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THE BUDGET
OTE
F H
U N ITED STA TES G O V ER N M EN T
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
ENDING JUNE
30

1 9 5 3

U N IT E D S T A T E S
G O V E R N M E N T P R I N T I N G O F F IC E
W A S H IN G T O N : 1952

F or Sale b y the Superintendent o f Docum ents, U. S. G overnm ent Printing Office, W ashington 25, D . C.




P rice $5.75 (P ap er C o ve r)

IN T R O D U C T IO N

The Budget for the fiscal year 1953 contains the Pres­ ury funds— Federal funds (owned by the Government),
ident’s recommendations for the work program and finan­ and trust and deposit funds (held in trust or in suspense
cial program of the Government for the coming year. It by the Government). By definition, however, the con­
also presents comparable information for the fiscal years ventional budget totals relate only to transactions in the
1951 (actual) and 1952 (partly actual and partly esti­ Federal funds.
The Budget document consists of the Budget Message
mated).
The Budget contains information on both the income and four parts which contain summary tables, detailed
side of the Budget and the outgo side. With respect to data, and special analyses.
In the Budget Message (pp. m 5 through m 8 1 ) the
the outgo of money, the Budget deals with three stages
of the spending process— authorizations, obligations, and President makes the general presentation of his financial
expenditures.
^program and outlines his major recommendations.
Congress acts on the outgo side of the Budget by grant­
Part I of the document (pp. a 1 through a 1 3 ) contains
ing authorizations to incur obligations for expenses, grants, seven summary tables on Federal funds and on the public
capital outlay, and fixed charges. This congressional debt. Each of these tables is designed to bring together
action takes several different forms, the most common of in one to three pages some aspect of the over-all presenta­
which is an appropriation. The Budget contains sum­ tion of the Federal Budget.
maries and detailed schedules which show all new obliga­
Part II (pp. I through 1035) contains the details of
tional authority— both appropriations and other kinds.
the Budget for Federal funds, including various types of
It also contains details on obligations incurred and to be tables and schedules, narrative statements on the work to
be performed and the money needed, and the text of the
incurred.
The outgo side of the Budget is financed on the basis language proposed for enactment by Congress on each
of expenditures, not authorizations nor obligations. item of authorization.
Hence the surplus or deficit is determined by comparing
Part III (pp. 1037 through 1137) contains similar
expenditures with receipts. Expenditures result when detail for trust funds, and a schedule on deposit funds.
the obligations incurred by Government agencies are paid. It also contains memorandum information on “ working
In some cases the expenditure and the obligation occur funds,” which presents the activity in accounts which are
at the same time; in most cases, however, the expenditure established when money is advanced by one agency to
follows the obligation by some time, varying from a few another for interagency services.
days, in the case of salaries and wages, to several years
Part IV (pp. 1139 through 1205) contains various
in the case of contracts for major construction and the special analyses of Budget data. Some of these give
procurement of new heavy equipment. The Budget details on information appearing in part I— for example,
contains summaries of expenditures, tables listing the a breakdown of Budget receipts by source, and a break­
expenditures by accounts, and (for the first time) detailed down of Budget expenditures according to functions and
schedules relating expenditures in each account to obliga­ subfunctions. Many of the other special analyses in
tions and authorizations.
part IV contain tabulations which cut across the entire
The material in the Budget covers both groups of Treas­ Federal program.
m

2




T B EO C N E T
A L F O T NS
£ag6

B u d g e t M e s s a g e of t h e P r e s id e n t ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m5

B u d get expenditures_______________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

m6

N ew obligational au th ority_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m8

B udget receipts_________________ ______ _______

m8

___________ ________________________________________________________________________________________

Financing the security e ffort. ______________________________ ______ .____ _________________________________________________________________________
M iscellaneous receipts_________________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________________________________________

m9

M il

Borrowing and the public d e b t........................... -___ _______________________________________________________________________________________________

M il

Expenditures and authorizations b y major function. _ __________ _____________________________________________________________________________

M il

____

M ilitary services____________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

m 12

International security and foreign relations__________________ _________________ _______________________________________________________________

m

Finance, commerce, and industry_________________________________ ______________________________________ _____ _________________________________

m25

Transportation and com m unication________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

m 30

N atu ral resources______________________

________________________ _____ ________________________________________

_____ ___________________ _______

18

m 37

Agriculture and agricultural resources_____ _______________ _ _______ _________________________________________ ____________ ______________________

m 43

L ab or____________________________________________________________ _____ ____________________________________

____________________________________

m 46

_______ _________________________________

m 50

H ousing and com m unity d evelopm en t._

___ _

___ _______ ____ ______________________ ____

Education and general research___________ _________________________ ______________________________ ___
Social security, welfare, and h ealth ....................

___....... ....... .....................................................................

Veterans’ services and benefits__________________ _______ ______ _______ ____ ___________________________

_ ___________________ _____ ___________
_

m 57

............ .....................................................

m 62

__________________ ______ _____________

m 67

General governm ent_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

m 72

Interest____________________________________________________ ____ ________________ ______ ______________________________________________________________

m 77

Im proving the m anagem ent of G overnm ent program s_____ _______________________ _________ ________________________________________________

m 78

P a r t I. S u m m a r y T a b l e s :
T ab le 1. Resum6 of Budget receipts, expenditures, and public d eb t___________________________________________________________

a5

T ab le 2. Resum e of new obligational auth ority (by type and function) _ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

a6

T ab le 3. Effect of financial operations- on the public d e b t_______________________________________________________________________
T ab le 4. Summary” of B udget expenditures (by agen cy)_________________________________________________________________________

a7
a8

T ab le 5. Suir mar^ of new obligaHunal authority (by ag en cy)__________________________________________________________________

a9

T ab le 6. Sum m ary of f i d g e t authorizations (by type of authorization and a g en cy)_______________________________________

a

IO

T ab le 7. Sum m ary of B udget expenditures in relation to authorizations (by ag en cy)______________________________________

a

12

P a.r t I I . E s t im a t e s of F e d e r a l F u n d s , B u d g e t A u t h o r iz a t io n s a n d E x p e n d i t u r e s (b y O r g a n iz a t i o n U n it a n d A c c o u n t
T it l e ), a n d D e t a il e d E s t i m a t e s , N a r r a t i v e s , a n d S c h e d u l e s :
Legislative bran ch______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
T h e Judiciary_____________________________________________

6

_____ ___ _______________ __________________________________________________

E xecutive Office of the President____________ ____________ ________________________

42

_______________________________________________

56

Funds appropriated to the President_____ ___ ______
______ ________________________ ____________________________________________
Independent offices_____________________ _________ _______________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________

66
94

Federal Security A g e n cy _____________________________ ________________ ____ ____________________________________________________________

222

General Services A d m in is tr a tio n .______________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

286

H ou sin g and H o m e Finance A g e n c y __________ __ ________________ ___________________________________________________________________
D ep artm en t of A griculture__________ _______________________ _______________________ _____ _____ ________________________________________

400

D ep artm en t of C om m erce____ ___________

5 30

__________________________________

________________ ______________________

316

D ep artm en t of D efense_____________________________________ ___________________ ___________ ___________________________________________

5 94

_____________
____
___________ __________________________________________________
D ep artm en t of the Interior___
D e p artm e n t of Justice........ .................................................................................................. ............ ................. ....... .........................................................

734
836

D ep artm en t of L ab or________________________ _________________ ____________________ _______ ________ __________ ________________________

862

P ost Office D e p a rtm e n t________ __________________

884

D ep artm en t of S ta te _____________ _____ _____ . _.

_____________________ ____________________ _________________________________
.. _.

___ ___ ____ __________ _____ _ _____________________________________

896

T reasury D e p a r tm e n t________________ __________________ _________________ ____________________________________________________________

924

D istrict of C o lu m b ia ______________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

970

P a r t I I I . E s t im a t e s fo r T r u s t , D e p o s it , a n d W o r k in g F u n d s :
T ab le

8. Sum m ary of trust receipts, expenditures, and appropriations_______________________________________________________

1039

T ab le 9. T ru st receipts (by agency and account title )______________ ____________________________________________________________

1040

T ab le 10. T ru st appropriations and expenditures (by agency and account title )_____________________________________________

1044

T ab le 11. Sum m ary of deposit fu n d s________________________________________________________________________________________________

1048

D etailed estim ates, narratives, and schedules on trust fu n d s____________________________________________________________________

1049

D etailed estim ates and schedules on working funds_______________________________________________________________________________

1105

m

9 5 0 0 0 0 — 52--------II




3

m4
P art

TABLE OF CONTENTS

IV.

S pecial A

nalyses:

A. Receipts from and payments to the public_
_
_
..._........................... .......
B. New obligational authority and expenditures (by function and agency)_
_
... ..
C. Explanation of the estimates of receipts (by source)____________ ___
D. Investment, operating, and other Budget expenditures--- . ...
E. Federal credit programs-................. .... ............. .....
F. Federal activities in public works and other construction___
G. Federal aid to State and local governments____ _______
H. Certain Investment and interfund transactions--.
I. Comparison of Budget receipts and expenditures (by function)
..
I n d e x - ..........................................................................




_

__________
_
______________

1142

1144
1X58
1165
1173
1183
1196
1200
1202
1207




BUDGET

M ESSAGE

OF

TH E

P R E S ID E N T

To the Congress oj the United States:
I transmit herewith my recommendations for the Budget of the
United States for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1953.
Expenditures are estimated at 85.4 billion dollars, an increase of
14.5 billion dollars over the current fiscal year, and 45.3 billion dollars
over 1950, the last full fiscal year before the attack on Korea.
Receipts under present tax laws are estimated at 71.0 billion dollars,
an increase of 8.3 billion dollars over the current fiscal year, and 34.0
billion dollars over 1950.
The increase in receipts will fall short of meeting the increase in ex­
penditures. In the absence of new revenue legislation, a deficit of
14.4 billion dollars is in prospect for the fiscal year 1953, 6.2 billion
dollars greater than the estimated deficit for the current fiscal year.
BUDGET

[Fiscal years.

TOTALS

In billions]
1950
actual

1951
actual

1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Receipts (under existing tax laws)_________________
Expenditures__________________ __________ ____ -

$37.0
40.1

$48.1
44.6

$62.7
70.9

$71.0
85.4

Deficit (—) or surplus ( + ) ___________________

- 3 .1

+ 3 .5

- 8 .2

-1 4 .4

Eighteen months ago, the unprovoked attack upon the Republic of
Korea made it clear that the Kremlin would not hesitate to resort to
war in order to gain its ends. In the face of this grim evidence, this
Nation and the other nations of the free world realized that they must
rearm in order to survive.
Since then, we have made significant progress in rebuilding our de­
fenses. We have more than doubled the strength of our armed forces.
We have increased the number of our Army divisions from 10 to 18.
We have returned to duty more than 160 combatant vessels from our
“mothball” fleet. We have added more than 40 wings to our Air
Force. We have greatly expanded our production of military equip­
ment and our ability to mobilize for any emergency. We have
provided our allies overseas with the critical margin of aid necessary
to help them to grow stronger.
This Budget reflects the progress we have made thus far, and it lays
the groundwork for further progress.
m5




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

It reflects our progress to date in two ways. First, the high rate of
expenditures for military equipment estimated for 1953 reflects the
results of the tremendous effort that has been made during the past
18 months in getting the flow of production started. Second, the
smaller amount of new obligational authority which I am recom­
mending indicates the substantial portion of the financial requirements
for our military build-up that has been met in the appropriations
already made by the Congress.
This Budget lays the groundwork for further progress by providing
for additional increases in the strength of our armed forces, additional
deliveries of arms to our allies overseas, continued requirements of our
atomic energy program, and further development of our economic
strength. By the end of the fiscal year 1953, we will have reached or
passed the peak production rates for all of our major military items
except some of the newer model aircraft and some weapons not yet
in production.
This Budget calls for the largest expenditures in any year since
World War II. It will involve a heavy burden for our taxpayers,
because the job of building the strength we need to safeguard the
security of this Nation is enormously expensive.
Despite its size, this is not a Budget for all-out mobilization. It is
a Budget carefully planned to carry us a long way forward on the road
to security— at a pace which is not only within our present economic
capacity, but which will enable us to grow stronger in the years to
come.
If new international tensions do not develop, and if no further
aggressions are attempted, I hope we will be able to reduce Budget
expenditures after the fiscal year 1954. By then we should have
completed most of our currently planned military expansion.
BUDGET EXPENDITURES

More than three-fourths of the total expenditures included in this
Budget are for major national security programs—military services,
international security and foreign relations, the development of
atomic energy, the promotion of defense production and economic
stabilization, civil defense, and merchant marine activities. Major
national security programs not only dominate this Budget but also
account for practically all of the increase in total Budget expendi­
tures since the attack on Korea. As the table on the following page
indicates, expenditures for all other Government programs have
declined 9 percent since the fiscal year 1950. This decline has
occurred during the period when the costs of goods and services
which the Government buys have been rising.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

For the fiscal year 1953, expenditures for all other Government
programs will be nearly a billion dollars below the level of the pres­
ent fiscal year. Within this net decrease, some programs have been
reduced, others have been held to current levels, and still others have
been expanded.
B U D G E T E X P E N D IT U R E S

[Fiscal years.

Amounts in billions]

1950
actual

Expenditures for major national security programs. _
Expenditures for all other Government programs___
Total Budget expenditures___________ ______

1951
actual

Percent
increase
1952
1953
or de­
estimated estimated crease ( —)
1953 over
1950

$17.8
22.3

$26.4
18.2

$49.7
21.2

$65.1
20.3

266
-9

40.1

44.6

70.9

85.4

113

I have sharply reduced expenditures for those programs which can
be deferred or eliminated, even though these programs bring clear
benefits to the Nation and would be highly desirable in normal times.
For example, many long-range programs for the development of our
natural resources are being deferred in order to place greater emphasis
on meeting current defense requirements. This Budget contains
funds for only half as many general flood-control projects as my
Budget of 2 years ago. New starts on flood control, reclamation, and
river and harbor works have been limited to urgently needed power
projects, flood-control projects in the Kansas-Missouri area, and
emergency rehabilitation work which cannot be deferred. The
Federal-aid highway program will remain below the authorized
level of 500 million dollars, and major emphasis is being placed on im­
proving the network of roads most essential to defense and civilian
traffic. Expenditures for rural electrification and rural telephones
have been reduced. All major programs for housing and community
development outside critical defense housing areas will be held sub­
stantially below the levels authorized by basic legislation.
Many other programs, which are necessary for preserving the basic
strength of this Nation, have been maintained at approximately their
present levels. Finally, a number of programs contributing directly to
the defense effort have been expanded— such as defense housing, aid
for schools in defense areas, projects for expansion of electric power
generation, and the port security program of the Coast Guard.
A Budget of the scope and size that I am recommending makes
it imperative that each department and agency of the Government




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

enforce every possible economy in spending the money for which it
is responsible. The Department of Defense, in particular, must con­
tinue to place the greatest emphasis upon efficiency in the adminis­
tration of the military programs. In the past year, many improve­
ments have been made in the management of the Government’s
affairs. Some of these improvements are outlined in the final section
of this Message.
NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHORITY

To provide for further progress toward reaching our national
objectives, I am recommending in this Budget a total of 84.3 billion
dollars in new obligational authority for the fiscal year 1953. This is
9.2 billion dollars less than the amount of new obligational authority
available for the current fiscal year.
This Budget also includes 3.2 billion dollars of appropriations to
liquidate prior year contract authorizations.
The obligational authority either already enacted or recommended
in this Budget will have an important effect on expenditures in future
fiscal years. Under the expanding security program, there is an
extended time lag between the enactment of obligational authority
and actual expenditures. Many months elapse between the time
the Congress authorizes expenditures for ships, planes, tanks, and
other items of military equipment and the time when these items
are produced, delivered, and completely paid for. Under these
circumstances, the new funds authorized in one fiscal year may not
be entirely spent until several years later. For example, of the new
obligational authority recommended for 1953, nearly half will be spent
in later years. By the end of the fiscal year 1953, virtually all of this
authority will have been obligated, in the form of contracts for
necessary goods and services for which delivery and payment cannot
be made until the fiscal year 1954 or later.
According to present indications, total Budget expenditures will
continue to be high in the fiscal year 1954, even though new obliga­
tional authority may decline further.
BUDGET RECEIPTS

The following table shows the source of estimated Budget receipts
for the fiscal year 1953, based o d existing tax legislation, compared to
revised estimates of receipts for the current fiscal year and actual
receipts for the fiscal year 1951.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

BUDGET
[F is ca l y e a r s.

R E C E IP T S
I n m illio n s ]

Source

Direct taxes on Individuals:
Individual income taxes____ ___________
__ __
Estate and gift taxes_____________ ________
_______ ______
Direct taxes on corporations:
Income and excess profits taxes_____ _______________ _________
Excises____________ _____ . . .
_ . . . ______ ________ ____ _
Customs__________ . __ . . . . _____
____ ___ . . . __
Employment taxes:
_____ _
Federal Insurance Contributions Act
Federal Unemployment Tax A ct____________
. ______ _____
Railroad Retirement Tax A ct______________
__ _______ __
Railroad Unemployment Insurance A ct__ __ . . _______ . . . _
Miscellaneous receipts:
__ __ ______
Existing legislation
Proposed legislation___________________
_. . . ______ . . . _ .
Deduct:
Appropriation to Federal old-age and survivors insurance trust
fund_______________ ________ ________ __ . . .
___ __
Refunds of receipts____________________________________________
Budget receipts______________________________________________

N

o t e .—

1951

1952

1953

actual

estimated

estimated

$23,365

$29,324

$32,235

730

740

770

14,388

22,900

27,800

8, 693

9,0 4 6

9, 744

624

575

575

3 ,120

3, 850

4,030

233

257

269

577

740

690

10

10

11

1,629

1, 598

1,598
15

-3 ,1 2 0

-3 ,8 5 0

-4 ,0 3 0

-2 ,1 0 6

-2 ,5 1 0

- 2 , 709

48,143

62, 680

70,998

E s tim a t e d re c e ip ts fo r 1953 e x c lu d e n e w ta x p r o p o s a ls .

FINANCING THE SECURITY EFFORT

When we embarked on the defense program to keep our country
strong, I stated that sound financial policy required us to pay for the
increased defense costs by current taxation, and that we should avoid
adding substantially to the public debt. This policy is important to
the preservation of the financial strength of our Government, to the
success of the stabilization program, and to the sharing of defense
costs fairly.
To carry out this policy, I proposed to the Congress two separate
tax measures during the latter half of 1950 and another early in 1951.
The Congress responded promptly to my earlier recommendations but
enacted only part of the proposals I made last year.
I recommended last year that the Congress provide at least 10
billion dollars of additional revenue and laid stress on the importance
of improving the equity of the tax system. The legislation enacted
by the Congress late last year will contribute little more than half of
the amount I recommended.
Since then, the needs of adequate defense have become clearer.
For the fiscal year 1952, total Budget expenditures are estimated at

M lO




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

about 71 billion dollars, and they are expected to rise nearly 15 billion
dollars in the fiscal year 1953.
While revenues under present tax laws are expected to rise, they
will still fall short of meeting expenditures by a substantial amount
in 1952 and an even larger amount in 1953.
A pay-as-we-go tax policy is difficult to regain once we fall behind.
We cannot now undertake, on a strict pay-as-we-go basis, the dual
job of making up for the inadequate revenue legislation last year and
meeting the increases in expenditures immediately ahead. However,
there is still time to insure more nearly adequate financing for the
defense program as a whole. In my judgment this calls, at the very
least, for the amount of additional revenue by which last year’s legis­
lation fell short of my recommendations.
The need for improving the equity of the tax system gives me as
much concern as the need for revenue. The tax laws should not be
used as a means of granting special favors or hiding special subsidies.
Glaring injustices in our tax laws should be eliminated before those
with modest means are asked to shoulder additional burdens.
The Congress has made some progress in this direction, but un­
happily it has also added new loopholes, as I stated at the time I
signed the Revenue Act of 1951. When the Congress practices
favoritism in writing tax laws, it encourages self-seekers to try to gain
favored treatment.
The attainment of the revenue objectives I have outlined would not
fully resolve our revenue problem this year or next. The Congress
should be clear about the risks involved in this course. But economic
growth will continue to increase the productivity of the tax system in
future years. Moreover, I hope that world conditions and the build­
up of our defensive strength will permit a reduction in Federal expendi­
tures after the fiscal year 1954. Thus, the problem of financing
defense should be eased once the build-up of our defensive strength
has been attained.
How we meet the situation in the meantime will depend greatly on
the reaction of producers and consumers in the face of unavoidable
shortages and the rise in incomes stemming from Government expendi­
tures. One of the key factors will be the adequacy of savings to re­
strain demand and to meet the investment requirements of business.
We cannot, however, be complacent. It is cause for grave concern
that, partly as a result of inadequate revenue legislation last year, we
are now confronted with the impracticability of financing Government
expenditures currently out of taxes for the next year or two.
Prudence demands that we return to a pay-as-we-go policy as
quickly as practicable. In the meanwhile, we must be continually




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

alert to threats to economic stability and be prepared to deal with the
situation as it develops.
MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS

The Bureau of the Budget, in cooperation with the other Federal
departments and agencies, has undertaken a comprehensive study of
the fees charged by Government agencies for services to private indi­
viduals and groups. The objective of this study is to place these serv­
ices on a self-supporting basis wherever practicable, in accordance with
the policy I first stated in my 1948 Budget Message and with the
provisions of title V of Public Law 137, enacted in the first session of
this Congress. Some of these results are reflected in this Budget, in
the form of an additional 37 million dollars in reimbursements to
appropriations and miscellaneous receipts. Some of the more signifi­
cant adjustments in fee schedules, however, cannot be made without
legislative authority. The legislative proposals to effect these adjust­
ments will be submitted to the Congress as they are prepared.
BORROWING AND THE PUBLIC DEBT

On the basis of present tax rates, it is estimated that the public
debt will increase from 255 billion dollars at the beginning of the cur­
rent fiscal year to 260 billion dollars by June 30, 1952, and 275 billion
dollars by June 30, 1953— the present statutory limit.
The prospective debt increase makes it essential that the Govern­
ment continue to follow policies in the new financing and the refunding
of maturing issues which reinforce the economic stabilization program.
The American people can help the stabilization program by continu­
ing to purchase savings bonds and by taking other steps to increase
new savings. The millions of people who own savings bonds maturing
in the near future can also help to combat inflation by keeping their
bonds and allowing them to continue accumulating interest, rather
than cashing them at this time. Legislation enacted last year permits
the holders of these bonds to earn interest on them for another 10 years
without the necessity of exchanging them for new bonds.
EXPENDITURES AND AUTHORIZATIONS BY MAJOR FUNCTION

The following table shows estimated expenditures and recommended
new obligational authority for the fiscal year 1953, classified by major
function. It also compares, by major function, estimated expendi­
tures in the fiscal year 1953 with revised estimates for the current
fiscal year and with actual expenditures in 1951.

M il

m

12




MESSAGE OP THE PRESIDENT

EXPENDITURES AND AUTHORIZATIONS BY MAJOR FUNCTION
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

$39, 753
7,196
751
2, 153
3, 082
1, 408
240
881
238
2,680
5,166
1, 353
5, 955
25

$51,163
10,844
833
1,643
3, 237
1,478
246
678
624
2, 662
4,197
1, 484
6,255
100

$52, 359
8, 238
1,171
1, 521
2, 694
1, 327
259
1, 421
688
2, 578
4,181
1, 443
6, 255
125

70, 881

85, 444

84, 260

Function
1951
actual

M ilitary services__________________________________
International security and foreign relations________
Finance, commerce, and industry______________ __
Transportation and communication_______________
Natural resources.-- __________________ _ _______
Agriculture and agricultural resources_____________
Labor_____________________________________________
Housing and com m unity developm ent____________
Education and general research _________________
Social security, welfare, and health_________ ______
Veterans’ services and benefits_________________ _
General government ___________ - ___ ___ ____
Interest____________ ________ __________ _______
Reserve for contingencies
___
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement
Total

_____________________________________

$20,462
4, 727
176
1,685
2, 051
650
228
602
115
2, 380
5, 339
1,209
5, 714
-7 0 5
44, 633

MILITARY SERVICES

The cost of expanding and strengthening our armed forces con­
tinues to be the largest item in the Budget.
During the past 18 months our fighting men and their allies have
repulsed two waves of aggression in Korea. At home we have not
only supported our forces in Korea but also have made substantial
progress in building military strength for use in the event of an all-out
emergency. We now have almost 3% million men and women in our
armed forces, more than twice as many as we had when Korea was
attacked. Our monthly production of guns, tanks, planes, ships, and
other military hard goods has increased fivefold since Korea and will
continue to increase in the months ahead.
This Budget provides not only for maintaining our present military
strength, but also for building toward somewhat higher goals than
we had planned a year ago. These new goals contemplate an Air
Force of 143 wings, an Army of 21 divisions, a Navy with 408 major
combatant vessels in the active fleet and 16 large carrier air groups, a
Marine Corps of three divisions and essential supporting elements for
all these services.
Expenditures for military services are estimated at 51.2 billion dol­
lars in the fiscal year 1953 as compared to 39.8 billion dollars in 1952,
20.5 billion dollars in 1951, and 12.3 billion dollars in 1950. The in­
crease is due largely to the fact that the rate of military production




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M l3

has risen sharply from the levels of 18 months ago and will continue
to rise through the fiscal year 1953. It also reflects the costs of
modern weapons, which are much higher than in World War II.
I am recommending 52.4 billion dollars in new obligational author­
ity for military services in the fiscal year 1953 as compared to 61.7
billion dollars in 1952. This reduction is possible because a substan­
tial portion of the obligational authority required to finance our mili­
tary expansion has already been provided by the Congress.
MILITARY SERVICES
[Fiscal years.

In billions]

Expenditures

New obligational authority

Cost category, program or agency
1951
actual

Department of Defense, military func­
tions:
Military personnel------ ---------_ .
Major procurement and production:
Aircraft__________________________
Other____________________ _____
Acquisition and construction of real
property___ ____________ _______
Operation and maintenance--------------Civilian components—.
Research and developm ent_____ _____
Industrial m obilization______________
Department-wide activities__________
Activities supporting military services:
Stockpiling of strategic and critical
materials________________ ________
Other________________________________
T ota l______________________________

1952
1953
estimated estimated

1951

1952 1

1953 2

$7.2

$10.1

$11.0

$8.2

$11.1

$11.9

2.2
2.1

5.8
7.2

11.0
9.0

8.7
13.3

14.9
14.5

14.1
7.6

.4
5.8
.6
.8
.1
.5

2.7
10.4
.7
1.0
.2
.8

3.5
12.1
.8
1.4
.2
1.0

2.4
11.5
.8
1.2
.3
1.3

4.0
13.0
.7
1.5
. 1
1.2

2.5
12.4
.8
1.7
.1
1.0

.7
.1

.8
.1

1.1
.1

2.9
. 1

.6
.1

.2
.1

20.5

39.8

51.2

50.7

61.7

52.4

1 Includes proposed legislation and supplemental? of $J .5 billion.

2 Includes proposed legislation of $3.5 billion.

Military personnel.— This Budget provides for an increase in total
active armed strength from 3.6 million men at the end of the current
fiscal year to 3.7 million men during the fiscal year 1953 and for an
increase in expenditures for military personnel from 10.1 billion dollars
in 1952 to 11.0 billion dollars in 1953. These expenditures include
provision for pay, clothing, subsistence, and transportation of our
men and women in uniform.
It is likely that we shall have to maintain relatively large military
forces for a long time to come. This fact raises three problems with
respect to the welfare of military personnel that will require legislative
action. The first is legislation proposed by the Administration
to make increases in military pay and allowances comparable to the

m

14




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

increases granted civilian employees of the Government last year.
The military budget includes, under proposed legislation, an amount
estimated to be sufficient to cover the cost of such an increase.
Second, present laws do not in many cases provide adequate bene­
fits for the families of servicemen who die, either while serving their
country or after retirement. In recognition of this need, the Congress
is now considering survivors benefit legislation which would authorize
a self-sustaining system based on contributions from the servicemen
themselves. This legislation, however, does not provide protection
if service in the armed forces is terminated before retirement. I
believe that protection should be continuous and that the most
equitable way to achieve this protection is to extend the coverage
of the old-age and survivors insurance system to all members of the
armed forces. Such coverage would provide the same basic protec­
tion for our service men and women that is now enjoyed by most
other Americans. A military survivors benefit system should be
designed to provide supplementary benefits scaled to the earnings in
excess of those covered by the old-age and survivors insurance system.
These new military benefits would supplement the payments under the
old-age and survivors insurance and veterans’ laws in these higher pay
ranges.
Third, I am concerned about the very large future obligations which
are being accumulated under the present military retirement system.
At the present time, these future obligations are not funded and
annual appropriations cover only the military retirement costs for
that year. I believe that the Congress should examine all the Fed­
eral retirement laws and the experience which we have gained under
them with a view to determining whether future obligations for
military retirement should be met by a contributory system in which
career military personnel and the Government share in the establish­
ment and maintenance of a retirement fund adequate to meet the
rapidly increasing costs of military retirement benefits.
M ajor procurement and production.— Funds for major procurement
are used to provide our expanding armed forces with modern tanks,
ships, aircraft, vehicles, ammunition, guided missiles, electronic equip­
ment, and other hard goods ranging from the largest bomber to the
smallest pistol cartridge.
More than half of the expenditures for major procurement in the
fiscal year 1953 will be for aircraft. These very large costs reflect the
fact that the airplanes which we are building are much heavier and
very much more complex in design and equipment than those of even




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

a few years ago. In some of the new models, for example, the cost of
the electronic equipment alone represents more than the entire cost of
World War II planes designed for the same type of mission.
Most types of military equipment require many months to manu­
facture. Thus, much of the expenditures for major procurement in the
fiscal year 1953 will be from funds appropriated in earlier years. On
the other hand, a large portion of the new obligational authority which
I am recommending for the fiscal year 1953 will be used to place con­
tracts for military equipment that will be delivered and paid for in
subsequent fiscal years. I am recommending new authority of 21.7
billion dollars for major procurement in 1953, as compared to 29.4
billion dollars enacted for the current fiscal year.
In addition to supplying our active forces with the weapons and
equipment required to carry out their missions, this Budget will pro­
vide some reserves of equipment which would help supply the armed
forces in the event of an all-out emergency. However, in a long-term
mobilization effort such as that on which we have embarked, our
policy is to rely primarily on a continuing flow of production and
the ability to achieve rapid expansion of production if necessary
rather than on the accumulation of large inventories of military
equipment.
This policy means that we will try to avoid production peaks and
troughs which would unnecessarily disrupt the economy. We will
also strive for the type of balance between military and civilian pro­
duction which will permit us to maintain both a strong economy and
a strong military posture. At the same time, we will be producing
weapons of the most advanced design and will keep fresh the know­
how of military production. Our production effort therefore must be
judged by how well it achieves these results as well as by the speed
with which the goods are delivered.
Acquisition and construction oj real property.— The rapid expansion
and modernization of our armed forces necessitates considerable
new military construction as well as major repair and modernization
of existing facilities. Obligational authority for much of this work
has already been enacted by the Congress, but, as is true with pro­
curement funds, expenditures take place many months after the let­
ting of contracts. Expenditures in 1953 are estimated at 3.5 billion
dollars as compared to 2.7 billion dollars in the current fiscal year.
These expenditures take account of the recommendations for certain
additional military construction which I shall submit to the Congress
in the near future.

M l5

m

!6




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Operation and maintenance.— The operation and maintenance of
our military equipment and our military establishments require the
services of many people and the purchase of many things. These
funds are used to purchase fuels, lubricants, spare parts, and other
supplies. They are also used to pay for storage, repairs, maintenance,
and handling of armor, armament, and ammunition; to operate and
maintain supply depots, service-wide transportation and communica­
tion facilities, and medical establishments of the Army, Navy, and
Air Force. As we continue to expand our military strength, these
tasks grow in both magnitude and complexity.
A considerable portion of these funds is for the pay of civilian em­
ployees engaged in operation and maintenance. Total civilian
employment in the Department of Defense for military functions
will reach approximately 1.3 million in the current fiscal year. In
fiscal year 1953, it is expected to be slightly higher and will represent
about half of all Federal civilian employment. Approximately 60
percent of the Department’s civilian employees are engaged in in­
dustrial activities- at arsenals, ship yards, ordnance depots, repair
shops, and similar military installations.
Civilian components— The civilian components of the armed forces
consist of the National Guard; the Air National Guard; the Organized
Reserve units; and reserve officers’ training units of the Army, Navy,
Air Force, and Marine Corps. A vital part of our long-range policy
of increasing the potential military strength of this Nation consists of
increasing the size and improving the preparedness of these units.
Since Korea it has been necessary to draw upon our Reserves for
active duty. The number of men in the Organized Reserves and the
National Guard units declined from 837,000 in June 1950 to 525,000
in October 1951. This Budget provides for an increase to a strength
of 932,000 men in the civilian components by the end of the fiscal
year 1953.
Three legislative proposals which would strengthen our civilian
components are now before the Congress. The universal military
training bill would provide for 6 months of military training for every
able-bodied young man. The Armed Forces Reserve bill establishes
three classes of Reservists— the ready, stand-by, and retired Re­
serves— and prescribes a more equitable and uniform policy applicable
to Reserve personnel of all services. The Reserve Officers’ Training
Corps bill provides for a reorganization and strengthening of the
college officer procurement programs of the services.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

It is contemplated that, if the statutory basis is provided, the
universal military training program will be put into effect on a limited
basis as early in the fiscal year 1953 as possible. It will be gradually
expanded until all qualified young men enter the program. With the
increase in the size and strength of our Reserve forces brought about
through universal military training, we can ultimately work toward a
progressive decrease in the size of our Regular standing forces.
These three bills, if enacted without delay, would progressively in­
crease the size and improve the quality of our civilian components and
provide us with Reserve strength that can be rapidly mobilized in
event of emergency.
Research and development.— In building our military strength we
are providing our forces with the best and most advanced weapons
possible. In present-day warfare, and to an even greater extent in
the future, technical superiority in weapons can mean the difference
between victory and defeat. A strong research and development
program is essential to insure that our productive and material
resources go into weapons and equipment that are superior in quality
and performance to those of any aggressor and that we will be able
to maintain this superiority in the years to come.
As a result of research and development work done in the past few
years, our forces are now being equipped with new types of weapons
and equipment far superior to those of World War II. More new
and improved weapons are now going into production, and we are
perfecting the development of still others which will add to our military
strength in the years immediately ahead.
Expenditures of the Department of Defense for research and
development are estimated at 1.4 billion dollars in 1953, an increase
of 400 million dollars over 1952.
Stockpiling.— For the fiscal years 1947 through 1952 the Congress
provided obligational authority totaling 5.0 billion dollars for the
stockpiling of strategic and critical materials. In the four years pre­
ceding Korea, exclusive of transfers of materials acquired under other
authority, 783 million dollars was spent for materials. Since Korea
there has been a rapid acceleration of the rate of stockpiling. M a­
terials contracts valued at 2.3 billion dollars were placed in the 16
months ended October 31, 1951. Deliveries in this same period
amounted to 886 million dollars.
Taking into account these expenditures and transfers, as well as
price changes, the stockpile inventory at the end of October was
valued at 3.3 billion dollars. We expect to have in our stockpile at

M l7

m 18




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

the end of the fiscal year 1953, strategic and critical materials Vorth
about 5 billion dollars at September 1951 prices and will have under
contract an additional 1.7 billion dollars’ worth of vital materials for
delivery after 1953. This reserve of rubber, copper, tin, manganese,
chromite, tungsten, cordage fibers, and more than 60 other materials
will be an important source of strength in the years to come.
I am recommending 155 million dollars in new obligational authority
for stockpiling in the fiscal year 1953. This is about 435 million dol­
lars less than the Congress enacted for the current fiscal year. Two
developments account in large measure for the decrease. First,
additional expansion of supply will be financed from Defense Produc­
tion Act borrowing authority, thereby reducing the need to place
long-term contracts under stockpile authority. Second, the quantity
of materials available for stockpiling in 1952, although large, will be
less than originally anticipated because of the increase in consump­
tion of materials for military purposes and expansion of productive
capacity. Therefore, a portion of the funds provided in earlier years
will be available to acquire materials in 1953.
Expenditures for stockpiling in fiscal year 1953 are estimated at
1.1 billion dollars as compared to 800 million dollars in 1952. This
increase reflects the fact that, because of actions taken in earlier
years to expand supplies, more material will be available for stock­
piling in 1953.
Other activities supporting military services.— Included in this part of
the Budget are the net receipts of the Reconstruction Finance Corpo­
ration for production and sale of tin, synthetic rubber, and abaca fibers
and for the liquidation of certain assets and liabilities remaining from
its World War II programs. Other activities supporting the military
services are mainly the research programs of the National Advisory
Committee for Aeronautics, the activities of the Selective Service
System, and the National Security Training Commission.
INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN RELATIONS

The vast rearmament program upon which this Nation has entered
has a single objective— the building of defensive forces and a mobiliza­
tion base which will serve as a deterrent to communist aggression
and which can, if the deterrent fails, give us and our allies the strength
to defeat the aggression.
For that purpose, strength within the United States is not enough.
The areas most vulnerable to aggression are not in the Western
Hemisphere. They are in Europe, in the Middle East, and in Asia.
To deter aggression and provide for our own security require not

Ml 9

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

only building up our own strength but also building strength in
these areas.
The foreign policy and international programs of the United States,
as well as our own military program, recognize that fact. That is
why American forces are now serving with our allies in Korea and
Europe. That is why the Congress last year authorized the mutual
security program of military and economic assistance to nations
which have common security interests with us and a determination
to preserve their freedom.
The bulk of expenditures for international security in this Budget
are for military and economic assistance. Other major expenditures
are for the campaign of overseas information and education, for
participation in the United Nations and other international organiza­
tions, and for the regular activities that make up the conduct of foreign
affairs.
INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN RELATIONS
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Recom m ended
new obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

$4,497

$6,868

$7,186
3,339

$14
7,900

40

110

157

170

190

218

162

154

4,727

7,196

10,844

8,238

Program or agency
1951
actual

Military and economic assistance:
----------------------Present programs----------M utual security program (proposed legislation).
Conduct of foreign affairs:
Overseas information and education._ ________
Participation in international organizations,
and other____ ______________________________
T o ta l.................................... ............................

Military and economic assistance.— I will soon submit to the Con­
gress specific recommendations for the mutual security program totaling
about 7.9 billion dollars. Expenditures for military, economic, and
technical assistance in the fiscal year 1953 are estimated at 10.5 billion
dollars, as compared with 6.9 billion dollars in the present fiscal year.
The bulk of the assistance will go directly toward helping to build
adequate military defenses. The program will also include substan­
tial sums for technical assistance and development work, under the
Point Four concept, to help the people of economically underdevel­
oped areas move forward in solving their most pressing problems. The
solving of these problems is of vdtal importance in meeting the threat
of subversion, which in many areas of the free world is graver than the
threat of military attack.

950000— 52------- h i




m

20




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

The increase in mutual security program expenditures will be due
to a sharp acceleration in deliveries of military equipment to our allies
overseas. Expenditures for these deliveries and for certain other
forms of military assistance, such as training, are estimated at 4.0
billion dollars in the current fiscal year and 8.0 billion dollars in the
fiscal year 1953. During the past 18 months these deliveries have
been smaller than originally planned, partly because of the demands of
the Korean conflict, and partly because of the time required for the
production of complex long-lead-time equipment. Our production of
weapons is now increasing at a rate which will make possible deliveries
in the magnitudes required for the scheduled build-up of free world
forces. Accordingly, I have directed that a policy of allocating mili­
tary equipment be established which will assure that United States
forces in Europe and NATO forces, as well as other forces of certain
foreign countries which in the case of war are most likely to be first
attacked, are adequately equipped.
Our mutual security program is a vital and indispensable element
in building security for the free world as a whole and for this country.
Under this program, friendly nations overseas will be able to obtain
the crucial margin of resources— military or economic— which they
need in order to develop rapidly their own potentials of strength
against aggression and subversion. The strength they can build will
be joined with the strength we are building in the total fight for
security and peace.
We cannot, as two world wars have proved, isolate ourselves from
threats to other free men. This Nation cannot stand by and see
free peoples overrun. In the end, that could only mean isolation of
this country in a world organized against it by Soviet masters.
Military and economic assistance to Europe.'— Through the efforts of
the Europeans themselves, combined with the additional resources
we are making available through our military and economic assist­
ance programs, real progress is being made in Europe toward the
urgent objective of achieving adequate defense forces.
As of 18 months ago, the North Atlantic Treaty countries in
Europe had virtually no combat-ready defensive units in all of Con­
tinental Western Europe, except for certain naval forces and the
ground divisions and air squadrons on occupation duty in Germany.
Since then, the active strength of their forces has been substantially
increased; in terms of men on active duty, their effective ground
strength now exceeds that of our own Army. Air cover and naval
support are being provided in increasing amounts. Moreover, the
units have been brought to a higher state of effectiveness through




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

longer periods of service and more thorough training and through
substantial additions to equipment including replacement of obsolete
weapons. Finally, many of the scattered units of the various coun­
tries are now, under the command of General Eisenhower, being welded
into a single fighting force, and supporting systems of communica­
tions, supply, and bases are being developed. Combined defense ex­
penditures of the nine European members of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization have been increased sharply, from the equiva­
lent of 4.5 billion dollars in fiscal year 1950 to an amount estimated
at more than 9.0 billion dollars in the current fiscal year.
Over the coming months progress in building European defenses
will be even more rapid, under plans recently developed by the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s Temporary Council Committee,
under United States chairmanship. This Committee has reviewed
the present status of European defenses and the further requirements
estimated by the military leaders of the member nations and by
General Eisenhower’s international headquarters. It has developed
a realistic plan of action for a rapid build-up of effective defense
forces backed by well-trained and quickly mobilizable reserves.
This plan of action is designed to see that nonessentials and duplica­
tions are stripped out and that the highest priority jobs are done first.
In spite of these reductions, it will still be necessary for many of the
member countries to make substantially larger efforts than previously
planned, and we, in addition to our contribution of forces, will have
to provide expedited deliveries of military equipment and economic
assistance.
On the basis of this new plan of action two important conclusions
emerge. First, it is now clear that within 12 more months Western
Europe can have a compact force which would offer strong resistance
in the event of an attack. Secondly, under the new plan it is now
clear that within a few years it will be possible to attain a level of
Western European defenses which would make invasion there so
costly, and so unlikely of success, that the danger of its being at­
tempted would become remote.
Our mutual security aid is an essential component required to
achieve the new defense plan on schedule. We will provide planes,
tanks, guns, production equipment, raw materials, and other supplies
which are needed to carry out the plan but which the Europeans can­
not obtain from their own resources.
The largest part of this aid will be in the form of military equip­
ment. The equipment we provide will have the direct effect of
bringing to combat readiness additional air wings, ground divisions,

M21

m

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MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

and naval units defending Western Europe against aggression. To
an increasing extent, the equipment we provide will be procured in
Europe. This will somewhat lighten the production burden on this
country, and by stimulating European military production will help
to bring nearer the day when Europe will be able to maintain her
forces without further assistance from us.
To enable the European countries to expand their defense programs
on schedule, other aid in the form of commodities— economic aid—
will be needed. The economy of Europe is undergoing a serious strain,
in part because of its own expanding defense programs and in part
because of world price movements associated with the defense build­
up of the free world as a whole. Two of the key countries, Britain and
France, have been unable in recent months to pay for essential im­
ports except by dipping deeply into their limited dollar reserves.
As the European defense programs expand, and industry and man­
power are directed toward defense rather than producing for export,
European dollar deficits will continue to be serious although not
nearly so large as those which had to be dealt with in the immediate
postwar years.
To meet these problems it will be necessary for the European
countries to take additional measures to facilitate allocation of re­
sources to defense and to prevent internal inflation. But despite
such measures, the Europeans will require our aid in meeting the
problem of dollar deficits without interruption of the defense build-up.
The mutual security program will also include assistance to certain
European countries not included in the North Atlantic Treaty.
This Budget includes funds for military and economic assistance
to help maintain the independence of Yugoslavia, which stands as
an example to Soviet satellites that independence can be achieved.
Greece and Turkey, key barriers to Soviet expansion into the eastern
Mediterranean, are maintaining large forces which are expected to
be integrated soon into the North Atlantic Treaty defense system.
Through military and economic assistance we will continue to assist
them in carrying this heavy burden. Negotiations are also in process
leading toward German participation in European defense.
Assistance to other areas oj the jree world.— The vulnerability to
internal and external aggression of many parts of the non-European
free world, especially the Middle East and Asia, requires that we make
the strongest efforts to help these areas gain in strength and stability.
Our mutual security program for these areas, as compared with
Europe, will place proportionately more emphasis on economic aid




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

and technical assistance than on supplying military equipment. So
long as conditions exist to feed the fires of communist agitation—
conditions of poverty, disease, illiteracy, and economic stagnation—
there will be the continuous danger of subversion and internal col­
lapse. These problems are deep rooted and stubborn, but they can
be solved. Under the Act for International Development and other
legislation, this country adopted a long-range policy of working
directly with the underdeveloped countries to help them solve these
problems and lay a firm foundation upon which they can build with
their own resources. This policy has helped them to achieve progress
within their own economies, and to increase their contribution of
vital raw materials to the rest of the free world. In each instance
our assistance is predicated on the maximum possible effort by the
recipient country to solve its own problems.
In the Middle East, events during the past year have emphasized
the urgency of achieving stability and more adequate defenses. Much
can be accomplished by programs of technical assistance to deal with
basic problems of low productivity which underlie much of the region’s
difficulties. This Budget provides funds for our contribution for the
second year of the 3-year program for reintegration of Arab refugees,
and other funds for assistance to the Arab states, Iran, and Israel.
In Asia, the mutual security program for the fiscal year 1953 will
provide for a continued flow of military equipment, to assist the
troops of France and of the Associated States of Vietnam, Laos, and
Cambodia, in their gallant fight against the communist insurgents in
Indochina. We are providing, and will continue to provide under
this Budget, military equipment and other supplies to the Chinese
forces defending Formosa. Philippine troops, with weapons supplied
under the mutual security program, are making good progress in
suppressing the communists who have been a dangerous threat to
the economic and political development of the republic.
The needs of Asian countries for economic aid vary substantially
from country to country. Some countries are rich in resources; here
the great need is for technical assistance to help them more quickly
master the complex problems of developing and organizing their re­
sources for the welfare of their people. In Indonesia, for example,
technical assistance will be provided to help this young republic de­
velop its resources and establish essential administrative, health, and
educational facilities, so as to increase the stability of its democratic
government. To other countries in Asia we are supplying technical
assistance and also developmental aid to supplement their own
development programs. In India, for example, the government has
undertaken a large-scale program of agricultural expansion, in order

m23

m24




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

to meet the increasing pressure of population in relation to food pro­
duction. In spite of mobilizing every resource it can, India will
require some aid from us to help solve her agricultural problem.
In Latin America it is essential that we continue our part of the
jointly financed programs of technical assistance, which are making an
important contribution toward solving problems of health, education,
and agricultural productivity. The Latin-American economy con­
tinues to attract a large flow of private American capital. Key
development projects, including those for strategic materials, will
continue to be financed primarily on a loan basis, especially by the
Export-import Bank under its recently increased loan authority.
This Budget also contains limited funds for military assistance to
Latin America.
We are also contributing to United Nations technical assistance
programs. In addition, the broad purposes of the Point Four con­
cept are being furthered by private investment, by loans from our
Export-import Bank, many of them for strategic materials develop­
ment, and by loans from the International Bank for Reconstruc­
tion and Development. In preparing the mutual security program
for underdeveloped countries, careful consideration has been given
to all loan possibilities.
Overseas injormation.— Expenditures for our overseas information
and educational exchange program, basic to our Campaign of Truth,
are estimated at 157 million dollars in the fiscal year 1953. The
increase of 47 million dollars over the current fiscal year will be needed
for expanded radio facilities, including ship-borne transmitters, capable
of reaching more and more people behind the Iron Curtain, and over­
powering Soviet “jamming” attempts; for transfer of the Army’s
information program in Japan to the State Department; and for a gen­
eral intensification of our efforts in the most critical areas of the world.
This vital program is coordinated with other parts of our total
security effort. Soviet propaganda and agitation use every possible
device, direct and concealed, to pervert the hopes and play upon the
fears of free peoples. Internal subversion, buttressed by propaganda
techniques rather than the commitment of Soviet armies, has played
the leading part since World War II in the expansion of the Soviet
Empire. Against these menacing instruments of the cold war, the
Campaign of Truth has been making substantial gains. The overseas
information program, speaking through every possible medium—radio,
press, motion pictures, information centers, exchange of persons— is
exposing the true nature of the communist menace and explaining to
the rest of the world the truth about our objectives.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 25

Other foreign affairs.— In addition to the funds for overseas infor­
mation and education, this Budget includes expenditures of 162
million dollars for the conduct of other foreign affairs. We and our
allies must make sure, through the United Nations and other channels,
that war does not come about from a misunderstanding of our true
motives or from a failure to understand our determination to resist
tyranny.
FINANCE, COMMERCE, AND INDUSTRY
T h e

a u th o r ity g r a n te d

u n d e r th e D e fe n s e P r o d u c tio n

in d is p e n s a b le in b r o a d e n in g th e e c o n o m ic b a s e fo r
a n d in in c r e a s in g d e fe n s e o u t p u t .

W ith

our

A ct has been
s e c u r ity

e ffo r t

th is a u t h o r it y , w e a r e g iv in g

FIN AN CE, COMMERCE, AND INDUSTRY
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Net expenditures or net receipts ( —)
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

$501

$301
285

$900

50

9
41

6
45

2

4
9

28

5

8

112

14
135

150

—19

78

—1

17
9

17
9

18
9

18
9

—16
7

—30
7

—3
7

7

176

751

833

1,171

Program or agency
1951
actual

Promotion of defense production and economic
stabilization:
Expansion and allocation of production:
Funds appropriated to the President:
Present programs.......... .............. ..... ........
Proposed legislation................................
Department of Commerce:
Present programs.......... ............................
Proposed legislation................................. .
Small Defense Plants Administration:
Present programs................ ............ .........
Proposed legislation__ _______________
Other:
Present programs_________ ___________
Proposed legislation___________________
Price, wage, and rent controls:
Econom ic Stabilization Agency:
Present programs_____________________
Proposed legislation____ ______________
Business loans and guarantees (Reconstruction
Finance Corporation)___________________________
Promotion or regulation of trade and industry:
Department of Commerce_____________________
Antim onopoly programs and other___ ________
Promotion or regulation of financial institutions:
Reconstruction Finance Corporation
Securities and Exchange Commission and other.
T otal..... ...............................................................

$138

13

1

5

26

0)

1 Less than one-half million dollars.

e x te n s iv e
lo a n s ,

fin a n c ia l

g u a ra n te e s

m a te r ia ls

and

a id
of

to

d e fe n s e

p r iv a te

e q u ip m e n t.

lo a n s ,

T h rou gh

in d u s tr ie s
and

th rou g h

co n tra cts

to

G overn m en t
pu rch ase

a llo c a t io n s , s c a r c e m a te r ia ls

raw
a re

m 26




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

channeled to essential users. Controls over prices, wages, and rents,
as well as selective credit controls, are necessary for economic stabiliza­
tion. Unfortunately the act is not strong enough to insure that we
can hold the line on prices. I therefore urge that the act be improved
as well as extended beyond the present expiration date of June 30,
1952.
Net expenditures for finance, commerce, and industry during the
fiscal year 1953 are estimated at 833 million dollars, compared to 751
million dollars in 1952 and 176 million dollars in 1951. The sharp
increase since 1951 has been due entirely to the expansion of programs
promoting defense production and economic stabilization. The pro­
posed extension of the Defense Production Act accounts for all except
40 million dollars of the new obligational authority of 1,171 million
dollars recommended for 1953.
Expansion oj production.— The expansion of defense production is
primarily the job of private enterprise. The Government’s responsi­
bility is to guide and assist the expansion wherever necessary.
Under the general supervision of the Director of Defense Mobiliza­
tion and the Defense Production Administrator, Federal agencies with
defense responsibilities are using the authority of the Defense Pro­
duction Act and related legislation to give broad financial aid to
defense industries. Nine Government agencies engaged in defense
procurement have guaranteed about 1.5 billion dollars in loans by
private banks to meet working capital requirements of defense con­
tractors and subcontractors.
Substantial progress also has been made in expanding defense pro­
duction by loans, commitments to purchase, and purchases of equip­
ment and materials under the borrowing authority of 2.1 billion
dollars granted in the Defense Production Act. The Defense Mate­
rials Procurement Agency has already been authorized to make
600 million dollars in purchases and purchase commitments for
rubber, magnesium, copper, aluminum, manganese, and other critical
materials, and 260 million dollars in advances and purchases to finance
the expanded production of urgently needed machine tools. Under
the same authority the Department of Agriculture is financing ex­
pansions in supply of a few key agricultural products, and the De­
partment of the Interior is making advances for exploration and devel­
opment of domestic mineral resources.
The Reconstruction Finance Corporation has been authorized to
use 275 million dollars from the same borrowing authority for loans,
mainly to expand facilities for production of machine tools, copper,
aluminum, and steel. These loans are in addition to the substantial




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

volume of loans for defense purposes made by the Corporation under
its regular authority. Similar loans in foreign areas will be made by
the Export-import Bank.
Using these and other means, we are making great strides toward
achieving increased economic strength. By the end of the fiscal year
1953, we will have steel ingot capacity of about 119 million tons com­
pared to 109 million tons at present and 100 million tons 18 months
ago. Programs already underway will enable us to nearly double 1950
primary aluminum production by the end of 1953, and further in­
creases in capacity are being planned. Production of machine tools is
making good progress. Magnesium production will soon be more than
seven times the pre-Korean level. Increases in supplies of other
critical raw materials such as manganese, tungsten, and molybdenum
are also assured over the next few years. At the same time, we are
helping friendly nations to expand their productive capacity. These
efforts will continue until our total supplies are adequate to meet both
military and civilian requirements.
The immediate effect on the Budget and the ultimate net cost to the
Government of all these programs will be small compared to the size
of the transactions and their contribution to the security effort.
Most of the loan guarantees will not require any net expenditures,
since premiums paid are expected to cover all expenses and losses.
According to present plans, the existing borrowing authority in the
Defense Production Act will be fully obligated by the end of the fiscal
year 1952. I therefore expect to recommend that the borrowing
authority be increased by 900 million dollars to permit the financial
assistance necessary primarily for long-range development of new
sources of strategic raw materials. This will involve additional net
expenditures of 285 million dollars in the fiscal year 1953.
Allocation of resources.— Defense production is absorbing a steadily
increasing share of the Nation’s resources. For some time, defense
needs and normal civilian demand for some materials and products
have been greater than the supply. Under the general supervision of
the Defense Production Administration, the National Production
Authority in the Department of Commerce has established allocations
and other controls over the use of these items in order to increase our
defense production quickly and efficiently. The Controlled Materials
Plan has been a valuable aid in shifting steel, aluminum, and copper
to the uses which best promote the security effort. The needs of
defense and other essential users are assured preference through a
priorities system. The burden on small business has been minimized
through exemptions for small orders, self-certification procedures, and

M27

m 28




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

speedier processing. Exports also are being channeled by the Depart­
ment of Commerce to meet the most essential requirements of friendly
nations.
These controls are necessary to make sure that defense programs
and essential civilian activities will receive necessary equipment and
materials and that other users get their fair share of any remaining
supply.
Small business.— The security effort has necessarily disturbed the
normal peacetime patterns of business activity. The problem of ad­
justment has been especially serious for many small businesses. The
newly established Small Defense Plants Administration, the Depart­
ment of Commerce, and other agencies are helping small business make
this adjustment. Major attention is being given to increasing the
opportunities of small business to participate in defense production, as
either prime contractors or subcontractors, and to obtain a fair allo­
cation of materials. Where other public and private credit facilities
prove inadequate, the Reconstruction Finance Corporation will make
loans upon the recommendation of the Small Defense Plants Adminis­
tration. The agency is also planning to help groups of small businesses
organize production pools to handle larger defense contracts. Finally,
where necessary to assure adequate participation by small business, the
Small Defense Plants Administration will itself take prime defense con­
tracts, subcontracting the work to small plants. Appropriations
required for the revolving fund to finance these contracting and sub­
contracting operations account for 25 of the 28 million dollars in
appropriations recommended for the agency under proposed legisla­
tion in the fiscal year 1953.
P rice, wage, and rent controls.— As military production increases, in­
flationary pressures also increase. This is so because military produc­
tion adds to private incomes while decreasing the supply of goods
which consumers can buy.
Increased taxes, coupled with price, wage, rent, and credit controls,
together with voluntary restraints by consumers, business, and labor,
have prevented a sharp rise in prices during the past year. The
increase in inflationary pressures expected during the coming fiscal
year, however, will require not only higher taxes, increased restraints
on credit, and voluntary saving to absorb excess purchasing power,
but also more effective direct controls. If the price-control program
is to be both effective and fair, the staff of the Office of Price Stabiliza­
tion must be strengthened. The agency has now reached a crucial
stage in the development of its price-control program, the establish­




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

ment of regulations specifically designed for individual commodities,
industries, and geographical areas— including definite dollars-andcents ceilings wherever possible. The administration of these regu­
lations during the period of increasing pressure on prices requires
a larger staff able to handle complaints and applications for price
adjustments promptly, and to assist businessmen in complying with
the regulations.
The Wage Stabilization Board and Salary Stabilization Board
have established their major policy regulations. Both Boards must
expand their present staffs to enforce these regulations and to handle
the increasing backlog of cases. Ineffective enforcement would give
violators an unfair advantage in recruiting employees, and thus hurt
both the defense effort and economic stabilization.
The influx of military personnel and defense workers into key
defense areas has caused a sharp increase in the demand for rental
housing. To meet the danger of excessive rent increases, the Director
of Defense Mobilization and the Secretary of Defense have already
authorized the imposition of rent controls in about 100 areas. In
each case, special aids— discussed under Housing and Community
Development— are also being provided to enc6urage rapid expansion
in the supply of rental housing. The Office of Rent Stabilization is
now administering rent controls in these and other areas covering
about 6.8 million rental units. It is estimated that by the end of the
fiscal year 1953, tenants in 10 million rental units will be protected
by Federal rent control.
In the fiscal year 1953, under the proposed extension of the Defense
Production Act, the Economic Stabilization Agency will require new
obligational authority of 150 million dollars for administration of
price, wage, and rent controls. Total expenditures are estimated at
149 million dollars, 37 million dollars more than estimated for the
fiscal year 1952. This additional amount will be required largely to
keep the agency— particularly the Office of Price Stabilization— at the
level of operations which it should reach by the end of this fiscal year.
Business loans and guarantees.— At the same time that we are mak­
ing certain that credit is not a bottleneck in the defense effort, we are
curtailing nondefense loans. The Reconstruction Finance Corpora­
tion is making only those loans which assist military or essential
civilian production. New commitments— including loans recom­
mended by the Small Defense Plants Administration— are estimated
at 166 million dollars in the fiscal year 1952 and 260 million dollars
in 1953, compared to 285 million dollars in 1951. Increased collec­
tions on outstanding loans are a major reason for the anticipated de­
cline in net expenditures.

M29

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 30




TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION

Efficient transportation and communication services are critical
factors in an economy mobilizing for defense. Current economic
activity has already created traffic loads which in total exceed any
peacetime peak levels. Further traffic increases are in prospect as
defense production continues to expand.
T R A N S P O R T A T IO N

AND

[Fiscal years.

C O M M U N IC A T I O N

In millions]

Net expenditures or net receipts (—)
Program or agency
1951
actual

Promotion of merchant marine:
Maritime Adm inistration_____ _________ ___
Inland Waterways Corporation_______________
Provision of navigation aids and facilities:
Coast Guard_ _ ________ ___________ _________
Corps of Engineers______ _______ _____ ___
Panama Canal Company___________________ .
Promotion of aviation (Civil Aeronautics Adminis­
tration)_________
____ ________ - _____
Provision of highways:
Bureau of Public Roads:
Present programs_________ _______ ______
Extension of Federal-aid and forest high­
way programs (proposed legislation)
Alaska roads and other. ___________________
Postal service (deficit):
Present programs__ _________________________
Postal rate increase (proposed legislation)_____
Regulation of transportation:
Interstate Commerce Commission. _________
Civil Aeronautics Board_______ _________ ____
Defense Transport Administration:
Present programs_____ _
_ __ _____
Extension of Defense Production Act (pro­
posed legislation)_________________
___
Other services to transportation:
Reconstruction Finance Corporation__________
Coast and Geodetic Survey___________________
Alaska Railroad
__________________ _______
Treasury Department________________________
Regulation of communication______ _____________
Total

_________ ___________________________

1952
estimated

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
1953
for 1953
estimated

$101

$287
1

$164

$72

162
121
18

230
118
10

239
100
9

239
115
3

160

181

166

143

430

454

459

12

26

26

21

417
20

626

814

669
—225

669
—225

11
3

11
4

12
4

12
4

3

3

—13
12
15

13
16

1

2

7

-5
12
12
-1 1
7

1,685

2,153

—8
12
16

-1

0)
8

8

1,643

1,521

1 Less than one-half million dollars.

The Federal Government is assisting the transportation and com­
munication industries to adjust their operations to these expanding
needs. In addition, the Government has temporarily undertaken new
activities to meet abnormal requirements arising out of the defense
emergency. Among these are the port protection activities of the
Coast Guard, the direct operation of merchant vessels by the National




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Shipping Authority, and the transportation controls of the Defense
Transport Administration and other agencies.
Net expenditures for transportation and communication will be
reduced from 2.2 billion dollars in the present fiscal year to 1.6 billion
dollars in 1953, assuming enactment of the further increases in postal
rates which I am recommending.
Merchant marine.— The primary objective of our merchant marine
policy is to assure an active nucleus of trained maritime labor and
management, which can serve as the foundation for the expansion
of shipping operations in the event of full mobilization. To achieve
this objective, the Government provides operating and construction
subsidies for shipping services on essential trade routes. Abnormal
requirements arising from the present emergency are being met
through temporary new programs rather than by adding to our
permanent subsidy legislation.
One such emergency program is the construction of modern cargo
ships, capable of operating at high speeds for greater safety from
possible submarine attack. The Maritime Administration in the
Department of Commerce is now building 35 such vessels and may
have to undertake additional construction in future years. Expendi­
tures for this new program, which were less than 1 million dollars in
the fiscal year 1951, will increase to an estimated 134 million dollars
in 1952 and 144 million dollars in 1953.
The present emergency has also made it necessary for the Govern­
ment to undertake direct operation of merchant vessels in order to
supplement privately owned shipping capacity. The National
Shipping Authority, within the Maritime Administration, is operat­
ing about 470 vessels reactivated from the reserve of war-built ships.
This represents nearly one-fourth of our active merchant fleet. Through
this program, the Government has relieved a world-wide shortage of
dry cargo vessels and has helped to stabilize cargo rates at a reason­
able level. The National Shipping Authority is now handling much
of the abnormal traffic resulting from the Korean conflict, coal ship­
ments to Europe, grain shipments to India, and other emergency
needs. Revenues derived from these operations are expected to
exceed expenditures by 99 million dollars in 1953. These net receipts
into the Authority’s revolving fund will account for most of the
decline in over-all maritime expenditures between 1952 and 1953.
The long-term development of a healthy, privately owned merchant
marine is dependent upon the sound administration of the direct sub­
sidy programs authorized by the Merchant Marine Act of 1936. The
Federal Maritime Board now has under review the subsidy determina­
tions for postwar years and is developing improved procedures for

M 31

m 32




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

determining such subsidy rates in the future. As these determinations
are brought up to date, operating subsidy expenditures will reflect
substantial retroactive payments for past years, as well as a more
complete coverage of current obligations. Expenditures for this pro­
gram are estimated at 60 million dollars for the fiscal year 1952 and
75 million dollars for 1953.
In addition to the direct subsidies for vessel operation and construc­
tion, the Merchant Marine Act provides the shipping industry with
substantial indirect aid in the form of special tax concessions. While
I strongly favor all assistance necessary to maintain an adequate
merchant marine, I again recommend to the Congress the immediate
reduction of present unwarranted tax benefits for the shipping industry
as an initial step toward the elimination of this hidden form of
subsidy.
Whenever the Congress finds that public policy requires Govern­
ment assistance in any field, it should provide that assistance directly
through appropriations and not indirectly through preferential tax
measures. Such tax provisions generally fail to distribute the assist­
ance where it is most needed.and where it will produce the best results.
Moreover, they provide concealed benefits which are exempt from
the annual scrutiny the Congress normally gives appropriations. Be­
cause they are concealed, these benefits are difficult to reduce or
to eliminate when the need for them no longer exists.
For more than a quarter of a century, the Government has operated
the Inland Waterways Corporation, primarily to promote the develop­
ment of common carrier barge service on the Mississippi and Warrior
Rivers and their tributaries. In establishing the Corporation, the
Congress intended that it be sold to private operators after it had
demonstrated the economic feasibility of full-scale common carrier
operations. That possibility has never been demonstrated with suffi­
cient certainty to encourage any substantial offer for these properties.
The equipment has deteriorated seriously and will require rehabilita­
tion if the Government is to continue these services. I recommend
that the Congress consider promptly whether to relax the statutory
conditions which now limit sale of the Corporation or whether to ap­
propriate sufficient funds to permit the line to be rehabilitated.
Navigation aids and facilities.— The Coast Guard, which has
important peacetime responsibilities for promoting marine safety
and enforcing our maritime laws, must also be ready to provide
direct assistance to the Navy in the event of war. To increase its
state of readiness for any future emergency, the Coast Guard is
increasing the crew complement of its vessels and of its shore sta­
tions outside the continental limits. It is also expanding its reserve




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

training program. These emergency measures, together with its
new program for protecting the Nation’s ports against sabotage,
will increase expenditures from 162 million dollars in the fiscal year
1951 to an estimated 230 million dollars in 1952 and 239 million
dollars in 1953.
River and harbor improvements by the Corps of Engineers will be
held to a low level in 1953, in keeping with the over-all policy of
restricting public works activity during the present emergency. Only
one new navigation project is being recommended, and construction
of existing projects will be curtailed. River and harbor navigation
expenditures will decline from an estimated 118 million dollars in
the fiscal year 1952 to 100 million dollars in 1953.
On July 1, 1951, the Panama Canal Company was established to
permit integrated operation of the Canal and its supplementary com­
mercial activities on a more businesslike basis. The Company is
now reviewing the level of its commercial charges. Apart from
necessary capital outlays, its operations will be placed on a selfsustaining basis in the fiscal year 1953.
Aviation.— Federal promotion of civil aviation has contributed to
the spectacular growth of air transportation since the end of World
War II. During the past six years, aircraft capacity operated by
scheduled and nonscheduled airlines has expanded tenfold. This
increased capacity, together with its supporting ground facilities,
represents an important mobilization reserve— as demonstrated by
the present participation of civil carriers in carrying military per­
sonnel and supplies to Korea.
The Civil Aeronautics Administration in the Department of Com­
merce operates navigation and landing aids, enforces safety regula­
tions, provides financial assistance for local airport construction, and
conducts various other programs aimed at increased safety and effi­
ciency of aviation operations. Many of these facilities and services
are essential for military as well as civil aircraft and have been
developed with full attention to the needs of both groups.
The present emergency,, which has substantially increased air
traffic, has correspondingly increased the normal workload for avia­
tion programs. It has also required the inauguration of new activi­
ties such as the identification and control of air traffic for purposes
of air defense. Despite these increased responsibilities, expenditures
for the fiscal year 1953 will be held below the level of 1952. This
results largely from the limitation of airport grants and airway
modernization to those projects which are most essential in this
emergency period.

m 33

m 34




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

In addition to basic facilities and services, the Federal Government
also provides financial aid to the airlines for their commercial develop­
ment. These subsidies, which are now merged with compensation for
carrying mail, should be provided separately so that the Congress
and the public may have a full opportunity to evaluate them. The
Civil Aeronautics Board recently completed a study estimating the
amount of subsidy contained in air-mail payments to domestic carriers
and now has under way a similar study for international lines.
Although these studies represent a significant step in the right
direction, the full benefits of subsidy separation will be obtained only
when the Board is able to make direct subsidy payments from funds
appropriated for that specific purpose. I therefore recommend again
that airline subsidies be completely separated from payments for carry­
ing the mail. Any such separation should apply uniform standards
to all carriers, international as well as domestic.
For the fiscal year 1951, the Civil Aeronautics Board has estimated
that the subsidies to domestic airlines alone amounted to nearly 35
million dollars, or 56 percent of the total mail payments received by
those lines. In view of the increased profitability of airline operations,
the Board is taking immediate steps to reduce or eliminate subsidies
wherever possible. The airline industry as a whole has now reached
a stage of development where it needs less Government support than
in former years, and this subsidy should be curtailed. As an impor­
tant further step in the direction of financial independence, the
industry should begin in the near future to bear its fair share of the
cost of federally provided facilities through a system of airway user
charges.
Highways.— The Nation’s highways require major improvement if
they are to handle adequately the steadily increasing levels of motor
vehicle traffic. Under the Federal-aid highway program, the Bureau
of Public Roads in the Department of Commerce provides grants-inaid to assist State and local governments in the financing of needed
highway construction. Partly as a result of the steel shortage, this
program will remain below the authorized annual level of 500 million
dollars, with expenditures estimated at 412 million dollars in the fiscal
year 1952 and 400 million dollars in 1953. Within this program,
special emphasis is being placed on the Interstate Highway System—
a limited network of roads most essential to both civilian and defense
highway traffic.
Federal-aid highway authorizations under existing legislation have
been fully apportioned to the States, and this legislation should be
extended in the present session of the Congress for an additional two-

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

year period. Although a need clearly exists for a high level of road
improvement, State and local governments must continue to assume
the primary responsibility for financing such construction. Under
present circumstances, the Federal Government should concentrate
its highway aid on those projects of national interest which are most
urgently needed for defense and essential civilian transportation.
A new authorization of 400 million dollars annually— 100 million
dollars below the present authorization— should enable the Govern­
ment to discharge this responsibility.
Nearly 25 million dollars will be spent in the fiscal year 1953 for
direct Federal construction of main highways through the national
forests. I recommend that this program be extended for an addi­
tional two years at an annual level of 17.5 million dollars, or 2.5 million
dollars below the current authorization.
In addition to its continuing highway programs, the Bureau of
Public Roads now has responsibility for constructing access roads to
military installations, defense plants, and sources of strategic mate­
rials. The authorization for this program was recently increased to
45 million dollars, and expenditures are estimated at 8 million dollars
in the fiscal year 1952 and 27 million dollars in 1953. Only roads of
special defense urgency, which are not required for normal civilian
traffic, will be constructed under this authorization.
Postal service.— I am seriously concerned about the excessive
levels to which the postal deficit has risen in postwar years. For
the fiscal years 1946 through 1952, the cumulative postal deficit
will exceed 3 billion dollars. This huge loss reflects the failure of
postal rates to keep pace with the substantial postwar increases in
salaries, transportation charges, and other operating costs. Postal
rates were raised during the first session of the present Congress, and
most of the new rates will take effect by the beginning of the fiscal
year 1953. However, these increases— insufficient even in relation to
the costs existing at the time of their enactment— were more than
offset by salary increases which were concurrently enacted. They
have since been made even more inadequate by railroad rate increases
recently authorized by the Interstate Commerce Commission.
The Postmaster General is continuing his program of mechanizing
operations and is taking other steps to improve the efficiency of the
postal service. The Department is modernizing its motor vehicle
service. It has instituted an improved money-order system, revised
its accounting procedures, and made other improvements in the man­
agement of its affairs. The average output of postal employees per
man-hour has increased by more than 10 percent since 1945. To

950000—52------iv




m 35

m 36




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

further improve efficiency, I again recommend early enactment,
with certain amendments, of the Post Office Department reorganiza­
tion bill. This legislation would permit appointment of postmasters
by the Postmaster General under the classified civil service and
would otherwise strengthen the administration of the postal opera­
tion. However, the maximum potential improvements in efficiency
cannot in themselves result in any major reduction of the postal
deficit. The only effective means of reducing the deficit to a reason­
able level is through a substantial increase in postal rates.
On the basis of postal rates now enacted, the postal deficit for the
fiscal year 1953 would be nearly 670 million dollars. With the
exception of first-class mail, all postal services will be operated at a
loss in 1953. According to preliminary estimates of the Post Office
Department, the loss on second-class mail alone will amount to
roughly 250 million dollars. The newspapers and magazines which use
this class of mail now benefit from rates which cover only a small
fraction of cost, thus receiving a large and unjustified subsidy.
Another major subsidy goes to those who distribute advertising cir­
culars and other material through third-class mail, on which the loss
in 1953 is estimated at about 150 million dollars. Parcel post and
foreign mail will sustain losses estimated at approximately 125 million
dollars and 75 million dollars, respectively.
In the interest of sound fiscal and postal policy, the heavy losses
experienced on these various classes of mail should be immediately
reduced and eventually eliminated. The postal deficit as a whole
should be reduced to a level representing the cost of Government mail,
other services to Federal agencies, and similar items which are properly
chargeable to general tax revenues. To achieve this objective, addi­
tional revenue of about 500 million dollars annually must be raised
through increased postal rates. I recommend that a major part of this
increase be authorized during the present session of the Congress and
that the balance be provided one year later so as to permit a reason­
able transition to the new rates. Specifically, I recommend immediate
rate increases adequate to yield 300 million dollars on an annual basis.
Part of this increase can be effected by administrative action of the
Postmaster General and will not require action by the Congress.
This Budget assumes that the new rates will become effective for only
part of the fiscal year 1953 and that additional revenue actually
received in that year will amount to 225 million dollars. The Post­
master General will shortly present specific rate proposals designed to
carry out this recommendation, and I most strongly urge prompt and
favorable action by the Congress.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M 37

NATURAL RESOURCES

Natural resources are strategic assets in our effort to build the
military strength necessary to discourage aggressors. But we must
look beyond the short term and provide for continued expansion of
our economy. This requires an adequate supply of basic resources—
minerals, fuels, water, power, agricultural and forest products. Such
a supply can no longer be taken for granted. If we are to continue to
NATURAL

RESOURCES

[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1951
actual

Atomic energy (Atomic Energy Commission)
Defense production activities:
Department of the Interior:
Present programs .
___ ____
Proposed legislation______ ______ _. _
Land and water resources:
Corps of Engineers:
Flood control and multiple-purpose proj­
ects-____________________________________
St. Lawrence project (proposed legislation).
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Reclamation:
Present programs_____________________
Hells Canyon power project (proposed
legislation)___ __ ________ __ _ _
Power transmission (Bonneville, South­
eastern, and Southwestern Power Admin­
istrations)--------------------- ----------------------Indian land resources_____________________
Bureau of Land Management and other... .
Tennessee Valley Authority (net)-------------------International Boundary and Water Commis­
sion, United States and Mexico ____________
Federal Power Commission___________________
Forest resources:
Forest Service and other Agriculture.. _ ______
Payments to counties from land grant funds.— Mineral resources:
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Mines and other_____ . ______
Payments to States, Mineral Leasing Act_.
Department of Defense:
Naval petroleum reserves---------- -------------Fish and wildlife resources (Fish and Wildlife
Service and other)______________________________
Recreational use of resources (National Park
Service)----------- ------------------ ---------------------- ---------General resource surveys (Geological Survey).......
T o ta l...____________________________________

i Less than one-half million dollars.

1952
estimated

$897

$1, 725

2

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
1953
for 1953
estimated

$1, 775

$1, 255

6
5

5

491

503

562
15

547
20

295

276

257

228

6

8

44
27
7
72

62
36
12
190

71
48
13
200

83
57
12
200

6
4

12
4

15
5

16
5

79
2

96
7

97
7

98
7

19
17

22
15

22
18

21
18

15

19

21

22

26

37

39

31

30
18

38
22

33
28

32
29

2,051

3,082

3,237

2,694

m 38




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

strengthen our Nation, we must improve our use and conservation of
existing resources and increase our efforts to find and develop new ones.
M y 1953 Budget recommendations represent a balanced approach
to both the national emergency needs and the long-term objectives.
They continue our policy of postponing many desirable long-range
projects in order to place greater emphasis on meeting current defense
requirements. But they provide for those long-range developments
which cannot be postponed without serious harm to our economy.
Expenditures for the development of natural resources in the fiscal
year 1953 are estimated at 3.2 billion dollars, compared to 3.1 billion
dollars in the current fiscal year. More than half of the 1952 and 1953
expenditures, and most of the billion-dollar increase in expenditures
since 1951, will be for our expanding atomic energy program. Expend­
itures for flood control and irrigation and for multiple-purpose river
basin development, including hydroelectric energy, account for most
of the remainder of the total.
Atomic energy.— Although the past year has brought considerable
progress in the industrial and other peacetime applications of atomic
energy— including more widespread participation by private industry—
the principal emphasis of this program continues of necessity to be
placed on the national security. The major program initiated in
October 1950 for expanding the productive capacity of our atomic
energy plants is well under way, and major production facilities now
under construction will begin to contribute to output in the fiscal year
1953. This program is under constant study in order to make the
adjustments necessary to continue our leadership in this field.
Funds recommended for the Atomic Energy Commission include
increased amounts for the procurement of uranium ores and concen­
trates, the production of fissionable materials and atomic weapons,
and the development of improved and more effective weapons. The
several tests of atomic weapons and devices carried out during the
past 12 months demonstrate the effectiveness of recent research.
Increases are also provided for an expanded effort to develop improved
nuclear reactors for the production of fissionable material as well as
reactors for the propulsion of submarines and aircraft. The develop­
ment of propulsion reactors complements other studies under way in
contributing to the ultimate goal of economical production of elec­
tricity for civilian use. The Commission will also continue its vigorous
programs in basic and applied research in the physical sciences and in
biology and medicine.
Land and water resources.— Pre-Korea plans for development of our
land and water resources have been modified to reflect the urgent needs




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

of the defense emergency. The few new starts recommended since
the attack on Korea have been restricted to urgently needed projects,
principally those providing power benefits.
Many river basin development projects for flood control, navigation,
or irrigation provide hydroelectric power which is not only a valuable
asset to the civilian economy but is of utmost importance to defense
production. This Budget contains funds to make it possible for
power features of these multiple-purpose projects to go forward
according to schedule. Funds provided for other projects already
under construction will bring them to completion at an orderly and
economical construction rate, or to a point where they can be stopped
without losing benefits already gained or impairing the value of invest­
ments already made.
Many desirable projects have been retarded or suspended since the
beginning of the Korean emergency. For example, the Budget which
I transmitted to you two years ago included funds for 122 general
flood-control projects. After the attack on Korea, the number was
reduced to 102. The 1953 Budget recommends funds for 64 general
flood-control projects, 60 of which were initiated in previous years.
Some of the projects for which funds were recommended two years
ago have been completed, but many of them have been suspended.
Seventeen of the 64 projects in this Budget will be completed or
virtually completed with the funds recommended for 1953. Thus
the scope of this program has been reduced substantially since the
Korean emergency. This is also true of the reclamation program.
As a result of these actions, combined expenditures for flood control,
irrigation, and multiple-purpose projects now under construction by
the Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation will be held
to about the fiscal year 1952 level, despite the fact that expenditures
on some large projects with power features will increase substantially.
Only a limited number of new starts for these programs are recom­
mended in this Budget. They are restricted to urgently needed
power projects in critical shortage areas, flood-control projects in the
Kansas-Missouri area, and emergency rehabilitation work which
cannot be deferred.
The Kansas-Missouri area during the past summer suffered one of
the worst flood disasters in the history of our country. This Budget
includes 21 million dollars for starting construction on Tuttle Creek
and Glen Elder Dams, both in Kansas, and for flood protection work
at Topeka, Kansas, and Cape Girardeau, Missouri. Furthermore,
by Executive order I have established a Missouri Basin Survey Com­
mission to review the many different kinds of problems that exist in
the large area of the basin and to advise the country as to the best

m 39

m 40




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

way to proceed to achieve an orderly, businesslike development of the
resources of the basin resulting in the greatest benefits for all the
people of the basin and the Nation.
The accelerating pace of defense production, coupled with the
anticipated expansion in civilian needs, is placing a growing demand
on our power-producing facilities. Of the 735 million dollars of
expenditures for projects under way by the Corps of Engineers and
the Bureau of Reclamation in 1953, about 390 million dollars— or
over 50 percent—will be spent on multiple-purpose projects providing
power benefits. In order to further expand our power potential, four
new river development projects are recommended for initiation in
fiscal year 1953. These are the St. Lawrence project, Hells Canyon
power project and Ice Harbor Lock and Dam on the Snake River,
and the Hartwell Reservoir in South. Carolina.
If there has ever been a water resource project with great strategic
benefits, it is the St. Lawrence development. The large hydro­
electric power potential alone offers ample justification for under­
taking this project without further delay. But the emerging iron
ore problem makes it a strategic necessity. Beyond one end of the
waterway are the large steel-producing centers and the declining
high-grade iron ore deposits of the United States. Beyond the other
end are the large new discoveries of high-grade ore in Canada. In
view of the importance of this project, the Government of Canada
has recently announced that it is prepared to proceed independently
with its construction, rather than wait indefinitely for United States
participation. I have already indicated my intention to support such
action by Canada, if that is the only way to obtain immediate con­
struction of this project. However, if Canada built the waterway,
she would, of course, control its operation. I feel strongly that our
Nation’s interest in the development of this resource on the basis
which I have recommended is so vital that we should join as a full
partner in its construction and operation.
The Ice Harbor and Hartwell projects are authorized, but the
St. Lawrence development and Hells Canyon power project require
authorization by the Congress. I again urge the Congress to author­
ize these two projects without delay. The 37 million dollars recom­
mended for the four projects would permit the starting of construction
on these important developments.
I also recommend 63 million dollars to begin installation of 11
additional steam-electric and hydroelectric generation units in the
power system of the Tennessee Valley Authority. The additions are
needed not only to meet the steady growth in the power needs of the
area but also for the large increase in the requirements for the atomic
energy facilities in this area.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

These new projects and units will provide ultimate capacity of 3.5
million kilowatts. This capacity, together with the 8.3 million kilo­
watts presently installed in Federal projects and the 10.3 million
kilowatts to be installed ultimately in projects under way, will make a
substantial addition to our power supply.
Funds recommended for the fiscal year 1953 for the Bonneville,
Southwestern, and Southeastern Power Administrations, Bureau of
Reclamation, and Tennessee Valley Authority will provide properly
scheduled facilities to transmit available power to load centers.
I am also including funds in this Budget to continue planning the
urgently needed redevelopment of Niagara power facilities made pos­
sible by the treaty with Canada. In addition, I recommend the en­
actment of legislation to permit construction of facilities that would
enable us to realize the full power potential of the Niagara site.
In order to make it possible to meet defense power requirements
in the Pacific Northwest, I also recommend legislation to authorize
the construction, operation and maintenance of fuel-fired electricgenerating plants. Such plants would provide an early increase in
capacity and would make more effective existing hydroelectric
facilities.
Because of the large increases in costs that have been experienced
on some projects I have asked the Director of the Bureau of the
Budget to prepare for the consideration of the Congress, appropriation
language which would require further congressional approval before
work could go forward where the total cost of the authorized improve­
ment has increased by more than 10 percent above the last estimate
approved by the Congress, after allowance for changes in construction
cost levels. This will permit a reappraisal to be made to determine
whether we would be justified in proceeding with the work.
The Water Resources Policy Commission has submitted to me a
comprehensive report and recommendations on Federal responsibility
for and participation in the development, utilization, and conservation
of our water resources and related land-use activities. The recom­
mendations of the Commission have been under intensive study
during the past year by representatives of the Executive Office and
interested agencies. The Commission’s report and this study indicate
the need for improved means for comprehensive planning and co­
ordination in the development of these resources, including wider
State and local participation, as well as for broadening the scope of
some programs. Legislative recommendations for better development
of the Nation’s water resources and related land-use activities are
now being prepared.

M41

m 42




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Mineral resources.— To meet our immediate defense objectives,
programs in the field of mineral resources are aimed at assuring this
Nation and the free world adequate supplies of metals, minerals, and
fuels at reasonable prices. To this end, the Defense Materials Procure­
ment Agency has been established with central responsibility for pro­
curement and development operations for the current mobilization
effort.
The Bureau of Mines and the Geological Survey appraise known
sources and make surveys for new sources of critically needed mate­
rials— such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, tungsten, copper, and lead—
and conduct research aimed at improving mining practices and meth­
ods of extracting minerals, recovery of secondary metals, and increased
efficiency in the use of substitutes. Research and operation of pilot
and demonstration plants for production of synthetic liquid fuels from
oil shale and coal will be continued.
National forests and public lands.— Programs of the Forest Service
and the Bureau of Land Management provide for the management,
development, and increasing use of the valuable timber, range, and
mineral resources of our national forests and public lands.
The small increases over fiscal year 1952 will permit some expansion
in timber sales activities, thus adding to the supply of forest products
which are needed for defense activities.
Developmental programs jor the Indians.— Most of our Indian citizens
live on and make their living from the 56 million acres of land held
in trust for them by the United States. Much of this land is in need
of further development work, but even after development the lands
will support, at an adequate American standard of living, only about
half of the Indian population.
The goal of Federal Indian policy is to equip the Indians to take
their place as independent, self-supporting citizens of this Nation.
To do this job properly will require a substantial investment of Federal
funds and time enough to complete the task on an orderly basis. For
the fiscal year 1953 I am recommending new obligational authority of
57 million dollars for Indian land resources. This will provide for
acceleration of soil-conservation work and further development of
urgently needed water supplies and timber and range resources, as well
as additional roads and other construction needed to carry out the
various developmental programs for the Indians.
To insure effective use of their lands, the Indians are in need of
credit facilities. I recommend legislation to augment the loan fund
previously authorized in an amount sufficient to meet demands for
credit over the next 5 or 10 years.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M43

AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES

To meet increased military and civilian requirements, farm produc­
tion was expanded in the 1951 crop year and should continue to in­
crease in 1952.
Despite floods and droughts, farmers achieved a total production in
1951 as high as that in any previous year. In 1952, with present
production goals, farmers will be aiming at a new record, 6 percent
above 1951 and 50 percent above the 1935-39 average. These goals
represent the maximum practicable increase in the production of corn
and other feed grains which are necessary for meeting the increasing
demand for meat, poultry, and dairy products. Cotton production
will be continued at a high level, and the goal for wheat is materially
above the 1951 production when 16 million acres of winter wheat were
ruined by unfavorable weather.
Recommendations for agricultural programs in this Budget recog­
nize the desirability of expanding farm production and maintaining
the capacity of the Nation’s farms to produce foods and fibers in
abundance.
AGRICULTURE AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES
[Fiscal years.

In millions}
Net expenditures or net receipts (—)

Program or agency
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

-$781
46
180
69
4
21

$70
55
183
70
6
10

$240
50
188
70
4
15

$120
181
182
70
9
15

185
156
—1

51
165
29

35
162
11

23
162

276

250

223

83

284

302

261

257

62

68

68

69

149

149

147

152

4

4

1,478

1,327

1951
actual

Stabilization of farm prices and farm income:
Price support, supply, and purchase programs..
Removal of surplus agricultural commodities.. _
International Wheat Agreement----------------------Sugar Act_____________________________________
Federal crop insurance____________ _____ _____
Agricultural production programs_____________
Financing farm ownership and operation:
Farm Credit Administration and agencies_____
Farmers’ Home Administration-------------- --------Disaster loans._ __
_ . __ _____ _______
Financing rural electrification and rural tele­
phones -------------------------------------------------- ------- Agricultural land and water resources:
Agricultural conservation program (Produc­
tion and Marketing Administration)_____ __
Soil Conservation Service, flood control, and
other__________________________________ _____
Research and other agricultural services:
-------------------Present programs__________
Extension of Defense Production Act (pro­
posed legislation) __ _________________________
Total_______________ _____________________

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

650

1,408

m 44




MEvSSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Total expenditures for agriculture and agricultural resources are
estimated at 1.5 billion dollars in the fiscal year 1953. This compares
with 2.8 billion dollars in 1950, 650 million dollars in 1951, and an
estimated 1.4 billion dollars in 1952. Most of the fluctuation in
expenditures is in the agricultural price support program.
Stabilization of farm prices and farm income.— Programs designed
largely to aid in supporting farm prices and farm income include the
agricultural price support program, the permanent appropriation for
removal of surplus agricultural commodities, the International Wheat
Agreement, and payments to farmers under the Sugar Act. These
programs are all required under basic legislation. Expenditures de­
pend more on crop conditions and world economic conditions than
on current Budget authorizations.
The price support program is being used to encourage farm pro­
duction by keeping support prices on cotton, corn, wheat, soybeans,
milk, wool, and certain other commodities at maximum levels of 90
percent of parity. This level of support should help to give farmers
the economic incentive necessary to maintain high production. In
the crop year 1952, with present production goals, we should be able
to reverse the downward trend in carry-over stocks of cotton, wheat,
and corn and begin to build up reserves to meet possible crop short­
ages in future years. If production is not reduced by poor growing
conditions, some of the increased carry-over— principally cotton and
wheat— will come into Commodity Credit Corporation inventories,
and its acquisition will result in a net Budget expenditure in the fiscal
year 1953. The Corporation had large net receipts in 1951, and ex­
penditures are estimated to be lower in 1952 than in 1953 because of
the liquidation of inventories acquired in 1949 and 1950.
The permanent appropriation for removal of surplus agricultural
commodities was established in 1935 at a time when the Nation was
in the midst of a depression and farmers were faced with burdensome
surpluses. Under present economic conditions only a fraction of the
funds available will be needed. In the fiscal year 1953 the funds
available will include the carry-over of 176 million dollars from prior
years plus 181 million dollars of new authorization. Expenditures
under this program, however, are estimated to be 50 million dollars
in 1953.
Expenditures under the International Wheat Agreement have risen
to a higher level than was anticipated at the time the agreement was
negotiated. Although we expected a downward trend in world wheat
prices after World War II, the Korean crisis and the increased demand
for wheat have caused increased prices since 1950. The Agreement,




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

which expires July 31, 1953, guarantees the export each year of a
certain quantity of wheat at the maximum price of $1.80 per bushel.
The loss arising from the difference between this export price and the
higher domestic price of wheat is met initially from Commodity Credit
Corporation funds, with reimbursement later from appropriated funds.
The cost of the wheat agreement has risen from 76 million dollars in
the fiscal year 1950 to 180 million dollars in 1951 and is estimated to
increase somewhat in 1952 and 1953.
Financing farm ownership and operation.— All credit agencies of the
Department of Agriculture are maintaining a careful review of loan
policies to emphasize credit needed for defense requirements and to
keep them consistent with the voluntary credit restraints followed by
private lenders.
Expenditures of the Farm Credit Administration are estimated to
decline from 185 million dollars in the fiscal year 1951 to 51 million
dollars in the current fiscal year and 35 million dollars in 1953.
The loan programs of the Farmers’ Home Administration aid lowincome farm families unable to obtain credit from other sources to
expand production and to achieve efficient farming units. These,
as well as many other programs of the Department of Agriculture,
encourage the economic development of family-size farms and the
better use of underemployed farm resources.
The unusually large net expenditure for disaster loans in 1952
represents mainly loans made in the Kansas-Missouri flood area. Net
expenditures for these loans are expected to decline in 1953.
Financing rural electrification and rural telephones.— The continuing
shortage of critical materials has made it necessary to reduce alloca­
tions of copper and aluminum for rural electrification. The decline
in Rural Electrification Administration expenditures in the fiscal
years 1952 and 1953 reflects the shortage of materials. In view of
the estimated carry-over into the fiscal year 1953 of 118 million
dollars of unused loan authorizations, I recommend that the new loan
authorization for the fiscal year 1953 be reduced to 75 million dollars.
This will permit continuance of new approved electrification and
telephone loans at the 1952 level of 190 million dollars, materially
less than the 260 million dollars of loans approved in 1951. In this
way we can avoid building up excessive commitments for loan ex­
penditures one, two, or three years in the future when we cannot now
forecast the availability of scarce materials.
Following the pattern established by the Congress, I also recom­
mend a contingency authorization of 50 million dollars for electrifi­

m 45

m 46




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

cation loans to be used if the Secretary of Agriculture certifies that
such funds are necessary to provide a fair distribution among the
States under the allocation formula, but still keeping within the
over-all level of loans approved in the fiscal year 1952.
Conservation.— An increase in funds for the Soil Conservation
Service in the fiscal year 1953 is required largely because of the
increasing number of new soil-conservation districts established by
farmers and the increased responsibilities for supervising permanent
practices financed from the conservation payments program. With
the growing demands on our soil resources, we cannot afford to relax
our efforts in this direction. I also recommend that the advance
authorization for the agricultural conservation payment program in
the crop year 1953 be continued at 256.5 million dollars, the level
authorized by the Congress for the 1952 crop year.
Research and other agricultural services.— The ability of the Nation’s
farmers to meet the increasing demands for food and fiber products
rests on the continued improvement of the technology of agriculture.
M y recommendations for research and other agricultural services,
which hold these programs close to the fiscal year 1952 level, represent
a desirable balance between the immediate needs of the security
effort and the need to strengthen our economy for the years ahead.
LABOR

In order to help meet the manpower needs of defense production
and essential civilian activities without jeopardizing existing labor
standards, which are essential to. sustained high productivity, we
are shifting the emphasis of Federal labor programs.
More effort is going into assisting employers in recruiting and
training. Mediators are giving special attention to settling disputes
in defense industries. Safety training programs are concentrating on
the prevention of accidents in hazardous defense work. Statistics on
prices, wages, and employment are being collected more promptly and
in more detail so that Government and industry can have a better
basis for decisions on contract placement and plant location, and on
price and wage stabilization programs.
In the fiscal year 1953 expenditures for all activities included under
labor will amount to 246 million dollars, 6 million dollars more than
in the current year. The increases are in the placement and defense
production activities of the Department of Labor and in operations of
the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service and the National
Labor Relations Board. Three-fourths of the total expenditures for




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 47

labor programs will be direct grants to the States for the administra­
tion of placement services and unemployment compensation.
LABOR
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

$183
6

$189
10

$192
11

$204
11

1

2

3

3

1951
actual

Placement and unemployment compensation ad­
ministration:
Department of Labor____ ______ ____ ________
Railroad Retirement Board___________________
Defense production activities:
Department of Labor:
Present programs - __ ___________________
Proposed legislation
_______________________
Labor standards and training:
Department of Labor
_____________________
Mine safety (Department of the Interior)_____
Labor relations____ _ _ _________________________
Labor information, statistics, and general admin­
istration________________________________________
T o t a l................. ............ ................... ................

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

(0

13
4
12

14
4
13

14
4
14

14
4
15

9

8

8

8

228

240

246

259

i Less than one-half million dollars.

Placement and unemployment compensation administration.— Em­
ployment service and unemployment insurance administration—
which is almost all under State control but is entirely financed by the
Federal Government— will reflect the continuing impact of defense
production. More placements and fewer claims for unemployment
benefits are expected on a national basis as total employment rises.
Generally, employment conditions are very good. However, in some
communities, such as Detroit, serious local increases in unemployment
have developed. Efforts are being made to improve these local
situations through the placement of defense work in these areas.
The employment services offer the best means for the orderly
recruiting of workers for defense plants. As defense production con­
tinues to expand, increasing manpower stringencies will place an even
greater responsibility on the employment services. Special efforts are
being made to reduce unnecessary migration and avoidable strains on
housing and community facilities by recruiting all local workers,
including women, older workers, members of minority groups, and the
handicapped, before arranging for out-of-State recruitment. The
public employment offices have the assistance of labor-management
committees in helping communities with labor shortages to solve their
manpower problems. These State activities will be administered by

m 48




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

an estimated 40,800 employees— 1,200 fewer than this year. How­
ever, expenditures will increase because of salary increases for State
employees.
Shifts to defense employment have contributed to a serious farmlabor shortage. To help meet this shortage, a new program to recruit
farm laborers from Mexico for work in the United States was started
last fall under authority of legislation passed by the Congress and in
accordance with a temporary agreement with the Mexican Govern­
ment, which expires February 11. The United States has been
operating five recruiting stations in the interior of Mexico and five
reception centers in this country. Under this program, about 150,000
workers have been brought into this country for work on farms when
need has been demonstrated. Their employment has been under
contracts which protect their rights and assure that American labor
standards will not be undermined.
The United States and Mexico have agreed that both countries
must take appropriate actions to prevent the trafficking in and em­
ployment of aliens who cross the border from Mexico illegally if we
are to preserve the labor standards of American workers and of legal
Mexican entrants. On our part, this requires the tightening of our
immigration law with respect to illegal entrants and increased appro­
priations to the Immigration and Naturalization Service for more
inspectors. I strongly urge prompt and favorable consideration of
legislation for this purpose. A supplemental appropriation for opera­
tion of the recruiting and reception centers will be necessary if the
agreement is renegotiated.
Defense, production activities.— While we shall continue to rely on
voluntary methods rather than Government controls in the field of
manpower, the Federal Government must provide the assistance
which is essential to help employers and communities in solving their
labor-supply problems. Defense Production Act funds finance the
Labor Department staff which directs the manpower work in the
several Bureaus of the Department, and also pay for four special
programs— helping employers plan training for new workers, assisting
State safety inspectors to conduct accident-prevention campaigns in
hazardous defense industries, recruiting workers from other States for
jobs in areas with labor shortages, and providing employment infor­
mation on additional labor market areas to enable Government
agencies to consider labor-supply factors as they make procurement
and materials allocation decisions.
Labor standards.— Sound labor standards must be maintained not
only because of the human rights involved but also because they




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 49

contribute directly to the high productivity essential in a defense
emergency. For this reason, the Secretary of Labor has urged that
such standards as those on hours of work and employment of women
and young people be held except where they need to be temporarily
relaxed to meet urgent production problems.
The recent coal mine explosion in West Frankfort, Illinois, is a
tragic demonstration of the need for new legislation to give Federal
safety inspectors power to enforce their recommendations. Under
existing law, the Bureau of Mines has only the power of persuasion.
With the establishment of the Committee on Government Contract
Compliance, the Executive Branch has acted, within the limits of its
present powers, to see that discrimination because of race, sex, or
color does not prevent workers from getting jobs which use their
highest skills. Further progress toward this objective will require
action by the Congress. I therefore renew my recommendation for
legislation to establish a Fair Employment Practice Commission.
Some of the most serious labor standards problems arise from
movement of workers from place to place to meet the manpower needs
of agriculture. The Commission on Migratory Labor which I ap­
pointed some time ago has recently recommended a series of actions
by Federal, State, and local governments to overcome economic
exploitation, poor housing and education, and other injustices en­
countered by migrants and their families.
I intend to take administrative action to carry out many of the
recommendations which concern the Federal Government. For ex­
ample, the Department of Labor will increase its efforts to enforce
the anti-child-labor provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
From time to time necessary legislation will be requested to carry out
other recommendations. One of the first laws needed is to regulate
private employment agencies operating across State lines. The
Commission on Migratory Labor found that unscrupulous agencies
and labor contractors disrupt the labor supply and exploit workers
by charging excessive fees, referring workers to nonexistent jobs, and
misrepresenting the nature of the work.
Labor information and statistics.— The Consumers Price Index,
which is an important factor in collective bargaining contracts for
several million workers and in wage stabilization for all workers, has
been largely based on data concerning spending habits of 1934-36.
Tremendous changes in the structure of the economy have taken place
since then. Therefore, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is preparing
an up-to-date index, based on a study of the spending habits in 1950
of people in large and small cities. The improved index will be com­

«

m 50




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

piled on a trial basis for a number of months and will be first published
for January 1953.
Unemployment trust fund.— Benefits for unemployment compensa­
tion are financed by special payroll taxes on employers which are
deposited in the unemployment trust fund. Neither the receipts nor
the expenditures are included in the Budget totals. In the fiscal
years 1952 and 1953, the tax receipts are expected to be lower than
in 1951, because firms which have had low unemployment will pay
lower taxes. Despite increases in unemployment in some areas, total
unemployment, and expenditures for benefits, are expected to be
somewhat lower in 1952 and 1953 than last year.
The local unemployment we are now experiencing illustrates the
continuing need for a strong system of unemployment insurance. I
hope the Congress will give consideration to a number of basic im­
provements in the Federal-State system along the lines recommended
in my message to the Congress of April 6, 1950.
U N E M P L O Y M E N T TR U ST FU N D

[Fiscal years.

In millions]

Item

1951
actual

1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Receipts:
$1,378
164

$1,319
182

$1,351

State and railroad withdrawals for benefits— _______ ___________

-8 9 8

-8 5 6

-7 0 7

N et accumulation_______________________________________________

644

645

852

Balance in fund at close of year___________________________________

8,068

8,713

9,565

Deposits by States and railroad unemployment taxes___________
Interest_____________________________________________________________

208

Payments:

H O U SIN G AND C O M M U N ITY D EVE LO PM EN T

In the years immediately following World War II, we were begin­
ning to make good progress on a comprehensive housing and com­
munity development program. Federal insurance and guarantees of
private mortgage loans, together with Federal mortgage purchases,
were making it possible for millions of families to purchase better
homes on reasonable terms. With these and other aids, the con­
struction of homes reached an all-time peak of 1.4 million new units
in 1950. To assist low-income families to obtain adequate housing,
the Congress had authorized the construction of 135,000 low-rent
public housing units a year for a six-year period. A broad program
had been started to assist communities in eliminating slums with the
aid of Federal loans and grants. Other activities were also well

m 51

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

under way to improve the quality or reduce the cost of housing and
to assist groups with special housing problems.
Since the attack on Korea, we have moved rapidly to adapt these
programs to meet the immediate needs of expanded military and
defense installations and to establish an adequate civil defense pro­
gram. Total housing construction is being reduced to free materials
and manpower for more essential uses and to help stabilize prices
and wages in the construction industry. Under legislation enacted
during the past year, the Federal Government is helping State and
local governments to provide housing and community facilities in
defense areas and is assisting them in civil defense preparations.
HOUSING AND COM M U NITY D EV ELO P M E N T
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
N et expenditures or net receipts (—)

Program or agency
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

$21

1951
actual

$61
213

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

Defense housing and community facilities:
Housing and Home Finance Agency:
____ __________ ______
Present programs.
Proposed legislation___ ______ ___________

0)

$325

Aids to private housing:
Housing and Home Finance Agency:
Federal National Mortgage Association____
Federal Housing Administration___________
Home Owners’ Loan Corporation__ ____
Other.
_________________ ____________ ______
Direct housing loans (Veterans Administra­
tion)
. _______ _______________
Farm housing (Department of Agriculture)____
Reconstruction Finance Corporation . .
Public housing programs (Housing and Home
Finance Agency and other)_______________________

$496
— 15
—80
—3

65
—7

0)
-5

-2 3

58
26
— 19

88
24

—5
21

— 16

— 13

124
6

63
30

-9 4
41

48
21

7

6
11

32
6

6

0)

9
44

25
339

350
600

0)

30

3

17

13

Provision of community facilities__________ ______
General housing aids:
Housing and Home Finance Agency:
Loans to educational institutions___________
Alaska housing and other___________________
Urban development and redevelopment (Housing
and Home Finance Agency)__________ ___________
Civil defense____ _ __________ _____ ____ ________

543
16

2

21

Disaster insurance, loans, and relief:
Reconstruction Finance Corporation
Funds appropriated to President:
Disaster relief
_ _____ ____ ________ - _____
Flood insurance program (proposed legisla­
tion) _____________ _______________________
Total................................................. .................

i Less than one-half million dollars.

