View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $2.45
Stock Number 4101-00088




THE BUDGET DOCUMENTS
Data and analyses relating to the budget for 1975 are published in
four documents:
The Budget of the United States Government, 1975 contains the
information that most users of the budget would normally need,
including the Budget Message of the President. The Budget presents
an overview of the President's budget proposals which includes
explanations of spending programs and estimated receipts. This document also contains a description of the budget system and various
summary tables on the budget as a whole. (Price $2.45.)
The Budget of the United States Government, 1975—Appendix contains detailed information on the various appropriations and funds
which comprise the budget.
The Appendix contains more detailed information than any of the
other budget documents. It includes for each agency: the proposed
text of appropriation language, budget schedules for each account,
explanations of the work to be performed and the funds needed, proposed general provisions applicable to the appropriations of entire
agencies or groups of agencies, and schedules of permanent positions.
Supplemental proposals for the current year and new legislative proposals are identified separately. Information is also provided on certain
activities, whose outlays are not part of the budget totals. (Price $15.05.)
Special Analyses, Budget of the United States Government, 1975
contains 16 special analyses that are designed to highlight specified
program areas or provide other significant presentations of Federal
budget data.
This document includes analytical information about: Government
finances and operations as a whole and how they affect the economy;
government-wide program and financial information for Federal
education, manpower, health, income security, civil rights, and
crime reduction programs; trends and developments in the areas of
Federal aid to State and local governments, research and development,
and environmental protection. (Price $1.75.)
The United States Budget in Brief, 1975 provides a more concise,
less technical overview of the 1975 Budget than the above volumes.
Summary and historical tables on the Federal budget and debt are
also provided, together with graphic displays. (Price 95ff.)

GENERAL NOTES
1. All years referred to are fiscal years, unless otherwise
noted.
2. Detail in the tables, text, and charts of this volume may
not add to the totals because of rounding.




TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
PART 1. THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
The budget and the economy
Toward a lasting world peace
Meeting the Nation's needs for energy and basic resources
Helping people through State and local governments
Strengthening the role of the individual
Improving management in the Federal Government
Conclusion
PART 2. PERSPECTIVES ON THE BUDGET
Budget authority
Budget funds and the Federal debt
Fiscal activities outside the Federal budget
The budget outlook to 1979
PART 3. BUDGET RECEIPTS
Summary
Economic assumptions
Changes in budget receipts
Receipts by source
PART 4. THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
Summary
Outlay trends since World War II
Energy
National defense
International affairs and finance
Space research and technology
Agriculture and rural development
Natural resources and environment
Commerce and transportation
Community development and housing
Education and manpower
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Interest
General government
General Revenue Sharing

1
5
9
10
13
16
19
21
23
24
26
30
34
43
44
45
46
47
49
50
51
55
59
71
77
79
85
91
100
108
118
124
131
137
138
146

PART 5. THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

149

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Agriculture
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Military
Department of Defense—Civil




151
158
161
164
168
179
184
192
III

IV

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 5. THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT—Continued
Page
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
195
Department of Housing and Urban Development
204
Department of the Interior
208
Department of Justice
217
Department of Labor
_ 219
Department of State
221
Department of Transportation
225
Department of the Treasury
___ 231
Atomic Energy Commission
236
Environmental Protection Agency
237
General Services Administration
238
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
241
Veterans Administration
243
Other independent agencies
245
Allowances
269
Budget totals
270
PART 6. THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS
273
The budget process
274
Coverage of the budget totals
277
Budget authority and related transactions
278
Receipts
280
Other transactions
282
Basis for budget
figures
283
PART 7. SUMMARY TABLES_.
285
Explanatory note relating to the summary tables
286
Table 1. Budget summary
287
Table 2. Budget receipts, outlays, and budget authority
288
Table 3. Budget authority and outlays by agency
289
Table 4. Budget authority available through current action by Congress
290
Table 5. Outlays from budget authority available through current action by Congress
291
Table 6. Relation of budget authority to outlays
292
Table 7. Obligations incurred, net
293
Table 8. Balances of budget authority
294
Table 9. Full-time permanent civilian employment in the executive branch
295
Table 10. Budget financing and outstanding debt
296
Table 11. Budget receipts by source
297
Table 12. Offsetting receipts by type
300
Table 13. Budget authority and outlays by function and agency
303
Table 14. Controllability of budget outlays
318
Table 15. Legislative proposals for major new and expanded programs in the 1975 budget__ 320
Table 16. Budget receipts by source, 1965-75
322
Table 17. Budget outlays by function, 1965-75
324
Table 18. Federal transactions in the national income accounts, 1964-75____ 329
Table 19. Federalfinancesand the gross national product, 1954-75 z
330
Table 20. Budget receipts and outlays, 1789-1975
331
Index333




PART I

THE BUDGET MESSAGE
OF THE
PRESIDENT




THE iUDGEl COLLAR
Fiscal Year 1975 Estimate

Where it ernesJrm*..
Individual

Corporation
Income Taxes

Income Taxes




From Employers

Other Federal
Operations

BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT
To the Congress of the United States:
The Federal budget must be both a consistent statement of our
national objectives and a responsible plan for achieving them. The
budget that I propose for fiscal year 1975 meets these standards. I t
places special emphasis on:
—the proper fiscal balance to keep the economy on the track to
sustained high employment and more stable prices;
—a strong defense force in support of our efforts to build an enduring
structure of peace in the world;
—a comprehensive energy program to deal with current shortages
and to reestablish our ability to be self-sufficient in energy;
—the New Federalism philosophy of strengthening the role of State
and local governments, and of the individual citizen;
—basic reforms of major domestic programs; and
—efficient management of the Federal Government in the years
ahead, through a more intensive focus on the tangible results that
programs achieve.
I n the face of economic uncertainty, my budget recommendations
provide for a fiscal policy that would support high employment while
restraining inflation. I t would maintain the flexibility to take further
action, if needed, to offset the effects of energy shortages. M y budget
recommendations hold the rise of Federal spending to the minimum
increases necessary.
The budget recommends total outlays of $304.4 billion in 1975,
$29.8 billion more than in 1974, and anticipates receipts of $295 billion,
a $25 billion increase over 1974. About 9 0 % of the increase in outlays between 1974 and 1975 represents mandatory spending increases
that are unavoidable under current law.
THE BUDGET AT A GLANCE
[In billions of dollars]
Item

Receipts
Outlays
Deficit(-)




1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

232.2
246.5

270.0
274.7

295.0
304.4

-14.3

-^7

-9.4

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Under conditions of full employment—conventionally defined as a
4% unemployment rate—Federal receipts would be substantially
higher and outlays somewhat lower than these figures. Thus, on a
full employment basis the budget shows a surplus of $4 billion in 1974
increasing to $8 billion in 1975.
The budget proposes increases for defense activities so that we can
increase our defense preparedness and preserve present force levels in
the face of rising costs. These proposals reflect minimum prudent levels
of defense spending consistent with maintaining adequate armed forces
to assure our national security.
The budget includes my program, Project Independence, to reestablish our capability for self-sufficiency in energy. I plan Federal funding
of $10 billion for the accelerated energy research and development
component of this program over the next 5 years. Other measures
already underway or proposed will help reduce low-priority energy
use and minimize economic dislocations due to shortages. Our vigorous diplomatic efforts to restore an acceptable pattern of world
trade in petroleum will complement these measures.
The budget carries forward the New Federalism philosophy. This
philosophy stresses the need to recognize the different roles appropriate to each level of government, and to the private sector—thereby
strengthening individual choice and self-reliance in America. The New
Federalism calls for Federal support in meeting national problems and
holds that State and local authorities are best able to make decisions
on local and statewide needs in accordance with local conditions and
community aspirations. Federal aid in the areas of law enforcement,
manpower, and rural development incorporate the principles of the
New Federalism. I now propose to apply this philosophy in major reforms of Federal assistance for health, education, community development, and transportation.
Our welfare system is inefficient and inequitable. I urge the Congress
to work with my Administration in developing a new system that is
simple, fair, and compassionate.
I am once again proposing a comprehensive plan for national
health insurance that would make adequate insurance against the costs
of health care available to all Americans. This far-reaching reform is
long overdue. I urge early congressional action on it. The budget proposes measures to prepare for this program.
Federal taxes impose a large burden on the Nation. Each Federal
program, therefore, must be managed as efficiently as possible, and
each must be subject to continuous scrutiny as to how well it meets
today's highest priority needs. This budget supports the major
management initiatives I have undertaken to ensure that Federal




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

5

programs produce results that truly satisfy the needs of the American
people—and do so at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer.
The end of American combat involvement in the Vietnam war and
the reduction of cold war tensions in recent years have contributed to a
significant shift in the composition of the Federal budget. Defense
outlays remained virtually constant from 1968 to 1974, despite substantial cost increases and the pay raises which have accompanied the
transition to an all-volunteer armed force. These added costs were
offset by large savings resulting from reductions in men and materiel.
Defense costs have been a decreasing share of our national budget,
falling from 44% of Federal spending in 1969 to an estimated 29% in
1975.
Conversely, Federal nondefense spending has increased from 56%
of Federal spending in 1969 to 71% in this budget. In the process,
the form that Federal spending takes has shifted dramatically away
from support for direct Federal operations and toward benefit payments to individuals and grants to State and local governments.
When I took office as President in 1969, defense outlays were nearly
one-fifth more than combined outlays for aid to individuals under
human resource programs and for aid to State and local governments.
While our defenses are being maintained and strengthened, this budget
proposes spending nearly twice as much money for aid to individuals
and to State and local governments as for defense. This dramatic shift
in Federal spending both reflects and supports the New Federalism.

THE BUDGET AND THE ECONOMY
During the past year, our economy operated at close to full capacity.
In fact, the Nation's capacity for producing basic materials was used
at a higher rate than in any previous year since World War II. New
jobs were created for about 2% million people. Unemployment fell
from a 5.4% average rate in the second half of calendar year 1972 to a
4.7% rate in the second half of 1973. At the same time, adverse
weather and other conditions cut into the world's food supplies,
including ours, while the policies of exporting countries cut supplies of
oil and raised its price sharply.
These developments created a severe inflation during calendar year
1973, particularly in prices of food and energy. Our budget policy has
been a key element in the effort to control that inflation. Strict
limitation of expenditures in 1973 applied fiscal restraint to an economy that was expanding at an unsustainable rate. The budget totals
recommended here continue a policy of fiscal responsibility as part of a
continuing anti-inflation program.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
THE BUDGET TOTALS
[Fiscal years. In billions]
1973
actual

Description

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

Budget receipts

232.2

270.0

295.0

Budget outlays

246.5

274.7

304.4

-14.3

-4.7

-9.4

276.7

310.9

322.1

437.3
323.8

468.4
343.0

486.4
346.5

508.0
359.0

50.1
133.7
48.9

43.9
147.7
67.2

45.9
159.7
83.3

48.2
170.7

Deficit ( - )
Budget authority
1972
actual
Outstanding debt, end of year:

Gross Federal debt
Debt held by the public
Outstanding Federal and federally assisted credit, end
of year:

Direct loans
Guaranteed and insured loans 1
Government-sponsored agency loans 2
1
2

.__

86.8

Excludes loans held by Government accounts and special credit agencies.
See table E-7 in Special Analysis E, Federal Credit Programs, published in a separate volume.

There is now evidence that the economy is slowing down. In part
this is due to the energy shortage, which limits our ability to produce
some products and reduces demand for others. Our energy-use policies
are designed to minimize the adverse impact of the energy shortage on
the economy, but some effect is inescapable.
Some slowdown in the growth of demand is appropriate to help
check inflation. This is especially true in view of supply limitations.
But this slowdown should not be permitted to go too far. Therefore,
I propose a budget which will continue a posture of moderate restraint
rather than greatly intensifying that restraint. Also, my Administration is developing and will be prepared to use a range of measures to
support the economy if that should be necessary—measures tailored
to the special conditions of the energy shortage. Along these lines, the
Congress should enact the proposals I made last year to improve our
regular unemployment insurance system by establishing higher minimum benefit standards and extending coverage to farm workers.
Under conditions of full employment the budget outlays I propose would be less than the receipts from present and proposed
taxes by about $4 billion in 1974 and $8 billion in 1975. A 4% rate
of unemployment is used as a measure of full employment in calculating these surpluses. These surpluses, following a small full-employment




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

deficit in 1973, and rising somewhat from 1974 to 1975, are consistent
with our objective of moderate restraint.
I n large part, the estimated increase in the full-employment surplus
is the result of the high inflation rate experienced in calendar year
1973 and expected to continue for the first half of 1974. I n the short
run, inflation increases receipts more than it increases outlays. Thus,
it increases for a time the surplus that would be achieved at high
employment. This means that the budget has the effect of restraining
inflation. The rising full-employment surpluses estimated here are
largely the product of an inflation that is proceeding too rapidly. To
use the size of these surpluses as an invitation or an excuse for more
spending would only make the inflation rate worse.
THE FULL EMPLOYMENT BUDGET
[Fiscal years. In billions]

Description

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1976
projection

311
303

339
329

Full-employment receipts
Full-employment outlays 1

243
245

278
274

Full-employment surplus or deficit (—)

—2

4

10

1
In these estimates, outlays for unemployment insurance benefits and the Emergency Employment Act program are calculated as they would be at an unemployment rate of only 4%.

A 4% unemployment rate is used in calculating full-employment
receipts and outlays as a conventional standard which approximately removes the effects on the budget estimates of year-to-year
changes in the level of economic activity. To serve this purpose the
unemployment rate used for the calculations must be reasonably stable
from year to year. However, this does not mean that the feasible and
proper target for unemployment is always represented by the same
figure. In fact, as a result of changes in the composition of the labor
force, a 4% overall unemployment rate today would mean much
tighter conditions in labor markets than would have been true ten or
twenty years ago.
The estimates of receipts in this budget include the windfall profits
tax on oil producers which I have proposed. This tax would recapture
the excess profits that these producers would otherwise realize due to
rising oil prices.
I continue to urge action on the tax reform and simplification proposals that were discussed with Congress last year. These proposals
would not appreciably affect the overall tax burden on the economy;
they would simply distribute it more equitably.




8

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

19 75

Our ability to carry out sound fiscal policy and to provide the resources needed to meet emerging problems is limited by decisions made
in the past. The portion of the budget subject to discretionary control
has shrunk in recent years primarily because of the relative decline in
controllable defense spending, the growth in mandatory grants to
State and local governments, and the growth in human resource
programs (which largely take the form of benefit payments, set by
law, to individuals and families). In 1975, over $223 billion in outlays;
or nearly three-quarters of the budget, will be virtually uncontrollable
in the short run due to existing law and prior-year commitments.
This represents a substantial decline in the controllability of the
budget since 1967, when only 59% of outlays were uncontrollable.
Controllability of Outlays — (Percenter)

llllSiiii
" rar

Uncontrollable Payments
lor Individuals

1961 *968
Fiscal Y««»i

1970 f97l W*

I9T3 1974 1975
Estimate

Just as each budget is heavily influenced by commitments embodied
in those that have preceded it, so each, in turn, strongly influences
those that follow. Therefore, the future impact of current decisions
must be taken into account by projecting future available resources
and the known claims against these resources. This is why the 1975
budget presents detailed projections of its 1976 spending implications;
this is also the reason that all five budgets submitted by my Administration have contained 5-year projections of full employment
outlays and receipts.




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

9

The costs of existing programs and of the new programs I have proposed will rise over time in response to growth in the number of eligible
beneficiaries for programs such as social security and other entitlement
programs, and in response to price increases. The rise in outlays for
existing and currently proposed programs, however, will be less rapid
than the rise in tax receipts. Thus, by 1979, receipts are projected to
reach about $428 billion on a full-employment basis, while outlays for
existing and proposed programs will be $391 billion. This leaves
a budget margin—a margin which can be used for tax reduction, new
initiatives, or retirement of public debt—of about $37 billion for
1979. This compares with a margin of $10 billion projected for 1976.
The 1979 margin is a relatively small one—less than 9% of the
projected 1979 receipts—to cover the exigencies of the next 5 years.
But it is indicative of longer-term fiscal health if proper fiscal discipline
is exercised.
TOWARD A LASTING WORLD PEACE
The overriding goal of American foreign policy is to build a lasting
world peace, a peace resting on the solid foundation of mutual respect
among all nations.
We have made great progress toward this objective during the past
few years. During this Administration we have:
—ended American combat involvement in the war in Vietnam;
—ended the draft;
—established more cooperative relations with the Soviet Union;
—developed promising new relationships with the People's Republic
of China;
—concluded an initial strategic arms limitation treaty with the
Soviet Union; and
—provided diplomatic leadership toward a Middle East peace
settlement.
Building sound foundations for a durable peace requires patient and
skillful diplomacy. To be effective, statesmanship must be backed by
credible military strength. The 1975 budget provides for the defense
forces essential to protect our national security and to maintain the
credibility and effectiveness of our diplomatic efforts to preserve
world peace.
Increases in spending for military functions are necessary for both
1974 and 1975. Outlays of $85.8 billion are proposed for 1975, compared to $79.5 billion for 1974. These figures include the outlay
impacts of proposed supplemental appropriations. These increases are
required to improve the readiness of our armed forces, to build up
levels of essential equipment and supplies, and to meet today's higher
costs of maintaining force levels. They would also provide for a vigorous
research and development effort that would enable us to produce new
weapon systems if they are needed to maintain the strategic balance.




10

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Because of the urgency I attach to a strong defense effort, I am
recommending supplemental appropriations for 1974. An increase of
$2.8 billion in budget authority is proposed to improve combat readiness and modernize forces, to augment munitions stock levels in
accordance with lessons learned in the Middle East war, and to meet
higher fuel costs.
The increases proposed for defense should be viewed in the context
of the substantial—but prudent—reduction in our defense forces that
has taken place since I took office. This reduction has resulted primarily from our success in bringing about a general easing of world
tensions, in achieving mutual arms limitations, and in improving
weapons systems and military efficiency. We have 36% fewer men
under arms today than we had in 1968. In constant dollar terms, we
will spend substantially less for defense in 1975 than we did in 1964,
before the Vietnam buildup began.
The dollar costs of defense manpower are much higher with an
all-volunteer armed force than they were under the draft. The Nation
is now paying the full real costs of its defense in dollar terms; we no
longer "tax" the young by commanding their services at less than
their market value. I hope that we will never again need a draft.
Strengthening international economic cooperation is essential to our
quest for peace. Expansion of peaceful trade relationships helps bind
together the peoples of the world. We have already made considerable
progress toward international monetary reform, progress which has
helped bring about dramatic improvement in our balance of payments.
The Trade Reform Act, now before the Congress, would authorize
U.S. participation in a new round of international discussions to
reduce trade barriers. Failure to enact this measure in a responsible
form could result in a wave of trade protectionism that would undermine the economic well-being of all nations. I urge the Congress to
approve it.
This budget provides for the continuation of our foreign assistance
programs to strengthen the economies of developing nations, to provide humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, and to help friendly
nations provide for their own defense.
MEETING THE NATION'S NEEDS FOR ENERGY
AND BASIC RESOURCES
Until recent years, this country was largely self-sufficient in energy
production. The rapidly growing demands of our households and
industries for more and more energy, however, have now outstripped
available low-cost domestic supplies. During the past few years we
have become dangerously dependent on imported petroleum, which
until recently was low in price. Development of relatively high-cost
domestic sources has lagged.




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

Three years ago, in the first energy message delivered to the Congress
by any President, I warned that the long era of abundant low-cost
supplies of energy was drawing to a close. I proposed an expanded program to produce greater supplies of clean energy. Last April, in my
second energy message, I warned that if existing trends continued
unchecked, the Nation would face a serious energy problem; I proposed legislative action to meet this challenge. Since then, I have
repeated my previous warnings and proposed urgent measures
to restore our capability for energy self-sufficiency. The interruption of
oil exports- by Arab countries following the Middle East war last
October has aggravated the energy problem and underscored sharply
the need for this country to regain its ability to be self-sufficient in
energy. I have taken all responsible actions I can within my existing
authority to meet this challenge.
The 1975 budget reflects a comprehensive national energy policy to
deal with current shortages and provides funds to initiate the Federal
portion of Project Independence, an accelerated private and governmental effort to reestablish our capability for self-sufficiency in
energy by 1980. I anticipate that the research and development
component of this program will require about $10 billion in Government funds during its first 5 years; greater amounts may be needed
thereafter. These funds will complement an even larger research and
development investment in the private sector, which I will continue
to encourage.
Higher prices will be necessary to stimulate development of adequate
supplies of fuel through the mechanism of the free market. To assure
that this will not result in excess profits for oil producers, I have
proposed an emergency windfall profits tax on these producers.
Other elements of my comprehensive national energy policy include:
—reorganization of Federal administrative machinery to deal more
effectively with short- and long-term energy needs;
—stringent energy conservation measures and mandatory allocation of petroleum products as long as shortages persist;
—mandatory reporting of oil production, inventories, reserves, and
costs;
—modernization of regulations for railroads in order to permit
energy savings and other economies;
—policies to accelerate development of domestic oil and gas reserves,
including removal of ceilings on wellhead prices for new natural
gas, production from the Elk Hills, Calif., Naval Petroleum
Reserve, and development by private industry of western oil
shale and of off-shore oil and gas deposits;
—measures to permit increased use of our vast coal reserves,
including environmental safeguards for surface mining, conversion of oil-fired electric powerplants to coal, improvement of




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

12

mining techniques, and accelerated efforts to develop technology
for coal gasification, coal liquefaction, advanced combustion
systems, and pollution control;
—development of fast breeder nuclear reactors, which will greatly
increase the amount of energy recoverable from our nuclear fuel
resources;
—more timely approval of sites for energy facilities and accelerated
construction of nuclear powerplants; and
—increased research on advanced energy sources, including fusion
power, and geothermal and solar energy.
Direct Energy Research and Development—Outlays
SBilliom

$ Billion*

1

Nuclear Bmm&m Reactor
1 Otkr Hwkm fm*t
Fossil Fuel and Other

The budget provides for $1.5 billion in outlays for direct energy
research and development programs in 1975, compared to $942 million in 1974. An additional $128 million in outlays is provided in 1975
for complementary basic research and for environmental and health
effects research. I will submit additional details on this accelerated
effort to the Congress shortly.
The Federal Government alone cannot overcome the energy crisis.
Project Independence will require a maximum effort by private
industry as well. The measures proposed in this budget provide the
essential governmental leadership to get this joint public and private
program underway. In addition, every American household and every




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

13

American business must economize on energy usage if we are to share
temporary shortages equitably, as we must, and reestablish our energy
independence in the long run.
The energy crisis has brought to the fore the need for a realistic
balancing of the demands of economic growth and the demands of
environmental protection. Shortages of "clean" fuels will mean that
some temporary variances from air quality plans will be necessary to
meet high priority energy needs. The progress we have made in
pollution control in recent years, however, along with reductions in
energy consumption, should insure that overall air quality will continue to improve.
The adverse impact of energy shortages on the economy could be
aggravated by shortages of other raw materials. A comprehensive
study on supplies of metal ores and other basic resources and our
needs for them is now underway. This study will help insure that our
policies properly anticipate potential problems.
We must also do everything we can to avoid a shortage of agricultural commodities such as we experienced last year. For many years
this country enjoyed abundant agricultural production. This abundance not only met domestic needs, but aided greatly in alleviating
hunger and malnutrition abroad. In 1972, however, adverse conditions
throughout much of the world created widespread agricultural shortages. Food costs began to spiral, both here and abroad.
My Administration made a number of important program changes
in 1973 to bring more farm land into production and to increase farm
output. These steps, combined with favorable weather conditions,
made 1973 a record crop year; farm income reached an all-time high
level. Agricultural income now depends more upon the private market,
and less upon the Government, than has been the case for over 3
decades. In 1973, direct Government payments to farmers experienced
their largest dollar decline in history.
HELPING PEOPLE
THROUGH STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
Ours is a federal system of government. Our Constitution, now
nearly two centuries old, provides for a logical division of responsibilities among:
—a strong national government, concerned with essential national
needs;
—State and local governments close to, and responsive to, the
needs of individuals and local communities; and
—private citizens endowed with civil liberties that are secure from
governmental encroachment.

540-000 O - 74 - 2




14

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

During the first century and a half of our national experience, State
and local governments were able to meet community and State needs
from their own revenue sources. They were financially independent of
the Federal Government. During the past 40 years, however, the needs
of State and local governments have outstripped their resources. The
Federal Government has therefore come to play a larger and larger
role in financing their day-to-day operations. In the 4 years between
1969 and 1973, Federal grants to States and localities doubled. In 1973
this financial aid, disbursed through literally hundreds of separate
programs, provided more than 20% of total State and local revenues.
Federal Grants to State and Local Governments
SBill

SO-

Estimat*

Unfortunately, these Federal programs have all too often been
accompanied by regulations and restrictions which have stifled innovation and initiative on the part of State and local officials, severely
limiting the ability of those officials most familiar with problems at
the local levej to respond to local needs.
In response to this problem I have applied a philosophy of government that has come to be known as the New Federalism. It calls for
each level of government to focus its attention on the functions most
appropriate to that level. By strengthening the resources and responsibilities of State and local governments, it permits their policies
and programs to reflect local needs more sensitively.




