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THE BUDGET
OF THE

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30

1959

UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
WASHINGTON : 1958

For Sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C.




Price $5.50 (Paper Cover)

Pursuant to the provisions of the Budget and Accounting Act (31 U. S. C. 1-24) and other applicable laws, the
budget for the fiscal year 1959 contains the President's
recommendations for the work program and financial
program of the Government for the 12 months beginning
July 1, 1958, and ending June 30, 1959. It also presents
comparable information for the fiscal years 1957 (actual)
and 1958 (partly actual and partly estimated).
The material in the budget covers both groups of funds
administered by agencies of the Government—Federal
funds (owned by the Government), and trust and deposit
funds (held in trust or in suspense by the Government),
although only the Federal funds are included in the computation of the budget surplus or deficit.

of part II is arranged in chapters reflecting the organization of the Government.
Part III (pp. 825 through 875) contains a summary
table on trust and deposit funds, and detailed schedules
and explanatory statements on the various trust funds.
Part IV (pp. 877 through 955) contains special analyses of budget data and Federal programs. These
analyses supplement material appearing in other parts of
the budget. Some of these give details for certain summary figures appearing in part I—-for example, a classification of budget receipts by source, and a classification of
budget expenditures according to functions and subfunctions. Several of the other special analyses in part
IV contain materials which present different groupings or
classifications of data.
An appendix, printed separately, contains more detailed
ARRANGEMENT OF THE BUDGET
information on personal services by grade and title.
The budget document consists of the President's budget
The budget for the municipal government of the District
message and four parts which contain summary tables, of Columbia is also printed separately and the main
detailed data, and special analyses.
volume of the budget contains detail only for the Federal
In the budget message (pp. M4 through M56), appear the payments and loans to the District.
general statement of the President's financial program and
an outline of his major recommendations.
EXPLANATORY STATEMENTS
Part I of the document (pp. 1 through 8) contains five
Introductory statements at the beginning of each part
summary tables. Each of these tables is designed to
bring together in one or two pages some overall aspect of give further explanations as follows:
Pages 2-3—Types of funds; basis of stating receipts and
the Federal budget.
Part II (pp. 9 through 824) contains the detail of the expenditures; concept of budget surplus or deficit; types
budget for Federal funds, including various types of tables of new obligational authority; certain budget classificaand schedules, explanatory statements of the work to be tions.
Pages 10-12—Operation of Federal funds and format of
performed and the money needed, and the text of the
language proposed for enactment by Congress on each item material printed for most accounts and funds in part II.
Page 826—Operation of trust and deposit funds covof authorization. Also included is material on a few trust
funds which require congressional action. This part of ered by part III.
Page 878—Coverage of the special analyses printed in
the budget begins with four statements (tables 6 through
9) which supplement the tables of part I. The remainder part IV.




Detail will not necessarily add to totals, because of rounding.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
R6sum6 of the Budget
BUDGET MESSAGE OP THE PRESIDENT
Analysis of major programs and budgetary issues
Protection
M a j o r national security
International affairs and
finance
Civil benefits
Labor and welfare
Commerce and housing
Veterans services and benefits
Agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources
Interest and general government
Interest
General government
PART I. SUMMARY TABLES
Table 1. Summary of budget receipts and expenditures
Table 2. Summary of budget expenditures (by agency)
Table 3. Summary of new obligational authority (by function and agency)
Table 4. Summary of changes in status of public debt
Table 5. Summary of budget and trust transactions for fiscal year 1959
PART II. ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS
Table 6. Summary of budget authorizations, obligations, expenditures and balances
Table 7. Summary of new obligational authority (by type of authorization and agency)
Table 8. Summary of balances available at start of year
Table 9. Summary of expenditures of public enterprise funds
Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Independent offices
General Services Administration
Housing and H o m e Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice.
Department of Labor
Post Office Department
Department of State
Treasury Department
District of Columbia
PART I I I . ESTIMATES FOR TRUST FUNDS
Table 10. Trust receipts and expenditures
Detailed estimates, narratives, and schedules on trust funds
PART I V . SPECIAL ANALYSES
A. Federal Government receipts f r o m and payments to the public
B. Analysis of budget receipts
C. Analysis of budget by function and agency
^
D . Investment, operating, and other budget expenditures
E. Federal credit programs
F. Federal activities in public works and other construction
G. Federal aid to State and local governments
H . Federal research and development programs
I. Principal Federal statistical programs
J. Selected investments and interfund transactions
K . Comparison of budget receipts and expenditures b y function
INDEX




__

M3

M4
M5
M12
M13
M14
M22
M27
M31
M37
M45
M46
M51
M52
M53
M53
1
4
5
6
7
8
9
13
14
16
18
19
47
59
69
95
221
257
295
375
431
521
561
623
707
725
745
757
781
819
825
829
837
877
879
883
889
897
907
918
930
937
948
951
954
957




R E S U M E OF T H E BUDGET
[Fiscal years.

In billions]

1953
actual

1954
actual

1955
actual

1956
actual

1957
actual

1958
estimate

$80. 3

$62. 8

$57. 1

$63. 2

$70. 2

$71. 4
2.9

$65. 1
7.4

80. 3

62. 8

57. 1

63. 2

70. 2

74. 4

72. 5

64. 8

64. 7

60. 4

68. 1

71. 0

72. 4

72. 3
2. 1

64. 8

64. 7

60. 4

68. 1

71. 0

72. 4

74. 4

74. 3

67. 8

64. 6

66. 5

69. 4

72. 5
0. 3

70. 7
3.3

74. 3

67. 8

64. 6

66. 5

69. 4

72. 8

73. 9

Budget surplus ( + ) or deficit (—) _ - 9 . 4

-3. 1

-4. 2

+ 1.6

+ 1.6

-0. 4

+ 0. 5

Public debt at close of year _

1

271. 3

274. 4

272. 8

270.5

271. 2

271. 2

78. 4

67. 8

52. 1

46. 0

43.7

40. 1

39. 9

New obligational authority:
Under existing legislation
Under proposed legislation
Total

Budget receipts:
Under existing legislation
Under proposed legislation
Total
Budget expenditures:
Under existing legislation
Under proposed legislation
Total

Balances of appropriations carried forward at end of year

266.

1959
estimate

NOTE.—Detail in this and subsequent tables may not add to totals shown due to rounding.
Unless otherwise noted, all references to years are to fiscal years ending June 30.

30

$ Billions

Surplus
70

Deficit

Expenditures

.. - \ -

n




BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
To the Congress of the United States:
The budget for the fiscal year 1959 which I am transmitting with
this message reflects the swiftly moving character of the time in which
we live. It is clearly a time of growing opportunity as technology and
science almost daily open wholly new vistas to all mankind. Yet it is
also a time of growing danger. The progress of the Soviets in longrange missiles and other offensive weapons, together with their continuing rejection of a workable disarmament, compels us to increase
certain of our defense activities which we have only recently expanded
many fold.
We know that we are sturdy today in the many strengths that keep
the peace. This budget reflects our determination to remain so in
the future.
This budget reflects another determination—that of adhering to
those principles of governmental and fiscal soundness that have always
guided this administration—economy in expenditures, efficiency in
operations, promotion of growth and stability in a free-enterprise
economy, a vigorous Federal-State system, concern for human wellbeing, priority of national security over lesser needs, revenues adequate
to cover expenditures and permit debt reduction during periods of
high business activity, and revision and reduction of taxes when
possible.
To meet the responsibilities imposed on us by world conditions and
by the fiscal principles to which we adhere, the budget for 1959 contains recommendations to provide:
(1) An immediate increase for 1958 of $1.3 billion in spending
authority for the Department of Defense, and a further increase
of $2.5 billion in 1959 over 1958, to be applied principally to
accelerate missile procurement, to strengthen our nuclear retaliatory power, and to spur military research and development
programs;
(2) A resulting increase of $2.8 billion in estimated 1959 expenditures over 1957 for missiles, nuclear armed or powered
ships, atomic energy, research and development, science and
education, plus a further provision of $0.5 billion for defense
purposes, if needed; in addition, authority to transfer up to $2
billion between military appropriations, in order to take prompt
advantage of new developments;
(3) A decrease of $1.5 billion in 1959 expenditures below 1957
for other military arms and equipment and aircraft of declining
importance, in favor of the newer weapons;
C4) Curtailments, revisions, or eliminations of certain present
m5




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

civil programs, and deferments of previously recommended new
programs, in order to restrain nonmilitary spending in 1959 and
to provide the basis for budgetary savings of several billion
dollars annually within a few years;
(5) Continuation of present tax rates to help achieve a balanced budget in 1959.
I believe that this budget adequately provides for our Federal
responsibilities in the year ahead.
The estimated budget totals for the current fiscal year and for the
fiscal year 1959 are compared with actual results of earlier years in the
following table:
B U D G E T TOTALS
{Fiscal years. In billions]
1956
actual
Budget receipts
Budget expenditures..
Budget surplus ( + ) or deficit ( - )
New obligational authority

1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$68.1
66.5

$71.0
69.4

$72.4
72.8

$74.4
73.9

+1.6

+1.6

-.4

+.5

63.2

70.2

74.4

72.5

1

* Includes $6.6 billion of anticipated supplemental requests.

Defense, science, and the budget.—Americans are determined
to maintain our ability to deter war and to repel and decisively
counter any possible attack. Today we possess military superiority
over any potential aggressor or aggressors. Every American should
clearly understand that the vast defense programs undertaken during
the past several years have greatly advanced our military preparedness
and developed and harnessed impressive new scientific achievements.
We have sharply increased the numbers of scientists and engineers
assigned to top priority defense programs. We have expanded many
fold the expenditures for the development of missiles, both defensive
and counteroffensive. We have accelerated development of advanced
guidance systems, new fuels, and heat-resistant materials. We have
greatly enlarged our network of warning devices and communications.
Our longer-range ballistic missile development, in particular, has long
had the highest national priority. The result is striking. Whereas
in 1953 we spent only $1 million on these programs, we spent $1
billion in 1957 and will spend more in 1958 and still more in 1959.
Our defenses are strong today, both as a deterrent to war and for
use as a crushing response to any attack. Now our concern is for
the future. Certain elements of our defense program have reached
the point where they can be further accelerated. I will transmit to
the Congress, immediately, a supplemental appropriation request of




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

$1.3 billion for the Department of Defense for the fiscal year 1958.
Further increases in new obligational authority are requested for the
fiscal year 1959. The recommended authority for the military
functions of the Department of Defense is $39.1 billion, which is $0.6
billion more than was requested in last year's budget for 1958 and
$3.8 billion more than the amount the Congress has thus far enacted
for 1958. Spending for military functions of the Department of
Defense in 1959 is estimated to total $39.8 billion.
The development of longer-range ballistic missiles, construction of
missile sites and detection systems, and other missile programs including guided missile ships will be substantially augmented. The
total expenditures for missile research, development and procurement,
for guided missile ships, and for missile-related construction will be
$4.3 billion in 1958 and $5.3 billion in 1959, compared with $3 billion
spent in 1957, $1.7 billion in 1956, and $1.2 billion in 1955. Commencing in 1958, we will procure a number of new missiles which have
been recently developed and have now become operational.
As an indispensable part of our efforts to maintain an adequate
defense, the budget recommendations for 1959 call for continued contributions to the efforts of free world nations to promote the collective defense and economic growth. The Soviet threat to freedom is
far more than military power alone. Poverty and ignorance, and the
despair, fear, and unrest that flow from them, have always been
enemies to liberty. The Communists well know this and unceasingly
exploit these factors to extend their influence and control. This
Soviet economic assault on freedom is rapidly growing. Conquest by
this route is no less menacing to us and other free nations than conquest by military force. We must, accordingly, vigorously advance
our programs to assist other peoples in their efforts to remove poverty
and ignorance. As we succeed in these military and economic efforts,
our own freedom and security are strengthened, and the prospects for
peace are improved.
Scientific and research efforts throughout the Nation must be
expanded. This is a task not only for the Government but also for
private industry, foundations, and educational institutions. The
Government, on its part, will increase its efforts in this area. Supplemental appropriations for 1958 will be requested for the National
Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and the National Science Foundation, as well as the Department of Defense. For 1959, new programs to promote education in science are being recommended and
basic research activities are being generally expanded.
Changes in emphasis.—Total Government expenditures (1) for
all procurement to equip our forces and those of our allies with
weapons, ships, planes, and missiles, (2) for atomic energy, and (3) for




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

all scientific research and education will be approximately $21.1 billion
in 1958 and $21.6 billion in 1959, compared with $20.5 billion in 1957.
Within these totals for procurement and science, we have gradually
but substantially changed our emphasis. This administration's continuing attention in recent years to new concepts of defense is shown
by the fact that more than 75% of the total funds for procurement in
the 1959 budget and 1958 supplemental requests is programed for new
types of equipment which had not been developed in the fiscal year
1955 or were not being bought in production quantities in that year—
the first full year following the Korean conflict. In 1953, missiles
alone took less than 2 cents of each dollar spent for major procurement;
in 1957. missiles took about 15 cents of everv procurement dollar: and




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

years will be larger than in 1957—even though it is recommended that
certain other programs, both defense and civil, be retarded or reduced.
Total appropriations and other forms of new obligational authorityrecommended for the fiscal year 1959 amount to $72.5 billion. This
is $4.7 billion more than has been enacted for 1958 and $2.3 billion
more than for 1957. In addition, $6.6 billion of supplemental
authorizations are estimated for the current year, 1958, for the Department of Defense, Commodity Credit Corporation, Export-Import
Bank, and other agencies, as summarized in table 3 of part I of this
budget document.
Budget expenditures in the fiscal year 1959 are estimated to be
$73.9 billion. This is $1.1 billion more than now estimated for 1958
and $4.5 billion more than in 1957.
Not all of the obligational authority enacted for a fiscal year is spent
in the same year. Amounts of authority enacted in prior years but
which have not yet been spent and are carried forward from one fiscal
year to the next are called unexpended balances. These balances are
not cash on hand, but represent authority to draw on future receipts
of the Treasury in order to pay bills.
The total balances of appropriations to be carried forward at the
end of the fiscal year 1959 are estimated to be $39.9 billion. Of this
amount 78% will have been obligated; that is, already committed.
The largest part of the unexpended balances of appropriations is in
the Department of Defense, reflecting the long time which necessarily
elapses between the placing of orders for complex military equipment
and delivery and final payment. It is estimated that $32.1 billion
will be carried forward by that Department at the end of 1959, of
which $24.4 billion will have been obligated.
Budget receipts.—Although higher than in previous years, the
current estimate of receipts for the fiscal year 1958 is somewhat
smaller than earlier expectations, reflecting readjustments currently
taking place in our economy following the rapid growth of the past
several years. It now appears that 1958 budget receipts will not
exceed $72.4 billion, although they will be well above 1957 receipts
of $71 billion. A combination of increased defense expenditures and
decreased receipts in the revised estimates for the current fiscal year
results in an estimated budget deficit of $0.4 billion.
There are strong grounds to support my confidence that the expansion of our economy will soon be resumed, bringing higher levels of
receipts with present tax rates. The acceleration of defense efforts
already under way, the increasing pace of activity in a number of
programs involving State and local as well as Federal'expenditures,
the rapid pace of technological advance and its application by American industry, the expanding needs and desires of our growing popula-




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

tion, and Government policies designed to facilitate the resumption
of growth are among the major factors that justify this confidence.
While there are many uncertainties in forecasting results 18 months
in advance, our best estimate at this time of budget receipts for 1959
is $74.4 billion. This would produce a balanced budget with a surplus
of $0.5 billion in 1959.
SOURCE OF BUDGET

RECEIPTS

Fs c f Year 1959 Estimate
ir a
flllll^^

With relatively minor exceptions, present tax rates have not been
changed since 1954 when a program of tax reduction and reform was
enacted, saving taxpayers nearly $7.5 billion annually. If the Congress follows my recommendations, I believe that we shall be able to
do what is required for our defense efforts and meet the basic needs of
our domestic programs without an increase in tax rates. To maintain present rates, I recommend that tax rates on corporation income
and certain excises, which under existing law are scheduled for reduction next July 1, be extended for another year.
We shall continue our efforts to assure that no one can avoid paying his fair share of the country's total high tax burden. Pending
legislation (H. R. 8381), which was developed jointly by the Treasury
Department and the House Committee on Ways and Means to
remove unintended tax benefits and hardships, should be enacted
with a few modifications. The Treasury Department will continue
to review the operation of the tax laws and make recommendations
for such additional changes as are needed to close loopholes.
There are certain technical tax revisions which will give substantial
benefits to small business, with a minimum loss of revenue and with




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

no changes in tax rates. These revisions will be set forth in the
Economic Report. They are based on the work of the Cabinet
Committee on Small Business.
Debt limit.—A debt limitation serves as a proper reminder of the
importance of operating economically in discharging the responsibilities placed by the Constitution and the statutes on the executive
branch. However, the present limit of $275 billion is too restrictive
in view of rising defense expenditures and of the need for more flexibility to permit efficient and economical debt management.
Therefore, I will recommend that the present limit be revised upward temporarily through the fiscal year 1959. There should be an
adequate margin to take care of any unexpected developments and
to give the Treasury some much-needed flexibility in conducting its
financing during this coming period.
Trust funds.—The total budget expenditures and receipts discussed thus far exclude funds held in trust by the Government.
Budget totals are important indicators of fiscal policy and are a
major determinant of changes in the public debt. However, to
measure more fully the scope of all Federal Government activities
and their impact on the national economy it is necessary to consider
the trust funds as well as the budget funds.
In the fiscal year 1959, the expenditures of the trust funds will rise
by an estimated $1.2 billion, compared with an increase of only $0.2
billion in their receipts. Payments for the highway program are estimated to increase $0.6 billion to $2.5 billion and benefits under the
old-age and survivors insurance program will also increase $0.6 billion
to $8.7 billion. These payments will help contribute to economic
stability during the coming period and will also aid in the long-run
growth of the economy.
TRUST FUNDS
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
1957
actual

Trust receipts
Trust expenditures Trust accumulations

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$14.4
13.0

$16.4
15.2

$16.6
16.4

1.4

1.2

0.3

Receipts from and payments to the public.—A consolidation
of budget and trust funds which eliminates interfund payments and
noncash transactions shows that the total Federal payments to the
public in the fiscal year 1959 will be $1.8 billion more than in 1958.
Payments to the public in 1959 will be $0.6 billion less than receipts

M12




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

from the public. Additional details on this consolidation are presented in special analysis A of the budget document.
F E D E R A L G O V E R N M E N T RECEIPTS F R O M A N D P A Y M E N T S TO T H E PUBLIC
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$82.1
80.0

Excess of receipts over payments

$85.1
84.9

$87.3
86.7

2.1

Receipts from the public
Payments to the public..

0.2

0.6

ANALYSIS OF MAJOR PROGRAMS AND BUDGETARY
ISSUES
For purposes of summarization and discussion, budget expenditures
are grouped into the categories of protection, civil benefits, interest
and general government.
Expenditures for major national security and for international
affairs and finance, which together make up the category of "protection," will require 64% of estimated total 1959 budget expenditures.
The $47.1 billion estimated to be spent on protection in the fiscal
year 1959 is more than in any year since 1955.
An estimated 22% of budget expenditures in 1959 will be for civil
benefit programs. These*programs are grouped under the headings:
Labor and welfare; commerce and housing; veterans services and
benefits; agriculture and agricultural resources; and natural resources.
The estimated $16.4 billion to be spent on civil benefits in 1959 is
$0.6 billion less than the comparable amount for the current year.
The estimate of 1959 expenditures for interest is $7.9 billion, the
same as in 1958. Expenditures for general government will require
an estimated $1.4 billion in 1959, also about the same as in 1958.
B U D G E T E X P E N D I T U R E S A N D AUTHORIZATIONS B Y PURPOSE
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
Budget expenditures

Purpose

Protection--——,————--Civil benefits
Interest-General government
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies
Total

1957
actual
—

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$45.2
15.1
7.3
1.8

$46.3
17.0
7.9
1.4
0.2

$47.1
16.4
7.9
1.4
1.1

69.4

72.8

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

73.9

»Compares with new obligational authority of $70.2 billion for 1957 and $74.4 billion for 1958.

$45.9
16.0
7.9
1.4
1.3
1

72.5




M2.1

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

The budget also includes estimated expenditures of $1.1 billion for
the fiscal year 1959 as an allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies not included in the categories above. Within this allowance $500 million is estimated specifically for defense contingencies,
$339 million is estimated for proposed pay adjustments for postal and
other civilian employees not in the Department of Defense, and $300
million is for other contingencies. The cost of proposed pay adjustments for military and civilian personnel of the Department of Defense
is included in the estimates for that Department.
PROTECTION

Our security is an integral part of the security of the entire free
world. In addition to strengthening our own defenses, we must
improve the effectiveness of our partnership with our allies. This
requires a greater pooling of scientific resources, a freer exchange of
technological information, and closer military cooperation. Preliminary steps to accomplish these objectives were taken at the recent
Paris meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
This budget reflects coordinated plans for strengthening our own
and allied defenses. The composition of free world forces, and the
equipment with which they are provided, must be designed for the
needs of an era of increasingly destructive weapons with far-reaching
range. Our Government's research and development will be generally
expanded with particular emphasis on developing and improving
missiles both for defensive and for counteroffensive purposes.
An effective system of military security requires closer economic
cooperation through trade, investment, loans, and technical assistance
with nations throughout the free world so that they can develop their
resources and raise their living standards. To the degree that this
economic cooperation strengthens the internal stability and ability of
those nations to preserve their independence, the cause of a just and
lasting peace will be advanced.
PROTECTION, I N C L U D I N G COLLECTIVE SECURITY
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
Budget expenditures

Function

Major national security programs
International affairs and
finance
Total

1957
actual

-

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$44.4
0.8

$44.9
1.5

$45.8
1.3

$44.3
1.6

45.2

46.3

47.1

45.9

M14




M E S S A G E OF T H E P R E S I D E N T M2.1

M A J O R NATIONAL SECURITY

New obligational authority recommended for major national security programs for 1959 is $44.3 billion, compared to $41.0 billion
estimated for 1958 and $41.3 billion enacted for 1957.
Expenditures for these programs are estimated to be $45.8 billion
in the fiscal year 1959, $1 billion more than in 1958 and $1.4 billion
more than in 1957. Increases are anticipated for the military functions
of the Department of Defense and for atomic energy development.
Expenditures for military assistance and defense support will be about
the same as in the current year, but appropriations will increase to
finance the lead-time for newer-type weapons. Expenditures for the
stockpiling of strategic and critical materials and for the defense
production expansion program will decline.
Department of Defense, Military Functions.—To accelerate
the adaptation of our defenses to changing conditions, a request for
supplemental appropriations of $1.3 billion for the Department of
Defense in the fiscal year 1958 is being transmitted to the Congress.
The result will be to increase total new obligational authority for 1958
for the military functions of the Department of Defense to $36.6
billion. A further increase of $2.5 billion is recommended for the
fiscal year 1959, bringing the total for that year to $39.1 billion.
It is essential that we be able promptly to modify and accelerate
programs when and as important discoveries or technological developments in weapons indicate such action to be desirable. To accomplish
this end, the budget includes a contingency reserve of $500 million
for defense purposes only. It also proposes that the Congress authorize the President to transfer up to $2 billion between appropriations available for military functions of the Department of Defense.
This transfer authority is important and I will not hesitate to use it.
I have already discussed the urgent problem of reorganization of
the Department of Defense in the State of the Union message. In
the interest of the taxpayer, improved operating and fiscal controls
must accompany larger appropriations.
Expenditures in 1958 are now estimated to be $38.9 billion compared with the original 1958 budget estimate of $38 billion. Estimated expenditures for 1959 are $39.8 billion, an increase of $0.9
billion over the current estimate for 1958, $1.3 billion higher than in
1957, and $4 billion more than in 1956.
These increased appropriations and expenditures are necessary for
a speedup in the adjustment of military strategy, forces, techniques,
and organization to keep pace with the rapid strides in science and
technology. Since the end of the Korean conflict, new weapons systems of vastly increased combat effectiveness have been provided for
our military forces, while numbers of military units and personnel




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M2.1

MAJOR NATIONAL SECURITY
{Fiscal years.

In millions]

New obligational authority
Program or agency

Department of Defense—Military Functions:
Direction and coordination of defenseArmy:
Present programs
Proposed legislation:
Military pay adjustment
Military construction
Navy:
Present programs.Proposed legislation:
Military pay adjustment
Military construction.
Air Force:
Present programs.
Proposed legislation:
Military pay adjustment
Military construction
Other central defense activities:
Present programs
Proposed legislation
(military
construction)
..
__
Proposed civilian pay adjustment
Subtotal
Atomic energy:
Present programs
Proposed legislation (plant acquisition and construction)
Subtotal

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$15

$26

$356

$14

$21

$215

7,672

7,694

8,532

9,063

9,043

8,663

1957
actual

Subtotal
Total

1957
actual

1958
estimate

184
320
10,220

10,469

10,284

651

17,219

16,891

520

17,697

10,398

10,640

784

10,724
142
47

188
965

675

1959
estimate

182
35

146
290
18,363

18,008

53
602

18,388

184
544

716

810
20
205

205
36,255

» 36,605

* 39,145

38,439

38,861

• 39,779

1,962

2,362

2,298

1,990

2,300

2,530

120
1,962

2,362

20

2,018

2,418

1,990

2,300

2,550

70

Stockpiling and expansion of defense production
,
Mutual security, military:
Military assistance:
Present program
Proposed legislation
Defense support:
Present program
Proposed legislation

Budget expenditures

490

565

422

2,352

2,200

1,846
354

1,143

945

575
310

1,340
1,800

1,110

689
865

3,127

2,029

2,665

3,495

3,145

3,085

41,344

40,995

44,298

44,414

44,871

45,836

* Includes $1,270 million of anticipated supplemental requests.
» Does not include $500 million for defense purposes shown in the budget under allowance for proposed
legislation and contingencies.

M16




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

have been gradually reduced. We can expect new developments at
an ever-increasing pace.
The rapidly changing character of the military program is strikingly
evident when the weapons and equipment we propose to buy in 1959
are compared with those bought as recently as 1955—the first full
fiscal year after the Korean conflict.
There is hardly a production model aircraft on the Air Force's proposed list for procurement with 1959 funds that was included in its
1955 program. All thefightersand bombers proposed for procurement
with 1959 appropriations will be capable of supersonic speeds and of
using guided missiles and nuclear weapons. Of the $1.5 billion of aircraft, engines, and aeronautical equipment proposed to be bought by
the Navy in 1959, about 80% will be for models which had not reached
the point of being bought in production quantities in 1955.
Even in the new field of missile technology, there will be a very
marked shift of emphasis from the earlier, initial weapons systems to
the much more advanced systems of the future. The longer range
ballistic missiles—Atlas, Titan, Thor, Jupiter, Polaris—only one of
which was beyond the technical study stage
years ago, will account
for nearly half of the missile program for 1959. For the total missile
program, about 90% of the dollars planned for procurement in 1959
are for weapons which were not in production in operational quantities
in 1955.
Most of the ships in the proposed 1959 construction program are
entirely new types not to be found in the 1955 shipbuilding list. These
include guided missile destroyers and the first nuclear-powered frigate.
The first three ballistic missile submarines for the fleet are included in
the 1958 supplemental request.
Fully half of the proposed 1959 program of military construction is
for facilities for the Strategic Air Command and for weapons systems
and equipment which will have been brought into operational use
since 1955.
Research and the operation of facilities for research, development,
and testing of missiles will take a much greater proportion of the research and development budget in 1959 than in 1955. In the 4 fiscal
years 1956-59, roughly $20 billion of research and development,
procurement, military personnel, and construction funds will have
been programed for the research, development, test, and evaluation
of new weapons systems to bring them to operational status.
Programs requiring greater emphasis.—The budget provides funds
for a still greater expansion of the swiftly progressing intercontinental
and intermediate range ballistic missile programs. The Jupiter and
Thor intermediate range ballistic missiles are being placed in produc-

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

tion. Work on the Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile will be
accelerated.
Funds are also provided to speed up the operational availability of
the Polaris intermediate range ballistic missile and the first three
submarines designed to employ this weapon.
Expansion and further improvement of the continental defense early
warning network will be undertaken and construction of a new ballistic
missile detection system started, including the necessary facilities for
communication with the North American Defense Command and the
Strategic Air Command.
This budget includes funds for accelerating the dispersal of Strategic
Air Command aircraft to additional bases and for the construction of
"alert" facilities. The readiness of these retaliatory forces must be
measured in minutes. Not only must planes be kept constantly in
the air, but also additional combat air crews must be able to take off
almost instantly upon receipt of warning of an impending enemy
attack. Takeoff time will be appreciably shortened by constructing
additional runways, fueling stations, and quarters for the crews at the
runway. Within the total appropriations for the fiscal years 1958 and
1959, about $0.5 billion is provided for the dispersal and increased
readiness of the Strategic Air Command.
Funds are provided for an expanded research and development
effort on military satellites and other outer space vehicles, and on antimissile missile systems, to be carried out directly under the Secretary
of Defense. An increase is also included for basic and applied research
in other areas.
Antisubmarine warfare capabilities will be increased to counter
potential enemy submarine threats.
While greater attention is given in this budget to the foregoing areas,
conventional warfare capabilities of all the military services are also
being improved. For example, funds are provided to initiate production of new models of small arms and ammunition, standardized for
use by all members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Military and civilian pay.—With the development of new weapons
systems, the technical proficiency demanded of military personnel has
increased tremendously. Personnel trained at great expense in the
operation and maintenance of these modern weapons must have
greater incentives to remain in service. For present and long-range
efficiency and for greater equity, the military pay system must be
recast. Minimizing the present large turnover in military personnel
will reduce the percentage of men in training and add to the percentage
of men assigned to combat missions.
The funds provided in this budget for military personnel are based on
achieving these objectives and on making the changes in pay rates

440000—58

II




M2.1

M18




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

effective on July 1, 1958. The funds for the Department of Defense
also include an allowance to cover its share of the cost of the revision
in the pay structure for classified civilian employees recommended in
the general government section of this message.
The revisions proposed are an adaptation of the principles recommended by the Advisory Committee on Professional and Technical
Compensation in its report of May 8, 1957. The principles for
military pay call for rewarding proficiency and merit and for stimulating career motivation. Attainment of these desirable goals requires
elimination of the current longevity system in which a man of lower
rank can receive more pay than one of higher rank, and the substitution of a system which would: (1) add two pay grades for both officers
and enlisted personnel; (2) widen the pay differentials between grades
by means of substantial increases for the senior officer and senior
enlisted grades; and (3) establish uniform entering pay rates for
each grade.
Actions for economies.—The programs and pay adjustments described above will be costly. Beyond the reduction of $1.5 billion for
procurement of aircraft and conventional weapons from 1957 to 1959,
it is necessary that every possible economy be effected in other defense
activities to help offset the increased costs of the high priority programs. This means, among other things, that we must eliminate
programs and facilities no longer reeded and make sure that we have
no needless duplication.
All forces, units, and activities are being reexamined to determine
whether or not they will still be needed as modern weapons, improved
techniques, and new organizations come into being. Any activity of
the services not making an essential contribution to a military mission
must be eliminated.
As with our active-duty forces, the size, mission, and organizational
structure of our reserve components must be shaped to meet the
requirements of modern warfare. They must be designed to augment
the active-duty forces quickly and efficiently. Our reserve personnel
programs will give greater emphasis to quality and readiness than to
quantity.
The Department of Defense is now operating a very large number
of installations and bases in the continental United States and overseas. Some of these installations involve use of costly or extensive
facilities for activities that could be performed more economically at
other locations. As the Department of Defense continues to adopt
modern weapons and revised organizations, some of these stations
will become unnecessary. On the other hand, dispersal of the retaliatory forces will require some additional bases and increased costs.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Closing down and disposing of installations not definitely required for
the combat forces or for their supply and distribution systems will
help make funds available to support the new stations. Keeping
nonessential installations in operation, thereby diverting personnel
and funds from our true defense requirements at the expense of our
combat capabilities, poorly serves our defenses and the general
public.
All facilities and activities which are retained will be continually
evaluated to prevent extravagance and wastefulness in operation and
maintenance. The Department of Defense, in collaboration with the
Treasury, Bureau of the Budget, and General Accounting Office, is
also engaged in improving financial management in the operation and
maintenance activities and other areas.
The supply and distribution activities of the armed services must
also be further streamlined. The Department of Defense is now
making a comprehensive review of procurement practices and inventory management. Emphasis is being placed upon techniques for
coordinating defense supply systems so that they will be oriented to
support adequately the increasing numbers of new weapons and avoid
oversupply for older weapons.
In the interest of holding procurement costs to a minimum, I
recommend that the Renegotiation Act be extended.
Development and control of atomic energy.—Expenditures by
the Atomic Energy Commission in the fiscal year 1959 will increase to
$2,550 million, $250 million more than estimated for 1958, which in
turn was $310 million over 1957, These increases reflect our determination both to increase the tempo of progress in achieving a greater
nuclear military capability and to press ahead in our successful development of the peaceful applications of atomic energy.
From year to year we have hoped that success would finally crown
our efforts to reach an international agreement which would permit, if
not general disarmament, at least some reduction in the production
of nuclear armaments. Again we find ourselves in a situation that
leaves us no choice bat to test and produce further quantities of such
armaments for the defense of the free world. The substantial increase
in the availability of uranium concentrates and the expanded capacity
of the Atomic Energy Commission's production plants will result in
greater production and larger operating expenditures in 1959.
During the last several years, the Atomic Energy Commission's
research and development in both peaceful and military applications
of atomic energy have grown rapidly to the highest levels ever attained. Continuing emphasis will be given to basic research, and
construction will continue on four additional high-energy particle
accelerators in the multibillion electron-volt range.

M2.1

M20




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

Applied research and development activities will be increased in
1959 and concentrated on those aspects which appear most likely to
result in reaching technical goals. In particular, there will be continuing emphasis on naval and other military nuclear propulsion reactors, and on the more promising approaches to development of
reactors to produce safe and economic electrical energy for civilian use.
Stockpiling and defense production expansion.—Expenditures
for stockpiling and expansion of defense production are estimated to
be $565 million in 1958 and $422 million in 1959. The stockpile
objectives on all but a few scarce materials will be substantially completed under contracts now in force. In October 1957, an advisory
committee was established to work with the Office of Defense Mobilization on a study of stockpiling policies and programs in the light of
current concepts of war and defense.
The Defense Production Act of 1950 has provided much of the basic
authority required to bring about needed expansion of production
capacity, to provide controls over the use of scarce materials, and
to initiate other measures essential to enhance our military strength.
It should be extended another 2 years beyond its present expiration
date of June 30, 1958. I do not now anticipate any specific new
programs which will require financial assistance under this legislation,
but accelerated research and development in certain military programs
may require further expansion of production potentials for key materials. The authority to set priorities and allocate materials, currently
being used for critical materials for direct military and atomic energy
procurement, will continue to be needed.
Mutual security program.—Soviet ambition poses a threat to
the free countries that takes several forms: open armed attack, internal subversion, and economic domination. Mutual security helps
to meet all forms of this threat. For the fiscal year 1959, I am recommending new obligational authority of $3,940 million for the mutual
security program. Expenditures are estimated to be $3,868 million.
Two portions of the mutual security program—military assistance
and defense support—are primarily related to our military defense
effort and, therefore, are discussed in this section of the message. The
other portions of the mutual security program, while they contribute
to security and defensive strength, are primarily designed to promote
the economic development and political stability of less developed
countries. They are discussed in the international affairs and finance
section of this message. The two parts of the mutual security program are combined in the following table:




M2.1

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M U T U A L SECURITY
[Fiscal years.

PROGRAM

In millions]
Budget expenditures
1957
actual

t'

Subtotal
Total, mutual security

$2,200

$1,846
354

$1,800

575
310

865

3,145

3, 085

2,665

174

625

136

103
47

164

266
193

486
1,275

1,143

3,495

Subtotal
International affairs and finance:
Development loan fund
Technical cooperation:
Present program. _
Proposed legislation
Special and other assistance:
Present program _
Proposed legislation

1959
estimate

20

Major national security:
Military assistance:
Present program.
Proposed legislation
Defense support:
Present program
Proposed legislation

1958
estimate

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

$2, 352

Function and program

.

..

__

114

341

945

448

455

604

783

3,950

3,749

3,868

i 3, 940

i Compares with new obligational authority of $3,807 million for 1957 and $2,764 million for 1958.

Mutual security, military assistance.—The nature of military assistance varies by country and area, taking into account military need,
technological abilities, and division of defense responsibility among
the United States and other countries. Countries which have
received military assistance maintain for the common defense of the
free world the equivalent of 200 army divisions, and some 23,000
aircraft and 2,300 naval vessels. From 1950 through 1957 our
assistance has augmented by about 17% the total defense expenditures
of these countries.
In Europe, this assistance is programed according to the defensive
strategy for the whole North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Military assistance for certain other countries, particularly in the
Middle East and Asia, will continue to give special emphasis to the
threat of internal subversion while also contributing to the deterrence of foreign attack.
In addition to missiles and other advanced weapons, the military
assistance program provides for necessary conventional equipment,
supplies, construction, and training for ground, sea, and air defense of
friendly countries.

M22




M E S S A G E OF T H E P R E S I D E N T M2.1

Continuing efforts are being made to maintain the forces needed for
international defense purposes at the lowest possible cost. The
strength of forces in assisted countries has been and will continue to
be reviewed to insure that our support is related to current military
requirements and technology. We are financing military equipment
wherever possible on a basis of sales for cash and credit rather than
by grants.
Recommended new obligational authority for military assistance in
the fiscal year 1959 is $1,800 million. To fulfill probable needs growing out of agreements at the recent NATO meetings, an additional
amount of up to $200 million for procurement of more missiles and
other new equipment is covered by the allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies for the fiscal year 1958. Expenditures for
military assistance in 1959, which will be made primarily from obligational authority enacted in previous years, are estimated to be $2,200
million, the same amount estimated for 1958.
I firmly believe that the current United States outlay for protection would have to be substantially larger were it not for the military assistance program which enables other countries to contribute
more to collective defense. Without our military assistance program
the same degree of protection might not be obtainable at any cost.
Mutual security, defense support.—Our military assistance is extended to many countries that are maintaining collective defense
forces beyond their economic means. Therefore, we supply economic
assistance under the appropriations for defense support so that these
countries can provide for their defense forces and at the same time
maintain economic and political stability.
New obligational authority of $865 million is requested for defense
support. Expenditures in 1959 are estimated at $885 million or $60
million below the estimate for 1958.
In determining these amounts, account has been taken of the most
effective use of local currencies obtained as counterpart for assistance
dollars and from sales of surplus United States farm products. The
local currencies, which are in addition to dollar grants, are used to
help channel the countries' own economic resources to the most
desirable objectives. However, these currencies cannot replace the
dollars needed for materials and equipment that must be imported,
mainly from the United States.
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS A N D FINANCE

The major objective of our international economic policies and
programs is to help build the free world's economic strength in the
interest of mutual well-being and the maintenance of peace. Ex-




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M2.1

panded production, improved efficiency, and greater economic progress for ourselves and other peoples of the free world will depend
to a considerable extent on an increase in the flow of international
trade and investment. To aid in this worldwide objective and at
the same time to expand our markets abroad and thus create new
jobs at home, I am recommending the extension with broadened
authority of the Reciprocal Trade Agreements program. I am also
recommending an expansion of the lending authority of the ExportImport Bank, an increase in new obligational authority for developmental and technical assistance under the mutual security program,
and the authorization of funds to assist in the completion of the
Inter-American Highway.
International affairs and finance are estimated to require $1.3 billion
of expenditures in the fiscal year 1959, $156 million less than in 1958.
The decline reflects primarily the fact that in 1958 the Export-Import
Bank has made a substantial disbursement under a previously
authorized loan to the United Kingdom.
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS A N D
[Fiscal years.

FINANCE

In millions]
Budget expenditures

Program or agency

Economic and technical development:
Export-Import Bank
Nonmilitary mutual security program:
Development loan fund
Technical cooperation:
Present program
Proposed legislation...
Special and other assistance:
Present program
Proposed legislation
Other:
Present programs (primarily reimbursement to
Department of Agriculture for commodities
shipped abroad)
Proposed legislation (Inter-American Highway)
Foreign information and exchange activities:
United States Information Agency
Department of State, exchange of persons
President's special international program—
Conduct of foreign affairs:
Department of State
Other
Total.

1957
actual

1958
estimate

-$100

1959
estimate

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

$51
20

114

341

174

$625

136

103
47

164

266
193

486

448

136

139
10

108
18
7

100
26
15

108
21
11

110
21

155
2

192
2

199
2

181
2

1,312

i 1,615

832

i Compares with new obligational authority of $1,131 million for 1957 and $3,292 million (including $2
billion of anticipated supplemental authorizations for Export-Import Bank) for 1958.

M24




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

Reciprocal trade.—In order to pay for imports of goods and services
from the United States other countries must be able to export to us.
Progress for them and for us will receive its greatest impetus by
development of the most favorable fields of production coupled with a
gradual but steady reduction of unjustifiable trade barriers. We
welcome the proposed European common market and free trade area
as steps toward these broad goals.
We live in a world of economic, no less than political, interdependence.
As the greatest producer, consumer, and exporter in the world, the
United States must be a dependable market for foreign goods if mutually beneficial trade is to grow and prosper. The Reciprocal Trade
Agreements Act should be extended for 5 years beyond its expiration
date of June 30, 1958, with certain new authority for the President to
negotiate gradual and selective tariff reductions. Legislation should
also be enacted to authorize United States membership in the Organization for Trade Cooperation to improve the administrative efficiency
of our trade agreements with other countries. To provide coordinated
Cabinet level direction of this program at home, I have recently established the Trade Policy Committee under the chairmanship of the
Secretary of Commerce.
In addition, I recommend that the Congress delete a rider which
in past years has been attached to the Defense Appropriation Act
and which virtually prohibits normal competitive bidding by other
countries on many defense contracts. The rider is clearly inconsistent
with policies designed to expand international trade and makes our
heavy defense costs even more burdensome.
Export-Import Bank.-—-The Export-Import Bank has had a steadily
increasing role in promoting United States exports and imports and in
financing economic development projects abroad through loans to
United States and foreign firms and to foreign countries. Since the
Bank requires repayment in dollars, its loans for economic development are made for projects that will earn or save dollars for the
borrowing country, or for projects in countries with adequate prospects
of earning dollars from other sources. It is now estimated that the
lending authority provided the Bank in 1955 will be entirely committed
sometime during 1959. To assure continuity in the Bank's operation
and to provide for possible emergencies, I am requesting $2 billion in
new obligational authority to expand the Bank's lending capacity.
This new authorization should be made available before the end of
the current fiscal year.
Nonmilitary mutual security.—While strengthened trade legislation
and additional lending authority for the Export-Import Bank will
help substantially in promoting world commerce and economic de-




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

velopment, these actions are insufficient in themselves to accomplish
our international objectives.
Few national desires are stronger today than the wish of the peoples
of less developed countries to improve their living standards. It is
our national policy to encourage and assist this aspiration. As a
country blessed with great natural resources, modern industry, and
high productivity, we recognize the compelling humanitarian reasons
for helping less fortunate people abroad as we help them at home.
The progress of some less developed countries will be dangerously
slow without outside help, despite their best efforts. The people of
these countries are conscious of the technological advances made and
the levels of living enjoyed beyond their borders, and are understandably impatient for similar achievements. If Western help is
unavailable or inadequate, these countries may become dependent
upon the Communist bloc. We are concerned that they strengthen
their independence and find prospects for improved living standards
within a free society. It is my earnest hope that other free governments will also enlarge their efforts in advancing the development,
trade, and well-being of less developed countries.
In addition, without economic progress, military security may
prove illusory. People who see little improvement in their economic
conditions may question the value of the freedom that our mutual
defense efforts are intended to preserve. The events of the cold war
reemphasize the importance of our helping to insure that peoples of
less developed countries have faith in their future.
For these various reasons, it is critically necessary to carry forward
our development loans, technical assistance, and other special types of
assistance under the mutual security program.
Mutual security, development loan fund.—In many cases, urgent needs
for economic development in less developed countries cannot be
financed by the Export-Import Bank or by other sources such as the
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development or private
institutions. To meet such needs for financing economically and
technically sound projects, the development loan fund was authorized
in the Mutual Security Act of 1957. Loans from this fund may be
made on less stringent terms than Export-Import Bank or other such
loans, with repayments in local currencies as well as dollars.
Projects are now being considered and negotiations are being started
with a number of countries which will result in the commitment of an
appreciable volume of loans by the end of the fiscal year 1958. To
make possible the continuation and expansion of such development
loans, I am requesting provision of $625 million in new obligational
authority for 1959, as authorized by the Congress in basic legislation
last year.

M2.1

M26




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

Mutual security, technical cooperation.—Because of technical assistance extended under the mutual security program, millions of people
today are better off than before and productivity has been significantly
increased. For example, disease has been lessened in many countries
as people have been taught water purification techniques. Illiteracy
has been greatly reduced. Farmers in many countries have learned
how to diversify crops and improve livestock strains.
This budget requests $164 million of new obligational authority in
1959 to carry forward the United States program of technical assistance
and also to provide for our joining with other nations to increase the
financial resources of the United Nations program of technical assistance. This increase will help to broaden the scope of multilateral
cooperation through a new program for regional surveys of resources
and for regional training institutes approved last December by the
United Nations General Assembly. I am convinced of the need for
our own technical assistance program and I am equally convinced of
the need for multilateral technical assistance programs, in which our
contribution is multiplied by the funds and experts of many nations.
Mutual security, special and other assistance.—The budget for the
mutual security program provides for certain additional special activities, such as support vital to the stability of a number of friendly
countries not covered by other categories of aid, our contributions to
the United Nations International Children's Fund, and our refugee
programs.
It is obviously impossible to predict today all of the problems which
the free world will face during 1959. In order to help meet the
emergencies that experience shows inevitably arise, I believe it necessary that a special contingency fund again be provided in the mutual
security appropriation. For this purpose, $200 million is recommended for 1959.
Diplomacy, informational and cultural programs, and exchange of
persons.—Greater understanding among nations, on a people-topeople as well as a government-to-government basis, is a necessary
part of our efforts to remove the misunderstandings that hinder disarmament, the building of a safeguarded peace, and the strengthening
of freedom. It is especially important that Americans and peoples
who have recently gained, or are approaching, independence come to
appreciate each other's problems and aspirations. It is similarly
important that Americans and Eastern Europeans renew the contacts
that once were an important strand in friendly international relations.
The budget recommends $183 million in new obligational authority
in 1959 for the conduct of foreign affairs, primarily for the operation




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M2.1

of the Department of State. This amount includes provision for
additional foreign service posts in Africa and for the strengthening of
consular, economic, and political work in the Middle East and the
Far East. New obligational authority requested for the United
States Information Agency, and for exchange of persons, cultural
presentations, and international trade fairs amounts to $139 million;
within this total, there is provision for more exchanges of leaders,
scientists, and students with Eastern Europe and other areas.
I wish here to call attention specifically to the need for a supplemental appropriation for the Brussels Fair. Congressional action on
this important activity last year left United States participation badly
hampered in comparison with programs of other nations, especially
the Soviet Union. I consider this item of particular importance to
our country and urge the Congress to expedite its approval.
CIVIL BENEFITS

The bulk of the Federal Government's budget expenditures for
domestic programs is classified under five broad categories—labor and
welfare, commerce and housing, veterans services and benefits, agriculture and agricultural resources, and natural resources. These
benefits take various forms, such as grants to State and local governments, direct benefit payments to individuals, loans, public works,
research, and other public services.
B U D G E T E X P E N D I T U R E S A N D AUTHORIZATIONS FOR CIVIL BENEFITS
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
Expenditures

Function

Labor and welfare
Commerce and housing
Veterans services and benefits
Agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources
Total

1957
actual
- .

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$3.0
1.5
4.8
4.6
1.3

$3.4
2.1
5.0
4.9
1.5

$3.6
1.6
5.0
4.6
1.5

$3.6
2.1
5.0
3.8
1.4

15.1

17.0

16.4

i 16.0

i Compares with new obligational authority of $18.6 billion for 1957 and $20.4 billion for 1958.

Total expenditures for civil benefits in the fiscal year 1959 are
estimated to be $16.4 billion. New obligational authority is reduced
from an estimated amount of $20.4 billion in 1958 to $16 billion in 1959.
Under present conditions, I am not recommending enactment at
this time of certain legislation now pending in the Congress for new
programs which I have previously advocated. For example, instead

M28




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

of general aid for construction of schoolrooms, I am now recommending
a broad temporary program of aid to education which is largely
science-oriented. I am also deferring proposals for some other grant
programs and for certain new public works projects.
I am also making recommendations to reduce some programs, to
curtail expansion in others, and to transfer greater responsibility from
the Federal Government to State and local governments or to private
individuals or enterprises. All of these recommendations, in addition
to being required by sound public policy, will help to hold expenditures in future years to prudent levels.
Some of the changes in legislation which I am recommending apply
to three general types of activities—grants-in-aid, credit, and special
services for which charges should be made,
Grants-in-aid.—In the past 25 years, the number of grant-in-aid
programs conducted by the Federal Government has increased many
fold. Federal expenditures and the amount of taxes levied at the
national level have correspondingly increased.
As I have repeatedly emphasized, the continued vitality of our
federal form of government requires that, to the maximum extent
possible, primary responsibility for public programs be shouldered by
that level of government most familiar with local problems and most
responsive to them. We must exercise the utmost restraint in assigning new programs and responsibilities to the Federal Government,
and we should continuously search out those programs and activities
now carried on at the national level that can and should be handled
by the States or localities.
Prudent limitation of Federal activities cannot alone meet the whole
problem of overcentralization. The continued strength of our federal
system also depends upon reinforcing the administrative and fiscal
ability of the States to carry out their responsibilities. Accordingly,
I suggested at the Governors' Conference at Williamsburg, Va., in
June of 1957, that an action group be established to make recommendations on this and other aspects of the problem. A Joint
Federal-State Action Committee consisting of 10 governors and of
representatives of the executive branch of the Federal Government
was subsequently created.
The initial progress report of this Committee, made last month,
recommends complete transfer of two programs to the States together
with the simultaneous relinquishment of a portion of the local telephone service tax which the Federal Government now collects. These
programs are vocational education and the construction of waste
treatment facilities. Legislative proposals to carry out these and
future recommendations of the Committee will be transmitted to the
Congress. An orderly readjustment requires time for action by both




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

the Congress and the State legislatures. Consequently, the effect of
the proposed transfers on expenditures and revenues of the Federal
Government will occur beginning in 1960. The report also recommends increasing the degree of State responsibility in three other
programs: urban renewal planning; natural disaster relief; and regulating and promoting peaceful uses of atomic energy, particularly for
health and safety.
Cooperation of this nature is a highly desirable and, in my judgment,
a long overdue experiment in public administration and finance. The
success of the venture depends upon further cooperation among the
executive branch, the Congress, the governors, the legislative bodies
of the States, and the local governments involved. As for this administration, I can say that the executive branch is eager, as well as willing,
to do its part to insure that success.
Federal credit programs:—From a few small beginnings, Federal
programs for making direct loans, purchasing mortgages, and insuring
or guaranteeing private loans have multiplied greatly over the past
quarter century. As shown in special analysis E in this budget document, new commitments for a great variety of specific credit requirements in the fiscal year 1959 are estimated at $16.5 billion, predominantly for housing and agricultural programs. About three-quarters
of these commitments are for guaranties and insurance of private
loans, which usually do not require significant budget expenditures.
However, net budget expenditures for direct loans and mortgage
purchases will amount to an estimated $1.4 billion in 1959.
On June 30, 1957, the total amount of outstanding private loans
guaranteed or insured in whole or in part by the Federal Government
amounted to $55.9 billion. This is expected to increase to $65.9
billion by the end of the fiscal year 1959. In addition to these privately financed loans, the amount of direct loans outstanding on
June 30, 1957, was $17.5 billion, compared to $20.3 billion expected
as of June 30, 1959.
In order that Government credit programs will make a maximum
contribution to economic growth and stability, this administration
has placed special emphasis upon achieving a more consistent policy
among them. For this purpose, it is necessary that such programs:
(1) charge adequate interest rates on all new loans; (2) substitute
private financing for Government loans and mortgage purchases
wherever possible; and (3) be subject to effective budgetary control.
In many cases, present legislation sets maximum interest rates that
do not permit the Treasury or the lending agencies to cover present
costs. At my request, legislation has been submitted to the Congress requiring that, insofar as consistent with the purposes of each
program, all costs of future loans be paid by the borrowers who

M2.1

M30




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

benefit from the loans. Such legislation, by removing or reducing
hidden subsidies, would make a significant contribution toward better
budgeting.
Loans or mortgage purchases by the Federal Government should be
available only if private financing cannot be obtained on reasonable
terms. In several important areas Federal guaranties or insurance
have encouraged greater participation by private lenders and reduced
reliance on direct Government loans. Legislation should be enacted
to authorize other Federal lending programs to substitute guaranties
or insurance of private loans to the maximum feasible extent. Moreover, for all loan guaranty programs, the Government should be
authorized to permit interest rates high enough to attract private
lenders. I suggest that all limitations or ceilings placed on interest
rates be reviewed, and that authority be provided to vary the rates
for guaranteed or insured loans in line with market conditions and
under proper safeguards.
A few Federal credit programs and a few other enterprise activities,
as well, are not now subject to budgetary review and audit control.
I again recommend that the Government Corporation Control Act
be amended to provide for such review and control over all Government corporations authorized to use Federal funds.
Charges for special services.—When the Government provides a
service conferring a special quasi-commercial benefit on identifiable
individuals or groups above and beyond the benefits to the public
generally, I believe it should charge the beneficiaries for the special
service, rather than place the full burden of cost on the general
taxpayer.
This principle has been put into practice in the financing of the new
highway program through the payment of excise taxes by highway
users into a highway trust fund. The forest and public lands highway programs of the Department of Commerce, however, are still
financed from general revenues. Since most of these highways are on
one of the Federal-aid systems, I recommend that their financing be
transferred to the trust fund. Legislation will also be recommended to
provide for payment from the trust fund of the expenses incurred by
the Treasury in collecting taxes going into the trust fund, similar to
the present practice of paying for the costs incurred by the Department
of Labor in determining wage standards for highway contracts.
In the field of aviation, the Federal Government provides a wide
range of special services benefiting private users of the airspace. As
I have previously pointed out, it is increasingly appropriate that
these users pay their fair share of the costs. As first steps toward this
end, this budget proposes that a tax of 3K cents a gallon be levied on
jet fuels and that taxes on aviation gasoline be increased to 3% cents a




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

gallon from the present 2 cents, with increases of % cent per year for
4 years in both taxes up to 6K cents a gallon. The receipts from taxes
on aviation gasoline, which now go into the highway trust fund,
should be kept in the general revenues to help finance the operations
of the airways.
Legislation should also be enacted to raise patent fees, and to
charge employers of longshoremen for the costs of administering disability compensation. Recommendations elsewhere in this message
to adjust postal rates and authorize more adequate interest rates on
Government loans also will serve to reduce unnecessary subsidies to
special groups.
In addition to the above specific recommendations, all Government
agencies have recently been instructed at my direction to prepare
legislative proposals generally designed to remove present restrictions
or limitations on their authority (1) to recover full cost to the Government of services that provide special benefits to individuals or groups
and (2) to obtain a fair market value for the use or sale of federally
owned resources or property.
By enactment of the legislation proposed in this budget and of
other proposals which I shall make from time to time, we can move
closer to the ultimate goal of an equitable system of fees and charges
throughout the Government.
LABOR AND WELFARE

Expenditures for labor and welfare, including the education and
basic research programs classified under this heading, are estimated
to be $3.6 billion in the fiscal year 1959, $200 million more than for
the current year. The increase is primarily for scientific research and
education programs. Previous recommendations for new programs,
such as general aid for school construction, are being deferred.
A large portion of the expenditures for labor and welfare programs
consists of grants-in-aid to States and local governments, and cannot
be reduced without changes in basic authorizing legislation. At this
time, I am proposing revisions in the legislation governing five of these
grant programs which will lead to some small reductions in the
Federal budget for the fiscal year 1959, and to some larger reductions
in later years. Under these proposals, the proportion or amount of
Federal participation would be reduced for schools in federally affected
areas, for hospital construction, and for public assistance. I am also
recommending action on legislation relating to revenues so the States
can assume responsibility beginning in 1960, and Federal aid can
cease, for vocational education and waste treatment plant construction.
Continuing work by the Joint Federal-State Action Committee, as
well as thoroughgoing reappraisals by Federal agencies on their own

M2.1

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

M32




initiative, should lead to further recommendations for reducing grantin-aid programs in future years, with the States assuming more of the
responsibility for these activities and themselves collecting more tax
revenues to finance them.
LABOR A N D
[Fiscal years.

WELFARE
In millions]
Budget expenditures

Program or agency

Promotion of science, research, libraries, and museums:
National Science Foundation: Basic research
Other..
Promotion of education:
National Science Foundation: Science education.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare:
Science and general education programs (proposed
legislation)
Assistance for schools in federally affected areas:
Present program
Proposed legislation Vocational education and other
Department of the Interior
labor and manpower
Promotion of public health:
National Institutes of Health
Hospital construction grants
Grants for construction of waste treatment facilities
Other
Public assistance.
Correctional and penal institutions
Other welfare services
Total

1957
actual

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$32
39

$38
42

$55
64

$58
58

14

17

53

82

75

146
1
130
58
57
432

174

223

54
48
400

60
53
411

122
90
60
60
420

165
73
1
230
1, 558
32
147

202
97
31
251
1,822
34
162

203
112
51
267
1,809
36
167

211
75
45
252
1, 809
37
165

2,966

3,443

3,643

i 3,616

i Compares with new obligational authority of $3,189 million for 1957 and $3,571 million for 1958.

Science, research, and education.—In the face of Soviet challenges,
the security and continued well-being of the United States depend, as
never before, on the extension of scientific knowledge. Our technological progress requires a higher level of support for basic scientific
research from both private and public sources. It also demands a
growing supply of highly trained manpower—scientists, engineers,
teachers, and technicians.
To this end, I am recommending an expanded program for the National Science Foundation and a new program for the Department of
Health, Education, and Welfare. These programs will be closely
coordinated. The Foundation is promoting science education and
training primarily through grants to universities or fellowships to
individuals. The program for the Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare will strengthen our general educational base, complement

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

the activities of the National Science Foundation, and be channeled
mainly through grants to States.
This budget proposes appropriations of $140 million for the National
Science Foundation in 1959, more than three times the amount currently authorized. To permit immediate action in stepping up the
Foundation's activities, the budget also includes a supplemental
appropriation of $10 million for 1958.
These recommendations will enable the National Science Foundation to proceed vigorously in expanding support for basic research. Of
the 1959 appropriation, $58 million, double the 1958 amount, is provided for research grants, for research facilities and equipment, and
for related activities.
Assistance to basic research is provided also in physical sciences by
the Bureau of Standards and in life sciences by the National Institutes of Health. Expenditures included in other parts of the budget
for basic research by the Atomic Energy Commission, the National
Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and the Department of Defense will be higher than in the current year. Most of the expenditures will be for research projects carried on by university scientists
and, as a byproduct, will contribute importantly to the education of
graduate students.
The second major part of the National Science Foundation program
is to help meet the need for improving and extending science education.
The 1959 budget for the Foundation provides $82 million, including
$3 million of administrative expenses, for this purpose, or about five
times the present amount. Most of this is for expansion of programs which have proved their worth in improving high school and
college science education. These programs include (1) action to
interest able students in science careers, (2) measures to improve the
methods of teaching and the content of courses in mathematics and
science and to give supplementary training to college and high-school
teachers, and (3) provision for fellowships to highly qualified college
graduates and scientists for advanced study in science and mathematics.
I am recommending that legislation be enacted to authorize a temporary program for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to provide grants to help stimulate the State, local, and private
action necessary to meet certain critical educational needs. The
major objective of this new program will be to provide matching
grants to strengthen State departments of education and local school
systems, particularly in the administration and teaching of science
and mathematics. The new grant program will also foster improvement of general education through grants to States or educational
institutions to extend testing and counseling services for young people,
provide college scholarships for outstanding high-school graduates,

440000—58

ill




M2.1

M34




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

strengthen graduate schools, expand the teaching of foreign languages,
and improve the adequacy and reliability of educational statistics.
These recommendations for the National Science Foundation and
the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare are designed to
meet our most urgent needs for support of science, to aid in the identification and encouragement of talent, and to strengthen our teaching
staffs. In planning these programs, account has been taken of several
important considerations.
First, more effective utilization of available scientists and engineers
is the most immediately productive attack on existing shortages in
these fields. Action to achieve this is a responsibility of private
employers and organizations as well as governmental agencies.
Second, the basic responsibility for science education and training
as well as for conduct of research in our country depends primarily
on non-Federal support, and requires a thorough understanding of
the problem by all our citizens and their wholehearted support.
Therefore, I strongly recommend that this Federal participation in the
Nation's educational processes be limited to 4 years (allowing additionally for the completion of scholarships granted within these 4
years), and be considered as an emergency stimulant to encourage the
States and local communities to bring their educational systems up
to date in the light of our modern scientific age. The proposed
Federal assistance is carefully designed to insure against any possible
domination by the Federal Government of our educational system,
which must continue to be locally controlled and operated in accordance with our American tradition.
Third, we must accept the fact that scientists are not trained
overnight and science students do not become skilled scientists in a
year. New programs in these fields must continue in most instances
for a number of years to achieve concrete results. With full awareness
of our tradition of not involving the Federal Government in the
Nation's public educational processes, this stimulation I have proposed
must not be so overemphasized that the programs cannot be later
carried on by those who must continue to carry the responsibility—the
local school districts, universities, and industry.
Fourth, the needs of our free society cannot be met by improving
science and technology alone. The national needs require the development through a strong general educational system of a vast number
of aptitudes and skills. Every community in our country should do
its level best and if possible more than is now being done to provide
better education for the growing number of students. A good deal
of improvement in our teaching methods and standards and greater
use of our present facilities can be achieved by acquainting the boards
of education, superintendents, teachers, parents, and pupils with the
needs the country faces.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Fifth, specialized programs must not be allowed to upset the important balance needed in a well-rounded educational program which
must insure progress in the teaching of all areas of learning.
Schools in federally affected areas.—The Federal Government has a
responsibility for aiding school districts when it creates serious financial
problems for them. It has recognized this responsibility in the past by
providing grants to help build and operate schools in districts where
enrollment is swelled by Federal activities. Experience with these
programs, however, suggests that they should be modified; many of
the communities for which grants have been made no longer have
problems as acute as those suddenly generated by the migration of
workers and families to them during the Korean crisis.
In view of the continued maintenance of a substantial defense
establishment with shifting locations, authority for grants for construction and operation of schools should be extended, but the assistance
should be restricted to instances where the Federal personnel both
live and work on Federal property. However, grants for operation
of schools on behalf of people living on taxable property should be
gradually reduced during an adjustment period, and then terminated.
Labor and manpower.—Rapid technological developments and constant changes within the economy create complex manpower problems. This budget provides increased grants to the States to handle
unemployment compensation claims promptly and to maintain an
effective employment service system. The budget also recommends
funds for the Department of Labor to carry forward its efforts to help
labor and management meet the demand for technicians and skilled
workers which accompanies the demand for scientists and engineers.
I again recommend the enactment of legislation to improve the welfare of working men and women. In this field, recommendations are
already before the Congress for legislation to assure equal pay for equal
work, to revise the laws governing hours of work on Federal construction projects, to extend the coverage of the minimum wage, and to
improve the coverage of unemployment compensation. I will make
proposals in a special message to the Congress concerning amendments
to the legislation on labor-management relations and the registration
and safeguarding of union as well as welfare and pension funds.
Health and hospital programs.—Expenditures for health programs
have increased sharply since 1955. In 1959 the increase will be
largely for construction programs already underway. New obligational authority for health activities is being reduced, principally with
respect to construction of hospitals. This will not materially affect
the planned level of obligations and expenditures for hospital grants
in the fiscal year 1959, because prior-year appropriations are available

M2.1

M36




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

and will be used. New obligational authority of $75 million is recommended for the fiscal year 1959.
The authorizing legislation for hospital construction grants will
expire on June 30, 1959. In view of the progress already made
toward meeting community hospital requirements for general beds,
the Federal program should be modified to meet only the most urgent
needs, with emphasis on specialized needs.
The Congress should take action on legislation under which the
Federal Government can help the medical and dental schools to build
teaching, as well as research, facilities to help meet medical and
dental manpower needs.
Social and economic security programs.—Nine out of ten workers
are covered under the old-age, survivors, and disability insurance
programs, and three out of five are insured against unemployment.
These benefits are financed through trust funds supported by special
employment taxes. Retirement and survivors insurance is provided
as well through trust funds covering railroad workers, Federal civil
service employees, and veterans. Many individuals are also eligible
under prescribed conditions for public assistance, veterans pensions,
military retirement, or other benefits financed from general appropriations in the Federal budget. Of the estimated $22 billion in total
expenditures from budget and trust funds for labor and welfare programs and for veterans services and benefits, an estimated $10 billion
will be for old-age benefits.
The rapid growth of Federal programs for maintaining individual or
family incomes, and the numerous piecemeal liberalizations in the
applicable laws, suggest the need for appraising these activities as a
whole. The Advisory Council on Social Security Financing is studying
some of the problems of retirement and disability insurance financing,
and this budget includes funds for other basic studies. In the meantime, technical provisions of the old-age, survivors, and disability insurance legislation should be simplified and the paperwork burden on
employers should be lessened by enactment of consolidated annual
wage reporting for both income tax and social security payroll tax
purposes.
Although Federal old-age, survivors, and disability insurance provides an increasing share of economic security for the aged, the dependent, and the disabled, the Federal Government's expenditures for
public assistance continue to mount because of the successive
amendments increasing the Federal matching share. These programs
are now well established and the individual States have gained experience as to appropriate levels of assistance. In line with my belief
that the States should have greater responsibility for programs of this
nature, proposals will be sent to the Congress for modernizing the
formulas for public assistance with a view to gradually reducing Fed-




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

eral participation in its financing. This legislation should be made
effective starting in 1960 to assure that the States will have adequate
opportunity to adjust their finances and their programs, thus preventing an adverse impact on needy recipients.
The railroad retirement system is a self-financed retirement and
social insurance program operated by the Government for the convenience of the railroad workers and industry. The financing of this
system is far from sound on an actuarial basis. I reiterate my earlier
recommendations that the Congress take steps to increase employer
and employee contribution rates sufficiently to correct this inadequate
long-term financing.
Legislative action is also needed to place on a sound basis the financing of Federal contributions to the railroad retirement account for
time which railroad workers have spent in military service. The
Comptroller General has reported that under existing law the Federal
Government has appropriated to this fund over $300 million more
than the probable actual cost of benefits which will ultimately be paid,
based on credits for time spent in military service. The Government
should be charged only for the actual cost of benefits as they are paid.
At the same time that the Government has been making overpayments to the railroad retirement account, it has been incurring a
liability to the old-age and survivors insurance trust fund for similar
military service credits. In equity to all concerned, I recommend that
overpayments to the railroad retirement account be recovered and
applied to meet general budget liabilities to the old-age and survivors
insurance trust fund for military service benefits.
COMMERCE AND HOUSING

Net expenditures for commerce and housing programs, in the
aggregate, are expected to decline from $2.1 billion in the fiscal year
1958 to $1.6 billion in 1959. The principal reductions arise from
proposed legislation to provide more adequate postal rates and from
termination under existing law of the authority of the Veterans
Administration to make direct loans for housing. Some other expenditures will increase substantially as the result of authorizations
made in prior years. The major increases are in the Housing and
Home Finance Agency for mortgage purchases and college housing
loans, and in the Department of Commerce for improvement of the
Federal airways.
I repeat my recommendation of last year for the prompt enactment
of appropriate authority under which communities with basic problems of persistent unemployment can be assisted in their solution.
Extension of the Export Control Act is recommended. Prompt
enactment of legislation to control advertising on the interstate high-,
way system is also recommended.

M2.1

M38




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

C O M M E R C E A N D HOUSING
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Budget expenditures

Program or agency

Postal service:
Present program
Proposed legislation..
Community development and facilities:
Urban Renewal Administration:
Present program.
Proposed legislation
Other
Public housing programs
Other aids to housing:
Federal Housing Administration.
Federal National Mortgage Association:
Present program
Proposed legislation._
College housing:
Present program
Proposed legislation
Veterans Administration
Other...
Promotion of water transportation
Provision of highways
Promotion of aviation
Other aids to business:
Small Business Administration:
Present program
Proposed legislation (business loans)
Other
Regulation of commerce and finance:
Department of Commerce:
Present program
Proposed legislation (export-control extension) _
Other
Disaster insurance, loans, and relief:
Small Business Administration:
Present program
Proposed legislation (disaster loans)
Other
Civil defense:
Federal Civil Defense Administration:
Present program
Proposed legislation
Other
Total .

1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

$518
1-700

39

61

56

-61

1

$701
—700

4
200
12
126

139

-39
-188

90
219

97

200
- 6

365
40
295

-10

145
-1
397
38
413

-5
-23
407
7
572

84

77

-27
84
34

35

10
544
654

47

3
43

37

15

18

63

67

42
26

-1
1,453

2,146

1,627

* 2, 061

1 Does not include $160 million for pay adjustments shown in the budget under allowance for proposed
legislation and contingencies.
2 Compares with new obligational authority of $3,852 million for 1957 and $4,026 million for 1958,
•Less than $500,000.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Postal service.—In every year since the close of World War II, the
postal service has incurred large deficits. These deficits have placed
heavy and unfair burdens on the taxpayers, to the special advantage
of large users of the mails. Even with the improvements in efficiency in the last few years, expenditures needed in 1959 to provide
the minimum requirements for postal service under present legislation
will exceed receipts by an estimated $684 million.
The reasons for these chronic deficits are clear. In the quarter
century since 1932, postal costs have more than doubled. On the
other hand, postage rates for letters and publications are almost
identical today with those 25 }^ears ago, and rates for advertising
matter have been increased by only 38%. Only parcel post, which
is required by law to pay its way, has had rate increases commensurate
with cost increases. Meanwhile postal volume has almost tripled.
Every expansion in volume at today's postal rates tends to add to the
deficit passed on to the general taxpayers.
In meeting this problem the Post Office Department has made
effective use in recent years of the management practices successfully developed by private industry. The organization and methods
of the Department have been modernized and its administration
decentralized in order to meet local needs more promptly and efficiently. Obsolete postal buildings are being replaced or renovated.
An aggressive research program has been initiated. Specialized motor
vehicles, mail-sorting machines, and other new equipment are being
developed and installed. These will provide better service to the
public at lower operating cost.
On the other hand, further increases in certain costs in 1959 and
later years are expected. An amount of $25 million has been included
in the Post Office Department budget to provide for recent and
pending increases in charges by railways for transportation of mail.
The general allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies also
includes $160 million to cover the estimated costs of postal pay
increases recommended to become effective July 1, 1958, as part of
the general policy on employee pay.
In view of present and prospective postal deficits, legislation to
authorize adequate postal rates has become one of the most urgent
items of unfinished business before the Congress. The House of
Representatives has already approved changes in rates for letters,
publications, and advertising mail which would add materially to
present revenues, but still leave a large deficit. To provide revenues
which will more adequately meet present needs, the pending legislation should be amended, primarily by establishing a 5-cent letter
rate on all except local letters. This is more than the 4-cent rate
I recommended last year for both local and other letters, but it is
needed to take account of the pay increase and other higher costs.

M2.1

M40




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

The recommendations I am making should result in a net increase in
postal revenues of about $700 million in the fiscal year 1959. With
the postal pay adjustments which are being recommended, the postal
deficit will still be substantial.
Legislation now before the Congress should be enacted to authorize
the liquidation of the Postal Savings System. In view of the growth
of federally insured private savings institutions and the availability
of U. S. savings bonds, this system has become unnecessary. Its use
has been declining and its termination will free Post Office staff for
other duties.
Housing and community development.—Last year our population
increased by 3 million people; before another decade passes it will
exceed 200 million. Almost 60% of our people work and live in the
174 metropolitan areas and within these areas most of the growth
has been in the suburbs. The rapid growth of our population and
its increasing concentration in urban and suburban areas have created
unprecedented problems for both industry and government in helping
achieve the goal of a decent home and a suitable living environment
for every American family.
Private industry and State and local governments have the basic
responsibility for helping families meet this goal. The Federal
Government can help best by guaranteeing loans, encouraging the
private market for housing obligations, and by making limited grants
to State and local public agencies. We must avoid unnecessary
reliance on direct Federal financing. Such financing not only burdens
the taxpayer but, more important, by discouraging private financing,
limits the total amount of housing activity. To increase the effectiveness of Federal aids, important revisions are proposed in this budget.
Under the Housing Acts of 1949 and 1954, the Urban Renewal
Administration makes loans and grants to help remove or prevent the
slums which obstruct the orderly development of our cities. In July
1957, 178 federally supported urban renewal projects in 122 cities were
actually in process of clearance and redevelopment, and plans were
underway for 254 more projects in these and 142 other cities. By the
end of the first decade of the program in 1959, over 600 projects will
be either completed or in the planning or development stages.
Now that this important program is well underway throughout the
Nation and the gains to participating communities have become
well recognized, I believe the time has come when States and local
communities should assume a share of the administrative responsibilities and financial costs more nearly commensurate with the benefits
which their citizens receive, To this end I am recommending
fivefold program.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

First, in the future the local communities should share in the costs
of planning from the start. In the past, in most instances, the
Federal Government advanced all the money required for planning
projects, and the local share was paid only if and when projects
based upon these plans went forward. The substitution of this costsharing formula for the previous advances will encourage more careful
programing of individual projects and will mean fewer cases in
which projects are abandoned after significant Federal outlays.
Second, I strongly support the recommendation of the Joint FederalState Action Committee that each State establish a special agency for
urban development, housing, and metropolitan planning to assume,
as soon as possible, the financial responsibility for local planning of
urban renewal projects. Adoption of this recommendation will be a
constructive first step toward increasing the role of the States in this
program and should ultimately permit the Federal Government to
withdraw from supervision and review of planning.
Third, on all projects initiated in 1960 and later years, the States
and localities should be required to provide an increasing share of the
cost of buying and clearing the land and other net project costs. The
present formula under which the local agency pays for one-third and
Federal capital grants pay for the remaining two-thirds of the net
project cost should be changed by providing for annual reductions, so
that by the fiscal year 1962 the Federal Government would contribute
not more than 50% of the cost of local projects. In the interim,
the State legislatures will have an opportunity to decide the extent
of their future participation and the local communities can likewise
adjust their own financial planning.
Fourth, the Federal Government should give positive assurance concerning this program to the States and the cities by authorizing funds
now for 1959 and each of the 5 succeeding years. Specifically an additional $200 million for capital grants should be provided in the fiscal
year 1959. Since over $50 million in unused authority for capital
grants will remain at the beginning of 1959, more than $250 million
will be available for grants in that year. For 1960, $250 million should
be authorized with a Federal participation of 60% of net project costs.
For 1961, the amount should also be $250 million but the Federal
share should be 55%. For 1962-64, the amount should be $200 million
annually with the Federal share 50%. With the change in the statutory formula, the reduced Federal grants will support a generally larger
urban renewal program.
Fifth, consideration should be given to authorizing the Urban
Renewal Administration to help local public agencies finance nonresidential urban renewal projects which do not require Federal
capital grants by guaranteeing obligations issued to finance such
projects. In many communities, the increased property taxes obtain-

M2.1

M42




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

able from this type of redevelopment are so substantial that private
financing should be obtained without ultimate net cost to the Federal
Government.
Capital grants are only part of the present and prospective requirements for Federal support for the urban renewal program. It is
estimated that in 1959 the Federal National Mortgage Association
will make commitments of $250 million for the purchase of federally
insured mortgages on housing in urban renewal areas and on housing
for families displaced by this and other government programs. The
amount of these mortgage purchase commitments arises partly from
the statutory requirement that all purchases by the Association be
made at par—considerably above the prices which private lenders
would be willing to pay. As I have previously urged, this requirement should be repealed. With more realistic mortgage prices, it
should be possible to restore the incentive for private financing originally intended under the Housing Act of 1954 and thus avoid the
necessity for additional large amounts of new obligational authority
to finance purchases of mortgages under this program and under
programs for armed services and cooperative housing. Even without par purchases, however, the Association will require $90 million
of new obligational authority in 1959 to purchase mortgages which
are not currently acceptable to private lenders. As urban renewal
receives greater local support, these mortgages should become increasingly attractive for private financing, and hence the present
special assistance program for them should be looked upon as a
temporary stimulant only.
An estimated 81,000 families will be displaced from their homes in
1959 by urban renewal projects, highway construction, and other
governmental (primarily State and local) action. Most of these
families can afford standard housing available in the private market,
and, if necessary, they can obtain insured mortgages which are eligible
for purchase by the Federal National Mortgage Association. To
make this program effective in high cost areas, the maximum amount
of a mortgage that can be insured should be increased from $10,000
to $12,000 for single-family homes. The Public Housing Administration has authority to meet anticipated requests from local public
agencies for loans and contributions to support the needed housing
for families of lower income. To assure orderly provision of such
units, the time limits governing this authority need to be extended
beyond present expiration dates.
With the expiration in July 1958 of the special loan guaranty benefits
for veterans of World War II and of the direct housing loan program
for all veterans, the Federal Housing Administration again becomes
the only Federal agency providing comprehensive insurance or
guaranties of private housing credit. At my request, the Congress




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

last year liberalized the terms under which Federal Housing Administration mortgages were insured, making broader benefits available
for the general public, including veterans. To strengthen further the
mortgage insurance and guaranty programs, I shall recommend legislation to revise ceilings on interest rates and to remove discount controls which now discourage private financing of military housing and
certain other FHA-insured mortgages and which prevent many veterans of the Korean conflict from using their continuing loan guaranty
benefits. To make the liberal terms of insured mortgages available
for larger and better houses, the maximum mortgage amount on
owner-occupied housing should be increased to $30,000. To provide
more effectivefinancingaids for housing built for the elderly, the special
provisions in existing programs should be liberalized and consolidated
into a separate rental housing program for elderly persons. Finally, to
give continuing assurance to home buyers, builders, and lenders of the
availability of mortgage insurance, an additional $3 billion per year
should be authorized in the maximum permissible dollar amount of
outstanding FHA-insured mortgages during each of the next 5 fiscal
years.
To meet the increased needs for college housing arising from soaring
enrollments, Federal loans to colleges should be entirely for essential
dormitories and faculty housing, and should no longer be made
for student unions and other less essential facilities. Private
financing should be encouraged by (1) replacing the subsidized
interest rates required by the present statute with rates in
no event less than the Government's costs, (2) authorizing
Federal guaranties of college housing obligations which do not have
Federal tax exemption, and (3) prohibiting direct loans where private
funds are available on reasonable terms. In addition, new obligational
authority of $200 million is needed for the^fiscal year 1959.
Water transportation.—Our maritime legislation, originally enacted
in 1936, is being reviewed with the aim of reducing future Government subsidies to the minimum amount consistent with the national
interest. For example, it appears that the replacement period for
ships receiving operating subsidies might well be extended from the
present 20-year period to 25 or more years. This review will include
the laws governing both construction and operating subsidies to
determine what changes, if any, are needed. To the extent that
changes are desirable, appropriate recommendations will be made.
Promotion of aviation— New obligational authority and expenditures
for promotion of aviation will again increase substantially under the
1959 budget, primarily to expand the capacity of the Federal airways
to accommodate the rapid growth of air traffic and the new types of
high-speed aircraft soon to be in operation. The Civil Aeronautics

M2.1




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

Administration will require $230 million to operate and maintain the
airways system and to enforce air safety regulations and $175 million
for procurement of new airways facilities. The amounts for facilities
in 1959 and later years will be less than would otherwise be needed
because of the recently completed arrangements for sharing facilities
and data with the Department of Defense. New obligational authority of $35 million is requested for the Airways Modernization
Board, recently established to undertake needed research and development on improvement of air traffic control and navigation facilities.
At the same time supplemental appropriations of $12 million are
requested for the fiscal year 1958 and new obligational authority
of $107 million for 1959 to permit the National Advisory Committee
for Aeronautics to expand its research and development activities
dealing with basic problems involved in the flight of aircraft, ballistic
and guided missiles, and space vehicles.
To pay a substantial part of the cost of operating the airways
system, I am recommending increased taxes on aviation fuels. I
also think we should redouble our efforts to find ways and means to
reduce and ultimately eliminate all subsidies for airlines.
Small business.—The Small Business Administration has been
providing extensive financial and technical assistance to small businesses, as well as disaster loans to businesses and homeowners, under
temporary authority expiring July 31, 1958. The experience of its
first 4% years has demonstrated the importance of these programs.
Accordingly, I recommend that the limitation on the life of the
Administration be removed and that new obligational authority of
$53 million be provided. Including the proceeds from the increasing
repayments on earlier loans, this will provide $161 million for new
direct loans, participating loans, and other aids to small business during the fiscal year 1959. As mentioned earlier, certain tax revisions
to aid small business should be enacted.
Civil defense.—'Our civilian defenses must be further strengthened
through joint Federal-State action. To carry out this purpose, recommendations were transmitted to the last session of the Congress to
provide for greater Federal sharing with the States of costs of civil
defense personnel and administration and for placing added responsibility on the Federal Government for civil defense. New obligational
authority of $26 million is provided in the budget for the first-year
cost of this legislation, which has been approved by the House of
Representatives and is pending in the Senate.
Expenditures for activities designed to promote the defense of the
civilian population against nuclear attack are estimated to be about
the same in the fiscal year 1959 as in the current year. The question
of a shelter program is under consideration md tests of various types




M E S S A G E OF T H E

PRESIDENT

M2.1

of shelters are continuing. The budget provides for extending and
improving the attack warning system, and for expanding research
and training in civil defense problems. These increases will be offset
by a temporary suspension of procurement of medical supplies.
The structure of Federal organization for the planning, coordination, and conduct of our nonmilitary defense programs has been
reviewed, and I have concluded that the existing statutes assigning
responsibilities for the central coordination and direction of these
programs are out of date. The rapid technical advances of military
science have led to a serious overlap among agencies carrying on these
leadership and planning functions. Because the situation will continue to change and because these functions transcend the responsibility of any single department or agency, I have concluded that
they should be vested in no one short of the President. I will make
recommendations to the Congress on this subject.
VETERANS SERVICES AND BENEFITS

Expenditures for Federal services and benefits to veterans in the
fiscal year 1919 are estimated to be $5 billion. This amount is $219
million greater than expenditures in 1957, but $22 million lower than
the estimate for the current year. The expenditures estimated for
1959 reflect the cost of increases in disability compensation rates
enacted in the past session of Congress and a steady growth in nonservice-connected pension caseloads. On the other hand, reductions
which exceed the increases in compensation and pensions will result
from a decline in the readjustment needs of veterans of the Korean
conflict and from economies in operations.
V E T E R A N S SERVICES A N D BENEFITS
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Budget expenditures

Program or agency

Readjustment benefits:
Education and training
Loan guaranty and other benefits
Unemployment compensation
Compensation and pensions
Hospital and medical care
Hospital construction
Insurance and servicemen's indemnities.
Other services and administration (Veterans Administration and others)
Total

1

Recommended new
obligational
authority
fpr 1959

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$774
73
53
2,870
765
36
47

$729
93
44
3,107
807
39
44

$626
18
3,232
804
36
40

$625
93
19
3,232
806
9
52

175

171

162

160

4,793

5,034

5,012

U.996

1957
actual

W

Compares with new obligational authority of $4,870 million for 1957 and $5,013 million for 1958.

M46




M E S S A G E OF T H E P R E S I D E N T M2.1

IP addition to these programs financed from regular appropriations,
large veterans insurance operations are carried on through the trust
funds reported in part III of the budget. Payments and dividends
of $682 million are expected to be disbursed to veterans and their
survivors from these insurance funds in the fiscal year 1959.
Under existing laws, our country is faced in the long run with large
and increasing expenditures for veterans programs. While a further
decline in readjustment benefits may be expected during the next
several years, costs for pensions for needy veterans will increase
sharply. These pensions meet needs not related to the veteran's
period of service, but rather to the hazards to health and income that
generally grow with increasing age. Fundamental changes have taken
place in our society in the last several decades which require us to
reconsider the laws providing veterans benefits and services which
now overlap other growing public benefit and welfare programs. As
I indicated last summer, a message on veterans affairs will be sent to
the Congress at an early date. In that message there will be set forth
for the consideration of the Congress recommendations for specific
adjustments and improvements in the compensation, pension, and
related programs which will enable us to discharge our national
responsibilities to veterans with the greatest possible equity to all
concerned.
The budget makes provision for new obligations of $50 million
during 1959 for construction, modernization, and repair of hospital
and domiciliary facilities. However, substantial unobligated balances
of prior-year appropriations reduce the need for new appropriations
for construction purposes to $9 million. The general operating expenses of the Veterans Administration will be reduced more than 5%
in the coming year because of numerous administrative improvements
and declining workloads in the readjustment benefits programs.
AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL

RESOURCES

Expenditures for agriculture and agricultural resources have
amounted to over 30% of the Federal expenditures for civil benefits in
the fiscal years 1956 and 1957 and are estimated to take almost as large
a proportion in 1958. This compares with a little over 20% in 1953
and 1954. In this budget, I am recommending important revisions
in our price support, conservation, and rural credit programs to place
them on a sounder long-term basis with less reliance on the Federal
Treasury. These revisions will result in only moderate reductions
in budget expenditures in the fiscal year 1959, but should result in
more significant reductions in 1960 and later years.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL
[Fiscal years.

M2.1

RESOURCES

In millions]
Budget expenditures

Program or agency

Stabilization of farm prices and farm income:
Commodity Credit Corporation:
Commodity loans and purchases:
Present program
Proposed legislation (extension of title I of Public Law 480)
Payments to producers and purchasers:
Present programs
Proposed legislation (special milk programs)
Carrying charges and operating expenses
Receipts (sales for dollars and other adjustments) _ _
Subtotal, Commodity Credit Corporation
Soil bank (excluding conservation practice payments)
Removal of surplus agricultural commodities
Sugar Act, acreage allotments, and other:
Present programs
Proposed legislation (acreage allotments)
Total, stabilization of farm prices and farm income...
Conservation of agricultural land and water resources:
Agricultural conservation program
Soil bank (conservation practice payments)
Soil Conservation Service, watershed protection, Great
Plains, and other
„
Financing rural electrification and rural telephones
Financing farm ownership and operation:
Farmers' Home Administration.
Disaster loans.*
__ _
_ _
Farm Credit Administration
Research and other agricultural services..
Total, agriculture and agricultural resources

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$3,081

$2,506

28

95

118

135

1,006
-1,793

1,166
-1,666

34
75
1,234
-1,564

2,684
535
171

2,745
620
150

2,380
604
150

1,790
529
228

121

113

122
-2

122
-2

3,511

3,628

3,253

2,667

249
13

251
86

227
152

235
151

89
267

105
339

112
376

110
215

245
10
-28
227

270
-8
-5
259

208
—2
-4
279

208

4,582

4,924

4,601

i 3,849

1957
actual

$3,352

$1,790

2
261

i Compares with new obligational authority of $5,298 million for 1957 and $6,393 million (including $2,187
million of anticipated supplemental authorizations) for 1958.]

Estimated expenditures in 1959 are $4.6 billion, the same as in
1957, but $0.3 billion less than in the current year. The anticipated
decline is primarily in the operations of the Commodity Credit Corporation. Total new authority to incur obligations requested for agriculture and agricultural resources in 1959 is $3.8 billion. This amount
includes $1.8 billion to restore the capital of the Corporation for
price support losses realized in the fiscal year 1957; those losses were
reflected in budget expenditures in 1957 and prior years.

M48




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Price supports and related programs.—Expenditures for price supports and other programs to stabilize farm prices and farm income have
averaged more than $3.5 billion per year during the last 3 fiscal years.
Under present farm laws these expenditures are likely to continue
at high levels. Our system of price supports has tended to price key
farm commodities as if they were scarce, stimulating continued production in excess of the quantities that existing markets can take at
these prices. Controls have not been effective in reducing overall
agricultural production, despite the severe restrictions they impose
on farmers' freedom to produce and market. As a result, the Government has become the market for huge quantities of agricultural commodities, and our surplus disposal operations have been greatly
expanded both at home and abroad. Present agricultural policy,
therefore, places a heavy burden on taxpayers and complicates our
foreign-trade relations.
A technological explosion is occurring on American farms as can be
seen from the fact that production per farm worker has doubled in the
last 15 years. A new dimension in farm policy has been created
which makes it virtually impossible to curtail agricultural output
with the type of controls acceptable in our society. Under these
circumstances, farm products are likely to continue to be abundant,
and we cannot successfully continue with present obsolete legal
formulas governing acreage allotments and price supports.
I shall send to the Congress shortly a special message recommending
certain changes in existing legislation that will permit the Secretary
of Agriculture to establish price supports for basic crops consistent
with the increased productive capacity of our agriculture. These
measures could not begin to have a significant effect in freeing the farm
economy from Government controls before 1960 under a program of
gradual adjustment of production to normal market demands.
Titles I and II of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 expire on June 30, 1958. Although sales of surplus
agricultural commodities for foreign currencies under title I of this
act do not provide a solution to the basic problem of adjusting agricultural production, they have proved to be an important temporary
method of coping with problems arising out of the longtime accumulation of surplus agricultural commodities. This budget proposes
extension of titles I and II of this act for 1 additional year, with an
increase from the present $4 billion to $5.5 billion in the authorization
for the Commodity Credit Corporation to incur costs and losses under
title I. Such an authorization does not constitute new obligational
authority, but the resulting costs and losses necessitate new obligational authority in future years to reimburse the Corporation. The
budget includes, therefore, an anticipated 1958 supplemental appropria-

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

tion of $1.3 billion to reimburse the Corporation for the 1957 program.
The operations of title I of this act and the uses of the foreign currencies are summarized in the Department of Agriculture chapter of
part II of the budget.
Both the acreage reserve and the conservation reserve programs of
the soil bank have been helpful in diverting cropland from the production of agricultural commodities that are in excess supply. After
careful consideration, however, I believe that more material and lasting
benefits per dollar spent, both in reducing production of surplus
crops and in obtaining enduring conservation of the Nation's agricultural resources, will be achieved under the conservation reserve program. This budget, therefore, proposes termination of the acreage
reserve program at the end of the 1958 crop year, and recommends a
conservation reserve program of $450 million for the 1959 calendar
year, an increase of $125 million above the program for 1958.
I also recommend that the special school milk program be extended
after its present expiration date of June 30, 1958, that the National
Wool Act be extended, and that legislation be enacted to require a
greater sharing by the States in the costs of disaster relief assistance to
farmers.
Agricultural conservation program.—The budget includes $235 million in new obligational authority to finance cost-sharing payments to
farmers in the fiscal year 1959 for conservation practices performed
during the 1958 crop year. These payments were authorized by
the 1958 agricultural appropriation act. I am recommending that
a program level of $125 million be authorized for the 1959 crop
year. This amount, together with other public efforts in support
of soil and water conservation, will permit cost-sharing payments
for the more permanent soil and water conservation practices that
are needed to maintain an adequate agricultural resource base.
Those practices which are a part of usual and required annual farming
methods or which return immediate benefits to the farm are properly
the responsibility of the farmer, rather than of the Government.
Thus, the appropriation required for the fiscal year 1960 can be
reduced to approximately $125 million.
Agricultural credit programs.—The budget includes a new authorization of $206 million for loans to electrification and telephone borrowers.
Over the years the Rural Electrification Administration programs
have done much to enrich the lives of our rural families, and have
contributed greatly to the advance of rural America and our country's
economy generally. The increased use of power requires additional
generating capacity and heavier transmission and distribution facilities

440000—58

I
V




M2.1

M5Q




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

to meet the growing needs for electricity in rural areas. Approximately one-half of REA electric power now goes to rural industrial and
nonfarm residential consumers, and in the future these nonfarm users
will account for a larger share of the increasing demands. This situation, together with the present state of development of rural electric
cooperatives, clearly indicates that it would be in the public interest
to broaden the sources of capital from which the REA system may
obtain the financing necessary for continued growth and adequate
service to consumers. Therefore, legislation will be proposed (1) to
assist both electric and telephone borrowers to obtain financing
from private sources where the security is adequate and the loans
can be repaid within a reasonable time, and (2) as previously mentioned in this message, to adjust interest rates on future loans for all
loan programs to meet the Government's costs.
Disbursements for direct loans under the loan programs of the
Farmers' Home Administration, exclusive of farm housing loans, are
expected to amount to $231 million in the current fiscal year. This
budget recommends a reduction of the authorization for these direct
loans to $175 million for 1959. The Farmers' Home Administration
will continue to assist farmers in arranging operating loans from other
sources. Also, legislation will be proposed to encourage private
investors to make more insured real estate loans.
Utilization research.—During the past year, the Commission on
Increased Industrial Use of Agricultural Products made a report
to me and to the Congress which emphasizes the importance of
research on utilization of farm products. Our present research on
industrial uses of farm products is, therefore, being expanded as a
step in carrying out some of the Commission's recommendations.
Appropriations recommended for 1959 provide $19 million for domestic utilization research, and, to the extent feasible, steps will be taken
to make available to the Department in the fiscal year 1959 up to
an additional $5 million of foreign currencies, obtained from the sale
of surplus agricultural commodities, to contract for utilization research
abroad. The research financed by foreign currencies will be directed
toward increasing acceptance and use of our farm commodities and
their products in foreign markets. Together with the amounts provided for the Forest Service (classified under natural resources) $26
million is estimated to be available for utilization research.
The Department will continue to review its research activities,
particularly in farm production, with the objective of placing increased emphasis on utilization research wherever this is feasible.
Studies are proceeding to determine the most effective organizational
arrangements for conducting this research within the Department,




MESSAGE OF T H E P R E S I D E N T

NATURAL

M2.1

RESOURCES

The 1959 budget recommendations for natural resource programs
contemplate the greatest possible economy in the use of Federal dollars, with due regard to the effectiveness of these programs in contributing to national security and long-term economic growth.
This budget contemplates curtailing some programs and stretching
out construction on certain public works projects where this can be
done without impairing the value of investments previously made.
At the same time, there will be necessary increases in expenditures
for public works, because of the many commitments made for projects
started in previous years. Total Federal expenditures for natural
resources will increase $35 million over the current year. These
expenditures are estimated to be $1.5 billion in the fiscal year 1959,
of which about $1 billion will be for the development of water resources.
There should be increased financial participation by State and local
agencies and private interests in conservation and development programs. Such participation multiplies the effectiveness of Federal
Government expenditures for these programs. In particular, there
should be a uniform and consistent basis of local sharing of the costs
on all projects involving flood control which produce identifiable
benefits to local groups.
N A T U R A L RESOURCES
[Fiscal years. In millions]
Budget expenditures
Program or agency

Land and water resources:
Corps of Engineers, civil functions
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Reclamation
Power marketing agencies
Indian lands resources
Public domain lands and other
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation
Tennessee Valley Authority:
Present program
Proposed legislation
Department of State
Federal Power Commission
Forest resources
Fish and wildlife resources
Recreational resources
Mineral resources
General resource surveys and other
Total

1957
actual

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$610

$630

$665

$628

171
42
39
24
37

199
41
42
28
44

216
38
50
29
19

202
36
35
28

-7

41

3
5
162
51
59
62
38

6
6
171
65
78
63
43

47
13
5
6
169
58
73
56
47

17
125
4
6
170
58
40
51
46

1,296

1,457

1,492

11,446

i Compares with new obligational authority of $1,355 million for 1957 and $1,439 million for 1958.

M52




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

Many of the resource programs yield financial receipts, most of
which come from sale of power and timber and from mineral leases
on the public lands and the Outer Continental Shelf. These receipts
are estimated to be $859 million in the fiscal year 1959. The estimated
expenditures for 1959 include shared-revenue payments of $78 million
of these receipts to States and counties.
Water resources.—The construction activities of the Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation for flood control, navigation,
irrigation, water supply, and power projects will be limited in 1959 to
orderly continuation of work started in prior years. For the fiscal
years 1956, 1957, and 1958, a total of $210 million was provided as the
first-year appropriations for starting 407 new projects having an
estimated total cost of $4.5 billion. As a result, expenditures for these
two agencies in 1959 will be higher than in any of the 5 preceding
years and will increase further in 1960. We should not at this time
add to this extremely high level of commitments by starting any new
projects in 1959.
Construction on 309 water resources projects which these agencies
will have underway in 1958 will go forward in 1959 as economically as
possible. Expenditures for maintenance and operation of present
facilities in 1959 will be at levels which will provide reasonable protection of the Federal investment.
In the interest of sound and efficient water resources programs in
coming years, funds have been provided to continue investigations
and advance planning and to assemble basic data for future projects.
In accordance with my earlier recommendations, both Houses of
the Congress have had under consideration legislation which would
authorize the sale of revenue bonds by the Tennessee Valley Authority.
I hope that action on appropriate legislation will be speedily concluded
in order that the Tennessee Valley Authority may be in a position to
meet approved needs for new generating facilities, with the Congress
still retaining budgetary control of the program. This budget includes, under proposed revenue-bond legislation, $125 million to
finance the construction of additional power generating units.
INTEREST AND GENERAL GOVERNMENT

Interest expenditures of $7.9 billion, predominantly on the public
debt, will account for 11 % of budget expenditures in thefiscalyear 1959.
Expenditures for general government, primarily for central administrative costs not classified among the other major activities, will be
held to about the 1958 level despite increases in workload accompanying the normal growth of population. The estimated total expenditures in 1959 of $1.4 billion are less than 2% of the total budget.




M E S S A G E OF T H E

PRESIDENT

M2.1

INTEREST

The estimated interest payments in 1959 will be about the same
as in 1958. During the past several years, market rates of interest
have been steadily increasing until recent months, reflecting the heavy
competition for savings to finance record levels of capital investment.
These higher rates have meant corresponding increases in the budget
cost of refinancing the large volume of maturing Government obligations. With recent changes in interest rates, however, no further
increase in payments for 1959 is now estimated.
INTEREST
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Budget expenditures

Item

1957
actual

Recommended new
obligational
authority
for 1959

$7,800
61
6

$7,800
62
7

$7,800
62
7

7,308

Total

1959
estimate

$7, 244
57
6

Interest on the public debt
Interest on refunds of receipts
Interest on uninvested funds..

1958
estimate

7,867

7,869

7,869

Apart from fluctuations in rates, the level of interest payments
is determined by the size and composition of the public debt. The
only sound long-run method of reducing this cost is to balance the
budget, economic conditions permitting, and apply the surplus revenues to reducing the debt.
GENERAL

GOVERNMENT

If we are to retain in Government service the highly skilled and
able civilian employees who contribute so much to the Nation's
strength, it is clear that certain revisions are needed in the statutory
pay structures for these employees, as well as for military personnel.
My proposals for such revisions, to be effective July 1, 1958, and for
other civilian personnel legislation, will be submitted to the Congress
at an early date.
This budget includes in the 1959 allowance for proposed legislation
and contingencies $160 million to meet the cost of pay revisions for
postal employees and $179 million for employees in all other agencies
except the Department of Defense. The budget for the Department
of Defense, the Government's largest employer, makes allowance for
its share of the additional cost.
While the adjustments which will be proposed under the Classification Act will affect rates of pay at all levels, they will have as a primary
objective more adequate compensation for those whose present salary

M54




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

is substantially less than their responsibilities. Salary rates for junior
and intermediate scientific and managerial grades should be more
nearly competitive with non-Federal rates. Pay relationships in the
middle and upper grades should be revised to provide greater incentive
for those who assume increased responsibilities and demonstrate their
proficiency in discharging them. Statutory limitations on the number
of positions in the highest pay grades should be removed altogether, to
permit more reasonable salaries for scientists and executives carrying
heavy burdens of leadership and decision. Structural revision of
the postal pay system has already been substantially accomplished
but a general pay increase under that system is now appropriate.
Last year I recommended a program of hospitalization and medical
insurance for Government employees. In view of the priority given
to recommended pay adjustments, I propose that this health insurance program be postponed.
To carry out the recommendation of the Hoover Commission for
improving career opportunities and effectiveness in the civil service,
legislation should be enacted to authorize the training of Government
employees outside as well as within the agencies in which they are
employed. Legislation should also be enacted to provide for each
employing agency to bear its share of the cost of accident compensation
benefits.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Recommended new
obligational
1959
authority
estimate
for 1959

Budget expenditures
Program or agency

Legislative functions
.
Judicial functions
Executive direction
.
Federal financial management
General property and records management..Central personnel management and employment costs
Civilian weather services
Protective services and alien control
Territories and possessions and the District of Columbia:
Present program.
Proposed legislation (land acquisition, National Capital
Planning Commission)
Other general government
Total

1957
actual

1958
estimate

$90
40
12
476
194
i 627
38
187

$101
44
14
508
255
124
39
193

$112
46
14
507
275
108
41
197

$82
46
14
508
266
108
40
198

74

81

91

90

17

4
8

1
9

1,377

1,403

* 1,362

51
1,789

(*)

1 Includes Government payment to the civil service retirement and disability fund. Starting in 1958,
this payment was allocated among all employing agencies.
2 Compares with new obligational authority of $1,833 million for 1957 and $1,368 million for 1958.
*Less than $500,000.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

In order to meet the most pressing needs for new Federal buildings,
the authority of the General Services Administration and the Post
Office Department to enter into lease-purchase contracts should be
extended.
I have been advised by the Attorney General that section 601 of
Public Law 155, 82d Congress, concerning certain real estate transactions, reflects the exercise of legislative authority not warranted by
the Constitution and that it is therefore unconstitutional. I recommend immediate repeal of this provision.
In furtherance of the invitation extended by the United States to
hold the Eighth Olympic Winter Games in this country in 1960, I
recommend that the Congress authorize the expenditure of not more
than $4 million to assist in the construction of adequate facilities for
the games and to defray the costs of providing assistance to the
games by elements of our Armed Forces.
Legislation now pending before the Congress to place Government
appropriation requests on an accrued expenditure basis should be enacted, in accordance with the recommendations of the Hoover Commission. This is a businesslike approach and it is hoped that the
opposition that developed in the past will be withdrawn as a result
of further study and modifications in the way the procedure is to be
applied. Likewise, efforts to achieve economy in Government would
be greatly helped by legislation authorizing an item veto. This
legislation would change the present situation under which every
appropriation bill must be approved or disapproved as a whole,
regardless of the merits or demerits of its individual items.
Last year, the Congress enacted legislation to cover some of my
most urgent proposals for amending the immigration laws. I urge
that legislation on my remaining proposals be promptly enacted.
I recommend again that the Congress enact suitable legislation
providing for home rule in the District of Columbia. Under any such
system the citizens of the District should be authorized to elect local
officials, to vote in Federal elections, and to have a delegate in the
House of Representatives.
I also recommend that the Congress complete action on appropriate
legislation admitting Hawaii and Alaska into the Union as States.
Americans have a tradition of uniting in action when their freedoms
and welfare are threatened. We do not shirk our clear responsibilities
when new challenges arise.
I feel confident that this budget expresses the way in which the
American people will want to respond to the promises and dangers of

M2.1

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT M2.1

M56




the dawning age of space conquest. New dimensions must be added
to our defenses, and outmoded activities must be discarded. Closer
international cooperation is vital in a world where great distances
are losing their meaning. As we devote more of our efforts and
resources to these compelling tasks, we will have to limit our demands for less essential services and benefits provided by the Federal
Government.
Our response must rise above personal selfishness, above sectional
interests, above political partisanship. The goal of lasting peace with
justice, difficult though it may be to achieve, is worth all of our efforts.
We must make the necessary sacrifices to attain it. Our own people
demand it and the nations of the world look to us for leadership.
DWIGHT D .
JANUARY

13,

1958.

EISENHOWER.

PART I

SUMMARY TABLES
Table 1. Summary of Budget Receipts and Expenditures
Table 2. Summary of Budget Expenditures (by Agency)
Table 3. Summary of New Obligational Authority (by Function and Agency)
Table 4. Summary of Changes in Status of Public Debt
Table 5. Summary of Budget and Trust Transactions for Fiscal Year 1959

1

440000—58




1

INTRODUCTION TO PART I

Part I of the budget contains five summary tables.
Each of these tables is designed to bring together in one
or two pages some overall aspect of the Federal budget.

