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THE BUDGET
O F

U N IT E D

T H E

ST A T ES G O V ER N M EN T
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30
1954

U N IT E D ST A T E S
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G
W A S H IN G T O N

:

O F F IC E

1953

For Sale by the Superintendent o f Docum ents, U . S. G overnm ent Printing Office, W ashington 25, D . C .




Price $5.50 (Paper Cover)

IN T R O D U C T IO N

T h e B u dget for the fiscal year 1954 contains the Presi­
dent’s recom m endations for the w ork program and finan­
cial program of the G overn m en t for the com ing year.
I t also presents com parable inform ation for the fiscal
years 1952 (actual) and 1953 (partly actual and partly
estim ated).
T h e material in the B u d g et covers b oth groups of
Treasury funds— Federal funds (owned b y the G overn ­
m ent), and trust and deposit funds (held in trust or in
suspense b y the G overn m en t). I t contains inform ation,
on b oth the incom e side of the B u dget and the ou tgo side.
T h e B u dget reflects one stage of the incom e side and three
stages of the ou tgo side. T h e form er is shown on the
basis of cash received. T h e latter is reflected in terms
o f authorizations, obligations (or in some cases accrued
expenditures), and cash expenditures (checks issued).
Congress acts on the ou tgo side of the B u dget b y grant­
ing authorizations to incur obligations and m ake expendi­
tures for expenses, grants, capital outlay, and fixed
charges. This congressional action takes several differ­
ent forms, the m ost com m on of w hich is an appropriation.
T h e B u dget contains summaries and detailed schedules
which show all new obligational authority, b oth appro­
priations and other kinds. I t also contains details on
obligations incurred (or som etim es on expenditures ac­
cruing, in the case o f business-type budgets).
The outgo side o f the B u dget is custom arily measured
in terms of cash expenditures, n ot on the basis o f authori­
zations or obligations. Expenditures occu r when the
obligations and liabilities incurred b y G overnm ent agen­
cies are paid. In som e cases the paym ent and the obliga­
tion occu r at the same time. In m ost cases, how ever,
the p aym ent follow s the obligation b y som e time, varying
from a few days or weeks in the case of salaries and wages,
to several years in the case o f som e contracts for m ajor
construction and the procurem ent o f new h eav y equip­
m ent. T h e B u dget contains summaries o f expenditures,
tables listing the expenditures b y accounts, and detailed
schedules relating the expenditures in each accou n t to
obligations and authorizations.
m

2




T h e B udget docum ent consists o f the B u dget M essage
and four parts which contain sum m ary tables, detailed
data, and special analyses.
In the B u dget M essage (pp. m 5 through m 5 5 ) the
President makes the general presentation o f his financial
program and outlines his m a jor recom m endations.
P art I o f the docum ent (pp. A l through a 1 3 ) contains
seven sum m ary tables on Federal funds and on the public
debt. E ach o f these tables is designed to bring together
in one to three pages som e over-all aspects o f the Federal
B udget.
Part I I (pp. 1 through 970) contains the details o f the
B u dget for Federal funds, including various types o f
tables and schedules, explanatory statem ents o f the w ork
to be perform ed and the m on ey needed, and the text o f
the language proposed for enactm ent b y Congress on each
item o f authorization.
Part I I I (pp. 971 through 1074) contains similar detail
for trust funds, and a schedule on deposit funds. It also
contains m em orandum inform ation on “ w orking fun ds,”
w hich presents the a ctiv ity in accounts w hich are estab­
lished when m on ey is a dvan ced b y one agen cy to another
for interagency services.
Part I V (pp. 1075 through 1139) contains various
special analyses o f bu d get data and Federal program s.
Som e o f these give details for certain sum m ary figures
appearing in part I — for example, a classification o f
b udget receipts b y source, and a classification o f budget
expenditures according to functions and subfunctions.
M a n y o f the other special analyses in part I V con tain
tabulations w hich cut across the entire Federal program .
A n appendix, printed separately, contains m ore de­
tailed inform ation on personal services b y grade and
title, and repeats schedules o f obligations b y o b je c t from
part I I o f the budget.
In trod u ctory statem ents at the beginning o f each part
give further explanations o f b ud get form at. T h e in tro­
d uction to part I (pp. a 3 and a 4 ) summarizes som e o f
the m ore im portant facts w ith respect to the structure
o f the budget system , the con cept o f the budget surplus
and deficit, classifications, and term in ology used.

TABLE

O F

CON TEN TS
Page

B udget

M essage

P r e s i d e n t ____________________________________________________________________________________________ _________ ___________________________

m

5

B u d g e t e x p e n d i t u r e s ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

7

m

8

of

the

E x p e n d i t u r e p o l i c y ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
T a x p o l i c y ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

IO

B u d g e t r e c e i p t s _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

M il

B o r r o w i n g a n d t h e p u b l i c d e b t _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

M il

E x p e n d i t u r e s a n d a u t h o r i z a t i o n s b y m a j o r f u n c t i o n s _________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

M i l i t a r y s e r v i c e s ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

12
13

I n t e r n a t i o n a l s e c u r i t y a n d f o r e i g n r e l a t i o n s ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

18

F i n a n c e , c o m m e r c e , a n d i n d u s t r y ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

22

T r a n s p o r t a t i o n a n d c o m m u n i c a t i o n ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

24
27

N a t u r a l r e s o u r c e s __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

A g r i c u l t u r e a n d a g r i c u lt u r a l r e s o u r c e s _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

3l

L a b o r __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

34

H o u s i n g a n d c o m m u n i t y d e v e l o p m e n t ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

37

E d u c a t i o n a n d g e n e r a l r e s e a r c h _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____

m

41

S o c i a l s e c u r i t y , w e lf a r e , a n d h e a l t h _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

43

V e t e r a n s ’ s e r v i c e s a n d b e n e f i t s _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

47

G e n e r a l g o v e r n m e n t _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m

50

I n t e r e s t _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________

m

53

Part

I.

Sum mary

T ables:

T a b le l .

R 6 s u m 6 o f B u d g e t r e c e ip t s , e x p e n d i t u r e s , a n d p u b l i c d e b t ______________________________________________________________________

a

5

T a b le 2 .

R £ s u m 6 o f n e w o b l i g a t i o n a l a u t h o r i t y ( b y t y p e a n d f u n c t i o n ) _________________________________________________________________

a

6

T a b le 3 .

a

7

S u m m a r y o f B u d g e t e x p e n d i t u r e s ( b y a g e n c y ) _______________________________________________________________________________________

a

8

T a b le 5 .

S u m m a r y o f n e w o b l i g a t i o n a l a u t h o r i t y ( b y a g e n c y ) ______________________________________________________________________________

a

9

T a b le 6.

S u m m a r y o f B u d g e t a u t h o r i z a t i o n s ( b y t y p e o f a u t h o r i z a t i o n a n d a g e n c y ) ______________________________________________

a

10

T a b le 7 .
Part II.

E f f e c t o f f i n a n c ia l o p e r a t i o n s o n t h e p u b l i c d e b t ____________________________________________________________________________________

T a b le 4 .

S u m m a r y o f B u d g e t e x p e n d i t u r e s in r e l a t i o n t o a u t h o r i z a t i o n s ( b y a g e n c y ) _____________________________________________

a

12

E s t im a t e s f o r F e d e r a l F u n d s , B u d g e t A u t h o r iz a t io n s a n d
T it l e ),

and

D e t a il e d

E s t im a t e s ,

N a r r a t iv e s , a n d

E x p e n d it u r e s

(b y O r g a n i z a t i o n

U n it a n d

A ccount

S ch edules:

L e g i s la t i v e b r a n c h ____________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________

6

T h e J u d i c i a r y _____________________________________________ - _________ _________________________________________________________________________________________

37

E x e c u t i v e O ffic e o f t h e P r e s i d e n t ____________________________________________________________________ - ________________________________________________

51

F u n d s a p p r o p r i a t e d t o t h e P r e s i d e n t _________________________________________________________________________________ - ______________________________

60

I n d e p e n d e n t o f f i c e s __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

84

F e d e r a l S e c u r i t y A g e n c y __________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________

202

G e n e r a l S e r v i c e s A d m i n i s t r a t i o n __________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________

266

H o u s i n g a n d H o m e F i n a n c e A g e n c y _________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________

294

D e p a r t m e n t o f A g r i c u l t u r e _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

368

D e p a r t m e n t o f C o m m e r c e _________________________~ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

496

D e p a r t m e n t o f D e f e n s e ____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

554

D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e I n t e r i o r _______________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________

696

D e p a r t m e n t o f J u s t i c e ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

794

D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

837

D e p a r t m e n t o f S t a t e _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

848

T r e a s u r y D e p a r t m e n t _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

874

D i s t r i c t o f C o l u m b i a ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Part III.

818

P o s t O ffic e D e p a r t m e n t ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

911

E s t im a t e s

for

T rust,

D e p o s it , a n d

W o r k in g

F unds:

T a b le 8 .

S u m m a r y o f t r u s t r e c e ip t s , e x p e n d it u r e s , a n d a p p r o p r i a t i o n s ----------------------------- „ ---------------------------------------------------------------------

T a b le 9 .

T r u s t r e c e ip t s ( b y a g e n c y a n d r e c e ip t t i t l e ) ___________________________________________________________________________________________

974

T a b le 1 0 .

T r u s t a p p r o p r i a t i o n s a n d e x p e n d it u r e s ( b y a g e n c y a n d a c c o u n t t i t l e ) ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

978

T a b le 11.

S u m m a r y o f d e p o s i t f u n d s _____________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________

982

D e t a i l e d e s t i m a t e s , n a r r a t i v e s , a n d s c h e d u l e s o n t r u s t f u n d s _ -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------D e t a i l e d e s t i m a t e s a n d s c h e d u le s o n w o r k i n g f u n d s _____________________________________________________________________________________________
Part

IV .

S p e c ia l

973

983
1043

A nalyses:

A.

R e c e i p t s f r o m a n d p a y m e n t s t o t h e p u b l i c ____________________________________________________________________________________________________

1077

B.

N e w o b l i g a t i o n a l a u t h o r i t y a n d e x p e n d it u r e s ( b y f u n c t i o n a n d a g e n c y ) ____________________________________________________________

1078

C.

B u d g e t r e c e ip t s ( b y s o u r c e ) _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1091

D .

I n v e s t m e n t , o p e r a t i n g , a n d o t h e r B u d g e t e x p e n d it u r e s ______________________________________________________________________________ ____

1098

E.

F e d e r a l c r e d i t p r o g r a m s _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1107

F.

F e d e r a l a c t i v i t i e s i n p u b l i c w o r k s a n d o t h e r c o n s t r u c t i o n ________________________________________________________________________________

1116

G.

F e d e r a l a i d t o S t a t e a n d l o c a l g o v e r n m e n t s ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

1129

H .

C e r t a i n i n v e s t m e n t a n d i n t e r f u n d t r a n s a c t i o n s _____ _________________________________________________________________________________________

1134

I.

C o m p a r i s o n o f B u d g e t r e c e ip t s a n d e x p e n d it u r e s b y f u n c t i o n _________________________________________________________________________

1136

I n d e x _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




m

3

1141







B U D G E T

M E SSA G E

O F

T H E

P R E S ID E N T

To the Congress oi the United States:

I am transm itting, w ith this M essage, the B u dget o f the U nited
States G overn m en t for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1954.
This B u d g et represents m y ju d gm en t as to the am ount o f funds
needed to carry forw ard our program s for the security and welfare o f
ou r people and fo r w orld peace. I t is based, like all those I have
transm itted in previous years, on the p o licy that the G overnm ent
should undertake to do o n ly w hat is essential for the safety and w ell­
being o f the N ation , and that what m ust be done should be done in
the m ost efficient manner.
This B u dget has been prepared under unique circum stances. I t is
the first B u dget since the a dop tion o f the T w entieth A m endm ent to the
C onstitution to be presented to the Congress b y a President w ho will
leave office a few days after its transmission. M y successor will be
inaugurated as President on January 20. H is will be the E xecu tive
responsibility during the tim e when this B u dget is being considered
b y the Congress, and his will b e the responsibility for the adm inis­
tration o f Federal program s for the period o f time covered b y this
B udget. I have done all in m y pow er to ease the problem s o f transition
to the new adm inistration, including inform ing the President-elect,
through a representative o f his choice, o f the background and consider­
ations w hich have entered into the preparation o f this B udget.
H ow ever, I wish to make it clear that neither m y successor in office nor
a n y o f his staff has participated in the decisions herein represented.
T h e President-elect has no responsibility fo r the am ounts included in
this B udget, and will be entirely free, o f course, to propose changes in
them .
B ecause o f the particular circum stances, there is one significant
difference betw een this B u dget and others I have transm itted. In
previous years, the B u dget estimates have included the cost o f new
legislation w hich I recom m ended to the Congress. Such a practice is
a sound rule fo r Federal budgeting. Th is year, how ever, I am n ot
transm itting specific proposals fo r new legislation. A ccord in gly, the
usual estim ates o f the fiscal effects o f such legislation are n ot included.
F or exam ple, neither estim ated expenditures fo r aid to m edical
education n or estim ated receipts from increased postal rates are
included. I still support these and certain oth er legislative proposals
as stron gly as ever, b u t since I w ill n o t be in office during the fiscal
year 1954, I do n ot think it proper fo r m e to transm it specific new
m5




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

legislative proposals or to budget for them . H ow ever, funds are
included in this B u dget to carry forw ard certain activities already
under w a y which will require renewed legislative au fchority to continue
in to the n ext fiscal year, such as the program s under the M u tu a l
Security A c t and the D efense P rodu ction A ct.
In this B udget, I am recom m ending that the Congress enact 72.9
billion dollars in new authority to incur financial obligations during
the fiscal year 1954. T o ta l expenditures, from these funds and from
balances o f authorizations previously enacted, are estim ated at 78.6
billion dollars. R eceipts under present tax laws, w hich provid e fo r
the expiration o f som e o f the p ost-K orean tax increases, are estim ated
at 68.7 billion dollars. On this basis, the deficit is estim ated at 9.9
billion dollars. T h e follow in g table shows the B u dget totals fo r the
five fiscal years 1950 through 1954.
BU D G E T TO TALS
[Fiscal years.

In billions]

1950

1951

1952

actual

actual

actual

1953

1954

estimated estimated

N ew authority to incur obligations___________________

$50.2

$84.1

$92.9

$80.8

$72.9

Expenditures______________ ________ - _______ __________
Receipts (under existing tax law s)....................................

40.1
37.0

44.6
48.1

66.1
62.1

74.6
68.7

78.6
68.7

Deficit (—) or surplus ( + ) ............................ ...........

- 3 .1

+ 3 .5

- 4 .0

-5 .9

-9 .9

These figures show very clearly the b ud getary im pact o f the
defense m obilization program on w hich we em barked after the co m ­
m u nist aggression in K orea in June 1950. T h is program required,
am on g oth er things, that w e increase our a ctive m ilitary forces b y
a b ou t tw o m illion m en and w om en, equip those larger forces w ith
new and im proved w eapons, and m aintain them for an indefinite
period. These were steps ju dged necessary n ot o n ly to carry o u t the
com m itm en t we u n dertook in K orea, b u t also to increase ou r defense
preparedness in the light o f the continuing possibility o f fighting on
a m u ch larger scale. W e are now well along in this program . Our
arm ed forces have long since reached the level o f 3.6 m illion ; the
initial equipm ent to outfit them has been ordered, and m u ch o f it
has been delivered.
N ew obligational authority, prim arily to finance the purchase o f
m ilitary w eapons and equipm ent, rose sharply after the a ttack on
K orea and reached a peak o f 92.9 billion dollars in the fiscal year 1952.
Since then, new obligational authority has been declining. T h e




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

am ount recom m ended for the fiscal year 1954 is 20 billion dollars
less than the am ount enacted for 1952.
A lth ou gh new obligational authority is declining, expenditures are
still rising. T his is due to the long lead-tim e in volved in the procure­
m ent o f m ilitary equipm ent— the tim e required to design, produce,
test, and deliver such com plex item s as planes, tanks, ships, and guns,
after contracts are let. Because o f this long lead-tim e, m ost items o f
m ilitary equipm ent are n ot usually delivered and com pletely paid for
until tw o or som etim es three years after th ey are ordered.
E ach year from 1951 through 1953, new obligational authority has
exceeded expenditures, because new obligational a uthority represented
for the m ost part orders being placed, and expenditures represented
for the m ost part paym ents for goods being delivered. In the fiscal
year 1954, fewer orders will be placed, b u t m ore goods will be de­
livered. A s a result, expenditures are expected to exceed new
obligational authority for the first tim e since before K orea.
U nder our present defense program , m ilitary expenditures are ex­
pected to reach their peak in the fiscal year 1954 and to start declin­
ing in subsequent years. I f our armed forces are stabilized at their
presently approved goals and if no new aggressions occur, new obli­
gational authority and expenditures m ay be expected to level off
in future years at the am ounts necessary to m aintain these forces and
to replace current equipm ent w ith new and better items as they are
developed. I t is difficult to forecast w ith any precision the am ount
b y w hich total Federal expenditures m ay be expected to drop in
future years under these assumptions, bu t it m ay be in the neighbor­
h ood o f 15 billion dollars. In m y judgm ent, how ever, a drop o f this
m agnitude cannot be expected for at least tw o or three years.
BUDGET

E X P E N D IT U R E S

This B u dget is dom inated, as the last three have been, b y the cost
o f national security. A b o u t 73 percent o f all B u dget expenditures
in the fiscal year 1954 will be for six m ajor national security program s—
m ilitary services, international security and foreign relations, the
developm ent o f atom ic energy, the p rom otion o f defense p rodu ction
and econom ic stabilization, civil defense, and m erchant m arine activi­
ties. In the fiscal year 1954 these program s will cost approxim ately
57.3 billion dollars.
A n additional 14 percent o f B u dget expenditures in 1954 will be
for interest and for veterans’ services and benefits. These expendi­
tures, w hich will am ount to approxim ately 11 billion dollars, repre­
sent for the m ost part a continuing cost o f W orld W ar I I ; in addition,




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

th ey include the costs o f services and benefits for the grow ing num ber
o f veterans o f the fighting in K orea,
T h e rem aining J.3 percent, or 10.3 billion dollars, will be for all
other activities o f the G overnm ent. Som e o f these activities— such as
the p ort security program o f the C oast G uard and the internal security
program o f the Federal B ureau o f In vestigation— have a direct
bearing on our national security. Others— such as our program s for
agriculture, housing and com m u nity developm ent, education and
general research, labor, social security, welfare, and health— help to
assure our continued social and econ om ic progress and to strengthen
the N ation for the long, hard period o f w orld tension that lies ahead o f
us. Still others represent basic functions o f G overnm ent, such as
m aking and enforcing the laws, collecting taxes, and m aintaining
Federal records and property.
A s the follow in g table indicates, expenditures for m a jor national
security program s n o t on ly dom inate this B u dget, b u t also accou n t
for m ost o f the increase in total B u dget expenditures since 1950, the
last full fiscal year before the attack on K orea.
B U D G E T E X P E N D IT U R E S
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
1950
actual

Program

1951
actual

1952
actual

1954
1953
estimated estimated

M ajor national security______________ _____ ______ _____
$17.8
$26.4
$47.2
$53.2
4.9
6.6
5.3
4.5
Veterans' services and benefits.____ __________________
5.7
5.9
5.8
6.5
Interest__________________________________ _____ ________
9.6
7.9
_______ _
9.0
Other________________________________________ 10.4
+ .3
-.9
Adjustment to daily Treasury sta te m e n t-.-..............
-.7
Total............ ............................................... .....................

E X P E N D IT U R E

40.1

44.6

66.1

74.6

$57.3
4.6
6.4
10.3

78.6

P O L IC Y

In the preparation o f this B udget, every G overnm ent program —
including those directly concerned w ith national security— has been
review ed in the light o f the current ou tlook for international d evelop ­
ments, in the light o f the h eavy tax burden, and in the light o f the
long-term needs o f the N ation . T h e recom m ended estim ates reflect
ou r con stan t effort to adjust expenditure program s to m ake sure th ey
are at the m inim um level consistent w ith our national ob jectives.
Proposals for m ilitary procurem ent, for example, reflect ou r p o licy
o f relying, w herever possible, on a continuing flow o f w eapons and
equipm ent from prod u ction lines, rather than on the accum ulation o f
large inventories o f reserve stocks.




M ESSAGE

OF

THE

P R E S ID E N T

Increased funds have been included in this B u dget on ly for those
program s where, in m y judgm ent, a clear and definite need exists
that cannot be longer deferred w ithout im pairing the public interest.
In the case o f several regulatory agencies, such as the Interstate C om ­
m erce C om m ission, the Federal Trade Com m ission, the Securities and
E xchange C om m ission, and the Federal C om m unications C om m is­
sion, earlier cutbacks were so severe that steps have been taken in
this B udget to restore som e o f them. E ven in these instances, h ow ­
ever, the policies have been strict. Funds have been provided for
handling increased workloads or backlogs o f unfinished w ork on ly
when failure to do so w ould result in delays w hich w ould have to be
m ade up later at an even greater expense, or in a serious im pairm ent
o f an a gen cy’s ability to carry out the responsibilities assigned to it
b y law. It w ould be shortsighted to do less.
Because o f the overriding requirem ents o f the national security
program s, m an y im portant G overnm ent services to businessmen,
farmers, and the public at large have been held, in recent years, to
levels below those justified b y our grow ing population and expanding
econom y. R ising prices have also increased the cost o f G overnm ent
and have reduced the actual service to the public per dollar spent
ju st as they have reduced the purchasing pow er o f private individuals
and firms. W hen defense spending has declined, we m ust bring these
services to levels consistent with the long-range developm ent o f the
N ation and its resources.
T h e recom m ended appropriations anticipate increases in efficiency
resulting from reorganizations, im proved m anagem ent procedures, and
better program ing o f the w ork to be done. Substantial progress has
been m ade in strengthening Federal m anagem ent in the last few years
so as to get m ore w ork done at less cost. This progress is reflected in
this B udget, and will continue to be a factor in future Budgets.
G overnm ent organization and procedures are n ot static. T h e y m ust
be continually review ed and m odernized in order to adapt the m achin­
ery o f G overnm ent to its current tasks. A n exam ination o f needed
actions to im prove G overnm ent organization and m anagem ent is now
a regular and continuing part o f the process o f preparing and adm inis­
tering the Federal B udget. R eorganization plans transm itted under
the R eorganization A ct o f 1949 have m ade a num ber o f far-reaching
im provem ents in providing officials o f the executive branch w ith
m ore effective organization and m ore adequate authority to do their
job s. I believe it will be found to be m ost desirable to extend the
authority in that act, which expires A pril 1, 1953, as one o f the steps
needed to assure continued progress in increasing the efficiency with
w hich the executive branch is managed.

m IO




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

TAX

P O L IC Y

I h ave always held that the G overn m en t's fiscal p o licy should aim
at p rom otin g the stable grow th o f our econ om y. This means that
norm ally in times o f high em ploym ent and rising national incom e the
Federal G overn m en t should operate w ith a balanced B udget.
In the years follow ing the end o f W orld W ar II, when the econ om y
was operating at a full-em ploym en t level, m y B u dget M essages called
fo r balanced budgets and d ebt reduction. D u rin g the four fiscal
years 1947 through 1950, the G overnm ent had an over-all net surplus
o f 4.3 billion dollars.
A fter the outbreak o f hostilities in K orea, I recom m ended that we
finance our rearm am ent effort on a pay-as-w e-go basis. In response
to m y recom m endations, the Congress raised tax rates in 1950 and
again in 1951. These tax increases were substantial. T h e y helped
p rodu ce a B u dget surplus in the fiscal year 1951, b u t th ey have n o t
m et our subsequent revenue requirements. T h e fiscal year 1952
ended with a deficit o f 4 billion dollars. A deficit o f 5.9 billion dollars
is n ow estim ated for the current fiscal year. A n even larger deficit,
9.9 billion dollars, is estim ated for the fiscal year 1954.
U nder present law, a num ber o f the tax increases enacted in 1950
and 1951 will terminate in 1953 and 1954. T h e excess profits tax on
corporations is scheduled to expire on June 30, 1953. U nder the
R even u e A c t o f 1951, the rate increases on individuals' incom e will
term inate on D ecem ber 31, 1953, and the increases in norm al rates
on corporations' incom e will expire on M arch 31, 1954. V irtu ally all
o f the excise tax rate increases under this act will also expire on M a rch
31, 1954. T h e purpose o f the Congress in setting term ination dates
was to assure early review o f the tax increases enacted after K orea.
R esponsibility for this review falls on this session o f the Congress.
I f the increases are allowed to expire as scheduled, the G overnm ent
will lose abou t 2 billion dollars in revenue in the fiscal year 1954.
T h e full effect o f the expirations will be an annual revenue loss o f
approxim ately four times this am ount.
T h e continuing increase in expenditures for national security and
the prospect o f a substantial deficit in the fiscal year 1954 pose an
im m ediate and serious problem in tax p olicy. W hile I do n o t wish
to m ake any specific recom m endations, I do wish to m ake it clear
that in m y judgm ent it w ould n ot be wise to plan for a large B u dget
deficit during a period w hen business a ctivity, civilian em ploym ent,
and national incom e are reaching unprecedented heights. T h e course
o f prudence and w isdom w ould be to continue to strive for a balanced
B u dget and a pay-as-w e-go p o licy in our rearm am ent program .




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M il

In its consideration o f the level o f tax rates, I hope the Congress
will also give serious consideration to im proving the equity o f the tax
system . T h e injustices and loss o f revenue arising ou t o f loopholes
in the tax laws should be eliminated. C onfidence in the equity o f
tax laws is essential in a dem ocracy.
BUDGET

R E C E IP T S

T h e follow ing table shows the source o f estim ated B u dget receipts
for the fiscal year 1954, com pared to revised estimates o f receipts for
the current fiscal year and actual receipts for the fiscal year 1952.
T h e estim ates for 1954 are based on present tax laws.
B U D G E T R E C E IP T S
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
1952
actual

Item

1953
estimated

1954
estimated

Direct taxes on individuals:
Individual income taxes_______________________________ ____________
Estate and gift taxes____________________________________ _______ ___
Direct taxes on corporations: Income and excess profits taxes_______

$29,880
833
21, 467
8,893

$33,551
895
23,700
9,795

$33,394
940
23,300
9,869

550

590

590

3,569
259
735
10
1,803

4,000
271
650

4,298
280
660

U

U

1,745

2,180

Appropriation to Federal old-age and survivors insurance trust
fund______________________________________________________________
Refunds of receipts_________________________________________________

- 3 ,5 6 9
- 2 ,3 0 2

—4,000
-2 ,5 1 1

- 4 ,2 9 8
—2,559

Budget receipts________________ ______ ___________________________

62,128

68,697

68,665

Excises____________________________________________________ •
_______
Customs___________ _____ _________ _______ ______________ ____________
Employment taxes:
Federal Insurance Contributions A c t______ _____________________
Federal Unemployment Tax A c t_______ ____ _______ ______________
Railroad Retirement Tax A ct_________________________________ __
Railroad Unemployment Insurance A c t__________________________

Miscellaneous receipts_____________________________________________
Deduct:

B O R R O W IN G

AND

TH E

P U B L IC

DEBT

On the basis of the present fiscal ou tlook and existing tax laws, the
p ublic debt is expected to increase from 259 billion dollars at the
beginning o f the current fiscal year to about 264 billion dollars b y
June 30, 1953, and 274 billion dollars b y June 30, 1954.
L ast spring substantial revisions b oth from the standpoint o f in­
creased rate and increased interm ediate yields were announced in the
savings b ond program , designed to p ut these w idely held issues on a
basis m ore nearly com parable w ith alternative investm ents. H olders
o f alm ost three-quarters o f the m aturing savings bonds are taking
advantage o f the new arrangements under which interest continues
to accrue on bonds n ot presented for cash redem ption at m aturity.

m

12




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

E X P E N D IT U R E S

AND

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

BY

M AJOR

F U N C T IO N

T h e follow ing table shows estim ated expenditures and recom m ended
new obligational authority for the fiscal year 1954, classified b y m a jor
fun ction. I t also com pares estim ated expenditures in the fiscal year
1954 w ith revised estim ates for the current fiscal year and w ith actual
expenditures in 1952. A m ore detailed breakdow n o f expenditures
and new obligational authority b y m ajor fun ction is contained in
Special Analysis B , in part IV of this docum ent.
E X P E N D I T U R E S A N D A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S B Y M A J O R F U N C T I O N
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Function
1952
actual

M ilitary services______________________________________________
International security and foreign relations_________________
Finance, commerce, and industry___________________________
Transportation and communication____ ____________________
Natural resources___________ _________ ________________ __
Agriculture and agricultural resources_______________________
Labor _________ _________________ ___________________ ______
Housing and community development____________________ .
Education and general research______________________________
Social security, welfare, and health__________________________
Veterans’ services and benefits_________ ____________________
General government___________________ _____ _________________
Interest________________________ _______________________________
Reserve for contingencies____________ _____________________
Adjustment to daily Treasury sta te m e n t-____ _____ _______

$39, 727
5,268
241
1,923
2, 948
1,045
243
735
171
2,491
4,863
1,411
5,934

Total______________________ ______ ______________________

66,145

Recom­
mended new
obligational
1954
1953
authority
estimated estimated
for 1954

$44,380
6,035
458
2,056
3,370
1,943
252
757
272
2, 594
4,546
1,385
6,520
25

$46,296
7,861
275
2,016
4,097
1,827
268
509
288
2, 579
4,564
1,547
6,420
40

$41,535

74,593

78, 587

72,883

8,011
88
2,061
3,459
1,455
278
691
177
2, 563
4,617
1,478
6, 420
50

-8 5 5

T h e estimates for 1954 include several hundreds o f millions o f d ol­
lars o f receipts, authorizations, and expenditures relating to foreign
credits and currencies for which no com parable figures appear in the
1952 and 1953 totals.
U ntil now foreign credits and currencies have been available to
certain agencies w ith ou t the norm al processes o f budgeting. R ecen t
legislation requires that foreign credits be budgeted and reported in
the same manner as regular funds o f the G overnm ent. Th is step is
desirable in order to obtain adequate control over the use o f such
credits, to prom ote effective utilization of the foreign credits on hand
or otherwise available in lieu o f dollars, and to m ake full disclosure o f
the G overn m en t’ s financial operations in the B u dget totals.
A ccord in gly, this B u dget includes appropriation estim ates for the
dollar equivalent o f the agencies’ estim ated use of foreign currencies
in 1954. T h e appropriations w ould be used to purchase foreign




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

currencies from the Treasury as they are required for expenditure.
These transactions will add the same amount to both Budget receipts
and expenditures, and will therefore have no effect on the deficit.
MILITARY SERVICES

This year we are budgeting for the fourth fiscal year following the
attack on Korea. During the past 30 months, we and our allies of
the United Nations have been fighting and holding the communist
aggressors. In addition, we have been expanding our armed forces
toward larger goals— 21 A rm y divisions, 3 Marine divisions, a N a v y
of 408 combatant ships with air support, and an Air Force of 143
wings.
This is an expensive program, but our national security
depends on it. W e cannot afford to lower these goals until the free
world is secure against the communist menace.
In order to appraise properly the budgetary impact of our rear­
mament program, it is necessary to examine the four fiscal years 1951
through 1954 as a single time span, and to bear in mind the relation­
ship between new obligational authority and expenditures. In the
fiscal year 1951, new obligational authority for the military functions
of the Department of Defense totaled 48.2 billion dollars, and in 1952
it reached 60.3 billion dollars. In the current fiscal year, it is expected
to drop to 48.1 billion dollars, and I am recommending a further
reduction to 41.2 billion dollars for 1954.
Because of the long lead-time involved in military procurement,
expenditures for most types of weapons and equipment occur many
months after the Congress has enacted the authority for their pur­
chase. Thus, as a result of the 1952 peak of new obligational author­
ity, expenditures are expected to reach their peak in the fiscal year
1954.
If we maintain the force level I am recommending in this
Budget, expenditures for the military functions of the Department of
Defense should begin to decline in the fiscal year 1955 and should
continue to decline until they reach the level required to keep our
armed forces in a state of readiness. On the basis of present rough
estimates, that level m ay be in the neighborhood of 35 to 40 billion
dollars annually.
In addition to the military functions of the Department of Defense,
the military services category includes certain supporting activities
such as the stockpiling of strategic and critical materials, the research
programs of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and
the Selective Service System. Expenditures for all programs in the
military services category are estimated at 46.3 billion dollars in the
fiscal year 1954. This is an increase of 1.9 billion dollars over 1953
and 6.6 billion dollars over 1952.

M l3

m

14




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M I L I T A R Y S E R V IC E S
[Fiscal years.

In billions]
Expenditures

N ew obligational authority
Cost category, program, or agency
1951
actual

1952
actual

1953
esti­
mated

1954
esti­
mated

1951
actual

1952
actual

1953
esti­
mated

1954
esti­
mated

$8.4

$10.8
12.4

$11.6

$11.7
10.3

$7.0
5.4

$11.0

$11.4

12.2

$11.2

9.8

10.6

(29.2)
14.9
1.9
12.4
4.0
.7
1.5

(19.8)
13.8
.7
5.3
2.3
.7
1.7

(14.2)

(4.9)
2.4
.4

( 11. 0
)
5.4

(16.5)

(17.4)

7 .4

8.7

.9

2.1

.6

1.0

5.0

8.2

7 .7

2.3

2.7

.2

.2
.6

1.8
.6
1.1
.2
1.0

Department o f Defense, military
functions:

M ilitary personnel ______ ______
Operation and maintenance____
M ajor procurement and produc­
tion . _----- ---------- --------------------Aircraft ___________________
Ships___________ ___________
Other______________________
M ilitary construction___________
Civilian components___________
Research and developm ent_____
Industrial mobilization____ ____
Department-wide activities_____
Subtotal....... ............ ........... .......

11.1
( 22. 8
)

10.1
.8
11.9
2.4

.8
1.2

11.1

8.2
1.1
4.9
.7
.9

.4
.5
.7

1.2

1.5

.1
.8

1.8
.6
1.0

48.2

60.3

48.1

41.2

19.7

2.9

.1

.6
.1

.1
.1

.2
.1

.1

51.2

61.0

48.3

41.5

20.5

.3

.7

.8

1.4

.1
1.0

1.6
.1
1.0

38.9

43.2

45.4

.8

1.1
.1

Activities supporting military serv­
ices:

Stockpiling of strategic and criti­
cal materials_________ _________
O th er...............................................
Total..................... .......... .........-

.7
0)

39.7

44.4

.9
0)

46.3

* Less than 50 million dollars.

Military personnel.— Expenditures for military personnel are for the
pay, subsistence, clothing, and transportation of our armed forces.
This Budget provides for an average strength of more than 3.6 million
service men and women, an increase of more than 2.1 million since the
beginning of the Korean conflict and slightly above the average
provided for in the 1953 Budget.
Despite the slight increase in average strength, expenditures for
military personnel in the fiscal year 1954 are expected to be 200 million
dollars less than in 1953 since expenditures in 1953 include outlays
for retroactive com bat-duty pay and mustering-out pay.
A s a result of two amendments to the 1953 Departm ent of Defense
Appropriation A ct placing percentage limitations on officer grades
and restricting the retirement of officers, the Departm ent has been
unable to administer our military personnel program in the best in­
terests of the Government and the men. One amendment, which
limits the proportion of officers of each rank, unduly restricts the
flexibility of the services in assigning rank commensurate with respon­
sibility.

Apparently intended to slow down promotions of officers




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

in the higher ranks, it has had its greatest impact on those in the lower
ranks. The second amendment discourages the voluntary retirement
of certain officers when it might be in the best long-run interests of both
the Government and the officers to encourage some of these retire­
ments. I t has the damaging long-range effect of limiting the number
of career-minded young junior officers from whom we must draw our
future military leaders and on whom we must depend for the future
effectiveness of our military forces. W hile I am in sym pathy with
the basic purpose of these two amendments, I believe they are doing
more harm than good.

Therefore, I believe they should be repealed

as soon as possible.

Operation and maintenance.— To operate and maintain the divisions,
ships, and aircraft of our military establishment in the fiscal year
1954, I am recommending 10.3 billion dollars in new obligational
authority. This is 800 million dollars less than the amount estimated
for 1953, and 2.1 billion dollars less than the amount enacted for
1952.
The decline is due primarily to the fact that the Congress has
already provided a large part of the funds needed to fill the pipeline
for supplying our expanded forces, to complete the rehabilitation of
our military installations, and to purchase a mobilization reserve' of
spare parts and soft goods. Expenditures for operation and main­
tenance are estimated at 10.6 billion dollars, which is 800 million
dollars more than the estimate for 1953. The 1954 estimate makes
no specific allowance for additional costs that would result from the
continuation of combat operations in Korea.

Major procurement and production.— The Congress has already
authorized m ost of the funds needed initially to purchase aircraft,
ships, vehicles, artillery, weapons, ammunition, guided missiles,
electronics, and other major items of military equipment for our de­
fense buildup. A large part of this equipment has been placed on
order and is in production. Deliveries are increasing substantially.
However, additional funds are required to bring us closer to our
armed force goals and to replace weapons and equipment that are
worn out, obsolescent, or destroyed or consumed in battle.
In this Budget I am recommending 14.2 billion dollars of new obli­
gational authority for major procurement and production, compared
with 19.8 billion dollars estimated for 1953 and 29.2 billion dollars
enacted for 1952. About 58 percent of m y 1954 recommendation is
for aircraft, about 34 percent is for artillery, ammunition, and other
major items, and nearly 8 percent is for shipbuilding.
Expenditures for major procurement and production, which largely
reflect deliveries, are expected to reach a peak of 17.4 billion dollars

m

15

m 16




M ESSAG E

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

in the fiscal year 1954. Under our present production plans, they
should thereafter begin to decline gradually toward the level necessary
to keep our armed forces equipped with modern weapons.
In this Budget, as in the 1953 Budget, maximum reliance is placed
on maintaining a continuing flow of production along with the ability
to expand that production rapidly if necessary, rather than on the
accumulation of large reserves of weapons and equipment.

In gen­

eral, the production of reserve stocks for full mobilization is scheduled
at the minimum rate which would preserve as m any of our existing
military production lines as possible in operation for a long period in
the future. A noteworthy exception to the application of this general
principle is ammunition, for which additional funds m ay be required
in the spring of 1953 unless it becomes clear that combat consumption
will cease during the calendar year.

Military construction.— To properly house, train, supply, and deploy
our expanded military forces, it has been necessary to repair, rehabili­
tate, and construct military installations from which our forces
operate. For the three fiscal years 1951 through 1953, Congress has
enacted 8.7 billion dollars of new obligational authority for this
purpose.

A n additional 700 million dollars is recommended in this

Budget for building projects which have already been authorized by
the Congress, but for which funds have not yet been provided. Alm ost
all of this 700 million dollars is for Air Force bases in the United States
and overseas. Nearly 60 percent of the post-Korean military con­
struction program has been for Air Force operating biases here and
abroad. These are necessary to accommodate the increased number
of air wings which are being formed. The problem of the need for
additional authorizations is being studied b y the Departm ent of
Defense.
Although the new obligational authority recommended for 1954 is
considerably below the amount enacted in each of the preceding three
years, expenditures for military construction are expected to rise from
2.3 billion dollars in the current fiscal year to 2.7 billion dollars in 1954
as work already under way nears completion.

Civilian components.— The civilian components of the armed forces
consist of the Organized Reserve, the A rm y National Guard, the Air
National Guard, and the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. These
units provide the trained nucleus around which a rapid expansion of
our active military forces could be accomplished in a minimum time.
This Budget provides for an increase in the strength of our civilian
components receiving drill pay from 845,000 at the end of the fiscal
year 1953 to 978,000 at the end of the fiscal year 1954, because an




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

increasing number of men who are released from active service are
becoming members of the civilian components.

Research and development.— As a result of research and development
work done in the past few years, our forces are now being equipped
with m any new types of weapons and equipment far superior to those
of W orld W a r I I . Additional new and improved weapons are now
going into production, and we are making intensive efforts to perfect
still others which will contribute directly to our military strength in
the years immediately ahead. These new developments will eventu­
ally give our forces capabilities far beyond those of the present.
Advances in almost every field of science are being applied to weapons
and techniques of warfare. These developments are complex and
costly, and the time required to translate new ideas into practical
military weapons is long. Our gratification in the progress we are
making must be sobered by the realization that parallel developments
are undoubtedly under way behind the Iron Curtain.
Expenditures of the Department of Defense for research and devel­
opment are estimated at 1.6 billion dollars in 1954, an increase of 200
million dollars over 1953.

Industrial mobilization.■ The industrial mobilization activities of
—
the Departm ent of Defense include (1) the maintenance of reserve
industrial plants and tools, (2) engineering and management studies
to improve manufacturing methods and to reduce the quantities of
the scarce critical materials now being used, and (3) mobilization
planning in conjunction with other agencies to insure the availability
of industrial capacity which can be expanded to meet the requirements
of total mobilization. All of these programs are essential to the main­
tenance of a strong mobilization base.

Since Korea, our military procurement program has added to our
mobilization base, and the need for separate industrial mobilization
activities has thereby been reduced. However, there are still de­
ficiencies in our capacity to swing rapidly into full-scale production
of the military items needed in wartime. A study is now being made
to determine the nature and extent of these deficiencies.
For the purpose of filling such gaps in the mobilization base, I am
recommending that 500 million dollars be appropriated to the D e ­
partment of Defense to purchase the plants, tools, and productive
facilities that would be needed. M o st of this fund will be used to
acquire tools and facilities beyond those needed for currently planned
procurement. The requested amount will be adequate for the first
year, but additional amounts m ay be needed later.

Ml7

m 18




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

A second problem of industrial readiness concerns the maintenance
of existing elements of the mobilization base. A s the production and
procurement of military equipment decline during or after the fiscal
year 1954, a part of the expanded capacity for producing m ilitary
items will be converted to civilian production, or otherwise disappear
from the mobilization base. Steps should therefore be taken to pre­
vent such loss. T he cost of acquiring these facilities will be borne
b y this new fund in an amount not to exceed 100 million dollars as
well as b y regular appropriations to the Departm ent of Defense.
I t should be made clear that present legislative authority, and the
funds herein requested, will not meet the needs of the mobilization
base outside the capacity which is directly related to the production
of military items. For other elements of the base, such as certain
kinds of basic industrial facilities, new legislation and funds m ay be
needed.

Stockpiling.— During the fiscal year 1954, it is estimated that nearly
900 million dollars worth of strategic and critical materials will be
added to our stockpile. B y the end of 1954 our stockpile inventory
will be valued at 5.5 billion dollars in June 1952 prices. This is more
than double the value of our stockpile inventory at the end of the
fiscal year 1950, and represents nearly 75 percent of our total objective,
which amounts to 7.4 billion dollars.
INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN RELATIONS

T he Budget recommendations for international security and foreign
relations are designed to further the common effort of the United
States and other free nations to establish the foundations for lasting
peace and security. In this joint undertaking, we are helping our
allies to build the strength needed b y them and b y us to resist the
forces which jeopardize the peace and threaten our security. I f this
aid is to be effective, it must meet the particular and m ost urgent
needs of each individual country. In some instances, it consists
largely of the weapons necessary for the expansion of military
strength. In others, it takes the form of goods, services, and the
technical skills needed to help millions of people in their struggle
against poverty, disease, and starvation— conditions which create
unrest and invite subversion. B y providing this assistance, we are
helping ourselves just as much as we are helping our allies. W hen the
members of a flood-threatened community join together to build a
dike, each m an’s effort helps to protect his own house as well as his
neighbor’s.
During the past two years, under the mutual security program, we
have made significant progress in helping our allies to achieve greater




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m

military strength, economic growth, and political stability. I am
confident that the Congress, b y extending the M utual Security A ct,
will make it possible to continue this progress.
The magnitude and duration of future grant aid programs, and the
attainment of the long range objectives of our foreign economic policy,
will depend on the success of efforts to increase the level of United
States imports, and United States private and public investment
abroad.
IN T E R N A T IO N A L S E C U R IT Y A N D F O R E IG N R E L A T IO N S
[ Fiscal years.

In millions]
EIxpendituniS
1952
actual

Recom ­
mended new
obligational
1953
1954
authority
estimated estimated
for 1954

Military and economic assistance:

Present programs_____________________________________
Mutual security program (proposed legislation).............

$5,026

$5,775

$5,559

2,000

$89
7,600

Conduct o f foreign affairs:

Overseas information and education, including acquisi­
tion and construction of radio facilities______________
Participation in international organizations and other.T otal________________________ ___________ __________

99
143

101
159

123
179

135
187

5,268

6,035

7,861

8,011

Military and economic assistance.— This Budget includes 7.6 billion
dollars in new obligational authority for the mutual security program,
1.1 billion dollars more than the Congress enacted for the fiscal year
1953.

This increase is required primarily because of the urgent need to

help our allies meet certain critical deficiencies in equipment and
supplies for their armed forces. Another factor is the necessity
of expanding our efforts to deal with critical economic problems in
the underdeveloped areas of the world.
A s of Novem ber 1, 1952, we had shipped to our allies more than
3 billion dollars worth of weapons and military equipment, including
17,230 tanks and combat vehicles, 92,700 military transport vehicles,
1,403,213 small arms and machine guns, 19,843 artillery pieces for the
ground forces, 432 naval vessels, and 2,673 aircraft. Deliveries are
rising, and in the fiscal year 1954 are expected to rise still further.
In Europe, economic assistance has been an indispensable factor in
expanding military forces. In the underdeveloped areas of the world,
our economic and technical assistance has been an important element
in helping to raise food production, improve health standards, and in­
crease the technical knowledge needed to build stronger economic and
political institutions.

19

m

2 0




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

Aid to Europe.— During the fiscal year 1954 our aid will enable the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization to improve the combat effective­
ness and increase the size of present land, naval, and air forces. A
year ago, firm goals for December 1952 were set at 50 divisions, 4,000
front line operating aircraft, and 1,600 naval vessels. These goals are
now being reviewed by the North Atlantic T reaty Organization in
Paris.
A s new units are added to the growing defense budgets of our N A T O
allies it becomes increasingly important to weigh carefully the added
military strength achieved against the new economic burden which is
incurred. European defense expenditures have more than doubled
since Korea and are continuing to increase. In spite of this effort, the
European nations are still unable to provide and maintain, out of their
own resources, all the complex and expensive modern weapons required
b y their armed forces. The mutual security program helps to provide
the crucial margin of resources they need.
A n increasing volume of the required weapons and equipment is
being purchased in Europe under United States contract. This off­
shore procurement is essential to the expansion of military production
capacity in Europe. Such capacity will not only increase the ability
of our European allies to provide their own weapons in the years
ahead, but also will support prolonged combat operations in the event
of aggression. During the fiscal year 1952, contracts for offshore
procurement totaled 621 million dollars. In the current fiscal year,
this amount is expected to nearly double. This Budget assumes a
further increase in the fiscal year 1954.
Economic aid will be needed b y several European countries.
France will need this type of assistance in order to meet her N A T O
commitments and still continue her fight against the communist
guerrillas in Indochina. The United Kingdom also will need eco­
nomic assistance to carry forward her expanded defense effort in the
face of a severe drain on her dollar reserves. Some economic aid also
will be needed b y other European nations to enable them to fill critical
gaps in the N A T O defenses.

Assistance to other areas ojthejree world.— In areas outside of Europe
there are m any friendly nations, containing nearly half of the earth’s
population and much of its material wealth, which are struggling
against conditions that threaten their continued existence as free
nations. Our economic and technical assistance is helping the people
of these nations to help themselves— to develop the economic and
political strength required to combat the threat of communist im ­
perialism.

Where necessary, we are also supplying military aid to




M ESSAGE

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P R E S ID E N T

help these nations resist aggression and thereby secure time for the
economic changes which will make them less vulnerable to subversion.

In the Middle East, we are assisting in the relief of Arab refugees
through our contribution to the United Nations refugee agency.
Point Four technical assistance is being provided most countries in
the Middle East to help them expand and strengthen their economies.
In some instances, notably Israel and certain Arab states, this tech­
nical assistance is supplemented by limited economic aid.
In Indochina, our military assistance has been a crucial factor in
strengthening the troops of France and the Associated States of Viet
N am , Laos, and Cambodia in their fight against a powerful, com­
munist-led revolt. The security of the island of Formosa has been
markedly increased.

The communist-led uprising in the Philippines

has been reduced to small proportions through the energetic efforts
of the Philippine Government, aided by United States military
equipment.
Further military assistance is needed if4these countries
are to continue their resistance to aggression.

Our economic assistance to India and to other nations in Asia is
helping them to continue the progress they have already made toward
alleviating famine and disease— the necessary first steps in their efforts
to improve the living conditions of their peoples. These countries can
make a vital contribution to the strength of the free world if their
economic development programs are given the extra momentum
which outside aid can provide.
In Latin America the United States has helped finance economic
development mainly through loans from the Export-Im port Bank.
This area also offers attractive fields for private United States invest­
ment, which in the calendar year 1951 increased by nearly 200 million
dollars. In order to further economic development in Latin America,
the United States has for a number of years extended technical assist­
ance on a grant basis for certain projects undertaken jointly with
Latin American governments.

Conduct of foreign affairs.— The efficient functioning of our diplo­
matic and consular missions, and our extensive participation in the
United Nations and other international organizations, constitute
vital links in the chain of international security which we are seeking
to forge.
Expenditures for the conduct of foreign affairs in the fiscal year
1954 are estimated at 302 million dollars, an increase of 42 million
dollars over the current year. This increase is due, first, to the fact
that the dollar equivalent of foreign currencies spent by the United
States is included in the 1954 estimate for the first tim e; second, to the

m

21

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MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

added workload of investigations and clearances required b y the
Immigration and Nationality A ct of 1952 in connection with the
issuance of visas and passports in the United States and at our over­
seas missions; and third, to an anticipated increase in expenditures for
construction of overseas radio facilities for the “ Voice of Am erica.”
I have repeatedly emphasized the importance of our overseas
information and education program. In this Budget I am recom­
mending appropriations of 135 million dollars to continue and expand
this vital work.
FINANCE, COMMERCE, AND INDUSTRY

T he vast expansion of our productive capacity which we have
achieved since Korea would not have been possible without the
authority granted under the Defense Production A ct. T o assure fur­
ther progress toward our mobilization goals, I believe it is necessary to
continue this legislation through the fiscal year 1954, including au­
thority to allocate critical materials and equipment, provide incentives
for the expansion of defense production, and stabilize prices, wages,
and rents. N o new obligational authority will be needed to provide
financial assistance for expanding defense production, but 54 million
dollars has been included in this Budget for administering production
and stabilization and export controls.
M ore than 90 percent of the 1954 expenditures for finance, com ­
merce, and industry programs will be for the promotion of defense
production and economic stabilization. These expenditures are
expected to decline in 1954 as military and economic expansion goals
are achieved.
F IN A N C E , C O M M E R C E , A N D IN D U S T R Y
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Net expenditures or net
receipts (—)

Program or agency
1952
actual

1954
1953
estimated estimated

R ecom ­
mended
new obliga­
tional
authority
for 1954

Promotion o f defense production and economic stabiliza­
tion:

Expansion of defense p rod uction........................................
Production and stabilization controls and other:
Present programs_________________________________
Proposed legislation_________ _________________
Business loans and guarantees (Reconstruction Finance
Corporation)_________________ _______ __________________

$128

$320

$200

148

107
4

50

2
$54

—37
26
-2 4

-4
26
5

—
10

Promotion or regulation o f trade and industry..........................
Promotion or regulation o f financial institutions____________

28
5

28

T ota l......................................................................................

241

458

275

8
8

6




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Expansion oj dejense production.— Under the authority of the
Defense Production Act and related legislation, the Government has
offered a wide variety of incentives to private industry to expand
defense production and to broaden the economic base for any future
mobilization effort. Producers of aluminum, copper, machine tools,
and other critical commodities have received long-term purchase
commitments totaling about 3.5 billion dollars to guarantee markets
for the output of their new facilities, and the Government has bought
1.5 billion dollars of scarce materials for resale to private business.
In addition, nearly 400 million dollars in loan commitments have
been made, as well as grants for the exploration of mineral resources,
for the subsidization of high-cost production, and for the purchase
of equipment to be leased to defense contractors. The transactions
already approved total about 6 billion dollars, and additional trans­
actions totaling 2 billion dollars have been authorized. Since most
of this assistance either will not involve Government expenditures or
will be repaid, the net ultimate cost is expected to be less than 800
million dollars. In addition, a substantial volume of private defense
production loans have been guaranteed and large investments in
defense facilities have been stimulated by permitting accelerated
amortization of these investments for tax purposes.
Budget expenditures for expansion of defense production in the
fiscal year 1954 are estimated at 200 million dollars, primarily from
commitments already made. Since much of the planned expansion
has been completed, new commitments are expected to decline
substantially.

Small business.— The Small Defense Plants Administration, the
Department of Commerce, and other Federal agencies are helping
small businesses to make their full contribution to the defense effort.
Under an agreement between the Small Defense Plants Administra­
tion and the Department of Defense, more than 200 million dollars
in defense contracts has already been reserved exclusively for small
firms. The total amount of defense contracts going to small business
is, of course, substantially larger. The Reconstruction Finance
Corporation has made many loans to small businesses which have
not been able to obtain private credit. Nearly 300 of these loans,
amounting to 37 million dollars, have been made upon recommenda­
tion of the Small Defense Plants Administration.
Business loans and guarantees.— N ew lending activity under the
regular business loan authority of the Reconstruction Finance Cor­
poration has been sharply reduced from the levels prevailing before
K orea.

The 1954 Budget assumes no significant increase in new loans.

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Accordingly, the Corporation plans to close a number of local offices,
maintaining only small information
assistance to loan applicants.

units to provide advice and

TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION

Federal programs in the fields of transportation and communication
are designed to help assure that these important services are adequate
to meet the needs of a peacetime economy, as well as possible mobiliza­
tion needs in the event of war. In carrying out these programs, the
Government provides facilities and services which private enterprise
cannot suitably supply, grants subsidies where authorized, and
regulates economic and safety aspects of transportation and com­
munications operations. In the fiscal year 1954, expenditures for
these programs are estimated at 2 billion dollars, or 40 million dollars
below the level for 1953. This reduction is due mainly to an expected
decline in ship construction expenditures.
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N A N D C O M M U N IC A T IO N
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Net expenditures or net
receipts (—)

Program or agency
1952
actual

1953
1954
estimated estimated

Recom ­
mended
new obliga­
tional
authority
for 1954

Promotion o f merchant marine:

Maritime Administration_____________________________
Inland Waterways Corporation________ _____________

$229

$235

$150

$167

205
106
-1 9

244

246
113
3

246

110
2

447
23
170
740
18
-4
7

573

590

628

21

22

22

167

178
669
16

163
669
16
31

1,923

2,056

1

Provision o f navigation aids and facilities:

Coast Guard________________________ ____ _________ __
Corps of Engineers______________________ _________ __
Panama Canal Com pany____________ ________ _______

111

Provision o f highways:

Bureau of Public Roads___ _____________ _ _ _ ______
Alaska roads and other.__
_ ________________ _____
Promotion o f aviation (Civil Aeronautics Administration) __
Postal service (deficit)____________________________________ __
Regulation o f transportation------- ------------------------------------Other services to transportation_________
. _____________
Regulation o f communication__________________ ___________

T otal_______ _______________________________

_____

66
6
17
15

6

21
8
2,016

8
2,061

Merchant marine.— Through subsidies for ship construction and
operation, the Government helps to maintain an active maritime
industry adequate to the needs of defense and commerce. In recent
years, this continuing subsidy program has been supplemented by
emergency measures arising from defense mobilization needs. The
M aritim e Administration, for example, is building 35 cargo ships of

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

advanced design to meet special defense requirements for high speed
ocean transportation. This program will be largely completed during
the fiscal year 1954. The reduction in expenditures for this emer­
gency program will be partly offset by the cost of building other
vessels which I believe should be started in the fiscal year 1954. An
appropriation of 108 million dollars is recommended for construction
of four passenger-cargo ships needed for commercial operation on
essential trade routes, and an appropriation of 11 million dollars for
the construction of a prototype high-speed tanker incorporating
design features important for defense operations. Experience gained
from the prototype project will enable the M aritim e Administration
to expand construction of this type of ship rapidly in the event of a
future emergency.
Since the outbreak of hostilities in Korea, the emergency operation
of Government-owned cargo ships by the National Shipping Authority
has helped to overcome a world-wide shortage of shipping capacity.
A s the shortage of private capacity has eased, the Government has
steadily withdrawn from this operation, and has returned its ships to
inactive status in the reserve fleet. B y the end of the fiscal year 1954,
only about 50 ships will remain in active operation under this program,
as compared to a maximum of 538 during the fiscal year 1952. This
Budget includes funds to maintain the reserve fleet in a condition to
meet any future emergency.

Navigation aids and facilities.— Construction of navigation facilities
by the Corps of Engineers is limited in this Budget to projects already
under way, and to those which should not be deferred any longer in
view of national defense requirements or essential civilian needs. T o
permit the efficient handling of essential water-borne traffic, fi ve new
starts are recommended, including the Warrior River Lock and D am
in Alabam a for the replacement of obsolete and structurally unsound
locks, and harbor improvements at New Y ork, Duluth-Superior, Red­
wood City, California, and Portland, M aine. In addition, an exten­
sion of the existing sea wall at the Galveston harbor project will be
started to protect a highly developed urban area.
These new projects
will involve a total cost of 42 million dollars, of which an estimated
4 million dollars will be spent in the fiscal year 1954. Maintenance
activity on existing projects is being held to minimum levels required
to permit continued operation and prevention of excessive deteriora­
tion.

Highways.— Federal assistance for highway improvement is pro­
vided principally through grants to State and local governments.

2 0 0 0 0 0 — 5 3 — — i ll




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Construction activity, which had been retarded by the steel shortage
and other factors, has expanded considerably in recent months. A s
a result, Federal-aid expenditures for highway construction are
expected to increase from 417 million dollars in the fiscal year 1952
to 511 million dollars in 1953, and 540 million dollars in 1954.
The level of highway grants in any given year is determined b y
legislative authorizations previously enacted by the Congress and b y
the volume of State and local construction activity on Federal-aid
road systems. Therefore there is little control over the expenditure
level of this program through the Budget process. For example, the
funds included in this Budget for the fiscal year 1954 represent merely
an estimate of the grants that will be required to meet commitments
incurred under the Federal-Aid Highway A c t of 1950. The Highw ay
A ct of 1952 increased the annual authorization from 500 million
dollars to 575 million dollars and will cause expenditures to increase
in the fiscal years 1955 and 1956.
In addition to Federal-aid highway grants, the Bureau of Public
Roads will spend 50 million dollars in the fiscal year 1954 for other
highway programs, such as forest highways and access roads to defense
plants, military installations, and sources of strategic materials.

Aviation.— Despite major technological and financial gains in recent
years, the aviation industry is still in a developmental stage, and con­
tinues to need substantial Federal assistance in order to realize its full
potential growth. Such aid is provided principally through the Federal
airways program, grants-in-aid for airport construction, and airline
subsidies.
In keeping with the general restriction on public works activity
during this emergency, airport construction grants to State and local
governments have been curtailed in recent years. W ith the continued
growth of air traffic, serious airport inadequacies have developed.
T o permit increased Federal assistance for the most urgently needed
projects, it is recommended that new obligational authority for this
program be increased from the 14 million dollars enacted for the fiscal
year 1953 to 30 million dollars for 1954.
Subsidies for airline operation are now merged with compensation
for carrying mail, and are included in postal expenditures. However,
recent studies by the Civil Aeronautics Board provide for the first time
an official estimate of the cost of this subsidy program. For the
fiscal year 1954, it is estimated that airline subsidies will amount to
71 million dollars, or slightly more than half of the total air mail
payments.




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

Postal service.— W ith presently authorized rates, the postal deficit
for the fiscal year 1954 is estimated at 669 million dollars, about the
same as in 1953.
Unless postal rates are increased, the fiscal year 1954 will be the
sixth consecutive year in which the postal deficit will exceed one-half
billion dollars. The largest part of these deficits results from the
grossly inadequate postal rates being charged for magazines and other
second-class mail, and for advertising circulars and other third-class
mail.

I have repeatedly urged the Congress to relieve the taxpayers of
this unnecessary burden by increasing postal rates sufficiently to
reduce the postal deficit to the cost of handling Government mail,
airline subsidies and other items which are properly chargeable to
general tax revenues— a cost in the neighborhood of 170 million
dollars.
Regulation.— Recent reductions in the appropriations for the regu­
latory agencies— particularly the Interstate Commerce Commission
and the Federal Communications Commission— have seriously im­
paired their ability to carry out the responsibilities assigned to them
by law. The administrative expenditures of these agencies are small
in relation to the importance of their activities to the Nation’s econ­
omy. This Budget provides moderate increases for these agencies to
enable them to overcome serious backlogs of pending cases, and to
deal more effectively with emerging new problems.
NATURAL RESOURCES

Expenditures for natural resources programs in the fiscal year 1954
are estimated at 4.1 billion dollars, an increase of 727 million dollars
over the current fiscal year and 1.1 billion dollars over 1952. Alm ost
all of this increase is in the atomic energy program, which will account
for two-thirds of the expenditures for natural resources in 1954. Other
major expenditures will be for flood control, irrigation, and multiplepurpose river basin development, including related power facilities.
The remaining expenditures will be largely for the management and
development of the national forests, parks, and public lands, and for
our mineral resources programs.
The money we spend for the orderly conservation, development,
and use of our natural resources represents a sound investment. In
m any cases the activities are wholly or partially self-liquidating.
B u t what is more important, they contribute to our military strength
and to long-range economic progress. They are prerequisite in m any
fields to the needed expansion of private investment. W hile exercis­

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M ESSAGE

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TH E

P R E S ID E N T

ing the utmost economy in these programs, I believe we should
allow for some work made urgent by the continuing drain on our
resource base and by the postponement of needed development
during and since World War II.
N A TU R A L RESOURCES
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1952
actual

Recom ­
m ended new
obligational
1953
1954
authority
estimated estimated
for 1954

$1,670

$2,000

$2,700

$1,997

487

499

495

552

249
61
30

Recreational use o f resources.__________ _____________________
General resource surveys and other............. ..............................

185
16
95
56
30
33
26

226
70
40
15
232
19
104
65
38
34
28

229
81
42
16
243
19
106
59
38
39
30

235
80
42
16
254
16
106
56
35
39
31

T o t a l............. ................................. ............... ....................

2,948

3,370

4,097

3,459

Atomic energy ........................................................... .......... ...............
Land and water resources:

Corps of Engineers: Flood control and multiple-purpose projects........................................................ ............. .
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Reclamation: Irrigation and multiplepurpose projects.................. .........................................
Power transmission agencies................. ......................
Indian land resources........................... ........................
Bureau of Land Management and other........ ..........
Tennessee Valley A uthority................................................
Department of State and other....................... ....................
Forest resources_____________________ ______________________
Mineral resources ________ _____________ ____________________
Fish and wildlife resources__________ _______________________

10

Atomic energy.• Ten years ago, scientists working at the University
—
of Chicago under Federal sponsorship brought about the world's first
nuclear chain reaction. Since then, our efforts in the development of
atomic energy have of necessity been devoted primarily to meeting
the needs of national security. Two major expansions of facilities for
the production of fissionable materials and atomic weapons have been
authorized b y the Congress since the attack on Korea. The first was
authorized in the fiscal year 1951 and the second early in the fiscal
year 1953. The rise in atomic energy expenditures results largely from
construction work on the new facilities. As a result of this expan­
sion, our ability to meet the threat of aggression will be significantly
increased.
The new obligational authority which I am recommending for 1954
is substantially less than the amount enacted for the current fiscal
year, because the bulk of the construction funds needed to finance
the expansion programs has already been provided. However, I am
recommending an increase in funds for operations. These funds will
provide for increases in our reserve of atomic weapons and for the




M ESSAGE

OF

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P R E S ID E N T

development and testing of improved weapons. I am also recom­
mending an increase in funds for the development of atomic power
for naval ships. The keel of the first nuclear-powered submarine was
laid last summer. The funds recommended for aircraft reactor
research will enable this program to proceed at an effective pace.
Research in the peacetime uses of atomic energy shows steady prog­
ress. W e have developed new techniques in medical research, and
substantial progress has been made in the fields of physics, chemistry,
and biology. This research will continue in 1954. This Budget also
provides for continuing research in the development of atomic re­
actors for the production of electric power— a program which promises
to have a major im pact on future power developments.

Land and water resources.— In the fiscal year 1954, the Federal
Government will spend 1.1 billion dollars for the development of land
and water resources. More than half of this amount will be for the
133 river basin development projects and units now under construc­
tion by the Bureau of Reclamation and the Corps of Engineers.
Much of this work is multiple-purpose development for irrigation,
flood control, navigation, and hydroelectric power, creating substantial
benefits for industry and agriculture and making an important con­
tribution to defense. Seven flood control projects and seven irrigation
projects or units will be substantially completed during the year.
The m ajor part of the task of developing our river basins is still
ahead of us. I believe we should no longer defer certain flood control
and power projects which we have repeatedly postponed since the
beginning of W orld W a r II . I am therefore recommending funds in
the 1954 Budget for starting construction on eight new projects and
five additions to existing projects, where planning is for the most part
well advanced and where there is clear economic justification. This
new work is required to protect important areas which are highly
vulnerable to floods, or to meet defense or essential civilian power needs
in critical shortage areas. The ultimate cost of these new projects
and features is estimated at 325 million dollars, of which about 16
million dollars will be spent in the fiscal year 1954. Funds also have
been included in this Budget for advance planning of some -high
priority projects already authorized by the Congress.

Six of the new projects I am recommending are for flood control.
These include Toronto Reservoir in Kansas, and five local protection
works at Wheeling-Benwood on the Ohio, Sny Basin in Illinois, Lake
Pontchartrain in Louisiana, Cape Girardeau in Missouri, and on the
Little Missouri River near Murfreesboro, Arkansas.
This Budget also includes funds to enable the Tennessee Valley
Authority to start construction of a steam electric plant in the western

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M ESSAGE

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P R E S ID E N T

part of the system, and to begin installation of additional units in
the Kingston and John Sevier steam electric plants. These facilities
are required to meet the growing power needs of the area for defense,
industrial, and domestic purposes. I also recommend that construc­
tion be started on Ice Harbor Lock and Dam in the Pacific Northwest
and that work begin on the installation of power facilities in three
reclamation projects. These are the Deer Creek power plant of the
Provo River project in Utah, the American Falls power division of the
Minidoka project in Idaho, and the Roza power plant in the Yakima
project in Washington. I also believe that the Congress should
authorize the Hells Canyon power project in the Pacific Northwest.
The situation regarding the St. Lawrence project is somewhat
different now from what it has been. W h en the last Congress did
not approve the 1941 Canadian-United States agreement calling for
joint construction of both the seaway and power phases of the project,
Canada and the United States proceeded with alternate arrangements,
under which the main river control works necessary for power devel­
opment would be built by appropriate entities in the two countries,
and Canada would build the necessary additional works to provide a
deep waterway between M ontreal and. Lake Erie on the Canadian
side of the international boundary. A s I have repeatedly informed
the Congress, I regard these alternate arrangements as much less
desirable than the 1941 agreement but in the absence of congressional
action they represent the only way to get the project built.
The alternate arrangements are well along. The International
Joint Commission has approved the plans for the main dams and
control structures in the International Rapids section of the St.
Lawrence River. The Province of Ontario is ready to construct the
Canadian share of these works. Applications are pending before the
Federal Power Commission for a license to build the United States
share. The Government of Canada is prepared to construct the
waterway. Under these circumstances, the Canadian Government
have informed us that they consider it no longer practicable to revert
to the 1941 agreement.

I believe, however, that there is still an opportunity for the United
States to join, as we should have long ago, in building the St. Lawrence
seaway. If the new administration and the new Congress propose
practical arrangements for sharing the cost and the construction of
the seaway, I believe the Canadians will, even at this late date, admit
us to partnership in the seaway. I hope very strongly that this will
be done, for it is clearly in the best interest of both countries that this
important waterway along our common boundary should be built and
controlled by both countries together.




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

Water resources policy.— In the past few years I have frequently
informed the Congress of the need for new concepts and procedures to
modernize the outdated ways of handling our water resources develop­
ment. I have supported efforts to plan and operate water resources
projects on a regional basis. From time to time I have reported to
the Congress that certain projects failed to meet standards for sound
Federal investment, and have indicated that present Federal law is
in need of clarification or revision.
In 1950, I established the W ater Resources Policy Commission to
examine these problems and report their findings to me. A t m y
request, the Bureau of the Budget has been making an intensive
study of the Commission’s findings, recommendations, and legislative
proposals, working with representatives of other Federal agencies and
consulting with State and interstate bodies and private associations.
Also at m y request, the Director of the Budget has recently estab­
lished uniform standards and procedures to be used in reviewing
proposed water resources programs and projects. These guides will
strengthen and improve Executive Office review of water resources
development proposals. However, major changes m ust be made in
present Federal legislation before up-to-date policies for comprehensivedevelopment of water resources can be made fully effective.
I
also suggest that the Congress m ay wish to study its own
machinery for dealing with water and related land resources programs
in order to provide a sounder basis for consideration of interrelated,
multiple-purpose programs.
A year ago, I established a Missouri Basin Survey Commission to
study the policies and organizational problems involved in the water
resources development of this basin, the scene of two serious floods
within the past two years. The forthcoming report of this C om ­
mission should make a substantial contribution to the sound program
planning and improved administration needed for the balanced
development of this large basin.
AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES

Our agricultural programs are designed primarily to achieve three
related goals: first, to preserve a healthy farm economy; second, to
conserve and improve our soil resources; and third, to assist farmers in
attaining the high level of production necessary to meet the food and
clothing needs of our people.
N et expenditures for agricultural programs in the fiscal year 1954
are estimated at 1.8 billion dollars, 116 million dollars lower than the
estimate for the current fiscal year.

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MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

A G R IC U L T U R E A N D A G R IC U L T U R A L R E S O U R C E S
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Net expenditures or net
receipts (—)

Program or agency
1952
actual

1954
1953
estimated estimated

R ecom ­
mended
new obliga­
tional
authority
for 1954

Stabilization o f farm prices and farm income:

Price support, supply, and purchase programs (in­
cluding the International Wheat Agreement)________
Removal of surplus agricultural commodities__________
Sugar A ct------ -------- -------- -------------------------------------------Federal crop insurance----------------------------- ------------------Agricultural production programs_____________________

-$ 70
38
60
7

10

$801
67
65

6
10

$729
75
65
5

8

$282
173
65

8
8

Financing farm ownership and operation:

49
175

233

49
175
—5
239

Research and other agricultural services________ ___________

274
67
143

275
74
147

254
79
154

252
82
152

T otal_______________________________________________

1,045

1,943

1,827

1,455

Farm Credit Administration and agencies_____________
Farmers’ Home Administration_____ ______ ________ __
Disaster loans __ ______ ____________________________
Financing rural electrification and rural telephones________
Agricultural land and water resources:

Agricultural conservation program (Production and
Marketing Administration)-------------- ------------------------Soil Conservation Service, flood prevention, and other —

92
167
13
244

70
173

22

209

Stabilization of farm prices and income.— Expenditures for stabiliza­
tion of farm prices and income are made under the agricultural pricesupport program, the International W heat Agreement, the permanent
appropriation for removal of surplus agricultural commodities, the
Sugar A ct, and the Federal crop insurance program.
N et expenditures for price support, made by the Com m odity Credit
Corporation, represent primarily the excess of outlays for loans and
purchases over loan repayments and proceeds from sales of inventories.
W hether the Corporation has net receipts or net expenditures in any
particular fiscal year depends mainly on factors affecting the supply
and demand for commodities under price support— such as the acreage
planted, weather conditions, food needs in this country and abroad,
and general economic conditions. Estimated expenditures of 729
million dollars in 1954, including the costs of the International W heat
Agreement, are 72 million dollars below the current estimate for 1953.
This is due largely to an expected decline in outlays for wheat, offset
in part by increased outlays for corn. The substantial change
between the net receipts in 1952 and the large estimated expenditures
in 1953 is accounted for mainly b y the increase in corn and wheat
production and the decrease in wheat exports between the two years.
The present International W h eat Agreement expires on July 31,
1953. Further negotiations for its extension will be undertaken this




m33

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

month. This Budget assumes that United States participation in
the Agreement will be continued.

Financing farm ownership and operation.— Agricultural credit
programs supplement private credit sources. T he loan programs of
the Farmers’ H om e Administration help new farmers and low-income
farmers unable to obtain credit from other sources to develop and
operate efficient family-size farm units. Despite the numerous appli­
cations for these loans, other budgetary requirements impel me to
recommend that the program be kept to approximately the same
level as in the fiscal year 1953.

The programs supervised by the Farm Credit Administration—
including the activities of the Federal land banks, Federal inter­
mediate credit banks, production credit corporations, and banks for
cooperatives— are also directed toward achieving more efficient familysize farm operations, and toward the development of farmers' coopera­
tives.

Financing rural electrification and rural telephones.— The

rural elec­

trification program has made great strides since its inception in 1935.
Less than 11 percent of all farms had the benefit of central station
electric service in that year; less than 12 percent were without this
service on June 30, 1952. The loan program which I am recommend­
ing for rural electrification is 30 million dollars less than in 1953, but
it allows 135 million dollars for further progress toward bringing
electricity to the Nation's farms.
The 1950 census showed that only 38 percent of our farms had
telephones— a smaller percentage than in 1920. Furthermore, many

farms with telephones had unreliable service. I am therefore rec­
ommending an increase of 30 million dollars in the loan program for
rural telephones.

Conservation oj agricultural land and water resources.■
—From the
long-run view, conservation of our soil resources is the most important
of our agricultural goals. Without adequate conservation measures,
neither a high level of production nor a healthy farm economy can
be long maintained.
For this reason I recommend that the advance authorization for
the agricultural conservation payments program in the crop year 1954
be continued at the 250-million-dollar level authorized by the Con­
gress for the 1953 crop year. I am also recommending an increase of
2 million dollars in the Soil Conservation Service appropriation to
provide technical services to new soil conservation districts, which
are being established at the rate of about 125 each year. This is

m 34




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

the minimum program which I feel is compatible with the sound
m anagement of our soil resources.
Effective soil and water conservation is an indispensable part of our
N ation ’s efforts to prevent and control floods. B y increasing the
amount of water held on the land on which it falls, by slowing the rate
of run-off, and b y controlling the course which the water takes in m ajor
watersheds, we not only prevent loss and improve the productivity
of the soil, but we also lessen the danger of flood damage and siltation on the main streams.
Thus far, however, flood prevention
efforts of this kind in the upper reaches of our rivers have generally
lagged behind the flood control work we have been doing on the main
streams. For that reason this Budget recommends appropriations
of 22 million dollars to accelerate upstream flood prevention work,
compared with 8 million dollars in the current fiscal year. Fourteen
million dollars of the total amount recommended for 1954 will be
allotted to the 11 watersheds on which work was begun in 1947;
8 million dollars will be for work to be started on seven new water­
sheds and for investigations and surveys. The commencement of
work on the new watersheds is recommended because it will not only
have important flood prevention and conservation benefits, but also
because it will enhance the value of downstream projects constructed
by the Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and nonFederal interests. The 18 watersheds on which work is either being
done or is proposed in this Budget represent only a small fraction of
the agricultural and forest lands on which work needs to be done.

Research and other agricultural services.— Expenditures for research
and other continuing basic services for agriculture, such as extension
work and insect and pest control, are expected to increase from 147
million dollars in the fiscal year 1953 to 154 million dollars in 1954.
This is due largely to construction of the laboratory for research on
foot-and-m outh disease for which the Congress appropriated funds
last year. Also, I am recommending increases in a few of the most
essential research activities, such as the Federal grant to State experi­
m ent stations, marketing research under the Agricultural M arketing
A ct, and research on plants and animals and on insect and disease
control.
LABOR

The labor programs of the Federal Governm ent help to promote
the effective use of our manpower resources, which is necessary for
the strengthening of our military defenses and for the continued
vigorous growth of our economy.

These programs furnish basic

economic protection to the working force against the hazards of




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

m 35

P R E S ID E N T

unemployment, safeguard workers against substandard wages and
working conditions, bring together the job opportunity and the job
seeker, and speed the movement of manpower into defense industries.
In the fiscal year 1954, expenditures for labor programs are esti­
mated at 268 million dollars. Eighty percent of this amount will be
for direct grants to the States for the administration of employment
service and unemployment compensation programs, including the
recently established unemployment compensation program for vet­
erans. Increases in these grants will account for most of the rise in
labor expenditures over 1953. Small increases are recommended to
strengthen Federal labor-management relations activities and to
enable the Department of Labor to cooperate with the States in
finding more effective ways to deal with the distressing economic and
social problems of migratory farm workers and their families. In
addition, increases in appropriations for employment service, indus­
trial safety, and apprentice training programs are recommended to
enable the Department to continue work previously financed through
a special appropriation for defense production activities.
LABOR
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Recom ­
mended new
obligational
1954
authority
1953
estimated estimated
for 1954

Expenditures
Program or agency
1952
actual

Placement and unemployment compensation administra­
tion:

Department of Labor- ----------- -----------------------------------Railroad Retirement Board _____ ____________ ______
Defense production activities: Department of Labor_____

$192

10
2

$201
11
2

$215

$225

11

11

13

14

14

5

6

6

15
7

15
7

268

278

0)

Labor standards and training:

Department of Labor _________ ___________- _________
M ine safety (Department of the Interior and other)___
Labor relations_____ _ -------------- _ ------------- -------------------

14
4
13

Labor information, statistics, and general administration. _

8

13
7

T o t a l -----------------------------------------------------------------------

243

252

1 Less than one-half million dollars.
Placement and unemployment compensation administration.— Part of
the estimated increase in grants to the States for administration of
unemployment compensation is due to changes in legislation. The
Veterans' Readjustment Assistance A ct of 1952 provides for unem­
ployment compensation payments to veterans who do not find work
after release from the armed forces. These payments are adminis­
tered through State employment security agencies under agreements

m 36




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

with the Secretary of Labor. Another factor in the increase is that
the cost of administering the Federal-State unemployment compen­
sation program is greater because State salary rates continue to in­
crease and the expanded coverage under State laws results in more
claims for unemployment compensation even though the general level
of unemployment remains low. Finally, experience now indicates
that a higher claims load than was assumed in the last Budget will
develop in 1953 and continue in 1954, as a result of temporary unem­
ployment due to industry-by-industry adjustments. These increased
workloads, which could not be foreseen at the time the 1953 Budget
was prepared, will require a supplemental appropriation tentatively
estimated at 6.7 million dollars for grants to the States in the fiscal
year 1953.

Although some State unemployment compensation programs have
been strengthened by extending coverage, there is still need for basic
improvements in the Federal-State system along the lines I have
previously recommended.
M ore attractive job opportunities in industry for the domestic labor
force make necessary the recruitment of additional workers from
M exico for seasonal farm employment. These workers are brought
in under conditions which protect them from exploitation and protect
the employment opportunities and labor standards of available
United States workers.

A bout 275,000 M exican workers will be

needed to meet farm production requirements in 1954.

Legislation

authorizing such recruitment expires on December 31,
believe it will be necessary to continue this program.

1953.

I

Labor standards and training.■ Increasing defense production has
—
reversed a downward trend in accidents on the job. In 1951, more
than 2 million workers were injured, resulting in a loss of 140,000 m anyears of working time. To reduce these individual tragedies with their
accompanying losses to national production, the Departm ent of Labor
is planning to intensify its safety training program in cooperation with
safety organizations, private industry, and State and other Federal
agencies. Provision also is made in this Budget for enforcement of
the recently enacted Coal M ine Safety A ct.
T he Bureau of Apprenticeship will continue to encourage and assist
in establishing training programs for apprentices needed to meet
critical shortages in skilled occupations essential to defense production.
Greater emphasis will be given to general programs for training semi­
skilled and unskilled workers on the job to increase their productivity
and skills in a wide variety of defense production occupations.
T he report of the Commission on M igratory Labor in 1951 pointed
up the unique social and economic problems of migratory farm work­




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

ers, which call for special attention by Federal and State governments
and local communities. T hat report has stimulated increased interest
and action by a number of States. This Budget includes 156 thousand
dollars to enable the Departm ent of Labor to start a program of
cooperation with the States in developing more effective ways to
bring to these workers and their families a reasonable share of the
advantages normally enjoyed by other citizens.

Unemployment trust fund .— Receipts of the unemployment trust
fund in the fiscal year 1954 are expected to be slightly higher than
in 1953. Benefit payments are also expected to be slightly higher,
because more unemployed workers will be eligible for benefit pay­
ments under the expanded coverage of State laws, even though it is
assumed the level of unemployment will remain low. These receipts
and payments are not included in the Budget totals.
U N EM PLO YM EN T TRU ST FUND
[Fiscal years.

In millions]

Item

1952
actual

1953
estimated

1954
estimated

Receipts:

Deposits b y States and railroad unemployment taxes____ ____ _
____________________ _____ ______ _______________ ______
Interest

$1,459
184

$1,351

202

$1,387
209

State and railroad withdrawals for benefits_____________ ______ .

-1 ,0 5 7

-9 2 6

“ 977

...................... ...................................................

586

627

619

Balance in fund at close o f year_______________________________________

8,654

9,281

9,900

Payments:

N et accumulation

HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

The Federal Government, by insuring and guaranteeing private
loans, has helped to finance the construction of nearly half of the
7 million new homes built since the end of W orld W ar II, as well as
the purchase and improvement of many million existing homes.
A
large number of these units has been bought by veterans of W orld
W ar I I with the assistance of loans guaranteed by the Veterans
Administration. Since the attack on Korea, special emphasis has
been placed on providing housing and community facilities in critical
defense areas. The record levels of construction both before and since
June 1950 have materially improved the housing of the average
American citizen. Adequate housing is still unavailable, however, for
millions of low-income families.
N et expenditures for housing and community development in the
fiscal year 1954 are estimated at 509 million dollars, a decline of 248

m 38




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

million dollars from the current fiscal year. Principal factors in the
expected decline are a lower volume of mortgage purchases and direct
loans for veterans' housing, and substantial net receipts instead of
expenditures for the public housing programs.
H O U S IN G A N D C O M M U N IT Y D E V E L O P M E N T
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Net expenditures or net
receipts (—)

Program or agency
1952
actual

1954
1953
estimated estimated

Recom ­
mended
new obliga­
tional
authority
for 1954

Defense housing and community facilities:

Present programs
Proposed legislation ______ _______
Aids to private housing :
Housing and Home Finance Agency:
Federal National Mortgage Association___
Federal Housing Administration
______
Other __ ________ ______________
_ - ___ __
Veterans’ housing loans (Veterans Adm inistration)___
Farm housing (Department of Agriculture) __
__
Reconstruction Finance C o rp o ra tio n ____ .
_______
Public housing programs__________
__ _ _ __ --------------

$12

$77

458
-2 9
-1 5
70

460
-3 8
-2 6
80
19
-7
18-

19
-7
-4 8

22

40
33
51
74

509

22
-6
136

$29
50

$100

354
-6 3
-2 3

-12
19
51

General housing aids:

Housing and Home Finance Agency:
College housing loans _
__
Other
________________ ___
_

_ _ _ _ _ _
_ _________
Urban development and redevelopment........... __ ________

1
10
6

Provision o f community facilities___________________ __
Civil defense__ __ ___________ _________ __
__ _________
Disaster loans and relief

9
33
28

7
17
31
84
13

735

757

Total________ _______

_____________ __________ ___

6

5
350
16
150

6
691

Defense housing and community facilities.— T o help meet the m ost
urgent defense requirements, Federal assistance has been granted or
is planned for about 200,000 new housing units in critical defense
housing areas and near military posts. Private builders are con­
structing most of these homes with the aid of liberal Federal mortgage
insurance backed in m any cases b y Federal mortgage purchase
commitments.
In those areas where private builders, even with these special
financing aids, are unable to provide the needed housing, the Federal
Government is supplying 19,000 temporary units to meet short-term
needs near defense installations. Federal grants and loans are also
helping local communities to finance the expansion of community
facilities where defense activities have made such expansion necessary.
T o provide a small part of the additional temporary housing units
urgently needed near military installations, I am recommending sup­
plemental appropriations of 12.5 million dollars for the current fiscal




M ESSAGE

OF

THE

P R E S ID E N T

year. Moreover, since it is now apparent that we cannot complete
the needed minimum program before the Defense Housing and
Com m unity Facilities A ct expires next June 30, I believe that the
major provisions of the act should be extended for another year,
with increased authorizations and additional appropriations of 100
million dollars.

Aids to private housing.— M o st of the private housing built in
critical defense housing areas is being financed with mortgages in­
sured by the Federal Housing Administration. Since the successive
relaxations of real estate credit controls in 1951 and 1952, applica­
tions for Federal insurance of mortgages in other areas have been
rising steadily. If this trend continues, it is expected that there will
be a need in the fiscal year 1954 for mortgage insurance comm it­
ments to finance nearly 300,000 new housing units. In addition,
it is estimated that there will be a need for the Federal Housing
Administration to insure mortgages covej-ing purchases of more than
200.000 existing houses and 2 million other loans for improvement
and repair of existing housing. T o meet these needs will require
increases of 1.5 billion dollars in the maximum mortgage insurance
authorizations and 500 million dollars in the authority to insure
property-improvement loans. Neither of these steps is likely to
increase Budget expenditures, since the premiums paid for the
insurance usually exceed administrative expenses and losses.
The Federal National M ortgage Association is authorized by law
to purchase certain mortgages insured b y the Federal Housing Adm in­
istration or guaranteed by the Veterans Administration. The V e t­
erans Administration also has authority, until June 30, 1953, to make
direct loans to veterans in areas where guaranteed loans are not
readily available. Over the past two years, both substantial pur­
chases of veterans’ housing mortgages and direct housing loans to
veterans have been necessary, because the 4 percent interest rate
on the guaranteed mortgages has been unattractive to m any private
lenders. The expenditure estimates in this Budget assume that
under the restrictive policies adopted last fall a smaller volume of
veterans’ mortgage purchases will be necessary in the fiscal year
1954.
Purchases of defense housing mortgages are expected to
increase under the additional authority provided b y the Congress
last summer.

Public housing.— Since the attack on Korea, the low-rent public
housing program has been held far below the average annual level of
135.000 starts authorized in 1949. For the fiscal year 1953, the Con­
gress has limited the program to 35,000 new units, which will meet

m

39

m40




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

only a small part of the needs of low-income families now living in
substandard units. For the fiscal year 1954, I am including in this
Budget, as I did for 1952 and 1953, provisions for starting a minimum
of 75,000 new units.
In this program, local authorities construct and operate the housing
units. The Federal Government lends the authorities money or
underwrites private loans to start construction, and pledges an annual
contribution to help maintain the rents at levels which the tenants
can afford. During the fiscal year 1954, the local authorities expect
to sell substantial amounts of long-term bonds to private investors,
using the proceeds to repay short-term loans from the Federal Gov­
ernment. As a result, receipts are expected to exceed expenditures
for new loans under this program. In addition, the Public Housing
Administration plans to sell 16,000 war housing units built during
World War II. This will mean a further increase in receipts.

College housing loans.— In* May 1950, the Congress authorized 300
million dollars in loans to help educational institutions obtain adequate
housing for their students and faculty. This program has been held
at low levels and has been confined to defense-related housing con­
struction. However, applications for loans which qualify under these
limitations have been increasing, and expenditures are expected to
rise substantially in the fiscal year 1954.
Urban development and redevelopment.— The broad program for slum
clearance and urban redevelopment authorized by the Housing A c t
of 1949 has been moving slowly, partly because of the time required
by the local communities to make specific plans for projects which
meet both local needs and Federal requirements. A t present, about
180 cities are actively planning projects, but actual clearance and
redevelopment operations have begun on only 23 approved projects
in 14 cities. B y the end of the fiscal year 1954, it is expected that
10 projects will be completed and about 110 others will be under way.
Under the original statute, additional loan and grant authority
totaling 350 million dollars becomes available in the fiscal year 1954.
However, because of the limited progress of the program to date
and the plans to use private funds to replace m ost of the direct Fed­
eral lending, expenditures are estimated at only 33 million dollars.

Civil defense.— Recent advances in the techniques of warfare make
it imperative that we immediately provide the essentials of a civil

M ESSAGE

OF

THE

P R E S ID E N T

defense program. I have repeatedly warned that failure to do so
could leave a fatal gap in our security structure. Passive civil de­
fense of the W orld W ar II type cannot be effective against atomic
warfare. Rather, the emphasis must shift to strong preattack
measures, the success of which depend largely on advance warning.
In this Budget, therefore, I am recommending appropriations which
would enable the Federal Government to complete the air-raid
warning system in the 191 cities which are likely to be principal tar­
gets in the event of an enemy attack on the United States. Because
the effectiveness of civil defense organizations and techniques depends
so directly on an adequate Nation-wide warning system, the Federal
Government should pay the full cost of the warning program. The
Government also should continue to accept full financial responsi­
bility for the stockpiling of a national reserve of medical and engi­
neering supplies and equipment. The present 50 percent matching
arrangement should continue for other civil defense programs, since
primary responsibility for organization and training of voluntary
forces remains with the States and cities.
I am recommending total appropriations of 150 million dollars for
civil defense in the fiscal year 1954. Because of anticipated delays
in deliveries of medical and engineering supplies, expenditures are
expected to decline from 84 million dollars in the current fiscal year
to 74 million dollars in 1954.
EDUCATION AND GENERAL RESEARCH

Expenditures for education and general research in the fiscal year
1954 are estimated at 288 million dollars, an increase of 16 million
dollars from the present fiscal year. These expenditures, of course,
do not include the amounts spent for education and research in carry­
ing out military, veterans’ , atomic energy, and other programs.
Sixty-five percent of the expenditures for education and general
research in the fiscal year 1954 will be for grants to those local school
districts that have been overburdened by defense activities. Another
10 percent will be for grants to States to help support their vocational
education programs and their land-grant colleges. The Federal
Government also assists Howard University and educational institu­
tions for the deaf and blind, and it maintains major library and
museum services at the National Capital. Expenditures for general
purpose research are for the work of the Census Bureau, the National
Bureau of Standards, and the National Science Foundation.

2 0 0 0 0 0 — 53--------IV




m

41

m 42




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

E D U C A T IO N A N D G E N E R A L R E S E A R C H
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1952
actual

R ecom ­
mended new
obligational
1954
authority
1953
estimated estimated
for 1954

Promotion o f education:

Office of Education:
Assistance for school construction and operation in
defense-affected areas............ ........................ ............
Vocational education____ _______________ _________
Grants for colleges of agriculture and the mechanic
arts........ ............. ....... .................... ............ ..............
Other_________________ ________ __________________

$92
26

$192
25

$187
25

$70
26

5
3

5
3

5
3

6

8
11

13

5
3
5
13

Educational aid to special groups_________________ _______
Library and museum services............. ............. ...............................
General purpose research:

11

National Science Foundation____________________ _____
Census Bureau____________________________ __________
National Bureau of Standards__________ - .......................

18

T otal____ _____ _________________ ________ _______

1

11

24

9

4
13
11

8
12

15
31
9

171

272

288

177

Promotion of education.* Payments to help build schools in districts
—
overburdened by Federal Government activities and for children
living on Federal property are estimated at 140 million dollars in the
current fiscal year and, because of the expiration of the law authorizing
these payments, will decline to an estimated 111 million dollars in
1954.
Under present law, payments will be made only on appli­
cations filed before last July, and expenditures will be made from
appropriations now available. Nearly 1,000 school districts are
being helped to build more than 1,200 schools under this program.
Paym ents for school operating costs in overburdened districts and
for children living on Federal property are estimated at 76 million
dollars in the fiscal year 1954, a rise of nearly 25 million dollars over
1953. The increase results largely from the fact that enrollments and
costs per pupil are rising. This program covers more than a million
children in 2,600 school districts. The law authorizing these pay­
ments will expire on June 30, 1954.
These programs to aid school districts affected directly b y defense
activities have been very useful. T hey do not, of course, help the
thousands of other school districts which are struggling with the
problems of overcrowded schools, underpaid teachers, and obsolete or
inadequate buildings. I hope the Congress will consider ways and
means of helping the States to meet these needs.




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

National Science Foundation.— The National Science Foundation
was created by the Congress in recognition of the need to formulate
an adequate scientific research policy for the Nation, to remedy gaps
in our basic scientific knowledge, and to overcome shortages of
specialized manpower. However, sufficient funds have not been
appropriated to permit the Foundation to perform these functions
effectively. As I have pointed out in previous Messages, the Founda­
tion should become the primary instrumentality through which the
Federal Government gives support to basic research that is not directly
related to the statutory functions of other Federal agencies. For this
reason, the appropriation recommended for the Foundation in 1954
contains* amounts for support of basic research and for fellowships
which would otherwise be included in the estimates of other depart­
ments and agencies.
I urge the Congress, in the light of these considerations, to provide
the Foundation in the fiscal year 1954 the full 15 million dollars
authorized by present law. The law should be amended so as to
permit a higher level of appropriations in the future.

Census Bureau.— Expenditures for census work will rise substan­
tially in the fiscal year 1954 because the Census Bureau will take the
basic 5-year censuses of business, transportation, manufactures, and
mineral industries, and will begin preliminary work on the 1954 census
of agriculture. A s a result of improvements in the methods of col­
lecting and compiling data, the total expenditure for the censuses of
business and manufactures will be less than the last time they were
taken despite increases in salary rates and other costs.
SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, AND HEALTH

Expenditures for social security, welfare, and health are estimated
at 2.6 billion dollars in the fiscal year 1954, approximately 15 million
dollars less than the estimate for the current year. The chief factor
in the expected decline is a drop in expenditures for hospital con­
struction.
M ore than half of the expenditures for social security, welfare, and
health are in the form of Federal grants to the States for public assist­
ance. M o st of the grants are for assistance payments to the needy
aged. A t present, 20 percent of the people over 65 years of age
depend on this program for support.

m43

m44




M ESSAGE

OF

THE

P R E S ID E N T

S O C IA L S E C U R IT Y , W E L F A R E , A N D H E A L T H
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
R ecom ­
mended new
obligational
1953
authority
1954
estimated estimated
for 1954

Expenditures
Program or agency
1952
actual

Retirement and dependents insurance (Railroad Retire­

ment Board and other)_________________ ______ _________
Public assistance_____________________________________________
Promotion o f public health_________ __________________________
Aid to special groups:

$772
1,179
328

$684
1,342
339

$695
1,342
309

$695
1,342
294

22

23
84
53
37
30

24
83
58
37
28

24
83
59
37
29

2

3

2,594

2,579

Vocational rehabilitation (Federal Security A g e n c y )...
School lunch (Department of Agriculture)_____________
Indian welfare and other________ ______________________
Accident compensation (Department of L abor)___________

84
47
36
23

Prisons and probation____________ __________________________
Defense community facilities and services (Federal Secu­

rity A gency)______________________________ ____ _________
T otal_______________ _

_____ __________________

0)
2,491

2,563

1 Less than one-half million dollars.

Railroad retirement.— Budget expenditures for railroad retirement
are mainly transfers of railroad payroll taxes to a trust account. The
expenditures for the fiscal year 1954 also include approximately 35
million dollars as the final installment of a 1949 appropriation of
167 million dollars from general revenues to the railroad retirement
account to cover the cost of granting railroad workers credit for time
spent in military service during W orld W a r I I.

Public assistance— The Federal Government makes grants to the
States to pay part of the cost of m onthly payments to four categories
of people in need— the aged, the blind, the permanently and totally
disabled, and dependent children. In the fiscal year 1954, these
grants are estimated at 1.3 billion dollars, the same as in the current
fiscal year. Although the number of beneficiaries on State and local
rolls is somewhat lower than last year, individual payments have been
rising steadily. This reflects action b y the States to cover earlier
increases in the cost of living and to provide more adequate relief.
I t also reflects congressional action last summer increasing Federal
contribution rates, effective from October 1, 1952, for a period of two
years.
The need for public assistance should decline as more and more
people acquire the protection of old-age and survivors insurance and
qualify for higher benefit payments. Eighty percent of the gainfully
employed people in the United States are now covered by this insur­
ance. These people can look forward to monthly benefits in their old




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

age as a matter of right, and at their death their dependents m ay also
be entitled to m onthly payments. This system of contributory social
insurance was designed as our principal instrument for providing social
security. It is now beginning to achieve that position. A t present,
the total of old-age and survivors insurance benefits is about equal to
the combined expenditures of the Federal, State, and local govern­
ments for public assistance payments for all persons in need. Further
improvements in our social insurance program should be m ade; they
will quicken the rate at which public assistance can be reduced to its
intended role as a second line of defense against want, filling gaps in
the social insurance program.

Promotion oj public health.— Federal expenditures for all public
health programs— exclusive of medical care for military personnel and
veterans— are estimated at 309 million dollars in the fiscal year 1954.
About half of this amount will be for grants-in-aid to State govern­
ments and local communities for hospital construction, general health
services, maternal and child health, and the control of such m ajor
diseases as tuberculosis, venereal disease, cancer, mental illness, and
heart ailments. Other expenditures are for operation of Public Health
Service hospitals, for payments to medical schools and universities
for medical research and training, and for clinical and laboratory
research conducted by the Federal Government. This Budget also
includes appropriations for grants administered by the National
Institutes of Health to private and public institutions for construc­
tion or major alteration of medical research facilities.
The expected decline in expenditures for these programs is due to
several factors. Federal payments for hospital construction grants
are expected to be 32 million dollars less because of prior year reduc­
tions in new obligational authority. Construction outlays for health
research facilities are expected to drop by 11 million dollars with
completion of the clinical research center during the current year.
These decreases will be partly offset b y increases in expenditures for
research.
Several problems in the health field require congressional attention.
W e do not have enough doctors, dentists, and nurses to serve the whole
population. M a n y localities are without adequately staffed health
offices. Measures are needed to bridge the financial gap between good
medical care and the average fam ily’s ability to pay for it. The
Commission on the Health Needs of the Nation, which I established a
year ago to study and report on long-term health requirements, has
now published its findings and recommendations. I urge the Congress
to give this report prompt and careful study to the end that appro­
priate action m a y be taken to meet our national needs.

m45

m 46




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

Aid to special groups.— Essential improvements in hospital, school
and employment services for our 400,000 native Indians will require
some increase in expenditures for these services in the fiscal year 1954.
M o st of this is for a program to provide Indians with training for
employment in industry and agriculture and to help them m ake satis­
factory adjustments in new locations. A small increase is recom­
mended for the Federal-State vocational rehabilitation program, which
now helps about 65,000 disabled persons annually to become capable
of gainful employment. Under another federally aided program, low priced school lunches are now available to one-fourth of our school
children.

Trust funds .— Each of the three major civilian retirement systems
sponsored by the Federal Government is financed through a separate
trust fund with payroll contributions as the principal source of revenue.
S O C IA L S E C U R IT Y , W E L F A R E , A N D H E A L T H
(Trust funds)
[Fiscal years.

In millions]

Fund and item

1952
actual

1953
estimated

1954
estimated

Federal old-age and survivors insurance trust fun d :

Receipts:
Appropriation from general receipts_______ _________________
Interest and other _______________________________________
Payments of benefits and administration expenses____ ________

$3,569
363
- 2 , 067

$4,000
435
- 2 , 650

$4, 298
482
-3 ,1 6 9

N et accumulation___________ __________ ____ ______________

1,865

1,785

1,611

Balance in fund at close of year....................................................... .

16, 590

18,375

19,986

768
79
-391

684
90
-4 66

695
98
-4 8 2

456

308

311

2,901

3,209

3, 520

Receipts:
Employee contributions.
. ________ ___, ___________ _ „
Transfer from Budget accounts and other__________________
Interest____________________________________________________
Payments of annuities and refunds, and expenses______________

418
310
189
-3 0 0

434
321
215
-3 6 7

400
430
250
-3 84

N et accumulation____________________________________________

617

603

696

5,054

5, 657

6,353

Railroad retirement account:

Receipts:
Transfers from Budget accounts. ______________ ___________
Interest
________________________________________________
Payments of benefits, salaries, and expenses____________________
Net accu m u lation._________________________________________
Balance in fund at close of year_______________________ _________
Federal employees* retirement funds:

Balance in funds at close of year. _____________________________




M ESSAGE

OF

THE

m47

P R E S ID E N T

For the fiscal year 1954, receipts in these trust funds are expected to
exceed the benefit payments by 2.6 billion dollars. This will raise
the balances in the three accounts to nearly 30 billion dollars. It is
desirable to build up reserves now because the cost of benefits will
increase over the years as more and more people become eligible for
retirement. The interest earned by the reserves which are being
accumulated will help to meet this future cost.
In the case of old-age and survivors insurance, present law provides
for gradual increases in the tax rate. Effective January 1, 1954,
the rate is scheduled to rise from 1% percent to 2 percent each on
employers and employees.
T he receipts and payments of these trust funds are not included in
the Budget totals.
VETERANS’ SERVICES AND BENEFITS

In the fiscal year 1954, the Federal Government will spend an esti­
mated 4.6 billion dollars for a wide variety of veterans’ services and
benefits, ranging from medical and readjustment assistance to service
pensions and burial benefits.

These servicesjand benefits are pro­

vided to veterans or dependents of veterans who died or were disabled
in the service, and in m any instances also to veterans without serviceconnected injuries or to their families.
Expenditures for veterans’ programs have declined 38 percent from
the post-W orld W ar I I high of 7.4 billion dollars. However, the total
for 1954 continues at about the 1953 level, and the outlook for future
years is for increases rather than decreases.
V E T E R A N S ’ S E R V IC E S A N D B E N E F IT S
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1952
actual

Recom ­
mended new
obligational
1954
authority
1953
estimated estimated
for 1954
$2, 546

$2, 546
62

660
103

691
83

717

1, 325

854

809

810

122

144

158

158

238

239

211

224

4, 863

4, 546

4, 564

4, 617

Compensation and pensions_________ _____________________
Insurance and servicemen’ s indemnities............................. .....
Hospitals and medical care:

$2,178
216

$2, 444

Current expenses_______ ________ _____________________
Hospital construction..____________ _____________ ____

661
123

Education and training_______________________________
Other (Veterans Administration and Department of
Labor) ____ _______________________________________
Other services and administration (Veterans Administra­
tion and other)__________________________________________
T otal.............................. ............................. .........................

102

6
6

100

Readjustment benefits:

m 48




M ESSAGE

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TH E

P R E S ID E N T

Tw o main factors point to an upward trend in expenditures. The
basic factor is the rapid growth of the veteran population. Since
1940 the number of veterans has increased from 4.3 million to approxi­
m ately 19.8 million. N ew veterans are now being discharged at a
rate of approximately one million a year. I f our armed forces con­
tinue at their present size, m ost of the people in the United States
will eventually be veterans or dependents of veterans.
The second factor which points to an increase in outlays is the
extension and liberalization of veterans' benefits through legislation.
In the last 10 years the Congress has enacted more than 500 laws
affecting veterans’ benefits. Because eligibility conditions and
benefit rates are fixed b y basic statutes, four-fifths of the expenditures
of the Veterans Administration are not subject to direct control
through the Budget process.
I strongly support the policy of providing assistance to veterans,
particularly those injured in the service, in assuming their normal
places in society. In considering new veterans’ legislation, however,
recognition should be given to the extensive development in recent
years of general welfare programs, such as social security, which serve
both veterans and nonveterans. There is overlapping at present
between the two sets of programs which should be corrected.

Compensation and pensions.— It is estimated that an average of
3,348,000 individuals and families will receive veterans’ compensa­
tion and pension payments totaling more than 2.5 billion dollars in
the fiscal year 1954. Expenditures for these programs are increasing
steadily. Even if no new legislation is enacted and no allowance is
made for a further increase of the veteran population, it is estimated
that expenditures for veterans’ compensation and pensions will
double in the next 30 to 40 years.