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

15

Broader sharing of Federal revenues with State and local governments is helping to make this philosophy a reality. Under the General
Revenue Sharing program, now in its second year, State and local
governments receive over $6 billion a year for use in meeting State
and local needs as they see them.
This Administration has also sought to substitute broad-based
formula grants for narrow categorical grant programs, giving State and
local governments significant discretion as to how funds are used and
insuring that Federal aid is more equitably distributed among recipients. These principles now apply to several major areas of Federal
assistance.
The Law Enforcement Assistance program has demonstrated the
feasibility of broad-based formula grants. Aid under this program is
being increased from $28 million in 1969 to $747 million in 1975 and is
helping to make the streets of America safer.
The Comprehensive Employment and Training Act which I signed in
December extends these same grant principles to manpower programs,
Under this Act, the Federal Government will no longer specify the
types, methods, and proportions of various manpower services to be
provided. Instead, State and local governments will be able to use
the funds allocated to them to provide the mix of services which they
decide best meets the needs of their areas. The budget provides for
$2 billion in outlays for this program in 1975.
New authorities under the Rural Development Act are being implemented this year in a manner which is supportive of State and local
developmen t plans and priorities.
I urge congressional action to achieve similar reform in additional
areas this year:
The principles embodied in the Education Grants Consolidation and
Reform I proposed last year deserve priority attention. State and local
education agencies should have greater freedom to direct Federal
assistance toward meeting what they view as high priority local needs.
I will continue to work with the Congress, therefore, on legislation to
consolidate and improve education grant programs.
The Better Communities Act would replace several ineffective grant
and loan programs with a more streamlined approach to the problems
of urban areas. This act would allow localities to decide for themselves
how to allocate community development funds. The budget proposes
funding for this program of $2.3 billion in 1975.
The Unified Transportation Assistance Program I am proposing
this year would provide $2.3 billion in highway and mass transit
funds, and permit States and localities to allocate these grant funds
flexibly, in accordance with local conditions and priorities. Since




16

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

transportation is a major consumer of energy and is strongly affected
by the energy crisis, high priority must be given to enabling States and
localities to make decisions on transportation systems based on their
assessment of economy, energy conservation, environmental impact,
and safety considerations.
I am proposing legislation for a new Economic Adjustment Assistance
program. This legislation would permit States and communities to
respond flexibly to problems of economic change and unemployment.
Another central feature of the New Federalism is strengthening the
ability of State and local governments to perform effectively. The
Responsive Governments Act would broaden Federal assistance available
for improving State and local planning, decisionmaking, and management capabilities.
I urge the earliest possible enactment of all these measures.
In parallel with these legislative initiatives, my Administration is
continuing its efforts to consolidate and streamline categorical grant
programs, to simplify complex and burdensome procedures, and to
remove unnecessary, inflexible program restrictions.
As part of this same effort, Federal programs are being decentralized
along uniform regional lines, and the Federal Regional Councils are
being strengthened to facilitate coordination of Federal with State
and local activities at the operating level.
The budget accelerates our programs for aiding State and local
governments in improving water quality. The Environmental Protection Agency has allotted $4 billion to the States for 1975 to make
grants for municipal sewage treatment plants, a $1 billion increase
over the allotment for 1974. Priorities for grants within these allotments will be determined by the States. A total of $6.9 billion was
made available for this program in 1973 and 1974, more than twice
the amount made available in the preceding 2 years.
STRENGTHENING THE ROLE OF THE INDIVIDUAL
Abraham Lincoln believed that:
"The legitimate object of Government is to do for a community
of people whatever they need to have done, but cannot do at all, or
cannot do so well, for themselves, in their separate and individual
capacities. In all that the people can individually do as well jor themselves, government ought not to interfere."
I share this belief. This philosophy underlies the efforts of my Administration to strengthen the role of the individual in American society.
It is a cornerstone of the New Federalism.
I believe that government policy should seek to maintain an
economic environment in which all who are able to work can find
employment and adequate earnings. For those unable to support




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

17

themselves, government should help to provide the means necessary
to meet personal and family needs, while preserving individual
dignity and self-respect.
My Administration has consistently endeavored to strengthen the
role of the individual in American society and to ensure that all
Americans enjoy equality of opportunity in education, in employment, in business, and in housing. We have consistently worked to
improve assistance for the retired, the disabled, and the unemployed.
Reflecting these concerns, Federal human resource programs have
grown dramatically. Between 1969 and 1975, outlays for these programs will have increased by 139%, while outlays for all other programs will have risen only 26%.
The national health insurance plan I am proposing represents
another major step toward improving the lives of individual Americans. My proposal calls for basic reform in the financing of medical
care. It would bring comprehensive insurance protection against
medical expenses within reach of all Americans, including millions of
people who cannot now obtain adequate insurance coverage. Costs of
coverage for low-income families would be federally supported, with
payments scaled according to family income.
It will take several years for this reform to become fully operational.
In the interim, the 1975 budget provides $26.3 billion for existing
health programs. Under this budget, the momentum of cancer, heart,
and other research initiatives would be sustained, and total funding
for biomedical research would exceed $2 billion in 1975, almost double
the 1969 level. To support continued reform of our medical care
system, the budget proposes a total of $125 million in 1974 and 1975
to demonstrate health maintenance organization concepts throughout
the Nation. I am also proposing a Health Resources Planning Act to
enhance State and regional capabilities and responsibilities for planning
and regulating health services.
The rapid growth of human resource programs in recent years has
brought about many improvements in the well-being of the American
people. Higher social security benefits and extension of the Medicare
program, for example, have increased the economic security of the
elderly and the disabled. Cash benefits under social security programs
will rise from $26. 2 billion in 1969 to $62.9 billion in 1975. They now
reach 29 million beneficiaries. Five social security benefit increases have
been enacted since 1969. Taken together, these increases total nearly
70%, far exceeding the increases in the cost of living, and in average
wages, over this period. I continue to urge enactment of legislation
to reform private pension plans, legislation which would further
strengthen the economic security of millions of Americans in their
retirement years.




18

THE BUDGET FDR FISCAL YEAR 1975

The Supplemental Security Income program began operation on
January 1, 1974, replacing the various State public assistance programs for the aged, the blind, and the disabled with a more uniform
and equitable national system. This broad reform provides higher
benefits for these disadvantaged groups. In addition, Federal assumption of responsibility for these programs will provide substantial fiscal
relief to State and local governments.
Also during the past month, food stamp benefits have been increased
by over 20%, and the program has been extended to those parts of the
country where it was not available before. Outlays for food stamps will
be $3.9 billion in 1975, 78% higher than the 1973 level.
I propose further measures to improve the income security of
Americans, including:
—reform of pensions for veterans and their dependents, with
provisions for automatic cost-of-living adjustments in benefits,
and better matching of pensions to family need;
—an increase in education benefits for veterans to help meet cost
increases since these benefits were last raised;
—automatic cost-of-living increases for the aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries of the Supplemental Security Income program;
—transfer of food stamps and related nutrition programs to the
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, to improve coordination of income maintenance programs; and
—continued priority efforts to develop a practical program of
direct cash assistance for housing.
One of the major unfinished pieces of business of my Administration is the replacement of the current welfare system with a new
system that works. Figures collected over the past year are grim
testimony to the fact that our current welfare system is a mess; these
figures show that fully 40% of the payments made are incorrect. I
intend to make new proposals to solve this continuing problem.
As we begin this effort, I hope that the debate can focus on the substance of the issues, not on superficial labels. I believe that the majority of the American people agree on the principles that should guide
Federal income assistance:
—the system should provide strong work incentives for those able
to help themselves;
—income assistance should be provided in cash, rather than in
kind, so that families can make their own spending decisions;
—the system should be as simple as possible, replacing the chaotic
rules and overlapping programs that we have now;




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

19

—the levels of support provided should reflect the compassionate
spirit of the American people toward those who cannot provide
for themselves; and
—Federal aid should be provided on an equitable basis nationwide.
I believe that the Administration and the Congress, working together,
can and must find a solution that accords with these principles.
IMPROVING MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT
The recommendations contained in this budget are part of a broad
effort by my Administration, working with the Congress and with State
and local officials, to improve public services at all levels. The New
Federalism is a crucial element of this broad endeavor. A second,
complementary element consists of improving the efficiency and
effectiveness of Federal programs in carrying out Federal responsibilities.
Concern for meeting problems must extend beyond the well-intended
commitment of public funds. What really matters are the tangible
results produced through the effective use of these funds—results
measured in terms of better lives for all Americans.
Since I assumed office as President, I have encouraged extensive
efforts to streamline and revitalize the organization and management
of the Federal Government. These efforts are helping to ensure that
the taxpayers get their money's worth from the Government.
To enable the Federal Government to meet emerging challenges
more effectively, several new organizations have been created during
my Administration, and existing ones have been improved. Among
these new offices are Action, the Environmental Protection Agency,
the Council on Environmental Quality, the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration, the Domestic Council, the Office of
Management and Budget, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the
Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Council on International
Economic Policy, and the Federal Energy Office.
In 1971 I proposed creation of four new departments, including a
department to be responsible for energy and natural resources. I
continue to urge congressional approval of this proposal as revised in
legislation submitted last year. In addition, I ask the Congress to join
me in renewing consideration of other departmental reorganization
legislation that will permit more effective management of the Government.




20

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

During the past 25 years, Presidents have been able to make many
improvements in Government organization under Presidential Reorganization Plan Authority. This legislation has now expired. I urge
the Congress to restore this authority as soon as possible in order to
facilitiate continued modernization of our governmental structure.
Good organization is only a first step toward improving governmental performance. Government can be effective only if the public
service can develop and retain capable leadership. In response to this
need, this Administration has placed high priority on the identification
and development of the most able career managers. We intend to
intensify this effort.
Increasing the effectiveness of individual programs is another
essential step in improving overall governmental performance. During
the past year I have launched an intensive effort to strengthen the
management of major Federal activities. The emphasis in this management initiative is not on producing a great display of activity, nor
on merely rearranging work processes; the emphasis is on producing
significant results. To help keep a constant focus on program results,
I have asked each major department and agency to work with me in
developing a set of specific objectives to be achieved during fiscal year
1974. As we approach 1975, we will identify further objectives.
Currently, we are working toward more than 200 such objectives,
ranging from international monetary reform to improvement of opportunities for minorities and women.
These objectives will not simply be identified and then filed away
and forgotten. Specific results are to be achieved by specific deadlines.
These commitments will be reviewed continually and will guide dayto-day operations until the objectives are met.
Congressional procedures, too, are in need of reform—particularly
those that deal with the budget. In my last three budget messages
I encouraged the Congress to reform its procedures for considering
the budget. I noted that the Congress faced a fundamental problem
because it lacks a system for relating each individual spending decision—whether or not it is part of the appropriation process—to
overall budget totals. The need for a more systematic congressional
process was once again illustrated during the session just concluded.
Congressional actions, taken together, increased spending totals over
my proposals by $3.8 billion in 1974 and by $8.2 billion in 1975.
The Congress is currently moving toward a new budgetary system.
I commend this action and urge that the final procedures worked out
by the Congress recognize the necessary and proper role of the President and his responsibility for efficient administration of the executive
branch. I am particularly concerned about provisions which would
subject some of the most routine financial actions of the executive
branch to veto by either house of the Congress.




THE BUDGET MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT

21

CONCLUSION
The proposals set forth in this budget are constructive and forwardlooking. They meet the Federal Government's responsibility to provide
vigorous national leadership toward the solution of major national
problems. They do so within the bounds of fiscal prudence.
But the Federal Government cannot do everything. It should not
be expected to. Nor can money alone solve all our problems. Recognizing these limitations, my Administration has made an intensive
effort to identify and do well those things which the Federal Government should do. By the same token, this budget, like my previous ones,
stresses the revitalization of individual initiative and of State and
local capabilities. It represents an important further step in my efforts
to restore a proper balance of individual and governmental power in
America.
RICHARD NIXON.
FEBRUARY 4,




1974.




PART 2

PERSPECTIVES
ON THE BUDGET

23

PERSPECTIVES ON THE BUDGET
This part of the budget explains in greater detail a number of subjects mentioned in the budget message and discusses several topics
relating to budget totals. First, separate sections discuss budget authority and then budget funds and the Federal debt. These sections are
followed by a discussion of fiscal activities outside the Federal budget,
particularly the outlays of off-budget Federal agencies and privately
owned Government-sponsored enterprises. Finally, the longer range
outlook is examined and the next year's budget—the budget for
1976—is previewed in some detail.
BUDGET AUTHORITY
The Congress must provide budget authority, generally in the form
of appropriations, before Federal agencies can commit the Government
BUDGET AUTHORITY
(In billions of dollars]
Description

1973
actual

Available through current action by the Congress:
Enacted
Proposed in this budget
To be requested separately:
Upon enactment of proposed legislation
Allowances:
Civilian agencies *
Department of Defense—Military2

181.4

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

188.3
10.4

186.2

3.4

7.2

.4
.1

2.2
2.2

Subtotal available through current action by the Congress.

181.4

202.6

197.7

Available without current action by the Congress (permanent
authorizations):
Trust funds (existing law)
Interest on the public debt
Other
Deductions for offsetting receipts

90.8
24.2
13.1
-33.1

104.7
29.1
11.7
-37.3

120.9
30.5
12.6
-39.5

276.4

310.9

322.1

Total budget authority

_

1
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development programs, civilian agency
pay raises, and contingencies.
2
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
and military pay raises for the Department of Defense.

24




25

PERSPECTIVES

to make expenditures or loans. For 1975, a total of $322.1 billion of
budget authority is recommended.
The Congress will have to act on $197. 7 billion of the total budget
authority proposed for 1975 in order for it to become available. The
remaining $124. 4 billion will be available under existing laws without
further action by the Congress. Such authority consists mainly of
trust fund programs for which existing law generally appropriates the
receipts of the fund automatically, and of interest on the public debt,
for which budget authority is automatically provided under a permanent appropriation enacted in 1847.
Not all of the budget authority provided for 1975 will be obligated
or spent in that year.
• Budget authority for most trust funds authorizes expenditure of
the funds' receipts from special taxes and from Federal fund
payments to the trust funds, to be used as needed over a period
of years for benefit payments and other purposes specified by law.
• Budget authority for many construction and procurement programs covers the estimated full cost of projects at the time they
are started, although the outlays will occur over a number of years
as work on the projects progresses.
Relation of Budget Authority to Outlays—1975 Budget
Figures in brackets represent Federal funds only
$Bi1lion>

To be spent in 1975

New Authority
Recommended
for 1975
322.1

203.2
[181.1]

[220.6]

[228.7]

Unspent Authority
Enacted in
Prior Years
319.8
[168.2]
NOTE; ?t* dfffer.nC« b*tw« r t * * X^i




Outlays
in 1975
304.4

217.3

Unspent Authority
for Outlays in
Future Years
336.2

[127.4]

[174.9]

To be spent
in Future Years

W f f « t S 9 U rt t * » * ftd^ol fvnd. jhowfl tn ferocic,* c

26

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

• Budget authority for many insurance and direct or guaranteed
loan programs provides financing for a period of years, and may
include contingency amounts to be used only in the event of
defaults or other claims on the programs.
As a result of these factors, there is a substantial carryover of unspent budget authority from previous years, most of which is earmarked for specific uses and not available for new program proposals.
As shown in the preceding chart, $101.2 billion of outlays in 1975,
over 33% of the total, will be made under budget authority enacted
in previous years. Conversely, nearly 37% of 1975 budget authority
will not result in outlays until future years.
BUDGET FUNDS AND THE FEDERAL DEBT
The budget covers the financial transactions of two principal types
of funds: Federal funds and trust funds.
Federal funds are derived mainly from taxes and borrowing. Most of
these funds are not restricted by law to any specific Government purpose. Trust funds, on the other hand, are collected and used for specific
purposes, such as the payment of social security and unemployment
insurance benefits.
BUDGET FINANCING AND CHANGE IN DEBT OUTSTANDING, 1973-75
[In billions of dollars]
Description

Budget surplus (—) or deficit
Means offinancingother than debt:
I ncrease or decrease (—) in available cash and monetary assets _ _
Decrease or increase (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc
.__
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins (—)
Outlays of off-budget Federal agencies
Increment on gold (—)
Total, means of financing other than debt
Change in Federal debt held by public

Increase or decrease (—) in Federal agency investments in Federal debt:
Federal funds investments
Trust fund investments
Change in gross Federal debt

1973
actual

1974
estimate

14.3

4.7

.9

1975
estimate

9.4

—3.0

3.0
.9
-.4
.6

.1
.7
-.4
2.7
-1.2

.1
.8
_ 7
2.8

5.0

-1.2

3.1

19.3

3.5

12.5

.8
Ml.O

.3
14.1

.6
8.5

* 31.1

17.9

21.6

1
Reflects nonrecurring increase of $4.5 billion resulting from a procedural change in the timing
of certain trust fund transactions.




27

PERSPECTIVES
Federal Debt as a Percent of GNP
Percent of G N P

Percent of G N P

Debt Held By:

70Gross Federal Debt

|

-70
{

Government Aceoanls

E253 Federal Reserve System
H H Other
Federal Debt held
by the Public

-60

— 50

-40

-30

10

The budget combines the receipts and outlays for both types of
funds and deducts the various transactions that occur between
them. Hence, the Federal budget is called the "unified budget/'
Generally, the budget displays the net financial transactions between
the Federal Government and the public. Thus, as is shown in the
previous table, the unified budget surplus or deficit is the principal
determinant of the change in Federal debt held by the public.1
The deficit expected for 1975 and the other factors noted in the
preceding table will increase the Federal debt held by the public from
$346.5 billion at the end of 1974 to $359.0 billion at the end of 1975.
As the chart below shows, the growth of debt held by the public
has, for most years, been considerably slower than the growth of the
economy.
Some Government agencies are authorized to issue their own debt
instruments to the public or to other Government agencies and funds.
Such borrowing is part of the Federal debt. At the end of 1973 the
outstanding debt of such agencies that was held by the public was
$9.1 billion. This amount is expected to rise to $12.6 billion by the
end of 1975.
1

Federal debt held by the public includes debt held by the Federal Reserve System.




28

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

Gross Federal debt is the sum of the debt held by the public and
the debt held within the Government, such as the investments in
Treasury debt issues by the social security trust funds. The Federal
funds deficit is the principal determinant of changes in gross Federal
debt.
Gross Federal debt is expected to rise from $486.4 billion on June 30,
1974 to $508.0 billion on June 30, 1975. As the lower section of the
preceding table indicates, $9.1 billion, or approximately 42%, of this
increase is in debt held by Federal agencies and trust funds, reflecting
mainly the investment of trust fund surplus receipts in Treasury debt.
FEDERAL FUNDS FINANCING AND CHANGE IN DEBT SUBJECT TO LIMIT, 1973-75
[In billions of dollars]
Description

1973
actual

Federal funds surplus (—) or deficit
Means of Federal fundsfinancingother than debt:
Decrease or increase (—) in deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins (—)
Increase or decrease (—) in cash balances and other means of
financing (net)

1975
estimate

25.0

18.1

17.9

.8
—.4

.7
—.4

.8
—.7

1

—3.5

.2

4.6

—3.3

.3

.4

.7

.8

-.2
.7
1

4.2

1

Total, means of financing other than debt
Increase or decrease (—) in Federal funds investment in Federal
debt
Decrease or increase (—) in Federal funds debt not subject to
limit (net)
Effect of off-budget agencies on debt subject to limit
Change in debt subject to limit

1974
estimate

-.2
.9

-.3
1.1

30.5

16.3

19.8

1
Reflects nonrecurring increase of $4.5 billion resulting from a procedural change in the timing
of certain trust fund transactions.

A statutory debt limit covers almost all of the gross Treasury
debt issues, but most borrowing by Federal agencies other than the
Treasury is excluded from this limit.
The concept of Federal debt subject to statutory limitation is roughly
consistent with the administrative budget concept of debt that was
used until the 1969 budget. The administrative budget was similar in
concept to the Federal funds part of the unified budget. As a result,
changes in the Federal debt subject to limit are more closely related to
the Federal funds surplus or deficit than to the unified budget surplus
or deficit.




PE R SPECTIVE S

29

The Federal funds deficit in 1975 is estimated to be $17.9 billion
and the debt subject to limit is estimated to increase by $19.8
billion. The preceding table indicates the sources of the difference
between the two figures.
FEDERAL FUNDS RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]
Description

Outlays (by agency):
Department of Defense military functions and military assistancel
Department of the Treasury:
Interest on the debt
Other
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Veterans Administration
Department of Agriculture
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Allowances 2
All other

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

74.2

79.6

86.0

24.2
8.6
26. 7
11.9
10.0
3. 6
27.3

29.1
6.8
32. 3
13.0
9.3
5.0
.3
28.2

30.5
7.3
36.1
13.4
9.2
5.6
1.6
31.1

186.4
161.4

203.7
185.6

220.6
202.8

Deficit

25.0

18.1

17.9

Change in debt subject to limit

30.5

16.3

19.8

Total
Receipts

1
Includes allowances
and military pay raises
2
Includes allowances
agency pay raises, and

for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
for the Department of Defense.
for acceleration of energy research and development programs, civilian
contingencies.

A substantial part of Federal funds deficits—and, therefore, a
substantial part of the growth in debt subject to limit—is associated
with transactions between Federal funds and trust funds. These
transactions consist primarily of Federal funds payments to social
insurance trust funds (such as the Federal Government's contribution
for supplementary medical insurance and its payment to finance the
unfunded liability of the civil service retirement fund) and interest
paid on Treasury debt securities held by trust funds.
From 1963 through 1973, there was a cumulative Federal funds
deficit of $170 billion, of which $84 billion was attributable to transactions with trust funds. Indeed, a significant Federal funds deficit
can occur, as one did in 1969, when there are surpluses in the unified
budget and in the transactions of Federal funds with the public. The
relevant figures for 1973 through 1975 are shown in the following table:

540-000 O - 74 - 3




30

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
BUDGET SURPLUS OR DEFICIT ( - ) BY FUND GROUP
(In billions of dollars]
Description

Federal funds:
Transactions with the public
Transactions with trust funds.
Total
Trust funds:
Transactions with the public
Transactions with Federal funds
Total
Budget total:
Federalfunds
Trust funds
Total

1973

_

1974

1975

—4.0
—21.1

2.2
—20.4

5.3
—23.2

-25.0

-18.1

-17.9

-10.3
21.1

-6.9
20.4

—14.8
23.2

10.7

13.5

8.4

-25.0
10.7

-18.1
13.5

-17.9
8.4

-14.3

-4.7

-9.4

FISCAL ACTIVITIES OUTSIDE THE FEDERAL BUDGET
The budget does not include several fiscal activities of the Federal
Government that result in spending similar to budget outlays. Two
major exclusions—the off-budget activities of Federal agencies and
the activities of privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises1—are discussed in some detail below.

Outlays of off-budget Federal agencies and Governmentsponsored enterprises.—Off-budget agencies are federally owned
and controlled, but their transactions have been excluded from the
budget totals under provisions of law. Therefore, their fiscal activities
are not reflected in either budget outlays or the budget surplus or
deficit, and appropriations requests for their off-budget activities are
not included in the totals of budget authority. The debt of these
agencies is not subject to the statutory debt limitation but is, however,
part of the gross Federal debt.
The first off-budget agency was the Export-Import Bank (excluded
by statute as of August 17, 1971),2 although prior to the adoption of
the unified budget forfiscalyear 1969 the substantial trust fund activity
of the Federal Government was not included in the administrative
budget. Since 1972, the Postal Service fund, the Rural Telephone
Bank, and the lending activities that became the Rural electrification
1
Detailed financial statements for these organizations are contained in the Budget Appendix,
Part IV, Annexed Budgets.
2
The Exchange Stabilization Fund and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
(but not the Federal Reserve Banks) are Federal entities. They are excluded from this discussion.




PERSPECTIVES

31

and telephone revolving fund were removed from the budget; and the
Environmental Financing Authority fund, the Federal Financing
Bank, and the United States Railway Association were authorized to
be established outside the budget. The budget totals do, however, still
include administrative expenses of the Rural Electrification Administration lending programs and the United States Railway Association,
and they also include subsidies paid to the Postal Service and the
Environmental Financing Authority.
While the budget authority and outlays of off-budget activities are
excluded from the budget totals, not all of these activities are excluded
from Presidential and congressional review. For example, a limitation
on the program activity of the Export-Import Bank is established
annually.
Government-sponsored enterprises were established and chartered
by the Federal Government to perform specialized functions that were
needed to achieve national objectives. The earlier enterprises were all
created with partial or full Government ownership and direct Government control, but, in time, some of these were converted to private
ownership and some new enterprises were established as privately
owned institutions. The current i*ule governing the budget treatment
of these enterprises dates back to 1967, when a recommendation on
this subject by the President's Commission on Budget Concepts was
adopted. The rule excludes from the budget those privately owned
Government-sponsored enterprises in which the Government has no
equity.
The Federal Land Banks and Federal Home Loan Banks both had
become fully privately owned by 1952 and have always been excluded
from the unified budget. The Federal National Mortgage Association,
the Banks for Cooperatives, and the Federal Intermediate Credit
Banks became wholly privately owned by repaying the Federal equity
capital during fiscal year 1969 and were accordingly removed from the
budget. The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation and the
Student Loan Marketing Association were subsequently authorized
to be established with full private ownership.
Except in the case of the Postal Service, the excluded outlays are
for loan programs. These programs are similar to the direct loan
programs in the unified budget. The outlays of most of these loan
programs reflect primarily, but not solely, the difference between new
loans disbursed and repayments of principal. For example, during 1973
new loans disbursed by the excluded programs equaled $35.4 billion
and repayments were $22.8 billion. Outlays were $11.4 billion. Like
direct loans in the budget, the loans of the excluded programs are
designed to influence economic resources toward particular uses. They
also provide some stimulus to aggregate economic activity, although
this is offset to a degree in that their net lending has to be financed




32

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

COMPARISON OF OUTLAYS FOR THE UNIFIED BUDGET, OFF-BUDGET FEDERAL
AGENCIES, AND GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED ENTERPRISES
[In billions of dollars]
Outlays
Fiscal year

Unified
budget

1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959...
I960....

70.9
68.5

_

1961
1962
1963
1964
1965

_
_
_
_

_
_

-0.3

70.5
76.7
82.6
92.1
92.2

.4
.1
-.5
1.1
.4

97.8
106.8
111.3
118.6
118.4

-.3
1.1
.5
1.8
1.2

1966
1967.
1968
1969....
1970

134.7
158.3
178.8
184.5
196.6

1971
1972
1973

211.4
231.9
246.5
274.7
304.4

.2

1974 estimate
1975 estimate

1.9
-2.9

1.7
4.3
9.6
.3
0.1
.6
2.7
2.8

4.1
10.8
12.9
1.2

1
Excludes the Federal Financing Bank and the off-budget activities of the United States
Railway Association, which were authorized in recent legislation.

largely by borrowing from the financial markets just as does a deficit
in the unified budget. The Government-sponsored enterprises primarily provide support to housing and also support agriculture and
higher education.
In the table above, the excluded outlays of the off-budget Federal
agencies and the privately owned Government-sponsored enterprises
are compared to the unified budget outlays. The outlays of the offbudget agencies began at a negligible amount in 1972 but have grown
substantially since then, in part because more off-budget agencies
have been created. These outlays are expected to equal $2.8 billion or
about 1% of budget outlays in 1975.




