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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
86.90
86.93
86.97
86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

5,617

5,735

5,733

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................
88.45
Offsetting governmental collections .....................

¥26
¥40

¥19
¥190

¥58
¥147

¥66

¥209

¥205

Federal Funds
General and special funds:
HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT
For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the conduct
and support of human space flight research and development activities, including research, development, operations, and services; maintenance; construction of facilities including repair, rehabilitation, and
modification of real and personal property, and acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized by law; space flight, spacecraft control and communications activities including operations, production, and services; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and
operation of mission and administrative aircraft, ø$5,480,000,000¿
$5,638,000,000, to remain available until September 30, ø2000¿ 2001.
For necessary expenses of the International Space Station, to become
available on October 1 of the fiscal year specified and remain available
for that and the following fiscal year, as follows: for fiscal year 2001,
$2,328,000,000; for fiscal year 2002, $2,091,000,000; for fiscal year
2003, $1,721,000,000; and for fiscal year 2004, $1,573,000,000. (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development,
and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0111–0–1–252

1998 actual

1999 est.

2000 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program:
00.01
Space station ............................................................
00.03
Payload and utilization operations ...........................
00.04
Space shuttle ............................................................
09.01 Reimbursable program ..................................................

2,360
223
2,932
61

2,397
184
2,896
209

2,474
168
2,987
205

10.00

Total new obligations ................................................

5,576

5,686

5,834

21.40
22.00

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year ...............
New budget authority (gross) ........................................

226
5,621

271
5,689

274
5,843

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year .................

5,847
¥5,576
271

5,960
¥5,686
274

6,117
¥5,834
283

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
42.00
Transferred from other accounts ..............................

5,507
5,480
5,638
53 ................... ...................

43.00

5,560

5,480

5,638

66

209

205

68.00
68.10
68.90

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
Offsetting collections (cash) ................................
From Federal sources: Change in receivables
and unpaid, unfilled orders .............................

¥5 ................... ...................

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ...........................................................

61

209

205

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

5,621

5,689

5,843

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year:
72.40
Obligated balance, start of year ...............................
72.95
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

1,700

1,662

1,613

70.00

72.99
73.10
73.20
74.40
74.95
74.99

28

23

23

Total unpaid obligations, start of year ................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Unpaid obligations, end of year:
Obligated balance, end of year ................................
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

1,728
5,576
¥5,617

1,685
5,686
¥5,735

1,636
5,834
¥5,733

1,662

1,613

1,714

23

23

23

Total unpaid obligations, end of year ..................

1,685

1,636

1,737

88.90
88.95

89.00
90.00

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
From Federal sources: Change in receivables and
unpaid, unfilled orders ..............................................
Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

3,768
3,655
3,761
1,778
1,871
1,767
37
209
205
34 ................... ...................

5 ................... ...................

5,560
5,551

5,480
5,526

5,638
5,528

This appropriation provides funding for human space flight
activities, including development of the Space Station, the
Space Station research program, and operation of the Space
Shuttle. This includes support of planned cooperative activities with Russia, upgrades to the performance and safety
of the Space Shuttle, and required construction projects in
direct support of Space Station and Space Shuttle programs.

Performance Objectives
Space Station.—The International Space Station (ISS) will
be an international laboratory in low Earth orbit on which
American, Russian, Canadian, European, and Japanese astronauts will conduct unique scientific and technological investigations in a microgravity environment. The goal of the Station is to support activities requiring the unique attributes
of humans in space and establish a permanent human presence in Earth orbit. The proposed budget provides multi-year
funding through an advanced appropriation for the continued
development of the vehicle and its research components and
for current operations, assembly and utilization of the Station.
With the first launches successfully completed, the budget
includes funding to keep subsequent assembly missions on
schedule for completion in 2004 and provide a long-term solution to the safe return of the full complement of Station
crewmembers in the event of an emergency.
In 1998, preparations for the successful launches of the
first two components of the Station—the FGB control module
and the first node—were completed. The elements were
launched in November and December, assembled in orbit and
activated. Flight hardware elements for the next four U.S.
assembly launches—the Z1 truss, the control moment gyros,
the first photo-voltaic array and battery sets, initial thermal
radiators, communication equipment, the U.S. Laboratory,
and the Multi-Purpose Logistics Carrier—were delivered in
preparation for multi-element integrated testing (MEIT).
Crew training, payload processing, hardware element processing, and mission operations were supported. In 1999, fabrication of flight hardware, qualification testing, assembly, integration and mission operations will all continue. The laboratory module will be delivered and MEIT for flights through
6A, the outfitting of the lab module, will be initiated. Two
logistics flights will be launched to the Station, as will the
Russian Service Module. In 2000, plans are to launch seven
U.S. missions to Station, including the lab module. The Russian launch of a Soyuz vehicle will achieve the capability
1051