Internal revenue and customs receipts are stated on the
basis of collections reported by collecting officers. Other
receipts are reported on the basis of confirmed deposits.
Basis of stating budget expenditures.—Tables 1 and 2 inTYPES OF FUNDS
clude information on budget expenditures. Such expenditures cover the general fund, the special funds, the
A basic distinction is made between Federal funds on public enterprise funds, and the intragovernmental rethe one hand, and trust and deposit funds on the other.
volving and management funds. Expenditures for the
The Federal (Government-owned) funds are of four public enterprise funds and for the intragovernmental
types as follows:
funds are included in the totals on a net basis—that is,
The general fund is credited with receipts which are not their collections are deducted from gross expenditures and
earmarked by law for a specific purpose, and is charged the results are the net expenditures. Interagency paywith expenditures that are payable from appropriations ments and reimbursements to appropriations are also
(except appropriations of earmarked receipts) and those netted; that is, to avoid double counting they are treated
payable from borrowing. Both in number of items and only as expenditures of the agency whose appropriation or
in amounts, most of the Government's business is trans- fund is ultimately bearing the charge. Some incidental
acted through the general fund.
reimbursements from outside the Government to approSpecial funds are those which are established to account priations are similarly netted out of expenditure figures.
for receipts that are earmarked by law for a specific purUnder the checks-issued basis which is used, expenditures
pose. They exclude the funds which carry on a cycle of are reported for the fiscal year in which the checks are
operations for which there is continuing authority to use issued, regardless of when the obligation was incurred or
the receipts (as described in the next paragraph). Some when the goods and services were received. Modifications
special funds are subject to annual appropriation by Con- in this basis are made as follows: (a) Where payment is
gress. Others are automatically available under the laws made in cash instead of by check, the cash payment is an
which created the funds.
expenditure; (b) where payment is made by the issuance
Public enterprise (revolving) funds are those which fi- of bonds or by an increase in their redemption value,
nance a cycle of operations, in which the expenditures instead of by the issuance of checks, such an issuance or
generate receipts coming primarily from the public and increase is an expenditure; and (c) interest on the public
available for continuing use. They include nearly all of debt, other than increases in the redemption values of
the Government corporations, the postal fund, and various savings bonds, is reported on an accrual basis.
unincorporated enterprises.
Debt and investment transactions.—-Receipts never inIntragovernmental revolving and management funds (include money obtained from borrowing by any type of
cluding consolidated working funds) are those which are Federal fund. Nor are borrowings considered as a decreated to facilitate financing operations within and duction in arriving at budget expenditures. Similarly,
between Government agencies. They consist of two retirement of debt is always excluded from budget extypes—intragovernmental revolving funds which finance a penditure figures of all types of Federal funds. The purcycle of operations, like public enterprise funds but with chase of U. S. Government securities, and redemptions or
receipts primarily from within the Government; and sales thereof, are also excluded from expenditure and
management funds which permit the pooling of advance receipt figures.
payments from two or more appropriations to carry out
Eliminations from both receipts and expenditures.—Cercertain activities.
tain transfers from one fund to another are eliminated
The other funds, for which the Government serves in a from budget receipts and expenditures. This is done to
fiduciary capacity, are of two types—trust funds and avoid inflating both sides of the budget. Payments to the
deposit funds. They are explained in the introduction general fund of earnings and dividends on capital of reto part III.
volving funds, and the return of such capital to the general
fund are the items so excluded.
BUDGET RECEIPTS, EXPENDITURES, AND SURPLUS OR DEFICIT
Budget surplus or deficit.—The budget surplus or deficit
shown in table 1 represents the difference between the
The budget totals and the budget surplus or deficit budget receipts and budget expenditures of a given year.
relate only to the Federal funds, and exclude trust and Cash balances, appropriation balances, and surpluses and
deposit funds. Tables 1, 2, and 3 are therefore limited deficits of previous years are not a part of the calculation.
to transactions of the Federal funds.
Basis of slating budget receipts.—Table 1 includes a
NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY
summary of budget receipts. Budget receipts represent
Table 3 summarizes the new obligational authority—
the total received for the general fund and the special
funds, less (a) refunds of receipts and (b) transfers to the total of authority becoming available in a given fiscal
trusu fund receipts in the four cases where the law pro- year for entering into new obligations.
The obligation basis.—Expenditures can be made only
vides an indefinite appropriation to a trust fund in an
amount equal to certain tax receipts. Gross receipts pursuant to appropriations or other specific authority
and the deductions are itemized in special analysis B of granted by Congress. Government agencies are generally
permitted by law to incur obligations requiring the future
part IV.




SUMMARY TABLES

3

payment of money only when they have an appropriation legislation. Such items are not provided for in the approor other specific authority to do so. Congressional action priation text included in this budget, but will be formally
on the budget must therefore include authority to cover transmitted to the Congress later. Such estimates inobligations expected to be incurred within the fiscal year, clude, in addition to the various items which are idenrather than to cover only the expenditures which are ex- tified in part II, an "allowance for proposed legislation and
pected to be made during that year in payment of obliga- contingencies" to cover items which cannot be foreseen
tions.
now but which will be transmitted later when definite
Types oj new obligational authority.—-There are three amounts can be determined and the needs can be more
basic types of new obligational authority: Appropria- specifically identified. Congressional action upon this
tions, contract authorizations, and authorizations to allowance will be requested later, not at a single time nor
expend from debt receipts. In addition, there are some- as a single lump-sum item, but in the form of a number of
specific appropriations for individual items.
times reappropriations and reauthorizations.
Appropriations are authorizations to make expenditures
The items estimated herein, for both 1958 and 1959, but
from the general fund of the Treasury or from the various planned for formal presentation to the Congress later,
special funds. In some cases the authority to incur obli- appear in the budget under the heading "Proposed for
gations has previously been granted in the form of con- later transmission."
tract authorizations; in such cases, the appropriation to
EFFECT O N T H E DEBT
permit the payment of such obligations is said to be to
liquidate contract authorizations and it is not a part of
Table 4 gives details regarding the effect of each year's
new obligational authority. In all other cases appropri- operations upon the public debt. The budget surplus or
ations confer authority both to incur new obligations and deficit is not the only factor which causes a change in
to pay for them.
the public debt. The amount necessary to borrow or
Contract authorizations are authorizations to incur obli- available to repay is also influenced by: Changes in cash
gations prior to the enactment of an appropriation. A balances; the result of trust fund transactions; the use of
contract authorization does not in itself permit the spend- borrowing directly from the public (not Treasury borrowing of money; hence it must be followed by an appropria- ing) as a means of financing budget expenditures of certain
tion to permit payment of the contracts and other obliga- enterprises (and the repayments of such borrowing as an
tions thus incurred.
application of public enterprise fund receipts); and the
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts are authori- change in the amount of checks outstanding and other
zations to incur obligations and make expenditures from items in process of clearance through the accounts.
borrowed money. Such authorizations may take these
forms: (a) Authorizations for the Treasury to make public
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT
debt receipts available to a given agency or enterprise,
Table 5 brings together the total financial plan for the
often in exchange for notes of the enterprise; (b) authorizations for a Government-owned corporation to borrow Government—the budget figures for Federal funds and
directly from the public; and (c) cancellation of notes the estimates for trust and deposit funds—for 1959; and
which have been issued by a Government enterprise and it presents a consolidated statement of receipts from and
are held by the Treasury, where the cancellation has the payments to the public. The statement not only elimieffect of permitting further expenditures to be made nates interfund payments, but also brings in certain
(through restoring previously used authority to borrow transactions of Government-sponsored enterprises which
are not otherwise reflected in the budget, converts to a
from the Treasury).
Reappropriations and reauthorizations are actions to cash basis those expenditures which are made in the
continue available part or all of the unused balances of form of debt issuances (or increases in the redemption
prior appropriations or authorizations which would other- value of debt), and eliminates noncash receipts resulting
wise expire. When the authorizations thus continued had from seigniorage. Details on a 3-year basis and further
been previously granted for current operations of the explanations are given in special analysis A of part IV.
year, the continuation of their availability into a new year
CLASSIFICATIONS
constitutes new obligational authority.
Distinction between permanent and current authorizaReceipts are classified in tables 1 and 5 by source, a
tions.-—Some new obligational authority is permanent, but classification which is set forth in detail in special analysis
most is current. The permanent items are those under B of part IV.
which additional sums become available from time to time
Expenditures and new obligational authority are classiunder action previously taken by the Congress; no further fied in two ways in the part I tables. A classification by
action is required each year. Most permanent authoriza- function is used in tables 1 and 5 and the first part of table
tions are in force until repealed; a few are in effect for only 3; groups transactions according to broad governmental
a few years as specified in the law. The current authori- purposes; subcategories of this classification as applied to
zations are those enacted by Congress in or immediately Federal funds are set forth in special analysis C. A
preceding each fiscal year.
classification by agency, used in table 2 and the second
part of table 3, shows transactions by major organizational
PROPOSED FOR L A T E R T R A N S M I S S I O N
units of the Government, with most agencies that are
Tables 1, 2, and 3 identify in separate columns the independent of the ten executive departments being
portion of receipts, new obligational authority, and grouped together. The main entries in this classification
expenditures which are anticipated under proposed legis- correspond to "chapters" in part II of the budget and to
lation and supplemental budget items under existing the way in which part III is organized.




4

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959
TABLE 1
S U M M A R Y OF BUDGET RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES
Based on existing and proposed

legislation

[In millions]
1959 estimate

1958 estimate
1957
actual

Description

BUDGET RECEIPTS (special analysis B):
Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Excise taxes
.. ..
Employment taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs
_
Miscellaneous budget receipts
_ _

_ _

Budget receipts

____
_
_ ....

BUDGET EXPENDITURES (special analysis C):
Major national security
International affairs and finance
Veterans' services and benefits
Labor and welfare _
Agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources
Commerce and housing
General government _
_
Interest
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies:
Pay adjustment:
Postal
Other (excluding Department of Defense) _
Defense contingencies
Other contingencies _ _
Budget expenditures __

.._ _

Budget surplus ( + ) or deficit ( —)
* Includes proposed postal rate increase of $700 million.




Under existing laws and
authorizations enacted
or recommended

Proposed for
later transmission

Total

Under existing laws and
authorizations enacted
or recommended

Proposed for
later transmission

Total

$35, 620
21, 167
9, 055
328
1, 365
735
2, 760

$37, 200
20, 385
8, 898
339
1,486
765
3, 327

$37, 200
20, 385
8, 898
339
1, 486
765
3, 327

$38, 500
19, 500
8, 098
347
1, 570
780
3, 523

71, 029

72, 400

72, 400

72, 318

2, 082

74, 400

44, 414
832
4, 793
2, 966
4, 582
1, 296
1, 453
1, 789
7, 308

44, 696
1,455
4, 734
3, 236
4, 896
1,442
2, 136
1, 358
7, 867

44, 871
1, 468
5, 034
3, 443
4, 924
1, 457
2,146
1, 377
7, 867

43, 381
994
5,012
3, 425
4, 433
1,473
2, 184
1, 398
7, 869

2, 455
318

45, 836
1, 312
5, 012
3, 643
4, 601
1, 492
1, 627
1, 403
7, 869

$175
13
300
207
28
16
10
19

200
69, 433
+ 1 , 596

71, 821

72, 788
-388

218
168
20
2-556
5

$38, 500
20, 400
9, 280
347
1, 570
780
3, 523

160
179
500
300

200

968

$900
1, 182

70, 168

160
179
500
300

3, 766

73, 934
+ 466

5

S U M M A R Y TABLES
TABLE 2
SUMMARY OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES
BY AGENCY
[In millions]
1958 estimate

Description

Legislative branch
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
Mutual security
Other
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
Veterans Administration,
Other
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
—
Department of Labor
..
Post Office Department
Department of State_
Treasury Department
District of Columbia
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies:
Pay adjustment:
Postal
Other (excluding Department of Defense) __
Defense contingencies
Other contingencies
Budget expenditures.
1 Less than one-half million dollars.
* Includes proposed postal rate increase of $700 million.




1957 actual

Under authorizations
already
enacted

$97
39
10

$116

3, 950
160

3, 749
405

1,990
4, 805
916
558
-23
5, 006
562
38, 439
639
2, 295
572
214
418
518
179
8, 061

2, 300
4, 831

Proposed for
later transmission

26

43

12

$292

8

3
5
32
0)

175

660

2

2, 569
637

176

411

«

10
52

686
215
8, 641
30

Under authorizations
enacted or
recommended
in this
document

Proposed for
later transmission

$126

3, 749
405

202

222

Total

$116
44
12

0)

1, 013
444
5, 295
652
38, 686

1959 estimate

2, 890
302

978

2, 300
5, 124
1, 021
447
207
5, 327
652
38, 861
662
2, 745
647
223
463

2, 530
4, 977
605
413
455
4, 813

20

686
13

228
8, 641
30

$1

45

12

0)

168

800

3
1, 771

38, 008
696
2, 644

5

210

1

661
228
452
659
225
8, 591
38

140

(')
1

-675
4

160
200
69, 433

71, 821

200

968

72, 788

179
500
300
70, 168

3, 766

62 THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959
TABLE 3
S U M M A R Y OF N E W OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY
BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY

Based on existing and 'proposed legislation
[In millions]
1959 estimate

1958 estimate
Description

1957
enacted

Enacted

Proposed for
later transmission

Recommended
in this
document

Total

Proposed for
later transmission

BY FUNCTION
Major national security
International affairs and finance
Veterans' services and benefits
Labor and welfare
Agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources
Commerce and housing
General government
Interest
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies:
Pay adjustment:
Postal
Other (excluding Department of Defense) __
Defense contingencies
Other contingencies
Total new obligational authority.
BY AGENCY
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated t o the President:
Mutual security
Other
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
Veterans Administration
Other
General Services Administration
Housing and H o m e Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Post Office Department
Department of State
Treasury Department
District of Columbia
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies:
Pay adjustment:
Postal
Other (excluding Department of Defense) __
Defense contingencies
Other contingencies
Total new obligational authority.
i Less than one-half million dollars.
* Incla4es proposed postal rate increase'of $700 million.




$41, 344
1,131
4, 870
3,189
5, 298
1, 355
3, 852
1, 833
7, 307

$39, 725
1, 154
4,713
3, 302
4, 205
1,417
4, 009
1,345
7, 867

$1, 270
2, 139
300

268
2, 187

22
17
23

$40, 995
3, 292
5, 013
3, 571
6, 393
1, 439
4,026
1,368
7, 867

$39, 216
326
4, 996
3, 340
3, 8 5 2
1, 321
2, 165
1, 361
7, 868

$5, 0 8 2
1, 290
276

-2

125
2 ~ 1 0 3

1

160
179
500
500

400

400

6, 627

74, 365

64, 4 4 5

70,179

67, 7 3 8

91
40
11

43

44

99
46

12

12

12

3, 807
27

2, 764
41

2, 764
41

1, 962
4, 942
1, 193
235
1, 553
6, 086
703
36, 255
664
2, 491

2, 362
4, 666

622

216
434
524
230
8, 060
33

612
266

2, 120
4, 560
702
35, 335
667
2, 640
639
227
411
696

200

292
2, 025
3
5
2,317

(0

1,270
7
229

0)

11
52
13

8, 645
32

2, 362
4, 959
2, 637
269
2, 125
6, 877
702
36, 605
674
2, 869
651
227
463
696
213
8, 645
32

8, 0 0 7

3, 940

2, 298
4, 968

120

621

205

336
148
4, 109
938
36, 848
685
2, 517
583
230
465
676
203
8, 619
36

490

-2

13
2, 297
276

-675
5

160

400

70, 179

67, 738

400

6, 627

74, 365

179
500
500
64, 445

8, 007

SUMMARY TABLES
TABLE

7

4

SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN STATUS OF PUBLIC DEBT
[In millions]
Description

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

EFFECT OF OPERATIONS ON CASH BALANCES AND THE
PUBLIC DEBT
Effect of operations on cash balances:
Budget surplus or deficit (—)
Trust fund operations, increase or decrease (—) in cash balances (table 10)
_ _ _ _ __
Public enterprise debt and investment transactions, net (special analysis J)
Increase or decrease (—) in outstanding checks, deposits in
transit, and similar items __

$1, 596

-$388

$466

334

302

-498

-140

-118

-62

-518

-42

94

1, 272

-246

6, 546
878

5, 590
883

6, 000
900

Cash position resulting from operations
Less cash balances at close of year:
In Treasury
Outside Treasury

8, 696

6, 227

6, 900

5, 590
883

6, 000
900

6, 000
900

Increase (—) or decrease in public debt

2, 224

— 673

$272, 751
- 2 , 224

$270, 527
673

$271, 200

270, 527

271, 200

271, 200

$270, 527

$271, 200

$271,200

107
446

116
430

107
410

270, 188

270, 886

270, 897

Statutory limitation on debt at close of year. .

275, 000

275, 000

275, 000

Maximum statutory limitation on debt during year__

278, 000

275, 000

275, 000

Total effect of operations on cash balances

_

Cash balances at start of year:
In Treasury
Outside Treasury

Public debt at start of year
Increase or decrease (—) in public debt
Public debt at close of year

_

COMPARISON OF PUBLIC DEBT WITH STATUTORY
LIMITATION
Public debt at close of year__
__
Plus guaranteed obligations of Government agencies not owned by
Treasury
__ _ _
_ _
Less debt not subject to statutory limitation
__ _
Debt subject to statutory limitation




_

___

8

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
TABLE

5

SUMMARY OF BUDGET AND TRUST TRANSACTIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959
Based on existing and proposed legislation
[In millionsl

Description

RECEIPTS
Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Excise taxes
Employment taxes_
Estate and gift taxes
Customs
Miscellaneous budget and trust receipts._
Total receipts.
EXPENDITURES
Major national security
International affairs and finance
Veterans' services and benefits
Labor and welfare
Agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources
Commerce and housing
General government
Interest
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies:
Pay adjustment:
Postal.
Other (excluding Department of Defense) _ Defense contingencies
Other contingencies
Undistributed
Total expenditures
Excess of receipts over expenditures.




Budget funds
(table 1)

$38, 500
20, 400
9, 280
347
1, 570
780
3, 523

Interfund and other
Consolidated
items (special
(special analysis A )
analysis A)

Trust funds
(table 10)

$2, 164
8, 613
5, 842

-$3, 733

74, 400

16, 619

- 3 , 733

45, 836
1, 312
5, 012
3, 643
4, 601
1, 492
1, 627
1, 403
7, 869

255
9
691
12, 288
-169
30
2, 830
386

-33
-30
- 1 1

-137
- 6 8

-3
-252
-42
- 1 , 653

160
179
500
300
43

- 1 , 407

73, 934

16, 364

- 3 , 635

+ 466

+ 255

-98




PART II

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS
Table 6. Summary of Budget Authorizations, Obligations, Expenditures and Balances
Table 7. Summary of New Obligational Authority (by Type of Authorization and Agency)
Table 8. Summary of Balances Available at Start of Year
Table 9. Summary of Expenditures of Public Enterprise Funds
Detailed Estimates:
Legislative Branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds Appropriated to the President
Independent Offices
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Post Office Department

Department of State
Treasury Department
District of Columbia

INTRODUCTION TO PART II
Part II contains the details of the budget for Federal
funds, including various types of tables and schedules,
explanatory statements of the work to be performed and
the money needed, and the text of the language proposed
for enactment by Congress on each item of authorization.
Included herein is also material on a few trust funds
which require congressional action.

This part of the budget begins with 4 statements
(tables 6 through 9) which supplement the tables of
part I. The remainder of part II is arranged in chapters
reflecting the organization of the Government.
Each chapter begins with a summary narrative statement, and certain summary tables. These are followed
by detailed material for each appropriation or fund.

SUMMARY TABLES AND THEIR CONTENTS
SUMMARIES

OF A U T H O R I Z A T I O N S AND

EXPENDITURES

Listing of accounts.—A principal table for each chapter
shows the new obligational authority and budget expenditures by appropriation account and fund. The listing is
arranged by bureau or comparable organization unit and,
for each such unit, is divided into several sections: Current authorizations (other than for public enterprise and
intragovernmental funds), permanent authorizations, public enterprise and intragovernmental funds, and supplemental items proposed for later transmission.
Authorizations by type.—Forms of new obligational
authority other than appropriations are set forth under
the applicable appropriation titles, identified by separate
line entries. A recapitulation at the end of the account
listing shows the authorizations divided between current
and permanent and classified by type. In this recapitulation new obligational authority for public enterprise
and intragovernmental funds is classified with other
authority of the same type. The figures are carried
forward into a governmentwide summary in table 7.
Classification by function.—Functional code numbers
appear in a separate column of the chapter listings, indicating the category in the functional table (special
analysis C of part IV) where each item has been included.
Transactions of public enterprise funds.—An appended
table in each chapter is used for public enterprise funds.
It shows the gross expenditures, the receipts from operations, and the budget expenditures (the difference between
the two other figures). The figures for gross expenditures
and for receipts are derived from the detailed business-type
budget statements, which show expenditures and receipts
on an accrual basis with a single adjustment (on either
the expenditure or receipt side but not both) for the conversion from an accrual to a checks-issued basis (net).
The figures from the chapters are totaled in table 9.
SUMMARIES OF BALANCES CARRIED

FORWARD

An analysis of unexpended balances for each chapter
shows for each account the balances of budget authorizations carried forward at start and end of the past, current, and
budget years. These balances are summarized in table 8.
Many budget authorizations are available for obligation for only 1 year, but some are available for longer
periods of time or without time limit. In the case of those
which are for a specific period of time, unobligated balances are written off at the end of that time, but obligated
balances remain available indefinitely to pay outstanding
obligations lawfully incurred.
In the case of salaries and wages, travel, and like items,
the lag between obligations and expenditures is usually no
more than a few weeks or a few months. In the case of
construction, major procurement, certain research contracts and similar items, the lag between obligations and
expenditures may be 1 or 2 years or even longer.
Balances are not in the form of cash, but are bookkeeping authority for the incurring of obligations or the
making of expenditures, for which cash must be provided
at the time the expenditures occur.
10




The unobligated balance for each account or fund represents the difference between the unexpended balance and
the net obligations outstanding. Net obligations represent the unpaid obligations (both those which have accrued into liabilities and those which are undelivered or
unperformed), less the accounts receivable and intragovernmental orders for services or materiel which have been
accepted but have not yet become receivables.
RELATIONSHIP

OF T R A N S A C T I O N S

AND

BALANCES

The total amount available—new obligational authority
plus balances brought forward and adjustments—is shown
on the last of the chapter summary tables, together with
the expenditures and other disposition made of the
amounts available. The body of the table is arranged to
"flow" from start to end of the year; obligations incurred,
net, are shown for reference at the end.
Similar information, but arranged to place obligations
incurred within the sequence of the table's flow, is summarized for the Government as a whole in table 6.
Writeoffs, restorations, and other adjustments in availability.—Writeoffs of unused balances of authorizations
occur in four ways: (a) rescissions by act of Congress;
(b) the automatic lapsing of unobligated balances when
an appropriation expires for purposes of obligation; (c) the
return of capital and transfer of dividends from revolving
funds to the general fund; and {d) adjustments in the
obligated balances of expired accounts due to the payment
of obligations in smaller amounts than anticipated or to
the amendment or cancelling of obligations.
Restorations of balances previously written off occur in
the case of expired accounts when the balances left for
payment of old obligations are insufficient to cover them,
due to payments in larger amounts than anticipated, the
amendment of obligations, or the discovery of previously
unrecorded items.
Obligations incurred, net.-—The obligations incurred are
stated on a gross basis in the detailed schedules, but are
summarized on a net basis, consistent with the method of
stating budget expenditures and new obligational authority. Thus, the summary figures are based on total
obligations incurred less reimbursements to appropriation
accounts, revenues and other receipts of revolving funds,
and recoveries of prior obligations.
Authority for expenditures.—Expenditures for the budget
year are broken down on two tables in each chapter summary into those coming out of new obligational authority
of the same year and those coming out of balances, etc.
It is generally assumed that prior year balances available
in commingled accounts will be obligated before the new
authorizations are obligated, and that expenditures will
reflect the liquidation of those obligations on the basis of
previous experience. In the case of revolving funds it is
assumed that budget authorizations are expended in an
amount equal to the sums placed in the fund during the
year, and that, if all of the authorization is not placed in
the fund at once, it is moved to the fund and expended on
a first-in, first-out basis.

11

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS
FORM OF DETAILED MATERIAL

For each appropriation and fund, the budget includes
certain detailed material, as follows: (1) appropriation
language, if applicable; (2) a schedule of program and
financing; (3) a narrative statement on program and performance; (4) a schedule of object classification. An exception occurs in the case of certain permanent appropriations and other older appropriation accounts on which only
a residual balance remains; such accounts of a bureau or
independent agency are often combined into a single
presentation instead of having detailed schedules.
In the case of revolving funds, there are usually three
additional schedules, covering (5) the sources and application of funds; (6) revenue, expense, and retained earnings;
and (7) financial condition.
APPROPRIATION

LANGUAGE

The language proposed for inclusion in the 1959 appropriation acts is printed at the head of each item requiring
action by Congress, except for those items which are not
formally recommended at this time but will be proposed
for later transmission. The language of the 1958 appropriation acts is used as a base. Following the language
are citations to relevant laws and the appropriation act
from which the text is taken, as in this example:
S A L A R I E S AND

EXPENSES

F o r n e c e s s a r y e x p e n s e s of t h e I n t e r n a l R e v e n u e S e r v i c e , i n c l u d i n g
p u r c h a s e ( n o t t o e x c e e d o n e h u n d r e d f o r r e p l a c e m e n t o n l y ) a n d hire
of p a s s e n g e r m o t o r v e h i c l e s ; a n d s e r v i c e s a s a u t h o r i z e d b y s e c t i o n 1 5
of t h e A c t of A u g u s t 2 , 1 9 4 6 ( 5 U . S . C . 5 5 a ) , a n d of e x p e r t w i t n e s s e s a t s u c h r a t e s as m a y b e d e t e r m i n e d b y t h e C o m m i s s i o n e r ;
$ 3 2 5 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 : Provided,
That not to exceed
$200,000
of the
amount
appropriated
herein
shall be available
for expenses
of instruction
and
facilities
for the training
of employees
by contract,
subject
to such
regulations
as may
be prescribed
by the Secretary
of the Treasury.
(5
U. S. C. 132;
title 26 U. S. C.; Treasury-Post
Office
Appropriation
Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $325,500,000

Estimate 1959,

SCHEDULE OF PROGRAM AND FINANCING

This schedule consists of two parts. In the section for
program by activities, obligations are broken down by
purpose, program, or project. This breakdown, especially
tailored for each agency and account, reflects the particular duties and responsibilities for which the money is
used. The financing section shows the appropriation provided and other means of financing the program, and the
disposition of amounts not used during the year. Only
two of the possible entries are illustrated here:
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
1. .Rulings, technical planning, and
special technical services...
2. Collection of revenue
.
3. Audit of tax returns
4. Tax fraud and special investigations.
5. Alcohol and tobacco tax regulatory
work
6. Taxpayer conferences and appeals. .
7. Legal services....
8. Inspection
9. Statistical reporting
10. Executive direction
1
Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)...,

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$4, 632, 770
128, 836, 522
106, 701, 706
15, 738,885

$5, 260,124
134, 331,036
113, 576,377
16, 743, 758

$5, 065, 524
135, 793,886
114, 323, 511
16,862,034

23,181,034
9, 771,076
7, 043, 800
4, 096, 635
1,847,329
3, 634, 552

24, 274, 554
11,046, 227
7,998,096
4, 419, 834
2, 513,167

23,712, 856
11,059,022
7,988, 780
4, 393, 434
2, 346, 867
3, 954, 086

305, 484, 309

324, 246, 759

325, 500, 000

265, 691

1,253,241
325,500,00)

Obligations refer to orders placed, contracts awarded,
loan agreements made, and services received during the
year, regardless of the time of payment. Appropriations
or other obligational authority must be provided by the
Congress before obligations can be incurred.




COST BASIS

Where the data are available in the accounting system,
cost-type budgets are presented. In such cases, the
figures opposite the activity entries are the value of goods
and services consumed in carrying out the program, in the
case of operating costs; and they are the value of capital
assets received, in the case of capital outlay programs.
The program portion of a typical cost-type budget looks
like this:
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$593, 946
73, 771
298, 304

$670, 000
100,000
310,000

$664,000
91,000
300, 000

Total operating costs
Deduct depreciation (not requiring
funding)..!..

966,021

1, 080,000

1. 055, 000

97,120

80,000

80, 000

Net operating costs, funded
4. Relation of costs to obligations:
. Obligations incurred for costs of
other years, net
.

868, 901

1,000,000

975,000

1, 000,000

975, 000

1957 actual
Program by activities;
Operating costs:
1. System operation and maintenance.
2. Power contracts and rates
3. General administration

9, 423

Total program (obligations)

878, 324

In those cases where the program is principally for
procurement or public works, additional columns are often
shown to make a more complete presentation. The
financing section of a cost-type budget schedule is the
same as for any other schedule.
The relation of costs to obligations is usually summarized in one or two lines on this schedule, but is
amplified further in an additional text table inserted in
the narrative statement of program and performance
which follows. A typical schedule on the relation of
costs to obligations is as follows:

$325,500,000

Koman type shows the text used in the 1958 appropriation acts. Italic type indicates proposed new language.
Brackets enclose material which it is proposed to omit.

1957 actual

SCHEDULE OF PROGRAM AND FINANCING

Selected resources at end of year:
Unpaid undelivered orders (appropriation
balances obligated for goods and services
on order not yet received)
Accrued annual leave (leave earned but
not taken b y employees, charged to
activity costs) ( - )
Total selected resources at end of year.
Selected resources at start of year

1956
actual

1957
actual.

STATEMENT

1959
estimate

$45,790

$47,291

$60,000

$50,000

-119,157

-111,235

-123,944

-113,944

-73,367

-63,944
73,367

-63,944
63,944

-63,944
63,944

Obligations incurred for costs of other years, n e t . .

NARRATIVE

1958
estimate

9,423

OF PROGRAM

AND

PERFORMANCE

The work planned and services proposed to be carried
out are described briefly in a narrative statement for each
appropriation or fund. Where practicable the narrative
statement indicates the expected accomplishment in
relation to the financial estimates, and it gives some
measures of program and performance. Headings in the
statements usually agree with the categories in the statement of program by activities.
In the case of permanent appropriations and revolving
funds, the narrative statements set forth the financing
arrangements, including the source of the money and the
statutory basis for the earmarking of receipts.
SCHEDULE OF OBJECT

CLASSIFICATION

There is shown for each account a summary of personal
services and a classification of the obligations according
to a uniform list of objects.
The object classes, numbered from 01 to 16, reflect the
nature of the things or services purchased, regardless of
the purpose or the nature of the program for which they
are used.
Permanent positions are those of a full-time nature
which are of indefinite duration. Some are filled by
persons with temporary appointments. The "number of

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

12

employees at end of year" represents the number of (a)
full-time and regularly scheduled part-time employees in
pay status on the last work day in June, and (b) intermittent employees who work at any time during June. This
is the basis for reports of the Civil Service Commission.
Object Classification
1957 actual

01

6.7

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
..... .

52,
1,
52,
50,

52, 571
1,975
53,181
51,364

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
.
Number of employees at end of year..
Average OS grade and salary

1958 estimate

$5,180

6.9

1959 estimate
51,931
1,587
52, 264
50,500

444
587
570
775

$5,257

7.0

$5,399

Total obligations

$265, 445, 665
4, 747, 665
2,311,227

$266, 859, 431
4, 747, 665
2, 311, 227

270, 818, 509
8, 357, 621
1, 573, 013
5, 878, 732
1, 544, 946
7, 529, 140
3, 364, 038
3,253,188
2, 325, 560
674, 950
164,612

272, 504, 557
8, 635, 289
1, 655, 909
5, 944, 412
2, 369, 406
7, 773, 516
3,113, 514
3, 375, 247
1, 746, 492
16, 485, 687
510, 000
132, 730

273, 918, 323
8,255,133
1, 655, 909
5, 944, 412
1, 845, 983
7, 773, 516
3,113, 514
3,369, 247
1, 746, 492
17, 234, 741
510, 000
132, 730

305, 484, 309

Total personal services
... .
Travel
.•_.
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction...
.
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
..
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

$263, 415, 474
5, 771, 611
1, 631, 424

324, 246, 759

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Operating income or loss (—):
Revenue.

$11,231,889
11,493,564

Net operating income or loss ( — ) . . .
Nonoperating income or loss (—):
Proceeds from sale of equipment
Net book value of assets sold (—)
Net gain or loss (—) from sale of.
equipment
Net income or loss ( - ) for the year.
Analysis of retained earnings or deficit:
Retained earnings or deficit (—), beginning of y e a r . .
Adjustments not affecting selected
working capital ( — ) . . . .
Retained earnings or deficit (—), end
of year

$13, 378, 500
13, 258,810

$13, 657, 500
13, 659,000

- 2 6 1 , 675

119,690

-1,500

4,235
-15,025

Expense..

1,500

1,500

1,500

- 1 0 , 790

1,500

- 2 7 2 , 465

121,190

157,285

-120,612

578

578

578

- 5 , 432
-120,612

325, 500, 000

The statement includes an analysis of the retained earnings or the cumulative deficit. This analysis shows any
additions to earnings, other than net income for the year,
any charges made against retained earnings, and the balance of profits kept in the enterprise as of the end of the
year (whether in the form of cash, inventories, other current assets, or fixed assets).
S T A T E M E N T OF F I N A N C I A L

Average grades and salaries are computed arithmetically. Thus the average salary sometimes falls outside
the salary range of the average grade.
STATEMENT

OF S O U R C E S A N D A P P L I C A T I O N

OF

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual
Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Purchase of equipment
Expense:
Purchase of raw materialsOther expense
Donation of working capital assets...
Increase in selected working capital..

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$85, 850

$109,000

3,341, 289
7,227,997
8,892

3, 671,196
8, 537,853

3,810,000
8,987,043

10,177,190
4,235
73,043

12,628, 500
1,500
230,998

12,907, 500
1,500

12, 860,998

12,909,000

Total gross expenditures..
Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Sales of goods and services
Proceeds from sale of equipment
Decrease in selected working capital
Total receipts from operations..

-542, 949

Budget expenditures

Because the statement is built on the basis of transactions which affect working capital, it excludes depreciation,
losses on loans, and other "nonfund" transactions.
STATEMENT

OF R E V E N U E ,

EXPENSE, AND

For each revolving fund there is presented a balance
sheet of assets, liabilities, and investment of the Government at the close of the year, as in this example:
Financial Condition

FUNDS

For all revolving funds, there is shown a presentation
of funds applied and provided, other than the investment
of Government capital in the fund, borrowings, and the
repayment of capital and dividends.
The statement generally reflects revenues and expenditures on an accrual basis; an adjustment is made for
changes in selected working capital (current assets, other
than cash and inventories for sale or manufacture, less
current liabilities) in either section of the statement as
appropriate. Because of such an adjustment, the gross
expenditures shown on the statement, less the receipts
from operations, equals budget expenditures on a checksissued basis, as in the following example:




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1, 740,638
115, 960

$2,283, 587
98, 500

$1, 562,674
111,113

2, 028, 365
283, 649
74,318
7,102, 004

1, 840. 561
262, 595
43, 984
G, 871, 099

1,840, 561
262, 595
13, 651
6, 927,194

1957 actual
Assets:
Cash with Treasury
Accounts receivable, net
Inventories:
R a w materials
.. _
Finished goods
Deferred charges
Land, structures and equipment, n e t . . .
Total assets..

11, 344, 934

11,400, 326

10,717, 788

-

2. 682, 660

% 844. 810

2,194, 220

-

9, 014, 334
-3,167

8, 782, 886

8, 554, 938
200,000

-228,281

- 2 2 7 , 948

- 2 3 1 , 948

...

Liabilities:
Current
Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of y e a r . . . .
Donations in or out ( - ) , net
Depreciation not recoverable
operations (—)

8, 782, 886
- 1 2 0 , 612

8, 554, 938
578

8, 522, 990
578

8, 662, 274

8, 555, 516

8, 523, 568

from

End of year
Retained earnings or deficit (—)
Total Government investment

The balance sheet excludes any balances of appropriations or borrowing authorizations which have not
yet been paid into the revolving fund. The section on
investment of the Government is divided into three subsections as appropriate: (a) the interest-bearing capital,
(b) the non-interest-bearing capital, and (c) the retained
earnings.
Because the balance sheet is on an accrual basis, it does
not reflect the obligations incurred which have not yet
matured into liabilities, nor does it reflect unfilled customer
orders received and available as a basis for obligation in the
case of intragovernmental revolving funds. Therefore,
there is appended to the balance sheet a schedule which
shows the unobligated balances, relating them to the unexpended balances and showing the computation of the
net obligated balance as in the following example:
Status of Certain Fund Balances

RETAINED

EARNINGS

For revolving funds there is also presented a statement
of revenue and expense, computed on an accrual basis,
and the resulting net income or loss for the year. This
statement is usually on a full accrual basis, including
sums for depreciation, provisions for losses on receivables,
etc. Where a fund consists of several programs, revenue
and expense may be identified for each; otherwise they
are shown only for the fund as a whole, as here illustrated:

CONDITION

1956 actual
Unexpended
Cash

balance:

Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
Unpaid
undelivered
orders
Accounts
receivable,
net ( - )
Unfilled
customers'
orders (—)
Total obligated balance
Unobligated balance

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,150,198

$1,740,638

$2,283, 587

$1, 562,674

2, 720, 937

2, 682, 660

2, 844,810

2,194,220

268,184

533, 663

538, 610

485,000

-143,848

-115,960

- 9 8 , 500

-111,113

-1,698,322

-1,008,748

-1,485,591

-1,423,292

1, 359, 682

1, 677,071

1, 586, 598

1, 559, 359

790, 516

63,567

696, 989

3,315

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS
TABLE

13

6

SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS, OBLIGATIONS, EXPENDITURES AND BALANCES
Based on existing and proposed legislation
[In millions]
Description

1957 enacted

Current authorizations:
Appropriations
Appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
_
Contract authorizations__
_
Reappropriations
_
_
Total current authorizations _

___

$58, 750
(174)
3, 003
2
141

__ _

_ _ _ _ _

___

_

_

_ _

8, 334
4
64

8, 855

8, 403

179
603
801
015

74,
32,
-31,
-1,

365
801
282
220

72, 452
31, 282
- 2 8 , 482
-497

68, 967
37, 408
462
- 1 , 354
- 3 6 , 048

__
_

__
__ _
_ _

Budget expenditures.




8, 346
19
490

_
.

_ _ _ _ _ _
____

J

74, 671
36, 048

74, 750
37, 924

- 3 7 , 924

- 3 8 , 742

69, 433

Obligations brought net
_ _
Obligated balances incurred, forward, start of year __
Restored from certified claims account
Adjustment of obligations in expired accounts.
Obligated balances carried forward, end of year (—)

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of new obligational authority _
Out of balances of prior authorizations

64, 052

70,
35,
-32,
-4,

Total new obligational authority
_
Unobligated balances brought forward, start of year_ _ _ _
Unobligated balances carried forward, end of year ( —)
Balances no longer available for obligation (—)_ _ _ _

65, 507

8, 282

_ __

$62, 995
(133)
796
201
60

7, 753
190
339

_ __ _

$61, 266
(107)
4, 123
4
114

61, 896

_ _
_

Permanent authorizations:
Appropriations
__
__
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts _ _ _
___
___
Contract authorizations
_
__
Total permanent authorizations

1959 estimate

1958 estimate

72, 788

73, 934

69,433

72, 788

f
1

49, 671
24, 263

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

14

TABLE

7

SUMMARY OF NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY
BY TYPE OF AUTHORIZATION AND AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[In millions]
1958 estimate
Description

1957 enacted

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Appropriations:
Legislative branch..,
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
Mutual security
Other
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
Veterans Administration
Other..
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency...
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
.
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice.
__
Department of Labor
Post Office Department
Department of State..
Treasury Department
District of Columbia.
Allowance for proposed legislation and contingencies:
Pay adjustment:
Postal ..
Other (excluding Department of Defense)
Defense contingencies
Other contingencies
. _ _ _ _ .

$91
40
11

-

2,324
4,666
574
265
120
3,812
542
35, 317
665
2,627
507
227
411
696
198
703
32

-

58,750

$1

292
25
3
5
2,317
(*)
1,270
7
229
11
0)
52
13

$96
44
12l

$99
46
12

9

2,324
4,958
599
268
125
6,129
542
36,587
672
2,856
518
227
463
696
210
703
32

2,288
4,968
619
335
147
3,423
875
36,790
684
2,507
496
230
465
676
200
699
36

_ _

Total authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Contract authorizations:
Legislative branch
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Total contract authorizations
i Less than one-half million dollars.
a Includes proposed postal rate increase of $700 million.

61,266

$99
46
12
$3,940

3,940
9

120

2,408
4,968
698
335
147
3,421
888
39,087
684
2,783
496
230
465
1
205
699
36

80

-2
13
2,297
276

a -675
5

160
179
500
500

400

4,627

Total

55, 603

160
179
500
500

7,393

62,995

(28)
(5)
(40)
(58)
(1)
(42)

.
.

Authorizations to expend from debt receipts:
Funds appropriated to the President: Mutual security
Independent offices
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture

56,642

Proposed for
later transmission

2,764
41

2,764
41

1,899
4,792
1,189
234
119
4,073
608
36,171
662
2,480
495
216
434
524
228
657
33

Recommended
in this
document

Total

400

Total appropriations to liquidate prior contract authorizations




$96
43
12

3,767
27

Total appropriations
Appropriations to liquidate prior contract authorizations:
Legislative branch
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency .
_
Department of Commerce
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare __
Department of the Interior

Proposed for
later transmission

Enacted

1959 estimate

(10)

(10)

(22)

(22)

(53)
(1)
(43)

(53)
(1)
(43)

(50)
(30)
(1)
(30)

(50)
(30)
(1)
(30)

(174)

(107;

(107)

(133)

(133)

40

-

35
1,640
448

2,000

1,200
1,763
3,003

2,123

2,000

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

2

4

4

1

2,035
1,640
448

125
290
381

4,123

381

125
290
381

415

796

200

200
1

200

201

15

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS
TABLE

7

SUMMARY OF NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY—Continued
BY TYPE OF AUTHORIZATION AND AGENCY—Continued

Based on existing and proposed legislation—Continued
[In millions]
1958 estimate
Description

1957 enacted

Enacted

Proposed for
later transmission

1959 estimate
Recommended
in this
document

Total

Proposed for
later transmission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
Reappropriations:
Legislative branch....
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
Other
General Services Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior

0)




50

50

114

60

60

65,507

56,045

0)
114

58,883

1
2
242
8
2
10
82
3
7,403

1
2
1
289
8
2
10
88
3
7,942

1
2
1
289
8
2
10
88
3
7,942

1
2
1
301
8
2
10
87
3
7,920

1
2
1
301
8
2
10
87
3
7,920

7,753

8,346

8,346

8,334

8,334

149
33
8

9
10

9
10

4

4

190

19

19

4

4

200
95
44

351
95
44

351
95
44

1
63

1
63

339

490

490

64

64

8,282

8,855

8,855

8,403

8,403

70,179

67, 738

74,365

64,445

(0

Total authorizations to expend from debt receipts

Less than one-half million dollars.

65
10
1

0)

65
10
1

61,896

Authorizations to expend from debt receipts:
Independent offices: Veterans AdministrationHousing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture

1

$10

141

Total appropriations __

Total new obligational authority.

$10

0)

(0

PERMANENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Appropriations:
Independent offices:
Veterans Administration
Other.
General Services Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions. _
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
Department of the Interior
Department of State
Treasury Department

Total permanent authorizations

$38

0)

75

Total current authorizations

Total contract authorizations,

0)
$38

0

0)

Total reappropriations

Contract authorizations:
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of CommerceDepartment of the Interior

0)
$63
2
1

_ _

_
__

$6,627

6,627

$8,007

0)

64,052

0)

8,007

72,452

16

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959
TABLE

8

SUMMARY OF BALANCES AVAILABLE AT START OF YEAR
Based on existing and proposed legislation
[In millions]
1957 actual
Description

Obligated

BALANCES OF AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Appropriations:
Legislative branch
The judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
Mutual security
_
___ _
Other
__
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
Veterans Administration.
Other
General Services Administration
__
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
_
Department of Commerce
_
_ ___
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
_
_
Department of State._
Treasury Department..
.
District of Columbia
_
. _

$6

$38
3
1

0)

Unobligated

Obligated

Unobligated

Obligated

$18

$37
2
1

$4

$22
3
1

0)

Unobligated

0)

338
24

3,109
13

764
17

2,531
14

29
22

862
14

975
90
103
408
1
165
173
25,154
147
454
131
14
85
29
55

376
130
83
412
2
254
183
12, 341
104
144
95
0)
3
14
12
31

977
90
153
257
2
112
235
24,137
146
623
173
13
5
75
70

308
175
147
223
2
330
248
10,862
117
142
77
1
3
17
16
38

1,271
116
152
208
3
207
398
23, 626
165
731
214
15
7
67
75

65
109
123
89

1,104
131
292
216
4
142
488
23, 294
233
660
191
16
19
51
90

14, 552

30, 232

13, 505

29,840

8,908

27,833

6,734

69
263

94
335

105
471

109
265

90
171

129
104

70
59

153
7,603
3, 610
-108
2,821

49
1,556
1,788
1,587
3

203
6, 588
4,182
934
2,786

67
1,666
2, 536
1,438
3

41
5,587
4,816
2,457
2,787

19
1,788
2, 677
1,348
2

54
5,365
4,179
1,853
2,787

4,467

14,411

5,412

15,269

6,084

15,949

6,067

14,367

10
3
87

129
3
497
24
2,005
39
1
40

111

15

89

52

38

105

639

306

789

498

548

37

95

92

91

96

51

1
13

1
7

1
48

2
19

1
47

1
24

1

1,304

2,738

150

894

434

1,017

671

638

-1

Contract authorizations:
Legislative branch
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
*
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior

3,380
10

27
823
1,209
1,621
3

Total authorizations to expend from debt receipts

12

14

1

11

-2

12

183
35

100

184
35

29
420
57
50
72
28
2,221
42

42
67
—8
133
34
2
-232
49

1,190

Total contract authorizations




Obligated

1960 estimate

90
694

Authorizations to expend from debt receipts:
Funds appropriated to the President:
Mutual security.
Other..
Independent offices:
Veterans Administration
Other
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Treasury Department

* Less than one-half million dollars.

Unobligated

1959 estimate

31, 415

Total appropriations

Revolving and management funds:
Legislative branch
Funds appropriated to the President:
Mutual security
_
Other
_
. . .
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
_ _
Veterans Administration
Other....
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions. __

$38
2
1

1958 estimate

2
35

14

-

26
96
11
107
29
-6
-303
40

(»)

0)

16
600
45
27
62
42
2, 978
37

33
208
-1
138
43
0)
-462
42

0)

18
427
52
49
64
18
2,374
46

317
56
7, 797
109
102
34
0)
11
1
40

(l)
37
161
-4
118
46
3
-292
43

0)

$67
21
1
303
83
6,130
28
46
12
0)
4
1
38

0)
1
37
450
62
52
75
31
1,886
37

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS
TABLE

17

8—Continued

SUMMARY OF BALANCES AVAILABLE AT START OF YEAR—Continued
Based on existing and proposed legislation-—Continued
[In millions]
1957 actual
Description

Obligated

1958 estimate

Unobligated

Obligated

1959 estimate

Unobligated

Obligated

1960 estimate

Unobligated

Obligated

Unobligated

BALANCES OF AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT—Continued
Revolving and management funds—Continued
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice. __ _._
Department of Labor
Post Office Department
___
___
Department of State __
Treasury Department

$4
-6
1
192

__
___
0)

17

$1
11
-7
1
195

$1
29
10
1
22

0)

.

0)

20

(9

13

$2
10
-7
1
205

$1
35
11
<9
0)

17
0)
7

11

$2
10
-6
1
222

0)
14
0)

0)
0)

$1
18
10
1
9

Total balances of authorizations enacted or recommended in this document

3,902

252

3,133

553

37,408

35,603

36,048

32,801

36,910

10

-1

3,078

543

2, 681

28,952

35,114

24, 420

1, 661

221

Total revolving and management funds

BALANCES OF AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Appropriations:
The judiciary
Funds appropriated to the President: Mutual security.—
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
Other
General Services Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
___
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of State—
Allowance for contingencies.

$1
22
11

226

1

13
0)
0)
(0

_

4
0)

769
5
53
1
0)
0)

100
52

326

10
1,147

1
1,569

119
0)
1
400

200

Authorizations to expend from debt receipts:
Independent offices
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Total authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Contract authorizations:
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Revolving and management funds:
Department of Agriculture
__

1,796

246
90

1,866
200

336

2,066
200

_ _ __

-198

-28

Total balances of authorizations proposed for later transmission
Total balances available at start of year__

3,490

2,000

1,042

330

2,000

Total appropriations

1,014

2,330

3,628

4,063

37, 403

35,603

36,048

32,801

37,924

31, 282

38, 742

28,482

$31,415
4,467
1,304
221

$14,552
14,411
2,738
3,902

$30,232
5,412
150
252

$13, 505
15,269
894
3,133

$30,882
6,084
434
525

$9, 238
17,949
1,017
3,078

$31,323
6,403
671
345

$8, 530
16, 433
838
2,681

37,408

35, 603

36,048

32,801

37,924

31, 282

38,742

28,482

RECAPITULATION
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Contract authorizations
Revolving and management funds
Total balances available at start of year
i Less than one-half million dollars.

440000—58




2

___

18

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
TABLE

9

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES OF PUBLIC ENTERPRISE FUNDS
Based on existing and proposed legislation
[In millions.

The budget expenditures shown in this table are included in the budget expenditures of the respective functions and agencies in all tables of the budget]
GROSS EXPENDITURES

Description

1957
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Funds appropriated to the President:
Mutual security
Other
Independent offices:
Veterans Administration
Other
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce...
Department of Defense—Military Functions
Department of Defense—Civil Functions
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor
Post Office Department
Treasury Department
Total

-




1957

1958

1959

1957

1959

1958

$100
343

$2
183

$1
116

$1
71

—$2
130

$19
370

$99
272

175
1,895
28
1,726
4,832
46
2
86
2
43
3
3,048
1

255
1,321
7
1,792
4,482
20
65
94
3
71
4
3,356

119
983
2
1,957
4,096
17
108
88
3
82
5
3,454

113
1,952
39
1,756
3,387
31
3
97
2
32
3
2,531
52

125
797
11
1,599
3, 312
29
25
90
3
34
4
2,670
11

137
943
5
1, 515
2,907
21
53
90
3
40
6
2, 795
15

62
-56
-11
-30
1,445
15
-1
-11

130
524
-4
192
1,169
-9
40
4

-18
39
-3
442
1,190
-4
54
-2

11

37

518
-51

686
-10

41
-1
659
-15

12,199

.

11,976

11,357

10,183

8,827

8, 602

2,019

3,148

2, 753

1
2

75
106
75
25

-

219

12,199

11,976

11,638

-219
700

281

Total
Grand total

1959

BUDGET EXPENDITURES

$20
486

$312

-

Proposed for later transmission:
Funds appropriated to the President: Mutual Security
Independent offices
Department of Agriculture
Post Office Department

1958

RECEIPTS FROM OPERATIONS

219
10,183

703

9,046

9,305

74
104
75
-675

-219
2,019

-422

2,929

2,331

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
In accordance with the provisions of the Budget and
Accounting Act of 1921, as amended, the budget for the
legislative branch of the Government is prepared by that

branch and is printed in the budget document without
revision.

RECAPITULATION OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS A N D EXPENDITURES
By function and subfunction
[In thousands]
New obligational authority

Expenditures

Function and subfunction
1957 enacted
General
601
602
610

Total, general government

Total, labor and welfare-Commerce and housing:
518 Other aids to business
Total, legislative branch




-

>82,483
30
3,295

$90,273
28
-3,544

$101,436
28
2,312

$111, 725
30
1,689

87,250

85,808

»,757

103,775

113,444

8,316
1,067

9,022
1,125

10,202
1,355

7,644

9,300
1,238

10,172
1,286

9,384

Labor and welfare:
215 Promotion of science, research, libraries, and museums
217 Other welfare services and administration

$84,048
28
3,175

0,722

-

1959 estimate

$77,705
28
2,990

government:
Legislative functions
Judicial functions
Other general government

1958 estimate

10,147

11,557

8,540

10,538

11,459

1,390

1,274

1,270

1,394

1,271

98,787

98,639

96,567

115,707

126,173

91,394

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

19

20

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE

Organization unit and account title

SENATE
Current authorizations:
Compensation of Senators
Mileage of President of the Senate and of Senators
Expense allowance of majority and minority leaders
Compensation of the Vice President of the United States
Expense allowance of the Vice President.
Salaries, officers and employees
Contingent expenses of the Senate:
Legislative reorganization
—
Senate policy committees
—
Joint Economic Committee
Joint'Committee on Atomic Energy..
Joint Committee on Printing
Committee on Rules and Administration
Vice President's automobile
Automobile for the President pro tempore
Automobiles for majority and minority leaders....
Reporting Senate proceedings
Furniture
Inquiries and investigations
Folding documents
Senate restaurants
Motor vehicles
Miscellaneous items
—
Postage stamps
Stationery (revolving fund)
Communications
Airmail and special delivery stamps
Fuel for heating apparatus
----Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies
:___'
Joint Committee on Navaho-Hopi Indian Administration
Packing boxes
Payment to estates and widows of deceased Members of the Senate..
Recording studio revolving fund

Functional
code

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)
1957
actual

601
601
601
601
601
601

$2,166,240
51,000
4,000
35,070
10,000
14,265,255

$2,328,245
51,000
4,000
37,695
10,000
14,306,425

$2, 328, 245
51,000
4,000
37,695
10,000
14,306,555

100,000
210,000
135, 560
222,775
63,185
29,565
8, 785
10, 785
21, 570
170, 250
31,190
2,820,000
29,000
85,000
16, 560
1,370, 000
39, 775
187, 500
14, 550

106, 500
223,650
143,360
234,385
66,840
32,990
7,600
7,100
14, 200
188,825
31,190
2,650,000
29,000
85,000
16, 560
1,455,000
40, 275
187, 500
14, 550

106,500
223,650
143,360
234,385
66,840
32,990
7,600
12,600
25,200
188,825
31,190
2,650,000
29,000
85,000
16, 560
1,455,000
39, 775
187,500
14, 550

59,116
170,305
131,513
181,529
57,216
27,265
6, 543
9,204
15,135
170,250
29,176
2, 726,800
28,906
75,457
15,710
1,331,941
38,121
137,160
10, 289
-346
37

1959
estimate

$2,160,917
47, 229
4,000
35,065
10,000
11,995, 596

601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
801
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601

1958
estimate

215,000
5,000

$19,700,000

i, 800,000

19,700,000

19,800,000

8,250,000

39,550,000

158, 293
815
45,000
-59,483

45,000

22, 362,615

22,271,890

22,288,020

19,618,759

601
601
601
601

9,897,000
200, 000
5,831, 595
14, 600, 000

10,638,000
200,000
5,992,105
14, 600,000

10,638,000
200,000
6,135, 600
15,000, 000

9,828, 374
183,408
5,362,088
13, 690,955

601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601

231,800
1,003,855
125,000
1,750,000
270, 000
20,000
86,985
975, 000
526, 700
12,145
92, 760
174,000
16, 500
14,900
6,500
13, 500

231,800
1,885, 000
120, 000
1,800,000
230,000
20, 000
89, 795
975,000
525,600
12,145
92, 760
175,000
16, 500
8,000
8,000
8,000
100,000
100,000

231,800
2, 296,400
125,000
2,000, 000
240,000
20,000
89, 795
1,075,000
525,600
12,145
138,460
200,000
16, 500
16,000
16,000
16,000

187,402
983, 731
81, 502
1, 758,126
216, 756

112,500

22,500

601
601

28,800
83,095

29,600
82,780

Total, Senate
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Current authorizations:
Compensation of Members.
Mileage of Members and expense allowance of the Speaker
Salaries, officers and employees
.
Members' clerk hire
Contingent expenses of the House:
Furniture
Miscellaneous items
Reporting hearings
Special and select committees
Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation
Joint Committee on Immigration and Nationality Policy
Office of the Coordinator of Information
Telegraph and telephone
Stationery (revolving fund)
Attending physician's office
Postage stamps
Folding documents
Revision of laws
Speaker's automobile
Automobile for the majority leader.
Automobile for the minority leader
New edition to the United States Code
New edition of the District of Columbia Code
Joint Senate and House recording facility revolving fund
House recording studio revolving fund
House of Representatives restaurant fund
Payment to widows and heirs of deceased Members of Congress..
Capitol Police:
General expenses
Capitol Police Board




87,079
860,953
482, 707
12,001
92,662
188,496
16,414
14,105
6,551
11,617
51, 760
133,432
-81,128
-98,241
112,500

!8,800

28,060

21

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)
1957
actual

1959
estimate

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

H O U S E OF R E P R E S E N T A T I V E S — C o n t i n u e d
Current authorizations—Continued
Office of the Legislative Counsel:
Salaries and expenses, Senate
Salaries and expenses, House of Representatives
Joint Committee on Reduction of Nonessential Federal Expenditures..
Education of Senate and House pages
Penalty mail costs
Statement of appropriations

$187,385
174,000
22, 500
52,800
2,081,000
10,000

53, 500
2,259,000
10,000

$159,735
143,982
23, 209
43, 690
2,076,000
10,000

38, 561, 375

40, 490, 270

41,810, 836

36, 737,860

$38, 250,000

$39, 550,000

601
601

211,000
50,000

239,800
50,000

243,000
50,000

208, 352
33, 384

239, 699
50,134

242,000
50,000

601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601

764,700
60,000
932, 600

893, 600

J

994,269

934, 634

893, 600

J

860,915

360, 867

316, 600

6,370

4, 471

5, 990

J

1,102, 491

1, 378, 515

1, 774, 000

38, 500
1,149,900

901,800
25,000
307,000
56,000
4, 500
1, 320, 400
87,000
40,300
1, 258,000

37,949
1,115,869

40,184
1, 245, 561

41, 900
1, 278, 400

601
601

(10,000,000)
1,304,300

(7, 500,000)
1,700,000

4,924, 452
1, 289, 481

11, 358, 688
1, 661,828

24, 386,000
1, 757,000

601
601
601
601
601

(5, 250,000)

(2,846,000)
2,846,000
1,000,000
250,000

8, 521,379

11,849,939

1, 500,000

380,721

1,000,000
250,000
1,789, 295

6,315,000

1,515,285

688,617

2,043,401

Total, House of Representatives
A R C H I T E C T OF T H E

CAPITOL

Current authorizations:
Office of the Architect of the Capitol:
Salaries
Contingent expenses
Capitol Buildings and Grounds:
Capitol Buildings
Reappropriation
Capitol Grounds
Reappropriation
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings
Senate Office Buildings.

-.
-

Legislative garage
House Office Buildings
Acquisition of property, construction and equipment, additional
House Office Building: Liquidation of contract authorization
Capitol Power Plant
Additional office building for the United States Senate:
Liquidation of contract authorization
Hnntrfift flTithnn'TflHnn
Furniture and furnishings additional Senate Office Building
Remodeling, Senate Office Building
Extension of the Capitol' Liquidation of contract authorization
Changes and improvements, Capitol Power Plant:
Liquidation of contract authorization .
Contract authorization
_ _
Capitol Building Senate and House roofs and chambers
Reconstruction, repair, alteration, and improvements, Capitol
Grounds
_
Senate restaurants
Library buildings and grounds:
Structural and mechanical care
Furniture and furnishings
Total, Architect of the Capitol-BOTANIC
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Relocation of greenhouses

$192,000
186,000

$165,000
163,000
22, 500
52, 240
2,076,000
10,000

601
601
601
601
601
601

601
601
601

6,600
1, 265, 600

317, 600
6,000
1, 822,000
42,000
1, 283,400
(22, 500,000)
1, 769,000

1

(12,000,000)
(1,196,000)
730,000

•

6,914
454,917
19,641

601
601

21,243
164

800,000
75,000

774,200
67,000

747,400
89,800

558,047
72,733

1,082,374
72,123

752,400
84, 800

7,388,200

10,927,000

7,263,800

22,103,169

34,028,336

41,441,091

253,600

275,500

385,500
587,000

246,447

274,088

380,500
587,000

253,600

275,500

972, 500

246,447

274,088

967, 500

215
518
601
215

5,310,593
1,287,547
1,067,387
1,487,100

5,875,000
1,390,000
1,200, 000
1,620,000

6,154,408
1,274,056
1,257,609
1,777,535

5,279,654
1, 270,246
1, 064,289
1,483, 427

5,849,888
1,394,373
1,196, 707
1,608,958

6,116, 090
1,270,693
1, 250, 509
1, 749,328

215
215
602
217

300,000
90,000
27,500
1,067,481

320,000
90,000
27,500
1,125,000

320,000
90,000
30,000
1,355,000

302,133
90,329
28,280
895,326

311,741
89,209
27,506
1,238,093

319,309
89,937
29,643
1,286,347

215
215

——

GARDEN
215
215

-

Total, Botanic Garden.
L I B R A R Y OF C O N G R E S S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
_._
Copyright Office: Salaries and expenses
Legislative Reference Service: Salaries and expenses
Distribution of catalog cards: Salaries and expenses
Increase of the Library of Congress:
General increase of the Library
Increase of the law library
Books for the Supreme Court
Books for the blind: Salaries and expenses...
Organizing and microfilming the papers of the Presidents: Salaries and
expenses
_
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements
- Total, Library of Congress




—

60,000

215

46,015
-388,550

215
10,637,608

11,647,500

12,308,608

11,461

46, 792

10,025,134

11,727,936

12,204,663

22

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued

Organization unit and account title

Functional
code

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1957
actual

1959
estimate

$10,000,000
3,175,000

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

$10,700,000
3,295,190

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G OFFICE
Current authorizations:
Printing and binding
Office of the Superintendent of Documents: Salaries and expenses
Intragovernmental funds:
Government Printing Office revolving fund
Working capital and congressional printing and binding

601
610

$9,200,000
2,990,400

$11,379,523
3,009,563

$10,520,494
3,328,142

-6,553,840
71

610
601

$9,415,474
3,206,750
-895,166

-1,639,000

Total, Government Printing Office.—

12,190,400

13,175,000

13,995,190

7,835,317

11,727,058

12,209,636

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures

91,393,798

98,787,160

98,638,954

96,566,686

115,707,418

126,172,890

$90,603,798
(28,446,000)
730,000
60,000

$95,773,160
(10,346,000)
2,846,000
168,000

$98,638,954
(22,500,000)

$96,566,686

$115,707,418

$126,172,890

91,393,798

98,787,160

98,638,954

96,566,686

115,707,418

126,172,890

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
Appropriations
Appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations
Contract authorizations
_
_
Reappropriations .
Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures




j

23

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
ANALYSIS OP UNEXPENDED BALANCES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiseal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Balance, start
of 1960

Estimated expenditures from—

Total

New obligational
author- New obli- Balances
gational of prior
ity
authorauthority
ity

Unobligated

Total

SENATE
Current authorizations

$4,815

$6,484

$6,600

$22,288

$19,150

$650

$6,700

9,021

8,810

8,900

41,811

36,200

3,350

9,000

8
24

8
10

8
10

243
50

234
40

8
10

9
10

289
17

58
19

50
21

50
22

103
1
88

132
2
100

844
296
6
1,642
40
1,178

50
21

61
2
70

894
318
6
1,822
42

132
2
100

180
2
105

HOUSE OF R E P R E S E N T A T I V E S
Current authorizations
A R C H I T E C T OF T H E CAPITOL
Current authorizations:
Office of the Architect of the Capitol:
Salaries
Contingent expenses
Capitol Buildings and Grounds:
Capitol Buildings
Capitol Grounds
_ _ _ _
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings.
Senate Office Buildings
Legislative garage
House Office Buildings
__ _ _
Acquisition of property, construction and equipment, additional House Office Building:
Liquidation of contract authorization_,
_
rinnfroflf OTifhrtrivofinn
Capitol Power Plant
Additional office building for the United States Senate:
Liquidation of contract authorization.
_
.
Contract authorization
..
Extension of the Capitol:
Liquidation of contract authorization
__
Contract authorization
_
Changes and improvements, Capitol Power Plant:
Liquidation of contract authorization
Contract authorization
Capitol Building, Senate and House roofs and chambers
Reconstruction, repair, alteration, and improvements, Capitol Grounds
Senate restaurants
Library buildings and grounds:
Structural and mechanical care
Furniture and furnishings. .
_

$19

669
95,000
149

$47
85,000

89
1,310

13,864
5,250

4,962
37,600

5,745
85,000
162

$62,406

1,058

10,592

88

1,588

4,990
37,600

14,839
25,600

16,609
25,600

3,225
25,600

14,820
25,600

6,315

1,236
1,196
14

3,051
1,196
14

2,221
730

2,732
730

681
730

50
19

476
20

19

f
i $12,146

1,500

21

88,548

361
25
135,043

Total, Architect of the Capitol

}
1,886
77,500 J
200

1,283

163,136

148,086

1,769

1,557

200

92,730

55,000
212

2,043 1
730 I

88

88

25,600

8,505
25,600

2,043 J
1.

730

270
25

275
20

583
25
129,515

24,386

747
90

477
65

275
20

124,985

7,264

6,379

35,062

37,834

90,808

BOTANIC G A R D E N
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses __
Relocation of greenhouses
Total, Botanic Garden

10
..
- _ . _ _

13

15

386
587

366
587

15

19

10

13

15

972

953

15

19

325
78
54
180

349
95
55
184

375
90
59
195

6,154
1,274
1,258
1,778

6,742
1,181
1,192
1,554

374
90
59
195

413
93
66
224

120
33
4
420

128
34
4
307

320
90
30
1,355

199
58
26
979

120
32
4
307

129
34
5

50

46

.
_

__

L I B R A R Y OF CONGRESS
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses _
_
Copyright Office: Salaries and expenses.
_.
_
Legislative Reference Service* Salaries and expenses
Distribution of catalog cards: Salaries and expenses
Increase of the Library of Congress:
General increase of the Library of Congress
«
Increase of the law library
Books for the Supreme Court
Books for the blind: Salaries and expenses
Organizing and microfilming the papers of the Presidents: Salaries and expenses
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements
Total, Library of Congress




__

21
5

123
34
5
252

17
13

3

19

226

406

29

1,071

256

1,667

1,586

4
47

394
12,309

10,977

376

1,228

347
1,691

24

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1958

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1959

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Fi£seal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1960

Estimated expenditures from—

New obligational
author- New obli- Balances
ity
gational of prior
authorauthority
ity

Unobligated

Total

G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G OFFICE
Current authorizations:
Printing and binding
Salaries and expenses, Office of the Superintendent of Documents
.
Intragovernmental funds:
Government Printing Office revolving fund—.
,

$4,971

$2,646

$3,231

$10,700

$7,990

$2,530

$3,410

404

379

347

3,295

2,982

346

314

$12,382

11,717

$14,261

13,667

$10,761

11,461

12,382

17,092

14, 261

16,692

10,761

15,039

13,995

147,454

195,145

144,032

181,752

103,491

157,125

98,639

Enacted or recommended in this document:
$6,415
Appropriations
_
128,654
Contract authorizations
Revolving and management funds: Intragovernmental funds- - 12,385

$44,362
139,046
11,737

$18,215
111,330
14,487

$56,349
111, 330
14,073

$3,994
88,736
10,761

147,454

195,145

144,032

181,752

103,491

Total, Government Printing Office

.

-

Total, legislative branch

-1,639

$12,039

10,972

1,237

12,039

13,624

84,631

41,542

49,873

121,842

$88
37,746
12,039

»$21, 760
89,835
i 10,247

49,873

121,842

1

9,900

RECAPITULATION

Total, legislative branch.

$41,440
103,830 | $98,639
11,855
157,125

98,639

$84,631

84,631

(
$41,542 |
[
41,542

1
i Excludes capital transfer (payment of profits to Treasury), in 1959 of $3,200 thousand.




2

Excludes amounts no longer available in 1959 of $4,548 thousand.




25

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES
[In thousands]
1957 actual
Balances brought forward at start of year from authorizations enacted or
recommended in this document:
Appropriations
Contract authorizations
Revolving and management funds. _.

$44,362
139,046
11, 737

Total budget expenditures
Amounts no longer available:
Unobligated balances expiring and lapsing..
Capital transfers from revolving funds to receipt accounts
Adjustment of balances downward in expired accounts, net
Total amounts no longer available
Balances carried forward at close of year from authorizations enacted or
recommended in this document:
Appropriations
C on tract authorizations
Revolving and management funds
Total balances carried forward at close of year

Obligations incurred, net..

J

157,125

95,773
(10,346)
2,846
168

98,639
(22,500)

98,787

98,639

286, 540

Total budget authorizations available

181, 752

91,394
1

Total new obligational authority..
Other amounts available: Restored from certified claims account

$41,440
103,830
11,855

90,604
(28,446)
730
60

New obligational authority:
Enacted or recommended in this document: Current authorizations:
Appropriations
Appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations
Contract authorizations
Reappropriations
*

$56,349
111, 330
14,073

195,145

Total balances brought forward

Expenditures:
From obligational authority enacted or recommended:
Out of new obligational authority.
Out of balances of prior obligational authority

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

280,539

255, 764

96,567

115,707

96,567

115,707

126,173

3, 455
4,604
162

4,606
3,101

4,549
3,200

8,221

7,707

7,749

56,349
111, 330
14,073

41,440
103,830
11,855

21,760
89,835
10,247

181,752

157,125

121,842

56,757

$131,621

$144,508

f
i

84,631
41,542

26

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1959

SENATE

CONFERENCE

Current authorizations:
S A L A R I E S OF S E N A T O R S , M I L E A G E
OF T H E P R E S I D E N T OF T H E
S E N A T E A N D OF S E N A T O R S , E X P E N S E A L L O W A N C E OF T H E M A J O R I T Y A N D M I N O R I T Y L E A D E R S OF T H E S E N A T E , A N D S A L A R Y A N D
E X P E N S E A L L O W A N C E OF T H E V I C E P R E S I D E N T
COMPENSATION

OF

SENATORS

For compensation of Senators, $2,328,245. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 , 3 2 8 , 2 4 5
Estimate 1959, $ 2 , 3 2 8 , 2 4 5

MILEAGE

OF PRESIDENT

OF TEE

SENATE

AND

OF

SENATORS

For mileage of the President of the Senate and of Senators,
$51,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 5 1 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 5 1 , 0 0 0

EXPENSE

ALLOWANCE

OF MAJORITY

AND

MINORITY

LEADERS

For expense allowance of the majority leader and the minority
leader of the Senate, $2,000 each, in all, $4,000. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 4 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 4 , 0 0 0

COMMITTEES

For clerical assistance to the Conference of the Majority, at rates
of compensation to be fixed by the chairman of said committee,
$40,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $40,000
Estimate 1959, $40,000
For clerical assistance to the Conference of the Minority, at rates
of compensation to be fixed by the chairman of said committee,
$40,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $40,000
Estimate 1959, $40,000
ADMINISTRATIVE

AND

CLERICAL

ASSISTANTS

OF THE

VICE

PRESIDENT

OF THE

UNITED

STATES

For the compensation of the Vice President of the United States,
$37,695. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 3 7 , 6 9 5
Estimate 1959, $ 3 7 , 6 9 5

EXPENSE

ALLOWANCE

OF THE

VICE

PRESIDENT

For expense allowance of the Vice President, $10,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 0 , 0 0 0

SALARIES,

OFFICERS AND

EMPLOYEES

For compensation of officers, employees, clerks to Senators, and
others as authorized by law, including agency contributions as
authorized, which shall be paid from this appropriation without
regard to the below limitations, as follows:
OFFICE

OF T H E

VICE

PRESIDENT

For clerical assistance to the Vice President, at rates of compensation to be fixed by him in basic multiples of $5 per month,
$101,925. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $101,925
Estimate 1959, $101,925

SENATORS

OFFICE

OF T H E

SERGEANT

AT

ARMS

AND

DOORKEEPER

For office of Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper, [$1,760,940: Provided, That effective July 1, 1957, the basic annual compensation of
the following positions shall be: Editor and printer, $4,020 in lieu
of $3,000; three cabinetmakers at $2,700 each in lieu of $2,640 each;
finisher, $2,700 in lieu of $2,640; upholsterer, $2,700 in lieu of $2,640;
superintendent, service department, $6,060 in lieu of $4,800; foreman, repairman, $2,820 in lieu of $2,760; repairman, $2,640 in lieu
of $2,580; repairman, $2,520 in lieu of $2,460] $1,761,070. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,760,940

COMPENSATION

TO

For administrative and clerical assistants and messenger service
for Senators, $9,640,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $9,640,000
Estimate 1959, $9,640,000

Estimate 1959, $1,761,070

O F F I C E S OF T H E S E C R E T A R I E S F O R T H E M A J O R I T Y A N D T H E M I N O R I T Y

For the offices of the Secretary for the Majority and the Secretary for the Minority, $94,950. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $94,950
Estimate 1959, $94,950
OFFICES

OF T H E M A J O R I T Y

AND

MINORITY

WHIPS

For two clerical assistants, one for the majority whip and one
for the minority whip, at not to exceed $5,580 basic per annum each,
$20,045. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $20,045
Estimate 1959, $20,045

Total, salaries, officers and employees:
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 4 , 3 0 6 , 4 2 5
Estimate 1959,

CONTINGENT

EXPENSES

LEGISLATIVE

OF T H E

$14,306,555

SENATE

REORGANIZATION

Legislative reorganization: For salaries and expenses, legislative
reorganization, $106,500. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Actf
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 0 6 , 5 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 0 6 , 5 0 0

CHAPLAIN

Chaplain of the Senate, $5,000.
tion Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $5,000
OFFICE

(Legislative Branch AppropriaSENATE

Estimate 1959, $5,000

OF T H E

SECRETARY

For office of the Secretary, $572,915.
priation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $572,915
COMMITTEE

(Legislative Branch Appro-

COMMITTEES

Estimate 1959, $572,915

EMPLOYEES

For professional and clerical assistance to standing committees,
and the Select Committee on Small Business, $2,030,650. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $2,030,650
Estimate 1959, $2,030,650




POLICY

Senate policy committees: For salaries and expenses of the
Majority Policy Committee and the Minority Policy Committee,
$111,825 for each such committee; in all, $223,650. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $223,650
Estimate 1959, $223,650

JOINT

ECONOMIC

COMMITTEE

Joint Economic Committee: For salaries and expenses of the
Joint Economic Committee, $143,360. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,
$4,205,000
Estimate 1959, $ 4 , 2 0 5 , 0 0 0

27

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
JOINT

COMMITTEE

ON ATOMIC

ENERGY

INQUIRIES

Joint Committee on Atomic Energy: For salaries and expenses
of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, $233,520; and for expenses of compiling and preparing year end Joint Committee reports,
$865, said sum, or any part thereof, may be paid as additional compensation to any employee of the United States; in all, $234,385.
(.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$234,385

JOINT

COMMITTEE

ON

$234,385

Estimate 1959,

$66,840

COMMITTEE

ON RULES

AND

$66,840

ADMINISTRATION

Committee on Rules and Administration: For reimbursement
to General Services Administration for space furnished the United
States Senate, $30,810; and for expenses of compiling, preparing, and
indexing material for the Senate Manual, $2,180, said sum, or any
part thereof, in the discretion of the chairman of the Committee on
Rules and Administration, may be paid as additional compensation
to any employee of the United States; in all, $32,990. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$32,990

VICE

PRESIDENT'S

$32,990

AUTOMOBILE

Vice President's automobile: For purchase, exchange, driving,
maintenance, and operation of an automobile for the Vice President,
$7,600. CLegislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 7 , 6 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 7 , 6 0 0

AUTOMOBILE

FOR

THE

PRESIDENT

PRO

FOR MAJORITY

AND

MINORITY

LEADERS

Automobiles for majority and minority leaders: For purchase,
exchange, driving, maintenance, and operation of two automobiles,
one for the majority leader of the Senate, and one for the minority
leader of the Senate, [$14,200] $25,200. {.Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 4 , 2 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 5 , 2 0 0

REPORTING

SENATE

$188,825

Estimate 1959,

$188,825

FURNITURE

Furniture: For services and materials in cleaning and repairing
furniture, and for the purchase of furniture, $31,190: Provided, That
the furniture purchased is not available from other agencies of the
Government. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $31,190
Estimate 1959, $31,190




DOCUMENTS

Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$29,000

SENATE

$29,000

RESTAURANTS

Senate restaurants: For repairs, improvements, equipment
and supplies for Senate kitchens and restaurants, Capitol Building
and Senate Office Building, including personal and other services,
to be expended under the supervision of the Committee on Rules and
Administration, United States Senate, $85,000. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $85,000
Estimate 1959, $85,000

MOTOR

VEHICLES

Motor vehicles: For maintaining, exchanging, and equipping
motor vehicles for carrying the mails and for official use of the offices
of the Secretary and Sergeant at Arms, $16,560. {Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 6 , 5 6 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 6 , 5 6 0
MISCELLANEOUS

ITEMS

Miscellaneous items: For miscellaneous items, exclusive of
labor, $1,455,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 , 4 5 5 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 , 4 5 5 , 0 0 0
POSTAGE

STAMPS

Postage stamps: For Office of the Secretary, $650; Office of
the Sergeant at Arms, [$725J $225; Offices of the Secretaries for the
Majority and the Minority, $100; and for airmail and specialdelivery stamps for Senators and the President of the Senate, as
authorized by law, $38,800, in all, [ $ 4 0 , 2 7 5 1 $39,775. {Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 4 0 , 2 7 5
Estimate 1959, $ 3 9 , 7 7 5
STATIONERY

(REVOLVING

FUND)

Stationery (Revolving Fund): For stationery for Senators and
the President of the Senate, $174,600; and for stationery for committees and officers of the Senate, $12,900; in all, $187,500, to remain available until expended. {Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 8 7 , 5 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 8 7 , 5 0 0

PROCEEDINGS

Reporting Senate proceedings: For reporting the debates and
proceedings of the Senate, payable in equal monthly installments,
$188,825. (.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

FOLDING

Folding documents: For the employment of personnel for
folding speeches and pamphlets at a gross rate of not exceeding
$1.61 per hour per person, $29,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)

TEMPORE

Automobile for the President pro tempore: For purchase, exchange, driving, maintenance, and operation of an automobile for
the President pro tempore of the Senate, [$7,100 J $12,600. {.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 7 , 1 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 2 , 6 0 0

AUTOMOBILES

INVESTIGATIONS

PRINTING

Joint Committee on Printing: For salaries and expenses of the
Joint Committee on Printing, $62,635; for expenses of compiling,
preparing, and indexing the Congressional Directory, $1,600; and
for compiling, preparing, and indexing material for the biographical
directory, $2,605, said sum, or any part thereof, in the discretion of
the chairman or vice chairman of the Joint Committee on Printing,
may be paid as additional compensation to any employee of the
United States; in all, $66,840. {Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

AND

Inquiries and investigations: For expenses of inquiries and
investigations ordered by the Senate or conducted pursuant to
section 134 (a) of Public Law 601, Seventy-ninth Congress, including
$380,000 for the Committee on Appropriations, to be available also
for the purposes mentioned in Senate Resolution Numbered 193,
agreed to October 14, 1943, $2,650,000. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 , 6 5 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 , 6 5 0 , 0 0 0

COMM UNI CATIONS

Communications: For an amount for communications which
may be expended interchangeably for payment, in accordance with
such limitations and restrictions as may be prescribed by the Committee on Rules and Administration, of charges on official telegrams
and long-distance telephone calls made by or on behalf of Senators
or the President of the Senate, such telephone calls to be in addition
to those authorized by the provisions of the Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1947 (60 Stat. 392; 2 U. S. C. 46c, 46d, 46e),
as amended, and the First Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1949 (63
Stat. 77; 2 U. S. C. 46d-l), $14,550. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $14,550

Estimate 1959, $14,550

28

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959

SENATE—Continued

OFFICE

Current authorizations—Continued
CONTINGENT

EXPENSES

OP T H E

[ADMINISTRATIVE

SENATE—Continued

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Current authorizations:
M I L E A G E FOR THE M E M B E R S , AND E X P E N S E
OF T H E S P E A K E R
COMPENSATION

OF

ALLOWANCE

MEMBERS

For compensation of Members (wherever used herein the term
"Member" shall include Members of the House of Representatives,
Delegates from Territories, and the Resident Commissioner from
Puerto Rico), $10,638,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 0 , 6 3 8 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 0 , 6 3 8 , 0 0 0

MILEAGE

OF MEMBERS

AND

DOORKEEPER

For the Office of the Doorkeeper, $863,725. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $863,725
Estimate 1959, $863,725

PROVISIONS]

[Salaries or wages paid out of the items under "Contingent
Expenses of the Senate" shall hereafter be computed at basic rates,
plus increased and additional compensation, as authorized and provided by law.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)

SALARIES,

OF T H E

EXPENSE

ALLOWANCE

OF THE

SPEAKER

For mileage of Members and expense allowance of the Speaker,
as authorized by law, $200,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0

SPECIAL

AND

MINORITY

EMPLOYEES

For six minority employees, $70,935.
priation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $70,935

{Legislative Branch ApproEstimate 1959, $70,935

For the office of the majority floor leader, including $2,000 for
official expenses of the majority leader, $58,555. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $58,555
Estimate 1959, $58,555
For the office of the minority floor leader, $45,800. {Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $45,800
Estimate 1959, $45,800
For the office of the majority whip, $25,015. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $25,015
Estimate 1959, $25,015
For the office of the minority whip, $25,015. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $25,015
Estimate 1959, $25,015
For two printing clerks, one for the majority caucus room and one
for the minority caucus room, to be appointed by the majority and
minority leaders, respectively, $11,470[, to be equally divided, so
long as the two positions are held by the present incumbents].
{Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $11,470

SALARIES,

OFFICERS

AND

EMPLOYEES

For compensation of officers and employees, as authorized by law,
a t follows:
OFFICE

OF T H E

SPEAKER

For the Office of the Speaker, $53,075. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $53,075
Estimate 1959, $53,075
OFFICE

OF T H E

PARLIAMENTARIAN

For the Office of the Parliamentarian, including $2,000 for preparing the Digest of the Rules, $58,325. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $58,325
Estimate 1959, $58,325

Estimate 1959, $11,470

For a technical assistant in the office of the attending physician,
to be appointed by the attending physician, subject to the approval
of the Speaker, $7,790. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $7,790
Estimate 1959, $7,790
OFFICE

OF T H E

POSTMASTER

For the Office of the Postmaster, including employment of substitute messengers, and extra services of regular employees when required at the basic salary rate of not to exceed $2,100 per annum
each, [$251,425] $255,620. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $251,425
Estimate 1959, $255,620
OFFICIAL R E P O R T E R S

OFFICE

OF T H E

CHAPLAIN

For the Office of the Chaplain, $7,450.
propriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $7,450
OFFICE

OF T H E

{Legislative Branch ApEstimate 1959, $7,450

EMPLOYEES

For committee employees, including not to exceed $435,000 for the
Committee on Appropriations, [$2,270,000] $2,400,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $2,270,000
Estimate 1959, $2,400,000
OFFICE

OF T H E

SERGEANT AT

ARMS

DEBATES

For official reporters of debates $158,255. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $158,255
Estimate 1959, $158,255
OFFICIAL R E P O R T E R S TO

CLERK

For the Office of the Clerk, including [$95,950 for the Office of the
House Recording Studio, $927,770] an additional $9,300 for clerical
assistants in the Disbursing Office, $987,070. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $927,770
Estimate 1959, $937,070
COMMITTEE

OF

COMMITTEES

For official reporters to committees, $159,840. {Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958 )
Appropriated 1958, $159,840
Estimate 1959, $159,840
APPROPRIATIONS

COMMITTEE

For salaries and expenses, studies and examinations of executive
agencies, by the Committee on Appropriations, and temporary personal services for such committee, to be expended in accordance
with section 202 (b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act, 1946,
and to be available for reimbursement to agencies for services performed, $500,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $500,000

Estimate 1959, $500,000

For the Office of the Sergeant at Arms, including $7,500 for additional clerical assistants, $497,660. {Legislative Branch AppropriaTotal salaries, officers and employees:
tion Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 5 , 9 9 2 , 1 0 5
Estimate 1959,
Appropriated 1958,
$4,205,000
Estimate 1959, $ 4 , 2 0 5 , 0 0 0




$6,135,600

29

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
MEMBERS'

CLERK

HIRE

For clerk hire, necessarily employed by each Member in the
discharge of his official and representative duties, [$14,600,000]
$15,000,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $14,600,000
Estimate 1959, $15,000,000

CONTINGENT

EXPENSES

OF T H E

Furniture: For furniture and materials for repairs of the same,
including labor, tools, and machinery for furniture repair shops, and
for the purchase of packing boxes, $231,800. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $231,800
Estimate 1959, $231,800

OF THE

Estimate 1959, $20,000

COORDINATOR

OF

INFORMATION

TELEGRAPH

AND

TELEPHONE

Telegraph and telephone: For telegraph and telephone service,
exclusive of personal services, [$975,000] $1,075,000. {Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $975,000

ITEMS

Miscellaneous items: For miscellaneous items, exclusive of salaries
unless specifically ordered by the House of Representatives, including the sum of $30,000 for payment to the Architect of the Capitol
in accordance with section 208 of the Act, approved October 9, 1940
(Public Law 812); the exchange, operation, maintenance, and repair
of the Clerk's motor vehicles; the exchange, operation, maintenance, and repair of the folding room motortruck; the exchange,
maintenance, operation, and repair of the postoffice motor vehicles
for carrying the mails; the sum of $600 for hire of automobile for the
Sergeant at Arms; the sum of $2,000 for the Clerk of the House, for
preparation of the annual budget for the House of Representatives;
materials for folding; and for stationery for the use of committees,
departments, and officers of the House; [$1,885,000, and in addition,
$80,000 to be derived by transfer from surplus in the stationery
revolving fund: Provided, That, notwithstanding the provisions of
section 401 of the Civil Service Retirement Act Amendments of
1956 (Public Law 854), the Clerk of the House is hereafter authorized
to pay, from the contingent fund of the House, with respect to all
officers and employees of the House who are covered by such Act,
the amounts, which, under the terms of such section 401, otherwise
would be contributed from the appropriations or funds specified
therein. As used in this paragraph the term "officers and employees of the House" means employees in the legislative branch whose
salaries, wages, or other compensation are disbursed by the Clerk of
the House of Representatives] $2,296,400. {Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,885,000

OFFICE

{Legislative Branch Appropriation

Office of the Coordinator of Information: For salaries and other
expenses of the Office of the Coordinator of Information, $89,795.
{Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $89,795
Estimate 1959, $89,795

HOUSE

FURNITURE

MISCELLANEOUS

Nationality Policy, $20,000.
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $20,000

Estimate 1959, $2,296,400

Estimate 1959, $1,075,000

STATIONERY

(REVOLVING

FUND)

Stationery (revolving fund): For a stationery allowance for each
Member, for the [second session of the Eighty-fifth] first session oj
the Eighty-sixth Congress, $525,600, to remain available until expended. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $525,600
ATTENDING

Estimate 1959, $525,600
PHYSICIANS

OFFICE

Attending physician's office: For medical supplies, equipment,
and contingent expenses of the emergency room and for the attending physician and his assistants, including an allowance of $1,500 to
be paid to the attending physician in equal monthly installments as
authorized by the Act approved June 27, 1940 (54 Stat. 629), and
including an allowance of $75 per month each to four assistants as
provided by the House resolutions adopted July 1, 1930, January 20,
1932, and November 18, 1940, and Public Law 242, Eighty-fourth
Congress, $12,145. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $12,145
Estimate 1959, $12,145
POSTAGE

STAMPS

Reporting hearings: For stenographic reports of hearings of committees other than special and select committees, [$120,000]
$125,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Postage stamps: Postmaster, $320; Clerk, $640; Sergeant at
Arms, $480; Doorkeeper, $400; United States airmail and specialdelivery postage stamps for each Member, the Speaker, the majority
and minority leaders, the majority and minority whips, and to each
standing committee, as authorized by law; [$92,760] $188,460:
Provided, That the provisions of House Resolution 399, Eighty-fifth
Congress, shall be the permanent law. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Appropriated 1958, $120,000

Appropriated 1958, $92,760

REPORTING

SPECIAL

AND

HEARINGS

Estimate 1959, $125,000

SELECT

FOLDING

COMMITTEES

Special and select committees: For salaries and expenses of special
and select committees authorized by the House, [$1,800,000, of
which not to exceed $60,000 shall be immediately available]
$2,000,000. (.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,800,000
Estimate 1959, $2,000,000

COMMITTEE

ON INTERNAL

REVENUE

TAXATION

Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation: For the payment
of the salaries and other expenses of the Joint Committee on Internal
Revenue Taxation, [$230,000] $240,000.
(.Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $230,000
Estimate 1959, $240,000

COMMITTEE

ON

IMMIGRATION

AND

NATIONALITY

POLICY

Joint Committee on Immigration and Nationality Policy: For salaries and expenses of the Joint Committee on Immigration and




OF

LAWS

Revision of laws: For preparation and editing of the laws as authorized by the Act approved May 29, 1928 (1 U. S. C. 59), $16,500,
to be expended under the direction of the Committee on the Judiciary. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $16,500
Estimate 1959, $16,500
SPEAKER'S

JOINT

DOCUMENTS

Folding documents: For folding speeches and pamphlets, at a
gross rate not exceeding $2.15 per thousand or for the employment
of personnel at a gross rate not exceeding $1.61 per hour per person,
[$175,000] $200,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $175,000
Estimate 1959, $200,000
REVISION

JOINT

Estimate 1959, $138,460

AUTOMOBILE

Speaker's automobile: For purchase, exchange, hire, driving,
maintenance, repair, and operation of an automobile for the Speaker,
[$8,000] $16,000. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,$31,190Estimate1959,$31,190Appropriated1958,$14,550Estimate 1959, $14,550

30

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1959

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
CONTINGENT

EXPENSES

AUTOMOBILE

FOR

OF T H E
THE

HOUSE—Continued

MAJORITY

LEADER

Automobile for the majority leader: For purchase, exchange,
hire, driving, maintenance, repair, and operation of an automobile
for the majority leader of the House, [$8,000] $16,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $8,000
Estimate 1959, $16,000
AUTOMOBILE

FOR

THE

MINORITY

LEADER

Automobile for the minority leader: For purchase, exchange,
hire, driving, maintenance, repair, and operation of an automobile
for the minority leader of the House, [$8,000] $16,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $8,000
Estimate 1959, $16,000

[NEW

EDITION TO T H E

UNITED

STATES

CODE]

[New edition to the United States Code: For preparation of new
edition of the United States Code, $100,000, to remain available
until expended.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $100,000

[NEW

EDITION

OF T H E D I S T R I C T

OF C O L U M B I A

CODE]

[New edition of the District of Columbia Code: For preparation
of new edition of the District of Columbia Code, $100,000, to# remain
available until expended.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $100,000

P A Y M E N T S TO W I D O W S A N D H E I R S OF D E C E A S E D
OF C O N G R E S S

Appropriated 1958, $82,780

PROVISION

Salaries or wages paid out of the items herein for the House of
Representatives shall hereafter be computed at basic rates, plus increased and additional compensation, as authorized and provided by
law. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)

O F F I C E OF T H E L E G I S L A T I V E

GENERAL

[General expenses:] For purchasing and supplying uniforms; the
purchase, maintenance, and repair of police motor vehicles, including two-way police radio equipment; contingent expenses, including
$25 per month for extra services performed for the Capitol Police
Board by such member of the staff of the Sergeant at Arms of the
Senate or the House, as may be designated by the Chairman of the
Board; [$27,600] $28,800. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, • $29,600
Estimate 1959, $28,800
o Includes $2,000 appropriated in Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.

CAPITOL

POLICE

BOARD

[Capitol Police Board:] To enable the Capitol Police Board to
provide additional protection for the Capitol Buildings and Grounds,
including the Senate and House Office Buildings and the Capitol
Power Plant [$82,780] $89,236. Such sum shall be expended only
for payment for salaries and other expenses of personnel detailed




COMMITTEE

ON

POLICE
EXPENSES

COUNSEL

For salaries and expenses of maintenance of the Office of the Legislative Counsel, as authorized by law, including increased and additional compensation as provided by law, [$361,385] $378,000, of
which [$187,385] $192,000 shall be disbursed by the Secretary of
the Senate and [$174,000] $186,000 shall be disbursed by the
Clerk of the House[: Provided, That effective July 1, 1957, the
gross compensation of the Legislative Counsel of the Senate shall
be $17,500; and no more than three employees in the Office of the
Legislative Counsel of the Senate may be designated as Senior
Counsel, whose compensation shall be $15,500 gross per annum
each]. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $361,385
Estimate 1959, $378,000
[JOINT

CAPITOL

Estimate 1959, $89,236

The foregoing amounts under "Capitol Poliee ,, shall be disbursed
by the Clerk of the House.

MEMBERS

[For payment to Anastasia S. Bowler, widow of James B. Bowler,
late a Representative from the State of Illinois, $22,500.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $22,500
ADMINISTRATIVE

from the Metropolitan Police of the District of Columbia, and the
Commissioners of the District of Columbia are authorized and
directed to make such details upon the request of the Board. Personnel so detailed shall, during the period of such detail, serve under
the direction and instructions of the Board and is authorized to
exercise the same authority as members of such Metropolitan Police
and members of the Capitol Police and to perform such other duties
as may be assigned by the Board. Reimbursement for salaries and
other expenses of such detail personnel shall be made to the government of the District of Columbia, and any sums so reimbursed shall
be credited to the appropriation or appropriations from which such
salaries and expenses are payable and shall be available for all the
purposes thereof: Provided, That any person detailed under the
authority of this paragraph or under similar authority in the Legislative Branch Aporopriation Act, 1942, and the Second Deficiency
Appropriation Act, 1940, from the Metropolitan Police of the District of Columbia shall be deemed a member of such Metropolitan
Police during the period or periods of any such detail for all purposes
of rank, pay, allowances, privileges, and benefits to the same extent
as though such detail had not been made, and at the termination
thereof any such person who was a member of such police on July 1,
1940, shall have a status with respect to rank, pay, allowances,
privileges, and benefits which is not less than the status of such
person in such police at the end of such detail: Provided further, That
the Commissioners of the District of Columbia are directed to pay
the lieutenants detailed under the authority of this paragraph the
same salary as that paid in fiscal year 1955 plus $625 each and such
increases in basic compensation as may be subsequently provided
by law so long as these positions are held by the present incumbents
and that the Commissioners of the District of Columbia are directed
to pay the deputy chief detailed under the authority of this paragraph the same salary as that paid in fiscal year 1956 plus $600 and
such increases in basic compensation as may be subsequently provided by law so long as this position is held by the present incumbent. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)

R E D U C T I O N OF N O N E S S E N T I A L
EXPENDITURES]

FEDERAL

[For an amount to enable the Joint Committee on Reduction of
Nonessential Federal Expenditures to carry out the duties imposed
upon it by section 601 of the Revenue Act of 1941 (55 Stat. 726),
to remain available during the existence of the committee, $22,500,
to be disbursed by the Secretary of the Senate.] (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $22,500

EDUCATION

OF S E N A T E A N D H O U S E

PAGES

For education of congressional pages and pages of the Supreme
Court, pursuant to section 243 of the Legislative Reorganization Act,
1946, [$52,800] $53,500, which amount shall be advanced and
credited to the applicable appropriation of the District of Columbia,
and the Board of Education of the District of Columbia is hereby
authorized to employ such personnel for the education of pages as
may be required and to pay compensation for such services in accordance with such rates of compensation as the Board of Education
may prescribe. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$4,205,000

Estimate 1959, $4,205,000

31

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
PENALTY

MAIL

COSTS

For expenses necessary under section 2 of Public Law 286, Eightythird Congress, [$2,081,000] $2,259,000, to be available immediately. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 , 0 8 1 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 , 2 5 9 , 0 0 0
STATEMENT OF

APPROPRIATIONS

For the preparation, under the direction of the Committees on
Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives, of the
statements for the [first] second session of the Eighty-fifth Congress,
showing appropriations made, indefinite appropriations, and contracts authorized, together with a chronological history of the regular
appropriation bills as required by law, $10,000, to be paid to the
persons designated by the chairmen of such committees to supervise
the work. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 0 , 0 0 0

aggregate amount of the purchase or the service does not exceed
$1,000 in any instance.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
CONTINGENT

Contingent expenses: To enable the Architect of the Capitol to
make surveys and studies and to meet unforeseen expenses in connection with activities under his care, $50,000. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 5 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 5 0 , 0 0 0
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Unforeseen expenses in connection with
all activities under the Architect of
the Capitol (total obligations)

$18,858

OF T H E

1959 estimate

$50,000

$50,000

50,000

50,000

$50,000

50,000

50,000

31,142

Appropriation (new obligational authority)--

Current authorizations:
OF T H E A R C H I T E C T

1958 estimate

$50,000

1957 actual

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL
OFFICE

EXPENSES

CAPITOL

50,000

Object Classification

SALARIES

Salaries: For the Architect of the Capitol, Assistant Architect of
the Capitol, and Second Assistant Architect of the Capitol, at salary
rates of $19,000, $17,500, and $16,000 per annum, respectively, and
other personal services at rates of pay provided by law; and the
Assistant Architect of the Capitol shall act as Architect of the Capitol during the absence or disability of that official or whenever there
is no Architect, and, in case of the absence or disability of the Assistant Architect, the Second Assistant Architect of the Capitol shall
so act; [$239,800] $243,000. (31 U. S. C. 689; 40 U. S. C. 161, 162,
164a; 166b-l; 5 U. S. C. 2205, 2206; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 3 9 , 8 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 4 3 , 0 0 0
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
General administration of all activities
under the Architect of the Capitol
(total obligations)
-

1958 estimate

$239,800

$243,000

239,800

243,000

27
27

211,000

27
27

Object Classification
27
27

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Average GS grade and salary
01

07
11

Personal services:
Permanent positions.
Other personal services
Total personal services
Other contractual services
__
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations

8.3

$5,867

Total obligations

1959 estimate

2,555

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

Other contractual services
Kemodeling Senate terrace rooms
to provide additional accommodations for the Senate recording and
television facility
Emergency boiler repairs, Capitol
Power Plant _
Installation of safety devices, Senate subway transportation system
Survey and study, remodeling Senate Office Building

1,978
3,157
98
18,858

8.8

$6,210

8.8

$6,318

$189,355
18, 642

$201, 540
25,160

$204,140
25,160

207,997
448

226, 700
400
12,700
239,800

243,000

Appropriations under the control of the Architect of the Capitol
shall be available for expenses of travel on official business not to
exceed in the aggregate under all funds the sum of $7,500. (40
U. S. C. 166a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
[Hereafter the purchase of supplies and equipment and the procurement of services for all branches under the Architect of the
Capitol may be made in the open market without compliance with
section 3709 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, as
amended, in the manner common among businessmen, when the

GROUNDS

BUILDINGS

Capitol Buildings: For necessary expenditures for the Capitol
Building and electrical substations of the Senate and House Office
Buildings, under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol,
including minor improvements, maintenance, repair, equipment,
supplies, material, fuel, oil, waste, and appurtenances; furnishings
and office equipment; special and protective clothing for workmen;
uniforms or allowances therefor as authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954, as amended (5 U. S. C. 2131); personal and other
services; cleaning and repairing works of art, without regard to section 3709 of the Revised Statutes, as amended; purchase or exchange,
maintenance and operation of passenger motor vehicle; not to exceed
$300 for the purchase of necessary reference books and periodicals;
not to exceed $500 for expenses of attendance, when specifically
authorized by the Architect of the Capitol, at meetings or conventions in connection with subjects related to work under the Architect
of the Capitol; [$901,800] $893,600. (40 U. S. C. 162, 163, 163a,
166; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 9 0 1 , 8 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 8 9 3 , 6 0 0

229,300
400
13,300

208,445

CAPITOL

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$926,800

$893,600

824,700

926,800

893,600

$764,700
60,000

$901,800
25,000

$893,600

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Maintenance and operation
Capitol (total obligations).




$13,625

CAPITOL BUILDINGS AND

$208,445

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available

07

of

the

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward—.
Unobligated balance no longer availableNew obligational authority
New obligational authority:
Appropriation.
Reappropriation

$782,147
-19,036
61,589

32

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued

Object Classification

Current authorizations—Continued
CAPITOL

BUILDINGS AND
CAPITOL

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees

GROUNDS—Continued

BUILDINGS—continued

01
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positionsAverage number of all employees

1959 estimate

140
138

141
141

137
135

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions..
01

1958 estimate

.2

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent _
Other personal services

$5,828
$3,880

8.9

$6,053
$4, 256

8.9

$6,157
$4, 368

$516, 032
12,849
98, 786

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
Other contractual services:
Annual painting
Elevator repairs and improvementsSubstation equipment and repairs. _
General annual repairs and alterations
Maintenance and repair, lighting
systems, grounds
Maintenance, air-conditioning system
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
Repairs, works of art
Advertising
Installation of 2 additional elevators
in Senate wing and improvements
to 2 adjoining elevators
Painting interior shell of dome,
interior of outer shell of dome, and
all structural members of dome...
Purchase of framed oil portrait of
former Architect of the Capitol...
Suplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Total obligations

$566,000
16, 000
107,300

$597, 200
16,000
112,300

627,667
143
23
54
600

689,300
100
25
20
600

725, 500
100
25
20
1.000

38,192
3, 488
3, 226

30, 000
4,000

32, 000
4, 000
4,205

31, 310
7,483
19, 865
1, 847

37, 000
9,205
25, 300
2,000
5, 000

2, 000
5,000
50

25,000
37,
23,
1,
32,

54
54

$4, 681
$3, 454

6.3

$4, 719
$3, 793

6.3

$4,812
$3,946

$181, 376
14,372
31, 702

22
4

250, 800
50
30
20

260, 600
50
30
20

16, 948
1,996
1, 703

8, 450
5,000
2, 000

8, 450
5, 000
2,000

6,097

12, 000

12, 000

545

500
50

700
50

594, 000
10,142
5, 083

56, 000
8, 500
5, 800
13, 800

8,500
5,800
14, 400

863, 990

...

$220, 000
7,500
33,100

227, 450

Total personal services
_
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
...
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs
...
Snow removal. _
Maintenance of signal lights.
Repairs to streets, sidewalks, curbing, and other paved areas. . . .
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
_
Advertising
__
New
combined
sanitary-storm
water sewer
08 Supplies and materials
_
09 Equipment
__
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions

$210, 200
7, 500
33,100

363,000

317, 600

OFFICE

BUILDINGS

10, 500
21, 900

50

1, 650
23, 417
3,758

6.3

Personal services:
Permanent positions
. _
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total obligations

54
54

26, 300

19, 424

782,147

CAPITOL

4, 600

1959 estimate

54
51

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions

Object Classification

1958 estimate

SUBWAY

TRANSPORTATION,

CAPITOL

AND

SENATE

Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings:
For maintenance, repairs, and rebuilding of the subway transportation system connecting the Senate Office [Building] Buildings
with the Capitol, including personal and other services, [$4,500]
$6,000. (86 Stat. 1448; 62 Stat. 1029; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 4 , 5 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 6 , 0 0 0

500
400
000
700

27, 300
1,000
32, 700

Program and Financing

926, 800

893, 600

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Maintenance of the subway transportation system connecting the Senate
Office Buildings with the Capitol
(total obligations)

GROUNDS

Capitol Grounds: For care and improvement of grounds surrounding the Capitol, Senate and House Office Buildings; Capitol
Power Plant; personal and other services; care of trees; planting;
fertilizers; repairs to pavements, walks, and roadways; waterproof
wearing apparel; maintenance of signal lights; and for snow removal by hire of men and equipment or under contract without
compliance with section 3709 of the Revised Statutes, as amended;
[$307,000: Provided, That not to exceed $56,000 of the amount made
available under this head for the fiscal year 1957 for construction of
a combined sanitary-storm water sewer extending from the Additional Senate Office Building to the existing sewer crossing Constitution Avenue just west of New Jersey Avenue Northwest is hereby
continued available until June 30, 1958] $817,600. (40 U. S. C.
162, 198a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 3 0 7 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 3 1 7 , 6 0 0

1959 estimate

$4,500

$6,000

4,500

6,000

$3, 700

$5,000

350
450

500
500

4, 500

6,000

$6, 518

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

82
6,600

Object Classification
07

08
09

Other contractual services:
General annual repairs
_
Installation of track brakeshoes
and safety devices on subway
cars
_ _
.
_.,
Supplies and materials
Equipment
_
Total obligations

$2,604
3,617
297
6, 518

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Care and improvement of the Capitol
grounds (total obligations)

New obligational authority
New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Reappropriation_




.

1959 estimate

$363,000

$317,600

932,600

363,000

317,600

$932,600

$307,000
56,000

$317,600

$863,990

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

1958 estimate

68,610

SENATE

OFFICE

BUILDINGS

Senate Office Buildings: For maintenance, miscellaneous items
and supplies, including furniture, furnishings, and equipment, and
for labor and material incident thereto, and repairs thereof; for
purchase of waterproof wearing apparel and for personal and other
services; including eight female attendants in charge of ladies'
retiring rooms at $1,800 each, for the care and operation of the
Senate Office Buildings; uniforms or allowances therefor as authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954, as amended (5 U. S. C. 2131) ;
to be expended under the control and supervision of the Architect
of the Capitol; in all, [$1,320,400: Provided, That not to exceed
$87,000 of the amount made available under the head "Senate
Office Building" in the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,

33

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
1957, shall continue available until expended] $1,822,000. (40
U. S. C. 174b-l; 174c; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,320,400
Estimate 1959, $1,822,000
Program and Financing

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

7
7

7
7

7
7

$3, 422

$3, 670

$3, 771

_

$23, 952
9, 419

$25,560
9,440

$26, 400
10,300

Total personal services
_ __
Other contractual services: General
annual repairs_ _._ ___
Supplies and materials
___ _ _
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

33,371

35, 000

36,700

2,896
1,134

2,500
1, 000
1,800

2, 500
1,000
1,800

37, 401

40, 300

42,000

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees.

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Average salary of ungraded positions
01

Program by activities:
Maintenance and operation of the Senate Office Buildings (total obligations).