PERSPECTIVES

33

The excluded outlays of the Government-sponsored enterprises have
likewise grown—from small amounts in the early 1960's to an average
of $5.8 billion, or 2.7% of budget outlays, during 1969-73, when more
Government-sponsored enterprises were outside the budget. In 1974
and 1975 these enterprises are expected to spend $12.9 billion and
$1.2 billion, respectively, which equal 4.7% and 0.4% of budget
outlays. The off-budget Federal agencies and the Governmentsponsored enterprises together are estimated to spend an average
$9.8 billion in 1974-75, which equals 3.4% of budget outlays in these
years.
In large part because the excluded outlays are primarily for credit
programs, they have certain characteristics that tend to differentiate
them from most budget outlays. This can be seen most clearly with
respect to the Government-sponsored enterprises, several of which
have operated outside the budget long enough for comparisons to be
made.
One distinguishing characteristic is that the excluded outlays are
more volatile than total budget outlays, although they are not more
volatile than some individual programs within the budget. As the
table shows, the outlays of the Government-sponsored enterprises
have fluctuated by large amounts several times, particularly since
the mid-1960's. The most important reason has been the cyclical
nature of mortgage lending and institutional deposit flows, which for
certain of the enterprises leads to large swings in lending, the repayment of past loans they have made, and the sale of assets. In some
years these factors have even produced large negative outlays for the
Federal Home Loan Banks. The largest yearly change in the outlays
of Government-sponsored enterprises is expected to occur in 1975,
with a total decrease of $11.7 billion. This will be due primarily to a
large decline in the credit advanced by the Federal Home Loan
Banks to their member savings institutions, and a large increase in the
repayment of past advances.
Another distinction is that the outlays of the Government-sponsored
enterprises are less predictable than the total outlays in the unified
budget, and for much the same reason that they are volatile. In 4 of
the 5 years from 1969 to 1973, the absolute difference between the
actual outlays and the original budget estimate of outlays was more
for the Government-sponsored enterprises as a group than for the
entire unified budget—which is over 20 times larger. During this
period the absolute difference averaged $4.0 billion for these enterprises, which is greater than the $3.0 billion average absolute difference
for the unified budget.3
3
The original budget estimate of the 1969 outlays was adjusted to take out the enterprises
that became fully privately owned and were accordingly removed from the budget during 1969.




34

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Other fiscal activities.—Several other fiscal activities that are
not measured in the budget also have economic impacts. Two of the
most significant of these activities are credit guarantees and tax
expenditures.
Credit guarantees.—Credit guarantees influence economic resources
toward particular uses, especially toward housing, and provide some
stimulus to the total spending in the economy. The outstanding
guaranteed loans held by the public are large and have grown substantially each year.4 By the end of 1973, they were $147.7 billion.
Their total impact on the economy is uncertain, however, since some
portion of the private loans that were guaranteed might have been
made anyway.
Tax expenditures.—Tax expenditures are benefits to individuals or
corporations that result from tax exclusions, tax deductions, preferential tax rates, or tax deferrals. Tax expenditures are very difficult to
estimate, though, even for past periods.5 The concept requires a
standard for comparison with the actual tax base, and there is substantial disagreement on what this standard should be. In addition, the
estimate of any one tax expenditure depends on whether one tax
provision is assumed to change at a time or all provisions are assumed
to change simultaneously. Moreover, the aggregate impact of all
tax expenditures on receipts depends on the extent that the statutory tax rates would be reduced in order to compensate for broadening the tax base. If the impact would be largely offset, the effects of tax
expenditures on total receipts and aggregate spending in the economy
would be small. Thus, while tax expenditures clearly do have substantial effects on the allocation of economic resources, the concept of tax
expenditures and the problem of estimating them prospectively are
such that estimates have been prepared only for past calendar years
by the staffs of the Treasury Department and the Joint Committee
on Internal Revenue Taxation.
THE BUDGET OUTLOOK TO 1979
In an age of increasingly complex problems requiring long-range
solutions, the Nation cannot afford to look only a single year into the
future when making budgetary decisions. Such decisions have longer
range implications which we must try to assess before committing
ourselves and our limited resources. The composition and level of the
4
See Special Analysis E, "Federal Credit Programs", in Special Analysts. Budget of the United
States Government. Fiscal Year 1975.
• See "Estimates of Federal Tax Expenditures", Committee on Ways and Means of the House
of Representatives. June 1, 1973.




PERSPECTIVES

35

1975 budget have been largely determined by past decisions and will,
in turn, strongly affect subsequent budgets, mandating many expenditures, precluding others, and generally limiting our options in future
years.
The Administration believes that the long-range implications of
the budget are important. Thus, in the 1971 budget, it pioneered in
presenting 5-year projections of Federal outlays and receipts. The
1973 budget expanded the presentation by including detailed 5-year
projections of the cost of legislative proposals for major new and
expanded programs. In the 1974 budget, a detailed preview of the
next budget was introduced. This year more information on the outlook
is presented.
By making these estimates available to the Congress, the public,
and agencies of the executive branch, a framework is provided within
which to examine this and future budgets. Such information helps us
foresee difficulties, and thereby avoid becoming prisoners of the
unintended consequences of past decisions. Analysis of these projections underscores the disciplined approach needed to maintain consistent fiscal policies that promote economic growth and stability,
while providing the resources needed to support essential Federal
services.
The 1979 outlook.—In the tables and discussion that follow, receipt
and outlay estimates assume that the economy is operating at full
employment, which is defined as a 4% rate of unemployment in the
civilian labor force. The receipts projections assume that new taxes
proposed in this budget are adopted, and that the existing tax law is
not otherwise changed.
THE 1979 OUTLOOK
[In billions of dollars]

Item

Actual
1973

Estimate
1974

1975

1976

1979

Full-employment receipts
Full-employment outlays, current programs

243
245

278
274

311
303

339
329

428
391

Full-employment margin, current programs__

—2

4

8

10

37

The outlay estimates are simply projections of the consequences of
continuing current and proposed programs; they are not forecasts of
what the Administration will propose in future budgets or of possible
program levels after future policy decisions. Generally, they reflect what
is required by existing law and contractual obligations, extensions of
expiring laws, 1975 budget proposals, and the minimum pay and price




36

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

adjustments necessary to maintain real program levels. The assumption that expiring laws will be extended is not an Administration
commitment to continue these programs, because no decision has
necessarily been made on their future status. The assumption is used
simply to reflect approximately how the 1975 program mix would look
in 1979. These projections are a pragmatic way of preparing to meet
future problems because they indicate the direction current decisions
are taking us. They provide a means of recognizing the uncertainties
of the future and provide a warning if the course set is wrong.
Full-employment receipts are expected to grow by 38% between
1975 and 1979 to about $428 billion. The receipts projection reflects
an increase in the average tax rate on taxable personal income as
inflation and rising real income move people into higher tax brackets.
This form of implicit tax increase raises taxes by about $17 billion in
1979. Full-employment outlays for 1975 programs are expected to
grow more slowly, increasing by 29% to about $391 billion by 1979.
The excess of full-employment receipts over full-employment outlays
provides an estimate of the margin that would be available to cover
new initiatives, such as tax reductions, reductions in the public debt,
and new or expanded programs between now and the end of 1979. The
margin can be used not only to guide resource allocation but also as a
guide to fiscal policy. For example, the $8 billion margin in 1975,
following a $4 billion margin in 1974, is providing appropriate restraint
on the economy. The potential 1979 margin is about $37 billion.
Almost half of this margin results from the implicit tax increase
mentioned above.
The full-employment margin foreseen is predicated on conservative
projections of the future costs of 1975 programs. For example, in the
past, various initiatives have added to the budget total and thereby
decreased the margin. The Congress added $7.0 billion to the 1973
budget and $3.8 billion to the 1974 budget, both of which will have an
even larger impact on future budgets. Thus, past experience suggests
that the margin now projected is larger than it will be in the future.
Ignoring the limitations implicit in these estimates may lead to unsound budgetary commitments, and thereby seriously inhibit policy
options for years to come.
Initiatives in the 1975 budget.—Projections of the cost for the
major new and expanded programs which are legislative proposals
appear in summary table 15. These proposals, plus the initiative for
an energy research and development program which does not require
new legislation, could add as much as $10 billion to outlays by 1979.
These programs, however, address pressing national needs. They
underline this Administration's priorities—with an eye to available
resources. These initiatives permit us to live within our means while
still allowing a margin for coping with future problems.




PERSPECTIVES

37

Program trends.—The outlay trends between 1975 and 1979 for the
major program categories are summarized in the following table.
The 2 1 % increase in outlays for national security and international
affairs is significantly less than the 2 9 % growth in total outlays. T h e
major increases arise from military pay and price allowances. This
projection implies a continued decline in the proportion of the budget
devoted to these outlays—barring major changes in the international
situation.
Human resources programs exhibit marked growth—36% from
1975 to 1979. This growth reflects the Nation's heavy commitment to
health and income security, the outlays for which will be determined
largety by price trends and the growing number of persons eligible for
benefit payments.
PROJECTED FULL-EMPLOYMENT OUTLAYS FOR CURRENT PROGRAMS. 1975-79
(In billions of dollars]

Major category l

National security and international affairs
Domestic affairs
Human resources
Physical resources
General Revenue Sharing
Other
Net interest
Employer share, employee retirement
Total, full-employment outlays

Estimate
1975

1976

1979

91.8
192.6
149.9
24.9
6.2
11.6
22.0
—3.6

99.1
212.7
161.8
28.6

111.1
261.3
204.2
29.0

6.3

6.6

14.7
22.5
-3.7

21.5
22.5
-4.1

302.8

329.4

390.8

Percent
- change
1975-79
21
36

36
16
8
85
2
14
29

1
These broad categories are defined to include the following functions: National security and
international affairs includes national defense and international affairs and finance. Human resources includes education and manpower; health; income security; and veterans benefits and
services. Physical resources includes agriculture and rural development; natural resources and environment; commerce and transportation; and community development and housing. Other includes
space research and technology; general government; and undistributed allowances and adjustments. Net interest includes the interest function less interest received by trust funds.

The projected increases in outlays for physical resources programs
and General Revenue Sharing assume that the authorizations for those
programs that expire before 1979 will be continued. The major
changes in programs summarized under "Other" are the allowances
for civilian pay and price increases and increases in law enforcement
programs. The projections of net interest assume that the amount of
debt outstanding will be the same as at the end of 1975, with any
changes due to the refinancing of the existing debt at current interest
rates.
Federal payments to individuals and aid to State and local
governments.—Federal
spending has shifted markedly in the past 20




38

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

years—and with particular abruptness in the last 5 years—away
from direct Federal purchases of goods and services, for such programs
as defense and space, and tcward direct Federal payments to individuals and aid to State and local governments. From 1959 to 1973,
payments to individuals and aid to State and local governments have
almost doubled as a percentage of total outlays and increased fivefold in dollar terms.
PAYMENTS TO INDIVIDUALS AND FEDERAL AID TO
STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS *
[In billions of dollars]
Category

Payments to individuals
Aid to State and local governments
To finance payments for individuals
Other
._
Total
Percentage of total outlays

1959
actual

1969
actual

1973
actual

1975
est.

19792
est.

13.2

85.0
44.0
14.5
29.4

117.5
51.7
16.9
34.8

167.8
59.5
21.7
37.8

68.1
36.9

128.9
52.3

169.2
55.6

227.3

19.7
6.7

47.8
20.3

2.4
4.3
26.3
28.6

7.1

58.2

The present outlook indicates that payments to individuals and aid
to State and local governments under existing programs will grow to
about 58% of total outlays by 1979. Between 1975 and 1979 these
outlays will increase by $58 billion and reach a total of $227 billion.
These projections indicate that the Federal Government is having,
and will continue to have, an increasingly indirect budgetary impact on
the marketplace. In keeping with the principles of the New Federalism,
Federal money is being channelled into payments to individuals and
into broader, more flexible assistance to State and local governments.
Ability to control outlays.—The need to project future resources
and the claims upon them is underscored by the increasing long-term
budgetary commitments and the consequent declining controllability
of budget outlays. In 1967, 59% of total Federal spending was virtually uncontrollable due to existing law or prior legal commitments.
Since then, repeated increases in uncontrollable programs have been
enacted into law. As a result, uncontrollable spending has been rising
at a faster rate than Federal receipts, and more rapidly than the rate
of growth of the whole economy. In 1975, about 74% of the budget
will be virtually uncontrollable. Of this amount, 78% are "open-ended
programs and fixed costs," which includes social security, General




PERSPECTIVES

39

CONTROLLABILITY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS
[In billions of dollars]

Estimate

Category

1975

1979 1

Percent
change
from
1975
to 1979

Relatively uncontrollable under present law:

Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
Medicare^
All other payments for individuals

67.2
14.2
52.8

94.1
23.0
64.7

40
62
22

134.2
37.2

181.8
31.7

36
—15

Total, open-ended programs and fixed costs
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations

171.4
52.3l

213.6
1014

25
22

Relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement

84.4]
—3.6

—4.1

14

304.4

390.8

28

Subtotal, payments for individuals
Other open-ended programs and fixed costs

Total budget outlays

_

1
The assumption to continue General Revenue Sharing after the law expires in 1977 allows discretionary control in the 1979 program level. Therefore, General Revenue Sharing is included in
relatively controllable outlays in 1979.

Revenue Sharing, interest on the Federal debt, veterans benefits, and
similar programs.
As the above table shows, uncontrollable outlays for payments
for individuals will increase by 36% between 1975 and 1979. This
growth will be as fast as the expected rate of growth in full-employment
receipts, and portends a continued struggle to maintain policy flexibility, with an increased concentration of the burden of fiscal policy
adjustments being placed on a small part of the budget.
The budget in 1976.—Within the framework provided by the 5-year
outlook, greater detail can be presented for 1976. However, the
projections do not represent decisions or commitments as to specific
amounts that will be requested for particular programs or agencies
when the 1976 budget itself is submitted a year from now. New
decisions will have to be made in light of the conditions that will
exist next year. The implications of the 1975 recommendations for
the 1976 budget are presented in the following tables, which show
estimated 1976 budget authority and outlays by function and major
agency. The estimate for the 1976 unemployment trust fund assumes
that the economy is at full employment.
Implications of the outlook.—This outlook demonstrates that
the initiatives proposed in this budget will not unduly restrict our




40

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
BUDGET AUTHORITY BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY
[In billions of dollars]
Description

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

Budget authority by function:

National defense 1
International affairs and finance
Space research and technology
Agriculture and rural development
__
Natural resources and environment- _
_
Commerce and transportation
Community development and housing.
Education and manpower
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services._.
Interest
__._
General government__
___
_
General Revenue Sharing
Allowances 3_
_
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions. _
Total budget authority
Budget authority by agency:

Legislative and judicial branches
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture. _
Commerce
Defense —Military 1
Defense —Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Civil Service Commission.
National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationVeterans Administration
Other agencies
_
Allowances 3
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions. _
Total budget authority

-8.4

88.2
5.3
3.0
6.7
2.5
22.8
5.0
13.8
26.2
93.0
13.8
27.8
6.4
6.1
.4
-10.0

95.0
4.7
3.2
7.4
__ 3
14.5
6.4
11.5
28.0
104.0
14.1
29.1
6.8
6.2
2.2
-10.7

276.4

310.9

322.1

.8
.1
6.6
11.4
1.8
77.6
2.0
89.2
5.2
-1.9
1.8
10.4
.7
3.6
32.7
7.8
3.4
12.7
18.8
-8.4

.9
.1
9.2
11.8
1.5
82.7
1.7
106.5
4.5
-3.8
1.9
9.3
.8
17.6
35.8
9.4
3.0
13.8
13.7
.4
-10.0

1.0
.1
5.3
14.0
1.7
91.0
1.6
113.7
6.2
-2.6
2.1
9.7
.9
9.8
37.7
10.2
3.2
14.1
10.8
2.2
-10.7

276.4

310.9

322.1

82.8
3.6
3.4
7.1
7.2
10.5
6.1
12.0
22.2
79.8
12.8 22.8
6.0
8.3

101.0
4.1
3.4

5.6
9.0
15.1
6.8
11.8
30.2
2
112.3
14.0
30.4
7.0
6.4
5.3
-11.6
2

350.5

1.0
.1
4.9
12.6
1.7
96.0
1.7
122.9
6.6
-2.3
2.2
2
9.3
.8
10.5
39.3
11.3
3.4
13.9
20.8
5.3
-11.6
2

350.5

1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian and
military pay raises for the Department of Defense.
2
Includes an estimate for the unemployment trust fund which assumes full employment. Because of the increasing uncertainties, no forecast of the unemployment rate has been made
for3 1976.
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development programs, civilian
agency pay raises, and contingencies.




PERSPECTIVES

41

BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION AND AGENCY
[In billions of dollars]
Description

Outlays by function:
National defense *
International affairs and finance
Space research and technology
Agriculture and rural development
._
Natural resources and environment
Commerce and transportation
Community development and housing
Education and manpower
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Interest
General government
General Revenue Sharing
Allowances3
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions._
Total outlays
Outlays by agency:
Legislative and judicial branches
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense-Military 1
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Civil Service Commission
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other agencies
.._.
Allowances*
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions. _
Total outlays
1

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1976
estimate

76.0
3.0
3.3
6.2
.6
13.1
4.1
10.2
18.4
73.1
12.0
22.8
5.5
6.6
—8.4

80.6
3.9
3.2
4.0
.6
13.5
5.4
10.8
23.3
85.0
13.3
27.8
6.8
6.1
.3
—10.0

87.7
4.1
3.3
2.7
3.1
13.4
5.7
11.5
26.3
100.1
13.6
29.1
6.8
6.2
1.6
—10.7

246.5

274.7

304.4

.7
*
3.7
10.0
1.4
73.3
1.7
82.0
3.6
-2.3
1.5
8.6
.6
8.2
31.0
4.6

.9
.1
4.6
9.3
1.5
78.4
1.6
96.8
5.0
-3.8
1.9
8.6
.7
8.4
35.8
5.9

1.0
.1
4.4
9.2
1.7
84.6
1.6
111.0
5.6
-2.7
2.1
10.0
.8
9.1
37.6
7.3

1.0
.1
4.3
10.4
1.8
90.8
1.7
120.6
7.4
-2.4
2.2
2
8.9
.8
9.7
39.3
8.1

3.3
12.0
10.8
—8.4

3.2
13.2
12.0
.3
—10.0

3.3
13.6
13.3
1.6
—10.7

3.4
13.7
14.7
4.4
—11.6

246.5

274.7

304.4

94.8
4.3
3.4
4.1
4.1
13.7
7.4
12.3
28.6
2
107.2
13.8
30.4
6.9
6.3
4.4
—11.6
2

329.4

2

329.4

Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian and
military pay raises for the Department of Defense.
2
Includes an estimate for the unemployment trust fund which assumes full employment. Because of the increasing uncertainties, no forecast of the unemployment rate has been made
for3 1976.
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development programs, civilian
agency pay raises, and contingencies.
*Less than $50 million.




42

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

ability to respond to issues in the future. Moreover, a good part
of the growing long-range uncontrollability of the budget, due to
increased commitments to assist individuals and State and local
governments, furthers the Administration's objective of improving the
effectiveness and responsiveness of government by permitting decisions to be made by those closest to the problem. The outlook also
highlights the fact that our resources are not unlimited and that the
Nation must make Federal budget decisions within the constraints of
these longer range projections if an appropriate division of resources
between the Federal Government and the rest of the economy is to be
maintained.







PART 3

BUDGET RECEIPTS

43

BUDGET RECEIPTS
This section of the budget describes the major sources of budget
receipts, sets forth the economic assumptions on which the receipts
estimates are based, and discusses the legislative proposals affecting
them.
SUMMARY
Total budget receipts in 1975 are estimated at $295 billion, compared with $270 billion in 1974, an increase of $25 billion. The estimates for 1974 and 1975 are given in round numbers to emphasize
the difficulties of making accurate forecasts of budget receipts. The
estimates should be considered in terms of a range of estimates extending a minimum of one percent on either side.
The expansion of economic activity, although expected to be at a
lower rate than in the recent past, will raise individual incomes and
provide increased budget receipts in 1975. In addition, estimated
budget receipts in 1975 reflect:
• Higher social insurance taxes and contributions resulting from
legislated increases in the taxable earnings base.
• Proposed legislation to institute an Emergency Windfall Profits
Tax, which will take the form of a graduated tax on the sale of
domestic crude oil at prices higher than the ceiling price established by the Cost of Living Council on December 1, 1973.
• The tax reform and simplification proposals submitted by the
Administration in April of last year. These proposals include a
property tax credit for the elderly, a new and expanded minimum
taxable income provision, a limitation on artificial accounting
losses, and a proposal to simplify our tax structure.
• Legislation which has been proposed to liberalize deductions for
individual contributions to pension plans.
Composition of budget receipts.—The Federal tax system relies
predominantly on income and payroll taxes. In 1975:
• Income taxes paid by individuals and corporations are estimated
at $129 billion and $48 billion, respectively. Combined receipts from these income taxes will account for 60% of total
budget receipts.
44




BUDGET RECEIPTS

45

• Social insurance taxes and contributions—composed largely of
payroll taxes levied on wages and salaries and paid equally b y
employers and employees—will produce an estimated $85.6
billion, 2 9 % of the total.
• Excise taxes imposed on selected commodities, services, and
activities are expected to provide $17.4 billion, 6 % of total budget
receipts.
• Other taxes and miscellaneous receipts will amount to an estimated $15.0 billion, 5 % of the total.
BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
[In billions of dollars]
Source

1973
actual

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds)
Excise taxes i
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties
Miscellaneous receipts !

1975
estimate

103.2
36.2
64.5
16.3
4.9
3.2
3.9

118.0
43.0
77.9
17.1
5.4
3.5
5.0

129.0
48.0
85. 6
17.4
6.0
3.8
5.2

232.2

Total budget receipts
1

1974
estimate

270.0

295.0

Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.

ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
The economic assumptions t h a t underlie the estimates of budget
receipts are shown in the table below. The projection for calendar year
1974 reflects the expected slowdown in the rate of economic expansion
from the unsustainable rate of the previous 2-year period. This slowdown will be accentuated b y the shortage of energy supplies.
ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
[Calendar years. In billions of dollars]
Description

Gross national product
Personal income
Corporate profits before tax

1972
actual

1.155
939
98

1973
estimate

1,288
1,035
126

1974
estimate

1,390
1,135
124

Full-employmerit
receipts.—While actual receipts are affected
by the state of the economy, full-employment receipts are based on the
amount of income that would be generated if the economy were continually operating at full employment (conventionally defined as

540-000 O - 74 - 4




46

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

unemployment equal to 4% of the civilian labor force). The receipts
that would be produced by existing and proposed tax laws if economic
resources were fully employed were $243 billion in 1973 and are estimated to be $278 billion in 1974 and $311 billion in 1975.
CHANGES IN BUDGET RECEIPTS
Budget receipts are estimated to rise by $37.8 billion in 1974 and
$25.0 billion in 1975. The year-to-year changes can be divided between
those due to growth in the tax base and those due to revisions in
the tax structure. Under tax laws in effect in January 1972, receipts
would have risen by $28.4 billion in 1974 (from $228.7 billion to $257.1
billion) and by $19.8 billion in 1975 (from $257.1 billion to $276.9
billion). Thus, enacted and proposed tax law changes, which are shown
in the accompanying table, increase the growth in receipts by $9.4
billion in 1974 and by $5.2 billion in 1975.
CHANGES IN BUDGET RECEIPTS
[In billions of dollars]
1973
actual

Receipts under tax rates and structure in effect on Jan. 1, 1972 __
Enacted legislative changes:
Social security taxes:
Rate increase from 10.4% to 11.7% effective Jan. 1, 1973 *
Taxable earnings base increases:
$9,000 to $10,800 effective Jan. 1, 1973 !
$10,800 to $13,200 effective Jan. 1, 1974
$13,200 to $14,100 effective Jan. 1, 1975
Reduction in telephone excise tax
Increase in Medicare premium

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

228.7

257.1

276.9

+3.2

+6.8

+7.0

+0.4

+4.7
+0.4

—0.1

—0.3
+0.1

+5.4
+4.6
+0.1
—0.5
+0.2

Total receipts under existing legislation
Changes due to proposed legislation:
Emergency Windfall Profits Tax 2
Administration tax reform and simplification proposals
Liberalized deductions for individual contributions to pension
plans
Increase in railroad retirement receipts
Write-off of silver certificates

232.2

268.8

293. 7

+1.0

+3.0
—1.0

Total receipts from existing and proposed legislation

232.2

-0.9
+0.2
+0.2
270.0

295. 0

1
The effect of the tax rate increase from 10.4% to 11.7% is calculated using the taxable earnings
base of $9,000; the effect of the taxable earnings base increase from $9,000 to $10,800 is calculated
using the 11.7% tax rate.
2
The estimates for this proposal are shown net of the impact on regular corporation income taxes.
The gross impact in 1975 is $5 billion.




BUDGET RECEIPTS

47

RECEIPTS BY SOURCE
Individual income taxes.—Individual income tax receipts are
estimated at $118 billion in 1974 and $129 billion in 1975. The increase
of $11 billion in 1975 is largely due to growth in taxable personal
income. The estimate for 1975 reflects the Administration tax reform
and simplification proposals, which will reduce taxes by $1 billion.
The 1975 estimate also reflects legislation which has been proposed to
liberalize deductions for individual pension plans. The tax loss from
this proposal is estimated to be $0.9 billion in 1975.
Corporation income taxes.—Corporation income tax receipts are
estimated at $48 billion in 1975, an increase of $5 billion over the
previous year. A large part of this increase results from the proposed
Emergency Windfall Profits Tax.
Social insurance taxes and contributions.—Keceipts from this
source are expected to total $85.6 billion in 1975, up by $7.7 billion
from 1974. Included in the total are social security and other payroll
taxes, unemployment insurance taxes and deposits, Federal employee
retirement contributions, and payments by the elderly for supplementary medical insurance. These receipt figures reflect:
• An anticipated increase in the dollar amount of payrolls covered
by the social security system and by other retirement and insurance programs due to the expansion of employment and the rise
in wage rates;
• A statutory increase in the taxable earnings base under social
security from $10,800 to $13,200 effective January 1, 1974, and
an anticipated increase from $13,200 to $14,100 effective January 1, 1975, through the operation of the automatic adjustment
mechanism; and
• Anticipated legislation to provide the increased receipts that are
required to finance the present level of benefits under the railroad
retirement system.
Excise taxes.—Excise taxes are levied on a variety of products,
services, and activities. Receipts from these taxes in 1975 are estimated
at $17.4 billion, which is $0.3 billion more than in 1974. Excise tax
receipts in both 1974 and 1975 reflect the continued phasing out of
the telephone excise tax. This tax rate was reduced from 9% to 8%
on January 1, 1974, and will be reduced to 7% on January 1, 1975.




48

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

19 7 5

Budget Receipts

1965

1966

Fiscal Year,

1967

1968

1969

1970

Wt\

f972

1973

1974

1975
Estimate

Other receipts.—Estate and gift taxes, customs, and miscellaneous
receipts are estimated to total $15.0 billion in 1975, an increase of
$1.0 billion from 1974.
The detail of budget receipts by source is shown in table 11 in
part 7. In addition to these budget receipts, the Government receives
significant proprietary income from the public. This is derived from
various market-oriented activities—such as rents, royalties, and the
sale of Government products and property—that are excluded from
budget receipts and instead are treated as offsets to related budget
authority and outlays. The detail of proprietary receipts from the
public is shown in table 12 in part 7.




