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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Since 2001, the Administration:
• Launched a High Growth Job Training Initiative to train workers for jobs in the career
fields of the 21st Century;
• Developed and implemented the Community-Based Job Training Grant program
to bring community and technical colleges, employers, and job-seekers together
to prepare for the changing economy;
• Revised outdated and burdensome regulations in order to better protect workers by
strengthening overtime protections and improving the transparency of labor union
finances;
• Removed barriers to participation of faith-based and community organizations in grant
programs;
• Published the first-ever regulations explaining the reemployment rights and protections for our National Guard, Reserve, and active duty servicemembers serving in the
War on Terror and elsewhere around the world; and
• Posted the strongest-ever worker protection enforcement results.
The President’s Budget:
• Gives workers more control over their own career planning, skills training, and
reemployment through innovative, flexible Career Advancement Accounts;
• Continues the commitment to help workers develop the skills necessary to compete
in the 21st Century through the High Growth Job Training and Community-Based Job
Training Grant Initiatives;
• Protects workers’ pensions and promotes the security of workers’ retirement savings;
• Reinforces critical worker protections, including worker safety and health;
• Streamlines and improves the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program to better assist
workers who have lost their jobs due to trade-related reasons; and
• Reduces improper Unemployment Insurance benefit payments and reduces
Unemployment Insurance tax evasion.

181

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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

FOCUSING ON THE NATION’S PRIORITIES
The President’s priorities for the Department of Labor (DOL) include safeguarding workers’
pensions; helping job seekers gain the skills necessary to compete in the 21st Century; reforming
programs to give workers more choice and control over their job training and career development;
protecting workers through strong and effective enforcement of labor laws; improving workers’
access to health benefits; and managing for results. The 2007 Budget reflects these priorities and
continues the Administration’s commitment to workers and their families.

Safeguarding Workers’ Pensions
The President has proposed comprehensive pension reform to ensure that employers honor the
retirement promises they make to their workers, and the 2007 Budget continues that commitment.
The retirement security of the 34 million Americans who are participating in single-employer sponsored defined benefit pension plans depends on employers keeping the pension promises they make.
However, the current system does not ensure that pension plans are adequately funded.
The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) is a Government corporation created to insure
benefits promised under private defined benefit pension plans in the event the sponsor can no longer
maintain the plan. When underfunded plans terminate, PBGC becomes plan trustee and pays insured benefits. When large plans terminate, they place a strain on the pension insurance system
and impose an increasing burden on employers who sponsor healthy pension plans. Over 1.2 million
workers and retirees participated in plans that have failed and now receive their benefits, subject to
guarantee limits, from the insurance program administered by PBGC. At the end of 2005, PBGC’s
liabilities exceeded its assets by nearly $23 billion. Although PBGC will be able to pay benefits for
some years to come, the Agency will be unable to meet its long term obligations under current law.
Current projections show that the Federal budget funds devoted to paying pension benefits will run
out in 2015. At that time, PBGC would liquidate assets held in trust as needed to pay benefits until
these funds, too, are exhausted. Underfunding must be corrected to protect worker benefits and to
ensure taxpayers do not risk paying for broken promises.
The Administration’s proposal will reform the funding rules to ensure pension promises are kept;
improve disclosure to workers, investors, and regulators about pension plan status; and adjust PBGC
insurance premiums to improve the financial condition of the insurance program. These reforms will
restore solvency to PBGC and encourage continued participation in the voluntary pension system
by healthy plans. The Administration is currently working with the Congress on pension legislation
to improve pension plan funding, transparency, and increase PBGC premiums above their current
level.

Preparing Workers for Careers in the Fastest Growing Economic Sectors
Our Nation’s economy is expanding and, as a result, the labor market is changing. The Administration’s goal is for all workers who want a job to find one. The President wants to ensure that
the United States meets the education and skills training challenges brought on by the growth in
industries requiring high-skilled workers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 26 of the 30
fastest growing jobs require some type of post-high school education or training. Many high growth
industries are reporting shortages of qualified, appropriately skilled employees.

