appara­
tus, etc.

Schools.

Total.

Land
and
build­
ings.
$500,000
604,500
705,817
513,780
529,200
400,000
497,500

41,480
15,000
44,050
67,025
30,400
83,710
35,000
50,000
*37,000
30,000
52,472

$18,000
149,274
123,096
79,300
70,000
91,800
145,980
15,000
85,450
167,799
94,400
246,510
70,500
133,000
*78,100
71,500
144,377

i

*37,201
21,782
71,250
43,078
17,000
23,882
55,000
15,000
42,000

* 70,350
171,782
91,250
r 90,578
v 31,000
58,207
95,050
75,000
72,000

$10,000
58,274
42,764
29,300
32,000

(J)

(J)

U)

Appara­
tus, etc.

$40,000
53,500
26,000
24,800
38,000
25,000
U )

610,000
778,711
476,000

■0
15,000
77,000
18,000

724,200
373,000
156,500
230,000
594,730

25,000
70,000
5,000
12,000
30,342

416,820
198,783
570,000
s 600,200
167,000
474,129
335,000
670,000
363,400

8,562
20,000
27,700
s 49,200
5,000
132,000
11,000
30,000
44,240

(J)

V)

(J)

(J)
(J)

Total.

$540,000
658,000
731,817
538,580
567,200
425,000
*497,500
575,000
i 625,000
855,711
494,000
1,005,000
749,200
443,000
161,500
242,000
625,072

I ll
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
U)
425,382
129
218,783
130
597,700
131
s 649,400
132
172,000
133
606,129
134
346,000
135
700,000 . 136
407,640
137

Including land and buildings for jails.
Including police department.
Including cash of school district extending beyond city limits.
p Including 1 fire station and land and buildings for police department and jails.
q Including jails, land and buildings for police department, and 1 fire station.
rNot including 1 fire station, included in land and buildings for city hall.
8 Including property of school district extending beyond city limits.
t Including 1 engine house, markets, and land and buildings for police department and jails,
u Including jails, 1 engine house, markets, and land and buildings for police department.
vNot including 1 engine house, included in land and buildings for city hall.

m

n
o




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

1048

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
T able X X I V —ASSETS (2)—Concluded.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Art galleries, museums, etc.

Libraries.
Cities.

Johnstown, P a .......
Elmira, N .Y ............
Allentown, P a.........
Davenport, Iowa . ..
McKeesport, P a ___
Springfield, 111.........
Chelsea, Mass..........
Chester, P a ..............
York, Pa...................
Malden, Mass..........
Topeka, K a n s.........
Newton. M ass.........
Sioux City, Iowa .. .
Bayonne, N .J .........
Knoxville,Tenn .. .
Schenectady, N. Y ..
Fitchburg, Mass___
Superior, W is..........
Rockford, 111..........
Taunton, Mass.........
Canton, O h io..........
Butte, M o n t............
Montgomery, A la ...
Auburn, N .Y ..........
Chattanooga, T enn.
East St. Louis, 111.. .
Joliet, 111.................

Land and Books,
buildings. apparatus,
etc.

&330,000
55,000

Total.

35.000
57,500
16.000

«5,000
315,827
5 60,300
79,500
dO, 800
26,600

94,400
W

51.668
(ff)
25,000
24,500
50,000

46,^000
(*)
131,000
J 30,000
60,500

i 4,600
t

” 25*666'
‘*85*666

(tf)

25,000
24,500
157,350

**25*666'
30.000
25.000

115,000
25,000

a Included in city hall.
b Building in process of construction.
c Included in police department.
d Included in land and buildings for city hall.
cNot including land and buildings.
/In clu d ed in waterworks.
ffNot reported.
h Not including apparatus, etc., not reported.




Total.

(*)

(*)

(m)

146,068

107,350

Appara­
tus, etc.

5330,000
60,000
c 57,500
62,000

5,000
184,827
30,300
19.000
10,800
12.000

Land and
buildings.

(o)

(?)

1049

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (2)—Concluded.
Parks.
Land and
buildings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

$80,000
il2 '250
45^000
80'000
40,000

Jails.

$500
2,700

(f)

177,000
(g)

150,000
201,667
34,000
(g)

20,000
58,000
5,000
40,000
128,150
(00

20,000
71,750
51,500

40,000
8,000
110,000
30,000
100,000

Total.

4,000
2,000
(/)
(flr)

h

(g)

33,000
(g)

1,000
(0)

100
125
(0)

1,300
1,200
500
5,000

h

$80,500
114' 950
45' 00u
84j 00J
42,000
(/)
177,000
85,000
183,000
201,667
35,000
250,000
20,000
58,000
5,000
40,100
128,275
(0)

20,000
73,050
52,700

40,500
8,000
115,000
30,000
100,000

Land and
build­ Appara­
tus, etc.
ings.

,

(a)
a
(a)
(c)
(c)

(a)
(a)
(a)
(c)

Total.

Workhouses, reformatories,
etc.
Mar­
ginal
num­
Land and Appara­
ber.
build­ tus, etc.
Total.
ings.

(a)
aj
(a)
c
(c)

(»)

(*)

(°)

(0)

(«)

...............
|

(c)
a

(a)

(a)

{P)

(P)

( c)

(c )

«

\p )

(d)
(a)
(a)
(a)

$6,000
(c)
\c)

(00
( P)

$500
( a)

(a)
(a)

(00

{ P)

e$500
(a)
(a)

170
(c )

(a)
6,170
(c)

(c)

(c)

i Included in land and buildings for schools.
j Including land and buildings for art galleries, museums, etc.
fcIncluded in land and buildmgs for libraries.
i Included in other assets.
m included in libraries and other assets.
"Included in land and buildings for police department.
o Included in police department and other assets.
P Included iu fire department.




(0)

Ill
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
12*
12)
131
131
332
131
331
135
136
137

1050

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (3)—Concluded.
Asylums, almshouses, etc.

Hospitals.
Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

Cities.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Johnstown, P a ............
Elmira, N. Y ............... <4143,000
Allentown, Pa..............
Davenport, Io w a .........
McKeesport, P a ..........
Springfield, 111............
Chelsea, Mass..............
1,800
Chester, Pa...................
Y:ork, P a ......................
Malden, Mass...............
Topeka, K an s..............
2,000
Newton. Mass..............
25,000
Sioux City, Io w a .........
Bayonne, N. J ..............
Knoxville, T e n n .........
43,000
Schenectadv, N. Y ___
Fitchburg, Mass.......... 182,400
Superior, Wis...............
(<0
Rockford, 111...............
1,335
Taunton, M ass............
Canton, Ohio...............
500
Butte, M ont.................
Montgomery, A l a .......
4,000
Auburn, N. Y ..............
Chattanooga, Tenn___
43,000
East St. Louis, 111.........
500
Joliet, 111......................

Appara­
tus, etc.

•

Total.

Land
and
build­
ings.

Appara­
tus, etc.

Total.

Docks
and
wharves.

<4143,000
6133

(<0

640,000
4,000

i33
d

1,800
28,500
632,000

500
2,000

2,500
27,000

2,000

201,425
(<0
1,335

638,825

35,000

3,050

38,050

45,000

19,025

66,825

70,000

(c )

150

650

500

4,500

10,000
200

39,500
(<0

5,980
(c )

45,480
(o)

37,500

6,000

43,500

(c)

53,000
700

10,000

Property owned by city; management private.
Including parks.
Not reported.
^Not including apparatus, etc., not reported.
cNot including apparatus, etc., for city hall, police department, schools, parks, and hospitals, not
reported.
a
b
c




1051

STATISTICS OF CITIES,
T able X X IV .—ASSETS (3)—Concluded.

Ferries
and
bridges.

Markets.

$114,900
242,994
40.000
20.000

Bath
houses
and
WaterCeme­
teries. bathing • works.
pools
and
beaches.

Gas
works.

Electriclight
plants.

$58,700
$426,374
$150,000

545,210
51,055,000
488,203

40,000

$103,500

i
1

1,093,881

35,000

68,000

6,300
7,500

152,500
300,000

100,000

75,700
(«)
164,277

(*)

$1,500

31,000
82,000
100,000
180,000

(<)

10,223
(<0

(•)

44,800

1,500

7,500
18,000
20,000

81,000

2,089,285
1,000,000
300,000
896,000
1,101,544
<«)
642,468
1,288,128
646,472
1,024,000
584,122
325,666

(c)

(®)
158.242

Other.

Total
assets.

$45,000 $1,036,656
1,693,615
49,646
1,698,497
1,400
1,228,702
10,000
287,374
2,155,908
7,500
1,977,430
339,561 e 2,708,648
30,079
942,980
27,700
991,168
169,424 / 3,451,100
012,300
1,143,618
25.000
6,304,502
146,500
2,482,128
35.000
1,851,040
51.521
812,468
155,139
1,831,281
140,997
3,358,366
(c )
119)l57
1,491,974
55.521
2,800,992
41,528
1,680,384
36,750 h 1,235,065
76.000
1,608,923
1,000
1,541,780
45.000
870,282
10.000
1,492,428
20,000
1,307,117

/N o t including apparatus, etc., for parks, not reported.
0 Including apparatus, etc., for art galleries, museums, etc., and jails.
h Including cash and property of school district extending beyond city limits.
1 Included in land and buildings for city hall.




Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137

1052

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X V .—PER CAPITA DEBT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND EXPENDI­

TURES FOR MAINTENANCE.
Expenditures for maintenance.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Police
depart­
Assessed ment, in­
Street
valuation cluding
ex­
Mu­
All
Fire
Net
of real
police
pendi­ other
debt.
courts,
de­ Schools. nici­ tures,
and
pal
pur­ Total,
part
jails,
personal
except poses.
light­
property. work- ment.
ing. light­
houses,
ing.
reform­
atories,
etc.

1 New York, N. Y ....... $86.82 « $1,056.93
$3.21 $1.32 b $5.51 $0.76 $2.07 $15.85 $28.72
.50
.92
.26
2 Chicago, 111............... ©20.22
4.56
3.94 12.37
2.19
208.10
.82
.92 d.58
2.49
6.30 14.31
3.20
3 Philadelphia, P a ___ &5.77
690.15
.97
663.52
2.88
1.29
2.57
.99
5.95 14.65
4 St. Louis, M o ............ 30.69
3.77 g 20.49 *38.18
2.24
1.34
2,009.32
/ 5.03
5.31
5 Boston, M ass............ ©82.21
.76 ' 7.45 14.64
.98
2.72
6 Baltimore, Md.......... 59.32
833.35
2.10
.63
.28
3.22
.67
1.37
1.25
7 Cleveland, Ohio....... 37.76
503.73
5.53 12.32
.95
.71
3.14
2.21
1.86
6.98 15.85
i 655.00
8 Buffalo, N. Y ............ 47.94
.86
2.72
3.33
.73
1.48
1,180.29
1.88
7.31 16.83
9 San Francisco, Cal ..
1.03
1.39
1.00
9.52 18.28
631.33
2.03
J3.31
10 Cincinnati, O h io ___ 79.65
.92
1.26
1,055.94
1.47
1.68
8.35 16.21
11 Pittsburg, P a ............ 55.76
2.53
.72
.40
12 New Orleans, L a ___ 59.68
.89
1.59
485.58
.90
9.83 14.33
*1.70
2.90
5.22 *13.52
1.86
13 Detroit, M ich............ 16.28
824.16
1.84
1.15
5.32 12.55
2.57
555.38
1.53
.71
14 Milwaukee, Wis....... 23.06
1.27
1.92 ©7.58 ol8.77
4.12 m . 86
1 672.13
3.36
.93
15 Washington, D. C___ 49.25
1.84
1.25
3.26
.85 *.55
16 Newark, N .J ............ 58.05
621.90
7.20 *14.95
17 Jersey City, N .J ....... 75.88
1.13
2.34
.76 J>1.04 q 9.61 *16.85
447.63
1.97
577.21
1.07
.70 ©1.20 35.78 12.91
18 Louisville, K y .......... 38.76
1.77
2.39
1.04
.74
1.55
3.51
19 Minneapolis, M inn.. 31.83
486.73
1.19
5.99 14.02
2.12
1.99
4.16
1.63 *1.64
20 Providence, R. I ....... 78.82
1,083.16
7.93 *19.47
.68
21 Indianapolis, Ind___ 22.20
.62
9.35
.99
3.06
3.11
707.86
.89
.94
3.22
22 Kansas City, Mo....... 8 3o. 22
1.44
.45
462.47
8.27 15.95
1.63
1.05 *6.18 * 13.91
3.44
.79
23 St. Paul, M inn.......... 50.77
511.51
1.30
1.18
1.42
1.47
1.11 10.56 19.05
24 Rochester, N. Y ......... 60.27
684.99
1.26
3.23
.66
1.08
1.11'
4.85
25 Denver, C o lo ............ 13.49
959.74
4.57 13.50
1.23
.52
.78
26 Toledo, O h io ............ 46.21
427.07
.78,
2.66
4.88 10.50
.88
1.11 1
2.73
.54
27 Allegheny, Pa.......... 50.35
1.04
6.91 12.33
730.86
1.39 ©3.21 w10.92
.57
28 Columbus, O h io....... 40.83
1.37,
3.18
494.45
1.20
2.58
1.24
1.38
1.01
29 Worcester, Mass....... 45.90
944.45
4.28
9.05 19.54
.93 ©1.51 w 10.55 19.13
30 Syracuse, N. Y .......... 76.14
725.87
1.46
3.42
1.26
1.33
3.42
.78
888.42
1.28
4.21 12.98
1.96
31 New Haven, C onn... 34.14
.73
32 Paterson, N .J .......... 36.46
1.12
1.19
2.91
.81
456.39
4.66 11.42
33 Fall River, Mass....... *34.76
1.15
3.05
.93 ©1.48 t©7.17 15.08
696.77
1.30
.60
1.55
34 St. Joseph, Mo.......... 16.59
.67
244.90
.68
5.24
8.74
.61
1.07!
3.57
35 Omaha, Nebr............ 59.89
330.67
.93
.73
6.22 13.13
36 Los Angeles, Cal....... 10.41
1.14
4.52
1.76
667.07
.65
1.19
4.13 13.39
1.20
37 Memphis, Tenn......... 1/30.14
.93
1.31
.46
352.30
.95
3.66
8.51
.65
226.74
.45
38 Scranton, P a ............ 10.25
.56
3.06
.60
2.08
7.40
0 Including $0.32 liable for taxes for State purposes only, $58.97 franchises, and $81.37 exempt from
taxes for State purposes.
b Including $0.06 for College of City of New York and $0.05 for Normal College.
c Including $2.31 special assessment bonds against private property.
dNot including $0.12 expended by street railway company and $0.01 expended by board of directors
of trust funds.
e Including net county debt.
/Inclu din g $1.90 expended by county.
(/Including $0.22 expended by county.
h Including $2.12 expended by county.
1 Including $36.21 special franchises.
i Including $0.45 for University of Cincinnati.
* Not including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
l Not including $4.86 gross receipts of street railways taxed at the rate of 4 per cent.
wNot including expenditures by United States Government for lightingof public parks and spaces.
nIncluding expenditures by United States Government for waterworks, but not including $2 paid
out of sinking fund.
©Including expenditures by United States Government for waterworks, but not including expend­
itures by United States Government for lighting of public parks and spaces, and $2 paid out of sink­
ing fund.
P Including expenditures for garbage removal, but not including expenditures for street sprinkling,
paid for by property owners.
q Not including expenditures for garbage removal included in street expenditures.
r Including expenditures for garbage removal.
8 Including $7.05 park certificates of indebtedness.
t Not including $0.44 paid out of sinking fund.
uNot including $2.59 paid out of sinking fund.
©Includiug expenditures for sewers.
wNot including expenditures for sewers included in street expenditures.
* Including $0.82 trust funds carried by city as floating debt.
1
/Including $0.56 market-house bonds secured by mortgage on market house, and $2,33 park bonds
secured by mortgage on park property.




1053

STATISTICS OF CITIES,

T able X X V .— PER CAPITA DEBT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND EXPENDI­

TURES FOR MAINTENANCE—Continued.
Expenditures for maintenance.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80

Cities.

Net
debt.

Lowell, M ass............
Albany, N . Y ............
Cambridge, M ass___
Portland, O r e g .........
Atlanta, Ga...............
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Dayton, O h io............
Richmond, Va..........
Nashville, T e n n .......
Seattle, Wash............
Hartford, C onn.........
Reading, P a ..............
Wilmington, D e l ___
Camden, N. J ............
Trenton, N .J ............
Bridgeport, Conn___
Lynn, Mass...............
Oakland, C a l............
Lawrence, M ass.......
New Bedford, Mass. .
Des Moines, Iowa___
Springfield, Mass___
Somerville, M ass___
Troy, N .Y .................
Hoboken, N .J ..........
Evansville, Ind .........
Manchester, N. H ___
Utica, N .Y .................
Peoria, 111 ..................
Charleston, S. C.........
Savannah, G a ..........
Salt Lake City,Utah.
San Antonio, T ex ___
Duluth, Minn............
Erie, P a ....................
Elizabeth, N .J..........
Wilkesbarre, P a ___
Kansas City, Kans. . .
Harrisburg, P a .........
Portland, M e ............
Yonkers, N .Y ............
Norfolk, V a...............

$32.73
«31.69
67.76
f t 59.97
35.85
19.61
33.24
71.85
43.14
ft69.46
57.33
17.33
28.44
33.21
34.08
21.30
49.61
J5.88
29.25
49.32
17.16
33.80
27.73
27.69
21.85
35.17
26.17
11.45
12.90
58.43
50.88
60.45
44.16
105.30
13.08
58.15
11.40
47.42
20.77
26.11
69.03
79.44

Police
depart­
Assessed ment, in­
Street
valuation cluding
Mu­
ex­
of real
police
Fire
All
nici­ pendi­ other
and
courts,
de­ Schools. pal tures,
personal
pur­ Total.
jails,
part­
light­ except poses.
property.
work- ment.
ing. light­
houses,
ing.
reform­
atories,
etc.
$754.72
694.69
1,022.67
461.28
608.54
631.12
504.05
773.02
476.95
477.57
733.33
535.89
557.77
358.18
449.36
821.26
745.26
589.66
625.46
977.45
202.58
1,143.68
849.20
758.42
462.66
437.64
548.54
1 564.73
206.51
269.38
638.57
580.90
554.29
445.90
357.41
330.71
348.80
v 211.81
514.71
888.74
749.24
508.95

$1.44
1.63
1.37
.63
1.51
1.04
1.13
1.18
1.16
1.06
1.56:
.631!
1.08
1.23
1.21
1.00
1.15
.97
ftl.00
1.72
.79
fcl. 04
1.04
1.55
1.83
.88
.84
.76 :
1.31 1
1.38|
1.41
.80 ,
.85
.99
.59
.99
.70
1.06
.56
.82
1.74
1.12

$1.25
1.42
.97
.85
1.25
1.29
.83
1.01
1.10
1.08
1.42
.51
.47
1.08
.97
.98
1.38
1.02
.92
1.19
1.15
1.50
1.02
.86
1.36
1.00
1.54
1.30
1.04
.74
1.24
.74
.79
1.57
.96
.47
.69
.74
.36
1.17
.95
.84

$3.49 «
2.94
4.67
2.86
1.77
3.20
3.54
1.35
2.09
2.93
4.72
2.59
2.49
3.03
t-2.96
2.34
3.40
3.99
2.86
3.56
3.89
5.53
4.64!
1
2.86
3.06
2.91 1
2.18
2.92
3.32
m . 12,
(P)

4.56
1.95 i
4.32
2.51
2.30
2.77
2.14
2.87
2.68
4.06
1.07

$0.98 $0.98
.79
.90
.77
2.30
.53
.53
.80 c*l. 00
e.59
.42
.59
.37
1.00
.58 / . 78
.37
.53
.72
2.32
.85 e.70
.65
.58
1.05
.55
.74
e .4 l
1.17
.73
1.57
.76
.74
.85
.77
.56
.79 «1.08
.39
.71
1.03 ; 2.06
.92
1.56
1.67
1.11
.45
.29
.47
*47
1.02
1.03
.52
1.08
.59
.58
.42
.51
.93
.59
.54
1.03
1
1.70
.42
.91
.32
.68 .
.41 s.49
.77
.74
.54
.61
.72
.61
.72 <?1.28
.95
.78 j
.30! u»1.46

$6.68
6.84
12.85
4.81
<*6.06
4.77
3.97
8.81
fir 4.41
6.48
7.12
3.15
3.28
3.52
4.37
3.95
9.15
2.18
6.36
7.08
3.68
6.73
7.15
5.48
6.60
4.22
4.33
4.62
4.74
«5 .10
5.78
5.95
r2.24
9.76
2.99
* 3.97
Ml. 49
5.00
3.03
6.68
7.78
.*10.55

$14.82
14.52
22.93

10.21

12.39
el0.89
10.48
13.72

10.12

12.45

10.
e lO .

12.
el5.
10.
17.
16.
9.
10.
11.
11.
o 8.
a 9.

7.16
10.09
8.15
e 13.35
16.26
15.34

a Including $6.75 certificates of indebtedness against private property,
ftIncluding $3.52 improvement bonds against private property.
c Not including expenditures for street cleaning ana sprinkling included in expenditures for all
other purposes.
d Including expenditures for street cleaning and sprinkling.
eNot including expenditures for street sprinking paid for by property owners.
/ Not including expenditures for street cleaning included in expenditures for all other purposes.
g Including expenditures for street cleaning.
ft Including $5.90 local-improvement bonds against private property.
*Data are for 16 months.
iN ot including $0.34 in litigation.
ft Not including police courts, jails, workhouses, reformatories, etc., supported by county,
in c lu d in g $16.63 franchises.
»»Not including $1.07 expended by State and county,
nIncluding 80.02 contributed to Jacksonville fund.
o Including $0.02 contributed to Jacksonville fund, but not including $1.07 expended by State and
county for schools.
p Supported by State and county.
a Not including amount expended by State and county for schools,
r Not including $2.14 paid out of sinking fund.
s Including expenditures for parks.
t Not including expenditures for parks, included in street expenditures.
«N ot including expenditures for street cleaning and sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
v Not including $14.06, railroad property.
w Including expenditures for garbage removal.
1
a Not including expenditures for garbage removal included in street expenditures,
:

9398— N o. 42 — 02------12



1054

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

T able X X V —PER CAPITA DEBT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND EXPENDI­
TURES FOR MAINTENANCE—Continued.
Expenditures for maintenance.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

Net
debt.

Assessed
valuation
of real
and
personal
property.

Police
depart­
ment, in­
Street
cluding
Mu­
ex­
All
Fire
police
nici­ pendi­ other
de­ Schools. pal tures,
courts,
pur­ Total.
part­
jails,
light­ except poses.
work- ment.
ing. light­
houses,
ing.
reform­
atories,
etc.

$265.90
$3.74 $0.48 «$0.52 $2.38 a $8.80
81 Waterbury, Conn___ $31.06
$0.96 $0.72
8.60 16.63
.70
.63
1.02
4.14
839.11
1.54
82 Holyoke, Mass.......... 34.55
7.13
2.27
.57
.38
472.85
2.19
.63
1.09
83 Fort Wayne, I n d ___ 612.04
8.32
2.68
.59
.48
384.27
2.91
.95
.71
84 Youngstown, Ohio .. 14.69
13.73
.44
1.17
7.28
550.69
2.50
1.06
1.28
85 Houston, T ex............ c 63.21
.46 d . 84 e5.56 10.82
544.96
1.06
2.13
.77
86 Covington, K y.......... 47.84
8.35
.24
2.15
453.88
.60
.77
3.69
.90
87 Akron, Ohio.............. 42.38
9.34
.72
4.39
479.70
1.85
.48
.90
1.00
88 Dallas, T ex ............... 34.59
9.31
3.50
.79
.40
481.79
3.16
.79
.67
89 Saginaw, M ich ......... 28.84
1.97 a 6.01
2.14
.66 a . 48
410.49
.39
.37
90 Lancaster, P a .......... 17.00
3.82 / 8.24
.32 / .24
473.88
.41
2.77
.68
91 Lincoln,Nebr............ 42.65
6.32 14.94
2.28
674.84
.77
3.31
.97
92 Brockton, Mass......... 45.28
1.29
3.73 10.81
.76
3.82
468.49
1.10
.75
.65
93 Binghamton, N. Y . .. 17.50
6.87 ft10.53
.23
.69
486.06
94 Augusta, Ga.............. 48.10
1.56
1.29
(flO
8.95 16.35
.82 »!■ 16
872.33
3.32
1.15
95 Pawtucket, R. I ....... 100.93
.95
*•
6.88
2.74
.45
.41
433.75
2.22
.46
.60
96 Altoona, P a .............. 24.31
6.20 10.97
.27
608.97
1.08
1.06
2.36
97 Wheeling, W. V a....... 14.23
3.07 ft 5.99
424.28
1.02
.81
.62
.47
98 Mobile, Ala............... *22.59
(i)
m .64
.42 a . 73 «5.31 o9.48
431.60
1.45
.93
99 Birmingham, Ala . . . *62.47
1.23 a 4.79
a . 28
1.84
473.33
.75
.69
100 Little Rock. A r k ___ JP4.51
451.13
.91 <*1.20 c3.73 10.19
.85
.69
2.81
101 Springfield, Ohio___ 23.47
a. 89 r 8.68 16.29
3.44
102 Galveston, T e x ......... 111.22
765.27
1.43
1.85
.67 10.56 17.46
539.46
.95
1.18
4.10
103 Tacoma, Wash.......... sllO. 69
7.49 15.49
1.51
.99
104 Haverhill, Mass....... 37.85
707.86
1.32
.89
3.29
6.11 13.68
.63
515.40
.28
105 Spokane, W ash......... t 71.02
1.05
1.68
3.93
3.65 10.04
.56
523.02
.69
106 Terre Haute, Ind ___ w7.96
.78
1.00
3.46
3.27 a9.10
.64 «1.06
633.98
.74
107 Dubuque, Iowa......... 40.92
2.53
.86
7.27
2.79
.33
.52
148.16
108 Quincy, 111............... 25.63
.70
.75
2.18
2.63 «7.17
386.09
1.92
.46 a . 88
.49
.79
109 South Bend, I n d ___ t’17.60
7.37 15.24
1.02
1.56
776.52
110 Salem, Mass.............. W18.67
.97
3.26
1.06
5.58
1.47
.33
.46
111 Johnstown, P a ......... 10.98
351.58
.46
.25
2.61
.94
4.93 12.91
x 472.41
1.02
112 Elmira, N. Y ............ 31.04
3.57
.96
1.49
6.48
2.15
.32
.55
609.48
.36
.52
2.58
113 Allentown, Pa.......... 20.23
9.39
2.81
.80
4.11
.26
.72
114 Davenport, Io w a ___ 1/12.92
476.56
.69
9.19
3.54
.48
.55
115 McKeesport, P a ....... 16.51
478.38
2.80
.93
.89
3.98 10.42
.61
185.15
2.94
.63
116 Springfield, 111......... 28.37
1.02
1.24
1.19 11.23 18.71
666.71
3.531 .79
117 Cnelsea, Mass.......... 34.19
.99
.98
a Not including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
&Not including street-improvement bonds.
e Not including $2.36 in litigation.
d Including expenditures for garbage removal.
cNot including expenditures for garbage removal included in street expenditures.
/N o t including $0.14, value of work performed by citizens in lieu of payment of poll tax in cash.
0 $2.29 expended by State and county.
ftNot including $2.29 expended by State and county for schools.
1Including $1.68 street-improvement bonds, but not including $57.77 debt of old city placed in hands
of trustee on reorganization of city.
j$1.18 expended by State and county.
ft Not including $1.18 expended by State and county for schools.
i Not including $1.77 improvement bonds to be paid from improvement assessments.
m Not including $0.60 expended by State and county, but including expenditures for libraries, art
galleries, museums, etc.
n Not including expenditures for libraries, art galleries, museums, etc., included in expenditures
for schools.
oNot including $0.60 expended by State and county for schools and expenditures for street
sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
jpNot including the bonded indebtedness of 22 special-improvement districts for which no report is
made to the city.
g Not including expenditures for street cleaning included in expenditures for all other purposes.
r Including expenditures for street cleaning.
* Including $3.09 local-improvement bonds against private property.
t including $6.24 special-assessment bonds and warrants against private property.
«N ot including $2.18, local-improvement bonds.
v Including $11.23, street and sewer improvement bonds, held against private property.
wNot including $4.64, trust and endowment funds, regarded as a liability by the city,
a Including $18.97, franchises
y Including $2.30, improvement bonds secured by abutting property.




1055

STATISTICS OP CITIES,

T able X X V .—PER CAPITA DEBT, ASSESSED VALUATION OF PROPERTY, AND EXPENDI­

TURES FOR MAINTENANCE—Concluded.
Expenditures for maintenance.

Mar­
ginal
num­
ber.

Cities.

118 Chester, Pa................
119 York, P a ..................
120 Malden, M ass..........
121 Topeka, Kans..........
122 Newton, Mass..........
123 Sioux City, Io w a ___
124 Bayonne, N. J ..........
125 Knoxville, T e n n ___
126 Schenectady, N. Y ..
127 Fitchburg, Mass.......
128 Superior, Wis............
129 Rockford, 111............
130 Taunton, Mass.........
131 Canton, Ohio............
132 Butte, M ont..............
133 Montgomery, Ala . . .
134 Auburn, N. Y ............
135 Chattanooga, T enn..
136 East St. Louis, 111___
137 Joliet, 111...................

Police
depart­
Assessed ment^ in­
Street
valuation cluding
Mu­
ex­
Net
of real
police
Fire
debt.
and
courts,
de­ Schools. nici­ pendi­
pal tures,
personal
part­
jails,
light­ except
property.
work- ment.
ing. light­
houses,
ing.
reform­
atories,
etc.
$23.77
12.30
46.47
31.92
115.57
f62.55
52.96
40.85
29.66
45.46
40.66
15.50
45.98
30.40
©*18.56
64.75
18.56
29.11
29.16
6.15

$426.83
485.69
791.79
c 284.06
1,633.53
164.74
420.06
350.41
370.89
751.05
483.92
192.69
686.47
384.68
612.55
402.54
P 402.91
427.49
154.40
119.41

$0.71
.56
.98
.80
1.94
.69
1.21
.65
.56
1.06
.88
.54
1.32
.81
2.12
1.26
.61
1.02
1.01
.89

$0.45
.38
.99
.82
1.55
.84
.40
.66
.53
.95
1.17
.86
.88
1.11
1.22
.86
.59
1.10
.78
.91

$2.66
©2.09
4.62
2.97
5.43
3.47
3.96
1.49
1.46
3.39
3.74
3.13
3.73
3.34
©5.56
1.12
2.29
1.47
2.29
2.05

$0.64
.63
.87
1.59
.49
.90
.71
.62
.96
.38
.63
.26
.78
.72
.61
.86
3.20
.46
.51

$0.38
.43
2.08
.95
4.62
31.19
.40
J. 50
.53
1.58
.58
.83
31.33
.07
1.76
.64
3.76
.78
1.13
1.09

All
other Total
pur­
poses.

a$1.98
dl.44
6.91
3.84
13.58
ft3.49
7.10
*3.45
3.38
7.23
6.02
2.70
7.38
3.91
«4.65
6.49
3.09
3.70
3.27
1.98

5$6.82
5.53
16.45
9.38
28.71
i 10.17
13.97
1 7.46
7.08
15.17
12.77
8.69
314.90
10.02
w16.03
©10.98
3 8.20
8.27
8.94
7.43

Not including $0.39 paid out of sinking fund.
Not including $0.39 paid out of sinking fund, but including $0.16 paid out of sinking fund which
can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
c Including expenditures for libraries, art galleries, museums, etc.
dNot including expenditures for libraries, art galleries, museums, etc., included in expenditures
for schools.
e Not including $10.85, railroad property.
/In clu d in g $8.22, improvement bonds secured by abutting property.
i/Not including expenditures for street sprinkling, paid for by property owners.
ftNot including $2.24 paid out of sinking fund.
i Not including $2.24 paid out of sinking fund and expenditures for street sprinkling paid for by
property owners.
j Including expenditures for construction and other capital outlay for sewers; also expenditures
for sewers and garbage removal.
*Not including expenditures for sewers and garbage removal included in street expenditures.
i Including expenditures for construction and other capital outlay for sewers.
m Including debt of school district extending beyond city limits,
n Including expenditures of school district extending beyond city limits.
©Including unpaid warrants which can not be traced to the various items of expenditure.
P Including $11.44, franchises,
a For 4 months only.
a

b




LABOE CONDITIONS IN CUBA.
N E W L A W R E L A T IN G TO R A IL R O A D EM PLO YEES.
In connection with the article on “ Labor conditions in Cuba” in the
last number o f the Bulletin, that fo r July, 1902, on pages 752 and 753,
mention was made o f the railroad law promulgated in February, 1902,
and two sections o f the law giving provisions which relate to railroad
employees were quoted. This was the law in force at the time the
article was prepared for the Bulletin by the author. On A pril 28,
1902, too late to come to the attention o f Dr. Clark, a new order was
promulgated b y the military governor, General W ood, revoking that
portion o f the law entitled “ Criminal Law Affecting Railroads,” which
included the two sections referred to above as quoted, and in place
thereof substituting provisions differing in many important particulars.
The two sections o f the present law which relate especially to employees
o f railroads are as follows:
X I . Everyone is guilty o f a crime and liable to p rision correccional
in its minimum degree (imprisonment from six months, one day to two
years and four months), who by any act willfully obstructs or inter­
rupts, or causes to be obstructed or interrupted, the construction,
maintenance or free use o f any railway or any part thereof, or any
matter or thing appertaining thereto or connected therewith. But
nothing in this order shall lim it the right o f employees either individ­
ually or collectively to leave the service o f the company except while
in train service between stations as provided in article X V I I I o f this
chapter.
X V III . A ll railroad employees whose labor is essential to the oper­
ation o f railroads, who abandon their posts while on train service
between stations, without notice and without giving sufficient time to
have others substituted in their place and duties, shall be guilty o f a
crime, punishable by arresto m ayor (imprisonment o f one month and
one day to six months) and shall be liable fo r injuries occasioned by
such act to the punishment prescribed in the Penal Code.
1056




AGREEMENTS BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES.
[It is the purpose of this Departm ent to publish from tim e to tim e im portant
agreements made between large bodies o f em ployers and em ployees w ith regard to
wages, hours of labor, etc. The Department would be pleased to receive copies of
such agreements whenever m ade.]

BITUM INOUS C O A L MINING.
Indianapolis Interstate Agreem ent f o r Seale Tear B eginning A p ril 1,

im .

I n d ia n a p o l is , I n d ., February 8, 190%.
In pursuance o f the instructions from the joint convention, we hereby
reaffirm last year’s scale for the year beginning A pril 1,1902, and end­
ing A pril 1, 1903.

Operators.

M iners.

THIN-VEIN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA.

G.
O.

W. Schluederberg.
A . Blackburn.

P. Dolan.
William Dodds.
OHIO.

Jno. H. Winder.
W . J. Mullins.

W . H. Haskins.
D. H. Sullivan.
BLOCK DISTRICT OF INDIANA.

J. H. McClelland.
W . W . Risher.

William Wilson.
Harry W right.

BITUMINOUS DISTRICT OF INDIANA.

Jno. K. Seifert.
Hugh Shirkie.

W . D. Van Horn.
J. H. Kennedy.
ILLINOIS.

H. N. Taylor.
W . W . Keefer.

W . R. Russell.
W. D. Ryan.

In behalf o f the United M ine Workers o f A m erica:

Attest:
W . B. W ilson, Secretary.

John Mitchell.
T. L. Lewis.
W . B. Wilson.

The follow ing is a copy o f the Indianapolis interstate agreement for
the scale year ending A pril 1,1901, which is reaffirmed above:
I t is hereby agreed:
S e c t io n I. (a) That an advance o f fourteen (14) cents per ton o f two
thousand (2,000) pounds for pick-mined screened coal shall take effect
in western Pennsylvania thin vein, the H ocking, the basing district
o f Ohio, and the block-coal district o f Indiana.