$1,144,077

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

121, 523

New obligational authority

$1,407,400

$1,822,000
07

1,407,400

1,265, 600

1, 822,000

08
11

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

Total obligations
New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Reappropriation

___

$1, 265, 600

$1,320,400
87,000

$1,822,000

HOUSE

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Average GS grade and salary. _
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things..
Communication services..
__
Other contractual services:
Elevator repairs and improvementsFurniture repairs__
General annual repairs
Annual painting.. . .
Laundry
Ice
_ ___
... _ . __
Maintenance, air-conditioning systems
Rebuild four central-station airconditioning units, First Street
wing, Senate Office Building. _ . .
Repairs to roof
_____
Replacement of lighting fixtures
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
_. _ _
08 Supplies and materials.
09 Equipment:
Annual rugs and floor coverings
Annual tools, machinery, and miscellaneous
Annual furniture and furnishings. _.
Revolving arm chairs for offices
Typists chairs for offices..
File cabinets._ . . . . . . . ._
_ ...
New typewriter desks (50) and flat
top desks (10)
Dust collector for carpenter shop
Reception arm chairs . . . _ _ .__
Foldingchairs-- . . . _ . . .
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions._
02
03
04
07

Total obligations

218
217
6.4

$4, 671
$3, 545

6. 0

$4, 562
$3, 469

361
361
6. 0

$4, 670
$3, 623

$706, 530
11, 068
111,392

$905, 600
15, 000
150, 000

$1, 212, 300
15, 000
205, 700

828, 990
575
84
268

1, 070,600

27,607
2, 954
7, 962
31, 567
4, 719
2,289

2,500
2, 500
15,000
27,000
6, 500
2, 000

5, 000
5, 000
15, 000
37, 000
10,000
3,000

9, 355

9,700

9, 700

24, 850
130, 766

45,000
87, 000

2, 381
25, 433

2, 500
30,000

3, 800
35,000

11, 744

25,000

25,000

2, 772
4,124
3, 562
1, 327
10, 782

14, 600
2, 500
3, 650
1, 350
5, 000

3, 000
5, 000
3, 650
1,350
5,000

5, 980
3, 986

6,000

49,000
1, 407, 400

1, 822, 000

(new

440000—58




3

obligational

$1,258,000

$1,283,400

1, 258,000

1,283,400

364
364

364
364

16,997

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1,149,900

Object Classification

GARAGE

1957 actual

Appropriation
authority)

1959 estimate

$1,132,903

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available..

6, 000
6, 000
3,500
70,000

Program by activities:
Maintenance and operation of the
House Office Buildings (total obligations)

1958 estimate

137,000

Program and Financing

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Legislative garage: For maintenance, repairs, alterations, personal
and other services, and all other necessary expenses, [$40,300]
$42,000. (40 U. S. C. 185a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $40,300
Estimate 1959, $42,000

Program by activities:
Maintenance and operation of legislative garage (total obligations)

BUILDINGS

House Office Buildings: For maintenance, including equipment,
waterproof wearing apparel, uniforms or allowances therefor as
authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954, as amended (5 U. S. C.
2131), miscellaneous items, and for all necessary services,
[$1,258,000] $1,283,400. (40 U. S. C. 175; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,258,000
Estimate 1959, $1,283,400

1,433, 000

1,144, 077

LEGISLATIVE

361
280

OFFICE

$37,401

01

02
03
04
07

$42,000

40,300

42,000

5. 5

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Elevator modernization and improvements . . .
Laundry. ...
08 Supplies and materials.
09 Equipment:
Special equipment
__
Storage boxes. _ __
_______
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions

ACQUISITION

__

$4, 540
$3,326

5.7

$4, 618
$3, 532

5. 7

$4, 705
$3, 594

$891, 782
3, 437
96, 282

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
__
Other contractual services:
Annual painting
______
Elevator repairs __
_ _
Maintenance, air-conditioning systems
__ __ __ _.
. . . __
General annual repairs. - _
Payment to employees' life insurance fund...
_
_
_
Replacement of revolving door, old

1959 estimate

$40,300

360
356

Average GS grade and salary.
Average salary of ungraded positions

Total obligations.

1958 estimate

1,099
38,500

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees

...

$981,100
2, 500
113,100

$998, 400
2, 500
118,100

991, 501
10
4

1, 096, 700
25
10
10

1,119, 000
25
10
10

41, 431
6, 424

40, 000
4, 955

52, 000
4, 955

10, 524
5, 599

13,100
10, 000

7,200
10,000

3, 265

3, 200

3,200

8, 000
31, 218
2, 844
35, 815

25, 000

30, 000

1,141
3,127

1,000
3, 000
53, 000

1,000
3,000
53, 000

1,132, 903

1, 258, 000

1, 283, 400

OF PROPERTY,
CONSTRUCTION AND
EQUIPMENT,
ADDITIONAL
HOUSE OFFICE
BUILDING

Acquisition of property, construction and equipment, additional
House Office Building: To enable the Architect of the Capitol, under
the direction of the House Office Building Commission, to continue
to provide for the acquisition of property, construction and equip-

34

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1959

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued

Program and Financing

Current authorizations—Continued
CAPITOL

BUILDINGS

AND

1957 actual
GROUNDS—Continued

ACQUISITION
OF PROPERTY,
CONSTRUCTION
AND
EQUIPMENT,
ADDITIONAL
HOUSE OFFICE
BUILDINQ—continued

ment of an additional fireproof office building for the use of the
House of Representatives, and other changes and improvements,
authorized by the Additional House Office Building Act of 1955 (69
Stat. 41, 42), [$7,500,000] $22,500,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $7,500,000
Estimate 1959, $22,500,000

Program by activities:
Operation and maintenance of the
Capitol Power Plant, its steam and
chilled water distribution systems
(total obligations)

$1,303,668

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation
authority)

(new

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,700,000

$1,769,000

1,700,000

1,769,000

71
69

75
75

632

obligational

1,304,300

Object Classification

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions

Program by activities:
1. Acquisition of property, protection,
maintenance, and demolition of
structures, and miscellaneous incidental expenses _
2. Construction and equipment of an
additional office building for the
House of Representatives
3. Changes, alterations, and remodeling, Old House Office Building
4. Changes, alterations, and remodeling, New House Office Building
5. Administration, miscellaneous, contingencies, and appurtenances

01
$2, 093, 516

$35,000

18,178,000

46,000,000

2, 271

1,957, 770

2,000,000

552

1, 825,000

2,000,000

76,800

650,000

225,000

3, 500,628

Total obligations

$30,850

1,327,489

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Appropriation
Contract authorization (indefinite) __ _
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Appropriation
Contract authorization (indefinite) _ _ .

22,641,620

50, 260,000

- 8 8 , 547,955

-47,327
-85,000,000

""-62,"405,"707

47,327
85,000,000

62,405, 707

12,145, 707

Contract authorization (indefinite)
Status of Unfunded Contract Authorization
Unfunded balance at beginning of year___
Unfunded balance at end of year.
Appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

$95,000,000
-85,000,000

$85, 000, 000
- 7 7 , 500, 000

$77, 500,000
-55,000,000

10,000,000

7, 500,000

10

Other contractual services:
Construction and equipment of an
additional office building for the
House of Representatives.
__
Changes, alterations, and remodeling, Old House Office Building. _.
Changes, alterations, and remodeling, New House Office Building..
Administration, miscellaneous, contingencies, and appurtenances
Lands and structures: Acquisition of
property, protection, maintenance
and demolition of structures, and
miscellaneous incidental expenses...

CAPITOL

$1, 327, 489

$18,178,000

$46, 000, 000

2,271

1, 957, 770

2,000, 000

552

1, 825, 000

2,000, 000

76. 800

650,000

225, 000

2,093, 516

30, 850

35,000

22, 641, 620

50, 260,000

POWER

PLANT

Capitol Power Plant: For lighting, heating, and power (including
the purchase of electrical energy), for the Capitol, Senate and House
Office Buildings, Supreme Court Building, Congressional Library
Buildings, and the grounds about the same, Botanic Garden, legislative garage, and for air-conditioning refrigeration not supplied from
plants in any of such buildings; for heating the Government Printing Office, Washington City Post Office, and Folger Shakespeare
Library, reimbursement for which shall be made and covered into
the Treasury; personal and other services, fuel, oil, materials, waterproof wearing apparel, and all other necessary expenses in connection
with the maintenance and operation of the plant, [$1,700,000]
$1,769,000. (40 U. S. C. 185; 42 Stat. 767; 46 Stat. 51, 588; 50
Stat. 10; 52 Stat. 892; 68 Stat. 803; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $4,205,000
Estimate 1959, $4,205,000




Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services:
Annual gas
Purchase of electrical energy
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs and alterations
... .
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
Advertising
...
Repairs and replacement, steam
tunnel.
Survey and study of Capitol Power
Plant and other facilities required
for expanded building program
08 Supplies and materials:
Miscellaneous annual supplies
Fuel
09 Equipment:
Replacement of bulldozer.
Purchase of air compressor
_
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations

[ADDITIONAL

3, 500, 628

Total obligations

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

71
70
7. 0

$5, 420
$4, 623

7.0

$5, 497
$5,144

7.0

$5,601
$5,268

$325,324
13,087
41,178

$355,800
20,000
52, 700

$396, 800
20,000
52, 700

379, 589
78

428,500
100
10
10

469,500
100
10
10

128
584,118

200
653,400

200
790,000

37, 410

36,000

41,000

1,159

1,230
50

1,230
50

107,000
50,000
17,500
382,000

21,000
386,900

24,000

24,000
7,000
28,000

1,700,000

1,769, 000

15,098
286,088

22, 500,000

Object Classification
07

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees

1,303,668

OFFICE B U I L D I N G

FOR THE

UNITED

STATES

SENATE]

[Construction and equipment of additional Senate Office Building: To enable the Architect of the Capitol, under the direction of
the Senate Office Building Commission, to continue to provide for
the construction and equipment of a fireproof office building for the
use of the United States Senate, in accordance with the provisions
of the Second Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1948 (62 Stat. 1029),
$2,846,000: Provided, That no part of the funds herein appropriated
shall be obligated or expended for construction of the rear center
wing of said building, from the ground floor up, provided for under
the building plans heretofore approved by such Commission: Provided further, That the amount of $20,600,000 fixed by the Second
Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1948 (62 Stat. 1029) as the limit of
cost for construction and equipment of an additional office building
for the United States Senate is hereby increased by $2,846,000.]
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958; 71 Stat. 277.)
Appropriated 1958, $2,846,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Construction and equipment of an additional office building for the United
States Senate (total obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Appropriation
Contract authorization
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Appropriation.
Contract authorization (new)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$340,434

$3,815,765

-88,508
-1,310,199

-1,058,273

-$88,508

88,508

88,508

1,058,273

2,846,000

35

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
Status of Unfunded Contract Authorization
1957 actual
Unfunded balance at beginning of year
Contract authorization (new)

1958 estimate

$5,250,000

Appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization

Object Classification
1959 estimate

1957 actual
07

$2,846,000

1958 estimate

Other contractual services

1959 estimate

$250,000

2,846,000

5,250,000

EXTENSION OF THE CAPITOL
Object Classification
07

1
$340,434 |

Other contractual services

[FURNITURE

AND

Program and Financing
$3,815,765

FURNISHINGS,
ADDITIONAL
BUILDING]

1957 actual

SENATE

OFFICE

[Furniture and furnishings, additional Senate Office Building: To
enable the Architect of the Capitol, under the direction of the Senate
Office Building Commission, to carry out the provisions of the Act
of July 10, 1957 (Public Law 85-93, Eighty-fifth Congress), authorizing furniture and furnishings for the additional office building for
the United States Senate, authorized to be constructed and equipped
by the Second Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1948 (62 Stat. 1029),
$1,000,000, to remain available until expended.] (Supplemental
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,000,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Furniture and furnishings for additional
Senate Office Building (total obligations)—
Financing:
Appropriation
thority)

Program by activities:
Extension, reconstruction, and replacement of the central portion of the
Capitol, and other related and appurtenant improvements (total obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Appropriation
...
Contract authorization (indefinite) - _
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Appropriation
Contract authorization, _ _

$2,123,156

$11,613,574

$3,225,000

- 4 , 961, 730
-37,600,000

-14,838, 574
-25,600,000

- 3 , 225,000
-25,600,000

14,838, 574
25,600,000

3, 225,000
25,600,000

25,600,000

Status of Unfunded Contract Authorization
Unfunded balance at beginning of year_ .
Unfunded balance at end of year_

1958 estimate

$37,600,000
-25,600,000

Appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization
__

12,000,000

1959 estimate

au-

Other contractual services

$2,123,156

CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENTS,

CAPITOL

SENATE

OFFICE

BUILDING]

[Remodeling, Senate Office Building: Toward carrying out the
provisions of the Act of July 10, 1957 (Public Law 85-95, Eightyfifth Congress), authorizing the enlargement and remodeling of
Senators' suites and structural, mechanical, and other changes and
improvements in the existing Senate Office Building to provide
improved accommodations for the United States Senate, $250,000,
to be expended by the Architect of the Capitol under the direction
of the Senate Office Building Commission and to remain available
until expended: Provided, That the funds herein appropriated may
be expended only for such work as can be done by the force of the
Architect of the Capitol, except that not to exceed $20,000 of such
funds may be expended on a personal service contract basis for
consulting architectural and engineering services for preparation of
preliminary plans and estimates of cost heretofore completed.]
(Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $250,000

Program by activities:
1. Boiler plant changes and related improvements-._ _ .
2. New tunnel, steam lines, chilled
water lines, and related improvements
_
3. Electrical conversion, 25-eycle alternating current and direct current
to 60-cycle alternating current
4. Refrigeration plant changes, improvements, and additions
5. Electrical substation, construction
and equipment-.- . _ _ _
6. Engineering, administration, and
contingencies.. .

1957 actual




au-

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$20,633

$9,408

108,070

45, 209

$35,000

11,416

1,339,910

1,345,000

20,467

75,827

262

._

50, 228

70, 000

30,925

1, 540, 354

1, 410,925

- 2 , 221, 279
-730,000

-680,925
-730,000

2, 221, 279
730,000

680,925
730,000

730, 000

Status of Unfunded Contract Authorization

1959 estimate

Unfunded balance at beginning of year-..
C on tract authorization (new)
Unfunded balance at end of year
Appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.
$250,000

250,000

PLANT

-1,236, 355
-1,196, 000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Appropriation
Contract authorization
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Appropriation- Contract authorization
Contract authorization (new)

1958 estimate

POWER

211,076

Total obligations

Program and Financing

(new obligational

$3, 225,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Financing:
Appropriation
thority)
-

$11,613, 574

1,000,000

$1,000,000

Program by activities:
Enlargement and remodeling of Senators' suites and structural, mechanical, and other changes and improvements in the existing Senate Office
Building, to provide improved accommodations for the United States
Senate (total obligations)

$25,600,000
-25,600,000

Object Classification

Equipment

[REMODELING,

$25,600,000
-25,600,000

$1,000,000

Object Classification
09

1959 estimate

Contract authorization (indefinite—
new) _ _
.

07
(new obligational

1958 estimate

$1,196,000
730,000
-730,000

$730,000

$730,000

-730,000

-730,000

$1, 540,354

$1,410,925

1,196,000

Object Classification
07

Other contractual services

$211,076

36

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
CAPITOL

BUILDINGS

CAPITOL BUILDING,

SENATE

AND

GROUNDS—Continued

AND

LIBRARY

BUILDINGS AND

STRUCTURAL

HOUSE

ROOFS A N D

CHAMBERS

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Reconstruction of roofs and skylights
over Senate and House wings and remodeling Senate and House chambers,
Capitol Building (total obligations)...

1959 estimate

-13,518
6,604

Structural and mechanical care: For the necessary expenditures
for mechanical and structural maintenance, including minor improvements, equipment, supplies, waterproof wearing apparel, and
personal and other services, [$774,200] $747,400, of which not to
exceed [$28,500] $20,000 shall be available for expenditure without
regard to section 3709 of the Revised Statutes, as amended. (2
U. S. C. 141; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $774,200
Estimate 1959, $747,400

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Mechanical and structural maintenance, Library buildings and grounds
(total obligations)

Appropriation
authority)

(new

$6,914

_

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$774,200

$747,400

774,200

747,400

$782,224

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

Object Classification
Other contractual services

CARE

Program and Financing

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

07

GROUNDS

MECHANICAL

$6,914

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance no longer available.

1958 estimate

AND

17, 776

obligational

800, 000

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees

RECONSTRUCTION,

REPAIR, ALTERATION,
C A P I T O L GROUNDS

AND

IMPROVEMENTS,

1957 actual

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions _
01

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate
04
07

Program by activities:
Reconstruction, repair, alteration and
improvement of the areas of the Capitol Grounds located above and in the
vicinity of the legislative garage (total
obligations)..

$30,661

$19,484

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward.
Unobligated balance carried f o r w a r d —

-50,145
19,484

-19,484

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

Object Classification
02
04
07

$230
5
30,426

Total obligations

SENATE

$19,484

30,661

Travel
. ... ... .
Communication services
Other contractual services

19,484

RESTAURANTS

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Repairs, improvements, and equipment
to provide improved facilities for the
Senate restaurants, Capitol Building
(total obligations)
_
. .

$19,300

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance no longer available .

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

-19,330
30

08
09

10
11

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

59
59

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services
Total personal services
Communication services
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs
Annual painting
Maintenance and repairs, airconditioning and refrigeration
systems
Maintenance and repairs, elevators.
Equip part of bookstacks with map
cases, annex
Equip part of deck for bookshelving, annex
Installation of floor tile, both buildings
Pointing exterior stonework, both
buildings
Repairs to mosaic ceilings and floor
tile and marble floor tile, main
building
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
Air-conditioning Coolidge Auditorium, main building
Installation of stairways and doors,
5th floor, annex (reading rooms
to deck 12)
Plumbing renewals in public toilets.
Replacement of pressure reducing
valves, annex
Plaster repairs and renewals, both
buildings
Survey and study to provide improved illumination, main and
annex buildings
Roof repairs and replacements,
both buildings
Replacement of 2 dumbwaiters,
main building
Repairs to leaded stained glass skylights, main building
Elevator modernization and improvements
Supplies and materials
Equipment:
Floor scrubbing machine
Replace fire gongs, main building...
Fumigation vault, annex
Electric paper baler
Care of grounds
Grants, subsidies, and contributions-.
Total obligations

$3,950
$5,034

$4,018
$5, 201

$268,080
74, 497

4. 5

$286,100
81,100

$304, 500
85,100

342, 577
33

367, 200

389, 600

10, 366
15, 520

18,300
15,000

18,300
20,000

9,349
3,929

10,000
5,000

7,500
5,000

26, 724

30,000

20,000

95,174

85,000

85,000

24,178

29,400

28,000

9,319

15,000

15,000

1,324

10,000

20,000

835

900

$3,840
$4,601

4.5

1,000
34,000
5,000
8,000
22,000
6,000
20,000

91,754

110,000
12,000
18,500

111, 449
19,000

15,336
1,960
1,666
782,224

17, 500
1,400

17,500
4,000

10,000
19,000

1, 500
20,000

774, 200

747,400

Object Classification
07
09

Other contractual services.
Equipment.
Total obligations.




$5, 717
13,583
19,300

FURNITURE

AND

FURNISHINGS

Furniture and furnishings: For furniture, partitions, screens,
shelving, and electrical work pertaining thereto and repairs thereof,

37

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
office and library equipment, apparatus, and labor-saving devices,
[$67,0001 $89,800. (2 U. S. C. 141; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $67,000
Estimate 1959, $89,800
Program and Financing

Object Classification
1957 actual

Program by activities:
Furniture and furnishings for the Congressional Library buildings (total
obligations)

1958 estimate

$73,813

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees

1959 estimate

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions-

$3, 897
$4, 014
$181,934
2,982
32,989

$193, 900
3,000
33, 500

$200, 400
3,000
36, 500

217, 905
71
126
20
293

230, 400
150
50
100
100
300

239, 900
150
50
100
100
300

115

5,200
100

5,200
100

1,187

(new

obligational

$67,000

67,000

75,000

$89,800

89,800

Object Classification
07

09

Other contractual services:
Maintenance and repair, office machines and devices
Refinishing central desk, main
reading room, main building
Resurfacing desk tops, main reading room, main building
Equipment:
Annual office furniture, equipment,
and office machines
Typewriter replacements
Movable partitions
Visible file cases for serial record
Recarpeting rare-book room and
chief assistant librarian's office. __
60-cycle alternating current electric
fans for main building
Refurnishing study facilities, deck
" D , " main building
Electric adding rjaachines
Microfilm reading machines
Replacement of rugs, congressional
reading room, main building
Composing machines and related
equipment for card division
Card cabinets for copyright office. _

08
$9,064

$9, 500

$9, 500
6,000

30,000
10,000
10,000
1, 225

28,115
9,958
5,689

30,000
15,000
10,000
1,225
3,375
14,700

2,250
1,225
1, 700

67,000

EXPENSES

Program and Financing

Appropriation
authority).

(new




obligational

$248,404

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$275,500

$385,500

275,500

385, 500

5,196
253,600

OF

600
10,000
15, 400
100
13,000

600
100,000
10,000
15, 400
100
13, 500

275, 500

385, 500

GREENHOUSES

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Demolition and removal of existing
greenhouses and other structures from
square 576 west in the District of
Columbia, and construction in lieu
thereof, of new greenhouses and other
necessary structures at the Botanic
Garden nursery (total obligations)

Salaries and expenses: For all necessary expenses incident to
maintaining, operating, repairing, and improving the Botanic
Garden and the nurseries, buildings, grounds, collections, and
equipment pertaining thereto, including personal services (including
not to exceed $3,000 for temporary labor without regard to the
Classification Act of 1949, as amended); waterproof wearing
apparel; not to exceed $25 for emergency medical supplies; traveling
expenses including streetcar fares, not to exceed $275; the prevention and eradication of insect and other pests and plant diseases by
purchase of materials and procurement of personal services by
contract without regard to the provisions of any other Act; purchase
and exchange of motor trucks; purchase and exchange, maintenance,
repair, and operation of a passenger motor vehicle; purchase of
botanical books, periodicals, and books of reference, not to exceed
$100; all under the direction of the Joint Committee on the Library;
[$275,500] $885,500: Provided, That no part of this appropriation
shall be used for the distribution, by congressional allotment, of
trees, plants, shrubs, or other nursery stock. (40 U. S. C. 216;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 7 5 , 5 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 3 8 5 , 5 0 0

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

544
11,"324"

1957 actual

19,800

BOTANIC GARDEN

Program by activities:
Maintenance and operation of the
Botanic Garden (total obligations)

$4,020
$4, 599

Program and Financing

Current authorizations:

1957 actual

4.0

Relocation of greenhouses, Botanic Garden: To enable the Architect
of the Capitol, under the direction of the Joint Committee on the Library,
to provide for the relocation of greenhouses in accordance with the
provisions of the Act of August 6, 1956 (70 Stat. 1068), $587,000, to
remain available until expended.
Estimate 1959, $ 5 8 7 , 0 0 0

1,100

73,813

$3, 958
$4, 415

4.J0

248, 404

RELOCATION

5,449
4,973

AND

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
Rents and utility services
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs
Laundry
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
:
Repairs to main conservatory
Supplies and materials
Equipment: Botanic Garden stock...
Annual care of grounds
Grants, subsidies, and contributions Total obligations

10, 565

Total obligations

SALARIES

1959 estimate

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

1957 actual

Appropriation
authority)

1958 estimate

$587,000

Financing:
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

587,000

Object Classification
07

Other contractual services _ .

$587,000

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
The Library of Congress, established in 1800, is not only
the library of the Congress itself, but is also the principal
general library of the United States Government. The
Library's first obligation is to the Congress; the second, to
other agencies of the Government; and the third, to other
libraries, scholars, investigators, and the genera] public.
Its collections are comprehensive and varied, and include
outstanding collections of books, periodicals, newspapers,
documents of the national governments of the world,
literature in the Oriental languages, etc., and manuscripts,
maps, music, motion picture films, sound recordings, prints,
and photographs. In addition to maintenance of the collections and the rendering of the general and basic services
connected therewith, including the Legislative Reference
Service, certain specialized functions are performed;
registration of copyrights, catalog card distribution, and
the service of books in raised characters and talking books
to the blind. In terms of these broad fields of activity

38

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS—Continued
comparative obligations (including only those chargeable
to annual appropriations) for 1957 and estimated for 1958
and 1959 are:
1957 actual

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$963,002
2,007,505
1,354,628
789,098

$1,065,125
2,268,795
1, 516, 521
854,457

$1,045,672
2,405,971
1, 554,936
866,993

719,567

754,588

770,836

5,833,800

6,459,486

6,644,408

1,066,675

1,200,000

1,257,609

1,176,662
1,486,656
1,065,369

1,272,655
1,620,000
1,125,000

1,274,056
1,777,535
1,355,000

3, 728,687

4,017,655

4,406, 591

10,629,162

11,677,141

12,308,608

General and basic services:
Acquisition of library materials
Organization of the collections
Reader and reference services
Maintenance and protective services
Executive direction and general administrative services
Total general and basic services
Special service to the Congress: Legislative
Reference Service
Specialized services:
Copyright
Catalog card distribution service
Books for the blind

-

Total specialized services
Total obligations

In addition to funds appropriated annually by Congress,
there are also available a number of gift and trust funds,
and working funds.
Estimates for the physical equipment, maintenance, and
operation of the Library buildings are carried under the
request of the Architect of the Capitol.
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Library
of Congress, not otherwise provided for, including development and
maintenance of the Union Catalogs; custody, care, and maintenance
of the Library Buildings; special clothing; and expenses of the
Library of Congress Trust Fund Board not properly chargeable to the
income of any trust fund held by the Board; [$5,875,000J $6,154,408.
(2 U. S. C. 131-166; 5 U. S. C. 150; 17 U. S. C. 1-215; 20 U. S. C.
91; 28 U. S. C. 921; 31 U. S. C. 588, 589; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 5 , 8 7 5 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, « $ 6 , 1 5 4 , 4 0 8
«Includes $118,479 for activities previously carried under "Salaries and expenses,"
Copyright Office, Library of Congress. The amounts obligated in 1957 and 1958 are
shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Acquisition of library materials
2. Organization of the collections
3. Reader and reference services
4. Maintenance and protective services.
5. Executive direction and general administrative services

Financing:
Comparative transfers from (—) ''Salaries and expenses, Copyright Office,"
Library of Congress
Unobligated balance no longer available.
(new

1959 estimate

$597,984
2,268,795
1, 516, 521
854,457

$605,672
2,355,971
1,554,936
866,993

obligational

719, 567

754, 588

770,836

5,419,287

Total obligations

Appropriation
authority)

$548,489
2,007, 505
1,354, 628
789,098

1958 estimate

5,992,345

6,154,408

-110,192
1,498

-117,345

5,310, 593

5,875,000

6,154,408

Personal services and incidental expenses for basic operations are financed from this appropriation.
1. Acquisition of library materials.—The development
of the Library's collections is planned; materials are procured by purchase, gift, exchange, copyright deposit,
transfer, and official deposit; and materials are selected
for addition to the permanent collections. The objective for 1959 is to continue improvement in acquisitions
procedures and in exchange relations with institutions in
the more important areas of the world. The collections
totaled 36,118,639 items as of June 30, 1957, and consisted of 11,057,773 books and pamphlets; 15,469,572
manuscript pieces, and 9,591,294 maps, pieces of music,




reels of microfilm, photographs, and other miscellaneous
items. Of the items received, about 1,000,000 are added
to the permanent collections annually. Those received
from various sources in 1957 and estimated for 1958 and
1959 are as follows:
Description
Purchase
Deposit by virtue of law:
Copyright
Other
Transfer from Federal agencies
Official donation from State and local agencies
Exchange
Gift from individual and unofficial sources . .
Total.

1957 actual
518,221

1958 estimate
550,000

1959 estimate
550,000

356,263
550,463
2, 517,324

361,607
550,000
2, 250,000

366,951
550,000
2, 250,000

109,175
455,844
796,031

100,000
450,000
1,000,000

100,000
450,000
1,000,000

5,303,321

5,261,607

5,266,951

2. Organization of the collections.—Library materials are
cataloged, classified, marked, and arranged; Library of
Congress catalogs and the main National Union Catalog
(card catalog) are maintained; special collections are
organized for use; and binding operations are controlled.
The objectives for this activity in 1959 are the cataloging
of a larger number of the materials received during the
year particularly those in Oriental languages; handling
receipts of special materials and organizing them for use
on a current basis; and improved cataloging methods and
procedures to assure the usefulness of the collections.
Selected performance data for 1957 and estimated for
1958 and 1959 (not including processing activities performed by the Reference Department and the Law Library) are as follows:
Description
Volumes fully cataloged and added to the
classified collection
Items otherwise organized for use (without
full cataloging)
Cards filed in catalogs
Volumes bound
Items repaired, cleaned, mounted, etc
Cards filed in the National Union Catalog
and its supplements

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

139,942

165,000

175,000

14,077
1,466,847
70,146
194,928

40,000
1,800,000
74,500
194,000

40,000
1,800,000
74,500
195,000

1,120,066

1,200,000

1,300,000

3. Reader and reference services.—Books and other library
materials are provided within and without the Library,
reference and bibliographic assistance is rendered, and
custody of the collections is maintained. The objectives
for 1959 include adequate and improved service to readers
during the 52 hours of full service and the 26 hours of
limited service weekly; service in the New Senate Office
Building; and improved organization of material through
the preparation of bibliographies, checklists, indexes, and
other finding aids. The workload in all major activities
is expected to increase in 1958 and 1959, as follows.'
Description
General reader and reference service:
Books and pamphlets served
Other units of material served
Units issued on loan
Reference inquiries answered
Reference letters
Law library reader and reference service:
Books and pamphlets served
Reference inquiries answered

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1,258,508
615,605
200,935
457,789
64,735

1,300,000
675,000
210,000
475,000
70,000

1,300,000
675,000
215,000
480,000
75,000

325,478
74,770

350,000
78,000

365,000
80,000

4. Maintenance and protective services.—A staff of 191,
including 82 part-time charwomen, preserves, cleans, and
maintains the two library buildings, collections, and
grounds; operates telephone switchboards, elevators,
check stands, and motor vehicles; procures and maintains
furniture, office supplies, housekeeping materials, and
miscellaneous equipment; assigns space; and operates the
receiving and stockrooms. The guard force staff of 76
is necessary to prevent fire and theft, to maintain order,
and to provide regular inspections of all areas in both
buildings in which is assembled one of the greatest accumulations of national treasures in the world.

39

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1,024
42
1, 057
1,117

1, 038
42
1, 071
1,131

985
38
1, 006
1, 070
6.0

Personal services:
Permanent positions.
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$4, 880
$3, 091

6. 0

$4, 896
$3,152

6.0

$4, 947
$3,152

$4, 586, 544
109, 414
89, 643

5, 048, 495
1, 300
850
51, 950
32, 500
464,180
40, 298
26, 800
324, 972
1, 000

5,165, 670
1, 300
850
55, 550
34,900
493, 741
42, 798
26, 800
1, 750
330, 049
1,000

5, 419, 287

Total obligations

$4, 967, 563
118, 348
79, 759

4, 785, 601
1, 498
528
52,142
32, 832
465,136
44,268
36, 011
1, 271

Total personal services.
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things.
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions .
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities ....

$4, 850, 388
118, 348
79, 759

5, 992, 345

1957 actual

SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Copyright
Office, including publication of the decisions of the United States
courts involving copyrights, [$1,390,000] $1,274,056. (2 U. S. C.
181, 186, 189, 140, 150; 17 U. S. C. 1-215; 31 U. S. C. 588, 589;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,390,000
Estimate 1959, « $1,274,056
° Excludes $118,479 for activities transferred to "Salaries and expenses," Library of
Congress. The amounts obligated in 1957 and 1958 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$283,151
270,340

$312,814
293,412

$327,089
308,330

290,100
121,052

312, 533
127,748

316, 646
130, 594

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Receiving and accounting for applications, fees, and correspondence...
2. Examining copyright applications
3. Indexing and cataloging materials
received
4. Reference services
5. Printing the catalog of copyright
entries and bulletins of decisions...
6. General supervision and legal services

Financing:
Comparative transfers to "Salaries and
expenses," Library of Congress
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

30,000

32, 500

196,148

158,897

1,176,662

Total obligations

32,838
179,181

1,272,655

1,274,056

110,192
693

117,345

1,287, 547

1,390,000

1, 274,056

The Copyright Office is responsible for recording copyright claims, assignments and renewals, for supplying
copyright information to the public, for collecting and
accounting for copyright fees, and for printing complete
and indexed catalogs for each class of copyright entries.
The office is conducted as a business operation. The
amount requested for personal services is substantially
counterbalanced by fees received for services rendered
as indicated in the table which follows. In addition, the
value of books and other library materials deposited in
accordance with the Copyright Act and transferred to
the Library of Congress is credited to the copyright
operation. The income and costs for 1957 and estimates
for 1958 and 1959 are as follows:




$919,390
558, 661

1,435,001

1,456,526

1,478,051

1,088,140
88,522

1,127,372
145,283

1,120, 442
153,614

1,176,662

1,272,655

1,274,056

Salaries
Other costs
Total costs

1959 estimate

The program and performance under each of the
activities described are predicated on an estimated 232,581
copyright registrations during 1959, an estimated 229,194
during 1958, and aa actual 225,807 during 1957.
1. Receiving and accounting for applications, etc.—Materials received by the Copyright Office are assembled and
routed; accounts are maintained for all moneys received;
records relating to the registration of copyrights are filed;
and materials are deposited in accordance with the Copyright Act. Performance data are as follows:

6,154, 408

OFFICE

$906,001
550. 525

Total income

1957 actual
225,807
518,189

Registrations
Mail received and dispatched

COPYRIGHT

1958 estimate

$892,612
542,389

Income:
Fees applied
Estimated value of materials deposited

1958 estimate
229,194
525,961

1959 estimate
232,581
533,733

2. Examining copyright applications.—All applications
and deposits are examined before issuance of registration
certificates or recording of documents to determine
whether the provisions of the Copyright Act have been
satisfied. Performance data are as follows:
1957 actual
290,467
233,941

Cases and documents examined
Registrations and recordation of documents.

1958 estimate
294,824
237,450

1959 estimate
299,181
240,959

3. Indexing and cataloging materials received.—The Register of Copyrights is required to print complete and
indexed catalogs of all items registered. The catalog
entries prepared by the Copyright Office are made available in part to the Library for its general operations.
Registrations cataloged are shown under No. 1 above.
4. Reference services.—The Copyright Office makes available to the public, information concerning the provisions of
the Copyright Act, including procedures, policies, and
rulings; information concerning registrations is furnished
on a fee basis. Obtaining compliance with registration requirements is also part of this activity. Performance
data are as follows:
1957 actual
55,489
24,123

Titles searched
Letters and search reports written

1958 estimate 1959 estimate
56,321
57,153
24,485
24,847

5. Printing the catalog of copyright entries and bulletins
of decisions.—Catalogs for each class of copyright entries
and bulletins of copyright decisions are printed and made
available to the public.
6. General supervision and legal services.—The work includes legal services relating to the status and improvement of copyright law in its foreign as well as domestic
aspects.
Object Classification

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions.
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

238
237
258

234
233
254

236
229
256
5.9

$4, 685
$4, 220

$1,069, 726

6.0

$4, 717
$4,347

6.0

$4. 769
$4.347

18,414

$1,117, 557
500
9,315

$1,110, 627
500
9,315

1,088,140

1,127,372

1,120,442

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

40

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
COPYRIGHT
SALARIES

OFFICE—Continued

AND

EXPENSES—continued

Object Classification—Continued
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$4,175
1, 650
61, 988
8, 724
10, 003
1, 982

$4,000
8, 500
44,100
10, 900
5,000

$4,000
8, 500
52, 500
10, 900
5,000

72, 783

72, 714

1,176, 662

1, 272, 655

1, 274,056

1957 actual
02 Travel
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies amd materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations.

during the Eighty-fifth Congress, first session. It is
expected that there will be as many bills to be covered
during the Eighty-sixth Congress, first session. The
preparation of analytical and name indexes to an increasing number of committee hearings is to be continued.
3. Reference files, bibliographic and congressional reader
service.—-Reference files, containing clippings, pamphlets,
and documents are maintained as the basis for reply to the
majority of inquiries; researchers are supplied with bibliographic and reference tools; selective and comprehensive
bibliographies are prepared for Members and committees
of Congress; and reader services are provided by the
congressional reading room. During 1957, a total of
70,324 reference file items was processed, 11,763 bibliographic entries prepared, 39,531 published items acquired
and processed, and 3,455 readers served.
Object Classification

LEGISLATIVE

REFERENCE

SALARIES

AND

SERVICE

1957 actual

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary to carry out the
provisions of section 203 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of
1946, as amended (2 U. S. C. 166), [$1,200,000] $1,257,609: Provided, That no part of this appropriation may be used to pay any
salary or expense in connection with any publication, or preparation
of material therefor (except the Digest of Public General Bills), to
be issued by the Library of Congress unless such publication has
obtained prior approval of either the Committee on House Administration or the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.
(2 U. S. C. 186, 189, 150, 164, 164a, 165, 166; Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated

1958, $1,200,000

Estimate

1959,

$1,257,609

Program and Financing

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation
authority)

(new

$857,959
60,814

1958 estimate

obligational

163
158
163

171
166
171

8. 9

Average GS grade and salary. _
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

02
04
06
07
08
11

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$976,762
80,406

103,338
44, 564

89, 787
53,045

90,975
53, 746

1,200,000

1, 257, 609

1, 200,000

1, 257, 609

712
1,067, 387

9.1

$6, 881
$3, 863

9.0

$6, 875
$3,863

$1, 020,074
406
5,347

$1,080, 502
500
9,537

$1,134, 595
500
9,537

1, 025, 827
856
260
17, 412
14, 773
7,547

1,090, 539
1,000
200
13,000
18,627
5, 500
71,134

1,144, 632
1,000
200
13,000
18, 627
5, 500
74, 650

1, 066, 675

Total personal services
Travel . _
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

$1,031,588
81,300

$6, 702

1, 200, 000

1, 257, 609

1959 estimate

1,066, 675

Total obligations.

1959 estimate

158
152
158

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year

Total obligations
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Research and analysis.
2. Preparation of indexes and digests
3. Reference files, bibliographic, and
congressional reader service
4. Administration

1958 estimate

EXPENSES

DISTRIBUTION
SALARIES

OF C A T A L O G
AND

CARDS

EXPENSES

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the preparation and distribution of catalog cards and other publications of
the Library, [$1,620,000] $1,777,585. (2 U. S. C. 181, 186, 189,
140, 150; 81 U. S. C. 588, 589; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 , 6 2 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 , 7 7 7 , 5 3 5
Program and Financing

The Legislative Reference Service prepares research
reports, digests, etc., in answer to inquiries from Members
and committees of Congress.
1. Research and analysis.—The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 lists 19 specific fields of congressional
concern in which top-level research by senior specialists
is authorized. These correspond in general to the spheres
of committee activity. The following 12 fields are now
covered by one or more senior specialists: International
trade, international affairs, taxation and fiscal policy,
American government and public administration, conservation, American public law, labor, engineering and
public works, agriculture, price economics, social welfare,
and transportation and communications. Available to
the Members and committees are also the preparation of
charts, translations, reading lists, information in report
form or otherwise, and answers to spot reference inquiries.
In 1957, a total of 60,443 congressional inquiries was
answered. Since 1950, the average annual increase in the
number of inquiries has been 5.5%. The total of inquiries
for 1958 is estimated at 64,500; and for 1959, 67,000.
2. Preparation of indexes and digests.—The Digest of
Public General Bills covered 9,232 bills and resolutions




1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Supplying cards for the Library of
Congress
2. Supplying cards for other libraries
3. Preparation, printing, and distribution of publications related to
cataloging
4. Preparation, printing, and distribution of the National Union Catalog.
5. Preparation, printing, and distribution of the Subject Catalog

(new

1959 estimate

$268,610
959,978

$278,170
1,046, 421

123,617

94, 352

99,864

160, 510

241,610

296,565

obligational

52,756

55,450

56,515

1,486,656

Total obligations.
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation
authority)

$242,030
907, 743

1958 estimate

1,620,000

1,777,535

1,620,000

1,777,535

444
1, 487,100

The card division sells copies of the Library's printed
catalog cards and publications. It maintains a stock of
over 130,000,000 catalog cards representing some 3,200,000
titles, and fills orders from approximately 9,000 regular
subscribers—mostly libraries—in the United States and
abroad. In 1957, about 97% of this appropriation was
recovered in the form of receipts from card and publica-

41

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

tion sales. Receipts of $1,441,000 were deposited in miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury in 1957. The objectives for 1959 are meeting the increased demand for
catalog cards and maintaining a reasonable level of
service and economy, the continued expansion of the
National Union Catalog, and the printing of cards for
books in Chinese and Japanese.
1. Supplying cards for the Library of Congress.—The
number of cards supplied to the Library of Congress in
1957 was 4,087,673; estimated for 1958, 4,200,000; and
for 1959, 4,500,000.
2. Supplying cards for other libraries.—The number of
cards sold in 1957 was 26,953,659; estimated for 1958,
28,300,000; and for 1959, 29,700,000.
3. Preparation, printing, and distribution of publications
related to cataloging.—These publications are an integral
part of the cataloging activities of the Library of Congress
and include the Classification Schedules, lists of Subject
Headings, Rules for Descriptive Cataloging, Cataloging
Service Bulletins, and similar publications.
4. Preparation, printing, and distribution of the National
Union Catalog.—This catalog (a cumulative author list)
is issued monthly and cumulated quarterly and annually.
Subscribers also receive issues of Motion Pictures and
Films trips (quarterlies with annual cumulation), and
Music and Phonorecords (issued on a 6-month basis and
annual cumulation). There were 956 paid subscriptions
for all issues in calendar year 1957, and it is estimated
that there will be 970 subscriptions for 1958 and 1,000
for 1959. It is anticipated that 400 copies of the 1957
issue will be sold in 1958 and the same number in 1959.
5. Preparation, printing, and distribution of the Subject
Catalog.—This catalog is issued in 3 quarterly volumes
with an annual cumulation. There were 384 paid subscriptions for calendar year 1957. It is estimated that
there will be 400 paid subscriptions in 1958 and about
410 in 1959.

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$320,000

Program by activities:
Purchase of books and other library materials (total obligations)

$304,765

$336,908

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward

-21,485
-188
16,908

-16,908

300,000

320,000

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

320,000

This appropriation constitutes the only means of acquiring regular domestic trade publications (except for
copyright deposits) and many foreign trade publications,
both current and noncurrent, from approximately 100
countries or areas. The publications acquired by purchase constitute a most important part of the Library's
acquisitions although they represent only a small portion
of the material received annually. The objectives for
1959 are to continue at the present level the acquisition
of selected important foreign newspapers and periodicals;
the acquisition of important materials from critical areas;
the direct purchase of selected current titles on microfilm
as an economy measure in lieu of binding; and the microfilming of deteriorating materials as a necessary preservative measure.
Object Classification
1957 actual
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
07 Other contractual services..
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment (books and other library
materials)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$20,000
3,400
9,400
1,050
50

$20,000
3,400
9,400
1,050
50

$14,143
1,290
10,412
1,002
277,918

303,008

286,100

304,765

Total obligations

336,908

320,000

Object Classification

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
A verage salary of ungraded positions
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
11

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

215
210
218

223
218
226

204
195
207
4. 5

$4, 082
$4,485

4. 6

$4,109
$4,485

4. 5

$4,141
$4,485

$863, 511
3, 399

$903, 541
3,399

834, 041
3,496
1,123
38, 549
403
593,210
4, 710
11,124

866, 910
3,400
800
44,150
300
639, 565
3,089
5,500
56, 286

906, 940
3,400
800
44,150
300
754, 535
3,089
5, 500
58,821

1, 486, 656

Total obligations

GENERAL

1959 estimate

$795, 416
38, 625

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things.
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

INCREASE

1958 estimate

1,620, 000

OF T H E L I B R A R Y
INCREASE

OF

OF THE

1, 777, 535

CONGRESS

OF THE

LAW

LIBRARY

Increase of the law library: For expenses (except personal
services) necessary for acquisition of books, legal periodicals, and
all other material for the increase of the law library, $90,000, to
continue available during the next succeeding fiscal year. (2
U. S. C. 131, 132, 134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 144; Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $90,000
Estimate 1959, $90,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$90,000

Program by activities:
Purchase of books and other library
materials (total obligations)

$82,248

$102,733

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Recovery of prior year obligations.
Unobligated balance carried forward

-4,946
-35
12,733

-12,733

90,000

90,000

Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

90,000

LIBRARY

General increase of the Library: For expenses (except personal
services) necessary for acquisition of books, periodicals and newspapers, and all other material for the increase of the Library,
$320,000, to continue available during the next succeeding fiscal
year. (2 U. S. C. 131, 182, 132a; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $320,000
Estimate 1959, $320,000




INCREASE

This appropriation constitutes the only means of
acquiring law books published in the regular domestic
trade (except for copyright deposits) and many foreign
law books published in countries all over the world. The
legal publications acquired by purchase constitute a most
important part of the law library's acquisitions, although

42

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
INCREASE

OF T H E L I B R A R Y

INCREASE

OF THE

OF

CONGRESS—Continued

LAW

LIBRARY—CONTINUED

a substantial part of the annual receipts is received by
means other than purchase.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1959 estimate

$2,500
350
3,150

$2,500
350
3,150

78, 552

96,733

84,000

82,248

102,733

90,000

$504
136
3,056

02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
09 Equipment (books and other library
materials)
Total obligations-

BOOKS FOR

1958 estimate

THE

SUPREME

COURT

Books for the Supreme Court: For the purchase of books and
periodicals for the Supreme Court, to be a part of the Library of
Congress, and purchased by the Librarian of the Supreme Court,
under the direction of the Chief Justice, [$27,500] $80,000. (2
U. S. C. 181, 182, 185, 187, 139; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 7 , 5 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 3 0 , 0 0 0
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$27,500

$27,500

$30,000

27,500

27,500

30,000

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Purchase of books
(total obligations)
Financing:
Appropriation
authority)

and

(new

periodicals

obligational

Books and periodicals are purchased for the library of
the Supreme Court, which, though a part of the Library
of Congress, is administered under the direction of the
Chief Justice.
Object Classification

1957 actual
09

Equipment (books and other library
materials)
...

BOOKS
SALARIES

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$27, 500

$30,000

$27,500

FOR THE
AND

BLIND

EXPENSES

For salaries and other expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the Act entitled "An Act to provide books for the blind",
approved March 3, 1931 (2 U. S. C. 135a), as amended, [$1,125,000]
$1,355,000. (2 U. S. C. 131, 135a, 135a note, 135b, 186, 189, 140; 71
Stat. 630; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 , 1 2 5 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 , 3 5 5 , 0 0 0
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
1. Procurement and distribution
2. Cataloging, reference, and training
services
Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority)

1959 estimate

$975,269

$1,034,307

$1,263,543

90,100

90,693

91,457

1,065,369

1,125,000

1,355,000

1,125,000

1,355,000




2,112
1,067,481

Description
Talking books purchased:
(а) New titles
.
(б) Old titles rerecorded
Embossed books purchased: Titles—
Talking book machines:
Purchased
Repaired
Salvaged—scrapped
Records replaced

1957 actual

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

174
22
142

184
10
142

220
10
147

7,000
1,571
5,500
3,761

*

8,000
3,600
3,000
3,700

9,600
3,600
3,000
3,700

Objectives for 1959 include the procurement of more
titles of books, of more copies of the popular titles, of a
sufficient number of machines to equip newly registered
blind readers and to replace scrapped machines, and
continuation of the quality inspection program of books
and machines and of research in sound reproduction and
Braille printing.
2. Cataloging, reference, and training services.—Catalogs
of talking and Braille books are prepared and maintained,
including a Union Catalog of Hand Copied Books in
Braille which brings together a record of holdings of all
libraries. The Division also maintains a unique collection
(about 25,000 volumes) of books in Braille not available
elsewhere for loan in the United States. As one of the
regional libraries, it services the blind (approximately
6,000 readers) of the District of Columbia and of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.
During the period 1946 to 1956 the number of readers
throughout the country requiring catalogs from which to
select reading matter has grown from 30,088 to 58,197
and circulation from 801,797 units (volumes or containers)
to 1,451,090. During the period 1947-57, readers served
by the Library of Congress regional library for the blind
increased from 2,001 to 6,432, and the number of volumes circulated from 36,643 to 86,916. The number
of readers and circulation are expected to continue to
increase in 1958 and 1959. Inquiries are received concerning library and related services available to the blind.
Individuals throughout the Nation who are interested in
transcribing or proofreading Braille are trained and those
qualified are certified.
Public Law 85-308, approved September 7, 1957,
removed the $1,125,000 ceiling on the authorized appropriation.
Object Classification

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions .
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary

1958 estimate

1957 actual

The division for the blind is responsible for administering a national program to provide reading material for the
blind of the United States, Territories, and insular possessions. It has two closely related operations.
1. Procurement and distribution .—It provides books in
embossed characters, and talking books with their associated reproducers. The books are distributed through 28
regional libraries which assume responsibility for their
custody and circulation. The reproducers are distributed
through 55 State agencies. The maintenance and procurement of these books is shown in the following table:

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things.—
04 Communication services...
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment—
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
Total obligations

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

25
25
25

25
25
25

24
23
24
4.8

$4,412

5,0

$4,467

5.0

$4,522

$102,466

$111,687
1,000
430

$113,051
1,000
430

102,466
2,201
25
1,168
8,776
66,201
17, 246
867,286

113,117
4,350
100
1,000
12,600
78,850
14,400
893, 295
7.288

114,481
5,350
100
1,000
12, 600
78, 850
14,400
1,120,931
7,288

1,065,369

1,125,000

1,355,000

43

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
ORGANIZING

AND

MICROFILMING

THE

SALARIES

AND

PAPERS

OF THE

PRESIDENTS

EXPENSES

For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the Act of
August 16, 1957 (71 Stat. 868), $50,000, to remain available until
expended. (2 U. S. C. 181-166; 71 Stat. 368.)
Estimate 1959, $50,000

ALLOCATIONS

RECEIVED

FROM

OTHER

ACCOUNTS

NOTE.—Obligations incurred under allocations from other accounts are included in the
schedules of the parent appropriation as follows:
"Research and development," Department of the Air Force.
"Research and development," Department of the Army.
"Research and development," Department of the Navy.
"Salaries and expenses," National Science Foundation.
"International educational exchange activities," Department of State.
"Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund."

Program and Financing

Intragovernmental funds:
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

ADVANCES AND R E I M B U R S E M E N T S
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Organizing, arranging, indexing, and
microfilming (total obligations)

$50,000

Financing:
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

50,000

Public Law 85-147, approved August 16, 1957, authorizes an appropriation of $720,000 to remain available
until expended to arrange, index, and microfilm the papers
of the Presidents of the United States in the collections of
the Library of Congress to preserve their contents and to
make them more readily available for research. It is
proposed to start this program in 1959 on a plan which
calls for completion of the entire program in about 8
years. The objectives for the first year will be the determination of the best plan for arranging and indexing the
papers, to begin the preparation of an index, prepare a
small segment of the papers for microfilming, and initiate
the actual microfilming.

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Acquisition of library materials,
2. Organization of collections:
Department of Defense
Other agencies
3. Reference services:
Department of the Air Force
Other agencies
4. Legislative Reference Service:
Congressional committees
Other agencies

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$38,420

$337,706
23,000

3,096,407
245,651

2,591,000
125,689

94,302
3,263

82, 500

82, 500

3,387,160

Total obligations

337,706
23,000

2, 822,944
127, 523

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts
Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward....
Unobligated balance no longer available.

$16,488

277,591
23,117

3, 801, 752

3,159,895

3,012

3, 575,309

3,159,895

3,387,160

Total financing

226,443

3,613,554
85
-226,443
-3,048

3, 801, 752

3,159, 895

626
110
648
591

455
76
517
531

Object Classification

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate
10
10
10

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
5.4

Average GS grade and salary
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions-..
Positions other than permanent

Total personal services
02 Travel
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services. __
08 Supplies and materials
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions

39,190
500
50
1,440
1,000
5,125
150
2,545

Total obligations

50, 000

ADMINISTRATIVE

PROVISIONS

Appropriations in this Act available to the Library of Congress
for salaries shall be available for expenses of investigating the loyalty
of Library employees; special and temporary services (including employees engaged by the day or hour or in piecework); and services as
authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a).
Not to exceed ten positions in the Library of Congress may be
exempt from the provisions of appropriation Acts concerning the
employment of aliens during the current fiscal year, but the Librarian
shall not make any appointment to any such position until he has
ascertained that he cannot secure for such appointments a person in
any of the categories specified in such provisions who possesses the
special qualifications for the particular position and also otherwise
meets the general requirements for employment in the Library of
Congress.
Appropriations in this Act available to the Library of Congress
shall be available, in an amount not to exceed $11,000, when specifically authorized by the Librarian, for expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the function or activity for which the appropriation is made. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)




Average GS grade and salary
01

$4, 005
$38, 690
500

__

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11

565
94
643
755
7.3

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$5,146

7. 6

$5,195

8. 2

$5, 561

$2,681, 521
427, 815
100,493

3,323, 472
14, 410
550
16, 829
4,000
77, 847
97, 618
48, 705
20, 350
197, 971

2, 792, 930
10, 950
300
11,050
2,400
10,350
104, 523
39, 670
15,300
172,422

3,387,160

Total obligations

$2,451,317
281,955
59,658

3,209,829
10,339
1,060
20,415
5,238
9,205
62,022
47. 745
21, 307

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services.
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

$2,793,877
443, 518
86,077

3,801, 752

3,159,895

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
Current authorizations:
PRINTING

AND

BINDING

For authorized printing and binding for the Congress; not to exceed $7,500 for printing and binding for the Architect of the Capitol;
expenses necessary for preparing the semimonthly and session index
to the Congressional Record, as authorized by law (44 U. S. C. 182);
printing, binding, and distribution of the Federal Register (including the Code of Federal Regulations), as authorized by law (44
U. S. C. 309, 311, 311a); and printing and binding of Government
publications authorized by law to be distributed without charge to
the recipients; [$10,000,000] $10,700,000: Provided, That this appropriation shall not be available for printing and binding part 2
of the annual report of the Secretary of Agriculture (known as the
Yearbook of Agriculture): Provided further, That this appropriation
shall be available for the payment of obligations incurred under
the appropriations for similar purposes for preceding fiscal years.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriation 1958, $10,000,000

Estimate 1959, $10,700,000

44

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE-Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
PRINTING

AND

BINDING—Continued

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Printing, binding,
(total obligations)

and

$10,000,000

$10,700,000

9,200,000

Financing:
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1959 estimate

$9,200,000

distribution

1958 estimate

10,000,000

10,700,000

This appropriation covers authorized printing, binding'
and distribution of publications for the Congress, the
Federal Register, and Government publications authorized by law to be distributed without charge to the
recipients (67 Stat. 330).
Object Classification
1957 actual
06

1959 estimate

$10,000,000

$10,700,000

$9,200,000

Printing and reproduction

OFFICE

1958 estimate

OF S U P E R I N T E N D E N T
SALARIES

AND

OF

DOCUMENTS

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses of the Office of
Superintendent of Documents, including [personal services in accordance with the Classification Act of 1949, as amended, and] compensation of all employees [who shall be subject to the provisions
o f ] in accordance with the Act entitled "An Act to regulate and fix
rates of pay for employees and officers of the Government Printing
Office ,, , approved June 7, 1924 (44 U.-S. C. 40); traveling expenses
(not to exceed $1,500); price lists and bibliographies; repairs to
buildings, elevators, and machinery; and supplying books to depository libraries; [$3,175,000] $3,295,190. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriation 1958, $3,175,000
Estimate 1959, $3,295,190
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,853,447

$1,963,561

$2,036.396

382,397
534,298
216,204

411.109
563. 795
236,535

428, 777
584, 708
245,309

Total direct costs
Reimbursable costs:
2. Distribution for other agencies and
Members of Congress

2, 986,346

3,175,000

3, 295,190

67,352

65,200

65,200

Total program costs
5. Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations
of other years (unpaid undelivered orders), net (—)

3,053,698

3,240,200

3,360,390

purchased from the Public Printer to be placed on sale.
Acquisition costs are paid from sales receipts; hence no
appropriation is required for printing sales copies. By
law, the sale price is set at the cost of manufacture plus
50%. At the end of each year, excess receipts from
sales not required for purchasing additional publications
are turned into the Treasury Department as miscellaneous receipts. For 1957, earnings from the actual sale of
publications amounted to $2,900,312. It is estimated
that earnings for 1958 will be $3,100,000 and $3,300,000
for 1959. These earnings more than cover the appropriation required to finance the sales program.
A proportionate share of the overhead costs which accrue
to the Government Printing Office revolving fund, amounting to approximately $500,000 annually, is not financed
from appropriated funds but is recovered from the purchasers of Government publications. The number of sales
orders has been steadily increasing, and in the last 10 years
the volume of orders and the dollar value of publications
sold has more than doubled. The current public interest in
the Government's publishing program points to a continuing increase in the volume of orders.
2. Distribution for other agencies and Members of Congress.—The Superintendent of Documents maintains mailing lists, including the list for the Congressional Record,
and performs mailing operations upon the request of any
Government agency without reimbursement. Mailing
services for farmers7 bulletins, soil surveys, and other
publications which are allocated to Members of Congress
on a quota basis are also provided.
3. Depository library distribution.—Upon request, 1
copy of every Government publication is supplied to more
than 570 libraries which are designated depositories for
Government publications.
4. Cataloging and indexing.—This activity covers the
preparation and distribution of catalogs and indexes of all
publications issued by the Federal Government, the
principal series being the Monthly Catalog of United
States Government Publications and the Numerical List
and Schedule of Volumes.
5. Relation of costs to obligations.—The year-end balances of unpaid undelivered orders are as follows: 1956,
$3,847; 1957, $3,744; 1958, $3,744; 1959, $3,744.

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Direct costs:
1. Sales distribution
2. Distribution for other agencies and
Members of Congress
3. Depository library distribution
4. Cataloging and indexing

Total program (obligations)
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority)

SUMMARY OF WORKLOAD

1957
actual
2,458,463
1,242,540
$6,345,156
49,686,936

1958
estimate
2,650,000
1.350,000
$6,600,000
53,000,000

1959
estimate
2,800,000
1,450,000
$7,000,000
56,000,000

62, 683,245

66,000,000

69,000,000

4,719,894
36,613

5,200,000
40,000

5,500,000
43,000

Object Classification

-103
3,053,595

3,240,200

3,360,390

—67,352
4,157

-65,200

-65,200

2,990,400

3,175,000

3,295,190

The work programs of the Office of the Superintendent
of Documents are of a service nature, and hence there is no
control over the volume of work which is required by law.
1. Sales distribution,—Government publications are




Number of sales orders
Letters of inquiry. _
Amount of sales
Number of publications sold
Publications distributed for other Government
agencies
Number of publications distributed to depository
libraries
Number of publications cataloged and indexed

1957 actual

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

1959 estimate

490
36
521
489

501
36
531
500

480
37
506
480

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions _
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year.
4.5

Average GS grade and salary.
Average salary of ungraded positions

1958 estimate

$4,151
$3,174

4.5

$4,204
$3,174

4.5

$4,244
$3,174

_

$1,808, 777
136,398
63,278

$1,908, 630
133,000
23,000

$1,959,920
133,000
23,000

Total personal service obligations___

2,008, 453

2,064, 630

2,115,920

45

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
Object Classification—Continued
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,000, 630
1,500
1,200
56,000
11, 000
654, 320
82,000
222, 770
33,100
112, 480

$2,051,920
1,500
1,200
56,000
11,000
691, 920
82, 000
252, 770
33,100
113, 780

2, 986, 243

3,175,000

3, 295,190

63, 883
3,298
171

64, 000
1, 000
200

64, 000
1,000
200

67, 352

65, 200

65,200

3,053, 595

3, 240, 200

3,360,390

1957 actual
Direct obligations:
01 Personal services
.
02 Travel
03 Transporation of things
04 Communication services— _
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
Total direct obligations
Reimbursable obligations:
01 Personal services
04 Communication services
08 Supplies and materials
Total reimbursable obligations
Total obligations-

$1,944, 570
557
1,337
57, 996
6,658
654, 941
77, 549
222,347
20, 288

intendent of Documents are deposited to the revolving
fund, and the cost of these publications is paid therefrom.
All profits accruing from these transactions are deposited
in the Treasury of the United States and credited to
miscellaneous receipts (44 U. S. C. 63).
Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship is
derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
reflected in the following table:
1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$3,271,704
11,197,655
6,938,515
112,371
8,270,653

$3,271,000
10,400,000
6,559,515
100,000
10,999,959

$3,271,000
10,300,000
6,300,515
100,000
8,261,037

Total selected resources at
end of year
28,614,436
Selected resources at start of year ( - )

29,790,898
-28,614,436

31,330,474
-29,790,899

28,232,552
-31,330,474

Costs financed from obligations of other years,
net ( - )
Obligations incurred for costs of other years,
net..

1,176,462

1,539,576

Intragovernmental funds:
GOVERNMENT

PRINTING

1956
actual

1957
actual

$3,036,764
8,592,787
6,628,120
42,425
10,314,340

Selected resources at end of year:
Commodities for sale
Work in process
Supplies
Deferred charges
Unpaid undelivered orders

-3,097,922

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
OFFICE

REVOLVING

FUND

1957 actual

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Operating costs:
Printing and binding
Adjustment of costs included above
not requiring funding

$85, 518,246

$84, 642, 307

$81,093,238

115,447

100,000

100,000

Total operating costs
Depreciation included above (—)

86,633,693
-692, 988

84,742,307
-759,000

81,193,238
-800,000

Total operating costs, funded
Capital outlay: Purchase of equipment-.

85, 940, 705
2,191,083

83,983,307
2,220,000

80, 393,238
2, 920, 000

Total program costs, funded
Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations of
other years, net (—)
Obligations incurred for costs of other
years, net

88,131,788

86,203, 307

83,313,238

1,176, 462
89,308,250

87, 742, 883

1959 estimate

$2,191,083

$2,220,000

$2,920,000

28,066,397
57,874,307

27,000,000
56,983,307
1,043,834

25,839,000
54, 554,238

88,131,787

87,247,141

83,313,238

92, 787, 694
397,821
1,500,112

87,842,307
300,000

84,493,238
300,000
159,000

94,685,627

88,142,307

84, 952,238

- 6 , 553,840

-895,166

-1,639,000

1, 539, 576

Total program (obligations)

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Acquisition of equipment
Expense:
Materials applied
Other
Increase in selected working capital

1958 estimate

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Revenues and receipts:
Printing and binding operations
Proceeds from sales of equipment-..
Increase or decrease (—) in accepted
orders on hand
Total amounts becoming available.
Unobligated balance brought forward.
Total amounts available
Capital transfer (payment of earnings
to Treasury) (—)
Unobligated balance carried forward
Financing applied to program

pro-

Decrease in selected working capital
Total receipts from operations
Budget expenditures

-3,097,922

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings

80, 215, 316

Revenue Expense

84, 493,238
300,000

Nonoperating income or loss (—):
Proceeds from sale of equipment
Net book value of assets sold (—)

-

$92,787,694
86,633,693

92, 787, 694
397,821

87, 842,307
300,000

2, 604, 869

-797, 655

-100,000

95, 790, 384
12, 382, 407

87,344, 652
14, 260, 750

84, 693, 238
10, 761, 495

108,172, 791

101, 605, 402

95,454, 733

- 4 , 603,791
-14,260,750

-3,101,024
- 1 0 , 761,495

-3,200, 000
- 1 2 , 039, 417

89, 308,250

87, 742,883

80, 215, 316

Net gain from sale of equipment
Net income for the year
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of year
Prior year income adjustmentPayment of earnings to Treasury (—):
Sales of publications-__ _
Printing and binding operations
Retained earnings, end of year

$87,842,307
84,742,307

$84, 493,238
81,193,238

6,154,001

Net operating income

The Government Printing Office executes orders for
printing, binding, and blankbook work, placed by Congress and the various departments and independent
establishments of the Federal Government and furnishes,
on order, blank paper, inks, and similar supplies. Operations are subject to the authority of the Joint Committee
on Printing (44 U. S. C.).
A separate appropriation, "Printing and binding," has
been established to pay for authorized printing and binding for the Congress; printing, binding, and distribution
of the Federal Register; and printing and binding of
Government publications authorized by law to be distributed without charge to the recipients (67 Stat. 330).
All work for Government agencies other than the above
is done on a reimbursable basis and financed through this
fund. Receipts from sales of publications by the Super-




Total gross expenditures
Receipts from operations (funds
vided) :
Revenue.
_
_
Proceeds from sale of equipment

3,100,000

3,300,000

397,821
-282,374

300, 000
-200,000

300,000
-200,000

115,447

100,000

100,000

6,269,448

3,200,000

3, 400,000

3,977, 630
19, 761

5, 663,048

5,762,024

-2,603,791
-2,000,000

-3,101,024

-3,200,000

5, 663,048

5, 762,024

5,962,024

$13,667,312
7,561,531
3,271, 704
11,197,655
6,938,515
112,371
8,231,438

$11,461,454
9,400,000
3,271,000
10,400,000
6, 559, 515
100,000
9,492,438

$9,900,454
9,400,000
3,271,000
10,300,000
6,300, 515
100,000
11,412,438

50,980,526

50,684,407

50,684,407

9,895,095

9,500,000

9,300,000

35,433,888
8,256
-19,761

35,422,383

35,422,383

35,422,383
5,663,048

35,422,383
5, 762,024

35,422,383
5,962,024

41,085,431

41,184,407

41,384,407

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury and in banks
Accounts receivable, net
Commodities for sale
Work in process
Supplies
Deferred charges
Equipment, net
Total assets
Liabilities:
Current
Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Donated equipment
Correction of opening capitalization. _
End of year
Retained earnings
Total Government investment

46

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE—Continued

Object Classification—Continued

Intragovernmental funds—Continued
GOVERNMENT

PRINTING

OFFICE

REVOLVING

FUND—Continued

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
Unexpended balance:
Cash with Treasury
Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
Unpaid undelivered orders
Accounts receivable,
net ( - ) _
Accepted
orders
on
hand (—) (est.)
Total obligated balance
Unobligated balance

1957 actual

1958 estimate

$11,461,454

$9,900,454
9,300,000

10,373,473

9,895,095

9,500,000

10,314,340

8,270,653

10,999,959

8,261,037

-12,760,170

-7,561,531

-9,400,000

-9,400,000

- 8 , 592,787

-11,197,655

-10,400,000

-10,300,000

-665,144

-593,438

699,959

-2,138,963

12,382,407

14,260,750

10, 761,495

12,039,417

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

5,945
2
5,907
5,808

5,794
1
5, 773
5,765

5,715
1
5,694
5,710

$4, 892

$5,011

$5, 001

$28,888,347
7,396
4, 252, 315

$28, 923, 572
7,000
3, 317, 235

$28,469, 288
6,500
3,016, 550

Object Classification

Average salary of ungraded positions
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Excess of annual leave earned over
leave taken
Total personal services
Travel..
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services.
Printing and reproduction
O ther contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment




1959 estimate

$1, 295

$1,840,000
1, 500

$1,800,000
1,500

87,875,393

84, 700,307

81, 944, 238

1959 estimate

$13,667,312

1957 actual

11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities.. __
Total accrued expenditures..

$11,717,263

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year

1958 estimate

1957 actual

291, 275

150,000

120,000

33,439, 333
11,884
722, 866
60, 613
623,238
22, 916, 481
224, 719
27, 853,074
2,021, 890

32, 397, 807
10,000
670,000
56,000
575, 000
21,000,000
200,000
25, 900,000
2,050,000

31, 612, 338
9,400
630,000
52,500
540,500
19, 500,000
188,000
24,860,000
\ 750,000

GENERAL PROVISIONS
SEC. 102. No part of the funds appropriated in this Act shall be
used for the maintenance or care of private vehicles.
SEC. 103. Whenever any office or position not specifically established by the Legislative Pay Act of 1929 is appropriated for herein
or whenever the rate of compensation or designation of any position
appropriated for herein is different from that specifically established
for such position by such Act, the rate of compensation and the
designation of the position, or either, appropriated for or provided
herein, shall be the permanent law with respect thereto: Provided,
That the provisions herein for the various items of official expenses
of Members, Officers, and Committees of the House, and Clerk Hire
for Members shall be the permanent law with respect thereto: Provided further, That the provisions relating to positions and salaries
thereof carried in H. Res. 533 of the Eighty-fourth Congress and
H. Res. 28, 126, and 165 of the Eighty-fifth Congress shall be the
permanent law with respect thereto: Provided further, That the
provisions of H. Res. 144 of the Eighty-fifth Congress shall be the
permanent law with respect thereto.
SEC. 104. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall
be paid as compensation to any person appointed after June 30,
1935, as an officer or member of the Capitol Police who does not meet
the standards to be prescribed for such appointees by the Capitol
Police Board: Provided, That the Capitol Police Board is hereby
authorized to detail police from the House Office, Senate Office, and
Capitol Buildings for police duty on the Capitol Grounds.
[SEC. 105, The appropriations, authorizations, and authority
with respect thereto in this Act shall be available from July 1, 1957,
unless otherwise provided, for the purposes provided in such appropriations, authorizations, and authority. All obligations incurred during the period between June 30, 1957, and the date of
enactment of this Act in anticipation of such appropriations,
authorizations, and authority are hereby ratified and confirmed if
in accordance with the terms hereof.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Actt 1958.)

THE JUDICIARY
In accordance with the provisions of the Budget and
Accounting Act of 1921, as amended, the budget for the

judiciary is prepared by that branch of the Government
and is printed in the budget document without revision.

R E C A P I T U L A T I O N OF B U D G E T AUTHORIZATIONS A N D E X P E N D I T U R E S
By function and subfunction
[In thousands]

Function and subfunction

New obligational authority
1957 enacted

General government:
602 Judicial functions.




$39,913

Expenditures

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$43,720

$46,073

1957 actual

$38,813

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$43, 738

$45,628

47

48

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

S U P R E M E C O U R T OF T H E U N I T E D

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

STATES

Current authorizations:
Salaries
Printing and binding, Supreme Court reports
Miscellaneous expenses
Care of the building and grounds
Preparation of rules for civil procedure
Automobile forthe Chief Justice

-

602
602
602
602
602
602

$1,181,600
91, 200
55,150
201,500

$1,238,000
90,000
62, 500
218,200

$1,249,000
90,000
74,500
317,000

5,835

5,835

1, 535,285

602

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
C O U R T OF C L A I M S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Repairs and improvements

$1,236,459
97, 702
61,142
295, 819

$1,248, 700
90,000
75,500
315,000

5,835

5,810

5,800

1,614, 535

1, 736,335

1,606,332

1, 696,932

1, 735,000

284,850

307,000

308,450

261,972

305,200

306, 600

602

625, 000

677,010

699, 620

642,303

698, 200

699,097

602
602

727, 400
9,000

810,855
9,000

812, 655
9,000

724, 500
10,170

803, 400
9,000

810, 200
9,000

736,400

-

$1,119,740
65, 754
56,184
359,357
7
5,290

819,855

821,655

734,670

812, 400

819, 200

8, 706,000
16,175, 500
4,410, 000
2.721.800
753, 500
575,000
1, 475,692
1.913.801

8,800,000
18, 473, 200
4, 250,000
2, 780, 000
840, 450

9, 358, 500
19, 291,000
4,988,000
3, 098, 300
1,101,000
2,034, 700
2,635,800

9,061, 500
18, 220,000
4, 593, 730
2,834,000
831,800
362,460
1, 747,100
2, 330, 000

9,015, 000
19,000,000
4,528,000
3,025,000
1,095,000

1, 709,000
2, 274, 700

8, 591,908
15,965,923
4,325, 756
2, 712, 704
704, 202
18,066
1, 367, 218
1,881, 493

Total, Supreme Court
C O U R T OF C U S T O M S A N D P A T E N T

APPEALS

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.

.
CUSTOMS

COURT

Total, Court of Claims
COURTS

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

OF A P P E A L S , D I S T R I C T C O U R T S , A N D
JUDICIAL SERVICES

Current authorizations:
Salaries of judges
Salaries of supporting personnel
_
Fees of jurors and commissioners
Travel and miscellaneous expenses _
Administrative Office of the United States courts
Air conditioning courtrooms, offices, and other rooms
Salaries of referees (indefinite special account)
Expenses of referees (indefinite special account)
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation):
Salaries of judges
Fees of jurors and commissioners
Travel and miscellaneous expenses
Salaries of referees (indefinite special account)
Expenses of referees (indefinite special account)

OTHER

602
602
602
602
602
602
602
602

_

300,000
675,000
59,000
65,000
75,000

602
602
602
602
602

245,000

1, 964,000
2, 512,000
300,000
430,000
59,000
65,000
75,000

Total, courts of appeals, district courts, and other judicial services. .

36, 731, 293

40,301,350

42, 507,300

35, 567, 270

40, 225, 590

42,068,000

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures

39,912,828

43, 719, 750

46,073,360

38,812,547

43, 738,322

45, 627,897

$39,912,828

$42,545, 750

$46,073,360

$38,812,547

$43,493,322

$44, 698, 897

245,000

929,000

43, 738, 322

45, 627,897

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
Appropriations
- Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations

--

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures




1,174,000

- -39,912,828

43, 719, 750

46,073,360

38, 812,547

49

THE JUDICIARY
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Balance,start
of 1958

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

New obligational
author- New obli- Balances
ity
gational
of prior
authorauthority
ity

Balance, start
of 1960

Unobligated

Total

S U P R E M E C O U R T OF T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S
Current authorizations:
Salaries _
__ _ .
__ __
Printing and binding, Supreme Court reports
Miscellaneous expenses
_
Care of the building and grounds
Automobile for the Chief Justice
..

$1,191
50
66
305
5

$58
40
9
10
1

$58
40
8
12
1

200

119

1,736

1,617

118

119

20

22

308

285

22

23

73

51

700

648

51

52

42
2

38

45

813
9

765
9

45

48

44

__

$1,249
90
74
317
6

16

-

$59
40
9
10
1

342

..

$57
48
8
88

120

Total, Supreme Court

$57
35
9
241
1

38

45

822

774

45

48

219
646
345
326
28

310
735
344
295
28
362
147
183

48
988

8,967
18,012
4,528
2,784
1,058

48
988

241
37

9,358
19,291
4,988
3,098
1,101

241
37

391
1,279
460
314
43

109
128

2,035
2,636

1,855
2,384

109
128

180
252

C O U R T OF C U S T O M S A N D P A T E N T A P P E A L S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

-

CUSTOMS

COURT

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
C O U R T OF C L A I M S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Repairs and improvements
Total, Court of Claims

__

_

__

C O U R T S OF A P P E A L S , D I S T R I C T C O U R T S , A N D
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES
Current authorizations:
Salaries of judges . . .
_
,
Salaries of supporting personnel
Fees of jurors and commissioners
_
Travel and miscellaneous expenses.
_
__
Administrative Office of the United States courts.
Air conditioning courtrooms, offices, and other rooms
Salaries of referees (indefinite special account)
Expenses of referees (indefinite special account).
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation):
Salaries of judges _
_
Fees of jurors and commissioners
Travel and miscellaneous expenses.. _
_
__ _
Salaries of referees (indefinite special account)..
Expenses of referees (indefinite special account)

__

38
151

300
430
59
65
75

300
430
59
65
75

Total, courts of appeals, district courts, and other judicial
services

1,753

2,404

2,480

42, 507

39,588

2,480

2, 919

Total, the judiciary.

2,275

2,734

2,716

46,073

42,912

2,716

3,161

$2,275

$2,734

$1,787

$46,073

$42,912

$1,787

$3,161

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations
__
Total, the judiciary

440000—58




929
2,275

4

2,734

2,716

929
46,073

42,912

2,716

3,161

50




THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES
[In thousands]
1957 actual

Balances brought forward at start of year from authorizations:
Enacted or recommended in this document: Appropriations.
Proposed for later transmission: Appropriations

Total new obligational authority
Other amounts available: Restored from certified claims account..
Total budget authorizations available..
Expenditures:
Prom obligational authority enacted or recommended:
Out of new obligational authority
Out of balances of prior obligational authority
Total expenditures from obligational authority enacted or recommended
From obligational authority proposed for later transmission:
Out of new obligational authority
Out of balances of prior obligational authority

Amounts no longer available:
Unobligated balances expiring and lapsing
Adjustment of balances downward in expired accounts, net.
..

Balances carried forward at close of year from authorizations:
Enacted or recommended in this document: Appropriations..
Proposed for later transmission: Appropriations

Obligations incurred, net..

42, 546
1,174

39,913
6

43, 720

46,454

38,813

43, 493

38,813

43,493
245

38,813

Total budget expenditures.

Total balances carried forward at close of year..

2,734

39,913

1959 estimate

$2,734

42,194

New obligational authority;
Enacted or recommended in this document: Current authorizations:
Appropriations
Proposed for later transmission: Appropriations

$2,275

2,275

Total balances brought forward..

Total amounts no longer available

1958 estimate

43, 738

611
36
647

2,734

1,787
929

2,734

2,716

$39,303

$43,720

$46,073

51

THE JUDICIARY
Program and Financing

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$62,500

$74,500

62, 500

74, 500

$221
11, 560
1, 300
1,800
15,920
2,750
393
14, 853
6,276

$500
11, 000
1, 300
1,800
18, 750
3,300
500
15, 750
9,600

$500
11, 000
1, 300
1,800
14,150
2,900
500
15, 750
26,600

55,073

62, 500

74, 500

1957 actual

Current authorizations:
SALARIES

[Salaries:] For the Chief Justice and eight Associate Justices,
and all other officers and employees, whose compensation shall be
fixed by the Court, except as otherwise provided by law, and who
may be employed and assigned by the Chief Justice to any office or
work of the Court [$1,238,000] $1,249,000. (28 U. S. C. 1, 5,
671-675; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,238,000
Estimate 1959, $1,249,000

Program by activities:
Miscellaneous expenses, Supreme Court
(total obligations)

$55,073

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

77

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

55,150

Object Classification
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

02
04
05
06
07

Program by activities:
Salaries, Supreme Court (total obligations)
___
_

$1,119,599

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

62,001

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

$1,238,000

$1,249,000

08
09

Travel
Communication services
Penalty mail . .
Rents and utility services.
Printing and reproduction
_
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials.
Equipment
Total obligations

1,181, 600

1, 238,000

1, 249,000
CARE

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
01

07
11

Total personal services.
Other contractual services
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations

163
20
182
205

164
20
181
206

$1, 056, 026
60, 583

$1,108, 399
66, 901
3, 000

$1,119, 399
66, 901
3, 000

1,116, 609
2,990

1,178,300
3,300
56,400

1,189,300
3,300
56, 400

1,119, 599

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

163
20
173
191

1, 238, 000

1, 249, 000

OF THE

BUILDING

AND

GROUNDS

[Care of the building and grounds:] For such expenditures as
may be necessary to enable the Architect of the Capitol to carry
out the duties imposed upon him by the Act approved May 7, 1934
(40 U. S. C. 13a-13b), including improvements, maintenance,
repairs, equipment, supplies, materials, and appurtenances; special
clothing for workmen; and personal and other services (including
temporary labor without reference to the Classification and Retirement Acts, as amended), and for snow removal by hire of men
and equipment or under contract without compliance with section
3709 of the Revised Statutes, as amended (41 U. S. C. 5); [$218,200]
$817,000, (Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $218,200
Estimate 1959, $317,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

PRINTING

AND

BINDING

SUPREME

COURT

REPORTS

[Printing and binding Supreme Court reports:] For printing
and binding the advance opinions, preliminary prints, and bound
reports of the Court, $90,000. (28 U. S. C. 411, 412, 673; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $90,000
Estimate 1959, $90,000

Program by activities:
Structural and mechanical care of Supreme Court Building and grounds,
including supplying of mechanical
furnishings and equipment (total
obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Printing and binding Supreme Court
reports (total obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority).

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$90,000

$90,000

$83,354

91,200

90,000

Total number of permanent positions.._
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

90,000
07

Obligations by Objects
06

Printing and reproduction

MISCELLANEOUS

$83,354

$90,000

$90,000

EXPENSES

[Miscellaneous expenses:] For miscellaneous expenses to be
expended as the Chief Justice may approve, [including $4,200 for
purchase of one passenger motor vehicle for replacement only,
$62,500] $74,500. (Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $62,500
Estimate 1959, $74,500




1959 estimate

$218,200

$317,000

218,200

317, 000

33
33
33

33
32
33

33
33
33

$142,247
34, 982

$150, 800
38,000

$160, 800
42,000

177,229

188, 800

202, 800

4,991
2,158

9,000
2, 000
150

42,000
2, 000
150

$198,028
3,472
201, 500

Object Classification

01

7,846

1958 estimate

08
09

11

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services...
Total personal services
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs and improvements.
Annual painting
Snow removal.
__ . . . . . .
Payment to employees' life insurance fund
Maintenance, air-conditioning system
Repairs and improvements to
spaces vacated by administrative
office, United States courts.
Supplies and materials
Equipment:
Annual
P u r c h a s e and replacement of
kitchen equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations

476

500

700

605

1,000

10, 000

7,769

6,000

42, 000
6,000

750

750

4,800
198,028

10, 000

10, 600

218, 200

317, 000

52

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES—Con.
Current authorizations—Continued
AUTOMOBILE

FOR

THE

CHIEF

JUSTICE

[Automobile for the Chief Justice:] For purchase, exchange,
lease, driving, maintenance, and operation of an automobile for
the Chief Justice of the United States, $5,835. (Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $5,835
Estimate 1959, $5,835
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Automobile for the Chief Justice (total
obligations)

1959 estimate

$5,835

$5,835

$5,057

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

Customs cases

778

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

5,835

5,835

1
1
1

1
1
1

01
05
07
08
11

$4,028
500
25
504

$4,044
500
16
1,012
263

$4,044
500
328
700
263

5,057

5,835

5,835

, _

Personal services: Permanent position
__
Rents and utility services.
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
... _ _ . . .
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligation

Pending, beginning of year
Docketed during year
Disposed of during year
Pending, close of year

Intragovernmental funds:
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$6,200

7,124

6,200

7,000

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

04

Communication services

$6,200

$7,124

_

$7,000

COURT OF CUSTOMS AND PATENT APPEALS
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

Total obligations

~

$267,870

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$307,000

$308,450

307,000

308,450

16,980

Appropriation
authority)

(new




obligational

284,850

1959 estimate

26
26
26

26
26
26

$263,535
9,495
520

$264,985
9,495
520

249,997
266
5
1,378
300
10,497
1,319
881
3,227

273,550
300
50
1,500
500
12,000
1,000
1,000
3,800
13,300

275,000
300
50
1,500
500
12,000
1,000
1,000
3,800
13,300

267,870

307,000

308,450

CUSTOMS COURT
Current authorizations:
AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For salaries of the chief j u d g e [ , ] and
eight judges [ , and all other]; salaries of the officers and employees
of the c o u r t [ , ] as determined by the court; and necessary expenses
of the court, including exchange of books, and traveling expenses,
as may be approved by the chief judge[, $677,010];
$699,620:
Provided, That traveling expenses of judges of the Customs Court
shall be paid upon the written certificate of the judge. (5 U. S. C.
886-842;
28 U.
588;
Judiciary

S.

C. 251-255,

456,

Appropriation Act,
Appropriated 1958, $677,010

871, 872,
1958.)

961,

962;

31

U.

S.

C.

Estimate 1959, $699,620

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Salaries and expenses (total obligations) .

$595,913

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$677,010

$699,620

677,010

699,620

29,087

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Salaries and expenses (total obligations).

1958 estimate

Program and Financing

[Salaries and expenses:] For salaries of the chief judge, four
associate judges, and all other officers and employees of the court,
and necessary expenses of the court, including exchange of books,
and traveling expenses, as may be approved by the chief judge,
[$307,000] $808,450. (5 U. S. C. 836-842; 28 U. S. C. 211-213,
831-834; 31 U. S. C. 588; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $307,000
Estimate 1959, $308,450

1957 actual

1957
84
82
74
92

$249,997

.

Total personal services
—
Travel...
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
..
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials..
Equipment..
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

SALARIES
Object Classification

1956
91
63
70
84

26
25
25

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

$7,000

$7,124

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts

1957
23
40
43
20

1957 actual

06
07
08
09
11

A D V A N C E S AND R E I M B U R S E M E N T S

Patent and trademark cases

Object Classification

02
03
04

Program by activities:
Communication services (total obligations)

1956
21
31
29
23

1
1
1

5,835

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees _
Number of employees at end of year

This item is not subject to the approval of the Judicial
Conference.
The Court of Customs and Patent Appeals has exclusive jurisdiction in appeals from judgments of the Customs
Court in all cases involving the construction of law and
facts respecting classification of merchandise and rate of
duty imposed thereunder, and all appealable questions as
to laws and regulations governing the collection of customs
revenues. Its decisions are final unless taken to the
Supreme Court on writs of certiorari.
The court also has exclusive jurisdiction of appeals
from the Tariff Commission on questions of law only,
in the matter of unfair practices in import trade, and
appellate jurisdiction from decisions of the Patent Office
in patent and trademark cases, except those involving
equity.

625,000

This item is not subject to the approval of the Judicial
Conference.
The Customs Court has exclusive jurisdiction in civil
actions brought under regular tariff laws, internal revenue
laws relating to imported merchandise, customs simplification acts, and provisions set forth in various reciprocal
trade agreements. In these cases the court interprets the

53

THE JUDICIARY

law and facts respecting classification of merchandise and
rate of duty to be imposed thereon. It also has both
original and appellate jurisdiction in cases involving questions as to value of imported merchandise.
CASELOAD

Pending,
beginning
of year

Received

Terminated

119,285
131,567

32,184
24,670

19,902
19,931

131,567
136,306

80,050
85,008

18,585
16,067

13, 627
25,221

85,008
75,854

23
8

47
288

62
23

8
273

74
47

24
8

51
34

47
21

191
135

Classification cases:
1956 actual
1957 actual..
Reappraisement cases:
1956 actual
1957 actual
...
Applications for review:
1956 actual
1957 actual
Petitions for remission of additional
duties:
1956 actual
1957 actual
Remands of protests:
1956 actual.
1957 actual

75
64

131
132

135
67

Pending,
end of year

also has general jurisdiction to hear and determine claims
for damages other than tort actions, provided the claimants would have the right to sue in law or equity, if the
United States were not immune to such suits. It has
jurisdiction in suits against the United States by contractors dissatisfied with the findings and decisions of contracting agencies under terminated war contracts, and
jurisdiction concurrent with that of the courts of appeals to review district court decisions in cases involving
tort actions. It has authority to review the decisions of
the Indian Claims Commission on appeal from that Commission. It is also given jurisdiction in special act cases
referred to the court by either House of Congress.
The court continues to carry a heavy load of cases, but
it has been able to dispose of the cases which are ready to
be heard as expeditiously as the Department of Justice
can process them. No material change in program is
planned for 1959.
Object Classification

Object Classification
1958 estimate

78
1
74
80

81
2
81
83

81
2
81
83

$552,599
4,352

$588,685
6,000
1,500

$611,295
6,000
1,500

556,951
12,921
1,390
7,370
980
1, 693
1,956
3,710
8,775
167

596,185
17,000
2,000
7,500
1,000
4,200
4,300
4,000
9,000
31, 725
100

618,795
17,000
2,000
7,500
1,000
4,200
4,300
4,000
9,000
31,725
100

595,913

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
01

02
03
04
06
07
08
09
11
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Taxes and assessments
Total obligations

677,010

78
72
73

78
78
78

78
78
78

$630,344

$670,055
2,100

$674, 355
2,100

630,344
10,252
2,425
663
3,665
59,889
2,247
5,704
6,366

672,155
18,500
2,500
800
3, 600
60,700
3,300
6,200
5,000
38,100

676,455
16,000
2,500
800
3, 600
60,700
3,300
6,200
5,000
38,100

721, 555

810,855

812.655

699, 620

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Penalty mail
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
02
04

Total obligations

AND

IMPROVEMENTS

[Repairs and improvements:! For necessary repairs and improvements to the Court of Claims buildings, to be expended under the
supervision of the Architect of the Capitol, $9,000. (81 Stat. 1185;
Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 9 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 9 , 0 0 0

COURT OF CLAIMS
Current authorizations:
AND

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

REPAIRS

SALARIES

1958 estimate

1957 actual

1959 estimate

1957 actual

EXPENSES

Program and Financing

[Salaries and expenses: J For salaries of the chief judge, four associate judges, and all other officers and employees of the Court, and
for other necessary expenses, including stenographic and other fees
and charges necessary in the taking of testimony, and travel,
[$810,8551 $812,655. (5 U. S. C. 886-842, 28 U. S. C. 171, 456,
791-795, 962; 81 U. S. C. 588, 41 U. S. C. 114; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Program by activities:
Structural and mechanical
nance (total obligations)

Appropriated 1958,

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

Estimate 1959,

$810,855

$812,655

1957 actual

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Salaries and expenses (total obligations).

$721,555

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

Appropriation
authority)
1958 estimate

$812,655

810,855

812,655

5,845

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

727,400

obligational

$8,662

1959 estimate

$9,000

$9,000

9,000

9,000

338
9,000

1959 estimate

$810,855

(new

mainte-

1958 estimate

This appropriation provides for structural repairs and
improvements to the Court of Claims buildings, including
the repairs and maintenance of the mechanical equipment.
The work is performed under the supervision of the
Architect of the Capitol.
Object Classification

The United States Court of Claims has jurisdiction of
all cases involving claims against the United States (except in pension suits) instituted upon constitutional
grounds or under Federal law or regulations, all claims
arising out of any contract with the Federal Government
&nd its agencies, and claims for the refund of taxes. It




1957 actual
07

Other contractual services:
General annual repairs
Annual painting
Total obligations

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$4,097
4,565

$5,000
4,000

$5,000
4,000

8,662

9,000

9,000

54

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

OF

JUDGES

[Salaries of judges:] For salaries of circuit judges; district judges
(including judges of the district courts of Alaska, the Virgin Islands,
the Panama Canal Zone, and Guam); justices and judges of the
Supreme Court and circuit courts of the Territory of Hawaii; justices and judges retired or resigned under title 28, United States
Code, sections 371, 372, and 373; and annuities of widows of Justices
of the Supreme Court of the United States in accordance with title
28, United States Code, section 375; [$8,800,000] $9,858,500. (28
U. S. C. 44, 133, 135; 48 U. S. C. 632, 634a, 1344, 1348, 1358; 70
Stat. 123, 1026; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$8,800,000

Estimate 1959,

$9,358,500

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Salaries (total obligations)

$8, 682, 725

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

1959 estimate

$8,800,000

$9,358, 500

8,800,000

9,358, 500

23,275
8, 706,000

New obligational authority

1958 estimate

SALARIES

OF SUPPORTING

PERSONNEL

[Salaries of supporting personnel:] For salaries of all officials and
employees of the Federal Judiciary, not otherwise specifically provided for, [$18,473,200] $19,291,000: Provided, That the compensation of secretaries and law clerks of circuit and district judges shall
be fixed by the Director of the Administrative Office without regard
to the Classification Act of 1949, as amended, except that the salary
of a secretary shall conform with that of the General Schedule grades
(GS) 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, or 10, as the appointing judge shall determine, and
the salary of a law clerk shall conform with that of the General
Schedule grades (GS) [ 5 , ] 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12, as the appointing
judge shall determine, subject to review by the [judicial conference]
Judicial Conference if requested by the Director, such determination
by the judge otherwise to be final: Provided further, That (exclusive
of step increases corresponding with those provided for by title VII
of the Classification Act of 1949, as amended, and of compensation
paid for temporary assistance needed because of an emergency) the
aggregate salaries paid to secretaries and law clerks appointed by
one judge shall not exceed $13,485 per annum, except in the case of
the chief judge of each circuit and the chief judge of each district
court having five or more district judges, in which case the aggregate
salaries shall not exceed $18,010 per annum. (5 U. S. C. 2254;
18 U. S. C. 3654, 3656; 28 U. S. C. 604 (a) (5), 634, 711 (a) (b),
712, 713 (a), 751 (a) (b), 752, 753, 755; 48 U. S. C. 102, 104, 106,
107, 868, 870, 1844,
1405y; 11 D. C. C. 312; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$18,473,200

$19,291,000

Program and Financing
New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Transferred from "Salaries of supporting personnel" (71 Stat. 166)
_

$8,406,000

8, 706,000

Appropriation (adjusted)

$8,800,000

$9, 358, 500

8, 800,000

$9,358, 500

1957 actual

The statutory salaries of all active United States circuit
and district judges, the justices and judges of the Supreme
Court and circuit courts of Hawaii, and all justices and
judges who have retired or resigned in pursuance of law are
payable from this appropriation. Provision also is included under this item for the payment of annuities to the
seven living widows of Supreme Court justices pursuant to
68 Stat. 918 and a matching contribution by the Government to the judicial survivors annuity fund equal to the
amounts required to be made by the participating judges
(28 U. S. C. 376).
Salaries were paid to an average of 384 judges in 1957.
The appropriation for 1958 will provide for the salaries of
380 although on July 1, 1957, there were actually 385
judges on the rolls and the number is expected to increase
during the year to about 396. It is estimated that it will
be necessary to provide for the salaries of 403 judges in
1959 due to the upward trend in the number of retired
judges in evidence recently. A supplemental appropriation for 1958 is proposed for later transmission.

Program by activities:
Direct obligations: Salaries-..
Reimbursable obligations: Salaries

Total number of permanent positions:
Active judges
Retired and resigned judges
Average number of judges
Number of judges at end of year:
Active judges
Retired and resigned judges
01

Personal services: Permanent positions
_ _
07 Other contractual services
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims
Total obligations




$19,291,000
7,000

18,480,200

19,298,000

-7,000

-7,000

16,175, 500

18,473, 200

19,291,000

$16,475, 500

$18,473,200

$19,291,000

18,473, 200

19,291,000

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts
Unobligated balance no longer available.
New obligational authority. _
New obligational authority:.
Appropriation
Transferred to "Salaries of judges" (71
Stat. 166)

-300,000

Appropriation (adjusted)

16,175,500

The primary and appellate jurisdictions of the courts of
the United States are vested in the 94 district courts and
11 courts of appeals. Provision for the salaries of the
administrative and legal aides required to assist the judges
in the conduct of hearings, trials, and other judicial
functions and to man the component offices of the courts
including tne Federal Probation System is made under
this heading.

Object Classification
1957 actual

$18,473,200
7,000

-7,159
117,208

Total obligations

1959 estimate

16,065,451

...

1958 estimate

$16,058, 292
7,159

300,000

CASELOAD

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

330
63
384

329
58
380

330
80
403

316
69

323
58

324
80

$8,634,474
13,251

$8,536, 500
13,500
215,000

$9,083,500
13,500
226, 500

35,000

35,000

35,000

8, 682, 725

8,800,000

9,358,500

Courts of appeals:
1956 actual
1957 actual
District courts:
Civil—1956 actual.
1957 actual
Criminal—1956 actual
1957 actual

Pending,
beginning
of year

Received

2,175
2,029

3,588
3,701

68,832
63,526
8,778
7,304

Passport applications
filed
Probation system:
Persons under supervision, end of year
Presentence investigations, during year

Pending,
Terminated end of year
3,734
3,687

2,029
2,043

62,394
67,700
1 62,380
63,568
28, 739
30,213
28,120 actual
27,929
1956
188,379

63,526
62,338
7,304
7,495
1957 actual
171,737

31,385
22,365

33,137
23,168

i The number of civil cases filed, excluding the District of Columbia, increased
from 54,362 in 1956 to 56,279 in 1957. The reduction in the total number of cases received
is due to a statute effective Sept. 17,1956, requiring divorce and domestic relations cases
in the District of Columbia to be filed in the municipal court instead of in the district court.

55

THE JUDICIARY
Object Classification

TRAVEL

AND

MISCELLANEOUS

EXPENSES

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

3,233
57
3,159
3,239

3,254
51
3,260
3,330

3,355
51
3,351
3,431

..

$15, 764, 796
196,821
53,056

$17,002, 555
183, 700
123,045

$17, 767,155
183, 700
123,045

Total personal service obligations...

16,014, 673

17,309,300

18,073, 900

Direct obligations:
01 Personal services
07 Other contractual services
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
15 Taxes and assessments

16,007, 514
48,140
2,638

17,302,300
55,000
1,113, 500
2, 400

18,066,900
55,000
1,166, 700
2, 400

[Travel and miscellaneous expenses:] For necessary travel and
miscellaneous expenses, not otherwise provided for, incurred by the
Judiciary, including the purchase of firearms and ammunition, the
cost of contract statistical services for the office of Register of Wills
of the District of Columbia and not to exceed $1,000 for the payment of fees to attorneys appointed in accordance with the Act of
June 8, 1938 (52 Stat. 625), not exceeding $25, in any one case,
[$2,780,000] $3,098,300: Provided, That this sum shall be available
in an amount not to exceed [$12,000] $17,500 for expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the work of Federal Probation when incurred on the written authorization of the Director of
the Administrative Office of the United States Courts. (5 U. S. C.
55a, 73b (2-3) , 835-842; 18 U. S. C. 726; 28 U. S. C. 456, 604, 604a,
639, 961, 962, 1915b; 48 U. S. C. 102, 114, 863, 1405y; Judiciary
Appropriation Act, 1958.)

16,058,292

18,473,200

19,291,000

Appropriated 1958, $2,780,000

7,159

7,000

7,000

16,065,451

18,480,200

19,298,000

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total direct obligations
Reimbursable obligations:
01 Personal services
Total obligations

Estimate 1959, $3,098,300

Program and Financing

1957 actual
FEES

OF JURORS

AND

COMMISSIONERS

[Fees of jurors and commissioners:] For fees, expenses, and costs
of jurors (including meals and lodging for jurors in Alaska, as provided by section 193, title II, of the Act of June 6, 1900, 31 Stat.
362); compensation of jury commissioners; and fees of United States
commissioners and other committing magistrates acting under title
18, United States Code, section 3041: [$4,250,000] $4,988,000.
(11 U. S. C. 203 (b); 28 U. S. C. 631, 633, 636, 1865, 1871; 48
U. S. C. 25, 867; 70 Stat. 745; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $4,250,000

1957 actual

Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

$4, 343, 434

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$4,250,000

$4,988, 000

4,250,000

4,988,000

66,566
4,410,000

Grand and petit jurors who serve in the Federal courts
are paid statutory fees and expenses, as are jury commissioners. United States commissioners are primarily
committing magistrates and are paid fees for their services.
The amount of service and the compensation of jurors
depends mainly on the number of jury trials requested
by the parties to civil and criminal cases in the United
States courts. The earnings of commissioners are directly
related to the volume of cases presented by Federal law
enforcement officials.
The call for juries is expected to increase moderately
as the general activities of the courts continue to be heavy
and efforts to reduce backlogs are intensified.
Under recently enacted legislation increasing the fees for
services of jurors and commissioners payments to them
are expected to increase substantially. A supplemental
appropriation for 1958 is proposed for later transmission.
Object Classification
1957 actual
01
07

11
15

Personal services: Fees, United States
commissioners
Other contractual services: Fees:
Jury commissioners
Grand jurors
Petit jurors.
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Taxes and assessments
Total obligations




expenses

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts.
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

$2,690, 720

1959 estimate

$2,780,000

$3,098,300

2,780,000

3,098,300

-3,097
34,177
2, 721,800

Estimate 1959, $4,988,000

Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Fees, expenses, and costs (total obligations).
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

Program by activities:
Travel and miscellaneous
(total obligations)

1958 estimate

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$604,638

$600,000

$750, 000

8,367
600,812
3,120, 517

8,500
540,000
3,091, 500

9,100

10,000

8,500
718,000
3,489,000
12, 500
10,000

4,343,434

4,250,000

4,988,000

Under the statutes and administrative regulations
promulgated thereunder the expenses of travel and subsistence incurred by the judges, officials, and supporting
personnel of the courts in attending sessions of court or
transacting other official business are paid from this
appropriation. Provision is also made for the cost of
supplying, equipping and maintaining their offices and
libraries, and for the incidental expenses of operating the
11 courts of appeals and 94 district courts of the United
States.
The prospective increase in the number of retired
judges rendering judicial service, the proposed expansion
of the probation system and clerks' offices to cope with
rising caseloads, and the general increase in the cost of
services and facilities for the courts require a substantially
larger appropriation in 1959 than for 1958 for the impersonal expenses of operating the courts. A supplemental appropriation for 1958 is proposed for later
transmission.
Object Classification

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,176.884
25, 891
302,168
90,000
6,540
162,369

$1,325, 700
28,400
315,000
92,000
6,600
159,300

$1,373,100
31,100
346,400
94,000
6,600
172, 800

44,412

45,000

45,000

1,000
32,182
188,019

1,000
54, 500
161, 500

1,000
42,000
190, 900

167, 541
88, 796
85, 831
319,087

83,000
117,000
64,000
327,000

160,600
150, 700
103,000
381,100

2, 690, 720

2,780,000

3,098,300

1957 actual
02
03
04

Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
05 Rents and utility services.
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services:
Transcripts ordered by court
Attorneys' fees, Commission on
Mental Health, District of Columbia.
Miscellaneous.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment:
General office
Furniture
Lawbooks, accessions
Lawbooks, continuations
Total obligations.

56

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
ADMINISTRATIVE

OFFICE

OF THE

UNITED

STATES

Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual
Reimbursable obligations:
01 Personal services

COURTS

1959 estimate

$840,450

$1,101,000

$3,670

Total obligations

[Administrative Office of the United States Courts:] For necessary expenses of the Administrative Office of the United States
Courts, including travel, advertising, and rent in the District of
Columbia and elsewhere, [$840,450] $1,101,000. (28 U. S. C.
601-606; 70 Stat. 738, 739, 747; Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 8 4 0 , 4 5 0
Estimate 1959, « $ 1 , 1 0 1 , 0 0 0

1958 estimate

708,417

A I R CONDITIONING COURTROOMS, OFFICES, AND OTHER ROOMS
Program and Financing

O Includes $75,000 for activities previously carried under "Salaries and expenses, general
administration," Department of Justice.

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activity:
Direct obligations: Salaries
penses
Reimbursable
obligations:
and expenses
_

and

ex-

Salaries

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

1959 estimate

Program by activity:
Air conditioning court space (total obligations)

$704,747

$840,450

$1,101,000

Appropriation
authority)

3,670
840,450

07
840,450

_.

Direct obligations:
01 Personal services
02 Travel
04 Communication services
...
Penalty mail
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
_ ...
15 Taxes and assessments
Total direct obligations




$380, 526

Other contractual services

1,101,000

SALARIES

OF

REFEREES

(Indefinite special account)
[Salaries of referees:] For salaries of referees as authorized by the
Act of June 28, 1946, as amended (11 U. S. C. 68), not to exceed
[$1,699,000] $2,034,700, to be derived from the referees' salary
fund established in pursuance of said Act. (Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, " $ 1 , 7 0 9 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 , 0 3 4 , 7 0 0
A Includes $10,000 appropriated in Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.
Amounts Available for Appropriation
1957 actual
Unappropriated balance at beginning of
year.. __ _ .
Receipts (fees for services)
__
Unobligated balance returned from appropriation account
Total available for appropriation.. _
Deduct appropriation
Unappropriated balance at end of
year

$3,335,991
1,905,942

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$3, 773,732
2,188,300

$4, 253,032
2, 427, 500

5,249,424
1, 475, 692

5, 962,032
1, 709,000

6, 680, 532
2,034, 700

3,773, 732

4,253,032

4,645,832

$1, 475, 692

$1,709,000

$2,034, 700

1,475,692

1,709,000

2,034,700

7,491

Program and Financing

1957 actual

Total personal service obligations. __

575,000

ALLOCATION TO GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION

Object Classification

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

194,474

obligational

Object Classification

-3,670
48,753
753,500

(new

1,101,000

This office is responsible, under the supervision and
direction of the Judicial Conference of the United States,
for providing for the administration of the United States
courts. The principal functions are providing administrative staff and services for the courts; examining the
state of the dockets of the various courts and compiling
and publishing statistical information concerning the
business transacted by the courts; the administration of
the probation and bankruptcy systems; and the general
business affairs of the courts.
The estimates for 1959 provide for an expansion of the
program concerned with statistical studies and the examination and survey of court dockets and for transferring
from the Department of Justice the function of examining
judicial offices. It is planned to develop new procedures
and means to relieve the serious congestion existing in a
number of courts; propose changes to lighten the constantly mounting caseload of the Federal courts generally;
cope with the rapidly rising number of bankruptcy cases;
and to meet the heavier administrative and fiscal work
incident to the growing judicial establishment.

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

$380,526

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

708,417

Total obligations

1958 estimate

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

133
1
117
125

135
1
132
134

161
1
158
159

$598,086
2, 812
7,927

$682,250
3,000
2, 550

$840,665
3,000
3,000

608,825

687,800

846, 665

605,155
17,134
8,443
5,850
17, 669
10, 707
4,624
8,148
26, 917

687,800
13,200
8,100
6,000
53,900
10,600
4,000
7,550
6,200

846,665
44,000
10,180
6,000
88,100
11,100
7,145
8,610
25,350

100

43,000
100

53,750
100

704,747

840,450

1,101,000

Program by activities:
Salaries of referees (total obligations)...
Financing:
Appropriation
thority)

(new

obligational

au._

The district courts of the United States are constituted
courts of bankruptcy and invested with original jurisdiction at law and in equity in proceedings brought under the
bankruptcy statutes. This jurisdiction primarily is exercised through referees appointed by the several district
courts. Their compensation and expenses are paid from
special funds created by payments of fees and charges by
parties to the proceedings. The present system is selfsustaining and no general tax dollars are involved in its
operation.
A marked and steady rise in the number of new cases
filed with the referees has occurred in recent years. The
number of cases filed in 1957 was 73,761, 11,675 more than

57

THE JUDICIARY

in 1956. It is estimated on the basis of current trends
that new cases filed in 1958 and 1959 will total 85,000 and
95,000, respectively. Provision for more referees and
additional service by the present referees will be necessary
to cope with the rising caseloads forecast for the current
and ensuing fiscal years. As a result, a supplemental
appropriation for 1958 is proposed for later transmission.