950000—52----- Y




1
602

881

50

678

1,421




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Almost a third of the new homes built in the fiscal year 1953 will be
in areas serving military and defense installations. They will be
rented or sold at prices which military personnel and defense workers
can afford to pay. Necessary community facilities also will be built
in these areas. Federal aid must be given where needed, but it will
be held to a minimum. These steps are vital in helping to assure an
adequate, stable supply of manpower for new or expanding defense
plants as well as adequate civilian personnel for military installations.
Despite the importance of providing better housing for many of
our people, housing starts in the fiscal year 1953 should be held to
850,000 or even less— depending upon the availability of mate­
rials— because of the requirements of the defense program. This
amount of construction, which must first supply housing in defense
areas, will provide for no more than the maintenance of present hous­
ing standards in other areas. All major Federal programs for housing
and community development outside critical defense housing areas
will be held substantially below the levels authorized by basic
legislation.
In the fiscal year 1953, net expenditures for housing and community
development are estimated at 678 million dollars, compared to the 881
million dollars estimated for 1952. Expenditures for civil defense and
for defense housing and community facilities will rise sharply, but net
purchases of mortgages are expected to be almost half a billion dollars
lower than in the current year, and substantial net receipts, instead
of net expenditures, are expected in public housing programs.
Defense housing and community facilities.— Since enactment of new
legislative authority last September, the Director of Defense Mobiliza­
tion has certified about 140 areas as meeting the conditions prescribed
in the statute for critical defense housing areas. Additional com­
munities will be designated as the need is demonstrated. In the
certified areas, the Federal Government will make special efforts to
assure that adequate housing and community facilities are constructed
to meet defense requirements. According to present estimates,
roughly 400,000 new housing units should be built or placed under
construction to meet needs in critical defense areas during the next
18 months.
We are continuing to rely primarily on the initiative of private
builders and local communities to provide the needed housing and
facilities in these areas. A new and more liberal program of mortgage
insurance, as well as special support from the Federal mortgage pur­
chase program, is available to help builders obtain the necessary
financing. In those areas where private builders are unable to provide




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

enough housing of the type needed for defense workers and military
personnel and at prices and rents they can afford to pay, the Federal
Government will construct such housing directly.
Federal loans and grants are also available to assist local com­
munities in critical defense housing areas in providing facilities and
services essential to the construction of housing. Federal assistance
will be available only to the*extent that the financial resources of such
communities are inadequate to finance the facilities required.
The funds which the Congress has tbus far made available for these
programs provide only a small beginning on the work which must be
done. Available funds for the direct construction of housing are so
limited in the face of the pressing need that nearly the entire amount
must be used for temporary housing near military installations. Less
than 6,000 units can be supplied with present appropriations. These
funds will take care of only a small part of the need at military installa­
tions and will permit very little direct construction of housing for
workers at defense plants. Additional funds also will be needed for
providing community facilities and services.
Accordingly, I am recommending supplemental appropriations for
the current fiscal year to make available the additional funds now
authorized for defense housing and community facilities. The grow­
ing need for defense housing also makes it essential that the present
statutory authorization be increased so that the Congress can provide
additional funds as quickly as defense requirements are demonstrated.
On the basis of specific needs thus far identified, additional appropria­
tions in 1953 estimated at 325 million dollars will be required. Of
this amount, 25 million dollars is needed for community facilities.
Aids to private housing.— Soon after the attack on Korea, the down­
payment requirements on federally insured or guaranteed mortgages
and on other mortgages were increased and the repayment periods
shortened as a method of limiting construction without resort to
direct controls. These changes helped to slow down the rate of new
construction and credit expansion, but the action of the Congress last
fall in removing most of the authority for such controls has reversed
the trend.
During the coming months, it will be necessary to reduce the level
of housing construction further to make it consistent with the needs
of economic stabilization and the limited availability of scarce mate­
rials. As one of the most essential methods of achieving this objective,
I urge the Congress to restore previous authority over down payments
and other credit terms.
In recent months the Federal National Mortgage Association has
purchased a large volume of mortgages guaranteed by the Veterans

m

53

m 54




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Administration in ©rder to provide the support authorized by law for
veterans’ housing. The activities of the Association, however, are
now increasingly directed toward providing adequate financing for
construction in critical defense housing areas. By the fiscal year
1953, over one-half of the mortgages purchased will be those financing
either military or other defense housing. The 1953 estimates assume
that, with the continued large volume of savings, the supply of private
mortgage funds will be sufficient to reduce the need for Federal support
of both defense and nondefense housing.
The mortgage insurance programs of the Federal Housing Admin­
istration also have been redirected to support the defense effort.
Liberal mortgage insurance terms have been made available to builders
constructing homes in defense housing areas. On the other hand, a
sharp reduction is in process in the number of mortgages insured in
other areas consistent with the reduced construction planned for 1953.
In total, an estimated 360,000 new housing units will be constructed
with the aid of financing insured by the Federal Housing Administra­
tion. In addition, nearly 150,000 existing homes will be purchased
with mortgages insured by the agency. Since the premium receipts
for such insurance usually equal or exceed the expenses and losses, this
program normally involves little or no Budget expenditures. For the
next fiscal year, it will be necessary to authorize an increase of
1 billion dollars in the total authority to insure mortgages under these
various programs, principally for insurance of defense housing mort­
gages.
In addition to guarantees of private housing loans to veterans, the
Administrator of Veterans’ Affairs has limited authority to make
direct housing loans to veterans in areas where adequate private
financing is not available. This program was extended by the Con­
gress until June 30, 1953, on a revolving-fund basis. Almost all of
the 150 million dollars in basic authority has now been spent or com­
mitted. The estimates for 1953 assume that the sale of loans already
made will provide adequate funds to meet the future need for new
loans.
Public housing programs.— By the end of this fiscal year an esti­
mated 140,000 low-rent public housing units will have been started
under the Housing Act of 1949. Despite this progress, the need for the
low-rent public housing program to help provide decent homes for lowincome families continues to be great. As part of the restrictive policy
followed on pxmdefense housing, I again recommend this year— as I
recommended last year— that 75,000 new units be started in the next
fiscal year, compared to the average of 135,000 units a year authorized
in the basic statute.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

While local authorities construct and operate public housing projects,
the Federal Government assists them by extending direct loans and
by contracting to make payments, over a period of years, high enough
to assure adequate security for long-term private financing. This
year local housing authorities will repay a substantial amount of
Federal loans with funds raised by the sale of their own obligations
to private investors. On the basis of the two offerings to date, net
receipts are estimated from this program in the fiscal year 1953.
Annual payments of contributions to help cover the difference be­
tween cost of operation and rental income of the projects will, however,
increase substantially next year as many of the new units now under
way are completed and occupied.
General housing aids.— Loans to help educational institutions ease
their housing shortages have been confined exclusively to institutions
having shortages resulting directly from defense activities such as
Reserve officers’ training programs. Loan commitments in the cur­
rent fiscal year have been limited to 40 million dollars, and an addi­
tional 20 million dollars of the 300 million dollars authorized in the
basic statute will be made available in 1953.
The Alaska Housing Act of 1949 gives special assistance for housing
in the Territory. The increased military preparations since 1950 have
emphasized the need for housing for the supporting civilian population.
At my request, the Federal agencies responsible for housing and related
public works in Alaska are taking steps to expedite construction of
both the needed housing and the supporting community facilities. I
am recommending a supplemental appropriation to the revolving fund
for Alaskan housing, as well as appropriations for necessary public
works. Further changes in basic authority will be requested if
studies now being made reveal the need for further assistance to this
strategic area.
Urban development and redevelopment.— The long-range slum clear­
ance and urban redevelopment program, designed to assist cities in
the elimination and redevelopment of their blighted areas, is now well
under way. Over 200 cities have indicated their intention to proceed
with redevelopment programs and have received assurance that Fed­
eral assistance will be available for their programs. Of these cities,
more than 150 have submitted plans which have been approved for
Federal assistance.
To prevent conflict with defense requirements, present policies
provide that communities may acquire sites for redevelopment, but
may not demolish existing structures or construct new structures

m 55

m

56




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

unless these steps are specifically determined to be consistent with
defense needs. These limitations will hold the net expansion in the
coming year to the minimum rate necessary to make the program
effective. For the fiscal year 1953, for example, new loan commit­
ments are not expected to exceed 100 million dollars— even though the
basic statute authorizes 250 million dollars in borrowing authority
for 1953— with expenditures estimated at 25 million dollars. The
basic statute also authorizes contracts for capital grants of 100 million
dollars a year, but no payments on such grants are now expected in
the fiscal year 1953.
Civil defense.— A strong civil defense program is an indispensable
part of our security effort. Neither our geographic position nor our
military defenses can assure absolute protection against attack. An
enemy can strike our industrial centers and inflict heavy damage in
lives and property. This threat to our civilian population and to our
productive facilities can be reduced, however, by strengthening the
civil defense program now under way. Failure to do so could leave a
fatal gap in our security structure. I am therefore recommending a
substantially increased appropriation.
These funds will finance
minimum Federal stockpiles of essential supplies and will match State
and local expenditures to prepare protective shelters in densely popu­
lated areas and to assemble necessary local equipment. ^
I
Although civil defense is primarily a State and local responsibility,
the Federal Civil Defense Administration plays a key role in providing
information, leadership, coordination, and financial assistance to State
and local governments. Federal expenditures for civil defense in the
fiscal year 1953 are estimated at 339 million dollars, compared to
44 million dollars in 1952 and less than half a million dollars in 1951.
This sharp increase is necessary to overcome dangerous gaps which
now exist in the program, caused by the inadequate financial support
given it by the Congress last year.
Disaster insurance, loans, and relief.— The great floods last summer
in Kansas and Missouri made necessary Federal assistance to relieve
suffering, repair the damage, and return the stricken area to full
economic activity as quickly as possible. The emergency assistance
included loans by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation and
the Department of Agriculture, and grants administered through
the Housing and Home Finance Agency. Through the cooperative
efforts of the Federal, State, and local governments and the American
Red Cross, the homeless were given shelter and the threat of epidemics
was avoided.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

While disasters of this magnitude happen rarely, we should be
better prepared for them than we are at present. Individuals and
business firms should have an opportunity to purchase financial pro­
tection against this hazard. The insurance facilities now available
from private companies are extremely limited.
Accordingly, I
repeat my recommendation of last summer for the enactment of
legislation to supplement these private facilities by establishing a
Federal flood insurance system. An appropriation of 50 million
dollars is recommended to create a flood insurance fund.
As part of our preparation against the greater hazards of modern
war, I urg£ the Congress to consider legislation authorizing Federal
programs necessary to restore orderly community life, maintain
minimum incomes, and compensate individuals and business firms for
property damage arising from enemy attack. In an atomic age, the
probability of such an attack is so unpredictable and the expenditures
necessary to provide a minimum level of protection are potentially so
large that neither private nor public insurance is feasible. Never­
theless, orderly advance planning is essential. At the request of the
Senate Banking and Currency Committee, the Director of the Bureau
of the Budget has submitted a draft of legislation providing minimum
authority required in advance of such attack, including authority to
set up a skeleton organization and to draft specific plans for partial
indemnities and other necessary programs. The appropriate agencies
of the Government are continuing to review and improve these
proposals.
ED UCATION AND GENERAL RESEARCH

Federal expenditures for education and general research are esti­
mated at 624 million dollars in the fiscal year 1953, compared to an
estimated 238 million dollars in 1952 and 115 million dollars in 1951.
These sums do not include special-purpose education and research
activities included in other Budget categories.
The substantial increase in the fiscal year 1953 will strengthen basic
education programs and fundamental research. The added funds
are needed primarily for new legislation which I am recommending to
help all the States improve elementary and secondary education, to
help provide schools in those communities which are overburdened
because of Federal activities, and to give financial assistance to capable
young people who otherwise could not attend a college or university.
New obligational authority recommended for 1953 is 688 million
dollars, but largely because of the length of time required to complete
and pay for buildings under the school construction program the
expenditures will be 64 million dollars less than this amount.

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 58




E D U C A TIO N AN D G E N E R A L RESEARCH
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1951
actual

1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Recommended
neW obliga­
tional authority
for 1953

Promotion of education:
Office of Education:
General aid for operating expenses, elemen­
tary and secondary schools (proposed
legislation)________________________________
Education of children on Federal property
and in emergency and critical defense
housing areas:
Present programs ________________
Proposed legislation_____________________
General assistance to college students (pro­
posed legislation)__________________________
Vocational education_______________________
Other progr ams_____________________________

$290

Total .................................... ......... ......................... .

185
35

190
80

$17

$151

27
7
6

26
9
8
11

30
26
8
8
12

30
26
8
5

10

Educational aid to special groups_______________ . .
Library and museum services_____ ______________
General purpose research:
National Science Foundation._____ _____________
National Bureau of Standards__________________
Seventeenth Decennial Census (Department of
Commerce)____________
___________ _______
.................. ................. .........
O th e r ...........................

$300

10

1
11

5
12

15
9

30
8

13
8

3
10

11

115

238

624

688

0)

12

2

1 Less than one-half million dollars.

Promotion oj education— elementary and secondary.— At present, too
many of our people are unable to make full use of their capabilities,
whether in civilian employment or military service, because their
opportunities for education and training have been limited. Schools
are overcrowded, substandard instruction is common, and teachers’
salaries continue low in many areas.
The most serious aspect of this situation is that it can so easily
become very much worse. Our school-age population is now rising
rapidly, as a result of the great increase in births which began in the
war years. The number of children entering the first grade is now
nearly 10 percent higher than it was only four years ago. Four years
from now it will have risen another 24 percent. Meanwhile, of course,
these children will be moving up through the grades, year by year,
putting new strains successively on our elementary and secondary
school systems.
I have urged the Congress for several years to enact legislation pro­
viding grants to the States for operation and maintenance of their local
schools. These grants would assist the States in improving their




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

systems of elementary and secondary education by raising teachers*
salaries, providing more and better textbooks, and in many other ways.
The security program has reemphasized this need. In some States
more than one-third of the young men called by the Selective Service
System failed the educational tests for entrance into military service
during the fiscal year 1951. The States with the highest rejection rates
are precisely those low-income States which, despite heavier taxes in
relation to income, are unable to provide a satisfactory education for
their young people. Many of the men rejected for military service
because of educational deficiencies are also unable to meet our needs
for skilled workers in industry. At a time like this we cannot afford
to waste any resources, yet this pool of inadequately used human
resources is being continually enlarged because many young people
are denied the opportunity for a proper education.
This is a need that we must begin to meet at once. This Budget
includes a recommendation of 300 million dollars as the preliminary
estimate for general aid to education in the fiscal year 1953. Because
of higher costs and the greater number of school children, this amount
of aid will not fully accomplish the purposes which my earlier proposal
was designed to achieve. I hope that the Congress will enact legisla­
tion containing provisions to raise equalization aid to a more adequate
level over the next decade.
In addition to this new program of general aid, the Budget includes
45 million dollars in estimated appropriations for operation and
maintenance aid to certain local school districts where the Federal
Government has a special responsibility to furnish assistance because
Federal activities have imposed special burdens.
This Budget also includes estimated appropriations of 225 million
dollars for the construction of school facilities in critical defense hous­
ing areas and other places specially affected by Federal activities. Of
this amount, 150 million dollars is needed to continue the program
already authorized, and the remainder is a preliminary estimate of
needs under proposed legislation.
We are also moving forward on a detailed three-year Nation-wide
survey of our school construction needs generally, as authorized by the
Congress in 1950. In cooperation with the Office of Education, the
States are making good progress in surveying their shortages of school
facilities and their resources available to meet these shortages. The
information coming in from this survey will help us to determine what
the future role of the Federal Government should be in relation to
school construction needs.
Meanwhile, the States and localities are doing a great deal to meet
the situation. During the calendar year 1951 they broke all previous

M 59

m 60




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

construction records by building more than 40,000 new classrooms
costing 1.3 billion dollars. It is gratifying that, despite the shortage
of structural steel, we have been able to make enough available for
the first half of 1952 to continue and even increase this rate of
construction on the basis of modified designs which require less steel.
The present programs of Federal aid to critical areas for con­
struction and operation of schools are based on two laws enacted in
1950. Under these laws we provide aid to local school districts for
construction and for operation of schools to meet burdens resulting
from peacetime and World War II Federal activities. Expenditures
under both laws are estimated at 185 million dollars in 1953. Many
localities receiving such aid have suffered additional financial strain
because of current mobilization activities. Because of the rigid
formulas in these laws, we have been unable to provide adequate aid
to these localities and to others, such as the Savannah River and
Paducah areas, where new atomic energy installations have resulted
in a vastly increased need for schools.
Late in the last session the Congress passed legislation which would
have amended these laws so as to provide more adequate and flexible
authority for assisting critical defense housing areas, but the bill
included certain objectionable provisions which compelled me to
withhold my approval. I hope that the Congress will reenact, at
this session, the much-needed amendments in an acceptable form and
at the same time make other improvements in the laws. Expendi­
tures under this proposed legislation are estimated at 35 million
dollars in the fiscal year 1953 for both the construction and the
operation programs.
Children of migratory workers constitute a special group whose
present educational opportunities are inadequate. As has been
pointed out by the Commission on Migratory Labor, because these
children move with their families, they start school later, attend fewer
days, make less progress, and drop out earlier than others. As a
first step toward meeting this problem, we need to work out special
teaching materials and methods suited to their education. I have
therefore included in this Budget money to enable the Office of
Education to make the necessary studies in cooperation with the
States and with institutions of higher learning.
Promotion oj education— colleges and universities.— In the present
emergency, our military forces and our defense industries need an
increasing number of people who have advanced education and
training. Full strength on all fronts is essential for the long pull, and
trained manpower is critically important to such strength. This need




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

for a substantial and rapid increase in the number of people who go to
colleges and universities is a national problem requiring national
action.
By temporarily postponing the induction of students into the
armed forces, we took one step toward assuring that each man receives
the training which will enable him to serve national needs most
effectively. At present, however, family financial ability tends to
be the factor that decides who, among the able, can continue his
education and who will be inducted immediately. The results are
not only unfair— they are detrimental to our national interest.
Elsewhere in this Budget there are Federal programs for aid to
college students, such as the programs of veterans’ education and
the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps. These programs are necessary
for special purposes. They do not meet the broader needs of the
Nation. A general program of scholarship aid and loans for under­
graduate students is the logical and practical answer, and this Budget
therefore includes 30 million dollars for initiating such a program in
the fiscal year 1953. The program I am recommending is designed to
provide modest payments to a limited number of students, and to give
this aid only in those instances where the students otherwise could not
go to college.
National Science Foundation.— During the last decade we have seen
how basic scientific research can alter the foundations of world power.
We have seen that this research yields a stream of new knowledge
which fortifies our economic welfare as well as our national strength.
We have learned that a strong, steady, and wide-ranging effort in
science is as essential to our sustained national security as the pro­
duction of weapons and the training of military personnel.
The National Science Foundation has been established as the
Government agency responsible for a continuing analysis of the
whole national endeavor in basic research, including the evaluation
of the research programs of other Federal agencies. On the basis of
studies now under way, the Foundation will formulate a broad
national policy designed to assure that the scope and the quality of
basic research in this country are adequate for national security and
technological progress.
The Foundation also will stimulate or sponsor basic research in
subjects which otherwise might receive inadequate attention. While
the research program of the Foundation is not intended to supersede
the basic research programs of other agencies, the Foundation should
ultimately become the principal agency through which the Federal
Government gives support to basic research that is not directly related

m

61

m 62




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

to the statutory functions of other Federal agencies. The proposed
increase for research support by the Foundation has been taken into
account in arriving at the recommendations for the basic research
programs for the Department of Defense and other agencies.
In the present fiscal year the National Science Foundation is
initiating a modest program of fellowships in the sciences. The
1953 Budget recommendation for the Foundation provides for an
expansion of this program to help meet the increasing need for special­
ized and professional personnel in the present emergency.
To make its greatest contribution speedily and effectively, the
Foundation needs in the fiscal year 1953 an appropriation of the full 15
million dollars authorized by law. Expenditures in 1953 are estimated
at 10 million dollars below the appropriation because many research
grants extend over two or three years and because the fellowship
program is only beginning.
SOCIAL SECURITY, W ELFARE, AND H EALTH

Expenditures for social security, welfare, and health are estimated
at 2.7 billion dollars for the fiscal year 1953, slightly less than in the
current year and 282 million dollars higher than in 1951. Most of
the increase over 1951 occurs in proposed legislation for public assist­
ance and in transfers to the railroad retirement trust account of pay­
roll taxes collected from railroad employers and employees.
In the past year, our programs for protecting people against want
and privation have progressed further toward a contributory social
insurance basis. Old-age and survivors insurance, financed through
a trust fund, has forged ahead of public assistance as a source of
income for nonworking people over 65 years of age.
This marks the realization for the first time of a basic principle of
the Social Security Act— that the major role of protecting people
against want in old age should be assigned to social insurance,
financed mutually by employers and employees through payroll taxes,
and providing benefits as a matter of right without a means test.
Only 16 months ago there were 2,800,000 aged people on the public
assistance rolls, while only 2,000,000 were receiving old-age and
survivors insurance, and average public assistance benefits were
substantially greater than old-age insurance payments. Today, more
than 3,200,000 persons receive old-age insurance, while the number
of aged receiving public assistance has dropped by about 100,000
from the peak reached in September 1950 and is still declining.
Moreover, insurance benefit rates have been increased to a level




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

M03

almost equal to average public assistance payments. The 1950
amendments to the Social Security Act— which broadened the cover­
age and increased the benefits— played a major role in reversing the
previous trend.
Unquestionably, the healthiest form of economic security for all
people is opportunity for steady employment. The overwhelming
majority of people in the American labor force— white collar and
blue collar, skilled and unskilled— are able to work and want to work.
To that end, additional efforts should be made by private employers
and Government to utilize the skills of the older workers and, where
necessary, to retrain them for work commensurate with their capaci­
ties. But for those who are unable to work— older or disabled people
or widows with growing children— insurance protection should be
available on an adequate basis.
S O C IA L

S E C U R IT Y ,

W ELFARE,

[Fiscal years.

AND

H EALTH

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1952
estimated

1951
actual

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
1953
for 1953
estimated

Retirement and dependents insurance:
Railroad Retirement Board___________________

$608
7

$773
7

$723
3

$723
3

1,187

1,182

1,142
100

1,142
100

17
83
37
27

22
84
45
37

24
83
61
37

24
83
63
37

305

382

341

268

109

133

133

135

15

15

2,680

2,662

Public assistance:
Federal Security Agency;
Present program__________________________
Proposed legislation_______________________

Aid to special groups:
Vocational rehabilitation (Federal Security
Agency)------------------- ---------------- ------------------School lunch (Department of Agriculture)------Indian welfare and other____ _______ _________
Accident compensation (Department of Labor)____
Promotion of public health (Federal Security
Agency and other)______________ ____________
Crime control and correction (Department of Jus­
tice and other)__________________________________
Defense community facilities and services (Fed­
eral Security Agency)
____ _____________
Total_______________________________________

2,380

2,578

Benefits should be increased without delay. Because of the rising
wage level, the revenues of the old-age and survivors insurance system
are higher than will be needed to pay the present scale of benefits to
people who will retire. Under these circumstances, it is possible to




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

increase average primary benefit rates by about 5 dollars a month.
This increase can be made without in any way increasing the contribu­
tion rates in present laws. This would raise the average benefit of a
retired worker to 47 dollars a month.
In addition, I hope the Congress will not neglect other desirable im­
provements in our social insurance laws which will move us closer to
our objective of making old-age and survivors insurance a basic
protection for all employed groups, with special pension plans supple­
menting this basic protection. We should extend coverage to mem­
bers of the armed forces, public employees, farmers, farm and house­
hold workers not regularly employed by a single employer, and other
employed groups who are not covered by a publicly sponsored insur­
ance system. Also, as soon as practicable, the present limitation of
3,600 dollars a year on earnings taxed under the insurance system
should be brought up to date, and provision should be made for per­
manent and total disability protection.
Railroad retirement.— Expenditures of the Railroad Retirement
Board consist principally of transfers to the railroad retirement trust
account of taxes collected from railroad employers and employees.
The amendments enacted last October raised benefits for the 400,000
persons who were then receiving retirement payments under the Rail­
road Retirement Act. They also provided benefits for the first time
for the wife or husband of a retired railroad employee. Expendi­
tures for these benefits are made directly from the trust fund and do
not, therefore, affect the Budget total.
These amendments were enacted by the Congress as a first step
toward improving the railroad retirement system. Much more
remains to be done if we are to give railroad workers and their depend­
ents adequate protection on a sound financial basis. I am glad that
the Congress adopted a resolution providing for a comprehensive
study of the railroad retirement system, its benefits and financing,
and its relationship to the old-age and survivors insurance program.
Public assistance.— Federal grants to the States for the existing
public-assistance programs are declining. Expenditures in the fiscal
year 1953 under present law are estimated at 1.1 billion dollars, 40
million dollars below the amount now estimated for the current year.
The number of recipients of old-age assistance and aid to dependent
children began to decline during the past year, largely because of
increased employment and improved old-age and survivors insurance.
This decline is expected to continue in the fiscal year 1953.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

For those who are in genuine need, and who have no recourse other
than public assistance, upward adjustments in monthly payments are
warranted in view of advances in the cost of living. The Federal
Government in assisting the States to bear the costs of public assist­
ance has a responsibility for sharing the expense of the necessary ad­
justments. Many States have had difficulty in raising their benefits
to adequate levels. I recommend the enactment of legislation to
provide additional help on a matching basis to assist the States to
attain higher benefit levels. This Budget includes 100 million dollars
as a tentative estimate of the amount needed for this purpose.
Aid to special groups.— The Federal Government traditionally
assumes part of the financial responsibility for two programs operated
by the States for special groups. One of them provides low-cost
lunches to school children, thus offering some assurance against under­
nourishment of our children. My Budget recommendation for this
activity is based upon continuing Federal participation at the present
level. The other program rehabilitates disabled people and returns
them to productive employment, thus increasing our labor force and
our national production of goods and services. I am recommending
a moderate increase for this purpose.
The Federal Government also provides health, welfare, and educa­
tional services for our 400,000 native Indians. Because the present
level of these services is clearly inadequate, this Budget provides for a
15-million-dollar increase in expenditures in the next fiscal year. In
addition to permitting some improvement and expansion of basic
health and educational services, this increase will enable the Bureau
of Indian Affairs to conduct a constructive program to provide the
Indians with training and off-reservation relocation opportunities and
to help them to make satisfactory adjustments in new locations.
Promotion oj public health.—‘The health of the American people is
essential for our security and development. Like any other resource,
health should be safeguarded and improved. The Federal Govern­
ment has contributed to this objective in a number of ways, par­
ticularly through its extensive research programs and its financial
aid to the States. But we still have a long way to go.
On the basis of available studies indicating the pressing need for
such measures, I recommend that legislation be enacted to provide aid
for medical education and local public health units. Furthermore, in
order to help outline a course of action which will aid in meeting the

m 65

m 66




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

long-term health requirements of the Nation, I have established a
commission to study various health problems. The Commission will
consider, among other things, the availability of medical services and
the adequacy of present methods of paying for them.
Public health services are provided primarily by local health agencies
with extensive cooperation and assistance from the States and the
Federal Government. More than half of the Federal expenditures for
promotion of public health are for grants-in-aid to the States and
localities by the Public Health Service and the Children’s Bureau.
These grants are for such activities as hospital construction, control of
venereal disease and tuberculosis, mental health, maternal and child
health, general health services, and detection of cancer and heart dis­
ease. Most of the remainder goes toward technical assistance to the
States in the form of demonstrations, educational programs, and con­
sultative services, and for the research programs of the Public Health
Service and Children’s Bureau. The estimate of expenditures for
health programs in the fiscal year 1953 is lower than for the current
year primarily because of smaller outlays to liquidate contract author­
izations, particularly under the Federal-State hospital construction
program. This reduction reflects our continuing policy of holding
new construction to a minimum.
Defense community facilities and services.— This item is for Federal
assistance to critical defense housing areas in providing facilities and
services essential to health and welfare, including sewage disposal and
water supply. Unless these basic needs are met, it will not be possible
to attract all the workers needed for defense production. These
health and welfare activities support the defense housing and com­
munity facilities program which is discussed in the Housing and
Community Development section of this Message.
Trust funds.— In addition to the railroad retirement trust account,
mentioned above, the Federal Government maintains two other large
trust funds for publicly sponsored retirement and insurance systems—
old-age and survivors insurance and civil-service retirement. The
money in the trust funds is invested in Government securities, and
the interest earnings are added to the principal in each fund. The
balances in these three funds will aggregate approximately 25 billion
dollars at the end of the current fiscal year.

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 67

SOCIAL SECURITY, WELFARE, AND HEALTH
(Trust funds)
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
1951
actual

Fund and item

1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Federal old-age and survivors insurance trust fund:
Receipts:
Appropriation from general receipts....... ............................... _
Interest and other____ __________________________ ____ ____
Payments of benefits and administrative expenses:
Present program___________________________________________
Proposed legislation....... ..................... ................................... .

$3,119
291

$3,850
342

$4,030
407

- 1 , 568

-2,059

-2,337
-225

1,842

2,133

1,875

14, 725

16, 858

18. 733

Receipts:
Transfers from Budget accounts___ _______________________
Interest..__________________________________________________
Payments of benefits, salaries, and expenses___________________

608
70
-321

773
79
-397

723
90
-4 4 7

Net accumulation__________________________ ________________

357

455

366

______

2, 445

2,900

3,266

Receipts:
Employee contribution____________________________________
Transfer from Budget accounts and other________ _______
Interest________________________________ __________________
Payments of annuities and refunds, and expenses______________

378
305
165
-2 7 0

415
310
189
-300

413
465
216
-3 2 2

Net accumulation_______ ___________ ________ _______ _____

578

614

772

Balance in fund at close of year_____ __________________________

4, 418

5, 032

5,804

Net accumulation______________________________________
Balance in fund at close of year........ ................................... ..............

Railroad retirement account:

Balance in fund at close of year_ _____________________
_

Federal employees’ retirement funds:

V E TERA N S’ SERVICES AND BENEFITS

Expenditures for veterans’ services and benefits, which have de­
clined 43 percent from the World War II peak of 7.4 billion dollars in
1947, are estimated at 4.2 billion dollars in the fiscal year 1953. The
decline results from sharp reductions in expenditures for readjust­
ment benefits and insurance outlays.
In view of the large increase in the size of our armed forces since
Korea, and the continued increase in expenditures for compensation
and pensions, further large declines in veterans’ outlays are unlikely.
Our veteran population is increasing rapidly under the policy which
requires nearly all able-bodied young men coming of military age to
serve their turn in the armed services. As our commitments to our
growing number of veterans increase, we should constantly inquire

950000—52------V
i




m

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

68




into how we can best meet their needs and the needs of their depend­
ents. In considering legislation affecting veterans, we must take into
account the prevailing economic and military situation, the relation of
veterans’ programs to the whole range of Government programs, the
availability of other Government services, and the lessons learned
from experience.
The chief responsibility of the Government is to give medical care
to veterans who have been injured in the service, to assist them to
assume their place in society as productive and self-reliant citizens,
and to give necessary aid to the families of veterans deceased or in­
jured from service causes. We should also provide other demobilized
servicemen with timely readjustment assistance on a sound basis.
The needs of veterans and their families not resulting directly from
military service can be best met through the welfare programs serving
the whole population. These programs have been expanded and im­
proved in recent years. Only the special and unique needs of service­
men and their dependents arising directly from military service should
be provided for in special veterans’ programs.
VETERAN S*

SERVICES AN D

[Fiscal years.

B E N E F IT S

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1951
actual

1952
estimated

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
1953
for 1953
estimated

Readjustment benefits:
Education and training:
Present programs_____ ________________ _
Proposed legislation_______________________
Loan guarantees______________________________
Unemployment and self-employment allow­
ances_______________________________________
O th e r._____ _________________ ________ _____

$1,943

$1,486
77

$626
75
72

$625
75
72

91
8
64

5
44

2
37

2
27

2,037

2,086

135
50

79
246

2,149
100
56
68

2,149
100
56
70

Current expenses________ ___________ _______
Hospital construction_________________________
Other services and administration (Veterans Ad­
ministration and other)_________________________

600
145

670
211

695
107

698
95

266

262

210

212

Total, ________________ __________ _____ ____

5,339

5,166

4,197

4,181

Compensation and pensions:
Compensation and pension payments:
Present programs________ _____ __________
Proposed legislation..........................................
Subsistence to disabled veterans______________

Insurance and servicemen’s indemnities_________
Hospitals and medical care:




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Readjustment benefits.— Expenditures for education and training of
World War II veterans are estimated at 626 million dollars in the
fiscal year 1953, a decline of 860 million dollars from the revised
estimates for the current fiscal year. The 1953 expenditures will
provide for an average enrollment of 491,000 in school, job, and farm
training courses. The reduction from an average enrollment of over
one million in the current fiscal year reflects the fact that July 25,1951,
was the deadline for initiation of training under the program. By the
end of the fiscal year 1953, approximately 7,800,000 veterans—-about
half of all the veterans of World War II— will have received education
and training at a cost to the Government of 14.3 billion dollars.
This investment is already proving to be of great benefit to the veterans
and the Nation.
Other expenditures under the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act are
for unemployment and self-employment allowances and loan guaran­
tees. In the fiscal year 1953, only the outlays for loan guarantee
activities will continue to be large. Government expenditures for
interest gratuities on guaranteed loans and on account of defaulted
loans are estimated to decline slightly to 72 million dollars. An esti­
mated 391,000 new loans amounting to 3.3 billion dollars are expected
to be guaranteed. This will raise to 21.5 billion dollars the aggregate
of veterans’ loans for homes, farms, and businesses guaranteed by the
Government since 1945.
This Budget includes 75 million dollars to cover the first year’s cost
of a new program of readjustment benefits for discharged servicemen
who have served since the beginning of the Korean conflict. I recom­
mend prompt enactment of such a program. However, I do not
believe that extension of the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act in its
present form would be the proper way to meet the new need. The
main assistance to be provided at this time should be a sound and
constructive program of education and training. The new legislation
should take account of the significant imperfections which have
become apparent in our experience with the “ GI bill.” All possible
effort should be made to incorporate into any new program the lessons
learned from that experience. Studies now bein^made by the Con­
gress should be of value in the consideration of pending bills to estab­
lish a new readjustment program for these veterans.
Compensation and pensions.— It is estimated that under existing
laws an average of 3,179,000 individuals and families will receive
veterans’ compensation and pension payments totaling more than
2.1 billion dollars in the fiscal year 1953. This is a net increase of
84,000 in the average number of cases and 63 million dollars in pay­

m 69

m 70




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

ments over the estimates for the current fiscal year. The expenditure
estimates reflect an anticipated supplemental appropriation of 42
million dollars in the fiscal year 1952 to cover expenditures for com­
pensation and pensions, in part because of new legislation enacted by
the first session of this Congress.
The total of 2.1 billion dollars under present laws for the fiscal year
1953 includes 1.5 billion dollars in compensation payments to servicedisabled veterans and families of those veterans who have died from
service-connected causes, as well as 618 million dollars in pension
payments for non-service-connected disabilities. Under existing laws
expenditures for compensation and pensions will more than double in
future years, with the increase entirely in non-service-connected pen­
sions. Legislation to increase further the number of non-serviceconnected pension beneficiaries should be reviewed in light of the fact
that most veterans who need financial help will be covered by the
old-age and survivors insurance program. In those cases where
veterans are not covered by this program, the sensible remedy is to
extend old-age and survivors insurance to include them.
With respect to death and disability compensation payments arising
from service causes, I recommend that the Congress carefully review
the rates and revise them where recent increases in the cost of living
warrant. This Budget includes 100 million dollars to defray the cost
of such increases. The legislation making the specific changes should
take into account the new dependents’ allowances for disabled veterans
with families, and the increases in death compensation rates which
have been enacted in recent years, as well as payments to beneficiaries
under other Government programs. In particular, the Congress
should carefully investigate the disparities which exist because of the
fact that survivors of many servicemen receive both veterans’ benefits
and old-age and survivors insurance benefits on the basis of military
service, while families of other veterans receive only the veterans’
benefits.
Insurance and servicemen’s indemnities.— After intensive investi­
gation, the Congress early last year established a new system of $10,000
indemnities to fancies of servicemen who die while on active duty
or within 120 days after discharge. These indemnities are provided
for every serviceman without charge in lieu of the National Service Life
Insurance which was previously available on an optional basis. They
provide universal protection for servicemen’s dependents. At the
same time they cost the Government less than National Service Life
Insurance. Indemnity payments to families of servicemen will be
about 9 million dollars in the fiscal year 1953.




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

In the Insurance Act of 1951, the Congress also provided an
improved system of insurance to cover disabled and other servicemen
after their discharge from the armed forces. This new insurance,
financed through revolving funds, is based upon more realistic mortality
tables and interest and premium rates than are used in the National
Service Life Insurance program. Receipts in these funds will be 2
million dollars more than expenditures in 1953.
In addition, the Government continues to reimburse the National
Service Life Insurance and United States Government Life Insurance
trust funds for the cost of deaths of policyholders traceable to war
hazards, and also pays claims for certain veterans who failed to meet
regular standards of insurability. It is estimated that Budget expendi­
tures for these payments will rise to 242 million dollars in the current
fiscal year because of casualties in Korea, but they are expected to
decline to 61 million dollars in 1953. Further reductions are expected
in subsequent years, since new members of the armed forces are
covered by the indemnity system.
Hospital and medical care.— With the opening of 20 new veterans7
hospitals in the fiscal year 1953, the average number of patients is
expected to increase by 4,400 above the current year’s level. Corre­
spondingly, current expenses for hospital and medical care of veterans
are expected to increase 25 million dollars.
The number of patients in hospitals and homes in the fiscal year
1953 is estimated to average about 134,000, of which about two-thirds
are non-service-connected cases. It is estimated that the out-patient
case load during the year will decline seven percent, to 3,486,000 visits
and treatments. Total current expenses for hospital and medical care
in the fiscal year 1953 are estimated at 695 million dollars.
Hospital construction.— Expenditures for construction of hospital
and domiciliary facilities for veterans are expected to decline in the
fiscal year 1953 as the program to provide 36,500 new beds nears
completion. M y Budget recommendations include 95 million dollars
in new obligational authority to complete hospitals now under con­
struction, to permit the construction of three new hospitals uiider the
36,500-bed program, and to begin conversion and modernization of
existing facilities.
Other services and administration.— It is estimated that expenditures
for administration and miscellaneous services will be 52 millioh dollars
less in the fiscal year 1953 than in the current year. About 21 million
dollars of the reduction is due to the fact that the 1952 total included

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 72




a nonrecurring outlay for automobiles for blind and amputee veterans.
The remainder is a reduction in the expenses of administering the
nonmedical benefit programs. This in part reflects declining work­
loads and in part more efficient methods of operation as the result
of consolidation of district offices and the substitution of the service­
men's indemnity program for National Service Life Insurance.
Trust funds.— The Servicemen’s Indemnity Act of 1951 virtu­
ally terminated the issuance of new National Service Life Insurance
policies, but did not affect 7.6 million policies now outstanding under
National Service Life Insurance and United States Government Life
Insurance trust funds.
In the current fiscal year, expenditures from these two trust funds
are substantially greater than receipts because the second special
National Service Life Insurance dividend is still being paid. By the
start of the fiscal year 1953 it is expected that dividend payments out
of the National Service Life Insurance fund will be on a current basis.
In that year expenditures and receipts from the two trust funds will
approach a balance.
V E T E R A N S ’ LIF E IN S U R A N C E FU N DS

(Trust funds)
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
1951
actual

Item

1952
estimated

1953
estimated

Receipts:
Transfers from general and special accounts................... ................
Interest on investments.__ _________________ _____ _____ ______Premiums and other__________________ _ _ _______ ____ ____
Total______ _ ____________________

_________________________

$45
205
520

$186
211
407

$56
206
425

770

804

687

236
455

654
506

186
537

691

1,160

723

79

-3 5 6

-3 6

6, 772

6,416

6,380

Expenditures:
Dividends to policyholders . . *
_ . .
Benefits and other__________ ______ ________________________
Total___________ ________________ _________

__

_____ ___

Net withdrawal (—) or net accumulation______________ _____

Balance in funds at close of year____________ _____________

GENERAL G O V ERN M EN T

Expenditures for general Government services and activities in the
fiscal year 1953 are estimated at 1.5 billion dollars. This is a net in­
crease of 131 million dollars over the current fiscal year. The net
increase includes a rise of 148 million dollars in the Government’s




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

m 73

contribution, as employer, to the civil-service retirement system,
higher expenditures to handle the increased volume of tax collections,
and decreases in several items.
A sharp decline in expenditures for public building construction
reflects my Budget policy of limiting new construction to projects
directly supporting our security effort.
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Program or agency
1951
actual

1952
estimated

Recommended
new obliga­
tional authority
1953
for 1953
estimated

Legislative functions................................... ..............
Judicial functions...... ......................................... .
Executive direction and management.....................
Federal financial management:

$40
28
9

$43
30
10

$49
26
8

$44
25
7

Bureau of Internal Revenue_____ _____________
Customs collection, debt management, and
other___ ,________ _______________ ____ _____ _
General Accounting Office------------------- ---------- -

244

279

303

305

137
32

138
33

151
32

153
32

Central property and records management
Civil Service Commission------ ------------------------Legal services (Department of Justice)........... . .
Government Printing Office------------------- ---------

146
16
8
12

230
20
10
13

199
22
11
12

198
22
11
28

Government payment toward civilian employees'
retirement system................................................
Other general government:

305

310

458

458

33

41

44

44

Other central services:

Immigration control (Department of Justice)...
Public building construction (General Services
Administration)_____________________ ______
Dispersal of Government activities (proposed
legislation)__________________________________
Other____ ______ _____________________________

24

23

12

175

173

5
152

15
101

Total------------------------------------------------------------

1,209

1,353

1,484

1,443

0)

i Less than one-half million dollars.

Federal financial management.— The Revenue Act of 1951 increased
the amount and variety of taxes to be collected. The increased funds
provided in this Budget will enable the Bureau of Internal Revenue
to expand its auditing and enforcement operations to assure better
compliance with the tax laws. The maintenance of public confidence
in the tax collection process is essential to our tax system To this
end, steps have been taken or are in process to insure the integrity of
the tax-collecting system by tightening up the supervision of all
Bureau operations throughout the country, establishing an inspection
service independent of the rest of the Bureau, and speeding up the
prosecution of delinquent taxpayers. Furthermore, I have trans­

m 74




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

mitted to the Congress, under the Reorganization Act of 1949, a plan
for reorganization of the Bureau for the purpose of bringing about an
improved organization with clearer lines of authority and responsi­
bility, and providing that all positions in the Bureau not now filled
through civil service, except that of the Commissioner of Internal
Revenue, shall be so filled hereafter.
Most of the increase in expenditures for tax enforcement will be
used to intensify investigations of the tax returns and activities of
racketeers and to enforce the new wagering taxes levied by the
Revenue Act of 1951. To perform this work effectively, some 7,000
employees will have to be added to the Bureau staff before the end
of the current fiscal year. Early approval of a supplemental appro­
priation will be needed to make this possible.
The Renegotiation Board, established under a statute enacted last
spring, is now organizing to review profits earned under defenserelated contracts and to prevent or recover excessive payments by
the Government. This Budget includes an estimate of 7.3 million
dollars for expenses of the Board during the fiscal year 1953.
Central property and records management.— Under the Federal Prop­
erty and Administrative Services Act of 1949, the General Services
Administration has brought about more efficient and effective use of
the Government’s real and personal property and is endeavoring to
eliminate nonessential requirements, to set inventory levels at a mini­
mum, and to apply stricter standards of use and replacement. This
program has been reoriented to meet the needs of the defense agencies
and other Government agencies for space, equipment, and supplies.
The volume of records preserved by operating agencies and in
recently established regional records centers is continually being
reduced, and the storage of the remaining records is being further
centralized to release scarce office and warehouse space. By the end
of the fiscal year 1953, the regional records center program will release
for other uses nearly 2 million square feet of space and approximately
200,000 filing cabinets.
Civilian personnel management.— An increase in Government per­
sonnel has been required to meet the needs of our security programs.
The Civil Service Commission has had to expand its examining,
recruiting, and placement activities to safeguard the merit system.
The use of expert boards of examiners will be extended and improved
and a program of centralized recruiting in major employment centers
will be inaugurated to eliminate duplication of recruiting efforts.




m essage

of t h e

p r e s id e n t

At present, a few Federal agencies have authority to assign a limited
number of personnel for advanced training in fields directly related to
the w
^ork of their agencies. In order to increase the productivity of
employees in various lines of scientific, technical, and administrative
work, I recommend that the Congress extend standard but limited
authority to Government agencies generally, so that they may provide
such training at institutions of learning, scientific laboratories, or
private establishments for a small number of their personnel.
Experience under the several existing statutes authorizing positions
in grades GS-16, -17, and -18 under the Classification Act shows that
the total number of allowable positions in these top-level grades should
be increased if the Government is to attract and retain the most
competent and responsible employees.
The recent pay increases voted for Federal employees under the
Classification Act of 1949 created a problem in some Federal agencies
which are authorized to fix pay rates by administrative action. In
cases where these rates customarily approximate those of the Classifi­
cation Act and no generally comparable increases have been given,
provision is made in this Budget for the necessary increases.
Federal civilian employees’ retirement.— The cost of civilian employ­
ees’ retirement benefits is financed by contributions from the em­
ployees and the Government. By law, Federal employees covered
under the system are required to contribute to a trust fund 6 percent
of their salaries, and the Government is required to contribute an
amount sufficient to cover the remaining cost of benefits. The Gov­
ernment cojitribution for the fiscal year 1953 consists of a normal con­
tribution of 2.78 percent of payroll to pay currently accruing costs,
and a deficiency contribution to pay interest on and provide for amorti­
zation of the Government’s accrued liability to the fund. This liability
results from employees’ services rendered prior to the effective date of
the system, credits for military service, and insufficient appropriations
for the Government contribution in some years. This Budget includes
458 million dollars for the annual contribution of the Government for
the fiscal year 1953 to the Civil Service retirement and disability trust
fund, 148 million dollars more than in the current fiscal year. This
estimate takes into account the higher benefits for future annuitants
which will result from a recent advance in the pay rates for Govern­
ment employees. It also provides for the first of 30 annual payments
to amortize the Government’s accrued liability to the fund so that the
retirement system eventually will be financed on a full reserve basis,
as is contemplated by the retirement act.

m 76




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Federal employees’ unemployment compensation.— Legislation is
needed to provide unemployment compensation benefits for Federal
employees, as part of the present Federal-State system of unemploy­
ment insurance. In the past, Federal employees relied on accumu­
lated annual leave to provide income during temporary periods of
unemployment. This is a distortion of the purpose of annual leave.
Moreover, the amount of protection afforded through leave accumu­
lation varies greatly among individuals and without any particular
relationship to the likelihood of unemployment. Because of recent
laws which temporarily stopped the accumulation of leave, and the
new leave law of 1951 reducing the amount of leave permitted to most
Federal employees, many of them are now without even this uncertain
protection. This applies especially to the temporary workers hired
during the present emergency.
Dispersal oj Government activities.— Last year I recommended a
program for the dispersal of essential units of Government in the
vicinity of the District of Columbia in the interests of security and
reduction of congestion in the metropolitan area.
The Public Works Committee of the Senate, after extensive hearings
and deliberations, reported a bill providing for the construction of a
limited number of Federal buildings outside of but in the vicinity of
and accessible to the District of Columbia, the construction of a
circumferential highway outside of the boundaries of the District of
Columbia, and the permanent decentralization of units of Government
which could operate at distant locations without significant loss of
efficiency. I am in full accord with the objectives set forth in the bill
and the accompanying committee report. I am convinced that any
program which fails to place primary emphasis on dispersal to nearby
areas would not be in the interest of security, efficient administration,
or good area planning.
Subsequent review of that part of the program involving dispersal
has led to the conclusion that presently owned Government land
should be used as sites for necessary buildings and facilities, with
resulting economy. This Budget includes 15 million dollars as a
preliminary estimate of the amount needed in the fiscal year 1953.
I strongly urge approval of this modified program.
Payments on Federal real estate.—-The Congress now has before it a
proposal, drafted in the Bureau of the Budget, to establish a general
system of limited payments to State and local governments in cases in
which their finances have been adversely affected by Federal Govern­
ment acquisitions of real estate. The problem is one of long standing.




m 77

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

It is becoming more acute as we acquire more property for military
bases and other defense-related facilities which impose new burdens
upon some local governments. The enactment of a reasonable solu­
tion will help to spread governmental costs more equitably and at the
same time will strengthen our Federal-State system of government.
IN TEREST

Most of the interest payments now being made by the Federal
Government result from the large increase in the public debt which
arose out of World War II. In the fiscal year 1953, interest will cost
the Government about six times as much as it did in the prewar fiscal
year 1940 and will account for over seven percent of total Budget
expenditures.
INTEREST
[Fiscal years.

In millions]
Expenditures

Item
1952
estimated

1953
estimated

$5,615
93
6

$5,850
100
5

$6,150
101

$6,150
101

4

4

5,714

5,955

6,255

6,255

1951
actual

Interest on the public debt.......................... ..........
Interest on refunds of receipts................ ....... .......
Interest on trust deposits......................................
Total_______________________________________

Obligational
authority
for 1953
(permanent
indefinite)

Interest on the public debt.— Expenditures for interest on the public
debt in the fiscal year 1953 are estimated at 6,150 million dollars, an
increase of 300 million dollars over the 1952 estimate and 535 million
dollars over 1951. The rise in expenditures is due both to an increase
in the amount of interest-bearing debt and to higher interest rates.
On the basis of present estimates of receipts and expenditures, the
debt will increase by 20 billion dollars during the fiscal years 1952 and
1953. However, because of the lag between the borrowing of new
funds and the initial interest payments, the full impact of the debt
increase will not be reflected in increased interest payments until the
fiscal year 1954.
During the past calendar year, the average interest rate on the
total interest-bearing debt has increased by about one-tenth of one per­
cent, With a debt of the present size, this means an increase of over
250 million dollars in the computed annual interest charge. This in­
crease in the interest charge cannot, however, be directly associated
with the increase in interest payments during the fiscal year 1953.
The estimate of expenditures for the fiscal year 1953 is based upon

m 78




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

the present levels of interest rates since it is not possible to predict
changes in rates in the future.
The continued expansion of special issues to Government trust funds
and other Government agencies will further increase interest payments
in the fiscal year 1953. The average interest rate on most of these
issues is higher than the average rate paid on the rest of the public
debt.
For the first time in several years, interest accruals on savings bonds
are not expected to rise in the fiscal year 1953. In fact, they may fall
slightly. Interest accruals on series E savings bonds sold during World
War II have now reached maximum levels. Increased accruals on
bonds sold since World War II will be more than offset by reduced
accruals on maturing obligations which will, at the option of the
owner, either be redeemed or extended for another 10 years under the
authority of legislation enacted last spring.
Interest on refunds.•
—Interest is paid on refunded receipts because
the Federal Government has had the temporary use of the funds.
Most refunds result from the overpayment of taxes by individuals and
corporations. The rate paid on such refunds is six percent, the same
rate that taxpayers are charged on delinquent payments.
Refunds of tax overpayments are expected to be higher in the fiscal
years 1952 and 1953 than in 1951. This will result in an increase in
interest expenditures.
IM P R O V IN G TH E M A N A G E M E N T OF G O V E R N M E N T P R O G R A M S

In presenting to the Congress a Budget that reflects expanding
Federal programs in support of the Nation’s security effort, I am
keenly aware of the challenging job of management placed upon the
Federal Government. I have already outlined in previous sections of
this Message a number of improvements in the management and
operation of various parts of the Government. There are, in addi­
tion, other developments to which I wish to draw attention here.
Since the start of the defense mobilization program, we have done
a great deal to adapt the machinery of Government for the efficient
performance of new tasks. Practically all agencies of the Government
today have reoriented their activities, and many have modified their
internal structures to carry out their new responsibilities. In addi­
tion, several new agencies have been created, primarily to assist in the
coordination of our security programs. In the field of production and
stabilization, the Office of Defense Mobilization, the Defense Produc­
tion Administration, and the Economic Stabilization Agency were
organized during the months immediately following the attack on




MESSAGE OP THE PRESIDENT

Korea. More recently, the Defense Materials Procurement Agency
and the Small Defense Plants Administration have been established.
In the field of foreign assistance, the creation of the coordinating
position of the Director for Mutual Security, the termination of the
Economic Cooperation Administration and the creation of the Mutual
Security Agency, and the integration of the Institute of Inter-American
Affairs into the Technical Cooperation Administration in the Depart­
ment of State represent important developments.
The basic organizational shifts to meet the demands of our security
programs have been substantially completed. We are now faced with
the continuing problem of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of
our governmental machinery.
In order to assure continuing progress in this field, the Executive
agencies are required to submit programs for management improve­
ment along with their annual budget requests. These programs were
examined as this Budget was prepared in order to identify the most
urgent operating problems and to find opportunities for reducing
operating costs. I have also had the benefit of advice from members
of my Advisory Committee on Management, upon which I have
placed the special duty of reviewing the status and progress of the
management of our defense mobilization programs.
Because the largest share of Federal funds is spent by the Depart­
ment of Defense, particular consideration is being given to its manage­
ment problems. Substantial progress has been made in placing
the accounting and financial administration of manufacturing and other
business-type operations of the military departments on a sound and
business-like basis. This will enable better management and cost
control of operations such as ordnance arsenals, sea transport, and
printing plants.
While principal emphasis has necessarily been placed on the organ­
ization and management of civilian and military mobilization pro­
grams, the general improvement of management in other parts of the
Executive branch has gone forward. A notable action was the re­
organization plan for providing single direction of the Reconstruction
Finance Corporation. The Veterans Administration is consolidating
into a smaller number of offices insurance activities formerly per­
formed by 11 district offices— an action that will result in an annual
saving of several million dollars. The Administrator of Veterans7
Affairs has also engaged management consultants to undertake a com­
prehensive examination of the organization and management of the

m 79

m

80




MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Veterans Administration. The Post Office Department has recently
inaugurated a new money-order system which will save several million
dollars annually, and is taking other steps to improve the efficiency
of the postal service. These are illustrative of the vigorous actions I
shall continue to expect from the management improvement programs
that all agencies have established at my request.
In addition to actions taken by individual departments and agencies
to improve their organizations and to obtain greater operating econ­
omies, improvements of a Government-wide nature are also being
made. Of major significance are those in the Government’s fiscal
operations, made under the joint accounting program being conducted
by the Comptroller General of the United States, the Secretary of the
Treasury, and the Director of the Bureau of the Budget in collabora­
tion with all other agencies of the Government. That program,
greatly advanced by the enactment of the Budget and Accounting
Procedures Act of 1950, is directed mainly at providing full, accurate
and timely financial information concerning the operations of the
Government. This will enable Government officials to carry out their *
functions more effectively and economically, and will provide the tax­
payer with better information as to where and how the tax dollar is
spent.
Programs throughout the Government chiefly concerned with the
collection of statistical data and economic analysis have also been re­
viewed as recommended by the Task Force on Statistical Agencies to
the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Gov­
ernment. The objective of this appraisal was to avoid overlapping
and duplication in statistical programs and to eliminate unnecessary
expenditures. The Budget recommendations for these activities are
designed particularly to develop an orderly Government-wide pro­
gram which will meet at minimum costs the new requirements for
economic information imposed by the security effort.
It is my intention to maintain a vigorous program for the improve­
ment of Government management on all fronts. During the coming
year I shall continue to make improvements in the mobilization agen­
cies under the authority of the Defense Production Act. Under the
Reorganization Act of 1949,1 have already submitted to the Congress
a plan to strengthen the Bureau of Internal Revenue. I expect to
propose to the Congress additional reorganization plans, as well as to
recommend legislation for administrative changes. A number of the
recommendations of the Commission on Organization of the Executive
Branch of the Government which require legislation have not yet been




M81

MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

acted upon by the Congress. I urge the Congress to review those
recommendations and act on the ones which are still applicable and
which will contribute to the more effective administration of the
Government.
This Budget represents the program I am recommending for promot­
ing peace and safeguarding security.
In the current world crisis, the price of peace is preparedness. In
terms of the sacrifices which this involves, it is a heavy price, but when
freedom is at stake, it is a price which all of us will gladly pay.
It is my hope— and I know this hope is shared by all the peoples of
the world— that we can some day cast off the heavy burden of arma­
ments and devote our full energies to fighting the only war in which
all mankind can be victorious— the war against poverty, disease, and
human misery.
This Nation will continue to do everything in its power to trans­
form that hope into reality.
H

J a n u a r y 21, 1952.

arry

S. T

ruman.







PART I

SUMMARY TABLES
esum of B
e
udget R
eceip E en itu an P blic D
ts, xp d res, d u
ebt
Table 1. R
esum of N O
e
ew bligation A
al uthority (by Type an F ction)
d un
Table 2. R
ffect of F an O eration on th P blic D
in cial p
s
e u
ebt
Table 3. E
m
udget E en itu (by A
xp d res
gency)
Table 4. Sum ary of B
m
ew bligation A
al uthority (by A
gency)
Table 5. Sum ary of N O
Table 6. Sum ary of B
m
udget A orizations (by Type of A
uth
uthorization an Agency)
d
Table 7. Sum ary of B
m
udget E en itu in R
xp d res
elation to A th
u orization (by Agency)
s




IN T R O D U C T IO N T O P A R T I

Part I of the Budget (pages a1 to a 1 3 ) contains seven
summary tables on Federal funds and on the public debt.
Each of these tables is designed to bring together in one
to three pages some aspect of the over-all presentation
of the Federal Budget.
TYPES OF FEDERAL FUNDS

The Federal (Government-owned) funds which are
covered in part I of the Budget are of three types as
follows:
The general fund is credited with all receipts which
are not earmarked by law and is charged with ex­
penditures that are payable out of appropriations of
“ any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated”
and out of borrowing. Both in number of items and in
amount, most of the Government’s transactions are trans­
actions of the general fund.
Special funds are those which are credited with receipts
that are earmarked by law for a specific purpose. Some
special funds are subject to annual appropriation by
Congress. Others are automatically available under the
law.
Business enterprise and revolving funds are those which
are credited with certain collections (other than taxes)
which are earmarked by law to carry out a cycle of bus­
iness-type operations. Also included in this group are a
few funds created by law to expedite, accounting for and
administration of, operations financed from two or more
appropriations of an agency.
BUDGET RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES

Basis oj stating budget receipts.— Table 1 includes a sum­
mary of budget receipts. Such receipts include all money
covered into the Treasury to the credit of the general fund
and of special funds. Budget receipts never include money
obtained from borrowing. Because business enterprise
and revolving funds are covered on a net basis in the
expenditures (see below), budget receipts do not include
receipts of such funds.
Basis oj stating budget expenditures.— Tables 1, 4, and
7 include information on budget expenditures. The gen­
eral fund expenditures are stated on a checks-issued basis,
less refunds and reimbursements received directly into
the accounts. An exception to the checks-issued basis is
interest on the public debt, for which expenditures are
reported on the basis of amounts becoming payable during
the year, whether paid or not. Special fund expenditures
are reported on the basis of checks issued less refunds
collected. In the case of business enterprise and revolving
funds the expenditures are reported on a net basis; that
is, the collections received by the fund are deducted from
checks issued, and the resulting figure is shown as an
expenditure. Where the collections are larger than the
checks issued, the amount included in the expenditures is
a negative figure.
Repayments of borrowing are always excluded from
budget expenditure figures. Similarly, net investments
in United States Government securities are excluded from
the expenditure figures.




Eliminations jrom both receipts and expenditures.— Cer­
tain payments from one fund to another are eliminated
from budget receipts and expenditures. This is standard
accounting practice and it is done in order to avoid in­
flating both sides of the Budget. General fund invest­
ments in business enterprise and revolving funds, the pay­
ments of earnings and dividends on such capital, and the
return of such capital to the general fund are the types
of items which have been so excluded.
BUDGET SURPLUS, DEFICIT, AND PUBLIC DEBT

Budget surplus and deficit.— The budget surplus or defi­
cit, shown in table 1, represents the difference between
budget receipts and budget expenditures in the year.
Cash balances at the opening or closing of the year have
no effect upon the figure. Similarly, surpluses and defi­
cits of previous years do not enter into the calculation.
Therefore, a budget surplus of one year is not used in the
tables to influence a budget deficit of a following year.
The public debt.— The last section of table 1 summarizes
and table 3 gives details regarding the effect of each year’s
operations upon the public debt. The budget surplus or
deficit is not the only factor which causes a change in the
public debt. The amount of the debt which it is neces­
sary to borrow or which it is possible to redeem is also in­
fluenced by: changes in the Treasury cash balance, the
result of trust fund transactions, the use of Government
corporation debt to the public as a means of financing
budget expenditures of the corporations (and vice-versa in
the case of repayments), and the change in the amount of
outstanding checks and other items in process of clearance
through the accounts.
TIMING OF AUTHORIZATIONS

Distinction between permanent and current authoriza­
tions.— Tables 2 and 6, as well as the detail in part II, dis­
tinguish permanent authorizations from current authori­
zations. The “permanent” items are those under which
new money becomes available from time to time under
action previously taken by the Congress; no further action
is required each year. The “ current” authorizations are
those enacted by Congress in or immediately preceding
each fiscal year.
Items proposed jor later transmission.— While the sum­
mary tables of the Budget present a complete financial
program, the details in part II are not a formal transmittal
of the entire Budget. Tables 1, 2, and most of the other
tables in the Budget identify by separate columns the
estimate of amounts which it is expected will be trans­
mitted later. Such items include: (a) supplemental esti­
mates for the current year, (6) appropriations and other
authorizations to carry out programs for which authorizing
legislation is to be submitted in advance of recommended
appropriation language, (c) proposed legislation which
would affect receipts, and {d) an allowance for items which
cannot be foreseen now but which will be transmitted later
when definite amounts can be determined and the needs
can be more specifically identified. The last-named allow­
ance is called a “ reserve for contingencies” ; congressional
a3

a4

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

action upon it will be requested later, not as a single
lump sum item, but in the form of a number of specific
appropriations for individual items.
TYPES OF AUTHORIZATIONS

In tables 2 and 6 budget authorizations are classified
according to types as follows:
Appropriations are authorizations to make expenditures
from the general fund of the Treasury or from the various
special funds. Most appropriations confer authority both
to incur obligations and to expend money. In some cases
the authority to incur obligations has previously been
granted in the form of contract authorizations; when this
has happened, the portion of the appropriation which is to
permit the payment of such obligations is said to be “ for
liquidation of prior contract authorizations.”
Contract authorizations are authorizations to incur

obligations prior to the enactment of an appropriation.
A contract authorization does not in itself permit the
spending of money; hence it must be followed by an appro­
priation to permit payment of the contracts and other
obligations thus incurred.
Authorizations to expend from debt receipts are authoriza­
tions to make expenditures from borrowed money. Such
authorizations may take these forms: (a) authorizations
for the Treasury to make public debt receipts available
to a given agency or enterprise, often in exchange for notes
of the enterprise; (6) authorizations for a Governmentowned corporation to borrow directly from the public;
and (c) cancellation of notes which have been issued by a
Government enterprise and are held by the Treasury,
where the cancellation restores or increases the authority
to spend from debt receipts.
Reappropriations and reauthorizations are actions to
continue available part or all of the unused balance of a
prior appropriation or authorization which would other­
wise expire.
Total new obligational authority shown in tables 2 and 5
is the sum of the various types of authorizations named,
less the portion of appropriations which is merely for
liquidation of prior contract authorizations. This total
represents the new authority becoming available for the
purpose of making commitments in any given year.
RELATING EXPENDITURES TO AUTHORIZATIONS

The last section of table 2 and all of table 7 are devoted
to summarizing the relationship between budget author­
izations and budget expenditures. Most budget author­
izations are available for obligation for only 1 year, but
some are available for longer periods of time. Even those




which expire for obligational purposes at the end of 1 year
remain available for making expenditures in payment of
such obligations for an additional 2 years. Therefore, a
substantial portion of each year’s expenditures comes
from authorizations of prior years, and a substantial
portion of each year’s authorizations is carried over into
future years before it is spent.
Because old and new money are commingled in some of
the accounts, no attempt is made in the summary figures
to separate actual spending in 1951 between the old and
the new authorizations. However, the Budget presents
such a breakdown on an estimated basis for 1952 and 1953.
In the case of business enterprise and revolving funds, it
assumes that budget authorizations are expended in an
amount equal to the portion credited to the revolving fund
during the year. The remainder of the revolving fund
expenditures (or expenditure credits) are not related to
budget authorizations, and are here classified as being
charges or credits to “ receipts of the enterprise.”
CLASSIFICATIONS

Budget receipts shown in table 1 are classified according
to source. A more detailed itemization of this classifica­
tion appears in Special Analysis C of part IV.
Expenditures and authorizations are classified by func­
tions in tables 1 and 2, as in the Budget Message. This
classification indicates the broad purposes and groups of
programs for which expenditures are made by the Govern­
ment. A more detailed list of the contents of each func­
tional category appears in Special Anatysis B of part IV.
Expenditures and authorizations are classified by major
organization unit in tables 4 through 7. This indicates the
agency which receives the budget authorization. Expend­
itures are shown opposite the same agency, even though a
portion of the money is sometimes spent through alloca­
tions, advances, or reimbursements made to another
agency. The details for each organization unit are found
in part II of the Budget.
ACCOUNT RECLASSIFICATION

Since the issuance of the last Budget, a number of
accounts have been reclassified from one fund group to
another in order that they can be included in the fund
category where they properly belong. For comparability
in this Budget, such reclassified accounts are shown for the
year 1951 in the same fund group and in the same manner
as they are now classified for 1952 and 1953. This neces­
sarily has caused minor differences between the figures
presented here and the amounts shown in other Govern­
ment reports for the past year.

a5

SUMMARY TABLES

T able 1
RfiSU M E OF BUDG ET RECEIPTS, EX PEN D ITU RES, AN D PUBLIC D EBT

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953.

In millions]

P A R T A— B U D G E T R E C E I P T S A N D E X P E N D I T U R E S
1952 estim ate

Description

1951 actual

BUDGET RE CEIPTS (see special analysis C for
detail):
Direct taxes on individuals _
.. .
Direct taxes on corporations
.
Excise taxes
_
_
Employment taxes
_ __
Customs
Miscellaneous receipts _ _
_ ..

$24,
14,
8,
3,

095
388
693
940
624
1,629

Total. ___
.
_
Deduct:
Appropriations to Federal old-age and survi­
vors insurance trust fund__________
Refunds of receipts (excluding interest)_____

BUDGET EXPEN DITU RES (see special analysis B
for detail):
Military services
_ _____
Veterans’ services and benefits
_ _
International securitv and foreign relations _ _ _
Social security, welfare, and health
Housing and community development
Education and general research
_ _ ______
Agriculture and agricultural resources
Natural resources____
Transportation and communication
Finance, commerce, and industry .... _
L a b o r ______________ __
General government______
Interest. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Reserve for contingencies___
_ _ __
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis___

Budget surplus_________________
Budget deficit. _ _______ _ _

Proposed for
later
transmission

$30,
22,
9,
4,

064
900
046
857
575
1, 598

T otal

$30,
22,
9,
4,

064
900
046
857
575
1, 598

Under exist­
ing laws and
expenditure
authoriza­
tions enacted
or recom­
mended

_

_

_

Proposed for
later
transmission

T otal

005
800
744
000
575
1, 598

$15

$33, 005
27, 800
9, 744
5 ,0 0 0
575
1, 613

15

77, 737

$33,
27,
9,
5,

53, 369

69, 040

69, 040

77, 722

3, 120
2, 106

3, 850
2, 510

3, 850
2, 510

4, 030
2, 709

48, 143

Total Budget receipts___

Total Budget expenditures___

Under exist­
ing laws and
expenditure
authoriza­
tions already
enacted

1953 estim ate

62, 680

62, 680

70, 983

20,
5,
4,
2,

38,
4,
7,
2,

39,
5,
7,
2,

49,
4,
7,
2,

25

462
339
727
380
602
115
650
2, 051
1, 685
176
228
1, 209
5,714

1,
3,
1,

1,
5,

747
872
187
659
869
235
397
047
889
730
236
286
955

753
166
196
680
881
238
1, 408
3, 082
2, 153
751
240
1, 353
5, 955
25

1, 772

70, 881

$1, 006
294
9
21
12
3
11
35
264
21
4
67

4, 030
2, 709
15

70, 998

100

1,
3,
1,

1,
6,

662
021
504
545
425
269
474
185
863
351
243
457
255

163
197
844
662
678
624
478
237
643
833
246
484
255
100

6, 190

85, 444

1, 501
176
3, 340
117
253
355
4
52
° 220
482
3
27

51,
4,
10,
2,

1,
3,
1,

1,
6,

-7 0 5
44, 633

69, 109

79, 254

3, 510
_____

14, 446

8, 201

P A R T B— P U B L IC D E B T

Description

Public debt at beginning o f year
.......
Change due to budget surplus ( —) or deficit ( + )___
Other changes in public debt..
...
___
Public debt at end o f year___

________ ___________

1951 actual

....................
_____
_

1953 estimate

$257, 357
- 3 , 510
+ 1, 375

$255, 222
+ 8, 201
- 3 , 201

$260, 222
+ 14, 446
+ 254

255, 222

260, 222

274, 922

° Deduct (reflects reduction of postal deficit under propossd legislation for postal rate increases of $ 2 m
2 5 illion).




1952 estimate

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

a6

T

able

2

RfiSU M E OF NEW O BLIGATIONAL A U TH O R ITY
B Y T Y P E AN D F U N C T IO N

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953.

In millions]
1952

Description

1951 e n a cted

Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

T otal

Recommended
in this docu­
ment

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

T otal

BY TYPE OF N EW O BLIGATIONAL A U TH O R ITY
C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

$12, 659

$85, 685
856
2, 361
43
1
95

$66, 196
1
360

2, 401

89, 041

66, 557

2, 791

60

2, 851

3, 237

77, 215

83, 849

2, 341

86,190

63, 320

Appropriations________________________________________
Authorizations to expend from public debt receipts.
Authorizations to expend from corporate debt receipts.
Contract authorizations______________________________

5, 964
225
42
632

6, 272
250
71
648

6, 272
250
71
648

6, 593
250
20
100

6, 593
250
20
100

Total obligational authority under permanent
authorizations_______________________________

6, 863

7, 241

7, 241

6, 963

6, 963

Total new obligational authority______________

84, 078

91, 090

2, 341

93, 431

70, 283

13, 977

84, 260

50,
5,
8,
2,

60,
4,
9,
2,

148
069
387
524
653
167
595
593
805
781
240
173
955

1, 507
295
10
38
50
3
12
61
208
47
4
81

48, 859
4, 006
338
2, 478
1, 046
278
1, 323
2, 660
1, 325
40
256
1, 419
6, 255

3, 500
175
7, 900
100
375
410
4
34
196
1, 131
3
24

25

61,655
4, 364
9, 397
2, 562
703
170
1,607
2, 654
2, 013
828
244
1,254
5, 955
25

125

52, 359
4, 181
8, 238
2, 578
1,421
688
1, 327
2, 694
1, 521
1,171
259
1,443
6, 255
125

91, 090

2, 341

93, 431

70, 283

13, 977

84, 260

91, 090
50, 286

2, 341
629

93, 431
50, 915

70, 283
32, 288

13, 977
8, 395

84, 260
40, 683

40, 804

1, 712

42, 516

37, 995

5, 582

43, 577

2, 636
26, 426

60

2, 696
26, 426

3, 237
38, 756

608

3, 237
39, 364

6, 190

85, 444

Appropriations _ _______________ ________ _____ ____
Reappropriations _ __ __________ ____ _________________
Authorizations to expend from public debt receipts__
Reauthorizations to expend from public debt receipts.
Contract authorizations_________ ____ ________________
Reauthorization of contract authority _ ____________

$75, 593
978
2, 574
6
2, 331
103

$83, 284
856
2, 361
43
1
95

$2, 401

Total______________
__ _____ _________________
Less portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior
contract authorizations____
. _ _______________

81, 585

86, 640

4, 370

Total obligational authority under current
authorizations_________________________ _____

900

$78, 855
1
1, 260

418

418

13, 977

80, 534
3, 237

13, 977

77, 297

P E R M A N E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

BY FUNCTION (see special analysis B)
Military services_____________________________________
Veterans’ services and benefits_______________________
International security and foreign relations__________
Social securit}^, welfare, and health__________________
Housing and community development_______________
Education and general research______________________
Agriculture and agricultural resources._ ___________
_
Natural resources..__ ________________________________
Transportation and communication.___ _____________
Finance, commerce, and industry____________________
Labor______________________________ _________________
General government_______________ __________________
Interest_____ ____________ _____ ______________________
Reserve for contingencies _ ..... ....... ........... ..................
Total new obligational authority_______

746
677
792
324
831
227
1, 228
3, 268
2,1 93
1,696
228
1,154
5,714

84, 078

1,
2,
1,

1,
5,

RELATION OF NEW OBLIGATIONAL AUTHOR­
ITY TO EXPENDITURES, 1952 AND 1953
Total new obligational authority (as above)_________
Less portion to be expended in future years-________
Expenditures in year (see table 7):
Out of new obligational authority.
... .... ....
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior contract
authorizations_____ ___ ________________________
Out of balance of prior expenditure authorizations.
Net expenditures (receipts (—)) of business enter­
prise and revolving funds.............. .......................

Total Budget expenditures (table 1)________




-7 5 7

-7 5 7

69, 109

1, 772

70, 881

-7 3 4

-7 3 4

79, 254

a7

SUMMARY TABLES
T

able

3

EFFECT OF FINANCIAL OPERATIONS ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
Based on existing and proposed legislation
[F o r th e fisca l y e a r s 1951, 1952, a n d 1953.

D e s c r ip t io n

I n m illio n s ]

1952 e s t im a t e

1951 a ct u a l

1953 e s t im a t e

Net results of financial operations for the year:
Budget surplus (—) or deficit ( + ) (from table 1 ) ...............
Excess of trust receipts over expenditures ( —) (from table 8 ) _ _
Issue (—) or redemption ( + ) of Government corporation debt
to the public (from special analysis H )_______
____________
Change in Treasury cash balance, increase ( + ) or decrease ( —)_
Change in clearing account for outstanding checks, etc.,
increase (—) or decrease ( + )
- - .........................
Total, increase ( + ) or decrease (—) in public debt held
by the public. __

- $ 3 , 510
- 4 ,

142

+

$ 8 ,2 0 1
-3 ,5 9 0

- 9 8

- 1 0
+

1, 8 4 0

+

214

- 3 ,

+

$14, 446
- 3 ,

718

- 3 7

357

- 1 7

- 7 5

- 5 , 608

+ 1, 139

+ 10, 616

+ 3, 369

+ 3, 836

+ 4, 079

+ 104

+ 25

+ 5

Total, increase ( - f ) or decrease (—) in public debt held
by trust funds and Government investment accounts_
_

+ 3, 473

+ 3, 861

+ 4, 084

Net increase ( + ) or decrease (—) in public debt

- 2 , 135

+ 5, 000

+ 1 4 , 700

$257, 357
- 2 , 135

$255, 222
+ 5, 000

$260, 222
+ 1 4 , 700

255, 222

260, 222

274, 922

Net borrowing from ( + ) or repayment to ( —) :
Trust funds (from special analysis H ).. _
Government-owned corporations and enterprises (from special
analysis H) _ _ _ _
___
___
..
_
. ..

Public debt at beginning of year_
_
Net increase ( + ) or decrease ( —) in public debtPublic debt at end of year

_

_

_

__ _ _ _

___

MEMORANDUM

Treasury cash balance:
$5,517

$ 7,357

$4,0 00

- ____________ ______

7,357

4 ,0 0 0

4 ,0 0 0

Change in Treasury cash balance, increase (+ ) or decrease (—) _________________

+ 1 , 840

-3 ,3 5 7

A t b e g in n in g o f y e a r _________
A t end o f year

-

____ ____ _________________
___

__

_______

_

___

_________ ___________________
___________

Clearing account for outstanding checks, etc.:
$897

$683

$700

__________ _____ _____

683

700

775

Change in clearing account for outstanding checks, etc., increase (—) or de­
crease (+ ) _ _______________ _______ __ _______ _________ _______ _______

+214

-1 7

-7 5

A t b e g in n in g o f y e a r * ________
A t end o f year




_________ ____ __________ ____ __________
-

_____

_ _______

__

_ ______ ____

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

a8

T able 4
S U M M A R Y OF BU DGET EXPEN DITU RES
BY AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953. In millions]
1952 estimate

Description

1951 actual

Legislative branch
_____
The Judiciary
_ ___
_ _ _ _ _ _
___
Executive Office o f the P r e s id e n t -- ___
_
Funds appropriated to the P r e s id e n t_
Independent offices:
Atomic Energy Commission. _
Civil Service Commission
__
_________
Economic Stabilization Agencv__ __ _____
Export-import Bank of Washington _____ _
Federal Civil Defense Administration _ __ ___
Railroad Retirement Board __
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
Reconstruction Finance Corporation
Tennessee Valley Authoritv ..
..
_
Veterans Administration.................
Other
................. .... .
.
Federal Security Agency .
___
General Services A dm inistration
Housing and H om e Finance Agency
_
_ ..
.
Department o f Agriculture.
__ _ ........................ ...
Department o f Com merce
Department o f D efense:
Military functions
.... —
Civil functions
_
___
Department o f the Interior
Department of Justice
....
Department o f Labor
_
_
___
Post Office Department (general fund)
Department o f State __ _
_ _
Treasury D epartm en t.._
_
_
______
District o f Columbia (Federal contribution) _ ____
Reserve for contingencies. _
_
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis______
Total Budget expenditures______

_______ ___

Under expend­
iture author­
izations
already
enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Under expend­
iture author­
Proposed for
izations
later trans­
enacted or
mission
recommended
in this
document

$61
25
9
4, 158

$64
26
10
7, 178

$1
1

897
324

25
1
15

614
a 92
72
5, 389
278
1,571
840
461
834
803

1, 700
332
85
63
44
783
° 50
190
4, 953
201
1, 787
1, 064
663
1, 595
989

19, 772
994
587
151
233
626
281
6, 363
11

38, 000
772
636
177
246
620
336
6, 634
11

Total

$65
27
10
7,178

$72
27
9
7, 383

1, 725
333
100
63
44
783
° 50
190
5, 247
215
1, 803
1,071
674
1,611
1,065

1, 750
483
13
85
339
734
° 51
200
4, 011
224
1, 738
1, 304
29
1, 675
887

39, 000
775
645
197
250
814
343
6, 667
11
25

48, 500
716
675
187
249
669
335
6, 999
12

25

76

1, 772

70, 881

79, 254

294
14
16
7
11
16
76
1, 000
3
9
20
4
194
7
33

$2
3, 624
25
136

176
24
471
22
252
5
44

Total

$72
27
11
11, 007
1, 775
483
149
85
339
734
° 51
200
4, 187
248
2, 209
1,326
281
1,680
931

100

50, 000
731
686
189
253
444
335
7, 001
12
100

6, 190

85, 444

1, 500
15
11
2
4
&225
2

— 705
44, 633

69, 109

a Deduct, excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.
b Deduct, proposed postal rate increase.




1953 estimate

a9

SUMMARY TABLES
T

able

5

S U M M A R Y OF N EW O BLIGATIONAL A U TH O R ITY
BY AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953.

In millions]
1953

1952
Description

1951 enacted
Enacted

Legislative branch __
____
The J u d icia ry _ .
_
Executive Office o f the President
Funds appropriated to the President _
_ _
Independent offices:
A tom ic Energy Commission
Civil Service Commission
E conom ic Stabilization Agency .
E xport-Im port Bank of Washington
Federal Civil Defense Administration
Railroad Retirement Board
Reconstruction Finance C orporation.
Tennessee Valley Authority
_ _
Veterans Adm inistration.
_ ....... _
Other
..
... .............
Federal Security Agency
.
General Services Administration^
_
______
Housing and H om e Finance Agency
.
. _. ..
Department o f Agriculture
.
.. . ..
Department o f Com merce
Department o f D efen se:
M ilitary functions
............. ............. ....... ............Civil functions _
Department o f the Interior__
___ _
............. Department o f Justice
Department o f Labor .... .
..........
.........
Post Office Department (general fund)
Department o f State____________ ______________________
Treasury Department
District o f Columbia (Federal contribution) _
Reserve for contingencies
Total new obligational authority_______ ______
° D educt, proposed postal rate increase.




Proposed for
later trans­
mission

$68
26
9
9, 835

$72
26
10
8, 598

$1
1

1, 976
325

50
1
16

32
481
250
195
5, 822
243
1, 750
3, 091
374
1,408
1,274

1, 307
332
98
1, 000
75
784
100
238
4, 110
187
1, 589
778
474
1, 789
923

47, 776
882
598
159
230
624
290
6, 349
11

59, 523
621
545
183
246
620
255
6, 596
11

295
42
31
16
50
17
20

Total

Recommended Proposed for
in this
later trans­
mission
document

$73
27
10
8, 598

$83
28
9
5

1, 357
333
114
1,000
75
784
100
238
4, 405
229
1, 620
794
524
1,806
943

1, 255
483

91, 090

1, 255
483
150
600
735

600
735
200
4, 001
231
1, 668
346
404
1, 525
319
48, 602
700
663
189
263
669
339
6, 954
12

25
84, 078

$2
8, 850

$83
28
11
8, 855

150

61, 023
624
554
205
252
814
262
6, 631
11
25

2, 341

93,431

70, 283

1, 500
3
9
22
6
194
7
35

Total

175
35
511
24
325
4
464
3, 500
20
14

200
4, 176
266
2, 179
370
729
1, 529
783

125

52, 102
720
677
189
266
444
339
6, 954
12
125

13, 977

84, 260

3
a 225

TH E

A lO

BUDGET

FOR

T

F IS C A L

able

YEAR

1953

6

SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS
feY TYPE OF AUTHORIZATION AND AGENCY

Based on existing and proposed legislation
IFor the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1D
53]
1953

1952
Description

1951 enacted 1
Enacted

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Appropriations:
Legislative branch _ _____________ ___ ______
- _ __ ___ _____ _____
The Judiciary __ ___ __ _ ______________ - _____ - ___ ______
Executive Office of the President.__ _
_
_ __
_
_ __
_______
Funds appropriated to the President___ ______________________
Independent offices _ _____________ _ __________ ___________ __
Federal Security Agency________________________________________ _____
General Services Administration____ ________
______ _ ___ _ _ _ ____
Housiner and Home Finance Agency
. . ...
Department of Agriculture___ __
_______________
___
____ __
Department of Commerce
__ __
Department of Defense:
Military functions______ __________________
_____________________ ’_
Civil functions __ ________ ___ ____________ _ __ _____ _____ _
Department of the Interior.____ __
_ - __ __
_______ __ _____ Department of Justice_____ _________
__ ___ __________ _____ _ ___
Department of Labor ________ _ . __ _____ _______ ____ ____ _ _ __
Post Office Department (general fund)
Department of State
Treasury Department
_ __ _
_
_
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)............................
Reserve for contingencies ______ ________
_ __ __

$72,202,754
$74, 550,151
25,543,665
25,918,115
9,338,553
9, 506, 465
8,121,823,655 7, 360,703, 976
9,103,807,644 7, 380, 472, 014
1,763,165,490 1, 721, 314, 722
3,239,273,053
986, 072, 445
40.300.000
70.738.000
736,434,899
853,112, 526
845,741,683
864, 983, 537

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

$974, 945
1,321, 435
346, 800
402, 912, 090
30, 982, 380
16, 259,000
49, 833,000
16, 942, 000
79, 687, 470

Total

Recom­
mended in
this docu­
ment

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

$75,525,096
$86,072,413
27,657,800
27,239,550
9,853,265
8, 589, 843
$2,000,000
7,360,703,976
5,000, 000 7,950,000, 000
360,400,000
7,783,384,104 7, 575, 854,700
1,752,297,102 1, 742, 688, 261
511, 000, 000
1,002,331,445
23, 800, 000
425, 298, 000
120.571.000
325, 400,000
53, 670,000
870,054,526
4, 000, 000
935, 336, 858
944,671,007
916, 759, 499
46.000, 000

Total

$86,072,413
27,657,800
10,589,843
7,955,000,000
7,936,254,700
2,253,688,261
449.098.000
379.070.000
939,336,858
962,759,499

48,222,768,207 60,847,512,709 1, 500,000,000 62,347,512,709 50,938,707,770 3, 500,000,000 54,438,707,770
2, 702,000
698.097.800
622,464,713
20.000.000
619,762, 713
718.097.800
880,846,855
9,166,600
625.264.800
13, 500,000
592,322,939
638.764.800
537,477,416
528.310.816
189, 785,000
22, 283,000
300,000
190.085.000
158,500,200
183,102,000
205.385.000
5,944,000
263,096,100
251,736,444
2,800,000
265,896,100
245, 792,444
230,477,800
669.322.000 « 225,000,000
444.322.000
194,050,000
623,755,000
813,921,507
619,871, 507
338,619, 508
7,397, 532
254,354,861
261,752,393
338,619,508
295,298,181
693.045.000
35,127,000
693.045.000
627,954,662
670,245,816
635.118.816
12,000,000
12,000,000
11,400,000
10.800.000
11.400.000
25,000,000
25,000,000
125,000,000
125,000,000

Total appropriations____ ____________________________________ ___ ___ 75,600,355,240 83,292,597,817 2, 400, 929,252 85,693,527,069 36,204,865,352 12,659,200,000 78,864,065,352
Deduct refunds of receipts (excluding interest): General Services Adminis­
tration__
___________ ____ ________ ___ ___ __ __ __
7,377,718
8,420,000
9, 250,000
9,250,000
8,420,000
Total appropriations, excluding refunds of receipts (excluding interest). 75,592,977,522 83,284,177,817 2,400,929,252 85,685,107,069 36,195,615,352 12,659,200,000 78,854,815,352
Reappropria tions:
Funds appropriated to the President____ ._ _____ __
_ __
Independent offices __
_______
Housing and Home Finance Agency___________________
__ . ___ __
Department of Agriculture ___________ ________ __________ __ ________
Department of Commerce. _________________________________ __ __ .
Department of Defense: Military functions_____
_ __
Department of the Interior_______ _____ _________ _________ _______ __
Department of State.......... ........ ...................... ... ................................

722, 929,493
40, 993, 089

722,929,493
40,993,089

5,434,085

519, 593
3,880,361
85, 000,000
74,448
2, 660, 810

519,593
3,880,361
85,000,000
74,448
2,660,810

977,821,758

856, 057, 794

856,057,794

Authorizations to expend from public debt receipts:
Funds appropriated to the President__________________ ______________ _ 1,662,500,000
527, 026,845
Independent offices __ _
_ _
____ . . .
400,000,000 1,102,977, 603
Housing and Home Finance Agency____________ _____________ ___ _
15,000, 000
Department of Agriculture__ _ _______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____
716,162, 507
511,198,457

527,026,845
1,102,977,603
15,000,000
716,162, 507

360, 240, 532

Total authorizations to expend from public debt receipts.. . . . . . . ._ _ 2,573,698,457 2, 361,166, 955

2,361,166,955

360, 240, 532

Total reappropriations______ ___________________ ____________ _ . . . _

Reauthorizations to expend from public debt receipts:
Funds appropriated to the President___________ ___________ ____ __ ___
. ________________
Independent offices____
Total reauthorizations to expend from public debt receipts
Contract authorizations:
Legislative branch___ _
___ ___ __ ___ __
Independent offices______________________________ _ _ _ _ _
Federal Security Agency
General Services Administration____ _______ _
_
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Commerce___ __ _
__
Department of Defense: Military functions __________
__
Department of the Interior____ __________ __
Department of Justice_______ ________________ ______
Total contract authorizations______________ _

446,936,688
59,087,617
125,000
443,616
35,289,752
430,505,000

1,200,000

195, 705

195,705

1,395, 705

1,395,705

900, 000,000

900,000,000

900, 000, 000

1,260,240,532

417,500,000

417,500,000

417, 500,000

417,500,000

360, 240,532

6,282,000

42,890,262
6,282,000

168,000
311.150.000
103,164,345.
125,000,000
12,000,000
327.416.000
1,418,285,000

42,890,262

42,890,262

42,890,262

1,229,083

1,229,083

33,197,000
700,000

2,331,080,345

° Deduct, proposed postal rate increase.
1 As reduced by rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation Act, 1951.




1, 200, 000

1,229,083

1,229,083

——

SU M M ARY

T

ab le

A ll

TABLES

6— C ontinued

SUMMARY OF BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS— Continued
BY TYPE OF AUTHORIZATION AND AGENCY— Continued
1953

1952
Description

1951 enacted
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

Recom­
mended in
this docu­
ment

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS— Continued
Reauthorizations of contract authority:
$53,214,141
$32,136,439
50,000,000
__________ _____________ __________ _____
Department of Commerce 62,655,950
__
Total reauthorizations of contract authority.

____ _ _________________

103,214,141

$32,136,439
62,655,950

94,792,389

94,792,389

81,585,074,223 86,640,314,300 $2,400,929,252 89,041,243,552 $66,557,251,589 $13,976,700,000 $80,533,951,589
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior contract authori­
zations:

__________________________
___ ______
Housing and Home Finance Agency____________________________________
Department of Commerce__________ __ . ____________ ______ ________ Department of Defense: Military functions_________ ______ _ ________
Department of Justice__ _____ ______________________________ ___________
Department of State__________________________________________________ .

4,268,000
3,000,000
455,523,729
44,476, 271
594,000,000
379,205,080
125,651,335
143,580,000
265,958,194
200, 000,000
14,100,000
100,000
514,183,505
556,174, 562
2,317,600,000 1, 424, 839, 700
67,080,615
36, 495, 000
540,000
360,000
11,000,000
3,000, 000

Total, deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior contract
authorizations___ _________ _______________________________ _________ 4,370,005,378 2, 791,130, 613
Total new obligational authority under current authorizations_______

3, 500,000
3,000,000
44, 476,271
379,205,080
117,000, 000
84, 241,779
143,580,000
200,000,000
General Services Administration000
70, 000,

60, 000, 000

3,500,000
117,000,000
84,241,779
70,000,000

616,174,562
598, 641, 499
1,424,839,700 2, 352, 680, 770
36,495,000
10, 673, 400
360,000
700, 000
3,000,000

598,641,499
2,352,680,770
10,673,400
700,000

60, 000, 000 2,851,130,613 3, 237, 437, 448

3,237,437,448

77,215,068,845 53,849,183,687 2, 340,929,252 86,190,112,939 63,319,814,141 13,976,700,000 77,296,514,141

PERM ANENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Appropriations:
914
The Judiciary
_ ____________________________________________________
1,000
__ ___ _________________ .
Independent offices _ _ ______________
43,933,063
45,255,879
9,763,746
Federal Security Agency__________ __________ _______________________ .
9,750,123
General Services Administration. _______________________________
___
682
1,000
Housing and Home Finance Agency________________ _______ _________
271
Department of Agriculture ________________ ____________________________
129,317,006
186, 525,390
Department of Commerce. _______ _______________________ _________ .
65,920
137,156
Department of Defense:
Military functions_______ _________________________________
. . ._
21,562,408
15, 362,714
Civil functions _ __________ ____ ___________________________ .
965,534
1,100,000
36,284,583
Department of the Interior. _________________________ ___________ ___
52, 906, 711
Department of Justice_________________ _______________________
___ _
251,364
245,000
Department of Labor
__ _____________________ _______
________ _
2, 500
7,967
Department of State_________________ _____________ __________ _______
623, 204
238,461
Treasury Department- __________________ ________ __________ . _____ 7,852,884,410 3, 460,344,917

1,000
45,255,879
9,750,123
1,000

1,000
45, 687,437
9, 755, 623
1,000

1,000
45,687,437
9,755,623
1,000

186,525,390
137,156

209,966, 444
112, 500

209,966,444
112,500

15,362,714
15, 906, 500
1,100,000
1, 510,000
52,906,711
48, 588, 395
185,000
245,000
2, 500
2,500
623,264
623,204
8,460,344,917 8,961,075,050

15,906,500
1,510,000
48,588,395
185,000
2,500
623,264
8,961,075,050

Total appropriations____________________________ _ _______ ____
8,095,276,329 3,772, 255, 594
Deduct refunds of receipts (excluding interest): Treasury Department__ _ 2,131,412,959 2, 500,000,000

8,772,255,594 9, 293,414,713
2,500,000,000 2,700,000,000

9,293,414,713
2,700,000,000

Total appropriations excluding refunds of receipts (excluding interest).. 5,963,863,370 3, 272, 255,594
Authorization to expend from public debt receipts: Housing and Home Fi­
nance Agency _______ ______________________ ____________ ______ ..
225,000,000
250,000,000

6,272,255,594 6, 593, 414,713

6,593,414,713

250,000,000

250,000,000

250,000,000

37,998,800
32,656,000

19,952,000

19,952,000

70,654,800

19, 952,000

19,952,000

Authorizations to expend from corporate debt receipts:
Housing and Home Finance Agency..
Department of Agriculture.. ____________ _________ _____ ___
Total authorizations to expend from corporate debt receipts

10.945.000
30.736.000
...

37, 998,800
32, 656,000

41,681,000

70, 654, 800
= = = = =

Contract authorizations:
Housing and Home Finance Agency_____________ ____ _______ _______
Department of Commerce____________ ___ __
_____ . . . . _____ .
Department of the Interior____________ . . . ______________ ____ ____ __

100,000,000
529,500,000
3,000,000

100, 000,000
548,000,000

100,000,000
548,000,000

100,000,000

100,000,000

632,500,000

648,000,000

648,000,000

100,000,000

100,000,000

Total new obligational authority under permanent authorizations_ . 6,863,044,370 7, 240, 910,394
_

7,240,910,394

6,963, 366, 713

6,963,366,713

Total contract authorizations____ ___________ _______ ____ ________

Grand total new obligational authority___ _____________ _______




84,078,113,215

11,090,094,081 2, 340,929, 252 93,431,023,333 70,283,180,854 13,976,700,000 84,259,880,854

a

TH E

!2

BUDGET

FOR

T

F IS C A L

a b l e

YEAR

1953

7

SUMMARY OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES— IN RELATION TO AUTHORIZATIONS
BY AGENCY
[Based on existing and proposed legislation]
1952 estimate
Expenditures from new authorizations
Description

Other expenditures

1951 actual
From new obligational authority
Current1

Permanent2

From appropria­
tions to
liquidate

From balances
of prior
authorizations

Net (receipts
(—)), business
enterprise and
revolving funds

Total

FRO M AUTHORIZATIONS ALREADY EN­
ACTED AND THOSE R ECO M M ENDED
IN THIS D OCUM EN T
$60, 747,757
25, Oil,186
8 710,278
,
4,158, 371,112
7,558, 484,292
1,570, 588,230
846, 769,771
461, 334,434
834, 210,873
802, 597,366

$60,881,082
25,080,154
8,957,301
2,391, 780,108
5, 984, 706,109
1,465,455,438
388,063,946
41,693, 500
964,442, 630
248, 617, 034

19,771,530,243
994,296,653
587,007,006
150,879,124
232,707,296
625,925,194
281,286,876
8,494,867,156
10,824,166

20, 557, 278,392
358,398,100
359,421,648
161,073,171
239, 799, 549
619,871,507
199, 428,650
569,170,430
11,400,000

47,476,149,013

34, 655, 518, 749

Deduct refunds of receipts (excluding interest):
General Services Administration____________
Treasury Department______________________

7,192,451
2,131, 412,084

Total refunds of receipts (excluding interest).

2, 138, 604,535

Total Budget expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recommended, excluding
refunds of receipts (excluding interest).

45,337,544,478

$3,344, 693
947,370
1, 068,489
4,836, 737, 729
2,071, 882, 910
191, 712.098
463,895, 766
679,049,211
575,222, 769
217,378,811

9, 803,906

Legislative branch_____________________________
The Judiciary_________________________________
Executive Office of the President______________
Funds appropriated to the President___________
Independent offices____________________________
Federal Security Agency_______________________
General Services Administration_______________
Housing and Home Finance Agency___________
Department of Agriculture_____________________
Department of Commerce_____________________
Department of Defense:
Military functions_________________________
Civil functions_____________________________
Department of the Interior____________________
Department of Justice_________________________
Department of Laboi__________________________
Post Office Department (general fund)_________
Department of State___________________________
Treasury Department____ ___________________
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)...
Total expenditures from authorizations
enacted and recommended.

FRO M

$1,000
39, 662,349
9,725,123
1,000
37,998,800
71,716, 996
104,477

$44,476,271
316,081, 952
120,091,712
200,000,000

520, 419, 573

6,957.000
962,870
30,997,321
245,000
2,500

1, 395, 522, 745

266,687
8,460,021,569

3,000,000

8,658,662, 692

2, 636, 321, 631

36,495, 000
234,378

-$95,441,607
-111,878,338
-2 9 , 585
22, 036,056
-95,377,025
-1 6 , 518,000
2,000, 672

16,493,113,338
407,883,429
203, 709, 038
18, 727,023
8,110,053
134
133, 736,493
119, 581,170

-452,871,475
4, 890, 244
5, 617,115
-3,827,880
-1,550,000

26,426,100, 524

-757,443,385

-14,493, 562

$64,225,775
26,028,524
10,025,790
7,177,552,501
8,300,454,982
1,786,954,786
1,073,996,768
663,364,486
1,594,864,395
988,520,567
38,000,000,000
772,134,643
636,240,122
176,451,692
246,362,102
619,871,641
336,431,830
9,134,279,607
11,400,000
71,619,160,211

2, 500, 000, 000

9,803,906
2,500,000,000

9, 803, 906

2, 500,000,000

2,509,803, 906

34,645,714,843

6,158,662,692

2,636,321,631

26,426,100, 524

-757,443,385

69,109,356,305

AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION

Legislative branch. ______ ____________
The Judiciary. ______________________
Executive Office of the President.. ___
Funds appropriated to the President_
_
Independent offices __________________
Federal Security Agency_______________
General Services Administration_______
Housing and Home Finance Agency___
Department of Agriculture____________
Department of Commerce. ___________
Department of Defense:
Military functions_________________
Civil functions____________________
Department of the Interior _____ ____
Department of Justice..................
Department of Labor__________________
Post Office Department (general fund).
Department of State_______ . . .
Treasury D e p a r t m e n t . . . ______
Reserve for contingencies

925,654
1,115, 796
326, 785
348, 940, 520
15,681,587
6,812, 000
11,064, 520
15, 585, 741
16, 031, 616

Total Budget expenditures________ _____

348,940,520
15,681,587
6,812,000
11,064,520
15,585,741
76,031,616

60,000,000

100 00 00
, 0, 0, 0

1,000,000,000

2, 529, 900
9,066,829
20,209, 590
4,223, 062
194, 050, 000
7,114,132
32,983, 590
25,000,000

Total expenditures from authorizations
proposed for later transmission__________
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis. _

925,654
1,115,796
326,785

2,529,900
9,066,829
20.209.590
4,223,062
194,050,000
7,114,132
32.983.590
25,000,000

60,000,000

1,711,661,322

1,771,661,322

-704,722,570
44,632,821,908

36, 357, 376,165

6,158, 662, 692

2, 696,321, 631

26, 426,100, 524

1 Refers to appropriations and other authorizations made available by annual action of the Congress.
2 Refers to appropriations under which additional money becomes available annually under law, without new action by the Congress.




-757,443,385

70,881,017,627

SU M M ARY

T

TABLES

a b l e

a

13

7

SUMMARY OF BUDGET EXPENDITURES— IN RELATION TO AUTHORIZATIONS
BY AGENCY
[Based on existing and proposed legislation]
1953 estimate
Other expenditures

Expenditures from new authorizations

Description
From new obligational authority
Current1

Permanent2

From appropria­
tions to
liquidate

From balances
of prior
authorizations

Net (receipts (—)),
business enter­
prise and
revolving funds

Total

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ALREADY ENACTED
AND THOSE RECO M M E N D ED IN THIS D O CU M ENT
$64, 562,402
26, 554, 550
8,050,933
3,151,279
6,021, 723,949
1, 502,697, 576
251,778, 869
52,722, 800
1, 045, 475, 212
271, 786,305
19, 542,348, 020
427,463,000
434, 807, 884
166, 478, 000
243, 434, 787
669, 322,000
226, 946, 836
618,354, 543

$3, 500,000

$ ,0 0
1 0
39, 759,144
9, 730, 855

1,000

117,000, 000
84, 241, 779
70,000,000

®6,342,100
62, 886,360
75, 793

598, 641,499

8,648,000

2, 352,680,770

-$202,469,072
-230, 420
9,395, 460
-7 2 , 865, 573
- 4 , 600, 747
-9 8 , 921, 211

10,673,400
700,000

496,131
i, 960, 655, 856

26, 954, 239, 057
288, 640, 500
193, 794,143
22,162, 444
6, 029, 373

-357, 915, 847
- 1 , 017, 700
- 2 , 254,105
- 3 , 035, 700

107, 587,199
120,124,917

1,100, 0 0
0
37, 507, 407
185, 000
2, 500

$3, 765, 330
837,961
639,765
7, 379, 810,993
1,811,478, 731
141, 750, 627
981, 851, 644
55, 933, 506
571, 261, 238
115, 984,321

-160, 000
- 7 , 591

-200, 0 0
0

48,500,000,000
716,185,800
674,528,729
186,489,744
249,266,660
669,322,000
334,870,166
9,699,127,725

12,000,000

1,00 0 0
2 0, 0
31, 589, 658,945

$71, 827,732
27, 393,511
8, 690,698
7,382, 962,272
7,787, 492,752
1,738, 190,417
1,313, 026,973
29, 448,633
1,675, 022,063
887, 566,707

9,114, 706, 946

3, 237,437,448

38, 755, 891,749

-734,282, 506

81,963,412,582

2, 700,000, 000

9,250,000
2,700,000,000

9, 250,000

2,700,000,000

2,709,250,000

31, 580,408,945

6,414, 706,946

3, 237, 437,448

38, 755,891, 749

-734,282, 506

79,254,162,582

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Independent offices
Federal Security Agency
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense:
Military functions
Civil functions
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Post Office Department (general fund)
Department of State
Treasury Department
District of Columbia (Federal contribution)
Total expenditures from authorizations enacted
and recommended.
Deduct refunds of receipts (excluding interest):
General Services Administration
Treasury Department
Total refunds of receipts (excluding interest)
Total Budget expenditures from authorizations
enacted or recommended, excluding refunds of
receipts (excluding interest).
FROM

49,291
205,639
20,015

1,800,000
3,624,400, 000
325.350.000
455.850.000

49,291
205,639
1,820,015
3,624,400,000
359,321,570
471,150,793
21,847,000
251,648,480
5,056,259
43,655,854

33,971,570
15,300,793
8,847,000
38,768,480
1,356,259
2,905,854

13.000.000
212.880.000
3, 700,000
40, 750,000

1,000,000,000

500, 000,000
172,100
415, 771
2,053,410
1, 720, 938

15.000.000

11,100,000
270, 000
2, 553,600
* 225,000,000

1,500,000,000
15,172,100
11,515,771
2.323.410
4,274,538
225.000.000
283,400
2.143.410

283,400
2,143,410

100, otio, 000

100.000.000
6,189,867,530

608,213,930

5, 581, 653, 600

AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
LATER TRANSMISSION

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Independent offices
Federal Security Agency
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense:
Military functions
Civil functions
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Post Office Department (general fund)
Department of State
Treasury Department
Reserve for contingencies
Total expenditures from authorizations proposed
for later transmission.
Adjustment to daily Treasury statement basis

37,162,062,545

6,414,706,946

3,237,437,448

39,364,105, 679

-734,282,506

85,444,030,112

Total Budget expenditures

®Deduct, excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.
b Deduct, proposed postal rate increase.
1 Refers to appropriations and other authorizations made available by annual action of the Congress.
2 Refers to appropriations under which additional money becomes available annually under law, without new action by the Congress.




FOR




P A R T

II

ESTIMATES FOR FEDERAL FUNDS




B
udget A th
u orization an E ditu
s d xpen res
(by O izationU it an A t Title)
rgan
n d ccoun
an
d
D
etailed E ates, N
stim
arratives, an Sch
d edules
Legislative Branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds Appropriated to the President
Independent Offices
Federal Security Agency
General Services Administration
Housing and Home Finance Agency
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense
Department of the Interior
Department of Justice
Department of Labor
Post Office Department
Department of State
Treasury Department
District of Columbia




IN T R O D U C T IO N

P art I I contains the details o f the B udget for Federal
funds, including various types o f tables and schedules,
narrative statem ents on the w ork to be perform ed and the
m on ey needed, and the text o f the language proposed for
enactm ent b y Congress on each item o f authorization.
This part also includes m aterial on funds of the m unicipal
governm ent of the D istrict of C olum bia.
The contents of part I I are arranged in chapters,
and the totals are carried forw ard to various tables of
part I. A n exception occurs in the case o f the figures
pertaining to m unicipal revenues o f the D istrict o f C olum ­
bia w hich do n ot enter into the totals o f Federal funds,
but are included within the trust fund totals in part I I I .
S U M M A R IE S

OF

NEW

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

AND

E X P E N D IT U R E S

A t the beginning of each chapter a table on the left page
summarizes new authorizations, and a table on the right
page summarizes expenditures. B o th tables segregate the
items proposed for later transmission, for w hich n o details
appear in this B udget, from those item s already enacted or
recom m ended in this D ocu m en t.
Sum m ary
c a te s

th e

o j new

to ta ls

o b lig a tio n s

or

a u t h o r iz a t io n s . — T h i s

of

each

m ake

ty p e

of

e x p e n d itu r e s .

a u t h o r iz a t io n s a r e e x p la in e d in
(p a g e s

a2

and

3 ).

a

th e ch a p te r a n d

T h e

T h e

v a r io u s

fig u r e s

com e

fr o m

a r e c a r r ie d fo r w a r d in t o

ta b le s 5 a n d 2 o f p a r t I .

fo r

new

o b lig a tio n a l

G ran d

a u th o r ity

in c u r

ty p e s
to

th e

ta b le

in d i­

to

th e In tr o d u c tio n

th e re to
th e

su m m ary

a u th o r iz a tio n

of

p art I

d e ta il in

6 and

fr o m

to ta ls a re s h o w n

e n a cte d

or

recom ­

m ended.
T h e

a p p r o p r ia tio n

m ary

and

tio n s
T h e

in

th e

w h ic h

w ere

m eet

th e

cost

a lr e a d y

1951

sh ow n

r e sc in d e d
fig u r e s

th e

of

e stim a te d

changes

ta k e n

b y

in

th is

su m ­

th e p o r tio n s o f a p p r o p r ia ­

s u b s e q u e n tly

a s a s e p a r a te fig u r e
to

fo r

a p p r o p r ia tio n

s u p p le m e n ta l

a c tio n

fig u r e s

d e ta il e x c lu d e

in

b y

fo r

C on gress.