1057

1058

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

(b) That the Danville district, the basing point of Illinois, shall be
continued on an absolute run-of-mine basis, and that an advance of
nine (9) cents per ton over present prices be paid in the district named.
(c) That the bituminous-coal district o f Indiana shall pay forty-nine
(49) cents per ton fo r all mine-run coal loaded and shipped as such. A ll
other coal mined in that district shall be passed over a regulation
screen and be paid fo r at the rate o f eighty (80) cents per ton o f two
thousand (2,000) pounds for screened lump.
Sec. II. That the screen hereby adopted for the State o f Ohio, west­
ern Pennsylvania, and the bituminous district o f Indiana shall be uni­
form in size, six (6) feet wide by twelve (12) feet long, built o f flat or
Akron-shaped bar, o f not less than five-eighths ( f ) o f an inch surface,
with one and one-fourth (14) inches between bars, free from obstruc­
tions, and that such screens shall rest upon a sufficient number o f bear­
ings to hold the bars in proper position.
Sec. III. That the block-coal district o f Indiana may continue the
use o f the diamond-bar screen, the screen to be seventy-two (72) feet
superficial area, o f uniform size, one and one-quarter (14 ) inches
between the bars, free from obstruction, and that such screens shall
rest upon a sufficient number of bearings to hold the bars in proper
position.
Sec. IY . That the differential between the thick and thin vein pick
mines o f the Pittsburg district be referred to that district for settle­
ment.
Sec. Y . (a) That the price o f machine mining in the bituminous dis­
trict o f Indiana shall be eighteen (18) cents per ton less than the pick­
mining rate fo r screened lump coal when punching machines are used,
and twenty-one and one-half (214 ) cents per ton less than pick-mining
rate when chain machines are used.
W hen coal is paid for on run-of-mine basis the price shall be ten
(10) cents per ton less than the pick-mining rate when punching
machines are used, and twelve and one-half (124) cents per ton less
than pick-mining rates when chain machines are used.
(b) That the machine-mining rate in the Danville district, the bas­
ing point o f Illinois, on both punching and chain machines, be thirtynine (39) cents per ton.
Sec. V I. That the mining rate in the thin vein o f the Pittsburg
district, and the Hocking, the basing district of Ohio, for shooting,
cutting, and loading, shall be advanced nine (9) cents per ton, and
that the block-coal district o f Indiana shall be advanced eleven and
one-half (114) cents per ton.
Sec. V II. That the mining rates in the central district o f Pennsyl­
vania be referred to that district for adjustment.
Sec. V III. That the advance on inside day labor be twenty per cent
(20%), based on the present Hocking Valley scale, with the exception
o f trappers, whose compensation shall be one dollar ($1.00) per day.
Sec. IX . That all narrow dead work and room turning shall be
paid a proportionate advance with the pick-mining rate.
Sec. X . That internal differences in any o f the States or districts,
both as to prices or conditions, shall be referred to the States or dis­
tricts affected fo r adjustment.
Sec. X I . The above scale is based upon an eight (8) hour workday.
The f oregoing scale, having been unanimously adopted by the Inter­



AGREEMENTS BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES.

1059

state Convention o f Miners and Operators, at Indianapolis, Indiana,
on February 2,1900, in witness hereof we hereto attach our signatures.
In behalf o f operators:

In behalf o f m iners:

F or Pennsylvania—
F. L . Robbins.
W m. B. Rodgers.
F or Ohio—
J. S. Morton.
W alter J. Mullins.
F or bituminous district o f
Indiana—
J. Smith Talley.
A . M. Ogle.
For block-coal district o f
Indiana—
W . W . Risher.
M. H. Johnson.
F or Illinois—
E. T. Bent.
Chas. E. Hull.

F or Pennsylvania—
P. Dolan.
Wm. Dodds.
F or Ohio—
W . H. Haskins.
T. L. Lewis.
For block-coal district of
Indiana—
W illiam Wilson.
Barney Navin.
For bituminous district of
Indiana—
W . D. Van Horn.
J. H. Kennedy.
F or Illinois—
John M. Hunter.
W. D. Ryan.

In behalf o f the U. M . W. o f A .:
John Mitchell, President.
W . C. Pearce, Secretary.
Illin o is State Agreem ent f o r Scale Year Ending M arch 31, 1903.
Whereas a contract between the operators o f the competitive coal
fields o f Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois and the United
Mine W orkers o f America has been entered into at the city o f Indian­
apolis, Indiana, February 8,1902, by which the present scale o f prices at
the basic points, as fixed by the agreement made in Indianapolis, Indiana,
February 2, 1900, is continued in force and effect for one year from
A pril 1, 1902, to March 31, 1903, inclusive; and
Whereas this contract fixes the pick-mining price o f bituminous
mine-run coal at Danville at forty-nine cents per ton of two thousand
pounds: Therefore, be it
Resol/oed, That the prices for pick-mined coal throughout the State
for one year, beginning A pril 1, 1902, shall be as follows:
FIRST DISTRICT.

Streator, Cardiff, Clarke City, and associated mines, including
Toluca thick v e in ___________________________ - ........... ....... $0. 58
Third vein and associated mines, including twenty-four inches
o f b ru sh in g ........................ ......................... ................. ....................76
Wilmington and associated mines, including Cardiff long wall
and Bloomington thin vein, including brushing__________
.81
Bloomington thick vein------------ ------------- -- -------------- ----------.71
Pontiac, including twenty-four inches o f b ru sh in g _________
.81
Pontiac top v e in ______________________________ __________ _
.58
Marseilles........ ......... ....................... ........................... - - ...............
1. 09



1060

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

(Rate at Marseilles to continue until September 1, 1902, at
which time the conditions are to be investigated by Presi­
dent Russell and Commissioner Justi, and if conditions are
changed, as now contemplated, an equitable adjustment shall
be made.)
Morris and Seneca (referred to a committee composed of
Commissioner Justi and two operators and President Rus­
sell and two miners to fix mining prices, which shall become
a part o f this contract; the same to be considered before
May 1, 1902).
(For settlement at Morris, see Morris local agreement.)
Clarke City lower seam, brushing in coal___________________ $0. 66
SECOND DISTRICT.

Danville, Westville, Grape Creek, and associated mines in
Yermilion County_______

.49

THIRD DISTRICT.

Springfield and associated mines__________ ____ ___________
Lincoln and N iantic_____ __________________________________
C o lfa x ___________ ______ ___ ______________ _________ _

. 497
.53
.53

FOURTH DISTRICT.

Mines on C. & A. south o f Springfield, to and including Carlinville; including Taylorville, Pana, Litchfield, Hillsboro,
W itt (Paisley), Divernon, and P aw nee________ _______ ___
Assumption long wall, under present regulations___________
Moweaqua room and pillar_________________________________
Mount Pulaski room and pillar_____________________________
Decatur, present conditions______________________ ___
.

.49
. 65£
.53
.66
.64

FIFTH DISTRICT.

Glen Carbon, Belleville, and associated mines, to and includ­
ing Pinckneyville, W illisville, and Nashville.__________ _
Coal five feet and u n d e r........................................ ................... .

.49
.54

SIXTH DISTRICT.

DuQuoin, Odin, Sandoval, Centralia, and associated mines __
Salem and Kim m undy........ ......... ........................... ............... ... _

.45
.50

SEVENTH DISTRICT.

Mount Y ernon______________
Jackson C o u n t y ____________
(All coal five feet and under, five cents extra per ton; this not
to apply to lower bench, nor rolls or horsebacks.)
Lower bench, Jackson County, for shipping mines, miners to
carry fourteen inches brushing. . ______ _______ ___________
Saline C o u n ty _______________________________
Williamson County_____ - . . . ___________ _____________
Gallatin County (price to be determined by Thomas Jeremiah
and Commissioner Justi and become a part o f this contract).



.50
.45

.58
.45
.42

AGREEMENTS BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES.

1061

EIGHTH DISTRICT.

Fulton and Peoria counties, thin or lower vein (third vein
conditions)_____________ _ ___________ _____ _____________ $0.
Fulton and Peoria counties, No. 5 vein...... .......................... ..
Astoria, No. 5 vein (Fulton and Peoria counties conditions) _ _
Pekin (price o f sixty cents per ton continued under provisions
similar to those in State agreement for year ending A pril
1, 1902, viz, price o f sixty cents per ton, with Fulton and
Peoria counties conditions to be in force for ninety days
from A pril 1, 1902, during which time a record is to be
kept to determine cost o f removing dirt, etc. Should this
rate be found to work a hardship, it shall be readjusted; if
it transpires that it is equitable, it shall continue during the
life o f this agreement. It is understood that the Pekin
operators and delegates will determine by what method the
readjustment shall be considered).
Fulton and Peoria counties, No. 6 vein (referred to a com­
mittee composed o f Commissioner Justi and two operators
and President Russell and two miners, to fix a mining price,
which shall become a part o f this contract; the present rate
o f fifty-nine cents per ton to continue in force pending
adjustment by said committee. The same to be considered
before May 1, 1902).
Gilchrist, W anlock, Cable, Sherrard, and Silvis mines, sixty
cents per ton, with last year’s conditions. In case o f defi­
cient work, where miner and mine manager can not agree
as to compensation, the mine committee shall be called in;
and if they can not agree, the dispute shall be carried up
under the thirteenth clause o f the present scale.
Kewanee and Etherley............ ....... ................... ............... ...........
Pottstown, No. 1 seam, scale to be the same as Gilchrist and
W anlock, except in the brushing o f the top, that shall be
settled by the subdistrict.

76
.56
.56

.65

NINTH DISTRICT.

Mount Olive, Staunton, Gillespie, Clyde, Sorento, and Coffeen, and mines on the Vandalia line as far east as and includ­
ing Smithboro, and on the B. and O. S. W . as far east as
Breese ............ .. _ ______ __________ ___________ _________ __ _
.49
Coal five feet and u n d e r _______________ ___________ ____________ 54
First. The Indianapolis convention having adopted the mining and
underground day labor scale in effect A pril 1, 1900, as the scale for
the year beginning A pril 1, 1902, no changes or conditions shall be
imposed in the Illinois scale fo r the coming year that increase the cost
o f production o f coal in any district in the State, except as may be
provided.
Second. No scale o f wages shall be made by the United Mine W ork ­
ers fo r mine manager, mine manager’s assistant, top foreman, com­
pany weighman, boss drivers, night boss, head machinist, head
boiler maker, head carpenter, night watchman, hoisting engineers, it
being understood that “ assistant” shall apply to such as are author­
ized to act in that capacity only. The authorit}7 to hire and discharge
shall be vested in the mine manager, top foreman, and boss driver.



1062

BULLETIN

of the department of labor.

It is further understood and agreed that the night watchman shall be
exempt when employed in that capacity only.
Third. A n y operator paying the scale rate o f mining and day labor
under this agreement snail at all times be at liberty to load any rail­
road cars whatever, regardless o f their ownership, with coal, and sell
and deliver such coal in any market and to any person, firm, or cor­
poration that he may desire.
Fourth. The scale o f prices for mining per ton of 2,000 pounds runof-mine coal herein provided for is understood in every case to be for
coal free from slate, bone, and other impurities, loaded in cars at the
face, weighed before screening; and that the practice o f pushing coal
by the miners shall be prohibited.
Fifth, (a) W hether the coal is shot after being undercut or sheared
by pick or machine, or shot without undercutting or shearing, the
miners must drill and blast the coal in accordance with the State min­
ing law o f Illinois, in order to protect the roof and timbers in the
interest o f general safety. I f it can be shown that any miner persist­
ently violates the letter or spirit o f this clause he shall be discharged.
(b) The system o f paying fo r coal before screening was intended to
obviate the many contentions incident to the use o f screens, and was
not intended to encourage unworkmanlike methods o f mining and
blasting coal, or to decrease the proportion o f screened lump, and the
operators are hereby guaranteed the hearty support and cooperation
o i the United Mine W orkers o f America in disciplining any miner
who, from ignorance or carelessness or other cause, fails to properly
mine, shoot, and load his coal.
Sixth. In case slate, bone, clay, sulphur, or other impurities are
sent up with the coal by the miner, it shall be the duty o f whomever
the company shall designate as inspector to report the same, with
the estimated weight thereof, and the miner or miners so offending
shall have such weight deducted from the established weight o f the
car, and for the first offense in any given month shall be fined fifty
cents; fo r the second offense in the same month he or they shall, at
the option o f the operator, be fined two dollars or suspended for two
working days; and fo r the third or any subsequent offense in the same
month, or in malicious or aggravated cases fo r the first or any subse­
quent offense, the operator may indefinitely suspend or discharge.
The company weighman shall post in a conspicuous place at the pit
head the names o f all miners dealt with hereunder.
The inspector designated by the operator shall be a member o f the
U. M. W . o f A ., but in the discharge o f the duties herein specified
shall not be subject to the jurisdiction o f the local union or president
or pit committee, and against any miner or committeeman seeking in
any way to embarrass the inspector in or because o f the discharge o f
such duties the provisions o f the miners’ State constitution shall be
invoked, and in addition he shall, at the option o f the operator, be
suspended fo r two working days.
In case it shall be alleged by either the local representatives o f the
miners or by the operator that the inspector is not properly perform­
ing his duties hereunder, it shall be so reported to the miners’ sub­
district president, who shall, within forty-eight hours after the receipt
o f notification, take it up with the superintendent o f the company for
adjudication; and if it shall be found that the inspector is not faith­
fully perform ing such duties, he shall be discharged or transferred to
other duties, as the operator may elect.



AGREEMENTS BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES.

1063

The proceeds o f all fines hereunder shall be paid to the miners5 sub­
district secretary-treasurer, and under no circumstances shall any such
fine be remitted or refunded.
Seventh. The miners o f the State o f Illinois are to be paid twice a
month, the dates o f pay to be determined locally, but in no event shall
more than one-half month’s pay be retained by the operator. When
any number o f men at any mine so demand, statements will be issued
to all employees not less than twenty-four hours prior to pay day.
No commissions will be charged for money advanced between pay
days, but any advances between pay days shall be at the option o f the
operator.
Eighth. The price fo r powder per keg shall be $1.75; the miners
agree to purchase their powder from the operators, provided it is fur­
nished o f standard grade and quality, that to be determined by the
operators and expert miners jointly where there is a difference.
Ninth. The price fo r blacksmithing fo r pick mining shall be sixtenths o f a cent per ton for room and pillar work, and twelve and onehalf cents per pay per man, or twenty-five cents per month for long
wall for pick and drill sharpening.
Tenth. It is understood that there is no agreement as to the price
o f oil.
Eleventh. The inside day wage scale authorized by the present
agreement—i. e., the Columbus scale o f 1898, plus an advance o f
twenty per cent—shall be the scale under this agreement; but in no
case snail less than $2.10 be paid for drivers.
Twelfth. The above scale o f mining prices is based upon an eighthour workday, and it is definitely understood that this shall mean eight
hours’ work at the face, exclusive o f noontime, six days a week, or
forty-eight hours in the week, provided the operator desires the mine
to work, and no local ruling shall in any way affect this agreement or
impose conditions affecting the same.
A ny class o f day labor may be paid, at the option of the operator,
fo r the number o f hours and fractions thereof actually worked, at an
hour rate based on one-eighth o f the scale rate per day. Provided,
however, that when the men g o into the mine in the morning they shall
be entitled to two hours’ pay, whether the mine hoists coal two hours
or not, except in the event that they voluntarily leave their work dur­
ing this time without the consent o f the operator they shall forfeit such
two hours’ pay. Provided, further, that overtime by day laborers,
when necessary to supply railroad chutes with coal by night or Sunday,
where no regular men therefor are exclusively employed, or when
necessary in order not to impede the operation o f the mine the day
follow ing, and fo r work which can not be performed or completed by
the regular shift during regular hours without impeding the operation
o f the mine, may be performed and paid for at the same rate per hour.
Thirteenth, (a) The duties o f the pit committee shall be confined to
the adjustment o f disputes between the pit boss and any o f the mem­
bers o f the United Mine W orkers o f America working in and around
the mine, fo r whom a scale is made, arising out o f this agreement or
any subdistrict agreement made in connection herewith, where the pit
boss and said miner or mine laborers have failed to agree.
(b) In case o f any local trouble arising at any shaft through such
failure to agree between the pit boss ana any miner or mine laborer,
the pit committee and the miners’ local president and the pit boss are
empowered to adjust it; and in the case o f their disagreement it shall



1064

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

be referred to the superintendent o f the company and the president of
the miners’ local executive board, where such exists, and shall they fail
to adjust it, and in all other cases, it shall be referred to the superin­
tendent o f the company and the miners’ president of the subdistrict;
and should they fail to adjust it, it shall be referred in writing to the
officials o f the company concerned and the State officials o f the U. M.
W . o f A . for adjustment; and in all such cases the miners and mine
laborers and parties involved must continue at work, pending an
investigation and adjustment, until a final decision is reached in the
manner above set forth.
(< I f any day men refuse to continue at work because o f a griev­
?)
ance which has or has not been taken up for adjustment in the manner
provided herein, and such action shall seem likely to impede the opera­
tion o f the mine, the pit committee shall immediately furnish a man or
men to take such vacant place or places at the scale rate, in order that
the mine may continue at w ork; and it shall be the duty o f any mem­
ber or members o f the United Mine W orkers who may be called upon
by the pit boss or pit committee to immediately take the place or places
assigned to him or them in pursuance hereof.
(a) The pit committee in the discharge o f its duties shall under no
circumstances g o around the mine for any cause whatever, unless called
upon by the pit boss or by a miner or company man who may have a
grievance that he can not settle with the boss; and as its duties are
confined to the adjustment o f any such grievances, it is understood that
its members shall not draw any compensation except while actively
engaged in the discharge o f said duties. A ny pit committeeman who
shall attempt to execute any local rule or proceeding in conflict with
any provision o f this contract, or any other made in pursuance hereof,
shall be forthwith deposed as committeeman. The foregoing shall not
be construed to prohibit the pit committee from looking after the mat­
ter o f membership dues and initiations in any proper manner.
(< Members o f the pit committee employed as day men shall not
e)
leave their places o f duty during working hours, except by permission
o f the operator, or in cases involving the stoppage o f the mine.
{ f ) The right to hire and discharge, the management o f the mine,
and the direction o f the working force are vested exclusively in the
operator, and the U. M. W . o f A . shall not abridge this right. It is
not the intention o f this provision to encourage the discharge o f
employees, or the refusal o f employment to applicants because of
personal prejudice or activity in matters affecting the U. M. W . o f A.
I f any employee shall be suspended or discharged by the company and
it is claimed that an injustice has been done him, an investigation to
be conducted by the parties and in the manner set forth in paragraphs
{a) and (b) o f this section shall be taken up promptly, and, if it i9
proven that an injustice has been done, the operator shall reinstate
said employee and pay him full compensation for the time he has been
suspended and out o f employment; provided, if no decision shall be
rendered within five days, the case shall be considered closed in so far
as compensation is concerned.
Fourteenth. The wages now being paid outside day labor at the
various mines in this State shall constitute the wage scale fo r that
class o f labor during the life o f this agreement; provided, that no top
man shall receive less than $1.80 per day.
Fifteenth. In the event o f an instantaneous death by accident in



AGREEMENTS BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES.

1065

the mine, the miners and underground employees shall have the privi­
lege o f discontinuing work for the remainder o f that day, but work,
at the option o f the operator, shall be resumed the day following, and
continue thereafter. In case the operator elects to operate the mine
on the day of the funeral o f the deceased, as above, or where death
has resulted from an accident in the mine, individual miners and
underground employees may, at their option, absent themselves from
work fo r the purpose of attending such funeral, but not otherwise.
And, in the event that the operator shall elect to operate the mine
on the day o f such funeral, then, from the proceeds o f such day’s
operation, each member o f the U. M. W . o f A . employed at the mine
at which the deceased member was employed shall contribute fifty
cents and the operator $25.00 for the benefit o f the family o f the
deceased or his legal representatives, to be collected through the office
of the company. Except in case o f fatal accidents, as above, the
mine shall in no case be thrown idle because o f any death or funeral;
but in the case o f the death o f any employee o f the company or mem­
ber o f his family, any individual miner may, at his option, absent
himself from work for the sake o f attending such funeral, but not
otherwise.
Sixteenth, (a) The scale o f prices herein provided shall include, in
ordinary conditions, the work required to load coal and properly
timber the working places in the mine, and the operator shall be
required to furnish the necessary props and timber in rooms or work­
ing face. And in long wall mines it shall include the proper mining
o f the coal and the brushing and care o f the working places and road­
way according to the present method and rules relating thereto, which
shall continue unchanged.
(b) I f any miner shall fail to properly timber, shoot, and care for
his working place, and such failure has entailed falls o f slate, rock, and
the like, the miner whose fault has occasioned such damage shall repair
the same without compensation, and if such miner fails to repair such
damage he may be discharged.
A ny dispute that may arise as to the responsibility under this clause
shall be adjusted by the pit committee and mine foreman, and in case
of their failure to agree, shall be taken up for settlement under the
thirteenth section o f this agreement.
In cases where the mine manager directs the placing o f cross-bars
to permanently secure the roadway, then, and in such cases only, the
miner shall be paid at the current price fo r each cross-bar when prop­
erly set.
The above does not contemplate any change from the ordinary
method o f timbering by the miner fo r his own safety.
Seventeenth. The operators will recognize the pit committee in the
discharge o f its duties as herein specified, but not otherwise, and agree
to check off union dues, assessments, and fines from the miners and
mine laborers, when desired, on proper individual or collective con­
tinuous order, and furnish to the miners’ representative a statement
showing separately the total amount o f dues, assessments, and fines
collected. When such collections are made, card days shall be
abolished. In case any fine is imposed, the propriety o f which is
questioned, the amount o f such fine shall be withheld by the operator
until the question has been taken up for adjustment and a decision
has been reached.



1066

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

Eighteenth. The operators shall have the right, in cases o f emer­
gency work or ordinary repairs to the plant, to employ in connection
therewith such men as in their judgment are best acquainted with and
suited to the work to be performed, except where men are perma­
nently employed fo r such work. Blacksmiths and other skilled labor
shall make any necessary repairs to machinery and boilers.
Nineteenth. The erection o f head frames, buildings, scales, machin­
ery, railroad switches, etc., necessary fo r the completion of a plant to
hoist coal, all being in the nature o f construction work, are to be
excluded from the jurisdiction o f the United Mine W orkers o f Am er­
ica. Extensive repairs to or rebuilding the same class of work shall
also be included in the same exception. The employees thereon to be
excluded, as above, when employed on such work only.
Twentieth. W hen any employee absents himself from his work for
a period o f two days, unless through sickness or by first having noti­
fied the mine manager and obtained his consent, he may be discharged.
Twenty-first, (a) Except at the basing point, Danville, the differen­
cial -fnr mardiinp. rmnino* thrrnicrh rn it t.ViP. State o f Illinois shall be Seven
It being understood and
^
o
3lude the snubbing of coal
either by powder or wedge and sledge, as conditions may warrant,
where cnain machine is used; but it is understood that this condition
shall not apply where two men have and work in one place only in the
same shift, except at the option o f the miner; and it shall also be
optional with the miner which system o f snubbing shall be followed.
The division o f the machine mining rate shall be fixed in joint subdis­
trict meetings.
(i) The established rates on shearing machines and air or electric
drills as now existing shall remain unchanged during the ensuing
year.
Twenty-second. A ny underground employee not on hand so as to go
down to his work before the hour fo r commencing work shall not be
entitled to g o below except at the convenience o f the company. When
an employee is sick or injured, he shall be given a cage at once. When
a cage load o f men comes to the bottom o f the shaft, who have been
prevented from working by reason o f falls or other things over which
they have no control, they shall be given a cage at once. F or the
accommodation o f individual employees, less than a cage load, who
have been prevented from working as above, a cage shall be run mid­
forenoon, noon, and midafternoon o f each working day; provided,
however, that the foregoing shall not be permitted to enable men to
leave their work for other than the reasons stated above.
Twenty-third. This contract is in no case to be set aside because o f
any rules o f the U. M. W . o f A. now in force or which may hereafter
be adopted; nor is this contract to be set aside by reason o f any pro­
vision in their national, State, or local constitutions.
Twenty-fourth. A ll classes o f day labor are to work full eight hours,
and the going to and coming from the respective working places is to
be done on the day hand’s own time. A ll company men shall perform
whatever day labor the foreman may direct. A n eight-hour day means
eight hours’ work in the mines at the usual working places, exclusive
o f noon time, fo r all classes o f inside day labor. This shall be exclu­
sive o f the time required in reaching such working places in the morn­
ing and departing from same at night.



AGREEMENTS BETWEEN EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES.

1067

Drivers shall take their mules to and from the stables, and the time
required in so doing shall not include any part o f the day’s labor,
their time beginning when they reach the change at which they receive
empty cars— that is, the parting drivers at the shaft bottom and the
inside drivers at the parting— and ending at the same places; but in no
case shall a driver’s time be docked while he is waiting fo r such cars
at the points named. The inside drivers, at their option, may either
walk to and from their parting or take with them, without compensa­
tion, either loaded or empty cars, to enable them to ride. This provi­
sion, however, shall not prevent the inside driver from bringing to
and taking from the bottom regular trips, if so directed by the opera­
tor, provided such work is done within the eight hours.
The methods at present existing covering the harnessing, unharness­
ing, feeding, and caring fo r the mules shall be continued throughout
the scale year beginning A pril 1, 1902; but in cases where any
rievances exist in respect to same, they shall be referred to the subistrict meetings for adjustment.
W hen the stables at which the mules are kept are located on the
surface and the mules are taken in and out o f the mines daily by the
drivers, the question o f additional compensation therefor, if any, is to
be left to the subdistricts affected for adjustment, at their joint sub­
district meetings.
Twenty-fifth. Mission Field scale is referred to Danville subdistrict
fo r adjustment.
Twenty-sixth. The company shall keep the mine in as dry condi­
tion as practicable by keeping the water off the roads and out o f the
working places.
Twenty-seventh. The operator shall keep sufficient blankets, oil,
bandages, etc., and provide suitable ambulance or conveyances at all
mines to properly convey injured persons to their homes after an
accident.
Twenty-eighth. The operator shall see that an equal turn is offered
each miner, and that he be given a fair chance to obtain the same.
The check-weighman shall keep a turn bulletin for the turn keeper’s
guidance. The drivers shall be subject to whomever the mine man­
ager shall designate as turn keeper, in pursuance hereof.
In mines where there is both hand and machine mining an equal
turn shall mean approximately the same turn to each man in the
machine part o f the mine, and approximately the same turn to each
man doing hand work; but not necessarily the same to each hand miner
as to each man working with the machines.
Twenty-ninth. There shall be no demands made locally that are
not specifically set forth in this agreement, except as agreed to in joint
subdistrict meetings held prior to May 1, 1902. W here no sub­
districts exist, local grievances shall be referred to the United Mine
Workers’ State executive board and the mine owners interested.
T he U nited M ine W orkers of A merica, D istrict N o . 12.
W . R. R ussell, President.
T. J. R eynolds , Vice-President,
W. D. R y a n , Secretary- Treasurer.

f

T he I llinois Coal O perators’ A ssociation.
O. L. G arrison, President.
E. T. B ent , Secretary.
P eoria , M arch IS, 1902.



1068

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

The district and local agreements made between operators and
miners in Illinois would require too much space to be published in this
connection. Copies o f these agreements may be obtained by applying
to Herman Justi, commissioner o f the Illinois Coal Operators’ Asso­
ciation, Chicago, 111.




RECENT REPORTS OF STATE BUREAUS OF LABOR STATISTICS.
LO U ISIA N A .
F irst Annual R eport o f the Bureau o f Statistics o f Labor f o r the State
o f Louisiana. 1901. Thomas Harrison, Commissioner. 267 pp.
The law o f July 9, 1900, (a) being act 79 o f the acts o f the general
assembly in its regular session o f that year, established a bureau
o f statistics o f labor, with a provision that the commissioner o f said
bureau should make annual reports to the governor o f the State,
presenting statistical details relating to all departments o f labor in
the State. In pursuance o f this duty the first annual report has been
issued, covering the year 1901. The subjects presented are: Popula­
tion o f Louisiana, 35 pages; labor laws, 62 pages; laws o f various
States creating bureaus o f labor, 34 pages; manufactures, 32 pages;
labor on steam and street railways, 6 pages; labor organizations and
industrial disputes, 10 pages; miscellaneous, .73 pages. The last chap­
ter presents facts as to exports, the port o f New Orleans, resources of
the State, and addresses by Carroll D. W right, Calvin M. W oodward,
and Francis E. Cook on certain educational phases of the industrial
question. In appendixes are given the rules o f the Association o f
Officials o f Bureaus o f Labor Statistics o f America and o f the Inter­
national Association for the Legal Protection o f Labor.
M anufactures.— The bureau secured returns from 98 establish­
ments, giving capital invested, value o f materials and products,
number and wages or salaries o f employees, hours o f labor, weeks in
operation, etc. The returns were not complete in all instances, and
no summaries are attempted. A series o f tables based on the reports
o f the Twelfth and previous censuses is also given.
L abor on Steam and Street R ailways .— Eight steam railroads
and 5 street railways are reported on as to mileage, number of
employees, total wages paid, hours o f labor, days of employment, etc.
A s in the case o f manufactures, no totals are given.
L abor O rganizations and I ndustrial D isputes.— Thirty-eight
labor organizations answered the bureau’s inquiries. These related to
date o f organization, membership, wages, hours o f labor, and benefit
features. No occupations are reported, the organizations being des­
ignated only by schedule number. The number of members is 5,908,
one union not reporting.
The report on industrial disputes is in the form of brief accounts o f
each o f the 15 demands or strikes reported to the bureau. Space is
also given to a number o f suggestions as to desired legislation.
<For a copy of this law see Bulletin No. 33, page 366.
*
9398— N o. 42— 0 2 ----- 13



1069

1070

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

M ARYLAND.
Tenth Annual R eport o f the Bureau o f Industrial Statistics o f M ar y Trnid, 1901. Thomas A. Smith, Chief, ix, 255 pp.
The follow ing subjects are treated in this report, namely: Concilia­
tion and arbitration, 3 pages; prices and wages, 6 pages; strikes, 17
pages; labor organizations, 2 pages; employment bureaus, 16 pages;
coal output for 1901,1 page; agriculture, 26 pages; canning and pack­
ing industries, 13 pages; manufactures, 47 pages; the clothing indus­
try, 40 pages; employment o f children, 4 pages; manual-training
schools, 14 pages; immigration, 1 page; new incorporations, 15 pages;
labor laws, 36 pages.
C onciliation and A rbitration .—A fter brief introductory remarks
there is presented a proposed bill for submission to the legislature,
providing fo r investigation and mediation by the bureau in cases of
labor disputes.
P rices and W ages.— The data here given relate to conditions in the
city o f Baltimore in 1901, with comparisons with figures for 1890 and
1895. The wages given are average fo r representative occupations;
the prices are fo r 29 articles o f meats, vegetables, canned goods, and
groceries. Income and itemized cost o f living are also given for each
o f 11 workingmen.
Strikes .— Sixteen strikes are reported as having occurred in 1901,
13 o f which were in Baltimore. Nine strikes were fo r increase o f
wages, 6 for a shorter working day, and 1 to restrict production for
the purpose o f maintaining prices. There were 9 strikes ordered by
labor organizations, 4 o f which were successful, while o f the 7 under­
taken without organization 1 succeeded partly and the rest failed.
The number o f strikers was 2,552, throwing 3,430 persons out o f
employment. The wage loss is reported at $100,715, or $29.36 per
employee. The loss to employers is estimated at $62,650.
L abor O rganizations.— Returns were secured from but 22 organi­
zations, though the number in the State is placed at about 100. A
directory and reports on trade conditions and wages and hours of
labor make up the main part o f this section.
E mployment B ureaus.— In this section is given a report o f an
investigation o f employment bureaus in Baltimore, together with a
statement o f the benefits o f free public employment offices and an
account o f an experiment in that direction made by the commissioner
without legislative direction. From the report it appears that 124
males and 14 females applied for work, and 53 males and 6 females
were assisted in securing positions during 1901. There were 85 appli­
cations for male help and 304 for female help.
Canning and P acking I ndustries.— This chapter gives a brief his­
tory o f these industries, with a more extended account o f present
conditions. A table presents statistics taken from the .report of the



REPORTS OF STATE BUREAUS OF LABOR---- MARYLAND.

1071

Twelfth Census; the bureau gives estimates for the year 1901. The
oyster industry is treated separately.
M anufactures.— Under this head is given a series o f tables based
on the reports o f the Twelfth Census, and a brief text discussion.
T he C lothing I ndustry .— Census statistics are here presented,
followed by a report on sweat shops in Baltimore, giving their loca­
tion, details o f inspection, prices paid for work, and a table showing
earnings and itemized expenses o f ten sweat-shop employees. Six
coat-making shops pay sewing-machine operators from $9.75 to $15
per week; basters, $7.80 to $15; finishers, $1.50 to $7.25; fellers, $5
to $5.75; for pressing, 8 and 9 cents per coat; and for machine made
buttonholes, 60 cents per hundred. Employment averages about eight
months per year.
E mployment of C hildren .— Under this head is a brief considera­
tion o f the subject, based partly on census returns and partly on
inquiries made by the bureau. No tables are presented.
M anual T raining Schools.—This chapter reports the present
status o f manual training, following the recent legislative provisions
for the same in the public schools o f the State. It appears that 2,218
pupils are receiving such training, and that 19 teachers devote their
entire time to the work. These numbers relate to the State outside the
city o f Baltimore, which has given such instruction for a number of
years.
A portion o f an address delivered by Prof. Calvin M. W oodward, o f
St. Louis, before the late meeting o f the Officials of Bureaus o f Labor
Statistics is also given in the report.
N E W JE R SE Y .
Twenty-third Annual R eport o f ths Bureau o f Statistics o f Labor and
Industries o f New Jersey, f o r the year ending October 31, 1900.
William Stainsby, Chief, vi, 329 pp.
The subjects presented in this report are: Statistics of manufactures,
134 pages; movement o f wages and employment during 1899, 16 pages;
cost o f living, 13 pages; trade unions, 47 pages; railroad transporta­
tion, 10 pages; street railways, 4 pages; the glass industry and com­
pany stores o f South Jersey, 20 pages; laws and court decisions affecting
labor, 16 pages; Jewish colonies o f South Jersey, 26 pages; industrial
chronology, 21 pages.
Statistics of M anufactures.— Returns were secured from 1,681
establishments representing 88 general industries, and 57 establish­
ments classed as miscellaneous. The facts presented are grouped into
9 tables, as follow s: Number o f firms and corporations, partners and
stockholders, by industries; capital invested and value o f materials
and products; three tables showing smallest, greatest, and average
number o f employees by industries, and aggregates by months; wages
paid, and average yearly earnings; classified weekly wages; hours o f



1072

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

labor, days in operation, and proportion o f business done; and a sum­
mary o f the foregoing facts fo r 9 principal industries. Additional
tables show fo r certain industries the amount and value o f specified
materials used and o f specified goods made; also a series o f compari­
sons between identical establishments in 49 industries for the years
1898 and 1899.
O f the 1,738 establishments reporting, 1,735 report capital invested,
the total being $255,689,550; 1,728 report value o f materials used at
$200,901,940, and o f products at $355,465,970. The average number
o f employees in all industries was 176,954. O f the 1,738 establish­
ments, 934, or 53.74 per cent, were owned by private firms, and 804, or
46.26 per cent, by corporations. O f the capital reported, $48,767,189,
or 19.07 per cent, was invested by private firms, and $206,922,361, or
80.93 per cent, by corporations. The per capita investment in private
firms by 1,636 owners or partners averaged $29,809; 28,774 stockholders
in corporations have an average investment o f $7,191 per capita.
Twenty-nine industries are reported as having a product in 1899 of
the value o f $3,000,000 or over. These 29 industries represent 73.69
per cent o f the capital invested, 78.82 per cent o f the total industry
product o f the State as here shown, and give employment to 69.13 per
cent o f the employees engaged in manufactures.
The follow ing tables present the principal data for these industries:
STATISTICS OF 29 LEADING INDUSTRIES, 1899.

Industries.

Per­
cent of
Stock­ Hours Aver­ busi­
Estab­
age
ness
lish­
of
Corpo­ Part­ holders labor days in done of
in
ments Firms. rations. ners in
firms. corpo­ per opera­ maxi­
report­
mum
rations. day. tion.
ing.
capac­
ity.

Brew ing......................................................
Brick and terra cotta................................
Chemical p rod u cts...................................
Cigars and to b a c c o ...................................
Cotton goods...............................................
Cotton goods, finishing and dyeing.........
Electrical appliances................................
Fertilizers..................................................
Food products............................................
Foundries, iro n ..........................................
Glass............................................................
Hats, f e l t ....................................................
Jewelry.......................................................
Lam ps.........................................................
Leather.......................................................
Machinery............................................. .
Metal goods.................................................
Oilcloth................................ ......................
O ils..............................................................
Paper...........................................................
P ottery.......................................................
Rubber goods.............................................
Shoes...........................................................
Silk d yein g .................................................
Silk w e a v in g .............................................
Smelting and refining..............................
Steel and iron, forg in g s...........................
Steel and iron, structural.........................
Woolen and worsted g o o d s......................

81
66
42
22
32
18
16
12
15
32
23
51
65
8
55
89
51
7
14
36
30
33
48
23
109
7
11
19
28

8
39
13
18
22
7
4
5
8
17
6
36
50
2
29
41
20
2
5
12
10
2
26
. 9
57
1
4
8
13

23
27
29
4
10
11
12
7
7
15
17
15
15
6
26
48
31
5
9
24
20
31
22
14
52
6
7
11
15

12
57
27
25
33
12
6
14
16
28
12
62
113
3
49
59
33
2
10
26
24
4
46
12
124
2
4
12
31

534
507
1,171
566
112
72
560
364
68
603
109
98
72
484
318
637
460
32
3,550
415
548
356
182
58
407
68
181
144
286

Total..................................................

993

474

519

858

12,962




9.96
9.87
9.71
8.81
9.81
9.22
9.93
10.00
10.06
9.84
8.91
9.51
9.67
8.62
9.85
9.82
9.92
10.00
9.28
9.80
9.60
9.97
9.52
9.65
9.82
10.87
9.90
9.58
10.00

310.00
237.72
319.07
250.86
286.34
290.00
301.62
282.50
293.46
290.40
251.74
271.76
288.73
261.87
292.20
297.12
293.53
343.71
271.50
285.47
296.20
280.27
277.18
292.00
290.01
332.71
297.54
303.95
292.43

70.03
76.19
84.10
84.77
89.40
85.66
84.75
67.08
83.13
82.34
82.39
74.90
81.15
70.62
75.74
74.07
76.47
91.43
66.07
88.05
82.83
81.97
75.52
71.17
80.45
90.71
70.45
77.90
88.32

REPORTS OF STATE BUREAUS OF LABOR— NEW JERSEY.