Object Classification
1957 actual

01

07
11
15

163
125
163

174
144
174

$1,213,250
388,880

$1,587,875
316,725

1,472,614
3,011

Total personal services
Other contractual services
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Taxes and assessments
_

114
60

$1,079,403
393, 211

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent

88
75

173
125
162

Total
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

1959 estimate

85
88

Number of permanent positions:
Full-time
Part-time

1958 estimate

1,602.130
4,170
102,700
1,709,000

386
41
392
452

392
58
444
470

462
58
506
539

01

$1,316,418
136,586
1,341

$1,480,000
189,000
7,400

$1,747,900
199,000
8,300

1, 454,345
58,677
5,436
41,162
122,932
55,204
22, 632
14, 821
61, 868
75,882
842

1,676,400
60,000
7,000
43,000
143,000
58,000
23,000
17,000
62,500
81, 500
101,300
2,000

1, 955,200
72,600
8,000
53,000
125,000
68,000
26,000
22,000
70,000
112, 700
121,300
2,000

1,913,801

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total personal services
Travel
__
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
___
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments

2,274, 700

2,635,800

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1,904,600
6,300
123,800
2,034,700

67

Total obligations

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

02
03
04

Total obligations

Proposed for later transmission:

1,475,692

SALARIES

OF

JUDGES

Program and Financing
EXPENSES

OF

REFEREES

1957 actual

(Indefinite special account)
[Expenses of referees:] For miscellaneous expenses of referees,
United States courts, including the salaries of their clerical assistants, travel, purchase of envelopes without regard to the Act of
June 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 476), not to exceed [$2,199,700] $2,635,800,
to be derived from the referees' expense fund established in pursuance of the Act of June 28, 1946, as amended (11 U. S. C. 68 (c)
(4)). (11 U. S. C. 102 (a) (2); Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,° $ 2 , 2 7 4 , 7 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 2 , 6 3 5 , 8 0 0
« Includes $75,000 appropriated in Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.
Amounts Available for Appropriation
1957 actual
Unappropriated balance at beginning of
year
__
Receipts (fees for services) _
Unobligated balance returned from appropriation account
Total amount available for appropriation
__
Deduct appropriation
Unappropriated balance at end of
year

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,976,506
2,581,300

$2,283,106
2,897,500

3,890,307
1,913,801

4,557,806
2,274, 700

5,180,606
2,635,800

1,976,506

2,283,106

Program by activities:
Salaries (total obligations)

..

$300,000

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

300,000

Under existing legislation, 1958 —A supplemental appropriation of $300,000 is anticipated to provide for the
salaries of the increased number of Federal judges now on
the payroll. The number of retired and resigned judges
went up in 1957 to 63 from 54 tlie year before and to 71
on September 30, 1957. The payroll for all judges on
that date totaled 391 although tiie appropriation available provides for only 380. Tne overall number is expected to go even higher to an average of 396 for the year
or 16 above the number provided for currently.

2,544,806

$1,849,118
2,031,065
10,124

FEES

OF J U R O R S

AND

COMMISSIONERS

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program and Financing
Program by activities:
Miscellaneous expenses (total obligations)
Financing:
Appropriation
thority)

(new

obligational

au-

Program by activities:
Fees, expenses, and costs (total obligations)
$1,913,801

1,913,801

$2,274, 700

2,274,700

$2,635,800

$675,000
675,000

2,635,800

Office and other expenses of referees, including compensation of clerical employees, are payable upon authorization of the director of the administrative office of the
United States courts. Workload data appear under the
account for salaries of referees. In order to process the
anticipated increase in volume of cases it is necessary to
expand the referees' staffs and their facilities in 1959. A
supplemental appropriation for 1958 is proposed for later
transmission.




Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

Under existing legislation, 1958—A. supplemental appropriation for 1958 is anticipated to cover increased costs for
jurors and commissioners as follows: (1) $150,000 for jury
fees and costs due to increased use of juries in 1958 beyond
currently available funds; (2) $400,000 to meet increased
fees payable under Public Law 85-299 which became
effective September 7, 1957; and (3) $125,000 to meet increased fees payable to United States commissioners pursuant to Public Law 85-276, effective as of September 2,
1957.

58

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES—Continued
Proposed for later transmission—Continued
TRAVEL

AND

MISCELLANEOUS

EXPENSES

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Under existing legislation, 1958.—The continuing increase in the number of bankruptcy cases being filed is
expected to make it necessary to submit a request for
supplemental funds for additional services of referees in
1958 of $65,000.
EXPENSES

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

OF

REFEREES

(Indefinite special account)
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Miscellaneous expenses (total obligations)

1957 actual

$59,000

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

Program by activities:
Miscellaneous expenses (total obligations)

59,000

Under existing legislation, 1958.—A supplemental appropriation of $59,000 is anticipated to cover mounting costs,
estimated at $14,000, for printing records in cases appealed
to the Supreme Court by poor persons who are unable to
bear such costs, and the increase of almost 17% over last
year in the cost of lawbook-upkeep services amounting
to $45,000.
SALARIES

OF

(Indefinite special account)
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Salaries (total obligations)
Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation




1959 estimate

$75,000
75,000

Under existing legislation, 1958.—A supplemental appropriation ot $75,000 is anticipated for expenses of referees,
including salaries of clerical employees, in order to process
the larger number of bankruptcy cases currently being
filed.
GENERAL PROVISIONS—THE JUDICIARY

REFEREES

1957 actual

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

1958 estimate

1958 estimate

$65,000
65,000

1959 estimate

SEC. 302. Sixty per centum of the expenditures for the District
Court of the United States for the District of Columbia from all
appropriations under this title and 30 per centum of the expenditures
for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
from all appropriations under this title shall be reimbursed to the
United States from any funds in the Treasury to the credit of the
District of Columbia.
SEC. 303. The reports of the United States Court of Appeals for
the District of Columbia shall not be sold for a price exceeding that
approved by the court and for not more than $ 6 . 5 0 per volume.
(Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
The new obligational authority recommended for 1959
for compensation of the President and for staff assistance
in the White House offices and in the several agencies of
the Executive Office is approximately the same as the 1958
amount with two exceptions: (1) an increase of $206,000
to enable the Office of Defense Mobilization to discharge
more effectively its responsibilities of coordinating emergency planning by all Federal agencies, and (2) an increase
of $125,000 for special projects.

About 36% of the recommended 1959 budget for the
Executive Office is for the Bureau of the Budget, which
is the staff arm of the President responsible for working
on governmentwide problems such as organization, accounting, statistics, and legislative reference, as well as
for preparation and review of the budget. The White
House staff and various special projects account for 30%,
and the Office of Defense Mobilization for 20%.

R E C A P I T U L A T I O N OF B U D G E T AUTHORIZATIONS A N D E X P E N D I T U R E S
By function and subfunction
[In thousands]

New obligational authority

Expenditures

Function and subfunction
1957 enacted

General government:
603 Executive direction and management




$10,715

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$11,521

$11,875

1957 actual

$10,399

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$11,526

$11,763
59

60

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE

Organization unit and account title

C O M P E N S A T I O N OF T H E

Functional
code

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)
1957
actual

1958
estimate

PRESIDENT

Current authorizations:
Compensation of the President..

603

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

603

1,875,000

2,051,970

2,051,970

1,875,555

2,025,000

603

1,500,000

1,375,000

1,500,000

1,344,403

1,375,000

603
603

383,775

400,400

415,400

389,937
33,100

395,000
56,057

383,775

400,400

415,400

423,037

451,057

603

3,935,000

4,205,000

4,205,000

3,852,625

4,190,000

603

365,700

375,000

375,000

339,514

374,000

603

248,000

700,000

700,000

252,020

672,430

2,200,000

2,214,000

2,420,000

2,112,222
1,047

2,237,000
1,933

2,200,000

2,214,000

2,420,000

2,113,2

2,238,933

57,500

50,000

57,500

T H E W H I T E HOUSE OFFICE
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses..
SPECIAL PROJECTS
Current authorizations:
Special projects.
EXECUTIVE MANSION AND

GROUNDS

Current authorizations:
Executive Mansion and Grounds..
Addition to Executive Mansion...
Total, Executive Mansion and Grounds
B U R E A U OF T H E B U D G E T
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

-

C O U N C I L OF E C O N O M I C

ADVISERS

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses..
NATIONAL SECURITY

COUNCIL

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
O F F I C E OF D E F E N S E

MOBILIZATION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Defense rental areas division..

603

Total, Office of Defense Mobilization..
P R E S I D E N T ' S A D V I S O R Y C O M M I T T E E ON G O V E R N M E N T
ORGANIZATION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

603

34,763

49,000

13,676

380

PRESIDENT'S COMMISSION ON V E T E R A N S ' PENSIONS
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

-

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures..

603
10,714,975

11,521,370

11,874,870

10,398,862

11,525,800

$10,714,975

$11,521,370

$11,874,870

$10,398,862

$11,525,800

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
Appropriations




61

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

C O M P E N S A T I O N OF T H E

Total

Unobli-

Total

Unobligated

Total

New obligational
author- New obli- Balances
ity
gational
of prior
authorauthority
ity

PRESIDENT

Current authorizations:
Compensation of the President

...

$150

$150

T H E W H I T E HOUSE OFFICE
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.

$131

$102

$129

2,052

1,920

$113

126

145

145

1,500

1,310

140

16

415

394

16

67

16

415

394

16

192

195

210

4,205

3,981

209

15

14

15

375

360

15

18

14

42

700

658

42

137

149

126
2

2,420

2,275

120
2

137

153

128

2,420

2,275

122

58

55

SPECIAL PROJECTS
Current authorizations:
Special projects
EXECUTIVE MANSION AND

GROUNDS

Current authorizations:
Executive Mansion and GroundsAddition to Executive M a n s i o n -

18

Total, Executive Mansion and Grounds
B U R E A U OF T H E

107

50

BUDGET

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
C O U N C I L OF E C O N O M I C A D V I S E R S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
NATIONAL SECURITY

COUNCIL

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses .
O F F I C E OF D E F E N S E

MOBILIZATION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Defense rental areas division
Total, Office of Defense Mobilization.
PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY C O M M I T T E E
GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION

ON

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
PRESIDENT'S COMMISSION ON V E T E R A N S '
PENSIONS
Current authorizations:
15

Salaries and expenses
Total, Executive Office of the President..

89

743

50

11,875

11,103

$743

$50

$11,875

$11,103

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations




660

Balance, start
of 1960

Unobligated

62




THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959
SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES
[In thousands]
1957 actual

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

Balances brought forward at start of year from authorizations enacted or
recommended in this document: Appropriations

$743

$692

$688

New obligational authority:
Enacted or recommended in this document: Current authorizations: Appropriations

10,715

11,521

11,875

11,469

12,213

12,563

10,399

11, 526

10,399

11, 526

11,763

692

688

800

$10,385

$11,571

$11,875

Other amounts available:
Restored from certified claims account
, .. .
Adjustment of balances upward in expired accounts, net

,

6
5

^

11

Total other amounts available
Total budget authorizations available
Expenditures:
From obligational authority enacted or recommended:
Out of new obligational authority
Out of balances of prior obligational authority
Total budget expenditures

.

__

Amounts no longer available:
Unobligated balances expiring and lapsing
__ _ _
Adjustment of balances downward in expired accounts, net
Total amounts no longer available

»

Balances carried forward at close of year from authorizations enacted or
recommended in this document: Appropriations...

Obligations incurred, net

J

1

J

11,103
660

369
9
378

63

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT

SPECIAL PROJECTS

Current authorizations:

Current authorizations:

For compensation of the President, including an expense allowance
at the rate of $50,000 per annum as authorized by the Act of January
19, 1949 (3 U. S. C. 102), $150,000. (General Government Matters
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 5 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 5 0 , 0 0 0
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

150,000

150,000

Financing:
Appropriation
thority)- -

(new

obligational

PROJECTS

150,000

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Compensation of the President (total
obligations)
_ _.

SPECIAL

For expenses necessary to provide staff assistance for the President in connection with special projects, to be expended in his discretion and without regard to such provisions of law regarding the
expenditure of Government funds or the compensation and employment of persons in the Government service as he may specify,
[$1,375,0001 $1,500,000: Provided, That not to exceed 10 per
centum of this appropriation may be used to reimburse the appropriation for "Salaries and expenses", The White House Office, for
administrative services. (<General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$1,375,000

Program and Financing

au-

1957 actual
Object Classification
01

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

Personal services. _

Program by activities:
Administration (total obligations)

SALARIES AND

EXPENSES

For expenses necessary for The White House Office, including not
to exceed $215,000 for services as authorized by section 15 of the
Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at such per diem rates for
individuals as the President may specify, and other personal services
without regard to the provisions of law regulating the employment
and compensation of persons in the Government service; expenses of
attendance at meetings; newspapers, periodicals, teletype news service, and travel and official entertainment expenses of the President,
to be accounted for solely on his certificate; $2,051,970. (General
Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Estimate 1959, $ 2 , 0 5 1 , 9 7 0
Appropriated 1958, $ 2 , 0 5 1 , 9 7 0
Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Administration (total obligations)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,051,970

$2,051,970

2,051,970

2,051,970

$1,846,946

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available -

28,054

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1,875,000

These funds provide the President with staff assistance
and provide administrative services for The White House
Office.
Object Classification

1957 actual

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services,.

Total personal services.
Traveling expenses of the President. _.
Other travel
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments.
02

Total obligations




6.9

$5,167

1959 estimate
272
4
272
272

272
3
272
272
6.8

$5,259

6.8

$5,259

$1, 534, 710
60,668
76,880

$1,615, 735
70,000
92,400

$1, 615, 735
75,000
92,400

1,672,258
29,062
8,763
51, 061
2,533
35, 448
5,127
1,614
31, 899
9,181

1, 778,135
40,000
25,000
50,000
4,000
30,000
5,386
1,614
30,000
15,000
66, 835
6,000

1, 783,135
40,000
25,000
50,000
4,000
30,000
5,000
2,000
30,000
10,000
66, 835
6,000

2,051,970

2,051,970

1,846,946

$1, 500,000

1,375,000

1, 500,000

This fund is used by the President for staff assistance
on special problems which arise from time to time but
cannot be considered the responsibility of an existing
agency. Examples of the type of assistance provided
during the current year are projects on the coordination
of the Nation's scientific effort, disarmament, and coordination of public works planning.
Object Classification
1957 actual

140
145

2,685

$894,850
111, 250
18,300
9,825
130, 750
100, 000
36,180
29,450
39,120
5,275

$1,067,860
96,650
14,500
10, 200
76,040
150, 000
27, 680
18, 500
32,800
5, 770

1,358,386

Total obligations

117
117

$851,224
118,491
17,504
13,768
180,874
100, 000
34,080
39,760

Personal services: Positions other than
permanent
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.. _
15 Taxes and assessments

02
04
06
07

1959 estimate

113
113

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

1958 estimate

1,375,000

1, 500,000

EXECUTIVE MANSION AND GROUNDS
Current authorizations:

1958 estimate

268
3
271
273

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

$1,375,000

1, 500,000

01
1957 actual

1959 estimate

141,614

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

Current authorizations:

1958 estimate

$1,358,386

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

THE WHITE HOUSE OFFICE

Average GS grade and salary

$1,500,000

EXECUTIVE

MANSION

AND

GROUNDS

For the care, maintenance, repair and alteration, refurnishing,
improvement, heating and lighting, including electric power and fixtures, of the Executive Mansion and the Executive Mansion grounds
and traveling expenses, to be expended as the President may determine, notwithstanding the provisions of this or any other Act,
[$400,400] $415,400. (8 U. S. C. 109-110; D. C. Code 8-108 (1951
edition); General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 4 0 0 , 4 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 4 1 5 , 4 0 0
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$383,775

$400,400

$415,400

383,775

400,400

415,400

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Care, maintenance, and operation of
the Executive Mansion and the surrounding grounds (total obligations)
Financing:
Appropriation (new
thority)

obligational

au-

64

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1959

EXECUTIVE MANSION AND GROUNDS-Continued

Program and Financing

Current authorizations—Continued
EXECUTIVE

MANSION

AND

1957 actual
GROUNDS—Continued

These funds provide for the care, maintenance, and
operation of the Executive Mansion and the surrounding
grounds.
Object Classification

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions _
Average number of all employeesNumber of employees at end of year. _ __

72
3
70
72

72
7
76
72

72
7
76
72

Average salary of ungraded positions- . _

$3, 794

$3,867

$4, 037

$254,016
11,368
25,451

$265, 616
24,945
8,395

$280, 616
24,945
8, 395

290,835
23
4
34, 412
40
15,386
42,218
650

298,956

145
30, 890
125
14,100
34,575
4,984
16, 625

400, 400

415,400

$236,500
448,600
183,300

$237,000
449,300
183,700

321,467
346,090

389,800
364,000

390,600
364,800

372,169
283,373
377,466
424, 424
423,907

400,400
302, 700
405, 700
459, 400
447,300

401,300
303,400
406,600
460,400
448,300

313,956

145
30,890
125
14,100
34, 575
4,984
16, 625

1959 estimate

$191,165
410,685
170,275

Program by activities:
1. Office of accounting
2. Office of budget review..
3. Office of legislative reference
4. Office of management and organization
5. Office of statistical standards
6. Program divisions:
(a) Commerce and
finance
...
(b) International
(c) Labor and welfare
(d) Military
.
(e) Resources and civil works
7. Executive direction and administration

1958 estimate

01

Personal services:
* Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

-

Total personal services.
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services.
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials.
.
___ __
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments..
__.

207

Total obligations

383,775

ADDITION

TO E X E C U T I V E

MANSION

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Additions and improvements
obligations)

(total

1958 estimate

$39, 600

$49, 557

-89,157
49, 557

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward.
Unobligated balance carried forward

1959 estimate

- 4 9 , 557

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

This account has been used for improvements to the
grounds of the White House and for unusual repairs in
the Executive Mansion.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Total obligations

$6, 500
4,753
8,191
428
19,728

$5, 857
40,000
500
3,200

39,600

01 Personal services
07 Other contractual services _ _
08 Supplies and materials.
_____
09 Equipment
_ .__
10 Lands and structures _ _ _
_ __ _

1959 estimate

537, 659

567,300

559,600

3,858,680

Total obligations

4,205,000

4, 205,000

4,205,000

4, 205,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

76,320
3,935,000

The Bureau assists the President in the discharge of
his budgetary, management, and other executive responsibilities.
1. Office of accounting.—Direction is given to programs
for improving accounting and financial management in
the executive agencies, in collaboration with the General
Accounting Office and the Treasury Department.
2. Office of budget review.—Budget instructions and procedures are developed, review of agency estimates is
coordinated, and the budget document is prepared.
3. Office of legislative reference.—-Proposed legislation
and agency reports on pending legislation, enrolled bills,
and proposed Executive orders and proclamations are
reviewed for the President.
4. Office of management and organization.—Programs
and plans are developed for improved Government
organization and procedures, and guidance is provided in
the work of the Bureau to improve agency management
and operations.
5. Office of statistical standards.—Proposed agency
reporting plans and forms are reviewed, and the Government's statistical activities, coverage, and methods are
coordinated and improved.
6. Program divisions.—Agency programs, budget requests, and management activities are examined, appropriations are apportioned, proposed changes in agency
functions are studied, and agencies are assisted in the
improvement of their administration. Responsibility for
this work with respect to particular agencies is divided
among five divisions: (a) commerce and finance, (6) international, (c) labor and welfare, (d) military, and (e)
resources and civil works.

49, 557

Object Classification
1957 actual

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET
Current authorizations:
S A L A R I E S AND

EXPENSES

For expenses necessary for the Bureau of the Budget, including
newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding $400); teletype news
service (not exceeding $900); not to exceed $110,000 for expenses of
travel; expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of this appropriation; and not to exceed $20,000 for services
as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C.
55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for individuals; $4,205,000.
(81 U. S. C. 1-24, 665, 847-849, 852; 5 U. S. C. 46e, 188t, 189-189J,
885-842, 1151, 2188; 89 U. S. C. 902 (g); 40 U. S. C. 856 (e); 44
U. S. C. 220; General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $4,205,000




Estimate 1959, $4,205,000

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
..
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions

02
03
04
06
07

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

453
5
442
440

452
5
441
440

456
3
432
440
10. 5

$7,926

10.5

$7,965

10.5

$8,014

$3, 452, 901
25,861
8,897

$3,519,700
40,000
22,300

$3,511,800
40,000
22,200

3, 487, 659
86,210
206
56,323
127, 687
18,074
26, 025
29,272
26,382

3, 582,000
110, 000
2,000
56,000
139,000
18, 000
26,000
28,000
22,000
221,000

3,574,000
110,000
2,000
56,000
139,000
18,000
26,000
28,000
22,000
229, 000

65

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
Object Classification

Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual
13
15

1958 estimate

$104
738

$1, 000

$1,000

3,858, 680

4,205, 000

4, 205, 000

Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments
..
Total obligations

1957 actual

1959 estimate
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees, _ _ __
Number of employees at end of year _ _ _
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

Intragovernmental funds:
ADVANCES AND R E I M B U R S E M E N T S
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Office of accounting __ _
2. Office of budget review
__
3. Office of legislative reference
4. Office of management and organization _
__
5. International division
...
6. Executive direction and administration,-

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$200
900
200

$200
900
200

$350
2, 228
2,621

2,100

2,100

8,600

8, 600
12, 000

11, 600
400

12, 000

13, 799

12, 000

Total financing, __

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

2
2
2

Average GS grade and salary

10.0

Personal services: Permanent
tions
.

31
2
32
31

$4, 729
$11, 658

6.4

$4,804
$12, 256

6.4

$4, 894
$12, 256

$268, 845
18, 913
7,506

309, 500
12, 000

309, 500
12,000

1, 419

5,000
14, 000
1, 500
14, 000
2, 200
1, 500
14, 300
1,000

5, 000
14, 000
1,500
14,000
2,200
1, 500
14, 300
1,000

337, 690

Total obligations

$281, 500
20, 000
8, 000

295,264
5, 439
1
5, 283
9, 214
1,310
12, 885
2, 253
4, 622

Total personal services
. .
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services. _
._ .
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
_____
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments

02
03
04
06
07

$281, 500
20, 000
8, 000

375, 000

375, 000

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts.. . . .
__ _ _
Non-Federal sources (58 Stat. 845)

01

6. 3

Personal services:
Permanent positions
.
_ ...
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
_ __

12, 000

31
2
32
31

31
2
30
31

12,000

13,449
350

1959 estimate

8, 600

13, 799

Total obligations

1958 estimate

posi-

$7, 775

2
2
2
10. 0

$13, 799

$7, 775

2
2
2
10. 0

$12, 000

$7, 775
$12,000

Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

For expenses necessary for the National Security Council,
including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not in excess of $50 per diem for
individuals; acceptance and utilization of voluntary and uncompensated services; and expenses of attendance at meetings concerned
with work related to the activity of the Council; $700,000. (50
U. S. C. 402; General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $700,000

Estimate 1959, $700,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$248,000

$260,000
440,000

$260,000
440,000

_

248,000

700,000

700,000

(new obligational au. . . __ .
__ _ __ .

248,000

700,000

700,000

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS
Program by activities:
1. Policy coordination
2. Operations coordination,

Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

Total obligations.. . .

For necessary expenses of the Council in carrying out its functions under the Employment Act of 1946 (15 U. S. C. 1021), including newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding $400); not exceeding
$15,000 for expenses of travel; expenses of attendance at meetings
concerned with the purposes of this appropriation; and press clippings (not exceeding $300); $375,000. (General Government
Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $375,000

Estimate 1959, $375,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Economic analysis (total obligations).__

$337, 690

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$375, 000

$375,000

375,000

375, 000

28,010

Appropriation (new obligational authority).

365, 700

The Council of Economic Advisers analyzes the
national economy and its various segments; advises the
President on economic developments; recommends policies
for economic growth and stability; appraises economic
programs and policies of the Federal Government; and
assists in preparation of the annual Economic Report of
the President to Congress.
440000—58




5

Financing:
Appropriation
thority)..

_

1. Policy coordination.—The National Security Council
advises the President regarding national security policies.
Also, the Central Intelligence Agency is under the direction of the Council. Members of the Council are the
President, the Vice President, the Secretary of State, the
Secretary of Defense, the Director of the Office of Defense
Mobilization, and, as directed by the President, other high
officials. Staff services for the Council's policy coordination activities are financed from this appropriation.
2. Operations coordination.—The Operations Coordinating Board was established in 1953 to advise, when directed by the President, with the responsible executive
agencies to assist in coordinating implementation of national security policies approved by him on the Council's
recommendation. The Board is composed of the Under
Secretary of State, the Deputy Secretary of Defense, the
Director of Central Intelligence, the Director of the United
States Information Agency, one or more representatives
of the President, and, as necessary, officials of other
agencies. In 1957 and prior years, staff services for the
Board's operations coordination activities were financed

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

66

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL-Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES—Continued

from member agencies7 appropriations. Since July 1,
1957, when the Board was established within the structure of the Council by Executive Order 10700, such services
have been financed from this appropriation.
Object Classification
1957 actual

77
1
74
77

77
1
74
77

27
26
9. 9

Average GS grade and salary

1959 estimate

28

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year

01

1958 estimate

Personal services:
Permanent positions
.
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$7,439

10. 2

$7, 703

10. 2

$7, 779

$585, 715
3,000
7, 331

$590, 934
1,000
7,353

218, 495
411
4,017
642
836
19, 588
2,538
1, 473

596,046
3,500
13,000
1,200
3, 614
35, 800
6,800
2,200
37, 840

599, 287
3,500
10,000
1,000
3,634
33, 850
6,800
2,200
39, 729

248,000

700,000

700, 000

$211,860
6,635

Total personal services
02 Travel
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions . _
Total obligations.. _

OFFICE OF DEFENSE MOBILIZATION
Current authorizations:
S A L A R I E S AND

whenever he has reason to believe that imports threaten
to impair the national security. The Director is responsible for policies and programs for the acquisition and
storage of materials for the national stockpile. In 1959,
the agency will begin financing the full-time staffs (consisting of 2 people each) of the Regional Mobilization
Committees in 8 cities to provide for better coordination
of the emergency planning by Federal agencies.
2. Interdepartmental Radio Advisory Committee.—The
Committee assists the Director in the allocation of radio
frequencies to Government stations and the coordination
of governmentwide telecommunications policies.
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
_
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees-.
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary.
01

254
6
244
254

$7,616

9. 7

$7,807

9. 7

$7, 711

$1,714,909
72,620
41, 265

$1,848,400
78, 750
35,800

1, 868,025
91,391
284
44, 740
2,524
28.622
529
10,806
56, 634
13, 657
9,086
225
1,900

1,828. 794
89, 580
1,000
44,000
12, 490
31, 050
1,000
11, 900
57,160
17, 900
8,200
107,326
1,000
2,600

1,962,950
114,165
950
44,000
20,950
27, 500
1,000
11, 800
82, 000
23, 600
7, 900
120,285
500
2,400

2,128,423

Total obligations

For expenses necessary for the Office of Defense Mobilization,
including newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding $500); hire of
passenger motor vehicles; reimbursement of the General Services
Administration for security guard service; and expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of this appropriation;
[$2,214,000] $2,420,000, of which [$182,000] $185,000 shall be
available for the Interdepartmental Radio Advisory Committee:
Provided, That contracts for not to exceed eight persons under this
appropriation for temporary or intermittent services as authorized
by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), may be
renewed annually. (60 Stat. 810; General Government Matters
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $2,214,000
Estimate 1959, $2,420,000

238
5
223
240

$1,745, 230
74,242
48, 553

Total personal services. _
02 Travel.. _ _
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
___
05 Rents and utility services.
06 Printing and reproduction..
Photographing
_
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
_
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

EXPENSES

1959 estimate

251
5
234
244

. . . 9. 6

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

1958 estimate

2,214, 000

2,420,000

ALLOCATIONS RECEIVED F R O M

OTHER

ACCOUNTS

NOTE—Obligations incurred under allocations from other accounts are included in
the schedules of the parent appropriations as follows:
"Military construction, Army."
"Emergency fund for the President, national defense."

Intragovernmental funds:
ADVANCES

AND

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing

Piogram and Financing
1957 actual
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Direction of defense mobilization
program
2. Interdepartmental Radio Advisory
Committee.
Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority)

$1,992,128

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,032,000

$2,235, 000

136,295

182,000

185,000

2,128,423

2, 214,000

2,420,000

71,577
2,200,000

2, 214,000

2,420,000

1. Direction of defense mobilization program.—The
Office coordinates all mobilization activities of the executive branch of the Government, including production,
procurement, manpower, health, stabilization, transportation, protection of facilities important to the national
defense, telecommunications, and control of electromagnetic radiation. The Director advises the President concerning policies and programs respecting the coordination
of military, industrial, and civilian mobilization, and




Program by activities:
1. Health resources advisory committee: Consultant services to Selective Service System
__ _ _
2. Science advisory committee: Miscellaneous services
...
3. Miscellaneous services to other accounts
Total

1958 estimate

$12,791

1959 estimate

$13,000

$13,000

15,000
176

bligations

12, 967

28,000

13,000

Financing:
Advances
reimbursements from
other accounts

12,967

28,000

13,000

1
1
1

2
1
1

1
1
1

$7,209
5,757
1

$17,280
10,420
25
50
225

$5, 600
7,400

12,967

28,000

13,000

Object Classification
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
__
Number of employees at end of year.
01
02
04
08
15

Personal services: Positions
than permanent
Travel
Communication services
Supplies and materials
Taxes and assessments
Total obligations

other
__
.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

67

purchase requisition that such special features or equipment are
essential for the proper performance of such activities.
SEC. 202. Unless otherwise specified and during the current fiscal
year, no part of any appropriation contained in this or any other
Current authorizations:
Act shall be used to pay the compensation of any officer or employee
of the Government of the United States (including any agency the
SALARIES
AND
EXPENSES
majority of the stock of which is owned by the Government of the
United States) whose post of duty is in continental United States
For necessary expenses of the President's Advisory Committee on
unless such person (1) is a citizen of the United States, (2) is a
Government Organization, established by Executive Order 10432 of
person in the service of the United States on the date of enactment
January 24, 1953, including services as authorized by section 15 of
of this Act who, being eligible for citizenship, had filed a declaration
the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to exceed
of intention to become a citizen of the United States prior to such
$50 per diem for individuals; expenses of attendance at meetings
date, (3) is a person who owes allegiance to the United States, or
concerned with the purposes of the Committee; and actual trans(4) is an alien from the Baltic countries lawfully admitted to the
portation expenses and an allowance of not to exceed $15 per diem
United States for permanent residence: Provided, That for the purin lieu of subsistence while away from their homes or regular places pose of this section, an affidavit signed by any such person shall be
of business, for members of the Committee and other persons serv- considered prima facie evidence that the requirements of this
ing without compensation; [$50,000] $57,500. (General Govern- section with respect to his status have been complied with: Provided
ment Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
further, That any person making a false affidavit shall be guilty of
Appropriated 1958, $ 5 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 5 7 , 5 0 0 a felony and, upon conviction, shall be fined not more than $4,000
or imprisoned for not more than one year, or both: Provided further,
That the above penal clause shall be in addition to, and not in
Program and Financing
substitution for, any other provisions of existing law: Provided
further, That any payment made to any officer or employee con1957 actual
1958 estimate 1959 estimate
trary to the provisions of this section shall be recoverable in action
by the Federal Government. This section shall not apply to
Program by activities:
citizens of the Republic of the Philippines or to nationals of those
Staff services, administration, and recountries allied with the United States in the current defense
search (total obligations)
$34,948
$50,000
$57, 500
effort, or to temporary employment of translators, or to temporary
Financing
employment in the field service (not to exceed sixty days) as a
22,552
Unobligated balance no longer available.
result of emergencies.
Appropriation (new obligational auSEC. 203. Appropriations of the executive departments and inde50,000
57, 500
57,500
thority)
pendent establishments for the current fiscal year, available for
expenses of travel or for the expenses of the activity concerned, are
hereby made available for living quarters allowances in accordance
The President's Advisory Committee on Government with the Act of June 26, 1930 (5 U. S. C. 118a), and regulations
Organization advises the President, the Assistant to the prescribed thereunder, and cost-of-living allowances similar to those
President, and the Director of the Bureau of the Budget allowed under section 901 (2) of the Foreign Service Act of 1946,
in accordance with and to the extent prescribed by regulations of the
on major organizational problems and the development of President, for all civilian officers and employees of the Government
proposed corrective actions by means of reorganization permanently stationed in foreign countries: Provided, That the
plans, Executive orders, and other administrative actions. availability of appropriations made to the Department of State for
carrying out the provisions of the Foreign Service Act of 1946 shall
not be affected hereby.
Object Classification
SEC. 204. No part of any appropriation for the current fiscal year
contained in this or any other Act shall be paid to any person for
1958 estimate 1959 estimate
1957 actual
the filling of any position for which he or she has been nominated
after the Senate has voted not to approve the nomination of said
5
Total number of permanent positions
5
5
person.
1
1
Full-time equivalent of all other positions6
4
5
Average number of all employees.
SEC. 205. No part of any appropriation contained in this or any
5
Number of employees at end of year
6
5
other Act for the current fiscal year shall be used to pay in excess
of $4 per volume for the current and future volumes of the United
Average GS grade and s ilary
$8, 734 11. 6 $8, 865
11.6
$8, 660 11. 6
States Code Annotated, and such volumes shall be purchased on con01 Personal services:
dition and with the understanding that latest published cumulative
$44, 325
Permanent positions
$37, 845
$29, 619
annual pocket parts issued prior to the date of purchase shall be
2,000
3, 000
Positions other than permanent
100
465
163
Other personal services
300
furnished free of charge, or in excess of $4.25 per volume for the
current or future volumes of the Lifetime Federal Digest.
47, 625
Total personal services
29, 882
40, 310
SEC. 206. Funds made available by this or any other Act for
02 Travel
1,269
2,500
2, 500
04 Communication services
614
1,000
1,000
administrative expenses in the current fiscal year of the corporations
07 Other contractual services: Services
and agencies subject to the Government Corporation Control Act, as
2,000
2, 000
2,000
performed by other agencies
_
amended (31 U. S. C. 841), shall be available, in addition to objects
1,000
1,000
808
08 Supplies and materials
250
400
374
09 Equipment
for which such funds are otherwise available, for rent in the District
2,840
2,875
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
of Columbia; services in accordance with section 15 of the Act of
100
100
1
15 Taxes and assessments
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); and the objects specified under this
34, 948
50,000
57, 500
Total obligations
head, all the provisions of which shall be applicable to the expenditure of such funds unless otherwise specified in the Act by which they
are made available: Provided, That in the event any functions
budgeted as administrative expenses are subsequently transferred
to or paid from other funds, the limitations on administrative
GENERAL PROVISIONS
expenses shall be correspondingly reduced.
SEC. 207. No part of any funds of or available to any wholly
D E P A R T M E N T S , AGENCIES, AND CORPORATIONS
owned Government corporation shall be used for the purchase or
construction, or in making loans for the purchase or construction
SEC. 201. Unless otherwise specifically provided, the maximum
amount allowable during the current fiscal year, in accordance with of any office building, without specific authority in law therefor,
section 16 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 78), for the pur- primarily for occupancy by any department or agency of the
chase of any passenger motor vehicle (exclusive of buses and ambu- United States Government or by any corporation owned by the
lances), is hereby fixed at $1,500 except station wagons for which the United States Government.
SEC. 208. During the current fiscal year, the provisions of Bureau
maximum shall be $1,950: Provided, That such amounts may be
exceeded by the net extra cost, not to exceed $800, of any special features of the Budget Circular A-45, dated June 3, 1952, shall be controlling
or equipment which, while affecting the operation of the vehicle as a over the activities of all departments, agencies, and corporations of
passenger carrying vehicle, are required to render it suitable and safe the Government: Provided, That said circular may be amended or
for the carrying out of criminal law enforcement or police type activities changed during such year by the Director of the Budget with the
by the Departments of the Treasury, Interior, and Justice, upon cer- approval of the chairman of the Committee on Appropriations of
tification by the head of the agency concerned, with respect to each the House of Representatives: Provided further, That the Bureau of

PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON
GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION




68

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959
similar items, to the extent and in the manner authorized by law,
without reimbursement to the Treasury: Provided further, That
nothing in section 1415 of the Act of July 15, 1952, or in this section
shall be construed to prevent the making of new or the carrying out
of existing contracts, agreements, or executive agreements for
periods in excess of one year, in any case where such contracts,
agreements, or executive agreements for periods in excess of one
year were permitted prior to the enactment of this Act under
section 32 (b) (2) of the Surplus Property Act of 1944, as amended
(50 U. S. C. App. 1641 (b) (2)), and the performance of all such
contracts, agreements, or executive agreements shall be subject to
the availability of appropriations for the purchase of credits as
provided by law.
[SEC. 210. Hereafter, any appropriation required to be apportioned pursuant to section 3679 of the Revised Statutes, as amended,
may be apportioned on a basis indicating the need for a supplemental
or deficiency estimate of appropriation to the extent necessary to
permit payment of such pay increases as may be granted those
employees (commonly known as wage-board employees) whose compensation is fixed and adjusted from time to time in accordance with
prevailing rates (5 U. S. C. 1082 (7)).] (General Government Matters
Appropriation Act, 1958.)

GENERAL PROVISIONS—Continued
DEPARTMENTS,

AGENCIES,

AND

CORPORATIONS—Continued

the Budget shall make a report to Congress not later than January
31, [1958] 1959, of the operations of this order upon all departments, agencies, and corporations of the Government: Provided
further, That, notwithstanding the provisions of any other law, no
officer or employee shall be required to occupy any Governmentowned quarters unless the head of the agency concerned shall determine that necessary service cannot be rendered or property of
the United States cannot be adequately protected otherwise.
SEC. 209. Pursuant to section 1415 of the Act of July 15, 1952 ([66
Stat. 662J 81 U. S. C. 724), foreign credits (including currencies)
owed to or owned by the United States may be used by Federal
agencies for any purpose for which appropriations are made for the
current fiscal year (including the carrying out of Acts requiring or
authorizing the use of such credits) and for liquidation of obligations
legally incurred against such credits prior to July 1, 1953, only when
reimbursement therefor is made to the Treasury from applicable
appropriations of the agency concerned: Provided, That such credits
received as exchange allowances or proceeds of sales of personal
property may be used in whole or part payment for acquisition of

Statement of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles for the fiscal year 1959
EXECUTIVE

Appropriation

Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Number

Gross
cost

OFFICE

Old vehicles to
be exchanged
Number

Allowance
(estimate)

OF T H E

Net cost
of vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles
still to
be used

PRESIDENT

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Users and public purpose

B U R E A U OF THE BUDGET

Salaries and expenses

$2,200

For transportation of officials and staff of the Bureau of the
Budget to departmental offices in Washington.

420

For transportation of officials and staff members of the Council
of Economic Advisers to departmental offices in Washington.

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS

Salaries and expenses
NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

For courier service.

Salaries and expenses: Station wagon.
OFFICE OF DEFENSE MOBILIZATION

Salaries and expenses

Total, Executive Office of the
President.




3,000

5,620

Director: To provide transportation for the Director, to and
from official meetings in Washington, D . C., with Members
of Congress and other Government officials. In addition,
trips to classified locations. Messengers: Delivery of classified and special documents in the Washington area.

F U N D S A P P R O P R I A T E D T O T H E PRESIDENT
The 1959 budget includes $3,949 million for several programs of the Government for which new obligational
authority is granted directly to the President, who may
designate officials or agencies to act for him in carrying
out the activities involved. The amount for these various
activities is $1,143 million more than in 1958, primarily
because of the increase recommended for the mutual
security program. The 1959 request for this program
is $3,940 million, compared with a total availability in
1958 of $3,528 million which includes authority to use
$764 million of unobligated prior year funds.
Military assistance and defense support.—Expenditures
for military assistance to friendly nations abroad will not
change significantly in 1959. It is expected that delivery
of missiles will begin, while delivery of conventional
weapons will start to decline. The request of $865 million
for defense support in 1959 is $140 million more than the
total availability in 1958; the increase is mainly for Far
Eastern and Middle Eastern countries, which account for
about 90% of the program.
Economic and technical development.—New obligational
authority recommended for 1959 for international economic and technical development is $350 million more
than total availability in 1958. A large part of the increase is to provide the development loan fund with sufficient working capital to meet an anticipated sharp rise in
loan commitments; $625 million is requested for this
purpose in 1959 compared with $300 million appropriated
for 1958, the year in which the fund started.
The budget also provides increases for technical cooperation (mainly for a larger United States contribution to the
United Nations technical assistance program), for participation in worldwide malaria eradication, and for contingencies. Provision is also made for a number of other
special activities, such as the United States contribution
to the United Nations children's fund.
Foreign information and exchange.—New obligational
authority of $7.6 million is recommended for the President's special international program for 1959, compared
with $15.1 million for 1958. The program for 1959 includes (1) about 35 cultural presentation projects, such as




overseas tours of orchestras and theatrical, musical, dance,
and sports groups; (2) participation in 18 trade fairs and
exhibitions, including exhibits in Eastern Europe and
adjacent areas.
Expansion of defense production.—No new obligational
authority for 1959 is included in the budget for the expansion of defense production. Borrowing from the
Treasury up to a limit of $2.1 billion is authorized under
present law. This program encourages the expansion of
production capacity for materials needed for defense—
mainly by means of loans, purchase contracts, and commitment contracts to purchase output if not sold by the
producer in the open market. To provide authority for
new activities that may be necessary in connection with
the parts of the defense program which are being accelerated, extension of the Defense Production Act for 2
years beyond its present expiration date of June 30, 1958,
is being requested.
Expenditures, chiefly for purchases of defense materials,
are estimated to increase from $130 million in 1957 to
$370 million in 1958, reflecting the softening of private
markets for minerals and metals, which has caused producers to exercise their option under earlier contracts
which committed the Government to purchase. Aluminum, copper, and titanium comprise the major portion
of the materials delivered under such contracts. The
budget contemplates a tapering off of such deliveries in
1959 as contracts expire. Budget expenditures in 1959
are therefore estimated to decrease by $98 million to
$272 million.
The defense production expansion program is carried
on in close coordination with the program of the General
Services Administration for stockpiling strategic and
critical materials.
Disaster relief.—The budget includes no request for
new obligational authority for 1959 to provide assistance
to State and local governments in the relief of damage
and suffering caused by natural disasters. In 1958, $25
million wTas appropriated for this purpose. It is estimated
that $18.1 million will be available for obligation in 1959
from appropriations enacted in prior years.
69

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

70

R E C A P I T U L A T I O N OF B U D G E T AUTHORIZATIONS A N D E X P E N D I T U R E S
By function and subfunction
[In thousands]
New obligational authority
1957 enacted

1958 estimate

Major national security:
057 Stockpiling and defense production expansion
058 Mutual defense assistance:
Military assistance..Defense support.

$2,017,500
1,109, 700

$1,340,000
689,000

Total, major national security

3,127, 200

Total, funds appropriated to the President




1959 estimate

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$129,837
$1,800,000
865,000

2,351,800
1,143,468

2, 200,000
945,001

2, 200,000
885,000

2,029,000

2,665,000

3,625,106

3,514,776

3,356,864

735,183
15,145

1,275,000
7,600

463,919
6,663

604,823
15,434

783,213
10,542

750,328

1,282,600

470,582

620,257

793,755

6,000

25,000

14, 984

18,000

18,000

1,400
—

$271,864

699,071
_

$369,775

687,871
11, 200

International affairs and finance:
152 Economic and technical development
153 Foreign information and exchange activities
Total, international affairs and finance
Commerce and housing:
521 Disaster insurance, loans, and relief
General government:
603 Executive direction and management

Expenditures

1,000

1,000

155

1,425

1,264

3, 833, 671

2,805,328

3,948,600

4,110, 828

4,154,458

4,169,883

71

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE

Organization unit and account title

Functional
code

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)
1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

DEFENSE AID
Current authorizations:
Defense aid, special fund.
DISASTER

14,984, 415

18,000, 000

$18, 000, 000

46,163

1, 220,000

985, 000

129,836,897

$6, 000,000

E M E R G E N C Y F U N D FOR T H E

E X P A N S I O N OF D E F E N S E

603

369, 775,490

271,864,100

109,186

$1, 000,000

1, 000, 000

205,000

279, 000

PRODUCTION

Public enterprise funds:
Revolving fund, Defense Production A c t . . .
E X P E N S E S OF M A N A G E M E N T

$25,000,000

PRESIDENT

Current authorizations:
Emergency fund for the President, national defense

057
IMPROVEMENT

Current authorizations:
Expenses of management improvement
MUTUAL

$134,401

RELIEF

Current authorizations:
Disaster relief

603

400,000

058

2,017, 500, 000

1,340,000,000

2,351, 800, 464

2, 200,000,000

1,846,000,000

058

1,109,700,000

689,000,000

1,143,448,745

945,000,000

575,000,000

639,370,000

435,183,000

457,179,864

585,000,000

370,000,000

SECURITY

Current authorizations:
Military assistance:
Military assistance
Oommon-use items
Defense support:
Defense support
Defense support, Europe...
Defense support, Near East and Africa
Defense support, Asia
Defense support, Near East, Africa and South Asia
Mutual defense financing, defense support, economic and technical
assistance, Europe
Mutual defense financing, defense support, economic and technical
assistance, Formosa and the Associated States of Cambodia, Laos,
and Vietnam
Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific
Economic, technical, and other assistance:
Development assistance
Technical cooperation, general authorisation
United Nations expanded program of technical assistance
Technical cooperation programs of the Organization of American States.
Special assistance, general authorization
Special assistance in joint control areas in Europe
Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration
United Nations refugee fund
Escapee program
United Nations children's fund
United Nations Relief and Works Agency
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Ocean freight charges, United States voluntary relief agencies
Control Act expenses
General administrative expenses
Atoms for peace
President's fund for Asian economic development
Defense support, Latin America
Development assistance, American Republics and non-self-governing
territories of the Western Hemisphere
Development assistance, Asia
Development assistance, Near East and Africa
Economic and technical assistance, defense support, Asia and Pacific,
other than Formosa and the Associated States of Cambodia, Laos
and Vietnam
Economic and technical assistance, Near East and Africa
Foreign research reactor projects
Mutual security loans, Export-Import Bank of Washington
Ocean freight charges, surplus agricultural commodities
Palestine refugee program
Special economic assistance, India and Pakistan
Special Presidential fund




$37,945

152

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

72

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE-Continued

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

MUTUAL

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

1959
estimate

1957
actual

1958
estimate

SECURITY—Continued

Public enterprise funds:
Development loan fund (current appropriation)
Foreign investment guaranty fund (authorization to expend from debt
receipts)
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation) :
Military assistance
Defense support
Economic, technical, and other assistance
Development loan fund

152
152

$300,000,000

$20,000,000

$40, 000, 581

—$2,028,054

15, 434,272

183, 929

19, 452
12,837
68
70
86, 552
4,621

2, 764,183, 000

11, 200, 000

15,145,000

3,940,000,000

928

212
100,000
4,000
105,140

4,110,827,617

4,154, 458, 232

, 110, 827,617

4,154,458, 232

4,110, 827,617

4,154,458, 232

PROGRAM

Current authorizations:
President's special international program
REFUGEE

6, 662, 751

123,600

PRESIDENT'S SPECIAL I N T E R N A T I O N A L

3,749, 400, 000

$1,800,000,000
865,000,000
650,000,000
625,000,000
3, 806, 570, 581

Total, mutual security

3,950, 401,019

!, 625, 641

058
058
152
152

-600,000

153

7, 600, 000

RELIEF

Current authorizations:
Refugee relief

8, 500, 000
MISCELLANEOUS

Current authorizations:
Assistance to Greece and Turkey
Assistance to the Republic of Korea
Emergency relief liquidations
Expenses, international development
Obligations, defense aid, liquidation lend-lease program
United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration..

058
152
217
152
152
152

Total, miscellaneous..
3, 833, 670, 581

2, 805,328,000

3, 948,600,000

$3, 793, 670,000
40,000,581

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures..

$2, 805, 328, 000

$8, 600,000

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
A ppropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts..
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations

3, 940, 000,000
2, 805, 328,000

3,833, 670, 581

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures..

3, 948, 600,000

EXPENDITURES AND APPLICABLE RECEIPTS OF PUBLIC ENTERPRISE FUNDS
[In thousands]

Organization unit and account title

MUTUAL

GROSS EXPENDITURES
(funds applied)
1957

1958

1959

RECEIPTS FROM OPERATIONS
(funds provided)
1957

1958

1959

BUDGET EXPENDITURES

1957

1958

1959

SECURITY

Development loan fund:
Enacted or recommended
Proposed for later transmission
Foreign investment guaranty fund
E X P A N S I O N OF D E F E N S E

.
.

Total, public enterprise funds

152
152
152

$2,028

$20,011

600

$518
517
900

$100,044
75,000

$11

-$2,028

-600

$99,526
74,483
-900

$20,000

PRODUCTION

Revolving fund, Defense Production Act.




Functional
code

057

$312,413

485,623

342,803

182,576

115,848

70,939

129,837

369,775

271,864

312,413

505, 634

517,847

184, 604

116,459

72,874

127,809

389,175

444,973

73

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

. Unobli-

Total

New obligational
authorNew obliity
gational
authority

Balances
of prior
authority

Balance, start
of 1960

Unobligated

Total

DEFENSE AID
Current authorizations:
$256

DISASTER

$256

22, 774

Defense aid, special fund

29,268

$218

RELIEF

Current authorizations:
Disaster relief

13,123

20, 284

18,122

$18, 000

27, 284

i,284

E M E R G E N C Y F U N D FOR T H E
PRESIDENT
Current authorizations:
40

Emergency fund for the President, national defense E X P A N S I O N OF D E F E N S E

55

275

$1, 000

$930

70

PRODUCTION

Public enterprise funds:
Revolving fund, Defense Production Act:
Cash
Authorization to expend from debt receipts

262, 276

13,811
956, 271

470,725

34, 675
805,570

170, 502

34, 769
435, 700

Total, expansion of defense production-_

262, 276

970,082

470, 725

840, 245

170, 502

470, 469

519

528

1, 958,171

538,800

2,000, 402

1,117,462

36,000

642, 761

189,449

59,499

34, 619
163, 986

59, 499

271,864

198, 605

E X P E N S E S OF M A N A G E M E N T
IMPROVEMENT
Current authorizations:
Expenses of management improvement.
MUTUAL

Current authorizations:
Military assistance:
Military assistance1
Common-use items
Defense support:
Defense support
Defense support, Europe
Defense support, Near East and Africa.
Defense support, Asia
Defense support, Near East, Africa and South
Asia
Mutual defense financing, defense support,
economic and technical assistance, Europe
Mutual defense financing, defense support, economic and technical assistance, Formosa and
the Associated States of Cambodia, Laos, and
Vietnam
Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific
Economic, technical, and other assistance:
Development assistance
Technical cooperation, general authorization
United Nations expanded program of technical
assistance
Technical cooperation programs of the Organization of American States
Special assistance, general authorization
Special assistance in joint control areas in Europe.
Intergovernmental Committee for European
Migration
United Nations refugee fund
Escapee program
United Nations children's fund
United Nations Relief and Works Agency
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
Ocean freight charges, United States voluntary
relief agencies
Control Act expenses
General Administrative expenses
Atoms for peace
President's fund for Asian economic development.
Defense support, Latin America
Development assistance, American Republics and
non-self-governing territories of the Western
Hemisphere
Development assistance, Asia
Development assistance, Near East and Africa
* See footnotes on p. 74.




135

323

279

44

1, 093,124

1,846,000

339,822

1,065, 601

809, 601

575,000

234, 601

807,108

657, 291

370,000

287,291

SECURITY

195, 500

142,601

25, 000

74

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE-Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

MUTUAL

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Balance , start
of 1960

Estimated expenditures from—

New obligational
New obliauthorgational
ity
authority

Total

Balances
of prior
authority

Unobligated

Total

SECURITY—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued
Economic, technical, and other assistance—Con.
Economic and technical assistance, defense support, Asia and Pacific, other than Formosa and
the Associated States of Cambodia, Laos, and
Vietnam)
Economic and technical assistance, Near East
and Africa
Foreign research reactor projects
Mutual security loans, Export-Import Bank of
Washington
Ocean freight charges, surplus agricultural commodities
Palestine refugee program
Special economic assistance, India and Pakistan.
Special Presidential fund
Public enterprise funds:
Development loan fund (current appropriation)
Foreign investment guaranty fund:
Cash
Authorization to expend from debt receipts
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Military assistance
Defense support
_
Economic, technical, and other assistance
Development loan fund

$100,000

$69,210

$159,071

$105,177

$2,028
199,072

89,577

$99,526

$280,000

[

2,628 1
199,072

$1,800,000
865,000
650,000
625,000

r
1

$354,000
310,000
240,000
74,483

$180,474

70,377

3,528
199,072

225,517

-900

$474

1371,000
555,000
410,000
550,517

407,311

Total, mutual security

3,877,465

869,426

4,074, 211

218, 505

3,041, 716

3, 940, 000

978,483

2,889,626

296,368

3,131,305

628

2,073

3,024

6,610

3,110

6,321

7,600

5,831

4,711

200

3,379

PRESIDENT'S SPECIAL I N T E R N A T I O N A L
PROGRAM
Current authorizations:
President's special international program
REFUGEE

RELIEF

Current authorizations:
Refugee relief

184

1,510

MISCELLANEOUS
Current authorizations:
Assistance'to Greece and Turkey
__ _ _
Obligations, defense aid, liquidation lend-lease
program
_
United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration
_

1
1,730

Total, funds appropriated to the President

4,880,932

1,356,900

1,530

22

4

18

1,757
693,380

100

26

Total, miscellaneous

1,630

1,652

104

1,548

4,944,312

410,611

3,547,903

3,948,600

985,244

356,150

3,344,318

|
$283
1 129,876

i $876,122
363,058

3,184,639

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Revolving and management funds: Public enterprise funds
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations
_
^
Total, funds appropriated to the President

1

$361,894 $3,751,779
331,486 1,115,342

$780,998 $3,902,967
575,902 1,004,642

13,811

36,703

$50,532 $2,595,734
634,772
260,079
100,000

\

$8,600

$6,761 $3,184,639

I

317,397
3,940,000

693,380

4,880,932

1,356,900

4,944,312

410,611

3,547,903

985,244

3,184,639

356,150

Excludes outstanding common-item order reservations accounted for as balances under Department of Defense—Military Functions, see table on pp. 518-519.




218,621

225,517 11,886,517

978,483

3,948,600

474

3,344,318




FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
SUMMARY

75

OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES
[In thousands]
1957 actual

Balances brought forward at start of year from authorizations enacted or
recommended in this document:
Appropriations
__ __
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Revolving and management funds.

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$3, 751,779
1,115,342
13,811

8,600
3,940,000

2,805,328

3,948,600

-47,278

17,698

-47,278

17,698

9,107,210

Total budget authorizations available

2,805,328

392,607

Total balances other amounts available..

8,600

1,899
390, 708

Other amounts available:
Restored from certified claims account
Net transfers of balances from or to (—) other agencies

2,805,328

3,833, 671

Total new obligational authority -

3,547,903

3,833,671

Total new obligational authority enacted or recommended.
Proposed for later transmission: Appropriations

4,944,312

3,793,670
40,001

New obligational authority:
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
Appropriations
...
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts

$2,595, 734
634,772
317,397

4, 880, 932

Total balances brought forward

$3,902,967
1,004, 642
36,703

7,702,362

7,514,201

4,110,828

4,154,458

4,110,828

4,154,458

Expenditures:
From obligational authority enacted or recommended:
Out of new obligational authority
Out of balances of prior obligational authority
Total expenditures from obligational authority enacted or recommended
From obligational authority proposed for later transmission: Out of new
obligational authority

Amounts no longer available:
Unobligated balances expiring and lapsing
Adjustment of balances downward in expired accounts, net
Total amounts no longer available
Balances carried forward at close of year from authorizations:
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations. _
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Revolving and management funds
Proposed for later transmission: Appropriations
Total balances carried forward at close of year

- - _

_

f
1

6,761
3,184,639

3,191,400
978,483

4,110,828

Total budget expenditures

Obligations incurred, net

J

4,154,458

4,169,883

3,902,967
1,004,642
36,703

2,595,734
634,772
317,397

876,122
363,058
218,621
1,886,517

4,944,312

3,547,903

3,344,318

$3, 508,946

$3, 704,339

$4,020,759

51,913
155
52,068

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

76

DEFENSE AID
DEFENSE

AID,

SPECIAL

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Payment of claims (total obligations)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$172,346

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward- _ .
Unobligated balance carried forward

-255, 843
83, 497

-$83, 497
83,497

State
Nevada
North Dakota.
Oklahoma
Oregon
Do.
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Texas

Type
Flood
Tornado
Flood
Storm
Flood
Storm
Hurricane.
Flood and hurricane-

Virginia
Washington
West Virginia

FUND

Flood..
do_.
do..

Date declared
Aug. 31,1956
June 22, 1957
M a y 18, 1957
July 20, 1956
Mar. 1, 1957
Aug. 9, 1956
Aug. 18, 1956
Apr. 29, M a y 4, and June
29, 1957.
Feb. 1, 1957
Mar. 6, 1957
Jan. 31, 1957....

Total..

-$83,497
83, 497

Allocation
$30,000
1,000,000
126,000
300,000
300,000
3, 500,000
1, 000,000
300,000
300,000
200,000
12, 076,000

Object Classification

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

49
15
53
38

43
9
49
40

Object Classification
ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS
13

$172, 346

Refunds, awards, and indemnities

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

DISASTER RELIEF

7.9

Average GS grade and salary
01

Current authorizations:
[DISASTER

80
10
80
73

RELIEF]

[ F o r expenses necessary to carry out the purposes of the Act of
September 30, 1950 (Public Law 875), as amended, authorizing
assistance to States and local governments in major disasters,
$10,000,000 to remain available until expended: Provided, That
not to exceed 3 per centum of the foregoing amount shall be available for administrative expenses.] (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,° $25,000,000
«Includes $15,000,000 appropriated in Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
15

Program and Financing

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Program by activities:
1. Administration
2. Grants to disaster-affected areas

1958 estimate

$485,000
19, 515,907

$473,000
17, 649,000

15,651,888

20, 000, 907

-423
-22,774,372
13,122,907

-13,122, 907
18,122,000

-18,122,000

6,000,000

25,000, 000

$6,578
$256,160
60,000
11,840

482,196
120, 503
3,151
42,154
19,186
353
2,806, 776
355, 304
79,070
2, 581
1,094,486
10,644,058

342,000
90,000
2, 700
43,300
2,000

328,000
80,000
2, 700
38,850
2,000

1,000
3, 360, 478
2,000
1,000
668, 500
15, 485,429

1,000
2,000,000
1, 500
15,"665^650

492
1, 578

700
1,800

600
1,700

15,651,888

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things.
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Lands and structures
Grants, subsidies, and contributions._
Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims
Taxes and assessments

$236,400
94,000
11,600

20,000,907

18,122,000

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Federal Civil Defense Administration. _
Corps of Engineers
_
Department of Agriculture
_
_ .
Housing and Home Finance Agency

$11,066,944
4,623,908
-37,964
-1,000

$19,295, 528
705,379

$18,122,000

Type
Flood
Fire
Tidal wave
Flood
._do
do
Hurricane
Flood and hurricane. _
Flood
Tornado and flood. _ .

Date declared
M a y 29,1957..
Dec. 29, 1956..
Mar. 16,1957-.
M a y 27, 1957..
June 22, 1957.
Jan. 31, 1957"
Oct. 4, 1956
May 16 and June 29,1957.
June 22, 1957
May 22, 29, and June 22,
1957.

EMERGENCY FUND FOR THE PRESIDENT
Current authorizations:

This program provides for a coordinated effort by the
Federal Government to assist States and their political
subdivisions affected by major disaster when they are
unable to cope with the situation physically or financially.
Responsibility for the administration of this program is
delegated to the Federal Civil Defense Administration.
Disaster relief operations of the entire Federal Government are coordinated and funds are made available to
affected areas and to reimburse Federal agencies for disaster operations. State and local civil defense organizations are active in disaster operations and receive valuable
operational training as a result. Funds appropriated in
1958 are considered adequate for 1959 operations under
this program.
Major disaster areas proclaimed by the President and
allocation of funds made to States for 1957 are:




8.8

18,122,000

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

State
Arkansas
California
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Kentucky...
Louisiana
Do
Minnesota
Missouri

$6,290

1959 estimate

$383,922
15,267,966

Total obligations
Financing:
Reimbursements from other accounts...
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance carried forward

8.6

$386,716
56,694
38, 786

Total obligations
1957 actual

$5,962

Allocation
$400,000
100,000
60,000
2,000,000
260,000
200,000

EMERGENCY

FUND

FOR THE

PRESIDENT,

NATIONAL

DEFENSE

For expenses necessary to enable the President, through such
officers or agencies of the Government as he may designate, and
without regard to such provisions of law regarding the expenditure
of Government funds or the compensation and employment of
persons in the Government service as he may specify, to provide in
his discretion for emergencies affecting the national interest,
security, or defense which may arise at home or abroad during the
current fiscal year, $1,000,000: Provided, That no part of this
appropriation shall be available for allocation to finance a function
or project for which function or project a budget estimate of appropriation was transmitted pursuant to law during the Eighty-fifth
Congress, second session, and Eighty-sixth Congress, first session,
and such appropriation denied after consideration thereof by the
Senate or House of Representatives or by the Committee on Appropriations of either body. (General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,000,000

Estimate 1959, $1,000,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Emergency programs (total obligations).

$282,174

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

717,826

Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

1,000,000

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

These funds are to enable the President to provide for
emergencies affecting the national interest, security, or
defense.
Object Classification

EMERGENCY

FUND

FOR

THE

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$925, 000

1957 actual

$1, 000, 000

PRESIDENT

Reserved for future allocations
ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

12.3

Personal services:
Positions other than permanent-.
Permanent positions
Other personal services

$8, 800
$14, 200
26, 500
6,000

2,731
2,461
242
I, 631
275,007

46, 700
10,000
2,000
2, 500
3,200

39

8,000
200
400
1, 700
300

1,000,000

$1,000,000

$275, 000

$925,000
25, 000
50,000

$1, 000, 000

Total, allocation accounts..

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Reserved for future allocation
Office of Defense Mobilization
General Services Administration
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare

Program by activities—Continued
Capital outlay:
1. Minerals and metals production
program (General Services Administration) : Lands, structures,
equipment, and advances- _ __ 2. Machine tool program (General
Services Administration)
4. Administrative expenses (General
Services Administration): Office
equipment
6. Mineral exploration program (Interior): Loans
__ ___
8. Foreign lending program (ExportImportjBank)

REVOLVING

FUND,

DEFENSE

PRODUCTION

ACT

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$104, 095, 538
3,318,458

$68, 805,363
2, 899,000

$31,627,000
2,316,000

1, 561, 830
82, 539

1, 500,000
98,000

1,500,000
11,000

31, 533,000
4, 898, 400

43,228,000
4, 790, 500

555, 762
1, 539, 917

Program by activities:
Operating costs:
1. Minerals and metals production
program
(General
Services
Administration) :
Cost of commodities sold
Other program expense
2. Machine tool program (General
Services Administration):
Depreciation on tools leased
Other program expense
3. Rubber program (General Services
Administration): Program expense
4. Administrative expenses (General
Services Administration):
Interest
Other expense
Adjustment to prior year operations
5. Agricultural commodities program
(Agriculture):
Interest
Other program expense
6. Mineral exploration program (Interior):
Estimated losses on loans
Other program expense
7. Domestic lending program (Treasury):
Acquisition of loans
Other program expense
8. Foreign lending program (ExportImport Bank):
Interest
Other program expense

1, 621
20, 754, 053
3, 547, 378
209,481
4, 454, 291
1,229, 614
2,344,292
1,942,520

2, 240, 000
2,250,000

1,440,000
2,000, 000

4,260,063
6, 376, 014

6,000,000
4, 810, 000

4, 795,000

909, 942
3,462

900, 000
3,000

769, 800
3,000

Total operating costs
Depreciation included above (General Services Administration) (—)_.
Provisions for self insurance at Government-owned
plant
(General
Services Administration) (—)
Provision for losses on loans (Interior)

155,091,096

128,032,442

94,115, 754

- 4 , 086,140

- 5 , 500,000

-5,500,000

- 7 9 , 856

- 6 5 , 000

-65,000

- 2 , 344,292

-2,240, 000

-1,440,000

Total operating costs, funded

148,580,808

120,227,442

87,110, 754




$300,000

116,178
9,297

9,600

$9,500

2,930,097

2,800,000

1,800,000

8, 636,023
3,109, 600

1,809, 500

200,066, 860

123,337,042

88,920, 254

- 2 6 , 024,157
300, 216, 957

92, 616, 946

423, 553, 999

181, 537, 200

12,332, 442

7,882, 535

10, 695, 000

19,037,000
87, 844, 250

11, 552, 000
46, 690, 200

8, 567, 214

1, 597,000

Total amounts becoming availableUnobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
...

382, 491, 703

123, 330,999

70, 534, 200

262, 276,000

470, 725, 000

170, 502,000

Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carired forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
_

644,767, 703

594,055, 999

241,036, 200

-470, 725,000

-170, 502,000

- 5 9 , 499,000

174,042, 703

423, 553,999

181,537,200

Under section 304 (b) of the Defense Production Act
of 1950, designated agencies are authorized with Presidential approval to incur obligations of $2.1 billion on a
probable ultimate net cost basis for the purpose of making
loans and procuring critical materials in furtherance of
the defense effort. The obligations are financed by
borrowings from the Treasury. The 1951 amendments
to the act permit commitments in excess of $2.1 billion
so long as estimated probable ultimate net cost and
outstanding working capital do not exceed this amount
at any one time. Programs undertaken must be certified
as essential to the national defense by the Office of Defense
Mobilization. As of June 30, 1957, that Office had
authorized programs having a gross value of $8,297
million which required certification of borrowing authority
to cover working capital requirements and the estimated
net cost to the Government. Of the $8.3 billion, gross
transactions of $2.2 billion remained to be completed,
and $0.5 billion remained to be placed under contract.

67, 335
1, 568,119

1957 actual

1959 estimate

38, 316, 797
118, 953, 974
656, 380
212,232,110

Total financing applied to program.

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION

$39, 794, 457

174,042, 703

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Revenue and receipts:
Collection of loans. __ _
Advances repaid and proceedslfrom
sale of equipment
Other receipts..
Adjustment to prior year income
Recovery of prior year obligations

7,174

1958 estimate

51,486, 052

Total program (obligations)

75, 000

Total obligations

1957 actual

Total program costs, funded.__
Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations of
other years, net (—)
O bligations incurred for costs of other
years, net
____ _ _

282,174

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions. _
Taxes and assessments

Program and Financing—Continued

Total capital outlay

42

$2, 689

77

CERTIFICATIONS AS OF JUNE 30, 1957

[In thousands]
General Services Administration
Treasury Department
Department of Agriculture
Department of the Interior
Export-Import Bank of Washington
Total certifications
Unused authorizations
Total

$1, 265, 633
230,615
64, 735
33,048
35, 244
1, 629, 275
470, 725
2,100,000

Of the $1,629.3 million certified, $962.7 million is required to cover the estimated probable ultimate net cost
and $666.6 million is required for working capital to cover
materials inventories, loans and advances to contractors.
The working capital estimate has assumed a resale of
materials to the stockpile. However, further sales to the
stockpile are temporarily deferred pending receipt and

78

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION—Con.
REVOLVING

FUND,

DEFENSE

PRODUCTION

ACT—Continued

analysis of the report of the Office of Defense Mobilization
committee recently established to review the Government's stockpiling. Should it be indicated that sales to
the stockpile should be revised downward, there is a
possibility that an increase in the $2.1 billion borrowing
authority will be necessary.
Extension of the Defense Production Act is being
requested for 2 years beyond its present expiration date
of June 30, 1958. While no specific new programs are
proposed at this time, certain changes in military programs may result in urgent needs for research, development, and expansion of productive capacity requiring
assistance under the act.
General Services Administration.—Borrowing authority
of $1,265,633,000 has been certified as of June 30, 1957, to
finance the expansion of productive capacity for strategic
metals and minerals and machine tools. This amount
includes $863,259,000 for probable ultimate net cost of
specific programs of which $678,276,000 is for metals and
minerals programs, $69,900,000 for machine tool programs,
and $115,083,000 for Treasury interest, custodial, and
administrative expenses. It also includes $402,374,000 of
working capital required for carrying inventories for which
no sale is now foreseen.
The bulk of the Defense Production Act expansion programs have been contracted for and physical expansion
completed. The plants are in production and the contracts
are now in the administration phase with the major
problems being receipt, custody, and eventual disposition
of the materials. Future deliveries of materials under the
contracts are expected to be substantial but will depend
upon economic and business conditions. For instance the
decline in price of copper is resulting in the exercise of
options granted under floor price contracts. Also the
easing in industrial demand for nickel and aluminum is
resulting in substantial deliveries to the Government.
The exercise of option rights by contractors is being
carefully examined with a view to reducing deliveries to
the Government as far as possible within the terms of the
contracts whenever procurement priority levels have been
attained.
A summary of transactions involving strategic minerals
and metals (including work-in-process inventory) under
this fund follows:
[In millions]

1957 actual
$567.1

Inventory—July 1
Deliveries during year

216.6

Total sales
Losses on sales (profits)
Inventory—June 30

-

Total dispositions and June 30 inventory

281.4

1,097.0

1,313.6

51.8
50.2

—

417.4

783.7

Total available for sale
Sales during year:
To national stockpile
To industry

1958 estimate 1959 estimate
$1,032.2
$679.6

7.4
65.5

34.4

102.0
2.1
679.6

72.9
(8.1)
1,032.2

34.4
(6.9)
1,286.1

783.7

1,097.0

1,313.6

Major Defense Production Act programs administered
by General Services Administration are as follows:
1. Domestic purchase programs designed to increase
domestic production by fixed incentive prices available
to all domestic producers of materials such as beryl, mica,
mercury, and manganese.
2. Basic expansion programs to increase mining or
refining capacity of such materials as aluminum, copper,




nickel, and fluorspar by offering guaranteed markets under
specific contracts and for specific projects.
3. Research and pilot plant programs to develop new
processes for economic recovery of low grade domestic
ores and for developing new processes for producing new
materials, such as titanium or synthetic mica.
4. A program for the production of nickel from the
Government-owned Nicaro nickel plant.
5. A program for expansion of machine tool producing
capacity by (a) installing under lease Government-owned
machine tools in the plants of private producers, (b)
placing pool order contracts for general purpose machine
tools to be activated in the event of a future emergency.
6. A program to "round out" capacity to produce steam
turbines and turbine gears by installing machinery and
equipment in plants of private contractors.
The expansion of the Government-owned nickel plant
in Cuba, which was authorized by the Office of Defense
Mobilization and cleared with the Joint Committee on
Defense Production, has been completed at a cost of less
than $37 million. After a break-in period, it is expected
that the enlarged plant will produce nickel at a rate of
50 million pounds per year.
In addition, the General Services Administration certifies defense loans to the Treasury Department or the
Export-Import Bank of Washington and makes recommendations with respect to tax amortization certificates.
The Administration also has been delegated responsibility
for the basic materials development program previously
carried on by Foreign Operations Administration and its
successor, the International Cooperation Administration
in certain countries of Europe, Near East, and Africa.
A total of $7,315.8 million in gross value of contracts
has been entered into by General Services Administration
under Defense Production Act authority. Of this amount
a total of $5,314.4 million has been completed as measured
by procurement, guaranteed production, completion of
facilities, completed research, etc.
The balance of
$2,001.4 million will mature as follows:
195 8
195 9
1960
After 1960

[In millions]

$534.2
413. 3
371. 5
682.4

A large part of the maturing contracts is represented
by contingent Government commitments for aluminum,
copper, nickel, titanium, and manganese. The extent to
which options will be exercised will depend upon industrial
demand for aluminum, nickel, and titanium and upon the
price fluctuations in copper and manganese.
Cumulative loss from resale of commodities and from
expenses incurred amounted to $175.9 million as of June
30, 1957. The probable ultimate net cost of activities
completed, including the losses on valuation or expected
resale of commodities in inventory, was estimated at
$609.7 million as of June 30, 1957.
Department of Agriculture.—The purchase, management,
and resale of agricultural commodities, except forest products, are carried out by the Commodity Credit Corporation, which is reimbursed from this fund for the net costs
involved. The Secretary of Agriculture has been allocated
borrowing authority for this purpose.
During 1957, the Corporation continued the management of inventories of castor beans and American-Egyptian cotton acquired under programs initiated in prior
years. The castor oil and nearly all of the AmericanEgyptian cotton inventories had been disposed of by June
30, 1957. The remainder of the cotton will be sold during

79

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

1958. However, it is contemplated that a small amount
of castor beans will remain in the inventory of the Commodity Credit Corporation beyond June 30, 1959.
Net realized losses on purchase and resale operations
amounted to $4,454,291 during 1957 and is estimated at
$555,762 and $67,335 during 1958 and 1959, respectively.
During 1958 the Secretary of Agriculture will reimburse
the Commodity Credit Corporation in the amount of
$11,697,700 for the net costs of the 1953 castor bean and
oil and American-Egyptian cotton programs. These payments constitute the net budgetary expenditures under
this fund.
In addition to purchase and resale operations, the
Secretary of Agriculture may recommend to the Office of
Defense Mobilization the certification of certain loans for
increasing plant capacity to process or store agricultural
commodities. No loans were certified during 1957 and
none are expected to be certified during 1958 andl959.
Department oj the Interior.—Operations within the Department of the Interior with regard to the expansion of
defense production have been limited to the encouragement of exploration for strategic and critical minerals and
metals. As of June 30, 1957, the Office of Defense
Mobilization had extended to the Defense Minerals Exploration Administration borrowing authority in the
amount of $34,000,000. In August 1957 the amount was
increased to $38,800,000. From the beginning of the
program through June 30, 1957, Defense Minerals Exploration Administration had entered into 1,055 contracts in
which the Government's share of estimated costs
amounted to $31,304,152 as against total estimated costs
of $50,893,072.
Defense Minerals Exploration Administration had certified, as of the end of June 1957, 304 discoveries on projects involving contract amounts of $18,243,151, of which
the Government's share is $11,515,012. As of June 30,
1957, a total of $9,212,413 of Government funds had been
spent on these certified projects. If production takes
place on these projects within a 10-year period, some part,
at least, of the Government funds advanced will be repaid
under a royalty arrangement.
Treasury Department.—The function of making and
administering loans to domestic private business enterprises under the authority of section 302 of the Defense
Production Act of 1950, as amended, was assigned to the
Secretary of the Treasury by Executive Order 10489,
dated September 26, 1953. Applications for loans are
considered upon certification for essentiality by the Office
of Defense Mobilization or General Services Administration. Net loan certifications were $204,560,068 on June
30, 1957, against which actual borrowings from the
Treasury amounted to $167,890,000.
There were no new loans authorized under this authority in 1957 and none are anticipated for 1958 or 1959.
Loans outstanding on June 30, 1957, totaled $180,233,536.
In addition, there was $24,326,532 in undisbursed commitments, of which $18,326,532 represented commitments
to participate in loans made by banks wherein disbursement of Treasury funds is deferred.
Loans and commitments outstanding are disposed of to
private financial institutions and investors whenever
possible.
Export-Import Bank oj Washington.—Pursuant to section 311 of Executive Order No. 10480 of August 15,
1953, which superseded Order No. 10161, the ExportImport Bank, with funds provided under section 304 of
the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended, is responsible for making and administering all loans under




section 302 of the act, upon receipt of certificates of essentiality issued by the Director of Defense Mobilization or
the General Services Administrator, where the expansion,
development, or production so financed is carried on in
foreign countries.
No certifications were received and no new loans were
authorized by the bank during 1957. It is contemplated
that there will be no additional certifications to the ExportImport Bank in connection with these operations.
Loans outstanding on June 30, 1957, totaled $36.5 million, and are expected to be $27.4 million by June 30, 1959.
All undisbursed loan obligations were liquidated by June
30, 1957.
Relation oj costs to obligations.-—The relationship is derived by year-end balances and applicable adjustments as
reflected in the following table:
1956 actual

1957 actual

$217,858

$176,356

$176,356

$176,356

567,252,082
4,962,271
13,643,856

679,593,363
5,362,046
4,361,174

1,032,247,000
5,362,046
4,361,174

1,286,135,000
5,362, 046
4,361,174

695,582,313

353,909,174

292,905,280

130,037,226

Total selected resources at end
of year
1,281,658,380
Selected resources at start of year ( - ) _

1,043,402,113
-1,281,658,380

1,335,051,856
-1,043,402,113

1,426,071,802
-1,335,051,856

-238,256,267

291,649,743

91,019,946

212,232,110

8,567,214

1,597,000

300,216,957

92,616,946

Selected resources at
end of year:
Advances
Inventories:
Commodities for
sale
Supplies
Deferred charges
Obligations other
than liabilities; undisbursed commitments and unpaid
undelivered orders.

Increase or decrease (—) in selected resources
Adjustment due to recovery of prior
year obligations
Costs financed from obligations of
other years, net ( - )
Obligations incurred for costs of other
years, net

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

—26,024,157

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual
Gross expenditures (funds applied):
General Services Administration:
Minerals and metals program:
Acquisition of assets
Expense:
Purchases and manufacturing
costs
Other expense
Machine tool program:
Acquisition of machine tools
Expense
Undistributed:
Acquisition of administrative equipment
Expense
Ad justment to prior year operations
Total, General Services Administration
Department of Agriculture:
Expense
Increase in selected working capital-.

$39, 794,457

$300,000

213, 833, 266
3, 317,845

417,394,000
2,899,000

$281,450,000
2,316,000

116,178
82, 539

98,000

11,000

9,600
36, 431, 400

9,500
48, 018, 500

9 297
24,303', 052
209, 481
281, 666,115

331, 805, 000

Total, Treasury Department.
Export-Import Bank of Washington:
Acquisition of loans
Expense
Increase in selected working capital._.
Bank

of

5, 683, 905

2, 095, 679
9, 602, 021

1, 635, 454

5, 683,905

11, 697, 700

1, 635, 454

2, 930,097
1,942, 520

2, 800,000
2, 250,000

1, 800, 000
2, 000, 000

4, 872, 617

5,050,000

3, 800, 000

6, 000,000
4, 805,000

4, 790, 000

10, 636, 078

Total, Department of the Interior, _
Treasury Department:
Acquisition of loans...
Expense

Total gross expenditures..

1959 estimate

4, 260, 063
6,376, 015

Total, Department of Agriculture. _
Department of the Interior: Loan program:
Acquisition of loans
Expense

Total, Export-Import
Washington

1958 estimate

10,805,000

4, 790, 000

!, 636, 023
913, 404
5, 111

903, 000
35, 616

772,800

9, 554, 538

938, 616

772, 800

312,413, 253

485, 623,316

342, 803, 254

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

80

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION—Con.
REVOLVING FUND, D E F E N S E PRODUCTION

1957 actual

ACT—Continued

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)—Continued
1957 actual
Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
General Services Administration:
Minerals and metals program:
Advances repaid and proceeds from
sale of equipment
Revenue
Adjustment to prior year operations.
Machine tool program:
Advances repaid and proceeds from
sale of equipment
Revenue
Adjustment to prior year operationsUndistributed:
Revenue
Adjustment to prior year operations.
Decrease in selected working capital-.

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$28, 584, 615
105, 745,931
582, 548

$16,865,000
76, 346,000

$11,400,000
35,911,000

9, 732,182
2,340, 691
33, 737

2,172,000
826, 000

5, 683,905

Department of the Interior:
Loan program: Loans repaid
Decrease in selected working capital..

65, 785

96, 209,000

47, 932,000
1, 635,454

500, 000
124, 215

400,000
130,000
530, 000

Total, Department of the Interior-

604, 469

Treasury Department:
Loans repaid
Revenue
Adjustment of prior year income
Decrease in selected working capital-

9, 337,998
9,143, 789
20,048
619,002

2, 794, 536
8,980,000

5, 815, 000
8, 846, 000

964, 825

222, 500

19,120,837

12, 739, 361

14, 883, 500

2,455, 760
1,719, 772

4, 588,000
1, 687, 250

4,480,000
1,459, 200
19,000

4,175, 532

6, 275, 250

5, 958, 200

Total, Export-Import
Washington.

Bank

of

Total receipts from operations.

182, 576, 355

115,847,826

70, 939,154

Budget expenditures

129,836,898

369, 775, 490

271,864,100

Net operating income or loss (—),
machine tool program
Undistributed:
Revenue
Expense

4, 641, 637

1, 968, 000

826, 000
1, 598, 000

469, 000
1, 511, 000

696, 322

-772, 000

-1,502,430

-1,042,000

3, 791
24, 303,052

36, 431, 400

48,018, 500

- 2 4 , 299, 261

- 3 6 , 431, 400

-48,018, 500

Nonoperating income or loss (—):
Proceeds from sale of assets
Net book value of assets sold (—)_

9, 886, 238
- 1 0 , 779, 825

2,172,000
-2,172, 000

152, 000
-152, 000

Net loss (—) from sale of assets_

686, 400
-47,394, 554

-247, 601, 830

-281,760,231

-281, 760, 231

-329,154, 785

$34,768, 523
24,346, 012
176,356
1,032, 247,000
5,362,046
4,361,174
211,315, 919
40,071, 656
98, 507, 252

$34,619, 023
24,127,012
176, 356
1, 286,135,000
5,362,046
4,361,174
201,011, 919
28,671,656
92,855, 252

1,451,155,938

1, 677,319, 438

-247, 601, 830

Total assets

$34,674,650
25,193,110
176,356
679, 593, 363
5, 362,046
4, 361,174
212, 608,663
56, 936, 656
105, 920,359
1,124, 826, 377

liabilities and reserves:
Current liabilities
Reserves— Government-owned plant

40, 803,444
405,302

End of year
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Donated assets
Assets transferred to other Government agencies or funds (—)
...
End of year
Deficit ( - )

_

33,195,704
535,302

31, 878, 052

33,731,006

1,143,729,132

1, 294,430,142

1, 664,299,505

150,701,010

369, 869,363

271,714, 600

1, 294, 430,142

during

31, 407, 750
470, 302

41, 208, 746

Total liabilities and reserves
Government investment:
Interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Borrowings from Treasury
year, net

1956 actual
U n e x p e n d e d balance:
Cash
_ __
Budget authorizations. _

1,664,299, 505

1,936,014,105

37,032,016
-155, 250

36, 789,319

36,738,612

-87,447

- 5 0 , 707

- 9 , 500

36,789,319
-247,601,830

36, 738,612
-281,760, 231

36,729,112
-329,154, 785

1,083,617,631

1,419,277, 886

1,643, 588,432

undis-

Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
Obligations other than
l i a b i l i t i e s ; undisbursed commitments
and unpaid undelivered orders
_
Accounts receivable,
net and cash in transit ( - )

Net loss (—) for the year, General
Services Administration
Department
of Agriculture: Expense
(net operating loss (—) for the year)
Department of the Interior: Expense
(net operating loss (—) for the year)
Treasury Department:
Revenue
Expense
Net operating income
Nonoperating income or loss (—):
Writeoff loans
Decrease in allowance for losses on
loans

Total obligated balance
_
Unobligated balance

- 2 5 , 998,956

- 3 2 , 561, 763

- 5 , 683,905

-2,095, 679

- 1 , 635, 454

- 4 , 286, 812

-4,490,000
8,980,000
4, 805,000

8, 846,000
4. 790, 000

2, 767, 775

4,175, 000

4, 056, 000

- 4 6 , 643

-1,380,000

-719,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$13, 810, 539
956, 270,868

$34, 674, 650
805, 569, 858

$34, 768, 523
435, 700, 495

$34, 619, 023
163, 985, 895

840, 244, 508

470, 469, 018

198, 604, 918

33,154, 956

40, 803, 444

31, 407, 750

33,195, 704

695, 582, 313

353,909,174

292, 905, 280

130, 037, 226

- 2 0 , 931, 862

-25,193,110

- 2 4 , 346, 012

-24,127, 012

707, 805, 407

369, 519, 508

299,967,018

139,105, 918

262, 276,000

470, 725, 000

170, 502,000

59, 499, 000

- 3 , 440, 000

9,143,789
6, 376, 014

1957 actual

970, 081, 407

Total unexpended
balance

-893, 587
-47,092,500

4, 290, 209

1, 409, 791

750, 000

Net nonoperating income

4,243, 566

29, 791

31, 000

Net income for the year, Treasury Department

7,011, 341

4, 204, 791

4, 087, 000




784, 250
-34,158, 401

446, 899
- 1 5 , 320

Assets:
Cash with Treasury
Accounts receivable
Advances.
_
Commodities for sale
Supplies.__
Deferred charges
Loans receivable, n e t . . .
Advances on long term contracts
Land, structures, and equipment, net__

$35, 911,000
33, 943, 000

2, 340, 691
1, 644, 369

(—),

806,368

Status of Certain Fund Balances

Machine tool program:
Revenue
Expense

loss

$1, 459, 200
772, 800

-219,881, 445

Total Government investment

$76, 346, 000
71, 704, 363

$105, 745. 915
107, 248, 345

Net operating loss (—), minerals
and metals program

Net operating
tributed

$1, 687,250
903,000

-28,151, 964

Deficit (—), end of year

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
General Services Administration:
Minerals and Metals program:
Revenue
Expense..

1959 estimate

Financial Condition

3, 791
20,047
5, 948,070
152, 991, 612

1958 estimate

$1, 719.772
913,404

Net loss (—) for the year. _
Analysis of deficit:
Deficit (—), beginning of year
Adjustment to prior year operations:
Affecting working capitaL .
Not affecting working capital

152, 000
469,000

Department of Agriculture:
Decrease in selected working capital..

Total, Treasury Department

Export-Import Bank of Washington:
Revenue
__
Expense.
__
Net operating income for the year,
Export-Import Bank of Washington..
_ _ __

Total, General Services Administration
-

Export-Import Bank of Washington:
Loans repaid
Revenue
Decrease in selected working capital..

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings—Continued

Object Classification—Administrative
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of other positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year...
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions. 01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent.
Other personal services.
Total personal services

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

283
283

244
2
231
226

334
3
281
284
.1

$6, 427
$1,803

8.3

$6,494
$1,848

8.5

$6, 531
$1,638

$1,805, 216
26,017
38, 587

$1,806,932
20,829
68, 419

$1,473,898
19,829
37,273

1,869,820

1,896,180

1,531,000

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
0 bject Classification—Administrative— Continued
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

2,152
2,187

$137,700
9,800
49,400
5,000
15, 700
82,000
1,694,700
34,900
24,600
113,900
4,000
3,120

$121,300
7,600
38,400
4, 500
12,500
60,000
1,484,700
23,800
16, 500
95,700
4,000
3,000

4,008,375

4,071,000

3, 403,000

$2,394, 290
1,432,857
177,766
3,462

$2,408,000
1,525,000
135, 000
3,000

$2,300, 000
1,000,000
100,000
3,000

1957 actual
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

Travel
Transportation of things
_
Communication services
__
Rents and utility services
__
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies,
Supplies and materials
Equipment
__
_
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments
Total accrued administrative expenditures

Accrued administrative expenditures are
distributed as follows:
General Services Administration
Department of the Interior
.
Treasury Department
Export-Import B a n k . .

$105,682
2, 717
32,634
15, 983
10,839
60,336
1,858, 734
24,367
22, 924

EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT
Current authorizations:
EXPENSES

OF

MANAGEMENT

IMPROVEMENT

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$16,459

$230,000

$288,863

-135,310
-12
518,863

-518,863

-288,863

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Improving the management of executive agencies (total obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new obligational authority) __

288,863

400,000

These funds enable the President to have studies conducted of the organization and operations of the executive
branch and to develop and install improvements therein.
Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$210, 500

$258,363

1
1
0

2
2
3

3
3
3

$6, 729

$17, 800

$27,900
100

6,729
90
140
9,500

17, 800
500

28,000
500

100
1,100

200
1,800

16, 459

19, 500

30, 500

16, 459

230, 000

288, 863

1957 actual
EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT
IMPROVEMENT

Reserved for future allocations.
ALLOCATION TO BUREAU OF THE BUDGET

Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year.
01

Personal services:
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services. _

02
04
07

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Other contractual services

11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total, Bureau of the Budget
Total obligations

_
_

[MUTUAL SECURITY]
The mutual security program promotes the foreign
policy, security, and general welfare of the United States
by assisting other free world nations to maintain and
440000—5.8




6

81

increase their military and economic strength. It is
conducted under the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as
amended. Responsibility for execution of the program
has been delegated by the President to the Secretaries of
State and Defense. The Secretary of State has been
delegated responsibility for general coordination.
The mutual security program takes four principal forms.
Military assistance includes military end items, supplies,
training, construction, and research. Defense support is
essential economic assistance such as food, raw materials
and machinery, to countries supporting military forces
beyond their unaided capabilities. The development loan
fund is designed to stimulate economic development by
providing capital on a loan basis. Unlike the military
assistance and defense support programs, the fund is not
programed on a country basis for presentation to
Congress; in contrast, projects submitted by eligible
countries are reviewed and approved on their economic
and financial merits within the funds made available by
Congress.
Economic, technical, and other assistance
includes special assistance, contingency funds, technical
cooperation, and contributions to the United Nations and
other international agencies for voluntary multilateral
programs.
From 1957 and 1958 appropriations, about $456 million
is being used to pay for surplus agricultural commodities
which are sold in the recipient countries. Local currency
proceeds from these and other defense support commodities are used for local requirements of the mutual
security program such as troop support and economic
development.
Substantial unexpended balances are required because
of the time necessary for the procurement and delivery
of equipment and for implementing complex economic
projects. A steady decline in unexpended balances for
military assistance over the past several years has been
partially offset by an increase for other portions of the
program. The development loan fund, in particular,
because it is designed to finance long-range development,
will tend to accumulate unexpended balances.
Although the 1958 appropriation represents a substantial decrease from the 1957 level, the unobligated
balances of approximately $761 million continued available in 1958 resulted in a much smaller decrease in the
actual program obligation level.
Appropriations required in 1959 to finance the mutual
security program under existing and proposed legislation
appear later in this chapter.
Current authorizations:
[For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the
provisions of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended, to
remain available until June 30, 1958 unless otherwise specified
herein, as follows:]
MILITARY

ASSISTANCE

[Military assistance: For assistance authorized by section 103 (a)
to carry out the purposes of title I, chapter 1 (including administrative expenses as authorized by section 103 (b), which shall not exceed $23,500,000 for the fiscal year 1958), $1,340,000,000, to remain
available until December 31, 1958; and in addition not to exceed
$538,800,000 of unobligated and unreserved balances of funds
heretofore made available for purposes of section 103 (a) and
section 104 are continued available until December 31, 1958 for
the purposes of section 103 (a); J (Mutual Security Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,340,000,000

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

82

[MUTUAL SECURITY]

Continued

Ourrent authorizations-—Continued
MILITARY

ASSISTANCE—Continued

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$418, 539, 272
74, 745, 706
717,938, 992

$501, 400, 000
80, 000, 000
714, 500,000

$405, 898,000
79, 500,000
542, 300, 000

178,422, 570

60, 016, 000

73,846, 280

34,400,000

206, 829,622
169, 976, 617
61, 818, 733
22, 045,247

19, 375, 000
166, 578,000
71, 006, 000
23, 500, 000

5, 367, 568

6, 561, 000

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Grant aid operations:
1. Deliveries of materiel common to
United States requirements
ordered from:
(a) Army_
(b) Navy
(c) Air Force
2. Other materiel programs:
(а) Offshore procurement
(б) Navy shipbuilding in the
United States
(c) Direct procurement in the
United States
3. Supply operations 4. Training
5. Administration
6. Contributions
to
international
military headquarters and agencies
7. Contributions to construction of
facilities in other countries:
(a) Infrastructure
(b) Military public works
8. Research and development
.
9. Other activities. .
Total, grant aid operations
Reimbursable military sales operations:
1. Deliveries of materiel common to
United States requirements
under mutual security military sales ordered from:
(a) Army
.
(b) Navy
(c) Air Force

57, 755, 704
66, 617,167
36, 802, 235
34, 434, 241
2,125,139, 954

75,
57,
39,
33,

000,
339,
766,
403,

000
000
000
000

1, 882, 844, 000

26, 800, 000
10, 500, 000
27, 700, 000

Total, reimbursable military sales operations.
Total obligations

_

1, 027, 698, 000

65, 000, 000
2,125,139, 954

1, 882, 844, 000

1,092, 698, 000

Financing:
Comparative transfers from (—) other
accounts
- 6 2 , 250
Balance brought forward:
Unobligated and unreserved.
-195, 500,000 -538, 800,000
- 2 5 , 000, 000
Reserved (69 Stat. 438)
. -2,642,320,203 -2,251,611,737 -2,298,889,737
Recovery of prior year obligations. ..
-74,345, 227
- 7 6 , 322, 000
Balance carried forward:
538, 800,000
Unobligated and unreserved.
25, 000, 000
2, 251,611,737 2, 298, 889, 737 1,206, 191,737
Reserved (69 Stat. 438)
Unobligated balance transferred to
"Military assistance" shown under
"Proposed for later transmission"
(see below)
Unobligated and unreserved balance no
14,175, c
longer available
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

2, 017, 500, 000

1,340, 000, 000

The military assistance program is designed to increase
the mutual security of the free world by contributing to
the development, maintenance, and training of modern
military forces, which deter external aggression, lessen the
chances of internal subversion, and protect valuable oversea bases. Forty-five foreign countries are receiving
grant aid under the military assistance program, and many
other countries are eligible to buy modern military equipment on liberal credit terms. Many of these countries
have joined with the United States in regional and bilateral defense arrangements, such as the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization and the Southeast Asia Treaty
Organization, which are basic to this Nation's security.
Foreign forces supported by the program are numerically much greater than the United States Armed Forces,
and provide striking power, depth in reserves, and flexibility which this Nation's forces alone cannot provide.
Because it is imperative that these forces keep pace with
rapid changes in weapon technology, missiles and other
advanced weapons are being increasingly emphasized,




commensurate with their supply availability, allies'
technical capabilities, and the nature of the threat.
Functionally, the military assistance program consists
of: (1) military materiel and supplies for the buildup,
maintenance, and modernization of allied forces; (2) training and advisory services to allied military personnel;
(3) the U. S. contribution to jointly financed international
military facilities and activities, especially in the NATO
area; (4) assistance to allies in the research and development of advanced weapons; and (5) operating and administrative expenses.
Grant aid operations—1 Common item orders.—A large
percentage of materiel is procured through orders placed
in the military services for common procurement with
similar items in the service programs. Such orders constitute a reservation of funds, from which the service is
entitled to reimbursement upon delivery of the items
ordered. The obligations estimated for 1959 represent
only reimbursements to the military services for deliveries
made and not the funds reserved under this program. A
schedule relating "reservations" to the appropriations of
the military services appears at the end of the Department
of Defense—Military Functions chapter.
2. Other materiel programs—(a) Of shore procurement.—
Through 1957, the United States placed orders abroad
for approximately $2.8 billion of military assistance requirements. This program assists in building a defense
production base abroad.
(b) Navy shipbuilding in the United States.—Due to
special restrictions applying to Navy ship construction,
this element of the overall materiel program is accounted
for separately. The program has decreased from the 1957
level because the buildup phase is nearing completion and
because of a proposed shift in emphasis from new construction to ship loans.
(c) Direct procurement in the United States.—Included
are supplies and military hardware of a t}^pe not used by
the U. S. military services. The reduction from the 1957
level is due to a change in accounting definitions; in 1957,
civilian-type supplies such as fuel, uniform material, and
medicines were included in this activity, but beginning
in 1958, these items are included in common item orders.
3. Supply operations.—Included are packing, handling,
and transportation costs, and the cost of repairing and rehabilitating excess equipment either ordered from the
military services or scheduled for redistribution from one
country to another.
4. Training.—Only by modern, efficient, and intensive
training can the materiel supplied under military assistance be effectively utilized. With the increasing utilization of complex electronics and missiles in the program,
requirements for additional and specialized training increase concurrently.
5. Administration.—The administrative expenses of the
military assistance advisory groups and the departmental
costs of the program are included.
6. Contributions to international military headquarters
and agencies.—Included are the assessments levied against
the United States in accordance with cost-sharing agreements for support of NATO and SEATO.
7. Contributions to construction of facilities in other
countries.—Construction of military and logistical facilities under the jointly financed NATO infrastructure program and military construction in certain non-NATO
countries are continuing requirements.
8. Research and development.—This program is intended
to accelerate research and development by our allies of

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

advanced weapons and to combine U. S. weapon technology with their productive capability.
9. Other activities.—These include support for UN forces
in Korea and nutrition surveys.
Reimbursable military sales operations.—Under section
103 (c) of the Mutual Security Act, repayment made
within 3 years for military assistance sales, not to exceed
$175 million, can be credited to current appropriations
and shall be available until expended. The common item
order reservation procedures apply to these transactions.

Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Average GS grade and salary.

8.3

.6, 307

8.3

$1, 337, 515
59, 300
176,685

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services.
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

1,497,606
287,209
19,040
37,196
240
15,007
36,355,991
15,944
48,804
62, 504, 704
3,000
1,076

1, 573, 500
318, 500
14,400
42,000
17,000
38, 514, 200
22,100
26,000
80,851,400
4,400
1,500

100, 785,817

121,385,000

2, 787
2, 469
2, 590

3, 065
3,004
2, 874

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year...

01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
13
15
16

7. 6

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services.
Total personal services.
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services.
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
S upplies and materials
Equipment
Lands and structures
Grants, subsidies, and contributions__
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments
Investments and loans
Total, Department of the Army

$5, 428

7. 6

01

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services,
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
10 Lands and structures
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions._
15 Taxes and assessments
Total, Department of the Navy




2,510
2,406

3,149,198
7, 721, 508
19, 551, 212
3, 700
6,100
29, 200
56, 688,131
138, 693, 108
576, 063, 500
133,314
2, 500
1, 529

866. 891, 219

802, 043, 000

675

711
4
668
677

13,148, 795
14, 250, 553
48, 928,109
49, 214
335, 724
17, 440
19, 340, 322
18, 075, 568
482, 708, 596
248, 332, 759
53, 042, 466
7, 266
4, 299
4, 431
10, 098, 869

16, 478, 362
15, 606, 968
60, 862, 806
72, 985
223, 520
45, 690
28, 310, 416
21, 500, 000
283, 476, 217
296,167, 775
47, 485, 216
589, 845
11, 600
9,600

908, 344, 411

770, 841, 000

1,912
1,863
1, 728
$4,130

6. 5
1.8

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent.
Other personal services.

1,113, 619
102, 085
153, 596
171, 796
904, 325
4,236
501, 436
3, 568, 697
359, 994
491, 067
4, 700, 566
220
700, 000

1, 357,161
102, 700
146, 500
157, 800
928. 300
4, 400
520, 400
3, 791, 200
308. 600
343, 400
822, 739
800

12, 771, 637

Total obligations

$185, 368, 000
247, 330, 000

2,125,139, 954

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Department of Defense:
Office of the Secretary of Defense
Department of the Army..
Department of the Navy
Department of the Air Force
Department of State
International Cooperation Administration
..
Export-Import Bank of Washington..

432, 698,000

7, 063, 363
5, 283, 125
3, 397, 800
52.095
118, 705
14, 920
11, 654, 882
48, 521,171
103, 754, 969

236, 346, 870

180,091,000

8, 484,000
1, 882, 844, 000 $1, 092, 698,000

$100, 785, 817
908, 344, 411
236. 346, 870
866, 891, 219
6, 657,090

$121. 385,000
770, 841,000
180,091,000
802, 043,000
6, 779,000

5, 414, 547
700,000

1, 705,000

CURRENCY

SCHEDULE

FOREIGN

Foreign Currency, Military Assistance
[All amounts are st'ited in U. S. dollar equivalents computed at rates of exchange as of
June 30, 1957, except for balances brought forward from 1956]
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Offshore procurement:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954..
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954..
Agricultural
Trade
Development
and Assistance Act of 1954.

$6, 125, 080
938, 303

7, 270, 206
5, 260, 222
3,178, 955
30, 219
80,143
12, 354
6, 543, 269
55, 653, 425
158, 070, 089
243, 953
1,460
2, 575

$7,103
$14, 300
$1, 584

$1, 243, 129
5, 240
108, 792

$4,160

$6, 232,190
1, 03S, 016

6. 5
1.8

$999, 216
2, 697
111, 706

INFORMATIONAL

5. 2

$7,103
$14, 300
$1,442

..

Total, allocation accounts.

2, 008
1,893
1,975

5. 2

601
624

Total personal services.
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services.
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials.
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments
16 Investments and loans

$10, 873, 553
5, 604, 809

Number of employees at end of year

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

2, 868, 337
6, 396, 613
31, 283, 887
3, 500
4, 334
21, 820
75,889, 399
150,301, 790
600,116, 623

02
03
04
05
06
07

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

01

$2,104, 391
1, 044, 807

Average FSS grade and salary..
Average FSR grade and salary.
Average ungraded salary

$5, 449

$8, 011,348
5,137, 447

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees

Average GS grade and salary

$2,159,056
709, 281

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year ,

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

Average GS grade and salary

$5, 896
$942

8.5

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

$1,300, 672
46, 781
150,153

Total, Office of the Secretary of
Defense

$5, 669
$1,150

Total, Department of the Air Force

1959 estimate

6,321

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

1959 estimate

423
397
378

Total personal services.
Travel
Transportation of things.
Communication services.,
Rents and utility services.
Printing and reproduction . . .
Other contractual services.
Supplies and materials.
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions ..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities...
Taxes and assessments..

01

205
4
204
197

211
4
202
203

487
419
416

Average GS grade and salary
Average ungraded salary,

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

1958 estimate

DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE

Total number of permanent positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year...

Object Classification
1957 actual

83

Total obligations
$28, 340, 784
61, 659, 216

226, 860
3, 110
90,000, 000

..

.

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance transferred from
"Foreign currency, economic, technical, and other assistance"
.
Unobligated balance carried forward
New obligational authority.. .

$18,094,099
5, 722, 357

1958 estimate

$3, 401, 590
51, 749, 457

15, 256, 260

68, 358, 000

39, 072, 716

123, 509, 047

-45,161, 048

-105, 288,113

-14,179,025
105, 288,113

- 2 2 , 455, 229
126, 279, 346

85, 020, 758

122.045,051

84

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

[MUTUAL SECURITY]—Continued

Program and Financing—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued

1957 actual

INFORMATIONAL FOREIGN CURRENCY SCHEDULE—Continued
Foreign Currency, Military Assistance—Continued
Program and Financing—Continued
1957 actual
New obligational authority:
Authorizations to expend foreign currency receipts from the Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance
Act of 1954 (68 Stat. 454)
Transferred from "Foreign currency,
economic, technical, and other assistance" (68 Stat. 843)
Authorization to expend foreign
currency receipts (adjusted)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Appropriation (new obligational authority)
$83,083,831

$67, 038,195

1, 936, 927

55,006, 856

85,020, 758

122,045, 051

Offshore procurement.—Foreign currencies of approximately 13 countries are used for military materiel and
services procured abroad for the mutual defense of the
United States and friendly nations. The currencies available under sections 502 and 402 of the Mutual Security
Act are transferred from, the consolidated foreign currency
schedule under "Economic, technical, and other assistance'J below. Other currencies, generated by the sale of
agricultural surplus commodities under the Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, are allocated to the Department of Defense for this activity.
Object Classification
1957 actual
07
08
09

Total obligations

___
•

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$15, 256, 260
5,000,000
18, 816, 456

$68,358,000

$13,912,000

55, 151,047

54, 700, 680

39,072, 716

Other contractual services
Supplies and materials--Equipment.