Insurance and servicemen's indemnities.:—Under the Servicemen’s
Indem nity A ct of 1951 the Government pays 10 thousand dollars to the
fam ily of each serviceman who dies on duty or within 120 days there­
after. This supersedes the optional system of national service life
insurance. In the case of policyholders who acquired national service
life insurance or United States Government life insurance before
the indemnity law was enacted, the Government continues to reim­
burse the trust funds for deaths traceable to war hazards. Expendi­
tures for indemnities are expected to rise from about 6 million dollars
in the fiscal year 1952 to nearly 15 million dollars in 1954, while
Government payments to the insurance funds are expected to decline
from 210 million dollars to 51 million dollars.




M ESSAGE

OF

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Hospital and medical care.— The increase in current expenses of the
veterans' hospital and medical program reflects the opening of new
hospitals being completed under the construction program authorized
after W orld W ar I I .
M y Budget recommendations for the fiscal year
1954 provide for an estimated daily average beneficiary load of 136,250
in veterans' hospitals, in contract hospitals, and in State homes. B y
June 30, 1954, the Veterans Administration is expected to have in
operation 170 hospitals and 17 domiciliary homes. This Budget
includes a recommendation for new obligational authority of 80 million
dollars to build the final four hospitals in the current construction
program, and 20 million dollars for modernization, improvement, and
repair of existing hospitals.

Readjustment benejits.— Expenditures for readjustment benefits in
the fiscal year 1954 are expected to decline slightly from the level now
estimated for 1953. Expenditures for benefits to W orld W a r II
veterans are declining, but outlays for benefits to veterans of the
Korean conflict are rising, because the Veterans' Readjustment
Assistance A ct of 1952 extended to the veterans of the current emer­
gency benefits similar to those which had been provided under the
“ G I b ill" to W orld W ar I I veterans. In the fiscal year 1954 it is
estimated that about 70 percent of the readjustment expenditures
will be for benefits under the new law.
The estimated 1954 expenditures provide for an average enrollment
in school, job, and farm training courses of 715,000 veterans, of whom
475,000 are expected to be veterans of the Korean conflict. T hey
also provide for unemployment allowances of 47 million dollars under
the new law for an estimated weekly average of 55,200 veterans, and
75 million dollars to cover interest gratuities and losses under the
veterans' loan guarantee program. I t is expected that 368,000 new
loans totaling 3.1 billion dollars will be guaranteed during the year.

Trust funds .— Under the national service life insurance and United
States Government life insurance trust funds, 50 billion dollars of
insurance continues in force in about 7 million policies issued before
the Servicemen's Indemnity A ct of 1951. In the three fiscal years
1952 through 1954, expenditures from these funds are expected to
exceed receipts b y a decreasing margin as special dividend payments
decline. The receipts and payments of these trust funds are not
included in the Budget totals.

m 49

m 50




M ESSAGE

OP

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

V E T E R A N S ' L IF E IN S U R A N C E F U N D S
(Trust funds)
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
1952

1953

1954

actual

Item

estimated

estimated

Receipts:

Transfers from general and special accounts_______ ______
Interest on investments_______________________
___________ Premiums and other------------ -----------------------------------------------------

$203
201
473

$85
201
431

$47
200
419

877

717

666

556
532

276
511

185
525

1,088

787

710

_______

-2 1 1

-7 0

-4 4

Balance in funds at close o f year---------- ------ -------------- --------------------------

6, 561

6,491

6,447

T otal...................... ...................

...............

-

Expenditures:

Dividends to policyholders_____
Benefits and other____ ___________

_______________

T otal............................................ ....................................
N et withdrawal ( —) _______ _______________

_____

.........

-

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

Expenditures in the general government category are largely for
making and enforcing laws, collecting taxes, managing the public
debt, administering Federal records and property, and for paym ents to
the Civil Service retirement trust fund.

Expenditures for general government are expected to increase from
1.4 billion dollars in the current fiscal year to 1.5 billion dollars in

the fiscal year 1954. The increase is chiefly due to higher Federal
payments to the Civil Service retirement system and to increased
expenditures for maintenance and repair of Government buildings.
Federal financial management.— Under the reorganization plan ap­
proved b y the Congress last M arch, the Bureau of Internal Revenue
has reconstituted its W ashington office, decentralized certain super­
visory functions to 17 newly established districts, and made its
inspection service independent of the rest of the Bureau. W e llqualified personnel have been selected to fill the key positions, all of
which, except the position of Commissioner of Internal Revenue, are
now part of the classified civil service. These steps, b y strengthen­
ing supervision and more clearly defining responsibilities, should not
only tighten enforcement of the revenue laws, but also permit the
Bureau to give better assistance to taxpayers.

This Budget provides

for increased activity in the collection of delinquent taxes.




M ESSAGE

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m 51

P R E S ID E N T

Large numbers of savings bonds purchased during W orld W a r II
are now reaching maturity.
The owners of m ost of these bonds are
continuing to hold them under the extension program authorized in
1951.
Nevertheless, more than one-quarter of these bonds are being
presented for redemption.
These redemptions, plus an increase in
current sales of new savings bonds, have sharply increased the work­
load of the Bureau of the Public D eb t. I am therefore recommending
an increase in the Bureau’s appropriation.
GENERAL GOVERNM ENT
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Recom ­
mended new
obligational
1954
authority
1953
for 1954
estimated estimated

Expenditures
Program or agency
1952
actual

Legislative and judicial functions............. . _ ...................... .........
Executive direction and management ____________________
Federal financial management:

$70
9

$76

8

$77
7

$75
7

Tax collection__________________ _________ ___________ Customs collection, debt management, and other______

270
168

273
173

281
186

273
182

191

164

205

20

21
22

21

202
20

324

23
430

40
430

91
40
33
50

70
41

76
47

77
48

21

21

21

59

59

59

76
26
30

76
27
30

65
27

22

28
16

1,411

1,385

1,547

1,478

Other central services:

Central property and records management____________
C ivil Service Commission_____________________________
Other------------------- -------------- ---------- ----------------------------Retirement for Federal civilian employees______
Protective services and alien control:

_______

Federal Bureau of Investigation_______________________
Immigration and Naturalization Service---------------------Other_________________________________________________
Territories, possessions, and District o f Columbia_____
Other general government:

Payment of claims and relief acts (Treasury Depart­
m ent)--------------------------- -------------------------------------------Weather Bureau____________ _____________ _________
Other___________________ ________ ____________
—
T otal____

...

________ ______________

24
313

O)

1 Less than one-half million dollars.
Central property and records management.— Under the Federal
Property and Administrative Services A ct of 1949, as amended, the
General Services Administration has taken major steps to manage
more efficiently the buildings owned or operated b y the Federal
Government, to buy more economically the items used by m any
Government agencies, and to reduce materially the cost of handling
and storing Government records.
The sharp reductions in appropriations last year have made it
impossible to maintain and operate public buildings properly. I
am therefore recommending an increase to restore these services to

m

52




M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

levels more nearly adequate— but still below those maintained b y
operators of comparable private buildings. I am also recommending
increases to permit necessary repairs to Government buildings, to
finance the first installment of a three-year program for modernizing
major post office facilities in the interests of increased efficiency, to
extend the central procurement of common-use items, and to obtain the
increased savings that m ay be expected from wider use of surplus
equipment and supplies. The funds recommended in this Budget
would also finance the last two of ten record centers started two years
ago, and thus would complete a program which has already made large
savings through better utilization of space and release of filing
equipment.

Civilian personnel management.— The great improvements made in
the Federal civilian service in recent years have brought us nearer
to our goal of a real career service throughout the Government, in
which all appointments and promotions are based on merit and the
conditions of employment provide positive incentives to honest,
efficient work. T o continue this progress, the funds proposed in this
Budget w^ould increase the proportion of placements made through
competitive examinations conducted by the Civil Service Commission
and boards of examiners in the agencies, extend the Commission's
inspections of personnel management in the agencies, and bring
certain overseas personnel under the competitive civil service.
T he Classification A ct of 1949 authorized a limited number of posi­
tions in grades G S -1 6 , 17, and 18 created under that act.
This au­
thorization has been amended b y a series of subsequent enactments,
frequently in appropriation acts, each allowing a few positions for
selected agencies and programs. The lack of consistency in these
several statutes constitutes an obstacle to effective management and
should be eliminated through the enactment of a single general au­
thorization covering the requirements of all executive branch agencies.
For this reason, appropriation requests do not include authority to
individual agencies for additional positions in these grades.

Retirement jor Federal civilian personnel.-— I am recommending
appropriations of 427 million dollars to cover the Government's
obligations to the Civil Service Retirement and Disability fund and
3 million dollars to pay annuities under special laws. The Govern­
m ent's obligations to the Civil Service Retirement and Disability fund
include 59 million dollars to cover the cost for 1953 and 1954 of the
temporary increase in benefits voted last summer for persons then
receiving annuities from the Civil Service retirement system, and 368
million dollars for its contribution as employer for the fiscal year 1954.
T he amounts I am recommending do not provide for payments on




M ESSAGE

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m 53

P R E S ID E N T

the Governm ent’s outstanding liability to the fund, since this is one
of the problems to be studied by the Committee on Retirement Policy
for Federal Personnel recently established b y the Congress.

Protective services and alien control.— The Immigration and Nation­
ality A ct, which became effective on December 24, 1952, has con­
siderably expanded the responsibility of the Department of Justice
and other departments in such fields as investigation, deportation,
inspection, and naturalization. The law also expands Federal controls
over alien crewmen and registered aliens, increases visa requirements,
and adds new grounds for exclusion and deportation. Also, the
Government must pay almost all of the costs of detention, hospitali­
zation, and deportation which were previously borne in part by
private carriers. T o finance the substantial increases in staff neces­
sary to administer the new law, as well as to strengthen enforcement
along the M exican border, it is recommended that the appropriation
for the Immigration and Naturalization Service be increased to 48
million dollars in 1954, and that a supplemental appropriation of 1.7
million dollars be enacted for 1953.
I continue to believe that the new law contains m any provisions
that are unwise, unfair, and incompatible with our foreign policy
objectives. The Commission on Immigration and Naturalization
has now published its findings and recommendations. I urge the
Congress to give them its prompt attention.
INTEREST

Interest payments constitute a large and growing charge on the
Budget. T hey represent mainly the current cost of the fivefold
increase in our public debt which occurred as a result of W orld W a r I I .
As fixed charges, they cannot be reduced b y congressional or Executive
action, but vary only as securities are issued, retired, or refunded under
changing interest rates and with varying payment periods.
IN T E R E S T
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Item

1952
actual

Interest on public debt___ _ ________________________________
Interest on refunds o f receipts------ ------- --------------------------------Interest on trust deposits------------------ ------------------------ ---------

T otal________________________________

_____________

Recom ­
mended new
obligational
1953
1954
authority
estimated estimated
for 1954

$5,853
76
5

$6,450
65
5

$6,350
65
5

$6,350
65
5

5,934

6,520

6,420

6,420




M ESSAGE

OP

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

Interest on the public debt.— The cost of interest on the public debt
in the fiscal year 1954 is estimated at 6,350 million dollars. The
decrease of 100 million dollars from the 1953 estimate does not indi­
cate a reversal of the upward trend in interest payments, but merely
reflects an unusual situation which occurred during the fiscal year
1953.
M ore than 15 billion dollars in certificates of indebtedness
which paid almost a year's interest at m aturity were refunded early
in the fiscal year 1953 into new obligations on which interest pay­
ments for half a year or more are due on June 1, 1953.
Thus, about
20 m onths' interest on this portion of the debt falls due during the
current fiscal year.
Although interest expenditures in 1954 will be lower than in 1953
because of this unusual situation, interest costs are still rising. These
increases are due in large part to the higher interest rates paid on
securities issued or refunded during the past two years. In addition,
each year an increasing amount of special issues is held b y Govern­
ment agencies and trust funds. The interest rates on these issues are
slightly above the average rate on the debt as a whole. Furthermore,
these interest rates tend to increase when the average interest rate
on the total debt rises.
Recent increases in the size of the interest-bearing debt are the
second major reason for the rise in interest costs. B y the end o f the
current fiscal year, the outstanding debt will have increased b y
6.5 billion dollars since Korea, and the 9.9 billion dollar deficit esti­
m ated for the fiscal year 1954 will cause a further increase.

M y interest in and study of the Federal Budget began m any years
before I became President. As President, I have given the Budget
m y constant attention.
I t should receive that same attention from
the Congress, particularly because of one basic fact often overlooked
and often misunderstood.
This fact is that the financial program of the Government cannot
be planned in terms of a single fiscal year.
I t must be planned in the
light of security, economic, and budgetary goals— not just for the ensu­
ing year but for three and even four years ahead.
T he Budgets I have transmitted have always reflected such plan­
ning. M y recommendations on taxes and appropriations have had




M ESSAGE

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m

P R E S ID E N T

as their objectives the meeting of all our responsibilities for the
security and welfare of our people and for a growing economy with a
stable currency and a balanced budget.
Budget and fiscal policies are tools of national policy. As such, they
are subjects of controversy and evolution.
I believe that the policies
I have supported are sound, and that the recommendations in this
Budget will enable us to meet our national needs in the fiscal year 1954
in the light of the Nation-wide and world-wide objectives of the United
States.
H
J a n u a r y 9, 1953.

arry

S. T

rum an

.

55




PART 1

SUMMARY TABLES
Table 1. Risum of B
e
udget R
eceipts, E
xpenditures, an P
d ublic Debt
Table 2. R
esum of N O
e
ew bligational Authority (by Type an Function)
d
Table 3. E
ffect of Financial O eration on the P
p
s
ublic Debt
Table 4. Sum ary of B
m
udget E
xpenditures (by Agency)
Table 5. Sum ary of N O
m
ew bligational Authority (by A
gency)
Table 6. Sum ary of B
m
udget A
uthorizations (by Type of A
uthorization an A
d gency)
Table 7. Sum ary of B
m
udget E
xpenditures in R
elation to A
uthorizations (by A
gency)

Al

2 0 0 0 0 0 — 53--------v







IN T R O D U C T IO N T O P A R T I
Part I of the Budget (pp. a 1 to a 1 3 ) contains seven
summary tables on Federal funds and on the public
debt. Each of these tables is designed to bring together
in one to three pages some over-all aspects of the Federal
Budget.
TYPES

OF

FEDERAL

FUNDS

T he Federal (Government-owned) funds which are
covered in part I of the Budget are of three types as
follows:
T he general fund is credited with all receipts which are
not earmarked b y law for a specific purpose, and is
charged with expenditures that are payable from appro­
priations out of “ any money in the Treasury not other­
wise appropriated” and from borrowing. B oth in number
of items and in amount, most of the Government’s
transactions are transactions of the general fund.
Special funds are those which are established to account
for receipts that are earmarked b y law for a specific
purpose. T hey exclude the funds which carry on a cycle
of operations for which there is continuing authority
to use the receipts (as described in the next paragraph).
Some special funds are subject to annual appropriation b y
Congress. Others are automatically available under the
laws which created the funds.
Revolving and management funds include two sub­
categories. Revolving funds are those which finance a
continuing cycle of operations with receipts derived
therefrom earmarked for continuing use. Revolving
funds m ay be for external operations (including the
funds of m ost Government-owned corporations) or for
intragovernmental purposes. Management funds are those
which are created to expedite accounting for and adminis­
tration of operations financed from two or more appro­
priations of an agency.
BUDGET

R E C E IP T S

AND

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Basis of stating budget receipts.— Table 1 includes a
summary of budget receipts. Such receipts include all
money paid into the Treasury to the credit of the general
fund and of special funds. Budget receipts never include
money obtained from borrowing. Because revolving and
management funds are reported on a net basis in the
expenditure figures (see below), budget receipts do not
include receipts of such funds.
Basis of stating budget expenditures.— Tables 1, 4, and 7
include information on budget expenditures. Such ex­
penditures cover the general funds, the special funds, and
the revolving and management funds. In the case of
revolving and management funds, the expenditures are
completely on a net basis; that is, the collections received
by the fund are deducted from the total of the checks
issued in payment for goods and services received, and
the resulting figure is shown as the expenditure. Where
the collections are larger than the sum of checks issued
for such a fund, the net amount included in the expendi­
tures is a negative item.
Expenditures for all categories shown in these tables
are on a checks-issued basis. This means that expendi­
tures are reported for the fiscal year in which the checks




are issued, or (where no checks are required) the year
in which payment is made in cash. It also covers the
interest on the public debt becoming payable in the year,
including coupon interest and the increase in the redemp­
tion value of savings bonds. Table 1 includes an adjust­
ment figure for the past year to bring the final total to
the Daily Treasury Statement expenditure basis.
In the case of general fund expenditures, the amounts
shown are net of incidental reimbursements from outside,
made to the appropriations. In the case of all funds, ex­
penditures are net of reimbursements received from within
the Government (thus avoiding double-counting).
Retirement of Government debt is always excluded from
budget expenditure figures. Similarly, net investments in
United States Government securities (which occur some­
times in the case of Government corporations) are excluded
from the expenditure figures.
Eliminations from both receipts and expenditures.— Cer­
tain payments from one fund to another are eliminated
from budget receipts and expenditures. This is done in
order to avoid inflating both sides of the Budget. The
payments of earnings and dividends on capital, and the
return of such capital to the general fund are the types
of items which have been so excluded.
BUDGET

SURPLUS,

D E F IC IT , A N D

P U B L IC

DEBT

Budget surplus and deficit.— The Budget surplus or
deficit, shown in table 1, represents the difference between
the budget receipts and budget expenditures of a given year.
Cash balances at the opening or closing of the year have
no effect upon the figure. Nor does the use of prior year
appropriation balances in lieu of new appropriations
change the figure. Similarly, surpluses and deficits of
previous years cannot enter into the calculation.
The public debt.— The last section of table 1 summarizes
and table 3 gives details regarding the effect of each year’s
operations upon the public debt. The budget surplus or
deficit is not the only factor which causes a change in the
public debt. The amount which it is necessary to borrow
or which it is possible to repay is also influenced b y:
Changes in the Treasury cash balance, the result of trust
fund transactions, the use of Government corporation
borrowing directly from the public as a means of financ­
ing budget expenditures of the corporations (and vice
versa in the case of direct repayments of borrowing by the
corporations), and the change in the amount of outstand­
ing checks and other items in process of clearance through
the accounts.
T IM IN G

OF

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Distinction between permanent and current authoriza­
tions.— Tables 2 and 6, as well as the detail in part II,
distinguish permanent authorizations and current au­
thorizations. The “ permanent” items are those under
which additional sums become available from time to
time under action previously taken by the Congress; no
further action is required each year. M o st permanent
authorizations are in force until repealed; a few are in
effect for only a few years as specified in the law. The
a

3

a4

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

“ current" authorizations are those enacted by Congress
in or immediately preceding each fiscal year.
Items proposed jor later transmission.— W hile the sum­
mary tables of the Budget present a complete financial
program, the details in part I I are not a formal transmittal
of the entire Budget. Tables 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 identify by
separate columns the estimate of amounts which it is
expected will be transmitted later. Table 7 identifies
such items in a separate stub section. Such items include:
(a) Supplemental estimates for the current year, (b) appro­
priations and other authorizations to carry out programs
for which authorizing legislation is to be submitted in
advance of the formal recommendation for appropriation,

(c) proposed legislation which would affect receipts, and
(d) an allowance for items which cannot be foreseen now
but which will be transmitted later when definite amounts
can be determined and the needs can be more specifically
identified. The last-named allowance is called a “reserve
for contingencies"; congressional action upon it will be
requested later, not at a single time nor as a single lump
sum item, but in the form of a number of specific appro­
priations for individual items.
TYPES

OF

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Government agencies are generally permitted by law to
incur obligations requiring the future payment of money
only when they have an appropriation or fund available
for the purpose. Therefore, authorizations are enacted
to cover obligations to be incurred within the fiscal year,
rather than merely covering the expenditures which will
be made during that one year in payment of obligations.
In tables 2 and 6 budget authorizations are classified
according to types as follows:
Appropriations are authorizations to make expenditures
from the general fund of the Treasury or from the various
special funds. In some cases the authority to incur
obligations has previously been granted in the form of
contract authorizations; when this has happened, the
appropriation to permit the payment of such obligations
is said to be “for liquidation of contract authorization."
In all other cases appropriations confer authority to incur
new obligations and to pay for them.
Contract authorizations are authorizations to incur obli­
gations prior to the enactment of an appropriation. A
contract authorization does not in itself permit the spend­
ing of money; hence it must be followed by an appropria­
tion to permit payment of the contracts and other
obligations thus incurred.
Authorizations to expend jrom debt receipts are authoriza­
tions to make expenditures from borrowed money. Such
authorizations may take these forms: (a) Authorizations
for the Treasury to make public debt receipts available
to a given agency or enterprise, often in exchange for notes
of the enterprise; (b) authorizations for a Governmentowned corporation to borrow directly from the public;
and (c) cancellation of notes which have been issued by a
Government enterprise and are held by the Treasury,
where the cancellation has the effect of permitting further
expenditures to be made (through restoring previously used
authority to borrow from the Treasury).
Reappropriations and reauthorizations are actions to con­
tinue available part or all of the unused balances of prior
appropriations or authorizations which would otherwise
expire. They are in fact a form of new authority.
Total new obligational authority shown in tables 2 and 5
is the sum of the various types of authorizations named
a,bove, less the portion of appropriations which is for
liquidation of prior contract authorizations. This total




represents the new authority becoming available in any
given year for the purpose of making commitments.
R E L A T IN G

E X P E N D IT U R E S

TO

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

The last section of table 2 and all of table 7 are devoted
to summarizing the relationship between budget author­
izations and budget expenditures. Most budget author­
izations are available for obligation for only 1 year, but
some are available for longer periods of time. Even those
which expire for obligational purposes at the end of 1 year
remain available for making expenditures in payment of
such obligations for an additional 2 years. Therefore, a
substantial portion of each year's expenditures comes
from authorizations of prior years, and a substantial por­
tion of each year's authorizations is carried over into
future years before it is spent. The carry-over of balances
is controlled by certain basic statutes and by the language
of appropriation acts.
Because old and new money are commingled in some
of the accounts, no attempt is made in the summary
figures to separate actual spending in 1952 between the use
of new authorizations and the use of balances. However,
the Budget presents such a breakdown on an estimated
basis for 1953 and 1954. In the case of revolving and
management funds, it assumes that budget authoriza­
tions are spent in an amount equal to the portion credited
to the revolving fund during the year. The remainder
of the revolving and management fund expenditures (or
negative expenditures) are not related to budget authori­
zations, and are here classified as being charges or credits
to “receipts of the enterprise."
C L A S S IF IC A T IO N S

U SED

IN

PART

I

Budget receipts shown in table 1 are classified accord­
ing to source. A more detailed itemization of this classi­
fication appears in Special Analysis C of part IV.
Expenditures and authorizations are classified by func­
tions in tables 1 and 2, as in the Budget Message. This
classification indicates the broad purposes and groups of
programs for which expenditures are made by the Gov­
ernment. A more detailed list of the contents of each
functional category appears in Special Analysis B, and a
10-year table by functions appears in Special Analysis I
of part IV.
Expenditures and authorizations are classified by major
organization unit in tables 4 through 7. This indicates
the agency which receives the budget authorization.
Expenditures are shown opposite the same agency, even
though a portion of the money is sometimes spent through
allocations, advances, or reimbursements made to another
agency. The details for each organization unit are found
in part II of the Budget.
F O R E IG N

C R E D IT S

FORM ERLY

A V A IL A B L E

FREE

Several laws have enabled certain agencies which
operate abroad to use some of the foreign credits and
currencies which the Government receives, without credit­
ing such collections to Treasury receipts and without an
appropriation for the use of them. In other cases, the
foreign credits have been available to an agency only when
purchased by an appropriation, and the value of the
credits purchased has been shown in miscellaneous receipts
of the Treasury.
This Budget includes in the recommended appropria­
tions the value of foreign credits which are needed for
obligation in 1954. It reflects the collections of such
credits in budget receipts and the spending of such credits
in budget expenditures.

SUMMARY TABLES

a5

Table 1
RfiSUMfi OF BUDGET RECEIPTS, EXPENDITURES, AND PUBLIC DEBT

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952,1953, and 1954.

In millions]

P A R T A— B U D G E T R E C E IP T S A N D E X P E N D IT U R E S
1953 estimate

Description

1952 actual

Under exist­
ing laws and
expenditure
authorizations
already en­
acted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

1954 estimate

Total

Under exist­
ing laws and
expenditure
authorizations
enacted or
recommended

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

BUDGET RECEIPTS (see special anafysis C for

detail):
Direct taxes on individuals____________________
Direct taxes on corporations__________________
Excise taxes_________________________________
Employment taxes___________________________
Customs____________________ ______________ _
Miscellaneous receipts__ __________________ _

713
467
893
573
550
1, 803

$34, 446
23, 700
9, 795
4, 932
590
1, 745

67, 999

Total Budget receipts.

$34, 334
23, 300
9, 869
5, 249
590
2, 180

$34, 334
23, 300
9,869
5,249
590
2,180

75, 208

75, 208

75, 522

75, 522

3, 569
2, 302

4, 000
2, 511

4, 000
2, 511

4, 298
2, 559

4, 298
2, 559

62,128

Total________ ____ _________ _______________
Deduct:
Appropriations to Federal old-age and sur­
vivors insurance trust fund_____________
Refunds of receipts (excluding interest)___ _

446
700
795
932
590
1, 745

68, 697

68, 697

68, 665

68, 665

39,
4,
5,
2,

43, 680
4, 048

44,
4,
6,
2,

46,
4,
5,
2,

$30,
21,
8,
4,

$34,
23,
9,
4,

BUDGET EXPENDITURES (see special analysis B

for detail):
Military services_____________________________
Veterans' services and benefits________________
International security and foreign relations_____
Social security, welfare, and health____________
Housing and community development_________
Education and general research________________
Agriculture and agricultural resources-------------Natural resources____________________________
Transportation and communication____________
Finance, commerce, and industry______________
Labor_______________ _______________________
General government__________________________
Interest_____________________________________
Reserve for contingencies_____________________
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis.

727
863
268
491
735
171
1,045
2, 948
1, 923
241
243
1,411
5, 934

$700
498
15
341

25

380
546
035
594
757
272
1,943
3, 370
2,056
458
252
1, 385
6, 520
25

1, 793

74,593

6, 020

2, 253
756
272
1, 943
3, 369
1,857
454
245
1,383
6, 520

1
( h)

1

199
4
7
2

196
562
859
579
448
264
1, 827
4, 095
2, 006
25
268
1,544
6, 420

40

296
564
861
579
509
288
1, 827
4, 097
2,016
275
268
1, 547
6,420
40

2, 494

78, 587

$100
2
2, 002
(6)

46,
4,
7,
2,

61
24
2
10

250
3

-8 5 5

Total Budget expenditures.

66,145

Budget deficit______________

72, 800

4,017

76, 093

5, 896

9, 922

P A R T B— P U B LIC D E B T
1952 actual

Description

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Change due to budget deficit (-j*)______________ ________ _______
Other changes in public debt______________________
__________

$255, 222
+ 4, 017
-1 3 4

$259, 105
+ 5, 896
- 1 , 101

$263, 900
+ 9, 922
-2 2

Public debt at end of year_____________________________ _____________

259, 105

263, 900

273, 800

Public debt at beginning of year________________

*Less than one-half m
illion.




_________________

a6

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
T

able

2

RESUME OF N EW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY
B Y T Y P E A N D F U N C T IO N

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952,1953, and 19 . In m
54
illions]
1953
Description

1952 enacted

Enacted

1954

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

Recommended
in this
document

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

BY TYPE OF NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY

(see table 6)
C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Appropriations________ ___________________________
Reappropriations_________________________________
Authorizations to expend from public debt receipts.
Reauthorizations to expend from public debt receipts.
Contract authorizations___________________________
Reauthorization of contract authority______________

$84, 843
1,144
2, 403
43
3
63

$71, 403
540
1,527

Total______________________________________
Less portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior
contract authorizations---------------------------------------

88, 499

73, 472

2 ,0 11

75, 483

57, 570

2, 857

3, 083

196

3, 279

911

85, 642

70, 389

1,815

72, 204

56, 659

Appropriations___________________________________
Authorizations to expend from public debt receipts..
Authorizations to expend from corporate debt receipts.
Contract authorizations___________________________

6, 254
250
84
648

7, 514
250
87
707

7, 514
250
87
707

7, 417
250
46
707

Total obligational authority under permanent
authorizations___________________________

7, 236

8, 558

92, 878

78, 947

1, 815

61, 022
4,391
9, 549
2, 423
708
181
1, 687
2, 648
1, 934
788
246
1, 367
5, 934

47, 474
3, 777
6, 692
2, 192
1, 520
309
1,364
5, 552
1,862
137
249
1,299
6, 520

850
500
17
341
13
24

Total obligational authority under current
authorizations___________________________

$2 ,011

$73, 414
540
1, 527

$56, 511
404
654

$7, 804

$64, 315
404
654
1

7, 804

65, 374
911

7, 804

64, 463

P E R M A N E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Total new obligational authority_________

8, 558

8, 420

80, 762

65, 079

48,
4,
6,
2,
1,

41, 535
4, 617
411
2, 563
591
177
1,455
3, 459
2, 061
34
278
1,478
6, 420

30

324
277
709
533
533
333
1, 364
5, 555
1, 877
141
256
1, 310
6, 520
30

78, 947

1, 815

80, 762

78, 947
40, 262

1, 815
218

38, 685
3, 052

7,417
250
46
707
8, 420

7, 804

72, 883

BY FUNCTION (see special analysis B)

Military services_________________________
Veterans’ services and benefits____________
International security and foreign relations.
Social security, welfare, and health________
Housing and community development_____
Education and general research___________
Agriculture and agricultural resources_____
Natural resources•_______________________
_
Transportation and communication________
Finance, commerce, and industry__________
Labor___________________________________
General government______________________
Interest_________________________________
Reserve for contingencies________________
Total new obligational authority______________

92, 878

3
15
4
7

41, 535
4, 617

7, 600
100

8 ,0 1 1

2, 563
691
177
1,455
3, 459
2, 061

54

88

50

278
1,478
6, 420
50

65, 079

7, 804

72, 883

80, 762
40, 480

65, 079
26,145

7, 804
5, 664

72, 883
31, 809

1,597

40, 282

38, 934

2, 140

41, 074

196

3, 248

911

30, 871

36, 426

11

RELATION OF NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHOR.
ITY TO EXPENDITURES, 1953 AND 1954

Total new obligational authority (as above)_______
Less portion to be expended in future years________
Expenditures in year (see table 7):
Out of new obligational authority_____________
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior contract
authorizations_____________________________
Out of balances of prior expenditure authoriza­
tions______________________________________
Net expenditures (receipts (—)) of revolving and
management funds_________________________
Total Budget expenditures (table 1)_




30, 871
192
72, 800

192

1, 793

76, 093

354

36, 780

2, 494

78, 587

-1 7 8

74, 593

911

-1 7 8

a7

SUMMARY TABLES
T

able

3

EFFECT OF FINANCIAL OPERATIONS ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952,1953, and 1954.
Description

In millions]

1952 actual

Net results of financial operations for the year:
Budget surplus (—) or deficit ( + ) (from table 1)_ _________
_
Excess of trust receipts over expenditures ( —) (from table 8)-_
Issue ( —) or redemption ( + ) of Government corporation
___ ________
debt to the public (from special analysis H)
Change in Treasury cash balance, increase ( + ) or decrease ( —)_
Change in clearing account for outstanding checks, etc., in­
crease (—) or decrease ( + ) _______________ __________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

+ $4,017
- 3 , 489

+ $5, 896
- 3 , 412

+ $9, 922
- 3 , 229

-1 1 4
-3 8 8

-9 6
-9 6 9

-2 9

+401

-2 4

+4

+ 427

+ 1, 395

+ 6, 668

+ 3, 355

+ 3, 328

+ 3, 195

+ 101

+ 72

+ 37

Total, increase ( + ) or decrease (—) in public debt held
by trust funds and Government investment accounts. -

+ 3, 456

+ 3, 400

+ 3, 232

Net increase ( + ) or decrease (—) in public d e b t ___ __

+ 3, 883

+ 4, 795

+ 9, 900

Total, increase (+ ) or decrease (—) in public debt held
__ __
__ ___ ________
by the public_______
Net borrowing from (+ ) or repayment to (—):
Trust funds (from special analysis H )____
___
_____
Government-owned corporations and enterprises (from special
analysis H )_______ __ ___ _ _ ______ ___ __ ______

255, 222
259, 105
Public debt at beginning of year __ _________ ________________ _
+ 4, 795
+ or decrease (—) in public debt
____ ______Net increase (+ ) 3, 883

_

263, 900
+ 9, 900

259, 105

263, 900

273, 800

At beginning of year
_____________ __________________________________________
At end of year _ _ _ - . ______________ ________________________________________

$7,357
6,969

$6,969

$6,000

6,000

6,000

Change in Treasury cash balance, increase ( + ) or decrease (—) ----------------------------

-388

-969

$683
282

$282
306

$306
302

+401

-2 4

+4

Public debt at end of year________ _____________________________
M EM ORANDUM

Treasury cash balance:

Clearing account for outstanding checks, etc.:

At beginning of year______________________________________________________ _________
At end of year_________ ________ ____________________ _____________________ _____
Change in clearing account for outstanding checks, etc., increase (—) or decrease

(+ )

___________ ____________ ____ _______________ ____________________________




THE BUDGET FOK FISCAL YEAR 1954

a8

T

4

able

SUM M ARY OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES
BY AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952,1953, and 1954. In millions]
1953 estimate

Agency

1952 actual

Legislative branch
_
__
The Judiciary_________________________________________
Executive Office of the President-_
Funds appropriated to the President
_
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission
_
_
_____
Civil Service Commission. _ ..
Economic Stabilization Agency __ _
Export-import Bank of Washington _
Federal Civil Defense Administration___________
Railroad Retirement Board_____ ____ __
Reconstruction Finance Corporation_______
Tennessee Valley Authority___ _____ _ _
Veterans Administration_______ . _
Other_____
___
___
Federal Security Agency._
_
__ _____
General Services Administration___
_______ _______
Housing and Home Finance A gen cy______ _______
Department of Agriculture______
_____________ ____
Department of Commerce_ ________________ _________
_
Department of Defense:
Military functions______ ____ ____ ________
____
Civil functions_____ ____
__ _______________
Department of the Interior
________________________
Department of Justice
_ __
________________
Department of Labor_ __
____ _______
___
_
_______
Post Office Department (general fund)_
___ _ ____
Department of State __ _
__
Treasury Department. _
_
_
______
____
District of Columbia (Federal contribution) ______ __
Reserve for contingencies
_ _______
_____
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis_______
Total Budget expenditures______

_ _____

1954 estimate

Under expend­
iture author­ Proposed for
later
izations
already
transmission
enacted

Under expend­
iture author­
izations
Proposed for
enacted or
later
recommended transmission
in this
document

$62
27
9
4, 983

$69
28
9
5, 850

1, 670
332
91
29
33
778
° 220
185
4, 923
205
1,671
1,070
585
1,242
979

2,

38, 967
710
585
195
253
740
258
6, 627
11

000
345
67
83
81
694
« 56
232
4, 118
220
1 , 600
1,261
539
2, 143
898

42, 700
659
616
169
253

4

466
(&
)
341
1

199
700

$69
28
9
5, 865
2, 000
345
71
83
81
694
* 56
232
4, 584
220
1,941
1,261
540
2,143
1,097

$70
28
8

5, 408
2,

2

45
70
706
« 120
243
4, 492
243
1 , 880
1 , 126
319
2, 031
1,017
45, 400
640
659
183
321
669
315
7, 176

25

1, 793

74,593

76, 093

(6)
2

39

274
7, 271

1

11

(>)
(b
)
$2, 248

700
450

43, 400
659
616
171
292
666
275
7, 271
11
25

666

(b
)

2

(6)
24
61
14

Total

$70
28
8
7, 656
2, 700
450
2
45
70
706
« 120
243
4, 494
243
1, 904
1,126
380
2, 031
1, 031

40

45, 500
640
659
184
321
669
317
7, 178
12
40

2, 494

78, 587

100

(6
)
1

(b
)
2
2

12

-8 5 5
66,145

72, 800

a Deduct, excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.
h Less than one-half million.




w
(b
)
$15

Total

SUMMARY TABLES
T

able

a9

5

SUM M ARY OF NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY
BY AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954. In m
illions]
1953

Agency

1952 enacted

Enacted

_
_
__ __
____
Legislative branch _____
The Judiciary _
__ __
_ _ _
_ _ _
Executive Office of the President__ __ _
Funds appropriated to the President _
_ __ _ __
Independent offices:
Atomic Fn^rpy Commission
Civil Service Commission. _____
Economic Stabilization Agency _ _
___
Export-import Bank of Washington. _ _ _
Federal Civil Defense Administration_ __ _
_
Railroad Retirement Board _ _ _ _
__
___
_
Reconstruction Finance Corporation_ __ _
Tennessee Valley Authority___
_ _
_ Veterans Administration
_
_____
Other
_
_ _
_____
Federal Security Agency
_
_ _
____ __
Housing and Home Finance Agency _
_ _
Department of Agriculture
_
_ _
_ _
Department of Commerce _ _
Department of Defense:
Military functions _
_ _ _
____________
_
_
___
Civil functions_ __
Department of the Interior
_
Department of Justice _
_ _ _ _ _
Department of Labor
_
_
_
Post Office Department (general fund)__ __ _
Department of State
__
_
Treasury Department
_ _
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)
Reserve for contingencies
Total new obligational authority______

6 Less

than one-half million.




______

$75
27
10
8, 601

$75
28
8
6, 452

1, 307
337
101
1, 000
75
778
100
238
4, 454
201
1, 609
788
479
1, 887
941

4, 144
343
60

60, 574
655
555
203
253
740
262
6, 617
11

47, 257
596
591
170
257

1954

Proposed for
later
transmission

Total

Recommended Proposed for
later
in this
document
transmission

$85
29
8

$17

$75
28
8
6, 469

1, 997
450

1, 997
450

4

4,144
343
64
43
694

150
706

150
706

336
254
336
4,315
468
4, 554
3, 847
207
234
207
1, 939
1, 574
365
1, 773
322
6
316
General Services Administration 395
_
13
1, 382
406
1, 369
1, 563
1, 659
1, 563
918
1, 074
903
15

4

254
4, 554
234
1, 773
395
506
1, 659
1, 078

50

41, 319
688
664
187
332
669
332
7, 101
12
50

7, 804

72, 883

(6)

(b
)

43
694

850

1

48, 107
596
592
172
296
666
241
7, 201
11
30

1, 815

80, 762

65, 079

1
2

39

666

238
7, 199

3
2

11

78, 947

$7, 650

100

41, 319

30
92, 878

Total

688

664
187
332
669
332
7, 101
12

$85
29
8
7, 651

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

A lO

T able 6
SUM M ARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS B Y T Y P E OF A U T H O R IZ A T IO N A N D A G E N C Y

Based on existing'and^proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
1953
Description

1952 enacted
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans*
mission

1954

Total

Recom­
mended in
this docu­
ment

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Appropriations:
Legislative branch_____________________
_______ ___
The Judiciary_____________ ____ ____________ _______

$78,210,885
27.360.350
9,817,265
7,385,636,244
7,713,971,289
1,741,234,412
996,346,595
98,198,580
900,235,369
948,920,957

$77,763,301
27,398, 700
8,128, 515
6,003,244,750
8, 943,910,908
1 626, 589,155
,
395,086,270
104,661,000
733,502,964
796,963,636

Funds appropriated to the President______________ _____
Independent offices _ ____________________ ____ _______
Federal Security Agency______ ____________ __________
General Services Administration..___ ____________ _____
Housing and Home Finance A
gp/noy
Department of Agriculture............. ....... .............................
Department of Commerce_____________________ ______
Department of Defense:
Military functions________________________________ 61,627,259,186 49,544,174,252
Civil functions__________________________________
653,563,663
595,066,600
Department of the Interior___________________________
536,053,167
549,646,499
Department of Justice._______ ______ _______________
203,009,500
170, 237,000
Department of Labor _______________________________
253,054,444
257,483, 539
Post Office Department (general fund)_________________
740,000,000
666,000,000
Department of State_ _______ ______ ________________
_
262,232,661
237,659,174
Treasury Department _____________________________
665.536.350
663,325, 573
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)_____________
11,400,000
11,000,000
Reserve for contingencies____ ______ _______ __________

$475,200
200,000
16, 701, 750
472,195,500
364,931,000
6,000,000
12, 500,000
211,235,000

$77,763,301
27,873,900
8,328,515
6,019,946,500
9,416,106,408
1,991,520,155
401,086,270
117.161.000
733,502,964
1,008,198,636

$87,189, 556
28,671,975
7,881,990
1,000,000 $7,650,000,000
7,259, 505,164
1, 787, 578, 761
444, 581, 200
75, 550,000
100,000,000
752,847,022
1,131,195, 925
4,300,000

$87,189,556
28,671,975
7,881,990
7,651,000,000
7,259,505,164
1,787,578,761
444,581,200
175.550.000
752,847,022
1,135,495,925

50,394,174,252
595,066,600
550,271,499
625,000
172.687.000
2,450,000
296,639,539
39,156,000
666,000,000
240,519,174
2,860,000
665,625,573
2,300,000
11,000,000
30,000,000
30,000, 000

41,444,416,000
687,098,100
615, 964,065
187.150.000
331, 818,600
668, 800,000
331,864,390
665.328.000
12,000,000

73,423,471,286

56,520,440,748

9,080,100

8,910,000

73,414,391,186

56,511,530,748

99,000
25,979
448,528,869
77,006,360
171,934
1,200,000
13,175,042

99,000
25,979
448,528,869
77,006,360
171,934
1,200,000
13,175,042

404, 000, 000

404,000,000

195, 705

195,705

Total appropriations
__
____
___
D educt refunds o f receipts (excluding interest) : General Serv­

84,852,040,917

71,411,841,836

ices Administration___________________ ________________

8,414,736

9,080,100

Total appropriations, excluding refunds of receipts (ex­
cluding interest) _________________________________ 84,843,626,181

71,402,761,736

850,000,000

2,011, 629,450

2,011, 629,450

50,000,000

41,444,416,000
687,098,100
615,964,065
187.150.000
331,818,600
668.800.000
331,864,390
665,328,000
12,000,000
50,000,000

7,804,300,000

64,324,740,748
8,910,000

7,804,300,000

64,315,830,748

Reappropriations:

Legislative branch.._______________________ __________
Executive Office of the President______________________
Funds appropriated to the President__________ ________
Independent offices______ ___________________________
Department of Agriculture__
_________ _________ __
Department of Commerce_____ _______________ ______r_
Department of Defense: Military functions____________
Department of the Interior............................................ ......
Department of State_____ _______ ____________________

732,704,187
40,359,190
779,890
3,860,253
363,665,000
74,448
2,713,321

Total reappropriations______________________________

1,144,156,289

540,402,889

540,402,889

404,000, 000

404,000,000

Funds appropriated to the President____________ _____
Independent offices___ ___________________ _____ _____
Housing and Home Finance Agency_________ _____ ____
Department of Agriculture_____ ______________________

527,254,316
1,127,977,603
15,000,000
732,399,225

75,000,000
900,000,000
551, 793,936

75,000,000
900,000,000
551,793,936

653,797,970

653,797,970

Total authorizations to expend from public debt receipts..

2,402,631,144

1, 526, 793,936

1,526,793,936

653,797,970

653,797,970

1,740,205
1,500,000

1,663,195

1,663,195

503,027

503,027

3,240,205

1,663,195

1,663,195

503,027

503,027

Authorizations to expend from public debt receipts:

Reauthorizations to expend from public debt receipts: Inde­

pendent offices...... ......................................... ......................

42,890,262

Contract authorizations:

Federal Security Agency............................... ......................
Department of the Interior......... ............. ...........................
Total contract authorizations........ .................... ............ .




SUMMARY TABLES

A ll

T able 6—Continued
SUM M ARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS— Continued
B Y T Y P E OF A U T H O R IZ A T IO N A N D A G E N C Y— Continued

1953
1952 enacted

Description

Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
m
ission

1954

Total

Recom­
mended in
this docu­
ment

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

$7,804,300,000

$65,374,131,745

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
Reauthorizations of contract authority:
Independent offices......................................... ....................
Department of Commerce................................................ .

$635,623
62,655,950

Total reauthorizations of contract authority___________

63,291,573

Total._________ ___ _______________ _______________
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior con­
tract authorizations:
Legislativei branch .
__ _
Funds appropriated to the President___________________
Independent, offices.
......... .
___ ___________ _____
Federal Security Agency..

88,499,835,654 $73,471,621,756

3,000,000
44,476,271
379,205,080
143,580,000
200,000,000

$2,011,629,450 $75,483,251,206 $57,569,831,745

3,000,000

3,000,000

2,500,000

2,500,000

117,000,000
63,991,779
70,000,000
8,000,000
5p2,141,499
2,307,680, 770
10,673,400
700,000

117,000,000
63,991,779
70,000,000
8,000,000
698,641,499
2,307,680,770
10,673,400
700,000

25,385, 664
24, 704,000
40.000.000
20.000.000
665,161,925
131, 968,000
1, 500,000

25,385,664
24,704,000
40.000.000
20.000.000
665,161,925
131,968,000
1,500,000

911,219,589

"F
innsing q ri Hom Finance Agency
n
e,
Department, of Commern
e
Department of Defense- Military functions
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice_____ _______________________ __
Department of State..___ ________________ - _________

622,461,637
1,424,839,700
36,495,000
360,000
3,000,000

Total, deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of
prior contract authorizations_______________________

2,857,417,688

3,083,187,448

196,500,000

3,279,687,448

911, 219,589

Total new obligational authority under current author­
izations______________ _______________ _________ 85,642,417,966

70,388,434,308

1,815,129,450

72,203,563,758

56,658,612,156

196, 500,000

7,804,300,000

64,462,912,156

PERMANENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Appropriations:

44,288,341
9,700,123
185,840,214

694,765,092
9,700,123
212,878,099

694.765,092
9,700,123
212,878,099

706,623, 785
9,688,331
206,562,787

706,623,785
9,688,331
206,562,787

7,989,359
979,037
53,921,764
396,179
8,228,715,540

6,892,476
1,127,460
52,630,550
398,300
9,035,193,470

6,892,476
1,127,460
52,630,550
398,300
9,035,193,470

7.011.000
1.050.000
49,897,112
398,300
8,985,728,470

7.011.000
1.050.000
49,897,112
398,300
8,985,728,470

8,531,830,557

10,013, 585,570

10,013,585,570

9,966,959,785

9,966,959,785

2,277,738,928

2,500,000,000

2,500,000,000

2, 550,000,000

2,550,000,000

6,254,091,629

7, 513, 585,570

7,513,585,570

7,416,959,785

7,416,959,785

250,000,000

250,000,000

250,000,000

250,000,000

250,000,000

Housing and Home Finance Agency
________
Department of Agriculture_____ _______________________

16,184,250
67,659,000

22.305.000
64.773.000

22.305.000
64.773.000

45,949,000

45,949,000

Total authorizations to expend from corporate debt
receipts________________________________________

83,843,250

87,078,000

87,078,000

45,949,000

45,949,000

100,000,000
548,000,000

100,000,000
607,500,000

100,000,000
607,500,000

100,000,000
607,500,000

100,000,000
607,500,000

648,000,000

707,500,000

707,500,000

707,500,000

707,500,000

Total new obligational authority under permanent
authorizations
_ . ____
________________

7,235,934,879

8,558,163,570

8,558,163,570

8,420,408,785

8,420,408,785

Grand total new obligational authority_______________

92,878,352,845

78,946,597,878

80,761,727,328

65,079,020,941

Independent offices_________ _______________________
Federal Security Agency
____ - - - _____
Department of Agriculture
____ ____________________
Department of Defense:
Military functions
_ _ _ _ _ _______ ________
Civil functions______ ___ __________ . .. _________
Department of the Interior
________
______
Department of State .. _ ........... . .. ______________
Treasury Department
___
Total appropriations

______________ ______ _______

D educt refunds o f receipts (excluding interest) : Treasury De­

partment ____________

____________________________

Total appropriations excluding refunds of receipts (exclud­
ing interest)
..
- .
Authorization to expend from public debt receipts: Housing
__________ ______
and Home Finance Agency
Authorizations to expend from corporate debt receipts:

Contract authorizations:

Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Commerce
Total contract authorizations




.

___
____ -

__
--

...

1,815,129,450

7,804,300,000

72,883,320,941

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

a !2

Table 7
SUM M ARY OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES— IN RELATION TO AUTHORIZATIONS
BY AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
1953 estimate
Expenditures from new authorizations
Description

Other expenditures

1952 actual
From new obligational authority
C urren t 1

Permanent *

From appro­
priations to
liquidate

From balances
of prior
authorizations

N et (receipts
(—)), revolv­
ing and man­
agement funds

Total

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ALREADY ENACTED AND
RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOCUMENT
Legislative branch______________________________________
The Judiciary__________________________________________
Executive Office of the President_________________________
Funds appropriated to the President______________________
Independent offices_____________________________________
Federal Security Agency________________________________
General Services Administration__________________________
Housing and Home Finance Agency______________________
Department of Agriculture______________________________
Department of Commerce_______________________________
Department of Defense:
Military functions__________________________________
Civil functions_____________________________________
Department of the Interior______________________________
Department of Justice__________________________________
Department of Labor___________________________________
Post Office Department (general fund)____________________
Department of State____________________________________
Treasury Department__________________________________
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)_______________

$61,731,725
26,742,694
9,108,283
,982,628,181
,026,078,692
,670,965,200
,078,134,737
584,761,191
,242,124,910
979,145,892

$61,221,173
26, 571,100
7,697, 798
1, 500,000,000
5,204,461,904
1,302,457, 545
260, 738,400
95,961,000
806,095, 795
236,818,501

;, 966,980,963
709,876,032
584,784,735
195,254,977
252,502,962
740,000,000
258,200,273
,905,141,846
11,400,000

19,329,262,906
297,637, 591
357,728,896
151,753,307
245,601, 509

Total expenditures from authorizations enacted and
recommended__________________________ ________

69,285,563,293

31,331,875, 505

Deduct refunds of receipts (excluding interest):
General Services Administration______________________
Treasury Department. _____________ _______________

8,054,224
2,277,738,572

10, 802,056

Total refunds of receipts (excluding interest)__________

2,285,792,796

Total Budget expenditures from authorizations enacted
or recommended, excluding refunds of receipts (ex­
cluding interest).

66,999,770,497

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
The Judiciary_________________________________________
Executive Office of the President_________________________
Funds appropriated to the President_____________________
Independent offices____________________________________
Federal Security Agency________________________________
Housing and Home Finance Agency................. ......... ............
Department of Commerce----------------------------------------------Department of Defense: Military functions___________ ____
Department of the Interior.......... ......... ............ ....................
Department of Justice____________ ____ ________________Department of Labor..................... ......... .................— .........
Department of State_______________________________ ____
Treasury Department_____________ ______ _____________
Reserve for contingencies------- -----------------------------------------

$808,210

19,194,384
9, 700,123

116,600,000
61, 400,896
70,000,000

22,305,000
69, 518, 787

8,000,000
481,091,961

4, 287,476
29,156
33, 525, 992

2,304,019,651
9,473,400
301,000

666,000,000
190,489,886
580,378,194

150,000
9,035,042, 251

$7,198,472
1,176,323
915,323
4, 253,957, 750
1,935,337,123
226,502,678
945, 791,429
550,269,997
1, 257,671,452
198,305,743
20, 664,047,967
359,068,267
211,139,149
18,822,630
8,318,005
134
83,370,768
149,576,816

9,863,753,169

3,051,695,118

30,871,470,026

75,310,406,219

10,802,056
2,500,000,356

10,802,056

2, 500,000,356

2,510,802,412

31,321,073,449

7,363, 752, 813

3,051,695,118

30, 871,470,026

191,612,401

72,799,603,807

182,700
163.000
14,651,750
469,893,500
340,913,000
500.000
199.000.000
700.000.000
485.000
2.115.000
39,054,000
1.270.000

196, 500,000

25,000,000
196,500,000

1,793,227,950

-854,523,539
66,145,246,958

191,612,401

2, 500,000,356

1, 596, 727,950

Total Budget expenditures______________

5,697,184

42,700,000,000
658,753,128
615,837,323
168,915,162
253,347,088
666,000,134
274,010,654
9,770,694,445

11,000,000

25, 000, 000

Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis.

398,382,000
2,018,114
3,969,886
-1,961,775
-572,426

11,000,000

182, 700
163.000
651, 750
14,
469, 893, 500
340, 913.000
500.000
2, 500.000
700, 000,000
485.000
2, 115.000
39, 054.000
1 270.000
,

Total expenditures from authorizations proposed for
later transmission.

$96,262,411
-162,014, 732
-98,975
- 4 , 549,095
-137,650,671
10,077, 518
-17,947,038

$69,227,855
27,747,423
8,613,121
5,850,220,161
7,783,578,679
1,599,962,267
1,271,980,734
538,885,326
2,143,363,552
898,269,167

32,917,801,399

7,363,752,813

1 Refers to appropriations and other authorizations made available b y annual action of the Congress.
2 Refers to appropriations under which additional money becomes available annually under law, without new




3,248,195,118

30,871,470,026

action b y the Congress.

191,612,401

74,592,831,757

SUMMARY TABLES

a

13

Table 7
SUM M ARY OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES— IN RELATION TO AUTHORIZATIONS
BY A G E N C Y

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
1954 estimate

Expenditures from new authorizations

Other expenditures
Description

From new obligational authority
C urren t1

From appro­
priations to
liquidate

From balances
of prior
authorizations

Net (receipts
(—)), revolv­
ing and man­
agement funds

Total

F R O M A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S A LR E A D Y E N A C T E D A N D
R E C O M M E N D E D IN T H IS D O C U M E N T
$64,115, 512
27,427, 575
7, 517,190
800,000
5,880,998,898
1, 603, 764,882
288,880,850
54,950,000
807,325,415
263, 575,446
19, 891,715,000
389,811,891
415, 597, 761
166,978,669
312,730,989
668, 800,000
246,188, 248
585,318,496

$701,036, 257
9,688,331

25,385,664
24,704,000
40, 000, 000

20,000,000
71,362, 787
665,161,925
4,405,445

131, 968,000

31, 643,086

1,500,000

225,081
8,985, 563,847

$3,035,331
824,300
604,603
5,401, 699,647
2,400, 237, 546
242,155, 519
800,318,627
381, 772,856
1,168, 694,878
95,481,677

$5,256,041
-176,298,016
-572,359
5, 873, 539
-137, 519,040
-16,403, 637
-7,081,271

25,201, 572, 555
266,251,473
215,220,171
18,476,101
8,886,261

170,339,000
-16,157,319
-5,014,045
-1,966,000
-706,468

68,331, 553
152,698,061

$2, 500,000

1,985, 560

319,203,816
2,030,979,443
1,017,137,777
45,400,000,000
639,906,045
658,946,973
183,488,770
320,910,782
668,800,000
314,744,882
9,725,565,964

12,000,000

12,000,000

31,688,496,822

$69,650,843
28,251,875
8,121,793
5,407,755,688
8,831,360,349
1,879,740,373
1,135,073,016

9,803,924,834

911,219, 589

36,426,261,159

-178, 264,015

78,651,638,389

2, 550,000,000

8,857,600
2,550,000,000

8,857, 600

2, 550, 000, 000

2,558,857,600

31,679, 639, 222

7,253, 924,834

!, 857,600

911, 219, 589

36,426, 261,159

-178, 264,015

76,092,780,789

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Independent offices
Federal Security Agency
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense:
Military functions
Civil functions
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Post Office Department (general fund)
Department of State
Treasury Department
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)
Total expenditures from authorizations enacted and recom­
mended.
Deduct refunds of receipts (excluding interest):
General Services Administration
Treasury Department
Total refunds of receipts (excluding interest)
Total Budget expenditures from authorizations enacted or
recommended, excluding refunds of receipts (excluding
interest).
F R O M A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S P R O P O S E D F O R L A T E R
T R A N S M ISS IO N

292, 500
37,000
202,050,000
2.302.000
24, 018, 000
10, 500,000
10,235,000

100,000,000

140.000
335.000

50,000,000
3,900,000

292,500
37,000
2,248,050,000
2.302.000
24.018.000
60.500.000
14.135.000

100,000,000

2, 046,000,000

140.000
335.000

102.000

102.000

1, 590,000
2.300.000

1.590.000
2.300.000
40,000,000

353,901,500

2,493,801,500

40,000,000
2,139,900,000

The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Independent offices
Federal Security Agency
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense: Military functions
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Department of State
Treasury Department
Reserve for contingencies
Total expenditures from authorizations proposed for later
transmission.
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis

33,819, 539,222

7,253,924,834

911,219, 589

36,780,162, 659

-178,264,015

78,586,582,289

Total Budget expenditures

1Refers to appropriations and other authorizations made available by annual action of the Congress.
* Refers to appropriations under which additional money becomes available annually under law, without new action by the Congress.







P A R T

II

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS




B u d get
(b y

A u th o r iz a tio n s

O r g a n iz a tio n

U n it

and

and

E x p e n d itu r e s
A c c o u n t

T itle )

and
D e ta ile d

E s tim a te s ,

N a r r a tiv e s , a n d

L
egislative B ch
ran
The J d
u iciary
E
xecutive O
ffice of the P
residen
t
Funds A
ppropriated to the P
residen
t
In ep d t O
d en en ffices
F
ederal Security A
gency
G eral S
en
ervices A inistration
dm
H
ousing an H e F ce A
d om inan gency
D
epartm of A
ent
griculture
D
epartm of C m
ent
om erce
D
epartm of D
ent
efense
D
epartm of the In
ent
terior
D
epartm of J stice
ent
u
D
epartm of L
ent
abor
Post O
ffice D
epartm
ent
D
epartm of State
ent
Treasury D
epartm
ent
D
istrict of C
olum
bia

S c h e d u le s




IN T R O D U C T IO N T O P A R T II
Part I I contains the details of the Budget for Federal
funds, including various types of tables and schedules,
explanatory statements of the work to be performed and
the money needed, and the text of the language proposed
for enactment by Congress on each item of authorization.
This part also includes material on funds of the municipal
government of the District of Columbia, and a few other
trust funds which require congressional action.
The contents of part I I are arranged in chapters reflect­
ing the organization of the Government. Totals from the
various chapters are carried forward to various tables of
part I.
S U M M A R IE S

OF

NEW

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

AND

E X P E N D IT U R E S

A t the beginning of each chapter a table in large type
summarizes new authorizations, and a second table sum­
marizes expenditures. B oth tables segregate the items
proposed for later transmission, for which no details
appear in this Budget, from those items already enacted
or recommended in this document.
Summary oj new authorizations.— This summary indi­
cates the totals of each type of authorization to incur obli­
gations or make expenditures. The various types of au­
thorizations are explained in the introduction to part I
(pp. a 2 and a 3 ) . The figures come from the detail in
the chapter and are carried forward into table 6 and from
there to tables 5 and 2 of part I. Grand totals are shown
for the new obligational authority enacted or recom­
mended.
Summary oj expenditures.— This summary indicates
the total expenditures for the chapter. For the years 1953
and 1954, it estimates the portion of the expenditures
which come out of appropriations or other authorizations
currently granted by Congress, and the expenditures
coming from permanent authorizations and from the
balances of prior authorizations. Additional entries are
used where required for expenditures which will come from
appropriations currently made to liquidate prior contract
authorizations, and for the net expenditures of revolving
and management funds. Because old and new money are
commingled in some of the accounts, no attempt is made
in the summary figures to separate actual spending in
1952 between the old and the new authorizations.
The figures are taken from the detailed analysis sched­
ules appearing throughout the chapter.
The amounts
shown in the chapter summaries are carried forward into
table 7 and from there the totals are taken into tables 4, 2,
and 1 of part I.
In preparing the estimates for 1953 and 1954, it is
generally assumed that old money available in commingled
accounts will be obligated before the new money is
obligated, and that expenditures will reflect the liquidation
of those obligations on the basis of previous experience.
W here the obligation and expenditures are simultaneous,
the first-in, first-out method is used to assign expendi­
tures between old and new money. In the case of revolving
funds where budgetary authorizations are commingled
with receipts of the enterprise, it is assumed that the
budgetary authorizations are expended in an amount equal
to the amount thereof placed in the revolving fund during
the year, and that the remaining expenditure or net
collections are therefore a charge or credit to receipts of the
enterprise.

STATEM ENT

OF

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S
ACCOUNT

AND

E X P E N D IT U R E S

A detailed listing of the organization units and account
titles show the budget authorizations and expenditures for
each.
The accounts are divided into several sections:
current authorizations other than revolving and manage­
ment funds, permanent authorizations, revolving and
management funds, and supplemental items proposed for
later transmission.
Special types of authorizations are set forth under the
applicable appropriation titles, identified b y separate stub
entries. Functional code numbers appear in a separate
column, indicating the category in the Budget Message
and in the functional tables where each account shown
here has been included.
A separate double page spread is used for revolving and
management funds. This portion of the table shows the
total amounts provided by operations, the total amounts
applied to operations and the net expenditures (which is
the difference between the two other figures just named).
Appropriations and other budgetary authorizations to use
general fund money for revolving funds are shown in this
section. The expenditures for each revolving fund include
both the spending from budgetary authorizations and the
spending of receipts of the enterprise.
D E T A IL E D

M A T E R IA L

The detailed material generally follows the order of the
chapter summaries. Thus, the accounts of a given organ­
ization unit m ay be found in several places, if the unit has
different types of authorizations and funds.
Supple­
mental items which are anticipated for later transmission
are summarized at the end of each chapter, but the regular
detailed material on them will be submitted to Congress
when the supplemental is formally transmitted b y the
President.
W ithin the detailed material, bold-face headings are
generally used for account titles for which congressional
action is being proposed; light-face headings are used for
the accounts which require no action at this time.
The kind of display regularly shown for general and
special fund appropriations is illustrated and explained on
page 4 and the types of financial statements regularly
used for revolving funds are illustrated and explained
on page 5.
The management funds follow the same general style
as general and special fund accounts with an extra sum­
mation of amounts provided and amounts applied, printed
at the end of the expenditure analysis schedule. Special
schedules are used to show separately the use of appropria­
tions which are solely for the liquidation of contract
authorizations.
The individual schedules contain considerable addi­
tional data beyond that which is shown in summary
schedules. For example, the detailed schedules on general
and special fund appropriations show balances available
for expenditure at the beginning and end of each year,
divided between the portion thereof which is obligated and
the portion which is unobligated. The detailed schedules
also show such additional information as the reimburse­
ments credited directly to appropriation accounts, the
savings which will lapse from each year's appropriations,
and various other data of interest.

3
200000— 53------ 1




BY

T IT L E

EXPLANATORY ILLUSTRATION OF BUDGETS FOR GENERAL AND SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS
A P O R T N LAN U E
P R P IA IO
G AG
T e la g a e p p se b th Pe id n fo
h n u g ro o d y e r s e t r
in luio inth 1954 a p o r tio a ts is pin d
csn
e
p r p ia n c
r te
a th h a o e c ite r q ir g a tio . T e
t e e d f a h m e u in c n h
la g a e in th 1953 a p o r tio a ts is ue
nug
e
p r p ia n c
sd
a a b se Im e ia ly fo w g th la g a e
s a .
md te llo in e n u g
a e c tio s to r le a t la s a d th a p p ­
r ita n
e v n w n e p ro ria
tio a ts fr mwic th te t ista e .
n c o hh e x
kn

. S la a d E en G era A m istra n J stice
a ries n xp ses, en l d in tio , u —
F r e p n s n ce ry fo th ad in tio o th D artm t J
o x e se e ssa r e m istra n f e ep
en
of J stice an fo ex m a n of ju icia o e in d g purchase y
u
d r a in tio
d l ffic s, clu in
of two passenger motor vehicles for replacement only; m lla e u (
isce n o s
an em e cy e p se a th rized o ap ro b th A
d erg n x en s u o
r p ved y e ttorn /
ey
G n ra o h A m istrative A
e e l r is d in
ssistan a d i iiiiiiiin ii| n 11 I
t; n
lu f
m tes of ap ro ria n in th field [$2,375,0003^^550,000.
a
p p tio s
e
;
(5 U. S. C. 22a, 291, 294, 310, 312, 341; 8 U. S. C. 153; 18 U. S. C.

R mn ty e s o s th te t ue in th 1953
o a p hw e x s d
e
a p o r tio a ts.
p r p ia n c
Ita ty e in ic te p p se n w la g a e
lic p d a s ro o d e n u g
a d fig r s
n ue.
Ba k tse c se mte ia wic itisp p se to
r c e n lo a r l h h
ro o d
o it in1954.
m

4201; 28 U. S. C. 507b, 547c; 31 U. S. C. 83; 13 Stat. 516; Depart­
ments of State, Justice, Com
merc&j-emd The Judiciary Appropriation
Act, 1953.)

A p p ted 1953, $2,375,000 .
p ro ria
E ate 1954, $2,550,000
stim
A p p ted (a ju ) 1953, $2,495,000
p ro ria
d sted
A M OUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

15 at a 15 et ae 15 et ae
92 cul 93 simt 94 simt
S HD L O A O N A A B
C E U E F M U TS V ILA LE
Fre c a c u t thr iss o na b ie sc e u
o a h c o n e e h w r f h d le
wic lis th a p o r tio s md o re u e ,
h h ts e p r p ia n a e r q ir d
o e s uc s o mn y o a th r to inu
th r o r e f o e r u o ity
cr
o lig tio s, d d c n fo th a o n n t ue
b a n e u tio s r e mu ts o s d
w in th y a a d th a o n o "O ligation
ith e e r, n e mu t f b
s
in u d
c rre ."

•
......
Apo r t no etimte
pr piaio r s a _____
$,45 0
2 4 ,0 0
Ta s re fr m a r sa depne,
r nfer d o “Slaie n xe s s
I m r t na dNt r liz t nSr ­
m igaio n aua aio ev
ic ,” prun t Rogn aio P n
e us a t o e r a iz t n la
N. 2o 15...........................
o f 90
Ajute a po r t no et ae
d s d pr piaio r simt
2 4 ,0 0
,4 5 0
Rimus mn fr m n n e e a
e b r e e ts o o -Fd r l
70
2
Rimus mnsfr mt e ac u ts ..
e b re e t o ohr c o n ..
18?3
0, 3
Tta aa b f ro ligt n
o l vilale o b aio ......
2 5 ,9 3
,5 3 5
Uo lig te bla c, et ae s v g...*
nb a d a ne simt d a ins
Oligt n inur d
b aio s c re ...............
2 4 ,0 3
,52 2
Cmaaiv tase fr m a r sa d
o pr t e rnf r o “Slaie n
epne, I m r t na dNt r liz xe s s m igaio n aua a
t nSr ic”.. . ...
io ev e
8,65
38
Cmaaiv ta s rt “Slaie a de­
o pr t e r nfe o a r s n x
pne, gnr llea at it s Jsic”.
e s s e ea gl civ ie, ut e
-2 ,9 0
92
Tt lo ligt n............... .
oa b aio s
2 9,7 8
,5 5 8

$,35 0
2 7 ,0 0

$,50 0
2 5 ,0 0

100
2,00
2 9 ,0 0
,4 5 0

16,60
00

2 5 ,0 0
,5 0 0

10,00
00

2 9 ,0 0
,5 5 0

2 5 ,0 0
,6 0 0

2 9 ,0 0
,5 5 0

2 9 ,0 0
,5 5 0

B la c s n t a a b a r th e d o th
a n e o v ila le fte e n f e
y a to b la se .
e r; e p d

2 5,00
,60 0

2 5,0 0
,6 0 0

OBLIGATIONS BY A C T IV IT K S

15 at a 15 et ae 15 et ae
02 cul 93 simt 94 simt
O L A IO S B A T IT S
B IG T N Y C IV IE
F a c l r q ir mn a e bo e d w b
in n ia e u e e ts r r k n o n y
up s , po r m p o c o a tiv . T is
r o e r g a , r je t, r c ity h
Eeakdow is especially tailoredfor each agency
r
n
a d a c u t, r fle tin th p r u r d tie a d
n c o n e c g e a tic la u s n
r s o s ilitie fo wic it r c iv s mn y
e p nib s r h h e e e o e .
W e r imus mn a e r c iv d fr mo e
h re e b r e e ts r e e e o th r
a c u ts of th G v r mn th o lig tio s
co n
e o e n e t, e b a n
c a e b to s c r imus mn a e o n
h rg a le
uh e b r e e ts r fte
p ce ina s p r te p r no th s h d le
la d
e a a o tio f is c e u .

N R A IV S A E E T
A R T E T T MNS
T e wr p n e a d s r ic s p o o d to b
h ok la n d n e v e r p se
e
c r ie o t a e d s r e b ie u d re c
a r d u r e c ib d r fly n e a h
a p o r tio o fu d W e p a tic b th
p r p ia n r n . h re r c a le e
n r a es te e ts in ic te th e p c da c m
ar tiv ta mn d a e x e te c o ­
p h e t inr la ntoth fin n ia e timte a d
lis mn e tio
e ac l s a s n
g e so e ma ue o po r ma dp r r a c .
iv s m e s r s f r g a n e fo mn e
I th c se o p r a e t a p o r tio s th nr a
n e a f e mn n p r p ia n, e ar ­
tiv s te e ts a e p in th s uc o th
e ta mn lso x la
e o re f e
mn y a d th s tu r b s fo th a p p ­
o e n e ta to y a is r e p ro ria
tio .
n

D O lig tion
irect b a s

1 Eeu ed et n
. xc tiv ir cio ...................
2 Am is aiv r v wa da pa _
. d in tr t e e ie s n pe ls
3 Am is aiv s r ic s
. d in tr t e ev e...........
Tta d eto lig tio s
o l ir c b a n...

$9,87
34 1
33 8
9,21
1 9,4 7
,6 9 5

1.. Eecuiv d ectioie s n pels
x t e ir n
..........*
____
2 Am is aiv r v wa da pa _
d in tr t e e
3 Am is aiv s r ics
. d in tr t e ev e...........

14
.15
33
5
16 3
0,75

$9,60
35 9
43 7
6,20
1 3 ,0 0
,6 6 4

D e t o lig tio s a e th se fo wic th
ir c b a n r o
r h h is
a e cy g ts th mn y d c , e e b a p ­
g n e e o e ire tly ithr y p ro
p ia n c n a t a th r a n r imus mn
r tio , o tr c u o iz tio , e b r e e ts
fr mo ts eth G v rn e t, o o e ma s.
o u id e o e mn r th r e n
' O lig tio s s o ninth p r n o th s h d
b a n hw
is o tio f e c e ­
u a e fin n e b o e a p o r tio s a d ac­
le r a c d y th r p r p ia n n
c u ts a d th r fo e th a o n s o n hr a e
o n , n e e r e mu ts h w e e r
d p a d w inth d e t o lig tio s s c n o
u lic te ith e ir c b a n e tio f
t ft p y g a c u ts.
h a in c o n

Tta o lig tio s
o l b a n..
1 PERFORM ANCE

1.

Executive direction .— The

Attorney General, aided*
by the Deputy Attorney General and other immediate
assistants, directs and supervises the programs and
____ ____ ;-----------activities of the Department.
2. Administrative reviews and a p p e a l^ -J n addition to
reviews of requests for pardon, these include the work of
the Board of Immigration Appeals and of the Board of

E e u e d e tio , a m is a es r ic s a d
x c tiv ir c n d in tr tiv e v e , n
s ila c m o o e e d a tiv s a e mr ly
im r o mn v rh a c itie r e e
liste , e c p we th r is so e u uu l c c m
d x e t hn ee
m n s a ir u ­
s n eto b e p in d
ta c
e x la e .
H a in s in th n r a e s te e ts uu lly
ed g
e a r tiv ta mn s a
a re w th sc e u s o o lig tio s b a tiv
g e ith e h d le f b a n y c i­
tie .
s

OBLIGATIONS BY O B JE C TS

Pr a e t p s n a e th se o a fu e
e mn n o itio s r o f
ll-tim
n tue wic a e o in e ite d r tio . T e in
a r h h r f d fin ua n h y ­
c d p s n wic my b fille b p r o s
lu e o itio s h h a e d y e s n
w te p r r a p in e ts.
ith mo a y p o tmn

Ojetc sifict n
b c las aio
S m ary of Penonal S ices
um
erv

O L A IO S B O J C S
B IG T N Y B E T
T e e is s o n fo e c a c u t a s m a y o
hr
h w r a h c o n u mr f
p r o a s r ic sa dac s ific tio of th o lig ­
e s n l e v e n la s a n e b a
tio s a c r in to a u ifom lis o o je ts.
n c od g
n r
t f bc
T e e o je t c s e , n me e fr m0 to 16,
h s b c la s s u b r d o 1
r fle tth n tueo th th g o s r ic sp r h s d
e c e a r f e in s r e v e uc a e ,
r g r le s o th p r o e o th n tue o th
e ad s f e up s r e a r f e
po r mfo wic th y a e ue .
r ga r h h e r s d

Tta n me o pr a e tps io s
o l u br f emnn oit n....
Fll-time u a n oa ohrps io s
u e q ivle t f ll t e oit n.
Aeaen me o a e p ye........
vr g u br f ll mlo e s
Aeaes laie a dgae:
vr g a r s n r ds
Gnr lshdlegae:
e ea c e u r ds
Aeaes lay
vr g a r ......................
Aeaega e
vr g r d........... ...........
Ca s poet ea dc so ia gae:
r ft , r t civ, n ut d l r ds
Aeaes lay
vr g a r ......................
Aeaega e
vr g r d.......................
Uga e ps io s Aeaes lay
nr dd oit n: vr g a r __
I Pro a sr ic o ligt n:
es nl ev e b aio s
Pr a e tps io s
emnn oit n..................
Pr-t ea dte pr r ps io s
at im n moay oit n__
Rg la pyinecs o 5-we b s ...
eu r a xes f 2 ek a e
Py e ta oebs r t s
a mn bv aic ae............
Tta proa s r ic^b aio s
o l es nl ev e o ligt n...

A era e sa r s a d a e g g a e a e c m
v g la ie n v ra e r d s r o ­
p te a ith e a . T e a e g sa ry my
u d r mtic lly h v ra e la
a
fa e e w ino o tsid th sa r r n e of th
ll ithr ith r u e e la y a g
e
a e g ga e
v ra e r d .
E p y e t inp r e p sitio s a d th se o
mlo mn
a t-tim o n n o f
a se so a n tue o o s ot d r tio is in lu e
a n l a r r f hr ua n
c dd
hr .
ee
P y e ts fo th e tr d yo d y ine c ss o
a mn r e x a a r a s x e f
52 we s p r y a o e tim, n h o k d r n
e k e e r, v r e ig t-wr iffe e ­
tia h lid y p e a e in lu e h r .
l, o a ay, tc., r c d d e e

D
irect O lig tion
b a s

k0 Pro a s r ics
1 es nl ev e.....................
I 0 Ta e
2 r v l...............................
I 0 Ta s ot t no t ins
3 r npraio f h g.............
I 0 Cm uic tio s r ics
4 o mn a n e .............
1 0 Rrinindntilityrovveesn
0 e tsa u s r ic ............
5 n n
e
I 6 P t ga dr p dcio ...........
e ut
I 0 Ohrcnr cul s r ics
7 t e o t at a ev e...........
J0 Splie -admt r ls
8 up s n aeia ..............
I 0 Eu mn
9 q ip e t...........■
_
.............
' 1 Rfud, a ad, a dine n ie__
3 e ns wr s n dmit s
1 Txsa das smns
5 ae n ses e t ..............
Tta d eto ligt n..
o l irc b aio s
AN L SIS O E P N IT R S «
AY
F XED UE
T is sc e u s o s th r la nh b een
h h d le h w e e tio s ip etw ''
o lig tio s inur d d r g th y a a d th
b a n c r e uin e e r n e
a o n d b r e in th sa e p r d T e u ­
mu ts is us d
e m e io . h n
liq id te o lig tio s (i. e., o lig tio s wic
uad b a n
b a n hh
h v n t y t b e p id a th b g n ga d e d
a e o e e n a ) t e e in in n n
o th y a a e th p in ip l ite s inmk g th
f e er r e r c a m
a in e
b id e fr mo lig tio s to e p n itue .
r g o b a n
xe d rs
T e sc e u a d tr u s th y a e ­
h h d le lso is ib te e e r's x
p n itue b twe th s wic c m fr m u o i­
e d r s e e n o e h h o e o a th r
z tio s o th sa e y a hr ca d "c r e t
a n f e m e r, e e lle u r n
a th riz tio s" (we e o a p r a e t o n n
u o a n h th r f e mn n r o ­
p r a e t n tue a d th s wic c m fr m
e mn n a r ), n o e h h o e o
a th r a n o a pio y a
u o iz tio s f r r e r.
I th ca o mn g mn fu d q d n l
n e se f a a e e t n s d itio a
lin s a e s o n inth sc e u to s o th to l
e r hw
is h d le h w e ta
fu d p o id d b o e a n a d a p
n s r v e y p r tio s n p lied to
o e a n a d th n t e c o b d e r
p r tio s n e e ffe t n u g ta y
e p n itue .
xe d rs




O lig tio s r fe to o d r p ce , c n a ts
b a n er
r e s la d o tr c
a a e , a d s r ic s r c iv d d r g th y a
w rd d n e v e e e e uin e e r,
r g r le s o th tim o p y e t. A p p ­
e a d s f e e f a mn
p ro ria
tio s o o e o lig tio a a th r ms b po
n r th r b a n l u o ity ut e r ­
v e b th Cn r s b fo o lig tio s c n b
id d y e o g e s e re b a n a e
inur d
c re .

O lig tion P
b a s ayable O t ofR bu en
u eim rsem ts
F O er A nts
rom th ccou

Q lig tio s.w ich h v b e inur d b t n t
b a n h
a e e n c re u o
y t p id a e e a d a clo ly a p ssib ,
e a r stimte s se s o le
b t th e e tu l p y e t my b in a s h
u e v n a a mn a e
lig tly
d r n a o n fr mth o lig tio firt r p r d
iffe e t mu t o e b a n s e o te .
T is lin in ic te th d r n e a is g fr mth
h e d a s e iffe e c r in o is
cu .
a se

0 Proa s r ic s
1 es nl ev e..
Tta o lig tio s
o l b a n......
A NA LY SIS OF EX PEN D IT U RE S

15 at a 15 et ae 15 et ae
92 cul 93 simt 94 simt
Uliq idt do ligt n, sato ya_
n u ae b aio s t r f e r
Oligt n inurddr gt eya--b aio s c re uin h e r
Ajut e tinoligt n o pio y a s
d smn b aio s f r r e r ..
Dd c
e ut:
Rimus b o ligt n.............
e b ra le b aio s
Uliq idt do ligt n, e do y a.._
n u ae b aio s n f e r
Tta e pn itue..
o l xe d rs
Epnit r saed t ib t da f llo s
x e d ue r isr ue s o w:
Oto c re ta t oiz t n..........
u f urn uhr aio s
Oto pio a t oiz t n............
u f r r uhr aio s

$9,15
13 5
252 2
, 4,03
37
,01
2 3,29
,78 4
1893
0, 5
7,32
23
2 3,9 7
,2 8 1

$3,97
28 1
255 0
, 9,00

$5,00
25 0
2 5 ,O J
,60 O
O

2 3,9 7
,8 3 1
2 7,97
,48 1

2 0,0 0
,9 5 0
10,,7o'
0oa
22 0
6 0
2 4 ,3 0
,5 2 0

ooo
2 9,1 3 yfcTm
,1 4 5
16 2
9,26
28 1
3,97

2 8 ,3 0
,2 7 0
25 0
5,00

10,00
00
25 0
5,00

S c th to l o o lig tio s in lu e th r im
in e e ta f b a n c d s e e ­
b r a le ite s b t th e p n itue fig r s a e
us b
m, u e x e d r ue r
n c s a ily n t o r imus mn (pimr to
e es r
e f e b r e e ts r a ily
a o d p a a c u tin fo th G v r mn a
v id u lic te c o n g r e o e n e t s
a w o ), it is n c s a yto d d c r imus mn
h le
e es r
e u t e b r e e ts
inar in a e p n itue fig r s
r iv g t x e d r ue.
T is is a e a p we e s c e s e a n a
h
n x m le h r u c s iv n u l
a p p tio s a e m d . I a p o r tio s o
p ro ria n r a e f p r p ia n f
tw o mr y a s wr mr e u d r th la , a
o r oe e r ee e g d n e e w
sin le fig r wu a p a in th 1952 c lu n
g
ue o ld p e r
e
om
fo e p n itue o t o b th c r e t a d pio
r x e d r s u f o ur n n r r
a th r a n
u o iz tio s.

EXPLANATORY

IL L U S T R A T IO N

OF

The financial statements shown below are regu­
larly used for revolving funds. Such funds also have
narrative statements on program and performance.

BUDGETS

R E V O L V IN G

1 5 actual
92
FU D APPLIED
NS
To operations:
A
cquisition of assets......................
Expenses.__________________
Total funds applied to operations...
To financing: In
creaseinT
reasurycash...
Total funds applied................. .
FU D PRO ED
NS
VID
B operations:
y
Incom
e
.
.. ___
D
ecrease in selected w
orking capital
item .. ............................
s
Total fu provided by operations.
nds
B financing: A
y
ppropriation T funds provided................
otal

FUNDS

Budgetary authorizations for such funds and limitations
on expenses of the Government corporations follow the
general format illustrated on the opposite page.

A. Statement of sources and application of funds
[For fisca yearsendingJu e 3 , 1 5 ,1 5 , and 1 5 ]
l
n 0 92 93
94

/
STATEMENT OF TH SOURCES AND
E
APPLICATION OF FUNDS
T is a balanced presentation of the am
his
ounts
becoming available during the year, either in the
form of cash or other working capital, and the way
in which those am
ounts have been used.
The statem excludes depreciation, losses on
ent
loans, and other transactions which affect neither
cash nor other current assets and liabilities. It
does reflect transactions which affect cash, accounts
receivable, accounts payable, other accrued
liabilities, inventories of supplies for adm
inistrative
purposes, deferred charges and credits.
Both the funds applied and the funds provided
parts of the statem are divided between "operent
ations” and Treasury "financing." The sum of
the am
ounts applied to operations less the am
ounts
provided by operations equals the net expendi­
tures, which are included w
ithin the budget ex*
penditures for the Government as a whole.

FOR

1 5 estim
93
ate 1 5 estim
94
ate

$7 1
5 ,8 8
2 6 ,1 1
,0 5 9
2 ,0
,123 09
2 85 44
,6 ,4
4 ,4
,808 53

$0 0
2 ,0 0
2 ,5
,932 74
2 5 ,5 4
,9 2 7
52 2
7 ,4 6
355 0
, 2 ,0 0

*1 ,0 0
40
2,3 ,0
89 32
2 ,0
,403 32
76 6
0 ,4 8
3 09 00
,1 .5

3.1 3 7 4
2, 8
64 6
8 ,6 9
3 ,4
,808 53
1
,000,00
0
4 ,4
,808 53

3 5 5 CO
, 2, O

3 ,5
,109 00

3,525 00
,0

3 .5
,109 00

3 ,0
,525 00

3 ,5
,109 00

If the enterprise acquires m
aterials for m
anu­
facture or sale, purchases for manufacture or sale
are included in expenses, whether or not the
m
aterials are used w
ithin the year.

’ The change in selected working capital item
s
w equal the difference between the figures on
ill
statem C for two successive years for current
ent
assets (other than Treasury cash and inventories
for, sale and manufacture) less current liabilities.
The am
ounts shown on this line are equal to the
amount shown as payments to the fund on the
"Budgetary Authorization Schedule."

E C O BU ETARY EXPEN ITU
FFE T N DG
D RES
Funds applied to operations...............
F
unds provided by operations.............
N effect on budgetary expendi­
et
tures.................................
The above am n a ch
ou t? re arged or cred­
ited (— a follow
) s
s:
To budgetarv au
thorization.............
To n receipts of th en
et
e terprise.........

$ ,1 3 0
2 2 ,0 9
3,8 8 5
0 ,4 3

$ ,9 2 54
2 5, 7
3 2 , G0
,5 5 C

$2 0 ,0 2
,4 3 3
3,109,5 0
G

-1,685,444

-572,426

-706,468

1
,000.00
0
-2,685,444

-572,426

-706,463

Net effect on budgetary expenditures includes
the spending of appropriations for the revolving
fund as well as the spending of the fund's own re­
ceipts. A negative figure here indicates collec­
tions in excess of expenditures.

B. Statement of income and expense
[F fisca years ending Ju e30,1952,1953, and 1 5 ]
or l
n
94
STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSES
This is a statem of th income and expenses
ent
is
and the resulting profit or loss for the year. This
statem is norm
ent
ally on a full accrual basis, in­
cluding in the expenses sum for depreciation and
s
provision for losses on receivables. It also indi­
cates losses and charge-offs when they occur. In
addition, gains or losses from the safe of equip­
m or other assets appear here.
ent
At the bottom of this statem there is an anal­
ent
ysis of the retained earnings or cum
ulative deficit,
showing any additions to it during the year, any
charges made against it, and the balance at the
end of the year.

1 5 actu
9 2 al
Incom C
e: ontracting for w
orkers..........
E
xpenses:
T
ransportationof w
orkers...............
Food a d sh for w
n elter
orkers.............
M
iscellaneous.............................
D
epreciation..............................
Total expen
ses........................
N incom for the year.............
et
e
R
etainedearn gs begin of th year...
in
ning e
R
etainedearn gsendof th year..
in
e

1 5 estim
93
ate 1 5 estim
94
ate

$ ,1 3 8
3 2 ,7 4

$3 2 ,0 0
,5 5 0

$ ,1 9 5 0
3 0, 0

1 0 ,5 5
,0 8 1
94 6
8 .8 7
7 ,8 9
10
2 6 ,1 1
,0 5 9
1 ,4 5
45
2 ,6
,079 46
1 4 ,1 8
,0 4 3

1 2 ,0 0
,5 0 0
1 2 , 60
,3 6 9
8 .8 4
58
2 3 ,5 4
,9 2 7
1 ,4 5
95
2 ,0
,952 29
52 7
7 ,9 1
1 4 ,1 8
,0 4 3
1 1 ,1 9
,6 7 0

1 2 ,5 0
,2 8 0
1 9 ,8 0
,0 7 7
6 ,6 2
26
2 89 32
,3 ,0
2 ,9 5
25
2 11 87
,4 ,9
67 1
9 ,5 3
1 1 ,1 9
,6 7 0
2,3 4 2
1 ,6 2

1 4 ,1 8
,0 4 3

C. Statement of financial condition
[A of Ju e 30,1952, 1 5 , an 1 5 ]
s
n
93 d 94
1 5 actu
9 2 al

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
T is a balance sheet of assets, liabilities, and
his
investm of the Government at the close of the
ent
fiscal year. Like the other statem
ents, it is nor­
mally on an accrual basis.
When interest is paid on part or all of, the
investm of the United States Government, this
ent
section is broken down to indicate the amount
which has been invested by the Government on
which the fund pays interest, the amount invested
on which the fund does not pay interest, and the
retained earnings or deficit.

ASSE
TS
C
urrent assets: C w U S T
ash ith . . reasF assets:
ixed
L portionch
ess
argedoff a depreciation.
s
Total fixedassets.....................
Total assets...........................
LIA ILITIE
B
S
C
urrent liabilities: A
ccounts payable.....
INVESTM
ENT O U S. G
F .
OVERN
­
M
ENT
P cipal of fund: A
rin
ppropriation.........
R
etainedearnings...........................
T investm of U S, G
otal
ent
.
overnTotal liabilities and investm of
ent
U S. G
.
overnm
ent..............




If the enterprise conducts a sales operation, the
cost of goods sold, rather than purchases, is
considered an expense in this statem
ent.
— Depreciation and other expenses not shown on
.
statem A are indicated separately.
ent
"""• Retained earnings here agrees w the balance
ith
sheet. It represents cumulative profits kept in the
business, whether in the form of cash, inventories,
receivables, or fixed assets.

1 5 estim
93
ate 1 5 estim
94
ate

$ ,6 5 4
2 8 ,4 4

$3 5 ,8 0
,2 7 7

$3 6 ,3 8
,9 4 3

5 ,8 8
71
1 ,4 5
45
4 ,3 3
36
2 ,8
,728 07

7 ,8 8
71
33 1
,9 0
4 ,90
3 8
3,301 78
,7

91 1
,8 8
5 ,8 5
66
3 ,9 3
45
3,9 9 9
9 ,2 1

64 6
8 ,6 9

64 6
8 ,6 9

64 6
8 ,6 9

1
,000,000

1 4 ,1 8
,0 4 3

1
,000,000
1 17 09
,6 ,1

1
,000,000
2 1 ,0 2
,3 4 2

2,044 38
,1

2,617,109

3 ,6
,314 22

2 ,8
,728 07

3 ,7
,301 78

3.999 91
,2

Cash w United States Treasury is the su
ith
m
that the fund has on deposit w the Treasury.
ith
It excludes any balances of appropriations (or
other authorizations) which have not yet been
paid into the business enterprise or revolving fund.
- Liabilities normally m
eans what is owed for
oods and services which have been received,
he remainder of the obligations outstanding,
covering item on order which have not yet been
s
received, is shown as a footnote.

f

The investm of the United States Govern­
ent
m indicates the Government's interest as owner,
ent
plus the Government’s interest as creditor in the
form of notes payable to the Treasury where a
Government corporation has authorization to bor­
row on such notes.

Schedule A-l. Accrued expenditures by objects

SCHEDULE OF ACCRUED EXPENDITURES
BY OBJECTS
This is a schedule of accrued expenditures by
uniform object class. Som es the details are
etim
on an obligation basis, w an adjustm for
ith
ent
the change in item O order, ending w tht
s n
ith
total accrued expenditures.

> Income (as well as expenses) is usually based
on the accrual method of accounting.

O
bject classification
0
3
0
5
0
7
08

Transportation of things...............
R an utility services.............
ents d
O contractual services.............
ther
S pplies andm
u
aterials.................
Total accruedexpenditures.........

1 5 actu
9 2 al
$1,0 8 1
0 ,5 5
1 ,2 4
64
19 9
0 ,0 5
85 7
7 ,7 2
5 ,5 5
56
5 ,8 8
71
2,123,009

1 5 estim
93
ate 1 5 estim
94
ate
$1 0,000
,52
1 ,5 0
90
5 ,6 0
89
1
,2o8,0 0
0
6 ,3 4
68
20,000

2 ,5
,952 74

$1,22
8,500
1 .0 0
40
2,20
9 5
1,068 20
,6
48 6
,6 2
1 .0 0
40
2,403 32
,0

The total of this schedule equals the am
ounts
shown in Statem A as applied to operations
ent
(other than the am
ounts of increases in working
capital, if any). Where there are annual con­
gressional lim
itations on certain expenses, this
schedule is usually lim
ited to the expenses which
are under lim
itation.

5




LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
SUM M ARY OF N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations
A p p r o p r ia tio n s ._____ _____________________ _
R e a p p r o p ria tio n s___
D educt portion of appropriations for liquida­
tion of prior contract authorization________
T otal new obligational authority (for
detail see following table)
______

6

$78, 210, 885

$77, 763, 301
99, 000

3, 000, 000

3, 000, 000

75, 210, 885

74, 862, 301

$87, 189, 556

,

2,5 0 0 ,0 0 0

84, 689, 556




L E G IS L A T IV E B R A N C H
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1952,1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

FROM
AUTHORIZATIONS
ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOCU­
MENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations.
_
___ _
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior con­
tract authorizations

>

2, 500, 000

62, 029, 383

66, 615, 512

7, 198, 472

$61, 731, 725

$64, 115, 512

808, 210
Total expenditures from new authori­
zations_____
_ _ _ ___

$61, 221, 173

3, 035, 331

69, 227, 855

69, 650, 843

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure authori­
zations_____
___
-Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following ta b le )_____ __ _

61, 731, 725

7

8

TH E BUDG ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1954
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
B Y O R G A N IZ A T IO N U N IT A N D A C C O U N T T IT L E

[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Func­
tional
code
No.

Organization unit and account title

E X P E N D IT U R E S

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1952
enacted

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

1952
actual

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

E N A C TE D O R R E C O M M E N D E D IN THIS
DOCUM ENT
Current authorizations
Senate:
Salaries of Senators________________________________________
Mileage of President of the Senate and of Senators_________
Expense allowance of the Vice President__________________
Expense allowance of Senators_____________________________
Salaries, officers and employees____________________________
Contingent expenses of the Senate:
Salaries and contingent expenses, legislative reorganization
Salaries and contingent expenses, Senate policy committees
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on the
Economic R eport_____________________________________
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Atom ic Energy_______________________________________
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Printing______________________________________________
Contingent expenses, Joint Committee on Inaugural Ex­
pense_________________________________________________
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, for
the Vice President___________________________________
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, for the
President pro tempore________________________________
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance,
majority and minority leaders_________ ______________
Contingent expenses, reporting debates and proceedings. Contingent expenses, cleaning furniture_________________
Contingent expenses, furniture and repairs______________
Contingent expenses, expenses of inquiries and investiga­
tions__________________________________________________
Contingent expenses, folding documents_________________
Contingent expenses, materials for folding_______________
Contingent expenses, fuel for heating apparatus_________
Contingent expenses, kitchen and restaurants___ _______
Contingent expenses, mail transportation_______________
Contingent expenses, miscellaneous item s_______________
Contingent expenses, packing boxes_____________________
Contingent expenses, postage____________________________
Contingent expenses, air-mail and special-delivery stamps
Contingent expenses, stationery_________________________
Contingent expenses, communications__________________
Compiling and preparing a revised edition of the Bio­
graphical Directory of the American Congress_________
Contingent expenses, Committee on Interstate and
Foreign Commerce______________ ____ _______________
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on Fed­
eral Expenditures_________________________________
Payment to widow of Hon. Kenneth S. W herry_____
Payment to son and daughters of Hon. Arthur H . Vandenberg-----------------------------------------------------------------------Total, Senate..

601
601
601
601
601

$1, 200,000
51,000

$1 , 200,000
51,000

$1, 200,000
51,000

$1,199,653
46,005

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

240,000
9,110,216

240,000
9,123,591

240,000
9,123,636

239,931
8,220,277

601
601

100,000

100,000

100,000

129,340

129,340

129,340

76,068
80,628

601

133,275

133,275

133,275

121,114

601

188,060

188,060

188,060

180,316

601

46,125

46,125

47,335

40, 738

601

156,000

601

5,835

5,835

5,835

5,466

601

5,835

5,835

5,835

517

601
601
601
601

11,670
135,785
3,190
18,000

11,670
135, 785
3,190
18,000

11,670
135, 785
3,190
18,000

12,925
135,785
2,887
25, 571

1,224,120
31,765
1,500

1,224,120
31,765
1,500

1,288,385
28,136
1,168
1,199
47,803
8,773
757,119
4,255
825
12,815
79,834

601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601

1,374,120
41,765
1,500
2, 0 0
0
67,500
9, 560
i 801,955
3,000
825
12,815
87, 600

2,000

2,000

65,000
9, 560
801,955
3,000
825
12,815
116,700
14, 550

65,000
9,560
801,955
3,000
825
12,815
87,600
14, 550

601

20, 0 0
0

1 Excludes $350 appropriated in 1952 for prior fiscal years.
2 Excludes $50,000 appropriated in 1952 for prior fiscal years.




12,527,562

19,062
12,500

12, 500

12,500
13,823,471

13,841,496

13,657,661

12,680,226

601
601
601
601

5,492.500
1, 273, 500
4, 286,094
9,344,150

5,492,500
1,273,500
4, 626,953
9,678,565

5,492,500
1,273,500
4, 863,320
9, 828,565

5,461,458
1,262, 414
4,086,968
9,217,944

601
601

183, 850
800,000

180,000
501,500

220, 500
895,000

167, 909
645,314

601

100,000

100,000

150,000

112,398

601

2 1,275,000

800,000

1,250,000

1,212,025

House o f Representatives:

Salaries of Members and Delegates__________________
Mileage and expenses of Members and Delegates____
Salaries, officers and employees______________________
Clerk hire, Members and Delegates_________________
Contingent expenses of the House:
Contingent expenses, furniture, repairs and packing boxes..
Contingent expenses, miscellaneous items_________
Contingent expenses, stenographic reports of committee
hearings_________ _______________________________
.
Contingent expenses, expenses of special and select com ­
mittees___ ________ _____________________________

12,696,804

7, 271

601

- - ■
—

$12, 527,562

700

601
601
601

$12,696,804

1

9

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
B Y O R G A N IZ A T IO N U N IT A N D A C C O U N T TIT LE — Continued

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

E X P E N D IT U R E S
(from prior year and new authorizations)

N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1952
enacted

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

1953
estimate

1952
actual

1954
estimate

E N A C T E D O R R E C O M M E N D E D IN TH IS
D O C U M E N T — Continued
Current authorizations— Continued
H ouse o f Representatives—Continued
Contingent expenses of the House—Continued
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Internal Revenue Taxation_____ _____ _____________ ..
Salaries and contingent expenses, OflQce of Coordinator of
Information______________________________ _________ _
Contingent expenses, telegraph and telephone service... .
Contingent expenses, stationery, revolving fund_____
Contingent expenses, attending physician_______________
Contingent expenses, postage stamps___________________
Contingent expenses, folding d ocu m en ts-_______ __
...
Contingent expenses, revision of l a w s -_______ _________
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, for
the Speaker________ ________ ___ . . . ______ _
Contingent expenses, preparation of new edition of the
United States Code . . ____________ ___________ . . .
Payment for contesting seats.______ __ ___________________
Payments to families of deceased Members of the House of
Representatives___ __________ . . . ___ _ _____ __ __ .

601

$187,475

$190,000

$192,000

$180,916

601
601
601
601
601
601

75,750
750.000
482,600
8,985
58,000

601

74,630
1,077,000
483,800
8,985
35,600
90, 250
13, 400

13, 700

77,930
800,000
350,400
8, 985
57, 975
110, 000
.13, 700

71,181
433,237
342, 768
8, 727
35,600
70,436
17,236

601

6, 660

6, 660

11, 000

6,445

601
601

16, 624

40,891
12,622

601

100,000

87, 500

110.000

100,000

24,448,713

25, 595,375

17,900
17,900
Capitol Police B o a rd . 18,440
16, 310

17, 900
19,110

112,600
119.000
125.000
Salaries and expenses,114.000 of Representatives
House
114.000
108,465

24, 316,846

296,843

289,435

296,843

289, 435

11, 772
15, 756

601
601

$24,316,846

23, 226,277

23,473, 989

601
601

$23,226,277

Total, House of Representatives_______________________

24, 849, 518

Legislative miscellaneous:

Capitol Police:
Uniforms and equipment_____ ______ ______________ ____
........... ............ ..................................... .
Office of Legislative Counsel:
Salaries and expenses, Senate___ ________________________
.................
Joint Committee on Reduction of Nonessential Federal
Expenditures______________ ____ _______ _______________
Education of Senate, House, and Supreme Court pages........
Statement of appropriations. ____________________________

601
601
601

101,392
102,619

20,000
32, 790
4, 000

33,220
4, 000

38,400
4,000

24, 624
4,000

292,065

Total, legislative miscellaneous............................................

>

326, 560

318,410

260,181

142,400
780, 332

143, 200
695,800
29,000

144, 000
679, 400

Architect o f the Capitol:

Salaries_____________________________ __________ __________
._ __ _ ______ _________
Capitol Buildings_____ __
Reappropriation_________________________ _____ __
Preliminary plans and estimates, extension and comple­
tion of east central front of Capitol Building_____________
Reconstruction, repair, alteration, and improvement of
terraces, Capitol Building________________________________
Capitol grounds____________ _________ ___________________
Legislative garage_____________________________ ____________
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Build­
ings _____ __ ____________
_ _______________ _
Senate Office Building_______________ ____________________
House Office Buildings___ . . . _ ___________ __ __________
Reappropriation______ __ __ _
Capitol power plant_____________________ . . .
Changes and improvements, Capitol power plant__________
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract au­
thorization___ __
Library buildings and grounds:
Structural and mechanical c a r e _________________________
Furniture and furnishings_________ ________________ ___
House restaurants _
Capitol Building and repairs »
Completion of Rotunda Frieze, Capitol Building
Replacement of equipment, Senate restaurants
Senate restaurants, Senate Office Building

601
601
601

601
601
601
601
601
601




238, 700
34, 200
2,600
788,972
1,039, 564

240, 000
34,800

143, 500

788,624

689,400
25, 000

10,100

837, 000
1,003, 600
49, 200

229,006
31,922

238, 707
34,645

600, 0 0
0
946, 600
47, 200

3, 500
777,800

2, 776
736,419

9,680
764, 763

3, 850
777, 800

1, 303,000
3,000,000

768,975
1,010,050
70.000
1,359,000
3,000,000

1, 330, 600
2, 500,000

601

•(3,000,000)

(3,000,000)

(2, 500,000)

303
303
601
601
601
601
601

336, 700
50,000

1, 012,100

713, 900
J
130,000

956,121

1,077,932

1,017,100

1,177,346
1,114, 792

1,347,188
7, 432, 639

1, 330, 600
4.691, 790

372,926

431, 784

160, 327

335,000
50.000
23,000

j

23, GX)
46, 279
18, 579

20, 0
00
3, 542
46, 845

18, 500

|
j

678,900

122,000

40

7, 754,968

Total, Architect of the Capitol___________________ _____
Botanic Garden: Salaries and expenses................ .......... ............

141,872

624,354

25, 000

601
601
601
601

131, 976
J

303

7,768,925

9, 206,100

5, 588,352

12,355, 732

11,073, 740

214, 200

218, 500

221,000

196,108

216,817

220,000

10

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
BUDGET

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

AND

E X P E N D I T U R E S — C o n tin u e d

BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—
Continued
N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
N o.

E X P E N D IT U R E S

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1952
enacted

1954
estimate

1953
estimate

1952
actual

1954
estimate

1953
estimate

E N A C T E D O R R E C O M M E N D E D IN TH IS
D O C U M E N T —Continued
Current authorizations—Continued
Library o f Congress:
Salaries and expenses_________________ ___________. . . _____ _
Salaries and expenses, Copyright Office............... ........ ............
Salaries and expenses, Legislative Reference Service.............
Salaries and expenses, distribution of catalog cards............ .
General increase of the Library of Congress________________
Increase of the Law Library_______________________________
Books for the Supreme Court___________________ __________
Books for the b l i n d . ____ ________________________________
Salaries, Library proper_____ _____________________________
Salaries, Copyright O ffice.________________________________
Revision of Annotated Constitution_______________________
Salaries and expenses, union catalogs______________________
General printing and binding______________________________
Printing the catalog of title entries of Copyright Office____
Printing catalog cards______ _____ _______________________ _
Miscellaneous expenses__________ ________________________
Salaries and expenses, Library buildings___________________
Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress Trust Fund
Board........... ..................... ......................................................... .

303
503
601
303
303
303
602
302
303
503
303
303
303
503
303
303
303
303

80, 660
450,000
39, 500
550,500
80,000
786, 485

$891,159
648,607
270.000
85.500
22.500
1, 000,000
3,470,000
1,008,409
3,000
85,492
450.000
44.500
586, 500
80,000
794, 820

500

$5,114,100
1,121,860
970,200
1,264,800
335,000
94.000
25.000
1,125,000

500

$866,300
622,250
270,000
85,500
22, 500
1, 000,000
3,417,838
987, 510

$849, 537
612,504
384, 655
116, 611
22,541
1,099,017
3,354,981
971,129
125
81,964
424,684
36, 663
553, 214
84,437
773,363

$862,672
641,170
276,168
112,989
22, 757
1,167,036
3,462,025
1,002,881
3,001
85,041
462,230
42,962
586,062
79,188
792,921

$4,639,100
1,021,860
940,200
1,164,800
335.000
94.000
24.000
1,125,000
250.000
75.000

10,000
100,000
22,250
135, 000

8,000
60,000

500

9, 259,543

9,440, 987

10,049,960

9,365,425

9, 599, 603

10,004,210

605

19,200,000

19,000,000

25,100,000

7,228, 629

8,001,428

8,206,000

605

2,817,120

2,817,120

3,041,050

2,938,815

2,834,351

3,013,050

22,017,120

21,817,120

:8,141,050

10,167,444

10,835, 779

11,219,050

78,210,885

77,862,301

87,189,556

61, 731, 725

9,227,855

3,000,000

3,000,000

2,500,000

75,210,885

74, 862,301

84,689,556

Total, Library of Congress..
Government Printing Office:

W orking capital and congressional printing and binding----Salaries and expenses, Office o f Superintendent of D ocuments___-------- ------------- ------- --------------------------------- ---------Total, Government Printing Office..
Total current authorizations, enacted or recommended
in this docum ent and total budget expenditures-------Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior con­
tract authorizations________ ______ __________________ _
Total new obligational authority.