1073

STATISTICS OF 29 LEADING INDUSTRIES, 1899—Concluded.

Value of
material
used.

Capital
invested.

Industries.

B rew ing............................................... $17,765,799
Brick and terra co tta .........................
7,059,502
Chemical products.............................. 13,798,456
Cigars and tobacco..............................
6,067,798
Cotton goods........................................
3,910,597
Cotton goods, finishing and dyeing..
4,453,903
7,304,211
Electrical appliances.........................
3,912,100
Fertilizers.............................................
2,138,243
Food products.....................................
2,924,147
Foundries, iron...................................
4,045,452
Glass.....................................................
2,165,283
Hats, felt...............................................
3,174,095
Jew elry................................................
1,894,510
L am ps..................................................
6,209,174
Leather................................................
15,623,634
Machinery...........................................
5,302,217
Metal goods..........................................
1,980,000
OiJcloth................................................
O ils....................................................... 17,342,953
3,110,290
Paper....................................................
5,502,462
P ottery................................................
6,700,548
Rubber goods......................................
2,320,191
Shoes....................................................
1,996,190
Silk d y e in g ..........................................
Silk weaving........................................ 19,737,047
Smelting and refining........................
5,660,000
2,763,206
Steel and iron, forgings......................
5,614,970
Steel and iron, structural..................
7,959,617
Woolen and worsted g o o d s...............

Aver­
age
em­
ploy­
ees.

Value of
product.

$2,887,462 $11,691,016
4,931,848
1,384,955
8,104,981 13,800,362
3,622,701
7,016,231
4,854,826
2,303,279
8,286,900
5,385,571
3,895,152
1,835,468
2,732,775
4,128,436
6,917,669
8,191,961
2,829,841
5,923,189
1,416,693
4,936,726
3,750,012j 7,548,645
3,253,708
6,489,470
1,617,320
3,398,631
7,394,687 12,047,017
6,236,477 16,695,256
6,453,068
9,487,237
2,299,018
3,534,665
30,371,378 34,102,998
2,869,810
4,863,516
1,217,864
4,243,341
8,205,344 12,441,996
6,682,954
3,670,981
2,210,237
4,687,778
21,812,149 37,587,209
b 9,325,557 b 17,430,973
3,340,322
5,037,411
c 2,922,704 0 5,713,715
6,543,420 10,515,033

1,736
5,001
3,275
2,701
4,728
3,695
2,006
944
1,201
536
5,148
5,233
2,410
2,060
3,775
all, 648
4,061
855
2,682
1,804
3,535
4,034
4,718
3,574
21,672
2,527
2,156
4,961
6,656

Wages
paid.

Aver­
age
yearly
earn­
ings.

$1,398,075 $805.34
2,013,843 402.68
1,572,793 480.24
834,042 308.79
1,333,739 282.09
1,511,761 409.13
1,081,470 539.11
456,569 483.65
525,678 437.70
1,860,871 526.26
2,438,246 473.63
2,559,917 489.18
1,364,846 566.32
759,612 368.74
1,781,478 471.91
a 6,753,362 0579.78
1,612,894 397.16
411,320 481.07
1,579,342 588.86
816,386 452.54
1,981,118 560.43
1,739,918 431.31
1,755,945 372.18
1,531,874 428.61
8,727,789 402.72
1,190,651 471.17
1,181,005 547.77
2,196,177 442.68
2,040,666 306.59

Total....................... .................... 188,426,595, <*162,915,451 <*280,164,492 a122,332 055,011,387
a Not including 45 establishments not reported.
b Not including 2 establishments not reported.
<?Not including 1 establishment not reported.
d Not including 3 establishments not reported.

The following table presents, by sex, the number and per cent o f
persons employed in all industries (1,738 establishments) at the speci­
fied rates o f wages:
EMPLOYEES IN ALL INDUSTRIES (1,738 ESTABLISHMENTS) RECEIVING CLASSIFIED RATES
OF WAGES, BY SEX, 1899.
Males.
Weekly wages.

Females.

Total.

Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent.

Under $5.....................................................
$5 or under $6.............................................
$6 or under $7.............................................
$7 or under $8.............................................
$8 or under $9.............................................
$9 or under $10...........................................
$10 or under $12..........................................
$12 or under $15..........................................
$15. or under $20..........................................
$20 or o v e r ..................................................

15,933
6,487
8,781
14,501
13,492
18,542
19,757
21,172
19,206
8,110

10.92
4.44
6.02
9.93
9.24
12.70
13.53
14.50
13.16
5.56

18,431
8,969
8,142
5,568
3,516
2,348
2,260
1,339
379
51

36.14*
17.59
15.96
10.92
6.89
4.60
4.43
2.63
.74
.10

34,364
15,456
16,923
20,069
17,008
20,890
22,017
22,511
19,585
8,161

17.45
7.85
8.59
10.19
8.63
10.60
11.18
11.43
9.94
4.14

Total..................................................

145,981

100.00

51,003

100.00

196,984

100.00

From this table it appears that more than one-third o f the females
employed in the manufactures o f the State receive less than $5 per
week, and that the per cents steadily diminish as the wage rate rises,
more than one-half the whole number being found in the groups receiv­
ing less than $6. Nearly 11 per cent o f the males receive less than $5



1074

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

weekly, presumably largely boys. Beginning with the next rate the
groups increase, with one exception, until the rate “ $9 or under $10”
is reached. A bove this rate the groups include ranges o f $2, $3, and
$5, so that the comparison can be carried no farther. A t a rate some­
what less than $10 is found the median wage for males, while females
receiving $9 or more weekly comprise but 12.50 per cent o f the total
number o f females employed.
From the tables showing comparative statistics fo r 1898 and 1899
the follow ing summary is taken. The totals are for identical estab­
lishments in 49 industries:
COMPARATIVE STATISTICS OF MANUFACTURES IN 1,010 ESTABLISHMENTS, 1898 AND 1899.
Capital
invested.

Years.

1898........................................................................ $129,962,754
1899........................................................................ 148,439,113
a

Cost Of
material.

Value of
products.

Wa^es
paid.

$117,263,364
140,791,108

$203,093,642
238,969,304

« $48,230,569
a 53,775,984

For 1,077 establishments.

Aside from the growth o f business shown by these figures, the fact
is worthy o f note that 22 establishments which are reported as owned
by corporations in 1899 were reported as owned b y firms in the pre­
vious year.
M ovement of W ages and E mployment .— Reports received from
454 establishments were sufficiently complete to enable a comparison
as to the number o f employees in 1898 and 1899, and also to show the
number o f employees receiving an increase o f wages in 1899. The
number o f persons employed in these establishments was 57,472 in
1899 as against 46,896 in 1898, a gain o f 22.55 per cent. O f the 57,472
employees in 1899, 42,264 received an average increase in wages o f
9.8 per cent within the year.
C ost of L iving .— This is a continuation o f the presentation o f pre­
vious years, and shows the retail prices o f 51 items o f food and other
commodities in the principal markets in all counties o f the State in the
month o f June, 1900. Summary comparisons with 1898 and 1899 are
also given.
T rade U nions.— Under this head are given 10 tables showing mem­
bership, rates o f wages, hours o f labor, and benefit features o f 53
labor organizations in the State, together with an extended analysis and
general discussion. The membership o f these unions was 6,918.
F orty-four unions had a total income o f $46,369, o f which 39 paid
$13,604 to the national union. Benefits were paid by 31 unions to
the amount o f $21,365. Eight (the whole number reporting) cigarmakers’ unions, a musicians’ union, and 7 o f the 12 carpenters’ unions
report an eight-hour day. The longest day reported is eleven hours by
3 bakers’ unions and a retail clerks’ protective association. The reports




REPORTS OF STATE BUREAUS OF LABOR— NEW JERSEY.

1075

show increase o f wages secured through organization in amounts
varying from $0.20 to $2 per day in the different industries.
Steam R ailroad T ransportation.—Tables are presented showing
number, working time, and average wages o f railroad employees, in the
aggregate, and for each o f the 7 roads operating in New Jersey.
Street R ailways .— Reports were secured from but two compan­
ies—those which control the systems in and about Newark and Jersey
City. The first-named employs 3,065 persons, at an average weekly
wage o f $11.88. The largest groups o f employees are motormen,
1,017, whose average weekly earnings are $12.66; and conductors,
1,053, at an average wage o f $12.14 per week. These employees work
ten to twelve hours per day fo r six and seven days per week. The
second company pays 1,081 employees an average of $10.05 per week.
Its 345 motormen and 352 conductors receive $10.25 and $10 per week,
respectively, working ten hours daily, and six and seven days per week.
T he G lass I ndustry and C ompany Stores of S outh J ersey . —
This is a sketch presenting form er and present industrial conditions,
with some account o f the different acts o f legislation intended to remedy
certain abuses. These relate particularly to payment o f wages and
company stores. The remedy seems to have been found by the parties
concerned meeting by representative committees in a conference which
agreed to rules as to wage scales and apprentices and abolished com­
pulsory trading at company stores and compulsory occupancy of
company houses.
T he J ewish C olonies of S outh J ersey .— There is here given a his­
torical account o f the establishment and growth of a number o f colonies
planted to provide fo r a class o f immigrants who were practically
exiles. The oldest colony was planted in 1882, since which time a num­
ber o f others have been attempted with varying success. Some o f
them are quite prosperous and are o f especial interest as showing the
possibility o f a class o f persons who usually flock into cities to become
competitors in an overstocked labor market turning their attention to
agriculture and succeeding. Those colonies whose object was entirely
speculative have almost uniform ly failed.
REPORTS OP STATE BOARDS OP ARBITRATION.
ILLIN O IS.
Sixth Annual R eport o f the State B oard o f A rbitration.
1901. J. McCan Davis, Secretary. 59 pp.

March 1,

This report is for the year ending March 31, 1901. Within this
year two cases were submitted to the board and a third was acted upon
at the request o f one party. In each instance the recommendations
o f the board were adopted. The report presents the decisions and a
synopsis o f the evidence in each case; also the evidence o f the secretary



1076

BULLETIN OF TfiR DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

o f the board before the United States Industrial Commission, and a
copy o f the arbitration law o f the State and o f a circular o f informa­
tion prepared by the board relative to its powers and duties.
M ASSACH USETTS.
Sixteenth Annual R eport o f the State.Board o f Conciliation and A rb i­
tration, f o r the year ending December SI, 1901. B. F. Supple, Sec­
retary. 225 pp.
In this report a brief review o f the year’s work o f the board is fo l­
lowed by a detailed account o f its proceedings in each o f 108 difficulties
that came to its notice. An appendix contains the laws o f the United
States and o f various States relating to the subjects o f arbitration and
conciliation.
Nine cases o f arbitration were referred to the board. In one of these
the employer went out o f business before a conclusion was reached,
so that but 8 decisions were rendered. There were 39 conciliations
effected by the board, 26 other cases were found to be in process of
mutual settlement, and in 16 cases the struggle was fought to an end,
new employees being taken on in place o f those who had been dis­
satisfied. Eighteen disputes were abandoned by the board for various
reasons.
There were joint requests for the services o f the board in 37 instances,
and by one o f the parties in 27. In the remaining 4A cases the board’s
interposition was voluntary. In 95 cases the difficulty had taken the
form o f a strike.
Questions relating to wages occasioned 44 per cent o f the difficulties;
hours and conditions o f labor, 39.2 per cent; and sentiment, as sym­
pathy, discharges, etc., 16.8 per cent.
N E W YORK.
Fourteenth A nnual Repw 't o f the B oard o f M ediation and A rbitration.
January, 1901. Thos. A . Braniff, Secretary. 372 pp.
This report contains an account o f the more important labor disputes
within the State during the year 1900, and a statement of the proceed­
ings o f the board in a number o f the principal cases. The arbitration
laws o f various States are also given.
There were 547 strikes and lockouts in the State during the year, of
which 335 were successful or compromised, while 212 failed. Ques­
tions relating to wages were responsible fo r 363 disputes, and union­
ism fo r 104, leaving but 80 for all other causes.
It appears that considerably less than one-half o f thfese disputes
came before the board. No summary o f results appears in the report.




RECENT FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS.

FRANCE.
Statistique des Greves et des Hecours a la Conciliation et a VArbitrage
Survenus Pendant TAnnee 1900. Direction du Travail, Ministere
du Commerce, de PIndustrie, des Postes et des Telegraphes. xvi,

619 pp.
The present volume is the tenth o f a series o f annual reports on
strikes and conciliation and arbitration issued by the French labor
bureau. The information is presented in form similar to that con­
tained in previous reports o f the bureau.
Strikes .— During the year there were 902 strikes, involving 222,714
strikers. Eight hundred and ninety-nine strikes involved 10,253
establishments. The strikes resulted in an aggregate loss o f 3,760,577
working days, including 1,115,524 days lost by 26,757 employees who
were not strikers. The average time lost per striker was 12 days.
O f the strikers 180,591 were men, 29,753 were women, and 12,370
were young persons. The year 1900 had the largest number o f
strikes, strikers, and days lost on account o f strikes o f any year since
the publication o f strike data, there being an increase o f 162 strikes,
45,888 strikers, and 209,843 days lost over the preceding year. Only
1 lockout is reported, 1 establishment and 55 employees being affected
by it. O f the 902 strikes reported in 1900, 552 were participated in
by members o f labor organizations, and in 253 strikes the employers
were organized. Twenty-three workingmen’s unions and 1 employ­
ers’ association were organized while strikes Were in progress or im­
mediately afterwards. In 42 strikes regular aid was given by labor
organizations for the relief o f strikers.
O f the 902 strikes reported, 631 involved but 1 establishment each,
91 involved from 2 to 5 establishments, 53 from 6 to 10 establishments,
73 from 11 to 25 establishments, 31 from 26 to 50 establishments, 15
from 51 to 100 establishments. O f the 8 remaining strikes, 7 involved
from 110 to 812 establishments, and 1 involved 2,500 establishments.
As regards the results o f the disputes in 1900, 205 strikes, involv­
ing 24,216 strikers, were successful; 360 strikes, involving 140,358
strikers, were partly successful, and 337 strikes, involving 58,140
strikers, failed.
The two tables following show the number o f strikes, strikers, and
establishments involved, according to the results o f strikes, also the
number o f working days lost, and the proportion that the number o f
strikers is to the total number o f working people in each o f 17 groups
o f industries:



1077

1078

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
STRIKES BY INDUSTRIES, 1900.
Total.

Succeeded.

Agriculture, forestry, and
fisheries.............................
M ining..................................
Quarrying.............................
Food products......................
Chemical industries............
Paper and printing..............
Hides and leather goods___
Textiles proper....................
Clothing, cleaning, and
upholstery........................
W oodworking......................
Building trades (wood­
work) ................................
Metal refining......................
Metallic goods......................
Precious-metal w o rk ..........
Stone, earthenware, and
glass...................................
Building trades (stone, tile,
excavating, etc., w o r k )..
Transportation and hand­
ling ...................................
T ota l...........................
a
b

Succeeded partly.

Failed.

EstabStrikes. lishments.

Industries.

Estab­
lish­
Strikes.
ments.

Estab­
lish­
Strikes.
ments.

Strikes.

Estab­
lish­
ments.

3
4
1
6
5
3
10
65

«2
4
1
111
14
5
31
116

7
16
6
15
11
6
19
90

66
24
15
1,040
14
65
182
391

4
21
5
18
11
13
18
91

6
22
5
247
43
14
567
458

14
41
12
39
27
22
47
236

73
50
21
1,398
71
84
780
965

7
10

49
39

12
14

890
613

7
19

11
28

26
43

950
680

5
6
22
2

58
5
a 62
2

17
5
27

311
5
232

2
7
39
2

3
7
133
2

24
17
88
4

372
17
427
4

9

10

13

38

6

11

'28

59

24

140

37

480

45

183

106

803

34

a 116

65

3,246

29

137

128

3,499

765

360

7,612

337

1,876

902

10,253

205

b

Not including establishments in 1 strike not reported.
Not including establishments in 3 strikes not reported.

STRIKERS AND DAYS OF WORK LOST BY ALL EMPLOYEES THROWN OUT OF WORK BY
STRIKES IN 1900, BY INDUSTRIES.
Strikers in strikes which—
Industries.

Suc­
ceeded.

Suc­
ceeded
partly.

Agriculture, forestry, and fisheries.........
M in in g .......................................................
Quarrying..................................................
Food products............................................
Chemical industries..................................
Paper and printing...................................
Hides and leather goods...........................
Textiles proper..........................................
Clothing, cleaning, and upholstery.........
W oodw orking............................................
Building trades (w ood w ork)...................
Metal refining............................................
Metallic goods...........................................
Precious-metal work................. ...............
Stone, earthenware, and glass.................
Building trades (stone, tile, excavating,
etc., w ork)...............................................
Transportation and handling...................

161
803
20
207
467
118
321
7,104
651
673
155
392
3,151
83
611

1,707
33,384
1,378
3,847
5,015
689
3,121
29,724
9,777
3,214
2,188
856
7,844

1,681
7,615

Total..................................................

24,216

a
b
c
d

Failed.

Days of
Strikers work lost
per 1,C00 by all em­
Total
strikers. working ployees
people, thrown
(a)
out of
work.
0.74
269.48
33.43
17.20
140.80
9.47
70.07
77.52
24.18
523.84

2,338

1,745
4,289
34
220

2,359
41,927
1,850
4,727
10,845
1,188
11,771
49,418
10,791
5,610
2,355
2,993
15,284
117
3,169

53.72
36.75
5.72
19.60

15,4$6
477,260
10,007
41,662
74,067
7,907
191,020
1,716,129
58,474
44,388
29,798
34,302
112,618
2,200
441,590

6,035
29,241

3,469
10,269

11,185
47,125

32.65
76.38

140,456
363,203

140,358

58,140

222,714

<*56.47

3,760,577

491
7,740
452
673
5,363
381
8,329
12,590
360
1,723

1
2

Figures in this column are according to the census of 1896.
Including building trades (woodwork).
Included in woodworking.
Figures relate to all industrial working people in France.

O f the different industries, the textiles furnished 236 strikes and
49,418 strikers; the building trades, 130 strikes and 13,540 strikers;
transportation and handling, 128 strikes and 47,125 strikers; metals
and metallic goods, 109 strikes and 18,394 strikers; mining, 41 strikes
and 41,927 strikers; making 644 strikes and 170,404 strikers for these
five groups o f industries, or nearly three-fourths o f the total number
o f strikes and more than three-fourths o f the total number o f strikers.
Considering the number o f persons actually engaged in the various



FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS— FRANCE.

1079

industries according to the census o f 1896, it is shown that the rela­
tive prevalence o f strikes was greatest in the mining industry, 269.48
out o f every 1,000 employees having taken part in disputes during the
year. The group o f chemical industries comes next, with 140.80 strik­
ers per 1,000 employees.
In the two tables following the strike data are shown by causes:
STRIKES, BY CAUSES, 1900.
[A considerable number of strikes was due to two or more causes, and the facts in such cases have
been tabulated under each cause; hence the totals for this table necessarily do not agree with those
for the preceding tables.]
Succeeded.
Cause or object.

Estab­
Strikes.
lish­
ments.

Failed.

Succeeded partly.

Estab­
lish­
Strikes.
ments.

For increase of wages..............
Against reduction of wages...
For reduction of hours of la­
bor with present or in­
creased wages........................
Relating to time and method
of payment of wages, etc___
For or against modification
of conditions of w ork..........
Against piecework...................
For or against modification of
shop rules..............................
For abolition or reduction of
fin es.....................................
Against discharge of work­
men, foremen, or directors,
or for their reinstatement..
For discharge Of workmen,
foremen, or directors..........
Against employment of wom­
an ...........................................
For limitation of number of
apprentices
.............
Relating to deduction from
wages for support of insur­
ance and aid fu n d s..............
Other ........................................

Total.

Strikes.

Estab­
lish­
ments.

Strikes.

Estab­
lish­
ments.

113
32

722
63

249
21

6,966
94

218
13

1,726
37

580
66

9,414
194

44

1,324

24

3,214

32

615

100

5,153

25

102

12

349

20

66

57

517

14
6

100
84

7
3

143
143

21
17

25
911

42
26

268
1,138

15

15

12

24

15

39

42

78

13

13

8

8

16

16

37

37

24

28

11

18

54

75

89

121

32

32

11

11

61

102

104

145

1

1

2

71

3

72

1

1

1

1

39
43

326
168

29
22

257
76

i
1

3 !
7 !

14
66

7
14

55
26

STRIKERS AND DAYS OF WORK LOST BY ALL EMPLOYEES THROWN OUT OF WORK BY
STRIKES IN 1900, BY CAUSES.
[A considerable number of strikes was due to two or more causes, and the facts in such cases have
been tabulated under each cause; hence the totals for this table necessarily do not agree with those
for the preceding tables.]
Strikers in strikes which—
Cause or object.

For increase of wages................................................
Against reduction of wages......................................
For reduction of hours of labor with present or
increased wages.......................................................
Relating to time and method of payment of
wages, etc.................................................................
For or against modification of conditions of work.
Against piecew ork.....................................................
For or against modification of shop rules...............
For abolition or reduction of fines...........................
Against discharge of workmen, foremen, or direct­
ors, or for their reinstatement.................... ..........
For discharge of workmen, foremen, or directors..
Against employment of wom en................................
For limitation of number of apprentices.................
Relating to deduction from wages for support of
insurance and aid fu n d s........................................
Other.............................................................................




Days of
work lost
by all em­
Total
strikers. ployees
thrown
out of
work.

Suc­
ceeded.

Suc­
ceeded
partly.

Failed.

37,893
4,046

92,070
6,697

48,894
2,403

178,857
13,146

3,223,806
295,643

23,925

35,448

19,139

78,612

1,590,169

4,769
6,810
859
1,803
2,730

2,919
29,902
585
4,268
1,621

3,978
3,201
14,664
3,203
3,688

11,666
39,913
16,108
9,274
8,039

531,422
644,679
108,892
583,280
75,581

13,958
3,234
13
40

4,430
3,254

6,430
7,738
5,040

24,818
14,226
5,053
40

139,212
120,714
37,574
80

8,775
15,633

100
1,071

5,519
1,574

14,394
18,278

151,977
543,599

1080

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

Strikes due to wage disputes continued in 1§00, as in preceding
years, to be the most numerous, 646 strikes, involving 192,003 strikers,
being due to this cause alone. Nearly three-fourths o f the persons
engaged in strikes on account o f wages were either successful or partly
successful. O f the other causes o f strikes those relating to demands
fo r discharge o f workmen, foremen, or directors and for reduction o f
hours o f labor were most prevalent. O f the strikers who presented
the form er demands more than one-half failed, while of those demand­
ing reduction o f working time more than three-fourths succeeded either
wholly or in part. Those involved in strikes against piecework and
against the employment o f women were nearly all unsuccessful.
The next two tables show, respectively, the results o f strikes accord­
ing to their duration and according to the number o f strikers involved:
STRIKES AND STRIKERS, BY DURATION OF STRIKES, 1900.
Strikes.
Days of duration.

Strikers.

Succeed­ Succeed­ Failed.
ed.
ed partly.

Total.

Succeed­ Succeed­
ed.
ed partly.

Failed.

Total.

7 or u n d e r ...............
8 to 15........................
161} 30......................
31 to 100....................
101 or ov e r...............

162
26
10
• 8

205
69
53
27
6

212
63
31
29
2

579
157
94
64
8

18,044
4,485
1,076
611

44,457
32,470
38,098
23,208
2,125

17,032
16,059
13,687
11,252
110

79,533
53,014
52,861
35,071
2,235

Total...............

205

360

337

902

24,216

140,358

58,140

222,714

DURATION AND RESULTS OF STRIKES, BY NUMBER OF STRIKERS INVOLVED, 1900.
Days of duration.

Strikes.
Strikers involved.

Suc­
Suc­
ceeded. ceeded
partly.

Failed.

Total.

7 or
under.

8 to 15. 16 to 30.

31 to
100.

101 or
over.

25 or under............
26 to 5 0 ...............
51 to 100.................
101 to 200 ...............
201 to 500 ...............
501 to 1,000..............
1,001 or ov e r..........

50
44
45
38
25
1
2

51
62
75
69
57
24
22

145
65
43
37
24
11
12

246
171
163
144
106
36
36

182
126
107
78
59
19
8

45
23
24
30
17
7
11

11
13
18
17
21
6
8

8
7
12
18
7
4
8

2
2
1
2

T ota l............

205

360

337

902

579

157

94

64

8

1

As in the preceding year, the strikes were mostly o f short duration,
579 o f the 902 strikes lasting seven days or less, 157 lasting from
eight to fifteen days, 94 from sixteen to thirty days, 64 from thirtyone to one hundred days, and 8 lasting more than one hundred days.
M ore than one-half o f the strikes involved 100 strikers or less
each. The smaller strikes, involving 25 strikers or less each, were
mostly failures, while the majority o f the larger strikes were either
wholly or partly successful.
C onciliation and A rbitration .— During the year 1900 the law o f




FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS— FRANCE.

1081

December 27, 1892, regarding conciliation and arbitration (a) in trade
disputes was applied 362 times in 234 different disputes. The excess
in the number o f applications o f the law oyer the number o f disputes
is explained by the fact that some disputes extended over several
cantons, and that in some instances the employees o f each establish­
ment affected, or even each class o f employees in the same establish­
ment, entered separate demands fo r conciliation. In only 9 o f the 234
disputes was the law applied before entire cessation o f work occurred.
As the number o f strikes during the year was 902, the proportion of
the number of disputes in which the law was applied o f the total num­
ber o f disputes was 25.94 per cent. The proportion for the seven
preceding years, taken collectively, in which the law was applied, was
22.85 per cent. In 1900 the initiative in demanding the application of
the law was taken by the employees 141 times, by the employers 6
times, by both employers and employees 8 times, and in 79 cases the
initiative was taken through the intervention o f justices of the peace.
A s regards the results o f the application o f the law, it was found
that in 14 o f the 234 disputes work was resumed before committees of
conciliation were constituted. In 96 o f the 220 cases remaining the
demands for conciliation were refused in 88 cases by the employers, in
3 by the employees, and in 5 cases by both employers and employees.
In 10 o f the 96 cases the dispute was ended, after the refusal o f the
demand fo r conciliation, either by the complete abandonment o f their
demands by employees or by their acceptance o f concessions pre­
viously offered, while in the other 86 cases strikes were declared or con­
tinued, but in 4 o f these cases the employers, after the strike had begun,
consented to conciliation, thus raising to 128 the number o f disputes
to be submitted to such method o f adjustment. O f the other 82 cases
in which strikes were declared or continued 9 strikes were successful,
30 were partly successful, and 43 failed.
F or the settlement o f the remaining 128 disputes 140 committees of
conciliation were constituted, 2 disputes engaging 4 committees each,
2 engaging 3 each, and 2 engaging 2 each. O f these 128 disputes 60
were settled directly by the committees o f conciliation, 18 by arbitra­
tion, and 4 were adjusted by the parties themselves after having had
recourse to committees o f conciliation. This leaves 46 cases in which
the attempted conciliation and arbitration failed and strikes resulted
or continued. These strikes succeeded in 5 cases, succeeded partly in
24, and failed in 17 cases.
The follow ing statement gives a summary o f the cases in which
recourse was had to the law o f 1892 regarding conciliation and arbi­
tration, together with the results o f such recourse during the year
1900 and fo r the preceding seven years collectively.
« For a copy of this law see Bulletin No. 25, pp. 854-856.




1082

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

SUMMARY OF CASES IN WHICH RECOURSE ^VAS HAD TO CONCILIATION AND ARBITRA­
TION, 1893 TO 1899 AND 1900.
Items.

1893 to
1899.

1900.

Total number of strikes.................................................................................................
Cases in w hich the law of 1892 was ap p lied ...............................................................

3,370
a 778

902
&362

Disputes settled—
Before the creation of committees of conciliation...............................................
After refusal of demands for conciliation............................................................
Directly by committees of conciliation.................................................................
By arbitration...........................................................................................................
Directly by parties after having had recourse to conciliation...........................

54
34
ol83
24
15

14
10
60
18
4

Total cases settled through the application of the la w ...................................

307

106

251
211

82
46

463

128

Strikes resulting or continuing:
After refusal of demand for conciliation..............................................................
After failure of recourse to conciliation and arbitration...................................
Total cases of failure after application of the la w ............................................

d

The 778 cases of recourse to the law relate to 770 disputea.
The 362 cases of recourse to the law relate to 234 disputes.
There were but 180 disputes settled by committees of conciliation, 3 of them being counted twice,
because 2 committees were formed in each of these 3 cases.
d Figures here apparently should be 212; those given are. however, according to the original.
a
b
c

The above summary shows that o f 234 disputes considered in 1900,
106 were settled directly or indirectly through the application of the
law o f 1892, and in the case o f 128 the recourse to the law proved
fruitless. O f the 106 disputes settled 17 were favorable to the demands
o f the employees, 76 resulted in a compromise, and 13 were unfavor­
able to the employees. In the 128 disputes which continued after the
failure o f attempts at conciliation and arbitration the employees suc­
ceeded in 14, succeeded partly in 54, and failed in 60 cases.
G E R M A N Y.
Streiks und Aussperrungen im Jahre 1900. Streiks una Aussperrungen
im Jahre 1901. Bearbeitet im Kaiserliehen Statistischen Amt. 329
p p .; 306 pp.
These are the second and third annual reports on strikes and lock­
outs published bv the German imperial statistical bureau. The reports
contain analyses and summaries o f the strikes and lockouts in 1900
and 1901, respectively, copies o f schedules o f inquiry, and tables show­
ing in detail, by locality and industry for each dispute, the duration,
establishments affected, total number o f employees, strikers, and others
thrown out o f employment, causes, results, manner of settlement, etc.
The data relate to strikes ending iii 1900 and 1901, respectively.
Strikes and L ockouts in 1900.— There were 1,433 strikes reported
in 1900, affecting 7,740 establishments. The strikes in the case o f
6,038 o f these affected the entire establishment, while in the case o f
1,702 only certain branches or occupations were affected. Operations
were completely suspended in 2,382 o f the form er and in 351 of the
latter.
There were, in 1900,122,803 strikers and 9,007 others thrown out of



FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS---- GERMANY.

1083

employment on account o f strikes, making a total o f 131,810 employees
affected.
The follow ing table shows, by principal groups o f industries, the
number and results o f strikes, the number o f establishments and strikers
involved, and the number o f other employees thrown out o f work on
account o f strikes during the year 1900:
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY GROUPS OF INDUSTRIES, 1900.
[The column headed “ Strikers” shows the maximum number of strikers at any time during strike.]
Strikes which—
Total
strikes.

Industries.

Gardening, florist, and nursery trades.........
Mining, smelting, salt, and peat extraction.
Stonework and earthenware.........................
Metal w ork.......................................................
Machinery, tools, and instruments...............
Chemicals.........................................................
Forestry products, lighting materials, and
varnishes.......................................................
Textiles............................................................
Paper.................................................................
Tjftat.her............................................................
Wooden ware and carved goods....................
Food products............................ .....................
Clothing and cleaning...................................
Building trades................................................
Printing and publishing................................
Painting, sculpture, decoration, and artistic
work ..............................................................
Commercial employment...............................
Transportation................................................
T otal.......................................................

1
56
99
89
66
8

Estab­
lish­
Suc­
Suc­ ceeded Failed. ments.
ceeded. partly.

.

Other
em­
Strik­ ployees
ers. thrown
out of
work.

3
23
8
11
1

1
26
27
27
19
4

27
49
54
36
3

1
103
179
329
200
8

20
14,735
5,395
3,945
7,395
559

8
73
20
44
197
77
73
496
16

1
12
2
9
34
16
16
121

3
25
7
19
71
28
37
158
2

4
36
11
16
92
33
20
217
14

8
138
90
225
2,232
310
636
2,869
16

507
6,928
3,362
2,462
21,257
3,014
7,584
33,074
307

5
47
58

1
9
8

2
17
32

2
21
18

6
147
243

127
3,016
9,116

58
726

1,433

275

505

653

7,740 122,803

9,007

631
283
1,047
207
15
1,053
14
237
15
375
4,329
17

O f the 18 groups o f industries, that o f building trades had the largest
number of strikes, strikers, and establishments affected. Next in
importance with regard to the number o f strikers involved are the
groups o f wooden ware and carved goods and mining, smelting, etc.
These three groups o f industries furnish 52 per cent o f all the strikes
and 56 per cent o f all the strikers in 1900.
The next two tables show, respectively, the results o f strikes accord­
ing to their duration and according to the number o f strikers involved:
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY DURATION, 1900.
[The column headed “ Strikers” shows the maximum number of strikers at any time during strike.]
Strikes which—
Days of duration.

Less than 1 ................................
1 to 5 ..........................................
6 to 1 0 ........................................
11 to 2 0 ......................................
21 to 3 0 ......................................
31 to 5 0 .......................................
51 to 100.....................................
101 or over.................................
T ota l................................ii




Total
strikes.

156
526
200
175
125
110
121
20
1,433

Suc­
ceeded
partly.

Failed.

32
133
33
33 .
22
14
8

22
164
80
79
58
52
41
9

102
229
87
63
45
44
72
11

275

505

653

Suc­
ceeded.

Strikers.

Other em­
ployees
thrown
out of
work.

197
1,112
898
1,517
899
1,539
1,118
460

4,042
31,909
14,374
24,010
8,318
21,004
16,322
2,824

950
2,703
980
1,115
1,005
595
1,633
26

7,740

122,803

9,007

Estab­
lish­
ments.

1084

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY NUMBER OF STRIKERS INVOLVED, 1900.'

[The column headed “ Strikers” shows the maximum number of strikers at any time during strike.]
Strikes which—
Strikers involved.

Total
strikes.

.Suc­
ceeded.

Suc­
ceeded
partly.

Failed.

Estab­
lish­
ments.

Other em­
ployees
Strikers. thrown
out of
work.

2 to 5 ..........................................
6 to 10........................................
11 to 20.......................................
21 to 30.......................................
31 to 50.......................................
51 to 100.....................................
101 to 200...................................
201 to 500...................................
501 or over..................................

109
208
319
184
187
209
113
73
31

25
48
61
33
44
35
17
12

16
51
81
64
72
104
55
44
18

68
109
177
87
71
70
41
17
13

121
265
519
359
473
1,156
1,115
1,573
2,159

433
1,655
4,876
4,654
7,476
15,495
16,009
23,297
48,908

48
173
568
339
745
1,185
2,448
2,480
971

T ota l................................

1,433

275

505

653

7,740

122,803

9,007

In the follow ing table, show ingthe causes and results o f strikes in
Germany in 1900, the demand, and not the strike, is taken as the unit,
and hence the figures do not agree with those in the preceding tables:
STRIKES, BY CAUSES, 1900.
[A considerable number of strikes was due to two or more causes, and the facts in such cases have
been* tabulated under each cause; hence the totals for this table necessarily do not agree with those
for the preceding tables.]
Strikes which—
Cause or object.

Against reduction of wages.........................................................
For increase of wages...................................................................
For extra rate for overtime.........................................................
For extra pay for secondary w ork.............................................
For payment of wages before regular pay day.........................
Other causes affecting w ages.....................................................
Against increase of hours............................................................
For reduction of h o u rs...............................................................
For abolition or limitation of overtime work...........................
For reduction of hours on Saturday..........................................
Against introduction of overtime work.....................................
For regular hours.........................................................................
Other causes affecting hours of labor........................................
For change in method of paym ent...........................................
Against change in method of payment....................................
For reinstatement of discharged employees........................... .
For discharge or against employment of certain persons.......
For discharge of foremen, e t c ....................................................
Against being compelled to work on holidays.........................
For better sanitary conditions, etc.............................................
Against use of material from establishment in which strike
was pending..............................................................................
For better treatm ent...................................................................
For recognition of committee of em ployees............................
For posting of shop rules and adoption of fixed scale............
Other causes.................................................................................

Total
strikes.

Succeed­
Suc­
ceeded. ed partly. Failed.

99
956
203
71
29
78
12
345
45
93
1
3
14
83
1
188
56
37
36
48

32
159
23
8
1
9
3
55
3
7

14
22
64
57
214

1
2
4
11
26

2
7
1
29
8
2
3
8

20
428
123
52
14
43
3
182
22
66

47
369
57
11
14
26
6
108
20
20
1

3
7
40

5
36

39
9
10
20
27

120
39
25
13
13

3
10
34
33
108

10
10
26
13
80

Thirty-eight lockouts were reported in 1900, o f which 35 ended
during the year. The latter involved 607 establishments, of which
192 were entirely closed. There were 9,085 persons locked out, and
226 thrown out o f employment on account o f lockouts.
Strikes and L ookouts in 1901.— During 1901 there were 1,056
strikes reported, affecting 4,561 establishments. The strikes in the
case o f 3,525 o f these affected the entire establishment, while in the
case o f 1,036 only certain branches or occupations were affected.
Operations were completely suspended in 1,055 o f the former and in



FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS— GERMANY.