1052

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT—Continued

of permanent occupation of the Station with rotating crews
of three. Phase 2 of the Station assembly will be completed
with the launch of the airlock, and preparations will continue
for the start of Phase 3 and increasing research utilization
in 2001.
As part of the FY 1999 operating plan, Russian Program
Assurance (RPA) was re-established within the Space Station
budget line. The RPA funding provides contingency activities
to address ISS program requirements resulting from delays
or shortfalls on the part of Russia in meeting its commitments
to the ISS program. The first step in the contingency plan
is to protect against a potential further delay in the Russian
Service Module (SM) and its capabilities. The ISS program
is purchasing, from the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
(NRL), an interim control module (ICM) to provide backup
attitude control and reboost functions for the ISS. Additionally, the Shuttle fleet is being configured for reaction control
system (RCS) interconnectivity modifications to enable greater
Shuttle reboost capability to the ISS. A permanent U.S. propulsion capability is being developed for implementation in
the 2002 timeframe. This includes a propulsion module, carriers, and activities to support propulsion logistics.
Payload and Utilization Operations.—Spacelab program
funds support the mission planning and hardware preparation
activities required to support the Spacelab payloads and experiment infrastructure. In 1998, one Spacelab module mission (Neurolab) was flown, along with one pallet mission.
The Spacelab program was completed in 1998 following the
Neurolab mission. In FY 1998, Multi-Purpose Experiment
Support Structures (MPESS), pallets and other common support equipment were transferred to the Payload Processing
budget. All other Spacelab hardware has been dispositioned.
Activities funded by the Payload Processing budget support
the required technical expertise and facilities to perform the
payload buildup, test and checkout, integration, servicing,
transportation and installation in the launch vehicle. In FY
1999, launch and landing payload support activities will be
provided for six Space Shuttle missions, including two pallet
missions, the AXAF launch, and three assembly flights for
the ISS. In FY 2000, launch and landing payload support
activities will be provided for eight Space Shuttle missions,
including seven ISS assembly and utilization flights. During
this period, eight pallets will be used in Space Shuttle missions, including the third HST servicing mission and three
of the ISS assembly flights. In FY 1999 and 2000 over 20
major and secondary payloads will be supported, including
major hardware for ISS assembly.
The Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) Mission Support
budget provides funds for acquiring requisite launch services
to meet all NASA requirements and for technical insight of
commercially provided launch services. Advanced mission design/analysis and leading edge integration services are provided for the full range of NASA missions under consideration
for launch on ELVs. During FY 1998, two Pegasus launches,
SNOE and TRACE, were launched along with one Titan 11
provided by the USAF; and the pathfinder activity was accomplished for the first launch of an Atlas-Centaur from a new
launch site at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Support for 13
missions, including EOS-AM-1, Landsat-7, and four planetary
missions are planned for launch in FY 1999 and integration
and technical management of 24 payloads are planned for
launch in FY 2000 and FY 2001 are supported.
Advanced Projects pursues advanced technology developments for future human space flight requirements. Under
this program, the X-38 experimental vehicle is being designed
to demonstrate the technology and processes required to
produce a crew return vehicle for the ISS. Beginning in FY

1999, funding for Advanced Projects other than X-38 and
X-38 transition costs were terminated. The Engineering and
Technical Base provides basic engineering and technical capabilities to support the NASA mission assigned to the program
carried out by the Human Space Flight Centers. These funds
support a core capability dedicated to multi-program laboratories, test facilities and associated systems, including a skill
base to respond to research, testing and simulation needs.
Space Shuttle.—The Space Shuttle is a partially reusable
space vehicle that provides several unique capabilities to the
United States space program. These include retrieving payloads from orbit for reuse, servicing and repairing satellites
in space, safely transporting humans to and from space,
launching International Space Station components and providing an assembly platform in space, and operating and returning space laboratories. The six flights manifested for FY
1999 include a major microgravity payload, the Space Shuttle’s first assembly flight of the International Space Station,
two additional space station assembly and supply flights, the
deployment of the Advanced X-Ray Astophysics Facility
(AXAF), and the Shuttle Radar Topography mission, a joint
DOD/NASA Radar payload to digitally map the Earth.
Eight flights will be flown during FY 2000, including seven
International Space Station Space assembly flights. In addition, the Space Shuttle will make its third visit to the Hubble
Space Telescope for replacement of mission critical components and routine servicing and upgrading some of its instrument sensors with state-of-the art detectors and cameras. Upgrades to the Shuttle to increase its safety, reliability and
maintainability will be continued.
Account Structure.—As directed in the FY 1999 VA/HUDIndependent Appropriations Act (P.L. 105–276), NASA is prepared to support a revised account structure for ‘‘Human
Space Flight.’’ The new structure would split ‘‘Human Space
Flight’’ into two accounts, ‘‘International Space Station’’ and
‘‘Launch Vehicles and Payload Operations.’’ A crosswalk between the ‘‘Human Space Flight’’ account and these two new
accounts is provided below.
Crosswalk to Two Account Structure
(In millions of dollars of BA)

1998 actual

International Space Station ........................................................
Launch Vehicles and Payload Operations ...................................

2,441
3,118

1999 est.

2000 est.

2,305
3,175

2,483
3,155

However, because almost all scheduled future Space Shuttle
flights support International Space Station development and
because common operations and facilities will increase as the
International Space Station moves into its operational phase,
the two-account structure would be an obstacle to more integrated and efficient management of these programs and lower
costs. For these reasons, the Administration proposes maintaining the single ‘‘Human Space Flight’’ account.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0111–0–1–252

25.4
25.5
25.7
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Direct obligations:
Transportation of things ...........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Printing and reproduction .........................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................
Research and development contracts .......................
Operation and maintenance of equipment ...............
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................

22.0
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

1998 actual

1999 est.

2000 est.

8

8

8

45
3
1,669
334

45
3
1,658
332

46
3
1,703
341

101
125
2,841
51
77
84
153
24

100
124
2,821
51
76
83
152
24

103
128
2,900
52
79
86
156
24

5,515

5,477

5,629

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

Federal Funds—Continued

99.0

Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

61

209

205

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

5,576

5,686

5,834

SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

AND

88.90
88.95

TECHNOLOGY

For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the conduct
and support of science, aeronautics and technology research and development activities, including research, development, operations, and
services; maintenance; construction of facilities including repair, rehabilitation, and modification of real and personal property, and acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized by law; space
flight, spacecraft control and communications activities including operations, production, and services; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and operation of mission and administrative aircraft,
ø$5,653,900,000¿ $5,424,700,000, to remain available until September
30, ø2000¿ 2001. (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and
Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act,
1999.)
(in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0110–0–1–999

1999 est.

2000 est.

1,980
240
1,553
404
136
1,483
508

2,131
250
1,387
345
150
1,226
599

2,189
257
1,455
404
104
1,038
577

10.00

Total new obligations ................................................

6,304

6,088

6,024

21.40
22.00

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year ...............
New budget authority (gross) ........................................

508
6,198

401
6,253

566
6,002

23.90
23.95
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year .................

6,706
¥6,304
401

6,654
¥6,088
566

6,568
¥6,024
544

5,690

5,654

5,425

559

599

577

¥51 ................... ...................

68.90

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ...........................................................