69,650,!

11

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
C U R R E N T

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

SENATE

A D M IN IS T R A T IV E

S a l a r ie s a n d E x p e n s e A l l o w a n c e o f S e n a t o r s , M il e a g e o f
t h e P r e s id e n t o f t h e S e n a t e a n d o f S e n a t o r s , a n d E x p e n s e
A l l o w a n c e o f t h e V ic e P r e s id e n t

Salaries of Senators—
F or compensation o f Senators,
Appropriation A ct, 1958.)

$1,200,000.

(Legislative Branch

Appropriated 1953, $51,000

Estimate 1954, $51,000

Expense Allowance of the Vice President—
For expense allowance o f the Vice President, $10,000.
tive Branch Appropriation A ct} 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $10,000

(.Legisla­

Estimate 1954, $10,000

Expense Allowance of Senators—
For expense allowance of Senators, $240,000.
Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $240,000

(Legislative Branch

and

E

m ployees

Salaries, Officers and Employees, Senate—
For compensation o f officers, employees, clerks to Senators, and
others, as authorized by law, as follows:
th e

v ic e

p r e s id e n t

For compensation o f the Vice President of the United States,
$30,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Aot, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $30,000

Estimate 1954, $30,000

For clerical assistance to the Vice President, at rates of com pen­
sation to be fixed b y him in multiples of $5 per month, $55,410.
(.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $55,410

Estimate 1954, $55,410
CHAPLAIN

Chaplain o f the Senate, $2,946.
tion A ct, 1953.)

(.Legislative Branch Appropria­

Appropriated 1953, $2,946

Estim ate 1954, $2,946
OF

THE

SECRETARY

For office of the Secretary, $420,870 [ , including one cameraman,
Joint Recording Facility, at the basic rate of $3,600 per annum, as
authorized by Public Law 375, Eighty-second C on gress]. (Legisla­
tive Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
A ppropriated 1953, $420,870
C O M M IT T E E

Estimate 1954, $420,870
EM PLOYEES

For professional and clerical assistance to standing committees
and the Select Com mittee on Small Business, $1,687,045. (Legisla’
tive Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,687,045

OF

SERGEANT

Estimate 1954, $1,687,045

Estimate 1954, $33,310

For clerical assistance to the Conference of the M inority, at rates
of compensation to be fixed by the chairman o f said committee,
$33,310. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)




AT

ARMS

AND

DOORKEEPER

Estimate 1954, $1,245,795

O F F IC E S O F T H E S E C R E T A R I E S F O R T H E M A J O R IT Y A N D T H E M I N O R I T Y

For the offices of the secretary for the m ajority and the secretary
for the minority, $62,165. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $62,165

Estimate 1954, $62,165

Total, salaries, officers and employees:
Appropriated 1953, $9,123,591

Estimate 1954, $9,123,636

o n t in g e n t

E

xpenses

of

the

Sen ate

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Legislative Reorgani­
zation—
Legislative reorganization: For salaries and expenses, legislative
reorganization, including the objects specified in Public Law 663,
Seventy-ninth Congress, $100,000. (Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $100,000

Estimate 1954, $100,000

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate Policy Committees—
Senate policy committees: For salaries and expenses o f the
M ajority Policy Com mittee and the M inority Policy Com mittee,
$64,670 for each such com m ittee; in all, $129,340. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $129,340

Estimate 1954, $129,340

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on the
Economic Report—
Joint Committee on the Econom ic R eport: For salaries and ex­
penses of the Joint Com mittee on the E conom ic Report, $133,275,
including compensation for stenographic assistance at such rates
and in accordance with such regulations as may be prescribed by
the Com mittee on Rules and Administration notwithstanding the
provisions of Public Law 304, Seventy-ninth Congress. (Legisla­
tive Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $133,275

Estimate 1954, $133,275

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Atomic Energy—
Joint Com mittee on .Atom ic Energy: For salaries and expenses of
the Joint Com mittee on Atom ic Energy, including the objects speci­
fied in Public Law 20, Eightieth Congress, $188,060, and including
compensation for stenographic assistance at such rates and in ac­
cordance with such regulations as may be prescribed by the C om ­
mittee on Rules and Adm inistration notwithstanding the provisions
of Public Law 585, Seventy-ninth Congress. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Estimate 1954, $188,060

C O M M IT T E E S

For clerical assistance to the Conference o f the M ajority, at rates
o f compensation to be fixed by the chairman o f said com m ittee,
$33,310. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $33,310

Estimate 1954, $5,552,785

Appropriated 1953, $1,245,750

Appropriated 1953, $188,060
CONFERENCE

Appropriated 1953, $33,310

SENATORS

For office of Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper, [$1 ,2 45 ,7 50 ]
$1,245,795. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

C

O F F IC E

TO

Estimate 1954, $240,000

S a l a r ie s , O f f ic e r s

of

A S S IS T A N T S

Estimate 1954, $1,200,000

Mileage of President of the Senate and of Senators—
For mileage of the President o f the Senate and o f Senators,
$51,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

o f f ic e

C L E R IC A L

Appropriated 1953, $5,552,785
O F F IC E

Appropriated 1953, $1,200,000

AND

For administrative and clerical assistants and messenger service
for Senators, $5,552,785[, including additional clerical assistants for
each Senator from the State of Minnesota, as authorized b y Public
Law 282, Eighty-second C on gress]. (Legislative Branch A ppropria­
tion Act, 1953.)

Estimate 1954, $33,310

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Printing—
Joint Com m ittee on Printing: For salaries for the Joint Com mittee
on Printing at rates to be fixed by the committee, [$ 3 8 ,1 2 5 ] $89,335;
for expenses of compiling, preparing, and indexing the Congressional
D irectory, $1,600; for compiling, preparing, and indexing material
for the biographical directory, $1,900, said sum, or any part thereof,
in the discretion of the chairman or vice chairman of the Joint Com ­
mittee on Printing, may be paid as additional compensation to any
em ployee of the United States; and for travel and subsistence
expenses at rates provided by law for Senate committees, $4,500;

12

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

SENATE— Continued
C o n t in g e n t

E xpenses

o f

th e

S e n a te —

Continued

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Printing— Continued
in all, [$ 4 6 ,1 2 5 ] $47,335. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $46,125

Estimate 1954, $47,335

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on Inaugural Ex­
penses—
[J o in t Com mittee on Inaugural Ceremonies of 1953: To enable
the Secretary of the Senate to pay the necessary expenses of the
inaugural ceremonies of the President of the United States, January
20, 1953, in accordance with such program as may be adopted by
the joint committee of the Senate and House o f Representatives,
appointed under a concurrent resolution of the tw o Houses, includ­
ing the pay for extra police, $156,000.] (Supplemental Appropria­
tion Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $156,000
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Automobile and Maintenance, for
the Vice President—
Vice President’s autom obile: For purchase, exchange, driving,
maintenance, and operation of an autom obile for the Vice President,
$5,835. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $5,835

Estimate 1954, $5,835

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Automobile and Maintenance, for
the President Pro Tempore—
Autom obile for the President pro tem pore: For purchase, ex­
change, driving, maintenance, and operation of an autom obile for
the President pro tem pore of the Senate, $5,835. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $5,835

Estimate 1954, $5,835

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Automobiles and Maintenance,
Majority and Minority Leaders—
Autom obiles for m ajority and minority leaders: For purchase,
exchange, driving, maintenance, and operation of tw o automobiles,
one for the m ajority leader of the Senate, and one for the m inority
leader of the Senate, $11,670. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $11,670

Estim ate 1954, $11,670

at rates in excess of $9 per day except that higher rates may be
established by the Com m ittee on Rules and Adm inistration in the
case of travel beyond the limits of the continental United States.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, « $1,224,120

Estim ate 1954, $1,224,120

° Includes $250,000 appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriation A ct, 1953.

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Folding Documents—
Folding docum ents: For folding speeches and pamphlets at a
gross rate not exceeding $2 per thousand, $31,765. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $31,765

Estimate 1954, $31,765

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Materials for Folding—
Materials for folding: For materials for folding, $1,500.
lative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,500

(Legis­

Estimate 1954, $1,500

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Fuel for Heating Apparatus—
Fuel, and so forth: For fuel, oil, cotton waste, and advertising,
exclusive of labor, $2,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $2,000

Estimate 1954, $2,000

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Kitchen and Restaurants—
Senate restaurants: For repairs, im provements, equipm ent, and
supplies for Senate kitchens and restaurants, Capitol Building and
Senate Office Building, including personal and other services, to be
expended under the supervision of the Com m ittee on Rules and
Administration, United State Senate, $65,000. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $65,000

Estimate 1954, $65,000

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Mail Transportation—
M otor vehicles: For maintaining, exchanging, and equipping
m otor vehicles for carrying the mails and for official use of the
offices of the Secretary and Sergeant at Arms, $9,560. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
A ppropriated 1953, $9,560

Estim ate 1954, $9,560

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Miscellaneous Items—
Miscellaneous items: For miscellaneous items, exclusive of labor,
$801,955. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $801,955

Estimate 1954, $801,955

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Reporting Debates and Proceed­
ings—
R eporting Senate proceedings: For reporting the debates and
proceedings of the Senate, payable in equal m onthly installments,
$135,785. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Packing Boxes—
Packing boxes: For packing boxes, $3,000. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $135,785

Appropriated 1953, $3,000

Estimate 1954, $135,785

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Cleaning Furniture—
Furniture: For services in cleaning, repairing, and varnishing
furniture, $3,190. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $3,190

Estimate 1954, $3,190

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Furniture an<^ Repairs—
Furniture: For materials for furniture and repairs of same, and
for the purchase of furniture, $18,000. (Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $18,000

Estimate 1954, $18,000

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Expenses of Inquiries and Investi­
gations—
Inquiries and investigations: F or expenses of inquiries and in­
vestigations ordered by the Senate or conducted pursuant to section
134 (a) of Public Law 601, Seventy-ninth Congress, including com ­
pensation for stenographic assistance of committees at such rates
and in accordance with such regulations as may be prescribed by the
Com mittee on Rules and Adm inistration notwithstanding the pro­
visions of section 134 (a) of Public Law 601, Seventy-ninth Congress;
and including [$ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 ] $ 400,000 for the Com mittee on A ppro­
priations, to be available also for the purposes mentioned in Senate
Resolution Numbered 193, agreed to O ctober 14, 1943, and Public
Law 20, Eightieth Congress, [$ 9 7 4 ,1 2 0 ] $1,224,120: Provided, That
no part of this appropriation shall be expended for per diem and
subsistence expenses (as defined in the Travel Expense A ct of 1949)




Estim ate 1954, $3,00f>

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Postage—
Postage stamps: For office of Secretary, $500; office o f Sergeant
at Arms, $225; offices of the secretaries for the m ajority and the
m inority, $100; in all, $825. (Legislative Branch A ppropriation Act,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $825

Estim ate 1954, $825

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Air-Mail and Special-Delivery
Stamps—
Air-mail and special-delivery stamps: For air-mail and specialdelivery stamps for Senators and the President of the Senate, as
authorized by law, $12,815. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1953.)
A ppropriated 1953, $12,815

Estim ate 1954, $12,815

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Stationery—
Stationery: For stationery for Senators and for the President of
the Senate, including $10,000 for stationery for committees and
officers of the Senate, $87,600.
[Stationery: For an additional allowance for stationery of $300
for each Senator and the President of the Senate for the second
session of the Eighty-second Congress, $29,100, to remain available
for obligation until January 2, 19 53 .] (Supplemental Appropriation
Act, 1953f Legistative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $116,700

Estimate 1954, $87,600

13

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Communications—
Com m unications: For an am ount for communications which may
be expended interchangeably for paym ent, in accordance with such
limitations and restrictions as may be prescribed by the Committee
on Rules and Administration, of charges on official telegrams and
long distance telephone calls made by or on behalf of Senators or
the President of the Senate, such telephone calls to be in addition
to those authorized by the provisions of the Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1947 (60 Stat. 392; 2 U. S. C. 46c, 46d, 46e),
the First Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1949 (63 Stat. 77; 2 U. S. C.
4 6 d -l), and Second Supplemental Appropriation A ct, 1952, Public
Law 254, Eighty-second Congress, $14,550. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $14,550

Estimate 1954, $14,550

[T h e amendment made by this paragraph shall be applicable with
respect to taxable years beginning after Decem ber 31, 1951.]
(Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
S a l a r ie s , O f f ic e r s

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Sa l a r ie s , M

il e a g e

,

and

E

xpenses

of

M

O F F IC E

Appropriated 1953, $5,492,500

Estimate 1954, $5,492,500

Mileage and Expenses of Members and Delegates, House of
Representatives—
For mileage and expense allowance of M embers of the House of
Representatives, Delegates from Territories, and the Resident C om ­
missioner from Puerto R ico, as authorized by law, $1,273,5 0 0 [: Pro­
vided, That for the tw o taxable years beginning after Decem ber 31,
1952, the place of residence of a M em ber of Congress (including any
Delegate and Resident Commissioner) within the State, congres­
sional district, Territory, or possession which he represents in
Congress shall be considered to be his home for the purposes of
section 23 (a) (1) (A) of the Internal Revenue Code, but amounts
expended by such M em ber within each such taxable year for living
expenses shall not be deductible for incom e tax purposes in excess
of $3 ,000 ]. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,273,500
[A

m endm ent

to

I nternal

Estimate 1954, $1,273,500
R

evenue

C

ode]

[S ection 23 (k) of the Internal Revenue Code (relating to deduc­
tions for bad debts) is amended by adding at the end thereof a new
paragraph as follo w s :]
[ “ (6) E x c e p t i o n . — This subsection shall not apply in the
case of a taxpayer, other than a bank, as defined in section 104,
with respect to debts owed by (A) any political party, (B) any
national, State, or local com m ittee of any political party, or
(C) any committee, association, or organization which accepts
contributions or makes expenditures for the purpose of in­
fluencing or attem pting to influence the election of Presidential
or Vice Presidential electors or of any individual whose name is
presented for election to any Federal, State, or local elective
public office, whether or not such individual is elected. For the
purpose of this paragraph, the terms ‘ contributions7 and ‘ex­
penditure’ shall have the meanings prescribed for such terms
in section 591 of title 18 of the United States C ode.” ]




OF

THE

m ployees

SPEAK ER

For Office of the Speaker, $47,285.
priation Act, 1953.)

(Legislative Branch A ppro­

Appropriated 1953, $47,285

Estimate 1954, $47,285
sp e a k e r

’s

TABLE

For the Speaker’s table, including $2,000 for preparing Digest of
the Rules, $43,885. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $43,885
O F F IC E

Estimate 1954, $43,885
OF

THE

C H A P L A IN

For the Office of the Chaplain, [$ 7 ,2 4 5 ] $2,950.
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $7,245

(Legislative

Estimate .1954, $2,950

O F F IC E

OF

THE

CLERK

For the Office of the Clerk, [$660,813: Provided, That in connec­
tion with the operation of the Joint Senate and House Recording
Facility an additional position of laboratory technician, to be com ­
pensated at the basic rate of $3,300 per annum, is hereby author­
iz e d ] $672,765; including the employment of an Assistant Property
Custodian at the basic rate of $2,800 per annum as authorized by
House Resolution 725 agreed to July 2, 1952; and $745 additional for
longevity increased pay, telephone operators. (Legislative Branch Ap~
propriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $660,813

Estimate 1954, $672,765

C O M M IT T E E

em bers

Salaries of Members and Delegates, House of Representatives—
For compensation of Members of the House of Representatives,
Delegates from Territories, and the Resident Commissioner from
Puerto R ico, $5,492,500. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
19 53 )

E

Salaries, Officers and Employees, House of Representatives—
For compensation of officers and em ployees, as authorized by law,
as follows:

THE

The Sergeant at Arms is authorized and directed to secure suitable
office space in post office or other Federal buildings in the State of
each Senator for the use of such Senator and in the city to be desig­
nated by him: Provided, That in the event suitable space is not avail­
able in such buildings and a Senator leases or rents office space else­
where, the Sergeant at Arms is authorized to approve for paym ent,
from the contingent fund of the Senate, vouchers covering bona fide
statements of rentals due in an am ount not exceeding $900 per an­
num for each Senator.
The Secretary of the Senate and the Sergeant at Arms are author­
ized and directed to protect the funds of their respective offices by
purchasing insurance in an am ount necessary to protect said funds
against loss. Premiums on such insurance shall be paid out of the
contingent fund of the Senate, upon vouchers approved by the chair­
man of the Com mittee on Rules and Adm inistration.
Salaries or wages paid out of the foregoing items under “ Contin­
gent expenses of the Senate” shall be com puted at basic rates, plus
increased and additional com pensation, as authorized and provided
by law. (.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

and

EM PLOYEES

For com m ittee employees, including a sum of not to exceed
$302,215 for the Com mittee on Appropriations, [$ 1 ,7 60 ,0 00 ]
$1,966,720. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,760,000
O F F IC E

OF

TH E

Estimate 1954, $1,966,720
SERGEANT

AT

ARMS

For Office of the Sergeant at Arms, $384,045.
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $384,045
O F F IC E

OF

(Legislative Branch

Estim ate 1954, $384,045
THE

DOORKEEPER

For Office of the Doorkeeper, [$651,970] $650,665.
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $651,970
S P E C IA L

AND

Estimate 1954, $650,665
M IN O R IT Y

For six minority employees, $54,685.
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953^ $54,685

(Legislative

EM PLOYEES

(Legislative Branch A ppro­
Estimate 1954, $54,685

For office of the m ajority floor leader, including $2,000 for official
expenses of the m ajority leader, $46,755.
(Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $46,755

Estimate 1954, $46,755

For office of the m inority floor leader, $35,380.
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $35,380

(Legislative

Estim ate 1954, $35,380

For tw o messengers, one in the m ajority caucus room and one in
the minority caucus room, to be appointed by the m ajority and
minority whips, respectively, $6,655. (Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $6,655

Estimate 1954, $6,655

For two printing clerks, one for the m ajority caucus room and
one for the minority caucus room, to be appointed by the m ajority

14

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES— Continued
Salaries , Officers

and

E mployees— Continued

Salaries, Officers and Employees, House of Representatives— Con.
special and minority employees — continued

and minority leaders, respectively, $7,485.
Appropriation A ct, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $7,485

(Legislative Branch

Estimate 1954, $7,485

For tw o clerks, one for the m ajority whip and one for the minority
whip, to be appointed by said whips, respectively, $10,670. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $10,670

Estimate 1954, $10,670

For a technical assistant in the office of the attending physician,
to be appointed by the attending physician, subject to the approval
of the Speaker, $6,295. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $6,295

Estimate 1954, $6,295

o f f ic e

of

the

For Office of the Postmaster,
Appropriation Act, 1953.)

postm aster

$177,230.

Appropriated 1953, $177,230
o f f ic ia l

(.Legislative Branch

Estimate 1954, $177,230

reporters

of

debates

For official reporters of debates, $124,435.
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $124,435

(Legislative Branch

Estimate 1954, $124,435

for the purchase of packing boxes, [$ 1 8 0 ,0 0 0 ] $220,500.
tive Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $180,000

reporters

to

Appropriated 1953, $501,500

Estimate 1954, $125,415

a p p r o p r ia t io n s

c o m m it t e e

For salaries and expenses, studies and examinations of executive
agencies, by the Com m ittee on Appropriations, and tem porary per­
sonal services for such com m ittee, to be expended in accordance
with section 202 (b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act, 1946,
and to be available for reimbursement to agencies for services per­
form ed, [$ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 ] $500,000.
[F o r an additional am ount for salaries and expenses, studies and
examinations of executive agencies, by the Com mittee on Appropria­
tions, including the purposes of Com m ittee on Appropriations R eso­
lution Num bered 11, adopted by the committee on July 2, 1952,
$250,000.] (Supplemental Appropriation A ct, 1953; Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $500,000

Estimate 1954, $500,000

Total, salaries, officers and em ployees:
Appropriated 1953, $4,626,953

C le r k

Estimate 1954, $4,863,320

H ir e , M e m b e rs a n d D e le g a t e s

Clerk Hire, Members and Delegates, House of Representatives—
For clerk hire necessarily em ployed by each M ember and D ele­
gate, and the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, in the dis­
charge of his official and representative duties, as authorized by
law, [$ 9 ,6 78 ,5 65 ] $9,828,565. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $9,678,565
C

o n t in g e n t

E

xpenses

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Stenographic
Reports of Committee Hearings—
Reporting hearings: For stenographic reports o f hearings of
committees other than special and select committees, [$ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 ]
$150,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $100,000

Estimate 1954, $150,000

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Expenses of
Special and Select Committees—
Special and select com m ittees: For salaries and expenses of special
and select committees authorized b y the House, [$ 8 0 0 ,0 0 0 ]
$1,250,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ctf 1958.)
Estimate 1954, $1,250,000

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives,
Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation—
Joint Com m ittee on Internal Revenue Taxation: F or the p a y ­
ment of the salaries and other expenses of the Joint Com m ittee on
Internal Revenue Taxation, [$ 1 9 0 ,0 0 0 ] $192,000. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation A ct, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $190,000

Estim ate 1954, $192,000

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives,
Office of the Coordinator of Information—
Office of the Coordinator of Inform ation: For salaries and other
expenses of the Office of the Coordinator of Inform ation, [$ 7 5 ,7 5 0 ]
$77,930. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $75,750

Estim ate 1954, $77,930

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Telegraph and
Telephone Service—
Telegraph and telephone: For telegraph and telephone service,
exclusive of personal services, [$ 7 5 0 ,0 0 0 ] $800,000. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $750,000

Estim ate 1954, $800,000

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Stationery,
Revolving Fund—
Stationery (revolving fu n d): For a stationery allowance of $800
for each Representative, Delegate, and the Resident Commissioner
from Puerto Rico, for the [fir s t ] second session o f the Eighty-third
Congress, $350,400, to remain available until expended.
[Stationery (revolving fu n d): For an additional am ount for
“ Stationery (revolving fu n d )” , $132,200, including an additional
stationery allowance of $300 for each Representative, Delegate, and
the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, for the second session
of the Eighty-second Congress, to remain available until expen ded .]
(Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953; Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $482,600

Estim ate 1954, $350,400

Estimate 1954, $9,828,565
of th e

H

o u se

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Furniture, Re­
pairs, and Packing Boxes—
Furniture: For furniture and materials for repairs of the same,
including labor, tools, and machinery for furniture repair shops, and




Estimate 1954, $895,000

c o m m it t e e s

For official reporters to com m ittees, [$ 1 0 2 ,1 2 0 ] including com­
pensation for the employment of two official reporters at the basic rate
of $7,500 per annum each as authorized by House Resolution 732 and
House Resolution 739 agreed to July 3 and July 4, 1952, $125,415.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $102,120

Estim ate 1954, $220,500

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Miscellaneous
Items—
Miscellaneous items: For miscellaneous items, exclusive of sala­
ries unless specifically ordered by the House of Representatives,
including the sum of $47,500 for paym ent to the Architect of the
Capitol in accordance with section 208 of the A ct approved O ctober
9, 1940 (Public Law 812); the exchange, operation, m aintenance,
and repair of the Clerk's m otor vehicles; the exchange, operation,
maintenance, and repair of the folding room m otortruck; the ex­
change, maintenance, operation, and repair of the post-office m otor
vehicles for carrying the mails; the sum of $600 for hire of auto­
mobile for the Sergeant at Arms; materials for folding; and for
stationery for the use of committees, departments, and officers of
the H ouse; [$5 0 1 ,5 0 0 ] $895,000. (Legislative Branch A ppropria­
tion Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $800,000
o f f ic ia l

(Legisla­

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Attending Phy­
sician—
Attending physician’s office: For medical supplies, equipment, and
contingent expenses of the em ergency room and for the attending
physician and his assistants, including an allowance of $1,500 to be
paid to the attending physician in equal m onthly installments as
authorized by the A ct approved June 27, 1940 (54 Stat. 629), and

15

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
including an allowance o f not to exceed $30 per month each to four
assistants as provided by the House resolutions adopted July 1, 1930,
January 20, 1932, and N ovem ber 18, 1940, $8,985. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation A ctt 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $8,985

Estimate 1954, $8,985

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Postage Stamps—
Postage stamps; Postmaster, $200; Clerk, $400; Sergeant at Arms,
$300; Doorkeeper, $250; United States airmail and special-delivery
postage stamps for each Representative, Delegate, and the Resident
Commissioner from Puerto Rico, and the Speaker, the m ajority and
minority leaders, the m ajority and minority whips, and each stand­
ing committee of the House, [a n d after June 30, 1952, the amount
allowed to Members, Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner
from Puerto R ico for each fiscal year shall be $125 each and to stand­
ing committees $50 each; $58,000] $57,975. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $58,000

Estim ate 1954, $57,975

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Folding Docu­
ments—
Folding docum ents: For folding speeches and pamphlets, at a
rate not exceeding $1 per thousand or for the em ploym ent of per­
sonnel at a rate not to exceed $5.20 per day per person, $110,000.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $110,000

Estimate 1954, $110,000

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Revision of
Laws—
Revision of laws: For preparation and editing of the laws as
authorized by the A ct approved M ay 29, 1928 (1 U. S. C. 59),
$13,700, to be expended under the direction of the Com mittee on
the Judiciary. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $13,700

Estimate 1954, $13,700

Contingent Expenses, Hotase of Representatives, Automobile and
Maintenance, for the Speaker—
Speaker’s autom obile: For exchange, driving, maintenance,
repair, and operation of an autom obile for the Speaker, [$ 6 ,6 6 0 ]
$11,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $6,660

Estimate 1954, $11,000

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Preparation of
New Edition of the United States Code—
[Preparation of New United States C ode: For the preparation
of a new edition of the United States Code, $100,000, to remain
available until expen ded .] (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $100,000

The provisions of House Resolution 318, Eighty-second Congress
(relating to electrical or mechanical office equipm ent for the use of
Members, officers, and committees of the House of Representatives),
are hereby continued in effect; and the appropriations for “ Clerk
Hire, Members and Delegates” contained in this and subsequent
Acts are hereby made available for the purpose set forth in sub­
section (c) of such resolution. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1953.)

CAPITOL POLICE
Uniforms and Equipment, Capitol Police, House of Representa­
tives—
General expenses: For purchasing and supplying uniforms; the
exchange, maintenance, and repair of passenger m otor vehicles;
contingent expenses, including $25 per m onth for extra services
perform ed for the Capitol Police Board by such member of the staff
of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate or the House, as m ay be
designated by the chairman of the Board; $17,900. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $17,900

Capitol Police Board, House of Representatives—
Capitol Police Board: T o enable the Capitol Police Board to pro­
vide additional protection for the Capitol Buildings and Grounds,
including the Senate and House Office Buildings and the Capitol
Power Plant, [$ 1 8 ,4 4 0 ] $19,110. Such sum shall only be expended
for paym ent for salaries and other expenses of personnel detailed
from the M etropolitan Police of the D istrict of Columbia, and the
Commissioners of the D istrict of Columbia are authorized and
directed to make such details upon the request of the Board. Per­
sonnel so detailed shall, during the period of such detail, serve under
the direction and instructions of the Board and is authorized to
exercise the same authority as members of such M etropolitan Police
and members of the Capitol Police and to perform such other duties
as may be assigned by the Board. Reimbursement for salaries and
other expenses of such detail personnel shall be made to the govern­
ment of the District of Columbia, and any sums so reimbursed shall
be credited to the appropriation or appropriations from which such
salaries and expenses are payable and be available for all the pur­
poses th ereof: Provided, That any person detailed under the author­
ity of this paragraph or under similar authority in the Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1942, and the Second Deficiency A ppro­
priation Act, 1940, from the M etropolitan Police of the D istrict of
Columbia shall be deemed a member of such M etropolitan Police
during the period or periods of any such detail for all purposes of
rank, pay, allowances, privileges, and benefits to the same extent
as though such detail had not been made, and at the termination
thereof any such person who was a member of such police on July 1,
1940, shall have a status with respect to rank, pay, allowances,
privileges, and benefits which is not less than the status of such
person in such police at the end of such detail. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $18,440

Salaries or wages paid out of the items herein for the House of
Representatives shall be com puted at basic rates, plus increased
and additional compensation, as authorized and provided by law.
The Sergeant at Arms is authorized and directed to secure suit­
able office space in post offices or other Federal buildings in each
district represented by a M ember of the House of Representatives
for the use of such M ember and at a place in such district which
such M em ber m ay designate: Provided, That in the event suitable
office space is not available in such buildings and a M ember leases
or rents office space elsewhere, the Sergeant at Arms is authorized
to approve for payment, from the contingent fund of the House of
Representatives, vouchers covering bona fide statements of rentals
due in an amount not exceeding $900 per annum for each such
M em ber. For the purposes of this paragraph (1) the terms “ M em ­
ber of the House of Representatives” and “ M em ber” include the
Delegate from Alaska, the Delegate from Hawaii, and the Resident
Commissioner from Puerto Rico, and (2) the term “ district” in­
cludes Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto R ico, and, in the case of a Representative-at-large, a State.
N o part of the appropriation contained in this A ct for the con­
tingent expenses of the House of Representatives shall be used to
defray the expenses of any com m ittee consisting of more than six
persons (not more than four from the House and not more than two
from the Senate), nor to defray the expenses of any other person
except the Sergeant at Arms of the House or a representative of his
office, and except the widow or minor children, or both, of the de­
ceased, to attend the funeral rites and burial of any person who at
the time of his or her death is a Representative, a Delegate from a
Territory, or a Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico.




Estimate 1954, $17,900

Estimate 1954, $19,110

The foregoing amounts under “ Capitol P olice” shall be disbursed
by the Clerk of the House. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1953.)

OFFICE OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL
Salaries and Expenses, House of Representatives, Legislative
Counsel—
Salaries and Expenses, Senate, Legislative Counsel—
For salaries and expenses of maintenance of the Office of the
Legislative Counsel, as authorized by law, including increased and
additional compensation as provided by law, [$ 2 3 3 ,0 0 0 ] $239,000,
of which [$119,0001 $125, 000 shall be disbursed b y the Secretary
of the Senate and $114,000 by the Clerk of the House of Repre­
sentatives. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $233,000

Estimate 1954, $239,000

[JOINT COMMITTEE ON REDUCTION OF NONESSENTIAL FEDERAL EXPENDITURES]
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Federal Expenditures—
[F o r an amount to enable the Joint Com mittee on R eduction of
Nonessential Federal Expenditures to carry out the duties im posed

16

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

[JOINT COMMITTEE ON REDUCTION OF NONESSENTIAL FEDERAL EXPENDITURES]— Con.
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Federal Expenditures— Continued
upon it by section 601 of the Revenue A ct of 1941 (55 Stat. 726), to
remain available during the existence of the committee, $20,000,
to be disbursed by the Secretary of the Sen ate.] (Legislative Branch
Appropriation A ct, 1953.)

o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjects

Object classification
Ol

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$134,300

$135,100

400
8,500

400
8,500

143,200

144,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$7,130
132,518

$7,672
143, 200

$9,000
144,000
153,000

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
$125,195
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
429
base_________________ __________
..............
Payment above basic rates. 6,894
Obligations incurred_____________

132,518

Appropriated 1953, $20,000
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

EDUCATION OF SENATE AND HOUSE PAGES
Education of Senate, House, and Supreme Court Pages—
For education of congressional pages and pages of the Supreme
Court, pursuant to section 243 of the Legislative Reorganization
Act, 1946, [$ 3 3 ,2 2 0 ] $38,400, which am ount shall be advanced and
credited to the applicable appropriation of the D istrict of Columbia,
and the Board of Education of the D istrict of Colum bia is hereby
authorized to em ploy such personnel for the education of pages as
may be required and to pay compensation for such services in
accordance with such rates of compensation as the Board of Educa­
tion may prescribe. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Appropriated 1953, $33,220

Appropriations under the control of the Architect of the Capitol
shall be available for expenses of travel on official business not to
exceed in the aggregate under all funds the sum of $3,000. (40
U. S. C. 166a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Estimate 1954, $38,400

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS
Statement of Appropriations—
For the preparation, under the direction of the Committees on
Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives, of the
statements for the [se c o n d session of the E igh ty-second] first
session of the Eighty-third Congress, showing appropriations made,
indefinite appropriations, and contracts authorized, together with
a chronological history of the regular appropriation bills as required
by law, $4,000, to be paid to the persons designated by the chair­
men of such committees to supervise the work. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $4,000

Estimate 1954, $4,000

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL
O

f f ic e

of

the

A

r c h it e c t

of

the

C

a p it o l

Salaries. Office of the Architect of the Capitol—
Salaries: For the Architect of the Capitol, Assistant Architect of
the Capitol, Chief Architectural and Engineering Assistant, and
other personal services at rates of pay provided by law; and the
Assistant A rchitect of the C apitol shall act as Architect of the
Capitol during the absence or disability of that official or whenever
there is no Architect, and, in case of the absence or disability of
the Assistant Architect, the Chief Architectural and Engineering
Assistant shall so act; [$ 1 4 3 ,2 0 0 ] $ 144 , 000. (31 U. S. C. 689;
40 U. S. C. 161, 162, 162a, 164a, 166b; Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)

139,648

150,872

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________ ________________

7,672

9,000

9, 500

Total expenditures_________________

131,976

141,872

143, 500

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations_____________

124,846
7,130

134, 200
7,672

134,500
9,000

C

a p it o l

B

u il d in g s

and

G

rounds

Capitol Buildings, Architect of the Capitol—
Capitol Buildings: For necessary expenditures for the Capitol
Building and electrical substations of the Senate and H ouse Office
Buildings, under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol,
including minor im provem ents, maintenance, repair, equipm ent,
supplies, material, fuel, oil, waste, and appurtenances; furnishings
and office equipm ent; special and protective clothing for w orkm en;
personal and other services; cleaning and repairing works of art
without regard to section 3709 o f the Revised Statutes, as amended;
purchase or exchange, maintenance and operation of passenger
m otor vehicle; not to exceed $300 for the purchase of necessary
reference books and periodicals; not to exceed $150 for expenses of
attendance, when specifically authorized b y the Architect of the
Capitol, at meetings or conventions in connection with subjects
related to work under the A rchitect of the Capitol; [$695,800:
Provided, That $29,000 of the am ount made available under this
head for the fiscal year 1952 shall remain available until June 30,
1953] $679,400. (40 U. S. C. 162, 163, 163a; Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $695,800
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $679,400

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

AM O U NTS

Estimate 1954, $144,000

$695,800

$679, 400

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Obligations incurred

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

$143, 200

$144,000

132, 518

__ ___________

1954 estimate

$142,400
-9 ,8 8 2

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

1953 estimate

143,200

144, 000

Appropriation or estimate_____ ________
Transferred to “ Subway transportation,
Capitol and Senate Office Buildings,
Architect of the Capitol,” pursuant to
Public Law 3 7 5 .___ ___________________

$780,332

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Prior year balance available____
___ __
Prior year balance re a p p ro p ria te d --____

780,032
19,036

695,800
19,036
29,000

679,400

Total available for obligation_______
Balance available in subsequent year____
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year______________ _____________________
Carried to surplus fund____ ______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

799,068
-19,036

743, 836

679,400

Obligations incurred_______________

Appropriated 1953, $143,200

730,090

-29,000
-19,036
-2 0 , 942

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

724,800

679,400

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1954 estimate
O B L IG A T IO N S

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees...... .........

22
20

22
22

22
22

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary..........................................
Average grade. _______ ______________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades;
Average salary................ ........................
Average grade...........................................

$5, 211
GS-7.2

$5, 265
GS-7.2

$5,307
GS-7.2

$5,190
CPC-10.0

$5, 315
C P C - 10.0

$5, 315
CPC-10.0




-3 0 0

Object classification

BY

OBJECTS

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees...........

146
141

144
144

144
144

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.............- ................ ..........
Average grade................................- .........

$5,151
GS-7.9

$5,087
GS-7.6

$5,141
GS-7.6

17

LEGISLATIVE BKANCH
o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjbcts

Object classification

1952'actual

Average salaries and grades— Continued
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary
__ ________________
Average grade
____________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
01

— c o n tin u e d

Personal services:
Permanent positions
...............
Tem porary positions _______ __ . _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base _________ ________ ________
Paym ent above basic rates _______

Total personal services ,,, Travel
_ _ ______________________
Transportation of things_______ ______
.............
Communication services
Other contractual services:
Painting, anrmal
Elevator repairs and improve­
ments ___ _________________
__
Substation equipment and repairs. _
General annual repairs and alter­
ations _________ _ _____________
Maintenance and repair, lighting
systems, grounds
Advertising______ _ __________ __
M a in t e n a n c e , air c o n d it io n in g
system _____ _____ ___________
Pointing stonework, Senate and
House Wings and terraces______
Repairs, works of art______________
A ir filter systems for 8 dehumidi­
fiers
_ _ _____ _________
Renew steam supply line, House
W ing, basement floor
Eliminate large skylights over Sen­
ate Library and House D ocu­
ment room, and replace with
reinforced concrete fireproof roof,
covered with copper; provide
adequate lighting in areas affected.
Replace Old Supreme Court section
of roof
_
____
__ _____
Install copper flashing over north
and south walls of original Capitol
Building
- Replace with hollow metal doors
the old wooden doors, ground
floor, Senate and House con­
necting corridors
N ew kalamein doors, House kitchen.
Repairs to marble stairway, Law
Library entrance
Renew hot and cold water and
sewer lines, old Library space___
Replace rain leader, Old Library
Space
_________ . . Painting dome and central portion^
Modernization Mem bers’ and em­
ployees’ barbershops
Replacement 4 revolving doors:
Law Library; House Docum ent;
principal floors, House and Senate
Wings
Pointing stonework—air intake
towers
________
Modernization Elevators #2 and #3
selective-collective operation ___
08 Supplies and materials ________ ____
09 Equipm ent: Annual
_ ___________

02
03
04
07

Obligations incurred___ ___________

1953 estimate

$3,619
C PC-5.4
$2,980

$3,495
C PC-5.4
$2, 980

1954 estimate

$3,664
CPC-5.4
$2, 980

$441, 461
8,877

$465, 655
1,400
62, 945

1,400
62,945

513,040
7
16
13

542,000

546, 400

26,304

30.000
2, 250
5, 500

4, 250
5, 500

21, 752

23.000

32.000

8, 259

29

9, 210
50

9, 255
50

3,889

3,800

12,000

OF

for

o b l ig a t io n

12,000
O B L IG A T IO N S

100
25
20

07

A N A L Y S IS

100
25
20

5,300

OBJECTS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authorizations)—
1954, $25,000.

Reconstruction, Repair, Alteration and Improvement of Terraces,
Capitol Building, Architect of the Capitol—
Terraces of Capitol Building: For reconstruction, repair, alteration,
and improvement of the terraces of the Capitol Building, including
expenditures for personal and other services and all other necessary
items, $837,000.
Estimate 1954, $837,000

15.000
8,500

15,078

BY

Other contractual services—1954, $25,000.

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1954, $837,000.

6,000
3.000

O B L IG A T IO N S

07

A N A L Y S IS

30.000

BY

O BJECTS

Other contractual services: Reconstruction, repair, alteration, and improvement
of terraces—1954, $837,000.
OF

5, 500

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

2, 500

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred during the year.
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___ __
_____
____________

4,800
1,300

1954 estimate
$837,000
237,000

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations)__
_ _ _

600,000

3, 745
2,626

25.000

928
39, 521

4.000

8,422

27, 709
3,685
27, 475
19,959
5, 536

22, 0 0
0
1,000

22, 0 0
0
1,000

730,090

724,800

Capitol Grounds, Architect of the Capitol—
Capitol G rounds: For care and im provem ent of grounds surround­
ing the Capitol, Senate and House Office Buildings; Capitol Power
Plant; personal and other services; care of trees; planting; fertilizers;
repairs to pavements, walks, and roadw ays; reconstruction of plaza,
driveways, roadways, walks, and drainage and sewer systems, includ­
ing all necessary incidental expenses; w aterproof wearing apparel;
maintenance of signal lights; and for snow rem oval by hire o f men
and equipm ent or under contract without compliance w ith section
3709 of the Revised Statutes, as am ended; [$ 2 4 0 ,0 0 0 ] $1,008,600.
(40 U. S. C. 162, 193a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

679,400

Appropriated 1953, $240,000
AM OUNTS

A N A L Y S IS

a v a il a b l e

30.000

2, 613
3, 229

am o u n ts

Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1954, $25,000.

$470,055

1,298
61,404

Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Chairman and Ranking
M inority Member of the Senate Committee on Public Works, the
Chairman and Ranking M inority Member of the House Committee
on Public Works, the M inority Leader of the Senate, the M inority
Leader of the House of Representatives and the Architect of the Capitol,
$25,000.
Estimate 1954, $25,000

Estimate 1954, $1,003,600

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
1952 actual

1953 estimate

$59,139
730,090

$163, 824
724,800

$100,000
679,400

789,229

888,624

100,000

90,000

__ ___________

624,354

788, 624

689,400

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ _____
Out of prior authorizations __ ________

574,928
49,426

624,800
163,824

589,400

1954 estimate

779,400

1,051
163,824

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year. ___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
U nliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures

$238,700
-11,272

$240,000

$1,003,600

Obligations incurred_______________

227, 428

240,000

1,003,600

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

O B L IG A T IO N S

100,000

Preliminary Plans and Estimates, Extension and Completion of
East Central Front of Capitol Building, Architect of the
Capitol—
Extension and completion of east central front of Capitol: For neces­
sary expenditures to enable the Architect of the Capitol to prepare pre­
liminary plans and estimates of cost for the extension and completion
of the east central front of the United States Capitol, under the direction
o f a Commission to be composed of the President of the Senate, the




Appropriation or estimate______ _________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

Object classification

BY

O B JE C TS

1952 actual

T otal number of permanent positions____
Average number of all em ployees..............

54
52

54
54

54
54

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______ ______________
Average grade______________ _________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________ ________

$3,437
GS-2.3

$3,530
GS-2.7

$3,561
GS-2.7

$2, 967
C PC-3.0

$3,099
C P C -3.8

$3,140
C P C -3.8

$165,869
8,060

$175, 706
7,500

$178,806
7,500

615

554

554

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Temporary positions______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.....................................................

18

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL— Continued
C a p ito l B u ild in g s a n d G r o u n d s —

o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjects

Object classification

Continued

Capitol Grounds, Architect of the Capitol— Continued

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

by

o bjbcts

Object classification

$1,177

$ 1,000
600

$1,000

32,795

34,800

49,200

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,973
32,795

$2,845
34,800

$3,000
49,200

34,768

08
09

Supplies and m aterials______________
Equipm ent__________________________
Obligations incurred.._____ ________

o b l ig a t io n s

37,645

52,200

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$24,024

$24,040

$24,040

Total personal services...................
Travel____ ____ ____________________
Transportation of things.......................
Communication services--------- --------- Other contractual services:
General annual repairs.......................
Snow rem oval_____________ ________
Maintenance, signal lights_________
A d vertisin g_______________________
Repairs to streets, sidewalks, curb­
ing, and other paved areas_______
Reconstruction of plaza, driveways,
roadways, sidewalks, and drainage
and sewer system s in the old
Capitol Grounds; reconstruction of
paviflgover the Legislative Garage
and adjacent areas in the enlarged
section of the Capitol Grounds
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent:
Annual________ _____ ________. _____
Replacement, traffic signal con­
trollers __________________________

198, 568

207,800
50
30

210,900
50
30

66

8,450
5,000

8, 450

2,304

2,000
50

5,000
2, 500
50

3, 757

5, 600

5, 600

Obligations incurred___________

227, 428

A N A L Y S IS

01

02
03
04
07

08
09

Personal services—Continued
Paym ent above basic rates_________

A N A L Y S IS

OF

3
5

20

9,306

20

OF

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.__

760,000

5, 662

6,000

4,861

6,000

5,000

5,000

240,000

1, 003, 600

2, 896

2,845

1953 estimate

$18, 701
227,428

$16,707
240,000

246,129

256,707

1, 021, 600

AM O U NTS

416
16, 707

18,000

75,000

Total expenditures_________________

229, 006

238, 707

946, 600

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations __________
Out of prior authorizations____________

210,923
18, 083

222,000
16, 707

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$10,100

$3, 500

...
Appropriation or estimate__________
Transferred from “ Capitol buildings,
Architect of the Capitol,” pursuant to
Public Law 375...... .......... ................. . . .

$2,600

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. __

2,900
-7 0

10,100

3,500

2,830

10,100

3, 500

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

300

Obligations incurred____________ . .

Object classification

BY

OBJECTS

1952 actual

O B L IG A T IO N

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$34,200
- 1 , 405

$34,800

32, 795

34,800

49,200

$2, 619

$1,800

$2, 700

211

7,500
350
450

350
450

2,830

10,100

3,500

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

07

A N A L Y S IS

OF

$49,200

Obligations incurred_______________

Other contractual services_____ ______
Repairs and replacement, track
system_____ ________ ___________
08 Supplies and materials____________ __
09 E quipm ent_____________________ _____
Obligations incurred_____ __________

Estimate 1954, $49,200

BY

44,200
3,000

Estimate 1954, $3,500

O B L IG A T IO N S

Legislative Garage, Architect of the Capitol—
Legislative garage: For maintenance, repairs, alterations, per­
sonal and other services, and all other necessary expenses, [$ 3 4 ,8 0 0 ]
$49,200. (40 U. S. C. 185a; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1953.)

1952 actual

31,800
2,845

1952 actual

928, 600
18,000

FOR

47,200

29,950
1,972

A V A IL A B L E

$18,000
1,003,600

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

A V A IL A B L E

5,000

34,645

Subway Transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings,
Architect of the Capitol—
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings: For
maintenance, repairs, and rebuilding of the subway transportation
system connecting the Senate Office Building with the Capitol,
including personal and other services, [$ 1 0 ,1 0 0 ] $8,500. {86 Stat.
1443: Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

1954 estimate

Appropriated 1953, $34,800

3,000

31,922

Total expenditures________________

Appropriated 1953, $10,100

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

O B L IG A T IO N S

1

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________ __
Out of prior authorizations_____________

1952 actual

AM OUNTS

E X P E N D IT U R E S

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years._
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$122

$180

$600

4
2,830

10,100

3,500
4,100

O BJECTS

2,956
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all em ployees________
Average salaries and grades:
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_________ _ _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates................
Total personal services.................. .
07 Other contractual s ervices... _____
Painting entire ceiling structure of
garage and other miscellaneous
areas....................................................




1953 estimate
7
7

7
7

1954 estimate
7
7

$3,204
C PC-3.7

$3,286
CPC-3.7

$3,286
CPC-3.7

$21,990

$23,005

$23,005

7,054

86

80
7,615

80
7, 615

29,130
2,488

30, 700
2,500

30,700
2,500
15,000

10,280

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________ ________

180

600

250

Total expenditures. ................... .........

1952 actual

2,776

9,680

3,850

2,670
106

9, 500
180

3, 250
600

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations............... .
Out of prior authorizations. ................. .

Senate Office Building, Architect of the Capitol—
Senate Office Building: For maintenance, miscellaneous items and
supplies, including furniture, furnishings, and equipm ent, and for
labor and material incident thereto, and repairs thereof; for purchase
of waterproof wearing apparel and for personal and other services;
including five female attendants in charge of ladies’ retiring room s at
$1,800 each, for the care and operation of the Senate Office Building;
to be expended under the control and supervision of the Architect of
the Capitol [w h o shall after June 30, 1952, maintain service in all

19

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
facilities for the House of Representatives under his jurisdiction for
not less than one half hour after daily adjournm ent of the House of
R epresen ta tives]; in all, [$ 7 6 8 ,9 7 5 ] $777,800. (40 U. S. C. 174c;
Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $768,975

Estimate 1954, $777,800

A M O U N T S A VA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 actual
Appropriation or estim ate.. . . . _____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred_______ ______

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$788, 972
-5,851

$768,975

$777,800

783,121

768, 975

777,800

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all em ployees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade___ _ _ ____________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary__________ __________
Average g r a d e . __
______________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Temporary positions______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic ra tes.......... .

Total personal services__________
03 Transportation of things ._ . _______
04 Communication services_________
07 Other contractual services:
Elevator repairs___________________
Furniture repairs.. _______________
General annual repairs_____________
Annual painting___________________
Laundry____________ ____ _________
Ice ________________ ____ _ _______
Maintenance, air conditioning sys­
tem ______ ________ . . . _______
Structural and mechanical changes
and improvements, basement
floor_________
____ ___________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipm ent:
Annual rugs and floor coverings___
Annual machinery, tools and mis­
cellaneous. ____________ ________
Annual furniture and furnishings. _.
Revolving arm chairs for offices____
Typewriter desks for offices________
Typist chairs for offices____________
File cabinets_______ ___________. . .
Fluorescent desk lam ps.___________
New floor scrubbing machine_____
Reception arm chairs for offices____
Folding chairs for Caucus R oom ___
N ew refrigeration equipment for
drinking water system__________

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate____ __ ______
Prior year balance reappropriated_______
Total available for obligation.. _ __
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year____ _______ __ ______________ ____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred._________ ____

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

201

208
208

210
210

$4,199
GS-5.8

$4, 040
GS-5.3

$4,093
GS-5.3

$3,118
C PC-3.9
$3,047

$3.148
C PC-3.8
$3,047

$3,175
C PC-3.8
$3,047

$551, 281
14, 619

$575, 000
15,000

$584, 725
15.000

1,754
67,861

6 , 475
6

66, 475

635, 515

657, 975

667, 700

205

1,500

2

1,500

57

2,126
1,759
6, 562
11, 532
6,494
2, 0 0
0

27, 600
6,500
2, 0 0
0

4,430

5,200

1,500
2, 0 0
0

8,000

26, 589
23,724

20,000
10, 0 0
0
1,000

16, 731
1,989
2,849
3, 630
12, 999
2,440
6, 412
1.485

2, 500
3. 650
16, 200
1,350
2, 500

1,000

2,215
2,193

1,500

2, 0 0
0
8,000
21, 600
6,500
2,000
8, 300
20,000
10,000
1,000

2,500
3,650
16, 200
1, 350
2,500

1,000
2,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,039, 564

$1,010,050
70,000

$1, 012,100

1.039, 564

1,080,050

1, 012,100

1, 080, 050

1, 012,100

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

361
351

360
360

360
360

$4,027
GS-5.2

$4,089
GS-5.2

$4,120
GS-5.2

$3, 220
C PC-4.2
$2, 851

$3,300
C PC-4.3
$2, 851

$3,334
CPC-4.3
$2, 851

$776, 835
5,060

$812,300
2,500

$816, 200
2,500

2, 096
63,063

1, 900
64,300

1, 900
64,300

847,054

" —70,000
- 6 521
,
963,043

OBLIG ATIO N S BY O BJECT S

1952 actual

Object classification

OBLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

AM O U N T S A V A IL AB LE FOR O BLIGATION

Total number of permanent positions-----Average number of all employees. _______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average s a la r y .___________ _________
Average grade
_______ _____ .
Crafts,, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary . . . __ _ _ __________
Average g r a d e ___
______ ________
Ungraded positions: Average salary____
01 Personal services:
Permanent p o sitio n s______________
Temporary positions_____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base
__ ______________ ____
Paym ent above basic r a t e s _
_
Total personal services_________
02 Travel
__ ________ _______
03 Transportation of things.. .
___ _
04 Communication services . _. . ____
07 Other contractual services:
Painting, annual
_
___________
Elevator repairs. _______ ________
Elevator modernization and im­
provements. . __ _ . ______
Air conditioning maintenance_____
General annual re p a irs ______ _
.
Replacement of revolving door—old
building
__
_________________
Replacement of 5 revolving doors,
new building
. . ________ _
R oof repairs and replacement, old
building
______________
Pointing balustrades, coping and
cornice on roof, old building;
pointing west terrace, new building.
Photoelectric controls for door
closers
. . . . ________________
Pointing ledge, seventh floor bal­
cony new building
____ __
Structural and mechanical alter­
ations to provide accommodations
for television and recording ac­
tivities
________________
08 Supplies and m aterials_______ ______
09 Equipment:
Special equipment_. _____________
Storage boxes ______
_____ _____
Desk lamps (fluorescent)___________

881,000
25

132
15

10
10

884, 900
25

30, 353
3, 844

30,000
3,955

30,000
3,955

7,000
4, 535
9, 897

4,000
8, 800

11,900
5,000
8, 800

10
10

7,287
40, 000
70, 000
10, 309
2,179

6,000

33,186

48, 750
25, 000

847

500

25, 000
500

9, 388

Obligations incurred _ _________

783,121

768, 975

2,000

963, 043

1, 080, 050

1, 012,100

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$92, 325
963, 043

$97, 882
1, 080, 050
1, 177, 932

$100 0 0
, 0
1, 012,100
1, 112,100

4,405

777, 800
A N A L Y S IS

A N A L Y S IS

2,000

1, 055, 368

Obligations incurred___________

2,000

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
1952 actual

D educt:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

1954 estimate

$49.806
783,121

$95, 788
768,975

$100,000
777,800

832,927

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.......

1953 estimate

864, 763

877,800

720
95, 788

100,000

100,000

Total expenditures.......... ...................

736,419

764,763

777,800

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations................. .
Out of prior authorizations_____ _______

689,472
46,947

668,975

677,800

95, 788

100,000

House Office Buildings, Architect of the Capitol—
House Office Buildings: For maintenance, including equipment,
waterproof wearing apparel, miscellaneous items, and for all neces­
sary services, [$961,300: Provided, That of the amounts made
available under this head for the fiscal year 1952, $70,000 shall
remain available until June 30, 1953] $1,012,100. (40 U. S. C.
175; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, a $1,010,050
Estimate 1954, $1,012,100
®
Includes $48,750 appropriated in the Supplem
ental Appropriation Act, 19 3
5.
200000—53----- 2




Unliquidated obligations, start of y e a r ...
Obligations incurred during the year------Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ..

1, 365
97, 882

100, 0 0
0

95, 000

Total expenditures .. _____________

956,121

1, 077, 932

1, 017,100

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______ __
Out of prior authorizations____ ______

8 8 489
6,

980, 050
97, 882

917,100
100, 00
0

87, 632

Capitol Power Plant, Architect of the Capitol—
Capitol Power Plant: For lighting, heating, and pow er (including
the purchase of electrical energy), for the Capitol, Senate and House
Office Buildings, Supreme Court Building, Congressional Library
Buildings, and the grounds about the same, Botanic Garden, legisla­
tive garage, and for air-conditioning refrigeration not supplied from
plants in any of such buildings; for heating the Governm ent Print­
ing Office and Washington City Post Office, reimbursement for which
shall be made and covered into the Treasury; personal and other
services, fuel, oil, materials, waterproof wearing apparel, and all

20

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL-Continued
C a p it o l B u ild in g s

and

G rou n ds—

AM O U N T S A V A ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

Continued

1952 actual

Capitol Power Plant, Architect of the Capitol— Continued
other necessary expenses in connection with the maintenance and
operation of the plant, [$ 1 ,3 5 9 ,0 0 0 ] $1,330,600. (40 U. S. C. 185;
42 Stat. 767; 46 Stat. 51, 583; 50 Stat. 10; 52 Stat. 392; Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,359,000

Estimate 1954, $1,330,600

$3,000,000
-3,000,000

$3,000, 000
-3,000,000

$2,500,000
-2,500,000

2,897, 267
11,498, 000

8, 428, 788

2, 616, 788

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year
(contract authorization)---------- -------------

14,393,267

8,426,788

2,616,788

8, 426, 788

-2 ,6 1 6, 788

-50,088

5,966,479

5, 810, 000

2,566.70n

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

-

Obligations incurred_______________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_____ __________
Applied to contract authorization....... .......
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation
__________ _________
Contract authorization____ ____________

A M O U N T S AVA IL A B LE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate
O B L IG A T IO N S BY O B JE C T S

Appropriation or estimate_____ ________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$1,303,000
-29,429

$1,359,000

$1,330,600

Obligations incurred............................

1,273, 571

1,359,000

1,330,600
07

OB LIG A TIO N S BY O BJE CTS

Object classification

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade___
____
___ __
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary________ ____________ .
______ ____ ____________
Average grade
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions.-. ............. .......
Part-time and temporary em ploy­
m ent- . . ___ . ________ ____ __
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e _ _ ____ __________ __________
Paym ent above basic rates_________
Total personal services....... ............

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

96
93

93
93

93
79

$4, 707
GS-6.1

$4, 764
GS-6.1

$4, 825
GS-6.1

$3, 638
C PC-5.8

$3, 716
C PC-5.9

$349, 225

$353,980

$316,000

420,187

$125,000

610,782

2,453,000

2,391,700

134

2,189,664

39, 094

75,000

50,000

5,966, 479

5, 810,000

2,566,700

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1952 actual

60, 420

52,000

1,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year-------

$1,841,954
5, 966, 479

$6,693,641
5,810,000

$5,071,002
2,566,700

407, 846

415, 600

369,000

7, 808,433

12,503,641

7,637,702

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year __________________________________

6, 693, 641

5,071, 002

2,945, 912

Total expenditures_________________

1,114, 792

7, 432,639

4, 691, 790

f
1,114, 792 I

6, 624,429

808,210

2, 500, 000
2,191, 790

1,200

13, 500
369, 730

Obligations in cu rred -............... .....

1, 273, 571

1,359,000

1,330, 600

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

100
10
10
200

34, 924

535,000

43,000
50

5, 711
419,063

100
10
10
200

488,000

5

100

43,000
50

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
$194, 798
1, 273, 571

$288,188
1, 359, 000

$300, 000
1, 330, 600

1, 468, 369

1, 647,188

2, 835
288,188

300, 000

300, 000

Total expenditures ________________

1,177, 346

1, 347,188

1, 330, 600

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
985, 858
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of____ ________
prior authorizations 191. 488

1, 059, 000
288,188

1, 030, 600
300, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________ }
Out of prior authorizations............ ...........

L

ib r a r y

B

u il d in g s

Estimate 1954, $2,500,000

G

Appropriated 1953, $335,000

rounds

Estimate 1954, $713,900

A M O U N T S A V A ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$336,700
-11,942

$335,000

$713,900

324, 758

335,000

713,900

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

56
55

56
56

58
58

$3,230
GS-3.0

$3,310
GS-3.0

$3,350
GS-3.0

$3, 578
C PC-5.8

$3,664
C PC-5.8

$3, 650
C PC-5.8

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_______ ________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—.
Obligations incurred_____ _________

O BL IG AT IO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

Changes and Improvements, Capitol Power Plant, Architect of the
Capitol—
Changes and im provem ents, Capitol Power Plant: Tow ard carry­
ing out the changes and im provem ents authorized by the Act of
O ctober 26, 1949 (Public Law 413, Eighty-first Congress),
[$ 3 ,0 00 ,0 00 ] $2,500,000, to be expended by the Architect of the
Capitol under the direction o f the House Office Building Com ­
mission. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

and

Structural and Mechanical Care, Library Buildings and Grounds,
Architect of the Capitol—
Structural and mechanical care: For the necessary expenditures
for mechanical and structural maintenance, including minor im ­
provements, equipment, supplies, waterproof wearing apparel, and
personal and other services, [$3 3 5 ,0 0 0 ] $713,900. (2 U. S. C.
141; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

1, 630, 600

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior yearsUnliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...




4, 728, 453

Obligations incurred___________

A N A L Y S IS

$672,149

1,235
49, 720

13, 500
398, 530

Appropriated 1953, $3,000,000

$588,016

7,666

12, 605
392, 465
852

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

Other contractual services:
Boiler plant changes and related
improvements
_
New tunnel, steam lines, chilled
water lines, and related improve­
m ents___ ________________________
Electrical conversion, 25-cycle alter­
nating current and direct current
to 60-cycle alternating current____
Refrigeration plant changes and
related improvements_____
Engineering, administration, and
contingencies_________ _________

$3, 746
CPC-5.9

02 Travel_____________ __________________
03 Transportation of things______ _______
04 Communication services.......................
05 Rents and utility services:
Annual g a s . . . _________________
N avy Yard standby service_____ __
Purchase of electrical energy_______
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs and altera­
tions ________ ___________________
Advertising___
_ ________ _____
08 Supplies and materials:
Miscellaneous annual supplies_____
____________Fuel
_________________
Oil and waste__.................... .......... .

A N A L Y S IS

1952 actual

Object classification

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees------------Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________ _____________
Average grade----- -----------------------------Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_________ _____________

1952 actual

21

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjects

Object classification

01

07

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

o b l ig a t io n s

$204,300

$211,000

757

700

40, 408
238,388

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$8 232
,
7,606

$10, 000

700

09 Equipm ent—Continued
Furniture for new em ployees...........
M ovable partitions___________ ____
Special furniture and equipment___

45,400

45,400

Obligations in cu rre d .....................

49, 216

50,000

130,000

250,400

257,100
13,400

4,009

4.000
4.000

4, 500
4,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

12,924

13.000

95.000
13.000

$50,000

$4,000
130,000

8,079

8,100
20.000

50,000

134, 000

4,000

12,000
122,000

20,012

30,000

A N A L Y S IS

OF

2,500

197,300
3.000

$10,000

10,000
72, 500

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year. .
Obligations incurred during the year___
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
yea r___________________________________

46,000

Total expenditures .
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations___________

46,000

118,000
4,000

3.000

1,200
25,000

CONSOLIDATED ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES, LIRRARY BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS,
ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL

1952 actual

1,100
60,000
7,395
15,478

13, 500
750

" 13," 500

985
3,760

1,100

1,100

324,758

Total obligations.

OF

— c o n tin u e d

11,850

Total personal services________
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs____________
Maintenance and repairs, air con­
ditioning and refrigeration sys­
tems____________________________
Maintenance and repairs, elevators..
Installation of two new passenger
elevators in East Wing, A n n e x ...
Annual painting___________________
Acoustical tile ceilings (both build­
ings)-------------------------------------------Equipping part of bookstacks with
map cases, Annex_______________
Finishing one deck for bookshelving, and equipping one deck, A n­
nex______________________________
Air filters for Northeast Bookstack,
main building___________________
Installation of floor tile in Pages’
School, main building___________
Tile flooring for Cafeteria__________
Automatic sprinkler system, cellar,
main building___________________
Replace storage batteries operating
fire alarm and watch systems, A n­
nex______________________________
Replacement, repairs, and altera­
tions to refrigeration equipment,
main and annex buildings_______
Replace insulation on pneumatic
tubes in Annex__________________
Supplies and materials______________
Equipment: Fire extinguishers______
Lands and structures:
Annual care of grounds____________
Repairs to paving and coping..........

A N A L Y S IS

o bjects

Object classification

1954 estimate

$197,223

Personal services:
Permanant positions______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates (includ­
ing Sunday opening pay)........... . .

1953 estimate

by

335,000

713,900

Unliquidated obligations, start of y e a r...
Obligations incurred during the year____

1953 estimate

$75,854
373,974

$75, 784

449,828

75, 784

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$335,000

$25,000
713,900

335,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year....... .

1954 estimate

738,900

•
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r ..._____ __________________________

25,000

60,000

_

310,000
310,000

653,900
25,000

1,118
75, 784
372,926

75, 784

300, 616
72,310

75, 784

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations.....................

House Restaurants, Architect of the Capitol—
[H ou se Restaurants: For structural and mechanical changes,
labor, materials, equipm ent, and all other necessary items to provide
facilities for carry-out food service in the New and Old House Office
Buildings, to be operated as part of the House of Representatives
restaurants, $23,000.] (Supplemental Appropriation A ct, 1953.)

678,900

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations____________

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures...............................

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1954 estimate

Total expenditures______________

Appropriated 1953, $23,000
AM OUNTS

Furniture and Furnishings, Library Buildings and Grounds,
Architect of the Capitol—
Furniture and furnishings: For furniture, partitions, screens,
shelving, and electrical work pertaining thereto and repairs thereof,
office and library equipment, apparatus, and labor-saving devices,
[$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 ] $180,000. (2 U. S. C. 141; Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $50,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $130,000

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate__________ _____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. —
Obligations incurred............................

A V A IL A B L E

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

07
09

Other contractual services....................
Equipm ent:
Annual office furniture, equipment,
and office machines
Typew riter replacements...................




O BJECTS

1952 actual

Object classification

1953 estimate

07

Other contractual services:
Old House Office B uilding...
N ew House Office Building..
09 Equipment:
Old House Office B uilding...
New House Office Building..

1954 estimate

$6 500
,

2,000
8,500
6, 0 0
0

23, 000

Obligations incurred______

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures 0 of current authorizations)—
iut
1953, $23,000.

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$50,000
-784

$50,000

$130, 000

Miscellaneous

49,216

50,000

130,000

Acquisition of Site, Construction, and Equipment, Additional Senate
Office Building—
O B L IG AA M O U N T S A V A ILC T S E
T IO N S B Y O B J E A B L

Object classification

FO R O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1953, $23,000.

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$7,501

$7,500

$7, 500

15, 111
10,766

20,000
10,000

20,000
10,000

FOR

O B L IG AT IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Prior year balance available:
Appropriation.........................................
Contract authorization________________

$8 , 508
8
19, 708, 636

$88 508
,
19, 708, 636

$88 508
,
19, 708, 636

Total available for obligation______

19, 797,144

19, 797,144

19, 797,144

22

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL— Continued

Replacement of Equipment, Senate Restaurant, Capitol Building—
A N A L Y S IS

Miscellaneous— Continued
Acquisition of Sitey Construction, and Equipment, Additional Senate
Office Building— Continued
A M O U N T S A V A IL A B L E F O R O B L IG A T IO N ----- C o n t i n u e d

1952 actual
Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation_________________________
_
Contract authorization_ ______________

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year (total expenditures out of prior authoriza"
tions)—1952, $3,542.

Senate Restaurants, Senate Office Building, Architect 4>f the Capitol—

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

- $ 8 , 508
8
-1 9 , 708, 636

- $ 88 508
,
-1 9 , 708, 636

- $ 88 508
,
-1 9 , 708, 636

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

A N A L Y S IS

OF

1954 estimate

$18, 500
-1 2 5

Obligations incurred_______________

Obligations incurred...........................

1954 estimate

18,375

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$348,021

$348,021

$348,021

348,021

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year.......................... ......................................

1953 estimate

348,021

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJECTS

348,021

Object classification

1952 actual

07 Other contractual services_____ _____
09 Equipm ent______________________ ___

$3,466
14,909

Obligations incurred_______ _

Total expenditures....................... .......

18,375

___

Capitol Building, Senate and House Roofs and Chambers—
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

A N A L Y S IS

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Prior year balance available.........................
Balance available in subsequent y e a r __

$40, 564
-1 8 , 920
21,644

1954 estimate

18,920

O B L IG A T IO N S

07

BY

OF

1953 estimate

$166,042
21, 644

$27,359
18,920

187, 6 6
8

D edu ct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__ __________ ______________________

1954 estimate

46,279

27,359

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)

46, 279

160,327

Completion of Rotunda Frieze, Capitol Building, Architect of the
Capitol—
A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1954 estimate
•

$20,000
-1,4 2 1

Appropriation or e s tim a te____
___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

18, 579

Obligations incurred

O B L IG A T IO N S

07

1953 estimate

BY

O BJECTS

Other contractual services—1952, $18,579.
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

$40
40

Total expenditures_________ _______

46, 845

40

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___ _______
Out of prior authorizations_____________

18,335
28, 510

40

BOTANIC GARDEN
Salaries and Expenses, Botanic Garden—
Salaries and expenses: For all necessary expenses incident to main­
taining, operating, repairing, and im proving the Botanic Garden
and the nurseries, buildings, grounds, collections, and equipm ent per­
taining thereto, including personal services (including not to exceed
$3,000 for tem porary labor w ithout regard to the Classification A ct
of 1949); waterproof wearing apparel; not to exceed $25 for emer,
gency medical supplies; traveling expenses including streetcar faresnot to exceed $275; the prevention and eradication of insect and other
pests and plant diseases by purchase of materials and procurem ent
of personal services by contract without regard to the provisions of
any other A ct; purchase and exchange of m otor trucks; purchase
and exchange, maintenance, repair, and operation of a passenger
m otor vehicle; purchase of botanical books, periodicals, and books
of reference, not to exceed $100; repairs and im provem ents to D irec­
tor’s residence[ ; and dem olition and rem oval of small conservatory
and adjoining structure from Reservation 6 -B , bounded by Canal
Street and Independence Avenue and Second S tre e t]; all under the
direction of the Joint Com mittee on the Library; [$ 2 1 8 ,5 0 0 ]
$221,000: Provided, That no part of this appropriation shall be used
for the distribution, by congressional allotm ent, of trees, plants,
shrubs, or other nursery stock. ( 40 U. S. C. 216; Legislative Branch
Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $218,500

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Total expenditures (out o f prior
authorizations).............................




A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

$18, 579
$18, 579
18, 579

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year

Estim ate 1954, $221,000

1954 estimate
AM OUNTS

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year

1954 estimate

117
40

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

AM OUNTS

$28, 627
18,375
47,002

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

Other contractual services: Reconstruction of roofs and skylights over Senate and
House W ings and remodeling Senate and House Chambers, Capitol B u ild in g 1952, $21,644; 1953, $18,920.
A N A L Y S IS

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$18,920

Obligations incurred............................

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

18, 579
Appropriation or estimate_____ . _ _______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

18, 579
18, 579

$214,200
-13,968

$218,500

$221,000

Obligations incurred_______________

200,232

218,500

221,000

23

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

1952 actual

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions..-..
Average number of all employees_____
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________
Average grade______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade__________________ ____

01

GS-3.0

$3,365
CPC-4.8

$159,510
3,000

$164,010
3,000

548
21,183

530
22,560

530
22, 560

168,420
63

185,600
150
50

190,100
150
50

108
140

100
200

4,212
75
7, 594
19, 620

5, 200

5,200

9,600
15,400

9,600
15,400

100

100

100

100

218, 500

221,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$16,206
200, 232

$20,317
218,500

$22,000

216,438

238, 817

243,000

200, 232

OF

100
200

2,000

Obligations incurred..

A N A L Y S IS

$3,324
CPC-4.8

$143,698
2, 991

Total personal services__________
Travel______________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services.____ _____
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs____________
Laundry__________________________
Supplies and materials______________
Equipm ent (includes plant material).
Lands and structures:
Annual___________________________
Demolition and removal of small
conservatory and adjoining struc­
-B
ture from Reservation 6 ,
bounded b y Canal St. and Inde­
pendence A ve. and 2d St________

$3,540
GS-3.7

$3,089
CPC-3.8

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Paym ent above basic rates________

$3,483
GS-3.7

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of yea r..
Obligations incurred during the y e a r...
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year..

221,000

13
20,317

22,000

23,000

Total expenditures_______ ________

196,108

216, 817

179,915
16,193

196, 500
20,317

198, 000
22, 0 0
0

$632, 674

884,600
1,083,309
1, 236,607
1, 000,000

970, 200
1,121,860
1, 264,800
1,125,000

9, 443, 478

10,049, 960

The Library’s first obligation is to Congress; the second
to other agencies of the Government; and the third to
other libraries, scholars, investigators, and the general
public.
In addition to funds appropriated annually by Congress,
there are also available a number of gift and trust funds,
working, transferred, and allocated funds.
Certain responsibilities for the physical equipment,
maintenance and operation of the Library buildings rest
by law with the Architect of the Capitol, and estimates for
these purposes are carried under the request of that office.
For the general and basic services, the major objectives
for 1954 are to enable the Library to meet the increasing
number of official inquiries requiring material from
hitherto little emphasized geographical and subject areas;
to repair its sustaining services which were weakened by
the need for developing new areas in which service was
demanded by the Federal agencies; and to permit necessary
flexibility in staff assignments to insure basic adequacy
of services. Additions to the staff are proposed for a few
operations which are threatened with a serious breakdown.
Two new projects are proposed. For the specialized
services, the objectives for 1954 are the strengthening of
the staff, organization and techniques to meet the de­
mands of Congress (Legislative Reference Service) and
of the public (Copyright, catalog card distribution, and
the service of books for the blind).

220,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations...... ...........

$605,180

9, 287, 678

Total obligations________ _______

1954 estimate

907,228
1,058,671
1,173,218
996, 293

Executive direction and general adminis­
trative services_________ _____________
Specialized services:
Legislative Reference Service__________
Copyright_____________________________
Catalog card distribution service_____ .
Books for the blind____________________

1953 estimate

$596, 644

O BJECTS

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
IN T R O D U C T O R Y

STATEM ENT

The Library of Congress, established by an act of
Congress approved April 24, 1800, is not only the library
of the Congress itself, but is also the general library of the
Government of the United States, complemented in
special fields by other Government libraries. Its collec­
tions are comprehensive and varied, and include important
manuscripts, maps, music, motion picture films, sound
recordings, prints, photographs, books, periodicals, news­
papers, documents of all national governments of the
world, oriental literature, etc. In addition to housing
the collections and performing general and basic services
connected therewith, certain specialized functions are
performed: The Legislative Reference Service, Copyright,
catalog card distribution, and the service of books in
raised characters and talking books to the blind. In terms
of these broad fields of activity comparative obligations
(including only those chargeable to annual appropriations)
for 1952 and estimated for 1953 and 1954 are:
1952 actual
General and basic services:
Acquisitions_______ _____
__
Organization of the collections..........
Reader and reference services
Maintenance and protective services_
_




$999,289
1, 449* 330
1,320, 536
786,469

1953 estimate

$1,029,950
1,472, 692
1,336, 320
794,820

1954 estimate

$1,086,808
1, 558,333
1,486,033
804, 252

SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Salaries and Expenses, Library of Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Library of
Congress not otherwise provided fo r, including compensation of the
Librarian Emeritus, as authorized by law; development and main­
tenance of the Union Catalogs; custody, care, and maintenance of the
Library buildings; specia l clothing; and expenses of the Library of Congress
Trust Fund Board not properly chargeable to the income of any trust
fund held by the Board, $5,114,100. (2 U. S. C. 131-166; 5 U. S. C.
150; 17 U. S. C. 1-6 5 ; 20 U. S. C. 91; 28 U. S. C. 921; 31 U. S. C.
588, 589; 52 Stat. 808; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Estimate 1954, ° $5,114,100
« Estimate is for activities previously carried under appropriations as follows:
“ General printing and binding, Library of Congress” ---------------------------------- $430,000
“ Miscellaneous expenses, Library of Congress” ----------------- --------------------------70,800
“ Salaries, Library proper, Library of Congress” ------------------------- ------------------ 3, 708,658
“ Salaries and expenses, union catalogs, Library of Congress” ---------------------97, 637
“ Salaries and expenses, Library buildings, Library of Congress” ---------------806,505
“ Expenses, Library of Congress trust fund board” --------------------------------------500
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedules as comparative trans­
fers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred)---------------------------------------------Comparative transfer from—
“ Salaries, Library proper, Library of
Congress” . __________________________
“ Salaries and expenses, union catalogs,
Library of Congress” ------------------------“ General printing and binding, Library
of Congress” _________________________
“ Miscellaneous expenses, Library of
Congress” -----------------------------------------“ Salaries and expenses, Library build­
ings, Library of Congress” ---------------“ Salaries and expenses, Library of
Congress trust fund board” ........... .......
T otal obligations.

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

15,114,100
$3,420,017

$3,470,000

80,636

85,492

428, 671

430,000

52, 789

52,800

786,469

794,820

4,768,582

4,833, 612

500
5,114,100

24

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
1952 actual

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS— Continued
sa la r ie s

and

expenses

—continued

Cards filed in catalogs___________________
Volumes sent to bindery_________________
Items repaired, cleaned, mounted, etc___

Salaries and Expenses, Library of Congress— Continued
O B L IG A T IO N S

Description

BY

1953 estimate

Acquisition of library materials_______
Organization of the collections_________
Reader and reference services_____ . . .
Maintenance and protective services.. .
Executive direction and general admin­
istrative services_______________ . . .
Total direct obligations___________

$615,603
1,446,060
1,320, 536
786,469

$624, 600
1,472, 692
1,336, 320
794,820

$632,808
1, 558,333
1, 486,033
804, 252

596, 644

605,180

632, 674

4, 765,312

4,833, 612

5,114,100

4,833, 612

5,114,100

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
From Other Accoun ts

2. Organization of the collections............
Total obligations__________________

PR O G R AM

AND

1,450,000
65,000
180,000

1,450,000
70,000
185,000

1954 estimate

Direct Obligations

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

1954 estimate

N o t e .— These figures are for the Processing Department only and do not reflect cata­
loging, filing, binding, and related processing operations performed b y other depart­
ments of the Library.

A C T IV IT IE S

1952 actual

1,449,214
61,417
167, 859

1953 estimate

3,270
4,768, 582

PERFORM ANCE

3.
Reader and rejerence service.— Books and other library
materials are provided within and without the Library
and reference assistance rendered. The objectives of this
activity for 1954 are: More adequate service bo readers
during the 52 hours of full service and the 26 hours of
limited service; the expansion of the area and language
specialization program in regions of sensitive importance
and to strengthen basic departmental operations such as
the shelving of incoming materials, cataloging of non­
book materials (maps, manuscripts), the selection and
preparation of materials for binding, and the interpreta­
tion of the collections through the preparation of bibliog­
raphies and checklists. The upward trend in workload
is expected to continue in 1953 and 1954.

Personal services required for the basic operations of
the Library are financed from this appropriation.
Description
1952 actual
1953 estim ate. 1954 estimate
1.
Acquisition oj Library materials.— The development
1,465,000
1,414,042
1,440,000
and
of the collections of the Library is planned; materials are Books unitspamphlets served_____________
800,000
750.000
698,807
Other
of material served___________
250.000
240.000
218,368
procured by purchase, gift, exchange, copyright deposit, Units issued on loan_____________________
Reference inquiries answered (including
transfer, or otherwise; and materials are selected for
telephone requests for reference service
and loans, aid to readers, and reference
addition to the collections. The objectives for 1954 are:
630.000
570,877
600.000
conferences)___________________________
34, 689
40,000
37,000
Greater selectivity and improved efficiency in the pro­ Reference letters_________________________
curement of materials, with emphasis on the acquisition
of noncurrent strategic materials and filling serious gaps
4. Maintenance and protective services.'— The two Library
in the collections; and the strengthening of exchange
relations with institutions in important areas. The buildings and the collections and other properties con­
collections totaled 30,746,772 items as of June 30, 1952, tained therein are maintained, preserved, and protected.
and consisted of 9,578,701 books and pamphlets; 12,855,870 A staff of 200, including 90 part-time charwomen, pre­
manuscript pieces and 8,312,201 maps, pieces of music, serves, cleans, and maintains the Library buildings,
reels of microfilm, photographs, and the other miscellane­ collections and grounds, operates telephone switchboard,
ous items. A continued increase in receipts from various elevators, check stands, motor vehicles, and the laundry;
procures and maintains furniture, housekeeping materials,
sources is anticipated in 1953 and 1954.
and miscellaneous equipment; assigns space; and operates
the receiving and stock rooms. Constant alertness by
Description
1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
the Guard Force staff of 79 is necessary to prevent fire
and theft, for the maintenance of order and for regular
371,786
Purchase_________________ _________ _ .
400.000
400, C O
O
Copyright_______________________________
inspections of all areas in both buildings, which contain
36C, 044
390.000
390, 000
Transfer and deposit (principally from
one of the greatest accumulations of national treasures
Government a g e n c ie s ),.___ __ _ _ ___
1,087,874
1, 500,000
1,500,000
Gift from individual and unofficial sources.
733, 246
500, 000
500.000
in the world.
Exchange_____________________ _________
543,081
725, 000
725.000
Source not reported (mainly newspaper
5. Executive direction and general administrative services.
and periodical issues)____________ ____

Tota]____ __________ ______________

786, 271

1, 000,000

1, 000,000

3,882,320

4, 515,000

4, 515,000

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

Of the pieces received about 1% million items are added
Total number of permanent positions-----to the collections annually.
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
2.
Organization oj the collections.— Library materials are Average number of all employees------------cataloged, classified, marked, and arranged; Library of Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Congress catalogs and the National Union Catalogs are
Average salary_______ ____________
maintained; and binding operations controlled. The
Average grade----------- ---------------------Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
objectives for this activity in 1954 are: Improvement of
Average salary.........................................
Average grade_______________________
the preliminary control of materials; and the cataloging
A ct of Oct. 15,1949 (2 U. S. C. 136a note).
of foreign language publications.
A ct of Oct. 15,1949 (2 U. S. C. 136a note).
A ct of June 20, 1938 (52 Stat. 808)______
Selected performance data for 1952 and estimated for
Ungraded positions: Average salary----1953 and 1954 are as follows:
Description
Volumes fully cataloged and added to the
classified collection___________________
Items otherwise organized for use (with­
out full cataloging).....................................




1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

144, 584

145,000

145,000

24, 570

25,000

25,000

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions___________________
Part-time and temporary positions:
Part-time positions (charwom en)------Temporary positions_________ . _____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week b a s e ...
Payments above basic rates.................
Total personal service obligations...

BY

O BJECTS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

965
42
965

965
41
964

1,051
42

$4,512
GS-6.2

$4, 558
G S - 6.2

$4,563
G S - 6.2

$2,953
C PC-3.2
$15,000
$14,000
$8,490
$1, 591

$2, 981
C PC-3.2
$15,000
$14, 800
$8,490
$1, 346

$3,002
C PC-3.2
$15, 000
$14, 800
$8,490
$1, 346

$4,051,060

$4, 111, 149

$4,362,039

104, 605
5, 274
15, 907
41, 753

108,268
6,450
16, 245
45, 000

108,268
6,450
17, 693
45, 000

4, 218, 599

4,287,112

4, 539, 450

1952 actual

1,022

25

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjects

Object classification

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

P R O G R AM

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Direct Obligations

Personal services_________ __________
02 T ravel_________________________
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Comm unication services..- ___ _ _
05 Rents and utility services_________
06 Printing and r e p ro d u ctio n .._____
07 Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agen­
cies, ________ ______ _____
08 Supplies and materials_________ _
09 E quipm ent_______________ ___
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities

$4,215, 329
757
583
27, 271
25, 070
428, 671
30, 361

$4,287,112
1,800
600
28, 600
25, 500
430, 000
27, 700

$4, 539,450
1,800
600
28, 550
30, 000
430,000
33, 000

6, 450
28, 920
1, 900

7,000
21, 750
3, 500
50

5, 700
39, 250
5, 700
50

Total direct obligations____________

4, 765,312

4, 833, 612

5,114,100

4, 833, 612

5,114,100

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

01

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim burse­
m ents From Other A ccoun ts

01

Personal services__________ _

3, 270

Total obligations_____ ___________

A N A L Y S IS

OF

4, 768, 582

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Obligations incurred during year___
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__ _______ _______ ______

$5,114,100
475,000

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations)_________________

C

4,639,100

o p y r ig h t

Of f

ic e

■Salaries and Expenses, Copyright Office, Library of Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Copyright
Office, including publication of the decisions of the United States
courts involving copyrights, $1,121,860. [2 U. S. C. 181, 186, 189,
140, 150; 17 U. S. C. 1—
65; 31 U. S. C. 588, 589; Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Estimate 1954, 0 $1,121,860

0Estimate is for activities previously carried under appropriations as follows:
$20,000
“ General printing and binding, Library of Congress” ______________________
“ Miscellaneous expenses, Library of Congress” __________________________
10,400
“ Salaries, Copyright Office, Library of Congress” _________________________ 1,046, 960
“ Printing the catalog of title entries of the Copyright Office, Library of Con­
gress” -------------- . . . . ------- ------------------------------------------------ ------------------44, 500
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative trans­
fers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Appropriation or estimate (obligations in­
curred)___________ . _
Comparative transfer from—
“ Salaries, Copyright Office, Library of
Congress” ____________________
“ Printing the catalog of title entries of
Copyright Office, Library of Con­
gress” . ____ _____
______
“ General printing and binding, Library
of Congress” ________ __________
“ Miscellaneous expenses, Library of
Congress” . __ _____________
Total obligations____ _____________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,121,860
$988, 956

$1,008,409

39,315

20,000

10, 400

10, 400

1,058,671

1, 083, 309

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Direct Obligations

tions, fees, and correspondence______
Examining copyright applications_____
Indexing and cataloging all materials. __
Reference service
Cataloging of copyright entries and
bulletins of decisions________ _____
6. General supervision and legal services...
Total direct obligations.................

$192,924
218, 431
408, 014
87, 247

$189,
227,
429,
82,

1952 actual

Registrations. . ________________________
Mail received and dispatched..... .......... .

203, 705
480,912

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

208,797
492,934

213,890
504,957

2.
Examining copyright applications.'— All applications
and deposits are examined before issuance of registration
certificates or recording of documents to determine
whether the provisions of the Copyright Act have been
satisfied. Performance data for 1952 and estimates for
1953 and 1954 are as follows:
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

265, 533

272,171

278,809

211, 422

216, 707

221,993

1952 actual

1,121,860

1. Receiving and accounting for applica­
2.
3.
4.
5.

Description

Items examined for registration. _ _______
Registrations and recordation of docu­
m ents. _ _______________ ____________

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Description

PERFORM ANCE

The Copyright Office is responsible for recording and
cataloging all copyright applications, assignments and
renewals, supplying copyright information to the public,
and for collecting and accounting for copyright fees. Title
17 U. S. C., sec. 210, provides that the Register of Copy­
rights shall print complete and indexed catalogs for each
class of copyright entries. The amount requested for
fiscal 1954 will enable the Register of Copyrights to pub­
lish the Catalog of Copyright Entries and a Bulletin of
Copyright Decisions and make them available to the
public within a reasonable period. The office is conducted
as a business operation. The amount requested for
personal services is approximately equal to the fees
received for services rendered. In addition, the value of
books and other library materials deposited in accordance
with the Copyright Act and transferred to the Library of
Congress are also to be credited to the copyright operation.
The objective for 1954 is to keep current with the work­
load at all times, and to render prompt and efficient
service to the public. The program and performance
under each of the activities described are predicated on
an estimated 213,890 copyright registrations during 1954,
an estimated 208,797 during 1953, and an actual 203,705
during 1952. The basis for the estimated increase be­
tween 1952 and 1954 is an anticipated increase of 5
percent in registrations.
1.
Receiving and accounting for applications, etc.— All
materials mailed or delivered to the Copyright Office are
received, assembled, and routed, accounts maintained for
all moneys received, records relating to the registration of
copyrights filed, and materials deposited in accordance
with the Copyright Act. Performance data for 1952 and
estimates for 1953 and 1954 are as follows:

Description

44, 500

20, 000

AND

654
425
922
343

$193,356
237, 537
446, 606
86, 438

39, 500
110, 966

44, 500
109, 465

44, 500
113, 423

1,057,082

1, 083, 309

1,121, 860

Indexing and cataloging all materials received.-— The
3.
Register of Copyrights is required to print complete and
indexed catalogs of all items registered. In the interest
of over-all economy and the elimination of overlapping
activities, the Copyright Office also prepares full catalog
entries in accordance with Library of Congress cataloging
rules on about 10-20 percent of the items registered.
Performance data for 1952 and estimates for 1953 and
1954 are as follows:

Obligations Payable Out of Reim burse­
m ents F rom Other Accounts

Registrations cataloged-

2. Examining copyright applications_____

1,058, 671

_____________

203, 705

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

208, 797

213, 890

1,589

Total obligations..................................

1952 actual

Description




1, 083, 309

1,121,860

4.
Reference services.— The Copyright Office makes avail­
able to the public information concerning the provisions

26

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS— Continued
C o p y r ig h t

O ffic e

— Continued

Salaries and Expenses, Copyright Office, Library of Congress— Con.

of the Copyright Act, including procedures, policies and
rulings; information concerning registrations is furnished
on a fee basis. Obtaining compliance with registration
requirements is also part of this activity. Performance
data for 1952 and estimates for 1953 and 1954 are as
follows:

Provided, That no part of this appropriation may be used to pay
any salary or expense in connection with any publication, or prep­
aration of material therefor (except the Digest of Public General
Bills), to be issued by the Library of Congress. (2 U. S. C. 181,
186, 189, 150, 164a) 166; Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct,
1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $891,159

Estimate 1954, ° $970,200

“ Includes $15,300 for activities previously carried under “ Miscellaneous expenses,
Library of Congress.” Amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as
comparative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
1952 actual

Description

1953 estimate
57, 784
17, 772

59,193
18, 205

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1954 estimate
Appropriation or estimate----------------------Reimbursements from other accounts

________________
56,375
17, 339
Letters and ___ ____reports written
search

$866,300
25,662

$891,159

$970,200

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

891, 962
-3 4

891,159
-24,859

970,200

Obligations incurred_______________

Titles searched_______

891,928

866,300

970,200

15,300

15, 300

907, 228

881, 600

970, 200

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$201, 549
464,339

$229, 738
510,915

“ Miscellane­
5.
General supervision and legal services.— The work of Comparative transfer fromCongress” ------ous expenses, Library of
the Copyright Office is closely coordinated; this includes
Total obligations__________________
legal services relating to the status and improvement of
copyright law in its foreign as well as domestic aspects,
O B L IG A T IO N S
such improvement constituting the major objective under
this activity in 1954.
Description
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

BY

A C T I V IT IE S

1952 actual

O BJECTS

Direct Obligations

Object classification

1952 actual

1954 estimate

239
239

249
244

Sum m ary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade______ _________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade________ _____________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

239
234

1. Authoritative research and analysis----2 General research
___________________
3. Preparation of digests, indexes and ab­
__ __ ____________ - ___
stracts
4. Reference files, bibliographic and reader
service _ ___________________________
5. Administration
____ ________________

$203,839
463,840

Total direct obligations___________

1953 estimate

65,904

70,934

74,091

96,410
51, 573

107,738
37,040

112, 576

881, 566

881,600

970, 200

881,600

970,200

$4,220
GS-5.7

$4,230
GS-5.7

$4,257
GS-5.7

$2,420
C PC-2.0
$3, 255

$2, 552
C PC-3.0
$3, 516

$2, 632
C PC-3.0
$3, 515

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions___________________
$985,081
$1,004, 539
3,875
Regular pay in excess of 52-week b a se ...
3,870

1. Authoritative research and analysis___
2 General research
____ _______
4. Reference files, bibliographic and reader
service
- _____________

$1,035,999
4,061

Total obligations payable out of re­
imbursements from other ac­
counts
-- _____

25,662

Total obligations ________________

907, 228

42,880

Total personal service obligations.._

988,956

1,008,409

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
From Other Accoun ts

16, 730
7,980
952

1,040,060

Direct Obligations
01 Personal services___________________ _
02 Travel_____________________ __________
04 Communication services..-............. __
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services____ _______
08 Supplies and materials_______________

Total direct obligations____________

987,367

1,008,409

1,040,060
5.000

59,315
3,400
7,000

64, 500
3,400
7,000

64, 500
5,300
5,000

1,057,082

1,083,309

1,121,860

1,083,309

1, 121, 860

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

2.000

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
F rom Other Accoun ts

01

Personal services____________________

1,589

Total obligations__________________

1,058,671

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Obligations incurred during year_________
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________ _________ ________
_ _
Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations)________ _________

$1,121,860

100,000
1,021,860

LE GISLATIVE REFEREN CE SERVICE

Salaries and Expenses, Legislative Reference Service, Library of
Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary [personal services
to enable the Librarian ] to carry out the provisions of section 203
of the Legislative Reorganization A ct of 1946[, including not to
exceed $20,000 for employees engaged by the day or hour at rates
to be fixed by the Librarian; services as authorized by section 15
of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); printing and binding;
and supplies a n d jn a teria ls; $891,159] (2 T S. C. 166), $970,200:
J.




PROGRAM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

To carry out the objectives of the Legislative Reorgan­
ization Act of 1946, research reports and digests are pre­
pared and inquiries from Members and committees of
Congress relating to legislative problems and programs
are answered. The objectives for 1954 are: The readjust­
ment of all activities to an anticipated increase in the
number of inquiries and more adequate research coverage
in areas of congressional concern.
1. Authoritative research and analysis.— The Legislative
Reorganization Act of 1946 specifies 21 fields of specific
congressional concern. During 1953 the following 12
fields, all carried forward from 1952, are to be covered:
International economics, international relations, taxation
and fiscal policy, American government and public ad­
ministration, conservation and natural resources, social
welfare, American law, labor economics, engineering and
public works, transportation and communications, agri­
culture, and housing. It is proposed in 1954 to add two
additional fields: Money and banking and industrial
organization.
2. General research.— General research is performed and
reports furnished, spot reference inquiries answered,
graphs, charts and illustrations prepared, and translations
made. Congressional inquiries numbered 52,460 in 1952,
which was 16.2 percent over 1951. A continuation of
increase is anticipated. Assuming an annual increase at

27

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

the rate of 10 percent, the total for 1953 would be 57,706;
and for 1954, 62,476. Sufficient staff is requested for 1954
to provide more adequate handling of the substantia]
increase in inquiries since 1950.
3. Preparation oj digests, indexes, and abstracts.— The
Digest of Public General Bills covered 11,000 bills during
the Eighty-second Congress (4,121 in the second session).
It is expected to cover as many during the Eighty-third
Congress, second session. The card index to the Federal
Statutes was maintained as an essential reference tool.
4. Eejerence files, bibliographic and reader services.—
Reference files, containing clippings, pamphlets and docu­
ments, are maintained; researchers supplied with biblio­
graphic and reference tools; selective and comprehensive
bibliographies prepared for Members and committees of
Congress; and reader services provided by the Congres­
sional Reading Room. During 1952, 65,315 reference file
items were processed, 10,884 bibliographic entries pre­
pared, 24,244 published items acquired and processed,
and 3,199 readers served. It is expected to maintain this
level in 1953 and 1954.
5. Administration.
O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Library, [including personal services (including not to exceed
$30,000 for employees engaged in piecework and work by the day
or hour and for extra special services of regular em ployees at rates
to be fixed b y the Librarian), personal services for printing and
binding, freight and expressage, postage, traveling expenses con­
nected with such distribution, and expenses of attendance at meet­
ings when incurred on the written authority and direction of the
Librarian, $648,607] $1,264,800. (2 U. S. C. 131, 136, 139, 140,
150; 31 U. S. C. 588, 589; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1953.)
Estimate 1954, 0 $1,264,800
0Includes $588,000 for activities previously carried under appropriations as follows:

Appropriated 1953, $648,607

“ Miscellaneous expenses, Library of Congress” ______________________________
$1,500
“ Printing catalog cards, Library of Congress” ________________________________ 586, 500
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative .trans­
fers.
AM OUNTS

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade______________ _______
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary._____________________
Average grade_______________________

151
149

$1, 264,800

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

622,350
-3 0 2

648,607

1, 264,800

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer from—
“ Printing catalog cards, Library of
Congress” . .
_ ______________ ___
“ Miscellaneous expenses, Library of
Congress” . __ _____ _______________

622, 048

648,607

1,264,800

549,670

586,500

1,500

1,500

Total obligations____________ _____

1,173, 218

1,236, 607

1, 264,800

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$14,918
593,146

$15,600
596, 700

100

BY

A C T I V IT IE S

166

1

Description

1952 actual

Direct Obligations

$5, 798
G S - 8.6

$5, 691
GS-8.2

$2,941
C PC-2.0

$5, 613
GS-7.9
$2, 552
C PC-3.0

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions___________________
Part-time and temporary positions.........
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base___
Payment above basic rates_ _________
_

$862,422
3, 201
3,366
1, 696

$849,045

$927,033

3,305
450

3,642
725

Total personal service obligations___

870, 685

853, 800

932,400

1,000

1,000

1.
2.

Supplying cards for the Library of
Congress___________________________
Sale of cards to other libraries............. .
3. Preparation and distribution of publi­
cations---------------------------------------------4. Card printing for the Library of Con­
gress.. -------------- ---------------------- --------5. Card printing for other libraries...........
6. Printing and binding the Author Cata­
log--------------- ------- ----------------------------7. Printing and binding the Subject Cata­
log---------------------------------------------------8. Printing and binding publications re­
lated to cataloging................................

Direct Obligations

Total direct obligations_____ ______

Personal services_____________________
Travel_____ ________________________
Communication services_____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials....... ...................

845,023

853, 800

300
13,084
15, 612
7,547

300
10, 500
15,000

2,000

932,400
2.500
300
13,000
16, 500
5.500

Total direct obligations___________

881, 566

881, 600

$14,307
567, 276
41,865

42,043

66,000

188, 475
249,839

204,895
271,605

196,317
260,233

43,593

35,000

57,000

22,652

30,000

31,00Q

45,111

45,000

41,950

1,173,118

1,236,607

1,264,800

1, 236, 607

1,264,800

970, 200

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
From Other A ccoun ts

01

1954 estimate

$648,607

171

145

1953 estimate

$622, 250

1954 estimate

151

O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Reimbursements from other accounts ._

O B L IG A T IO N S

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees..............

FOR

1952 actual

S um m ary o f Personal Services

01
02
04
06
07
08

A V A IL A B L E

25, 662

Total obligations__________________

907, 228

OF

881,600

970, 200

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$49,840
891, 928

$66,372
866,300

$70,000
970,200

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year____
Obligations incurred during the year.........

941, 768

932, 672

1,040, 200

D educt:
Reimbursable obligations______________
Unliquidated obligations, end of y ea r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

25, 662
66,372
197

70, 000

100,000

Total expenditures..............................

849, 537

862, 672

940, 200

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations.......................

799, 907
49, 630

796,300
66,372

870,200
70,000

DISTRIBUTION OF CATALOG CARDS

Salaries and Expenses, Distribution of Catalog Cards, Library of
Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the preparation
and distribution of catalog cards and other publications o f the




Sale of cards to other libraries________

100

Total obligations________ ________ _

2.

1.173, 218

PR O G R A M

Personal services____ _______________

A N A L Y S IS

Obligations Payable Out of Reim burse­
ments From Other Accoun ts

AND

PERFORM ANCE

The work of the Card Division is that of a mail order
house doing a business of some $900,000 a year. It
maintains a stock of over 150,000,000 catalog cards repre­
senting some 2,000,000 titles, and fills orders from more
than 8,000 regular subscribers in the United States and
abroad. It also prepares and offers for sale certain publica­
tions. More than 97 percent of the personnel costs of
this appropriation is chargeable to the cost of card and
publication sales, and this cost plus 10 percent profit is
returned to the Treasury! The remaining 3 percent
represents a service to the Library of Congress. The
objectives for 1954 are: The greater use of card repro­
duction by means other than printing to expedite the
filling of orders for out-of-print cards; continued improve­
ments in operations with resulting reductions in cost to
card subscribers; increasing the scope and utility of the
Library’s Author and Subject catalogs in book form;
and extending the usefulness and coverage of Serial
Titles Newly Received.
Approximately 70 percent of the portion of this appro­
priation which is used for printing catalog cards and
related publications is chargeable to the cost of card

28

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS— Continued
d is t r ib u t io n

of

catalog

cards—

c o n tin u e d

Salaries and Expenses, Distribution of Catalog Cards, Library of
Congress— Continued

and publication sales, and this cost plus the 10 percent
statutory profit is returned to the Treasury; the remain­
ing 30 percent represents service to the Library of Con­
gress. It is planned in 1954 to keep within the publica­
tion pattern of 1953 by offsetting anticipated increases
in certain areas such as the Author Catalog by anticipated
decreases in other areas; for example, an anticipated
decrease in card production when the printing of cards
for motion pictures reaches its anticipated normal level.
1. Supplying catalog cards for the Library of Congress.—
The number of cards supplied to the Library of Congress
in fiscal 1952 was 4,950,658; estimated for 1953, 5,000,000;
and for 1954, 5,000,000.
2. Sale of cards to other libraries.— The number of cards
sold in fiscal 1952 was 20,816,692; estimated for 1953,
23,000,000; and for 1954, 25,000,000.
3. Preparation and distribution of publications .— Con­
tinued emphasis will be placed on the improvement and
wider distribution of the two library catalogs issued
periodically in book form: The Author Catalog (formerly
the Cumulative Catalog) and the Subject Catalog, the
latter begun in 1950, and both widely accepted as impor­
tant bibliographic tools. The requested increase is to
permit necessary expansion of Serial Titles Newly
Received, a publication prepared by the Library as part
of its program of accession lists. It provides a central
listing of serials received by American libraries, and its
proposed expansion will result in active participation by
approximately 100 libraries, including some indication of
their serial holdings. The total service is of particular
importance in meeting the needs of scholars, librarians,
and research workers for information about newly pub­
lished serials in their fields of interest.
4. Card printing for the Library of Congress.— The
number of cards printed in fiscal 1952 for the Library of
Congress was 4,950,658; estimated for 1953, 5,000,000;
and for 1954, 5,000,000.
5. Card printing for other libraries:— The number of
cards printed or otherwise reproduced in fiscal 1952 for
sale to other libraries was 30,137,014; estimated for 1953,
32,994,524; and for 1954, 31,150,214. The estimated
increase in the number of cards to be printed is based in
large part on the estimated increase in the number of
out-of-print titles to be reproduced by multilith, and the
production of cards for motion pictures and film strips.
6. Printing and binding the Author Catalog.— The
Author Catalog is a book catalog of the cards printed by
the Library of Congress arranged by author. It is issued
monthly and cumulated quarterly and annually. It is
planned to issue a 5-year cumulation in fiscal 1953 in lieu
of the annual issue for calendar 1952. In fiscal 1954,
the issuance of an annual cumulation (for 1953) will be
resumed. There were 733 paid subscriptions for monthly
and quarterly issues in 1952. It is estimated in 1953,
subscriptions for all issues will number about the same
as those for all issues in 1951— 886; and 890 in 1954.
The Library of Congress has, since 1948, published the
Army Medical Library Catalog as a supplement to the
Author Catalog. The 1948, 1949, and 1950 issues have
been author arrangements, but the 1951 issue is published
in two parts: Part One— Authors, and Part Two—
Subjects. The Army Medical Library Catalog is sold as
a separate item. Two hundred and fifty copies were sold




in 1951; 208 copies had been sold in 1952 between publi­
cation in May and September 30; it is estimated that 250
will be sold in 1953, and 260 in 1954.
7. Printing and binding the Subject Catalog.— The Sub­
ject Catalog is a book catalog reproducing cards printed
by the Library of Congress and arranged according to
subject content of the publications represented. It is
published quarterly and cumulated annually. There were
375 paid subscriptions for 1952; it is estimated that there
will be 385 in 1953, and 390 in 1954.
8. Printing and binding of publications related to catalog­
ing.— These publications are auxiliary to the cataloging
activities of the Library of Congress and include the
Classification Schedules, lists of Subject Headings, Rules
for Descriptive Cataloging, Cataloging Service Bulletins,
and similar publications. Because of the need to reprint
a large number of classification schedules, it is anticipated
that 1953 expenditures will equal those of 1952; a slight
reduction in the publication program is anticipated for
1954, as compared with 1952.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJECTS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

172

179

187

172

179

183

1952 actual

Object classification
S u m m ary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions .
Average number of all employees-------------

1

1

1

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________ __________
Average grade______________ _____-Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade______________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary-----

$3,527
GS-3.9

$3, 538
GS-3.9

$3, 599
GS-3.9

$2, 908
C PC-2.8
$3,166

$2, 890
C P C - 2.8
$3,350

$2, 913
C P C - 2.8
$3,350

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions________________ -Part-time and temporary positions------Regular pay in excess of 52-week base..Payments above basic rates

$603,864
3, 252
2, 308
4,313

$627,189
5,000
2,418

$654, 241
5,000
2, 559

Total personal service obligations._.