1085

123 o f the latter. There were 55,262 strikers and 7,420 other employees
thrown out o f work, making a total o f 62,682 persons affected.
The following table shows, by principal groups of industries, the
number and results o f strikes, the number o f establishments and strikers
involved, and the number o f others thrown out of employment on
account o f strikes during the year 1901:
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY GROUPS OF INDUSTRIES, 1901.
[The column headed “ Strikers” shows the maximum number of strikers at any time during strike.]
Strikes which—
Total
strikes.

Industries.

Gardening, florist, and nursery trades.........
Mining, smelting, salt, and peat extraction.
Stonework and earthenware.........................
Metal work.......................................................
Machinery, tools, and instruments...............
Chemicals.........................................................
Forestry products, lighting materials, and
varnishes.......................................................
Textiles............................................................
Paper.................................................................
Leather ............................................................
Wooden ware and carved g o o d s ...................
Food products..................................................
Clothing and clean in g...................................
Building trades................................................
Printing and p ublishing................................
Painting, sculpture, decoration, and artis­
tic w ork .........................................................
Commercial em ploym ent..............................
Transportation................................................
Hotels, restaurants, etc...................................
Other industries...............................................

2
58
11
43
113
69
67
378
8

T otal.......................................................

1,056

Estab­
lish­
Suc­
Suc­ ceeded Failed. ments.
ceeded. partly.

4 ............
21
3
102
21
98
13
38
5
4 ............

4
18
14

1

11
12
27
10
12
77
2

4
8
15
19
14
1
18
4
11
28
19
24
111
4

66
66

38
25
174
594
54
4

126
2,118
8,201
3,201
5,042
227

2
29
7

3
83
164
187
303
991
1,860
8

250
3,085
172
1,764
2,491
3,554
4,593
18,971
184
29
760
373
27
94

10

19
3

20

58
40
31
190

2

n

3
4

3
2

4
12
8
3

5
35
14
1
7

200

285

571

4,561

3

Other
emStrik- ployees
ers. thrown
out of
work.

1

55,262 i

562
2,217
145
102

3
923
5
104
19
507
2, S L
O

32

7,420

O f these groups o f industries, that o f building had, as in the
preceding year, the largest number o f strikes, strikers, and estab­
lishments affected. Next in importance with regard to the number
o f strikers involved were the groups o f stonework and earthenware
and machinery, tools, and instruments, 58 per cent o f all the strikers
in 1901 belonging to these three groups.
The next two tables show, respectively, the results o f strikes in
1901 according to their duration and according to the number of
strikers involved:
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY DURATION, 1901.
[The column headed “ Strikers” shows the maximum number of strikers at any time during strike.]
Strikes which—
Days of duration.

Total
strikes.

Succeded Failed.
Suc­
ceeded. partly.

Estab­
lish­
ments.

Strikers.

Other em­
ployees
thrown
out of
work.

Less than 1................................
l t o 5 ..........................................
6 to 10........................................
11 to 20.......................................
21 to 30 ......................................
31 to 50.......................................
51 to 100.....................................
101 or o v e r ................................

114
379
132
115
77
93
108
38

22
99
29
20
14
9
4
3

21
93
45
35
21
27
28
15

71
187
58
60
42
57
76
20

158
657
663
423
285
1,353
815
207

3,111
15,162
5,423
5,226
3,004
6,335
11,093
5,908

416
3,086
356
315
186
405
2,018
638

T ota l................................

1,056

200

285

571

4,561

55,262

7,420

9398— N o . 42 — 0 2 ------14



1086

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY NUMBER OF STRIKERS INVOLVED, 1901.

[The column headed “ Strikers ” shows the maximum number of strikers at any time during strike.]
Strikes which—
Strikers involved.

Total
strikes.

Suc­
ceeded.

Suc­
ceeded
partly.

Failed.

Estab­
lish­
ments.

Strikers.

Other em­
ployees
thrown
out of
work.

2 to 5 ..........................................
6 to 1 0 ........................................
11 to 2 0 .......................................
21 to 8 0 ......................................
31 to 5 0 .......................................
51 to 100.....................................
101 to 200 ...................................
201 to 500 ...................................
501 or over..................................

93
193
238
136
141
129
76
37
13

13
40
45
37
27
23
10
4
1

10
35
59
35
57
42
31
11
5

70
118
134
64
57
64
35
22
7

100
244
390
294
466
552
572
793
1,150

349
1,559
3,593
3,438
5,683
8,775
10,438
11,415
10,012

24
322
542
349
528
1,764
1,606
1,479
806

T ota l................................

1,056

200

285

571

4,561

55,262

7,420

The follow ing table shows the causes and results of strikes in 1901,
the demand and not the strike being taken as the unit:
STRIKES, BY CAUSES, 1901.
[A considerable number of strikes was due to two or more causes, and the facts in such cases have
been tabulated under each cause; hence the totals for this table necessarily do not agree with those
for the preceding tables.]
Strikes which—
Cause or object.

Total
strikes.

Against reduction of wages.........................................................
For increase of wages...................................................................
For extra rate for overtime.........................................................
For extra pay for secondary work.............................................
Other causes affecting w ages.....................................................
Against increase of h o u r s ..........................................................
For reduction of hours.................................................................
For abolition or limitation of overtime work...........................
For reduction of hours on Saturday..........................................
For regular hours.........................................................................
Other causes affecting hours of labor........................................
For change in method of payment.............................................
Against change in method of payment.....................................
For reinstatement of discharged employees.............................
For discharge or against employment of certain persons.......
For discharge of foremen, e t c ....................................................
Against being compelled to work on holidays.........................
For better sanitary conditions, e t c ............................................
Against use of material from establishment in which strike
was pending..............................................................................
For better treatment....................................................................
For recognition of committee of employees.............................
For posting of shop rules and adoption of fixed s ca le ............
Other causes..................................................................................

170
499
72
42
85
12
146
26
45
7
13
32
13
147
70
22
12
28
1
19
51
57
134

Suc­
ceeded.
44
77
6
1
10
17
1
3
5
3
29
11
6
1
6
6
3
12
14

Suc­
ceeded
partly.
41
193
42
30
37
1
78
12
26
4
7
9

Failed.

18
11
3
3
15

85
229
24
11
38
11
51
13
16
3
6
18
10
100
48
13
8
7

4
14
26
57

1
9
34
19
63

There were 38 lockouts reported in 1901, o f which 35 ended the
same year. The latter affected 238 establishments, o f which 60 were
entirely closed. A total o f 5,414 persons were locked out, and 95
others were thrown out o f employment on account o f lockouts.
G R E A T BRITAIN .
The Hmising Question in London. 1900. xvi, 381 pp.
by the London County Council.)

(Published

This volume presents an account o f the work done by the municipal
authorities during the period 1855 to 1900 in the way o f providing



FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS---- GREAT BRITAIN.

1087

sanitary dwellings for the laboring classes, together with a summary
o f the acts o f Parliament under which they have proceeded. The area
considered is the Metropolis exclusive o f the old City o f London.
Legislation began with the Laboring Classes Lodging Houses A ct of
1851. This act related to the indrease o f supply o f houses, with a view
to the relief o f conditions o f overcrowding; but a supplemental bill o f
the same date had the no less important purpose o f improving the sanita­
tion o f a certain class of lodging houses. Numerous bills and amend­
ments followed, enlarging the powers o f the municipal authorities,
until in 1890 a consolidating act was passed, under which, with some
subsequent amendments, the work o f improvement is now carried on.
The Public Health (London) A ct o f 1891 and the London Building Acts
o f 1894 and 1898 are also auxiliary to this work.
The housing o f the working classes act o f 1890 prescribes in detail
the mode o f procedure, providing first fo r a representation by the
proper medical officer as to the insanitary condition o f the area or
areas to be improved. I f this officer is derelict, two justices o f the
peace or twelve or more ratepayers may take the initiative. Then
follow provisions as to investigation, the determination o f costs, the
preparation o f an improvement scheme, methods of condemnation and
reimbursement, provision o f funds, etc. The term o f sinking funds
is limited to sixty years. Early restrictions that were found to be
impracticable or onerous provided that condemned residential areas must
be rebuilt with dwellings, and that the new buildings must accommodate
a population equal to that displaced. The first o f these was found to
be poor financiering, as the site frequently had a much higher com­
mercial than residential value, and the second interfered at times
with the object o f improved sanitation; they have, therefore, been
modified by a grant o f discretionary powers. The results show, how­
ever, that the aggregate operations have provided for a considerably
larger population than was found in the condemned structures.
The conditions demanding remedy were not only those o f improperly
constructed or dilapidated buildings, but also o f those so placed as to
interfere with ventilation, etc. It frequently happened, therefore,
that adjacent buildings must be removed for the sake o f making desired
improvements, o f which fact the act takes due cognizance.
Overcrowding might also take place when there was no fault to be
found with the buildings themselves, so that a system o f registration
and inspection has been provided for. A chapter devoted to this sub­
ject gives in brief the results o f various investigations since 1844, and
shows the slow progress made and the continuing need o f legislation
and law enforcement.
W hat has been done in the way o f the reconstruction o f insanitary
areas and the correction o f overcrowding has naturally occasioned
something o f a redistribution o f population. This opens the question



1088

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

of workmen’ s trains, which is made the subject o f one o f the chapters
o f this report. The Royal Commission on the Housing of the W ork ­
ing Classes, 1885, investigated this phase o f the matter, and offered as
suggestions that fares on the workmen’s trains should not exceed the
difference between the rent o f their homes in the overcrowded dis­
tricts which required relief and the lower rents o f the suburbs, and
that the hours o f running should be adapted to the needs o f the work­
ing people. Provision is now made in the charters o f some roads and
voluntary action has been taken by others, so that in 1897 there were
318 cheap-rate trains arriving daily at London termini between the
hours o f 3 a. m. and 8.42 a. m.
A large part o f the report is taken up with detailed presentations of
improvement schemes devised for particular areas, of which plates
and brief specifications are given.
From tables showing the results o f the work done from 1875 to 1900
by the Metropolitan Board o f W orks and its successor, the London
County Council, under the Artisans’ Dwellings and Housing o f the
W orking Classes Acts, the follow ing totals are taken, these totals
including work in progress as well as that completed at the time of
issuing the report (September, 1900): Area dealt with, 94| acres; per­
sons displaced, 49,375; cost o f clearances, £2,898,616 ($14,106,115);
number o f persons provided for, 64,428; co3t o f dwellings (including
land and incidentals), £1,248,754 ($6,077,061); gross annual rent
receivable from occupied tenements, £36,692 ($178,562).
IT A L Y .
Statistica degli Scioperi avvenuti nelV Industria e nelV A gricoltura
durante V cmno 1899. Ministero di Agricoltura, Industria e Commercio, Direzione Generale della Statistica. 1901. xxxix, 106 pp.
This is the eighth o f the series o f annual reports published by the
bureau o f statistics o f the department o f agriculture, industry, and
commerce o f Italy. It relates to the manufacturing, mining, and
agricultural industries.
Strikes and L ockouts in 1899.— There were 268 strikes reported
in 1899, o f which 9 were among agricultural employees and 259 in
other industries. There were 11 shut-downs, o f which three were
lockouts.
In the summary tables given, strikes o f agricultural
employees and shut-downs and lockouts are not included.
The 259 strikes considered involved a total o f 43,194 strikers, and
caused a loss o f 231,590 working days. O f the strikers 28,228 were
men, 11,280 were women, and 3,686 were children 15 years o f age or
under. The year 1899, like the preceding year, was not marked by
any strikes o f exceptional magnitude. The largest strike was that o f



FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS---- ITALY.

1089

railway employees in Turin, which involved 1,850 persons. Only 7
other strikes involved 1,000 or more strikers each. The total number
o f strikes and strikers was greater in 1899 than in 1898, but the num­
ber o f days lost was smaller.
The two follow ing tables show the causes and results o f strikes in
1899.
CAUSES OF STRIKES, 1899.
Strikes.
Cause or object.

Strikers.

Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent.

For increase of wages...................................................................
Against reduction of wages.........................................................
For reduction of hours.................................................................
Against increase of hours............................................................
Other causes..................................................................................

113
28
17
5
96

44
6
2
37

19,539
4,325
3,631
2,384
13,315

45
10
9
6
30

Total.....................................................................................

259

100

43,194

100

11

RESULTS OF STRIKES, BY CAUSES, 1899.
Succeeded.
Cause or object.

Strikes.
Num­ Per
ber. cent.

For increase of
wages ..............
Against reduc­
tion of wages..
For reduction of
hours...............
Against increase
of h ou rs..........
Other causes.......
T o ta l.........

Succeeded partly.

Strikers.

Strikes.

Num­ Per Num­ Per
ber. cent. ber. cent.

Failed.

Strikers.

Strikes.

Num­ Per Num­ Per
ber. cent. ber. cent.

Strikers.
Num­ Per
ber.
cent.

25

21

3,660

19

39

34

9,356

48

49

45

6,523

33

11

39

2,263

52

6

22

1,209

28

11

39

853

20

9

53

2,150

59

5

29

1,332

37

3

18

149

4

3
32

60
S3

484
5,649

20
42

19

20

4,646

35

2
45

40
47

1,900
3,020

80
23

80

31

14,206

33

69

27

16,543

38

110

42

12,445

29

O f the 259 strikes reported, 141, or 54 per cent, were due to wage
disputes; 22, or 9 per cent, to disputes regarding hours o f labor, and
96, or 37 per cent, to other causes. O f the 43,194 strikers, 23,864, or
55 per cent, struck on account o f wage disputes; 6,015, or 14 per
cent, on account o f hours o f labor, and 13,315, or 31 per cent, for
other reasons.
W ith regard to the results o f strikes in 1899, it is shown that 31
per cent succeeded, 27 per cent succeeded partly, and 42 per cent
failed.
O f the strikers involved, 33 per cent were in successful
strikes, 38 per cent in partly successful strikes, and 29 per cent in
strikes that failed.




BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

1090

In the follow ing table the total strikes, strikers, and working days
lost in 1899 are given by occupations:
STRIKES, STRIKERS, AND WORKING DAYS LOST, BY OCCUPATIONS, 1899.
Strikers.
Occupations.

Strikes.

Adults.
Males.

Compositors and lithographers.................
Day laborers.................................................
Dyers, gilders, and varnishers...................
Employees in food-product industries___
Founders......................................................
Glaziers and glass workers.........................
Hack drivers and tramway employees___
Hatters.........................................................
Longshoremen, coal handlers, etc............
Machinists and blacksmiths......................
Masons and stone cutters...........................
Match factory employees................. .........
Miners and quarrymen..............................
Potters and kilnmen...................................
Railway employees.....................................
Shoemakers, tailors, and others in cloth­
ing industry.............................................
Tanners.........................................................
Tobacco workers..........................................
Weavers, e t c ................................................
Other occupations......................................
Total.

! Children
! 15 years
Females. of age or
under.

5
16
4
11
3
3
9
3
12
17
15
3
30
8
5

151
3,001
212
961
463
98
4,004
31
2,088
1,922
1,370
149
7,755
565
3,158

9
3
3
73
27

314
82

522

1,103
801

1,373
8,166
293

259

28,228

11,280

427
1

11
173
9

202

82

11

53
25
168
1,436
37

258
12
15

79
4
1,547
62

Total.

Working
days lost.

151
3,001
223
1,561
473
98
4,004
315
2,088
1,986
1,395
575
9,203
617
3,158

2,090
12,859
2,279
3,901
6,233
172
13.424
1,263
36,767
19,820
2,833
1,689
35.424
3,410
3,158

915
1,373
10,816
1,156

3,106
432
7,363
71,038
4,329

43,194

231,590

86

The 9 strikes o f agricultural laborers in 1899, which are not included
in the above table, involved 1,895 strikers, o f whom 1,130 were men
and 765 were women. Tw o o f these strikes were successful, 3 were
partly successful, and 4 failed.
Eleven cases were reported in 1899 where proprietors closed their
establishments for the purpose o f accomplishing certain objects, but
o f these shut downs only 3 were directed against employees and can
properly be called lockouts. These 3 lockouts affected 372 persons,
o f whom 368 were men and 4 were children. One o f these lockouts
was successful, but for the other two the results were not reported.
C ouncils of P rudhommes.— On December 31, 1899, there were
86 councils o f prudhommes, or councils fo r the conciliation and arbi­
tration o f labor disputes, instituted according to law. This was an
increase o f 5 over the preceding year. Only 39 o f these performed
their functions in 1899. Four cases were reported where they had
occasion to intervene in the settlement o f strikes.




FOREIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS— ITALY.

1091

Strikes D uring T wenty -O ne Y ears.— The following table gives
a summary o f the more important facts published in relation to strikes
in all but the agricultural industries in Italy during each o f the years
1879 to 1899:
STRIKES, BY YEARS, 1879 TO 1899.
Strikes which—

Year.

1879.......
1880.......
1881.......
1882.......
1883.......
1884.......
1885.......
1886.......
1887.......
1888.......
1889.......
1890.......
1891.......
1892.......
1893.......
1894.......
1895.......
1896.......
1897.......
1898.......
1899.......

Strikes
for
which
Total
strikers
Suc­
strikes. Suc­
were
ceeded. ceeded Failed.
re­
partly.
ported.
32
27
44
47
73
81
89
96
69
101
126
139
132
<U19
« 131
/ 109
126
210
217
256
259

T ota l. (72,483

(a)

(a)
(a
fa)
fa)

(a)
(«)

(a)
(«)
(a)
(«)

(a\

( a)

(«)
(a\

a
?a)
«)
(«)
M
(a)
(a)

159
24
34
35
41
79
70
70
80

u429
33
46
29
39
51
60
68
69

0 410
57
41
39
46
80
87
118
110

592

824

988

(a)
(«)
(«)
(a)
o

M
W

(a)
(a)

h

Strikes
for
which Aggre­
gate
Chil­
days days of
dren 15
lost
work
Women. years of Total. were
lost.
age or
re­
under.
ported.

Men.

(b )
( b)

( 6)
(&)

(&

h )

4,011
5,900
8,272
5,854
12,900
23,967
34,166
16,951
25,027
28,974
23,322
38,402
34,733
30,800
32,109
27,595
19,307
96,051
76,570
35,705
43,194

28
21,896
26
91,899
38
95,578
45
25,119
65
111,697
78
149,215
82
244,393
95
56,772
218,612
66
95
191,204
123 215,880
129
167,657
123
258,059
114 216,907
122
234,323
103
323,261
126
125,968
210 1,152,503
217 1,113,535
239,292
256
259
231,590

2,436 *143,658 *102,632 *52,132 623,810

2,400 5,485,360

28
26
39
45
67
81
86
96
68
99
125
133
128
117
127
103
126
210
217
256
259

( a)
(a)
(aj

\
a)
• (a)

Strikers.

(&)
(&)

(b)

(&)

(&)

(b)

(b)

lb)

\b)

(b)
\b)

(ib)
( 6)

( 6)
( 6)
(6)

\b)
\b)
(b)
(b )
(b)

(6)

(b)
l b)

(b)

( 6)

Ib )
Ib )

(b)

(b)

(&)
(6 )

( 6)
(&)

19,766
11,788
39,955
21,809
22,112
28,228

(b)
(b )
(b)

3,890
5,192
34,264
38,435
9,571
11,280

\b)
\b )

3,939
2,327
21,832
16,326
4,022
3,686

Included in results of strikes for 1891.
&Not reported.
0 Including strikes occurring during the years 1879 to 1890, but not including 68 strikes the results
of which were not reported.
d Including 6 strikes the results of which were not reported,
e Including 10 strikes the results of which were not reported.
/In clu din g 6 strikes the results of which were not reported.
9 Including 79 strikes the results of which were not reported.
h This total does not agree with the total in table showing strikes by number of strikers involved,
page 1093; the computation is made, however, from figures in the original reports.
1 Not including figures for 1879 to 1893.
a

The follow ing table gives a comparison o f the proportionate results
of strikes during a period o f years:
RESULTS OF STRIKES 1879-91 TO 1899.
Per cent of strikers.

Per cent of strikes.
Year.

1879-1891......................................................
1892 ............................................................
1893..............................................................
1894..............................................................
1895........................................ ....................
1896..............................................................
1897..............................................................
1898..............................................................
1899..............................................................




Suc­
ceeded.
16
21
28
34
32
38
33
27
31

Suc­
ceeded
partly.
43
29
38
28
31
24
27
27
27

Failed.

Suc­
ceeded.

41
50
34
38
o7
38
40
46
42

25
29
29
19
33
49
23
27
33

Suc­
ceeded
partly.
47
19
44
24
40
31
45
31
38

Failed.

28
' 52
27
57
27
20
32
42
29

1092

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,

The number and results o f strikes and the number o f strikers are
shown by occupations for the eight years 1892 to 1899 in the follow ­
ing table:
SUMMARY OF STRIKES, BY OCCUPATIONS, FOR THE PERIOD 1892 TO 1899.
Strikes which—

Jotal
strikes.

Occupations.

Strikes
for which Total
strikers strikers.
Result
Suc­
Suc­
were
not
ceeded. ceeded Failed. known. reported.
partly.

Bakers and pastry c o o k s......................
Carpenters and joiners.........................
Compositors and lithographers............
Day laborers............................................
Drivers and teamsters...........................
Dyers, gilders, and vam ishers..............
Employees in food-product industries
other than bakeries...........................
Founders.................................................
Glaziers and glass workers...................
Hack drivers and tramway employees.
Hatters....................................................
Longshoremen, coal handlers, etc........
Machinists.............................................
Masons and stonecutters......................
Miners and quarrymen.........................
Potters and kilnm en.............................
Railway em ployees..............................
Shoemakers, tailors, and others in
clothing industry..............................
Tanners..................................................
Weavers, spinners, carders, e t c ............
Other occupations..................................

20
16
34
113
16
19

10
6
11
30
7
3

5
4
7
30
5
6

5
6
16
53
3
10

29
35
10
38
24
36
57
89
202
52
12

6
4
4
6
10
11
15
32
85
19
2

7
7
3
19
8
10
9
31
36
20
8

15
24
3
13
6
15
33
25
73
13
2

55
50
412
108

14
14
117
27

12
13
130
25

29
22
164
48

T o ta l.............................................

1,427

433

395

678

20
16
34
112
15
19

4,638
1,153
1,739
22,943
2,097
2,168

29
35
10
38
24
36
57
87
195
52
12

3,114
2,385
438
14,173
84,704
7,601
5,528
12,284
75,937
4,144
7,909

1
1
8

55
50
412
107

6,964
3,608
81,139
16,665

21

1,415

361,331

1
1

1
8

More than one-half o f all the strikes during this eight-year period
were those o f textile workers, miners and quarrymen, and day labor­
ers, the textile workers alone having participated in 412 o f the 1,427
strikes. O f 361,331 strikers who participated in 1,415 strikes reported,
84,704 were engaged in the hat-making industry, 81,139 in the textile
industry, and 75,937 in mining and quarrying, making for the three
industries a total o f 241,780, or more than two-thirds o f the entire
number.
The two follow ing tables show the strikes for the period, 1879 to
1891, and for each year, 1892 to 1899, classified according to their
duration and the number o f strikers involved, respectively:
STRIKES, BY DURATION, 1879-91 TO 1899.
Days of duration.
3 or u n d er........................................
4 to 10.................................................
11 to 30...............................................
Over 3 0 .............................................

1879-91. 1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898. 1899.
633
256
112
16

60
36
19
1

67
39
11
8

52
33
12
7

61
44
19
2

Total........................................ «1,017 5116 cl25 <*104

126

91
70
42
7

104
56
37
19

153
57
33
13

161
70
23
5

1,382
6J1
308
78

210 c216

256

259

/ 2,429

« Not including 39 strikes the duration of which was not reported.
&Not including 3 strikes the duration of which was not reported.
cNot including 6 strikes the duration of which was not reported.
^ Not including 5 strikes the duration of which was not reported.
<?Not including 1 strike the duration of which was not reported.
/N o t including 54 strikes the duration of which was not reported.




Total.

1093

FOBEIGN STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS— ITALY,
STRIKES, BY NUMBER OF STRIKERS INVOLVED, 1879-91 TO 1899.
Strikers involved.
1 to 49................................................
50 to 99..............................................
100 to 199...........................................
200 to 499...........................................
500 to 999...........................................
1 0 or o v e r .....................................
,0 0

1879-91. 1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 18%. 1897. 1898. 1899.
272
206
199

20
2
89
53

Total........................................ «1,039

27
18
26
27

1
1
8

117

28
24

70
52
44
31
14

92
55
63
35

2

54
35
46
52
14
9

126

20
1

217

40
16
18
18
5
7

39
34

127 «104

2
2
41
6
6

2
1

27
3

6

Total.

6

98
51
48
39
15

5

8

7‘10
491
487
490
163
104

256

259

a 2,455

a This total does not agree with the figures given in the general table of strikes, p. 1091; the figures
are reproduced, however, as shown in the original report.

The strikes were mostly o f short duration, 1,382 out o f 2,429 reported
lasting three days or less. A bout one-half o f the strikes involved less
than 100 strikers each.




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.
[This subject, begun in Bulletin No. 2, has been continued in successive issues.
A ll material parts of the decisions are reproduced in the words of the courts, indi­
cated when short b y quotation marks, and when long by being printed solid. In
order to save space, matter needed simply by way of explanation is given in the
words of the editorial reviser.]

DECISIONS U NDER ST A T U T O R Y L A W .
C ontract of E mployment— B reach — M erger of Corporations—
Globe and R utgers F ire Insurance Compa/ny o f New York v. Jones,
Supreme Court o f M ichigan, 89 Northwestern R eporter, page 580.—
Action was brought in the circuit court o f W ayne County to recover
from James A . Jones the sum o f $1,106.19 alleged to be due the com­
pany named. Jones had been agent fo r the Rutgers Fire Insurance
Company under a contract for five years from March 1,1898. On the
20th day o f December, 1898, the Rutgers Fire Insurance Company and
the Globe Fire Insurance Company, both corporations o f the State o f
New Y ork, merged to form a new corporation under the style o f the
Globe and Rutgers Fire Insurance Company. A New York statute
provides fo r such mergers, and that “ The new corporation shall suc­
ceed to all the obligations and liabilities o f the merging corporations,
or either o f them.” Another clause provides that “ A ll the rights,
franchises, and interests o f the merging corporations in and to every
species o f property and things in action belonging to them, or either
o f them, shall be deemed to be transferred to and vested in the new
corporation.”
Jones claimed that he first learned that the Rutgers had ceased to do
business in Michigan in March, 1899, and learned about the same time
o f the consolidation. A t that date he had on hand the sum named above
as a balance due the Rutgers Company. He was offered the agency o f
the new company, but declined it, declaring that he had objection to the
men in control o f the Globe. The judge o f the court below had ruled
that the consolidation o f the Rutgers with the Globe was a breach o f
the form er’s contract with Jones, and that Jones was entitled to recover
damages therefor to the amount o f the company’s claim against him, if
the jury found that he had sustained that amount o f damages. The
jury so found, and the company appealed, declaring that Jones’s con­
tract with the Rutgers was made with a knowledge o f the provisions
of the New Y ork statute relating to merger, and subject to the same,
1094




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1095

and that acts done in accordance with the statute could not be breach
o f contract.
Judge M oore, who announced the opinion o f the supreme court,
affirmed the judgment o f the court below, using in part the following
language:
It will be noticed that by the terms o f the New Y ork statute the
two corporations were merged in the corporation provided for in the
agreement. This made a new corporation. (3 Cook, Corp. sec. 897;
Smith v. Railway Co., 114 Mich. 460, 72 N. W . 328.) Is it true, as
contended here, that, because one has contracted to render personal
service fo r one corporation fo r a definite period o f time, his contract
for personal service may pass to a new corporation, made up o f two
or more corporations by virtue o f the merger o f the two or more
companies? In 2 W ood, Mast. & St. sec. 91, it is said: 46When
a person contracts to work fo r another for a term, the parties are
treated as having contracted in reference to the personal qualities o f
each other, and the master can not shift his liability by turning the
servant over to another master before the term is ended, nor can the
servant compel the master to accept the service^ o f another person in
lieu o f his own. The consent ox the parties is essential to effect a
substitution, and this is true even though the servant is ill, and unable
to labor himself. [Cases cited.]
Everyone knows that insurance
companies, like individuals, differ in reputation and methods o f doing
business. An insurance agent has a right to say for whom he will
work, and under a contract to work for one company he can not be
required to work fo r an entirely different company.
Judgment is affirmed.

C ourt of M ediation and A rbitration — C onstitutionality of
S tatute — R ehearing — M andamus— Renaud et al. v. State B oard o f
M ediation and A rbitration, Supreme Court o f M ichigan, 83 N orth­
western R eporter, page 620.— A ct No. 238, acts o f 1889 (sections 559568, Compiled Statutes o f Michigan, 1897), provides fo r the appoint­
ment by the governor o f 4 three competent persons” who shall consti­
4
tute a 44State court o f mediation and arbitration,” the title o f the act
being 44
An act to provide for the amicable adjustment o f grievances
and disputes that may arise between employers and employees and to
authorize a State court o f mediation and arbitration.” Under the pro­
visions of this act, Pingree & Smith, manufacturers o f boots and
shoes, and their employees, by Timothy O’Connor and E. A . Allen,
submitted a question as to the prices to be paid by the employers for
certain classes o f work. The case was heard and a decision arrived at,
with which Pingree & Smith were dissatisfied, and they moved fo r a
rehearing. The court granted such rehearing, whereupon Renaud
and others asked o f the supreme court an appropriate writ to prevent
the rehearing, claiming that in granting rehearing the court exceeded
its powers. Pingree & Smith also attacked the court as being improp­



1096

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

erly constituted, so that the supreme court passed upon the three ques­
tions o f the constitutionality o f the act establishing the court, its right
to grant a rehearing, and the proper remedy to be sought if such
rehearing was improperly allowed.
The contention o f Pingree & Smith is first taken up by Judge
M oore, who announced the opinion o f the court, concerning which he
said:
W e can not state their position more clearly than by quoting from
brief o f counsel. “ By section 28 o f article 6 fof the constitution],
the legislature may establish courts o f conciliation, with such powers
and duties as shall be prescribed by law. The general scheme o f the
constitution, as far as it relates to judicial officers, is for their elec­
tion, and not for their appointment. Section 23, art. 6, o f the con­
stitution provides for the establishment o f courts o f conciliation; and
by 6courts’ , here, as well as elsewhere in the constitution, is meant a
permanent organization fo r the administration o f justice, and not a
special tribunal provided for by law. I f the administration o f justice
embraces the enforcement o f the orders or decrees o f courts, the court
o f mediation and arbitration, being deficient in authority given by the
legislature to do this, is not such a court as is meant by section 23 o f
article 6; for, by the act o f its creation, it can do nothing but render a
decision on subjects submitted to it in a particular way, and file its
decision with the county^ clerk. Under the act there is no authority
given to the judges or members o f the court to compel the appearance
o f either party, nor is there any method o f composing the differences
or question in dispute by turning over the parties to a court with
authority to enforce its decrees.”
It is true that as to the members o f the supreme court, the circuit
judges, judges o f probate, and justices o f the peace, the constitution
provides that they shall be elected; but we think it is not open to
question that, if the constitution did not require these judicial officers
to be elected, but authorized the legislature to establish these courts
and prescribe their powers and duties, it would be entirely competent
for the legislature to do so. This is just what is done by section 23,
article 6, of the constitution. The act does not fail because the legis­
lature, in creating the court, did not provide its members should be
elected. * * * [The article referred to] reads, “ The legislature
may establish courts o f conciliation with such powers and duties as
shall be prescribed by law.” This language is simple and clear, and
would seem to give the legislature abundant authority to create courts
o f conciliation, and to clothe them with as little or as great power as
to the legislature seemed proper. It is to be regretted that the law
passed by the legislature is not a more perfect one, but we think it
very clear that the power conferred upon the respondent, if exercised,
is calculated to bring about conciliations between those employers and
employed between whom differences have arisen, and that the law was
enacted, as suggested by its title, to provide fo r the amicable adjust­
ment o f grievances and disputes that may arise between employers and
employed. The act does not undertake to confer power or impose
duties in relation to all classes o f civil cases, but such power as it does
confer is within the constitutional right o f the legislature.




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1097

On the question o f rehearing, Judge Moore said:
The law which called this court into existence is the limit o f its
power. The act nowhere authorizes the court to grant a rehearing.
When its decision has been rendered and filed, it has exhausted its
power in a given case.
As to the mode of preventing the rehearing, the court relied on
section 191, Comp. Laws, which gives the supreme court general superin
tending control over all inferior courts, and accordingly issued a writ
o f mandamus vacating the order granting a rehearing.

Court of M ediation and A rbitration — P ower — C onstruction
Statute— Pingree et ah v. State Court o f M ediation and A rbitra­
tion, Supreme Court o f M ichigan, 89 Northwestern R eporter, page
948.— The questions here discussed are as to the scope o f the power
o f the State court o f mediation and arbitration, and as to interpre­
tation o f the clause providing that the court’s decision shall be ren­
dered in prescribed form within ten days after the matter submitted
has been fully heard.
Pingree & Smith, manufacturers o f boots and shoes, having failed
to reach an agreement with their employees as to the prices to be
paid for certain classes o f work, the two parties submitted to the
court a statement o f the points in issue, with the following introduc­
tory sentences: u Being unable to agree on prices o f the following
work, we hereby jointly request an arbitration o f same by your hon­
orable board, agreeing to abide by your decision. Prices to remain
in force until May 1, 1900.” This paper bore date o f December 16,
1899. The case had been fully heard on March 9,1900, and the decision
was rendered on the 31st day o f the same month.
From the remarks o f Judge M oore, who announced the conclusions
o f the supreme court, the follow ing is quoted:
of

Pingree & Smith insist that, as a matter o f law, the finding o f the
State court o f mediation and arbitration was erroneous, because said
court did not confine itself to the terms o f said written submission.
It is said by counsel: “ The decision o f this court o f mediation and
arbitration makes a new contract between employers and employees,
and substitutes it for the one existing at the time the submission was
made. W ithout any authority under the submission or elsewhere so
to do, the court o f arbitration said to the firm that the men who were
engaged to work and who were working by the day or week must be
considered or treated as if they had been engaged to work and were
working by the piece.” It is, o f course, well settled that when arbi­
trators g o beyond the submission they exceed their jurisdiction, and
the award may be set aside. The record shows that an attempt had
been made to have the prices fixed by the piece, instead o f having the
work done by the day or week, and that upon the hearing, without




1098

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

objection, testimony was given upon both sides, not only by local
experts, but by witnesses from a distance, in relation to the scale o f
wages by the piece as well as by the day. The terms o f submission
were doubtless prepared in view o f the actual situation and the claims
o f the respective parties, and, we think, are sufficiently broad to justify
the court in saying the compensation should be by the piece, instead
o f by the day or week.
The court o f arbitration fixed July 26, 1899, as the date when the
scale o f prices fixed by it should go into effect. To this the firm
objected, maintaining that the submission contained nothing authoriz­
ing the fixing o f a date. From the records it appears that a new
machine had been put into the factory on the date fixed by the court,
and that it was the change in methods caused by the introduction o f
this machine that was in part responsible fo r the dispute as to prices.
A statement was made during the hearing by Mr. Pingree to the
effect that the prices set would control from the time the machine was
put in. Quoting this and other expressions o f similar intent, the court
said:
In view o f these statements, made during the progress o f the trial,
we do not think the respondents can be heard to say the court erred
in fixing the date it did when its decision should take effect.
The contention that the decision was void because announced only
after twenty-two days instead o f after ten days, as the law provides, was
overruled by the court on the ground that such statute is directory and
not strictly binding, citing Rawson v. Parsons, 6 Mich., 405, in support
of this position. Judge M oore said o f the case in hand:
Several complicated scales o f prices were introduced, and, if the
testimony was to be intelligently considered and passed upon, some
time would necessarily elapse. What little delay there was is not to
be charged against the parties to the litigation, if to anybody; and the
law ought not to be given such a construction as is contended for by
the relators.
The case is affirmed.
From the above, Judge H ooker dissented, maintaining that the case
was not properly in court and that the writ by which it was sought to
be brought to its consideration should have been dismissed with costs.

D eath of M inor U nlawfully E mployed — R ight of A ction—
C onstruction of S tatute — Kansas and Texas Coal Company v.
Gabsky et al., Supreme Court o f Arkansas, 66 Southwestern R eporter,
page 915.— M ary Gabsky and others sued the above-named company in
the circuit court o f Sebastian County to recover damages for the death
o f John Gabsky, a minor, employed in the mines o f the company con­
trary to the provisions o f the law.