PART 4

THE FEDERAL
PROGRAM BY FUNCTION




49

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
This section discusses the budget in terms of the functions or
purposes being served. Outlays for each program are placed in the
single function which best represents that program's major purpose.
The functions differ from the categories used in part 2 of the separate
volume of Special Analyses where a program may be placed in more
than one category depending upon the analytical purpose being
served. Because of the special interest in energy programs, they are
discussed in a separate section, even though outlays are included
under various functions or in a special allowance for acceleration of
energy research and development.
SUMMARY
Total outlays in 1975 are estimated to be $304.4 billion, an increase
of $29.8 billion over 1974. In 1976, full-employment outlays for programs in the current budget are projected at $329 billion.1
Major functions.—Distribution of 1975 budget outlays among
major functions may be summarized as follows:
• National defense accounts for $87.7 billion or 28.8% of the total.
• International affairs and finance outlays account for $4.1 billion,
or 1.3% of the total.
• Human resources programs (education and manpower, health,
income security, and veterans benefits and services) account for
$151.5 billion, 49.8% of the budget.
• Physical resources programs (agriculture and rural development, natural resources and environment, commerce and transportation, and community development and housing) represent
$24.9 billion, or 8.2%.
• General Revenue Sharing is $6.2 billion, or 2.0% of the budget.
• A special allowance for acceleration of energy research and
development will total $0.5 billion in 1975.
• Programs in other domestic affairs functions (space research and
technology and general government), and allowances will total
$11.1 billion, or 3.7% in 1975.
• Net interest (interest paid to the public) is $22.0 billion, or 7.2%
of the budget.
1
Includes an estimate for the unemployment trust fund which assumes full-employment. Because of the increasing uncertainties, no forecast of the actual unemployment rate has been made
for 1976.

50




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

51

SUMMARY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
[In billions of dollars)

Function

National security and international affairs:
National defense2
International affairs and
finance
Domestic affairs:
Human resources programs
Education and manpower
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Physical resources programs
Agriculture and rural development
Natural resources and environment
Commerce and transportation
Community development and housing
General Revenue Sharing
Other
General government
Space research and technology
Special allowance for acceleration of energy
research and development
Allowances 3
Net interest:
Interest
Interest received by trust funds
Employer share, employee retirement
Total budget outlays

Outlays
1969

1973

1974

81.2
3.8

76.0
3.0

80.6
3.9

(63.5)
6.5
11.6
37.7
7.6
(18.3)
6.2
2.2
7.9
2.0

(113.7)
10.2
18.4
73.1
12.0
(24.0)
6.2
.6
13.1
4.1
(6.6)
(8.8)
5.5
3. 3

(132.4)
10.8
23.3
85.0
13.3
(23.6)
4.0
.6
13.5
5.4
(6.1)
(10.3)
6.8
3.2

(7.0)
2.8
4.2

1975

87.7
4. 1
(151.5)
11.5
26.3
100.1
13.6
(24.9)
2.7
3.1
13.4
5.7
(6.2)
(11.6)
6.8
3. 3

Recommended
budget
authority

95.0
4.7
(157.6)
11.5
28.0
104.0
14.1
(28.0)
7.4
—.3
14.5
6.4
(6.2)
(12.2)
6.8
3.2

.3

.5
1.1

.8
1.4

15.8
—3.1
—2.0

22.8
—5.4
—2.9

27.8
—6.4
—3.5

29.1
—7.1
—3. 6

29.1
—7.1
—3.6

184.5

246.5

274.7

304.4

322.1

* Compares with budget authority in 1969 of $196.2 billion, in 1973 of $276.4 billion, and in 1974
of 2$310.9 billion.
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform and civilian
and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
* Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.

OUTLAY TRENDS SINCE WORLD WAR II
Both the size and composition of the Federal budget have changed
dramatically in the past 3 decades. The years 1947-50 were characterized by relatively heavy outlays for veterans benefits, foreign
assistance, and net interest—which together accounted for more than
42% of total outlays in each of those years. National defense spending
ran between 30% and 36% of total outlays, and the remaining functions amounted to only 22% to 27% of the total. By 1953, due to the
Korean War, spending for veterans, international affairs, and net




52

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

interest had dropped to 16% of the total, while defense amounted to
two-thirds, and all other spending was less than 2 0 % . T h e rise in
defense spending in conjunction with Vietnam fighting peaked in 1968
at 4 5 % of total outlays. Last year, outlays for veterans, international
affairs, and net interest dropped to 1 3 % of the total, defense spending
was reduced to less than one-third, and all other spending rose to over
half of the total.
The following table, showing budget outlays at 5-year intervals
since 1950, illustrates many of the changes that have occurred.
BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION SINCE 1950
[In billions of dollars]
Function

1950

1955

1960

1965

National security and international affairs:
National defense *
13.1 40.2 45.9 49.6
International affairs and
finance
4.8
2.0
3.1
4.3
Domestic affairs:
Human resources
(14.0) (14.5) (25.5) (35.4)
Education and manpower
.2
.6
].]
2.3
Health
.3
.3
.8
1.7
Income security
4.7
9.1 18.3 25.7
Veterans benefits and services
8.8
4.5
5.4
5.7
Physical resources
(5.9) (5.7) (10.1) (14.6)
Agriculture and rural development
2.8
4.0
3.3
4.8
Natural resources and environment
1.2
.5
1.0
2.1
Commerce and transportation
1.6
1.1
4.8
7.4
Community development and housing
.2
*
1.0
.3
General Revenue Sharing
Other
(1.2) (1.3) (1.6) (7.3)
General government
1.2
1.2
1.2
2.2
Space research and technology
.1
.1
.4
5.1
Special allowance for acceleration of energy
research and development
Allowances2
Net interest:
Interest
5.7
6.0
8.3 10.4
Interest received by trust funds
- . 9 -1.2 -1.4 -1.8
Employer share, employee retirement3
—.8
—* —.9 —1.3
Total budget outlays
Percent distribution:
National security and international affairs
Domestic affairs
Netinterest
Employer share, employee retirement3

43.1

41.5
49.1
11.3
—1.8

68.5

1970

1975
estimate

80.3 87.7
3.6
4.1
(72.6)(151.5)
7.3 11.5
12.9 26.3
43.7 100.1
8.7 13.6
(21.2) (24.9)
6.2
2.7
2.6
3.1
9.5 13.4
3.0
5.7
(6.2)
(7.0) (11.6)
3.3
6,8
3.7
3.3
-5
1.1
18.3 29.1
-3.9 -7.1
—2.4 —3.6

92.2 118.4 196.6 304.4

61.7 53.1 45. 5 42.7 30. 2
31.2 40.4 48.4 51.3 63.8
7.1
7.5
7.2
7.3
7.2
— ** —1.0 —1.1 —1.2 —1.2

1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform and civilian and
military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes allowances for civilian agency pay raises and contingencies.
3
Includes —$0.5 billion of budget outlays in 1950 unallocable by function.
*Less than $50 million.
**Less than 0.05%.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

53

A broader perspective is gained by focusing on the major groupings
relative to total output in the economy (GNP).
1950

1955

I960

1965

1970

1975

estimate

Outlays (in billions of dollars):
National security and international affairs
Domestic affairs
Other
Total
Percent of GNP:
National security and international affairs
Domestic affairs
Other
Total

17.9
21.2
4.1

42.3
21.4
4.8

49.0
37.3
6.0

53.9
57.3
7.2

83.9
100.8
11.9

91.8
194.2
18.4

43.1

68.5

92.2

118.4

196.6

304.4

6.8
8.0
1.5

11.2
5.7
1.3

9.9
7.5
1.2

8.2
8.8
1.1

8.8
10.6
1.2

6. 3
13.3
1.3

16.4

18.1

18.6

18.1

20.6

20.9

Total outlays have risen in response to the expansion of the economy,
the demand for more public services, and inflation. However, these
factors do not affect all components of the budget equally. Spending
for national security and international affairs programs has fluctuated
greatly as a share of GNP depending on world conditions, but the
trend has been sharply downward for most of the post-World War II
period. In contrast, the trend of domestic affairs spending has been
steadily upward over most of this period, while net interest has grown
at about the same rate as the total economy. The following chart,
by focusing on averages for several groups of years, helps to show the
trends that have dominated Federal spending over this span of time.
Total outlays as a percent of GNP rose substantially between 1947
and 1966, initially because of the national security affairs expansion
necessitated by the Korean War and post-Korean security needs, and
subsequently because of the rapid rise in domestic affairs spending.
For the period 1967-75, the decline in national security and international spending relative to GNP has been sufficient to offset virtually
all of the increase in domestic affairs spending, so total outlays have
fluctuated narrowly around 21% of GNP since 1967.
The decline in the proportion of our economy devoted to national
security and international affairs is reflected in the following results.
• The armed forces in 1973 reached the lowest manpower level
since 1951.
• Foreign assistance in real terms (adjusted for inflation) is at the
lowest level since World War II.
• Total defense spending in real terms (adjusted for inflation) was
lower in 1973 than in any year since 1951.




54

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

19 7 5

Budget Outlays as a Percent of G N P
5-Year Averages

20~~

15Domestic Affairs

10-

—

National Security
and International
Affairs

5 ~11

i 1
i

1947-50'
Fiscal Year.

I95f~55

Other
1956-60

(961-65

1966-70

I97J-75
Estimate

* Covers only 4 years, since 1946 included significant World War II spending.

The 1975 budget proposes an increase in national security and
international affairs spending in real terms. However, total spending
on national security and international affairs—again, in real terms—
will be markedly below the peacetime levels of the 1955-65 period. In
fact, in the 3 years covered by this budget, national security and international affairs outlays will be the lowest percentage of GNP since
fiscal year 1941.
In contrast, spending on domestic affairs programs has expanded
rapidly and is continuing to expand. The bulk of this growth is concentrated in human resources programs, especially in income security and
health activities.
In 1960, human resources programs amounted to $26 billion, which
was 68% of total outlays for domestic affairs but only 28% of total
budget outlays. By 1970 these outlays had increased to $73 billion,
totaling 72% of domestic affairs spending and 37% of total outlays.
By 1975, outlays for human resources programs are estimated to be
over $150 billion, and amount to 78% of spending for domestic affairs
and half of total outlays.




THE

FEDERAL

55

PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

SPENDING FOR DOMESTIC AFFAIRS AS A PERCENT OF GNP
Fiscal year

1950__
1955
1960
1965_
1970

Total

Human
resources

All other

1975 estimate

8.0
5.7
7.5
8.8
10.6

i5.3 2.7
3.8 1.8
5.2 2.4
5.4 3.3
7.6 3.0

13.3

_
.

10.4

2.9

Veterans benefits and services accounted for nearly two-thirds of this percentage, but by 1975
will be less than 10% of the human resources total.

Net interest is the third major category of Federal budgetary outlays. While it varies from year to year, net interest has been a relatively
stable percent of the GNP for 2 decades.
ENERGY
Until recent years, this country was largely self-sufficient in energy
production. With low energy prices in this country, households and
industries increased their consumption rapidly. The growing demand
for energy has now outstripped readily available domestic supplies.
Thus, we have become more dependent on imported petroleum, which
was, until recently, low in cost, and the development of higher priced
domestic sources lagged. The interruption of oil exports by Arab
countries following the Middle East war, which aggravated the energy
problem, underscores sharply the need for this country to reestablish
its ability to be self-sufficient in energy.
The 1975 budget provides funds for the Federal role in a comprehensive national energy policy to deal with current shortages and
funds to initiate Project Independence. This is an accelerated private
and governmental effort to reestablish the Nation's capability for selfsufficiency in energy by 1980. The research and development component of this program, which takes into account the recommendations
of the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, anticipates
Federal funding of $10 billion or more during the next 5 years. Greater
amounts may be needed after 1980. It is intended that this R. & D .
program will encourage and complement, rather than supplant, a
vigorous research and development effort by private industry.
Other key elements of the comprehensive national energy policy
include:
• stringent energy conservation measures to curtail use of scarce
fuels;




56

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

• allocation of petroleum products to give priority to energy supplies critical to economic growth and employment;
• adjustment of outmoded regulatory restrictions on railroads in
order to permit energy savings and other economies;
• accelerated development of domestic oil and gas reserves, including removal of the ceiling on the wellhead price of new natural
gas, production from the Elk Hills, Calif., Naval Petroleum
Reserve, and development by private industry of western oil
shale and Outer Continental Shelf oil deposits;
• increased early use of our vast coal resources, including coal
from surface mining under guidelines and standards governing
environmental impact;
• increased use of currently available technologies for secondary
and tertiary recovery of oil and for gasification of coal;
• accelerated approval of sites for energy facilities and construction
of nuclear power plants; and
• reorganization of the Federal administrative machinery to deal
more effectively with short- and long-term energy needs.
Recent steps toward the goal of achieving the capability for energy
self-sufficiency include:
• establishment of the Federal Energy Office as a focal point for
energy matters within the executive branch;
• accelerated leasing of the Outer Continental Shelf for oil and gas
development;
• enactment of legislation permitting the construction of the
Alaskan pipeline;
• first leasing of Federal land to permit the production of oil from
shale; and,
• $115 million supplemental funding during the fiscal year 1974 to
initiate accelerated Federal support of energy research and
development.
Achieving the capability for energy self-sufficiency will require that
the United States sharply increase its ability to utilize domestic coal,
nuclear, and other energy resources. For the longer term, the Nation
must also develop advanced technologies which will permit energy selfsufficiency through the exploitation of renewable or virtually inexhaustible energy resources, such as fusion and solar energy.
In carrying forward this national research and development strategy,
there are important reasons for a strong Federal role.
• National security and economic stability require the capability
for energy self-sufficiency even if the availability of imported
petroleum in the short-term improves.
• Federal support or encouragement of energy R. & D. can speed
the commercial availability of new energy technologies.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

57

• The magnitude and urgency of the R. & D . effort required for
energy self-sufficiency can require Federal as well as private
involvement.
While these factors indicate the need for strong Federal support, it is
imperative that the private sector's primary responsibility for energy
R. & D . be fostered and that its technical and financial capabilities
be fully utilized. The Federal program must be structured to encourage
private investment in energy R. & D . and to avoid unnecessary Government expenditures which may merely replace private sector investments.
A key element of the Federal program is the flexibility to tailor the
Federal effort in each R. & D. area to the characteristics of the technology, the stage of development, and the industry involved. I n some
R. & D . areas in which there is considerable uncertainty as to the level
of private funding that will actually be forthcoming in response to
market forces, this implies flexibility to step up Federal support if
required, and reduce it when no longer needed.
The 1975 budget provides a total of over $2.0 billion in budget
authority for energy R. & D . as reflected in the following table.
The budget provides for a substantial increase in nuclear energy
programs. Specifically, this increase provides for continued growth in
ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Energy research and development programs included under regular
functional categories:
National defense: Atomic Energy Commission
Natural resources and environment:
Department of the Interior
Environmental Protection Agency
Education and manpower: National Science Foundation
Other
Subtotal, energy R. & D. programs included under regular
functional categories
Special allowance for acceleration of energy research and development
Total, all energy research and development programs

Recommended
—
budget
1974
1975
authority
estimate estimate for 1975
Outlays

648

791

856

182
60
24
28

200
63
30
47

232
70
38
47

942

1,131

1,243

461

809

942

x

1,592

1

2,052

1
Includes an increase of $84 million in outlays and $172 million in budget authority for related
basic research and for environmental and health effects research.




58

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

the program to develop the liquid metal fast breeder reactor as well
as a greatly expanded effort to develop the technology for harnessing
nuclear fusion as a future energy source. Funds under the total shown
for the Atomic Energy Commission will also be used for programs to
develop other advanced converter and breeder reactors, to make nuclear systems even safer, to develop improved methods for producing
enriched uranium, and to increase basic research in relevant physical
and biological sciences. These funds will be further augmented by
allocations from the allowance for R. & D. acceleration shown in the
table above.
While some increases for nonnuclear energy R. & D. programs are
shown by agency in the table above, the major expansion of funds for
these programs will be financed from the allowance for acceleration of
energy R. & D. The combination of these funds will provide for greatly
expanded programs to develop improved technologies for coal extraction, for producing clean liquid and gaseous fuels from coal and for
direct combustion of coal.
Coal gasification and liquefaction techniques, presently at an early
state of development, can increase the versatility of coal and enhance
its importance as an energy resource. The success of these techniques
will contribute greatly to U.S. energy self-sufficiency because the
United States has the world's largest known reserves of coal. The
allowance for acceleration of R. & D. also supports programs to
develop and demonstrate new technologies for environmental control
and expanded programs in solar and geothermal energy, as well as research to improve the efficiency of energy conversion. In addition, the
allowance for acceleration of energy R. & D. provides for increased
efforts in basic research and in environmental sciences and health
effects research.
The overall plans for energy R. & D. in 1975, and through 1979, have
been provided in the President's Energy Message of January 23.
Budget amendments will be transmitted, concurrently with this
budget, to the Congress, distributing the allowance for acceleration of
R. & D. by agency.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

59

NATIONAL DEFENSE
Program Highlights
• Ended American combat involvement in the war in
Vietnam.
• Maintained military strength.
• Continued negotiations on further strategic arms limitations with the Soviet Union.
• Initiated discussions on mutual and balanced force
reductions in Europe with the Warsaw Pact countries.
• Completed the transition to an All-Volunteer Force.
New Developments
• Strengthen military readiness and modernize combat forces.
• Introduce a number of new research and development
programs to maintain the effectiveness of the general purpose forces and to have the option to produce new strategic
systems.
• Expand airlift capabilities.
• Increase the ratio of combat to support forces.
• Improve military efficiency by reducing overhead costs.
Peace throughout the world, and continued progress toward prosperity, are related goals shared by all civilized nations. In order to
contribute toward these goals, the national security programs of the
United States must enable us to deter other nations from initiating
conflict which affects this Nation's vital interests, and if deterrence
fails, to defeat any aggressor.
Military strength, the will to employ that strength if necessary, and
the recognition of American resolve by potential adversaries, are also
requirements for successful negotiations. Unless the United States
maintains its strength and its resolve, there is only limited incentive
for potential adversaries to keep the peace and to compromise
where perceived national interests conflict.
Supplemental appropriations in 1974, and an increase from $88.2
billion budget authority in 1974 to $95.0 billion in budget authority in
1975, are necessary to maintain a level of U.S. military strength consistent with the achievement of these goals.
These increases are the minimum required to insure the combat
readiness and modernization of American forces, to provide for the




60

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

development of future weapons and to offset the erosion of defense
purchasing power through pay and price increases. Despite these
essential increases, national defense programs in 1974 and 1975 will
require a smaller percentage of gross national product and the Federal
budget, and will employ a smaller portion of the Nation's labor force
than at any time since 1950.
Outlays for national defense programs, including those provided
for by the supplemental appropriations request for 1974, will be
$87.7 billion in 1975 and are expected to reach $94.8 billion in 1976.
NATIONAL DEFENSE
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

1973
actual

Department of Defense—Military 2 3
Military Assistance2 3
Subtotal, Military and Military Assistance 2
Atomic Energy 2 3
Defense-related activities
Deductions for offsetting receipts 4 ..
Total

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

78,400
1,100

84,600
1,200

90,974
1,925

73,828 79,500
2,393
2,328
177
-16
-377 -1,240

85,800
2,886
12
-969

92,899
3.058
59
-969

76,021

87,729

95,047

73,297
531

_

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1975 *

80,573

1 Compares with budget authority of $82,787 million in 1973 and $88,177 million in 1974.
Entries net of offsetting receipts.
> Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
* Excludes offsetting receipts which have been deducted by subfunctions above: 1 973, $ 1,933 million;
1974, $2,912 million; 1975, $3,706 million.
2

Department of Defense—Military.—The Soviet Union continues
to pursue an aggressive program to develop new military weapons.
As U.S. forces and defense spending, measured in dollars of constant
purchasing power, have been reduced, Soviet forces and spending
have been increased. In order to prevent a serious imbalance from
developing, the United States must continue to modernize and to
improve the readiness of its combat forces.
It is hoped that negotiations toward strategic arms limitations
and mutual and balanced force reductions will be successful in reducing further the threat of war. However, while negotiations continue,
the United States must maintain adequate force levels and technology.
If negotiations fail and the Soviet Union seeks military advantage, the
United States must be prepared to increase its forces quickly and
effectively.
Because the time required for development and deployment of
major weapon systems is long, decisions made today will shape the




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Defense

61

Outlays as a Percent of GNP

* Department of Defense—Military and military assistance.

ability of the United States to maintain its strength 5 to 10 years from
now. Although American forces are adequate today, the United
States must begin the research and development efforts necessary
to prepare for the future.
As long as the allies of the United States assume their share of the
burden, general purpose force levels overseas will be maintained in the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries. Agreement with
Warsaw Pact members upon mutual reductions, if reached, will leave
the security of all NATO nations undiminished. Efforts to inject
new vitality into the NATO alliance will be pursued through serious,
candid discussions. As the Asian allies of the United States become
increasingly self-sufficient, they will be expected to increase their share
of the burden for their defense. Even though many American forces
have been withdrawn from Southeast Asia, the United States will
continue to lend substantial support to its allies there.
Specific materiel shortages which were brought to light during the
Middle-East crisis will be eliminated, and the readiness of ships,
aircraft and weapons will be increased in accord with more realistic
estimates based upon this recent experience. Military efficiency will
be improved through increasing the ratio of combat to support forces.
540-000 O - 74 - 5




62

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OUTLAYS *
Actual
1968

Outlays (in billions):
Manpower
Operating costs (other than payroll)
Procurement, research and development, and construction
Total
Percent of total:

Manpower...
-Operating costs (other than payroll)
Procurement, research and development, and construction
Total
1

Estimated
1973

1974

1975

32.6
12.3

41.2
10.5

43.9
12.1

47.5
13.3

33.1

22.1

23.5

25.0

78.0

73.8

79.5

85.8

42
16

56
14

55
15

55
16

42

30

30

29

100

100

100

100

Includes military assistance program and foreign military sales programs.

Manpower costs for 1974 and 1975 will require a larger share of the
military budget than the total of operations, procurement, research
and development, and construction, as indicated in the accompanying
table. Data for 1968, the peak year of the Vietnam war, are shown for
comparative purposes.
Major Department of Defense missions are shown in the following
table in terms of total obligational authority. Total obligational
authority for any year is the sum of budget authority granted or
requested from the Congress in that year plus unused budget authority
from prior years and other financial adjustments.
Strategic forces.—Total obligational authority of $7.6 billion is
proposed in 1975 for strategic forces. The primary objective of these
forces is to deter nuclear attack against the United States and its
allies. To achieve this objective, the United States must have a secure
capability to limit conflict and, even after absorbing a first strike, to
inflict unacceptable damage upon a potential aggressor. Although the
United States is hopeful that continued strategic arms limitations
negotiations will lead to further equitable agreements, this country
must continue to be in a position to prevent its potential adversaries
from attaining nuclear superiority.
In view of the extensive development of strategic weapons now
underway in the Soviet Union, the United States must maintain a
wide range of weapons development programs. Development of the
Trident sea-based ballistic missile system and the B - l advanced
manned strategic bomber will continue. Research and development




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

63

SUMMARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BUDGET PROGRAM1
[In billions of dollars]
Total obligational authority
Major military programs

Actual
1968

Strategic forces
_
General purpose forces
Intelligence and communications
Airlift and sealift
Guard and Reserve
Research and development2
Central supply and maintenance
Training, medical, and other general personnel activities
Administration and associated activities
Support of other nations l
Total obligational authority
Prior year funds and other financial adjustments
Total budget authority
1
8

Estimate
1973

1974

1975

7.2
30.4
5.5
1.8
2.2
4.3
8.4

7.2
25.8
5.7
.9
3.9
6.5
8.6

6.9
27.9
5.9
1.0
4.4
7.0
8.9

7.6
29.2
6.5
1.0
4.8
8.4
9.3

12.2
1.2
1.8

16.4
1.7
2.6

18.2
1.8
1.8

20.1
2.2
2.2

75.0

79.3

83.8

91.3

1.4

—1.7

—1.1

—.3

76.4

77.6

82.7

91.0

Excludes military assistance program and foreign military sales programs.
Excludes R. & D. in other program areas on systems approved for production.

projects to provide a number of other possible strategic weapons will
be initiated. These include larger warheads for intercontinental
ballistic missiles, mobile missiles, cruise missiles, and a smaller ballistic
missile submarine. Decision to produce and deploy these systems will
depend, among other things, upon the outcome of the strategic arms
limitation negotiations.
In response both to the interim strategic arms limitations agreement and to a reassessment of the nature of the strategic threat, the
United States will continue a major reorient a tion of the strategic
defensive forces. The Safeguard antiballistic missile system at Grand
Forks, N. Dak., will become operational in 1975, thus providing protection to Minuteman missiles located in that area. However, Safeguard deployment will be limited at this time to the North Dakota
site.
In recognition of the reduced threat of a massive bomber attack,
the Nike-Hercules surface-to-air missile batteries located in the
United States, and some fighter interceptor squadrons, are being
phased out. Current U.S. air defense efforts concentrate on surveillance, control of U.S. air space, warning of attack, and a prudent interception capability. The ability to detect and warn of an
enemy missile attack will be improved by means of satellite-based
sensors and sophisticated radar systems.




64

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

SUMMARY OF ACTIVE MILITARY

1975

PERSONNEL AND FORCES
Actual

Description

Estimated

June 30,
1968

June 30,
1973

June 30,
1974

June 30,
1975

1,570

75
6
37
0
95
0

81
0
54
6
16
9
61
9

72
8
51
5
16
9
65
4

3.547

2.252

2,174

2,152

1.487

72
5
28
9
89
9

89
3
59
7
18
9
78
0

78
8
52
6
12
9
66
7

70
8
54
5
16
9
67
4

3.436

2,324

2,218

2,177

1.000

1,000

1,000

1,000

5
4
66
5
56
0

54
66
5
56
0

54
66
5
56
0

1
3
3

1
3
3

n%

4
2
5
1
5
3

22
1
4
3

22
1
4
3

22
1
4
3

2
3
3
3
31
8
17
5

1
6
6
0
22
4
6
6

1
4
6
1
16
8
6
5

1
5
67
11
9
6
5

0
3
2
10
3

4
1
3
5
3

4
1
3
32

4
1
3
32

Military personnel (in thousands):

End strength:
Army
Navy
Marine Corps
Air Force
Total, Department of Defense
Average strength:
Army
Navy
Marine Corps.
Air Force
_
Total, Department of Defense.

75
8
51
4
16
9
630

Strategic forces:

Intercontinental ballistic missiles:
Minuteman
Titan II
Polaris-Poseidon missiles.
Strategic bombers

5
4
66
5
79
1

General purpose forces:

Land forces:
Army divisions
Marine divisions
Tactical air forces:
Air Force wings
Navy attack wings
Marine Corps wings
Naval forces:
Attack and antisubmarine carriers..
Nuclear attack submarines
Other warships
Amphibious assault ships

I92/3

3

Airlift and sealift forces:

C-5A airlift squadrons
_
Other strategic airlift squadrons
Troopships, cargo ships, and tankers..