1952

in c lu d e

s u p p le m e n t a l r e q u ir e d

p ay

s c a le s

r e s u lt in g

fro m

C on gress.

S u m m a r y o j e x p e n d it u r e s . — T h i s s u m m a r y i n d i c a t e s t h e
to ta l

e x p e n d itu r e s

and

1953,

w h ic h

it

com e

fo r

in

1951
T h e

u le s

fo r

th e re
In
and

th e

fig u r e s

h ere

th e

net

w h ic h

som e

ta k e n

c a r r ie d

of

th e

and

1952

th e b a la n c e s

fr o m

is

of

se p a ra te

th e
th e

new

no

d e ta ile d

in to

a n a ly s is

ta b le

7

1952

and

sch ed ­

a m o u n ts
and

fro m

1 o f p a r t I.

1953, b o th

assu m ed

th a t

th e

h ere
o ld

m o n e y a v a ila b le in c o m m in g le d a c c o u n t s w ill b e o b lig a t e d
b e fo r e

th e n e w

m o n e y is o b lig a t e d , a n d

t h a t e x p e n d itu r e s

w ill r e fle c t th e liq u id a t io n o f t h o s e o b lig a t io n s o n th e b a s is
o f p r e v io u s e x p e r ie n c e .

In

t h e c a s e o f b u s in e s s e n te r p r is e

a n d r e v o lv in g fu n d s w h ic h r e c e iv e a p p r o p r ia tio n s o r o th e r

9 5 0 0 0 0 — 52--------1




II

budgetary authorizations, the table assumes that any
budgetary authorizations for such funds are spent in an
am ount equal to the portion o f the authorization actually
credited to the revolving fund during the year. Therefore,
the lines here for expenditures from appropriations or
other budgetary authorizations include paym ents to busi­
ness enterprise and revolvin g funds.
Th e lines here for expenditures charged (or credited) to
receipts o f the enterprise consist on ly of the portion o f
the total expenditures o f the enterprise, n ot already
chargeable to the budget authorizations. This is in con ­
trast to the detailed schedule w hich follow s, where expen­
ditures ou t o f budget authorizations and ou t o f revolvin g
fund receipts are m erged into a single set o f figures for
each business enterprise.
STATEM ENT

OF

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S
ACCOUNT

AND

E X P E N D IT U R E S

BY

T IT L E

A double-page spread lists the organization units and
account titles for the chapter, and shows the b u d get
authorizations and expenditures fo r each. T h e accounts
are divided into several sections: C urrent authorizations
other than business enterprise and revolvin g funds, per­
m anent authorizations, business enterprise and revolvin g
funds, and supplem ental item s (other than p a y increases)
proposed for later transmission. S u p p le m e n ta l for p a y
increases are set forth in separate colum ns in the same
portion of the statem ent as the regular authorizations to
which th ey relate.
Special types o f authorizations are set forth under the
applicable appropriation titles, identified b y separate
stub entries.
F unctional cod e num bers appear in a
separate colum n, indicating the category in the B udget
M essage and in the functional tables where each accou n t
shown here has been included.
A separate group o f headings is used for business
enterprise and revolving funds. T his portion o f the table
shows the total am ounts p rovided b y operations, the
total am ounts applied to operations and the net expendi­
tures (which is the difference betw een the tw o other
figures just nam ed). In the case o f the few funds included
here which are solely of an accounting nature (such as the
accounts o f advances for the D epartm en t of D efense),
the gross figures are n o t shown under funds provid ed and
funds applied, but the net expenditure figure is placed in
the appropriate colum n.
D E T A IL E D

M A T E R IA L

is

a c tu a l s p e n d in g

ta b le s 4 , 2 , a n d

g e n e r a lly

a tte m p t

T h e

P A R T

e n te r ­
m on ey

a u th o r iz a tio n s .

ch a p te r.

fo rw a rd

a p p r o p r i­

b u s in e s s

and

a c c o u n ts,

to

fro m

c o n tra c t a u th o r­

o ld

th e n e w

th e fig u r e s fo r
it

p r io r

B ecau se

are ta k e n in to

d e ta il,

fr o m

w ill c o m e

e x p e n d itu r e s

th ro u g h o u t

are

to ta ls

years

e x p e n d itu r e s

o r o th e r a u th o r iz a tio n s

liq u id a te

fu n d s.

th e o ld

are

c o m p u tin g
in

to

s u m m a r y fig u r e s

b e tw e e n

th e

th e

in

a p p e a r in g

sh o w n

m ade

r e v o lv in g

c o m m in g le d

m ade
in

and

and

th e

th e

A d d it io n a l e n tr ie s a re u s e d w h e r e

fo r e x p e n d itu r e s

c u r r e n tly

iz a tio n s ,

are

of

p e r m a n e n t a u th o r iz a tio n s a n d

r e q u ir e d

p r ise

F or

p o r tio n

C o n g r e s s , a n d th e e x p e n d itu r e s c o m ­

o f p r io r a u th o r iz a tio n s .

a tio n s

c h a p te r.

th e

o u t o f a p p r o p r ia tio n s

c u r r e n tly g r a n te d b y
in g fr o m

th e

e s tim a te s

T O

Th e detailed m aterial generally follow s the order o f the
chapter summaries.
Thus, the accounts o f a given
organization unit m ay be foun d in several places, if the
unit has different types o f authorizations and funds.
W ith in the detailed material, bold -face headings are
generally used for accou n t titles for w hich congressional
action is being p roposed; light-face headings are used for
the accounts which require no action at this time.
T h e kind of m aterial regularly used on general and
special funds is illustrated and explained on the next page.
T h e three types of financial statem ents regularly used
for business enterprise and revolvin g funds are illustrated
and explained on page 5 .
3

EXPLANATORY

A P O R T NL N U G
P R P IA IO A G A E
Te la g a e p p se b th Peidn fo
h n u g ro o d y e r s e t r
in s n in th 1 5 A p p tio A is
cluio
e 9 3 p ro ria n cts
pin da th ha of e chite r q ir g a n
r te t e e d a m e u in ctio .
Te la g a e inth 1 5 A p p tio A is
h nu g
e 9 2 p ro ria n cts
ue a a b se Im e ia ly fo w g th
sd s
a . md te llo in e
la g a e ae cita n to r le a t la s a d th
n u g r tio s e v n w n e
a p p tio ats fr mwic th te t ista e .
p ro ria n c o h h e x kn

S HD L O A O N S A A A L
C E UE F M U T V IL B E
Fre cha u t thr iss o nabie schd le
o a cco n ee hw r f e u
wic liss th a p p tio s md o r q ire ,
h h t e p ro ia n a e r e u d
o e s u sof mnyo a thrity to inu ■b
thr o rce
oe r u o
c r oli­
g tio s d d ctio s fo th a o n nt ue
a n, e u n r e mu ts o s d
w inth y a a dth a o n of "O lig tion
ith e e r, n e mu t
b a s
in rre ."
cu d

IL L U S T R A T IO N

OF

BUDGETS

FOR

GENERAL

AND

S P E C IA L

S la a d E p ses, W en B rea —
a ries n x en
om ’s u u
S la s a dex en F e p n s n ce ryfor th w of th
a rie n p ses: or x e se e ssa
e ork e
W en B re u a a th
om ’s u a , s u orized by th A of J n 5 1 2 (2
e ct u e , 9 0 9
U S C 1 -1 ), in d g p rch se of rep a d mteria for
. . . 1 6 clu in u a
orts n a l
in a a ex ib [$ 7 ,2 5 of w ichn m th n 8 1 .5 1
formtion l h its, 3 9 8 , h ot ore a )37 8 sh ll b a a b for p a serviceaj
a e v ila le
erson l
_ (L b r-F era
_ a o ed l
S rity A p ria A 1 5 .)
ecu p rop tion ct, 9 2
^ 1
1
A p ria 1 5 , a$ 6 ,5 0
p rop ted 9 2 3 2 7
E a 1 5 , $ 6 ,7 0
stimte 9 3 3 4 0
74o t eLbr eea Sc *
0 f h ao-Fdr l eu
AAAL FROL AI N
VI BE O BI T
L
GO

FUND

ACCOUNTS

Rmn ty e s o s th te t u d inth 1 5
o a p hw e x »e
e 92
A p p tio A
p ro ria n cts.
Bakts e clo mteia wic it isp p se
r c e n se a r l h h
ro o d
to o it in1 5 .
m 93
Ita ty e in ic te p p se nw la g a e
lic p d a s ro o d e n u g
*a dfig r s
n ue.

_ Tefo catofs p le e ta 1 5 a po r tio s
h re s u p mn l 9 2 p r pia n
r q ir d d e toch ne inp ys le isin d d
eu e u
a g s a ca s clu e
in th r g la s hd le . O e s p le e ta
e e u r c e u s thr up mn ls
a p a a th e dof e chchp r
p e r t e n a a te.
- Bla ce nt a a b a r th e d of th
a n s o v ila le fte e n
e
ya,- tob la s d
e r e pe .

Aorsr tupretimtee t py
pp e n e a .........
od
Praeiaio om t l d o a
rpop s ple s a u
c sr n n
Rimu.e et frmt e acut.
eebs m s o ohr co ns
s
Oligt n inurd
b aios c re.
ol aio s b a t it s
bigt n y c iv ie

15et ae 15 et ae
92 sim 93 sim
t
t
O L A IO S B A T IT S
B IG T N Y C IV IE
F a cia r q ir mn a b kn d w b
inn l e u e e ts re ro e o n y
p rp s , po ra , p je o a ity Tis
u o e r g m ro ct, r ctiv . h
b a d w ise e lly ta re fo e cha en
re k o n sp cia ilo d r a g cy
a d a u t, r fletin th p r u r d tie a d
n cco n e c g e atic la u s n
r s o s ilitie fo wic itre iv s mny
epnib s r h h ce e o e .
We r imus mn ae re iv d fr mo e
hre e b re e ts r ce e o thr
a u ts of th Gv rn e t, th o lig tio s
cco n
e o e mn e b a n
ch rg a le to s c r imus mn a o n
a eb
uh e b re e ts re fte
p cedinas p ra prtio of th schd le
la
e a te o n is e u .

Det O a n
irc b tios
lig
1Itet atcin doeerwrorcni­
. nios ain awm t ok s---vsigffet g rp in e - o d
g
nt nosndroadplic s
n gn
2 Aoisr sricso dgnt oa c­
. rm y evte nle laio ffet
3 Pv oiowf rnao is wnes....
. dgt e e ao wse okie_
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in t e ircio n m g e
h
4 Eeuiv...................m t
. xc icsd et nadnaae...
n n
sr e
ev
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o l irc b aio s
O a nFoaOetocenbre e ts
b tiosPybtOAR tsusm
lig rm hr coim n
a le u f u
1I tet atcin doeerwrorcni­
. nios ain awm t okn.....
vsigffeg g rp in eso d
n o g
2 Pontio o sadrn n plic s
. rm nt t nad ad o ie_
o f
s
Tta breten frybt e taf
o imbsaiot pmohr o
l olig ns aale o c
r utu m .... ..........­
e ...... s o u
c ns
o
Oligt n inurd .....
b aios c re..

5,72
22
5,20
06

5,30
42
4,76
44

5,30 I
42
4,76
44

— D e o lig tio s a ths fo wic t is
■ ir ct b a n re o e r h h h
a en gts th mny d ctly e e b a p ­
g cy e e o e ire , ithr y p ro
p tio , co tra a thriz tio , r imus mn
ria n n ct u o a n e b re e ts
fr mo ts eth Gv rn e t, o o e ma s
o u id e o e mn r thr e n.
' Olig tion s o nint isprtio of th s e ­
b a s hw h o n e chd
u ae fin n db o e a p p tio s a da
le r a ce y thr p ro ria n n c­
co n , a dthr fo th a o n s o nhr ae
u ts n ee re e mu ts hw ee r
d p te w inth d c o lig tio s s ctio o
u lica d ith e iret b a n e n f
th p y ga u ts
e a in cco n .

PORM N PROM C
RGA AD EFRA E
N
N R A IV S A E E T
A R T E T T MNS
Te wr p n e a ds r ic s p p se to b
h ok la nd n ev e ro o d e
ca d o t ae d scrib d bie udre ch
rrie u r e e r fly ne a
a p p tio o fu d We p ctica le th
p ro ria n r n. hre ra b e
nra es te e ts in ica th ex e da ­
ar tiv ta mn d te e p cte ccom
p h e tinr la ntoth finn l etimte a d
lis mn e tio
e a cia s a s n
g e so emaue of po r ma dprfo a ce
ivs m e s r s r ga n e rmn .
I th ca of pr a e ta p p tio s th nra
n e se emnn p ro ria n, e ar ­
tiv s te e ts a e p in th so r e of th
e ta mn lso x la e uc
e
mn y a dth s tu r b s fo th a p p ­
o e n e ta toy ais r e p ro ria
tio .
n

The Bureau establishes standards and policies to pro­
mote women’s opportunities for profitable employment,
and investigates and reports on matters pertaining to the
3. Advisory services on legislation affecting the welfare o j *
women workers.— Technical and advisory services are fur­
nished State and Federal agencies, the international
bodies, women’s organizations, civic groups, and- indi­
viduals in the various fields of women’s labor law and
civil and political status, including preparation of replies
to United Nations questionnaires for the Government on
the legal status and treatment of women.
4. Executive direction and management services. *

BI AI N B OJCS
L T S Y BET
GO
Ojetc sifict n
b c las aio
Smayo ProaSrics
u m f esnl ev e
r
Ttaimeeivfptmllnhrsoitsn
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ur enqbao a aptyoit
ll-t m r fr mt e .
Aa m
v
e
O L A IO S B OJ CS
B IG T N Y BE T
Tee is s o nfo e ch a u t a s m ayof
hr hw r a cco n u mr
prs n l s r ic sa daclas tio of th ob a
e o a ev e n s ifica n e lig ­
tio s a rd g to a uifom lis of o je
n cco in
nr t
b cts.
Tee ob c s e , n me d fr m0 to 1 ,
hs ject las s u bre o 1 6
r fletth ntueof th th g o s r ic sp rc ae ,
e c e a r e ins r ev e u h s d
r g r les of th p rps o th ntue of th
e ad s
e u oe r e a r
e
po r mfo wic thyae Oe .
r ga r h h e r sd

Analysis of expen itu es
d r
A nwschd let isy a s o sth r la nh
e e u h e r hw e e tio s ip
b twe o lig tio s inur dd r gth y a a d
e e n b a n c re uin e e r n
th a o n d b r e inth s m p rio . Te
e mu ts is us d e a e e d h
u liq id te o lig tio s (i. e o lig tio s wic
n u a d b a n ., b a n h h
h v nt y t b e p id a th b g n g a d
a e o e e n a ) t e e in in n
e dof th y a aeth pin a ite sinmk g
n
e e r r e r cip l m a in
th b g fr mo lig tio stoe pn itue.
e rid e o b a n x e d r s
Tis schd le a d tr u s th y a ex
h e u lso is ib te e e r’s ­
pnitue b twe ths wic co e fr ma ­
e d r s e e n oe h h m o u
thr a n of th s m y a hr ca "c r e t
oiz tio s e a e e r, ee lled ur n
a thriz tio s" (we e o a pr a e t o nn
u o a n hthr f emnn r o ­
pr a e t ntue a d ths wic co e fr m
emnn a r ), n o e h h m o
a thriz tio sof apio y a Epnitue fr m
uo a n
r r e r. x e d r s o
th p y s p le e ta fo cat fo 1 5 ae a
e a u p mn l re s r 9 2 r lso
s g g te .
e re a d
4




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vegaacieunrre:s
r e la sle ds
Gvrlg re r.ga d
nr a
Aeaesae
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vrg rd.
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tla pyinecp__2oit a
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am
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Tta proasric oligt n.
o l esnl ev e b aios
Det O a n
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lig
0 Trvnlsrics ....... .
1 Paea ev ..............
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AAYI O BPN]
NLSS F XED
15 at a 15et ae 15et ae
91 cul 92sim 93 sim
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t
$526
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8
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4,50
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liq iosinura uint r f aa—
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$2 0
4,80
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b
30
9,0
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0,50
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eecbrale b a n............
ut:
17
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a ligaios f r er
4,80
20
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7
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d
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o l xe d ue.............
3955
7, 5
33 4
8,37
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6,70
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3050
2,90
37
2,57
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23
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*Ha in s in th nra e s te e ts uully
ed g
e ar tiv ta mn s a
a re whth s e u s of o lig tio s b a i­
g e it e chd le b a n y ctiv
tie.
s
_ Ee tiv d ctio , a m is a es r ic s a d
xcu e ire n d in tr tiv ev e, n
s ila co mn o e e d ativ s a mre
im r m o v rha c itie re e ly
lis d ex p we thr isso e uuul c c m
te , ce t hn ee m ns a iru ­
s n tob e p in d
ta ce e x la e .
Pr a e t ps n ae ths of a fu e
emnn o itio s r o e
ll-tim
ntue wic a of in e ited ra n T e in
a r h h re dfin u tio . hy ­
clu e ps n wic my b fille b pr o s
d oitio s h h a e d y es n
w te pr r a pin e ts
ith moay p o tmn .
A era e s laie a da e g ga e ae co ­
v g a r s n v ra e r ds r m
p te a mtic lly Te a e g s la my
u d rith e a . h v ra e a ry a
fa e e w ino o ts eth sa ryr neof th
ll ithr ith r u id e la a g
e
a e g g d.
v ra e ra e
^ E p y e t inpr e ps n a dths of
mlo mn at-tim o itio s n o e
a s ao a ntueo of s ot d r tio is in d d
e s n l a r r hr ua n clu e
hr .
ee
Py e ts fo th e tr d yo d y ine ce s of
a mn r e x a a r a s x s
5 we s pr y a o etim, n h okd re ­
2 e k e e r, vr e ig t-wr iffe n
tia h a p y e aein d dhr .
l, olid y a , tc., r clu e ee
Olig tion r fe to odr p ce , c n cts
b a s e r r es la d o tra
a a e , a d s r ic s re iv d d r g th y a
wrd d n ev e ce e uin e e r,
r g r les of th tim of p y e t. A p ria
e ad s
e e a mn p rop ­
tio s o o e o lig tio a a thr ms b p ­
n r thr b a n l u oity ut e ro
v e b th Cnr s b fo o lig tio s ca b
id d y e o ges e re b a n n e
inur d
c re .

S ceth to l of o lig tio s inlu e th r im
in e ta b a n c ds e e ­
b rs b ite s b t th e pn itue fig r s ae
u a le m, u e x e d r ue r
nc s a nt of r imus mn (pimr to
ees rily e
e b re e ts r aily
a oidd p tea u tin fo th Gv r mn a
v u lica cco n g r e o en e t s
h le
ee s ry e u e b re e ts
a wo ), itisnc s a to d d ct r imus mn
inar in a e pn ituefig r s
riv g t x e d r ue.
_ Olig tio s wic hv b e inur d b t nt
b a n h h a e e n c re u o
y t p idaeetimte a clo ly a p ssib , b t
e a r s a d s se s o le u
th e e tul p y e t my b inas h d r
e vn a a mn a e
lig tly iffe­
e t a o n fr m th o lig tio firt r prte .
n mu t o e b a n s e o d
Tis lin in ica s th d re ce ais g fr mth
h e d te e iffe n r in o is
ca s .
ue
^ Tisisa e a p wees c es ea n a a ­
h n x mle hr uc s iv n u l p
po r tio s ae md . I a p p tio s of tw
r pia n r a e f p ro ria n
o
o mr yas wr mrg d udr th la , a
r oe e r ee e e ne e w
s g fig r wu a p a in th 1 5 c lu n
inle ue o ld p e r
e 91 o m
fo e pn itue o t of bth c re t a d pio
r xe d rs u
o ur n n r r
a thriz tio s
u o a n.

EXPLANATORY

IL L U S T R A T IO N

OF

BUDGETS

FOR

T h e three financial statem ents shown below are regularly
used for business enterprise and revolvin g funds. Such
funds also have narrative statem ents on program and per­

S A E E TO T ES U C S A D
T T MN F H O R E N
A P IC T N O F N S
P L A IO F U D
Tisisa b la ce pee ta nof th a o n
h
a n d r s n tio
e mu ts
b co in a a b d r gth y a e e inth
e m g v ila le uin e e r, ithr e
fom c s o o e wr in ca ita a dth wy
r of ah r thr ok g p l, n e a
inwic ths a o n hv b e ue .
h h oe mu ts a e e n s d
Tes te e t e clu e d p cia n los s o
h ta mn x d s e re tio , s e n
lo n a d o e tr natio s wic a ct nithr
a s, n thr a s c n h h ffe e e
c s nr o e c re t as ts a d lia ilitie. I
ah o thr ur n se n b s t
d e re c tr natio swic a ctcaha u ts
o s flet a s c n h h ffe s , cco n
re iv b , a u ts p y b o e a e
ce a le cco n a a le, thr ccrud
lia ilitie , ine toie of s p lie fo a m is a e
b s vn r s u p s r d in tr tiv
p rps s dfe e c ag s a dce its
u o e, e rr d hr e n r d .
Bthth fud a p da dth fud p v e
o e ns p lie n e ns ro id d
pr of th s te e taed id db twe "op
ats e ta mn r iv e e e n er­
a n a d Te s r "fin n g Te s mof
tio s" n r auy a cin ." h u
th a o n a p dtoo e tio slesth a o n
e mu ts p lie p ra n s e mu ts
p v e b o e tio s e u ls th nt e p n i­
ro id d y p ra n q a e e x e d
tue, wic a in d d w in th b d e ex
r s h h re clu e ith e u g t ­
pnitue fo th Gv r mn a awo .
e d r s r e o en e t s hle

B U S IN E S S

E N T E R P R IS E

AND

R E V O L V IN G

FUNDS

form ance. T h e m aterial on bu d getary authorizations for
such funds and on lim itations on expenses follow the
general form at illustrated on the opposite page.

A S tem t of so rces a da p tionoffu d
. ta en u n p lica
ns
[Frfisayased gJn 3, lS 15,ad15]
o cl er nin ue 0 fil, 82 n 93
15 at a 15et ae 15 et ae
91 cul 92sim 93 sim
t
t
F NSAPI D
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t
66 1
4,66
60 0,
3,00
60 0 4
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tr
87 8
7,36
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6,50
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6,50
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o l xes.
1 2,02 1 9,50 1 9,50
,54 0
,56 0
,56 0
Ss t l.....................
,5 ,20 ,64 0
4
0 ,64 0 <
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nrmtoasletd wr in c it l
ceab in e ce ok g a
e
s
9,84
26
1,3
48
66
TtagnceplieTeseytah
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lfun ap dr o r c s ...
s e o pr n
,6863 ,60 6
6
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3,13
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3,64
3
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F NSP OIDD
UD R V E
Boaraios fast: 'Eu m t..
yeeat n: ses qip e
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R lizt no
n
29
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30
,50
20
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no s: f od n ev e
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,65 0
Rna cm o qates
e
18
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10
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10
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o l co e
15821 16600 1 1,00
, 6, 4
, 2, 0
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o l ns rv e y pr t n. ,50 3
,69 0
,69 0
B finocia:io
yprnr g n
in
$0,00
300
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$,26
16
Dpes t rauy - h
erae
a
1 7,77 $,69 0 1 2,76
,80 3 1 2,50 ,60 6
Tta fud poidd
o l ns rv e...........
EFC O B D EAYEP NIT RS
FET N UGT R XE D UE
2,87 ,60 0
1750 168 6 1 1,,70
Fnsaolieetbppr tss ...... $,5074 $,,69 0 $,6956
ud ppidd ooaioio .
pv d oyeeann
r t ..........
Fns r
ud
1 7, 3 1 2,50 1 2 6
, 3,17
Nt e c o bdeayepn!*
e ffet n ugt r xed
146
6,37
-63
3
16
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Teaoeasfotw: c agd(o ceit
hebv))m nsaehre r rd ­
r
J
dugt ruuhr aios
(—ao ats izt n
llo o
T bdea t f h nepis
o
303
3,60
50
-6 3
3
16
,26
T ntreey o t eetrr e ..... -10.03
o e cips

Prhs s fo mn fatue o sa a s o n
uc ae r a u c r r le re hw
hre we e o nt th mteia a ue w in
e , hthr r o e a r ls re s d ith
th y a
e e r.
Tea o n a p to o e tio s, o e thn
h mu ts p lied p ra n thr a
ch n e in wr in ca ita a uully b kn
a g s ok g p l, re s a ro e
d w b ob c s ina s p otin schd le
o n y ject las
u pr g e u .
We thr a a n a co g s io a lim tio s
hre ee re n u l nre s n l ita n
ona m is a ee p ne th ob schd le is
d in tr tiv x e s s, e ject e u
uully lim d to th e p ne wic a u dr
sa
ite
e x e s s h h re ne
lim tio .
ita n
Te ch n e in se cte wr in ca ita ite s
h ag
le d ok g p l m
w e u l th d re ce b twe th fig r s o
ill q a e iffe n e e n e ue n
s te e t Cfo tw s c e s e y a fo c re t
ta mn r o uc s iv e rs r ur n
as ts o e thn Te s r cah a d ine toie
se , thr a r auy s n vn r s
fo sa a d mn fatue les c re t lia ilitie .
r le n a u c r , s ur n b s

Nt e ct o b d e ry e pn itue in ds
e ffe n u g ta x e d r s clu e
th spn in of a p p tio s fo th re o in
e e d g p ro ria n r e vlv g
fu da wll a th s e d gof th fu d o nr ­
n s e s e pn in
e n 's w e
ce ts A ng tiv fig r hr in ica s collec­
ip .
e a e ue ee d te
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n x s xe d rs

B S tem t cf in m a dex en
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[Frfisayased gJn 3, 15,15,ad15]
o cl er nin ue 0 91 92 n 93
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t
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S A E E T O IN O E A D EP NE
T T MN F C M N XE S S
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h
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n e eu g r fit r s r e e r. h
s te e t is nrmlly o a fu a a b s , in
ta mn o a n ll ccru l ais ­
c d g inth e pne s mfo d p cia na d
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a e n a n e o ith e r auy
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t x d s n a n s p ro ria n
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n

51 7
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75 9
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3 x se ulig0 92a t n,0 s f m no e
5




L E G I S L A T I V E

B R A N C H

SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations
Appropriations
_
_____
Contract authorizations _ _ _

__ __
__

Total current authorizations
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquida­
tion of prior contract authorizations _ _ _
Total new obligational authority en­
acted or recommended,_ __ __ _

$72, 202, 754
168, 000

$74, 550, 151

$86, 072, 413

72, 370, 754

74, 550, 151

86, 072, 413

4, 268, 000

3, 000, 000

3, 500, 000

68, 102, 754

71, 550, 151

82, 572, 413

PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
Appropriations: Pay increases__ __

_____

Total new obligational authority (for
detail, see following tables)________

6

974, 945

68, 102, 754

72, 525, 096

82, 572, 413




L E G IS L A T IV E B R A N C H
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOC­
UMENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations _____
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior con­
tract authorizations__ ____________
Total expenditures from new authori­
zations____________ _ __________

$60, 881, 082

$64, 562, 402
3, 500, 000

•

60, 881, 082

68, 062, 402

3, 344, 693

$60, 747, 757

3, 765, 330

64, 225, 775

71, 827, 732

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure authori­
zations __
___________________________
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recommended____

60, 747, 757

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
925, 654

Out of current authorizations: Pay increases
Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure authori­
zations: Pay increases .
______ __

49, 291

Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions proposed for later transmission.
Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following tables)_____________

925, 654

60, 747, 757

49, 291

65, 151, 429

71, 877, 023

7

TH E

8

BU DGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

1952

1951 enacted
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
(Other than business enterprise and revolving funds)
Senate:
Salaries and expense allowance of Senators, mileage of
the President of the Senate and of Senators, and
expense allowance of the Vice President:
Salaries of Senators________________________________
Mileage of President of the Senate and of Senators.
Expense allowance of the Vice President.................
Expense allowance of Senators________________ ____
Salaries, officers and employees.......................................
Contingent expenses of the Senate:
Salaries and contingent expenses, legislative reorgan­
ization.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Senate policy com­
mittee.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee
on the Economic Report.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee
on Atomic Energy.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee
on Printing.
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance,
for the Vice President.
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance,
for the President pro tempore.
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance,
majority and minority leaders.
Contingent expenses, reporting debates and pro­
ceedings.
Contingent expenses, cleaning furniture_____ ______
Contingent expenses, furniture and repairs_________
Contingent expenses, expenses of inquiries and
investigations.
Contingent expenses, folding documents___________
Contingent expenses, materials for folding_________
Contingent expenses, fuel for heating apparatus____
Contingent expenses, kitehens and restaurants_____
Contingent expenses, mail transportation__________
Contingent expenses, miscellaneous items__________
Contingent expenses, packing boxes________ _____ _
Contingent expenses, postage______________________
Contingent expenses, air-mail and special-delivery
stamps.
Contingent expenses, stationery__________________ _
Compiling and preparing a revised edition of the
Biographical Directory of the American Congress.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Federal Expenditures.
Contingent expenses, Committee on Interstate and
Foreign Commerce.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee
on Foreign Economic Cooperation.
Payment to son and daughters of Hon. Arthur H.
Vandenberg.
Payment to widow of Hon. Virgil M . Chapman_____
Total, Senate.

$1,200,000
51.000
10.000
240,000
9,110,216

$1,200,000

240.000
8,327,320

$1,200,000
51.000
10.000
240,000
8,327,320

100.000

100.000

100,000

100,000

100.000

601

91,430

119,430

119,430

129, 340

129,340

601

125,585

125, 585

125,585

133,275

133,275

601

160,135

160,135

160,135

173, 060

173,060

601

28,180

43,333

43,333

46,125

46,125

601

5.480

5.480

5,480

5,835

5.835

601

5.480

5.480

5,480

5,835

5.835

601

10,960

10, 960

10,960

11,670

11,670

601

122,785

125, 532

125,532

135, 785

135,785

601
601
601

2,900
35,878
1,382,000

2, 900

1,0 0
8 0
882,000

2,900
18,000
882,000

3,190
18,000
974,120

3,190
18,000
974,120

601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601

28,875
1,500

28, 875
1, 500

2,000

2,000
42, 500
9,560
786, 895
3,000
825
12,815

31,765
1, 500
2,000
42, 500
9,560
801,955
3,000
825
12,815

31,765
1,500

42,500
9,560
986,895
3.000
825
10,250

28,875
1,500
2,000
42,500
9,560
786,895
3,000
825
12,815

42,500
9,560
801,955
3,000
825
12,815

601
601

87,600
5.000

87,600

87,600

87,600

87,600

601

20,000

601

200,000

12, 402, 725

12,402,725

13,340,971

13,340,971

601
601
601
601
601

$1,200,000

$ , 200,000
1

51.000

51,030

10.000

10,000

240.000
8,166,096

10.000
240.000
9,110,216

2,000

601
601

12.500

601

12.500
13,160,914

3 Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated,




51.000

L E G IS L A T IV E

BRANCH

9

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951,1952, and 1953]
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1953 estimate

1952 estimate

Organization unit and account title
1951 actual

Out of authori­
zations already
enacted

Out of authori­
zations pro­
posed for later
transmission3

Total

Out of authori­
Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations pro­
years and rec­ posed for later
ommended in transmission3
detail herein

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
(Other than business enterprise and revolving funds)
Senate:
Salaries and expense allowance of Senators, mileage of the
President of the Senate and of Senators, and expense
allowance of the Vice President:
Salaries of Senators
Mileage of President of the Senate and of Senators
Expense allowance of the Vice President
Expense allowance of Senators
Salaries, officers and employees
Contingent expenses of the Senate:
Salaries and contingent expenses, legislative reorganiza­
tion.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Senate policy committees

$1,199,062
47.218

10,000
239,813
7,377,962
65.219
81,576
109,574
146,292
19,204
3,983
1,289
8,157
122,785

$11,410,507

$11,410,507

$12,227,693

$12,227,693

Contingent expenses, cleaning furniture
Contingent expenses, furniture and repairs
Contingent expenses, expenses of inquiries and investiga­
tions.
Contingent expenses, folding documents
Contingent expenses, materials for folding
Contingent expenses, fuel for heating apparatus
Contingent expenses, kitchens and restaurants
Contingent expenses, mail transportation
Contingent expenses, miscellaneous items
Contingent expenses, packing boxes
Contingent expenses, postage
Contingent expenses, air-mail and special-delivery stamps

2,821
28,330
1,308,347
32,378
1,661
2,376
43,286
9,895
1,037,726
2,048
885
9,000
84,761
12,035

Contingent expenses, stationery
Compiling and preparing a revised edition of the Bio­
graphical Directory of the American Congress.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Federal expenditures.
Contingent expenses, Committee on Interstate and Foreign
Commerce.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Foreign Economic Cooperation.
Payment to son and daughters of Hon. Arthur H. Vandenberg.
Payment to widow of Hon. Virgil M . Chapman

15,916
159,229
12,764

12,500
12,208,092

Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on the
Economic Report.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Atomic Energy.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Printing.
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, for
the Vice President.
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, for the
President pro tempore.
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, ma­
jority and minority leaders.
Contingent expenses, reporting debates and proceedings

11,410, 507

11,410,507

12, 227, <

* Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




12,227,693

Total, Senate

TH E

10

BUDGET

BUDGET

FOR

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

F IS C A L

AND

YEAR

1953

E X P E N D I T U R E S — C o n t in u e d

BY O R G A N IZA T IO N UN IT AND ACC O U N T T IT L E -C o n tin u e d
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

1952

1951 enacted
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
House of Representatives:
Salaries, mileage, and expenses of Members:
Salaries of Members and Delegates____ _________ ....
Mileage and expenses of Members and Delegates___
Salaries, officers and employees........................................
Clerk hire, Members and Delegates.................... ...........
Contingent expenses of the House:
Contingent expenses, furniture, repairs, and packing
boxes.
Contingent expenses, miscellaneous items..................
Contingent expenses, stenographic reports of com­
mittee hearings.
Contingent expenses, expenses of special and select
committees.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee
on Internal Revenue Taxation.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Office of the
Coordinator of Information.
Contingent expenses, telegraph and telephone service,
Contingent expenses, stationery, revolving fund___
Contingent expenses, attending physician--------------Contingent expenses, postage stamps----------------------Contingent expenses, folding documents___________
Contingent expenses, revision of law s..------------------Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance,
for the Speaker.
Contingent expenses, preparation of new edition of
the United States Code.
Payment for contesting seats______________ ______ ___
Payment to widows of deceased Members of the House
of Representatives.

601
601
601
601

$5,492,500
1,273,500
3,823,835
8,844,150

$5,492, 500
1,273, 500
4,062,199
8, 844,150

$5,492,500
1,273,500
4,062,199
8,844,150

$5,492,500
1,273,500
4,654,055
9,828, 565

$5,492,500
1,273,500
4,654,055
9,828,565

601

236.000

175.000

175,000

195, 500

195,500

601
601

452.000

800.000

100,000

800,000
100,000

550.000
100.000

550.000

100.000

601

800,000

800, 000

800,000

800,000

800,000

601

180,000

180,000

180,000

190,000

190.000

601

69.000

69.000

69,000

75, 750

75,750

601
601
601
601
601
601
601

377.000
228.000
6,985
35,400
90.000
12,600
10,675

1, 077, 000
483, 300
8,985
35, 600
85.000
12,600
6,175

1,077,000
483,300
8,985
35.600
85,000
12.600
6,175

1,077,000
350,400
8,985
35,600
120,000
13, 700
6,660

1,077,000
350,400
8,985
35,600

62,500

4,624
50,000

4,624
50,000

22,094,145

23,559,633

23,559,633

24,772, 215

24,772,215

601
601

17,900
14,515

17,900
14,515

17,900
14,515

17,900
16,440

17,900
16,440

601
601
601

105,000
94,500

105.000

100.000
20,000

105,000
100,000
20,000

119,000
114,000

119.000
114.000

601

32,800

29,850

29,850

33,220

33,220

Statement of appropriations.

601

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

4,000

268,715

291,265

291,265

304,560

304,560

132,700
606,500

134,300
741,332

142,400
780,332

143,200
695, 800

143,200
695,800

216,000
31,800
2,600

220,600
31,800
2 ,600

250,400
34,800

250,400
34,800

10,100

10,100

765,800
1,026,300
1,3^9,000
3,500,000
(3,500,000)

765,800
1,026,300
1.359.000
3.500.000
(3,500,000)

601
601

Total, legislative miscellaneous..
Architect of the Capitol:
Salaries__________________________ ____ ____________ _
Capitol Buildings----------------- ---------------------------- ------Completion of rotunda frieze, Capitol Building.......
Capitol Grounds--.---------------------- -------------------------- Legislative garage------------------------------------------------- — .
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office
Buildings.
Senate Office Building----- ---------------------------- ---------....
House Office Building................ ........................ ............. .
Capitol power plant......... ...................................................
Changes and improvements, Capitol power plant____
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601
601

$8,100
39,000

20,000

643,900
899,300
1,316,500
4,000,000
(4,000,000)

2 P ay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated,




120.000
13,700
6,660

601

Total, House of Representatives..
Legislative miscellaneousi
Capitol Police:
Uniforms and equipment--....................... ...................
Capitol Police Board-----------------------------------------------Office of Legislative Counsel:
Salaries and expenses,. Senate-_____ ________________
Salaries and expenses, House of Representatives____
Joint Committee on Reduction of Nonessential
Federal Expenditures.
Education of Senate, House, and Supreme Court

100.000

733,572
961,564
1,267,600
3,000,000
(3,000,000)

20,000
18,100
2,400

55.400
78,000
35.400

238,700
34,200
2,600
788,972
1,039,564
1,303,000
3,000,000
(3,000,000)

L E G IS L A T IV E

BUDGET

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

AND

BRAN CH

11

E X P E N D I T U R E S — C o n t in u e d

B Y O R G A N IZA T IO N UNIT AND A CC O U N T T ITL E — Continued
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations pro­
zations already
posed for later
Enacted
transmission 3

Total

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations
years and rec­ posed forpro­
later
ommended in transmission3
detail herein

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued

249,488

House of Representatives:
Salaries, mileage, and expenses of Members:
Salaries of Members and Delegates
Mileage and expenses of Members and Delegates
Salaries, officers and employees
Clerk hire, Members and Delegates
Contingent expenses of the House:
Contingent expenses, furniture, repairs, and packing boxes

373,813
47,597

Contingent expenses, miscellaneous items
Contingent expenses, stenographic reports of committee

741,578

Contingent expenses, expenses of special and select com­
mittees.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Joint Committee on
Internal Revenue Taxation.
Salaries and contingent expenses, Office of the Coordinator
of Information.
Contingent expenses, telegraph and telephone service
Contingent expenses, stationery, revolving fund
Contingent expenses, attending physician
Contingent expenses, postage stamps
Contingent expenses, folding documents
Contingent expenses, revision of laws
Contingent expenses, automobile and maintenance, for the

$5,456,458
1,260,348
3,564,884
8,307,934

170,192
66,464

$22,381,651

$22,381,651

!3,533,604

$23,533,604

339,163
187,715
8,760
29,450
69,968
12,964
9,962
52,667

Contingent expenses, preparation of new edition of the
United States Code.
Payment for contesting seats
Payment to widows of deceased Members of the House of
Representatives.

4,000

100,000
21,053,405

22,381,651

22,381,651

23, 533,604

23,533,604

Legislative miscellaneous:
' Capitol police:
Uniforms and equipment
Capitol Police Board
Office of Legislative Counsel:
Salaries and expenses, Senate
Salaries and expenses, House of Representatives
Joint Committee on Reduction of Nonessential Federal
Expenditures.
Education of Senate, House, and Supreme Court ]

15,052
14,288
96,316
93,394

276,702

276,702

289,042

32,897
4,000

Statement of appropriations

255,947

276,702

124,053
611,969

133,130
740,471

276,702

$7,600
36,800

289,042

140,730
777,271

142,600
698,300

2,200

143,100
700,500

239,401
34,073
2,622

248.300
34,600

1,000
10
0

249,300
34,700

783,578
1,046,889
1,320,798
3,432,516

764.300
1,023,300
1,351,200
7,806,705

289,042

$500

20,000

20,000
201,408
31,506
2,903

222,301
31, 773
2,622

17,100
2,300

637,637
852,137
1,299,600
209,459

731,378
973,889
1,287,398
3,432,516

52,200
73,000
33,400

10,100

10,100
3, 200
5, 000

2,000

3 Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




Total, House of Representatives

767,500
1,028,300
1,353,200
7,806,705

Total, legislative miscellaneous
Architect of the Capitol:
Salaries
Capitol Buildings
Completion of rotunda frieze, Capitol Building
Capitol Grounds
Legislative garage
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings
Senate Office Building
House Office Building
Capitol power plant
Changes and improvements, Capitol power plant
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract au­
thorization.

12

TH E

BUDGET

BUDGET

FOR

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

F IS C A L

AND

YEAR

1953

E X P E N D I T U R E S — C o n t in u e d

B Y O R G A N IZA T IO N U NIT A N D A CC O U N T TITLE — Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

1952

1951 enacted
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans-

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
Architect of the Capitol—Continued
Library buildings and grounds:
Repairs and maintenance........ .......... ........... ............. .
Salaries_____________ _____ _____ _________ ________
Salaries, Sunday opening._______ __________ ________
Structural and mechanical care.....................................
Furniture and furnishings...........................................
Miscellaneous:
Acquisition of site, construction, and equipment,
additional Senate Office Building.
Capitol Building, Senate and House roofs and cham­
bers.
Contract authorization___________________ ______
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate con­
tract authorization.
Repairs, improvements, and equipment, Senate-----Restaurant, Senate Office Building________________
Replacement of equipment, Senate restaurant,
Capitol Building.

303
303
303
303
303

$74,100
215,300
14,700
72,000

$320,000
50,000

$16,700

$336,700
50,000

$584,000
151,300

$584,000
151,300

601
601

268,000

601
601

168,000
(268,000)

601
601
601

30,000
4,000

18, 500

8,695,400

7,501, 868

253,100

7,754,968

8,520,700

8,520,700

303

196,500

199,500

14,700

214,200

218, 500

218,500

303
503
601
303
303
303
303
602
302
303
503
303
303
303
303

3,044,000
890.000
790.000
552,100
77.000
270.000
85.500
22.500

3,124, 204
914, 510
800, 000
566,891
79,430
270.000
85, 500
22, 500

293,010
86,870
73,000
55,285
7,000

3,417,214
1,001,380
873.000
622,176
86,430
270.000
85.500
22.500

1,000,000

4,147,930
1,042,540
964,026
667, 631
104,276
388.000
95.000
25.000

1 000,000
,

1,000,000

1,000,000

4.147,930
1,042,540
964,026
667,631
104,276
388.000
95,000
25,00U

1,000,000

450.000
39.500
550,500
85.000
698,680
500

450.000
39, 500
550, 500
80, 000
711,625
500

450.000
39.500
550,500
80,000
786,485
500

536.000
44,500
769,207
105,400
837,572
500

536.000
44,500
769,207
105,400
837,572
500

8,555,280

8,695,160

9,285,185

10,727,582

10,727,582

605

16,700,000

19,200,000

19,200,000

25,000,000

25,000,000

605

2,699,800

2,700,000

117,120

2,817,120

3,187,885

3,187,885

Total, Government Printing Office____ __________

19,399,800

21,900,000

117,120

22,017,120

28,187,885

28,187,885

Grand total................................................ ..................
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior
contract authorizations.

72,370,754
4,268,000

74,550,151
3,000,000

974,945

75,525,096
3,000,000

86,072,413
3, 500,000

86,072,413
3,500,000

Total new obligational authority...............................

68,102,754

71,550,151

974,945

72,525,096

82,572,413

82,572,413

Total, Architect of the Capitol________________
Botanic Garden: Salaries and expenses..
Library of Congress:
Salaries, Library proper______________________________
Salaries, Copyright Office----------- ------- -----------------------Salaries and expenses, Legislative Reference Service...
Salaries and expenses, distribution of catalog cards___
Salaries and expenses, union catalogs_________________
General increase of the Library of Congress___________
Increase of the law library__________________________
Books for the Supreme Court________________________
Books for the adult blind____________________________
General printing and binding.-----------------------------------Printing the catalog of title entries of Copyright Office.
Printing catalog cards________________________________
Miscellaneous expenses_________________ _____________
Salaries and expenses, Library buildings------------- ------Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress Trust Fund
Board.
Miscellaneous:
Revision of Annotated Constitution of the United
States of America.
Other_____________ ______________ _________________

2 Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




74,860

303

Total, Library of Congress.
Government Printing Office:
Working capital and congressional printing and bind­
ing.
Office of Superintendent of Documents: Salaries and
expenses.

18,500

590,025

L E G IS L A T IV E

BUDGET

A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

13

BRANCH

AND

E X P E N D I T U R E S — C o n t in u e d

BY O R G A N IZA T IO N UNIT A N D A CC O U N T T IT L E — Continued
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1953 estimate

1952 estimate

Organization unit and account title
Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations
zations already posed forpro­
later
enacted
transmission 8

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations
years and rec­ posed forpro­
later
ommended in transmission *
detail herein

Total

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS— Continued

$15,700

$385,554

$334,376

$369,854

1,281

60,261
206,606

$1,000

$682,300

60,261

1,760,448

$681,300

206,606

690
1,276

Contract authorization
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract au­
thorization.
Repairs, improvements, and equipment, Senate
Restaurant, Senate Office Building
Replacement of equipment, Senate restaurant, Capitol
Building.

2

47,127
3,542

47,127
3,542

6,068,745

8,262,868

238,100

8,500,968

12,760, 705

15,000

12,775,705

186,984

203,006

13,800

216,806

217,300

900

218,200

3,002,175
884,322
786,726
548,263
71,782
277,394
94,987
22,880
1,248,594
460,003
34,219
558,529
78,458
651,583

3,120,000
918,200
805,208
566,501
80,407
277.000
107.000
22, 500
1,061,949
460.000
40.000
555.000
83.000
710.000
400

275,010
85,415
68,632
53, 760

3,395,010
1,003,615
873,840
620,261
86,507
277.000
107.000
22,500
1,061,949
460.000
40.000
555.000
83.000
781,217
400

4,105,430
1,039,985
953, 658
662,806
101,876
332.000

18,000
1,455
4,368
1,525
900

4,123,430
1,041,440
958,026
664,331
102,776
332.000

15,586

126

6,100

100.000

100.000

25.000
1,051, 000
510.000
45.000
750.000

25.000
1,051,000
510.000
45.000
750.000

100.000

100.000
831, 830
500

3,643

835,473
500

9,367,425

10, 609, 085

29, 891

10,638,976

10,197,582

71, 217

9,002,418

126

37,543
560,134

Architect of the Capitol— Continued
Library buildings and grounds:
Repairs and maintenance
Salaries
Salaries, Sunday opening
Structural and mechanical care
Furniture and furnishings
Miscellaneous:
Acquisition of site, construction, and equipment, addi­
tional Senate Office Building.
Capitol Building, Senate and House roofs and chambers

8,773,044

8,807, 291

9,889,205

10,197,582

2,312,335

2,686,168

113,620

2,799,788

3,187,885

3,500

3,191,385

12,201,540

12,883,750

113,620

12,997,370

12,190,303

3,500

12,193,803

60,747,757

64,225,775

925,654

65,151,429

71,827,732

49,291

71,877,023

9,002,418

Total, Architect of the Capitol
Botanic Gardens: Salaries and expenses
Library of Congress:
Salaries, Library proper
Salaries, Copyright Office
Salaries and expenses, Legislative Reference Service
Salaries and expenses, distribution of catalog cards
Salaries and expenses, union catalogs
General increase of the Library of Congress
Increase of the law library
Books for the Supreme Court
Books for the adult blind
General printing and binding
Printing the catalog of title entries of Copyright Office
Printing catalog cards
Miscellaneous expenses
Salaries and expenses, Library buildings
Salaries and expenses, Library of Congress Trust Fund
Board.
Miscellaneous:
Revision of Annotated Constitution of the United States
of America.
Other
Total, Library of Congress
Government Printing Office:
Working capital and congressional printing and binding
Office of Superintendent of Documents: Salaries and ex-

Total, Government Printing Office
Grand total
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior con­
tract authorizations.
Total new obligational authority

* Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




TH E

14

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

C U R R E N T A U T H O R I Z A T IO N S
SE N A TE
Salaries and Expense A llowance of Senators, M ileage of
the President of the Senate and of Senators, and E xpense
A llowance of the Vice President
Salaries of Senators—
For compensation of Senators, $1,200,000. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,200,000
Estimate 1953, $1,200,000
Mileage of President of the Senate and of Senators—
For mileage of the President of the Senate and of Senators,
$51,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Actt 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $51,000
Estimate 1953, $51,000
Expense Allowance of the Vice President—
For expense allowance of the Vice President, $10,000. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $10,000
Estimate 1953, $10,000
Expense Allowance of Senators—
For expense allowance of Senators, $240,000. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $240,000
Estimate 1953, $240,000
Salaries, Officers

and

E mployees

Salaries, Officers and Employees, Senate—
[For compensation of officers, employees, clerks to Senators, and
others, as authorized by law, including increased and additional
compensation provided by the “ Federal Employees Pay Act of
1945” , as amended, and the “ Second Supplemental Appropriation
Act, 1950” , as follows:]
For compensation of officers, employees, clerks to Senators, and
others, as authorized by law, as follows:
OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT

For compensation of the Vice President of the United States.
$30,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $30,000
Estimate 1953, $30,000
For dlerical assistance to the Vice President, at rates of compensa­
tion to be fixed by him in multiples of $5 per month, [$50,370]
$55,410. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $50,370
Estimate 1953, $55,410
CHAPLAIN

Chaplain of the Senate, [$2,646] $2,946. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2*,646
Estimate 1953, $2,946
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

For office of the Secretary, [$367,706, including the following
positions: Chief Clerk, $7,500 in lieu of Chief Clerk, who shall per­
form the duties of reading clerk, $7,500; bill clerk, $4,500 in lieu of
principal clerk, $4,500; engineer, Joint Recording Facility, $2,280;
secretary, $4,100 in lieu of clerk, $4,100; assistant secretary, $3,380
in lieu of clerk, $3,380; assistant superintendent of document room,
$4,000 in lieu of clerk, $4,000; clerk of enrolled bills, $3,900 in lieu
of clerk, $3,900; first assistant in document room, $3,420 in lieu of
clerk, $3,420; secretary to Parliamentarian, $3,180 in lieu of clerk,
$3,180; custodian of records, $3,180 in lieu of clerk, $3,180; assist­
ant executive clerk, $3,000 in lieu of clerk, $3,000; assistant keeper
of stationery, $2,880 in lieu of clerk, $2,880; reference assistant,
$2,700 in lieu of clerk, $2,700; stockroom clerk, $2,460 in lieu of
clerk, $2,400; reference assistant, $2,460 in lieu of clerk, $2,400;
journal index clerk, $2,460 in lieu of clerk, $2,400; second assistant
in document room, $2,460 in lieu of clerk, $2,400; reference assist­
ant, $1,980 in lieu of clerk, $1,740; clerks^—two at $2,040 each in
lieu of $1,860; two at $1,980 each in lieu of $1,740; reference assist­
ant, $2,640 in lieu of first assistant in document room, $2,640;
clerk, $2,220 in lieu of second assistant in document room, $2,040;
special officers—two at $2,520 each in lieu of $2,460; assistants in
document room—four at $2,220 each in lieu of $2,040; chief mes­
senger in document room, $1,980 in lieu of skilled laborer, $1,740;




assistant librarian, $3,120 in lieu of first assistant librarian, $3,120;
secretary in library, $2,220 in lieu of assistant in library, $2,100;
legislative analyst, $2,220 in lieu of assistant in library, $2,100;
chief messenger in Secretary’s office, $2,400 in lieu of laborer,
$2,280; messenger, $1,980 in lieu of laborer in Secretary’s office,
$1,740; messengers—four at $1,980 each in lieu of four laborers at
$1,740 each; chief messenger in disbursing office, $1,920 in lieu of
laborer, $1,680; chief of library stacks, $1,860 in lieu of laborer,
$1,620; reference assistant, $1,800 in lieu of laborer, $1,500; mes­
senger, $1,800 in lieu of laborer, $1,500; chief messenger in library,
$1,740 in lieu of laborer, $1,440; messenger, $1,620 in lieu of laborer,
$1,320; messenger, $1,620 in lieu of $1,320; press liaison, $2,880 in
lieu of assistant at press door, $2,520; assistant at press door, $2,160
in lieu of $2,000; aide to the Vice President, $2,460 in lieu of $2,400]
$414,580.
[Office of the Secretary: For an additional amount (effective on
the first day of the first month following enactment of this Act)
to increase the basic salary of parliamentarian from $8,000 to
$12,500 so long as the position is held by the present incumbent;
and for the basic salary of assistant parliamentarian to be selected
by the parliamentarian, $5,940; $7,120, and the Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act for the fiscal year 1952 hereby is amended
accordingly.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952; Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $374,826
Estimate 1953, $414,580
COMMITTEE EMPLOYEES

For professional and clerical assistance to standing committees,
and the Select Committee on Small Business, [$1,579,685] $1,687,045. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,579,685
Estimate 1953, $1,687,045
CONFERENCE COMMITTEES

For clerical assistance to the Conference of the Majority, at rates
of compensation to be fixed by the chairman of said committee,
[$30,280] $33,310. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $30,280
Estimate 1953, $33,310
For clerical assistance to the Conference of the Minority at rates
of compensation to be fixed by the chairman of said committee,
[$30,280] $33,310. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $30,280
Estimate 1953, $33,310
ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL ASSISTANTS TO SENATORS

For administrative and clerical assistants and messenger service
for Senators, [$5,041,545] $5,545,700. (Legislative Branch Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $5,041,545
Estimate 1953, $5,545,700
OFFICE OF SERGEANT AT ARMS AND DOORKEEPER

[For office of Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper, $1,130,628,
including the following positions: Messengers acting as assistant
doorkeepers—three at $2,580 each in lieu of $2,560; messengers—■
twenty-five at $2,100 each in lieu of $1,900; messengers for the
minority— chief, $2,400 and three at $2,100 each in lieu of four at
$1,900 each; messengers—four at $1,980 each in lieu of $1,780;
messengers for service to press correspondents—two at $1,800 each
in lieu of $1,500; clerks—one, $3,480 in lieu of $2,700; one, $2,580
in lieu of $2,500; one, $2,460 in lieu of $2,400; one, $2,400 in lieu of
$2,280; one, $2,280 in lieu of $2,160; four at $2,160 each in lieu of
$1,980; one, $2,160 in lieu of $1,950; cabinetmakers—two at $2,520
each in lieu of $2,460; finisher, $2,520 in lieu of $2,460; upholsterer,
$2,520 in lieu of $2,460; assistant chief janitor, $2,220 in lieu of
$2,100; night foreman, $1,920 in lieu of $1,680; assistant chief
telephone operators—three at $2,460 each in lieu of $2,400; tele­
phone operators—thirty-three at $1,980 each plus longevity in­
creases as authorized by law in lieu of $1,800 plus such longevity
increases; skilled laborers—five at $1,920 each in lieu of $1,680;
laborer in charge of private passage, $2,400 in lieu of $2,280; female
attendants, ladies’ retiring rooms, two at $1,800 each in lieu of
$1,560; laborers—three at $1,920 each in lieu of $1,700; thirty at
$1,620 each in lieu of $1,320; four at $600 each in lieu of $540;
wagon master, $2,520 in lieu of $2,480; assistant wagon master,
$2,100 in lieu of $1,940; mail carriers—twenty-six at $2,100 each in
lieu of $1,940; clerks in folding room—one, $2,460 in lieu of $2,400;
one, $1,980 in lieu of $1,740; chief folder, $2,460 in lieu of $2,040;
folders—thirteen at $1,740 each in lieu of $1,440; lieutenants, police
1 force—two at $2,340 each in lieu of $2,200; special officers, police

L E G IS L A T IV E

force— two at $2,340 each in lieu of $2,200; sergeants, police force—
four at $2,280 each in lieu of $2,120; privates, police force—seventyfive at $2,160 each in lieu of $2,000: Provided, That hereafter the
pay of pages shall begin not more than five days before the conven­
ing or reconvening of a session of the Congress or of the Senate, and
shall continue until the end of the month during which the Congress
or the Senate adjourns or recesses, or the fourteenth day after such
adjournment or recess, whichever is the later date.] For office of
Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper, $1,245,750. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,130,628
Estimate 1953, $1,245,750
OFFICES O TH SECRETARIES FOR THE M
F E
AJORITY AND THE M
INORITY
For the offices of the secretary for the majority and the secretary
for the minority, [$57,060J $62,165. (Legislative Branch Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $57,060
Estimate 1953, $62,165
Total, salaries, officers and employees:
Appropriated 1952, $8,327,320
Estimate 1953, $9,110,216

C ontingent E xpenses

of the

Senate

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Legislative Reorgan­
ization—
Legislative reorganization: For salaries and expenses, legislative
reorganization, including the objects specified in Public Law 663,
Seventy-ninth Congress, $100,000. (Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $100,000
Estimate 1953, $100,000
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate Policy Committees—
Senate policy committees: For salaries and expenses of the
Majority Policy Committee and the Minority Policy Committee,
[$59,715] $64,670 for each such committee; in all, [$119,430J
$129,340. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $119,430
Estimate 1953, $129,340
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
the Economic Report—
Joint Committee on the Economic Report: For salaries and
expenses of the Joint Committee on the Economic Report,
[$125,5853 $133,275. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $125,585
Estimate 1953, $133,275
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Atomic Energy—
Joint Committee on Atomic Energy: For salaries and expenses of
the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, including the objects
specified in Public Law 20, Eightieth Congress, [$160,1353 $173,060.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $160,135
Estimate 1953, $173,060
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Printing—
Joint Committee on Printing: For salaries for the Joint Com­
mittee on Printing at rates to be fixed by the committee, [$35,6333
$38,125; for expenses of compiling, preparing, and indexing the
Congressional Directory, $1,600; for compiling, preparing, and
indexing material for the biographical directory, [$1,6003 $1,900,
said sum, or any part thereof, in the discretion of the chairman or
vice chairman of the Joint Committee on Printing, may be paid as
additional compensation to any employee of the United States;
and for travel and subsistence expenses at rates provided by law
for Senate committees, $4,500; in all, [$43,3333 $46,125. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $43,333
Estimate 1953, $46,125
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Automobile and Maintenance, for
the Vice President—
Vice President’s automobile: For purchase, exchange, driving,
maintenance, and operation of an automobile for the Vice President,
[$5,4803 $5,835. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 5 ,4 8 0




E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 5 ,8 3 5

BRANCH

15

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Automobile and Maintenance, for
the President Pro Tempore—
Automobile for the President pro tempore: For purchase, ex­
change, driving, maintenance, and operation of an automobile for
the President pro tempore of the Senate, [$5,4803 $5,835. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $5,480
Estimate 1953, $5,835
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Automobiles and Maintenance,
Majority and Minority Leaders—
[Automobile3 Automobiles for majority and minority leaders:
For purchase, exchange, driving, maintenance, and operation of
two automobiles, one for the majority leader of the Senate, and one
for the minority leader of the Senate, [$10,9603 $11,670. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $10,960
Estimate 1953, $11,670
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Reporting Debates and Proceed­
ings—
Reporting Senate proceedings: For reporting the debates and
proceedings of the Senate, payable in equal monthly installments,
[$125,5323 $135,785. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 195-2, $125,532
Estimate 1953, $135,785
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Cleaning Furniture—
Furniture: For services in cleaning, repairing, and varnishing
furniture, [$2,900] $8, 190. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,900
Estimate 1953, $3,190
Contingent Expenses* Senate, Furniture and Repairs—
Furniture: For materials for furniture and repairs of same and for
the? purchase of furniture, $18,000. (Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $18,000
Estimate 1953, $18,000
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Expenses of Inquiries and Investi­
gations—
Inquiries and investigations: For expenses of inquiries and inves­
tigations ordered by the Senate or conducted pursuant to section
134 (a) of Public Law 601, Seventy-ninth Congress, including com­
pensation for stenographic assistance of committees at such rates
and in accordance with such regulations as may be prescribed by
the Committee on Rules and Administration, but not exceeding the
rate of 25 cents per hundred words for the original transcript of
reported matter; and including $100,000 for the Committee on
Appropriations, to be available also for the purposes mentioned in
Senate Resolution Numbered 193, agreed to October 14, 1943, and
Public Law 20, Eightieth Congress, [$882,0003 $974,120: Provided,
That no part of this appropriation shall be expended for per diem
and subsistence expenses (as defined in the Travel Expense Act of
1949) at rates in excess of $9 per day except that higher rates may
be established by the Committee on Rules and Administration in
the case of travel beyond the limits of the continental United States.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $882,000
Estimate 1953, $974,120
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Folding Documents—
Folding documents: For folding speeches and pamphlets at a
gross rate not exceeding $2 per thousand, [$28,875.3 $31,765.
(.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $28,875
Estimate 1953, $31,765
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Materials for Folding—
Materials for folding: For materials for folding, $1,500. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,500
Estimate 1953, $1,500
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Fuel for Heating Apparatus—
Fuel, and so forth: For fuel, oil, cotton waste, and advertising,
exclusive of labor, $2,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,000
Estimate 1953, $2,000
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Kitchens and Restaurants—
Senate restaurants: For repairs, improvements, equipment, and
supplies for Senate kitchens and restaurants, Capitol Building and
Senate Office Building, including personal and other services, to be

TH E

16

BUDGET

FOR

SE N A T E — C ontinued
C ontingent Expenses

of the

Senate— Continued

Contingent Expenses, Senate, Kitchens and Restaurants— Con.
expended under the supervision of the Committee on Rules and
Administration, United States Senate, $42,500. (.Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $42,500
Estimate 1953, $42,500
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Mail Transportation—
Motor vehicles: For maintaining, exchanging, and equipping
motor vehicles for carrying the mails and for official use of the
offices of the Secretary and Sergeant at Arms, $9,560. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $9,560
Estimate 1953, $9,560
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Miscellaneous Items—
Miscellaneous items: For miscellaneous items, exclusive of labor,
[$786,895: Provided, That the following Senate resolutions are
amended as indicated: Number 453, agreed to February 26, 1931,
by inserting $1,560 in lieu of $1,260; Number 340, agreed to Decem­
ber 3, 1930, by inserting $1,740 in lieu of $1,440; Number 204,
agreed to June 16, 1938, by inserting $1,500 in lieu of $1,200;
Number 372, agreed to December 18, 1930, by inserting $1,980
in lieu of $1,800; Number 175, agreed to July 7, 1943, by inserting
$2,460 in lieu of $2,400; Number 419, agreed to January 28, 1931,
by inserting $2,460 in lieu of $2,400; Number 230, agreed to March
16, 1942, by inserting $2,340 in lieu of $2,220; Number 62, agreed
to December 15, 1931, by inserting $1,740 in lieu of $1,440; Num­
ber 83, agreed to December 17, 1931, by inserting $1,740 in lieu of
$1,440; Number 428, agreed to February 17, 1931, by inserting
$1,800 in lieu of $1,560] $801,955. (Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $786,895
Estimate 1953, $801,955
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Packing Boxes—
Packing boxes: For packing boxes, $3,000. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $3,000
Estimate 1953, $3,000
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Postage—
Postage stamps: For office of Secretary, $500; office of Sergeant at
Arms, $225; offices of the secretaries for the majority and the
minority, $100; in all, $825. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $825
Estimate 1953, $825
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Air-Mail and Special-Delivery
Stamps—
Air-mail and special-delivery stamps: For air-mail and specialdelivery stamps for Senators and the President of the Senate, as
authorized by law, $12,815[, and the maximum allowance per capita
of $105.66 is increased to $132.07 .for the fiscal year 1952 and there­
after]. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $12,815
Estimate 1953, $12,815
Contingent Expenses, Senate, Stationery—
Stationery: For stationery for Senators and for the President of
the Senate, including $10,000 for stationery for committees and
officers of the Senate, $87,600 [: Provided, That commencing with
the fiscal year 1952 the allowance for stationery for each Senator
and for the President of the Senate shall be at the rate of $800 per
annum]. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $87,600
Estimate 1953, $87,600

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

against loss. Premiums on such insurance shall be paid out of the
contingent fund of the Senate, upon vouchers approved by the Chair­
man of the Committee on Rules and Administration.
[Salaries or wages paid out of the foregoing items under “ Con­
tingent expenses of the Senate” shall be computed at basic rates
as authorized by law, plus increase and additional compensation as
provided by the “ Federal Employees Pay Act of 1945” , as amended,
and the “ Second Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1950” .]
[Changes made herein relating to the title or rate of compensa­
tion of any position under the Secretary of the Senate or the Sergeant
at Arms and Doorkeeper shall take effect on the first day of the first
month following enactment of this A ct.]
Salaries or wages paid out of the foregoing items under “ Contingent
expenses of the Senate” shall be computed at basic rates, plus increased
and additional compensation, as authorized and provided by law.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Actt 1952.)

H O U SE OF R E P R E S E N T A T IV E S
Salaries, M ileage, and Expenses

of

M embers

Salaries of Members and Delegates, House of Representatives—
For compensation of Members of the House of Representatives,
Delegates from Territories, and the Resident Commissioner from
Puerto Rico, $5,492,500. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $5,492,500
Estimate 1953, $5,492,500
Mileage and Expenses of Members and Delegates, House of
Representatives—
For mileage and expense allowance of Members of the House of
Representatives, Delegates from Territories, and the Resident Com­
missioner from Puerto Rico, as authorized by law, $1,273,500.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,273,500
Estimate 1953, $1,273,500
Salaries, Officers

and

E mployees

Salaries, Officers and Employees, House of Representatives—
For compensation of officers and employees, as authorized by
law, as follows:
office of the speaker

For Office of the Speaker, [$43,400] $47,285. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $43,400
Estimate 1953, $47,285
THE

speaker’ s

TABLE

For the Speaker’s table, including $2,000 for preparing Digest
of the Rules, [$30,490] $43,885. (Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $30,490
Estimate 1953, $43,885
OFFICE O THE CHAPLAIN
F
For the Office of the Chaplain, [$6,555] $7,245. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $6,555
Estimate 1953, $7,245
O
FFICE O THE CLERK
F
For the Office of the Clerk, [$593,843] $661,195. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $593,843
Estimate 1953, $661,195
COM ITTEE EM
M
PLOYEES

The Sergeant at Arms is authorized and directed to secure suitable
office space in post office or other Federal buildings in the State of
each Senator for the use of such Senator and in the city to be desig­
nated by him: Provided, That in the event suitable space is not
available in such buildings and a Senator leases or rents office space
elsewhere, the Sergeant at Arms is authorized to approve for pay­
ment, from the contingent fund of the Senate, vouchers covering
bona fide statements of rentals due in an amount not exceeding
$900 per annum for each Senator.
The Secretary of the Senate and the Sergeant at Arms are author­
ized and directed to protect the funds of their respective offices by
purchasing insurance in an amount necessary to protect said funds




For committee employees, including a sum of not to exceed
[$275,000] $302,215 for the Committee on Appropriations,
[$1,700,000] $1,966,720. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,700,000
Estimate 1953, $1,966,720
OFFICE O TH SERGEANT AT ARM
F E
S
For Office of the Sergeant at Arms, [$348,406] $884,045.
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 3 4 8 ,4 0 6

(Legis­

E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 3 8 4 ,0 4 5

L E G IS L A T IV E

BRANCH

17

OFFICE O THE DOORKEEPER
F

CLERK HIRE, M BERS AND DELEGATES
EM

For Office of the Doorkeeper, [$581,625] $721,970. (.Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $581,625
Estimate 1953, $721,970

Clerk Hire, Members and Delegates, House of Representatives—
For clerk hire necessarily employed by each Member and Delegate,
and the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, in the discharge
of his official and representative duties, as authorized by law,
[$8,844,150] $9,828,565. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $8,844,150
Estimate 1953, $9,828,565

SPECIAL AND MINORITY EM
PLOYEES
For six minority employees, [$50,165] $54,685. (.Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $50,165
Estimate 1953, $54,685
[F or three special employees, $8,430.]
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $8,430

(Legislative Branch

For office of the majority floor leader, including $2,000 for official
expenses of the majority leader, [$42,945] $46,755. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $42,945
Estimate 1953, $46,755
For office of the minority floor leader, [$32,500] $35,380. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $32,500
Estimate 1953, $35,380
For two messengers, one in the majority caucus room and one in
the minority caucus room, to be appointed by the majority and
minority whips, respectively, [$6,050] $6,655. (Legislative Branch
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $6,050
Estimate 1953, $6,655
For two printing clerks, one for the majority caucus room and one
for the minority caucus room, to be appointed by the majority and
minority leaders, respectively, [$6,805] $7,485. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $6,805
Estimate 1953, $7,485
For two clerks, one for the majority whip and one for the minority
whip, to be appointed by said whips, respectively, [$9,700]
$10,670. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $9,700
Estimate 1953, $10,670
For a technical assistant in the office of the attending physician, to
be appointed by the attending physician, subject to the approval of
the. Speaker, [$5,720] $6,295. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $5,720
Estimate 1953, $6,295
OFFICE O THE POSTM
F
ASTER
For Office of the Postmaster, [$161,240] $177,230. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $161,240
Estimate 1953, $177,230
OFFICIAL REPORTERS O DEBATES
F
For official reporters of debates, [$114,935] $124,435. (Legisla­
tive Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $114,935
Estimate 1953, $124,435
OFFICIAL REPORTERS TO COM ITTEES
M
For official reporters to committees, [$94,390] $102,120. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $94,390
Estimate 1953, $102,120
APPROPRIATIONS COM ITTEE
M
For salaries and expenses, studies and examinations of executive
agencies, by. the Committee on Appropriations, and temporary per­
sonal services for such committee, to be expended in accordance
with section 202 (b) of the Legislative Reorganization Act, 1946,
and to bfe available for reimbursement to agencies for services per­
formed, [$225,000] $250,000. (Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $225,000
Estimate 1953, $250,000

T o t a l , s a la r ie s , o f f i c e r s a n d e m p l o y e e s :
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 4 , 0 6 2 ,1 9 9




E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 4 ,6 5 4 ,0 5 5

C ontingent Expenses

of the

H ouse

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Furniture, Repairs,
and Packing Boxes—
Furniture: For furniture and materials for repairs of the same,
including labor, tools, and machinery for furniture repair shops, and
for the purchase of packing boxes, [$175,000] $195,500. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $175,000
Estimate 1953, $195,500
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Miscellaneous
Items—
Miscellaneous items: For miscellaneous items, exclusive of salaries
unless specifically ordered by the House of Representatives, in­
cluding the sum of $47,500 for payment to the Architect of the
Capitol in accordance with section 208 of the Act approved October
9, 1940 (Public Law 812); the exchange, operation, maintenance,
and repair of the Clerk’s motor vehicles; the exchange, operation,
maintenance, and repair of the folding room motortruck; the ex­
change, maintenance, operation, and repair of the post-office motor
vehicles for carrying the mails; the sum of $600 for hire of automo­
bile for the Sergeant at Arms; materials for folding; and for sta­
tionery for the use of committees, departments, and officers of the
House; [$250,000] $550,000.
[Miscellaneous items: For an additional amount for “ Miscella­
neous items” , $550,000: Provided, That the appropriation “ Clerk
hire, Members and Delegates” , fiscal year 1952, is hereby made
available for the purposes set forth in subsection (c) of House
Resolution 318, Eighty-second Congress.] (Second Supplemental
Appropriation Act, 1952; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $800,000
Estimate 1953, $550,000
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Stenographic
Reports of Committee Hearings—
Reporting hearings: For stenographic reports of hearings of com­
mittees other than special and select committees, $100,000.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $100,000
Estimate 1953, $100,000
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Expenses of
Special and Select Committees—
Special and select committees: For salaries and expenses of
special and select committees authorized by the House, $800,000.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $800,000
Estimate 1953, $800,000
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Joint
Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation—
Joint Committee on Internal Revenue Taxation: For the pay­
ment of the salaries and other expenses of the Joint Committee on
Internal Revenue Taxation, [$180,000] $190,000. (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $180,000
Estimate 1953, $190,000
Salaries and Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Office
of the Coordinator of Information—
Office of the Coordinator of Information: For salaries and other
expenses of the Office of the Coordinator of Information, [$69,000]
$75,750. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $69,000
Estimate 1953, $75,750
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Telegraph and
Telephone Service—
Telegraph and telephone: For telegraph and telephone service,
exclusive of personal services, $1,077,000. (Legislative Branch Ap­
propriation Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 1 ,0 7 7 ,0 0 0

E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 1 , 0 7 7 ,0 0 0

TH E

18

BUDGET

FOR

H O U SE OF R E P R E S E N T A T IV E S — C ontinued
C ontingent Expenses

of the

H ouse—Continued

Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Stationery, Re­
volving Fund—
Stationery (revolving fund): For a stationery allowance of $800
for each Representative, Delegate, and the Resident Commissioner
from Puerto Rico, for the [second] first session of the [Eightysecond] Eighty-third Congress, $350,400, to remain available until
expended.
[Stationery (revolving fund): For an additional amount for
“ Stationery (revolving fund)” , Eighty-second Congress, first ses­
sion, $500, to remain available until expended.] (,Second Supple­
mental Appropriation Act, 1952, Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $483,300
Estimate 1953, $350,400
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Attending
Physician—
Attending physician’s office: For medical supplies, equipment,
and contingent expenses of the emergency room and for the attend­
ing physician and his assistants, including an allowance of $1,500
to be paid to the attending physician in equal monthly installments
as authorized by the Act approved June 27, 1940 (54 Stat. 629), and
including an allowance of not to exceed $30 per month each to four
assistants as provided by the House resolutions adopted July 1,
1930, January 20, 1932, and November 18, 1940, $8,985. (Legis­
lative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $8,985
Estimate 1953, $8,985
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Postage Stamps—
Postage stamps: Postmaster, $200; Clerk, $400; Sergeant at
Arms, $300; Doorkeeper, $250; United States airmail and specialdelivery postage stamps for each Representative, Delegate, and the
Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, and the Speaker, the
majority and minority leaders, the majority and minority whips,
and each standing committee of the House, as authorized by law;
$35,600. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $35,600
Estimate 1953, $35,600
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Folding Docu­
ments—
Folding documents: For folding speeches and pamphlets, at a rate
not exceeding $1 per thousand or for the employment of personnel at
a rate not to exceed $5.20 per day per person, [$85,000] $120,000.
(.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $85,000
Estimate 1953, $120,000
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Revision of
Laws—
Revision of laws: For preparation and editing of the laws as
authorized by the Act approved May 29, 1928 (1 U. S. C. 59),
[$12,600] $13,700, to be expended under the direction of the Com­
mittee on the Judiciary. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $12,600
Estimate 1953, $13,700
Contingent Expenses, House of Representatives, Automobile and
Maintenance, for the Speaker—
Speaker’s automobile: For exchange, driving, maintenance, re­
pair, and operation of an automobile for the Speaker, [$6,175]
$6,660. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $6,175
Estimate 1953, $6,660
Salaries or wages paid out of the items herein for the House of
Representatives shall be computed at basic rates, plus increased and
additional compensation, as authorized and provided by law.
No part of the appropriation contained in this Act for the con­
tingent expenses of the House of Representatives shall be used to
defray the expenses of any committee consisting of more than six
persons (not more than four from the House and not more than two
from the Senate), nor to defray the expenses of any other person
except the Sergeant at Arms of the House or a representative of his
office, and except the widow or minor children, or both, of the de­
ceased. to attend the funeral rites and burial of any person who at the
time of his or her death is a Representative, a Delegate from a
Territory, or a Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico.
[The rates of compensation for telephone operators and members
of the police force under the House of Representatives are hereby




F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

revised to correspond with changes made herein relating to similar
positions under the Senate.] (.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Payment for Contesting Seats, House of Representatives—
[For payment to James C. Davis, contestee, for expenses incurred
in the contested election case of Lowe versus Davis, as audited and
recommended by the Committee on House Administration, $1,275.]
[For payment to Thomas B. Curtis, contestee, for expenses in­
curred in the contested election case of Karst versus Curtis, as
audited and recommended by the Committee on House Adminis­
tration, $1,460.]
[For payment to Raymond W. Karst, contestant, for expenses
incurred in the contested election case of Karst versus Curtis, as
audited and recommended by the Committee on House Administra­
tion, $1,889.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $4,624
Payment to Widows of Deceased Members of House of Repre­
sentatives—
[For payment to Eleanor M. Fellows, widow of Frank Fellows
late a Representative from the State of Maine, $12,500.]
[For payment to Winifred Gillette, widow of Wilson D. Gillette,
late a Representative from the State of Pennsylvania, $12,500.]
[For payment to Ruth M. Vaughn, widow of Albert C. Vaughn,
late a Representative from the State of Pennsylvania, $12,500.]
[For payment to Ida Stefan, widow of Karl Stefan, late a Repre­
sentative from the State of Nebraska, $12,500.] (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $50,000
•

C A P IT O L PO LIC E
Uniforms and Equipment, Capitol Police, House of Representatives—
General expenses: For purchasing and supplying uniforms; main­
tenance, and repair of passenger motor vehicles; contingent expenses,
including $25 per month for extra services performed for the Capitol
Police Board by such member of the staff of the Sergeant at Arms of
the Senate or the House, as may be designated by the chairman of
the Board; $17,900. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $17,900
Estimate 1953, $17,900
Capitol Police Board, House of Representatives—
Capitol Police Board: To enable the Capitol Police Board to pro­
vide additional protection for the Capitol Buildings and Grounds,
including the Senate and House Office Buildings and the Capitol
Power Plant, [$14,515] $16,440. Such sum shall only be expended
for payment for salaries and other expenses of personnel detailed
from the Metropolitan Police of the District of Columbia, and the
Commissioners of the District of Columbia are authorized and
directed to make such details upon the request of the Board.
Personnel so detailed shall, during the period of such detail, serve
under the direction and instructions of the Board and is authorized
to exercise the same authority as members of such Metropolitan
Police and members of the Capitol Police and to perform such other
duties as may be assigned by the Board. Reimbursement for
salaries and other expenses of such detail personnel shall be made
to the government of the District of Columbia, and any sums so
reimbursed shall be credited to the appropriation or appropriations
from which such salaries and expenses are payable and be avail­
able for all the purposes thereof: Provided, That any person detailed
under the authority of this paragraph or under similar authority
in the Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1942, and the Second
Deficiency Appropriation Act, 1940, from the Metropolitan Police
of the District of Columbia shall be deemed a member of such
Metropolitan Police during the period or periods of any such
detail for all purposes of rank, pay, allowances, privileges, and
benefits to the same extent as though such detail had not been made,
and at the termination thereof any such person who was a member
of such police on July 1, 1940, shall have a status with respect to
rank, pay, allowances, privileges, and benefits which is not less than
the status of such person in such police at the end of such detail.
(Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $14,515
Estimate 1953, $16,440
The foregoing amounts under “ Capitol Police” shall be dis­
bursed by the Clerk of the House. (Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)

L E G IS L A T IV E

O FFIC E

OF TH E

LE G ISL A T IV E

BRANCH

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION— Continued

C O U N SE L

Salaries and Expenses, Senate, Legislative Counsel— Salaries and
Expenses, House of Representatives, Legislative Counsel—
For salaries and expenses of maintenance of the Office of the
Legislative Counsel, as authorized by law, including increased and
additional compensation as provided by law, [$205,000] $233,000,
of which [$105,000] $119,000 shall be disbursed by the Secretary
of the Senate and [$100,000] $114,000 by the Clerk of the House
of Representatives. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $205,000
Estimate 1953, $233,000

19

1951 actual
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_____
_ _________________________

Salaries and Contingent Expenses, Senate, Joint Committee on
Federal Expenditures—
[For an amount to enable the Joint Committee on Reduction of
Nonessential Federal Expenditures to carry out the duties imposed
upon it by section 601 of the Revenue Act of 1941 (55 Stat. 726),
to remain available during the existence of the committee, $20,000,
to be disbursed by the Secretary of the Senate.] (Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $20,000

$8,100
$132, 700
- 8 , 476

142,400

$143,200

Obligations incurred—...........................

124, 224

142,400

143,200

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

22
21

22
22

22
22

$4,807
GS-7.2

$5, 257
GS-7.2

$5,307
G S-7.2

$4,650
C P C -10.0

$5,190
C P C -10.0

$5,315
C P C -10.0

$116, 598

$133,100

$134,300

324
7,302

800
8,500

400
8,500

124, 224

142, 400

143,200

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$6, 959
124,224

$7.130
142,400

$8,800
143,200
152,000

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees.............
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____ ____________________
Average grade_________________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary___ ________ _____________
Average grade_________________________
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions________________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________ _ _________ __
Payment above basic r a t e s ...............
Obligations incurred____ _________

E D U C A T IO N OF SE N A T E A N D H O U SE P A G E S
Education of Senate, House, and Supreme Court Pages—
For education of congressional pages and pages of the Supreme
Court, pursuant to section 243 of the Legislative Reorganization
Act, 1946, [$29,850] $33,220, which amount shall be advanced and
credited to the applicable appropriation of the District of Colum­
bia, and the Board of Education of the District of Columbia is
hereby authorized to employ such personnel for the education of
pages as may be required and to pay compensation for such services
in accordance with such rates of compensation as the Board of
Education may prescribe. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $29,850
Estimate 1953, $33,220

S T A T E M E N T OF A P P R O P R IA T IO N S
Statement of Appropriations—
For the preparation, under the direction of the Committees on
Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives, of the
statements for the [first] second session of the Eighty-second Con­
gress, showing appropriations made, indefinite appropriations, and
contracts authorized, together with a chronological history of the
regular appropriation bills as required by law, $4,000, to be paid to
the persons designated by the chairmen of such committees to
supervise the work. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $4,000
Estimate 1953, $4,000

A R C H IT E C T O F T H E C A P IT O L
Office

of the

A rchitect

of the

Capitol

Salaries, Office of the Architect of the Capitol—
Salaries: For the Architect of the Capitol, Assistant Architect of
the Capitol, Chief Architectural and Engineering Assistant, and
other personal services at rates of pay provided by law; and the
Assistant Architect of the Capitol shall act as Architect of the
Capitol during the absence or disability of that official or whenever
there is no Architect, and, in case of the absence or disability of the
Assistant Architect, the Chief Architectural and Engineering Assist­
ant shall so act; [$134,300] $143,200. (31 U. S. C. 689; 40 U. S.
C. 161, 162, 162a, 164a, 166b; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $134,300
Estimate 1953, $143,200
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate............ .................

95 0 0 0 0 — 52--------2




$132, 700

1952 estimate
$134,300

1953 estimate

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

Object classification

[ J O I N T C O M M IT T E E O N R E D U C T IO N O F N O N E SSE N T IA L FE D E R A L E X P E N D IT U R E S ]

1952 estimate

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

131,183

149,530

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________________________________ ______

7,130

8,800

8,900

Total expenditures.................................

124,053

140, 730

143,100

117, 094
6,959

126,000
7,130

134,300
8,300

7,600

500

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.....................
Out of prior authorizations............... ..........
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay in c r e a s e s .,..................................

Appropriations under the control of the Architect of the Capitol
shall be available for expenses of travel on official business not to
exceed in the aggregate under all funds the sum of $3,000. (40
U. S. C. 166a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Capitol B uildings

and

Grounds

Capitol Buildings, Architect of the Capitol—
Capitol Buildings: For necessary expenditures for the Capitol
Building and electrical substations of the Senate and House Office
Buildings, under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol,
including minor improvements, [maintenace] maintenance, repair,
equipment, supplies, material, fuel, oil, waste, and appurtenances;
furnishings and office equipment; special and protective clothing
for workmen; personal and other services; cleaning and repairing
works of art; purchase or exchange, maintenance and operation of
passenger motor vehicle; not to exceed $300 for the purchase of
necessary reference books and periodicals; not to exceed $150 for
expenses of attendance, when specifically authorized by the Archi­
tect of the Capitol, at meetings or conventions in connection with
subjects related to work under the Architect of the Capitol;
[$741,332] $695,800. (40 U. S. C. 162, 163, 163a; Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $741,332
Estimate 1953, $695,800
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
$695,800

$606,500

$741,332

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_________________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_____ ______ __
Prior year balance available............. .............

24,664

39,000
19,036

$143, 200

Total available for obligation_______
Balance available in subsequent year.........

631,164
-1 9 ,0 3 6

799,368

695,800

TH E

20

BU DGET

FOR

and

YEAR

1953

obligations by

A R C H IT E C T O F T H E C A P IT O L — C ontinued
Capitol B uildings

F IS C A L

Grounds—Continued

Object classification

o bjects —

continued

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION----Continued

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$20,137
$20, 700
08 Supplies and m aterials.................. ...
4,920
09 Equipment: Annual______________ __ 1,000

Capitol Buildings, Architect of the Capitol—Continued

1951 actual

$22,000
1,000

1952 estimate

780,332

695,800

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$62,405
31
608,672

$59,139

$62,200

780,332

695,800

671,108

Obligations incurred.____ _________
1951 actual

608,672

839,471

758,000

59,139

62,200

57,500

611,969

777,271

700,500

552,006
59,963

681,332
59,139

638,300
60,000

36,800

2,200

1953 estimate
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Unobligated balance, estimated savings __
___ _ - _____
Carried to surplus___ .

—$3,456

Obligations incurred...........................

608,672

-$19,036
780,332

1951 actual
$695,800
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _.
Obligations incurred during the year.........

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary..................___.......... .......
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions..........................
Temporary positions............ ..............
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base- _________________________
Payment above basic rates................
02
03
04
C7

Total personal services___________
Travel__________
_ __ ____________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services______ _____ .
Other contractual services:
Painting, annual___________ _______
Elevator repairs, annual___________
Substation equipment and repairs. General annual repairs and altera­
tions_____________ ______________
Maintenance and repair, lighting
systems, grounds________________
Advertising__________________ ____
Maintenance, air conditioning sys­
tem:
Annual......... ....................- .......
Air filter systems for 8 dehumidi­
fiers ______ _ .............................
Renew steam supply line, House
wing, basement floor___________
Eliminate large skylights over Sen­
ate library and House document
room, and replace with reinforced
concrete fireproof roof, covered
with copper; provide adequate
lighting in areas affected-.. _ ___
Replace old Supreme Court section
of ro o f__________ _______________
Install copper flashing over north
and south walls of original Capitol
Building. ___ ___________ ____
Replace with hollow metal doors
the old wooden doors, ground
floor, Senate and House connect­
ing corridors__ _
- __ __ __
New kalamein doors,
House
kitchen__________________________
Repairs to marble stairway, Law
Library entrance___ ____________
Painting dome and central portion
Renew hot and cold water and sew­
er lines, old Library space
Modernization Members’ and em­
ployees’ barbershops__ _______ _
Replacement 4 revolving doors:
Law Library; House Document;
principal floors, House and Senate
Wings
___ _______ __
____
Pointing stonework—air intake
tow ers.__ __ _ _ ___ _ ________
Replace rain leader, old Library
space ___ __ _ _____________ ___
Repairs, works of art______________
Plumbing renewals
_ _ _
Improvements, House sergeant at
arms office _ ____________
Special roof repairs, Southeast sec­
tion of Dome
_ _ _ _______
Repairs to roof, west terrace
_Convert Law Library space for
committee and office use __ _ _
Renovating Senate Terrace Rooms
No. 2 and No. 6
Remodeling House Radio Gallery
to accommodate filming and tele­
casting
_____ _ ___
Increase output capacity, substa­
tion, Senate Office Building..........




1951 actual
146
143

1952 estimate
146
146

1953 estimate
146
146

$4,600
GS-7.5

$5,151
GS-7.8

$5,195
GS-7.8

$3,173
CPC-5.4
$2, 298

$3,523
CPC-5.4
$2,980

$3, 575
CPC-5.4
$2,980

$393, 826
9,805

$457,437
12,000

$465,655
12,000

1,223
61,787

2,800
62, 940

1,400
62, 645

466,641
23
2
9

535,177
100
25
20

542, 000
100
25
20

33,056
2,361
4,808

25.000
2,250
5,500

30.000
2,250
5.500

19,381

21.000

23.000

9,151

9,210
50
3,800

3.800

Total expenditures_______________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations______ __
Out of prior authorizations___________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases.____ - ____________

9,210
50

4,372

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year _ ____
_ ______ ______ _____

6,000
3,000

Capitol Grounds, Architect of the Capitol—
Capitol Grounds: For care and improvement of grounds sur­
rounding the Capitol, Senate and House Office Buildings; Capitol
Power Plant; personal and other services; care of trees; planting;
fertilizers; repairs to pavements, walks, and roadways; waterproof
T
wearing apparel; maintenance of signal lights; and for snow removal
by hire of men and equipment or under contract without compliance
with section 3709 of the Revised Statutes, as amended; [$220,6001
$250,400. (40 U. S. C. 162; 193a; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $220,600
Estimate 1953, $250,400
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1953 estimate

$220,600

$250,400

Appropriation or estimate___________ ___
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases __ __ _ _ ______________________

$216,000

Total available for obligation.. _ . . .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

216,000
-7,784

238, 700

250,400

208, 216

238,700

250,400

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred-.-____ ______

30.000

1952 estimate

18,100

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

5.500

Object classification

2.500

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees________

54
52

54
54

54
54

4.800

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary....... .................................
Average grade____ __________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary. ......................... ..............
Average grade.............................. ..........

$3, 077
GS-2.3

$3,447
GS-2.3

$3,459
GS-2.3

$2. 661
CPC-3.1

$2, 996
CPC-3.1

$3,063
CPC-3.1

$149, 754
6, 859

$172, 543
7,500

$175, 706
7, 500

567
22,198

1,092
23,965

554
24,040

Total personal services......... .........
02 Travel________ ___ __ _______________
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services......... ............ .
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs____________
Snow removal. _
_____ _
Maintenance signal lights________
Advertising
_
__
Repairs to streets, sidewalks, curb­
ing, and other paved areas______
08 Supplies and materials_______
09 Equipment:
Annual___
__________
Replacement, traffic signal control­
lers _____ ___ __ ___________

179,378

205,100
50
30
20

207,800
50
30
20

9,343
58
2,059

8,450
5,000
2,000
50

8,450
5,000
2,000
50

2,478
8,819

4,000
6,000

16,000
6,000

6,029

5,000

5,000

Obligations incurred___________

208, 216

1,300
3,745
55.000
25.000
8, 500

28.000
5.000
520
4,609
434
5,918
3,216
18,564
2,763
2,159
5,628

4.000
31,000

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Temporary positions______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.
_ . -------------------------------Payment above basic rates................

1951 actual

48
4

3,000
238, 700

250,400

L E G IS L A T IV E

21

BRANCH

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$11,994
208,216

$18, 701
238, 700

$18,000
250,400

Appropriation or estimate__ ______ _ . .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

220,210

257,401

268,400

Obligations incurred_______________

$18, 701

$18,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end ofyear___
Adjustments in obligations of prior
years
_
__ __ __
_______

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,600
-7 0

$2,600

$10,100

2 ,530

2 ,600

10,100

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$19,100

1951 actual

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
101

___

___

__

201,408

239,401

249,300

Object classification

189, 710
11,698

203, 600
18, 701

231,300
17,000

$1, 552

$1, 800

$1, 800

17,100

1,000

07 Other contractual services______ . .
Repairs and replacements, track
system_____________ ____________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipment
__________________________

363
615

350
450

7, 500
350
450

Obligations incurred____ ___________

2,530

2,600

10,100

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$500
2,530

$122
2, 600

$100
10,100

3,030

Total expenditures

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations- _ __
Out of prior authorizations. .
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases __ __ __ _ __ .

2, 722

10, 200

122

100

100

Legislative Garage, Architect of the Capitol—
Legislative garage: For maintenance, repairs, alterations, per­
sonal and other services, and all other necessary expenses, [$31,800]
$34,800. (40 U. S. C. 185a; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $31,800
Estimate 1953, $34,800

1951 actual

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1952 estimate

1951 actual

$31,800

1953 estimate
$34,800

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases

$31,800

Total available for obligation_ _ . .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

31,800
-443

34, 200

34,800

Obligations incurred_____________ _

31,357

34, 200

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustments in obligations of prior
years . _ ........... .

5

34, 800

2,400

OBLIGATIONS BT OBJECTS

Total expenditures____ _________ _.
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.
Out of prior authorizations. . . . .
. .

2,903

2,

622

10,100

2, 408
495

2,

500
122

10, 000
100

Senate Office Building, Architect of the Capitol—
Senate Office Building: For maintenance, miscellaneous items and
supplies, including furniture, furnishings, and equipment, and for
labor and material incident thereto, and repairs thereof; for purchase
of waterproof wearing apparel and for personal and other services;
including five female attendants in charge of ladies’ retiring rooms at
$1,800 each, for the care and operation of the Senate Office Building;
to be expended under the control and supervision of the Architect
of the Capitol; in all, [$733,572] $765,800. (40 U. S. C. 174c;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $733,572
Estimate 1953, $765,800

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

7
7

7
7

7
7

$2, 902
CPC-3.7

$3,204
CPC-3.7

$3,286
CPC-3.7

$20, 240

$22,365

$23,005

75
6, 770

160
7, 575

80
7, 615

Total personal services___________
07 Other contractual services.. ________
08 Supplies and materials____________ __
09 Equipment... _____ ______________ _

27, 085
2,879
1,064
329

30,100
2, 500
1,000
600

30, 700
2, 500
1,000
600

Appropriation or estimate_________ _ . .
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_________________ _ _______ __

$643, 900

Obligations incurred_______________

31,357

34,200

34, 800

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

643, 900
-3,150

788, 972

765, 800

Obligations incurred_______________

640, 750

788, 972

765, 800

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

204
202

205
205

205
205

$3, 778
GS-5.5

$4,199
GS-5.5

$4, 268
GS-5.5

$2, 800
CPC-3.8
$2,358

$3,157
CPC-3.8
$3, 047

$3,206
CPC-3.8
3, 047

$481, 665
13, 017

$561, 597
15, 000

$571, 825
15, 000

1,440
63,647

3,000
66,475

1,500
66,475

559,769
4
17

646,072

654,800

1,141
2,199
9,953
13,060

1,500
2,000
8,000
13,100

1,500
2,000
8,000
27,600

Object classification

1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees. •
Average salaries and grades:
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_________________
_
Average grade. _____________________
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions ____________ _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________________ ___________
Payment above basic rates___ _____

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,115
7
31,357

$1,973

$2,100

34,200

34, S00

33, 479

36,173

36,900

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_______________ ___________ ______

1,973

2,100

2,200

Total expenditures________________

31, 506

34,073

34, 700

29,384
2,122

29,800
1,973

32, 600
2, 000

2,300

100

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years__
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations.. . _____ __
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases____________ _________

Subway Transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings,
Architect of the Capitol—
Subway transportation, Capitol and Senate Office Buildings: For
maintenance, repairs, and rebuilding of the subway transportation
system connecting the Senate Office Building with the Capitol,
including personal and other services, [$2,600] $10,100. (36 Stat.
1443; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r ia t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 2 ,6 0 0




E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 1 0 ,1 0 0

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate
$733, 572 .

1953 estimate
$765, 800

55, 400

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary............ ....................... .
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary........... .........
Average grade____ ________________ _
Ungraded positions: Average salary
01 Personal services:
Pei manent positions_______________
Temporary positions______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base, __________ .
_ . _
Payment above basic rates___ _____
Total personal services_________
03 Transportation of things..................
04 Communication services...................
07 Other contractual services:
Elevator repairs _____________ ____
Furniture repairs _ ______________
General annual repairs_____________
Annual painting_____ ______________

1951 actual

* 4

2 2

TH E

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

A R C H IT E C T O F T H E C A P IT O L — Continued
C apitol B uildings

and

Grounds— Continued

Other contractual services—Con.
Laundry___ _______________________
I c e ............. ....... ...... ........................
Maintenance, air conditioning sys­
tem. _ ___________ ____________
Replace revolving door (Delaware
and Constitution Avenues)______
Structural and mechanical changes
and improvements, basement
floor_____________________________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipment:
Annual rugs and floor coverings
Annual machinery, tools and mis­
cellaneous.-. ____________ _______
File cabinets
- - _____ — __ ..
Fluorescent desk lamps____ ____—
Annual furniture and furnishings_ _.
Typewriter desks for offices______
Typist chairs for offices. _ ______ .
Re\olving arm chairs for offices.
Reception arm chairs for offices____
Folding chairs for Caucus Room
New refrigeration equipment for
drinking water system _ . . ___

1953 estimate

$5, 658
1,835

$6, 500
2,000

$6, 500
2,000

3,252

4,500

5,200

07

Obligations incurred___________

7,200

24,017

28,000
20,000

20,000

4, &
90

15,000

10,000

1,848
2,498
1.124
2,185

1,000
2, 500
1,000
2. 500
16. 200
1.350
3,650
2, 300
1,800

1,000
2, 500
1,000
2, 500
16.200
1.350
3,650

640.750

765.800

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$46.844
640,750

$49,806
788, 972

$55,200
765,800

687, 594

838,778

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.—
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

55,200

Total expenditures _______ ________

767, 500

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ __
Out of prior authorizations____ ________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases __________________

590, 944
46, 693

681, 572
49,806

712, 300
52,000

52,200

3,200

House Office Buildings, Architect of the Capitol—
House Office Buildings: For maintenance, including equipment,
waterproof wearing apparel, miscellaneous items, and for all neces­
sary services, [$961,564] $1,026,300. (40 U. S. C. 175: Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $961,564
Estimate 1953, $1,026,300
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate.. ______ _____
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_________________________________
Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—.
Obligations incurred________ _____

$899,300

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$961,564

$1,026,300

78.000
1,039, 564

1,026,300

1,039,564

1,026,300

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

361
351

361
361

361
361

$3, 743
GS-5.3

$4,185
GS-5.3

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___ __ _______________
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade. __ _______________ Ungraded positions: Average salary___
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Temporary positions ___________ .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base. ________________ ______
-Payment above basic rates________
Total personal services....................




1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$18
9

$25
10
10

$25
10
10

39, 081
4, 058

30.000
3,955

30, 000
3,955

4, 679
9, 518

7, 000
4, 000
8, 800

4, 000
8,800

7,731

8, 000

5,480

71,400

71, 400

11.000
6,000
7,148
32, 429

25, 000

25,000

1,000
1, 960

500
2, 000

500
2,000

13, 690
8, 548
5, 070
1,886

4, 000

2,301
2,482
885, 988

1,039, 564

1,026,300

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$59,160
885,988

$92,325
1, 039, 564

$85,000
1,026,300

945,148

1,131,889

1,111,300

92,325
686

85, 000

83, 000

852,137

1, 046,889

1, 028,300

793,693
58, 444

881, 564
92,325

943,300
80,000

73, 000

5, 000

$2, 855
CPC-3.9
$2,286

$3, 200
CPC-3.9
$2,855

$3, 238
CPC-3.9
$2, 855

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year. —_
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year—.
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Total expenditures________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases........... ..........................

Capitol Power Plant, Architect of the Capitol—
Capitol Power Plant: For lighting, heating, and power (including
the purchase of electrical energy [whenever such energy cannot be
supplied by the Capitol Power Plant and also as provided by the Act
of October 26, 1949 (Public Law 413, Eighty-first Congress)]), for
the Capitol, Senate and House Office Buildings, Supreme Court
Building, Congressional Library Buildings, and the grounds about
the same, Botanic Garden, legislative garage, and for air-condition­
ing refrigeration not supplied from plants in any of such buildings;
for heating the Government Printing Office and Washington City
Post Office [and for light and power therefor whenever available],
reimbursement for which shall be made and covered into the Treas­
ury; personal and other services, fuel, oil, materials, waterproof
wearing apparel, and all other necessary expenses in connection with
the maintenance and operation of the plant, [$1,267,600] $1,359,000.
(40 U. S. C. 185; 42 Stat. 767; 46 Stat. 51, 583; 50 Stat. 10; 52 Stat.
392; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,267,600
Estimate 1953, $1,359,000

$4, 270
GS-5.3

899,300
-13,312
885,988

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

continued

53,500

783, 578

Obligations incurred... .............