123, 509, 047

68, 612,680

$27,320,765

$28,823, 384

$52, 285, 431

1,083, 535
39, 072, 716
-28,823,384

123, 509, 047
- 5 2 , 285,431

68, 612, 680
-64,884, 543

38, 653, 632

100, 047, 000

56,013, 568

$19, 081, 235
6, 483,818

$17, 439, 000
18, 828,000

$2, 967, 111
43, 087, 457

13,088, 579

63, 780,000

9,959, 000

Expenditure Analysis
Obligated balance brought forward _ - _ _
Obligated balance transferred from "Foreign currency, economic, technical and
other assistance" (68 Stat. 843)
_ Obligations incurred__
Obligated balance carried forward.
Expenditures--.
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954. Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954-_
Agricultural Trade Development and
Assistance Act, 1954
___

DEFENSE

SUPPORT

[Defense support: For assistance authorized by section 131 (b),
$689,000,000; and in addition $36,000,000 of unobligated balances
of funds heretofore made available for purposes of section 131 are
continued available for the purposes of that section: Provided, That
not less than $40,000,000 thereof shall be available for Spain, exclusive of technical cooperation;] (Mutual Security
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$689,000,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

Program by activities:
Defense support:
(a) Europe and Africa
(b) Near East and South Asia
(c) Far East
Total obligations




Financing:
Comparative transfers from (—) other
-$22,173,491
accounts..
_ _ _
Unobligated balance brought forward
(annual appropriation acts)...
Recovery of prior year obligations
- 9 0 , 926, 612
Unobligated balance carried forward
(annual appropriation acts)
36,000,000
Unobligated balance no longer available18,112, 387

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$79, 200, 000
165, 800,000
565,000, 000

1,168,687, 716

810,000,000

1959 estimate

-$36,000,000
-85,000,000

689, 000,000

Defense support is economic assistance designed primarily to enable a country to raise and support military
forces for the common defense without reducing already
low living standards. In general, the level of defense
support is intended to be sufficient to prevent economic
retrogression, political instability, deterioration of morale
or other conditions wilieh might adversely affect the military effort.
Defense support contributes to the current requirements
of food, fertilizers, industrial raw materials, fuels, and
essential machinery of countries supporting military forces
beyond their economic capabilities. Defense support also
contributes to internal price stability and the foreign exchange position of the recipients. Commodities are
normally sold in commercial markets for local currency
which in turn is utilized for military budget support and
for essential economic projects. Approximately one-fourth
of the defense support program has been surplus agricultural commodities.
(a) Europe and Africa.—Defense support is provided
to Spain, Morocco, Libya, and Ethiopia, all of which
have granted the United States base rights of strategic
importance.
(b) Near East and South Asia.—The continuation of
tensions, the further evidence of Soviet imperialistic
designs, and the strategic and economic importance of
the area provide a strong case for effective defensive forces
and economic stability. Greece, Turkey, Iran, and Pakistan, all involved in regional defense pacts with the United
States, are receiving assistance in 1958.
(c) Far East.—A large proportion of defense support is
allocated to seven Far East countries—Korea, Taiwan,
Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and the Philippines—which maintain military establishments beyond
their own unaided capabilities. These forces provide an
important deterrent to Communist aggression around the
Pacific rim.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
ADMINISTRATION

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average grade and salary, established by
the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as
amended (22 U. S. C. 801-1158):
Average FSR grade and salary
Average FSS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

$105,174,164
243, 730, 685
819,782,867

1,109, 700,000

1958 estimate

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services

734
643
645

2.2
6.1

$12, 566
$7,492
$1, 629

706
667
687

2.2
6.0

$12, 637
$7, 586
$1, 630

$3,125, 319
21, 913
1, 263, 927

$3, 242, 000
25, 000
1, 310, 600

4,411,159

4, 577, 600

1959 estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
Program and Financing—Continued

Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual
INTERNATIONAL

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

08
09
11
13
15
16

Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction.__
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments
Investments and loans
Total, International
Administration

Cooperation

$1, 628, 218
29, 536,368
13,185
125,326
12, 360
25, 980, 775
798, 969
463, 526, 255
291,478, 064
208,165, 980
1,155
2, 489
137, 677,485

$1, 700,000
29, 500, 000
15, 000
125, 000
15, 000
26, 000,000
800, 000
347, 663, 700
229, 600, 000
150,000, 000
1,200
2, 500
20, 000, 000

1,163, 357, 788

New obligational authority. __

-$99,151,472

-4,865,000
- 1 7 , 905, 724
117,888, 578

99,151, 472

23,119,511

344, 536, 536

278, 434, 773

70, 862,879

$61,033,334

$12, 280, 379

$344, 536, 536

217,401, 439

58, 582, 500

Authorization to expend foreign
currency receipts (adjusted).

344, 536, 536

278,434, 773

70, 862, 879

8. 5

$5, 953

6,056

8,853

5.1

Foreign currencies of approximately 14 countries are
available for defense support purposes under the acts as
cited below.
Mutual Security Act of 1954.—The currencies available
under sections 502 and 402 of this act are transferred from
the consolidated foreign currency schedule under "Economic, technical, and other assistance/' below.
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of
1954.—Foreign currencies, generated by the sale of agricultural surplus commodities under this act are allocated
to the International Cooperation Administration to finance
the purchase abroad of goods and services for other
friendly countries, to promote balanced economic development and trade among nations, and to promote multilateral trade and economic development.

$9, 401
$1, 220, 540
9,400
102, 663

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Commui-ication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials.
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments .

1,172,392
196,635
2, 316,363
4, 676
4,424
1, 524
1, 878, 606
36,697
78, 898,384
21, 229,496
988, 344
700
1,638

1,332, 603
109,300
3, 528,801
2,200
309, 965
15,000
96, 707, 533
30, 583,143
1,336,602
500
1,000

106, 729,879

133, 926, 647

Subtotal
Deduct portion of foregoing obligations
originally charged to other object
classes under International Cooperation Administration:
Department of Agriculture
Department of the Army___
Corps of Engineers, Civil
Department of Commerce
Federal Communications Commission..
General Services Administration
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor
Department of the Navy

Object Classification
687, 640
51, 349, 737
12,941
11, 230, 547
2,057
32, 849, 786

305,000
21, 500
183, 267
400,000
4, 352, 810

101,399,951

133,926, 647

Total obligations

Obligated balance brought forward
Obligations incurred—_ __ __.
Obligated balance carried forward
Adjustment due to changes in exchange
rates to permit conversion to dollar
equivalents
___
Expenditures

, 163, 357, 788
5, 329, 928

FOREIGN

__ -

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954.__
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954, __
Agricultural Trade Development and
Assistance A c t . . .
__

$810,000,000

CURRENCY

$262, 335, 218
45, 818, 603

$255, 288,967
41,882, 912

$141,759,840
10,000,000

297,171, 879

151, 759, 840

$44,001,274
297,171, 879
- 5 3 , 840, 369

$53, 840, 369
151, 759, 840
- 2 8 , 990,175

299, 629, 565

287, 332,784

176, 610, 034

$20,190, 071
279,439,494

$11, 924,127
238, 788,657

$4,865,000
149, 728, 806

36,620,000

22, 016, 228

Expenditure Analysis

810, 000, 000

1,168, 687, 716

1959 estimate

308,153, 821

11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions. .
16 Investments and loans

38,000,000

5, 329, 928

Total, allocation accounts

1958 estimate

1957 actual

628, 200
71,437, 948
12, 222
18, 585, 700

259, 797
12, 750
285, 718
382,140
4, 326, 838

Subtotal

INFORMATIONAL

-$117, 888, 578

1
194
93

$1,044,819
14,680
112,893

Obligations are distributed as follows:
International Cooperation Administration
Department of the Army

-$63,600,139

810,000, 000

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total obligations

1959 estimate

151
2
165
134

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

01

_

1958 estimate

New obligational authority:
Authorization to expend foreign currency receipts from the Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance
Act of 1954 (68 Stat. 454)
Transferred from "Foreign currency,
economic, technical, and other assistance" (68 Stat. 843)

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Average GS grade and salary
Average I C A grade and salary, established by the Director, International
Cooperation Administration (68 Stat.
833)

1957 actual
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward.__
Unobligated balance transferred from
"Foreign currency, economic, technical and other assistance" (67 Stat.
159)
Adjustment due to changes in exchange
rates to permit conversion to dollar
equivalent ._
_ _______
Balance carried forward
_____

COOPERATION

ADMINISTRATION—continued

02
03
04
05
06
07

85

$35,397,729
308,153, 821
-44,001, 274
79, 289

SCHEDULE

Foreign Currency, Defense Support
[All amounts are stated in U. S. dollar equivalents computed at rates of exchange as of
June 30, 1957, except for balances brought forward from 1956]
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Defense support:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954.
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954.
Agricultural Trade
Development
Assistance Act of 1954
Total obligations




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$20,174,945
287,978,876

$11,924,127
242, 524,418

$4, 865,000
125,481,575

42, 723, 334

21,413, 265

308,153, 821

297,171, 879

151, 759,840

ECONOMIC,

TECHNICAL,

AND

OTHER

ASSISTANCE

[Development assistance: Not to exceed $52,000,000 of unobligated balances of funds heretofore made available for purposes of
development assistance are hereby continued available for the
purposes for which originally appropriated;J
[Technical cooperation, general authorization: For assistance
authorized by section 304, $113,000,000; and in addition not to
exceed $12,000,000 of unobligated balances of funds heretofore
made available for purposes of section 304 are continued available
for the purposes of that section;]
[United Nations expanded program of technical assistance: For
contributions authorized by section 306 (a), $15,500,000

86

T H E B U D G E T F O R , FISCAL Y E A R 1959

[MUTUAL SECURITY]—Continued

Program and Financing—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued
[Technical cooperation programs of the Organization of American
States: For contributions authorized by section 306 (b), $1,500,000;]
[Special assistance, general authorization: For assistance authorized by section 400 (a), $225,000,000: Provided, That not less than
$10,000,000 shall be available for Guatemala J
[Special assistance in joint control areas in Europe: For assistance
authorized by section 403, $11,500,000 which shall remain available
until September 30, 1958;]
[Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration: For
contributions authorized by section 405 (a), $12,500,000: Provided,
That no funds appropriated in this Act shall be used to assist directly
in the migration to any nation in the Western Hemisphere of any
person not having a security clearance based on reasonable standards
to insure against Communist infiltration in the Western Hemisphere;]
[United Nations Refugee Fund: For contributions authorized by
section 405 (c), $2,233,000;]
[Escapee program: For assistance authorized by section 405 (d),
$5,500,000;]
[United Nations Children's Fund: For contributions authorized
by section 406, $11,000,000;]
[United Nations Relief and Works Agency: Not to exceed
$23,800,000 of unobligated balances of funds heretofore made
available for purposes of section 407 are continued available for
purposes of that section;]
[ N o r t h Atlantic Treaty Organization: For contributions for the
construction of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization civilian
headquarters as authorized by section 408, $1,500,000;]
[Ocean freight charges, United States voluntary relief agencies:
For payments authorized by section 409 (c), $2,200,000;]
[Control Act expenses: For carrying out the purposes of the
Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act of 1951, as authorized by
section 410, $1,000,000;]
[General administrative expenses: For expenses authorized by
section 411 (b), $32,750,000;]
[Atoms for Peace: Not to exceed $4,450,000 of unobligated
balances of funds heretofore made available for purposes of section
12 of the Mutual Security Act of 1956 are hereby continued available for the purposes of section 4 1 9 ; ] (Mutual Security Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $435,183,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Development assistance:
(a) Europe and Africa..
(b) Near East and South Asia
(c) Far East
(d) Latin America.
2. Technical cooperation:
(a) General
(b) United Nations
(c) Organization
of
American
States
3. Special assistance:
(a) Europe and Africa
(b) Near East and South Asia
(c) Far East
. .
(d) Latin America.
(e) Nonrcgional..-..
(f) Undistributed _
.
4. Other programs:
(a) Special Presidential fund
(b) Joint control areas in Europe...
(c) Migrants, refugees, and escapee
program
(d) United Nations children's fund.
0?) United Nations Relief and
Works Agency
(f) Ocean freight charges, United
States voluntary relief agencies
(g) North Atlantic Treaty Organization (civilian Headquarters)
(h) Control Act expenses
(i) Administrative expenses (other
than military assistance).
(j) Atoms for peace
(k) President's fund for Asian
economic development
(7) Special programs.
Total obligations..




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

-45, 300,000

-$92, 250,000

—$3, 928, 000

-97,168, 576

-97,080, 414

-132, 294
-36, 893, 378

-118, 537
- 2 5 , 000, 000

92, 250, 000

3, 928, 000

1957 actual

ECONOMIC, TECHNICAL, AND OTHER ASSISTANCE—Continued

1958 estimate

$45, 580, 000
167, 384,078
4, 717, 500
50,402, 569

$34, 000. 000
27, 000,000
3,000, 000

131,149, 769
15, 500,000

138, 314, 993
15, 500,000

1, 500,000

1, 500, 000
18,200,000
42, 300,000
9, 000, 000
30,000,000
25, 050, 000
100, 450,000

33,357, 437
12,108, 776

3,000,000
11,500,000

52,874,889
10,000,000

20, 233,000
11,000,000

21, 500, 000
2, 040, 475

19,872,000
2, 200,000

1,115,095

1, 500,000
1,000,000

29, 739, 573
1,050,000

32, 750, 000
4, 450, 000

1, 972,884
2, 766, 757

93, 765, 421
118, 637

584, 759,802

645, 703, 951

1959 estimate

Financing:
Comparative transfers to other accounts_
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Aiinual appropriation acts
Other legislative authority:
Appropriation
Authorization to expend from debt
receipts
Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Annual appropriation acts
Other legislative authority:
Appropriation
Authorization to expend from debt
receipts
Unobligated balance transferred to
"Other mutual security programs"
shown under "Proposed for later
transmission" (see bel^w)
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority)

$26,811, 745

97,080, 414
118,537

3,928,000

17, 843, 750
639, 370, 000

435,183, 000

1. Development assistance.—-This assistance is designed
to promote economic development and to contribute to
economic and political stability in countries not receiving
military assistance. Beginning in 1958, requirements of
this type are either classified as "3. Special assistance" or
covered under the development loan fund, with one exception: development assistance programed in 1957, but
not implemented, has been extended into 1958. No
funds are being requested in 1959.
2. Technical cooperation.—This program provides for
the interchange of knowledge, experience, techniques, and
skills with the people of the less-developed areas of the
world to help them carry out their economic development and strengthen their freedom. Teaching, training,
and exchange of information are carried out in such fields
as industry, mining, agriculture, labor, education, health,
sanitation, public administration, transportation, and community development. Supplies and equipment are provided only to the extent necessary to support effective
teaching and demonstration. Aid is provided bilaterally,
in programs administered by the International Cooperation Administration, and multilaterally, by contribution
to the technical assistance program of the Organization of
American States and to the United Nations expanded
technical assistance program. The bilateral programs are
coordinated with the multilateral to achieve balanced
country and regional programs and prevent duplication
of effort.
3. Special assistance.—This is a new category of assistance created by the Mutual Security Act of 1957, It is
intended to provide (1) assistance which may not meet the
criteria of defense support or the development loan
fund; and (2) a reserve fund for economic, political, and
military contingencies. Assistance of the first type
mentioned is programed for specific countries such as
Tunisia, Jordan, Israel, Bolivia, and Guatemala or for
specific activities such as malaria eradication and Hungarian refugees.
4. Other programs.—Several miscellaneous activities are
authorized by the Mutual Security Act. Contributions
for refugee and migrant programs are made to the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration, United
Nations Refugee Fund, and the United Nations Work and
Relief Agency. An escapee program, conducted under
U. S. auspices, provides care and maintenance for refugees

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

from Iron Curtain countries. The United States contributions to the United Nations Children's Fund are included. Ocean freight is paid for supplies shipped abroad
by nonprofit relief agencies. Administrative expenses of
nonmilitary mutual security programs and for control of
East-West trade are provided. The a toms-f or-peace program, undertaken in 1957, is continued. Funds appropriated in 1956 are still available for Asian regional economic development projects.
Loans.—The International Cooperation Administration
and predecessor agencies have been authorized, by several
laws, to make loans to friendly nations. Those made
from the development loan fund and under authority
of the Agricultural Trade and Development Assistance
Act are shown in schedules elsewhere in the budget.
The following table reflects the loans made from current
mutual security obligational authority and related foreign
currencies in millions of dollars and dollar equivalents:
1957 actual

Loan obligations incurred;
United States currency
Foreign currency
Loan disbursements made:
United States currency
Foreign currency
Loan principal repayments (U. S. currency).
Interest collections:
United States currency
Foreign currency

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

234
89

103

51
43
16

220
80
24

125
30
34

41

42

41
6

These loans are usually in the form of a line of credit,
extended as a part of the aid program for a country.
Procurement authorizations or project agreements constitute the obligations; payments against those obligations
are considered to be loan disbursements under the agreements.
The status of the loans at the end of the respective fiscal
years is:
1956
actual
1,872
1
214
50

Loans outstanding
Interest past due
Undisbursed loan obligations
Unobligated authority

1957
actual
1,950
2
443
50

1958
1959
estimate estimate
2,226
2,347
4
7
246
91

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

01

8,904
7,516
8,000

9,864
8,485
8, 912

8.8

$6, 563

8.8

>6, 607

2. 7
5. 2

$11,807
$8,095
$1,150

2. 6
5.4

$11,900
$8,008
$1,170

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$38,377,947
260, 391
8, 586, 263

$43, 650, 750
268, 500
9, 754, 650

Total personal services.
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services.
06 Printing and reproduction.
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials.
09 Equipment
10 Lands and structures
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments.
16 Investments and loans
Un vouchered—-

47, 224, 601
9,227,935
6, 647,395
727, 215
2, 603, 402
534,128
38, 202, 550
10, 928, 565
60, 297,812
30, 367, 579
3 213
130, 548^ 539
10, 919
39,157
115, 693,929
21, 604

53, 673,900
9, 300,000
7, 700,000
735,000
3,000,000
558,900
39,000,000
11,000,000
62,000,000
32,000,000

Total, International
Administration

Cooperation

24.5,350,051
9, 600
35,000
83,000, 000
29,000

453,078, 543

547, 391, 451

1,120
48
1,032
1,024

1,253
66
1,260
1,190

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year




Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS—continued

Average GS grade and salary
Average grade and salary, established by
the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as
amended (22 U. S. C. 801-1158):
Average FSO grade and salary
Average FSR grade and salaryAverage FSS grade and salary.
Average I C A grade and salary, established by the Director, International
Cooperation Administration (68 Stat.
833)
Average salary, grades established by act
Of July 1,1944 (42 U. S. C. 207)
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

8.0

$6,030

8.0

$6,017

5. 0
1. 0
7. 8

$8,375
$15,400
$6, 564

5.0
1. 0
7. 8

$8, 560
$15,800
$6, 592

5.3

i9,195

5. 3

$9,180

$1, 759

168,184,300

642

600

16, 003,090
14, 631,120
7, 873, 402
31, 822
16,085

16, 014. I l l
10, 495,181
14, 919, 900
75. 890
24, 000

41, 426
13, 762,161

66, 450
16,000,000

5, 901, 428
226, 454
2,440, 676
2, 300, 663
651, 647

Subtotal

9, 323, 003
1,302, 984
8, 602, 273
113,995
30, 220
62,084
1, 718, 954
2, 200, 214
32,460,311
7,952, 557
104,395,996
195
21, 514

195, 561,875

Subtotal
Deduct—
Quarters and subsistence charges
Portion of foregoing obligations originally charged to other object classes
under International Cooperation
Administration:
Department of Agriculture
Department of the Army
Department of Commerce
Corps of Engineers, Civil
Farm Credit Administration
Federal Communications Commission
General Services Administration
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare
Housing and Home Finance Agency..
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor
Department of the Navy

$8,050, 936
446, 725
825,342

7, 525,824
974,398
7, 722, 550
79, 561
17, 248
54,806
2,191,462
1,423, 572
32, 377, 220
6, 531,108
106, 641,440
1,116
21, 570
30, 000,000

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments
16 Investments and loans
Unvouchered.-

$1, 760

$6, 544, 705
312,800
668,319

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

6, 868, 505
252, 500
2, 320, 401
2, 539, 700
294, 562
69,871,800

63,880,616

Total, allocation accounts.

131, 681,259

98, 312, 500

Total obligations

INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION
ADMINISTRATION

Average GS grade and salary
Average grade and salary established by
the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as
amended (22 U. S. C. 801-1158) :
Foreign Service reserve
Foreign Service staff—
Average salary of ungraded positions

1959 estimate

87

584, 759, 802

645, 703, 951

$453,078, 543
1,050,000
207, 255

$547, 391, 451
4, 450, 000
145,000

42, 437
30,000,000
100, 381, 567

93, 717, 500

Obligations are distributed as follows:
International Cooperation Administration
Atomic Energy Commission
Department of Commerce
President's Citizens Advisers on the
Mutual Security Program
Export-Import Bank of Washington
Department of State

INFORMATIONAL

FOREIGN

CURRENCY

SCHEDULE

Foreign Currency, Economic, Technical, and Other Assistance
[All amounts are stated in United States dollar equivalents computed at rates of exchange
as of June 30, 1957, except for balances brought forward from 1956]
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Development assistance:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of
1954
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of
1954
Sec. 505 (a), Mutual Security Act
of 1954
Agricultural Trade Development
and Assistance Act of 1954
2. Technical cooperation: Sec. 502,
Mutual Security Act of 1954
3. Special assistance: Sec. 402, Mutual
Security Act of 1954.

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,399,869
20,000,000

$20, 686, 557

103,694,905

374, 704, 704

427,411,412

943, 650

130,990

$20,915,361
1,100,000

7,000,000

3,000,000

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

88

[MUTUAL SECURITY]—Continued

Object Classification

Current authorizations—Continued

1957 actual

INFORMATIONAL FOREIGN CURRENCY

SCHEDULE—Continued

Foreign Currency, Economic, Technical, and Other Assistance—Continued

1957 actual
Program by activities—Continued
4. Other programs:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of
1954
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of
1954
Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward.__
Unobligated balance transferred to—
"Foreign currency, military assistance" (67 Stat. 159, 68 Stat. 843)
"Foreign currency, defense support"
(67 Stat. 159)
Adjustment due to changes in exchange
rates to permit conversion to dollar
equivalents.- __ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ .
Unobligated balance carried forward
New obligational authority
New obligational authority:
Authorization to expend foreign currency receipts:
Agricultural Trade Development and
Assistance Act of 1954 (68 Stat. 454) __
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954.
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954_
Transferred to—
"Foreign currency, military assistance" (68 Stat. 843)
"Foreign currency, defense support"
(68 Stat. 843)
Authorization to expend foreign
currency receipts (adjusted)

1958 estimate

$71,357

$128, 901
10, 567, 702

$11,374, 564

142,003,394

413,932,166

462, 472, 533

- 4 0 , 594, 446

- 9 8 , 514,345

14,179,025

$53," 140," 134 ""$62,"780,"737
360, 792,032
399,691, 796
413,932,166

462,472, 533

$18, 229,190
142,003,394

$41,382,698
413,932,166

$81,791,167
462, 472, 533

-1,083,535
- 4 1 , 382,698

81, 791,167

101, 866,794

118,256, 711

Obligated balance brought forward
Obligations incurred
Obligated balance transferred to "Foreign
currency, military assistance"
(68
Stat. 843)
Obligated balance carried forward
Adjustment due to changes in exchange
rates to permit conversion to dollar
equivalents
__
Balance no longer available.

373, 523, 697

442, 396,906

$1,004,744
26, 914,860
987,740

$4, 585,448
38,689,910
112,260

$1, 006, 586
39,451,183

89,240,937
108, 430

329,847, 842
288, 237

401,939,137

22,455, 229

-203,020,433

4,865,000
- 1 , 626, 507
98, 514,345

203,"020~433_ """206,"" 550," 400

212,475,811

540, 893, 483

470. 867, 500

$125, 022,811
389, 099
433, 537,364

$502, 528, 523

$450,000,000

310, 773,255

79, 450,000

- 1 , 936,927

-55,006, 856

-344. 536, 536

-217, 401, 439

- 5 8 , 582, 500

212, 475,811

540, 893, 483

470, 867, 500

Foreign currencies of approximately 44 countries are
available for economic, technical, and other assistance
under the acts as cited below.
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954.—Mutual security
appropriations were made available by Congress in 1954
to purchase surplus agricultural commodities in this
country for sale abroad to friendly countries for their
currencies. The foreign currencies received from the sale
of these surplus agricultural commodities are used for
mutual security program objectives in accordance with
agreements reached with each government.
Sec. 4-02, Mutual Security Act of 1954.—Mutual security
appropriations have been made available by Congress
since 1955 to purchase surplus agricultural commodities
in this country for sale abroad to friendly countries for
their currencies. The foreign currencies received from the
sale of these commodities to friendly countries can be used
only for the purposes for which the dollar funds were
originally appropriated.
Sec. 505 (a), Mutual Security Act of 1954.—Under the
terms of this section, mutual security may be furnished
on a reimbursable basis, repayable with foreign currency.
Reimbursements by Burma have been utilized for the
benefit of Pakistan.
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of
1954-—Foreign currencies, generated by the sale of agricultural surplus commodities under this act, are allocated to the International Cooperation Administration to finance the purchase abroad of goods and services
for other friendly countries, to promote balanced economic development and trade among nations and to promote multilateral trade and economic development.




$1,100,000
38, 338, 559
102, 564,835

Expenditure Analysis

1959 estimate

15,278,121

1959 estimate

142,003,394

08 Supplies and materials
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—
16 Investments and loans
Total obligations

Program and Financing—Continued

1958 estimate

Expenditures..
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Sec. 502, Mutual Security Act of 1954. __
Sec. 402, Mutual Security Act of 1954. __
Sec. 505 (a), Mutual Security Act of 1954.
Agricultural Trade Development and
Assistance Act
Counterpart funds
_

493,999
-3,639

[Funds appropriated under each paragraph of this Act (other
than appropriations under the head of military assistance), including specified amounts of unobligated balances, and amounts certified
pursuant to section 1311 of the Supplemental Appropriation Act,
1955, as having been obligated against appropriations heretofore
made for the same general purpose as such paragraph, which
amounts are hereby continued available (except as may otherwise
be specified in this Act) for the same period as the respective appropriations in this Act for the same general purpose, may be consolidated in one account for each paragraph.]
[GENERAL PROVISIONS]

[SEC. 102. N o part of any appropriation contained in this Act
shall be used for publicity or propaganda purposes within the
United States not heretofore authorized by the Congress.]
[SEC. 103. Payments made from funds appropriated herein for
engineering fees and services to any individual engineering firm on
any one project in excess of $25,000 shall be reported to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives at least twice annually.]
[SEC. 104. Pursuant to section 1415 of the Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953, and in addition to other amounts made available
pursuant to said section, not to exceed the equivalent of $300,000
of foreign currencies or credits owed to or owned by the United
States shall remain available until expended, without reimbursement to the Treasury, for liquidation of obligations incurred against
such currencies or credits prior to July 1, 1953, pursuant to authority
contained in the Mutual Security Act of 1951, as amended, and Acts
for which funds were authorized by that Act and, hereafter, foreign
currencies generated under the provisions of this Act shall be utilized
only for the purposes for which the funds providing the commodities
which generated the currency were appropriated.]
[SEC. 105. None of the funds provided by this Act nor any of the
counterpart funds generated as a result of assistance under this or
any other Act shall be used to make payments on account of the
principal or interest on any debt of any foreign government or on
any loan made to such government by any other foreign government;
nor shall any of these funds be expended for any purpose for which
funds have been withdrawn by any recipient country to make payment on such debts: Provided, That to the extent that funds have
been borrowed by any foreign government in order to make a deposit
of counterpart and such deposit is in excess of the amount that
would be required to be deposited pursuant to the formula prescribed
by section 142 (b) of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended,
such counterpart may be used in such country for any agreed
purpose consistent with the provisions of such A c t . ]
[SEC. 106. Except for the appropriations entitled "Special assistance, general authorization" and "Development loan fund", not
more than 20 per centum of any appropriation item made available
by this Act shall be obligated and/or reserved during the last month
of availability.]

F U N D S A P P R O P R I A T E D TO T H E P R E S I D E N T
[SEC. 107. None of the funds made available by this Act shall be
used to carry out the purposes of the first sentence of section 400 (c)
of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended.]
[SEC. 108. The appropriations and authority with respect thereto
in this Act shall be available from July 1, 1957, for the purposes
provided in such appropriations and authority. All obligations
incurred during the period between June 30, 1957, and the date of
enactment of this Act in anticipation of such appropriations and
authority are hereby ratified and confirmed if in accordance with
the terms hereof.]
[SEC. 109. The Congress hereby reiterates its opposition to the
seating in the United Nations of the Communist China regime as
the representative of China, and it is hereby declared to be the
continuing sense of the Congress that the Communist regime in
China has not demonstrated its willingness to fulfill the obligations
contained in the Charter of the United Nations and should not be
recognized to represent China in the United Nations. In the event
of the seating of representatives of the Chinese Communist regime
in the Security Council or General Assembly of the United Nations,
Program a
APPROPRIATED FUNDS
1957 actual

$200,000,000

Total obligations incurred

200,000,000

__

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Appropriation
Collection of loans __ __ _
Interest on loans,
_
Fees for guaranties issued
Total amounts becoming available.
__ _
Unobligated balance brought forward. _ _ __
Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carried forward ._ __ _
Financing applied to program

Public enterprise funds:
DEVELOPMENT

LOAN

FUND

[Development Loan Fund: For advances to the Development
loan fund as authorized by section 203, $300,000,000, to remain
Act,
available until expended;] (Mutual Security Appropriation
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $300,000,000
Financing

1957 actual

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$90,000, 000

Total
1957 actual

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$200,000, 000

$90, 000,000

200,000,000

100,000, 000

10,000,000

300, 000, 000
11, 000

10,000,000

100,000,000

10,000
308, 000
200, 000

$99, 000

$90, 000
2, 772, 000

300, 000,000
110,000

100,000
3, 080, 000
200, 000

300, 011,000

518, 000
100, 011, 000

99, 000

2, 862, 000
99, 000

300,110, 000

3, 380, 000
100,110, 000

300, 011, 000
-100, 011, 000

100, 529, 000
-529,000

99, 000
- 9 9 , 000

2, 961, 000
- 2 , 961, 000

300,110, 000
-100,110, 000

103, 490, 000
- 3 , 490,000

200, 000, 000

100, 000, 000

200, 000, 000

100, 000, 000

Beginning in 1958, the Mutual Security Act authorized
a development loan fund to make loans, credits, or guaranties to nations, organizations, persons, or other entities
to encourage the economic development of friendly nations.
The fund is to be administered so as to support and encourage private investment and enterprise and is not to
compete with private investment capital or the activities
of the Export-Import Bank and the International Bank
for Reconstruction and Development. Before making any
loan, the management of the fund considers the availability of financing from other free world sources and
ascertains the soundness and feasibility of the activity to
be financed.
The basic financial terms and conditions for the operation of the fund are determined by a loan committee
consisting of the Deputy Under Secretary of State for
Economic Affairs, acting as chairman, the Director of the
International Cooperation Administration, and the Presi-




the President is requested to inform the Congress insofar as is compatible with the requirements of national security, of the implications of this action upon the foreign policy of the United States and
our foreign relationships, including that created by membership in
the United Nations, together with any recommendations which he
may have with respect to the matter.] (Mutual Security Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Foreign currencies (in dollar equivalents)

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

Program by activities :
Operations (obligations):
1. Direct loan commitments
2. Guaranties and deferred participation
loans.
_ _

89

dent of the Export-Import Bank. The fund is administered by a manager appointed by the President.
Budget program.—Loan commitments for development
purposes will begin in 1958, but guaranties and deferred
participation loans are not expected to be undertaken until
1959. Obligations by the fund will increase in 1959 to
$500 million, most of which will be funded from 1959
appropriations proposed for later transmission.
Financing.—An appropriation of $300 million was provided in 1958. The request for appropriations for 1959
is shown under "Proposed for later transmission." Repayments of interest and principal may be either in dollars or
foreign currencies.
Operating results.—Although the revenue of the fund will
be in both dollars and foreign currencies it is anticipated
that the major portion will be in foreign currencies. The
fund presently bears no administrative expenses and no
allowance has been established for losses.

90

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

[MUTUAL SECURITY]—Continued

Public enterprise funds—Continued

DEVELOPMENT LOAN FUND—Continued
Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
APPROPRIATED FUNDS
1957 actual

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Direct loan program: Loan disbursements.
Increase in selected working capital

Foreign currencies (in dollar equivalents)

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

1957 actual

Total

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

1957 actual

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$20,000,000
11,000

$2,862,000

$20,000,000
110,000

100,044,000

99,000

2, 862,000

20,110,000

11,000

10,000
308, 000

99,000

90,000
2,772,000

110,000

99,000

2,862, 000

200,000
11,000

...

518,000

20,000, 000

Total receipts from operations .
Budget expenditures

$99,000

20,011,000

Total gross expenditures..
Receipts from operations (funds provided):
Direct loan program:
Loan repayments
Interest receivable
Guaranties and deferred participation loan
program: Fees collected

$100,000,000
44,000

99, 526, 000

110,000
20, 000, 000

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
$99, 000

52, 772, 000

$110,000

508, 000
11,000

$11, 000

Direct loan program: Revenue
Guaranties and deferred participation loan program: Revenue

99, 000

2, 772, 000
99, 000

110, 000

519, 000

99, 000

2, 871, 000

110, 000

$308,000
200, 000

Net income for the year
Retained earnings, beginning of year..
11, 000

Retained earnings, end of year..

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury.
Loans receivable
Interest receivable...

$280,000,000
2,000,000
11, 000

Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year. . . J
Appropriations during year
Conversion of capital during year.

$18, 000,000
99, 000

$2, 466, 000
107, 910,000
495, 000

$280, 000,000
20,000,000
110, 000

282, 011,000

Total assets.__
liabilities: Current..

$180, 474, 000
11, 990,000
55,000
192, 519, 000

18, 099, 000

110, 871, 000

300,110,000

90, 000,000

282, 000, 000

18, 000,000

300, 000, 000
- 1 8 , 000,000
282, 000, 000
11,000

Total Government investment...

192, 000,000
519, 000

18, 000, 000
99, 000

108, 000, 000
2, 871, 000

300, 000, 000
110, 000

282, 011,000

End of year
Retained earnings.

- 9 0 , 000, 000

18, 000, 000

300, 000, 000

192, 519, 000

18, 099, 000

110,871,000

300,110, 000

$2, 466, 000

$280, 000, 000

$182, 940, 000

180, 000, 000

-110,000

180, 000, 000
-550, 000

-495, 000

179, 890, 000

179, 450, 000

2, 961, 000

100,110, 000

3, 490, 000

$200, 000, 000

$100,000, 000

Status of Certain Fund Balances
$280, 000, 000

179, 945, 000

100, 011, 000

Total obligated balance..
Unobligated balance

180, 000, 000
- 5 5 , 000

179, 989, 000

Obligated balance, net:
Undisbursed loan obligations..
Accounts receivable (—)

$180, 474, 000

180, 000, 000
- 1 1 , 000

Unexpended balance: Cash

529, 000

-99, 000

Object Classification
16

Investments and loans

FOREIGN

$200,000,000

INVESTMENT

GUARANTY

$100,000,000

Program and Financing—Continued

FUND

1957 actual

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Capital outlay (obligations):
1. Guaranties issued against the risk
of inconvertibility
. . ...
2. Guaranties issued against the risk
of loss by expropriation
3. Guaranties issued against the risk
of loss by war




1959 estimate

$16, 767,437

$55,000,000

$70,000,000

13,167,833

35,000,000

45,000,000
5,000,000

29,935,270
21, 864,720

Total guaranties issued
Less amount not obligated
Total program (obligations)

1958 estimate

..

90,000,000
69,300, 000

120,000,000
92,400,000

8,070, 550

20, 700,000

27, 600,000

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Authorization to expend from public
debt receipts
Fees collected
Adjustment of prior year revenue
Recoveries of prior year obligations.. _

1958 estimate

$40, 000, 581
416,533
1,611,521
2, 009, 082

"4,"500,"OOO"

Total amounts becoming available....
Unobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)

44,037, 717

5,100, 000

Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carried forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)

113, 247,474

110,276,924

-105,176,924

- 8 9 , 576,924

8,070, 550

20, 700, 000

Financing applied to program

$600, 000

>9,209, 757 105,176, 924

1959 estimate

91

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

In order to encourage American industrial investment
abroad, the Mutual Security Act, as amended, authorizes
the issuance of $500 million of guaranties against noncommercial risks, These risks are (1) inconvertibility of
local currency receipts from investment, (2) loss of investment resulting from expropriation or confiscation, and
(3) loss from war damage. The insurance, which may
have a maximum term of 20 years, is available in any
country with which the United States has agreed to instistute the guaranty program. Thirty-six countries (plus
their overseas dependencies) now participate. War
damage coverage authorized in 1956 is now available for
new investments in four countries which have signed the
agreement. Extensions of existing agreements with a
number of interested countries to include this coverage are
being negotiated.
Budget program.—Total guaranties for 1959 are estimated at $120 million, but since the program is on a
fractional reserve basis, total obligations for 1959 are
estimated at $27.6 million.
Financing.-—Congress provided $37.5 million of public
debt authority in 1957, An additional $2.5 million of such
authority was restored by the sale of foreign currencies
generated under the informational media guaranty program.
Operating results.—The fund bears no expenses. Administrative expenses are paid from mutual security,
economic, technical and other assistance funds allocated
to the International Cooperation Administration. No
guaranties have had to be fulfilled. Fees collected through
June 30, 1957, are $2 million and are carried forward as
retained earnings.

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings—Continued
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2, 028, 054

$2, 628,054

2, 628,054

3, 528,054

$2, 028, 054

$2, 628, 054

$3, 528,054

2, 028,054

2, 628,054

3, 528,054

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1957 actual
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of year
Adjustment of prior year revenue.

$1, 611, 521

Retained earnings, end of year

2, 028, 054

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury

...

Government investment:
Retained earnings

...

...

_

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
Unexpended balance:
Cash
Budget authorizations. .

1957 actual

$159, 070, 940

$2, 028,054
199, 071, 521

$2, 628, 054
199, 071, 521

$3, 528,054
199, 071, 521

159, 070,940

201, 099, 575

201, 699, 575

202, 599, 575

91, 472, 704
- 1 , 611, 521

95, 922, 651

112,122, 651

132, 222, 651

89, 861,183

95, 922, 651

112,122, 651

132, 222, 651

69, 209, 757

105,176, 924

89, 576, 924

70,376,924

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$20,700,000

$27, 600,000

Total unexpended
balance
Obligated balance, net:
Undisbursed obligations__.
Accounts receivable (—).
Total obligated balance
.
Unobligated balance

Object Classification
1957 actual
16 Investments and loans

.

$8,070, 550

Intragovernmental funds:

Position With Respect to Guaranty Authority
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Original guaranty authority
Recoveries from prior year guaranties

$500,000,000
3,620,603

$500,000,000
9,120,603

$500,000,000
17,620, 603

Gross guaranty authority

503,620,603

509,120,603

134,394, 630

204,394,630

42,013,344

77,013, 344

122,013,344

MILITARY

ASSISTANCE

517,620,603

79,394,630

A D V A N C E S AND REIMBURSEMENTS,

1959 estimate

Program and Financing

Guaranties issued:
Guaranties issued against the risk of
inconvertibility
Guaranties issued against the risk of loss
by expropriation
Guaranties issued against the risk of
loss by war
Total guaranties outstanding

5,000, 000
211,407,974

331,407,974

382, 212, 629

Unused guaranty authority

121,407, 974

297,712,629

186, 212,629

1957 actual
Program by activities:
J. Administration
2. Other activities

...

..

1958 estimate

$78,200
4,437,162

$1,680,000

_ ___ .

4, 515, 362

1, 680,000

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts
...
Non-Federal sources (40 U. S. C. 481
(c))
.

4, 515, 275

1, 680,000

Total obligations

.

Total financing. __

87
4, 515,362

1,680,000

Sources and Application of Funds
Object Classification
Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Revenue__
Adjustment of prior year revenue
Budget expenditures

$416, 533
1, 611,521

$600, 000

$900, 000

- 2 . 028. 054

-COO, 000

-900,000

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year...
Average ungraded salary
01

Revenue, Expense, and
Guaranties issued against the risk of
inconvertibility: Revenue
Guaranties issued against the risk of loss
by expropriation: Revenue. .
Guaranties issued against the risk of loss
_
by war: Revenue
Net income for the year.




$222, 667

$325, 000

$465,000

193, 866

275,000

400, 000

416, 533

600, oooj

900,000

35,000

03
05
07
08
09

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services.
Total personal services..
Transportation of things
Rents and utility services...
Other contractual services..
Supplies and materials.
Equipment
Total obligations.

$1, 218
$28,459
2, 753
31,212
90
18,829
5, 682
4,455,860
3, 689
4, 515,362

$1,680,000
1, 680,000

1959 estimate

92

T H E B U D G E T F O R , FISCAL Y E A R 1959

[MUTUAL SECURITY]—Continued

Under proposed legislation, 1959.—Appropriations of
$865 million are anticipated in 1959 to finance defense
support programs under legislation to be proposed.

Intragovernmental funds—Continued
ADVANCES

AND REIMBURSEMENTS,

DEFENSE

SUPPORT

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

ECONOMIC,

TECHNICAL,

AND

OTHER

ASSISTANCE

Program and Financing
Program by activities:
Defense support (total obligations)
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts.-.

$126,828

$100,000

126, 828

100,000

$89,214
37,614

Total obligations

ADVANCES

AND

REIMBURSEMENTS,
ECONOMIC,
O T H E R ASSISTANCE

TECHNICAL,

AND

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1 Technical cooperation.
2. Administrative expenses _

1958 estimate

$356, 866
368,592

75, 000

725,458

Total financing

675, 000

89,619

Under existing and proposed legislation, 1959.—Appropriations of $650 million are anticipated in 1959 to finance
economic, technical, and other assistance programs already
authorized or under legislation to be proposed. In addition, it will be requested that 1958 unobligated balances,
estimated at $3,928,000, be continued available in 1959.

750,000

635, 839

650, 000,000

$400,000
350,000

725, 458

Total obligations
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts
__
Non-Federal sources (40 U. S. C.
481 (c))

1959 estimate

-3,928,000

Proposed supplemental appropriation
_
_
_

100,000

$653,928,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance transferred from
"Economic, technical, and other assistance" (see above)..

$50, 000
50, 000

126, 828

Other contractual services
Supplies and materials

750,000

DEVELOPMENT

$41,384
594, 455
89,619

750, 000

Program by activities:
Operations (total obligations) _

Total amounts becoming availableUnobligated balance carried forward. __

ASSISTANCE

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Financing applied to program
1958 estimate

Program by activities:
Military assistance (total obligations)

Foreign
currencies
(in dollar
equivalents),
1959 estimate

$400,000,000

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Proposed supplemental appropriation
Interest on loans _
Fees for guaranties issued

Proposed for later transmission:
MILITARY

FUND

APPROPRIATED
FUNDS,
1959 estimate

$25, 000
650, 000
75, 000

725, 458

Total obligations

LOAN

Program and Financing

Object Classification
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
09 Equipment

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
* Economic, technical, and other assistance (total obligations)

Object Classification
07
08

1958 estimate

1957 actual

_

Total, 1959
estimate

$400,000,000

625,000,000
130, 000
500, 000

$1,170,000

625,000,000
1,300,000
500,000

625, 630,000
-225,630,000

1,170,000
-1,170,000

626,800, C O
O
-226,800,000
400,000,000

400,000,000

1959 estimate

$750,000,000

Financing:
Unobligated and unreserved balance
transferred from "Military assistance" (see above)
Balance carried forward: Reserved (69
Stat. 438)

1,075,000,000

Proposed supplemental appropriation

1,800,000,000

Under existing legislation, 1959.—Additional supplemental appropriations of $625 million are anticipated in
1959 to finance the development loan fund. It is estimated that $100 million of unobligated balances will also
be available to the fund in 1959.

-25,000,000

Under existing and proposed legislation, 1959.—Appropriations of $1,800 million are anticipated in 1959 to
finance military assistance programs already authorized
or to be authorized under legislation to be proposed.
DEFENSE

SUPPORT

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Defense support (total obligations)
Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$865,000,000
865,000,00

PRESIDENT'S SPECIAL INTERNATIONAL
PROGRAM
Current authorizations:
PRESIDENT'S

SPECIAL

INTERNATIONAL

PROGRAM

For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the
provisions of the "International Cultural Exchange and Trade Fair
Participation Act of 1956", [$12,400,000, of which $6,500,000 shall
be available for the Universal and International Exhibition of
Brussels, 1958] including uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by law (5 U. S. C. 2131), $7,600,000, to remain available until
expended: Provided, That not to exceed a total of [ $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 ]
$65,000 may be expended for representation.
[ F o r an additional amount for the "President's special international program", including uniforms or allowances therefor, as
authorized by law (5 U. S. C. 2131), $2,745,000, to remain available
until expended: Provided, That the amount made available under
this head in the Departments of State and Justice, the Judiciary,
and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1958, for United States

93

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
participation in the Universal and International Exhibition of
Brussels, 1958, is increased from "$6,500,000" to "$7,045,000".]
(70 Stat. 778; Departments of State and Justice, the Judiciary, and
Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1958; Supplemental
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $15,145,000

Estimate 1959, $7,600,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1959 estimate

$1,973,989
4,108,723

$2,998,115
3, 737,317

$3,000,000
6, 500,000

3,011, 764
20,096

8,323, 236

1,010,000

9,114, 572

Program by activities:
1. Artistic and athletic presentations...
2. Trade fairs and exhibitions
3. Universal and International Exhibition of Brussels
4. Program coordination and publicity-

1958 estimate

15,058,668

10, 510,000

-628, 340
-309,900
3, 023, 668

-3,023,668

200, 000

11, 200,000

15,145, 000

7,600, 000

Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward.
Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

The purpose of this fund is to strengthen the ties which
unite us with other nations by demonstrating the cultural
interests, developments, and achievements of the people
of the United States, and the contributions being made by
the United States economic and social system toward a
peaceful and more fruitful life for its own people and other
people throughout the world.
The Director of the United States Information Agency
serves as coordinator of the following activities:
1. Artistic and athletic presentations.—The Department
of State administers this program, which supports outstanding American cultural attractions appearing abroad.
This support is necessary primarily because of high international transportation costs and presentation at places
where commercial revenues are inadequate to cover operating expenses. Approved projects, with itineraries reaching all areas of the world, numbered 30 for 1957, and are
estimated at 38 during 1958, and 35 during 1959.
2. Trade fairs and exhibitions.—The Department of
Commerce administers this program, which finances
United States exhibitions plus commercial and labor missions at important international trade fairs and similar
exhibitions. Authorizations for 1957 and 1958 provided
for United States participation in 24 and 17 trade fairs,
respectively. A major exhibit in Moscow, U. S. S. R., for
which a supplemental appropriation was made in 1958, will
not be held until 1959. Funds requested in 1959 will
provide for 18 trade fairs and exhibits.
3. Universal and International Exhibition of Brussels.—
The Department of State, through a United States Commissioner General, is using these funds to finance a major
United States exhibit and related activities in the Universal and International Exhibition of Brussels, 1958. This
exhibition will be the first major world's fair since the New
York World's Fair of 1939-40, and will include national
exhibits from approximately 50 countries plus a number
of international organizations. It is estimated that 35
million persons will visit the exhibition.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

566
36
347
676

573
34
305
161

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number^of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary




1957 actual

179
9
117
183
8.9

$6,917

9.2

$6,947

9.3

$7,044

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS—continued

Average grade and salary:
Grades established by the Secretary of
State
Grades established by the Secretary of
State, equivalent to GS grades
Grades established by the Foreign Service Act of 1946 (22 U. S. C. 801-1158):
Foreign Service officer
Foreign Service reserve
_
Foreign Services staff
Average salary of ungraded positions
(foreign countries):
United States rates.
Local rates

-3,110,000

3,110, 000

Object Classification—Continued

01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

$18,733

$19,050

$19,050

6.9

$5,063

6.8

$4,940

6.8

$4,974

3.0
3.1
8.4

$12,100
$11,404
$6,290

3.0
3. 2
7.9

$12,100
$11,115
$6,344

3.0
3.2
7.9

$12,100
$11,100
$6,344

$5,980
$4,075

$7,036
$2,537

$6, 723
$2, 634

$769,919
57,583
25,544

$1,746, 863
279,612
124,904

$1, 509,847
256,011
83, 252

853,046
593,660
328,051
47,841
163,627
38,206
4, 564, 442

2,151,379
589,450
513,199
42,936
235, 968
104,482
7,120, 613

1,849,110
1,000, 500
401, 700
51, 900
494, 700
113, 800
3,040,280

72, 340
311, 285
304,291
1,835,615
650
1, 518

427,660
294, 447
302,889
2, 843,945

525, 500
187,100
2, 843, 735

431,700

1,675

9,114, 572

15,058,668

10, 510,000

$4,985, 753
4,108, 723
20, 096

$11,321,351
3, 737,317

$4,010,000
6,500,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services.. ___ __ _
Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services.__
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other
agencies
__ _ _ _ _ __
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions__:
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments.
Total obligations

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Department of State
...
Department of Commerce.
United States Information Agency

REFUGEE RELIEF
Current authorizations:
REFUGEE

RELIEF

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Investigation and visa issuance
2. Administration of loans
3. Investigations in Germany
4. Medical examinations
5. Inspection
6. Occupational selection

$5,162,891
17, 507
1, 515, 451
305,823
236,874
198,915
7,437,461

Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

1,062, 539

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

;, 500,000

Object Classification
ALLOCATION" ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees. _ _
Number of employees at end of year.
Average GS grade and salary
Average grade and salary:
Grades established by the Foreign
Service Act of 1946 (22 U. S. C.
801-1158):
Foreign Service officer
Foreign Service reserve officer
Foreign Service staff officer
Average salary of ungraded positions:
Foreign countries (local rates)
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services

2,485
3
1, 492
24
6.8

$4,890

6.4
4.0
9.7

$6,043
$9,833
$5,115
$1, 536
3,351, 251
12,263
494,828
3,858,342

94

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

REFUGEE RELIEF—Continued

Program and Financing—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued

1957 actual

REFUGEE RELIEF—Continued
Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total to be realized in dollars.

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS— continued

02
03
04
05
06
07

Travel
Transportation of things...
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments
16 Investments and loans
Unvouchered
Subtotal
Deduct charges for quarters

Adjustment to market rate of currencies
allocated for U. S. uses
Authorizations for use by agencies without reimbursement to Commodity
Credit Corporation:
Mutual security:
Military assistance
Defense support
Economic, technical, and other assistance
United States Information Agency. . . .
Department of Agriculture
Department of State:
Educational exchange . . .
_
Counterpart fund, sec. 708 (c), Public
Law 118, July 16, 1953
Export-Import Bank of Washington

$349,195
133,737
59,166
76, 498
2,183
180, 944
2, 638, 825
87, 012
24, 375
35
272
8, 748
15,000
7, 324
7, 441, 656
4,195

Total obligations

Total adjustments and authorizations for free use

7, 437, 461

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Department of State
Department of the Army
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
...
Department of Justice.
.
Department of Labor
Treasury Department
Total obligations

Balance carried forward:
Reserved for country uses. . . .
Unreserved

$5,162, 891
1, 515, 451
305, 823
236, 874
198,915
17, 507

Intragovernmental funds:
REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Investigation and visa issuance:
International Cooperation Administration.
Miscellaneous

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$140,000
7
140,007

Total obligations
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts._
_
.
Non-Federal sources (5 U. S. C. 61 (b)).
Total financing

140,000
7
140,007

Object Classification
01 Personal services: Positions other
than permanent
07 Other contractual services: Services
performed by other agencies
Total obligations.

140,000
140,007

MISCELLANEOUS
INFORMATIONAL FOREIGN CURRENCY SCHEDULE
Foreign currency realized under the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act,
as amended (7 U. S. C. 1704)
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Balance brought forward:
Reserved for country uses
Unreserved
Recoveries from prior allocations..
Sales agreements entered into
Subtotal..




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$331, 792, 426 $1,000, 810,186 $1, 320,694,152
504, 880,395
558, 469, 994
3, 877, 865
610, 000, 000
1,049,975,000
1,886,647, 821

$64, 786, 869

1959 estimate

$66,079,639

$81,650,000

22,493, 752

71,200,000

4,480,000

87, 280,621

137, 279, 639

86,130,000

20,107, 568

83,083,831

67,038,195
61,033,334

12, 280,379

125,022, 811
50, 000
3, 860,100

502, 528, 523
2, 087, 000
5, 690, 202

450,000,000
3, 591,000
14, 060, 742

7, 906,000

8, 567, 000

56, 710

240,087, 020

68, 240,000
715,184, 254

1, 000, 810,186
558 469, 994 Jl, 320, 694,152

479,932,121
754, 632, 031

NOTE—Balances brought forward at the beginning of 1957 are stated at agreement
rates. They differ from balances shown in the 1958 budget, in which they were stated
at market rates.

7, 437, 461

ADVANCES AND

Sales by Treasury to appropriations and
funds
Authorized for use by agencies with longterm reimbursement to Commodity
Credit Corporation: Department of
Defense

1958 estimate

2,173,158, 045

1,320,694,152

Title I of the Agricultural Trade Development and
Assistance Act of 1954 authorizes the sale of up to $4
billion of surplus agricultural commodities to friendly
nations for their currencies, with reasonable precautions
neither to displace United States sales for dollars nor to
disrupt unduly world commodity prices. The Commodity Credit Corporation finances the costs. The foreign
currencies generated by these sales may be used (a) to
help develop new markets for United States agricultural
commodities, (6) to purchase strategic and critical materials, (c) to procure military materiel and services for the
common defense, (d) to purchase goods and services for
other friendly nations, (e) to promote balanced economic
development and trade among nations including loans to
American and foreign business firms abroad, (J) to pay
United States obligations abroad, (g) to make loans to
promote multilateral trade and economic development
abroad, (h) to finance international education exchange
activities, (i) to translate and publish books and other
publications abroad, and (j) to aid American-sponsored
schools, libraries, and binational centers overseas.
Most of the currencies are used without charge to appropriations; some are sold to appropriations, and the proceeds of such sales go to the Commodity Credit Corporation. A lump-sum appropriation is recommended to reimburse the Commodity Credit Corporation for its losses
which are not made up through such sales.
As of June 30, 1958, it is estimated agreements will
have been signed calling for deposits of sales proceeds
totaling $2.7 billion. This will represent the market
value of commodities and ocean transportation in which
the Commodity Credit Corporation investment will be
approximately $4 billion. No estimates are included in
this schedule for sales agreements that may be signed
under the proposed legislation increasing title I authorizations by $1.5 billion. Subsidiary schedules on currency
uses are presented in the chapters of the Departments of
State, Defense, and Agriculture, the General Services Administration, the United States Information Agency, and
under "Military assistance,'' "Defense support," and
"Economic, technical, and other assistance" in the funds
appropriated to the President chapter.

INDEPENDENT
The total recommended new obligational authority for
the 47 independent agencies and 10 historical and memorial
commissions for 1959 is $8,211 million, a decrease of $1,746
million from the estimated 1958 total. The decrease
largely reflects the fact that an expansion in the lending
authority of the Export-Import Bank of Washington
requested for 1958 will not recur in 1959. The largest
increases in new obligational authority from 1958 to 1959
are for the National Science Foundation and the Atomic
Energy Commission.
Expenditures of independent agencies in 1959 are estimated to be $8,272 million. This amount is a decrease of
$172 million from 1958.
Development and control of atomic energy.—New obligational authority recommended for the Atomic Energy
Commission in 1959 is $2,418 million, an increase of $56
million over the amount provided for 1958. Expenditures
are estimated to increase from $2,300 million in 1958 to
$2,550 million in 1959.
The increases in both new obligational authority and
expenditures are almost entirely for operating expenses.
Larger quantities of raw uranium concentrates will be
received as mills come into being under prior contracts.
Substantial growth in production of advanced nuclear
weapons is planned. The effort to develop reactors for
civilian atomic power and for military propulsion will be
expanded, accompanied by emphasis on such civilian
power problems as reactor safety and waste disposal.
Research in the physical and life sciences will go forward
at the higher levels recently attained, with increases to
explore more fully the problems inherent in radioactive
hazards.
New obligational authority of $120 million for construction in 1959, together with available balances from
appropriations provided in previous years, will result in
construction expenditures of $240 million in 1959, $20
million more than in 1958. Improvements are planned
in production facilities for fissionable materials and weapons. Construction will also proceed on experimental
reactors for power and propulsion, on supporting facilities
for reactor development, and on four high energy particle
accelerators.
International economic and technical development.—The
Export-Import Bank anticipates that its commitments
for development loans in 1959 will remain high, but that
exporter loans and loans for the purchase of agricultural
commodities will be somewhat lower than in 1958. This
decline is expected to be accompanied by an increased
willingness of private institutions to finance exports.
Gross budget expenditures of the Bank in 1959 for
disbursements on loans, operating expenses, and interest
on money borrowed from the Treasury are estimated
to be $562 million. After deducting estimated receipts
from collections of interest and principal, net budget
expenditures are $57 million. This is less than the
net expenditures of $400 million estimated for 1958,
primarily because a large credit against pledged securities
is being disbursed to the United Kingdom in 1958.
The budget proposes legislation to authorize an increase




OFFICES

of $2 billion in the Bank's lending authority in 1958.
lending authority was last provided in 1955.

New

Foreign information and exchange activities.—In 1959?
the United States Information Agency will expand its
operations in the Middle East and Africa, intensify efforts
to reach the peoples of the Soviet Union and its satellites,
and undertake some general strengthening of press, radio,
motion picture, and information center activities. The
Agency intends also to reach large new audiences by improving facilities of the Voice of America. Major relay
base construction projects will be advanced toward completion and existing facilities modernized.
Recommended new obligational authority for the Agency in 1959
is $110 million, $13.8 million more than for 1958.
Veterans' services and benefits (summary).—The recommended new obligational authority for the Veterans Administration for 1959 is $4,968 million, approximately the
same as for 1958. Of the total, 79.5% is for cash payments
to veterans for compensation, pensions, and readjustment
benefits; 16.4% is for hospital and medical services; and
the remainder is for administration and miscellaneous
programs.
Veterans' education, training, and other readjustment
benefits.—Average enrollment of veterans of the Korean
conflict in education and training is declining from a peak
of 574,000 in 1957 to an estimated 460,000 in 1959.
Training allowances will also be paid to a few veterans
of World War II and to an estimated 7,000 war orphans.
As the number of veterans receiving these benefits declines,
expenditures are estimated to drop from $729 million
in 1958 to $626 million in 1959.
Expenditures for other readjustment benefit programs
are approximately at last year's level. The average number of disabled veterans receiving vocational rehabilitation
is estimated to be 12,800 in 1959, compared with 16,635 in
1957 Veterans of World War II will no longer be eligible
to apply for loan guaranties after July 25, 1958. Obligations and expenditures in 1959 for payment of claims and
acquisition of properties on which loans have been defaulted
are estimated to be $82 million, most of which will later be
recovered from sale of properties. The defaulted loans
are a small proportion of the $24 billion of guaranties
estimated to be outstanding at the end of 1959.
Veterans7 compensation and pensions.—The budget provides for compensation payments of $2 billion for serviceconnected disability and death in an estimated average
of 2,447,000 cases in 1959. While the average number
of cases is declining slowly from a peak of 2,465,000 in
1956, the total amount of payments will increase because
of legislation which raised benefit rates for living veterans
by 10% to 30% effective October 1, 1957. The estimated
net increase from 1958 to 1959 is $30 million.
Pensions for non-service-connected disability and death
are being paid in a steadily larger number of cases, primarily because of the advancing age of World War I
veterans. The average caseload in 1959 is estimated to
be 1,352,000, compared with 1,248,000 in 1958. Estimated payments of $1.1 billion are $96 million more than
in 1958.
95

96

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

A supplemental appropriation of $256 million is anticipated for 1958 to cover the estimated requirements for
compensation and pensions in excess of the amounts
appropriated.
Veterans9 hospitals and medical care.—The new obligational authority of $707 million requested for 1959 anticipates that inpatient care will be provided for a daily
average of 110,900 patients in Veterans Administration
hospitals. Approximately two-thirds of the patients are
receiving care for conditions not connected with military
service. The number of patients in tuberculosis hospitals
has been declining as a result of the use of new drugs. In
addition to its hospitals, the Veterans Administration
operates domiciliary homes with an estimated 16,600
residents in 1959; it will also pay for an average of 3,000
patients per day in other hospitals and for half the cost of
caring for 9,200 veterans in State soldiers' homes.
The budget also provides new obligational authority of
$75.8 million for 1959 for operation of outpatient clinics
and for fees to doctors or dentists where clinics are not
available. Both the medical and dental outpatient programs are declining but over 2 million visits are estimated
for 1959.
New obligational authority of $9 million is recommended for construction, modernization, or repair of
facilities in 1959. Total obligations, however, are expected to be considerably higher because balances of
appropriations from prior years will be used. Construction will be started on a 500-bed general hospital to replace
an existing hospital, and funds are provided for planning
replacement projects at three other hospitals.
Insurance and other veterans' services and administration.—Payment of insurance claims resulting from extrahazardous conditions of military service, and of indemnities to survivors of persons who died in service or within
120 days after discharge during the period 1951 to 1956,
are estimated to be $52 million in 1959. Additional insurance operations for policies issued since 1951, which
are conducted through revolving funds, are estimated to
result in $12 million net receipts. New obligational
authorit}^ requested for general operating expenses of
the Veterans Administration is $12 million less than in
1958, continuing the reductions made in each of the past
several years because of lower workloads and introduction
of better methods.
Promotion of science, research, museums, and education.—
New obligational authority of $140 million is recommended for the National Science Foundation for 1959,
$90 million more than the 1958 funds appropriated which
includes a proposed supplemental appropriation of $10
million. An increase is also recommended for the Smithsonian Institution for its scientific research and museum
activities.
Of the total 1959 request for the National Science
Foundation, $58 million, more than twice the comparable 1958 amount, is for grants to (1) support basic
research projects in universities and other nonprofit institutions, (2) assist in the construction and maintenance
of specialized research facilities in such fields as astronomy,
biology, electronic computation and nuclear physics, and
(3) improve the collection and dissemination of scientific
data from both domestic and foreign sources. The balance, $82 million, will provide for more than a fivefold
expansion over 1958 in activities for education in the
sciences. These funds are for grants to universities and
other organizations to (1) develop improved curricula for




high school and college science and mathematics courses,
(2) increase the number of supplementary training institutes for school and college faculties, (3) interest more
young people of ability to undertake careers in science,
and (4) provide more opportunities for highly qualified
college graduates and research investigators to undertake
further graduate study.
Conservation and development of land and water resources.—Construction of the United States share of the
St. Lawrence Seaway will be substantially complete by
the end of 1959 and will be financed during that year from
borrowing authority provided in previous years. The
Seaway is to be opened to 14-foot-draft traffic by July 1,
1958, and to 27-foot-draft traffic in the spring of 1959.
Related hydroelectric power facilities are being constructed by the New York State Power Authority and
the Ontario Hydroelectric Power Commission.
Legislation is proposed to permit the Tennessee Valley
Authority to finance construction of new power facilities
by the sale of revenue bonds, as required to meet increasing power needs of the area. Including this proposal, the
new obligational authority of $142 million recommended
for the Tennessee Valley Authority for 1959 is $129 million
more than in 1958. The 1959 request also includes funds
for construction underway and for research and development activities. Most of the operating expenses of the
Authority are met from its revenues, principally from the
sale of power and of fertilizer materials.
Promotion of aviation.—Supplemental appropriations
recommended for the National Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics in 1958 and new obligational authority
recommended for 1959 will provide for an immediate
expansion of research and development activities looking
toward solutions of problems involving the flight of
aircraft, ballistic and guided missiles, and space vehicles.
This program is closely coordinated with those of the
Department of Defense.
The budget includes new obligational authority of $35
million for the Airways Modernization Board for 1959.
This is more than double the amount provided for this
agency in 1958, the year it was established. Increased
emphasis is being placed on research and development to
meet the needs of civil and military aviation for improved
air traffic control and navigation facilities.
Other aids to business.—New obligational authority of
$52.8 million is recommended to carry on the business and
disaster loan programs and the procurement and technical
assistance programs for small business in 1959. Legislation to extend the Small Business Act beyond its present
expiration date of July 31, 1958, and to remove the
limitation on the life of the Small Business Administration
is recommended.
The volume of new business loans of the Small Business
Administration is expected to continue in 1959 at about
the 1958 rate. New obligational authority and net
expenditures are estimated to decline sharply in 1959,
since repayments of principal available for relending are
accelerating as the volume of outstanding loans increases.
Regulation of commerce and finance.—The budget provides increased funds in 1959 for the Interstate Commerce Commission, Federal Communications Commission,
Securities and Exchange Commission, and Federal Trade
Commission in recognition of the increases in their regulatory workload and the need to strengthen their enforcement activities.

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

Civil defense.—The budget provides for the first year
cost of legislation authorizing Federal grants to match
State and local expenditures for personnel and administration and for certain other needs of the overall civil
defense effort. This legislation has been approved by the
House of Representatives and is pending in the Senate.
Recommended new obligational authority for the Federal Civil Defense Administration in 1959 under existing
legislation is below that for 1957. This results from suspension of procurement for the stockpile of emergency
supplies and equipment. Plans are underway to develop
a master survival resource plan to serve as the basis for
future stockpiling. In the interim, needed rehabilitation

97

of certain stockpiled items, primarily blood plasma, will
receive attention. The budget provides for extending
the attack warning system to additional key target areas
and to a nationwide network of radio stations. Research
concerned with shelter design and testing, radiological
defense, and warning and communications will be increased. Training programs, particularly on radiological
defense, will be expanded, and two new resident training
centers will be established.
Many Government agencies carry on activities which
are part of the entire civil defense effort. The budgetary
requests for these activites are included in the budgets
of the respective agencies.

R E C A P I T U L A T I O N OF B U D G E T A U T H O R I Z A T I O N S A N D

EXPENDITURES

By function and subfunction
[In thousands]
New obligational authority
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,961,837

$2,361,565

$2,418,000

$1,990,117

$2,300,054

$2,550,000

1,575

1,810

113,000

1,700
2,000,000
96,200

110,032

1,553
-99,992
107,876

1,702
392, 528
100,146

1,805
50,883
107, 513

114,575

2,097,900

111,842

9,438

494,375

160,201

779, 236
73,294
2,893,650
56,614
825,205
166,970

721, 492
92, 555
3,082, 250
46,072
852,991
165,702

625, 297
92, 663
3,232,000
51,670
814,774
152,968

774,020
73,283
2,869,989
46,806
800,641
167,837

729, 377
92, 570
3,107,312
43,732
846,413
163,394

625, 648
93,106
3,232,000
40,400
840,150
154,683

4, 794,969

4,961,063

4,969,372

4, 732, 575

4,982, 799

4,985,987

42,638
5
15,300
64,872

41,300
5
18, 012
40, 433

43,045
5
81,870
67,159

41, 585
5
13, 864
38, 204

41,037
5
17, 249
46,118

42, 532
5
52, 933
68, 835

122,816

99, 750

192,079

93, 658

104,408

164,305

2,142
150

2,200

2,125

-28,285
120

-5,318
9

-4,310

2,292

2,200

2,125

-28,165

-5,309

-4,310

10,626

53,987
17

148,276

35,490
17

90,575
18

84,912

10,626

54,004

148,276

35, 507

90, 593

84,912

78,176
38
149,343
84,900
34,007
93,560
12,000

132, 917
38

141, 700
46

88, 295
37,700
39,300
14,000

38,800
39, 575
67,800
14,000

76,065
34
43,374
68, 763
33, 567
63,374
5,327

99, 700
38
106,169
83, 637
37,300
67,415
7,939

128, 500
41
-48,048
56, 803
39, 519
63, 522
6, 531

452,025

312, 250

301,920

290, 504

402,198

246, 868

132
20
39,040
49,000
544,961
320
1,440
1,845
1,309

178

178
42,681

20,660
100
1,020
5,057
716

20, 748
1,508
2,121
578

166
2
39,932
7, 721
21,400
213
964
3,989
861

176

40, 510

131
9
37, 744
1,628
544,633
251
1,318
604
1,240

638,068

68,241

67,813

587,558

75,247

84,107

8,097,207

9,956,971

8,211,428

7, 711,192

8,444, 365

8,272,069

1957 enacted

Major national security:
056 Development and control of atomic energy.
International affairs and finance:
151 Conduct of foreign affairs
153

.

Foreign information and exchange activities

Expenditures

_ _ .

.

Total, international affairs and finance

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Veterans' services and benefits:
101
102
103
104
105
106

Veterans' education and training
Other veterans' readjustment benefits
Veterans' compensation and pensions
Veterans' insurance and servicemen's indemnities
Veterans' hospitals and medical care.
Other veterans' services and benefits
Total, veterans' services and benefits

Labor and welfare:
211 Labor and manpower
213 Promotion of public health
214 Promotion of education
215 Promotion of science, research, libraries, and museums.__

...

Total, labor and welfare
Agriculture and agricultural resources:
352 Financing farm ownership and operation
355 Research, and other agricultural services.>
Total, agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources:
401 Conservation and development of land and water resources—
405 Recreational use of natural resources,.
Total, natural resources
Commerce and housing:
513 Promotion of aviation
516 Public housing programs
517 Other aids to housing
518 Other aids to business
519 Regulation of commerce and finance
520 Civil defense...
521 Disaster insurance, loans, and relief

...
-

Total, commerce and housing
General
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610

government:
Judicial functions
Executive direction and management...
Federal financial management..
General property and records management
,
Central personnel management and employment costs
Civilian weather services
Protective services and alien control
Territories and possessions, and the District of Columbia
Other general government

-

...

- --

Total, general government
TotaL independent offices
440000—58




7

-

42,115
13, 855
20, 736
1,443
5,120
660

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959

8

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE

Func
tional
code

Organization unit and account title

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON W E A T H E R

1957
enacted

1958
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

1959
estimate

1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

CONTROL

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses..
Reappropriation

607
607

AIRWAYS MODERNIZATION

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

$300,000
20, 479

$100,000

|

$250,951

$213,022

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Expenses

513

15,137,130

518

60,000

$35,000,000

5, 700, 000

$28,000,000

50,000

10,000

ALASKA INTERNATIONAL RAIL A N D H I G H W A Y
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Construction of memorials and cemeteriesDedication of World War II memorials
Total, American Battle Monuments Commission
ATOMIC ENERGY

1, 250, 000
1, 250, 000

1, 250,000

1,084, 216
2, 810,007
60, 829

1, 210, 000
2, 500,000

1, 220,000
3,000,000

2, 500, 000

1,250,000

3, 955, 052

3, 710,000

4, 220,000

2, 080,000, 000

2, 310,000, 000

220,000,000

220,000,000
- 6 4 , 347

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Operating expenses
Reappropriation
Plant acquisition and construction
Public enterprise funds:
Defense production guaranties
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation) :
Plant acquisition and construction.

056
056
056

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE

1, 751, 900, 000
63,137, 269
146,800, 000

2, 215, 470, 000
37, 932, 221
108,162, 500

2, 288, 000, 000
J 1,726,039,909
10, 000, 000
264,131, 245

518

-144, 325

-103, 214

056

-53,966

53,966

056

120, 000, 000
1, 961,837, 269

Total, Atomic Energy Commission

2, 361, 564, 721

20, 000, 000

2, 418, 000, 000

1, 989, 972,863

2, 299, 950, 752

2, 549, 935, 653

1, 628, 376

7, 720, 538

13,855, 430

AGENCY

Current authorizations:
Construction
CIVIL SERVICE

1,140, 000
1, 050,000

2,190, 000

106
106
106

49,000, 000
COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Investigations of United States citizens for employment by international
organizations
Annuities, Panama Canal construction employees and lighthouse
service widows
Payment to civil service retirement and disability fund
Limitation on administrative expenses, employees' life insurance fund
(trust fund)
Intragovernmental funds:
Investigations

17,437,045

18, 420,000

17,465,948

18, 245,801

18,350,000

491,800

383,000

422, 642

488, 619

393,400

2, 524,000
525,000,000

2,360,000

2,328,000

2,397, 273
525,000,000

2,468,327

2,331,000

-229, 772

606

18,300,000

457, 955

685,582

54, 767

545,056,091

21,888, 329

21,129,167

(115, 990)

545,419,000

Total, Civil Service Commission

(123,800)

21,151,800

(123, 800)

21,131,000

C O M M I S S I O N ON C I V I L R I G H T S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
C O M M I S S I O N ON G O V E R N M E N T

675,000

750, 000
SECURITY

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses..
Reappropriation

608

632, 500
152, 745

j

586,880

102,000

119, 864

8, 987

C O M M I S S I O N ON I N C R E A S E D I N D U S T R I A L USE OF
AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
Current authorizations:
Commission on Increased Industrial Use of Agricultural Products...




355

150,000

155
INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

COMMISSION ON I N T E R G O V E R N M E N T A L

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)
1957
actual

1958
estimate

RELATIONS

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

603

C O M M I S S I O N ON O R G A N I Z A T I O N OF T H E E X E C U T I V E
B R A N C H OF T H E G O V E R N M E N T
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

603

D I S T R I C T OF C O L U M B I A A U D I T O R I U M

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
EXPORT-IMPORT

-31

$150,000

BANK

OF

$6, 0 3 9

- 9 3 , 680, 4 9 9

399, 9 4 8 , 1 5 9

-6,311,142

- 7 , 420, 4 2 9

- 9 9 , 991, 641

392, 527, 730

1, 979, 0 6 0

2, 200, 000

WASHINGTON

Public enterprise funds:
Export-Import Bank of Washington fund
Limitation on administrative expenses
Liquidation of certain Reconstruction Finance Corporation assets
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Export-Import Bank of Washington (authorization to expend from debt
receipts).. .

152
152
152

(1, 670,000)

($1, 9 0 0 , 0 0 0 )

($2, 0 5 5 , 0 0 0 )

2, 000,000,000

152

2, 000,000, 000

Total, Export-Import Bank of Washington
FARM CREDIT

88, 6 3 6

ADMINISTRATION

Permanent authorizations:
Farm Credit Administration
Administrative expenses (indefinite special account) _
Public enterprise funds:
Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation:
Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation fund
Limitation on administrative expenses
Production credit associations investment fund
Agricultural marketing revolving fund
Federal intermediate credit banks:
Operating fund
Limitation on administrative expenses

352

2 , 1 4 2 , 205

352

(2, 230, 000)

2 , 1 2 5 , 000
( 2 , 1 2 5 , 000)

352
352

- 5 5 6 , 735

(550,000)

-1,992,000

352

40, 0 0 0

200, 000

352

-2,735,508

- 5 , 726, 000

352
(3, 5 7 6 , 0 0 0 )

(3,375,000)

(1, 6 9 3 , 0 0 0 )

2 , 1 4 2 , 205

352

Total, Farm Credit Administration
F E D E R A L CIVIL D E F E N S E

2, 200, 000
(2, 200, 000)

2, 200, 000

2,125,000

-27, 012,042

- 2 8 , 285, 2 2 5

- 5 , 318,000

ADMINISTRATION

Current authorizations:
Operations
Emergency supplies and equipment
Research and development
Federal contributions
Salaries and expenses, civil defense functions of Federal agencies
Public enterprise funds:
Civil defense procurement fund.
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Civil defense assistance to States
Total, Federal Civil Defense Administration

520

15, 560, 0 0 0

17, 000, 0 0 0

19, 400, 0 0 0

1 4 , 9 9 8 , 061

15, 000, 0 0 0

520

47, 000, 000

3, 300, 000

18, 000, 000

32, 581, 0 4 5

3 8 , 3 0 0 , 000

520

10, 000, 000

2 000, 000

4,400, 000

520

17, 000, 0 0 0

17, 000, 0 0 0

520

5, 0 3 1 , 6 5 7

5,040,000

8,647,943

8,000, 000

2,849,869

607,000

- 7 3 4 , 501

467,558

67, 800, 000

6 3 , 3 7 4 , 074

67,414,558

70,000

51, 718

70,000

4, 000, 0 0 0

.520

26, 000,000
93, 560, 0 0 0

F E D E R A L C O A L M I N E S A F E T Y B O A R D OF R E V I E W
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses




70,000

70,000

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959

100

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957

enacted

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS

1958

estimate

1959

estimate

!7,828,000

FEDERAL HOME LOAN B A N K

$8,300,000

!8,950,000

$ 7 , 7 7 2 , 001

$8,249,000

-29,151

72,953

517
517

( 1 , 0 3 6 , 700)

(1, 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 )

(1,600,000)

517

(4, 2 8 9 , 0 0 0 )

(5,665,000)

(6, 3 4 3 , 0 0 0 )

(596,000)

(675,000)

(720,000)

517

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION

- 3 3 , 3 6 2 , 796

-38,459,076

5,662

5,000

- 3 3 , 3 8 6 , 285

517
517

Total, Federal Home Loan Bank Board

-38,381,123

SERVICE

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

3,305,000

FEDERAL POWER

3,550,000

3,695,000

3,262,668

3,559,450

401

5, 225, 0 0 0

5 , 5 3 0 , 000

6,385,000

5,171,033

5,491,000

401

43,983

40, 0 0 0

41,000

32,980

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Permanent authorizations:
Payments to States under Federal Power Act (indefinite special account)
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation):
Salaries and expenses

100,000

401

Total, Federal Power Commission

44, 0 0 0
90, 0 0 0

5, 268, 983

5, 670, 0 0 0

6,426,000

5, 550, 0 0 0

FEDERAL TRADE

5, 9 5 0 , 0 0 0

6 , 0 2 5 , 000

700, 000

570,000

5, 2 0 4 , 0 1 3

5, 625, 0 0 0

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
FOREIGN CLAIMS S E T T L E M E N T

5, 9 2 8 , 0 0 0

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Payment of Korean claims

610
610

Total, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission

622,149

506,655

23,369

5, 5 5 9

570,000

565, 0 0 0

645, 5 1 8

34,000,000

36,050,000

38,300,000

32,928,169

610
610

225, 000

OFFICE

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
HISTORICAL A N D MEMORIAL

700, 000

604

GENERAL ACCOUNTING

35,420,350

COMMISSIONS

Current authorizations:
Alexander Hamilton Bicentennial Commission
Booker T . Washington Centennial Commission
Boston National Historic Sites Commission
Corregidor Bataan Memorial Commission, salaries and expenses.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission
Jamestown-Williamsburg-Yorktown Celebration Commission
John Marshall Bicentennial Celebration Commission
Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Commission
Woodrow Wilson Centennial Celebration Commission

55,000

31,165
189, 721

35,279

405

16, 560

17,203

17,825

610
610
610
610
610
610

44,000

49,937

46,000

358

8,500

88,000

139,135

108,656

10, 000
115,000

4,406
140,000

39,380

60,400

48, 5 0 0

60, 0 9 2

15,124

597,100

322,949

593, 500

148, 560

602

132,300

177,700

177,700

130, 763

165,829

519

14,879,696

16, 7 5 0 , 0 0 0

17,500,000

14,623,774

16,623,013

Total, Historical and Memorial Commissions..
COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
INTERSTATE COMMERCE




1958

estimate

BOARD

Public enterprise funds:
Revolving fund
Limitation on administrative expenses
Limitation on nonadministrative expenses
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation:
Revolving fund
Limitation on administrative expenses
Home Owners' Loan Corporation fund

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses..

1957

actual

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.

INDIAN CLAIMS

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

COMMISSION

I N D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

101

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued

Organization unit and account title

I N T E R S T A T E COMMISSION ON T H E P O T O M A C R I V E R
BASIN
Current authorizations:
Contribution to Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. __
NATIONAL ADVISORY

COMMITTEE

FOR

Functional
code

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

213

$5,000

$5,000

513
513
513
513
513

62, 676, 500
1,500,000
14,000,000

71,000,000

80,480,000

35,000,000

1957
actual

$5,000

26, 220, 000

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

63, 701,996

71,000,000

78, 500,000

11,217, 543
12, 883
1,132,883

17,305,123
33, 771
661,106

19, 500,000

4, 500, 000
500,000

J

500,000
2,000,000

5,000,000
6, 780,000

513
513

Total, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

78,176, 500

117, 780,000

106, 700,000

76,065,305

94,000,000

100, 500,000

516

38,000

38, 000

45, 500

34,304

38,000

41, 000

609
609
609

200,000
200,000
45,046

225,000

250,000

155,333

232,000

249, 750

119,406

207,835

1,250,000

1,393,000

1,120,000

240,217

3,143,444

1,119,480

3,400,000

751,000

400,000

3,751,000

1,695,046

5,057,333

2,121,000

514,956

3,983,279

5,120,230

211

8, 951, 500

9,384,800

9, 985, 000

8,969,334

9,481,142

9,814, 260

211
211
211

475, 500
250,000
486, 500

520,000
250, 000
525,000

520,000
250,000
525,000

460,812
216,162
462,187

521, 234
219, 965
527,132

520, 000
250, 000
525,000

1, 212,000

NATIONAL CAPITAL HOUSING

1, 295,000

1, 295,000

1,139,161

1,268,331

1, 295,000

214
215
215

15, 299, 786
24, 700, 214

15, 511,540
24,488,460

81, 870, 000
58,130,000

13, 863, 794
16,324, 731
15,026, 746

15, 748, 736
20, 651, 264
16,500,000

51, 932, 544
45, 667, 456
2,000,000

215

500,000

486,375

74,539

51, 337

13, 663

AUTHORITY

Current authorizations:
Maintenance and operation of properties
NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
_„_
Salaries and expenses, Washington regional mass transportation survey—
Reappropriation
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and playground
system
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and playground
system

609

609

Total, National Capital Planning Commission
NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS

NATIONAL MEDIATION

39,333

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Arbitration and emergency boards
Salaries and expenses, National Railroad Adjustment Board
Total, National Mediation Board.
NATIONAL SCIENCE

J

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

FOUNDATION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses:
(Promotion of education in the sciences)
(Promotion of scientific research)
International Geophysical Year
Public enterprise funds:
Research and development of rubber program: Reappropriation
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements
_
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation):
Salaries and expenses:
(Promotion of education in the sciences)
(Promotion of scientific research)
-

215

NATIONAL SECURITY TRAINING

2, 500,000
7,500,000

214
215
40,500, 000

Total, National Science Foundation

140, 000,000

1,000,000
7,000,000

45,752,983

54,988,202

107,600,000

34,079

50,000,000

1,500,000
500,000

2,836

14,190

43,195

COMMISSION

_

P E R M A N E N T C O M M I T T E E FOR T H E OLIVER W E N D E L L
HOLMES DEVISE
Permanent authorizations:
Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund (indefinite special account)




1957
enacted

AERONAUTICS

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
Reappropriation
Construction and equipment
Construction and equipment (liquidation of contract authorization)
Construction and equipment, unitary plan._ _
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation):
Salaries and expenses
Construction and equipment.

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

211

50,000

610

15,085

14,000

12,700

60,000

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959

102

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TlTIE—Continued

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

PRESIDENT'S A D V I S O R Y COMMISSION ON P R E S I D E N T I A L
OFFICE SPACE
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
RAILROAD RETIREMENT

603

1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)
1958
estimate

195?
actual

$9,199

$20,000

$2, 3 5 3

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Limitation on salaries and expenses (trust fund)
RENEGOTIATION

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

(7,600,000)

($8,150,000)

($8,450,000)

3, 675, 0 0 0

3, 000, 0 0 0

2,900, 000

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.

604

3, 5 2 4 , 9 0 4

3 , 0 4 8 , 729

36,970,146

44,000,000

SAINT L A W R E N C E S E A W A Y D E V E L O P M E N T
CORPORATION
Public enterprise funds:
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation fund (authorization
to expend from debt receipts)
Limitation on administrative expenses

35,000,000
(440,000)

5, 749, 000

6, 700, 0 0 0

7,100, 000

27, 000, 0 0 0

28, 000, 000

1,900,000

2, 2 3 5 , 0 0 0

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.

519

SELECTIVE SERVICE

(400,000)

29,050, 000

SECURITIES A N D E X C H A N G E

(325,000)

5, 765, 447

6, 5 0 0 , 0 0 0

28,127,982

26, 655, 0 0 0

1 , 6 7 2 , 698

2, 303, 9 9 2

SYSTEM

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
S M A L L BUSINESS A D M I N I S T R A T I O N
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Salaries and expenses, small defense plants activities
Public enterprise funds:
Revolving fund:
(Business loans) (current appropriation)
(Disaster loans and relief) (current appropriation)
Revolving fund, small defense plants activities
Liquidation of Reconstruction Finance Corporation loans:
(Business loans)
(Disaster loans and relief)
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Salaries and expenses
Revolving fund:
(Business loans)
(Disaster loans and relief)

1,578

83, 000, 000

9,576,000
- 1 0 7 , 620

-1,637,000

2,800,000
518

36,000, 000

521

14,000,000
102, 2 3 5 , 0 0 0

52, 8 0 0 , 0 0 0

74, 2 3 4 , 0 4 6

91, 629, 4 5 0

7 , 3 5 5 , 000

4, 650, 8 2 0

5, 471, 8 8 8

INSTITUTION

215

4, 425, 0 0 0

215

6, 000, 000
800, 000

345,000

33, 712, 000

215

1, 535, 0 0 0

157, 7 5 2
1,645,000

1, 6 7 4 , 0 0 0

215

847, 5 0 0

1, 504, 9 6 8

1, 675, 0 0 0

1,369

215

39,057

6,314, 909

8 , 3 7 8 , 445

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.

39, 672, 0 0 0

8, 4 4 5 , 0 0 0

9, 029, 0 0 0

608

SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES CONTROL




8 5 , 9 1 9 , 500

7 , 1 8 4 , 209

-4,427,000

Total, Smithsonian Institution

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses..

67, 239, 091

-1,857,646

96, 900, 000

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Additions to the Natural History Building
Museum of History and Technology
Salaries and expenses, National Gallery of Art.
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements

TARIFF

14,000,000

- 4 , 306

Total, Small Business Administration..
SMITHSONIAN

86, 000, 000

12,000,000

350, 0 0 0

175,000

375,000

308, 240

373, 6 9 2

151

1,575,000

1,700,000

1,810,000

1, 553, 3 0 9

1,701,526

BOARD

COMMISSION

INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

103

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued

Organization unit and account title

T A X C O U R T OF T H E U N I T E D

Functional
code

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

1957
actual

1958
estimate

$1, 365,000

$1, 460, 000

$1,481,000

$1, 291,108

$1, 462, 459

5, 357,000

604

13, 317, 000

16, 850, 000

-6, 684, 327

40, 949, 799

AUTHORITY

Public enterprise funds:
Tennessee Valley Authority fund (current appropriation)
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation) :
Tennessee Valley Authority fund (authorization to expend from debt
receipts)

125, 000, 000

Total, Tennessee Valley Authority.
UNITED STATES INFORMATION

5, 357, 000

13, 317, 000

141, 850, 000

- 6 , 684, 327

40, 949, 799

113, 000, 000

95,100, 000
1,100, 000

105, 000, 000
5, 032, 000

102, 928, 649
563, 054

96, 000, 000
2, 000, 000

4, 384, 393

2,145, 599

AGENCY

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Acquisition and construction of radio facilities
Public enterprise funds:
Informational media guaranty fund (authorization to expend from debt
receipts)

153
113, 000, 000

96, 200, 000

110, 032, 000

107,876, 096

100,145, 599

106
105
105
105
106
103

162,302,130
20, 773, 800
663, 900,000
82,363,000
1, 628, 000
2, 893, 650, 000

161,374, 000
21, 763, 400
702, 000, 000
79,000, 000
1, 790, 000
2, 826, 250,000

149, 582, 000
21, 481, 000
707,100,000
75, 798, 000
2,136, 000
3, 232,000, 000

160, 599, 471
18, 768, 805
662, 621, 551
80, 951, 582
1, 618, 432
2, 869, 989, 443

158,176,106
22,334, 373
700, 513, 469
78, 698, 310
1, 781, 896
2, 851,312,325

101
102
104
105
105
105
104
104
104
106
102
104

779, 236,393
73, 263, 607

691.492,000
92. 555, 000

774, 019, 969
73, 263, 607

699. 376, 972
92, 555, 000

2,000,000
51, 635,000
4, 533,000
5,000, 000
23, 200, 000
26, 750,000
850,000
30,000

1,500,000
42. 500, 000
2, 028,000
4, 275, 000
7, 600,000
29,877, 500

625, 297, 000
92. 663, 000
51,100.000
1,250,000
9,145,000

2, 288,181
32, 592, 535
3, 418,025
4, 408, 798
19,485,837
35,886, 210
1,004, 787
19,871

1,509, 964
34, 322,884
4,834,411
4,336, 663
14,811,745
35, 546, 750
693, 516
10,129

Total, United States Information Agency
VETERANS

1957
enacted

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

STATES

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
TENNESSEE VALLEY

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

ADMINISTRATION

Current authorizations:
General operating expenses
Medical administration and miscellaneous operating expenses
Inpatient care
Outpatient care
Maintenance and operation of supply depots
Compensation and pensions
Readjustment benefits:
(Education and training)
(Other readjustment benefits).
Veterans' insurance and indemnities
Grants to the Republic of the Philippines
Construction of hospital and domiciliary facilities.
Major alterations, improvements, and repairs
Military and naval insurance
National service life insurance
Servicemen's indemnities
Automobiles and other conveyances for disabled veterans
.
Refund of repayments of subsistence allowances (indefinite)
Military and naval family allowance
Permanent authorizations:
National service life insurance
Veterans' insurance and indemnities
Public enterprise funds:
Canteen service revolving fund
Direct loans to veterans and reserves (permanent authorization to
expend from debt receipts)
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters
Service-disabled veterans insurance fund (current appropriation)
Soldiers' and sailors' civil relief fund
Veterans special term insurance fund
Vocational rehabilitation revolving fund
Intragovernmental funds:
Supply fund
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation):
Inpatient care
Maintenance and operation of supply depots
Compensation and pensions
Readjustment benefits
Servicemen's indemnities

104
104

-10

663,571

-313,811

76, 760,035
-2,661
517,354
-619
-14,156,096
- 8 , 497

144, 550, 424
3,960
607,979
5,125
-14,390, 995

1, 404, 248

570, 000

570,000

-734,231

663,571

-694, 592

570,000

149,343, 482
1,000,000

1, 500,000

-620

4, 200,000
37, 800
256,000,000
30,000,000
2, 250,000

4, 200,000
37, 800
256, C O 000
O,
30,000,000
2, 250, 000

Total, Veterans Administration

4,942,121, 983

4,958, 562, 700

4, 968,122,000

5,123, 639, 783

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures..

8,097, 207,046

9,956, 971,489

8, 211, 427,900

8, 444,365, 457




104

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE-Continued

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1957
enacted

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

$7,879, 795, 926

$7, 563, 255,390
35,000,000
38,124,299

8, 211,427,900

>$7,711,191,916

;8,144,387, 657

199,551,000
125,000,000

9,956,971,489

1958
estimate

2,748,700

317,767,800
2,000,000,000

1959
estimate

1957
actual

$7,874,128,200

2,824,000

BUDGET EXPENDITURES
(from new and prior authorizations)

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
Appropriations. _
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts..
Reappropriations
Permanent authorizations:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts..
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts

65, 202, 794
2,864,844
149, 343,482

8,097,207,046

Total new obligational authority and budget expenditures..

10,000,000

;8, 111, 595, 483

299,977,800
7,711,191,916

160,473,449

8,444,365,457

8,272,068,932

EXPENDITURES AND APPLICABLE RECEIPTS OF PUBLIC ENTERPRISE FUNDS
[In thousands]

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

ATOMIC ENERGY

GROSS EXPENDITURES
(funds applied)
1957

1958

RECEIPTS FROM OPERATIONS
(funds provided)

1959

1957

1958

BUDGET EXPENDITURES

1957

1959

1959

1958

COMMISSION

Defense production guaranties

$1

518

$1

$145

$104

350, 519

396,207

504,936

-93,681

399,948

57,000

7,859

6,434

—6,311

—7,420

-6,117

357,388

404,066

511,370

-99,992

392,528

50,883

642

2,004

2,042

—557

-$144

E X P O R T - I M P O R T B A N K OF W A S H I N G T O N
Export-Import Bank of Washington f u n d . .
Liquidation of certain Reconstruction Finance Corporation

152

796,155

561,936

558

439

317

257,396

796, 594

562,253

352

85

12

352
352
352

1,217,762
50

1,000

1,244,774
10
2,736

300
5,726

400
5,000

—27,012
40
- 2 , 736

200
-5, 726

1,217,897

1,006

1,248,162

8,030

7,442

-30,265

- 7 , 518

764

716

-735

468

22

8,101

-29

73

-46

152
Total, Export-Import Bank of Washington
FARM CREDIT

256,8

ADMINISTRATION

Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation: Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation fund
Federal intermediate credit banks:
Operating fund
Production credit associations investment fund
Agricultural marketing revolving fund
Total, Farm Credit Administration
F E D E R A L CIVIL D E F E N S E

600
-5,000

—6,4

ADMINISTRATION
...

520

961

Revolving fund
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation: Revolving fund
Home Owners' Loan Corporation fund

517
517
517

1,003
6

1,232

5,142

Civil defense procurement fund.,
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK

738

BOARD
8,055

5,171

1,208
5

1,400
5

34,366

39,667

44,525

-33,363
6

18,459
5

-43,125
5

6,151

8,152

9,460

39,537

46,533

52,626

-33,386

-38,381

—43,166

215

486

75

486

75

401

47,299

47,917

36,970

44,000

Total, Federal Home Loan Bank Board.
N A T I O N A L SCIENCE

-2,036

FOUNDATION

Research and development of rubber program
SAINT L A W R E N C E S E A W A Y D E V E L O P M E N T
CORPORATION
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation fund




23,832

10,329

3,917

4,832

19,000

INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

105

EXPENDITURES AND APPLICABLE RECEIPTS OF PUBLIC ENTERPRISE FUNDS—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Functional
code

Organization unit and account title

GROSS EXPENDITURES
(funds applied)
1957

1958

RECEIPTS FROM OPERATIONS
(funds provided)

BUDGET EXPENDITURES

1959

1957

1958

1959

1957

1958

$21,349
6,519
4

$45,683
6,780
108

$67,337
7,173

$67,239
7,184
-4

$85,919
9,576
—108

-$24,554
-1,038

2,538

4,900
2,265

3,875
2,030

-1,858

-4,427
-1,637

-3,509
-1,519

1959

S M A L L BUSINESS A D M I N I S T R A T I O N
Revolving fund
(Disaster loans and relief)Revolving fund, small defense plants activities
Reconstruction Finance Corporation liquidation fund:
Business loans
Disaster loans and relief
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Revolving fund
(Disaster loans and relief)

518
521
518
518
521

680

473
628

366
511
84,009
9,373

82, 221
9,088

1,788
285

149,059

143,177

30,410

59,736

82,487

72,561

89,323

60,690

252,505

309,511

326,589

259,189

268,561

279,937

-6,684

40,950

46,652

AUTHORITY
401
401

U N I T E D STATES INFORMATION

13,000

13,000

252,505

309,511

339,589

259,189

268,561

279,937

-6,684

40,950

59,652

153

9,357

7,537

8,563

4,973

5,391

5,950

4,384

2,146

2,613

106
517
106
104
102
104
106

31,260
130,198
77
5,310
24
8,225
334

32,232
207,970
84
6,695
20
7,889
300

31,840
70,609
80
8,060
20
7,974
300

31,994
53,438
80
4,793
25
22,381
342

32,546
63,420
80
6,087
15
22,280
301

32,375
75,491
80
7,097
10
21,414
300

-734
76,760
-3
517
-1
-14,156
-8

-314
144,550
4
608
5
-14,391
-1

-535
-4,882

175,428

255,190

118,883

113,053

124,729

136,767

62,375

130,461

-17,884

2,070,452

1,575,780

1,207,502

2,064,882

921,831

1,082,192

5,570

653,949

125,310

Total, Tennessee Valley Authority
AGENCY

Informational media guaranty fund..
ADMINISTRATION

Canteen service revolving fund.—
Direct loans to veterans and reserves
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters
Service-disabled veterans' insurance fund
Soldiers' and sailors' civil reliefVeterans' special term insurance fund
Vocational rehabilitation, revolving fund
Total, Veterans Administration
Total, public enterprise funds




$42,783
6,135

102,971

Tennessee Valley Authority fund
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed legislation):
Tennessee Valley Authority fund

VETERANS

$131, 602
16,356

518
521

Total, Small Business Administration
TENNESSEE VALLEY

$88,588
13,703

-

963
10
-13,440

106

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Balance, start
of 1958

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

New obligational
New obliauthorgational
ity
authority

Total

Balances
of prior
authority

$18,600

Balance, start
of 1960

$9,400

Unobligated

Total

ADVISORY C O M M I T T E E ON W E A T H E R
CONTROL
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

_

AIRWAYS MODERNIZATION

$113

$55

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

___

$10, 592

$35,000

$17,592

ALASKA INTERNATIONAL RAIL AND
H I G H W A Y COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

$6

10

10

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
._
Construction of memorials and cemeteries
Dedication of World War II memorials .
Total, American Battle Monuments Commission
ATOMIC ENERGY

$3, 374

194
7,306

130
3,000

224
4,306

7, 542

10, 557

6,124

8, 710

3,374

7,500

1,250

1,090

3,130

4, 530

622,191
728, 746

65, 287

843,847
492, 388

1, 466, 153

308,029

700, 445
584, 226

2, 298, 000

375, 810

843,847
220, 000

831, 847
272, 388

197

197

341

341

445

445

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE

-64

$509

509

54

120, 000
376,007

Total, Atomic Energy Commission

CIVIL SERVICE

154
8, 556

1,090

$6,124

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Operating expenses
Plant acquisition and construction _
Public enterprise funds:
Defense production guaranties
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed
legislation):
Plant acquisition and construction

Current authorizations:
Construction
__

118
10, 316
123

1,250

$7,423
119

1,351,134

308,370

1, 285, 066

65, 732

1,336, 680

3,514

5, 490

47,138

52, 861

43, 241

20,000

2, 418, 000

1, 486,153

45,141

100, 000
1, 063, 783

509

1, 204, 744

13, 855

1,756

31, 286

AGENCY

__

__

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Investigations of United States citizens for employment by international organizations
Annuities, Panama Canal construction employees
and lighthouse service widows
Intragovernmental funds:
Investigations
Total, Civil Service Commission.

1,066

18, 420

17, 289

1,061

1,131

44

47

383

346

47

37

176

3, 712

1,061

42

3, 712

1,007

298

190

2, 328

2,141

190

3, 545

3, 607

3, 768

3, 488

3,073

4,829

3,607

5,117

3,488

4,371

187

55
21,131

19, 776

3, 570

3,018

1,353

3, 570

4, 373

COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS
Current authorizations:




750 1

675

75

I N D E P E N D E N T OFFICES
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED

107

BALANCES—Continued

BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Total

New obligational
New obliauthorgational
ity
authority

Balances
of prior
authority

Balance, start
of 1960

Unobligated

Total

C O M M I S S I O N ON G O V E R N M E N T
SECURITY
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

$135

$160

$52

COMMISSION
ON
INCREASED
INDUST R I A L USE OF A G R I C U L T U R A L P R O D UCTS
Current authorizations:
Commission on Increased Industrial Use of Agricultural Products

9

C O M M I S S I O N ON I N T E R G O V E R N M E N T A L RELATIONS
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

1

D I S T R I C T OF C O L U M B I A A U D I T O R I U M
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses-

6

E X P O R T - I M P O R T B A N K OF W A S H I N G T O N
Public enterprise funds:
Export-Import Bank of Washington fund:
Cash.
..
. . .
Authorization to expend from debt receipts
_
Liquidation of certain Reconstruction Finance
Corporation assets- .
...
- . . _
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed
legislation):
Export-Import Bank of Washington fund (authorization to expend from debt receipts)
_
Total, Export-Import Bank of Washington
FARM CREDIT

2,039, 776

1, 024
2, 793, 500 $1, 323, 078

88

78

$806. 853

$2, 856
2, 440, 400

$1, 500
55, 500

-

-6,117

59

2,000,000
2, 794, 524

1,323,156

2, 865, 704

2, 806, 912

1,084

1,137

1,247

1,137

1,247

2, 539
499,705

2, 593
499,705

1,073
499,735

1,120
499,735

532

2,000,000

2,395, 300

4, 363, 756

109

1,137

1,247

- 2 , 006
-30

573

40,000

40,000

40,000

343

40, 000

58,130
38, 600

58,130
38, 600

57,930
44, 326

57, 930
44. 326

638, 675

638,832

143, 925

144,076

(2)

50,883

4, 443, 256

984

45

1, 800, 000

2, 000, 000

2,039, 864

$1,356
$595, 255 12, 362, 400

ADMINISTRATION

Permanent authorizations:
Administrative expenses (indefinite special account)- _
__
Public enterprise funds:
Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation: Federal
Farm Mortgage Corporation fund:
Cash
Authorization to expend from debt receipts
Federal intermediate credit banks:
Federal intermediate credit banks investment
fund.
-Operating fund:
Cash
Authorization to expend from debt receipts
Federal intermediate credit banks revolving fund.
Production credit associations investment fund
Agricultural marketing revolving fund
Farm Credit Administration revolving fundTotal, Farm Credit Administration

111,498
273,382
37,300
35,865
60, 765

35,865
60,765

1,022,038

1,022,742

$2,125

$2,016

3 378

40, 000

40,000

600
-5,000

57,330
49,326

57, 330
49,326

-6,327

148,136

148,281

112,048
273,382
37,300

* Excludes capital transfer in 1959 of $22,500 thousand.
2 Excludes capital transfer of $7 thousand and unobligated balance no longer available
of $6,110 thousand in 1959.




43, 704
2, 822. 000

2,125

2,016

3 Excludes capital transfer of $2,200 thousand and unobligated balance rescinded of
$30 thousand in 1959.

108

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1958

Balance, start
of 1957

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Balance, start
of 1960

Estimated expenditures from—

New obligational
authorNew obliity
gational
authority

Total

Balances
| of prior
[authority

Unobligated

Total

F E D E R A L CIVIL D E F E N S E
ADMINISTRATION
Current authorizations:
Operations
_
__
Emergency supplies and equipment
Research and development
___ __
Federal contributions.__ _
Salaries and expenses, civil defense functions of
Federal agencies. _
Public enterprise funds:
Civil defense procurement fund
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed
legislation):
Civil defense assistance to States
_
Total, Federal Civil Defense Administration...
FEDERAL COAL M I N E SAFETY
OF R E V I E W
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

$6, 929
8, 993

$2,887
26, 720
8, 866
16, 729

$9,043
14,022

286
2, 953

4,171

$2,653
39, 244
13, 834
25,030

$1, 500
17,000

$4, 653
4,244
10, 794
34,030

986

937

$19,400
18,000
4,400

$15,000
5, 756
1,000

607
4,374

4,905

22

59, 659

27,439

86, 273

19,486

$912

915

6,000

26, 000
18,875

$6,053
12, 244
9, 694
24,030

$3,000
4,244
4,500
10,000

20,000

54, 658

67, 800

41,756

21,766

912

58,936

BOARD

2

2

2

70

68

2

2

344

_

399

450

8, 950

8, 450

450

500

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses. _
F E D E R A L DEPOSIT INSURANCE
CORPORATION
Current authorizations:
Investment in Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (authorization to expend from debt receipts). 3,000, 000
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK

Total, Federal Home Loan Bank Board

-46

356
1,000,000

320
1,000,000

297,175
750,000
501

-43,125

313,363
750,000

* 320,847
750,000
436

2,047,950

-43,166

2,063,719

2,071,603

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

317
1,000,000

315
1,000, 000

346
1, 000,000

265
1,000,000

274
1,000,000

257,812
750,000
626

270, 218
750,000

275,979
750,000
566

290,620
750,000

2,003,228

2,008,755

2,020,533

2,026,891

2,040, 885

5

CONCILIA-

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
FEDERAL POWER

3,000,000

3, 000, 000

BOARD

Public enterprise funds:
Federal Home Loan Bank Board revolving fund:
345
Cash
1,000,000
Authorization to expend from debt receipts
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation:
Revolving fund:
252,883
Cash
750,000
Authorization to expend from debt receipts
Home Owners' Loan Corporation fund

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND
TION SERVICE

3,000,000

3,000, 000

208

187

178

3,695

3,474

178

221

275

281

320

6,385

5,922

288

495

33

44

40

41

40

41

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Permanent authorizations:
Payments to States under Federal Power Act (indefinite special account)
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation) :

10
Total, Federal Power Commission...

308

325

370

« Excludes capital transfer of $19,453 thousand and unobligated balance no longer available of $60 thousand in 1959.




10
6,426

5,922

338

536

INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

109

ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

FEDERAL TRADE

Unobligated

Total

Total

Unobligated

New obligational
authorNew obliity
gational
authority

Total

Balances
of prior
authority

Balance, start
of 1960

Unobligated

Total

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

$204

$314

$335

$6,025

$5,675

$335

$350

57
6

50

565

515

50

50

33
33

63

50

565

515

50

50

1,519

1,560

2,190

38,300

35,546

2,190

2,754

FOREIGN CLAIMS S E T T L E M E N T
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Payment of Korean claims .
Total, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission.
GENERAL ACCOUNTING

OFFICE

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
HISTORICAL A N D M E M O R I A L
COMMISSIONS
Current authorizations:
Alexander Hamilton Bicentennial Commission
Booker T. Washington Centennial Commission
Boston National Historic Sites Commission
Corregidor Bataan Memorial Commission, salaries
and expenses
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission.
Jamestown-Williams burg-Yorktown Celebration
Commission
John Marshall Bicentennial Celebration Commission
Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Commission
Woodrow Wilson Centennial Celebration Commission
__ .

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

73

35

35

54

55

$26
35

10
57

31
35
1
1
1

1
1

$38

41

33

$3

8

38

43

35

3

8

3
10
21

5
98
21

27

179

Total, historical and memorial commissions
INDIAN CLAIMS

$69

252

101
15

169

217

COMMISSION

INTERSTATE COMMERCE
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

4

5

178

172

5

6

916

1,043

17,500

16,468

1,043

1,032

5

-

4

685

_ - -

5

80,480
26,220

72,500
500

COMMISSION

.