General purpose forces.—Strong general purpose forces are also
necessary. These include: Army divisions, Marine Corps divisions,
tactical air forces, and naval combat and support ships. In order to
maintain combat strength on which national security is founded,
1975 programs for general purpose forces center on improving combat
preparedness and on modernizing weapons. Increasing the ratio of
combat to support forces without reducing readiness is also a major




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

65

goal. Additional combat units will be added to the active forces within
current total manpower by decreasing the number of support units
and by reducing headquarters staffs.
Modernization of land forces will continue with emphasis on tank
and antitank systems, tactical air defense, artillery, and battlefield
air mobility. Modern tanks with increased capabilities and new Cobra
helicopters equipped with wire-guided missiles will be purchased to
increase antitank capabilities. Development of an advanced attack
helicopter, a new tank and a more effective antitank missile also will be
continued. Tactical air defense will be enhanced through additional
purchases of the Improved Hawk missile system and through development and testing of a new hand-held antiaircraft missile and short
range air defense system. Artillery capabilities will be improved
through the development and procurement of new medium artillery
systems and conventional munitions with greater range and power.
Mobility on the battlefield will be provided in the next few years by
the development of troop transport and heavy lift helicopters.
Naval forces preserve our vital right to use the seas and protect our
interests on faraway shores. Increased modernization is planned
through refitting existing naval forces with improved missiles, torpedoes, radars and sonars, and purchase of smaller, less costly ships which
will be required for control of the seas. Included are seven patrol frigates, four patrol hydrofoils, and a sea control ship. The last is the
first of a new class of vessel which can be used to launch a variety of
helicopters and short take-off and landing aircraft to perform antisubmarine, antiaircraft, and other missions. Procurement of one
nuclear-powered guided missile frigate and additional nuclear attack
submarines is recommended. Naval support forces will also be strengthened by the addition of the first of a new class of tankers and the continuation of the destroyer tender building program.
A high rate of production of tactical aircraft is proposed to continue
the modernization of the tactical air forces. This is essential to assure
continued U.S. air superiority. Ground attack and close air support
capabilities will be enhanced through the procurement of electronically-guided bombs and missile systems. Coordination of tactical air
forces will be improved with the purchase of aircraft for the airborne
warning and control system. The 1975 budget also provides funds
for engineering development of a new fighter for the Air Force and
the initiation of the development of a new Navy fighter. Both programs are designed to provide an aircraft capable of ensuring air
superiority but at a lower cost than the F-14 and F-15.
Greater purchases of flight simulators, designed to maintain the
quality of training while saving fuel and reducing accidents, is a major
new initiative. This added ability to train pilots under realistic threat




66

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

and emergency conditions at less overall cost will help assure continuing superiority of the tactical air forces.
Airlift and sealift forces.—The effective use of airlift for strategic
purposes was clearly demonstrated during the recent transfer of supplies to the Middle East. The ability to react in a convincing fashion
to distant armed conflict with material support contributed substantially to limiting the duration of combat.
A major initiative of this budget is the expansion of airlift capabilities. Modifications to lengthen the C-141 and to provide efficient
cargo capability for wide body commercial aircraft in the Civil Reserve
Air Fleet are proposed. Funds for additional C-141 and C-5 crews will
increase the capability to react in an emergency. New material handling equipment will also be developed. Total obligational authority of
$1.0 billion is provided for these initiatives and to maintain overseas
equipment, to operate aircraft and ships, and to improve force readiness.
Guard and Reserve.—The Guard and Reserve forces constitute an
available force, equipped to meet military contingency requirements
at lower peacetime costs than active forces. Guard and Reserve forces
are designated as the initial source of manpower to augment the active
forces in an emergency.
In recent years the amount of equipment assigned to the Guard and
Reserve units has increased substantially. Old equipment has been
replaced with modern equipment which is more compatible with that
of the active forces. Training also has been improved. However, added
incentives are required to recruit and retain members, particularly
those with prior military service.
A comprehensive study is underway to review and identify ways to
use more efficiently the Reserve forces, and the results of that work
will be reflected in the 1976 Budget. In the interim, total obligational
authority of $4.8 billion in 1975 will provide for a more capable
Guard and Reserve force.
Research and development.—An increase in total obligational authority from $7.0 billion in 1974 to $8.4 billion in 1975 is planned to
strengthen the research and development program. This effort will be
directed toward maintaining the technological lead and anticipating
the possible technological advances of potential adversaries. This will
include the development of new strategic and tactical systems to
maintain force effectiveness. Work will also proceed on the development of a new tank, an advanced attack helicopter, an improved
antiship missile defense system to protect carriers, and an array of
systems to counter enemy air defenses.
In addition, the research and development program will explore
technology that may be used in the development of future systems.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

67

Guidance technology for both tactical and strategic missiles, laser
technology, and advanced reconnaissance technology will continue
to receive emphasis.
Training, medical, and other general personnel support activities.—The
transition to an all-volunteer force has required substantial increases
in the compensation of members of the armed forces. Between 1968
and 1975 total active duty pay costs will have increased $5 billion,
from $19 billion to $24 billion, although the number of personnel
has been reduced from 3.5 million to 2.2 million. A doubling of per
capita average pay, from $5,500 to $11,000 has caused this increase.
The cost of providing health services to the 9.5 million eligible
beneficiaries of the military health care system will exceed $3 billion
in 1975. A major interdepartmental study of this system is underway
to determine the ability of the current system to meet future needs
of the armed forces. This study will identify ways to ensure quality
medical care for Department of Defense beneficiaries consistent with
the President's national health initiatives.
An allowance of about $0.4 billion for recomputation of military
retired pay has been included in each of the past two Defense budget
requests, in fulfillment of a pledge made in 1968. In both years the
request was not approved by the Congress. Consequently, although
the Administration continues to support recomputation, it cannot
realistically include it in the budget request.
Current law provides that basic pay and allowances of military
personnel be increased whenever civilian pay is adjusted. The law also
requires that the entire increase for both pay and allowances be added
to basic pay only. This feature results in an inadvertent overstatement
of basic pay and an understatement of the allowances for quarters and
subsistence. This in turn results in accelerated increases in the costs of
those elements of compensation, such as retirement pay and reenlistment bonuses, which are paid as a percentage of basic pay. Legislation
has been proposed to permit military pay raises to be applied separately
to basic pay and allowances but still retain the matching increase
requirement.
Benefits to former military personnel will require $6.0 billion total
obligational authority in 1975, an increase of $0.8 billion over 1974 and
$4.8 billion over 1964. Because the incentives provided by the current
retirement program are not well matched to the manpower needs of the
services, and because the cost of retirement annuities continues to
climb dramatically, program reform is essential. Legislation has been
submitted to change the program gradually to provide better support
to manpower goals at a lower cost. The total of active duty and




68

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

retirement compensation will be substantially larger than in the past,
but a greater share will be paid during active service and less during
retirement.
Support of other nations.—This program includes direct support by
the Defense Department for the armed forces of South Vietnam within
the limits permitted by the Paris Agreement. Also included are the
military personnel costs of military assistance missions and advisory
groups around the world, the U.S. share of the cost of international
military headquarters, and NATO common logistics. For 1975, $2.2
billion in total obligational authority is recommended for this program.
Military assistance.—Military assistance and credit sales programs provide the support necessary to strengthen the efforts of
other countries to provide for their own defense. Additional discussion
of these programs is contained in the International Affairs and Finance section.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

69

Atomic Energy Commission
Program Highlights
• Signed contract for construction of a liquid metal fast
breeder power reactor demonstration plant.
• Achieved significant progress toward controlling nuclear
fusion for power reactors.
• Completed the world's most powerful nuclear particle
accelerator at the National Accelerator Laboratory.
New Developments
• Will increase research and development to help achieve
the capability for self-sufficiency in energy.
• Will propose legislation and take administrative actions
to expedite the construction of nuclear power plants.

Atomic Energy.—Outlays by the Atomic Energy Commission
(AEC) will increase by $558 million in 1975 to $2.9 billion. Outlays
are expected to reach $3.0 billion in 1976.
ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
[In millions of dollars]
Program

Military programs
Civilian energy programs
Research programs
Regulatory program
Program support and cost adjustments

1973
actual
_
^

Total program outlays
Deductions for revenues and reimbursements from non-Federal
sources for services and materials
Net outlays

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1,340
781
476
46
146

1,414
1,029
476
55
159

1,498
1,288
503
69
198

2,789

3,133

3,556

—396

—805

—670

2,393

2,328

2,886

Military programs.—The development, underground testing, and
production of nuclear weapons will continue at about the 1974 level.
Outlays for the production of plutonium and other reactor products
to meet military needs will be higher. The development of improved




70

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

naval nuclear propulsion plants will increase, primarily because of
additional research and development on the Trident submarine reactor.
Civilian energy programs.—The increase of $259 million from the
1974 level refl cts the President's commitment to a greatly increased
energy program over the next 5 years. The accelerated research and
development program is described in a special section en energy at
the beginning of Part 4.
The AEC uranium enrichment plants will operate at higher levels
of production to meet the increasing demand for fuel for power reactors.
Expansion of the capacity of these plants will proceed at a rapid pace.
In addition, the AEC will continue the development of improved
methods for producing enriched uranium, primarily by gas centrifuge.
Research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences.—AEC will increase spending on programs to provide new knowledge of
physical properties and phenomena applicable to energy problems and
to increase understanding of the environmental and health effects of
energy production.
Regulatory program.—AEC will expand its activities for the licensing
and inspection of the nuclear power industry in order to accelerate
licensing of vitally needed power plants while maintaining rigorous
safety standards.
Revenues.—Revenues from the sale of uranium enrichment services
will decline from the 1974 level because of the very large sale to Japan
which occurred in that year.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

71

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AND FINANCE
Program Highlights
• Continued to encourage international cooperation to
resolve economic problems and stimulate trade.
• Encouraged other developed nations to provide a greater
share of the support for international financial institutions and the United Nations.
• Provided disaster relief to Nicaragua, Pakistan, and
drought-stricken countries in Africa.
• Initiated a shift in Indochina assistance toward reconstruction and economic development.
• Provided emergency military assistance to Israel.
New Developments
• Will further orient bilateral development aid toward
agriculture, health, population, and education.
• Will participate in international negotiations to lower
trade barriers and improve the trading system.
• Will increase efficiency of export promotion programs.

The world community must make a renewed commitment to international cooperation. Work is underway to construct a new international monetary system responsive to future needs. A new round of
multilateral trade negotiations will begin this year. The challenge of
economic development is increasingly being met through cooperative
action by donor countries.
Outlays for international affairs and finance are estimated to be
$4.1 billion in 1975 and $4.3 billion in 1976.
Economic and financial assistance.—Through foreign assistance
programs, the United States continues to assist friendly developing
nations in their quest for economic advancement and a secure defense.
These programs, together with continued U.S. leadership in negotiations on arms control, trade, investment, and monetary reform,
constitute vital elements of U.S. strategy to build a durable structure
of peace.
Foreign assistance programs, under direction of the Secretary of
State, serve security, developmental, and humanitarian purposes.
International security assistance.—These programs help friendly
developing countries establish and maintain the capacity for selfdefense. Total Federal fund outlays for 1975 are estimated at $1.5
billion, compared to $1.4 billion in 1974. In 1974, $2,550 million is




72

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AND FINANCE
[In millions of dollars]
Recommended
budget
1975
authority
1974
l
estimate estimate for 1975
Outlays

Program or agency
1973
actual
Economic and financial assistance:

International security assistance:
(Military assistance) 2 3
Security supporting assistance
Indochina postwar reconstruction ___
._
International development assistanceMultilateral
Bilateral*
President's foreign assistance contingency fund
Peace Corps 4
_
Other.._

(865) (1.261) (1.350)
18
1
17
1
65
4
68
4
43
9

(1.079)
6
3
70
9

50
1
87
3
1
1
7
4
52

69
6
95
9
24
7
8
7
0

1,184
1,004
30
83
5
5

Subtotal, economic and financial assistance...
Food for Peace
Foreign information and exchange activities:
United States Information Agency 4
Board for International Broadcasting Activities
Department of State and other

2,129
74
5

2,446
76
9

2,670
72
4

3,209
78
7

27
0
3
9
5
0

29
1
5
1
5
5

27
4
50
62

27
5
5
0
6
5

Subtotal, foreign information and exchange

25
9

36
2

39
5

32
7

41
6
1
5

56
8
24

63
2
2
9

617
2
1

46
7

60
1

62
5

68
3

*
-50
-646

-1
-50
-241

-1
-50
-268

-1
-50
-268

2,957

3,886

4,103

4,680

111
94
6
27
84
57

Conduct of foreign affairs:

Department of State 4 5
Other
Subtotal, conduct of foreign affairs
Deductions for offsetting receipts:

Intragovernmental transactions 6_
Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total

_

—

5

Entries net of offsetting receipts.
• Excludes offsetting receipts which have been deducted by subfunction above: 1973. $14 million;
1974, $38 million; 1975, $41 million.
"Less than $0.5 million.

available for regular and emergency security assistance to Israel.
Because of the uncertainties in the Middle East, additional budget
authority for security assistance to Israel is not being requested at
this time. As the situation clarifies, a budget amendment may be
requested.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

73

Military assistance includes grants for equipment and training and
credit sales of military equipment. This program, which is administered
by the Department of Defense, is classified in the national defense
function.
Military assistance is structured to encourage a shift from grants
to credit assistance and to cash sales as the economies of recipient
countries strengthen and the world political situation becomes more
stable. Several countries, such as the Republic of China and Greece,
no longer receive grants. Others, such as Turkey, receive a mixture of
grants and loans. (Military assistance to South Vietnam is included in
the Defense Department appropriations and is not included in the
table above; such assistance to Laos will be transferred back to the
military assistance program in 1975.) Total Federal fund outlays for
military assistance are estimated at $1.4 billion in 1975, compared to
$1.3 billion in 1974.
INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE
(In millions of dollars]

Assistance program

-

Outlays

Budget authority
1973

1974

1975

1973

1974

1975

Military assistance: 1 2

Grant military assistance
Foreign military credit sales
Credit sales to Israel
Emergency security assistance
Israel
Emergency military assistance
Cambodia *
______
Offsetting receipts, and other
counts

_.

3 650
325

485
233
123

510
293
4

645
280

691

925
315

671

for
2,200
for

150
ac-

Subtotal, military assistance. _
Security supporting assistance.......
Total

551
400

-90

-131

-161

24

-237

-245

861
598

3,194
113

1,079
63

865
645

1,261
117

1,350
118

1,459

3,307

1,142

1,510

1,378

1,468

1
2
3

Military assistance is classified in the national defense function.
Excludes trust funds.
Includes $200 million in contract authority to draw down military department stocks for assistance
to Cambodia pursuant to Section 506 of the Foreign Assistance Act, as amended.
* Availability subject to authorization.

Security supporting assistance helps sustain the economies of countries important to the foreign policy interests of the United States.
Outlays for 1975 are estimated to be $118 million.
Indochina postwar reconstruction.—Economic assistance to South
Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia is being shifted from general support
to reconstruction and longer-term development. Stable economic




74

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

growth should enable these nations to become less dependent on foreign
assistance, although progress has been limited by continuing security
problems. The United States is joining with other nations and with
international financial institutions in this effort and in refugee relief.
Outlays are estimated at $648 million for 1975.
International development assistance,—These programs support the
economic advancement of less developed countries. The program levels
proposed for 1975 reflect the continuing commitment of the United
States to join with other donor countries in a cooperative effort.
Outlays are estimated at $1.6 billion in 1975. Assistance is provided both
multilaterally—through international institutions—and bilaterally.
The principal instruments for multilateral assistance are the
international financial institutions—the World Bank Group and the
Inter-American, Asian, and African Development Banks. These
institutions mobilize private and governmental capital to help solve
development problems. During recent years, U.S. contributions have
declined as a percentage of total contributions to these institutions.
This trend reflects the general acceptance of responsibility for sharing
the development burden among industrialized countries. Budget authority of $1.0 billion is requested for 1975.
Budget authority for U.S. voluntary contributions to international
organizations is proposed at $179 million in 1975. The largest share,
$110 million, is for the United Nations Development Program, which
supports technical advisors and pre-investment surveys. The United
Nations Relief and Works Agency, which provides food, housing,
schooling and health services to about 800,000 displaced refugees in
the Middle East, will receive an estimated $23 million.
Bilateral development assistance is administered principally by the
Agency for International Development (AID). Outlays are estimated
at $964 million in 1975, about the same as in 1974. In response to
congressional directives, AID is emphasizing programs that help the
lower income groups in developing countries in a number of key
areas—food and nutrition, health care, population control, and education. Much of this assistance will be provided in the context of
multidonor groups. In addition, U.S. bilateral aid is used for urgent
disaster relief needs such as arose last year in Nicaragua, Pakistan,
and the Sahel region in Africa.
The Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) offers insurance against expropriation, war, or currency inconvertibility to U.S.
firms investing in less developed countries. Budget authority of $25
million is requested for 1975 to add to OPIC's reserves.
The Inter-American Foundation supports experimental activities in
Latin America undertaken primarily by private nonprofit organizations. Outlays are estimated at $9 million for 1975.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

75

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
[In millions of dollars]
Budget authority
1974

1973

Multilateral:
International financial institutions:
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
International Development Association
Inter-Ame.rican
Development
Bank
. . ____
Asian Development Bank
African Development Bank
Special payments 1
International organizations
Subtotal, multilateral
Bilateral:
Functional development programs 2 .
Development loans _
Grants and other programs
Overseas Private Investment Corporation
Inter-American FoundationOther
. .
Subtotal, bilateral
Proprietary receipts from the public.
Total

Outlays

1975

1973

1975
estimate

1974

1

12

320

320

320

125

220

270

418

418

500
171
15

193

285

4

16

312
26
1

171
1,449

127

146

179

186

136

163

865

2,503

1,184

510

669

772

579

868

766

722

381
456

214

231

1
7
7

-5

8

-10
4
6

896
-104

1,004
-123

837
-320

995
-104

964
-123

3,295

2,065

1,027

1,560

1,613

392
518

285

103

13

25

25

7

8

931
-320
1,476

9
8

1
For transfer to international financial institutions as required to maintain the gold value of U.S.
dollar contributions.
2
Includes all of the activities previously included under development loans and several of the
activities previously included under grants and other programs.

The President's foreign assistance contingency fund.—This fund allows
the United States to meet unforeseen circumstances. It is used principally for humanitarian assistance, but also may be used for development and security aid. Budget authority of $30 million is requested
for 1975.
The Peace Corps (Action).—This agency sends volunteers to over 69
developing nations to help meet their needs for trained manpower
and to promote better international understanding. In 1975, approximately 6,800 Peace Corps volunteers will help to train people, primarily in health, education, and agriculture. Financial support
from host countries will supplement the $83 million budget authority
requested in 1975.




76

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Food for peace.—The United States donates and sells agricultural
commodities on favorable terms to friendly nations under the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act (Public Law 480).
Smaller quantities of commodities will be shipped in 1974 than in
previous years because of commodity shortages and increased food
prices. Because of the possibility of continuing shortages of some
commodities, a limited program is projected for 1975. Outlays for
Food for Peace are estimated at $742 million in 1975.

Foreign information

and exchange activities.—Important

mutual benefits flow from widened social, educational and cultural
contacts between the people of the United States and other countries.
The Department of State will encourage private institutions to participate more actively in exchange activities. Programs of the United
States Information Agency will continue at about current levels.
Conduct of foreign affairs.—Increased operating costs of the
Department of State will require additional outlays in 1975, even
though employment will not increase. Assessment rates for U.S.
contributions to the United Nations and most affiliated organizations
will decline to 25% of total contributions beginning in 1975. This
will reduce U.S. contributions by about $22 million below the levels
that otherwise would have been required.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

77

SPACE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

Program Highlights
• Conducted Skylab missions to test man's ability to
work in space for long periods of time.
• Continued development of the space shuttle transportation system to reduce the cost of future space operations.
• Completed the first unmanned spacecraft photographic
examination of the planet Jupiter.
• Demonstrated techniques to survey earth resources from
space.
New Developments
• Will further the application of space technology to
domestic needs by surveying natural resources, monitoring
the world's oceans, and improving weather forecasting
capabilities.
• Will develop spacecraft to explore the atmosphere of
Venus.

The 1975 budget provides a program that is balanced among space
science, aeronautics, and the practical application of space technology.
The development of a manned, reusable space shuttle will continue in
order to make possible more economical access to space. Outlays in
1975 of $3.3 billion are $95 million greater than anticipated 1974
expenditures. In 1976, outlays are expected to be about $3.4 billion.
Manned Space Flight.—In calendar 1973, Skylab, a three-man
experimental space station, began to test man's ability to live and work
in space for up to 84 days. In July 1975, the United States and the
U.S.S.R. will conduct a rendezvous and docking mission with manned
spacecraft. By about 1980, use of the space shuttle will reduce the cost
of operations in earth orbit by enabling the recovery of satellites for
reuse, repair of satellites in space, and reuse of launch vehicles.
Space Science and Applications.—Exploration of the solar system will proceed using unmanned spacecraft. Work has begun on spacecraft which will explore the atmosphere of Venus. Preparations will
continue for the July 1976 Viking unmanned search for life on Mars.
Recently, the first spacecraft to travel to Jupiter obtained scientific
measurements and photographed that planet. Two larger spacecraft
are being developed to explore Jupiter and Saturn in more detail late

540-000 O - 74 - 6




78

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

SPACE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY
[In millions of dollars]

Outlays

Program

1973
actual

Manned space flight:
Earth orbital program....
Apollo lunar program

_

Total

r

rr

.—-

1975

1,218
319

_

Subtotal, manned space
flight
_.
Space science and applications
Space technology
Aeronautical technology
Supporting space activities2
_
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the public
_

1974

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1975 *

_
__.

1,409
70

1,562
6

1,530

1.537
1,064
166
242
316

1,479
948
141
288
358

1,568
936
133
310
352

1,530
939
133
311
356

—13

— 37

3,311

3,177

— 25
3,272

-25
3,245

i Compares with budget authority for 1973 and 1974 as follows: 1973. $3,406 million; 1974. $3,038
million.
3
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.

in the 1970's. Development will continue on high energy astronomy
observatories to study the composition of distant stars.
In the applications program, research and development will continue on a new generation of weather satellites to provide major improvements in weather forecasting. A satellite to monitor the earth's
pollution is being developed. In addition, the demonstration of the
utility of satellite data for agriculture, geology, and other applications
will continue with the launch and operation of the second earth
resources technology satellite. Work will begin on a spacecraft to
locate and map geothermal sources which have the potential of being
used as sources of energy. A satellite will be developed to monitor the
oceans and improve weather prediction capabilities.
Space and aeronautical technology.—Research to develop
improved materials, structures, propulsion, electric power sources?
communications, and data processing for use in future space missions
will be continued.
The budget for aeronautical research and technology includes funds
for reducing aircraft noise and exhaust pollution and for improving
fuel consumption. Improvements in aircraft performance, reliability,
and safety will also be sought.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

79

AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Program Highlights
• Released producers of major crops from Federal controls.
• Increased farm exports to record levels.
• Expanded agricultural research programs.
New Developments
• Costs of price support programs will decline as farm
income rises.
• Credit for rural electrification and telephones will increase.
• Conservation funds will be focused on practices of
long-range public benefit.
• Rural development programs will be directed toward
State and local plans and priorities.

Agriculture programs provide income protection for farmers. Rural
development programs assist in the economic development of rural
areas and provide financial assistance for public facilities, such as
water supply systems. Other agriculture programs also provide food
assistance for the needy and help assure wholesome food supplies to
the consumer.
Outlays for these programs will be $2.7 billion in 1975 and are
expected to increase to $3.4 billion in 1976 as a result of lower asset
sales.
Farm Income Stabilization.—Record high farm income in 1973
has sharply reduced agriculture's dependence on Federal price support
programs. A shortfall in world agricultural output pushed farm product
prices up sharply last year. This shortfall and the consequent release
of producers of major crops from Federal controls increases the opportunity for farmers to respond to the forces of the market place.
With the incentive of higher prices and the absence of restrictions
on acreage of major crops, farm output is expected to reach record
levels.
The Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act of 1973 instituted a
system of guaranteed or target prices and deficiency payments to three
major commodity groups—wheat, feed grains, and upland cotton.
Farmers will be guaranteed returns on the normal production of land in
the program if average prices drop below target levels. The Administration has proposed similar legislation for rice and peanuts.




80

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Farm income stabilization:
Price support and related programs _
Proposed legislation.
Long-term land retirement programs
Removal of surplus agricultural commodities
National Wool Act
Sugar Act.
Agricultural and emergency credit programs (less net
asset sales) 2.._
Other2
Subtotal, farm income stabilization
Rural housing and public facilities:
Rural Electrification Administration
Rural housing (less net asset sales)
Community facilities arid industrial development
Other*..-

Outlays
1973
actual

3,555

1974
1975
estimate estimate

909

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1975

52
740
74
87

50
867
7
91

932
—175
49
355
3
92

4,249

162
170

137
282

-38
188

485
187

4,840

2,343

1,405

5,434

49
304
70
90

529
-227
—181
104

17
158
122
120

19
-224
18
129

19
127
245
129

Subtotal, rural housing and public facilities
Agricultural land and water resources:
Soil Conservation Service—conservation operations
Rural environmental program
Other*

225

417

-59

520

150
188
19

172
88
23

192
114
24

193
119
20

Subtotal, agricultural land and water resources.. _
Research and other agricultural services:
Research and extension programs
Consumer protection, marketing and regulatory programs
Other*

356

283

330

332

471

523

544

542

380
103

401
120

426
134

493
143

955

1,044

1,104

1,178

Subtotal, research and other agricultural services.
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total

— 185
6,191

—48
4,039

—51
2,729

—51
7,411

1 Compares with budget authority of $7,148 million for 1973 and $6,652 million for 1974.
Includes both Federal and trust funds.

2

The act also requires payments to wheat, cotton, and feed grain
producers whose yields fall below two-thirds of normal due to natural
forces. Since the costs involved could be substantial and crop insurance is generally available to cover such situations, legislation will be
proposed to eliminate this provision from the act.




81

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Federal Subsidies for Asricultural Price Supports
seuw

$ Billion,

CCC*-Owned Inventory
(end of year)

Estimate

* Commodity Credit Corporation
CCC—Commodity Credit Corporation.