613, 737

639, 607

666, 800

613,637
3,334
7
4, 970
549, 670
1, 500

639, 607
3,500
500
5,000 •
586, 500
1, 500

666,800
3,500
500

Direct Obligations

01

02

03
04
06
08

Personal services____________________
___ ___________________
Travel
Transportation of th in g s ______ _____
Communication services____________
Printing and reproduction___
_ _ _
Supplies and materials_____ _________

6,000

586, 500
1, 500

1,236, 607

1,264,800

1, 236, 607

1,264,800

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$33,385
622,048

$42,563
648,607

$50,000
1,264,800

655,433

Total direct obligations____________

691,170

1,314,800

1,173,118

Obligations Payable Out of R eim bursem ents
F rom Other Accounts

01

100

Personal services
Total obligations

______________ A N A L Y S IS

OF

1,173,218

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations start of year.......
Obligations incurred during year_________
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Reimbursable obligations
Unliquidated obligations end of year—

42,563

50,000

150,000

Total expenditures_________________

612, 504

641,170

1,164,800

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorization___________
Out of prior authorization_____________

579,428
33,076

598,607
42, 563

1,114,800
50,000

266

100

IN CREASE OF THE L IB R A R Y OF CONGRESS

General Increase of the Library of Congress—
General increase of the Library: For [p u rch a se ] expenses (except
personal services) necessary for acquisition of books, [m iscellan eou s]
periodicals and newspapers, [p h otocop y in g supplies and p h oto­

29

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
copying la b o r ,] and all other material for the increase of the Library,
[in cluding paym ent in advance for subscription books and society
publications, and for freight and expressage, postage, commissions,
and traveling expenses not to exceed $25,000, including expenses of
attendance at meetings when incurred on the written authority and
direction of the Librarian in the interest o f collections, and all other
expenses incidental to the acquisition of material for the increase of
the Library b y purchase, gift, bequest, or exchange, $270,000]
$335,000, to continue available during the next succeeding fiscal
year. {2 U. S. C. 131, 132, 132a; Legislative Branch Appropriation
'Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $270,000
AM O U NTS

Estimate 1954, $335,000

A V A IL A B L E

FO R O B L IG A T IO N

Increase of the Law Library, Library of Congress—■
Increase of the law library: For [th e purchase] expenses {except
personal services) necessary for acquisition of books [a n d f o r ], legal
periodicals [ f o r ] , and all other material for the increase of the law
library, [including paym ent in advance for legal periodicals and ,
for legal society publications, and for freight and expressage, postage,
commissions, traveling expenses not to exceed $2,500, including
expenses of attendance at meetings when incurred on the written
authority and direction of the Librarian in the interest of collections,
and all other expenses incidental to the acquisition of material for
the increase of the law library, $85,500] $94,000, to continue avail­
able during the next succeeding fiscal year. (2 X . S. C. 131, 132,
J
134, 135, 137, 138, 139, 144/ Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $85,500

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Estimate 1954, $94,000

1954 estimate
AM OUNTS

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Prior year balance available_____________

$270,000

$270,000
6,860

272,868
-6 ,8 6 0

276,860

335,000

Obligations incurred........... ................

266,008

276,860

335,000

FOR O B L IG A T IO N

$335,000

Total available for obligation............
Balance available in subsequent year.

A V A IL A B L E

O B L IG A T IO N S

2,868

BY

1952 actual

PR O G R AM

AND

O BJECTS

1952 actual

Object classification

02

BY

103,891

94,000

95,178
BY

$94,000

103,891

94,000

A C T I V IT IE S

Purchase of books and other library materials—1952, $95,178; 1953, $103,891; 1954, $94,000.

PERFORM ANCE

This appropriation constitutes the only means of ac­
quiring regular domestic trade publications (except for
copyright deposits) and many foreign trade publications,
both current and noncurrent, from approximately 100
countries or areas. The publications acquired by pur­
chase constitute a most important part of the Library’s
acquisitions although they represent only a small portion
of the material received annually.
The increase in fiscal 1954 is necessary in large part to
repair to some extent the damage done to the Library’s
noncurrent book acquisitions program during the past 3
years through the necessity to expend funds to meet the
increased costs of current books, subscriptions, and in*
cidental expenses. The increase requested will also pro­
vide for slight increases in the acquisition of current books
and subscriptions; permit the continuance of a portion of
the Library’s exchange program which was financed until
recently by funds transferred from the Department of
State; and enable the Library to acquire additional noncurrent materials (including photoreproductions) to meet
its reference responsibilities to the Congress, the executive
agencies of the Federal Government, and the general
public.
O B L IG A T IO N S

O B L IG A T IO N S

$85,500
18,391

113,569
-18,391

Obligations incurred______ ________

A C T IV IT I E S

Purchase of books and other library materials—1952, $266,008; 1953, $276,860; 1954,
$335,000.

1954 estimate

$85,500
28,069

Appropriation or estim ate._________ ____
Prior year balance available................... .
Total available for obligation............
Balance available in subseqmint y e a r.___

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

PROGRAM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

This appropriation constitutes the only means of
acquiring law books published in the regular domestic
trade (except for copyright deposits) and many foreign
law books published in countries all over the world. The
legal publications acquired by purchase constitute a most
important part of the Law Library’s acquisitions, although
a substantial part of the annual receipts is received by
means other than purchase.
The increase in fiscal 1954 is necessary to meet an in­
crease in the prices of legal publications of 10 to 20 percent
over the prices of 1951. Such increase in the appropria­
tion is essential to enable the Law Library to acquire the
items for which it must continue to subscribe, current
material from all jurisdictions with particular emphasis
on common law countries and the sensitive areas abroad,
and older publications to fill gaps in the collections in
order to obtain the comprehensive and complete coverage
that the very nature of law requires. Maintenance of
the 1951-52 level of acquisition by means of the requested
increase in appropriation would permit the Law Library,
as the only general legal research library of the Govern­
ment, to continue to meet the reference and other service
demands of the Congress, the executive and judicial
branches of the Government, and the general public.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJECTS

Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things........................
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services................ .
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent (books and other library
materials)........ ............ ........................

$21,889
2,530
9,898
12,600
76
47

$25,000
3,000
9,300
15,240
50
50

$25,000
4,000

11,100

Object classification

224,220

279,400

266,008

276,860

335,000

02 Travel- _
.
_ _____________
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services____ ________
09 Equipm ent (books and other library
materials)........ ....................... .............

$2,106
92

218,968

Obligations incurred........... ...........

Obligations incurred_____________

03
04
05
07
08
09

A N A L Y S IS

OF

15,400
50
50

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2,500
500
3,000

$2, 500
700
3,300

90,094

97, 891

87, 500

95,178

103, 891

94,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$80, 531
95,178

$59,098
103,891

$50,000
94,000

2,886

E X P E N D IT U R E S
A N A L Y S IS

1953 estimate

$242,955
266,008

$124,308
276,860

$125,000
335,000

508,963

401,168

460.000

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year...............................................................

124,308

125,000

125.000

Total expenditures................. ............

384,655

276,168

335,000

/
384,655 I

151,860
124,308

210,000

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1954 estimate

1952 actual

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorization.....................
Out of prior authorization......................... }




125,000

Unliquidated obligations start of year
Obligations incurred during the year.........

175,709

162,989

144,000

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r ._________________________________
Total expenditures______ _________

59,098
116,611

50,000
112, 989

50.000
94.000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations................... J
Out of prior authorizations.......................

f
116,611 \

53,891
59,098

44.000
50.000

30

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS— Continued

PR O G R A M

Books for the Supreme Court, Library of Congress—
Books for the Supreme Court: For the purchase of books and
periodicals for the Supreme Court, to be a part of the Library of
Congress, and purchased b y the Librarian of the Supreme Court,
under the direction of the Chief Justice, [$ 2 2 ,5 0 0 ] $25,000. (2
U. S. C. 131, 132j 135, 137, 139; Legislative Branch Appropriation
A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $22,500
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $25,000

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1952, $22,500; 1953, $22,500; 1954,
$25,000.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

A C T IV IT IE S

Purchase of books and periodicals—1952, $22,500; 1953, $22,500; 1954, $25,000.
PR OGRAM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

Books and periodicals are purchased for the library of
the Supreme Court, which, though a part of the Library
of Congress, is administered under th§ direction of the
Chief Justice. The increase proposed for 1954 is to pay
for increased prices of books and periodicals.
O B L IG A T IO N S

09

BY

O BJECTS

Equipm ent (books and other library materials)—1952, $22,500; 1953, $22,500; 1954,
$25,000
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2,434
22, 500

$2,257
22, 500

$2, 0 0
0
25,000

24,934

24,757

27,000

2,257
136

2,000

3,000

Total expenditures..............................

22, 541

22, 757

24,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ ______
Out of prior authorizations................ .......

21,338
1,203

20, 500
2,257

22,000
2,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year....... .
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years-

BOOKS FOR [ A D U L T ] T H E BLIND

Books for the Blind, Library of Congress—
[ T o enable the Librarian of C ongress] For salaries and other
expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the Act entitled
“ An A ct to provide books for the [a d u lt ] blind” , approved M arch
3, 1931 (2 U. S. C. 135a), as amended, [$1,000,000, including not
exceeding $77,330 for personal services, not exceeding $200,000 for
books in raised characters, and the balance remaining for soundreproduction records and for the purchase, maintenance, and re­
placement of the G overnm ent-owned reproducers for sound-repro­
duction records for the blind and not exceeding $2,000 for necessary
traveling expenses connected with such service and for expenses of
attendance at meetings when incurred on the written authority and
direction of the Librarian; and for printing and bin din g ] $1,125,000.
(2 U. S. C. 131, 135b, 136, 139, 1%0; Legislative Branch A ppropria­
tion Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,000,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $1,125,000

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

$1,125,000

$1, 000,000
-3 ,7 0 7

$1, 000,000

Obligations incurred___________ ____

996,293

1, 000,000

BY

1,125,000

A C T IV IT IE S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1. Procurement and distribution_________
2. Cataloging and reference service_______

$938,535
57,758

$941,035
58,965

$1,066,035
58,965

Obligations incurred_______________

996,293

1, 000,000

1,125,000




1953 estimate

1954 estimate

190
171

165
140

180
140

0

2, 876

5,448
7,174
3, 000
10, 0 0
0

6,447
2,018
2, 983

6,886

3, 000
10, 0
00

2.
Cataloging and reference services.— Catalogs of talk­
ing and Braille books are prepared and maintained. In
addition to publishing cumulative supplements for both
mediums in 1954, it is planned to initiate the reproduction
of a catalog of our total collections by offset process.

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions-----Average number of all employees------------Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary------- --------------------------Average grade--------------------------------01

Description

1952 actual

Talking books purchased (titles)_________
Embossed books purchased (titles)_ ____
_
Talking book machines:
Purchased ___ ______________________
Repaired _ __ __________
________
Salvaged-scrapped _________ ________
Records replaced
____________ ______

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

O B L IG A T IO N S

Description

O B L IG A T IO N S

1953 estimate

PERFORM ANCE

The Library of Congress program for providing books
for the blind of the United States, its Territories and in­
sular possessions is authorized by the act of March 3,
1931 (2 U. S. C. 135a), as amended. The most recent
amendment, by removing the word “ adult” from the
language of the authorization act, extended the program
to provide a reader service for blind children. The
moneys authorized to be appropriated annually by this
act are used for providing books published either in
raised characters, on sound-reproduction recordings, or
in any other form. Funds are also expended for the pur­
chase of sound-reproduction recordings and for the pur­
chase, maintenance, and replacement of reproducers for
such sound-reproduction recordings. The books are cir­
culated through the facilities of 28 regional distributing
libraries and the talking book machines are distributed
through 55 State lending agencies, with preference given
to blind veterans.
The objectives for 1954 are: Provision for reproductions
of books in Braille and Moon type commensurate with
the declining reader demand and within the limitation of
available funds to provide the maximum satisfaction to
increased reader demand for talking books including some
titles for children, preparation of new specifications for
talking book reproducers and provision for a slight net
increase in the number of talking book reproducers be­
yond the replacement requirement of 5,000 per year,
preparation of new specifications for the printing of books
in Braille type, sponsoring a national conference for vol­
unteer groups directed to the coordination, simplification,
and better understanding of the procedures for transcrib­
ing books in single copies into Braille type and special
recording of text books on plastic disks, and improvement
of liaison between the Library of Congress and agencies in
the field.
1.
Procurement and distribution.— Books are selected,
purchased, and distributed, and talking books are pur­
chased, repaired, and replaced.

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

AND

Personal services:
Permanent positions------ ------- --------Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.
Total personal services-----------------

03 Transportation of things-------------------04 Communication services-------------------06 Printing and reproduction----------------07 Other contractual services. ...................

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

20
19

20
20

20
20

$4,046
GS-4.9

$3,878
GS-4.5

$3,920
GS-4.5

$77,033
297

$77,032
298

$77,028
302

77,330
802
507
1,497
4,494
91,621

77,330

77,330

93,000

82,000

2,000
1,000
1,800
6,000

2,000
1,000
2,000
8,000

31

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjects

Object classification
08
09

1952 actual

______

A N A L Y S IS

OF

1953 estimate
$14,000
804,870

$18,000
934,670

1, 000,000

996, 293

1953 estimate

$242,025

$250,000

$179,238
560
3, 420,017

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year........

3,470,000
3, 712,025

250,000

250, 000

1954 estimate

Total expenditures____ ___________

3,354, 981

3,462, 025

250,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations____________

3,175,183
179, 798

3, 220, 000
242,025

250,000

1, 000,000

$517,036

$350,000
1,125,000

1, 517,036

1,475,000

350,000

350,000

1,099,017

1,167,036

1,125,000

651,085
447,932

650,000
517,036

775.000
350.000

1,189

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current appropriations_________
Out of prior appropriations___________

1954 estimate

2,809
242,025

517,036

Total expenditures_________________

1953 estimate

3, 599,815

1,617, 242
D educt:
U nliquidated obligations end of year___
Adjustments in obligations of prior
years_
_
_ __
____ _____

1952 actual

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations______________
Unliquidated obligations end of year___

$620,949
996, 293

U nliquidated obligations start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1,125,000

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

OF

1954 estimate

$12,473
807, 569

Supplies and m aterials._____________
E quipm ent_________________ _______
Obligations incurred.. _ __

A N A L Y S IS

— c o n tin u e d

[

c o p y r ig h t

o f f ic e ]

Salaries, Copyright Office, Library of Congress—
[Salaries: For the Register of Copyrights and other personal
services, including personal services for printing and binding,
$1,008,409.] (2 U. S. C. 131, 136, 139, 140 , 150; 17 U. S. C. 1 -6 5 ;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,008,409

A D M IN IS TR AT IV E PROVISIONS

Appropriations in this A ct available to the Library of Congress for
salaries shall be available for expenses of investigating the loyalty of
Library employees; special and temporary services (-including employees
engaged by the day or hour or in piecework) and extra special services
of regular employees at rates to be fixed by the Librarian; and services
as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a).
Appropriations in this Act available to the Library of Congress shall
be available, when specifically authorized by the Librarian, for expenses
of attendance at meetings concerned with the function or activity for
which the appropriation is made.
N ot to exceed ten positions in the Library of Congress may be
exem pt from the provisions of appropriation Acts concerning the
em ploym ent of aliens during the current fiscal year, but the Librar­
ian shall not make any appointm ent to any such position until he
has ascertained that he cannot secure for such appointments a person
in any of the three categories specified in such provisions who
possesses the special qualifications for the particular position and
also otherwise meets the general requirements for em ploym ent in
the Library of Congress. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ctr
1953.)
Salaries, Library Proper, Library of Congress—■
[Salaries, Library proper: For the Librarian, the Librarian
Emeritus, and other personal services including special and tem ­
porary services and extra special services of regular employees (not
exceeding $5,000) at rates to be fixed by the Librarian, services as
authorized by section 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C.
55a), and personal services for printing and binding, $3,470,000, of
which so much as may be necessary m ay be transferred to other
agencies of the Governm ent for the purpose of investigating the
loyalty of Library employees, and for health service program as
authorized by la w .] (2 T . S. C. 131-166; 5 T . S. C. 150; 20
J
J
T . S. C. 91; 52 Stat. 808; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
J
1953.)

N ote .—E stimate of $1,046,960 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Copyright Office, Library of
Congress.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as com ­
parative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate. _______ ______
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$987,510
1, 589

$1,008,409

Total available for obligation...........
Unobligated balance, estimated sa v in gs-.

989,099
-143

1,008,409

Obligations incurred_________ _____
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and ex­
penses, Copyright Office, Library of
Congress” _________________ __________

988, 956

1,008,409

-988,956

1954 estimate

-1,008,409

Total obligations________ _________

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

$69,472
1,008, 409

$75,000

1,042,191
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Reimbursable obligations
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r.._

1954 estimate

$53, 235
988, 956

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during year________

1953 estimate

1,077, 881

75,000

1

1,589
69,472

75,000

Total expenditures________________

971,129

1, 002, 881

75,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.. _______
Out of prior authorizations____________

917, 895
53, 234

933,409
69, 472

75,000

[R E V IS IO N

OF ANNOTATED C O N ST IT U T IO N ]

Appropriated 1953, $3,470,000
N ote .—E stimate of $3,708,658 for activities previously carried under this title has
been transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress.” The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Revision of Annotated Constitution, Library of Congress—
[Salaries and expenses: For necessary personal services to enable
the Librarian to revise and extend the Annotated Constitution of
the United States of America, to include Supreme Court cases
through the 1951-52 term, $3,000.] (Legislative Branch A ppro­
priation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $3,000

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$3,417,838
2,809

$3,470,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

3,420,647
-630

3,470,000

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, Library of Congress'*................

3,420,017

3,470,000

-3,420,017

-3,470,000

Total obligations..................................




AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate________ _ .
Prior year balance available________ ____

$126

Obligations incurred_______________

126

1953 estimate
$3,000
3,000

1954 estimate

32

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS— Continued
[r e v is io n

o f

a n n o ta te d

AM OUNTS

c o n s t i t u t i o n ] — co n tin u e d

BY

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJECTS

Other contractual services—1952, $126; 1953, $3,000.
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$450,000
-1,329

Obligations incurred___ ___________
Comparative transfer to—
“ Salaries and expenses, Library of Con­
gress” _____ ______ ___________ ______
“ Salaries and expenses, Copyright
Office, Library of Congress” ________

448, 671

450,000

-428, 671

1954 estimate

$450,000

-430,000

-

20,000

20,000

-

Total obligations__________________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate
A N A L Y S IS

Unliquidated obligations start of year____
Obligations incurred during the year____

O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

A C T IV IT IE S

Preparation of Annotated Constitution of the United States of America— 1952, $126;
1953, $3,000.
07

FO R

1952 actual

Revision of Annotated Constitution, Library of Congress— Con.
O B L IG A T IO N S

A V A IL A B L E

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

$1

$126

3,000

126

3,001

D educt unliquidated obligations end of
year_____ _____________________________

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

[

u n io n

$100,000

537, 547

562, 230

100,000

633
112, 230

100,000

424, 684

462, 230

100,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations. _________
Out of prior authorizations
______

338, 741
85, 943

350,000
112, 230

100,000

3, 001

125 |

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years,
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

3,000

ca talo g s]

Salaries and Expenses, Union Catalogs, Library of Congress—■
[Salaries and expenses: T o continue the development and main­
tenance of the Union Catalogs, including personal services (including
not to exceed $700 for em ployees engaged by the day or hour at
rates to be fixed by the Librarian); personal services for printing
and binding; traveling expenses including expenses of attendance
at meetings when incurred on the written authority and direction
of the Librarian; and other necessary expenses; $85,492.] {2 U. S. C.
131, 136 139, 140, 150, 162; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $85,492

Printing the Catalog of Title Entries of Copyright Office, Library of
Congress—
[P rintin g the Catalog of Title Entries of the Copyright Office: For
the publication of the Catalog of Title Entries of the C opyright
Office and the decisions of the United States courts involving
copyrights, $44,500.] (2 U. S. C. 131, 136, 139; 17 U. S. C. 56, 57;
31 U. S. C. 588, 589; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $44,500

Estimate of $97,637 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress." The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
N o t e .—

AM OUNTS

$112, 230
450,000

Total expenditures________________

125

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________ }
Out of prior authorizations ___________

$88 876
,
448, 671

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1

Total expenditures____ ____________

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

N o t e . —Estimate of $44,500 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Copyright Office, Library of
Congress.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as com ­
parative transfers.

O B L IG A T IO N
AM OUNTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1954 estimate
1952 actual

Appropriation or estimate-----------------------Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

$80,660
-2 4

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, Library of Congress” ................

80,636

-85,492

1954 estimate

85,492

-80,636

1953 estimate

$85,492
Appropriation or estimate-----------------------Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$44,500

Obligations incurred..--------------------Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, Copyright Office, Library of
___________________________
Congress”

Total obligations_________________

$39, 500
-1 8 5
39,315

44,500

-39,315

—44, 500

Total obligations
A N A L Y S IS

OF

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$10, 877
80,636

$9, 549
85,492

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year
_ __ __________________

95,041

10,000

9, 549

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorization____ _______
Out of prior authorization______ _____

10,000

81, 964

Total expenditures_________ ______-

85,041
75,492
9,549

71,087
10,877

and

b in d in g

10,000
10,000

]

General Printing and Binding, Library of Congress—
[G eneral printing and binding: For miscellaneous printing and
binding for the Library of Congress, including the Copyright
Office, and the binding, rebinding, and repairing of Library books,
$ 4 5 0 ,0 0 0 .] (2 U. S. C. 131, 139, 152; 31 U. S. C . 588, 589;
Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $450,000
N o t e . —Estimate of $450,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to appropriations as follows:
“ Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress” ---------------- ------- ------------------------ $430,000
“ Salaries and expenses, Copyright Office, Library of Congress” ----------- --------20,000
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedules as comparative
transfers.




A N A L Y S IS

OF

$10,000

91, 513

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year_____

p r in t in g

_____

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

[

___

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$16,371
1,689
39,315

$20,712

$22,250

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Obligations incurred during the year--------

44,500
22,250

57,375

65,212

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year
_____

20,712

22, 250

Total expenditures____________~ .

36, 663

42, 962

22,250

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations...................
Out of prior authorizations _____ ______

18, 603
18,060

22, 250
20,712

22,250

Printing Catalog Cards, Library of Congress—
[P rintin g catalog cards: For the printing of catalog cards and of
miscellaneous publications relating to the distribution of catalog
cards, and for duplication of catalog cards b y methods other than
printing, $586,500.] (2 U. S. C. 139, 150; 31 U. S. C. 588, 58 9;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $586,500
N o t e — Estimate of $586,500 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, distribution of catalog cards,
Library of Congress.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule
as comparative transfers.

33

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

[
1954 estimate

Salaries and Expenses, Library Buildings, Library of Congress—
[Salaries and expenses: For personal services, including per­
sonal services for printing and binding, and necessary miscellaneous
expenses in connection with the custody, care, and maintenance o f
the library buildings; including not to exceed $750 for em ployees
engaged by the day or hour at rates to be fixed by the Librarian,
and including mail and delivery service, telephone service, special
clothing, cleaning of special clothing of separated employees, m edi­
cal supplies, equipment, and expenses for the emergency rooms,
housekeeping and miscellaneous supplies and equipm ent, and other
incidental expenses: $794,820.] (2 U. S. C. 139-14-1; Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)

1954 estimate

Appropriated 1953, $794,820

$134, 562

$135,000

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$550, 500
-8 3 0

$586, 500

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, distribution of catalog cards,
Library of Congress” __________________

549, 670

586, 500

-5 49 , 670

-586, 500

Total obligations.
OF

b u il d in g s ]

1953 estimate

1952 actual

A N A L Y S IS

l ib r a r y

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
$126, 573
11,533
549, 670

721,062

Deduct unliquidated obligations end of
year___________________________________

134, 562

135,000

Total expenditures________________

553, 214

586,062

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorization___________
Out of prior authorization........................

417,133
136,081

451, 500
134, 562

N ote .—E stimate of $806,505 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress.” The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

" ’ 586,"5o6'

687, 776

U nliquidated obligations start of year___
Adjustm ent in obligations of prior yea rs..
Obligations incurred during the year....... .

[

m is c e l l a n e o u s

expen ses

of

the

l ib r a r y

135,000

Appropriation or estimate____________
Reimbursements from other accounts..
135,000

]

N ote .—E stimate of $98,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to appropriations as follows:
“ Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress” ___________________________ _____$70,800
“ Salaries and expenses, Copyright Office, Library of Congress” ______________ 10,400
“ Salaries and expenses, Legislative Reference Service, Library of Congress” . _ 15,300
“ Salaries and expenses, distribution of catalog cards, Library of Congress” ___
1, 500
T he amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedules as comparative
transfers.
FO R

A N A L Y S IS

OF

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$786,485
461

$794,820

T otal available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

786,946
-4 77

794,820

Obligations incurred______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, Library of Congress” ________

786,469

794,820

-786,469

-794,820

Total obligations.

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year____

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$58,101

$60,000

$45,432
24
786,469
831,925

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations______________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

794,820
852,921

60,000

461
58,101

60,000

Total expenditures............................ .

773.363

792,921

60,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations____________

728,020
45,343

734,820
58,101

60,000

1954 estimate

[L IB R A R Y OF CONGRESS TRUST FUND B O A R D ]

-5 2 , 789

-52,800

Salaries and Expenses, Library of Congress Trust Fund Board—
[F o r any expense of the Library of Congress Trust Fund Board
not properly chargeable to the income of any trust fund held by the
Board, $5 00 .] (2 U. S. C. 139, 155; Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1953.)

-10,400

-10,400

Appropriated 1953, $500

-15,300

-15,300

N ote .—Estimate of $500 for activities previously carried under this title has been trans­
ferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress.” The amounts
obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

-1 ,5 0 0

-1 ,5 0 0

$80,000

$80,000

79,989

80,000

-1 1

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

1953 estimate

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred...........................
Comparative transfer to—
“ Salaries and expenses, Library of Con­
gress” _______________________________
“ Salaries and expenses, Copyright
Office, Library of Congress” _________
“ Salaries and expenses, Legislative
Reference Service, Library of Con­
gress” _______________________________
“ Salaries and expenses, distribution of
catalog cards, Library of Congress” —.
Total obligations........ .........................

FO R O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Appropriated 1953, $80,000

A V A IL A B L E

A V A IL A B L E

135,000

Miscellaneous Expenses, Library of Congress—
[M iscellaneous expenses: For miscellaneous expenses connected
w ith the administration of the Library, and not otherwise provided
for, including domestic and foreign postage, travel expenses, in­
cluding not exceeding $500 for expenses of attendance at meetings
when incurred on the written authority and direction of the Li­
brarian, printing and binding, and personal services, supplies, and
other necessary expenses for the operation of a photo-duplication
service, and for the purchase of photoduplications, $80,000.]
(2 U. S. C. 131-166; 17 U. S. C. 1-6 5 ; 28
S. C. 921; Legislative
Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)

AM OUNTS

AM OUNTS

$12,396
79,989

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$7,188
80,000

$8,000

8,000

D educt:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures..............................

92,385
760
7,188
84,437

87,188

79,188

72,806
11,631

72,000
7,188

8,000

$500
-5 0 0

Obligations in cu rre d ______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, Library of Congress” ...............

1954 estimate

$500
500
-5 00

8,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations............. .
Out of prior authorizations.......................

Appropriation or estimate______ _____ _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

1953 estimate




Total obligations................................

8,000

A N A L Y S IS

O F E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year
izations)—1953, $500.

(total expenditures out of current

author­

34

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
W ORKIN G CAPITAL AND CONGRESSIONAL PRINTIN G AND BINDING

Working Capital and Congressional Printing and Binding, Govern­
ment Printing Office—
T o provide the Public Printer with working capital for the
follow ing purposes for the execution of printing, binding, litho­
graphing, mapping, engraving, and other authorized work of the
Governm ent Printing Office for the various branches of the G ov­
ernment: For salaries of Public Printer and D eputy Public Printer;
for salaries, compensation, or wages of all necessary, officers and
em ployees additional to those herein appropriated for, including
employees necessary to handle waste paper and condemned ma­
terial for sale; to enable the Public Printer to com ply with the
provisions of law granting holidays and half holidays and Executive
orders granting holidays and half holidays with pay to em ployees;
to enable the Public Printer to com ply with the provisions of law
granting leave to em ployees with pay, such pay to be at the rate
for their regular positions at the tim e the leave is granted; rental
of buildings and equipm ent; fuel, gas, heat, electric current, gas
and electric fixtures; m otor vehicles for the carriage of printing
and printing supplies, and the maintenance, repair, and operation
of the same, to be used only for official purposes; [purchase (not
to exceed tw o for replacement o n ly ) ,] operation, repair, and main­
tenance of passenger m otor vehicles for official use of the officers
o f the Government Printing Office when in writing ordered by the
Public Printer; freight, expressage, telegraph and telephone service,
furniture, typewriters, and carpets; traveling expenses, including
not to exceed $1,000 for attendance at meetings or conventions
when authorized by the Joint Com m ittee on Printing; stationery,
postage, and advertising; directories, technical books, newspapers,
magazines, and books of reference (not to exceed $2,000); adding
and numbering machines, time stamps, and other machines of
similar character; purchase of uniforms for guards; rubber boots,
coats, and gloves; machinery (not to exceed $500,000); equipment,
and for repairs to machinery, implements, and buildings, and for
minor alterations to buildings; necessary equipment, maintenance,
and supplies for the emergency room for the use of all employees in
the Governm ent Printing Office who may be taken suddenly ill or
receive injury while on du ty; other necessary contingent and mis­
cellaneous items authorized by the Public Printer; for expenses
authorized in writing by the Joint Com mittee on Printing for the
inspection of printing and binding equipment, material, and sup­
plies and Governm ent printing plants in the D istrict of Columbia
or elsewhere (not to exceed $1,000); for salaries and expenses of
preparing the sem imonthly and session indexes of the Congressional
Record under the direction of the Joint Com mittee on Printing
(chief indexer at $8,800, one cataloger at $7,260, tw o catalogers at
$6,191 each, and one cataloger at $5,517); and for all the necessary
labor, paper, materials, and equipm ent needed in the prosecution
and delivery and mailing of the w ork; in all, [$19,000,000] $25,100,000; to which sum shall be charged the printing and binding
authorized to be done for Congress, including supplemental and
deficiency estimates of appropriations; the printing, binding, and
distribution of the Federal Register in accordance with the Act
approved July 26, 1935 (44 U. S. C. 301-310) (not to exceed
[$850,000] $675,000); the printing and binding of the supplement
to the Code of Federal-Regulations as authorized by the A ct of July
26, 1935, as amended (44 U. S. C. 311) (not to exceed [$400,000]
$4-75,000); the printing and binding for use of the Governm ent
Printing Office; the printing and binding (not to exceed $5,000) for
official use of the Architect of the Capitol upon requisition of the
Secretary of the Senate; in all to an am ount not exceeding [$ 9 ,000,000] $10,100,000: Provided, T h at not less than [$10,000,000]
$15,000,000 of such working capital shall be returned to the Treas­
ury as an unexpended balance not later than six months after the
close of the current fiscal year: Provided further, That notwith­
standing the provisions of section 73 of the A ct of January 12, 1895
(44 U. S. C. 241), no part of the foregoing sum of [$9,000,000]
$10,100,000 shall be used for printing and binding part 2 of the
annual report of the Secretary of Agriculture (known as the Year­
book of Agriculture).
Printing and binding for Congress chargeable to the foregoing
appropriation, when recom m ended to be done by the Com mittee on
Printing of either House, shall be so recommended in a report con­
taining an approxim ate estimate of the cost thereof, together with a
statement from the Public Printer of estimated approximate cost of
work previously ordered by Congress within the fiscal year for which
this appropriation is made.
During the current fiscal year any executive department or inde­
pendent establishment of the G overnm ent ordering printing and




binding or blank paper and supplies from the G overnm ent Printing
Office shall pay prom ptly by check to the Public Printer upon his
written request, either in advance or upon com pletion of the work,
all or part of the estimated or actual cost thereof, as the case may be,
and bills rendered by the Public Printer in accordance herewith shall
not be subject to audit or certification in advance of paym ent: Pro­
vided, That proper adjustm ents on the basis of the actual cost of
delivered w ork paid for in advance shall be made m onthly or quarter­
ly and as may be agreed upon by the Public Printer and the depart­
ment or establishment concerned. All sums paid to the Public
Printer for work that he is authorized by law to do; all sums received
from sales of waste paper, other waste material, and condemned
property; and for losses or damage to G overnm ent property; shall
be deposited to the credit of the appropriation made for the working
capital of the Governm ent Printing Office and be subject to [requ i­
sitio n ] disbursement by the Public Printer.
No part of any m oney appropriated in this A ct shall be paid to
any person em ployed in the Governm ent Printing Office while
detailed for or perform ing service in the executive branch of the
public service of the United States unless such detail be authorized
by law. (Legislative Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $19,000,000
AM O U NTS

Estim ate 1954, $25,100,000

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
W orking capital returned to Treasury____
Obligations incurred_______________

1954 estimate

$19,200,000

$19,000,000

$25,100,000

488,051
67,148, 975

Appropriation or estimate_______________
R e i m b u r s e m e n t s f r o m non-Federal
sources________________________________
Reimbursements from other accounts____
Reimbursements receivable from nonFederal sources__________________ ______
Reimbursements receivable from other
accounts_________________________ ______

1953 estimate

400,000
61, 616, 883

400,000
61,480, 196

54,025

-

30,000

30,000

16, 200,059

12, 970, 000

11, 970, 000

103, 091,110
-542, 743
10, 000, 0 0
0

94, 016,883

92, 548,367

98, 980,196

10, 000, 000

-1 5 , 000, 000

84, 016,883

-

83, 980,196

N o t e .— Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from sales of waste paper,
other waste material, and condemned property, and for losses or damages to Government
property (64 Stat. 607).
PR OGRAM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

The Government Printing Office executes orders for
printing, binding, and blank-book work placed by Con­
gress, and the departments, independent establishments,
and agencies of the Federal Government and furnishes,
on order, blank paper, inks, and similar supplies.
The amount appropriated each year includes the print­
ing and binding authorized to be done for Congress; for
the printing, binding, and distribution of the Federal
Register; and $15,000,000 for working capital, which is
returned to the Treasury not later than 6 months after
the close of the fiscal year. All work for other agencies of
the Government is reimbursed on the basis of actual cost
incurred.
O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positionsAverage number of all employees________

6
6, 969

7,054
4
6,983

6,983

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions___________ ___
Part-time and temporary positions _
Paym ent above basic rates_______.

$28,655,151
17, 813
4,142, 428

$29,673,287
13,117
2, 832, 299

$29,674,600
13,117
2,832,479

Total personal services___________
Travel_________________ ____________
Transportation of things____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services......... ............
Printing and re p ro d u ctio n ..________
Otjher contractual s e rv ice s __ ________
Supplies and materials_____ __________
Equipment____ __ _________________
Lands and structures__ _________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___

32,815, 392
19,160
919,278
100,878
834, 6 8
8
27,938, 660
112,940
28,996,109
809,188
1,132
943

32, 518, 883
19.000
845.000
98.000
770, 000
22, 500, 000

32, 520,196
19.000
845.000
98.000
770.000
22, 500,000

26,300, 0
00
864,000

1,000
1, 000

26, 300,000
826,000
1, 0
00
1, 000

Obligations incurred_____________ .

92, 548,368

84,016,883

83,980,196

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
13

7,087

100.000

7,054
4

100.000

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year i__.
Obligations incurred during the year___

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

—$4, 501, 209
92, 548,367

—$3, 407, 572
84, 016, 883

—$2, 699, 000
83, 980,196

88, 047,158

80, 609, 311

81, 281,196

83, 891,110
- 3 , 407, 572
318, 965

75, 016, 883
-2,699, 000
290,000

73, 880,196
- 1 , 075, 000
270,000

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations. ___ __
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligated balances carried to certified
claims a cco u n t____ _______
_ ___

16, 026

______________

7, 228, 629

8, 001, 428

8, 206, 0 0
0

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ _____
Out of prior authorizations ___ __ _

11,153, 962
- 3 , 925,333

11, 002, 227
- 3 , 000, 799

10, 672, 000
- 2 , 466, 000

Total expenditures

1 Unliquidated obligations at start of year are reported as follows:
Fiscal year 1952, gross unliquidated obligations $23,817,749; reimbursements receivable
$28,318,958.
Fiscal year 1953, gross unliquidated obligations $12,862,793; reimbursements receivable
$16,270,365.
Fiscal year 1954, gross unliquidated obligations $10,315,000; reimbursements receivable
$13,014,000.
OFFICE OF SUPERINTEN DEN T OF DOCUMENTS

Salaries and Expenses, Office of Superintendent of Documents—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Office of
Superintendent of D ocum ents, including personal services in accord­
ance with the Classification A ct of 1949, as amended, and compensa­
tion of employees who shall be subject to the provision of the A ct
entitled “ An Act to regulate and fix rates of pay for employees and
officers of the Governm ent Printing Office” , approved June 7, 1924
(44 U. S. C. 40); traveling expenses (not to exceed $1,500); price lists
and bibliographies; repairs to buildings, elevators, and machinery;
and supplying books to depository libraries; Z$2,817,120] $3,041,050:
Provided, That no part of this sum shall be used to supply to depos­
itory libraries any docum ents, books, or other printed matter not re­
quested by such libraries, and the requests therefor shall be subject
to approval by the Superintendent of D ocum ents. (.Legislative
Branch Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $2,817,120
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $3,041,050

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______ _______
Reimbursements from other accounts

$2, 817,120
15, 761

$2, 817,120
20, 0 0
0

$3, 041, 050
20, 0 0
0

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

2, 832, 881
-2 6 , 490

2, 837,120

3, 061, 050

2, 806, 391

2, 837,120

1. Sales distribution.— The Superintendent of Docu­
ments is authorized by law to sell copies of Government
publications purchased from the Public Printer. Acquisi­
tion costs are paid from sales receipts, so no appropriation
is required for printing sales copies. By provision of law,
the sale price is set at the cost of manufacture plus 50
percent. At the end of each fiscal year, excess receipts
not required for purchasing additional publications are
turned in to the Treasury Department as miscellaneous
receipts. For the fiscal year 1952 earned revenue from
this source was $1,762,752. It is estimated that mis­
cellaneous receipts earned will be $2,000,000 for 1953 and
$2,200,000 for 1954. The number of sales orders has been
steadily increasing, and in the last 10 years the volume
of orders has more than doubled and the dollar value of
publications sold has more than tripled. The current
public interest in the Government’s publishing program
points to a continuing increase in the volume of orders.
2. Distribution for other agencies and Members oj Con­
gress.— The Superintendent of Documents under pro­
visions of law is required to prepare mailing lists, including
the mailing list for the Congressional Record, and to
perform mailing operations upon the request of any
Government agency and without reimbursement from
those agencies. Another legal obligation is to handle the
mailing of Farmers’ Bulletins, Soil Surveys, and other
publications which are allocated to Members of Congress
on a quota basis.
3. Depository library distribution.— The Superintendent
of Documents is required by law to supply one copy of
every Government publication, upon request, to more
than 540 libraries which are designated depositories for
Government publications.
4. Cataloging and indexing.■ The law provides that the
—
Superintendent of Documents shall prepare and distribute
catalogs and indexes of all publications issued by the
Federal Government. The Monthly Catalog of U. S.
Government Publications and the Numerical List and
Schedule of Volumes are the two principal publications
which are issued to discharge legal requirements.

3, 061, 050

SUM M ARY OF WORKLOAD

Obligations incurred.................. .......

O B L IG A T IO N S

Description

BY

1952 actual

A C T IV IT IE S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Direct Obligations

1. Sales distribution__________ ___ _ . . .
2. Distribution for other agencies and
Members of Congress____ ___________
3. Depository library distribution_______
4. Cataloging and indexing______________

$1, 613, 661

$1, 636, 747

$1, 749, 309

543, 449
409. 083
224, 437

546, 521
411, 299
222, 553

603, 210
422, 247
266, 284

Total direct obligations. .....................

2, 790, 630

2, 817,120

3, 041, 050

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
From Other Accoun ts

Distribution for other agencies________

15. 761

20, 0 0
0

20, 0 0
0

2, 806, 391

2, 837, 120

3, 061, 050

PR O G R AM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

The Office of Superintendent of Documents is a division
of the Government Printing Office which operates under
separate appropriations. The work programs are entirely
of a service nature and are of such type that there is no
control over the volume of work which the Superintendent
of Documents is required by law to perform.
200000—53----- 3




O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

1954 estimate

1,984, 580
1,379,918
$5,019,999
58,923,337

2, 300,000
1, 700,000
$5, 200,000
62,000,000

2, 500, 000
1, 900,000
$5, 700,000
65.000.000

82, 509, 925

83, 000, 000

85.000, 000

4,186,198

4, 500, 000

4, 800,000

33,631

34,000

35,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

547
528

547
532

599
584

$3, 680
GS-4.5

$3, 758
GS-4.5

$3, 737
GS-4.3

$3,116
CPC-4.5
$2, 851

$3,156
C PC-4.5
$2, 851

$3,196
C PC-4.5
$2,816

$1, 782, 233
35,167

$1, 823, 020
55,000

$1, 982, 750
75, 000

81, 214
1,191
1, 899, 805

50, 000
1,300
1, 929,320

50, 000
2, 500
2,110, 250

BY

OBJECTS

1952 actual

Sum m ary o f Personal Services

Obligations incurred________ _______

2.

Num ber of sales orders______ ___________
Letters of inquiry_______________ _______
Amount of sales___________________ m____
Number of publications sold____ _______
Publications distributed for other Govern­
ment agencies. ____________ _ _ __ . .
Number of publications distributed to
depository lib r a r ie s ..______ __________
Number of publications cataloged and
indexed________________________________

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees. ______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade______ _______________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary________________ _____
Average grade_______________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions_______ ____
__ _
Part-time and temporary positions
Payment above basic rates:
Overtime____________________________
Night-work differential_____________
Total personal service obligations.._

36

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE-Continued
O F F IC E

OF

S U P E R IN T E N D E N T

OF

D O CU M EN TS— C o n tin u e d

Salaries and Expenses, Office of Superintendent of Documents—
Continued
o b l ig a t io n s

BY o b j e c t s — c o n tin u e d

Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Direct Obligations

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

Personal services____ ________________
Travel_________ __ _________________
Transportation of things.. _______ _.
Communication services........... ...........
Rents and utility services_________
Printing and reproduction.
________
Other contractual services__ _________
Supplies and materials___ ___ _____
Equipm ent_________________________

$1,884,611
826
4,144
8,073
11,706
513,007
86,040
209, 930
72, 293

$1,910,120
1.500
4.500
8.500
13.000
529,000
87.000
223, 500
40.000

$2,091,050
1, 500
4,900
9,000
13.000
543,000
89.000
224, 600
65.000

Total direct obligations___________

2,790,630

2, 817,120

3,041,050

15,194
567

19, 200
800

19, 200
800

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
Fro m Other Accoun ts

01 Personal services_____________________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements from other ac­
counts_________ _______ __________

15, 761

20,000

20,000

Obligations incurred_______________

2, 806,391

2, 837,120

3,061,050

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustments in obligations of prior years.
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$489,231

$472,000

2,837,120

3,061,050

3, 443,807
3,326,351
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations______________
15,761
20,000
489,231
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.__ 472,000

3, 533,050

2, 834,351

3,013,050

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
2, 338,454
2, 420,120
Out of current authorizations_________
414, 231
Out of prior authorizations____________
600,361

2, 579,050
434,000

Total expenditures..............................

$597,980
39,436
2, 806,391

2, 938, 815

20,000

500,000

GENERAL PROVISIONS
S e c . 102. Purchases m ay be made from the foregoing appropria­
tions under the “ Governm ent Printing Office” , as provided for in
the Printing A ct approved January 12, 1895, and w ithout reference
to the A ct approved June 30, 1949 (Public Law 152) as amended by
the A ct approved September 5, 1950 (Public Law 754), concerning
purchases for the Federal Governm ent.




S e c . 103. In order to keep the expenditures for printing and
binding for the current fiscal year within or under the appropriations
for such fiscal year, the heads of the various executive departments
and independent establishments are authorized to discontinue the
printing of annual or special reports under their respective juris­
dictions: Provided, That where the printing of such reports is dis­
continued the original copy thereof shall be kept on file in the
offices of the heads of the respective departments or independent
establishments for public inspection.
S e c . 104. N o part of the funds appropriated in this A ct shall be
used for the maintenance or care of private vehicles.
S e c . 105. W henever any office or position not specifically estab­
lished by the Legislative Pay A ct of 1929 is appropriated for herein
or whenever the rate of compensation or designation of any position
appropriated for herein is different from that specifically established
for such position by such Act, the rate of com pensation and the
designation of the position, or either, appropriated for or provided
herein, shall be the permanent law with respect thereto: Provided,
That the provisions relating to positions and salaries thereof carried
in H. Res. 277 and 308 of the Eighty-second Congress shall be the
permanent law with respect thereto.
S e c . 106. N o part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall
be paid as compensation to any person appointed after June 30, 1935,
as an officer or member of the Capitol Police who does not meet the
standards to be prescribed for such appointees by the Capitol Police
B oa rd: Provided, That the Capitol Police Board is hereby authorized
to detail police from the House Office, Senate Office, and Capitol
Buildings for police duty on the Capitol Grounds.
S e c . 107. N o part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall
be used to pay the salary or wages of any person who engages in a
strike against the Governm ent of the United States or who is a mem­
ber of an organization of Governm ent employees that asserts the
right to strike against the Governm ent of the United States, or who
advocates, or is a member of an organization that advocates, the
overthrow of the Governm ent of the United States by force or
violence: Provided, That for the purposes hereof an affidavit shall be
considered prima facie evidence that the person making the affidavit
has not, contrary to the provisions of this section, engaged in a strike
against the Governm ent of the United States, is not a mem ber of an
organization of Governm ent employees that asserts the right to
strike against the Governm ent of the United States, or that such
person does not advocate, and is not a member of an organization
that advocates, the overthrow of the G overnm ent of the United
States by force or violen ce: Provided further, That any person who
engages in a strike against the Governm ent of the United States or
who is a member of an organization of Governm ent employees that
asserts the right to strike against the Governm ent of the United
States, or who advocates, or who is a member of an organization that
advocates, the overthrow of the Governm ent of the United States by
force or violence, and accepts em ploym ent the salary or wages for
which are paid from any appropriation contained in this Act shall
be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, shall be fined not more
than $1,000 or imprisoned for not more than one year, or both :
Provided further, That the above penalty clause shall be in addition
to, and not in substitution for, any other provisions of existing law.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1953.)




TH E

J U D IC IA R Y

SUM M ARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED IN
THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations
Appropriations

$27, 360, 350

$27, 398, 700

$28, 671, 975

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
475, 200

Appropriations _
T otal new obligational authority (for
detail, see following table) _ _ _ _ _

27, 873, 900

27, 360, 350

28, 671, 975

SUM M ARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOCU­
MENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations __

______

Other Expenditures

$26, 571, 100

1, 176, 323

824, 300

27, 747, 423

28, 251, 875

$26, 742, 694

Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations___
_
___
____
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recom m ended- _

$27, 427, 575

26, 742, 694

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
182, 700

Out of current authorizations_________ _______
Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations. _ _________________ ____ _________

292, 500

T otal expenditures from authoriza­
tions proposed for later transmis­
sion_______________ ________________
T otal budget expenditures (for detail,
see follow ing ta ble)_________________

182, 700

26, 742, 694

292, 500

27, 930,123

28, 544, 375

37

38

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
B Y O R G A N IZ A T IO N U N IT A N D A C C O U N T T IT L E

[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
N o.

E X P E N D IT U R E S

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1952
actual

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

1952
actual

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

E N A C T E D O R R E C O M M E N D E D IN T H IS
DOCUM ENT
Current authorizations
Supreme Court o f the United States:

$980, 000
91, 200
58, 350
172, 500

$1, 017,900
91,200
46,450
174,100

$1,021,800
91,200
48, 950
174,100

$951,932
69,410
53,488
160, 490

$1, 015, 880
57,934
172,430

$1, 021, 600
91,200
48,950
173, 600

1, 302,050
201, 500
457,000

1, 329, 650
202, 700
467,000

1,336, 050
204,500
579,625

1, 235, 320
190,036
443,092

1, 333,172
202, 318
466, 550

1,335,350
204,100
569,625

Salaries and expenses_______
Repairs and improvements..

586,800
9,100

613,800
3, 700

618,000
248,900

558,360
5,737

610,873
5, 249

616, 000
224,400

Total, Court of Claims..

595,900

617, 500

866,900

564, 097

616,122

840,400

602
602
602
602

5,120, 000

5,120,000

5, 240,000
12,232, 400
3, 675,000
1, 647, 600

5,076, 629

5,117,128

5, 240,000
11, 847,400
3, 375,000
1,447, 600

602
602
602
602
602
207
602
602
602
602
602
602
602

575, 300
879.000
1.090.000

580.000
879.000
1.165.000

588,000
1,058, 750
1, 243,150

120.000

120.000
4,991,850
2.420.000
600,000
543.000
2,800, 0
00
2, 900, 000
837, 200
715.000
1, 100, 0 0
0

577, 665
880,897
1,162,195
120, 000
4,974,448
2,410,899
597, 755
679, 620
3,034, 891
2, 888,875
829, 221
732,414
1, 111, 588

586,000
1,056, 250
1, 240,150

4.918.000
2.377.000
593, 300
1 603,000
3,060, 000
2, 909,900
750, 000
715, 0
00
1,082, 600

559, 606
883, 673
1,060,078
101,467
4,848, 670
2,342, 520
564, 823
566, 660
2, 950,774
2, 865, 012
713, 659
711,875
1,057, 532

602

7,100

7,100

5, 733

7,018

1,000

602

3, 700

3, 700

1, 538

4, 647

800

Total, courts of appeals, district courts, and other judi­
cial services________________________________________

24,803,900

24, 781,850

25,684,900

24, 310,149

25,129, 261

25, 302,400

Total current authorizations, enacted or recommended
in this document______ _________________________

27,360,350

27,398, 700

28,671,975

26, 742,694

27,747,423

28, 251,875

Salaries______________________________________
Printing and binding Supreme Court reports..
Miscellaneous expenses_______________________
Care of the building and grounds------------------Total, Supreme Court of the United States_________
Court o f Customs and Patent Appeals: Salaries and expenses.
Customs Court: Salaries and expenses____________________
Court o f Claims:

Courts o f appeals, district courts, and other judicial services:

Salaries of judges______________________________ ___________
Salaries of supporting personnel, The Judiciary____ ____ _
Fees of jurors and commissioners, United States courts____
Travel and miscellaneous expenses, United States courts.—.
Salaries and expenses, administrative office, United States
courts________________ - ____ ____________________________
Salaries of referees, United States courts (special account)..
Expenses of referees, United States courts (special account).
Salaries of justices and judges, Hawaii......................................
Salaries of clerks of courts........ ............. ................. ..................
Probation system, United States courts____________________
Salaries of criers, United States c o u r ts ................. ........... ......
Fees of commissioners, United States courts........ ............. ...
Fees of jurors, United States courts________________ _______
Miscellaneous salaries, United States courts_______ _______
Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts_______ _____
Travel expenses, United States courts____________________
Salaries of court reporters, United States courts___________
Repairs and improvements, District Court of the United
States for the District of C o lu m b ia ..*________________
Repairs and improvements, United States Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia______________________

135,000
65, 200
17,200
23, 000
81, 000
140, 000
25, 500
21, 300

P R O P O S E D F O R L A T E R T R A N S M IS S IO N
Under existing legislation:

Courts of appeals, district courts, and other judicial services:
Fees of commissioners, United States courts_________
Fees of jurors, United States courts______ ____________
Travel expenses, United States courts________________
Salaries of court reporters, United States courts______
Salaries of referees, United States courts (special account)

200.000
17, 500
15, 700
135, 000

1Excludes $7 ,0 0appropriated in 1 5 for prior fiscal years.
00
92




132, 700

107.000
150.000
17, 500
15, 700
2, 300

475, 200

Total proposed for later transmission______________
Total new obligational authority and total budget
expenditures---- ------- ------- ------------------------------------

50,000

182, 700

292,500

27, 930,123

28, 544,375

107.000

602
602
602
602
602

27,3G0, 350

27, 873, 900

28, 671, 975

26, 742, 694

39

THE JUDICIARY
C U R R E N T

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES

a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$466
35, 728

$40, 000

$40,000

69,410

86, 928

91,200

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
32, 960
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of ____________
prior authorizations 36,450

51,200
35, 728

51, 200
40, 000

SALARIES

Salaries, Supreme Court—
For the Chief Justice and eight Associate Justices, and all other
officers and employees, whose compensation shall be fixed by the
Court, except as otherwise provided by law, and who may be
em ployed and assigned by the Chief Justice to any office or work of
the Court, [$1 ,0 17 ,9 00 ] $1,021,800. (28 U. S. C. 1, 5 , 671-675;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,017,900

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year—
Total expenditures________________

Estimate 1954, $1,021,800
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1953 estimate

1952 actual

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate . . ___ ____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$980,000
-1 9 , 532

$1,017,900
-3 ,3 0 0

$1,021,800

Obligations incurred______ _______. .

960,468

1,014, 600

Miscellaneous Expenses, Supreme Court—
For miscellaneous expenses to be expended as the Chief Justice
may approve, [$ 4 6 ,4 5 0 ] $48,950. (Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

1,021,800

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

a m o u n ts

Estimate 1954, $48,950

a v a il a b l e

for

o b l ig a t io n

1952 actual

O BJE CTS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1953 estimate

1952 actual

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$58, 350
4,909

$46, 450
5, 000

$48, 950
5,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

63, 259
-611

51, 450

53.. 950

62, 648

51, 450

53, 950

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

162

163

163

175

182

182

Personal services:
Permanent p osition s______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.............___.................................

$900,836
57,194

$948, 923
63,045

$956,123
63,045

2,438

2,632

2, 632

Obligations incurred....... .......... .

960,468

1,014, 600

1,021,800

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
01

Appropriated 1953, $46,450

20

20

20

Obligations incurred..................... .
o b l ig a t io n s

Object classification

by

objects

1952 actual

Direct Obligations
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$32,044
960,468

$40, 580
1,014, 600

$39,300
1,021,800

992, 512

1,055,180

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y ea r.. ________ ___ _________ ________

40, 580

39,300

951, 932

1,015,880

1, 021, 600

18,250
800
1,300
12, 600
3,000

20, 750
800
1,300
12, 600
3,000

Total direct obligations.....................

57, 739

46,450

48,950

39, 500

Total expenditures..............................

$500

$40
9,915
23,083
1, 820
751
10,114
12,016

1,061,100

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$500

04 Communication services.—...............
06 Printing and reproduction....................
07 Other contractual services...... ............ .
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipm ent......... ......... ....................... .

10,000

10,000

Obligations Payable Out of Reim burse­
ments F rom Other Accounts

919, 8 8
8
32,044

975, 300
40,580

982,300
39,300

.

4,909

5,000

, 5,000

Obligations incurred_______________

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations.......................

04

Communication services........... .

62, 648

51,450

53, 950

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$22,346
62, 648

$26,484
51, 450

$15,000
53, 950

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

PRINTING AND BINDING SUPREME COURT REPORTS

Printing and Binding Supreme Court Reports—
For printing and binding the . advance opinions, preliminary
prints, and bound reports of the Court, $91,200. (28 U. S. C. 4 1 1 ,
4 12 , 673; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary
Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $91,200

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate__ ____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

1954 estimate

$91,200

$91,200

$91, 200
-2 2 , 512

BY

OF

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____




68,688 |
105,604 ,
1

57,934

48, 950

31, 255
22, 233

31,450
26, 484

33, 950
15,000

CARE OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS

$35,728
91, 200

$40,000
91,200

126,928

131,200

Appropriated 1953, $174,100

E X P E N D IT U R E S

$36,916

53, 488

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations...... ............
Out of prior authorizations.......................

1954 estimate

91,200

OBJECTS

1952 actual

5,000
15,000

1953 estimate

91,200

0(3 Printing and reproduction—1952, $68688 1953, $91,200; 1954, $91,200.
,
;
A N A L Y S IS

68,950

5,000
15,000

Care of the Building and Grounds, Supreme Court—
For such expenditures as may be necessary to enable the Architect
of the Capitol to carry out the duties imposed upon him by the
A ct approved M ay 7, 1934 (40 U. S. C. 13a-13d), including im ­
provements, maintenance, repairs, equipment, supplies, materials,
and appurtenances; special clothing for workmen; and personal and
other services (including temporary labor without reference to the
Classification and Retirement Acts, as amended), and for snow
removal by hire of men and equipment or under contract w ithout
compliance with sections 3709, as amended, and 3744 of the Revised
Statutes (41 U. S. C. 5, 16); $174,100. (Departments of State,
Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

6,68
8 8

Obligations incurred.........................

O B L IG A T IO N S

1953 estimate

77, 934

4,909
26, 484
113

Total expenditures................ .............

Appropriated 1953, $91,200

84,994
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_______ ______
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

Estimate 1954, $174,100

40

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES— Con.

o b l ig a t io n s

Care of the Building and Grounds, Supreme Court— Continued
A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1953 estimate

1952 actual

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings-..

$172, 500
-10,411

$174,100

Obligations incurred_________ ______

162, 089

174,100

02
03
04
06
07
08
09

$174,100
174,100

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

37
37

37
37

$132, 405

479
23, 463

400
24, 595

400
24, 595

Total personal services___ _______
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs-. ________ _
Annual painting.__ ______________
Snow rem oval_____ _____________
08 Supplies and materials___ . . .
_ .
09 Annual equipment______________ . . .

146, 987

157, 400

157, 400

7, 048
1,919

7, 800

Obligations incurred_______________

162, 089

$108
27
919
7,928
370
487
1, 621

2,000
150
6,000

5, 962
173

750

A N A L Y S IS

OF

204,500

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

750
900
4, 475

E X P E N D IT U R E S

$8 573
,
408
190,173

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior y e a rs..
Obligations incurred during the year _ _

$9,118

$9, 500

202, 700

204, 500
214, 000

199,154

211,818

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___ __
___ _______________________

9,118

9,500

9, 900

190, 036

202, 318

204,100

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations __________

181,055
8,981

193, 200
9,118

194, 600
9, 500

CUSTOMS COURT

750

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$12, 980
162, 089

$14,330
174,100

$16,000
174.100

175,069

188,430

190,100

249
14,330

16,000

16, 500

Total expenditures...................... .......

160, 490

172, 430

147,983
12, 507

158,100
14,330

SALA R IE S AND EXPEN SES

173,600

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current a u thorizations.________
Out of prior authorizations.......................

157,600
16, 0
00

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

202, 700

750
900
4, 475

7,800

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$200
50
1,200
12,000

190,173

Obligations incurred.................... .

2, 000
150
6,000
174,100

1952 actual

$200
50
1,200
12,000

Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things. ___________
Communication services
_ _____
Printing and re p ro d u ctio n __ ______
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials. ____ ____
E quipm ent______________________ ____

$132, 405

174,100

OF

1954 estimate

Total expenditures________ ________

$123, 045

A N A L Y S IS

1953 estimate

1952 actual

37
35

Personal services:
Permanent positions____ . ________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a se ... . . .
. .
Payment above basic rates___ ____

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

OBJECTS

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees________
01

objects

Object classification

CARE OF THE BUILD ING AND GROUNDS---- C o n t in u e d

AM OUNTS

by

Salaries and Expenses, Customs Court—
For salaries of the chief judge, eight judges, and all other officers
and em ployees of the court, and necessary expenses of the court,
including exchange of books, and traveling expenses, as m ay be
approved by the chief judge, [$ 4 6 7 ,0 0 0 ] $579,625: Provided, That
traveling expenses of judges of the Customs Court shall be paid upon
the written certificate of the judge. (5 U. S . C. 836-842; 28 U. S. C.
251-255, 456, 871, 872, 961, 962; 31 U. S. C. 588; Departments of
State, Justicef Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $467,000
AM OUNTS

Estim ate 1954, $579,625

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate...........................
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$457,000
-1 ,2 3 2

$467,000

$579,625

Obligations incurred_______________

COURT OF CUSTOMS AND PATENT APPEALS

455,768

467,000

579,625

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

SALARIES AND EXPEN SES
O B L IG A T IO N S

Salaries and Expenses, Court of Customs and Patent Appeals—
For salaries of the chief judge, four associate judges, and all other
officers and em ployees o f the court, and necessary expenses o f the
court, including exchange of books, and traveling expenses, as may
be approved by the chief judge, [$202,700J $204,500. (5 U. S. C.
886-842; 28 U. S. C. 211-213, 831-834; 31 U. S. C. 588; Departments
of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $202,700
AM OUNTS

Object classification

Estimate 1954, $204,500

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate. . . . _________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.__

$201,500
-11,327

Obligations incurred_____ _________

190,173

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$202,700

$204,500

202, 700

204,500

02
03
04
06
07
08
09
15

6
8
67

6
8
6
8

72
72

Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________ _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base__________________________ . .

$422,282

$429,910

$457, 425

1,109

1,190

1,300

Total personal services________
Travel __________ ___________________
Transportation of things___________
Communication services ___________
Printing and reproduction..................
Other contractual services................. .
Supplies and materials____ _ _____
E quipm ent______ _________________ _
Taxes and assessments_______________

423,391
12,066
1,235
4,500
1,851
500
3,989
8,061
175

431,100
15,000
1,500
5.000
3.000
400
3,300
7, 500

458,725
15,000
1,500
5.000
3.000
60,400
3,300
32,500

455,768

467,000

579,625

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$12,850
455,768

$24,550
467,000

$25,000
579,625

468, 618

491,550

604,625

Obligations incurred_______________
A N A L Y S IS

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions........
Average number of all em ployees...............
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions____ ___________
Regular pay in excess of 52 week
base. __________________ _________
Total personal services_________




BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees_____ __
01

BY

OF

200

200

E X P E N D IT U R E S

O B JE C TS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

24
24

24
24

24
24

$178,347

$182, 750

$184,550

366

375

1952 actual

1954 estimate

375

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures_____________

178, 713

183,125

184, 925

__

976
24, 550

25,000

35,000

443,092

466, 550

569, 625

41

THE JUDICIARY
a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

O B L IG A T IO N S

1953 estimate

$442,000
24, 550

Object classification

1954 estimate

$544, 625
25,000

07

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
$432,706
Out of current authorizations. _ ............ .
Out of ____________
prior authorizations 10,386

COURT OF CLAIMS
Salaries and Expenses, Court of Claims—
For salaries of the chief judge, four associate judges, seven regular
and six additional commissioners, and all other officers and em­
ployees of the Court, and for other necessary expenses, including
stenographic and other fees and charges necessary in the taking of
testim ony, and travel, [$ 6 1 3 ,8 0 0 ] $618,000. (< U. S. C. 836-842;
5
28 U. S. C. 171, 456, 791-795, 962; 31 U. S. C. 588; 41 U. S. C. 114;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)

AM OUNTS

FOR

1953 estimate

$586,800
-2 8 , 620

$613,800

$618,000

Obligations incurred__________ _____

558,180

613,800

618,000

Object classification

BY

01

02

04
05
06
07
08
09
15

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

6
8

70

74
71

74
71

Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________ _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.. . . . _________________ __ __

$483, 968

$527,930

$532,130

1,530

1,650

1,650

Total personal services............
T ra vel... ______ _
. . . _ ________
Communication services.. __________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent_____ ___________________
Taxes and assessments..... ......................

485,498
8, 744
1,988
2, 969
46,747
1,317
5, 591
5, 322
4

529, 580
17,000
2, 500
3, 000
43, 000
1,500
7,000
10, 200

533,780
17.000
2, 500
3.000
43.000
1,500
7.000
10, 200

558,180

613,800

OF

20

20

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$29,073
613, 800
642,873

$32,000
618,000
650,000

813
29,073
558,360

32,000
610,873
581,800
29,073

7,786

5,749

249, 400

2,049

500

25, 000

Total expenditures._____ __________

5,737

5,249

224,400

5,268
469

3, 200
2,049

223, 900
500

[OTHER COURTS AND SERVICES] COURTS OF
APPEALS, D ISTR IC T COURTS, AND OTHER
JUDICIAL SERVICES
Salaries of Judges—
For salaries of circuit judges; district judges (including judges of
the district courts of Alaska, the Virgin Islands, the Panama Canal
Zone, and G u a m ); justices and judges of the Supreme Court and cir­
cuit courts of the Territory of Hawaii; and justices and judges retired
or resigned under title 28, United States Code, sections 371, 372,
and 373; [$5,1 20 ,0 00 ] $5,240,000. (28 U. S. C. 44, 1S3, 135; 48
U. S. C. 632, 634a, 1344, 1348, 1353; Acts of M ay I t , 1945, Public
Act 142 and M ay 4, 1951, Public Act 26, Legislature, Territory of
Hawaii; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary
Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $5,120,000

Estimate 1954, $248,900
FOR

Includes $120,000 for activities previously carried under “ Salaries of justices and
judges, Hawaii.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule
as comparative transfers.
AM O U NTS

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. ~
Obligations incurred.................. .........




A V A IL A B L E

$9,100
- 1 , 787
7,313

FO R O B L IG A T IO N

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$3,700

$248,900

3,700

248,900

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate----------------------Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$5,120 000
-66,139

$5,120,000

$5, 240,000

Obligations incurred......... .............
Comparative transfer from “ Salaries of
justices and judges, Hawaii” ________

5,053,861

5,120,000

5,240,000

101,467

120,000

Total obligations__________________

5,155,328

5,240,000

5, 240,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

353
339

354
345

354
345

$5,155,328

$5,240,000

$5,240,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

Personal services: Permanent posi­
tions (total obligations)____________
A N A L Y S IS

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

OP E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Obligations incurred during the year.........

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Estimate 1954, a $5,240,000

0

01

Repairs and Improvements, Court of Claims—
F or necessary repairs and im provements to the Court of Claims
buildings, including structural alterations, additions, and other im­
provements to provide additional accommodations for the Court, to be
expended under the supervision of the Architect of the Capitol,
[$ 3 ,7 0 0 ] $248,900. (31 Stat. 1135; Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

A V A IL A B L E

1954 estimate

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_________ _____ _________ __________

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all e m p lo y e e s.............

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENTS

AM OUNTS

1953 estimate

E X P E N D IT U R E S

$500
248,900

584,000
32,000

Appropriated 1953, $3,700

248, 900

$2,049
3,700

34,000
616,000

529,107
29,253

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures_______________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations______ . . .
Out of prior authorizations_____________

3,700

1952 actual

$30,066
558,180
588, 246

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during th e year_____

7,313

$473
7,313

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

233,300
9,100
796

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

618,000

A N A L Y S IS

$3,700
2,800

SALARIES OF JUDGES

1952 actual

Obligations incurred.____ _________

$3, 700

$2,814
3,703

1952 actual

OBJECTS

Total number of permanent positions........
Average number of all employees________

1954 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

O B L IG A T IO N S

OF

1953 estimate

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations. .....................

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Other contractual services:
General annual repairs_____________
Annual painting______________ ____
Reconstruction and additions: Rear
building_____ __ ________________
Air conditioning improvements.......
Ventilating fans___________________

A N A L Y S IS

Estimate 1954, $618,000

A V A IL A B L E

O B JE C TS

1952 actual

Obligations incurred.......................

SALARIES AND EXPEN SES

A ppropriated 1953, $613,800

BY

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year. _________________________________
Total expenditures_______ ________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations____ _____ _

$39, 782
114
5,053, 861
5,093, 757

$17,128

$20,000

5.120,000
5,137,128

5,240,000
5.260,000

17,128
5,076,629

20,000

20,000

5,117,128

5, 240,000

5 , 036,733

5 , 100,000

39,896

17,128

5, 220,000
20, 000

42

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

[O TH ER COURTS AND SERVICES] COURTS OF
APPEALS, D ISTR IC T COURTS, ^iV2> OTHER
JUDICIAL SERVICES— Continued
SALARIES

OF SUPPORTING PERSONNEL

Salaries of Supporting Personnel, The Judiciary—
For salaries of all officials and employees of the Federal Judiciary,
not otherwise specifically provided fo r, $12,282,400: Provided, That
the compensation of secretaries and law clerks of circuit and district
judges shall be fixed by the Director of the Administrative Office with­
out regard to the Classification Act of 1949, as amended, except that
the salary of a secretary shall conform with that of the General Schedule
grades (GS) 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8, as the appointing judge shall determine, and
the salary of a law clerk shall conform with that of the General Schedule
grades (GS) 5, 7, 9, 11, or 12, as the appointing judge shall determine,
subject to review by the judicial council of the circuit if requested by
the Director, such determination by the judge otherwise to be final:
Provided further, That (exclusive of step-incr eases corresponding with
those provided for by title V I I of the Classification Act of 1949, as
amended, and of compensation paid for temporary assistance needed
because of an emergency) the aggregate salaries paia to secretaries and
law clerks appointed by one judge shall not exceed $10,560 per annum,
except in the case of the chief judge of each circuit and the chief judge
of each district court having five or more district judges, in which case
the aggregate salaries shall not exceed $14,355 per annum. (18
U. S. C. 3654, 8656; 28 U. S. C. 604 (a) (5), 634, 711 (a) (b), 712,
713 (a), 751 (a) (b), 752, 753, 755; 48 U. S. C. 102, 104, 106, 107,
863, 870, 1344» 1849, 1405y; title 11, D. C. Code, sec. 312; Depart­
ments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation
A ct, 1953.)
Estimate 1954, a $12,232,400
« Estimate is for activities previously carried under appropriations as follows:
“ Salaries of clerks of cou rts"_____________________ ______ ___ _____________ $5,067, 000
“ Probation system, United States courts” . _______________________________
2,455,700
“ Salaries of criers, United States courts” _____ ______ _______ _____________
609,800
“ Miscellaneous salaries, United States courts” ____________________________ 2,984,200
“ Salaries of court reporters, United States courts” __________ _____________
1,115,700
T he amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative
transfers.
AM O U NTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

FEES OF JURORS AND COMMISSIONERS

Fees of Jurors and Commissioners, United States Courts—
Fo? fees, expenses, and costs of jurors (including meals and lodging
for jurors in Alaska, as provided by section 198, title I I , of the Act o f
June 6, 1900, 31 Stat. 362); compensation of ju ry commissioners; and
fees of United States commissioners and other committing magistrates
acting under title 18, United States Code, section 3041; $8,675,000.
(11 U. S. C. 203 (b) ; 28 U. S. C. 631, 688, 636, 1865, 1871; 48 U. S. C.
25 867 )
Estimate 1954, ° $3,675,000
® Estimate is for activities previously carried under appropriations as follows:
“ Fees of commissioners, United States courts” _____________________________ $675,000
“ Fees of jurors, United States courts” ______________________________________ 3,000,000
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative trans­
fers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$543,000
2,800, 0
00

Total obligations__________________

3, 646, 500

3,343,000

3,675,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$601,142
358

$543,000

$675,000

2,205, 502
5,935
670, 936

2,015,000
6, 500
618,000

2,183,000
6, 500
650.000

137,090
25, 537

135,000
25,500

135.000
25, 500

3, 646, 500

3,343,000

3,675,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

$3,675,00

BY

01

Personal services:
Fees:
United States com m ission ers___
Conciliation commissioners. __ .
07 Other contractual services:
Fees:
Jurors_____________________ ______
Jury commissioners_____________
Mileage, jurors______ ___________
Subsistence per diem in lieu of
mileage for daily travel________
Meals and lodgings, j u r o r s ..____

1954 estimate

Total obligations____ ______________

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

01

569, 788

600,000

Total personal services___________
15 Taxes and assessments_______ _____
Total obligations ________ ______

OF

1,070, 749

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations)__________________




1952 actual

11, 752, 693

12, 011, 850

BY

745

$3,675,000
300,000

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations) _____ ___________

00
0
1, 100, 0 0
0

2 , 882,

2,900,

12, 232, 400

OBJECTS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

2, 676
48
2, 648

2, 675
51
2, 665

2,689
52
2,682

$11, 501, 944
164,148

$11, 750, 095
172, 800

$11, 967, 445
176, 000

44, 801
40,120

45, 650
41, 305

45, 650
41, 305

11, 751,013
1,680

12, 009, 850

2,000

12, 230, 400
2, 0 0
0

12, 011, 850

12, 232, 400

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ _______________________________

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year.
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________ _____ _______ __________

11, 752, 693

Personal services:
Permanent positions_____ ________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Paym ent above basic rates_________

A N A L Y S IS

2, 420,000

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees._______

OF

$4, 991,850

2,355, 760

O BJECTS

1952 actual

$12, 232. 400
$4,873, 651

1954 estimate

$601,500
3,045,000

A N A L Y S IS

Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred)______________ ______________
Comparative transfer from—
“ Salaries of clerks of courts” ___________
“ Probation system, United States
courts” __ . _ ___________________
“ Salaries of criers, United States
courts” . ___ __
_ . . .
“ Miscellaneous salaries, United States
courts” ______________________________
“ Salaries of court reporters, United
States courts” ____________________

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred) ____ ___ _____ __
Comparative transfer from—
“ Fees of commissioners, United States
courts”
“ Fees of jurors, United States courts” . . .

Total obligations........ .............
1952 actual

O B L IG A T IO N

TRAVEL A N D MI SCELLANE OUS EXPENSES

Travel and Miscellaneous Expenses, United States Courts—
For necessary travel and miscellaneous expenses, not otherwise
provided for, incurred by the Judiciary, including the purchase of
firearms and ammunition, the cost of contract statistical services for
the office of Register of Wills of the District of Columbia and not to
exceed $1,000 for the payment of fees to attorneys appointed in accord­
ance with the Act of June 8, 1938 (52 Stat. 625), not exceeding $25 in
any one case, $1,647,600: Provided, That this sum shall be available,
in an amount not to exceed $8,500 for expenses of attendance at meetings
concerned with the work of Federal Probation when incurred on the
written authorization of the Director of the Administrative Office of the
United States Courts. (5 U. S. C. 55a, 78b (2 -8 ), 835-842; 18 U.
S. C. 726; 28 U. S. C. 456, 604, 604a, 639, 961, 962, 1915b; 48 U. S. C.
102, 114, 863, 1405y; Act of August 2, 1949, Public Law 201.)
Estimate 1954, ° $1,647,600
° Estimate is for activities previously carried under appropriations as follows:
“ Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts” _____________________________ $887, 0 0
0
“ Travel expenses, United States courts” ____________________________________ 760, 600
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

11, 847, 400

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

$12,232,400
385,000

3,375,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate
. . .
Reimbursements
from
non-Federal
sources _______________________________

$1,647, 600

Obligations incurred-----------------------

1,648, 800

1,200

43

THE JUDICIARY
A M O U N T S A V A IL A B L E FOR O B L IG A T IO N ----- C o n t i n u e d

1952 actual
Comparative transfer from—
“ Miscellaneous expenses, United States
courts” _______ _____ ________________
“ Travel
expenses,
United
States
____ _ _
courts” ____ _. ______

1953 estimate

$750,144

715,000

1, 465,144

1, 557, 950

1,648,800

by

o bjects

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

04
05
06
07
08
09
15

$6,000
12,100
9,000
1,000
7,000
6,000
1,200

$6,000
12,100
9,000
1,000
7,000
6,000
1,200

562,560

580,000

588,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$22,941
670
562,560

Obligations incurred_________ _____

1954 estimate

$6,300
9,350
8,550
753
9,533
6,672
1,003

Communication services...................... .
Rents and utility services_____ ____
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services______ ____
Supplies and materials________•
............
___________ ____
Equipm ent____ _
Taxes and assessments_______________

1953 estimate

$26,665

$29,000

580,000

588,000

586,171

Object classification

1954 estimate

$842,950

715, 000

Total obligations__________________

o b l ig a t io n s

606,665

617,000

Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).
N o t e .—

A N A L Y S IS
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

O BJECTS

1952 actual
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Direct Obligations

02 Travel
...................
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services_____________
05 Rents and utility services. ________
06 Printing and reproduction_______ ___
07 Other contractual services:
Psychiatric examinations__________
Transcripts ordered b y court______
Miscellaneous_____________________
08 Supplies and materials. ___________
09 Equipm ent:
General office_____________ ________
Law books, accessions ________
Law books, continuations ________

$715,000
24, 514
202, 0 0
0
22, 602
83, 843

$715,000
24, 000
214, 000
5, 500
96, 700

$760, 600
24.000
226, 300
7,300
101, 900

1, 070
24, 233
23, 496
103, 964

1, 500
30, 000
24, 000
104, 300

1, 500
30.000
24, 000
104, 300

20, 779
22, 936
219, 672

40, 000
54, 700
242, 500

76, 200
37, 000
254, 500

Total direct obligations........... .......

1, 464,109

1, 552, 200

1, 647, 600

1, 035

5, 750

1,200

1, 465,144

1, 557,950

1,648, 800

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

09 Equipm ent: General office__________
Total obligations-................................

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1,200
200,000

Appropriated 1953, $580,000
A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$575,300
-12,740

$580,000

$588,000

Obligations incurred_________ ______

562,560

580,000

588,000

02

Total personal services___________
Travel....... ............ ..................... ..............




551,000
26,665

557,000
29,000

SALARIES OF REFEREES

Salaries of Referees, United States Courts—
(Definite appropriation, special account)
For salaries of referees as authorized by the A ct of June 28, 1946,
as amended (11 U. S. C. 68), [$879,000jj $1,058,750, to be derived
from the referees’ salary fund established in pursuance of said A ct.
(Act of July 7, 1952, Public Law 457; Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $1,058,750

A V A IL A B L E

FO R A P P R O P R IA T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Unappropriated balance brought forward.
Receipts placed in special account_______
Savings from appropriations of prior years.

$876,808
1,283, 328
4,782

$1,285,918
1,249,000
3,297

$1,659,215
1, 254,000
7, 952

2,164,918
-879,000

2, 538, 215
-879, 000

2, 921,167
-1,058, 750

1,285,918

1, 659, 215

1, 862, 417

BY

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or e s tim a te __ ________. . .
Unobligated balance, reverted to unap­
propriated receipts__________ ________
Obligations in cu rred ______________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$879,000

$1,058,750

879,000

1,058,750

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$879,000

871,048

O B L IG A T IO N S

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions. _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.
Paym ent above basic rates________

535,895
23,611

Balance carried forward___________

Estimate 1954, $588,000

1952 actual

01

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
' Out of current authorizations_____ ____
Out of prior authorizations____ _______

Total available for appropriation. __
Appropriation or estimate_______________

ADM IN ISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES COURTS

Total number of permanent positions.. ,
Average number of all employees________

586,000

1, 447, 600

Salaries and Expenses, Administrative Office, United -States
Courts—
For necessary expenses of the Administrative Office of the United
States Courts, including travel, advertising, rent in the District of
Colum bia and elsewhere, and examination of estimates for appro­
priations in the field, [$ 5 8 0 ,0 0 0 ] $588,000. (28 U. S. C. 601-606;
Act of June 9, 1949, Public Law 92; Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation A ct, 1953.)

Object classification

31,000

577,665

$1, 648,800

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations).. _______________

O B L IG A T IO N S

29,000

559,506

Appropriated 1953, $879,000

Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_____ ______
Unliquidated obligations, end of year

AM O U NTS

26,665

Total expenditures_______ ________

Obligations Payable Out o f R eim burse­
ments From N on-Federal Sources

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year---------------------------------------------------

Object classification

-7 ,9 5 2

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

124
116

124
116

124
116

$507,123
176
1,955
1,345

$521,000
1,700

55
53
108

55
54
109

55
54
109

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____ _____ ___
Part-time and temporary positions . _

OBJECTS

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees...........

$516, 356
354,692

$517, 500
361,500

$635,250
423,500

871,048

879,000

1,058,750

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Obligations incurred_____________

$529,000
1,700

1952 actual

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

510,599
9,800

2,000

524,700
13,000

2,000

532,700
13,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Obligations incurred during the year____

$9,732
4,790
871,048

879,000

$1,058, 750

885, 570

880,897

1,058,750

$1,897

44

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

[OTH ER COURTS AND SERVICES] COURTS OF
APPEALS, D IST R IC T COURTS, AND OTHER
JUDICIAL SER VICES— Continued
s a la r ie s

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$68,486
3,368
1, 073,419

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligations incurred during the year.

o f r e f e r e e s — c o n tin u e d

1953 estimate
$85,195

$88,000

1,165,000

1, 243,150
1,331,150

1,145, 273

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_______________ ______ _____________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

85,195

88,000

91,000

Total expenditures________________

a n a l y s is

1, 250,195

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year _ _ __ _______

Salaries of Referees, United States Courts— Continued

1,060,078

1,162,195

1, 240,150

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations ___________

994,399
65,679

1,077,000
85,195

1,152,150

Total expenditures________________

883,673

$880,897

1,056, 250

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___ ____
Out of prior authorizations________ . . .

869,151
14, 522

879,000
1,897

1, 056, 250

EXPENSES

of

r e f e r e e s

Expenses of Referees, United States Courts—
(Definite appropriation, special account)
For miscellaneous expenses of referees, United States courts*
including the salaries of their clerical assistants, travel, purchase of
envelopes w ithout regard to the A ct of June 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 476),
[$1 ,1 6 5 ,0 0 0 ] $1,24S,150, to be derived from the referees’ expense
fund established in pursuance of the A ct of June 28, 1946, as
amended (11 U. S. C. 68 (c) (4)). (11 U. S. C. 102 (a) (2); Act of
July 7, 1952, Public-^Law 457; Departments of State, Justice, Com­
merce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,165,000

[H A W A II]

Salaries of Justices and Judges, Hawaii—
[F o r salaries of the chief justice and tw o associate justices of the
Supreme Court of the Territory of Hawaii, of judges of the cir­
cuit courts in Hawaii, and of judges retired under title 28, United
States Code, section 373, $120,000.] (48 U. S. Q. 682, 634a; Acts
of M ay 11, 1945, Public Act 142 and M ay 4 , 1951, Public Act 26,
Legislature, Territory of Hawaii; Departments of State, Justice, Com­
merce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $120,000
N ote .— Estimate of $120,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries of judges.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and
1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Estimate 1954, $1,243,150

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estim ate.. . . ________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

A P P R O P R IA T IO N

1952 actual

88,000

$2,500

$1,897

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$120, 0 0
0
-1 8 , 533

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries of
____
_ __ __
judges” .

-101, 467

1954 estimate

$120,000

120,000
120, 0
00

101, 467
-

Total obligations____ ____________ _
Unappropriated balance brought forward.
Receipts placed in special account______
Savings from appropriations of prior years.

$722, 727
1,289, 560
3,962

$926, 249
1, 235,000
25, 243

$1,021,492
1, 266, 000
16,581

Total avilable for appropriation____
Appropriation or estimate__________

2,016,249
-1,090,000

2,186,492
-1,165,000

2, 304,073
- 1 , 243,150

Balance carried forward ______ ____

926,249

1,021,492

1, 060,923

A N A L Y S IS

[
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)— 1952, $101,467; 1953, $120,000.

s a l a r ie s

of

c le r k s

of

c o u r ts

]

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estim ate-. ._ -------------Unobligated balance, reverted to unap­
propriated receipts_______________ _____

$1,090,000

Obligations incurred-----------------------

1,073,419

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,165,000

$1, 243,150

1,165,000

1, 243,150

-1 6 , 581

Salaries of Clerks of Courts—
[For* salaries of clerks of United States courts of appeals and
United States district courts, their deputies, and other assistants,
$4,991,850.] (28 U. S. C. 604 (a) (5), 711 (a) (b), 713 (a), 751 (a)
(b); 48 U. S. C. 104, 106, 107, 863, 1349, 1405y; Departments of
State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation A ct,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $4,991,850

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

N o t e .—Estimate of $5,067,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries of supporting personnel, The Judiciary.” The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

O BJECTS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

219
52
264

231
59
283

248
59
300

$700, 684
145,482

$757,800
163, 550

•$828, 950
163, 550

2, 700
1,370

2,800
1,400

2,800
1,400

Total personal services___________
Travel— ___________________________
Transportation of things_______ ______
Communication services-------------------Rents and utility services. ......... .......
Printing and reproduction...............
Other contractual services__
__ . . .
Supplies and materials____
_______
E quipm ent___
____________________
Taxes and assessments______ _______

850, 236
29,457
3,145
27,491
59,917
14,185
24,104
28,600
35, 563
721

925, 550
34,000
4,000
28,000
60,000
15,000
30,000
30,000
37, 650
800

996, 700
34,000
4,000
30,000
65,000
15,000
30,000
30,000
37,650
800

Obligations incurred_______________

1,073,419

1,165,000

1,243,150

Object classification

1952 actual

AM OUNTS

Total number of permanent positions____
Full time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees________
01

02'
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions____ ___________
Part time and temporary positions. _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________ _____
Paym ent above basic rates........ .......




A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate__________ . . .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.._

$4,918,000
-44,349

Obligations incurred_________ ______
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries of sup­
porting personnel, The Judiciary” _____

4,873, 651

4,991,850

-4,873, 651

1954 estimate

-4,991,850

Total obligations................. ..........

A N A L Y S IS

$4,991,850

.

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$94,898
4,873,651

$117, 598
4,991,850

$135,000

4,968,549

5,109, 448

135,000

45

THE JUDICIARY
a n a l y s is

of

e x p b n d it u r e s

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Deduct:
A djustm ent in obligations of prior years.
U nliquidated obligations, end of year—.

$2, 281
117, 598

Total expenditures.............................

4,848,670

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current a u th oriza tion s.._______
Out of prior authorizations.____ ______

[

system

4,856,850
117, 598

135,000

1954 estimate

$14,955

$17, 200

600,000

579, 778

614,955

14, 955

17,200

Total expenditures________________

564, 823

597, 755

17, 200

554, 833
9,990

582, 800
14, 955

17,200

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations. _ __________

]

[

fees

OF

c o m m is s io n e r s ]

Appropriated 1953 $543,000
N ote .—E stimate of $675,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Fees of jurors and commissioners, United States courts ”
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative
transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.—

$2, 377,000
-2 1 , 240

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries of sup­
porting personnel, The Judiciary” _____

2, 355, 760

1953 estimate

-2,420,000

$2,420,000

Appropriation or estimate__ _____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

$603,000
- 1 , 500
601, 500

543,000

-601, 500

1954 estimate

$543,000

Obligations incurred.— . . . _ _ _ __
Comparative transfer to “ Fees of jurors
and commissioners, United States
courts” ____ _________________________ . .

2,420,000

-2,355, 760

1954 estimate

17, 200

Fees of Commissioners, United States Courts—
[F o r fees of the United States commissioners and other com ­
mitting magistrates acting under title 18, United States Code,
section 3041, including fees and expenses of conciliation com m is­
sioners, United States courts, including the objects and subject to
the conditions specified for such fees and expenses of conciliation
commissioners in the Departm ent of Justice Appropriation Act,
1937, $543,000.] (11 U. S. C. 203 (b); 28 U. S. C. 631, 633, 636;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary A ppro­
priation A ct, 1953.)

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$9,450
540
569, 788

$135,000

N o te .—E stimate of $2,455,700 for activities previously carried under this title has
been transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries of supporting personnel, The Judiciary.”
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative
transfers.
FO R

1952 actual

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____________ _____ _____ ________

4,974,448

—•
-----------------

A ppropriated 1953, $2,420,000

A V A IL A B L E

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year____

Probation System, United States Courts—
[F o r salaries of probation officers and their clerical assistants, as
authorized by title 18, United States Code, sections 3654 and 3656,
$2,420,000: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be con ­
strued to abridge the right of the district judges to appoint probation
officers, or to make such orders as m ay be necessary to govern pro­
bation officers in their own courts: Provided further, That no part
of this appropriation shall be used to pay the salary or expenses of
any probation officer who, in the judgm ent of the chief or presiding
judge certified to the Attorney General, fails to carry out the official
orders of the Attorney General with respect to supervising or fur­
nishing inform ation concerning any prisoner released conditionally
or on parole from any Federal penal or correctional in stitu tion.]
(.Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary A ppro­
priation Act, 1953.)

AM OUNTS

OF

1954 estimate

$135,000

4, 756,053
92,617

p r o b a t io n

A N A L Y S IS

-543,000

Total obligations__________________

Total obligations________________
A N A L Y S IS
A N A L Y S IS

OF

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
1952 actual

$56,099
2,420,000

$65, 200

2, 402, 222

2, 476, 099

65,200

3, 603
56, 099

65,200

Total exp en d itu res____ ____ _____

2, 342, 520

2,410, 899

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations ___________

2,299,661
42, 859

2,354, 800
56, 099

1954 estimate

$125,780
601, 500

$159, 620
543,000

$23,000

702, 620

23,000

1954 estimate

$46,462
2,355, 760

1953 estimate

727,280

1953 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year. ___
D educt:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

159,620

23,000

Total expenditures__________ ______
65,200

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

566, 660

679, 620

23,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________ _
Out of prior authorizations____ ________

445,492
121,168

520, 000
159, 620

23,000

65,200
[

[

Salaries of Criers,
[F o r salaries of
Code, sections 713
Justice, Commerce,

s a l a r ie s

OF

1,000

c r ie r s ]

United States Courts—
criers as authorized by title 28, United States
(a) and 755, $600,000.] (Departments of State,
and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $600,000
N ote .—E stimate of $609,800 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries of supporting personnel, The Judiciary.” The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

fees

OF

ju ro rs]

Fees of Jurors, United States Courts—
[F o r fees, expenses, and costs of jurors; meals and lodging for
jurors in Alaska, as provided by section 193, title II, of the A ct of
June 6, 1900 (31 Stat. 362); and compensation for jury commis­
sioners; $2,800,000: Provided, That the compensation of jury com ­
missioners for the D istrict of Columbia shall conform to the pro­
visions of section 1401, title 11 of the D istrict of Colum bia C o d e .]
(28 U. S. C. 1865, 1871; 48 U. S. C. 25, 867; Departments of State,
Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $2,800,000

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _.

$593,300
-2 3 , 512

$600,000

Obligations incurred____________ .
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries of sup­
porting personnel, The Judiciary” . . . .

569, 788

1954 estimate

N ote .—E stimate of $3,000,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Fees of jurors and commissioners, United States courts.”
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

600,000

Total obligations_____ ____________




-569, 788

-600,

00
0

FOR O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate___ __ _______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

$3,060.000
-15,000

$2,800,000

Obligations incurred_______________

3, 045,000

2,800,000

1954 estimate

46

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

[O TH ER COURTS AND SERVICES] COURTS OF
APPEALS, D ISTRICT COURTS, AND OTHER
JUDICIAL SERVICES— Continued
[fe e s

o f

A M O U N T S A V A IL A B L E FO R O B L IG A T IO N ----- C o n t i n u e d

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

—$2,800,000

Total obligations__________________

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$138,935
1,730
3,045. 000

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year____________________________ ______

3, 034, 891

$234,891

234, 891

Total expenditures_______________

2, 950, 774

3, 034, 891

2, 810, 228

2, 800,000

$1,284
69,875

$81, 0 0
0

2, 865, 012

2, 888,875

$81, 0 0
0

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______
Out of prior authorizations___ _________

2, 812, 870
52,142

2,819, 000
69, 875

81,000

m is c e l l a n e o u s

N ote .—E stimate of $2,984,200 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries of supporting personnel, The Judiciary.” The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries of sup­
porting personnel, The Judiciary” -------

2, 882, 745

2, 900, 000

- 2 , 882, 745

- 2 , 900,000

Total obligations _________________

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year.........




O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Reimbursements from non-Federal sources -

$750,000
1,035

Total available for obligation--------Unobligated balance, estimated savings_ .

751, 035
-8 9 1

842, 950

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Travel and mis­
cellaneous expenses, United States
courts”
__ ____
- ________ __

750,144

842, 950

-750,144

1954 estimate

$837, 200
5, 750

-8 42 , 950

Total obligations
N ote .— R eimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of sale
of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$98,125
750,144

$132, 021
842, 950

$140,000

848, 269

974, 971

140,000

1,035
1, 554
132, 021

5, 750
140, 000

Total expenditures -----------------------

713, 659

829, 221

140, 000

624,034
89, 625

697, 200
132, 021

140, 000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_____ _______
Adjustment in obligations of prior years_
Unliquidated obligations, end of y ea r...

[
$2, 909, 900
-27,155

FOR

1954 estimate

$2, 900,000

Appropriation or estimate_ ______ . - -Unobligated balance, estimated savings. .

A V A IL A B L E

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations -----------------

Appropriated 1953, $2,900,000

OF

expen ses]

Miscellaneous Expenses, United States Courts—
[F o r miscellaneous expenses of the United States courts and
their officers; rent in the D istrict of Colum bia; purchase of firearms
and ammunition; and purchase of envelopes without regard to the
A ct of June 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 476); $837,200: Provided, That this
appropriation shall be available for paym ent of the cost of contract
statistical services for the Office of Register of Wills of the District of
Columbia: Provided further, That not to exceed $1,000 of this appro­
priation shall be available for the paym ent of fees to attorneys
appointed in accordance with the Act of June 8, 1938 (52 Stat. 625),
not exceeding $25 in anv one case.] {5 U. S. C. 55a; 18 U .S . C.
726; 28 U. S. C. 604, 639, 961, 1915b; 48 U. S. C. 102, 863, 1405y;
Act of August 2, 1949, Public Law 201; Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

AM OUNTS

s a l a r ie s]

Miscellaneous Salaries, United States Courts—
[F o r salaries of all officials and employees of the Federal judici­
ary, not otherwise specifically provided for, $2,900,000: Provided,
That the com pensation of secretaries and law clerks of circuit and
district judges shall be fixed by the Director of the Administrative
Office w ithout regard to the Classification A ct of 1949, as amended,
except that the salary of a secretary shall conform with that of the
General Schedule grades (GS) 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8, as the appointing judge
shall determine, and the salary of a law clerk shall conform with that
of the General Schedule grades (GS) 5, 7, 9, 11, or 12, as the ap­
pointing judge shall determine, subject to review by the judicial
council of the circuit if requested by the Director, such determina­
tion by the judge otherwise to be final: Provided further, That (ex­
clusive of step-increases corresponding with those provided for by
title V II of the Classification A ct of 1949, as amended, and of com ­
pensation paid for tem porary assistance needed because of an emer­
gency) the aggregate salaries paid to secretaries and law clerks ap­
pointed by one judge shall not exceed $10,560 per annum, except in
the case of the chief judge of each circuit and the chief judge of each
district court having five or more district judges, in which case the
aggregate salaries shall not exceed $14,355 per annum .]
(28
U. S. C. 604 {a) (5), 634, 712, 752; 48 U. S. C. 102, 863, 870, 1344,
1349, 1405y, title 11, D. C. Code, sec. 312; Departments of State,
Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)

A N A L Y S IS

1954 estimate

N ote .—E stimate of $887,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Travel and miscellaneous expenses, United States courts.”
The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative
transfers.

234,891

140,546

m is c e l l a n e o u s

AM OUNTS

1953 estimate

Appropriated 1953, $837,200

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations_______ _____

[

1954 estimate

2,800,000

3,185, 665

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

[
—$3,045,000

e x p e n d it u r e s

Total e x p e n d i t u r e s . ___________

Fees of Jurors, United States Courts— Continued

Comparative transfer to “ Fees of jurors
and commissioners, United States
courts” ________ _______ ________________

of

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

j u r o r s ] — co n tin u e d

1952 actual

a n a l y s is

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$53,426
2, 882, 745

$69,875
2, 900,000

$81,000

2,936,171

2, 969,875

81,000

travel

expen ses]

Travel Expenses, United States Courts—
[F o r necessary traveling expenses, not otherwise provided for,
incurred by the Judiciary, including traveling expenses of probation
officers and their clerks, $715,000: Provided, That this sum shall be
available, in an am ount not to exceed $8,500, for expenses of attend­
ance at meetings concerned with the work of Federal probation
when incurred on the written authorization of the D irector of the
Adm inistrative Office of the United States C ou rts.] (5 U. S. C.
73b(2-3) 835-842; 28 U. S. C. 456, 604(a), 962; 48 U. S. C. 114, 863,
1405y; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The Judiciary
Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $715,000
N o t e —E stimate of $760,600 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimate to “ Travel and miscellaneous expenses. United States courts.”
T he amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

47

TH E JU D IC IA R Y
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred)________ . __ ____________ _
Comparative transfer to “ Travel and mis­
cellaneous expenses, United States
courts” ___ __ ______ __ ______ _____

AM OUNTS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$715,000

-715, 000

Appropriation or estimate___ ___________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. „

$7,100
-2 ,1 6 6
4,934

OF

1954 estimate

$7,100

Obligations incurred_______________

$715, 000

7,100

-715, 000

Total obligations____ ______________

A N A L Y S IS

A V A IL A B L E

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
U nliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$59, 306
715, 000

$42, 914
715, 000
757, 914

711, 875

732, 414

672, 086
39, 789

689,500
42, 914

$3,961

$5,900

973

1,200

Obligations incurred___________

4.934

1954 estimate

7,100

25, 500

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___ . . . __
Out of prior authorizations____________

1953 estimate

25, 500

Total expenditures________________

1952 actual

25, 500

19, 517
42, 914

OBJE CTS

07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs____________
Maintenance, air conditioning sys­
tem, annual_______ ________ _____

$25, 500

774, 306

BY

25, 500

D educt:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of yea r...

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1, 717
4,934

$918
7,100

$1,000

6,651

8,018

1,000

918

1.000

T otal expenditures.......... .......... ........

5,733

7,018

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______
Out of prior authorizations. ....................

4,016
1.717

6,100

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__ ____ _____ ____________ _ _ _

[

s a l a r ie s

of

court

reporters]

Salaries of Court Reporters, United States Courts—
[F o r salaries of court reporters for the district courts of the United
States, as authorized by title 28, United States Code, section 753,
$1,100,000.] (Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The
Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $1,100,000
N o t e .—Estimate of $1,115,700 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries of supporting personnel, The Judiciary.” The
amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estim ate--. _ - ______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.„

$1,082,600
-11,851

$1, 100,000

Obligations i n c u r r e d _ ________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries of sup­
porting personnel, The Judiciary” ___

1,070, 749

1954 estimate

918

Repairs and Improvements, United States Court of Appeals for the
District of Columbia—
[F o r repairs and improvements to the United States Court of
Appeals Building, including repair and maintenance of the mechan­
ical equipment and for labor and material and every item incident
thereto, $3,700, to be expended under the direction of the Architect
of the C a p itol.] (37 Stat. 964, ch. 150; 45 Stat. 671, ch. 659; 28
U. S. C. 604-610; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and The
Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $3,700

-1,070,749

-

AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

Total obligations__________________

1953 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
D educt:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year—_
Total expenditures......... - ..................
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ _____
Out of prior authorizations. .....................

1953 estimate

3, 700

O B L IG A T IO N S

$21, 242
1, 070, 749

$32, 8 8
8
1, 100, 0 0
0

1, 091,991

1,132,888
21, 300

1, 057, 532

1, 111, 588

OBJECTS

21,300

1,571
32,888

BY

$21,300
Object classification
07
21, 300

1952 actual

Other contractual services:
General annual rep a irs__________ .
Air conditioning, maintenance and
im p rovem en ts........ ........................
Obligations incurred___________

1, 037, 861
19, 671

1, 078, 700
32, 8 8
8

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2, 700

$1, 596
1,131

1,000

727

3,700

2,

21,300
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

UNITED

Repairs and Improvements, District Court of the United States for
the District of Columbia—
[F o r repairs and improvements to the courthouse, including
repair and maintenance of the mechanical equipment, and for labor
and material and every item incident thereto, $7,100, to be expended
under the direction of the Architect of the C a p itol.] (18 Stat. 374,
ch. 130; 28 U. S. C. 604-610; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce,
and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1953.)




$3, 700

2, 727

1954 estimate

1954 estimate

AND IMPROVEMENTS, DISTRICT COURT OF THE
STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF C O L U M B IA ]

Appropriated 1953, $7,100

$3, 700
-973

Obligations incurred_____ ________

[R E P A IR S

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1,000

[R E P A IR S AND IMPROVEMENTS, UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS
FOR THE DISTRICT OF C O LU M B IA]

1, 100,000
1, 100,000

A N A L Y S IS

1, 000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of ye a r...
Total expenditures____ ___________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations....................

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1, 747
3,700

$800

2, 727

326

5,447

800

$599
3,

41
1,747

800

1,538

4, 647

800

980
558

2,900
1,747

800

48

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

GENERAL PROVISIONS— THE JUDICIARY
Sec . 402. Sixty per centum of the expenditures for the D istrict
Court of the United States for the District of Colum bia from all
appropriations under this title and 30 per centum of the expendi­
tures for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of
Colum bia from all appropriations under this title shall be reimbursed
to the United States from any funds in the Treasury to the credit
of the District of Columbia.
S ec . 403. The reports o f the United States Court of Appeals for
the District of Colum bia shall not be sold for a price exceeding that
approved by the court and for not more than $6.50 per volume.
[S e c . 404. When the buildings in Judiciary Square now occupied
by the D istrict Court of the United States for the District of Colum ­
bia and the United States Court of Appeals for the D istrict of
Colum bia are vacated b y such courts, the Architect of the C apitol
shall cease to perform any duties in connection with such buildings
and any duties theretofore perform ed by him with respect to these
buildings shall thereafter be perform ed by the General Services
Administration. Such amounts of the appropriations herein pro­
vided for expenditure for such buildings b y the Architect of the
Capitol as m ay be unobligated at the time of transfer of duties
shall be transferred by the Architect of the Capitol to the General
Services A dm inistration.] (Departments of State, Justice, Commerce,
and The Judiciary Appropriation A ct, 1958.)