DECISIONS OF COUNTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1099

Judgment was in favor o f the plaintiffs, from which the company
appealed and secured a reversal o f the lower court, with instructions
fo r a new trial. The statute under which suit was brought is section
5051 Sand. & H. D ig., which declares that “ No person under the age
o f 14 years shall be permitted to enter any mine or to work therein.”
Section 5058 provides that “ F or any injury to persons or property
occasioned by willful violation o f this act, a right o f action shall accrue
to the party injured for any direct damages sustained thereby.”
John Gabsky was a son of the plaintiff and was 11 years o f age. He
had been employed in the mine about four weeks when he was killed
by a large rock falling upon him from the roof of the room in which
he was. The company denied willful violation o f the law, as the boy’s
age had been represented as being 15 years. The case did not rest on
the evidence, however, in the supreme court, but solely on the con­
struction o f the statute. On this Chief Justice Bunn, after citing the
sections quoted above, spoke as follows:
The direct damages here referred to means damages fo r injury
occasioned by the fact o f being permitted to work in the mines; and.,
the working in the mines under the prohibited age being shown, and
to be willful in the legal sense, it is ordinarily conclusive upon the
defendant, fo r the object o f the act was to prohibit the working o f
children under 14 years o f age in coal mines at all. I f it is thought
that an action fo r damages for the death o f a person, as in this case,
survives in the next o f km, it should be asserted by a complaint based
upon our statute o f survivorship, commonly known as “ Lord Camp­
bell’s A ct.” What should be shown in a case under that act we leave
to the plaintiffs to determine. But, as the case was tried solely under
the minors’ act, and a complaint made in strict conformity thereto,
and no provision is made in that act fo r a survivorship o f the action,
the demurrer set forth in the first and second paragraphs o f the answer
[denying that the complaint stated sufficient facts to constitute a cause
o f action] should have been sustained; and the judgment o f the court
is reversed, and the cause is remanded fo r a new trial, with privilege
to the plaintiff to amend her complaint, if she so desires to do.

E mployees on P ublic W orks— Claims for Services — T ime of
F iling — C ontractor and Surety — A ssignment of C ontract—
Classes of W ork— French v. Pow ell et al., Supreme Court o f Cali­
fo rn ia , 68 P acific Reported', page 92.— This was an appeal from a
judgment o f the superior court o f Los Angeles County, allowing M. H.
French to recover certain sums from Charles L. Powell, a contractor,
and a surety company.
Powell had entered into a contract with the city o f Los Angeles for
the construction o f a certain tunnel, and, in accordance with the act of
March 27, 1897, had given bond with surety for the protection of
material men or those furnishing labor “ o f any kind” in pursuance



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BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

o f the w ork contracted for. A provision o f this law requires that
claims fo r materials or services must be filed in due form “ within
thirty days from the time such work is completed.”
French’s complaint set forth three causes o f action. One was a
claim fo r compensation for the work and services o f a man, team, and
scraper, furnished by him at an agreed price per day, amounting to
$514.75. The others were claims properly filed and assigned for labor
done by one Clapham as a blacksmith, to the value o f $154, and by one
French fo r one day’s service as superintendent o f work on the tunnel
at the agreed price o f $2.50.
The defendants controverted the allegations made and alleged fu r­
ther that the claims were not filed within the time required by the act.
The trial court found that Powell had, on May 10, 1899, assigned
all his interest in the contract in question to Swenson & Hill, which
firm had in turn contracted with one Chaffey to do the excavating,
grading, and filling required by said contract. Powell’s assignment
to Swenson & Hill was “ with the knowledge and approval o f said
municipal corporation, and all payments o f money by said contract
provided to be made by said Powell have been made direct to Swen­
son & H ill by said corporation as said payments have come due under
the contract.”
It was also found that French, Clapham, and the superintendent
had each rendered their services, the amount and value o f which were
found to be as claimed, as employees or at the request o f the subcon­
tractor Chaffey, and that at the time o f the filing o f the claims and the
trial o f the case the construction o f the tunnel was still in progress
and not yet completed.
The judgment o f the lower court was that Powell and his surety
were liable, and this was affirmed by the supreme court, Judge Chipman announcing its conclusions.
The first point taken up was the claim o f appellants that the suit
had been prematurely brought, contending that the clause providing
that claims must be filed “ within thirty days from the tim e’’ the
work contracted for is completed, also set a date earlier than which
no suit could be entertained; that is, that the entire work must first
be completed, and argued from an analogy to statutes relating to
mechanics’ liens. The court differed with appellants on this point,
holding that the right o f plaintiff was not similar to the lien o f a
mechanic, and concluded:
W e can see no good reason why the act should receive the construc­
tion contended for by appellants, while there are reasons why this con­
struction should be rejected. Aside from the long delay which often
attends the final completion o f public work, and the consequent hard­
ship entailed on laborers if compelled to wait so long, there is the
clear right to sue the contractor at any time; and why should his




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1101

security, who has taken on himself in some measure the contractor’s
burden, be in any better position? The statute makes him liable as
soon as the contractor is liable, provided only that the creditor files
his claim as the law directs. This we think he may do without wait­
ing the final completion o f the entire work.
Continuing, the court said:
The question next presented is as to who is liable to plaintiff on the
claims the subject o f the action. Appellants contend that Powell is
not liable, because the findings show that the services were rendered
at the request o f Chaffey, who was subcontractor under Swenson &
Hill, the assignees o f Powell. The bond refers to the contract entered
into by Powell with the city, and makes it a part of the bond. The
condition o f the bond is that “ the above-bounden principal [Powell]
shall pay or cause to be paid for all work and labor done thereon, of
any kind, and fo r all material and supplies furnished for the per­
formance o f said work; * * * if the said principal shall fail to
pay for any materials or supplies furnished for the performance of
the work contracted to be done, or for any work or labor done thereon
o f any kind, that the said sureties will pay the same, in an amount
not exceeding the sum hereinbefore specified,” etc. The contract
contains the follow ing provision (paragraph 7):
“ The contractor will not be permitted to sublet any portion o f the
work without the consent o f the city engineer, and, whenever such
subletting is permitted, the party performing the work will be con­
sidered as the agent o f the contractor. The latter will be held respon­
sible fo r all indebtedness incurred by the said agent on account o f the
w ork.”
W e do not think that Powell or his surety could shift the burden o f
their obligation— the form er by assigning the contract and the latter
by consenting to the assignment,— without the consent o f the parties
entitled to its benefits, and such consent was never given by plaintiff
or his assignors. The finding that the labor was performed at the
request o f Chaffey does not relieve Powell, for the contract made
Chaffey Powell’s agent. Plaintiff looked to Powell, as is shown by
the claims filed. The terms o f the bond are very broad. Payment
was to be made “ for all work and labor done thereon [the tunnel] of
any kind.” A s to the surety company, it expressly agreed to become
liable for Swenson & H ill’s debts.
It is next contended, as to the first cause o f action, that as plaintiff
performed no labor, and as he furnished a teamster, two horses, and a
scraper to Chaffey, the claim should have been made by the teamster,
and not by plaintiff, and, as this was not done, there is no action
against either Powell or the surety company. The engagement for
the labor o f the teamster, horses, and scraper was with plaintiff, for
which a gross sum per day was to be paid for the outfit. Plaintiff
looked to Powell, ana not to Chaffey; and, as we have seen, the con­
tract and bond warranted this, and it was immaterial whether he did
the work with his own hands. As to Clapham’s services as blacksmith,
appellants claim that it was not the kind o f labor.contemplated by the
act, and was not the kind o f labor for which a mechanic’s lien will be
permitted. W e do not regard the claim o f Clapham as similar to a
claim o f lien under the mechanic’s lien law. The bond and the con­
tract with the city are the source o f the obligation, and the obligors
9398— N o. 42— 02------ 15



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BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

agreed to pay fo r “ any work o f any kind” done on the tunnel. Clapham furnished the labor, and it was labor such as the contract called
for, and he filed the claim in his own name. Appellant admits that
the claim o f French [the superintendent] is good, within the meaning
of the act, but it is claimed that it is not good against Powell, because
he did not incur the debt, and, being prematurely filed, is void for all
purposes o f the action. F or reasons already given, the objections are
not well taken.
W e advise that the judgment be affirmed.

E mployers’ L iability — L ogging R ailroad — F ellow -Servant
A ct— C ontributory N egligence— Williams v. N orthern Lumber
Company, United States Circuit Courts D istrict o f M innesota, 113
Federal R eporter, page 388.— The plaintiff brought suit to recover
damages fo r the death o f her son who was employed by the Northern
Lumber Company as conductor and brakeman on a logging train. The
road on which deceased was employed was a private one, used only in
connection with the business o f the lumber company. The injury
causing the death o f Williams was the result o f logs falling from a
loaded car and striking him. A fter the plaintiff’s evidence had been
submitted, counsel for the lumber company asked that the court
instruct the jury to bring in a verdict fo r the defendant on the grounds
that the evidence showed no negligence on the part o f the company,
that the death was the result o f the contributory negligence o f the
deceased, and that if there was other negligence it was the negligence
o f a fellow-servant.
Whether or not the last reason given was a valid one depended on
the effect to be given to what is known as the fellow-servant act,
sec. 2701, Rev. St. o f M inn., which is as follows:
Sec. 2701. Every railroad corporation owning or operating a rail­
road in this State shall be liable for all damages sustained by any
agent or servant thereof bv reason o f the negligence o f any other
agent or servant thereof, without contributory negligence on his part,
when sustained within this State, and no contract, rule, or regulation
between such corporation and any agent or servant shall impair or
diminish such liability: Provided, That nothing in this act shall be so
construed as to render any railroad company liable fo r damages sus­
tained by any employee, agent, or servant while engaged in the con­
struction o f a new road, or any part thereof, not open to public travel
or use.
A fter stating the general rules as to negligence and the duty o f the
employer to provide a safe place to work, suitable appliances,, and
competent fellow-servants, Judge Lochren, speaking for the court,
discussed the bearing o f the statute quoted above, using in part the
following language:




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING- LABOR.

1103

[This section] would include responsibility on the part o f a railroad
corporation fo r negligence o f a fellow-servant, and it changes the law
in that respect, but it does not change it with respect to the effect o f
contributory negligence. This statute, as stated m several decisions,
would be unconstitutional, as being in the nature o f class legislation,
imposing a responsibility upon railroad corporations that is not
imposed upon other employers o f labor, if it were not from a con­
sideration that it is a peculiar regulation with respect to quasi public
corporations which have franchises from the State, granted for the
reason that the public is interested in the business of these corpora­
tions, and fo r that reason the legality o f such regulation by the State
is maintained as a proper regulation fo r the safety o f individuals and
o f the public generally with respect to corporations o f this kind. So
one question presented now is whether this statute applies to a rail­
road o f this kind, which is not a public railroad, used by the public, and
which is not a common carrier; fo r no person has a right to require
that he be carried upon it, or to have his private goods carried upon
it. It is a private concern, belonging to individuals, or to a company
which is not a railroad corporation, and therefore does not come
within the category o f bodies who are invested with franchises for the
use o f the public, which gives the State the right to make peculiar regu­
lations for public safety. It does not come within the language o f the
statute, because it is not a railroad corporation; and the proviso in
the statute indicates that the statute is intended to apply only to
corporations o f the character to which 1 have referred, possessed of
franchises, open to public travel or use, because the proviso is that
they shall not be liable fo r damage during the construction o f a new
road not open to public travel or use. It is said by counsel for
defendant that it can not apply to a J^aiiroad o f this kind because there
was no such railroad in operation at the time o f the passage o f the act
in 1887, and therefore it could not have been considered by the legis­
lature. I do not know what the fact is as to that. M y impression is
that counsel is right as to the fact that there was no such railroad in
operation at the time in this State, but I am not sure, and will not
assume, whether that is the fact or not. The language in this statute
indicates that it was not intended to include roads of this kind. But,
if it were the fact that these railroads were in existence in the State,
as they are now, then the presumption would be still stronger that
they were not intended to be included in that act, for the reason that
the language o f the act would exclude them. I think it is true that
an act may take effect upon business that was not carried on at the
time when the act was' passed if the language o f the act is such that
it will include that kina o f business, although the same was not known
at the time. But it seems to me the language o f this statute does
not include railroads o f this kind; therefore I feel constrained to hold
that the ordinary doctrine with respect to negligence on the part of
the fellow-servants applies in this case, and that such negligence is a
part o f the risk taken by the employee, and can not be imputed to
the employer.
Taking up the question o f contributory negligence on the part of
deceased, the court recited the testimony offered by plaintiff, which
was to the effect that Williams had charge o f the making up o f the




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BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

train and the direction o f the engineer; that it was his duty to see if
the cars were properly loaded, and if they were not, to see that the
logs were taken off and properly replaced, so that there should be no
danger from them. Plaintiff claimed that the injury had been occa­
sioned by the improper loading o f the logs, but in view o f the above
testimony as to W illiams’s duty, the court concluded:
Here, he being negligent himself, and being the person that was
injured by that negligence, it comes under the head o f contributory
negligence, which would prevent a recovery.
It seems to me, upon both o f these grounds, there is no evidence
upon which the jury can lawfully find a verdict in favor o f the
plaintiff.
Gentlemen o f the jury, the court directs that your verdict be for
the defendant.

E mployers ’ L iability — L ogging R ailroad — F ellow -S ervant
A ct— C ontributory N egligence — R elease — Schus v. Powers-Sim p­
son Company, Supreme Court o f M innesota, 89 Northwestern R eporter,
page 68.— Jacob Schus was employed by the above-named company as
a brakeman on a private railroad used only in connection with the
lumbering business o f the company. For injuries received while
effecting a coupling between cars on which the logs projected beyond
the ends o f the same, Schus recovered damages in the district court o f
Hennepin County. New trial being denied, the company appealed to
the supreme court, in which the judgment o f the court below was
affirmed.
Four principal questions were considered by the supreme court as
follows: (1) Whether the compan}^ defending the suit was a railroad
corporation within the meaning of, or coming within the operation of,
chapter 13, laws o f 1887 (G. S. 1894, sec. 2701) known as the FellowServant A ct; (2) whether the evidence established negligence on the
part o f the company as the proximate cause o f the plaintiff’s injury;
(3) whether or not Schus, who had to stoop in order to reach the
couplings on account o f the projecting logs, was guilty of contributory
negligence in attempting to make a coupling under the circumstances;
(4) whether there had been a settlement and release subsequent to the
accident occasioning the injury and prior to the bringing o f the suit.
The statute considered is quoted at length in Williams v. Northern
Lumber Company, above. On this point Judge Brown, speaking for
the court, said:
It is urged that the statute does not apply to defendant, for the
reason that it was not organized as a railroad corporation, and for the
further reason that it is not engaged as a common carrier of passen­
gers and freight; its railroad business being confined exclusively to
its own private affairs. The statute has been before the court repeat


DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1105

edly with respect to its validity and its application to particular serv­
ants and employees, and has been sustained, not as a law applying
exclusively to railroad corporations as a class,— for, if that were its
purpose, it would, as intimated by Judge Mitchell in Johnson v.
Railroad Co., 13 Minn. 222, 45 N. W . 156, 8 L. R. A . 419, be uncon­
stitutional and void as class legislation,— but as applying to employers
whose servants and employees are exposed to the peculiar hazards
and dangers incident to the operation o f railroads. In that case the
court said: u I f a distinction is to be made as to the liability o f employ­
ers to their employees, it must be based upon a difference in the nature
o f the employment, and not o f the employers. One rule o f liability
can not be established for railway companies, merely as such, and
another rule fo r other employers, under like circumstances and condi­
tions.” Within the reasoning o f that decision, and other cases in this
court (Smith v. Railroad Co., 44 Minn. 17, 46 N. W . 149; Lavallee v.
Railway Co., 40 Minn. 249, 41 N. W . 974; Mikkelson v. Truesdale, 63
Minn. 137, 65 N. W . 260), the test in interpreting and construing this
statute is not whether the corporation engaged in operating the railroad
was organized as a railroad corporation, but whether the road being
operated is a railroad, within the ordinary meaning o f the term, in and
about the operation o f which employees are exposed to those dangers
and risks against the consequences o f which the legislature intended to
provide. In Suth. St. Const. 218, it is said to be indispensable to .the
correct understanding o f a statute to inquire what is the subject o f it,—
what object is intended to be accomplished by it. The subject-matter
of the statute under consideration, and its intent and purpose, were to
protect employees engaged in a dangerous and hazardous employment;
and, within the decisions cited, the character o f the employer is not o f
controlling importance. The statute is to be given, if not a liberal, at
least a reasonable, interpretation, and one that will carry into effect the
intent o f the legislature. Defendant was not organized as a railroad
corporation, it is true; but it is conceded that it is operating a line o f
railroad equipped with engines and cars, the operation o f which, so
far as concerns the running o f its trains, is identical with ordinary
railroads, except that it is in the interests o f its own private affairs.
Every purpose intended to be subserved by the statute applies to it.
The mere fact that it is called a “ logging railroad,” and came into
existence since the passage o f that act, is by no means decisive o f the
question. It is a general rule o f statutory construction that legislative
enactments in general and comprehensive terms, prospective in opera­
tion, apply aliSe to all persons, subjects, and business within their
general purview and scope coming into existence subsequent to their
passage. (McAunich v. Railroad C o., 20 Iowa, 338.) And within this
rule, even though defendant is engaged in operating a “ logging rail­
road” only, ana exclusively in the interests o f its private affairs, and
though such railroads were not known at the time o f the passage of
the statute, and consequently not then in the contemplation o f the leg­
islature, the operation o f its road, in respect to the dangers and hazards
to which its employees are exposed, brings it squarely within the
spirit and purpose o f the law; and it must, to effectuate fully the inten­
tion o f the legislature, be held to be within its scope and operation.
Though the literal language thereof limits its operation to railroad cor­
porations, we hold that it applies to any corporation or person engaged
in operating a line o f railroad, incident to which operation are the



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BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

dangers and hazards to employees the legislature intended to provide
against.
A s to the second question considered, the syllabus by the court states
clearly the evidence and the conclusions o f law. The portion o f the
syllabus relating to this question is given herewith:
In this action the evidence received on the trial tended to show
that there was a general custom in respect to the operation o f the
road fo r the engineer, when cars being coupled came together, to
immediately stop his engine and hold it stationary until signaled to
again move it by the brakeman making the coupling. It further
tended to show that, on the occasion complained of, this custom was
not observed by defendant’s engineer, in consequence o f which plain­
tiff was injured. It is held that the evidence was sufficient to require
the submission o f the case to the jury, and to sustain their verdict to
the effect that such custom existed, and that the engineer’s failure to
follow and observe it at the time complained of was the proximate
cause o f the plaintiff’s injury.
On the third point Judge Brown spoke in part as follows:
It is true, as a general rule, that, if a person by his own carelessness
contributes to his injury, he can not recover. It is also true that a
railroad employee assumes all the ordinary risks and dangers of his
employment; but this assumption o f risks extends only to such as are,
in point o f fact, ordinary risks o f the employment. He does not
assume risks and dangers resulting from the negligence o f his fellowservants. The question o f plaintiff’s contributory negligence is dis­
posed of, we think, by the decision in Corbin v. Railroad Co., 64 Minn.
185, 66 N. W . 271,— a very similar case. There the car was loaded
with iron rails, and, as here [with the logs], they projected over the
end o f the car; and, in order to make the coupling, it was necessary
that the brakeman stoop over in going between the cars for that
purpose. He knew the situation, and the condition in which the cars
were loaded; and the court held that he was not guilty o f contributory
negligence, as a matter o f law, but that the question was one o f fact
fo r the jury to determine.
As to the point o f a release having been signed, it appeared that an
agent o f the company visited Schus while he was in the hospital and
gave him $75, securing his signature to a written release o f all further
claims. Schus denied any knowledge o f the fact that the paper was a
release, as he was unable to read the English language and relied on
the agent’s statements, which he claimed were fraudulent. W ith refer­
ence to this, Judge Brown said:
W e discover no reason, after a careful reading o f the evidence, for
disturbing the finding o f the jury in this case, though there are some
items o f evidence which tend strongly to corroborate defendant’s con­
tention, but it is by no means conclusive in its favor. There are cir­
cumstances, too, tending to corroborate plaintiff’s contention that the
money was paid as a donation. I f defendant did not deem itself lia­
ble to plaintiff on account o f his injuries, no reason is apparent why it
should donate to him any sum whatever; and, on the other hand, if, in



DEOtslotfs O c o u r t s
F

a f f F c t ih g

La b o r .

1107

its opinion, a liability in fact existed, and one which, in justice, it
ought to settle, it is fair to assume, as the jury probably did, taking
into consideration the nature and extent o f plaintiff’s injuries, that it
would have offered him considerably more than the very nominal sum
of $75.

E mployers’ L iability —N egligence op Superintendent — C on­
S tatute — Canney v. Wallceine, United States Circuit
Court o f Appeals, F irst Circuit, 113 Federal Reporter, page 66.—
The plaintiff, a driller in defendant’s quarry, was struck by a rope
which was being handled by the orders o f one Anderson, and was
thereby thrown down and injured. On suit damages were awarded
and an appeal taken, resulting in the judgment o f the lower court
being affirmed.
The case rested on a provision o f the Massachusetts employers’ lia­
bility act, which states that the employer is responsible for personal inju­
ries to an employee occurring6‘ by reason o f the negligence o f any person
in the service o f the employer entrusted with and exercising superin­
tendence, whose sole or principal duty is that o f superintendence.
From the evidence it appeared that Anderson had charge o f a derrick
in the quarry; that he took instructions from his employer as to what
kind o f stone was wanted and then marked off the ledge, gave orders
to drillers, derrickman, engineer, tool boy, and signalman; that he had
charge o f the stones from the time they were started in the pit until
thay left the quarry, but that when not otherwise engaged he took his
hammer and went to work with the rest o f the gang.
It was maintained by the defendant that one who labors the most of
the time with his hands is not a superintendent within the meaning of
the statute, and that the meaning o f the word “ principal” in the
statute means principal in point o f time and not in point o f impor­
tance, and he cited cases to support this position.
A s to the status o f Anderson, Judge Putnam, speaking for the court,
said:
struction of

The evidence leaves it entirely plain that, although the plaintiff
worked with Anderson and Anderson worked with the plaintiff, they
were not wholly employed in the same class o f labor, and that Ander­
son had under his charge men not engaged in drilling, and therefore
men not engaged in precisely the same labor in which the plaintiff was
engaged, although in the common work and in the same gang.
The defendant’s view o f the statute had not been given to the jury
in the instructions o f the trial judge and the instructions given were
excepted to. Judge Putnam reviewed the cases cited by defendant
and concluded:
The result o f these decisions undoubtedly establishes as a general
rule what is restated in Reynolds v. Barnard, 168 Mass. 228, 46 N. E.



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BULLETIN OP THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

704,— that, when au employee works with his hands the greater portion
o f the time, he can not superintend, within the purview o f the statute;
but they do not compel us to the conclusion that this rule is absolute,
and to be applied without qualification under exceptional circum­
stances. When the alleged superintendent is only a a mere laborer in
charge o f the gang,” this general rule might well be applied, if not as
a rule o f law, at least as a rule o f presumption o f fact so forcible that
the court would not allow a jury to disregard it. To go further, how­
ever, than to state it ordinarily as illustrative for the guidance o f
juries, would give an artificial construction to a statute which seems
simple, plain on its face, and reasonable in its purpose; and it would
also hold that the court could assume to know that a man can not work
constantly with his hands, and yet exercise superintendence in such man­
ner that that is his principal duty. Such an assumption would be so
forced as to exclude the possibility, which the common mind knows to
exist— that not only may an employee be engaged at all times in labor
with his hands, and yet exercise superintendence under such circum­
stances that that is his principal duty, but that, also, he may be so
engaged under such peculiar circumstances that quite continuous labor­
ing with his hands is a necessary part o f the duty o f superintendence.
Since none o f the decisions which have come to our observation were
rendered under circumstances which brought to the attention o f the
court the exceptional facts in support o f which the plaintiff produced
evidence in the case at bar, and since, therefore, we are not concluded
thereby with reference to such exceptional facts, and since, moreover,
the defendant’s proposition would compel us to give an artificial and
narrow construction to a remedial statute, contrary to the just and
reasonable rules ordinarily applicable, and since, also, the alleged sup­
erintendent in this case was, as we have shown, u something more than
a mere laborer in charge o f a gang,” we are unable to determine that
the instructions given the jury were not suitable and sufficient.
The judgment o f the circuit court is affirmed, with interest, and the
defendant in error recovers the costs o f appeal.

E mployers ’ L iability — R ailroad C ompanies— D uties of E mploy ­
E mployees —L iability of Company U sing T racks of
A nother Corporation for N egligence of L atter ’ s E mployees—
T est of L iability — F ellow -S ervants— B rad y v. Chicago and Great
Western R ailroad Company, United States Circuit Court o f Appeals,
Eighth Circuit, 111^ Federal Reporter, page 100.— John J. Brady was
foreman o f a switch crew in the employment o f the above-named
company. Before day on the morning o f November 1,1896, he passed
through the yards o f the St. Paul Union Depot Company, by the
alleged negligence o f whose employees his death was caused, a switch
having been left open so that the train o f which he had charge was
without warning brought into collision with cars standing on a transfer
track.
Elizabeth Brady, as administratrix o f the estate of the deceased,
appealed from a judgment in favor o f the railroad company, the judge
o f the court below having instructed the jury that the plaintiff had
ers and of




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1109

failed to make a case. The instruction was approved by the Circuit
Court, Judge Caldwell dissenting.
The defendant railroad company was one o f seven companies Avho
held equal amounts o f stock o f the St. Paul Union Depot Company,
and used its passenger depot and transfer yard under a contract which
gave to the depot company the right to prescribe rules and regulations
for the control o f the property used, and the exclusive right o f direc­
tion and command o f its switchmen employed in the transfer yard,
and the individual railroad companies had no right to turn a switch or
to direct that one be turned within the *said transfer yard. The rail­
road companies also agreed to indemnify the depot company for any
claims for damages resulting from the operation of their engines and
cars, or caused by the negligence o f the depot company’s employees
while acting for o.r in the furtherance o f the business o f the railroad
companies.
Am ong the claims made by the plaintiff were: That the depot com­
pany was negligent in promulgating reasonable rules, in failing to
employ a sufficient number o f switchmen, and in exercising control
and supervision o f the operation o f its yard; that Brady and the
employees o f the depot company were fellow-servants within the
operation o f section 2701, St. Minn., 1894, which makes railroad com­
panies liable to an injured employee for the acts of his fellow-servants,
if without contributory negligence on his part, and that the seven
railroad companies holding the stock o f the depot company were part­
ners and were each liable for the torts o f all the servants o f the depot
company. These and other propositions were argued at length by
Judge Sanborn, who announced the opinion o f the court, and all were
resolved unfavorably to the plaintiff.
The following syllabus, prepared by the court, presents in brief its
findings:
1.
The duty o f so operating a safely constructed and equipped rail­
road, subject to the rules and general supervision o f the master, as to
keep it reasonably safe fo r those employed upon it, is not a positive
duty o f the master, but a primary duty o f the servant.
3. A railway company running its trains over another road by per­
mission is liable to its employees for the negligence o f the servants of
the licensing corporation in the discharge o f the absolute duties of the
master.
4. But such a railway company is not liable to its servants for the
negligence o f the employees o f the licensing corporation in the dis­
charge o f their duties as servants.
5. The power o f the alleged master or principal to command or
direct the alleged servant or agent is the test o f the liability o f the
former for the acts o f the latter, under the maxim respondeat superior.
I f the master or principal has no power to command or direct the
alleged servant or agent, he is not responsible fo r his acts, because
there is no superior to respond.



1110

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

6. The G. W . Ry. Co. was operating a train through the yards o f a
depot corporation, under the customary contract for the use o f the
yards and depot jointly with other companies having like contracts,
when one o f its employees was killed by the alleged negligence o f the
servants o f the depot company in failing to properly turn the switches,
which were under the control o f the latter company. H eld the switch­
men o f the depot company were not the fellow-servants o f the employ­
ees o f the railway company, nor were they the agents or servants of
that company, within the meaning o f the fellow-servant statute o f M in­
nesota (St. 1894, sec. 2701).
7. The ordinary contracts between a depot corporation and several
railroad companies fo r the u3e o f a depot and transfer yards do not
establish a partnership relation between the companies, nor make the
depot corporation, the servant or agent o f the railroad companies, so
that they become liable fo r the negligence o f its servants, under the
maxim respondeat superior.

E mployment A gencies— L icense— “ E migrant A gents5 A c t 5—
5
C onstitutionality of Statute — State v. N apier, Supreme Court o f
South Carolina, J Southeastern R eporter, page IS.— J. W . Napier
±1
was convicted in the general sessions court o f Marlboro County o f a
violation o f 22 St. at Large, p. 812, known as the Emigrant Agents5
A ct, from which judgment he appealed. The statute provides that
“ No person shall carry on the business o f an emigrant agent in this
State without first having obtained a license therefor from the State
treasurer.5 Section 2 defines the term “ emigrant agent5 as meaning
5
5
“ any person engaged in hiring laborers or soliciting emigrants in this
State to be employed beyond the limits o f the same.5 The supreme
5
court affirmed the judgment o f the court below.
A fter disposing o f the question o f the form o f the indictment, which
was held to be good if only stating the offense in terms of the act,
without specifying particular instances o f hiring or soliciting, Judge
Jones delivered the follow ing as the opinion o f the court on the sub­
ject o f the constitutionality o f the statute:
It is contended that the act in question abridges the privileges o f
the citizen in restraining his right to make contracts o f hiring, etc.,
and in restraining his right o f egress from the State. But we fail to
see wherein the act so operates, unless it be in a very remote and inci­
dental way. The act, which is reported herewith, does not affect the
right o f any citizen to leave the State fo r labor elsewhere whenever
he pleases, and to make such contract fo r his labor as he chooses. The
statute, as already stated, affects only those who carry on the business
o f an emigrant agent, whose vocation is to hire laborers and solicit
emigrants to be employed beyond the limits o f the State. It is easy
to see that the business is o f such a nature that the legislature might
well see fit to thus regulate it, not only fo r the protection o f the agri­
cultural and manufacturing interests o f the State, but for the protec­
tion o f the laborers themselves against the acts and solicitations o f
designing and irresponsible persons, who may ply such a vocation in



DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1111

order to levy contributions from the ignorant and allured laborers, and
then not be found when the laborers, according to appointment, appear
at the railroad station to take their departure with him to their fields
o f labor. Payment o f the license fee, and the issuance o f the license
by the proper authority, afford some guaranty or evidence o f good
faith in the conduct o f such business. Nor is the statute discrimina­
tory, in any unlawful sense, by requiring a license for such business
when the labor is to be performed out o f the State, and not requiring
a license when the labor is to be performed within the State. The
business which seeks to induce laborers to leave the State, and the
business which promotes the employment o f laborers within the State,
are so different in their tendencies fo r good or evil to general interest
as to justify a different classification and treatment with respect to
them. A ll persons falling within the class named in the statute are
in all respects subject to the same requirements without any discrimi­
nation whatever.
The clause in the Federal Constitution relating to interstate com­
merce (article 1, sec. 8) is not violated by the statute in question.
The business o f procuring contracts for personal labor to be performed
out o f the State is not a commodity o f commerce, and any transporta­
tion o f persons that might result from such contract is so remote and
incidental as not to be deemed within the protection or meaning o f the
law o f interstate commerce. The case o f Williams v. Fears, 179 U. S.
270, 21 Sup. Ct. 128, 45 L. Ed. 186, [see Bulletin 36 U. S. Department
o f Labor, page 976], affirming the judgment o f the supreme court o f
Georgia (35 S. E. 699), is conclusive on this point, as well as all other
questions raised under the Federal Constitution.
It is further contended that the statute in question violates article
10, sec. 1, o f the State constitution, relating to taxation, because the
tax is not uniform. W e see no violation or the principle o f uni­
formity. The statute operates in every county in the State, and
affects every person belonging to the class conducting the business
described.
The judgment o f the circuit court is affirmed.

E nticing Servant — M inor — Contract of P arent — Construc­
Statute — State v. A ye, Supreme Court o f South Carolina, Jpl
Southeastern R eporter, page 519.— Adam A y e was convicted o f enticing
a servant, under section 291 o f the Criminal Statutes, which reads in
part as follows: “ A n y person who shall entice or persuade by any
means whatsoever any tenant, servant, or laborer under contract with
another, duly entered into by the parties * * * shall be deemed
guilty o f a misdemeanor * *
An appeal to the supreme court resulted in a reversal of the lower
court, Judge Pope dissenting.
The facts were that A ye did entice W iley Adams, minor son o f
W illis Adams, to leave the service o f one Goree, who had contracted
with the said W illis Adams for the services o f himself and two minor
children, W iley and John.
tion of




1112

BULLETIN OE THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

Chief Justice M clver, in announcing the opinion of the court, said:
It will be observed that the offense here charged has become a crim­
inal offense solely by virtue o f a statute, and to the words o f that
statute we must resort in order to ascertain whether they cover the
case under consideration. Now, what is meant by the words “ the
parties,” in the statute? W h y, surely, the person contracting to
serve and the person to be served. It is not, and can not be, pre­
tended that W iley Adams, the minor child o f W illis Adams, ever
entered into any contract with the prosecutor, Goree, to serve him as
a laborer or otherwise. It is difficult to comprehend how a person
could violate a contract to which he was not a party, or how he could
be enticed to violate such a contract; and that is the only charge
brought against the appellant. W hile it is quite true that a father is
entitled to the services o f his minor child, and may by contract trans­
fer that right to another, yet such contract would be the contract o f
the father, and not the contract o f the minor.

F actory I nspection— D elegation of L egislative A uthority —
C onstitutionality of Statute — Schaezlein et al. v. Oabaniss, Judge,
Supreme Court o f C alifornia, 67 P acific R eporter, page 755.— In the
police court o f the city and county o f San Francisco, Robert Schaezlein
and others were convicted o f a violation o f the State factory inspection
laws. On appeal to the supreme court o f the State the judgment was
reversed, the act under which conviction was had being declared uncon­
stitutional. The facts appear with sufficient fullness in the following
quotations from the remarks o f the court:
Petitioner was charged with violating the provisions o f “ An act to
provide for the proper sanitary condition o f factories,” etc., approved
February 6,1889. That act declares as follows: “ I f in any factory or
workshop any process or work is carried on by which dust, filaments
or injurious gases are generated or produced that are liable to be
inhaled by the persons employed therein, and it appears to the com­
missioner o f the bureau o f labor statistics that such inhalation could,
to a great extent, be prevented b y the use o f some mechanical con­
trivance, he shall direct that such contrivance shall be provided, and
within a reasonable time it shall be so provided and used.” Section 6
o f the act makes it a misdemeanor fo r any person to violate any o f the
provisions o f the act. (St. 1889, p. 3.) Petitioner was convicted o f hav­
ing unlawfully refused and neglected, after notice, to provide and use
a suction exhauster with property attached pipes, hoods, etc., in a metal
polishing shop, within a reasonable time after having been directed
so to do.
The ultimate question presented for consideration under this writ is
that o f the constitutionality o f the act above quoted. That the legis­
lature may not delegate its lawmaking functions, excepting to such




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1113

agents and mandatories as are recognized by the constitution, is, of
course, beyond controversy. Equally we think beyond controversy,
however, is the right o f the State, in the exercise o f its police power,
to pass reasonable laws for the protection o f the health o f employees
in given vocations, and to make the violation o f those laws penal
offenses. It is no invasion o f the right o f the employer freely to con­
tract with his employee to provide by general law that all employers
shall furnish a reasonably safe place and reasonably wholesome sur­
roundings fo r their employees. The difficulty with the present Jaw,
however, is that it does not so provide, but that it is an attempt to con­
fer upon a single person the right arbitrarily to determine, not only that
the sanitary condition o f a workshop or factory is not reasonably good,
but to say whether, even if reasonably good, in his judgment its condi­
tion could be improved by the use o f such appliances as he may desig­
nate, and then to make a penal offense o f the failure to install such
appliances. The legislature, as we have said, may require the owners
o f factories and workshops to put their buildings in proper condition
as to sanitation, may require them to provide reasonable safeguards
against danger for the operatives, but it may not leave the question as
to whether and how these things shall be done or not done at the
arbitrary disposition o f any individual.
The manifest objection to this law is that upon the commissioner has
been imposed, not the duty to enforce a law o f the legislature, but the
power to make a law for the individual, and to enforce such rules of
conduct as he may prescribe. It is thus arbitrary, special legislation,
and violative o f the constitution.

F ellow -S ervants— C onstruction of Statute— Jenkins v. M am moth M ining Company, Supreme Court o f Utah, 68 P acific R eporter,
page 8I f . — Abram Jenkins, a miner employed by the above-named
company, sued to recover damages fo r injuries received while so
employed. Judgment was in his favor in the district court o f the fifth
district, from which the company appealed. The supreme court
affirmed the judgment o f the court below. It is sufficient to say that
the case turned upon the construction o f section 1443 o f the revised
statutes o f Utah, which relates to fellow-servants. The finding o f the
court is stated in the follow ing sections o f the syllabus, which, though
unofficial, is a concise and accurate statement as to these points.
1. Rev. St., sec. 1443, provides that all persons who, while in the
service o f anyone, are in the same grade o f service, and are working
together at the same time and place and to a common purpose, neither
o f such persons being intrusted by such employer with any superin­
tendence or control over his fellow-employees, are fellow-servants with
each other. H eld, that a miner is not a fellow-servant with one whose
duty it is to manage and operate a cage by which the miners are con­
veyed in and out o f the mine.




1114

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

2.
A miner is not a fellow-servant with one employed as a 64tool
carrier,” whose only duty is to take sharpened tools into the mine and
throw them off at the various levels, and bring up the dull ones.