Net Federal expenditures for commodity price support declined in
1973 and are expected to drop further to $0.8 billion in 1975, the
lowest since 1958.
Exports of agricultural products have been an important factor in
achieving a favorable balance of trade. Agriculture's net contribution
to the U.S. trade balance in 1974 will be around $10 billion, nearly
double the $5.6 billion of 1973. Devaluation of the dollar and heavy
international demand for U.S. commodities lifted both the value and
the physical volume of exports to record levels. U.S. agricultural
exports in the current fiscal year are expected to be $19 billion, up
from $13 billion in 1973. The volume of exports may reach 94 million
metric tons, up 2 million from the previous record.
Rural Housing and Public Facilities.—The Rural Development
Act of 1972 is in its first }^ear of operation. The new programs under
this act will be administered in a manner supportive of the plans and
priorities of State and local governments. These programs consist of
$400 million for business and industrial development; $600 million for
loans for water, sewer, and other community facilities; $20 million for
grants for water and sewer facilities; and $10 million for grants for




82

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION OUTLAYS
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

Agriculture and rural development:

Price support operations:
Wheat payments
Feed grain payments
Cotton payments
Other price support operations
Receipts and adjustments

863
1,846
813
4,673
-4,640

Subtotal.

3,555
74

909
139

757
-22

1,048

735

1,141
—387

_

4
3,263
-2,510

3,629

Subtotal, price support operations
Other activities...

477
1,171
715
2,606
-4,060

1,095
—299

982
—240

754

796

742

4,383

1,844

1,476

International affairs and finance:

Food for Peace:
Gross outlays.
Receipts and reimbursements
Subtotal
Total outlays

^
.

_._

_.

other community facilities. These funds will be allocated among the
States on the basis of rural population and income through the Farmers
Home Administration.
The budget provides for continuation of the rural housing programs
with several major changes in direction and content. As a result
of the recent Federal housing study, subsidized housing assistance is
being redirected to provide more assistance to lower income families
through low-interest rehabilitation loans. In addition, home ownership
will be assisted primarily through purchase of existing housing units
rather than through new constiuction with its higher costs. These
rural housing assistance programs will be continued on an interim
basis pending further results from the Administration's housing
allowances pilot program.
An experimental program of loan guarantees will be undertaken to
test the effectiveness of attracting private capital into the rural
housing market. Direct Federal mortgages will also be available
through the Farmers Home Administration.
Electric and telephone loans, which by law aie excluded from the
budget totals, will be $2.3 billion in 1975. $1.4 billion will consist of
Federal guarantees of loans to bulk power suppliers.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

83

CREDIT PROGRAMS-AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT *
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

2,563
-2,910

1,642
-2,454

2,538
-2,342

-348

-813

196

1,119
-1,357

1,291
-1,255

1,093
-1,214

Farm income stabilization:

Commodity Credit Corporation:
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays
Agricultural and emergency credit programs:
Disbursements
Repayments

-239

____

3
5

-121

181
-420

527
-487

628
-682

-240

Net loan outlays

40

-55

Rural housing and public facilities: 2

Rural electrification and telephones:
Disbursements
Repayments

519
150
369 .

Net loan outlaysCommunity facilities and industrial development:
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays.
Rural housing and other:
Disbursements
Repayments

1,826
-2,054

2,563
-2,498

2,477
-2,845

Net loan outlays

-228

65

-368

Total net loan outlays

-685

-672

-348

1
Includes both direct and insured loans funds. The latter are provided primarily by private
lenders.
2
Rural electrification and telephone loans were excluded from the budget totals by statute
effective May 12, 1973:

Ojf-Budget Credit—Rural Electrification and Telephone
(In millions of dollars)
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays




__

1973
103
20
83

1974
921
156
765

1975
980
195
785

84

THE: BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

Agricultural land and water resources.—Conservation programs
have been redirected and will be funded at about the same level as in
1974. Funding has been shifted away from contracts covering practices which must be repeated every year. It will be directed in favor
of multiyear contracts which require that a comprehensive set of
practices with enduring benefits be carried out over the entirety of a
farm. This should result in a more effective use of Federal funds.
Research and other agricultural services.—In the past, agricultural technology and research has contributed to lower food prices
through gains in production efficiency. Efforts in 1975 will be directed
towards increasing animal and plant production efficiency in response
to increased consumer food demand and growing exports. Soybean and
meat research funds will be increased by $9 million with the goals of
reducing costs of beef, pork, and lamb production and of increasing
yields of soybeans. Funds also have been added to improve forecasting
of supply, demand, and prices of major agricultural commodities.
Outlays for regulatory and control programs will increase by $25
million in 1975. The Federal meat and poultry inspection program will
be expanded to assure that the meat and poultry products which
consumers buy are wholesome and unadulterated.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

85

NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

Program Highlights
• Proposed legislation dealing with adjustment of natural
gas regulation, deep water ports, electric facilities siting,
and emergency energy development, allocation, and
conservation.
• Proposed 84 million acres in Alaska for inclusion in the
national parks, national forests, wildlife refuge, and wild
and scenic rivers systems.
• Assisted State and local governments in acquiring 95,000
acres of park and recreation lands in 1974 through the
Land and Water Conservation fund.
• Expended $2.7 billion for construction of municipal
sewage facilities in 1973 and 1974.
• Developed a State and Federal permit program to
regulate discharges of pollutants into waterways.
New Developments
• Contract authority allotted to the States for 1975 for
waste treatment plant construction will increase by $1
billion, and reach a level of $4 billion, an increase of
33% over 1974 and 100% over 1973 levels.
• A total of $41 million will be provided in 1975 to carry
out proposed legislation for land use planning and mined
area protection.
• Outlays for research and development and abatement
and control activities of the Environmental Protection
Agency will increase by 35%.

Natural resources and environmental programs encourage wise use
of the Nation's resources of water, timber, energy, minerals, and
recreation lands, while protecting and improving the quality of the
environment.
Outlays for these programs, before deduction of offsetting receipts,
will be $1.6 billion above the 1974 level of $7.8 billion. By 1976 these
outlays are projected to reach $10.5 billion. Receipts and other deductions will total $6.3 billion in 1975. A major part of these receipts is
from outer continental shelf oil and gas leases. Other receipts are from
sales of other mineral leases, timber, grazing forage, and electric power.




86

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

1973
actual

1974
estimate

Recommended
budget
1975
authority
estimate for 1975 *

Pollution control and abatement:

Sewage plant construction grants
Other 5
Subtotal, pollution control and abatement

684
429

2,000
564

3, 350
649

* (4,000)
700

1,114

2,564

3.999

700

209
209
152

280
307
177

261
330
190

335
414
201

570

765

781

951

1,709

1.606

1.644

1,640

447
185
367
124
40

438
182
420
190
61

479
190
458
163
82

436
194
75
149
151

2,873

2,897

3.016

2,644

723
226

875
268
*

776
283
36

796
290
42

99
4
12
2
18
6

1.143
27
6
24
0

1.095
33
2
26
4

1.128
34
5
20
5

5,795

7,841

9,460

6,026

—2

—2

—2

—2

Recreational resources:

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation 2
National Park Service 2
Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and other 2
Subtotal, recreational resources
Water resources and power:

Corps of Engineers 2_...._
Department of the Interior:
Bureau of Reclamation 2
Other water and power programs 2
Tennessee Valley Authority
Soil Conservation Service-watershed projects 2
Federal Power Commission and other 2
Subtotal, water resources and power
Land management:

Forest Service 2
Bureau of Land Management and other 2
Proposed legislation for land use control
Subtotal land management
Mineral resources
Other natural resources programs
Subtotal, all programs
Deduction for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public:
Rents and royalties on outer continental shelf lands.

Other
TotaL

—3,956

—6,000

—5,000

—5,000

-1,248

-1,230

-1.330

-1.330

589

609

3,128

-306

* Compares with budget authority of $7,183 million for 1973 and $2,483 million for 1974.
2 Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
Net of $1 million of offsetting receipts in 1974.
* Contract authority totaling $4,000 million for 1975 was made available in 1974 as provided
by law, therefore no new budget authority is requested.
* Less than $0.5 million.
3




THE

FEDERAL

PROGRAM

87

BY FUNCTION

Pollution control and abatement.—The
basic responsibility
for controlling and abating pollution rests with State and local
governments, private industry, and the general public. In support of
pollution control objectives the Federal Government carries out a
broad range of programs including research on the sources and effects
of pollution; setting and enforcement of standards; technical assistance; and grants to State and local governments for pollution control
programs and for construction of sewage treatment facilities. In
1975, special emphasis will be placed on encouraging State and local
governments to assume an increasing share of the responsibility.
Areas best handled by those levels of government include carrying
out Federal standards in controlling air and water pollution, insuring
proper use of pesticides, and adopting environmentally sound techniques in solid waste management.
Outlays for pollution control and abatement programs in 1975 will
increase by $1.4 billion to a level of $4 billion. Most of this total
increase will be for grants for construction of waste treatment plants,
which will total $3.4 billion in 1975. Funds allotted to the
Pollution Control and Abatement ( E P A )
$ Billions

S BiHions

4.0-

3.0 —

10-

|:|:|:j: Sewage Plant :•:•:•:•:::•:•:•::
Construction Grants ;X\v:j:

1969
Fiscal Ycar5




1970

mi

ill
vm

i97f

1974

ms
Estimate

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

States for waste treatment facilities from contract authority provided
under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972
will total $4 billion for 1975 compared with $3 billion for 1974 and
$2 billion for 1973. Outlays for research and development and abatement and control programs in the Environmental Protection Agency
will be increased from $355 million in 1974 to $478 million in 1975.
Recreational resources.—Kecreation programs include grants to
State and local governments for buying and developing park and
recreation areas as well as Federal purchase, development, and
operation of nationally significant natural areas and historic sites.
Outlays for these programs will increase by $16 million from $765
million in 1974 to $781 million in 1975.
The Land and Water Conservation Fund provides for both grants
to State and local governments and purchase of Federal park and
recreation lands. This program will be fully funded in 1975 at $300 million. This will allow obligation of $196 million for grants to State and
local governments in 1975, an increase of $9 million, and $98 million
for Federal purchase of park lands in 1975. Allocation of two-thirds of
the program funds for grants to State and local governments will help
to assure that recreation program decisions are made by the levels of
government which are closer and more responsive to the people using
the recreation areas. In addition, each dollar so allocated by the
Federal Government will be matched by State or local funds.
Outlays for National Park Service, and Bureau of Sport Fisheries
and Wildlife programs will increase from $484 million in 1974 to $519
million in 1975, a change of $35 million. Included in these totals are
funds for construction of projects within the District of Columbia and
14 national park areas related to the 1976 American Revolution Bicentennial celebration. Authority for these projects will be $37 million
in 1974 and $54 million in 1975, totaling about $100 million over the
1973-1975 period.
Water resources and power.—Outlays for water resources and
power programs in 1975 will be $3.0 billion, an increase of $119 million
over 1974.
Water development programs.—These programs provide for construction of projects that produce and transmit electricity, improve water
supplies, help control floods and erosion, improve navigation, and
provide irrigation and water-related recreation opportunities.
The 1975 budget provides for $1,375 million for construction of
water resources projects by the Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of
Reclamation, compared with $1,333 million in 1974. Within this
amount, priority is placed on funding projects for hydroelectric power,




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

89

municipal and industrial water supply, and urban flood control. High
priority is given to maintaining schedules for projects nearing completion.
Legislation will be proposed to authorize the International Boundary
and Water Commission to construct, operate, and maintain a desalting
plant and other works necessary to improve the quality of the Colorado
River water entering Mexico pursuant to a recent international
agreement. Funds are included to implement this agreement.
New principles and standards for water resource project planning
and evaluation are now being put into effect. These new guidelines
will better identify more efficient projects and place greater emphasis
on environmental considerations. The recommendations of the
National Water Commission are being reviewed for reforms which
will broaden the responsibilities of State and local governments in
water resources development.
Power programs.—Outlays for power programs in 1975 will be $613
million, compared to $566 million in 1974. Gross outlays for the
Tennessee Valley Authority will rise from $1,431 million in 1974 to
$1,639 million in 1975, an increase of $208 million. This increase will
go mainly to power operation and capital investment. Net outlays
will increase by $38 million.
Land management.—The
public lands, national forests, and
outer continental shelf are administered to encourage wise use of
natural resources, to provide opportunities for recreation, to manage
and protect wildlife habitat and the quality of the natural environment, and to protect watersheds and areas of scenic beauty. These
lands also yield livestock forage, minerals, and a major portion of both
the Nation's fuels and wood products.
Land management outlays in 1975 will be $1,095 million. Excluding
outlays for fighting forest fires, which vary considerably from year to
year, land management outlays will increase by $63 million above
1974 levels. Timber totaling 11.8 billion board feet will be prepared
for sale from the national forests in 1975, an amount equal to the
1974 level. Reforestation in 1975 will total about 400,000 acres yielding
timber for the future, while preventing erosion and protecting wildlife
habitat.
Purchase of the Klamath Indian Forest lands as directed by Public
Law 93-102 will be undertaken in 1975. Funds will be requested when
the reappraisal of these lands is completed.
Payments to States and counties of a share of revenues produced
by public lands and national forests will increase by $2 million to a
1975 level of $221 million. Outlays of $41 million are provided for
proposed legislation for land use planning and mined area protection.




90

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Other proposed legislation will determine national policies to govern
the use and management of public domain lands, require more competitive mineral leasing, and improve control and environmental
safeguards over mineral development.
Oil and gas leases issued on the outer continental shelf in 1975 are
expected to total 2.4 million acres. Six oil shale leases are being offered
in 1974. These leases will contain unique royalty and bonus credit
provisions designed to stimulate development of an industry which
will supplement the Nation's energy supply. These special lease
provisions will be included only in the 1974 oil shale leases and will
not be included in later oil shale leases or leases covering other minerals
where the industry has been established. Environmental protection
and restoration will be emphasized during both development and production phases of oil shale exploitation.
Mineral resources.—These programs include energy research and
development, mine safety enforcement, petroleum allocation programs,
energy conservation, research and development, and energy data and
analysis programs. Funding for these programs will be substantially
increased in 1975. The major increases in the 1975 budget for Federal
funding of energy research and development are covered in a special
section on energy programs as part of the introduction to Part 4.

Other natural resources programs.—These programs include
topographic surveys and mapping, geological and mineral resources
surveys and mapping, and water resources investigations. Outlays will
be $246 million in 1975, an increase of $42 million over the 1974 level.
The budget includes an increase of $9 million to support national
land use legislation activities through the topographic surveys and
mapping program, the earth resources observation systems program,
and a new land use data and analysis program.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

91

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
Major objectives of commerce and transportation programs in 1975
are:
• Assist in the development of a rational and healthy transportation
system;
• Improve efforts to help communities and regions adjust to changing economic conditions through a new assistance program;
• Expand aid to small business and minority businessmen; and
• Develop strategies to conserve energy in transportation and
commerce.
Outlays for commerce and transportation will be $13.4 billion in 1975
and are expected to rise to $13.7 billion in 1976.

Transportation
Program Highlights
• Provided flexibility to meet urban transportation needs
through implementation of the 1973 Highway Act.
• Obtained legislation to restructure the bankrupt Northeast railroads.
• Increased resources available to Amtrak for improvements
of rail passenger service.
• Commenced automated tracking of aircraft to increase
safety and efficiency in the airways.
New Developments
• Propose the Unified Transportation Assistance Program
to increase State and local flexibility in attacking urban
transportation problems.
• Emphasize bus system improvements to conserve energy
and reduce automotive pollution.
• Emphasize highway construction safety program and
encourage enactment of State safety legislation.
• Propose legislation to allocate the costs of the aviation
system more fairly among its users.
• Improve the navigation system of the Pacific coastal
region.
• Propose the modernization of the regulation of the
Nation's railroads.




92

THE* BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
Program or agency

Ground transportation:
Highway improvement 2
Traffic and highway safety 2
Mass transit
Railroads

1973
actual

1974
1975
estimate estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1975 i

4,805
140
415
158

4.677
10
9
48
8
22
9

4.848
15
7
70
0
25
6

6.539
282
(3)
29
2

Subtotal, ground transportation
Air transportation:
Airways and airports 2
Air carrier subsidies

5,518

5,648

5,989

7,051

1.849
72

1.907
67

2.107
66

1.755
63

Subtotal, air transportation
Water transportation:
Coast Guard 2
Ocean shipping
Other

1.922

1.974

2.173

1,819

783
457
-7

848
502
9

909
569
4

913
563

Subtotal, water transportation...
Postal service
Advancement of business:
Export and travel promotion 2
Economic and demographic statistics 2___
Physical environment (NOAA) 2
Promotion of technology2
Small business assistance*
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation....
_Other aids to business 2___

1,234
1.567

1,360
1,999

1,481
1.553

1,477
1,553

40
59
340
127
1,317
—538
126

49
68
393
146
750
—558
158

48
76
447
153
471
—565
206

48
77
471
153
448
__
236

1,471

1,006

836

1.433

358
278
323
547

450
254
367
634

250
277
398
657

100
270
370
604

1,506
139

1,705
172

1,582
200

1,345
197

—131
-155

—159
-184

—87
-327

—87
-327

Subtotal, advancement of business
Area and regional development:
Disaster relief
Area and district development.,
Regional development2
Other
Subtotal, area and regional development
Regulation of business
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public.
Total.
1
2
3

_

_...

13,070

13,521

13,400

14,459

Compares with budget authority of $10,543 million in 1973 and $22,822 million in 1974.
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
A large amount of budget authority is available from prior year actions. Therefore, no new
budget authority is requested.
* Includes assistance to minority business.




93

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

Ground transportation.—In
order to provide State and local
governments with greater discretion in the use of Federal financial
assistance for ground transportation, the Administration will propose
major new transportation assistance legislation. The proposal will
provide Federal funding for non-Interstate highways, bus and rail
car purchases, rail system construction, and transit operating assistance in urbanized areas. It will also contain additional funding and
flexibility for rural areas. This Unified Transportation Assistance
Program will promote decisionmaking at the local level and will
foster better local trade-offs between capital investment and operating
expenses.
Pending enactment of this initiative, the budget includes recommendations for the existing Federal mass transit and highway programs. New obligations (i.e., new commitments to spend in current
and future years) for urban mass transit investment will be more
than $1.4 billion in 1975, including at least $200 million from highway
authorizations. This is an increase of about 50% over 1974 funding
for transit capital investments. In order to accelerate reductions in
energy consumption and automotive pollution quickly, special priority
will be given to the expansion of transit bus fleets. In addition, subFederal Support for Urban* Transportation
JBitlioru
3
Obligations

[.,•,'•,•'! I Airport*

&5
Hfcltway*

Trai*it.H5$Way Flexibility * *
Mass Transit

2.0

- %

1,7

f

~~f

-

Fiscal Years

Estimate

*Areas over 50,000.
""•Highway authority used for mass transit.
Note: Chart shows existing programs and does not reflect Unified Transportation Assistance Program.

540-000 O - 74 - 7




94

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

stantial funding will be available for long-term commuter rail and rapid
rail system investments which meet productivity and cost-effectiveness
criteria.
An effective transportation system requires continued attention to
the Nation's extensive highway system. New obligations for the highway program will be $4.8 billion, with $875 million allocated to urban
highway improvements and $250 million to safety improvements. The
Interstate Highway System, which will continue to receive over half
of the available highway funds, will carry over 20% of all highway
traffic when completed in the early 1980's.
In addition, funding for State and community highway safety
programs will be increased to $148 million, with half of the increase
earmarked as incentives to encourage State enactment of mandatory
seatbelt legislation. Improved grant management and evaluation
efforts should lead to more effective allocation of these safety grants
to the States. Continued emphasis will be placed on eradicating the
serious drinking-driver problem.
For several years, the Nation's rail freight industry has suffered
serious financial problems which have prevented full utilization of
its inherent efficiency. However, growing energy and environmental
concerns have increased the demand for improved rail transportation.
Legislation to restructure the bankrupt Northeast railroads has been
enacted to insure that the railroads are able to meet this challenge. In
addition, the Administration has proposed legislation to modernize
regulation of the Nation's railroads and to provide financial assistance
for the upgrading of plant and equipment. These efforts should improve
the economic efficiency and energy utilization of the railways.
To accommodate Amtrak's rapidly increasing ridership and utilize
its energy conservation potential, the Administration is revising its
1974 recommendations of $100 million in Federal loan guarantees to
provide a combined 1974-75 capital investment program of at least
$350 million.
Air transportation.—The
Administration is committed to the
continued orderly development of the national aviation system.
Additional automation and improvements of the system will become
fully operational in 1975 and will lead to a more efficient and reliable
airway system. The successful Airport Security Program, based upon
Federal monitoring of air carrier and airport security procedures, will
be continued.
The Administration reemphasizes its support of the principle that
the users of the aviation system should pay for the services they receive. The Airport and Airway Cost Allocation Study, recently submitted to the Congress, has established that many users are not paying
for the full cost of the Federal aviation services they consume. Legisla-




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

95

tion will be proposed to increase service fees and to provide for user
payment through the trust fund for part of the operating costs of the
Federal aviation system. This proposal will close the gap between the
revenues and costs of services related to civilian use over the next
4 years. It will also contain provisions to assure the continued funding
of present Federal airport and airway capital development programs.
Legislation to transfer the National Capital Airports to local
authorities will also be proposed, in order to provide local ownership
that is more responsive to community needs.
Water transportation.—To increase the international competitiveness of American ship construction and operation, the Federal
maritime program will provide $283 million for construction subsidies,
and operating subsidies of $243 million in 1975. The research and
development program will emphasize shipyard automation, nuclear
ship propulsion, and advanced ship operations.
A navigation system will be funded by the Federal Government to
meet non-military maritime and aviation requirements in the Pacific
coastal region. In line with the continued emphasis on marine environmental protection, the Coast Guard will increase the resources it
devotes to these problems.
Postal Service.—The Postal Reorganization Act of 1970 converted
the Post Office Department into the U.S. Postal Service. It is an
independent agency within the executive branch under the sole
direction of an 11-member Board of Governors, who have authority
to set postal rates following recommendations of the independent
Postal Rate Commission.
Since the Postal Service began operations in 1972, an intensive
capital improvement program has been underway. This will provide
more economical processing of an ever-increasing volume of mail
through automation and construction of special purpose processing
centers.
Budget treatment of the Postal Service for 1975 reflects its independence from direct Federal control. Information on postal operations
is shown in the Annexed Budget section of the Budget Appendix. Only
the Federal subsidy to the Postal Service, covering public service
costs, reductions in revenue associated with free and reduced-rate
mail, and transition costs resulting from the reorganization, is included in the budget totals. The recommended use of full, rather than
subsidized, rates for third-class mail will reduce the 1975 subsidy by
$257 million to $1,553 million. The budget also includes full Postal
Service reimbursement to the Government for the portion of the unfunded liability of the Civil Service retirement and disability fund
attributable to postal pay increases since the establishment of the
Service.




96

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Advancement
of business.—While the programs of Federal
agencies influence business activities, the major initiative in business
remains in the private sector. The primary effects of Federal actions
on the private business sector are through fiscal and monetary policy,
credit programs, tax policy, and regulation. In specific areas, however,
Federal agencies do provide important direct services to the
private sector.
The Small Business Administration will increase its guaranteed
loans by 10% in 1975 to encourage greater private institutional
financing of small business. Approximately 43,000 firms received such
loans from the SB A in 1974. Funds for SB A loans to minority firms
will be increased by 18% to aid approximately 11,000 minority firms.
In addition, the Office of Minority Business Enterprise will provide
management assistance to 25,000 minority firms in 1975. Through use
of coordinated financial and management assistance, these programs
will improve the likelihood that minority firms will be successful.
S B A Loans to Minority Businesses

600

1973

1974

1975

Fiscal Ye.

Includes both direct and guaranteed loans. Funds for the latter come primarily from private sources.

The Administration has proposed establishment of a National
Bureau of Fire Prevention in the Department of Commerce to assist
State and local governments in improving their capabilities in fire




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

97

prevention through education and training activities, research and
development, and a national data system.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's outlays
will increase by $54 million to provide expanded weather data collection, automation of field weather station activities and nautical
chart production, and additional grants to universities under the
Sea Grant program.

Business and Economic Development
Program Highlights
• Established major programs to develop minority business;
decentralized program administration.
• Increased total guaranteed and direct loans to small
businesses from $575 million in 1969 to $2.8 billion in
1975.
• Continued efforts to improve weather warning systems
to reduce loss of life and property.
• Proposed the Disaster Preparedness and Assistance Act
to consolidate the responsibility for disaster relief.
• Proposed legislation to reform and modernize patent laws.
New Developments
• Propose a new economic adjustment assistance program
for States and communities.
• Increase efforts to analyze the impact of Federal Government actions on business conditions.
• Improve minority business assistance programs to assure
greater success of minority firms; increase loans to
minority business.
• Establish the National Bureau of Fire Prevention to
assist States and communities in reducing the loss of life
and property from fires.

The technology development and utilization activities of the
National Bureau of Standards will be increased, with emphasis on
research efforts to insure safe control of radiation hazards, improve
instruments to measure pollution, and increase the efficiency and
security of government computer operations. Patent reform legislation
proposed by the Administration will represent the most comprehensive
reform and modernization of patent law since 1836. Efforts will be
undertaken to improve the quality of Federal statistics used by both
the private sector and governments.




98

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

MAJOR CREDIT PROGRAMS-COMMERCE AND TRANSPORTATION
[In millions of dollars]
Agency and program
LOAN APPROVALS

1973

1974

1975

335
1,917

434
2,491

511
2,698

75
13

22
17

19
12

46

101

147

29
7
—5

33
9

16

1

Small Business Administration:

Minority businesses
Nonminority businesses
Department of Commerce:

Area and regional development
Trade adjustment assistance
NET LOAN OUTLAYS
Small Business Administration
Department of Commerce:

Area and regional development
Trade adjustment assistance
Water transportation
Other

J
Total net loan outlays

-4

9
-6

139

166

-2
75

* Includes both direct and guaranteed loans. Funds for the latter are provided by the private sector.

Area and regional development.—The public works and related
programs of the Economic Development Administration and the
Regional Action Planning Commissions will be continued in 1975 to
permit an orderly transition to a new economic adjustment assistance
program to be proposed by the Administration. This new program will
facilitate flexible State and community response to problems of
economic change and unemployment.
Federal disaster aid is estimated to decline from nearly $1,022
million in 1974 to $485 million in 1975. Current expenditures still
reflect the heavy, but declining, outlay impact of tropical storm Agnes
in 1972 and the Mississippi River flooding in 1973. The administration
of disaster assistance will be consolidated and improved under the
proposed Disaster Preparedness and Assistance Act, which places
emphasis upon preventive measures and encourages the use of insurance before disasters occur. The role of State and local officials in
determining how Federal funds will be spent in assisting disasterstricken communities will be enhanced.
The health, education, mine restoration, and supplemental grant
programs of the Appalachian Regional Commission will be increased
and consolidated into a bloc grant, with $40 million set aside for
area development programs based on subregional development plans.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

99

Programing for the Appalachian Development Highway System will
emphasize route segments which meet the Commission's priorities.
The major objectives of national American Indian policy are to
strengthen the Indian's sense of autonomy and to preserve his community rights and relationships. Toward these ends, legislation is
again proposed to let Indians assume control of certain Federal programs and services, to provide Federally guaranteed or insured loans to
Indians, and to create an Indian Trust Counsel Authority to protect
Indian rights to natural resources. Additional legislation has been
proposed to foster local Indian self-determination by providing
flexible bloc grants to replace some current fixed-purpose programs.
Total outlays for all Indian programs, including education, health,
and welfare services classified in other functions, will increase by $24
million, to $1.6 billion in 1975.