I N T E R S T A T E COMMISSION ON T H E
P O T O M A C RIVER BASIN
Current authorizations:
Contribution to Interstate Commission on the
Potomac River Basin
NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE
AERONAUTICS

FOR

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses > __
Construction and equipment
Construction and equipment (liquidation of contract authorization)
Construction and equipment, unitary plan
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation) :
Salaries and expenses
..
Construction and equipment
,
—
Total, National
Aeronautics.




Advisory
.

Committee

13,221

6,150
25,946

8,379

6,624
28,717

787

1,896

268

34
763

18,545

6, 624
46, 412

4,480

500
6,280

23,025

69,816

6,000
19,000

14,815

500
2,000

8,604
53,132

4,280

for
14,008

33,992

8,647

36,138

106,700

73,000

27,500

14,815

66,016

110

T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959
ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1958

Balance, start
of 1957

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Estimated expenditures from—
New obligational
authorNew obli- Balances
ity
gational
of prior
authorauthority
ity

NATIONAL CAPITAL HOUSING
AUTHORITY
Current authorizations:
Maintenance and operation of properties

$2

$35

$6

$6

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Salaries and expenses, Washington regional mass
transportation survey
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and playground system
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed
legislation):
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and playground system

14
82
$973

169

1, 340

$1, 206

1,436

1,120

$99

2, 541

520

3,614

521

425

1,506

3, 614

9,985

9,390

425

520
250

490
230

525

475

1,295

1,206

548

1,195

140, 000

82, 800

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Arbitration and emergency boards
Salaries and expenses, National Railroad Adjustment Board

35

52

Total, National Mediation Board
N A T I O N A L SCIENCE

235

BOARD

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
NATIONAL MEDIATION

2, 350

250

3,000

Total, National Capital Planning Commission.
NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS

22

FOUNDATION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
International Geophysical Year
Public enterprise funds:
Research and development of rubber program
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements
Proposed for later transmission (under existing legislation) :
Salaries and expenses
Total, National Science Foundation .

183
32, 374

9, 010
33, 780

1, 553
17, 337

18,821
18, 759

120

22, 422
2, 259

14,800
2,000

75

65

604

14

8, 000
32, 557

42, 981

434

434

18,890

8, 000

37, 669

604

32, 681

140, 000

434

405

405

13

82,800

24,800

NATIONAL SECURITY TRAINING
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
P E R M A N E N T C O M M I T T E E FOR T H E
OLIVER W E N D E L L HOLMES DEVISE
Permanent authorizations:
Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund (indefinite
special account)
PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY COMMISSION
ON P R E S I D E N T I A L OFFICE SPACE
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses




60

Unobligated

INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

111

ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

RENEGOTIATION
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

Unobligated

Total

Total

Unobligated

New obligational
authority

Total

Estimated expenditures from—
New obligational
authority

Balances
of prior
authority

$2, 755

Balance, start
of 1960

$152

Unobligated

Total

BOARD

$224

-

$206

$157

$2,900

$150

SAINT L A W R E N C E S E A W A Y DEVELOPM E N T CORPORATION
Public enterprise funds:
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation
fund:
Cash
Authorization to expend from debt receipts._

$30, 428

4,850
89,000

$9, 201

180
56, 700

$25,363

280
47, 600

19,000

$17, 763

280
28, 600

Total, Saint Lawrence Seaway Development
Corporation
-

30, 428

93, 850

9,201

56, 880

25,363

47, 880

19,000

17, 763

28, 880

SECURITIES A N D E X C H A N G E
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
327

6, 600

498

500

2,402

2, 747

28,000

25, 316

2, 384

3,047

723

906
2

837

795

42

12,167

ADMINISTRATION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
- Salaries and expenses, small defense plants activities..
Public enterprise funds:
Revolving fund. .
Revolving fund, small defense plants activities... .
Liquidation of Reconstruction Finance Corporation loans
_
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed
legislation):
Salaries and expenses
Revolving fund
_ .
_ .
Total, Small Business Administration.
SMITHSONIAN

7,100

SYSTEM

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
S M A L L BUSINESS

498

1,848

SELECTIVE SERVICE

298

-

6, 768
1,369

43, 866
1, 256

4,109
108

64,443

16,450

68,947

-25,591

33

158

-82

40

2, 596

2, 428

-5,028

2, 800
50,000
8, 170

46, 003

4,135

65, 391

1,904
40,000

2, 607

51, 308

5 2, 206

896
41,063

19, 046

72, 212

52, 800

41,904

21, 484

2,607

56,374

1,451
455
34, 952
81

7,355

5,712

180
34,265

100
3,066

1,674

1,588

1,443
345
5,000
80

1,651
110
29,952
87

36, 939

9,029

7,300

6,868

3,166

31,800

INSTITUTION

Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
Additions to the Natural History Building
Museum of History and Technology.
Salaries and expenses, National Gallery of Art
Intragovernmental funds:
Advances and reimbursements

1,147
888

25
913

Total, Smithsonian Institution

2,245
81

923
34, 557

35,800
111

40

16

39

3,513

34, 573

36,873

34,445

SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES CONTROL
BOARD
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses
TARIFF
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

9

14

15

375

360

15

15

70

87

85

1,810

1,720

85

90

52

62

60

1,481

1,417

55

69

COMMISSION
»

T A X C O U R T OF T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses

e Excludes capital transfer of $4,100 thousand and unobligated balance no longer available of $1,150 thousand in 1959.




T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959

112

ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Estimated expenditures from—

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

TENNESSEE VALLEY

Total

Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

$102,434

-$36,028

Total

New obligational
authorNew obliity
gational
authority

Balances
of prior
Author' ity

Balance, start
of 1960

Unobligated

AUTHORITY

Public enterprise funds:
Tennessee Valley Authority fund
—
Proposed for later transmission (under proposed
legislation):
Tennessee Valley Authority fund (authorization
to expend from debt receipts)—
Total, Tennessee Valley Authority

-

$83,954

$129,902

12,465

$16,850

$16,850

125,000

$6,695

13,000

$29,802

-$15,501

66,000

129,902

6,695

102,434

-36,028

62,465

141,850

29,850

29,802

15,580
6,428

5,139

25,422
5,865

2,529

24, 522
4,965

105,000
5,032

81,900
1,900

18,600
2, 500

37
19,437

-12

5,472

77
15,013

r7

9,239

2,538

12,937

2,625

15,222

41,482

10, 611

46,377

5,067

42,431

83,954

50, 499

UNITED STATES INFORMATION A G E N C Y
Current authorizations:
Salaries and expenses.
Acquisition and construction of radio facilities.
Public enterprise funds:
Informational media guaranty fund:
Cash
Authorization to expend from debt receipts...
Total, United States Information Agency
VETERANS

110,032

83,800

23,713

149, 582

140, 682

8,800

21, 481
707,100
75,798
2,136
232,000
717, 960
51,100
1,250
9,145

18, 881
670,100
69,398
2,031
3, 228, 500
715, 560
50,997
1,250
1,375

2,500
36,000
6,050
100
3, 500
3,184
1,310

ADMINISTRATION

Current authorizations:
General operating expenses
Medical administration and miscellaneous operating expenses
Inpatient care
Outpatient care
Maintenance and operation of supply depots
Compensation and pensions
Readjustment benefits
Veterans' insurance and indemnities
Grants to the Republic of the Philippines
Construction of hospital and domiciliary facilities._
Major alterations, improvements, and repairs
Military and naval insurance
National service life insurance.
Servicemen's indemnities
Automobiles and other conveyances for disabled
veterans
Military and naval family allowance
Permanent authorizations:
Veterans insurance and indemnities
Public enterprise funds:
Canteen service revolving fund
Direct loans to veterans and reserves (authorization to expend from debt receipts)
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters
Service-disabled veterans insurance fund
Soldiers' and sailors' civil relief
Veterans special term insurance fund
Vocational rehabilitation, revolving f u n d . .
Intragovernmental funds:
Supply fund
Total, Veterans Administration.
Total, independent offices

« Excludes capital transfer in 1959 of $2,063 thousand.
' Represents transfers between accounts.




9,075

8, 677

-581

3,071
34, 514

7,744
7,967

1,705
33,466
6,873
83
4,902
5,169

25,031
7,663

28, 562
10,385

300
89,664
4,104
140
4,075
14,822

300
131,332
6,199
145
4,053
14,955

10
123, 418
4,876
726
7,793
5,680

10
150,374
7,314
713
7, 767
5,819

920

1,426

850
10

1,377
10

2,500
36,000
7,000
100
3,500
2,500

104, 942
2,880
651
556

158, 551
4,507
651
556
150

34, 596

66,967

2,139

684

570
3,037

6,501

3,105

5,622

2,453

5,191

-535

152,972
4
-2,879
446
12,466
607

180,277
4
637
446
20,912

203,478
2
-4,924
447
22,211
317

252,861

108,310
2
2,012
442
49,459
318

-4,882

1,120
447
35,068
317

40,841
2
-7,230
442
34,573
318

2,705

14,285

-3,358

8,646

-1,837

8,340

299,094

442,354

396, 754

569,470

178,825

, 573

4,968,122

8,960,847

11,100,569

7,866,357 10,931,532

8,377,938

11,861,009

8,211,428

6

963
10
-13,440

2
-11,613
432
46,754
318

-615

-1,172

19,344

77,541

157,519

6,914,653

1,357,415

7,860,685 11,701,797

8 Excludes capital transfer in 1959 of $799 thousand.
® Excludes unobligated balance no longer available in 1959 of $40,100 thousand.

INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

ANALYSIS OF UNEXPENDED

113

BALANCES—Continued

BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
[In thousands]

Balance, start
of 1957

Balance, start
of 1958

Organization unit and account title
Unobligated

Total

Unobligated

Total

Fiscal year 1959

Balance, start
of 1959

Unobligated

Total

Balance, start
of 1960

Estimated expenditures from—

New obligational
authorNew obliity
gational
authority

Balances
of prior
authority

Unobligated

Total

RECAPITULATION
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Revolving and management funds:
Public enterprise funds
Intragovernmental funds
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Total, independent offices

$588,665 $1,756,317
7,755,623 8,605,459

$630,011 $1,849,182
6,790,960 8,396, 349

$88,248 $1,614,865
5,419,369 7,226,610

$297,473 $1,835,991
5,628, 250 7,361,675
j$7,886,877 $6,818,998 $1,292,597

610,117
6,442

720,858
17,935

445,121
265

673,480
12, 521

446,084
1,651
4,480
2,000,000

8,960,847 11,100,569

7,866,357 10,931, 532

634,140
11,413

484,670
2,398

17, 790
|
2,000,000

8,377,938 11,861,009

324,551

95,655

64,818

8,211,428

6,914,653

1,357,415

io 584,110
11,973

il, 866,000

152,239
2,112,000

f

7,860,685 11,701,797

10 Excludes capital transfers of $51,122 thousand, unobligated balance no longer available of $47,420 thousand, and unobligated balance rescinded of $30 thousand in 1959,

440000—58-




-8

114




T H E B U D G E T F O R , F I S C A L Y E A R 1959
SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS, EXPENDITURES, AND BALANCES
[In thousands]
1957 actual

Balances brought forward at start of year from authorizations:
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations. _
_
___
__
_
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Revolving and management funds...
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations. _ _ _ Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
___

$1, 756,317
8,605,459
738, 793

_ .

1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$1,849,182
8,396,349
686,001

$1, 835, 991
7, 361, 675
645, 553
17, 790
2,000,000

_

Total balances brought forward

11,100, 569

10, 931, 532

11, 861,009

7, 879, 796

7, 874,128

65, 203

7, 563, 255
35, 000
38,124

7,944,999

7, 636,379

7, 884,128

__
...

2, 865
149,343

2, 824

2, 749

Total new obligational authority under permanent authorizations. _

152, 208

2, 824

2, 749

8,097, 207

7, 639, 203

7, 886, 877

317, 768
2,000, 000

199, 551
125,000

2,317, 768

324, 551

9, 956, 971

8, 211, 428

New obligational authority:
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Current authorizations:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Reappropriations

_
__

Total new obligational authority under current authorizations
Permanent authorizations:
Appropriations
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts.

__.

...

Total new obligational authority enacted or recommended

_

Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations.. . . .
__
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts.

..

Total new obligational authority proposed for later transmission
Total new obligational authority
Other amounts available:
Restored from certified claims account.
Net transfers of balances from other agencies.

8,097, 207
1,333
_ _

3, 479

_

Total budget authorizations available

19,199,109

8,144, 388

8, 111, 595

95, 655
64,818

299, 978

160,473

8, 444, 365

8, 272, 069

416, 242
54, 588
81, 862
3, 693

499,764
25, 582
61, 260

30
47, 420
51,122

556,385

Total expenditures from obligational authority enacted or recommended
_. __
_
..

|

8,144. 388

7, 711,192

-

7,711,192

299,978

...

20, 891, 982

7, 711,192

Expenditures:
From obligational authority enacted or recommended:
Out of new obligational authority... .
Out of balances of prior obligational authority
.

586, 606

98, 572

1,849,182
8,396,349
686,001

1, 835, 991
7,361, 675
645, 553

1, 614, 865
7, 226, 610
596,083

17,790
2, 000,000

152, 239
2,112, 000

10, 931, 532

11, 861, 009

11, 701, 797

$8,639, 005

$8, 861,165

$8, 630,109

From obligational authority proposed for later transmission:
Out of new obligational authority
_ __
Out of balances of prior obligational authority
Total expenditures from obligational authority proposed for later
transmission
Total budget expenditures.Amounts no longer available:
Unobligated balances rescinded
__
_. __
Unobligated balances expiring and l a p s i n g . . .
_ _. _ _
Capital transfers from revolving funds to receipts accounts .
Adjustment of balances downward in expired accounts, net
Total amounts no longer available.

______
__

__

Balances carried forward at close of year from authorizations:
Enacted or recommended in this document:
Appropriations
..
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts.
Revolving and management funds.__
Proposed for later transmission:
Appropriations
__
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts
Total balances carried forward at close of year

Obligations incurred, net

10, 000

_____
__ ___

.

20, 072, 437

j
1

6, 818,998
1, 292, 597

INDEPENDENT

[ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WEATHER
CONTROL]
Current authorizations:
[SALARIES

AND

OFFICES

115
Program and Financing—Continued
1957 actual

Program by activities—Continued
5. Executive direction and administration

EXPENSES]

[ T o complete its final report to the President and the Congress as
provided by law, $100,000: Provided, That the Committee shall
complete its report and terminate its activities by December 31,
1957.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $100,000

Total obligationsFinancing:
Comparative transfers from (—) other
accounts
New obligational authority _

Program and Financing

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$383,256

$15,225,105

15,348,270

35,000,000

-211,140
15,137,130

35,000,000

$0

$35,000,000

Program by activities:
Evaluation of experiments in weather
modification (total obligations)

13,696

_

New obligational'authority:
Appropriation
Reappropriation

1959 estimate

$100,000

$306,783

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer availableNew obligational authority

1958 estimate

320, 479

_

100,000

$300, 000
20,479

$100,000

The Committee completed its work as of December 31,
1957.
Object Classification

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
6.1

Average GS grade and salary.
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$4,407

7. 5

$4, 983

$39, 586
23, 618
2,989
66,193
22,847
1,739
2,765
19
3,337
128, 705
79, 586
964

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments

02
03
04
05
06
07

$11, 240
21,800
3,760
36,800
10,000
1,180

628
306,783

Total obligations.

20,000
21, 000
10, 000
500
475
45
100, 000

AIRWAYS MODERNIZATION

BOARD

Current authorizations:
EXPENSES

For necessary expenses of the Airways Modernization Board, including hire of passenger motor vehicles and aircraft, and expenses
of attendance at meetings concerned with the work of the Board,
$85,000,000, to remain available until expended. (71 Stat. 349.)
Appropriated 1958, $0
Estimate 1959, $35,000,000
Appropriated (adjusted) 1958, $15,137,130
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Operations analysis
2. Systems analysis
3. Systems experimentation_
4. Component development.




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,120,696
2,948,439
1,852,749
8,043,130

$2,942, 605
3,801,000
12,495,000
536,290

5,293,000

Appropriation (adjusted).

1957 actual

New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Transferred (31 U. S. C. 581c) from—
"Air navigation development," Civil
Aeronautics Administration
"Research and development," Department of the Air Force
"Research and development," Department of the Navy
"Research and development," Department of the Army
"Aircraft and missile support," Department of the Air Force

15,137,130

1, 288,860

1,607,414
1,247,856
5, 700,000
35, 000, 000

The Airways Modernization Board was established
by the Airways Modernization Act of 1957 to conduct research and development on facilities required to modernize
the national air traffic control and navigation system to
meet the growing needs of civil and military aviation.
The Departments of Commerce and Defense have carried
on work in this area in the past. As authorized by
the act, this work is being transferred to the Board
during 1958. Systems and devices developed by the
Board will be installed and used by both the Civil Aeronautics Administration, which is responsible for operation
of the Federal airways system, and the Department of
Defense.
The 1959 estimate is for an accelerated research and
development program aimed primarily at increasing the
traffic handling capacity of the Federal airways to accommodate efficiently and safely the air traffic forecast for
the future. Work on this program will be performed
largely by contract with private firms.
1. Operations analysis.—These projects will be directed
mainly at analyzing present airways systems, measuring
their performance, and identifying bottlenecks, as a basis
for research and development to meet future requirements.
2. Systems analysis.—These projects include theoretical
studies of the effectiveness and feasibility of existing and
proposed airways systems and components, including
traffic control procedures, navigation aids, communications, and radar. These analyses will make use of an
electronic air traffic simulator to be ordered in 1958.
Funds to complete construction of this device are included
in the 1959 estimate.
3. Systems experimentation.—These projects cover the
actual flight testing of new equipments, procedures and
other parts of proposed airways systems. The principal
expense in 1959 will be for the establishment of a test
center.
4. Component development.—These projects include research and development on new kinds of electronic and
other equipment and facilities necessary to increase the
capacity and efficiency of the airways system. Work will
be continued in 1959 on the development of a device to
process and display aircraft position and other control
information in traffic control centers. Work will also be
done to develop improved air navigation systems, traffic
control radar, communications, and other airways facilities.

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

116

AIRWAYS MODERNIZATION

BOARD—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
Current authorizations:

EXPENSES—Continued

SALARIES

Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

106
15
60
106

1957 actual

371
19
267
364

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions_
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions.
01

11. 9

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent.
Other personal services

$9,062

10.6

$7, 253
$4,000

$697, 367
230,000
80,062
1,007, 429
121, 211
12, 625
29, 212
15, 038
6, 288, 682
5, 490, 705
17,013
2, 317, 746

Total personal services.
Travel
Transportation of things
Communications services
Printing and reproduction
Contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
10 Lands and structures
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions-

02
03
04
06
07

$1, 962,652
300,000
103,000
2, 365, 652
302,900
17, 500
40,000
30,000
10, 737, 500
8, 942, 500
15,000
7, 910, 272
4, 500,000
138,676

18, 609
15,348, 270

Total obligations.

35,000,000

[ALASKA INTERNATIONAL RAIL AND HIGHWAY
COMMISSION]

AND

EXPENSES

For necessary expenses, [as authorized by the Act of June 26,
1946 (36 U. S. C. 121, 123-132, 138), as amended by the Act of
July 25, 1956 (70 Stat. 6 4 0 ) ] not otherwise provided for, of the American Battle Monuments Commission, including the acquisition of
land or interest in land in foreign countries; purchase and repair of
uniforms for caretakers of national cemeteries and monuments outside of the United States and its Territories and possessions; not to
exceed [$65,000] $70,000 for expenses of travel; rent of office and
garage space in foreign countries; purchase (one for replacement
only) and hire of passenger motor vehicles; and insurance of official
motor vehicles in foreign countries when required by law of such
countries; $1,250,000: Provided, That where station allowance has
been authorized by the Department of the Army for officers of the
Army serving the Army at certain foreign stations, the same allowance shall be authorized for officers of the Armed Forces assigned
to the Commission while serving at the same foreign stations, and
this appropriation is hereby made available for the payment of such
allowance: Provided further, That when traveling on business of the
Commission, officers of the Armed Forces serving as members or as
secretary of the Commission may be reimbursed for expenses as
provided for civilian members of the Commission: Provided further,
That the Commission shall reimburse other Government agencies,
including the Armed Forces, for salary, pay, and allowances of
personnel assigned to it. (86 TJ. S. C. 121, 128-182, 188; 70 Stat.
640; 71 Stat. 844; General Government Matters Appropriation
Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,250,000

Estimate 1959, $1,250,000

Program and Financing

Current authorizations:

1957 actual

[SALARIES

AND

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$65, 561

$84,098

$79,400

391,623

396, 565

388,100

699,767

761,663

773,300

7,372

7,674

9,200

1,164,323

1,250,000

1,250,000

1,250,000

1,250,000

EXPENSES]

[ F o r expenses necessary for the Alaska International Rail and
Highway Commission, established by the Act of August 1, 1956
(70 Stat. 888), including reimbursement to the "Emergency Fund
for the President, National Defense" for allocations made pursuant
to section 8 of said Act, $60,000, to remain available until August
31, 1958.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Program by activities:
1. Departmental administration
2. World War I memorials and cemeteries
_.
3. World War I I memorials and cemeteries
4. Latin American memorials and
cemeteries
Total obligations

Appropriated 1958, $60,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Financing:
Comparative transfers from (—) other
accounts
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation
authority)..

Program by activities:
Study of rail and highway routes (total
obligations)

$54,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forwardUnobligated balance carried forward...

6,000

Appropriation (new obligational authority).

$6,000

60,000

-6,000

The Commission was established to study the economic
and military feasibility of additional rail and highway
connections between the United States and Alaska. Its
final report to the Congress is due by August 1, 1958.
The basic act provided authorization of $75,000.

(new

obligational

- 3 2 , 758
8,435
1,140,000

The Commission is responsible for the maintenance and
operation of all permanent United States military cemeteries and memorials located in foreign countries.
These are 8 World War I cemeteries, a memorial chapel
in each cemetery, 11 World War I memorials outside the
cemeteries, 14 World War II cemeteries and memorials,
the United States National Cemetery, Mexico City,
Mexico, and the Santiago (Cuba) surrender tree site.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

424
32
445
451

439
17
445
451

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year

Total number of permanent positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year...
Average salary of ungraded positions..
01 Personal services: Permanent positions
02 Travel
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributionsTotal obligations




AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS
COMMISSION

1959 estimate

19,819

!9, 819

$30, 000
13,800
950
600
5,600
500
500
2,050

$3, 550

54,000

6, 000

200
1, 500
450
50
250

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services

413
11
418
438
5.3

$4,336
$1, 536

5.3

$4, 349
$1, 543

5.4

$4,374
$1, 549

$706, 523
11, 689
81, 731

$754, 704
37, 526
90, 689

$779,205
20, 510
91,910

799,943
47, 433
7. 736
7; 852
36,345
6,173
118,176

882,919
49, 757
11, 676
8,472
36, 896
5,671
100,854

891,625
70,000
5,000
8,000
36,000
5,000
80,000

INDEPENDENT

OFFICES

117

Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual
AMERICAN BATTLE

Object Classification

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

MONUMENTS

COMMISSION—continued

Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions-

$102,612
30,681

$85,000
25, 000
36, 576

1,156,951

Total, American Battle Monuments
Commission

$86,844
25,996
33, 241
1, 242,326

1, 242, 201

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OP THE
ARMY

Total number of permanent positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year...
Average GS grade and salary.
01

4.0

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

S3,415

4.0

$3, 500

4.0

$3, 585

$5,144
100
584

$5,325
100
697

$5, 506
100

Total personal services
Communication services
Rents and utility service
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials.
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions-

67
228
724
357
168

6,122
61
220
424
300
200
347

6, 304
65
220
350
300
200

Total, Department of the A r m y . . .

7,372

7,674

7,799

1,164,323

1, 250,000

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11

5.3

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
.
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Lands and structures
Grants, subsidies, and contributions.

$4,336
$1, 536
$210,888
156,007
150, 814

OF M E M O R I A L S

AND

CEMETERIES

[ F o r expenses necessary for the permanent design and construction of memorials and cemeteries in foreign countries as authorized
by the Act of June 26, 1946 (36 U. S. C. 121, 123-132, 138b), as
amended by the Act of July 25, 1956 (70 Stat. 640), and the Act of
August |5, 1947 (50 U. S. C. App. 1819), including not to exceed
$15,000 for expenses of travel, $1,250,000, to remain available until
expended: Provided, That the Commission shall reimburse other
Government agencies, including the Armed Forces, for salary, pay,
and allowances of personnel assigned to i t ] During the current
fiscal year, not to exceed $10,000 of funds heretofore a-ppropriated under
this head shall be available for travel expenses.
(General Government
Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $1,250,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Administration
2. Construction:
(а) European theater
(б) Mediterranean theater
(c) Pacific theater
(d) United States
Total obligations
Financing:
Comparative transfers to other accounts.
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$143,357

$146,489
1, 820, 338
219,088
1,252, 713
561,372

1,487, 885
57,387
1, 657, 715
60,000

2,316, 746

4,000,000

3,373, 512

32, 758
- 7 , 423,016
6,123, 512

-6,123, 512
3,373, 512

-3,373, 512

1, 050, 000

1, 250,000

This is the 10th year of a construction program of
United States military cemeteries in foreign countries and
memorials to commemorate the services of the American
Armed Forces in World War II at 15 locations in foreign
countries. The Commission estimates that by June 30,
1958, all cemeteries will be 100% completed, memorials
88.6%. The program, including memorials on the east and
west coasts of the United States, should be completed by
August 1, 1959, except for the Hawaiian memorial.
No additional funds are requested for fiscal year 1959
since the unobligated balance is sufficient to complete the
program.




60
24
58
42

5.3

$4,349
$1,543
$172,365
46,656
143, 647

$4, 374
$1, 549
$120, 565
3, 900
138,160
262, 625
10,000
6,600
225

DEDICATION

OF

WORLD

668
800
678
225
800
400
44, 475
2, 772
590
3, 562,983
7, 699

3,073, 870
4,169

2,316, 746

Total obligations

4,000,000

3,373, 512

WAR

II

362,
13,
3,

5.4

250
15, 375
398

MEMORIALS

Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Dedication of World War II memorials
(total obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward—
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation
authority)

(new

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$58,252
-119,486
61, 234

obligational

Object Classification
01
02
04
05
06
07
08

Personal services: Positions
than permanent
Travel
Communication services
Rents and utility services—
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials

other

$3,230
42,358
1, 580
826
2,051
6, 487
1,720
58, 252

Total obligations

$110, 525

1,652,457
223,854
290, 850
6, 228

77
96
126
88

517, 709
21,298
9,995
1,680
1,445
607
48,056
14, 536
2,011
1, 699, 409

1957 actual

CONSTRUCTION

1959 estimate

78
162
232
168

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

1, 250,000

Total obligations

1958 estimate

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
OPERATING

EXPENSES

For necessary operating expenses of the Commission in carrying
out the purposes of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended,
including the employment of aliens; rental in or near the District of
Columbia; services authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2,
1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); purchase of equipment; purchase, maintenance, and operation of aircraft; publication and dissemination of
atomic information; purchase, repair, and cleaning of uniforms;
purchase of newspapers and periodicals (not to exceed [$5,0003
$6,000); official entertainment expenses (not to exceed $30,000);
not to exceed [$3,700,000] $3,850,000 for expenses of travel, including expends of attendance at meetings of organizations concerned with the function or activity for which this appropriation is
made; reimbursement of the General Services Administration for
security guard services; not to exceed [$46,100,000] $46,800,000
for personal services; purchase (not to exceed four hundred and
[ s i x t y ] thirty-five for replacement only, including [ t w o ] one at not
to exceed $3,500 [ e a c h ] ) and hire of passenger motor vehicles;
[$2,215,470,000] $2,288,000,000, together with the unexpended
balances, as of June 30, [ 1 9 5 7 ] 1958, of prior year appropriations
made available under this head to the Atomic Energy Commission,
and, in addition, any moneys (except sums received from disposal of
property under the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 (42

118

T H E B U D G E T F O R , FISCAL Y E A R 1959

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
OPERATING

EXPENSES—Continued

U. S. C. 2301)) received by the Commission, notwithstanding the
provisions of section 3617 of the Revised Statutes (31 U. S. C. 484):
Provided, That of such amounts $100,000 may be expended for objects of a confidential nature and in any such case the certificate of
the Commission as to the amount of the expenditure and that it is
deemed inadvisable to specify the nature thereof shall be deemed a
sufficient voucher for the sum therein expressed to have been
expended: Provided further, That from this appropriation transfers
of sums may be made to other agencies of the Government for the
performance of the work for which this appropriation is made, and
in such cases the sums so transferred may be merged with the appropriation to which transferred: Provided further, That no part of this
appropriation shall be used in connection with the payment of a
fixed fee to any contractor or firm of contractors engaged under a
cost-plus-a-fixed-fee contract or contracts at any installation of the
Commission, where that fee for community management is at a rate
in excess of $90,000 per annum, or for the operation of a transportation system w^here that fee is at a rate in excess of $45,000 per annum.
{42 U. S. C. 2011; Atomic Energy Commission Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $2,215,470,000

Estimate 1959, ° $2,288,000,000

« Excludes $1,780,000 for activities transferred in the estimates to "Surveys, investigations, and research," Geological Survey. The amounts obligated in 1957 and 1958 are
shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Raw materials
2. Special nuclear materials
3. Weapons.
4. Reactor development
5. Physical research
6. Biology and medicine
7. Training, education, and information
8. Community
9. Program direction and administration...
10. Security investigations
11. Other costs
Adjustment of prior year costs

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$397,836,008
581, 602,626
323, 285,197
266, 550,778
59, 344, 215
31, 519, 984

$596,901,000
578,600,000
459,054,000
334,776,000
71,471,000
37,895,000

$670,000,000
592,000,000
532,600, 000
351,000,000
71, 500, 000
43,000,000

7,815, 945
17,777,637

16,850,000
17,921,000

18, 500,000
15,000,000

38,034,044
8,442,087
6, 619,603
-82,832

44, 704,000
8,442,000
8,137,000

46,600,000
7,000,000
6, 687,000

Total program costs 1
12. Revenues applied (—)

1, 738, 745, 292
- 3 4 , 573,859

2,174, 751,000
-34,875,000

2,353,887,000
-29,720,000

Net program costs
13. Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations
of other years, net (—)
Obligations incurred for costs of
other years, net

1, 704,171,433

2,139,876,000

2,324,167,000

68, 785,462

100,727,221

Total program (obligations).
Financing:
Comparative transfers to other accounts.
Unobligated balance no longer availableNew obligational authority

-26,167,000

1, 772, 956, 895

2, 240, 603, 221

4,148,153
37,932, 221

2,799,000
10,000,000

1,815, 037,269

2, 253, 402, 221

2, 298,000,000

2,298,000,000

New obligational authority:
$1,740,400,000 $2, 215,470, 000 $2, 288,000, 000
Appropriation.
Transferred from "Plant acquisition
and construction," Atomic Energy
11, 500,000
Commission (70 Stat. 769)
Appropriation (adjusted)
Reappropriation

1, 751,900,000
63,137,269

2,215,470,000
37,932,221

2, 288,000,000
10,000,000

1 Includes capital outlay for equipment: 1957, $57,398,823; 1958, $72,327,000; 1959
$80,547,000.

The Commission procures raw materials; manufactures
special nuclear materials and atomic weappns; develops
improved weapons; conducts research and development
aimed at generation of atomic power, including power from
controlled thermonuclear reactions, and protection of
health against possible hazards arising from atomic energy
operations; conducts investigations in the physical and life
sciences related to atomic energy; establishes and enforces
regulations for civilian uses of atomic energy; promotes
industrial participation in atomic energy development for
peaceful purposes; encourages scientific and industrial
progress through the dissemination of information under




the terms of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;
and participates in programs of international cooperation
in peaceful applications of atomic energy.
The program is administered in the field through 10
major offices. Most of the Commission's activities are
carried on in Government-owned facilities by industrial
concerns and educational institutions, operating under
contracts. Coordination with the armed services is
achieved through the Military Liaison Committee of the
Department of Defense.
Net program costs in 1959 are estimated at $2,324.2
million, or 8.6% greater than the estimated 1958 net costs
of $2,139.9 million, and 36.4% greater than actual net
costs of $1,704.3 million for 1957, The upward trend reflects mainly larger scale procurement of raw materials
and expanded production of nuclear weapons. Other increases occur in the efforts to develop varied types of
atomic weapons, in military and civilian power and propulsion reactor development, in research in the biological
and medical fields, and for isotope development.
In 1959, the net program costs exceed obligational requirements; the difference is represented by costs financed
from obligations of other years, net. The converse is
true in 1957 and 1958, when obligations exceed net program costs, the difference being reflected as obligations
incurred for costs of other years, net. The obligations
for operating expenses in 1959 total $2,298 million compared to $2,240.6 million in 1958 and $1,773 million in
1957.
1. Raw materials.—Uranium ores and concentrates are
procured from domestic and foreign sources for processing
in the production facilities of the Commission. Substantial additional tonnages of concentrates will be
obtained from United States producers and from Canada
in 1959, with minor decreases from other foreign sources
reflecting increased allocations to other countries. Resource evaluation will continue in the development of
data on uranium reserves.
2. Special nuclear materials.—Uranium concentrates are
processed into feed materials from which (a) plutonium is
produced in the reactors at Hanford, Wash., and Savannah
River, S. C., or (6) the isotope uranium-235 is extracted
in plants at Oak Ridge, Tenn., Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio. As production of feed and special nuclear
materials increases, the gains in output will be accompanied by lower unit processing costs. Work will continue on process improvement to reduce production costs,
increase yields, and improve the quality of products.
3. Weapons.—This program encompasses the production of weapons; the design, development, and testing of
new weapon types; and the storage, maintenance, and
custody of stockpiled weapons. Expanded production
facilities will be in operation and production of weapons
will increase.
4. Reactor development.—This program includes primarily the development of (a) civilian power reactors, including associated work on reactor safety, spent fuel reprocessing, and waste disposal; (6) commercial ship reactors; (c) power and propulsion reactors for a variety of
military requirements; and (d) experimental devices to
control thermonuclear reactions. Also included is the
operation of the National Reactor Test Station at Arco ;
Idaho. The costs by major category are:
Category:
Civilian power reactors...
Civilian power supporting effort
Commercial ship reactorsArmy package power reactors
Naval propulsion reactors
Aircraft propulsion reactors
Controlled thermonuclear project
All other
Total reactor development

1957 actual
$54,291,286
22,247,363
875,198
2,875,555
71,662,530
68,875,126
10,734,745
34,988,975
266,550,778

1968 estimate 1959 estimate
$90,800,000
$97,700,000
26,922,000
26,600,000
1,750,000
3,700,000
5,756,000
5,600,000
86,844,000
87,000,000
65,300,000
66,600,000
23,550,000
25,500,000
33,854,000
38,300,000
334,776,000

351,000,000

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

The Commission's civilian power reactor program
provides a foundation of technical knowledge through a
program of research and development on promising reactor
concepts; design, fabrication, and operation of power
reactor experiments; the development of experimental
reactors; and development of prototype power plants
usually on a cooperative basis with industry. Through
the cooperative arrangements program, the Commission
provides financial aid in the development of full-scale
power reactors built by private industry and public power
bodies. This aid provides a basis for a privately financed
nuclear power industry.
To provide broad support primarily for civilian power
reactor projects, the Commission's programs include
general research and development on materials, moderators, control techniques, fuel elements, spent fuel
reprocessing, and waste disposal systems, and reactor
safety. Some of this work is also applicable to military
reactor development.
^ The Commission's program for 1959 includes the continuation of work to develop atomic powerplants for use in
commercial vessels, and particularly for the nuclearpowered merchant ship now in construction.
In the military reactor programs, efforts will be continued to develop reactors to meet requirements of the
Department of Defense.
These include propulsion
reactors for submarines, surface combatant ships, military
aircraft, missiles, and transportable plants for the generation of heat and electric power at remote military installations. Many of the advances in military reactor development contribute significantly to the civilian power
program.
Development work looking toward control of thermonuclear reactions will continue at a substantial level in 1959.
The Commission also operates the National Reactor
Testing Station in Idaho, including two test reactors
which provide irradiation services for the Commission's
programs and for private industry on a reimbursable basis.
5. Physical research.—Basic and long-range investigations in the fields of physics, mathematics, chemistry, and
metallurgy are undertaken to provide an ever-expanding
fund of theoretical and practical knowledge in fields related to nuclear energy. Approximately 90 particle
accelerators, ranging in energy from several thousand
electron-volts to several billion electron-volts, are utilized
in the program. Approximately 65% of the cost of research is for work done in Commission laboratories and
35% is for work contracted to about 100 universities and
other independent institutions.
6. Biology and medicine.—Research is conducted on the
effect of radiation on living things. It includes investigations of the biological effects of nuclear explosions, and
the development of methods for minimizing exposure to
radioactive materials of all kinds and for minimizing and
protecting against the injurious effects of radiation. Support is given to the development of methods for utilizing
radioactive materials for human welfare, and to the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases, such as cancer.
The comprehensive study of permissible levels of exposure
to radioactive contamination from all causes is given special emphasis. Standards are established to insure that
the Commission's activities are conducted with safety to
both employees and the public.
The major portion of the research is carried on at 16
laboratories which are owned by or operated for the
Commission and the remainder, approximately 500 projects, is supported in more than 200 universities, colleges,
hospitals, and independent laboratories. The program




119

includes the operation of 4 facilities in the United States
devoted to cancer research and 2 laboratories in Japan
for the determination of the long-term effects of atomic
bombs on the population.
7. Training, education, and information.—This activity
includes operation of special schools; granting of fellowships for graduate students; assistance to high schools,
colleges, and universities; and dissemination of technical
information, including participation in international conferences and exhibits on nuclear science and technology;
and development of beneficial uses of radioisotopes.
Four schools will be operated in 1958 and 1959: The
International School of Nuclear Science and Engineering
at the Argonne National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge
School of Reactor Technology, the Oak Ridge Institute
of Nuclear Studies, and the new Puerto Rico Training
Center.
Under the fellowship program, approximately 150
college graduates will receive assistance for graduate
studies in nuclear energy technology. Other fellowships to be offered include 170 in radiological physics,
8 in industrial hygiene, and 11 in industrial medicine.
Assistance to schools to provide for educational programs in atomic energy will be continued. Grants will
be made to universities to help them acquire reactor
training equipment, teaching aids, demonstration apparatus, and special laboratory equipment. University
summer courses in general radiobiology will be made available to high school science teachers, and special faculty
training in reactor technology for university faculty
members will be provided.
To broaden the dissemination of information on matters
relating to atomic energy, the Commission operates the
Technical Information Service and the American Museum
of Atomic Energy at Oak Ridge, maintains libraries,
performs translation services, and conducts tours with
traveling atomic energy exhibits. At the request of the
Department of State, the Commission is planning and
preparing the United States technical presentation, including an exhibit, for the 1958 International Conference
on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy to be held at Geneva,
Switzerland, in September 1958. " The Commission will
also arrange in 1959 for nuclear exhibits at other selected
foreign conferences and exhibitions in order to demonstrate
United States technology.
It is planned to initiate in 1959 a program to provide
for additional development of practical applications for
use of radioisotopes in medicine, agriculture and industry.
The Commission will participate in research and development projects with industrial and research organizations
to exploit the practical application of radioisotopes and
applied radiation to industrial products, processes, and
manufacturing methods. Isotope training institutes will
be established at selected non-profit industrial, research
or educational institutions to accelerate training of
industrial and State radiation protection personnel in
radioisotope techniques and precautions for their safe use.
Assistance will be provided to industry to encourage
installation of needed reactor capacity for isotope production by private industry.
8. Communities.—The Commission operates 3 towns—
Oak Ridge, Tenn., Richland, Wash., and Los Alamos,
N. Mex.—with an estimated total population in 1959 of
71,000, and provides limited community services at other
locations. Legislation has been enacted to terminate
Government ownership and operation of Oak Ridge and
Richland; the 1959 estimates are based on anticipated
disposal of a major portion of Atomic Energy Commis-

120

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
OPERATING

EXPENSES—Continued

sion-owned real estate by the end of 1959 with resultant
reductions in requirements for property maintenance and
in revenues. The estimates also include costs associated
with the disposal program and provide for assistance payments to the community hospital at Richland which has
been transferred to a private nonprofit organization.
Since real estate revenues normally exceed operating
costs by a substantial amount, the loss in revenue as a
result of property sales together with the costs of disposal
will result in an estimated excess of costs over revenues
of $3.5 million in 1959. This relation between costs and
revenues, which are included under revenues applied, is
indicated in the following table:
1957 actual
Revenues
—
$18,987,959
Operating costs, including A E C cost related to disposal...
17,777,637
Excess of revenues over costs
Excess of costs over revenues

1,210,322

1958 estimate
$15,243,000

1959 estimate
$11,473,000

17,921,000

15,000,000

2,678,000

3,527,000

9. Program direction and administration.—The costs of
general management, supervision of program operations,
the negotiation and administration of contracts, the
establishment and enforcement of regulations for civilian
uses of atomic energy, including the issuance of licenses,
and other related administrative activities performed by
Commission personnel represent 2 % of total program costs
in 1959 compared to 2.1% in 1958. The budget provides
for no increase in personnel in 1959. The increase of
$1.9 million provides for salaries and travel and other costs
for a whole year for personnel added in 1958, as well as
operating costs at the German town headquarters for a full
year including eight months occupancy of the additional
wing now under construction.
10. Security investigations.—The Atomic Energy Act of
1954 requires background investigations of those persons
proposed for access to restricted data of the atomic energy
program. The number of full background investigations
to be completed is estimated at 27,205 for 1959, compared
with 32,451 for 1958 and 35,492 for 1957.
11. Other costs.—In furthering the objectives of the
Atomic Energy Act of 1954 concerning the utilization of
atomic energy for peaceful purposes, the Commission
furnishes materials and services to industrial organizations and other private parties apart from those which it
provides normally for its own basic programs. Costs for
these are incurred only upon the request of others.
Charges made for such products and services are included
under "Revenues applied" as a reduction in determining
the appropriations required. The items included are:
Costs of products sold
Costs of services performed
Total other costs

1957 actual
$4,717,615
1,901,988

1958 estimate
$6,096,000
2,041,000

1959 estimate
$4,686,000
2,001,000

6,619,603

8,137,000

6,687,000

12. Revenues applied.—Revenues are obtained from services performed and the sale and lease of products, including lease and sale of nuclear materials, produced as a
part of the Commission's own basic program (primarily
the operation of the Atomic Energy Commission-owned
communities and housing and the sale of special nuclear
materials and related products) and from products and
services for which costs are incurred only upon the request
of others and are included under "Other costs." The
items included are:




Total revenues.

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,151,857

$4,493,000

$4,085,000

248,111
352,797

969,000
353,000

1,627,000
353,000

463,510
18,987,959

418,000
15,243,000

255,000
11,473,000

8,476,434
2,424,692
1,468,499

10,081,000
1,669,000
1,649,000

7,863,000
1,659,000
2,405,000

34,573,859

Sale of source and special nuclear materials and related products
Income from lease and consumption
charges for special nuclear materials
Income from research hospitals
Income from training, education and information
Income from communities
Income from products sold and services
performed at request of others:
Products sold
Services performed
Miscellaneous income

34,875,000

29, 720,000

13. Relation oj costs to obligations.—The relationship is
derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
reflected in the following table:
Selected resources at end of year:
In ventoriesand items on order:
Inventories (goods unconsumed by activities)
Unpaid undelivered orders
(appropriation balances
obligated for goods and
services on order not yet
received)
Advances
(payments for
goods and services on
order not yet received)...
Collateral funds and other deposits (insurance collateral,
employee benefit and annuity funds, merchandise
deposits with vendors and
miscellaneous deposits)

1956 actual

1957 actual 1958 estimate 1959 estimate

$135,869,660

$161,331,583

$180,127,000

$185,519,000

559,198,115

600,073,299

685,319,211

653,760,211

474,753

714,108

21,890,000

24,099,000

21,499,000

21,499,000

Total selected resources at
end of year
717,432,528
Selected resources at start of year ( - )

786.217,990
-717,432,528

886,945,211
-786,217,990

860,778,211
-886,945,211

Costs financed from obligations of other
years, net ( - )
Obligations incurred for costs of other years,
net

68,785,462

100,727,221

-26,167,000

The increase in unpaid undelivered orders in 1958 over
1957 results primarily from the general rise in program
levels and the execution of certain long-term contracts
with industry under the power reactor cooperative
arrangements program. The decrease in 1959 below 1958
is attributed primarily to the costing of long-term contracts for materials procurement and cooperative power
arrangements with industry.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

7,453
83
6,991
7,215

7,491
70
7,178
7,215

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
7,435
32
6,694
6, 910

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
Average grade and salary, grades established by the Atomic Energy Commission-01

8.4

$6,141

8. 5

$6, 237

8.6

$6,319

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$40,196, 082
224, 407
1, 730, 738

$42,486, 795
456, 555
2, 056,650

Total personal services
02 Travel. __
__
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services.
06 Printing and reproduction.
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials.
_ _____
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions._
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments.
Unvouchered
_
__ _ _

42,151, 227
2, 893,156
5, 559, 611
3, 551, 111
226, 657, 217
495, 004
931, 589, 373
26, 218, 489
442,323,098
74, 856,000
4, 437,163
47, 571
4, 663
30

45, 000, 000
3, 600, 000
8, 484, 000
3,479, 000
209, 700, 000
885, 000
1,154,631,178
26, 243, 000
677,600,000
74, 077, 000
9, 583, 000
316,000
7,000
100, 000

46, 800, 000
3, 850, 000
10,317, 000
3, 573, 000
213,400, 000
868,000
1,138, 334, 000
25, 619, 000
734,600,000
76, 886, 000
8, 623, 000
316, 000
8,000
100, 000

Total, Atomic Energy Commission.. 1, 760, 783, 713

2, 213, 705,178

2, 263, 294,000

39
1
39
37

36
1
36
37

$44,297,139
412,387
2,090,474

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS
41
1
41
39

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees..
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary

6. 2

$4,846

6.1

$4,819

6.1

$4,868

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Object Classification—Continued

Object Classification—Continued

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$202,662
14,115
2,973

$201,347
2,100
1,153

$189,500
2,100
1,000

219, 750
4,291
63, 506
158
28, 567
13,827,105
-1,997,274
27,056

204, 600
2,300
1,300
250
30,075
26,310,316
336, 232

192, 600
300
3,300
150
75
32, 777,900
1,719,375

12,970

12,300

12,173,182

26,898,043

34,706,000

1, 772,956,895

2, 240,603, 221

2, 298,000,000

1957 actual
ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS—continued

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials.
09 Equipment _ _
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions...
15 Taxes and assessments
_

23

Total allocation accounts
Total obligations

121

Obligations are distributed as follows:
$1,760,783, 713 $2,213,705,178 $2, 263, 294,000
Atomic Energy Commission
Department of Agriculture:
154
Soil Conservation Service
246
539
Agricultural Research Service.
Department of Commerce: National
166,132
Bureau of Standards
Department of the Interior:
37,266
-37,266
Geological Survey

1957 actual
Obligations are distributed as follows—Con.
Department of the Interior—Con.
Bureau of Mines
Fish and Wildlife Service
Department of the Navy
Department of the Army
General Services Administration
Department of the Air Force
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare: Public Health Service..

[PLANT

ACQUISITION

$129,256
-287
36,355
13,897,343
-2,018,463
- 1 4 , 474

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$75,757

$75,000

44,860
25, 917, 621
322,000
500, 000

32,920,000
1,711,000

14,186

AND

CONSTRUCTION]

[For expenses of the Commission in connection with the purchase
and construction of plant and other expenses incidental thereto
necessary in carrying out the purposes of the Atomic Energy Act
of 1954, as amended, including the acquisition or condemnation
of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition,
construction, or expansion; and hire of passenger motor vehicles;
$108,162,500, to remain available until expended.] (42 U. S. C.
2011; 71 Stat. 403; Atomic Energy Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $108,162,500

Program and Financing
Cost to this appropriation
Total estimate To June 30,1956
Program by activities:
Facilities for:
1. Raw materials
2. Special nuclear materials
3. Weapons
4. Reactor development..
5. Physical research
6. Biology and medicine.
7. Training, education,
and information
8. Communities
9. Administration.

1957 actual

Obligations

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$13,293,000

$4, 284, 000

$4,166, 548

$4,043,000

$800,000

$6, 061,431

1,499,140,000
389, 747, 000
613,432, 000
109, 775, 000
18,417, 000

3, 223, 382, 000
221, 232, 000
186, 784, 000
17, 090, 000
10, 077,000

83,636, 261
57,912, 526
83,943, 610
12,660, 605
3, 077, 862

72, 748,000
44, 615, 000
81, 337, 000
17, 233, 000
4,124,000

64, 405, 000
33,680, 000
101,174, 000
19, 247, 000
1,138, 000

59,953, 816
62, 316, 658
102, 378,116
21, 822,441
1, 076, 501

2,500, 000
21,108,000
14,978,000

!, 193, 000
338,000

6,316, 676
7,621,925

500, 000
4, 307, 000
5, 818, 000

1, 500, 000
3, 533, 000
1, 200, 000

4, 716, 579
1,351, 065

234, 725, 000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

226, 677, 000

4,682, 390, 000
3,669,380,000
Total program costs.
10. Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations of other years (unpaid
undelivered orders), net (—)
Obligations incurred for costs of other years (unpaid
undelivered orders), net
Total program (obligations)

$1,117,000
85,
61,
175,
18,
1,

227,
006,
643,
809,
254,

000
098
000
000
000

$43, 220, 000
10, 000,000

2, 500, 000
6,916, 000
4,150, 000

138, 000

259,676,607

356,622, 098

53,358,000

-375, 810,475
- 4 5 , 094, 730
308, 028, 598

-308, 028, 598
- 5 , 718, 000
65, 287, 000

- 6 5 , 287,000

146,800,000

108,162,500

$158,300,000
- 1 1 , 500,000

$108,162, 500

146,800,000

108,162, 500

-173,319,000
340,594

121,897,098

259,676,607

356,622,098

53, 358,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward
Recovery of prior year obligations
.
Unobligated balance carried forward
Unobligated balance transferred to schedule shown under the head "Proposed for later transmission" below..
New obligational authority..
New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Transferred to "Operating expenses,' Atomic Energy Commission (70 Stat. 769).
Appropriation (adjusted) _

From this appropriation the Commission constructs
plant and facilities for its production, research, and supporting operations. Since the Atomic Energy Act of 1954
requires statutory authorization of appropriations for plant
acquisition and construction, obligations are estimated in
1959 only for projects for which appropriations have already
been authorized. No new appropriation is requested at
this time because the $65.3 million of unobligated balances
brought forward from prior years is more than sufficient
to cover the $53.4 million of obligations for these projects.
The remaining $11.9 million is to be applied against 1959
obligational requirements of projects included in the anticipated authorization of appropriations for which a supplemental will be transmitted later (see below).
Excluded from the total estimate column and from the
1959 estimated cost column are amounts for projects for




1957 actual

Appropriation
required for
1959

""il,"929,"666"

which authorizations will be sought for 1959 but which
have not yet been received.
Set forth below is information on the various activities
in terms of obligations incurred.
1. Facilities jor raw materials.—With the exception of
the Commission's processing mill at Monticello, Utah,
all United States mills for the processing of uranium ores
are privately owned. Obligations in 1957 and 1958 are
for the construction of access roads to uranium mines and
miscellaneous supporting facilities.
2. Facilities jor special nuclear materials.—Under this
activity obligations are provided in 1957 and 1958 for
additions, modification and improvements to {a) the feed
materials plants located at Fernald, Ohio, Weldon Springs,
Mo., and St. Louis, Mo.; (b) the gaseous diffusion plants
located at Oak Ridge, Tenn.; Paducah, Ky., and Ports-

122

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
[PLANT

ACQUISITION

AND

CONSTRUCTION]—Continued

mouth, Ohio, and (c) the production facilities located at
ITanford, Wash., and Savannah River, S. C.
3. Facilities for weapons.—This activity includes the
construction of facilities for the production of weapons,
for the storage of completed weapons, and for the development and engineering of new weapon types.
4. Facilities for reactor development.—This activity includes the construction of laboratory buildings for fundamental engineering work on reactor concepts and materials, facilities for the housing of reactor experiments, civilian
power experimental reactors generating electrical energy or
producing over 10,000 kilowatts of heat, and prototype
reactors for civilian and military purposes.
Obligations in 1957 and 1958 are primarily for (a)
experimental reactors for the Commission's civilian power
program; (b) prototype power reactors as part of the
cooperative arrangements program between the Commission and industry; (c) facilities to support the development
of improved reactor, chemical separations, and waste
disposal systems, and to provide other general support;
(d) continued support for the first merchant ship reactor;
(e) test facilities connected with military aircraft and
missile nuclear propulsion; and'(f) land based prototypes
and support facilities for the naval propulsion program.
Obligations in 1959 are for the completion of certain
previously authorized projects, including (a) experimental
reactors for the Commission's civilian power program,
(b) buildings to house advanced experimental devices for
controlling thermonuclear reactions, and (c) certain classified projects.
5. Facilities for physical research.—Large research
machines and laboratory buildings are constructed to
further research in physics, chemistry, and metallurgy.
The major portion of the obligations in 1957 and 1958
are for the completion of three ultra high energy particle
accelerators in the multibillion electron-volt range which
will assist in obtaining new knowledge about the atomic
nucleus and the elementary particles. One of these is
being built at Princeton, N. J., one at Cambridge, Mass.,
and another, larger than any now existing, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, Long Island. The
1958 estimates also cover the design of another multibillion
electron-volt accelerator, the sixth in the United States,
at the Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, 111., and
research facility improvements at University of California
Radiation Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory,
and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 1959 obligations provide for the first phase of construction on the
multibillion electron-volt accelerator at the Argonne
National Laboratory authorized in 1958.
6. Facilities jor biology and medicine.-—Under this
activity, research facilities are built for atomic energy
research in the fields of medicine, biology, and biophysics.
The new research hospital at the Brookhaven National
Laboratory, initiated in 1956, will be completed in 1958.
A mammalian radiation injury and reclamation area
will be provided at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
Tenn., in 1958.
7. Facilities jor training, education, and information.—
Obligations in 1958 are for construction of a nuclear
training center in Puerto Rico.
8. Facilities for communities.—Community facilities are
constructed in the Commission-operated towns of Rich-




land, Wash., Oak Ridge, Tenn., and Los Alamos, N. Mex.
Obligations in 1957 and 1958 are primarily for a new community hospital at Oak Ridge, municipal facilities in
Oak Ridge and Richland connected with the community
disposal program, and for additional housing and schools
at Los Alamos. Obligations in 1959 are for an additional
water well at Los Alamos, N. Mex.
9. Facilities for administration.—Obligations in 1957
and 1958 are mainly for the construction of the new headquarters building at Germantown, Md. Other obligations for these years provide for improvement or conversion of administrative facilities.
10. Relation of costs to obligations.—The year-end balances of unpaid undelivered orders are as follows: 1956,
$304,692,468; 1957, $305,033,062; 1958, $426,930,160; and
1959, $253,611,160. The changes in unpaid undelivered
orders result from the fact that obligations lead costs and
tend to fluctuate more rapidly than costs. The large
increase in obligations in 1958 is only partially costed in
1958, with the result that a larger amount of unpaid
undelivered orders are carried into 1959. In 1959, obligations shown in this account decline sharply, and costs and
unpaid undelivered orders also decline; however, additional 1959 construction obligations for the Atomic Energy
Commission are shown under "Proposed for later transmission."
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

Transportation of things
Communication services—
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
10 Lands and structures
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities

$153,790
14,028
25,552,911
1, 245,196
97,185
221,889, 284
30,668

$150,000
15,000
17,932,000
1,950,000
100,000
326,834, 769
30,000

Total, Atomic Energy Commission.

248,983,062

347,011,769

03
04
07

$53,358,000
53,358,000

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year..
$5, 210

Average GS grade and salary
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
10
11
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Lands and structures
Grants, subsidies, and contributions_
Taxes and assessments—
Total, allocation accounts..

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Atomic Energy Commission
Department of Commerce: Bureau of
Public Roads
Department of the Interior: Bureau of
Indian Affairs
Department of the Navy
Department of the Army
General Services Administration
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare: Public Health Service

GENERAL

$4,892

$87,872
38, 273
10,978

$52,498
15,000
2,902

137,123
9,908
2,091
638
68,364
489
908, 702
4,421, 412
5,144, 690

70,400
4,600
4,200
400
7,500
500
753, 204
6, 870,100
1, 895, 267
4,028
130

128
10,693, 545
i, 676,607

Total obligations.

6. 2

9, 610, 329
356, 622, (

$248,983,062

$347,011, 769

4,917,431

812,626

23, 280
29,310
1,316, 226
4,402, 762

53, 358, 000

$53,358,000

22,508
530
1,899, 665
6,875,000

4,536

PROVISIONS

Any appropriation available under this or any other Act to the
Atomic Energy Commission may initially be used subject to limita-

I N D E P E N D E N T OFFICES
tions in this Act during the fiscal year [1958J 1959 to finance the
procurement of materials, services, or other costs which are a part
of work or activities for which funds have been provided in any
other appropriation available to the Commission: Provided, That
appropriate transfers or adjustments between such appropriation
shall subsequently be made for such costs on the basis of actual
application determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
Not to exceed 5 per centum of any appropriation herein made to
the Atomic Energy Commission may be transferred to any other
such appropriation, but no such appropriation shall be increased by
more than 5 per centum by any such transfers, and any such transfers shall be reported promptly to the Appropriations Committees
of the House and Senate.
No part of any appropriation herein made to the Atomic Energy
Commission shall be used to confer a fellowship on any person who
advocates or who is a member of an organization or party that advocates the overthrow of the Government of the United States by force
or violence or with respect to whom the Commission finds, upon investigation and report by the Civil Service Commission on the
character, associations, and loyalty of whom, that reasonable
grounds exist for belief that such person is disloyal to the Government of the United States: Provided, That any person who advocates
or who is a member of an organization or party that advocates the
overthrow of the Government of the United States by force or
violence and accepts employment or a fellowship the salary, wages,
stipend, grant, or expenses for which are paid from any appropriation contained herein shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, shall be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned for not more
than one year, or both: Provided further, That the above penal
clause shall be in addition to, and not in substitution for, any other
provisions of existing law.
[ T h e appropriations, authorizations, and authority with respect
thereto in this Act shall be available from July 1, 1957, for the purposes provided in such appropriations, authorizations, and authority. All obligations incurred during the period between June
30, 1957, and the date of enactment of this Act in anticipation of
such appropriations, authorizations, and authority are hereby ratified and confirmed if in accordance with the terms hereof, and the
terms of Public Law 85-78, Eighty-fifth Congress, as amended.]
{42 U. S. C. 2011; Atomic Energy Commission Appropriation Act,
1958.)

123

Loans may be purchased by the Government if necessary
to keep financing in effect; however, the Atomic Energy
Commission has not yet been required to do this. Administrative expenses are paid out of guaranty fees.
In 1957, guaranties of 75% to 95% were in force. At
the beginning of 1957 credit amounting to $10,299,147
was available to four borrowers; at year end $8,063,779
was available to three borrowers. It is estimated that in
1958 and 1959 guaranties will be in force on five loans
for which the total amount of credit available to the
borrowers at the end of each year will be $6.4 million and
$3.7 million, respectively.
Net earnings are retained to meet possible future losses
(50 U. S. C. app. 2061-2166).
Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual

1959 estimate

$767
27

$1,000

$1,000

794

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Administrative expense
Increase in selected work ing capital

1958 estimate

1,000

1,000

Total gross expenditures
Receipts from operations (funds
vided) :
Guaranty and commitment fees

pro145,119

104, 214

65,347

-144,325

Budget expenditures

-103, 214

-64,347

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
$145,119
767

103, 214
341,303

64,347
444, 517

444, 517

508, 864

$341,303

$444, 517

$508,864

341, 303

Retained earnings, end of year

$65,347
1, 000

341, 303

Net income for the year
Retained earnings, beginning of year.

$104, 214
1, 000

144,352
196, 951

Revenue
Expense

444, 517

508, 864

1958 estimate

] 959 estimate

$341,303

$444,517

$508,864

341, 303

444, 517

508,864

Financial Condition
ALLOCATIONS

RECEIVED

FROM

OTHER

APPROPRIATIONS

NOTE.—Obligations incurred under allocations from other accounts are included in
the schedules of the parent appropriations as follows:
"Ships and facilities," Department of the Navy.
"Research and development," Department of the Navy.
"Aircraft and related procurement," Department of the Navy.
"Shipbuilding and conversion," Department of the Navy.
"Government in occupied areas," Department of State.
" Operation and maintenance," Department of the Army.
" A r m y industrial fund."
"Military construction, A r m y . "
"Research and development," Department of the Army.
"Procurement and equipment and missiles, A r m y . "
"Operations," Federal Civil Defense Administration.
"Surveys, plans, and research," Federal Civil Defense Administration.
" Operation and maintenance," Department of the Air Force.
"Research and development," Department of the Air Force.
"Military construction, Air Force."
"Aircraft and missile support," Department of the Air Force.
"Aircraft and missile procurement," Department of the Air Force.
"Mutual Security," funds appropriated to the President.

Assets:
Cash with Treasury
Government investment:
Retained earnings

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
U n e x p e n d e d balance:
Cash with Treasury . . .
Obligated balance: Current liabilities
Unobligated

$196, 978

1957 actual

27
196, 951

balance.

NOTE.—Excludes contingent liability for guarantied loans as follows: June 30, 1956,
$9,496,175; 1957, $7,383,986; 1958, $5,888,000.

Public enterprise funds:

Object Classification

DEFENSE PRODUCTION

GUARANTIES

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,000

$1,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$8,640,000
6,683,168
1,200,000
1,000,000

$13,900,000
5,900,000

$10,600,000
5,900,000

1,000,000

1,500,000

17,523,168

20,800,000

18,000,000

Program and Financing
07
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Operating costs: Administrative
pense (total obligations)

ex-

$767

1958 estimate

$1,000

$1,000

Intragovernmental funds:
ADVANCES AND

Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Revenues and receipts: Guaranty and
commitment fees
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d -

145,119
196,951

104,214
341,303

65,347
444,517

Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carried forward.—-

342,070
-341,303

445,517
-444,517

509,864
—508,864

767

1,000

1,000

Financing applied to program

Guaranties are given on loans made by private sources
to facilitate performance of defense production contracts.




$767

Other contractual services

1959 estimate

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Sale of products
2. Income from services
3. Community revenue
4, Miscellaneous income
Total obligations

124

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION—Continued
Intragovernmental funds—Continued
ADVANCES

AND

REIMBUSEMENTS—Continued

Program and Financing—Continued
1957 actual

1959 estimate

$6,000,000

$6,000,000

11,900,000

14,800,000

12,000,000

17,523,168

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts
Non-Federal sources (5 U . S. C.
61 (b),42 U. S. C. 2011)

1958 estimate

20,800,000

18,000,000

$5,623,168

Total financing

facilities connected with reactor development, $4.2
million for other research and development facilities, and
$3.7 million for a variety of other projects. Costs against
the $131.9 million total obligations will spread over several
years; only $23 million in costs is estimated for 1959,
resulting in unpaid undelivered orders in the amount of
$108.9 million at the end of 1959.
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY
Current authorizations:
CONSTRUCTION
Program and Financing

Object Classification
1957 actual
1
0

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average grade and salary, grades established by the Atomic Energy Commission
01 Personal services: Positions
than permanent
02 Travel
07 Other contractual services
09 Equipment
-

11.0

other

$8,540

$5,435
5,143
17,497,574
15,016

Total obligations

Program by activities:
1. Design, specifications, and
vision. .
2. Construction of building
3. Construction of roads

17,523,168

AND

$20,800,000

$18,000,000

20,800,000

18,000,000

CONSTRUCTION

Program and Financing
Cost to this appropriation
1958 estimate
Program by activities:
Facilities for—
1. Raw materials
2. Special nuclear materials
3. Weapons
4. Reactor development
5. Physical research
6. Biology and medicine
7. Training, education, and information
8. Communities
9. Administration
.
Total program costs
10. Relation of costs to obligations:
Obligations incurred for costs
of other years (increase in unpaid undelivered orders), net
Total program (obligations)..
Financing:
Unobligated balance transferred from
"Plant acquisition and construction"
(see schedule above)
Proposed supplemental
ation.

appropri-

1959 estimate

Estimated
obligations
1959

$100, 000
7,400, 000
8, 000, 000
6, 000, 000
400, 000
400, 000

$300, 000
44, 800, 000
40, 000, 000
39,167, 000
2, 000, 000
2, 200, 000

400, 000
200, 000
100, 000

2, 000, 000
1, 062, 000
400, 000

$103, 500
1,196, 500
2, 597,209

$260,000
41,055, 500
169, 765

5, 599, 578

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward

3,897,209

41, 485,265

- 3 , 514, 011
-223,850
47,138,283

-47,138,283

-43,241,074

43,241,074

1,755,809

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

51
1
43
45

46
1
25
40

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

108, 929,000
131, 929, 000

49,000,000

1. Design, specifications, and supervision.—Plans for the
new headquarters installation are to be completed in
calendar year 1958.
2. Construction of building.—-Contracts for construction are to be awarded during 1958 under funds appropriated in prior years totaling $54,500,000. The installation is expected to be ready for occupancy in 1961.
3. Construction of roads.—Up to $8,500,000 of the
$54,500,000 is available to the Department of the Interior,
the Department of Commerce, and the National Capital
Planning Commission for extension of the George Washington Memorial Parkway to the headquarters site.
Construction of the parkway extension was begun in
1956 and is expected to be complete in 1959.

23,000,000

131, 929, 000

-11,929,000

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

120, 000, 000

Under proposed legislation, 1959.—New obligational
authority in the amount of $120 million will be requested
in a supplemental transmission after congressional consideration of the Commission's request for authorization
of appropriations. Available unobligated balances have
been applied in determining the appropriation to be
requested. Of the $131.9 million of total obligations
anticipated, $84.8 million is expected to be proposed for
improvements and additions to existing production plants
which will increase production and safety and decrease
unit costs, and for additional weapons production and
development facilities. Proposed also are $20 million
for construction of a naval land-based prototype reactor
suitable for use in a destroyer, $19.2 million for other




$19,996
26, 556
5, 553,026

Total obligations

Proposed for later transmission:
ACQUISITION

1959 estimate

super-

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

PLANT

1958 estimate

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services..
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services.
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Lands and structures.
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations

Obligations are distributed as follows:
General Services Administration
National Park Service, Department of
the Interior.
...
Bureau of Public Roads, Department
of Commerce
...
National Capital Planning Commission.

51
1
26
42
6.8

$4,907

6.8

$4, 949

6. 7

$5,043

$129,476
1,937
7,712

$227, 609
2, 900
10,800

$130, 900
2, 900
10, 780

139,125
865
683
1,086
2,351
2,401
117,367
6,185
5, 058
5,324, 457

241, 309
15, 500
7,500
7, 500
7, 500
67, 700
303,600
25, 400
1, 000
3,206, 500
13,700

144, 580
9, 000
1, 000
1,000
1,000
6,000
251, 685
5, 000
2,000
41,055, 500
8, 500

5, 599, 578

3. 897,209

41, 485,265

$41,315, 500

$46, 552

$1, 300, 000

5,034,171

2, 099, 509

198, 855
320, 000

497, 700

169,765

INDEPENDENT

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses, including not to
exceed $22,000 for services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); not to exceed $10,000 for medical
examinations performed for veterans by private physicians on a fee
basis; not to exceed $100 for the purchase of newspapers and periodicals (excluding scientific, technical, trade or traffic periodicals, for
official use); payment in advance for library membership in societies
whose publications are available to members only or to members at
a price lower than to the general public; not to exceed $70,000 for
performing the duties imposed upon the Commission by the Act of
July 19, 1940 (54 Stat. 767); reimbursement of the General Services
Administration for security guard services for protection of confidential files; not to exceed $508,000 for expenses of travel; and not
to exceed $5,000 for actuarial services by contract, without regard
to section 3709, Revised Statues, as amended; [$18,300,000]
$18,420,000.
No part of the appropriations herein made to the Civil Service
Commission shall be available for the salaries and expenses of th.3
Legal Examining Unit in the Examining and Personnel Utilization
Division of the Commission, established pursuant to Executive
Order 9358 of July 1, 1943. (5 U. S. C. 22-1, 631-642, 652, 654,
851-869, 901-958, 1010; Supp. 740b-740i, 1051-1052,
1071-1133,
1151, 2001-2007, 2061-2066, 2121-2123, 2251-2267; 39 U. S. C.
31a and b; Supp. 962; 40 U. S. C. 42; Supp. 491; 50 U. S. C. App.
459; 65 Stat. 757; 66 Stat. 122; 70 Stat. 291, 721; Executive Orders
10000, Sept. 16, 1948; 10182, Nov. 21, 1950; 10242, May 18, 1951;
10422, Jan. 9, 1953; 10450, Apr. 27, 1953; 10452, May 1, 1953;
10530, May 10, 1954; 10540, June 29, 1954; 10552, Aug. 10, 1954;
10590, Jan 18, 1955; 10647, Nov. 28, 1955; Independent Offices
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $18,300,000

Estimate 1959, $18,420,000

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$5,813,994

$6,075,042

$6,090,000

3,461,822
2,363,347

3,699,000
2,323,000

3,710,000
2,320,000

1,669, 216
1,437,378

1,792,000
1, 655, 000

1,965,000
1, 660,000

1,128, 255

1,200,000

1,130,000

1,560,590

1,557,000

1,545,000

17, 434,602

18,301,042

18,420,000

-35,753

-1,042

17,398,849

18,300,000

18,420,000

17,437,045

18,300,000

18, 420,000

$17,407, 500

$18,300, 000

$18,420,000

18,300,000

18,420,000

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Recruiting and examining
2. Investigation of character and fitness
for employment
3. Inspections and classification audits. _
4. Administration of the retirement systems
5. Developing programs and standards.
6. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory
functions
_ ___
7. Executive and administrative services
Total program costs
8. Relation of costs to obligations: Costs
financed from obligations of other
years (unpaid undelivered orders),
net (_)
Total program (obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
New obligational authority
New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Transferred from "Investigations of
United States citizens for employment by international organizations"
(31 U. S. C. 697)
Appropriation (adjusted)

38,196

29, 545
17,437,045

1. Recruiting and examining.—Most appointments in
the competitive civil service are made under the open
competitive merit system through examinations held by
the office of the Commission and its boards of examiners,
made up of agency personnel operating under the supervision and direction of the Commission. Appointments
through such competitive examinations will accord career
or career-conditional status. While total new hires in
Government will be fewer in 1959 than in 1957 or 1958,
the number of competitive placements is expected to
increase as the amount of direct agency hiring continues




OFFICES

125

to decline. Physically handicapped persons are given
special placement attention. Veterans are aided in
securing the benefits to which they are entitled. An employees' incentive awards program is conducted to stimulate the development of new and improved methods and
ideas.
Production count
Examinations announced by—
The Commission
Boards of examiners

1957 actual 1958 estimate 1959 estimate
11,755
14,784

648,400
1,053, 200

559,100
1,233,500

1, 701,600

1,792,600

103,261
157, 666

97,400
159,600

81,100
185,900

260,927

Total

26,700

1,735,446

Total

26,300

712,026
1,023,420

Placements made by—
The Commission
Boards of examiners

9,000
17,700

26,539

Total
Applications processed by—
The Commission
Boards of examiners

10,400
15,900

257,000

267,000

2. Investigation oj character andjitnessjor employment.—
The Commission conducts most of the investigations required for security determinations of persons being employed in sensitive positions and fitness investigations of
all persons entering nonsensitive positions. The Commission also conducts other investigations connected with
appeals and the merit system.
Production count
National agency check and inquiry cases
Limited security investigations
Other personal investigations

1957 actual
334,243
6,354
5,961

1958 estimate
301,000
6,800
7,140

1959 estimate
301,000
6,875
6,840

3. Inspections and classijication audits.—The Commission inspects agency personnel operations to insure compliance with civil service laws and regulations and to stimulate improvement in personnel practices. It also conducts
classification surveys to insure compliance with classification standards.
4. Administration of the retirement systems.—Administering the Civil Service Retirement Act and other benefit acts
involves adjudicating annuity, death, benefit, refund, and
service credit claims as well as maintaining the control accounts for the fund and making payments to annuitants
and other claimants. Public Law 854, approved July 31,
1956, liberalizing benefits under the Retirement Act, has
resulted in substantial increases in the volume of work
processed.
Production count
Annuity and death claims
Rpfund claims
Service credit claims
Inquiries answered

1956
actual
64,909
182,614
24,840
192,332

1957
actual
80,621
201,087
30,536
224,203

1958
estimate
87,200
202,920
36,520
219,600

1959
estimate
93,490
205,170
35,450
232,560

5. Developing programs and standards.—The Commission develops programs, devises tests, issues standards and
regulations, and proposes legislation to improve the Federal personnel system for both competitive and noncompetitive positions.
6. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory junctions.—These
consist of the formulation of rules and regulations, hearing
and taking action on appeals, and the administration of
the political-activities statutes.
8. Relation oj costs to obligations.—The year-end balances of unpaid undelivered orders are as follows: 1956,
$136,795; 1957, $101,042; 1958, $100,000; 1959, $100,000.
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of employees __
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

2,910
5
2,805
2,823

2,920
2
2.814
2.815

2,990
9
2,799
2,808
6.9

$5,253

7.0

$5,273

7.0

$5,288

126

T H E B U D G E T F O R , FISCAL Y E A R 1959

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES—Continued

Object Classification—Continued
1958 estimate

1957 actual
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

1959 estimate

_

$14,823, 443
38,457
287,815

$15,011,058
28,248
74,494

$15,043,937
16, 563
74,500

Total personal services
Travel
...
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
___
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment—
_
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments
...

15,149, 715
444, 932
61, 417
579,148
68, 573
436, 513
191,987
131, 407
232,818
89, 476
10,159
2,704

15,113,800
462,000
62,000
583,000
78,000
428,000
193, 400
130, 600
229,000
71,000
936,000
10, 200
3,000

15,135,000
472,000
62,000
583,000
78,000
428,000
230, 700
138, 300
244,000
71, 000
975,000

17,398,849

18,300,000

1. Investigations.—The Civil Service Commission and
the Federal Bureau of Investigation have been conducting
investigations of United States citizens considered for
employment in international organizations of which the
United States Government is a member. In 1959 the
Commission will take over most of the investigations which
formerly were conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The reports of these investigations are forwarded to the International Organizations Employees
Loyalty Board of the Civil Service Commission which
makes advisory determinations under the loyalty standard. The advisory determinations are transmitted,
through the Secretary of State, to the Secretary General of
the United Nations or the executive heads of other international organizations.
2. Relation of costs to obligations.—The year-end balances of unpaid undelivered orders are as follows: 1956,
$30,090; 1957, $19,796; 1958, $21,300; 1959, $31,700.

18,420,000

02
03
04
05
06
07

Total obligations

3,000

Object Classification
1957 actual

INVESTIGATIONS

OF UNITED
STATES
INTERNATIONAL

CITIZENS
FOR EMPLOYMENT
ORGANIZATIONS

BY

[Investigations of United States citizens for employment by
international organizations:] For expenses necessary to carry out
the provisions of Executive Order No. 10422 of January 9, 1953, as
amended, prescribing procedures for making available to the
Secretary General of the United Nations, and the executive heads
of other international organizations, certain information concerning
United States citizens employed, or being considered for employment by such organizations, including services as authorized by
section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), [$491,800]
$383,000: Provided, That this appropriation shall be available for
advances or reimbursements to the applicable appropriations or
funds of the Civil Service Commission and the Federal Bureau of
Investigation for expenses incurred by such agencies under said
Executive order: Provided further, That members of the International Organizations Employees Loyalty Board may be paid
actual transportation expenses, and per diem in lieu of subsistence
authorized by the Travel Expense Act of 1949, as amended, while
traveling on official business away from their homes or regular
places of business, including periods while en route to and from and
at the place where their services are to be performed: Provided
further, That nothing in sections 281 or 283 of title 18, United
States code, or in section 190 of the Revised Statutes (5 U. S. C. 99)
shall be deemed to apply to any person because of appointment for
part-time or intermittent service as a member of the International
Organizations Employees Loyalty Board in the Civil Service Commission as established by Executive Order 10422, dated January 9,
1953, as amended. (.Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $491,800

Estimate 1959, $383,000

Program by activities:
1. Investigations (total costs) _
2. Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations
of other years (unpaid undelivered orders), net (—)
Obligations incurred for costs
of other years (unpaid undelivered orders), net

$434,101

1958 estimate

Average GS grade and salary
01

423,807

$490,296

$372,600

10,400

491,800

383,000

34,148

New obligational authority
New obligational authority:
Appropriation
_ _
Transferred to "Salaries and expenses,"
Civil Service Commission (31XJ. S. C.
697)
Appropriation (adjusted)




457,955

491,800

383,000

$487,500

$491,800

$383, 000

491,800

383,000

—29, 545
457,955

6
2
8
13

02
04
06
07
08
11

7.0

$5,273

7.0

$5,288

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$43,470
16,000
230

$43, 470
16,000
230

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services __
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Grants, subsidies, and contributions.

59, 700
10,000
600
200
1, 600
416, 700
100
2,900

59, 700
10,000
600
200
1,600
307,900
100
2,900

491,800

383,000

Total obligations

ANNUITIES,

$423,807

423,807

PANAMA
CANAL
CONSTRUCTION
EMPLOYEES
LIGHTHOUSE
SERVICE
WIDOWS

AND

[Annuities, Panama Canal construction employees and Lighthouse Service widows:] For payment of annuities authorized by the
Act of May 29, 1944, as amended (48 U. S. C. 1373a), and the Act
of August 19, 1950 (64 Stat. 465), [$2,360,000] $2,328,000.
(Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $2,360,000

1959 estimate

1, 504

Total program (obligations)..

6
2
8
13

Estimate 1959, $2,328,000

Program and Financing

-10,294

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Payment of annuities to employees
engaged in construction of the
Panama Canal
2. Payment of benefits to widows of
former employees of the Lighthouse Service.
Total program (costs—obligations).
Financing:
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

$2,269,433

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,115,000

$2,078,000

254, 567

245,000

250,000

2, 524, 000

2,360,000

2,328,000

2, 524,000

2,360,000

2,328,000

Annuities are paid to persons who were employed on
the construction of the Panama Canal or to their widows,
and benefits are paid to widows of former employees of
the Lighthouse Service.
Panama Canal annuitants
Lighthouse Service widows.—

June 80,1957 June 30,1958 June 30,1959
2,416
2,251
2,076
400
400
400

INDEPENDENT
Object Classification

OFFICES

127

Intragovernmental funds:

1957 actual

1958 estimate

INVESTIGATIONS

1959 estimate

Program and Financing
12

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims

PAYMENT

TO

CIVIL

SERVICE

$2,524,000

$2,328,000

$2,360,000

AND

DISABILITY

FUND

1957 actual

Financing:
Appropriation
thority)

(new obligational
-

au-

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

525, 000,000

Object Classification

Grants, subsidies, and contributions__

$12,003,083
-5,795
-87,145

$9,880,000

$9,945,000

-119,750

-122,250

Total operating costs
Adjustment of cost included above
not requiring funding

11,910,143

9,760,250

9,822,750

11, 915, 938

9,760,250

9,822,750

152,369

250,000

50,000

Program by activities:
Operating costs:
Cost of services performed
Net gain (—) from sale of fixed assetsDepreciation included above (—)

5,795

without

-146

Total capital outlay, funded

Beginning in July 1957, agencies pay to the fund an
amount equal to deductions from employees' salaries—
6.5% of the covered payroll. Since the total of these
receipts exceeds the payments from the fund, no governmentwide appropriation is received for 1959.
Financial statements of the civil service retirement and
disability fund are printed in part III of the budget.

11

1959 estimate

Capital outlay:
Acquisition of equipment
Property transferred in
charge (—)

$525,000, 000

1957 actual

1958 estimate

Total operating costs, funded

RETIREMENT

Program and Financing

Program by activities:
Payment of Government share of retirement (total costs—obligations)

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$525,000,000

152,223

250,000

50, 000

Total program costs, funded
Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations of other
years, net (—)
.
...
Obligations incurred for costs of other
years, net
.

12, 068,161

10,010,250

9,872,750

Total program (obligations)

11, 758,463

-309,698
212,189

Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Revenue
and receipts:
Sale of equipment
Sales of services
. . .
_______
Increase or decrease (—) in accepted
orders on hand

5,795
12,006,876
-351,227

LIMITATION

ON ADMINISTRATIVE
INSURANCE

EXPENSES,
FUND

EMPLOYEES'

LIFE

[Administrative expenses, employees' life insurance f u n d : ! Not
to exceed $123,800 of the funds in the "Employees' Life Insurance
Fund" shall be available for reimbursement to the Civil Service
Commission for administrative expenses incurred by the Commission during the current fiscal year in the administration of the
Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Act. ( 5 U. S. C. 2091•
2103, 68 Stat. 743, Aug. 17, 1954, as amended; Independent Offices
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$115,990

$123,800

$123,800

115,990

123,800

123,800

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Administration (total program obligations).
Financing:
Limitation

Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$113, 980
2,010

$123,800

$123,800

115,990

123,800

123,800

1957 actual
07
09

Other contractual services.. _
Equipment .
Total obligations




9~880~666~

9,"945,"606

Total amount becoming available.
Unobligated balance brought forward...

11,661, 444
3, 711, 579

Total amounts available
Capital transfer (payment of earnings
to Treasury) ( — ) . . .
...
Unobligated balance carried forward

15,373,023

13, 719,889

13,470,362

-7,071
- 3 , 607, 489

- 9 , 588
-3,487,862

- 3 , 570,112

11, 758, 463

10,222,439

9,900,250

37, 500
9, 982, 500
3, 487, 862

This fund finances on a reimbursable basis, full field
security investigations performed at the request of other
departments and agencies of the Government (66 Stat.
107). The capital of the fund consists of $4 million
appropriated in 1952.
Budget program.—Because work on some investigations
will be started in one fiscal year and completed in another,
work-in-process is recognized as an asset of the fund.
Agency estimates of investigations to be requested in 1958
and 1959 as compared to 1957 experience are presented
below. In addition, the table relates estimated workload
receipts to estimates of production, average positions, and
unit costs.
CASELOAD, AVERAGE POSITIONS,

Administration of the Federal Employees9 Group Life
Insurance Act.—This limitation covers expenses incurred
by the Civil Service Commission in the administration of
the Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Act (5
U. S. C. 2091-2103; 68 Stat. 743, Aug. 17, 1954, as
amended). The use of the limitation is reflected in the
schedule for "Advances and reimbursements."
Financial statements relating to the employees' life
insurance fund are printed in part III of the budget.

9,900,250

232,400
10,112,400
3, 607, 489

Financing applied to program

Trust funds:

27, 500

10,222,439

On hand, beginning of year..
Received

AND UNIT

1957 actual
11,199
46,984

COSTS

1958 estimate
6,788
36,000

1959 estimate
4,788
38,750

Total workload..
Processed

58,183
51,395

42, 788
38,000

43, 538
38,250

On hand, end of year..

6,788

4,788

5, 288

Average positions..
Unit cost

1,512
$239

1,425
$260

1,375
$260

The estimated increase in costs for 1958 and 1959
results to a great extent from the contributions to the
retirement fund beginning in July 1957.
Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship is derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
reflected in the following table:
Selected resources at end of year:
Advances
Work-in-process
Unpaid undelivered orders
Deferred charges

actual
$50,860
477,926
37,645
177

Total selected resources at end of year..
Selected resources at start of year (—)

566,608

Costs financed from obligations of other years, net (—).
Obligations incurred for costs of other years, net

1957
actual
$65,629
126,699
64,582

256, 910
-566,608

1958
estimate
$60,000
359,099
50,000

1959
estimate
$50,000
396, 599
50, 000

469,099
-256,910

496, 599
-469,099

212,189

27,500

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

128

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION—Continued

Object Classification

Intragovernmental funds—Continued
INVESTIGATIONS—Continued

Operating results.—Net earnings each year are paid into
Treasury the following year.

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Full-time equivalent of all other employees.
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$152, 223
11, 564, 711
65, 965

$250, 000
9, 992,650
322,932

$50, 000
9, 860, 250
89, 517

11, 782, 899

10, 565, 582

9, 999, 767

Receipts from operations (funds provided):
Revenue
Proceeds from sales of equipment

12,006, 876
5,795

9, 880,000

9, 945,000

05
06
07
08
09

Total receipts from operations

12, 012, 671

9, 880, 000

9, 945, 000

11
15

-229, 772

685, 582

54, 767

1957 actual
Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Acquisition of equipment
Expense.
Increase in selected working capital. .
Total gross expenditures

Budget expenditures

02
03
04

$9,880,000
9,880, 000

40,000

10,000

7,344
-1, 549

40,000
-40,000

10,000
-10,000

1,600
1,425
15
1,375

1,425
1,375
15
1,350

7.0

$5,273

7.0

$5,288

$7,773,358
87, 649
1, 405,080

$7,281, 200
57, 600
240, 300

$7,177, 500
57, 600
235, 500

9, 266, 087
1, 597, 346
58, 717
87,098
27, 869
89,131
103, 761
217, 667
125,753
152, 223
1,520
3, 062
1, 292

7, 579,100
1,338,321
44,800
66, 400
21, 300
68,100
79,150
209, 750
95, 950
250,000
1,200
481, 950
1, 000

7, 470, 600
1, 315, 450
45, 050
66, 800
21, 400
68, 450
79, 500
209, 500
96, 500
50,000
1,200
474, 800
1,000

11, 731, 526

10, 237, 021

9, 900, 250

26,937

- 1 4 , 582

11, 758, 463

10, 222,439

9,900,250

$9, 945, 000
9, 945, 000

5,795
1,549

$5,253

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
__ __
Rents and utility services
...
Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Expendable
... _
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Taxes and assessments

Total obligations

$12,006,670
12, 003,083

1959 estimate

1,600
1,512
22
1, 597
6. 9

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

Total accrued expenditures
Increase or decrease (—) in undelivered
orders
_

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Revenue..
Expense..

1958 estimate

1957 actual

Net operating income, sales program.
Nonoperating income:
Sale of equipment:
Proceeds from sale..
Trade-in allowanceTotal sale price
Net book value of assets sold (—)_

ADVANCES

5,795
206

Net gain from sale..
Miscellaneous
Total nonoperating income..

9,588

Retained earnings, end of year

9, 588

7,071
-7,071

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing

9,588

Financial Condition

$3,767,636
1, 203, 948
65,629
126,699
271,888

$3, 072,466
1, 235,000
60,000
359,099
402,138

$3,017,699
1,243,125
50,000
396,599
329,888

5,435,800

5,128, 703

5,037,311

Total assets
liabilities:
Current

1,426, 212

1,128, 703

1, 037,311

Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital
Retained earnings
_

4, 000,000
9, 588

4, 000, 000
4,000,000

$208,750

$208,750

113,980
11,441

123,800
6,350

123,800
6,350

422,034

338,900

338,900

415, 472

338,900

338,900

338,900

338,900

65

65

62
62

62
62

$7,724

7,892
31
5,523

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts
__ _
Non-Federal sources:
Proceeds from sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481(c))
Repayment of lump sum payments
(5 U. S. C. 61(b))

4,000,000

5,523

4, 000, 000

4,009,588

1959 estimate

275,443

Total obligations

Assets:
Cash with Treasury
Accounts receivable, net
Advances
Work-in-process
Equipment, net

1958 estimate

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Recruiting and examining
2. Investigation of character and fitness
for employment
.
4. Administration of the retirement systems. _
_
5. Developing programs and standards. _
6. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory
functions _
7. Executive and administrative services. _
__
8. Proceeds from sales of personal property
_ _ _ __

6,001

Net income for the year..
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of year..
Payment of earnings to Treasury (—)_

AND

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual

Unobligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
U n p a i d undelivered
orders
.
Accounts receivable,
net ( - )
A c c e p t e d orders on
hand ( - )
Total obligated balance.
Unobligated balance




422,034

Total financing

Total Government investment

Unexpended balance:
Cash with Treasury

1,039

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$3, 544,935

$3, 767,636

$3,072,466

$3,017,699

1,235,481

1,426, 212

1,128,703

1,037,311

37,645

64,582

50,000

50,000

-961,844

-1,203,948

-1,235,000

-1,243,125

- 4 7 7 , 926

-126,699

-359,099

-396, 599

-166,644

160,147

-415,396

-552,413

3, 711, 579

3,607,489

3,487,862

3,570,112

Object Classification
75
2
71
70

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

Total personal services
02 Travel...
03 Transportation of things .
04 Communication services
.
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services. _
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Total obligations

6.9

$5, 253

7.0

$5, 273

7.0

$5,288

$370,675
706

$297, 700
1,100

$297, 200
1,100

371,381
18,049
29
6, 082
5, 915
7,907
5,228
1, 920
5,523

298,800
1,000

298,300
1,000

6, 000
5, 500
7,700

6,000
5, 500
7,700

1,000

1,000

18,900

19, 400

422, 034

338, 900

338,900

I N D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

129

COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS
SALARIES

AND

Object Classification
1957 actual

EXPENSES

For expenses necessary for the Commission on Civil Rights, including
expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purpose of this
appropriation, $750,000.
Estimate 1959, $750,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Program by activities:
Investigation and study of civil rights
matters (total obligations)

1959 estimate

$750,000

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11

Personal services: Positions other
than permanent
Travel
Transportation
Communication services
Rents and utility services.
Printing and reproduction.
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials.
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..

49, 071

8,105
913
553
996
581
011

44,
7,
8,
2,

1957 actual

COMMISSION ON INCREASED INDUSTRIAL USE
OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS
Current authorizations:
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Preparation of recommendations to
bring about increased industrial use
of agricultural products (total obligations)...
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

Object Classification
1958 estimate

other

$590,000
40.000
5,000
8.000
8,000
40, 000
40,000
10, 000
5, 000
4,000
750,000

Total obligations.

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1959 estimate

Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Number of employees end of year

COMMISSION ON GOVERNMENT SECURITY
Current authorizations:
SALARIES AND

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

Program by activities:
Study of Government security program
(total obligations)

$614,988

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward.
Unobligated balance no longer available.

-135, 233
152, 745

21,149
150,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

02
03
04
06
07

Personal services:
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

:9, 222
269
49, 491
55, 641
14
1, 447
6, 754
2,128
12, 422
118
200
636
128, 851

1959 estimate

103,674

632, 500

$128,851

1957 actual

Total obligations
1957 actual

1959 estimate

Object Classification

08
13
15

EXPENSES

1958 estimate

On June 15, 1957, the Commission reported to Congress
specific recommendations to bring about the greatest
practical use for industrial purposes of agricultural products not needed for human or animal consumption.

01

152, 745

New obligational authority

3, 826

$41,432
1,936
114
2,788
100
1,433
577
54
-15
543
109

614,988

15 Taxes and assessments..

$505,972
33,031

750,000

The Commission on Civil Rights is responsible for
investigating allegations made that citizens are being
deprived of their right to vote by reason of their color,
race, religion, or national origin; collecting information
concerning legal developments constituting a denial of
equal protection of the laws under the Constitution; and
appraising laws and policies of the Federal Government
on equal protection of the laws. The Commission's final
report to the President and Congress is due by September
9, 1959. The Commission ceases to exist 60 days after
submission of its final report.

01 Personal services: Positions
than permanent
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
15 Taxes and assessments

1959 estimate

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year..

Total obligations.

Financing:
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

$49,071

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AUDITORIUM
COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES AND E X P E N S E S

New obligational authority:
Appropriation
Reappropriation

$632, 500

Program and Financing
$152,745
1957 actual

The Commission submitted a report to the President
and the Congress on June 21, 1957, and has ceased to exist.
440000^-58




9

Program by activities:
Formulation of plans for construction of
auditorium (total obligations)

$94,674

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

130

T H E B U D G E T FOR, FISCAL Y E A R 1959

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AUDITORIUM
COMMISSION—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
SALARIES

AND

Program and Financing—Continued

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority) _

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$55, 326

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
$6, 225
1,648
961
317
8, 769
76, 635
119

EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF WASHINGTON
Public enterprise funds:
OF W A S H I N G T O N

FUND

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$439, 615, 674
55, 296,147
69, 896, 800
500,000,000

$519,000,000
130, 000, 000
194, 000, 000
60,000,000

$496, 000,000
90, 000, 000
130, 000,000

155, 974
2, 353, 200

4, 000,000
2, 000,000
4,000, 000

26, 000,000
11,000,000
13,000, 000

-

1, 642, 345
34, 728

1, 900, 000
48,000

Total, administrative expenses
Purchase of equipment
Interest on borrowings from Treasury-

1, 677,073
29, 776
23,184, 584

1, 948,000
30, 000
31,198,125

2,101,000
20, 000
42,176, 750

1,123, 784, 040

966,176,125

825, 297, 750

265, 052, 835
85, 407, 768
32, 945
79, 092, 386

300, 713, 738
95, 453,125
20,000
76, 263,983

395, 470,175
109,424, 750
16, 000
131, 288, 716

429, 585, 934

472, 450, 846

636,199, 641

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Loan and guaranty program:
Direct loan commitments:
Development project loans
Exporter loans
Commodity loans
Emergency foreign trade loans-...
Guaranteed loan commitments:
Development project loans
Exporter loans
...
Commodity loans
Total, loan and guaranty program Insurance.-Administrative expenses:
Subject to limitation
Other

Total program (obligations)
Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Collection of loans
Interest income from loans
Insurance premiums
Recovery of prior-year obligations
Total amounts becoming available..




1, 795, 529,165

1, 443,052, 681

- 2 2 , 500, 000

- 2 2 , 500, 000

- 2 2 , 500, 000

-1,323,078,319

-806,853,040

-595,254,931

966,176,125

825,297, 750

Unused authority
1

1957 actual
$5,000,000,000

1958 estimate
$5,000,000,000

1959 estimate
$5,000,000,000

2,603,144,015
1,535,632,561
3,456,941

3,063,278,171
1,631,980, 720
3,000,000

3,211,920,544
1,738,079,456
2,500,000

4,142,233,517

4,698,258,891

4,952, 500,000

857,766,483

Total charges against authority...

The following corporation is hereby authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available to such corporation, and in accord with law, and to make such
contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations
as provided by section 104 of the Government Corporation Control
Act, as amended, as may be necessary in carrying out the programs
set forth in the budget for the fiscal year [1958J 1959 for such
corporation, except as hereinafter provided: {Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)

BANK

$806, 853,040

2, 469, 362, 359

The Export-Import Bank is a Government-owned
corporation which facilitates the financing of exports
and imports. To do this it participates in or guarantees credits extended by U. S. exporters, commercial
banks, and other financial institutions to foreign purchasers of exports from the United States. It makes
direct loans to finance U. S. exports and imports. It also
insures certain exports against risks of war and expropriation. At present, the total amount of loans, guaranties,
and insurance which the Bank may have outstanding at
one time is $5 billion (12 U. S. C. 635).
As the following table shows, it is estimated that the
Bank's uncommitted lending authority will be reduced to
$300 million by the end of 1958 and will be virtually
exhausted by the end of 1959.

CORPORATIONS

EXPORT-IMPORT

1959 estimate

1,123, 784,040

Statutory authority
Charges against authority: Loans outstanding
Undisbursed loan commitments
Unexpired insurance policies
_.

94, 674

Total obligations

1958 estimate

150. 000

Object Classification

other

Total amounts available
Capital transfers (payment of dividends
to Treasury (—))
Unobligated balance carried forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
Financing applied to program

The Commission has completed its assignment by presenting a report to the President and the Congress. Legislation is pending which would rename the Commission and
direct it to develop a national cultural center. No funds
are requested pending action on this legislation.

01 Personal services: Positions
than permanent
02 Travel
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials

1957 actual

Financing:—Continued
Unobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
$2,039, 776, 425 $1,323,078,319

EXPENSES—Continued

1957 actual

Program and Financing—Continued

301,741,109

1 47,500,000

Reserved for insurance.

To finance future operations as well as to maintain a
prudent current reserve of authority to meet emergencies
which may arise, legislation will be requested in 1958 to
raise the limit on the Bank's lending and borrowing authority by $2 billion. This request is shown below in a separate schedule.
The Bank's policy is to extend credit only when private
capital is unavailable. It encourages private participation in the credits extended. Loans generally are made
only for specific transactions or projects. No loan is made
unless the Directors believe it has reasonable assurance of
repayment.
Budget program—Development project loans.—A major
portion of the Bank's assistance for the exportation of
U. S. materials, equipment, and services continues to be
in the form of medium and longer term credits for development projects abroad. These loans not only finance export sales, but lay the foundation for expanded future
trade as foreign economies become stronger. It is estimated that 86 loans will be authorized or guaranteed by
the Bank during 1959 to finance exports for such projects
abroad involving power, agriculture, transportation, and
industrial development
DATA ON DEVELOPMENT PROJECT LOANS

[In millions]
1957 actual
Export-Import Bank funds:
Credit authorizations in the year
$439. 8
Loan disbursements in the year
145.3
Loan principal repayments in the y e a r . 8 5 . 1
Loans outstanding June 30
1,042. 2
Guaranteed loans:
Credit authorizations in the year
Loan disbursements in the year
Loan principal repayments in the year...
5.6
Loans outstanding June 30.
_
18.0

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$519.0
254. 4
106.4
1,190.1

$496.0
343.9
111.7
1,422.3

4.0
2.0
1.0
19.1

26.0
18.0
2.1
34.9

131

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

Exporter loans.—Credits requested by exporters are authorized on a case-by-case basis to assist U. S. manufacturers and exporters to sell abroad on deferred payments.
Such loans authorized in 1957 included credits to finance
a wide range of capital goods shipped to countries throughout the world.
The Bank has continued to establish credit lines for
individual exporters of capital equipment. The recipient
of such a line knows in advance of new foreign sales how
much assistance he will be able to obtain for such sales as
are made on credit, provided that the Bank's criteria on
the type of export and the credit standing of the importer
are met.
DATA ON EXPORTER

LOANS

[In millions]
1957 actual
Export-Import Bank funds:
Credit authorizations in the year
Loan disbursements in the year
Loan principal repayments in the year
Loans outstanding June 30
Guaranteed loans:
Credit authorizations in the year
Loan disbursements in the year
Loan principal repayments in the year
Loans outstanding June 30
.

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$55.3
23.6
8. 4
44.3

$130.0
64.0
11.9
96.4

$90.0
66. 7
15. 2
148.0

.2
.5
1. 7
4.3

2.0
1.8
1. 7
4.4

11.0
7.0
1. 7
9.6

Commodity loans.—Credits are authorized by the Bank
to finance the sale abroad of U. S. commodities such as
cotton, wheat, barley, soybeans, or tobacco, involving
medium term financing for periods of from 9 months to
several years not available from private credit sources.
DATA ON COMMODITY

LOANS

[In millions]
Export-Import Bank funds:
Loan authorizations in the year
Loan disbursements in the year
Loan principal repayments in the year
Loans outstanding June 30
Guaranteed loans:
Loan authorizations in the year
Loan disbursements in the year
Loan principal repayments in the year
Loans outstanding June 30

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$69. 9
60.7
55.1
60. 5

$194.0
132. 4
60. 4
132.6

$130.0
105. 4
140.1
97.8

2.3
2.9
5.8
3.1

4.0
2.0
3.1
2.0

13.0
9.0
2.0
9.0

Emergency foreign trade loans.—From time to time the
Bank is called upon to provide financial assistance to
meet emergency situations adversely affecting normal
trade between the United States and another country.
Such loans may take the form of lines of credit to a
foreign central bank or other bank or financial institution
to provide dollar exchange for a wide range of United
States exports, credits to fund commercial arrearages
resulting from dollar exchange difficulties, or credits to
assist in financing purchases in the United States required
for reconstruction abroad following a national disaster.
In 1957 a $500 million credit was authorized to the
United Kingdom, secured by collateral, to meet, if needed,
dollar requirements for goods and services to be obtained
in the United States. The estimate of emergency credits
for 1958 is $60 million. Emergency credits in i959 will
be financed out of the $2 billion increase in authority proposed for later transmission.
Substantial emergency credits to European countries
were disbursed during the years immediately following
World War II. Payments of principal and interest on
these loans are being received promptly.
DATA ON EMERGENCY FOREIGN TRADE LOANS

property of United States exporters which is held abroad
on consignment awaiting sale. A total of 759 policies
were issued by the Bank in 1957 covering 183,637 bales
of cotton valued at $31,574,812. It is estimated that
policies covering cotton to a value of $15,000,000 will be
issued in 1959.
Other operations.—Beginning in 1958, the Bank will
make loans in certain foreign currencies to private firms
for economic development and trade expansion. The
foreign currencies will become available as part of the
proceeds of U. S. surplus agricultural commodity sales
abroad (71 Stat. 345).1
The Bank also serves as administering agent for mutual
security loans and guaranties against currency transfer
risk and expropriation authorized by the International
Cooperation Administration and for defense production
loans made by the Office of Defense Mobilization. It also
acts as collecting agent for the Treasury on the debt
settlement agreement with the Federal Republic of
Germany.
Administrative expenses.-—The limitation proposed by
the Bank to cover its needs for administrative expenses in
1959 is $2,055,000, an increase of $155,000 over 1958. In
addition, foreign currencies equivalent to $200,000 are
requested to cover costs incurred abroad in making loans
of foreign currencies to private firms (71 Stat. 345).1
Operating results and financial condition.—During the
coining fiscal year the net income of the Bank is expected
to amount to $65.1 million, of which $22.5 million will be
paid to the Treasury as a dividend, and the remainder
added to the Bank's retained earnings. Net investment
of the Government in the corporation is expected to be
$3,185.5 million at the end of 1959, consisting of $1
billion in capital stock, $1,637.6 million of borrowings
from Treasury, and $547.9 million of retained earnings,
available for future contingencies.
It is anticipated that the Bank's loan disbursements
and other payments will exceed loan collections and
other receipts by $399.9 million in the current fiscal year.
However, in the budget year 1959 heavy repayments of
short term commodity loans will reduce the net budget
expenditure to $57 million.
i These foreign currencies are set forth in detail in special schedules below.
Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Loan and guaranty program:
Acquisition of loans
. ...
Acquisition of equipment
ExpenseReimbursable expense
Insurance program: Expense
..
Increase in selected working capital

$230, 985,117
29, 776
24, 849, 267
25, 369
12, 391
936, 498

$760, 829,149
30,000
33,138,125
20, 400
8, 000
2,129, 748

$516, 000, 000
20, 000
44, 271, 750
25,000
6, 000
1, 613, 500

Total gross expenditures..-

256, 838, 418

796,155, 422

561, 936, 250

265, 052, 835
85,407, 768
25,369
32, 945

300, 713, 738
95, 453,125
20, 400
20, 000

395, 470, 175
109, 424, 750
25, 000
16, 000

350, 518, 917

396, 207, 263

504, 935, 925

- 9 3 , 680, 499

399, 948,159

57, 000, 325

_ ...

Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Loan and guaranty program:
Loans repaid
_ __ .
Revenue
_ _ ...
...
Reimbursement of expense
.. _
Insurance program: revenue. . . .
Total receipts from operations._ _
Budget expenditures

.

[In millions]
Export-Import Bank funds:
Credit authorizations in the year
Loan disbursements in the year
Loan principal repayments in the year
Loans outstanding June 30

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$500. 0

$60.0
310.0
122. 0
1, 618. 7

$128. 5
1,490. 2

116. 4
1,430. 7

Insurance.—Besides its lending operations, the Bank
insures against the risks of war and expropriation the




Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Loan and guaranty program:
Revenue
.. . . .
Expense....
_
Net operating income, loan and
guaranty program _ .