GENERAL PROVISIONS
Sec. 601. N o part of any appropriation contained in this Act, or
of the funds available for expenditure by any corporation included
in this Act, shall be used to pay the salary or wages of any person
who engages in a strike against the G overnm ent of the United
States or w ho is a member of an organization of Governm ent em ­
ployees that asserts the right to strike against the Governm ent of
the United States, or who advocates, or is a mem ber of an organiza­
tion that advocates, the overthrow of the Governm ent of the
United States by force or violence: Provided, That for the purposes
hereof an affidavit shall be considered prima facie evidence that the
person making the affidavit has not contrary to the provisions of
this section engaged in a strike against the Governm ent of the
United States, is not a mem ber of an organization of Governm ent
em ployees that asserts the right to strike against the Governm ent
o f the United States, or that such person does not advocate, and
is not a member of an organization that advocates, the overthrow
of the Governm ent of the United States b y force or violence:
Provided further, That any person who engages in a strike against
the G overnm ent o f the United States or who is a member of an
organization of G overnm ent em ployees that asserts the right to
strike against the G overnm ent of the United States, or who advo­
cates, or who is a mem ber of an organization that advocates, the
overthrow of the G overnm ent of the United States by force or
violence and accepts em ploym ent the salary or wages for which are
paid from any appropriation or fund contained in this A ct shall be
guilty o f a felony and, upon conviction, shall be fined not more
than $1,000 or imprisoned for not more than on£ year, or both:
Provided further, That the above penalty clause shall be in addition
to, and not in substitution for, any other provisions of existing law.
[ S e c . 602. Except for the autom obiles officially assigned to the
Secretary o f State, the A ttorney General, the Secretary of C om ­
merce, autom obiles assigned for operation by the Federal Bureau
of Investigation and one-half o f the chauffeur-driven automobiles
in operation in the Departm ents on July 1, 1951, no part of any
appropriation contained in this A ct shall be used to pay the com ­
pensation of any civilian em ployee of the Governm ent of the
D istrict of Colum bia whose primary duties consist of acting as
chauffeur of any Governm ent-owned passenger m otor vehicle
(other than a bus or am bulance), unless such appropriation is
specifically authorized to be used for paying the compensation of
employees perform ing such d u ties.]
Sec. [ 6 0 3 ] 602. N o part of any appropriation contained in this
A ct shall be used for publicity or propaganda purposes not hereto­
fore authorized by the Congress.
[S e c . 604. N o part of any appropriation or authorization con­
tained in this A ct shall be used to pay compensation of any in­
cum bent appointed to any civil office or position which may becom e
vacant after July 1, 1952, through the fiscal year 1953: Providedy
That this inhibition shall not apply— ]
[(a ) to not to exceed 25 per centum of all vacan cies;]




[ ( b ) to positions filled from within the d epa rtm en t;]
[ ( c ) to offices or positions required b y law to be filled by
appointm ent of the President b y and with the advice and
consent of the S en a te;]
[ ( d ) to the Departm ent of Ju stice;]
[ ( e ) to the Judiciary B ra n ch ;]
[ ( f ) to the Civil Aeronautics A dm inistration;]
[C g ) to the operational personnel of the Weather Bureau,
National Bureau of Standards, the Field Office Service of the
Bureau of Foreign and D om estic Com merce, Coast and G eo­
detic Survey, and the Bureau of Public R o a d s ;]
[(h ) to the Patent O ffice;]
[ (i) to the Civil Aeronautics B o a r d ;]
[ ( j ) to em ployees under the provisions of the Foreign Service
A ct of 1946 as a m en d ed ;]
[ (k ) to construction personnel, International Boundary and
W ater Commission, United States and M e x ic o ;]
[(1) to em ployees in grades C P C -1 and 2 : ]
[ Provided further, That when the total num ber of personnel in a
departm ent subject to this section has been reduced to 90 per centum
of the total provided for in the budget estimates for 1953, this sec­
tion may cease to a p p ly .]
[ S ec . 605. (a) N o appropriation or authorization contained in
this A ct shall be available to pay— ]
[(1 ) for personal services of personnel above basic ra te s ;]
[(2 ) for transportation of things (other than m ail); o r ]
[(3 ) for travel of em p loyees,]
[m ore than 90 per centum of the am ount which the budget estimates
heretofore subm itted in connection with appropriation or authoriza­
tion contem plated would be expended therefrom for such purposes
respectively ; and the total am ount of each appropriation, any part of
which is available for such purpose, is hereby reduced by an am ount
equal to 10 per centum of the am ount requested in such budget esti­
mates for such purpose less an am ount representing the reduction, if
any, between the am ount requested for such purpose in the budget
estimates and the am ount appropriated herein for such p u rp ose.]
[ (b ) This section shall not apply to— ]
[(1 ) construction, International Boundary and W ater Com ­
mission, United States and M e x ic o .]
[(2 ) the Foreign Service, D epartm ent of S ta te .]
[(3 ) the D epartm ent of Ju stice.]
[(4 ) the Civil Aeronautics A dm inistration.]
[ (5 ) the Civil Aeronautics B o a rd .]
[(6 ) the operational personnel of the Coast and G eodetic
Survey, the Bureau of Public Roads, the National Bureau of
Standards, and the W eather B u reau .]
[ (7 ) the Field Office Service of the Bureau o f Foreign and
D om estic C om m erce.]
[(8 ) the Patent O ffice.]
(9) Bureau of the C ensus.]
(10) the Judiciary B ran ch .]
[ S ec . 606. N o part of the m oney appropriated by this A ct to any
department or made available for expenditure b y any corporation
included in this A ct which is in excess of 87}^ per centum of the
am ount required to pay the compensation of all persons the aggre­
gate budget estimates for personal services heretofore subm itted to
the Congress for the fiscal year 1953 contem plated would be em­
ployed by such department or corporation during such fiscal year
in the perform ance of— ]
[(1 ) functions perform ed by a person designated as an infor­
mation specialist, inform ation and editorial specialist, publica­
tions and inform ation coordinator, press relations officer or
counsel, photographer, radio expert, television expert, m otionpicture expert, or publicity expert, or designated b y any similar
title, o r ]
[(2 ) functions perform ed by persons who assist persons per­
form ing the functions described in (1) in drafting, preparing,
editing, typing, duplicating, or disseminating public inform a­
tion publications or releases, radio or television scripts, maga­
zine articles, photographs, m otion pictures, and similar
material, ]
[shall be available to pay the compensation o f persons perform ing the
functions described in (1) or (2). N o person whose only perform ance
of the functions described in (1) or (2) of the preceding sentence is in
activities necessary for the enforcement of law, prom otion of safety
o f human life, dissemination of weather inform ation, or scientific
experimentation, or whose compensation is paid from funds ap pro­
priated specifically for International Inform ation and Educational
Activities shall be deemed to be engaged in the perform ance of the
functions so described .] (Departments of State, Justice, Commerce,
and The Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1958.)

49

THE JUDICIARY
P R O P O S E D

F O R

L A T E R

Fees of Commissioners, United States Courts— •
A N A L Y S IS

OF

T R A N S M IS S IO N
a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

U nliquidated obligations, start of year
U nliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ___

Unliquidated obligations, end of year____

107,000

$17,500
$17, 500

Salaries of Court Reporters, United States Courts—
107,000
A N A L Y S IS

o f

Fees of Jurors, United States Courts—
OF

1954 estimate

$107,000

Expenditures out of prior authorizations

A N A L Y S IS

1953 estimate

Expenditures out of prior authorizations

$107,000

Proposed supplemental a p p rop ria tion _
_

— c o n tin u e d

e x p e n d itu r e s

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Proposed supplemental appropriation. _ .
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$200,000

Proposed supplemental appropriation___
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ___

$15, 700
15,700

Expenditures out of prior authorizations

15. 700

150,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ - ____
Out of prior authorizations___ _________

$15,700

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Unliquidated obligations, end of year

$150,000

50,000

Salaries of Referees, United States Courts—
150,000

A N A L Y S IS

OF

1952 actual

Travel Expenses, United States Courts—
A N A L Y S IS

OF

Proposed supplemental appropriation____
Unliquidated obligations, start of year




1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation _ _

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$135,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Unliquidated obligations, end of year____

2,300

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations______ __
Out of prior authorizations ....................

$17,500
$17, 500

1954 estimate

$2, 300

132, 700

2, 300




E X E C U T I V E O F F IC E O F T H E P R E S I D E N T
SUMMARY OF N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED IN
THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations
Appropriations _ _
Reappropriations _

_

....

$9, 817, 265

Total new obligational authority en­
acted or recommended ___

$8, 128, 515
25, 979

$7, 881, 990

9, 817, 265

8, 154, 494

7, 881, 990

PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
Appropriations

____ _

T otal new obligational authority (for
_____
detail, see following table)

200, 000

9, 817, 265

8, 354, 494

7, 881, 990

SUM M ARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

FROM
AUTHORIZATIONS
ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOCU­
MENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations ....

__

_ _

Other Expenditures

$7, 697, 798

915, 323

$9, 108, 283

Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations. __
____ __
T otal expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recommended

9, 108, 283

$7, 517, 190

604, 603

8, 613, 121

8, 121, 793

<

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations___

. . __

163, 000

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations. _ _ _____
___
Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following table) ___________ ____

37, 000

9, 108, 283

8, 776, 121

8, 158, 793

51

200000—53----- 4




52

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
B Y O R G A N IZ A T IO N U N IT A N D A C C O U N T T IT L E

[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Func­
tional
code
No.

Organization unit and account title

ENACTED

OR

RECOM M ENDED
DOCUM ENT

IN

E X P E N D IT U R E S

(appropriations unless other wise specified)

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1952
enacted

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

1952
actual

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

T H IS

Current authorizations
Compensation o f the President___________________
The W hite House Office: Salaries and expenses..

$150,000
1,883, 615

$150,000
1,907, 643

$150,000
1,904, 760

603
603

335,600

341,200
25,979

367,200

$150,000
1,645,496

$150,000
1,881,232

$150,000
1,604,780

354,755

364,486

369,200

30,796

603
603

100,863

137,689

Executive M ansion and grounds:

Executive Mansio n and grounds________________________ .. .
Reappropriation_________ _______________________________
A ddition to Executive Mansion, and improvements of
E xecutive Mansion and grounds_______________________

603

335,600
3, 608,000

367,179
3,461,200

367,200
3, 700,000

385,551
3, 676,032

465,349
3,472, 605

506,889
, 660,000

603
603

317,800
24,000

225,000

300,000

326,033
19,167

243,822

290,000

051
051

341,800
160,000
1,627,000
1, 711, 250

225.000
155.000
625.000
1, 263, 472

300.000
160.000
1,300,000

345,200
138,692
1,657,324
1,109, 988

243,822
144,113
939,000
1, 317,000

290,000
157,935
1,268,000
154,179

9,817, 265

8,154,494

7, 881,990

9,108,283

8, 613,121

8,121,793

Total, Executive Mansion and grounds-.
Bureau o f the Budget: Salaries and expenses..
Council o f Economic Advisers:

Salaries and expenses_______________________________
Salaries and expenses, defense production activities.
Total, Council of Econom ic Advisers__________________
National Security Council: Salaries and expenses___________
National Security Resources Board: Salaries and expenses...
Office o f Defense Mobilization: Salaries and expenses______

m

Total current authorizations, enacted or recommended
in this docum ent____________________________________
P R O P O S E D F O R L A T E R T R A N S M IS S IO N
Under existing legislation:

Council of Econom ic Advisers: Salaries and expenses_
_
National Security Resources Board: Salaries and expenses.

603
051




12,000

9, 817,265

100,000

25,000

200,000

Total proposed for later transmission________ _____ _
Total new obligational authority and total budget
expenditures_____________________________________

63,000

75,000
125,000

163,000

37,000

I 776,121
,

8,158,793

8,354,494

7, 881, S

9,108,283

53

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
C U R R E N T

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT

o b l ig a t io n s

Compensation of the President—
For compensation of the President, including an expense allow­
ance at the rate of $50,000 per annum, as authorized by the A ct
o f January 19, 1949 (3 U. S. C. 102), $150,000. (Independent
Offices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
A ppropriated 1953, $150,000
AM OUNTS

FOR

o b je c ts—

Object classification

1952 actual

BY

$1,000
25.000

Obligations incurred_______________

1, 609,398

1, 907, 643

1,904, 790

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$177,984
1,609,398

$73, 589
1, 907,643

$100,000
1,904,790

1,787,382 ;

1,981,232

2,004,790

A N A L Y S IS

OF

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

O BJECTS

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year._.

Personal services—1952, $150,000; 1953, $150,000; 1954, $150,000.
A N A L Y S IS

20.000

•

Compensation of the President—1952, $150,000; 1953, $150,000; 1954, $150,000.

01

1954 estimate

$1,000
25.000
25.000

O B L IG A T IO N

A C T IV IT IE S

1953 estimate

$911
23, 580
18, 795

Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1952, $150,000; 1953, $150,000; 1954,
$150,000.
O B L IG A T IO N S

co n tin u e d

07 Other contractual services___________
08 Supplies and materials___________ ___
09 Equipm ent___________ ___
_
.

Estimate 1954, $150,000

A V A IL A B L E

by

68,297
73,589

100,000

100,000

Total expenditures.......... .......... ........

1, 645,496

i,
1, 88 232

1,904, 790

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations. _______
Out of prior authorizations____________

1, 542,326
103,170

1, 807, 643
73, 589

1,804, 790

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)—1952, $150,000; 1953, $150,000; 1954, $150,000.

100,000

THE WHITE HOUSE OFFICE
EXECUTIVE MANSION AND GROUNDS

Salaries and Expenses, The White House Office—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for The White
H ouse Office, including not to exceed $100,000 for services as author­
ized by section 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at
such per diem rates for individuals as the President may specify,
and other personal services w ithout regard to the provisions of law
regulating the em ploym ent and compensation of persons in the
G overnm ent service; and travel and official entertainment expenses
of the President, to be accounted for solely on his certificate;
[$ 1 ,9 0 7 ,6 4 3 ] $1,904,790. (Independent Offices Appropriation A ct,
1953.)

Executive Mansion and Grounds—
For the care, maintenance, repair and alteration, refurnishing,
improvement, heating and lighting, including electric power and
fixtures, of the Executive Mansion and the Executive Mansion
grounds, and traveling expenses, to be expended as the President
may determine, notwithstanding the provisions of this or any other
Act, [$341,200, together with not to exceed $26,000 of the unobli­
gated balance of funds appropriated for such purpose in the
“ Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952” ] $867,200. (TJ.
S. C. 2; Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $1,907,643

Appropriated 1953, $341,200

AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $1,904,790

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

1952 actual

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$335,600

$341, 200
25,979

$367,200

335,600

367,179

367,200

367,179

367,200

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,883, 615
-274,217

$1,907, 643

$1,904,790

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Prior year balance reappropriated_______

1, 609,398

Appropriation or estimate________ _____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred_______________

AM OUNTS

O B L IG A T IO N

Estimate 1954, $367,200

1,907,643

1,904, 790

Total available for obligation______
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year____________________ ____ _________

-25,979

Obligations incurred____ _________

309, 621

1

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

A C T I V IT I E S

Administration—1952, $1,609,398; 1953, $1,907,643; 1954, $1,904,790.
PR O G R A M

AND

O B L IG A T IO N S

PERFORM ANCE

These funds provide the President with staff assistance
and provide administrative services for the White House
OfBce.
O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

O BJE CTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

261

279
283

$5, 413
GS-7.8

$5,241
GS-7.6

$3, 207
C PC-4.2

$3,268
C PC-4.2

$3,267
CPC-4.2

$1,320, 072
42,586
70, 607

$1, 532, 645
100, 00
0
93, 998

$1,543,790
100, 0 0
0
80,000

1,446,264

1, 726, 643
40, 000
20, 000
40, 000

40,000
20, 000
45,000
10, 0
00

AN D

O B L IG A T IO N S

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

6

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________
01

02
04
05
06

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______ - ____
Part-time and temporary positions.
Paym ent above basic rates________
Payments to other agencies for
reimbursable details.
Total personal services____ __
Travel (traveling expenses of the
President)_______________________
• Other travel_________ _____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services___________
Printing and reproduction.____ _____




PERFORM ANCE

These funds provide for the care, maintenance, and
operation of the Executive Mansion and the surrounding
grounds.

1,723, 790

39, 989
10,151
44,279
7,425
18,004

PR O G R AM

277

$5,097
GS-7.4

A C T I V IT I E S

273

252

BY

Care, maintenance, and operation of the Executive Mansion and the surrounding
grounds—1952, $309,621; 1953, $367,179; 1954, $367,200.

8

8

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades: Ungraded
positions:
Average salary._____________________

01

12,999

.

10,000
20,000

20,000

03
04
05
06
07

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates................
Total personal services___________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services_________
Printing and reproduction....................
Other contractual services.....................

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

71

72

74

72

77

79

$3,415

$3,491

$3,507

$248,181
14,929

$256,110
14,929

814
11,059

910
4,945

981
4, 945

241,859
54

268, 965

276,965

145
38, 890
125
13,200

143
30,890
125
13,200

6

$204,379
25,607 j

17,623
26
8,729

6

6

54

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

EXECUTIVE MANSION AND GROUNDS— Con.

o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjec ts

Object classification
08
09
10
15

— c o n tin u e d

Supplies and materials_____ _________
Equipm ent__________________________
Lands and structures........... .................
Taxes and assessments_______ ________
Obligations incurred________

1952 actual

$37,854

309,621

367,179

8,000

01

$37, 875

07
08
09

8,000

02
10

15
367, 200

Personal s e rv ice s __
_
__
Travel
..
.
.
__
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials______ ______
Equipm ent
_ ___________
Lands and structures___ __ ________
Taxes and assessments

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$3,000

$5,315
85
12, 075
28, 641

Total direct obligations____________

1954 estimate

$35,138
2, 573
3, 486
133

____

— c o n tin u e d

Direct Obligations

1953 estimate

1952 actual

o b jects

Object classification

Executive Mansion and Grounds— Continued
o b l ig a t io n s

bt

20,000
10, 0
00

$20 0 0
, 0

3, 500
14

5, 000
61, 955
45

5,000
81, 689

49, 630

100,000

116,689

6,296

2,000
102, 0 0
0

116, 689

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

10,000

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
From Other A ccounts
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

01
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$50,441
309,621

$5, 307
367,179
372,486

8,000

Total expenditures ........ .......... .........

354, 755

364, 486

369, 200

304, 361
50, 394

333,200
31,286

361, 200

55, 926

6,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..- ______
Out of prior authorizations- ____ ______

________

375, 200

5,307

Obligations incurred.. __

$8 0 0
, 0
367, 200

360, 062

Personal services___ _________________

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___ _____ __________ _____ _______

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
$3, 029
55, 926

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$21, 863
102, 0
00

$21, 0
00
116, 689
137, 689

58, 955

123, 863

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_________ _____
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

6,296
21, 863

2, 000
21, 000

Total expenditures (out of prior au­
thorizations) ______ _______________

8,000

30, 796

100, 863

Miscellaneous

137,689

Addition to Executive M ansion, and Improvements of Executive
Mansion and Grounds—
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Salaries and Expenses, Bureau of the Budget—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the Bureau of
the Budget, including newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding
$200); teletype news service (not exceeding $900); [n o t to exceed
$59,250 for expenses of tr a v e l;] and not to exceed $20,000 for serv­
ices as authorized by section 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5
U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for individuals ;
[$3 ,4 61 ,2 00 ] $3,700,000.
(31 U. S. C. 1 - 24 , 665, 847-84-9, 852;
5 U. S. C. 133t, 139—
139f, 835-842, 1151-1153; 44 U. S. C. 220;
Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Prior year balance available_____________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$266,319
6, 296

$216, 689

$116, 689

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year____

272, 615
-216, 689

218, 689
-116, 689

116, 689

Obligations incurred......... ..................

55,926

102, 0 0
0

116, 689

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$25,000

$25,000

75,000

91,689

Appropriation or estimate___ - _______
Reimbursements from other accounts____

49, 630

100, 0 0
0

116, 689

3. Renovation of Executive M ansion____

6, 296

Obligations incurred_______ ______

55, 926

2, 0
00
102, 0
00

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

2,000

A C T IV IT IE S

Appropriated 1953, $3,461,200
Description

1952 actual

AM OUNTS

Direct Obligations

1.
2.

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
$49, 630

Total direct obligations____________
Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
F rom Other A ccounts

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$3, 608, 000
74, 212

$3, 461, 200
60,000

$3. 700,000
60,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

3, 682, 212
-1 0 , 386

3, 521, 200

3. 760,000

Obligations incurred_______________

Im provem ent of grounds ___ ___ __
Completion of East W ing of Executive
Mansion. _ _ ___ __________ . . _

3, 671,826

3, 521, 200

3, 760,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

116, 689

O B L IG A T IO N S

AND

Object classification

A C T IV IT IE S

PERFORM ANCE

BY

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

O BJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

S um m ary of Personal Services

Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees_____

2
2

1
1

Average salaries and grades: Ungraded
positions: Average salary______________

$5, 805

$6 0
, 00

Personal service obligations: Part-time
and temporary positions____ __
____

11, 611

5, 000

1954 estimate

Office of budget rev iew ...........................
Office of legislative reference....... ............
Office of management and organization.
Office of statistical standards..................
Program divisions:
(а) Commerce and finance..................
( б International_____________ ______
)
(c) Labor and welfare_______________
(d) M ilitary______ __ _____________
(e) Resources and civil w orks............
6. Field service__________________________
7. Administration______ ________________

$423,037
149,033
346,360
391, 378

$402, 500
141, 700
337,000
386,100

$414,300
147, 500
383,300
391,100

384, 958
191, 901
398, 404
362, 945
378, 876
205, 872
439, 062

349, 400
204, 400
372, 200
374, 000
337, 600
169, 300
417, 000

349, 700
242,000
370, 800
447,200
382, 600
210, 700
420, 800

Obligations incurred_______________

Funds available in this account will be used for im­
provements to the grounds of the White House and for
completion of the interior of the East Wing of the Execu­
tive Mansion.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

1952 actual

Description
P R O G R AM




Estim ate 1954, $3,700,000

A V A IL A B L E

3, 671, 826

3, 521, 200

3,760,000

PROGRAM

AN D

PERFORM ANCE

The Bureau assists the President in the discharge of his
budgetary, management, and other Executive respon­
sibilities. Provision is made in the estimates for 1954 for

55

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

an increase in staff to provide for more intensive review of
agency programs and operating efficiency, with particular
emphasis on international, military, and resources and
civil works activities.
1. Office oj budget review.— Budget instructions and
procedures are developed, review of agency estimates is
coordinated, and the budget document is prepared.
2. Office oj legislative rejerence.— Proposed legislation
and agency reports on pending legislation, enrolled bills,
and proposed Executive orders and proclamations are
reviewed for the President.
3. Office oj management and organization.— Programs
and plans are developed for improved Government
organization and procedures, and guidance is provided
in the work of the Bureau to improve agency management
and operations.
4. Office oj statistical standards.— Proposed agency
reporting plans and forms are reviewed, and the Govern­
ment’s statistical activities, coverage, and methods are
coordinated and improved.
5. Program divisions.— Agency programs, budget re­
quests, and management activities are examined, appro­
priations are apportioned, proposed changes in agency
functions are studied, and agencies are assisted in the
improvement of their administration.
Responsibility
for this work with respect to particular agencies is divided
among five divisions: (a) Commerce and finance,
(6) International, (c) Labor and welfare, (d) Military,
and {e) Resources and civil works.
6. Field service.— Four field offices appraise and improve
agency field operations and maintain contact with State
and local governments.
7. Administration.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJE CTS

1952 actual

Object classification

1953 estimate

515

1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees________

493

2

485
4
465

519
5
497

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________

$6,770
G S - 10.0

$6,901
G S - 10.2
$3,135, 500
25,900

$3,348,000
27,900

12,570
6,474

12,000
7, 600

13,000
8, 600

3,393

1, 500

1,500

3,294,290
52,198
2,206
44,550
150, 270
8,987

3,182,500
56,400
1,500
44,000
150,000
3,800

3,399,000
72,000

43,225
44,047
29,547
2,506

40,000
31,000
9,000
3,000

3,671,826

3,521,200

3,760,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

02

03
04
06
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions______ _______
Part-time and temporary positions...
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base______ _____________________
Paym ent above basic rates________
Payments to other agencies for
reimbursable details_____________
Total personal services_____
Travel______________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services^___ - _____
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Services performed by other agen­
cies ____ _ ------ -------------------------Supplies and materials_______________
E quipm ent______________ __________
Taxes and assessments_____________
Obligations incurred________ ______

A N A L Y S IS

OF

2,000

44,000
150,000
4,000

E X P E N D IT U R E S

$245,442
3,671,826

$166,405
3,521,200

$155,000
3,760,000

3,917,268

3,687,605

3,915,000

D educt:
Reimbursable obligations.................... . . .
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

74,212
619
166,405

60,000

3,676,032

3, 472,605

3,690, 000

$3,310,605
162,000

$3,540,000
150,000

$3, 442,732
233,300

Appropriated 1953, $225,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $300,000

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

$225, 000

$300,000

317,356

Obligations incurred______ ______

1954 estimate

$317,800
-444

Appropriation or e s tim a te______ _______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

1953 estimate

225,000

30G, 000

A C T IV IT I E S

Economic analysis—1952, $317,356; 1953, $225,000; 1954, $300,000.
P R O G R AM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

The Council of Economic Advisers analyzes the na­
tional economy and its various segments; advises the
President on economic developments; recommends policies
for national economic growth and stability; appraises the
economic programs and policies of the Federal Govern­
ment; and assists in the preparation of the annual and
midyear economic reports of the President to the Con­
gress. Funds appropriated to the Council for the current
fiscal year are available only through March 31, 1953,
and a supplemental appropriation of $75,000 is anticipated
to provide funds for the last quarter of the fiscal year.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJE CTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

39
35

36
27

35
34

$6,800
GS-10.0

$6 700
,
GS-9.9

$6,900
GS-10.4

$3,135
C PC-5.0

$3,135
CPC-5.0

$3,135
CPC-5.0

$259, 299

$190, 835

$258, 670

3,071

1,400

1,000
2, 0 0
0

Total personal services. _ _
Travel______________________________
Communication services_____________
Printing and reproduction..................
Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agen­
cies______________________________
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 Equipm ent___ . . .
________________
15 Taxes and assessments____ _. _____

263,371
1,800
3. 614
28,382
11, 212

192, 235
1,275
2,900
18, 535
3,335

261, 670
1,800
4.080
19,450
5,200

6,600
2,099
50
228

4, 950
1,500

6,000

270

300

Obligations incurred_______________

317,356

225,000

300,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$21,822
225,000

$3,000
300.000

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all em ployees__ _____
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____________
_____
Average grade . . __
_
__
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary__________
_________
Average grade
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions _.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base .
_
Payment above basic r a t e s ____ .

02
04
06
07

1,001

1,500

165,000

Total expenditures-------- ----------------

1954 estimate

60,000

155,000

1953 estimate

Salaries and Expenses, Council of Economic Advisers—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Council in
carrying out its functions under the Em ploym ent Act of 1946 (15
U. S. C. 1021), including newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding
$200); [n o t to exceed $2,475 for expenses of tr a v e l;] and press
clippings (not exceeding $300); [$225,000, to remain available until
March 31, 1953] $300,000. (Independent Offices Appropriation A ct,
1953.)

10,000
3,000

— c o n tin u e d

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS

Object classification

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

e x p e n d it u r e s

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations__________ .

40,000
36,000

01

of

1952 actual

$6,900
G S - 10.1

$3,259,960
11,893

a n a l y s is




A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year____
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$30,379
317,356

56

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
PR O G R A M

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS— Continued
T he

Salaries and Expenses, Council of Economic Advisers— Continued

w ith
a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

N a tio n a l

respect

m ilit a r y

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

C o u n c il

in te g r a tio n

r e la tin g

C e n tr a l I n t e llig e n c e
T h e

PERFORM ANCE

to

th e

A gen cy

C o u n c il

a d v is e s

of

n a tio n a l

is u n d e r t h e

in c lu d e s

347,855

$246,822

$303,000

21,822

3,000

13,000

th e

Total expenditures_________________

326,033

243,822

290,000

297,102
28, 931

and

of

th e

222, 500
21, 322

287,000
3,000

m ilit a r y

D e v e lo p m e n t
p o in te d

T he

d ir e c tio n

P r e s id e n t,

o f th e

th e

V ic e

I n a d d it io n th e s e cre ­

d e p a rtm e n ts,

b y

B oard

th e

of

th e

th e C h a ir m a n o f th e R e s e a r c h

and

m ay

serve

P r e s id e n t

and

th e
as

C h a ir m a n

m em bers

c o n fir m e d

b y

w hen
th e

ap­

S e n a te .

O t h e r h ig h o ffic ia ls a t t e n d m e e t in g s o r p a r t ic ip a t e in C o u n ­

Miscellaneous

cil a c tio n s a s d ir e c t e d b y th e P r e s id e n t .

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Production Activities, Council of
Economic Advisers—
FO R

and

s e c u r ity .

t a r ie s a n d u n d e r s e c r e t a r ie s o f o t h e r e x e c u t i v e d e p a r t m e n t s
M u n itio n s B o a r d , a n d

A V A IL A B L E

P r e s id e n t

fo r e ig n ,

th e D ir e c t o r fo r M u t u a l S e c u r it y , a n d th e C h a ir m a n o f th e
N a tio n a l S e c u r it y R e s o u r c e s B o a r d .

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations____________

th e

d o m e s tic ,

P r e s id e n t, th e S e c r e t a r y o f S ta te , th e S e c r e t a r y o f D e fe n s e ,

$120

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
yea r.------ ----------------------------------------------

AM OUNTS

S e c u r ity
th e

p o lic ie s

C o u n c il.
Adjustment in obligations of prior yea rs.. _

to

AND

th e

T reasu ry

p a r t ic ip a t e

and

in

th e

a ll

C o u n c il

J o in t C h ie fs o f S ta ff, a n d

O B L IG A T IO N

g e n c e r e g u la r ly a tte n d
1952 actual

D ir e c to r

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

of

T h e S ecreta ry o f

D e fe n s e

a c t io n s , w h ile
th e

M o b iliz a t io n

th e

C h a ir m a n ,

D ir e c t o r o f C e n tr a l I n t e lli­

C o u n c il m e e tin g s .

T h e C o u n c i l s t a f f w o r k is p e r f o r m e d u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n
o f a c iv ilia n e x e c u t iv e s e c r e t a r y b y p e r m a n e n t C o u n c il e m ­

Appropriation or estimate .
_ .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred____ _

$24,000
-4 ,8 3 3

m en ts

19,167

_____

O B L IG A T IO N S

p lo y e e s a n d o ffic ia ls d e t a ile d f r o m
and

C o u n c il
BY

is

d e s ig n a te d

A C T I V IT I E S

a g e n c ie s .
th e
b y

s e n io r
th e

T h e
s ta ff

th e p a r t ic ip a t in g d e p a r t ­

p r in c ip a l

s ta ff

com p osed

P r e s id e n t b a s e d

on

of

u n it

th e

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJECTS

D ir e c to r

of

D e fe n s e

M u tu a l S e c u r ity , th e

M o b iliz a t io n ,

C h a ir m a n

o f th e

th e

th e

o ffic ia ls

n o m in a t io n

t iv e ly o f th e S e c r e ta r ie s o f S ta te , D e fe n s e , a n d

Econom ic analysis—1952, $19,167.

of

e ig h t

resp ec­

T reasu ry,

D ir e c to r

fo r

N a tio n a l S e c u r ity

R e s o u r c e s B o a r d , th e J o in t C h ie fs o f S ta ff, a n d th e D ir e c ­
1952 actual

Object classification

1954 estimate

tor

of

C en tra l

r e p o r tin g

9
3

Total nhmber of permanent positions........
Average number of all employees________

I n t e llig e n c e .

u n it w a s

P r e s id e n t to

keep

D u r in g

e s ta b lis h e d

r e q u ir e d

$7,676
GS-10.9

b y

u pon

fis c a l
th e

c u r r e n tly in fo r m e d

n a tio n a l s e c u r it y p r o g r a m s a n d

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade___________________ ____
01

1953 estimate

BY

1952

th e sta tu s

of

a

th e

o f a ll

to m a k e sta tu s re p o rts

th e P r e s id e n t o r th e
O B L IG A T IO N S

on

year

d ir e c tio n

as

C o u n c il.
O BJECTS

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Paym ent above basic rates_________

$14,000
1,767

Object classification

Total personal services___________
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services___________

15.767
2,500
900

Total number of permanent positions.......
Average num ber of all em ployees________

23

21

22

22

Obligations incurred_______________

19,167

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade._ ............... ............. .........
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average g r a d e ____ _____ ___________

$5,762
GS-8.1

$5,985
G S - 8.8

$6,089
GS-8.9

$3,230
C P C -4

$3, 230
C P C -4

$3,230
C P C -4

$129,628

$140,205
2,400

$142, 915
4,800

542
2,353

549
2,236

145, 500
500
2,300
500
1,740

150, 500
500
2,300
500
1, 740

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)—1952, $19,167.

01

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
Salaries and Expenses, National Security Council—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the N ation al
Security Council, including services as aut-horized by section 15 o f
the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not in excess o f
$50 per diem for individuals; acceptance and utilization of volu n ­
tary and uncompensated services; and expenses of attendance at
meetings concerned with work related to the activity of the C ou n cil;
[$ 1 5 5 ,0 0 0 ] $160,000.
(Department of Defense Appropriation Act,
1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $155,000

02

04
06
07
08
09

Personal services:
Permanent positions______
_____
Part-time and temporary positions
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________ _ ........... .......
Paym ent above basic rates_________
T otal personal services__________
Travel_______________________________
Communication services___ __________
Printing and reproduction___ _____ __
Other contractual services.....................
Supplies and materials...........................
Equipm ent______________
____ ____
Obligations in cu rred ________ _____

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

23

2,365
131,993
2,277

86

1,158
1,492
4,594

2,000
2,460

141,600

1954 estimate
23

2,000
2,460

155,000

160,000

OF

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$7,179
560
141,600

$10,647

$21,534

155,000

160,000

149,339

165,647

181,534

10,647

21,534

23,599

138,692

144,113

157,935

E X P E N D IT U R E S

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$160,000

1952 actual

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. _

$160,000
-18,400

$155,000

Obligations incurred...........................

141,600

155,000

O L A IO S B A T IT S
B IG T N Y C IV IE
Policy coordination-— 5 , $141,600; 1 53 $155,000; 1 5 , $160,000.
19 2
9 ,
94




1953 estimate

Estimate 1954, $160,000
A N A L Y S IS

AM OUNTS

1952 actual

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior ye a rs..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

160,000
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__________________________________
Total expenditures............ ..................

57

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

— c o n tin u e d

1953 estimate

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations__________

$130,953
7. 739

1954 estimate

$134,850
9, 263

1952 actual

$139,200
18, 735

area may prove desirable, the functions which* are provided
for in this appropriation must be carried on at an adequate
level. Funds appropriated to. the Board for the current
fiscal year are available only through April 30, 1953, and a
supplemental appropriation of $125,000 is anticipated to
provide funds for the last 2 months of the fiscal year.
O B L IG A T IO N S

NATIONAL SECURITY RESOURCES BOARD
Salaries and Expenses, National Security Resources Board—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the National
Security Resources Board; including services as authorized by sec­
tion 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates for
individuals not in excess of $50 per diem and contracts with tem ­
porary or part-time employees may be renewed annually; expenses
of attendance at meetings of organizations concerned with the work
of the National Security Resources Board; hire of passenger m otor
vehicles; reimbursement of the General Services Administration
for security guard services for protaction of confidential files;
not to exceed $8,000 for newspapers and periodicals; and not to
exceed $5,000 for emergency and extraordinary expenses, to be
expended under the direction of the Chairman for such purposes
as he deems proper, and his determination thereon shall be final
and conclusive; [$625,000, to be apportioned for use during the
period July 1, 1952, to April 30, 1953] $1,300,000. (50 U. S. C.
404; Department of Defense Appropriation A ct, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $625,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1954, $1,300,000

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate-----------------------Reimbursements from other accounts.. .

$1,627,000
783

$625,000
60,000

$1,300,000

Total available for obligation---------Unobligated balance, estimated savings._

1,627, 783
-47,175

685,000

1,300,000

1, 580,608

685,000

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

AND

135
41
161

135
80

115
30
139

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade
..........................................

$7,019
GS-10.1

$7,806
GS-11.3

$7, 865
GS-11.2

$785,643
332,814

$527, 000
89,000

$863, 500
285,000

3,624
5,862

1,000

01

Personal service?:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.
___ ___ _ _____________
Payment above basic rates___ ____
Payments to other agencies for
reimbursable details______ ___

Obligations incurred_______________

617,000
20, 0 0
0

1,139, 736
49,333
1, 6 8
8
24, 550
58
66,149
162, 287

1, 580,608

A N A L Y S IS

OF

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1,000

3,500

1,152,000
50.000
500

17,000

21.000

8,000
2, 0 0
0
6,000
7, 600
1,000

93,242
22, 503
14, 795
1,267
5,000

16,000
4,500

400
5,000

20,000
20,000
10,000
1,000
5,000

685,000

1,300,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$519,737
1,580,608

$351,579
685,000

$33,000
1,300,000

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

The Chairman of the National Security Resources
Board advises the President concerning the Nation’s secu­
rity resources potential in the event of war including such
policies and programs as are essential to the maintenance
of a strong security resource position. An increased
amount is provided for these functions in 1954.
The agencies responsible for defense mobilization pro­
grams will increasingly emphasize forward mobilization
planning during 1954. While some reorganizations in this

8

11,793

Total personal services_________
02 T r a v e l . .._____________________ _____
03 Transportation of things___________ _
04 Communication s e r v ic e s ........ ............
05 Rents and utility services___
_____
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services___ _______
Services performed by other agen­
cies_____________________ ________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipm ent______________ ___________
15 Taxes and assessments____ _________
U nvouchered... ________ _____ _______

A C T I V IT I E S

PERFORM ANCE

1953 estimate! 1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

Security resources—1952, $1,580,608; 1953, $685,000; 1954, $1,300,000.
PR O G RAM

OBJECTS

1952 actual

Object classification

1,300,000

Obligations incurred--------------- -------

BY

2,100,345

1,036,579

1,333,000

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations . . . ____ ____
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account. ____________________

783
77,407
351, 579

60,000
4, 579
33,000

65,000

_

1,657,324

939,000

1, 268,000

1,255, 516
401,808

620,000
319,000

1,235,000
33,000

Total expenditures______________

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________

13,252

Statement of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
N A T IO N A L S E C U R IT Y R E S O U R C E S B O A R D
M otor vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Appropriation
Num ber

Gross
cost

Num ber

Allowance
(estimated)

N et cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
chased

Salaries and expenses, National
Security Resources Board.

[OFFICE OF DEFENSE MOBILIZATION]
Salaries and Expenses, Office of Defense Mobilization—
[F o r expenses necessary for the Office of Defense M obilization,
including compensation of the D irector o f Defense M obilization;
printing and binding without regard to section 89 of the A ct of
January 12, 1895, as amended (44 U. S. C. 213); hire of passenger
m otor vehicles; reimbursement o f the General Services Administra­
tion for security guard service; not to exceed $5,000 for emergency
and extraordinary expenses, to be expended under the direction of




Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

4

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

$100

Public purpose and users

Attendance at meetings and conferences b y the Chairman and
top officials of the Board’s stall.

the Director for such purposes as he deems proper, and his determi­
nation thereon shall be final and conclusive; and expenses of attend­
ance at meetings concerned with the purposes o f this appropriation;
$1,250,000: Provided, That contracts under this appropriation for
tem porary or intermittent services as authorized by section 15 of
the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), m ay be renewed annu­
a lly .] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $1,250,000
Appropriated (adjusted) 1953, $1,263,472

58

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

[OFFICE OF DEFENSE MOBILIZATION]— Con.

o b l ig a t io n s

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_______________
Transferred from “ Salaries and expenses,
Defense Production Administration,”
pursuant to sec. 711 of the Defense Pro­
duction Act, as amended_________ . ___

$1, 711, 250

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Reimbursements from other accounts____

1953 estimate

1. 711, 250
29, 500

1954 estimate

13, 472

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

1, 740, 750
-393, 555

Obligations incurred______________

1,347,195

1, 299, 472

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

A C T IV IT IE S

Direction of defense mobilization program— 1952, $1,347,195; 1953, $1,299,472.
PR O G RAM

AND

Personal services:
Permanent positions----------------------Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week

$682,633
154,614

$727,918
142,101

2,880
11,898

1954 estimate

$2,958
C P C -3.7

2,894
5, 728

51,448

40, 619

903,473
149,282
1,075
25,110
2,266
86,466
41,298

919,260
137,393
4,424
23,490
1,133
60,448
50,000

41,353
29.348
60.349
2,175
5,000

66,336
22,655
8,136
1,197
5,000

1,347,195

Total personal services.............
02 Travel______________________________
03 Transportation of things------------------04 Communications service____________
05 Rents and utility services___________
06 Printing and reproduction......... .........
07 Other contractual services__________
Services performed b y other agen­
cies_______________________ ______
08 Supplies and materials............ ............
09 Equipm ent_________________________
15 Taxes and assessments.-------------------Unvouchered___________________________

1, 299, 472

1953 estimate

$2,833
C PC-3.4

Payments above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_______________

1, 263, 472
36, 000

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

Average salaries and grades—Continued
Crafts, protective, and custodial *
Average salary____________
Average grade______ ______

01

$1, 250, 000

o bjects

Object classification

Salaries and Expenses, Office of Defense Mobilization— Continued
AM OUNTS

by

1,299,472

PERFORM ANCE

Obligations incurred..

On behalf of the President, the office directs and coordi­
nates mobilization activities of the executive branch,
including production, procurement, manpower, stabiliza­
tion, and transport activities. The 1954 requirements for
these activities are included in a supplemental appropria­
tion under proposed legislation carried in the chapter
“ Funds appropriated to the President.”

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$207,707
1,299,472

$154,179

$1,347,195

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year..-.

1953 estimate

154,179

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade...................... ............ ......

1953 estimate

199
13
134

1954 estimate

148

Unobligated obligations, start of year..
Unliquidated obligations, end of year..
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorization.................




1,317,000

154,179

1,109,988

1,119,000
198,000

154,179

OFFICE OF DIRECTOR FOR MUTUAL SECURITY
$5,940
G S - 8.8

N ote .— Obligations incurred under allocations from “ M utual security, funds appro­
priated to the P resident," are shown in the schedules of the parent appropriation.

$5, 921
G S - 8.8
F O R

L A T E R

T R A N S M IS S IO N

Salaries and expenses, National Security Resources Board
(under existing legislation, 1953).— A supplemental ap­
propriation of $125,000 is anticipated to provide funds
for activities of the Board from May 1, 1953, through
June 30, 1953.
A N A L Y S IS

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Proposed supplemental appropriation .

1,109,988

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations___________

134

Salaries and expenses, Council oj Economic Advisers
(under existing legislation, 1953).— A supplemental ap­
propriation of $75,000 is anticipated to provide funds
for activities of the Council from April 1 through June
30, 1953.
OF

36,000
154,179

12

P R O P O S E D

A N A L Y S IS

1,507,179

29,500
207,707

Total expenditures_______________

O B L IG A T IO N S

1,347,195
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligation_____________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year..

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$75,000

12,000
63,000

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental ap propriation..
$12,000

12,000

$125,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

25,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.............. .
Out of prior authorizations____ ______

100,000

1954 estimate

25,000







F U N D S A P P R O P R IA T E D

T O T H E P R E S ID E N T

SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1954 estimate

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriations____________ __________________
Reappropriations__________________ _____ ____
Authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts______
_
_______ _ _ _ _

$7, 385, 636, 244
732, 704, 187

$6, 003, 244, 750
448, 528, 869

$1, 000, 000

T o ta l_____________________________ ____
D educt portion of appropriations for liquida­
tion of prior contract authorizations______

8, 645, 594, 747

6, 451, 773, 619

1, 000, 000

6, 451, 773, 619

1, 000, 000

16, 701, 750

7, 650, 000, 000

6, 468, 475, 369

7, 651, 000, 000

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED IN
THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations

T otal obligational authority under
current authorizations______ ____

527, 254, 316

44, 476, 271

8, 601, 118, 476

PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
Appropriations __________ _____________________
T otal new obligational authority (for
detail, see following tables)___ _ _

60

8, 601, 118, 476




F U N D S A P P R O P R IA T E D

TO

T H E P R E S ID E N T

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

FROM
AUTHORIZATIONS
ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOCU­
M ENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations_____ __________

'$1, 500, 000, 000

$800, 000

4, 253, 957, 750

5, 401,699, 647

96, 262, 411

5, 256, 041

5, 850, 220, 161

5, 407, 755, 688

14, 651, 750

2, 046, 000, 000

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations________ ________________________
Out of receipts of revolving and management
funds (n et)----__ __ __ _ __ — _____
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recom m ended______

$4, 982, 628, 181

4, 982, 628, 181

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations________________
Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations___________________ __ __ _______

202, 050, 000

Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions proposed for later transmission.
Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following tables)—
_____ __ __

14, 651, 750

4, 982, 628, 181

2, 248, 050, 000

5, 864, 871, 911

7, 655, 805, 688
61

62

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
B Y O R G A N IZ A T IO N U N IT A N D A C C O U N T T IT L E

[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]
N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

Func­
tional
code
No.

Organization unit and account title

E X P E N D IT U R E S

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1952
enacted

1954
estimate

1953
estimate

1953
estimate

1952
actual

1954
estimate

E N A C T E D O R R E C O M M E N D E D I N T H IS
DOCUMENT
Current authorizations

(Other than revolving and management funds)
Armed Forces leave payments: Payments, A rm ed Forces

Leave A ct of 1946_________________________________________
Assistance to Greece and Turkey______________________________
Assistance to the Republic o f Korea___________________________
Care, handling, and disposal o f surplus property abroad____
Defense aid, special fund_______________________________________
Disaster relief_____________________________ ______ _____ _________
Emergency fund for the President, national defense................

Reappropriation_____________________________________ _____

$55,800,000
1, 000,000
4, 580,100

$1, 000,000

$1, 000,000

Emergency fund for the President.______ _____________________

D o _________________________
D o _____ ____________________
D o _________________________
D o _________________________
D o _________________________
D o _________________________
D o _________________________

1,000

1,000

11,867,308

6,675,647

1,870,849

999,682

1, 000,000

40,052

$60,000
6,150,795

72,125
859, 986
775, 050
189, 672
15,395, 926
195,312
3,910
3, 707,475

1,108,633

168, 529, 540
5, 750,000
12, 233, 691

21, 470, 460

4,361, 474,028

Total expenses of defense production__________________

601, 849

21,199, 456

257
355
407
455
506
555
603
605

Expenses o f defense production..

$18,000

$691,201
21,323,375
15,936,133
1,064,152
5,310
16, 257,045

246,432

055
152
152
605
055
258
055
055

5,342,000,000

1,478
72,041

India emergency food aid: Authorization to expend from

public debt receipts_______________________________________
International children’ s welfare work_________________________
International development: Expenses_______________________
Mutual security:

M ilitary assistance, Europe, title I, M utual Security A c t ...
Econom ic and technical assistance, Europe, title I, Mutual
Security A ct____________________________________________
Assistance to Spain, M utual Security A c t _________________
M ilitary assistance, Near East and Africa, title II, Mutual
Security A ct____________________________________________
Econom ic and technical assistance, Near East and Africa,
title II, M utual Security A ct____________________________
Palestine refugee assistance, title II, M utual Security A c t ..
Relief and resettlement of refugees entering Israel, title II,
M utual Security A c t ____________________________________
M ilitary assistance, Asia and Pacific, title III, Mutual
Security A ct--------------------------------------------------------------------Econom ic and technical assistance, Asia and Pacific, title
III, M utual Security A ct________________________________
Special technical and economic assistance, Asia and Pacific,
title III, M utual Security A ct ----- ----------------------------------Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruction
Agency, title III, M utual Security A c t ________ _________
M ilitary assistance, American Republics, title IV , M utual
Security A c t ....... .............. .......................... - ................ .............

152
152
152

27, 254, 316

2,478,361

152
152
152

152
152
152
152
152
7, 284,359, 973

6.003. 244, 750

5,392,000,000

152
152
152
R E V O L V IN G A N D M A N A G E M E N T JF U N D S

(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
N o.

N E W A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S
(authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts unless otherwise specified)
1952

1953

1954

FU N DS P R O V ID E D
(b y operations)

1952

1953

1954

ENACTED OR R EC O M M EN D ED
Expansion o f defense production
_
_
.
_ ____
_
___
M utual security: Discharge of investment guarantee liabilities............... .
The Institute o f Inter-American Affairs: Corporate funds

Total revolving and management funds




506
152
152

$500,000, 000

500,000,000

$847,523,731
2,078,632
23, 631, 499

$328, 503, 225
2,457,000
19,409,000

$4,675,000

873, 233,862

350,369,225

4, 685, 000

10,000

63

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO TH E P R E SID E N T
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
B Y O R G A N IZA T IO N U N IT A N D A CC O U N T TITLE—Continued
N E W A U TH O R IZ A T IO N S
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Func­
tional
code
No.

Organization unit and account title

1952
enacted

1953
estimate

$728,124,087
44,476, 271

E X P E N D IT U R E S
(from prior year and new authorizations)

$447, 528,869

1954
estimate

1952
actual

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

E N A C T E D O R R E C O M M E N D E D IN T H IS
D O C U M E N T -C o n tin u e d
Current authorizations—Continued
M utual security—Continued
Technical assistance, American Republics, title IV , M utual
Secilrity A ct____________________________________________
M ovem ent of migrants, title V, M utual Security A ct...........
Ocean freight voluntary relief packages, title V, Mutual
Security A ct __________________________________________
Multilateral technical cooperation, M utual Security A ct___
Contributions to United Nations international children’s
emergenpy fund, Mutual Security Act
.............
Reappropriation
_____________________ ______________
M utual security (liquidation of contract authorization)
___ ____ __
Overtime, leave, and holiday compensation. __
R e lief o f Palestine refugees: Contributions to United N a­
tions for relief of Palestine refugees___ _
__ ______
Special fund for management improvement____ _ __________
Yugoslav emergency relief assistance

152
152
152
152
152
152
152
610

$220,056,870
2,847
5,000,000
21,931
7,120,486

Total current authorizations, other than revolving and
management funds________ ________ _____ _________ _

8,145,594,747

6,451,773,619

$1, 000,000

50,749

4,858,783,346

5,524,688,456

$5,399, 694,647

123,844,835

152
605
152

$138,460,727
689

325,531,705

8,061,041

4,982,628,181

5,850,220,161

5,407, 755, 688

2, 000,000

Revolving and management funds
500,000,000

R evolving and management funds (for detail, see below) • .

8, 645,594, 747

Total enacted or recommended in this docum ent.......... .

6,451,773,619

1, 000,000

P R O P O S E D FO R LA TE R T R A N S M IS S IO N
Under existing legislation:
Contributions to United Nations international children’s
emergency fund, M utual Security Act, Executive
_____
Emergency fund for the President, national defense
_____
Multilateral technical cooperation, Mutual Security Act,
Executive
Under proposed legislation:
E xpansion of defense production
_ __
Expenses of defense production and stabilization activities.
M utual security

152
055

9,814,333
350,000

7,814,333
300,000

152

6, 537,417

6, 537,417
200, 000,000

506
506
152

50,000,000
7,600,000,000
16, 701, 750

6, 468,475, 369

7, 651,000,000

6,468, 475,369

8, 645, 594, 747

Grand t o t a l ___ _. ______________ ___________________
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior
contract authorizations
__ ________________ _____________

46,000, 000

2, 000, 000,000

7, 650,000,000

7, 651,000,000

Total proposed for later transmission______ ___________

14, 651, 750
4,982, 628,181

2, 248,050,000

5,864, 871, 911

7,655,805, 6 8
8

44,476, 271

8, 601,118,476

Total new obligational authority ________ _____________

RE V O LV IN G A N D M A N A G E M E N T FUNDS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

N E T EFFECT ON B U D G E T
.E X P E N D IT U R E S

FUNDS A PPLIE D
(to operations)

Organization unit and account title
1952

1953

1954

1952

1953

1954

ENACTED OR R ECOM M EN D ED
$975, 591, 708
3, 461,155
18,025,834

$648, 430,390
5,159, 000
22,311, 540

$7, 500,000
5, 246,041

$128, 067, 977
1,382, 523
« 5, 605, 665

$319, 927,165
2, 702, 000
2, 902, 540

$2, 825, 000
5, 236,041

997, 078, 697

675, 900, 930

12, 746, 041

123, 844, 835

325, 531, 705

8,061,041

° Deduct, excess of repaym and collections over expenditures.
ents




60,000

Expansion o f defense production
Mutual security: Discharge of investment guarantee liabilities
The Institute o f Inter-American Affairs: Corporate funds
Total revolving and management funds

64

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
C U R R E N T

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

ASSISTANCE TO THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA

ARMED FORCES LEAVE PAYMENTS
Payments, Armed Forces Leave Act of 1946—
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

Assistance to the Republic of K orea, Executive Office of the President—

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

AM OUNTS

1953 estimate

A V A IL A B L E

$10,879, 519
5,836

$10,789,810

$10, 752, 607

Total available for obligation. ____
Balance available in subsequent year
Carried to surplus.

10, 885,355
-1 0 , 789,810
-22,172

10, 789, 810
-10,752, 607
- 2, 203

10, 752, 607
-1 0 , 749,107

Obligations incurred_______________

73,373

35,000

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1954 estimate

-

FOR

Recovered from prior year obligations____
Balance transferred to “ M utual security,
funds appropriated to the President,”
pursuant to 65 Stat. 373_______________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,251,754

3,500

Prior year balance available _________
Recovery of prior year obligations___

Obligations incurred_________
A N A L Y S IS

O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

- 1 , 251, 754

.
OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

A C T IV IT IE S

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Claims—1952, $73,373; 1953, $35,000; 1954, $3,500.
PR O G R AM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

Payments are made for terminal leave accumulated
prior to September 1, 1946, by uniformed personnel of the
Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, United States
Coast and Geodetic Survey, and United States Public
Health Service. The final date for filing claims for such
payments was June 30, 1951, except for certain claims
resulting from correction of service records (10 U. S. C. 18;
14 U. S. C. 50d; 34 U. S. C. 604; 37 U. S. C. 32-37, 39;
42 U. S. C. 210-1).
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O BJECTS

1952 actual

Object classification

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims_______________ _____________

$52,766

$25,000

$2,500

12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims____________
______________

49, 863, 590
15,936,133

$10,000

$20,607

$1,000

6,150,795

Care, Handling, and Disposal of Surplus Property Abroad, Executive
Office of the President—
OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account________________ ____

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2,927,164
1,680,563
182,449

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)________ ______ ___

ALLOCATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE
NAVY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

$6,150,795

1,251,754
6,150, 795

CARE, HANDLING, AND DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS
PROPERTY ABROAD

1954 estimate

1953 estimate

$73, 202, 272

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)_______ ___________

A N A L Y S IS

ALLOCATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE
ARM Y, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

12

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
D educt:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year._.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account_______________________

1,064,152

CHINA AREA AID
China Area Aid, Executive Office of the President—

SUMMARY

12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims........ .............. . . . ----------------

A N A L Y S IS

OF

AM OUNTS

$73,373

1953 estimate

A V A IL A B L E

1

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$665,320
73, 373

$41, 656
35, 000

$16, 656
3, 500

738, 693

76,656

20,156

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

5, 836
41,656

16, 656

Total expenditures (out of prior au­
thorizations)_____________________

691, 201

60,000

18, 000

Prior year balance available.____ ________
Balance transferred to “ Mutual security,
funds appropriated to the President,”
pursuant to 65 Stat. 373—_______________

ASSISTANCE TO GREECE AND TURKEY
Assistance to Greece and Turkey, Executive Office of the President—
OF

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$5, 635, 739
- 5 , 635, 739

Obligations incurred_______ _______

2,156

A N A L Y S IS

FO R O B L IG A T IO N

$3, 500

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the y e a r ------

$35,000

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of ye a r...
Deduct unliquidated obligations trans­
ferred to “ M utual security, funds ap­
propriated to the President,” pursuant
to 65 Stat. 373__________________________
Total expenditures-. . __________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$140, 739,680

140, 739, 680

DEFENSE AID

E X P E N D IT U R E S

Defense Aid, Special Fund—
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year—
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account- .
. . . .
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)




1953 estimate

1954 estimate

A N A L Y S IS

OF

$31, 541,235
5, 543,370
4, 674, 490
21,323,375

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year. __________ _____ _______ _______
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)__________________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$242, 748

$237,438

$236,438

237, 438

236, 438

235, 438

5,310

1,000

1,000

65

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

DISASTER RELIEF
Disaster Relief, Executive Office of the President—
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate
_
_ _
Prior year balance available_______ ______

$55,800,000
$31,474, 732

$26, 675, 647

Total available for obligations_____
Balance available in subsequent year____

55,800,000
-3 1 , 474, 732

31,474.732
-26,675, 647

26, 675, 647

Obligations incurred_______________

24,325,268

4,799,085

26,675,647

$24,325,268

$4,799,085

without regard to such provisions o f law regarding the expenditure
of Governm ent funds o j ; the compensation and em ploym ent of
persons in the Governm ent service as he may specify, to provide
in his discretion for emergencies affecting the national interest,
security, or defense which may arise at hom e or abroad during
the current fiscal year, $1,000,000 [ o f the unexpended balance in
this fund on June 30, 1952, is hereby continued available during
the fiscal year 1953]: Provided, That no part of this appropriation
shall be available for allocation to finance a function or project for
which function or project a budget estimate o f appropriation was
transmitted pursuant to law during the [secon d session of the
Eighty-second Congress or the first session of t h e ] Eighty-third
Congress and such appropriation denied after consideration thereof
by the Senate or House of Representatives or by the Com m ittee
on Appropriations of either body. (Independent Offices A pprop ri­
ation A ct, 195 S.)
Estim ate 1954, $1,000,000

$26,675,647

ALLOCATIONS

Housing and Home Finance A gency.........

AM OUNTS
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

A C T IV IT IE S

1952 actual
Adm inistration_______________________
2. Grants to disaster-affected areas____ _
3. Tem porary housing facilities.. . .........
4. Reserve for future allocations_ _______
_

$257, 611
19, 705,847
4,361,810

$157, 000
4,353, 895
288,190

$6,000

Obligations incurred_______________

24,325,268

4,799,085

26,675,647

1.

PR O G RAM

T h is a p p r o p r ia tio n
d e p a rtm e n ts

and

AND

a g e n c ie s

to

b y

$1, 000,000
4,580.100
9,058

$1, 000,000

Total available for obligation______
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year____ _____________________ _ _____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

5, 589,158

1, 000,000

1, 000,000

- 1, 000,000
- 3 , 702,825

Obligations incurred_______________

26," 669," 647

ren der

th e

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate__________ ____
Prior year balance reappropriated_______
Reimbursements from other accounts

886,333

1, 000,000

1, 000,000

PERFORM ANCE

is a l lo c a t e d

1953 estimate

P r e s id e n t to

a s s is ta n c e

to

$1, 000,000

th e

S ta te s

PR O G R AM

AN D

PERFORM ANCE

a n d lo c a l g o v e r n m e n t s in a re a s s tr ic k e n b y m a jo r d is a s te r .
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

T hese

O BJE CTS

fu n d s a re to

e m e r g e n c ie s
1952 actual

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees. - .........
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary. ---------- ---------------------Average grade____________ __________
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions----------------------Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e ___________ __________ __

Total personal services — ------02 Travel
. . . ______________ - 03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communications services____________
05 Rents and utilities services
. ..
06 Printing and reprodu ction ...................
07 Other contractual services-----------------Services performed b y other agen­
___
cies
08 Supplies and materials.................... .......
09 Equipm ent
_____ ____
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
15 Taxes and assessments____ _ _ _ _ _ _
Reserved for future allocations _________
Obligations incurred--------- ------------A N A L Y S IS

OF

1953 estimate
29
25

40
34

1954 estimate

1
1

$5, 935
G S- 8.6

$5,839
GS-7.1

$6,740
GS-11

$205,276

$138,349

$5,982

913

651

18

206,189
22,720
426
5,905
388
5
2,462

139,000

6,000

8,000
500
3,800
1,700
1,400

3, 111, 812
3,400
75
20, 971, 523
363

Total expenditures

______________

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations
_ . _ _ }
Out of prior authorizations ___________

n a tio n a l

a r is e a t h o m e

24,325, 268

4, 799,085

200

Average number of all employees________

01
02

03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

1954 estimate
$1, 000,000
26, 675, 647

$24,'325, 268

$8,068,223
4, 799, 085
12,867,308

27, 675, 647

8,068,223

1, 000,000

16,257,045

11,867,308

Average number of all employees...............
01 Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions___________________
02 Travel___________ _________________
03 Transportation of things........................
04 Communication services____________
05 Rents and utility services. _ ________
07 Other contractual services___________
08 Supplies and materials. _ ___________
09 E qu ipm ent__________________________
10 Lands and structures..............................
15 Taxes and assessments________ _____ _

21, 000,000
6, 675, 647

r.....................
16,257,045 \ 11,867,308

Obligations incurred_______________

Average number of all em ployees...............

EMERGENCY FUND FOR THE PRESIDENT
NATIONAL DEFENSE
Emergency Fund for the President, National Defense—
For expenses necessary to enable the President, through such
officers or agencies of the Governm ent as he m ay designate, and

02

04
05
06
07
08

or

or abroad.

OBJECTS

1952 actual

1953 estimate

67

30

$532, 522
69,765
3
10, 723
25,000
2, 751
1,552
8,029
17,380
737

$210,375
35,425

668,462

300,000

4

23

$23,078
4,138
145

$130,000
31,000

532
2,074

7, 500
5.000
53,500

2,395
68,042
314

4,500
26, 500

100,724

260,000

6

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF
COMMERCE

6 675, 647
,

p r o v id e fo r
s e c u r ity ,

5,100
15.000
19,200

11.000
3,000
900

ALLOCATION TO GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION

’ "’ "26,'669,"647

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1953 estimate

Personal services: Part-time and
temporary positions_________ _ __
Travel___________________ ______ __
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services______ ____
Supplies and materials______________
E quipm ent________________________ _
Taxes and assessments_______________
O bligations incurred.................. ........

36, 675, 647

BY

in te r e s t,

ALLOCATION TO EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE
PRESIDENT

01




m ay

th e

O B L IG A T IO N S

1,800
600
4, 642, 085

24,325,268
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________________________ _____

d e fe n s e w h ic h

e n a b le th e P r e s id e n t t o

Object classification

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year........

a ffe c t in g

4

Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions...................................
Travel__________ ______________ ______
Communication services...................
Rents and utility services. ............. .
Printing and reproduction.....................
Other contractual services...... ..............
Supplies and materials...........................

$16,907
10,334
1, 705
194
4,377
6,871
1,317

Obligations incurred..........................

41,705

2.000

1954 estimate

66

TH E B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1954

EMERGENCY FUND FOR THE PRESIDENT— Con.

a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

NATIONAL DEFENSE— Continued

1952 actual

Emergency Fund for the President, National Defense— Continued
o b l ig a t io n s

by

o bjec ts

Object classification

— c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

— c o n tin u e d

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

/ _____________
$1,870,849 I
$999,682

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__ ____ }
Out of prior authorizations____________

1953 estimate

$800,000

200,000

1954 estimate

Miscellaneous
a l l o c a t io n

to

departm ent

of

the

Emergency Fund for the President—

in t e r io r

Average number of all employees________

3

01 Personal services: Part-time and tem ­
porary positions____ _______________
02 Travel_______ _________ __________
04 Communication services_____ ________
06 Printing and reprodu ction ...
_____
08 Supplies and materials.____ __________
09 E quipm ent_____ ________________ _.

to d e p a r t m e n t

Average number of all employees________

Obligations incurred______________

to

e x p e n d it u r e s

1.000
600
2, 0
00

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of yea r...

25,000

1953 estimate

$304,344

1954 estimate

$40,052

17,860
40,052

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)__________________

246, 432

40,052

o f j u s t ic e

01 Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions___________________
02 Travel_____ ______________ _________
03 Transportation of things... __________
04 Communication services— ____ __
05 Rents and utility services.........- ____
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services___ ________
08 Supplies and materials..........................
09 E quipm ent_____ ___________________

a l l o c a t io n

of

1952 actual

$16,400
4.000
1, 0 0
0

Obligations incurred._____ ________

a l l o c a t io n

a n a l y s is

departm ent

of

5

15

$20, 406
1,096

$94, 498
11, 636
831
4,156

2, 579
4,989
2,328
8, 394
4,420
16,302

EXPENSES OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION
Expenses of Defense Production, Executive Office of the President—
a n a l y s is

9, 973
34, 078
997
831

60, 514

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year___

2

1953 estimate

$23,083, 507

1954 estimate

$1,108,633

775,418
1,108, 633

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)___________ ______

state

Personal services: Part-time and tem ­
porary positions __ ______________
Travel _______ _______________________
07 Other contractual services _________
08 Supplies and materials . _________

e x p e n d it u r e s

1952 actual

157,000

Average number of all e m p lo y e e s _______

of

21,199,456

1,108,633

01

$10, 555
4, 200
3, 500
500

02

Obligations incurred

a l l o c a t io n

to

treasury

FOREIGN ASSISTANCE
Foreign Assistance, Executive Office of the President—

18, 755

____________

a m o u n ts

a v a ila b le

departm ent

fo r

o b lig a tio n

1952 actual

Average number of all employees ________
01 Personal services: Part-time and tem ­
porary positions__________________
02 T r a v e l ..___________ ___________ ____
04 Communication services
- ________
05 Rents and utility services
. ______
08 Supplies and m ateria ls._____ ________

$8 499
,
329
254
5, 840

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

2

Obligations in c u r r e d .____________

Prior year balance available: Public debt
authorization (loan to Spain)_____ _____
Balance transferred to “ M utual security,
funds appropriated to the President,”
pursuant to 65 Stat. 373___________ _____

6

$45,300, 000
-45,300,000

Obligations in cu rred ______________

14,928
a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

su m m ar y

82

01 Personal services: Part-time and tem ­
porary positions __________________
Travel- . ______________________ ____
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent
. . ............. .
10 Lands and structures
15 Taxes and assessments________ _______
Reserved for future allocations_____ ______

$601, 412
85, 662
148
15, 267
36, 555
9, 456
18, 891
13, 772
36, 077
68 042
,
1, 051

$461, 828
8 , 261
6
831
17, 756
20, 0
00
30,173
102, 078
7,097
8,231
26, 500

Obligations incurred_______________

886 333
,

1952 actual

73

Average number of all e m p lo y e e s .._____

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

OF

Total expenditures _ _____________

239, 245

$1, 000,000

1, 000,000

1, 000, 0 0
0

INDIA EMERGENCY FOOD AID
India Emergency Food Aid, Executive Office of the President—
a v a il a b l e

for

o b l ig a t io n

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations
. _
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures________________




$1,268, 621
886,333

$199, 682
1, 000,000

$200,000
1, 000, 000

2,154, 954

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1954 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___ $1,287,358, 531
Deduct unliquidated obligations trans­
ferred to “ Mutual security, funds ap­
propriated to the President,” pursuant
to 65 Stat. 373__________________________ 1, 287,358, 531

a m o u n ts

A N A L Y S IS

1953 estimate

1,199, 682

1, 2t)0,000

Authorization to expend from public
debt receipts, pursuant to 65 Stat. 69._
Prior year balance available_______ ______
Balance transferred from “ M utual se­
curity, funds appropriated to the Presi­
dent,” pursuant to 65 Stat. 69 ________
Obligations incurred

9,058
75, 365
199, 682

200,000

1,870,849

999, 682

200, 000
1, 000, 000

_____________

1953 estimate

$27, 254,316
82, 500, 000
62, 745, 684
172, 500,000

obligations by activities
Em
ergency food aid— 9 2 $172,500,000.
15,

1954 estimate

67

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification
ALLOCATION TO MUTUAL SECURITY

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$52,032, 995

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE

16 Investments and loans.......................

1933 estimate

1954 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_ $4,812,042,064
_
Deduct unliquidated obligations, start of
year, transferred, pursuant to 65 Stat.
373, to—
“ Mutual security, funds appropriated
to the President” _________ ______ 4,453, 524,467
“ Mutual security, funds appropriated
to the President (liquidation of con­
tract authorization) ” .... .....................
358, 517, 597

A EN
G CY

16 Investments and loans_____________

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$120,467,005

Total expenditures___ ___________
SUMMARY

16 Investments and loans.... ..................
A N A L Y S IS

$172, 500,000

OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during year ______
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________ ________________
Total expenditures

MUTUAL SECURITY

___________

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations................
Out of prior authorizations- ............... }

1953 estimate

$17, 500,000
172, 500,000

$21,470,460

190,000,000

1954 estimate

21,470,460

21,470,460
168, 529, 540

21,470,460

/ . ____ _____
168,529,540 \ 21,470,460

INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S WELFARE WORK
International Children's Welfare Work, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent—
A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year (total expenditures out of prior authorizations)—
1952, $5,750,000.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Expenses , International Development, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent—
AM O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 actual
Prior year balance available (obligations
incurred)..............................................
Comparative transfer to “ Mutual secu­
rity, funds appropriated to the Presi­
dent"______________ _______ ___ ___

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,026,411
-1,026,411

Total obligations.............................
A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year___
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________________________
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)....... ......................

1953 estimate

$13,685,641
1,026,411

$2,478,361

14,712,052

1954 estimate

2,478,361

2,478,361
12,233,691

2,478,361

MUTUAL DEFENSE ASSISTANCE
M utual Defense Assistance , Executive Office of the President—
A M O U N T S A V A ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 actual
Prior year balance available___________
$146,444, 915
Balance transferred to “ Mutual security,
funds appropriated to the President,”
pursuant to 65 Stat. 373...... *_______ . -146,444,915
Obligations incurred_____________

200000—
-53----- 5




1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Mutual Security, Funds Appropriated to the President—
Military Assistance, Europe, Title I, Mutual Security Act,
Executive—
Economic and Technical Assistance, Europe, Title I, Mutual
Security Act, Executive—
Assistance to Spain, Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Military Assistance, Near East and Africa, Title II, Mutual Security
Act, Executive—
Economic and Technical Assistance, Near East and Africa, Title II,
Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Palestine Refugee Assistance, Title II, Mutual Security Act,
Executive—
Relief and Resettlement of Refugees Entering Israel, Title II,
Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Military Assistance, Asia and Pacific, Title III, Mutual Security Act,
Executive—
Economic and Technical Assistance, Asia and Pacific, Title III,
Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Special Technical and Economic Assistance, Asia and Pacific,
Title III, Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency,
Title III, Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Military Assistance, American Republics, Title IV, Mutual Security
Act, Executive—
Technical Assistance, American Republics, Title IV, Mutual
Security Act, Executive—
Movement of Migrants, Title V, Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Ocean Freight Voluntary Relief Packages, Title V, Mutual Security
Act, Executive—
Multilateral Technical Cooperation, Mutual Security Act,
Executive—
Contributions to United Nations International Children’s Emergency
Fund, Mutual Security Act, Executive—

[For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the
provisions of the Mutual Security Act of 1951 (Public Law 165,
approved October 10, 1951), as amended, as follows:]
[Military assistance, title I: For assistance authorized by
section 101 (a) (1), $3,128,224,750; and, in addition, unexpended
balances of appropriations heretofore made pursuant to section
101 (a) (1) of said Act shall remain available through June 30,
1953, and shall be consolidated with this appropriation;]
[Economic and technical assistance, title I: For assistance
authorized by section 101 (a) (2), $1,282,433,000; and, in addition,
unexpended balances of appropriations heretofore made pursuant
to section 101 (a) (2) of said Act shall remain available through
June 30, 1953, and shall be consolidated with this appropriation;]
[Assistance to Spain: Unexpended balances of appropriations for
‘‘Assistance to Spain”, granted in the Mutual Security Appropria­
tion Act of 1952, shall remain available until* June 30, 1953, and
shall be consolidated with funds allocated for assistance to Spain
pursuant to section 101 (c) of the Mutual Security Act of 1951, as
amended;]
[Military assistance, title II: For assistance authorized by
section 201, $499,116,500; and in addition, unexpended balances of
appropriations heretofore made pursuant to section 201 of said
Act shall remain available through June 30, 1953, and shall be
consolidated with this appropriation;]
[Economic and technical assistance, title II: For assistance
authorized by section 203, $50,822,750; and, in addition, unex­
pended balances of appropriations heretofore made pursuant to
section 203 of said Act (except the amounts allocated or available
for the purposes of sections 204 and 205 of said Act) shall remain
available through June 30, 1953, and shall be consolidated with
this appropriation;]
[Palestine refugee assistance, title II: For assistance authorized
by section 206 for carrying out the purposes of section 204 of said
Act, $60,063,250; and, in addition, unexpended balances of appro­
priations heretofore made available pursuant to section 203 and

68

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued
Mutual Security, Funds Appropriated to the President—Continued

allocated or otherwise available for the purposes of said section
204 shall remain available through June 30, 1953, and shall be
consolidated with this appropriation;]
[Relief and resettlement of refugees entering Israel, title II:
For assistance authorized by section 206 for carrying out the pur­
poses of section 205 of said Act, $70,228,000;]
[Military assistance, title III: For assistance authorized by
section 301, $540,807,500; and, in addition, unexpended balances
of appropriations heretofore made pursuant to section 301 of said
Act shall remain available through June 30, 1953, and shall be
consolidated with this appropriation;]
[Economic and technical assistance, title III: (a) For assistance
authorized by section 302 (a), to be furnished under the applicable
provisions of section 503 of the Mutual Security Act of 1952,
$202,778,250; and, in addition, unexpended balances of appropria­
tions heretofore made available pursuant to section 302 of said
Act and allocated or otherwise available to the Mutual Security
Agency (except unexpended balances of funds allocated for assist­
ance to Burma and Indonesia) shall remain available through
June 30, 1953, and shall be consolidated with this appropriation;
(b) For assistance authorized by section 302 (a) to be furnished
under the applicable provisions of the Act for International Develop­
ment, as amended, $67,793,000; and, in addition, unexpended
balances of (1) appropriations heretofore available pursuant to
section 302 of said Act and allocated or otherwise available to the
Technical Cooperation Administration, and (2) funds allocated for
assistance for Burma and Indonesia, shall remain available through
June 30, 1953, and shall be consolidated with this appropriation;]
[Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruction
Agency, title III: The unobligated balances of the appropriations
available during the fiscal year 1952 for carrying out section 303 of
said Act shall remain available through June 30, 1953;]
[Military assistance, Title IV: For assistance authorized by
section 403 to carry out the provisions of section 401 of said Act,
$51,685,750; and, in addition, unexpended balances of appropria­
tions heretofore made pursuant to said section 401 shall remain
available through June 30, 1953, and shall be consolidated with this
appropriation;]
[Technical assistance, title IV: For assistance authorized by
section 403 to carry out the provisions of section 402 of said Act,
$20,329,000; and, in addition, unexpended balances of appropria­
tions heretofore made pursuant to said section 402 shall remain
available through June 30, 1953, and be consolidated with this
appropriation;]
[Movement of migrants, title V: For assistance authorized by
section 534, $9,240,500;]
[Ocean freight, voluntary relief packages, title V: For assistance
authorized by section 535, $2,587,500.]
[ M u l t il a t e r a l

T e c h n ic a l

C o o p e r a t io n ]

[For contributions authorized by section 404 (b) of the Act for
International Development, as amended by section 10 (a) of the
Mutual Security Act of 1952, $9,171,333.]

Deputy Director of Mutual Security, and every such certificate shall
be deemed a sufficient voucher for the amount therein specified;
insurance of official motor vehicles in foreign countries; acquisition
of quarters outside the continental limits of the United States to
house employees of the United States Government by rental (with­
out regard to section 322 of the Act of June 30, 1932, as amended
(40 U. S. C. 278a)), lease, purchase, or construction, and necessary
repairs and alterations to such quarters; health and accident insur­
ance for foreign trainees and technicians while en route or absent
from their own countries participating in activities authorized under
the Mutual Security Act of 1951, as amended; actual expenses of
preparing and transporting to their former homes in the United
States or elsewhere the remains of persons or members of the families
of persons who may die while such persons are away from their homes
participating in activities under the Mutual Security Act of 1951, as
amended; and services of commissioned officers of the Public Health
Service and of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, and for the purposes
of providing such services the Public Health Service may appoint
not to exceed 20 officers in the Regular Corps to grades above that
of senior assistant, but not above that of director, as otherwise
authorized in accordance with section 711 of the Act of July 1, 1944,
as amended (42 U. S. C. 211a), and the Coast and Geodetic Survey
may appoint for such purposes not to exceed 20 commissioned officers
in addition to those otherwise authorized: Provided, That not to
exceed $37,800,000 shall be available for administrative expenses of
the departments and agencies concerned with the administration of
the programs provided for herein, including not to exceed $186,900
for personal services for those persons in a publicity office of the
Mutual Security Agency in the District of Columbia the major part
of whose activities is the dissemination of information in the United
States and for expenses incident to the dissemination of such infor­
mation, and no part of such amount shall be used to pay the salary
of any civilian employee at a rate greater than that paid by the State
Department for comparable work or services in the same area:
Provided further , That no part of such funds shall be expended for
the purchase of Agiicultural products or products produced from
Agricultural products not declared to be in short supply, in the
United States by the -Secretary of Agriculture, at less than the pre­
vailing market price for such commodity within the United States
or if obtained from the Commodity Credit Corporation stocks, at
less than the support price of such commodity including handling
and storage costs, but nothing in this proviso shall be construed to
prevent the operation of export payment programs, other than those
financed from funds contained in tbis chapter, pursuant to section
32 of the Act of August 24, 1935 (Public Law 320, Seventy-fourth
Congress), as amended, or to prevent the sale at less than the support
price, including handling and storage costs, of any commodity from
Commodity Credit Corporation stocks which has substantially de­
teriorated in quality or as to which there is danger of loss or waste
through deterioration or spoilage.] (66 Stat. 141-151, 652-655;
Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Appropriated 1953, $6,001,947,750
Appropriated (adjusted) 1953, $6,003,244,750

N o t e . —$44,476,271 of the 1952 appropriation for this account is excluded from this
schedule and set forth below under the title “ Mutual security (liquidation of contract
authorization), funds appropriated to the President.”
AM O U N T S A V A IL A B LE FOR OBLIGATION

[ C o n t r ib u t io n s to U n it e d N a t io n s I n t e r n a t io n a l C h il d r e n ’s
E mergency F und]

[For contributions authorized by section 12 of the Mutual
Security Act of 1952, $6,666,667.]
[G eneral

P r o v is io n s ]

[Appropriations in this title for economic or technical assistance
and allocations from any appropriations to the Director for Mutual
Security, or the Mutual Security Agency, or the Department of
State, shall be available, without limitation on any authority con­
ferred by the Mutual Security Act of 1951, as amended, or any Act
continued in effect thereby, for rents in the District of Columbia;
expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of
such appropriations; hire of passenger motor vehicles; purchase of
not to exceed two aircraft for use outside the continental limits of
the United States and maintenance, operation, and hire of aircraft;
purchase of not to exceed twenty passenger motor vehicles for use
outside the continental limits of the United States and, in addition,
passenger motor vehicles abroad may be exchanged or sold and
replaced for an equal number of such vehicles; transportation of
privately owned automobiles; entertainment within the United
States (not to exceed $20,000); exchange of funds without regard to
section 3651 of the Revised Statutes (31 U. S. C. 543); loss by ex­
change; expenditures (not to exceed $50,000) of a confidential
character other than entertainment provided that a certificate of
the amount of each such expenditure, the nature of which it is con­
sidered inadvisable to specify, shall be made by the Director or




1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate. _ __ ___ __ $7, 284,427,705 $6,001,947,750
Transferred from “ Salaries and expenses,
Federal Bureau of Investigation,”
pursuant to 66 Stat. 43___ _____ _
1,297,000
Transferred to “ Government in occupied
area of Germany,” pursuant to 62
Stat. 137, 65 Stat. 373, 65 Stat. 736, and
Executive Order 10300_______________
-67,732
Adjusted appropriation or estimate. 7,284,359,973
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation________ . . . ___ _
Public debt authorization (loan to
Spain)_____ . . . ___ _________ __
Prior year balance reappropriated. ___
Prior year balance reappropriated and
transferred from—
“ Mutual defense assistance, Executive
Office cf the President,” pursuant to
65 Stat. 373______________________
613, 222, 910
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office
of the President,” pursuant to
65 Stat. 373______________________
64.356,155
“ China area aid, Executive Office of the
344,134
President,” pursuant to 65 Stat. 373..
“ Assistance to the Republic of Korea,
Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to 65 Stat. 373___ ________
50,200,888
Balance transferred from—
“ Mutual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President,” pursuant to
65 Stat. 373______________________
146,444,915

6,003,244,750
142, 627,839
9, 811,989
447, 528,869

$1,376,977

69

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR O BLIG ATIO N -----C o n t i n u e d

1952 actual
Balance transferred from—Continued
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office
of the President,” pursuant to 65 Stat.
373: Public debt authorization (loan
to Spain)________________________
“ China area aid, Executive Office of the
President,” pursuant to 65 Stat. 373-“ Assistance to the Republic of Korea,
Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to 65 Stat. 373____________
“ Relief in occupied area of Germany,”
pursuant to 62 Stat. 137, 64 Stat. 198,
65 Stat. 373, and Executive Order
10300___________________________
Balance transferred to “ India emergency
food aid, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent,” pursuant to 65 Stat. 69________
Adjustment in prior year balance reap­
propriated and transferred from—
“ Mutual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President,” pursuant to
65 Stat. 373______________________
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office of
the President,” pursuant to 65 Stat.
373_____________________________
“ China area aid, Executive Office of the
President,” pursuant to 65 Stat. 373...
Reimbursements from non-Federal
.__
sources________________________ T
Reimbursements.from other accounts___
Total available for obligation_____
Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation_____________________
Public debt authorization (loan to
Spain)__________________________
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year______________________________

1953 estimate

Description

1954 estimate
t it l e

$45, 300,000

— continued

1952 actual

$1,434, 804
66,505, 642
19, 068

5. Economic and technical assistance:
(a) Country aid_________________ 1,474,061,342
(b) EPU-United States contribution,
11,395,000
(c) Technical assistance___________
16, 893,337
(d) Basic materials development___
90,010,471
(e) Confidential fund_____________
1,311
(/) Information projects__________
16,237,443

5, 635, 739
1, 251, 754
3,460,000

1953 estimate

$4,831, 526
78,336, 619
1,248,172,006
29,162,009
95, 958,187
50, 000
20, 765, 800

Total economic and technical
assistance________________
6. Assistance to Spain________________

1, 608, 598,904
35,488,011

1,394,108,002
134,811,989

Total title I—Europe____________

6, 053, 437, 514

4, 990,114, 713

192,850, 688
984,778

233,266, 720
9,648, 604

193,835,466

242,915,324

23,064,203
1,315, 882

28, 604, 887
1,945,691

24,380,085

30,550,578

213,138,036
1,741,269

259,362,321
3,640,852

Total...........................

214, 879,305

263,003,173

Total direct obligations...

-62,745,684

1954 estimate

i— e u r o p e — c ontinu ed

3. Escapees_________________________
4. Administration____________________
Adjustment in prior year obligations.

433,094,856

536,469,075

TITLE II— NEAR EAST AND AFRICA

1,991

Direct Obligations

1. Military assistance:
(a) Improving effectiveness of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses________

-1,947,720
-103,017
5,161
1,028,413

$5,000
1,035,000

8,150,815,612

6, 604,253,447

$1,376,977

-142,627,839

-1,376,977

-810,160

-9,811,989
-447,528,869

Obligations incurred_____________ 7, 550,846,915
Comparative transfer from—
“ Salaries and expenses, Federal Bureau
of Investigation” _________________
943,196
“ Expenses, international development,
Executive Office of the President” _
_
1,026,411
“ Foreign credits” available without
dollar purchase___________________
135,176,105
Comparative transfer to—
“ Salaries and expenses, State” _______
-2,884,580
“ International information and educa­
tional activities, State” ____________
-46,393
“ Representation allowances, State” ___
Total obligations.

o b lig a tio n s by a c t iv it ie s

6,602,876,470

566,817

Total..
(6) Improving effectiveness of naval
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses_______
Total..
(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses_______

176,446,881
-2,497,850
-25,200
-12,950

7,685,061,654

6,776,787,351

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

566,817

N o t e . —Reimbursements

from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).

(d) Operation of commissary and
mess facilities______________

1,028,413

1,035,000

Total military assistance___

434,123,269

537, 504,075

53, 524, 727

53, 797,332

Direct Obligations
O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

TITLE I— EUROPE

1. Military assistance:
(a ) Improving effectiveness of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________ $2,224,838,218 $1,685, 788,842
(2) Training expenses_______
10,118,724
2,305, 607
Total..
(6) Improving effectiveness of naval
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses_______
TotaL.
(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses_______
Total..

2,227,143,825

1,695,907, 566

559,221,512
15,669,065

519,615,180
18,919,835

574,890,577

538,535,015

1,275,786,191
33,372,359

1,012,667,751
115,241,789

1,309,158,550

1,127,909, 540

2 0 0 ,0 0
2 ,0 0 0
9,303,260

1 ,0 0 0
1 0 ,0 0

808,217

3,469, 000
520,000
15,000

230,111,477

15,004,000

Total military assist­
ance.................... ..... 4,341,304,429
2. Control Act expenses_______________
86, 656

3,377,356,121
670,456

Total.




Relief and Works Agency for
Palestine Refugees__________
(c) Relief and resettlement of refu­
gees entering Israel__________

50, 000,000

60,063,250

50,000,000

70,228,000

Total economic and technical
assistance_______________

153, 524, 727

184,088, 582

Total title II—Near East and
Africa__________________

587,647,996

721, 592, 657

499, 694,455
3, 636,847

396.459,888
6,953,815

503,331,302

403,413, 703

41,848, 052
1,013, 314

104,186,053
1,053,430

42, 861, 366

105,239,483

180, 771,457
1,646, 559

111, 982,071
4, 781, 698

TITLE m — ASIA AND PACIFIC

1. Military assistance:
(a) Improving effectiveness of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses________
TotaL.
(b) Improving effectiveness of naval

(d) Contributions to:

(1) Construction of facilities in
foreign countries for col­
lective defense_________
(2) NATO international mili­
tary headquarters______
(3) NATO international civil­
ian headquarters_______
(4) NATO standing group___
(5) International materials
conference_____________

1954 estimate

2. Economic and technical assistance:
(a) Bilateral technical cooperation.
(b) Contributions to United Nations

forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses________
Total.

(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses________
Total_________________

182, 418, 016

116, 763, 769

Total military assistance.

728,610,684

625,416,955

Economic and technical assistance:
(а) Special technical and economic
assistance__________________
(б) Bilateral technical cooperation. __
(c) Basic materials development.......
(d) China and Korea student aid___

144,499, 410
87,912, 914

194, 828, 259
80,429, 646
10, 900,000
1,130,965

1,869,170

$566,817

70

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued
Mutual Security, Funds Appropriated to the President— Continued
o b l ig a t io n s b y

a c t iv it ie s —

Description
t it l e

m — a s ia

c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

a n d p a c ip ic — c o n t i n u e d

2. Economic and technical assistancecontinued
(e) Contributions to United Nations
Korean Reconstruction Agency..
(J) Foreign assistance (adjustment
in prior year obligations)........
(ig) Information projects....................

$ 0 0 ,0 0
1 ,0 0 0

$41,452,642

—790,717
198,754

290,460

Total economic and technical
assistance....................... .....

243,689, 531

329,031,972

$566, 817

Total title III—Asia and
Pacific______________

972,300,215

954, 448, 927

566,817

18,616,528

33,397,252
123,900

TITLE IV— AMERICAN REPUBLICS

1. Military assistance:
(a) Improving
effectiveness
of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment............. .........
(2) Training expenses________
Total..

18, 616,528

33,521,152

(6) Improving effectiveness of naval
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment____________
(2) Training expenses..... .........
Total...............................

6,490,000

5, 717,003
3,135, 736
8,852, 739

(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment....................
(2) Training expenses..............
Total...............................

2,495,624

Total military assistance .
2. Economic and technical assistance: Bi­
lateral technical cooperation..............
Total title IV—American republics.

6,490,000

2,495,624

20,009, 273
182,890
20,192,163

27,602,152

62,566,054

18,872,064
46,474,216

20,399,000
82,965,054

1 ,0 0 0
0 0 ,0 0

9,240, 500
2, 587, 500
9,171,333

TITLE V— INTERREGIONAL ACTIVITIES

1. Movement of migrants (emigration of
surplus manpower).......... .................
2. Ocean freight voluntary relief packages..
3. Multilateral technical cooperation___
4. Contributions to United Nations in­
ternational children’s emergency
fund................................................. .
Total title V—interregional activities________ ________________
Total obligations..

2, 871,713
12,330,000

25,201,713

27,666,000

7,685,061,654

>776, 787,351
,

566,817

PROGRAM AN D PERFO RM AN CE

The mutual security program embodies military, eco­
nomic, and technical assistance to allied countries of the
free world. The fiscal year 1953 program represents the
second year of unified activity under the Mutual Security
Act of 1951, as amended. The United States contribu­
tion to this program takes six principal forms: (a) Mil­
itary end-items produced in the United States; (b) training
of foreign military personnel to assure effective use of the
materiel furnished; (c) military end-items procured in
Europe under the offshore procurement program; (d) de­
fense support in the form of imports to sustain the military
buildup; (e) economic and technical assistance in under­
developed areas; (/) contributions to United Nations and
other international agencies for mutual security programs
of a multilateral nature.
1. Europe (title T)— (a) Military assistance.—Materiel
and technical training are provided to friendly countries
to assist them in raising and strengthening their military
forces. The greatest portion of this aid takes the form
of military end-items such as planes, ships, guns, and
tanks. In order to assure proper utilization and main­
tenance of United States equipment in the program,




training is also furnished to selected individuals in the
armed forces of the recipient countries. That assistance
which is given to member countries of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization is directly related to the force goals
agreed upon by NATO.
Funds available under title I military assistance also
are utilized to make contributions to international organ­
izations, both military and civilian. Payments represent
the United States share of operating costs of NATO and
a small payment for participation in the International
Materials Conference.
(b) Control act expenses.—This program was established
by the Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act to deter
exports of strategic materials and equipment to countries
threatening w
orld peace. Staff in the Office of the Direc­
tor for Mutual Security engaged in this activity coordinate
the related economic defense efforts of United States
agencies.
(c) Escapees.—Supplementary care and maintenance is
provided for certain refugees from behind the iron curtain
and assistance is rendered for their permanent resettle­
ment.
(d) Administration.—The programs described herein
are administered (within policy guide lines established by
the Director for Mutual Security) by the following agen­
cies: Department of Defense, Department of State, and
Mutual Security Agency. Facilities and personnel of
various other agencies are also utilized in carrying out vari­
ous technical assistance programs, such as agriculture,
mining, and other specialized fields. Included for admin­
istration in fiscal year 1953 are the funds transferred to
the Mutual Security appropriations by the Federal Bureau
of Investigation for security investigations to be carried
out by the Civil Service Commission.
(e) Economic and technical assistance— (1) Country aid.—
The necessity for accelerated rearmament of the West has
forced the countries of Western Europe to undertake larger
defense programs than their recuperating econom yet
ies
can sustain without assistance. Defense expenditures of
the 12 European NATO countries and Germany (in the
case of the latter, occupation costs) have increased from
the equivalent of $6 billion in fiscal year 1950 to $7.8
billion in 1951, $11.3 billion in 1952, and an estimated
$13 billion in 1953.
The United States economic aid to the NATO countries
is now allocated on the basis of defense commitments
undertaken by these countries. In collaboration with the
Department of Defense, military production programs are
being developed for each country, integrating national
procurement schedules with NATO requirements and
United States offshore procurement. In addition, a
small amount of aid is required for economic purposes for
non-NATO European countries.
(2) Technical assistance.'—The principal objective of
this program is to increase European industrial and agri­
cultural productivity. The technical assistance program
is one means used to promote and stimulate free and
competitive trade practices, to encourage the development
and strengthening of free labor union movements, and to
further the development of European dependent overseas
territories. This program will continue on the basis of
specific requests for the services of United States techni­
cians, for study and training of Europeans in the United
States, and for scientific and technical information.
Local currency costs of projects, borne by participating
countries, will considerably exceed dollar costs on the
basis of past experience.
(3) Basic materials development.—Funds for this pro­
gram are used in European countries, their dependent

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

71

overseas territories, and other countries which have im­
(4) Exchange of student program.—Funds are provided
portant sources of raw materials. The funds are em­ to defray the expenses of selected citizens of China and
ployed for projects designed to increase the production and Korea to study or teach in accredited colleges, universities,
flow of basic materials in which deficiencies or potential and other educational institutions in the United States.
deficiencies in supply exist among nations receiving United In fiscal year 1953, grants will be made to approximately
States assistance.
523 students and 108 professors, teachers, and research
The program of materials purchases or advances of specialists.
(5) Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruc­
funds repayable in materials to the United States is
being administered in fiscal year 1953 by the Defense tion Agency.—This Agency was established to undertake
Materials Procurement Agency. Local currency from a comprehensive posthostilities program to meet the
the United States portion (10 percent) of the counterpart problems of relief and rehabilitation in Korea. For this
generated from economic assistance to European coun­ purpose, the United Nations has approved a program
tries will be made available for projects administered both of $250 million toward which the United States has
by the Mutual Security Agency and the Defense Mate­ pledged $162.5 million. In view of the continued un­
certainty about the cessation of hostilities, however,
rials Procurement Agency.
(f) Assistance to Spain.—Such economic, technical, and Congress has appropriated only $51,452,642. The balance
military assistance as may be approved by the President has been authorized for appropriation and for tranfer
from Army supplies should the military situation permit
will be provided.
2. Near East and Africa (title II) — (a) Military assist­ the Agency to assume greater responsibilities in fiscal
ance.—The military assistance programs for Greece and year 1953.
4. American Republics (title IV ) — (a) Military assist­
Turkey are to be continued to maximize the military
ance.—The military assistance program for South Amer­
potential of these countries and to give particular attention
to new requirements arising from their participation in ican countries provides for the continued maintenance of
NATO plans. Military assistance also is authorized to be equipment on hand and for limited additional equipment
to eliminate materiel deficiencies of forces to be employed
provided other Middle East countries.
under a hemispheric defense plan developed multi(b) Economic and technical assistance—(1) Bilateral
technical cooperation.—This program is designed to assist laterally by the Inter-American Defense Board. In ad­
the governments in the underdeveloped areas of the world dition, for a number of the countries whose economic
(American Republics and South Asia, as well as the Near condition makes it possible, reimbursable military assist­
East and Africa) in their efforts to eliminate or reduce the ance will continue under the Mutual Defense Assistance
handicaps to economic development. Programs are Act of 1949.
(b) Economic and technical assistance—Bilateral tech­
aimed at achieving balanced economic growth with an
nical cooperation.—Programs for bilateral technical coop­
emphasis upon the early increase in food supply.
(2) Contributions to United Nations Relief^ and Works eration are identical to those described in title II.
5. Interregional activities (title V)— (a) Movement of
Agency for Palestine Refugees.—The Palestine Refugee
migrants.—These funds are for the United States contri­
Agency continues relief operations and finds homes and
jobs for refugees. Since May 1950, it has provided bution to the Provisional Intergovernmental Committee
for the
Migrants from Europe,
subsistence rations for over 850,000 refugees, prevented national Movement of established in Decemberan inter­
organization
1951 to
serious outbreaks of epidemic diseases, provided employ­ facilitate the movement of surplus populations from
ment for many thousands of refugees on useful public- countries in Western Europe to countries affording
works projects, supported a primary school program for
resettlement opportunities overseas. The Committee's
refugee children, and provided technical training.
plan of operations currently calls for the movement of
(3) Relief and resettlement of refugees entering Israel.— approximately 100,000 European migrants in calendar
Direct relief is being provided in the form of consum
er year 1952 and 120,000 migrants in calendar year 1953.
goods and for purchasing equipment for the implementa­
(b) Ocean freight voluntary relief packages.—Voluntary
tion of long-term economic development projects in such nonprofit relief agencies continue to receive reimburse­
fields as agriculture, industry, housing, transportation, ment of ocean freight charges on supplies shipped to
power development, and public health.
countries which have concluded relief agreements. Ocean
3. Asia and Pacific (title III) — (a) Military assistance.— transportation charges are also paid on relief packages
Military assistance in the area of eastern and southeastern sent by parcel post from individuals in the United States.
Asia will continue to provide materiel and training de­
(c) Multilateral technical cooperation.—The United Na­
signed to aid in the preservation of national independence tions Expanded Program of Technical Assistance and the
and maintenance of security in the countries near the Technical Cooperation Program of the Organization of
Communist-controlled mainland of China.
American States assists governments of underdeveloped
(b)
Economic and technical assistance— (1) Special eco­countries in economic development programs. The aid is
nomic and technical assistance.—Funds are provided to largely in the form of demonstration and pilot projects in
countries in the Far East in varying proportions for agriculture, health, education, public administration,
(i) technical assistance mainly in the fields of agriculture, social welfare, etc., to which the recipient governments
public health, transportation, education, public adminis­ make substantial contributions, and the provision of
tration, and emergency war relief and rehabilitation; and fellowship study and training for their nationals.
(ii) economic assistance for development and to support
(d) Contributions to United Nations International Chil­
military assistance programs.
dren’s Emergency Fund.—These funds are authorized for
(2) Bilateral technical cooperation.—Programs for bi­ contributions to the United Nations International Chil­
lateral technical cooperation in South Asia are identical dren's Emergency Fund through December 31, 1953.
to those described in title II.
Emphasis has shifted from an emergency feeding and
(3) Basic materials development.—These funds are used relief program to long-range maternal and child-health
in Far East countries for the same purpose as described and welfare programs in the underdeveloped countries
of Asia, Africa, and Latin America.
in title I.




72

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued
Mutual Security, Funds Appropriated to the President— Continued
O BL IG AT IO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ALCTO T DPRMN O
LOAI N O EAT ET F
d fe se
e n —continued
Direct Obligations—Continued

ALCTO T MTA SCR Y GNY
LOAI NO UUL EUI AEC
T
Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and t
General schedule grades:
Average salary____________
Average grade.-----------------Foreign Service reserve grades:
Average salary____________
Average grade...___ ______
Foreign Service staff g
Average salary..
Average g

0
1

Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions-.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_________________________
Payment above basic rates_______
Payment to other agencies for
reimbursable details___________
Personal services financed from
foreign credits without dollar
purchase_____________________

Total personal services_______
Travel_________ ______ ____ _____
Transportation of things___________
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services__________
Printing and reproduction___ _____
Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies_________________________
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment______________________
Lands and structures_____________
Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
Refunds, awards, and indemnities.._
Taxes and assessments____________
Investments and loans (net)_______
Unvouchered..
Total obligations.

2,943
119
2,445
$5, 851
GS-8.6

$5, 931
GS-8.8

$11, 691
FSR-1.9

$11, 842
FSR-1.8

$5, 749
FSS-8.1

$5, 817
FSS-8.0

$13, 075, 572
753, 648

$11, 390,148
386, 733

68, 443
444, 543

44, 009
341, 215

55, 893

166, 883

7, 297, 725

7, 210, 512

21,695,824
3,099,454
671,884
851,373
1, 435,130
670,429
102, 514, 966

19, 539, 500
2,691, 237
545,040
823,610
1,300,720
529,870
110,991,406

3,104, 252
1,019,431
944,945
1,966,390
1,514,977,415

31, 751
173, 555,471
1,311

2,662,255
870,290
619,400
9,050,000
1,471,380, 263
800
27, 900
29,269,787
50,000

1,826, 540,146

1,650,352,078

10
2

The above obligations are distributed by
agencies as follows:
Mutual Security Agency____________ 1, 513,942, 227
Defense Production Administration_
_
110,949, 512
Department of Agriculture__________
63, 525,610
Department of Defense_____________
83,440,074
Department of Commerce__________
8, 505
Public Housing Administration... .. .
381,477
Director for Mutual Security-----------282,159
Federal Bureau of Investigation_____
750,074
Federal Security Agency------ ----------646,300
Department of Labor---------------------27,965
Department of State_______________
7,135,057
Defense Materials Procurement Agency.
45,356, 591
General Services Administration___
94, 595
Department of the Interior________
Total obligations..

2,400
85
2,079

1,826, 540,146

,353,966,211

1 .0 0
50
1 1 0 ,0 0
0 ,0 0 0
54,374,525
73,070,093

1 .0 0
20

1,041,890

926.000
542.000
108,172
269,187
64,921,000
106.000
1,650,352, 078

ALCTO T DPRMN O DFNE
LOAI N O EAT ET F EES
Summary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

19,877

50,104
5
43,313

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary-----------------------------Average grade____________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

$3,918
GS-5.3
$2,956

$3, 918
GS-5.3
$3,193

Direct Obligations
01

02
03
04
05
06
07

08
09

Personal services:
$67,825,924
$148,994,458
Permanent positions_____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
6,084
6 ,0 0
80
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
509,635
244,895
base_________________________
7,056, 525
5, 776, 043
Payment above basic rates_______
Personal services financed from
foreign credits without dollar
10,012,440
3, 790, 733
purchase_________ ____ _______
166,641, 058
Total personal services_______
77,643,679
15, 556,719
21,997,925
Travel__________________________
337,867,811
90,409,615
Transportation of things___________
549,478
Communication services___________
482,143
3, 539,708
2, 988,363
Rents and utility services__________
153,633
238,093
Printing and reproduction___ ______
190,497,657
Other contractual services__________
100,031,975
Services performed by other agen­
6, 524,681
4, 957, 535
cies_________________ ________
973,350,429
Supplies and materials_____ _______ 1,342,923,922
Equipment____ ______ ___________ 3,684, 964,811 2,912,226, 558




11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments____________

$229,303, 260
157,202

$11, 520,000
458,963

Subtotal_______________________
Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence______________________________

5, 549, 657,317

4,625,327,901

102, 574

103, 280

Total direct obligations__________

5, 549, 554, 743

4,625, 224,621

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

08 Supplies and materials.

1, 028,413

1,035,000

Total obligations____

5, 550, 583,156

4, 626,259, 621

1,171
13
739

2,798

$5,216
GS-7.8

$5,400
GS-8.3

$13, 600
FSR-1.0

$13, 600
FSR-1.0

$7,249
FSS-5.3

$6, 280
FSS-6.6

$7,155
Point IV-4.3

$7, 047
Point IV-4.3

$2, 552
CPC-3.0

$2, 552
CPC-3.0

$4, 339, 613
82, 077

$15, 502, 727
189, 000

$35,387

15, 436
541, 060

60, 071
3,155,867

140
500

4, 978,186
1, 752, 795
1, 706, 740
42, 478
332, 583
62, 964
10,297, 734

246,482
19,154,147
5, 504, 728
6,119, 013
90, 450
389, 099
69,000
37, 714, 994

ALCTO T DPRMN O SAE
LOAI N O EAT ET F TT
Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and „
General schedule grades:
Average salary...___ _____________
Average grade____________________
Foreign Service reserve grades:
Average salary----- -----------------------Average grade____________________
Foreign Service staff grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade___________________
Grades established by Administrator,
Technical Cooperation Administra­
tion:
Average salary----------------------------Average grade___________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade-----------------------------01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base____ _____ ______________
Payment above basic rates_______
Personal services financed from
foreign credits without dollar
purchase_____________________
Total personal services_______
02 Travel--------- ------ -----------------------03 Transportation of things___________
04 Communication services___________
05 Rents and utility services__________
06 Printing and reproduction_________
07 Other contractual services__________
Services performed by other agen­
cies________________________
Department of Agriculture_____
Bureau of the Budget__________
Department of Commerce______
Federal Communications Com­
mission____________________
Federal Security Agency_______
Housing and Home Finance
Agency.---------------- ------ ------Department of the Interior_____
Department of Labor__________
Civil Service Commission______
Department of State (“ Salaries
and expenses, State” )________
08 Supplies and materials____________
09 Equipment_ _______ ___________
_
10 Lands and structures_____________
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments____________
16 Investments and loans (net)_______
Total obligations-----------------------

255, 254, 905
855
18, 872, 064
307, 938, 352

The above obligations are distributed by
agencies as follows:
Department of Agriculture._________
Bureau of the Budget_______________
Mutual Security Agency_________ ....
Department of Commerce___________
Federal Communications Commission.
Federal Security Agency____________
Housing and Home Finance Agency.—
.
Department of the Interior__________
Department of Labor_______________
Federal Bureau of Investigation.......... .
Post Office Department_____________
Department of State________________
Total obligations_____ ____ _____

8, 735, 671
47, 791
23,177,340
757,196
13,126
1,461, 523
125,824
1,629, 583
234,456
661,037
1,464,963
269,629,842
307,938,352

5, 394, 293

2
0

2,382

36,027
1,500

873.000
58, 500
470.000
31.000
524, 600
79.000
379,200
193,100
889,120

5, 634, 730
3, 608, 025

4, 362,190
25, 466, 455
24, 789,307
393, 700
226, 569, 237

528, 440

20, 399, 000
374, 518, 940

566,817

1, 201,500
373, 317,440
374, 518, 940

566,817
566,817

10
0

RSRE FRFTR ALCTO
EEVD O UUE LOAI N
Unallocated................................ ........ .