G arnishment— E xemption of W ages— F ailure of G arnishee
A llege E xemption —E ffect of P ayment of J udgment— City
o f Laurel v. Turner, Supreme Court o f M ississippi, SI Southern
R eporter, page 965.— W . D. Turner was an employee of the city o f
Laurel, against whom A. J. L yon & Co. obtained a judgment for about
$90 in the court o f a justice o f the peace. Lyon & Co. then gar­
nisheed the city o f Laurel as a debtor o f Turner, to which the city
entered the defense that a municipal board was not subject to such a
proceeding. This plea was erroneously overruled, and a subsequent
appeal, fo r some undisclosed reason, was dismissed.
The city then paid Lyon & Co. the amount claimed and had the
judgment assigned to itself and proceeded to withhold Turner’s wages
for its own reimbursement.
Turner thereupon sued in a court o f a justice o f the peace and
obtained judgment against the city for wages due, which judgment
was affirmed in the circuit court, when an appeal was taken to the
supreme court o f the State, which, in its turn, affirmed the decision
o f the courts below.
Section 1963 o f the code exempts from execution the wages o f every
person working for wages, being the head o f a family, to the amount
o f $100. Section 2139 provides that any garnishee may defend by
declaring that he believes that the party from whom recovery is
sought will claim the debt or property, or some part thereof, as
exempt, whereupon such debtor shall be notified to appear and assert
his rights, pending the determination o f which proceedings shall be
stayed.
Judge Calhoon, speaking for the court, said:
to

Turner’s wages, under Code, sec. 1963, par. 10, cl. 44a,” were exempt
from execution,— he being the head o f a large family; and the city
should have set up the fact in its answer to the writ o f garnishment.
By not doing so, it 44deprived the defendant o f the exemption which
the law affords him,” if its silence were effective, which it is not.
See case o f Railway Co. v. W hipsker (Tex.), 13 S. W . 639, 8 L. R. A .
321, 19 Am. St. Rep. 734, and its citations, quoted from in the brief
o f counsel fo r appellee. Code, sec. 2139, marks out the course o f the
garnisheed debtor; and, if he fails to observe it, he fails at his own
peril. Exemptions are highly favored by the law, and their protection
may not be defeated by the intention or negligence o f garnishees.




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1115

P rotection of E mployee A gainst A ssault— D eath R esulting
B reach of Contract by E mployer —P ain and Suffering —
M isjoinder of Causes of A ction—Lewis's Adm inistrator v. Taylor
Coal Company o f Kentucky, Court o f Appeals o f K entucky, 66 South­
western R eporter,page 101^.— H. W . Lewis was a coal miner employed
by the above-named company during the progress o f a strike at its
mines. He was threatened with violence and appealed to the com ­
pany for protection, which was promised but not furnished. Lewis
was assaulted and severely beaten, and died some months later as a
result o f wounds then received. F or the assault, pain, and suffering,
and subsequent death, damages were sued for in the circuit court of
Ohio County, judgment being rendered in favor of the coal company.
Lewis’s administrator then appealed and the court o f appeals affirmed
the judgment o f the court below.
Section 241 o f the constitution of Kentucky provides that there may
be a recovery o f damages where death is the result o f negligence or
wrongful act. Section 6 o f the Kentucky statutes was enacted in
accordance with this provision o f the constitution. A fter referring
to these provisions o f law, Judge Paynter. who announced the opinion
of the court, said:
from

A t common law the right o f action for the injury to the person
abated on the death o f the party injured. Under K y. St. sec. 10,
the cause o f action fo r personal injury, causing physical and mental
suffering, does not abate on the death o f the injured person, except
actions io r assault [and some others]. So, under the principles o f the
common law, if appellee had, through its agent, inflicted the injury
which resulted in physical pain and mental suffering and death, neither
cause o f action would have survived. This court has held that the
cause o f action fo r death can not be joined with the cause o f action
fo r physical pain and mental suffering; that a recovery for one bars
an action for the other. [Cases cited.]
The master does not undertake to protect the servant from the
criminal acts o f others. This is not a duty which the law imposes,
or which arises from the relation o f master and servant. The law
does not make one liable civilty or criminally for the criminal act o f
another unless the positions o f the parties are such relatively that the
act must be considered as having been, in contemplation o f law,
advised or procured to be done by another. Actionable negligence
arises from a duty imposed by law to use ordinary care under the con­
ditions in which a person upon whom a duty rests is placed.
W ith these general observations, we come to the consideration of
sections 6 and 10 o f the Kentucky statutes. The word “ negligence”
is used in section 6 in its usual and ordinary sense. It was intended
to make one liable for his own negligent act, or for that o f another for
whose act he is responsible. The words “ wrongful act” are compre­
hensive enough to include negligent acts, but they were intended pri­
marily to cover cases where the act was wanton or was intentionally




1116

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

committed, or where one may have counseled or procured another to
do it, when, in contemplation o f law, the act o f counseling or advising
makes the wrongful act his own. It is not charged that under the
law o f master and servant (nor could it have been correctly done) the
appellee was bound to furnish a guard to protect the decedent from
tne hands o f a mob. Therefore there was no breach o f duty imposed
by law which would make it guilty o f negligence. It is not charged
that the appellee inflicted the injury upon decedent, or counseled,
advised, or procured others to do it. Therefore it is not charged, nor
could it have been, that the appellee was guilty o f the wrongful act
which resulted in the injury and death. Having reached the foregoing
conclusion, it follows that an action fo r the death o f the intestate will
not lie under section 241 o f the constitution, or section 6 of the Ken­
tucky statutes. I f appellee had been liable at common law for the
assault and battery committed upon the person of the intestate, the
cause o f action would not have survived to the personal representa­
tive, because the act complained o f was an assault, and an action
therefor does not survive to the personal representative. [See pro­
vision o f sec. 10 K y. St., above]. This court has held in Anderson v.
Arnold’s E x’ r., 79 K y. 370, that an action fo r an assault and battery
does not survive. O f course, the court did not mean to hold that,
when death has resulted from an assault, any cause o f action which
was given under the statute for the death would not survive; neither
do we want to be understood as holding a cause o f action given for
the death o f a person, either by section 241 o f the constitution, or any
section o f the statuses, is affected by section 10, although the death
was the result o f an assault. W e simply hold that the cause o f action
for the assault and battery does not survive. The action is really one
in contract. The contract averred can not bring the case within the
provisions o f section 241 o f the constitution and section 6 o f the
statute; nor can it have the effect o f keeping alive a cause o f action,
if it existed, which section 10 o f the statute declares does not survive.
The judgment is affirmed.
DECISIONS U NDER COMMON L A W .
D ischarged E mployee —L etters of R ecommendation— New York,
Chicago, and S t. Louis Railroad *Company v. Schaffer, Supreme
Court o f Ohio, 62 Northeastern R eporter, page 1036.— Schaffer was a
brakeman in the employment o f the above-named company, prior to
the 1st o f January, 1895, at about which time he obtained leave o f
absence, and when he reported for work on or about February 1,
1895, he was informed that he had been discharged. He brought suit
in the circuit court o f Huron County to recover damages for his
alleged unjust discharge and because the railroad company, in pursu­
ance o f an alleged conspiracy with other railroad companies, refused
to give him any letter o f recommendation or clearance card which was
necessary in order fo r him to secure employment on any road in the
alleged agreement. It appeared on trial that Schaffer had been twice
suspended for breach o f duty. Damages were awarded him and the
company appealed, obtaining a reversal o f the judgment.



DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1117

The following syllabus by the court presents the conclusions of law
deciding the case:
1. A master is under no legal obligation to give to his discharged
servant a statement o f his service, ana whether or not it was satisfac­
tory; and a discharged railroad employee can not maintain an action
for damages against the company which discharged him, for refusal
to furnish him with a clearance or statement o f the record of his serv­
ice, although he may have been unable to obtain other employment
in consequence o f such refusal by the company.
2. It is the right o f every person, natural or artificial, to employ or
refuse to employ in his business whomsoever he may wish; and he
can not be called upon to answer fo r his judgment in th^t regard by
the public or individuals, nor can the motives which prompt his action
be considered. A railroad company may lawfully refuse to continue
in its employ a person who has engaged in a strike affecting its
interests, or who has shown himself to be negligent, incompetent,
inefficient, or dishonest.

E mployers’ L iability — Contract of I ndemnity — A dmission of
E vidence — H errin et al. v. D aly, Supreme Court o f M ississippi, 31

Southern R eporter, page 790.— This was an action by John P. Daly to
recover damages for injuries received while at work in the sawmill of
Herrin, Lambert & Co. The judgment was in favor o f plaintiff and
rested chiefly on the ju ry’s conclusion as to the application of the
common-law rule o f fellow-servants. A point of some interest was
the ruling o f the trial judge permitting the question to be asked as to
any contract of indemnity that the firm might have with a guaranty
company. Defendants objected to the question, but the objection was
overruled, and the fact appeared that the company was indemnified to
the extent o f $1,500. Verdict for Daly was rendered, awarding dam­
ages in the sum o f $1,500, and an appeal was taken to the supreme
court, which reversed the court below and remanded the case for a new
trial.
Discussing this ruling, Judge Calhoon, speaking for the court said:
On the cross-examination by appellee’s counsel o f Lambert, one of
the defendants below, as a witness, he was asked if there was any one
back o f his firm who would satisfy the j udgment if obtained. The court
overruled an objection to this, and we think this action error. It could
not conceivably throw any light on the issue, and could have no other
tendency than to seduce a verdict on the ground that an insurance
company, and not the defendants, would be affected.

E mployers’ L iability — I nspection
ligence — M ooney

of

Stone

by

B uilders — N eg ­

v. B eattie, Supreme Judicial Court o f Massachu­
setts, 6% Northeastern R eporter, page 725.— In a suit in the superior
court o f Bristol County, Mooney, a stonemason, obtained judgment for
9398— No. 42— 02----- 16




1118

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

injuries occasioned by the explosion o f a stone furnished by his
employer, Beattie, and from this judgment Beattie appealed, securing
a reversal. The stone had been purchased in ordinary course o f busi­
ness, and when thrown to the ground by M ooney’s assistant it ex­
ploded on account o f a charge o f dynamite remaining in it, which had
failed to explode during the process o f quarrying.
The question turned on the duty o f inspection, and on this point
Judge Hammond, who delivered the opinion o f the court, summed up
as follows:
The whole testimony showed that the inspection was a general prac­
tice at the quarries, and all the expert witnesses, both quarrymen and
contractors, testified that they never knew such an inspection to be
made anywhere else. Not a single witness was called to show that the
contractor ever inspected the stone purchased by him from quarrymen. Judging the conduct o f the defendants by the usual standard
under the circumstances, we do not think that the defendants are
shown to have exercised less than reasonable care and prudence in
the discharge o f their duty to the plaintiff. The accident was the
result o f an unforeseen and almost unprecedented combination of
circumstances, fo r which the defendant can not reasonably be held
responsible.

L abor O rganizations— P rocuring D ischarge of M embers of
R ival U nion — Strikes —N ational Protective Association o f Steam F it­

ters and H elpers et al. v. Camming et ah, Court o f Appeals o f New York,
63 Northeastern R eporter, page 369.— This case arose from the action o f
Gumming, Nugent, and others, members and officers o f the Enterprise
Association o f Steam Fitters and the Progress Association o f Steam
Fitters and Helpers, in undertaking to procure the discharge o f
McQueed and others, members o f the National Protective Association
o f Steam Fitters and Helpers. McQueed had been instrumental in
organizing the latter association after having been refused member­
ship in one o f the defendant associations on the ground that he had
failed to pass the required* examination. A t a hearing in special term
an injunction was granted restraining Cumming et al., according to
the prayers o f the plaintiff, but an appeal to the appellate division
procured a reversal o f the trial court’s judgment. An appeal was
then taken by the National Protective Association to the Court of
Appeals, resulting in an affirmation o f the order o f the appellate
division.
The facts, on which no question was raised at this hearing, were
found by the trial judge to be as follows:
That the defendant Cumming threatened to cause a general strike
against the plaintiff association and against the plaintiff McQueed
wherever he found them at work, and that he would not allow them to
work at any job in the city o f New Y ork, except some small jobs



DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1119

where the men o f the Enterprise Association were not employed, and
that he and the defendant Nugent threatened to drive the plaintiff
association out o f existence; that the defendants Cumming and Nugent,
while acting in their capacity o f walking delegates for their respec­
tive associations, and members o f the board o f delegates, caused the
plaintiff McQueed and other members o f the plaintiff association to be
discharged by their employers from various places o f work upon
buildings in the course o f erection by threatening the said employers
that if they did not discharge the members o f the plaintiff association,
and employ the members o f the Enterprise [and] Progress Associa­
tion^] in their stead, the said walking delegates would cause a general
strike o f all men o f other trades employed on said buildings, and that
the defendant Cumming, as such walking delegate, did cause strikes
in order to prevent the members o f the plaintiff association from con­
tinuing with the work they were doing at the time the strike was
ordered, and that the said employers, by reason of said threats and
the acts o f the defendants Cumming and Nugent, discharged the
members o f the plaintiff association, and employed the members o f the
Enterprise and Progress associations in their stead.
There was a minority opinion, drawn up by Judge Vann and con­
curred in by two others. The opinion o f the court was prepared by
Chief Justice Parker, being concurred in by three others, and is in
part as follows:
The order o f the appellate division should be affirmed, on the ground
that the facts found do not support the judgment of the special term.
In the discussion o f that proposition, I shall assume that certain prin­
ciples o f law laid down in the opinion o f Judge Vann are correct,
namely: “ It is not the duty o f one man to work for another unless
he has agreed to, and if he has so agreed, but for no fixed period,
either may end the contract whenever he chooses. The one may work
or refuse to work at will, and the other may hire or discharge at will.
The terms o f employment are subject to mutual agreement, without
let or hindrance from anyone. I f the terms do not suit, or the
employer does not please, the right to quit is absolute, and no one
may demand a reason therefor. Whatever one man may do alone, he
may do in combination with others, provided they have no unlawful
object in view. Mere numbers do not ordinarily affect the quality o f
the act. Workingmen have the right to organize for the purpose of
securing higher wages, shorter hours o f labor, or improving their
relations with their employers. They have the right to strike (that is,
to cease working in a body by prearrangement until a grievance is
redressed), provided the object is not to gratify malice or inflict injury
upon others, but to secure better terms o f employment for them­
selves. A peaceable and orderly strike, not to harm others, but to
improve their own condition, is not in violation of law.” Stated in
other words, the propositions quoted recognize the right o f one man
to refuse to work for another on any ground that he may regard as
sufficient, and the employer has no right to demand a reason for it.
But there is, I take it, no legal objection to the employee’s giving a
reason, if he has one, and the fact that the reason given is that he
refuses to work with another who is not a member o f his organization,




1120

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

whether stated to his employer or not, does not affect his right to stop,
work; nor does it give a cause o f action to the workman to whom he
objects, because the employer sees fit to discharge the man objected
to, rather than lose the services of the objector. The same rule
applies to a body o f men, who, having organized, fo r purposes deemed
beneficial to themselves, refuse to work. Their reasons may seem
inadequate to others, but, if it seems to be in their interest as members
of an organization to refuse longer to work, it is their legal right to
stop. The reason may no more be demanded, as a right, of the organ­
ization than o f an individual; but, if they elect to state the reason,
their right to stop work is not cut off because the reason seems inade­
quate or selfish to the employer or to organized society. And if the
conduct o f the members o f an organization is legal in itself, it does
not become illegal because the organization directs one of its mem­
bers to state the reason fo r its conduct.
The object o f such an organization is to benefit all its members, and it
is their right to strike, if need be, in order to secure any lawful benefit
to the several members o f the organization,— as, for instance, to secure
the reemployment o f a member they regard as having been improp­
erly discharged, and to secure from an employer o f a number of them
employment fo r other members o f their organization who may be out
o f employment, although the effect will be to cause the discharge o f other
employees who are not members. And whenever the courts can see
that a refusal o f members o f an organization to work with nonmem­
bers may be in the interest o f the several members, it [they] will not
assume, in the absence o f a finding to the contrary, that the object o f
such refusal was solely to gratify malice, and to inflict injury upon
such nonmembers. A number o f reasons fo r the action o f the organi­
zation will at once suggest themselves in a case like this. One reason
apparent from the findings in this case, as I shall show later, is the
desire o f the organization that its own members may do the work the
nonmembers are performing. And another most important reason is
suggested by the fact that these particular organizations, associations
o f steam fitters, required every applicant for membership to pass an
examination testing his competency. Now, one o f the objections
sometimes urged against labor organizations is that unskillful work­
men receive as large compensation as those thoroughly competent.
The examination required by the defendant associations tends to do
away with the force o f that objection as to them. And again, their
restriction o f membership to those who have stood a prescribed test
must have the effect o f securing careful as well as skillful associates
in their work, and that is a matter o f no small importance, in view o f
the state o f the law, which absolves the master from liability for inju­
ries sustained by a workman through the carelessness o f a coemployee.
I know it is said in another opinion in this case that “ workmen can not
dictate to employers how they shall carry on their business, nor whom
they shall or shall not em ploy;” but I dissent absolutely from that propo­
sition, and I assert that, so long as workmen must assume all the risk
o f injury that may come to them through the carelessness of, coem­
ployees, they have the moral and legal right to say that they will not
work with certain men, and the employer must accept their dictation
or g o without their services.




DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFFOTlKG- tABOR.

Il2 l

A fter reviewing the facts as found by the trial judge (see above),
Judge Parker said:
Now there is not a fact stated in that finding which is not lawful,
within the rules which I have quoted supra. Those principles concede
the right o f an association to strike in order to benefit its members;
and one method o f benefiting them is to secure them employment,— a
method conceded to be within the right o f an organization to employ.
There is no pretense that the defendant associations or their walking
delegates had any other motive than one which the law justifies,— of
attempting to benefit their members by securing their employment.
It is only where the sole purpose is to do injury to another, or the act
is prompted by malice, that it is insisted that the act becomes illegal.
No such motive is alleged in that finding.
Judge Parker then reverted to the use o f the word “ threats” in the
finding o f the trial judge, and after saying that what was so named was
a “ simple notification o f their determination” to strike, he continued:
But the sense in which the word was employed by the court is o f no
consequence, fo r the defendant associations had the absolute right to
threaten to do that which they had the right to do. Having the right
to insist that plaintiff’s men be discharged, and defendant’s men put
in their place, if the services o f the other members of the organi­
zation were to be retained, they also had the right to threaten that
none o f their men would stay unless their members could have all the
work there was to do.
As to the finding that “ Gumming threatened to cause a general
strike against the plaintiff association and against the plaintiff McQueed
wherever he found them at work, and that he would not allow them
to work at any job in the city o f New Y ork, except some small jobs
where the men o f the Enterprise Association were not employed, and
that he and defendant Nugent threatened to drive the plaintiff asso­
ciation out o f existence,” the court states that:
It will be found that it fairly means no more than that the defend­
ant associations did not purpose to allow McQueed and the members o f
his association to work upon any jobs where members o f defendant
association were employed; that they were perfectly willing to allow
them to have small jobs, fitted, perhaps, for men who were willing to
work for small wages, but that the larger jobs, where they could afford
to pay and would pay the rate o f wages demanded by defendant asso­
ciations, they intended to secure for their members alone,— a determi­
nation to which they had a perfect right to come, as is conceded by the
rules which I have quoted. Having reached that conclusion, defend­
ants notified McQueed, who had organized an association when he
failed to pass the defendant’s examination, that they would prevent him
and the men o f his association from working on a certain class of jobs.
They did not threaten to employ any illegal method to accomplish that
result.
Judge Yann, who prepared the minority opinion, which was con­
curred in by two other judges, first rehearsed the findings o f fact as




1122

BULLETIN 0E THE DEPARTMENT OP LABOR.

already given and laid down certain general principles o f law, which
were quoted in part by Chief Justice Parker (page 1119, supra). After
stating, as there quoted, that “ a peaceable and orderly strike, not to
harm others, but to improve their own condition, is not*in violation
o f law,” Judge Vann continued:
They have the right to go further, and to solicit and persuade others,
who do not belong to their organization, and are employed for no fixed
period, to quit work, also, unless the common employer o f all assents
to lawful conditions, designed to improve their material welfare.
They have no right, however, through the exercise o f coercion, to
prevent others from working. When persuasion ends, and pressure
begins, the law is violated; for that is a trespass upon the rights of
others, and is expressly forbidden by statute. (Penal Code, sec. 168.)
They have no right, by force, threats, or intimidation, to prevent
members o f another labor organization from working, or a contractor
from hiring them or continuing them in his employment. They may
not threaten to cripple his business unless he will discharge them, for
that infringes upon liberty o f action, and violates the right which
every man has to conduct his business as he sees fit, or to work for
whom and on what terms he pleases. Their labor is their property,
to do with as they choose; but the labor o f others is their property, in
turn, and is entitled to protection against wrongful interference. The
defendant associations made their own rules and regulations, and the
plaintiff corporation did the same. Neither was entitled to any exclu­
sive privilege, but both had equal rights according to law. Public
policy requires that the wages o f labor should be regulated by the
law o f competition and o f supply and demand, the same as the sale of
food or clothing. A ny combination to restrain “ the free pursuit in
this State o f any lawful business,” in order “ to create or maintain a
m onopoly,” is expressly prohibited by statute, and an injunction is
authorized to prevent it.
A combination o f workmen to secure a lawful benefit to themselves
should be distinguished from one to injure other workmen in their
trade. Here we have a conspiracy to injure the plaintiffs in their
business, as distinguished from a legitimate advancement of the
defendant’s own interests. W hile they had the right by fair persua­
sion to get the work o f the plaintiff McQueed, for instance, they had
no right, either by force or by threats, to prevent him from getting
any work whatever, or to deprive him o f the right to earn his living
by plying his trade. B y threatening to call a general strike o f the
related trades, the defendants forced the contractor to discharge com­
petent workmen who wanted to work for him, and whom he wished to
keep in his employment. They conspired to do harm to the contractor
in order to compel him to do harm to the plaintiffs, and their acts in
execution o f the conspiracy caused substantial damage to the mem­
bers o f the plaintiff corporation. While no physical force was
used, the practical effect was that members o f one labor organization
drove the members o f another labor organization out o f business, and
deprived them o f the right to labor at their chosen vocation. The
object was evil, for it was not to compete for employment by fair
means, but to exclude rivals from employment altogether by unfair
means. The law gives all men an equal chance to live by their own



DECISIONS OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1123

labor, and does not permit one labor union to seize all the chances, by
compelling employers to refuse employment to the members o f all
other unions. The plaintiffs do not ask for protection against compe­
tition, but from “ malicious and oppressive interference” with their
right to work at their trade.
Judge Vann then recounted evidence given by employers during the
trial as to the insistence o f the defendants on the discharge of the
plaintiffs, the methods used to procure compliance with their demands
and to the effect that the men discharged “ were good workmen, that
their work was satisfactory, and that there was no reason for dis­
charging them, other than the threats made.” Continuing, he said:
It may be argued that the employers were not obliged to yield to
these threats, and this is true; but noncompliance meant ruin to them,
for their work would be completely tied up and their business para­
lyzed. A threat, with ruin behind it, may be as coercive as physical
force. W hen an association is so strong and its discipline so perfect
that its orders to strike are equivalent to the commands of an absolute
monarch, the effect is the same as the use o f physical force. (1 Tied.
Cont. Prs. and P rop., p. 433; Erie, Trade Unions, 12,105.) The pur­
poses o f the defendants, as well as the methods pursued by them, were
unlawful, and authorized the injunction granted by the trial court in
order to prevent irreparable injury and a multiplicity of suits. This
was conceded in Reynolds v. Everett, 144 N. Y. 189, 39 N. E. 72,
and demonstrated in Davis v. Zimmerman, 91 Hun. 489, 36 N. Y.
Supp. 303. The fact that a lawful strike inflicts injury upon the
employer is not controlling. As was said by a recent writer upon the
subject: “ The courts recognize the right o f workingmen to combine
together for the purpose o f bettering their condition, and, in endeavor­
ing to attain their object, they may inflict more or less inconvenience
and damages upon the employer; but a threat to strike unless their
wages are advanced is something very different from a threat to strike
unless workmen who are not members o f the combination are dis­
charged. W hile it may be argued that indirectly the discharge
o f the nonunion employee will strengthen and benefit the union, and
thereby indirectly benefit the union workmen, the benefit to the mem­
bers o f the combination is so remote, as compared to the direct and
immediate injury inflicted upon the nonunion workmen, that the law
does not look beyond the immediate loss and damage to the innocent
parties, to the remote benefits that might result to the union.” (1
Eddy, Combns., 416.)
The conclusions I have announced are supported by the weight of
authority in this country and in England. The leading case in this
State is controlling in principle, and requires a reversal of the order
appealed from. (Curran v. Galen, 152 N. Y . 33, 46 N. E. 297.) [See
Bulletin No. 11, U. S. Department of Labor, page 529.]
The facts in this case were next reviewed, which are in brief that
Curran had refused to join a branch o f the Knights of Labor, and had
been dismissed from service by his employers in pursuance o f an
agreement that they should employ none but members o f said organi­
zation. Curran complained o f “ malicious and false reports” prevent­




1124

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

ing his employment. The defense was that all that was done was
solely in pursuance o f the agreement referred to, and in accordance
with the terms thereof, and without intent or purpose to injure the
plaintiff in any way. This answer was held insufficient by both the
trial court and the supreme court o f the State, and Curi’an obtained
judgment. Judge Gray, in his memorandum concurring with the
opinion prepared by Chief Justice Parker, distinguished between the
present case and the case o f Curran v. Galen, holding that in the latter
case malice was an element, while in the case in hand none appears.
A fter presenting the above facts Judge Yann said:
A ll the judges who sat in this court united with Judge Gray [in the
case Curran v. Galen] in saying that: “ Public policy and the interests
o f society favor the utmost freedom in the citizen to pursue his lawful
trade or calling, and if the purpose o f an organization or combination
o f workingmen be to hamper or to restrict that freedom, and, through
contracts or arrangements with employers, to coerce other workingmen
to become members o f the organization, and to come under its rules
and conditions, under the penalty o f the loss o f their position and o f
deprivation o f employment, then that purpose seems clearly unlawful.”
Quotations were made from recent English opinions, and a large
number o f cases were cited in support o f the views set forth.
Judge Vann then concluded:
I think that the action o f the defendants was unlawful and was
properly restrained, but the injunction, in the form granted, is too
broad and requires modification. It prevents the defendants “ from
coercing or obtaining by command, threats, strikes, or otherwise, the
dismissal or discharge by any employer, contractor, or owner, of
the members o f the plaintiff corporation,” etc. This might prevent
fair persuasion or solicitation, which the defendants may resort to.
The order o f the appellate division, so far as appealed from, should
be reversed, and the judgment o f the special term modified by strik­
ing out the words “ or otherwise” therefrom, and, as modified, affirmed,
with costs to the appellants in all courts.

R ailroad Companies— H ospital S ervice — L iability for R efus ­
C ertificate of A dmission— M easure of D amages — Illin ois

ing

Central R ailroad Company v. Gheen, Court o f A ppeals o f Kentucky,
66 Southwestern R eporter, page 639.— T. W . Gheen sued in the circuit
court o f Livingston County to recover damages from the above-named
company for its refusal to admit him into a hospital. This hospital was
under the supervision and control o f the railroad company, and each
employee on a certain division who worked as much as four days in a
month was required to contribute toward its support, the amount of
such contribution being withheld by the company’s paymaster and by
him turned into the hospital fund.




DECISION'S OF COURTS AFFECTING LABOR.

1125

W hile in the employ o f the company, Gheen’s hand was injured and
he made application to his foreman for a certificate entitling him to
admission into the hospital, there to receive surgical treatment, board,
etc., as well as to receive transportation from the place o f his employ­
ment to the city o f Paducah in which the hospital was located. This
was denied, and Gheen was treated by the local surgeon o f the com­
pany, but not in such wise as to prevent the amputation o f three o f
his fingers, which he claimed could have been prevented by prompt
admission to the hospital. The trial resulted in a verdict fo r the
plaintiff from which the company appealed, obtaining a reversal o f
the judgment o f the court below with directions for a new trial.
The railroad company denied all responsibility for the hospital
management or liabilities, and also denied that Gheen was entitled to
admission, or that he was injured or damaged by being refused admis­
sion earlier than he was. Gheen claimed nothing for the original
injury, but only fo r the increased injury resulting from the delay o f
the company in allowing him to enter the hospital, into which he was
finally admitted and in which his fingers were amputated.
As to the liability o f the railroad company for the management of
the hospital, the court, after reciting the facts as to control and sup­
port given above, said:
W e are o f opinion that these facts, proven without serious, if any,
contradiction, would have authorized the court to instruct the jury
peremptorily that, if appellee had been engaged more than four days,
he was entitled to admission into the hospital, and if he was refused
permission to enter, or certificate entitling him to transportation and
entrance to the hospital, and was injured by such refusal, he was
entitled to recover.
The instruction o f the lower court as to measure of damages was in
part as follows:
The court says to the jury if, under the evidence and instructions,
they find for plaintiff, they will find only such damages as will com­
pensate him fo r the excess o f pain and suffering, if any, that he
endured over that which he would have endured if he had been
treated in the hospital, and for the loss o f his fingers and power to earn
money, and mental and physical suffering by reason thereof, provided
the jury believe from the evidence that his fingers could and would
have been saved if he had been permitted to enter said hospital when
he first applied for admission.
This instruction was excepted to by the appellant company, which
exception was sustained by the court o f appeals. The court said:
The general and universal rule o f law in regard to damages is that
every person must do all that can reasonably be done to render the
damage fo r any act or omission as light as possible. Under this rule,
the appellee, when he was refused admission to the hospital, if such




1126

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

be the case, was bound to do all that he could to keep the consequent
injury and damage as light as possible. To do so, he should have
employed medical and surgical attention to cure his hand, or, at least,
to arrest other and further injury. F or such services and attention,
or the cost thereof, the appellant, if liable at all, would be required
to pay. Appellee was entitled, if at all, to the skilled surgical atten­
tion he would have received at the hospital o f appellant, including
board, transportation, and such accommodations and charges as the
hospital would furnish its patients. I f appellant refused to furnish
such, and was bound to do so, the appellee could and should have
sought such attention elsewhere, and fo r the reasonable cost thereof
appellant would be liable. The science o f medicine and surgery has
not so far advanced that it could be said as a certain fact that if appel­
lee had been admitted into the hospital, and had received the very best
attention there to be had, he would not have suffered pain and mental
anxiety, and that surely he would not have lost his fingers. By the
establishment o f the hospital, the appellant did not assume or under­
take to cure disease, or in all cases relieve from injuries. The under­
taking was to furnish medical and surgical attention, and to nurse and
care for the patient who is admitted therein. I f appellant be liable
under the proof, its liability is for failure to furnish these things, and
the damage fo r such failure is the reasonable cost at which such care
and attention, board, and medical and surgical skill could have been
obtained, as well as cost o f transportation to the nearest suitable place
where such attention could be had.




LAWS OF VARIOUS STATES RELATING TO LABOR ENACTED SINCE
JANUARY 1, 1896.
[The Second Special Report of the Department contains all laws of the various States and Terri­
tories and of the United States relating to labor in force January 1, 1896. Later enactments are
reproduced in successive issues of the Bulletin from time to time as published.]

ARIZONA.
ACTS OF 1901.
L ia b ility o f em ployers fo r acts o f em ployees .

Section 2767 (Civil Code). Sub-section 4. Every corporation doing business in the
Territory of Arizona, shall be liable for all damages done to any employee in conse­
quence of any negligence of its agents or employees to any person sustaining such
damage: P rovided , Such corporation has had previous notice of the incompetency,
carelessness or negligence of such agent or employee.
Took effect April 19, 1901.
Creating unsafe am ount o f steam in boilers.

Section 308 (Penal Code). Every engineer or other person having charge of any
steam boiler, steam engine or other apparatus for generating or employing steam,
used in any manufactory, railway or other mechanical works, who willfully or from
ignorance or gross neglect creates, or allows to be created, such an undue quantity of
steam as to burst or break the boiler or engine or apparatus, or cause any other
accident whereby human life is endangered, is guilty of a felony.
Took effect September 1, 1901.
Offenses o f railroad em ployees.

Section 330 (Penal Code). Every conductor, engineer, brakeman, switchman, or
other person having charge, w holly or in part, of any railroad car, locomotive, or
train, who willfully or negligently suffers or causes the same to collide with another ear,
locomotive, or train, or with any" other object or thing whereby the death of a human
being is produced, is punishable by imprisonment in the Territorial prison for not
less than one nor more than ten years.
S ec. 355 (Penal Code). Every person in charge of a locomotive engine, who, before
crossing any traveled public way, omits to cause a bell to ring or steam-whistle to
sound at the distance of at least eighty rods from the crossing, and up to it, is guilty
of a misdemeanor.
S ec. 358 (Penal Code). Every engineer, conductor, brakeman, switch-tender, or
other officer, agent, or servant of any railroad company, who is guilty o f any willful
violation or omission of his duty as such officer, agent or servant, whereby human
life or safety is endangered, the punishment of which is not otherwise prescribed,
or any person or corporation knowingly employing any such person, is guilty of a
misdemeanor.
S ec. 360 (Penal Code). Any engineer, conductor or other employee of any cor­
poration operating a railway in this Territory, who shall suffer or permit any loco­
motive or cars to be or remain upon the crossing of any public highway over such
railway so as to obstruct travel over such crossing for a period exceeding fifteen min­
utes, is guilty of a misdemeanor, except in cases of unavoidable accident.
Took effect September 1, 1901.
P a ym en t o f wages.

Section 615 (Penal Code). All corporations or individuals employing men shall pay
wages due their employees at least once a month, in lawful money of the United
States of America, or bank check of even date.




1127

1128

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

Sec . 616 (Penal Code). Whenever an employee quits the service or is discharged
therefrom, such employee shall be paid, whatever wrages are due him, in lawful
money of the United States of America, or by check of even date, on a bank, and
said wages shall be paid at once.
Sec. 617 (Penal Code). Any person or persons violating any of the provisions of
the two preceding sections are guilty of a misdemeanor.
Took effect September 1, 1901.

IDAHO.
ACTS OF 1901.
L a b or Com m ission.

[Page 66.]
Section

.

1 There shall be and is hereby created, a commission to be composed of

two electors of the State, which shall be designated the labor commission, and which
shall be charged with the duties and vested with the powers hereinafter enumerated.
S ec . 2. The members of said commission shall be appointed b y the governor, by
and with advice and consent of the senate; and shall hold office for two years and
until their successors shall have been appointed and qualified. One of said com­
missioners shall have been, for not less than six (6) years of his life, an employee, for
wages, in some department of industry, in which it is usual to employ a number of
persons, under single direction and control, and shall be, at the time of his appoint­
ment, affiliated with the labor interest as distinguished from the capitalist or
employing interest.
The other of said commissioners shall have been, for not less than six years, an
employer of labor, for wages, in some department of industry in which it is usual to
employ a number of persons, under single direction and control, and shall be, at the
time of his appointment, affiliated with the employing interest, as distinguished from
the labor interest. Neither of said commissioners shall be less than twenty-five
years of age, and they shall not be members of the same political party. A political
party under the meaning of this section, should be held to mean one or more parties
supporting one ticket or member of a fusion; neither of them shall hold any other
State, county or city office in Idaho, during the term of office for which they shall
be appointed.
Each of said commissioners shall take and subscribe an oath, to be endorsed upon
his commission, to the effect that he will punctually, honestly and faithfully discharge
his duties as such commissioner.
S ec. 3. Such commission shall have a seal and shall not be required to leave their
personal labor or business, except to perform the duties devolving upon them as
members of the labor commission.
W hen necessary, they may appoint a secretary, who shall be a skillful stenographer
and typewriter, and wno shall receive a salary of four dollars per day and traveling
expenses for every day spent in the discharge of duty under the direction of the
commission.
Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of said commissioners, upon receiving authentic infor­
mation, in any manner, of the existence of any strike, lockout, or other labor com ­
plication in this State, effecting [affecting] the labor or employment of fifty persons
or more, to go to the place where such complication exists, put themselves into com­
munication w ith the parties to the controversy, and offer them [their] services as
T
mediators between them: P rovid ed , That in all cases where less than fifty persons
are on strike or lockout, the commission may, in their discretion, act as though such
number of strikers consisted of fifty or more persons. If they shall not succeed in
effecting an amicable adjustment of the controversy in that way, they shall endeavor
to induce the parties to submit their differences to arbitration, either under the pro­
visions of this act or otherwise as they may elect.
Sec. 5. For the purpose of arbitration, under this act, the labor commissioners and
the judge of the district court of the district in w hich the business in relation to
which the controversy shall arise, shall have been carried on, shall constitute a
board of arbitrators, to which shall be added, if the parties so agree, two other mem­
bers, one to be named by the employer, and the other by the employees in the arbi­
tration agreement. If the parties to the controversy are a railroad company, and
the employees of the company engaged in the running of trains, any terminal within
this State, of the road, or any division thereof, may be taken and treated as the loca­
tion of the business within the terms of this section, for the purpose of giving jurisdic­
tion to the judge of the district court, to act as a member of the board of arbitration.