821,000

49,806
151
637,637

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

__
Travel_____
Transportation of things____________
Communication services___ ________
Other contractual services:
Painting, annual _ _____________
Elevator repairs. _ ________________
Modernization of freight-passenger
elevator _____ ._
___________
Air conditioning maintenance____
General annual repairs. ___ _____
Replacement
of
2
revolving
doors—old building. _ _ ________
Roof repairs and replacement, old
building— ___ . . _______________
Pointing balustrades, coping and
cornice on roof, old building;
pointing West Terrace, new
building____ ____________________
Pointing ledge, seventh floor bal­
cony, new building. ___________
Replacement of concrete landing
and waterproofing—main en­
trance approach—old building. __
08 Supplies and materials_______ ______
09 Equipment:
Special equipment____________ ____
Storage boxes.__ _____________ ____
New rostrum and other improve­
ments, Education and Labor
Committee, old building......... .
Desk lamps (fluorescent)__________
Floor scrubbing machines_________
Vacuum cleaners__________________
Public address system, Armed Serv­
ices Committee. ________ ____ __
Public address system, Banking
and Currency Committee_____

02
03.
04
07

1952 estimate

10. 000
788, 972

o bjects —

Object classification

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS— continued
1951 actual

1953

obligations by

Senate Office Building, Architect of the Capitol—Continued

Object classification

YEAR

1951 actual

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

$674, 564
2,622

$799,764
2, 500

$812, 300
2, 500

1, 855
59, 859

3,700
57, 900

738,900

863, 864

1, 900
57,900
874,600

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,267,600

$1,359,000

Appropriation or estimate___ __ _________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases- ____________ ____
___________

$1,316,500

Total available for obligation____ __
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

1,316,500
-33,617

1,303,000

1,359,000

1, 282,883

1,303,000

1,359,000

Obligations incurred_________ _____

35,400

L E G IS L A T IV E

BRANCH

obligations by o bjects —

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number nf all employees
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______ _______ ____ ___
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_____________ _________
..........................................
Average grade
01

1951 actual

1952 estimate

105
103

105
96

93
93

$4, 238
GS-6.0

$4,707
GS-6.1

$4,764
GS-6.1

$2, 241
CPC-5.7

$3, 606
CPC-5.7

$3,716
CPC-5.8

$359,150

$353, 980

Obligations incurred__________ ____

Object classification

1953 estimate

Personal services:
Permanent positions............ ........... .
$343,565
Part-time and temporary employ­
ment ............... ........... ......... _
15, 248
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
1,209
b a s e _________ __________________
________
Payment above basic rates 61, 745

Total personal services.............. .....
02 Travel__________ ___________________
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services__________
05 Rents and utility service:
Annual gas________________________
Navy Yard standby service_______
Electrical energy (60-cycle).......... .....
Electrical energy (25-cycle).......... .....
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs and altera­
tions_____________________________
Advertising________________________
08 Supplies and materials:
Miscellaneous annual supplies_____
Fuel.................................. ...................
Oil and w aste........ ... .......... ..........._
09 E quipment: Replace 3 pick-up trucks _

2 3

07

Other contractual services—Continued
New tunnel, steam lines, chilled
water lines, and related improve­
ments................. .......... .................
Electrical conversion, 25-cycle alter­
nating current and direct current
to 60-cycle alternating current___
Refrigeration plant changes and re­
lated improvements_____________
Engineering, administration and
contingencies....................................
Obligations incurred....................

continued

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$4, 723, 783

$250,000

547,986

1, 741,000

3,988,014

202

2,189,798

$3,290

15,031

50,000

50,000

1,471, 411

9,514, 679

4,288,014

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$580,002
1,471,411

$1,841,954
9,514,679

$7,924,117
4,288,014
12, 212,131

2,700
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
2,800
65,900
430, 550
100
10
10

27

415,600
100
10
10

200

421, 767

1,200
60,420

200

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

16,600
379, 000

22,000
466,000

66, 255
29

43,000
50

43, 000
50

14, 995
586,419
1,598
4,572

15,000
417,680
800

13, 500
398, 530

1,282,883

1,303,000

1,359,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

2,051,413

11,356,633

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_
_____________ ______ _________

1,841,954

7,924,117

4, 405, 426

Total expenditures--____ __________

76
7,694
15, 788
163, 663

209,459

3,432, 516

7,806, 705

3,432, 516

3, 500, 000
4,306, 705

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations to liqui­
date prior contract authorizations
Out of prior authorizations ....................... }

209,459

{

LIBRARY BUILDINGS AN GROUN
D
DS

$202,478
9,037
1,282,883

$194,798

$177,000

1,303,000

1,359,000

Library Buildings and Grounds, Architect of the Capitol, Structural
and Mechanical Care—
Structural and mechanical care: For the necessary expenditures
for mechanical and structural maintenance, including minor im­
provements, equipment, supplies, waterproof wearing apparel, and
personal and other services, [$320,0003 $584,000. (2 U. S. C. 141;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $320,000
Estimate 1953, $584,000

1,494,398

1,497,798

1, 536,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

194, 798

177,000

182,800

1,299,600

1,320, 798

1,353,200

1,088,085
211,515

1, 092,600
194, 798

1,176,200
175,000

33,400

2,000

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Obligations incurred during the year........
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year __________ __ __________________
Total expenditures______ _______
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations-.-______
Out of prior authorizations_____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases __
_ _______________

1951 actual

Changes and Improvements, Capitol Power Plant, Architect of the
Capitol—
Changes and improvements, Capitol Power Plant: Toward carry­
ing out the changes and improvements authorized by the Act of
October 26, 1949 (Public Law 413, Eighty-first Congress),
[$3,000,000] $8,500,000, to be expended by the Architect of the
Capitol under the direction of the House Office Building Commis­
sion. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $3,000,000
Estimate 1953, $3,500,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate ______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
___________________________

$320,000

$584,000

Total available for obligation______
Comparative transfer from—
“ Library buildings and grounds, Archi­
tect of the Capitol,” salaries_________
“ Library buildings and grounds, Archi­
tect of the Capitol,” salaries, Sunday
opening________ ___________ _________
“ Library buildings and grounds, Archi­
tect of the Capitol,” repairs and
maintenance_________________________

336, 700

584,000

336, 700

584,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

56
55

56
56

56
56

$2,890
GS-3.0

$3,230
GS-3.0

$3,310
GS-3.0

$3, 231
CPC-5.8

$3,629
CPC-5.8

$3,667
CPC-5.8

$176,539

$201,810

$204,300

652

1,390

700

Total obligations__________________

16,700

$205, 633
11, 568
73, 236
290,437

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1951 actual

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate-------- --------------Applied to contract authorization________
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation
________ - Contract authorization__________ ______

$4,000,000
-4,000,000

$3,000,000
-3,000,000

$3, 500, 000
-3,500,000

368,678
15,496,000

2,897, 267
11,496,000

4,878, 588

Total available for obligation---------Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation
Contract authorization________________

15,864,678

14,393,267

4,878, 588

-2,897,267
-11,496,000

-4,878, 588

-590, 574

Obligations incurred........... ............. .

1,471,411

9, 514,679

4, 288,014

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
07

Other contractual services:
Boiler plant changes and related
improvements...................................




1951 actual

$904,902

1952 estimate

$810,098

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions-----Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates (includ­
ing Sunday opening pay)________
Total personal services_________
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs......................
Maintenance and repairs, air con­
ditioning and refrigeration sys­
tems_______ ____ _________________
Maintenance and repairs, elevators.
Annual painting_______________ _
Acoustical tile ceilings (both build­
ings)....................................................

39,990

45,400

45,400

217,201

248,600

250,400

10,291

10,500

11,500

4,213
3,687
12, 754

4,000
4,000
13,000

4,000
4,000
13,000

7,386

8,100

8,100

TH E

2 4

BU DGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

C N O ID T D A A Y IS O E P N IT R S Continued
O S L AE NL S F X E D U E —

A R C H IT E C T OF T H E C A P IT O L — C ontinued
library buildings and grounds— continued

1951 actual

Library Buildings and Grounds, Architect of the Capitol, Structural
and Mechanical Care— Continued

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

o b je ct s —

Object classification
Other contractual services—Continued
Equipping part of bookstacks with
map cases, annex________________
Finishing one deck for book-shelv­
ing, and equipping H deck, annex.
Installation of pneumatic tubes for
main reading room, main build­
ing______________________________
Move Prints and Photographs Di­
vision to annex__ __ _______ ____
Renovating present maps area,
main building___________________
Air filters for northeast bookstack,
main building........ ..........................
Installation of floor tile in pages’
school, main building____ ________
Tile flooring for cafeteria___________
Automatic sprinkler system, cellar,
main building___________________
Replace storage batteries operating
fire alarm and watch systems,
annex._ __
_______ __________
Vault in Shrine to hold leaves of
Constitution which cannot be
exhibited, main building____ __ _
Extension of locked bookstack
ranges, Music Division, main
building ___________ - ________
3 exhibit cases in corridor window
space, basement, main building
Replacement, repairs, and altera­
tions to refrigeration equipment,
main building________ ________
Alterations to provide additional
storage space in unfinished area,
annex_____ _____________________
Replace insulation on pneumatic
tubes in annex______________ ____
08 Supplies and materials
______________
09 Equipment:
Automatic ice machine____________
Fire extinguishers_________________
10 Lands and structures:
Annual care of grounds____________
Repairs to paving and coping______

continued

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

07

Total obligations________________

$20,005

$20,000

$20,000
112,350
20,000
10,000
10,000
3.000
3.000
1,200
25.000
1,100
5.000
2,500
1, 500

$77,000

$130,000

334,376

385, 554

682,300

286, 271
48,105

294,000
75,854

605,300
76,000

15, 700

1,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations____ _____ Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases______________ ____

Completion of Rotunda Frieze, Capitol Building, Architect of the
Capitol—
[Completion of rotunda frieze, Capitol Building: For carrying into
effect the provisions of Public Law 703, Eighty-first Congress, ap­
proved August 17, 1950, entitled “ Joint resolution to provide for
the utilization of the unfinished portion of the historical frieze in
the rotunda of the Capitol to portray (1) the Civil War, (2) the
Spanish-American War, and (3) the birth of aviation in the United
States” , $20,000, to be expended by the Architect of the Capitol, as
contracting and executive officer, under the direction, advice and
approval of the Joint Committee on the Library.] (.Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $20,000
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
Appropriation or estimate—1952, $20,000.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
07 Other contractual services—1952, $20,000.

45.000
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
18.000
10,000
13, 500

12,950

1951 actual

750
1,000

1,000
4,000

1,100

290,437

336,700

584,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions_______________________ ______ ___

20,000

Senate Restaurants, Senate Office Building, Architect of the
Capitol—
[Senate Restaurants: For repairs, improvements, furnishings,
equipment, labor and materials, and all necessary incidental expen­
ses, to provide additional restaurant facilities in the Senate Office
Building, to be expended by the Architect of the Capitol under the
supervision of the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration,
without regard to section 3709 of the Revised Statutes, as amended,
$18,500.] (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $18,500
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$72,000
-441

$50,000

$151,300

Obligations incurred_______________

71,559

50,000

151,300

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
1951 actual

1953 estimate

$20,000

Obligations incurred during the year . . .

950

1951 actual

1952 estimate

13, 500

Library Buildings and Grounds, Architect of the Capitol, Furniture
and Furnishings—
Furniture and furnishings: For furniture, partitions, screens,
shelving, and electrical work pertaining thereto and repairs thereof,
office and library equipment, apparatus, and labor-saving devices,
[$50,000] $151,300. (2 U. S. C. 141; Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $50,000
Estimate 1953, $151,300

Object classification

$75,854
1,187

Total expenditures---------- ---------------

obligations by

Deduct:
' Unliquidated obligations, end of year.-Adjustment in obligations of prior years-

Appropriation or estimate___ ___________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.._
Obligations incurred_______________

1952 estimate

$30,000
-9 7

$18,500

29,903

1953 estimate

18,500

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$6,657

$7,500

$7,500

07 Other contractual services___________
09 Equipment:
Annual office furniture, equipment
and office machines______________
Typewriter replacements__________
Furniture for new employees______
Movable partitions
________________
Special furniture and equipment___

17,830
10,019

16,000
10,000

8,072
28,981

10,000
6, 500

20,000
10,000
11, 500
10,000
92,300

Obligations incurred--------------------

71,559

50,000

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

151,300

07 Other contractual services.....................
09 Equipment__________ ________ ___
Obligations incurred..................... .

$11,095
18,808

$3,000
15,500

29,903

18,500

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

C N O ID T D A A Y IS O E P N IT R S
O S L AE NL S F X E D U E

$75,854
386,700

$77,000
735,300

411,417

462,554

812,300




$28,627
18,500
47,127

1953 estimate

$49,421
361,996

$29,903
29,903

1952 estimate

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year....... .

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year
_____

1952 estimate

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ ____ _________________________

28,627

Total expenditures..............................

1, 276

47,127

1953 estimate

L E G IS L A T IV E

a n a l y s is

of expenditures —

continued

1951 actual
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations.......... ............

BRANCH

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION----Continued

1952 estimate

$1,276

2 5

1953 estimate

1951 actual
Comparative transfer to “ Library build­
ings and grounds, Architect of the Capi­
tol, structural and mechanical care” ___

$18,500
28,627

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

-$73,236

Total obligations______________ ____

Miscellaneous
Acquisition of Site, Construction, and Equipment, Additional Senate
Office Building—

Salaries:
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation _................................ ..........
Contract authorization____ ___________
Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation_________ ____ ___________
Contract authorization........ ._ .......... .......

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$88, 508
19, 708,636
19, 797,144

$88, 508
19, 708,636
19, 797,144

$88, 508
19, 708, 636
19,797,144

—88, 508
-1 9 , 708, 636

-8 8 , 508
-19,708,636

-8 8 , 508
-1 9 , 708,636

Obligations incurred_________ ____ _

$215,300
-9,6 6 7

Obligations incurred____ ____ _____
Comparative transfer to “ Library build­
ings and grounds, Architect of the Capi­
tol, structural and mechanical care” -----

1953 estimate

205,633
-205,633

Total obligations_________________

Salaries, Sunday opening:

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

1952 estimate

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$348,021

$287,760

$307,938 '
41,364
349,302

348,021

287.760

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________ ________________________
Total expenditures_________________

348,021
1,281

287, 760
60,261

287.760

Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

1,281

60, 261

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate _____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings

$14,700
-3 ,1 3 2

Obligations incurred -------------------Comparative transfer to “ Library build­
ings and grounds, Architect of the Capi­
tol, structural and mechanical care” -----

1953 estimate

11,568
-11,568

Total obligations - _______________

Capitol Building, Senate and House Roofs and Chambers—

Repairs, Improvements and Equipment, Senate Restaurant, Senate
Office Building—

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
1952 estimate

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate____ __________
Applied to contract authorization_______
Contract authorization______ ____________
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation________________________
Contract authorization________________

$268,000
-268,000
168,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year ___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..

243,066
100,000

$40, 564

511,066

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year:
Appropriation_________________________

-4 0 , 564

Obligations incurred............................

470,502

Total expenditures_______________
Expenditures out of prior authorizations .

40,564

$689
1
690
690

Replacement of Equipment, Senate Restaurant, Capitol Building—
40, 564

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
07

1953 estimate

1951 actual

Other contractual services (reconstruction of roofs and skylights over Senate and
House wings and remodeling Senate and House Chambers, Capitol Building)—
1951, $470,502; 1952, $40,564.

Appropriation or estimate _________ _____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings- —

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$4,000
-456

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
______

Obligations incurred
1951 actual

1952 estimate

3,544

1953 estimate
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year—.
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Total expenditures
__
_ _ w
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations: Out of
appropriations to liquidate prior-year
contract authorizations
}
Out of prior authorizations.................... —

$1,491,359
470, 502

09 Equipment—1951, $3,544.

$166,042
40,564

1,961,861

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year--------

206,606

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

166,042
35,371

1952 estimate

1951 actual
206,606

1, 760,448

Unliquidated obligations, start of year __
Obligations incurred during the year

$3, 542
$3, 544
3,544

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year............... ................... ......................... .
Total expenditures _ ____________

Library Buildings and Grounds, Architect of the Capitol—
Repairs and maintenance:

3, 542

3, 542

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations
Out of prior authorizations
. -

r............. ..........
1, 760,448 \
206,606

1953 estimate

2

2

3, 542
*
3, 542

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate
Unobligated balance, estimated savings
Obligations incurred............. ..............




$74,100
-864
73,236

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

B O T A N IC

GARDEN

Salaries and Expenses, Botanic Garden—
Salaries and expenses: For all necessary expenses incident to
maintaining, operating, repairing, and improving the Botanic Gar­
den and the nurseries, buildings, grounds, collections, and equip-

TH E

2 6

BU DGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

B O T A N IC G A R D E N — Continued

LIB R A R Y O F C O N G R E S S

Salaries and Expenses, Botanic Garden—Continued
ment pertaining thereto, including personal services (including not
to exceed $3,000 for temporary labor without regard to the Classi­
fication Act of 1949); waterproof wearing apparel; not to exceed $25
for emergency medical supplies; traveling expenses including street­
car fares, not to exceed $275; the prevention and eradication of
insect and other pests and plant diseases by purchase of materials
and procurement of personal services by contract without regard to
the provisions of any other Act; purchase and exchange of motor­
trucks; purchase and exchange, maintenance, repair, and operation
of a passenger motor vehicle; purchase of botanical books, periodi­
cals, and books of reference, not to exceed $100; [an d] repairs and
improvements to Director’s residence; and demolition and removal
of small conservatory and adjoining structure from Reservation 6-B,
bounded by Canal Street and Independence Avenue and Second Street;
all under the direction of the Joint Committee on the Library;
[$199,500] $218,500: Provided, That no part of this appropriation
shall be used for the distribution, by congressional allotment, of
trees, plants, shrubs, or other nursery stock. (40 U. S. C. 216;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $199,500
Estimate 1953, $218,500

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

$218,500

Appropriation or estimate------- ---------------Proposed supplemental due to pay increases_________________________________

$196,500

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.._

196.500
-2.893

214,200

218, 500

193,607

214,200

218, 500

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

48
45

48
47

48
47

$3,157
G S-3.0

$3.484
G S-3.0

$3,516
G S-3.0

$2.743
CPC-3.8

$3,134
CPC-3.8

$3,206
CPC-3.8

$134,059
2, 564

$156, 710
3,000

$159, 510
3, 000

495
21,321

1,060
22, 530

530
22, 560

Total personal services.................. .
Travel______________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services____________
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs_____________
Laundry__________________________
08 Supplies and materials_ ____________
_
09 Equipment (includes plant material).
10 Lands and structures:
Annual- __________________________
Demolition and removal of small
conservatory and adjoining struc­
ture from Reservation 6-B,
bounded by Canal St. and Inde­
pendence Ave. and 2d St________

158,439
105
82
136

183,300
150
50
100
200

185, 600
150
50
100
200

5,507
75
10,988
18,275

5,200
100
9,600
15,400

5,200
100
9,600
15, 400

100

100

Obligations incurred....... ............

193,607

214,200

218,500

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$16,206

$13,600

214,200
230,406

218,500
232,100

Obligations incurred______ ________

14,700

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions........
Average number of all employees..........
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________________ ____ _
Average grade................................ ........
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary.........................................
Average grade......................... ................
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions...........................
Part-time and temporary positions .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base............................. ............ ..........
Payment above basic rates................
02
03
04
05
07

1951 actual

2,000

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$9,515
68
193,607
203,190

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year.............................................................
Total expenditures________ _____
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations___ _________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases_________ __________




1951 actual

1953 estimate

$199, 500

T h e L ibrary o f Congress, established b y an act o f C on ­
gress approved A pril 24, 1800, is n ot on ly the library o f the
Congress itself, b u t is also the general library o f the G o v ­
ernm ent o f the U nited States, com plem ented in special
fields b y other G overn m en t libraries. Its collections are
com prehensive and varied, and include im portan t m anu­
scripts, m aps, m usic, prints, photographs, newspapers,
docum ents o f all governm ents o f the w orld, oriental litera­
ture, etc. In addition to housing the collections and per­
form ing general and basic services con n ected therewith,
certain specialized functions are perform ed: the Legisla­
tive R eference Service, copyrigh t, catalog card distribu­
tion, and the service o f books in raised characters and
talking books to the adult blind. In terms o f these broad
fields o f a ctiv ity com parative obligations (including on ly
those chargeable to annual appropriations) for 1951 and
estim ated for 1952 and 1953 are:

16,206

13, 600
216,806
186,800
16,206

204,600
12,700

13,800

900

$916,408
1,330,543
1,160,599
697,015

$1,024,673
1,464,461
1, 290,155
786, 485

$1, 257, 201
1,758,146
1, 646, 211
837, 572

602,339

651,891

725,048

852,444
926,959
1,101, 929
998,902

887,126
1, 040, 880
1,172, 676
1,000, 000

979. 526
1,087,040
1,436, 838
1,000,000

8, 587,138

9, 318, 347

10, 727, 582

T h e L ibrary’s first obligation is to Congress; the second
to other agencies of the G overn m en t; and the third to
other libraries, scholars, investigators, and the general
public.
In addition to funds appropriated annually b y Congress,
there are also available a num ber of gift and trust funds,
working, transferred, and allocated funds.
Certain responsibilities for the physical equipm ent,
maintenance, and operation of the L ibrary buildings rest
b y law with the A rch itect of the Capitol, and estimates for
these purposes are carried under the request of that office.
F o r the general and basic services, the m a jor ob jective
in 1953 will b e to enable the Library to acquire, process,
and give reference service on the m uch greater volum e and
variety of materials it m ust collect in order to m eet the
vastly enlarged inform ational needs of the Congress and
Federal agencies under present w orld con dition s; to
strengthen the staff p rovidin g reference service on the
areas that h ave becom e critical in the present em ergency;
to m eet the increased service dem and resulting from the
creation of m any new agencies; and to gradually reduce
accum ulated arrearages that preven t full use of materials
already on hand. Som e additions to the staff are proposed
fo r a few operations which are threatened w ith a serious
breakdow n. N o new p rojects are proposed. F o r the
specialized services, the objectives in 1953 will b e the
strengthening of the staff, organization, and techniques to
m eet the dem ands o f Congress (Legislative R eference
Service) and o f the p u b lic (copyright, catalog card dis­
tribution, and the service of books fo r the adult b lin d ).

218,200

177,401
9,583

Total obligations..................................

1953 estimate

13,900

186,984

General and basic services:
Acquisitions________________ _____ ____
Organization of the collections.................
Reader and reference services...... ............
Maintenance and protective services___
Executive direction and general admin­
istrative services..._____ ____________
Specialized services:
Legislative Reference Service..................
Copyright______ __ __________________
Catalog-card distribution service.............
Books for the adult blind.........................

1952 estimate

Salaries, Library Proper, Library of Congress—
Salaries, Library proper: For the Librarian, the Librarian Emeri­
tus, and other personal services including special and temporary
services and extra special services of regular employees (not exceed­
ing $5,000) at rates to be fixed by the Librarian, services as author­

L E G IS L A T IV E

ized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), and
personal services for printing and binding, [$3,124,204] $4,147,930,
of which so much as may be necessary may be transferred to other
agencies of the Government for the purpose of investigating the
loyalty of Library employees, and for health service program as
authorized by law. (2 U. S. C. 131-166; 5 U. S. C. 150; 20 U. S. C.
91; 52 Stat. 808; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $3,124,204
Estimate 1953, $4,147,930
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

2.
Organization o j the collections.— L ibrary materials are
cataloged, classified, m arked, and arranged; L ibrary o f
Congress catalogs m aintained; and binding operations
controlled. T h e ob jectives for this a ctivity in 1953 are:
im provem en t o f the cataloging o f scientific publications
and the cataloging o f additional foreign language publica­
tions.
Selected perform ance data for 1951 and estim ated for
1952 and 1953 are as follow s:

1953 estimate

$3,124,204

2 7

BRANCH

$4,147,930

1951 actual

Description
Appropriation or estimate_________________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in-

$3,044,000

293,010
Reimbursements from other accounts___

14,129

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

3,058,129
-1 ,2 5 9

3,417,214

4,147,930

Obligations incurred...............................

3,056,870

3,417,214

4,147,930

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$615,099
1,025,164
1,264,369

$750,978
1,251, 624
1, 586,371

Direct Obligations
1.
2.
3.
4.

Acquisition of library materials________
Organization of the collections............. —
Reader and reference services---------------Executive direction and general admin­
istrative services----------------------------------

$547,693
912,822
1,125,815
456,411

512, 582

558,957

Total direct obligations_____________

3,042, 741

3,417, 214

4,147,930

3,417,214

4,147,930

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts
3. Reader and reference services---------------4. Executive direction and general admin­
istrative services
- - Total reimbursable obligations

_

Obligations incurred________________

1953 estimate

121,160

130.000

140.000

13,412
1,281,070
56,860
144,477

18,000
1,300,000
60,000
145.000

25.000
1,300,000
65.000
145.000

N ote .— These figures are for the Processing Department only and do not reflect cata­
loging, filing, binding, and related processing operations performed by other departments
of the Library.

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description

Volumes fully cataloged and added to the
classified collection _ _________________
_
Items otherwise organized for use (with­
out full cataloging) _____________________
Cards filed in catalogs_____________________
Volumes sent to bindery_____________ _____
Items repaired, cleaned, mounted, etc____

1952 estimate

11,868
2,261
14,129
3,056,870

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

3.
Reader and reference service.— B ook s and other library
materials are provid ed w ithin and w ith ou t the L ibrary
and reference assistance rendered. T h e objectives of this
activity for 1953 are: m ore adequate service to readers
during the 52 hours of full service and the 26 hours of
lim ited service, the expansion o f the area and language
specialization program in regions o f critical im portance,
and to strengthen basic departm ental operations such as
the shelving of incom ing m aterials, cataloging of n o n b ook
materials (maps, prints, photograp h s), the selection and
preparation of materials fo r binding, and the interpreta­
tion o f the collections through the preparation of b ib liog ­
raphies and check lists. T h e upw ard trend in w orkload
is expected to continue in 1952 and 1953.
Description

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Personal services required for the basic operations o f
Books and pamphlets served _________ __
1,482,866
1,500,000
1,600,000
Other units of material served____________
675.000
650.000
610,653
the L ibrary are financed from this appropriation.
Units issued on l o a n _________ ___________
226,059
245.000
265.000
1.
A cquisition o f Library materials.— Th e developm ent Reference inquiries answered (includes
telephone requests for reference service
o f the collections o f the L ibrary is planned; materials are
and loans, aid to readers, and reference
645,000
correspondence)__________ __ ___________
615,407
630.000
procured b y purchase, gift, exchange, copyrigh t deposit,
28,890
32,000
Reference letters___________________________
30,000
transfer, or otherw ise; and materials are selected for addi­
tion to the collections. T h e ob jectives for 1953 are:
greater selectivity and im proved efficiency in the procure­
4.
Executive direction and general administrative serv­
m ent o f materials, w ith emphasis on the publications o f the
ices.— O ver-all executive direction is given and general
Far E ast, N ear E ast, South Asia, and Eastern E u rop e;
adm inistrative services are p rovided for the entire staff
im provem en t in recording the receipt and holdings o f
o f the L ibrary. Positions under this a ctivity represented
serial p ublications; and the strengthening o f exchange re­
7.2 percent of the total num ber o f positions (inclusive o f
lations w ith institutions in critical areas. T h e collections
the full-tim e equivalent o f part-tim e and tem porary posi­
totaled 29,317,852 items as o f June 30, 1951, and con ­
tions) financed b y appropriated funds during 1951; esti­
sisted o f 9,241,765 b ook s and pam phlets; 12,163,121 m an­ m ated for 1952 and 1953, they will represent 7.15 percent
uscript pieces; and 7,912,966 m aps, pieces o f m usic, reels
and 6.56 percent respectively. E m phasis during 1953
o f m icrofilm , photographs, and the other m iscellaneous
will be placed on increased m echanization, im provem ents
items. A continued increase in receipts from various
in procedures, better utilization o f space, and form s control.
sources is anticipated in 1952 and 1953:
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Description
Purchase___________________________________
Copyright - _______________________________
Transfer and deposit (principally from
Government agencies)----------------------------Gift from individual and unofficial sources.
E xchan ge__________________________________
Source unidentified (mainly newspaper
and periodical issues)....................................
Total

.........- ............................... .............

1951 actual
$313,302
356,988

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$350,000
374.000

$400,000
390.000

1,208,410
315,936
676,681

2,000,000
500.000
700.000

2,000,000
500.000
725.000

2,274,059

2,500,000

2,500,000

5,145,376

6,424,000

6,515,000

O f the pieces received a bou t 1% m illion items are added
to the collections annually.




Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

748

755
1
745

995
3
937

$4, 077
GS-6.1

$4, 545
GS-6.3

$4,388
G S-6.0

$2,574
C P C -3.2
$15, 000
$14,000
$7,720

$2, 865
C P C -3.2
$15,000
$14,000
$8,490

$2,895
C P C -3 .2
$15,000
$14,000
$8,490

Summary of Personal Services
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees...............
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.............................................
Average grade................................ .............
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary.............................................
Average grade____ ____________________
Act of Oct. 15,1949 (2 U . S. C . 136a note).
Act of Oct. 15,1949 (2 U . B. C . 136a note).
A ct of June 20, 1938 (52^Stat. &08).............

755

TH E

2 8

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

L IB R A R Y O F C O N G R E S S — C ontinued
Salaries, Library Proper, Libraryof Congress—Continued
o bligations by

o bject s —

Object classification

continued

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 726
WB-8.1

$3, 007
WB-8.6

$2, 685
WB-6.6

$3,021, 879

$3,360,486

$4,081,710

428

5,000
13,178

5,000
5, 900
16, 770

20, 501

22, 550

22, 550

3,042, 808

3,401, 214

4,131,930

Sum m ary of Personal Services —Con.

Average salaries and grades—Continued
Lithographic wage board:
Average salary___._ _ __ _ .................
Average grade._ --------------------------------Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions____ ____________
Part-time and temporary positions:
At rates established by Librarian
Other temporary_____ __ _ ________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base
Payment above basic rates (overtime,
holiday, night differential)____ _____
Total personal service obligations.
Direct Obligations

01 Personal services______________ ______
07 Other contractual services___________
Services performed by other agencies..

3,028,679
9,913
4,149

3,401, 214
10, 000
6,000

4,131, 930
10, 000
6,000

Total direct obligations_____ _____

3,042, 741

3,417, 214

4,147,930

Obligations Payable Out o f Peimbursements
From Other A ccounts

01 Personal services____________________
Obligations incurred_______________

3, 056, 870

3,417,214

Total expenditures________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases____ ____________________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$138,672
3,056,870

$179,238
3,417,214

$201,442
4,147,930

3,195, 542
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations.. ___________
Unliquidated obligations, end of y ear...

3, 596,452

4,349,372

14,129
179, 238

201,442

225, 942

3,002,175

3,395, 010

4,123,430

2,863, 503
138, 672

2, 940,762
179,238

3, 921, 988
183, 442

275,010

18,000

COPYRIGHT OFFICE
Salaries, Copyright Office, Library of Congress—
Salaries: For the Register of Copyrights and other personal serv­
ices, including personal services for printing and binding, [$914,510]
$1,04^,540. (2 U. S. C. 131, 186, 139, 140, 150; 17 U. S. C. 1-65;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $914,510
Estimate 1953, $1,042,540
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

Income:
Fees applied._______________ ________
Estimated value of materials deposited .
Total_______ ______________________
Costs:
Salaries............................. ...........................
Printing and binding catalog of title
entries._____________________________
Other costs____________________________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$914,510

$1,042,540

Description
Registrations___________ ______________
Mail received and dispatched....................

$837,856
619,904

$879, 748
650,875

1, 388, 357

1,457, 760

1, 530,623

889,007

1,001,380

1,042, 540

37,952
31,380

39, 500
24, 900

44, 500
27,950

958, 339

1, 065, 780

1,114,990

1951 actual
200,354
474,741

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

210,300
498, 500

220,800
523, 500

2.
E xam ining copyright applications.— A ll applications
and deposits are examined before issuance of registration
certificates or recording o f docum ents to determ ine
whether the provisions o f the C opyrigh t A ct have been
satisfied. Perform ance data for 1951 and estimates for
1952 and 1953 are as follow s:

$890,000

Total available for obligation _ _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

890,000
-993

1,001,380

1,042, 540

Description

Obligations incurred_______________

889,007

1,001,380

1,042,540

Items examined for registration..................
Registrations___________ . _
Examination and recordation of docu­
ments.......... ................................................

86,870

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

264, 525
200,354

277,750
210,370

291,600
221,000

7,604

8,000

8,400

1953 estimate

1. Receiving and accounting for applica­
tions, fees, and correspondence____ __
2. Examining copyright applications_____
3. Indexing and cataloging all materials...
4. Reference service______________________
5. General supervision and legal services..

$161,362
181,050
363, 584
61,005
122,006

$172,700
219,119
417,944
69,845
121,772

$180,316
230,312
435,139
73,476
123,297

Obligations incurred.................... .......

889,007

1,001,380

1,042,540




$797,959
590,398

T h e ob jective for 1953 is to keep current w ith the w ork ­
load at all times, and to render p rom p t and efficient serv­
ice to the public. T h e program and perform ance under
each of the activities described are predicated on an esti­
m ated 220,800 copyright registrations during 1953, an
estim ated 210,300 during 1952, and an actual 200,354 dur­
ing 1951. T h e basis for the estim ated increase betw een
1951 and 1953 is an anticipated increase o f 5 percent in
registrations for each year.
1.
Receiving and accounting j o r applications, etc.— All
materials m ailed or delivered to the C opyrigh t Office are
received, assembled, and rou ted ; accounts m aintained
for all m onies re ce iv e d ; records relating to the registration
o f copyrights file d ; and materials deposited in accordance
w ith the C opyrigh t A ct. Perform ance data for 1951 and
estim ates for 1952 and 1953 are as follow s:

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases... ______________ _____________

Description

1953 estimate

4,147,930

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1951 actual

Total.....................................................

14,129

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

T h e C opyrigh t Office is responsible for recording and
cataloging all copyrigh t applications, assignments, and
renewals; supplying copyrigh t inform ation to the public;
and for collecting and accounting for copyright fees. Th e
office is con du cted as a business operation. T h e am ount
requested for personal services is approxim ately equal to
the fees received for services rendered. In addition, the
value of books and other library m aterials deposited in
accordance w ith the C opyrigh t A ct and transferred to the
L ibrary of Congress are also to be credited to the copyrigh t
operation. T h e incom e and costs for 1951 and estimates
for 1952 and 1953 are as follows:

3.
Indexing and cataloging all materials received.— T h e
K egister o f C opyrights is required to print com plete and
indexed catalogs o f all item s registered. In the interest
o f over-all econ om y and the elim ination o f overlapping
activities, the C opyrigh t Office also prepares full catalog
entries in accordance w ith L ibrary o f Congress cataloging
rules on abou t 10-20 percent o f the item s registered.

L E G IS L A T IV E

Library of Congress. (2 U. S. C. 181, 186, 189, 150, 164&, 166;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $800,000
Estimate 1953, $964,026

P erform ance data for 1951 and estim ates for 1952 and
1953 are as follow s:
Description

1951 actual

Registrations cataloged__________________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

210,370

2 9

BRAN CH

221,000

200,354

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

4.
Reference services.— T h e C opyrigh t Office makes
available to the public, on a fee basis, inform ation con ­
cerning copyright registrations, the provisions o f the
C opyrigh t A ct, including procedures, policies, and rulings.
O btaining com pliance w ith registration requirem ents is
also part of this a ctivity. Perform ance data for 1951
and estimates for 1952 and 1953 are as follow s:
1951 actual

1952 estimate

43,200
17,500

$800,000

$964,026

$790,000

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

824,837
-378

873,000

964,026

Obligations incurred_______________

824,459

873,000

964,026

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$185,829
399,565

$205,060
452,413

$226,441
499,594

73,000
34,837

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
1951 actual

1953 estimate

41,100
16,600

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate-----------------------Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
__
___________
Reimbursements from other accounts___

Description
Description

1952 estimate

Direct Obligations

Titles searched_____ _____________________
Letters and search reports written_______

39,138
15, 780

5.
General supervision and legal services.— T h e w ork
the C opyright Office is supervised and coord in ated; this
includes legal services relating to the status and im prove­
m ent o f cop yrigh t law in its foreign as well as dom estic
aspects, such im provem ent con stituting the m a jor o b je c ­
tive under this a ctiv ity in 1953.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions .
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade _ __________ __________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade____________________
Wage board:
Average salary. . . _____ _______________
Average grade.____ __________________

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

239
238

249
245

$4, 219
GS-5.6

$4,262
GS-5.6

$2,169
CPC-2.0

$2,420
CPC-2.0

$2,490
CPC-2.0

$2, 725
W B-8.5

$3, 255
W B-9.5

$3, 255
W B-9.5

01 Personal services_____________________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base ____________________________

$889, 007

$997,505

$1,038,452

Obligations incurred....................

889,007

3,875

4, 088

1,001,380

1,042, 540

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$48, 550
889,007

$53,235
1,001,380

$51,000
1,042, 540

937, 557

1, U 615
54,

1,093, 540

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________

53,235

51,000

52,100

Total expenditures..............................

884,322

1,003,615

1,041,440

835, 773
48, 549

868, 700
49, 500

990, 440
49, 545

85,415

1,455

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations........ .........
Out of prior authorizations_____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases_______________________

LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE SERVICE
Salaries and Expenses, Legislative Reference Service, Library of
Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary personal services to enable
the Librarian to carry out the provisions of section 203 of the Legis­
lative Reorganization Act of 1946, including not to exceed $20,000
for employees engaged by the day or hour at rates to be fixed by
the Librarian; services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of
August 2, 1946 (5 T S. C. 55a); printing and binding; and supplies
J.
and materials; [$800,000] $964,026: Provided, That no part of
this appropriation may be used to pay any salary or expense in
connection with any publication, or preparation of material there­
for, (except the Digest of Public General Bills) to be issued by the




Total direct obligations...................

69,580

66,705

73,652

87,898
46,750

97,081
51,741

107,204
57,135

789,622

873,000

964,026

873, 000

964,026

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
From Other Accoun ts

1. Authoritative research and analysis.._ _
2. General research ___________________ _
3. Preparation of abstracts, indexes, di­
gests, and summaries
4. Reference files, bibliographic and
reader services___ __ _ ___________

23,939
5,687
4,211
1,000

Total obligation payable out of re­
imbursements from other ac­
counts___________________________

34,837

Obligations incurred.______________

239
231

$3,818
GS-5.6

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year-------

1. Authoritative research and analysis____
2. General research_________ ___________
3. Preparation of abstracts, indexes, di­
gests, and summaries_______________
o f 4. Reference files, bibliographic and
reader services______________________
5. General supervision___________________

824,459

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T o carry ou t the ob je ctiv e s o f the L egislative R e o r­
ganization A c t o f 1946, research reports and digests are
prepared and inquiries from M em bers and com m ittees o f
Congress relating to legislative problem s and program s
are answered. T h e ob jectives for 1953 are: the read ju st­
m ent o f all activities to an anticipated increase in the
num ber o f inquiries and m ore adequate research coverage
in areas o f congressional concern.
1. Authoritative research and analysis.— T h e Legislative
R eorganization A ct o f 1946 specifies 21 fields o f specific
congressional concern. D u rin g 1952 the follow in g 11
fields, all carried forw ard from 1951, are to b e covered:
international econom ics, international relations, taxation
and fiscal p olicy, Am erican G overn m en t and p u b lic
adm inistration, conservation and natural resources, social
welfare, Am erican law, lab or econom ics, engineering and
p u blic works, transportation and com m unications, and
housing. I t is p roposed in 1953 to add tw o additional
fields: m on ey and banking and industrial organization.
2. General research:— General research is perform ed and
reports furnished; spot reference inquiries answ ered;
graphs, charts, and illustrations prepared; and transla­
tions m ade. C ongressional inquiries num bered 45,139
in 1951, w hich was 6.2 percent over 1950. A con tin u ation
o f the increase o f at least the existing rate is anticipated,
w hich w ould m ake the total fo r 1952, 47,938, and for
1953, 50,910. Sufficient staff is requested fo r 1953 to
p rovide m ore adequate handling o f the substantial in­
crease in inquiries since 1950.
3. Preparation o f abstracts, indexes, digests, and sum ­
maries.— T h e D igest o f P u b lic G eneral B ills covered
15,000 bills during the E ighty-first Congress, and 8,000
bills during the E igh ty-secon d Congress (to Septem ber 4,

TH E

3 0

BU DGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

L IB R A R Y OF C O N G R E S S — C ontinued

DISTRIBUTION O CATALOG CARD
F
S

LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE SERVICE---Continued

Salaries and Expenses, Distribution of Catalog Cards, Library of
Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For the distribution of catalog cards and
other publications of the Library, including personal services (includ­
ing not to exceed $30,000 for employees engaged in piecework and
work by the day or hour and for extra special services of regular
employees at rates to be fixed by the Librarian), personal services for
printing and binding, freight and expressage, postage, traveling
expenses connected with such distribution, and expenses of attend­
ance at meetings when incurred on the written authority and direc­
tion of the Librarian, [$566,891] $667,631. (2 U. S. C. 131, 136,
139, 140, 150; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $566,891
Estimate 1953, $667,631

Salaries and Expenses, Legislative Reference Service, Library of
Congress—Continued
1951); a further increase is expected during the E ig h tysecond Congress, second session.
4. Reference file s , bibliographic and reader services.—
R eferen ce files, containing clippings, pam phlets, and
docum ents, are m aintained; researchers supplied with
bibliographic and reference tools; selective and com pre­
hensive bibliographies prepared for M em bers and c o m ­
mittees of C ongress; and reader services p rovided b y the
Congressional R eading R oom . D u rin g 1951, 73,951
reference file item s were processed, 13,647 bibliographic
entries prepared, 19,883 published item s acquired and
processed, and 3,142 readers served. T h e increase in
a ctiv ity represents a 30 percent increase in 1951 over 1950
and it is expected to m aintain this level in 1952 and 1953.
5. General supervision.— Th e equivalent o f eight p osi­
tions is d evoted to over-all direction and supervision o f the
Legislative R eference Service and sufficient staff is re­
quested to perm it m ore expeditious handling o f mail and
d elivery service to congressional offices.

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1951 actual

151
2
150

151

170

147

555,417
-370

622,176

667, 631

555, 047

622,176

667,631

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$14,144
565,047

$15,179
606,327

Obligations incurred_____ _____ ___

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions __________ _____
Part-time and temporary positions____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base___
Payment above basic rates (overtime,
holiday, and night differential)_____

$5,179
GS-8.4

$5,798
GS-8.6

$5,728
GS-8.3

$2,610
CPC-3.0

$2,941
CPC-3.0

$2,852
CPC-3.0

1951 actual

Direct Obligations

1. Supplying cards for the Library of
Congress___ ______________ _______ _
2. Sale of cards to other libraries_____
3. Preparation and distribution of pub­
lications______ _____ _______________

$789, 671
8,878

$849,909
1,000
3,366

$936,347
1,000
3, 754

725

725

855,000

941,826

01 Personal service_____ _______________
06 Printing and reproduction____ _____ _
07 Other contractual services................. .
08 Supplies and materials_______________

766,376
15,896
2,140
5,210

855, 000
13,000

941, 826
16,200

5,000

6,000

Total direct obligations.....................

789,622

873,000

964,026

873,000

964,026

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$46,944
824,459

$49,840
873,000

$49,000
964,026

871,403

Direct Obligations

Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
From Other A ccoun ts

Personal services________ ___________
Obligations incurred_______________

34,837
824,459

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

922,840

1,013,026

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations..—________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

34,837
49,840

49,000

55,000

Total expenditures................... ...........

786,726

873,840

958,026

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental pay
increases....... .............. ............ ........ .........

739,782
46,944

766,000
39,208

909,026
44, 632

68,632

4,368




$12, 754
500, 736
38, 240

42,985

46,125

551, 730

622,176

667, 631

622,176

667,631

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other A ccounts

Sale of cards to other libraries_________

3,317

Obligations incurred_____ _____ ___

2.

2,664

01

3,317

165

801, 213

Total personal service obligations. __

55,285

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Total direct obligations____________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary._____________________
Average grade. ______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary____ _________________
Average grade_______________________

$667, 631

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

1953 estimate

S um m ary of Pervonal Services

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees__ ______

$566,891

$552,100

Description
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases. _____ _________________________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1952 estimate

555,047

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T h e w ork o f the Card D ivision is that o f a m ail-order
house doing a business o f abou t $1,000,000 per annum.
It maintains a stock o f over 159,000,000 cards, representing
som e 2,000,000 titles, and fills orders for m ore than 9,400
subscribers in the U nited States and abroad. I t also
prepares and offers for sale certain publications. M ore
than 97 percent o f this appropriation is chargeable to the
cost o f card and publication sales, and this cost plus 10
percent profit is returned to the Treasury. T h e rem ain­
ing 3 percent represents a service to the L ibrary o f C on ­
gress. T h e ob jectives for 1953 are: the greater use o f
card reprodu ction b y means other than printing; expedit­
ing operations w ith resulting reduction in costs to card
subscribers; and increasing the scope and u tility o f the
L ib ra ry ’s A u th or and S u bject Catalogs in b o o k form , b y
publishing a 5-year cum ulation o f the A u th or C atalog in
1953 and prelim inary w ork for a similar cum ulation of
the S u bject C atalog to be issued in 1954.
1. Supplying cards fo r the Library o f Congress.— T h e
num ber o f cards supplied to the L ibrary o f Congress in
1951 was 4,293,453; estim ated for 1952, 4,300,000, and for
1953, 4,900,000.
2. Sale o f cards to other libraries.— T h e num ber o f cards
sold in 1951 was 20,702,601; estim ated fo r 1952, 23,000,000,
and for 1953, 28,750,000.
3. Preparation and distribution o f publications.— C on ­
tinued emphasis will be placed on the im provem en t and

L E G IS L A T IV E

w ider distribution o f the tw o L ibrary catalogs issued
periodically in b o o k form : The A u th or C atalog (form erly
the C um ulative C atalog) and the S u bject C atalog, the
latter begun in 1950, and b oth w idely accepted as im por­
tan t bibliographic tools.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Description

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

172
2
169

172
2
172

188
2
183

$3,187
GS-3.1

$3, 527
GS-3.1

$3,565
GS-3.1

$2, 634
CPC-2.5

$2, 908
CPC-2.5

$2,880
CPC-2.6

$2, 850
WB-10.0

$3,165
WB-10.0

$3, 206
WB-10.0

$538, 002
5,130

$601,368
5,000
2, 308

$646, 552
5,000
2, 579

S u m m ary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions Average number of all fimployp.es
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary. ....... ...................... .
____ Average grade
______
________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
________
Average grade____ _______
♦
Lithographic wage board:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade____ _____ ____________
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions____ . . . . . . __
Part-time and temporary positions __.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base
Payment above basic rates (overtime,
holiday, and night differential)............

BRANCH

31

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Maintaining Union Catalog—1951, $77,000; 1952, $86,430; 1953, $104,276.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T h e N ational U nion C atalog is a centralized and c o ­
operatively m aintained record o f the holdings o f m ore
than 700 research libraries o f the U nited States and
C anada. I t contains m ore than 13,000,000 cards and is
consulted daily b y libraries and research institutions in
all parts o f the U nited States and the w orld, as well as
b y representatives o f G overn m en t agencies, visiting
scholars, and the L ibrary's ow n staff, in order to locate
copies o f research works. T h e staff files cards received,
notes additional locations for works already represented
in the catalog, eliminates duplicate entries, edits the
entries received, and responds to inquiries from other
libraries.
It is proposed in 1953 to gradually reduce an arrearage
o f 2,750,000 unfiled cards o n a p ro je ct basis and to con ­
tinue to acquire through ph otograp h ic reprodu ction
m ethods entries for m aterials n ot represented in the
N ational U nion C atalog, the inclusion o f w hich m a y have
special value at this juncture in h istory; i. e., collections
o f scientific materials and publications relating to critical
areas. T o the extent possible, the continuing program o f
adding cards received regularly from other libraries will
be m aintained as well as the reference service on the
catalog.
T h e num ber o f cards for, and locations of, research
materials added in 1951 was 959,140. T h e same num ber
is estim ated for 1952 and 1953. T h e num ber o f titles
searched in response to inquiries in 1951 was 17,272.
Th e same num ber is anticipated for 1952 and 1953.
These figures do n ot include inquiries answered through
the use o f the U nion C atalog b y readers them selves or
the use o f the U nion C atalog b y m em bers o f the L ibrary
o f Congress staff.

2, 998

5,500

5, 500

546,130

614,176

659,631

01 Personal services ............. ............ .......
02 Travel.. . _________________ ______
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services_________ .

546,130
1,878
66
6,973

614,176
2,000
500
5, 500

659, 631
2,000
500
5,500

Total direct obligations____________

551,730

622,176

667, 631

622,176

667, 631

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$33,385
622,176

$35, 300
667,631

Object classification

655, 561

702, 931

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all positions .............
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary ____________________
Average grade__________ ____________

Total personal service obligations.
Direct Obligations

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
F ro m Other Accoun ts

_

3,317

Obligations incurred_____ __________

01

555, 047

Personal services____

_

_______

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year....... .

$29,918
555, 047
584,965

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations
_ _
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

3, 317
33,385

35, 300

38, 600

Total expenditures________________

548, 263

620, 261

664, 331

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
O ut of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
pay increases________________________

518,345
29,918

536, 501
30. 000

629,331
33, 475

53, 760

1,525

UNION CATALOGS
Salaries and Expenses, Union Catalogs, Library of Congress—
Salaries and expenses: To continue the development and mainte­
nance of the Union Catalogs, including personal services (including
not to exceed $700 for employees engaged by the day or hour at rates
to be fixed by the Librarian); personal services for printing and bind­
ing ; traveling expenses including expenses of attendance at meetings
when incurred on the written authority and direction of the Li­
brarian; and other necessary expenses; [$79,430] $104,276. (2
U. S. C. 131, 136, 139, 140, 150, 162; Legislative Branch Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $79,430
Estimate 1953, $104,276

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____________ _
Part-time and temporary positions
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base___ _________ ____ ___________
02
03
06
08

Total personal services ..............
Travel... _____________________
_
Transportation of things __________
Printing and reproduction (photo­
duplication)______ ________________
Supplies and materials ______ _________
Obligations incurred__________ ____

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..-.
Obligations incurred during the year, _ ..

$77,000

Obligations incurred_______________

77,000




$79,430

$104,276

7,000
86,430

21
19

20
19

26
25

$3, 703
GS-5.2

$3,987
GS-5.0

$3,811
GS-4.4

$69, 620

$76, 217
700

$93,994
700

313

382

69, 620
220
73

77, 230
600
200

95,076
600
200

6,404
683

8,000
400

8,000
400

77,000

86,430

104, 276

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$5,659
77,000

$10,877
86,430

$10,800
104,276

82,659

97,307

115,076

10,877

10,800

12,300

71, 782

86, 507

102,776

66,123

70,107
10,300

91,976
9,900

6,100

900

1953 estimate
Total expenditures__ ........... ..........

Appropriation or estimate__________ _____
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases

1953 estimate

1951 actual

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_________ _____ _______ _ _
1952 estimate

1952 estimate

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1951 actual

104,276

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations. __________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
pay increases...........................................

5,659

TH E

3 2

BUDGET

FOR

L IB R A R Y OF C O N G R E S S — C ontinued
INCREASE O THE LIBRARY O CONGRESS
F
F
General Increase of the Library of Congress—•
General increase of the Library: For purchase of books, miscella­
neous periodicals and newspapers, photocopying supplies and photo­
copying labor, and all other material for the increase of the Library,
including payment in advance for subscription books and society
publications, and for freight and expressage, postage, commissions,
and traveling expenses not to exceed $25,000, including expenses of
attendance at meetings when incurred on the written authority and
direction of the Librarian in the interest of collections, and all other
expenses incidental to the acquisition of material for the increase of
the Library by purchase, gift, bequest, or exchange, [$270,000]
$388,000, to continue available during the1 next succeeding fiscal
year. (2 U. S. C. 131, 132, 132a, 139; Legislative Branch Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $270,000
Estimate 1953, $388,000
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

F IS C A L

YE A R

1953

Increase of the Law Library, Library of Congress—
Increase of the law library: For the purchase of books and for
legal periodicals for the law library, including payment in advance
for legal periodicals and for legal society publications, and for freight
and expressage, postage, commissions, traveling expenses not to
exceed $2,500, including expenses of attendance at meetings when
incurred on the written authority and direction of the Librarian
in the interest of collections, and all other expenses incidental to
the acquisition of material for the increase of the law library,
[$85,500] $95,000, to continue available during the next succeeding
fiscal year. (2 U. S. C. 131, 132, 184, 185, 187, 138, 189, 144;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $85,500
Estimate 1953, $95,000
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______ _________
Prior year balance available........... . ___ _

$270,000
14,393

$270,000
5,875

284,393
-5,875

275,875

388,000

Obligations incurred...........................

278,518

275,875

$85, 500
27,161

$95,000

Obligations incurred............ ............ .

388,000

*

94,858
-27,161

112, 661

95,000

67, 697

112, 661

95,000

$388,000

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year.. __

1953 estimate

$85, 500
9,358

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Prior year balance available........................
Total available for obligation____ __
Balance available in subsequent year

1952 estimate

1952 estimate

1951 actual

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Purchase of books and other library materials—1951, $278,518; 1952, $275,875; 1953,
$388,000.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

This appropriation constitutes the only means of ac­
quiring regular dom estic trade publications, except for
cop yrigh t deposits, and for m any needed foreign p u blica­
tions, b oth current and noncurrent, from approxim ately
100 countries or areas. T h e publications acquired b y
purchase constitute a m ost im portan t part of the L ib ra ry’s
acquisitions although they represent on ly a small p rop or­
tion of the material received annually.
T h e increase requested in 1953 is necessary in large part
to cover increased costs of publications of current m a­
terials, to carry on a special Finnish exchange p ro je ct for
the acquisition of strategic materials, to purchase the
N aficy C ollection of Iranian literature, and for a m icro­
film ing program fo r the preservation of valuable news­
paper and periodical holdings and for the preservation on
m icrofilm of valuable materials in E uropean archives.

Purchase of books and other library materials—1951, $67,697; 1952, $112,661; 1953, $95,000.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

This appropriation constitutes the on ly means o f a c­
quiring regular trade publications in the legal subjects
except for copyrigh t deposits. T h ou gh a large part o f the
annual receipts is acquired b y means other than purchase,
a very substantial and essential part is purchased to fill
gaps in the collections. Pieces purchased in 1951 totaled
43,682; estim ated for 1952, 45,000; and estim ated for 1953,
45,000. The increase proposed for 1953 is for restoration
o f the $95,000 base appropriation in effect prior to 1951
in order to assure the acquisition o f current legal m aterials
in critical areas o f the world, to fill in significant gaps in
the collections o f foreign law, to purchase additional
copies o f certain books and serials for interagency loan
to those Federal agencies concerned with pressing inter­
national problem s, and for increased costs.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things________ ____
Communication services_____ _____
Equipment (books and other library
materials)_______________ ________

$2,497
43
1,882

$2, 500
2,500
2,450

$2, 500
2,500
2,450

63, 275

105, 211

87, 550

Obligations incurred__________ . .

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

02
03
04
09

1951 actual

67,697

112, 661

95,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$107, 821
67, 697

$80,531
112,661

$86,192
95,000
181,192

1953 estimate

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
02 Travel._______ ______________________
03 Transportation of things______ ____
04 Communication services._....................
05 Rents and utility services. _____ __
07 Other contractual services_____ __ _
09 Equipment (books and other library

$23,166
1,867
7,066
9, 655
38

$25,000
4.000

$25,000
4, 500
7,000
10, 500

materials)______ __________________

236, 726

230,875

341,000

278, 518

275,875

388,000

Obligations incurred_____________

60
.0 0
1 ,0 0
00

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________ ________________ __________
Total expenditures _______________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________ }




1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$241,831
278,518

$242,955
275,875

$241,830
388,000

520,349

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year....... .

518.830

629.830

242, 955

241.830

297.830

277,394

277,000

332,000

277,394 f
I

228,500
48,500

260,000
72,000

175, 518

193,192

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year...... ............................................ ............

80,531

86,192

81,192

Total expenditures..................... ........

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1951 actual

94, 987

107,000

100,000

87,000
20,000

80,000
20,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________ }

94,987 /
\

Books for the Supreme Court, Library of Congress—
Books for the Supreme Court: For the purchase of books and
periodicals for the Supreme Court, to be a part of the Library of
Congress, and purchased by the Librarian of the Supreme Court,
under the direction of the Chief Justice, [$22,500] $25,000. (2
U. S. C. 181, 132, 185, 137, 139; Legislative Branch Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 2 2 ,5 0 0

E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 2 5 ,0 0 0

L E G IS L A T IV E

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
Appropriation or estimate—1951, $22,500; 1952, $22,500; 1953, $25,000.
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Purchase of books and periodicals—1951, $22,500; 1952, $22,500; 1953, $25,000.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

B ook s and periodicals are purchased for the library of
the Suprem e C ourt, which, though a part o f the Library
o f Congress, is adm inistered under the direction o f the
C h ief Justice.
T h e increase proposed for 1953 is to p a y for increased
prices of books and periodicals.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
09 Equipment (books and other library materials)—1951, $22,500; 1952, $22,500; 1953,
$25,000.
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,814
22, 500

$2,434
22, 500

$2,434
25,000

25,314

24,934

27,434

2,434

2,434

2,434

Total expenditures_________________

22,880

22, 500

20,377
2, 503

20,100
2,400

22,600
2,400

Unliquidated obligations, start of year__;_
Obligations incurred during the year....... .
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ ______________________________

BOOKS FOR ADULT BLIND
Books for the Adult Blind, Library of Congress—
To enable the Librarian of Congress to carry out the provisions of
the Act entitled “ An Act to provide books for the adult blind” ,
approved March 3, 1931 (2 U. S. C. 135a), as amended, $1,000,000,
including not exceeding [$70,000] $77,330 for personal services, not
exceeding $200,000 for books in raised characters, and the balance
remaining for sound-reproduction records and for the purchase,
maintenance, and replacement of the Government-owned repro­
ducers for sound-reproduction records for the blind and not exceed­
ing [$1,000] $2,000 for necessary traveling expenses connected
with such service and for expenses of attendance at meetings when
incurred on the written authority and direction of the Librarian;
and for printing and binding. (2 U. S. C. 131, 135b, 136, 139, 140;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,000,000
Estimate 1953, $1,000,000
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

33

for such sound reproduction recordings. T h e books are
circulated through the facilities o f 28 regional distributing
libraries and the talking b o o k m achines are distributed
through 55 State lending agencies, w ith preference given
to blind veterans.
Th e objectives for 1953 are: reactivation o f the braille
activities o f the division; revision o f regional distribut­
ing library systems in accordance ‘vfith the exigencies of
the service; revision o f the procedure for distributing and
maintaining a tabulation o f talking b ook m achines; im ­
provem ent o f talking b ook records in accordance w ith
im provem ents and refinements o f talking b ook machines,
im provem ent in the means and m anner o f selecting b o o k s ;
establishment o f an active advisory com m ittee for b o o k
selection purposes similar to the present partially active
B ook -of-the-M in u te C om m ittee and A dvisory G r o u p ; and
preparation o f new specifications for talking b ook records,
needles, braille paper, and other equipm ent used in the
program w hich have n ot been revised during the 10-year
period im m ediately preceding.
1.
Procurement and distribution.— B ook s are selected,
purchased and distributed, and talking b ook s are pur­
chased, repaired and replaced.

25,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations_____________

BRAN CH

Description

1951 actual

Talking books purchased (titles)___ __
Embossed books purchased (titles)______
Talking book machines:
Purchased__________ ___________________
’ Repaired______________ ________________
Salvaged-scrapped__________ ___________
Records replaced............................................

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______ _________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

$1,000,000
-1,098

$1,000,000

$1,000,000

Obligations incurred._____ _________

998,902

1,000,000

1,000,000

1953 estimate

99
98

200
200

200
200

15,000
3,663
3, 814
21,305

5,000
3, 000
2, 000
20,000

'3,385
3, 000
2,000
20,000

2.
Cataloging and reference service.— Catalogs o f talking
and braille books are prepared and m aintained. In addi­
tion to continuing the revision o f catalogs, there is in
process a revision of a pam phlet on braille transcription
and plans for 1953 call for a union catalog o f h and-copied
braille titles and a braille edition of the ink-print catalog
of press braille titles and o f the talking b oo k catalog.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees___ __

1952 estimate

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

_

20
19

20
19

20
19

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.............. .............. ..........
Average grade __ __ _________________

$3,665
GS-5.0

$4,046
GS-5.0

$4, 111
GS-5.0

$68, 685

$77,017

$77,012

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions________ _ __
Regular pay in excess of 52-week

313
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
1951 actual

Description

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1. Procurement and distribution________
2. Cataloging and reference service_______

$929, 500
69, 402

$917,960
82,040

$918,626
81,374

Obligations incurred_______ ________

998,902

1,000,000

1,000,000

02
03
04
06
07
08
09

Total personal services................
Travel____ . ___________
_________
Transportation of things______ ______
Communication services____________
Printing and reproduction________ __
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials._____ ________
Equipment____ _____________________
Obligations incurred..................... .

318

68, 685
989
972
1,484
15,917
61, 906
5, 263
843,686

77,330
1,000
3,000
1,600
25,000
70, 000
10, 500
811, 570

77,330
2,000
1,000
1,500
-25,000
55.000
10.000
828,170

998, 902

1,000, 000

1,000,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$870, 641
998, 902
1,869, 543

$620, 949
1,000,000
1, 620, 949

$559,000
1,000,000
1, 559,000

620,949

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T h e L ibrary o f Congress program for providing books
for the adult blind o f the U nited States, its Territories
and insular possessions is authorized b y the act o f M arch
3,19 31 , 2 U. S. C. 135a, as am ended. T h e m oneys author­
ized to be appropriated annually b y this act are used for
providing books published either in raised characters, on
sound reproduction recordings, or in any other form . Also
for the purchase o f sound reproduction recordings and for
the purchase, m aintenance, and replacem ent o f reproducers




1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_________________________ __ ______
Total expenditures._________ _______

1,248, 594

559, 000
1,061, 949

508,000
1, 051,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations____________

413, 405
835,189

441,949
620,000

496, 000
555,000

TH E

3 4

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

L IB R A R Y OF C O N G R E S S — C ontinued
PRINTING AND BINDING

1951 actual

General Printing and Binding, Library of Congress—
General printing and binding: For miscellaneous printing and
binding for the Library of Congress, including the Copyright Office,
and the binding, rebinding, and repairing of Library books, [$450000J $536,000. (2 U. S. C. 131, 139, 152; 31 U. S. C. 588, 589;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $450,000
Estimate 1953, $536,000
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate.. ____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred_______ _____

1952 estimate
$450,000

$536,000

449,905

450,000

536,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$250,862

$250,850

13, 762
8,324
67,016
757
34,784

13, 750
9,000
67, 000
3,000
32,420

14,025
9,000
74,490
3,000
54, 083

4, 587
50,429
19, 384

4,600
51,380
18, 000

Obligations incurred..................

449, 905

450, 000

$78,876
536,000
614.876

548,879

538, 876

88, 876

78,876

104.876

Total expenditures________________

460,003

460,000

510,000

364,804
95,199

378, 600
81,400

439,600
70,400

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations..................... .

536,000

Printing the Catalog of Title Entries of Copyright Office, Library
of Congress—
Printing the Catalog of Title Entries of the Copyright Office: For
the publication of the Catalog of Title Entries of the Copyright
Office and the decisions of the United States courts involving copy­
rights, [$39,5001 $44,500. (2 U. S. C. 131, 136, 139; 17 U. S. C.
56, 57; 31 T . S. C. 588, 589; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act,
J
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $39,500
Estimate 1953, $44,500
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate_____________ _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred________ ____

Printing and binding requirem ents o f the Library of
Congress except those which are financed b y special appro­
priations fo r card and cop yrigh t catalog printing are
financed b y this appropriation. A ll b u t a m inor p art of
the costs are fo r w ork done b y the G overnm ent Printing
Office branch b in dery operated in the L ibrary Annex.
1. Organization o j the collections.— B ook s are b o u n d ;
m anuscripts, m aps, etc., are repaired; p rotective boxes and
binders purchased; and other miscellaneous bindery oper­
ations perform ed. I t is estim ated that increased p rod u c­
tion in other divisions will increase binding requirements
in 1953 to 75,000 volum es, which is approxim ately 10,000
volum es m ore than the num ber (64,830) b oun d in 1951.
Increases for 1953 are to m eet this increased w orkload and
for an actual increase of 20 percent in the cost of labor,
paper prices, and other supplies and to p rovid e fo r addi­
tional lam inating w ork on maps.
2. Reference service, publications.— T h e L ibrary p u b ­
lishes b ook s and pam phlets usually of a bibliographical
character, and descriptive o f materials contained in its
collections. T h e increase proposed for 1953 is to m eet an
actual 25-percent increase in the cost of b o o k paper prices
and to publish V olu m e 3 of the Thom as Jefferson C atalog.
3. Administrative printing and binding.— C opyrigh t
applications, miscellaneous form s, and other printed
m atter for general adm inistrative purposes are procured,
and the A nnual R e p o rt of the Librarian and the Quarterly
Journal of C urrent A cquisitions are published. T h e in­
creases proposed for 1953 are to m eet an actual 25 percent
increase in b o o k paper prices and a 20 percent increase in
other paper prices, and to p rovid e fo r m iscellaneous
printed form s at the 1951 level.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
06 Printing and reproduction—1951, $449,905; 1952, $450,000; 1953, $536,000.

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$39,500
- 1 , 548

$39, 500

$44, 500

37, 952

39, 500

44,500

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE




$88,876
450,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r_____ _______ __ . . . ___ _______

4,692
63,369
18,000

1951 actual

1. Organization of the collections:
(a) Binding and rebinding of books,
etc____________________________
(b) Miscellaneous binding, lettering,
cutting, punching, and stapling.
(c) Protective boxes and binders____
(d) Repair of maps, manuscripts, etc.
(e) Print transfer............. .....................
2. Reference service, publications___ _____
3. Administrative printing and binding:
(a) Miscellaneous cutting, stapling,
and punching________ _______
(6) M iscellaneous printing of forms.. _
(c) Publications------------------- ------- -

$98,974
449, 905

$295,341

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Description

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

$450,000
-9 5

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1. Catalog of title entries____ ___________
2. Bulletins of decisions_________________

$37,952

$31,000
8,500

$39, 500
5,000

Obligations incurred_______ _______

37,952

39, 500

44, 500

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T itle 17, U nited States C ode, section 210, provides that
the R egister of C opyrights shall print com plete and in­
dexed catalogs for each class o f copyright entries. T h e
am ount requested for fiscal year 1953 will enable the
R egister o f C opyrigh ts to publish the C atalog o f C opyrigh t
Entries and a B ulletin o f C opyrigh t D ecisions and m ake
them available to the public within a reasonable period.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
06 Printing and reproduction—1951, $37,952; 1952, $39,500; 1953, $44,500.
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$12,638
37, 952

$16,371
39,500

$15,871
44,500
60.371

50,590
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_______ ___________
_____________

55.871

16,371

15.871

15.371

Total expenditures________________

34,219

40,000

45,000

21,855
12,364

24.000
16.000

30.000
15.000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ _____
Out of prior authorizations____________

Printing Catalog Cards, Library of Congress—
Printing catalog cards: For the printing of catalog cards and of
miscellaneous publications relating to the distribution of catalog
cards, and for duplication of catalog cards by methods other than
printing, [$550,500] $769,207. (2 U. S. C. 139, 150; 31 U. S. C.
588, 589; Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 5 5 0 ,5 0 0

E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 7 6 9 ,2 0 7

L E G IS L A T IV E

A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______ . . ____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings--.

$550, 500
- 3 , 618

$550, 500

$769,207

Obligations incurred- _ ___________

546, 882

550, 500

769, 207

1951 actual

1. Card printing for the Library of Con­
gress___
_ _ ______
. _____ _
2. Card printing for other libraries___ __ _
3. Printing and binding the Author
Catalog_____________________________
4. Printing and binding the Subject
Catalog_____________________ ______
5. Printing and binding publications re­
lated to cataloging___ ______ __ __
Obligations incurred _ _ _ _

_ _

1952 estimate

$169, 209
226, 718

$184, 710
244, 848
51, 501

151,714

30, 612

29, 441

42,068

73, 993

40,000

40,000

546, 882

550, 500

769, 207

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E

$230,233
305,192

46, 350

Printing and reproduction—1951, $546,882; 1952, $550,500; 1953, $769,207.

1953 estimate

1951 actual

A pproxim ately 70 percent o f this appropriation for the
printing o f catalog cards and related publications is charge­
able to the cost of card and publication sales, and this cost,
plus 10 percent profit, is returned to the Treasury; the
remaining 30 percent represents service to the Library
o f Congress. I t is planned in 1953 to keep pace w ith the
anticipated increase in the num ber o f titles cataloged,
and to publish a 5-year cum ulation o f the A u th or Catalog.
1. Card printing j o r the Library o j Congress.— The
num ber o f cards printed in 1951 for the L ibrary of
Congress was 4,293,453; estim ated for 1952, 4,300,000,
and, for 1953, 4,900,000.
2. Card printing jo r other libraries.— The num ber o f
cards printed in 1951 for sale to other libraries was 27,782,010; estim ated for 1952, 28,459,225; for 1953, 36,467,075. Th e estim ated increase in the num ber o f cards
printed is based in large part on the estim ated increase in
the num ber o f titles to be cataloged b y the larger catalog­
ing staff requested to cut dow n current cataloging ar­
rearages.
3. P rinting and binding the Author Catalog.— The
A u th or C atalog is a b ook catalog o f the cards printed b y
the L ibrary of Congress arranged b y author. It is issued
m on th ly and cum ulated quarterly and annually. It is
planned to issue a 5-year cum ulation in fiscal 1953 in
lieu o f the annual issue for calendar 1952. The quin­
quennial issue will bring together in one alphabet the
entries in the 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951 annual issues and
the titles cataloged in 1952. There were 862 paid sub­
scriptions for cpm plete or partial service in 1951; it is
estim ated there will be 875 in 1952 and 890 in 1953.
The A rm y M ed ica l L ibrary A u th or C atalog is an annual
supplem ent to the A u th or C atalog which lists the cards
m ultilithed b y the L ibrary o f Congress from co p y sup­
plied b y the A rm y M edical L ibrary. A lthough it is
officially a supplem ent to the A u th or C atalog it has since
1948 been published and sold as a separate item . There
were 240 copies sold in 1951; it is estimated that 250
will be sold in 1952 and 260 in 1953.
4. Printing and binding the Subject Catalog.— The Sub­
je ct C atalog is a book catalog reproducing cards printed
b y the L ibrary of Congress and arranged according to
su bject content of the publications represented. It is
cum ulated quarterly and annually. There were 383
paid subscriptions for 1951; it is estim ated there will be
390 in 1952 and 400 in 1953.
5. Printing and binding o j publications related to cata­
loging.— These publications are auxiliary to the cataloging




activities o f the L ibrary o f Congress and include the
Classification Schedules, Lists o f Su bject H eadings, Rules
o f D escriptive C ataloging, C ataloging Service Bulletins,
and similar publications. A slight reduction in the p u b ­
lication program is anticipated for 1952 and 1953 as
com pared w ith 1951.
06

P O RMA D P RO MNE
RGA N EF R A C

950000— 52 --------3

3 5

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

O L A IO S B A T IT S
B IG T N Y C IV IE
Description

BRANCH

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year-----------------------------------------------------Total expenditures-..

_

______

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ ______
Out of prior authorizations. ________ __

1953 estimate

$138, 220
546, 882

$126, 573
550, 500

$122, 073
769, 207

685,102

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate

677, 073

891, 280

126. 573

122, 073

141, 280

558, 529

555, 000

750, 000

424,110
134, 419

428, 427
126, 573

627, 927
122, 073

M
ISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES O THE LIBRARY
F
Miscellaneous Expenses, Library of Congress—
Miscellaneous expenses: For miscellaneous expenses connected
with the administration of the Library, and not otherwise provided
for, including domestic and foreign postage, travel expenses, includ­
ing not exceeding $500 for expenses of attendance at meetings when
incurred on the written authority and direction of the Librarian,
printing and binding, and personal services, supplies, and other
necessary expenses for the operation of a photo-duplication service,
and for the purchase of photoduplications, [$80,000] $105,400.
(2 U. S. C. 131-166; 17 U. S. C. 1-65; 28 U. S. C. 921; Legislative
Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $80,000
Estimate 1953, $105,400
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate..
. _____
Reimbursements from other accounts.- _

$85, 000
782

$80,000

$105,400

Total available for obligation _. _
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _-

85, 782
-4 5

80, 000

105, 400

85, 737

80,000

105,400

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$14, 209

' $14,000

$15, 500

18,791
25,874

16,000
25, 000

17, 500
30, 000

26,081

25, 000

29, 900
12, 500

84, 955

80, 000

105,400

80, 000

105,400

Obligations incurred.__ _. ________

O L A IO S B A T IT S
B IG T N Y C IV IE
Description

1951 actual

Direct Obligations

1. Photoduplication service to Congress _
2. Photoduplication service for Library of
Congress administrative require­
ments
_
___ _- . . .
_
3. Rental of tabulating equipment____ __
4. Stationery, office supplies and other
incidental expenses
_____ __
5. Motion picture containers. ____
Total direct obligations_________ . .
Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

4. Stationery, office supplies, and other
incidental expenses
____ __ _ _
Obligations incurred__________ _____

782
85, 737

P O RMA D P ROMNE
RGA N EF R A C
T h e part of the appropriation dealing w ith p h otoduplicating expenses has a dual purpose: (1) p rovidin g
photodu plicated materials as requested b y Congress, its
[em bers and its com m ittees, and (2) m eeting the ad­
m inistrative photoduplicating requirem ents of the L ibrary
of Congress. T h e other part of this appropriation is for
m inor m iscellaneous expenses required fo r the general ad-

TH E

36

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

L IB R A R Y O F C O N G R E S S — Continued
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES OF THE LIBRARY— C ontin ued

Description

Miscellaneous Expenses, Library of Congress—Continued
ministration, o f the L ibrary n ot p roperly chargeable to
other L ibrary appropriations. T h e increases proposed
for 1953 are (1) to m eet an actual increase of 20 percent
in paper prices, (2) for rental of additional tabulating
equipm ent to b e applied to bibliographical controls, (3)
for procurem ent of supplies and containers to prevent
deterioration o f the m otion picture collection for w hich
the L ibrary continues to have custodial responsibility,
and (4) to restore the appropriation to its 1951 base.

1. Maintenance services_________________
2. Protective services____ ______________
Obligations incurred....... ............ .......

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Direct Obligations

Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things. ____________
Communication services____________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction_______
Other contractual services________ __
Supplies and materials_______ ______
Refunds, awards, and indemnities

$517
178
3, 297
25,874
33, 000
625
21, 464

$1,025
300
3,300
25,000
30, 000
700
19,625
50

$1,025
800
3,300
30,000
33,000
1,200
36,025
50

Total direct obligations____________

84,955

80,000

105,400

80,000

105,400

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$5,899
85, 737

$12,396
80,000

$9,396
105,400

91, 636

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
13

92,396

114, 796

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
From Other A ccoun ts

08 Supplies and materials______________
Obligations incurred_______________

782
85, 737

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations___ __________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

782
12,396

9,396

14, 796

Total expenditures________________

78,458

83, 000

100,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________

73,375
5,083

71, 600
11,400

91, 600
8,400

LIBRARY BUILDINGS

Salaries and Expenses, Library Buildings, Library of Congress—
Salaries and expenses: For personal services, including persona^
services for printing and binding, and necessary miscellaneous
expenses in connection with the custody, care, and maintenance of
the library buildings; including not to exceed $750 for employees
engaged by the day or hour at rates to be fixed by the Librarian, and
including mail and delivery service, telephone service, special cloth­
ing, cleaning of special clothing of separated employees, medical
supplies, equipment, and expenses for the emergency rooms, house­
keeping and miscellaneous supplies and equipment, and other
incidental expenses; [$711,625] $887,572. (2 U. S. C. 139-141;
Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $711,625
Estimate 1953, $837,572
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$837,572

Appropriation or estimate-----------------------Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
_____________

$698,680

$711,625

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

698, 680
-1,665

786, 485

697,015

786,485

837, 572

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$457,466
239,549

$510,492
275,993

$562,800
274,772

697,015

786,485

837, 572

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T h e tw o L ibrary buildings and the collections and other
properties contained therein are m aintained, preserved,
and protected.
1. M aintenance services.— A staff o f 200, including 89
part-tim e charwom en, preserves, cleans, and m aintains
the L ibrary buildings, collections, and grounds; operates
telephones, elevators, check stands, m o to r vehicles, and
the laundry; procures and m aintains furniture, house­
keeping materials, and miscellaneous equipm ent; assigns
space; and operates the receiving room and stock room s.
T h e 1953 estimates provide for 13 additional laborers to
render m ore adequate service to acquisition and custodial
divisions in the physical handling o f large quantities of
unopened containers and incom ing m aterials, and to
im prove the cleanliness of the buildings and grounds; to
receive, shelve, and clean the collections; for increased
prices o f housekeeping supplies; and for the replacem ent
o f obsolete autom otive equipment.
2. Protective services.— C onstant alertness b y the guard
force is necessary to prevent fire and theft, for the m ain­
tenance o f order and for regular inspections o f all areas
in b o th buildings w hich contain one o f the greatest ac­
cum ulations o f national treasures in the world. F or ade­
quate coverage 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, a total
o f 79 d u ty stations m ust be m anned ahroughout the year
b y the 66 guards and 13 officers currently on the guard
force, which it is proposed to keep at the same level
during 1952 and 1953. Th e 1953 estim ates provide for
the accelerated replacem ent o f worn and sh abby uniform s,
and eight additional guards to insure peak strength at all
times.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary___ __________________
Average grade_____ _________________
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions:
Part-time positions (charwomen).
Temporary positions____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________________ ____ _______
Payment above basic rates (over­
time, holiday, and night differ­
ential)......... ....................................
Total personal services________
04 C ommunication services....... ...............
07 Other contractual services___________
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 Equipment.................... ........................
Obligations incurred......... .................

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

192
40
186

190
40
190

214
40
207

$3,336
GS-4.8

$3,818
GS-5.0

$3,742
GS-4.6

$2,680
CPC-3.2

$2,966
CPC-3.3

$2,957
CPC-3.2

$521, 515

$578,694

$629, 691

103,467
614

119, 770
750

119, 770
750

2,498

5,317

5,857

25,100
653,194
24,840
1,444
13, 528
4,009

. 34,100

34,100

738, 631
25,000
1, 500
17,354
4,000

790,168
25,000
1,500
18,689
2, 215

697,015

786,485

837,572

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$697,015

$45,432
786,485

$50,700
837,572

697,015

831,917

888,272

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

837, 572

Obligations incurred-------------------- ---

1951 actual




74,860

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year.........

L E G IS L A T IV E

a n a l y s is

op expen d itu res —

3 7

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

continued

1951 actual

BRANCH

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____________ __
_______ ________

$45,432

$50,700

$52, 799

Total expenditures________________

651, 583

781,217

835,473

651, 583

665,000
45,000

785, 473
46, 357

71, 217

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

3, 643

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations_______ _____
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
pay increases.____ _________________ _

01 Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions________________ _
02 Travel________________________ __ __
08 Supplies and materials____ . . . _____
Obligations incurred_______________

$13,131
548
97
13, 776

$126
126

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

LIBRARY O CONGRESS TRUST FUND BOARD
F
Salaries and Expenses, Library of Congress, Trust Fund Board—
For any expense of the Library of Congress Trust Fund Board
not properly chargeable to the income of any trust fund held by the
Board, $500. (2 U. S. C. 139, 155; Legislative Branch Appropria­
tion Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $500
Estimate 1953, $500
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate.... ... ................__
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year. _ __
Total expenditures________________
Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

$1,810
13,776
15, 586

$126
126
126

15, 586

Allocations Received From Other Appropriation Accounts—
Note.— Obligations incurred under allocations from other appropriations are shown in

the schedules of the parent appropriations, as follows:
“ International information and educational activities, Department of State.”

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$500

$500

500

500

$500
-500

Miscellaneous Expired Accounts, Library of Congress—
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Obligations incurred....... ............ .......

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
General administrative services—1952, $500; 1953, $500.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

A contingent fund is p rovided which usually reverts in
w hole or in part to the Treasury, b u t which is used occa ­
sionally to m eet certain expenses related to the operation
o f the T ru st Fund B oard w hich can n ot be m et out o f any
other fund.

.Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Expenditures out of prior authorizations
are distributed as follows:
“ Maintenance, Library buildings, Li­
brary of Congress” (303) __ ______ _
“ Salaries, Library building, Library of
Congress” (303). .
“ Index to State Legislation, Library of
Consrress” (303)____ _ _____________
“ Photoduplicating expenses, Library of
Congress” (303)... . _ _ _ _

$37,543

4,523
28,695
87
4, 238

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
07

Other contractual services—1952, $500; 1953, $500.

G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O FFICE

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

W
ORKING CAPITAL AN CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING
D
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$500

$100
500

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year_____

500

100

400

500

400

Total expenditures_______________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations ___________

600

100

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ _______ ______________________

400
100

Not to exceed ten positions in the Library of Congress may be
exempt from the provisions of the section of the Chapter entitled
“ General Provisions” of the “ Supplemental Appropriation Act,
1952” , concerning the employment of aliens, but the Librarian shall
not make any appointment to any such position until he has ascer­
tained that he cannot secure for such appointment a person in any
of the three categories specified in such section who possesses the
special qualifications for the particular position and also otherwise
meets the general requirements for employment in the Library of
Congress. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Miscellaneous
Revision of the Annotated Constitution of the United States of America,
Library of Congress—
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

Prior year balance available.........................
Balance available in subsequent year____

$13,902
-126

$126

Obligations incurred_______________

13,776

1953 estimate

126

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Preparation of Annotated Constitution of the United States of America—1951, $13,776;
1952, $126.




Working Capital and Congressional Printing and Binding. Govern­
ment Printing Office—
To provide the Public Printer with a working capital for the fol­
lowing purposes for the execution of printing, binding, lithographing,
mapping, engraving, and other authorized work of the Government
Printing Office for the various branches of the Government: For
salaries of Public Printer and Deputy Public Printer; for salaries,
compensation, or wages of all necessary officers and employees addi­
tional to those herein appropriated for, including employees necessary
to handle waste paper and condemned material for sale; to enable the
Public Printer to comply with the provisions of law granting holidays
and half holidays and Executive orders granting holidays and half
holidays with pay to employees; to enable the Public Printer to com­
ply with the provisions of law granting leave to employees with pay,
such pay to be at the rate for their regular positions at the time the
leave is granted; rental of buildings and equipment; fuel, gas, heat,
electric current, gas and electric fixtures; motor vehicles for the car­
riage of printing and printing supplies, and the maintenance, repair,
and operation of the same, to be used only for official purposes; pur­
chase (not to exceed [one at $2,700] two for replacement only),
operation, repair, and maintenance of passenger motor vehicles for
official use of the officers of the Government Printing Office when
in writing ordered by the Public Printer; freight, expressage, tele­
graph and telephone service, furniture, typewriters, and carpets;
traveling expenses, including not to exceed $1,000 for attendance
at meetings or conventions when authorized by the Joint Committee
on Printing; stationery, postage, and advertising; directories, tech­
nical books, newspapers, magazines, and books of reference (not to
exceed $2,000); adding and numbering machines, time stamps, and
other machines of similar character; purchase of uniforms for guards;
rubber boots, coats, and gloves; machinery (not to exceed $500,000);
equipment, and for repairs to machinery, implements, and buildings,
and for minor alterations to buildings; necessary equipment, main­
tenance, and supplies for the emergency room for the use of all em­
ployees in the Government Printing Office who may be taken sud­
denly ill or receive injury while on duty; other necessary contingent
and miscellaneous items authorized by the Public Printer; for ex­
penses authorized in writing by the Joint Committee on Printing
for the inspection of printing and binding equipment, material, and
supplies and Government printing plants in the District of Colum-

3 8

TH E

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAK

1953

G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G O FFICE— C ontinued

P O R M A D P RO MNE
R GA N EF R A C

W
ORKING CAPITAL AND CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING---CO
n.

Th e G overnm ent Printing Office executes orders for
printing, binding, and blank -book w ork placed b y C on ­
gress and the departm ents, independent establishments,
and agencies of the Federal G overnm ent and furnishes,
on order, blank paper, inks, and similar supplies.
Th e am ount appropriated each year includes the print­
ing and binding authorized to be done for Congress; for
the printing, binding, and distribution of the Federal
Register; and $15,000,000 proposed in 1953 for w orking
capital, which is returned to the Treasury n ot later than
6 m onths after the close of the fiscal year. A ll w ork for
other agencies o f the G overnm ent is reim bursed on the
basis of actual cost incurred.

Working Capital and Congressional Printing and Binding, Govern­
ment Printing Office— Continued
bia or elsewhere (not to exceed $1,000); for salaries and expenses of
preparing the semimonthly and session indexes of the Congressional
Record under the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing
(chief indexer at $8,000, one cataloger at $6,600, two catalogers at
$5,628 each, and one cataloger at $5,015); and for all the necessary
labor, paper, materials, and equipment needed in the prosecu­
tion and delivery and mailing of the work; in all, [$19,200,000]
$25,000,000; to which sum shall be charged the printing and bind­
ing authorized to be done for Congress, including supplemental and
deficiency estimates of appropriations; the printing, binding, and
distribution of the Federal Register in accordance with the Act
approved July 26, 1935 (44 U. S. C. 301-310) (not to exceed
[$480,000] $850,000); the printing and binding of the supplement to
the Code of Federal Regulations as authorized by the Act of July
26, 1935, as amended (44 U. S. C. 311) (not to exceed [$200,000]
$400,000); the printing and binding for use of the Government
Printing Office; the printing and binding (not to exceed $5,000)
for official use of the Architect of the Capitol upon requisition of
the Secretary of the Senate; in all to an amount not exceeding
[$9,200,000] $10,000,000: Provided, That not less than [$10,000,000] $15,000,000 of such working capital shall be returned to the
Treasury as an unexpended balance not later than six months after
the close of the current fiscal year: Provided further, That notwith­
standing the provisions of section 73 of the Act of January 12, 1895
(44 U. S. C. 241), no part of the foregoing sum of [$9,200,000]
$10,000,000 shall be used for printing and binding part 2 of the
annual report of the Secretary of Agriculture (known as the Year­
book of Agriculture).
Printing and binding for Congress chargeable to the foregoing
appropriation, when recommended to be done by the Committee on
Printing of either House, shall be so recommended in a report con­
taining an approximate estimate of the cost thereof, together with
a statement from the Public Printer of estimated approximate cost
of work previously ordered by Congress within the fiscal year for
which this appropriation is made.
During the current fiscal year any executive department or inde­
pendent establishment of the Government ordering printing and
binding or blank paper and supplies from the Government Printing
Office shall pay promptly by check to the Public Printer upon his
written request, either in advance or upon completion of the work,
all or part of the estimated or actual cost thereof, as the case may be,
and bills rendered by the Public Printer'in accordance herewith shall
not be subject to audit or certification in advance of payment: Pro­
vided, That proper adjustments on the basis of the actual cost of
delivered work paid for in advance shall be made monthly or quar­
terly and as may be agreed upon by the Public Printer and the de­
partment or establishment concerned. All sums paid to the Public
Printer for work that he is authorized by law to do; all sums received
from sales of waste paper, other waste material, and condemned
property; and for losses or damage to Government property; shall
be deposited to the credit of the appropriation made for the working
capital of the Government Printing Office and be subject to
requisition by the Public Printer.
No part of any money appropriated in this Act shall be paid to
any person employed in the Government Printing Office while de­
tailed for or performing service in the executive branch of the
public service of the United States unless such detail be authorized
by law. (Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $19,200,000
Estimate 1953, $25,000,000
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate..
_ _
Reimbursements
from
non-Federal
sources. . .
Reimbursements from other accounts___
Reimbursements receivable from nonFederal sources
Reimbursements receivable from other
accounts

$16, 700,000

$19, 200,000

$25,000,000

438, 720
60, 945, 047

500,000
95, 771,493

500,000
95, 264,919

Total available for obligation. __
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. _
Working capital returned to Treasury___

106, 402, 725
-679, 880
- 7 , 500, 000

115,471, 493

120, 764, 919

-1 0 , 000, 000

-1 5 , 000, 000

98, 222, 845

105,471, 493

105, 764, 919

Obligations incurred..

58, 708
28, 260, 250

Note.—
Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from sales of waste
paper, other waste material, and condemned property, and for losses or damages to
Government property (64 Stat. 607).




O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
01

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

7, 018
1
6, 914

7,003

7,003

6,887

6,887
$28,132, 469

Personal services:
Permanent positions... _ . . . ._ . . .
Part time and temporary positions..
Payment above basic rates_______

$26, 360. 205
4.115
3, 893, 437

$28, 017, 342
4, 378, 533

4, 378, 533

Total personal services. ________
Travel_____________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_______ ____
Rents and utility services. - . _______
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials.
________
Equipment__________________________
Lands and structures_________ __ __
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___

30, 257, 757
23, 349
1, 292. 087
80, 884
471, 847
33, 487, 689
78. 931
31,427.671
1,044, 059
57, 778
193

32, 395. 875
20, 500
1, 389, 928
83,600
769, 685
40,157, 977
90, 292
29, 444, 796
1,114, 300
3, 000
1, 540

32,511,002
20, 500
1, 416, 000
83, 600
774,312
40, 240,100
90, 265
29, 510, 300
1,114, 300
3, 000
1,540

Obligations incurred_______________

98, 222, 845

105, 471, 493

105, 764, 919

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

—$3, 046, 783
98. 222, 845

—$4, 501, 209
105, 471,. 493

—$5, 498, 791
105, 764, 919

95,176. 062

100, 970, 284

100, 266,128

89, 702, 700
- 4 , 501. 209
85,366

96, 271, 493
- 5 , 498, 791

95, 764, 919
- 4 , 501,209

Total expenditures________________

9,889, 205

10,197, 582

9, 002,418

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations ....................

12, 803, 352
- 2 , 914,147

13.197, 582
- 3 , 000, 000

12,102, 418
-3,100,000

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
13

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year.
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations______________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustments in obligations of prior years.

1 Unliquidated obligations at start of year are reported as follows:
Fiscal year 1951, gross unliquidated obligations, $8,496,731; reimbursements receivable,
$11,543,514.
Fiscal year 1952, gross unliquidated obligations, $23,817,749; reimbursements receivable,
$28,318,958.
Fiscal year 1953, gross unliquidated obligations, $26,738,791; reimbursements receivable,
$32,237,582.

OFFICE O SUPERINTENDENT O DOCUM
F
F
ENTS
Salaries and Expenses, Office of Superintendent of Documents—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Office of
Superintendent of Documents, including personal services in accord­
ance with the Classification Act of 1949, as amended, and compensa­
tion of employees who shall be subject to the provision of the Act
entitled “ An Act to regulate and fix rates of pay for employees and
officers of the Government Printing Office” , approved June 7, 1924
(44 U. S. C. 40); traveling expenses (not to exceed $1,500); price
lists and bibliographies; repairs to buildings, elevators, and ma­
chinery; and supplying books to depository libraries; [$2,700,000]
$3,187,885: Provided, That no part of this sum shall be used to
supply to depository libraries any documents, books, or other
printed matter not requested by such libraries, and the requests
therefor shall be subject to approval by the Superintendent of
Documents. (.Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 2 , 7 0 0 ,0 0 0

E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 3 ,1 8 7 ,8 8 5

L E G IS L A T IV E

A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
$3,187, 885

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases _ _
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$2,699,800

$2,700,000

5, 654

117,120
5,000

5,000

Total available for obligation _. ___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

2, 705,454
-118,872

2,822,120

3,192,885

586, 582

2,822,120

3,192,885

Obligations incurred____

_______

2,

BRANCH

39

(4)
Cataloging and indexing.— T h e law provides that
the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts shall prepare and dis­
tribute catalogs and indexes*of all publications issued b y
the Federal G overnm ent. T h e M o n th ly C atalog of
U nited States G overnm ent Publications and the N um eri­
cal List and Schedule o f V olum es are the two principal
publications which are issued to discharge legal require­
ments.
S M A YO W R L A
U MR F O K O D
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1,745,376
1,106,891
$4,152,351
56, 039,882

1, 900,000
1,200,000
$4, 600,000
60,000,000

2.300.000
1.700.000
■$5, 200, 000
65.000.000

63, 976,376

65,000,000

68.000.000

4,155,036

4, 500,000

4.800.000

27,188

28,000

29,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

539
503

612
597

709
692

$3, 291
GS-4.3

$3, 600
GS-4.2

$3, 546
GS-4.0

$3, 300
CPC-6.0
$2, 764

$3, 680
C P C -6.0
$2, 759

$3,680
CPC-6.0
$2,724

$1, 569,517

$1, 978, 620

$2, 268,185

30,461
198

30,000
200

30,000
20$

1, 600,176

2 , 008,820

2,298,385

Personal services ___________________
Travel __________ ______
___ ___ __
Transportation of things _ _ ________
Communication services _ _ _____
Rents and utility services
Printing and reproduction ___ _____
Other contractual services
.. ..
Supplies and materials
Equipm ent.__ . . _____ _____- . .

1, 594, 915
1,145
3, 642
5, 578
11, 024
482, 403
80, 095
161, 760
240, 366

2, 004, 320
1, 500
3, 800
5.600
11, 200
488, 000
90, 000
177, 700
35, 000

2, 293, 885
1, 500
4, 500
6, 500
13, 000
528, 000
105, 000
195, 500
40,000

Total direct obligations ___________

2, 580, 928

2, 817,120

3,187,885

5, 261
393

4.500
500

4, 500
500

1951 actual

O L A IO S B A T IT S
B IG T N Y C IV IE
Description

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Direct Obligations

1. Sales distribution_____________________
2. Distribution for other agencies and
Members of Congress.. ___________
3. Depository library distribution ______
4. Cataloging and indexing______________

$1, 537, 769

$1,665,814

$1,895,162

481, 346
358, 473
203, 340

535, 433
373, 872
242,001

608, 951
408,118
275, 654

Total direct obligations____________

2, 580, 928

2, 817,120

3,187, 885

Distribution for other agencies and
Members of Congress. ________ _ __

5, 654

5,000

5,000

Obligations incurred_______________

2, 586, 582

2,822,120

Number of sales orders___ ______________
Letters of inquiry . . . _____ ______ _____
Amount of s a l e s ...___ _
__ _________
Number of publications sold... _ . . .
_
Publications distributed for other Govern­
ment agencies_____
.
Number of publications distributed to depository libraries_______________ _____
Number of publications cataloged and
indexed____________ ________________

3,192,885

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
From Other Accounts
2.

P O RMA D P RO MNE
R GA N EF R A C
T h e Office of Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts is a division
o f the G overn m en t Printing Office w hich operates under
separate appropriations. T h e w ork program s are entirely
o f a service nature and are of such type that there is no
con trol over the volum e of w ork w hich the Superintendent
o f D ocu m ents is required b y law to perform .
(1) Sales distribution.— T h e Superintendent of D o c u ­
m ents is authorized b y law to sell copies of G overnm ent
publications purchased from the P u blic Printer. A cq u i­
sition costs are paid from sales receipts, so no appropria­
tion is required for printing sales copies. B y provision
o f law, the sale price is set at the cost of m anufacture
plus 50 percent. A t the end of each fiscal year, excess
receipts n ot required for purchasing additional publica­
tions are turned in to the Treasury D epartm en t as
m iscellaneous receipts. F or the fiscal year 1951, earned
revenue from this source was $1,624,234. It is estim ated
that miscellaneous receipts earned will be $1,800,000 for
1952 and $2,100,000 for 1953. T h e num ber o f sales
orders has been steadily increasing, and in the last 10
years the volum e of orders has m ore than doubled and
the dollar value o f publications sold has m ore than
tripled. T he current public interest in the G overn m en t’s
publishing program points to a continuing increase in the
volum e of orders.
(2) Distribution jo r other agencies and M embers o j
Congress.— T h e Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts under p ro­
visions of law is required to prepare m ailing lists, including
the m ailing list for the Congressional R ecord, and to
perform m ailing operations upon the request o f any
G overn m ent agency and w ith ou t reim bursem ent from
those agencies. A nother legal obligation is to handle the
m ailing of farm ers’ bulletins, soil surveys, and other
publications w hich are allocated to M em bers o f Congress
on a quota basis.
(3) D epository library distribution.— T h e Superintendent
o f D ocu m en ts is required b y law to su pply 1 co p y o f every
G overnm ent publication, u pon request, to m ore than 540
libraries w hich are designated depositories for G overn ­
m ent publications.




1951 actual

Object classification
S um m ary of Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_____________ ________
Average grade______________ _____
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________ _ __
Average sirade.. ______ _ . . _____ _
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions___ _ _ _______ _
Payment above basic rates:
Overtime_______ _ . _____________
Night-work differential _____ ______
Total personal service obligations.. .
Direct Obligations

01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
From Other Accounts

01 Personal services _________________
08 Supplies and materials . - ________
Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements from other ac­
counts ______ ______ _________
Obligations incurred

_____

5, 554

5, 000

5,000

2, 586, 582

2, 822,120

3,192,885

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$329, 387
2, 586, 582

$597, 980
2,822,120

$615, 312
3,192,885

A AY
N L SIS O E P N IT R S
F XE D UE
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year-------

2, 915, 969

3, 420, 100

3, 808,197

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations---------------------Unliquidated obligations, end of year...

5, 654
597, 980

5,000
615, 312

5. 000
611, 812

Total expenditures----- --- --------------

2,312, 335

2. 799, 788

3,191, 385

1, 982, 948
329, 387

2, 240, 000
446,168y

2, 737, 885
450, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations -------------Out of prior authorizations_________ . . .
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases
__ ________

113, 620

3, 500

40

THE

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

Statement of 'proposed obligations for the purchase and hire of passenger vehicles for the fiscal year 1953
G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G OFFICE
Motor vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Number

Allowance
(estimated)

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur­
chased

2

$400

$2,400

Appropriation
Number

Working capital and congressional
printing and binding, Government
Printing Office.

2

Gross
cost
$2,800

G E N E R A L P R O V IS IO N S
S e c . 102. Purchases may be made from the foregoing appropria­
tions under the ‘ ‘ Government Printing Office” , as provided for in
the Printing Act approved January 12, 1895, and without reference
to the Act approved June 30, 1949 (Public Law 152) as amended
by the Act approved September 5, 1950 (Public Law 754), concern­
ing purchases for the Federal Government.
S e c . 103. In order to keep the expenditures for printing and
binding for the current fiscal year within or under the appropria­
tions for such fiscal year, the heads of the various executive depart­
ments and independent establishments are authorized to discon­
tinue the printing of annual or special reports under their respective
jurisdictions: Provided, That where the printing of such reports is
discontinued the original copy thereof shall be kept on file in the
offices of the heads of the respective departments or independent
establishments for public inspection.
S e c . 104. No part of the funds appropriated in this Act shall be
used for the maintenance or care of private vehicles.
Sec . 105. Whenever any office or position not specifically estab­
lished by the Legislative Pay Act of 1929 is appropriated for herein
or whenever the rate of compensation or designation of any position
appropriated for herein is different from that specifically established
for such position by such Act, the rate of compensation and the
designation of the position, or either, appropriated for or provided
herein, shall be the permanent law with respect thereto: Provided,
That the provisions relating to positions and salaries thereof carried
in H. Res. 434, 464, 492, 493, 494, 534, 537, 587, 613, 626 and 693 of the
Eighty-first Congress, and H. Res. 37 and 224 of the Eighty-second
Congress shall be the permanent law with respect thereto.
S e c . 106. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act
shall be paid as compensation to any person appointed after June 30,
1935, as an officer or member of the Capitol Police who does not




Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

1

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

Public purpose and users

To be used by the Public Printer and subordinate officials when
such means of transportation is economical and advantageous
to the Government.

meet the standards to be prescribed for such appointees by the
Capitol Police Board: Provided, That the Capitol Police Board is
hereby authorized to detail police from the House Office, Senate
Office, and Capitol Buildings for police duty on the Capitol Grounds.
S e c . 107. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act
shall be used to pay the salary or wages of any* person who engages
in a strike against the Government of the United States or who is a
member of an organization of Government employees that asserts
the right to strike against the Government of the United States, or
who advocates, or is a member of an organization that advocates,
the overthrow of the Government of the United States by force or
violence: Provided, That for the purposes hereof an affidavit shall be
considered prima facie evidence that the person making the affi­
davit has not, contrary to the provisions of this section, engaged in
a strike against the Government of the United States, is not a mem­
ber of an organization of Government employees that asserts the
right to strike against the Government of the United States, or that
such person does not advocate, and is not a member of an organi­
zation that advocates, the overthrow of the Government of the
United States by force or violence: Provided further, That any per­
son who engages in a strike against the Government of the "United
States or who is a member of an organization of Government em­
ployees that asserts the right to strike against the Government of
the United States, or who advocates, or who is a member of an
organization that advocates, the overthrow of the Government of
the United States by force or violence, and accepts employment the
salary or wages for which are paid from any appropriation contained
in this Act shall be guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, shall be
fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned for not more than one
year, or both: Provided further, That the above penalty clause shall
be in addition to, and not in substitution for, any other provisions
of existing law. {Legislative Branch Appropriation Act, 1952.)







T H E J U D IC IA R Y
SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations
Appropriations

$25, 543, 665

$25, 918, 115

$27, 657, 800

914

1, 000

1, 000

25, 544, 579

25, 919, 115

27, 658, 800

Appropriations:
Pay increases _
..
_
Other__________________________________ ------------------------

1, 151, 435
170, 000

Permanent Authorizations
A

a

nn

Total new obligational authority en­
acted or recommended-___________
PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION

Total new obligational authority pro­
posed for later transmission.
Total new obligational authority (for
detail, see following tables)

42

.....................

25, 544, 579

1, 321, 435

27, 240, 550

27, 658, 800




T H E J U D IC IA R Y
SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOC­
UMENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
$25, 080, 154
1, 000

Total expenditures from new authori­
zations _ __ _ ____
__

$25,011,186

$26, 554, 550
1, 000

25, 081, 154

26, 555, 550

947, 370

Out of current authorizations-- _
__
Out of permanent authorizations _ _
_

837, 961

26, 028, 524

27, 393,511

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recommended

25, Oil, 186

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
1, 115, 796

Out of current authorizations: Pay increases
Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations:
Pay increases
_ _
Other

35, 639
170, 000

Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions proposed for later transmission.
Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following tables)___ __ _ _ _

1, 115, 796

25, Oil, 186

205, 639

27, 144, 320

27, 599, 150

43

TH E

4 4

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

1952

1951 enacted
Enacted

1953

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
Supreme Court of the United States:
Salaries.................... . . ..................... ...............................
Printing and binding Supreme Court reports...........
Miscellaneous expenses..... .............................................
Care of the building and grounds................................
Miscellaneous: Preparation of rules for civil procedure.

602
602
602
602
602

$915,000
91,200
52,100
159,200

$928,000
91,200
58, 350
160, 700

$52,000

11,800

$980,000
91,200
58,350
172,500

$1,017,900
91,200
46, 450
174,100

$1,017,900
91,200
46,450
174,100

1,217,500

1,238,250

63, 800

1,302,050

1, 329,650

1,329,650

602

192,200

194, 500

7,000

201,500

202, 700

202,700

602

417,465

433,165

23,835

457,000

467,000

467,000

602
602

575,000
10,700

579, 800
9,100

7,000

586,800
9,100

613, 800
3,700

613,8'
3,700

585,700

588, 900

7,000

595,900

617,500

617,500

602
602
602
207
602
602
602
602
602
602
602
602

106,500
5.095.000
4.470.000
2.145.000
520.000
545.000
2.900.000
2.600.000
675.000
725.000
972.000
520.000

10 00
2, 0

120,000

5.120.000
4, 520,000
2,180, 000
542, 300
543.000
2.800.000
2.670.000
750.000
715.000
988, 200
535.000

5.120.000
4, 925,850
2.377.000
594,800
543.000
2.800.000
2,909,900
750.000
715.000
1,082,600
578,400

124, 500
5,120,000
4,991,850
2,422, 200
607, 500
543, 000
2, 900,000
2, 928, 600
875,050
715.000
1,113,500
594,650

124.500
5.120.000
4,991,850
2,422,200
607.500
543.000
2.900.000
2,928,600
875,050
715.000
1,113,500
594,650

602

7,100

7,100

7,100

7,100

7,100

602

6,200

3,700

3,700

3,700

3,700

602

849.000

879.000

879.000

879.000

879.000

602

995.000

1.090.000

16,750

1,106,750

1,215, 300

1,215,300

Total other courts and services..

23,130,800

23,463,300

1,049,800

24,513,100

25,040,950

25,040,950

Total current authorizations.

25,543,665

25,918,115

1,151,435

27,069,550

27,657,800

27,657,800

1,000

1,000

1.000

27,070,550

27,658,800

27,658,800

27,658,800

27,658,800

Total, Supreme Court of the United States.......
Court of Customs and Patent Appeals: Salaries and
expenses.
Customs Court: Salaries and expenses.............................. .
Court of Claims:
Salaries and expenses............
Repairs and improvements..
Total, Court of Claims..
Other courts and services:
Salaries of justices and judges, Hawaii-------------------Salaries of judges-------------------------------- ------------------Salaries of clerks of courts_____________ _____ _____
Probation system, United States courts....................
Salaries of criers, United States courts------ ------- -----Fees of commissioners, United States courts_______
Fees of jurors, United States courts........ ................
Miscellaneous salaries, United States courts............
Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts...........
Travel expenses, United States courts_______ _____
Salaries of court reporters, United States courts.......... .
Salaries and expenses, administrative office, United
States courts.
Repairs and improvements, District Court of the
United States for the District of Columbia.
Repairs and improvements, United States Court of
Appeals for the District of Columbia.
Salaries of referees, United States courts (special
account).
Expenses of referees, United States courts (special
account).

405, 850
197, 000
52, 500

239, 900

94.400
43.400

PER M AN ENT AUTHORIZATIONS
(Indefinite appropriation, special account, unless
otherwise indicated)

1,000

Other courts and services: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Total _

25,544,579

25,919,115

1,151, 435

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
(Other than pay increase supplemental)
Under existing legislation:
Other courts and services:
Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts..
Fees of jurors, United States courts....................

602
602

70,000

Total new obligational authority and total budget
expenditures.