100

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING
Program Highlights
• Authorized $5.5 billion for programs to alleviate shortterm housing credit problems.
• Redirected Federal policies toward more effective and
more equitable means for addressing the primary cause
of inadequate housing—low income.
• Aided 539,000 families in 1973 through mortgage insurance programs.
• Began phaseout of seven Federal grant and loan programs
which tended to distort local priorities and interfere with
comprehensive local community development programs.
• Secured enactment of the Flood Disaster Protection Act
to expand the use of flood insurance in place of disaster
assistance.
New Developments
• Will provide $2.3 billion through the Better Communities
Act to expand and improve Federal support for local
community development activities.
• Will make commitments to purchase mortgages financing
construction of up to 200,000 housing units at reduced
interest rates.
• Will use a revised public housing leasing program to
provide low-income housing assistance and expand efforts
to determine whether a policy of direct cash assistance
for housing is practical.
• Will aid additional homebuyers through legislation increasing the size of mortgages eligible for Federal insurance.
• Will help State and local governments improve their
managerial capabilities through the Responsive Governments Act.
The community development and housing function, as discussed
here, primarily covers the activities of the Department of Housing
and Urban Development (HUD) and the Federal Home Loan Bank
Board (FHLBB). Viewed broadly, however, this function is affected
by programs and policies throughout the Federal Government. For
example, the quality of housing available to an individual family is
primarily determined by the family's income and assets; and many
Federal agencies administer programs or set policies which affect these




THE

FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

101

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Maintenance of the housing mortgage market:
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Mortgage insurance and related programs
Fair housing and equal opportunity
Federal property insurance and other
Federal Home Loan Bank Board. Federal Savings and
Loan Insurance Corporation, and other
Subtotal, maintenance of the housing mortgage
market
Low- and moderate-income housing aids:
Housing payments
_
Special assistance functions
Rehabilitation loans and other
Subtotal, low- and moderate-income housing aids_
Community planning, management, and development:
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Better Communities Act (proposed legislation)
Responsive Governments A c t 3
Water and sewer facilities grants
Urbanrenewal
Model Cities
Open space land programs
Neighborhood facilities grants
Research and technology
Departmental management and administration
Other planning, management, and development
Office of Economic Opportunity
Action: Domestic volunteer programs
Other:
Economic opportunity loan fund
Legal Services Corporation (proposed legislation) _ _ _
Residual administrative expenses for Economic
Opportunity (proposed legislation)

Outlays
1973
actual

66
9
9

1974
1975
estimate estimate

81
0
1
2
3
7

1,003
1
0
1
5

Recommended
budget
authority l
for 1975

1.079
1
2
3
6

—249

-325

-334

-165

704

515

1,608
-201
1
2

1,888
-148
4
6

2,263
-2
3
2

2,425
8
3
4

1,420

1,786

2,292

2,467

76
157
992
590
61
27
45
33
43
782
78

110
160
1,125
590
70
35
55
55
51
611
101

—7

—4

2

560
118
160
1,100
220
70
35
67
69
60
235
108
—2
33

1,127

2, 300
110

70
71
37
102

72

27

33

Subtotal, community planning, management,
and development

2,877

2,960

2,859

2,795

Total

4,132

5,450

5,667

6,389

1
2
3

Compares with budget authority of $6,093 million in 1973 and $4,960 million in 1974.
Estimated actual spending from full $2.3 billion made available to communities for use in 1975.
Legislation has been proposed to replace the comprehensive planning assistance program, for
which $110 million is requested in 1975, with a broader form of support for State and local planning
and management under the Responsive Governments Act.




102

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

factors. Similarly, Federal actions directly affecting the development
of individual communities occur in all budget functions. The Department of Agriculture's Farmers Home Administration, in particular,
administers a number of community development and housing programs similar to programs in this function but included in the agriculture and rural development function. Discussion of programs and
policies in this and other functional areas is not repeated here.
Despite the many different ways in which Federal actions can affect
the Nation's housing and community development, private sector
action is the primary force. Hence, direct Federal outlays are not
nearly as important in influencing housing and community development as other Federal actions which affect the overall performance
of the private sector. The most important Federal activities in this
regard are fiscal and monetary policies. Policies relating to financial
institutions and capital markets also have a major impact on this
function, although they result in little Federal spending. Finally,
important Federal aids to housing are provided through credit
guarantees and special credit institutions which involve little or no
budget outlays.
The Administration's policies for community development and
housing are designed to achieve three basic objectives:
• Assure an economic and institutional climate within which the
private housing industry can best respond to the Nation's housing
needs;
• Help State and local governments develop the resources and
managerial capacity needed to solve their problems and to take
advantage of development opportunities; and
• Focus the Federal role in housing and community development
on those activities which it can accomplish more effectively than
private industry or State and local governments.
In 1975, the major policy actions in this area will (1) help alleviate
the current problem of high interest rates on housing loans, (2) improve and expand support for community development and management under the Better Communities Act and the Responsive Governments Act, (3) develop further experience with direct cash assistance as a means for providing housing assistance to lower income
families, and (4) continue the phaseout of ineffective and wasteful
Federal programs while utilizing other programs in a revised form.
Budget outlays in 1975 for community development and housing
will total $5.7 billion, an increase of $200 million over outlays in
1974. Most of this spending will result from prior-year commitments,
many of which will require continued expenditures for many years.
Outlays in 1976 are projected at $7.4 billion.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

103

CREDIT PROGRAMS—COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency

1973
actual

Maintenance of the housing mortgage market:
Department of Housing and Urban Development:
Mortgage insurance and related programs:
Disbursements
Repayments

,

Low- and moderate-income housing aids:
Special assistance functions and other: 1
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays
Community planning, management, and development:
Urban renewal, public facilities, and other:
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays
Total net loan outlays

469
124

555
250

-486

Net loan outlays

1

1975
estimate

432
918

Net loan outlays
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation:
Disbursements
Repayments

1974
estimate

345

305

—8
24

1
9

1
5

—32

—8

—4

2,088
2,535

2,515
2,838

4,616
5,012

-447

-323

-396

803
832

1,034
1,054

841
881

-29

-20

-40

-994

-6

-135

"Special assistance functions" includes Tandem Plans.

Maintenance of the housing mortgage market.—A smoothly
functioning mortgage market is a prerequisite to the continued production of housing in sufficient quantities to meet the Nation's needs.
Stable mortgage markets are best fostered through sound fiscal and
monetary policies and through maintenance of an efficient and flexible
financial system.
Several Federal or federally sponsored agencies help to increase the
supply of funds available for housing. The Federal Home Loan Bank
System maintains public confidence in savings and loan associations,
the principal source of funds for home financing, by insuring savings
deposited with these institutions, by regulating them, and by providing
loans to expand their mortgage lending or to meet unexpected withdrawals. In addition, the Federal National Mortgage Association and
the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation augment the sources of




104

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

funds available for housing finance by purchasing mortgages from
originating lenders with funds raised in the securities markets. The
Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA) achieves a
similar result through its guarantee program for mortgage-backed
securities.
In addition to their regular activities in support of the market, these
agencies have helped to alleviate housing credit problems of a temporary nature. In September, the Federal Home Loan Bank Board
authorized up to $2.5 billion in forward commitments to savings and
loan associations to expand lending activities by assuring that they
will have the funds needed to meet their commitments. Also in
September, GNMA reinstituted the Tandem Plan, under which support for FHA-insured or VA-guaranteed mortgages was authorized
at interest rates somewhat below those prevailing. To insure that
improvements in mortgage market conditions continue, HUD will
revise and expand the Tandem Plan in 1974 by making commitments
to buy additional mortgages financing the construction of up to 200,000
housing units at lower interest rates. This will benefit all parties in
the housing market—homebuyers, sellers, and builders alike.
To assure the availability of adequate housing credit in the future,
these temporary measures must be accompanied by a basic reform of
the Nation's financial system. To this end, the Administration has
proposed the Financial Institutions Act, which would enable savings
and loan associations to compete more effectively for funds, and would
encourage additional investment in residential mortgages through a
tax credit on mortgage investment income.
The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) will continue to provide
mortgage insurance during 1975 for those families who are able to
fulfill the obligations accompanying a mortgage loan, but who are not
adequately served by private mortgage insurers. Heavy default rates
experienced under some mortgage insurance programs—particularly
those aimed at older, declining areas—will keep net outlays near the $1
billion level in both 1974 and 1975. The Administration's proposed
Housing Act would extend the benefits of FHA mortgage insurance
to additional homebuyers by increasing dollar limits and loan-to-value
ratios on loans eligible for insurance.
In addition to encouraging an adequate supply of funds for housing,
the Federal Government helps protect the right of individuals and
families to obtain housing and mortgage financing on a nondiscriminatory basis. Outlays for fair housing and equal opportunity programs
are expected to total $12 million in 1975.
Federal property insurance programs provide cooperative Federal and
private insurance against property damage caused by floods, crime,
and civil disorders. Legislation strengthening and expanding the




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

105

national flood insurance program has been enacted, and should reduce
annual flood losses by discouraging unwise development in flood-prone
areas. It will also improve assistance to flood victims by expanding
the use of insurance indemnification in place of the current system
of disaster loans.
Low- and moderate-income
housing aids.—In the generally
favorable economic and institutional climate of the last two decades,
the private housing industry has made great strides in increasing the
Nation's housing stock, thus helping to reduce the occupancy of substandard dwellings. The proportion of households living in housing
without plumbing has dropped from 34% in 1950 to only 6% in 1970.
In an effort to accelerate the pace at which the Nation's housing
goals are met, the Federal Government has committed itself to longterm housing assistance payments on behalf of approximately 2.5
million families. It is estimated that these commitments will cost the
Federal taxpayer between $66 billion and $90 billion in direct subsidy
payments over the years, in addition to large sums for direct and
indirect tax subsidies. Recently, a massive study of Federal housing
policy found many subsidized housing programs to be seriously defective. Specifically, the programs were shown to:
• Benefit those relatively few fortunate families who live in federally
aided housing, while taxing other (sometimes lower income)
families to pay the subsidies;
• Underwrite new housing construction when good—and far less
expensive—existing housing could have been used;
• Inflate the cost of the housing provided by up to 40% over private
market costs;
• Limit the freedom of individuals to make their own choices; and
• In some cases, provide benefits valued by the recipients at less
than 50ff per $1 of Federal expenditures.
The study also indicated that adequate housing can best be brought
within the reach of those who are without it through improvements
in their real income, not through Federal production subsidies.
Accordingly, priority is being given to efforts aimed at determining
whether a policy of direct cash assistance for housing can be put into
practical operation. Experimental programs involving direct cash
assistance are already underway in 10 cities. These programs will
provide the basic information and experience which must precede any
decision to launch a new program involving billions of tax dollars.
HUD will also provide housing assistance under the public housing
leasing program, revised to minimize the shortcomings of the old subsidy programs, which will develop valuable information on a direct
cash assistance approach. The Administration's proposed Housing Act
would increase the flexibility of this leasing program.




106

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

During 1974, commitments for projects will be made under the rent
supplement, homeownership assistance, and rental housing assistance
programs, as necessary to meet bona fide commitments which cannot
be met under the revised public housing leasing program.
New authorizations for contract approvals covering both bona fide
commitments and the revised leasing program are provided at 200,000
units in 1974. In 1975, HUD is authorized to process applications
for an additional 200,000 units under the revised leasing program.
The Administration's housing study drew attention to the problems
of operating public housing. Further review has confirmed that the
problems of its residents go far beyond housing, and require the attention, of State and local governments. It has also shown that the present
system, with local control but Federal financial responsibility, is
structurally inefficient and fosters poor management. It inequitably
penalizes taxpayers in communities where public housing is efficiently
managed to make up deficits in other areas.
This budget represents a step in a long-term program to improve the
operation of public housing, increasing operating subsidies from $280
million to $350 million in 1974 and $400 million in 1975. These increases will permit revisions to the present method of allocating operating subsidies in a manner that will provide greater incentives for more
effective management. Public housing will be further aided by reinstatement under new guidelines of the modernization program, under
which capital improvements costing $235 million in both 1974 and 1975
will be made. It is contemplated that the States and, where appropriate, localities will bear a greater portion of the costs of operating
public housing in future years.
Total housing payments for the subsidized housing programs are
expected to reach $2.3 billion in 1975, a $375 million increase over 1974.
Finally, Federal insurance for low down payment mortgages and
vigorous enforcement of fair housing laws will assist low- and moderate-income families in obtaining housing.
Community planning, management, and development.—In
1975, funding for the Administration's Better Communities Act and
Responsive Governments Act will complete the transition from restrictive
categorical grants to more responsive forms of support for community planning, management, and development.
By July 1, 1974, seven narrow and inflexible grant and loan programs
in the community development area will have been phased out,
thereby creating room in the budget for the more promising approach
to local development problems and higher funding level of the Better
Communities Act. The fragmented nature of the present programs,
combined with the red-tape and Federal second-guessing that goes
with them, tended to prevent local governments from responding
effectively to the needs of their citizens. Also, the lack of a uniform




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

107

mechanism for allocating funds resulted in some communities being
aided and others being ignored on a relatively haphazard basis.
The Better Communities Act would make funds available to
metropolitan cities and urban counties on the basis of relative need
as determined by objective criteria, and would give local officials more
flexibility to design community development activities in accordance
with local priorities. Communities of any size would be eligible to
receive Federal aid under the program from funds made available to
the States. Funding for the Better Communities Act will be $2.3 billion,
with the full amount available to recipient governments for use in 1975.
The Responsive Governments Act will expand and improve Federal
planning and management assistance. Grailts totaling $110 million
will enable State and local governments to strengthen their decisionmaking and managerial capabilities.
Research and technology programs will continue to test new approaches in the housing and community development area. In addition
to work on cash assistance for housing, the 1975 budget will finance
projects in the areas of public housing management, housing in rural
areas, and subsidized mortgage insurance. Funding for research and
technology will total $70 millioki in 1975.
Office of Economic Opportunity,—In 1974 other agencies assumed
responsibility for most programs previously financed through the Office
of Economic Opportunity. The migrant workers program was delegated to the Department of Labor, the Native American program was
assumed by HEW, health projects were transferred to HEW, and research and development functions were transferred to agencies with
statutory responsibility in fields of current OEO activity. The Congress appropriated funds to those agencies to finance the delegated
programs as proposed. In addition, legislation was submitted to establish a Legal Services Corporation and to transfer the community
economic development program to the Office of Minority Business
Enterprise of the Department of Commerce. With the phaseout of
direct Federal funding for Community Action, the continued existence
of OEO as an operating agency is no longer necessary.
Action.—Action's domestic volunteer programs include Volunteers
in Service to America (VISTA), University Year for Action, Older
Americans volunteer programs and a broad range of developmental
volunteer programs in other social program areas. In 1975, Action will
emphasize the development of new programs sponsored by private
organizations at the local level in accordance with locally-defined
needs. Action will also work toward developing programs that more
fully utilize such volunteers as middle-aged persons and ethnic groups.
In 1975, domestic volunteer programs will enroll an estimated 9,400
full-time and 129,000 part-time volunteers.




108

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

EDUCATION AND MANPOWER
Education, general science, and manpower programs increase the
capacity of the Nation to achieve social and economic progress. Outlays in this function are estimated at $10.8 billion in 1974, $11.5 billion
in 1975, and are expected to be $12.3 billion in 1976.
Education
Program Highlights
• Increased support for disadvantaged students at the
elementary and secondary levels from $1.1 billion in
1969 to $1.7 billion in 1975.
• Established basic educational opportunity grants, aiding 425,000 first-year, full-time postsecondary students in
1973-74.
• Provided approximately 1.7 million loans to students in
higher education through expanded loan programs in
1973.
• Helped the development of 360,000 preschool children
through Head Start programs during 1973.
New Developments
• Seek legislation to consolidate educational grant programs,
providing greater flexibility to State and local education
authorities.
• Fully fund basic educational opportunity grants for
some 1.6 million eligible postsecondary students in the
1975-76 school year.
• Propose legislation to increase the maximum amount
professional and other graduate students may borrow
under the guaranteed loan program.
• Expand educational research and development through
the National Institute of Education.
• Increase support of cuHural activities through the
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.
EDUCATION

State and local governments have the primary responsibility for
public education and pay 90% of its cost. Federal efforts are focused
on equalizing educational opportunity, research, demonstration, innovation, and reform. Outlays for education programs will be $6.9
billion in 1974 and are expected to reach $7.6 billion in 1975, an
increase of $3.2 billion since 1969.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

109

EDUCATION AND MANPOWER
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Outlays
1973
actual

1974
estimate

Education:
Consolidated education grants (proposed legislation)__
Elementary and secondary education:

Child development
Aid to school districts
Other

1975
estimate

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1975 1

1,910

2,875

384
2,557
238

411
2,919
247

440
1,558
302

459
675
271

Subtotal, elementary and secondary education. _
Vocational education
Higher education:
Student assistance..
Other

3,179
624

3,578
596

2,300
334

1,405
65

1,079
435

1,289
388

1,678
399

1,986
379

Subtotal, higher education
Other education aids:
National Institute of Education
Educational development
Cultural activities
Other
Proposed legislation

1,515

1,677

2,077

2,366

36
239
250
163

96
249
342
324

113
159
422
257
5

130
454
160
15

688

1,011

956

759

6,005
585

6,863
598

7,578
630

7,470
672

1,541
281
1,014
446

1,552
310
641
463

2,067
316

2,118
280

464

464

3,283
326

2,966
405

2,848
494

2,862
498

3,608

3,371

3,342

3,360

—13

—13

—13

—13

10,185

10,819

11,537

11,489

Subtotal, other education aids
Subtotal, education
General science 2
Manpower:
Manpower training and employment services:
Manpower program activities
Work incentive program
Emergency employment assistance
Federal-State employment service 2
Subtotal, manpower training and employment
services
Other manpower aids 2
Subtotal, manpower
Deduction for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total
1
2

Compares with budget authority of $12,049 million in 1973 and $13,782 million in 1974.
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.

540-000 O - 74 - I




110

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Education Outlays
$ Billions

, '

$ Billions

8-

-8

7,«

^^

^J

O"

Consolidated
Educational Grants

Elementary,
Secondary,
and Vocational

A ••••

mm iHf
SH

-4

Other Education
Aids

Higfier Education

—0

0—
1973
Fiscal Y e a n

1975

J974
EiHmate

Consolidated education grants.—Reform legislation to establish
consolidated education grants is currently before Congress. It provides
for six basic program categories: education of the disadvantaged,
vocational education, adult education, education of the handicapped,
innovation, and supportive services and material. The objectives
the Administration is seeking are:
• Reform of the distribution of funds for the education of disadvantaged children to achieve greater equity of payment to school
districts;
• Consolidation of many categorical programs into more flexible
funding arrangements;
• Provision of more decisionmaking authority to State and local
education agencies; and
• Reform of the Impacted Area Aid Program to phase out support
for pupils whose families live on property subject to local taxation.
Achievement of these objectives will allow State and local administrators to be more responsive to the problems of their jurisdictions.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

111

At the same time, it will allow the Federal Government to assist in
equalizing educational opportunity.
Upon enactment of acceptable separate legislative authorities—
elementary and secondary, vocational, and adult education—the
Administration will propose 1974 supplemental appropriations totaling
$2,852 million in budget authority for the 1974-75 school year. Planning by State and local school officials will be greatly facilitated by
this forward funding.

Elementary and secondary education.—Outlays in this category
appear to decline because many elementary and secondary education
programs are being converted into consolidated education grants in
1975.
Child development.—Federal funds support research, development,
demonstration, and dissemination to States of programs aiding the
development of preschool children. The largest single activity, Head
Start, will continue in 1975 to reach 282,000 children on a year-round
basis and an additional 78,000 preschoolers in the summer.
Aid to school districts.—In 1975, budget authority of approximately
$75 million will be provided to assist local educational agencies in
school desegregation; $35 million will be provided for support of
bilingual education projects; and $100 million will fund special
programs for the handicapped other than those in consolidated education grants. In addition, provision will be made for support of those
children whose parents reside on nontaxable Federal land within local
school districts. Other funds in this category will be replaced by
consolidated education grants.
Vocational education.—The Administration is supporting legislation to consolidate vocational education programs under an
authority which will provide greater decisionmaking authority and
flexibility for State agencies. In 1975, most vocational education
programs will be included in this consolidated grant program. Career
education and teacher training will continue to be funded under this
category.
Higher education.—The policy of giving Federal aid directly to
students in need, rather than through institutions, will be expanded.
Student assistance.—The budget provides increased direct assistance
to students in financial need. In 1975, $1.3 billion is requested to
fund basic educational opportunity grants of up to $1,400 for an
estimated 1.6 million eligible students in the 1975-76 academic year.
These basic grants will be supplemented by $250 million for the
College Work Study program, which will assist an estimated 520




112

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

thousand students. In addition, existing direct student loan revolving
funds will use repayments of previous loans to make $165 million in
new loans to an estimated 330 thousand students. The guaranteed
student loan program, with the infusion of additional private capital
generated by the Student Loan Marketing Association, will make
available more than $1 billion of student loans annually to about one
million students. Legislation will be proposed to increase the present
$10,000 ceiling on guaranteed loans to a new level of $25,000 to provide for professional or other graduate education.
Other higher education.—Outlays to support improvement of developing institutions, including Black colleges, will rise to $90 million
in 1975, compared with $70 million in 1974 and $27 million in 1969.
The Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education will
support innovation and reform projects to increase the quality of
postsecondary education. Funding for Howard University and
Gallaudet College will be increased over the 1974 level.
Other education aids.—Increased funding will be provided for
research and innovation in education as well as additional support
for cultural activities.
National Institute of Education.—The National Institute of Education functions as the national focal point for educational research
and development. Research results are disseminated to the education community as an aid in solving educational problems. Outlays
for NIE will increase by 18% over the 1974 level.
Educational development.—The programs in this category will be
transferred to the elementary and secondary and vocational education categories. The National Center for Educational Statistics has
been merged with the Office of Education planning and evaluation
activities.
Cultural activities.—In 1975, about $164 million will be spent by the
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities, an increase of
$69 million over fiscal year 1974. There will be a continuing emphasis on support for projects related to the Bicentennial. Some
$100 million will support the Smithsonian Institution's many activities in the arts and sciences.
Other.—The budget reflects proposed legislation to support the
demonstration of new methods of delivering public library services.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

113

General Science
Program Highlights
• Strengthened support of basic research including research
on broad societal problems and the development of a
scientific manpower base.
• Emphasized research addressing specific national needs,
such as the development of solar and geothermal energy
and earthquake engineering.
• Transferred the responsibilities of the Office of Science
and Technology to the National Science Foundation.
New Developments
• Will increase research support by 12% across a wide
front with emphasis on the uses of science to strengthen
the American economy.
• Will expand the program of Research Applied to National
Needs by 12% to increase the Federal energy program
and social and environmental research.

GENERAL SCIENCE

The National Science Foundation will increase its outlays from $598
million in 1974 to $630 million in 1975. Further emphasis on energy
research programs, under the President's accelerated 5-year commitment to such research and development, will provide additional
outlays in 1975, the details of which are covered in an Energy section
as part of the introduction to Part 4.
As reflected by obligations (new commitments to spending in present
or future years), research programs will increase substantially. A $34
million increase, to a total of $325 million, will be distributed over a
wide spectrum of research fields with emphasis given to strengthening
research related to industrial progress—particularly in engineering and
materials research—and to providing basic knowledge on the Nation's
varied energy problems. Another $8 million increase, to a total of $13
million, will be used to accelerate construction of an advanced radio
astronomy facility designed for study of the universe and its evolution.
Obligations for the program of Research Applied to National Needs
will rise to $84 million. This increase of $9 million over 1974 will be
used to accelerate energy research, primarily in solar and geothermal
energy, and research on socio-economic and environmental problems.




114

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Manpower

Program Highlights
• Consolidated categorical manpower programs into the
Comprehensive Employment and Tiaining Act that provides States and localities the flexibility needed to meet
their own needs.
• Found jobs for 137,000 recipients of Aid to Families with
Dependent Children in 1973.
• Helped assure all workers equal employment opportunity
regardless of age, sex, or race.
New Developments
• Will fund under the new act a locally determined mix of
training, transitional public service employment, and
other manpower services, including the means to create
700,000 summer jobs for disadvantaged youth.
• Will place 200,000 recipients of Aid to Families with
Dependent Children into unsubsidized jobs.
• Will fund 30 approved State occupational safety and
health plans, and increase enforcement through State or
Federal inspections of workplaces.
• Will increase efforts to prevent job discrimination through
the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and
the Federal Contract Compliance program.
• Urge legislation to protect workers' pensions.

MANPOWER

The Federal Government works with States and localities to help
train people for jobs, match the skills of those looking for work with
available jobs, prevent job-related disease and accidents, enforce minimum wage and other standards regulating employment practices,
and insure equality in employment opportunities.

Manpower training and employment services.—Help is provided to States and localities to train unemployed or underemployed
people, to match jobs with people seeking jobs, and to provide transitional employment opportunities.