508

599

577

70.00

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

6,198

6,253

6,002

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year:
72.40
Obligated balance, start of year ...............................
72.95
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

3,222

2,997

2,620

305

254

254

72.99
73.10
73.20
73.40
74.40
74.95

Total unpaid obligations, start of year ................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Adjustments in expired accounts ..................................
Unpaid obligations, end of year:
Obligated balance, end of year ................................
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

74.99

Total unpaid obligations, end of year ..................

86.90
86.93
86.97
86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

89.00
90.00

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
From Federal sources: Change in receivables and
unpaid, unfilled orders ..............................................
Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

¥38
¥521

¥41
¥558

¥41
¥536

¥559

¥599

¥577

51 ................... ...................

5,690
6,015

5,654
5,866

5,425
5,287

This appropriation provides for the research and development activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Funds are included for the construction, maintenance, and operation of programmatic facilities. Space
Science, Earth Science, Life and Microgravity Science, Aeronautics, and Space Transportation programs are included in
the 21st Century Research Fund.

Performance Objectives

1998 actual

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program:
00.01
Space science ............................................................
00.02
Life and microgravity science ...................................
00.06
Earth science .............................................................
00.07
Mission communication services ..............................
00.08
Academic programs ...................................................
00.09
Aero-space technology ...............................................
09.01 Reimbursable program ..................................................

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
68.00
Offsetting collections (cash) ................................
68.10
From Federal sources: Change in receivables
and unpaid, unfilled orders .............................

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................
88.45
Offsetting governmental collections .....................

1053

3,527
3,251
2,874
6,304
6,088
6,024
¥6,574
¥6,465
¥5,864
¥6 ................... ...................
2,997

2,620

2,781

254

254

254

3,251

2,874

3,035

2,861
2,550
2,447
3,160
3,316
2,840
230
599
577
323 ................... ...................
6,574

6,465

5,864

Space Science.—The Space Science program seeks to answer
fundamental questions concerning: the galaxy and the universe; the connection between the Sun, Earth and heliosphere;
the origin and evolution of planetary systems; and, the origin
and distribution of life in the universe. The Space Science
program is comprised of a base program of research and development activities, including research and flight mission
activities, and major space-based facilities.
In 1998, the Space Science program produced many notable
scientific accomplishments. Measurement of light from distant
exploding stars led teams to conclude that the universe will
expand forever at an increasing rate. This discovery was characterized by the editors of Science magazine, the journal of
the American Association for the Advancement of Science,
as the top scientific advance of 1998. The Rossi X-ray Timing
Explorer (RXTE) discovered a new type of star, known as
a magnetar, which generates extremely powerful magnetic
fields. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) continued to
produce many discoveries, including the first potential direct
image of an extrasolar planet, and, working with RXTE and
the Beppo-Sax mission, detected the largest explosion since
the Big Bang. The Keck telescope imaged the formation of
a new solar system. Within our own solar system, the Mars
Global Surveyor mission photographed portions of Mars with
unprecedented clarity, revealing ancient riverbeds and numerous geological structures. The Lunar Prospector spacecraft
detected the presence of water ice on the moon. This discovery
has important implications for future exploration mission concepts. The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory produced spectacular images of comets plunging into the Sun, and also
detected solar quakes. Also in the field of solar science, the
Transition Region and Coronal Explorer produced the sharpest images to date of magnetic reconnections on the Sun.
Near the end of FY 1998, and in early FY 1999, the New
Millenium Deep Space-1 mission, the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite, the Mars Climate Orbiter, and the Mars
Polar Lander were launched successfully. These launches both
capped off a highly successful year and initiated a period
in which nine Space Science missions will be launched over
a seven-month period. Other missions to be launched in this
period include the Stardust mission, the Wide Field Infrared
Explorer, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopy Explorer, and the
Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility.
To capitalize on these enormous successes during the past
year, the NASA budget request for FY 2000 once again highlights Space Science. Space Science continues to focus on the
Origins program and fundamental questions regarding the
creation of the universe and planetary systems and the possibility of life on Earth. Planning continues for the deployment

1054

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

AND

TECHNOLOGY—Continued

of powerful telescopes to detect Earth-like planets beyond our
solar system, for the 2003 launch of a mission to directly
observe subsurface oceans on Europa, and for future missions
to seek evidence of past or present life on Mars. The Space
Science program is responsible for Agency-wide core technology development, and additional funding is provided in
this program to enhance these Origins missions and enable
other future missions through the Administration’s IT initiative and other high-leverage technologies. These technologies
will increase the return of the Space Science program and
other NASA programs many fold through revolutionary capabilities in the areas of networking, intelligent systems,
nanotechnology, communications, lighweight structures, miniaturization, mobility, and propulsion for robotic spacecraft
and rovers.
The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) will be
launched in April 1999. Development activities continue on
the Relativity (Gravity Probe-B) mission, which is scheduled
for launch in 2000. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility
(SIRTF) initiated development in April 1998, with launch
planned for December 2001. Development activities on the
Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission continue in 1999, with launch
planned in 2000. Development activities on the Stratospheric
Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) continue as
planned. The upgraded Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is providing new insights into our universe. Funding for HST continues to support operations, as well as preparation for the
third servicing mission in 2000.
In Explorer missions, development activities continue in the
Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopy Explorer (FUSE), scheduled for
launch in 1999. Development is also underway for the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and Imager for Magnetosphereto-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Medium-Class Explorer (MIDEX) missions. MAP will be launched in November
2000, IMAGE in January 2000. Three Small (SMEX) missions
started development in FY 1998: the High Energy
Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) is to launch in 2000; the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) will launch in 2001; and
the Two Wide-Angle Neutral Atom Spectrometers (TWINS)
has been selected as mission of opportunity, to be launched
in 2002 and 2004. These missions emphasize reduced mission
costs and accelerated launch schedules.
The Mars Global Surveyor entered Mars orbit in September
1997, the Mars Climate Orbiter was launched in December
1998 and the Mars Polar Lander was launched in January
1999. Funds are requested for the development of future Mars
missions to be launched in 2001 and beyond. The third Discovery-class mission, Lunar Prospector, launched in 1998, and
has completed its primary mission. The fourth Discovery mission, Stardust, is on schedule for launch in February 1999.
Two Discovery missions selected in 1997 are proceeding on
schedule: the Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) will begin
development in FY 2000 and will be launched in 2002; the
Genesis solar wind sample return mission has begun development and will be launched in 2001.
The New Millenium program is providing flight demonstrations of critical new technologies which will reduce the mass
and cost of future science and spacecraft subsystems, while
maintaining or improving mission capabilities. The Deep
Space-1 mission was launched in October 1998 and has validated its technologies. The Deep Space-2 mission was
launched along with the Mars Polar Lander in January 1999,
and will arrive at Mars in December 1999.
Life and Microgravity Science.—This program uses the
microgravity environment of space to conduct basic and applied research to understand the effect of gravity on living