25,544,579

* Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




25, 919,115

100,000

170,000

Total-

70,000

100,000

170,000

1,321,435

27,240,550

THE

J U D IC IA R Y

4 5

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations
zations already posed forpro­
later
enacted
transmission 3

Total

Out of authori­
Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations
years and rec­ posed forpro­
later
ommended in transmission3
detail herein

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS

$891,706
54,797
42,276
156,765
1,658

$925,044
88,116
60, 696
160, 980

$50,500

1,147,202

Supreme Court of the United States:
Salaries
Printing and binding Supreme Court reports
Miscellaneous expenses
Care of the building and grounds
Miscellaneous: Preparation of rules for civil procedure

$1,012,900
91,200
51,450
172, 900

$1, 500

11,100

$975,544
88,116
60,696
172,080

700

$1,014,400
91,200
51,450
173,600

1, 234,836

61, 600

1,296,436

1, 328,450

2, 200

1,330,650

184,993

194,062

6, 711

200,773

202,411

289

202,700

Court of Customs and Patent Appeals: Salaries and expenses

416,362

432,015

23,135

455,150

465, 300

700

466,000

Customs Court: Salaries and expenses

528,008
18,422

574, 866
9,073

5,250

580,116
9,073

610,050
3,950

1,750

611,800
3,950

Court of Claims:
Salaries and expenses
Repairs and improvements

546,430

583,939

5, 250

589,189

614,000

1,750

615,750

Total, Court of Claims

100,497
4,952,833
4,379,026
2,120,980
506,190
537,784
2,845,491
2,535,392
777,875
683,184
960,182
509,288

120,000
5,106,032
4, 514,898
2,170, 462
539,750
543,030
2,895,935
2,656,426
824,875
713,306
985,442
533,941

120,000
5,106,032
4,911,748
2,362,462
591,250
543,030
2,895,935
2,890,326
824,875
713,306
1,077,742
575,341

124, 500
5,120, 000
4, 965, 850
2, 409, 200
604, 500
543.000
2,800,000
2,911, 600
793,050
715.000
1,110, 500
590, 650

7,861

7,117

7,117

7,100

7,100

6,729

3,999

3,999

3,700

3,700

838,919

878, 732

878,732

879, 000

879.000

952,866

1,088,486

11,150

1,099,636

1, 204, 700

5,600

1,210,300

22,715,097

23, 582,431

1,019,100

24,601,531

24, 782,350

30,700

24,813,050

Total, other courts and services

25,010,084

26,027, 283

1,115,796

27,143,079

27, 392, 511

35,639

27,428,150

Total current authorizations

396, 850
192,000
51, 500

233, 900

92,300
41,400

9.000
5.000
1.000

6,000

2,100
2,000

124.500
5.120.000
4,974,850
2,414,200
605.500
543.000
2.800.000
2.917.600
793,050
715.000
1.112.600
592,650

Total, Supreme Court of the United States

Other courts and services:
Salaries of justices and judges, Hawaii
Salaries of judges
Salaries of clerks of courts
Probation system, United States courts
Salaries of criers, United States courts
Fees of commissioners, United States courts
Fees of jurors, United States courts
Miscellaneous salaries, United States courts
Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts
Travel expenses, United States courts
Salaries of court reporters, United States courts
Salaries and expenses, administrative office, United States
courts.
Repairs and improvements, District Court of the United
States for the District of Columbia.
Repairs and improvements, United States Court of Appeals
for the District of Columbia.
Salaries of referees, United States courts (special account)
Expenses of referees, United States courts (special account)

PER M AN EN T AUTHORIZATIONS
(Indefinite appropriation, special account, unless
otherwise indicated)
1,102

25,011,186

26,028, 524

1,241

1,241

1,115,796

1,000

27,144,320

27,393, 511

1,000

35,639

27,429,150

Other courts and services: Replacement of personal property
sold.
Total
PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSM ISSION
(Other than pay increase supplemental)

70,000
100,000

Under existing legislation:
Other courts and services:
Miscellaneous expenses, United States courts
Fees of jurors, United States courts

170,000

170,000

Total proposed for later transmission

205,639

27,599,150

70,000
100,000

25,011,186

26,028, 524

1,115,796

27,144,320

27,393, 511

8 Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




Total new obligational authority and total budget
expenditures.

4 6

THE

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

C U R R E N T A U T H O R I Z A T IO N S
SU PREM E

analysis of expenditures— continued

C O U R T O F T H E U N IT E D S T A T E S

SALARIES
Salaries, Supreme Court—
For the Chief Justice and eight Associate Justices, and all other
officers and employees, whose compensation shall be fixed by the
Court, except as otherwise provided by law, and who may be em­
ployed and assigned by the Chief Justice to any office or work of
the Court, [$928,0001 $1,017,900. (28 U. S. C. 1, 5, 671-675;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $928,000
Estimate 1953, $1,017,900
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$928,000

$1,017,900

Appropriation or estimate:______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_________________________________

$915,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

915,000
-20,980

980, 000

894, 020

980, 000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year... _______ . . . __________________

$40,000

$40, 000

54, 797

88,116

91, 20C

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations . . ___
Out of prior authorizations____. . . . _

22,175
32, 622

51, 200
36, 916

51, 200
40, 000

M
ISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES
Miscellaneous Expenses, Supreme Court—
For miscellaneous expenses to be expended as the Chief Justice
may approve, C$58,3503 $46,450. (Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $58,350
Estimate 1953, $46,450

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$52,100
4,815

$58, 350
5, 000

$46, 450
5, 000

1953 estimate

Total available for obligation._____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

56, 915
-191

63, 350

51, 450

162
19
177

162
20
179

163
20
182

Obligations incurred. ____ . . . _
Comparative transfer to “ Miscellaneous
expenses, United States courts” .. ___

56, 724

63, 350

51,450

63, 350

51^450

$841,037
51, 432

$914, 384
63, 045

$952, 284
63, 045

1, 551

2, 571

2, 571

894, 020

980, 000

1,017, 900

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$500
10, 000
24.150
800
1, 300
12, 600
9, 000
58, 350

$500
10, 000
18, 250
800
1, 300
12, 600
3, 000
46, 450

Total obligations .

Personal Services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base... _________ ______________
Obligations incurred____

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions.. ..
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees. ______
01

A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N

Appropriation or estimate. ____ . . _
Reimbursements from other accounts____

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification

1953 estimate

$36,916

. . _.

1, 017, 900

52,000

1952 estimate

...

Total expenditures____

1,017,900

Obligations incurred_______________

1951 actual

___

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Object classification

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year.. ___________ ________ ______
Total expenditures___ _____________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations..
_
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases___________ . . . _____

1951 actual

Direct Obligations

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$32, 044
£80,000
1,012,044

1,054,400

$29.730
894, 020
923, 750

56, 056

_ ___ . . .

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual

.

-668

$36, 500
1, 017, 900

32,044

36, 500

40,000

891,706

975, 544

1,014,400

861, 976
29, 730

893,000
32, 044

977, 900
35,000

50, 500

$40
9, 717
22, 999
712
786
8,717
8, 270
51, 241

02
04
06
07

Travel___________________________ . . .
Communication services... ._
.
Printing and reproduction______
Other contractual services___________
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 Equipment_____________ . . . . . . .
Total direct obligations_________ . .

1,500

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accoun ts

04

Communication services

...

Total obligations______ . . .

4, 815

_. . .

5, 000

5, 000

56, 056

..

63, 350

51, 450

1952 estim
ate

1953 estim
ate

$13,519
56, 724
70, 243

$22, 346
63, 350
85,696

$20, 000
51, 450
71,450

4. 815
22, 346
806
42, 276

5, 000
20, 000

5, 000
15, 000

60. 696

51. 450

29, 563
12, 713

38,350
22, 346

31, 450
20, 0C0

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
PRINTING AND BINDING SUPREM COURT REPORTS
E

1951

Printing and Binding Supreme Court Reports—
For printing and binding the advance opinions, preliminary
prints, and bound reports of the Court, $91,200. (28 U. S. C.
411, 412, 678; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the
Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $91,200
Estimate 1953, $91,200
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1952 estim
ate

1953 estim
ate

$91,200
-32,109

$91, 200

$91, 200

59, 091

91, 200

91, 200

1951

Appropriation or estim
ate__________
Unobligated balance, estim
ated savings..
Obligations incurred____ ____

actual

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
06

Printing and reproduction—1951, $59,091; 1952, $91,200; 1953, $91,200.

A AY
N L SIS O E P N IT R S
F XE D UE
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year.........




$30,709
1,913
59,091
91, 713

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$36,916

$40,000

91, 200

91,200

128,116 1

131,200

Unliquidated obligations, start of year--O
bligations incurred during the year----Deduct:
Reim
bursable obligations----- -------Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustm in obligations of prior years_
ent
Total expenditures_________ _
Expenditures are distributed a follows:
s
O of current authorizations----------ut
O of prior authorizations------------ut

actual

CARE O TH BUILDING AN GROUN
F
E
D
DS
Care of the Building and Grounds, Supreme Court—
For such expenditures as may be necessary to enable the Architect
of the Capitol to carry out the duties imposed upon him by the Act
approved May 7, 1934 (40 U. S. C. 13a-13d), including improve­
ments, maintenance, repairs, equipment, supplies, materials, and
appurtenances; special clothing for workmen; and personal and other
services (including temporary labor without reference to the Classi­
fication and Retirement Acts, as amended), and for snow removal by
hire of men and equipment or under contract without compliance
with sections 3709, as amended, and 3744 of the Revised Statutes
(41 U. S. C. 5, 16); [$160,700] $174,100, of which not to exceed
[$147,500] $157,400 shall be available for personal services.

THE

J U D IC IA R Y

A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N

(Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $160,700
Estimate 1953, $174,100
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$160, 700

$174,100

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_

$159, 200

Total available for obligation___ .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. ...

159, 200
-3 ,8 7 8

172, 500

155, 322

172, 500

1951 actual

Object classification

201, 500

202, 700

181,914

201, 500

202, 700

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

24
23

24
24

24
24

$171,076

$183, 373

$184, 573

401

342

342

Total personal services_________
Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things... . . ________
Communication services__________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services. ____ __
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipment... . .
________ . . . _ .

171,477
144
6
867
6, 500
368
737
1,815

183, 715
145
25
875
12,000
600
850
3,290

184, 915
145
25
875
12,000
600
850
3, 290

37
36

37
37

Personal services:
Permanent positions. . _
. _.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.. _ . . . ______ ______ _
Payment above basic rates..___ ._

$114,892

$130, 380

$132, 405

400
23, 660

800
24, 620

400
24. 595

Total personal services.
...
Other contractual services:
General annual repairs________
Annual painting_____________ _____
Snow removal.
__ ____ ____
08 Supplies and materials________ ______
09 Annual equipment___ _______

138,952

155,800

157, 400

5, 982
3,414
6,110
864

7, 800
2,000
150
6,000
750

7,800
2,000
150
6,000
750

155, 322

172, 500

Obligations incurred______________

181, 914

201, 500

202,700

Obligations incurred.._____ ______

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$13,481
181,914

$8, 573
201,500

$9,300
202, 700

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

$14, 485
155,322

$12,980
172,500

$13,400
174,100

169, 807

185,480

187, 500

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.__
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

12, 980
62

13,400

13,900

Total expenditures_________________

156, 765

172,080

173, 600

142, 604
14,161

148,000
12, 980

160, 200
12, 700

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ . _
Out of prior authorizations_______ . . .
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases

11,100

700

Miscellaneous
Preparation of Rules for Civil Procedure, Supreme Court—
A AY
N L SIS O E P N IT R S
F XE D UE
1952 estimate

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _

1953 estimate

$1,193
465
1, 658

Total expenditures
Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions.. _
_ __
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base..
. . __ . _ ^ __________

1,658

02
03
04
06
07
08
09

--------------------

1951 actual

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred, during the year_____

Object classification

174,100

07

7,000

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

37
37

Total number of permanent positions. _..
Average number of all employees- ______
01

_

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees. _ ____
1953 estimate

195, 395

210,073

212,000

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

8, 573
1,829

9,300

9, 300

Total expenditures_________________

184,993

200,773

202, 700

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_____ ____
Out of prior authorizations_________ . .
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases . _______ ___

173, 807
11,186

185, 489
8, 573

193, 400
9,011

6,711

289

CU STO M S COURT
SALARIES AND EXPENSES
Salaries and Expenses, Customs Court—
For salaries of the chief judge, eight judges, and all other officers
and employees of the court, and necessary expenses of the court, in­
cluding exchange of books, and traveling expenses, as may be ap­
proved by the chief judge, [$433,165, of which not to exceed
$401,165 shall be available for personal services] $467,000: Provided,
That traveling expenses of judges of the Customs Court shall be
paid upon the written certificate of the judge. (5 T . S. C. 836-842;
J
28 T . S. C. 251-255, 456, 871, 872, 961, 962; 31 T . S. C. 588; De­
J
J
partments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $433,165
Estimate 1953, $467,000
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

C O U R T OF C U S T O M S A N D P A T E N T A PP E A LS
SALARIES AN EXPENSES
D
Salaries and Expenses, Court of Customs and Patent Appeals—
For salaries of the chief judge, four associate judges, and all other
officers and employees of the court, and necessary expenses of the
court, including exchange of books, and traveling expenses, as may
be approved by the chief judge, [$194,500, of which not to exceed
$176,715 shall be available for personal services] $202,700. (5
T . S. C. 836-842; 28 T . S. C. 211-213, 831-834; 31 T . S. C. 588;
J
J
J
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, i952.)
A p p r o p r i a t e d 1 9 5 2 , $ 1 9 4 ,5 0 0




E s t i m a t e 1 9 5 3 , $ 2 0 2 ,7 0 0

$202,700

192, 200
-10,286

Obligations incurred_____ _

1952 estimate

1951 actual

$194,500

Total available for obligation. . .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. _

11,800

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

1953 estimate

$192, 200

174,100

______

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate____ _ _ __ _
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
_____ __ ___________ .

174,100

Obligations incurred. __

4 7

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$433,165

$467,000

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases . . . . _______________________

$417, 465

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

417, 465
- 3 , 539

457, 000

467,000

Obligations incurred_______________

413, 926

457, 000

467,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

68
67

68
67

23,835

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees________

1951 actual
64
63

TH E

4 8

BU DGET

FOR

F IS C A L

salaries and expenses—continued

Object classification

Salaries and Expenses, Customs Court—Continued
obligations by objects—continued

02
03
04
06
07
08
09
15

Total personal services_______
____________________
Travel
Transportation of things-------------------Communication services_________
Printing and reproduction__________
Other contractual services_________
Supplies and materials_______ ___
Equipment______
- - ------------Taxes and assessments_____
_____
Obligations incurred_______

_____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1,095

431, 500
15,000
1,500
5, 000
3,000
390
3.000
7, 500
110

526, 292

586,800

613,800

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$30,909
873
526, 292

$30,066

$36, 750

586,800

613,800

558,074
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________

616, 866

650, 550

30, 066

36, 750

38, 750

528,008

580,116

611,800

496, 227
31, 781

544, 800
30,066

575,050
35,000

5, 250

1,750

1,095

425,000
13, 500
1, 500
4, 500
2,000
390
2,500
7, 500
110

Obligations incurred_______________

$430,405

384,713
10, 894
1, 068
4,491
3,080
140
2, 536
7,002
2

$7, 500
10,800
20

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations __________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases_____ _____ _________

$423,905

$7, 500
10,800
20

Total expenditures_____ __________

$384,713

$6,074
6,273
25

1953 estimate

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

457,000

413, 926

1951 actual

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.. Obligations incurred during the year_____

467,000

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year-------

1951 actual

08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipment_________ _______________
15 Taxes and assessments_________ ___

1952 estimate

1951 actual

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base ______ ____________________

1953

obligations by objects—continued

C U S T O M S C O U R T — C ontinued

Object classification

YEAR

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$12,850

$14, 700

$15,197
4X3, 926

457,000

467,000

429,212

469, 850

481,700

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year ______ __
___ - _______ - _

12, 850

14, 700

15, 700

Total expenditures-------------------------

416,362

455,150

466.000

402,010
14,352

419,165
12, 850

Repairs and Improvements, Court of Claims—
For necessary repairs and improvements to the Court of Claims
buildings, to be expended under the supervision of the Architect of
the Capitol, [$9,100] $3,700. (31 Stat. 1135; Departments of State,
Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $9,100
Estimate 1953, $3,700

451,300
14,000

23,135

REPAIRS AND IM
PROVEM
ENTS

700

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations---------------Out of prior authorizations.. . __ __
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases ____ _____________

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

C O U R T OF C L A IM S

Appropriation or estimate__ ____ __ __
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. .

$10,700
-2 ,3 9 2

$9,100

$3,700

SALARIES AN EXPENSES
D

Obligations incurred________ ______

8,308

9,100

3, 700

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$3, 700

Salaries and Expenses, Court of Claims—
For salaries of the chief judge, four associate judges, seven regular
and six additional commissioners, and all other officers and employ­
ees of the court, and for other necessary expenses, including steno­
graphic and other fees and charges necessary in the taking of testi­
mony, and travel, [$579,800, of which not to exceed $495,580 shall
be available for personal services] $613,800. («5 U. S. C. 836-842;
28 U. S. C. 171, 456, 791-795, 962; 31 U. S. C. 588; 41 U. S. C. 114;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $579,800
Estimate 1953, $613,800

$2, 581
5,707
20

$3,700
4,900

Obligations incurred_____________

8,308

9,100

3,700

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$10, 587
8,308

$473
9,100

$500
3, 700

18,895

9,573

4, 200

473

500

250

Total expenditures.______ _______

18, 422

9,073

3, 950

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ _____
Out of prior authorizations____________

7,835
10, 587

8,600
473

3,450
500

500

1951 actual

$579, 800

$613,800

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

613,800

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________

Total available for obligation---------Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

575,000
-4 8 , 708

586,800

Obligations incurred_______________

526, 292

586,800

7,000

613,800

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions-----Average number of all e m p l o y e e s .-------

69
67

74
69

74
71

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.

$454, 546

$500,895
1, 685

$527,895
1,685

Total personal services.............. ___
Travel_______________________________
Communication services_______ ______
Rents and utility services.................. .
Printing and reproduction----------------Other contractual services..................

454, 546
8,848
2, 053
2,660
44, 805
1,008

502, 580
17,000
2, 500
2, 400
43,000
1,000

529, 580
17,000
2,500
2,400
43,000
1,000




Other contractual services:
General annual repairs..... ........ .
Annual painting____
___ ______
Improvements: Revolving door___
Ventilating fans___________________

1953 estimate

$575,000

02
04
05
06
07

07

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate----------- ---------Proposed supplemental due to pay increases

Object classification

Object classification

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

O T H E R C O U R T S A N D SE R V IC E S
HAWAII
Salaries of Justices and Judges, Hawaii—
For salaries of the chief justice and two associate justices of the
Supreme Court of the Territory of Hawaii, of judges of the circuit
courts in Hawaii, and of judges retired under title 28, United States
Code, section 373, [$120,000] $124,500. (48 U. S C. 632, 634a;
'.
Acts of May 11, 1945, Public Act 142 and May 4, 1951, Public Act 26

THE

J U D IC IA R Y

Legislature, Territory oj Hawaii; Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $120,000
Estimate 1953, $124,500
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or e s tim a te -........ ..............
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$106,500
-6,0 0 3

$120,000

100,497

120,000

124,500

[$4,520,000] $4,991,850. (28 U. S. C. 640 (a) (5), 711 (a) (b),
713 (a), 751 (a) (b); 48 U. S. C. 104, 106, 107, 863, 1349, 1405y;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $4,520,000
Estimate 1953, $4,991,850
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

$124,500

Obligations incurred_______________

4 9

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1951 actual

01

1953 estimate

15
14

15
15

$120,000

$124,500

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred during the year_____

$100,497

$120,000

$124,500

Expenditures out of current authorization s..._________ _____ _________________

100,497

120,000

124,500

SALARIES

OF

JUDGES

Salaries of Judges—
For salaries of circuit judges; district judges (including judges of
the district courts of Alaska, the Virgin Islands, the Panama Canal
Zone, and Guam); and justices and judges retired or resigned under
title 28, United States Code, sections 371, 372, and 373; $5,120,000.
(28 U. S. C. 44, 183, 185; 48 U. S. C. 1844, 1848, 1858; Departments
of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act,
1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $5,120,000
Estimate 1953, $5,120,000

4,925,850

4,991,850

Obligations incurred_______________

4,385,036

4, 925,850

4,991,850

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1,114
27
1,107

1,128
27
1,130

1,128
27
1,133

$4, 282, 028
69,936

$4,800,808
78,326

$4,866,808
78,326

8, 500
24, 272

18,812
27,054

18,812
27,054

4,384, 736
300

4,925,000
850

4,991,000
850

Obligations incurred_____ _________

4,385,036

4,925,850

4,991,850

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$91,027
4,385,036

$94,898
4,925,850

$109,000
4,991,850

4,476,063

5,020,748

5,100,850

94,898
2,139

109,000

126.000

4,379,026

4,911,748

4, 974,850

4,290,138
88,888

4,420,000
94,898

4,865,850
100,000

396,850

9,000

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

1951 actual

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____ _________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e __ ______ ________ __________
Payment above basic rates________

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.__
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

$4,991,850

405,850
4,470,000
-8 4 , 964

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions .
Average number of all employees________

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

$4,520,000

$4,470,000

Total personal services......... ..........
15 Taxes and assessments____ __________

1952 estimate

$100,497

Personal services: Permanent posi­
tions__________________ ______ ____

1953 estimate

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

14
12

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees_____ _

Appropriation or estimate...... ............ .........
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_________________________________

1952 estimate

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. ..

$5,095,000
-116,673

$5,120,000

$5,120,000

Obligations incurred_______________

4, 978,327

5,120,000

5,120, 000

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Total expenditures.........................
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.________
Out of prior authorizations___ _________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases^___________________

PROBATION SYSTEM
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

335
322

339
331

339
331

$4,978,327

$5,120,000

$5,120,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$16, 635
4,978,327

$39,782
5,120,000

$53.750
5,120,000

4,994,962

5,159, 782

5,173,750

39, 782
2,347

53, 750

53, 750

Total expenditures............................

4,952,833

5,106,032

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations-------------------

4,938, 545
14,288

5,066, 250
39, 782

5,066, 250
53, 750

Probation System, United States Courts—
For salaries of probation officers and their clerical assistants, as
authorized by title 18, United States Code, sections 3654 and 3656,
[$2,180,000] $2,422,200: Provided, That nothing herein contained
shall be construed to abridge the right of the district judges to
appoint probation officers, or to make such orders as may be neces­
sary to govern probation officers in their own courts: Provided
further, That no part of this appropriation shall be used to pay the
salary or expenses of any probation officer who, in the judgment of
the chief or presiding judge certified to the Attorney General, fails
to carry out the official orders of the Attorney General with respect
to supervising or furnishing information concerning any prisoner
released conditionally or on parole from any Federal penal or correc­
tional institution. (Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the
Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,180,000
Estimate 1953, $2,422,200

5,120,000

Object classification

1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees________
01

Personal services: Permanent posi­
tions___________ __________________

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

SALARIES O CLERKS OF COU
F
RTS
Salaries of Clerks of Courts—
For salaries of clerks of United States courts of appeals and
United States district courts, their deputies, and other assistants,




#

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,180,000

$2,422,200

Appropriation or estimate----- ------- ---------Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
__ _________________________

$2,145,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..-

2,145,000
-18,316

2,377,000

2,422,200

Obligations incurred—........................

2,126,684

2,377,000

2,422,200

197,000

THE

50

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1353

analysis of expenditures—continued

O T H E R C O U R T S A N D SE R V IC E S — Continued
probation system— continued

1951 actual

Probation System, United States Courts—Continued
O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

591, 250

605, 500

496, 042
10,148

530,300
9,450

592, 500
12,000

51, 500

1,000

$2,331, 237
30, 890

$2,376, 437
30,890

4,000
5,089

8,977
5, 546

8, 977
5, 546

Total pergonal services__________
15 Taxes and assessments_______________

2,126,446
238

2,376, 650
350

2,421,850
350

Obligations incurred_______________

2,126, 684

2,377,000

2,422,200

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$40, 758
2,126, 684

$46,462
2,377,000

$61,000
2,422, 200

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E

Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$15,000

506,190

$2,084,092
33,265

1951 actual

$13,000

Total expenditures___ ____________

523
10
525

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates________

$9,450
1,325

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____
...
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases. ____________________

523
10
524

01

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

518
12
522

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees___ ____

1952 estimate

2,167,442

2, 423, 462

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year------- ---------- -------------------------------

61,000

Total expenditures________________

2,120, 980

2, 362, 462

2, 414, 200

2,080, 222
40, 758

2,124, 000
46, 462

2,353, 200
56, 000

192,000

A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
Appropriation or estim
ate— 9 1 $545,000; 1 5 , $543,000; 19 3 $5 ,000
15,
92
5 , 43 .

69, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____ _______
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases____________ _______

Fees of Commissioners, United States Courts—
For fees of the United States commissioners and other committing
magistrates acting under title 18, United States Code, section 3041,
including fees and expenses of conciliation commissioners, United
States courts, including the objects and subject to the conditions
specified for such fees and expenses of conciliation commissioners in
the Department of Justice Appropriation Act, 1937, $543,000. (28
U. S. C. 681, 683, 636; 11 U. S. C. 203 (b); Departments of State,
Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $543,000
Estimate 1953, $543,000

2, 483,200

46,462

FEES O COM ISSIONERS
F
M

5, 000

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$542, 520
2, 480

$541,500
1, 500

$541, 500
1,500

545,000

543, 000

543,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$96,262
22, 302
545,000

$125, 780

$125, 750

543,000

543, 000

663, 564

OF

Personal services: Fees:
United States Commissioners______
Conciliation commissioners_____ _
Obligations incurred......................

SALARIES

01

1951 actual

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________ ______________________

668, 780

668, 750

125, 780

125, 750

125, 750

1953 estimate

Total expenditures________________

537, 784

543,030

543,000

$607, 500

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations ____ ______

419, 220
118, 564

417, 250
125, 780

417, 250
125, 750

CRIERS

Salaries of Criers, United States Courts—
For salaries of criers as authorized by title 28, United States
Code, sections 713 (a) and 755, [$542,300] $607,500. (Depart­
ments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $542,300
Estimate 1953, $607,500
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases. _ ______________________________

$520,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.._

520, 000
-1 4 , 508

594,800
594, 800

607, 500

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

184
3
169

184
3
177

184
3
177

$494,075
9,021

$581,153
9, 763

$593, 853
9, 763

1,000
1,366

2,216
1,535

505,462
30

594, 667
133

607, 367
133

Obligations incurred______ _________

505, 492

594, 800

607, 500

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

2, 216
1,535

Total personal services___________
15 Taxes and assessments_____ _______

1951 actual

607, 500

505,492

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E

Obligations incurred_______________

$542,300
52, 500

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions _
Average number of all employees________
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates________

1951 actual

FEES O JURORS
F
Fees of Jurors, United States Courts—
For fees, expenses, and costs of jurors; meals and lodging for
jurors in Alaska, as provided by section 193, title II, of the Act of
June 6, 1900 (31 Stat. 362); and compensation for jury commis­
sioners; C$2,800,000] $2,900,000'. Provided, That the compensation
of jury commissioners for the District of Columbia shall conform
to the provisions of section 1401, title 11 of the District of Columbia
Code. (Act of July 14, 1949, Public Law 168; 48 U. S. C. 25, 867;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,800,000
Estimate 1953, $2,900,000
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate. _ ____________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred_________ _____

Object classification
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____




1953 estimate

$2,800,000

$2, 900,000

2, 853, 743

2,800,000

2,900,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 060,000
5,275

$2,080,000
5, 275

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual

1952 estimate

$2, 900,000
-4 6 , 257

1952 estimate

$11,473
505,492

$9,450
594,800

516, 965

604, 250

$13,000
607, 500
620, 500

1951 actual

1953 estimate
07

Other contractual services:
Fees:
Jurors___________ _____ __________
Jury commissioners....... .................

$2,052, 285
5, 275

THE

J U D IC IA R Y

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E

obligations by objects—continued
Object classification
07

Other contractual services—Con.
Fees—Continued
Mileage jurors___________________
Subsistence per diem in lieu of
mileage for daily travel________
Meals and lodgings, jurors...........

51

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$620,957

$559, 500

$639, 500

150, 720
24, 506

150, 725
24, 500

150, 725
24, 500

1951 actual

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years._
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$52, 922
1,470
2, 534, 426

$53,426

$73,000

2, 909, 900

2,928, 600
3,001,600

2, 853, 743

2,800, 000

2,900,000

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$138,935

Total expenditures_ ........................ .
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.
____
Out of prior authorizations __________

2,938,935

138, 935

43,000

143,000

2, 845, 491

2, 895, 935

2,800, 000

2, 718, 731
126, 760

2, 757,000
138, 935

2, 757,000
43, 000

2, 943,000

M
ISCELLANEOUS SALARIES
Miscellaneous Salaries, United States Courts—
For salaries of all officials and employees of the Federal judiciary,
not otherwise specifically provided for, [$2,670,000] $2,928,600:
Provided, That the compensation of secretaries and law clerks of
circuit and district judges shall be fixed by the Director of the
Administrative Office without regard to the Classification Act of
1949, as amended, except that the salary of a secretary shall con­
form with that of the General Schedule grades (GS) 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8,
as the appointing judge shall determine, and the salary of a law
clerk shall conform with that of the General Schedule grades (GS)
5, 7, 9, 11, or 12, as the appointing judge shall determine, subject
to review by the judicial council of the circuit if requested by the
Director, such determination by the judge otherwise to be final:
Provided further, That (exclusive of step-increases corresponding
with those provided for by title VII of the Classification Act of 1949,
as amended, and of compensation paid for temporary assistance
needed because of an emergency) the aggregate salaries paid to
secretaries and law clerks appointed by one judge shall not exceed
[$9,600] $10,560 per annum, except in the case of the chief judge
of each circuit and the chief judge of each district court having
five or more district judges, in which case the aggregate salaries
shall not exceed [$13,050] $14,355 per annum. (28 U. S. C.
604 (a) (5), 634, 712, 752; 48 U. S. C. 102, 863, 870, 1344, 1349,
1405y, title 11, D. C. Code, sec. 312; Departments of State, Justice,
Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,670,000
Estimate 1953, $2,928,600
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

84, 000

2, 535, 392

2,890, 326

2,917,600

2,481,000
54,392

2, 603, 000
53, 426

2,844, 600
67, 000

233,900

6,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations ____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases _____________ _____

2,900,000

2,984, 426
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____ _______________ __ _______ __

73,000

$43,000

2, 800,000

$130,661
22
2, 853, 743

2,963,326

53, 426

Total expenditures __________ ____

Obligations incurred___________

2, 588, 818
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,670,000

$2,928,600

Appropriation or estimate_________ ______
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases________________________________

$2,600,000

Total available for obligation---------Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

2, 600, 000
-6 5 , 574

2,909,900

2, 928, 600

Obligations incurred..........................

2, 534, 426

2,909, 900

M
ISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES
Miscellaneous Expenses, United States Courts—
For miscellaneous expenses of the United States courts and their
officers; rent in the District of Columbia; purchase of firearms and
ammunition; and purchase of envelopes without regard to the Act of
June 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 476); [$750,000] $875,050: Provided, That
this appropriation shall be available for payment of the cost of
contract statistical services for the Office of Register of Wills of the
District of Columbia: Provided further, That not to exceed $1,000
of this appropriation shall be available for the payment of fees to
attorneys appointed in accordance with the Act of June 8, 1938
(52 Stat. 625), not exceeding $25 in any one case. (5 U. S. C. 55a;
18 U. S. C. 726; 28 U. S. C. 604, 639, 961, 1915b; 48 U. S. C. 102,
863, 1405y; Act of Aug. 2, 1949, Public Law 201; Departments of
State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $750,000
Estimate 1953, $875,050
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual
$675,000
-1 8 2

$750,000

$875,050

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer from “ Miscella­
_
neous expenses, Supreme Court” _

674,818

750,000

875, 050

Total obligations__________________

675,486

750,000

875,050

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees............. .
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions____ ____ ______
Part-time and temporary positions .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base........................ ...........................
Payment above basic rates________

1951 actual
621
8
597

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

624
8
615

614
8
606

$2,490, 079
32,135

$2,853, 358
37, 354

$2,872, 058
37, 354

4,813
7,252

10, 946
7,874

10, 946
7, 874

Total personal services............. .
15 Taxes and assessments...........................

2, 534, 279
147

2,909, 532
368

2, 928, 232
368

Obligations incurred...........................

2, 534,426

2,909,900

2,928, 600

9 5 0 0 0 0 — 52 -------- 4




668

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
1 5 actual
91

Object classification

0
3
0
4
0
5
0
6
0
7
0
8
0
9

Transportation of things_____________
Communication services. . . _________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services:
Psychiatric examinations__________
Transcripts in forma pauperis..........
Miscellaneous ____________________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipment:
General office______________________
Law books, accessions_____________
Law books, continuations.................

2, 928, 600

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate____ __ _______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

T otal obligations.............................

239,900

1952 estimate

1 5 estimate 1 5 estimate
92
93

$18,300
13 00
9, 0
21,857
75,668
87
5
2 ,5 7
1 9
20,025
91,990
1,7 0
4 3
11,334
206,128
675,486

$8 50
1, 0
20 00
1, 0
22,000
7,70
8 0
2.000
30.000
20.000
93,300
29,800
2,7 0
5 0
220,000
750,000

$18,500
2 9 50
1, 0
7.000
104.000
2.000
3,0 0
0 0
20,000
115,300
50,000
5,70
6 5
252.000
875,050

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1 5 actual
91
Unliquidated obligations, start of year.__.
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r____ ________ __________________
Total expenditures________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________ __
Out of prior authorizations____________

1 5 estimate 1 5 estimate
92
93

$196,131
5,051
674,818
876,000
98,125
777,875

$98,125
750,000
848,125
2 ,20
3 5
824,875

$ 3, 2 0
2 5
875,050
898,300
105,250
793,050

586,1 1
3

76 70
2, 5
98,1 5
2

79 80
6, 0
23,250

11 74
9, 4

TRAVEL EXPENSES
Travel Expenses, United States Courts—
For necessary traveling expenses, not otherwise provided for, in­
curred by the Judiciary, including traveling expenses of probation

52

THK

BUDGET

FOR

FT^CAL

19,53

obligations by objects—continued

O T H E R C O U R T S A N D S E R V IC E S -C o n tin u e d
tra\el expenses— continued

1951 actual

Object classification

Travel Expenses, United States Courts—Continued
officers and their clerks, $715,000: Provided, That this sum shall be
available, in an amount not to exceed $8,500, for expenses of attend­
ance at meetings concerned with the work of Federal probation when
incurred on the written authorization of the Director of the Adminis­
trative Office of the United States Courts. (5 U. S. C. 78b (2-3),
835-842; 28 U. S. C. 456, 604 (a), 962; 48 U. S. C. 114, 863, 1405y;
Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $715,000
Estimate 1C53, $715/00
A O N S A A B E F R O L A IO
M U T V IL L O B IG T N
1951 actual

YEAH

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions _______ _____
Part-time and temporary positions .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base. ______________________ ____
Obligations incurred.___

___

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,058,900
19,500

$1,089,800
19,500

$939, 920
19, 555
1,800

4,200

4,200
1, 082, 600 |

961,275

1,113,500

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year . . .
Adjustment in obligations of prior years .
Obligations incurred during the year___ .

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$19, 773
376
961, 275

$21,242

$26.100

1, 082, 600

1,113,500
1,139,600

Obligations incurred ______ _______

1953 estimate

981,424
Appropriation or estimate _...
.
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.-.

1952 estimate

1,103,842

$715,000

$715,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year ____ ___________________ _______

21, 242

26,100

27,000

715,000

Total expenditures______ ______ _

960,182

1,077. 742

1,112, 600

940,033
20,149

964,200
21, 242

1,086, 500
24,000

92,300

2,100

$725, 000
-25, 000

715, 000

700, 000

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations ______ ___
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases__ _____________________

ADM
INISTRATIVE O
FFICE O TH UNITED STATES COURTS
F E

02 Travel:
Judges____________________________
Clerks_______ ________ _ _______
Probation officers__________________
Law clerks___ __ . ____________
Secretaries to judges. _____________
Criers
___ __ _____________
Court reporters.._ . ___________
Transporting juries________________
Other____________ _ ______________

$186, 808
92, 000
238,383
35, 000
60, 000
30.000
51.000
6, 661
148

$192,000
94,000
240, 000
36, 000
62, 000
31, 300
52, 000
7, 500
200

$192,000
94,000
240, 000
36, 000
62, 000
31, 300
52, 000
7, 500
200

Obligations incurred_____________

700,000

715,000

715,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$45, 582
700, 000

$59,306
715,000

$61,000
715,000

745, 582

774,306

776,000

61,000

61,000

Appropriation or e s t i m a t e _______ _ .
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases __ _ __________ __
_____ _

$520,000

59,306
3,092
683,184

713,306

715,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

520,000
-8,432

578,400

594, 650

641, 569
41, 615

654, 000
59, 306

654,000
61,000

Obligations incurred_______________

511, 568

578,400

594,650

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

124
1
122

124
1
123

$527, 031
2,300

$536, 881
2,300

2,047
500

2,047
500

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Total expenditures.____ __________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations......... ............

Salaries and Expenses, Administrative Office, United States
Courts—
For necessary expenses of the Administrative Office of the United
States Courts, including travel, advertising, rent in the District of
Columbia and elsewhere, and exairination of estimates for appro­
priations in the field, [$535,000, of which not to exceed $488,500
shall be available for personal services] $594,650. (28 U. S. C.
601-606; Act of June 9, 1949, Public Law 92; Departments of State,
Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $535,000
Estimate 1953, $594,650
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$535,000

$594,650

43,400

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
SALARIES O COURT REPORTERS
F

Object classification

Salaries of Court Reporters, United States Courts—
For salaries of court reporters for the district courts of the United
States, as authorized by title 28, United States Code, section 753,
[$988,200] $1,113,500. (Departments of State, Justice, Commerce,
and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $988,200
Estimate 1953, $1,113,500
A O N S A A A L F R O L A IO
M U T V IL B E O B IG T N
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$988, 200

$1,113,500

Appropriation or estimate. - . . _ ______
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases . . ___________ ____ __ _______

$972,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. .

972, 000
-1 0 , 725

1,082,600

1,113,500

961, 275

1, 082, 600

1,113,500

Obligations incurred______________

94,400

Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________




1951 actual
221
5
218

125
1
115

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
$457, 503
Part-time and temporary positions.
2,316
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e .__ ____ . _______________
Payment above basic rates
______
484
Total personal services____
______ ______
Travel _ . . . . .
Communication services____________
Rents and utility services___________
Printing and reproduction__________
Other contractual s e r v i c e s ._______
Supplies and materials______________
P quipment______ __________________
’
Taxes and assessments______________

460,303
10, 348
5, 455
8, 295
10, 033
763
9, 981
6,177
213

531,878
13,000
5,500
9, 200
9.000
1.000
5,000
3, 400
422

541, 728
13.000
5, 500
11.000
9.000
1.000
7.000
6.000
422

Obligations incurred_______________

02
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

511, 568

578,400

594, 650

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$21,626
511,568

$22,941
578.400

$26,000
594, 650

533,194 1

601,341

620,650

A A Y O E P N IT R S
N L SIS F X E D U E

O L A IO S B O JE T
B IG T N Y B C S
Object classification

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

1951 actual

1952 estimate ■ 1953 estimate
223
5
223

223
5
223

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year

THE

a n a l y s is

op expenditures —

continued

195] actual
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year.-.
Adjustment in obligations of prior years_

J U D IC IA R Y

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$26,000

$28,000

$22,941
965

5 3

Total expenditures..............................

509,288

575,341

592, 650

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.--.........
Out of prior authorizations____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases.....................................

488,631
20, 657

511,000
22,941

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,109

$2, 700

$2, 700

1,018
2,803

1,000

1,000

5,930

3,700

3, 700

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,410
5,930

$599
3,700

$3C
C
3,700

7,340

4,299

4,000

599
12

300

300

Total expenditures _______________

6,729

3,999

3, 700

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ ______
Out of prior authorizations___________

5,330
1,399

3,400
599

3,400
300

07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs. _________
Air conditioning, maintenance, and
improvements_________________
Painting_______________________

2,000

1951 actual

566, 650
24,000

41,400

Object classification

Obligations incurred___________

REPAIRS AND IM
PROVEM
ENTS, DISTRICT COURT O THE UNITED STATES
F
FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUM
BIA
Repairs and Improvements, District Court of the United States for
the District of Columbia—
For repairs and improvements to the courthouse, including repair
and maintenance of the mechanical equipment, and for labor and
material and every item incident thereto, $7,100* to be expended
under the direction of the Architect of the Capitol. (18 Stat. 374,
ch. 180; 28 U. S. C. 604-610; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce,
and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $7,100
Estimate 1953, $7,100

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year. _ __
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year—_
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

SALARIES O REFEREES
F

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$7,100
—54

$7,100

$7,100

7,046

7,100

7,100

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______ _______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...
Obligations incurred

.......................

Salaries of Referees, United States Courts—
(Definite appropriation, special account)
For salaries of referees as authorized by the Act of June 28, 1946
(11 U. S. C. 68), $879,000 to be derived from the referees’ salary fund
established in pursuance of said Act. (Departments of State, Justice,
Commercej and the Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $879,000
Estimate 1953, $879,000

1953 estimate

1951 actual

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION
Object classification

1951 actual

1951 actual
07 Other contractual services:
General annual repairs_____________
Maintenance, air conditioning sys­
tem, annual________ _____________
Obligations incurred___________

$5,029

$5,900

$5,900

2,017

1,200

1,200

7,046

7,100

7,100

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Unappropriated balance brought forward.
Receipts placed in special account_______
Savings from appropriation of prior years.

$583,372
1,142,208
228

$876,808
1,210,500
3, 304

$1,211,612
1,174,000

Total available for appropriation.
Appropriation or estimate...........................

1, 725,808
-849,000

2,090,612
-879,000

2,385,612
-879,000

Balance carried forward....................

876, 808

1,211,612

1, 506,612

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 539
7,046

$1, 717
7,100

$1,700
7,100

9,585

8,817

8,800

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

1,717
7

1,700

1, 700

Total expenditures____ __________

7,861

7,117

7,100

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations______ . . .
Out of prior authorizations___ ________

5,334
2, 527

5,400
1, 717

5,400
1,700

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, reverted to unappro­
priated receipts______ _ ______________
Obligations incurred______ ________

Repairs and Improvements, United States Court of Appeals for the
District of Columbia—
For repairs and improvements to the United States Court of
Appeals Building, including repair and maintenance of the mechan­
ical equipment and for labor and material and every item incident
thereto, $3,700, to be expended under the direction of the Architect
of the Capitol. (37 Stat. 964, ch. 150; 45 Stat. 671, ch. 659; 28
U. S. C. 604-610; Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the
Judiciary Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $3,700
Estimate 1953, $3,700

1953 estimate

$849,000

$879,000

$879,000

-3 ,3 0 4
845,696

879,000

879,000

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
Object classification

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEM
ENTS, UNITED STATES COURT O APPEALS
F
FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUM
BIA

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate • 1953 estimate

54
55
109

57
54
110

57
54
110

Personal services:
Permanent positions...........................
Part-time and temporary positions.

$505, 271
340,425

$528,500
350,500

$528, 500
350, 500

Obligations incurred— ...................

845,696

879,000

879,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.............
01

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate
___________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

$6,200
-2 7 0

$3,700

$3,700

Obligations incurred-----------------------

5,930

3,700

3,700




$2,955
845,696
848,651

$9, 732
879,000

$10,000
879,000

888,732

889,000

9, 732

10, 000

10,000

Total expenditures..................... .........

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

838,919

878, 732

879,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations............. .
Out of prior authorizations......................

835,963
2,956

869,000
9,732

869,000
10,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year........
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of

5 4

THE

BUDGET

FOR

F IS C A L

YEAR

1953

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

O T H E R C O U R T S A N D S E R V IC E S — C ontinued
EXPENSES O REFEREES
F

Object classification

1951 actual

1951 actual
Unappropriated balance brought forward_
Receipts placed in special account_______
Savings from appropriations of prior years.
Total available for appropriation___
Appropriation applied to prior year ac­
counts__________ ______________________
Appropriation or estimate....................... .
Balance carried forward—................ .

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$596,225
1,122,487

$722,727
1, 215, 000
22, 096
1,959,823

2,013, 073

-985
-995, 000
722, 727

-1,106, 750
853,073

-1,215, 300
797,773

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,090,000

$1,215,300

202
55
247

231
53
276

248
60
303

$573, 708
133, 429

$727,120
145,560

$808,350
163,770

1, 250
663

3,260
775

3,260
775

Total personal services..................
Travel....... ..................... ..........................
Transportation of things.......................
Communication services.....................
Rents and utility services....................
Printing and reproduction_________ _
Other contractual services....................
Supplies and materials._____ ________
Equipment________________ ____ __
Taxes and assessments....................... .

709,050
32, 000
3,400
25,125
57,343
10, 500
73. 557
27,800
36,631
498

876, 715
35, 500
4,000
26,500
60. 000
11,490
30,000
27,050
35,000
495

976,155
37,000
4,000
28, 000
60, 000
12, 000
30, 000
30,000
37,650
495

975,904

1,108,750

1, 215,300

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$48,686
975, 904

$68,486
1,108, 750

$75,600
1, 215,300

1,175, 236

1,290,900

68,486
3,238

75,600

80,600

Total expenditures__________ _____

952, 866

1,099,636

1,210,300

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations___________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases____ _______________

908,310
44,556

1,020,000
68, 486

1,134, 700
70, 000

11,150

5,600

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees...... ........
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions................. .........
Part-time and temporary positions. _
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base........................................ ............
Payment above basic rates................
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

$853,073
1,160,000

1,718,712

1953 estimate

1,024,590

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR APPROPRIATION

1952 estimate

Obligations incurred................ .........

Expenses of Referees, United States Courts—
(Definite appropriation, special account)
For miscellaneous expenses of referees, United States courts, in­
cluding the salaries of their clerical assistants, travel, purchase of
envelopes without regard to the Act of June 26, 1906 (34 Stat. 476),
[$1,090,000] $1,215,800 to be derived from the referees’ expense
fund established in pursuance of the Act of June 28, 1946 (11
U. S. C. 68 (c) (4))[, of which not to exceed $800,010 shall be
available for personal services]. (11 U. S. C. 102 (a) (2), Depart­
ments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,090,000
Estimate 1953, $1,215,300

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate.............. .............
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases............................................................
Total available for obligation........... .
Unobligated balance, reverted to un­
appropriated receipts.................................
Obligations incurred...........................

$995,000

16,750
995,000

1,106,750

1,215,300

-19.096
975, 904

1.106,750

1,215,300

PERM ANENT A
(Indefinite appropriation, special

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

unless otherwise indicated)
a n a l y s is of expenditures —

O T H E R C O U R T S A N D SE R VICE S
Replacement of Personal Property Sold, Judiciary—
Appropriated (estimate) 1952, $1,000
Estimate 1953, $1,000

continued

1951 actual

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate...........................
Prior year balance available_____________

$914

$1,000
241

$1,000

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year

914
-241

1,241

1,000

Obligations incurred__________ ____

673

1,241

1,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$434
673

$1,241

$1,000

1,107

1,241

1,000

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
09 Equipment—1951, $673; 1952, $1,241; 1953, $1,000.
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year.........




Deduct adjustment in obligations of prior
years..................................... ............ ............

1953 estimate

$1,241

$1,000

1,000
241

1,000

$5

Total expenditures.......... ...................

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 estimate

1,102

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations.................... }

1,102 J
I

G E N E R A L P R O V IS IO N S — T H E JU D IC IA R Y
S e c . 402. Sixty per centum of the expenditures for the District
Court of the United States for the District of Columbia from all
appropriations under this title and 30 per centum of the expenditures
for the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
from all appropriations under this title shall be reimbursed to the
United States from any funds in the Treasury to the credit of the
District of Columbia.
S e c . 403. The reports of the United States Court of Appeals for
the District of Columbia shall not be sold for a price exceeding that
approved by the court and for not more than $6.50 per volume.
(Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)

THE

J U D IC IA R Y

G E N E R A L P R O V IS IO N S
S e c . [6 0 1 ]— . No part of any appropriation contained in this
Act, or of the funds available for expenditure by any corporation
included in this Act, shall be used to pay the salary or wages of any
person who engages in a strike against the Government of the United
States or who is a member of an organization of Government em­
ployees that asserts the right to strike against the Government of
the United States, or who advocates, or is a member of an organiza­
tion that advocates, the overthrow of the Government of the United
States by force or violence: Provided, That for the purposes hereof
an affidavit shall be considered prima facie evidence that the person
making the affidavit has not contrary to the provisions of this
section engaged in a strike against the Government of the United
States, is not a member of an organization of Government employees
that asserts the right to strike against the Government of the
United States, or that such person does not advocate, and is not a
member of an organization that advocates, the overthrow of the
Government of the United States by force or violence: Provided
further, That any person who engages in a strike against the Gov­
ernment of the United States or who is a member of an organization
of Government employees that asserts the right to strike against
the Government of the United States, or who advocates, or who is a
member of an organization that advocates, the overthrow of the
Government of the United States by force or violence and accepts
employment the salary or wages for which are paid from any appro­
priation or fund contained in this Act shall be guilty of a felony
and, upon conviction, shall be fined not more than $1,000 or im­
prisoned for not more than one year, or both: Provided further,
That the above penalty clause shall be in addition to, and not in
substitution for, any other provisions of existing law.
[ S e c . 602. No representative of the United States Government
in any international organization hereafter shall make any commit­
ment requiring the appropriation of funds for a contribution by the
United States in excess of 33% per centum of the budget of any
international organization for which the appropriation for the
United States contribution is contained in this Act: Provided, That
in exceptional circumstances necessitating a contribution by the
United States in excess of 33 }i per centum of the budget, a commit­
ment requiring a United States appropriation of a larger proportion
may be made after consultation by United States representatives in
the organization or other appropriate officials of the Department
of State with the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and
House of Representatives: Provided, however, That this section shall
not apply to the United States representatives to the Inter-American
organizations.]
[N o representative of the United States Government to any
international organization of which the United States is not now a
member shall, unless specifically authorized in an appropriation Act
or other law, make any commitment requiring the appropriation of
funds for a contribution by the United States in excess of 33H per
centum of the budget of such international organization.]
[ S e c . 603. No part of any appropriation or authorization con­
tained in this Act shall be used to pay compensation of any incum­
bent appointed to any civil office or position which may become
vacant after August 1, 1951, through the fiscal year 1952: Provided,
That this inhibition shall not apply— ]
[(a) to not to exceed 25 per centum of all vacancies;]
[(b) to positions filled from within the department;]
[(c) to offices or positions required by law to be filled by
appointment of the President by and with the advice and
consent of the Senate;]
[(d) to the Department of Justice, except general adminis­
tration personnel;]
[(e) to the Federal Bureau of Investigation;]
[(f) to the Judiciary Branch;]

Fees of Jurors, United States Courts—

Miscellaneous Expenses, United States Courts—

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Proposed supplemental appropriation___
Unliquidated obligations, start of year__ •
_
Unliquidated obligations, end of year____
Total expenditures________________
Expenditures out of prior authorizations




[(g) to the Civil Aeronautics Administration;]
[(h) to the operational personnel of the Weather Bureau,
Coast and Geodetic Survey, and the Bureau of Public Roads;]
[(i) to the Patent Office;]
[(j) to the Civil Aeronautics Board;]
[(k) to employees under the provisions of the Foreign
Service Act of 1946 as amended;]
[(1) to employees in grades CPC-1 and 2 :]
[ Provided further, That when the total number of personnel in a
department subject to this section has been reduced to 90 per centum
of the total provided for in the budget estimates for 1952, this section
may cease to apply.]
[ S e c . 604. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act
shall be used to pay the compensation of any employee engaged in
personnel work in excess of the number that would be provided
by a ratio of one such employee to- one hundred and fifteen, or a
part thereof, full-time, part-time, and intermittent employees of
the agency concerned: Provided, That excess factors arising from
unusual requirements approved by the President may be used in
applying a different ratio, but in no instance shall the number be
in excess of the number that would be provided by a ratio of one
such employee to eighty-five, or a part thereof, full-time, part-time,
and intermittent employees of the agency concerned: Provided
further, That for purposes of this section employees shall be con­
sidered as engaged in personnel work if they spend half time or more
in personnel administration consisting of direction and administra­
tion of the personnel program; employment, placement, and separa­
tion; job evaluation and classification; employee relations and
services; training; committees of expert examiners and boards
of civil-service examiners; wage administration; and processing,
recording, and reporting: Provided further, That this section shall
not apply to personnel work concerning employees of the Foreign
Service of the United States.]
S e c . [605] — . Except for the automobiles officially assigned
to the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, the Secretary of
Commerce, automobiles assigned for operation by the Federal
Bureau of Investigation and one-half of the chauffeur-driven auto­
mobiles in operation in the Departments on July 1, 1951, no part
of any appropriation contained in this Act shall be used to pay the
compensation of any civilian employee of the Government in the
District of Columbia whose primary duties consist of acting as
chauffeur of any Government-owned passenger motor vehicle (other
than a bus or ambulance), unless such appropriation is specifically
authorized to be used for paying the compensation of employees
performing such duties.
[ S e c . 606. The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation,
United States Department of Justice, hereafter is authorized without
regard to section 505 of the Classification Act of 1949 to place two
positions in grade GS-18, and seven positions in grade GS-17, in the
General Schedule established by the Classification Act of 1949, and
such positions shall be in lieu of any positions in the Federal Bureau
of Investigation previously allocated under section 505. The com­
pensation of the Associate Director of the Federal Bureau of In­
vestigation hereafter shall be $17,500 per annum.]
[The Secretary of State hereafter is authorized without regard to
section 505 of the Classification Act of 1949 to place the position of
Director, Office of Budget and Finance in grade GS-17 in the
General Schedule established by the Classification Act of 1949 so
long as the position is held by the present incumbent.]
[The Secretary of Commerce hereafter is authorized without
regard to section 505 of the Classification Act of 1949 to place the
position of Director, Office of Budget and Management in grade
GS-17 in the General Schedule established by the Classification
Act of 1949 so long as the position is held by the present incumbent.]
(Departments of State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appro­
priation Act, 1952.)
E R T R A N S M IS S I O N

PROPOSED FO R

1951 actual

5 5

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

1952 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation____

$70,000
$70,000
70,000

$100,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Unliquidated obligations, end of year____

1953 estimate

100,000

$100,000

70,000

Total expenditures________________

100,000

70,000

Expenditures out of prior authorizations.

100,000




E X E C U T IV E

O F F IC E

OF

T H E P R E S ID E N T

SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations
Appropriations: Total new obligational au­
thority enacted or recommended. _______

i $9, 338, 553

$9, 506, 465

$8, 589, 843

PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
Appropriations:
Pay increases_________ _____ _______ _____
Other_
_ ___
_______ ___________
Total new obligational authority (for
detail, see following tables)________

346, 800
2, 000, 000

9, 338, 553

9, 853, 265

10, 589, 843

1 As reduced by rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation Act, 1951.
56

E X E C U T IV E

O F F IC E

OF

T H E P R E S ID E N T

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1 5 , 1 5 , and 1 5 ]
91 92
93
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS ENACTED
OR RECOMMENDED IN THIS DOC­
UMENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations_________ ___
Other Expenditures

$8, 957, 301

1, 068, 489

639, 765

10, 025, 790

8, 690, 698

$8, 710, 278

Out of balances of prior expenditure authori­
zations___ _____ __
_
___
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recommended__

$8, 050, 933

8, 710, 278

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations:
Pay increases_
_
______
Other __ _ __ __
_

326, 785
1, 800, 000

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure authori­
zations: Pay increases
_____ __




20, 015

Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions proposed for later transmission _
Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following tables)______________

326, 785

10, 352, 575

8, 710, 278

1, 820, 015

10, 510, 713
57

9-

58

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

1952

Func­
tional
code
No.
1951 enacted *
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS

The White House Office: Salaries and expenses.............
Executive Mansion and grounds:
Executive Mansion and grounds__________________ . .
A ddition to Executive Mansion, and improvement of
Executive Mansion and grounds.

603
603

$150,000
1,585,553

$150,000
1,8S3, 615

$33,000

$150,000
1,916,615

$150,000
1, 907, 643

$150,000
1,907,643

603
603

266, 000

315, 600

20,000

335,600

367,200

367,200

266,000

315, 600

20,000

335, 600

367, 200

367,200

Total, Executive M ansion and grounds._________
Bureau of the Budget: Salaries and expenses___________

603

3,377,000

3, 362,000

246,000

3,608,000

3,850,000

3,850,000

Council of Economic Advisers:
Salaries and expenses.
______________________________
Salaries and expenses, defense production activ ities,...

603
603

300,000

300,000
24,000

17,800

317,800
24,000

349,000

349,000

300.000
160.000
3,500,000

324.000
160.000
1, 600,000

17,800

341,800
160,000
1,630,000

349.000
186.000
1, 780,000

349.000
186.000
1,780,000

8, 589,843

8,589,843

Total, Council of Econom ic Advisers___________
National Security Council: Salaries and expenses_______
National Security Resources Board: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Office of Defense Mobilization: Salaries and expenses..

051
051
506

Total current authorizations..........- _____ _________

30,000

1, 711, 250
9,338,553

9, 506,465

1,711,250
346,800

9,853,265

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
(Other than pay increase supplem ental)
Under proposed legislation: Office of Defense M obiliza­
tion: Salaries and expenses.
Total new obligational authority and total budget
expenditures.

$2, 000,000

506

9,338,553

9, 506, 465

1 As reduced b y rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation Act, 1951.
2 Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




346,800

9,853,265

8, 589,843

2,000,000

2, 000,000

10,589,843

59

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
B Y O R G A N IZA T IO N U N IT AND A C C O U N T TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
E X P E N D IT U R E S
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1953 estimate

1952 estimate

Organization unit and account title
1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori*
zations
zations already posed forpro­
later
enacted
transmission 3

Total

Out of authori­
Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations pro­
years and rec­
ommended in posed for later
transmission 3
detail herein

Total

C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S
$150,000
1,907,643

Compensation o f the President
The W hite H ouse Office: Salaries and expenses

$150,000
1,437,092

$150,000
1,863,099

$31,500

$150,000
1,894,599

$150,000
1,906,143

257,914
1,773

320,485

19, 515

340.000

485

200,000

200.000

349, 515
69,348

350,000
69,348

259,687

520,485

19,515

540,000

418, 863

485

419,348

Total, Executive Mansion and grounds

3,224,681

3,353, 692

231, 750

3,585,442

3,828, 750

14, 250

3,843,000

Bureau o f the B udget: Salaries and expenses

285,944

302,159
20,700

16,020

318,179
20,700

347,220

1, 780

349,000

285,944
120,924
3,231,950

322, 859
145,405
2,039,000

16,020

338,879
145,405
2,067,000

347, 220
180, 722
1,779,000

1,780

349,000
180,722
1,781,000

1,631,250

80,000

10,352,575

8, 690, 698

28,000

1,631,250
8,710,278

10,025, 790

326, 785

$1,500

2,000

80,000
20,015

8,710,713

Executive Mansion and grounds:
Executive Mansion and grounds
A ddition to Executive Mansion, and improvement of E x­
ecutive Mansion and grounds.

Council o f Economic Advisers:
Salaries and expenses
Salaries and expenses, defense production activities
Total, Council of Econom ic Advisers
National Security Council: Salaries and expenses
National Security Resources Board: Salaries and expenses
Office o f Defense M obilization: Salaries and expenses
Total current authorizations
P R O P O S E D F O R L A T E R T R A N S M IS S IO N
(Other than pay increase supplem ental)

1,800,000

8,710,278

10,025,790

326, 785

10,352,575

8,690,698

1,800,000

Under proposed legislation: Office of Defense M obilization:
Salaries and expenses.

1,820,015

10,510,713

Total new obligational authority and total budget ex­
penditures.

Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




60

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT

o b lig a tio n s

Compensation of the President—
For compensation of the President, including an expense allowance
at the rate of $50,000 per annum, as authorized by the Act of Jan­
uary 19, 1949 (3 U. S. C. 102), $150,000.
(Independent Offices
Appropriation A ct, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $150,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1953, $150,000

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate—1951, $150,000; 1952, $150,000; 1953, $150,000.

by o b je c t s

Object classification

BY

01

$40.000
, 000
35, 000

$40,000
, 000
40, 000

1, 495, 699

1,916, 615

1, 907, 643

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$119,377
1, 495, 699

$177.984
1, 916, 615

$200,000
1, 907, 643
2,107, 643

2
0

2
0

10, 0
00

10, 00
0

2 , 000
0
10
,0 0

17, 000

10
,0 0

23, 000
25, 000

25, 000
25,000

A C T I V IT IE S

BY

A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

O BJECTS

1951 actual

Personal services—1951, $150,000; 1952, $150,000: 1953, $150,000.
A N A L Y S IS

1953 estimate

$37,131
4, 929
34, 092
7,655
17,406
900
20, 651
5,641

02 Travel (traveling expenses of the
President)______ ______ _________
Other travel________________ ____ _
04 Communication services________ ____
05 Kents and utility services___________
06 Printing and reproduction ............. .
07 Other contractual services___________
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 E qu ipm ent-._____ _______ __________

Compensation of the President—1951, $150,000; 1952, $150,000; 1953, $150,000.
O B L IG A T IO N S

1952 estimate

1951 actual

Obligations incurred..........................
O B L IG A T IO N S

— co n tin u e d

OF E X P E N D I T U R E S

1951 actual

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$150,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions______ ______________ _ _ _

$150,000

150,000

$150,000

150,000

150,000

THE WHITE HOUSE OFFICE

2, 094, 599

177, 984

200, 000

200,000

Total expenditures___________ ____

Obligations incurred during the year_____

1, 615, 076
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year.................................. ............... ..........

1,437, 092

1, 894, 599

1,907,643

1, 391, 863
45, 229

1, 685,115
177, 984

1,706,143

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations..................
Out of prior authorizations......................
Out of proposed 1952 supplemental for
pay increases______________ _________

200,000

31, 500

I,

500

Salaries and Expenses, The White House Office—
Salaries a n d . expenses: For expenses necessary for The White
House Office, including not to exceed $100,000 for services as author­
ized b y section 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at
such per diem rates for individuals as the President may specify, and
other personal services without regard to the provisions of law regu­
lating the em ploym ent and compensation of persons in the G overn­
ment service; and travel and official entertainment expenses of the
President, to be accounted for solely on his certificate; [$1 ,8 83 ,6 15 ]
$l,907,6Jj.3. (3 U .S . C. 103; Independent Offices Appropriation Act,
1952.)

Executive Mansion and Grounds—
For the care, maintenance, repair and alteration, refurnishing,
improvement, heating and lighting, including electric power and
fixtures, of the Executive Mansion and the Executive Mansion
grounds, and traveling expenses, to be expended as the President
may determine, notwithstanding the provisions of this or any other
Act, [$3 1 5 ,6 0 0 ] $367,200. (3 U. S. C. 109, 110; Independent
Offices Appropriation A ct, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $1,883,615

Appropriated 1952, $315,600

AM OUNTS

Estimate 1953, $1,907,643

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

EXECUTIVE MANSION AND GROUNDS

O B L IG A T IO N

1951 actual

AM OUNTS

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1, 883, 615

$1,907, 643

Appropriation or estimate___________
Proposed supplemental due to pay
increases__________________ .
__ _

$1, 585, 553

Total available for o b lig a t io n ..___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

1, 585, 553
-8 9 , 854

1, 916, 615

1, 907,643

Total obligations_____________ ____

1,495, 699

1, 916, 615

33,000

BY

AN D

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees. ______
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______ ________ _ . . .
Average g r a d e . . ________ _
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade______________________
01

254
3
257

$367,200

266, 0 0
0
-3 7

335,600

367, 200

Obligations incurred......... .................

265, 963

335,600

367,200

O B L IG A T IO N S

1952 estimate

PR O G RAM

20,000

BY

A C T I V IT I E S

293

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

279
283

8

8

Total number of permanent positions
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

$5, 406
GS-7.9

$5,413
GS-7.8

$2, 944
CPC-4.1

$3.199
C PC-4.2

$3, 268
C PC-4.2

Personal services:
Permanent positions______ ______
Part-time and temporary positions..
Payment above basic rates________
Payments to other agencies for
reimbursable details___ _ __ ___

$1, 241, 563
44, 941
73,440

$1, 543, 875
100, 0 0
0
101, 740

$1, 532, 645
100, 0 0
0
93,998

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base____ ______ ________ ________
Payment above basic rates________

Total personal services_________

1,367, 294

726, 643

Total personal services....................
03 Transportation of things......................
04 Communication services........................

7,350
1, 745, 615

I,

PERFORM ANCE

These funds provide for the care, maintenance, and
operation of the Executive Mansion and the surrounding
grounds.

1953 estimate

. 286

AND

$4, 657
GS-7.4




$315,600

Care, maintenance, and operation of the Executive Mansion and the surrounding
grounds—1951, $265,963; 1952, $335,600; 1953, $367,200.

O BJE CTS

1951 actual

1953 estimate

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

PERFORM ANCE

BY

1952 estimate

$266,000

A C T IV IT IE S

These funds provide the President with staff assistance
and provide administrative services for the White House
Office.
O B L IG A T IO N S

O B L IG A T IO N

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases_______________________________

A d m i n i s t r a t i o n — 1951, $ 1 ,4 9 5 ,6 9 9 ; 1952, $ 1 ,9 1 6 ,6 1 5 ; 1953, $ 1 ,9 0 7 ,6 4 3 .
PR O G RAM

FOR

1951 actual

1, 907, 643

O B L IG A T IO N S

Estimate 1953, $367,200

A V A IL A B L E

Average salaries and grades: Ungraded
positions: Average salary_______ ______
01

BY

O BJECTS

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

60

2

71
6.4
72

72
6.4
77

$3,085

$3,415

$3, 491

$182,330
4,785

$228,181
14, 929

$248,181
14, 929

6, 221

910
4, 945

910
4,945

193,336
49

248, 965

268, 965

61

ill

14§

61

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
o b l ig a t io n s

by

o b je c ts—

Object classification
05
06
07
08
09
15

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

o b l ig a t io n s

1952 estimate

$38, 890
125
13, 200
37, 875
8, 0 0
0

265, 963

Obligations incurred______ ________

$27, 290
125
13, 200
37, 875
8, 0 0
0
335, 600

367, 200

1952 estimate
$50,441

$1,272
2,143

386,041

413,241

15, 064

50,441

46,041

63, 241

257,914

Total expenditures.........................

340,000

350,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations____ _ _
Out of prior authorizations____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases________ ____________

279,485
41,000

320,000
29, 515

19, 515

230,094
27,820

485

FOR OBLIGATION

1952 estimate

1951 actual
Prior year balance available_______ ______
Reimbursements from other accounts___

$268,462
15,064
283, 526
-266,319

273,819

Obligations incurred.......................... .

17,207

1953 estimate

$266,319
7, 500

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year____

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S
1951 actual

am ounts

1,773

200, 0
00
200, 0
00

1,773

1953 estimate

69,348
69,348

Estimate 1953, $3,850,000

a v a il a b l e

fo r

1951

Appropriation or estimate----------------------Proposed supplemental due to pay in-

o b l ig a t io n

actual

1952

estimate

1953

estimate

$ 3 ,3 7 7 ,0 0 0

$ 3 ,3 6 2 ,0 0 0

Reimbursements from other accounts____
$2,143

4 1 ,0 7 2

2 4 6 ,0 0 0
6 0 ,0 0 0

6 0 ,0 0 0

Total available for obligation. ______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

$266,319

Renovation of Executive M ansion........

15,064

3, 4 1 8 ,0 7 2
- 1 5 , 685

3 , 6 6 8 ,0 0 0

3 ,9 1 0 ,0 0 0

3, 402, 3 87

3, 6 6 8 ,0 0 0

3 ,9 1 0 ,0 0 0

Obligations incurred________ _______

17, 207

-

273, 819

____ ______

$ 3 ,8 5 0 ,0 0 0

7, 500

Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
F rom Other A ccoun ts

2.

69,348

7, 500
69.348

Appropriated 1952, $3,362,000

Direct Obligations

Improvement of grounds......... ................

276,848

15,064
3, 029

Salaries and Expenses, Bureau of the Budget—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the Bureau of
the Budget, including newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding
$200); teletype news service (not exceeding $900); and not to exceed
$20,000 for services as authorized by section 15 of the A ct of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not to exceed $50 per diem for
individuals; [$3,362,0003 $3,850,000. (31 U. 8 . C. 1 -2 4 ; 5 U. S. C,
133t, 139-139f ; Independent Offices Appropriation A ct} 1952.)

creases

1.

$69,348

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET

O B L IG A T IO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

1952 estimate

$3,029
273,819

Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

273,819

1951 actual

1953 estimate

19,866
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations______________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year....

1952 estimate

$2,659
17, 207

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Miscellaneous

Description

273,819

Total expenditures____ ___________

Addition to Executive M ansion, and Improvements of Executive M an­
sion and Grounds—
A M O U N T S A V A IL AB LE

7,500

17,207

Personal services________ _________

A N A L Y S IS

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year............. ........... ............. .......................

260, 319

Total direct obligations______ _____
Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursements
From Other A ccounts

367, 200

308,355

$5,000
176, 219

$46,041

335,600

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

$38,392
4,000
265,963

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year.........

1952 estimate

D irect Obligations— Continued

Obligations incurred....................... .
1951 actual

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

________
09 Equipm ent
_
10 Lands and structures
_

01

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

o b je c ts—

Object classification

1953 estimate

$13, 607
152
5, 856
32,174
20, 716
73

Rents and utility services.....................
Printing and reproduction....................
Other contractual services____ ______
Supplies and materials..........................
E quipm ent________________ _________
Taxes and assessments...........................

by

Obligations incurred____ __________

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description

1951

actual

1952

estimate

1953

estimate

PRO GRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

Fiscal analysis.. . ---------------------------Administrative m anagem ent-------------Statistical standards_________________
Legislative reference__________________
Field service activities________________
Administration...... ...................................

$ 1 ,5 1 0 ,8 4 8
2 8 4 ,0 6 0
5 0 2 ,8 9 0
3 6 1 ,1 4 7
1 3 4 ,0 9 2
199, 373
4 09, 977

$1, 6 4 1 ,3 5 0
331, 400
527, 600
3 9 0 ,0 0 0
1 4 7 ,8 0 0
2 0 1 ,4 5 0
4 2 8 ,4 0 0

$1, 725, G50
3 4 8 ,9 0 0
6 5 4 ,3 0 0
4 07 , 600
1 4 7 ,2 0 0
2 0 0 ,2 2 5
4 2 6 ,1 2 5

Obligations incurred........... ...............

Funds available in this account will be used primarily
for improvements to the grounds of the White House and
for other work not included under the program for the
renovation of the Executive Mansion.

3 ,4 0 2 ,3 8 7

3, 668
,000

3 , 9 1 0 ,0 0 0

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

S u m m a ry o f Personal Sercic.es

Full time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees............. .

3
3

2
2

Average salaries and grades: Ungraded
positions: Average salary----------------------

$5, 021

$.3, 750

$15, 064

$7, 500

488
324
59

50, 000
35, 000

01

Personal
services: Part-time and
temporary positions_________ _____
Direct Obligations

06 Printing and reproduction........... .........
07 Other contractual services.....................
08 Supplies and materials- - *------------------




100

1953 estimate

PROGRAM AND PERFO RM AN CE

The Bureau assists the President in the discharge of
his budgetary, management, and other executive respon­
sibilities. Provision has been made in the 1953 estimates
for an increase in staff to provide more intensive review
of defense construction and procurement activities in the
United States and overseas.
1.
Estimates.—Executive control over expenditures is
provided through review of budget estimates, continuing
examination of agency operations and financial require­
ments, and apportionment of appropriations.

62

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
U. S. C. 1021), including newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding
$200); and press clippings (not exceeding $300); [$3 00 ,0 00 ] $349,000. (Independent Offices Appropriation A ct, 1952.)

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, Bureau of the Budget— Continued

2. Fiscal analysis.—Budgetary policies are developed,
and related programs of different agencies are analyzed
to insure balance and consistency.
3. Administrative management.—Plans are developed
for improved Government organization and procedures,
and agencies are assisted in making improvements in
their management and operations.
4. Statistical standards— Proposed agency report forms
are reviewed, and the Government’s statistical activities,
coverage, and methods are coordinated and improved.
Approximately 4,200 report forms were cleared in cal­
endar year 1951, with the number expected to increase
to 5,000 in 1952.
5. Legislative reference.—Proposed legislation and agency
reports on pending legislation, enrolled bills, Executive
orders, and proclamations are reviewed and analyzed for
the President. Workload for calendar year 1951 included
approximately 3,100 agency reports on general legislation,
750 congressional requests for Bureau views, 700 enrolled
bills, and 170 Executive orders and proclamations.
6. Field service activities.—Four field offices serve the
Bureau in its contact with agency field operations and
with State and local governments.
7. Administration.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

Appropriated 1952, $300,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1953, $349,000

A V A IL A B L E

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average .salary______________________
Average g rad e.._____________________
01

Personal services:
Permanent positions ______________
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base
__________________________
Payment above basic rates _ ...........
Payments to other agencies for reim­
bursable details____ ____________

1952 estimate

08
09
15

515
5
497

549
5
528

534

6

500

$6,167
GS-9.9

$6,816
GS-10.1

$6,812
G S - 10.1

$2,987, 215
31,367

$3,270, 500
28,000

$3,479,100
28, 0 0
0

8,193

12,600
8.500

13, 400
8, 500

1, 224

1.500

1, 500

Total personal services_________
Travel__________________- .......... ..........
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agencies,
Supplies and materials.......... ...............
E quipm ent_________________________
Taxes and assessments_______________

3,027,999
58, 571
1,312
44, 299
158, 434
6, 568
36, 294
46, 951
21,174
785

3,321,100
67, 500
1, 500
46, 000
145, 000
6, 0 0
0
43, 900
31, 000
4, 000

2,000

3, 530, 500
75, 000
15, 000
47, 000
150, 000
5, 000
38, 500
36, 000
10, 0
00
3, 000

3, 402,387

3, 66 , 000
8

3, 910, 000

A N A L Y S IS

OF

Total expenditures________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations_____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases__________ _____ .___

$349,000

$300,000

Total available for obligation...........
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

300,620
-3 9 8

317,800

349,000

Obligations incurred........... ...............

300, 222

317,800

349,000

O B L IG A T IO N S

17,800
620

BY

A C T IV IT IE S

Econom ic analysis—1951, $300,222; 1952, $317,800; 1953, $349,000.
PR O G R AM

AND

PERFORM ANCE

The Council of Economic Advisers advises the President
on economic developments and policies relating to eco­
nomic growth and stability, appraises the economic pro­
grams and policies of the Federal Government, and assists
in the preparation of the annual and midyear economic
reports of the President to the Congress.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

O B JE C TS

1951 actual

$108,808
3,402,387

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

39
34

39
35

39
39

$6,324
GS-10.0

$7,167
GS-10.3

$7,228
GS-10.3

$2,874
CPC-5.0

$3,135
CPC-5.0

$3,215
CPC-5.0

$250,530

$275,500

$297,100

Total number of permanent positions.......
Average n amber of all employees------------Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.........................................
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary................ ..................... .
Average grade. . .....................................01

Personal services:
Permanent positions......... .................
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
____________ _______
base
Payment above basic rates: Over­
time and holiday pay___.................

1,000

1,000

2,000

2, O O
C

3,000

Total personal services.......... .
02 Travel
_______________
04 Communication services.................... .
06 Printing and reproduction----------------07 Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipm ent____________ _____________
15 Taxes and assessments-------------------- -

252, 530
3,356
4,042
23,393
3,782
6,600
2,474
4,004
41

278, 500
1,400
3,700
23,200
3,450
6,600
■500
400
50

301,100
3,300
4.000
27, 200
3, 750
6, 600

Obligations incurred...........................

300,222

317,800

349,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$16.721
300.222

$30,379
317.800

$30,000
349,000

316.943

348,179

379,000

A N A L Y S IS

OF

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$245,442
3, 668 000
,

$268, 0 0
0
3,910, 000
4,178,000

3, 913, 442

41, 072
245, 442

60, 000
268, 0 0
0

60, 0 0
0
275, 000

3, 224, 681

3, 585, 442

3,843, 000

3,117,166
107,515

3, 235,392
118,300

3, 675, 750
153, 000

231,750

Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year.........

2.000
1,000
50

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

3,511,195
D educt:
Reimbursable obligations______________
U nliquidated obligations, end of y ea r„_

$300,000

Appropriation or estimate . . __ ________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases __ __ _ _ _____ ____________
Reimbursements from other accounts.......

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred_______________

02
03
04
06
07

1952 estimate

O BJECTS

1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all em ployees________

O B L IG A T IO N

1951 actual

Object classification
Object classification

FO R

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations___ __________
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

620
30,379

30,000

30,000

Total expenditures..............................

285,944

318,179

349,000

269,260
16,684

272,159
30,000

322,220
25,000

16.020

1,780

14, 250

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Oat of current authorizations.-...............
Out of prior authorizations_____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases___________ —_______

Miscellaneous

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS
Salaries and Expenses, Council of Economic Advisers—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Council in
carrying out its functions under the Em ploym ent A ct of 1946 (15




Salaries and Expenses, Defense Production Activities, Council o f
Economic Advisers—
Appropriated 1952, a $24,000.
* The amount shown as appropriated for 1952 represents a temporary appropriation
pursuant to sec. 1 (d) of the act of July 1,1951 (Public Law 70).

63

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
A M O U N T S A V A ILAB LE FOR O BLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings

1953 estimate

$24.000
-3 ,3 0 0

Obligations incurred___________
Comparative transfer from ‘ ‘Expenses of
defense production, Executive Office of
the President"_______________ __ _

$26,858

Total obligations.......................... .......

26,858

20,700

20,700

O B L IG A T IO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

Econom ic analysis—1951, $26,858; 1952, $20,700
O BL IG AT IO N S B Y O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Average number of all employees_______

9
3

9
3

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade

$7,075
GS-10.9

$7, 676
GS-10.9

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Paym ent above basic rates_______

$12,800

$14,000

Total personal services____ ______
06 Printing and reproduction........__.........
07 Oth er contractual services____ _______
09 Equipm ent

15,000
6,453
2,373
3,032

Total ob lig a tion s ___________ ______

26,858

1953 estimate

01

200
16, 200

2,200

2,

V -------------

3,000
1,500

and of the military departments, the Chairman of the
Munitions Board, and the Chairman of the Research and
Development Board may serve as members when ap­
pointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.
Other high officials attend meetings or participate in
Council actions as directed by the President. The
Secretary of the Treasury and the Director of Defense
Mobilization participate in all Council actions, while the
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Director of Cen­
tral Intelligence regularly attend Council meetings.
The Council staff work is performed under the direction
of a civilian executive secretary by permanent Council
employees and officials detailed from the participating
departments and agencies. The principal staff unit of
the Council is the Senior Staff composed of eight officials
designated by the President based on nomination respec­
tively of the Secretaries of State, Defense, and Treasury,
The Director of Defense Mobilization, the Director for
Mutual Security, the Chairman of the National Security
Resources Board, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Direc­
tor of Central Intelligence. During fiscal year 1952 a
reporting unit was established upon the direction of the
President to keep currently informed on the status of all
national security programs and to make status reports as
required by the President or the Council.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

20,700
Object classification

A N A L Y S IS

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

20

25

18

21

28
25

$5,357
G S - 8.2

$6,119
G S - 8.8

$6.153
G S -8 9
.

$2,690
C PC-4.0

$3,070
C PC-4.0

$3,150
CPC-4.0

$105,761

$138,466
5.000

$163,346
5.000

534
4.000

654
4.000

OF EX PE N D ITU R E S
S um m ary of Personal Services

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary........................................
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_________ ____ ________

$20,700

Obligations incurred during the year
Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions__________________________________

20,700

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
Salaries and Expenses, National Security Council—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the National
Security Council, including services as authorized by section 15 of
the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates not in excess of
$50 per diem for individuals; acceptance and utilization of voluntary
and uncompensated services; and expenses of attendance at meetings
concerned with work related to the activity of the Council;
[$ 1 6 0 ,0 0 0 ] $186,000. (50 U. S . C. 402; Department of Defense
Appropriation A ct, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $160,000.
Estimate 1953, $186,000
A M O U N T S A V A IL A B LE FOR O BLIG ATIO N

Obligations incurred....................... .

$160,000
-40,131

$160,000

$186,000

119,869

160,000

109, 298
357
1,502
393
436
3,445
4,438

148,000
2. 500

173,000
2.500

Obligations incurred_________ ______

119,869

160,000

186,000

1952 estimate

1953 Estimate

$8,234
119,869

$7,179
160,000

$21,774
186,000

128,103

167,179

207,774

7,179

21,774

27,052

PRO GRAM AND P ERF O RM AN CE

The National Security Council advises the President
with respect to the integration of domestic, foreign, and
military policies relating to the national security. The
Central Intelligence Agency is under the direction of the
Council. The Council includes the President, the Vice
President, the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense,
the Director for Mutual Security, and the Chairman of the
National Security Resources Board. In addition the secre­
taries and under secretaries of other executive departments

2,000
1,000
2,000
2,500
2,000

2,000
1.500
2,000
3.000
2.000

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

186,000

Policy coordination—1951, $119,869; 1952, $160,000; 1953, $186,000.

3,537

Total personal services___________
Travel
_
_____________________
04 Communication services_____________
06 Printing and reproduction________ .
07 Other contractual services___________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipm ent----------------------------------------

02

1953 estimate

O BL IG AT IO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S




01 Personal services:
Permanent positions. ........................
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base
.
________ ____
Payment above basic rates________

A N A L Y S IS

1952 estimate

1951 actual
Appropriation or estim ate.. ___________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

Total number of permanent positions.......
Average number of all employees________

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year.........
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________
Total expenditures.......... .......... ........

120,924

145,405

180,722

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations...................
Out of prior authorizations.......................

112, 696
8,228

139,200
6,205

161,820
18,902

NATIONAL SECURITY RESOURCES BOARD
Salaries and Expenses, National Security Resources Board—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the National
Security Resources Board; including services as authorized b y sec­
tion 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), at rates for
individuals not in excess of $50 per diem and contracts with tem po­
rary or part-time employees m ay be renewed annually ; expenses of
attendance at meetings of organizations concerned with the work

64

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

NATIONAL SECURITY RESOURCES BOARD— Con.
Salaries and Expenses, National Security Resources Board— Con.
of the National Security Resources Board; hire of passenger motor
vehicles; reimbursement of the General Services Administration for
security guard services for protection of confidential files; n ot to
exceed $8,000 for newspapers and periodicals; and not to exceed
[$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ] $5,000 for emergency and extraordinary expenses,
to be expended under the direction of the Chairman for such purposes
as he deems proper, and his determination thereon shall be final
and conclusive; [$ 1 ,6 00 ,0 00 ] $1,780,000. (50 U. S. C. 404;
Department of Defense Appropriation A ct, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,600,000

Estimate 1953, $1,780,000

A M O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate
$1, 600, 0 0
0

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases________________________________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$3, 500, 000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings--.

3, 518, 490
-958, 004

1, 630, 000

1, 780, 000

Obligations incurred_______________

2, 560, 486

1, 630, 000

1, 780, 000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1. Security resources____
Civil defense_________

$2, 301, 486
259, 000

$1, 630, 000

$1, 780, 000

Obligations incurred.

2, 560, 486

1, 630, 000

1, 780, 000

2.

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

actual

1952

estimate

1953

estimate

$ 1 ,2 2 0 ,9 1 1
2, 560, 486

Total expenditures-

$ 7 4 ,5 3 7
1 ,7 8 0 ,0 0 0

3, 7 8 1 ,3 9 7

2 ,1 4 9 , 737

1 ,8 5 4 ,5 3 7

1 8 ,4 9 0
5 1 9 ,7 3 7
10, 647

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations
_ ._ __
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account. . . _________ ________

$ 5 1 9 ,7 3 7
1, 6 3 0 ,0 0 0

74, 537

73, 537

573

8 ,2 0 0

950

2 ,0 6 7 , 000

1 ,7 8 1 ,0 0 0

2 ,3 7 9 ,9 6 6
8 5 1 ,9 8 4

1, 5 4 4 ,0 0 0
4 9 5 ,0 0 0

1 ,7 1 5 ,0 0 0
64, 000

2 8 ,0 0 0

...... .......... .

2 ,0 0 0

3, 231,

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______ __
Out of prior authorizations^ ___
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases.. ........... ................1____

OFFICE OF DEFENSE MOBILIZATION

18, 490

1951 actual

1951

$1, 780, 000

30, 000

O BLIG ATIO NS BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

PROGRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE

The Chairman of the National Security Resources
Board advises the President concerning the Nation’s
security resources potential in the event of war including
such policies and programs as are essential to the main­
tenance of a strong security resource position. The
Board utilizes the facilities of other agencies as well as
the services or facilities of private individuals and institu­
tions in its security resource studies. The Chairman
serves also as a member of the National Security Council.
Civil defense planning, previously a responsibility of the
Board, was taken over by the Federal Civil Defense Ad­
ministration, an independent agency, during fiscal year
1951.

[ s a l a r ie s

and

expenses

]

Salaries and Expenses, Office of Defense Mobilization—
[F o r expenses necessary for the Office of Defense M obilization,
including compensation of the D irector of Defense M obilization at
the rate of $22,500 per annum; printing and binding w ithout regard
to section 89 of the A ct of January 12, 1895, as amended (44 U. S. C.
213); hire of passenger m otor vehicles; reimbursement of the General
Services Administration for security guard service; not to exceed
$5,000 fo'r emergency and extraordinary expenses, to be expended
under the direction of the D irector for such purposes as he deems
proper, and his determination thereon shall be final and conclusive;
and expenses of attendants at meetings concerned with the purposes
of this appropriation; $1,711,250: Provided, That contracts under
this appropriation for tem porary or intermittent services as author­
ized by section 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), may
be renewed an n ually.] (Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,711,250
A M O U N T S AVAILABLE

FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate (obligations in­
______ ______
curred),
_ __
Comparative transfer from—
“ Expenses of defense production, Ex­
ecutive Office of the President” ______
“ Emergency fund for the President,
national defense” - . _________________

364,223

1953 estimate

358,270

Total obligations__________________

1952 estimate

$1, 711,250
$5,953

1,711,250

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O BJECT S
PROGRAM AND PERFO RM AN CE

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary__________
Average grade__________

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates________
Payments to other agencies for reim­
bursable details__________________

Total personal services_________
Travel__________________________________
Transportation of things______________
Communication services______________
Rents and utility services_____________
Printing and reproduction____________
07 Other contractual services____________
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials'._______________
09 Equipment____________________________
15 Taxes and assessments________________
UnVouchered______________________________

02
03
04
05
06

Obligations incurred..




1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

353
57

135
34
156

150
34
176

$6 247
,
GS-9 .6

$6 995
,
GS-10.1

$7, 401
G S - 10.6

$1,425, 949
460, 801

$799, 700
300, 000

$1, 045, 200
300, 000

21, 746

3, 300
7, 000

3,800

45,760

20,000

20,000

1,954, 256
105,160
3,186
49,252
300
55,254
10, 563
248, 090
33,423
96,120
613
4, 269

1,130, 000
80, 0 0
0
500
25.000
75
18.000
4, 560
325, 665

1,369, 000
80, 0 0
0
500
27,000

2, 560,486

1, 630, 000

20,000
15, 000
1,200
10,000

On behalf of the President the office directs and coordi­
nates all mobilization activities of the executive branch,
including production, procurement, manpower, stabiliza­
tion, and transport activities. Legislation is proposed to
extend the authorization for these activities. The 1953
requirements are included in a proposed supplemental ap­
propriation.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Direction of defense mobilization program—1951, $364,223; 1952, $1,711,250.
O BLIG ATIO NS BY O B JE C T S

18,000
4, 560
242,440

20,000
12,000
1,500
5,000

1, 780,000

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

112
6
33

177
19
140

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______ __ . . . __ __
Average grade________ ____________

$4, 874
G S -9 .3

$6 223
,
G S-10.5

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions—. _ . . . ____
Part-time and temporary positions-.
Payment above basic rates________

$142, 858
34, 840
4,837

$775,416
152, 000
59,265

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_____ __

1953 estimate

65

E X E C U T IV E OFFICE OF TH E P RESIDEN T
o b l ig a t io n s

by

Object classification
01

o b je c ts—

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

Personal services—Continued
Payu.ents to other agencies for re____________
imburs'-.ble detrils

Total personal services________
T ravel_________
___________ .
0 3 Transportation of things___________
04
Comm unication services___________
05
Rents end utility services____________
06
Printing pnd reproduction_________
07
Other contractual services
Services performed by other agencies.
08
Supplies nd materials._......... .........
09 E quipm ent..
_____________________
15 Tnxes and assessments._____ _______
Unvouchered.- _______________________

02

A N A L Y S IS

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

1952 estimate

Unliquidated oblieations. start of vear
Obligations incurred during the year___
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year . ...................... - _________________

$50,000
191,075
39, 420
31
8, 056
229
32, 407
675
13,311
9, 448
69, 216
355

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1, 036, 681
206, 558
500
59, 830

T otal exDenditures

$80,000
$1,711.250
80,000
1,631.250

. _________ __

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations . . _ ____
Out of prior authorizations________ . . .

6,100

217, 800
30, 800
75,500
28,451
43,030

1953 estimate

1, 631, 250
%

80,000

80, 0 0
0

1,000

OFFICE OF DIRECTOR FOR MUTUAL SECURITY

1, 711, 250

N o t e . — Obligations incurred under allocations from “ Mutual security” are shown in
the schedules of the parent appropriation.

5,000

Total obligations................. ................

Statem of proposed obligations for purchase and hire of passenger m
ent
otor vehicles for the fiscal year 1953
E X E C U T IV E O F F IC E OF T H E P R E S ID E N T
M otor vehicles to
be purchased

Old vehicles to
be exchanged

Appropriation
Num ber

bureau

of th e

Gross
cost

Number

Allowance
(estimated)

Net cost
of ve­
hicles to
be pur-

Old ve­
hicles
still to
be used

Cost of
hire of
motor
vehicles

P ublic purpose and users

budget

For transportation of officers and staff of Bureau of the Budget
to departmental offices in Washington.

Salaries and expenses, Bureau of the
Budget.
COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS

For transportation of officials and staff of the Council of E co­
nom ic Advisers to departmental offices in Washington.

Salaries and expenses, Council of
E conom ic Advisers.
NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL

Primarily for use b y the Executive Secretary and staff of the
Council.

Salaries and expenses, National Se­
curity Council.
NATIONAL SECURITY RESOURCES
BOARD

$500

Salaries and expenses, National Se­
curity Resources Board.

Attendance at meetings and conferences b y the Chairman and
top officials of the Board’s staff.

Total. Executive Office of the
President.

PROPOSED

FOR

L A T E R T R A N S M IS S IO N
A N A L Y S IS

Salaries and expenses, Office of Defense Mobilization
(under proposed legislation, 1953).—Legislation will be
proposed to extend the Defense Production Act through
fiscal year 1953. The budget proposes a supplemental
appropriation of $2,000,000 for later transmission to cover
the requirements of the Office of Defense Mobilization
during fiscal year 1953.




O F E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation _

$2, 000,000

Unliquidated obligations, end of year..

200,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tion s.,_________________________________

1,800,000




F U N D S A P P R O P R IA T E D T O T H E P R E S ID E N T
SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriations. ________________ _______________
Reappropriations _ ___________
___ __________
Authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts-_______________________ ____________ _
Reauthorizations to expend from public debt
receipts___________
________ __
Reauthorization of contract authority __

$8, 121, 823, 655
446, 936, 688

$7, 360, 703, 976
722, 929, 493

1, 662, 500, 000

527, 026, 845

6, 282, 000
53, 214, 141

32, 136, 439

Total current authorizations___________
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquida­
tion of prior contract authorizations________

10, 290, 756, 484

8, 642, 796, 753

455, 523, 729

44, 476, 271

9, 835, 232, 755

8, 598, 320, 482

1953 estimate

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations

Total new obligational authority en­
acted or recommended_______________

$5, 000, 000

5, 000, 000

5, 000, 000

PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
Appropriations__________________________ _______
Authorization to expend from public debt
receipts_______ ______________ _____________

7, 950, 000, 000
900, 000, 000

Total new obligational authority pro­
posed for later transmission_________
Total new obligational authority (for
detail, see following tables)__________

66

8, 850, 000, 000

9, 835, 232, 755

8, 598, 320, 482

8, 855, 000, 000




F U N D S A P P R O P R IA T E D

TO

T H E P R E S ID E N T

SUM M ARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

FROM A U TH O R IZA TIO N S ENACTED
OR RECOM M ENDED IN THIS DOC­
UMENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations
Out of appropriations to liquidate
contract authorizations _
. ...

$2, 391, 780, 108

$3, 151, 279

prior
44, 476, 271

Total expenditures from new author­
izations _ _ _ _ _ _ _
___

>$4, 158, 371, 112 < 2 ,4 3 6 ,2 5 6 ,3 7 9

3, 151, 279

4, 836, 737, 729

7, 379, 810, 993

Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations____
_ __
_________ __
Out of receipts of business enterprises and
_______ __
revolving funds (net)_ __
Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recom m ended_____

- 95, 441, 607

4, 158, 371, 112

7, 177, 552, 501

7, 382, 962, 272

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations. _ __

__

3, 624, 400, 000

___

Total budget expenditures (for detail,
see following tables)____
_______

4, 158, 371, 112

7, 177, 552, 501

11, 007, 362, 272

« Deduct, excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.

67

68

TH E B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953
BU DGET AU TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EXPEN DITU RES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
N o.

1951 enacted 1
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans-

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
(Other than business enterprise and revolving funds)
Armed Forces leave payments: Payments, Armed
Forces Leave Act of 1946.
Assistance to Greece and Turkey______________________
Assistance to the Republic of Korea___________________
Care, handling, and disposal of surplus property abroad..
China aid_______ _______________________________________
Defense aid_____________ ______________________________
Disaster relief_________________________________________
Emergency fund for the President, national defense----Re-appropriation________ ____________________________
Emergency fund for the President.......... ..

055

Expenses of defense production.
D o __________________________
D o __________________________
D o __________________________
D o _______ __________________
D o _________ _______________
D o__________________________
D o _________________________

257
355
407

152
152
605
152
055
258
055
055
603

455
506

555
603

Total expenses of defense production.
Foreign assistance____________________________________
Reappropriation_____________________________________
Authorization to expend from public debt receipts___
Reauthorization to expend from public debt receipts..
India emergency food aid______________________________
Authorization to expend from public debt receipts..
International Children’s Emergency Fund of the United
Nations; Reappropriation.
International children’s welfare work__________________
International development: Expenses__________________
Mutual security:
Military assistance, Europe, title I, Mutual Security
A ct.
Econom ic and technical assistance, Europe, title I,
Mutual Security Act.
Assistance to Spain, M utual Security A c t ___________
M ilitary assistance, Near East and Africa, title II,
M utual Security Act.
Econom ic and technical assistance, Near East and
Africa, title II, M utual Security A ct.
M ilitary assistance, Asia and Pacific, title III, Mutual
Security Act.
Econom ic and technical assistance, Asia and Pacific,
title III, M utual Security Act.
Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruc­
tion Agency, title III, Mutual Security Act.
M ilitary assistance, American Republics, title IV ,
Mutual Security A ct.
Technical assistance, American Republics, title IV ,
M utual Security A ct.
Reappropriation______ ________________ _______ _____
Reauthorization of contract authority________________
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

$90,000,000
75,414,000
$30,800,000
1, 000,000
4, 580,100

$30,800,000
1, 000,000
4,580,100

27,026,845

10, 000,000

27,026,845

7,328, 903,976

7,328,903,976

1, 000,000
226,500
4,623,931
2.995.000
879.000
46,254,495
844.000
27,000
6.340.000
62,189,926

152
152
152
152
152
152
152

1,999,759,000
257,540,974
62,500,000
6,282,000
100, 000,000

152
152

5,750,000
29,437,000

1,203,241

152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152

718,349,393
32,136,439
(44,476,271)

* A s redu ced b y rescissions pursuan t to sec. 1214 of the G eneral A p p ro p ria tio n A c t , 1951.




718,319,393
32,136,439
•(44,476,271)

$5, 000, 000

$5,000,000

69

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO TH E P R E SID E N T
»BU DG ET A U TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EX PEN DITU RES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1953 estimate

1952 estimate

Organization unit and account title
1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations
zations already posed forpro­
later
enacted
transmission

Total

Out of authori­
zations of prior Out of authori­
zations
years an d rec­ posed forpro­
later
ommended in
transmission
detail herein

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
( Other than business enterprise and revolving funds)
$2,727,844

$750, 000

$750,000

$60,000

65,253,917
37,884,978
1,347,915
63,405,367
31,115

31, 541, 235
60, 000 0
, 00
2, 927,164

31,541,235
60,000,000
2,927,164

13,202, 272

1,193, 429
16, 525, 000

1,193,429
16,525,000

13, 000 0
, 00

5, 000, 000

5,000,000

5,000, 000

1,207,346

304, 251

304,251

96,673
3,701,737
2,011,379
683,153
25,386,122
646,128
22,497
1,609,164

129, 827
867, 729
942,390
187,192
16, 543,493
197,074
4,361
4,353,660

129,827
867,729
942,390
187,192
16,543,493
197,074
4,361
4,353,660

34,156,853

23, 225, 729

Armed Forces leave payments: Payments, Armed Forces
Leave A ct of 1946.
Assistance to Greece and Turkey
3,202,272 Assistance to the Republic of Korea
Care, handling, and disposal of surplus property abroad
China aid
Defense aid
13,000,000 Disaster relief
Emergency fund for the President, national defense
5,000,000 I
Reappropriation
Emergency fund for the President

23,225,726

4,151,279

$60,000

Expenses of defense production
D o.
D o.
D o.
D o.
D o.
Do.
D o.
Total expenses of defense production

2,808,851,125

162,500, 0 0
0

13,810,216

162,500,000

5,750,000
13,685,641

5,750,000
13,685,641

1,337,000,000




>337,000,000
,

27, 500,000

7,023,000,000

27,500,000

7,023,000,000

Foreign assistance
Reappropriation
Authorization to expend from public debt receipts
Reauthorization to expend from public debt receipts
India emergency food aid
Authorization to expend from public debt receipts
International Children’s Emergency Fund of the United
Nations: Reappropriation.
International children’s welfare work
Internatfonal development: Expenses
Mutual security:
M ilitary assistance, Europe, title I, M utual Security Act
Econom ic and technical assistance, Europe, title I, M utual
Security A ct.
Assistance to Spain, M utual Security A ct
M ilitary assistance, Near East and Africa, title II, M utual
Security Act.
E conom ic and technical assistance, Near East and Africa,
title 11, M utual Security A ct.
M ilitary assistance, Asia and Pacific, title III, M utual
Security A ct.
Econom ic and technical assistance, Asia and Pacific, title
III, M utual Security Act.
Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruction
Agency, title III, M utual Security A ct.
M ilitary assistance, American Republics, title IV , M u tu al
Security Act.
Technical assistance, American Republics, title IV , Mutual
Security Act.
Reappropriation
Reauthorization of contract authority
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

70

TH E B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

1952

Func­
tional
code

No.

1951 enacted 1
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
Mutual defense assistance:
__________________
North Atlantic area___
Greece and Turkey_____________________________________
Greece, Turkey, and Iran_______ __________________
Iran, Republics of Korea and the Philippines________
Republics of Korea and the Philippines_______________
Emergency fund, general area of China____
_______
Nations in Southern and Eastern A sia ..
. . . . _____
Reappropriation.......... . . . __________
____________
Reauthorization, of contract authority_____ __________
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate con­
tract authorization.

152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152
152

Overtime, leave, and holiday compensation____
. .
R elief o f Palestine refugees: Contribution? to United

BIO
152

27,450,000

605
152

37,800,000

$5,678,023,729

188,192,473
53,214,141
(455,523,729)

Nations for relief of Palestine refugees.

Special fund for management improvement
Yugoslav emergency relief assistance___

8,685,756,484

$8,142, 796, 753

88,142,796,753

1,605,000,000

500,000, 000

500,000,000

10,290,756,484

Total current authorizations other than business
enterprise and revolving funds.

8,642,796,753

8,642,796,753

$5,000,000

$5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

BUSINESS E N T E R P R ISE AND R EVOLVIN G
FUNDS
Business enterprise and revolving funds (for detail, see
below).

T otal......

............ .......................

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Under proposed legislation:
Expansion of defense production: Authorization to
expend from public debt receipts.
Flood insurance..____________________________________
M utual security__________
.. . ____________________

$900, 000, 000
50, 000,000
7, 900, 000, 000

Grand total_____________ ________________________
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior
contract authorizations.

10,290,756,484
455,523,729

8,642,796, 753
44,476,271

8,642,796,753
44,476,271

Total new obligational authority_________________

9,835,232,755

8,598,320,482

I 000,000
,

8,598,320,482

1 As reduced b y

8,850,000,000

8, 850,000, 000

8,855,000,000

8. 850, 000,000

T ota l-

50,000,000
7,900,000,000

8, 850, 000,000

258
152

900,000,000

8,855,000,000

rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation A ct, 1951.
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND REVOLVING FUNDS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
(authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts unless otherwise specified)
1951

1952

1953

FUNDS PROVIDED
(by operations)

1951

1952

1953

ENACTED OR RECO M M ENDED
Expansion of defense production: Revolving fund, Defense Production
Act.
Mutual security: Discharge of investment guaranty liabilities_______
The Institute of Inter-American Affairs: Salaries and expenses (current
appropriation).
Total business enterprise and revolving funds........... ............ ..............




506
152
152

$1,600,000,000

$500,000,000

$942,882, 797 ..

1,788,931
560, 249

5,000,000

1,605,000,000

$107, 324,164

500,000,000

2, 388,893
2,020,000

109,673,344

947,291, 690

..

.

..

71

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
E X P E N D IT U R E S
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations pro­
zations already posed for later
enacted
transmission

Total

Out of authori­
zations of prior Out of authori­
zations
years and rec­ posed for pro­
later
ommended in
transmission
detail herein

Total

C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S — Continued
M utual defense assistance:
North Atlantic area
Greece and Turkey
Greece, Turkey, and Iran
Iran, Republics of Korea and the Philippines
Republics of Korea and the Philippines
Emergency fund, general area of China
Nations in Southern and Eastern Asia
Reappropriation
Reauthorization of contract authority
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.
Overtime, leave, and holiday compensation
R elief o f Palestine refugees: Contributions to United Nations
fox relief of Palestine refugees.
Special fund for management improvement
Yugoslav emergency relief assistance

$925,334,991

4,718
20,450,000

$5,000.000

$5,000,000

528,952
30,439,314

77, 052
7,283, 608

77,052
7,283,608

4,014,532,862

6, 672, 763,106

6,672,763,106

$7,081,762,272

Total current authorizations other than business enter­
prise and revolving funds.

$7,081,762,272

BUSINESS E N T E R P R IS E A N D R E V O LV IN G
FU N DS
143,838,250

504, 789,395

504,789,395

301, 200, 000

301,200,000

4,158,371,112

7,177. 552, 501

7,177,552,501

7,382.962, 272

Business enterprise and revolving funds (for detail, see below)

7,382,962,272

Total
P R O P O S E D F O R LA T E R T R A N S M ISS IO N

$284, 400,000

1, 000, 0
00
3, 339,000, 000

4, 158,371, 112

7,177, 552, 501

7,177,552,501

1, 000,000
3,339,000,000

3, 624, 400.000
7,382,962,272

284,400,000

3,624,400,000

3, 624, 400, 000

11,007,362,272

Under proposed legislation:
Expansion of defense production: Authorization to expend
from public debt receipts.
Flood insurance
M utual security
Total
Grand total
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior con­
tract authorizations.
Total new obligational authority

BUSINESS E N T E R P R IS E AND R E V O LV IN G FUNDS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

N E T EFFECT ON B U D G E T
E XP E N D IT U R E S

FUNDS APPLIED
(to operations)

1952

1951

Organization unit and account title
1953

1951

1952

1953

ENACTED O R R E C O M M E N D ED
$245, 344, 773

$1,443, 786, 302

2,516, 014
5, 650, 807

3, 566, 6 8
8
4,728,095

253, 511, 594

1, 452,081,085




301, 200,000

$138,020,609

$500,903,505

727,083
5,090,558

$301, 200,000

1,177,795
2,708,095

143,838,250

504,789,395

$301,200,000

Expansion o f defense production: Revolving fund, Defense Production A ct
M utual security: Discharge of investment guaranty liabilities
The Institute o f In ter-American Affairs: Salaries and expenses (current appro­
priation).