LABOR LAWS— IDAHO---- ACTS OF 1901,

1129

Sec. 6. An agreement to enter into arbitration under this act, shall be in writing
and shall state the issue to be submitted and decided, and shall have the effect of an
agreement, by the parties, to abide by, and perform the award.
Such an agreement may be signed by the employer, as an individual firm, or cor­
poration, as the case may be, and execution o f the agreement, in the name of the
employer, by any agent or representative of such employer, then and therefore in
control or management of the business or department of business, in relation to
which the controversy shall have arisen, shall bind the employer. On the part of
the employees the agreement may be signed by them, in their own person, not less
than two-thirds of those concerned in the controversy, signing, or it may be signed
by a committee, by them appointed. Such committee may be created by election
at a meeting of the employees concerned in the controversy, at which not less than
two-thirds of such employees shall be present, which election, and the fact of the
presence of the required number of employees at the meeting, shall be evidenced by
the affidavit of the chairman and secretary of such meeting, attached to the arbitra­
tion agreement. If the employees, concerned in the controversy, or any of them
shall be members of any labor union or working men’ s society, they may be repre­
sented in the execution of said arbitration agreement by officers or committeemen of
the union or society designated by it, in any manner conformable to its usual
methods of transacting business, and others of the employees, represented by com­
mittee as hereinbefore provided.
Sec. 7. If upon any occasion calling for the presence and intervention of the labor
commissioners, under this act, one of said commissioners shall be present and the
other absent, the judge of the district court of the district in which the dispute shall
have arisen, as defined in section 5, shall upon the application of the commissioners
present, appoint a commissioner pro tern., in the place of the absent commissioner
and such commissioner pro tern, shall exercise all the powers of a commissioner
under this act, until the termination of the duties of the commission with respect to
the particular controversy, upon the occasion of which the appointment shall have
been made, and shall receive the same pay and allowances provided by this act, for
the other commissioners. Such commissioner pro tern, shall represent and be affili­
ated with the same interests as the absent commissioner.
Sec. 8. Before entering upon their duties, the arbitrators shall take and subscribe
an oath or affirmation to the effect that they w ill honestly and impartially perform
their duties as arbitrators, and a just and fair award render, to the best of their abil­
ity. The sitting of the arbitrators shall be in the court room of the district court or
such other place as shall be provided by the county commissioners, of the county in
which the hearing is had. The district judge shall be the presiding member of the
board. He shall have power to issue subpoenas for witnesses who do not appear
voluntarily, directed to the sheriff of the county, whose duty it shall be to serve the
same, without delay. H e shall have power to administer oaths and affirmations to
witnesses, enforce order, and direct and control the examinations.
The proceedings shall be informal in character, but in general accordance with the
practice governing the district courts in the trial of civil cases. All questions of prac­
tice, or questions relating to the admission of evidence, shall be decided b y the pre­
siding member of the board summarily and without extended argument. The sittings
shall be open and public. If five members are sitting as such board, three members
of the board, agreeing, shall have power to make an award, otherwise two. The sec­
retary of the commission shall attend the sitting and make a record of the proceed­
ings in shorthand, but shall transcribe so much thereof only as the commission shall
direct.
Sec. 9. The arbitrators shall make their award in writing and deliver the same
with the arbitration agreement and their oath as arbitrators, to the clerk of the dis­
trict court of the judicial district in which the hearing was had, and deliver a copy
of the award to the employer and a copy to the first signer of the arbitration agree­
ment on the part of the employees. A copy of all the papers shall be preserved by
the commission.
Sec. 10. The clerk of the district court shall record the papers, delivered to him,
as directed in the last preceding section, in the order book of the district court. Any
person, w ho was a party to the arbitration proceedings, may present to the district
court of the county in which the hearing was had, or the judge thereof, in vacation,
a verified petition referring to the proceedings and the record of them, in the order
book, and showing that said award has not been complied with, stating by whom
and in what respect it has been disobeyed.
And thereupon, the court or judge thereof, in vacation, shall grant a rule against
the party or parties so charged, to show cause within five days, why said award has
not been obeyed, which shall be served by the sheriff as other process. Upon return
made to the rule, the judge or court, if in session, shall hear and determine the ques­




1130

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

tions presented and make such order or orders, directed to the parties before him, in
personam, as shall give just effect to the award. Disobedience by any party to such
proceedings of any order so made, shall be deemed a contempt of the court, and may
be punished accordingly. But such punishment shall not extend to imprisonment
except in case of willful disobedience. In all proceedings under this section, the
award shall be regarded as presumptively binding upon the employer and all employ­
ees w ho were parties to the controversy submitted to arbitration, wT
hich presumption
shall be overcome only by proof of dissent from the submission delivered to the arbi­
trators, or one of them, in writing, before the commencement of the hearing.
Sec. 11. The labor commission with the advice and assistance of the attorney gen­
eral of the State, which he is hereby required to render, may make rules and regulations
respecting proceedings in arbitration, under this act, not inconsistent with this act,
or the law, including forms, and cause the same to be printed and furnished to all
persons applying therefor, and all arbitration proceedings under this act shall there­
after conform to such rules and regulations.
Sec. 12. Any employer and his employees, not less than twenty-five in number,
between wT
hom differences exist which have not resulted in any open rupture or
strike, may, of their own motion, apply to the labor commission, for arbitration of
their differences, and upon the execution of an arbitration agreement, as herein­
before provided, a board of arbitrators shall be organized in the manner hereinbefore
provided, and the arbitration shall take place and the award be rendered, recorded
and enforced, in the same manner as in arbitrations under the provisions found
in the preceding sections of this act.
Sec. 13. In all cases arising under this act, requiring the attendance of a judge of
the district court as a member of the arbitration board, such duty shall have prece­
dence over any other business pending in his court, and if necessary for prompt
transaction of such other business, it shall be his duty to appoint the district judge
of an adjoining district to sit in the district court in his place during the pendency
of such arbitration, and such appointee shall receive the same compensation for his
services as is now allowed by law to judges appointed to sit in case of change of judge
in civil actions. In case the judge of the district court, whose duty it shall become
under this act, to sit upon any board of arbitrators, shall be at the time actually
engaged in a trial which can not be interrupted without loss and injury to the parties,
ana which will, in his opinion, continue for more than three days to come, or is dis­
abled from acting by sickness or otherwise, it shall be the duty of such judge to call
in and appoint the district judge of an adjoining district, to sit upon such board of
arbitrators, and such appointed judge shall have the same power and perform the
same duties as member of the board of arbitration as are by this act vested in and
charged upon the district judge regularly sitting, and he shall receive the same com­
pensation, now provided by law, to a judge sitting by appointment, upon a change
of judge in civil cases, to be paid in the same way.
Sec. 14. If the parties to any such labor controversy as is defined in section 4 of
this act, shall have failed at the end of five days, after the first communication of
said labor commission to them, to adjust their differences amicably, or to agree to
submit the same to arbitration, it shall be the duty of the labor commission to pro­
ceed at once to investigate the facts attending the disagreement.
In this investigation, the commission shall be entitled, upon request, to the pres­
ence and assistance of the attorney general of the State, in person or by deputy,
whose duty it is hereby made to attend, without delay, upon request, by letter or
telegram, from the commission. For the purpose of such investigation, the com­
missioners shall have power to issue subpoenas and each of the commissioners shall
have power to administer oaths and affirmations. Such subpoena shall be under seal
of the commission, and signed by the secretary of the commission, or a member of
it, and shall command the attendance of the person or persons named in it, at a time
and place named, which subpoena may be served and returned as other process by
any sheriff or constable in the State.
In case of disobedience of any such subpoena or the refusal of any witness to
testify, the district court having jurisdiction or the judge thereof, during vacation,
shall, upon the application of the labor commission, grant a rule against the dis­
obeying person or persons or the person refusing to testify, to show cause, forth­
with w hy he or they should not obey such subpoena or testify as required by the
commission, or be adjudged guilty of contempt, and in such proceedings, such
court, or the judge thereof, in vacation, shall be empowered to compel obedience to
such subpoena, as in the case of subpoena issued under the order of and by the
authority of the court, or to compel a witness to testify as witnesses in court are
compelled to testify. But no person shall be required to attend as a witness, at any
place outside the county of his residence. Witnesses called by the labor commis­
sion, under this section, shall be paid $2 per diem fees out of the expense fund pro­
vided by this act, if such payment is claimed at the time of their examination.




LABOR LAWS— IDAHO---- ACTS OF 1901.

1131

Sec. 15.. Upon the completion of the investigation authorized by the last preced­
ing section, the labor commission shall forthwith report the facts thereby disclosed,
affecting the merits of the controversy, in a brief and condensed form to the governor.
Sec. 16. Any employer shall be entitled, in his response to the inquiries made of
him by the commission in the investigation provided for in the last two preceding
sections, to submit in writing to the commissioner a statement of any facts material
to the inquiry, the publication of which would be likely to be injurious to his busi­
ness, and the facts so stated shall be taken and held as confidential, and shall not be
disclosed in the report or otherwise.
Sec. 17. Said commissioners shall receive a compensation of six dollars each per
diem, for the time actually expended, and actual and necessary traveling and hotel
expenses, while absent from home in the performance of duty, and each of the two
members of the board of arbitration, chosen b y the parties under the provisions of
this act, shall receive the same compensation for the days occupied in service, upon
the board. The attorney general or his deputy shall receive his necessary and actual
traveling expenses while absent from home in the service of the commission. Such
compensation and expenses shall be paid by the State treasurer upon warrants drawn
by the auditor upon itemized and verified accounts of time spent and expenses paid.
All such accounts, except those of the commissioners, shall be certified as correct by
the commissioners, or one of them, and the accounts of the commissioners shall be
certified by the secretary of the commission.
It is hereby declared to be the policy of this act, that the arbitrations and investi­
gations provided for in it, shall be conducted with all reasonable promptness and
dispatch, and no member of any board of arbitration shall be allowed payment for
more than fifteen days’ service, in any one arbitration, and no commissioner shaH
be allowed payment for more than ten days’ service in the making of the investiga­
tion provided for in section 14 and sections following.
Sec. 18. For the payment of the salary of the secretary of the commission, the
compensation of the commissioners and other arbitrators, the traveling and hotel
expenses herein authorized to be paid, and for witness fees, printing, stationery,
postage, telegrams and office expenses, there is hereby appropriated out of any
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of three thousand dol­
lars for the year 1901, and three thousand dollars for the year 1902.
Sec. 19. w ithin ten days after the members of the labor commission shall have
been appointed, and said appointments ratified by the senate, they shall meet at the
State capital for a period of not to exceed ten days, for the purpose of drafting rules
and method of procedure in sessions of the commission, in accordance with section
11 of this act, and for such period the pay of the commissioners, and the secretary
of the commission shall be the same as allowed them by this act, when serving as
arbitrators or mediators.
Sec. 20. All laws, in conflict with this act, are hereby repealed.
Sec. 21. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage, an
emergency existing therefor.
Approved, March 12, 1901.
E m ploym en t agencies.

[Page 131.]
Section 1. From and after the date of the passage of this act no person or persons
shall carry on, hold, or keep any labor agency, or bureau of employment without
first having obtained written permission of the county commissioners of the county
wherein said agency or bureau is to be located.
Sec. 2. Before any person or persons shall be permitted to open, keep, or conduct
any labor agency or bureau of employment within the jurisdiction of said county,
he shall furnish a bond with good and solvent security in favor of the chairman of
said county commissioners in the full sum and amount of five thousand dollars
($5,000), conditioned that he shall well and truly carry out the purposes for which
said agency shall have*been established, and that he shall pay all such damages
which may result from his or their actions as such agent or agents, keeper or keepers
of said bureau of employment and that anyone who may have been injured or dam­
aged by said agent or agents by any act done in furtherance of said business or by
fraud or misrepresentations o f said agents or keepers, shall have a right to sue for
the recovery of such damages before any court of competent jurisdiction.
Sec. 3. Anyone violating the provisions of this act shall be subject to a fine of not
more than $300, nor less than $100, and imprisonment in the county jail for not more
than 90 days, nor less than 30 days.
Sec. 4. Whereas an emergency exists, this act shall take effect and be in force
from and after its passage.
Approved March 11, 1901.




1132

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR,
INDIANA.
ACTS OF 1901.
Chapter 28.—

Inspection o f fa ctories.

Section 1. Section 19 of [ “ An act concerning labor, etc.,” approved March 2,1899,
[shall] be amended so as to read as follows:
Section 19. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act, a depart­
ment of inspection is hereby created, and the governor shall by and with the advice
and consent of the senate, appoint a chief inspector to have charge of said depart­
ment. Said inspector shall hold and continue in office after the expiration ot his
term of office until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. The term
of office of the chief inspector shall be for four years. The annual salary of such
chief inspector shall be one thousand eight hundred dollars ($1,800) and actual
expenses when absent from home in the discharge of his official duties. Said chief
inspector shall, by and with the consent of the governor, appoint a sufficient number
of deputies to enforce the provisions of this act, not to exceed five (5) one of which
shall be a chief deputy inspector, whose salary shall be one thousand five hundred
dollars ($1,500) per annum and actual expenses when absent from home in the dis­
charge of his official duties. The salaries of such other deputies as may be appointed
shall be one thousand dollars ($1,000) each per annum and actual expenses when
absent from home in the discharge of their official duties. But said actual expenses
for the department of inspection shall in no year exceed the sum of three thousand
dollars ($3,000), and the duties of the deputy inspectors shall be such as shall
be assigned them b y the chief inspector. Said chief inspector shall also employ
a stenographer at a salary not to exceed six hundred dollars ($600) per annum.
The salary and actual expenses of said deputy inspectors and stenographer shall be
paid monthly as due, on voucher duly attested before some officer authorized to
administer oaths, and approved and signed b y the chief inspector, and the salary
and actual expenses of the chief inspector shall be paid* in monthly installments,
out of the treasury of the State, upon warrants of the auditor of state, and the total
annual appropriations of ten thousand nine hundred dollars ($10,900) for such pay­
ments aforesaid, is hereby made out of any moneys in the Shite treasury not other­
wise appropriated: P rovid ed f That the auditor of state shall issue no warrant,
except upon itemized bills, sworn to, and presented by the chief inspector provided
for in this act.
Approved February 26, 1901.
C hapter 35.— Inspection

o f bakeries, etc.

Section 1. Every building, room basement or cellar occupied or used as a bakery
or confectionery, canning, packing, pickling, or preserving establishment, or for the
manufacture (for sale) of any food product shall be properly heated, lighted, drained,
plumbed and ventilated and conducted with a strict regard to the health of the
operatives and the purity and wholesomeness of the food articles produced.
Sec. 2. The floors, side-walls, ceilings, fixtures, furniture and utensils of every
establishment or place where food products are manufactured or stored, shall at all
times be kept in a clean, healthful and sanitary condition.
The side-walls and ceilings of every bake room or confectionery shall be well plas­
tered, wainscoted or ceiled with metal or lumber. Plastered walls and ceilings shall
be oil painted or kept well lime washed and all interior woodwork in every bakery or
confectionery shall be kept well oiled or painted with oil paint and kept washed
clean with soap and water. And every building room, basement, or cellar occupied
or used for the manufacture of any food products shall have, if deemed necessary by
the chief inspector an impermeable floor made of cement or tile laid in cement.
Sec. 3. The chief inspector or deputy inspector of the Department of Inspection or
any health officer shall have the full power at all times to enter and inspect every build­
ing, room, basement, or cellar occupied or used as aforesaid and if such inspection
shall disclose a noncompliance with the purpose and provisions of this act, the chief
inspector shall require the execution of such lawful sanitary measures or alterations
in or about such premises as will conform to the requirements of this act, and secure
the production of the food products thereof in a clean and wholesome condition.
Sec. 4. Flour and meal shall be stored in dry and wT ventilated rooms only and
ell
no basement or cellar not now occupied or used as a bakery or confectionery shall
hereafter be used as such except that the requirements of section 1 of this chapter
shall have been first fully complied wT
ith.




LABOR LAWS— INDIANA— ACTS OF 1901.

1133

Sec. 5. The sleeping place or places for the persons employed in a bake-shop shall
be separate and apart from the bake room; and no person shall be allowed to sleep
in a bake room or place where flour or meal or the products thereof are stored. No
domestic animal except cats shall be permitted to remain in a bake room or place
used for the storage o f flour or meal food products.
Sec. 6. No employer shall knowingly require, permit or suffer any person to work
in a bakery or confectionery w ho is affected with consumption of the lungs; or with
scrofula, or with any venereal disease or with any communicable skin disease. Cus­
pidors shall be provided by the owner or operator for each workroom of every bak­
ery or confectionery, and no employee or other person shall expectorate on the
floor or side-walls of any bakery or confectionery or place where the manufacture of
any food product is conducted.
Plain notices shall be posted in every place where food products of any kind are
produced forbidding all persons expectorating on the floors of such establishment.
Sec. 7. The door and window openings of every food producing establishment
during fly season shall be fitted with self-closing wire screen doors and top outward­
tipping wire window screens.
Sec. 8. Every bakery and confectionery shall be provided with washroom and
watercloset or closets but separate and apart from the bake room or rooms where
the manufacture of any food product is conducted.
Sec. 9. A ny person w ho violates any of the provisions of this act or refuses to com ply
with any lawful requirements, of the chief inspector, duly made in writing shall be
guilty oi a misdemeanor and on conviction shall be punished for the first offense by
a fine not less than ten dollars ($10) or more than fifty dollars ($50), for the second
offense by a fine of not less than fifty dollars ($50) or more than one hundred dol­
lars ($100), and third offense not less than two hundred dollars ($200) or by impris­
onment for not more than sixty days or both fine and imprisonment.
A copy of this act shall be conspicuously posted in each workroom of every estab­
lishment effected [affected] b y the provisipns of this act.
Approved February 28, 1901.
C

h apter

1 2 2 .—

R ate o f w ages on p u b lic w orks.

1. From and after the passage of this act, unskilled labor employed upon
any public work of the State, counties, cities and towns, shall receive not less than
twenty cents an hour for said labor, which may be enforced in a proper action, and
in case a suit shall be necessary for the recovery of the compensation herein pro­
vided for, and where the compensation is recovered, the person suing shall recover
also a reasonable attorney's fee, together with a penalty not exceeding double the
amount of wages due: P rovid ed , That boards of commissioners, common councils of
towns or cities are prohibited from making contracts with such laborers by the week
or any definite length of time wherein a price is agreed upon at a rate less than as
provided herein.
Sec. 2. A n y contractor or other person in charge of public work of the State,
counties, cities or towns, whose duty it is to contract with, employ and pay, the
unskilled labor on such public work, w ho shall violate the provisions of section one
of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall
be fined in any sum not exceeding ten dollars, to w hich may be added imprisonment
in the county jail not exceeding thirty days.
Sec. 3. A ll laws and parts of laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.
Approved March 9,1901.
S e c t io n

C

h apter

165.— P rotection

o f w ages o f laborers on p u b lic w orks— Contractors' bonds.

S e c t i o n 1. Hereafter the common council of any city in the State of Indiana, not
governed by special charter granted by the legislature", and the board of trustees of
any incorporated town within such State, shall require all contractors for street, alley,
sewer ana other public improvements, to give a good and sufficient bond, payable
to the State of Indiana, at least two of the sureties on which bond shall be residents
of the county in w hich such city or town is located, which bond shall guarantee the
faithful performance of the work, and that the contractor so receiving said contract
shall promptly pay all debts incurred in the prosecution of such work, including
labor, materials furnished, and for boarding tne laborers thereon, where such con­
tractor agrees to be responsible for such board.
Sec. 2. A ny laborer, material man or person furnishing board, labor or material to
said contractor as in the preceding section provided, and having a claim against such
contractor therefor shall after thirty days after the completion of said work have a

9398— N o. 42—02------------ 17



1134

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

right of action for same with attorney’ s fee thereon before any court of competent
jurisdiction in the county where such city or town making such improvements is
located.
Sec. 3. A ll laws and parts of laws in conflict herewith are hereby repealed.
Sec. 4. An emergency existing for the immediate taking effect of this act, therefore
the same shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.
Approved March 11, 1901.
C

h apter

225.— Contracts o f em ployees

w aiving right to dam ages.

.

S e c t i o n 1 A ll contracts between employer and employee releasing the em ployer
from liability for damages arising out of the negligence of the employer b y w hich
the employee is injured, or in case of the employee’ s death, to his representatives,
are against public policy, and hereby declared null and void.
Sec. 2. All contracts between employer and employee releasing third persons,
copartnerships or corporations from liability for damages arising out of the negli­
gence of such third persons, copartnerships or corporations by w hich the employee
of such employer is injured, or in case of the death of such employee, to his repre­
sentatives, are against public policy and are hereby declared null and void.
Sec. 3. All contracts between an employee and a third person, copartnership or
corporation in which it is agreed that the employer of such employeeahall be released
from liability for damages of such employee arising out of the negligence of the
employer, or in case of the death of such employee, to his representatives, are against
public policy and are hereby declared null and void: P rovid ed , That nothing in this
act shall apply to voluntary relief departments, or associations organized for the
purpose of insuring employees. Nothing in this act shall be construed to revert
back to contracts made prior to the passage of this act. Nor shall this act affect
pending litigation: P rovid ed , That nothing in any section of this act shall be so con­
strued as to affect or apply to any contract or agreement that may be made between
the employer and employee, or in case of death, his next of kin or his representative
after an injury to the employee has occurred, but the provisions of this act shall
apply solely to contracts made prior to any injury.
Sec. 4. Whereas an emergency exists for the immediate taking effect of this act
therefore the same shall be in force from and after its passage.
Approved March 11, 1901.
C

h apter

232.— In sp ection

o f m ines.

S e c t i o n 1 . Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 , of an act entitled “ An act abolishing the office
of mine inspector in the State of Indiana, establishing the office of inspector of mines,
providing the manner of appointment to such office, repealing all laws and parts of
laws in conflict therewith, and declaring an emergency,” passed notwithstanding the
governor’ s veto, March 4th, 1891, being sections 7452, 7453, 7454 and 7455 of Burns’
1894 revisions of the Indiana statutes, [shall] be amended to read as follows:
Section 3. The inspector of mines shall appoint two assistants, who shall each pass
such examinations touching his qualifications for such position as may be prescribed
by such inspector of mines. Such inspector of mines shall execute certificates of
such appointment and deliver the same to each of such assistants, w ho shall there­
upon qualify b y each executing a bond and taking an oath in the manner and form
provided by this act, and when so qualified, each such assistant is authorized and
empowered to draw his salary and to perform all the duties of his office as prescribed
b y this act. Each of such assistants shall be subject to the orders and directions of
the inspector of mines, and, in pursuance of such orders and directions, is empowered
to do any and all acts and to perform all the duties incumbent upon the inspector
of mines. They shall each make a detailed and itemized report as often as required,
to the inspector of mines, of the work performed b y him, and shall hold his office
subject to removal at any time by such inspector of mines for cause.
Sec. 2. Section 4 of said above entitled act [shall] be amended to read as follows:
Section 4. The inspector of mines and his assistants shall be residents of the State
of Indiana for at least five (5) years immediately preceding their appointment to
office, and shall be practical miners of at least ten (10) years’ experience in actual
mining, and no person shall be eligible to hold the office of inspector of mines or
assistant inspector of mines w ho is or may be pecuniarily interested in any coal mine
within this State, either directly or indirectly. The inspector of mines and his
assistants, before entering upon the duties of their offices, shall each execute a bond
payable to the State of Indiana, with good and sufficient surety, in the sum of one
thousand dollars ($1,000), and shall take and subscribe to an oath to be endorsed
upon the back of each bond for the faithful performance of the duties of the office,
which bond shall be approved by and filed with the secretary of state.




LABOR LAWS— INDIANA— ACTS OF 1901.

1135

Sec. 3. Section 5 of said above entitled act [shall] be amended to read as follows:
Section 5. The inspector of mines and his assistants shall perform all the duties
now required by law to be performed by the mine inspector, and such inspector of
mines shall make an annual report to the State geologist of all matters now required
b y law to be reported, w hich report shall be published with the report of the State
geologist, and shall in every respect comply with the law pertaining to the inspec­
tion of mines.
Sec. 4. Section 6 of said above entitled act [shall] be amended to read as follows:
Section 6. The inspector of mines shall receive as compensation for his services
the sum of one thousand eight hundred dollars ($1,800) per annum, and each assist­
ant inspector of mines shall receive as compensation for his services the sum of one
thousand two hundred dollars ($1,200) per annum, and for expenses, said inspector
and his assistants shall receive the sum actually and necessarily expended for that
purpose, in the discharge of their official duties, all to be paid quarterly by the State
treasurer from the funds in the State treasury not otherwise appropriated. All
expense bills shall be sworn to and shall show the items of expense in detail. Said
inspector of mines may also appoint a secretary to assist him in the discharge of his
duties, who shall receive a salary of six hundred dollars ($600) per annum.
S e c . 5. A ll laws in conflict with any of the provisions of this act are hereby
repealed so far as in conflict.
S e c . 6. Whereas an emergency is hereby declared to exist for the immediate tak­
ing effect of this act, it shall, therefore, take effect and be in force from and after its
passage.
Approved March 11, 1901.
C

h apter

236.— M ine

regulations— Use o f explosives.

S e c t i o n 1. Whenever any workman is about to open a keg or b ox containing
powder, or other explosives, he shall place and keep his lamp at least five feet dis­
tant from said explosive, and in such a position that the air current can not carry
sparks to it; and no person shall approach nearer than five feet to any open box or
keg containing powder or other explosive with a lighted lamp, pipe or any other
thing containing fire.
S e c . 2. In the process of charging and tamping a hole, no person shall use any
iron or steel-pointed needle. The needle used in preparing the blast shall be made
of copper, and the tamping bar shall be tipped with at least five inches of copper.
No coal dust nor any material that is inflammable, or that may create a spark shall
be used for tamping and some soft material shall be placed next to the cartridge or
explosive.
Sec. 3. Any person or persons violating any of the provisions of this act shall be
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and if found guilty, shall be fined not less than
five dollars ($5) nor more than fifty dollars ($50) or six months in the county jail,
at the discretion of the court.
Approved March 11, 1901.

C

h apter

237.— P aym en t

fa r assignm ent o f wages o f coal m ine em ployees in checks,
tickets, etc.

S e c t i o n 1.
Whenever any merchant or dealer in goods or merchandise, or any
other person, shall take from any employee or laborer for wages, who labors in or
about any coal mine in this State, an assignment of such employee’ swages, earned or
unearned, due or to become due, or shall take from such employee or laborer any
order on his employer for any such wages, and shall issue or give to any such em­
ployee or laborer, in consideration of or in payment for any such assignment or
transfer or order, any check, other than a check on a solvent bank, or any ticket,
tok^n or device payable or redeemable or purporting to be payable or redeemable,
or agreed to be payable or redeemable in goods, wares or merchandise or anything
other than lawful money of the United States, such checks, tickets, token or device
shall at once become due and payable in lawful money of the United States, for and
to the extent of the full amount of the wages assigned or relinquished for it, and the
holder of such check, ticket, token or device shall, after demand, have the right to
collect the same, with reasonable attorney’ s fees, b y suit in any court of competent
jurisdiction.
Sec. 2. A ll laws and parts of laws in conflict with the provisions of this act are
hereby repealed.
Approved March 11, 1901.




1136

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.
C

hapter

264.— M arking

and sale o f convict-m ade goods .

S e c t i o n 1. It shall be unlawful for any person or persons or corporations to expose
for sale within the State of Indiana, without first obtaining from the secretary of
state a license to sell any convict-made goods, merchandise or wares, as hereinafter
provided.
S e c . 2. Every person, persons or corporation desiring to act as agent for or to deal
in convict-made goods, merchandise or wares, before exposing such goods within the
limits of the State of Indiana, shall make an application in writing to the secretary
of state, setting forth his or their residence, or office, the class of goods he, they or
it desires to deal in, the town, village or city, giving the street number at w hich he,
they or it intends to locate, together with tne names of two or more responsible citi­
zens of the State of Indiana, w ho shall enter into a bond of not less than five thou­
sand dollars to guarantee that the said applicant w ill in all and every particular com­
ply with any and all laws of the Sta e of Indiana, regulating and presc—bing the sale
of convict-made goods, wares and merchandise.
S e c . 3. The secretary of state shall thereupon issue a license to such applicant for
one year, except as hereinafter provided, w hich license shall set forth the name of
the person, persons or corporation, and shall be kept conspicuously posted in his,
their or its place of business.
Sec. 4. Such person, persons or corporations shall annually, before the fifteenth
day of January in each year, transmit to the secretary of state a verified statement
setting forth: (1) The name of the person* persons or corporation. (2) His, their
or its place of business. (3) The names of the persons, agents, warden or keepers
of any prison, jail, penitentiary or reformatory, or establishment using convict labor,
with whom he has done business, and the person, persons or corporation to whom
he has sold goods, wares or merchandise, giving the State, city or town and street
number of such purchaser or purchasers. (4) In general terms the amount paid to
each of such agents, wardens or keepers, for goods, wares, or merchandise, and the
character of goods, wares or merchandise so received.
Sec. 5. Every person, persons or corporation shall pay annually, upon the issue
of such license as hereinbefore provided, the sum of five hundred dollars to the
secretary of state as a license fee, which amount shall be credited to the maintenance
account of the State prison.
S e c . 6. Licenses shall be for one year unless revoked as subsequently provided.
S e c . 7. The secretary of state shall have the power to revoke the license of any
person, persons or corporation upon satisfactory evidence or upon conviction for
any violation of any law regulating the sale of convict-made goods, wares or mer­
chandise; but no such revocation shall be made until due notiee.to the person, per­
sons or corporation so complained of; and for the purpose of this section the said
secretary of state, or his authorized agents, shall have power to administer oath and
to compel the attendance of persons and the production of books, papers, et cetera.
Sec. 8. A ll goods, wares or merchandise made or partly made by convict labor in
any penitentiary, prison, reformatory or other establishment shall before being
exposed for sale, be branded, labeled or marked as hereinafter provided, and it shall
not be exposed for sale in any place within this State without such brand, label or
mark.
S e c . 9. The brand, label or mark hereby required shall contain at the head or top
thereof the words “ Convict-made,” followed by the year and name of the peniten­
tiary, prison, reformatory or other establishment in which it was made, in plain
English letters of the style known as Great Primer Roman capitals. The brand or
mark shall in all cases, where the nature of the article will permit, be placed upon
the same, and only where such branding or marking is impossible a label shall be
used; and whence a label is used it shall be in the form of a paper tag, w hich shall be
attached by wire to each article, where the nature of the article w ill permit, and
placed securely upon the boxes, crates or other covering in w hich such goods, wares
or merchandise may be packed, shipped or exposed for sale. Said brand, mark or
label shall be placed upon the outside of, and upon the most conspicuous part o^the
furnished [finished] article and its box, crate or covering. In case of manufactured
clothing of any nature, such label shall be of linen and securely sewed upon each
article of such clothing in a place where upon examination it may be easily discerned.
S e c . 10. W hen upon complaint or otherwise [the] commissioner of labor statistics
has reason to believe that this act is being violated, he shall advise the prosecuting
attorney of the county in which such alleged violation has occurred of that fact,
giving the information in support of his conclusions, and the prosecuting attorney
shall at once institute the proper legal proceedings to compel compliances with this
act. Any person offending against the provisions of this act shall be guilty of a mis­




LABOR LAWS— INDIANA— ACTS OF 1901.

1137

demeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be sentenced to pay a fine not exceeding
ten hundred dollars and not less than fifty dollars, or to be imprisoned for a term
not exceeding twelve months nor less than ten days, or both.
Sec. 11. It shall be lawful for any person, persons or corporation to furnish evi­
dence as to the violation upon the part of any person, persons or corporation, and
upon the conviction of such person, persons or corporation one-half of the fine pro­
vided for by this act which shall be secured, shall be paid to the commissioner of
labor statistics to be used by him in investigating and securing information regarding
violations of this act and in paying expenses of securing conviction for violations
thereof: P rovided , That this act shall not apply to outstanding or existing contracts.
Sec. 12. A ll laws and parts of law’s in conflict with any of the provisions of this
act are hereby repealed.
Sec. 13. Whereas an emergency exists for the immediate taking effect of this act,
the same shall be in force from and after its passage.
Approved March 15, 1901.

MICHIGAN.
ACTS OF 1901.
A ct N o. 113.—

Inspection o f fa ctories , etc.

Section 1. No male under the age of eighteen years and no female under the age
of twenty-one years shall be employed in any manufacturing establishment in this
State for any longer period than sixty hours* in one week unless for the purpose of
making necessary repairs to machinery in order to avoid the stoppage of the ordi­
nary running of the establishments, and no male under the age of eighteen years and
no female under the age of twenty-one years shall be employed in any store in this
State employing more than ten persons for a longer period than sixty hours in one
wreek: P rovid ed , That no more than ten hours shall be exacted from such male
minors or females under twenty-one years on any day unless for the purpose of
making a shorter workday on the last day of the week.
Sec. 2. No child under the age of fourteen years shall be employed in any manu­
facturing establishment, hotel or store within this State. It shall be the duty of ’
every person employing children to keep a register, in w hich shall be recorded the
name, birthplace, age and place of residence o f every person employed b y him under
the age of sixteen years; and no child shall be employed between the hours of six
o’ clock p. m. and seven o ’ clock a. m. in any manufacturing establishment or work­
shop in this State; and it shall be unlawful for any manufacturing establishment,
hotel or store to hire or employ any child under tne age of sixteen years without
there is first provided and placed on file a sworn statement made b y the parent or
guardian, stating the age, date and place of birth of said child, and that the child
can read and write. If said child have no parent or guardian, then such statement
shall be made by the child, w hich statement shall be kept on file by the employer,
and which said register and statement shall be produced for inspection on demand
by any factory inspector appointed under this act: P rovid ed , That in the city of
Detroit and the city of Grand Rapids all sworn statements must be made before a
deputy factory inspector.
Sec. 3. No child under the age of sixteen years shall be employed by any person, firm
or corporation conducting any manufacturing establishment in this State, at employ­
ment whereby its life or lim b is endangered, or its health is likely to be injured, or
its morals may be depraved, by such employment. No female under the age of
twenty-one years and no male under the age of eighteen years shall be allowed to
clean machinery while in motion.
Sec. 4. Factory inspectors shall have power to demand a certificate of physical
fitness from the county physician, who shall make such examination free of charge,
in case of persons who seem physically unable to perform the labor at which they
may be employed, and shall have power to prohibit the employment of any person
that can not obtain such a certificate: P rovid ed, This section shall not apply except
to children under sixteen years of age.
Sec. 5. It shall be the duty of the owner, agent or lessee of any manufacturing
establishment where hoisting shafts or well-holes are used, to cause the same to be
properly enclosed and secured. It shall also be the duty of the owner, agent or
lessee to provide or cause to be provided at all elevator openings in any manufactur­
ing establishment, workshop, hotel or store such proper trap or automatic doors
or automatic gates, so constructed as to open or close by the action of elevators
either ascending or descending. The factory inspector, assistant factory inspector,




1138

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

or deputy factory inspector, shall inspect the cables, gearing or other apparatus of
elevators in manufacturing establishments, workshops, hotels and stores at least
once in each year, and more frequently if necessary, and require that the same be
kept in a safe condition.
S e c . 6. Fire escapes shall be provided for all manufacturing establishments, hotels
and stores, two or more stories in height, if in the opinion of the factory inspector it
is necessary to insure the safety of the persons employed in such establishments; said
fire escapes or means of egress, or as many thereof as may be deemed sufficient by
the inspector, shall be provided, and where it is necessary to provide fire escapes on
the outside of such establishments, they shall consist of landings or balconies at each
floor above the first, to be built according to specifications approved by the fac­
tory inspector. The windows or doors leading to all fire escapes shall open out­
wardly, or upwardly when provided with a counterbalancing weight, said windows
or doors to be not less than thirty-six inches in height and thirty inches in width.
All fire escapes shall be located as far as possible, consistent with accessibility, from
the stairways and elevator hatchways or openings; and the ladder thereof shall extend
to the roof; stationary stairs or ladders shall be provided on the inside from the upper
story to the roof, as a means of escape in case of fire. Signs indicating the way to
fire escapes shall be placed in conspicuous places. Factory inspectors shall in writing
notify the owner, agent or lessee of such manufacturing establishments, hotels ana
stores, of the required location and specifications of such fire escapes as may be ordered.
S e c . 7. Stairways with substantial hand rails shall be provided in manufacturing
establishments, and where in the opinion of the factory inspector it is necessary, the
steps of such stairs in all such establishments shall be substantially covered with rub­
ber, securely fastened thereon, for the better safety of persons employed in said
establishments. The stairs shall be properly screened at sides and bottom where
females are employed, and where practicable the doors of such establishments shall
swing outwardly or slide, as ordered by said factory inspector, and shall be neither
locked, bolted or fastened during working hours.
S e c . 8. It shall also be the duty of the owner of any factory, or his agent, superin­
tendent or other person in charge of the same, to furnish or supplv, or cause to be
furnished or supplied, in the discretion of the factory inspector, where machinery is
in use, proper shifters or other mechanical contrivances for the purpose of throwing
belts on or off pulleys. A ll gearing or belting shall be provided with proper safe­
guards, and wherever possible machinery shall be provided with loose pulleys. All
vats, saws, pans, planers, cogs, set-screws, gearing and machinery of every descrip­
tion, shall be properly guarded when deemed necessary by the factory inspector.
S e c . 9. Exhaust fans shall be provided for the purpose of carrying off dust from
emery wheels and grindstones, and dust-creating machinery, wherever deemed neces­
sary by the factory inspector.
S e c / 10. Every manufacturing establishment, workshop, hotel or store in which
five or more persons are employed, and every such institution in w hich two or more
children, young persons or women are employed, shall be supplied with proper
wash and dressing rooms, and kept in a cleanly state and free from effluvia arising
from any drain, privy, or other nuisance, and shall be provided within reasonable
access with a sufficient number of proper water-closets, earth-closets or privies for
the reasonable use of the persons employed therein, at least one of such closets for
each twenty-five persons employed; and wherever two or more persons and one or
more female persons are employed as aforesaid, a sufficient number of separate and
distinct water-closets, earth-closets or privies shall be provided for the use of each
sex, and plainly so designated, and no person shall be allowed to use any such closet
or privy assigned to persons of the other sex.
S e c . 11. Not less than forty-five minutes shall be allowed for the noonday meal in
any manufacturing establishment in this State. Factory inspectors shall have power
to issue written permits in special cases, allowing a shorter meal time at noon, and
such permit must be conspicuously posted in the main entrance of the establish­
ment, and such permit may be revoked at any time the inspector deems necessary,
and shall only^be given where good cause can be shown.
S e c . 12. The commissioner o f labor and deputy commissioner of labor and deputy
factory inspectors shall be factory inspectors in the meaning of this act. A t least
one of w hich deputy factory inspectors shall be a woman. Said factory inspectors
are hereby empowered to visit and inspect at all reasonable hours, as often as prac­
ticable or required, the factories, workshops and other manufacturing establishments
in this State where the manufacture of goods is carried on, and all hotels where any
person or persons are employed, also all stores employing ten or more persons.
Deputy factory inspectors shall report to the commissioner of labor of this State at
such time and manner as he may require. It shall also be the duty of the factory
inspector to enforce all the provisions of this act and to prosecute for all violations of




LABOR LAWS— MICHIGAN— ACTS OF 1901.