systems and to conduct research in the areas of fluid physics,
combustion science, fundamental physics materials science
and biotechnology. In FY 1999, the program has flown one
science mission (STS-95) on a Spacelab carrier with ISS precursor science experiments. STS-95 included commercially
sponsored research as well as research on the effects of aging
conducted with the National Institute on Aging. FY 1999
has also seen the beginning of ISS assembly. In FY 2000
the U.S. laboratory module for the ISS will be launched,
which will allow initial Life and Microgravity hardware and
experiments to be established aboard the ISS and will begin
a new era of research. As assembly of the ISS continues
to advance, ISS Crew Health Care System (CHECS) components will be utilized to provide on-orbit medical, environmental, and countermeasure capabilities for all ISS crew
members. In early FY 2001, the program will fly a dedicated
Space Shuttle research mission which will extend previous
Space Shuttle research results and help the program as well
as the community to prepare for increasing research operations on the ISS.
Earth Science.—The purpose of NASA’s Earth Science (ES)
enterprise is to understand the total Earth system and the
effects of natural and human-induced changes on the global
environment. ES is pioneering the new interdisciplinary field
of research called Earth system science, which recognizes that
the Earth’s land surface, oceans, atmosphere, ice sheets and
biota are both dynamic and highly interactive. Earth system
science is an area of research with the potential for immense
benefit to the nation, yielding new knowledge and tools for
weather forecasting, agriculture, urban and land use planning, and other areas of economic and environmental importance. In concert with other agencies and the global research
community, ES is providing the scientific foundation needed
for the complex policy choices that lie ahead on the road
to sustainable development. ES has established three broad
goals to fulfill its purpose: (1) expand scientific knowledge
of the Earth system using NASA’s unique capabilities from
the vantage points of space, aircraft and in situ platforms;
(2) disseminate information about the Earth system; and, (3)
enable productive use of ES science and technology in the
public and private sectors.
In 1998, the Earth Science program continued to make
great progress analyzing data from significant scientific
events detected from orbiting spacecraft and scientific campaigns. Multiple spacecraft and instruments have played an
˜
important role in predicting the El Nino event and will con˜
tinue to track a possible La Nina. Images derived from the
TOPEX-Poseidon satellite allowed the public to watch the
˜
progression of El Nino across the Pacific Ocean. Radarsat
brought the first detailed radar map of Antarctica. A cooperative mission with Japan, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was launched and has proven to be valuable
for both scientific research and development of new weather
forecasting capabilities. ES has been monitoring fires worldwide including those in Indonesia, Mexico and Russia and
the results are available via the Internet. The Sea-viewing
Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), which became fully
operational as part of a data purchase from the private sector,
provided important data on coastal up-welling in the Northwest, Argentina, and South Africa related to dramatic plankton blooms, a critical food source for fish. These data are
used to understand the role of oceans in removing carbon
dioxide from the atmosphere and the ocean’s productivity.
The Earth Observing System (EOS), the centerpiece of
Earth Science, is a program of multiple spacecraft, supporting
technology and interdisciplinary science investigations to provide a long-term data set of key parameters needed to understand global climate change. The first EOS satellite launches
will begin in 1999 with the launches of Landsat-7, AM–1,
and QuikSCAT. EOS PM–1 and Chemistry are on schedule

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

to launch in 2000 and 2002 respectively. Preceding the EOS
are a number of individual satellite and Shuttle-based missions which are helping to reveal basic processes.
Complementing EOS, under the Earth Probes Program, will
be a series of small, rapid development Earth System Science
Pathfinder (ESSP) missions to study emerging science questions and to use innovative measurement techniques in support of EOS. The first two ESSP missions, Vegetation Canopy
Lidar (VCL) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment
(GRACE), are scheduled for launch in 2000 and 2001, respectively. The next ESSP missions were selected in December
1998. NASA has chosen for development one primary and
two alternate small spacecraft missions. The Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations Climatologie Etendue des Nuages et des Aerosols (PICASSOCENA) mission, led by NASA’s Langley Research Center, will
be the next ESSP mission scheduled for launch in 2003.
Data from Earth Science missions, both current and future,
will be captured, processed into useful information, and broadly distributed by the EOS Data information System
(EOSDIS). EOSDIS will ensure that data from these diverse
missions remain available in active archives for use by current and future scientists. Since these data are expected to
find uses well beyond the Earth Science research community,
EOSDIS will ultimately be accessible by environmental decision-makers, resource managers, commercial firms, social scientists and the general academic community, educators, state
and local government—anyone who wants the information.
The ES science program is essential to the discovery of
new concepts and to the design of future missions. ES research is coordinated through the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the Committee on the Environment and Natural Resources (CENR) and its Subcommittee
on Global Change Research, and the various boards and committees at the National Academy of Sciences.
Aero-Space Technology.—The mission of this Enterprise is
to pioneer the identification, development, verification, transfer, application, and commercialization of high-payoff aerospace technologies. Through its research and technology accomplishments, Aero-Space Technology promotes economic
growth and national security through a safe, efficient national
aviation system and affordable, reliable space transportation.
To meet this challenge, the Enterprise has established three
pillars for success. Within these three pillars, a set of ten
objectives, each with its own roadmap, has been defined to
address current and future National needs. The technologies
associated with these objectives are pre-competitive, longterm, high-risk research endeavors with high-payoff in terms
of market growth, safety, low acquisition cost, consumer affordability and cleaner environment. The goals of this Enterprise directly support national policy in Aero-Space, documented in ‘‘Goals for a National Partnership in Aeronautics
Research and Technology’’ and the 1994 National Space
Transportation Policy.
The first Pillar, Global Civil Aviation, addresses the fundamental, systemic issues in the aviation system to ensure
continued growth and development appropriate to the needs
of the national and global economies. These systemic issues—
safety, capacity, environmental compatibility, and affordability—cut across markets including large subsonic civil
transports, air cargo, commuter and general aviation, and
rotorcraft. The second Pillar, Revolutionary Technology Leaps,
will revolutionize air travel and the way in which aircraft
are designed, built, and operated, and addresses the challenges in General Aviation, Design Tools, and Experimental
Planes. The Third Pillar, Access to Space, will enable greater
commercial potential of space and the expansion of space
research and exploration by significantly reducing the cost
of space transportation systems while improving reliability,
operability, responsiveness, and safety.