301,200,000

Total business enterprise and revolving funds

72

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

ARMED FORCES LEAVE PAYMENTS

ASSISTANCE TO GREECE AND TURKEY
Assistance to Greece and Turkey, Executive Office of the President—

Payments, Armed Forces Leave Act of 1946, as Amended—
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

A N A L Y S IS

O B L IG A T IO N

1951 actual

1952 estimate

$13, 663, 526
-10,879,519

$10,879,519
-1 0 , 754, 519

$10,754, 519
-10,729,519

Obligations incurred_______________

2, 784, 007

125, 000

25,000

BY

AND

1952 estimate

$96, 590, 964
204,188

$31,541, 235

96, 795,152

1953 estimate

31, 541, 235

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________ . ________________

31, 541,235
65, 253, 917

31, 541, 235

65, 253, 917

31, 541, 235

PERFORM ANCE

BY

O B JE C TS

1952 estimate

1951 actual

Object classification

U nliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustm ent in obligations of prior years..

Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

Payments are made for terminal leave accumulated
prior to September 1, 1946, by uniformed personnel of the
Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, United States
Coast and Geodetic Survey, and United States Public
Health Service. The final date for filing claims for such
payments was June 30, 1951, except for certain claims
resulting from correction of service records (10 U. S. C.
18; 14 U. S. C. 50d; 34 U. S. C. 604; 37 U. S. C. 32-37,
39; 42 U. S. C. 210-1).
O B L IG A T IO N S

1951 actual

Total expenditures________________

A C T IV IT I E S

Claims—1951, $2,784,007; 1952, $125,000; 1953, $25,000.
PR O G RAM

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1953 estimate

Prior year balance available_____________
Balance available in subsequent year_____

O B L IG A T IO N S

OF

1953 estimate

ASSISTANCE TO THE REPUBLIC OF KOREA
Assistance to the Republic of K orea, Executive Office of the President—
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate_______________
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year and transferred to “ Mutual secur­
ity, Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to Mutual Security A ct of 1951
(65 Stat. 373)_____________ : ___________
_
Obligations incurred_____ _____
Comparative transfer to “ M utual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the President” .

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$90,000, 000

, -50,200,888
39, 799,112
-3 9 , 799,112

Total obligations______ ______ ____
ALLOCATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE,
FEDERAL SECURITY AGENCY

12

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims
__
___ _______________

A N A L Y S IS

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
____
claims
- -.

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

12

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims
__________ _______

$100,000

$1,800,000

$20 0 0
, 0

$354,599

$25,000

$5,000

ALLOCATION TO COAST GUARD, TREASURY
DEPARTMENT

12

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims
_________ _____

Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims_____________________________

A N A L Y S IS

OF

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations. ________
Out of prior authorizations____________ }

13, 202, 272

60,

37, 884, 978

0 ,00
00 0

13, 202, 272

r_____________
I 60, 0 0 0 0
0, 0

13, 202, 272

Care, Handling, and Disposal of Surplus Property Abroad, Executive
Office of the President—
A N A L Y S IS

OF

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

$63, 737
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year____________________________ __

SUM M ARY

12

73, 202, 272
13, 202, 272

CARE, HANDLING, AND DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS
PROPERTY ABROAD

ALLOCATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE
N A V Y ,D E P A R T M E N T OF DEFENSE

12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance
claims------ ------- ----- -------------------

$13, 202, 272

37, 884, 978

Total expenditures____ __________
ALLOCATION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF THE
A R M Y , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

$73, 202, 272

$71, 288,138
39, 799,112

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________________ _________________

$14

1953 estimate

73, 202, 272

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

1952 estimate

111, 087,250

ALLOCATION TO COAST AND GEODETIC SUR­
V E Y , DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

12

OF

$565,657

$2,784,007

$125, 000

$25, 000

$4, 275, 079
2, 927,164
1,347, 915
1,347, 915

Total exp en d itu res_______ _______
Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 927,164
2, 927,164 _____________
2, 927,164

E X P E N D IT U R E S

CHINA AID
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$609,157
2, 784, 007

$665,320
125,000

$40,320
25,000

China Aid, Executive Office of the President—
Unliquidated obligations, start of year----Obligations incurred during the year-------

3,393,164

790,320

665,320

40, 320

2,727,844

750, 000

60, 0 0
0

2,727,844

750, 000

60,000

FOR

O B L IG A T IO N

5,320

Total expenditures........ .....................

A V A IL A B L E

65,320

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year
. ____________________

AM OUNTS

Expenditures out of prior authorizations. _




1951 actual
Adjusted appropriation transferred from
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office of
the President,” pursuant to Foreign
Econom ic Assistance A ct of 1950 (64
Stat. 198)...............................................

$75,414,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
A M O U N T S A V A IL AB LE FOK O BLIG ATIO N---- C o n t i n u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Prior year balance available______________ |
Balance transferred to “ M utual security,
Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to M utual Security A ct of
1951 ^65 Stat. 373)-- —
Prior year balance reappropriated________
Gain by foreign exchange_____

$10,374,861

Total available for obligation_______
Balance available in subsequent year____
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year and transferred to “ M utual se­
curity, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent,” pursuant to M utual Security
Act of 1951 (65 Stat. 373)

175,063, 498
- 5 , 635, 739 -

Obligations incurred - Comparative transfer to “ M utual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the President” .

1953 estimate

$5. 635, 739

169,083, 625

73

That not exceeding 2 per centum of the foregoing am ount shall be
available for administrative expenses.]
[F o r an additional amount for “ Disaster relief” , $25,000,000, to
be expended without regard to the lim itation in section 8 of the A ct
of September 30, 1950 (Public Law 8 7 5 ).] (42 U. S. C. 18551855g; Independent Offices Appropriation Act of 1952; Act of July 18,
1951 (Public Law 80 ); Act of Oct. 24, 1951 (Public Law 202).)
Appropriated (estimate) 1952, a $30,800,000

- 5 , 635, 739
89, 270,902
3,735

« Includes $5,000,000 appropriated in the Flood Rehabilitation Act, 1952 (Public Law

202).

A M O U N T S A VA ILAB LE FOR O BLIGATION

1951 actual
—344; 134

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______ _________
Prior year balance available_ ______
_
Total available for obligation_______
Balance available in subsequent year.........

-169,083, 625

$30,800,000
30,800,000
- 1 2 , 432, 000

12,432, 000

18, 368,000

12,432,000

Total obligations._

$12,432, 000

Obligations incurred_____ __________
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

ALLOCATIONS

!
1952 estimate

1951 actual

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year—Unliquidated obligations transferred to
“ M utual security, Executive Office of
the President,” pursuant to Public
Law 165.
.
_
Adjustment of obligations of prior years-

$35,063, 215
169,083, 625

1953 estimate

Housing and Home Finance A g e n c y .._
_

$140, 739, 680

204,146,840

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

] 40, 739, 680

$18, 368,000

O BLIG ATIO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

Description

1951 actual

1952 estimate

...

. . . ______

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations
}
Out of prior authorizations_____________

1.
2.
3.
4.

140, 739, 680

Ad m in istration___ ____ _____________
Grants to disaster affected areas_______
Temporary housing fa cilities._________
Reserved for future allocations-- - ____

$359, 750
12,958, 250
5, 050, 000
$12, 432,000

1, 793

63,405,367

PROGRAM

{ ______________

DEFENSE AID

1951 actual

Obligations incurred

..

_______ __

1952 estimate

Object classification

1953 estimate

207,033
-174,532
32,501

Refunds, awards, and indemnities— 1951, $32,501.
OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

1952 estimate

$1,207,739
32,501

1,193,429

1,193,429

$5,987
GS-8.9

Personal services:
Permanent positions._ ___ ________
Part-time and temporary positions
Regular pay in excess of 52-week

$243,950
28,000

Total personal services_________
02 Travel.
_ __ . ______________
_
03 Transportation of th in g s____________
04 Communication services............ ............
05 Rent s'and utility services_________
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services________ __
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials _____ _______
09 Equipm ent.
_ _________ _ ______ __
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions
15 Taxes and assessments. _ .
______
Reserved for future allocations. _
___

273.000
43, 700
800
10, 000
300
300
331, 250
4,000
5,800
800
17, 698, 000
50
$12,432,000
j

18,368, 000

12,432,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$18,368,000

$1,843,000
12, 432,000

18,368,000

14, 275,000

15,696
1,193, 429

31,115

1,193,429

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

DISASTER RELIEF
D isaster Relief, Executive Office o f the President—
[F o r expenses necessary to carry out the purposes of the A ct of
September 30, 1950 (Public Law 875), authorizing assistance to
States and local governments in m ajor disasters, $800,000, to
remain available until expended: Provided, That the appropriation
“ Em ergency Fund for the President” shall not be available for
obligation after June 30, 1951, and any unobligated balance remain­
ing on that date shall be disposed of pursuant to the provisions of
the Surplus Fund-Certified Claims A ct of 1949: Provided further,




1953 estimate

45
45

Obligations incurred________________

31,115

Total expenditures

1953 estimate

$1,193, 429

1, 240, 240

Expenditures out of prior authorizations. _

1952 estimate

1,050

O BL IG AT IO N S B Y O B J E C T S

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations end of year___
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account____________ _____________

1951 actual

Full-time equivalent of all positions____—.
Average number of all employees_________

Refunds to foreign nations— 1951, $32,501.

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year

B Y O B JE C T S

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salarv________ . ______ ______
Average grade____________ ___ _____

$174,532
-174 ,5 3 2

$207,033

01

A N A L Y S IS

AND P ERF O RM AN CE

O BLIG ATIO N S

O BL IG AT IO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

13

12, 432,000

This appropriation is allocated by the President to the
departments and agencies to render assistance to States
and local governments in areas stricken by major disaster.

AM O U N T S A V A IL AB LE FOR OBLIGATION

Total available for obligation_______
Balance available in subsequent year

18, 368, 000

63,405,367

Defense A id—

Prior year balance available.______________
Carried to surplus . _
_
_______________

1953 estimate

140, 739. 680

Obligations incurred_______ ____ __
Total expenditures

1953 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
vear ___________ ________ _____ __________
Total expenditures._____ __________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations ____________

1,843,000

1, 275,000

16, 525, 000

13,000,000

16, 525,000
13,666,000
!

74

TH E B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

EMERGENCY FUND FOR THE PRESIDENT

o b l ig a t io n s

N ATION AL DEFENSE

objects

Object classification

Emergency Fund for the President, National D efense—
For expenses necessary to enable the President, through such
officers or agencies of the Government as he may designate, and
without regard to such provisions of law regarding the expenditure
of Government funds or the compensation and em ploym ent of
persons in the Governm ent service as he may specify, to provide in
his discretion for emergencies affecting the national interest, secu­
rity, or defense which may arise at home or abroad during the current
fiscal year, [$1,000,000: Provided, That any unexpended balance in
this fund on June 30, 1951, shall remain available during the fiscal
year 1952] $5,000,000: Provided Ifurther’ , That no part of this
J
appropriation shall be available for allocation to finance a function
or project for which function or project a budget estimate of appro­
priation was transm itted pursuant to law during the second, session
of the Eighty-second Congress or the first session of the Eighty-third
Congress and such appropriation denied after consideration thereof
by the Senate or House of Representatives or by the Com mittee on
Appropriations of either body. (Independent Offices Appropriation
Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $1,000,000

by

— c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

t o b u r e a u OF CENSUS,
DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

a l l o c a t io n

Average number of all employees...........

01 Personal services: Part-time and tem­
05 Rents and utilities____________________
06 Printing and reproduction______ _____

$62, 955
$763
7, 957
522

Total obligations______ ______ _______

72,197

02

porary positions____________________
Travel_________________________________

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Average number of all em ploy ees.-...........

01
03
07
08
09
15

Estimate 1953, $5,000,000

Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions____________________
Travel_________________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Other contractual services____________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipment___________________________
Taxes and assessments_______________

$57,182
2,623
18
25, 567
431
36, 472
542

Total obligations_____________ _____ _

02

122, 835

A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION
ALLOCATION TO FEDERAL B U R E AU OF IN­
VESTIGATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
01

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Prior year balance reappropriated_______
Reimbursements from other accounts____
Total available for obligation______
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year___________________________________
Obligations in cu rre d -_____ _____
Comparative transfer to—
“ Salaries and expenses, Subversive A c­
tivities Control Board” ______________
“ Operations, Federal Civil Defense A d­
ministration” _______________________
“ Salaries and expenses, Office of Defense
M obilization” _____________________

$10, 000,000

$1, 000,000
4,580,100

738
10, 000, 738

5, 580,100

5, 000, 000

- 4 , 580,100
5,420, 638

5, 580,100

5, 000 0 0
, 0

-5 8 , 249
-1,831, 000
-358,270
3,173,119

Total obligations.

Personal services: Paym ent above
basic rates_________________________

$1, 275, 000

$5,000,000

5, 580,100

5, 000, 000

ALLOCATION TO IMMIGRATION AND N ATU ­
RALIZATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF
JUSTICE

Average number of all employees________
01

Personal services: Part-time and tem ­
porary positions___________________
03 Transportation of things____________
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services: Services
performed b y other agencies_______
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 Equipm ent__________ _____ _________
15 Taxes and assessments______________
Total obligations__________________

$59, 330
5,890
3, 865
239,198
13,980
156, 533
294
479,090

PROGRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE

These funds are to enable the President to provide for
emergencies affecting the national interest, security, or
defense which mav arise at home or abroad.

ALLOCATION

TO EXE C UTIV E
THE PRESIDENT

1951 actual

01

02

OBLIG ATIO NS B Y O B JE C T S

Object classification

ALLOCATION TO TREASURY DEPARTMENT

Average number of all employees________

1952 estimate

OFFICE OF

1953 estimate

03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

Average number of all employees________
01

Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions, __________________

$112,048
28, 210
1,978
10, 277
1,433
128,183
1,793
4, 930
153

$435,195
85.000
9,000
15, 000
50.000
88,800
3,200
4, 000
800

Total obligations- - .................. ...........

289, 005

690,995

Travel _____________________________

ALLOCATION TO G ENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION

02
04
06
07
08

Travel__________ ______ _________
Communication services___________
Printing and reproduction..............
Other contractual services...... .........
Supplies and materials------- ---------Lands and structures....... .................

19
1,477
45,014
4, 000
762,470
813,000

21

23

21, 992

15, 508

$1, 673,898
34, 401
5, 986
2, 292
24, 500
7, 561
438, 016
21, 040
201, 945
762, 470
1, 010

$444,123
85, 329

192
0, 030

Average number of all employees.
01

Personal services___________
Travel______________________
Transportation of things___
04 Communication services___
05 Rents and utility services..
06 Printing and reproduction..
07 Other contractual services..
08 Supplies and materials_____
09 Equipm ent_________________
10 Lands and structures______
15 Taxes and assessments_____
Reserved for future allocations..
02
03

9,192
21, 030
50. 000
88, 800
3, 206
4, 000
55, 000
823
4,818, 597

$5, 000, 000

5, 580,100

5,000,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,268, 621
5, 580,100
6.848, 721

$1,848, 721
5,000.000

5, 420, 638
738
1, 268, 621
4,151, 279

55, 000

Average number of all employees
Personal services: Part-time and tem ­
porary positions - ----------- -------------




Total obligations.

1.848, 721

1.848, 721

5, 000, 000

5, 000, 000

3,173,119
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year........

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF
COMMERCE

01

$8 928
,
329

$55, 000

Total obligations. - ............. .........

10

$7, 383
2. 785
78
295
6 266
.
264
54
836
4,010

Total obligations .

04 Communication services_____ _____ ...
05 Rents and utilities____________________
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services____________
08 Supplies and materials_______________
09 Equipment____________________________
15 Taxes and assessments- ______ _______

02

Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions____ _____ __________
Travel________________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services___________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent___________________________
Taxes and assessments________ _____

22
$100,000

$5, 420, 638

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations.........................
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures.............................
i

6.848, 721

75

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
a n a l y s is

of b x p e n d it u r e s —

co n tin u e d

1951 actual

o b l ig a t io n s

1952 estimate

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations __ _ .
$4,151,279
_________ .
Out of prior authorizations.

1953 estimate

$3, 731,379
1,268, 621

$3,151,279
1,848, 721

o b je c ts—

Object classification

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF THE
A R M Y , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE— COn.

07 Other contractual services____ _______
08 Supplies and materials_______________
15 Taxes and assessments..... ... .......... .......

$41,288

Obligations incurred____ ___________

MISCELLANEOUS

96, 289

Emergency Fund for the President—
A M O U N TS A VA ILAB LE

by

8
8

180

FOR O BLIGATION
ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF STATE

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

01

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

870,139

$36,332
2,968
39,300

1, 752. 361
-882, 222

Obligations incurred______________

02

Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions._ _______________
T ra ve l... ____________________ _____
Obligations incurred______ _ ..........

$1, 000,000
750,000
2,361

Appropriation or estimate____________
Prior year balance available__________
Reimbursements from other accounts..

6

Average number of all employees________

SUM M ARY

Average number of all employees________

01
02

OBLIG ATIO NS BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

ALLOCATION TO EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE
PRESIDENT

25

Average number of all employees________
01

Personal services.. _________________

04
06
07
08
09

Communication s e rv ice s .____ _____
Printing and reproduction. _________
Other contractual services___ _____
Supplies and materials .........................
E q u ip m e n t .._______ _____ ________

$255,158
45, 729
8, 021
97,180
37,434
9,348
12,471

Obligations in c u r r e d ..____________

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred_____ ________

04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
15

$339, 714
55, 594
11, 979
2,035
117, 556
240, 286
9,511
12,471
9, 713
71,100
180
870,139

465,341

$521
20,249
4, 572
25, 342

Obligations incurred -

ALLOCATION TO GENERAL SERVICES ADM IN­
ISTRATION (ALTERATIONS EAST WINO OF
EXECUTIVE MANSION)
I
j

_

_

$127
56, 287
9,713
66,127

Obligations incurred _

$2,035
27, 851
29,886

05 Rents and utility services
07 Other contractual services
Obligations incurred

ALLOCATION TO GENERAL SERVICES ADM IN­
ISTRATION (FLOOD D AM AG E— N EV AD A)

$72, 854

Other contractual services

ALLOCATION TO HOUSING AND HOM E
FINANCE AGENCY

01 Personal services
02 Travel
04 Communication services
r\7
A f h o r finntrnptlinl cif'TvioP’S
n s ffnrvnlip^ nnri materials
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
OVdicratinn5 inenrrpd
?

$1,000
250
50
2, 5?5
75
71,100
75,000

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF THE
A R M Y , DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
c

o

_

PrtrcAti a 1
__ -._ i
A Troxrol
O
04 Communication"services........................ |

rn




1951 actual

1952 estimate

$619,771
24, 048
870,139

6
$47,224
6,597
912

1953 estimate

$304,251

304,251

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations________ ______
Unliquidated obligations, end of year___

2,361
304, 251

Total expenditures---------- ---------------

1,207,346

304, 251

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations_____________

589,342
618,004

304, 251

EXPENSES OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION
Expenses of Defense Production, Executive Office of the President—
AM O U N T S

A VA ILAB LE FOR O BLIG ATIO N

1951 actual

ALLOCATION TO GENERAL SERVICES ADM IN­
ISTRATION (DISASTER FLOOD RELIEF—
KANSAS)

4rr6 0
TY
AVai«qrrA nuinuer rtf dii cjj.ijj.iujc
r»g
ui oil O lnl

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1,513, 958

04 Communication services
06 Printing and reproduction
07 Other contractual services

07

A N A L Y S IS

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment of prior year obligations_____
Obligations incurred during the year_____

ALLOCATION TO COMMISSION FOR THE COM­
MEM ORATION OF THE ONE HUNDRED
AN D SEVENTY-FIFTH AN NIVERSAR Y OF
THE SIGNIN'"! OF THE DECLARATION OF
INDEPENDENCE

06 Printing and reproduction.
_
07 Other contractual services_
10 Lands and structures

37

Personal services____________________
T r a v e l ____ _________________________
Communication services.. _ ________
Rents and utility services___ _ _ _ _ _
Printing and reproduction_______ ___
Other contractual services___ ____
Supplies and materials_______________
E quipm ent__________ __________ ___
Lands and structures. __ __ _________
Grants, subsidies, and contributions._
Taxes and assessments______________

Appropriation or estimate-----------------------Transferred pursuant to Public Law 45
from—
“ Operating expenses, General Services
Administration” -------------------------------“ National school lunch program, Pro­
duction and Marketing Administra­
tion” _______________________ ________
“ Marketing services, Production and
Marketing Administration” -------------“ Removal of surplus agricultural com ­
modities” ____________________________
“ Salaries and expenses, Forest Service” .
“ Salaries and expenses, Bureau of Agri­
cultural Economics” _________________
“ Salaries and expenses, Office of the
Solicitor, Agriculture” ----------------------“ Salaries and expenses, Office of the
Secretary of Commerce” -------------------“ Seventeenth decennial census, Bureau
of the Census” . ------------ --------------------“ Pay and allowances, commissioned
officers, Coast and Geodetic Survey” .
“ Departmental salaries and expenses,
Bureau of Foreign and Dom estic
Commerce” _____________________ r - - “ Field office service, Bureau of Foreign
and Domestic Commerce” ----------------“ Salaries and expenses, maritime activi­
ties” ............................................. ..............
“ Salaries and expenses, Patent Office” - .
“ Operation and administration, Na­
tional Bureau of Standards” --------------

$57,331,895

300.000
175.000

100.000
225.000
61,231
17, 700

20,000
35.000
150.000
30.000
1,250,000
75.000
425,600
150.000
50.000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

76

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

EXPENSES OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION— Con.

AM O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR O BLIGATION---- C o n t i n u e d

Expenses o f Defense Production, Executive Office of the PresidentContinued
AM O U N T S A V A IL AB LE FOR O BLIG ATIO N-----C o n t i n u e d

1951 actual
Transferred pursuant to Public Law 45
from—Continued
“ Radio.propagation and standards, N a­
tional Bureau of Standards” -------------“ Salaries and expenses, Civil Aeronau­
tics Administration” _________________
“ Maintenance and operation, Washing­
ton National Airport, Civil Aeronau­
tics Administration” ________________
“ Conservation and development of
mineral resources, Bureau of M ines” . .
“ Surveys, investigations, and research,
Geological Survey” __________________
“ Health, education, and welfare serv­
ices, Bureau of Indian Affairs” ______
“ Revision of consumers’ price index,
Bureau of Labor Statistics” __________
“ Salaries and expenses, Bureau of E m ­
ployees’ Compensation” _____________
“ Salaries and expenses, Wage and Hour
Division” ___________________________
Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Reimbursements from other accounts____
Total available for obligation--------Unobligated balance, estimated savings-..
Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to—
“ Salaries and expenses, Office of Defense
M obilization” _______________________
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Council of Economic
Advisers” ___________________________
“ Salaries and expenses, Defense Pro­
duction Administration” ____________
“ Salaries and expenses, Defense Trans­
port Administration” _______________
“ Salaries and expenses, Economic Sta­
bilization A gency” __________________
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Federal Security
Agency” -------------------------------------------“ Emergency operating expenses, Gen­
eral Services Administration” _______
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Office of the Adminis­
trator, Housing and Home Finance
Agency” -------------------------------------------“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Agriculture” _________
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Department of Com ­
merce” _______________________ ______
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Interior” _____________
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Justice” ______________
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Labor” _______________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Transferred to—
“ Yugoslav emergency relief, Executive
i
Office of the President” (64 Stat. 198)_ -$37, 800, 000
“ China aid, Executive Office of the
President” (64 Stat. 198)._ _ _______
-7 5 , 414, 000
“ India emergency food aid, Executive
Office of the President” (65 Stat. 69)-. - 100 000 0 0
,
, 0
Adjusted appropriation or estimate_ 1, 999, 759, 000
Authorization to expend public debt
receipts (loan to S pain),. ___________
62, 500, 000
Prior year balance available: Public debt
authorization (loan to Spain)___ _ ...
Balance transferred to “ Mutual security,
Executive Office of the President,” pur­
suant to M utual Security Act of 1951
(65 Stat. 373): Public debt authoriza­
tion (loan to Spain)_______ ___________
Prior year balance reappropriated:
Appropriated funds___ ________ ____ _
257, 540,974
Public debt authorization.......... ..............
6,282,000

$100,000
505.000
7,500
500.000
300.000

110.000

1953 estimate

$45, 300, 000

-4 5 , 300, 000

Total available for obligation. ......... 2,326,081,974
Balance available in subsequent year:
Public debt authorization (loan to Spain).
-45,300,000
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year and transferred to “ Mutual securitv, Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to Mutual Security A ct of
1951 (65 Stat. 373)______________________
-64,356,155

95.000
60.000
116,000
62,189,926
8,759
62,198,685
-4,807,347

Obligations incurred___ ______
2, 216,425,819
Comparative transfer to “ Mutual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the President” . -2,216,425,819

57,391,338

Total obligations__________________
-5 ,9 5 3
A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

-26,858
-1,168,524

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

-870,345
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___ $1,879, 783,784 $1, 287,358,478
Obligations incurred during the year_____ 2,216,425,819

-25,376,309

4,096, 209,603
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year. . 1,287,358, 478
Unliquidated obligations, transferred
to “ Mutual security, Executive Office
of the President,” pursuant to Public
Law 165________ _ ____________ __
Total expenditures_______ _____ ___ 2, 808, 851,125
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
}2 ,808,851,125

-19,693
-5,962, 824

-226, 500
- 4 , 569,466

1,287,358, 478

1, 287,358,478

-15,354, 558
-2,953, 769

INDIA EMERGENCY FOOD AID

-1 3 , 337

India Emergency Food A id , Executive Office of the President—

-843,202

Total obligations .

A M O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year_
_

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$23, 225, 726
$57,391,338
57,391,338

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_____________
Unliquidated obligations, end of year..

8, 759
23, 225,726

Total expenditures______ ____ ____

34,156, 853

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations________
Out of prior authorizations___________

23, 225, 726

34,156,853

Adjusted appropriation: Transferred from
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office
of the President,” pursuant to Public
Law 48-_. . . . . __ ___ _ . . _______
Authorization to expend from public debt
« receipts pursuant to 65 Stat. 6 9 _ ____
_
Balance transferred from “ Mutual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to Public Law 48____________
Prior year balance available_____________

1952 estimate

$100 000,000
,
$27, 026,845
62,973,155
82, 500,000

Total available for obligation........ .
Balance available in subsequent year........

23, 225, 726

100, 000,000
-8 2 , 500,000

172, 500, 000

Obligations incurred.................... .......

23, 225, 726

1953 estimate

17, 500,000

172, 500,000

O BLIG ATIO NS BY A C T IV IT IE S

FOREIGN ASSISTANCE

Emergency food aid—1951, $17,500,000; 1952, $172,500,000.

Foreign Assistance, Executive Office of the President-

O BLIG ATIO NS BY O B JE C T S

16 Investments and loans—1951, $17,500,000; 1952, $172,500,000.

AM O U N T S A V A IL AB LE FOR OBLIGATION

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
1951 actual

Appropriation or estim ate.. ______ ______ $2, 200 000,000
,
Transferred from “ Government and relief
in occupied areas” pursuant to Foreign
Aid Appropriation Act of 1950 (63 Stat.
12,973,000
711)............ .........- ..................... - ........ .........




Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year

$17,500,000

1

17,500,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$17, 500,000
172, 500,000
190,000,000

$27,500,000
27, 500, 000

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
a n a l y s is

o p e x p e n d it u r e s —

co n tin u e d

1951 actual
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year___________________________________

1952 estimate

$17, 500,000

A N A L Y S IS

Total expenditures_______________

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1953 estimate

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year____

$27,500,000
162, 500,000

$27,500, 000

162, 500,000

Expenditures out of prior authorizations.

77

27, 500,000

International Children’s Emergency Fund of the United Nations,
Executive Office of the President—
A M O U N T S A VA ILAB LE

Contributions to the International Children’s Emergency Fund of the United
Nations—1951, $1,203,241.
O BLIG ATIO N S B Y O B JE C T S

Total expenditures_______________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$3, 743,691
1,203, 241
4,946,932

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizaions_________
Out of prior authorizations..................

1,203,241
3,743,691

Mutual Defense Assistance, Republics of Korea and the Philippines,
Executive Office of the President—
Mutual Defense Assistance, Emergency Fund, General Area of China,
Executive Office of the President—
Mutual Defense Assistance, Nations in Southern and Eastern A sia ,
Executive Office of the President—
AM O U N T S A V A IL AB LE FOR O BLIGATION

International Children’s Welfare Work, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent—
FOR OBLIGATION

Appropriation or estimate—1951, $5,750,000.
O BL IG AT IO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

Contributions to the International Children’s Emergency Fund of the United N a­
tions—1951, $5,750,000.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1951, $5,750,000.
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year..
Obligations incurred during the year....

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$5,750,000
$5, 750,000

1951 actual

5, 750,000

Total expenditures________________

5, 750, 000

Expenditures out of prior authorizations.

Applied to contract authorization________
Prior year balance available (appropria­
tion)
-- _______ __________
Balance transferred to “ M utual security,
Executive Office of the President,” pur­
suant to M utual Security A ct of 1951
(65 Stat 373)
-- - ______ _____ -Prior year balance reappropriated:
Appropriation
__ ____
Contract authorization
Reimbursements from other accounts___

5, 750, 000

5,470, 614, 776
-124,083,170

Total obligations.

A M O U N TS AVAILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

Ar\ rA V Cft An nr
r> T ?,TJ
Transferred from “ International informa­
tion and educational activities, Depart­
ment of State,” pursuant to General
Appropriation Act, 1951 (64 Stat. 595) —

$ 2 6 ,9 0 0 ,0 0 0

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Unobligated balance, estimated savings—

2 9 ,4 3 7 ,0 0 0
— 1 ,9 4 1 ,1 4 3

/''iVilirra+irmc IJ LiT'Tpri
K UllfeCitlUilo I'nm 'L IC .--- ------------ ----J
LL U U
Comparative transfer to “ M utual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the President” .




2, 5 3 7 ,0 0 0

2 7 ,4 9 5 ,8 5 7
-2 7 ,4 9 5 ,8 5 7

1952

estimate

$124,083,170

-124,083,170
188,192,473
53, 214,141
852,162 ------

---------

-603,448, 216
-32,136, 439

______

Expenses, International Development, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent—
actual

5,856,000

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

1951

1953 estimate
- - .................-

-455, 523, 729

Total available for obligation
Balance available in subsequent year____
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year and transferred to “ M utual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent,” pursuant to M utual Security
Act of 1951 (65 Stat. 373):
Appropriation
Contract authorization

1952 estimate

4, 710, 946, 951
Obligations incurred __
Comparative transfer to—
“ Yugoslav emergency relief, Executive
-1 5 , 271, 667
Office of the President” ______________
“ Mutual security, Executive Office of
-4,695,675,284
the President”
- - __

5, 750, 000

5, 750, 000
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year------------------------------------------------------

13,685,641

Mutual Defense Assistance, Greece and Turkey, Executive Office of
the President—

INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’ S WELFARE W ORK

AM O U N T S A V A IL AB LE

13, 810,216

Mutual Defense Assistance, Iran, Republics of Korea and, the Philip­
pines, Executive Office of the President—

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year._
Obligations incurred during the year___

13,685,641

13,810,216

Mutual Defense Assistance, Greece, Turkey, and Iran , Executive Office
of the President—

Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1951, $1,203,241.

1951 actual

13,685,641

13,685, 641

Mutual Defense Assistance, North Atlantic Area, Executive Office of
the President—

O BLIG ATIO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

A N A L Y S IS

$13,685,641

MUTUAL DEFENSE ASSISTANCE

FOR OBLIGATION

Prior year balance reappropriated—1951, $1,203,241.

11

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________

1953 estimate

$27,495,857
27,495,857

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
vear____ ________________ _____________
Total expenditures___________ ___

INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’ S EMERGENCY FUND

1952 estimate

1951 actual
U nliquidated obligations, start of year—
Obligations incurred during the year

1953

estimate

Unliquidated obligations, end of year—
Total expenditures

_____

1953 estimate

$1,027,605, 632 $4,812,365,430
4,710,946,951
5,738, 552, 583

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations______________
Unliquidated obligations, transferred to
“ Mutual security, Executive Office of
the President,” pursuant to Public

1952 estimate

4,812,365,430

852,162

4,812,365,430
4,812,365,430
925, 334,991

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of appropriation to liquidate | 925, 334,991
prior-year contract authorization------Out of prior authorizations____________

•

78

TH E BU D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

MUTUAL SECURITY
M utual Security, Executive Office o f the President—
M ilitary Assistance, Europe, Title I, M utual Security Act, E xec­
utive—
Econom ic and Technical Assistance, Europe, Title I, Mutual Secu­
rity Act, Executive—
Assistance to Spain, M utual Security Act, Executive—
M ilitary Assistance, Near East and Africa, Title II, Mutual Security
Act, Executive—
Econom ic and Technical Assistance, Near East and Africa, Title II,
M utual Security Act, Executive—
Military Assistance, Asia and Pacific, Title III, Mutual Security
Act, Executive—
Econom ic and Technical Assistance, Asia and Pacific, Title III,
Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency,
Title III, Mutual Security Act, Executive—
Military Assistance, American Republics, Title IV, Mutual Security
Act, Executive—
Technical Assistance, American Republics, Title IV, M utual Secu­
rity Act, Executive—
[F o r expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the
provisions of the M utual Security A ct of 1951 (Public Law 165,
approved October 10, 1951), as fo llo w s :]
[M ilita ry assistance, title I: For assistance authorized b y section
101 (a) (1), $ 4,818 ,852 ,457 , 0f which $44,476,271 is for paym ent of
obligations incurred under authority granted in the Second Supple­
mental Appropriation Act, 1950, and extended in the Foreign Aid
Appropriation Act, 1951, to enter into contracts under the M utual
Defense Assistance A ct of 1949, as amended (22 U. S. C. 1571-1604);
and, in addition, unexpended balances of appropriations heretofore
made for carrying out the purposes of title I of the M utual Defense
Assistance A ct of 1949, as amended, shall remain available through
June 30, 1952, and such unexpended balances of appropriations shall
be consolidated with this appropriation ;]
[E con om ic and technical assistance, title I: For assistance author­
ized by section 101 (a) (2), $1,012,000,000; and, in addition, $10000,000 to carry out the provisions of section 115 (e) of the Econom ic
Cooperation A ct of 1948, as amended, except that when determined
by the Director such balances as cannot be effectively expended shall
be merged with funds appropriated under section 101 (a) (2) of the
M utual Security A ct of 1951; and, in addition, unexpended balances
of appropriations heretofore made for carrying out the purposes of
the E conom ic Cooperation A ct of 1948, as amended (22 U. S. C.
1501-1522), shall remain available through June 30, 1952, and be
consolidated with this appropriation ;]
[Assistance to Spain: For econom ic, technical, and military assist­
ance, in the discretion of the President under the general objectives
set forth in the declaration of policy contained in the titles of the
Economic Cooperation A ct of 1948 and the M utual Security A ct of
1951, for Spain, $100,000,000;]
[M ilitary assistance, title I I : For assistance authorized by section
201, $396,250,000; and, in addition, unexpended balances of appro­
priations heretofore made for assistance to Greece and Turkey, avail­
able for the fiscal year 1951, pursuant to the A ct of M ay 22, 1947, as
amended (22 U. S. C. 1401-1410), and for assistance to Iran pursuant
to the M utual Defense Assistance Act of 1949, as amended (22
U. S. C. 1571-1604), shall remain available through June 30, 1952,
and be consolidated with this appropriation ;]
[E con om ic and technical assistance, title I I : For assistance
authorized by section 203, $160,000,000;]
[M ilitary assistance, title II I : For assistance, authorized by
section 301, $535,250,000; and, in addition, unexpended balances of
appropriations heretofore made for the purposes of title III of the
Mutual Defense Assistance Act of 1949, as amended (22 U. S. C.
1602-1604), shall remain available through June 30, 1952, and be
consolidated with this appropriation ;]
[E con om ic and technical assistance, title I I I : For assistance,
authorized by section 302, $237,155,866; and, in addition, unex­
pended balances of funds heretofore made available for carrying out
the purposes of the China Area Aid Act of 1950 (22 U. S. C. 1547)
shall remain available through June 30, 1952, and be consolidated
with this ap propriation ;]
[C ontributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency,
title II I : For the United States contribution to the United Nations
Korean Reconstruction Agency as authorized by section 303, the
unobligated balances of the appropriations heretofore made, and
available during the fiscal year 1951, for assistance to Korea under
authority of the Far Eastern Econom ic Assistance Act of 1950, as




amended (22 U. S. C. 1543, 1551, 1552), shall remain available
through June 30, 1952, and be consolidated with this appropriation;]
[M ilita ry assistance, title I V : For assistance authorized bv section
401, $38,150,000;]
[T echn ical assistance, title IV : For assistance authorized bv sec­
tion 402, $21,245,653.]

[GENERAL PROVISIONS]
[ S e c . 2. Appropriations in this A ct under the heading “ Mutual
Security” for econom ic and technical assistance and allocations from
any appropriations under such heading to the Director for Mutual
Security or the Mutual Security Agency shall be available, without
limitation on any authority conferred by the Mutual Security Act
of 1951 or any A ct continued in effect thereby, for rents in the Dis­
trict of Colum bia; expenses of attendance at meetings concerned
with the purposes of such appropriations; hire of passenger m otor
vehicles; purchase of not to exceed ten aircraft for use outside the
continental limits of the United States and maintenance, operation,
and hire of aircraft; purchase of not to exceed fifty passenger m otor
vehicles for use outside the continental limits of the United States
and, in addition, passenger m otor vehicles abroad may be exchanged
or sold and replaced for an equal number of such vehicles; transpor­
tation of privately owned autom obiles; entertainment within the
United States (not to exceed $20,000); exchange of funds without
regard to section 3651 of the Revised Statutes (31 U. S. C. 543) ;
loss by exchange; expenditures (not to exceed $50,000) of a confi­
dential character other than entertainment provided that a certifi­
cate of the am ount of each such expenditure, the nature of which it
is considered inadvisable to specify, shall be made by the Director
or D eputy Director of M utual Security, and every such certificate
shall be deemed a sufficient voucher for the am ount therein speci­
fied; insurance of official m otor vehicles in foreign countries; acqui­
sition of tem porary quarters outside the continental limits of the
United States to house employees of the United States Government
by rental (without regard to section 322 of the A ct of June 30, 1932,
as amended (40 U. S. C. 278a)), lease, or construction and necessary
repairs and alterations to such tem porary quarters; health and
accident insurance for foreign trainees and technicians while en
route or absent from their own countries participating in activities
authorized under the Mutual Security A ct of 1951; actual expenses
of preparing and transporting to their former homes in the United
States or elsewhere the remains of persons or members of the families
of persons who may die while such persons are away from their
homes participating in activities under the Mutual Security A ct of
1951; and services of commissioned officers of the Public Health
Service and of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, and for purposes of
providing such services the Public Health Service m ay appoint not
to exceed 20 officers in the Regular Corps to grades above that of
senior assistant, but not above that of director, as otherwise author­
ized in accordance with section 711 of the A ct of July 1, 1944, as
amended (42 U. S. C. 211a), and the Coast and Geodetic Survey
may appoint for such purposes not to exceed 20 commissioned officers
in addition to those otherwise authorized: Provided, That not to
exceed $75,000,000 shall be available for administrative expenses of
the departments and agencies concerned with the administration of
the programs provided for herein and no part of such amount shall
be used to pay the salary of any civilian em ployee at a rate greater
than that paid by the State Departm ent for comparable work or
services in the same area.]
[ S e c . 3. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act, or of
the funds available for expenditure by any corporation included in
this Act, shall be used to pay the salary or wages of any person who
engages in a strike against the Governm ent of the United States or
who is a member of an organization of Governm ent employees that
asserts the right to strike against the Governm ent of the United
States, or who advocates, or is a member of an organization that
advocates, the overthrow of the Governm ent of the United States
by force or violence: Provided, That for the purposes hereof an
affidavit shall be considered prima facie evidence that the person
making the affidavit has not contrary to the provisions of this
section engaged in a strike against the Governm ent of the United
States, is not a member of an organization of G overnm ent employees
that asserts the right to strike against the Governm ent of the United
States, or that such person does not advocate, and is not a member
of an organization that advocates, the overthrow of the Governm ent
of the United States b y force or violence: Provided further, That any
person who engages in a strike against the Governm ent of the
United States or who is a member of an organization of Governm ent
employees that asserts the right to strike against the Governm ent
of the United States, or who advocates, or who is a member of an
organization that advocates, the overthrow o f the Governm ent of the

79

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO TH E P R E SIDE N T
United States b y force or violence and accepts em ploym ent the
salary or wages for which are paid from any appropriation or fund
contained in this A ct shall be guilty o f a felony and, upon conviction,
shall be fined not more than $1,000 or im prisoned for n ot more than
one year, or both: Provided further, That the above penalty clause
shall be in addition to, and not in substitution for, any other pro­
visions of existing la w .] (65 Stat. 373-387; 65 Stat. 730-733;
Mutual Security Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $7,328,903,976
A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

Description
t it l e

344,134

50,200,888

Total military assistance.
Deduct contingency for transfer.................

4. Administration:
(a) Obligations incurred_____________
(h) Proposed increase in 1952 limita­
tion due to pay increases_______
Total administration..............
Total title I— Europe________

45,300,000

5,336,901, 674
500, 000, 000
4, 836, 901, 674
500,000,000

2,111.984,388
350,000.000
13.407,711
478,925
342,000

1,022, 242,784

20, 000,000
342, 000

10, 000 0 0
, 0

3,647,740
7.064,108
10.521

2,727,683
38,325.000
50,000

2,486,935,393

1,093,687, 467

52,205,337

75,000,000

52, 205,337

78; 723, 278

3. 723, 278

6 270,988.306 6, 509, 312, 419

Direct Obligations

o, 635, 739

—

1.

-6 2 , 973,155
960, 000

7, 231, 924, 286

1951 actual

157.333. 283
3,042, 024
160,375,307

204, 544,637
2,571,248
207,115,885

69,807. 459

25,504.396
688, 825
26,193,321

(c ) Im proving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment______________
(2) Training expenses_________
Total___________________
Total dircct obligations...

60,018,867
1,641,262
61,660,120
291, 842,895

230,978, 068
981,020
231.059, 088
465, 268. 294

852.162
292, 695, 057

960,000
466,228, 294

1. 460, 383
2,349,407

23, 450.000
32, 806, 000

3, 751, 500
25,450,000

3, 744. 000
50.000.000

33, 011, 290

160,000,000

325, 706, 347

626, 228, 294

262,075, 739

331,430,365
1, 278,003
332, 708, 368

67, 991,163
1,816. 296

Obligations Payable Out o f R eim bursem ents
F rom Other Accoun ts

(d) Operation of mess facilities______
Total military assistance..........

8,147, 919, 291

Direct Obligations

1952 estimate

TITLE I— EUROPE

Direct Obligations

M ilitary assistance:
(a) Im p r o v in g effectiven ess of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipm ent____ __________ $2,149,295, 894 $2, 791,853, 920
(2) Training expenses-------------4,650,918
5, 656,640
2,153,946, 812

M ilitary assistance:
(a) Im proving effectiveness of ground
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipm ent______________
(2) Training expenses_________
T otal........................... .......
(6 Im proving effectiveness of naval
)
forccs:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipm ent______ _____
(2) Training expenses_________
Total..

2.

2, 797, 510, 560

(6 Im proving effectiveness of naval
)
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment______________
(2) Training expenses...............

286, 231,833
10,401,340

852,234, 531
7,020, 858

T otal____________________

296, 633,173

859, 255, 389




3, 731, 847,576

TITLE II— N EA R EAST A>'P AFRICA

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Total....................................

1952 estimate

1 M ilitary assistance— Continued
(c) Im proving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipm ent______________ $1, 257, 952, 697 $1, 634, 837.705
23,314, 894
45, 298,020
(2) Training expenses_________
T otal____________________ 1,281,267,591 1, 680,135, 725

Total economic and technical
assistance_____________________

8,147,919, 291
Obligations incurred____ _ _ ____
Comparative transfer from—
“ M utual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President” _________ ___ $4, 695, 675, 284
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office of
the President” . __ __ _ ______ __ . 2,216,425,819
“ Yugoslav emergency relief, Executive
Office of the President” _ .
52, 994, 589
“ Contributions to United Nations for
relief of Palestine refugees, Depart­
ment of State” _________ _____
25, 450,000
___
“ China aid, Executive Office of the
169,083,625
President” ____
___ - _____ ____
“ Assistance to the Republic of Korea,
39, 799,112 .
Executive Office of the President” ___
. ------------“ Salaries and expenses, The Institute
of Inter-American Affairs, Depart­
5,000,000
ment of State” ______ ._ __________
“ Expenses, international development,
27,495, 857
Executive Office of the President” -----

1.

1951 actual

continued

3. Economic and technical assistance:
(a) Country aid______________________
(b) E P U capital fund________________
(c) Technical assistance______________
(d) Bilateral technical cooperation...
(< Multilateral technical coopera­
e)
tion _____________________________
(/) M an power utilization___________
(g) Ocean freight voluntary relief
packages________________________
(h) Basic material? development____
(0 Confidential fund________________

64, 356,155

“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office of
the President,” pursuant to Mutual
Security A ct of 1951 (65 Stat. 373)
(Public debt authorization)_________
“ China aid, Executive Office of the
President,” pursuant to Mutual Se­
curity A ct of 1951 (65 Stat. 373)___ __
Balance transferred to “ India emergency
food aid, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent,” pursuant to India Emergency
Food A id A ct of 1951 (65 Stat. 69)_____
Reimbursements from other accounts____

Description

i— e u r o p e —

— c o n tin u e d

Direct Obligations— Continued

124. 083, 170

Total obligations__________________

a c t iv it ie s

2. Military aid funds subject to possible
transfer under sec. 101 (b )____________

603, 448, 216
32,136,439

Contract authorization___ _____ _ _
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office
of the President,” pursuant to M u ­
tual Security A ct of 1951 (65 Stat. 373).
“ China aid, Executive Office of the
President,” pursuant to M utual Se­
curity A ct of 1951 (65 Stat. 373)______
“ Assistance to the Republic of Korea,
Executive Office of the President,”
pursuant to M utual Security A ct of
1951 (65 Stat 373)
Balance transferred from—
“ Mutual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President,” pursuant to
Mutual Security A ct of 1951 (65 Stat.

by

N et total military assistance..

$7,328, 903,976
-44,476, 271

Appropriation or estimate . _ ____________
Applied to contract authorization. . . .
Prior year balance reappropriated and
transferred from:
“ M utual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President,” pursuant
to M utual Security A ct of 1951 (65
Stat. 373):

o b l ig a t io n s

1953 estimate

Econom ic and technical assistance:
(a) Special technical and economic
aid___________________________
(b) Bilateral technical cooperation.__
(c) Multilateral technical coopera­
tion_____ ______ ______________
(d) Palestine refugee program........
(e) Relief of refugees coming into
Israel_________________________
Total economic and technical
assistance...............................
Total title II—Near East and
Africa_____________________

50.000.000

TITLE in — ASIA AND PACIFIC

Direct Obligations

1. M ilitary assistance:
(a) Improving effectiveness of ground
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipm ent_______ _______
( 2) Training expenses.................
Total................................ _.

262, 764, 647

1953 estimate

80

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued
o b l ig a t io n s

by

a c t iv it ie s —

D escription

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

t i t l e h i — a s i a a n d p a c i f i c — continued
Direct Obligations—

Continued

1. M ilitary assistance—Continued
(6 Improving effectiveness of naval
)
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipm ent_____________
(2) Training expenses_________

$70, 525, 769
697., 045

$62,611,626
405,671

T otal____________________

71, 222, 814

63,017, 297

Im proving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment. ______________
(2) Training expenses_________

75, 201,081
1, 297, 249

263,051, 534
869, 099

(c )

Total

76,498,330

_ _

Total military assistance.

2.

Econom ic and technical assistance:
(a) Special technical and economic
aid
. ._ ______________ ____
(b) Bilateral technical cooperation___
(c) Multilateral technical coopera­
tion_________ _________________
( d) Ocean freight voluntary relief
packages. __ ________________
(e) Exchange of student program
Total economic and technical
assistance ____ ___________

263, 920, 633

410,485, 791

659, 646, 298

162, 937,117
1,498,883

233, 294,627
450,000

4, 914,000

4,914,000

42,516
3,615,005

100, 0 0
0
4,377,112

173,007, 521

243,135, 739

3. Contributions to United Nations
Korean Reconstruction A gency_____

38, 989, 365

50, 200,888

Total title III—Asia and Pacific___

622,482,677

952, 982, 925

TITLE IV— AMERICAN REPUBLICS
Direct Obligations

1.

Military assistance:
(a) I m p r o v in g e ffe c t iv e n e s s of
ground forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment
( 2) Training expenses

19,533, 000
305,000
19,838, 000

T o t a l _________
( 6 Improving effectiveness of naval
)
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment
(2) Training expenses

7,537,500
2, 000,000
9,537,500

T otal____________________
(c)

Improving effectiveness of air
forces:
(1) Furnishing supplies and
equipment
(2) Training expenses
Total . . . ___________

8, 200,000
574,500

8, 774, 500

Total military assistance
2. Technical assistance:
(а) Bilateral technical coop eration...
( б Multilateral technical coopera­
)
tion _
_
Total technical assistance_____

38,150,000

8, 746, 956

17, 245,653

4,000,000
12, 746,956

4,000, 000
21, 245, 653

Total title IV —American R e­
publics

12,746,956

59,395, 653

Total obligations_____ ________

7,231,924,286

8 , 147,919,291

PROGRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE

The mutual security program embodies military,
economic, and technical assistance to other nations that
will enable them most effectively to make their respective
contributions to the common effort to maintain the
security of the free world. To this end, the foreign-aid
programs conducted under earlier legislation were merged
into a unified program under the Mutual Security Act of
1951. The individual components of the unified pro­
gram are not new. These components include the mutual




defense assistance program for military aid, the European
recovery program for helping Europe to reestablish
economic stability and rebuild its productive power; the
international development program for furnishing of
technical “ know-how” to economically underdeveloped
countries; and contributions to similar technical assist­
ance programs carried on by the United Nations and the
Organization of American States. The most important
characteristic of the unified program is the predomi­
nance of military assistance and the correlation of eco­
nomic aid with this purpose.
Appropriations and other authorizations made under
existing legislation from the inception of the programs
through June 30, 1952, approximate $25.8 billion, roughly
divided between $12.4 billion for military assistance and
$13.4 billion for economic (including technical) assist­
ance. Appropriations for 1952 total $7.3 billion.
1.
Military assistance.— Military assistance under the
act of 1951 is designed to correlate the provision of United
States military equipment and supplies with the raising
and training of forces within the aided countries. I a
addition, this assistance provides for supplementary
training through United States schools and training per­
sonnel to assure effective use of the materials furnished
and for needed maintenance, parts, and spares.

Under title I of the act of 1951, programs are developed
by Military Assistance Advisory Groups (MAAG’s) com­
posed of members of the United States military services
stationed in each European country, including certain
countries not in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
From information provided to the M A AG’s on the size and
nature of the units in being and to be formed in the time
covered, total supply requirements are determined. These
are reduced by (a) the supplies and equipment owned by
the country, on order, or within its production achieved
with economic aid; (6) the undelivered supplies and equip­
ment included for the country in the mutual defense as­
sistance programs for 1950, 1951, and 1952; and (c) equip­
ment and supplies which, in the judgment of the MAAG,
can be provided by purchase or otherwise from the coun­
try’s resources. The programs are screened by a Joint
American Military Advisory Group (JAMAG), other
United States staff agencies located in London, and the
military departments in Washington, using criteria set by
the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
The military assistance programs for Greece and Tur­
key (title II) are to be continued to maximize the military
potential of these countries. The estimate includes
authorization to provide military assistance to the forces
of other Middle East countries, specifically Iran.
Military assistance in the area of eastern and south­
eastern Asia under title III is designed to aid in the preser­
vation of national independence and maintenance of se­
curity in the countries near the Communist-controlled
mainland of China. The programs for these countries
contemplate the provision of military equipment and
technical guidance to the forces of the Republic of the
Philippines, the National Republic of China, and Thailand,
and in Indochina to the French as well as the native
forces.
The military assistance program for South American
countries (title IV) will provide for the rehabilitation and
repair of equipment already on hand, and thereafter for
limited additional equipment under a hemispheric defense
plan developed multilaterally by the Inter-American De­
fense Board. In addition, for a number of the countries
whose economic condition makes it possible, reimbursable

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO TH E P R E SID E N T

military assistance will continue under the Mutual Defense
Assistance Act of 1949.
The training activities are to assure the maintenance and
use of existing United States type of equipment.
2. Economic and technical assistance: Europe (title I )—
(a) Country aid.—As a result of previous aid and other
developments, the European dollar gap was reduced from
a $7 billion level in 1947 to $2.5 in 1951. But the necessity
for accelerated rearmament of the West has forced the
countries of Western Europe to undertake larger defense
programs than their recuperating economies can yet sus­
tain without assistance. Defense expenditures of the nine
European North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
countries have increased from the equivalent of $4.4 bil­
lion in fiscal year 1950 to $5.2 billion in 1951 and an esti­
mated $8 billion in 1952. During 1953, European NATO
defense budgets will take another sharp jump. Over $500
million in counterpart funds will be released to Western
European countries in 1952 for financing their military
production programs.
United States economic aid to the NATO countries is
now allocated on the basis of defense commitments under­
taken by these countries. Furthermore, in collaboration
with the Department of Defense, military production pro­
grams are being developed for each country, integrating
national procurement schedules with NATO requirements
and United States offshore procurement. At least 10 per­
cent of the economic aid to be extended to European coun­
tries in 1953 will be provided on credit terms; the balance
will be made available as a direct grant.
(ib) European Payments Union capital fund.—The Euro­
pean Payments Union (EPU) is a financial institution
through which members of the Organization for European
Economic Cooperation settle trade surpluses and deficits
with one another. The aftermath of Korea and the
accelerated rearmament of the West have produced large
and rapid fluctuations in the balance of payments of the
member countries. Steps to achieve an interim adjust­
ment have been taken, and further corrective measures
are under consideration now.
(c) lechnical assistance.—This assistance will continue
on the basis of specific requests for the services of United
States technicians, for study and training in the United
States, and for scientific and technical information. Local
currency costs of projects, borne by participating countries,
will considerably exceed dollar costs on the basis of past
experience. Observation of American practices by the
Europeans since the start of the program is leading to a
more fundamental approach for further increasing Euro­
pean productivity.
(d) Emigration of surplus manpower.—Funds will be
utilized to encourage emigration from participating
countries to areas where such manpower can be effectively
utilized. An amount of $10 million will be made available
to an interim organization being formed to keep intact and
utilize facilities formerly operated by the International
Refugee Organization. It is expected that the United
States contribution will approximate one-third of the total
funds to be contributed by participating countries.
(e) Ocean freight—voluntary relief packages.—Although
the ocean freight subsidy on gift packages via parcel post,
commercial channels, and on certain categories of CARE
food packages has been discontinued to all European
countries except Austria, Greece, Italy, and Trieste, vol­
untary nonprofit relief agencies continue to receive reim­
bursement of ocean freight charges on supplies shipped to
ECA-grant countries which have concluded relief agree­
ments.




81

(f) Basic materials development.—Funds are used in
countries where Mutual Security Agency economic and
technical assistance programs are being conducted to
increase the production of raw materials in which the
United States is actually or potentially deficient. In
addition, direct purchases of such materials for the United
States stockpile are made with 5 percent local currency
counterpart funds.
(g) Confidential funds.—Expenditures of a confidential
character other than entertainment may be made upon
certification by the Administrator or Deputy Administra­
tor.
3. Near East and Africa (title IT)— (a) Special technical
and economic aid.—Funds are for projects mainly in the
fields of agriculture, health, and transportation, together
with a program designed to stimulate an improvement in
the living standards in underdeveloped areas.
(b) Bilateral technical cooperation.—This is to assist the
governments in the underdeveloped areas of the world
(Latin America, the Near East and Africa, and South
Asia) in eliminating or reducing the present handicaps to
economic development. Primary attention will be given
to increasing food production.
(c) Palestine refugee program.—The Palestine Refugee
Agency undertakes to find homes and jobs for Palestine
refugees and continues relief operations. Since May 1950,
it has provided subsistence rations for over 850,000
refugees, prevented serious outbreaks of epidemic diseases,
provided employment for many thousands of refugees on
useful public-works projects, supported a primary-school
program for refugee children, and provided technical
training. The estimate provides for making available the
$50 million appropriated for fiscal year 1952 to continue
the work undertaken by the Agency.
(d) Relief of refugees coming into Israel.— The act of
1951 authorized expenditure of a sum not to exceed
$50,000,000 for specific refugee relief and resettlement
projects in Israel. It is proposed to provide direct relief
in the form of consumer goods to maintain a minimum
ration and to implement long-term economic aid projects
in such areas as agriculture, industry, housing, and public
health through purchase of equipment and extension of
technical assistance. An integral part of the program
will be the matching contribution by the Government of
Israel, this Israeli pound fund will be placed under joint
Israeli United States control.
4. Asia and Pacific (title I I I ) — (a) Special technical and
economic aid.—Funds to the six countries of southeast
Asia (Republic of China on Formosa, the Philippines, the
Associated States of Indochina, Burma, Indonesia, and
Thailand) consist in varying proportions of (1) projects
mainly in the fields of agriculture, health, and transporta­
tion and emergency war relief; (2) commodities (mostly
producer goods) supplied for sale to maintain essential
supplies and to obtain the local currency counterpart
needed to finance the local costs of the projects; (3) sup­
port of military assistance programs, including (i) “ common-use” items (such as petroleum products, food for
troops, and certain construction materials for barracks
and airfields); (ii) additional salable commodities to help
cushion the local inflationary impact of the military
assistance effort, and (iii) additional projects of military
importance such as improvement of roads, bridges, and
harbors.
(b)
Ocean freight—voluntary relief packages.— Ocean
transportation charges are paid on relief packages sent
from the United States by individuals and by American
nonprofit agencies.

82

TH E B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

MUTUAL SECURITY—Continued

o b l ig a t io n s

by

Object classification
Programs for bilateral and multilateral technical coop­
eration in this title are identical to those described in
ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF
titles II and IV, respectively.
d e f e n s e — continued
(c)
Exchange oj student program.—The Department of
Direct Obligations
State administers a program to defray the expenses of
Personal services:
selected citizens of China and Korea to study or teach
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions
in accredited colleges, universities, and other educational
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
institutions in the United States. In fiscal year 1951,
Payment above basic rates________
grants were made to 2,817 students and 77 professors,
Total personal services__________
teachers, research scholars, and other professional work­ 02 T ravel______________________________
ers. In fiscal year 1952, grants will be made to approxi­ 03 Transportation of things____________
04 Communication services____________
mately 2,165 students and 500 professional workers.
05 Rents and utility services___________
(d) Contributions to United Nations Korean Reconstruc­ 06 Printing and reproduction__________
<
07 Other contractual services__________
tion Agency.—This Agency was expected to undertake a 08 Supplies and materials______________
09 Equipm ent_________________________
comprehensive post-hostilities program in Korea, toward 11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
which 24 nations pledged a total of $250 million in cash 15 Taxes and assessments..
Total direct obligations..
and kind, including $162.5 million pledged by the United
States. However, because of uncertainty about the Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other A ccoun ts
cessation of hostilities, Congress appropriated only the
unobligated balance from 1951 funds, approximately $50 08 Supplies and materials.
Total obligations____
million. Authorization exists to seek $45 million more
in 1952, should the military situation permit spending of
ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF STATE
a larger sum in fiscal year 1952.
5. Latin America (title IV ) — (a) Bilateral technical co­ Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions
operation.—Programs for bilateral technical cooperation Average number of all employees________
have been described in title II.
Average salaries and grades:
(b)
Multilateral technical cooperation.—While this pro­ General schedule grades:
Average sa la ry _____________________
gram is world-wide and receives funds from the four
Average grade______________________
Foreign Service officers grades:
economic appropriations under mutual security, the pro­
Average salary______________________
gram statement has been placed herein to obviate the
Average grade______________________
Foreign Service reserve grades:
necessity of repeating it in each title.
Average salary_____________________
Average grade__________________ ____
Contributions to the United Nations (including the
Foreign Service staff grades:
specialized agencies) and the Organization of American
Average salary______________________
Average grade______________________
States for their technical cooperation programs are pro­
Grades established b y Public Law 535,
81st Congress:
posed at $13,000,000 for 1953. This continues the level
Average salary______________________
established in fiscal year 1952. Beyond the contributions
Average grade_______ _______ ______
of other nations to the international fund, nations in 01 Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
which projects are operating supply local personnel and
Part time and temporary positions..
additional local funds. These contributions average the
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
equivalent of approximately $3 for every $1 contributed
Payment above basic rates________
Payment to other agencies for reim­
by the United States.
bursable details_________________
6. Administration.— The programs described above are
Total personal services________
T ravel______________________________
administered (within policy guidelines established by the
Transportation of things____________
Director for Mutual Security) by the following agencies:
Communication services____________
Rents and utility services___________
Military aid, Department of Defense; economic aid,
Printing and reproduction__________
Other contractual services__________
Mutual Security Agency; technical assistance, Depart­
Services performed by other agen­
ment of State; and Mutual Security Agency—depending
cies_____________________________
Supplies and materials________ ____ _
on the countries involved. Facilities and personnel of
Equipm ent_________________________
various other agencies are also utilized in carrying out
Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
Taxes and assessments______________
technical assistance programs in specialized fields such as
Investments and loans (net)________
agriculture, reclamation, and mining.
Total obligations______ __________
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF
DEFENSE
S um m ary o f Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions.......
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

9,548

22,061

8,121
$3,875
GS-6.1
$3,450

$4,114
GS-5.8
$3,588

co n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

$30, 675, 923
5,000

$73, 903.123
78,000

5, 574, 938

112, 551
5,448, 625

36, 255, 861
11,444, 326
58, 979, 204
119, 698
215, 720
116,120
129, 794,819
713,029, 682
3, 507, 615, 605
1,124,117
65, 068

79, 542, 299
11, 274, 6 6
6
300,879, 624
186, 922
7,017,000
25, 300
111,958, 272
1,324, 650, 470
4,203, 344, 901
10, 258, 627
180,150

4,458, 760, 220

6,049, 318, 231

852,162
4,459, 612,382

6 050, 278, 231
,

1, 650

960, 000

1,229

222

4,017
611
3, 559

$4,981
GS-9.1

$5, 614
GS-9.4

$9, 244
FSO-2.8

$10, 296
F S O - 2.6

$9, 448
FSR-2.5

$10, 590
FSR-2.4

$3.520
FSS-11.6

$4,378
FSS-11.3

$7,131
4.2

$9, 438
3.5

$5,336, 264
314, 525

$22,439, 972
786, 551

548, 242

99,491
4, 213,082

53, 761
6,252,792
948, 744
467, 528
270,176
93,331
340, 564
5, 863, 515

27, 580, 8 6
8
3, 733,980
9,424, 689
305, 759
163, 654
234,051
5,002,346

20,647
903,104
2,377,452
44,906,995
742
5,000,000
67,445, 590

3, 545,889
30,384, 697
236,024, 669
2, 485
2, 000, 000
318,403,105

41, 790

728,307
14, 508
1,064,197
257,123
1,647
62,018, 916

8, 574,000
91,800
3 . 222.000
46,000
6,835,600
362, 700
2.243.000
563, 200
2, 500
296,462,305

67,445,590

318,403,105

2,823

2,707
76
2,448

2,336,950
64,475
959,467

19, 638

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average g r a d e ______________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

1953 estimate

The above obligations are distributed by
agencies as follows:
Department of Agriculture_____ ______
Bureau of the Budget_________________
Department of Commerce_____________
Federal Communications Comm ission..
Federal Security Agency______________
Housing and Home Finance Agency___
Department of Interior________________
Department of Labor_______ __________
Tariff Commission____ ________________
Department of State__________________

o b je c ts—




6

Total obligations.

ALLOCATION TO MUTUAL SECURITY AGENCY

\

Total number of permanent positions........
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees........ .......

66

2,435

1953 estimate

83

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
o b l ig a t io n s

by

Object classification

o b je c ts—

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

o b l ig a t io n s

1952 estimate

Direct Obligations—

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary__________________
Average grade____________________
Foreign Service reserve grades:
Average salary____________________
Average grade____________________
Foreign Service staff grades:
Average salary________________ . . .
Average grade_____________ _____
Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week

Paym ent above basic rates________
Payment to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_______ _______
Total personal services________
02 Travel_______________________________
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services_____________
05 Rents and utility services____________
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 E quipm ent__________________________
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
15 Taxes and assessments____________ . . .
16 Investments and loans (net).................
U nvouchered_______________________ ____
Total obligations.

Object classification

o b je c ts—

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

s u m m a r y — continued

ALLOCATION TO MUTUAL SECURITY
a g e n c y — continued

1

1953 estimate

by

$5,340
GS-8.7

$5,738
GS-8.4

$10,683
FSR-1.9

$11,949
FSR-1.9

$5,182
F S S- 8.1

$5,582
F S S- 8.2

$12, 001,001
553,381

$13,556,112
708,482

358,290

68,162
448,724

180,961
13,093,633
814,955
3!3,266
292,610
499,781
419,912
470,277
1,252,749
248,314
486,854
2,669,748,828
14, 614
17,200,000
10,521
2,704, 866,314

The above obligations are distributed by
agencies as follows:
2,191, 536, 410
M utual Security A gency___ ___ ______
Department of Agriculture__________ 338, 609,149
Department of Defense________________
52, 357, 528
48, 308, 578
Department of Comm erce______ <
______
Post Office Departm ent_______________
2, 082, 972
Federal Security A gency______________
1, 354, 630
Department of Labor______________
130, 957
Department of State__________________
315, 310
General Services Administration______
70,108, 920
Department of the Interior____________
49, 360
Public Housing Administration----------12, 500
2, 704, 866 314
,
Total obligations.
UNALLOCATED _____ ___________________________

___________

98,300
14,879,780
586,250
198,464
234,736
471,457
589,952
534,858
1,326,663
105,593
142,667
1,164,788,467
2,500
26,568
95,300,000
50,000
1,279,237,955

Continued

09 Equipm ent________ _________________ $3, 510,479,911 $4,233, 872,265
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.. 2, 715, 779,940 1,411,071,763
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
2,500
15 Taxes and assessments_______________
209,203
80,424
16 Loans and investments (net)_________
22, 200,000
97,300,000
U nvouchered.._ . . . _________________ __
10,521
50,000
U nallocated.____ _ _____________________
500,000,000
Total direct obligations_________ __ 7,231,072,124 8,146,959,291
Obligations Payable Out of Reim bursem ents
From Other Accoun ts

08 Supplies and materials_________ __ __
852,162
Total obligations____ ______________ 7,231,924,286

A N A L Y S IS

960,000
8,147,919,291

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the y e a r ___
Unliquidated obligations transferred from
the following, pursuant to P ublic Law
165:
‘ ‘M utual defense assistance, Executive
Office of the President” _____ _ __ _
“ Foreign assistance, Executive Office of
the President” ______ _________ _
“ China aid, Executive Office of the
President” _________ _____ _________

1952 estimate

$8,050,422,879
$8,147,919, 291

4,812,365,430
1,287,358,478
140, 739, 680
14,388,382,879

1,014, 880, 535
150, 929, 700
13,569, 800
21, 532, 600
1, 593, 000
1, 079, 200
53, 600
282, 220
75, 309, 800
7,500

1953 estimate

8,050,422,879

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations________ ____
Unliquidated obligations, end of year

960,000
8,050,422,879

1,027^422,879

Total expenditures________ _______

6,337,000,000

7, 023,000,000

44,476, 271
2,371,523,729
3,921,000,000

7,023,066,666

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations:
Out of appropriations to liquidate
prior year contract authorizations
Out of new obligational authority____
Out of prior authorizations_____________

1, 279, 237, 955
$500,000,000

Schedules relating to local currencies made available pursuant to Public Law 472, 80th
Cong., as amended, Public Law 329, 81st Cong., as amended, without purchase from
an appropriation
[All amounts are stated in United States dollar equivalents com puted at the rate of
exchange current at the time of the transaction]

S u m m a ry o f Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
A verage salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary— ___________________
Average grade________________ _____
Foreign Service officers grades:
Average salary----------------------------------Average grade_______________________
Foreign Service reserve grades:
Average salary----------------------------------Average grade_______________________
Foreign Service staff grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________
Grades established b y Public Law 535,
81st Cong.:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

A M O U N T S A V A ILAB LE FOR O BLIGATION

14, 021
288
11, 785

28, 785
693
25, 645

$4, 225
G S - 6.8

$4, 467
GS-6.5

$9, 244
FSO-2.8

$10, 296
FSO-2.6

$10, 507
FSR-2.0

$11, 501
FSR-2.0

FSS- 8.6

$5, 355
FSS- 8.8

$7,131
4.2
$3,450

$9, 438
3.5
$3,588

$48,013,188
872,906

$109,899,207
1,573,033

1,481,470

280,204
10,110,431

234,722
55,602,286
13,208,025
59,759,998
682,484
808,832
876, 596
136,128,611
1,273,396
714,181,100

140,090
122,002,965
15,594,896
310,502,777
727,417
7,652,111
849,303
117,495,476
1,326,663
1,328,301,952

1951 actual
Amounts becoming available pursuant to
sec. 408 (b) and 408 (d ), Public Law 329,
81st Cong____________
$5,117,576
Additional amounts becoming available
pursuant to sec. 115 (h), Public Law 472,
80th Cong., as amended . __________
114,143,800
Prior year balance available. . . . _171,874,466
Adjustment due to changes in exchange
rates to permit conversion to dollar
- 2 , 499, 750
equivalents__________ ______ __ ________
Transferred to U. S. Treasury______ __ _ -22,006,000
Total available for obligation______
266, 630, 092
Balance available in subsequent y e a r . __ -172,162,835
Unobligated balance, estimated savings
Total obligations__________________

Direct Obligations

01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08

Personal services:
Permanent positions................ .........
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base__________________ _____ ____
Paym ent above basic rates------------Paym ent to other agencies for reim­
bursable details._________________
T otal personal services------------Travel_________________ ____ ________
Transportation of things------ ------- ----Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services.....................
Printing and reproduction----------------Other contractual services----------------Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials--------------- ------9 5 0 0 0 0 -5 2 -




1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$4,872, 598
63,934,000
172,162,835

-35,150, 000
205,819, 433
-50,670, 959
155,148,474

94,467,257

O BLIG ATIO N S B Y A C T IV IT IE S

Description
1. Strategic materials program:
Development projects_________ ______
Purchases_____________ . . _____ __
Total strategic materials program ..
2. Information______ __
___________ . .
3. Technical assistance: Operational sup­
port. __ _________________ ________
4. Administration_______________________
Total obligations_________________

1951 actual

1952 estimate

$24,064, 000
15,980,000

$85,060,000
14,700,000

40,044,000
30,587,800

99.760.000
21.980.000

23,835,457

5,405,000
28,003,474

94,467,257

155,148,474

1953 estimate

84

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

MUTUAL SECURITY— Continued

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

Schedules relating to local currencies made available pursuant to Public Law 472,80th
Cong., as amended, Public Law 329, 81st Cong., as amended, without purchase from
an appropriation—Continued
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_____________ _____________________
Total expenditures________________

01 Personal services .... ...... ................
Travel____________ _______________
03 TransDortation of things........ ___.........
04 Communication services........ ............
05 Rents and utility services .... .............. .
06 Printing and reprodu ction ...............
07 Other contractual services:
Strategic materials developm ent___
Information projects_______________
Technical assistance support _____
Services performed by other agencies.
All other________________ __________
08 Supplies and materials
__
09 E quipment______ ____________________
10 Land and structures
_ ____________
11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
15 Taxes and assessments_______________

$10, 298,147
3,035,408
509,332
896,217
1,050,620
371, 615

$13, 547, 614
4, 659,029
678,813
1,184, 683
1, 769,825
429, 254

24.064.000
15.083.000

85,060,000
21,030, 000
5,405,000
2, 624, 788
1, 8 6 211
8,
15,983,459
661,003
208,000
19, 495
1,300

Total obligations........ ...................... .

94,467, 257

02

18,061,117
1, 645,821
17,308,372
1, 922, 317
181, 632
5,188
1,371
33,100

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.................. J
Out of prior authorizations__________ _

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$5,000,000
$25, 450,000
5, 000,000
20, 450, 000

5,000,000

20, 450,000

/ _____________
I
5, 000,000

SPECIAL FUND FOR MANAGEMENT
IMPROVEMENT
Special Fund for Management Improvement, Executive Office o f the
President—
A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

155,148,474

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year...............................
.........................

Overtime, Leave, and Holiday Compensation—

$606, 004

Total expenditures________________

OVERTIME, LEAVE, AND HOLIDAY
COMPENSATION

528, 952

77, 052

528, 952

1953 estimate

77, 052

Expenditures out of prior authorization.

$77, 052

77, 052
= = = = =

A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

YUGOSLAV EMERGENCY RELIEF
Prior year balance available_____________
Balance available in subsequent year____
Carried to surplus (Public Law 266, 81st
Cong.)
_______________________

$132,033
-127,315

Obligations in cu rred .................. .......

4,718

$127,315

Yugoslav Emergency Relief Assistance, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent—

-127,315

AM O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Claims—1951, $4,718.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Allocation to Departm ent of the N avy, Department of Defense: 01
services—1951, $4,718.

Personal

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$4,718

Obligations incurred during the year___

4, 718

Expenditures out of prior authorizations._

Adjusted appropriation or estimate:
Transferred from “ Foreign aid, Execu­
tive Office of the President,” pursuant
to sec. 2, Yugoslav Emergency Relief
Assistance A ct of 1950 (64 Stat. 1122)___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.
Obligations incurred________ ____
Comparative transfer from “ Mutual
defense assistance, Executive Office of
the President” . _______________________
Comparative transfer to “ Mutual se­
curity, Executive Office of the Presi­
dent” . ______ _______________ ________

Contributions to United Nations for Relief of Palestine Refugees,
Department of State—

Appropriation or estimate. ___________
Prior year balance available _
Repaid to Reconstruction Finance Cor­
poration__________ _______________ ____
Obligations incurred
__
_
Comparative transfer to “ M utual secu­
rity, Executive Office of the President” .
Total ob lig a tion s_____




________

$27, 450,000
6 000,000
,

15,271, 667
-5 2 , 994, 589

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

AM O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR O BLIGATION

1952 estimate

37, 722, 922

Total o b lig a tio n s.............................

RELIEF OF PALESTINE REFUGEES

1951 actual

$37,800,000
-77,078

1951 actual
1953 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year

1952 estimate
$7, 283, 608

$37, 722,922
37, 722,922

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year _ _______________________________

25, 450, 000

Total expenditures___________ : ___
_

30,439,314

-2 5 , 450,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorization___________
Out of prior authorization. ___________

7, 283, 608

7,283, 608

30,439,314

-

8, 000, 0
00

7, 283, 608

7,283,608

1953 estimate

85

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
B U S IN E S S

E N T E R P R IS E A N D

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION
Revolving Fund, Defense Production Act—
N o t e . —The estimate of additional borrowing authority and expenses for 1953 is included
in a n item proposed for later transmission under this head at the end of the chapter.

B

u d g e t a r y

A

u t h o r iz a t io n

S

R E V O L V IN G

FUNDS

priation of $900,000,000 based upon contemplated extension
of the Defense Production Act.
A recapitulation of estimated gross value of transactions
and ultimate net cost follows:

c h e d u le s

Million of dollars

A M O U N T S AVA IL A B LE FOR O BLIG ATIO N

Borrowing
authority
required

Gross trans­
actions
1951 actual
Authorization to expend from public
debt receipts:
New authorizations— ___________ _____ $1, 600,000, 000
Prior year balance available_______
____
Total available for obligation______ 1, 600,000,000
Balance available in subsequent year____ -1,120,639,000
Obligations incurred (commitments
for investment in revolving fun d).

A N A L Y S IS

479,361,000

1952 estimate

Programs certified to N ov. 30,1951_______
Programs expected to be certified between
Dec. 1,1951, and June 30,1952_________
Programs expected to be certified during
fiscal year 1953_____ ____________________

1,620, 639,000

Total.

1,620,639,000

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred (commitments for
investment in revolving fu n d )____ ____

1952 estimate

$479,361,000

1,620,639,000

1953 estimate

$321,461, 000 $1,343,056,000

479, 361,000

1,942,100, 000

1.343.056.000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________ ___________________________

321, 461,000

1,343,056, 000

1.041.856.000

Total expenditures (investment in
revolving fu n d)__________________

157, 900, 000

599, 044,000

301, 200,000

599, 044,000

301, 200,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations____________

B

u s in e s s

-T

y p e

157,900, 000

S

t a t e m e n t s

PROGRAM AND P ERF O RM AN CE

Under section 304 (b) of the Defense Production Act of
1950, designated agencies are authorized, with Presidential
approval, to incur obligations of $2.1 billion largely for
the purpose of making loans and procuring critical
materials in furtherance of the defense effort. The
obligations are financed by borrowings from the Treasury.
The 1951 amendments to the act permit commitments in
excess of $2.1 billion so long as ultimate costs do not
exceed this amount. Programs undertaken must be
certified as essential to the national defense by either the
Defense Production Administrator, the Secretary of
Agriculture, or the Administrator of the Reconstruction
Finance Corporation.
As of November 30, 1951, authorized borrowings were
as follows:
Defense Materials Procurem ent A g en cy___________
Reconstruction Finance Corporation_______________
Departm ent of Agriculture_________________________
Departm ent of the Interior________________________
T o ta l________________________________________

$807,
275,
150,
10,

295,
000,
000,
000,

000
000
000
000

1, 242, 295, 000

The remaining $857,705,000 of the $2.1 billion author­
ized is expected to be allocated by June 30, 1952. The
1953 budget includes an anticipated supplemental appro­




5.166.8

278.0

1,242.3

1.462.9

274.2

857.7

1,650.4

349.0

900.0

8,280.1

901.2

3,000.0

1953 estimate

$500,000,000
1,120,639,000

1951 actual

Ultimate net
cost

_____ _

- _______

The difference between the borrowing authority required
and the ultimate net cost represents working capital
needed to finance loans, advances to contractors, inventory
purchases, etc. Following is a description of programs
which were financed by borrowings through November 30,
1951.
Department oj Agriculture.— The purchase and resale of
agricultural commodities, except forest products, are car­
ried !out by the Commodity Credit Corporation which is
reimbursed for the net costs involved. The Production
and Marketing Administration has been delegated the re­
sponsibility for certifying loans for increasing plant capac­
ity to process or store agricultural commodities, except for
forest products.
During fiscal year 1951, Commodity Credit Corporation
stocks of linseed and tung oil were reserved for defense
needs. In addition, programs were initiated to increase
supplies of castor beans and kenaf seed and fiber. During
fiscal year 1952 these two programs will be expanded and
new programs will be initiated to assure supplies of long
staple cottonseed and sansevieria fiber. It is also con­
templated that stocks of gum turpentine and rosin of the
Commodity Credit Corporation will be reserved for de­
fense purposes during fiscal year 1952. Certification of
loans to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation will be
expanded during fiscal year 1952.
Net realized loss on purchase and resale operations
through June 30, 1952, is estimated at $7,664,000. Loans
were certified to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation
totaling $310,000 during fiscal year 1951, and are estimated
to amount to $47 million during fiscal year 1952, primarily
due to increased fertilizer production.
Department ojthe Interior.—Certifications to the Depart­
ment through November 30, 1951, have been limited to the
exploration and development of strategic and critical min­
erals and metals for which an allocation of $10 million has
been made to the Defense Minerals Exploration Adminis­
tration.
As of November 30, 1951, 216 exploration projects had
been approved in which the Government’s share of ex­
penditures totals $6,665,000 against a total cost of $11,163,000. Additional projects to be financed by the bal­
ance of $3,335,000 of the $10 million already allocated are

86

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION— Con.

A. Statement of sources and application of funds— Continued

Revolving Fund, Defense Production Act— Continued

expected^to; number 110 with a total valuation of $5,500,000. It is expected that an additional $20 million will
be allocated by June 30, 1952.
Defense Materials Procurement Agency.—As of Novem­
ber 30, 1951, programs amounting to $807,295,000 had
been certified for procurement of defense materials includ­
ing aluminum, copper, cobalt, lead, manganese, mag­
nesium, molybdenum, mica, nickel, tungsten, zinc, rubber,
and machine tools. Of this amount, $260,000,000 is for
the machine tool pool order and equipment installation
programs, $200,000,000 for the rubber program, and the
balance of $347,295,000 for other mineral and metal
programs.
It is anticipated that an additional
$287,148,000 will be certified by June 30, 1952.
In addition to contracting for procurement, and giving
financial assistance to contractors by advances or guar­
anteeing loans, the agency certifies direct loans to be made
by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation and the
Export-import Bank, and participates in determinations
for the issuance of accelerated tax amortization certificates.
Reconstruction Finance Corporation.—The Corporation
has been allocated $275 million for loans under the Defense
Production Act. Of this amount, $250 million is for facil­
ity expansion loans which must be certified by the Defense
Production Administrator or the Secretary of Agriculture
or their delegates. The remaining $25 million is for
working capital loans which may be made by the Admin­
istrator of the Corporation without certification from other
agencies. Of the $250 million, $183 million is expected to
be disbursed by June 30, 1952, for the following: (a) Agri­
cultural commodities, $5 million; (b) expansion of minerals
and metals supply or productive capacity, $120 million;
(c) machine tool industry expansion, $10 million; and (d)
other industries, $48 million. No working capital loans
had'been|committed by November 30, 1951.
Administrative expenses.—During 1951 and 1952, the
administrative expenses of the Defense Materials Pro­
curement Agency and the Reconstruction Finance Corpo­
ration relating to programs authorized by sections 302 and
303 of the Defense Production Act were paid from borrow­
ing authority. The expenses relating to programs carried
on by the Defense Minerals Administration of the Depart­
ment of the Interior were paid from appropriations made
to the Secretary of Interior. Up to November 30, 1951,
no administrative expenses had been incurred by the
Department of Agriculture or the Export-import Bank.
The amounts shown in statement A for administrative
expenses are for the Defense Materials Procurement
Agency and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation based
on programs certified through November 30, 1951. Dur­
ing 1953 it is proposed that the borrowing authority be
used to pay the administrative expenses of all agencies
engaged in carrying on programs financed from the
authority, in order to provide a consistent pattern of
financing the administrative expenses of these programs.
A. Statement of sources and application of funds
[For fiscal years ending June 30, 1951, 1952, and 1953]
[Relates only to allocations made through N ov . 30, 1951]
1951 actual

1952 estimate

FUNDS APPLIED
To operations:
D efen se M a te ria ls P ro c u re m e n t
Agency:
Minerals and metals program:
Acquisition of assets, advances to
contractors.........................................




1953 estimate

1951 actual
FUNDS A P P L IE D -Continued

#

To operations—Continued
Defense M a t e r i a l s P r o c u r e m e n t
A gency—C ont inued
Minerals and metals program—Con.
Expenses:
Purchases_______________________
Operating expenses______________
N et loss on commitment to pur­
chase contracts________________
Rubber program: Expenses:
Purchases_________________________
Operating expenses________________
Other_____________________________
Machine tool program: Acquisition
of assets:
Advances to contractors___________
M achine tools on lease......................
Other:
Administrative expenses__________
Interest expense, payable to U. S.
Treasury________________________
Miscellaneous_______________________
Accrued annual leave acquired____
Increase in selected working capital
items______________________________
Total funds applied to operations,
Defense Materials Procurement
A gency------------------------------------Department of Agriculture: Agricul­
tural commodities:
Expenses, net loss on purchase and
resale______________________________
Increase in selected working capital
items______________________________
Total funds applied to operations,
Department of Agriculture____

$2,677, 493
14,531

$164, 374,000
2,880,000

224,941,308
1,196,356
20,572

774,125,000
19,986,835

21,477, 000

110, 0 , 0 0
00 0
50, 000, 000

336,899

3,480,000

312,627
1,774
80,042

8, 206,000

7, 581,121

237,162, 723

1,217,108, 835

114

7,663,886
114

114

7, 664,000

Department of the Interior: Minerals
exploration program:
Acquisition of assets, loans___________
Expenses, interest payable to U. S.
Treasury__________________________

8,506,525

Total funds applied to operations,
Department of the Interior____

;, 581, 525

Reconstruction Finance Corporation:
Minerals and metals program: A cqui­
sition of assets, loans....... ...................
Machine tool program: Acquisition
of assets, loans___ ____ ____________
Agricultural commodities program:
Acquisition of assets, loans________
Other:
Acquisition of assets, loans________
Expenses:
Interest payable to U. S. Treas­
ury-----------------------------------------Administrative expenses________
T otal____ _____________ ____ _
Increase in selected working capital
items______________________________

75,000

2, 000,000

120, 000,000
10, 000,000

5,853,541

73,223,351

25,778
267,352

1, 725,000
475,000

8,146,671

210,423,351

35,265

8, 591

5,000,000

Total funds applied to operations,
Reconstruction Finance Corpo­
ration_________________________

8,181, 936

210,431,942

Total funds applied to operations.

245,344,773

1,443, 786,302

To financing: Increase in Treasury cash:
Defense Materials Procurement Agency.
Department of the Interior____ _______
Reconstruction Finance C orporation....

19,022,449
500,000
356,942

96,803,962
993,475
343,058

Total funds applied to financing___

19,879,391

98,140,495

Total funds applied-----------------------FUNDS PROVIDED
By operations:
Defense Materials Procurement Agency:
Minerals and metals program: In­
come, sales________________________
R ubber program: Income, sales_____
Machine tool program:
Income, interest on advances to
contractors______________________
Rental of machine tools___________
Other____________________ _____ ____

265,224,164

1,541, 926,797

1,168,868
105,016, 206

115,187,000
800,000,000

T otal_____________________ ________
Decrease in selected working capital
items_________________ ____________

106,185,172

Total funds provided b y opera­
tions, Defense Materials Pro­
curement A gency_____________

$62,580,000

1952 estimate

Reconstruction Finance Corporation:
Minerals and metals program: Reali­
zation of assets, repayment of lo a n s..

4.300.000
2.187.000
921,674,000
7,058,797

106,185,172

928,732,797

6,600,000

1953 estimate

87

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
A. Statement o f sources and application o f funds— Continued
1951 actual

1952 estimate

Total funds provided b y opera­
tions, Reconstruction Finance
Corporation___________________
Department of the Interior: Decrease
in selected working capital items_____
Department of Agriculture: Decrease
in selected working capital items_____

1951 actual

1953 estimate

FUNDS PROVIDED—Continued
By operations—Continued
Reconstruction Finance C orp ora tion Continued
Agricultural commodities program:
Realization of assets, repayment of
loans______________________________
Machine tool program: Realization of
assets, repayment of loans__________
Other:
Realization of assets, repayment of
loans____________________________
Income, interest on loans___________

B. Statement of income and expense— Continued
1953 estimate

DEFENSE MATERIALS PROCUREMENT
a g e n c y — continued

Expenses—Continued
Minerals and metals—Continued
Operating expense............. .....................
Net cost commitment to purchase
contracts__________________________

$300,000
500,000
., 076,892
61,986

1,138,878

$14,531

1,403,321

188,731,000

21,477,000

Total expenses, minerals and metals.
Machine tools: Depreciation, machine
tools on lease_____ _________________

2,600, O
ftO
4,075,000

$2,880,000

2,187,000

Undistributed:
Administrative expense_____________
Interest expense, U. S. Treasury_____
Miscellaneous__________________ ___ _

336,899
312, 627
1, 774

3.480.000
8.206.000

651, 300

11, 686,000

14,075,000
S u b to ta l._______________________ _
Increase in reserve for liquidation of
programs___________ ____________ _

75,000

533,334

114

107,882, 798
- 1 , 697,626

1,066,666
12, 752, 6 6
6

1,184, 634

Net loss for the year........................

107,324,164

Total undistributed expenses____
Total expenses___________________

T otal funds provided b y operations.

1952 estimate

942,882,797

997, 795, 6 6
6

By financing:
Borrowing from U. S. Treasury:
Defense
Materials
Procurement
A gency_________ ___________________
Department of Agriculture__________
Department of the Interior__________
Reconstruction Finance Corporation

150,000,000
500,000
7, 400,000

385,180,000
7.664.000
9.500.000
196, 700,000

Expenses: Net cost of operations................

$114

$7, 663, 886

Total funds provided b y financing..

157,900,000

599,044,000

Net loss for the year....................... .

-1 1 4

- 7 , 663,886

Total funds provided________ _____

265, 224,164

1,541,926, 797

-76,121,666

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES
Funds applied to operations___
Funds provided b y operations..
Net effect on budgetary expendi­
tures____________________________

$245,344, 773 $1, 443, 786, 302
942,882, 797
107,324,164
138,020,609

500,903, 505

$75,000
2, 500,000

Net loss for the year_________ . . ____

$301,200,000

Expenses:
Interest expense, U. S. Treasury_______
Increase in allowance for losses on loans.

-2,575,000

301,200,000
RECONSTRUCTION FINANCE CORPORATION

The above amounts are charged (or
credited (—)) as follows:
T o budgetary authorizations__________
T o net receipts of enterprise___________

157,900,000
-19,879,391

599,044,000
-98,140,495

B. Statement of income and expense

1952 estimate

DEFENSE MATERIALS PROCUREMENT
AGENCY

Income:
Rubber, sales________________________
Mineral and metal, sales.................. ......
Machine tools:
Interest income from advances....... .
Rental income_____________________
Other--------------------------- ---------------------Total incom e.
Expenses:
Rubber:
Cost of commodities sold:
Purchase of commodities__________
Increase in com m odity in ven tory...

$105,016,206
1,168,868

$800,000,000
115,187,000
4.300.000
2.187.000

$4,075,000

25, 778
267,352

1,725,000
475,000
3, 530,000

220,000

Total______________________________

1953 estimate

513,130

5,730,000

Net loss for the year..........................

[For fiscal years ending June 30,1951, 1952, and 1953]
[Relates only to allocations made through N ov. 30, 1951]
1951 actual

$61,986

Expenses:
Interest expense, U. S. Treasury_______
Administrative expense________________
Increase in allowance for losses on loans.

301,200,000

Income: Interest income............ ..................

-451,144

-1,655,000

Net loss, defense production activities-.

—$2,148,884

-$88,015,552

Retained earnings beginning of year:
Balance at beginning of year__________
N et loss for year_____ ____ ___________
Accrued employees’ annual leave
acquired___________________________

-2,148,884

-2,228,926
-88,015, 552

Balance at end of year....................

-2,228,926

-80,042
-90,244,478

C. Statement o f financial condition
106,185,172

921,674,000
[As of June 30, 1951, 1952, and 1953]
[Relates only to allocations made through N ov. 30, 1951]

224,941,308
-121,681,728

774,125,000

Cost of commodities sold.
O perating expenses_____ ____

103,259,580
1,216,928

774,125,000
19,986,835

ASSETS

Subtotal........................ ........................
Increase in valuation allowances and
operating reserves:
Loss on accounts receivable........—
Reserve for self insurance...................

104,476,508

794,111,835

Current assets:
Cash with U. S. Treasury........................

$19,879,391

$118,019,886

237,500
580,835

13,165

Total expenses, rubber p rogram ..

105,294,843

794,125,000

Accounts receivable:
T r a d e __ ___________ ________________
Claims_____ __________ ______________
Government agencies________________

135,121,549
201,508
3,906,434

135,121,549
201,508
3,906,434

Minerals and metals:
Cost of commodities sold:
Purchase of com m odities..................
Increase in com m odity inventory. _.

Less allowance for losses.....................

139,229,491
237,500

139,229,491
237,500

2,677,493
-1,288,703

164,374,000
Accrued interest receivable.......................

138,991,991
101,351

138,991,991
425,000

Cost of commodities sold...............

1,388,790

164,374,000




1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

88

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION— Con.
Revolving Fund, Defense Production Act— Continued

by

o b je c ts—

1952 estimate

1952 estimate

$10,485
914

Total obligations

1953 estimate

$68,300
3, 900

604, 251

09 Equipm ent _
15 Taxes and assessments . . .
1953 estimate

co n tin u e d

1951 actual

Object classification

C. Statement of financial condition— Continued
1951 actual

o b l ig a t io n s

3,955,000

A SS E T S —Continued
Current assets—Continued
Inventories:
R ubber_____________________
Tungsten___________________
Magnesium____ _ _________

MUTUAL SECURITY
$121, 681, 728
623, 710
664,993
122,970, 431

122,970,431
172, 580,000

6, 776,649
220,000
6, 556,649

Discharge of Investment Guaranty Liabilities—

$121,681, 728
623, 710

213,506,525
6, 250,000
207,256,525

Advances to contractors______
Loans receivable__________
Less allowance for losses.

Machine tools on lease_________________
Less portion charged off as depre­
ciation_____ _______________________

N o t e .—The estimate of activity in this fund for 1953 is included in the item for
“ M utual security” under proposed legislation.

B

A

u t h o r iz a t io n

S

c h e d u le s

AM O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR O BLIGATION

50,000,000

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$174,631,402

$164,347,195

$136,079,236

2,187,000
Prior year balance of authorization to ex­
pend from public debt receipts_________
Reduction in authorization to expend
from public debt receipts: Proceeds of
sale of foreign cu rre n c y _________ _____
Balance of authorization to expend from
public debt receipts available in subse­
quent year_______________ ____ ________

288,499, 813

808,056,833

L IA B IL IT IE S

Current liabilities:
Accounts payable:
T rade_______________________
Government agencies________
Total accounts payable___

40,501, 692
80,816,055
121,317, 747
939, 596
86, 686
338,405
88, 303
140, 768
1,593, 758
8,803,065

9,041,777
8,803,901

Total current liabilities^

131,714,570

139,163,311

580,835
533, 334

594,000
1, 600,000

1,114,169

-136,079, 236

8,782,314

26,365,519

2,194,000

132,828, 739

-164,347,195

2,288,000
174,000
4, 518,000
214,303
1,847,474

Total accrued expenses..
Trust and deposit liabilities.

-1,902,440

121,317, 633

Accrued expenses:
Operating expense...... ..............
Administrative______________
Interest payable to Treasury _
A ccrued annual leave________
Other________________________

-1,501,893

Obligations incurred_______________

47,813,000
Total assets..

u d g e t a r y

141, 357, 311

T otal other liabilities________

IN V E S T M E N T OF U. S.
GOVERNM ENT
Interest-bearing investment:
Notes held b y U. S. Treasury___
D e ficit.________ / . ______________

155,671,074

Total exp en d itures_
_

808,056,833

d m in is t r a t iv e

E

x p e n s e s

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O BJECT S

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions___
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and _
General schedule grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade_______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary______________________
Average grade______________ ________
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Excess of annual leave earned over
annual leave taken______________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
Payment above basic races.

02

03
04
05
06
07
08

Total personal services..
Travel_____________________
Transportation of things___
Communications_______
Rents and utility services...
Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services..
Supplies and materials.........




1951 actual
293
3
117

1952 estimate
874
7
623

$58,049,187

59,236,189

58.049.187

32,870,670

58,049,187

58.049.187

764,172

1,187,002

764,172

1,187,002

__ ______

Expenditures out of prior authorizations...

666, 699, 522

288, 499,813

$32,870,670
26,365,519

33,634,842
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year__ _____ ________________ ________ _

u s in e s s

-T

PROGRAM

Total liabilities and Investment o f
U. S. Government_______________

1953 estimate

$24,852,528
8,782,314

Unliquidated obligations start of year____
Obligations incurred during year________

756,944,000
-9 0 , 244,478

Total investment o f U . S. Govern­
m ent____________________________

1952 estimate

1951 actual

B

157,900,000
-2,228,926

A

-136,079,236

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

Other liabilities:
Reserve for self insurance_______
Reserve for liquidation expense..

Total liabilities..

40, 501,692
80,815, 941

1953 estimate

y p e

S

t a t e m e n t s

AND PERFO RM AN CE

Section 111 (b) of Public Law 472, Eightieth Congress,
as amended, authorizes the Director of Mutual Security
to issue industrial investment (including forward con­
tracting) and informational media guaranties up to
$200,000,000 to stimulate the flow of private capital into
projects abroad which further the purposes of that law.
This authority has been supplemented by section 520 of
the Mutual Security Act of 1951 (Public Law 165), which
makes guaranty funds available for investment in any
country eligible to receive assistance under the Mutual
Security Act. In addition to the $200,000,000 borrowing
authority, net fees collected increase funds available for
obligation.
STATUS OF GUARANTIES BY TYPES

[As of June 30,1950,1951, and 1952]
$4,324
GS-6.3

$5,316
GS-7.8

$2,830
CPC-3.6

$2, 930
CP C -3.3
$10, 250

$491, 975

$3,313,100

2,683
24,563

4.500
70,000

11,424

1.500
81,500

530,645
17,582
393
3,789
12, 555
5,254
20, 525
2,109

3,470, 600
152, 000
5,700
50.600
30,400
66,700
81,200
25.600

1950 actual

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Industrial........ ................... ..........................
Forward contracting_____________________
Informational media______ _________ ____

$22,276, 566
550,000
2,025,961

$28,309,018
250,000
5,075,823

$45,000,000
5,000,000
10, 000,000

Total outstanding................................

24,852,527

33,634,841

60,000,000

Industrial investment guaranties.—By the end of fiscal
1951, a total of $30,369,504 guaranties had been issued,
of which $28,559,018 were outstanding. Of the amount
outstanding, $28,084,018 were against the risks of incon­
vertibility of local currency receipts from investments;
one guaranty for $225,000 was against the risk of loss by
expropriation and confiscation; and one guaranty for

89

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

$250,000 covered forward contracting for the furnishing
of capital goods items and related services.
From the inception of the guaranty program until Oc­
tober 31, 1951, no disbursements had been made under
any of these guaranties and a total of $427,942 in fees
had been collected.
Increase in the number of guaranties resulting from the
1950 amendment to the Economic Cooperation Act (Public
Law 535), which broadens the scope of the act to include
investments of such intangibles as patents, processes, and
techniques, as well as to cover the risk of loss from expro­
priation or confiscation, is presently just beginning to be
felt. Authority in the Mutual Security Act of 1951 (Pub­
lic Law 165, sec. 520) to use guaranty funds in areas
provided for in that act is expected to further increase
guaranty activity.
Injormational media guaranties.— The Director is au­
thorized to issue guaranties up to $10,000,000 in any fiscal
year against nontransferability of funds in connection with
American investments in enterprises producing or distrib­
uting informational media. As of October 31, 1951,
$4,317,134 disbursements have been made against the
guaranties, and $158,987 in fees have been collected.
A. Statement of sources and application of funds— Discharge of
investment guarantee liabilities
[For the fiscal years ending June 30, 1951, 1952, and 1953]
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

C. Statement o f financial condition— Continued
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

IN VESTM EN T OF U. S.
G O VER N M EN T
Principal of the fund:
Notes held b y U. S. Treasury _______
Retained earnings reserved for future
contingencies____ . . ____________

$1,196,156

987, 721

1,697,424

Total investment of U. S. Govern­
ment_________ ___________________
Sch edu le

$2,383,158

501, 268

3,370,879

A - l . Accrued expenditures by objects

16 Investments and loans (net)—1951, $2,516,014; 1952, $3,566,688.

THE INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS
[Submitted under the Government Corporation Control Act]
N o t e . — The

estimate of appropriations and expenses for 1953 is included in the item for
“ Mutual security” under proposed legislation.

Salaries and Expenses, the Institute o f Inter-Am erican Affairs—
B

u d g e ta r y

A

u t h o r iz a t io n

S

c h e d u les

AM OU N TS AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate (obligations in­
curred), ________ 1. ______________ ____
Comparative transfer to “ M utual secu*
rity, Executive Office of the President” ..
Total o b l i g a t i o n s . _____ ________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$5,000,000
-5,000,000

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

FUNDS APPLIED
To operations: Acquisition of assets: For­
eign currencies_________________ ________
To financing: Increase in Treasury cash.-

$2, 516,014
37,089

$3, 566, 6 8
8
9, 207 ,

Total funds applied________________

2,553,103

3, 575,895

1951 actual
Obligations incurred during the year

By operations:
Real ization of assets: Foreign currencies.
Income: Fees__________________________

1, 501,893
287, 038

1,902,440
486, 453

Total funds provided b y program
operations. ______________________
By financing: Borrowing from Treasury..

1, 788, 931
704,172

Total funds provided............. ............

2, 553,103

2,388, 893
1,187, 002
3,575,895

B

Net effect on budgetary expendi­
tures. ________________________
The above amounts are charged (or
credited ( —)) as follows:
T o budgetary authorizations............. .......
T o net receipts of the enterprise..............

$2, 516, 014
- 1 , 788, 931

$3, 566, 6 8
8
-2,388, 893

727,083

1,177, 795

764,172
-3 7 , 089

1,187, 002
- 9 , 207

1

B. Statement of income and expenses
[For fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
1951 actual

1952 estimate

-T

y p e

5,000,000

S

t a t e m e n t s

P U R P O S E A N D F IN A N C IA L O R G A N IZ A T IO N

EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES
Funds applied to operations_____________
Funds provided b y operations........... .........

u s in e s s

1953 estimate

$5,000,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions (investment in the revolving fund).

FUNDS PROVIDED

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$486,453

The objectives of the Institute of Inter-American
Affairs are to further the general welfare of the American
Republics by carrying out cooperative programs in tech­
nical fields such as public health, agriculture, and educa­
tion. In addition to funds appropriated to the Institute,
participating countries contribute to the cooperative
programs.
The major activities of the Corporation are conducted in
accordance with the terms of agreements entered into with
the governments of the other American Republics. These
agreements provide for program operation by a coopera­
tive service, which is a part of the appropriate ministry
(health, agriculture, or education) of the host government
and is headed by the chief of the Institute’s field party.
Both the cooperating republic and the Institute contribute
funds, materials, services, and facilities.

Income: Fees collected__________________
Retained earnings reserved for future
contingencies____ _ _______ ____

$287,038
214,230

501, 268

A N A L Y S IS

Retained earnings, end of year____

501,268

987,721

Expansion in the activities of the Institute which
occurred in 1951 is not reflected in the following statements
since it was financed by allocations under the international
development appropriation. During 1951, the corporate
fund financed programs which had been in operation in
1950.
The Institute has authority to operate until 1955 (act
of September 3, 1949, Public Law 283), and the funds for
its 1952 programs are included in the mutual security
appropriation. An indication of the Institute’s 1953
program plans will be submitted at a laterdate.

C. Statement of financial condition
[As of June 30, 1951, 1952, and 1953]
1951 actual

1952 estimate

ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash with U. S. Treasury........................
Foreign currencies on hand (at cost)----Total assets * ^




____

$152,806
1,544,618
1,697,424

$162,013
3,208,866
3,370,879

1953 estimate

OF

BUDGET

PROGRAM S

AND

F IN A N C IA L

R E V IE W

90

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
T

he

I n s t it u t e

of

I n te r-A

m e r ic a n

A

f f a ir s —

A.

Statement o f sources and application o f funds

[For fiscal years ending June 30* 1951, 1952, and 1953]
1951 actual

FUNDS APPLIED
To operations:
Cooperative programs and directly related expenses:
Expenses:
Health and sanitation. . _
- ........ ............................ ......... ....... .......__ _ ____ _ _.
Agriculture (food supply)
___ - ____________ __ ________ __ _ ________
Education.
__ ________ ___
___ _________________ ______________ _________
General expenses.
_ _
.
__
__________ ______ ____
____

1952 estimate

$2,744,413
1,121,768
1,140,165
53,599

$1,475,732
750,598
740,883
41,600

___________________

$5,059,945
590,862

$3,008,813

Total expenses
_
__ _________ ____ _ _______ _________________________ _____
Increase in selected working capital items __
_____ _____________ _______ ____________

5,650,807

3,008,813
1,719,282

5,650,807

4,728,095

Subtotal

.