GS-6.6

$125,656,712

250
500

10
0

73

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

o l a io s b o j c s o tin e
b ig t n y b e t —c n u d
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

55,302
110
47,774

Information schedule relating to foreign credits available free to supplement the above
appropriation in 1952 and 1953 and anticipated for purchase for said appropriation in
1954
[All amounts are stated in United States dollar equivalents computed at the rate of
exchange current at the time of the transaction]
Amounts Available for Obligation—Without Purchase

8

SUMMARY

Summary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions_
Average number of all employees_______

30, 702
132
23,061

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
$4,136
$4,075
Average grade____________________
GS-5.7
GS-5.6
Foreign Service reserve grades:
Average salary__________ ________
$11, 854
$11, 700
Average grade_________ ______
FSR-1.8
FSR-1.9
Foreign Service staff grades:
Average salary___________ _______
$5, 796
$5,836
Average grade............. ......... ....... ___
FSS-8.0
FSS-8.0
Grades established by Administrator,
Technical Cooperation Administra­
tion:
Average salary_____________ _____
$7,155
$7,047
Average grade____ _ . __________ Point IV—4.3 Point IV—4.3
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary________ __________
$3, 202
$3,109
Average grade.__ ________ _______
CPC-5.0
CPC-4.9
Ungraded positions: Average salary
$2, 956
$3,193

8
$4, 560
GS-6.6

Direct Obligations

01 Personal services:
Permanent pcsitions____________
Part-time and temporary positions. _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____ _____ __ __________
Payment above basic rates ...
Payment to other agencies for reim­
bursable details.
_________
Personal services financed from for­
eign credits without dollar pur­
chase___________ _____ ____ _

$85, 241,109
841,809

$175, 887,333
643,733

$35,387

328,774
6, 761, 646

613,715
10, 553, 607
166,883

11,088,458

Amounts becoming available pursuant
to—
Sees. 408 (b) and 408 (d), Public Law
$6,993,576
329, 81st Cong., as amended________
Sec. 115 (h), Public Law 472,80th Cong.,
89, 622,561
as amended-.. _ _
._ ______ _
Sec. 407 (c), Public Law 535, 81st Cong.,
as amended
- _____
6,006,000
171,874,466
Prior year balance available___________
Less adjustment in prior year balance.. -18,972, 280
Adjustment due to changes in exchange
rates to permit conversion to dollar
-3,150,044
equivalent______________ _________
100,000
Reimbursements from other accounts___
Transferred to U. S. Treasury__________ -14, 724,050
237, 750, 229
Total available for obligation_____
Balance available in subsequent year __ -101,934, 154
Unobligated balance, estimated savings
135,816, 075
Obligations incurred_________
Comparative transfer to-*
-607,260
“ Salaries and expenses, State” ________
-32, 710
“ Representation allowances, State” ___
“ Mutual security, funds appropriated
-135,176,105
to the President”
Total obligations
_____
___

140
500

55, 893

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$6,792,339
128,804,899
5, 500,000
101,934,154
-1,075,000
343,579
-8 , 480,000
233,819,971
-55, 936,490
177, 883, 481
-1,404,000
-32,600
-176,446, 881

17,469,434

Analysis of Expenditures of Foreign Credits—Without Purchase
1952

Total personal services. ____
205.334, 705
104,317,689
Travel
____
_
_______ __
30,193,890
20, 408, 968
Transportation of things___ _______
92, 788, 239
344, 531,864
Communication services___ _______
1,375,994
1,463, 538
Rents and utility services____ _
4, 756,076
5,229, 527
Printing and reproduction_____ ___
752,503
971, 486
Other contractual services______ _ _ 212,844, 675
339, 204,057
Services performed by other agen­
cies__ ______ _____
____
13,456,080
17,046, 646
08 Supplies and materials____________ 1,349, 578,083
999,687,174
09 Equipment______________________ 3, 689, 517, 781 2, 937,635, 265
10 Lands and structures____ _____ _
1.966, 390
9,443, 700
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions_ 1,999, 535, 580 1, 709,469, 500
_
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
120
800
15 Taxes and assessments_____________
189,808
486.963
16 Loans and investments (net)_______
192,427, 535
49, 668, 787
Unvouchered________________________
1,311
50,000
125, 656,712
Unallocated_______ _________________

02
03
04
05
06
07

Subtotal_______________________
Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence. ____ ___________ __________

7, 684,135,815

6, 775, 855, 631

102, 574

Total direct obligations__________

7,684, 033, 241

6, 775, 752, 351

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in prior year balance _ _
Obligations incurred during the year____

250
500

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations-----------------Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Total expenditures (payable di­
rectly from foreign credits)..........

1,028,413

100

Description

7,685,061,654

6,776, 787,351

$ 2 2 ,1 9 3 , 978
18, 972, 280
135, 8 1 6 ,0 7 5

$ 7 1 ,1 3 7 ,5 0 8

2 4 9 ,0 2 0 ,9 8 9

1 0 0 ,0 0 0
7 1 ,1 3 7 , 508

2 0 6 ,8 2 3 ,6 9 5

estimate

343, 579
4 1 ,8 5 3 , 715

105, 7 4 4 ,8 2 5

1954

$ 4 1 ,8 5 3 ,7 1 5

177, 883, 481
4 1 ,8 5 3 ,7 1 5

4 1 ,8 5 3 ,7 1 5

1952

actual

1953

estimate

1954

estimate

Direct Obligations
1.

566,817

1953 estimate

$10,331,874,186
566,817

$ 2 4 0 ,3 0 1

$ 6 6 8 ,1 2 6
7 1 ,4 7 1

2 4 0 ,3 0 1

7 3 9 ,5 9 7

1 6 ,0 2 0

2 6 1 ,5 6 3
1 5 6 ,5 8 1

Total_________________

1954 estimate

$9,072,037, 716
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____ $7,"550,"846,'915" 6, 602,876, 470
Unliquidated obligations transferred
from—
“ Mutual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President/' pursuant
to 65 Stat. 373_ _______________ 4,453, 524,467
Less adjustment in prior year bal­
1, 991
ance
. ____ _________________
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office
of the President,” pursuant to 65
Stat. 373
___ ___________ 1,287,358, 531
Plus adjustment in prior year balance.
1, 947, 720
“ China area aid, Executive Offce of the
140, 741.473
President,” pursuant to 65 Stat. 373_
103,017
Plus adjustment in prior year balance.
Obligated balance restored from certified
25,186
claims________________ _______ ____
13, 434, 545,318 15.674.914.186
Deduct:
1,040,000
1,033, 574
Reimbursable obligations _------- --------Unliquidated obligations, end of year... 9,072,037, 716 10.331.874.186
Total expenditures............... ........ . 4, 361,474,028 5,342,000,000
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________ }4,361,474,028 /1,500,000,000
13,842,000,000
Out of prior authorizations ................ .

Military assistance:
(a) Improving effectiveness of
ground forces:
(1 ) Furnishing supplies and
equipment __ _ _ __ _
(2 ) Training expenses________
Total...... ........ .............
(6) Improving effectiveness of naval
forces:
(1 ) Furnishing supplies and
equipment
(2 ) Training expenses..... .........

1 6 ,0 2 0

4 1 8 ,1 4 4

(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1 ) Furnishing supplies and
equipment....... ............
(2 ) Training expenses.......... .

566,817

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

estimate

TITLE I— EUROPE

566,817

1,035,000

Total obligations------------------------

1953

Obligations by Activities—Without Purchase

528,440

Obligations Payable Out of Reimburse­
ments From Other Accounts

08 Supplies and materials____________

actual

176, 9 8 2 ,3 3 3

36,027
1,500

103,280




1953 estimate

2 4 4 ,2 8 5
1 4 4 ,1 8 0

5 4 4 ,0 5 9
9 2 8 ,4 6 5

3 8 8 ,4 6 5

1 ,4 7 2 ,5 2 4

3 ,3 0 3 ,2 6 0

2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

7 6 8 ,3 7 6

3 ,1 9 2 ,0 0 0

4 ,0 7 1 ,6 3 6

5 ,1 9 2 ,0 0 0

4 ,7 1 6 ,4 2 2

Total
(d) Contributions to:
(2 ) NATO international mili­
tary headquarters............
(3 ) NATO international civilian
headquarters..... ..............

10.332.441.003

2
3.
4
5.

4.940.441.003
5,392,000,000
5,392,000,000

Total............................
Total military assist­
ance
________
Control Act expenses
_ ___
Escapees
- ___________
Administration
__________

1 1 ,0 2 6
2 6 ,8 5 8 ,8 8 6

7 ,8 2 2 ,2 6 5
1 7 0 ,4 5 6
1 ,9 5 5 ,3 0 4
4 1 ,4 2 7 ,0 4 0

Economic and technical assistance:
(c) Technical assistance....................
(d) Basic materials development___
(/) Information projects....................

2 ,0 6 2 ,5 9 0
8 1 ,7 5 5 ,0 0 0
1 6 ,2 3 7 ,4 4 3

1 0 .6 0 9 .0 0 0
7 6 .6 8 9 .0 0 0
2 0 ,7 6 5 ,8 0 0

Total economic and technical
assistance
- _____

1 0 0 ,0 5 5 ,0 3 3

1 0 8 ,0 6 3 ,8 0 0

Total direct obligations incurred_

1 3 1 ,6 4 1 ,3 6 7

1 5 9 ,4 3 8 ,8 6 5

.....................

74

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
Obligations by Objects—Without Purchase—Continued

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued
Mutual Security, Funds Appropriated to the President—Continued
Information schedule relating to foreign credits available free to supplement the above
appropriation in 1952 and 1953 and anticipated for purchase for said appropriation in
1954—Continued
Obligations by Activities—Without Purchase—Continued
Description
t it l e

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

i— e u r o p e — c o n t i n u e d

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

4. Administration ___________________
Total title I—Europe------------•

$100,000
131,741,367

$343,579
159,782,444

Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

su m m a r y — continued

Direct Obligations— Continued

07 Other contractual services.......... .. . _
Basic materials____ ____________
Information projects...................... .
Technical assistance_____ ______
Services performed by other agen­
cies_________________________
All other. . ___ ______________
08 Supplies and materials______ ____ _.
09 Equipment _ . ____________ . .
10 Lands and structures_________ ____
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
15 Taxes and assessments...... ...............
Total direct obligations incurred_
_

$1,915,477
81,755.000
16, 436,197
2,062, 590

$11,874.988
77,589.000
21,056, 260
10, 609,000

5,832, 515
1, 848, 988
972, 815
871,638
1,966,390
3, 755, 769
748

9. 548, 427
1, 522. 800
1,077,010
734,184
9, 443, 700
4,659,000
1,100

135,076,105

176,103,302

100,000

343, 579

TITLE H— NEAR EAST AND AFRICA

1. Military assistance:
(a) Improving effectiveness of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment______ ______
(2) Training expenses..... .........

Obligations Payable Out o f Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

07 Services performed by other agencies..
773,933

2,400
2,233,382

Total...............................
(b) Improving effectiveness of naval
forces:
(2) Training expenses..... .........
(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(2) Training expenses. - ............

773,933

2,235,782

07 Services performed by other agencies:
“ Salaries and expenses, State” —. ..
“ Representation allowances, State” .

607,260
32,710

1, 404,000
32,600

90,293

266,236

Obligations incurred___ ____ ___

135,816,075

177,883, 481

425,663

1,207,328

Total military assistance.

1,289,889

3, 709,346

2. Economic and technical assistance:
(a) Bilateral technical cooperation__

29,309

214,000

Total title II—Near East and
Africa_______________ ____

1,319,198

3,923,346

Activities Shown as Comparative Transfers

Mutual Security (Liquidation of Contract Authorization), Funds
Appropriated to the President—
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION

1952 actual

TITLE HI— ASIA AND PACIFIC

1. Military assistance:
(а) Improving effectiveness of ground
forces:'
(2) Training expenses________
(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(2) Training expenses-------------

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Applied to contract authorization. .
Obligations incurred.. _ _ .
59,065

1,807,407
198,754

10,947, 736
900,000
290,460

Total economic and technical
assistance.. .. ___________

2,006,161

12,138,196

Total title III—Asia and Pacific.

2,115, 540

12,408,635

__

270,439

2. Economic and technical assistance:
(б) Bilateral technical cooperation...
(c) Basic materials development___
(g) Information projects ........ .......

$44,476,271
-44,476,271

146,777

109,379

1954 estimate

123,662

50,314

1953 estimate

Total military assistance. _

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Unliquidated obligations transferred from
“ Mutual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President,” pursuant to
65 Stat. 373...............................................
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year
__ __________ ____________

TITLE IV— AMERICAN REPUBLICS

Total expenditures______________

1. Military assistance:
(a) Improving effectiveness of ground
forces:
(2) Training expenses________
(6) Improving effectiveness of naval
forces:
(2) Training expenses____ ___
(c) Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(2) Training expenses........... .

$117,416

32, 710

32,600

Obligations incurred-.............. .......

135,816,075

177,883,481

138,460,727
220,056,870

1952 actual

1.404,000
Prior year balance available___________
Balance available in subsequent year___
Carried to surplus (Public Law 266, 81st
_____ ______
Cong )

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred
1954 estimate

. . _____

SUMMARY




$17, 469,434
7,621,395
824,861
706,430
1,188,713
177,000

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF THE
NAVY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

01 Personal services (obligations in­
curred)
- . . .

$123,779
-123,779

O BL IG AT IO N S BY O B JE C T S

$11,088,458
4,082,931
582,430
657,357
1,065,165
181,637

1953 estimate

2,845

Direct Obligations

Personal services_____ ___________
Travel __________________________
Transportation of things----------------Communication services........ ............
Rents and utility services......... ........
Printing and reproduction.................

138,460,727

$126,624
-123,779

Claims—1952, $2,845.

01
02
03
04
05
06

138,460,727

358,517,597

AM O U N T S AVA IL A B LE FOE O BLIGATION

Obligations by Objects—Without Purchase
Object classification

$358,517,597

Overtime, Leave, and Holiday Compensation —

332,456

$607,260

$138,460,727

OVERTIME, LEAVE, AND HOLIDAY
COMPENSATION

132,940

Activities shown as comparative transfers
to:
“ Salaries and expenses, State,” title I—
Administration......... ......... ...............
“ Representation allowances, State,”
title I—Administration-------------------

1954 estimate

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ _ ____ } 220,056,870 / ___________
\ 138,460,727
Out of prior authorizations....................

82,100

Total title IV—American
republics__ ___ ___

1953 estimate

$2,845

1954 estimate

75

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

RELIEF OF PALESTINE REFUGEES

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the vear

1953 estimate

$691
2,845

1954 estimate

$689

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

Uliq idte o lig t n, satoya (t ta e pnit r so to pio a thr a n)—
n u a d b aio s t r f e r o l x e d ue u f r r u oiz tio s

3,536

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__- . ____ ___________ ______

Contributions to United Nations for R elief of Palestine Refugees,
Department of State—

1952, $5,000,000.

689

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)........ ............ ......

SPECIAL FUND FOR MANAGEMENT
IMPROVEMENT

689

2,847

RELIEF IN OCCUPIED AREA OF GERMANY

Special Fund for Management Improvement, Executive Office of the
President—
A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

R elief in Occupied Area of Germany —

1952 actual
Prior year balance available for transfer
to “ Mutual security, funds appropri­
ated to the President” __________
Recovery of prior year obligations
Balance transferred to “ Mutual security,
funds appropriated to the President,”
pursuant to 62 Stat. 137, 64 Stat. 198,
65 Stat. 373, and Executive Order 10300..

1953 estimate

1952 actual

AM O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1, 215,903
2,244,097

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account___________________
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)_______________

1954 estimate

$77,052
54,877
244
21,931

-3,460, 000

YUGOSLAV EMERGENCY RELIEF

Obligations incurred-___ ________

Yugoslav Emergency
President—

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

Relief Assistance,

Executive

Office

of

the

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account — _________ ___ _

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$13,562

$2, 257, 659

Unliquidated obligations, start of year...
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

2,244,097
13,562
13,562

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)__ ______ ___ _

Total expenditures.........................

K E V O L V IN G AN D M

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION
N ote.—The estimate of activity under this fund for the fiscal year 1954 is shown under
this head in the proposed for later transmission section at the end of the chapter.

Budgetary A uthorization Schedules
A M O U N T S A V A ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Authorizations to expend from public
debt receipts:
New authorizations____ ___ ________
$500,000,000
Prior year balance available__________ 1,120,639,000

435,000, 000
-235,000,000

Obligations incurred (commitments
for investment in revolving fund). 1,185, 639,000

1954 estimate

$435,000,000

Total available for obligation_____ 1, 620, 639, 000
Balance available in subsequent year____ -435,000,000

200,000, 000

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___ $321,461,000 $1,269,539,065
Obligations incurred (commitments for
investment in revolving fund)________ 1,185, 639,000
200,000,000

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations—investment in
revolving fund).............. .............




1953 estimate

$7,283,608

1954 estimate

$50,749

50,749
112,373
7,120,486

50,749

N A G E M E N T FU N D S

Business-Type Statements
PROGRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE

Expansion of Defense Production —

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year.................................. ...................

1952 actual

1, 507,100,000

1,469,539,065

1, 269,539,065

1, 242,936, 771

237, 560, 935

226, 602, 294

1954 estimate

Under section 304 (b) of the Defense Production Act
of 1950, designated agencies are authorized, with Presi­
dential approval, to incur obligations of $2.1 billion largely
for the purpose of making loans and procuring critical
materials in furtherance of the defense effort. The obli­
gations are financed by borrowings from the Treasury.
The 1951 amendments to the act permit commitments in
excess of $2.1 billion so long as ultimate costs do not
exceed this amount. Programs undertaken must be certi­
fied as essential to the national defense by either the
Defense Production Administrator, the Secretary of Agri­
culture, or the Administrator of the Reconstruction
Finance Corporation.
As of September 15, 1952, certifications of borrowing
authority w as follows:
ere

Defense Materials Procurement Agency__________ $698, 571, 000
Reconstruction Finance Corporation_____________ 454, 000, 000
Department of Agriculture______________________
61, 000, 000
Department of the Interior__________________ :___
16, 000, 000
Export-import Bank___________________________
65, 000, 000
Total___________________________________ 1,294,571,000

Of the rem
aining $805,429,000 of the $2.1 billion
authorized, $570,429,000 is expected to be certified by
June 30, 1953, and $235 m
illion by June 30, 1954.
Defense Materials Procurement Agency.—Borrowing
authority in the amount of $698,571,000 had been certi­
fied as of September 15, 1952, to finance programs for

76

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION—Con.
Expansion of Defense Production — Continued

the expansion of the productive capacity and supply of
defense materials covering mining, processing, production,
procurement, and research development programs. The
amount certified includes $100,000,000 for working capital
and $598,571,000 for the probable ultimate net cost as
defined in section 304 (b) of the Defense Production Act
of 1950, as amended, of which $39,000,000 is for the
machine tool pool order and equipment installation pro­
grams and $559,571,000 for mineral and metal programs.
The exclusive rubber procurement program carried out
by this Agency was terminated June 30, 1952, and the
program will be liquidated in fiscal year 1953.
In addition to the above, the Agency certifies direct
loans to be made by the Reconstruction Finance Cor­
poration or Export-import Bank and participates in
determinations with respect to the issuances of accelerated
tax amortization certificates; and has been delegated the
responsibility for the basic materials development pro­
gram which had been previously carried on by the Eco­
nomic Cooperation Administration and its successor,
Mutual Security Agency, in certain countries in Europe,
the Near East, and Africa.
Department oj Agriculture.—The purchase and resale of
agricultural commodities, except forest products, are
carried out by the Commodity Credit Corporation,which
is reimbursed for net costs involved. The Production
and Marketing Administration has been delegated the
responsibility for certifying loans to the Reconstruction
Finance Corporation for increasing plant capacity to
process or store agricultural commodities, except forest
products. An allocation of $4,000,000 was made to the
Reconstruction Finance Corporation for this purpose.
During the fiscal year 1952, programs to increase sup­
plies of castor beans and kenaf fiber have been continued
and expanded and new programs initiated to assure sup­
plies of long staple cotton and cottonseed. During fiscal
year 1953, it is anticipated that these programs will be
continued.
Net realized losses on purchase and resale operations
during fiscal year 1952 were $1,137,679 and are estimated
at $10,387,554 during the fiscal year 1953.
Department of the Interior.-—Certifications have been
limited to the exploration and development of strategic
and critical minerals and metals for which an allocation of
$16 million has been made to the Defense Minerals
Exploration Administration.
Thus far, 357 exploration projects had been approved
in which the Government’s share of expenditures totals
$10,750,060 against a total cost of $18,072,807. Addi­
tional projects to be financed by the balance of the
$16,000,000 already allocated are expected to number 200
with a total valuation of $4,000,000.
Reconstruction Finance Corporation.—Under the author­
ity provided by section 304 of the Defense Production Act,
a total of $454,000,000 has been allocated to the Corpora­
tion. Of this amount, $411,000,000 has been allocated
for loans of the types provided for by section 302 of the
Defense Production Act. Lending activity during fiscal
years 1951, 1952, and 1953 are summarized below:




1952 actual

1951 actual
Num­
ber
Defense production
loans:
New commitments. __
Disbursements....... .
Outstanding, end of
year:
Commitments____
Loans________ ..

Amount
(in
millions)

Num­
ber

1953 estimate

Amount
(in
millions)

Amount
(in
millions)

Num­
ber

40
20

68
8

175
92

199
57

175
125

195
101

17
17

47
7

71
101

129
59

85
201

205
149

On June 30, 1952, a commitment of $40.8 million was
made against the allocation of $43 million for purchase of
refined tin.
Export-import Bank oj Washington.—Credits subject to
the provisions of section 302 of the Defense Production
Act of 1950, as amended, for the production abroad of
essential materials are authorized only upon receipt by
the Export-import Bank of a certificate of essentiality
from the relevant defense agency. This permits the
financing of essential projects with which are associated
risks precluding assistance by the Bank under the pro­
visions of its own act. Allocations of borrowing authority
totaling $65 million for this purpose have been approved
by the Defense Production Administration. Under this
authority, credits totaling $539,760 were authorized dur­
ing fiscal year 1952 for the production in Latin America
of sisal and zinc for the stockpile. It is anticipated that
the remaining $64,460,240 will be obligated in fiscal year
1953, principally for the production of copper, cobalt,
and manganese ore.
Administrative expenses.—Beginning with fiscal year
1953, the administrative expenses which are incident to
carrying out the defense expansion programs described
above are being financed from the borrowing authority.
Allocations of borrowing authority for these expenses are
made as new programs are certified and placed into
operation. The funds are controlled through apportion­
ment of specific amounts for such expenses.
A. Statem ent of sources and application of funds
[For fiscal years ending June 30, 1952, 1953, and 1954]
[Relates only to allocations through Sept. 15, 1952]
1952 actual

1953 estimate

FUNDS APPLIED
To operations:
Defense Materials Procurement Agency:
Minerals and metals program:
Acquisition of assets:
Advances to contractors________
G o v e r n m e n t - o w n e d industrial plant assets______ ..
Construction in progress___ ___
Operating equipment... _______
Expenses:
Purchases and manufacturing ex­
penses___ ________ ________
Operating expenses______ _____
Net cost of programs other than
purchase and resale__________
Other____ ____ ... .....................
Rubber program: Expenses:
Purchases____________ _________
Operating expenses______________
Other.._____ __________________
Machine tools program:
Acquisition of assets:
Advances to contractors______ _
Machine tools________________

$21,309,212

$39,507,000

2.890. 645
44,108
16, 421

633,000

109, 851, 740
291, 761

280, 508,948
7,407,852

10,670,922
9,706

62, 867, 000

636,660,032
8, 204, 768
15, 461

9,000,000

22,380, 979
7,262,277

10,000,000
30,000,000

1954 estimate

77

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

A. Statem ent o f sources and application o f funds —Continued
1952 actual

1953 estimate

A. Statem ent of sources and application o f fun(Ls—Continued

1954 estimate

1952 actual

FUNDS APPLIED—Continued

FUNDS PROVIDED—Continued

To operations—Continued
Defense M a te ria ls P rocu rem en t
Agency—Continued
Machine tools program—Continued
Expenses:
Net cost of machine tool pool
order terminations___________
Other:
Acquisition of assets: Office equip­
ment________________________
Expenses:
Administrative expenses_______
Interest expense—U. S. Treasury.
Loan guarantee expense________
Accrued annual leave acquired.
Increase in selected working capital
items__________________________

By operations—Continued
Defense M a teria ls P rocurem ent
Agency—Continued
Rubber program: Income: Sales____
Machine Tool program:
Income:
Interest on advances to contrac­
tors_______________________
Rental on machine tools_______
Realization of assets_____________
Other:
Loan guarantee fees_____________
Prior year adjustments__________
Decrease in selected working capital
items---------------------------------------

1953 estimate

Total funds applied to operations,
Defense Materials Procure­
ment Agency_______________
Department of Agriculture: Agricultural
commodities: Expenses, net cost of
purchase and resale operations, funds
applied to operations______________
Department of Interior: Minerals ex­
ploration:
Acquisition of assets, loans_________
Expenses:
Interest expense payable to U. S.
Treasury____________________
Administrative expenses_________
Total funds applied to operations,
Department of the Interior___
Reconstruction Finance Corporation:
Acquisition of assets, loans_________
Refined tin reserve inventory pro­
gram:
Acquisition of assets_____________
Expenses, operating_____________
Other:
Interest payable to U. S. Treasury..
Administrative expenses_________
Adjustment of prior years’ income-.
Increase in selected working capital
items________________________
Total funds applied to opera­
tions, Reconstruction Finance
Corporation_______________
Export-Import Bank:
Minerals and Metals program: Acqui­
sition of assets, loans____________
Other:
Expenses:
Interest payable to U. S. Treas­
ury________________________
Administrative expenses_______
Increase in selected working capi­
tal items___________________

i, 000,000
$78, 532
3,029, 982
4,051,043
9,837
169,316

5,800,000

8 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0
113,389

45, 887, 539
872, 834, 281

1,137, 679

459, 837,189

10,387, 554

2, 686, 782

9,035, 499

13, 306

75, 000
1, 500,000

2, 700, 088

10, 610, 4

57,153, 562

101, 250, 000

40, 766, 879

1 ,0 0 0
0 0 ,0 0

504, 841
547, 246
1, 553

2, 940, 000
710, 000

207,000

40, 625, 854

•, 974,081
8

155, 732,854

60, 655

11, 500,000
125,000
3,000

706

234,294

Total funds applied to opera­
tions, Export-Import Bank.

61, 641

11, 862, 294

Total funds applied to opera­
tions___________________

975, 707,770

!, 430,390

To financing: Increase in Treasury cash:
Defense Materials Procurement Agency.
Department of the Interior__________
Reconstruction Finance Corporation...

108, 405,079
1,329, 723
157, 033

934, 501
162, 025

Total increase in Treasury cash___
Payment of profit on vending machines
to Treasury______________________

109, 891, 835

1,096, 526

Total funds applied to financing_
_

109, 891, 896

1, 096, 526

Total funds applied_____________

1,085, 599, 666

$726, 294, 596

$60, 906, 556

407,394
103,078
74,105

1,380,000
3, 500, 622

32,333
5,747

1,092, 569
49,011,115

Total funds provided by opera­
tions, Defense Materials Pro­
curement Agency----------------Department of Agriculture: Decrease in
selected working capital items, funds
provided by operations____________

797,024, 421

290, 475, 792

1,137, 679

10,387, 554

Department of the Interior:
Realization of assets______________
Decrease in selected working capital
items_________________________

19, 811

40,000

1 ,0 0
00

5,000

29, 811

45,000

4, 591, 712

1 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,0 0

Total funds provided by opera­
tions, Department of the InteReconstruction Finance Corporation:
Realization of assets, repayment of
loans_______________________ _
Refined Tin Reserve program: Reali­
zation of assets __. ______________
Other income:
Interest earned on loans_________
Other_________________________
Decrease in selected working capital
items__________________________
Total funds provided by opera­
tions, Reconstruction Finance
Corporation________________
Export-Import Bank:
Minerals and Metals program: Reali­
zation of assets, repayment of
loans________________________
Income: Interest on loans________
Total funds provided by opera­
tions, Export-Import Bank___

9,866* 879
1, 346, 055
21, 4G
1

5, 200.000
28,000

43. 371, 886
49. 331,114

27, 094, 879

706

250,000
250. 000

706

500,000

Total funds provided by opera­
847, 523, 731
tions______________________
By financing:
Borrowing from U. S. Treasury:
Defense Materials Procurement
Agency-----------------------------------183, 700,000
Department cf the Interior_________
4,000,000
Reconstruction Finance Corporation.
49,800,000
Export-Import Bank______________
60,935
Total borrowings_______________
237, 560,935
Appropriation transfers:
To Defense Materials Procurement
Agency:
From Department of the Interior.
400.000
From General Services Administra­
tion_________________________
115.000
Decrease in Treasury cash—Defense
Materials: Procurement Agency-----238, 075, 935
Total funds provided by financing..
Total funds provided____________ 1, 085, 599, 666

328, 503, 225

74.940.000
11.500.000
128,800,000
11,362,294
226,602,294

649, 526,916

61

Interest on advances to contractors..
Other_________________________




EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES
Funds applied to operations___________
Less adjustment for balances in working
funds------------------ -------------------------

i, 911,178
195,738
252

172,164,000
2,420,930

$975, 707, 770

Adjusted funds applied to operations.
Funds provided by operations........ .......

FUNDS PROVIDED
By operations:
Defense Materials Procurement
Agency:
Minerals and Metals program: In­
come:

94,421,397
321, 023, 691
649, 526, 916

$648, 430, 390

975, 591, 708
847, 523, 731

648, 430,390
328, 503, 225

Net effect on budgetary expendi­
tures____ __________________

128,067,977

319,927,165

116,062

1954 estimate

78

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION— Con.

B. Statem ent o f incom e and expense —Continued

Expansion of Defense Production — Continued

1952 actual

A. Statem ent of sources and application o f funds —Continued
EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES—Continued
1952 actual
The above amounts are charged (or cred­
ited (— as follows:
))
To budgetary authorizations................
To net receipts of the enterprise............

1953 estimate

$237,560,935
-109,492,958

1954 estimate

$226, 602, 294
93,324,871

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

DPRMN O TEI TR R
EAT ET F H NEI
O
Expenses:
Interest expense—U. S. Treasury____
Increase in allowance for losses on loans.
Administrative expense_____________

$13,306
2,404,075

$75,000
9,445,949
1,500,000

2,417,381

11,020,949
-11,020, 949

$5,200,000
28,000

1,367,516

Net loss for the year..

—
2,417, 381

$1,346,055
21,461

Total........................

5,228,000

504,841

RCNTUTO FNNECROAI N
EOSRCI N I AC OPRTO
B. Statem ent o f incom e and expense

Income:
Interest and income.
Other........................

[For fiscal years ending June 30,1952, 1953, 1954]
[Relates only to allocations made through Sept. 15, 1952] *
1953 estimate

DFNEMTR L POUE ET
EES AEI S RCRMN
A
AEC
GNY

Income:
Sales:
Rubber....................... ............ ...........
Minerals and metals.______ ______
Interest on advances to contractors:
Minerals and metals______________
Machine tools____________________
Rentals, machine tools. ____ _______
Loan guarantee fees. _______________
Other__ _________ _________________

Total income.

$726, 294, 596
69,911,178

$60, 906, 556
172,164, 000

195, 738
407, 394
103,078
32,333
327

2, 420,930
1,380, 000
3, 500, 622
1,092, 569

1954 estimate

Expenses:
Interest expense, U. S. Treasury...........
Operating expenses, tin program.........
Administrative expenses...... . ............
Increase in allowance for losses on loans..

547,246
1,031,100

2,940,000
207.000
710.000
601.000

Total____ _____________________

1952 actual

2,083,187

4,458,000

Net income (or loss (— for the year)
)

-715, 671

770,000

$706

$250,000

EPR-I PR BN
XOTMOT AK
Income: Interest income______

Total income... _____ ___________

796, 944, 644

241, 464, 677

Expenses:
Rubber:
Cost of commodities sold:
Purchases........................................
Decrease in inventory____________

Expenses:
Interest expense—U. S. Treasury..
Administrative expense........... .
Total.............................

280

128,000

636, 660, 032
69, 775,171

9,000,000
51,906, 556

Net income for the year.

426

12 0
2 ,0 0

Cost of commodities sold..........
Operating expenses. _____ _ _______
Other expenses___________
____

706, 435, 203
8, 204, 768
15, 461

60, 906, 556

714, 655, 432

60,906, 556

Increase in valuation allowance and
operating reserves:
Provision for:
Doubtful accounts_____ _______
Liquidation_______________ ___
Self-insurance.- ______________
Decrease in valuation allowance due
to liquidation of program_________

762, 500
766, 666
771, 384

Net loss for the year, defense production
activities__________________________
Deficit, beginning of year______________
Adjustment for prior year operations____
Payment of profit on vending machines to
Treasury............. ........... ............. •----_
Accrued annual leave acquired. ...............
Deficit, end of year..

125,000
3,000

-19, 256,498
-2 , 228,926
4,194

-186,877.193
-21,650,607

-61
-169,316
-21,650,607

—208,527,800

-1,300,000

C. Statem ent o f financial condition

Total expenses, rubber program. _

716, 955, 982

59, 606, 556

[As of June 30,1952,1953, and 1954]

Minerals and metals:
Cost of commodities sold:
Purchases and manufacturing ex­
pense____________ _______ ____
Increase in inventory. _________

109,851, 740
37, 583, 294

280, 508,948
30,059,000

72, 268, 446
291, 761

250,449, 948
7,407,852

10, 670,922

62, 867,000

1,198, 512
9,706
84,439,347

1, 200, 000
321, 924, 800

2,154, 654
1,186, 914
87, 780,915

1,800,000
1,080, 000
324, 804, 800

Cost of commodities sold_______
Operating expenses_______________
Net cost of programs other than pur­
chase and resale_ __ _. _ ________
Depreciation, Government-owned in­
dustrial plant assets_____________
Other _ __ __________________ .
Increase in reserves at Governmentowned plants:
For expenses paid from other funds..
For self-insurance, contingencies, etc.
Machine tools:
Depreciation, machine tools on lease..
Net cost, machine tool pool order ter­
minations______________________
Total expenses, machine tool pro­
gram
_■____ _________
Undistributed:
Administrative expenses..... ...............
Interest expense—U. S. Treasury.......
Loan guaranty expense......................
Total undistributed expenses.........
Total expenses

_-

Net loss for the year......... .............

1952 actual

103,078




ASSETS

103,078

5,800,000
8,000,000
113,389
13,913,389

29. 771, 226
4,317,362

$36,446,355
4, 317,362

Accounts receivable:
Trade____________________
Government agencies_______
Claims_____________ ____ _
Other_____________________

21, 245, 368
59, 798,151
801,397
375, 299

3, 245,368
3, 798,151
801, 397
375,299

82, 220, 215

1 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

8, 220, 215

Accrued interest receivable____

81,220, 215
837,807

7, 220, 215
2,865,459

Inventories:
Rubber_______________ ____
Minerals and metals______
Supplies and materials............

51,906, 556
79, 638,876
4,164, 653

109,830,997
4,164, 653

135, 710, 085

113,995,650

11,141
102,938

11,141
102,938

Total current assets....... .....
Advances to contractors..............

351,970, 774
43,690,190

164,959,120
93,197,190

Loans receivable...... ..................
Less allowance for losses.............

62,066,125
3,654,075

171,561,624
13,700,024
157,861,600

44,108
78, 532
16, 421
87, 275
7,100,972

677,108
78, 532
16,421
87, 275
37,100,972

Less allowance for losses_____

9,500,622

3,029,982
4,051,043
9,837
7,090,862

Current assets:
Cash with U. S. Treasury_____
Cash in banks_______________

58,412,050

3,500,622
6,000,000

811.930.837

407.825.367

-14,986,193

-166.360,690

DPRMN O AR UTR
EAT ET F GI LUE
C
Expenses: Net cost of operations..............
Net loss for the year........................

$1,137,679
-1,137,679

1953 estimate

$10,387,554
-10,387,554

Advances:
Employees........................—
Government agencies..............

Land, structures, and equipment:
Construction in progress............
Office equipment...... ............... .
Operating equipment. .............. .
Machine tools in storage........... .
Machine tools on lease...............

1 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

1954 estimate

79

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

C.

Statement of financial condition—Continued
1952 actual

1953 estimate

$2,890,645

$,1
2

10, 217, 953
103,078
1,198, 512

3,603, 700
2,398, 512

Deferred charges and other assets:
Prepaid insurance and deferred charges..
Government-owned industrial plants:
Deferred charges________ ________
Other assets_____________________

1,645

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

34,848, 741

5,387

587

255, 219
267, 762

255,219
267, 762

Total_________________________

528,368

Total assets___________________ _

;, 517, 745

c o n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$2, 732,331

1,500
148, 733

14, 211
66,212

523, J

1954 estimate

$4,368,109

12, 449
145, 016

17,803
57,325

80,122

755, 700

Total personal services_______
Travel_______________________ __
Transportation of things___________
Communications.. . ____________
Rents and utility services__________
Printing and reproduction.................
Other contractual services_________
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment______________________
Taxes and assessments___________

3,050,341
175,819
5,854
70, 961
39,851
47,002
143,862
32, 954
79, 511
9,605

5, 349,170
439, 430
20, 350
119, 326
104, 450
79, 225
1, 731, 600
55,800
69,150
9, 500

Total obligations_______________

6 0 , 22
,0 2 1

1, 301, 590
8, 916,363

Total______________ _____ _____

o b je c ts—

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Excess of annual leave earned over
annual leave taken_____________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base______ __ ........... ....... ...
Payment above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for
reimbursable details....................

40,850, 953

Less portion charged off as depreciation:
Machine tools on lease____________
Government-owned industrial plants.

by

Object classification

1954 estimate

ASSETS—Continued
Land, structures, and equipment—Con.
Government-owned industrial plant
assets.___ ____________________ ...

o b l ig a t io n s

3, 655, 760

7,978, 000

451, 390, 219

LIABILITIES

m u t u a l s e c u r it y

Current liabilities:
Accounts payable:
Government agencies_____________
Trade.________ _________________
Other---------------- ------------------------

58,457,747
16,929,710
439,323

12,138,468
7,162,908
439,323

Total accounts payable__________

75,826,780
2,815,833
316, 654
1, 600,235

5,452,468
316, 654
1, 616,054

Total accrued expenses................. .
Trust and deposit liabilities_________

4, 732, 722
43,112

7,385,176
43,112

Total current liabilities____ ______

80,602,614

27,168,987

1,352,219
1,300,000

1,352,219

2,154,654

3,954, 654

1,186,914

N o t e . —The estimate of activity in this fund for 1954 is included in the item for “ Mutual
security” under proposed legislation.

19, 740,699

Accrued expenses:
Interest—U. S. Treasury............. —
Accrued annual leave_____________
Other---------- ------------------------ -—

Discharge of Investment Guarantee Liabilities —

2,266,914

Other liabilities:
Reserves:
Rubber program:
For self-insurance_______ ______
For liquidation_________________
Minerals and metals: At Govern­
ment-owned industrial plants:
For expenses paid by other funds—
For self-insurance, contingencies,
etc__________________________
For losses under deferred participa­
tions in bank loans______________

10
,1 0

B udgetary A uthorization S chedules
am ounts

5,994,887
86, 597, 501

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$156, 594, 684

$124,519,146

-2,033,000

-3,800,000

-124,519,146

-36, 664,146

30,042, 538

84,055,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$33, 634, 841
5, 210, 656

$37, 531,653
30,042, 538

$64, 907,191
84,055,000

38, 845, 497

67, 574,191

148.962.191

37, 531, 653

64,907,191

146.157.191

1, 313, 844

2,667,000

2,805,000

Prior year balance of authorization to ex­
pend from public debt receipts...... ....... $163,583,024
Reduction in authorization to expend
from public debt receipts: Proceeds of
sale of foreign currency. _ ______ _____
-1, 777, 684
Balance of authorization to expend from
public debt receipts available in subse­
quent year______ _________________ -156,594,684
Obligations incurred_____________

a n a l y s is

of

34,744,874

5,210, 656

e x p e n d it u r e s

1952 actual

INVESTMENT OF U. S. GOVERN­
MENT

Unliquidated obligations, start of year---Obligations incurred during the year____

Interest-bearing investment:
Notes payable—U. S. Treasury........... .
Assets transferred from other Govern­
ment agencies:
Appropriated fund_________________
Supplies and materials---------------------Deficit____________________________

515,000
2,594,916
-21, 650,607

515,000
2, 594,916
-208,527,800

Total investment of U. S. Govern­
ment________________________

376,920, 244

416, 645, 345

Total liabilities, reserves, and in­
vestment of U. S. Government

463, 517, 745

451, 390,219

A

o b l ig a t io n

7,575,887

Total liabilities_______________

for

1952 actual

20
,1 0

Total other liabilities____ ______

a v a il a b l e

d m in is t r a t iv e

E

xpen se s—

D

e f e n s e P r o d u c t io n
A u t h o r it y

o b l ig a t io n s

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees........ .
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.................. .................
Average grade__________ ________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______ ____________
Average grade___________________
Ungraded positions:
Average salary-----------------------------




395,460,935

by

622,063,229

A

c t iv it ie s —

B

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year. ____________________________
Total expenditures (out of prior au­
thorizations).............. ..................

B u sin e ss T ype S tatem ents
PROGRAM AND PERFO RM AN CE

o r r o w in g

o b je c ts

1952 actual

1953 estimate

841
14
559

924
14
800

$5,282
GS-7.3

$5, 753
GS-8.2

$2,946
CPC-3.5

$2, 925
CPC-3.4

$10,650

1954 estimate

Section 111 (b) of Public Law 472, Eightieth Congress,
as amended, authorizes the Director for Mutual Security
to issue industrial investment (including forward con­
tracting) and informational media guarantees up to
$200,000,000 to stimulate the flow of private capital into
projects abroad which further the purposes of that law.
This authority was supplemented by section 520 of the
Mutual Security Act of 1951 (Public Law 165), which
makes guarantee funds available for investment in any
country eligible to receive assistance under the Mutual
Security Act. In addition to the $200,000,000 borrowing
authority, net fees collected increase funds available for
obligation. By the end of fiscal year 1953, it is expected
that unused guarantee authority w be $124,519,146.
ill

80

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1054
EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued
Discharge of Investment Guarantee Liabilities —Continued

Funds applied to operations___________
Funds provided by operations_________

[As of June 30, 1952, 1953, and 1954]

Total outstanding_______________

2,702,000

2,825,000

1,313,844
68,679

2,667,000
35,000

2,805,000
20,000

$55,700,000
550,000
8, 657,191

$133,000,000
2,000,000
11,157,191

B. Statem ent o f incom e and expen se

37, 531, 653

64,907,191

146,157,191

[For fiscal years ending June 30, 1952, 1953, and 1954]

A. Statem ent of sources and application of funds
[F o r fiscal yea rs en d in g June 3 0 , 1 9 5 2 , 1 9 5 3 , and 1 9 5 4 ]

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$3,461,155

$5,159,000

$7,500,000

1,777,684
300,948

2,033,000
424,000

3,800,000
875,000

2,078,632

2.457.000

4.675.000

1,313.844
68,679
3,461,155

2.667.000
35,000
5,159,000

2.805.000
20,000
7, 500,000

1952 actual
FUNDS APPLIED

FUNDS PROVIDED




1, 382,523

The above amounts are charged as follows:
To budgetary authorizations______
To net receipts of the enterprise______

$33,465, 462
250,000
3, 816,191

been issued, 6f which $33,715,462 were outstanding. Of
the amount outstanding, $32,188,062 w against the risks*
ere
of inconvertibility of local currency receipts from invest­
ments; $1,277,400 were against the risk of loss by expro­
priation and confiscation; and one guaranty for $250,000
covered forward contracting for the furnishing of capitalgoods items and related services.
From the inception of the guarantee program until July
1, 1952, no disbursements had been made under any of
these guarantees and a total of $622,619 in fees had been
collected.
The increase in guarantees expected to result from the
Mutual Security Act of 1951 (Public Law 165, sec. 520)
which extended the use of guarantee funds for investment
in any area in which assistance is authorized under the
act, has not yet been fully realized because of difficulties
encountered in instituting this program in new areas.
Informational media guarantees.—Guarantees up to
$10,000,000 may be issued in any fiscal year against the
nontransferability of funds in connection with American
investments in enterprises producing or distributing
informational media. As of July 1, 1952, a total of
$13,073,817 informational media guarantees had been
issued, of which $3,816,191 were outstanding. Fees
totaling $199,684 had been collected and disbursements
of $6,611,602 had been made.
The Mutual Security Act of 1952 (Public Law 400,
sec. 536) stated that the authority to make informational
media guarantees should be fully continued and be
exercised after June 30, 1952, by any department or
agency of the Government designated by the President.
Executive Order 10368 dated June 30, 1952, so designated
the Department of State. The Director for Mutual
Security will make available to State in fiscal year 1953
the sum of $13,816,191, $3,816,191 of which represents
the outstanding commitments as of June 30, 1952, and
$10,000,000 the maximum new guarantees that may be
issued in any one fiscal year under the present law.

By operations:
Realization of assets: Dollar proceeds
from sale of foreign currency________
Income: Fees---------------------------------Total funds provided by program
operations____________________
By financing:
Borrowing from Treasury____________
Decrease in Treasury cash----------------Total funds provided_______ _____

$7,500,000
4,675,000

1954 estimate

Industrial investment and forward contracting guaran­
tees.—By the end of fiscal 1952 a total of $37,978,917 had

To operations: Acquisition of assets:
Purchase of foreign currencies-------------

$5,159,000
2,457,000

1953 estimate

1952 actual
Industrial________________ __________
Forward contracting_______ ________ _
Informational media_________ ________

$3,461,155
2,078,632

Net effect on budgetary expendi­
tures.............................................

STATUS OF GUARANTEES OUTSTANDING BY TYPES

1952 actual
Income: Fees collected________ . .. . __
Retained earnings beginning of the year..

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$300,948
501,268

$424,000
802, 216

$875,000
1,226,216

802,216

1,226,216

2,101,216

Retained earnings end of year____

C. Statem ent o f financial condition
[As of June 30, 1952, 1953, and 1954]
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$84,127
3,228,089

$49,127
6,354,089

$29,127
10,054,089

3, 312, 216

6,403,216

10,083,218

Principal of the fund:
Notes held by U. S. Treasury________
Retained earnings reserved for future
contingencies ____________________

2, 510,000

5,177,000

7,982,000

802,216

1,226,216

2,101,216

Total investment of U. S. Govern­
ment. ______________________

3,312,216

6,403,216

10,083,216

ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash with U. S. Treasury.. _________
Foreign currencies on hand (at cost)___
Total assets _______________ ..
INVESTMENT OF U. S.
GOVERNMENT

Schedule A -l. A ccrued expenditures by objects
16 Investments and loans (net) (total accrued expenditures)—1952, $3,461,155; 1953,
$5,159,000; 1954, $7,500,000.

THE INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS
[Submitted under the Government Corporation Control Act]
N ote.—The estimate of appropriation and expenses for 1954 is included in the item for
“ Mutual security” under proposed legislation.
PURPOSE

AND

F IN A N C IA L

O R G A N IZ A T IO N

The objectives of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs
are to further the general welfare of the American Re­
publics by carrying out cooperative technical assistance
programs. In addition to funds provided by the United
States through the Institute, the participating countries
contribute to the cooperative programs.
The major activities of the Corporation are conducted
in accordance with the terms of agreements entered into
with the governments of the other American Republics.
These agreements provide for program operation by a
cooperative service, which is a part of the appropriate
ministry (e. g., health, agriculture, education) of the host
government and is headed by the chief of the Institute’s
field party. Both the cooperating republic and the
Institute contribute funds, materials, services, and
facilities.
A N A L Y S IS

OF

BUDGET

PROGRAM S

AND

F IN A N C IA L

R E V IE W

Net expenses in 1952 were about $17.9 million and are
estimated at $22.3 million for 1953. The portion of the
increase which is not attributable to continuation of
activities at their attained going rates lies mainly in the
technical fields of public administration and government

81

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

services where additional country programs are being
initiated.
The Institute has authority to operate until 1955 (act
of Sept. 3, 1949, Public Law 283), and the funds for its
1952 and 1953 programs are derived from the mutual secu­
rity appropriation. An indication of the Institute’s
1954 program plans will be submitted at a later date.

A.

B.

ANALYSIS OF DEFICIT
1952 actual

$101,192,010
22, 251,391

$123,443,401

Balance at end of fiscal year______

101,192,010

123,443,401

123,443,401

C.

Statement of financial condition
[As of June 30, 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1954 estimate

1952 actual

FUNDS APPLIED
To operations:
Program expenses:
Agriculture and natural resources .
Health welfare and housing______ _
Education
Public administration and govern­
ment services.
__ __
Program direction
O ther____ ___ ___
___________

1954 estimate

$83,183, 524
17, 875, 486
133,000

[For fiscal years ending June 30,1952, 1953, and 1954]
1953 estimate

1953 estimate

Balance at beginning of fiscal year______
Net expenses for vear. ___ . _ ______
Adjustment of prior year transactions__

Statement of sources and application of funds
1952 actual

Statement of income, expenses, and analysis of deficit—Continued

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ASSETS
Cash with U. S. Treasury: Revolving
fund accounts______________________
Accounts receivable____ _________
Deferred and undistributed charges____

$7,092,078
3, 317, 586
18,462

$5,189, 538
2,000
8,462

$175,000

Total assets____________________

10,428,126

5,200,000

175,000

5,000,000

$7,707,400
4,970,700
2, 709,800

$8,100,000
5,379,200
3, 695,000

1,293,000
1,194, 586
* 17,348

3,259,191
1, 818, 000
10,000

$10,000

Subtotal____________________ _
Adjustment of prior year transactions..
Increase in selected working capital
items___________ _______________

17,892,834
133,000

22,261,391

10,000
5,014, 538

Accounts payable______ ____ _ _____
Trust and deposit liabilities (servicio
deposits unexpended)_________
___

8,320,291

50,149

255,444

200,000

175,000

Total funds applied to operations—
.
To financing: Increase in Treasury cash._

18, 025, 834
4, 384,162

22,311,540

5,024, 538

Total liabilities______ ___________

8, 575, 735

5,200,000

175,000

Total funds applied______________

22,409,996

22,311, 540

5,024, 538

82,741,608

82, 741,608

82, 741, 608

FUNDS PROVIDED
By operations:
Undistributed receipts: Proceeds of
incidental sales______ _____ ____
Reimbursements from mutual security
appropriation
___
Decrease in selected working capital
items
~ . ________ *
__
Total funds provided by operations.
By financing: Decrease in Treasury cash__
Total funds provided____________

17,348

10,000

18,872,064

20,399,000

10,000

LIABILITIES

INVESTMENT OF U. S.
GOVERNMENT
Non-interest-bearing investment:
Appropriations_____
____________
Reimbursement from international de­
velopment program____ ______
Reimbursement from mutual security
program. ______
_ ___________
Deduct cumulative deficit_____________

1,430,729

1,430, 729

1,430, 729

18,872,064
101,192,010

39, 271,064
123,443, 401

39, 271,064
123, 443,401

Total investment of U. S. Govern­
ment______
_ _____ _____

1,852,391

Total liabilities and investment of
U. S. Government_____________

10,428,126

5,200,000

175,000

3, 520, 584
22,409,996

20,409,000
1,902, 540

10,000
5,014, 538

22,409,996

22,311, 540

5,024, 538

Schedule A-l.

EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES
Total funds applied to operations----------Adjustment for advances to working fund
administered by other agencies
_. _
Total funds applied to operations
(adjusted)----------------- -------Total funds provided by operations-------Adjustment for advances to working
funds administered by other agencies.._
Total funds provided by operations
(adjusted)____________________
Net effect on budgetary expendi­
tures________________________
The above amounts are charged (or
credited (— to net receipts of the
))
enterprise__________ . ____ ______

B.

$18,025,834

$22,311, 540

18,025, 834
22, 409,996

22, 311, 540
20,409,000

1, 221, 503

-1,000,000

23,631, 499

19, 409.000

10,000

-5 , 605, 665

2, 902, 540

5, 236,041

— 605, 665
5,

2,902,540

5,236,041

5, 246, 041
10,000

Statem of income, expenses, and analysis of deficit
ent
[For fiscal years ending June 30,1952,1953, and 1954]
1952 actual

Expenses:
Agriculture and natural resources_____
Health welfare and housing............ ......
Education.
Public administration and government
services-.___ __________ ________
Program direction. ________ _______
Other___ _____ __________ ________
Total expenses_____________ ____
Deduct proceeds of incidental sales___
Net expenses 1

____

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$7,707,400
4, 970, 700
2, 709,800

$8,100,000
5, 379, 200
3, 695,000

1, 293,000
1,194, 586
17, 348

3, 259,191
1, 818,000
10,000

$10,000

17, 892, 834
17,348

22, 261, 391
10,000

10,000
10,000

17,875,486

22, 251, 391

1 Corporation not operated for profit. Deficit represents depletion of capital in carry­
ing out cooperative programs.




Object classification

$5,024,538
221, 503

Accrued expenditures by objects
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

___
Number of permanent positions...
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

373
190
461

761
220
770

Average salaries and grades:
Grades established by Administrator,
Technical Cooperation Administra­
tion:
Average salary _________________
Average grade___________________

$7, 546
Point IV-4.2

$7, 600
Point IV-4.1

$3, 938, 808
744, 045
722, 501
34, 631
56, 276
34, 640
865, 790

$6, 706, 691
1, 200.000
1.100, 000
70.000
100.000
70.000
1.400.000

2,826, 523
216,448
432, 895
8,020, 277

3.400.000
275.000
600.000
7,339, 700

$10,000

17, 892, 834

22, 261, 391

10,000

01
02
03 .
04
05
06
07

Personal services _ _ __ ___
__
Travel .._ _ _ . .......... ............
Transportation of things__________
Communication services_____
Rents and utility services_________
Printing and reproduction___ _ __ _
Other contractual services____ _ _
Services performed by other agen­
cies____ _
- - _________
08 Supplies and materials_________ ...
09 Equipment
...........
__
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Total accrued expenditures_______

[C orporation]
[The following corporation is hereby authorized to make such ex­
penditures, within the limits of funds and borrowing authority avail­
able to such corporation or agency and in accord with law, and to
make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year
limitations as provided by section 104 of the Government Corpora­
tion Control Act, as amended, as may be necessary in carrying out
the programs set forth in the Budget for the fiscal year 1953 for such
corporation:]
[Institute of Inter-American Affairs. ] (66 Stat. 653; Supplemental
Appropriation Act, 1953.)

82

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

PROPOSED F O R L A T E R T R A N S M IS S IO N

Contributions to United Nations International Children’s
Emergency Fund, Mutual Security Act, Executive (under

existing legislation, 1953).—A supplemental appropriation
of $9,814,333 is required for the United States contribu­
tion to the UNICEF program through December 31, 1953.
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation___

2,000,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations....................

7,814,333

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1952 actual

$9,814,333

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.......

1954 estimate

Expenses oj dejense production and stabilization activities
(under proposed legislation, 1954).—The budget assumes
that the authorities contained in the Defense Production
Act of 1950, as amended, will be extended. A supple­
mental appropriation of $50,000,000 for administrative
expenses is anticipated for 1954.

2,000,000

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

$50,000,000
4,000,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions_____________________________

46,000,000

Multilateral technical cooperation, Mutual Security Acty
Executive (under existing legislation, 1953).—A supple­

mental appropriation of $6,537,417 is required for the
United States contribution to the United Nations ex­
panded technical assistance program for calendar year
1953.

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.......

50,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations___________

300,000

O F E X P E N D IT U R E S

1954 estimate

$350,000

Proposed supplemental appropriation___

Proposed supplemental appropriation___

A N A L Y S IS

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, end of year___

$2,000,000

Emergency jund jor the President, national dejense
(under existing legislation, 1953).—A supplemental appro­
priation of $350,000 is recommended for fiscal year 1953
to enable the President to take care of em
ergencies which
may arise during the balance of the fiscal year.

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation___
$50,000

$6, 537,417

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions___ __________________________

1954 estimate

6, 537,417

50,000

Mutual security (under proposed legislation, 1954).—
Appropriations totaling $7.6 billion are included in this
Expansion oj dejense production (under proposed legis­ Budget for fiscal year 1954, under proposed legislation,
lation, 1954).—The budget assumes extension of title III for continuation of the mutual security program of mili­
of the Defense Production Act beyond the present expira­ tary aid, defense support, and technical assistance. The
tion date. Section 304 (b) of the act includes authoriza­ detailed program proposals for each of the three types of
tion to expend from public debt receipts in the amount of assistance will be presented to Congress in the near
$2.1 billion of which $235 million is expected to be avail­ future. A substantial portion of the funds requested will
able for 1954. Financial activity under this authority be used to assist friendly countries in strengthening their
defenses. In addition, the request also includes amounts
during 1954 follows:
to finance other related international programs essential
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S
to the security of the United States.
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Funds applied to operations.............. ......
Funds provided by operations..... ............

$580,415,000
380,415,000

Net effect on budgetary expendi­
tures___ _________________ ____

200,000,000

The above amounts are credited (— to
)
prior budgetary authorizations.............

200,000,000

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S




1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation

$7,600,000,000

Unliquidated obligations, end of year___

5,600,000,000

Expenditures out of current authorizations

2,000,000,000

200000— 53-------6







INDEPENDENT OFFICES
SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS
DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations

Appropriations
$7, 713, 971, 289 $8, 943, 910, 908 $7, 259, 505, 164
77, 006, 360
40, 359, 190
404, 000, 000
Reappropriations _
......
Authorizations to expend from public debt
75, 000, 000
receipts
1, 127, 977, 603
Reauthorizations to expend from public debt
42, 890, 262
receipts
_ .
635, 623
Reauthorization of contract authority .
- ■ ................-

Total obligational authority under
current authorizations ........... _

8, 925, 833, 967

9, 095, 917, 268

7, 663, 505, 164

379, 205, 080

117, 000, 000

25, 385, 664

8, 546, 628, 887

8, 978, 917, 268

7, 638, 119, 500

44, 288, 341

Total. ___________________________
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquida­
tion of prior contract authorizations_____

694, 765, 092

706, 623, 785

8, 590, 917, 228

9, 673, 682, 360

8, 344, 743, 285

Permanent Authorizations

Appropriations
Total new obligational authority
enacted or recommended __
PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION

Appropriations

.......... -

Total new obligational authority (for
detail see following tables)________
84

472, 195, 500
8, 590, 917, 228 10, 145, 877, 860

8, 344, 743, 285

IN D E P E N D E N T O F F IC E S
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOCU­
MENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations

Out of current authorizations __
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior con­
tract authorizations
Out of permanent authorizations . . . _ _

$5, 204, 461, 904 -$5, 880, 998, 898
116, 600, 000
689, 194, 384
6,010,256,288

6, 607, 420, 819

1, 935, 337, 123

2, 400, 237, 546

« 162, 014, 732

Total expenditures from new author­
izations.. __
$8, 026, 078, 692

25, 385, 664
701, 036, 257

® 176, 298, 016

7, 783, 578, 679

8, 831, 360, 349

Other Expenditures

Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations
Out of receipts of revolving and management
funds (net)___ _____ __ __ _ _ _ _
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recommended___ , 8, 026, 078, 692
FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations

Out of current authorizations ................... .

469, 893, 500

Other Expenditures

Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations _
Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following tables)__ .

2, 302, 000
8, 026, 078, 692

8, 253, 472, 179

8, 833, 662, 349

° Deduct, excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.




85

86

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE

[For the fiscal years 1952, 1953, and 1954]

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

N EW AUTHORIZATIONS

EXPENDITURES

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1952
enacted

1953
estimate

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1954
estimate

1952
actual

1953
estimate

1954
estimate

ENACTED OR R ECO M M EN D ED IN THIS
D OCUM ENT
Current authorizations

(Other than revolving and management funds)
American Battle Monuments Commission:

Salaries and expenses____________________________ . ___
Construction of memorials and cemeteries______________
Construction of memorials and cemeteries (liquidation of
contract authorization)_____________________________
Dedication of World War II memorials_________________

$719,000
3,000,000

Total, American Battle Monuments Commission..

3, 719,000

$400,000
500,000

$780,000
9,500,000

$738,253
709,803
3,001,000

930, 000

10,280,000

808, 934, 500
64,486. 360
3,270, 541,000

1,156,418,000

4,449,056

$400,000
4,200,000

$766,000
4,000,000

2 ,0 0
00
4,620,000

4, 766,000

824, 564, 867

1, 012, 713,000

1,104,251,155

1,687, 287,000

Atomic Energy Commission:

Operating expenses______________________________
Reappropriation__________________________ ____
Plant and equipment____________________________
Reappropriation----------------------------------------------Liquidation of contract authority__________________
Salaries and expenses____________________________
Reappropriation_______________________________
Rcauthorization of contract authority.-.......... .........

436,371,000
404,000,000

340,000,000
1,265, 897, 750
40, 359,190
635,623
1, 646, 892, 563

4,200, 961,860

1,996, 789,000

1, 669, 895, 704

19,860,000
2,955,900

18, 703,350
2, 707,000

20,300,000
2,600,000

19, 529, 586
2,253, 752

18,545,000
2,685,305

20,108,000
2,609,000

310,000,000

Total, Atomic Energy Commission..

57,000,000

321,450,000

176.139.000

310,000,000

321,450,000

176.139.000

325, 816,022

71,183, 978

1,344,079, 682

2 0 ,0 0 0
,0 0 0 ,0 0

2, 700,000,000

Civil Service Commission:

Salaries and expenses..... ....................... ............................. .
Annuities under special acts__________________________
Payment to Civil Service retirement and disability fund
(normal cost)------------------------------ ------ -------------------Payment to Civil Service retirement and disability fund
(interest) (indefinite appropriation)______________ ___
Payment to civil service retirement and disability fund
(increases in annuities)__ __________________________
Miscellaneous----------------------------------------------------------

192.015.000
58,987, 000

606
606

Total, Civil Service Commission___________________

192.015.000
58,987,000
435, 899

332,815,900

342, 860, 350

450,041,000

332,219,237

342, 620,147

28,955

22, 887

3, 060,456
2, 320,481
9, 099, 833
90, 981, 877

515, 000
3, 030, 000
2, 219, 681
1, 033, 984
66, 945, 084

8,994,716
513, 840
20,665, 799

1 ,0 0 0
0 0 ,0 0

1 ,1 0 0
0 0 ,0 0

30,000,000

23.700.000
47.300.000

21,800,000
38,000,000

150, 000,000

30,174,355

81,000,000

70,000,000

449,858,000

Commission on Renovation of the Executive Mansion: Sal­

aries and expenses....................................................... ....... .

603

45, 000

506
506
455
152
506

515, O O
C
3, 500, 000
2, 543, 750
10, 074, 500
100, 553, 375

60, 000, 000

256
256
256
256

11,560,000
7, 750,000
56, 000,000

8 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0
1,0000
5 0, 0
2 ,0 0 0
0 0 ,0 0

75, 310,000

43,000,000

Defense Materials Procurement Agency: Salaries and ex­

penses------------------------------- ----------- ------------------------Defense Production Administration: Salaries and expenses..
Defense Transport Administration: Salaries and expenses___
Displaced Persons Commission: Salaries, expenses, and loans.
Economic Stabilization Agency: Salaries and expenses-------Federal Civil Defense Administration:

Operations_______________________
Federal contributions_____________
Emergency supplies and equipment..
Protective facilities________________
Total, Federal Civil Defense Administration________
Federal Coal Mine Safety Board of Review: Salaries and
expenses___________________________________________
Federal Communications Commission: Salaries and expenses

553
458

3, 048, 028

22000
, 0, 0

1 ,0 0 0
2 0 ,0 0
1 0 0 ,0 0
0 ,0 0 0
8 0 , 00
,0 0 0
85, 000

375, 930

1000
1, 0

1, 600,000

10 0
0 ,0 0

6, 585, 550

6, 408, 460

80000
, 0, 0

6, 544, 665

6, 400,000

75, 000
7, 700,000

Salaries and expenses______________________ _________
Boards of inquiry___________________________________

3,115, 688
47, 500

3,400,000
47, 500

3, 700,000
47, 500

3,176, 509
2,426

3,390,000
47, 500

3,650,000
47, 500

Total, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service_
_

3,163,188

3,447, 500

3, 747, 500

3,178,935

3,437, 500

3,697, 500

401
401

4,118,325
212,600

4,085, 700

4,570,000

4,041,814
216,998

4,067,000
12,816

4,453,000

503

4, 330, 925
4, 314, 400

4,085, 700
4,178, 800

4,570,000
5, 500, 000

4,258,812
4, 250, 910

4,079,816
4, 266, 516

4,453,000
5, 335,000

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service:

Federal Power Commission:

Salaries and expenses _ -............. ....... ....................... ........
Flood control surveys_______________ _______________
Total, Federal Power Commission_________
Federal Trade Commission: Salaries and expenses...




87

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

EXPENDITURES

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

(from prior year and new authorizations)

1952

1953

1954

1952

1953

1954

enacted

estimate

estimate

actual

estimate

estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS
DOCUMENT—Continued
Current authorizations— Continued
General Accounting Office:
Salaries and expenses_____
Miscellaneous expenses___

604
604

$30,888,832
1,600,000

$30,100,000
1,960,000

$32,000,000

$30,362,073
1,450,405

$29,613,194
1,900,713

$31,640,000
360,000

602

32,488,832
93, 500

32,060,000
91,400

32,000,000
140, 000

31,812,478
92, 514

31, 513,907
92,000

32,000,000
137, 000

455
455
455

9,479, 935
1,037,000
747,100

9,319, 500
974, 500
709, 500

10,400,000

9, 280,000
970.000
700.000

10,300,000

740,000

9, 790,967
1,043,606
755, 841

11, 264,035

11,003, 500

12,150,000

11,590,414

10,950,000

12,040,000

5,000
186, 000

5,000

5,000

5,000
106, 399

5,000
60, 732

5,000

50, 650, 000
6, 650, 000

48, 586,100
16, 700, 000

58,830, 000
14, 600,000

50, 872, 322
2, 221, 788

50.000.000
2,190, 610

55,000,000

4,200, 000

10, 313, 789
3, 989,009

5, 809, 390
18.000.000

7, 000, 000
25, 000,000

Total, General Accounting Office_____________

Indian Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses..
Interstate Commerce Commission:
General expenses___________________________________
Railroad safety_____________________________________
Locomotive inspection._____ _______ ______________
Total, Interstate Commerce Commission______________

1 1 ,0 0
,0 0 0

1 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0
740,000

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin: Contri­
bution to Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin__________________________________________________________
Motor Carrier Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses___

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics:
Salaries and expenses________________________________________
Construction and equipment_______________________________
Construction and equipment (liquidation of contract au­
thorization)________________________________________________
Construction and equipment, unitary plan________________

11, 700,000

Total, National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

1 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

80000
, 0, 0

69, 000,000

66,286,100

77, 630,000

67,396, 908

76,000,000

95, 000,000

35,640

45,000

48,000

32, 766

50, 564

47,000

National Capital Housing Authority: Maintenance and oper­
ation of properties__________________________ ___________ _____

251

National Capital Planning Commission:
Salaries and expenses_________________________________________
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and
playground system _______________________________________
District of Columbia redevelopment________________________

175,000

609

168,000

155,000

1, 250,000

447, 644
31

895, 904

1, 249, 200

155,000

Total, National Capital Planning Commission___

6 ,0 0
60
6,00
60

1,425, 000

447, 675
148, 356

1, 417, 200
370
9,660, 000

295, 668

9, 000, 000

9,800, 000

11,976
I 321, 710
,

896,384
244, 272
800
1,867, 000

398,494
138,000

422.000
138.000

441, 000
138,000

410,439
122, 272

421.000
136.000

441, 000
137.. 000

575, 749

National Capital Sesquicentennial Commission_________
National Industrial Recovery___________________________
National Labor Relations Board: Salaries and expenses...

570.000

589,000

528, 255

565,000

587,000

National Mediation Board:
Salaries and expenses_________________________________________
Arbitration and emergency boards___________________________
Salaries and expenses, National Railroad Adjustment
Board______________________ _____ ___________________________

1,112, 243
3, 500, 000

penses__________________________________________________________

Philippine War Damage Commission: Salaries and expenses.Railroad Retirement Board:
Payment to railroad retirement account (annual indefinite)_
Salaries and expenses (trust fund l i m i t a t i o n ) _____________
Renegotiation Board: Salaries and expenses....____ ___________
Securities and Exchange Commission: Salaries and expenses.
Selective Service System: Salaries and expenses______________
Small Defense Plants Administration: Salaries and expenses..

1,130,000
4, 750, 000

1,168,000
15,000,000

185, 000

Total, National Mediation Board_______________________

National Science Foundation: Salaries and expenses__________
National Security Training Commission: Salaries and ex­

37, 500

55, 000

1,060, 966
1, 267, 940

1 2 , 00
,1 2 0
4, 033, 000

1220
0, 1

82, 544
3, 959

2, 433

21
0

734, 800, 402

(2
)

1,649,139

0
)
(2
)

0
)
(2
)
8, 500, 000
60000
, 0, 0

734, 800, 402

0
)

1,165,000

82200
, 2, 0
55, 000

0
)
82 0 0
, 0 ,0 0

1,198, 583
5, 798, 625
31,723,891
577,454

5, 226, 700
5, 302, 810
35, 958,360
3,660, 680

5, 992, 800
34, 752.000
400,000

5, 813, 480
33, 009, 000
1,225,150

5, 407, 800
5, 245, 080
36, 772, 000
3, 750, 000

2, 553,200
1,240,000

2,419,500
1,428,050

3.525.000
1.315.000

2,680,635
1,241,091

2,440,160
1,418, 545

3,405,670
1,313,400

3,793,200

3,847, 550

4,840,000

3,921, 726

3,858,705

4, 719,070

34, 400, 000

Smithsonian Institution:
Salaries and.expenses- _______________________________________
Salaries and expenses, National Gallery of A rt...........................
Total, Smithsonian Institution.

* See permanent section below.
2 Limitations on use of trust funds for salaries and expenses: 1952, $6,410,808; 1953, $6,207,000; and 1954, $6,400,000.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

88

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)

NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1952

enacted

1954

1953

1954

1952

1953

estimate

estimate

actual

estimate

estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS
DOCUMENT—Continued
Current authorizations— Continued

$235,000

$291,305
20,000

$400,000

235,000
1,250,600
859,000

311,305
1, 291, 375
900,000

400,000
1,392,000
970,000

674,585, 080

653,879, 467
12, 500,000
189, 502, 793
2, 204,351, 000

713, 500, 000
207, 600,000
2, 546, 291,000

931, 209,127
78, 430, 873
6, 000,000

483, 539,132
75,368, 068
6,854,000
49, 791, 000

809, 700,000
75, 262, 000
1,496, 000
92, 368, 000

27, 505, 080
233. 570,000
7, 300,000
21, 060, 370
1,100, 000
25, 000,000

59,000,000
8, 750, 000
54, 072,000
8, 595,000
17,206,000
1,861, 500
5, 000,000

21,185, 664
7, 344,000
45,836,000
14, 604,000
35, 743,000
3, 285, 000

Total, Veterans Administration.

4,408, 757,462

3,830,269,960

Total, current authorizations, other than revolving and
management funds_____________________ ____ ___

7, 512,076, 502

8,683,390,268

Subversive Activities Control Board: Salaries and expenses..

Reappropriation. . _ . ............................ ... ________
Total, Subversive Activities Control Board_________
Tariff Commission: Salaries and expenses-------------------------The Tax Court of the United States: Salaries and expenses_
_

141
604

$201,396

$310,221

$390,000

201,396
1, 249,446
871,005

310,221
1,282, 668
899, 400

390,000
1, 384,243
966,060

659,880,896

652, 342, 000

684,983,000

225,355,000
2,177,892, 764

185,990,000
2, 206, 684,138

199, 400,000
2,'545, 791,000

1,325, 658,881
78, 430, 873
5,003, 796
95, 501, 253

648, 262,130
75, 300,000
5,341, 515
41, 638, 297

808, 962,000
75,000,000
5, 085, 691
58, 704, 068

27, 505,080
203, 617, 891
6, 584,447
43, 511, 762
1, 309, 056
1,215,801
309, 214

59,000, 000
1, 875,000
84, 524,136
9,149, 549
35,091, 632
1,767,143
29, 787, 682
238,634

21,185, 664
3, 500,000
45, 836,000
14, 615,004
35, 743,000
5, 285,000

4, 574,214, 664

4,851, 776,714

4,036,991,856

4, 504, 090,427

7, 409,150,164

7, 914, 982, 263

6, 747, 674,177

7, 968, 613,600

34,018

39,000

650,524,469

660,000,000

1

Veterans Administration:

Administration, medical, hospital, and domiciliary services:
(Medical, hospital, and domiciliary services)__________
Reappropriation. _______________________________
(Nonmedical program, administration, and operations)...
Compensation and pensions. ________________________
Readjustment benefits:
(Education and training). _________________________
(Other readjustment benefits)_______________________
Military and naval insurance _______________________
Hospital and domiciliary facilities_____________________
Hospital and domiciliary facilities (liquidation of contract
authorization)... _______ ________________________
Major alterations, improvements, and repairs__________
National service life insurance appropriation...... .............
Servicemen’s indemnities.____ _____ __________ _
_
Veterans’ miscellaneous benefits______________________
Grants to the Republic of the Philippines______________
Automobile and other conveyances for disabled veterans__
Miscellaneous: Administrative facilities______________

105
105
106
103

11
0
12
0
104
105
105
105
104
104

12
0
105
106
106

230, 766, 932
2,172, 230,000

J

Permanent authorizations

(Indefinite appropriation, special account, unless otherwise
indicated)
Commission on Renovation of the Executive Mansion: Dis­

position of materials removed_________________________

603
401

33, 531

23,832

17,857

Federal Power Commission: Payments to States under

Federal Power Act__________________________________

38,826

93,000

650,000,000

660,000,000

27,671

Railroad Retirement Board:

Payment to railroad retirement account (indefinite appro­
priation, general account)_________ ____ ____ _____
See current section above.




21
0

(3
)

(3
)

89

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES—Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued

Func­
tional
code
No.

Organization unit and account title

N EW AUTHORIZATIONS

(appropriations unless otherwise specified)
1952

enacted

1953

estimate

1954

estimate

EXPENDITURES

(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952

1953

actual

estimate

1954

estimate

Permanen t au thoriza tions—Continucd
Railroad Retirement JSoard—Continued

Payment to railroad retirement account (definite appro­
p r ia t io n , gen era l a n n ou n t)

.

___
Total, Railroad Retirement Board.

201
552

-___ ____ _____

$33,000,000
10,287,654
43, 287,654

$34,852,000
$33,000,000
$33,000,000
$33,000,000
11,000,000
11,000,000
9,676,675
Railroad unemployment insurance administration fund
10,755,949

$34,852,000
11,019,980

694,000,000

694, 280,418

705,871,980

705,852,000

42,676, 675

Veterans Administration:

Military and Naval insurance____________ ____________
________

161,162
788,137

225,653
81, 703
75,000
644, 563
National service life insurance appropriation
603,785
786, 055

81, 595
669,418

75, 000
603,785

949,299

726,266

678,785

1,011,708

751,013

678, 785

44, 288,341

694,765,092

706, 623, 785

43, 739, 886

695, 065,449

706, 589, 765

Revolving and management funds (for detail, see below) __

1,413, 757,465

412, 527,000

254,355,000

67,356, 543

340, 839,053

156,156, 984

Total enacted or recommended in this document

8,970,122,308

9, 790.682,360

8,370,128,949

8,026,078,692

7,783,578,679

8,831,-360,349

104
104

Total, Veterans Administration_____ ____________
Total, permanent authorizations, other than business
enterprises______ . ___________ _______
Revolving and management funds

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Under existing legislation:

Federal Coal Mine Safety Board of Review. Salaries and
expenses____ ______________ _____________________
Veterans Administration:
Administration, medical, hospital, and domiciliary serv­
ices:
(Medical, hospital, and domiciliary services)_________
(Nonmedical program, administration, and operations).
Compensation and pensions
Grants to the Republic of the Philippines.
Readjustment benefits
____
Servicemen’s indemnities
____ ___
Veterans miscellaneous benefits ._ .
Under proposed legislation: Economic Stabilization Agency:
Salaries and expenses___________________ ____
_.

553

20,000

18,000

2,000

105
106
103
105
101
104
102

5,000,000
13,960,000
237.573.000
1,423, 500
206.058.000
2.500.000
1.361.000

4, 500,000
12,460,000
237.573.000
1,423,500
206.058.000
2.500.000
1.361.000

500,000
1,500,000

506

4, 300, 000

4,000, 000

300, 000

472,195,500

469,893,500

2,302,000

8, 253,472,179

8,833, 662,349

Total proposed for later transmission.. - ...................
Grand tota l__
_____
.....
__ ____
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior con­
tract authorizations.
. ___ ____ ___ _____
Total new obligational authority. _ _ __
_




. . _____

8,970,122,308

10,262,877,860

8,370,128,949

379, 205,080

117,000,000

25,385, 664

8,590,917,228

10,145,877,860

8,344, 743, 285

8,026,078,692

90

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
REVOLVING AND M AN AG EM EN T FUNDS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

FUNDS PROVIDED

(authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts unless otherwise specified)

1952

1953

1954

(by operations)

1952

1954

1953

ENACTED OR R ECO M M EN D ED

$5, 344
64, 638

(1,013, 000)

($,2 0 0 )
1 0 ,0 0

358, 915,093

431, 513,807

30, 866, 695

28,698,500

95,067,000
5.800.000
1.400.000
2, 500,000
6.800.000
3,120,000

112,701,000
5.800.000
1.400.000
3, 200,000
7, 000,000
3,000,000

6 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

6 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

85, 743, 763
558,977,000
519, 316

33,637,293
583, 545,200
526,000

1,040, 643,179

($1,125,000)

239, 725, 470

21,171,989
35, 548,094
747, 573, 737
5,181,360

1 0,00 0
,0 0 0 ,0 0

Loans from Treasury_____________________________________________________
Limitation on administrative expenses___________________________________
Federal Civil Defense Administration: Civil defense procurement fund
(current appropriation).

$27, 500
14,181, 806

165, 288, 548
19,532,435
31,115,365
6, 282,369
6, 415, 843
2, 533, 439

$4,000,000

$27, 500
9, 791, 648

21,933,903

Atomic Energy Commission: Defense production guarantees_____________
Civil Service Commission: Investigations (current appropriation)______
Export-Import Bank of Washington:

765, 927,079
1,400

756, 809,493

125,929,233

148,962,092

179, 700,000

Reconstruction Finance Corporation:
Lending program:
Loans, mortgages, and investments:
. . . ________________________________
Business enterprises______
Railroads____________ . . .
. ____ __________________________
Financial institutions____________
_______________________________
Public agencies_____________________ ________________________________
Housing mortgages___________________________________________________
Disaster relief______________________________________________ _______ Civil defense_______________________________________________ ___ . . .
Foreign governments_______________________________________________
Income, expenses, collateral acquired, and changes in working capital
Production and liquidation program___________________________________
Liquidation of Smaller W ar Plants Corporation program___________
Limitation on administrative expenses_______________________________

504
456
501
254
252
258
256
152
504
055
504

(17, 750,000)

(15,000,000)

(13,300,000)

1 0 0 ,0 0
0 ,0 0 0

Total, Reconstruction Finance Corporation________________________

Small Defense Plants Administration: Revolving fund (current appro­

10 0, 00
0,00 0

1,500,000

506

priation)

Tennessee Valley Authority:

238,389,600

Payment to Tennessee Valley Authority fund (current appropriation).
Tennessee Valley Authority fund------------------- -------------------------------------

336,027,000

27,977,603
42,890, 262

254,355,000

75,000,000

Veterans Administration:
Canteen service revolving fund______________________ ________ ______
Direct loans to veterans and reserves________________________________
Reauthorization to expend from public debt receipts_____________
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters________________________
Service-disabled veterans’ insurance fund (current appropriation).
Soldiers’ and sailors’ civil relief_____________ _____ ____________________
Veterans’ special term insurance fund (current appropriation)_____
Vocational rehabilitation, revolving fund___________________________
Total, Veterans Administration..
Total revolving and management funds..




106
252
252
106
104

12
0
104
106

24,269,230

71,367,865

75,000, 000

1, 413, 757,465

412,527,000

254,355,000

45,947,180

65,400

179,810
225,000
495,027

70.000
15.000
180,000
455, 600
480,000

42,019,578

250,000

25,314, 519

44, 390,216

40,259
1,182
180,167
76,369
597,421

250,000

25,088,246

16,854,950

70, 451, 699

72,462, 299

1,470.. 321,345

1,384,943, 206

1,483,393, 405

80
,0 0

91

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
R EV O LV IN G AND M A N A G E M E N T FUNDS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)
FUNDS APPLIED

N E T EF FE C T O N B U D G E T
E X P E N D IT U R E S

(to operations)

Organization unit and account title

1952

1953

1954

1952

1953

1954
ENACTED OR R E C O M M E N D ED

$3, 505
67, 950

$4, 500
11,953, 234

$4, 500
14, 879, 687

« $1, 839
3,312

« $23,000
2,161,586

« $23, 000
697, 881

269, 111, 783

441,411,404

476, 610,807

29, 386, 313

82,496, 311

45,097,000

25, 015, 215

30,866, 695

28, 698, 500

3, 081, 312

Atomic Energy Commission: Defense production guarantees
Civil Service Commission: Investigations (current appropriation)
Export-import Bank of Washington:
Loans from Treasury
Limitation on administrative expenses

(

Federal Civil Defense Administration: Civil defense procurement fund (cur
rent appropriation).

Reconstruction Finance Corporation:

157, 295,000

72,310,215
2, 915,000

101,439,000

16,000,000

« 92,978,333
“ 19,532,435
“ 31,115,365
« 3,367,369
« 6, 415,843
11,892,306

4,570,000
3,000,000

2,565,000
3, 650, 000

96,059,805
634,573,737
181,360

19,695,000
508,977,000
519,316

35,299, 293
458,545,200
526,000

820,465,862

710,056,316
24,200

637,024,493
1,400

*220,177,317

311,134,519

380,507, 249

422, 558,000

24,436, 607

25,600,347

86, 835,281
50,097
20,465
16,672
21, 256
498, 676

14,425,745

62, 228,000

« 11,2 62 ,00 0

“ 5 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

« 5 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

« 1 ,4 0 0,0 00

* 1 ,4 0 0,0 00

13, 500,000

31, 800,000

“ 6 ,8 0 0 ,0 0 0

« 7,000,000

1, 450,000

» 435,000

3, 000,000

« 21,171, 989
60, 511,711
“ 113,000,000
« 5,000,000

Lending program:
Loans, mortgages, and investments:
Business enterprises
Railroads
Financial institutions
Public agencies
•
Housing mortgages
Disaster relief
Civil defense
Foreign governments
Income, expenses, collateral acquired and changes in working capital
Production and liquidation program
Liquidation of Smaller W ar Plants Corporation program
Limitation on administrative expenses

3, 650,000

«6 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

“6 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

« 66,048, 763

1,6 6 2,0 00

« 50,0 00 ,00 0

“ 1 25,000,000

* 55,870, 763
22,800

1119, 785,000
1,400

185, 205, 286

231, 545,157

242,858,000

24, 778, 932

167,377

512,101

« 535,587

124, 602,614

34,032,000

39, 980,331

80, 212,398

« 1 1,9 15 ,18 0

60, 200
41,500

9,838
19, 283
«163,495
« 55,113
“ 98,745

« 5, 200
33, 500
«113, 810
« 115,000
“ 17, 027

« 5,0 0 0

478,000

65.000
77,070
55.000
265.000
500.000

111, 879,054

150,958, 661

59, 773,002

69,859, 476

80, 506,962

‘ 12, 689, 297

Total, Veterans Administration

1,537, 677, 888

1, 725,782, 259

1,639, 550,389

67,356, 543

340,839, 053

156,156, 984

Total revolving and management funds

Total, Reconstruction Finance Corporation

Small Defense Plants Administration: Revolving fund (current appropriation)
Tennessee Valley Authority:
f
{

Payment to Tennessee Valley Authority fund (current appropriation)
Tennessee Valley Authority fund

Veterans Administration:

6 ,0 0
60
10 0
1,00

® Deduct, excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.




62, 070
« 125,000
« 190, 600

2 ,0 0
00

{

Canteen service revolving fund
Direct loans to veterans and reserves
Reauthorization to expend from public debt receipts
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters
Service-disabled veterans’ insurance fund (current appropriation)
Soldiers’ and sailors’ civil relief
Veterans’ special term insurance fund (current appropriation)
Vocational rehabilitation, revolving fund

92

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S— c o n t i n u e d

S L R S A D E P NE
A A IE N X E S S

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$533, 627
7,101
2,052
34,321
12,332

$555,472
7,101
2,133
36, 757
12,344

$578, 605
8,206
2,202
36,877
12,344

T otal pers onal services. ______
Travel__ _____________ _______
Transportation of things___________
Communication services____ ____
Rents and utility services__________
Printing and reproduction____ _ _ .
Other contractual services.. ________
Supplies and materials.. _________
Equipment_____________ _______

589,433
9,833
2, 652
3, 655
5,924
323
30, 994
55,366
19,305

613,807
11, 587
4, 283
4,175
9, 665
2,070
19,945
31,813
22, 205

638, 233
12,000
4,408
4,175
10,065
370
21, 749
59.000
30.000

Total obligations________________

717,485

719, 550

780,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$80,449
1,115
717,485

$60,796

$60,796

400,000

780,000

799,049

460,796

840,796

60, 796

60, 796

74, 796

Total expenditures_________ _____

738,253

400,000

766,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations. ________
Out of prior authorizations__ ________

657, 296
80,957

339, 204
60, 796

715, 204
50, 796

Object classification

Salaries and Expenses, American Battle Monuments Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses, as authorized by
the Act of June 26, 1946 (36 U. S. C. 121, 123-132, 138), including
the acquisition of land or interest in land in foreign countries; pur­
chase and repair of uniforms for caretakers of national cemeteries
and monuments outside of the United States and its Territories and
possessions at a cost not exceeding $500; [not to exceed $11,590 for
expenses of travel;] rent of office and garage space in foreign
countries; purchase of two passenger motor vehicles for replacement
only; and insurance of official motor vehicles in foreign countries
when required by law of such countries; [$400,000, and in addition,
the Commission is authorized to utilize for carrying out the purposes
of this appropriation, without dollar reimbursement from this or any
other appropriation, foreign currencies or credits owed to or owned
by the Treasury of the United States in an amount not exceeding
$319,550, and the Secretary of the Treasury is directed to make such
foreign currencies or credits available to the Commission in the
amount stated] $780,000: Provided, That where station allowance
has been authorized by the Department of the Army for officers of
the Army serving the Army at certain foreign stations, the same
allowance shall be authorized for officers of the Armed Forces
assigned to the Commission while serving at the same foreign
stations, and this appropriation is hereby made available for
the payment of such allowance: Provided further, That when
traveling on business of the Commission, officers of the Armed Forces
serving as members or as secretary of the Commission may be
reimbursed for expenses as provided for civilian members of the
Commission. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $400,000
Estimate 1954, $780,000

1952 actual

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions. .. _________
Part-time and temporary positions. _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base _
Post and quarters allowances_____
Station allowance_______________
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

A A Y I O EP N I UE
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Obligations incurred during the year. __.
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____________ __________ . . .

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$719,000
-1,515

$400,000

$780,000

Obligations incurred_____________
Comparative transfer from “ Foreign
credits” authorization... .................. __

717, 485

400,000

780,000

Total obligations________________

319, 550
717,485 '

719,550

780,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1. Departmental______ ______________
2. World War I memorials and ceme­
teries___________________________
3. World War II memorials and ceme­
teries. _ _ ______ ______ ________
4. Mexico City National Cemetery___

$24, 274

$26,850

$25, 350

255, 518

240,199

267,150

431,018
6,675

446,001
6,500

481,000
6,500

Total obligations________________

717, 485

719, 550

780,000

C NT U T NO M M R L A DC MT R S
O S R C IO F E O IA S N E E E IE
Construction of Memorials and Cemeteries, American Battle
Monuments Commission—

Construction of memorials and cemeteries: For expenses neces­
sary for the permanent design and construction of memorials and
cemeteries in foreign countries as authorized bv the Act of June 26,
1946 (36 U. S. C. 121,123-132, [138] 188b), and the Act of August 5,
1947 (50 U. S. C. App. 1819), [$500,000] $9,500,000, to remain
available until expended[, and, in addition, the Commission is
authorized to utilize for carrying out the purposes of this appropria­
tion, without dollar reimbursement from this or any other appropria­
tion, foreign currencies or credits owed to or owned by the Treasury
of the United States in an amount not exceeding $4,500,000, and the
Secretary of the Treasury is directed to make such foreign currencies
or credits available to the Commission in the amount stated, to
remain available until expended: Provided, That foreign currencies
available to the credit of the Treasury shall be used to defray ex­
penses incurred for this purpose wherever practicable]. (Independ­
ent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Appropriated 1953,

$500,000

All permanent United States military cem
eteries and
memorials located in foreign countries are operated and
maintained. The estimate provides general maintenance
of 8 World War I cemeteries, a memorial chapel in
each cemetery, 11 World War I memorials outside the
cemeteries, 14 World War II cemeteries, and the United
States National Cemetery, Mexico.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_____________
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation
_
____ _____
Contract authorization
______
Total available for obligation-------Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation.__ __________ . . . _
_
Obligations incurred_____ _____
Comparative transfer from “ Foreign
credits” authorization
__
Total obligations-------------------- -

1952 actual

$9,500,000

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C

Object classification

Estimate 1954,

1953 estimate
376
6
382

397
6
400

$3,735
GS-5.1

$3,808
GS-5.1

$3, 808
GS-5.1

$3,392
CPC-5.5
$1,101

$3,427
CPC-5.5
$1,097

$3,427
CPC-5.6
$1,121

1954 estimate

$3,000,000

$500,000

$9, 500,000

3,548,000
1,000,563
7, 548,563

2, 784, 562
3, 284, 562

9,500,000

3, 284, 562

-2, 784, 562
4, 764,001

9, 500,000

4, 500,000
4, 764,001

7, 784, 562

9, 500,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1954 estimate

358
6
364

1953 estimate

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade____________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary. ..................... ............
Average grade___________ ________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___




Description

1952 actual

1. Departmental____ _. _____ ____ _
2. Construction of World War II memori­
als and cemeteries:
Overhead _ _____________________
Construction ______ ___________

$38,120

$43,220

$43,245

318,376
4,407, 505

355,834
7,385,508

348,775
9,107,980

Total obligations_______________

4, 764,001

7,784, 562

9,500,000

93

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The estimate covers the fifth year’s requirement for a
6-year program of construction of United States military
cemeteries in foreign countries. Construction covers the
development at 15 locations in foreign countries and
includes permanent headstones, erection of a memorial
structure at each location, and other features, such as
landscaping, roads and paths, drainage, water supply,
caretaker’s residences, and utility buildings required for
operating purposes*
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions--.-.
Average number of all employees .

89
81

87
84

83
83

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary._ . . _____ _ _
Average grade_______ ___________
Ungraded positions: Average Salary___

$4,436
GS-6.2
$1, 556

$4,403
GS-6.6
$1, 630

$4,401
GS-6.5
$1, 630

$222,048

$234,325
901
35,436
23,867

281,228
23,042
4,939
3,641
12,801
4. 570
4,152
17,818
4, 305
4,407,505

294, 529
39, 288
6,980
4, 405
12, 255
3,680
3,010
19,347
15, 560
7, 385, 508

295, 586
41, 276
7,085
4, 705
12, 755
3, 505
3,150
18, 746
5, 212
9,107, 980

Total obligations________ _______

4, 764,001

7, 784,562

9, 500,000

1953 estimate
$6,509,376
3,284, 562

$5, 593,938
9, 500,000

8, 219, 742

9, 793. 938

15, 093, 938

Appropriated 1953,

$30,000

1954 estimate

$3,455,741
4,764,001

Appropriation Act, 1953.)

903
36, 281
23, 613

Total personal services____ _____
Travel__________________________
Transportation of things________ ._
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services....... ....... .
Printing and reproduction.________
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials______ _____
Equipment-. ________ _________
Lands and structures________ _____

[For expenses necessary for an appropriate dedication of World
War II memorials, erected under authority of the Act of June 26,
1946 (36 U. S. C. 123), to be available for such purposes as the Com­
mission may deem necessary and proper and without regard to the
provisions of other laws or regulations relating to the expenditure of
public funds (except that this exemption shall not be construed as
waiving the requirement for the submission of accounts and vouchers
to the General Accounting Office for audit), $30,000, to be imme­
diately available and to remain available until June 30, 1953:
Provided, That, when in the discretion of the American Battle Monu­
ments Commission it would be in the public interest, personnel and
transportation facilities of any other Government agency may be
furnished by such agency, without reimbursement, to the Com­
mission for the purposes of this appropriation.] (Supplemental

$234, 789

854
34,047
24,279

Dedication of World War II Memorials, American Battle Monu­
ments Commission—

01 Personal services;
Permanent positions____ ____ ___
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base _ __________ __________
Post and quarters allowances.. . _
________
Station allowance
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings

$30,000
-10,000

Obligations incurred-..________

20,000

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Dedication of Suresnes Memorial—1953, $20,000.

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year......

02
04
05
06
07
08

Travel . . ______ ___ ___ ______
Communication services____ ______
Rents and utility services_____ _____
Printing and reproduction.______ _
Other contractual services .. _____
Supplies and materials_____ ______

1954 estimate

$14,000
500
1,100
1,500
2,000
1,000

Obligations incurred ___________

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

1954 estimate

20, 000

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authorizations)—
1953, $20,000.

Deduct:
Obligations transferred to “ Construc­
tion of memorials and cemeteries (liq­
uidation of contract authorization),
American Battle Monuments Com­
mission” ___
_...
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

1,000, 563
6, 509, 376

5, 593, 938

11, 093, 938

Total expenditures______________

709,803

4, 200,000

4,000,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.........
Out of prior authorizations.......... .........

[All amounts are stated in United States dollar equivalents computed at the rate of
•exchange current at the time of the transaction]

325,000
384,803

350,000
3,850,000

350,000
3, 650,000

Amounts Available for Obligation—Without Purchase

Miscellaneous
Informational schedules relating to “ Foreign credits” available free to supplement the
above appropriations in 1952 and 1953 and anticipated for purchase by said appropria­
tions during 1954

1952 actual

Construction of Memorials and Cemeteries (Liquidation of Contract
Authorization), American Battle Monuments Commission—
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION

1952 actual
Prior year balance available
_.
Applied to contract authorization

___

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,000,563
-1,000,563

Amounts becoming available pursuant to
Public Law 455, title I (obligations in­
curred)______ ___ ____________
Comparative transfer to—
“ Salaries and expenses, American Bat­
tle Monuments Commission” ___ __
“ Construction of memorials and ceme­
teries, American Battle Monuments
Commission” ___ ___ _________
Total obligations____

__

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$4,819,550
-319, 550
-4,500,000

___

Obligations incurred_____ _______
Analysis of Expenditures—Without Purchase

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year---Obligations transferred from “ Construc­
tion of memorials and cemeteries,
American Battle Monuments Commis­
sion”
. ______ ____
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)




1953 estimate

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$2,000,447

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year___

1,000,563

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__ _____________ ______ ___ _

3,001,000

Total expenditures (payable di­
rectly from “ Foreign credits’ *
)

1953 estimate

$4,819,550

1954 estimate
$4,209,550

4.819.550

4,209,550

4.209.550

1,809, 550

610,000

2,400,000

94

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
Obligations by Activities—Without Purchase—Continued

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION—
Continued
Miscellaneous—Continued
Informational schedules relating to “Foreign credits” available free to supplement the
above appropriations in 1952 and 1953 and anticipated for purchase by said appropria­
tions during 1954—Continued

Description

1952 actual

1. Salaries and expenses, American Bat­
tle Monuments Commission:
World War I memorials and ceme­
teries_________________________
W orld War II memorials and ceme­
T
teries________________________

1953 estimate

Object classification
1954 estimate

$100,171
219,379

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$4, 500,000
4,819,550

Obligations by Objects—Without Purchase

Obligations by Activities—Without Purchase
Description

1952 actual

2. Construction of memorials and ceme­
teries___________________________
Obligations incurred..

1. Salaries and expenses, American Bat­
tle Monuments Commission:
01 Personal services_____________
2. Construction of memorials and ceme­
teries, American Battle Monu­
ments Commission:
07 Other contractual services.........
Obligations incurred..

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$319,550

4,500,000
4,819, 550

Statem of 'proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ent
otor
AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Appropriation
Number
Salaries and expenses, American
Battle Monuments Commission.

Gross
cost

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
Allowance be pur­
Number (estimated) chased

$2,800

$0
20

$2,600

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Public purpose and users

Motor vehicles provided in field only for use by members and
secretary of the Commission on inspection trips and by offi­
cers and employees in supervision and maintenance of United
States military cemeteries and memorials, and construction
of World War II cemeteries.

Commission under this head for the fiscal year 1953 shall be available
in amounts not to exceed $27,909,900 for expenses of program
direction and administration personnel, and not to exceed $3,183,498
Operating Expenses, Atomic Energy Commission—
Act of 1946 (Public
Operating expenses: For necessary operating expenses of the for ,expenses of travel.] (Atomic Energy Offices Appropriation Law
Act,
Commission in carrying out the purposes of the Atomic Energy 585 approved Aug. 1, 1946); Independent
1953; Supplemental
Act of 1946, including the employment of aliens; services authorized Appropriated 1953, Appropriation Act, 1953.) 1954, $1,156,418,000
$797,080,500
Estimate
by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); mainte­ Appropriated (adjusted) 1953, ° $808,934,500
nance and operation of aircraft; publication and dissemination of
atomic information; purchase, repair, and cleaning of uniforms; Federal $11,854,000 for activities previously carried under “ Salaries and expenses,
° Includes
purchase of newspapers and periodicals (not to exceed [$4,000] parative Bureau of Investigation.” The amount obligated in 1952 is shown as a com­
transfer.
$6,000); official entertainment expenses (not to exceed $5,000);
A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
[not to exceed $2,509,350 for expenses of travel;] reimbursement
of the General Services Administration for security guard services;
1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
[and] not to exceed [$23,564,275] $32,352,552 for program direc­
tion and administration personnel; [$708,986,500,] and hire of pas­ Appropriation or estimate_______ _. ..
$797, 080, 500 $1,156,418, 000
senger m
otor vehicles; $1,156,418,000, together with the unexpended
Salaries and expenses,
balances, as of June 30, [1952] 1953, of prior year appropriations Transferred from “of Investigation,” pur­
Federal Bureau
suant to Public Law 784, approved
m available under this head to the Atomic Energy Commission [,
ade
Sept. 12, 1950,
and such balances shall be available for the payment of obligations proved Apr. 5,and Public Law 298, ap­
1952 ________________
11,854,000
incurred by the Commission in connection with the construction of
Adjusted appropriation
808, 934, 500 1,156,418,000
plants and the acquisition and installation of equipment]: Provided, Balance reappropriated and or estimate.
transferred
That of such amounts $100,000 may be expended for objects of a from “ Salaries and expenses, Atomic
confidential nature and in any* such case the certificate of the Com­ lic Law Commission,” pursuant to Pub­
Energy
455, 82d Cong___ _____ ___
64,486, 360
mission as to the amount of the expenditure and that it is deemed
inadvisable to specify the nature thereof shall be deemed a sufficient Balance transferred to “ Plant and equip­
ment, Atomic Energy Commission,”
voucher for the sum therein expressed to have been expended: pursuant to Public Law 455, 82d Cong
-33, 553,409
Provided further, That from this appropriation transfers of sums Reimbursements from non-Federal
175.000
sources____________________ _____
175, 000
may be made to other agencies of the Government for the per­
Reimbursements from other accounts .
844.000
1,060,075
formance of the work for which this appropriation is made, and in
Obligations incurred_____________
841,102, 526 1,157, 437,000
such cases the sums so transferred may be merged with the appro­
priation to which transferred: Provided further, That no part of this Comparative transfer from— Energy
‘ ‘ Salaries and expenses, Atomic
appropriation shall be used to pay the salary of any officer or
Commission” __________________ __ $741,183, 796
employee (except such officers and employees whose compensation “ Salaries and expenses, Federal Bureau 12,124,080
of Investigation” __ _ ____________
is fixed by law, and scientific and technical personnel) whose posi­
tion would be subject to the Classification Act of 1949, as amended,
Total obligations________________
753,307,876
841,102, 526 1,157, 437,000
if such Act were applicable to such position, at a rate in excess of
the rate payable under such Act for positions of equivalent difficulty N te.—Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of sale
o
or responsibility: Provided further, That no part of this appropria­ of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).
tion shall be used in connection with the payment of a fixed fee to
OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
any contractor or firm of contractors engaged under a cost-plus-afixed-fee contract or contracts at any installation of the Commis­
Description
1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
sion, where that fee for community management is at a rate in
excess of $90,000 per annum, or for the operation of a transportation Operating costs:
system where that fee is at a rate in excess of $45,000 per annum.
1. Source and fissionable materials____
[Operating expenses: For an additional amount for “Operating 2. Weapons______________ ______ __ $218,007, 808 $321,382,000 $439, 638,000
206,181,404
284,900,000
320.026.000
3. Reactor development______ _ __
67, 881, 662
94,853,000
110.300.000
expenses”, including the hire of passenger motor vehicles, 4. Physical research______ ______
35, 649, 774
38, 900,000
$88,094,000, of which $50,000,000 shall be available only for the 5. Biology and medicine........................ 23,864, 710 25, 200,000 43, 548,000
weapons program: Provided, That appropriations granted to the 6. Community_____________________ 2, 560, 241 2,288,000 26, 565, 000
2,136, 000
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION




INDEPENDENT OFFICES
o b l ig a t io n s

by

a c t iv it ie s —

co n tin u e d

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$30,466, 712
13,452,107

$35, 864, 000
17,050,000

$40, 678, 000
16,282, 000

598, 064, 418
1,375, 629

820,437,000
1,060,075

999,173, 000
844,000

2, 526, 210
-23, 056,059
174, 595, 941
-363,095

-336, 000
4,463,867
15, 302, 584

9,936,000
3, 604,000
143, 705,000

Total obligations for operating ex­
penses. _ ---------------------- ------Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources
__ ____ -

753,143,044

840,927, 526

1,157, 262,000

164,832

175,000

175,000

Total obligations___ ____________

753,307,876

841,102, 526

1,157, 437, 000

1952 actual

Description
Operating costs—Continued
7. Program direction and administra­
tion .
------8. Security investigations-----------------Total operating costs__________ __
Reimbursable costs___________________
Increase or decrease (— in:
)
Inventories- _______ - _ ... -----Working capital __ ---- ---------------Unliquidated obligations. - ____ ._
Transfers to or from (— other agencies..
)

N te.—The Commission’s estimates for operations (as distinguished from the plant
o
and equipment estimates) are based on costs to be accrued during each of the fiscal years
converted in total to the required obligational authority. Operating costs shown do
not include provision for depreciation of plant and equipment.
PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The Commission manufactures fissionable materials and
atomic weapons; conducts research and development aim
ed
at improved weapons, more efficient production of fission­
able materials, generation of useful power from atomic
energy, and protection of military and civilian personnel
against hazards arising from atomic energy operations; and
disseminates unclassified technical information to encour­
age scientific and industrial progress.
The program is administered in the field through 10
major offices; most of the Commission’s activities are
carried on in Government-owned facilities by industrial
concerns and educational institutions, operating under
contracts. Coordination with the armed services is
achieved through the military liaison committee of the
Department of Defense.
Obligations for operating expenses in 1954 total $1,157,262,000 of which $999,173,000 represents 1954 operating
costs. The remaining $158,089,000 is for other obliga­
tional authority required for increases in inventories,
working capital, and unliquidated obligations which are
related to work to be performed subsequent to 1954, and
for reimbursable costs. Operating costs in 1954 are ex­
pected to be 22 percent greater than in 1953 and 67 per­
cent greater than actual costs in 1952. The upward
trend reflects increased procurement of raw materials, the
start-up of new production facilities for fissionable mate­
rials and weapons, and some expansion in research and
development.
1. Source and fissionable materials.—Uranium ores and
concentrates are processed into feed materials, from which
plutonium is synthesized in the reactors now operating or
under construction at Hanford, Wash., and Savannah
River, S. C., or from which the fissionable isotope uranium
235 is extracted in existing and projected plants at Oak
Ridge, Tenn., Paducah, Ky., and Portsmouth, Ohio.
New foreign sources of uranium will contribute substantial
tonnages in 1954, and production from domestic sources
will continue to expand. New facilities for producing
feed and fissionable materials will provide sharply in­
creased output at lower unit processing costs. Emphasis
will continue on development of new equipment and proc­
esses to increase yields and improve the quality of products.
2. Weapons.—This program encompasses the produc­
tion of weapons; the development, design, and testing of
new weapon types; and the storage, maintenance, and
custody of stockpiled weapons. The number of technical
personnel employed at the principal weapon development




95

centers, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the
Sandia Laboratory in New Mexico, will continue to in­
crease. New production installations and expanded facil­
ities at existing installations will be in operation, and
weapon tests are planned to be conducted, as develop­
ments may warrant, at the test sites in Nevada and at
Eniwetok.
3. Reactor development:—New reactor designs are being
developed to produce fissionable materials at lower unit
cost, to propel naval vessels and military aircraft, and to
generate electric power. Two land-based prototype
reactors for propulsion of a submarine are under construc­
tion, and development of aircraft reactors will continue
during 1954. An experim
ental reactor is being operated
to explore the practicability of “breeding,” that is,
producing more fissionable material in a reactor than is
consumed. A reactor to test materials began operation
in 1952. Greater em
phasis is being placed on developing
reactors for generation of electric power. Several groups
of industrial concerns are also engaged, at their own
expense, in the study of reactors which could be built and
operated by private industry for this purpose, and addi­
tional companies are planning to participate in this work.
Work on specific reactor designs constitutes about
80 percent of the scientific and technical effort in reactor
development; the remainder covers work, applicable to
many reactor designs, on the development of materials,
components, and systems for heat transfer, shielding,
and chem
ical processing; operation of the experimental
facilities at Idaho; and conduct of a school of reactor
technology for scientific and engineering personnel in
both Government and industry.
4. Physical research.—This activity provides for studies
and experimental investigations in physics, chemistry,
and metallurgy required by the Commission to reach its
objectives. The Commission’s activities employ unusual
materials for which the nuclear, as well as the physical
and chem
ical, properties need to be determined accurately.
These materials are used at temperatures and radiation
densities which are outside the range of previous industrial
experience.
Approximately two-thirds of the cost of physical
research is incurred for work carried on in Commission
laboratories, and one-third is for research contracted to
some 100 universities and other independent institutions.
Minor amounts are provided for isotope distribution and
the operation of a computing facility.
5. Biology and medicine.—The Commission’s primary
concern in this activity is to evaluate the extent of radia­
tion and other atomic energy hazards; to prescribe ade­
quate protective m
easures against radiation in atomic
energy operations; and to provide related information
to other Government agencies responsible for civilian
and military defense. Research is conducted on such
problems as the radiation and toxic effects of m
aterials
used and produced; the effects of ionizing radiation on
living organisms; and flash burns and other phenomena of
nuclear explosions. Roughly two-thirds of the research
is carried out at a dozen Commission laboratories, and the
rem
ainder is supported at approximately 160 univer­
sities, colleges, and hospitals. The development by in­
dustry of instruments for detecting and monitoring
radiation is actively encouraged.
Radiation sources are used in Commission hospital re­
search facilities for the study and treatment of cancer,
and for this purpose radioisotopes are furnished to other
qualified users at a small fraction of their cost. The use
of radioactive materials in other medical, biological, and
agricultural research is also stimulated.