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183

To address these challenges the President has
proposed initiatives and reforms intended to
make the Nation’s workforce investment system
more responsive to the needs of workers and employers in the 21st Century. The Administration
and the Congress have worked together to enact
two important initiatives:
High Growth Job Training Initiative.
In
2002, the Administration began this initiative
as a pilot to prepare workers for the jobs being
created in high growth industries. Through
2005, $256 million in grants went to 130
partnerships of training providers, employers,
President Bush discusses job growth and job training.
and the workforce investment system.
In
December 2004, legislation was enacted to permanently authorize the program and finance it
through fees that employers pay when they submit visa applications for high skilled foreign workers
to work in the United States. The 2007 Budget provides $125 million for this program, which will
train an estimated 50,000 U.S. workers and help meet American industries’ need for qualified,
skilled employees.
Community-Based Job Training Grants. The 2007 Budget continues the President’s commitment to
this initiative, which he introduced in the 2005 Budget. Community and technical colleges, working
in conjunction with local industries, are a powerful economic development tool. They are accessible
to many workers and job seekers who need the education and skills training necessary for improving
employment and earnings. In addition, these colleges are well positioned to respond to local employers and help train workers for jobs that are available in their community and region. In October
2005, the Department awarded the first 70 competitive grants, totaling $125 million, through this
Presidential initiative. The 2007 Budget provides $150 million, $26 million (21 percent) more than
2006 funding, to train an estimated 60,000 workers.

Giving Workers More Choice and Control Over Their Job Training, Reemployment,
and Career Development

This Administration is committed to helping America’s workers prepare themselves for the career opportunities of the 21st Century economy. Career Advancement Accounts will give workers more choice and control
over their job training and employment options.
Secretary Elaine Chao

The Administration supports an ownership society, in which citizens have a vital stake in the future
of the United States. In keeping with this emphasis, the Administration proposes to reform Federal
programs to give workers more choices to obtain the training and reemployment services they need.
Existing job training programs must be transformed to meet the needs of workers and businesses in
the 21st Century.
The 2007 Budget introduces an important ownership society initiative, Career Advancement
Accounts (CAAs). CAAs will be self-managed accounts available to workers entering the workforce
or transitioning between jobs, or incumbent workers in need of new skills to remain employed or

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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

FOCUSING ON THE NATION’S PRIORITIES—Continued
move up the career ladder. CAAs will give workers the resources they need to increase their skills
and compete for the jobs of the 21st Century economy. These accounts will:
• Empower individuals by significantly increasing workers’ choices in the job training and education they need to get back to work. Workers will have the resources to take the longer-term
training that leads to higher paying jobs.
• Triple the number of workers trained by extending training opportunities to some 800,000
workers annually. This will be accomplished, in part, by reforming how training is delivered
by consolidating redundant programs.
• Increase flexibility by allowing individuals to use their accounts for training and other services
to help them advance their careers.

Protecting Workers
The President is committed to continuing the Department’s advances in worker protections. The
2007 Budget provides $1.4 billion for the enforcement of labor laws, improving worker safety, and
compliance assistance.
The Department’s Employment Standards Administration (ESA) enforces provisions regarding
minimum wages, overtime, family leave, and child labor. Since 2001, productivity in ESA’s labor
law enforcement programs has improved and, as a result, the amount of back wages collected, the
number of workers receiving back wages, and the amount of union dues protected has increased. For
example, compared to 2001, ESA’s investigators completed 15 percent more cases per investigator
per year. This has resulted in a 25-percent increase in the amount of back wages collected. The number of audits conducted by the Office of Labor Management Standards has increased by 157 percent
since 2001, and the amount of funds recovered by the office has increased tenfold.
The 2007 Budget requests $772 million for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) to strengthen workplace safety and
health through strong enforcement and innovative partnerships and cooperative agreements with
employers. These efforts will be complemented by outreach, education, and compliance assistance.
This balanced approach is producing notable results. Between 2001 and 2004, the workers’ nonfatal
injury and illness rate dropped more than 10 percent and the fatal injury rate declined nearly five
percent. Between 2001 and 2005, annual mine fatalities dropped from 72 to 57.

Protecting Workers Through Education and Outreach
The Southern California offices of the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) developed the Employment Education
and Outreach (EMPLEO) initiative. EMPLEO coordinates Federal and State governmental agencies and
non-profit organizations to promote compliance with labor laws. EMPLEO offers compliance assistance to
employers and workplace protection information to low-wage workers. Over the past 15 months, WHD has
assisted upward of 600 callers and collected $3.4 million on behalf of 2,004 low-wage workers. In one case,
a WHD investigation of Global Business Services, Inc. resulted in the recovery of $1.9 million in back wages
for 775 janitorial and related service workers.