__

_ _ __

______

___ __ ____ ____

FUNDS PROVIDED
By operations:
Undistributed receipts:
__ __
__
Proceeds of incidental sales._ _
_
Adjustment of prior year transactions
_
__ _ __

.. ________ - ____________
__ _____________ ___________

20,000

35,745
234,466

Subtotal
_
..
_ __ ________ ____ _____ __________________
Reimbursements from M utual Security appropriation
._ __ __
_ . . __________
Decrease in selected working capital items__________ ______ ___ _________ ______________
Total funds provided by operations____
______________________ _________________
By financing:
A p p rop ria tion .____ _______
_______ __________ ____
___ ________ - _______ _____
Decrease in Treasury cash__
_ __ _ _______________________ ____________ _____

20,000
2, 000,000

270,211

560, 249

_

2,708,095
5,090,558

2,708,095

__ _ __________________________________________

5,650,807

4,728,095

_
_

5,000,000
90,558

2, 020,000

_______________________ .

Total funds provided by financing
Total funds provided

290,038

_____

EFFECT ON BUDGETARY EXPENDITURES

_ _ _
_____

$5,650,807
560, 249

$4,728,095
2, 020,000

_________

5,090, 558

2,708,095

.. _____ ______ _____ ______________________
. ________ ________________________________

5,000,000
90,558

2,708,095

5,090,558

2,708,095

T otal funds applied to operations
Total funds provided b y operations

*

Net effect on budgetary expenditures _ ___
T he above amounts are charged as follows:
T o budgetary authorizations .............T o net receipts of the enterprise ______




_______
__
___.

___ __________________________

1953 estimate

91

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
T

he

I n s t it u t e

of

I n t e r -A

A

m e r ic a n

f f a ir s —

B.

Statement of income, expenses, and analysis of deficit

[For fiscal years ending June 30, 1951, 1952, and 1953]
1951 actual

Expenses:
Health and sanitation:
Cooperative programs:
Technical and other assistance.......... . .
Cooperative project funds____________
Expenses related to cooperative programs.

1952 estimate

$1,428,252
1,150,000
166,161

$893,236
562,496

20,000
744,413

Agriculture (food supply):
Cooperative programs:
Technical and other assistance_______
Cooperative project funds____________
Expenses related to cooperative programs.

$1,475,732

439, 516
302,082
9,000

642,778
475,000
3,990

750, 598

1,121,768
Education:
Cooperative programs:
Technical and other assistance_______
Cooperative project funds____________
Expenses related to cooperative programs.

1953 estimate

736,409
347,500
56,256

523,039
207, 295
10, 549

General expenses. .............
Administrative expenses.

1,140,165
53,599
690,862

740,883
41,600

Total expenses----- --------------D educt proceeds of incidental s

5,650,807
35,745

3,008,813

Net expenses *_____________

5,615,062

2, 988,813

$76,372,199
5,615,062
-234,466

181,752,795
2,988,813

20,000

ANALYSIS OF DEFICIT

Balance at beginning of fiscal year-----N et expenses for year------- -----------------Adjustment of prior year transactions .

84,741, e

81,752,795

Balance at end of fiscal year__

1 Corporation not operated for profit.
T

he

D eficit represents depletion of capital in carrying out cooperative programs.
I n s t it u t e

of

I n te r -A

m e r ic a n

A

f f a ir s —

C. Statement of financial condition

[As of June 30, 1950,1951, 1952, and 1953]
1950 actual

1951 actual

1952 estimate

ASSETS
Cash with U. S. Treasury
_
Accounts receivable__ _
Deferred and undistributed charges
Total assets_________

_

.

_

_

._

_ __ _

_

_______ _

LIABILITIES
Accounts payable
_
Trust and deposit liabilities (serviclo deposits unexpended)

__

____

$2,798,653
27,428
18,916

$2,708,095
29,626
19, 543

2,844,997

2,757,264

1,382, 529
93,059

__

1, 506,333
262,118

1,475,588

1,768,451

77,741,608

82,741,608

76,372,199

81,752,795

- - -

1,369,409

988,813

________-

2,844,997

2,757,264.

__
___ _______

___ ______

.

Total liabilities

__

_____

IN VESTM EN T OF U. S. GOVERNM EN T
Non-interest-bearing Investment:
Appropriations
Reimbursement from mutual security program
Deduct cumulative deficit

_______________________________________
_ _
___________ __________________________

Total Investment of U. S* Government
Total liabilities and investment of U. S« Government




--

$82,741,608
2,000,000
84,741,608

1953 estimate

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

92

THE INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN
AFFAIRS— Continued
Schedule

Schedule

1951 actual

Object classification

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

A— Accrued expenditures by objects
1.
01

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions........
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees........... . .
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________ _______
Grades established b y Public Law 535,
81st Cong.:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade_______________________
01

A -l. Accrued expenditures by objects— Continued

Personal services:
Permanent positions......................... .
Part-time and temporary positions.

1951 actual

1952 estimate

341
159
447

$5, 782
G S- 8.1

$6,913
4.1

$9,438
3.5

$1, 771, 662
317, 729

$905,000
160,000

PROPOSED

02
03
04
05
06
07

08
09

11

FOR

LA

Expansion oj defense production (under proposed legisla­
tion, 1953).—The 1953 budget includes a proposed sup­
plemental authorization to expend an additional $900,000,000 from public debt receipts. Amendment of section
304 (b) of the Defense Production Act is proposed to
increase borrowing authority to $3 billion in lieu of
$2.1 billion currently authorized.
A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental authorization to
expend from public debt receip ts ______

$900,000,000

Unliquidated obligations, end of year____

615,600,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions__________________________________

284,400,000

Flood insurance (under proposed legislation, 1953).—
The Budget includes $50,000,000 for the fiscal year 1953
to establish a Federal flood insurance program. This is in
accordance with the recommendations made by the
President to the first session of the Eighty-second Con­
gress. The program aims to supplement the limited
private insurance facilities presently available.

$485, 514
29,544

15,000

Total personal services_________
Travel______________________________
Transportation of th in g s.................. .
Communication services........................
Rents and utility services.............. .......
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials____ _________
E quipm ent__________ ____ __________
Grants, subsidies, and contributions..

2,604,449
424, 748
78,507
20,813
55, 602
10, 342
70, 665
13,000
76,192
97, 582
2,198, 907

1,454,940
280,000
37.000

33.000
47.000
1, 071,873

Accrued expenditures_____________

238
82
235

$5,007
GS-7.8

1953 estimate

Personal services— Continued
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______ ______________ ______
Payment above basic rates................
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details________ ______

5, 650,807

3,008,813

$3,600
371,340

10.000

25.000
5.000
37.000

8.000

T R A N S M IS S IO N
a n a l y s is

o f e x p e n d it u r e s —

co n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions______ _____________ ___________

1953 estimate

$1, 000,000

Mutual security (under proposed legislation, 1953).—
Appropriations totaling $7.9 billion are included in this
budget for 1953 under proposed legislation for continua­
tion of the mutual security program (authorized in fiscal
1952 by Public Law 165, 82d Cong.) of military, economic,
and technical assistance. The detailed program pro­
posals for each of the three types of assistance, broken
down by major geographic areas of the world, will be
presented to the Congress within a few weeks. The bulk
of the^ funds requested will be used to assist friendly
countries in strengthening their defenses, through fur­
nishing military materiel from the United States, financing
additional military production in the countries themselves,
and providing the economic aid necessary to permit them
to undertake increased national defense expenditures.
The request also includes amounts to finance other inter­
national programs essential to the security of the United
States.
a n a l y s is

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

1951 actual

A N A L Y S IS OP E X PE N D ITU R E S

1953 estimate

Proposed supplemental appropriation
Unliquidated obligations end of year_____




1952 estimate

1953 estimate
$50,000,000
49,000,000

_.

$7,900,000,000

Unliquidated obligations, end of year____

1951 actual

Proposed supplemental appropriation

1952 estimate

4,561,000,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions._____ ______________ ___________ _

3,339,000,000




%




IN D E P E N D E N T O F F IC E S
SUMMARY OF NEW AUTHORIZATIONS
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriations_____
_____
_ _____
Reappropriations _
_
_____
___
Authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts_______
_____ _____
__ ____
Reauthorization to expend from public debt
receipts________ __ __
___
Contract authorizations _
_ _ _ _

$9, 103, 807, 644
59, 087, 617

$7, 380, 472, 014
40, 993, 089

$7, 575, 854, 700

400, 000, 000

1, 102, 977, 603

T otal current au th orization s..
____
D educt portion of appropriations for liquida­
tion of prior contract authorizations_______

1 9, 874, 045, 261

8, 567, 332, 968

7, 575, 854, 700

594, 000, 000

379, 205, 080

117, 000, 000

9, 280, 045, 261

8, 188, 127, 888

7, 458, 854, 700

43, 933, 063

45, 255, 879

45, 687, 437

9, 323, 978, 324

8, 233, 383, 767

7, 504, 542, 137

47, 092, 090
355, 820, 000

360, 400, 000

402, 912, 090

360, 400, 000

8, 636, 295, 857

7, 864, 942, 137

ENACTED OR RECOMMENDED
IN THIS DOCUMENT
Current Authorizations

T otal current obligational authority
enacted or recom m ended 1 _ _ _____

42, 890, 262
311, 150, 000

Permanent Authorizations
A ppropriations_____

___

_____ ____ __

T otal new obligational authority
acted or recom m ended- _

en­

PROPOSED FOR LATER
TRANSMISSION
Appropriations:
Pay increases
_________
__
_
___
O ther___
__ _ _ _______________ _ _
T otal new obligational authority pro­
posed for later transmission, _ _____
T otal new obligational authority (for
detail, see follow ing tables)
_____

9, 323, 978, 324

--------------- #-------------------------------------------------------- :
1 As reduced by rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation Act, 1951.

94

IN D E P E N D E N T

O F F IC E S

SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURES
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$5, 984, 706, 109

$6, 021, 723, 949

316, 081, 952
39, 662, 349

117, 000, 000
39, 759, 144

$7, 558, 484, 292 - 6, 340, 450, 410

6, 178, 483, 093

2, 071, 882, 910

1, 811, 478, 731

“ 111,878,338

« 202, 469, 072

8, 300, 454, 982

7, 787, 492, 752

45, 030, 520
303, 910, 000

325, 350, 000

1951 actual

FROM A U TH O R IZA TIO N S ENACTED
OR RECOM M ENDED IN THIS DOC­
UMENT
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current a u th o r iz a tio n s ____
Out of appropriations to liquidate prior con­
tract authorizations_____ __
_
_ _ _
Out of permanent authorizations
_ _______
T otal expenditures from new authori­
zations_______
_ _
_ _
Other Expenditures
Out of balances of prior expenditure author­
izations. _ _
__
_
_ __ ____
Out of receipts of business enterprise and
_ _
_____
revolving funds (net) ___
T ota l expenditures from authoriza­
tions enacted or recom mended

7, 558, 484, 292

FROM AUTHORIZATIONS PROPOSED
FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
Expenditures From New Authorizations
Out of current authorizations:
Pay increases _ _ _ _ _ _
_
O th er
_____ __ _________ __ _ __

___

Other Expenditures
Out of balance o f prior expenditure author­
izations:
Pay increases _ _
_ _ _
Other
____ __
___
_ _ _____

2, 061, 570
31, 910, 000

Total expenditures from authoriza­
tions proposed for later transmission.
T otal budget expenditures (for detail,
see follow ing tables) _________
__

348, 940, 520

7, 558, 484, 292

359, 321, 570

8, 649, 395, 502

8, 146, 814, 322

° D educt, excess o f repayments and collections over expenditures.




95

96

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
BUDG ET A U TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EX PEN DITU RES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951, 1952, and 1953]
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
N o.

1952

1951 enacted1
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 3

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
(Other than business enterprise and revolving funds)
American Battle Monuments Commission:
Salaries and expenses.------ ------------------------ ------------Construction of memorials and cemeteries____________
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

#

610
610
610

$660,000
7,010,000
(5,000,000)

$719,000
3,090,000

$719,000
3,000,000

$779,000
5,000,000

$779,000
5,000,000

7,670,000

3, 719,000

3,719,000

5,779,000

5,779,000

2,032,143,000
57,271,317
300,1^0,000
(414,000,000)

1, 605, 774, 550
40, 993, 089

1,605,774,550
40,993,089

1,312,000,000

2,389,564,317

1,646, 767, 639

16,511,913

18,900,000
2,955,900
310, 000,000

$1,400,000

324,519,590

331,855, 900

1,400,000

603

35.000

25,000

25,000

603
506

30.000
515,000

515,000

Total, American Battle Monuments Commission.

Atomic Energy Commission:
Salaries and expenses______________ ____ _____________
Reappropriation............ ........................... . _..................
Contract authorization_____________ _______________
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

406
406
406
406

Total, A tom ic Energy Commission___________
Civil Service Commission:
Salaries and expenses__________________________ _____
Annuities under special acts---------------------------------------Payment to civil service retirement and disability fund.
Miscellaneous:
Annuities, Lighthouse Service w idows........................
Panama Canal construction annuity fund---------------

605

201
606

305,000,000

201
201

Economic Stabilization Agency:
Salaries and expenses_________________________________
Miscellaneous: Salaries and expenses, Housing Expe­
diter functions.

506

3,400,000

455

Total, Federal Communications Comm ission.

7,800,000

1,312,000,000

20,300,000
2,955,900
310,000,000

22,097,000
2,707,000
457,869,000

22,097,000
2,707,000
457,869,000

333,255,900

482,673,000

482,673,000

1,312,

200,000

3.600.000
2,543,750

7,000,000

182,000

7.182.000

98, 053, 375

7, 700, 000

105,753,375

98, 053, 375

7, 700, 000

105,753,375

1,750,000
25,000,000

11,195,000
7, 750, 000
56, 000, 000

406, 000

11,601,000
7,750,000
56,000,000

32, 000,000
50. 000, 000
243.000.000
250, 000, 000

32.000.000
50.000.000
243.000.000
250.000.000

26,750,000

74, 945, 000

406, 000

75,351,000

575.000.000

575,000,000

6,600,000

6,116,650

488, 900

6,605,550

8 075, 000
,

8,075,000

6,600,000

6,116,650

488,900

6,605,550

8, 075, 000

8,075,000

506
506

256
256
256
256

458
458

i As reduced by rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation Act, 1951.
> Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




000
0 , 00

1,646,767,639

2,543, 750

152

Total, Federal Civil Defense AdministrationFederal Communications Commission:
Salaries and expenses-------------------------- -----------------Miscellaneous: Printing and binding...................... .

(57,000,000)

603

Total, Econom ic Stabilization A gency___________
Federal Civil Defense Administration:
Operations. _______ ________________
Federal contributions________________
Emergency supplies and equipment—.
Protective facilities....... ................ ..........

(57, 000, 000)

204,500
2,803,177

Total, Civil Service Commission..
Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch
of the Government: Salaries and expenses.
Commission on Renovation of the Executive Mansion:
Salaries and expenses.
Reappropriation___________________________ ______
Defense Materials Procurement Agency: Salaries and
expenses.
Defense Production Administration: Salaries and
expenses.
Defense Transport Administration: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Displaced Persons Commission: Salaries, expenses, and
loans.

(340,000,000)

(340, 000, 000)

1,312,000 000
,
J

97

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
BUDG ET AU TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EXPEN DITU RES
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE
[For the fiscal years 1951,1952, and 1953]
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
j

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations pro­
zations already
posed for later
enacted
transmission 8

Total

Out of authori­
zations of prior Out of authori­
zations pro­
years and rec­
om mended in posed for later
transmission 3
detail herein

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS
(Other than business enterprise and revolving funds)

$709,073
2,495,480

$679,000
4,000,000

$679,000
4,000,000

$800,000
6,000,000

$800,000
6,000,000

3,204,553

4,679,000

4,679,000 ‘

6,800,000

6,800,000

896,734,185

1, 700, 000,000

1,700,000,000

1, 750, 000, 000

1,750,000,000

896,734,185

1, 700, 000, 000

1,700,000,000

1, 750, 000, 000

1,750,000,000

16,206,369

20,064,941
2,735,900
310,000,000

21,877,000
2,717, 000
457,869,000

$120,000

305,000,000

18, 784,941
2, 735,900
310,000,000

21,997,000
2,717,000
457,869,000

122,610
2,585,894

13,650
192,436

323,914,873

331,726,927

482,463,000

120, 000

482,583,000

$1,280,000

13,650
192,436
1,280,000

333,006,927

31,886

31,886

445,000

62,680

445,000

70,000

3,400,000

190.000

2,289,375

254,375

7,029,845

792.000

3,210,000

190,000

2,289,375

Total, American Battle M onum ents Commission

Atomic Energy Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Reappropriation
Contract authorization
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract au­
thorization.
Total, A tom ic Energy Commission
Civil Service Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Annuities under special acts
Payment to civil service retirement and disability fund
Miscellaneous:
Annuities, Lighthouse Service widows
Panama Canal construction annuity fund
Total, Civil Service Commission
Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the
Government: Salaries and expenses.
( Commission on Renovation of the Executive Mansion: Sal­
aries and expenses.

2

|

American Battle Monuments Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Construction of memorials and cemeteries
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.

70,000
10,000

200,000

Reappropriation
Defense Materials Procurement Agency: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Defense Production Administration: Salaries and expenses

254,375
Defense Transport Administration: Salaries and expenses

5,319,645

6,855,845

174,000

8,000

800,000
Displaced Persons Commission: Salaries, expenses, and loans

85,103,375
279,643

7,250,000

92,353,375
279,643

12,950,000

450,000

13,400,000

85,383, 018

7, 250,000

92,633,018

12,950,000

450,000

13,400,000

143,756

12,609,600
10,000,000
6,000.000
500,000

390,400

13.000.000
10.000.000
6,000,000
500,000

28,984,400
50.000, 000
200,000,000
50.000.000

15,600

29.000.000
50.000.000
200,000,000
50.000.000

143,756

29,109,600

390,400

29,500,000

328,984,400

15,600

329,000,000

6,554,387
62

6,060,911

474,233

6,535,144

7,802,333

14,667

7,817,000

6,554,449

6,060,911

474,233

6,535,144

7,802,333

14,667

7,817,000

* Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




Economic Stabilization Agency:
Salaries and expenses
Miscellaneous: Salaries and expenses, Housing Expediter
functions.
T otal, E conom ic Stabilization A gency
Federal Civil Defense Administration:
Operations
Federal contributions
Emergency supplies and equipment
Protective facilities
Total, Federal Civil Defense Administration
Federal Communications'Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding
Total, Federal Communications Commission

98

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

1952

Func­
tional
code
N o.
1951 enacted 1
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

1953

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service:
Salaries and expenses______________________________
Salaries and expenses, boards of in q u iry ,__________

$2,949,700
50,000

$2,911,913
47, 500

$214, 500

$3,126,413
47,500

$3, 579, 000
47, 500

$3,579,000
47,500

2,999,700

2, 959, 413

214, 500

3,173,913

3, 626, 500

3,626,500

3,890,300
314,700

3, 805,325

275,000
15,000

4,080,325
215,000

4,540,000

4,540,000

200,000

4,205,000

4,005,325

290,000

4,295,325

4, 540, 000

4,540,000

3,891,695

4,040,400

274,000

4,314,400

4,367, 000

4,367,000

3,891,695

4, 040, 400

274, 000

4,314,400

4,367, 000

4,367,000

31,084,500
1,600,000

29,894, 000
1, 600,000

1, 580, 000

31,474,000
1,600,000

30,100,000
2,125,000

30,100,000
2,125,000

32,684,500

31,494, 000

1, 580,000

33,074,000

32, 225,000

32,225,000

87,700
7,300

89,600

3,900

93,500

104,700

104,700

95,000

89, 600

3,900

93,500

104,700

104,700

9,718,600
983,000
706,600

8, 784, 935
983,000
706,600

719,000
61,000
47,000

9,503,935
1,044,000
753,600

9.975.000
1.042.000
761,000

9.975.000
1.042.000
761,000

11,408,200

10,474, 535

827, 000

11,301,535

11, 778,000

11,778,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

602

190,000

134,000

5,350

139,350

055
055
055
055

f 45,750,000
I 17,318,000
1 11, 000,000
(15,000,000)

49,250, 000
18,350, 000

1,400,000

50.650.000
18.350.000

54.334.000
20.700.000

54.334.000
20.700.000

(11, 700,000)

(11,700,000)

( 1, 000 000
,
)

( 1, 0 , 0 0
00 0 )

74,068,000

67, 600,000

1,400,000

69,000,000

75,034,000

75,034,000

251

38,000

32,800

1,600

34,400

47,000

47,000

610,

599,500

155, 000

155,000

600,000

600,000

551
551

Total, Federal M ediation and Conciliation ServiceFederal Power Commission:
Salaries and expenses_________________________________
Flood-control surveys________________________________
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding_________________

401
401
401

Total, Federal Power Commission _
Federal Trade Commission :
Salaries and expenses---------------------------Miscellaneous: Printing and binding

503
503

Total, Federal Trade Commission.
General Accounting Office:
Salaries_______________________________
Miscellaneous expenses------ ------------------

604
604

Total, General Accounting
Indian Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses..
Reappropriation----- ------------------ ---------- ---------------

602
602

Total, Indian Claims Commission..
Interstate Commerce Commission:
General expenses______________________
Railroad safety________________________
Locom otive inspection_____ __________
Miscellaneous_________________________

455
455
455
455

Total, Interstate Commerce Commission..
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin:
Contribution to Interstate Commission on the P oto­
mac River Basin.
Motor Carrier Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses.
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics:
Salaries and expenses________________________________
Construction and equipment___________ _____ _______
Contract authorization_____________________________
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.
Miscellaneous:
Construction and equipment, unitary plan-------------Printing and binding______________________________

055
055

Total, National A dvisory Committee for Aero­
nautics.
National Capital Housing Authority: Maintenance and
operation of properties.
National Capital Park and Planning Commission:
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway,
and playground system.
Miscellaneous:
D istrict of Columbia redevelopment, project plan­
ning.

610

1 As reduced b y rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation AGt, 1951.
2P ay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




99

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations
zations already posed forpro­
later
enacted
transmission 3

Total

Out of authori­
zations of prior Out of authori­
zations
years and rec­ posed forpro­
later
ommended in
transmission 3
detail herein

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued

$2,661,674
257

$209, 700

$3,234,000
40,000

$3, 546, 200
45, 000

$4,800

$3,551,000
45,000

2,661,931

3,064,300

209, 700

3,274,000

3, 591, 200

4, 800

3,596,000

3,804,682
310,377
4,874

3,810, 377
199, 360

269, 623
12, 640

4,080,000
212,000

4,494, 623

20,000

5, 377
2, 360

4,500,000
22,360

4,119,933

4,009, 737

282, 263

4,292,000

4, 514, 623

7, 737

4,522,360

3,741,214
3,981

4,092,109

263,000

4,355,109

4, 357, 000

11,000

4,368,000

3,745,195

4,092,109

263,000

4,355, 109

4, 357,000

11,000

4,368,000

30,114,806
1,511,454

29, 720,000
1,564,456

1,480, 0 0
0

31,200,000
1,564,456

30, 000,000
2, 100,000

100,000

30,100,000
2,100,000

31,626,260
|

$3, 024,300
40,000

31,284,456

1,480,000

32,764,456

32,100,000

100,000

32,200,000

87,233

91,351

3,809

95,160

104,189

91

104,280

87,233

91,351

3,809

95,160

104,189

91

104,280

9,295,409
917,390
667,468
4,411

8, 976, 872
996, 568
714,138

704,000
59,600
45, 900

9,680,872
1,056,168
760,038

9,893,614
1,038,006
757,269

15,000
1,400

1,100

9,908,614
1,039,406
758,369

10,884,678

10,687,578

809,500

11,497,078

11,688,889

500

11,706,389

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,.000

124,974

137, 587

5, 350

142,937

44,290,154
17,043,980

48,040,000
15,000,000

1,360,000

49,400,000
15,000,000

51,460,000
10, 000,000

238,487
5,604

5,000,000

5,000,000

15,000,000

61,578,225

68,040,000

1,360,000

69,400,000

76,460,000

40,000

76,500,000

27,660

38,922

1,378

40,300

45, 778

222

46,000

1,005,245

979,156

979,156

1, 021, 592

17,

5,000

40,000

15,000,000

20,000
3 Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.
9 5 0 0 0 0 — 52-------- 7




51,500,000
10,000,000

1,021,592

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service:
Salaries and expenses
Salaries and expenses, boards of inquiry
Total, Federal M ediation and Conciliation Service
Federal Power Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Flood-control surveys
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding
Total, Federal Power Commission
Federal Trade Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding
Total, Federal Trade Commission
General Accounting Office:
Salaries
Miscellaneous expenses
Total, General Accounting Office
Indian Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses
Reappropriation
Total, Indian Claims Commission
Interstate Commerce Commission:
General expenses
Railroad safety
Locom otive inspection
Miscellaneous
Total, Interstate Commerce Commission
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin: C on­
tribution to Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin.
Motor Carrier Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics:
Salaries and expenses
Construction and equipment
Contract authorization
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.
Miscellaneous:
Construction and equipment, unitary plan
Printing and binding
Total, National A dvisory Committee for Aeronautics

National Capital Housing Authority: Maintenance and opera­
tion of properties.
National Capital Park and Planning Commission:
Land acquisition, National Capital park, parkway, and
playground system.
Miscellaneous:
District of Columbia redevelopment, project planning

100

TH E BUDGET FOR FISCAL YE A R 1953

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.
1951 enacted 1

1952

Enacted

1953

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Prd^osed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
National Capital Park and Planning Commission—
Continued
M iscellaneous— C ont inued
District of Columbia redevelopment, project plan­
ning, no year.

National Capital Sesquicentennial Commission.............. .
National Industrial Recovery__________________________
National Labor Relations Board: Salaries and expenses..
National Mediation Board:
Salaries and expenses.------ --------------------------------- ------- Arbitration and emergency boards----------------------------Salaries and expenses, National Railroad Adjustment
Board.
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding________________

Office of the Housing Expediter: Salaries and expenses - .
Reappropriation-------- ------- -----------------------------------------

$600,0C0

8,409,418

9,800, 000

9,800,000

400,494
138,000
593,749

422.000
138.000
570.000

422.000
138.000
570.000

1,132,243

1,130,000

1,130,000

3, 500, 000
185,000

3,500,000
185,000

15,000,000
111, 000

15,000,000

740,000, 000

740,000,000

690, 000,000

690,000,000

$155, 000

610
453
551

8,562,500

7,885,418

$524,000

551
551
551

409,200
325,000
764,300

378, 494
138, 000
575, 749

22,000

1,498,500

1, 092, 243

40, 000

225,000

Total, National Mediation Board.
National Science Foundation: Salaries and expenses----National Security Training Commission: Salaries and
expenses.

00
0

$599,500

Total, National Capital Park and Planning
Commission.

304
055

506
506

$155,000

18,000

$600,

111,000

11,815,500
1,600,000

Total, Office of the Housing Expediter___________

13,415,500

Philippine War Damage Commission: Salaries and
expenses.

40,200,000

Railroad Retirement Board:
Payment to railroad retirement account:
Annual definite---------------------------- -------------- - .......... .
Annual indefinite____ _____ _______________________
Miscellaneous_______________________________________
Salaries and expenses (trust fund limitation)_________

201
201
201

438,004,924

(4
)
438,004,924

Renegotiation Board: Salaries and expenses. -

Smithsonian Institution:
Salaries and expenses................ .......... .......... .........
National Gallery of Art: Salaries and expenses.
Total, Smithsonian Institution------------------

(4
)

(4
)

(4
)

740, 000,000

740,000,000

690,000,000

690,000,000

1,633,713

7, 500, 000

7,500,000

055

6,080,000

5, 378,480

435, 000

5,813,480

5, 950, 000

5,950,000

6,080,000

501
501

Total, Securities and Exchange Commission.
Selective Service System: Salaries and expenses----------Small Defense Plants Administration: Salaries and
expenses................ ................................................................ .

(4
)

1,633, 713

Total, Railroad Retirement Board____

Securities and Exchange Commission:
Salaries and expenses_____________________
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding______

(4
)

5, 378, 480

435,000

5,813,480

5,950, 000

5,950,000

36,430,000

30,154,000

481,000

30,635,000

39, 6 6 000
8,

39, 6 ,000
86

350, 000

506

303
303

350,000

2,600,000
1,154,000

2,391,200
1,154,000

162,000
91,000

2,553,200
1,245,000

2, 565, 000
1,300, 0 0
0

2.565.000
1.300.000

3,754,000

3, 545, 200

253, 000

3,798,200

3, 865, 000

3,865,000

1As reduced b y rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation A ct, 1951.
2 Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated,
* Limitations on the use of trust funds for salaries and expenses: 1951, $5,446,000; 1952, $4,845,808; and a pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952, $368,000; 1953, $6,307,000.




101

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE-Continued
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations
zations already posed forpro­
later
enacted
transmission 3

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations pro­
years and rec­
ommended in posed for later
transmission 3
detail herein

Total

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
National Capital Park and Planning Commission—Continued
Miscellaneous— Continued
District of Columbia redevelopment project planning,
no year.

$964

$511

$511

1,026,209

979, 667

979,667

$1, 021, 592

$1,021,592

903,185
17,343
8,486,809

217, 264
88, 496
7, 998, 673

217,264
88,496
8,492,673

96, 941

96,941

9, 537,092

$30,000

9,567,092

396,231
152,441
625,106

379, 000
140,000
579, 0 0
0

21, 0 0
0

418, 000
138, 000
571,000

1,000

17, 0 0
0

400,000
110, 0 0
0
59f>, 000

1,000

419.000
138.000
572.000

1,175,819

1, 098, 000

38, 000

1,136,000

1,127, 000

2,000

1,129,000

74,027

1, 300,000
175,000

1,300,000
175,000

4, 900,000
115,000

12,313,740

773, 706

773,706

12,313,740

773, 706

773, 706

86,582,804

14, 818

14,818

$494,000

2,041

j

4,900,000
115,000

Total, National 'C apital Park and Planning Com ­
mission.
National Capital Sesquicentennial Commission
National Industrial Recovery
National Labor Relations Board: Salaries and expenses
National Mediation Board:
Salaries and expenses
Arbitration and emergency boards
Salaries and expenses, National Railroad
Board.
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding
Total, National M ediation Board

■
t

National Science Foundation: Salaries and expenses
National Security Training Commission: Salaries and ex-

f Office of the Housing Expediter: Salaries and expenses
1 Reappropriation
Total, Office of the Housing Expediter
Philippine War Damage Commission: Salaries and expenses

574,991,049

Railroad Retirement Board:
Payment to railroad retirement account:
Annual definite
Annual indefinite
Miscellaneous
Salaries and expenses (trust fund limitation)

740, 000, 000

740,000,000

690, 000,000

690,000,000

740,000,000

740,000,000

690,000,000

690,000,000

1, 579, 713

1,579,713

7,314,000

7,314,000

Renegotiation Board: Salaries and expenses
Securities and Exchange Commission:
Salaries and expenses
Miscellaneous: Printing and binding

9,262

575,000,311

Adjustment

'

5,924,924
1,637

5,436,700

410,000

5,846, 700

5,914,710

25,000

5,939, 710

5,926,561

5,436, 700

410,000

5,846,700

5,914, 710

25,000

5,939, 710

26,772,458

29,184, 742

461,000

29,645,742

37, 647, 202

20,000

37,667,202

350,000

350,000

2,442,298
1,138,127

2, 484, 430
1,151, 619

151,000
88, 600

2,635,430
1,240,219

2, 551, 625
1, 295, 600

11,000
2, 400

2,562,625
1,298,000

3,580,425

3, 636, 049

239, 600

3,875,649

3, 847, 225

13, 400

3,860,625

3 E x p en d itu res from p a y increase su pplem en tal for fiscal year 1952 unless otherw ise in dica ted .




Total, Railroad Retirement Board

Total, Securities and Exchange Commission
Selective Service System: Salaries and expenses
Small Defense Plants Administration: Salaries
penses.
Smithsonian Institution:
Salaries and expenses
National Gallery of Art: Salaries and expenses
T o ta l, Sm ithsonian Institu tion

and

ex­

102

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
N o.

1952

1951 enacted 1

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

Enacted

1953

Recommended
in detail
herein

Total

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
Subversive Activities Control Board: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Tariff Commission: Salaries and expenses ___________
The Tax Court of the United States: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Veterans Administration:
Administration, medical, hospital, and domiciliary
services:
Medical, hospital, and domiciliary services_________
________
Reappropriation .. __ __ __ __ __
Nonmedical program, administration, and opera­
tions.
Compensation and pen sion s_________________________
Readjustment benefits:
■R<inration and train in c
Other readjustment b en efits__________________ . __
Military and naval insurance_____________________ __
Hospital and domiciliary facilities__
__ ___ ______
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract
authorization.
Major alterations, improvements, and re p a irs __ _____
National service life insurance appropriation__ ____
Servicemen’s indemnities
_______ _____________
Veterans’ miscellaneous benefits____
_ _ _ ______
Grants to the Republic of the Philippines- ___ __ ___
Automobiles and other conveyances for disabled
veterans.
Miscellaneous:
Administrative facilities. _________________________
Other_______________ ___________ __________________
Total, Veterans Administration __

610

$175,000

$235,000

151
604

1,265,700
809,900

1,163,600
818, 0
00

105
106

602,203,000
179,000
277,281,735

103

2,174,138,000

2, 112, 230, 000

101
102
104
105
105
106
104
104

102
105
106

2,385,331,000
120,269,000
6,830,000
160,000,000
(160,000,000)

31,600,000
71,100,000
650,000
1,175,000

$235,000

$470,000

$470,000

$87,000
44, 840

1,250,600
862,840

1,388,000
900,000

1,388,000
900,000

658, 244,434

16,341, 000

674,585,434

696, 500, 000

696,500,000

214, 853, 578

13, 913, 000

228,766,578

198, 500, 000

198,500,000

2,112,230,000

2, 204,351, 000

2,204,351,000

780,000,000
81, 640,000
6, 000,000
27, 505,080
(27, 505, 080)

780,000,000
81,640,000
6, 000,000
27,505,080
(27,505,080)

624, 579,000
74, 055, 000
6, 854,000
153,600,000
(59, 000, 000)

624.579.000
74,055,000
6,854,000
153.600.000
(59,000,000)

183, 570,000
5,000, 000
21,060,370
1, 100, 000

183,570,000
5,000,000
21,060,370
1, 100,000

4.000.000
54, 072,000
8, 595,000
27,206,000
1,861,500
5.000.000

4.000.000
54.072.000
8,595,000
27.206.000
1,861,500
5.000.000

106
106

________ ____

5,830,756,735

4,091, 203,462

30, 254,000

4,121,457,462

4,059,173, 500

4,059,173,500

Total current authorizations, other than business
enterprises and revolving funds.

9,274,331,261

7,183, 075, 503

47,092, 090

7,230,167,593

7,350,827, 700

7,350,827,700

406

172,486

125,000

125,000

125,000

125,000

605

6,518

14,000

14,000

14,000

14,000

603

47,487

24,000

24,000

458

2,436

2,500

2,500

3,400

3,400

401
401
503

27,609
574
1,903

38, 200
800
1,800

38,200
800
1,800

37, 700
1,800
1,500

37,700
1,800
1,500

604

338

455

546

500

500

6,400

6,400

152

7,422

7,000

7,000

PERM AN EN T AUTHORIZATIONS
(Indefinite appropriation, special account, unless other­
wise indicated)
Atomic Energy Commission: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Civil Service Commission: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Commission on Renovation of the Executive Mansion:
Disposition of materials removed.
Federal Communications Commission: Replacement of
personal property sold.
Federal Power Commission.
Payments to States under Federal Power A c t _______
Replacement of personal property sold _____________
Federal Trade Commission: Replacement of personal
property sold.
General Accounting Office: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Interstate Commerce Commission: Replacement of
personal property sold.
Mutual Security Agency: Replacement of personal
property sold.

1 As reduced b y rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation A ct,
2P ay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




1951.

103

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­
zations already
enacted

Out of authori­
zations pro­
posed for later
transmission 3

Out of authori­
zations of prior Out of authori­
zations pro­
years and rec­ posed for later
ommended in
transmission 3
detail herein

Total

Total

CURRENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
$83,938
1,242,300
795,831

1,163,117
820,200

$238,428

$238,428
$80, 797
43,100

1,243,914
863,300

1, 362,070

$440,000

$440,000
$6 203
,
1,740

Subversive Activities Control Board: Salaries and expenses

1,368,273
899,700

Tariff Commission: Salaries and <
The Tax Court of the United States: Salaries and expenses

Veterans Administration:
Administration, medical, hospital, and domiciliary services:
[
[

Medical, hospital, and domiciliary services
Reappropriation
Nonmedical program, administration, and operations

599,436,000

652, 617,325

15, 540, 336

668,157,661

692, 200,000

800,000

693,000,000

257,602,984

214, 062, 946

13, 550, 054

227,613,000

198,136,390

363,610

198.500.000

2,171,474,700

2,123, 225,902

2,123,225,902

2, 204, 351,000

2,204,351,000

1,943,340,599
99,568,470
5,888,172
144,902,049

1, 337, 544,685
81, 700,000
7, 050, 775
209, 321,032

1,337,544,685
81,700,000
7,050,775
209,321,032

626,134,000
74,000,000
6,890,821
103,424,416

626.134.000
74,000,000
6,890,821
103,424,416

43,523,353
63,823,757
165,575
620,183

184, 092,800
4,879,848
44,673, 305
2, 796,517
1,424,161

184,092,800
4,879,848
44,673,305
2,796,517
1,424,161

1, 500,000
54,072, 000
8, 715,152
37,430, 089
5, 761, 500
5,000, 000

1,500,000
54,072,000
8,715,152
37,430,089
5,761,500
5,000,000

859,731
8,854

547,847
47

547,847
47

5,331,214,427

4,863,937,190

29,090,390

4,893,027,580

4,017,615,368

1,163,610

4,018,778,978

Total, Veterans Administration

7,405,991,419

7,950,234,365

45,030,520

7,995,264,885

7,505, 008,947

2,061,570

7,507,070,517

Total current authorizations, other than business enter­
prise and revolving funds.

308,968

24,880

125,000

125,000

14,000

14,000

9,915

14,784

14,784

14,463

20,291

20,291

1,682

4, 513

4,513

2, 400

2,400

27,063

28,158
1,374
2,719

28,158
1,374
2,719

38, 200
1,800
1, 500

38,200
1,800
1,500

1,314

521

521

6,400

6,814

7,608

7,608

3 E x p en d itu res from p a y increase su p p lem en tal for fiscal year 1952 unless otherw ise in dica ted .




Compensation and pensions
Readjustment benefits:
Education and training
Other readjustment benefits
M ilitary and naval insurance
Hospital and domiciliary facilities
Portion of above appropriation to liquidate contract author
ization.
M ajor alterations, improvements, and repairs
National service life insurance appropriation
Servicemen’s indemnities
Veterans’ miscellaneous benefits
Grants to the R epublic of the Philippines
Automobiles and other conveyances for disabled veter­
ans.
Miscellaneous:
Administrative facilities
Other

PER M AN EN T AUTHORIZATIONS
(Indefinite appropriation, special account, unless otherwise
indicated)
Atomic Energy Commission: Replacement of personal prop­
erty sold.
Civil Service Commission: Replacement of personal property
sold.
Commission on Renovation of the Executive Mansion: D is­
position of materials removed.
Federal Communications Commission: Replacement of per­
sonal property sold.
Federal Power Commission:
Payments to States under Federal Power A ct
Replacement of personal property sold
Federal Trade Commission: Replacement of personal property
sold.
General Accounting Office: Replacement of personal property
sold.
Interstate Commerce Commission: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Mutual Security Agency: Replacement of personal property
sold,

104

TH E BUDGET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE-Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

1952

Func­
tional
code
N o.
1951 enacted 1

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

Enacted

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

PER M ANENT AUTHORIZATIONS—Continued
National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Re­
placement of personal property sold.
National Labor Relations Board: Replacement of per­
sonal property sold.
Railroad Retirement Board:
Payment to railroad retirement account (definite ap­
propriation, general account).
Railroad unemployment insurance administration fund.
Securities and Exchange Commission: Replacement of
personal property sold.
Selective Service System: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Smithsonian Institution: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Tariff Commission: Replacement of personal property
sold.
Veterans Administration:
M ilitary and naval insurance..........................................
National service life insurance appropriation-------------Replacement of personal property sold, ------ ---------

055

$21,403

$25,000

$25,000

$30,000

$30,000

551

476

2,000

2,000

2,000

2,000

201

33,000,000

33, 000,000

33,000,000

33,000,000

33,000,000

552
501

9,800,798
3,260

11, 200,000

11, 200,000

11, 680,000

2, 250

2,250

3.000

11.680,000
3.000

055

354

1, 00
0

1,000

1.000

1.000

303

1,013

151

358

600

104
104
106

62,413
771,458
4,211

50.000
701,229
60.000

50.000
701,229
60.000

50.000
681,637
50.000

50.000
681,637
50.000

43,933,063

45,255, 879

45,255,879

45, 687,437

45,687,437

599,714,000

1,384, 257,465

1,384,257,465

225, 027,000

9,917,978,324

8, 612, 588,847

$47, 092, 090

8,659,680,937

7,621, 542,137

406
152
506
602

50.000.000
2, 000 0 0
, 0
8, 000,000
70,000

50.000.000
2, 000,000
8, 000,000
70,000

055

5,200,000

5,200,000

506
506

25.000, 000
550,000

25.000.000
550,000

25, 000,000

25.000.000

42.000.000
50, 000, 000
148,000,000

42.000.000
50.000.000
148,000,000

Total permanent authorizations, other than busi­
ness enterprises.
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND REVOLVING
FUNDS
Business enterprise and revolving funds (for detail, see
below ).
Total

______ _________________________________

7,621,542,137

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
(Other than pay increase supplem ental)
Under existing legislation:
Atom ic Energy Commission: Salaries and expenses...
Displaced Persons Commission______________________
Economic Stabilization Agency: Salaries and expenses.
M otor Carrier Claims Commission: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Selective Service: Salaries and expenses----------------- . . .
Small Defense Plants Administration:
Revolving fund___________________________ ______ _____

Salaries and expenses____________ ________ ________
Veterans Administration:
Automobiles and other conveyances for disabled vet­
erans.
Compensation and pensions_ -------------------------------National service life insurance appropriation ^
Readjustment benefits
Under proposed legislation:
Defense Production Administration: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Defense Transport Administration: Salaries and ex­
penses.
Economic Stabilization Agency: Salaries and expenses.
Small Defense Plants Administration:
Revolving fun d.
Salaries and expenses...........................................

103
104

101
506

4.500.000

4.500.000

455

2.800.000

2.800.000

506

150,000,000

150,000,000

506

25, 000, 000
3,100, 000

25,000,000
3,100,000

506

' As reduced b y rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation Act, 1951.
2 Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.




105

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE—Continued
EXPENDITURES
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations pro­
zations already
posed for later
enacted
transmission 3

Total

Out of authori­
zations of prior Out of authori­
zations pro­
years and rec­ posed for later
ommended in
transmission 3
detail herein

Total

PER M AN EN T AUTHORIZATIONS— Continued
$8,567

$37,

$37,836

$30,000

$30,000

1,066

1,

1,800

2,000

2,000

33,000,000

33,000,000

33,000, 000

33,000,000

10,337, 053
2, 983

10,337,053
2,983

11,323,940
3.000

11,323,940
3.000

1,354

1,354

1.000

1.000

107,788
701,229
62,476

50.000
681,637
45.000

50.000
681,637
45.000

44,642,055

45, 325,877

45,325,877

33,000,000
5,792,
2,

,013
358

600

17,
771,
62.

107,
701,
62,

39,745,232

44,642,055

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Replacement
of personal property sold.
National Labor Relations Board: Replacement of personal
property sold.
Railroad Retirement Board:
Payment to railroad retirement account (definite appropri­
ation, general account).
Railroad unemploym ent insurance administration fund
Securities and Exchange Commission: Replacement of per­
sonal property sold.
Selective Service System: Replacement of personal property
sold.
Smithsonian Institution: Replacement of personal property
sold.
Tariff Commission: Replacement of personal property sold
Veterans Administration:
M ilitary and naval insurance
National service life insurance appropriation
Replacement of personal property sold
Total permanent authorizations, other than business
enterprises.
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND REVOLVING
FUNDS

112,747,641

305, 578, 562

7,558,484,292

8,300,454,982

305,578,562

$45,030, 520

237,157,928

8,345,485,502

7, 787, 492,752

237,157,928

$2,061, 570

7,789,554,322

Business enterprise and revolving funds (for detail, see below)

Total
PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION
(Other than pay increase supplem ental)

25, 000, 000
1, 110, 0 0
0
7, 200, 000

25,000,000
1, 110,000
7,200,000

4,100, 000

4,100,000

],

1, 000, 000

1, 000,000

500, 000

500,000

25, 000, 000

25.000.000

42, 000, 000
50. 000, 000
148, 000 0
, 00

42. 000.000
50.000.000
148,000,000

25, 000, 000
890, 000
800, 0 0
0
70, 000

25,000,000
890.000
800.000
70.000

100,000

1, 100, 0 0
0

4, 000, 000
50, 000

4,000, 000
50.000

Under existing legislation:
A tom ic Energy Commission: Salaries and expenses
Displaced Persons Commission
Economic Stabilization Agency: Salaries and expenses
M otor Carrier Claims Commission: Salaries and expenses
Selective Service: Salaries and expenses
Small Defense Plants Administration:
R evolving fund
Salaries and expenses
Veterans Administration:
Automobiles and other conveyances for disabled veterans

4. 050. 000

4 . 050.000

Compensations and pensions
National service life insurance appropriation
Readjustment benefits
Under proposed legislation:
Defense Production Administration: Salaries and expenses

2. 500. 000

2.500.000

Defense Transport Administration: Salaries and expenses

135, 000, 000

135,000,000

6, 000,000

6, 000,000

2,800,000

2.800.000

? E x pen ditu res from p a y increase su pplem en tal for fiscal y ear 1952 unless otherw ise in dica ted .




Econom ic Stabilization Agency: Salaries and expenses
Small Defense Plants Administration:
R evolving fund
Salaries and expenses

106

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953
BUDG ET AU TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EX PEN DITU RES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
N E W AUTHORIZATIONS
(appropriations unless otherwise specified)

Organization unit and account title

1953

1952

Func­
tional
code
N o.
1951 enacted 1
Enacted

Proposed for
later trans­
mission 2

Total

Recommended
in detail
herein

Proposed for
later trans­
mission

Total

PROPOSED FOR LATER TRANSMISSION— Con.
Under proposed legislation—Continued
Veterans Administration:
Readjustment benefits, Korean conflict
Compensation and pensions..

101

$75, 000, 000
100, 000, 0
00
$355, 820, 000

T otal_____________________________ _____ ________

$355,820,000

$75,000,000
100,000,000

360, 400,000

103

360,400,000

Grand total. ____________________________________
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior
contract authorizations.

$9,917,978,324
594,000,000

$8 612, 588, 847
,
379, 205, 080

402, 912,090

9,015,500,937
379,205,080

$7, 621, 542,137
117, 000, 000

360, 400, 000

7,981,942,137
117,000,000

Total new obligational authority_________________

9,323,978,324

8, 233, 383, 767

402, 912, 090

8,636,295,857

7, 504, 542,137

360, 400, 000

7,864,942,137

1 As reduced b y rescissions pursuant to sec. 1214 of the General Appropriation
2Pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.

Act, 1951.

BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND REVOLVING FUNDS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

N EW AUTHORIZATIONS
(authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts unless otherwise specified)
1951

1952

FUNDS PROVIDED
(b y operations)

1953

1951

1952

1953

ENACTED OR RECOM M END ED
Atomic Energy Commission: Revolving fund, defense production guar­

506

$20, 500

$90,000

227, 038, 500

240,398, 000

35,100,000

94,400, 000

484,186, 667
53,173, 338

675,745,794
40,172, 000

685, 461,074

932,162

975, 026

975, 000

18, 814, 596
5, 446,184

15, 830, 000
4, 200, 000

12, 720, 000
3, 900, 000

1, 045, 660

8, 701, 260

2, 000, 0 0
0
6, 000, 0
00

4,100, 000
15,000,000

15, 869, 822
284,791,467

30,110,000
176, 250, 415

2, 600, 0 0
0
344,028, 035

960,046,901

951,283,235

1,068, 784,109

108, 205, 760

131,631,717

147, 584, 000

antees.

Export-import Bank of Washington:
Loans from Treasury_______________________________________ ____________
Limitation on administrative expenses__________________________________
Federal Civil Defense Administration: Civil defense procurement fund
(current appropriation).

256

($965,000)
5,000,000

$1,000,000,000
i (1,025,159)

($1,131,000)
25,000,000

| $205,064,482

Reconstruction Finance Corporation (revolving fund):
Military services: Activities supporting defense_________________________
International security and foreign relations: Military and economic
assistance.
Housing and community development:
Public housing program_______________________________________________
Aids to private housing:
Federal National Mortgage Association_____________________________
Loans for prefabricated housing................................................................. .
Mortgages____ _______________________________________________________
Provision of community facilities_______ _____________________________ _
Loans for civil defense__________________________________________________
Disaster insurance, loans, and relief. ________ _______________________ _
Transportation and communication: Other services to transportation.
Finance, commerce, and industry:
Promotion or regulation of financial institutions- ____________________
Business loans and guarantees_________________________________________
Limitation on administrative expenses__________________________________

055
152

252
252
252
254
256
258
456

1 Includes $75,159 for proposed supplemental due to pay increases.
* Includes $550,000 for proposed supplemental due to pay increases.




250,000,000

501
504
(26,000,000)

401
401

100,000,000
2 (18,300,000)

250,000,000

Total, Reconstruction Finance Corporation.
Tennessee Valley Authority:
Paym ent to Tennessee Valley Authority fund (current appropriation).
Tennessee Valley Authority fund____________________________________

87, 085, 745

100,000,000

194,714,000

238,389,600

(18,500,000)

200,027,000

J

107

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

BUDGET AUTHORIZATIONS AND EXPENDITURES— Continued
BY ORGANIZATION UNIT AND ACCOUNT TITLE— Continued
E X PE N D ITU R E S
(from prior year and new authorizations)
1952 estimate

1953 estimate
Organization unit and account title

1951 actual

Out of authori­
zations already
enacted

Out of authori­
zations pro­
posed for later
transmission 3

Total

Out of authori­ Out of authori­
zations of prior
zations pro­
years and rec­ posed for later
ommended in transmission 3
detail herein

Total

P R O P O S E D F O R L A T E R T R A N S M IS S IO N — Continued

$75,000,000
100, 000,000
$303,910, 000
$7,558,484,292

,
$8 300,454, 982

348, 940, 520

8,649,395,502

357, 260,000

$303,910,000
$7, 787, 492, 752

$75,000,000
100, 000,000
357,260,000

359,321, 570

8,146,814,322

Under proposed legislation— Continued
Veterans Administration:
Readjustment benefits, Korean conflict
Compensation and pensions
Total
Grand total
Deduct portion of appropriations for liquidation of prior con­
tract authorizations.
Total new obligational authority

3 Expenditures from pay increase supplemental for fiscal year 1952 unless otherwise indicated.

B USIN ESS E N T E R P R IS E AND R E V O L V IN G FU N DS
(Including budget authorizations therefor from the general fund)

FU N DS A PP L IE D
(to operations)

N E T EFFECT ON B U D G E T
E X PE N D ITU R E S

1952

1951

Organization unit and account title

1953
ENACTED OR R EC O M M E N D ED

$3,750

$15,000

289,596,65$

325,400,000

49, 800,000

104, 700,000

434,186,667

600, 745, 794

643,290,000

162, 091, 631
2, 661, 897

* $75,000

62,558,158

85.002.000

14,700,000

10.300.000

* 50,000,000
1 53,173,338

< 75,000,000
*
“ 40,172,000

1 42,171,074

“ 932,162

$280,728,287

« $16,750

1 975,026

« 15,830,000
8,500,000

J 12,720,000
19,100,000

$75,663,805

1, 476, 365

12, 700, 000

23, 000, 000

75,005,886
2,661,897
° 18,814,596
° 3,969,819

1,137, 048
950, 000

31,700,000
1, 000, 0 0
0

6, 7C0, 000
2, 000 000
,

91,388
° 7,751,260

29,700,000
5,000,000

2,600,000
* 13,000,000

265, 416,337

254, 801,153

343,091,369

< 15,869,822
*
< 19,375,130
*

« 30,010,000
78,550,738

« 2,600,000
< 936,666
*

867, 919, 945

901,046,947

1,018,081,369

* 92,126,956

« 50,236,288

180, 366, 865

321,747,391

347, 584, 000

72,161,105

190,115,674

100,000

9

D e d u ct excess of repaym ents and collection s o ver expenditures.




Atomic Energy Commission: Revolving fund, defense production guarantees
Export-Import Bank o f W ashington:
Loans from Treasury
! Limitation on administrative expenses
Federal Civil Defense Administration: Civil defense procurement fund (cur­
rent appropriation).
Reconstruction Finance Corporation (revolving fun d):
M ilitary services: Activities supporting defense
International security and foreign relations: M ilitary and economic assist­
ance.
Housing and com m unity developm ent:
Public housing program
A ids to private housing:
Federal-National Mortgage Association
Loans for prefabricated housing
Mortgages
Provision of com m unity facilities
Loans for civil defense
Disaster insurance, loans, and relief
Transportation and communication: Other services to transportation
Finance, commerce, and industry:
Promotion or regulation of financial institutions
Business loans and guarantees
Limitation on administrative expenses
Total, Reconstruction Finance Corporation

200, 000,000

Tennessee Valley Authority:
j Payment to Tennessee Valley Authority fund (current appropriation)
1 Tennessee Valley Authority fund

108

TH E BU DGET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953
BU DG ET AU TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EX PEN D ITU RES— Continued
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND REVOLVING FUNDS

Organization unit and account title

Func­
tional
code
No.

N EW AUTHORIZATIONS— Continued
(authorizations to expend from public debt
receipts unless otherwise specified)
1951

1952

FUNDS PROVIDED
(b y operations)

1951

1953

1952

1953

ENACTED OR R ECO M M EN D ED —Continued
Veterans Administration:
Canteen service revolving fund
--__ _____
Direct loans to veterans and re serv es-_______ __________________
Reauthorization to expend from public debt receipts
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters
_
_ _
_
Service-disabled veterans’ insurance fund
- ______ . _ ___________
Soldiers’ and sailors’ civil relief
__
__________ _
Veterans’ special-term insurance fund _______________________________
Vocational rehabilitation, revolving fund
. _ . . _ _ _____________

106
252
252
106
104

$21,543,617

Total, Veterans Administration_________________________________ _

150,000,000

45,867,865

Total business enterprise and revolving funds.............. .......................

599,714,000

1,384,257,465




$225,027,000

39, 452,127

113, 549, 390

50,881
900, 000

49, 000
2, 925, 000

200,000

200,000

310, 000
730,000

1, 530,000
585, 000

25,573,217

102
104
106

2,352, 990

1,380,412

[

$23,482,870

269, 239

$2,977,603
42,890,262

$22,113,852

26,959

$150,000,000

63, 756, 860

142, 321, 260

1,298,890,360

1, 408, 830, 812

1, 693, 577,369

109

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES
BU DG ET AU TH O R IZA TIO N S AND EXPEN D ITU RES— Continued
BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND REVOLVING FUNDS

NET EFFECT ON BUDGET
EXPENDITURES

FUNDS APPLIED
(to operations)

Organization unit and account title
1951

1952

1953

1951

1952

1953

ENACTED OR R E C O M M E N D E D — Continued
Veterans Administration:
Canteen service revolving fund
| Direct loans to veterans and reserves:
1
Reauthorization to expend from public debt receipts
Rental, maintenance, and repair of quarters
Service-disabled veterans’ insurance fund
Soldiers’ and sailors’ civil relief
Veterans’ special-term insurance fund
Vocational rehabilitation, revolving fund

$21,519,417

$23,076,561

$23,340, 828

° $24,200

$962,709

« $142,042

59, 991,240

127, 852, 248

108, 875, 000

57,638,250

88,400,121

« 4,674,390

17,121

46,100
1.050.000
63,000
1.030.000
550,000

®9,838
« 225,289

1,051,176

57,819
290.000
18,000
205.000
715.000

« 329,236

6,938
« 610,000
« 182,000
« 105,000
« 15,000

« 2,900
° 1,875,000
“ 137,000
« 500,000
“ 35,000

82, 622, 904

152, 214, 628

134. 954, 928

57,049,687

88,457,768

« 7,366,332

Total, Veterans Administration

1, 411, 638,001

1, 714,409,374

1, 930, 735, 297

112,747,641

305,578,562

237,157,928

Total business enterprise and revolving funds

43,950

® Deduct excess of repayments and collections over expenditures.




110

THE B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953
C U R R E N T A U T H O R IZ A T IO N S

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION

o b l ig a t io n s

by

o b je c ts—

Object classification

co n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$831

$851

$913

$463, 516
13, 627

$473, 665

$569,119
11,103

37,991

1,303
39,112

734
47, 004

Total personal services__________
Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things_______ _____
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials....... .......... ........
Equipm ent_______ _________________
Lands and structures. ...........................

515,134
11, 267
2,348
3,396
5,191
414
29, 469
37,875
23,373
8,785

514,080
13,295
6, 615
3, 224
12, 452
575
61, 515
48, 337
42, 437
16, 470

627,960
15, 429
5, 040
3, 604
14,322
2,162
39, 620
45,685
15, 735
9.443

Total obligations........ .........................

637, 252

719,000

779, 000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$130,204
3,222
656,096

$80,449

$120,449

719,000

779,000

789, 522

799, 449

899, 449

Salaries and Expenses, American Battle Monuments Commission—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses, as authorized by
the A ct o f June 26, 1946 (36 U. S. C. 121, 123-132, 138), including
the acquisition o f land or interest in land in foreign countries;
purchase and repair o f uniforms for caretakers o f national cemeteries
and monuments outside o f the United States and its Territories and
possessions at a cost not exceeding $500; rent o f office and garage
space in foreign countries; the purchase o f one passenger m otor
vehicle for replacement on ly; and insurance o f official m otor vehicles
in foreign countries when required by law o f such countries; [$719,000, o f which not more than $504,000 shall be available for personal
services! $779,000: Provided, That where station allowance has
been authorized by the Departm ent o f the Arm y for officers of the
Arm y serving the Arm y at certain foreign stations, the same allow­
ance shall be authorized for officers o f the armed forces assigned to
the Commission while serving at the same foreign stations, and
this appropriation is hereby made available for the paym ent o f
such allowance: Provided further, That when traveling on business
o f the Commission, officers o f the armed forces serving as members
or as secretary o f the Commission may be reimbursed for expenses
as provided for civilian members of the Commission.
[T h e funds provided in the Independent Offices Appropriation
Act, 1952, shall be available to the Commission for the em ploym ent
o f personnel in foreign countries (not exceeding 450) without
regard to the limitations on the amounts available for personal
services contained therein and without regard to the provisions of
section 605 th ereof.] {Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952; In ­
dependent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

03*
04
05
06
07
08
09
10

Appropriated 1952, $719,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_________ _________________________

80,449

120, 449

99,449

Total expenditures _______________

709,073

679, 000

800,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations _ _________

575,958
133,115

600,000
79,000

681,000
119,000

Estimate 1953, $779,000

AM O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estim ate.. . ___________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. _

$660,000
- 3 , 904

$719,000

656,096

719,000

779,000

-18,844

Total obligations__________________

637,252

719,000

779,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$21, 495
219,872

$25,890
250, 960

$28,397
271,962

388, 048
7,837

434, 835
7,315

470, 942
7, 699

637, 252

719,000

01

02

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e . . _____ : _________________
Payment above basic rates________

A N A L Y S IS OF EXPE ND ITU RES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligations incurred during the year____

$779,000

Obligations incurred_______________
Comparative transfer to “ Construction
of memorials and cemeteries, American
Battle Monuments Commission” _____

Average salaries and grades—Continued
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

1

779,000

O BLIGATIONS BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description

1951 actual

1 . D e p a r t m e n t a l._________ ____________
2. W orld W ar I memorials and cemeteries.
3. W orld War II memorials and ceme­
teries____________ •___
__________
4. Mexico C ity National Cemetery______
Total obligations__________________

Construction of Memorials and Cemeteries, American Battle
Monuments Commission—
Construction of memorials and cemeteries: For expenses necessary
for the permanent design and construction of memorials and ceme­
teries in foreign countries as authorized by the A ct of June 26, 1946
(36 U. S. C. 121, 123-132, 138), and the A ct of August 5, 1947 (50
TJ. S. C. 1819), [$3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 ] $5,000,000, to remain available until
expended [ , of which not more than $305,850 shall be available for
personal serv ices]: Provided, That foreign currencies available to
the credit of the Treasury shall be used to defray expenses incurred
for this purpose wherever practicable. (Independent Offices A p ­
propriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $3,000,000
AM OUNTS

Estimate 1953, $5,000,000

AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual
PROGRAM

Provision is made for the maintenance and operation
of all permanent United States military cemeteries and
memorials located in foreign countries. The 1953 esti­
mate provides general maintenance of 8 World War I
cemeteries, a memorial chapel in each cemetery, 11 World
War I memorials outside the cemeteries, 14 World War II
cemeteries, and the Mexico City National Cemetery.
The increase over 1952 is for better maintenance of these
cemeteries.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions.......
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary _____________ ________
Average grade ______________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary........................................
Average grade..........................................




1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$7,010.000
-5,000,000

$3,000,000

$5,000,000

2, 502,249
5,000,000

3, 548,000
1,000, 563

1, 000,000

7, 548, 563

6, 000,000

AND PERFO RM AN CE

1951 actual

1952 estimate

379

463
14
465

$3, 232
GS-4.4

$3,665
GS-4.7

$3,665
GS-4.7

$3,029
C PC-5.5

$3, .421
CPC-5.5

$3,392
rCPC-5.4

Total available for obligation______
Balance available in subsequent year:
A ppropriation._ _
__________ _____
Contract authorization__ __ __________

467
18
431

9, 512,249
- 3 , 548,000
- l r000, 563

Obligations incurred.. ............. ........
Comparative transfer from “ Salaries and
expenses, American Battle Monuments
Commission” _______ ____ _____________

4,963,686

Total obligations__________________

4, 982, 530

-

1, 000,000
6, 548, 563

6, 000,000

6, 548, 563

6, 000,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

18,844

O BLIG ATIO NS BY A C T IV IT IE S

1953 estimate

391

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Applied to contract authorization________
Prior year balance available:
Appropriation_______________ _________
Contract authorization___ ____ _______

Description

1951 actual

1. Departmental________________________
2. W orld W ar II memorials and ceme­
teries:
Overhead____ ____ _____________ . . .
Construction___________________ ___

$38, 742

$43,003

$48,973

281,108
4,662, 680

338,337
6,167,223

446,899
5,504,128

Total obligations..................... ............

4,982,530

6, 548, 563

6 000,000
,

1 11

IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES
PROGRAM AND PERFO RM AN CE

Construction at 15 locations in 8 foreign countries
includes provision of permanent headstones, memorial
structures, landscaping, roads and paths, water supply,
caretakers’ residences, and utility buildings.
O BLIG ATIO N S B Y O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions..___
Average number of all employees________

97
74

8
8
8
8

103
103

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade__________________ ____
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

$3,634
GS-5.6
$1,481

$4,331
GS-6.1
$1,429

$4, 204
GS-5.8
$1, 419

$199, 896
1,384

$234, 379
2,700

$274, 227
2, 700

59, 765

1,348
73, 485

773
79,185

Total personal services....................
02 Travel______ ________________ _______
03 Transportation of things_____________
04 Communication services_____________
05 Rents and utility services...................
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services............... .
08 Supplies and materials_______ ___ ___
09 E quipm ent_____________ __
______

261, 045
18,844
3, 951
2,348
7. 906
1,653
4, 664, 832
20, 056
1,895

311,912
30, 918
7, 417
4,096
8,500
2, 005
6,169, 546
14,169

356,885
43, 419
12,165
4, 026
9, 925
2, 225
5, 533, 562
23,637
14,156

Total obligations_______ ___________

4, 982, 530

6, 548, 563

6, 000, 0
00

01

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Part-time and temporary positions .
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____ _______ _
Paym ent above basic rates.......... .

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 987, 972
4, 963,686

$5, 456,178
6, 548,563

$8,004, 741
6, 000, 0 0
0

7, 951,658

12, 004, 741

14, 004, 741

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_____________ _____ ________________

5, 456,178

8, 004, 741

Total expenditures.............. ...............

2,495, 480

4, 000, 000

8, 004, 741
6, 000, 0 0
0

f ____________
2, 495,480 {
800,000
I
3, 200,000

900,000
5,100,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations:
Out of appropriation to liquidate
prior-year contract authorization_
_
Out of new obligational authority____ |
Out of prior authorizations- _ _________

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
SA LA R IE S AN D

EXPENSES

Salaries and Expenses, Atomic Energy Commission—
For expenses necessary to carry out the purposes o f the Atom ic
Energy A ct of 1946, including em ploym ent o f aliens; purchase of
land and interests in land; services authorized by section 15 of the
A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); purchase of not to exceed
[th ree hundred and sev en ty-five] four hundred and fifty passenger
m otor vehicles, of which [tw o hundred and fifteen ] three hundred
and twenty-seven shall be for replacement on ly; purchase, main­
tenance, and operation o f aircraft; publication and dissemination
of atomic inform ation; purchase, repair, and cleaning o f uniforms;
purchase of newspapers and periodicals (not to exceed $8,000);
official entertainment expenses (not to exceed $5,000); reimburse­
ment o f the General Services Adm inistration for security guard
services; and paym ent o f obligations incurred under prior year
contract authorizations; [$1,139,932,750, o f which not more than
$25,135,000 shall be available for personal services,] $1,312,000,000,
together with the unexpended balances, as of June 30, [1 9 5 1 ] 1952,
of prior year appropriations to the Atom ic Energy Commission, of
which am ounts $100,000 may be expended for objects of a con­
fidential nature and in any such case the certificate of the Com mis­
sion as to the am ount o f the expenditure and that it is deemed
inadvisable to specify the nature thereof shall be deemed a sufficient
voucher for the sum therein expressed to have been expended; from
which appropriation transfers of sums may be made to other agencies
of the Governm ent for the perform ance of the work for which this
appropriation is made, and' in such cases the sums so transferred
may be merged with the appropriation to which transferred: Pro­
vided, That no part of this appropriation shall be used to pay the
salary of any officer or em ployee (except such officers and em ployees




whose compensation is fixed by law, and scientific and technical
personnel) whose position would be subject to the Classification
Act of 1949, as amended, if such A ct were applicable to such position,
at a rate in excess of the rate payable under such A ct for positions
of equivalent difficulty or responsibility: Provided further, That no
part of this appropriation shall be used—
(A) to start any new construction project for which an esti­
mate was not included in the budget for the current fiscal year;
(B) to start any new construction project the currently esti­
mated cost of which exceeds the estimated cost included therefor
in such budget; or
(C) to continue any com m unity facility construction project
whenever the currently estimated cost thereof exceeds the esti­
mated cost included therefor in such budget;
unless the Director of the Bureau of the Budget specifically approves
the start of such construction project or its continuation and a de­
tailed explanation thereof is subm itted forthwith by the Director
to the Appropriations Com m ittees of the Senate and the House of
Representatives and the Joint Com m ittee on A tom ic Energy; the
limitations contained in this proviso shall not apply to any con­
struction project the total estimated cost of which does not exceed
$500,000; and, as used herein, the term “ construction p roject” in­
cludes the purchase, alteration, or im provem ent of buildings, and
the term “ budget” includes the detailed justification supporting the
budget estimates: Provided further, That whenever the current esti­
mate to complete any construction project (except com m unity
facilities) exceeds by 15 per centum the estimated cost included
therefor in such budget or the estimated cost of a construction proj­
ect covered by clause (A) o f the foregoing proviso which has been
approved by the Director, the Com mission shall forthwith submit a
detailed explanation thereof to the D irector of the Bureau of the
Budget and the Com mittees on Appropriations of the Senate and
of the House of Representatives and the Joint Com m ittee on Atom ic
Energy: Provided further, That the tw o foregoing provisos shall have
no application with respect to technical and production facilities
(1) if the Commission certifies to the D irector of the Bureau of the
Budget that immediate construction or immediate continuation of
construction is necessary to the national defense and security, and
(2) if the D irector agrees that such certification is justified: Pro­
vided further, That no part o f the foregoing appropriation shall be
used in connection with the paym ent o f a fixed fee to any contractor
or firm of contractors engaged under a cost-plus-a-fixed-fee contract
or contracts at any installation of the Commission, where that fee
for com m unity management is at a rate in excess o f $90,000 per
annum, or for the operation o f a transportation system where that
fee is at a rate in excess o f $45,000 per annum : Provided further,
That no part o f the foregoing appropriation shall be used for any
new construction project until after the Commission shall have
notified all architects and engineers involved that the plans for such
project should be purely utilitarian and w ithout unnecessary re­
finements.
[F o r an additional am ount for “ A tom ic Energy Com mission” ,
$265,965,000: Provided, That the limitation contained in the
Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952, on the am ount avail­
able to the Commission for personal services is hereby amended to
read, “ of which not to exceed $30,400,000 shall be available for
personal services” : Provided further, That section 605 of the Inde­
pendent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952, shall not be applicable to
the C om m ission .] (Atomic Energy Act of 1946 (Public Law 585,
approved August 1, 1946); Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952;
Second Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952; Independent Offices
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, ° $1,605,897,750 Estimate 1953, $1,312,000,000
Appropriated (adjusted) 1952, ° $1,605,774,550
° Includes $200,000,000 appropriated in the Second Supplemental Appropriation Act,
1952.
AM O U N T S

AVA ILAB LE

FOR O BLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________ $2,032,143,000 $1,605,897, 750 $1,312,000,000
Transferred to—
“ Grants to States, surveys and school
construction, Office of Education,
Federal Security A gency," pursuant
to sec. 209 (d) of Public Law 815, 81st
-96,000
Congress____________________________
“ Maintenance and operation of schools,
Office of Education, Federal Security
Agency, 1951,” pursuant to sec. 8 (c)
-27,200
of Public Law 874, 81st Congress_____
Adjusted appropriation or estimate. 2,032,143.000
Applied to contract authorization________ -414,000,000
Contract authorization___________ _______
300.150,000
57, 271. 317
Prior year balance reappropriated_______
1,186, 248
Reimbursements from other accounts____
Total available for obligation............

1,976,750,565

1, 605, 774, 550
-340, 000,000

1,312,000,000
-57,000,000

40, 993,089
1, 200,000

1, 200,000

1,307,967,639

1,256,200,000

112

THE B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

materials. Plant and equipment costs for 1953 are ex­
pected to remain at almost the 1952 level as the construc­
s a l a r ie s a n d e x p e n s e s — c o n tin u e d
tion of major facilities authorized in 1951 continues.
1.
Operations— (a) Source and fissionable materials.—In
Salaries and Expenses, Atomic Energy Commission— Continued
converting source materials into fissionable materials, ura­
A M O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR O BLIG ATIO N---- c o n t i n u e d
nium ores and concentrates, largely obtained from foreign
sources, are processed into feed materials both for the
1952 estimate 1953 estimate
1951 actual
plants at Oak Ridge, Tenn., which extract the fissionable
isotope uranium 235, and for the reactors at Hanford,
Balance reappropriated for subsequent
year _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
-$40,993,089
Wash., which synthesize plutonium. A continuing supply
Unobligated balance, estimated savings •
- 1 0 , 553,300
of uranium depends upon discovery of new ore deposits
and development of methods to make usable various lowObligations incurred-. _ _
1, 925, 204,176 $1,307,967, 639 $1, 256, 200,000
grade sources. Exploratory drilling in the United States
in 1953 will increase by 21 percent over 1952 and by 240
O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S
percent over 1951. Costs incurred for uranium procured
Description
1951 actual
1952 estimate
1953 estimate
will increase substantially. The quantities of feed and
fissionable materials produced will continue to increase
1. Operations (accrued cost basis):
during 1953, while unit processing costs will decline as new
(a) Source and fissionable materials..
$138, 272, 654
$254, 221, 500
$341, 500,000
(b) W eapons__________________ ______ _
141, 515, 021
228, 000, 000
200, 647; 900
plant capacity and improved techniques are placed in
65, 204, 000
(c) Reactor developm ent____________
40, 572,011
92, 400, 000
service. Emphasis will continue on development of new’*
(rf) Physical research. . . . ___________
31, 488, 918
37, 265, 600
43,100, 000
(e) Biology and medicine____________
20, 615, 908
23, 285, 500
24, 600, 000
equipment and processes to increase yields and improve
(f) Communitv operations.. _
4, 037, 086
2, 979, 900
2,800, 000
(g) Program direction and adminis­
product quality.
31, 366,974
__ _________
tration _____ ___
23,800,838
35,400, 000
(6)
Weapons.—Substantially higher costs will be in­
614, 971, 374
Total operating costs_________
400, 302, 436
767,800, 000
Reimbursable costs________________________
1, 200,000
1,186, 248
1, 200,000 curred in 1953 in the production of greater numbers of
Increase or decrease (—) in:
weapons; the development, design, and testing of new
Stores inventories _ ___________________
— 1, 451, 253
5, 950, 372
3, 202, 000
weapon t}^pes; and the storage, maintenance, and custody
Special reactor materials________________
6, 396, 657
-7 8 6 , 396
5, 561, 000
Other special materials__________ ______
243, 076
2, 019,895
2, 037, 000
of stockpiled weapons. A further increase in technical
Working carjital_____________________ ___
10,685,960
- 1 8 , 876,223
700, 000
50,385, 424
118,172, 960
22, 200, 0 0 personnel is anticipated at the principal weapon develop­
0
Unliquidated obligations________________
Payments to or from (—) other agencies.
-3 6 ,0 7 3
-2 6 3 . 000
ment centers, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and
Total operating obligations_________
467, 712, 475
722, 388,982
802, 700, 000
the Sandia Laboratory in New Mexico. New production
2. Plant and equipment (obligations):
installations and expanded facilities at existing installa­
(a) Source and fissionable materials
tions will be in operation, and activity will continue at
facilities ._ ____________________
1, 247, 494,197
359, 962, 271
311,400, 000
(b) Weapons facilities______ . . . . . .
103,565,791
114,314, 416
55, 000, 000
the test sites in Nevada and at Eniwetok.
(r) Reactor development facilities. _
52, 556,879
50,147. 317
44,100, 000
(d) Physical research facilities _____
5, 341, 568
4,894,115
5, 985, 000
(c) Reactor development.—The development of new
(e) Biology and medicine facilities___
5,184, 282
4,020,900
515, 000
reactor designs is being directed toward reactors for pro­
(/) Community facilities . ________
16, 276, 022
11,725, 048
5, 500, 000
(a) Administrative facilities . . .
__
48, 984
200, 776
ducing fissionable materials at lower unit cost and with
(h) Equipment not included in con­
35, 914, 632
struction projects----------------------31, 423,160
31, 000, 000
smaller consumption of uranium; propelling naval vessels
and military aircraft; and generating electric power.
Total plant and equipment
obligations. _______________ 1, 457, 491, 701
585,578,657
453, 500, 000
Development of reactors for submarine propulsion is
Obligations incurred. ______ 1,925,204,176
1,307, 967, 639 1, 256, 200, 000
underway. An experimental reactor has been completed
to explore the principle of “ breeding,” that is, producing
N o t e . — The Commission’s estimates for operations (as distinguished from the plant
more fissionable material in a reactor than it consumes.
and equipment estimates) are based on costs to be accrued during each of the fiscal years,
converted in tota] to the required obligational authority. Operating costs shown do not
A reactor to test materials will come into operation during
include provision for depreciation of plant and equipment. Estimates for plant and
1952. The development of an aircraft reactor will be
equipment are shown on an obligation basis; the relationship between obligations and
accrued costs for plant and equipment is shown in the statement of program and
further intensified in 1953. Work on specific reactor de­
performance.
signs constitutes about 80 percent of the scientific and
PROGRAM AND PERFO RM AN CE
technical effort in reactor development, the remainder
The Commission manufactures fissionable materials and consisting of work on common problems of reactor physics,
atomic weapons; conducts research and development heat transfer, shielding, and the development of materials,
aimed at improved weapons, more efficient production components, and systems of chemical processing.
of fissionable materials, generation of useful power from
A school of reactor technology is conducted for scientific
atomic energy, and protection of military and civilian and engineering personnel in both Government and
personnel against hazards arising from atomic energy industry. The Commission has followed a policy of
operations; and disseminates unclassified technical in­ assigning new reactor projects to industrial contractors
formation to encourage scientific progress.
not heretofore engaged in atomic work and has encouraged
The program is administered in the field through nine industrial proposals for the design and construction of dual
major offices; most of the Commission’s activities are purpose plutonium- power-producing reactors on a risk
carried on in Government-owned facilities by industrial and profit basis.
and educational contractors. Coordination with the
(d) Physical research.—A broad program of basic and
armed services is achieved through the Military Liaison applied research in physics, chemistry, and metallurgy
Committee of the Department of Defense.
supports the whole range of the Commission’s technical
Estimated costs to be incurred in 1953 total activities. This research is carried on in the Commis­
$1,745,443,400, an increase of 1.7 percent over estimated sion’s laboratories and in numerous universities and
costs in 1952 and of 103 percent over actual costs for colleges. The latter perform chiefly basic research but are
1951. Approximately 44 percent of the 1953 total repre­ undertaking increasing amounts of applied research as well.
sents operating costs, which have increased by 24.8 percent Upon completion of a new research reactor at Argonne
over 1952 and 91.5 percent over 1951. This growth stems National Laboratory in 1952 and of very high voltage
from the operation of new plants, the expansion of research particle accelerators at the Radiation Laboratory at
and development, and increased expenditures for raw Berkeley and the Brookhaven National Laboratory in
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION— Continued




IN D E P E N D E N T OFFICES

113

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S
1953, additional basic physics research will be initiated.
Increased emphasis is also planned for 1953 on research
Object classification
1951 actual
1952 estimate 1953 estimate
aimed at solving problems in the production of certain
metals used in reactor construction and in the extraction of Total number of permanent positions____
6,851
7, 306
7,505
29
37
uranium from low-grade ores, and at developing informa­ Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
37
Average number of all employees ______
5, 249
6,248
7,140
tion on the atomic nucleus which is needed for reactor
grades:
designs. Radioisotopes will continue to be produced for Average salaries andgrades:'
General schedule
Average s a la ry ___________________
$4, 624
$5, 267
research, medical, and industrial uses.
$5, 372
Average grade______________
GS-7.5
GS-7.9
G S - 8.0
(e)
Biology and medicine.—In these activities the Com­ Crafts, protective, and custodial _______
grades:
Average s a la ry _____ _ _____________
$3, 075
$3, 487
$3, 565
mission’s primary concern is to evaluate the extent of
Average grade
. . .
C P C - 6.1
C PC-6.4
C PC-6.3
Ungraded positions: Average salary___
$3, 452
radiation and other atomic energy hazards; to prescribe
$3, 518
$3, 631
adequate protective measures for atomic energy opera­
Direct Obligations
tions; and to provide related information to other Govern­ 01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
$23, 202, 578
ment agencies responsible for civilian and military defense.
$31, 067, 535
$36, 076, 416
Part-time and temporary positions.
215, 485
271,833
268, 445
Research is conducted on the radiation and toxic effects
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e . __ __ ____________
__
119, 490
138, 755
of materials used and produced; the effects of ionizing
Payment above basic rates
1, 452, 902
1, 752, 391
2,144, 583
Payments to other agencies for
radiation on living organisms; and flash burns and other
reimbursable details . . _
13, 751
5,838
7, 400
phenomena of nuclear explosions. This research is per­
Total
24, 876, 803
33, 225, 000
38, 635, 599
formed in Commission laboratories and at a large number 02 Travel___ . . personal services______
_______ _ . . .
_
1,( 80, 051
3, 059, 299
3,345, 927
2, 532, 697
of universities, colleges, and hospitals. Radiation-detec- 03 Transportation of things_________ . . .
3,061, 719
1, 407, 499
04 Communication services _ . . .
1,769,320
1,852, 748
2,134, 970
tion and monitoring instruments are developed and tech­ 05 Rents and utility services __________
43, 201,821
70,480, 547
55,616, 911
06
280, 841
411, 403
399,920
nical data, including recommended standards for permis­ 07 Printing and reproduction. . .-. ______ 353,C55,328 548,610,095 592,401,652
Other contractual services
.
sible exposure, are furnished to contractors, the Depart­
Services performed b y other agen­
cies_____
...
26, 244
70, 711
62,894
ment of Defense, and the Federal Civil Defense Ad­ 08 Supplies and materials.. ____ _____
_
37, 614,898
59, 990,391
107,077, 732
09 Equipm ent___ . . . _____ __________
31,423,160
35, 914, 632
31, 000, 000
ministration.
10 Lands and structures. ... __________ 1, 426,0C8, 541
549,664, 025
422,500, 000
The use of radiation in the study and treatment of 11 Grants, subsidies, and contributions..
816,162
226, 450
200, 0 0
0
Refunds,
1,111
10, 500
10, 500
cancer and other diseases and the application of radio­ 13 Taxes andawards, and indemnities___
15
assessments_____ _________
80,119
106, 396
10, 951
100, 0 0
0
100,000
active materials to biological and agricultural research are Unvouchered_______ _. . _____________
encouraged; radioisotopes will continue to be furnished
Total direct obligations.. ________
1, 924,017,928 1,306, 767, 639 1, 255, 000,000
free to qualified users engaged in studying or treating Obligations Payable Out o f Reim bursem ents
From Other A ccounts
cancer.
(J) Community operations.—The Commission operates 07 Other contractual services ____ _
1,186, 248
1, 200,000
1, 200,000
the towns of Los Alamos, N. Mex., Oak Ridge, Tenn., and
Obligations incurred_______________ 1, 925, 204,176 1,307,967, 639 1, 256, 200,000
Richland, Wash., totaling more than 65,000 in popula­
tion, and provides limited services at other locations. In
A N A L Y S IS OP E X P E N D IT U R E S
1953 the net cost of these operations is expected to be
further reduced.
1951 actual
1952 estimate 1953 estimate
(g)
Program direction and administration.—General
management, executive direction, technical supervision Unliquidated obligations, start of year___ $808,222, 695 $1,835, 506,438 $1,442, 274, 077
of program operations, the negotiation and administra­ Obligations incurred during the year_____ 1,925, 204,176 1, 307,967, 639 1, 256,200,000
2, 733,426,871 3,143,474,077 2,698,474,077
tion of contracts, and other related activities performed Deduct:
by the Commission will require an increase in the number
Reimbursable o b lig a tio n s ..._____ _____
1,186, 248
1, 200, 0 0
0
1, 200,000
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r... 1,835, 506,438 1,442, 274,077
947,274,077
of its employees in 1953 because of the increased scope of
Total expenditures_____ __________
896, 734,185 1,700,000,000 1, 750,000,000
the total program. The costs incurred for these functions
will represent 4.6 percent of total operating costs, com­ Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations:
pared with 5.9 percent in 1951.
Out of appropriations to liquidate
334, 592, 741
contract authorization _______ __ _
300, 000, 000
57,000,000
2.
Plant and equipment.—More than half of the obliga­
Out of new obligational authority____
318,173,036
400,000, 000
415,000,000
tions estimated for plant and equipment in 1953 are for
243,968,408 1, 000 000,000 1, 278, 000,000
Out of prior authorizations
,
the residual financing of the production plant under con­
struction at Savannah River. In addition, it is planned
to start construction of several different experimental
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
reactors, a research reactor, and laboratory buildings at
Los Alamos and the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. Salaries and Expenses, Civil Service Com m ission—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses, including not to
Other new projects consist chiefly of additions and modifi­
cations to existing production and research facilities. exceed [$ 2 8 ,0 0 0 ] $30,000 for services as authorized by section 15
of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); not to exceed $10,000
Costs incurred for plant and equipment in 1952 and 1953 for medical examinations perform ed for veterans by private physi­
are substantially higher in both years than in 1951 as cians on a fee basis; travel expenses of examiners acting under the
construction work continues on the new plants authorized direction of the Commission, and expenses of examinations and
and largely financed in 1951. Accrued costs are reconciled investigations held in Washington and elsewhere; not to exceed $125
for the purchase of newspapers and periodicals (excluding scientific,
to obligations in the following summary table:
technical, trade or traffic periodicals, for official use); paym ent in
PLANT AND EQUIPMENT COSTS RECONCILED TO OBLIGATIONS

1952 estimate

1953 estimat e

$458, 421,861 $1,100,651,012

$976, 443, 400

1951 actual
Total plant and equipment accrued costs.
Increase or decrease ( —) in—
Construction working capital__________
Construction unliquidated obligations..
Total plant and equipment obliga­
tions .. _________________ _____
*




47,821, 200
951, 248,640

-3,667, C34
-511,405,321

- 5 , 743, 400
-517, 200, 000

1,457, 491, 701

585,578, 657

453,500,000

advance for library membership in societies whose publications are
available to members only or to members at a price lower than to
the general public; not to exceed [$ 6 5 ,0 0 0 ] $81,000 for perform ing
the duties imposed upon the Commission by the Act of July 19,
1940 (54 Stat. 767); reimbursement of the General Services Adm in­
istration for security guard services for protection o f confidential
files; and not to exceed $5,000 for actuarial services by contract,
without regard to section 3709, Revised Statutes, as am ended;
[$1 7,500,000] $ 22,097,000: Provided, That no details from any
executive department or independent establishment in the District
of Columbia or elsewhere to the Commission's central office in

TH E B U D G ET FOR FISCAL Y E A R 1953

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION—Continued

o b l ig a t io n s

Salaries and Expenses, Civil Service Commission— Continued
Washington or to any o f its regional offices shall be made during
the current fiscal year, but this shall not affect the making of details
for service as members o f the boards of examiners outside the im ­
mediate offices o f the Commission in Washington or of the regional
directors, nor shall it affect the making o f details o f persons qualified
to serve as expert examiners on special subjects: Provided further,
That the Civil Service Commission shall have power in case of
emergency to transfer or detail any o f its employees to or from its
office or field force: Provided further, That members of the Loyalty
Review Board in Washington and of the regional loyalty boards in
the field may be paid actual transportation expenses, and per diem
in lieu of subsistence authorized by the Travel Expense Act^of 1949
while traveling on official business away from their homes or*regular
places o f business, and while en route to and from and at the place
where their services are to be perform ed: Provided further, That
nothing in section 281 or 283 of title 18, United States Code, or in
section 190 o f the Revised Statutes (5 U. S. C. 99) shall be deemed
to apply to any person because of his appointment for part-time or
intermittent service as a member of the Loyalty Review Board or
a regional loyalty board in the Civil Service Commission [ : Provided
further, That not to exceed $575,000 o f this appropriation shall be
available for travel expenses}.
[F o r an additional am ount for “ Salaries and expenses” , $1,400,000;
and the lim itation under this head in the Independent Offices A ppro­
priation Act, 1952, on the amount available for travel expenses, is
increased from “ $575,000” to “ $619,000” . ]
N o part of the appropriations herein made to the Civil Service
Commission shall be available for the salaries and expenses of the
Legal Examining Unit in the Examining and Personnel Utilization
Division of the Commission, established pursuant to Executive
Order Numbered 9358 of July 1, 1943, or for the compensation or
expenses of any member of a board of examiners (1) who has not
made affidavit that he has not appeared in any agency proceeding
within the preceding tw o years, and will not thereafter while a
board member appear in any agency proceeding, as a party, or in
behalf of a party to the proceeding, before an agency in which an
applicant is em ployed who has been rated or will be rated by such
member; or (2) who, after making such affidavit, has rated an
applicant who at the time of the rating is em ployed by an agency
before which the board member has appeared as a party, or in
behalf of a party, within the preceding tw o years: Provided, That
the definitions of “ agency” , “ agency proceeding” , and “ party” in
section 2 of the Administrative Procedure A ct shall apply to these
terms as used herein.
No part of appropriations herein shall be used to pay the com pen­
sation of officers and employees of the Civil Service Commission
who allocate or reallocate supervisory positions in the classified civil
service solely on the size of the group, section, bureau, or other
organization unit, or on the number of subordinates supervised.
References to size of the group, section, bureau, or other organiza­
tion unit or the number of subordinates supervised may be given
effect only to the extent warranted by the w orkload of such organi­
zation unit and then only in combination with other factors, such
as the kind, difficulty, and com plexity of work supervised, the degree
and scope of responsibility delegated to the supervisor, and the
kind, degree, and value of the supervision actuallv exercised. (5
U. S. C. chap. 12; 18 U. S. C. 611; 81 U. S. C. 388;'Executive Orders
6670, Apr. 7, 1934; 6731, June 5, 1934; 7915 and 7916, June
,
1988; Second Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952; Independent
Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

24

Appropriated 1952, $18,900,000

by

a c t iv it ie s —

1951 actual

Description
Direct Obligations—

co n tin u e d

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1, 257, 465

$1, 576, 578

$1,867,017

1, 491, 251
419, 69&
63, 226

1, 507, 563
455, 458
62,365

1, 562, 098
468, 779
63, 050

720,165
1,139, 624

740, 816
1, 209, 503

754, 211
1, 210, 504

16, 455, 791

20,300, 0
00

22, 097, 000

Continued

3. Administration of the personnel classi­
fication system______________________
4. Administration of the retirement sys­
tems. ____ ____ _______ ___ ___
5. Service records. ______ _______________
6. Federal Personnel C o u n c il______ _____
7. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory
functions_____
___ _______ ______
8. Executive and administrative services.
Total direct obligations________ __
Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

1. Examining, placement, and veterans’
preference_____
__ _____________
2. Investigation of character and fitness
for em ployment_____________________
3. Administration of the personnel classi­
fication system ... _____ _______ _ _
4. Administration of the retirement sys­
tems. _ _______ _______________ . . .
5. Service records... ______ __ _______ . . .
6. Federal Personnel C o u n c il.____ _____
7. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory
functions.._ _________________ _ _ _
8. Executive and administrative services.

65,171

50, 545

50, 545

17,936

215,000

215, 000

5,185

5,185

6,866
6,882
157
4, 401
246
14, 070

Total obligations payable out of re­
imbursements from other ac­
counts. _____________________ . . .

115, 729

270, 730

270, 730

Obligations incurred________ _____

16, 571, 520

20, 570, 730

22,367, 730

PROGRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE

As the central personnel agency of the Government, the
Civil Service Commission holds examinations, certifies
eligibles to fill vacancies in the Federal service, and deter­
mines the character and suitability of applicants for such
employment. It also administers the Classification Act of
1949 and the retirement system under the act of 1920, as
amended.
1.
Examining, placement, and veterans’ preference.—
From December 1, 1950, on, most appointments are being
made on a temporary-indefinite basis. The use of com­
petitive examinations will be continued, except that where
there are not enough qualified applicants the Commission
will authorize noncompetitive examination procedures and
standards. The recruiting facilities of the Commission and
its agency boards and committees of examiners will be fully
utilized in making temporary-indefinite appointments.
Veterans are aided in securing the benefits to which they
are entitled under law. The Commission also inspects
personnel activities carried on by agencies subject to its
review. The increase is to bring more appointments under
the competitive examining procedure and to increase the
number and scope of agency inspections.

Estimate 1953, $22,097,000

A M O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

Production count

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
$22, 097, 000

_.
Appropriation or estimate___ _
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases. . _____________________________
Reimbursements from other accounts

$16, 511, 913

$18, 900, 000

115, 729

1,400, 0 0
0
270, 730

16, 627, 642
-56,122

20, 570, 730

22,367, 730

Obligations incurred_______________

16, 571, 520

20, 570, 730

22, 367, 730

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$6
,334, 088

$6 783, 750
,

$8,074,239

5,030, 276

7, 963, 967

8,097,102

682,682
578,539
235, 936
342, 603
1,466

1952 estimate
506,025
654,600
185,000
469, 600
1,618

1953 estimate
681,725
635, 250
184,250
451,000
2, 524

270, 730

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

Applications processed____ ___________ .
Placements m ade_______ ___________
. .
B y the Commission __________________
B y boards of examiners________________
Agencies inspected_____ __________ . . . _

1951 actual

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description

1951 actual

Direct Obligations

1.
2.

Examining, placement, and veterans’
preference__________________________
Investigation of character and fitness
for em ploym ent......................................




2.
Investigation of character andfitness for employment.—
The Commission has specific responsibilities for carrying
out the Federal employees’ loyalty program, including the
making of loyalty checks and inquiries on new appointees,
and the establishment of regional loyalty boards to
adjudicate loyalty cases and of a central loyalty board to
review decisions of the regional and agency boards. In
addition, investigations are made of applicants for certain
positions in the Federal service, including postmasters and
the higher-grade administrative and technical positions.

115

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
o b l ig a t io n s

Production count

1951 actual

1952 estimate
822,097
2,909
73

800,662
3,879
115

by

o b je c ts—

Object classification
Record check and inquiry cases__________
Regional loyalty cases adjudicated_______
L oyalty appeals adjudicated____ ________
Suitability investigations converted from
loyalty cases__________ ____ ____________
Other personnel investigations.._ ...............

479,364
1,464
94
7,945
5,179

20,978
6,800

21, 504
7,114

1951 actual

Allocation standards established................
Conducting audits______________ ________.

664
85,384

1952 estimate
663
108,672

1953 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$18,350,055

$19,606,267

336, 959
85, 814

116,913
70,200
8,499
98,145

163,081
76,000
4.382
97, 000

14, 908, 570

18, 643, 812

19, 946, 730

Personal services____ ____ ___________
Travel______________________________
Transportation of things___ _________
C ommunication services........................
Rents and utility services......................
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services___ _______
Supplies and materials______________
Equipm ent__________________________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments.................. .........

14, 804, 426
366, 968
62,343
147, 257
114, 925
378, 561
41, 406
331, 563
191, 677
1,055
15,610

18, 426, 082
506,763
61, 635
152, 978
156, 0 0
0
400, 000
41,000
358, 773
146, 269
500
50, 000

19, 729, 000
639.000
75, 000
170, 000
150, 000
460, 000
168, 0 0
0
410.000
193, 000

Total direct obligations____________

16,455, 791

20,300, 000

22, 097, 000

103, 244
7,064
78
266

217, 730
34,200

217, 730
34, 200

200

200

40
1,514
1, 501

42
10, 334
8,224

42
10,334
8,224

S um m ary of Personal Services— Con.

Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions____ ______________
Part-time and temporary positions:
Part-time em ploym ent____________ .
W . A . E. em ploym ent_______ _______
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base
Paym ent above basic rates____________
Miscellaneous fee services______________

3.
Administration oj the personnel classijication system.—
The Commission prepares and issues allocation standards
for positions under the Classification Act of 1949, con­
ducts a program of audits to insure compliance with ex­
isting standards, and establishes new minimum and 01
maximum rates of pay for certain groups of employees. 02
The increase recommended for audits is related to the 03
04
05
larger number of positions to be covered in 1953.
06
Production count

co n tin u e d

1953 estimate

07
08
09
13
15

630
144,553

Total personal service obligations. __

$14,391,290
31,577
62,930

Direct Obligations

103, 000

Obligations Payable Out of Reim burse ments F ro m Other Accoun ts

4.
Administration of the retirement systems.—Administer­ 01
ing the Civil Service Retirement Act, the Panama Canal 02
03
Construction Annuity Act, and the Lighthouse Service 04
06
Widows' Benefit Act, involves adjudicating annuity, 07
death and benefit claims, claims for refund of contribu­ 08
09
tions to the retirement fund, and service credit claims.

Personal services.________ ___________
Travel____________________________
Transportation of t h in g s .________ __
Communication services_____________
Printing and reproduction. . . . . .
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials..... .....................
Equipm ent..............................................
Total obligations payable out of re­
imbursements from other ac­
counts............................................

2,022

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

115, 729

270,730

270,730

16, 571, 520

20,570,730

22,367,730

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,355,144
16,571,520

$1,564,941
20,570,730

$1,800,000
22,367, 730

17,926,664

22,135, 671

24,167,730

Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.

1951 actual

Production count

115,729
1,564,941
39,625

270,730
1,800,000

270,730
1, 900,000

Total expenditures...............................

16, 206, 369

20,064,941

21,997,000

14, 962, 030
1, 244,339

17,425,269
1,359, 672

20,377,000
1, 500,000

1,280, 000

120,000

Obligations incurred_______ ________
A nnuity and death claims__ _____________
Refund claim s.. . ______________________ _
Service credit claims_____________________
Inquiries answered_ ____________________
_

47, 528
182,992
28,234
206,035

43,380
168,970
27, 285
190,426

43,140
166,100
27,637
192,305

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1951 actual

5.
Service records.—A service record file is maintained Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
on approximately 15,500,000 present and former employ­ Obligations incurred during the year.........
ees. The slight increase is to maintain the files on a cur­
Deduct:
rent basis.
Reimbursable obligations_________ _____
Production count
R eports filed____________________________
R eports audited____ __ __ ______________
Status cases determined_________________
Inquiries answered______________________

1951 actual
1, 488, 676
40,051
48,677
89,154

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1,708,060
39, 711
50,092
89,409

2,877,000
31,986
34,787
89,409

6. Federal Personnel Council.—The Council advises the
President and the Commission in the protection and im­
provement of the merit system.
7. Regulatory, appellate, and advisory junctions.—These
consist of the formulation of rules and regulations;
hearing and taking action on appeals; the administration
of the political activities statutes; and the recommenda­
tion of measures to the President to promote the ac­
complishment of the objectives of the rules and regulations.
8. Executive and administrative services.
O BLIG ATIO N S B Y O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

S u m m a ry o f Personal Services

Total number of permanent positions........
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees...............
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary__________________ ____
Average grade..........................................
9 5 0 0 0 0 — 52--------8




3,746
7
3,640

4,356

11

4,236

4,599
15
4,475

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations...... ............
Out of prior authorizations.......................
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases. . . ____ _____ ___________

Annuities Under Special Acts, Civil Service Commission—
Annuities, Panama Canal construction em ployees and Light­
house Service widows: For paym ent of annuities authorized b y the
Act of M ay 29, 1944, as am ended (48 U. S. C. 1373a), and the A ct
of August 19, 1950 (64 Stat. 465), [$ 2 ,9 5 5 ,9 0 0 ] $2,707,000. (Inde­
pendent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,955,900

Estimate 1953, $2,707,000

AM O U N T S AVA IL A B LE FOR O BLIGATION

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred). ____________________________
Comparative transfer from—
“ Panama Canal construction annuity
fund, Civil Service Commission” ____
“ A n n u itie s, L ig h th o u se
S ervice
widows, Civil Service Commission” ..
Total obligations................... .............

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,955,900

$2,707,000

2,955,900

2,707,000

$2,320,966
136,260
2,457,226

O BL IG AT IO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

$3,982
GS-5.6

$4,364
GS-5.6

$4,417
GS-5.7

Paym ent of annuities to employees engaged in the construction of the Panama Canal
and widows of former employees of the Lighthouse Service—1951, $2,457,226; 1&52,
$2,955,900; 1953, $2,707,000.

116

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION— Continued

Miscellaneous

Annuities, Lighthouse Service Widows, Civil Service Commission—
Annuities Under Special Acts, Civil Service Commission— Con.
PROGRAM

AND P ERFO RM AN CE

1951 actual

Annuities are paid to persons who were employed on the
construction of the Panama Canal or to their widows, and
benefits are paid to widows of former employees of the
Lighthouse Service. On June 30, 1951, there were 3,031
Panama Canal annuitants on the roll as compared with
an estimate of 2,964 on June 30, 1952, and an estimate of
2,854 on June 30, 1953. On June 30, 1951, there were 270
Lighthouse Service widows on the roll as compared with
an estimate of 315 on June 30, 1952, and 335 on June 30,
1953.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

12 Pensions, annuities, and insurance claims—1951, $2,457,226; 1952, $2,955,900; 1953,
$2,707,000.
A N A L Y S IS

A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

Obligations incurred_____ ____
___
Comparative transfer to “ Annuities under
special acts, Civil Service Commission” .

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,955,900

$220,000
2, 707,000

2,955,900

2,927,000

220, 0
00

210,000

_____ ______

2, 735, 900

-136,260

2, 735,900

2,497,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y ea r.. ________________________________
Total expenditures _

220,000

Payment to Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund, Civil
Service Commission—
Paym ent to civil-service retirement and disability fund: For
financing the liability of the United States, created by the A ct
approved M ay 22, 1920, and Acts am endatory thereof (5 U. S. C.,
ch. 14), [$3 10,000,000] $457,869,000, which am ount shall be placed
to the credit of the “ civil-service retirement and disability fu nd” .

A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU RES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year.........

1952 estimate
$13,650
13, 650

136,260
13,650
122,610

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations......................

13, 650

122, 610

13,650

Panama Canal Construction Annuity Fund, Civil Service Com
­
mission—
AM O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate_______________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. __

-2,320,966

2,320, 966

Total obligations__________________
A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU RES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.. .
Obligations incurred during the year........

AM O U N T S AVA ILAB LE ^ O R O BLIGATION

Appropriation or estimate—1951, $305,000,000; 1952, $310,000,000; 1953, $457,869,000.

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year . ............................ ................... .........
Total expenditures_____________

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

For the purpose of paying the United States share to the retirement fund—1951,
$305,000,000; 1952, $310,000,000; 1953, $457,869,000.

1953 estimate

$2,803,177
-482, 211

Obligations incurred_____________ .
Comparative transfer to “ Annuities under
special acts, Civil Service Commission” .

1952 estimate

1952 estimate

$214, 302
243, 062
2, 320, 966

192, 436

192, 436
2, 585,894

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_______ __
Out of prior authorizations____ _______

1953 estimate

$192, 436

2, 778, 330

Estimate 1953, $457,869,000

1953 estimate

$136,260

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_________ ____ ____________________

(.Independent O
ffices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $310,000,000

136,260

Total obligations__________________

2, 717, 000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________
Out of prior authorizations- __________

U nliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the y e a r ____

1953 estimate

$204,500
-68,240

Total expenditures___________ ____

OF E X PE N D ITU RES

1951 actual

Appropriation or estimate_____ . _ ____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.__

1952 estimate

192,436

2,129,858
456,036

192, 436

PROGRAM AND P ERFO RM AN CE

The Government contributes to the civil-service retire­
ment and disability fund based on an estimated average
employment during 1953 of 1,767,000 persons covered by
the fund.
The Government contribution for 1953 is based on 2.78
percent of salaries of covered employees and the amor­
tization of its accrued liability within 30 years.

COMMISSION ON ORGANIZATION OF THE EXEC­
UTIVE BRANCH OF THE GOVERNMENT
Salaries and Expenses, Commission on Organization of the Execu­
tive Branch of the Government—
A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU R ES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Expenditures out of prior authorization...

O BL IG AT IO N S BY O B JE C T S

11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions—1951, $305,000,000; 1952, $310,000,000; 1953,
$457,869,000.
A N A L Y S IS

OF E X PE N D ITU RES

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred during the year_____

$305,000,000

$310,000,000

$457,869, 000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions__________________ _____

305, 000,000

310,000,000

457,869,000




1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2
2

COMMISSION ON RENOVATION OF THE
EXECUTIVE MANSION
Salaries and Expenses, Commission on Renovation of the Executive
Mansion—
[F o r all expenses of the Commission on R enovation of the Execu­
tive Mansion as authorized by Public Law 40, Eighty-first Congress,
$25,000.] (.Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $25,000

117

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR O BLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_______________
Prior year balance reappropriated_______

$35, 000
30, 000

$25,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

65,000

25, 000

64, 999

1953 estimate

25,000

-1

Obligations incurred______________

O BLIG ATIO N S BY

A C T IV IT IE S

Expenses of the Commission—1951, $64,999; 1952, $25,000.

Department of the Interior, and certain defense produc­
tion activities in the General Services Administration were
transferred to this Agency. During 1952, administrative
expenses of the Agency were derived by transfers of
$400,000 from the Department of the Interior and $115,000
from the General Services Administration. In addition,
$465,000 of the borrowing authority provided by section
304 (b) of the Defense Production Act will be used to
finance development of new overseas minerals sources of
supply. During 1953, all expenses of the Agency will be
financed from the borrowing authority.
O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

O BLIG ATIO N S BY O B JE C T S

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Total number of permanent positions _ _
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees
_____

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades: Ungraded
positions: Average salary______________
01

Object classification

1953 estimate

$3,763
22, 885
21, 700

Obligations incurred-.

25,000

2, 250
450
65

100
35

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$5, 462
64, 999

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations at end of year.
Adjustment in obligations of prior year.