Federal Funds—Continued

1055

The accomplishments over the past year provide a foundation for longer term technology development to address national needs. Great strides have been made in Aviation Safety. In FY 1998, non-destuctive inspection prototypes that locate cracks, corrosion and disbonds in aircraft fuselages were
demonstrated and the technology transferred to industry. An
airborne coherent Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) system for advanced in-flight measurements demonstrated its
capability to precisely detect the turbulence level one kilometer ahead of the airplane. The Aviation Safety program
in FY 2000 will demonstrate technologies for a real time
graphical display of weather in the cockpit.
NASA has made similar strides toward other aviation goals.
In FY 1998, innovative concepts were demonstrated that
showed promise in significantly reducing aviation noise. Advanced low NOx combustor concepts demonstrated a 50% reduction in NOx in flame tube tests, and showed potential
for achieving the 70% reduction goal. The Environmental Research Aircraft & Remote Sensor Technology (ERAST) project
set a world record for solar powered aircraft by reaching
an altitude of 80,200 feet. A solar powered RPV, with the
capability of reaching 100,000 feet, will be flight tested in
FY 2000.
The Reduced Seat cost element of the AST Program will
be completed in FY 1999 with the testing of a semi-span
advanced composite wing to verify weight (25 percent reduction) and structural performance goals, and the fabrication
of wing cover panels to verify the cost reduction goal (20
percent reduction). The Capacity Program demonstrated its
Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) in an initial deployment at Dallas Fort Worth airport. Results showed that significant capacity gains were possible with this system under
various weather conditions. Building on previous technology
development efforts, the final demonstration of the Terminal
Productivity element will occur in FY 2000 and is expected
to demonstrate the potential for a 12 to 15% increase in
airport throughput. Also in FY 2000, the Advanced Air Transportation element is planned to demonstrate decision support
tools that have the potential for a 30% increase in throughput
for the extended terminal area.
The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, through the
X–33, X–34 and new Future-X Pathfinder Programs, continues to develop, apply and demonstrate new technologies that
significantly advance the ability of the launch vehicle industry
to initiate commercially viable reusable launch systems. The
X–33 and X–34 have completed major hardware fabrication
and test milestones and are scheduled to begin flight tests
in 1999. The Future-X Program selected the first of its
planned series of flight demonstrators. The first Future-X
demonstrator complements existing x-vehicles by investigating the orbit-to-Earth and orbital operations regimes of the
flight spectrum, and will begin flight tests in 2000.
The Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) focuses on advanced technology across a broad front in order
to reduce costs beyond the targets of the immediate RLV
program goals. The ASTP includes a base of core technology
investments as well as technology investments unique to focused program efforts. In FY 1999, the ion engine aboard
Deep Space-1 was activated and continues to operate in a
nominal fashion. Industry-led Future Launch Architecture
studies are currently underway to support an end-of-the decade decision on lower cost civil space transportation architectures as called for in the National Space Transportation Policy. Funds are provided in the Future Space Launch budget
line for the years beyond FY 2000 to pursue the decision.
The Commercial Technology Program’s focus in FY 1998
was continued investment of 10–15 percent of the NASA R&D
budget in commercial partnerships with industry. Based on
experience to date, these commercial partnerships are expected to increase the return on the government’s R&D in-

1056

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS

AND

TECHNOLOGY—Continued

vestment, allowing NASA to do more with limited funds, and
strengthening the international competitiveness of key industry sectors. In FY 1999 and 2000, the program will continue
to emphasize increasing commercial partnerships with industry and continue to refine and expand a technology and partnership database.
Mission Communication Services.—The primary goal of this
operational program is to provide highly reliable, cost-effective
space operations services in support of NASA’s science and
aeronautics programs. In addition, support is provided to
interagency, international, and commercial space-faring enterprises on a reimbursable basis. The mission communication
services program is composed of ground networks, space network services, and mission control systems, as well as Agency
radio spectrum management and data standards coordination.
Services are provided to a large number of NASA missions,
including planetary and interplanetary missions; human
space flight missions; near-earth and earth orbiting missions;
and sub-orbital and aeronautical flight tests. On October 1,
1998 a Consolidated Space Operations Contract (CSOC) was
competitively awarded to Lockheed-Martin Space Operations
Company. This contract is designed to maximize space operations resources by reducing systems overlap and duplication.
Academic Programs.—The goal of this program is to
promote excellence in America’s education system through enhancing and expanding scientific and technological competence. NASA’s education programs span the elementary
through graduate levels and are directed at both students
and faculty. The goal of the Minority University Research
Program is to expand opportunities for talented students from
underrepresented groups who are pursuing degrees in science
and engineering and to strengthen the research capabilities
of minority universities and colleges. The range of activities
conducted under this program will continue to capture the
interest of all students in science and technology, develop
talented students at the undergraduate and graduate levels,
provide research opportunities for students and faculty members at NASA centers, and strengthen and enhance the research capabilities of the nation’s colleges and universities.
Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1998 actual

Identification code 80–0110–0–1–999

25.4
25.5
25.7
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Direct obligations:
Transportation of things ...........................................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Printing and reproduction .........................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................
Research and development contracts .......................
Operation and maintenance of equipment ...............
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

99.0
99.0
99.9

22.0
23.1
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

production and services; maintenance; construction of facilities including repair, rehabilitation, and modification of facilities, minor construction of new facilities and additions to existing facilities, facility
planning and design, environmental compliance and restoration, and
acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized by law;
program management; personnel and related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901–5902;
travel expenses; purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, and operation
of mission and administrative aircraft; not to exceed $35,000 for
official reception and representation expenses; and purchase (not to
exceed 33 for replacement only) and hire of passenger motor vehicles,
ø$2,511,100,000¿ $2,494,900,000, to remain available until September
30, ø2000¿ 2001. (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and
Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act,
1999.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0112–0–1–999

35
169
2,105
168

44
99
2,180
177

01.00
09.01

Total direct program .................................................
Reimbursable program ..................................................