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

185

Boosting Penalties for Non-Compliance
In some cases, employers’ compliance with Federal requirements hinges on the threat of enforcement and monetary sanctions. Some of DOL’s current civil monetary penalties have not been raised
in decades (other than for inflation) and are not high enough to deter repeated or egregious offenses.
To strengthen deterrence, the Administration again calls on the Congress to pass legislation to increase civil monetary penalties for violations of laws administered by MSHA. The Administration
proposes to raise the maximum penalty for egregious violations from $60,000 to $220,000, bringing
its penalties more in line with those assessed by OSHA. The 2007 Budget also proposes legislation
designed to further strengthen enforcement and protect families by increasing the amount of civil
monetary penalties that can be assessed to employers who willfully violate child labor laws.

Improving Workers’ Access to Health Benefits
The President is committed to helping small business owners and their employees gain access to
affordable healthcare. The 2007 Budget reproposes a plan to allow small businesses to join together
through industry and professional associations to purchase affordable health benefits for their workers. These Association Health Plans (AHPs) will give small businesses the same purchasing power
and options that larger firms and unions currently enjoy and would expand health coverage for many
uninsured Americans in working families. The President also proposes to allow a broad range of civic,
faith-based, and community organizations to offer health benefits to their members through similar
AHPs. DOL would oversee and regulate AHPs to ensure that they meet strict solvency and other
requirements.

Helping Ex-Offenders Join the Workforce by Expanding Choices for Services
The Prisoner Re-entry Initiative is a four-year effort led by DOL, in partnership with the Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Housing and Urban Development (HUD), aimed at reducing recidivism
and the societal costs of re-incarceration by helping inmates find work when they return to their
communities. This initiative harnesses the resources and experience of faith-based and community
organizations in assisting ex-offenders. As part of their transition back to society, ex-offenders need
full access to job training, housing, and mentoring services provided by faith-based and community organizations—access that can be accomplished through expanded choice. Unlike traditional
approaches to serving this population, the Prisoner Re-entry Initiative will enable participants to
choose from among a variety of service providers. A local community grantee organization will manage and monitor these opportunities that will allow each participant to decide which service providers
are best suited to meet his or her unique needs. The 2007 Budget requests $20 million in DOL, nearly
$25 million in HUD, and $15 million in DOJ for the Prisoner Re-entry Initiative.

186

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

RESTRAINING SPENDING AND MANAGING FOR RESULTS
The Administration is committed to ensuring that taxpayer dollars are spent wisely. The 2007
Budget proposes a series of reforms, including legislative action and other improvements to protect
taxpayer dollars. In addition, the Department continues its commitment to the President’s Management Agenda (PMA) and to using the Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) to identify ways it
can improve.

Controlling Spending While Getting Results
Through achieving results and doing more with less, the Department continues to make a positive difference in the day-to-day lives of America’s working families. Since 2001, DOL’s discretionary
spending has decreased, but the Department continues to attain positive results and meet performance targets. For example, the Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), responsible
for enforcing the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, has continued to meet its performance
goals by successfully closing an increasing percentage of its criminal cases, as well as 76 percent of its
civil cases, and obtaining monetary results of over $1.6 billion. EBSA’s customer satisfaction score
has also increased. The Federal Employees’ Compensation Act (FECA) program met all four of its
2005 goals. FECA reduced program costs by encouraging employees to return to work sooner and by
keeping medical costs down. This effort saved $21 million in 2005 alone. FECA also met its medical cost savings goal by keeping its average per case medical costs inflation well below the national
average.
Such results are complemented by the fact that DOL was the first agency to achieve an all-green
scorecard on the five Government-wide PMA components. DOL also received the 2005 President’s
Quality Award for Performance in Integrating Strategic Management Systems—which is the highest
award given to Executive Branch agencies for management excellence and for specific management
initiatives as outlined in President Bush’s Management Agenda. This was the first time an agency
achieved recognition in this top award category.

Reducing Workforce Investment System Overhead While Training More Workers
The 2007 Budget proposes reforms for job training that will increase individual choice and train
more workers, while reining in overhead costs. The President’s reforms would consolidate several
similar programs, put strict limits on overhead costs, and provide States with additional flexibility in
deciding how they provide employment services and job training. States should be allowed to redesign
their workforce investment systems so that they work better, with less Federal red tape. In return,
States should eliminate unnecessary overhead so that more resources can be directed to program
participants. Currently, too much funding is spent on competing and overlapping bureaucracies. In
addition, the 2007 Budget reduces funding for Workforce Investment Act pilots and demonstrations
by 40 percent from the 2006 level. The President’s proposal will save taxpayer dollars while training
more workers.