96

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION— Continued
Operating Expenses, Atomic Energy Commission— Continued

Object classification

6. Community operations.—The Commission operates
the towns of Los Alamos, N. Mex., Oak Ridge, Tenn.,
and Richland, Wash., which are expected to have a total
population of 77,500 in 1954, a 16 percent increase over
1952, and provides limited services at other locations.
In 1954 the net cost of these operations is slightly less than
in 1953 and 1952.
7. Program direction and administration.—General man­
agement, executive direction, technical supervision of pro­
gram operations, the negotiation and administration of
contracts, and other related activities performed by Com­
m
ission personnel will require an increase in the number of
employees in 1954, as the scope of the total program con­
tinues to expand. The costs incurred for these functions
w represent 4.1 percent of total operating costs, com­
ill
pared with 5.1 percent in 1952.
8. Security investigations.—The Atomic Energy Act of
1946, as amended, requires background investigations of
those persons proposed for access to “ restricted data” of
the atomic energy program. In prior years the funds for
security investigations were provided in the regular appro­
priations to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. How­
ever, Public Law 298, 82d Congress, provides for a divi­
sion of investigative caseload between the United States
Civil Service Commission and the Federal Bureau of In­
vestigation and requires that the funds for background
investigations of personnel be provided in appropriations
to the AEC. The total number of cases to be referred to
the two investigative agencies is estimated at 101,500 for
1954 compared with 97,500 for 1953.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

5, 991

7, 656
28
7, 096

8,387
32
8, 039

$5,125
GS-7.7

$5, 317
GS-7.9

$5, 340
GS-8.0

$3,470
CPC-6.3

$3, 587
CPC-6.5

$3, 580CPC-6.4

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions________________
Part-time and temporary positions___
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.Payment above basic rates__________
Payments to other agencies for reim­
bursable detail___________________

$29, 390, 575
172, 602
115,496
1, 555, 068

$36, 245, 031
223, 441
140, 630
1, 917, 602

$41, 486,000
280, 000
159,000
2, 065,000

Total personal service obligations. _.

31, 250, 271

Summary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________ ____ _
Average grade___________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade___________________

7,386

2
1

16, 530

Direct Obligations

0 Personal services_________________
1
0 Travel__________________________
2

Transportation of things___________
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services__________
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies_________________________
Supplies and materials____________
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities__
Taxes and assessments____________
Unvouchered.
Total direct obligations..

03
04
05
06
07

31, 203, 737
2,173, 245
4, 253,904
2,375, 894
60,358,933
289,308
563,846, 583
41,139,150
45,159,339
656,133
219, 942
91, 247
751, 767, 415

Obligations Payable Out of Reimburse­
ments From Other Accounts

01 Personal services________
02 Travel_________________
07 Other contractual services..
Total obligations payable out of re­
imbursements from other accounts.
Total obligations for operating ex­
penses_______________________




46, 534
5,318
1,323, 777
1,375, 629
753,143,044

60
,1 0

Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources___________ _____
Total obligations________________

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$164, 832

$175,000

$175,000

753,307, 876

841,102, 526

1,157, 437,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations transferred from “ Salaries
and. expenses, Atomic Energy Com­
mission” ___ _______ _____________
Obligations incurred during the year___
Deduct:
Reimbursements received___ ______
Obligations transferred to “ Plant and
equipment, Atomic Energy Com­
mission” _______ _ __________ _ _
Unliquidated obligations, end of year

$626, 573,172
$1,335,395, 526
841,102, 526

1,157, 437,000

2,176, 498, 052

1, 784,010,172

1, 235,075

1,019,000

724,124, 938
626, 573,172

770, 278,172

Total expenditures______________

824,564, 867

1,012,713,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations_______ ...

214,384,240
610,180, 627

386,139, 828
626. 573,172

Plant and Equipment, Atomic Energy Commission—

Plant and equipment: For expenses of the Commission in connec­
tion with the purchase and construction of plant and the acquisition
of equipment and other expenses incidental thereto necessary in
carrying out the purposes of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946, includ­
ing purchase of land and interests in land; purchase of aircraft; and
purchase [of not to exceed two hundred and twenty-five J (not to
exceed five hundred and ninety-seven of which four hundred and fortynine shall be for replacement only) and hire of passenger motor ve­
hicles [, of which one hundred and sixty-five shall be for replacement
only; $371,741,000: Provided, That there shall be transferred to and
merged with this appropriation that portion of the unexpended bal­
ances of prior year appropriations included under the appropriation
for Operating Expenses which is applicable to Plant and Equip­
ment, and amounts so transferred together with the foregoing appro­
priation shall remain available until June 30, 1953]; $4-36,371,000,
to remain available until expended: Provided, That the unexpended bal­
ances of prior year appropriations m available under this head shall
ade
be m
erged w this appropriation: Provided further, That no part of
ith

this appropriation shall be used—
(A) to start any new construction project for which an estimate
was not included in the budget for the current fiscal year;
(B) to start any new construction project the currently estimated
cost of which exceeds by thirty-five per centum the estimated cost
included therefor in such budget: Provided further, That the fore­

going proviso shall not apply to any project for the alteration, extension,
or improvement of technical or production facilities unless such project
includes the construction of a new building estim
ated to cost in excess
$100,000.
1,00 of [Plant and equipment: For an additional amount for “Plant and
00

equipment”, including the purchase (not to exceed an additional one
hundred) and hire of passenger motor vehicles, $2,898,800,000:
Provided, That in connection with the expansion of facilities pro­
38, 532, 804
44, 000,000
vided in this appropriation, the Commission is authorized without
3, 583, 700
3,183, 498
regard to section 3679 of the Revised Statutes to enter into new
4, 684,050
5, 893, 750
contracts or modify existing contracts to provide for electric utility
2, 407, 673
2, 444, 505
80, 339, 371
85,328,183
services for periods not exceeding twenty-five years, and such con­
363, 903
365, 745
tracts shall be subject to termination by the Commission upon
499, 943, 868
794,160, 551
payment of cancellation costs of not to exceed $57,000,000, and any
61,112, 087
68, 450, 752
appropriation presently or hereafter made available to the Commis­
142, 064, 221
157,357, 769
sion shall be available for the payment of such cancellation costs:
765, 000
824.000
Provided further, That no part of the foregoing appropriation shall
29, 705
29, 973
104, 085
116, 258
be available for the construction of any office building, residence,
1000
0, 0
10 0 warehouse or similar structure, utility, or other specific portion or
0.00
839, 867, 451 1,156, 418,000
unit of a project, unless funds are available for the completion of
such building, utility, or other specific portion or unit of such project.
The foregoing proviso shall not be construed to prevent the purchase
of land for any project, the construction of any new building or pro­
curement of any machinery, equipment or materials therefor, nor
1,060,075
844,000
any utility nor any portion or unit of a specific project if the funds
are available to pay the cost of such land, the cost of such building,
1,060,075
844, 000
machinery, equipment or materials, or the cost of such utility or
the cost of any such specific portion or unit of such project.]
38, 532, 804

44,000,000

840, 927, 526

1,157, 262,000

(Atomic Energy Act of 1946 (Public Law 585 approved Aug. 1, 1946);

97

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1958; Supplemental Appro­
priation Act, 1958.)

Appropriated 1953,

$3,270,541,000

Estimate 1954,

1953 estimate

$3,270, 541,000
Appropriation or estimate_____________
Prior year balance reappropriated
____
Balance transferred from “ Operating ex­
penses, Atomic Energy Commission,”
33, 553, 409
pursuant to Public Law 455, 82d Cong
3,304,094,409
Total available for obligation_____
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
-404,000,000
year ____ _______________________
2, 900,094,409
Obligations incurred-- __ _ _____
Comparative transfer from “ Salaries and
expenses, Atomic Energy Commission” . $501,961,058
501,961,058 2, 900,094, 409
Total obligations________________

1954 estimate
$436,371,000
404,000,000

840, 371,000

Obligations for facilities:
1. Source and fissionable materials_____
2. Weapons________________________
3. Reactor development____ ______ ..
4. Physical research.. __ ___________
5. Biology and medicine___... ______
6. Community_____________________
7. Administrative__________________
8. Equipment not included in con­
struction projects_______________
Total obligations______ _______

$284,071, 724 $2, 710, 201, 734
107, 974.677
97,037,044
52,083, 400
56, 770,711
4,138, 690
3,990,380
752, 791
3,908,399
7. 726, 980
13, 597,419
105, 917
3, 552

$660, 344,000
79, 327,000
51, 775,000
4, 824,000
391.000
8,669,000
125.000

22,279, 779
2, 900, 094, 409

34, 916,000
840, 371,000

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
Although obligations in 1954 decrease sharply from
1953, expenditures for plant and equipment in 1954 will
exceed those in 1953. This growth in expenditures will
result largely from continued construction work on the
new facilities for the production of uranium235, plutonium,
and weapons, for which $2,804,200,000 was appropriated
in July 1952 for the major portion of a plant expansion
program. Included in these facilities are large additions
to plutonium capacity at Hanford, Wash., and to uranium
235 capacity at Oak Ridge, Tenn., Paducah, Ky., and the
new site at Portsmouth, Ohio. Work will continue also
on the construction of plutonium facilities at Savannah
River, S. C., authorized in 1951, for which $320,000,000
is required in 1954 in addition to $1,180,000,000 previously
appropriated.
In addition, $311,000,000 will be obligated for projects
for the expansion of production facilities for which funds
w
ere appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriation
Act, 1953. The balance of $209,371,000 is for other
construction projects and equipment. Total obliga­
tional requirements for plant and equipment are offset
in part by $404,000,000 previously appropriated which
w be applied against 1954 needs. The projects other
ill
than Savannah River for which funds will be obligated
include facilities for fissionable materials production,
weapons production and development, and reactor de­
velopment; experimental reactors for the propulsion of
naval vessels or the production of power and plutonium;
and plant improvements needed to realize potential
gains in efficiency throughout the Commission’s many
large production plants and research laboratories. A
total of $34,916,000 is required for equipment not included
in construction, including laboratory equipment, process
equipment, and shop tools.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification
09 Equipment
___ - ____ *
10 Lands and structures______________
Total obligations _____ ______




1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$22, 279, 779
$37,412, 270
464, 548, 788 2, 877, 814, 630
501,961,058 2, 900,094,409

$34, 916,000
805, 455,000
840,371,000

1952 actual

$2, 519, 968,192
$724,124,938
2, 900,094,409

Deduct unliquidated' obligations, end of
year___ _____________ ____________

8407371,666

3, 624, 219,347

3, 360,339,192

2, 519, 968,192

1, 673, 052,192

1,104, 251,155

1, 687, 287, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ ____
Out of prior authorizations___________

379, 036, 256
725, 214, 899

240, 328,000
1, 446, 959,000

Liquidation of Contract Authority, Atomic Energy Commission—
840,371,000

1954 estimate

37,412, 270
501,961,058

1954 estimate

840,371,000

1953 estimate

1952 actual

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations transferred from “ Operating
expenses, Atomic Energy Commission” .
Obligations incurred during the year.. ...

1953 estimate

Total expenditures________ ______

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description

1952 actual

$436,371,000

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

[Liquidation of contract authority: For expenditure by the
Commission to liquidate obligations incurred under prior year
contract authority, $57,000,000. J (Atomic Energy Act of 1946

(Public Law 585 approved Aug. 1, 1946); Independent O
ffices Appro­
priation Act, 1958.)

Appropriated 1953, $57,000,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_____________
Applied to contract authorization______

1953 estimate

$340,000,000
-340,000,000

$57,000,000
-57,000.000

1954 estimate

Obligations incurred_ ________ _
_

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations transferred from “ Salaries
and expenses, Atomic Energy Commis­
sion” . ___ _ _____ ____________
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ _______ _____ __________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$14,183,978
$340,000,000

57,000,000

340,000,000

71,183,978

14,183,978

Total expenditures______________

325, 816,022

71,183,978

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior
year contract authorization..._____
Out of prior authorizations_______

325, 816,022

57,000,000
14,183, 978

A M IS R T E P O IS N
D IN T A IV R V IO S

No part of the appropriations herein made to the Atomic Energy
Commission shall be available for payments under any contract
hereafter negotiated without advertising by the Commission, except
contracts with any foreign government or any agency thereof and
contracts for source material with foreign producers, unless such
contract includes a clause to the effect that the Comptroller General
of the United States or any of his duly authorized representatives
shall until the expiration of three years after final payment have
access to and the right to examine any directly pertinent books,
documents, papers, and records of the contractor or any of his sub­
contractors engaged in the performance of and involving transactions
related to such contracts or subcontracts: Provided, That no part of
such appropriations shall be available for payments under any such
contract which includes any provision precluding an audit by the
General Accounting Office of any transaction under such contract.
Any appropriation available under this Act or heretofore made to
the Atomic Energy Commission may initially be used during the
fiscal year [1953] 1954 to finance the procurement of materials,
services, or other costs which are a part of work or activities for
which funds have been provided in any other appropriation available
to the Commission: Provided, That appropriate transfers or adjust­
ments between such appropriations shall subsequently be made for
such costs on the basis of actual application determined in accord­
ance with generally accepted accounting principles.
Not to exceed 5 per centum of any appropriation under this head
may be transferred to any other such appropriation but no such
appropriation shall be increased by more than 5 per centum by any
such transfers.
[Reduction in contract authority: Contract authority available
to the Commission is hereby reduced by $635,623.] (Atomic
Energy Act of 1946 (Public Law 585 approved Aug, 1, 1946);
Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1958.)

98

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

A O NSAALBEFROLGTO--Cn u d
MU T VI AL O BI AI N o tin e

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION— Continued
Miscellaneous

1952 actual

Salaries and Expenses, Atomic Energy Commission—

N te.—$340,000,000 of the 1952 appropriation for this account is excluded from this
o
schedule and set forth above under title “ Liquidation of contract authority, Atomic
Energy Commission.”
A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_____________ $1, 265, 897, 750
Prior year balance reappropriated:
Appropriation______________________
40, 359,190
Contract authorization______________
635, 623
Adjustment in prior year balance.. ^____
-123, 200
Reimbursements from non-Federal
164, 832
sources____________________________
Reimbursements from other accounts___
1,375, 629
Carried to miscellaneous receipts pursu­
-42, 987
ant to Public Law 137, 82d Cong______

1954 estimate

Comparative transfer to—Continued
“ Plant and equipment, Atomic Energy
Commission” __ _
_____ ___ -$501, 961,058
Total obligations____ _______ _.
N o t e . — Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of sale
of personal property (41 U. S. C. 231 (c)).

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_ $1, 835, 506, 438 $1, 392, 395, 526
_
Obligations incurred during the year____ 1, 243,144, 854
3, 078, 651, 292 1,392,395, 526
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations____________
1, 540, 461
Obligations transferred to—
“ Liquidation of contract authority,
Atomic Energy Commission” _____
340, 000,000
57, 000, 000
“ Operating expenses, Atomic Energy
Commission”
_______
1,335, 395, 526
Adjustment in obligations of prior years_
635, 623
Unliquidated obligations, end of year... 1, 392, 395, 526
Total expenditures___
1,344, 079, 682
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations __ ______
365,163, 856
Out of prior authorizations____
____
978, 915, 826

Total available for obligation_____ 1,308, 266, 837
Balance reappropriated and transferred
to “ Operating expenses, Atomic Energy
Commission,” pursuant to Public Law
455, 82d Cong______________________
-64, 486, 360
Reduction in contract authorization
-635, 623
pursuant to Public Law 455, 82d Cong__
Obligations incurred_____________
Comparative transfer to—
“ Operating expenses, Atomic Energy
Commission” ____________________

1953 estimate

1, 243,144, 854
-741,183, 796

Statement of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m
otor vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Motor vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Appropriation
Gross
cost

Number

Allowance
Number (estimated)

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
chased

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles
$12,000

Operating expenses, Atomic En­
ergy Commission.
449
>597 $1, 598,400

Plant and equipment, Atomic
Energy Commission.

$104,650

$1, 493, 750

2,465

38,000

Public purpose and users

To provide necessary transportation of Atomic Energy Com­
mission and contractor personnel on official business by
authorized operators Within and between project sites and
areas.
Do.

i Includes 53 busses and 28 station wagons.

Statement of proposed obligations for purchase, maintenance, and operation of aircraft for the fiscal year 1954
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Aircraft to be
purchased
Appropriation
Number
Plant and equipment, Atomic
Energy Commission.

1

Gross
cost
$5,600

Aircraft to be
exchanged

Net cost
of air­
craft
to be
Allowance
pur­
Number (estimated) chased
1

$1,100

$4,500

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, Civil Service Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses, including not to
exceed $29,000 for services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); not to exceed $10,000 for medical
examinations performed for veterans by private physicians on a fee
basis; travel expenses of examiners acting under the direction of the
Commission, and expenses of examinations and investigations held
in Washington and elsewhere; not to exceed $100 for the purchase of
newspapers and periodicals (excluding scientific, technical, trade or
traffic periodicals, for official use); payment in advance for library
membership in societies whose publications are available to members
only or to members at a price lower than to the general public; not
to exceed [$65, 0001 $78,000 for performing the duties imposed upon
the Commission by the Act of July 19, 1940 (54 Stat. 767); reim­
bursement of the General Services Administration for security
guard services for protection of confidential files; [not to exceed




Old
aircraft
still
to be
used

Cost of
mainte­
nance and
operation
of aircraft

8

$144, 310

Public purpose and users

Transportation of official personnel, air patrol of prohibited
areas, scientific exploration for raw materials.

$479,250 for expenses of travel;] and not to exceed $5,000 for
actuarial services by contract, without regard to section 3709,
Revised Statutes, as amended; [$18,703,350] $20,300,000: Provided,
That no details from any executive department or independent
establishment in the District of Columbia or elsewhere to the Com­
mission’s central office in Washington or to any of its regional
offices shall be made during the current fiscal year, but this shall not
affect the making of details for service as members of the boards of
examiners outside the immediate offices of the Commission in
Washington or of the regional directors, nor shall it affect the making
of details of persons qualified to serve as expert examiners on special
subjects: Provided further, That the Civil Service Commission shall
have power in case of emergency to transfer or detail any of its
employees to or from its office or field force: Provided further, That
members of the Loyalty Review Board in Washington and of the
regional loyalty boards in the field may be paid actual transportation
expenses, and per diem in lieu of subsistence authorized by the
Travel Expense Act of 1949 while traveling on official business away
from their homes or regular places of business, and wT en route to
hile

99

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

and from and at the place where their services are to be performed:
Provided further, That nothing in section* 281 or 283 of title 18,
United States Code, or in section 190 of the Revised Statutes (5
U. S. C. 99) shall be deemed to apply to any person because of his
appointment for part-time or intermittent service as a member of
the Loyalty Review Board or a regional loyalty board in the Civil
Service Commission.
No part of the appropriations herein made to the Civil Service
Commission shall be available for the salaries and expenses of the
Legal Examining Unit in the Examining and Personnel Utilization
Division of the Commission, established pursuant to Executive
Order Numbered 9358 of July 1, 1943, or for the compensation or
expenses of any member of a board of examiners (1) who has not
made affidavit that he has not appeared in any agency proceeding
within the preceding two years, and will not thereafter while a
board member appear in any agency proceeding, as a party, or in
behalf of a party to the proceeding, before an agency in which an
applicant is employed who has been rated or will be rated by such
member; or (2) who, after making such affidavit, has rated an
applicant who at the time of the rating is employed by an agency
before which the board member has appeared as a party, or in
behalf of a party, within the preceding two years: Provided, That
the definitions of “agency”, “agency proceeding”, and “party” in
section 2 of the Administrative Procedure Act shall apply to these
terms as used herein.
No part of appropriations herein shall be used to pay the com­
pensation of officers and employees of the Civil Service Commission
who allocate or reallocate supervisory positions in the classified
civil service solely on the size of the group, section, bureau, or other
organization unit, or on the number of subordinates supervised.
References to size of the group, section, bureau, or other organiza­
tion unit or the number of subordinates supervised may be given
effect only to the extent warranted by the workload of such organ­
ization unit and then only in combination with other factors, such
as the kind, difficulty, and complexity of work supervised, the
degree and scope of responsibility delegated to the supervisor, and
the kind, degree, and value of the supervision actually exercised.
[The Civil Service Commission shall not impose a requirement
or limitation of maximum age with respect to the appointment of
persons to positions in the competitive service, except such positions
as the Civil Service Commission may publish from time to time in
such form and manner as it may determine: Provided, That no
person who has reached his seventieth birthday shall be appointed
in the competitive civil service on other than a temporary basis.]
(5 U S. C chap. 12; 18 U S. C 611; 81 U S. C 388; Executive
.
.
.
.
.
.
Orders 6670, Apr. 7, 1934; 6731, June 5, 1934; 7915 and 7916, June
24, 1938; Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

$18,703,350

Estimate 1954,

$20,300,000

1953 estimate

Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$95, 642

$100, 549

$73, 500

152, 235
607

1,451
1,000

1,500

4,700
12, 845

12,000

10,000

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

1. Examining, placement, and veterans’
preference_______________________
2. Investigation of character and fitness
for employment__ ______ ______
3. Position classification. _ _____ _ __
4. Administration of the retirement sys­
tems _ ____ . . ____ _____ _
9. Executive and administrative services. _
Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements from other ac­
counts______________________

266,029

115,000

85,000

Obligations incurred_____________

19, 980,836

18, 818, 350

20,385,000

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
As the central personnel agency of the Government, the
Civil Service Commission holds competitive examinations,
provides qualified persons to fill vacancies in the competi­
tive service, and determ
ines the character and suitability
of applicants for employment. It also administers the
Classification Act of 1949 and the civil service retirement
system under the act of 1920, as amended.
1.
Examining, 'placement, and veterans’ preference.—
Most appointments in the competitive Civil Service will
be made under the open competitive merit system through
examinations to be held by the offices of the Commission
and its Boards of Examiners. Veterans are aided in secur­
ing the benefits to which they are entitled under law. The
increase is to bring more appointments under the compet­
itive examining procedure.
Production count

1952 actual

Examinations announced:
By the Commission__ ______ _
By Boards of Examiners ... ________
T o ta l.._____ ______

_____

Applications processed:
By the Commission_____ ___
By Boards of Examiners...____

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

o l a io s b a t it s o tin e
b ig t n y c iv ie —c n u d

1953 estimate 1954 estimate

7,466
19, 345

7, 742
18, 483

13,609
22, 769

26,811

26, 225

36, 378

641, 313
1, 486, 694

631, 797
1, 444, 546

974, 944
1, 860, 783

1954 estimate

Total_____________ ___________

2,128,007

2, 076, 343

2, 835, 727

Placement made:
By the Commission___
By Boards of Examiners____________

91, 452
332, 747

101, 421
336,599

138, 500
339,500

424,199

438,020

478,000

Appropriation or estimate------------------ Reimbursements from non-Federal sources.
Reimbursements from other accounts___

$19,860,000
3,916
266,029

$18,703,350

$20,300,000

115,000

85,000

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

20,129, 945
-149,109

18,818, 350

20,385,000

Obligations incurred---------- --------

19, 980,836

18,818,350

20,385,000

N o t e . —Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$6,146,857

$6,191,200

$7,659,000

7, 382,468
1, 522, 798

6,148, 700
1, 539,300

5, 538,000
1, 796,000

1, 440,468
483, 451
61,876

1,444, 200
472,600
61, 900

1,442,100
596.000
61, 900

761, 749
791, 944
1,123,196

764,450
949,400
1,131, 600

801.000
1, 261,000
1,145,000

19, 714,807

18, 703, 350

20,300,000

Direct Obligations

1. Examining, placement, and veterans’
preference___________________ ..
2. Investigation of character and fitness
for employment _______________
3. Position classification_________ _ _.
4. Administration of the retirement sys­
tems___________________________
5. Service records.. __________________
6. Federal Personnel Council__________
7. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory
functions of the Commission_______
8. Inspection service__________ _______
9. Executive and administrative services..
Total direct obligations.__________

200000—53------7




Total____

________

2.
Investigation of character andfitness for employment.—
The Commission has specific responsibilities for carrying
out the loyalty program, including the establishment of
regional boards and a central board to review decisions
of the regional and agency boards. In addition, persona]
investigations are made involving suitability for Federal
employment, appeals from veterans, charges of collusion
in examinations, etc.
Production count
Record check and inquiry cases____ ____
Loyalty cases adjudicated_____________
Loyalty appeals adjudicated___________
Suitability investigations converted from
loyalty cnses... ___
_ _ . ______
Other personal investigations__________

1952 actual

1953 estimate 1954 estimate

849,873
4, 225
62

580,867
3, 276
65

558, 537
3, 030
58

30, 048
7,377

24, 770
8,147

19, 977
7, 499

3. Position classification.—The Commission issues stand­
ards for allocation of positions under the Classification

100

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

9. Executive and administrative services.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, Civil Service Commission—Continued

Act of 1949; conducts a program of audits to insure agency
compliance with existing standards; reviews requests for
reconsideration of the classification of positions; and
establishes new minimum and maximum rates of pay for
certain groups of employees.
Production count
Allocation standards established________
Conducting audits___________________

1952 actual
581
110,477

1953 estimate 1954 estimate
610
115, 889

610
139,193

Object classification

Annuity and death claims_____________
Refund claims______________________
Service credit claims__________________
Inquiries answered___________________

45,057
161,480
29, 091
188, 740

4, 227
46
4,082

3,929
11
3,793

4,243
10
4,092

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade____________________

$4,330
GS-5.6

$4,409
GS-5.8

$4,414
GS-5.9

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions.._______________
Part-time and temporary positions. ___
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base...
Payment above basic rates__________ _

$17, 315, 641
197, 804
63, 664
152, 630

$16, 554, 932
91, 518
63,323
5, 569

$17,973,574
82,614
68,683
14,129

Total personal service obligations. __

17,729, 739

16, 715,342

18,139,000

17, 511, 015
599, 240
63, 038
160, 249
160, 470
400, 498
202, 883
364,170
205, 4
2,8
995
46, 821

16, 610,358
479, 250
73,300
169, 300
168, 700
430, 000
167, 450
364, 000
201, 500
1.000
38, 492

18,064, 000
575.000
103.000
183, 500
96, 000
500, 500
158, 200
393, 800
158, 500

19, 714,807

18, 703, 350

20, 300, 000

218, 724
38, 617
163
3,293
2,569
1, 670
993

104, 984
9,992
24

75.000
10.000

Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements
from
other
accounts..._______ __________

266, 029

115, 000

85,000

Obligations incurred_________ . ..

19, 980, 836

18, 818, 350

20, 385,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1, 564, 941
19, 980, 836

$1, 696, 234
18, 818, 350

$1, 854, 584
20, 385, 000

21, 545, 777

20. 514, 584

22, 239, 584

269, 945
50, 012
1, 696, 234

115, 000

85, 000

1, 854, 584

2, 046, 584

19, 529, 586

18, 545, 000

20,108, 000

18, 041,121
1, 488, 465

16, 933, 578
1, 611, 422

18, 346. 500
1, 761, 500

1953 estimate 1954 estimate
45,929
155,000
28, 830
188, 600

45,919
155, 000
28, 830
188, 600

Direct Obligations

Total direct obligations__________

67, 500

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

01
02
04
06
07
08
maintained 09

5.
Service records;—A service record file is
on approximately 16,250,000 present and former em­
ployees. This file is used in answering inquiries, as a
source of status determination, and for auditing certain
reports of personnel actions prior to filing.

1954 estimate

Summary of Personal Services

Personal services ________________
Travel__________________________
Transportation of things__________
Communication services______ ____ _
Rents and utility services.
______
Printing and reproduction.._______
Other contractual services____ _____
Supplies and materials_____________
Equipment_ ____ _ _ _
_
. . . ___
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
15 Taxes and assessments_____ _______

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees. ..........

4. Administration oj the retirement systems.—Adminis­
tering the Civil Service Retirement Act, the Panama
Canal Construction Annuity Act, and the Lighthouse
Service Widows’ Benefit Act involves adjudicating an­ 01
02
nuity, death and benefit claims, claim for refund of 03
s
contributions to the retirement fund, and service credit 04
05
claim as well as maintaining the control accounts for 06
s
the fund and making payments to annuitants and other 07
08
claimants.
09
Production count

1952 actual

Personal services _____ __________
Travel__ .. . _________________ _
Communication services________ __
Printing and reproduction................
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials. ______ ____
Equipment_ ____ _______________
_

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS
Production count

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1,943, 265
50,038
118,462
115,323

1,924,137
47,627
165,054
115, 746

1952 actual
Personnel actions filed_______________
Personnel actions audited. ________ ____
Status cases determined__________ _ __
Inquiries answered___________ _______

2,097, 743
49,725
89, 553
117,244

6. Federal Personnel Council.—The Council advises the
President and the Commission in the protection and
improvement of the merit system, recommends changes in
the personnel regulations and procedures, and serves as
an instrument for raising the standards of personnel
administration in the Government.
7. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory junctions oj the
Commission.—These consist of the formulation of rules
and regulations; hearing and taking action on appeals;
the administration of the political activities statutes; and
the recommendation of m
easures to the President to
promote the accomplishment of the objectives of the rules
and regulations.
8. Inspection service.-—The Commission inspects agency
personnel operations subject to its review to insure com­
pliance with civil service laws and regulations, and to
stimulate and recommend improvement in personnel
practices.

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year. _ __
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_____ . . .
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Total expenditures . ... _______
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ _ _
Out of prior authorizations. __
______

Annuities Under Special Acts, Civil Service Commission—

Annuities, Panama Canal construction employees and Lighthouse
Service widows: For payment of annuities authorized by the Act
of May 29, 1944, as amended (48 U. S. C. 1373a), and the Act of
August 19, 1950 (64 Stat. 465), [$2,707,000] $2,600,000. {Inde­

pendent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953)

Appropriated 1953,

$2,707,000

Agencies inspected. ___________ _______
Boards inspected_____________________




1952 actual
1,556
936

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

2,041
1,287

2, 778
1,577

$2,600,000

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate .. _________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.._
Obligations incurred_____ _____

Production count

Estimate 1954,
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2,955,900
-498, 263

$2, 707,000

$2,600,000

2, 457,637

2,707,000

2,600,000

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Payment of annuities to employees engaged in the construction of the Panama Canal
and widows of former employees of the Lighthouse Service—1952, $2,457,637: 1953,
$2,707,000; 1954, $2,600,000.

101

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
Annuities are paid to persons who were employed on
the construction of the Panama Canal or to their widows,
and benefits are paid to widows of former employees of
the Lighthouse Service. On June 30, 1952, there were
2,972 Panama Canal annuitants on the roll, as compared
with an estimate of 2,862 on June 30, 1953, and an esti­
mate of 2,732 on June 30, 1954. On June 30, 1952, there
were 333 Lighthouse Service widows on the roll, as com­
pared with an estimate of 353 on June 30, 1953, and 368
on June 30, 1954.

Payment to Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (Interest),
Civil Service Commission—

(Indefinite appropriation, general account)

Payment to the civil-service retirement and disability fund (interest):
For payment to the “civil-service retirement and disability fund,” as
a part of the liability of the United States, such amount as shall be
determ
ined by the Secretary of the Treasury to be equivalent to interest
for the next preceding fiscal year (at the highest current annual rate
received on the greater portion of the investm
ents of the fund) on the
amount of the unfunded accrued liability of the United States to the
fund as of July 1, 1952, as determ
ined by the Civil Service Commission.

Estimate 1954, ° $192,015,000

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

a Estimate is for activities previously carried under “ Payment to civil service retire­
ment and disability fund (normal cost), Civil Service Commission.” The amounts
obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance claims—1952, $2,457,637; 1953, $2,707,000; 1954,
$2,600,000.

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

1952 actual
1952 actual

1953 estimate

$2,457,637

$203, 885
2, 707, 000

$225, 580
2, 600, 000

2, 457, 637

2, 910, 885

203, 885

225, 580

__

2, 253, 752

2, 685, 305

2, 253, 752

2, 481, 420
203,885

2, 383, 420
225, 580

1954 estimate

2, 609, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations__________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year ____ _____________ ;___ _____
Total expenditures________ _

2, 825, 580

Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred) _____________ _________
Comparative transfer from “ Payment to
civil service retirement and disability
fund (normal cost), Civil Service Com­
mission” .............. . . _____________

$169,863,000

$138,182,000

216, 580

Total obligations _______________

169,863,000

138,182,000

192,015,000

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

Payment to Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (Normal
Cost), Civil Service Commission—

Payment to civil-service retirement and disability fund (normal
cost): For financing, except as otherwise provided, the liability of
the United States, created by the Act approved May 22, 1920, and
Acts amendatory thereof (5 U. S. C. ch. 14), [$321, 450, 000,]
$176,189,000 which amount shall be placed to the credit of the
“civil-service retirement and disability fund”. (Independent
O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $321,450,000
Estimate 1954, ° $176,139,000
° Excludes $192,015,000 interest on the unfunded accrued liability of the United States
to the fund transferred in the estimates to “ Payment to civil service retirement and dis­
ability fund (interest), Civil Service Commission.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and
1953 are shown in the schedule as comparative transfers.

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred).
___ _ _____ _______
$310,000,000
Comparative transfer to “ Payment to
civil service retirement and disability
fund (interest), Civil Service Commis­
sion” _______________ __________ . -169,863,000
Total obligations_______________

$192,015,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$321,450,000

$176,139,000

183, 268,000

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
Provision is made for the payment of 4 percent interest
for the fiscal year 1953 on the Government’s accrued
liability to the fund. The liability as of July 1, 1952,
was $4,800,366,000.
The apparent increase reflected in the above schedule
for fiscal year 1954 results from the fact that the amounts
appropriated for “ Payment to civil service retirement
and disability fund” for 1952 and 1953 were insufficient
to provide for both the Government’s normal cost and the
total interest on the accrued liability for those years.
The amounts shown in the above schedule as comparative
transfers are the differences between the normal cost and
the total amounts appropriated for 1952 and 1953 and
represent the amounts allocable to interest from those
appropriations.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1952, $169,863,000; 1953, $138,182,000; 1954,
$192,015,000.

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

-138,182, 000

140,137,000

For paying the interest on the unfunded liability under the retirement fund—1952,
$169,863,000; 1953, $138,182,000; 1954, $192,015,000.

176,139, 000

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)—1954, $192,015,000.

For paying the normal cost of the United States share to the retirement fund—1952,
$140,137,000; 1953, $183,268,000; 1954, $176,139,000.

Payment to Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (In­
creases in Annuities), Civil Service Commission—

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The Government’s normal contribution for 1954 is
based on an estimated average employment during 1954
of 1,700,000 employees covered by the act, at the rate of
2.78 percent on an average salary of $3,805.
For fiscal year 1954, a separate appropriation is being
requested to cover the interest on the unfunded accrued
liability of the United States to the fund. In previous
years the interest has been included with the Govern­
ment’s normal cost in a single appropriation.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1952, $140,137,000; 1953, $183,268,000; 1954,
$176,139,000.

A A Y I O EP N I UE
NL SS F X E DT RS

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)—1952, $310,000,000; 1953, $321,450,000; 1954, $176,139,000.




Payment to the civil-service retirement and disability fund for
increases in annuities provided by the Act of July 16, 1952: For pay­
m to the “ civil-service retirement and disability fund” for the cost,
ent
as heretofore determined by the Civil Service Commission, of increases
in annuities provided by the Act of July 16, 1952 (66 Stat. 723), for the
fiscal years 1953 and 1954, $58,987,000, of which $31,397,000 is for
the cost of such increases for the fiscal year 1954-

Estimate 1954,

$58,987,000

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1954, $58,987,000.

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
For paying the cost of benefit increases granted by the act of July 16, 1952—1954, $58,987,000.

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
Provision is made for the cost of benefit increases author­
ized by Public Law 555, Eighty-second Congress, approved
July 16, 1952, for 10 months of fiscal year 1953 from the

102

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION— Continued
Payment to Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (Increases
in Annuities), Civil Service Commission—Continued

effective date of the act, and for all of fiscal year 1954.
The cost of increased benefits is not included in calculat­
ing the Government’s normal contribution to the civilservice retirement and disability fund.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

1953 estimate

$6. 886
44,125

$22,012
875

51.011

22,887

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

44
22.012

Total expenditures______________

28, 955

22, 887

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations _____ ____

11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1954, $58,987,000.

1954 estimate

22,113
6,842

22, 887

Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)—1954, $58,987,000.

DEFENSE MATERIALS PROCUREMENT AGENCY

Miscellaneous

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Materials Procurement Agency—

Miscellaneous Expired Accounts—

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__________ ___ _ _____________
Total expenditures _ ___
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of prior authorizations:
“ Panama Canal construction annuity
fund, Civil Service Commission”
(606)
“ Annuities, Lighthouse Service wid­
ows, Civil Service Commission”
(606)__________________________

1953 estimate

$206,086
239, 655

Transferred (pursuant to Executive
Order 10281) from—
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Interior” . __ ____
“ Emergency operating expenses, Gen­
eral Services Administration” ______

$9,842

445,741

9,842

9,842
435, 899

9, 842

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$400,000
115,000

Adjusted appropriation or estimate
(obligations incurred)__________
Comparative transfer from—
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Interior” ___ _______
“ Emergency operating expenses. Gen­
eral Services Administration” ______

9, 842

400, 727

1952 actual

1954 estimate

515.000
219.000
47, 245

Total obligations.................. ...........

781,245

35,172

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
COMMISSION ON RENOVATION OF THE
EXECUTIVE MANSION

Defense materials procurement—1952, $781,245.

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

Salaries and Expenses, Commission on Renovation of the Executive
Mansion—

[Appropriations available to the “Commission on Renovation of
the Executive Mansion”, for fiscal year 1952, shall remain available
until September 30, 1952.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.)
A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate _______ _____
Prior year balance available
___ ____

$45,000

Total available for obligation. _____
Balance available in subsequent year

45,000
-875

875

Obligations incurred_____________

44,125

1954 estimate

875

$875

Expenses of the Commission—1952, $44,125; 1953, $875.

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

3
1
4

1

Average salaries and grades:
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

$4,250
$20,119
3, 700
23, 819
3, 650
500
16, 000
76
30
50

600
275

Obligations in cu rr e d .__________

44,125

875

1954 estimate

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

137
2
105
$6,219
GS-8.6
$3, 070
CPC-4.0
$10, 650
$646,142
14,819
2,485
2,528

Total personal services_________
Travel______________ ____ ______
Transportation of things___________
Communication services________ ...
Printing and reproduction____ _____
Other contractual services__________
Services performed by other agen­
cies__________________________
08 Supplies and materials_____ _______
09 Equipment______________________
15 Taxes and assessments_____________

665,974
15,606
1,890
9, 716
5,188
5,100

Total obligations........................... .

781,245

02
03
04
06
07

55,700
5,364
14,904
1,803

$600

Total personal services___ . .. ..
Travel
____
_ __
Communication services
Printing and reproduction
Other contractual services_________
Supplies and materials___________
Taxes and assessments_______ ___

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade_____ _ ___________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary__________ _______
Average grade_______________ ____
Ungraded positions: Average salary

1952 actual

$4,455

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions. ___ ______
Part-time and temporary positions.

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees______

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions________ __
Part-time and temporary positions. _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________ ______ ____
Payment above basic rates_______

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

Object classification

Object classification

02
04
06
07
08
15




1

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year.......................................................
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations).............................

$515,000

1953 estimate
$515,000

515,000
515,000

1954 estimate

103

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e

[DEFENSE PRODUCTION ADMINISTRATION]
[

Object classification

s a l a r ie s a n d e x p e n s e s ]

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Production Administration—

[For expenses necessary for the Defense Production Administra­
tion, including employment of aliens, reimbursement of General
Services Administration for security guard services, and expenses of
attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of this appro­
priation, $2,875,000: Provided, That transfers (not to exceed 10 per
centum) between the appropriations “Salaries and expenses, De­
fense Production Administration” and “Salaries and expenses,
Defense Production Activities, Department of Commerce” may be
made by agreement between the Secretary of Commerce and the
Administrator of the Defense Production Administration with
approval of the Bureau of the Budget.] (50 U. S. C. 2061, as
amended; Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $2,875,000
Appropriated (adjusted) 1953, $3,048,028

01 Personal services—Continued
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base ______________ ________
Payment above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_____________

1952 actual

*

1953 estimate

$10, 848
13, 631

$6, 700
5,600

48, 275

08
09
15

Total personal services_______
Travel
. - ___ __________
Transportation of things___________
Communication services_____ _____
Rents and utility services.___ _____
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services.._______
Services performed by other agen­
cies _____________ ___ _____
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment____ ____ ___________ ..
Taxes and assessments____________

2, 925, 746
142, 008
6
53,146
990
67, 219
65, 791

2, 576,000
113, 000

123, 761
29, 250
13, 990
6,843

125, 000
13, 000
1, 000
7,000

Obligations incurred____________

02
03
04
05
06
07

1954 estimate

3, 428, 750

3,048,028

58,000
98, 000
57, 028

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
A A Y I O EP N I UE
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate
1952 actual

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Transferred from—
“ Salaries and expenses, defense pro­
duction activities, Department of
Commerce,” pursuant to Public Law
253_____________________________
“ Salaries and expenses, defense pro­
duction activities, Department of
Commerce,” pursuant to Public Law
547____________________________
Transferred to “ Salaries and expenses,
Office of Defense Mobilization,” pursu­
ant to sec. 711 of the Defense Production
Act, as amended__________________

$2,800,000

Adjusted appropriation or estimateReimbursements from other accounts___

3,500,000
10, 392
3,'510,392
-81,642

3,048,028

3,428, 750

3,048,028

1954 estimate

$3,428, 750

$357, 902
3,048,028

$375,930

3,428, 750

3,405,930

375,930

3,048,028

Total available for obligation....... .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. __

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred___ _____ ____

$2,875,000
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year____

700,000

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations____________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

3, 060, 456

3,030,000

375,930

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations----------------

-13,472

375,930

Total expenditures........................ .

186,500

10,392
357, 902

3, 060, 456

2, 672, 098
357,902

375,930

[DEFENSE TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION]
[

s a l a r ie s an d e x p e n s e s ]

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Transport Administration—

[For expenses necessary for the Defense Transport Administra­
tion, including expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with
the purposes of this appropriation, $2,200,000: Provided, That this
appropriation shall be available for not to exceed four contracts for
PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
temporary or intermittent services as authorized by section 15 of
the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a) which may be renewed
The 1954 requirements for these activities are included annually.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.)
in a supplemental appropriation under proposed legisla­ Appropriated 1953, $2,200,000
tion carried in the chapter “ Funds appropriated to the
OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

Direction of defense production program—1952, $3,428,750; 1953, $3,048,028.

President.”
The Administration (a) directs and coordinates the
plans, procedures, and methods of the executive depart­
ments and agencies concerned with the supply and dis­
tribution of industrial resources and products, and the
production aspects of full mobilization preparations; (b)
evaluates defense and essential civilian requirements in
relation to available supply; (c) participates with repre­
sentatives of foreign nations and other Government
agencies in making recommendations concerning the
distribution of world resources of vital materials; (d)
makes determinations regarding the direction of resources
to various uses; and (e) directs the administration of loan
and tax amortization functions.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

539
24
443

473
18
362

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____ _____ _________
Average grade____________________

$6,338
GS-9.2

$6, 504
GS-9.6

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
Part-time and temporary positions. -

$2,615,477
237, 515

$2, 367, 400
196, 300




♦
1954 estimate

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate........................
Reimbursements from other accounts

$2, 543, 750
2,061

$2,200,000

Total available for obligation____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

2, 545, 811
-93, 588

2, 200, 000

2,452, 223

1954 estimate

2, 200,000

Obligations incurred____________

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Defense mobilization—1952, $2,452,223; 1953, $2,200,000.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The 1954 requirements for this activity are included in
a supplemental appropriation under proposed legislation
carried in the chapter “Funds appropriated to the Presi­
dent.” The Administration formulates and carries out
plans and programs for mobilizing domestic surface trans­
portation, storage, and port facilities in the United States
and its Territories and possessions. The agency assembles
and analyzes data with respect to the need for transporta­
tion and storage, and the ability of existing facilities to
meet the requirements; coordinates and directs the move­
ment of passenger and freight traffic in cooperation with
Government and private transportation agencies; assigns

104

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954
o l a io s b a t it s o tin e
b ig t n y c iv ie —c n u d

[DEFENSE TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION]— Con.
[ salaries

and expenses ]

—continued

Description

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Transport Administration—Con.

and administers priorities to insure expeditious movement
of traffic; presents to the Defense Production Administra­
tion estimated requirements for construction, operation,
maintenance, and repair materials; presents to the appro­
priate agencies estimated requirements for manpower;
and makes recommendations to the Defense Production
Administration concerning accelerated tax amortization
and defense loans.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary..
Average §

1952 actual

Payment above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details..... ..................
Total personal services......... ...
Travel__________________________
Transportation of things___________
Communication services___________
Printing and reproduction............. .
Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies_________________________
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment______________________
Taxes and assessments...... ................

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations___________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year..

1 0 , 00
,1 0 0
2 0 ,0 0
,2 0 0

11, 290
4, 033
2, 419

103,877
66,917
7,182
3,343
494,970

392
9,225
415
250

7,039,683

438, 557

ALCTO T DPRMN O TE
LOAI N O EAT ET F H
AM
RY

1954 estimate

$2, 452, 223

2 0 , 00
,2 0 0

$129, 681

$1, 00
10 0

2, 452, 223

2,329, 681

10 0
1 ,0 0

1000
1, 0
2, 219, 681

10 0
1 ,0 0

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______
Out of prior authorizations_________

2,320, 481

2, 090, 000
129, 681

1000
1, 0

DISPLACED PERSONS COMMISSION

Salaries, Expenses, and Loans, Displaced Persons Commission-

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

193
128

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary. ................................ .
Average grade....................................
Ungraded positions: Average salary-----

$3, 533
GS-5.2
973

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base-------------------------------------

$172,623
240

Total personal services________
Travel________________ _________
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services..... .......... .
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services_________
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment....................... ................

172,863
1, 596
1, 090
5,494

2, 389
11, 990
139

$5, 296

Subtotal_________ _____________
Deduct charges for quarters and sub­
sistence.............. .............................. .

195, 571

5, 296

02
04
05
06
07
08
09

Obligations incurred................... .

1
0

118
195, 453

5, 296

$4,205
GS-4.5
$2,958

$3,255
GS-4.0

143

$9,027

ALCTO T FDRL EUI Y GNY
LOAI NOEEA SCR AEC,
T
PBI HAT SRI E
UL ELH EV
C
C
Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees_______

$10,074, 500
10,074, 500
-1 , 745, 240
8,329, 260

$1, 745, 240

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary....... ...........................
Average grade____________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

1, 745, 240
-1, 275, 520
469, 720

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____ ____ ___
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_________________________
Payment above basic rates......... .

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S




165,618
6,197
57,149
532
6,003
126
1,519
191,131

Total number of permanent positions----Average number of all employees..........

1953 estimate

2, 061
129, 681

1, 584,554
212,490
4,369,372
9,485
56,945
2,416
16,958
111,174

Obligations incurred......................

997,177
64, 516
403
13, 710
4, 033
2,419

1,144,233
18,118
28,317
2, 895

1,573

15, 600

Total personal services......... .
02 Travel...... ............ --------- ------------Travel for sec. 12 cases___________
03 Transportation of things__________
04 Communication services__________
05 Rents and utility services_________
06 Printing and reproduction_________
07 Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies----- ------ ----------- ------ -------08 Supplies and materials............... .......
09 Equipment................. .......... ....... ...
15 Taxes and assessments............ ..........
16 Investments and loans............ ..........

20,958
1,138, 738
85, 907
13
15, 096
4, 615
14, 291

$7,039, 683
195,453

DPAE PROSCMI SO
I LCD ESN OM I N
S
S

$164,045

2,320, 481

1. Selection and resettlement of displaced
persons, war orphans, and refugees...
2, Security investigation.............. ............

1953 estimate

$1, 520, 805
5,400
42, 749

3,439
2, 980

1952 actual

1952 actual

$5, 715
GS-8.2

Total expenditures_____________

Description

Object classification

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____ ________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base
Payment above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details____ ____ ___

3,854
2,984

Obligations incurred...... .................

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

$5,724
GS-9.8

18 4 223
9,
96, 535

Total available for obligation_____
Balance available in subsequent year___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings

469, 720

$5,018
GS-7.7

165

$1, 001, 931
109, 011

Appropriation or estimate_____ ______
Prior year balance available............ .........

8,329, 260

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade..... ..................... .........

199

1952 actual

Obligations incurred.............. ........

1953 estimate

$438, 557
5, 296

1954 estimate

1954 estimate

$16, 290
2,105
4,110
3,362

22
0
1
0

1954 estimate

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year...

$135,895
457,368
275, 861
225,000

107
29

22
0
1
2

1952 actual

Health examination________________
Consular service................................. .
Immigration inspection___ _________
Resident alien registration__________

292

2, 452,223

Obligations incurred..

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees_______

1953 estimate

$5, 715
GS-8.2

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week

3.
4.
5.
6.

1952 actual

02
03
04
05
07

Total personal services_________
Travel__________________________
Transportation of things_________ ___
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services......... .........
Other contractual services__________

158
12,783

1,700

96,084
17,844
8,781

10,727
2,579
2,975

20
2

1,642
16,706

1954 estimate

105

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
Object classification

1952 actual

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e

1953 estimate

ALCTO T FDRLEUI Y GNY
LOAI NOEEA SCR AEC,
T
pb h
u lic ealthse ic —
rv e continued
$188
80

$9

Subtotal______________ ____
Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence_______________ ______________

141,545

16,290

Obligations incurred........................

135,895

5,650
16,290

ALCTO T DPRMN O SAE
LOAI N O EAT ET F TT
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______
_____ ___
Average grade____________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
Grades established by the Foreign Serv­
ice Act of 1946 (22 U. S. G. 801-1158):
Foreign Service grades:
Average salary........ ........ .........
Average grade______ ___________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____
____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_________________________
Payment above basic rates_______

234
137

4
1

$4,268
GS-5.7
$1,200

$407,406

$2,105

918
22,962

457,368

2,105

122
98

14
2

$4, 200
GS-5.6

$3, 410
GS-3.7

$411,014

$5, 700

460
70
411,544
88, 072
299
722
224

5,700
1,742
20
10

Obligations incurred_ _______
_

500, 861

7,472

1, 085
675

137
34

$4, 750
GS-6.3
1,156

$5,192
GS-8.5

S MAY
UMR
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
._ ...
Average grade_____
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
Grades established by the Foreign Serv­
ice Act of 1946 (22 U. S. C. 801-1158):
Foreign Service grades:
Average salary____________ _____
Average grade_________ _______
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____ ________________ _
Payment above basic rates___
Payments to other agencies for reim­
bursable rates________________
Total personal services___
02 Travel_
_ ___ . _
_____
Travel for sec. 12 cases. _ _ .
03 Transportation of things___________
04 Communication services.
05 Rents and utility services____ ______




Subtotal
Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence
_
__
_ ___

8, 335,028

469, 720

Obligations incurred.......................

8, 329, 260

5, 768
469,720

1952 actual

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
____
year

1953 estimate

$647,845
686,992
8, 329, 260

$564, 264

9,664,097

1954 estimate

1,033,984

469, 720

564, 264

______

9,099,833

1,033,984

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations . _____
Out of prior authorizations________ _

8, 375,490
724, 343

1,033, 984

[SALARIES AND EXPENSES]

Total personal services_____
Travel______________________
Communication services_
_ ___
Other contractual services_______
Taxes and assessments_____ . ..

Total number of permanent positions .
Average number of all employees

392
14, 521
415
259

[ECONOMIC STABILIZATION AGENCY]

ALCTO T I M RTO ADNT ­
LOAI N OMI AI N N AU
G
RLZTO SRI E DPRMN O
AI AI N EV , EAT ET F
C
JSI E
UT
C

02
04
07
15

103, 877
81, 750
7, 789
6, 341
494,970

Total expenditures

431,286
7,952
1, 715
2,248
1,247
315
6,600
2,843
468
2,694

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____ _ ... _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______ _____ __________
Payment above basic rates....... ......

$1, 519
191,141

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year____

$3,897
FS-11.4

2,105

Average salary and grade:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______ _______
Average grade__________ _ _

1954 estimate

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

Total personal services
Travel.____ ________ ____________
Transportation of things________
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services______ __
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials.....................
Equipment_ ________ ___________
_
Taxes and assessments__________ _

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees____ _

1953 estimate

$33, 989
121, 073

06 Printing and reproduction________
07 Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies
_
...........
08 Supplies and materials_____ __ ___
09 Equipment
15 Taxes and assessments ___________
16 Investments and loans

$3,009
GS-3.3

Obligations incurred____________

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

1952 actual

Object classification

s m a y continued
u mr —

08 Supplies and materials..................... .
15 Taxes and assessments.................... .

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees_______

1954 estimate

Salaries and Expenses, Economic Stabilization Agency—

[For expenses necessary for the Economic Stabilization Agency,
including hire of passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed $5,000 for
emergency and extraordinary expenses, to be expended under the
direction of the Administrator for such purposes as he deems proper,
and his determination thereon shall be final and conclusive; and
expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of
this appropriation ; including expenses of liquidation of those agen­
cies whose operations and functions will expire prior to June 30,
1953, $60,000,000: Provided, That of this amount $11,000,000 shall
be available for the Office of Rent Stabilization of which $2,000,000
shall be placed in reserve under the provisions of section 3679 of
the Revised Statutes, as amended, to be released by the Director
of the Budget only on his determination that the workload of the
agency so requires: Provided further, That subparagraph (B) of
section 204 (f) (1) of the Housing and Rent Act of 1947, as amended,
is amended to read as follows:]
[ “(B) In any incorporated city, town, village, or unincor­
porated area of any county which, at a time when maximum
rents under this title are in effect therein, and prior to Sep­
tember 30, 1952, declares (by resolution of its governing body
adopted for that purpose, or by popular referendum in accord­
ance with local law) that a substantial shortage of housing
accommodations exists which requires the continuance of
Federal rent control in such city, town, village, or unincor­
porated area; and”]
[(2) of section 204 (f) of the Housing and Rent Act of 1947, as
amended, is amended to read as follows:]
[ “(2) Any incorporated city, town, village, or unincorpo­
rated area of any county which makes the declaration specified
in paragraph (1) (b) of this subsection shall notify the President
in writing of such action promptly after it has been taken.”]

(64 Stat. 798; 65 Stat. 131; 66 Stat. 296; Supplemental Appropriation
Act, 1953.)

$3, 897
FS-11.4
$2, 594, 991

$180, 877

7,176
78, 564

Appropriated 1953, $60,000,000

3, 273

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

15, 600
2, 696, 331
327, 954
4,369,372
19, 981
60, 802
10, 799

184,150
10, 518
57,149
3,507
6,023
126

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$100,553,375
-1,993,160

$60,000,000

Obligations incurred_____________

98, 560,215

60,000,000

1954 estimate

106

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

[ECONOMIC STABILIZATION AGENCY]— Con.
[ salaries

and expenses]

—continued

Salaries and Expenses, Economic Stabilization Agency—Con.

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1. Office of the Economic Stabilization
Administrator____ ______________
Office of Price Stabilization__________
Office of Rent Stabilization_________
Wage Stabilization Board___________
Salary Stabilization Board._________
Railroad and Airline Wage Board____
National Enforcement Commission___

$485.445
68, 741, 635
14,145,767
13,635,215
1,497,406
54, 747

$425.000
36,900,000
11,000,000
9, 510, 000
2,000,000
75.000
90.000

Obligations incurred_____________

98, 560,215

1954 estimate

60,000,000

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

Program emphasis is on prompt disposition of petitions
for wage and salary increases which are not covered by
self-administering regulations, and on the conduct of
enforcement program. Proposed wage and salary in­
creases are reviewed in the light of published standards.
Investigations are conducted to establish facts needed in
making wage and salary decisions, in developing regula­
tions, and in the conduct of enforcement activities.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ALLOCATION TO OFFICE OF THE
ADMINISTRATOR

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:

General schedule grades:
The 1953 appropriation provides funds for these activ­
Average‘salary___________________
Average grade-----------------------------ities through April 30, 1953, when the existing stabilization
authority expires. The Budget assum extension of this 01 Personal services:
es
Permanent positions____________
authority and additional requirements for 1953 are in­
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
cluded under a supplemental proposed for later trans­
base________________________
Payment above basic rates_______
m
ission at the end of this chapter. The 1954 requirem
ents
Total personal services_________
are included in a supplemental appropriation under pro­ 02 Travel__________________________
posed legislation carried in the chapter “Funds appropri­ 15 Taxes and assessments____________
Unvouchered________________________
ated to the President.”
Obligations incurred____________
1. Office of the Economic Stabilization Administrator.—
This office develops general econom stabilization policies
ic
ALLOCATION TO OFFICE OF PRICE
for the guidance of the constituent agencies, and reviews,
STABILIZATION
coordinates, and approves the programs developed to Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
carry such policies into effect.
2. Office of Price Stabilization.—In 1953 price-control Average number of all employees----------m
easures will continue to be directed to those areas of the Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________
economy where inflationary pressures are greatest and
Average grade____ ____
controls will continue to be relaxed where such action w
ill
1
not affect the general level of prices. The agency has 0 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
inaugurated the posting of ceiling prices in retail establish­
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
ments wherever practicable.
base_________________________
Payment above basic rates____ —
3. Office of Bent Stabilization.—Rent ceilings are estab­
Total personal services________
lished and enforced. The Defense Production Act of
Travel__________________________
Transportation of things---------------1950, as amended, terminated rent controls on September
Communication services__________
30, 1952, in all but certified critical defense housing areas
Rents and utility services-------------Printing and reproduction________
unless communities under control as of September 30 took
Other contractual services_________
Services oerformed by other agen­
affirm
ative action requesting extension. Action con­
cies_________________________
tinuing controls was taken in communities covering about
Supplies and materials ...................
Equipment-------------------------------70 percent of rental units formerly under control. Major
Refunds, awards, and indemnities. __
Taxes and assessments........ ............
workload items for the 10 months, July 1952 through April
Obligations incurred.
1953, as compared with all of fiscal year 1952, are as
follows:
WRLA
OKOD
ALLOCATION TO OFFICE OF RENT

$7, 262
GS-10.4

$7,041
GS-10.2

$446,422
16,662

$406,550
2,900

1,723
3, 724
468, 531
15,103
1,009
802
485, 445

20
,1 0
412,900
6,500
600
5,000
425,000

13,131
9
11, 469

11,850
4
5, 235

$5, 290
GS-8.1

$5, 725
GS-8.6

$57,811,899
90,350

$32, 738,300

223,900
621, 200
58,747,349
3,168,813
412,361
1, 485,933
14,440
1,662, 111
495, 595

126,400

33,086,700
1, 317, 500
177,500
741.000
6,300
834,200
148,600

940. 456
926, 327
444,863
695
442,692
68, 741,635

247,900
163.000
37,000
300
___ 140,000
36,900,000

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.............

3,073
16
2,708

2,937
10
1, 775

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.............. .................... .
Average grade........ ....... ............ .......

$4, 570
GS-6.5

$4, 700
GS-7.8

$12,169,425
47,200

$9, 944,161
30.000

1,350

2 ,0 0
20

20 0
0 ,0 0

STABILIZATION

Type of action
First rents _____________________ _
Tenants’ complaints._ __ ___________
Compliance actions___________________
Landlords’ petitions______ __________
Eviction cases. _ _____________ ______
Settlements for repayment to tenants___
Payments to U. S. Treasury_________ _

1952 actual
73,802
249,097
146,959
2,082, 243
429,853
$4,125,135
$667,028

1953 estimate 1954 estimate
61,000
174.000
109.000
1, 208,000
284.000
$3,020,000
$453,000

4, 5, 6, and 7. Wage Stabilization Board, Salary Stabili­
zation Board, Bailroad and Airline Wage Board, and
National Enforcement Commission.—These organizations
establish and enforce wage and salary controls. In July
1952 the National Enforcement Commission was created
by the Administrator to serve in a quasi-judicial capacity
in determining to what extent sanctions should be imposed
upon employers for violations of wage regulations. The
function had previously been performed within each of the
wage^control agencies.




01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______ ____ _
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________ —
Payment above basic rates....... .....
Total personal services____ ____ _
02 Travel___________________ ____
03 Transportation of things---------------04 Communication services---------------05 Rents and utility services__________
06 Printing and reproduction-------------07 Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agencies
08 Supplies and materials-----------------09 Equipment--------------------------------15 Taxes and assessments-----------------Obligations incurred............. ........

51,000
76, 503
12,344,128
777,174
136,010
295, 508
6,198
222,390
50,792
23,489
107, 225
88, 551
34,302
14,145, 767

32.000
14, 724
10,020,885 .....................
399,180
161, 524
211,677
375
86,261
32,307
36,342
20,376
232
30, 841
11,000,000

107

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Object classification

Total number of permanent positions......
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

1,738
76
1,292

1,628
42
1,308

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________ ____
Average grade____________________

$5,203
GS-7.7

$5,260
GS-7.8

$6,270,901
836, 590

$6,346, 700
468, 500

9,940
153,247

1,850
39,150

55, 460

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions.

$66, 930
15, 900

90,000

Obligations incurred..
SUMMARY

Obligations incurred_____________

13, 635,215

9, 510,000

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

399
4
162

404
294

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________ ____
Average grade___________________

$5,340
GS-8.4

$5,614
GS-8.7

$840,024
57,461
625
14, 807

$1, 639, 915
28,000
885

19,420

6,400

Total personal services_______
Travel__________________________
Transportation of things__________
Communication services__________
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies_________________________
08 Supplies and materials____________
09 Equipment____________________
15 Taxes and assessments____________

932,337
71,014
4,170
28,430
79,489
9,664

1, 675, 200
146,000

201, 824
34,143
131.683
4,652

76, 500
5,000
1,500
7,400

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year____

Obligations incurred____________

1,497,406

2 0 ,0 0
,0 0 0

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year _____ ________ ___________

ALLOCATION TO SALARY STABILIZATION
BOARD

02
03
04
06
07

2

1,00
00

02
04
06
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_____________
Total personal services..
Travel___________________
Communication services____
Printing and reproduction_
_
Other contractual services___
Supplies and materials_____
Equipment_______________
Taxes and assessments______
Obligations incurred..

ALLOCATION TO NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT
COMMISSION

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______




$18,431
108
15,705

16, 913
61
8, 691

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade___________________

GS-7.8

$5,450
GS-8.3

$77, 578,364
1,049, 263

$51, 210, 056
569,000

287,188
869, 481

162, 485
255, 974

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____ ________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________________________
Payment above basic rates............
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details---- ------ -------Total personal services_______
02 Travel__________________________
03 Transportation of things___________
04 Communication services___________
05 Rents and utility services_________
06 Printing and reproduction_________
07 Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies--------------------------------------08 Supplies and materials____________
09 Equipment______________________
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities_
_
15 Taxes and assessments____________
Unvouchered_______________________
Obligations incurred____________

77, 673

6,400

79, 861, 969
4, 463, 747
574, 241
2,055, 873
22, 089
2, 218,323
634, 719

52, 203,915
2,092, 680
366, 224
1,186, 427
8, 075
1, 041,861
223,807

5, 998, 238
1, 313, 371
886, 744
695
529, 404
802

2, 396, 642
213, 976
41,332
300
219, 761
5,000

98, 560, 215

60,000,000

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS P X E DT RS

$5, 620
GS-8.6

$39,693

$67, 500
1,700

10
,0 0

2,793
43,486
438
1, 056
681
51
567
8,313
155

69, 200

54, 747

75,000

220
,0
1,350
600

20
0

800
300
350

1954 estimate

$966, 746
98, 560, 215

$8, 545,084
60,000, 000

$1,600,000

99,526,961

68, 545,084

1,600,000

8, 545,084

1,600, 000

Total expenditures____________

$5, 756
GS-8.8

1953 estimate

90, 981, 877

66,945,084

1,600,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _______
Out of prior authorizations__________

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.______

0
1

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees______

33.000
42.000
3, 400

ALLOCATION TO RAILROAD AND AIRLINE
WAGE BOARD

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salaries........... .
Average grade___ _____

82, 830
7,000
170

Total personal services..
02 Travel__________________
15 Taxes and assessments____

6,856,200
214.300
17, 200
199, 400
1,400
78,800
39.300
2, 035, 900
24, 800
2,300
40, 400

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base
Payment above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details____________

1954 estimate

$5,352
GS-8.1

7,326,138
431,205
21, 700
244,946
1,451
253, 652
78, 617
4, 832,469
185,109
213,334
46,594

08
09
15

1953 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade___________________

Total personal services_______
Travel_____ ____________________
Transportation of things___________
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services__________
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment______________________
Taxes and assessments____________

02
03
04
05
06
07

1952 actual

ALLOCATION TO NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT
com m ission — continued

ALLOCATION TO WAGE STABILIZATION
BOARD

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______ ____
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52*week
base_________________________
Payment above basic rates_______
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_____ _____

1954 estimate

90, 015,131
966, 746

58,400,000
8, 545,084

1,600,000

1952 actual

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

This Administration is responsible for preparing national
plans and programs for the civil defense of the United
States, and the dissemination of civil defense information.
It provides coordination and guidance to the States and
their political subdivisions in the development of local
defense plans, and makes financial contributions toward
these programs. It also stockpiles, at strategically lo­
cated points, supplies and equipment necessary to supple­
ment existing local resources after an attack.
This estimate will provide for substantial advancement
of the stockpiling program, and continuation of the match­
ing of State contributions to provide emergency supplies and
equipment required at target areas, and a start on a match­
ing program for protective shelters in congested areas.

108

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION— Con.
OPERATIONS

Operations, Federal Civil Defense Administration—

For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in carrying
out the provisions of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 [Public
Law 920, 81st Congress], as amended (50 U. S. C. App. 2251-2297),
including [purchase (not to exceed eight) and hire of passenger
motor vehicles;] services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); reimbursement of the Civil Service
Commission for full field investigations of employees occupying
positions of critical importance from the standpoint of national
security; expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with civil
defense functions; reimbursement of the General Services Adminis­
tration for security guard services; not to exceed $9,000 for the pur­
chase of newspapers, periodicals, and teletype news services; and
not to exceed $6,000 for emergency and extraordinary expenses to be
expended under the direction of the Administrator for such purposes
as he deems proper, and his determination thereon shall be final and
conclusive; [$8,000,000] $12,000,000. (Supplemental Appropria­
tion Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

$8,000,000

Estimate 1954, ° $12,000,000

« Includes $723,300 for activities previously carried under “ Maintenance and opera­
tions, Air Force.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the schedule
as comparative transfers.

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate__ ________ _
Reimbursements from other accounts

$11, 560,000
11,351

$8,000,000
5,100

5 2 000,000
)1 ,

Total available for obligation. _____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings,..

11, 571, 351
-460, 620

8, 005,100

12, 000, 000

Obligations incurred_______ _____
Comparative transfer from “ Maintenance
and operations, Air Force” ___..
_

11,110, 731

8, 005,100

12, 000, 000

560, 000

600, 000

Total obligations________________

11, 670, 731

8, 605,100

12, 000, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$755, 261
502,447
1,577,767
2,186, 041
526,127
1, 946, 550
811, 521
728,167
136,174
2, 500, 676

$795,100
626, 000
843, 400
2, 221, 600
459, 900
862, 600
925,100
144, 000
1, 727, 400

$873, 000
1, 225, 000
907, 000
2, 528, 000
656, 000
1, 329, 000
1, 562, 000
1,022, 000
180, 000
1, 718, 000

11, 670, 731

8, 605,100

12,000,000

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

1952 actual

Communications. _ _____________
Supply service_________ _______
Training_ ______
_
Technical guidance __
_ ___
Health and welfare__ _
_____
Public information. _____
_______
Research _______ _______ ___
Attack warning,__ ... _________ _
Executive direction . __________ _
General administration_________
Total obligations____

___

____

and organization, and (2) technical training to selected
individuals who, upon return to their communities, estab­
lish local training programs; (6) the Western Training
School provides technical training only. Total enroll­
ment in the 2 schools will be approximately 1,500 in fiscal
year 1953 and 1,500 in fiscal year 1954.
4. Technical guidance.—Substantial progress has been
made in the establishment of organizations for civil de­
fense planning in each State and major Federal agency.
These organizations are provided advice on technical
problems and recommended ways to minimize damage to
persons and property, and organizing, training, equipping,
and utilizing forces to control and recover from damage.
5. Health and welfare.—Plans are developed to mobilize
medical and welfare personnel of local communities in
event of a civil defense emergency, and to establish
emergency hospitals, first-aid stations, and mass care
centers. The needs for Federal stockpiling for medical
supplies and equipment to augment local resources are
determined and procurement is supervised.
6. Public information.—Information on individual and
family protection and participation in organized civil de­
fense is disseminated to the general public. Advice and
guidance is given to States and localities in developing
public information programs. Planning for dissemina­
tion of public information and instructions in the em
er­
gency period is developed.
7. Research.—Arrangements are made with other Gov­
ernment agencies and private contractors to pursue
research on civil defense problems. In 1954 effort will
be concentrated on the effects of and defenses against
biological, chemical, and radiological warfare, and on
research pertaining to shelter construction.
8. Attack warning.-—Engineering and supervision of the
attack warning system to bring audible warning to the
public is provided. This system consists of leased lines
from air defense control centers to 175 key points through­
out the Nation. The number of key points will be in­
creased to approximately 195 in 1954. Procurement of
warning devices and their placement and installation in
localities is supervised.
9. Executive direction.
10. General administration.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C

Object classification

Provision is made for technical guidance to the States
and operation of educational, supply, communication, and
attack warning programs to develop and maintain an
effective system of civil defense.
1. Communications.—Civil defense communication
channels linking States and localities are planned, and
criteria and specifications developed. A secure communi­
cation system linking States with the Federal Govern­
ment and agencies of the Government to each other is pro­
vided. Classified communication installations are oper­
ated.
2. Supply service.—Reserve stocks of medical supplies,
emergency water supply equipment, and other items not
normally found in American cities in sufficient quantity
to cope with a civil defense emergency are stored in sites,
strategically located throughout the country.
3. Training.—Methods and techniques for training
civil defense workers are devised and made available to
State and local civil defense organizations. Two training
schools are operated: (a) The National Civil Defense
Training Center, which provides (1) training to key State
and local civil defense officials in civil defense planning

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees. ___ _




Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______ _______ _
Average grade_______ __________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____ ______
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.
_______ _
Payment above basic rates _ ____
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_____ --- . _

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1,175
38
839

1, 094
6
809

923
9
847

$6,309
GS-9.4

$6, 576
GS-9.7

$6, 536
GS-9.6

$4, 958,072
314, 463

$5, 229, 224
42,090

$5,343,088
94, 900

18, 996
113,475

19, 231
65, 665

20, 503
9, 600

183,855

120,490

131,909

Total personal services_______
02 Travel__ _ __________ _
03 Transportation of things____
04 Communication services ._. _ .
05 Rents and utility services___ ___
06 Printing and reproduction______ __
07 Other contractual services__________
Services performed by other agencies._ ________________ _____
08 Supplies and materials______ _ _
09 Equipment_ ____ _ ________
_
10 Lands and structures_______ _ _
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities_
_
15 Taxes and assessments _______ _ __
Unvouchered.___ _ _ ____ _
...

5, 588,861
505,839
56, 949
142, 426
51,970
355, 203
2, 270, 527

5,476, 700
391, 045
9,600
289,035
85, 760
264, 200
1, 289,160

5, 600, 000
557, 700
44.000
562.000
90.000
600.000
1,385, 000

1, 729, 662
229, 603
651,363
66, 500
107
17, 678
4,043

542, 500
131,750
101, 700

2, 952,000
150,000
34,300

17, 650
6,000

19,000
6, 000

Total obligations________ ______

11, 670,731

8, 605,100

12,000, 000

109

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

A A YI O EP N I U E
NL SS P X E DT RS
1952 actual

a a y is o e p n it r s o tin e
n l s f x e d u e —c n u d

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1, 560,817
11,110,731

$3, 423, 638
8,005,100

$1,423, 638
12,000,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year.. .. __
.....

12, 671, 548

11, 428, 738

13, 423, 638

Total expenditures_____. . . ______

11,351
241, 843
3, 423, 638

5,100
1, 423, 638

3,323, 638

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.. ______
Out of prior authorizations______ ___

Total expenditures______________

8, 994, 716

10, 000, 000

10,100, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations_____ _____

7, 730, 611
1,264,105

6, 800,000
3, 200, 000

9, 200,000
900,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations . _ ______
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$21, 788,077

$13,088,077

$21, 288,077

513, 840

23, 700,000

21, 800, 000

513, 840

5, 200, 000
18, 500, 000

12,100,000
9, 700,000

EMERGENCY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT

FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Federal Contributions, Federal Civil Defense Administration—

Emergency Supplies and Equipment, Federal
Administration—

Civil Defense

For procurement of reserve stocks of emergency civil defense
materials as authorized by subsection (h) of section 201 of the
Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, [$20,000,000]

(Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.)
For financial contributions to the States, not otherwise provided $100,000,000. 1953, $20,000,000
Appropriated
Estimate 1954, $100,000,000
for, pursuant to subsection (i) of section 201 of the Federal Civil
Defense Act of 1950, as amended, to be equally matched with State
A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
funds, [$15,000,000] and to remain available until June 30, 1955,

$30,000,000, of which $8,500,000 shall be available for contributions
for attack warning systems but without regard to the foregoing require­
ment of equal m
atching w State funds: Provided, That the am
ith
ounts
otherwise required of any State to m
atch Federal contributions pur­
suant to said subsection may be reduced by w
hatever amounts said
State may have paid or may be required to pay to m
atch Federal con­
tributions from previous appropriations for attack warning systems.
(Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

$15,000,000

Estimate 1954,

$30,000,000

Appropriation or estimate_____ . . _
Balance transferred from “ Federal con­
tributions, Federal Civil Defense Ad­
ministration,” pursuant to Public Law
253
Total available for obligation____ .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.._
Obligations incurred_ ...
_

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1952 actual

1953 estimate
$15,000,000

$30,000,000

-10,400,000

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings,

22,350,000
-48,083

15,000,000

22,301,917

15,000,000

30,000,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2, 636, 321
1,817,249
3, 268, 259
9,988,084
4, 592,004

$950,000
1.425.000
3.142.000
8.183.000
655.000
645.000

$12,000,000
2, 500,000
2,000,000
12,000,000
1,000,000

22,301,917

15,000,000

30,000,000

$20,000,000

$100,000,000

66, 400, 000
-197, 535

20, 000,000

100,000,000

66, 202, 465

20,000, 000

100, 000, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$56,000,000
10, 400, 000

Description

1952 actual

30,000,000

Obligations incurred_____________

1954 estimate

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Prior year balance available. _ ___
Balance transferred to “ Emergency sup­
plies and equipment, Federal Civil
Defense Administration/’ pursuant to
Public Law 253
_____________ _

_ ...

1953 estimate

$7, 750,000
25,000,000

1. Medical supplies and equipment_____
2. Engineering service______________ _.

Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

1952 actual

Attack warning____________________
Communications__ _______________
Public safety services..___ ______
Medical supplies and equipment_____
Training___________ ____________
Welfare services _____ _ __________
Obligations incurred,._ _________

20,000,000

100,000, 000

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
Materials and equipment not normally available or not
present in the quantities needed to cope with the condi­
tions caused by enemy attacks are stockpiled in strategic
locations. The items to be procured are limited to
medical and engineering needs, and are related to the
availability of such items in the target areas to be sup­
ported.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

Obligations incurred____

11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1952, $22,301,917; 1953, $15,000,000; 1954,
$30,000,000.

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS




66, 202, 465

1952 actual

________
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
_______ ___________

Civil defense funds of States and localities are equally
matched for selected types of civil defense organizational
equipment and supplies. The programs for which con­
tributions are made are attack warning, communications,
public safety services, medical services, training, and wel­
fare services. In fiscal year 1954, attack warning devices
will be financed by 100 percent Federal contributions.
No funds w be matched for fire equipment.
ill
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year........

$82,000,000
18,000,000

500,000

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

1952 actual

$19,000,000
1,000,000

Obligations incurred____ _______

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

$60, 326, 848
5, 875, 617

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$22,301, 917

$21, 788, 077
15, 000, 000

$13,088,077
30, 000,000

22,301, 917

36, 788,077

43,088,077

. .

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$46,402,065
19,800,400

$17,000,000
3,000,000

$63, 500,000
36, 500,000

66, 202,465

20,000,000

100,000,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$66, 202,465

$45, 536, 666
20,000,000

$18, 236, 666
100,000,000

66,202, 465

65, 536, 666

118, 236, 666

45, 536, 666

18, 236, 666

80, 236, 666

20, 665, 799

47, 300,000

38,000,000

20, 665, 799

17,000,000
30,300,000

22,000,000
16,000,000

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year .
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________
_
____________
Total expenditures________ ____
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ ._
Out of prior authorizations..................

P O E T E F C IT S
R T C IV A IL IE
Protective Facilities, Federal Civil Defense Administration—

For financial contributions to the States for shelters and other protec­
tive facilities pursuant to subsection (i) of section 201 of the Federal

110

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION— Con.

—continued

Protective Facilities, Federal Civil Defense Administration—Con.

Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, to remain available until June
80, 1955; $8,000,000: Provided, That this appropriation shall be
available without regard to the apportionment formula set forth in said
subsection: Provided further, That the Administrator shall not approve
any programs or projects for such shelters and protective facilities
which cannot be completed as usable units within the limits of the
amount of this appropriation and the amounts to be m available by
ade
the States to m
atch contributions hereunder.

Estimate 1954,

Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1954, $8,000,000.

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary
_
Average grade. -- _ _ _

$6,983
GS-10.0

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
Part-time and temporary positions.
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

$34,915
18, 000

Total personal services________
Travel ._ _ _ ____ _
Transportation of things_ ____ ___
_
Communication services___ __ _
Rents and utility services
_______
Printing and reproduction
__ _ _
Other contractual services _ __ _ _
Supplies and materials
- __
Equipment... __ ___ _____ _
Taxes and assessments_____________

$500,000
7, 500, 000

Obligations incurred........................

1954 estimate
5
1
6

____
_______

Obligations incurred................
1. Engineering studies____ ^___________
2. Shelter construction___
_____ _

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______

$8,000,000

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N

Description

1952 actual

Object classification

protective facilities

52,915
11,000
50
2, 870
1,500
2, 000
10,000
2, 500
2,000
165

....

85,000

8,000, 000

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
Funds provided for modification of existing structures
to afford protection from enemy attack and for engineer­
ing studies leading to such construction are equally
matched by the States. In 1954, Federal matching is
limited in the case of shelter construction to high priority
projects where plans are well developed and States have
matching funds available. Need, location, and design of
shelters are subject to review by the Administration,
using criteria derived from past and current studies made
by both governmental and private agencies.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1954, $8,000,000.

A A Y I O EP N I UE
N L SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Obligations incurred during the year-.. .
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_________ _____ _ ___ . . . ___

$8,000,000
7,900,000

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations)________________

FEDERAL

COAL

100,000

MINE SAFETY
REVIEW

BOARD

OF

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Federal Coal
Mine Safety Board of Review, including services as authorized by sec­
tion 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U S. C 55a), $85,000. (Sec.
.
.
205, Act of July 16, 1952, 66 Stat. 697.)

Estimate 1954,

Obligations incurred during the year _ _
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year
______

$85,000

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1954, $85,000.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
Coal mine operators, affected by orders issued by Fed­
eral coal mine inspectors, may appeal to the Board for
annulment, revision, or temporary relief. Hearings are
held, applications determined, and findings and orders of
the Board are published. This estimate provides for a
small permanent staff and for the part-time services of the
three members of the Board,




10,000

Total expenditures (out of current
authorizations) _
_____

75,000

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, Federal Communications Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses in performing the
duties [imposed by the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U. S. C.
151), the Ship Act of 1910, as amended (46 U. S. C. 484-487), the
International Radiotelegraphic Convention (45 Stat. pt. 2, p. 2760),
Executive Order 3513, dated July 9, 1921, as amended under date
of June 30, 1934, relating to applications for submarine cable
licenses, and the radiotelegraphy provisions of the Convention for
Promoting Safety of Life at Sea (50 Stat. 1121),] of the Commission
as authorized by law, including newspapers (not to exceed $175),
land and structures (not to exceed [$3,000),] $88,000), special
counsel fees, improvement and care of grounds and repairs to
buildings (not to exceed $17,500), purchase of not to exceed [ten ]
sixteen passenger motor vehicles [for replacement only], and
services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946
(5 U. S. C. 55a), [$6,408,460, of which not to exceed $88,525, shall
be available for expenses of travel] $8,000,000. (Independent
O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1958.)

Appropriated 1953,

$6,408,460

Estimate 1954, $8,000,000

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1953 estimate 1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate---- --------------Reimbursements from other accounts . __
Reimbursements from non-Federal sources.

$6, 585, 550
243,057
5, 655

$6,408, 460
343,132
2,172

$8,000,000
351,477
5,3C
0

Total available for obligation..........
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
_
Obligations incurred_ __________

6, 834, 262
-5,374
6,828, 888

6, 753, 764

8,356, 777

6, 753, 764

8,356, 777

N ote.—Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Hearing of appeals from orders of Federal coal mine inspectors—1954, $85,000.

1954 estimate
$85,000

1952 actual

Salaries and Expenses, Federal Coal Mine Safety Board of Re­
view—

1953 estimate

Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$773,673

$704,390

$775,051

425, 970

386,643

488, 796

2, 511, 500
628, 681
898, 251
1,347, 756
6, 585,831

2,313,271
585, 928
1,168,023
1, 252,377
6,410, 632

2,843,312
716,458
1, 667,074
1, 514, 609
8,005,300

Direct Obligations

1. Common carrier activities________ ..
2. Applied technical research and fre­
quency allocation________________
3. Field engineering and monitoring ac4. Safety and special radio services--------5. Broadcast activities------------------------6. Executive, staff, and service activities..
Total direct obligations---- -----------

111

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b a t it s o tin e
b ig t n y c iv ie —c n u d
Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

166, 716

$234,889

$293,544

42, 791
416
2, 265
29, 909

35, 754
15,000
6,927
50, 562

6,975
50,958

Tota*l obligations payable out of re­
imbursements from other accounts.

243,057

343,132

351,477

0 bligations incurred........................

6,828, 888

6, 753, 764

8,356, 777

5.
Broadcast activities.—Broadcasting stations, include
ing standard (AM), frequency modulation (FM), and tele­
vision (TV), are licensed and regulated. The increase is
proposed to handle a greatly increased workload, primarily
in the field of television. Pertinent data are shown in the
following table:

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

1. Common carrier activities _________
2. Applied technical research and fre­
quency allocation________________
3. Field engineering and monitoring ac­
tivities_ _ _ ___________________
_
4. Safety and special radio services...........
5. Broadcast activities________________
6. Executive, staff, and service activities..

$960

1951 actual 1952 actual

The Commission regulates interstate and international
wire and radio communication.
An increase of $1,591,540 is proposed for 1954, prin­
cipally (1) to handle the substantially increased workload
in processing applications for new television stations, and
(2) to strengthen radio-monitoring and enforcement ac­
tivities including the establishment of new monitoring
and direction-finding facilities.
1. Common carrier activities.—The Commission ap­
proves existing and proposed rates and practices of com­
mon carriers, proposed m
ergers and acquisitions of prop­
erties, extensions and reductions in services, construction
of facilities, and applications for use of radio in com­
munications services.
2. Applied technical research and frequency allocation.—
Radio wave characteristics, equipment capabilities, and
other technical matters are studied in relation to the
allocation and assignment of frequencies for best utiliza­
tion of the radio spectrum. The increase proposed will
provide for (a) work on technical problems which have ac­
cumulated during the last few years and (b) imple­
mentation of frequency agreements reached at the
Extraordinary Administrative Radio Conference, Geneva,
195L
3. Field engineering and monitoring activities.—Field
staff inspects radio stations, conducts operator examina­
tions, monitors the radio spectrum, collects engineering
data, and locates lost ships and aircraft and illegal sources
of radio em
ission. The proposed increase is primarily for
the establishment of two new monitoring stations and for
placing secondary monitoring stations on 24-hour
operation.
4. Safety and special radio services.—Aviation, police,
marine, amateur, and other nonbroadcast uses of radio
are licensed and regulated. The increase is to take care
of rapidly growing workloads owing partly to the defense
program. Pertinent data are summarized below:

Stations regulated ° b____ ________
License applications received_______
« As of June 30 of each year.
&Excluding amateurs.




87,575
109,381

99,425
141, 563

1954 esti­
mate

3,153

3,280

3, 758

3,958

466
172
26

270
135
92

290
129
448

505
145
521

° As of June 30 of each fiscal year.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

1951 actual 1952 actual

____ _______
Stations regulated
Applications disposed of for new sta­
tions or major«change of facilities:
AM __________________ _______
F M ................................. ............ .
TV............. ....................................

1953 esti­
mate

1953 esti­
mate
124,459
159,010

1954 esti­
mate
128,512
177,760

6.
Executive, staff, and service activities.—These also
include the adjudicatory functions of the Commission.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Summary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees_______

1,243
1,143

1, 237
1,106

1,459
1,333

Average salaries and grades.
General schedule grades:
Average salary.................. ............ .
Average grade___________ ________

$5, 379
GS-7.9

$5, 514
GS-8.1

$5, 547
GS-8.0

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions____ __________
Part-time and temporary positions___
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base...
Payment above basic rates__________

$6,102,453
307
23,405
74, 566

$6,039, 652

$7, 288, 527

23,180
61,300

27,800
69,850

Total personal service obligations...

6, 200, 731

6,124,132

7,386,177

Personal services____ _ _________
Travel____ _______ ____________
Transportation of things... ________
Communication services_ ________
_
Rents and utility services__ ____
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual servi ces________ _
Supplies and materials..._
_ _____
Equipment_____________________
Lands and structures_____________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___

5,957,674
76, 735
14,097
149, 953
48,315
29,434
62, 312
134, 217
113,074

5,781,000
88,000
18,000
150.000
54,693
30.000
65.000
125.000
96, 389
2,550

7,034, 700
110,000
22.000
153.000
57.000
77, 300
72.000
152.000
239,300
88.000

Total direct obligations__________

6, 585,831

6,410, 632

8,005, 300

Direct Obligations

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
13

20

Obligations Payable Out of Reimburse­
ments From Other Accounts

01 Personal services_________________
Obligations incurred....................

243,057

343,132

351,477

6,828,888

6, 753, 764

8, 356, 777

A A YI O EP N I UE
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations____________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account....................................

1953 estimate 1954 estimate

$522,439
1,673
6,828,888

$558,019

$566,479

6, 753, 764

8,356, 777

7,353,000

7,311,783

8,923,256

248,712
558,019

345,304
566,479

356, 777
866,479

1,604

Total expenditures________ ______

6,544,665

6,400,000

7,700,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations __________

6,037,022
507,643

5,900,000
500,000

7,200,000
500,000

112

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

Statem of proposed obligations fqr purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ent
otor
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Appropriation
Number
Salaries and expenses, Federal Com­
munications Commission.

16

Gross
cost

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
Allowance be pur­
Number (estimated) chased

$22,400

15

$4, 500

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

$17, 900

Federal

Appropriated 1953,

$3,400,000

Used primarily by inspectors, engineers, and similar field per­
sonnel concerned with investigating unlawful radio activities,
monitoring, conducting examinations, and carrying out other
provisions of the Communications Act.

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
Object classification

1952 actual

Estimate 1954,

$3,700,000

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate.
__ ______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—
.

$3,115, 688
-11, 714

$3,400,000

$3, 700,000

Obligations incurred __ __________

3,103, 974

3,400,000

3,700,000

1953 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________ _______
Average grade_.
. _______
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______
__ ___ __
Average grade_____________ . ___
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions______ _ __
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.. _ ...
- _____ _____
Payment above basic rates_____
Total personal services_________
Travel- _______ __
_________ ..
Transportation of things___ ______
Communication services_
_
_____
Rents and utility services___ ____
Printing and reproduction____ _ _
Other contractual services____
Services performed by other agen­
cies_ _ _
_
__ ______
08 Supplies and materials__ _______
09 Equipment_____________________
15 Taxes and assessments_______ _____

02
03
04
05
06
07

1954 estimate

Obligations incurred.__

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual
$2,921,482
182,492

$3,193,000
207,000

$3,499,000
201,000

Obligations incurred_____________

3,103, 974

3, 400,000

3, 700,000

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The Service, through mediation and conciliation, assists
in the prevention or settlement of labor-management
disputes affecting interstate commerce and defense pro­
duction in industries other than rail and air transporta­
tion.
1. Mediation and conciliation of labor disputes.—In the
past year, the facilities of the Service w made available
ere
in approximately 20,000 labor-management disputes, in­
volving more than 14,000,000 employees. In addition to
aiding the settlement of specific disputes, the Service
makes a general contribution to the improvement of
labor-management relations by working to secure a greater
degree of mutual understanding between management and
labor in the period between contract negotiations. The
increase of $300,000 will finance (a) the increased cost in
1954 of staff hired during 1953, (b) a sm staff of traveling
all
mediators to aid mediators in the field in settling dis­
putes, and (c) regional counterparts of the National
Labor-Management Panel to advise the Service in the
fieid.
2. Administration.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.............




1954 estimate

$7,099
GS-10.3

$7,161
GS-10.4

$7,348
GS-10.5

$2, 752
CPC-3.0

$2, 832
CPC-3.0

$2, 872
CPC-3.0

$2, 614, 761
4,050

$2,814,434
18,000

$3,004, 644
30, 000

10, 231
1, 251

11,066
1, 500

11,856
1, 500

2, 630, 293
332,036
9, 359
84, 763
4, 093
4,897
6,342

2, 845,000
387, 000
10,000
95.000
5.000
6.000
12.000

3,048,000
430,000
8,000
;95,000
66, 000
6,000
15, 000

9, 699
11,210
8, 886
2,396

11,000
14.000
12.000
3,000

11,000
10,000
8,000
3, 000

1952 actual
386
360

________

3,103, 974

3,400,000

3,700,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$219,194
3,103,974

$146,043
3,400,000

$156,043
3, 700,000

3,323,168

3, 546,043

3, 856,043

146,043
32

156,043

206,043

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

1. Mediation and conciliation of labor
disputes_____________________ _
2. Administration___ _______________

Object classification

1953 estimate

Mediation and Conciliation

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the Service to
carry out the functions vested in it by the Labor-Management Rela­
tions Act, 1947 (29 U. S. C. 171-180, 182), including expenses of the
Labor-Management Panel as provided in section 205 of said Act;
temporary employment of arbitrators, conciliators, and mediators
on labor relations at rates not in excess of $75 per diem; expenses of
attendance at meetings concerned with labor and industrial rela­
tions; and services as authorized bv section 15 of the Act of August 2,
1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); [$3,400,000J $3,700,000. (Labor-Federal
Security Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Public purpose and users

107

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE
Salaries and Expenses,
Service—

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

411
1
391

420
2
404

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account _ _

584

__ __ . ..

3,176, 509

3,390,000

3, 650,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___ ___
Out of prior authorizations____
_

2,966, 685
209,824

3,250, 000
140,000

3, 500,000
150,000

Total expenditures____

Boards of Inquiry, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service—

Boards of inquiry: To enable the Service to pay necessary
expenses of boards of inquiry appointed by the President pursuant
to section 206 of the Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947 (29
U. S. C. 176-180, 182), including services as authorized by section
15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), and rent in the
District of Columbia, $47,500. (Labor-Federal Security Appro­

priation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

Estimate 1954,

$47,500

$47,500

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_____ ______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$47,500
-45,074

$47,500

$47, 500

Obligations incurred__________ ..

2,426

47,500

47,500

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Investigations of labor disputes which imperil the national health and safety—1952,
$2,426; 1953, $47,500; 1954, $47,500.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
The President appoints boards of inquiry in accordance
with the provisions of the Labor-Management Relations

113

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

Act, 1947, when an existing or threatened work stoppage
will imperil the national health or safety.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

2

2

Average number of all employees_______
01 Personal services:
Part-time and temporary positions..
Payment above basic rates_______

$1,050
209

$22, 500

$22, 500

Total personal services______
Travel_ _____ ________________
_
Communication services_ ________
_
Printing and reproduction_____ ____
Other contractual services____ _____
Supplies and materials____________

1, 259
105
112
250
700

22, 500
20,000
2,000
500
2,000
500

22, 500
20,000
2,000
500
2,000
500

Obligations incurred_____________

2, 426

47, 500

47, 500

02
04
06
07
08

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
Obligations incurred during the year (total expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions)—1952, $2,426; 1953, $47,500; 1954, $47,500.

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, federal Power Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the work of the
Commission, as authorized by law, including [not to exceed $202,500
for expenses of travel;] purchase (not to exceed [one] two for re­
placement only) and hire of passenger motor vehicles; and not to
exceed $500 for newspapers; [$4,085,700] $4,570,000, of which not
to exceed $10,000 shall be available for special counsel and services
as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C.
55a), but at rates not exceeding $50 per diem for individuals. (15
U S. C 717-717w; 16 U S. C 791a-825s; 881k-m, n-1, n-3, y-1;
.
.
.
.
832a, d e, f, h i; 833d, e, g (a), h; 33 U S. C 701b~4, j ; 59 Stat.
,
,
.
.

12, 25; 60 Stat. 634, 641, 1080; 62 Stat. 1174-5; 64 Stat. 213; 43
U S. C 617-1 (c); 45 Stat. 200, 212-213, 1344, 1623, 1639-40;
.
.
Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

$4,085,700

Estimate 1954,

$4,570,000

A ONS AALBE FROLGTO
MUT VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate___
Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources-..
___ _________________
Reimbursements from other accounts. _.

$4,118,325

$4,085,700

$4,570,000

1,541
81, 779

959
20,000

1,300

Total available for obligation.. _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

4,201, 645
-27, 561

4,106, 659

4, 571,300

Obligations incurred_
_
. ._ _
Comparative transfer from “ Flood control
surveys, Federal Power Commission” -.

4,174,084

4,106, 659

4,571,300

Total obligations________________

4,386, 507

4,106,659

4, 571,300

212,423

N te.—Reimbursements from non-Federal sources consist of (1) payments from States
o
and municipalities for services rendered by staff members under provisions of Federal
Power Act (16 U. S. C. 824h) and Natural Gas Act (15 U. S. C. 717p) and (2) proceeds
of sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).
OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1. Licensing of non-Federal hydroelectric
projects ___ . . _
_
_ ___
2. Regulation and surveys, electric power
industry _ _ - ___
_
3. Regulation and surveys, natural gas
industry___
____
_____
4. Investigations relating to Federal river
development projects __________
5. International Joint Commission
6. Administration. ______ _ _ . . . ___
Total obligations_______ _______

1953 estimate
$642,382

$675,000

1,253,656

1,086, 590
1, 525,260

1,865,300

437,627
6, 774
485, 518

384,986
6,328
461,113

400.000
6, 000
460.000

4,386, 507

4,106,659

4,571,300

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

673

685

690

169

134

109

$1,419

$1, 553

$1,674

$1, 660, 646

$1, 588, 712

$1, 618, 569

2.
Regulation and surveys, electric power industry.—
Regulation covers the transm
ission and sale for resale of
electric energy in interstate commerce and the rates,
accounts, depreciation practices, certain security issues,
disposition of properties, m
ergers, and the interconnection
and coordination of facilities of public utilities subject to
the Commission’s jurisdiction. Statistics and other infor­
mation about the electric utility industry are gathered and
published. An increase in funds is proposed to expedite
the handling of requests for rate increases and to keep
current the collection of electric power requirements and
supply data. Pertinent data are:
By calendar year
Description
1951 actual
Number of public utilities regulated____
Operating revenues (in millions).. ______
Number of utilities reporting for statis­
tical purposes_______ ____________

1952 estimate 1953 estimate

270
$4, 450

270
$4,800

270
$5,300

1, 450

1, 450

1, 450

3.
Regulation and surveys, natural gas industry.—Regu­
lation covers the transportation and sale for resale of
natural gas in interstate commerce and the rates, accounts,
and depreciation and depletion practices. Certificates of
public convenience and necessity are issued to natural gas
companies subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission.
Statistics and other information about the natural gas
industry are gathered and published. An increase in
funds is proposed primarily to cope with the rapidly in­
creasing requests for rate adjustments. As of June 30,
1952, suspended cases awaiting final action totaled $104
million per year, and by August 31,1952, had reached $166
m
illion. An increase is also provided to process increasing
numbers of applications for construction of pipeline facil­
ities. Other pertinent data are:
By calendar year

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The Federal Power Commission administers the Federal
Power Act and Natural Gas Act and has additional duties
under other acts relating to Federal power development.




Number of licensed projects
._ ._ . __
Number of applications pending (end of
year)--------------------------------------------Total claimed cost (in millions) of major
projects___________________________
Annual income to Government from
licenses ... _______________________

1,165,000

1, 580,975

Description

1954 estimate

$621,957

1.
Licensing of non-Federal hydroelectric projects.—
Licenses are issued to private, State, and municipal
interests for proposed and existing hydroelectric projects
affecting public lands and streams subject to Federal
jurisdiction; construction and operation of such projects
are inspected; and the cost of construction is determined.
Pertinent data are:

Description
1951 actual
Number of natural gas companies______
Operating revenues (in millions)_
_ __.

142
$1,923

1952 estimate 1953 estimate
155
$2,300

160
$2,600

4.
Investigations relating to Federal river development
projects.—Studies are made of river basins and individual
projects proposed by the Departments of the Army and
Interior to determine possibilities for conservation, de­
velopment, and utilization of potential power resources.
Review and approval are required of certain proposed
rates for sale of power from such projects. Information on

114

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

A A Y I O EP N I UE
N L SS F X E DT RS

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION— Continued

the power features of Federal river development projects
is furnished Congress and Federal and State agencies.
Only 19.9 million kilowatts out of a potential 106 mil­
lion kilowatts of hydroelectric energy in the United States
w developed as of December 31, 1951. In fiscal year
ere
1952, 125 studies w carried on, and it is estimated that
ere
action can be taken on 115 of a potential 160 cases in 1953
and on 120 of an additional 170 in 1954.
5. International Joint Commission.—This covers par­
ticipation of the Federal Power Commission in the Inter­
national Joint Commission which adjudicates controver­
sies between the Governments of the United States and
Canada or nationals of the two countries, principally over
boundary waters, and conducts investigations as directed
by the two Governments.
6. Administration.

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations____________
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year..
Obligated balance canied to certified
claims account
._ _ _
Total expenditures............. .........
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ ____
Out of prior authorizations ...................

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

698

716

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary-----------------------------Average grade_____________ ____ .

656

759
1
719

$5, 519
GS-8.1

$5, 656
GS-8.2

$5, 671
GS-8.3

$3, 920,066
419

$3, 688, 840
3, 985

14, 432
8, 695

14, 575
1, 800

16,117
2, 500

Total personal services_________
Travel.____________ ____________
Transportation of things----------------Communication services__________
Rents and utility services____ ______
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services. _______
Services performed by other agen­
__
cies________ ________
Supplies and materials------------------Equipment_____________ . ..
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments_____________

3, 943, 612
236, 623
3, 699
26, 662
20, 997
61, 692
19, 906

3, 709, 200
204, 000
3, 200
27, 500
21,150
55, 800
20, 800

4, 080,000
260,000
3.000
28,000
21,000
72.000
22.000

3, 725
45, 333
21, 528
275
2,455

3,500
42, 300
14, 959
1, 000
3, 250

4.000
40,000
36,300
1.000
4,000

Total obligations------------ -----------

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13
15

$334,196
4,106,659

$352,896
4, 571,300

4,479,136

4,440,855

4,924,196

83, 320
* 19,686
334,196

20,959

1, 300

352,896

469,896

4,041,814

4,067,000

4,453,000

3, 776,115
265, 699

3, 732,804
334,196

4,113,000
340,000

120

Flood Control Surveys, Federal Power Commission—

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N

4,386, 507

4,106, 659

4, 571,300

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Reimbursements from other accounts___
Total available for obligation. ........
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

213,917
-1,494

Obligations incurred_____________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, Federal Power Commission” .

1954 estimate

$212,600
i, dvr

-212,423

$4, 049, 678
11, 705

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base ________________________
Payment above basic rates
_______

$305,052
4,174,084

1952 actual

756

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_____ _

1954 estimate

Miscellaneous

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1953 estimate

1952 actual

Salaries and Expenses, Federal Power Commission— Continued

212,423

Total obligations________________

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

1953 estimate

$19,360
212,423

$12,816

231, 783

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations___________
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account
_ _

1954 estimate

12,816

1,317
645
12,816
7

Total expenditures______________

216,998

12,816

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations___________

199,297
17, 701

12,816

Statem of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ent
otor
FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Appropriation
Number
Salaries and expenses,
Power Commission.