2,454
91

2,477
131

2,500
121

10.00

Total new obligations ................................................

2,545

2,608

2,621

21.40
22.00

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year ...............
New budget authority (gross) ........................................

160
2,471

85
2,642

119
2,616

23.90
23.95
23.98
24.40

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance expiring ........................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year .................

2,631
2,727
2,735
¥2,545
¥2,608
¥2,621
¥1 ................... ...................
85
119
114

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Current:
40.00
Appropriation .............................................................
41.00
Transferred to other accounts ...................................

2,433
2,511
2,495
¥53 ................... ...................

43.00

2,380

2,511

2,495

131

131

121

68.90
5
1
61
6
369
1,102

60
6
366
1,093

265
134
2,421
111
52
165
24
994

251
127
2,293
105
49
156
23
941

249
126
2,275
104
49
155
23
935

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

5,796
508

5,489
599

5,447
577

Total new obligations ................................................

6,304

6,088

6,024

For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in carrying
out mission support for human space flight programs and science,
aeronautical, and technology programs, including research operations
and support; space communications activities including operations,

¥40 ................... ...................
91

131

121

Total new budget authority (gross) ..........................

2,471

2,642

2,616

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year:
72.40
Obligated balance, start of year ...............................
72.95
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

526

487

378

106

66

66

70.00

MISSION SUPPORT

Appropriation (total) .............................................
Permanent:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
Offsetting collections (cash) ................................
From Federal sources: Change in receivables
and unpaid, unfilled orders .............................
Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ...........................................................

5
1

64
6
390
1,164

2000 est.

36
204
2,059
155

2000 est.

5
1

1999 est.

Obligations by program activity:
Direct program:
00.01
Safety, reliability and quality assurance ..................
00.02
Space communication services .................................
00.03
Research and program management .......................
00.04
Construction of facilities ...........................................

68.00
68.10
1999 est.

1998 actual

72.99
73.10
73.20
73.40
74.40
74.95

Total unpaid obligations, start of year ................
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Adjustments in expired accounts ..................................
Unpaid obligations, end of year:
Obligated balance, end of year ................................
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

74.99

Total unpaid obligations, end of year ..................

86.90
86.93
86.97
86.98

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new current authority ..............................
Outlays from current balances ......................................
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................
Outlays from permanent balances ................................

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

632
553
444
2,545
2,608
2,621
¥2,614
¥2,717
¥2,541
¥10 ................... ...................
487

378

458

66

66

66

553

444

524

1,930
2,006
1,994
588
580
427
55
131
121
41 ................... ...................
2,614

2,717

2,541

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
Offsetting collections (cash) from:
88.40
Non-Federal sources .............................................
88.45
Offsetting governmental collections .....................
88.90
88.95

89.00
90.00

Total, offsetting collections (cash) ..................
From Federal sources: Change in receivables and
unpaid, unfilled orders ..............................................
Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

1057

Federal Funds—Continued

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1998 actual

Identification code 80–0112–0–1–999

¥23
¥108

¥29
¥102

¥24
¥97

¥131

¥131

¥121

40 ................... ...................

2,380
2,483

2,511
2,586

2,495
2,420

This appropriation provides funding for mission support and
includes: safety, mission assurance, engineering and advanced
concepts activities supporting agency programs; space communication services for NASA programs; salaries and related
expenses in support of research in NASA field installations;
design, repair, rehabilitation and modification of institutional
facilities and construction of new institutional facilities; and
other operations activities supporting conduct of agency programs.

Performance Objectives
Safety, Mission Assurance, Engineering, and Advanced Concepts.—The goal of this program is to invest in the safety
and success of NASA missions by assuring that sound and
robust policies, processes, and tools for safety, reliability,
quality assurance, and engineering disciplines are in place
and applied throughout NASA. The program also examines
long-term technology requirements for NASA’s strategic objectives.
Space Communication Services.—The primary goal is to
provide highly reliable, cost-effective space operations services
in support of NASA’s science and aeronautics programs. In
addition, support is provided to interagency, international,
and commercial space-faring enterprises on a reimbursable
basis. The space communications services program is composed of Space Network and telecommunications programs.
Services are provided to human space flight missions and
low earth-orbital spacecraft compatible with the Tracking and
Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS); to expendable launch
vehicles and research aircraft; and for telecommunications
interconnectivity among NASA, contractor and investigator
science facilities around the world. Development of a remote
ground terminal at Guam which extends network capability,
by providing coverage of the zone of exclusion, was completed
in FY 1998. Development of the TDRSS Replenishment Spacecraft is ongoing, with the first satellite scheduled for launch
late in FY 1999. Management and responsibility for all Wide
Area Network data distribution services for all manned, earth
orbiting and deep space missions and NASA administrative
communications will be outsourced by CSOC late in FY 1999.
Research and Program Management.—This activity provides for the salaries, travel support, other personnel expenses of the entire NASA civil service workforce, and includes vital support to the physical plant at the Centers and
at NASA Headquarters.
Construction of Facilities.—This activity provides for facility
construction activities to preserve NASA’s core infrastructure;
environmental compliance and restoration activities, design
of facilities projects, and advanced planning related to future
facilities needs. In 1998–2000, activities in support of discrete
projects to repair and modernize the basic infrastructure and
institutional facilities at NASA centers will continue, as well
as activities in support of environmental compliance and restoration requirements.

11.1
11.3
11.5
11.8

Direct obligations:
Personnel compensation:
Full-time permanent .............................................
Other than full-time permanent ...........................
Other personnel compensation .............................
Special personal services payments ....................