$85, 407, 768
24, 862, 350

$95, 453, 125
33,153,125

$109, 424, 750
44, 286, 750

60, 545, 418

62, 300, 000

65,138, 000

132

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF WASHINGTON—Con.
Public enterprise funds—Continued
EXPORT-IMPORT

BANK

OF W A S H I N G T O N

FUND—Continued

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings—Continued
1957 actual
Insurance program:
Revenue
Expense

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$20,000
8,000

$16,000
6,000

$32,945
12,391

Net operating income,
program

insurance

20,554

12,000

10,000

Net income for the year
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of y e a r „ _
Payment of dividends to Treasury (—)-_

60, 565,972

62,312,000

65,148.000

427,352,123
-22,500,000

465, 418,095
- 2 2 , 500,000

505,230,095
- 2 2 , 500,000

Retained earnings, end of year

465,418,095

505,230,095

547,878,095

the Export-Import Bank in foreign countries incident to such loans:
Provided, That fees or dues to international organizations of credit
institutions engaged in financing foreign trade and necessary expenses
(including special services performed on a contract or fee basis,
but not including other personal services [ , and fees or dues to
international organizations of credit institutions engaged in financing foreign trade]) in connection with the acquisition, operation,
maintenance, improvement, or disposition of any real or personal
property belonging to the Bank or in which it has an interest,
including expenses of collections of pledged collateral, or the
investigation or appraisal of any property in respect to which an
application for a loan has been "made, shall be considered as nonadministrative expenses for the purposes hereof. (12 U. S. C.
635-635 (i); Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)

E n d of year
Non-interest-bearing
stock-_
Retained earnings

capital:

$43, 704,224
24, 551,893
3, 576
2, 577,710,830
87,588

$2,856,065
26, 793, 466
3, 576
3,037,826,241
102, 588

$1, 355, 740
28,456, 966
3, 576
3,158,356,066
107, 588

3,067, 581, 936

3,188, 279, 936

2, 640,016

Government investment:
Interest-bearing capital:
Start of year.
- .
Borrowings from Treasury
year, net

2,751,841

2,801,841

during

Capital

1,206,500,000

1,178,000,000

1, 559,600,000

- 2 8 , 500,000

381,600,000

78,000,000

1,178,000,000

1,559, 600,000

1,637, 600,000

1,000,000,000
465, 418,095

1,000,000,000
505,230,095

1,000,000,000
547,878,095

2,643,418,095

3,064,830,095

3,185,478,095

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
Unexpended balance:
$1,023, 725
Cash
Budget authorizations. _ 2,793, 500,000

Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
Undisbursed loan obligations
Unpaid undelivered
orders
Unexpired war risk insurance
Guaranteed loans outstanding..
Accounts receivable (—).
Total obligated balance
Unobligated balance

LIMITATION

2,794, 523, 725
1, 701,290
739,239, 635

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$43, 704, 224
2, 822,000,000

$2, 856,065
2,440,400, 000

$1,355, 740
2,362,400,000

2,865, 704,224

2,443,256,065

2, 640,016
1, 535, 632, 561

2, 751,841

2,801,841

1, 631,980,720

1,738,079, 456

15,095

12,000

$1,900,000

$2,055,000

1,900,000

2,055,000

209
1
200
205

234
1
221
227

$1,642,345
27,655

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

01

202
1
185
185
8. 9

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
___
Excess of annual leave earned over
leave taken

$6,842

$1,341,201
2,416
8,158

8.8

$6,947
$1,462, 771
3,000
16,600

8. 8

$6,885

$1, 599,000
10,000
9,600

25,185

6,000

6, 500

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
_
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
__
07 Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments

1,376,960
84,470
1,596
20, 451
129,025
13,171
17,634
11,326
12,807
274

1,488,371
110,000
1, 500
21,300
145,300
16, 700
24, 200
19,379
14,750
92,200
300

1,625,100
110,000
2,000
22, 500
160, 000
18, 900
25,500
16, 250
16,050
103,500
300

Total administrative expenses
Less reimbursements from other accounts.

1,667, 714
25,369

1,934,000
34,000

2,100,100
45,100

1,642,345

1,900,000

2,055,000

25,433,185
- 2 4 , 551,893

25,451, 930
- 2 6 , 793,466

53, 564, 478
-28,456, 966

754, 747,300

1, 542, 625, 905

1,636,403,025

1, 768, 500,809

806,853,040

595, 254, 931

L I Q U I D A T I O N OF C E R T A I N R E C O N S T R U C T I O N F I N A N C E
ASSETS

1,323,078,319

Not to exceed [$1,900,000] $2,055,000 (to be computed on an
accrual basis) of the funds of the Export-Import Bank of Washington shall be available during the current fiscal year for [ a l l ]
administrative expenses of the Bank, including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a),
at rates not to exceed [ $ 5 0 ] $100 per diem for individuals, and
not to exceed $9,000 for entertainment allowances for members
of the Board of Directors when specifically authorized by the
Chairman of the Board; and, in addition, not to exceed the equivalent
of $200,000 of the aggregate amount of foreign currencies made available to the Export-Import Bank for loans pursuant to the Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954, as amended, shall
be available during the current fiscal year for expenses incurred by

CORPORATION

Program and Financing

2, 500,000

36,486, 621
-22,680, 246

Total obligations

12,000

3,000,000

ON A D M I N I S T R A T I V E E X P E N S E S , E X P O R T - I M P O R T
B A N K OF W A S H I N G T O N
[(LIMITATION)]




1959 estimate

2,363, 755, 740

3,456,941

2,039, 776, 425

1958 estimate

1,670, 000

Average GS grade and salary

Total Government investment

Total unexpended
balance.

Program by activities:
Administration (total obligations)

limitation

2, 646,058, 111

Total assets
Liabilities:
Current

1957 actual

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury and in banks
Accounts receivable
Supplies
Loans receivable
- ,
Furniture and equipment, net

Program and Financing

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$199
557, 666

$200
438,717

$200
316,379

557,865

438,917

316,579

6,142,686
716,667

6,028,334
561, 576
1,250,001

6,006,232
413,372

Total amounts becoming availableUnobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)

6,859,353

7,839,911

6,419,604

88,018

78,364

58,929

Total amounts available.
Repayment of borrowings from Treasury (—)
Capital transfers:
Repayment of investment to Treasury ( - )
Payment of profits to Treasury (—)___
Unobligated balance carried forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)

6,947,371

7,918,275

6,478,533

-6,165,837

-6,132,384

-6,110,021

- 1 4 2 , 686
- 2 , 619

-1,278,335
-9,710

-6,232
-733

-78,364

-58,929

-44,968

557,865

438,917

316,579

Program by activities:
Expense
_
Interest on borrowings

__

Total program (costs—obligations)—
Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Receipts
from operations:
Collection of loans
Interest income from loans
Sale of investments _

Financing applied to program.

133

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1954 relating to the
liquidation of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation
transferring certain foreign bonds, notes, and securities
to the Export-Import Bank, became effective as of close
of business June 30, 1954.
Liquidating proceeds of these assets are paid to the
Treasury, and are not available for future borrowing.
Revenue and receipts are estimated to amount to
$7,839,911 in 1958 and $6,419,604 in 1959, thereby
reducing the net investment of the U. S. Government to
$15,063,660.
Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual
Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Expense

1958 estimate

$557,865

$438, 917

$316, 579

6,142,686
716, 667

6,006, 232
413, 372

9, 654

6,028,334
561, 576
1, 250, 001
19, 435

Total receipts from operations

6,869,007

7, 859, 346

6,433, 565

- 6 , 311,142

- 7 , 4 2 0 , 429

- 6 , 1 1 6 , 986

13, 961

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
$716, 667
557, 865

Revenue
Expense

$561, 576
438, 917

$413, 372
316, 579

Net income for the year
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of y e a r —
Payment of profits to Treasury (—)

158,802

122,659
542,804
- 9 , 710

542,804

655, 753

751,813

Financial Condition
Assets:
Accounts receivable
Loans receivable
Investments, net

$343,838
27,053, 258
1, 250,001

1959 estimate

$15,750,000

$52,290,000

Total program obligations.

15,750,000

52, 490,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward..
Unobligated balance carried forward—.

"52,"490,"666"

Program b y activities:
1. Loans
2. Operating expense.

Authorization to expend foreign currency receipts pursuant to 71 Stat.
345

during

E n d of year

203,818

142, 717

32, 701,397

26, 535, 560
- 6 , 1 3 2 , 384

68,240,000

1957 actual
01 Personal services (contract
basis)
02 Travel
04 Communication services.
06 Printing and reproduction

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

or fee

$175,000
15,000
5,000
5,000

Total operating expenses

200,000

Analysis of Expenditures
Obligated balance brought forward
Obligations incurred
Obligated balance carried forward

$15,750,000
-14,250,000

$14,250,000
52, 490,000
-56,740,000

1,500,000

10,000,000

Total expenditures

20,403,176

-6,165,837

- 5 2 , 490,000

Operating Expenses—Foreign Currencies

15, 206, 377

265, 474

Government investment:
Interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Repayments to Treasury
year ( - )

21, 287, 671

200,000

Under the "Cooley amendment" to the Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (Public
Law 480), the Export-Import Bank will make loans in
foreign currencies to American private enterprises, for
economic development in foreign countries, and to American or, in certain cases, foreign private enterprises for
trade expansion from allocations of up to 25% of the
proceeds from sales abroad of surplus agricultural commodities. Amounts in this schedule reflect only estimated
funds to become available for this purpose in agreements
made or under negotiation as of October 31, 1957.

$187,685
15,018. 692

28, 647,097

Total assets
liabilities:
Current

$262, 747
21, 024, 924

SCHEDULE

1958 estimate

1957 actual

655,753
-733

Retained earnings, end of year

CURRENCY

Program and Financing

96,793

386,621
-2,619

FOREIGN

Private Enterprise loans from Foreign Currencies

1959 estimate

Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Loans repaid
Revpnuft _
Proceeds from sale of inv estments
Decrease in selected wor king capital

Budget expenditures..

INFORMATIONAL

-6,110,021

26, 535, 560

20, 403,176

14, 293,155

Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Repayment of capital to Treasury (—).

1, 445, 945
- 1 4 2 , 686

1,303, 259
- 1 , 278, 335

24, 924
- 6 , 232

E n d of year
Retained earnings

1,303, 259
542, 804

24, 924
655, 753

18, 692
751, 813

Total Government investment

21, 083,853

28,381, 623

Intragovernmental funds:
A D V A N C E S AND

15,063,660

1957 actual

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Unexpended balance
Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities..
Accounts receivable (—).
Total obligated balance

$331,320
-419,338

$265,474
-343,838

$203,818
-262,747

$142,717
-187,685

-88,018

-78,364

-58,929

88,018

78,364

58,929

44,968

1957 actual
Personal services (positions
than permanent)
14 Interest




$45,100

25,369

from

$34, 000

34,000

45,100

4
4

5
5

Object Classification

other

Average number of all employees
Average employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary

Object Classification

Total obligations

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other accounts

1959 estimate

$25,369

Program by activities:
Loans and guaranty management for
other agencies (total obligations)

1958 estimate

-44,968

Unobligated balance

01

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing

01
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$199
557,666

$200
438,717

$200
316,379

557,865

438,917

316,579

02
04
05
06
07
11

Personal services (permanent positions)
Travel
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total obligations

3
3
8.9

$6,842

8.8

$6,947

8.8

$6,885

$23,109
15
53
1,498
654
40

$29, 500

$39,450

50
2,000
800

50
2,530
800

1,650

2,270

25,369

34, 000

45,100

134

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF WASHINGTON—Con.
Proposed for later transmission:
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Program by activities:
Emergency foreign trade loans (total
obligations)

1959 estimate

$200,000,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward
Unobligated balance carried forward

$2,000,000,000

Proposed supplemental authorization to expend from public debt
receipts

-2,000,000,000
1, 800, 000, 000

2,000,000,000

Under proposed legislation, 1958.—As discussed above,
to finance future operations the Bank will request an
increase of $2 billion in lending and borrowing authority
in 1958. It is estimated that $200 million of the new
authority will be required for emergency loans in 1959.

The Administration supervises a coordinated agricultural credit system of farm credit banks and associations
which make credit available to farmers and their cooperatives.
Provision is made for supervision and examination
of: 12 Federal land banks (wholly farmer-owned); 13
banks for cooperatives (mixed ownership); 12 Federal
intermediate credit banks (mixed ownership); the Federal
Farm Mortgage Corporation (wholly Government-owned);
1,030 national larm loan associations; and 497 production
credit associations. Also, these credit agencies are furnished such services as assistance in financing and investments, custody of collateral for bonds and debentures,
credit analysis, development of appraisal standards and
policies, preparation of reports and budgets, and development and distribution of information on farm credit.
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION

Average GS grade and salary

Permanent authorizations:

01

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

(Indefinite special account)
Appropriated (est.) 1958, $ 2 , 2 0 0 , 0 0 0

Estimate 1959,

$2,125,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Administrative expenses (total obligations)
.

$1, 992, 488

$2, 200, 000

$2,125, 000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Recovery of prior year obligations
Unobligated balance carried forward

- 9 8 4 , 093
- 3 , 625
1,137,435

- 1 , 1 3 7 , 435

- 1 , 1 3 7 , 435

1,137, 435
2, 200,000

2,125, 000

1959 estimate

263
241
236

235
232
232

249
239
235
8. 8

$6, 770

8. 9

$6, 843

8. 7

$6, 727

$1, 603, 486

$1, 648,100

$1, 572,010

31, 835
8,150

45, 000
12, 900

45,000
13, 990

1, 643, 471
227, 408
3,151
25, 678
6, 756
21, 456
40, 516
7, 498
12, 782
1, 940

1, 706,000
269, 500
5, 000
30,000
3,000
25,000
25,000

1, 631,000
269, 500
5, 000
30,000
1, 000
25, 000
25,000

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utilitv services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies _
08 Supplies and materials
___
09 E q u i p m e n t . . . _
. __ _
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

20,000
15,000
102,000
1,000
500

20,000
15, 000
100,000
1,000
500 ;

1,137,435

2,142, 205

_.

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent:
Board compensation.
__
Other personal services

1958 estimate

Appropriation (new obligational authority).

Assessments based upon estimated administrative
expenses are collected from agencies in the farm credit
system, are appropriated to this special fund account,
and are made available for administrative expenses.
Obligations are incurred within fiscal year limitations
under "Limitation on administrative expenses, Farm
Credit Administration."

Total obligations

1,992, 488

ON ADMINISTRATIVE
ADMINISTEA

EXPENSES,

FARM

CREDIT

TION

Not to exceed [$2,200,000] $2,125,000 (from assessments collected from farm credit agencies) shall be obligated during the
current fiscal year for administrative expenses. (12 U. S. C. 636;
Department of Agriculture and Farm Credit Administration Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Program and Financing

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Supervision and examination of farm
credit banks and associations (total
obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available _
limitation




$1, 992,488

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,200,000

$2,125.000

2,200,000

2,125,000

237, 512
2,230,000

2,125, 000

2,200,000

Public enterprise funds:
FEDERAL

FARM

MORTGAGE

CORPORATION

FUND

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Preserving, leasing, and disposing of
reserved mineial interests.-.
Other
Total program (costs—obligations)

LIMITATION

1, 450
382

Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Revenue
and receipts:
Collection of notes receivable
Leases and sale of reserved mineral
interests
Other receipts
Total amounts becoming available..
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Cash
Authorization to expend from corporate debt receipts
Total amounts available
Capital transfer:
Payment of dividend to Treasury (—)_
Repayment of capital stock (—)
Unobligated balance rescinded
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Cash
Authorization to expend from corporate debt receipts
Financing applied to program

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$76,074
2,461

$5,000
500

$500

78, 535

5, 500

500

1, 978,000

2,042,000

641, 513
25

26, 500

641, 538

2,004, 500

2,042,000

2, 539,020

1,072, 723

531, 723

499, 705,300

499, 734, 600

502,885, 858

502, 811, 823

2, 573, 723

- 2 , 000,000

-2,500,000
- 1 0 , 000
- 4 9 9 , 764,600

-2,200,000

- 1 , 072,723

- 5 3 1 , 723

- 3 4 3 , 223

5,500

500

-30,000

-499,734,600
78, 535

135

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

The Corporation is in liquidation. It financed Land
Bank Commissioner loans until July 1, 1947, and assisted
Federal land banks in their financing.
Budget program.—As of June 30, 1955, the Corporation
liquidated its remaining loans through bulk sale to the
Federal land banks in exchange for non-interest-bearing
notes to be collected over a 10-year period. Its only
remaining activity was the disposal of reserved mineral
interests which were transferred to the Department of the
Interior on September 6, 1957, pursuant to Public Law
760, approved September 6, 1950.
Financing.—All of the $200 million investment of the
Government has been repaid to Treasury. In addition,
authority of the Corporation to issue corporate bonds was
eliminated in 1958.
Operating results and financial condition.—The retained
earnings of the Corporation at the end of 1959, after making dividend payment to the Treasury of $2.2 million, are
expected to be $5.7 million. Payments will continue to
be made to the Treasury until final liquidation.
Sources and Application of Fubds (Operations)
1957 actual

Total gross expenditures

$78,535
6,268

$5,500
7,000

$500
6,000

12,500

6,500

1956 actual
Unexpended balances:
Cash with Treasury
Budget authorization...

Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Collection of notes receivable—Federal
land banks
Revenues

641, 538

1,978,000
26, 500

2,042,000

Total receipts from operations

641,538

2,004,500

2,042,000

-556,735

-1,992,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Unobligated balance

$1,120, 861
499, 734, 600

$572, 861

$378,361

502, 298, 726

500, 855, 461

572, 861

378,361

54, 406

48,138

41,138

35,138

502, 244, 320

Total unexpended
balance.
. ..
Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities... . . .

LIMITATION

1957 actual

$2, 593,426
499, 705, 300

500, 807, 323

531,723

343, 223

ON ADMINISTRATIVE
MORTGAGE

EXPENSES,
CORPORATION

FEDERAL

FARM

The Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation is authorized to make
such expenditures, within available funds and in accordance with
law, as may be necessary to liquidate its assets: Provided, That
funds realized from the liquidation of assets which are determined
by the Board of Directors to be in excess of the requirements for
expenses of liquidation shall be [applied first to the retirement of
the remaining Government investment, in the capital stock of the
Corporation and then to J declared as dividends which shall be paid
into the general fund of the Treasury. (12 U. S. C. 1020; Department of Agriculture and Farm Credit Administration Appropriation
Act, 1958.)

1959 estimate

84,803

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Expense
Increase in selected working capital..

1958 estimate

Status of Certain Fund Balances

1957 actual
Financing:
Limitation (unobligated
longer available)

balance

no

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$5, 500

$500

$550, 000

-2,035,500

Budget expenditures

Object Classification
07

Other contractual services:
Subject to limitation
N o t subject to limitation

-$450
78, 985

F E D E R A L INTERMEDIATE

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings

CREDIT

BANKS

INVESTMENT

FUND

Program and Financing
-$2, 457

Nonoperating income or loss (—):
Lease and sale of reserved mineral interests
Other
Expense of preserving, leasing, and disposing of reserved mineral interests..
Other
Net nonoperating income..

-$500

641, 513
25

26, 500

-76,074
-4

-5, 000

565,460

Expense (net loss ( — ) )

21, 500

563,003

21,000

-$500
1957 actual
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward
Unobligated balance transferred from
"Federal intermediate credit banks
revolving: f u n d " (70 Stat. 660)
Unobligated balance carried forward
-500

Net income or loss (—) for the year..
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of year
Payment of dividend to Treasury (—)_.

-2,000,000

11,856, 305

10, 419, 308
- 2 , 500,000

-2, 200,000

Retained earnings, end of year

10, 419, 308

7, 940, 308

5, 739, 808

$1,120, 861
9, 621,985

$572, 861
7, 613, 985

$378, 361
5, 601, 985

10, 742, 846

8, 216, 846

1959 estimate

$40,000,000
$40,000,000
-40,000,000

1958 estimate

$40,000,000

-40,000,000

-40,000,000

Financing applied to program

5, 980, 346

7, 940, 308

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury..
Notes receivable—Federal land banks._
Total assets
Liabilities:
Current liabilities
Bonds payable: Held b y public, matured principal
Total liabilities
Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year. .
_
Repayment of capital stock (—)
E n d of year.
Retained earnings
Total" Government investment




This fund is available to Farm Credit Administration
as a revolving fund for investment in capital stock of the
Federal intermediate credit banks (12 U. S. C. 1131i (e),
70 Stat, 660).
PRODUCTION

CREDIT

ASSOCIATIONS

INVESTMENT

1957 actual
48,138

41,138
235, 400

205, 400

313, 538

276, 538

240, 538

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

35,138

265,400

FUND

Program and Financing

10, 000

10, 000
-10,000

10,000
10, 419,308

7,940, 308

5, 739, 808

10, 429,308

7, 940, 308

5, 739, 808

Program by activities:
Investment in capital stock of production credit associations (total obligations)
.....
Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Retirement of investment in capital stock
of production credit associations
Unobligated balance brought forward
Unobligated balance transferred from
" F a r m Credit Administration revolving f u n d " (70 Stat. 665)
Total amounts available.,.

000, 000

$50, 000

$500,000

10,000

300,000
58,130, 000

400,000
57, 930, 000

58, 430,000

58,330,00Q

$1,

60, 765, 000
60, 775, 000

136

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION—Continued

Financial Condition

Public enterprise funds—Continued
PRODUCTION

CREDIT

1957 actual

ASSOCIATIONS

INVESTMENT

FUND—Con.

Program and Financing—Continued
1957 actual
Financing—Continue d
Capital transfer (repayment of investment to Treasury) (—)
_
Unobligated balance carried forward
Financing applied to p r o g r a m . . .

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

—$2, 595, 000
-58,130, 000

—$57,930,000

-$57,330,000

50,000

500, 000

1,000,000

_

Total assets.

1957 actual
16 Investments and loans: Investments
in capital stock of production credit
associations-..

$50,000

1956 actual
Unexpended balance:
Cash with
Treasury
(unobligated balance)...

1958 estimate

185, 913, 572

185,913, 572

169, 968, 833
15, 944, 739

169, 968, 833
15, 944, 739

185, 913, 572

185, 913, 572

1957 estimate

1959 estimate

$35, 864, 564

$44,326,072

$49, 326, 072

1957 actual

$38,600,072

1959 estimate

$500,000

89, 587, 500
47, 000, 000

Status of Certain Fund Balances

This fund is available to Farm Credit Administration
for investment in capital stock of the production credit
associations (70 Stat. 665).
Object Classification

$49, 326, 072

93, 387, 500
48, 200, 000

185, 913, 572

Total Government investment

$44, 326, 072

169, 968, 833
15, 944, 739

_

Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital
Retained earnings

$38, 600,072
97, 513, 500
49, 800, 000

„__

1959 estimate

185, 913, 572

Assets:
Cash with Treasury
Investments in capital stock:
District banks for cooperatives
Central Bank for Cooperatives

1958 estimate

$1,000,000
FEDERAL

INTERMEDIATE

CREDIT

BANKS

REVOLVING

FUND

Program and Financing
AGRICULTURAL

MARKETING

REVOLVING

FUND
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Revenue and receipts:
Repayment of purchase money
mortgage
_ _
Revenue: Interest on loans
Recovery of prior year obligations

$47,235
1,773
2,686,500

1958 estimate

~ ~ $~2, 66
~ ~5 76 6~
~

1959 estimate

$5,"000,~000

Total amounts becoming available__
Unobligated balance brought forward. _

2,735, 508
35,864, 564

5,726,000
38, 600,072

5,000,000
44,326,072

Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carried forward--

38,600,072
-38,600,072

44,326,072
-44,326,072

49,326,072
-49,326,072

Financing applied to program. _ __

This fund is available for investments in the capital
stock of the banks for cooperatives (12 U. S. C. 1134).

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Repayments, cancellations, and recovery of prior year obligations (net
return of capital from Federal intermediate credit banks)
Total available for obligation
Unobligated balance transferred to
"Federal intermediate credit banks
investment f u n d " (70 Stat. 660)

$37,300,000

2,700,000
40,000,000
-40,000,000

Total financing

This fund was available to the Federal intermediate
credit banks as a "feeder" appropriation for capital stock
and paid-in surplus until December 31, 1956, when it was
transferred to Farm Credit Administration (12 U. S. C.
1131i (e), 70 Stat. 660).

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual
Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Financing program:
Repayments on purchase money
mortgage
_ _
Retirement of investments in capital
stock of district banks for cooperatives __
Retirement of investment in capital
stock of Central Bank for Cooperatives.—
-___
Revenue
Total receipts from operations
Budget expenditures

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Retained earnings, end of year




CREDIT

ADMINISTRATION

REVOLVING

FUND

Program and Financing
$47,235

1957 actual

1,986,500

$4,126,000

$3,800,000

700,000
1,773

1,600,000

1,200,000

2,735, 508

5,726,000

5,000,000

- 2 , 735, 508

-5,726,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

-5,000,000

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Financing program: Revenue (net income
for the year)
Retained earnings, beginning of year

FARM

$1, 773
15, 942,966

$15, 944, 739

$15, 944, 739

15, 944, 739

15,944, 739

15,944, 739

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Unobligated balance transferred to
" P r o d u c t i o n credit associations investment f u n d " (70 Stat. 665).

$60,765,000
-60,765,000

Total financing

This fund was available to the production credit corporations as a "feeder" appropriation for capital until
December 31, 1956, when the corporations were merged
with the Federal intermediate credit banks and the fund
was transferred to Farm Credit Administration (12 U. S. C.
1131b, 70 Stat. 665).

137

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
OPERATING

FUND,

FEDERAL

INTERMEDIATE

CREDIT

BANKS

Program and Financing
July 1 to
Dec. 31, 1956,
actual
Program by activities:
Operating costs:
1. Agricultural financing program:
(а) Administrative expenses
(б) Farm Credit Administration
assessment
(c) Franchise tax
(d) Other
2. Interest on borrowings
Total operating costs, funded
Capital outlay: Agricultural loans and
discounts
Total program costs, funded
Relation of costs to obligations: Costs
financed from obligations of other
years (unpaid undelivered orders),
net ( - )
Total program (obligations)
Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Revenue
and receipts:
Agricultural loans and discounts
Retirement of class A stock investment in production credit associations (net)
Interest on loans and discounts
Interest in U. S. securities
Assessments from production credit
associations
Other revenue

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,624,295
293,965
47,937
6, 920
13,992,200
15, 965,317
1,077, 528, 433
1,093,493,750

-11,524
1,093,482,226

1,228, 648,057
190,000
14, 283,817
1, 286, 287
108,255
5, 838

Total amounts becoming available..
Unobligated balance brought forward:
Cash
U . S . securities
Authorization to expend from corporate debt receipts

1, 244, 522,254

Total amounts available
Repayment to the "Federal intermediate credit banks investment
fund"...
Unobligated balance no longer available
(assumed b y merged corporation, 70
Stat. 659-68)
Unobligated balance carried forward
(transferred to trust transactions, 70
Stat. 659-68):
Cash
U . S. securities

1, 629, 402, 520

Financing applied to program

12, 212. 566
99,285, 700
273, 382, 000

- 2 , 700, 000

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
July 1 to
Dec. 31, 1956,
actual

-409, 742,000

-24,152, 594
- 9 9 , 325, 700
1, 093, 482, 226

The production credit corporations were merged in the
Federal intermediate credit banks as of January 1, 1957,
pursuant to the Farm Credit Act of 1956 (70 Stat. 659).
The act also provided for transfer to the banks of all of the
corporations' assets and liabilities, except their investments in production credit associations which were transferred to Farm Credit Administration. Provision is made
for retirement of the banks' Government capital and for
eventual ownership by the production credit associations.
Budget program.—The Federal intermediate credit
banks will continue their agricultural loan and discount
activities, and will provide the production credit associations with necessary supervision and services, a function
formerly performed by the production credit corporations.
Operations for the first half of 1957 result in budget
transactions; operations for the last half of 1957, all of
1958, and the first half of 1959 (as mixed-ownership corporations) will result in trust transactions; and operations
for the last half of 1959 will restilt in trust deposit transactions. The makeup of the Government equity at the time
of the change is shown in the statement of financial
condition.
The banks discount agricultural loans for and lend funds
to production credit associations and other financing institutions, and supervise the associations.
Administrative supervision of the 497 production credit
associations covers all phases of their lending activities
including an annual credit examination of loans, and pro-




vides for review and advisory service relating to business
management.
Operating costs.—Administrative expenses were $1,624,295 for the first 6 months of 1957. These expenses were
paid from corporate funds and were subject to limitation.
The amount set forth above does not include expenses
estimated at $32,495 for the first half of 1957, which were
not recorded as expenditures on the books until the last
half of 1957. In addition, the supervisory costs assessed
by the Farm Credit Administration were $293,965; these
costs were paid from corporate funds but were not included as administrative expenses of the banks subject to
limitation.
Operating costs included $13,992,200 interest paid or
accrued on collateral trust debentures and notes payable
to commercial banks and others.
Capital outlay.—The banks discounted agricultural loans
for and lent funds to production credit associations and
other financial institutions in the amount of $1,077,528,433
during the first half of 1957.
Financing.—The banks financed their lending operations
principally through the sale of their consolidated collateral
trust debentures in the investment markets, and by other
borrowings. The United States assumes no liability for
the debentures or other such borrowings. During the first
6 months of 1957 the banks issued $519,450 of debentures
and borrowed $105,175,000 from commercial banks. No
credit bank may have outstanding borrowings in an amount
exceeding 10 times its surplus and paid-in capital.
Relation of costs to obligations.—Year-end balances of
unpaid undelivered orders are as follows: 1956, $44,019;
1957, $32,495.

1958 estimate

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Agricultural financing program:
Acquisition of agricultural loans and
$1,077,528,433
discounts
Investment in class A stock of production credit associations
250,000
Expense
15,918, 705
Franchise tax to Treasury
47, 937
Transferred to merged corporation
(70 Stat. 659):
Cash with Treasury and in banks..
23, 702,113
99, 325, 700
Investment in U. S. securities
482, 976
Selected working capital
505,673
Increase in selected working capital...
Total gross expenditures

1,217,761,537

Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Agricultural financing program:
Repayment of agricultural loans and
discounts
Retirement of class A stock investment in production credit associations
Other (expense adjustment)
Revenue

1, 228,648,057

Total receipts from operations

1, 244, 773, 579

Budget expenditures

440, 000
1,325
15,684,197

- 2 7 , 012, 042

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Agricultural financing program:
Revenue
Expense
Net operating income or loss (—). _.
Nonoperating loss (—) (net loss (—)
from sale of TJ. S. securities;
Net income for the period
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of year
Franchise tax
Retained earnings, Dec., 31, 1956..--

$15,684,197
15, 909,848
-225, 651
- 7 , 532
-233,183
63,347,824
- 4 7 , 937
63,066, 704

1959 estimate

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

138

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION—Continued

Program and Financing—Continued
Jan. 1 to
June 30, 1957,
actual

Public enterprise funds—Continued
OPERATING FUND,

FEDERAL

INTERMEDIATE

CREDIT

BANKS—Con.

1, 830, 000

Financing—Continued
Transfer of production credit associations stock to Governor of Farm
Credit Administration (—)
Stock called for retirement based on
class B stock and participation certificates issued (—)
Unobligated balance no longer available
(transferred to deposit funds of
Treasury, 70 Stat. 659-68):
Cash
U. S. securities. _ ___
__
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Cash
U. S. securities
_ _

885, 859, 235

Financing applied to program.. ___

Financial Condition
July 1 to
D e c . 31, 1956,
actual
Assets:
Cash with Treasury and in banks
U . S. securities (par)
Accounts receivable, net
Agricultural loans and discounts
Class A stock of production credit associations
Total assets
Liabilities:
Current liabilities
Debentures and notes payable

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$23, 702,113
99, 325, 700
13, 405, 507
747, 595, 915

12, 922, 531
720, 635, 000

Total liabilities

733, 557, 531

Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Paid-in surplus during year.
Repayments during year

91, 935, 000
950,000
3, 650, 000
89, 235,000
63, 066, 704

E n d of year
Retained earnings
Total Government investment

152, 301, 704

Trust funds:
OPERATING

FUND,

FEDERAL

INTERMEDIATE

CREDIT

BANKS

Program and Financing
Jan. 1 to
June 30, 1957,
actual
Program by activities:
Operating costs:
1. Agricultural financing program:
(a) Administrative expenses
(b) Farm Credit Administration
assessment
(c) Franchise tax
(d) Other
(<?) Patronage refunds not distributed
(f) Cost adjustment
2. Interest on borrowings
Total operating costs, funded
Capital outlay:
1. Agricultural loans and discounts
2. Borrowings from public (net)

1958 estimate

July 1 to
Dec. 31, 1958,
estimate

$1, 605,138

$3,375,000

$1, 693,000

344, 211
80, 086
450

619, 700
381,100

309, 800

1,833
- 1 , 401
15, 641, 954

-1,500
38,122, 000

17, 672, 271

42, 496, 300

23, 300, 800

1, 208, 963, 443

2. 364, 849, 000

1,172, 239, 000
181, 970, 000

1, 208, 963, 443

2, 364, 849, 000

I, 354, 209, 000

Total program costs, funded
Relation of costs to obligations: Obligations incurred for costs of other
years,
net
(unpaid
undelivered
orders)

1, 226, 635, 714

2, 407, 345, 300

1, 377, 509, 800

Total program (obligation)
Financing:
Amounts becoming available: Revenues
and receipts:
Agricultural loans and discounts
Retirement of class A stock investment in production credit associations (net)
Issuance of class B stock to production
credit associations
Borrowings from public (net)
Interest on loans and discounts
Interest on U. S. securities
Assessments from production credit
associations
Other revenue

1, 226, 642, 816

2, 407, 345, 703

1, 377, 509, 800

957, 559, 473

2, 273,495, 000

1, 367, 354, 000

4, 371, 510
237, 860,000
16, 760,115
1,249, 720

4, 370, 680
90, 650, 000
41,478,000
2, 550, 000

23,044,000
1,289, 000

2,262
5,380

110, 300
9, 600

111, 700
5, 300

Total amounts becoming available.
Unobligated balance brought forward
(transferred from budget transactions, 70 Stat. 659-68):
Cash
U . S. securities

1,219, 638, 460

2, 412, 663, 580

1, 391, 804, 000

24,152, 594
99, 325, 700

10, 812,108
99, 330, 700

11, 347, 905
99, 480, 700

Total amounts available
B s t u m of capital to Treasury (—)_

1,343,116, 754
- 4 , 371, 510

2, 522, 806, 388
—4,370, seo

1, 502, 632, 605

Total capital outlay..




7,102

403

1, 830, 000

1958 estimate

July 1 to
Dec. 31, 1958,
estimate

-$1,830,000
- 1 2 9 , 620

-$261,400

- $ 2 5 , 517,105
-99,605, 700
- 1 0 , 812,108
- 9 9 , 330, 700

-11,347,905
- 9 9 , 480, 700

1,226, 642, 816

2, 407,345, 703

1,377, 509, 800

Budget program.—The Federal intermediate credit
banks will continue their agricultural loan and discount
activities, and will provide the production credit associations with necessary supervision and services, a function
formerly performed by the production credit corporations.
Operating costs.—Administrative expenses are estimated
at $1,693,000 for the first 6 months of 1959, and $3,375,000
for 1958; actual expenses for the last half of 1957 were
$1,605,138. These expenses are paid from corporate funds
and are subject to limitation until January 1, 1959. The
amount set forth above does not include unrecorded expenses of $39,597 at June 30, 1957, which were not
recorded as expenditures on the books until 1958. It is
estimated that such expenses will be $40,000 at June 30,
1958, and $40,000 at December 31, 1958. In addition,
the supervisory costs assessed by the Farm Credit Administration are estimated at $309,800 for the first half of
1959 and $619,700 for 1958, and were $344,211 for the
last half of 1957; these costs are paid from corporate funds
but are not included as administrative expenses of the
banks subject to limitation.
Operating costs include interest paid or accrued on
collateral trust debentures and notes payable to commercial banks and others, estimated at $21,298,000 for the
first 6 months of 1959 and $38,122,000 for all of 1958;
these costs were $15,641,954 during the last half of 1957.
Capital outlay.—It is estimated that the banks will discount agricultural loans for and lend funds to production
credit associations and other financial institutions in the
amount of $1,172,239,000 during the first 6 months of 1959
and $2,364,849,000 during 1958. Loans and discounts
during the last half of 1957 were $1,208,963,443.
Financing.—The banks finance their lending operations
principally through the sale of consolidated collateral trust
debentures in the investment markets, and by other borrowings. The United States assumes no liability for the
debentures or other such borrowings. It is estimated that
the banks will issue $612,300,000 of debentures and will
borrow $137,700,000 from commercial banks during the
first 6 months of 1959 and will issue $1,370,600,000 of
debentures and will borrow $310,750,000 from commercial
banks during the entire year 1958. During the last 6
months of 1957 the banks issued $690,750,000 of debentures and borrowed $189,000,000 from commercial banks.
No credit bank may have outstanding borrowings in an
amount exceeding 10 times its surplus and paid-in capital.
Relation of costs to obligations.—Year-end balances of
unpaid undelivered orders are as follows: 1956, $32,495;
1957, $39,597; 1958, $40,000; 1959, $40,000.
Operating results and financial condition.—Net income
of $1,149,200 is estimated for the first half of 1059. Thin

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

amount will be retained in undistributed earnings until
the end of the fiscal year, at which time the earnings for
the entire year will be distributed in accordance with
section 206 (a) of the Farm Credit Act of 1956 by transfer
to the reserve account, payment to Treasury as franchise
tax, and payment to the associations and other financial
institutions as patronage refunds.
By January 1, 1959, it is estimated that the Government-owned capital will be reduced from $87,405,000 (at
the time of the merger) to $78,271,790. The net worth
position of the system will not be decreased as private
capital interest will be increased during the period by
$10,124,015, consisting of $8,742,190 acquired by the
production credit associations by cash subscriptions required by the act and $1,381,825 acquired by the associations and other financing institutions as patronage refunds. It is estimated that retained earnings which remain
with the operating fund will amount to $64,830,885 at
December 31, 1958.
Net cash transactions will be transferred from this fund
into a deposit fund of Treasury on Jan. 1, 1959.
Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
Jan. 1 to
June 30, 1957,
actual

1958 estimate

Total gross expenditures.

1,232,968,245

Total receipts from operations

2, 412, 733,880

1,196,837,800

957, 559,473

2,273,495,000

1,830,000
1,401
18,017,477

1,500
44,147,900

4,371, 510

1,367,354,000

4,370,680

24,450,000

23, 702,113
99,325,700
482,976
682,668
2,322,015,080

1,391,804,000

126, 994,927

Net income for period

__

_ ..
__

...

Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of period..
Franchise tax _
._ _
Patronage refunds (paid b y issuance of
class B stock):
N o t affecting; costs
Affecting costs
Retained earnings, end of period

90, 718,800

-194,966, 200

$18,017,477
17, 590,352

$44,147, 900
42,115, 200

$24,450,000
23,300,800

427,125

2,032, 700

1,149, 200

63,066, 704
-80,086

63,173, 485
-381,100

63, 681, 685

-238,425
-1,833
63,173,485

63, 681, 685

Total assets ...




1, 067, 095, 661

882,182, 661

4,609, 935

10,124, 015

5, 418, 680
95, 400

21,690
4. 609, 935

E n d of period
Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
...
Return of capital to Treasury — ._
Transfer of stock of production credit
associations to Governor of Farm
Credit Administration
Stock called for retirement, based on
class B stock and participation certificates issued
...

10,124. 015

10,124. 015

89, 235, 000
- 4 , 371, 510

82, 903, 870
- 4 , 370, 680

78, 271, 790

- 1 , 830, 000
- 1 2 9 , 620

-261,400

82, 903,870
63,173, 485

Total investments
earnings

and

retained

78, 271, 790
63, 681, 685

78, 271, 790
64, 830, 885

150, 687, 290

E n d of year
Retained earnings

152, 077, 490

153, 226, 690

Status of Certain Fund Balances
June 30,
Dec. 31,
1956 actual 1956, actual 1957, actual

1958
estimate

Dec. 31,
1958,
estimate

Unexpended balance:
Cash and U. S. securities
$112,047,958 $123,027,813 $110,865,073 $110, 796,273 $123, 792,473
Budget authorization. 273, 382,000
Total unexpended
balances
. . 385, 429,958 123,027, 813 110,865, 073 110, 796, 273 123, 792,473
Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
11, 801,066 12, 922, 531 16, 287, 661 17, 950, 661 15, 007, 661
Obligations other than
40,000
44, 019
i 32, 495
39, 597
liabilities
...
40,000
A c c o u n t s receivable,
-11,295, 393 - 1 3 , 405,507 - 1 5 , 604, 993 - 1 8 , 022, 993 - 1 6 , 377, 993
net ( - )

Unobligated balance

549,692

-450,481

722, 265

- 3 2 , 332 -1,330,332

384, 880, 266 123, 478, 294 110,142, 808 110,828, 605 125,122,805

LIMITATION

ON ADMINISTRATIVE
EXPENSES,
INTERMEDIATE
CREDIT
BANKS

FEDERAL

Not to exceed [$3,375,000] $1,698,000 (to be computed on an
accrual basis) of the funds of the banks shall be available for administrative expenses for the six months ending December 31, 1958, including the purchase of not to exceed [ s i x ] one passenger motor
[vehicles] vehicle for replacement only and services performed
for the banks by other Government agencies (except services and
facilities furnished and examinations made by the Farm-Credit
Administration, and services performed by any Federal Reserve
bank and by the United States Treasury in connection with the
financial transactions of the banks); and said total sum shall be
exclusive of interest expense, legal and special services performed
on a contract or fee basis, and expenses in connection with the
acquisition, operation, maintenance, improvement, protection, or
disposition of real or personal property belonging to the banks or in
which they have an interest. {12 U. S. C. 1021; 70 Stat. 667; Department of Agriculture and Farm Credit Administration Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Program and Financing

1957 actual

1958 estimate

July 1 to
D e c . 31,1958,
estimate

$3,375,000

$1,693,000

64,830,885

$11, 315, 573
99, 480, 700
18, 022, 993
1,090, 353,885

$24,186, 773
99, 605, 700
16, 377, 993
895,238,885

1, 125, 469, 951 3,218,173,151

j 1,035,409,351

$11, 534, 373
99, 330, 700
15, 604, 993
998,999,885

$15,007,661
867,175, 000

4, 588, 245

-1,143,400

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury and in banks
U . S. securities (par)
Accounts receivable, net
Agricultural loans and discounts

$17, 950,661
1, 049,145, 000

974, 782, 661

Total liabilities
Private investment:
Start of year
Capital stock (class B ) , production
credit associations
Participation certificates, other financing institutions

July 1 to
Dec. 31, 1958,
estimate

$16, 287, 661
958, 495, 000

Liabilities:
Current liabilities
Debentures and notes payable

1958 estimate

i Estimated.

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Agricultural financing program:
Revenue
Expense
_ ___ _.

Jan. 1 to
June 30, 1957,
actual

Total obligated
balance

1,105,973,318

Trust expenditures.

Financial Condition—Continued

July 1 to
Dec. 31, 1958,
estimate

Gross expenditures (funds applied);
Agricultural financing program:
Acquisition of agricultural loans and
discounts
$1, 208, 963, 443 $2, 364, 849, 000 $1,172, 239,000
Expense.
42,116, 700
17, 591, 753
23,300,800
Franchise tax to Treasury
381,100
80, 086
Other
1,833
Return of capital to Treasury
4, 371, 510
4, 370, 680
Transfer of stock to Governor of Farm
Credit Administration
1, 830,000
Stock called for retirement based on
class B stock for participation certificates issued
261,400
129, 620
Increase in selected working capital
1, 298,000
755,000

Receipts frpm operations (funds provided) :
Agricultural financing program:
Repayment of agricultural loans and
discounts . _
Retirement of class A stock investment in production credit associations _ _ _ _ _
_
. . .
Other (expense adjustment)
Revenue
_ _
Issuance of class B stock to production
credit associations
. _
Transferred from merged corporation
(70 Stat. 659):
Cash with Treasury and in b a n k s . _
Investment in U . S. securities
Selected working capital, _
Decrease in selected working capital

139

Program by activities:
Discounting agricultural loans for and
lending funds to production credit
associations and other financing institutions, and supervising production
credit associations (total administrative expenses)
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available..

$3, 229,433
346, 567

rune n.nr

1,693,000

140

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION—Continued

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION

Trust funds—Continued
LIMITATION
ON ADMINISTRATIVE
INTERMEDIATE
CREDIT

EXPENSES,
FEDERAL
BANKS—Continued

Object Classification

1958 estimate

July 1 to
Dec. 31,1958,
estimate

505
11
391
382

396
12
383
383

395
6
192
383

$6,087

$6,047

$5,986

$2, 220,240
65, 585
53,641

$2,200,884
67, 236
14,680

$1,119, 759
30,991
2,450

1957 actual

Total number of permanent positions...__
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees. _
Number of employees at end of year
Average salary ranges established
Board of Directors
01

by

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Other payments for personal services: Directors' compensation

61,884

30,400

2, 342,000
278,300
55, 600
182,100
36, 600
96, 600
179,000

1,183, 600
140. 300
27, 700
91,000
16, 900
44, 400
89, 200

3, 592
24,843
43, 539
1,761

9, 600
28, 600
18, 900
145, 500
2,200

4,800
14, 200
5,900
74,000
1,000

3,229, 433

Total obligations

59,200

2,401, 350
234, 768
49, 757
194,087
29, 214
81,404
165,118

Total personal services
02 Travel
___
04 Communication services.
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
General agents' expense
General Accounting Office audit expense.. . _ _ .
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments

3,375,000

1,693,000

ALLOCATIONS RECEIVED F R O M O T H E R

ACCOUNTS

NOTE.—Obligations incurred under allocations from other appropriations are shown in
the schedules of the parent appropriation " M u t u a l security," funds appropriated to the
President.
MIXED-OWNERSHIP
BANKS FOR

CORPORATIONS

COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION, JUNE 3 0 ,

Other assets
Less allowance for losses

$384,325,833
3,225,700
15,245,003
953,542




$20,510,471
44,408,857
381,100,133
14,291,461
460,310,922

Liabilities and capital:
Unmatured debentures outstanding
Matured debentures—principal and interest
Notes payable—Federal intermediate credit banks
Notes payable—other
Dividends payable on class B capital stock and guaranty fund..
Federal franchise tax payable
D u e U. S. Government—redemption of class A capital stock
Other liabilities
Capital: Privately owned capital:
Capital stock:
Class B
$15,339,393
Class C
8,703,326
Other
1,229,694
$25,272,413
Earned surplus:
Surplus—reserved
5,773,046
2,955,071
Surplus allocated to patrons.
8, 728,117

Total

OPERATIONS

[Operations:] For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided
for, in carrying out the provisions of the Federal Civil Defense Act
of 1950, as amended (50 U. S. C., App. 2251-2297), including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5
U. S. C. 55a); reimbursement of the Civil Service Commission for
full field investigations of employees occupying positions of critical
importance from the standpoint of national security; expenses of
attendance at meetings concerned with civil defense functions; reimbursement of the General Services Administration for security
guard services; not to exceed [$6,000] $10,000 for the purchase of
newspapers, periodicals, and teletype news services; not to exceed
[$750,000] $920,000 for expenses of travel and not to exceed $6,000
for emergency and extraordinary expenses to be expended under
the direction of the Administrator for such purposes as he deems
proper, and his determination thereon shall be final and conclusive;
[$17,000,000] $19,400,000. (.Independent Offices Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

1957

Total assets

Government investment:
Class A capital stock
Surplus—reserved

Current authorizations:

COOPERATIVES

The banks for cooperatives make loans to finance the
operations of farmers' cooperatives. The banks' capital
funds are from the Agricultural Marketing Act Revolving
Fund and from borrowing farmers' cooperative associations (12 U. S. C. 1134). The Farm Credit Act of 1955
provides for eventual ownership of the banks by farmers'
cooperatives and the retirement of the U. S. Government
investment.
Assets:
Cash
U. S. securities (par $44,263,000)
Loans to cooperative associations
Less allowance for losses

This Administration prepares national civil defense
plans as an integral part of the total program for defense
of the United States against enemy attack. The Administration provides guidance to States and/or their political
subdivisions, maintains operational capability, including
attack warning and communications systems, makes financial contributions to States and political subdivisions
for civil defense purposes, and maintains stockpiles of
medical, engineering, and radiological defense equipment
and supplies.
For 1959, major civil defense effort will be devoted to
developing an effective radiological defense, and to programs for strengthening the capacity of Government at
all levels to survive and operate in an emergency.

141,672,200
82,338,152

178,820.000
78,853
2, 500,000
11,125,000
415,135
1,317, 482
5,641,300
2, 402, 270

34,000,530

224,010,352
460,310,922

$17,000,000

Estimate 1959,

$19,400,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Executive direction
2. Planning and intelligence
3. Research and development
4. Warning and operations plans..
5. Resources and requirements
6. Education and training
7. Specialized liaison
8. General administration and stockpile operations
9. Field operations
Total obligations
Financing:
Comparative transfers to other accounts.
Unobligated balance no longer available .
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$419,019
256,518
1,055,876
3,048,011
205,539
2,806,473
195,098

$495,900
284,100
1,025,000
4, 528,100
331,000
2, 513,300
198,100

$513,000
308,000
1,263,000
5,202,000
485,000
2,700,000
200,000

2,269,422
2,621,274

3, 522,500
3,972,000

3,765,000
4,964,000

12,877,230

16,870,000

19,400,000

2,333,266
349,504

130,000

15,560,000

17,000,000

19,400,000

2. Planning and intelligence.—Planning assumptions are
developed which reflect the capability of enemy weapons
technology, and the likelihood and probable means of
attack. Intelligence on modern weapons and enemy
capability is obtained from Federal security agencies and
evaluated for its implications in the development of longrange plans, and representation is provided on national
security planning groups.
3. Research and development.—Important areas to be
covered in 1959 include: Warning and communications;
radiological defense; shelter design and testing; health
and medical; and damage assessment. The research program is primarily carried out through contracts with
other Federal agencies, universities, and industry. The
program is administered under this appropriation; the

141

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

actual research contracts are financed under the "Research and development" appropriation.
4. Warning and operations plans.—A nationwide attack
warning system extending from Air Force control centers
to State and local control points is provided. The survival
planning program is administered and operational plans
are developed. Operational functions which should be
delegated to other Federal agencies are identified, and the
overall delegation program is coordinated. Natural disaster assistance is coordinated. As a result of a program
begun in 1958 and planned for completion in 1959, the
Federal Government will install and operate an attack
warning system for the Washington, D. C., area. Funds
are provided in 1959 for extending the attack warning
system to additional key-target areas and to a nationwide
network of radio stations, and for the procurement of
equipment for rapid computation of warning times.
Funds are also provided in 1959 for installation of an
emergency radio network connecting the regional offices
and national headquarters; and the installation of cryptographic facilities in regional offices.
5. Resources and requirements.—Operational plans are
developed to manage post-attack resources including manpower, food, water, medicine, transportation, communications and essential physical facilities. Plans are designed
to insure that essential civilian requirements are met,
physical facilities essential to the basic economy are reestablished, and the facilities and resources of Federal
agencies, national relief organizations, and State and local
governments are properly utilized.
6. Education and training.—Training methods, materials, and devices are developed and made available to
State and local organizations. Information on weapon
effects, and preventive measures that may be taken for
survival are provided to the general public. Instructional
and informational material covers such subjects as protection against fallout, conelrad, rumor and panic, mutual
aid, shelter, emergency action, first aid, and police and
fire training, all designed to provide the necessary knowledge for survival in the event of nuclear attack. In 1959,
the Administration will expand the training program and
will stress emergency planning by local, State, and Federal
government, especially in the area of radiological defense.
To accommodate the increased student load two new
training schools will be opened in 1959 to be located near
large population centers. About 15,500 people have completed one or more basic civil defense courses. An additional 1,700 persons will be trained in 1959.
7. Specialized liaison.—Educational and promotional
activities are carried out with industry, labor, religious,
and women's groups.
8. General administration and stockpile operations.—In
addition to centralized administrative services, this activity also finances stockpile management. Determination
of items to be stockpiled is made by other units within
FCDA; costs of stockpile items are financed under the
"Emergency supplies and equipment" appropriation; and
the warehouses are operated by other Federal agencies.
9. Field operations.—Civil defense plans are made
available to the States and localities through the seven
regional offices. Close working relationships are developed
with State and local officials. Field staff will be further
strengthened in 1959 to provide greater assistance to
States and localities, particularly in the area of radiological
defense.




Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1,389
16
1,296
1,464

1,575
22
1, 487
1, 631

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
9.1

Average GS grade and salary
01

1,141
15
1,133
1,191

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
.

$6,636 ^ 5

$6,641~ 9. 5

$6, 688

$7,175,837
102,003
86, 626

8, 592, 616
701, 750
142, 810
2,785, 714
182, 291
593,418
1,938, 553

10,116, 567
920,000
150, 666
3,134, 761
195, 469
712, 095
1, 779,328

327,990
621, 474
440, 531

374, 571
1,180, 953
547,052

21, 955

26,652
1,184
25,017
6,000

31, 551

22, 614
6,000
12, 651, 792

16,386,000

19,182, 000

17
15
17

Total, Federal Civil Defense A d ministration

$9,808, 940
153, 000
154, 627

7,364, 466
679, 764
147, 719
1, 734, 919
92, 424
937, 619
835, 934
270, 810
214,049
323, 519

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
...
Printing and reproduction
__
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
___
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims
_ __ _
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments
Unvouchered

02
03
04
05
06
07

$8,335,108
116,035
141, 473

37
35
37

17
17
17

32,"987
6,000

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of y e a r . . .
Average GS grade and salary
01

14.6

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$11,466

12.0

$177,322

$8,684
$313, 680

14.8

$11,660
$200,000

12,030

Total personal services
...
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services.. __
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction.._
07 Other contractual services.
08 Supplies and materials
__
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

177,322
2,129
4,825

325,710
32, 750
3, 750
300
10,000
1,000
82, 990
5, 500
20, 500

15
39, 848

200,000
2,000
2,400
100

12, 000

EMERGENCY

218, 000

16,870,000

19, 400, 000

$16,386,000

$19,182,000

185, 775

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Federal Civil Defense Administration..
Atomic Energy Commission
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare, Public Health Service
Department of Commerce, Weather
Bureau.__
__
General Services Administration

484, 000

$12, 651, 792
33,000

Total obligations

1, 500

225, 438

...

1, 500

12, 877, 230

Total, allocation accounts

1, 299

200,000

218,000

6,663

SUPPLIES

AND

284,000

EQUIPMENT

[Emergency supplies and equipment:] For expenses necessary
for warehousing and maintenance [of reserve stocks] of emergency
civil defense materials as authorized by subsection (h) of section
201 of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended,
[$3,300,000] $18,000,000.
(Independent Offices Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$3,300,000

Estimate 1959,

$18,000,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Medical supplies and equipment:
(a) Emergency hospitals
(6) Medical and surgical
(c) Blood and shock therapy
id) Other
Total medical supplies and
equipment

$20, 325, 606
12, 690, 624
7, 477, 541
67,016
40,560, 787

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

142

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION—Con.

Object Classification—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued
EMERGENCY

SUPPLIES

1957 actual

AND

EQUIPMENT—Continued

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Federal Civil Defense Administration. _
Veterans Administration
Department of the A r m y

Program and Financing—Continued
1957 actual

Total obligations

2, 860,694

$3,300,000

$18,000,000

3,300,000

18,000,000

3,300,000

18,000,000

$4, 325, 825

Financing:
Comparative transfers from (—) other
accounts... _ _ _ _ _ _
_ ___ _
Unobligated balance no longer available.

- 2 , 3 3 3 , 266
1, 585, 960

Appropriation (new obligational authority)
___

47, 000,000

Material and equipment not normally available, or not
present in quantities needed to cope with conditions
caused by enemy attack, are stockpiled in strategic locations. These supplies and equipment are stored under
the following criteria: (1) Minor storage locations of
approximately 10,000 to 15,000 square feet are used for
pre-positioning hospitals, medical supplies, and radiological instruments; (2) major storage locations of approximately 50,000 square feet are used in support of one or
more target areas; and (3) general reserve storage locations of from 100,000 to 500,000 square feet are used in
support of wide geographical regions. Governmentowned and controlled installations are used where
possible.
Through 1958, approximately $219 million of supplies
and equipment had been stockpiled in 43 warehouses.
During 1959, procurement of new items for the stockpile will be suspended pending the development of an
integrated resource plan covering all essential civilian
survival needs. Activities under this program will be
directed primarily toward the reprocessing of overage
blood plasma procured in prior years and an accelerated
program to pre~position emergency hospitals procured
through 1957.
Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,369, 497
3, 032, 292
19, 023, 383
23, 022, 688

$397,460
2, 635, 540
33, 000

$14, 559, 000
2,925,000
150,000

47, 447, 860

3, 066, 000

17, 634,000

36

45

36
36

44
44

45
30
44
44

1957 actual
FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION

07
08
09

Other contractual services. _
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Total, Federal Civil Defense Administration. _
ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees. _
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

02
04
05
07
08
11
15

_ _

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
__ _
Total personal services.
___ _
Travel
Communication services... _ _ _ _ _
Rents and utility services.
Other contractual services
_._
Supplies and materials.
__
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Taxes and assessments
Total, allocation accounts
Total obligations




1959 estimate

$3, 066, 000
234, 000

$17, 634,000
366,000

1959 estimate

47, 747,306

Program by activities—Continued
2. Radiological and chemical warfare
defense equipment.. __
3. Warehousing and maintenance of
stockpile

1958 estimate

$47,447, 860
288,188
11, 258

1958 estimate

4.1

$3, 966

4.1

$3, 966

4.1

$3,966

725

$153, 461

153, 461
46
341
10, 560
19, 700
115, 338

$188, 675
119, 000
725

189,400

308,400

350
10, 560
20, 000
1, 800
11,890

400
14, 000
25, 733
2,400
12,390
2,677

$188, 675

299, 446

234, 000

366,000

47, 747, 306

3, 300, 000

18,000, 000

RESEARCH

AND

DEVELOPMENT

^ [Surveys, plans, and research:] For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary for studies and research to develop measures
and plans for evacuation, shelter, and the protection of life and
property, as authorized by section 201 (d) of the Federal Civil
Defense Act of 1950, as amended, including services as authorized
by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a),
[$2,000,0003 $4,400,000, to remain available until expended.
(Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$2,000,000

Estimate 1959,

$4,400,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Survival planning
2. Research:
(a) Warning and communications.
(b) Radiological defense
._
(c) Engineering and nuclear testing
(d) Health and medical _ _
(e) Damage assessment
CO Other
Total obligations
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts
- . ._ ._ __.
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$5, 767, 241

$5,121, 720

105, 558
145,000

856,000
730, 000

$1,100,000
1,160,000

2,147, 219
20,000
301, 500
110, 458

1, 685,147
500, 000
500,000
150,000

2, 575,000
575,000
300,000
190,000

8, 596, 976

9, 542, 867

5, 900,000

-711, 000
- 6 , 928, 843
9,042, 867

- 9 , 0 4 2 , 867
1, 500,000

-1,500,000

2, 000,000

4, 400,000

10,000,000

1. Survival planning.—The program of studies leading
to survival plans for States and metropolitan areas will
be completed in 1958. Plans are being developed for
45 States, including the principal metropolitan areas.
2. Research.—This activity provides for increased research and development of civil defense systems and equipment through contracts with other Federal agencies, universities, industry, and other private institutions.
(a) Warning and communications.—This covers research and development in civil defense warning and
communications equipment including voice sound systems, home warning devices, and low frequency radio
transmission.
(b) Radiological defense.—The objective of this program
is the development of a national radiological defense
system which would include prediction, monitoring, shelter, countermeasures, reclamation procedures and
decon t amina tion.
(c) Engineering and nuclear testing.—This program provides for development of shelter designs for blast and
fallout protection and the field testing of protot}^pe
shelters.
(d) Health and medical.—Research in health and medical problems such as mass immunization techniques,
decontamination and protection of food and water supplies, blast biology studies, and shelter habitabilit}^ studies is carried out.
(e) Damage assessment.—This provides for participation in national bomb damage assessment system.

143

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Object Classification
1957 actual

S A L A R I E S AND E X P E N S E S ,
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

C I V I L D E F E N S E F U N C T I O N S OF F E D E R A L
AGENCIES

Program and Financing

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION
R E S E A R C H AND DEVELOPMENT

1957 actual

Other contractual services.
Services performed b y other agencies.

6,228,924
915, 598

$8,368, 721

1,000,000

$4,150,000
500,000

Total, Federal Civil Defense A d ministration

07

7,144, 522

9,368, 721

4,650,000

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

02
07
08
09

7. 5

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

2, 021, 609
49,669
59, 745
373,984
3,190, 777

Financing:
Comparative transfers to other accounts.
Unobligated balance no longer available.

81, 669
727, 554

Appropriation (new obligational authority)-

1, 427,010
12, 411
388

$174,146

$1, 250,000

Total, allocation accounts

1, 452, 454

174,146

1,250,000

Total obligations

8, 596, 976

9, 542, 867

5, 900,000

1959 estimate

257,670
368, 292

Total obligations

$5, 255
$3, 990
$11,120
531

Total personal services
Travel
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment

Program by activities:
1. Housing and H o m e Finance Agency.
2. Department of Agriculture
3. Department of Commerce
4. Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare
5. Department of the Interior
6. Department of Justice
7. Department of Labor

1958 estimate

4,000,000

Funds to finance the civil defense functions of Federal
agencies in 1959 are included within the regular appropriations of the various agencies involved.
Object Classification

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Federal Civil Defense Administration..
Department of the A r m y
A t o m i c Energy Commission

i, 368, 721
9,248
164, 898

$7,144, 522
5, 752
1, 446, 702

$4, 650,000

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1, 250,000
ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

FEDERAL

CONTRIBUTIONS

[Federal contributions: For financial contributions to the States,
not otherwise provided for, pursuant to subsection (i) of section 201
of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, to be equally
matched with State funds, $17,000,000, to remain available until
June 30, 1959.] (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$17,000,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

Total obligations

..

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d . .
Unobligated balance carried forward
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority) __

1959 estimate

$1,110, 928
6,303, 675
441, 548
1,680, 584
659,115
109,832
504, 949
943, 503

$1,318,023
6, 515, 538
774,882
1,977,035
885, 205
168, 258
788, 908
1, 593, 678

$1,800,000
7,000,000
800, 000
2, 000,000
1,000,000
300,000
1, 200, 000
2, 400, 000
500, 000

11, 754,134

Program by activities:
1. Attack warning
__
2. Communications. __
3. Public safety services
_ _
4. Medical supplies and equipment
5. Education services..
6. Mass care equipment
_
7. Engineering supplies and equipment.
8. Construction and general equipment.
9. Preservation of vital records

1958 estimate

14,021, 527

17,000, 000

- 8 , 993, 082
14,021, 527
217, 421

- 1 4 , 021, 527
17,000, 000

-17,000, 000

17, 000,000

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

406
25
333
351

Average GS grade and salary
01

9. 9

$7,189

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$1,891, 858
150,930
27, 369

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
13 Refunds, awards and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

2, 070,157
336,105
24, 267
20, 233
11,165
58, 708
332, 042
79, 584
115, 449
135,185
750
7,132

02
03
04
05
06
07

17,000, 000

Civil defense funds of States and their political subdivisions are matched for selected types of civil defense
equipment.
During the years 1952 through 1957, Federal obligations
under this program amounted to approximately $65
million. All States have participated in the program. Of
the total funds administered under the program, approximately 46% have been used to enable States and localities
to establish adequate emergency warning and communications systems. Another 23% of these funds have been
utilized for the purchase of medical supplies and equipment.

Total obligations

3,190, 777

Obligations are distributed as follows:
Housing and H o m e Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor...•

257, 670
368, 292
2, 021, 609
49, 669
59, 745
373, 984

No part of any appropriation in this Act shall be available for
the construction of warehouses or for the lease of warehouse space in
any building which is to be constructed specifically for the use of the
Federal Civil Defense Administration. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Public enterprise funds:
CIVIL

DEFENSE

PROCUREMENT

FUND

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$256, 508

$231,667

$280,850

637,042

420,600

510,000

893, 550

652,267

790, 850

Object Classification

1957 actual
11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions—




$11,754,134

1958 estimate
$14,021, 527

1959 estimate
$17,000,000

Program by activities:
Public safety programs
Medical
supplies
and
program

equipment

Total program (costs—obligations)..

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

144

Object Classification

F E D E R A L CIVIL D E F E N S E A D M I N I S T R A T I O N — C o n .

1957 actual

CIVIL DEFENSE

PROCUREMENT

FUND—Continued

03
08
09

Program and Financing—Continued
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$480,461
480,460
1, 353, 705

$382,090
382,090

$358,132
358,131

Total amounts becoming available..
Unobligated balance brought forward. __

2, 314, 626
2, 953,141

764,180
4, 374, 217

Total amounts available
Capital transfer (repayment of principal
to Treasury) (—)
. .
Unobligated balance carried forward

5, 267, 767

5,138, 397
- 3 , 500, 000
-986,130

- 9 1 1 , 543

893, 550

652, 267

790,850

. __ _

1, 702, 393

- 4 , 374, 217

Total obligations

716, 263
986,130

1957 actual
Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Reimbursements from:
Federal contributions appropriation
States
Recovery of prior year obligations

Financing applied to program

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$960,921

$764,180
467, 558

$716, 263
21, 960

960, 921

1, 231, 738

738, 223

1957 actual

Total gross expenditures
Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Reimbursement from States and from
the Federal contributions appropriation
Decrease in selected working capital

Budget expenditures

764,180

716, 263

764,180

716, 263

- 7 3 4 , 501

467, 558

21, 960

$937, 490
562,510

DEFENSE

5, 377,186

Total assets
Liabilities:
Current

1, 500, 000

ASSISTANCE

TO

STATES

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Civil defense assistance to States (total
obligations)
_ __

$26,000,000

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

26,000,000

Under proposed legislation, 1959.—Recommendations
for amendment of the Federal Civil Defense Act were
transmitted to the last session of the Congress. The proposals were substantially approved by the House of Representatives (H. R. 7576) and are now pending before the
Senate. These proposals include a program for Federal
matching of State and local civil defense personnel and
administrative costs as well as provide for other needed
improvements in the overall civil defense effort. A
supplemental appropriation of $26 million is anticipated,
to be distributed among the various appropriations which
will be augmented by the new legislation.
FEDERAL COAL M I N E SAFETY B O A R D OF R E V I E W

AND

EXPENSES

1, 500, 000

[Salaries and expenses:! For necessary expenses of the Federal
Coal Mine Safety Board of Review, including services as authorized
by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), $70,000.
(80 U. S. C. 475, 477; 66 Stat. 709; Department of the Interior and
Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 7 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 7 0 , 0 0 0

E n d of year (total Government investment)..

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available5,000, 000

5, 000, 000

1, 500, 000

- 3 , 500, 000
1, 500, 000

1, 500,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$937,490

$915,530

5, 000, 000

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Hearing appeals (total obligations)

377,186

Government investment:
Non-interest-bearing capital:
Start of year __ __
_ ..
Repayment of principal to Treasury
during year (—)
--

1957 actual

$4,170, 547

$4,905,048

582,088

377,186

Obligated balance, net:
Accounts payable
Obligations other than
liabilities
Accounts receivable, net
(-)

2,046, 859

625,783

513,870

588, 457

- 1 , 4 1 1 , 541

-472,138

-562,510

-584,470

Total obligated balance

1, 217,406

530,831

-48,640

2,953,141

4,374,217

986,130

911,543

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

$51,065

1959 estimate

$70,000

$70,000

70,000

70,000

18,935
70,000

Coal-mine operators, affected by orders issued by
Federal coal-mine inspectors, may appeal to the Board
for annulment or revision of, and temporary relief from
such orders. Hearings are held, applications determined,
and findings and orders of the Board are made public.
During 1957, the Board heard and determined 3 cases
requiring 7 days of hearings. It is estimated that there
will be approximately 100 to 125 orders subject to appeal
to the Board in 1958 and 1959.

3,987




790,850

Program and Financing

Assets:
Cash with T r e a s u r y . . .
Accounts receivable, net

Unobligated balance

652, 267

Program and Financing

$915, 530
584, 470

Financial Condition

Unexpended balance:
Cash with Treasury

CIVIL

SALARIES
960, 921
734, 501

$4, 905,048
472,138

.

$47, 452
71,170
672, 222

Current authorizations:

1, 695, 422

Total receipts from operations

$39,137
58, 704
554, 426

Proposed for later transmission:

This fund finances the procurement of civil defense
materials toward which contributions to the States are
authorized on a matching fund basis. The fund is
reimbursed for purchases from the Federal contributions
appropriation and from funds provided by the States
(65 Stat. 61).
Funds in the amount of $5 million were appropriated
in 1951 to establish the operating principal of this fund.
In 1958, $3.5 million of this principal, no longer required
for operations, is being returned to the Treasury.

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Procurement of civil defense materials
Increase in selected working capital . .

1959 estimate

893, 550

Transportation of things..
Supplies and materials.
Equipment

1958 estimate

$53, 614
80,419
759, 517

Public enterprise funds—Continued

Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.

1958 estimate
6
1

1959 estimate

5
1

5
1

145

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Object Classification—Continued
1958 estimate

1957 actual
Average number of all employees.__
N u m b e r of employees at end of year __ __
Average GS grade and salary..
01

1959 estimate

6
8

6
8

6
7
10. 0

Personal services:
Permanent positions
. . . ___
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services.

$7, 567

10. 2

$7,830

10. 2

$7, 992

$39,384
6, 450
10

$38,906
17, 300
180

$39, 540
17, 300
183

45,844
2,879

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things..
04 Communication services..
05 Rents and utility services
- .
06 Printing and reproduction.
_
07 Other contractual services. __
08 Supplies and materials. .
_
09 E q u i p m e n t . . .
______
„
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions

56,386
7,000
15
1,300
200
700
850
699
300
2, 550

57,023
7,000
15
1,100
100
500
750
612
300
2,600

70,000

70,000

907
332
396
416
291

Total obligations

51,065

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS

COMMISSION

Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

3. Safety and special radio services.—Aviation, police,
marine, amateur, and other nonbroadcast uses of radio
are licensed and regulated. Pertinent data follows:

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses in performing
the duties of the Commission as authorized by law, including newspapers (not to exceed [$175] $200), land and structures (not to
exceed [$68,200] $120,000), special counsel fees, improvement and
care of grounds and repairs to buildings (not to exceed [$18,500]
$15,400), services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), purchase of not to exceed three passenger
motor vehicles, for replacement only, and not to exceed [$112,900]
$107,470 for expenses of travel, [$8,300,000] $8,950,000. (Communications Act of 1934, as amended; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 8 , 3 0 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 8 , 9 5 0 , 0 0 0

1

Program by activities:
1. Applied technical research and fre
quency allocation. .
. _
2. Broadcast
__ .
3. Safety and special radio services
4. Field engineering ana monitoring
5. C o m m o n carrier
6. Executive, staff, and service

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority) .

$614, 756
1,638, 373
889,966
2, 576,853
961, 290
1, 618, 762

$657,339
1, 730, 463
992, 437
2,870,139
1,028,968
1, 670,654

7,825, 244

Total obligations...

$551, 558
1, 561,073
837, 770
2, 457,924
885, 591
1, 531, 328

8, 300, 000

8, 950, 000

1957
actual
215,955
186,025

1958
1959
estimate estimate
257,170
308,097
204,601
228,487

As of June 30 of each year—excluding amateur.

4. Field engineering and monitoring activities.—Field
employees inspect radio stations, give operator examinations, collect engineering data, monitor the spectrum, and
determine the location of lost ships, aircraft, and illegal
sources of radio emission.
5. Common carrier activities.—The Commission regulates the rates and practices of communications common
carriers; considers proposed mergers and acquisitions of
properties, extensions and reductions in service, construction of facilities, and applications for use of radio in
communication services.
6. Executive, staif, and service activities.—This activity
includes adjudicatory functions of the Commission.
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
- N u m b e r of employees at end of year.

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
13
15

1958 estimate

> 257
,

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent.
Other personal services

1,106
1,120
8. 2

$6, 203

$6, 717, 572
114, 975
86, 901

i, 921, 251
31,226

6, 919, 448
112, 824
24, 398
186, 378
57,186
40, 487
76, 200
81, 396
156, 546
146, 565
18, 253

Total personal services.
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
.. .
Rent and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Land and structures
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

7,041. 357
99, 900
18, 700
189,000

60, 000

1,125
4, 438

57,000
76, 000
75, 800
119, 500
105, 350
36, 500
414, 793
1,600
4,500

7, 825, 244

Total obligations

1959 estimate

1,202
4

1,226
14
1,084
1,119

Average GS grade and salary
01

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1956
actual
174,964
170, 506

Stations regulated i
License applications received

8, 300, 000

2, 756
7, 828,000

8, 300,000

8, 950,000

Intragovernmental funds:

The Federal Communications Commission regulates
wire and radio communications in interstate and foreign
commerce, including the rates and services of communications common carriers. A basic Commission objective is
to achieve maximum benefits to the public from the use
of the radio spectrum. Increases proposed for 1959 are
primarily to handle workload resulting from expanding
use of radio and television and technical advances in
communications.
1. Applied technical research and frequency allocation.—
This activity provides the Commission with the basic
information for determining the best utilization of the
radio spectrum.
2. Broadcast activities.—Standard broadcast (AM), frequency modulation (FM), Television (TV), and other
related services are licensed and regulated by the Commission. Pertinent data are shown in the following table:
1956
actual
Stations regulated i
4,352
Applications disposed of for n e w stations or
major change of facilities:
AM
532
FM
124
266
i A s of June 30 of each year.

440000—58




10

1957
actual

1958
estimate

1959
estimate

4,647

4,915

5,233

605
153
425

566
200
415

670
240
465

ADVANCES A N D

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing
1957 actual

$434,600

282,810

38,099
8, 554

44,000
1,508

45,638

438,860

698,318

480,238

438,860

from

$370,000

152,235

Total obligations
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other accounts

1959 estimate

$239,972

Program by activities:
1. Control of electronic radiation: Department of Defense
2. Operational research: Department
of Defense
3. Technical assistance: International
Cooperation Administration
4. Miscellaneous services

1958 estimate

698,318

480,238

100
97
100

60
58
59

Object Classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01
02
03

Personal services: Permanent
tions
Travel
Transportation of things

80
64
78
7.1

posi-

$5,163
$332,008
58,273
6,382

7. 7

$5,400
$534,981
58,000
12,200

8. 7

$6,616
$383,423
43,100
6,000

146

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION—Con.

FEDERAL

Intragovernmental funds—Continued
ADVANCES AND

Public enterprise funds:
HOME

LOAN

BANK

REIMBURSEMENTS—Continued

Total obligations

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$13,122

$4,600

1,632

20,540
13,725
17, 502
24,408
3,840

4,000
2,200
8,000
25,115
3,800

438,860

04 Communication services
05 Rent and utility services
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions .
15 Taxes and assessments

698,318

480, 238

$12,312
59
13,833
8,899
5,462

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
I N V E S T M E N T IN F E D E R A L D E P O S I T I N S U R A N C E

CORPORATION

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
$3,000,000,000 $3,000,000,000 $3,000,000,000
debt receipts)...
Unobligated balance carried forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)

3, 000,000,000

REVOLVING

1957 actual

3,000,000,000

FUND

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$152,200

$180,959

$213,800

188,744

250,981

346,445

64,233

74,099

88,275

3,870, 619

5,296, 565

6,114, 854

578,480
215, 636

697, 079
246,717

844, 780
334,846

Total direct costs
Relation of costs to obligations:
Cost financed from obligations of other
years, net (—)
Obligations incurred for costs of other
years, net

5,069,912

6,849,885

Total direct program (obligations) _
Reimbursable costs (obligations):
4. Examining savings and loan associations
6. Administrative services

5,069,099
115
71,859

65,000

65,000

Total program (obligations)

5,141,073

6,916,482

8,009,510

Financing:
A m o u n t s becoming available:
Examining fees and charges
Assessments for services and facilitiesReimbursements from other accounts.
Conservatorship and/or supervisory
representative in charge income
Other revenue

3,958,769
1,032,452
71,974

5, 550, 888
1,250,000
65,000

6,436,224
1,600,000
65,000

Total amounts becoming available . .
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d . . .

5,110,972
345,236

6,865,888
315,135

8,101,224
264, 541

Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carried forward

5,456,208
-315,135

7,181,023
- 2 6 4 , 541

8,365,765
-356,255

5,141,073

6,916,482

8,009, 510

Object Classification—Continued
1957 actual

BOARD

Program and Financing

3,000,000,000

The Corporation insures accounts of depositors in
insured banks up to $10,000. As of June 30, 1957, the
deposit insurance fund for the protection of depositors
amounted to $1.8 billion or 1.51% of all insured deposits,
which amounted to approximately $118.9 billion on that
date. No tax funds are used in its operations. Its
expenses are paid and the fund is accumulated from
assessments paid by insured banks and from income on
investments in obligations of the U. S. Treasury. However, the Corporation is authorized to borrow from the
Treasury, not to exceed $3 billion outstanding at any one
time, as required for insurance purposes. No borrowings
under this authorization have been made to date and
none are anticipated in 1958 or 1959.

Program by activities:
Direct costs:
1. Examination and supervision of
Federal home loan banks
2. Supervision of Federal and Statechartered institutions
-. 3. Chartering savings and loan associations
4. Examining savings and loan associations . .
5. Executive direction and staff services.
__
6. Administrative services
7. Credits allowed on prior year assessments

Financing applied to program

103,485
7,943,000

-813
1,597

1, 510

6,851,482

7,944,510

43, 642
4,135

The three-member Board supervises the Federal homeloan bank system, the system of Federal savings and loan
associations and the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation (12 U. S. C. 1421 et seq., 1461 et seq., and
1464 et seq.). Net administrative expenses of the Federal
Home Loan Bank Board are paid from assessments against
the 11 Federal home-loan banks, the Division of Examinations, and the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation.
[Dollars in thousands]

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD
The Federal Home Loan Bank Board formulates policies
and supervises the operations of the 11 Federal home loan
banks, the system of Federal savings and loan associations
and the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation.
The expenditure programs of the Federal Home Loan
Bank Board and the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation are presented as business-type budgets. Section 2 of Public Law 895, approved July 3, 1948, provides
that all expenses of the Division of Examinations, Federal
Home Loan Bank Board shall be considered nonadministrative. All expenses of the Division of Examinations are
defrayed from fees charged against and collected from the
institutions examined.
The estimated net administrative expenses of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board are paid from assessments
against the 11 Federal home loan banks, the Division of
Examinations, and the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation.




1957 actual
N u m b e r of members
4,469
Total assets of members
$44,584,000
Savings invested in members
$38,830,000
Mortgage loans of members
$36,955,000
Insured institutions examined and supervised
3,723
Federal home loan bank advances outoutstanding
$1,079,356

1958 estimate
4,550
$49,800,000
$43,855,000
$41,250,000

1959 estimate
4,620
$55,200,000
$49,050,000
$45,700,000

3,850

3,980

$1,200,000

$1,300,000

Budget program.—The Board's budget is based on six
activities.
1. Examination and supervision of Federal home-loan
banks.—The Board supervises and examines the operations
of the Federal home-loan banks.
2. Supervision of Federal and State-chartered institutions.—The financial condition and operations of each
insured institution is analyzed and corrective action is
instituted when warranted. Supervision of insured institutions operating under State charter is carried on,
cooperatively, under arrangements made with the respective State authorities.
3. Chartering savings and loan associations.—Federal
savings and loan associations are chartered and regulated.
In addition, applications of State-chartered associations

147

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

for conversion into Federal savings and loan associations
are examined.
4. Examining savings and loan associations.—Supervisory examinations are made of Federal savings and
loan associations, State-chartered associations insured
by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation,
and such uninsured member institutions of the Federal
home loan bank system as are not examined by State
examiners. Audits are also made of over 80% of
all insured associations. Examinations are also made of
institutions applying for insurance of accounts and for
conversion from a State to a Federal charter when required by the Board. The costs of examinations and
audits are assessed against the institutions examined.
5. Executive direction and staff services.—This includes
formulation of basic policy and the furnishing of staff
services that are common to the Board and the insurance
corporation.
6. Administrative services.—These consist of auditing;
accounting; budgetary and financial reporting; internal
budget control; fiscal organization and management;
and general housekeeping and common operating services,
including printing and reproduction work.
The amounts shown in the schedules for the above
activities include administrative expenses under annual
limitation; nonadministrative expenses under a separate
limitation; and certain additional expenses not under
limitation. Administrative expenses are estimated to
increase from $1,250,000 to $1,600,000 reflecting staff
increases to meet increasing workload and provision for
the payment of rent for the use of Government-owned
space. Nonadministrative expenses covering the expenses of examining savings and loan associations are
discussed separately below.
Relation oj costs to obligations.—The relationship is
derived by year-end balances of selected resources as reflected in the following table:
Selected resources at end of year:
Inventories:
Supplies
Postage meter
Unpaid undelivered orders
Total selected resources at end of year
Selected resources at start of year ( - )

1956
actual

$8,210
2,555
5,451

$9,191
1,833
4,379

$10,100
1,900
5,000

$11,110
1,900
5,500

16,216

_

1957
actual

15,403
-16,216

17,000
-15,403

18,510
-17,000

1,597

1, 510

Costs financed from obligations of other years, net ( — ) . . .
Obligations incurred for costs of other years, net

-.

1958
1959
estimate estimate

—813

Financial condition.-—The Board is not incorporated,
and has no capital stock. Its assets consist of cash 011
deposit with the Treasurer of the United States and
accounts receivable for the services which it renders.
Its liabilities consist essentially of accounts payable.

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Examination and supervision of Federal home loan banks:
Acquisition of equipment
Expense
Supervision of Federal and
Statechartered institutions:
Acquisition of equipment
Expense
Chartered savings and loan associations:
Acquisition of equipment
Expense
Examining savings and loan associations:
Acquisition of e q u i p m e n t —
—
Expense
Executive direction and staff services:
Acquisition of equipment
Expense
Administrative services:
Acquisition of equipment
Expense




1958 estimate

Gross expenditures (funds applied)—Con.
Credits allowed on prior year assessments
Increase in selected working capital

$180,959

213,672

52
188, 692

700
250,281

2,963
343,482

74, 099

128
88,147

34,672
!, 836, 062

17,100
5, 279,465

9, 000
6,105,854

2,094
576,386

2,875
694, 204

3,408
841,372

335
287,160

225
311,492

2,210
397, 636

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$103,485
23, 956

$47,039

$5,141,886

6, 938,841

8,055,039

Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Revenue
Decrease in selected working capital

5,110,972
60, 065

6,865,888

8,101,224

Total receipts from operations

5,171, 037

6,865, 888

8,101, 224

-29,151

72, 953

-46,185

$152,200
152, 200

$180, 959
180, 959

$213,800
213, 800

188, 744
188, 744

250, 981
250, 981

346,445
346, 445

64, 233
64, 233

74, 099
74,099

88, 275
88, 275

Examining savings and loan institutions:
Revenue
Expense
_
____

3, 831, 536
3, 870, 734

5, 351, 053
5, 296, 565

6, 208,078
6,114,854

Assessments and fees in excess of
expense, examining savings and
loan associations

-39,198

54, 488

93, 224

586, 764
578, 480

697,079
697,079

844, 780
844, 780

287, 495
287,495

311, 717
311, 717

399, 846
399, 846

-30,914

54,488

93, 224

330, 538

281, 541

Total gross expenditures

Budget expenditures

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Examination and supervision of Federal
home loan banks:
Revenue.
.
Expense. . . .
Assessments and fees in excess of
expense, examination and supervision of Federal home loan banks.
Supervision of Federal and State-chartered institutions:
Revenue
Expense
_
Assessments and fees in excess of
expense, supervision of Federal
and State-chartered institutions
Chartering savings and loan institutions:
Revenue.
Expense
. __
Assessments and fees in excess of
expense, chartering savings and
loan institutions

Executive direction and staff services:
Revenue
Expense
Assessments and fees in excess of
expense, executive direction and
staff services
Administrative services:
Revenue..
_
Expense

8,284

Assessments and fees in excess of
expense, administrative services
Assessments and fees in excess of
expense for the year
Analysis of deferred and undistributed
credits:
Deferred and undistributed credits,
beginning of year
Credit allowed on prior year assessments (—) _ __
_

1959 estimate

$382
151,818

64, 233

1957 actual

Deferred and undistributed credits,
end of year.

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual

Sources and Application of Funds (Operations)—Continued

361,452

-103,485
330, 538

281, 541

374,765

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury.
Accounts receivable
_ _
Inventory: Supplies
Other: Postage meter. __

. .

$346,403
797,080
9,191
1,833

$273,450
1,038,950
10,100
1,900

$319, 635
1,178, 540
11,110
1, eoo

Furniture, fixtures, and equipment
Less portion charged off as depreciation.

256, 640
256,640

277, 540
277, 540

295, 377
295,377

1,154, 507

1,324,400

1, 511,185

823,969
330, 538

1,042, 859
281, 541

1,136,420
374, 765

1,154, 507

1,324,400

1, 511,185

Total, furniture,
equipment

fixtures,

and

Total assets.
Liabilities:
Current 1
Deferred and undistributed credits..
Total liabilities

._

i Excludes contingent liability for accrued annual leave of $513,879 at the end of 1957,
$645,500 at the end of 1958, and $706,500 at the end of 1959.

148

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD—Continued

Object Classification

Public enterprise funds—Continued

1957 actual

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD REVOLVING

FUND—Continued

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
Unexpended
Cash

balance:

_

Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
Obligations other than
liabilities: Unpaid undelivered orders
Accounts receivable ( — ) .
Net obligations outstanding
Unobligated balance

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$317, 252

$346, 403

$273,450

823, 969

1,042, 859

4, 379
-797,080

5,000
-1,038,950

5,500
- 1 , 1 7 8 , 540

-27,984

31, 268

8,909

-36,620

345, 236

315,135

264, 541

356, 255

LIMITATION
ON ADMINISTRATIVE
EXPENSES,
FEDERAL
HOME

AND
LOAN

NONADMINISTRATIVE
BANK
BOARD

[Federal Home Loan Bank Board:] Not to exceed a total of
[$1,250,000] $1,600,000 shall be available for administrative
expenses of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, and shall be
derived from funds available to the Federal Home Loan Bank
Board, including those in the Federal Home Loan Bank Board
revolving fund and receipts of the Federal Home Loan Bank Administration, the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, or the Home Loan
Bank Board for the current fiscal year and prior fiscal years, and
the Board may utilize and may make payment for services and
facilities of the Federal home-loan banks, the Federal Reserve
banks, the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, and
other agencies of the Government (including payment for office
space): Provided, That all necessary expenses in connection with
the conservatorship of institutions insured by the Federal Savings
and Loan Insurance Corporation or preparation for or conduct of
proceedings under section 5 (d) of the Home Owners' Loan Act of
1933 or section 407 of the National Housing Act and all necessary
expenses (including services performed on a contract or fee basis,
but not including other personal services) in connection with the
handling, including the purchase, sale, and exchange, of securities
on behalf of Federal home-loan banks, and the sale, issuance, and
retirement of, or payment of interest on, debentures or bonds, under
the Federal Home Loan Bank Act, as amended, shall be considered
as nonadministrative expenses for the purposes hereof: Provided
further, That not to exceed [$46,950] $55,000 shall be available for
expenses of travel: Provided further, That members and alternates
of the Federal Savings and Loan Advisor Council shall be entitled
to reimbursement from the Board as approved by the Board for
transportation expenses incurred in attendance at meetings of or
concerned with the work of such Council and may be paid not to
exceed $25 per diem in lieu of subsistence: Provided further, That
notwithstanding any other provisions of this Act, except for the
limitation in amount hereinbefore specified, the administrative expenses and other obligations of the Board shall be incurred, allowed,
and paid in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Home
Loan Bank Act of July 22, 1932, as amended (12 U. S. C. 1421-1449):
Provided further, That the nonadministrative expenses for the examination of Federal and State chartered institutions (other than
special examinations determined by the Board to be necessary) shall
not exceed [$5,665,000] $6,843,000. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Program by activities:
1. Examination and supervision of
Federal home loan banks
2. Supervision of Federal and Statechartered institutions. _
_ _
3. Chartering savings and loan associations
_
- 5. Executive direction and staff services.
6. Administrative services
Total administrative expenses
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer availableLimitation




8.4

$6,334

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal s e r v i c e s . . .

8. 7

$6, 450

8. 6

$6,397

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

$1,051,122
4,306

$1,234,139
5,043

925, 950

1,055,428

1,239,182

Net personal services.._
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
_
Rents and utility services
___ ...
Printing and reproduction.. _
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agenciesSupplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

923, 692
38, 965
291
28, 280
2, 390
143
6, 527
4,947
20, 887
1, 776

1,055,428
46, 950
595
30,310
2, 640
3, 000
7,395
7,112
27, 005
3,800
65, 540

307

225

1,239,182
55, 000
570
31, 265
137, 385
3, 000
7, 570
7,685
30, 316
8,837
78, 855
100
235

1,028, 205

1, 250, 000

1, 600, 000

Total accrued administrative
penditures

2,258

ex-

L I M I T A T I O N ON N O N A D M I N I S T R A T I V E E X P E N S E S ,
OF E X A M I N A T I O N S

DIVISION

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
4. Examining savings and loan associations
5. Executive direction and staff services.

$3,834,198
163,867

$5, 296, 565
199, 835

$6,114,854
228,146

Total nonadministrative expenses..

3, 998, 065

5, 496, 400

6,343, 000

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

290,935

168, 600

4,289,000

Limitation

5,665,000

6,343,000

The division conducts regular periodic and special supervisory examinations of all Federal savings and loan associations, of State-chartered savings and loan associations
and other institutions of the savings and loan type which
are insured by the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation, and of noninsured member institutions of
the Federal Home Loan Bank System that are not subject
to State supervision. The division also examines and
analyzes the financial condition of institutions which
apply for membership in the system, for insurance of
accounts or for conversion from a State to a Federal
charter. The institutions examined bear the costs of
examination, and the fees charged therefor are calculated
to defray all of the operating expenses of the division.
The following table reflects the work of the division:
[Dollars in millions]

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$152,200

$180,959

$213,800

188,097

250,981

346,445

64,233
408, 850
214, 825

74,099
497,244
246, 717

88,275
616, 634
334,846

1,028,205

1,250,000

1, 600,000

Description
Examinations completed or to be completed __
Average size of insured institutions (start of
year)
Average volume new loans made b y insured
institutions

1,250,000

1,600,000

1957 actual
3,096

1958 estimate
3,858

1959 estimate
3,990

$10.3

$11.3

$12.3

$2.8

$2.6

$2.6

Object Classification
1957 actual

Average GS grade and salary..

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

663
628
661

710
671
710

533
484
518

Total number of permanent positions...
Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

8,495
1,036,700

187
180
187

$922,215
3,735

Program and Financing
1957 actual

157
152
156

Total personal services
Deduct portion not chargeable to
limitation
__ _

1,136, 420

5, 451
- 7 2 5 , 709

1959 estimate

146
134
137

Average GS grade and salary.
01

$319,635

692, 274

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees.
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

1958 estimate

8.1

$5,389

8.8

$5, 621

9.2

$5,867

149

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Program and Financing—Continued

Object Classification—Continued
1958 estimate

$2,626, 714
3,126

$3,572,861
14, 335

$3,970, 580
15,993

Total personal services
D e d u c t portion not chargeable to
limitation^

2,629,840

3, 587, 196

3,986, 573

22, 982

114, 240

Net personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Federal H o m e Loan Bank Board
services
Services performed b y other agencies
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments

2,606,858
1,103, 538
4, 996
51,156
54,068
9, 546
11,085

3,472,956
1, 481, 650
5,000
64, 250

102,821
240
15,992
36, 822
943

125, 000
750
18, 359
17,100
224, 030
750

750
19,072
9,000
256, 815
800

3,998,065

5,496,400

6, 343, 000

1957 actual

1959 estimate

1957 actual
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

Total accrued
expenditures

nonadministrative

3,986, 573
1, 747,950
5,000
66,500
65,000
9,400
16,140

62,000

9,600
14, 955

I N V E S T M E N T IN F E D E R A L H O M E L O A N

160,000

BANKS

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
...
$1,000,000,000 $1,000,000,000 $1,000,000,000
Unobligated balance carried forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
__
-1,000,000,000 -1,000,000,000 -1,000,000,000
Financing applied to program

The Federal home loan banks, together with the building and loan associations and similar institutions which
are members of the banks, constitute the Federal home
loan bank system, are designed to stabilize and strengthen
institutions promoting private thrift and individual home
ownership.
The 11 Federal home loan banks obtain their funds
from capital stock, issuance of their own obligations, and
deposits of member institutions. The capital stock of the
banks consists entirely of subscriptions of member institutions. Authority to borrow from the Treasury in the
amount of $1 billion is provided in 12 U. S. C. 1431 (64
Stat. 257). No borrowings have been made to date and
none is anticipated in 1959.
FEDERAL

SAVINGS

AND

LOAN

INSURANCE

CORPORATION

FUND

Program by activities:
1. Underwriting-.. . .
2. Prevention of default and payment
of insurance
3. Analysis of operations
4. Executive direction and fiscal and
other administrative services
5. Payment to Federal H o m e Loan
Bank Board for services and facilities
_ __
Total costs, funded 1
..
6. Relation of costs to obligations:
Costs financed from obligations of
other years, net (—)
Obligations incurred for costs of
other years, net
Total program (obligations)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$110,344

$131,027

$138,802

64,358
191,418

82,539
227,422

80,609
257,805

223,296

254,612

267,184

413,561
1,002, 977

512,500
1,208,100

656,000
1,400,400
-5,400

-946
1,626
1,002,031

1,209,726

1,395,000

1 Includes acquisition of equipment (fully depreciated) in the amount of $17,257 for
1957; $20,600 for 1958; and $24,400 for 1959.




Total amounts becoming a v a i l a b l e Unobligated balance brought forward:
Authorization to expend from public
debt receipts.
Investments in U. S. securities
Total amounts available.._
Repayment of capital stock to Treasury (—)
. _
__
Payment of return on capital stock to
Treasury (—)
Unobligated balance carried forward:
Authorization to expend from public
debt receipts.
__ __ _ __
Investments in U. S. securities
Financing applied to program

1959 estimate

$190,291

$102,060

$51,000

27,136,528
6,204, 778
1,406

31,890,100
6,864,000
18,300

36,116,600
7,421,000
2,100

33, 533,003

38,874,460

43, 590,700

750,000,000
252,882, 924

750,000,000
270,218,246

750,000,000
290,619,528

1,036,415,927

1,059,092, 706

1,084,210,228

-13,876,000

-16,170,000

- 1 8 , 783,000

-1,319,650

-1,093,452

-669,600

- 7 5 0 , 000,000
-270,218,246

-750,000, 000
-290,619,528

- 7 5 0 , 000, 000
-313,362,628

1,002,031

1,209,726

1,395,000

The Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation
is authorized by title IV of the National Housing Act (12
U. S. C. 1724 et seq.) to insure savings up to $10,000 in all
savings and loan associations which apply and are approved for insurance. The Corporation also may protect
investors by extending financial aid to institutions in
difficulty through loans, cash grants, or purchases of assets. When an insured institution declared in default is
a Federal savings and loan association, the Corporation
is appointed as receiver for the purpose of liquidation.
The Corporation also may act as receiver for Statechartered institutions declared in default if appointment
is tendered by State authority.
Revenue from insurance premiums and interest on investments has been sufficient to meet all insurance losses,
operating expenses, dividends on capital stock, and to establish a reserve for insurance losses of $229.5 million as of
June 30, 1957. The Corporation has authority to borrow
up to $750 million from Treasury, but no loans have ever
been required. Since the time and size of expenditures for
the prevention of default and payment of insurance are
unpredictable, estimates of these expenditures are omitted
from the financial statements.
The Corporation operates under the supervision and direction of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, which provides certain administrative services and conducts the examination and supervision of insured institutions. Although the cost of examinations are paid by the institutions examined, the Corporation is assessed for its share
of the costs of all services rendered by the Board.
[Dollars in thousands]

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Sale of fixed assets acquired.._
Insurance premiums and admission
fees
_
Interest earned on U. S. securities
Other revenue

1958 estimate

N u m b e r of insured institutions
Number of insured savers
Insured liability
Assets of insured members
Reserves and undivided profits of insured
institutions
Corporation's reserve for insurance l o s s e s . . .
Percent of authorization to total income

1957 actual
3,723
18,806,000
$36, 704,000
$42,068, 000
$2, 813,000
$229, 497
1.8

1958 estimate 1959 estimate
3,850
3,980
21,000,000
23,300, 000
$41,600,000
$46,700,000
$47,300,000
$52, 700,000
$3, 200,000
$265,967
1. 7

$3,700,000
$307,437
1.7

Budget program.—The budget program comprises five
activities.
1. Underwriting.—This activity constitutes an analysis
and evaluation of the insurance risk in connection with
applications for insurance of accounts and other applications submitted pursuant to regulatory requirements.
The assets of insured institutions have increased $10.5
billion or 33.3% in the last 2 years. The increasing
interest in insurance of accounts on the part of uninsured
institutions, plus the anticipated rate of growth, will in-

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

150

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD—Continued
Public enterprise funds—Continued
FEDERAL

SAYINGS

AND

LOAN

INSURANCE

FUND—Continued

CORPORATION

crease the insured liability of the Corporation to an estimated $46.7 billion by June 30, 1959, as compared to $36.7
billion on June 30, 1957.
2. Prevention of default and payment of insurance.—The
Corporation not only pays insurance in cases of defaulted
institutions, but prevents default wherever possible.
Through June 30, 1957, 38 institutions have needed financial assistance from the Corporation. Cash grants in the
net amount of $4.9 million have been made to 28 institutions to prevent default; a grant to 1 institution has been
authorized but not disbursed; the assets of 1 institution
were purchased and liquidated without loss; certain assets
of 1 institution were purchased and are in process of liquidation; and 7 institutions with aggregate assets of $9.2
million have been placed in liquidation and insurance paid.
Total losses since organization amount to $5.2 million.
3. Analysis of operations.—The Corporation maintains
a current analysis of the financial condition of member
institutions, the flow of savings, and the character and
volume of mortgage lending, including selective review of
geographical or community areas and phases of operations
and certain analyses of trends in the field of thrift and
home mortgage finance.
4. Executive direction and fiscal and other administrative
services.—This covers all fiscal and other administrative
services as well as management and direction.
5. Payment to Federal Home Loan Bank Board for services and facilities.—The Corporation currently subscribes
41% of the administrative expenses of the Federal Home
Loan Bank Board in return for services and facilities
provided by the Board.
Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship is
derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
reflected in the following table:
Selected resources at end of year:
Deferred charges
Accrued annual leave
Unpaid undelivered orders

1956
actual

1958
1959
estimate estimate

$1,853
84,629
3,245

$1,353
90,000

90,673

89,727
-90,673

91,353
-89,727

Costs financed from oblgiations of other years, net ( — ) . . .
Obligations incurred for costs of other years, net

—946

Total selected resources at end of year
Selected resources at start of year ( - )

$886
89,787

1957
actual

$953
85,000

Expense
Insurance losses
Return on capital stock
Legal reserve




Application of Funds (Operations)
1957 actual

Total gross expenditures..
Receipts from operations (funds provided) :
Proceeds from sale of assets acquired to
prevent d e f a u l t . . _
Revenue
__ __ __ __
Decrease in selected working capital

1,626

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$17, 257
985, 720

$20, 600
1,187, 500

$24, 400
1,376, 000

1, 002, 977

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Acquisition of furniture, fixtures, and
equipment-.
- __ __
Expense
__
___ _ __

1,208,100

1,400,400

190,291
33, 342, 712
832, 770

102, 060
38, 772, 400
792, 716

51,000
43, 539, 700
934, 200

34, 365, 773

Budget expenditures

39, 667,176

44, 524, 900

- 3 3 , 362, 796

Total receipts from operations

- 3 8 , 459, 076

- 4 3 , 1 2 4 , 500

Revenue, Expense, and Retained Earnings
Revenue
Expense

_

- -

.

_

-

$33, 342, 712
1, 002, 977

Net income for the year.
Analysis of retained earnings:
Retained earnings, beginning of year
P a y m e n t of return on capital stock to
Treasury (—)

85,953
-91,353

$38, 772, 400
1,208,100

$43, 539, 700
1, 400, 400

32, 339, 735

37, 564, 300

42,139, 300

198, 476, 393

229, 496, 478

265, 967, 326

- 1 , 3 1 9 , 650

- 1 , 093, 452

- 6 6 9 , 600

229, 496, 478

Retained earnings, end of year

265, 967, 326

307, 437, 026

$789,060
275,190,000
8,311,268
1,853
159, 505

$824,684
296,350, 000
9,991, 767
1,353
57,445

$796, 584
320,050,000
11,875,867
953
6,445

284,451, 686

307,225, 249

332, 729,849

Financial Condition

—5,400

Financing.—The Corporation is retiring its original
capital stock held by the Secretary of the Treasury at par
in amounts equivalent to 50% of annual net income.
Of the $100 million of original capital stock, $75.2 million
has been retired, and with an additional payment of approximately $18.8 million in 1959 the outstanding stock
will be reduced to $6.0 million. Funds for the retirement
of capital stock are obtained through the redemption of
United States securities held by the Corporation.
Through June 30, 1957, the Corporation has paid $42.2
million in lieu of dividends on capital stock. It is estimated that additional payments will be made to the Secretary of the Treasury of $1.1 million in 1958 and $0.7
million in 1959.
Operating results and financial condition.—Revenue of
the Corporation consists primarily of insurance premiums,
admission fees, and interest on investments in Government obligations. Total revenue, since 1934, of $287,052,953, has been applied as follows:
Percent
3.9
1.8
14.7
79.6

Operating expenses for 1959 are estimated at $1,400,400
consisting primarily of administrative expenses for the
Corporation of $720,000 and $656,000 for services rendered
by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board.
Net income before payment of a return on capital stock
for 1959 is expected to be increased by $9.8 million or
30.3% above the net income for 1957. After providing
for an interest payment in lieu of dividends on the capital
stock of $0.7 million for 1959, at a rate determined by the
Secretary of the Treasury, the balance of the net income,
$41.4 million, will be retained by the Corporation and
credited to its reserve for insurance losses.
The Corporation is required by law to accumulate a
reserve of 5 % of insured accounts and creditor obligations
of insured institutions before collection of premiums may
be discontinued. It is estimated that this statutory
requirement will amount to $2.3 billion by June 30, 1959.
The insurance reserve as of that date is expected to reach
$307 million or 0.66% of an estimated insured liability
of $46.7 billion.

Amount
$11,198,346
5,241,369
42,210,212
228,403,026

Assets:
Cash with Treasury.
U . S. securities (par).
...
Accounts receivable, n e t . .
Deferred charges.._
_ .
Assets acquired to prevent default, netTotal assets

_

Liabilities:
Current
...
Deferred credits (unearned insurance
premiums)

75,675

72, 690

16,390, 733

19, 202,133

13, 984, 208

Total liabilities
Government investment:
Interest-bearing capital:
Start of year
Repayment of capital stock to Treasury ( - )

66,190

13, 908, 533

16,456, 923

19,274,823

Total Government investment

40,971,000

24,801,000

-16,170,000

- 1 8 , 783,000

40, 971,000
229, 496,478

E n d of year
Retained earnings

54,847,000
-13,876,000

24,801,000
265,967, 326

6,018,000
307,437,026

270,467,478

290, 768,326

313,455,026

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
Unexpended balance:
Cash and U . S. securitiesBudget authorization- _ _
Total unexpended
balance

1957 actual

$257,811,914
750,000,000

$275,979, 060
750, 000,000

$297,174, 684
750, 000,000

$320, 846, 584
750,000,000

1,007,811,914

1,025,979,060

1, 047,174, 684

1,070,846, 584

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Status of Certain Fund Balances—Continued
1957 actual

1956 actual
Obligated balance, net:
Current liabilities
Deferred credits (unearned insurance premiums)
Accrued annual leave.__
Unpaid undelivered orders . _
Accounts receivable, net
(-)

Unobligated balance

HOME

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$83,210

$75, 675

$66,190

$72,690

12,054, 320
89, 787

13, 908, 533
84, 629

16,390,733
90,000

19, 202,133
85,000

- 7 , 298, 327

- 8 , 311, 268

- 9 , 9 9 1 , 767

-11,875,867

3,245

Total obligated balance

151

4,928,990

5, 760, 814

6, 555,156

1,002,882,924

1,020, 218, 246

1,040, 619, 528

OWNERS'

LOAN

CORPORATION

The Corporation was created to provide credit facilities
to refinance the mortgages of destitute urban home
owners. Its lending authority expired on June 12, 1936,
and since that time the Corporation has been dissolved.
Liabilities, representing matured bonds held by the public
together with accrued interest thereon, totaled $565,648
at the end of 1957 and are estimated to be reduced to
$435,648 by the end of 1959.

7,483,956

Sources and Application of Funds

1, 063, 362, 628

1957 actual
LIMITATION

ON ADMINISTRATIVE
EXPENSES,
FEDERAL
AND LOAN INSURANCE
CORPORATION

SAVINGS

[Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation:] Not to
exceed [$675,000] $720,000 shall be available for administrative
expenses, which shall be on an accrual basis and shall be exclusive
of interest paid, depreciation, properly capitalized expenditures,
expenses in connection with liquidation of insured institutions or
preparation for or conduct of proceedings under section 407 of the
National Housing Act, liquidation or handling of assets of or derived
from insured institutions, payment of insurance, and action for or
toward the avoidance, termination, or minimizing of losses in the
case of insured institutions, legal fees and expenses, and payments
for administrative expenses of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board
determined by said Board to be properly allocable to said Corporation, and said Corporation may utilize and may make payment for
services and facilities of the Federal home-loan banks, the Federal
Reserve banks, the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, and other
agencies of the Government: Provided, That not to exceed $15,400
shall be available for expenses of travel: Provided further, That
notwithstanding any other provisions of this Act, except for the
limitation in amount hereinbefore specified, the administrative
expenses and other obligations of said Corporation shall be incurred,
allowed and paid in accordance with title IV of the Act of June 27,
1934, as amended (12 U. S. C. 1724-1730). (Independent Offices
Appropriation Act, 1958.)

1959 estimate

$5,000

$5,000

5,662

Budget expenditures

1958 estimate

$5,662

Gross expenditures (funds applied):
Interest paid

5,000

5,000

Financial Condition
Assets:
Cash with Treasury.

...

$565,648

$500,648

$435,648

liabilities:
Interest payable
Matured bonds payable, held b y public.