Reducing Improper Unemployment Insurance Benefit Payments
The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides monetary benefits to eligible workers who
become unemployed through no fault of their own. The UI program is a joint Federal-State partnership. One of the challenges of the program is preventing improper payments. Almost $3 billion in
benefits were paid to ineligible workers in 2005. To attack this problem, the Administration proposes

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

187

a package of legislative changes that would reduce UI improper payments by an estimated $5 billion
over 10 years. The legislation would:
• Impose a penalty for UI fraud;
• Enlist private collection agencies in the recovery of overpayments;
• Charge employers when their actions lead to overpayments;
• Collect delinquent UI overpayments through garnishment of Federal income tax refunds;
• Boost States’ incentives to go after benefit overpayments by allowing them to use a portion of
recovered funds on fraud and error reduction; and
• Decrease benefit overpayments by providing more accurate date-of-hire information in State and
national new hire directories so that States can quickly stop unemployment benefit payments
to those people who have gone back to work.

Enhancing Unemployment Insurance Tax Integrity
UI is funded through employer payroll taxes. Unfortunately, some employers successfully evade
their responsibility to pay those taxes and impair the program’s effective service for other employers
and their workers. The Administration is committed to identifying tax violators and requiring them
to pay their fair share into the UI system. The 2007 Budget includes a new UI tax integrity proposal
that would reduce employer tax evasion by more than $400 million over 10 years. The legislative
proposal would:
• Reduce UI tax evasion by allowing States to use a portion of the taxes recovered following fraud
investigations for additional tax investigations and prosecutions; and
• Increase collection of delinquent unemployment taxes through garnishment of employer income
tax refunds.

Streamlining the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program
For more than three decades the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program has provided for
the training and income support that many workers have needed following a trade-related job loss.
An analysis by the PART found that the program was not well-coordinated with other programs that
could help trade-displaced workers return to work quickly. DOL is developing and implementing new
rules and strategies to make TAA more responsive and accessible to workers, including:
• Ensuring that all workers petitioning for TAA receive immediate rapid response assistance, including financial and career counseling;
• Encouraging States to provide TAA participants the reemployment assistance available to all
displaced workers under the Workforce Investment Act and other programs, including skills
assessment, counseling, and job placement services;
• Providing a career assessment for each TAA participant to promote better training and reemployment choices; and
• Providing greater flexibility in training programs by loosening restrictions on distance learning
and permitting workers to attend part-time training.

Strengthening Federal Workers’ Compensation Programs
The FECA and Black Lung Benefits Act programs play a critical role in protecting workers’
economic security, providing monetary and medical benefits, and rehabilitation services to Federal

188

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

RESTRAINING SPENDING AND MANAGING FOR RESULTS—Continued
employees and coal miners whose ability to work has been diminished by an occupational injury or
illness. The 2007 Budget proposes critical reforms to improve the operation and stability of these
programs.
FECA Improvements. FECA, which provides wage-replacement and medical benefits to Federal
employees for occupational illness, injury, or death, has not been substantially updated since 1974.
The Budget reproposes reforms to strengthen program integrity, promote benefit equity, and encourages workers to return to work as early as possible. These proposals would save the Federal Government $592 million over 10 years.
Black Lung Trust Fund Restructuring. The Black Lung Benefits Act provides wage-replacement
and medical benefits to coal miners who are totally disabled due to black lung disease and to eligible
survivors. The program pays benefits from the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, which is financed
through an excise tax on coal. In the early years of the program, the excise tax did not cover the
program’s costs, so DOL had to borrow from the Treasury. Since 1990, the Trust Fund revenues have
been adequate to pay benefit amounts and administrative costs, but have not been enough to cover
the ever-growing interest accrued on these loans or any of the outstanding principal. As a result,
DOL continues to borrow just to pay interest on a debt approaching $9 billion. To restore the program’s financial stability and integrity, the Administration will repropose legislation to restructure
the Trust Funds’ debt and eventually retire it.

Updating Key Economic Data
Each month, DOL’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes the Consumer Price Index (CPI), a
key measure of the Nation’s economic well-being that directly affects the income of some 80 million
Americans. To construct this economic indicator, BLS gathers monthly data on prices in 87 U.S. urban
areas, and surveys more than 45,000 families to identify their spending habits, the importance they
place on the items they purchase, and where they go to buy these items. Changes in the CPI ripple
through the economy, influencing such diverse factors as school lunch prices, collective bargaining
agreements, alimony and child support payments, and income taxes. Because the CPI has a major
effect on the Nation’s economy—including consumers, financial markets, and Government benefit
programs—BLS must ensure that its data is accurate and up-to-date. The 2007 Budget includes $8
million to update the CPI’s housing and geographic area samples, thereby improving accuracy of the
CPI by incorporating recent demographic and geographic trends and changes in the Nation’s housing
stock.