1139

the same before any magistrate or in any court of competent jurisdiction in this
State.
S e c . 13. Deputy factory inspectors shall make report to the commissioner of labor
o f each factory, hotel ana store visited and inspected by them, which report shall be
kept on file in the office of the commissioner, and a copy of said report shall be left
with the owner or person in charge of the establishment visited and inspected.
Deputy factory inspectors shall have the same power to administer oaths as is now
given to notaries public, in cases wT
here persons desire to verify documents connected
with the proper enforcement of this act.
Sec. 14. Sections one, two and three of this act shall not apply to canning factories
or evaporating works, but shall apply to any other place where goods, wares or
products are manufactured, repaired, cleaned or sorted, in whole or m part; but no
other person, persons or [corporation] corporations employing less than five persons,
or children, excepting in any of the cities of this State, shall be deemed a manufac­
turing establishment within the meaning of this act.
S e c . 15. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act, the commissioner
of labor is hereby authorized and required to cause at least an annual inspection of
the manufacturing establishments, factories and hotels, also all stores employing ten
or more persons, in this State. Such inspection may be b y the commissioner of labor,
the deputy commissioner of labor, or such other person as may be appointed by the
commissioner of labor for the purpose of making such inspection. Such persons shall
be under the control and direction of the commissioner of labor, and are especially
charged with the duties imposed, and shall receive such compensation as shall be
fixed by the commissioner of labor, not to exceed three dollars a day, together with
all necessary expenses. A ll compensation for services and expenses provided for in
this act shall be paid b y the State treasurer upon the warrant of the auditor general:
P rovided) That not more than twenty thousand dollars shall be expended in such
inspection in any one year: A n d provid ed fu rth er , That the commissioner of labor
shall present to the governor, on or before the first day of February of each year, a
report of such inspection, with such recommendation as may be necessary: A n d p ro ­
vided fu rth er y That in addition to the above amount allowed for expenses, there may
be printed not to exceed one thousand copies of such reports for the use of the labor
bureau for general distribution, and all printing, binding, blanks, stationery, supplies
or map work shall be done under any contract which the State now has or shall have
for similar work with any party or parties, and the expense thereof shall be audited
and paid for in the same manner as other State printing.
S e c . 16. The prosecuting attorney of any county of this State is hereby authorized
and required upon the complaint on oath of the commissioner of labor or factory
inspectors, to prosecute to termination before any court of competent jurisdiction, in
the name of the people of the State, actions or proceedings against any person or
persons reported to him to have violated the provisions of this act.
S e c . 17. No room or apartment in any tenement or dwelling house shall be used
for the manufacture of coats, vests, trousers, knee-pants, overalls, skirts, dresses,
cloaks, hats, caps, suspenders, jerseys, blouses, waists, waist-bands, underwear, neck­
wear, furs, fur trimmings, fur garments, shirts, hosiery, purses, feathers, artificial
flowers, cigarettes or cigars, and no person, firm or corporation shall hire or employ
any persons to work in any room, apartment or in any building or parts of buildings,
at making, in whole or in part, any of the articles mentioned in this section, without
first obtaining a wT
ritten permit from the factory inspector, or one of his deputies,
stating the maximum number of persons allowed to be employed therein and that
the building or part of building intended to be used for such work or business is
thoroughly cleaned, sanitary and fit for occupancy for such work or business. Such
permit shall not be granted until an inspection of such premises is made b y the fac­
tory inspector or one of his deputies. Said permit may be revoked by the factory
inspector at any time the health of the community or of those so employed may
require it. It shall be framed and posted in a conspicuous place in the room, or in
one of the rooms to which it relates. Every person, firm, company or corporation
contracting for the manufacture of any of the articles mentioned in this section, or
giving out the incomplete material from which they or any of them are to be made,
or to be w holly or partially finished, shall, before contracting for the manufacture of
any of said articles, or giving out said material from which they or any of them are
to be made, require the production by such contractor, person or persons of said
permit from the factory inspector, as required in this section, and shall keep a written
register of the names and addresses of all persons to whom such work is given to be
made, or with whom they may have contracted to do the same. Such register shall
be produced for inspection and a copy thereof shall be furnished on demand made
by the factory inspector or one of his deputies: P rovid ed, That nothing in this sec­
tion shall be so construed as to prevent the employment of a seamstress by any family




1140

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

for manufacturing articles for such family use. None of the work mentioned in this
section shall be done in any room or apartment used for living or sleeping purposes,
or w hich is connected with the room or rooms used for such purposes, and w hich has
not a separate and distinct outside entrance, except b y members of the fam ily dwell­
ing therein. Not less than two hundred and fifty cubic feet of air space shall be
allowed for each person employed, and ail work rooms shall be provided w ith suf­
ficient means of light, heat and ventiliation as may be prescribed by the chief factory
inspector. It shall be the duty of local boards of health, health officers and physicians
to report within twenty-four hours to the deputy factory inspector in their respective
districts each and every case of contagious or infectious diseases coming officially to
their knowledge. The chief factory inspector or any duly appointed deputy factory
inspector shall have power to seize and take charge of all articles found that are being
made or partially made, finished, cleaned or repaired in unhealthy or unsanitary
places where there are contagious or infectious diseases, in violation of the law, and
may proceed to disinfect, condemn or destroy the same as in .the opinion of the local
board of health or health officer, the public health or safety may require. W henever
it is reported to the chief factory inspector or to the State board of health, or to either
of them, that any of the articles named in this section are being or have been shipped
into this State, having previously been manufactured in whole or in part under un­
healthy conditions, said chief factory inspector shall examine said goods and the
condition of their manufacture, and if upon such examination said goods or any o f
them are found to contain vermin or to have been made in improper places or under
unhealthy conditions, h^shall make report thereof to the state board of health, w hich
board shall thereupon make such order or orders as the public health and safety may
require.
Sec. 18. A ny person w ho violates or omits to com ply with any of the foregoing
provisions of this act, or w ho interferes in any manner with the factory inspector in
the discharge of his duties, or who suffers or permits any child to be employed in
violation of its provisions, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction
shall be punished b y a fine of not less than five nor more than one hundred dollars
or by imprisonment for not less than ten nor more than ninety days, or by both such
fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the court.
S e c . 19. A ct one hundred eighty-four of the public acts of eighteen hundred ninetyfive, and all acts amendatory thereto, is hereby repealed.
This act is ordered to take immediate effect.
Approved May 13, 1901.

.

A ct No., 222.— E xa m in a tion ,

licensing, etc., o f plu m bers.

Section 1 W ithin thirty days after this act shall take effect, it shall be the duty o f
the local board of health, and if there be no local board of health then it shall be
the duty of the mayor of each of the cities of this State to appoint a board for the
examination of plumbers, to examine, license and register plumbers and formulate
rules and regulations therefor subject to the approval of such boards of health. Such
board shall consist of five persons, of whom one shall be an employing or master
plumber of not less than ten years* experience in the business of plumbing, and one
shall be a journeyman plumber of like experience, and the other members of such
board shall be the officers in charge of the plumbing and drainage department of the
board of health of such city, and the chief engineer having charge of sewers in such
city, but in the event of there being no such officers in such city, then any other twoofficers having charge or supervision of the plumbing, drainage or sewerage, whom
the mayor shall designate and appoint, or tw o members of the board of health o f
such city having like duties or acting in like capacities. The term of office of the
master and journeyman plumbers first appointed under the provisions o f this act
shall be as follows, to wit: One shall be appointed and hold office from the time of
such appointment until the first day of January, nineteen hundred two, and until
his successor shall be appointed. One shall be appointed and hold office from th e
time of such appointment until the first day of January, nineteen hundred three,
and until his successor shall be appointed, their term of office to expire respectively
on the first day of January, nineteen hundred two, the first day of January, nineteen
hundred three, and the board of health, and if there be no such board of health it
shall be the duty of the mayor in making the first appointments under this act, for
each one so appointed to specify the duration of the term of office to which he makes
said appointments, and annually thereafter, within ten days prior to the time of th e
expiration of the term of office of any such member of the board, his successor shall
be appointed by the board of health, and if there be no such board of health it shall
be the duty of the mayor to appoint for the term of two years, or until a successor
shall be appointed, and the Board of health, and if there be no such board, th e




LABOE LAWS— MICHIGAN---- ACTS OF 1901.

1141

m
ayor shall have pow to fill any vacancy caused in such board of exam
er
iners by the
death, rem
oval, inability to act, resignation or rem
oval from the city of any m ber
em
thereof, and such appointm shall be for the unexpired term Such officer in
ent
.
charge of the plum
bing and drainage departm
ent, and such chief engineer in charge
of sew ortne officersholding equivalentpositions oractingin like capacities, desig­
ers,
nated or appointed by the board of health, and if there be no such board of health,
by the m
ayor as herein provided, w they shall cease to hold the offices by reason
hen
or on account of which they w so designated or appointed, their successor shall
ere
act on the exam
ining board in their stead.

Sec. 2. The master and journeyman plumbers serving as members of such board
shall severally be paid at the rate of four dollars per day for each day’s services
when actually engaged in the performance of their duties pertaining to the office;
but such compensation shall not exceed the sum of five dollars per month in cities
of twenty-five thousand inhabitants or less, nor the sum of ten dollars per month in
cities having a population of over twenty-five thousand and less than three hundred
thousand, nor a sum of twenty dollars per month in cities having a population of
over three hundred thousand.
Sec. 3. All the members of such board shall be citizens and actual residents of the
city in which they are appointed.
Sec. 4. The several boards of exam
iners who shall be appointed under this act

shall have power and it shall be their duty to m at stated intervals in their
eet
respective citiesnot lessthanfourtim eachyear; they shall also m whenever the
es
eet
board of health of such city and if there be no such board of health, then when the
mayor thereof, shall in writing request them to do so; to have jurisdiction over and
to exam all persons desiring to engage in the trade, business or calling of plum
ine
b­
ing, either as journeym or em
en
ploying or m
aster plum
bers in the city in w
T
hich
such board shall be appointed, with the pow of exam
er
ining all persons applying
for a license as such journeym or em
an
ploying or m
aster plum
bers, or as inspectors
of plum
bing, to determ their fitness and qualifications for conducting the trade,
ine
calling or business of journeym or of m
an
aster plum
bers, or to act as inspector of
plumbing, and to issue licenses to all such persons who shall have subm
itted to and
passed a satisfactory exam
ination before such board, and shall be by it determ
ined
to be qualified for engaging in, carrying on or conducting the trade, calling or busi­
ness of journeym or employing or m
an
aster plum
ber, or com
petent to act as inspec­
tors of plumbing; to form
ulate, with the approval of the local board of health of the
city in which it shall act, a code of rules regulating all plum
bing and drainage w
ork
connected therewith in such city, including the proper m
aterials, andw
orkm
anship,
and from tim to time to add to, am
e
end or alter the sam to charge and collect
e;
from each person applying for exam
ination the sum of two dollars for each regular
exam
ination m by said board, and all money so collected shall be paid over by
ade
the board monthly to the treasurer of such city in which said board shall be
appointed.
Sec. 5. Any person desiring or intending to conduct the trade, business or calling
of a plum or of plum
ber
bing m any of the cities of this Stateasjourneym employ­
an,
ing or m
aster plum
ber, shall be required to subm to an exam
it
ination before such
board of exam
iners as to his experience and qualifications in such trade, business or
calling: P rovid ed , That every person now engaged in the trade, business or calling
of journeym m
an, aster or em
ploying plum in any city of this State and who h
ber
as;
been engaged for a period of two years or m
ore, and upon satisfactory proof made
before, or filed with suchexam
ining boardof the truththereof, together with a state­
m verified by his oath showing his nam place of business, postofficeaddress and
ent
e,
length of tim he actually served as a plum
e
ber, and upon the paym to said board
ent
of the sum of two dollars, shall be entitled to receive from said board a license with­
out further or other examination; all sum so collected shall be paid over to the
s
treasurer, as in case of fees received for examination: P rovid ed fu rth er however, That
any person com into this State and desiring to engage in any city of this State in
ing
the trade, calling or business of plum
bing, either as journeym plum
an
ber, or employ-,
ing plum
ber, or any person in this State desiring to engage in such trade, calling or
business, if at a time when said board is not m session, upon satisfactory proofs
m by him either by exam
ade
ination or otherw to any two m bers of said board
ise
em
of his fitness and qualifications to engage in such trade, business or calling, shall be
entitled to receive from said two m bers a tem
em
porary license, which shall entitle
him to engage in and carry on such trade, calling of business until the next regular
m
eeting of such board, when he shall be required to subm to the regular exam
it
ina­
tion of such board; and after a period of sixty days from the tim this act shall
e
take effect it shall not be lawful m any city in this State for any person to conduct
such trade, business or calling, unless he shall have first obtained a license from such
board, or from tw m bers thereof, as provided in the proviso last above set forth,
o em



1142

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

of the city in which he conducts, or proposes to conduct, engage in or carry on such
business, trade or calling.
S e c . 6. Within ninety days after this act shall take effect every journeym
an,
employing or m
aster plum carrying on his trade, business or calling in any of the
ber
cities of this State, shall register his nam and postoffice address at the office of the
e
board of health of the city in which he shall carry on or conduct such trade, busi­
ness or calling, under such rules and regulations as the respective boards of health
of each of the cities of this State shall respectively prescribe, and thereupon he shall
be entitled to receive a certificate of such registration: P rovided how ever, That such
journeym em
an, ploying or m
aster plum shall at the tim of applying for registra­
ber
e
tion, hold a license from an exam
ining board. And after a period of ninety days
from the tim this act shall take effect it shall not be lawful for any person to engage
e
in, or carry on the trade, business or calling of journeym employing or m
an,
aster
plum in any of the cities of this State unless his nam and postoffice address shall
ber
e
have been registered, as above provided.
S e c . 12. Each of such boards of exam
iners shall have pow to procure suitable
er
quarters for the transaction of business, to provide the necessary furniture, books
and stationery, and to employ a clerk w
hose duty it shall be to keep a detailed and
accurate record of all acts and proceedings of such board. The board of estim
ates
and the com on council of every city in this State shall annually insert in their tax
m
levy a sufficient sum to m the expenditures incurred under the provisions of this
eet
act; and all expenses incurred by the several boards of exam
iners in the execution
and perform
ance of the duties im
posed by this act, including the per diem of the
board of exam
iners and com
pensation of the inspector or inspectors of plum
bing
and drainage as fixed by the board, com issioner or departm m
m
ent aking their
appointm
ents shall be a cliarge on the respective cities, and shall be audited, levied,
collected and paid in the sam m
e anner as other city charges are audited, levied,
collected and paid.
Sec. 13. Any person violating any of the provisions of this act, or any of the rules
and regulations of the board of examiners as approved by the board of health of any
city in this State regulating the plumbing ana drainage work connected therewith
of such city, shall upon conviction thereof be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and
be punished by a fine of not exceeding $100 and the cost of prosecution, or by
imprisonment in the county jail for a period not exceeding ninety days, or both
such fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the court.

S e c . 14. After the passage of this act the com issioner or the board of public
m
w
orks of any city, or the officer or officers acting in a like capacity in any of the
cities of this State, and having chaise of the sew and w
ers
ater m
ains, shall not issue
a license to any one to connect with the sew or with the w
ers
ater m
ains of such
cities, unless such person has obtained and shall produce a certificate of registra­
tion, which is then in force, from the board of health of such city.
S e c . 15. This act shall not apply to cities containing less than fifteen thousand
inhabitants.
S e c . 16. All acts or parts of acts in any way inconsistent with or repugnant to the
provisions of this act are hereby repealed.
Approved June 6, 1901.
A

ct

N

o

.

235.—E xa m in a tion ,

licensing , etc., o f barbers.

[This act w passed in the senate under a title which had been am
as
ended in that
body. The secretary of the senate m a m
ade
istake and transm
itted the bill to the
house under the title as it stood before being am
ended, and it w passed there
as
under such w
rong title. O consideration by the suprem court, it w held that
n
e
as
the act w invalid, having been passed in the tw houses under different titles, and
as
o
therefore Act No. 212, Public Acts of 1899 (see Bulletin of the Departm ot Labor
ent
No. 28, pages 655, 656) rem
ains in force.]
MINNESOTA.

ACTS OF 1901.
Chapter

165.—R epaym ent o f advances m ade

b y em ployers.

Section 1. Every em
ployee who, with intent to defraud, shall accept or receive
transportation provided by or at the instance or expense of his em
ployer, from any
point in this State to or in the direction of the place w
here he has contracted to per­




LABOR LAWS— MINNESOTA— ACTS OF 1901.

1143

form labor for, or render services to such em
ployer, or w shall knowingly, and
ho
with intent to defraud, accept or receive the benefit of any other pecuniaryadvance­
m
ents m by or at the instance and cost of his em
ade
ployer, under an agreem on
ent
the part of such em
ployee to perform labor or render services in repaym of the
ent
cost of such transportation or of such other benefits, shall be deem and adjudged
ed
guilty of a m
isdem
eanor, if he shall neglect or refuse to render services or perform
labor of an equal value to the full am
ount paid for such transportation or other ben­
efits; or shall neglect or refuseto paysuchem
ployerin moneythe am
ount paidthere­
for. The value of the services to be rendered, or labor to be perform shall be
ed,
determ
ined by the price agreed to be paid therefor by such em
ployer under his con­
tract with the em
ployee.
The failure or refusal of anysuch em
ployee to perform suchlabor orto render such
services in accordance with his contract, or to pay in money the am
ount paid for
such transportation or other benefits, shall be pnma facie evidence of his intent to
defraud.
Sec. 2. Every person found guilty of such misdemeanor shall be punished by a fine
not exceeding twenty-five dollars ($25) and by imprisonment of not less than ten (10)
nor more than sixty (60) days.

S e c . 3. All acts orparts of acts inconsistent with the provisions of this act arehereby
repealed.
S e c . 4. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.
Approved April 6,1901.

Chapter
Section

194.—A n ti-tru st act— L a bor organizations exem pt.

6. Labor organizations shall not be term trusts under this act.
ed

Approved April 10,1901.

Chapter

310.—H ou rs

o f labor on p u blic w orks.

Section 1. The service of all laborers, w
orkm and m
en
echanics em
ployed upon
any public w
orks of, or w done for the State of M
ork
innesota, whether said w is
ork
done by contract or otherw shall be, and is hereby lim
ise,
ited, and restricted to eight
hours in any one calendar day; and it shall be unlaw for any officer of the State,
ful
or any person acting for or on behalf thereof, or any contractor or sub-contractor for
any part of any public w
orks of, or w done for such State, or any persons, corpo­
ork
ration, or association w
hose duty it shall be to employ or to direct and control the
services of such laborers, w
orkm or m
en
echanics, or who has in fact the direction or
control of the services of such laborers, workm or m
en
echanics to require or perm
it
them or any of them to labor m than eight hours in any one calendar day and
ore
except in cases of extraordinary em
ergency caused by fire, flood or danger to life
and property, and except to w upon public, military or naval w
ork
orks or defenses
in tim of w except in cases of em
e
ar,
ploym of labor in agricultural pursuits: P ro ­
ent
vid ed , That nothing herein contained shall be construed to apply to the em
ploym
ent
of labor on w now in progress, w
ork
hether contracted for or not.
S e c . 2. Each and every contract to which the State of M
innesota is hereinafter a
party, and every contract m
ade for, or on behalf of the said State, w
r
hich contract
may involve the employment of laborers, w
orkm or m
en
echanics, shall contain a
stipulationthat no laborer, w
orkm orm
an
echanics in the em
ploy of the contractor or
any sub-contractor doing or contracting to do any part of the w contem
ork
plated by
the contract, shall be required or perm
itted to w
ork m than eight hours in any
ore
one calendar day, except in cases of extraordinary em
ergency caused by fire, flood
or danger to life or property, and except to w
ork upon public, military or naval
w
ork, or defenses in tim of w and except in cases of em
e
ar,
ploym of labor in agri­
ent
cultural pursuits, and each and every such contract shall stipulate a penalty for such
violation of the stipulation directed by this act, of ten (10) dollars for each laborer,
workm or m
an
echanic, for each and every calendar day in which he shall labor
more than eight hours, and the inspector or officer, or person w
hose duty it shall be
to see that the provisions of any such contract are com
plied with, shall report to the
proper officer of such State, all violations of the stipulation in this act, provided for
m each and every such contract, and the am
ount of the penalties stipulated in any
such contract shall be withheld by the officer or person w
hose duty it shall be to
pay the m
oneys due under such contract, w
hether the violations for which such pen­
alties w im
ere posed by contractor, his agents or em
ployees, or any sub-contractor,
his agents or em
ployees, no person, on behalf of the State of M
innesota shall rebate
or perm any penalty im
it
posed under any stipulation hereinprovided for, unless upon
a finding w
hich he shall m
ake up and certify that such penalty w im
as posed by




1144

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

reason of an error of fact. Nothing in this act shall be construed to authorize the
collection of said penalty from the State. This act shall not apply to any contract
work done for any town or county in this State.
Sec. 3. Any officer of the State of M
innesota, or any person acting for, or on
behalf thereof, who shall violate the provisions of this act shall be deem guilty of
ed
am
isdem
eanor, and be subject to a fine or im
prisonm
ent, or both, at the discretion
of the court, the fine not to exceed five hundred dollars ($500), nor the im
prison­
ment m than one year. Nothing in this act shall be construed to apply to work
ore
or labor in constructing or repairing roads or highways.
Sec. 4. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent with this act are hereby repealed.
Sec. 5. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.
Approved April 13, 1901.
NEW HAMPSHIRE.

ACTS OF 1901.
Chapter

60.— E m p loym en t offices.

Section 1. Whoever, w
ithout a license therefor, establishes or keeps an intelli­
gence office for the purpose of obtaining or giving inform
ation concerning places of
employment for dom
estics, servants, or other laborers, or for the purpose of pro­
curing or giving inform
ation concerning such person for or to em
ployers, or for the
purpose of procuring or giving inform
ation concerning em
ploym in business,
ent
shall pay a fine of ten dollars for each day such office is so kept.
Sec. 2. The mayor and alderm of any city, or the selectm of any town, may,
en
en
for the purposes m
entioned in the preceding section, grant licenses to suitable per­
sons, subject to the provisions of sections 3 to 7, inclusive, and may revoke the
sam at pleasure.
e
Sec. 3. Licenses granted to keepers of intelligence offices shall be signed by the.
clerk of the city or town in which they are granted, and every such license shall be
recorded by the clerk of the city or town in a book kept for that purpose, before
being delivered to the licensee. Suchlicense shall set forth the nam of the person
e
licensed, the nature of the business, and the building or place in such city or town
in which it is to be carried on, and shall continue in force until the first day of May
next ensuing, unless sooner revoked.
Sec. 4. The board issuing such a license shall receive for the use of the city or
town for each license such sumnot less than tw dollars as the board shall deem
o
reasonable.
Sec. 5. Such license may be granted during the month of April, to take effect on
the first day of May then next ensuing.
Sec. 6. No license issued as aforesaid shall be valid to protect the holder thereof
in a building or place other than that designated in the license, unless consent to
rem
oval is granted by the mayor and alderm or selectm
en
en.
Sec. 7. When such license is revoked, such clerk shall note the revocation upon
the face of the record of the license, and shall give w
ritten notice to the holder of
the license by delivering the sam to him in person or leaving it at the place of
e
business designated in the license.
Sec. 8. This act shall take effect upon its passage.
Approved M
arch 7, 1901.
Chapter

61.— E m ploym en t o f children.

Section 1. Chapter 93 of the Public Statutes is hereby am
ended by striking out
sections 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15, and inserting the following instead thereof:
Section 10. No child underthe age of twelve years shall be em
ployed in any m
anu­
facturingestablishm
ent. No child underthe age of fourteen years shall be employed
in any m
anufacturing establishm
ent, nor in any m
echanical, m
ercantile, or other
employment duringthe time in which the public schools are in session in the district
in which he resides.
Section 11. No child under the age of sixteen years shall be em
ployed inanym
anu­
facturing establishm
ent, or in any m
echanical, m
ercantile, or other em
ploym
ent,
during the time in which the public schools are in session in the district in which he
resides, without first presenting a statem of his age from his parent or guardian,
ent
sw to before the superintendent of schools or, if there is no superintendent of
orn
schools, by som person authorized by the school board of the district in which such
e
child is employed.




LABOR LAWS— NEW HAMPSHIRE---- ACTS OF 1901.

1145

And no child under the age of sixteen years shall be em
ployed as aforesaid during
the tim in w
e
hich the public schools are in session in the district in which he resides
without first presenting a certificate from the superintendent of schools or, if there
is no superintendent of schools, som person authorized by the school board, that
e
such child canreadatsightandw legiblysim sentencesinthe English language.
rite
ple
And any superintendent of schools or person authorized by the school board w
ho
certifies falsely as to m
atters prescribed by this section shall be fined not less than
twenty nor m than fifty dollars for each offense.
ore
Section 12. No m
inor shall be em
ployed in any m
anufacturingestablishm or in
ent,
any m
echanical, m
ercantile, or other employm who cannot readat sightandw
ent,
rite
legibly sim sentences in the English language, while a free public evening school
ple
is m
aintained in the district in which he resides, unless he is a regular attendant at
sucheveningschool orat adayschool: P rovid ed, That uponpresentationbysuchm
inor
of a certificate signedby a regular practicing physician, and satisfactoryto the super­
intendent of schools, or, w
herethere is no superintendent of schools, the school board,
showing that the physical condition of such m
inor would render such attendance in
addition to daily labor prejudicial to his health, said superintendent of schools or
school board shall issue a perm authorizingthe employm of such minorfor such
it
ent
period as said superintendent of schools or school board may determ
ine. Said super­
intendent of schools or school board, orteachers acting under authoritythereof, m
ay
excuse any absence from such evening school arising from justifiable cause. Any
parent, guardian, or custodian who perm to be em
its
ployed any minor under his
control in violation of the provisions of this sectionshall forfeit not m thantwenty
ore
dollars for the use of the evening schools of such tow or city.
n
Section 13. If any ow
ner, agent, superintendent, or overseer of a m
anufacturing,
m
echanical, or m
ercantile establishm
ent, orany other person, shall employ any child
in violation of the provisions of either of the three preceding sections, he shall be
fined not exceeding fifty dollars for each offense, for the use of the district.
S e c . 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage.
Approved March-7, 1901.
C

h apter

99.—E xa m in a tion ,

licensing, etc., o f plum bers.

Section 1. Section 1 of chapter 55 of the Session Law of 1899 is hereby am
s
ended
so that the sam shall read as follows:
e
Section 1. No person, firm or corporation engaged in or w
,
orking at the business
of plum
bing in any city or tow in this State as shall by vote adopt the provisions of
n
this chapter, shall hereafter engage in or w at said business in this State, either
ork
as a m
aster or em
ploying plum
ber,, or as a journeym plum
an
ber, unless such person
or persons shall first obtain license or certificate so to do, in accordance with the
provisions of this act.
Sec. 2. Section 3 of said act is hereby amended so that said section shall read as

follows:

Section 3. Any such city or town in this State which shall by vote adopt the pro­
visions of this chapter, may by ordinance or by-law prescribe rules and regulations
for the m
aterials, construction, alteration, and inspection of all plum
bing, house
drainage, and sew connections, creating a board for the exam
er
ination of plum
bers,
fixing the length of term each m ber shall serve, and providing for an inspector
em
of plum
bing. Said board shall be appointed by the m
ayor or board of selectm
en,
ana shall consist of the following three persons: A m ber of the local board of
em
health, the city or town engineer, or, in the absence of such officer, alocal physician
in regular practice, and a journeym plum of not less than five years’ activeand
an
ber
continuous practical experience.

Sec. 3. Section 4 of said act is hereby amended so that said section when amended
shall read as follows:

Section 4. The exam
ining board when created as aforesaid shall exam and pass
ine
upon all applicants, whether as m
asters or employing plum
bers, or journeym
an
plum
bers, in their respective cities or tow and alsoall persons who may apply for
ns,
the office of plum
bing inspector. They shall issue a license to such persons only as
shall successfully pass the required w
ritten and practical examination; and they
shall register in a book kept for that purpose the nam and places of business of all
es
persons to whom a plum
ber’s license has been granted. They shall not issue a
license for m than one year, but the sam shall be renew from year to year
ore
e
ed
upon proper application and upon the paym of a fee of fifty cents. Saidexam
ent
in­
ing board shall serve without com
pensation. Each applicant for exam
ination for a
plum
ber’s license or certificate shall pay the sum of one dollar, and all m
oneys so
collected shall be paid into the treasury of the city or town w
here such application



1146

BULLETIN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.

is m
ade. The license or certificate provided for by this act shall be nontransferable;
and said application and exam
ination shall not be required of the sam person m
e
ore
than once in the sam city or tow Said license or certificate shall be valid
e
n.
throughout the State.
S e c . 4. This act shall take effect on its passage.
Approved M
arch 22,1901.
NEW MEXICO.

ACTS OF 1901.
C

h apter

40.— H ou rs o f labor on pu blic

highw ays.

S e c t i o n 1. All able-bodied m
ale persons in the Territory of New Mexico between
the ages of twenty-one and sixty years, shall be required to perform labor upon the
public roads and highways as herein provided, for any num of days required by
ber
the road supervisor of their respective precincts, not lessthantwo days nor to exceed
five days of eight hours each in any one year.
Approved M
arch 18, 1901.




L A IN A T L S IN P S N M E S O T E B L E IN
E D G R IC E
AT U BR F H UL T .
No. 1. Private and public debt in the United States, by G
eorge K. Holmes.
Employer and em
ployee under the com on law, by V. H. Olm
m
sted and S. D.
Fessenden.
No. 2. The poor colonies of Holland, by J. Howard G
ore, Ph. D.
The industrial revolution in Japan, by William Eleroy Curtis.
Notes concerning the m
oney of the U. S. andother countries, by W. C Hunt.
.
The wealth and receipts and expenses of the U. S., by W. M. Steuart.
No. 3. Industrial com unities: Coal M
m
ining Co. of Anzin, by W. F. Willoughby.
No. 4. Industrial com unities: Coal M
m
ining Co. of Blanzy, by W. F. Willoughby.
The sw
eating system by Henry White.
,
No. 5. Convict labor.
Industrial com unities: KruppIron and Steel Works, by W. F. Willoughby.
m
No. 6. Industrial com unities: Fam
m
ilistere Society of Guise, by W. F. Willoughby.
Cooperative distribution, by Edward W. Bem Ph. D.
is,
No. 7. Industrial com unities: Various com unities, by W. F. Willoughby.
m
m
Batesof w
ages paid under public and private contract, by Ethelbert Stew
art.
No. 8. Conciliation and arbitration in the boot and shoe industry, by T. A. Carroll.
Bailw relief departm
ay
ents, by Emory B. Johnson, Ph. D.
No. 9. The padrone system and padrone banks, by John Koren.
The Dutch Society for General Welfare, by J. H ard G
ow
ore, Ph. D.
No. 10. Condition of the Negro in various cities.
Building and loan associations.
No. 11. Workers at gainful occupations at censuses of 1870, 1880, and 1890, by W. C.
Hunt.
Public baths in Europe, by Edw M
ard ussey Hartwell, Ph. D., M. D.
No. 12. The inspectionof factories andw
orkshops in the U. S., by W. F. Willoughby.
M
utual rights and duties of parents and children, guardianship, etc., under
the law, by F. J. Stim
son.
The m
unicipal or cooperative restaurant of Grenoble, France, by C. 0. Ward.
No. 13. The anthracite m laborers, by G. O Virtue, Ph. D.
ine
.
No. 14. The Negroes of Farmville, Va.: A social study, by W. E. B. Du Bois, Ph. D.
Incom w
es, ages, and rents in M
ontreal, by Herbert Brow Ames, B. A.
n
No. 15. Boarding hom and clubs for w
es
orking wom by M S. Fergusson.
en,
ary
The trade-union label, by John Graham Brooks.
No. 16. Alaskan gold fields and opportunities for capital and labor, by S. C. D
unham
.
No. 17. Brotherhood relief and insurance of railw em
ay ployees, by E. B. Johnson,
Ph. D.
The nations of Antwerp, by J. H ard G
ow
ore, Ph. D.
No. 18. Wages in the United States and Europe, 1870 to 1898.
No. 19. Alaskan gold fields and opportunities for capital and labor, by S. C. Dunham
.
M
utual relief and benefit associations in the printing trade, by W. S. Waudby.
No. 20. Condition of railw labor in Europe, by Walter E. Weyl, Ph. D.
ay
No. 21. Pawnbroking in Europe and the U
nited States, by W. B. P
atterson, Ph. D.
No. 22. Benefit features of Am
erican trade unions, by Edw W. Bem Ph. D.
ard
is,
The N
egro in the black belt: Som social sketches, byW. E. B. DuBois, Ph. D.
e
Wages m Lyon, France, 1870 to 1896.
No. 23. Attitude of wom
en’s clubs, etc., tow social econom by Ellen M. Henard
ics,
rotin.
The production of paper and pulp in the U. S. from Jan. 1 to June 30, 1898.
No. 24. Statistics of cities.
No. 25. Foreign labor laws: G
reat Britain and France, by W. F. Willoughby.
No. 26. Protection of w
orkm in their em
en
ploym
ent, by Stephen D. Fessenden.
Foreign labor laws: Belgium and Sw
itzerland, by W. F. Willoughby.
No. 27. Wholesale prices: 1890 to 1899, by Boland P. Falkner, Ph. D.
Foreign labor laws: Germ
any, by W. F. Willoughby.



No. 28. Voluntary conciliation and arbitration in Great Britain, by J. B. M
cPherson.
System of adjusting w
ages, etc., in certain rolling mills, by J. H. Nutt.
Foreign labor laws: Austria, by W. F. Willoughby.
No. 29. Trusts and industrial com
binations, by J. W. Jenks, Ph. D.
The Yukon and Nom gold regions, by S. C. Dunham
e
.
Labor Day, by M M. C. de G
iss
raffenried.
No. 30. Trend of w
ages from 1891 to 1900.
Statistics of cities.
Foreign labor laws: Various European countries, by W. F. Willoughby.
No. 31. Betterm of industrial conditions, by V. H. Olm
ent
sted.
Present status of em
ployers’ liability in the T . S., by S. D. Fessenden.
J
Condition of railway labor in Italy, by Dr. Luigi Einaudi.
No. 32. Accidents to labor as regulated by law in the U. S., by W. F. Willoughby.
P
rices of com odities and rates of w
m
ages in M
anila.
The N
egroes of Sandy Springs, Md.: A social study, by W. T. Thom, Ph. D.
The British workm
en’s com
pensation act and its operation, by A. M. Low.
No. 33. Foreign labor laws: Australasia and Canada, by W. F. Willoughby.
The British conspiracy and protection of property act and its operation, by
A. M. Low.
No. 34. Labor conditions in Porto Kico, by Azel Ames, M. D.
Social econom at the P
ics
aris Exposition, by Prof. N. P. Gilman.
The workm
en’s com
pensation act of Holland.
No. 35. Cooperative com unities in the United States, by Rev. Alexander Kent.
m
The N
egro landholder of G
eorgia, by W. E. B. D Bois, Ph. D.
u
No. 36. Statistics of cities.
Statistics of Honolulu, H. I.
No. 37. Railway em
ployees in the United States, by Sam M
uel cCune Lindsay, Ph. D.
The N
egroes of Litwalton, Va.: A social study of the “ Oyster Negro,” by
William Taylor Thom, Ph. D.
No. 38. Labor conditions in Mexico, by Walter E. Weyl, Ph. D.
The N
egroes of Cinclare Central Factory and Calum Plantation, La., by
et
J. Bradford Law
s.
No. 39. C
ourse of wholesale prices, 1890 to 1901.
No. 40. Present condition of the hand-working and dom
estic industries of Germ
any,
by Henry J. Harris, Ph. D.
Workmen’s com
pensation acts of foreign countries, by Adna F. Weber.
No. 41. Labor conditions in Cuba, by Victor S. Clark, Ph. D.
Beef prices, by Fred C. Croxton.





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102