1999 est.

2000 est.

1,194
30
23
8

1,219
31
24
8

1,254
33
26
8

1,255
264
30
45
5
15

1,282
271
13
45
5
15

1,321
274
11
45
5
15

59
4
18
269

60
4
19
269

58
4
18
266

25.4
25.5
25.6
25.7
26.0
31.0
32.0
41.0

Total personnel compensation .........................
Civilian personnel benefits .......................................
Benefits for former personnel ...................................
Travel and transportation of persons .......................
Transportation of things ...........................................
Rental payments to GSA ...........................................
Communications, utilities, and miscellaneous
charges .................................................................
Printing and reproduction .........................................
Advisory and assistance services .............................
Other services ............................................................
Purchases of goods and services from Government
accounts ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ..................
Research and development contracts .......................
Medical care ..............................................................
Operation and maintenance of equipment ...............
Supplies and materials .............................................
Equipment .................................................................
Land and structures ..................................................
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ........................

27
49
140
2
95
21
15
135
6

28
49
141
2
96
21
15
136
6

27
48
138
2
93
21
15
133
6

99.0
99.0

Subtotal, direct obligations ..................................
Reimbursable obligations ..............................................

2,454
91

2,477
131

2,500
121

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

2,545

2,608

2,621

11.9
12.1
13.0
21.0
22.0
23.1
23.3
24.0
25.1
25.2
25.3

Personnel Summary
1998 actual

Identification code 80–0112–0–1–999

Direct:
1001 Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................
Reimbursable:
2001 Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

RESEARCH

AND

1999 est.

2000 est.

18,839

18,460

17,885

85

85

85

DEVELOPMENT

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0108–0–1–999

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Spending authority from offsetting collections:
68.00
Offsetting collections (cash) .....................................
68.10
From Federal sources: Change in receivables and
unpaid, unfilled orders .........................................
68.90

74.40
74.95

1999 est.

2000 est.

5 ................... ...................
¥5 ................... ...................

Spending authority from offsetting collections
(total) ................................................................ ................... ................... ...................

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year:
72.40
Obligated balance, start of year ...............................
72.95
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................
72.99
73.20
73.40

1998 actual

Total unpaid obligations, start of year ................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Adjustments in expired accounts ..................................
Unpaid obligations, end of year:
Obligated balance, end of year ................................
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................

104

51

31

34

29

29

138
80
60
¥45
¥20
¥44
¥13 ................... ...................
51

31

¥13

29

29

29

74.99

Total unpaid obligations, end of year ..................

80

60

16

86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from current balances ......................................

45

20

44

1058

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

Federal Funds—Continued

General and special funds—Continued
RESEARCH

AND

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)—Continued
1998 actual

Identification code 80–0108–0–1–999

Offsets:
Against gross budget authority and outlays:
88.45
Offsetting collections (cash) from: Offsetting governmental collections ............................................
88.95 From Federal sources: Change in receivables and
unpaid, unfilled orders ..............................................

89.00
90.00

1999 est.

2000 est.

¥5 ................... ...................
5 ................... ...................

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
40
20
44

Since FY 1995 NASA’s Research and Development activities
have been performed in Human Space Flight; Science, Aeronautics and Technology; and Mission Support. This account
shows spending from balances prior to the account restructuring.
SPACE FLIGHT, CONTROL

AND

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance,
start of year ..............................................................
73.10 Total new obligations ....................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
73.40 Adjustments in expired accounts ..................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance,
end of year ................................................................
72.40

DEVELOPMENT—Continued

DATA COMMUNICATIONS

1998 actual

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year:
72.40
Obligated balance, start of year ...............................
72.95
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................
72.99
73.20
73.40
74.40
74.95
74.99

Total unpaid obligations, start of year ................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
Adjustments in expired accounts ..................................
Unpaid obligations, end of year:
Obligated balance, end of year ................................
From Federal sources: Receivables and unpaid, unfilled orders ...........................................................
Total unpaid obligations, end of year ..................

56

29 ...................

64

14

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from current balances ......................................

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ...........................................................................
64
14
44

44

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
Total investments, start of year: U.S. securities: Par
value ..........................................................................
2 ................... ...................
92.02 Total investments, end of year: U.S. securities: Par
value .......................................................................... ................... ................... ...................
92.01

Since FY 1995 NASA’s Construction of Facilities activities
have been performed in Human Space Flight; Science, Aeronautics and Technology; and Mission Support. This account
shows spending from balances prior to the account restructuring.

1999 est.

2000 est.

20

12

2 ...................

12 ...................

1999 est.

2000 est.

25.2
25.4
32.0

Other services ................................................................
Operation and maintenance of facilities ......................
Land and structures ......................................................

2
3
22

1 ...................
3 ...................
25 ...................

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

27

29 ...................

RESEARCH

AND

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

12 ...................

2 ................... ...................

1998 actual

Identification code 80–0107–0–1–999

58
22
12
¥34
¥10
¥12
¥2 ................... ...................

22

30

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)

2

20

30
29
29 ...................
¥14
¥44
¥16
15

86.93

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0105–0–1–252

68
27
¥64
¥1

1998 actual

Identification code 80–0103–0–1–999

Change in unpaid obligations:
Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance,
start of year ..............................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance,
end of year ................................................................

1999 est.

2000 est.

72.40

86.93

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from current balances ......................................

34

10

12

Net budget authority and outlays:
89.00 Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
90.00 Outlays ...........................................................................
34
10
12

Since FY 1995 NASA’s Space Flight, Control and Data
Communications activities have been performed in Human
Space Flight; Science, Aeronautics and Technology; and Mission Support. This account shows spending from balances
prior to the account restructuring.
CONSTRUCTION

OF

89.00
90.00

Identification code 80–0107–0–1–999

00.01
00.02
00.03
00.04

Obligations by program activity:
Supporting activity .........................................................
Space transportation .....................................................
Mission to Planet Earth .................................................
Aeronautical research and technology ..........................

10.00

Total new obligations ................................................

1998 actual

2000 est.

4
9 ...................
4
10 ...................
1 ................... ...................
18
10 ...................