Providing Timely Access to Employee Benefit Information
Workers need timely, accurate information about their employee benefit plans to make informed
decisions about their retirement and plan for the future. Additionally, DOL needs timely data about
the status of pension, health, and welfare benefit plans to evaluate plan sponsors’ financial obligations and to ensure compliance with the law. The 2007 Budget includes $12 million to allow EBSA to
launch a new data system that will electronically process employee benefit compliance information.
This new data system will replace the current reporting system, which is paper-based, error-prone,
and inefficient.

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

189

Automating and Improving Pension Reporting
Each year DOL receives over one million Form-5500 filings, which disclose the financial condition of an
employer’s pension and other benefit plans. Some of these reports are more than one thousand pages in
length. The vast majority of these reports must be manually scanned into a data processing system. This
outdated process takes years to finish and produces countless errors. DOL’s Inspector General and the
Government Accountability Office have criticized this inefficient process. The 2007 Budget will automate
pension reporting—eliminating needless errors, improving report auditing, and saving taxpayer money.

When fully implemented in 2008, the new system will provide more timely, accurate, and comprehensive data on employee benefits, and support the President’s plan to ensure the transparency of
retirement information for workers, investors, and retirees. The system also will help EBSA and
other Federal agencies to effectively target enforcement efforts and strengthen compliance with the
law.

Reforming Foreign Labor Certification Processing
The Permanent Foreign Labor Certification program was designed to help employers hire foreign
workers when no willing U.S. worker is available. However, the PART and other analyses have indicated that this program requires major reform. In 2005, the backlog of employer applications stood
at more than 300,000, and in some instances it took applicants up to six years to receive the certification necessary to work in the United States. DOL is overhauling the program and automating the
certification process. The Department recently created two processing centers to handle new applications and two backlog elimination centers to process and eliminate the application backlog. The
Department predicts that the new centers and processes will reduce average processing time to approximately two months, eliminate the backlog by the end of 2007, better monitor fraud, and improve
responsiveness to employer requests for foreign workers. The 2007 Budget also proposes legislation
to authorize a cost-based user fee to be paid by employers and finance the administrative costs of the
reformed Permanent Foreign Labor Certification program.

Returning Programs to Their Original Missions
The Administration is committed to focusing programs and agencies on achieving their core mission. Two DOL programs that have significantly expanded their activities to include grant-making
activities that are not part of their core missions are the International Labor Affairs Bureau (ILAB)
and the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP). The 2006 Budget proposed significant reductions in funding for these grant-making activities. Between 2005 and 2006, funding for these two
programs was reduced by approximately 22 percent and 40 percent, respectively. The 2007 Budget
furthers the commitment to restore ILAB and ODEP to their original mission of research and advocacy by again reducing grant-making activities. The goal is to return these agencies to their original
roles and ensure they achieve desired results.

Modernizing the Senior Community Service Employment Program
The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) provides part-time employment,
job training, and other assistance to 90,000 seniors each year. The aim of the program is to promote pathways to economic self-sufficiency for senior citizens, and help the business community
tap a steady stream of experienced, dedicated workers. A PART analysis indicated that reforms

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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

RESTRAINING SPENDING AND MANAGING FOR RESULTS—Continued
were necessary to modernize and improve the effectiveness of SCSEP. DOL has completed one of
the PART recommendations, which called for an open competition of national grants. The expiration of SCSEP’s authorization in 2007 presents a new opportunity to modernize the program. The
2007 Budget proposes legislation to streamline the administration of the program by eliminating
multiple, overlapping administrative structures, and strengthen emphasis on training and helping
participants secure jobs in the paid labor force.

Strengthening Performance Measures
An important component of the PMA is ensuring that Government programs produce results and
American taxpayers get the most for their money. One critically important component of this results-oriented management approach is the measurement of program performance. DOL continually
strives to identify, evaluate, and improve the performance measures it uses to ensure that they lead
to better management of programs and a focus on relevant results. One way to evaluate and improve
performance is to have common performance measures for programs with similar goals. DOL, in coordination with other Federal agencies, has developed uniform evaluation metrics, called “common
measures,” for all job training and employment programs. For example, the common measures for
programs serving adult workers focus on whether they find and keep a job and how much they earn
after completing the program.