1952 estimate

$3,454
C P C -5 .0
$10, 250
$561,140
64,435
9,653

$6 734
,
GS-9. 7

635,228
25, 785

Total personal services
Travel
03 Transportation of things _ .
04 Communication services _______
06 Printing and reproduction. _ __ _
07 Other contractual services. __ __ __
Services performed b y other agen­
cies
08 Supplies and materials
09 Equipment
15 Taxes and assessments

02

A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

6
102

01 Personal services:
Permanent positions
Part-time and temporary positions_
Payment above basic rates

22,100

64, 999

Total personal services.
Travel_____________________
04 Communication services___
07 Other contractual services - .
08 Supplies and materials_____
15 Taxes and assessments_____

02

19. 400
2, 700

44, 585
2, 621
561
17, 002
176
54

Personal services:
Permanent positions______________
Part-time and temporary positions .

124

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary __ ______ _________
Average grade
_ __
_________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary
Average grade
Ungraded positions: Average salary _

$4, 250

1953 estimate

6, 8 6
8

25, 000

1953 estimate

1,102

8, 954
14, 270
860
76, 750
5, 714
14,337

1,000

784, 000

Total obligations_____________ _____

31,886
A N A L Y S IS

OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

895

Total expenditures________________

62, 680
18,114
4, 566

1951 actual

31,886

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorization___________
Out of prior authorizations____________

25,000
6, 8 6
8

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Materials Procurement Agency—
Appropriated 1952, $0
Appropriated (adjusted) 1952, $515,000

1952 estimate

Adjusted appropriation or estimate
(obligations incurred)____________
Comparative transfer from—
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Interior” _____________
“ Emergency operating expenses, Gen­
eral Services Administration” ............ .
Total obligations.

1953 estimate

$400,000
115,000
515,000
219, 000
50, 000
784, 000

OBLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Defense materials procurement—1952, $784,000.

70,00.0
445,000

__ ________

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ _____
Out of prior authorizations.
- _ _____

[ s a l a r ie s

70,000

445,000
70,000

and

Under Executive Order 10281, dated August 28, 1951,
the Defense Materials Procurement Agency was created
to procure adequate supplies of minerals, metals, and other
materials for the defense program. The functions previ­
ously performed by the Defense Minerals Administration,

expenses

]

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Production Administration—
[F o r expenses necessary for the Defense Production Adm inis­
tration, including em ploym ent of aliens, and expenses of attendance
at meetings concerned with the purposes of this appropriation,
$2,800,000; Provided, That transfers (not to exceed 10 per centum)
between the appropriations “ Salaries and expenses, Defense Pro­
duction Administration’ , and “ Salaries and expenses, Defense Pro­
duction Activities, D epartm ent of Com merce” may be made by
agreement between the Secretary of Commerce and the Adm inis­
trator of the Defense Production Administration with approval of
the Bureau of the B u d g et.] (50 U. S. C. 2061, as amended; Supple­
mental Appropriation A ct, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $2,800,000
Appropriated (adjusted) 1952, $3,400*000
A M OU N TS A VA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

PROGRAM AND P E RFO RM AN CE




$515,000

DEFENSE PRODUCTION ADMINISTRATION

A M O U N T S AVA IL A B LE FOR OBLIGATION

Transferred (pursuant to Executive Order
10281) from—
“ Salaries and expenses, defense produc­
tion activities, Interior” _____________
“ Emergency operating expenses, Gen­
eral Services Administration” _______

Total expenditures___

1953 estimate
$70,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year .
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year

DEFENSE MATERIALS PROCUREMENT AGENCY

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1952 estimate

______
Appropriation or estimate
Transferred from “ Salaries and expenses,
defense production activities, Depart­
ment of Commerce,” pursuant to P ub­
lic Law 253
__________ ____- --

$2,800,000

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.

3,400,000

600,000

1953 estimate

118

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

DEFENSE TRANSPORT ADMINISTRATION

DEFENSE PRODUCTION ADMINISTRATION— Con.
[

s a l a r ie s

and

expen ses]

[ s a l a r ie s

— c o n tin u e d

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Production Administration— Con.
A M O U N T S AVA ILAB LE FOR O BLIG ATIO N---- c o n t i n u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
_
____ _______ _______
Obligations incurred
_
. .
Comparative transfer from “ Expenses of
defense production, Executive Office of
the President”
__ . ________________
T otal obligations-

1953 estimate

1951 actual

$1,168, 524
3,600,000

Appropriation or estimate (obligations
incurred). _
_______ ___________
Comparative transfer from “ Expenses of
defense production, Executive Office of
the President” - ______________________

Direction of defense production program—1951, $1,168,524; 1952, $3,600,000.

870,345

PROGRAM AND PERFO RM AN CE

The Administration (a) directs and coordinates the
plans, procedures, and methods of the executive depart­
ments and agencies concerned with the supply and distri­
bution of industrial resources and products; (b) evaluates
defense and essential civilian requirements in relation to
available supply; (c) makes determinations regarding the
direction of resources to various uses; (d) directs the ad­
ministration of loan and tax amortization functions; and
(e) participates with representatives of foreign nations and
other Government agencies in making recommendations
concerning the distribution of world resources of vital
materials. Legislation is proposed to extend the author­
ization for these activities. The 1953 requirements are
included in a proposed supplemental appropriation.
O BLIG ATIO NS BY O B JE C T S

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees......... -Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary
Average grade
_ __ _____ ____
Ungraded positions: Average salary. _ .
01 Personal services:
Permanent positions_________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base.
Payment above basic rates________
Total personal services_________
Travel
. _ _ __ . __________
Transportation of things______ ______
Communication services_____________
Rents and utilities services
_______
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services.. ________
Services performed b y other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials______________
09 Equipment
_ __ _
15 Taxes and assessments_______________
02
03
04
05
06
07

Total obligations

__ _

. . .. .

343
9

469
25
453

$5, 692
GS-9.0

$6 545
,
GS-9.5
$13, 900

$634,899
102, 249

1953 estimate

7,197
744,345
39, 930
56
2,254

PROGRAM AND PERFORM AN CE

The Administration formulates and carries out plans and
programs for mobilizing domestic surface transportation,
storage, and port facilities in the United States. The
agency assembles and analyzes data with respect to the
need for transportation and storage, and the ability of
existing facilities to meet the requirements; coordinates
and directs the movement of passenger and freight traffic
in cooperation with Government and private transporta­
tion agencies; assigns and administers priorities to insure
expeditious movement of traffic; presents to the Defense
Production Administrator estimated requirements for con­
struction, operation, maintenance, and repair materials;
presents to the appropriate agencies estimated require­
ments for manpower; and makes recommendations to the
Defense Production Administrator concerning accelerated
tax amortization and defense loans. The 1953 require­
ments for the agency are included in a proposed supple­
mental appropriation, under proposed legislation to
extend the Defense Production Act.

Object classification

3, 600,000

1,000
66,000
1,000

169
7
67

210

$4, 737
GS-7.4

$6,214
GS-8.9

$2,378
CPC-3.0

$2, 754
CPC-3.1

$281,698
61, 725

$1,000,598
140,604

3,265

3, 848
4,600

01

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the y ea r... __

$3,600,000
3,600,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year
____ ___ . . _________________
Total expenditures___ _____________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _
___
Out of prior authorizations___ _________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases . _
_____________




1953 estimate
$200,000

200,000

02

200,000

03
04
06
07

190,000

08
09
15

200, 0 0
0
3, 400, 000
3, 210,000
190, 000

1952 estimate

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_______ ______________
Average grade. __________ . . . ___
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________________
Average grade___________ _____ __

8.000

1952 estimate

1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________

A N A L Y S IS OF E X PE N D ITU R E S

1951 actual

2,543,750

O BLIG ATIO NS BY O B JE C T S

117.000
17.000
104, 000
29.000
4.000

1,168, 524

$2,543,750

O BLIG ATIO NS BY A C T IV IT IE S

3, 088,000
165.000

29, 765
2, 350
56, 283
60, 354
231,692
1, 495

1953 estimate

Defense mobilization—1951, $870,345; 1952, $2,543,750.

$2, 766,000
285,000
12, 0 0
0
25,000

121

1952 estimate

$870,345

Total obligations......................... .......

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

1952 estimate

]

AM O U N T S AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

3,600,000

1951 actual

expenses

Appropriated 1952, $2,543,750

$200,000

1,168, 524

Object classification

and

Salaries and Expenses, Defense Transport Administration—
[F o r expenses necessary for the Defense Transport Administra­
tion, including expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with
the purposes o f this appropriation, $2,543,750.] (Supplemental
Appropriation Act, 1952.)

10,000

Personal services:
Permanent positions_____ . . . _ _ _
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________ _______
Paym ent above basic rates________
Payments to other agencies for reim­
bursable details_________________

13
196

12,339

Total personal services_________
Travel_______________________________
Transportation of things_____ _______
Communication services.....................
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services________
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipm ent_______
_______________
Taxes and assessments_______________

359,027
42, 636
718
7, 228
2, 782
5,146
320,932
11,994
118,501
1,381

1,149, 650
90.000
500

Total obligations_______ __________

870, 345

2, 543, 750

12.000
10,000

1,600
1,245,000
19, 500
13,000
2, 500

1953 estimate

119

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
A N A L Y S IS OF E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual

o b l ig a t io n s

1952 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year_____

2, 543, 750

254,375

3.
4.
5.
6.

254,375
2,289,375

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations............ ..........

c o n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Health examination________ __________
Consular service
__________ ________
Immigration inspection______________
Resident alien registration____________

$194,191
889,435
305,109
243,649
5,470,447

7,182,000

254,375
O BLIG ATIO N S B Y O B J E C T S

2,289,375
254,375
Object classification

DISPLACED PERSONS COMMISSION
Salaries, Expenses, and Loans, Displaced Persons Commission—
[D isplaced Persons Com m ission: F or expenses necessary to carry
out the provisions of the Displaced Persons Act of 1948, as amended
by the A ct o f June 16, 1950 (Public Law 555), including $1,100,000
for capital for loans pursuant to section 14 of said A ct; rents in the
District of Colum bia; travel expenses, including travel expenses
outside continental United States without regard to the Standard­
ized Government Travel Regulations, as amended, and the rates of
per diem allowances under the Travel Expense A ct of 1949; hire of
passenger m otor vehicles; printing and binding outside the conti­
nental limits of the United States without regard to section 11 of
the A ct of M arch 1, 1919 (44 U. S. C. I l l ) ; expenses incident to
the primary and secondary education of American children who are
dependents of Government personnel paid from this appropriation
and stationed overseas; services as authorized by section 15 of the
A ct of August
1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a); employm ent of aliens; and
paym ent of rent in foreign countries in advance; $7,000,000, of
which not less than $4,375,000 shall be available for the expenses of
transporting to the United States displaced persons of German
ethnic origin: Provided, That allocations may be made from this
appropriation b y the Commission upon approval by the Bureau of
the Budget to any department, agency, corporation, or independent
establishment of the Governm ent for direct expenditure for the
purposes of this appropriation, and any such expenditures may be
made under the specific authority herein contained or under the
authority governing the activities o f the department, agency, cor­
poration, or independent establishment to which amounts are allo­
cated: Provided further, That the Commission may enter into
agreements with international agencies for the use of their trans­
portation and other facilities for the transfer of persons as provided
in section 12 of the Displaced Persons A ct of 1948, as amended, and
with United States governmental agencies and may make payment
in advance or by reimbursement for expenses incurred by such
agencies in rendering assistance to the Commission in carrying out
the provisions o f this A c t .]
[T h e limitation fixed in Public Law 137 granting $1,100,000 to
the Displaced Persons Commission for loans pursuant to section 14
o f the Act, is hereby decreased to $600,000, ana the limitation fixed
in Public Law 137 granting $4,375,000 to the Displaced Persons
Commission for the expenses of transporting to the United States
displaced persons of German Ethnic origin, is hereby decreased to
$3,400,000.] C
Supplemental Appropriation A ct, 1952; Independent
Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

1951 actual

1952 estimate

DISPLACED PERSONS COMMISSION

Total number of permanent positions.
Average number of all employees_____
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary__________
Average grade----------------

01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
16

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_____________________________
Payment above basic rates......... .
Payments to other agencies for
reimbursable details_____________
Total personal services_________
Travel______________________________
Travel for sec. 12 cases_____________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services____________
Rents and utility services..____ _____
Printing and reproduction....................
Other contractual services___________
Services performed b y other agencies.
Supplies and materials_______________
E quipm ent__________________________
Investments and loans (net)_________
Obligations incurred..

450
400

496
393

$4, 537
GS-7.9

$4, 709
G S - 8.0

$1,615,750

$1,261,000

84, 500

5,000
58.000

24, 750

19.000

1, 725,000
132.000
815,841

1,343, 000
253, 000
3,370, 000
26,000
30.000
3.000

20,000
2,000
12,000
8,000

45, O O
C

11.000
6.000

160.000
30.000
16.000
600,000

118,000
25,000

600,000

3,565,841

5,791,000

279
130

121
121

$3,170
GS-4.8

$4,143
GS-6.3

$145,895

$123,382

26,203

610
4,518

6,000

ALLOCATION TO DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees........ .
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary..................
Average grade----------------

01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

Personal services:
Permanent positions_______________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base------------------------------- ------- ----Payment above basic rates. ..............
Total personal services.
Travel_____________________
Transportation of things___
Communication services___
Rents and utility services..^
Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services._
Supplies and materials_____
E qu ipm ents.............. ............

172,098
75, 994
600
1,160
3,900
700

2,000

14,460
1,310

128, 510
56,300
480
1,950
6,600
730
2,280
22,950

272, 222

1,200
221,000

$3,580
GS-5.8

$4,205
GS-4.5

Personal services:
Permanent positions....... ..................
Regular pay in excess of 52-week

$113,187

$113,376

Part-time and temporary positions.
Paym ent above basic rates________

7,641
23,465

10,000

Obligations incurred.

Appropriated 1952; $7,000,000

ALLOCATION TO FEDERAL SECURITY
AOENCY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

A M O U N TS A VA ILAB LE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estim ate................ ..........
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
crease__________________________________

$7,800,000

Total available for obligation______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. .

7,800,000
-2 ,3 2 9, 553

Obligations incurred.............—_____

5,470, 447

1953 estimate

T otal number of permanent positions...
Average number of all employees............
Average salary and grade:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________
Average grade...... ..........

7,182,000
7,182,000

$7.000,000
182,000

01

115

O BLIG ATIO N S BY A C T IV IT IE S

Description
1. Selection and resettlement of displaced
persons, war orphans, and refugees...
Security investigation...................... .......

2.




1953 estimate

$229,000
488.000
247.000
00
206, 0

Obligations incurred_______________

$254,375

Total expenditures............................

a c t iv it ie s —

Description

1953 estimate

$2, 543, 750

D educt unliquidated obligations, end of
year__________________ ________ _______

by

1951 actual

$3, 565,841
272, 222

1952 estimate

$5,791,000

221,000

1953 estimate

Total personal services..
02 Travel_______ ____ ________
03 Transportation of things___
04 Communication services___
05 Rents and utility services..
07 Other contractual services..
08 Supplies and materials.........
09 Equipm ent........... .................

144,293
28,822
8, 687
1,443
5,405
5,381
4,950

123,491
32,062
12, 734
1,895
1,890
51,185
8,400
1,780

1953 estimate

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

120

DISPLACED PERSONS COMMISSION— Continued

o b l ig a t io n s

Salaries, Expenses, and Loans, Displaced Persons C o m m is sio n Continued
o b l ig a t io n s

BY

Object classification

o bjects—

Object classification

c o n t in u e d

1951 actual

Taxes and assessments..

Subtotal_____________________________
Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence________________________ ______ _______
Obligations incurred..

ALLOCATION

to

1953 estimate

Deduct charges for quarters and subsist­
ence. _________________ ________ ______
Obligations incurred________

$208

$63

200,171

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

Personal services:
Permanent positions_____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________________________
Payment above basic rates-------------Total personal services.
Travel______________________
Transportation of things----Communication services___
Rents and utility services. _
Printing and reproduction..
Other contractual services..
Supplies and materials-------Equipment_________________
Obligations incurred..

5,980
194,191

229,000

271
235

474
187

Average salary and grade:
General schedule grades:
Average salary-------------Average grade--------------01

02
05
06
08
09

$5,980

Personal services:
Permanent positions-----------------------Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________________________
Payment above basic rates-------------Total personal services.
Travel_______________________
Rents and utility services._
Printing and reproduction._
Supplies and materials-------Equipm ent--------------------------Obligations incurred..

1953 estimate

$4,500

5,470, 447

__ __

4, 500

7,182,000

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES
1951 actual . 1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$497,043
5, 470,447

$647, 845
7,182,000

$800,000

5, 967, 490

$3, 885
G S-5.8

GS-5.7

$628, 798

7,829, 845

800,000

647, 845

800,000

5,319,645

7,029,845

800,000

6, 208,000
647,845

792,000

174,000

8,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year _ _.
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
yea r.. ________
. . .

65,855

___________ _

_

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations . ________
}
Out of prior authorizations- ___________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increase ______________________

5,319,645

/
1

$374,825
450
28,000

694, 653
46, 506
49, 484
16, 356
9,850
985
17, 735
11,300
42, 566
889, 435

488, 000

154
126

158
145

$3, 617
G S-5.5

$4,023
G S-5.6

$455, 338

ECONOMIC STABILIZATION AGENCY

403, 275
29, 758
23. 045
17, 970
2,170

$383, 594

6, 278
5, 504

ALLOCATION TO IMMIGRATION AND NATU­
RALIZATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF
JUSTICE

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees--------

1952 estimate

233, 500

Total expenditures
Average salary and grade:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_________
Average grade__________
01

1951 actual

DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees_____

continued

s um m ary —co ntinue d

1952 estimate

ALLOCATION t o FEDERAL SECURTY
AGENCY, PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE— COn.

15

o bjects—

by

[ s a l a r ie s

and

expenses

Salaries and Expenses, Economic Stabilization Agency—
[F o r expenses necessary for the Econom ic Stabilization Agency,
including hire of passenger m otor vehicles; not to exceed $5,000 for
emergency and extraordinary expenses, to be expended under the
direction of the Administrator for such purposes as he deems proper,
and his determination thereon shall be final and conclusive; and
expenses of attendance at meetings concerned with the purposes of
this appropriation; $98,053,375.! (Supplemental Appropriation
Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $98,053,375
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION
1951 actual

1,456
455, 338
75, 200
1, 266
892
6, 752
9,310

385,050
65, 365

548, 758

1, 205
919

$2, 256,177

Obligations incurred._______________
Comparative transfer from—
“ Expenses of defense production, Ex­
ecutive Office of the President” ______
“ Salaries and expenses, Office of Hous­
ing Expediter” _______________________

1953 estimate

$98, 053,375

105, 753,375

1,334
876

$2,958, 968
7, 641

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate _ __________ _
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases ______ ________ . . . ________________

453,000

300
2,285

]

Total obligations_______ ____________

7, 700,000

$25, 376,309
12, 754, 508
38,130, 817

105,753,375

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
Total number of permanent positions...
Average number of all other employees.
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15
16

Personal services:
Permanent positions-----------------------Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________________________
Pavment above basic rates-------------Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details________________
Total personal services-------------Travel_________________________________
Travel for sec. 12 cases---------------------Transportation of things---------------------Communication services---------------------Rents and utility services------------------Printing and reproduction-----------------Other contractual services------------------Services performed by other agencies,
Supplies and materials-----------------------Equipment____________________________
Taxes and assessments------------------------Investments and loans (net)---------------

Subtotal..




200,023

7,631
100, 518

24,750

19,000

3,191,382
358, 522
815,841
78, 771
63,959
22,421
14, 577
33,116
160,000
67,462
70,168
208
600,000

2,383, 326
436, 485
3,370,000
62,259
51,8^5
13, 66ff
12,030
65, 743
118, 000
64,139
8,980
63
600,000

5,476,427

7,186, 500

Description
1. Office of the Economic Stabilization
A d m in istrator_ ___________________
_

1951 actual

$148,533

2. Office of Price Stabilization:
Price operations. .
_ ___________
Chief co u n sel..._ ______ _____________
Price accounting _ _________________
Enforcement____ ______ __________
Economic p o lic v _________________ __
Public information___________________
Field operations. ________ __________
M anagem ent.. . .
__________ _ _
Executive___ __________ __ __________
3.
4.
5.
6.

1952 estimate

$528,000
29,119, 200
6.027.600
3, 873, 600
17,882, 200
223, 000
2, 645, 600
109,000
12,136,575
2.802.600

Total, Office of Price Stabilization.
Office of Rent Stabilization__________ .
Wage Stabilization Board______
Salary Stabilization B o a r d ____ ______
Railroad and Airline Wage Board_____

22,660, 452
12, 754, 508
2, 517, 087
50, 237

74,819, 375
14, 047, 000
14, 595,150
1, 700,000
63,850

Total obligations____________________

38,130,817

105,753,375

1953 estimate

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

121
o b l ig a t io n s

Legislation is proposed to extend stabilization authority.
T h e 1953 requirem ents are included in a proposed supple­
m ental appropriation under proposed legislation.

1. Office oj the Economic Stabilization Administrator.—
T his office develops general econ om ic stabilization policies
for the guidance o f the constituent agencies, and reviews
the program s developed to carry such policies into effect.
2. Office oj Price Stabilization.— Price-con trol measures,
consistent with the D efense P rodu ction A c t o f 1950, as
am ended, aim at stabilizing prices at the levels prevailing
in the fall o f 1951. D uring fiscal year 1952, regulations
are being developed and issued to replace the general
price freeze order o f January 26, 1951, and to establish
a system o f price controls tailored to the characteristics
o f particular industries or segments o f industries. Insofar
as practicable, these tailored regulations will prescribe
definite dollars-and-cents ceilings. T h e agency will p roc­
ess applications for price adjustm ents to relieve hard­
ships and to con form w ith the provisions o f the D efense
P rodu ction A ct o f 1950, as am ended. This w orkload is
being decentralized to the field offices to the m axim um
extent possible.
3. Office oj Bent Stabilization.— K en t ceilings are es­
tablished and enforced. Principal emphasis in 1952 is in
critical defense-housing areas. M a jo r w orkload items
are as follow s:

by

o bjects—

Object classification

c o n t in u e d

1951 actual

07 Other contractual services____________
Services performed by other agencies08 Supplies and materials________ .
09 E q u ip m en t________ „
________ _____
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities
15 Taxes and assessments_______________
Unvouchered___
________________________
Total obligations_____ _____ _________

1952 estimate

$320, 949
1, 474, 629
1, 765, 935
7,160,643

1953 estimate

$406, 900
6, 225, 450
1, 448, 600
898, 000
1,100
486, 900
5,000

80, 502
38,130, 817

105, 753, 375

A NA LYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year____
Obligations incurred during the year____

1953 estimate
$13,400,000

$105,753,375
105,753,375

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year_ __ _______________________________
_
Total expenditures__________________

92,353,375

13,400,000

13,400,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations______________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases_______________________

13,400,000

85,103,375
12,950,000
7, 250,000

450,000

M iscellaneous
Salaries and Expenses , Housing
Stabilization Agency —

Expediter Functions} Economic

A N A LYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Units controlled, end of year_________
Tenants’ complaints__________________
Compliance actions___________________
Landlords’ petitions................................
Eviction cases_________________________
Settlements for repayment to tenants.
Payments to U . S. Treasury_________

6,600,000
194,893
139, 543
1,098,890
395, 817
$3, 695, 482
$1, 425, 899

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

10, 250,000
296, 000
210, 000
5, 400, 000
588,000
$5, 000, 000
$2, 200, 000

1951 actual
Transfer of unliquidated obligations from
“ Salaries and expenses, Office of the
Housing Expediter,” pursuant to Public
Law 96, 82d Cong., and Executive Order
10276______________________________________
Expenditures out of prior authorizations

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$279,643
279, 643

4, 5, and 6. Wage Stabilization Board, Salary Stabiliza­
tion Board, and Railroad and Airline Wage Board.— W age

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION

and salary control regulations are established and enforced
as a part o f general econ om ic stabilization. Proposed
w age and salary increases are review ed in the light o f
equity and their probable effect on econ om ic stabilization.
Investigations are conducted to establish facts .needed in
m aking wage and salary decisions and in developing regu­
lations. In addition to its regulatory functions, the W age
Stabilization B oard has lim ited responsibilities in the
settlem ent o f labor disputes. Other agencies perform a
large prop ortion of the public con tact, investigation opera­
tions, and research w hich are financed under this activity.

INTRODUCTORY STATEM ENT

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees................

12, 808
56
4, 769

17,425
167
15, 913

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________________________
Average grade_________________________

$4, 561
G S-7.2

$5,169
GS-7.8

$21, 235, 814
533, 547

$79,807, 232
1, 770, 708

215,000
500, 890
64,003

319, 560
1, 090, 200
222, 900

22, 549, 254
1, 616, 422
392, 225
805, 891
550, 250
1, 414,117

83, 210, 600
6, 559, 600
446,000
2, 084,125
19, 600
3,961, 500

01

02
03
04
05
06

Personal services:
Permanent positions________________
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________________________
Payment above basic rates_________
Foreign service differential_________
Total personal services___________
Travel___________________ ________ ____
Transportation of things______________
Communication services................... ..
Rents and utility services______ _____ _
Printing and reproduction................ ..




1953 estimate

T h e program s o f this A dm inistration are considered to
be o f an em ergency nature and the estim ates o f appropria­
tion for 1953 in the am ount o f $600 m illion are therefore
recom m ended to be im m ediately available.
This A dm inistration is responsible for preparing national
plans and program s for the civil defense o f the U nited
States, and the dissem ination o f civil defense inform ation .
It provides coordin ation and guidance to the States and
their political subdivisions in the d evelopm en t o f local de­
fense plans, and makes financial con tributions toward these
program s. I t also stockpiles at strategically loca ted points
supplies and equipm ent necessary to supplem ent existing
local resources after an attack.
T his estim ate will provid e for substantial com pletion o f
the stockpiling program , approxim ately 50 percent o f the
m atching funds for em ergency supplies and equipm ent
required at target areas, and a start on a m atching program
for p rotective shelters in congested areas.
OPERATIONS

Operations, Federal Civil D efense Administration—
For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in carrying
out the provisions of the Federal C ivilD efen se A ct o f 1950 (Public
Law 920, 81st Congress), including purchase (not to exceed [ o n e ]
eight) and hire of passenger m otor vehicles; services as authorized
by section 15 of the A ct o f August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 5 5 a ); reim­
bursement of the Civil Service Commission for full field investiga­
tions of employees occupying positions of critical im portance from
the standpoint of national security; expenses o f attendance at

122

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION— Con.
o p e r a t io n s —

c o n tin u e d

Operations, Federal Civil D efen se Administration— Continued
meetings concerned with civil defense functions; reimbursement o f
the General Services Adm inistration for security guard services;
[a n d ] not to exceed $9,000 for the purchase of newspapers, periodicals,
and teletype news services; and not to exceed $6,000 for emergency
and extraordinary expenses, to be expended under the direction of
the Adm inistrator for such purposes as he deems proper, and his
determination thereon shall be final and conclusive; [$11,195,0001
to be immediately available, $32,000,000.
C
Supplemental Appropri­
ation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $11,195,000

Estimate 1953, $32,000,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$11,195,000

$32,000,000

Appropriation or estimate_________________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
crease
___________ _ _____________
Available from subsequent year appro­
priation
_
_ _ _______________ __
Available in prior year____ _____ __________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$1,750,000

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

1,767,085
-4 5 ,4 2 7

13,601,000

30,000,000

Obligations incurred......... ................. .
Comparative transfer from—
“ Emergency fund for the President,
national defense” ________ ______________
“ Salaries, expenses, and grants, N a ­
tional Heart Institute, Public Health
Service” _______________________________

1, 721, 658

13,601,000

30,000,000

600,000

800,000

Total obligations..................................

4,152, 658

14,401, 000

training program s. A pproxim ately 4,000 will be trained
in 1952, and 10,000 in 1953.
5. Technical guidance to States and municipalities.—
These services provide guidance for civil defense program s
to be carried ou t b y local forces and, through nine regional
offices, coordinates m obilization o f local resources.
6. Health and special weapons defense.— This w ork aims
at defense against potential biological and chem ical war­
fare m ethods, and provides plans for the care and rehabil­
itation o f civilian casualties in the event o f attack.
7. Public information.— T h e public is being inform ed on
means o f personal survival, and volu n teer participation
in civil defense is being stim ulated.
8. Research.— R esearch is necessary to acquire k n ow l­
edge leading to the con struction o f better and less costly
p rotective structures and to evaluate the effectiveness o f
civil defense measures.

406,000

9. Executive direction.

2,000,000
-2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

17,085

1,831,000

30,000,000

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees................
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______ ________________
Average grade____________________ _____
Crafts, protective, and custodial gra des:
Average salary______ __________________
Average g r a d e _______________________
01

Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$485,530
1,635,995
767, 387
1,422,090

$590,000
1, 580,000
6,000,000
2,160,000

242, 569
665,875
680, 261
442,847
1,388, 388

2,000,839
1,681,562
2,456,925
538, 740
3,411,932

6, 500,000
2,600,000
5,375, 000
2,805,000
2, 390, 000

Total obligations............... ......... ...........

6.
7.
8.
P.

Attack warning.. ........................ .................
Communications---------- ----------- -------------Supply service. .................. .........................
Training_____ ___________ _______ _______
Technical guidance to States and m u­
nicipalities____________________________
Health and special weapons defense___
Public information________ _____ ___ ___
R esearch__________ ____________________
Executive direction_____________________

$23,285
270, 676
42, 802
395, 955

4,152, 658

14, 401, 000

30,000,000

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

Provision is m ade for technical guidance to the States
and operation of educational, supply, com m unication, and
attack warning program s to develop and m aintain an
effective system o f civil defense.
1. Attack warning.— A system is n ow in operation to
provide warning o f im m inent enem y attack to k ey points
in States and cities, based on inform ation furnished b y
the air defense control centers o f the A ir Force.
2. Communications.— Channels o f rapid and sustained
com m unications connecting national headquarters, re­
gional offices, and the States are necessary for the effective
con trol and redistribution o f all forces em ployed in civil
defense. In 1953 w ork will be continued to perfect the
system , prim arily b y use o f existing com m ercial facilities.
3. Supply service.— This is a system o f strategically
located warehouses to be in readiness to support the
critical target areas w ith stockpiles o f m edical and other
supplies and equipm ent. A t least 10 will be in operation
b y the end o f 1952 and 50 are planned for 1953.
4. Training.— A Staff college and three training schools
are in operation. T h e Staff college trains key State and
local officials in civil defense planning and organization.
T h e schools give technical training to selected individuals
who, upon return to their com m unities, establish local




Personal services:
Permanent positions______________ _
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b a s e . ____ __ _____________________
Payment above basic rates_________
Payments to other agencies for re­
imbursable details_ ______________
_

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

555
19
228

1,350
24
1,018

1,700
16
1,557

$5,507
G S -8 .9

$6,856
GS-10.4

$6, 789
GS-10.3

$2, 412
C P C -3.2

$3,051
C P C -5.1

$3,023
C P C -4.9

$1,126,742
137,974

$6,209,000
212,000

$10,200,000
200,000

37,653

28,000
120,000

40.000
120,000

Total obligations________ ___________

17, 711

41,000

90.000

1,320,080
126,969
9,023
38, 979
5,262
442, 798
1,145,831
218,982
99, 707
740,202
4, 825

6,610,000
627,000
58,175
167,500
429, 250
1,045,450
2,607,485
793, 740
273,350
1, 774,350
8,700
6,000

10, 650,000
1,166, 766
405,100
311,400
2,888, 791
3,246, 500
8,807,520
1,265,000
206, 916
1,034,007
12,000
6,000

4,152, 658

14,401,000

30,000,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,721,658

$1,560,817
13,601,000

$2,161,817
30,000,000

1,721, 658

Total personal services________
02 Travel______ __________ _______ ______
03 Transportation of th in g s ___________
04 Communication services_____________
05 Rents and utility services____________
06 Printing and reproduction___ ________
07 Other contractual services___________
Services performed by other agencies.
08 Supplies and materials_____ __________
09 Equipm ent..
____________ _______ _
15 Taxes and assessments________________
Unvouchered____ ___________________ ______

15,161,817

32,161,817

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year. _
Obligations incurred during the year_____
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations.______. _______
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Total expenditures_______ __________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.....................
Out of prior authorizations________ _____
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases___________ ______ _____

17,085
1,560,817

2,161,817

3,161,817

143,756

13,000,000

29,000,000

143,756

11,048, 783
1,560,817

26,838,183
2,146, 217

390,400

15,600

FEDERAL CONTRIBUTIONS

Federal Contributions, Federal Civil D efense Administration—
For financial contributions to the States, not otherwise provided
for, pursuant to subsection (i) of section 201 of the Federal Civil
Defense A ct of 1950, [$7,750,000,1 to be immediately available
and to be equally matched with State funds, $50,000,000. ( Supple­
mental Appropriation Act , 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $7,750,000

Estimate 1953, $50,000,000

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

in the Third Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1951, shall be avail­
able for the purchase of medical supplies and equ ip m en t.] to be

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate_________________
Prior year balance available_________ __
Available from subsequent year appro­
priation____________________________ _____
Available in prior year____________________
Total available for obligation_______
Balance available in subsequent year_____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$7,750,000
25,000,000

$50,000,000

$25,000,000

25,000,000
-25,000,000

123

immediately available, $243,000,000.
Act , 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $56,000,000

(Supplemental Appropriation

Estimate 1953, $243,000,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

6,300,000
-6 ,3 0 0 ,0 0 0

43, 700,000

1951 actual

1953 estimate

_
Appropriation or estimate_ - _____ ______
Available from subsequent year appro­
priation ____
_ _
_________
Available in prior y e a r _______ ______ _____

$56,000,000

$243,000,000

71, 500,000

227,500,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$50,000,000
1,000,000
20, 500,000

$193,000,000
20,000,000
14, 500,000

71, 500,000

227,500,000

43, 700,000

39,050,000

________

1952 estimate

Obligations in cu rred --_ ______ ____
_

Obligations incurred______

39,050,000

15,500,000
-15,500,000

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Description

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$3,000,000
1.500.000
7.050.000
2, 500.000
20,000,000
5,000,000

$4,750,000
5,980,000
16.870.000
11.100.000

39,050,000

43,700, 000

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Attack warning_______________________ .
Communications____________________ ___
Fire-fighting services_________________ .
Rescue services____________ ________ ____
Medical supplies and equipment_______
Training_________________________________
Obligations incurred....................... ..

5,000,000

1951 actual
1 Medical supplies and equipment____
2. Welfare service_________________________
3. Engineering service. __________________
Obligations incurred________________

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

This program provides funds w hich are to be m atched
equally b y the States for the procurem ent o f supplies and
equipm ent necessary for civil defense purposes.
1. Attack warning.— T o give the general public warning
signals at the local level, contributions are m ade to provide
sirens and other p u b lic w arning devices.
2. Communications.— C ontribu tion s m ade are to guar­
antee local system s o f com m unications necessary to
con trol and direct the use o f civil defense forces follow ing a
disaster.
3. Fire-fighting services.— C ontributions are m ade to
provide fire apparatus above norm al civil requirem ents
based on the needs o f the individual areas.
4. Rescue services.— Organized and equipped teams of
rescue personnel are to be em ployed in releasing entrapped
and injured survivors from debris. M a tch in g funds will
be used to procure rescue vehicles and tools.
5. Medical supplies and equipment.— Th e funds p ro­
vided in 1951 are estim ated to be sufficient to enable all
critical areas to p rovid e first-aid supplies and equipm ent
for the first 4 hours follow in g an attack.
6. Training .— Joint financing o f training aids and re­
lated needs con tribu te to the training o f leaders and the
education o f the public.

M aterials and equipm ent n o t norm ally available in a
target area or n ot present in the quantities needed to cope
w ith an enem y attack are to be stock piled for distribution
follow ing an attack. Selection o f sites for the warehouses
has been based on the o b je ctiv e o f furnishing supplies to
a stricken area w ithin 4 hours. M ed ica l supplies suffi­
cient to provid e for 1,800,000 casualties will be stock piled
in 1952, and are requested for 2,700,000 casualties in 1953.
T h e engineering supplies consist prim arily o f portable
w ater pipe, purifiers, and generators; 310 miles o f pipe
will be procured in 1952 and 900 miles in 1953. W elfare
supplies for 1953 consist o f feeding kitchens, m attress
pads, and blankets sufficient to care for abou t 8 m illion
homeless persons in addition to those cared for b y existing
local resources.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Other contractual services.- -----------Supplies and materials
_
_ ______
Equipment
. _ ________________ _
_

$500,000
46.850.000
24.150.000

$1,965,000
147,547,000
77, 988,000

Obligations incurred____ ________

71, 500,000

227,500,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$71,500,000

$65,500,000
227, 500,000

71,500,000

293,000,000

Object classification
07
08
09

AN A LYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

11

1951 actual

1951 actual

Grants, subsidies, and contributions— 1952, $39,050,000; 1953, $43,700,000.
Unliquidated obligations, start of year. __
Obligations incurred during the year--------

A N A LYS IS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
65,500, 000

$39,050,000

$29,050,000
43, 700,000

39.050.000

72, 750,000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________________________________

29.050.000

22, 750,000

Total expenditures__________________

10,000,000

10, 000,000

21.950.000
28.050.000

93,000,000

6,000, 000

200,000,000

6,000,000

140,000,000
60,000,000

50,000,000

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations. _____________

-

___________

PROTECTIVE

EM ERGENCY SUPPLIES AND EQUIPM ENT

Em ergency Supplies and Equipment, Federal Civil D efense Ad­
ministration—
For procurem ent of reserve stocks of emergency civil defense
materials as authorized by subsection (h) of section 201 of the
Federal Civil Defense A ct of 1950, [$56,000,000: Provided, That
unobligated balances of funds appropriated for Federal contributions




Total expenditures

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations_________ _
Out of prior authorizations - _______ -

FACILITIES

Protective Facilities, Federal Civil D efense Administration—
For financial contributions to the States for shelters and other pro­
tective facilities pursuant to subsection (i) of section 201 of the Federal
Civil Defense Act of 1950, to be immediately available and to remain
available until expended, $250,000,000: Provided, That the Admin­
istrator shall not approve any programs or projects for such shelters
and protective facilities which cannot be completed as usable units
within the limits of the amount of this appropriation and the amounts
to be made available by the States to match contributions hereunder.

Estimate 1953, $250,000,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

124

FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ADMINISTRATION— Con.

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

Protective Facilities, Federal Civil D efense Administration— Con.

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
$8,075,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOK OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate________________
Available from subsequent year appro­
priation__________________________________
Available in prior year____________________

1953 estimate
$250,000,000

Appropriation or estim ate-. _____________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
Reimbursements from other accounts

$6,600,000

$6,116,650

72,479

488, 900
231,750

254,000

Total available for obligation___ __
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.__

6, 672,479
-1 8 2

6, 837,300

8,329,000

6,672,297

6,837,300

8,329,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$6, 500,000
- 6 , 500, 000
6, 500,000

Obligations incurred..

Obligations incurred________________

243, 500,000
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Description

Shelters— 1952, $6,500,000; 1953, $243,500,000.

1951 actual

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

Direct Obligations

Funds provided for m odification o f existing structures
and construction of single-purpose structures are appor­
tioned to the States on a statutory form ula and equally
m atched b y them. N eed, location, and design o f the
shelters are subject to review b y the Adm inistration.
Criteria for such review are derived from various studies
undertaken b y governm ental and private agencies. Using
the survey manual prepared b y Federal C ivil Defense
Adm inistration, 16 critical target cities have started
shelter surveys of existing buildings, 17 have organized
for surveys, and the rem ainder are expected to start during
1952. It is estim ated that 31 million people are located
during daytim e working hours in com m ercial or industrial
zones where the need for protective shelters is greatest.
O f these, 2 million can be sheltered in existing buildings
w ithout m odification, and 14 million m ore can be sheltered
if the existing buildings are m odified; the remaining 15
million can only be sheltered if entirely new buildings are
constructed. T h e estimate provides for a start on this
program , w hich is estim ated to eventually cost $1,730
million, of which the Federal G overnm ent will pay half.

1. Common carrier activities______________
2. Applied technical research and fre­
quency allocation _ _ _ _ _
_______
3. Field engineering and monitoring______
4. Safety and special radio services_______
5. Broadcast activities-___________ ________
6. Executive, staff, and service activities.

$818, 544

$775,498

$762, 249

463, 751
2,382,354
616,480
909,068
1,409,621

453,155
2,484, 994
614,049
929,036
1,348,818

532,819
3,627,035
658, 969
1,131,339
1,362, 589

Total direct obligations_____ ______ _

6, 599,818

6, 605, 550

8,075,000

173,945
40,310

195,255
40,980

17,495

17, 765

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

11

Grants, subsidies, and contributions— 1952, $6,500,000; 1953, $243,500,000.
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year
Obligations incurred during the year____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$6, 500,000

$6,000,000
243, 500,000

6, 500,000

249, 500, 000

Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
y e a r.. _ . . . __ __________ _________ _____

6, 000, 000

199, 500,000

Total expenditures_______ ____ ______

500,000

50, 000, 000

500, 000

44, 000, 000
6,-000,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations.. _ _
Out of prior authorizations____ ______

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, Federal Communications Commission—
[S a la r y ] Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses in per­
forming the duties imposed by the Communications A ct of 1934 (47
U. S. C. 151), the Ship A ct of 1910, as amended (46 U. S. C. 48 4487), the International Radiotelegraphic Convention (45 Stat. pt. 2,
p. 2760), Executive Order 3513, dated July 9, 1921, as amended under
date of June 30, 1934, relating to applications for submarine cable
licenses, and the radiotelegraphy provisions of the Convention for
Prom oting Safety of Life at Sea (50 Stat. 1121), including newspapers
(not to exceed $175), land and structures (not to exceed $3,000), special
counsel fees, im provem ent and care o f grounds and repairs to build­
ings (not to exceed $17,500), purchase of not to exceed [ t e n ]
twenty passenger m otor vehicles, of which sixteen shall be for replace­
ment only, and services as authorized by section 15 of the A ct of
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), [$ 6 ,1 16 ,6 50 ] $8,075,000. {Inde­
pendent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $6,116,650




Estimate 1953, $8,075,000

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts
1. Common carrier activities_____________
2. Applied technical research and fre­
quency allocation... __________ _____ _
3. Field engineering and monitoring______
5. Broadcast activities ___
____________
6. Executive, staff, and service activities..

4,389
16,947
19, 296
25,336
6, 511

Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements from other ac­
counts_____________________________

72,479

231, 750

254,000

Obligations incurred________________

6, 672, 297

6,837,300

8,329,000

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T h e Com m ission regulates interstate and international
wire and radio com m unication.
D irect obligations are estim ated to b e $8,075,000, an
increase of $1,469,450 com pared with 1952. T h e increase
is m ainly the result o f (1) defense-related needs for a
strengthened radio-m onitoring and direction-finding p ro ­
gram, including control of electrom agnetic radiations; and
(2) substantially increased workloads anticipated upon
lifting o f the television “ freeze” early in 1952.
1. Common carrier activities.— E xisting and proposed
rates and practices o f com m on carriers, proposed mergers
and acquisitions o f properties, extensions and reductions
in services, and construction o f facilities are passed upon.
2. Applied technical research and jrequency allocation.—
R ad io w ave characteristics, equipm ent capabilities, and
other technical m atters are studied in relation to the allo­
cation and assignment of frequencies for best utilization of
the radio spectrum . T h e increase is needed m ainly to
enable the Interdepartm ental R ad io A d v isory C om m ittee
to bring the frequency assignment list up to date.
3. Field engineering and monitoring .— Field staff inspects
radio stations, conducts operator exam inations, m onitors
the radio spectrum , collects engineering data, and locates
lost ships and aircraft and illegal sources o f radio emission.
T h e increase, related m ainly to the program for the con ­
trol o f electrom agnetic radiation, will allow the installa­
tion o f 4 m onitoring stations, and will p rovid e 24-hour
watches at 11 of the 22 stations w hich do n ot n ow have
rou n d-the-clock watches.
4. Safety and special radio services.— A viation , police,
amateur, and other nonbroadcast uses o f radio are
licensed and regulated. The increase is to take care
o f rapidly grow ing workloads ow ing p artly to the defense
program . Pertinent data are sum marized below :

INDEPENDENT OFFICES

125
a n a l y s is

1951
actual

1950
actual
Stations regulated « b
License applications

_________________
___ _______________

66, 708
93, 387

87, 575
109,381

1952 esti­
mated
96, 877
135,925

of e x p e n d it u r e s—

1953 esti­
mated
107,053
. 144,900

° As of June 30 of each fiscal year.
b Excluding amateurs.

1951 actual

1952 esti­
mated

$6, 535,144

$7,817,000

6,087, 929
466, 458

5, 595,822
465, 089

7, 266, 782
535, 551

474, 233

14, 667

M iscellaneous
and Binding, Federal Communications Commission —
a n a l y s is

1951
actual

1953 estimate

$12, 289

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___
Out of prior authorizations_ ___________
_
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases______________ ________

5.
Broadcast activities.—Broadcasting stations, includ­
ing standard (AM), frequency modulation (FM), and
television (TV), are licensed and regulated. The increase
is proposed to handle a greatly increased workload, pri­
marily in the field of television. Pertinent data are
shown in the following table:
Printing

1952 estimate

6, 554, 387

Deduct— Continued
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims acc o u n t________________________
Tota Jexpenditures_______ ____ __

1950
actual

c o n t in u e d

of

e x p e n d it u r e s

1953 esti­
mated
1951 actual

Stations regulated ° -----------------------------------

3,144

3,153

3,394

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

3,794
$62

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Applications disposed of for new stations
or major change of facilities:
A M ___________________________________
F M __________________________________
T V _______________________ ____________

651
199
38

466
172
26

336
135
81

335
150
504

Total___ _ _________________________

888

664

552

989

62

Expenditures out of prior authorizations

° As of June 30 of each fiscal year.

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE
Salaries and
Service—

Expenses,

Federal

M ediation

and

Conciliation

6.
Executive , staff, and service activities.—These also
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the Service to
include the adjudicatory functions of the Commission.
carry out the functions vested in it by the Labor-M anagem ent Rela­
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1,205

1,410

1,156

1,336

Summary of Personal Services
Total number of permanent positions........
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary______ ______ ____________
Average grade_ __________
_
_ . . _
_
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Average grade.
__ _
_ _ _
Ungraded positions: Average salary____
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions____ ______
_____
Part-time and temporary positions____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base
Payment above basic rates_________
Total personal service obligations. __

1,285
1
1,239

Total direct obligations____ _______

bor-Federal Security Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, ° $2,911,913
$4,759
GS-7.5

$5, 309
GS-7.6

$5,181
G S-7.6

$2, 608
C P C -3.4
$3,263

$2,931
C P C -3.3
$3, 263

$2, 931
C P C -3.4
$3,263

$5,908, 873
361

$6,132, 250

71, 758

23, 584
73,000

26,912
119, 750

5, 980, 992

6, 228, 834

7,144,000

5,908, 513
85, 439
20, 351
151,063
60, 412
34,300
91,784
136, 505
111,328

5,997,084
83, 750
18,000
150.000
53.000
30.000
60.000
130.000
83, 716

6, 890,000
118,000
25.000
159,000
63.000
30.000
75.000
158, 000
554,450
2, 550

6, 605, 550

8.075.000

Estim ate 1953, $3,579,000

$6, 997, 338

« The appropriation was reduced to this amount by sec. 704 of the Labor-Federal
Security Appropriation A ct, 1952.
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

Direct Obligations
01 Personal services____ __ _
...
_ _
______
02 Travel_________________________
03 Transportation of things
_______ __
04 Communication services .
_
.
05 Rents and utility services_____________
06 Printing and reproduction___________
07 Other contractual services_ ______ __
_
08 Supplies and materials . .
09 Equipm ent___ __ ________
__________
10 Lands and structures.
_
__ _
13 Refunds, awards, and indemnities___

tions Act, 1947 (29 U. S. C. 171-180, 182), including expenses of the
Labor-M anagem ent Panel as provided in section 205 of said A c t;
tem porary em ploym ent of arbitrators, conciliators, and mediators on
labor relations at rates not in excess of C$503. $75 per diem ; expenses
of attendance at meetings concerned with labor and industrial
relations; [ a n d ] services as authorized by section 15 of the A ct of
August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a) ; [$3,047,000, of which not more than
$2,566,653 shall be available for personal services] $3,579,000. ( La­

123
6, 599, 818

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 911,913

$3, 579,000

Appropriation or estimate___________ Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
- - _________________________

$2, 949, 700

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. --

2, 949, 700
-1 8 2 , 247

3,126,413

3, 579,000

2, 767, 453

3,126, 413

3, 579, 000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred________________

214, 500

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Description

1951 actual

1. Mediation and conciliation of labor
disputes . _
_ ___________ ______
_
2. Administration__________ _______________

$2, 595, 355
172, 098

$2,937,173
189, 240

$3, 369, 935
209, 065

Obligations incurred ................ ............

2, 767, 453

3,126, 413

: 3, 579, 000

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts
Personal services_______________ _______

72, 479

231, 750

254,000

Obligations incurred___________ _ .

6, 672,297

6, 837, 300

8, 329,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$522, 439
6, 837, 300

$592, 845
8, 329, 000

7,161, 594
7, 359, 739
Deduct:
72, 479
231, 750
Reimbursable obligations...... ......... ............
522,439
592,845
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r~.

8, 921,845

01

A N A LYSIS

OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year--------




$489, 297
6, 672, 297

254, 000
850, 845

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

The Service, through mediation and conciliation, assists
in the prevention or settlement of labor-management
disputes affecting interstate commerce and defense pro­
duction in industries other than rail and air transportation.
Obligations are estimated to be $3,579,000 in 1953, an
increase of $452,000 compared with 1952. The increase
reflects the need for additional staff to meet defense pro­
duction requirements.
1. Mediation and conciliation oj labor disputes.—During
1951 services were made available in about 14,000 labor-

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

126

AM OUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE— Continued
Salaries and Expenses,
Service— Continued

Federal

M ediation

and

1951 actual

Conciliation

management disputes which involved numbers of employ­
ees ranging from a few to over 100,000. The number and
time investment in disputes is expected to be larger in
1952 and 1953 because of wage and price controls and
the rapid expansion of defense production. In addition
to the settlement of specific disputes, free collective bar­
gaining and good relationships between labor and man­
agement are promoted to enable them to settle their
differences directly and amicably.
2. Administration.

Appropriation or estimate_________________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. .
Obligations incurred

-

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$47,500

$47, 500

47,500

47, 500

$50,000
-5 0 ,0 0 0

______

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Investigations of labor disputes which imperil the national health and safety— 1952,
$47,500; 1953, $47,500.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

The President appoints boards when a stoppage or
threatened stoppage of work will imperil the national
health or safety, as provided by section 206 of the LaborManagement Relations Act, 1947.

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Object classification

1951 actual

Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees_________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________________________
Average grade. . _________ ___ . .
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_______________ . .
.
__________________ . .
Average grade.
01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions. _ . . .
.
Part-time and temporary positions..
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base________ ._ ________ _
... .
Payment above basic rates
Total personal services____________
Travel
Transportation of th in g s_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services_________ .
Printing and reproduction.. _________
Other contractual services__ ________
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipment . .
_________
Taxes and assessments________________
Obligations incurred.. _______ __

_.

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

394
1
366

432
2
415

367
340

$6, 539
GS-10.4

$7,160
GS-10.5

$7,159
GS-10.4

$2, 758
C P C -3.0

$2, 752
C P C -3.0

$2,832
C P C -3.0

$2, 263,001
2,550

$2, 627, 766
7,500

$2. 979, 795
21, 570

10,300
500
2, 646,066
350, 790
7.000
80, 500
900
6.000
5, 500
9,307
13,350
5.000
2.000

3,013, 865
404,210
8, 750
87, 500
900
6, 000
6, 910
13,115
17,250
14, 500
6,000

2, 767, 453

3,126, 413

3, 579,000

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

2

2

Personal services: Part-time and tem­
porary positions
_ ________
T r a v e l____________ _______ _______ _
Communication services______________
Printing and reproduction____ _______
Other contractual services____________
Supplies and materials
.
______

$22, 500
20, 000
2,000
500
2,000
500

$22, 500
20, 000
2,000
500
2,000
500

Obligations incurred ______ _________

47, 500

47, 500

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$47,500

$7,500
47,500

Average number of all em ployees................
01
02
04
06
07
08

11, 500
1,000

2, 265, 551
311,075
7,173
77,103
52, 039
6, 895
6,437
9,019
13,321
18,178
662

Object classification

A NALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year____

$1, 710
47,500

40,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ _______
Out of prior authorizations

45,000

40,000

257

10.000

37,500
7,500

1,453

Total expenditures_____ ____________

55.000

7,500

1,710
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year
Adjustment in obligations of prior years

257

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
1951 actual

Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...
Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account_________________________
Total expenditures__________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations _ _______
Out of prior authorizations . _
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases _
.....................

1953 estimate

$148,808
2, 767,453

$219,194
3,126,413

$111,607
3, 579,000

2,916, 261

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate

3,345,607

3, 690, 607

219,194
35,196

111,607

139,607

2,661,674

3, 234,000

3, 551,000

2, 549,392
112, 282

2,806,000
218,300

3, 440,000
106, 200

209,700

4,800

197

Salaries and Expenses, Boards o f Inquiry, Federal M ediation and
Conciliation Service—
Boards of inquiry: T o enable the Service to pay necessary ex­
penses of boards o f inquiry appointed by the President pursuant to
section 206 of the Labor-M anagem ent Relations Act, 1947 (29
U. S. C. 176-180, 182), including services as authorized by section
15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), and rent in the
D istrict of Columbia, [$48,750, of which not more than $23,750
shall be available for personal services] $47,500. (Labor-Federal
Security Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, ® $47,500

Estim ate 1953, $47,500

«The Appropriation Act, 1952.
Securityappropriation was reduced tothis amount by sec. 704 of the Labor-Federal




Salaries and Expenses, Federal Pow er Com m ission—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary for the work of the
Commission, [n o t otherwise provided fo r ,] as authorized by law,
including not to exceed [$240,000J $270,000 for travel; purchase
(not to exceed [ o n e ] two, for replacement only) and hire of pas­
senger m otor vehicles; and n ot to exceed $500 for newspapers;
[$3,805,325, of which not more than $3,371,825 shall be available
for personal services a n d ] $4,540,000, of which not to exceed
$10,000 shall be available for special counsel and services as au­
thorized by section 15 of the A ct of August 2, 1946 (5 U. S. C.
55a), but at rates not exceeding $50 per diem for individuals.
(15 U. S. C. 7 1 7 -7 1 7w; 16 U. S. C . 791a-825s; 831k-m , n - 1 , n -8 ,
y - 1 ; 882a, d, e, f, h, i; 888d, e, g (a), h; 38 U. S. C. 701b~4 , j ; 59
Stat. 12, 25; 60 Stat. 634, 641, 1080; 62 Stat. 1 1 7 4 -5 ; Act of M a y
17, 1950, Public Law 51 6; 48 U. S. C. 61 7-1 (c); 45 Stat. 200 ,
212-213, 1344, 1628, 1 6 8 9 -4 0 ; Independent Offices Appropriation
Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $3,805,325

Estimate 1953, a $4,540,000

° Estimate includes activities previously carried under “ Flood control surveys, Federal
Power Commission.” The amounts obligated in 1951 and 1952 are shown in the schedule
as comparative transfers.
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual
Appropriation or estimate..........................
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases___ _____________________ ______
Reimbursements
from
non-Federal
sources.................................................................

$3,890,300

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$3,805,325

$4,540,000

275,000
9,577

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION-----C o n tin u e d

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$34,067

$87,000

3, 933, 944
-6 0 ,6 9 9

4,167,325

4,574,000

Obligations incurred________________
Comparative transfer from “ Flood con­
trol surveys, Federal Power Commis­
sion” _
_ _ __

3,873, 245

4,167,325

4, 574,000

315, 833

215, 000

Total obligations______ ______ ______ _

4,189, 078

4, 382, 325

and other information about the industry are gathered
and published. Pertinent data are:

$34,000

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

127

Reimbursements from other accounts

4,574, 000

N o t e .— Reimbursements from non-Federal sources consist of payments from States
and municipalities for services rendered b y staff members under provisions of Federal
Power Act (16 U . S. C. 824h) and Natural Gas Act (15 U . S. C. 717p).

Description

1951 actual

Number of certificate applications pend­
ing, end of year.. . ____________________
Amount of rate increases pending, end of
year (in millions)_________ ______ ________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

129

172

200

$29.7

$123

$140

4. Investigations relating to Federal river development
projects.—Studies are made of river basins and river devel­

opment projects proposed by the Departments of the
Army and Interior to determine possibilities for conserva­
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
tion, development, and utilization of potential power
resources and recommendations are made to the con­
1952 estimate
1953 estimate
1951 actual
Description
structing agencies. Review and approval are required
for certain proposed rates for sale of power from such
1. Licensing of non-Federal hydroelectric
projects. Information on the power features of Federal
$706,000
$647,989
$706,000
projects________________ ________________
2. Regulation and surveys, electric power
river development projects is furnished Congress and
1,297,000
1, 224, 711
1,297,325
industry_
_ _
_
___________
Federal and State agencies.
3. Regulation and surveys, natural gas
1, 582, 000
1, 739,000
1, 418, 683
industry____________________________
Only 18.6 million kilowatts out of a potential 106 million
4. Investigations relating to Federal
334, 000
369, 000
476, 349
river development projects____________
kilowatts of hydroelectric energy in the United States
8,000
8,000
7,510
5. International Joint Commission----------455, 000
455, 000
413,836
were developed as of December 31, 1950. In fiscal year
6. Administration___________ ____________
1951, 174 studies were carried on and it is estimated that
4,382, 325
4, 574,000
4,189, 078
Total obligations....... ..............................
action can be taken on 115 of a potential 135 cases in
1952 and on 130 of an additional 160 in 1953.
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE
5. International Joint Commission.—This covers partic­
The Federal Power Commission administers the Fed­ ipation of the Federal Power Commission in the Inter­
eral Power Act and Natural Gas Act and has additional national Joint Commission which adjudicates controver­
duties under other acts relating to Federal power develop­ sies between the United States and Canada, principally
over boundary waters, and conducts investigations as
ment.
1.
Licensing oj non-Federal hydroelectric projects.— directed by the two Governments.
6. Administration.
Licenses are issued for projects affecting public lands and
streams subject to Federal jurisdiction; construction and
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS
operation of projects are inspected; and the cost of con­
struction is determined. Pertinent data are:
Object classification
1951 actual
1952 estimate 1953 estimate
Total number of permanent positions____
Full-time equivalent of all other positions.
Average number of all employees.................

767
1
722

788

738

$4,892
GS-7.9

$5,486
GS-8.1

$5,464
GS-8.0

$3, 670,308
320

$3, 903,005
17, 248

$4,035,752
10,000

6,940

15,747
1,000

16,048
1,200

Total personal services________
Travel_____ __ ____________
. _
_
Transportation of t h i n g s ..___________
Communications services.. __________
Rents and utility services____
_ ...
Printing and reproduction____________
Other contractual services____________
Services performed by other agencies.
Supplies and materials________________
Equipm ent_________ _
Taxes and assessments_____ _____ _____

3,677,568
250,228
3,616
26,153
43,832
76,116
20,273
4,130
57,750
28, 776
636

3,937,000
236,000
2,000
27, 700
21,100
68,500
19,300
3,600
46,025
17,900
3,200

4,063,000
270,000
3.000
28,000
21,100
77,300
22,000
3,600
52.000
30.000
4.000

Total obligations__________________

4,189,078

4,382,325

4, 574,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$305,052
4,167,325

$305,377
4,574,000

4,159,475
4,472,377
3.
Regulation and surveys, natural gas industry.—Regu­ Deduct:
43,644
Reimbursable obligations____ __________
87,000
lation covers the transportation and sale for resale of
305,052
305,377
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ...
natural gas in interstate commerce, and the rates, accounts
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
5,756
Obligated balance carried to certified
and depreciation and depletion practices. Certificates of
341
claims account___________ _________ __
public convenience and necessity are issued to com
panies
3,804,682
4,080,000
Total expenditures........................... ..
subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission. Statistics

4,879,377

Description
Number of licensed projects_______________
Number of applications pending (end of
year)
__________ _________________
Total claimed cost (in m illions).. .............Annual income to Government from
licenses
________________________

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

653

683

693

193
$1,154

193
$1, 293

183
$1,376

$1, 205, 254

$1,620, 743

$1,306,359

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_________________________
Average grade______________________ _
01

2.
Regulation and surveys, electric power industry.—
Regulation covers the transmission and sale for resale of
electric energy in interstate commerce, and the rates, ac­
counts, depreciation practices, certain security issues, dis­ 02
03
position of properties, mergers, and the interconnection 04
and coordination of facilities subject to the Commission's 05
06
jurisdiction. Statistics and other information about the 07
industry are gathered and published. Pertinent data are: 08

09
15

B y calendar year

Personal services:
Permanent positions_________ ______
Part-time and temporary positions.
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base______________ _________ _______
Payment above basic rates_________

812

744

Description
1950 actual

Number of public utilities regulated--------Operating revenues (in millions)__________
N um ber of companies reporting for statis­
tical purposes
___________________




1951 estimate

1952 estimate

269
$4,039

270
$4,250

1,454

1,450

1,450

AN A LYSIS

OF EXPENDITURES

270
$4,450

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

$286, 230
3,873, 245

34,000
345,377

4,500,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

12S

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, Federal P ow er Com m ission— Continued
a n a l y s i s o f e x p e n d it u r e s — c o n t in u e d

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations_____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases_______ ______ _____ __

(Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$3, 515,325
295,052

$4, 204, 623
290,000

269, 623

1951 actual

for the Federal Trade Commission shall be expended upon any
investigation hereafter provided by concurrent resolution of the
Congress until funds are appropriated subsequently to the enact­
ment of such resolution to finance the cost of such investigation,
Appropriated 1952, ° $4,040,400

5,377

$3,531,785
272,897

Flood Control Surveys, Federal Power Com mission—
[F lood -con trol surveys: For expenses necessary for the work of
the Commission as authorized by section 4 of the A ct of June 28,
1938 (33 U. S. C. 701 j), and similar provisions in subsequent Acts,
including contract stenographic reporting services, $200,000.]

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

Appropriated 1952, $200,000

1953 estimate

$4,040,400

$4,367,000

$3,891, 695

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.. .

3,891,695
-1 1 9 , 727

4,314,400

4,367,000

3, 771, 968

4,314, 400

4,367, 000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,298, 713
292, 615
53,062

$1, 771,215
276,325
54, 735

$1,830, 250
275, 650
54,000

1,221,302
236, 600
309, 362
33,875
326, 439

1,272,430
257,305
342, 845
30, 805
308, 740

1, 271, 220
256,925
343,135
30, 795
305,025

3, 771, 968

4,314, 400

4, 367,000

Obligations incurred___ i ________

274,000

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

1951 actual

Description

Estimate of $219,500 for activities previously carried under this title has been
transferred in the estimates to “ Salaries and expenses, Federal Power Commission.”
The amounts obligated in 1951 and 1952 are^shown in the schedule as comparative trans­
fers.

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate______
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases

(88 U. S. C. 701b -4; 59 Stat. 12, 25; 60 Stat. 684, 641; 62 Stat.
1 1 7 4 -5 ; Act of M a y 17, 1950, Public Law 516; Independent Offices
Appropriation Act, 1952.)
N

Estimate 1953, $4,367,000

° Includes $100,000 appropriated in the Second Supplemental Appropriation Act, 1952

o t e .—

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate_________ _______
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
Reimbursements from other accounts___

$314,700

Total available for o b lig a t io n ..___
Unobligated balance, estimated savings.

320, 925
- 5 , 092

215,000

Obligations i n c u r r e d ___________
Comparative transfer to “ Salaries and ex­
penses, Federal Power Commission” . __

315, 833

215,000

-3 1 5 , 833

1953 estimate

-215,000

1. Antimonopoly:
Legal case work. ______ __ . __ . _.
Economic and financial reports_____
Export trade _
. . ______________
2. Antideceptive practices:
Legal case work__. _. __ . . . ____
Trade practice conferences___________
W ool and Fur Act administration___
Lanham Act and trade-marks_______
3. Administration___________________ ______

$200,000
15,000

Obligations incurred.. _________ ._

6,225

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

T otal obligations________ _____ _____ _

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_______________
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ...
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims accou n t____________ __________
Total expenditures__________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations__________
Out of prior authorizations_______ ______
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases __________ ______ ____

1953 estimate

$19,958
189
315, 833

$19,360

$22,360

335,980

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years. _
Obligations incurred during the year..........

1952 estimate

234, 360

6, 225
19, 360

22,360

215,000
22, 360

18
310,377

212,000

22,360

290, 530
19, 847

180,000
19, 360

20,000

12, 640

2,360

M iscellaneous
Printing and Binding, Federal Power Commission —
A NA LYSIS

OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.. .
Total expenditures_______ __________
Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$4, 635
239
4, 874
4,874

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
Salaries and Expenses, Federal Trade Com mission—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Federal
Trade Commission, including contract stenographic reporting serv­
ices, and not to exceed $700 for newspapers, [$3,940,400]
$4,867,000: Provided, That no part of the funds appropriated herein




The Commission seeks to maintain effective competitive
conditions and to prevent the development of monopo­
listic and unfair trade practices, thus promoting high
levels of production.
1. Antimonopoly.—Monopolistic restrictions of out­
put, boycotts, corporate m
ergers and acquisitions and
other monopolistic practices and conspiracies which re­
strain trade or tend toward monopoly are prevented;
economic data are gathered about business organization
and conduct, particularly concerning monopoly and re­
lated problems; and supervision is provided over the
registration and operation of associations of American
exporters engaged solely in export trade. The amend­
ment to section 7 of the Clayton Act has resulted in a
considerable increase in the number of investigations.
During 1951 there w 309 investigations of monopolistic
ere
practice completed. It is estimated that there will be 335
in 1952 and in 1953. Investigations of compliance with
Commission orders w
ere completed in 314 cases during
1951, with about the same level anticipated for 1952 and
1953.
2. Antideceptive practices.—False and misleading ad­
vertising and other unfair or deceptive practices are pre­
vented by corrective action of the Commission; manufac­
turers, distributors, and consum are protected from the
ers
evils of misbranding and nondisclosure of fiber content
with respect to manufactured wool products; consum
ers
and merchants are protected from deceptive and unfair
competition resulting from misbranding, false or decep­
tive advertising, and false invoicing of furs and fur prod­
ucts; and affirmative aid is provided to business for main­
taining effective competition through industry trade
practice conferences. During 1951, 2,324 applications for
complaint w reviewed, of which 869 received full-scale in­
ere
vestigation. Follow-up on compliance with cease-and-desist orders was completed in 370 cases. Operations during
1952 and 1953 are expected to continue at the 1951 level.
3. Administration.

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

720
691

720
691

$5, 253
G S -8.6

$5, 756
G S -8.6

$2, 602
C P C -3.7

$2, 726
C P C -3.6
$4,050

01

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13

Personal services:
Permanent positions________________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base_______________ _______________
Payment above basic rates_________

$2, 965
C P C -3.6
$4, 257

13,372,460

$3, 961,800

$3, 999,000

15, 000

15,400

Total personal services____________
Travel_________________________________
Transportation of things____________
Communication services______________
Rents and utility services_____________
Printing and reproduction......................
Other contractual services____________
Services performed by other agen­
cies________________________________
Supplies and materials________________
Equipment____________________________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Obligations i n c u r r e d ._____________

A N A LYSIS

16, 728
3, 389,188
157,380
779
20, 971
10, 005
56,491
12, 477

3, 976, 800
174, 700
1,500
23.000
10.000
35.000
12, 500

4,014,400
189,700
1,500
23.000
10.000
35.000
12, 500

30, 233
50, 305
43, 924
215

24, 500
40, 400
16.000
4, 314, 400

1951 actual

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings._

31,127,344
-1 ,2 7 8 ,9 4 2

31,474,000

30,100,000

29,848,402

31,474,000

30,100,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred____ __________

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Description

Total direct obligations_____________

29,805, 558

31, 474,000

30,100,000

11,000

31,474, 000

30,100, 000

4, 618,000

251,000

3, 493,142
248, 072

250,000

3, 800, 400
291, 709
263,000

Printing and Binding, Federal Trade Commission-

Office of the Comptroller General____
Office of the general counsel___________
Office of investigations________________
Transportation division_______________

1,385
8,187
2, 623
30, 649

Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements
from
other
accounts___________________________

OF EXPENDITURES

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2, 263
1, 718
3, 981
3,981

42,844

Obligations incurred________________

29,848,402

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

FILIPINO REHABILITATION COMMISSION
Expenses, Filipino Rehabilitation Com m ission—
[T h e appropriation granted under the head “ Filipino Rehabilita­
tion Com mission,” in the Second D eficiency Appropriation Act,
1945, shall not be available after June 30, 1951, and the balance
thereof remaining on that date shall be disposed of by the Secretary
of the Treasury pursuant to the provisions of the Surplus Fund—
Certified Claims A ct of 1949 (31 U. S. C. 7 1 2 b ); and the Secretary of
the Treasury is authorized and directed to pay to the Republic of the
Philippines the sum of $15,000 heretofore deposited in the Treasury
by the Republic of the Philippines as a contribution toward its share
of the expenses of the Filipino Rehabilitation C om m ission.]
(.Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

Obligations incurred_____________ __

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.

1.
2.
3.
8.

M iscellaneous

$50,000
-5 0 ,0 0 0

1951 actual

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

4, 606,109

291, 709

4, 368,000

Prior year balance available.
Reverted to Treasury, Public Law 1 3 7 __

42,844

4,117,000
240,000

$251, 000
4,367,000

1951 actual

1, 580,000

$551,000
1,119,000
1 ,4C5,000
330, 000
707.000
4, 516,000
430.000
6, 239,000
7, 879, 000
2, 714,000
572, 000
3, 578, 000

$291, 709
4, 314,400

Expenditures out of prior authorizations..

30,100,000

31,084, 500

- 1 , 605, 000

$549,000
1,112, 000
1, 478, 000
331, 000
690,000
4, 700, 000
445, 000
6, 525,000
8, 506,000
2,460, 000
476, 000
4, 202, 000

$260,955
3, 771, 968

Total expenditures__________________

29, 894,000

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases
Reimbursements from other accounts _

$418, 666
979,791
1, 282, 742
328, 664
409,112
4,190, 692
435, 417
5, 656, 611
8, 340,460
1, 679,173
94,581
4, 226, 499
800,077
963, 073

1953 estimate

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustm ent in obligations of prior years..

$30,100,000

Office of the Comptroller General____
Office of the general counsel___________
Office of investigations________________
Office of the chief clerk________________
Accounting systems division__________
Claims division________________________
Division of personnel__________________
Transportation division_______________
Audit division_________________________
Corporation audits division___________
Postal audit division__________________
Reconciliation and clearance division.
Accounting and bookkeeping division.
Postal accounts division______________

1952 estimate

1951 actual

$29,894,000

Direct Obligations

Total expenditures.
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations______________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases___________________________

1953 estimate

$32, 689, 500

4, 367,000

4,032, 923
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________________________________

1952 estimate

Appropriation or e s t i m a t e . . . . ______ .
Transferred to “ Contribution to postal
revenue, Post Office Department,” pur­
suant to 64 Stat. 460__________ _____ ____

24, 500
40, 400
16.000

3, 771, 9

Estimate 1953, $30,100,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

OF EXPENDITURES

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____




(31
U. S. C. 41, Sup. V, 841; 60 Stat. 812, 837; 64 Stat. 460, 832; Inde­
pendent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $29,894,000

1951 actual

ANALYSIS

Salaries, General Accounting O ffice—
Salaries: For personal services, [$2 9,89 4,00 0] $30,100,000.

$5,804
G S -8.6

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees_____
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary________________________
Average grade_________________________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary_____ ________ __________
Average grade_______________________ _
Ungraded positions: Average salary___

129

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

The General Accounting Office settles claim by or
s
against the Government; audits the financial transactions
of Government agencies; audits Government corpora­
tions; audits and settles fiscal officers’ accounts; renders
legal decisions relating to Government fiscal matters; con­
ducts investigations relating to the receipt, disbursement,
and application of public funds; develops, prescribes, and
evaluates accounting systems on a Government-wide
basis; and performs other related and necessary functions.
During 1951, refunds and collections in the amount of
$48,057,228 w e made through the audit, investigative,
^ re
and claim activities of the General Accounting Office.
s
1. Office oj the Comptroller General.—The Comptroller
General serves Congress by presenting to it reports on
matters relating to public funds, with recommendations
and advice. The scope and variety of legislative reports
and services to congressional committees continues to
broaden and the number to expand.
2. Office oj the General Counsel.—In addition to prepar­
ing decisions and reports, the general counsel and his staff
participate in conferences with legislative and administra­
tive officials of the Government on the legality or pro­
priety of proposed obligations and expenditures, the

130

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE—Continued
Salaries, General Accounting O ffice— Continued

sufficiency o f proposed legislation, the desirability o f new
legislation for particular purposes, and like m atters.
W ork load am ounted to 18,096 cases during 1951; the
b ack log on June 30, 1951, was 2,288.
3. Office oj Investigations.— This a ctivity com prises (a)
inspections at irregular intervals o f m ost o f the larger
Federal installations and activities throughout the co u n tr y ;
(6) investigations o f fraudulent transactions, suspected
fraud, or other serious irregularity; and (c) surveys o f
particular subjects o f Federal expenditure on a broad and
som etim es N ation-w ide basis. T h e w ork is carried on in
the field and at the spot where it can be best applied in the
interest o f the G overnm ent. F ive hundred and eighty-six
Federal offices and activities were visited in 422 cities
during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1951.
4. Office ojthe Chiej Clerk.— This office is responsible for
p rop erty m anagem ent and housekeeping w ork which en­
com pass duplicating, procurem ent, distribution o f mail,
and messenger and labor services.
5. Accounting Systems Division.— D uring 1952 and 1953
the m ajor w ork efforts of the A ccou n tin g System s D ivision
will continue to be directed to the cooperative w ork with
agencies in the developm ent of their systems, with special
emphasis and attention being given to those agencies
prim arily concerned with the current defense effort and
essential civilian services.
6. Claims Division.— A ll justiciable claims b y or against
the U nited States are settled, unless exclusive jurisdiction
is specifically conferred upon another agency b y law.
D uring 1951, the num ber of claims settled was 295,534.
7. Division of Personnel.— D uring 1951, the w ork per­
form ance standards program was accelerated and stand­
ards were in use for 489 positions, coverin g approxim ately
50 percent of the em ployees o f the office. Th e standard
indicates the essential w ork operations assigned to each
position, prescribes the approved m anner o f perform ance,
sets ou t the w ork aims to be accom plished, and provides
the means for evaluating em ployee perform ance.
8. Transportation Division.— This a ctivity audits freight
and passenger transportation paym ents for the account
o f the U nited States and the settlem ent of claims in v olv­
ing transportation charges.
O ver $420,000,000 has been
collected during the past 11 years.
9. Audit Division.— The traditional audit con du cted b y
the General A ccou n tin g Office is directed prim arily to the
accou n tability of the officers of the G overnm ent w ho have
been entrusted with public funds, and o f duly authorized
certifying officers for any illegal, im proper, or incorrect
paym ents.
W here found to be more feasible and practicable, m any
audits are perform ed im m ediately within the departm ents
and agencies or at p roject sites. A t present, site audits
are perform ed at 944 locations, including W ashington.
10. Corporation Audits Division.— D u rin g 1951, reports
on the audit o f 60 corporations subject to the G overnm ent
C orporation C ontrol A ct and other agencies su bject to
the com m ercial-type audit were rendered to the Congress.
T h e audit was current on June 30, 1951. The com pre­
hensive audit program w hich consists o f an audit o f
receipts, expenditures, and application o f public funds,
together with verification o f the assets, liabilities, p ro ­
prietary accounts, and operating results o f G overnm ent
agencies in accordance with generally accepted auditing
principles and procedures applicable to com m ercial
enterprises, is being expanded as rapidly as qualified
personnel can be obtained.




11. Postal Audit Division.— This division was created
to perform the com prehensive audit o f the P ost Office
D epartm ent and the Postal Service, w hich fun ction was
placed in the General A ccou n tin g Office b y the Post
Office D epartm en t Financial C on trol A c t o f 1950 (64
Stat. 460).
12. Reconciliation and Clearance Division.— Provision is
m ade for the audit, reconciliation, and adjustm ent o f offi­
cial checking accounts and such other activities as the
initial exam ination, analysis, and segregation o f fiscal
officers' accou n ts; furnishing o f inform ation from fiscal
accounts and docum ents; coordination, assem bly, and
preparation o f fiscal accounts for settlem ent and filing;
and m aintenance o f control over the flow o f fiscal accounts
and supporting docum ents through the Office.
13. Accounting and Bookkeeping Division.— This d ivi­
sion has been abolished, although certain o f its functions
were transferred to other divisions in the Office.
14. Postal Accounts Division.— A s a result o f the P ost
Office D epartm en t Financial C on trol A ct o f 1950, this
a ctiv ity was transferred to the P ost Office D epartm en t.
O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification

BY

O BJE CTS

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

7,612
7,284

7,144
6,844

6,923
6,560

$4,104
GS-6.1

$4, 604
G S-6.4

$4, 664
GS-6.5

$29,838,872
$31,314,000
__ _____
Regular pay in excess of 52-week base 120, 000

$29,930,000
115,000

Summary of Personal Services
Total number of permanent positions........
Average number of all employees _
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary____ _____ _____ _____ _ _
Average grade............................ .................
Personal service obligations:
Permanent positions- ._

Total personal service obligations...

29, 838,872

31,434,000

30,045,000

29, 796,028
1,265
8, 265

31,434,000

30,045,000

40, 000

55, 000

29,805, 558

31, 474, 000

30,100, 000

31,474,000

30,100,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Direct Obligations
01
13
15

Personal services _ _ _
_____________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments.. _________ _ _
Total direct obligations_____________

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts
01

Personal services

.

___

__

Obligations incurred________________

A N A L Y S IS

42,844
29,848,402

O F E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual
$1,875,904
59, 972
29,848,402

$1,626,628

$1,900,628

31,474,000

30,100,000

31, 784,278

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Adjustment in obligations in prior years._
Obligations incurred during the year_____

33,100,628

32,000, 628

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations
_
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r...

42,844
1,626,628

1, 900,628

1,900,628

Total expenditures__________________

30,114,806

31,200,000

30,100,000

28,178,990
1,935,816

28,120,000
1,600,000

28,200,000
1,800,000

1,480,000

100,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations_____ ______
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental for
pay increases - . . _____________________

M iscellaneous Expenses, General Accounting Office—
Miscellaneous expenses: For necessary expenses, [in cluding the
purchase of one passenger m otor vehicle for replacement only,
$1,600,000] $2,125,000. (81 U. S. C. 41, Sup. V, 84 1; act of Aug.
2, 1946, 60 Stat. 812, 887; 64 Stat. 460, 882; Independent Offices
Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $1,600,000

Estimate 1953, $2,125,000

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
AM OUNTS

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$1,600,000

$2,125,000

Appropriation or estimate
_ ..
Transferred to “ Contribution to postal
revenue, Post Office Department,”
pursuant to 64 Stat. 460.......... ................... ..

$1,750,000

Adjusted appropriation or estimate.
Reimbursements from other accounts._ _

1, 600, 000
22,133

1, 600, 000

2,125,000

Total available for obligation. __ . . .
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. __

1, 622,133
-1 3 2 , 749

1, 600,000

2,125,000

1,489,384

1,600,000

131

[T h e Com ptroller General of the United States hereafter is
authorized, subject to the procedures prescribed by section 505 of
the Classification A ct of 1949, but without regard to the numerical
limitations contained therein, to place tw o positions in grade G S-18,
tw o positions in grade G S-17, and seven positions in grade G S-16
in the General Schedule established by the Classification A ct of
1949, and such positions shall be in lieu of any positions in the
General Accounting Office previously allocated under section 505.
The authority granted herein shall not be construed to require or
preclude the reallocation of any positions in the General A ccou n t­
ing Office previously allocated under section 5 0 5 .] (.Independent,
Offices Appropriation A ct , 1952.)

2,125, 000

Obligations incurred _

_______

-1 5 0 , 000

...

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION
O B L IG A T IO N S

Description

BY

A C T IV IT IE S

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Direct Obligations
Miscellaneous expenses.

___ . . . ________

$1, 467, 251

$1,600, O O
C

$2,125,000

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts

pendent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $89,600

Miscellaneous expenses.. _________ _ _ __
Obligations incurred_______

Salaries and Expenses, Indian Claims Commission—
Salaries and expenses: For expenses necessary to carry out the
purposes of the Act of August 13, 1946 (25 U. S. C. 70), creating
an Indian Claims Commission, [$89,600, o f which not more than
$84,600 shall be available for personal services] $104,700. (Inde­

22,133

_ ...

AM OUNTS

1, 489,384

1, 600,000

Estim ate 1953, $104,700

A V A IL A B L E

FO R

O B L IG A T IO N

2,125,000
1951 actual

PR O G R A M

AND

PERFORM ANCE

T h e estim ate em braces all general adm inistrative
expenses, including travel, and all expenses incident
thereto, com m unication services, rental o f electrical
a ccoun tin g m achines, printing, and purchase o f m iscella­
neous supplies and equipm ent.
O B L IG A T IO N S

BY

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$89, 600

$104,700

Appropriation or estimate. . . ________ ._
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases___ . .
______ . . . ________ __
Prior year balance reappropriated
_

$87,700

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings....

95,000
- 7 , 005

93, 500

104, 700

Obligations incurred________________

87, 995

93,500

104, 700

O B L IG A T IO N S

O B JE C TS

3,900
7,300

BY

A C T I V IT I E S

Hearing and adjudication of Indian claims— 1951, $87,995; 1952, $93,500; 1953, $104,700.
Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
PR O G R A M

AND

PERFORM ANCE

Direct Obligations
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13

Travel_________________________ _____
Transportation of things____ _________
Communication services________ _
Rents and utility services__________
Printing and reproduction__________ _
Other contractual services.. ______ __
Supplies and materials______ _______
Equipment______________ __ _________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities____
Total direct obligations_____________

$569,969
46,895
62,898
282, 684
108,880
34,857
222,083
138,867
118

$850,000
60,000
90,000
224.000
150* 000
25, 000
120.000
80, 000
1,000

$1,250,000
75.000
90.000
224.000
150.000
25.000
210.000
100,000
1,000

1,467, 251

1, 600,000

2,125,000

1,600,000

2,125, 000

Obligations Payable Out of Reimbursements
From Other Accounts
02
09

Travel__________________________________
E q u ip m en t___________________________

This independent Com m ission o f three m em bers, w hich
is required to com plete its w ork b y A pril 10, 1957, was
created to hear and adju dicate claims, existing before
A ugust 13, 1946, of A m erican Indian tribes, bands, or
other identifiable groups o f Indians residing w ithin the
territorial lim its o f the U nited States or Alaska. C laim ­
ants were allowed a period o f 5 years from A ugust 13,
1946, within w hich to subm it their claims. There were
852 claims filed b y the end o f that filing period. Paym ents
of awards are dependent u pon subsequent appropriations
b y Congress. As o f June 30, 1951, appropriations totaling
$3,489,843 had been m ade to p a y awards.

21, 795
338

Total obligations payable out of
reimbursements
from
other
accounts__________________ ________

22,133

Obligations incurred..______________

1,489,384

O B L IG A T IO N S

Object classification
A N A L Y S IS

OF

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$331,898
1,489,384

$264,456
1, 600,000

$300,000
2,125,000

1, 821,282

1,864,456

22,133
23, 239
264, 456

300, 000

Total expenditures_________________ *

1, 511, 454

1, 564, 456

1953 estimate

12
11

11
11

12
12

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary. ________________________
Average grade_____________ _______ ____

$5, 052
GS-9.5

$5,783
G S-9.5

$6,321
GS-10.0

$82, 419

$88,083

$98, 704

2,100, 000

1, 223, 546
287, 908

1,340,000
224,456

1,850,000
250, 000

01

Appropriations for the General Accounting Office shall be avail­
able for newspapers and periodicals (not exceeding [$ 5 0 0 ] $600),
and services as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2,
1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a).




1952 estimate

Total number of permanent positions___
Average number of all employees............... .

325,000

950000—52------ 9

1951 actual

2,425,000

Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations _____________
Adjustment in obligations in prior years.
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ...

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations.................. ..

O BJE CTS

E X P E N D IT U R E S

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year..........

BY

02
04
06
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions___ ____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base___________________ ____ ________
Total personal services__________
Travel______________________________
.
Communication services. __ ______
Printing and reproduction____________
Other contractual services_____ _ _ .
Services performed by other agen­
cies___
___ ______ _____ _____ ____
Supplies and materials________________
Equipm ent_________________ ______ _ . .
Taxes and assessments________________
Obligations incurred________________

178

182

82, 419
2,163
605
174
108

88, 261
2,800
750
150
100

98, 886
3,100
750
150
100

45
518
1,940
23

50
600
745
44

50
600
974
90

87,995

93, 500

104, 700

THE BtJD&ET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

132

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION— Continued
Salaries and Expenses, Indian Claims Com mission— Continued
A N A LYSIS

OF EXPENDITURES

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$4,449
87, 995

$5, 211
93,500

$3, 551
104, 700

92,444

98,711

108, 251

5, 211

3, 551

3, 971

87, 233

95,160

104,280

82, 784
4, 449

86,140
5, 211

100, 729
3, 460

3,809

91

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year-------Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year________________ ____________________
Total expenditures_________________
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations................._
Out of prior authorizations ___________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases_ ___________ ________
_

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
General Expenses, Interstate Com merce Com mission—
General expenses: For expenses necessary in performing the func­
tions vested by law in the Commission (49 U. S. C. 1-24, 301-327,
901-923, 1001-1022), except those otherwise specifically provided
for in this Act, and for general administration, including not to
exceed $5,000 for the employm ent of special counsel; contract steno­
graphic reporting services; newspapers (not to exceed $200); and
purchase of [n in e ] Sixteen passenger m otor vehicles for replacement
on ly; [$8 ,7 84 ,9 35 ] $9,975,000: Provided, That Joint Board mem­
bers and cooperating State commissioners may use Government
transportation requests when traveling in connection with their
duties as such. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $8,784,935

posing o f proceedings involvin g the lawfulness o f rates,
fares, and charges.
2. Investigation , litigation, legal advice, and compliance.—
U niform system s o f accounts are form ulated and policed
for all types o f carriers; operating costs o f the various
types o f carriers are analyzed and evaluated in relation
to rate structure; assistance is rendered in the enforce­
m ent o f statutes and regulations affecting transportation
and carriers; briefs and arguments are prepared in cases
in volvin g suits to set aside orders o f the C om m ission;
examinations are m ade to ascertain that m otor carriers
and freight forwarders are adequately insured; and reg­
ulations are prepared to prom ote h ighw ay safety.
3. Collection and analysis of accounting and statistical
data.— Statistical com pilations and research are under­
taken for use in regulating carriers.
4. Supervision oj rate publications.— Carrier tariffs are
examined for com pliance with the law and regulations and
to insure clarity and uniform ity.
5. Railroad car service.— A field staff works directly with
carriers and shippers in handling problem s related to car
service in the transportation o f p rop erty b y railroad.
6. Valuation of railroads and pipelines .— This w ork
consists of keeping inventory and cost records current and
developing elements o f vaiue to be used in setting up
depreciation reserves, determ ining costs o f service, and
approving financial reorganizations.
7. Administration.

Estimate 1953, $9,975,000

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

Object classification
1951 actual

1952 estimate
$8, 784,935

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1953 estimate
$9,975,000

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees_________
$9, 718,600

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

9, 750,165
-9 0 ,1 0 4

9, 503, 935

9,660, 061

9,503,935

1, 762
1,683

1,830
1,750

$4, 674
GS-7.3

$5,195
GS-7.4

$5, 223
GS-7.4

$8, 578, 551

$8, 647, 925

$9,104,168

6,129

32,627
3, 263

34,381
6,293

8, 584, 680
327, 679
5,442
51, 281
137, 518
210, 560
119,170
141, 443
80, 078
30
2,180

8, 683, 815
300,416
9, 624
41, 505
40, 592
175, 000
111,315
101, 210
35, 458

9,144,842
307, 654
9,624
41, 505
40, 592
175, 000
111,315
101,210
38, 258

5, 666

5, 000

9, 660, 061

9, 503, 935

9,975,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$815,032

$638,095

9, 975,000

Obligations incurred.......... ........... .......

1,959
1, 834

Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary___ _____________________
_________________________
Average grade

Appropriation or e s tim a te ...____ ________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases____________________________ _______
Reimbursements from other accounts........

9, 975,000

719,000
31,565

01

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

1951 actual

Description
1. Applications, complaints, and other
proceedings___________________________
2. Investigation, litigation, legal advice,
and compliance........... __ __________
3. Collection and analysis of accounting
and statistical data____________ ______ _
4. Supervision of rate publications________
5. Railroad car service____ __
_______
6. Valuation of railroads and pipelines___
7. Administration_________________________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$2,698,309

$2,790,851

$2,957, 557

3,421,150

3,173, 982

3,327,538

862, 549
852, 082
356, 599
470,899
998, 473

846,723
845, 065
372,934
484,966
989,414

893,400
888, 033
382,163
493, 484
1,032,825

9, 660,061

9, 503,935

02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
13
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions___ _____________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
_________ _____ _________
base. .
Payment above basic rates........... ..
Total personal services_______ ____
Travel____________ __ _______________
Transportation of things____ _____ __
Communication services______________
Rents and utility services________ ____
Printing and reproduction___ ________
Other contractual services____________
Supplies and materials________________
E q u ip m en t___________________________
Refunds, awards, and indemnities___
Taxes and assessments . _________ ._

9, 975, 000

Obligations incurred_______________

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Obligations incurred________________

1951 actual
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

Unliquidated obligations, start of year___

$450,662

Adjustment in obligations of prior years..
32,439
T h e C om m ission regulates com m on carriers engaged
Obligations incurred during the year_____
9,660,061
9, 503, 935
9, 975,000
in interstate and foreign com m erce, including railroads,
10,143,162
10,318,967
10,613,095
m otor carriers, w ater carriers, pipelines, and contract
Deduct:
Reimbursable obligations_______________
31,565
carriers b y m otor vehicle and water*
Unliquidated obligations, end of y e a r ...
815,032
638,095
704,481
Obligated balance carried to certified
Obligations are estim ated to b e $9,975,000 for 1953, an
claims account________ _______ ________
1,156
increase of $471,065 com pared with 1952. T h e principal
Total expenditures_______ ________ .
9, 295,409
9, 680,872
9,908,614
increases are requested to perm it faster disposition of
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
(a) applications of m otor carriers for operating authority
Out of current authorizations___________
8,837, 200
8,169,990
9,276,750
and (b) proceedings in volvin g the lawfulness of rates, fares,
Out of prior authorizations_____________
458,209
806,882
616,864
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
and charges; and to examine a greater num ber of tariff
for pay increases______ ______ ________
704,000
15,000
publications filed with the Com m ission.
1.
Applications , complaints, and other proceedings.— Railroad Safety, Interstate Com merce Com m ission—
This w ork consists o f regulating rates, granting operating
Railroad safety: For expenses necessary in performing functions
authorities, approving financial reorganizations, and dis­
authorized by law (45 U. S. C. 1-15, 17-21, 35-46, 61-64; 49 U. S. C.




INDEPENDENT OFFICES
26) to insure a maximum of safety in the operation of railroads, in­
cluding authority to investigate, test experimentally, and report on
the use and need of any appliances or systems intended to promote
the safety of railway operation, including those pertaining to blocksignal and train-control systems, as authorized by the joint resolu­
tion approved June 30, 1906, and the Sundry Civil A ct of M ay 27,
1908 (45 U. S. C. 35-37), and to require carriers by railroad subject
to the A ct to install autom atic train-stop or train-control devices
as prescribed by the Commission (49 D. S. C. 26), including the
em ploym ent of inspectors and engineers, [$983,000, of which not
more than $743,700 shall be available for personal services]
$ 1,042,000. (Independent Offices Appropriation Act , 1952.)
Appropriated 1952, $983,000

Estimate 1953, $1,042,000

133
a n a l y s is

of e x p e n d it u r e s —

c o n t in u e d

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$71,042

$73,636

917,390

1,056,168

1,039,406

883,325
34,065

914,190
82,378

969,060
68,946

59,600

1,400

1951 actual
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year. _.
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account
. _ _____ _______
Total expenditures................... ..............
Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations..___ _______
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases____ _____ _____________

$83,210
25

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$983,000

$1,042,000

Appropriation or estimate_____________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases . . . ______ ________________________

$983,000

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings...

983,000
- 1 6 , 579

1,044,000

1,042,000

966,421

1,044,000

1,042, 000

Obligations incurred________________

61,000

Locom otive Inspection, Interstate Com m erce Commission —
Locom otive inspection: For expenses necessary in the enforcement
of the A ct of February 17, 1911, entitled “ An A ct to prom ote the
safety of employees and travelers upon railroads b y compelling com ­
mon carriers engaged in interstate com m erce to equip their locom o­
tives with safe and suitable boilers and appurtenances thereto” , as
amended (45 U. S. C. 22-34), [$706,600, of which not more than
$540,000 shall be available for personal services] $761,000.
(Independent Offices Appropriation Act, 1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $706,600

Estim ate 1953, $761,000

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

1951 actual

General office_ _________________________
_
Legal se c tio n ._________ _____ _____ ______
Inspection of safety appliances________
Inspection of hours of service___________
Inspection of signal systems____________

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$164,292
19,328
492,875
96,642
193, 284

$177,480
20,880
532,440
104, 400
208,800

$177,140
20,840
531,420
104, 200
208,400

966,421

1,044,000

1,042,000

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$706,600

$761,000

$706,600

Total available for obligation________
Unobligated balance, estimated savings___

706,600
-1 0 ,8 1 7

753, 600

761,000

Obligations incurred...............................

Obligations incurred________________

Appropriation or estimate__________ ______
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases___________________________ ______ _

695, 783

753,600

761,000

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$111,300
584,483

$122,496
631,104

$122,919
638,081

695, 783

753,600

761,000

47,000

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Safety appliances and installations are inspected, and
serious railroad accidents are investigated. W ork load
data are set forth below.

Description

1951 actual

1. General o ffic e ___________________________
2. Inspections of locomotives_____ ________
1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

1,200, 565

1,200,000

1,216,000

7,929

8,100

8,100

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

4,454
65

4,400
75

4,600
75

C om pliance w ith the L o co m o tiv e B oiler In spection A ct
is enforced to prom ote the safety o f em ployees and
travelers on railroads. W ork load data are shown below .

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

130
130

126
124

126
123

$5,965
GS-10.2

$6, 596
GS-10.4

$6, 630
GS-10.4

$814,106

$812,114

3,131
1,000

3,123
1,000

818,237
217,161
200
1,200
500
5,400
1,202
100

816,237
217,209
200
1, 200
500
5,400
1,154
100

Obligations incurred________________
Number of inspections..................... ................
Number of hours-of-service reports tabu­
lated _____ ______ ___________________
Number of signal and train-control in­
spections
____________________________
Number of accidents investigated................

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Object classification
Total number of permanent positions . , ,
Average number of all employees_________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary.____ ________ _________
Average grade_________________________
01

02
03
04
07
08
09
15

1951 actual

Personal services:
Permanent positions________________
$766,752
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
b ase .. . . _ _________ ____________
257
Payment above basic rates
_________
Total personal services____ _ . ._
T r a v e l___ ________________ __________
Transportation of things______________
Communication services______________
Other contractual services___________
Supplies and materials________________
Equipm ent____________________________
Taxes and assessments........... ............... .
Obligations incurred..............................

966,421

1,044,000




1952 estimate

1953 estimate

$28,169
6,035
966,421

$83,210

$71,042

1,044,000

1,042,000

1,000,625

1,127,210

1,113,042

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

109, 750
12,844

109,000
13,080

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

111
109

107
106

306
105

$5,051
GS-8.3

$5,627
G S-8.4

$5,738
G S-8.3

$549,081

$593, 967

$600,939

2,284
1, 54.9

2,312
1, 549

115,061
12,373

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Total number of permanent positions
Average number of all employees________
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_________________________
Average grade_________________________
01

1,042,000

A NALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

Unliquidated obligations, start of year-----Adjustment in obligations of prior years. Obligations incurred during the year_____

Number of locomotives inspected.................
Number of locomotives found defective...

Object classification

767,009
192,041
210
990
381
4,260
1,491
39

1951 actual

1951 actual

02
03
04
05
07
08
09
15

Personal services:
Permanent positions________________
Regular pay in excess of 52-week
base.. __
__ __
__ ________ __
Payment above basic rates_________

1951 actual

Total personal services. ________
Travel__________ _____________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services______________
Rents and utility services. __________
Other contractual services____________
Supplies and materials. ____________
Equipm ent____________________________
Taxes and assessments________________

549,081
140, 261
4
2,336
600
264
1,544
1,620
73

597, 800
150, 082
50
1, 750

604, 800
150,482
50
1, 750

460
1,640
1, 668
150

460
1,640
1, 668
150

Obligations incurred________________

695,783

753, 600

761, 000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1953

134

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION— Con.

MOTOR CARRIER CLAIMS COMMISSION

Locom otive Inspection, Interstate Com m erce Com mission— Con.
A NA LYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year.. _
Adjustment in obligations of prior years.
Obligations incurred during the year____

1952 estimate

1953 estimate
$51,139

753,600

”7617666

811,177

812,139

57, 577

51,139

53, 770

667, 468

Total expenditures .

$57, 577

725,055
Deduct:
Unliquidated obligations, end of year___
Obligated balance carried to certified
claims account________________________

$27, 732
1, 540
695, 783

760, 038
657,138
57, 000

an d

e x p e n s e s

]

Salaries and Expenses, M otor Carrier Claims Commission—
[F o r expenses necessary for the M otor Carrier Claims Commis­
sion established by the A ct of July 2, 1948 (Public Law 880),
including services as authorized by section 15 of the A ct of August
2, 1946 (5 U. S. C. 55a), $34,000.]
[F o r an additional amount for “ Salaries and expenses, M otor
Carrier Claims Com mission” , $100,000, of which not more than
$66,500 shall be available for personal services.] (Supplemental

707, 730
49,539

45, 900

s a l a r ie s

758,369

638, 437
29, 031

[

1,100

10

Appropriation Act, 1952; Independent Offices Appropriation Act,
1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $134,000
AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations___________ __
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases______________________

1951 actual

1952 estimate

Appropriation or estimate________________
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases___________________________________

Miscellaneous Expired Accounts, Interstate Commerce Commission-

$134,000

Total available for obligation_____
Unobligated balance, estimated savings..

190,000
-7 1 ,4 3 0

139,350

Obligations incurred_______________

M iscellaneous

$190,000

118,570

139,350

A NALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

1952 estimate

1951 actual

1953 estimate

1953 estimate

5,350

OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Administration— 1951, $118,570; 1952, $139,350.
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Expenditures out of prior authorizations
are distributed as follows:
“ Printing and binding, Interstate C om ­
merce Commission” (455)_____________
“ Salaries and expenses, Office of D e­
fense
Transportation
liquidation,
Interstate Commerce Commission”
(455)____________________________________

$4, 411
PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE

4,294

117

INTERSTATE COMMISSION ON THE POTOMAC
RIVER BASIN
Contribution to Interstate Commission on the Potom ac River
Basin—
Contribution to Interstate Commission on the Potom ac River
Basin: T o enable the Secretary of the Treasury to pay in advance to
the Interstate Commission on the Potom ac River Basin the Federal
contribution toward the expenses of the Commission during the cur­
rent fiscal year in the administration of its business in the con­
servancy district established pursuant to the A ct of July 11, 1940
(54 Stat. 748), $5,000. ( Independent Offices Appropriation Act,
1952.)

Appropriated 1952, $5,000

Estimate 1953, $5,000

AMOUNTS AVAILABLE FOR OBLIGATION

Appropriation or estimate— 1951, $5,000; 1952, $5,000; 1953, $5,000.
OBLIGATIONS BY ACTIVITIES

Contribution to the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin—1951, $5,000;
1952, $5,000; 1953, $5,000.

T h e C om m ission adjudicates claims against the U nited
States brought b y m otor carrier transportation systems
arising out o f their seizure or control b y the G overnm ent
in W orld W ar II. Th e Com m ission, in com pliance w ith
C onference C om m ittee R eport N o. 1222, issued O ctober
19, 1951, is in process of bringing its w ork to com pletion.
OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Object classification

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Total number of permanent positions..
Average number of all employees_____
Average salaries and grades:
General schedule grades:
Average salary_____________ ______ ____
Average grade____________ ____________
Crafts, protective, and custodial grades:
Average salary________________________
Average grade___________ _______ _____
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09

Personal services: Permanent posi­
tions_________________________________
Travel_________________________________
Transportation of things_____________
Communication services_____________
Rents and utility services____________
Printing and reproduction___________
Other contractual services____________
Supplies and materials_______________
Equipment____________________________
Obligations incurred..

$5,463
G S-8.6

$5,895
GS-8.5

$2, 252
C P C -3.0

$2, 632
C P C -3.0

$111,075
3,300
200
2,170
1,165
200
70

$102,190
10,000
200
3,000
200
10,000
13,000
600
160

118,570

139,350

PROGRAM AND PERFORMANCE
A NALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES

T h e Interstate Com m ission on the P otom a c R iv er Basin
was created b y com pa ct am ong the four States in the
basin, the D istrict of C olum bia, and the Federal G ov ern ­
m ent to abate w ater pollution. T h e appropriation re­
quested is for the Federal G overn m en t’s pro rata con tri­
b ution to the general expenses o f the Com m ission.

1951 actual
Unliquidated obligations, start of year___
Obligations incurred during the year_____

1952 estimate
$3, 587
139,350

128, 561
Deduct unliquidated obligations, end of
year______________________________________

$9,991
118, 570

1953 estimate

142, 937

3, 587

OBLIGATIONS BY OBJECTS

Total expenditures..
11

124,974

142,937

116,616
8,358

134,000
3, 587

Grants, subsidies, and contributions— 1951, $5,000; 1952, $5,000; 1953, $5,000.
A NA LYSIS

OF EXPENDITURES

1951 actual

1952 estimate

1953 estimate

Obligations incurred during year_________

$5,000

$5,000

$5,000

Expenditures out of current authoriza­
tions______________________________________

5,000

5,000

5,000

Expenditures are distributed as follows:
Out of current authorizations___________
Out of prior authorizations_____________
Out of anticipated 1952 supplemental
for pay increases________ _______ _______




5,350

MUTUAL SECURITY AGENCY
Obligations incurred under allocations from “ M utual security, Executive
Office of the President” are shown in the schedules of the parent appropriation.
N

o te—

INDEPENDENT OFFICES
NATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR
AERONAUTICS

135

_
Appropriation or estimate_ ________ __
Proposed supplemental due to pay in­
creases . . . ________________ ____________
Reimbursements from other accounts____

$45,750,000

Total available for obligation_______
Unobligated balance, estimated savings. __

45,750,000
-3 4 3 ,4 3 6

50,671, 500

54,334,000

research in research facilities used in the solution o f the
m ost urgent aerodynam ic problem s.
2. Power plants research.— Th e research under this head
centers on the newer form s o f aircraft and missile pow er
plants, such as tu rbo-jet, ram -jet, turbo-propeller, and
rocket engines. Th e increase in funds is to com plete the
staffing o f new ly constructed propulsion research facilities
and to perm it increased utilization o f research facilities.
3. Aircrajt structural research.— In 1953 particular em ­
phasis will be placed on structural problem s resulting from
the increased aerodynam ic and ground handling loads,
thinner wings, the n ovel configurations of m odern high­
speed aircraft, and aerodynam ic heating. T h e increased
funds are required prim arily to perm it an expansion o f
flight research a ctivity at the H igh-Speed Flight R esearch
Station.
4. Operating problems research.— C ontinuing studies
now under w a y on aircraft icing, flight through turbulent
weather, and the causes and prevention o f fires in air­
craft are o f vital im portance to civil aviation as well as
to the operation o f m ilitary aircraft.
5. Headquarters management and coordination.

45, 406, 564

50,671, 500

54,334,000

OBLIGATIONS BY LOCATIONS

Salaries and Expenses, National Advisory Committee for A ero­
nautics—
Salaries and expenses: For necessary expenses of the Committee,
including contracts for the making of special investigations and
reports and for engineering, drafting and com puting services; equip­
m ent; maintenance and operation of aircraft; purchase of [f o u r ]
fou