OF

INSPECTOR GENERAL

For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, ø$20,000,000¿
$20,800,000. (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and
Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act,
1999.)
Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–0109–0–1–252

29 ...................

1998 actual

1999 est.

2000 est.

10.00
Budgetary resources available for obligation:
21.40 Unobligated balance available, start of year ...............
23.95 Total new obligations ....................................................
24.40 Unobligated balance available, end of year .................

27

1 ................... ...................

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................ ................... ................... ...................
Outlays ........................................................................... ................... ................... ...................

OFFICE

1999 est.

1 ...................

Since FY 1995 NASA’s Research and Program Management
activities have been performed in Mission Support. This account shows spending from balances prior to the account restructuring.

FACILITIES

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)

1

56
29 ...................
¥27
¥29 ...................
29 ................... ...................

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations ............................................................

18

20

21

22.00
23.95

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
New budget authority (gross) ........................................
Total new obligations ....................................................

18
¥18

20
¥20

21
¥21

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

40.00

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation ..................................................................

Change in unpaid obligations:
72.40 Unpaid obligations, start of year: Obligated balance,
start of year ..............................................................
73.10 Total new obligations ....................................................
73.20 Total outlays (gross) ......................................................
74.40 Unpaid obligations, end of year: Obligated balance,
end of year ................................................................

22.00
20

New budget authority (gross) ........................................

23.90
23.95
24.40

18

1059

Trust Funds

Total budgetary resources available for obligation
Total new obligations ....................................................
Unobligated balance available, end of year .................

60.27

New budget authority (gross), detail:
Appropriation (trust fund, indefinite) ............................

73.10
73.20

Change in unpaid obligations:
Total new obligations ....................................................
Total outlays (gross) ......................................................

1

1

1

21

2
18
¥18

2
20
¥20

2
21
¥21

2

2

2

19
19
19
¥1 ................... ...................
18
18
18

1

1

1

1 ................... ...................
¥1
¥1
¥1

Outlays (gross), detail:
86.90 Outlays from new current authority ..............................
86.93 Outlays from current balances ......................................

16
2

18
2

18
2

87.00

Total outlays (gross) .................................................

18

20

21

86.97

Outlays (gross), detail:
Outlays from new permanent authority .........................

1

1

1

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

18
18

20
20

21
21

89.00
90.00

Net budget authority and outlays:
Budget authority ............................................................
Outlays ...........................................................................

1
1

1
1

1
1

16

17

17

17

17

17

The mission of the Office of Inspector General is to conduct
audits and investigations of agency activities. The Inspector
General keeps the Administrator informed of problems and
deficiencies in agency programs and operations.

Memorandum (non-add) entries:
Total investments, start of year: U.S. securities: Par
value ..........................................................................
92.02 Total investments, end of year: U.S. securities: Par
value ..........................................................................
92.01

Object Classification (in millions of dollars)
1998 actual

Identification code 80–0109–0–1–252

11.1
12.1
21.0
25.2

Personnel compensation: Full-time permanent .............
Civilian personnel benefits ............................................
Travel and transportation of persons ............................
Other services ................................................................

99.9

Total new obligations ................................................

1999 est.

2000 est.

13
15
16
3
3
3
1
2
2
1 ................... ...................
18

20

21

Personnel Summary
1998 actual

Identification code 80–0109–0–1–252

1001

Total compensable workyears: Full-time equivalent
employment ...............................................................

185

1999 est.

2000 est.

210

210

Trust Funds
SCIENCE, SPACE,

AND

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION TRUST FUND

Unavailable Collections (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–8978–0–7–503

1998 actual

1999 est.

2000 est.

Balance, start of year:
01.99 Balance, start of year .................................................... ................... ................... ...................
Receipts:
02.01 Earnings on investments; Science, Space and Technology Education, Trust Fund ...................................
1
1
1
Appropriation:
05.01 Science, space, and technology education trust fund
¥1
¥1
¥1
07.99 Total balance, end of year ............................................ ................... ................... ...................

Program and Financing (in millions of dollars)
Identification code 80–8978–0–7–503

10.00

Obligations by program activity:
Total obligations (object class 41.0) ............................

21.40

Budgetary resources available for obligation:
Unobligated balance available, start of year ...............

1998 actual

1999 est.

2000 est.

1 ................... ...................

18

18

18

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds appropriated for ‘‘Human space flight’’, ‘‘Science, aeronautics and technology’’, or ‘‘Mission support’’ by this appropriations Act, when any
activity has been initiated by the incurrence of obligations for construction of facilities as authorized by law, such amount available
for such activity shall remain available until expended. This provision
does not apply to the amounts appropriated in ‘‘Mission support’’
pursuant to the authorization for repair, rehabilitation and modification of facilities, minor construction of new facilities and additions
to existing facilities, and facility planning and design.
Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds appropriated for ‘‘Human space flight’’, ‘‘Science, aeronautics and technology’’, or ‘‘Mission support’’ by this appropriations Act, the amounts
appropriated for construction of facilities shall remain available until
September 30, ø2001¿ 2002.
Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds appropriated for ‘‘Mission support’’ and ‘‘Office of Inspector General’’,
amounts made available by this Act for personnel and related costs
and travel expenses of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall remain available until September 30, ø1999¿ 2000 and
may be used to enter into contracts for training, investigations, costs
associated with personnel relocation, and for other services, to be
provided during the next fiscal year.
øNASA shall develop a revised appropriation structure for submission in the fiscal year 2000 budget request consisting of five appropriations accounts (International Space Station; Launch Vehicles and
Payload Operations; Science, Aeronautics and Technology; Mission
Support; and Office of Inspector General).¿
NASA shall develop a revised appropriation account structure for
submission in the fiscal year 2001 budget request consisting of the
‘‘Human Space Flight’’ account; the ‘‘Science, Aeronautics, and Technology’’ account; and the ‘‘Office of the Inspector General’’ account.
The accounts shall each include the planned full costs (direct and
indirect costs) of NASA’s related activities and allow NASA to shift
civil service salaries, benefits and support among accounts, as required, for the safe, timely, and successful accomplishment of NASA
missions. (Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban
Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999.)


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