84,698
480,950

79,698
420, 950

74,698
360, 950

565,648

500, 648

435, 648

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total liabilities

Status of Certain Fund Balances
1956 actual
Unexpended balance:
Cash with Treasury
Obligated balance, net:
Liabilities.
..

1957 actual

$626,460

$565,648

$500,648

$435,648

-626,460

-565,648

- 5 0 0 , 648

-435,648

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$5,000

$5,000

Unobligated balance

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate
1957 actual

Program by activities:
1. Underwriting
2. Prevention of default and payment
of insurance
3. Analysis of operations
...
4. Executive direction and fiscal and
other administrative services

$108,946

$129,358

$136,826

62,960
184,291

80,870
218,915

78,633
247,727

215, 962

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

245,857

256,814

572,159

Total administrative expenses

675,000

720,000

675,000

96

96
96

$5,662

105

88
96

14 Interest

720,000

Intragovernmental funds:
ADVANCES

23,841
596,000

limitation.

FUND

AND

REIMBURSEMENTS, FEDERAL
BOARD

HOME

LOAN

BANK

Program and Financing

Object Classification
1957 actual
87
2
80
83

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
7. 7

Average GS grade and salary
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions
_ . _
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

-

Total personal services
Deduct portion not chargeable to
limitation..
Net personal services
02 Travel
_
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services...
_
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction..
07 Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
15 Taxes and assessments
Total accrued administrative expenses




$5,947

7. 8

$5,865

7. 6

$5, 782
$569, 424

$470,147
10,196
7,262

$530, 575
2,175
532, 750

571, 620

335

532, 750
15,400
100
12,600
41,000
15,000
14,700
4,700
5,100
33,300
350

571, 620
15,400
100
12,800
43,000
15, 200
14, 500
4, 700
5,300
37,200
180

572,159

675, 000

720,000

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other accounts
__

2,196

487, 605

Program by activities:
Administrative services (total obligations)
__

374
487, 231
7,030
47
11, 970
36,014
13, 410
8,355
3, 765
4,002

from

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$71,859

$65,000

$65,000

71,859

65,000

65,000

13
13

13
13

13
13

$44,408
216
934
144
216
25, 797
72

$39,455
195
780
130
195
21,840

$34,775
195
9,035
130
130
18, 525

2,340
65

2,145
65

65,000

65,000

Object Classification
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
01
04
05
07

Personal services
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
.
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments
Total obligations

72
71,859

152

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD—Continued
Intragovernmental funds—Continued
ADVANCES

AND R E I M B U R S E M E N T S ,

DIVISION

OF

EXAMINATIONS

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities :
Examining savings and loan associations (total obligations)
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other accounts

1958 estimate

also anticipated that the amount of time devoted to
individual disputes will also increase.
2. Presidential boards of inquiry.—Boards of inquiry
may be appointed by the President when, in his judgment,
an existing or threatened work stoppage in an essential
industry will imperil the national health or safety.

1959 estimate

Object Classification
1957 actual

from

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees. _ _ . _
Number of employees at end of year

115

Average GS grade and salary

Object Classification

01
01

$115

Personal services

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary for the Service
to carry out the functions vested in it by the Labor-Management
Relations Act, 1947 (29 U. S. C. 171-180, 182), including expenses
of the Labor-Management Panel as provided in section 205 of said
Act; expenses of boards of inquiry appointed by the President
pursuant to section 206 of said Act; temporary employment of
arbitrators, conciliators, and mediators on labor relations at rates
not in excess of $75 per diem; Government listed telephones in
private residences and private apartments for official use in cities
where mediators are officially stationed, but no Federal mediation
and conciliation service office is maintained; [purchase of one
passenger motor vehicle for replacement only at not to exceed
$3,000;] expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with labor
and industrial relations; and services as authorized bv section 15
of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); [$3,550,000]
$3,695,000. (Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, arid
Welfare Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$3,550,000

Estimate 1959,

$3,695,000

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,997,343
4,231
257, 915

$3,258,162
5,000
286,838

$3,394,945
5,000
295,055

3, 259,489

3, 550, 000

1959 estimate

343
4
342
342

347
4
349
343

Program by activities:
1. Mediation and conciliation of labor
disputes.-.
2. Presidential boards of inquiry — _
3. Administration
-- Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)--

$8, 203

3, 695,000

The Service assists labor and management in mediation
and prevention of disputes affecting industries engaged in
interstate commerce and defense production other than
air and rail transportation.
1. Mediation and conciliation of labor disputes.—During
the last year the number of disputes brought to the
attention of the Service was approximately 78,000. About
19,000 were assigned for initial inquiry to determine the
progress of the parties toward voluntary settlement and
need for Federal mediation assistance. Over 13,000 disputes were mediated and closed during the year. While
this was less than the 14,000 closed the previous year,
economic and labor conditions indicate that the number
of disputes is expected to increase in the next year. It is

$8, 220

10. 6

$8, 267

Total obligations

$2, 882, 900
22,300
12,800

2, 804, 287
269, 492
5, 533
83, 411
8, 872
7, 228
14, 735
14, 947
14, 653
34, 465
1,635
231

2, 830, 000
320,000
7,000
95, 000
34, 000
7, 500
16, 000
18, 500
13, 600
27, 000
179, 000
2,000
400

2, 918,000
340,000
7,000
100, 000
36, 500
7, 500
16, 500
17,100
14, 000
49,000
187,000
2,000
400

3, 259, 489

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things ..
04 Communication services
_.
05 Rents and utility services
.. ..
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

$2, 795, 000
22, 300
12, 700

3, 550, 000

3, 695, 000

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary for the work of
the Commission, as authorized by law, including not to exceed
[$300,000] $400,000 for expenses of travel; hire of passenger motor
vehicles; and not to exceed $500 for newspapers; [$5,530,000]
$6,385,000, of which not to exceed $10,000 shall be available for
special counsel and services as authorized by section 15 of the Act
of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), but at rates not exceeding $50
per diem for individuals[: Provided, That not to exceed $335,000
shall be available for investigations relating to Federal river development projects]. (15 U. S. C. 717-717w; 16 U. S. C. 791 a825s, 828; 831m-l, m-3; 832a (a), d, e, f, i (b); 833d, e, h; 33 U. S. C.
701 j; 43 U. S. C. 617-1 (c), 1344 (c); 45 Stat. 200, 212-13, 1344; 60
Stat. 1080; 68 Stat. 573; 71 Stat. 401; Executive Order 10485, Sept. 3,
1953; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $5,530,000
Estimate 1959, $6,385,000
Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$1,066,467

$1,119,800

$1,314, 600

927,226

985,600

997,300

2,379,300

2,563,000

3,238,500

320, 303
12, 905
477, 824

334,400
13, 900
513,300

307,400
13,900
513,300

5,184, 025

5, 530, 000

6,385,000

5, 530,000

6, 385, 000

1957 actual
3, 550,000

10. 6

$2, 787, 567
15, 032
1,688

_

45, 511
3, 305,000

346
3
339
332
10. 6

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal s e r v i c e s . _ _

3, 695,000

1957 actual




1958 estimate

$115

Program by activities:
1. Non-Federal hydroelectric project
activities
2. Regulation and surveys, electric
power industry
3. Regulation and surveys, natural gas
industry
4. Federal projects investigation and
regulation
_ _
5. International Joint Commission
6. Administration
Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority)

40, 975
5, 225, 000

The Federal Power Commission administers the Federal
Power Act and Natural Gas Act and has additional duties
relating to Federal power development.

153

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

1. Non-Federal hydroelectric project activities.—Licenses
are issued for hydroelectric projects affecting public lands
and streams subject to Federal jurisdiction; construction
and operation of projects are inspected; and cost of construction is determined for projects under license to private
interests. Pertinent data are:
Description

1957 actual 1958 estimate
635
640
107
108
109
111
$3,872
$2,091,323

Licensed projects
Applications completed during year
Applications pending (end of year)
Total claimed cost (in millions) of major
projects
Annual receipts from licenses

1959 estimate
645
122
99
$4,600
$1,845,000

$4,200
$1,653,000

2. Regulation and surveys, electric power industry.—
Regulation covers the transmission and sale for resale of
electric energy in interstate commerce and the rates,
accounts, depreciation practices, certain security issues,
disposition of properties, mergers, and the interconnection
and coordination of facilities of those public utilities
subject to the Commission's jurisdiction. Statistics
about the electric utility industry are gathered and
published. Pertinent data are:
[ B y calendar year]
N u m b e r of
Operating
millions)
N u m b e r of
poses
Operating
millions)

Description
public utilities regulated
revenues of regulated utilities

(in

utilities reporting for statistical purrevenues of reporting utilities

(in

Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

$6,800

$7,400

1,300

1,300

1,300

$9,600

$10,300

8. 6

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services..

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

746
8
711
730

819
840

750
8
705
758
$6,342

8. 7

$6, 422

860

8. 7

$6, 427

$4, 542,199
28,868
6,907

$4, 583,393
28,880
17, 727

$5, 244,800

4, 577,974
276, 070
3,607
64, 718
27, 676
66, 544
42, 700

4, 630,000
300,000
3,500
64,000
28, 500
64,000
43,500

5, 265,000
400,000
3,700
67,000
29,000
85,000
47,500

2,200
64, 228
56, 342

500
50,000
48,000
296,000

500
67,000
76,300
342,000

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services..
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction.. .
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies
. .
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

105
1,861

Total obligations

1956 actual 1957 estimate 1958 estimate
200
200
200

20,200

2,000

2,000

5, 530,000

5,184,025

6,385,000

$8,000

$11,000

3. Regulation and surveys, natural gas industry.—
Regulation covers the transportation and sale for resale of
natural gas in interstate commerce, and the rates, accounts,
and depreciation and depletion practices. Certificates of
public convenience and necessity are issued to those
natural-gas companies subject to the jurisdiction of the
Commission. Statistics about the natural-gas industry
are gathered and published. There were 107 natural-gas
pipeline companies, with operating revenues of $2.9
billion regulated in calendar year 1956 and approximately
10,000 independent producers. The same number of
companies is estimated in 1957 and 1958, the operating
revenues estimated for pipeline companies in billions to be
$3.2 in 1957 and $3.5 in 1958. Other pertinent data are:
Description
1957 actual 1958 estimate 1959 estimate
Certificate applications filed b y pipeline companies
511
500
500
Certificate applications filed b y independent producers
1, 298
1, 200
1, 200
Pipeline gas rate cases handled
74
83
91
Independent producer gas rate cases handled
441
609
669
Total rate filings received
7,800
6,900
7,600

4. Federal project investigation and regulation.—Of a
potential 116 million kilowatts of hydroelectric power in
the United States, 26.5 million kilowatts had been developed by Federal agencies and non-Federal interests as of
December 31, 1956.
Studies are made of proposed Federal river development
projects to determine possibilities for conservation,
development, and utilization of potential power resources.
Review and approval are required of certain proposed
rates for sale of power from Federal projects. Information on the power features of river development projects
is furnished to Congress and to Federal and State agencies.
In 1957, 103 studies were carried on and it is estimated
that there will be 105 in 1958 and 95 in 1959.
5. International Joint Commission.—The Commission
participates in the International Joint Commission,
which adjudicates controversies between the Governments or nationals of the United States and Canada over
boundary waters and waters that cross the boundary.




A supplemental appropriation is anticipated for 1958
and appears below.

Permanent authorizations:
P A Y M E N T S TO S T A T E S

UNDER

(Indefinite)
Appropriated (estimate) 1958,

FEDERAL

POWER

ACT

Estimate 1959,

$40,000

$41,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Payments to States (total obligations)..
Financing:
Appropriation
thority)

(new

obligational
__

au-

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$43,983

$40,000

$41,000

43,983

40,000

41,000

The States receive 37%% of the receipts from licenses
issued by the Federal Power Commission for occupancy
and use of national forests and public lands within their
boundaries (16 U. S. C. 810).
Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$40,000

$41,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$26,348

$19,000

$19,000

28,869

41,000

41,000

55, 217

60,000

60,000

55, 217

60,000

60,000

1957 actual
11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions..

$43,983

Intragovernmental funds:
ADVANCES AND

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Non-Federal hydroelectric project
activities--...
2. Federal projects investigation and
regulation
Total obligations
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from
other accounts
...

154

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION—Continued

Program and Financing—Continued

Intragovernmental funds—Continued
ADVANCES

AND

1957 actual

REIMBURSEMENTS—Continued
Object Classification
1957 actual

Average number of all employees. __ __ _
N u m b e r of employees at end of year ___
Average GS grade and salary
01

02
04
05
06
07
08
09
11

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

6
0

6
0

4
0
13.0

Personal services:
Permanent positions..Other personal services

$9,024

11.4

$7,166

11.4

$42, 835
165

38,804
13,372
160
743
1,123
280
90
645

43, 000
9,400
500
1,200
1,800
800
500

43,000
9, 400
500
1,200
1,800
800
500

2,800

2,800

55, 217

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services . _ _
Rents and utility services....
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services. __
Supplies and materials
E q u i p m e n t . . . _ ._
_.___.
Grants, subsidies, and contributions _
Total obligations

60,000

60,000

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Proposed for later transmission:
SALARIES AND

EXPENSES

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Non-Federal hydroelectric project
activities.
2. Regulation and surveys, natural gas
industry
_

$37,000
63,000

Total obligations.

100,000

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

100,000

Under existing legislation, 1958.—A supplemental appropriation for 1958 in the amount of $100,000 is anticipated
to conduct an increased number of hearings on license
applications for the development of hydroelectric power
sites by non-Federal interests and for handling an increasing workload of certificates of convenience and necessity and rate cases related to the natural gas industry.

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses of the Federal
Trade Commission, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as
authorized by law (5 U. S. C. 2131), not to exceed $700 for newspapers, services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2,
1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), and not to exceed [$251,250] $260,000 for
expenses of travel, [$5,950,000] $6,025,000: Provided, That no
part of the foregoing appropriation shall be expended upon any
investigation hereafter provided by concurrent resolution of the Congress until funds are appropriated subsequently to the enactment of
such resolution to finance the cost of such investigation. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $5,950,000
Estimate 1959, $6,025,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. A n t i m o n o p o l y :
(a) Investigation and litigation
(b) Economic and financial reports.




$2,539,660
514,650

$2,750,900
532,400

275,750

350,650
103, 220
352, 650
286,203

362,400
101,600
371,100
323,700

363,300
101,800
372,000
319,500

5, 516,423

5, 950,000

6,025,000

5,950,000

6,025,000

33, 577

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

5, 550,000

The Commission has the duty of preserving free competitive enterprise through prevention of monopolistic and
unfair trade.
1. Antimonopoly.—All types of monopolistic restrictions, including price-fixing conspiracies, boycotting, price
discriminations, and illegal mergers and acquisitions are
corrected; economic criteria are brought to bear on
monopoly problems; and supervision is provided over the
operations of associations of American exporters engaged
solely in export trade.
2. Antideceptive practices.—False and misleading advertising and other deceptive practices are prevented by corrective action, including the affirmative aid of voluntary
trade-practice conferences; business and the public are
protected from misbranding and nondisclosure of fiber content of manufactured wool products; consumers and merchants are protected from unfair practices with respect to
furs and fur products; and the public is protected from
dangers inherent in flammable fabrics. In 1959 additional funds are required to provide additional clinical
and laboratory testing of drugs, medicines, therapeutic
devices, etc.
3. Executive direction and management.—These also
include the adjudicatory functions of the Commission.
SELECTED WOKKLOAD DATA

Applications for complaints received
Investigations instituted
Investigations completed
__
___
Investigations pending
Formal complaints issued:
Antimonopoly..
_ _ __
__ . . .
Deceptive practices
._ ._ _ .
Orders to cease and desist issued:
Antimonopoly.._
_
_ .
Deceptive practices...
.
Stipulations to cease and desist negotiated
Assurances of discontinuance of violations
accepted
Pending matters in litigation
Trade-practice rules promulgated- _ _
Penalty suits filed
Penalty suits completed
___
_____
Appeals before Federal court pending
Appeals before Federal court completed

1956
actual
2,972
991
1,116
1,281

1957
actual
3,683
1,113
1,040
1,365

1958
estimate
3,800
1,200
1,300
1,300

1959
estimate
4,000
1,400
1,400
1,400

42
150

55
187

57
193

59
201

40
133
166

32
153
105

40
160
125

45
170
125

i 160
227
14
6
9
33
20

1, 760
262
10
12
5
32
38

1, 848
280
12
14
10
35
38

1,940
290
14
14
12
40
40

1 Does not include assurances of discontinuance of wool, fur, and flammable fabrics
violations.
Object Classification

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

02
03
04
05
06

8.9

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services
Total personal services.
Travel
Transportation of things
Communications services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

752
745
750

751
745
750

761
717
744

Average GS grade and salary

1959 estimate

$2,781,850
533,700

$1, 277,100

275,100

Financing:
Unobligated balance n o longer available.

01
1958 estimate

$1, 232,800

238, 620

Total obligations

$7,166

$42,835
165

$38,804

1959 estimate

$1,130,770

Program by activities—Continued
2. Antideceptive practices:
(a) Investigation and litigation
(b) Trade practice conferences and
small business
(c) Wool, fur, and
flammable
fabrics enforcement
(d) Insurance and trademarks
3. Executive direction and management.
4. Administration
__

1958 estimate

$6,657

8. 9

$6,672

8.9

$6,714

$4,839, 525
30, 945
...

$5,034,850
38,150

$5,060, 500
39,500

4,870,470
225,081
6,407
59,715
27,288
50,466

5,073,000
251,250
7,650
67,000
18,500
46,000

5,100,000
260,000
7,650
67,000
18,500
46,000

155

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Object Classification—Continued
1958 estimate

1957 actual
07
08
09
11
13

1959 estimate

$77,600
62,000
23,000
324,000

$102,600
62,000
23,000
338, 250

5, 950, 000

6, 025, 000

$62, 773
75, 453
128, 985

Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities

9, 785

Total obligations

5, 516,423

FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

For expenses necessary to carry on the activities of the Foreign
Claims Settlement Commission, including services as authorized by
section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not
to exceed $50 per diem for individuals; expenses of attendance at
meetings concerned with the purposes of this appropriation; not to
exceed [$18,500] $11,000 for expenses of travel; advances or reimbursements to other Government agencies for use of their facilities
and services in carrying out the functions of the commission; hire
of motor vehicles for field use only; and employment of aliens;
[$835,000] $650,000, of which [$265,000] $85,000 shall be derived
only from the war claims fund created by section 13(a) of the War
Claims Act of 1948 (Public Law 896, approved July 3, 1948) and
not to be .available for obligation after June 30, [1958] 1959.
(General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$570,000

$565,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Direct obligations:
1. Administration and settlement of—
(а) International claims.
(б) Korean claims
2. Review and development of claims
programs

$400,000

$465,000

100,000

100,000

100,000

678, 560

500,000

565, 000

6,079
100,000

265,000

85,000

784, 639

Total obligations
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
W a r claims fund
Other accounts
.
Unobligated balance no longer available(new

1959 estimate

$553, 560
25,000

Total direct obligations
Reimbursable obligations:
1. Administration and settlement of—
(a) International claims
_
(c) World W a r I I claims
...

Appropriation
authority)

1958 estimate

765, 000

650, 000

-265,000

700,000

obligational

-100,000
-6,079
21,440

570, 000

-85,000

70,000
565, 000

The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission is responsible for the settlement of claims authorized by the War
Claims and the International Claims Settlement Acts.
1. Administration and settlement oj—(a) International
claims.—Claims of United States nationals are authorized
against Bulgaria, Hungary, Rumania, Italy, and the
Soviet Union, including claims for losses arising from war
damage, nationalization, and default on governmental
debts. Funds totaling about $45 million derived from the
vesting of blocked assets in the cases of Bulgaria, Hungary,
and Rumania, and from settlements in the cases of Italy
and the Soviet Union will become available as trust funds
from which the Treasury will pay such claims. A 5%
deduction will be made as an offset against appropriations
for administrative expenses for the 4 years of the program.
As of June 30, 1957, a total of 2,694 claims had been
decided. The balance are to be completed as follows:
1957
actual
Soviet
Italian
Bulgarian
Hungarian
Rumanian
Total




1958

1959

Total

Total amount
claimed

1,620
239
146
452
237

1,460
1,486
145
673
236

1,050
521
100
1,600
600

4,130
2,246
391
2,725
1,073

$3,583,259,924
28,377,880
26,092,799
228,111,735
267,466,622

2,694

4,000

3,871

10,565

4,133,308,960

(c) World War II claims.—The settlement of claims of
religious organizations not previously compensable under
the War Claims Act was authorized August 6, 1956.
Claimants have filed 109 claims asking recoveries totaling
$29,854,337. Final settlements will be made in 1958.
Liquidation of this and previous programs under the War
Claims Act will continue during 1959 financed by reimbursement from the war claims fund.
2. Review and development of claims programs.—Operations included in the President's Reorganization Plan No.
1 of 1954 but not immediately embraced within active
claims programs are set out now as a separate activity
not charged to specific programs. These involve research,
reports, documentation, and similar functions responsive
to the requirements of the Congress and of other agencies
of the Government concerning past, present, and proposed
claims programs and problems.
Object Classification
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

140
118
114

120
104
90

110
90
70

i, 858

$5,858

$708,780
1,220

$653, 500
700

$554,370
4,630

710,000

654,200

559,000

613,631
6,511
10
12,027
3,489
3,072

425,100
15,000
50
11,020
3,300
3, 550

486,300

29,430
2,181
7,950

10,700
2,300
1,280

12,000
2,650
1,700

10
249

27,600
100

31,600
100

678,560

500,000

565,000

1,200
1, 750
508
447

229,100
3,500
3,840
2,200
2,450

72,700
1,000
1,500
900
800

4,282
317
1,170

6,750
1,400
800

2,500
550
300

36

14,900
60

4,700
50

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year__.
Average GS grade and salary

9.3

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions
Other personal services
Total personal service obligations..
Direct obligations:
01 Personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments
Total direct obligations..
Reimbursable obligations:
01 Personal services
02 Travel
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
Services performed b y
other
agencies
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments

9.2

$5,730

10,000

50
12,500
4,400
3,700

Total reimbursable obligations..

106, 079

265,000

85,000

Total obligations

784, 639

765,000

650,000

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses of the General
Accounting Office, including newspapers and periodicals (not
exceeding $500); [uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by
law] rental or lease of office space in foreign countries without regard
to the provisions of section 3648 of the Revised Statutes, as amended
(31 U. S. C. 529); not to exceed [$1,600,000] $2,850,000 for expenses
of travel; and services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); [$36,050,000] $38,300,000. (31
U. S. C. 41, Supp. V, 841; 60 Stat. 812, 837; 64 Stat. 460, 832; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 3 6 , 0 5 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 3 8 , 3 0 0 , 0 0 0

156

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

10. Accounting and auditing policy staff.—This staff
develops accounting policy for observance by each agency
Current authorizations—Continued
and for the guidance of audit work performed by General
Accounting Office auditors; develops internal auditing
SALARIES
AND
EXPENSES—Continued
objectives and standards for guidance of the executive
Program and Financing
agencies; reviews and develops, in cooperation with the
Treasury Department and the Bureau of the Budget,
1957 actual
1958 estimate 1959 estimate
central accounting and financial reporting processes; reviews agency accounting systems; develops and directs a
Program by activities:
Operating costs:
program of application of modern electronic systems and
$34, 670
$34,641
$35, 662
1. Office of the Comptroller General.
2. Office of the Assistant Comptroller
other advanced methods to accounting operations of the
33,303
33, 574
31,336
General. _____ _ _ _ _
____
Government; and assists and advises Congress on account3. Office of the assistant to the
24,740
23,854
29,482
Comptroller General
ing and auditing policy matters.
4. Office of legislative liaison
_
141, 548
148, 000
148, 952
5. Office of administrative services-_.
1,426,379
1, 776, 753
1, 732,182
11. Office oj staff management.—This function involves
3, 827, 400
3,912, 914
6. Claims division,
_ __
3, 754, 500
6,665,600
6,412,685
7. Transportation division,-_ _
(a) a recruiting program to obtain a high quality profes6,643, 500
272, 717
306,100
308,300
8. Division of personnel.
sional staff of accountants, auditors, and investigators;
1,213,252
1,268, 500
9. Office of the general counsel-...
1,280, 300
10. Accounting and auditing policy
(b) a training and professional career development pro344,400
staff
337, 775
345, 500
124, 065
11. Office of staff management
178, 685
gram; (c) exercising, in cooperation with the accounting
211, 680
12. Defense accounting and auditing
and auditing divisions, general control over the assigndivision
- ________
4, 925,900
5, 449, 000
4, 252, 469
13. Civil accounting and auditing
ment of the staff; and (d) securing appropriate recognition
division
_ _ _
_ .
- _
6, 281, 500
6, 096,142
6, 211,100
14. Field operations division
_
of the professional character of the accounting and audit9,114, 707
10, 793, 835
7, 706, 954
805, 322
15. European branch
919,100
868, 500
ing work of the General Accounting Office.
422, 370
16. Far East branch
145, 236
272,100
12. Dejense accounting and auditing division.—This
Total operating costs
36,084, 238
38, 300,000
32,942,946
17. Relation of costs to obligations:
division performs the accounting, auditing, and investiObligations incurred for costs of
other years, net __
_ _ ____
31, 927
gative functions of the General Accounting Office in the
Costs financed from obligations
Department of Defense. These functions involve the
—34,238
of other years, net (—) _
development, review, and evaluation of accounting sysTotal program (obligations).
36,050, 000
38, 300, 000
32, 974, 873
Financing:
tems; the evaluation of the performance of the Military
Unobligated balance no longer available1,025,127
Establishment in discharging its financial obligations; and
Appropriation (new obligational authe conduct of investigations of matters relating to the
thority)
34, 000, 000
36, 050,000
38,300,000
handling of public funds.
13. Civil accounting and auditing division.—This diviThe General Accounting Office is responsible to the
Congress for conducting independent reviews, audits, and sion performs the accounting, auditing, and investigative
investigations of the management and control of the functions of the General Accounting Office in all departfinancial transactions of the Government; for the rendi- ments and agencies of the Federal Government, other
tion of legal decisions relating to Government fiscal than those assigned to the defense accounting and auditmatters; for developing, prescribing, and evaluating ing division. These functions involve the development,
accounting systems on a governmentwide basis; for the review, and evaluation of accounting systems; the evaluasettlement of certain claims for and against the Govern- tion of the performance of the civil departments and
ment; and for advising and assisting the Congress and agencies in discharging their financial obligations; and the
Government agencies on matters relating to public funds. conducting of investigations of matters relating to the
During 1957, refunds and collections in the amount of handling of public funds.
14. Field operations division.—This division, through
$64,871,911 were made through these activities.
1-3. Office oj the Comptroller General.—Executive man- 19 regional offices, performs all assigned accounting,
agement of the General Accounting Office is carried out auditing, and investigative functions outside the metroby the Comptroller General who is assisted by the Assist- politan area of Washington, D. C.
15. European branch.—This branch, with headquarters
ant Comptroller General and staff assistants.
4. Office oj legislative liaison.—This office assists the in Paris, France, performs General Accounting Office funcComptroller General in coordinating the various activities tions as they relate to U. S. Government operations in the
of the General Accounting Office with the Congress, its European area, North Africa, and the Near East. Suboffices are located in London, England; Frankfurt, Gercommittees, and individual Members.
6. Claims division.—All claims by or against the United many; Rome, Italy; and Madrid, Spain.
16. Far East branch.—This branch, with headquarters
States are settled in this division except those for transportation items and claims wherein exclusive jurisdiction in Tokyo, Japan, performs General Accounting Office
functions as they relate to U. S. Government operations
is conferred by law upon another agency or the courts.
7. Transportation division.—This division audits freight in the Far East.
17. Relation oj cost to obligations.—The relationship is
and passenger transportation payments for account of
the United States and settles claims involving transpor- derived from year-end balances of selected resources and
tation charges. The transportation audit recovered applicable adjustments as reflected in the following table:
$47,654,842 during 1957.
1956
1957
1958
1959
9. Office oj the general counsel.—In addition to prepar- Selected resources at end of year: Inventories actual actual estimate estimate
and items on order:
ing decisions and reports on the legality or propriety of
Stores (goods unconsumed b y projects)
$75,308
$83,480
$83,480
$83,480
proposed obligations and expenditures of the GovernUnpaid undelivered orders (appropriation
balances obligated for goods and services
ment, the general counsel and his staff participate in
on order not yet received)
63,814
88,987
54,749
54,749
conferences with legislative and administrative officials
Total selected resources at end of y e a r . . 139,122
172,467
138,229
138,229
of the Government on legal matters of a fiscal nature, Selected resources at start of year (—)
—139,122 —172,467 —138,229
the sufficiency of proposed legislation, the desirability Adjustment of selected resources reported at start of —1,418
year
of new legislation for particular purposes, and render all
Costs financed from obligations of other years, net ( — ) .
—34,238
other required legal services.
Obligations incurred for costs of other years, net
31,927
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE—Continued




157

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Object Classification
1958 estimate

1957 actual

7.2

Average GS grades and salary
Personal services:
Permanent positions
_..
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$5,791
4
5,540
5,652

$5,863
1
5,645
5,770

$5,750
2
5,460
5,515

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

01

1959 estimate

$5,488

7.5

$5,597

7.8

$32,199,180
10,820
365,000

30,188,954
1, 455, 805
86, 926
153, 463
191, 978
144, 688
175,012
228, 694
211, 461
105, 203

31,300,000
1. 600,000
95,000
156, 000
157,000
120,000
179, 000
217,000
200,000
90, 000
1, 910,000

32,575,000
2, 350,000
118,000
156,000
157,000
120,000
183,000
230,000
200,000
90,000
2,095,000

17, 500
12, 371
2,818

17, 500
5,000
3,500

17,500
5, 000
3,500

32,974,873

Total obligations

Object Classification

$5,724

$30,916,085
41,915
342,000

36,050,000

1957 actual

01

Personal services:
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$70,605
5,532

T.

WASHINGTON

18, 781
1,668
134
1, 286
1,800
988
873

18,424

Total obligations

$18, 540
241

76,137
6,320
132
4,035
1,469
4, 868
4,021
460

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
15 Taxes and assessments

BOOKER

25, 607

77

CENTENNIAL

COMMISSION

Program and Financing

ADVANCES AND

REIMBURSEMENTS
1957 actual

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Office of administrative services
2. Claims division__ __
3. Transportation division
4. Division of personnel
5. Defense accounting and auditing division
_
6. Civil accounting and auditing division
7. Field operations division

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

4,000

6, 502
9,163

6,500
10,000

6,500
10,000

48, 714

50, 000

50,000

11

48, 714

9. 4

50,000

50,000

5
5
0

5
5
0

A grant was made to this Commission, created under
the laws of Virginia, to carry out the celebration of the
100th anniversary of the birth of Booker T. Washington,
to promote interracial goodwill, and revive interest in the
policies, programs, principles, and philosophies of Booker
T. Washington.

$5, 953

9. 4

$5, 953

9. 4

$5, 953

$29, 763
896
15,818
616
1, 621

$30,000
1,000
16,000
1,000
2,000

$30,000
1,000
16,000
1,000
2,000

48, 714

Total obligations

225,000

4,000

5
5
0

...

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

$19,000
500
5, 500
4,500

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

posi_ __

35,279

$35,279

$19,000
500
5,500
4,500

Object Classification

Personal services: Permanent
tions
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Equipment

$189,721

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward .
Unobligated balance carried forward...

1959 estimate

3, 798

from

Average GS grade and salary

Program by activities:
Directing celebration functions (total
obligations)

1958 estimate

$18, 975
422
5,466
4, 388

Total program costs (obligations). _
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other accounts

04
06
07
09

1959 estimate

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of y e a r . .

Intragovernmental funds:

01

1958 estimate

38,300,000

$30,012,988
16,496
159,470

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction-.
07 Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
__
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims...
_
.
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

The Alexander Hamilton Bicentennial Commission prepared plans for signalizing the 200th anniversary of the
birth of Alexander Hamilton, January 11, 1957. The
Commission will expire not later than January 11, 1958.

50,000

50,000

-35,279

Object Classification
Grants, subsidies, and contributions._

[BOSTON

NATIONAL

$189, 721

HISTORIC SITES

$35, 279

COMMISSION]

[The appropriation granted under this heading in the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1956 shall remain available until
June 30, 1958.] (Department of the Interior and Related Agencies
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Program and Financing

HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL

COMMISSIONS

Current authorizations:
ALEXANDER

HAMILTON

BICENTENNIAL

COMMISSION

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities :
Planning the celebration (total obligations). —
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward. __
Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new
authority)
_




obligational

1958 estimate

$98, 424

$25,607

-69,031
25,607

-25,607

55,000

1959 estimate

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Planning the preservation of historic
properties (total obligations) __

$18,020

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Unobligated balance no longer available.

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

- 3 4 , 580
16, 560

Reappropriation (new obligational
authority)

$16, 560

16, 560

The Commission is preparing an inventory of historic
sites and buildings in Boston and vicinity, together with
an analysis of their condition. A report will be submitted
to Congress recommending programs for their preservation by local, State, and Federal agencies for public use.

158

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL
Continued

COMMISSIONS-

1957 actual

Current authorizations—Continued
[ B O S T O N NATIONAL HISTORIC SITES

COMMISSION]—Continued

Object Classification
1957 actual

Object Classification—Continued

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments

Average OS grade and salary.

$5,890
$11,780
2,600
100

15,337
998
216
70
83
611
203
179

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments

$5,8
$11,645
3,692

8. 5

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

14,480
300
100
75

[SALARIES

MEMORIAL

AND

9,639

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

10,000

COMMISSION]

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$44,000

-54,183
2,142

Personal services: Positions
than permanent
02 Travel
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials

other
$122
3
13
198
23
2

1959 estimate

$1,900
4,600
750
950
1,100
339

361

9,639

[JAMESTOWN-WILLIAMSBURG-YORKTOWN
COMMISSION]
44,000

1957 actual

1958 estimate

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1959 estimate
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)
-

$4,887

5.0

$4, 409
$12,150

$4, 887
13, 200
81
18,087

CELEBRATION

[For expenses necessary to complete carrying out the provisions
of the Act of August 13, 1953 (67 Stat. 576), including services as
authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C.
55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for individuals; transportation and not to exceed $20 per diem in lieu of subsistence for members of the Commission serving without compensation; and entertainment; $88,000.] (Department of the Interior and Related
Agencies Appropriation Actf 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $88,000

Program by activities:
Planning the celebration (total obliga-

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year




1958 estimate

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

Total obligations

Object Classification

Total personal services..

1957 actual

44,000

The Corregidor Bataan Memorial Commission is to
erect on Corregidor Island a memorial to servicemen
who lost their lives while serving in the Pacific area during
World War II.
An appropriation of $56,000 was made in 1956 for the
expenses of this Commission through June 30, 1957. An
additional appropriation of $44,000 was made for 1958
to continue planning and to initiate a popular subscription
campaign for additional funds.

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent..
Other personal services

-9,639

The Commission is formulating plans for the location,
design, and construction of a permanent memorial to
Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Washington or its immediate environs.

01

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

01

$9,639

Object Classification

52,041

6. 5

1959 estimate

16, 560

$52,041

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward. _.
Unobligated balance no longer available.

COMMISSION

1958 estimate

$361

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward..
Unobligated balance carried f o r w a r d . . .

Program and Financing

Total obligations .

MEMORIAL

Program by activities:
Planning the memorial (total obligations)

Appropriated 1958, $44,000

Program by activities:
1. Planning for the memorial.
2. F u n d raising campaign

ROOSEVELT

1957 actual

[For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the Act of
August 5, 1953, as amended (67 Stat. 366 and 69 Stat. 589), $44,000.]
(General Government Matters Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions..

$9,470
100
500
300
10, 580
900
450
556
95

Program and Financing

EXPENSES]

1957 actual

DELANO

10

18,020

BATAAN

FRANKLIN

1959 estimate

44.000

279
500
50
766

303
20

Total obligations.

[CORREGIDOR

$2,371
280
89
769
29, 920
142
383

Total obligations

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

01

1958 estimate

$102,425

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$88,000

12, 575
115, 000

88,000

The Commission was established to commemorate in
1957 the 350th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown; the development of colonial culture at Williamsburg;
and the winning of our American independence at Yorktown in 1781. Federal participation in the celebration

159

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

was concluded on November 30, 1957. The Commission
will liquidate its activities prior to June 30, 1958, and
submit a report to the Congress.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

9. 7

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent

$7, 511

11. 6

25,900
2,500
200
960
1,300
13,000
42,840
1,000
100
200

102,425

Total obligations

$20, 700
5,200

30,328
2,425
218
1,859
2,189
3,906
57, 617
3, 580
82
221

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Taxes and assessments

1957 actual
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Unobligated balance n o longer available-

ROOSEVELT

8,000

CENTENNIAL

48,500

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary

COMMISSION

Program and Financing
1957 actual

1959 estimate

-$21,065
718

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

01

THEODORE

1958 estimate

A report on the activities of the Commission, commemorating in 1956 the centennial of Woodrow Wilson's
birth, is under preparation for submission to the Congress
after which the Commission will terminate.

$8,921

$29,103
1,225

Program and Financing—Continued

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Planning the celebration (total obligations)
_

$42,253

$60,020

$34, 730

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance carried forward

-451
98,198

-98,198
38,178

7.5

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services.

$5,141
$17,775
2,688
12

Total personal services
02 Travel
03 Transportation of things
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 O ther contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
15 Taxes and assessments

20,475
2,044
11
970
12,418
32,000
738
88
103

-38,178
3,448

Total obligations

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

140,000

The Commission will prepare (a) plans and a program
commemorating in 1958 the centennial of Theodore Roosevelt's birth, and (b) plans for completing the development
of Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, D. C., and the
Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park, N. Dak.
Object Classification
1957 actual

1959 estimate

5
2
7
7

5
2
7
6

$5, 780

$3, 710

$27,001
6,437
9

$28, 789
11, 500
111

$18. 479
4,560
71

Program by activities:
Adjudication of Indian claims (total
obligations)

40,400
4,100
500
3,500
400
4,500
2,500
2,620
600
900

23,110
2,500
400
1,500
300
3,100
1,500
1,500
300
520

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

42, 253

Total obligations

60,020

34, 730

CENTENNIAL

CELEBRATION

COMMISSION

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Planning the celebration (total obligations)




AND

$6, 689

_.

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Taxes and assessments

WILSON

SALARIES

$68,847

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary to carry out the
purposes of the Act of August 13, 1946 (25 U. S. C. 70), creating
an Indian Claims Commission, $177,700, of which not to exceed
$3,600 shall be available for expenses of travel. (71 Stat. 269;
Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 1 7 7 , 7 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 1 7 7 , 7 0 0

4
1
5
8

Personal services:
Permanent positions
_ ___ __ _
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
..

WOODROW

Current authorizations:

33, 447
2,472
46
610
49
812
2,252
1,178
929
458

Average salary of ungraded positions

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION

1958 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

01

68,847

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$130,876

$167,000

$177,700

1,424

10,700

132,300

177,700

177,700

This independent Commission of three members was
created to hear and adjudicate claims, existing before
August 13, 1946, of American Indian tribes, bands, or
other identifiable groups of Indians residing within the
territorial limits of the United States or Alaska. Of the
852 claims filed, 124 have been completed. Payments of
awards are dependent upon subsequent appropriations
made through "Claims, judgments, and private relief acts"
appropriation to the Treasury Department. Through
August 1957 these payments totaled $10,228,348. The
existence of the Commission was extended to April 10,
1962, by Public Law 767, approved July 24, 1956.

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

160

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES—Continued

Object Classification
1957 actual

Average GS grade and salary

02
04
06
07
08
09
11
15

1959 estimate

18
17
18

18
18
18

14
14
14

T o t a l number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
_
N u m b e r of employees at end of year _ _ _

01

1958 estimate

8.8

Personal services: Permanent positions
_
. _ . __
Travel
Communication services
__ __ _
Printing and reproduction... __
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Equipment.,.
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Taxes and assessments

$6, 705

9. 7

$7,098

9. 7

$7,133

$127,069
790
710
57
334

$161,020
3,600
1,600
200
500

5
384
1,325
202

700
500
2,100
9,290
145

50
500
440
9,580
210

130,876

Total obligations

$148, 515
3,600
1, 450
200
500

167,000

177,700

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses of the Interstate
Commerce Commission, including not to exceed $5,000 for the
employment of special counsel; services as authorized by section
15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to
exceed $50 per diem for individuals; newspapers (not to exceed
[$200] $600); purchase of not to exceed [sixty-two] fifty-four
passenger motor vehicles of which fourteen shall be for replacement
only; [ a n d ] not to exceed [$1,135,000] $1,250,000 for expenses
of travel; [$16,750,000] and uniforms or allowances therefor, as
authorized by law (5 U. S. C. 2181); $17,500,000, of which [(a) not
less than $1,363,500 shall be available for expenses necessary to carry
out railroad safety activities and not less than $956,600 shall be
available for expenses necessary to carry out locomotive inspection
activities; ( b ) ] $225,000 shall be available for expenses necessary
to carry out such defense mobilization functions as may be delegated pursuant to law: Provided, That Joint Board members and
cooperating State commissioners may use Government transportation requests when traveling in connection with their duties as
such. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$16,750,000

$17,500,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Regulation of carriers' rates, practices, operating authorities, and
finance
2. Compliance
3. Supervision and analysis of carriers'
accounting and statistics
4. Supervision and interpretation of
tariffs
5. Railroad safety and car service:
(а) Car service
(б) Railroad safety
(c) Locomotive inspection
6. Defense mobilization
7. Executive and advisory f u n c t i o n s —
8. General management and administration
Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority)-—




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$3, 590,523
3,364,591

$3,944,091
3, 904,356

$4,056,081
4,118, 736

1,986,051

2,239,696

2, 318, 718

918, 425

1,034, 720

1,099,946

723,119
1,229,417
844,066
97,154
913,373

865,851
1,363, 500
956, 600
225,000
999,391

918,817
1, 405,120
966,300
225, 000
1, 063,326

V

1,426

1,216, 795

1,327,956

14, 856,145

16, 750,000

17, 500,000

23, 551
14,879,696

16,750,000

17, 500,000

The Commission regulates carriers engaged in interstate and foreign commerce, including railroads, motor
carriers, water carriers, and pipelines.
The increase is requested to handle the continually increasing number of applications for motor-carrier operating
authority, improvement in the development of economic
and statistical data necessary to regulatory activities, and
to provide more adequate level of compliance pertaining
to the regulation of railroads and motor carriers.
1. Regulation of carriers' rates, practices, operating
authorities, and finance.—This work consists of regulating
rates, granting operating authorities, approving abandonments of and extensions of railroad lines, financial reorganizations, and rate agreements between carriers.
2. Compliance.—Statutes and regulations affecting
transportation and carriers are enforced; examinations
are made to ascertain that motor carriers and freight
forwarders are adequately insured; and surveys are conducted of motor-carrier operating practices to reduce
accidents and to promote safety on the public highways.
3. Supervision and analysis oj carrier accounting and
statistics.—Uniform systems of accounts are formulated
and policed for all types of carriers; studies are made of
operating costs for use in ratemaking; and data maintained for use in making valuations of railroad and pipeline properties and setting up accounts of reorganized
companies. Statistics are compiled from carriers' reports
and studies are made of operating, financial, and other
problems of transportation agencies.
4. Supervision and interpretation oj tariffs.—Common
and contract carriers' tariffs are examined for compliance with Commission's tariff circular rules. Authority
is granted to publish rates on less-than-statutory notice,
and informal complaints and carriers' requests to pay
reparation are handled.
5. Railroad safety and car service.—Field staff of the
Commission work with carriers and shippers in handling
problems of safety and efficient use of equipment in the
transportation of passengers and property by railroad.
This work includes inspection of safety appliances and
signal installations, inspection of locomotives, and enforcing compliance with car-service regulations designed
to increase the utilization of railroad rolling stock.
6. Defense mobilization.—Under delegation by the
Director of Defense Mobilization, emergency mobilization
plans and programs for domestic surface transportation,
storage, and port facilities are formulated.
7. Executive and advisory junctions.—These also include
the quasi-judicial and quasi-legislative functions of the
Commission.
SELECTED W O R K L O A D DATA

Application for permanent motor carrier operating authorities:
Received during year
Disposed of during year
Cases involving finance matters:
Received during year
Disposed of during year
Rate proceedings:
M o t o r carriers:
Filed during year
Disposed of during year
Other:
Filed during year
Disposed of during year
N u m b e r of tariffs filed during year:
M o t o r carriers
Rail carriers
Field audits of carrier accounts
Safety activities:
M o t o r carriers:
N u m b e r of accidents investigated
Safety surveys of carriers' operations
N u m b e r of vehicles inspected
Rail carriers:
Safety appliances inspected
N u m b e r of locomotives inspected

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

3,353
3, 504

4,120
3, 495

3,965
4,290

1,700
1,763

1,850
1,860

1,860
1,860

1,370
1,390

1,436
1,390

1,440
1,390

497
560

480
510

511
499

108,190
78,420
1,022

109,000
79,000
1, 225

110,000
80,000
1,225

349
9, 562
44, 652

808
11,654
67,800

920
12,904
74,400

1,104,836
100,607

1,354,000
106,700

1,354,000
106,700

161

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

1959 estimate

2,301
1
2,264
2,255

2,364
1
2,320
2,317

2,245
1
2,090
2,203
8. 2

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than p e r m a n e n t , . . .
Other personal services

1958 estimate

$6,019

8. 3

$6,046

8.3

$6,033

Total obligations

$13, 794, 520
7,500
61, 706

$14,103,280
7, 500
62,894

12, 728, 642
1,077,833
31,149
85,366
52,298
61,080
205,385
141,333
220,732
243, 528
705
8,094

13,863, 726
1,071, 619
23,917
89, 600
56,360
70, 500
190, 000
139,081
204, 701
178,990
851,906
1,000
8,600

14,173, 674
1, 250,000
27, 700
96,100
56,360
92, 500
255,000
156, 756
255,110
215,680
911,520
1,000
8,600

14,856,145

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail
05 Rents and utility services
06 Printing and reproduction..
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments
02
03
04

$12, 707, 567
6, 247
14,828

16,750,000

17,500,000

Object Classification
1957 actual
11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions. _

ADVANCES AND

1957 actual

other

ac-

Financing:
Advances and reimbursements from—
Other accounts
Non-Federal sources (40 U. S. C. 481
(c))

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$5,033

$5,000

$5,000

4,580

2,115

3,140

2,918

1,860

420

5,033

Total financing

5,000

5,000

02
09

0

$3, 253
1,020
760

$2,140
1,000
1,860

$3, 580
1,000
420

5,000

5,000

COMMISSION ON
RIVER BASIN

THE

POTOMAC

Current authorizations:
CONTRIBUTION

TO INTERSTATE
RIVER

COMMISSION
BASIN

ON THE

POTOMAC

[Contribution to Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin:] To enable the Secretary of the Treasury to pay in advance
to the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin the
Federal contribution toward the expenses of the Commission during
the current fiscal year in the administration of its business in the
conservancy district established pursuant to the Act of July 11, 1940
(54 Stat. 748), $5,000. (Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

AND

1
0

5, 033

other

Total obligations

INTERSTATE

$5,000

FOR

EXPENSES

Program and Financing
1
0

Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year
Positions

$5,000

$5,000

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses of the Committee, including contracts for the making of special investigations and
reports [(not to exceed $500,000)] and for engineering, drafting
and computing services; not to exceed [$402,500] $482,000 for
expenses of travel; maintenance and operation of aircraft; purchase
of seventeen passenger motor vehicles, of which fourteen shall be for
replacement only; not to exceed $100 for newspapers and periodicals;
uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 1114), as amended; and services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a);
[$71,000,000] $80,480,000. (50 U. S. C. 151, 158, 159, 160; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 7 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959f $ 8 0 , 4 8 0 , 0 0 0

Object Classification

Personal services:
than permanent
Travel
Equipment

1959 estimate

NATIONAL ADVISORY C O M M I T T E E
AERONAUTICS

SALARIES

REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing

01

1958 estimate

Current authorizations:

Intragovernmental funds:

Program by activities:
Miscellaneous services to
counts (total obligations)

The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin was created by compact among the four States in the
basin, the District of Columbia, and the Federal Government to abate water pollution.
This appropriation represents the Federal Government's pro rata share of the general expenses of the
Commission.
The Commission also receives financial assistance from
the Public Health Service under the program of grants
for water pollution control activities.

Estimate 1959,

$5,000

$5,000

Program and Financing

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Operating costs:
1. Aerodynamic research
2. Powerplants research
3. Aircraft structural research
4. Operating problems research
5. Headquarters management and coordination
Operating costs, funded
Supplies or services transferred in (—)
without charge
.. . . _
Total operating costs
6. Relation of costs to obligations:
Obligations incurred for costs of
other years, net
Total operating program (obligations)
Capital outlay:
7. Capital acquisitions
Capital assets transferred without charge:
Transfers in (—)
Transfers out
Capital outlay, funded
8. Relation of costs to obligations:
Obligations incurred for costs of
other years, n e t . _
Total capital acquisition program (obligations)
Total program (obligations)

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Contribution to the Commission (total
obligations)

$5,000

$5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

1959 estimate

$34,000,000
16,400,000
8, 700,000
2,000,000

$38,500,000
19, 200,000
10,150,000
2,200,000

1,682,998

1,800,000

1,827, 000

55,864,427

62,900,000

71,877,000

- 1 , 204, 804

-1,170,000

-1,150,000

54, 659, 623

61, 730,000

70, 727,000

600,798

270,000

153,000

55, 260,421

62,000,000

70,880,000

9,444,184

9,800,000

10,300,000

- 1 , 3 4 0 , 765
371, 726

-1,310,000
510,000

-1,310,000
510,000

8,475,145

9,000,000

9, 500,000
100,000

293, 354
9,000,000

9, 600,000

71,000, 000

80, 480,000

64,176,500

71,000,000

80, 480, 000

$62,676, 500
1, 500,000

$71,000,000

$80,480,000

8, 768,499
64,028,920
147, 580

$5,000

Financing:
Appropriation (new obligational authority).

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

$29, 678,408
14,967, 772
7, 714,404
1,820,845

1958 estimate

440000—58




11

New obligational authority
N e w obligational authority:
Appropriation
Reappropriation

162

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959

NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR
AERONAUTICS—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES—Continued

1956
actual
Selected resources at end of year:
Inventories and items on order:
Stores (goods unconsumed b y
projects)
Unpaid undelivered orders (appropriation balances obligated
for goods and services on order
not yet received)
Advances (payments for goods
and services on order not yet
received)
Accrued
annual leave
(leave
earned and not taken b y employees, charged to activity
costs)
Unapplied costs (costs incurred not
yet assigned to activities)

1957
actual

1958
estimate

$1,222,676

$1,240, 878

$1,284,000

$1,332,000

1,888,818

2,010,175

2,310,022

2,413,022

1959
estimate

Research and development conducted by the Committee
(National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics) is directed
130,462
37,059
82,514
84,514
at providing the scientific and engineering data necessary
for continued improvement in the design and performance
3,953,136 -3,700,005 - 3 , 8 0 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 , 0 0 0
of manned aircraft, ballistic and other guided missiles,
71, 750
170, 719
152,290
152,290
and their powerplants. The Committee is also conducting
Total selected resources at end
investigations concerned with satellites and other space
-241,174
28,826
181,826
of year
-639,430
technology. Military problems, including specific prob- Selected resources at start of year
639,430
241,174
-28,826
Adjustment of selected resources reported at start
lems in the development of particular military projects,
202,542
of year
are of special concern, and the Committee's program is Obligations incurred for costs of other years, net_.
600, 798
270,000
153,000
closely coordinated with related programs of the Department of Defense.
7, Capital acquisitions.—This activity includes acquiThe estimates for 1959 provide for a major augmenta- sition of certain research equipment; facility modifications
tion of the Committee's research operations in order to and improvements; minor construction; and the services
meet the increasingly complex problems of flight under a of staff engaged in design and inspection in connection
wide range of as yet little understood conditions. Supple- with construction of major facilities, which are funded
mental funds are being requested for 1958 in order to under the construction and equipment appropriation.
permit immediate initiation of this expanded effort and
8. Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship
are shown at the end of this chapter under the heading between capital outlay and capital outlay obligations is
"Proposed for later transmission."
derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
The Committee's activities are carried on mainly at its reflected in the following table:
3 laboratories and 2 flight stations and involve actual
1956
1959
1957
1958
actual
estimate
actual
estimate
flight tests of piloted and pilotless aircraft, experimentation
Selected resources at end of year (items on
with the aid of wind tunnels and other specialized equiporder):
Unpaid undelivered orders (appropriation
ment, and theoretical studies.
balances obligated for goods and services
$866,978
on order not yet received)
$579,274
$866, 978
•6,978
1. Aerodynamic research.—Research in this field is
Advances (payments for goods and services
850
6,500
6, 500
6, 500
on order not yet received)
directed at developing the design characteristics of air873,478
873,478
973,478
Total selected
at end of
craft and missiles of increased efficiency. Although the Selected resources atresourcesyear (—) year_ 580,124 -580,124 -873, 478 -873,478
start of
problems studied cover flight under a wide variety of Obligations incurred for costs of other years, net
293,354
100,000
conditions (including the relatively low-speed flight of
Object Classification
vertical and short-take-off aircraft), increased emphasis
1957 actual
1958 estimate
1959 estimate
has been placed in recent years on flight of manned and
unmanned vehicles at hypersonic speeds.
8,120
7,935
9,000
2. Powerplants research.—Research on propulsion sys- Total number of permanent positions
1
1
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
1
7, 787
7,930
Average number of all employees
8,500
tems and fuels is conducted to increase the speed, altitude, Number of employees at end of year
7,992
7,865
8,930
flight duration, and payload capabilities of aircraft, mis- Average GS grade and salary
!. 9
$6, 829
$6, 576
$6, 759
siles, and possible space vehicles. Emphasis is currently Average salary for grades established b y
$5, 449
$5,501
$5, 461
the Director
being placed on turbojet engines of advanced capabilities, 01 Personal services:
$53,449,000
$45, 932,183
$49,013,011
Permanent positions
1, 500
230
730
rocket engines of new design and utilizing higher energy
Positions other than permanent
581, 500
311,110
522, 717
Other personal services
fuels, and investigation of unconventional systems for
54,032,000
46,243, 523
49, 536, 458
Total personal services
432,000
374, 517
402, 500
02 Travel
propulsion in space.
158,000
167, 524
155,000
03 Transportation of things
281,000
201, 227
227,400
3. Aircraft structural research.—This research, which is 04 Communication services
1, 506, 000
979, 989
1, 270, 226
05 Rents and utility services
concerned with the ability of aircraft, missiles, and
7, 829,000
5, 947, 476
6, 085, 424
Electric power
130,000
112, 971
129,060
possible space vehicles to withstand aerodynamic stresses, 06 Printing and reproduction
544,000
440, 683
484,255
07 Other contractual services
1, 553, 500
782, 725
898,125
Repairs and alterations
is especially concerned with aero-thermo-elastic problems
410,000
727,311
410,000
Research contracts
106, 500
50, 362
64,300
Services b y other agencies
resulting from the temperatures and heating rates en90, 000
188, 500
90,000
Research services
80,000
38,300
50,000
Security investigations
countered at high speeds.
6, 234, 000
5, 337, 549
5, 669,620
08 Supplies and materials
3, 666, 000
2, 423, 991
2, 463, 417
4. Operating problems research.—Research in this field is 09 Equipment
3, 404,000
3,040, 665
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions-.
concerned with the study of problems of transport avia- 13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
6,000
5, 627
6,000
18,000
14, 624
17, 550
15 Taxes and assessments
tion such as turbulence, fire, icing, and noise; and also
64,036, 899
80,480,000
Subtotal
71,000,000
with safety problems associated with flight beyond the Deduct accounts receivable at end of year.
- 7 , 979
64, 028,920
80,480,000
Total obligations
71,000,000
atmosphere.
5. Headquarters management and coordination.—This
activity provides for central direction of the research proCONSTRUCTION
AND
EQUIPMENT
grams at all laboratories and research stations.
[Construction and equipment:] For construction and equipment
6. Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship
at
research stations
between operating costs and operating program (obliga- thelaboratories andnot to exceed one of the Committee, [including
acquisition of
hundred and fifteen acres of
tions) is derived from year-end balances of selected re- land, $35,000,000] $26,220,000, to remain available until expended.
sources and applicable adjustments as reflected in the (50 11. S. C. 151b; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $35,000,000
Estimate 1959, $26,220,000
following table:




163

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Program and Financing
Costs to this appropriation

Total
estimate

Program by activities:
1. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory
2. A m e s Aeronautical Laboratory
3. Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory..
4. High-Speed Flight Station
5. Pilotless Aircraft Station
Reserves

1957
actual

T o June 30,
1956

1959
estimate

$22,473, 271
11,341,372
7, 596, 798
3,997,461
1,595

$5,491,046
879, 634
4, 606,349
9,062
70,979

$8,453, 757
1,650,000
10, 500,000

$6,400,000
5,300,000

230,000

1,300,000

145,047, 558

Total program costs

45,410,497

11,057,070

20,833,757

24,000,000

11,000,000

4, 000, 000
24,833,757

-13,220,666
8,378,648
11,710

- 8 , 378, 648
18,544,891
35,000, 000

This appropriation provides for the modernization of
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics research
and supporting facilities and for the construction of certain
additional facilities for conducting research beyond the
capabilities of existing equipment.
1. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory.—The 1959 estimates provide for the construction of one major newfacility for high-temperature research on structures and
for utility improvements. Projects against w^hich costs
will be incurred in 1959 will be primarily from prior year
programs. Additional facilities at this location are being
requested in 1958 and are shown at the end of this chapter
under the heading "Proposed for later transmission."
2. Ames Aeronautical Laboratory.—The 1959 program
includes 2 new facilities for hypersonic research and modifications to 1 existing facility. Projects against which costs
will be incurred in 1959 will be primarily from prior year
programs.
3. Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory.—Included in the
1959 program are 2 new facilities for hypersonic research
and modifications to 4 existing facilities. Projects against
which costs will be incurred in 1959 will be primarily from
prior year programs.
4. High-Speed Flight Station.—Final payments were
completed in 1957 for the flight-test facility constructed
at this station.
5. Pilotless Aircraft Station.—The 1959 program includes
certain plant improvements.
6. Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship is
derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
reflected in the following table:
1957
actual

1958
estimate

$12, 355, 503
11,040, 234
16, 706,150

$18, 825, 503
10,061, 234
14, 598,150

$12,870,000
4, 321,000
8, 892,000

1,351,926
72,421

188,926
72,421

137,000

41, 526, 234

43, 746, 234

26,220,000

-18, 544,891
14, 814,891

14,000,000

Appropriation (new obligational authority) _

A d d selected
Appropriaresources and Appropriation required
unobligated tion required to complete
balance, end
for 19£9
of year

29,950,000

7, 773, 238

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward
Unobligated balance carried forward
Unobligated balance no longer available..

D e d u c t selected resources and
unobligated
balance, start
of year

5, 950, 000

18,830,308

Total program (obligations) .

1959
estimate

$18,925,630

$22,881,343

$28,831,343

55,713

100,000

100,000

Total selected resources at
end of year
11,208,105
Selected resources at start of year ( - )

18,981,343
-11,208,105

22,981,343
-18,981,343

28,931,343
-22,981,343

Obligations incurred for costs of other years,
net

7,773,238

4,000,000

5,950,000




1958
estimate

$61, 643, 577
29, 232, 240
48, 301,297
4,006, 523
1, 791, 500
72,421

6. Relation of costs to obligations: Obligations incurred for
costs of other years, net

1956
actual
Selected resources at end of year
(inventories and items on
ordar):
Unpaid undelivered orders (appropriation balances
obligated for goods and services
on order not yet received) _. _ $11,032,279
Advances (payments for goods
and services on order not yet
received)
175,826

Analysis of 1959 financing

26, 220, 0 0
0
Object Classification
1957 actual

10

Lands and structures.

CONSTRUCTION

_

AND

1958 estimate

$18,830,308

EQUIPMENT,

1959 estimate

$24, 833, 757

$29,950,000

UNITARY

PLAN

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory
2. Ames Aeronautical Laboratory
3. Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory.
Total program c o s t s . . _
4. Relation of costs to obligations: Costs
financed from obligations of other
years, net (—)_ _
_ ___
Total program (obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward__
Unobligated balance carried forward
Unobligated balance no longer available-

1958 estimate

$224,309
598, 673
328,173

$76,239
115, 292
339, 811

1,151,155

531,342

- 6 3 2 , 265

-365,099

518,890

166,243

-787,133
268, 243

1959 estimate

- 2 6 8 , 243
102, 000

Appropriation (new obligational authority)

An appropriation of $75 million was made in 1950 for
the construction of three large supersonic wind tunnels at
laboratories of the National Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics, for the development of military aircraft and
missiles and their powerplants, as authorized by the
Unitary Wind Tunnel Plan Act of 1949. These tunnels
were placed in productive operation during 1956.
Relation of costs to obligations.—The relationship is derived from year-end balances of selected resources as
reflected in the following table :
Selected resources at end of year (inventories
and items on order):
Unpaid undelivered orders (appropriation
balances obligated for goods and services
on order not yet received)
Advances (payments for goods and services
on order not yet received)
Total selected resources at end of year.
Selected resources at start of year (—)
„

1956
actual

1957
actual

$995,879

1958
estimate

$365,099

1,485
997,364

Costs financed from obligations of other years, net ( — ) . .

365,099
-997,364 -$365,099
-632,265

-365,099

1959
estimate

164

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959

NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR
AERONAUTICS—Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
CONSTRUCTION

AND E Q U I P M E N T ,

UNITARY

PLAN—Continued

Object Classification
1957 actual
10

Lands and structures

1958 estimate

$518, 890

1959 estimate

the District of Columbia Alley Dwelling [Authority! Act,[$38,000]
$45,500: Provided, That all receipts derived from sales, leases, or
other sources shall be covered into the Treasury of the United States
monthly: Provided further, That so long as funds are available from
appropriations for the foregoing purposes, the provisions of section
507 of the Housing Act of 1950 (Public Law 475, Eighty-first Congress), shall not be effective. (48 Stat. 930, amended by Public Law
733, 75th Cong.; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $ 3 8 , 0 0 0
Estimate 1959, $ 4 5 , 5 0 0
Program and Financing

$166,243

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Operation and maintenance of title I
properties (total obligations)

Proposed for later transmission:
S A L A R I E S AND

EXPENSES

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Aerodynamic research
2. Powerplants research
3. Aircraft structural research
4. Capital acquisitions

__

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total program (costs—obligations)

5,000,000

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation.

(new

Under existing legislation, 1958.—The supplemental estimate anticipated is to permit immediate augmentation of
the Committee's research operations, as follows: (1) Aerodynamic research on advanced supersonic aircraft, ballistic
and interceptor missiles, manned hypersonic vehicles, and
space vehicles including satellites; (2) powerplants research
on advanced turbojet engines, rocket engines, power systems for space flight, and supporting research on engine
materials and special fuels; (3) aircraft structural research
related to the problems associated w^ith the design of
efficient aircraft, missiles, and space vehicles to withstand
aerodynamic heating; and (4) capital acquisitions to support the accelerated research activities described above.
EQUIPMENT

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
1. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory
(total costs—obligations)

$2, 300,000

$4,480,000

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forwardUnobligated balance carried f o r w a r d . .

4,480,000

1957 actual

Proposed supplemental appropriation

38,000

45, 500

38,000

5,000,000

AND

$45, 500

135

obligational

1957 actual
$55,398

Receipts

CONSTRUCTION

$38,000

The Authority operates 112 low-rent housing units and
30 nonresidential properties under title I of the District
of Columbia Alley Dwelling Act. Operations are financed
by appropriations; receipts are paid into the Treasury,
as follows:

$1,960,000
1,110,000
530,000
1,400,000

_

Appropriation
authority)

1959 estimate

$37,865

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available.

Program and Financing

1958 estimate

Routine operating expense

1958 estimate 1959 estimate
$55,410
$55,050

32,207

34,224

39,584

5,658

3.776

5,916

Total obligations

37,865

38,000

45,500

Net income

17,533

17,410

9,550

Major repairs and replacements

Object Classification
1957 actual
Full-time equivalent of all positions
Average number of all employees.
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

02
04
05
06
07
08
09
11

1959 estimate

5
5
5

6
6
6

5
5
5

Average GS grade and salary
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

1958 estimate

6. 8

Personal services:
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$5,425
$3,922

6. 6

$5,184
$3, 955

6.6

$5,234
$3,955

$21,209
699

Total obligations

$27,370
730

21,908
44
262
4,586
47
5,313
3, 991
1, 714

22,000
45
260
4,800
40
3,158
4,200
2,175
1,322

28,100
45
260
4, 760
45
5,263
4, 450
1,200
1,377

37,865

Total personal services
Travel
Communication s e r v i c e s _ _ _
Rents and utility services
_
Printing and b i n d i n g . . .
_
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
__
Grants, subsidies, and contributions

$21, 274
726

38,000

45, 500

- 4 , 4 8 0 , 000

6, 780,000

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
Current authorizations:

Under existing legislation, 1958.—A supplemental estimate is anticipated for 1958 to provide for construction
of a data reduction center to speed the availability of
research results, a facility for investigation of high temperature materials, and instrumentation related to a research aircraft.
NATIONAL CAPITAL HOUSING AUTHORITY
Current authorizations:
OPERATION

AND

MAINTENANCE

OF

PROPERTIES

[Maintenance and operation of properties:] For the [maintenance and] operation and maintenance of properties under title I of




SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses, as authorized
by the National Capital Planning Act of 1952 (66 Stat. 781),
including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); not to exceed $175 for the purchase of
newspapers and periodicals; not to exceed $8,000 for expenses of
travel; payment in advance for membership in societies whose
publications or services are available to members only or to members at a price lower than to the general public; and transportation
and not to exceed $15 per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized
by section 5 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 73b-2), for
members of the Commission serving without compensation;
[$225,000] $250,000. (66 Stat. 781; Department of the Interior and
Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,
$35,000,000
Estimate 1959, $26,220,000

165

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Planning (total obligations)

Program and Financing—Continued
1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$225,000

$250,000

$164,775

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

225,000

250,000

The National Capital Planning Commission is the central planning agency for the Federal and District Governments for the orderly development and redevelopment of
the National Capital and the conservation of natural and
historical features. The National Capital Regional Planning Council coordinates planning in the counties and
cities of the metropolitan area. A common staff serves
both the Commission and the Council.
Object Classification

$1,326, 687

$1,219,480

2, 500, 000

1,219,480

- 1 , 2 0 6 , 480
99, 480

-99,480

1,250, 000

1, 393, 000

1,120, 000

$462,984

Total obligations

200,000

1959 estimate

-973,269
1,206,480

Program by activities—Continued
4. Park, parkway, and playground
system in the District of Columbia-

35,225

Appropriation (new obligational authority).

1958 estimate

1957 actual

1, 016, 789

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward-._
Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new obligational au-

The National Capital Planning Commission acquires
land for the development of the park, parkway, and playground system in the District of Columbia and its environs.
4. Park, parkway, and playground system in the District
oj Columbia.—Land is also acquired in the District of
Columbia, with all expenditures being repaid over a period
of years by the District of Columbia.
Object Classification

1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

28
1
26
27

30
1
29
30

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Pull-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
__
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

27
20
22

J 9. 6

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$7,020

9. 6

$7,067

9. 6

$7,088

Total obligations.

$182,700
3,000
1,700

$201, 680
6,000
1, 775

138, 654
5,653
2,615
643
1,732
8,343
1,890
2,437
2,498
310

187,400
8,000
2,700
800
2,000
5,500
2,600
2,500
1,000
12,000
200
300

209,455
8,000
2,700
800
2,250
7,125
2,600
2,750
1,000
12,820
200
300

164, 775

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Blueprinting, photostating, etc
07 Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments

02
04
06

$136,872
927
855

225, 000

250,000

ACQUISITION,

NATIONAL
CAPITAL
PARKt
PLAYGROUND
SYSTEM

PARKWAY,

Average GS grade and salary ,
01

02
04
06
07

08
09
10
11

8.0

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services.

$1,393,000

Estimate 1959, $1,120,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. George Washington Memorial Parkway, Va
2. George Washington Memorial Parkway, M d
3. Extension of stream valley parkways into nearby M a r y l a n d .




$178,429

8.0

8.0

:6, 405

16, 550

$11, 867

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction: Blueprinting, photostating, etc
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
Real property title examinations
Real property surveys
Real property appraisals
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Lands and structures
Grants, subsidies, and contributions__
Grants to Maryland

$12,610
49

$12, 910
49

11, 867
100

12, 659
100
105

12, 959
100
105

603

775
150
100
12, 787
32,000
8,824
600
100
1,745,000
800

775
150
100
11, 637
28, 250
7, 924
600
100
, 155,980
800

2, 500, 000

1,219, 480

6, 822
10, 715
2,967
577
816,138
'~167,"006"
1, 016, 789

686, 000

S A L A R I E S AND E X P E N S E S , W A S H I N G T O N R E G I O N A L
TRANSPORTATION SURVEY

1959 estimate

MASS

[Salaries and expenses, Washington regional mass transportation
survey: The unobligated balance of appropriations heretofore
granted under this head shall remain available until June 30, 1958:
Provided, That the employment of not more than one person by
contract or otherwise, pursuant to the third sentence of section 2 (c)
of the Act of June 6, 1924, as amended by the Act of July 19, 1952
(66 Stat. 783), may be extended for an additional year.] (66 Stat.
781; Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Transportation survey
tions)

(total

obliga-

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available
New obligational authority

1958 estimate

$6, 405

AND

[Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and playground system:] Under authority of the Act of May 29, 1930 (46
Stat. 482), as amended, for necessary expenses for the National
Capital Planning Commission for acquisition of land for the park,
parkway, and playground system of the National Capital, to remain available until expended, [$1,393,000, of which (a) $75,000 shall
be available for the purposes of section 1 (a) of said Act of May 29,
1930, (b) $318,000 shall be available for the purposes of section 1 (b)
thereof, and (c) $1,000,000 shall be available for the purposes of
section 4 thereof] $1,120,000, which shall be available for the purposes
of section 4 of said Act of May 29, 1930: Provided, That not exceeding
[$69,000] $63,500 of the funds available for land acquisition purposes shall be used during the current fiscal year for necessary
expenses of the Commission (other than payments for land) in
connection with land acquisition. (46 Stat. 482; Department of
the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positionsAverage number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year. _.

Total obligations.

LAND

1958 estimate

N e w obligational authority:
Appropriation
Eeappropriation

$205, 713

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$39, 333

39,333
245,046

$200, 000
45, 046

39,333

$39,333

$410,224

207,025

75, 704

168,351

687,385

The final phases of the mass transportation survey will
be concluded by June 30, 1958.

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

166

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION—
Continued

mittee makes the report requested during consideration of
the 1958 budget.
Program and Financing

Current authorizations—Continued
1957 actual
SALARIES

AND E X P E N S E S , W A S H I N G T O N R E G I O N A L
TRANSPORTATION
SURVEY—Continued

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

8.4

Average GS grade and salary
01

02
04
06
07
08
11
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent

$6,080

9. 5

Total personal services
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Blueprinting, photostating, etc
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Grants, subsidies, and contributions...
Taxes and assessments
Total obligations

$5,800
3, 901

61,171
2,452
467
1,163
580
117,090
21,950
568

9,701
1, 375
630
841
3, 740
158
583
305

205,713

Current authorizations:
SALARIES

39, 333

Intragovernmental funds:
ADVANCES AND R E I M B U R S E M E N T S
Program and Financing
1957 actual

1958 estimate

Program by activities:
Miscellaneous services for Department
of Commerce, Bureau of Public Roads
(total obligations)
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other accounts.-

$30,000

from

30,000

Object Classification

Average GS grade and salary.
01

02
07
11

5.0

$9,384,800

$4, 075
$3, 599
10,340

Total personal services
Travel
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..

13,939
1,730
12,260
1, 915
156
30, 000

Proposed for later transmission:

EXPENSES

Estimate 1959,

$9,985,000

Program and Financing

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent.

Total obligations.

1959 estimate

AND

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary for the National
Labor Relations Board to carry out the functions vested in it by the
Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947 (29 U. S. C. 141-167), and
other laws, including expenses of attendance at meetings concerned
with the work of the Board when specifically authorized by the
Chairman or the General Counsel; services as authorized by section
15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); and uniforms, or
allowances therefor, as authorized by the Act of September 1, 1954,
as amended (5 U. S. C. 2131); [$9,384,800] $9,985,000: Provided,
That no part of this appropriation shall be available to organize or
assist in organizing agricultural laborers or used in connection with
investigations, hearings, directives, or orders concerning bargaining
units composed of agricultural laborers as referred to in section 2 (3)
of the Act of July 5, 1935 (29 U. S. C. 152), and as amended by the
Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947, and as defined in section 3
(f) of the Act of June 25, 1938 (29 U. S. C. 203), and including in
said definition employees engaged in the maintenance and operation
of ditches, canals, reservoirs, and waterways when maintained or
operated on a mutual, non-profit basis and at least 95 per centum
of the water stored or supplied thereby is used for farming purposes.
(47 U. S. C. 222, Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and
Welfare Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriation 1958,

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
A verage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year

751,000

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD

22,000

272

$751,000

Financing:
Proposed supplemental appropriation

Under proposed legislation, 1959.—Legislation is pending
which would authorize additional Federal contributions to
the Maryland stream valley program. The anticipated
supplemental of $751,000 will be matched by $1,500,000
in State funds.

$7, 587

$39, 536
21,635

1959 estimate

Program by activities:
Extension of stream valley parkways
into nearby Maryland
.

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

MASS

1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Field investigations
2. Trial examiner hearing
.
3. Board adjudication
___
4. Securing of compliance with Board
orders
Total obligations..
Financing:
Unobligated balance n o longer available.
Appropriation (new obligational authority) —_

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$5, 506, 269
694,189
1,177, 247

$5, 761,000
752, 600
1, 259, 550

$6, 024, 900
806,500
1,350, 000

1, 571,489

1,611,650

1, 803,600

8,949,194

9, 384, 800

9, 985, 000

9,384, 800

9, 985, 000

2,306
8,951,500

The Board resolves representation disputes and remedies unfair labor practices by employers and unions.
1. Field investigation.—Charges of unfair labor practices
1957 actual
1958 estimate 1959 estimate
and petitions for elections to resolve representation disputes are investigated in the regional office in which they
Program by activities:
are filed. About 87% of the unfair labor practice cases
George Washington Memorial Park$3,400,000
ways (total obligations)
and 77% of the election cases are closed by settlement,
Financing:
dismissal, or withdrawal without the need for public
Proposed supplemental appropriation
3,400,000
hearing or further formal action. The balance is prepared for public hearing.
Filings of unfair labor practice charges have been inUnder existing legislation, 1958.—Estimates will be submitted after the Senate Interior and Insular Affairs Com- creasing and will result in an increase in number of cases




LAND

ACQUISITION

Program and Financing

167

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

pending at the end of 1958 as compared to the number
pending at the end of 1957. Additional funds are provided
in 1959 to reduce the pending caseload during 1959 to the
1957 end-of-year level.
2. Trial examiner hearing.—Trial examiners conduct
public hearings as the basis of findings and recommendations in intermediate reports. In 1957, there were 238
reports issued; for 1958, the estimate is 285; for 1959, 325.
3. Board adjudication.—In unfair labor practice cases,
the trial examiner's intermediate report becomes the
Board order, if no exceptions are filed within 20 days.
Exceptions are filed to approximately 80% of these reports
and are referred to the Board for decision. In contested
representation cases the Board may either order an election to determine the choice of bargaining representative
or dismiss the case.
DECISIONS ISSUED BY THE BOARD

1957 actual
154
1,474

Unfair labor practice..
Representation

1958 estimate
225
1,400

1959 estimate
350
1,375

4. Securing of compliance with Board orders.—If the
parties do not voluntarily comply with orders, the Board
must request the courts to enforce its decision. Most
contested decisions involve unfair labor practices. In
1957, there were 54 Board decisions of all kinds requiring
court litigation; for 1958, the estimate is 78; and for
1959, 85.1

NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary for the National
Mediation Board, including stenographic reporting services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a),
$520,000. (45 U. S. C. 154; Departments of Labor, and Health,
Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $520,000
Estimate 1959, $520,000
Program and Financing
1957 actual

$479,000
41,000

$479,000
41,000

463,181

520,000

520,000

475, 500

520,000

520,000

$460,000

Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

1959 estimate

$426,181
37,000

Program by activities:
1. Mediation
2. Administration

1958 estimate

$520,000

$520,000

520,000

520,000

12,319

New obligational authority. _
N e w obligational authority:
Appropriation
Transferred from "Salaries and expenses," National Railroad Adjustment Board (71 Stat. 183)

15, 500

Appropriation (adjusted)

475, 500

Object Classification

1958 estimate

1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
11
13
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

1, 220
1
1,182
1,197

$6, 625

8. 9

$6, 710

8. 9

$6, 671

$7, 517,076
6,536
34, 729

$7, 624, 545
4,500
50,930

7,558,341
538, 397
32, 685
235, 375
33, 509
135, 826
208, 777
13,969
92,160
89, 247
1,493
9, 415

7,679,975
531,450
31,000
237, 600
35, 850
100,300
191, 950
15,850
91,000
23,200
438, 325
1,000
7,300

8,031, 575
636,000
40, 000
246, 950
37,000
165,050
207,925
17,450
100,150
28, 500
465,300

8,949,194

9,384, 800

9,985,000

The Board mediates labor disputes and determines
collective-bargaining representatives for the 700 carriers
and 1.5 million employees in the railroad and airline industries. Workload is expected to remain relatively
stable.
MEDIATION CASES

______

9,100

Cases received during year..

Intragovernmental funds:
REIMBURSEMENTS

Program and Financing
1958 estimate

1957 actual
Program by activities:
Trial examiner hearing (total obligations)
Financing:
Advances and reimbursements
other a c c o u n t s . . .

1959 estimate

$40,665

$42,300

40,665

from

$42,300

42,300

1957 actual

Average GS grade and salary
01
02
11

Personal services: Permanent positions
Travel
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Total obligations




11. 3

Average GS grade and salary
Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

40
40
40

40
40
40

39
36
36

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

$8,159

11. 2

$7,980

11. 2

$8, 016

$336, 785

Total personal services
02 Travel . . . __
03 Transportation of things
__
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
_
__ _.
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions...

$353, 550
1,150

$353, 550
1,150

336, 785
104, 279
50
13, 904
4,233

354, 700
120, 000
50
13, 550
3,000
2,700
2,500

354, 700
120,000
50
13, 550
3,000
2,700
2,500

3, 608
322
463,181

Total obligations

ARBITRATION

$12,240

3

3

3
15.0

1958
1959
estimate estimate
304
300
500
500
504
500
300
300

23, 500

23, 500

520,000

520,000

42,300

Object Classification
Average number of all employees

1957
actual
243
550
489
304

Object Classification

01

ADVANCES AND

1956
actual
197
500
454
243

$7,973, 500
4,500
53,575

Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things.
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction.
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments
Total obligations

1,162
1
1,127
1,139

1, 206
1
1,125
1,151
8. 8

Average GS grade and salary
01

1959 estimate

15.0

$12,263

15.0

$12,263

$37,033
3,632

$37, 300
2,600
2,400

$37, 300
2,600
2,400

40, 665

42,300

42, 300

AND

EMERGENCY

BOARDS

[Arbitration and emergency boards:] For expenses necessary for
arbitration boards established under section 7 of the Railway Labor
Act, as amended (45 U. S. C. 157) , and emergency boards appointed
by the President pursuant to section 10 of said Act (45 U. S. C. 160),
including stenographic reporting services as authorized by section 15
of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), $250,000. (45 U. S. C.
154; Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and Welfare
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $250,000
Estimate 1959, $250,000

168

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1959

NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD—Continued

Program and Financing—Continned

ARBITRATION

AND

EMERGENCY

BOARDS—Continued

1957 actual

1958 estimate

$166,000
54,000

$166,000
84,000

220,000

$502,000

30,000

250,000

250,000

250,000

1. Voluntary arbitration.—When mediation fails, the
parties are urged to submit their differences to arbitration
or special adjustment boards, including neutral members
paid from this account.
2. Investigation of emergency disputes.—The President,
when notified of disputes which threaten seriously to
interrupt service, appoints an emergency board to investigate and report on the dispute as a basis for agreement.
NUMBER OF BOARDS

1956
actual
6
42
5

Arbitration boards.
Special adjustment boards..
Emergency boards

1957
actual
12
54
3

1958
1959
estimate estimate
12
12
75
75
3
3

Object Classification
1957 actual

01
02
05
06
07

Total obligations

NATIONAL

RAILROAD

SALARIES

10
11

10
11

$180,578
24,771
17,163
1, 500
2,205

other

1959 estimate

$173,000
30,000
15,000
2,000

$198,000
35,000
15,000
2,000

226, 217

Personal services: Positions
th an permanent
Travel
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services

1958 estimate

10
8

Average number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year

220,000

250,000

ADJUSTMENT

AND

BOARD

1957 actual




$525,000

525,000

525,000

- 1 5 , 500
486, 500

Railroad employee grievances resulting from application
of collective bargaining contracts may be brought for settlement to the 36-man board composed of 4 divisions.
Each division has an equal number of carrier and union
representatives paid by the parties and handles the grievances of a particular type of employee. The appropriation provides clerical assistance to the Board and neutral
referees to sit with divisions of the Board when they are
deadlocked.
WORKLOAD

1956
actual
3,724
2,409
1,426
4,707

Cases
Pending, beginning of year
Received during year
Closed during year
Pending, end of year

1957
actual
4,707
1,992
2,382
4,317

1958
1959
estimate estimate
4,317
4, 662
2,070
2,115
1,725
1, 940
4,662
4,837

Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

50
7
56
61

50
8
58
62

49
7
55
65
7. 2

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$5,230

7.2

$5,155

7. 2

$5, 214

$252, 784
126,881

$257,000
144, 600
1,000

379, 665
23, 669
81
8, 728
48, 594
3,320
5, 988
4,632
1, 462

384, 600
24, 500
100
8,500
69,000
3,000
6,000
9,800
17,100
2, 400

402,600
26, 500
100
8,700
49,000
3,500
6,000
9,100
17,100
2,400

476,139

Total personal services.
02 T r a v e l - . .
03 Transportation of things
_
04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction.._ . . .
07 Other contractual services
08 Supplies and materials
_ _
09 E q u i p m e n t - . - ___
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments

$254,000
129, 600
1,000

525,000

525,000

EXPENSES

Program and Financing

Total obligations

$525,000

Appropriation (adjusted).

Total obligations

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary for the National
Railroad Adjustment Board, including stenographic reporting
services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946
(5 U. S. C. 55a), $525,000, of which not less than [$155,000]
$172,000 shall be available for compensation (at rates not in excess
of $75 per diem) and expenses of referees appointed pursuant to
section 3 of the Railway Labor Act, as amended. (45 U. S. C.
153; Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and Welfare
Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $525,000
Estimate 1959, $ 5 2 5 , 0 0 0

Program by activities:
Adjustment of grievances:
(a) Train service employees
(b) Shop employees
(c) Other nonoperating employees
(d) Marine employees

N e w obligational authority:
Appropriation
Transferred to "Salaries and expenses,"
National Mediation Board (71 Stat.
183)

250,000

23, 783

Appropriation (new obligational authority) __

$525,000

1959 estimate

226,217

Financing:
Unobligated balance n o longer available.

$525,000

r$10,361

New obligational authority.

$175,255
50,962

Total obligations

1959 estimate

486,500

Financing:
Unobligated balance n o longer available-

Program and Financing

Program by activities:
1. Voluntary arbitration
2. Investigations of emergency disputes.

1958 estimate

1957 actual

Current authorizations—Continued

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$157, 790
114,966
161,273
42,110

$178, 500
116,500
180, 600
49,400

$178, 500
116, 500
180, 600
49,400

476,139

525,000

525,000

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For expenses necessary to carry out the
purposes of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as
amended (42 U. S. C. 1861-1875), including award of graduate fellowships; services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for individuals; hire of passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed [$175,000]
$325,000 for expenses of travel; not to exceed $350 for the purchase
of newspapers and periodicals; and reimbursement of the General
Services Administration for security guard services; [$40,000,000]
$140,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That of
the foregoing amount not less than $9,500,000 shall be available for
tuition, grants, and allowances in connection with a program of
supplementary training for high school science and mathematics
teachers. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1958, $40,000,000

Estimate 1959, $140,000,000

169

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Support of science:
(a) Grants and contracts
(b) Program development, operation and evaluation
2. Support of scientific manpower:
(a) Grants and contracts
(ft) Program development, operation and evaluation
3. Executive direction and managementTotal obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought f o r w a r d Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation (new obligational authority)

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$21,580,733

$24,029,612

$55,069,000

1,067,455

1,188,271

1,680,000

14,698,298

14,804,877

79,730,000

601,488
682,017

706,663
823,110

2,140,000
1,381,000

38,629,991

41, 552, 533

science education activities with scientists and educators
of other nations; and (6) maintenance of the National
Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel, and studies
relating to supply, demand, and utilization of scientific
manpower.
(6) Program development, operation and evaluation.—
Includes costs related to developing, administering, and
evaluating the above programs in support of scientific
manpower.

140,000,000

Object Classification
1957 actual

- 1 8 2 , 524
1, 552, 533
40,000,000

140,000,000

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees
N u m b e r of employees at end of year __ __
Average GS grade and salary.
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

1958 estimate 1959 estimate
975
2,400

It also supports (1) basic research facilities at universities and other nonprofit institutions in such fields as
astronomy, nuclear physics, electronic computation, and
biology, (2) collecting, translating, cataloging, and disseminating information on the results of scientific research, and developing improved methods for the exchange of scientific data, and (3) studies of the status of
research in the United States and foreign countries.
(b) Program development, operation and evaluation.—
Includes costs related to developing, administering, and
evaluating the above programs in support of science.
2. Support of scientific manpower—(a) Grants and contracts.—The Foundation supports (1) fellowships to
graduate science students, college science faculty fellowships, summer fellowships for high school science and
mathematics teachers, and summer study programs for college teaching assistants; (2) summer and academic-year
institutes for the training of high school and college teachers
of science and mathematics; (3) projects directed toward
the improvement of high school and college science and
mathematics course content; (4) activities to stimulate
interest in and secure improvement of teaching and training at high school and college levels; (5) cooperative




293
4
289
350

454
4
424
510

266
10
235
317
8.1

$6,118
$13, 486

8.0

$6,012
$12, 555

8.0

$5,953
$11,680

08
09
11
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services

$1, 448, 217
63, 684
93, 453

$1, 725, 630
24,260
135, 760

$2,690,040
34,250
180,060

Total personal services
- __ _
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction.
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions.Taxes and assessments

1, 605,354
141, 602
3, 899
58, 026
1,708
59, 770
3, 745, 790
113,849
33,346
52, 331
32,685, 301
4,351

1, 885, 650
196, 595
5,250
60, 000
2, 668
54, 750
4, 717, 521
145, 900
35,350
49,758
33, 840, 649
5,489

2,904,350
325,000
6,700
87,000
9,000
86,900
8,420,305
450,300
114,945
221,500
127,366,800
7,200

Total, National Science Foundation.

02
03
04
05
06
07

38, 505,327

40,999, 580

140,000,000

14
9
10

11
8

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS
Total number of permanent positions.. . .
Average number of all employees. _
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

GRANTS FOR SUPPORT OP BASIC RESEARCH PROJECTS
N u m b e r of grants awarded

1959 estimate

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
40,000,000

The Foundation supports basic research, education in
the sciences, and the interchange of foreign and domestic
scientific information. It is also responsible for developing and encouraging pursuit of a national policy for the
promotion of basic research and education in the sciences,
and for recommending to the President policies for
strengthening the Nation's scientific effort. The increased appropriation will provide for support of a greater
percentage of meritorious scientific research proposals; for
additional facilities for fundamental scientific research; for
making the results of research conducted in the United
States and abroad more readily available within the
scientific community; and particularly for increased
emphasis on programs to improve science teaching and to
increase the number of highly qualified research scientists
in this country. A supplemental of $10 million is anticipated in 1958.
1. Support of science—(a) Or ants and contracts.—The
Foundation supports basic research projects, principally
in institutions of higher learning.
1957 actual
963

1958 estimate

- 1 , 552, 533

03
06
07
08
09

7.2

__

Personal services:
Permanent positions _ __ _
Positions other than permanent

$4,708

7.3

$4,825

$38,916
2,463
41,379
25
910
81,648
38
664

Total personal services
Transportation of things..
Printing and reproduction...
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment--

$39,120
982
40,102
512, 851

124, 664

Obligations are distributed as follows:
National Science Foundation
Library of Congress
Department of the A r m y .

INTERNATIONAL

41, 552, 533

$140,000,000

$38, 505,327
22, 765
101,899

Total obligations

552, 953

38,629,991

Total, allocation accounts

$40,999,580
4,852
548,101

$140,000, 000

GEOPHYSICAL

YEAR

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Geophysical research related to the
earth's atmosphere:
(а) Basic atmospheric research.. _
(б) Earth satellite exploration of
the upper atmosphere
2. Geophysical research related to the
planet earth
3. Related scientific support activities..
4. Scientific direction and administration
Total obligations

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$2,957,420

$4,457,792

$81,000

8,816,571

8,139,834

21,000

2,025,521
907,131

1,838,491
1,922, 248

76,999
94,787

330,255

374,800

284, 500

15,036,898

16,733,165

558,286

170

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION—Continued

Object Classification—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued

1957 actual

INTERNATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL

YEAR—Continued
07

1957 actual

1958 estimate

- $ 3 2 , 373, 962
17, 337, 064

- $ 1 7 , 337,064
603,899

-$603, 899
45, 613

Appropriation (new obligational authority)-

This appropriation supports the United States program
for the International Geophysical Year, a worldwide
scientific undertaking involving concurrent research by
more than 50 nations, beginning in 1957. The results of
this research ultimately will benefit our international
relations, national defense, agriculture, commerce, and
industry. This undertaking involves securing and sharing on a multilateral basis scientific data which will assist
our own technological advancement in such fields as
weather forecasting and control, radio communication,
navigation, and upper atmospheric flight.
1. Geophysical research related to the earttis atmosphere—
(a) Basic atmospheric research.—Research into phenomena
observable in the upper atmosphere, including studies
of the aurora and airglow, cosmic rays, ionospheric
physics, meteorology, and solar activity.
(6) Earth satellite exploration of the upper atmosphere.—
Sustained observations of scientific phenomena in the
region beyond the earth's atmosphere by means of recording and transmitting instruments contained in unmanned
earth-circling satellites launched by rocket devices.
2. Geophysical research related to the planet earth.—
Research into phenomena originating on or within the
earth including studies of geomagnetism, glaciology,
oceanography, seismology, gravity, and longitude and
latitude measurements.
3. Related scientific support activities.—Scientific support activities related to the foregoing activities, such as
preparation of maps of the Antarctic, communication
networks, rocketry, and the center for storage and maintenance of scientific data gathered under the program are
included in this activity.

$6, 546,010

7
7
7

$558,286

$4, 263,073

$558, 286

150, 571

1,819, 726

685
6,394, 754

905,555
9, 744, 811

ALLOCATIONS RECEIVED F R O M

OTHER

ACCOUNTS

NOTE.—Obligations incurred under allocations from other accounts are included in
the schedules of the parent appropriation as follows:
"Research and development," Department of the N a v y .
"President's special international program."

Public enterprise funds:
RESEARCH AND D E V E L O P M E N T

OF R U B B E R

PROGRAM

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Operations (obligations):
Contracts and grants for support of
rubber research b y universities and
other organizations
Expense of terminating operations of
the Government rubber research
laboratories

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$437,100
58,076
495,176

Total program (obligations)
Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
Reappropriation (70 Stat. 686)
Unobligated balance no longer available

500,000
- 4 , 824

Financing applied to program

495,176

Object Classification
02
03
04
07

$314
373
6

Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Other contractual services: Services
performed b y other agencies
Grants, subsidies, and contributions.

57, 383
437,100
495,176

1959 estimate

7
7
7

16, 733,165

$8,490,888

Total obligations
1958 estimate

$12,470,092

15,036,898

Obligations are distributed as follows:
National Science Foundation
National Bureau of Standards, Department of Commerce
Coast and Geodetic Survey, Department of Commerce
Department of the N a v y

11

Object Classification

Other contractual services
Total obligations

1959 estimate

1957 actual

1959 estimate

ALLOCATION ACCOUNTS

Program and Financing—Continued

Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward--.
Unobligated balance carried forward

1958 estimate

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees. _
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
_ . . . 8. 6
Average salary of ungraded positions
01

02
04
06
07
08
09
11

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Other personal services.
Total personal services
Travel
Communications services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials
Equipment
...
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Total, National Science Foundation,




6
6
6
$6,059
$14, 500

9. 7

$7, 029
$14, 500

9. 7

Proposed for later transmission:
SALARIES AND

$7,132
$14,500

$43, 935
113

$51, 380
320
51, 700
5, 000
200
500
150
245, 914
50
250
3, 959, 309

57,890
6,000
200
500
150
122, 655
50
250
370, 591

8,490, 888 ^

4, 263, 0731

558, 286

Program and Financing
1957 actual

$57,570
320

44,048
9,108
199
345
132
3,857, 678
38
485
4, 578, 855

EXPENSES

Program by activities:
1. Support of science: Grants and contracts
2. Support of scientific manpower:
Grants and contracts
Total obligationsFinancing :
Proposed supplemental appropriation.

$7,500,000
2,500,000

10,000, 000
10,000,000

171

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

Under existing legislation, 1958.—An appropriation of
$10 million is proposed for later transmission for 1958 to
provide additional funds for grants to universities for
basic research; for grants to improve education in the
sciences; for grants to extend the translation of Russian
scientific literature; and for other basic science purposes.

NATIONAL SECURITY TRAINING

COMMISSION

Interest on the fund, and the principal if necessary, are
available for these purposes. The current program is
devoted primarily to the preparation of the history of the
Supreme Court.
Object Classification

1957 actual

07

01

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
National Security Training
sion (total obligations)

Other contractual services: Services
performed b y other agencies (total
obligations)-.. . . . __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

ALLOCATION

EXPENSES

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

02
04
06
07

TO LIBRARY

$32,692

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

Personal services: Positions
than permanent. _ __
Travel _
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services

$43,195

$60,000

43,195

60,000

309
741
19
42
79
1,190
14,190

__.

PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY COMMISSION
PRESIDENTIAL OFFICE SPACE

50, 000

ON

Current authorizations:

Total number of permanent positionsAverage number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year__.

SALARIES AND

EXPENSES

Program and Financing
7. 5

Average GS grade and salary

15

other

Total obligations..

Object Classification

02
03
04
06
07

$13,000

CONGRESS

17,308

Appropriation (new obligational authority)
__

01

OF

Total, Library of Congress

Commis-

1959 estimate

P E R M A N E N T COMMITTEE FOR THE OLIVER
W E N D E L L HOLMES DEVISE

Current authorizations:
S A L A R I E S AND

1958 estimate

$5, 641
1957 actual

Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent

$21,003
7,100

Total personal services..
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services..
Supplies and materials
Taxes and assessments

Program by activities:
Presidential office space study
obligations)

28,103
2, 765
26
585
873
191
131
18

Total obligations.

(total

Financing:
Unobligated balance 110 longer availableAppropriation (new obligational authority)

32, 692

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$11, 551
8, 449
20, 000

Object Classification
Average number of all employees
Number of employees at end of year.

PERMANENT COMMITTEE FOR THE
WENDELL H O L M E S DEVISE

OLIVER

Permanent authorizations:
OLIVER

WENDELL

HOLMES

DEVISE

02
04
06
07
08
09

FUND

(Indefinite special account)
Appropriated (estimate) 1958,

Estimate 1959,

$14,000

01

$12,700

Personal services:
Positions other than permanent..
Other personal services
Total personal services..
Travel
Communication services
Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services..
Supplies and materials
Equipment

$7,943
423
8, 366
1, 208
477
27
547

Total obligations.

11, 551

Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
Preparation of the history of the Supreme Court (total obligations)
Financing:
Unobligated balance brought forward...
Unobligated balance carried forward
Appropriation
authority)

(new

obligational

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$43,195

$60,000

BOARD

Current authorizations:
$14,190
- 4 3 3 , 502
434,397

-434,397
405, 202

- 4 0 5 , 202
357, 902

15,085

14,000

12, 700

The Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund was established
by 69 Stat. 533 to (1) prepare a history of the Supreme
Court of the United States and, if deemed advisable, (2)
finance an annual lecture or series of lectures and (3)
publish a memorial volume of Justice Holmes' writings.




RAILROAD RETIREMENT

LIMITATION

ON SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

(Trust fund)
[Salaries and expenses, Railroad Retirement Board (trust fund):]
For expenses necessary for the Railroad Retirement Board, including [not to exceed $1,000 f o r j expenses of attendance at meetings
concerned with the work of the Board, when specifically authorized
by the Board, stenographic reporting services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); and uniforms
or allowances therefor, as authorized bv the Act of September 1,
1954 (68 Stat. 1114); [$8,150,000] $8,450,000, to be derived from
the railroad retirement account. (45 U. S. C., 228a-228r; Departments of Labor, and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation
Act, 1958.)

172

THE BUDGET FOR, FISCAL YEAR 1959

RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD—Continued

Object Classification—Continued

Current authorizations—Continued
LIMITATION

ON SALARIES

1957 actual

AND

EXPENSES—Continued

02
03
04

(Trust fund)—Continued
Program and Financing
1957 actual
Program by activities:
1. Maintenance of earnings accounts
2. Processing claims
3. Maintenance of beneficiary rolls
4. Hearings and appeals
5. Actuarial services
6. Administration

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

$412,510
5,329,372
841,682
45,960
122, 718
699,501

Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available-

$445,164
6,030, 939
962,253
45,035
152,000
814,609

7,451,743

Total obligations..

$454,058
5,782,077
904,051
44, 935
158, 256
806,623
8,150, 000

8,450,000

7,600,000

The Board administers the railroad retirement system,
financed by employer and employee taxes. This is for
administrative expenses of the Board in the operation of
this program, and is derived from the railroad retirement
trust fund. This system provides annuities for age and
disability and benefits for survivors.
1. Maintenance of earnings accounts.—Eligibility for and
the amount of benefits are based on individual accounts
of compensation. This workload fluctuates with the level
of employment in the railroad industry, rates of turnover,
and similar factors. The costs are shared on a measured
basis with the railroad unemployment insurance program.
2. Processing claims.—Claims for annuities and benefits
are adjudicated and certified for initial payment. The
number tends to increase gradually each year, as more
railroad workers, their spouses or survivors become
entitled. Regular claims dispositions were 133,000 in
1957 and are estimated at 140,200 and 147,800 in 1958
and 1959.
3. Maintenance of beneficiary rolls.—Benefit payments
must be authorized each month for those persons on the
rolls who continue to remain eligible. The number of
monthly benefit payments were 7,647,638 in 1957 and are
estimated at 8,129,000 and 8,478,000 in 1958 and 1959
and will continue to increase annually.
4. Hearings and appeals.—Individuals whose claims for
annuities or benefits are disallowed or who dispute the
award have the right of appeal. Appeals dispositions
were 201 in 1957 and are estimated at 190 in 1958 and
1959.
5. Actuarial services.—Actuarial studies and estimates
are required by the Railroad Retirement Act to determine
the adequacy of the tax rate to establish and maintain a
sufficient reserve to meet all future payments.
6. Administration.—Except for administrative activities
of the retirement program exclusively, the cost of administration is shared between the retirement and the railroad
unemployment insurance programs on a measured basis.
Object Classification
1957 actual
Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
Personal services:
Permanent positions
Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services




1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1,437
20
1,331
1,358

1,440
26
1,359
1,390

1,464
26
1,231
1,331
6.0

$249,848
14,742
51,805
324,000
435,851
64, 590
139,244

90,944
117,952
98, 453
2,564
2,396

107, 604
120, 282
41,306
384,093
4,307
2,439

111,053
120,354
61, 111
407, 514
4,506
2,459

7, 451, 743

Total obligations

148,257

limitation

01

08
09
11
13
15

$216,946
14,742
51,295
313,500
423,015
58,417
128,125

8,150,000

8,450,000

8,450,000

8,150, 000

05
06
07

1959 estimate

$196,747
14,742
50,676
295, 564
400,143
46, 594
119,832

Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services
Penalty mail costs
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Services performed b y other agencies..Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Refunds, awards, and indemnities
Taxes and assessments
_

1958 estimate

$4,616

6.0

$4,677

6.1

$4,683

$5,590,733
81,070
343,333

$6,122,623
62,353
98,953

$6,249,125
81, 732
132,566

6,015,136

6,283,929

6,463,423

RENEGOTIATION BOARD
Current authorizations:
SALARIES

AND

EXPENSES

[Salaries and expenses:] For necessary expenses of the Renegotiation Board, including expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of this appropriation; hire of passenger
motor vehicles; not to exceed [$50,000] $40,000 for expenses of
travel; and services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for
individuals; [$3,000,000] $2,900,000. (Act of Mar. 23, 1951,
Public Law 9, as amended; Independent Offices Appropriation Act.
1958.)
Appropriated 1958,

$3,000,000

Estimate 1959,

$2,900,000

Program and Financing
1957 actual

Total obligations
Financing:
Unobligated balance no longer available Appropriation
authority)..

(new

obligational

1959 estimate

$490,285
837,073
2,210,410

$476,000
793,000
1,731,000

$463,000
771,000
1,666,000

3,537,768

Program by activities:
1. Executive direction
2. Staff operations
3. Renegotiation operations (field)

1958 estimate

3,000,000

2,900,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

137,232
3,675,000

The Board conducts renegotiation with contractors to
eliminate excessive profits in connection with procurement
under the national defense program. All contractors and
subcontractors who have any business subject to the act
are required to file with the Board. The Board has recovered $610,330,855 in excessive profits from the date of
its establishment through June 30, 1957. The act establishing this requirement expires December 31, 1958, but
this will have no effect on the budget of the agency until
later years.
1. Executive direction.—The Board is responsible for
final action in all cases. This includes screening all filings
involving renegotiable business over $1 million and requests for exemption.
2. Staff operations.—The headquarters staff furnishes
technical advice and assistance to the Board and regional
organization.
3. Renegotiation operations (field).—The three regional
boards conduct renegotiation proceedings and make initial
determinations. The field boards make the excessive
profit determination in all cases involving less than
$800,000 of renegotiable profits; however, this determination may be appealed to the statutory board. All determinations in cases involving more than $800,000 renegotiable profits are reviewed by the statutory board.

173

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
Program and Financing—Continued

CASE WORKLOAD

Filed
Assigned
Completed

1956 actual
44,531
2,239
2,644

1957 actual
23,952
1,393
2,192

1958 estimate 1959 estimate
22,900
20,600
1,350
1,350
1,600
1,600

Object Classification
1957 actual

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

1957 actual
Program by activities—Continued
Relation of costs to obligations: Costs
financed from obligations of other
years (unpaid undelivered orders),
net (—)_
Total program (obligations)

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees.
N u m b e r of employees at end of year
Average GS grade and salary
01

02
03
04
06
07
08
09
11
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions
-Positions other than permanent
Other personal services
Total personal services
Travel
Transportation of things
Communication services._
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services
Supplies and materials
Equipment
Grants, subsidies, and contributions
Taxes and assessments

478
1
438
359
9.3

$7,401

348
2
330
328

360
2
342
340
9. 5

$7, 548

9.4

$7, 533

$3,315,083
3,929
2,047

$2,621,200
10,000
11,800

$2,531, 500
8,000
11,500

3,321,059
34, 227
13,140
74,000
17, 637
28,332
18,415
27, 492

2; 643,000
40,000
2,000
74,000
15,000
30,000
18,000
5, 000
170,000
3,000

2,551,000
40,000
2,000
72,000
15,000
29,000
18,000
5,000
165,000
3,000

Financing:
Amounts becoming available:
N e w authorization to expend from
public debt receipts..
Revenue: Shipping tolls
___
Unobligated balance brought forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
Total amounts available
Unobligated balance carried forward
(authorization to expend from public
debt receipts)
Financing applied to program

1958 estimate

1959 estimate

-$25,127, 891

- $ 2 5 , 578, 952

—$6, 732, 900

21,226,160

18,838, 448

35,000, 000

9,100,100

1,500,000

30, 427, 585

9,201,425

25,362,977

30, 427, 585

44,201, 425

26,862,977

- 9 , 2 0 1 , 425

- 2 5 , 362,977

- 1 7 , 762,877

21,226,160

18, 838, 448

9,100,100

The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, a wholly Government-owned enterprise, is responsible for the construction, operation, and maintenance of
Total obligations
2,900,000
3,000,000
3,537,768
that part of the Saint Lawrence Seaway within the territorial limits of the United States (33 U. S. C. 981).
Completion of the United States section of the seaway
SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT
and the related navigation improvements being provided
by the Saint Lawrence Seaway Authority of Canada, in
CORPORATION
conjunction with the power-development works being
Public enterprise funds:
provided by the Power Authority of the State of New
The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation is hereby
York and the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of
authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of funds
Ontario, will afford a 27-foot navigation channel from
and borrowing authority available to such Corporation, and in
Lake Erie to Montreal.
accord with law, and to make such contracts and commitments
without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 104
Budget program—Capital outlay—The Corporation's
of the Government Corporation Control Act, as amended, as may
construction program consists of a 10-mile c