Update on the President’s Management Agenda
The table below provides an update on DOL’s implementation of the President’s Management
Agenda as of December 31, 2005.

Human Capital

Competitive
Sourcing

Financial
Performance

E-Government

Budget and
Performance
Integration

Status
Progress
The Department continues to be a leader of the PMA. The Department is the first agency to receive an all-green
scorecard. In Human Capital, DOL conducted program reviews in several regional Human Resource offices,
developed and implemented a work-life management plan, analyzed and revised the employee incentive award
program, and developed a formal leadership succession plan. In Competitive Sourcing, DOL has completed
over 15 competitions, saving an estimated $19 million. DOL also continued the implementation of a new core
financial system, completed automation of many data sources, and refined metrics and targets for financial
performance plans. In E-Government, DOL improved information technology (IT) security, updated their IT
strategic plan, and invested resources in training of their IT project managers. In Budget and Performance
Integration, the Agency continued to demonstrate the use of logic models for estimating full and marginal
costs, develop more accurate efficiency measures, and use performance and PART results to justify funding
requests and management actions.

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007

Initiative

191

Status

Progress

Eliminating Improper Payments
Real Property Asset Management
Faith-Based and Community Initiative
During 2005, DOL continued to demonstrate that it is a Government-wide leader on the improper payments
initiative, eliminating $600 million in improper payments in the UI program and reducing errors in the FECA
program by nearly 50 percent for a savings of approximately $3.1 million. To support the Real Property Asset
Management initiative, DOL has developed an accurate and current inventory of its property and has begun
implementing initiatives within its Asset Management Plan that will ensure that DOL’s real property inventory is
maintained at the right size and cost to best support its mission. Regarding the Faith-Based and Community
Initiative, DOL continues aggressive outreach, education, and technical assistance for State and local workforce
authorities that builds on successful pilot projects, evaluations of existing programs, and the use of practices
found to hold promise for successful implementation of program goals.

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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Department of Labor
(In millions of dollars)
Estimate

2005
Actual
Spending
Discretionary Budget Authority:
Training and Employment Services 1 ...........................................................
Unemployment Insurance Administration ....................................................
Employment Service/One-Stop Career Centers 2 ..................................
Community Service Employment for Older Americans ..........................
Bureau of Labor Statistics .................................................................................
Occupational Safety and Health Administration ........................................
Mine Safety and Health Administration ........................................................
Employment Standards Administration ........................................................
Employee Benefits Security Administration ................................................
Veterans’ Employment and Training ..............................................................
Departmental Management 1 ..........................................................................
Bureau of International Labor Affairs ............................................................
Office of Disability Employment Policy .........................................................
All other ....................................................................................................................
Total, Discretionary budget authority .................................................................

2006

2007

5,318
2,673
963
436
529
464
280
401
131
223
228
93
47
139
11,925

3,357
2,549
850
432
537
472
277
411
134
222
1,782
73
28
206
11,330

5,133
2,650
40
388
563
484
288
437
144
225
230
12
20
275
10,889

...............

—

125

—

Total, Discretionary outlays ...................................................................................

11,856

11,841

10,547

32,412
845

35,986
902

37,838
939

1,412
—

1,381
—

1,374
2,282

212
—

234
—

227
3

736
94

1,729
145

1,035
415

68
—
614
35,165

96
—
577
39,606

146
35
637
42,821

47,021

51,447

53,368

Memorandum: Budget authority from enacted supplementals

Mandatory Outlays:
Unemployment Insurance Benefits ................................................................
Trade Adjustment Assistance ...........................................................................
Black Lung Benefits Program 3
Existing Law .......................................................................................................
Legislative Proposal ........................................................................................
Federal Employees’ Compensation Act
Existing Law .......................................................................................................
Legislative Proposal ........................................................................................
Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program
Act..........................................................................................................................
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation 4 ....................................................
H–1B Training and Foreign Labor Certification Administration
Existing Law .......................................................................................................
Legislative Proposal ........................................................................................
All other 4 ................................................................................................................
Total, Mandatory outlays ........................................................................................
Total, Outlays ..............................................................................................................
1
2
3
4

2006 reflects the transfer of Job Corps from Training and Employment Services to Departmental Management.
2006 reflects the transfer of Employment Service State Grants to Training and Employment Services.
2006 reflects the Black Lung debt refinancing, which includes a one-time payment to Treasury. There is no Government-wide budgetary effect
until 2014, when the excise tax rates would be extended.
Net mandatory outlays are negative when offsetting collections exceed outlays.


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102