Federal

2

Gross
cost
$2,800

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
Allowance be pur­
Number (estimated) chased
2

$800

$2,000

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, Federal Trade Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Federal
Trade Commission, including contract stenographic reporting
services Li andnot to exceed $500 for newspapers, [and not to exceed
$142,235 for expenses of travel, $4,053,800] $5,500,000: Provided,
That no part of the funds appropriated herein for the Federal Trade
Commission shall be expended upon any investigation hereafter
provided by concurrent resolution of the Congress until funds are
appropriated subsequently to the enactment of such resolution to




Old ve­
hicles
still.to
be used
11

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Public purpose and users

$500

For use by engineers and other members of the Commission’s
staff in regional offices for inspection of electric utility and
gas plants; also for inspection of hydroelectric projects during
construction; and miscellaneous field investigations. 1 car
for general administrative use in the District of Columbia.
Motor vehicles will be hired only for special field investiga­
tions or inspections where official cars are not available.

finance the cost of such investigation.
priation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, ° $4,178,800

(Independent O
ffices Appro­

Estimate 1954, $5,500,000

° Includes $125,000 appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1953.

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.
Obligations incurred............... .......

$4,314,400
-7,483
4,306, 917

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$4,178,800

$5, 500,000

4,178, 800

5,500,000

115

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1. Antimonopoly:
(a) Investigation and litigation____
(b) Economic and financial reports...
2. Antideceptive practices:
(a) Investigation and litigation____
(b) Trade practice conferences_____
(c) Wool and fur act administration..
(d) Lanham act and insurance. ___
3. Executive direction and management. .
4. Administration _______ . . . ___ _
Obligations incurred_____________

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1, 755, 960
226,390

$2, 704,110
488, 495

$1, 693, 806
229, 511
1, 229, 400
217, 696
308,104
23, 691
299, 412
305, 297

1.107. 886
207, 835
273, 390
23, 775
292, 855
290, 709

1,111,600
211, 385
335, 030
24, 665
305, 890
318, 825

4,306, 917

4,178, 800

5, 500, 000

The Commission seeks to maintain effective competitive
conditions and to prevent the development of monopolistic
and unfair trade practices, thus promoting high levels of
production.
1. Antimonopoly.—Monopolistic restrictions of output,
boycotts, corporate m
ergers and acquisitions, and other
monopolistic practices and conspiracies which restrain
trade or tend toward monopoly are prevented; economic
data are gathered about business organization and con­
duct, particularly concerning monopoly and related prob­
lems ; and supervision is provided over the registration and
operation of associations of American exporters engaged
solely in export trade. An increase in funds for investiga­
tions and litigation is requested in 1954 to cope with the
mounting backlog of m
erger cases that has accumulated
since the amendment of section 7 of the Clayton Act in
December 1950, and to deal effectively with monopolistic
practices which have developed incident to the defense
mobilization program. It is proposed that a pilot study
be undertaken in 1954 of how the consumer’s dollar is
divided between manufacturers and distributors, and how
the manufacturer’s sales dollar is divided between labor,
material, and other expenses. The study will be designed
to meet the needs of business, labor, farm, and consum
er
organizations, and of Government agencies for such
information.
2. Antideceptive practices.—False and misleading ad­
vertising and other unfair or deceptive practices are pre­
vented by corrective action of the Commission; manu­
facturers, distributors, and consum are protected from
ers
the evils of misbranding and nondisclosure of fiber content
with respect to manufactured wool products; consum
ers
and merchants are protected from deceptive and unfair
competition resulting from misbranding, false or decep­
tive advertising, and false invoicing of furs and fur prod­
ucts; and affirmative aid is provided to business for main­
taining effective competition through industry trade prac­
tice conferences.
3. Executive direction and management.—These also in­
clude the adjudicatory functions of the Commission.
4. Administration.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade_______ __________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary.__ __________ . __
Average grade,.. ____ ______ .. .
Ungraded positions: Average salary ..

200000—53----- 8




1952 actual

01

1953 estimate
672
661

888
846

$5, 783
GS-8.5

$5,860
GS-8.7

$5, 793
GS-8.6

$2, 968
CPC-3.6
$4, 251

$3, 020
CPC-3.7
$4, 255

$3, 059
CPC-3.7
$4, 260

actual

1953

estimate

1954

estimate

$ 3,898, 722

$ 3,8 70 ,06 5

$ 4,899, 365

15, 950
20, 288

14, 700
15,000

18, 000
2 0,000

Total personal services, ,.. ... .
Travel________________ ________
Transportation of things, _ ... _____
Communication services___________
Rents and utility services____ _____
Printing and reproduction... _ ... __
Other contractual services_______ .
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials., ___ _ ...
Equipment,. .. _ ________ _. ...
_
Refunds, awards, and indemnities_

3, 934, 960
184, 653
3,9 8 2
29, 599
9, 587
35, 030
2 3,119
17, 040
46, 709
22, 091
147

3, 899, 765
163,035
1, 500
20, 000
10, 000
20, 000
12,500
22, 000
27, 500
2, 500

4, 937, 365

4, 306, 917

4,178,800

5, 500, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$291, 709
4, 306, 917

$347, 716
4,178,800

$260,000
5, 500, 000

4, 598, 626

4, 526, 516

5, 760, 000

347, 716

260,000

425,000

4, 250, 910

4, 266, 516

5, 335, 000

3, 987, 053
263, 857 .

3, 918, 800
347, 716

5. 075. 000
260,000

2 95,835
3, 000
3 2.000
22, 300
5 0.000
16, 500

22, 000
50, 000
7 1 . 000

A A YI O EPNI UE
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year__
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___ _________ ____ _. .-. _
Total expenditures,

___________

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations__________

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
Salaries and Expenses, General Accounting Office—

Salaries and expenses'. For [personal services, $30,100,000] nec­
essary expenses of the General Accounting Office, including news­
papers and periodicals (not exceeding $500), and services as authorized
by section 15 of the act of August 2, 1946 (5 U S. C 55a), $32,000,000.
.
.
(31 U S. C 41, Supp. V, 841; 60 Stat. 812, 837; 64 Stat. 460, 832;
.
.
Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $30,100,000
Estimate 1954, 0 $32,000,000
« Includes $2,200,000 for activities previously carried under “ Miscellaneous expenses,
General Accounting Office.” The amounts obligated in 1952 and 1953 are shown in the
schedule as comparative transfers.

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______ ___
Reimbursements from other accounts

$30, 888. 832
26, 319

$30,100, 000

$32, 000,000

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings,.,

30, 915,151
-448, 606

30,100,000
-600, 000

32, 000, 000

Obligations incurred____ ._ ____
Comparative transfer from “ Miscellane­
ous expenses, General Accounting
Office” __
.
____ _____ _____

30, 466, 545

29, 500, 000

32, 000, 000

Total obligations___

__________

1, 533, 968

1, 960, 000

32,000, 513

31,460,000

32, 000, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$544,400
1,156, 900
1, 941, 000
858, 000
4,114, 400
6, 517, 000
412,100
15, 592. 000
416, 000
448. 200
32, 000, 000

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1954 estimate

760
676

Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base ____ _
__
_ .
Payment above basic rates_______

1952

Obligations incurred___ _______

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

Object classification

Object classification

1952 actual

Direct Obligations

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Office of the Comptroller General
Office of the general counsel________
Office of investigations_____________
Accounting systems division________
Claims division_____ ____ _
_ ...
Transportation division____________
Division of personnel__________...
Division of audits_________________
European branch
Office of the chief clerk_____________

$507, 289
1,129, 066
1, 624, 435
628, 961
4, 713, 242
6, 621, 471
453. 257
15, 862. 842
432, 307

$539,000
1.156, 000
1. 794,000
815, 000
4. 538, 000
6, 559,000
412, 000
14, 995, 000
211,000
441, 000

Total direct obligations__________

31, 972, 870

31, 460, 000

116

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, General Accounting Office— Continued
o l a io s b a t it s o tin e
b ig t n y c iv ie —c n u d
Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$31,460,000

$32,000,000

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

2.
3.
4.
7.
8.

Office of the general counsel_________
Office of investigations. ___________
Accounting systems division..._ .
_
Division of personnel___ _________ _
Division of audits__________________

$9,142
2,733
4,126
8, 569
3,073

Total ob ligations payable out of
reimbursements from other ac­
counts_____________ _______

27, 643

Total obligations________________

32,000, 513

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
The General Accounting Office settles claims by or
against the Government; audits the financial transactions
of Government agencies; audits Government corporations,
audits and settles fiscal officers’ accounts; renders legal
decisions relating to Government fiscal matters; conducts
investigations relating to the receipt, disbursement, and
application of public funds; develops, prescribes, and
evaluates accounting systems on a Government-wide
basis; and performs other related and necessary functions.
During the fiscal year 1952, refunds and collections in the
amount of $55,724,940 were made through the audit,
investigative, and claims activities of the General
Accounting Office.
1. Office oj the Comptroller General.—The Comptroller
General serves Congress by presenting to it reports on
matters relating to public funds, with recommendations
and advice. The scope and variety of legislative reports
and services to congressional committees continues to
broaden, and the number to expand.
2. Office of the general counsel.—In addition to preparing
decisions and reports, the general counsel and his staff
participate in conferences with legislative and adminis­
trative officials of the Government on the legality or
propriety of proposed obligations and expenditures, the
sufficiency of proposed legislation, the desirability of
new legislation for particular purposes, and like matters.
A total of 11,997 legal matters of all types was handled
during the fiscal year 1952. This total represents .an
increase of 288 over the number of legal matters handled
in the fiscal year 1951.
3. Office oj investigations.—This activity com
prises (a)
inspections at irregular intervals of most of the larger
Federal installations and activities throughout the coun­
try; (6) investigations of fraudulent transactions, sus­
pected fraud, or other serious irregularity; and (c) surveys
of particular subjects of Federal expenditure on a broad
and sometimes Nation-wide basis. The work is carried
on in the field and at the spot where it can be best applied
in the interest of the Government.
4. Accounting systems division.—The major work efforts
of the Accounting Systems Division will continue to be the
cooperative work in the development of accounting sys­
tems and improvements in the agencies of the Government.
This work is carried out on a day-to-day consultative basis
with accounting and management representatives of the
individual agencies, and is in furtherance of the objectives
of the joint program for improving accounting launched by
the Comptroller General with the Secretary of the Treas­
ury and the Director of the Bureau of the Budget.




5. Claims division.—All justiciable claims by or against
the United States are settled, unless exclusive jurisdiction
is specifically conferred upon another agency by law.
During 1952, the number of claim settled w 433,496.
s
as
6. Transportation division.—This activity audits freight
and passenger transportation payments for the account
of the United States and the settlement of claims involv­
ing transportation charges. Through the efforts of the
General Accounting Office, over $458,000,000 has been
collected during the past 12 years in the transportation
audit.
7. Division oj personnel.—The establishment of the
Division of Audits and the resultant reduction in force,
reassignment of employees, and position classification
work constituted the most significant personnel manage­
ment activities during the fiscal year 1952. Progress on
the work performance standards program was necessarily
retarded due to the changes in organization; however,
over 60 percent of the employees are now covered by
approved standards as compared to 50 percent in 195i.
During the fiscal year 1952, the staff of the Division of
Personnel w reduced and the personnel ratio to total
as
office employees increased from a ratio of 1 to 115 to 1
to 135.e _
8. Division oj audits.—-This division was established dur­
ing 1952 by consolidating the old audit division, the corpo­
ration audits division, the postal audit division, and the
reconciliation and clearance division. Several funda­
mental changes in policies and concepts have been placed
into effect during the past year to improve the audit.
Basically these were: (1) broadening of the training and
experience of employees who are specialists in particular
phases or types of audit so that they may effectively
participate in the comprehensive audit program, (2) re­
organization of the centralized audit on an agency or
activity basis with emphasis on the selective audit ap­
proach, (3) establishment of a more realistic audit pro­
gram in the Military Establishment, particularly in regards
to its procurement program, and (4) increasing the number
of agencies under comprehensive or site audit as rapidly
as possible.
9. European branch.—In July 1952, a European branch
of the General Accounting Office was established with
headquarters in Paris, France, to perform the audit, inves­
tigative, legal, and other functions of the General Account­
ing Office in the European area, including the Near East
and North Africa. Suboffices will be established within
the geographic jurisdiction of the European branch as the
work progresses and the need therefor arises.
10. Office oj the chiej clerk.—The chief clerk is responsi­
ble for property management and housekeeping work
which encompass reproduction and duplication, procure­
ment, storage and issue, distribution of mail, and messen­
ger and labor services.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

7,000
. 6, 644

6,460
6,175

6,472
6,225

$4,575
GS-6.3

$4,764
GS-6.7

$4,808
GS-6.9

$30,356, 745
109,800

$29,326, 700
113, 300
60,000

$29, 597, 700
112, 300
90,000

30,466, 545

29, 500,000

29,800,000

Summary of Personal Services

_
Total number of permanent positions_
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____________ ______
Average grade_____ ___________ ..
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions ___ _______ ___ .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base...
Payment above basic rates___________
Total personal service obligations. __

117

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b o j c s o tin e
b ig t n y b e t —c n u d
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$30,440, 226
638,820
78.191
112, 587
212,175
145, 575
67.192
193, 587
84,478
39

$29,500,000
1,000,000
100,000
125.000
230.000
150.000
100.000
180,000
74,000
1,000

$29,800,000
1,100,000
100,000
135.000
250.000
150.000
100.000
200,000
124,000
1,000
40,000

31, 972, 870

31, 460,000

32,000,000

Direct Obligations

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13
15

Personal services_____ ___________
Travel_____ ______ ___________ __
Transportation of things___________
C o m m u n i c a t io n s e r v ice s

_

Rents and utility services___ ______
Pointing and reproduction..._____
Other contractual services_________
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment______ .. ___________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments__ _____...
Total direct obligations__________
Obligations Payable Out o f Reimburse­
ments From Other Accounts

01 Personal services_______ _ _ .. . .. .
02 Travel________________ _________

26,319
1,324

Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements from other ac­
counts_________ _____________

priation Act, 1953.)

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, Indian Claims Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary to carry out the
purposes of the Act of August 13, 1946 (25 TJ. S. C. 70), creating an
Indian Claims Commission, [$91,400, of which not to exceed $2,275
shall be available for expenses of travel] $140,000. (Independent
O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

27, 643

Total obligations________________

[Appropriations for the General Accounting Office shall be avail­
able for newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding $500), and
services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946
(5 U. S. C. 55a).]
[The fourth paragraph under the heading “General Accounting
Office” in Public Law 137, approved August 31, 1951 (65 Stat. 274),
is amended by changing “two positions in grade GS-18” to “four
positions in grade GS-18” and “seven positions in grade GS-16” to
“thirteen positions in grade GS-16”.] (Independent Offices Appro­

32,000,513

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year...... .
Deduct:
Reimbursements received___________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

32,000,000

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate. _ . _________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

1953 estimate

$93, 500
-1,947

$91,400

$140,000

Obligations incurred_____________

91, 553

91,400

140,000

1954 estimate

$1, 626, 628
48,413
30,466, 545

$1,753,191

$1,640,000

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

29,500,000

32,000,000

Hearing and adjudication of Indian claims—1952, $91,553; 1953, $91,400; 1954, $140,000.

32,141, 586

31, 253,194

33, 640,000

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
This independent Commission of three members, which
is required to complete its work by April 10, 1957, was
created to hear and adjudicate claims, existing before
August 13, 1946, of American Indian tribes, bands, or
other identifiable groups of Indians residing within the
territorial limits of the United States or Alaska. Claimants
were allowed a period of 5 years from August 13, 1946,
within which to submit their claims. There w
ere 852
claim filed by the end of that filing period. Payments of
s
awards are dependent upon subsequent appropriations
by Congress. As of June 30, 1952, appropriations totaling
$4,089,844 had been made to pay awards.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

26,319
1, 753,194

1, 640,000

2,000,000

Total expenditures_____ ________

30,362,073

29, 613,194

31, 640,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations________ _

28,687,032
1, 675,041

27,860,000
1, 753,194

30,000,000
1, 640,000

Miscellaneous Expenses, General Accounting Office—

[Miscellaneous expenses: For necessary expenses, including not
to exceed $1,062,500 for expenses of travel, $1,960,000.] (Inde­
pendent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

$140,000

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
31,460,000

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

Estimate 1954,

$91,400

$1,960,000

N
ote—
Estimate of $2,200,000 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred to “ Salaries and expenses, General Accounting Office.” The amounts obli­
gated in 1952 and 1953 are shown inthe schedule as comparative transfers.
A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate..____ ______
Reimbursements from other accounts___

$1, 600,000
1,324
1, 601,324
-67,356
1, 533, 968

1,960,000

-1, 533,968

-1, 960,000

11
11

18
17

$5, 789
GS-8.3

$5, 892
GS-8.3

$6,467
GS-9.2

$87, 389

$88,345

$132, 548

149

155

185

Total personal services............ .
Travel_____ _____ __ __________
Communication services___________
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services__________
Services performed by other agen­
cies__________________________
Supplies and materials_____________
Equipment_____________________
Taxes and assessments_____________

87, 538
2,193
584
73
13

88, 500
1,100
600
150
70

132, 733
4, 270
600
100
100

5
502
603
42

40
500
400
40

50
600
1,200
347

Obligations incurred...................... .

91, 553

91,400

140,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$5,211
91, 553

$4,250
91,400

$3,650
140,000

96,764

95,650

143,650

02
04
06
07

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

11
11

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base______ ____ ______________

Total obligations________________

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____ ______________
Average grade____________________

1,960,000

Obligations incurred____________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and
expenses, General Accounting Office” . ._

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions_
_
Average number of all employees_______

$1,960,000

Total available for obligation._____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

Object classification

1954 estimate

1954 estimate

$264, 456
1, 533,968

$300, 713
1,960,000

$360,000

1, 798,424

2, 260, 713

360,000

1,324
45, 982
300,713

360,000

Total expenditures..........................

1,450,405

1,900, 713

360,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations___________

1, 231, 930
218,475

1, 600,000
300, 713

360,000

08
09
15

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct;
Reimbursable obligations_________ _
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...




A A Y I O X E DT RS
NL SS FEPNI UE
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year__
Obligations incurred during the year.......

118

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, Indian Claims Commission—Continued
a a y is o e p n it r s o tin e
n l s f x e d u e —c n u d
1952 actual
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ ________ _______ ________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$4, 250

$3, 650

$6, 650

Total expenditures________ ___ __

92, 514

92,000

137,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ ...
Out of prior authorizations______ ____

87. 303
5, 211

87, 750
4, 250

133,350
3, 650

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
General Expenses, Interstate Commerce Commission—

General expenses: For expenses necessary in performing the
functions vested by law in the Commission (49 U. S. C. 1-24,
301-327, 901-923, 1001-1022), except those otherwise specifically
provided for in this Act, and for general administration, including
not to exceed $5,000 for the employment of special counsel; contract
stenographic reporting services; newspapers (not to exceed $200);
[not to exceed $230,650 for expenses of travel;] and purchase of
[nine] twenty passenger motor vehicles for replacement only;
[$9,319,500, of which $100,000 shall be available for valuations of
pipe lines] $10,400,000: Provided, That Joint Board members
and cooperating State commissioners may use Government trans­
portation requests when traveling in connection with their duties
as such. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $9,319,500
Estimate 1954, $10,400,000
A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate__________ __
Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources
. _______
Reimbursements from other accounts___

$9, 479,935

$9,319, 500
2, 250
17,942

5,000

Total available for obligation.
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. .

9, 552, 279
-18,207

9,339,692

10,405,000

Obligations incurred_____________

9, 534,072

9, 339,692

10,405,000

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

$10,400,000

2,549
69, 795

2. Investigation, litigation, legal advice, and compliance.-—
Uniform systems of accounts are formulated and policed
for all types of carriers; studies are made of operating
costs and analyses prepared in relation to rate structures;
assistance is rendered in the enforcement of statutes and
regulations affecting transportation and carriers; briefs
and arguments are prepared in suits to set aside orders of
the Commission; examinations are made to ascertain that
motor carriers and freight forwarders are adequately
insured; and surveys are conducted of motor carriers’
operating practices to reduce accidents and to promote
safety on the public highways.
3. Collection and analysis oj accounting and statistical
data.—Statistics are compiled from carriers’ reports and
studies made of operating, financial, and other problem
s
of transportation agencies which are essential to per­
formance of the Commission’s duties.
4. Supervision oj rate publications.—Common and con­
tract carriers’ tariffs are examined for compliance with
Commission’s tariff circular rules, and under certain con­
ditions authority to publish rates on less-than-statutory
notice is granted.
5. Railroad car service.—A field staff works directly
with carriers and shippers in handling problems related
to car service in the transportation of property by railroad.
6. Valuation oj railroads and pipelines.—This w
ork
consists of keeping inventory and cost records current and
developing elem
ents of value which are used in setting
up depreciation reserves, determining costs of service,
and approving financial reorganizations.
7. Administration.

N o t e . —Reimbursements

from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
sale of personal property (41 U. S. C. 231 (c)).

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1. Applications, complaints and other
proceedings.__ . . . ___ ... . _____
2. Investigation, litigation, legal advice,
and compliance.. _____ . . . _____
3. Collection and analysis of accounting
and statistical data______ _ . .. __ _
4. Supervision of rate publications_____
5. Railroad car service. _____ . . . ____
6. Valuation of railroads and pipelines___
7. Administration____________________
Obligations incurred_____________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$2,836, 569

$2,799, 580

$3,156, 252

3,116,064

3,058, 452

3,494, 529

845, 991
824, 937
356, 359
490, 928
1, 063, 224

837, 537
813,766
366,365
457,166
1,006, 826

881, 931
895, 552
381,867
531, 572
1,063, 297

9, 534,072

9, 339, 692

10, 405,000

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

Object classification

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1.762
1,662

1,661
1.634

1,900
1,805

$5, 259
GS-7.5

$5, 253
GS-7.5

$5, 241
GS-7.6

$8, 646.049
32, 619
3,109

$8, 548. 846
32.179
3, 263

$9, 443. 346
35, 686
3,109

Total personal services
Travel___________________
_
____
Transportation of things_
Communication services. ___
Rents and utility services_____
Printing and reproduction___ _____
Other contractual services. _ _
Services performed by other
agencies. _ _
08 Supplies and materials_______ _____
09 Equipment__________________
15 Taxes and assessments . __

8, 681. 777
255, 378
8,006
50, 839
50, 454
181. 289
107, 994

8, 584, 288
230, 650
9. 624
45. 005
41, 092
175, 000
101,118

9,482,141
318, 969
8,000
50, 300
51,000
181, 000
111, 100

139. 356
54,036
4.943

107, 407
40, 408
5,100

3.500
121, 910
67, 500
9, 580

Obligations incurred.. ________ _

9, 534,072

9, 339, 692

10, 405, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary__ _____________
Average grade. ______ ____ ____
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions______ ____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.
Payment above basic rates_______
02
03
04
05
06
07

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

The Commission regulates common carriers engaged in
interstate and foreign commerce, including railroads,
motor carriers, water carriers, pipelines, and contract car­ Unliquidated obligations, start of year__
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
riers by motor vehicle and water.
An increase of $1,080,500 is proposed for 1954 prin­ Obligations incurred during the year .
cipally for highway safety work, valuation of railroads Deduct:
and pipelines, and disposition of formal proceedings in rate
Reimbursable obligations______
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
and operating authority cases.
Obligated balance carried to certified
1.
Applications, complaints, and other proceedings.— claims account___________________
This work consists of regulating rates, granting operating
Total expenditures_______ .
authorities, approving abandonment of or extensions of Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations. .
railroad lines, financial reorganizations, and rate agree­
Out of prior authorizations___ _______
ments between carriers.




1952 actual

1952 actual
$815.032
8, 959
9, 534.072

$483, 969

$523,469

9, 339, 692

10,405,000

10, 358, 063

9, 823, 661

10, 928,469

72, 344
483, 969

20.192
523,469

5, 000
623,469

9, 790, 967

9, 280,000

10, 300, 000

8, 993.184
797, 783

8, 800, 000
480, 000

9, 780,000
520, 000

10, 783

119

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS

Railroad Safety, Interstate Commerce Commission—

Railroad safety: For expenses necessary in performing functions
authorized by law (45 U. S. C. 1-15, 17-21, 35-46, 61-64; 49 U. S. C.
26) to insure a maximum of safety in the operation of railroads,
including authority to investigate, test experimentally, and report
on the use and need of any appliances or systems intended to pro­
mote the safety of railway operation, including those pertaining to
block-signal and train-control systems, as authorized by the joint
resolution approved June 30, 1906, and the Sundry Civil Act of
May 27, 1908 (45 U. S. C. 35-37), and to require carriers by railroad
subject to the Act to install automatic train-stop or train-control
devices as prescribed by the Commission (49 U. S. C. 26), including
the employment of inspectors and engineers, [and including not to
exceed $163,050 for expenses of travel, $974,500] $1,010,000.
(Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $974,500

Estimate 1954,

$1,010,000

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations _
. . .
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior
years
__ _______
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account
Total expenditures____...

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$83,210
1,015, 975

$53,968
974,500

$58,468
1,010,000

1,099,185

1,028,468

1,068,468

30
53,968

58, 468

68,468

. 1,484
97

_____

1,043, 606

970,000

1,000,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations___ ...

962,088
81, 518

920,000
50,000

945,000
55,000

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$974, 500

$1, 010,000

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources________________ _________

$1,037, 000

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

1 037,030
,
-21, 055

974, 500

1,010,000

Obligations incurred_____________

1, 015, 975

974, 500

1 010,000
,

30

N te.—Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
o
sale of personal property (41 T S. C. 231 (c)).
J.
OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

Locomotive Inspection, Interstate Commerce Commission—

Locomotive inspection: For expenses necessary in the enforce­
ment of the Act of February 17, 1911, entitled “An Act to promote
the safety of employees and travelers upon railroads by compelling
common carriers engaged in interstate commerce to equip their
locomotives with safe and suitable boilers and appurtenances
thereto”, as amended (45 U. S. C. 22-34), [including not to exceed
$112,620 for expenses of travel, $709,500] $74-0,000. (Independent
O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953, $709,500

Estimate 1954,

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1953 estimate

1952 actual

1953 estimate

General office_______ _____________
Legal section__________ _________
Inspection of safety appliances_______
Inspection of hours of service________
Inspection of signal systems_________

$172, 716
20,320
518,147
101, 597
203,195

$165, 665
19, 490
496, 995
97, 450
194, 900

$171, 700
20, 200
515,100
101, 000
202, 000

1, 015, 975

974, 500

1,010, 000

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources
_ ________ __________ .

$747,100

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

747,162
-13, 650

709, 500

740, 000

Obligations incurred_____________

733, 512

709, 500

740,000

Safety appliances and installations are inspected, and
serious railroad accidents are investigated. Workload
data are set forth below.

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1, 225,000

$127, 006
582, 494

$136, 547
603, 453

Obligations incurred.. _____ _ _ ..

733, 512

709, 500

740, 000

1,228,000

1, 227, 938

7, 700

7,725

4,100
58

4,150
60

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

127
124

124
123

124
123

$6, 531
GS-10.3

$6, 517
GS-10.3

$6, 517
GS-10.3

$802,970

$798,824

$798,824

3,088
426

3,072
1,000

3,072
1,000

Total number of permanent positions......
Average number of all employees_______

Total personal services____ ____
Travel______ ____ ___ __ ___
Transportation of things_______ ...
Communication services___
___
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials______ ___
Equipment____
______________
15 Taxes and assessments
______ _____

806,484
200,117
234
1,073
660
5,543
1,513
351

802,896
163, 050
200
1,100
600
5,400
954
300

802,896
198, 550
200
1,100
600
5, 400
954
300

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary. _____ ____________
Average grade
_ ______________

Obligations incurred___ . . . ______

1,015,975

974, 500

1,010,000

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees. _ __ _
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:.
Average salary___ ______________
Average grade_____ ______ _____
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base______ _ .
___________
Payment above basic_____ _
rates
02
03
04
07
08
09

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

7, 717




1952 actual

1954 estimate

$126, 397
607,115

____

4,162
59

Object classification

1953 estimate

__

1. General office
.
2. Inspection of locomotives.

Number of inspections._ ______
Number of hours-of-service reports tabu­
lated. . . ______
. . . _ ___
Number of signal and train-control in-.
spections.. __________ ____________
Number of accidents investigated_______

62

N te.—Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
o
sale of personal property (41 U. S. C. 231 (c)).

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

1952 actual

$740,000

1954 estimate

Obligations incurred_____________

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

1954 estimate

$709, 500

1952 actual
Description

$740,000

Compliance with the Locomotive Boiler Inspection Act
is enforced to promote the safety of employees and travel­
ers on railroads. Workload data are shown below.
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

101, 700
11, 430

106, 200
12, 213

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

108
104

103
103

103
103

$5, 588
GS-8.3

$5, 709
GS-8.4

$5,709
GS-8.4

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions________ ____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base _ ._ ___ ___________

$580, 387

$588,897

$588, 897

2,232

2, 265

2, 265

Total personal services_______

582, 619

591,162

591,162

Number of locomotives inspected
___
Number of locomotives found defective...

110, 483
12, 319

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

1952 actual

120

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION— Con.

1952 actual

Locomotive Inspection, Interstate Commerce Commission—Con.
o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Travel_________________
Transportation of things.
Communication services...
Other contractual services.
Supplies and materials___
Equipment_____________
Taxes and assessments____

$143,495
41
2,433
156
1,627
2,992
149

$112,620
50
1, 750
460
1,640

$143,120
50
1, 750
460
1,640

150

150

Obligations incurred___

02
03
04
07
08
09
15

733, 512

709, 500

168
,6

168
,6

740,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$37,702

$47,202

709, 500
747, 202

740,000
787,202

62
37, 702

47, 202

47,202

232
755,841

700,000

740,000

695, 776
60,065

665,000
35,000

695, 000
45,000

$57, 577
2, 748
733, 512
793, 837

Unliquidated obligations, start of year---Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year----Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account ._ __ ___
Total expenditures__________.
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ __ .
Out of prior authorizations___________

Statem of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ent
otor
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Appropriation
Number

General expenses. Interstate Com­
merce Commission.

2
0

Gross
cost

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
Allowance
Number (estimated) chased

2
0

$28,000

$5,000

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

$23,000

Contribution to Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin: To enable the Secretary of the Treasury to pay in advance
to the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin the Fed­
eral contribution toward the expenses of the Commission during
the current fiscal year in the administration of its business in the
conservancy district established pursuant to the Act of July 11,
1940 (54 Stat. 748), $5,000. (Independent Offices Appropriation
Act, 1958.)
Appropriated 1953, $5,000
Estimate 1954, $5,000

Public purpose and users

All motor vehicles to be used by district directors, district
supervisors, and other employees in connection with field
work of the Bureau of Motor Carriers.

A O NSAAL BEF ROLGTO--C n u d
MU T VI AL O BI AI N o tin e

INTERSTATE COMMISSION ON THE POTOMAC
RIVER BASIN
Contribution to Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin—

Cs o
ot f
h eo
ir f
mto
or
vh le
e ic s

1952 actual
-$76,494

Balance available in subsequent year
Unobligated balance, estimated savings
Obligations incurred___

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Contribution to the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin—1952, $5,000;
1953, $5,000; 1954, $5,000.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin was created by compact among the four States in
the basin, the District of Columbia, and the Federal
Government to abate water pollution. The estimates
included under this appropriation title represent the
Federal Government’s pro rata contribution to the general
expenses of the Commission.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1952, $5,000; 1953, $5,000; 1954, $5,000.

1954 estimate

-$19,056

109,506

____

57,438

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Administration—1952, $109,506; 1953, $57,438.

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BE T
Object classification

1952 actual

FNSAALBEFROLGTO
UD VI AL O BI AI N
Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1952, $5,000; 1953, $5,000; 1954, $5,000.

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees____
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary...... ......
Average grade_________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_________________________
Payment above basic rates..............
02
03
04
06
07
08
09
15

$5,641
GS-8.0

$5,672
GS-8.2

$103,718

$52,538

159
160

150

Obligations incurred..

104,037
2,523
17
1,834
48
128
884
25

52,688

109, 506

Total personal services..
Travel__________________
Transportation of things_
_
Communication services---Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services..
Supplies and materials____
Equipment_____________
Taxes and assessments

57,438

20
,0 0
500
900
500
500
300
25
25

1
0

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS

Obligations incurred during year (total expenditures out of current authorizations)—
1952, $5,000; 1953, $5,000; 1954, $5,000.

1952 actual

MOTOR CARRIER CLAIMS COMMISSION

Salaries and Expenses, Motor Carrier Claims Commission—

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate .. . ........ .......
Prior year balance available______ _____

$186,000

Total available for obligation.........

186,000




1953 estimate
$76,494
76,494

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year...
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

1954 estimate

Total expenditures .
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.........
Out of prior authorizations..............-.

$3, 587
109, 506

1953 estimate
$3,294
57,438
60, 732

3,294
3, 400
106, 399
106,299

10
0

60, 732
60, 732

1954 estimate

121

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

MUTUAL SECURITY AGENCY

N
ote.—
Obligations incurred under allocations from “ Mutual security, funds appro­
priated to the President,” are shown in the schedules of the parent appropriation.
NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR
AERONAUTICS
Salaries and Expenses, National Advisory Committee for Aero­
nautics—

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Committee,
including one Director at not to exceed $17,500 per annum so long
as the position is held by the present incumbent[, and including];
contracts for the making of special investigations and reports and
for engineering, drafting and computing services; equipment; [not
to exceed $240,050 for expenses of travel;] maintenance and opera­
tion of aircraft; purchase of [four] ten passenger motor vehicles for
replacement only; not to exceed $100 for newspapers and periodicals;
and services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946
(5 U. S. C. 55a); [$48,586,100] $58,830,000. (50 U. S. C. Supp. IV
151, 157, 158,159,160; Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $48,586,100
Estimate 1954, $58,830,000
A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$48, 586,100
31, 000

$58, 830,000
12,000

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Reimbursements from other accounts___
Reimbursements from non-Federal
sources____________________ _ _ __

$50, 650, 000
16, 554
10, 005

23, 000

30,000

Total available for obligation____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

50, 676, 559
-113, 391

48, 640,100

58, 872,000

Obligations incurred____________i

50, 563,168

48, 640,100

staff several newly completed specialized research facilities
of considerable size and to carry on intensified research in
other facilities used in the solution of the most urgent
aerodynamic problems.
2. Power plants research.—The research under this head
centers on the newer forms of aircraft and m
issile power
plants, such as turbo-jet, ram-jet, turbo-propeller, and
rocket engines. The increase in funds is to staff newly
constructed propulsion research facilities and to permit
an expansion of effort in several critical fields of research.
3. Aircraft structural research.—In 1954 increased em­
phasis will be placed on structural problems resulting
from aerodynamic heating, increased aerodynamic and
ground handling loads, thinner wings, and the novel con­
figurations of modern high-speed aircraft. The increased
funds are also required to staff structural research facil­
ities coming into initial operation during the year, and to
permit expanded flight research activity at the High-Speed
Flight Station.
4. Operating problems research.—Continuing studies now
under way on aircraft icing, flight through turbulent
weather, and the causes and prevention of fires in aircraft
are of vital importance to civil aviation as well as to the
operation of military aircraft.
5. Headquarters management and coordination.

58, 872, 000

N ote.—Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of
sale of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

1952 actual

Aerodynamic research _____________
Power plants research__ _ ________
Aircraft structural research
___ __
Operating problems research.
___ .
Headquarters management and coor­
dination __ . .
_________ _
Obligations incurred _. .

______

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$25, 640, 342
16, 526, 524
5, 475,000
1. 693, 000

$23, 482,000
15, 685, 000
6, 452, 000
1, 795, 000

$28,165,000
18, 457, 000
9, 325,000
1, 685, 000

1, 228, 302

1, 226,100

1, 240, 000

50, 563,168

48, 640,100

58, 872, 000

OLGTOSB LCT N
BI AI N Y OAI S
O
Location

1952 actual

1. NACA Headquarters, Washington,
D. C_________________ ____ ____
Contracts for research at educational
and scientific institutions and other
Government agencies___________
2. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory,
Langley Field, Va_________ _____
Pilotless Aircraft Station, Wallops
Island, Va_____________________
High-Speed Flight Station, Ed­
wards, Calif_______ __ ________
3. Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mof­
fett Field, Calif________________
Western Coordination Office, Los
Angeles, Calif.______ ________
4. Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory,
Cleveland, Ohio_______________
Wright-Patterson Coordination Of­
fice, Dayton, Ohio_______ ______
Obligations incurred.......... ........

$1,200,617

1953 estimate 1954 estimate
$1,195,700

$1,208,600

997,551

960,000

1,000,000

19,692,928

19,236,900

23, 995,600

777,545

648,000

836,030

1,208,163

1,422,000

1,919,100

8,277,495

7,803, 370

9, 563,900

16,280

17,630

17, 800

18,381,205

17,343, 730

20, 317,870

11,384

12, 770

13,100

50, 563,168

48,640,100

58,872,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

7,708
1
7,600

7,655
1
7,220

9,300
2
8,202

$5,124
GS-8.0

$5,273
GS-8.2

$5,354
GS-8.4

$3,404
CPC-5.8

$3,509
CPC-5.9

$3,538
CPC-5.9

$4,241
NACA-9.3

$4, 343
NACA-9.4

$4,293
NACA-9.5

$35,216, 796 • $35,499,044
6,899
6,200
139,979
135,985
321,164
256, 741

$40,186,000
9,300
175,400
400,300

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
O B L IG A T IO N S

The Committee (NACA) conducts scientific research
Object classification
in aeronautics devoted almost entirely to problems of
military aviation but having applications to commercial
aviation as w
ell. The research is carried on mainly at Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
its three major laboratories and two auxiliary flight sta­ Average number of all employees..... .......
tions, supplemented by research sponsored at scientific Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
and educational institutions and other Government agen­
Average salary________ ___________
Average grade __ ____ ______ ____
cies. Close coordination with the aeronautical programs
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
of the Department of Defense is maintained through
Average salary___________ _______
Average grade__________ _______ _
military representation on the NACA and its subcom­
Grades established by the Director of
the NACA:
mittees, and NACA representation on the aeronautics and
Average salary___________________
guided m
issiles committees of the Research and Develop­
Average grade_________ __________
ment Board of the Department of Defense. Most of the 01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
research is directed toward obtaining basic scientific and
Part-time and temporary positions.
engineering data for continued improvement in the design
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.
Payment above basic rates..............
of military aircraft, missiles, and their power plants.
Total personal services......... .......
1.
Aerodynamic research.—This research seeks to de­02 Travel__________________________
velop the design of aircraft and m
issiles which can perform 03 Transportation of things___________
04 Communication services................ .
effectively in the critical transonic and supersonic speed 05 Rents and utility services:
Electric power____ ._ _________
ranges and at the low speeds of take-off and landing.
Other rents and utility services___
06 Printing and reproduction..............
Data obtained from actual flight tests of high-speed piloted 07 Other contractual services:
Repairs and alterations..................
and pilotless aircraft are correlated with wind-tunnel re­
Miscellaneous contractual services. _
sults and theoretical studies. The increased funds are to
Research contracts.........................»




BY

OBJECTS

1952 actual

35,684,838
304,667
148,999
133,175
3,134,312
467,439
102,514
1,316,246
275,428
763,051

35,897,970
240,575
127,050
139, 500
3 , 075,

40, 771,000
325,000
140,000
145,000

770
560,350
116,700

4 , 212,000

738,800
219,950
750,000

1,350,000
266,000
790,000

600,000
117,000

122

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR
AERONAUTICS— Continued

PROGRAM

Salaries and Expenses, National Advisory Committee for Aero­
nautics-Continued
o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$234,500
147,897
5, 276, 440
2, 525, 381
778
51, 752
50, 567, 417

$210,000
86,500
4, 494, 850
1, 925,160
1,000
60, 925
48, 645,100

$210,000
84,000
6, 000, 000
3, 758, 000
1,000
109, 000
58, 878, 000

4, 249
50, 563,168

5, 000
48, 640,100

6.000
58, 872, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$9, 000, 867
50, 563,168

$8, 409, 057
48, 640,100

$6, 750, 000
58, 872, 000

59, 564, 035

57, 049,157
54, 000
150, 000
6, 750, 000

42, 000
160, 000
10, 300, 000

112, 812

95,157

120, 000

Total expenditures________ ____ ..

50, 872, 322

50, 000, 000

55, 000, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows*
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations __________

43, 037, 864
7, 834, 458

42, 600, 000
7, 400, 000

49, 200, 000
5, 800, 000

The work of the NACA requires the continuing modern­
ization of its research facilities and the construction of
certain additional facilities for conducting research beyond
the capabilities of existing equipment.
1. Aerodynamic research.—The 1954 estimates provide
for modification of two existing wind tunnels each at the
Langley and Ames Laboratories to increase their useful­
ness for high-speed aerodynamic research, for one new
small wind tunnel at the Langley Laboratory for research
at very high speeds, and for improvements to electrical
substation facilities, also at the Langley Laboratory.
2. Power plants research.—The 1954 program includes
a large rocket-engine research facility at the Lewis Labo­
ratory and the replacement of heat accumulator apparatus
used in tests at the Wallops Island Station.
3. Aircraft structural research.—The proposed modifica­
tion of an existing tunnel at the Langley Laboratory,
although required primarily for aerodynamic research,
w increase the capacity of this tunnel for structural
ill
research.
OLGTOSB LCT N
BI AI N Y OAI S
O

65, 622, 000

26, 559
143, 285
8, 409, 057

A ftD PERFO RM AN CE

07 Other contractual services—Con.
Services performed by other agen­
cies:
Research __ _________________
Other special services______ ____
08 Supplies and materials____________
09 Equipment_ _____
_
- ____
1 Refunds, awards, and indemnities_
.3
_
15 Taxes and assessments___ ________
Subtotal_____________________ _
Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence
_ _ _ _ ____________ _____
Obligations incurred____________

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations- __________
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.__
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account___ _______________

Location
1. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory,
Langley Field, Va________________
2. Pilotless Aircraft Station, Wallops is­
land, Va_
___________________
3. High-Speed Flight Station, Edwards,
Calif ____
4. Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mof­
fett Field, Calif_________ _______
5. Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory,
Cleveland', Ohio_____ ____ _
Obligations incurred-

Construction and Equipment, National Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics—

Construction and equipment: For construction and equipment at
laboratories and research stations of the Committee, including the
acquisition of not to exceed ten acres of land adjacent to the Lewis Flight
Propulsion Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio, $14,600,000, to remain avail­
able until expended[, $17,700,000, of which $1,000,000 shall be
available for payments under contracts entered into pursuant to
the contract authority heretofore granted under this head]. (50
Estimate 1954,

$14,600,000

« Excludes $1,000,000 for liquidation of contract authorization, which is set forth below
under the title “ Construction and equipment (liquidation of contract authorization),
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.”
N o t e . —$11,700,000 of the 1952 appropriation for this account is excluded from this sched­
ule and set forth below under the title “ Construction and equipment (liquidation of
contract authorization), National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.”

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate
$14, 600, 000

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation- ________ ___________
Contract authorization _____________

$6, 650, 000

$16, 700, 000

142, 982
6, 324, 470

6, 028, 479

Total available for obligation_____
Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation________ ______ ____ _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings:
Appropriation
........ ................. . __
Contract authorization____ ________

13,117, 452

22, 728, 479

Obligations incurred____________

-6,028,479

14, 600, 000
-3, 400, 000

-31,108
-62, 414
6, 995, 451

22, 728, 479

11, 200, 000

1952 actual

1953 estimate

____ . .. . -

$11,693,120

$3, 725,600

3,800

143,200

310,000

161,000

3,839,000

5,665,791

1, 268,367

1,169, 700

290,000

5, 784, 792

5, 994, 700

6,995,451

22,728,479

11,200,000

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BE T
10 Lands and structures—1952, $6,995,451; 1953, $22,728,479; 1954, $11,200,000.

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$12, 779, 347
404,299
6,995,451

$6,215, 567
253, 248
22, 728,479

$25,822,871

20,179,097

29,197, 294

37,022,871

11,741, 742
6, 215, 567

1,183,813
25, 822,871

4,200,000
24,822, 871

2, 221, 788

2,190, 610

8,000,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations
___________

84, 670
2,137,118

100,000
2,090, 610

100,000
7, 900,000

1952 actual
_
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Obligations transferred to “ Construc­
tion and equipment (liquidation of
contract authorization), National
Advisory Committee for Aeronau­
tics” _____ _______ ___________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

11, 200,000

Construction and Equipment (Liquidation of Contract Authoriza­
tion), National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics—

Construction and equipment (liquidation of contract authorization):
For liquidation of obligations incurred pursuant to authority heretofore
granted under this head to enter into contracts for construction and
equipment, $4,200,000. (50 U S. C Supp. IV 151 (b); Independent
.
.
O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

$1,000,000

Estimate 1954,

1952 actual

1954 estimate

1. Aerodynamic research_____________
2. Power plants research__________ ____
3. Aircraft structural research__________

$5, 882, 880
308,159
804,412

$6, 900, 000
6,500,000
9, 328, 479

$4, 230, 000
6, 300, 000
670, 000

Obligations incurred____ ________

6, 995, 451

22, 728, 479

U, 200, 000




$874,860

$4,200,000

A ONSAALBEFR I U AI N F OTAT UHR AI N
MUT VI AL O LQI TO OCNRC ATOI TO
D
Z

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

1954 estimate

Total expenditures______________

U S. C Supp. IV 151 (b); Independent O
.
.
ffices Appropriation Act,
1953.)

Appropriated 1953, ° $16,700,000

1953 estimate

1952 actual

Appropriation or estimate____________
Prior year balance available..... ........ .......
Applied to contract authorization_______
Balance available in subsequent year. __
Obligations incurred___ _________

$11,700,000
225,555
-11,824,969
-100, 586

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$1,000,000
100, 586
-1,100, 586

-4,200,000

$4,200,000

123

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C

The funds required in 1954 are to complete the liquida­
tion of contract authority provided in 1951 for modification
of a large wind tunnel at the Ames Laboratory and for
constructing a facility at the Langley Laboratory for re­
search on aircraft landing gear.
A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$5, 997, 624

$7,425, 577

$2,800,000

11,741,742
17, 739, 366

1,183, 813
8, 609,390

4, 200, 000
7, 000, 000

Funds w made available in the Deficiency Appropria­
ere
tion Act, 1950, for the construction of three large super­
sonic wind tunnels at laboratories of the NACA as author­
ized by the Unitary Wind Tunnel Plan Act of 1949. These
tunnels are to be used for the development, primarily by
industry, of military aircraft and m
issiles.
1. Aerodynamic research.—This will provide for con­
tinuing the construction of two supersonic aerodynamic
tunnels, one each at the Langley and Ames Aeronautical
Laboratories.
2. Power plants research.— This w provide for con­
ill
tinuing the construction of a supersonic propulsion tunnel
at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory.

7,425, 577
10, 313, 789

2, 800, 000
5, 809,390

7, 000, 000

OLGTOSB LCTOS
BI AI N Y OAI N

4,931,827
5,381,962

600,000
5,209, 390

4, 200,000
2, 800, 000

1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations transferred from “ Construc­
tion and equipment, National Advisory
Committee for Aeronautics” ________
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year---------------------------------------------Total expenditures _
_______
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior
year contract authorization. . ___
Out of prior authorizations _________

Miscellaneous
Construction and Equipment, Unitary Plan, National Advisory Com­
mittee for Aeronautics—

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Location

1952 actual

1. Langley Aeronautical Laboratory,
Langley Field, Va. --------------------2. Ames Aeronautical Laboratory, Mof­
fett Field, Calif__________________
3. Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory,
Cleveland, Ohio______________ ..
Obligations incurred___ ________

1953 estimate

$6, 725, 632

1954 estimate

$1, 900, 508

12, 272,050

4,900,006

5,181, 973

16, 999,486

$768, 586

24,179, 655

23, 800,000

768, 586

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

1954 estimate

10 Lands and structures—1952, $24,179,655; 1953, $23,800,000; 1954, $768,586.
Prior year balance available_____ _ ___
Balance available in subsequent year___
Obligations incurred-..

$48, 748, 241
-24, 568, 586

$768, 586

24,179, 655

_______

$24, 568, 586
-768, 586
23, 800, 000

768, 586

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

0 PwrnlQTrfc roGACirph
no

1952 actual

___________

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate
$52,003,918
768, 586

Unliquidated obligations, start of year---Obligations incurred during the year____

1953 estimate

$26, 013, 272
24,179, 655

$46,203,918
23,800,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ 1. Aerodynamic research ... .
________ ___ __________

50,192, 927

70,003, 918

52, 772, 504

46, 203, 918

52,003,918

27, 772, 504

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)_______________

3, 989,009

18,000,000

25,000,000

1954 estimate

$18, 997, 682
5,181,973

$6,800, 514
16,999, 486

$768, 586

24,179, 655

Obligations incurred...__________

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

23, 800, 000

768, 586

Statem of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ent
otor
NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR AERONAUTICS
Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Appropriation
Number
Salaries and expenses, National Advi­
sory Committee for Aeronautics.

110

Gross
cost
$15, 800

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
Allowance be pur­
Number (estimated) chased
10

$3,850

$11, 950

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Public purpose and users

Vehicles to be used in the transaction of official business by
officials and designated employees.

40

1Includes 3 station wagons and 7 sedans.

Statem of proposed obligations for purchase, maintenance, and operation of aircraft for the fiscal year 1954
ent
NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR AERONAUTICS
Aircraft to be
purchased
Appropriation
Number

Gross
cost

Salaries and expenses, National Ad­
visory Committee for Aeronautics.

5Includes 3 aircraft on loan from the military services.
3 Passenger trips only.




Aircraft to be
exchanged

Net cost
of air­
craft
to be
pur­
Allowance
Number (estimated) chased

Old
aircraft
Siill
to be
used
29

Cost of
mainte­
nance and
operation
of aircraft
3 $66,500

Public purpose and users

Aircraft to be used by officials and designated employees for
authorized research activities and for transporting personnel
to remotely located auxiliary research stations.

124

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS

NATIONAL CAPITAL HOUSING AUTHORITY
Maintenance and Operation
Housing Authority—

of Properties,

National

Maintenance and operation of properties: For the maintenance
and operation of properties under title I of the District of Columbia
Alley Dwelling Authority Act, [$45,000] $48,000: Provided, That
all receipts derived from sales, leases, or other sources shall be
covered into the Treasury of the United States monthly: Provided
further, That so long as funds are available from appropriations for
the foregoing purposes, the provisions of section 507 of the Housing
Act of 1950 (Public Law 475, Eighty-first Congress) shall not be
effective. (48 Stat. 930, amended by Public Law 733, 75th Cong.;
Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $45,000
Estimate 1954, $48,000
A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$35,640
658

$45,000

$48,000

Total available for obligation._____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

36,298
-51

45,000

48,000

Obligations incurred_____________

36,247

45,000

48,000

Appropriation or estimate________ .
Reimbursements from other accounts. -

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Maintenance and operation of title I properties—1952, $36,247; 1953, $45,000; 1954, $48,000.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
The National Capital Housing Authority operates
7,661 units, of which 117 are under title I of the District
of Columbia Alley Dwelling Act of 1934 and 7,544 are
under title II. Operating expenses of title I properties
are financed by this appropriation, and rental income is
paid into miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury. Opera­
tions of the title II properties are financed under a trust
revolving fund, the estimates for which appear in part
III of this Budget.
T L I POETE— CM ADEPNE
I E RPRI S I OE N XES
T
N
1952 actual
Operating income-------------------------------

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$58, 271

$56, 219

$58,172

Expenses:
32, 344
Operating____ _________ __________
Major repairs and replacements_______3, 245

33,197
11, 803

33, 281
14, 719

Total expenses................................

35, 589

45, 000

48,000

Net income (to U. S. Treasury)___

22, 682

11, 219

10,172

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

6
6

7
6

7
6

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees_______

1952 actual

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average g r a d e . ________ _____
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary. _ ______________ __
Average grade________ __________

$4, 556
GS-6.3

$4,496
GS-6.4

$4, 559
GS-6.5

$3,055
CPC-4.1

$3,081
CPC-4.2

$3,121
CPC-4.2

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions________ ____
Payment above basic rates______

$22, 220
1, 774

$22,402
2,052

$21, 332
1, 928

Total personal services. ______
Travel___ _____
________ ____
Communication services_____ ______
Rents and utility services. _______
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials_____________
Equipment___ __________________
Lands and structures______________

23,994
42
192
2,836
40
3,485
5,431
227

24,454
37
156
2,916
23
6,413
8,429
689
1,883

23,260
69
158
2, 773
31
9, 894
8,192
1,223
2,400

Obligations incurred— ....................

36,247

45, 000

48,000

02
04
05
06
07
08
09
10




1952 actual

Capital
_
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
Adjustment in obligation of prior years._.
Obligations incurred during the year. __
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations _________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$12,387
354
36,247

$15, 564

$10,000

45,000

48,000

48,988

60, 564

58,000

658
15, 564

10, 000

11,000

___ ________

32, 766

50, 564

47,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______ .
Out of prior authorizations_____ ____

21,199
11, 567

35, 000
15, 564

37.000
10.000

Total expenditures

NATIONAL CAPITAL [PARK AND] PLANNING
COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, National Capital Planning Commission—

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses, as authorized by the
National Capital Planning Act of 1952 (66 Stat. 781), including
services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946
(5 U S. C. 55a); purchase of not to exceed one passenger motor vehicle
.
for replacement only; not to exceed $150 for the purchase of newspapers
and periodicals; payment in advance for membership in societies
whose publications or services are available to mem
bers only or to
m bers at a price lower than to the general public; and transportation
em
and not to exceed $15 per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by
section 5 of the Act of August 2,1946 (5 U.S. C 73b-2), for m bers
.
em
of the Commission serving without compensation; $175,000.

Estimate 1954, $175,000

. N o t e . — Estimate

is for activities previously carried under appropriation “ National
Capital Park and Planning Commission, District of Columbia.”

A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N
Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1954, $175,000.

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Planning—1954, $175,000.

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
The National Capital Planning Commission and its
partner agency, the National Capital Regional Planning
Council, were established by Public Law 592, Eightysecond Congress, approved July 19, 1952. The new
Commission succeeds the old National Capital Park and
Planning Commission. The planning activities of the
former Commission were financed from the District of
Columbia budget. To obtain maximum economy and
coordination of planning policies and programs, this
appropriation provides for a common planning staff to
serve the Commission and the Council.
Special projects of the Commission in 1954 will include
(a) review and recommendations on the District of
Columbia’s proposed long-range capital improvements
program and related regional highway proposals, (b)
comprehensive replanning of the problem areas of the
original city and analysis of basic conditions governing
such planning, and (c) revision of District of Columbia
zoning regulations in cooperation with the Zoning
Commission. Projects of the Regional Planning Council
are expected to include the initial work on regional land
use and transportation plans and an analysis of Federal
developmental programs in the nearby counties. In
addition to the foregoing special projects, the continuing
activities include (a) preparation and amendment of the
comprehensive plan for the National Capital; (6) reports
on Federal and District of Columbia land acquisition and
major construction projects; (c) reports on zoning amend­
ment petitions, transfers between agencies of jurisdiction
over land, highway plan changes, street and alley closings,
sale of public land, and other such projects.

125

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b a t it s o tin e
b ig t n y c iv ie —c n u d

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BE T
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___________________
Average grade___________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary___ ________________
Average grade ____ _____________
0 Personal services:
1
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________________________
Total personal services_______
Travel__________________ _____
Transportation of things___________
Communication services.................
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services_________
Services performed by other agen­
cies_____________________ ____
Supplies and materials____________
Equipment______________________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities_
_
Taxes and assessments.......................
Obligations incurred...... ............ .

Description

1954 estimate
27

1

25

3. Park, parkway, and playground sys­
tem in the District of Columbia, sec.
4, act of May 29,1930, as amended__
Obligations incurred______ ______

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$311,091
361,230

1954 estimate

$257, 766
261, 865

$479,000
1, 250,000

$5.885
GS-9.3

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
The National Capital Planning Commission (successor
to the National Capital Park and Planning Commission)
$142, 408
1 0 acquires land on behalf of the United States for parks,
,00
parkways, and recreation purposes in the District of
592
Columbia and its environs.
144, 000
8,359
1. George Washington Memorial Parkway.—Land is ac­
50
quired along the shores of the Potomac River above and
1,700
1,150
below Washington from Great Falls to Mount Vernon,
15, 427
one-half of the cost of which is borne by the local jurisdic­
537
tions. Obligations through 1953 will complete acquisition
820
2, 550
20 of the lower Virginia section, 35 percent of the upper
0
207
Virginia section, and 75 percent of the upper Maryland
175,000
section. No progress has been made on the lower Mary­
land section. The 1954 program calls for extension of the
A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS
upper Virginia section to the extent that the State of
Virginia and Fairfax County are prepared to contribute
1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
matching funds and completion of the upper Maryland
section.
Obligations incurred during the year____
$175,000
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
2. Extension oj National Capital park system into Mary­
year______________________________
7,000
land.—Land is acquired in cooperation with the MarylandTotal expenditures (out of current
National Capital Park and Planning Commission for ex­
authorizations)_______________
168,000
tension of the metropolitan park system into the Mary­
land environs. The system now includes units of varying
Land Acquisition, National Capital Park, Parkway, and Playground
length in the valleys of Cabin John Branch, Little Falls
System, National Capital Planning Commission—
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway and playground Branch, Rock Creek, Sligo Creek, Northwest Branch,
system: For necessary expenses for the National Capital [Park Paint Branch, and Anacostia River. The 1954 program
and] Planning Commission in connection with the acquisition of includes six proposed units which are in critical danger of
land for the park, parkway, and playground system of the National being destroyed through private real-estate subdivision.
Capital, as authorized by [section 4 of] the Act of May 29, 1930 Heretofore the United States has contributed one-third
(46 Stat. 482), as amended by the Act of August 8, 1946 (60 Stat. 960),
including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August of the cost of such units and has advanced the remaining
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), and real estate appraisers, by contract or two-thirds of the cost for 8 years without interest. For
otherwise without regard to the civil service and classification laws, the 1954 program, it is proposed that Federal participa­
at rates of pay or fees not to exceed those usual for similar services; tion be limited to the one-third contribution, which is the
and purchase of options; [$66,000,] to remain available until
expended, $1,250,000, of which (a) $475,000 shall be available for minimum participation provided by law.
the purposes of section 1 (a) of said Act of May 29, 1930, (b) $296,000
3. Park, parkway, and playground system in the District
shall be available for the purposes of section 1 (b) thereof, and (c) oj Columbia.—Land is also acquired in the District of
$479,000 shall be available for the purposes of section 4 thereof: Columbia, with all expenditures being repaid to the
Provided, That not exceeding [$24,940] $50,000 of the funds
available for land acquisition purposes shall be used during the United States Treasury by the District of Columbia.
current fiscal year for necessary expenses of the Commission Acquisitions are part of the Commission’s comprehensive
(other than payments for land) in connection with land acquisition. plan for the park, parkway, and playground system of the
(Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
National Capital.
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Appropriated 1953, $66,000
Estimate 1954, $1,250,000
A O NS AAL BE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
Object classification
1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
$2,872
CPC-3.0

1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate_____________
Reimbursements from non-Federal
source.____ ___ ______ ____ _____
Prior year balance available___________
Total available for obligation_____
Balance available in subsequent year___
Obligations incurred....................

1953 estimate

$155,000

$66,000

81
402,014
557,095
-195,865
361, 230

.

1954 estimate
$1, 250,000

195,865
261,865

1, 250,000

261, 865

1, 250,000

N te.—Reimbursements from non-Federal source above is due to excess deposit in
o
land acquisition case.
OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

Description
1. George Washington Memorial Park­
way, sec. 1 (a), act of May 29, 1930,
as amended_____________________
2. Extension of National Capital Park
System into nearby Maryland, sec.
1 (b), act of May 29,1930, as amended.




1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$50,137

$2,488

$475,000

2

1,611

296,000

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees. _____

4
1
3

3
3

2
1
2

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
______
Average salary _________
Average grade____ ______
____
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_____________ _ ...
Average grade________ __ ________

$3, 951
GS-4.7

$5, 250
GS-7.0

$6,147
GS-8.5

$12, 615

$10,155
500

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions__
_ ____
Part-time and temporary positions._
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base... . . . ___ _ .. . ________
02
04
06
07

Total personal services. ______
Travel__ _______ ________ ___ _
Communication services_ ________
_
Printing and reproduction: Blue­
printing, photostating, etc________
Other contractual services:
Services performed by other agen­
cies__________________________
Stenographic reporting services___

$2, 712
CPC-3.0
$7, 550
5, 350
60

119

366

12,960

12, 734
1,000
300

11, 021
1, 000
300

190

400

450

302
295

2,100
300

850
300

126

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

Miscellaneous

NATIONAL CAPITAL [PARK AND] PLANNING
COMMISSION— Continued
Land Acquisition, National Capital Park, Parkway, and Playground
System, National Capital Planning Commission— Continued

District of Columbia Redevelopment, National Capital Planning
Commission—

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
1952 actual
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

Prior year balance available___________
Balance available in subsequent year___

07 Other contractual services—Con.
Real property title examinations_
_
Real property surveys. __________
Real property appraisals________
08 Supplies and materials __________
09 Equipment______________________
10 Lands and structures______________
15 Taxes and assessments _____ ______

$22, 268
1, 342
2,200
24
179
321, 385
85

Obligations incurred________ ____

361, 230

$1, 700
1,200
2,500
300

Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
_
Obligations incurred during the year____

238, 606
261, 865

Obligations incurred........................

148

139

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

1, 250,000

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BE T
08 Supplies and materials—1952, $148; 1953, $139.

1953 estimate
$812, 239
261, 865
1,074,104

$178,200
1, 250,000
1, 428, 200

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS

1954 estimate

1952 actual

1953 estimate

_
Unliquidated obligations, start of year_
Obligations incurred during the year____

$224
148

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__________ __________________

372

480

1, 249, 200

341

1,071,000
178, 200

Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)______ _________

31

1954 estimate

$341
139

81
812, 239

178, 200

179,000

447, 644

895, 904

f
447,644 I

Total expenditures______________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________ }
Out of prior authorizations___________

$139

Administration—1952, $148; 1953, $139.

$898, 734
361, 230
1, 259, 964

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations
________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

$287
-139

$12,154
10, 350
12, 950
300
325
1, 200, 000

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

1954 estimate

1954 estimate

50,000
845,904

480

Statement of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
otor
NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
Motor vehicles to
be purchased
Appropriation
Number
Salaries and expenses, National Capi­
tal Planning Commission.

1

Gross
cost

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
Allowance
Number (estimated) chased

$1,400

1

$200

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET

NATIONAL CAPITAL SESQUICENTENNIAL
COMMISSION

Object classification

National Capital Sesquicentennial Commission—
1952 actual
Prior year balance available___________
Reimbursements received from nonFederal sources
____ _ _ ____ _

1953 estimate

69, 446

1,172,132

264, 873

-1,100, 000
-56,315

1952 actual

1953 estimate

8
26
10
$6, 557
$51, 346
82, 824

$13, 056

Total personal services______ _
Travel__________________________
Communication services____ .. . ___
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services__________
Supplies and materials__________ _
Equipment______________________

134,170
2, 210
1,649
2, 977
108, 570
1,969
28

13, 056
547
255
623
1,161
175

Obligations incurred_____________

251, 573

15, 817

02
04
06
07
08
09

15,817

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

Total number of permanent positions___
Full time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees ___•
____

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions________ ____
Part-time and temporary positions.

933

Obligations incurred_____________

1954 estimate

1. Construction of buildings and improve­
ments to grounds
2. Conducting Sesquicentennial special
_____________________
events _
3. Administration____________________
4. Decrease in prior year obligations

69, 857
107,100
-112, 084

$15, 817

07 Other contractual services ______ ..
08 Supplies and materials
_________

$8,000
2, 000

Obligations incurred--------------------

264, 873

15, 817

Obligations incurred_____________

10,000




1953 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

1954 estimate

$1,171,199

1, 436, 072
-1,171,199

1952 actual

NATIONAL CAPITAL SESQUICENTENNIAL
COMMISSION

$1,366, 626

Total available for obligation_____
Balance available in subsequent y e a r.__
Carried to surplus _ ___
___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings

Public purpose and users

Used by members and staff of Commission for inspection trips
in connection with acquisition of land and planning matters.

$1,200

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI A L O BI AI N

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

$200,000

ALLOCATION TO NATIONAL PARK SERV­
ICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

2

1954 estimate

127

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

o l a io s b o j c s c n u d
b ig t n y b e t — o tin e
Object classification

1952 actual

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

ALLOCATION TO COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS,
DETARTMENT*OF THE INTERIOR

07 0 ther contractual services (obligations
incurred)____________________ . _

$3,300

SUMMARY

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_______
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________
Part-time and temporary positions.

$51, 346
82,824

$13,056

134,170

1,649
2, 977
119,870
3, 969
264,873

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the National
Labor Relations Board to carry out the functions vested in it by the
Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947 (29 U. S. C. 141-167), and
other laws, including expenses of attendance at meetings concerned
with the work of the Board when specifically authorized by the
Chairman or the General Counsel; and services as authorized by sec­
tion 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); [$9,000,000:
Provided, That no part of this appropriation shall be available to
organize or assist in organizing agricultural laborers or used in
connection with investigations, hearings, directives, or orders con­
cerning bargaining units composed of agricultural laborers as referred
to in section 2 (3) of the Act of July 5, 1935 (49 Stat. 450), and as
amended by the Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947, and as
defined in section 3 (f) of the Act of June 25, 1938 (52 Stat. 1060)]
$9,800,000.
Act, 1953.)

13, 056
547
255
623
1,161
175

Obligations incurred___________ .

02
04
06
07
08
09

Total personal services_____
Travel_____________________
Communication services____ . _.. Printing and reproduction______ _ .
Other contractual services, _______ Supplies and materials____________
Equipment__________ ___________

Salaries and Expenses, National Labor Relations Board—

(47 U S. C 222; Labor-Federal Security Appropriation
.
.

15,817

21
,2 0

Appropriated 1953, $9,000,000

Estimate 1954,

A O NS AALBE FROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year___
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations___________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year__

1953 estimate

$182, 317
264,873

245, 205

69, 446
229, 388

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Reimbursements
from
non-Federal
sources__
_ _ ______
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$8, 295, 668

$9,000,000

$9,800,000

817
18, 329

2,500
4, 650

2,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. .

1954 estimate

$229, 388
15,817

447,190

$9,800,000

8, 314, 814
-51, 612

9, 007,150

9, 802, 000

8, 263, 202

9, 007,150

9, 802,000

933

Obligations'incurred____________

N o t e . — Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from the proceeds of sale
of personal property (40 U. S. C. 481 (c)).

Total expenditures (out of prior au­
thorizations) _________________

244, 272

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Description

NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY

National Industrial Recovery—

A ONS AAL BE FROLGTO
MUT VI AL O BI AI N
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Prior year balance available_____ _____
Balance available in subsequent year___

$1,337
-420

$420

Obligations incurred ____ ______

917

1954 estimate

1952 actual

1. Field investigation of cases and in­
formal disposition or preparation for
formal processing_________________
2. Trial examiner hearing of unfair labor
_________
practice cases,_ __
3. Board adjudication of cases. _ __ _ __
4. Securing of compliance with Board
orders,
including
enforcement
through court orders______________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$5,348,185

$5, 589, 601

$5, 831,025

648, 728
3,085,829

756, 974
1, 200,845

1,043, 827
1,307,097

1,180, 460

1, 459, 730

1, 620,051

8, 263, 202

9, 007,150

9,802, 000

420

Obligations incurred__

PORMADPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S
Land acquisition—1952, $917; 1953, $420.

OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Object classification

02
04
05
06
07
08
10

ALLOCATION TO FISH AND WILDLIFE
SERVICE

1952 actual

1953 estimate

Travel—
_____________________
Communication services._____
Rents and utility services _______
Printing and reproduction________
Other contractual services
___
Supplies and materials_ __________
_
Lands and structures _____ ________

$87
5
269
60
3
34
459
917

1954 estimate

$420

Obligations incurred.___________

420

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account _
___
Total expenditures (out of prior
authorizations)..... ....... ...............




__

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$87,159
917

$750
420

$370

88,076

1,170

370

750

The Board resolves representation disputes in industry
and rem
edies and prevents unfair labor practices by em­
ployers and unions. The estimate does not include funds
for representation elections in the building construction
industry or for “last offer” elections in national emergency
disputes because these elections have not been required
to any extent in recent years.
1. Field investigation of cases and informal disposition
or preparation for formal processing.—Charges of unfair
labor practices and petitions for elections to resolve
representation disputes are investigated in the regional
office in which they are filed. Failing settlement, dis­
missal, or withdrawal of these cases, they are prepared for
public hearing. About 87 percent of the unfair labor
practice cases and 73 percent of the election cases are
closed without the need for public hearing or further
formal action.

370

1952 actual

75,350
11,976

CASES PROCESSED IN FIELD 1

Charges of unfair labor practices
____
Petitions for representation elections____
800

5,402
10,702

370
1 As distinguished from the number of cases filed.

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

6,000
11,200

6,393
11,150

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

128

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, National Labor Relations Board—Continued

2. Trial examiner hearing of unfair labor practice cases.—
Trial exam
iners conduct public hearings which are the
basis of the findings and recommendations set forth in
intermediate reports. In fiscal year 1952, 344 reports
w issued; for 1953, the estimate is 386; for 1954, 550.
ere
3. Board adjudication oj cases.—In unfair labor practice
cases, if no exceptions are filed within 20 days of issuance
of the trial examiner’s intermediate report, it takes effect
as a Board order. Exceptions are filed to approximately
80 percent of the intermediate reports and are referred to
the Board for decision. In contested representation cases
the Board may either order an election to determine the
choice of bargaining representative or dism the case.
iss
DC I N I SE B TEBAD
EI OS SUD Y H OR
S
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD
Salaries and Expenses, National Mediation Board—

Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the National
Mediation Board, including stenographic reporting services as
authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a),
[$422,000] $441,000. {45 U. S. C. 154; Labor-Federal Security
Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Appropriated 1953,

Estimate 1954,

$422,000

$441,000

A O NS AAL BE F ROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N
Appropriation or estimate (obligations incurred)—1952, $398,494; 1953, $422,000; 1954,
$441,000.

OLGTOS B A TVTE
BI AI N Y CI I I S

Description

1952 actual

1. Mediation of labor-management dis­
putes and determination of collective
bargaining representatives in trans­
portation industry
2. Administration
____________________
Obligations incurred___ _ ______

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$392,420
29, 580
422, 000

$411,000
30,000
441,000

$370,600
27,894
398, 494

PORMA DPROMNE
RGA N E F R A C
The Board mediates labor disputes and determines col­
lective-bargaining representatives for the 700 carriers and
4.
Securing of compliance with Board orders, including 1.5 million employees in the railroad and airline industries.
enforcement through court orders.—If the parties do not Workload is expected to remain relatively stable.
voluntarily comply with the Board’s orders, the Board
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
must request the courts to enforce its decision. Most of
these contested decisions involve unfair labor practices;
Object classification
1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
in the last 2 years there has been a sharp rise from 60 to
80 percent in number of these taken to the courts. In Total number of permanent positions......
41
43
43
41
43
43
1952, 195 Board decisions of all kinds required court liti­ Average number of all employees_______
gation; for 1953, the estimate is 262; and for 1954, 325.
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary__________ _ ______
$6, 487
$6,625
$6, 487
OLGTOS B OJ CS
BI AI N Y BET
Unfair labor practice
__- ___ - ____
Representation _ _________ ________

256
1,789

328
2,396

508
2,275

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

Average grade___ ______ ___

Object classification

1952 actual

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees___ ___

1,399
16
1,255

1,375
17
1,315

1,417
18
1,391

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____ _____________
Average grade
___________________

$5. 327
GS-7.8

$5, 484
GS-8.2

$5, 647
GS-8.4

$6, 706.027
64, 213

$7, 250, 450
68, 800

$7, 822, 200
70,800

25,174
47, 751

30, 400
73,600

33, 400
73, 600

Total personal services_________
Travel, _______ ___ ________
Transportation of things____ .. . _
Communication services-.________
Rents and utility services________
Printing and reproduction_________
Other contractual services________
Services performed by other agen­
cies
_ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Supplies and materials.________ _
Equipment________ _____ ______
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments.._ __________

6,843,165
580,032
14, 650
223,146
36, 760
225, 629
195,074

7, 423, 250
608, 800
13,800
233,100
25.000
300,300
249, 500

8,000,000
650.000
14, 500
238,500
24.000
405.000
311.000

4,114
92, 428
40, 333
325
7,546

4. 600
96, 800
42.000

5,000
98.000
46.000

10,000

10,000

Obligations incurred_____________

8, 263, 202

9,007,150

___

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions__________ __
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.. _________ __________ _
Total personal services_______
02 Travel _______ _________
_____
03 Transportation of things ..................
04 Comrfiunicaticn services._____ ____
06 Printing and reproduction________ _
08 Supplies and materials_____________
09 Equipment _. . ________ _______
Obligations incurred_____________

GS-10.8

GS-10.5

GS-10.5

$302, 510

$322, 965

$333,170

985
303, 495
80, 514
50
8, 215
4, 000
2, 220

985
323,950
80, 750
50
10, 000
4, 300
2,500
450
422, 000

1,280
334, 450
90,000
50
10, 000
4,000
2,500
441, 000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$30, 864
398, 494
429,358

$18,919
422.000
440,919

$19, 919
441, 000
460,919

18, 919
410, 439

19, 919
421, 000

19, 919
441,000

382,138
28, 301

404, 000
17, 000

423, 000
18, 000

9,802,000

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base __
_ _
_ ________
Payments above basic rates_______
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13
15

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$662, 487
54, 270
8, 263, 202

$628, 516

$761, 516

9,007,150

9, 802,000

8, 979,959

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligations incurred during the year_ _
_

9, 635, 666

10, 563, 516

7.150
761, 516

2,000
901,516

Deduct:
19,146
Reimbursable obligations.__________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year... 516
628,
Obligated balance carried to certified
10, 587
claims account _ ________________

A A Y I O EP N I U E
N L SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year---------------------------------------------Total expenditures_______ ______
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations____ _____

Arbitration and Emergency Boards, National Mediation Board—

A A Y I O EP N I U E
NL SS F X E DT RS
1952 actual

398, 494

Arbitration and emergency boards: For expenses necessary for
arbitration boards established under section 7 of the Railway Labor
Act, as amended (45 U. S. C. 157), and emergency boards appointed
by the President pursuant to section 10 of said Act (45 U. S. C. 160),
including stenographic reporting services as authorized by section 15
of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), $138,000. (45
U S. C 154, 157; Labor-Federal Security Appropriation Act, 1953.)
.
.

Appropriated 1953,

Estimate 1954,

$138,000

1952 actual

Total expenditures. ____________

8, 321, 710

8, 867,000

7, 673, 412
648, 298

8, 296, 000
571,000

9,060, 000
600,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$138,000

$138,000

138,000

138,000

9, 660,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations...................

$138,000

A O NS AALBE F ROLGTO
MU T VI AL O BI AI N




Appropriation or estimate-------- ----------Unobligated balance, estimated savings.
Obligations incurred--------------------

$138,000
-13,020
124,980

129

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
o b l ig a t io n s b y a c t iv it ie s —

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description

1953 estimate

1952 actual

1954 estimate

Description

co n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

117,300

Adjustment of grievances under collective
bargaining agreements covering rail
carriers and their employees—Con.
(c) Other nonoperating employees_____
(d) Marine employees. _______________

$153,997
38,645

$149,800
41, 500

$150,000
41,300

138,000

Obligations incurred.............. ............

538, 647

570,000

589,000

1. Voluntary arbitration of controversies
between carriers and employees_____
Investigation of disputes threatening
interruption of essential transporta­
tion service_________________________

$9,036

$20, 700

$20, 700

115, 944

117,300

Obligations incurred__________ _____

124, 980

138, 000

2.

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

1. Voluntary arbitration of controversies between carriers
and employees.—When mediation fails, the parties are
urged to submit their differences to a board of arbitration
which includes a neutral member.
2. Investigation of disputes threatening interruption of
essential transportation service.—The President, when
notified of disputes which threaten seriously to interrupt
service, appoints an emergency board to investigate and
report on the dispute to gain a basis for agreement.

Railroad employee grievances resulting form the appli­
cation of contracts may be brought for adjustment to
the 36-man Board composed of an equal number of carrier
and union representatives who are paid by the parties.
The Board is organized into four quasi-independent
divisions having separate jurisdiction over employees in
four different groups of crafts.
o b l ig a t io n s

Object classification

by

o bje cts

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

5
5

6
6

6
6

$96, 745
18, 535
7, 264
2,436

$114,000
15, 000
5, 000
4, 000

$114,000
15, 000
5.000
4.000

124, 980

138,000

01

Obligations incurred-.

___________

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$17,835
124,980

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

60
9
65

59

60

10
68

70

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________

$4,177
GS-5.4

$4,302
GS-5.5

$4,283
GS-5.4

$236,050
184,148

$250, 545
187,500

$253, 626
198,000

769

950
438,995
30,125

974
452,600
30, 500

138,000

Full-time equivalent of all positions______
Average number of all employees ______
Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions________ ______ _
02 Travel. ___________ ________________
05 Rents and utility services____________
06 Printing and reproduction
_ _____

T otal number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

$20, 543
138,000

$22, 543
138,000

142, 815

158, 543

160, 543

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________

20, 543

22, 543

122, 272

136,000

114, 810
7,462

127,000
9,000

127, 000

Total personal services...............
Travel_____________ _ __________ _.
Transportation of things__________ _
Communication services..______ ___
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services____ ______
Supplies and materials______________
E q u ip m e n t...______ ______ _________
Obligations incurred______ ________

137,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____ ________

02
03
04
06
07
08
09

Personal services:
Permanent p osition s_____________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_________________ ___________

420,967
27, 863
134
6,062
70,055
2,897
6 , 680
3,989

2 00

20 0

6 , 500
81,680
3,000
6 , 500
3,000

6 , 500
83,000
3,000
7,000

570,000

589,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$60,970
570,000

$65,970
589,000
654,970

538,647

6 ,2 0 0

23, 543

Total expenditures____ ____________

01

11

N A T IO N A L

R A IL R O A D

ADJUSTM ENT

S a la r ie s a n d E x p e n s e s , N a tio n a l
N a tio n a l M e d ia t io n B o a r d —

R a ilr o a d

1 0 ,0 0 0

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$50, 578
538,647
589, 225

630,970

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r.____ ______________
_______ . . .
Total expenditures ______________

BOARD

A d ju s t m e n t

B oard,

60,970
528, 255

565,000

67,970
587,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations _______
__

480,160

508,000

526,000

65, 970

61,
48,095
57,000
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the National
Railroad Adjustment Board, including stenographic reporting
services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946
N A T IO N A L S C IE N C E F O U N D A T IO N
(5 U. S. C. 55a), [$570,000] $589,000, of which not less than
[$216,000] $227,000 shall be available for compensation (at rates S a l a r i e s a n d E x p e n s e s , N a t i o n a l S c i e n c e F o u n d a t i o n —
not in excess of $75 per diem) and expenses of referees appointed
Salaries
expenses: For expenses necessary
out
pursuant to section 3 of the Railway Labor Act, as amended. purposes ofand National Science Foundation Act of to carry U. S.the
the
1950 (42
C.
(4-5 U S. C 153; Labor-Federal Security Appropriation Act, 1953.)
.
.
1861-1875), including award of graduate fellowships; services as
Appropriated 1953, $570,000
Estimate 1954, $589,000 authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C.
55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for individuals; hire of
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
passenger motor vehicles; [not to exceed $118,750 for expenses of
travel] not to exceed $200 for the purchase of newspapers and peiiodi1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
cals; and reimbursement of the General Services Administration for
security guard services; [$4,750,000] $15,000,000, to remain avail­
able until expended. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriation or estimate____________ _
$575, 749
$570,000
$589,000
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.
-37,102
Appropriated 1953, $4,750,000
Estimated 1954, $15,000,000
Obligations in cu rre d -_____________

538,647

570,000

589,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description
Adjustment of grievances under collective
bargaining agreements covering rail
carriers and their employees:
(a) Train service employees___________
(6 ) Shop employees.............. .....................




1952 actual

$274,790
71,215

0 00

1952 actual

1953 estimate

$303,600
75,100

1954 estimate

$316, 700
81,000

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Prior year balance available_____ _____
Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year____

$3, 500,000

Obligations incurred_______________

3,466,000

3, 500,000
-34,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$4, 750,000
34,000
4, 784,000

$15,000,000

4, 784, 000

15, 000, 000

15,000

000

130

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

N A T IO N A L
S a la r ie s

and

S C IE N C E

F O U N D A T I O N — C o n t in u e d

E x p e n s e s , N a t io n a l S c i e n c e F o u n d a t io n — C o n t in u e d
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Description

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

1. Research policy development, and
services. _ _ _ _ _ _
__
__
__________
2. Research support_______
3. Training of scientific manpower____ __

$559,110
1, 243, 651
1, 663, 239

$1,175,000
2 , 120 , 0 00
1, 489,000

$1, 548,000
8 , 878,000
4, 574,000

Obligations in c u r r e d -._______ _____

3,466,000

4, 784,000

15,000,000

sciences is being given increased support, principally
through grants to educational and other research institu­
tions for specific projects of outstanding merit.
3.
Training oj scientific manpower.—To increase the
supply of trained scientific personnel, the estimate
provides for approximately 1,620 graduate fellowships,
primarily predoctoral, to be awarded for the academ
ic
year 1954-55. There is also a limited program designed
to improve the quality of teaching in individual scientific
fields.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

Object classification

The Foundation is responsible for developing a national
policy for the promotion of basic research and education
in the sciences, for evaluating scientific research programs
undertaken by agencies of the Federal Government, for
supporting basic research, for awarding graduate fellow­
ships, and for fostering the interchange of scientific
information. The Foundation does not itself operate any
research laboratories.
The Foundation is expected to become the principal
agency of the Government for the support of basic research
and for the award of graduate fellowships in the sciences,
giving due consideration to the requirements of other
Federal agencies for the support of basic research directly
related to their statutory functions. The total appropria­
tion recommended amounts to $15,000,000, the maximum
now allowed by basic law. This represents an increase of
$10,250,000 as compared with the current fiscal year.
The statutory ceiling on the Foundation’s appropriations
should be removed. The increase proposed for 1954 is
more than offset by reductions in the justifiable requests
of other agencies supporting basic research and awarding
fellowships, particularly the Department of Defense and
the Public Health Service.
1. Research policy development, and services.—National
science policy is being developed through studies of:
(a) the impact of scientific research and development on
educational institututions and industry; (b) the present
status of research in specific scientific fields; and (c)
research and development conducted or supported by the
Federal Government. The Foundation will formulate
and help carry out a Government-wide program of
collection and dissemination of information on the supply
and demand for scientific and engineering personnel.
2. Research support.—Basic research in the mathe­
matical, physical, biological, medical and engineering

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____________________ __
Average grade. . . __________ ________
Ungraded positions:
Average salary. ________ ___________
01

03
04
05
06
07
08
09

N A T IO N A L SCIE]
M otor vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Appropriation
Num ber

Gross
cost

Number

Allowance
(estimated)

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
chased

Salaries and expenses, National Sci­
ence Foundation.

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

64

136
7
116

142
9
145

$5,135
GS-7.4

$6,132
GS-9.1

$6 ,1 0 0
GS-9.1

$13, 920

$13, 538

$13, 538

354,661

705,000

897,000

34,413

57,000

75,000

1 ,8 6 6

3,000
5,000

4,000
5,000

88
6

5,148
3,848

1 ,0 0 0

1 ,0 0 0

Total personal services_________
Travel_____________________ _______
Transportation of things_____ . . .
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services___________
Printing and reproduction............ .......
Other contractual services...... ............ .
Supplies and materials____________
Equipm ent________________ ________
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
Taxes and assessments_______________

399,936
47,901
2,432
8 ,477
53
3,162
357,845
14,401
31, 208
2,599,416
1,169

771,000

982,000
117,000
3,300
15,000

Obligations incurred_______________

02

Statement of proposed obligations for purchase and

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary em ploy­
m ent____ ________________________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e . __ ______ __________________
Payment above basic r a t e s _______
Payments to other agencies for reim­
bursable details__________________

1952 actual

3,466,000

1 1 2 ,0 0 0

5,000
11, 900
100

100

4,000
740, 400
30,000
3,086, 600
3,000

11,600
845,000
35,000
16,000
12,971,000
4,000

4,784,000

15,000,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$76,901
3,466,000

$2, 272, 351
4, 784,000

$3,023,351
15,000,000

3,542,901

7,056,351

18,023, 351

2,272,351

3,023,351

9,801,351

1, 267, 940

4,033.000

8 , 2 2 2 ,0 0 0

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.................
1,203, 759
Out of_____________
prior authorizations 64,181

2.131.000
1.902.000

5.901.000
2.321.000

11

15

2 0 ,0 0 0

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures _ ______________

2 , 610

of passenger motor vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
F O U N D A T IO N

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

1

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

$ 200

Public purpose and users

T o be used for transaction of official business for the National
Science Foundation.

eral Services Administration for security guard services; hire of
passenger motor vehicles;] and expenses of attendance at meetings
concerned with the purposes of this appropriation; [rental of office
space in the District of Columbia; and purchase and installation
S a la r ie s a n d E x p e n s e s , N a tio n a l S e c u r it y T r a in in g C o m m is s io n —
equipment
the provisions of
For necessary expenses of the National Security Training Com­ of air-conditioning 26, 1942, as without regard to C. 317); $37,500]
mission, including services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of the Act of October S. C. App. amended (40 U. S.of Defense Appro467; Department
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates for individuals not in $55,000. (50 U.
excess of $50 per diem and contracts with temporary or part-time priation Act, 1953.)
Estimate 1954, $55,000
employees may be renewed annually; [reimbursement of the Gen­ Appropriated 1953, $37,500
N A T IO N A L

S E C U R IT Y




S A L A R IE S

T R A IN IN G

AND

EXPENSES

C O M M IS S IO N

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
ANALYSIS OP EXPENDITURES
1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate - _____ ___ _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.
Obligations incurred________ ______

P H IL IP P IN E

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$185,000
-35,246

$37, 500
37, 500

W A R

D A M A G E

C O M M IS S IO N

Salaries and Expenses, Philippine War Damage Commission—

$55,000

149, 754

131

55,000

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 actual

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Developm ent of policies and standards governing the National Security Training
Corps—1952, $149,754; 1953, $37,500; 1954, $55,000.

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct:
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of year_._
Total expenditures (out of prior au­
thorization)______ ____ _ _____

1953 estimate

$14,818

1954 estimate

$3,959 --------------------

8,426
3, 959
2,433

3, 959

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

The National Security Training Commission estab­
lishes policies and standards for the training of members
of the National Security Training Corps, including pro­
vision for the moral and spiritual welfare of the Corps.
This estimate provides for the continuation of a small
staff to enable the Commission to continue its develop­
ment of such policies and standards during congressional
consideration of universal military training.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

7

6
2

4

7

R A IL R O A D

R E T IR E M E N T

B O A R D

P a y m e n t to R a ilr o a d R e tir e m e n t A c c o u n t—

(Permanent indefinite, general account)
[Payment to railroad retirement account: For annual premiums
after June 30, 1952, to provide for the payment of all annuities,
pensions, and death benefits, in accordance with the provisions of
the Railroad Retirement Acts of 1935 and 1937, as amended (45
U. S. C. 228-228s), and for expenses necessary for the Railroad
Retirement Board in the administration of said Acts as may be
specifically authorized annually in appropriation Acts, for credit­
ing to the railroad retirement account, an amount equal to amounts
covered into the Treasury (minus refunds) during each fiscal year
under the Railroad Retirement Tax Act (28 U. S. C. 1500-1538).]
(Labor-Federal Security Appropriation Act, 1953.)

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade-------------------- ------------01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________ _______________ __
Paym ent above basic rates________
Payment to other agencies for reim­
bursable details ____ __
Total personal services________
Travel-- .
___
_ _ _ _ _ _ ___ __
Transportation of things..................
Communication services____ ________
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction____
___
Other contractual services. __ _______
Services performed b y other agen­
cies
_ _
_ ___________ __
Supplies and m aterials....... ............ __
E quipm ent_____ ___________________
Taxes and assessments__________ _ __
Obligations in cu rred --

__________

10
1
6

$6 , 393
GS-9.6

$5, 996
G S - 8 .8

$6 , 268
GS-9.6

$29, 449
7,049

$25, 692
2 ,0 0 0

148

145

1 , 000

1 , 000

34, 732
73, 272
5, 362
125
3, 733
8 , 533
24, 214
11, 063

28, 840
2 ,2 0 0
100
1 ,2 0 0

935
2, 500
600

41, 955
7, 200
100

1, 300
2 , 000

400

6,115
17, 294
43

2 00

25

920
600
500
25

149, 754

37,500

55,000

500
400

$149, 754

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$47, 544
37, 500

$2, 500
55, 000

85,044

1952 actual

57,500

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year.
______________________________

47, 544

2,500

2, 500

Total expenditures________________

1 0 2 , 210

82, 544

55.000

102 , 210

35, 000
47, 544

52, 500
2,500

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations __________
Out of prior authorizations--------------------

200000— 53------ ,9




1952 actual
Appropriation or estimate:
Annual indefinite _
Permanent indefinite
_ _ _
_
_
Permanent definite, Public Law 141,
81st Cong.
_ ___
_____________

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$650,000,000

$660,000,000

$734, 800,402
33,000,000

33,000,000

34,852,000

Total appropriation or estimate
Prior year balance available_____________

767, 800, 402
19,181,151

683, 000,000
19,181,151

694, 852, 000
18, 656, 682

Total available for obligation______
Proposed rescission of prior year balance
Balance available in subsequent year____

786, 981, 553

702,181,151

713, 508, 682
-1 8 , 656, 682

-19,181,151

-1 8 , 656, 682

Obligations incurred... ___________

767, 800,402

683, 524,469

694, 852,000

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Payment to railroad retirement account—1952, $767,800,402; 1953, $683,524,469; 1954,
$694,852,000.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Unliquidated obligations, start of year__
Obligations incurred during the year_____

° Excludes $33,000,000 appropriated in the Railroad Retirement Board Appropriation
Act, 1950.
b Excludes $34,852,000 appropriated in the Railroad Retirement Board Appropriation
Act, 1950.
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

$27, 810
13,000

113
1,929

Appropriated (estimate) 1953 a $650,000,000
Estimate 1954 &$660,000,000

The railroad retirement system is supported by taxes on
carriers and their employees established at a level designed
to support the system on an actuarially sound basis. Ap­
propriation of an annual premium, in an amount equal to
the taxes collected, is made to this account for payment to
the railroad retirement account (trust fund). This ap­
propriation is made in an indefinite amount, with pay­
ments to the trust fund being made currently, equal to the
taxes (less refunds) actually collected. Effective with
fiscal year 1953, this appropriation was changed from an
annual indefinite to a permanent indefinite authorization.

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

132
R A IL R O A D

R E T IR E M E N T

B O A R D — C o n t in u e d

Description

P a y m e n t to R a ilr o a d R e t ir e m e n t A c c o u n t — C o n t in u e d

The amount of $18,656,682 recommended for rescission
consists of the net overappropriations or overpayments
made to the railroad retirement account from the general
Treasury through June 30, 1951. These resulted from
the following: The railroad retirement legislation con­
templates that appropriations therefor will be equal to
the taxes collected. Prior to June 30, 1951, the annual
appropriations w in definite amounts which were based
ere
on estimated tax collections. Because of variations
between estimated collections and actual collections,
overpayments and underpayments w
ere made to the
railroad retirement account from time to time. Further
overpayments resulted from (1) payment of interest on
the overpayments already mentioned; (2) failure to take
into account the fact that tax refunds and interest thereon
were paid from the general Treasury; and (3) availability
to the account of amounts appropriated, but not used, for
administrative expenses. The proposed rescission w
ill
result in receipt by the account of an amount equal to the
net taxes collected in connection with the program for
the entire period prior to June 30, 1951. For periods
subsequent to June 30, 1951, this adjustment is made
currently and automatically by appropriation of an
indefinite amount equal to the net taxes collected.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions (payment to railroad retirement account)—
1952, $767,800,402:1953, $683,524,469: 1954, $694,852,000.
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 actual

Obligations incurred during the year
(total expenditures)____________________

o b l ig a t io n s b y a c t iv it ie s —

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$767,800,402

$683, 524,469

$694, 852,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
734,800,402
Out of current authorizations__________
Permanent indefinite authorizations..
’ "’ 656’ 666,"66o" ’ "" 6 6 6 ,'oo6 "o66
33,000,000
34,852,000
Permanent definite authorizations___ " ” "33,"000,"6 6 6 "
524,469
Out of prior authorizations____________

co n tin u e d

1952 actual

_
4. Hearings and appeals_ _______________
5. Actuarial se rv ice s _________________ __
6 . General administration______________

1954 estimate

$38, 648
182,150
585,057

$38, 712
162, 970
595, 381

207,000

6 , 400,000

$35,100
94, 703
557, 234

Obligations incurred________ _______

1953 estimate

6 , 294,076

6,

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

The Railroad Retirement Board administers the fed­
erally operated railroad retirement system, financed by
employer and employee taxes. This appropriation is for
that portion of the administrative expenses of the Board
required in the operation of this program, and is derived
from the railroad retirement account. The retirement
system provides employees' annuities for age and dis­
ability, spouses’ annuities, survivor benefits, and lump-sum
death benefits.
1. Maintenance oj accounts oj employee earnings:—
Eligibility for benefits and the amount of benefits are based
on compensation reported by employers and recorded by
the Board in individual accounts of earnings. The work­
load of maintaining these records fluctuates with the level
of employment in the railroad industry, rates of turn-over,
and sim
ilar factors. This activity is operated jointly with
a sim
ilar requirement under the railroad unemployment
insurance program and the costs are shared on a measured
basis.
2. Processing and certijication jor payment oj initial
claims.—Claims for age and disability annuities, spouses'
annuities, survivor benefits, and lump-sum payments are
adjudicated and certified to the Treasury for initial pay­
ment. The claim load tends to increase each year as
s
more railroad workers are forced to seek retirement be­
cause of age or disability, and as more spouses of retired
employees and more survivors of deceased employees
become eligible for benefits.

S a la r ie s a n d E x p e n s e s , R a ilr o a d R e t ir e m e n t B o a r d —

1952 actual
1953 estimate 1954 estimate
(Trust account)
Salaries and expenses, Railroad Retirement Board (trust fund):
96, 784
117,877
129,150
For expenses necessary for the Railroad Retirement Board, includ­ Claims dispositions______________________
ing not to exceed t$l>000l $1,500 for expenses of attendance at
meetings concerned with the work of the Board when specifically
authorized by the Board; purchase of one passenger motor vehicle,
3. Monthly recertification oj awarded claims.—Benefit
for replacement only; and stenographic reporting services as author­
payments must be authorized each month for those persons
ized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); on the rolls who continue to remain eligible. The number
[$6,207,0003 $6,400, 000, to be derived from the railroad retirement
account. (45 U. S. C. 228a -228r; Labor-Federal Security Appro­ of beneficiaries on the rolls will continue to increase until

the program matures.

priation Act, 1953.)

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1952 actual

1953 estimate

Limitation or estimate_______ __________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$6,410,808
-116, 732

$6,207,000

$6 , 400,000

Obligations incurred_______________

6 , 294,076

6,207,000

6,400,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description
1. Maintenance of accounts of employee
eamines. _ _ __
2. Processing and certification for payment of initial claims_____
3. M onthly recertification of awarded

claims................................. .




1952 actual

1952 actual

1954 estimate

$637,279

$664, 742
3,903,311

4,073, 246

739,194

833,092

865,078

5,323, 502

1954 estimate

6 , 2 0 0 ,0 0 0

6,500,000

4. Hearings and appeals.—Individuals whose claims for
annuities or benefits are disallowed or who dispute the
award have the right of appeal to the appeals council, and
subsequently to the Board itself.
1952 actual

$664, 613

4, 230, 566

Total number of monthly p a y m e n ts.___

1953 estimate

Appeals............................................................

181

1953 estimate
250

1954 estimate
300

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

5. Actuarial services.—Actuarial studies and estimates
are required by the Railroad Retirement Act to determ
ine
the adequacy of the tax rate to establish and maintain a
sufficient reserve to meet all future payments. A number
of new studies are being inaugurated under the provisions
of Public Law 234, approved October 30, 1951.
6. General administration.—Except for administrative
activities supported by and concerned with the retirement
program exclusively, the cost of general administration is
shared between the retirement and the railroad unemploy­
ment insurance programs on a measured basis.

o b l ig a t io n s b y o b j b c t s —

Object classification
01

02
03
04
05
06
07

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1952 actual

1953 estimate
1,247
29
1, 238

$4, 048
GS-5.1

$4, 008
GS-5.1

$4,306,423
410, 524

$4, 912, 223
81, 209

$5,127, 224
49,822

Total personal services___________
Travel_____
___ _______________
Transportation of things________ ____
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent__________________________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments_______________
Obligations incurred_________ _____

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_____ ________________
Average grade___ _____ _____________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions___________ .
Part-time and temporary positions. _

co n tin u e d

1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$19, 047
29, 955

$19,492
11, 538

5,122, 944
153,372'
9,424
48, 563
317, 611
37,326
70, 633
363,475
8 6 , 891
75, 854
359
7,624

5,042,434
151, 961
11, 204
48,366
322, 861
36, 281
73, 810
398, 284
78,382
33,562
1,181
8 , 674

5, 208, 076
151, 843
11, 355
48, 603
328,135
36, 292
75, 874
411, 520
82, 897
33, 239
1,181
10,985

6 , 294,076

6 , 207,

6,400,000

Personal services—Continued
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
$17,985
Payment above basic rates 388,012
________

1,299
18
1, 293

$4, 083
GS-5.1

08
09
13
15

1954 estimate

1,182
118
1,169

133

000

R D C N IN A O IATIO S
E U TIO
PPR PR
N

Payment to railroad retirement account: Appropriations granted
under this headfor the fiscal year 1951 and prior fiscal years are hereby
reduced by the sum of $18,656,682, which shall be carried to the surplus
of the Treasury.

Statem of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m vehicles for the fiscal year 1954
ent
otor
R A IL R O A D R E T I R E M E N T B O A R D
M otor vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Appropriation
Gross
cost

Num ber

Salaries and expenses, Railroad R e­
tirement Board.

Num ber

$1,400

1

N et cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
Allowance
(estimated) chased

1

$500

$900

Railroad unemployment insurance
administration fund, Railroad R e­
tirement Board.
Total, Railroad
Board.

Retirement

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

1

1,400

1

R E N E G O T IA T IO N

1

500

900

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Public purpose and users

In the transaction of official business for the Railroad Retire­
ment Board, to be used by the Board members and other
designated officials in the official performance of their duties
and also to transport official papers between the headquarters
office, the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve
Bank.
D o.

1

a m o u n t s a v a il a b l e fo r o b l ig a t io n —

B O A R D

SALARIES AND EXPEN SES

1952 actual

S a la r ie s a n d E x p e n s e s , R e n e g o t ia tio n B o a r d —

For necessary expenses of the Renegotiation Board, including
expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of
this appropriation; hire of passenger motor vehicles; [not to exceed
$235,500 for expenses of travel;] services as authorized by section
15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to
exceed $50 per diem for individuals; [and rents in the District of
Columbia; $5,407,800] $8,500,000. (Act of Mar. 23, 1951, Public
Law 9; Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
Appropriated 1953, $5,407,800
Estimate 1954, $8,500,000

Comparative transfer from —Continued
“ Aircraft and related procurement, Air
Force” . .
_____________ _____
“ Maintenance and operations, A rm y” . .
“ Service-wide operations, N a vy”

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$5,407,800

$8 , 500,000

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$404, 200
56, 935
151,170

Total obligations__________________

c o n tin u e d

2,324, 893

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
1952 actual

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1952 actual

1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$5, 407,800

$8 , 500,000

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Transferred (pursuant to Public Law 9)
from—
“ Maintenance and operations, A rm y” _.
“ Service-wide operations, N a vy” ______
“ Maintenance and operations, Air
Force”
______ ___________
“ Aircraft and related procurement, Air
Force”
_________________________

$1 , 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

Adjusted appropriation or estim ate......... Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

1, 649,139
-31,656

5,407,800

8,500,000

Obligations incurred............................
Comparative transfer from—
“ W orking funds, Office of Secretary of
Defense”
__
_________ __________
“ Maintenance and operations, Air
Force” ....................... - -------------------------

1,617,483

5,407,800

8,500,000




41, 594
105.000
41,545

48,000

$264,808
522,485
1, 537,600

$471,661
898,184
4,037, 955

6 , 848,428

$550,282
1,101,290

Total obligations...... ...........................

2,324, 893

5,407,800

8,

500,000

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

361.000

47,105

1 . Executive direction _________________
2 . Staff operations_______________________
3. Renegotiation operations (field)_______

The Renegotiation Board conducts renegotiation with
contractors and subcontractors to eliminate excessive
profits in connection with procurement under the na­
tional defense program. To date determinations of exces­
sive profits and refunds by contractors total $25,834,070.
1.
Executive direction.—The Board, consisting of 5 stat­
utory appointed members, is responsible for executive
direction, review, and final action in all cases.

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1954

134
R E N E G O T IA T IO N
s a l a r ie s a n d

o b l ig a t io n s by o b j e c t s —

B O A R D — C o n t in u e d

expen ses—

S a la r ie s a n d E x p e n s e s , R e n e g o t ia t io n B o a r d — C o n t in u e d

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
1952 actual

Object classification

1953 estimate

03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

Total obligations...... .............. ............

890
690

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r ___ ______
__
__________
_
Total expenditures.

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

M otor vehicles to
be purchased

Num ber

Gross
cost

Number

A N D

3

E X C H A N G E

Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses, including not to
exceed [$500] $1,350 for the purchase of newspapers; [not to exceed
$101,250 for expenses of travel;] and services as authorized by sec­
tion 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); [$5,245,080]

$6,000,000. (15 U S. C 77a—
.
.
77bbbb, 78a-78jj, 79-79z-6, 80al80a52, 80bl-80b21; 11 U S. C 501-676; 5 U S. C 1001-1011;
.
.
.
.
Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1953.)
$5,245,080

Estimate 1954, $6,000,000
1953 estimate

Total available for obligation___ __
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

$5, 245, 080
65, 720
5,310, 800

Obligations incurred-----------------------

5, 898, 700

5,310, 800

1954 estimate
$6 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0
65, 720
6 , 065,

720

6 , 065,

720

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description




1, 846, 495
50, 558
8 , 337
14, 090
83, 447
17,194
56, 301
45,050
197, 660
5, 761

4, 671, 550

7, 647, 600
358.000
12 , 00 0
121, 400

2, 324, 893

5,407, 800

2 2 0 ,0 0 0
1 0 , 0 00

70,700
215, 0 00
40, 500
50.000
60,050
60.000

51.000
61.000
95.000
115.000
39.000

1 0 ,0 0 0

8 , 500,

000

actual

1953

estimate

1954

estimate
$ 6 0 0 ,0 0 0

$1, 6 1 7 ,4 8 3

$418, 900
5, 407, 800

8, 500, 000

5, 826, 700

9 ,1 0 0 ,0 0 0

418, 900

600, 000

9 0 0 ,0 0 0

1 ,1 9 8 , 583

5, 226, 700

8,2 0 0 ,0 0 0

1, 198, 583

4, 807, 800
418, 900

7 ,6 0 0 ,0 0 0
6 0 0 ,0 0 0

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Public purpose and users

$800

M otor vehicles will be hired b y 4 regional offices for use in the
transaction of official business in connection with the R e­
negotiation A ct of 1951.

co n tin u e d
1953 estimate

1954 estimate

$250, 560

$232,645

$236, 645

225, 030
600,135
534,130
5,811,440

211, 750
548, 870
459,110
5, 245,080

244,330
561, 340
536, 950

1952 actual

Direct Obligations—Continued
5. Assistance to courts in corporate reor­
ganizations under Chapter X of the
Bankruptcy A ct__ . _ _
6 . Preparation of operational and busi­
ness statistics____
_ _________
7. Executive and staff fu n ctio n s ______ __
8 . Administrative services __
___ _____
Total direct obligations__________ _

6 , 0 0 0 ,0 0 0

1. Administration of full disclosure pro­
visions