115

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
Outlays (or Manpower Programs
SBill} O n ,

$ Billion,

4-

-4
3.61
3,34
Emergency
Employment
Assistance

Assistance
Employment

Other

1973

1974

1975

Fiscal Ye,

Manpower program activities.—In December 1973, the Congress
enacted manpower program reforms which embodied the major goals
of the Administration. Many separate programs have been consolidated into one statute. Most of the appropriation of $2.1 billion
under this Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) will
be distributed to State and local governments by formula. Prime
sponsors—generally cities of 100,000 population or more, States, or
combinations of local government units—will be able to use the money,
in accordance with plans they have prepared, for the manpower services they choose to meet the needs of the people within their areas.
These services can include skill training, remedial education, on-the-job
training, job development, job matching, transitional public service
employment, vocational counseling, and related supporting services.
Under the new legislation, $250 million is proposed as a 1974
supplemental and $350 million is provided in 1975 for distribution to
prime sponsors in areas with unemployment rates of 6.5% or more.
These funds are designed to enable localities with high unemployment
rates to increase their transitional public employment, or otherwise
expand their manpower programs. With funds provided by a proposed 1974 supplemental and the 1975 request, $300 million will be
distributed each year under the CETA formula for use in special summer employment programs for school-age youths by those States and




116

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

localities wishing to do so. Under the new act, States can exercise
authority throughout their areas by coordinating State agency services
with prime sponsor activities, providing for planning areas, developing
consistent labor market information, and giving technical assistance
to local prime sponsors.
The remainder of the total manpower appropriation is ava^able to
the Department of Labor for special national manpower programs,
including those for migrant workers, Indians, and the Job Corps.
About 592,000 man-years of training and employment will be provided in 1975 with $2 billion in outlays.
Work incentive program (WIN).—People receiving welfare payments
from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program
are aided in finding jobs so that they may become self-sufficient.
Every employable AFDC recipient must register for work or training.
Through testing, counseling, and exposure to various job opportunities
and methods of finding jobs, the local WIN staff help the recipients
find suitable jobs. Where necessary, opportunities for work experience
or subsidized on-the-job training are provided. If employment cannot be developed otherwise, the recipients are trained in skills in a
classroom setting. When these opportunities cannot be found, transitional public service employment can be provided. Local welfare
agencies supply child care, minor medical, and other supportive
services to assure that the WIN registrants can accept and retain
jobs. In 1973, about 137,000 WIN registrants were placed in jobs,
and 65% of these were still working after 90 days. In 1974, it is estimated that the program will spend about $300 million to help 200,000
registrants obtain jobs. The program will be kept at this level through
1975 as its effect on the welfare system is evaluated.
Emergency employment assistance.—About 325,000 individuals were
employed in transitional public service jobs over a 30-month period
in fiscal years 1972, 1973, and 1974. This emergency program was
enacted in 1971 when the national unemployment rate was 6%.
Authorization for appropriations for this program expired June 30,
1973.
The Federal-State Employment Service is operated by State governments with 100% Federal financing. In 1975, about 4.6 million people
will be placed in nonfarm jobs, about the same as in 1974. The Federal
Government will work closely with the States to help increase the
effectiveness and efficiency of the Service.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

117

Other manpower aids.—These programs help reduce job-caused
accidents and disease; enforce minimum wage and hour laws; assure
equal opportunities in employment; secure fair practices and resolve
disputes in labor-management relations; and obtain the basic statistical data to support economic, fiscal, and program decisions. In
1975, outlays for these programs are expected to be $494 million, $89
million more than in 1974. Unemployment benefits are discussed in
the Income Security function.
In 1975, 30 States are expected to be enforcing occupational
safety and health standards under programs which are as effective as
the Federal Government's. The Department of Labor pays 50% of
the cost of these State programs, and sets and enforces health and
safety standards in areas not covered by approved State plans.
The Government will expand efforts to assure that every worker
has nondiscriminatory opportunities for hiring and promotion. In 1975,
under the leadership of the Department of Labor, the 18 compliance
agencies in the Federal Contract Compliance Program will intensify
their review of the performance of Federal contractors' affirmative
action plans. These plans provide minorities and women equal employment opportunities. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will conduct an estimated 33,000 investigations and 15,000
conciliations of complaints of job discrimination in 1975. Legislation
is again recommended to extend the law which prohibits job discrimination against older workers so that it will cover State and local
government workers.
The Administration will continue its efforts to secure passage of
responsible legislation to assure workers the pensions which they expect
by requiring adequate vesting, funding, and fiduciary responsibility.
Many educational, scientific, and manpower programs are part of
other functions. For a coordinated discussion of these programs see
Special Analysis H, "Federal Education Programs/ 7 Special Analysis I,
"Federal Manpower Programs," and Special Analysis P, "Federal
Research and Development Programs," all in the Special Analyses
volume of the budget.




118

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

HEALTH

Program Highlights
• Increased support of biomedical research from $1.1
billion in 1969 to $2.2 billion in 1975.
• Aided training of over 300,000 students in health careers.
• Increased Medicare and Medicaid expenditures from
$8.9 billion in 1969 to $20.7 billion in 1975, expanding
coverage from 26 million to 47 million aged, disabled,
and low-income Americans.
• Funded consumer safety and disease prevention and control with $450 million in 1975, as compared with $346
million in 1973.
New Developments
• National health insurance legislation is being proposed
to provide financial assistance in obtaining quality medical
care for all Americans.
• A total of $125 million will be used to demonstrate health
maintenance organizations in 1974 and 1975.
• The quality and appropriateness of medical services will
be improved through Professional Standards Review
Organizations.
• Federal support for health manpower will be reoriented
to assure students the means to finance their educational
costs and to reduce unnecessary Federal subsidies.

Outlays for Federal programs in the health function are estimated
at $26.3 billion in 1975, an increase of $3 billion (13%) from 1974.
Outlays are expected to rise to $28.6 billion in 1976.
Development of health resources.—Programs for the development of health resources include support for research, training and
education, construction, and efforts to improve the organization and
delivery of services.
Biomedical research.—Outlays are estimated at nearly $2.2 billion in
1975. Major efforts to obtain new knowledge about heart disease and
cancer will continue. Budget authority for cancer research will total
$600 million in 1975, with outlays of $559 million anticipated. Outlays
for research on heart, lung, and blood diseases will reach $334 million.
Emphasis will also be placed on other important research areas including digestive diseases, cystic fibrosis, neurological disease, sickle cell




119

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
HEALTH
[In millions of dollars]

Recommended
budget
1974
1975
authority
estimate estimate for 1975 l
Outlays

1973
actual
Development of health resources:

Supporting biomedical research
_
Training health manpower
Proposed legislation
Constructing health facilities. _ _
_
Improving the organization and delivery of health
services
Proposed legislation
__
Subtotal, development of health resources-

1,639
712
188

2,035
693
5
264

2,188
776
20
216

1,964
428
20

244

349

184
40

128
75

2,784

3.345

3,424

2,615

9,479
4,600

12,180
5,827

849
345

1,057
430

16,714
6,592
-55
1,218
413
42

17

-12

14,191
6,563
-55
1,264
430
42
-23

15,290

19,482

22,412

24,925

203
143

239
206

213
237

244
243

18,417

23,268

Financing or providing medical services:

Financing medical services:2
Medicare (trust funds)
Medicaid
Proposed legislation
Other financing
Providing medical services
Proposed legislation
Health insurance for Federal employees
Subtotal, financing or providing medical services._
Prevention and control of health problems:

Preventing and controlling diseases. _
Consumer safety
Subtotal, prevention and control of health problems
Deductions for offsetting receipts: 3

Proprietary receipts from the public
Total

» Compares with budget authority for 1973 and 1974. as follows: 1973. $22,226 million; 1974. $26.153
million.
2
Entries net of offsetting receipts.
3
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been deducted by subfunction above: 1973, $(,860
million; 1974. $2,507 million: 1975. $2,846 million.

anemia, schizophrenia, aging, family planning, venereal disease, drug
addiction, alcoholism, and environmental factors that affect health.
Health manpower.—Measures undertaken since 1969 have assured
a major increase in the number of graduates of U.S. health professions
schools. Since 1965, first-year medical school enrollments have grown
from 8,854 to 13,726, a 55% increase. As in other fields of higher education, emphasis will be placed on aiding students rather than institutions, and on reducing unnecessary Federal subsidies. Students in the
health professions, who can anticipate high earnings, generally are




120

THE: BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Health Outlays

Tr

———
Prcventbn and Control of Health

Development of Health Resources

able to finance a greater share of their educational costs. Federally
guaranteed private loans are available, and proposed legislation will
increase their usefulness to students in the health professions by
raising ceilings on loans. In addition, legislation has been requested for
a scholarship program which will both assist students and help meet
Federal requirements for health professionals. Scholarships will be
provided in return for a commitment to a period of public service. A
new program of fellowships will provide postgraduate research training support. General purpose support to institutions will be phased
out gradually as Federal assistance shifts toward providing financial
assistance to individual students. In 1975, Federal outlays for training health manpower are estimated at $796 million.
Health facilities construction.—Over the past two and a half decades,
the Federal Government has spent over $4.0 billion to assist construction of hospitals and other health facilities. These funds represent
the Federal share of construction and modernization projects which
created some 470,000 additional hospital beds. Currently, however,
the Nation is experiencing an aggregate oversupply of hospital beds.
This oversupply contributes to inflation in medical care costs. To
minimize further oversupply, termination of the medical facilities
construction program is again being proposed. Recent experience has




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

121

repeatedly demonstrated that where construction is needed, it can
normally be financed through private and State and local government
borrowing, since public and private health insurance now reimburse
for the costs of such borrowing.
Organization and delivery of health services.—Legislation

will be

submitted to improve the Federal, State, and local partnership in
health planning. Research into ways of improving the delivery of
health services and understanding the relationship between health
services and health status will continue to be stressed in 1975.
Financing or providing medical services.—This activity represents the largest Federal effort in the health sector.
Financing medical services.—National health insurance legislation
is being proposed to guarantee that every American will be financially
able to obtain comprehensive medical care. In keeping with New
Federalism, financing of national health insurance will involve a
partnership between the Federal Government and the States, and
between employers and employees.
Until national health insurance legislation is enacted, Medicare
and Medicaid will remain the major Federal programs for financing
medical care. In 1975, Medicare outlays of $14.2 billion will help to
meet the medical costs of an estimated 12.2 million aged and disabled
Americans, 3.2 million more people than were aided in 1969. Review
of the quality and appropriateness of services provided under Medicare will be intensified.
Medicaid outlays of $6.5 billion in 1975 will help to pay for medical
care for an estimated 28.6 million low-income Americans. This represents a 200% increase in persons helped and a 182% increase in funding
since 1969. Early and periodic screening of children for dental and
other health problems will be emphasized in order to identify health
problems before they reach an advanced stage and become unnecessarily costly to treat. The management of Medicaid will be improved
by expanded eligibility screening and more effective program review.
The budget reflects legislation proposed earlier in the 93d Congress to
eliminate Federal matching for routine dental services for adults.
New legislation will be submitted to authorize Medicaid reimbursement for care received in free-standing clinics.
Efforts to improve the ways in which health services are made
available will be strengthened. In 1975, emphasis on the demonstration
of health maintenance organizations (HMO's) will continue. These
organizations provide health care on a prepaid basis and stress preventive services.
Total Federal funding for mental health, drug abuse, alcoholism,
family planning, maternal and child health, and comprehensive and




122

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

neighborhood health center programs will remain at approximately the
current levels pending the establishment of national health insurance.
The national effort against opiate abuse has succeeded in reducing
the total number of addicts and even more markedly reducing the
number of new addicts. Nationally, treatment capacit}^ exists for all
addicts who seek treatment voluntarily or as a result of increased law
enforcement efforts. The effort against opiate abuse will continue in
1975 with the addition of new outreach activities in an effort to help
hard-core addicts.
Subsidies to community mental health centers have demonstrated
the viability of mental health services in a community setting. In
1975, Federal support for existing centers will continue through the
8 year demonstration cycle. Mental health services will be available
more equitably under national health insurance than under the existing project grant system which funds centers in some communities but
not in others.
Improving the quality and appropriateness of medical care will be
the goal of a nationwide system of physician-sponsored Professional
Standards Review Organizations (PSRO's). Approximately 120 of the
proposed 182 PSRO's will be in existence by the end of 1975.
Providing medical services.—In addition to financing medical services,
the Federal Government also provides medical care directly. Health
services are provided to American Indians on reservations, Alaska
Natives, and merchant seamen. An estimated $472 million will be
expended on provision of medical services in 1975. Of this, $284 million
in outlays will be requested for the care of American Indians and
Alaska Natives, which is $177 million (160%) over the 1969 level.
Legislation has been introduced to transfer Saint Elizabeths Hospital
from the Federal Government to the District of Columbia and to
reimburse the District of Columbia for the care and treatment of
Federal beneficiaries at the Hospital.
Prevention and control of health problems.—Major programs
to prevent and control health problems include consumer safety, communicable disease control, and occupational safety and health. Outlays
for these programs are expected to reach $450 million in 1975.
The 1975 budget reflects a continued emphasis on consumer health
and safety. For the consumer safety activities of the Food and Drug
Administration, outlays of $195 million are being requested for 1975.
Emphasis on developing standards for the effectiveness of vaccines,
biologicals, and medical devices, and on inspecting blood banks will
continue.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

123

Programs in occupational health will continue to stress research
and the development of criteria for establishing safety and health
standards in the work environment. Efforts to control the spread of
venereal disease will continue to be emphasized in 1975.
Special Analysis J, "Federal Health Programs/' discusses all Federal
activities related to health, including those outside this function such
as programs for military personnel and veterans. See the Special
Analyses volume of the budget.




124

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

INCOME SECURITY

Program Highlights
• Increased cash benefits for social security from $26 billion
in 1969 to $63 billion in 1975, reaching 32.7 million
recipients and amounting to about 2 1 % of the Federal
budget.
• Initiated the new program of Supplemental Security
Income on January 1, 1974, with outlays totaling $4.8
billion for 5.6 million recipients in 1975.
• Increased food assistance program outlays from $1.2
billion in 1969 to $5.8 billion in 1975.
• Increased grants to States for Aid to Families with
Dependent Children (AFDC) from $1.7 billion for 6.1
million recipients in 1969 to $4.4 billion for 11.5 million
recipients in 1975.
• Covered 74% of the working population with unemployment insurance.
New Developments
• Achieve more effective management of welfare and service programs.
• Propose legislation to transfer the food stamp and related
programs to the Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare.
• Seek legislation authorizing a new program to demonstrate the benefits of coordinated delivery of related
human services at the State and local level.
• Propose legislation to provide automatic cost of living
increases for the aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries
of the Supplemental Security Income program.
• Develop legislation to replace current welfare programs
with a system that works.

The primary objectives of Federal income security programs are
to provide financial and other assistance to those in need and to provide partial replacement of income lost through retirement, disability,
illness, unemployment, or death. In recent years, the major emphasis
has been on:
• Providing a more adequate level of benefits for the elderly, the
blind, and the disabled; and
• Improving management to increase equity and eliminate waste.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

125

Outlays for income security programs will be $85 billion in 1974
and are expected to reach $100 billion in 1975, one-third of all Federal
budget outlays, and an increase of $62 billion since 1969. Full-employment outlays in 1976 are estimated to be $107.2 billion.1
1
Includes an estimate for the unemployment trust fund which assumes full-employment. Because
of the increasing uncertainties, no forecast of the actual unemployment rate has been made for 1976.

INCOME SECURITY
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays

Program or agency

Retirement and disability:
Old-age, survivors, and disability insurance: 2
Present programs
Proposed legislation
Federal employees retirement and disability 2 3
Railroad retirement: 2 3
Present programs
Proposed legislation
Special benefits for disabled coal miners
Subtotal, retirement and disability
Unemployment insurance 2 3
Public assistance:
Supplemental security income
Grants to States for maintenance payments:
Present programs
Proposed legislation
Food stamps
School lunch and other child nutrition
Assistance to refugees
Subtotal, public assistance
Social services:
Grants to States for social services
Rehabilitation services
Services for the aging and other special groups
Allied services (proposed legislation)
Administrative expenses and o t h e r 3
Subtotal, social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts: 4
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total

Recommended
budget
1974
1975
authority
estimate estimate for 1975 1

1973
actual

48,288

55,258

4,514

5,935

2,440

2,679

952

998

64,351
—345
7,230

65,173
11
10,240

2,801
198
879

2,776
238
876

56,194

64,871

75,114

79, 315

5,362

5,566

7,065

6,655

2,192

4,770

4,774

5,922

5,347

2,208
693
135

2,992
914
128

4,550
—203
3,926
1, 389
72

4,601
—203
3,985
1,468
60

8,999

11,573

14,505

14,685

1,614
699
63

1,786
760
224

2,078
788
296

144

217

227

41

2,520

2,987

—1

—1

73,073

84,995

3,389
—2
100,071

2,079
769
265
20
226
3,359
—2
104,012

1
Compares with budget authority for 1973 and 1974. as follows: 1973. $79,818 million; 1974,
$93,015 million.
2
Entries net of offsetting receipts.
3
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
4
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been deducted by subfunction above: 1973. $1,508
million; 1974. $1,761 million; 1975. $1,680 million.

540-000 O - 74 - 9




126

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Income Security Outlays
SSiHiom

Other Retirement and Social Insurance

Public Assistance and Services

•

I9T5
csiimctftt

Retirement and disability.—The social security cash benefit programs are the largest system of retirement, survivors, and disability
insurance in the world. In 1975, the system will pay an average of
$203 per month to a total of 13.2 million retired workers. The total
number of beneficiaries, including dependents and survivors, is expected to be 32.6 million. Net outlays are expected to be $64 billion
in 1975, an increase of $9 billion over 1974 and now representing 2 1 %
of all Federal budget outlays. The rise in outlays reflects the recently
enacted increase in benefits, the rising proportion of the elderly in
the population, and the steady rise in average wages which produces
higher average benefits as each generation of workers retires. To
finance these rising benefits, the amount of an employee's earnings
which is subject to the Social Security payroll tax rose from $10,800
in 1973 to $13,200 in 1974, and will probably rise to $14,100 on January 1, 1975, through the operation of the automatic adjustment
mechanism. The Administration will continue to seek legislation to
carry out the recommendation of the Social Security Advisory Council, that retroactive benefit payments be eliminated when they have the
effect of permanently reducing a beneficiary's regular monthly check.
Separate contributory systems provide benefits for retired or disabled railroad workers and Federal civilian employees. Outlays under




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

127

these programs are estimated at $10.2 billion in 1975, an increase of
$1.6 billion from 1974. For the railroad retirement system, the budget
assumes that legislation will be enacted to continue the present
temporary benefits and to provide the revenues necessary to pay
for them as part of a sound structure of permanent financing.
Public Law 93-69 requires the railroad industry to develop and submit
to the Congress by April 1, 1974, a proposal to assure the long-term
actuarial soundness of the system. The Administration is firmly
committed to the view that benefits paid under the railroad retirement system, to the extent that they exceed those of the social
security system, should be financed by the railroad industry itself,
as is the case with other industrial pension systems.
Unemployment insurance.—The basic unemployment insurance
program, which is established by States in conformance with Federal
standards, generally provides up to 26 weeks of benefits to those unemployed who worked in jobs covered by State laws. The amount of
the benefits is usually 50% of the worker's previous wages, subject to a
maximum set by the various State laws. Another 13 weeks of benefits
can be paid if the national insured unemployment rate is above
4.5%, or if a State insured unemployment rate is above 4% and at
the same time at least 20% higher than it was in the previous two
years. Temporary legislation in effect through March 1974, permits
the States to suspend the application of the 20% test.
Administrative improvements in the unemployment insurance
program will be continued to assure prompt payment of unemployment compensation benefits and the efficient collection of taxes by
the States. The Administration has proposed legislation to require
States to provide coverage for farmworkers and to increase the maximum weekly benefit to at least 66%% of the State's average weekly
wage. Outlays for unemployment insurance benefits which include
the program for ex-Federal workers are expected to be $7.1 billion in
1975.
Public assistance.—The Federal program of supplemental security
income, initiated on January 1, 1974, replaces federally aided State
programs of assistance to the aged, blind, and disabled. Federal benefits are expected to total $3.9 billion in 1975, assisting up to 5.6 million
recipients by the end of 1975, including 600,000 who will be receiving
only State supplementation payments. This includes the cost of recently enacted benefit increases. Legislation will be proposed to provide
automatic cost of living adjustments in the future in line with those
provided in the social security cash benefit programs. Administrative
costs of $397 million for the program are expected in 1975. In addition
to the direct cost of the program, the Federal Government will pay an




128

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 197 5

estimated $452 million to States to assure that their supplementation of
Federal benefits does not involve costs in excess of those incurred by
each State in 1972.
State and local programs of Aid to Families with Dependent
Children (AFDC) are assisted through grants to States for maintenance
payments. Until January 1, 1974, the Federal share of welfare benefits
for the aged, blind, and disabled were also covered by these grants.
The AFDC program is expected to grow only very slowly in 1975,
partly because it is believed that most eligible families are now receiving benefits, but also because of intensive efforts by Federal and
State governments to simplify and tighten up the management of the
program. Recent studies indicate that about 23% of all AFDC recipients are receiving a greater payment than they should, 10% are
receiving a payment for which they are not eligible and another 8%
are underpaid. To overcome this problem, steps are being taken to
assure that only eligible people receive benefits, and that they receive
the benefits to which they are properly entitled. In addition, the
Administration will continue to seek legislation to standardize procedures for deductions from earnings and the treatment of workrelated expenses.
Food assistance is a major adjunct of the cash assistance programs.
Total outlays for food assistance are expected to reach $5.8 billion in
1975, including activities discussed in the agriculture and rural development function. Outlays for the food stamp program will rise rapidly
in 1975 to $3.9 billion, an increase of $0.9 billion from 1974 and double
the level of 1972. This reflects a large cost of living adjustment on
January 1, 1974, which produced not only a 22% increase in the food
stamp allotment, but also a major expansion in the eligible population.
Reflecting the increased subsidy rates provided under recent legislation, outlays for the school lunch and related programs, part of
which is included in the agriculture and rural development function,
will also rise in 1975, to a total of $1.8 billion. Subsidized lunches will
be provided to an average of 24 million school children each day,
including 9.3 million needy children who receive extra subsidies.
In view of the close relationship between food assistance programs
and other income security programs, legislation will be proposed to
transfer the food stamp and related programs from the Department
of Agriculture to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.
This proposal is part of the Administration's broad organizational
objective of a Department of Human Resources. This reform will
assure more effective coordination, particularly between the food




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

129

stamp and AFDC programs. These two programs are administered
by the same State and local agencies and provide benefits to largely
overlapping groups of people. The two programs are also encountering
much of the same sort of management problems. Recent studies indicate
that the food stamp program is experiencing about the same proportion
of ineligibles and overpayment as in the AFDC program.
In addition to the administrative problems with the welfare programs already noted, there is increasing recognition of the inequity
and inefficiency which results from the massive overlaps, duplication,
and confusion of the present collection of welfare programs. In response to these problems the Administration will develop a proposal to
replace the current welfare programs with a new system that will work
more efficiently and effectively.
Social services.—The primary responsibility for providing social
services to individuals and groups rests with State and local governments and private voluntary agencies. The Federal Government,
however, does provide substantial financial assistance for these
activities.
An estimated $2.1 billion will be provided in 1975 under the program
of grants to States for social services and related activities such as child
welfare services. These grants cover activities ranging from day
care for children to homemaker counseling. Within the permanent
statutory ceiling of $2.5 billion for this program, the Administration
will continue to seek effective management of the funds to assure that
they are spent on useful services for those most in need.
Outlays for rehabilitation services will also rise in 1975, reaching
$788 million, compared to $760 million in 1974. Included in these
amounts are funds to continue support of State programs for the
developmentally disabled (persons with disabilities such as mental
retardation and cerebral palsy) as well as the traditional program of
vocational rehabilitation. The latter program will continue emphasis on
rehabilitation of those receiving public assistance and will give additional emphasis to rehabilitation of the severely disabled. The total
number of people served under the vocational rehabilitation program
is expected to reach 1.3 million in 1975. Additional funds for vocational
rehabilitation services are provided under two other programs. The
old age, survivors, and disability insurance programs, under social
security, will provide $70 million in 1974 and $83 million in 1975 for
services to beneficiaries. A further $40 million in 1974 and $54 million




130

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

in 1975 will be provided for vocational rehabilitation services for disabled beneficiaries of the Supplemental Security Income program.
Services for the aging and other special groups will also receive

increased support in 1975, with outlays rising $72 million to a total of
$296 million. Outlays for nutrition and other services for the aging
will reach $242 million in 1975, compared with $190 million in 1974.
The major emphasis of the aging program is on encouraging coordinated service delivery programs at the local level, which can bring
togethe* available Federal, State, local, and private funds in an
effective service delivery system. This is also the emphasis of the
juvenile delinquency prevention program for which the funding will
be increased from $10 million in 1974 to $15 million in 1975. This will
permit a significant expansion of the successful program of support
for model projects, including the demonstration of coordinated services
for runaway youth.
The Administration will also continue to seek legislation for a new
allied services program. This program, for which $20 million will be
proposed for 1975, is designed to demonstrate the benefits of coordinated planning and delivery of related human service programs at
the State and local level.
Disaster assistance programs, which were included in this section
in prior years, are now discussed as part of the commerce and transportation function.
Other activities which contribute to income security objectives, such
as military retired pay, veterans benefits, housing, and health programs,
are outside the scope of this section. For further information, see
Special Analysis K, "Federal Income Security Programs," in the Special
Analyses volume of the Budget.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

131

VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
Program Highlights
• Increased outlays for pension programs from $2.2 billion
in 1969 to $2.9 billion in 1975, covering 2.4 million
beneficiaries.
• Increased compensation for service-connected disability
or death from $2.7 billion to $3.9 billion between 1969
and 1975.
• Financed the education of 4.1 million veterans under the
GI bill since 1969.
• Increased the number of veterans assisted through
guaranteed mortgage loans by 46% since 1969.
• Increased the flexibility of the Veterans Administration
medical care system through the Health Care Expansion
Act of 1973.
New Developments
• Refinements of the pension system will be proposed to
bring payments more into line with need and rising costs.
• Replacement of five VA hospitals will be funded; over
7,600 full-time medical personnel will be added.
• Proposed legislation will increase GI bill educational
payments an average of 8% to cover cost increases.
In peace, as in times of war, the Nation will not slacken its efforts
to help those who have served in the armed forces. This budget
proposes spending for benefits and services to veterans and their
families of $13.6 billion. Outlays for 1976 are estimated at $13.8
billion.
Income security for'veterans.—Several programs help to maintain family income when veterans are disabled, aged, or deceased.
Service-connected compensation.—The Veterans Administration pays
compensation to those veterans who, as a result of military service,
have a disability that impairs their earning ability. The amount
paid varies with the degree of earnings impairment. For the severely
disabled, compensation is supplemented by a dependents' allowance
and special payments for losses of limbs and organs. Survivors of
veterans who have died from service-connected injuries also receive
compensation. Compensation payments will reach $3.9 billion in 1975.




132

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
VETERANS BENEFITS A N D SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]

Program or agency

Income security for veterans:
Compensation and pensions:
Service-connected compensation
Non-service-connected pensions
Other veterans benefits and services
Proposed pensions and cemetery legislation
Insurance programs:
National service life insurance trust fund
U.S. Government life insurance trust fund
All other insurance programs

Outlays
1973
actual

1974
estimate

Recommended
budget
1975
authority
estimate for 1975 l

3,836
2,565
95

3,909
2,569
151

3,946
2,602
172
165

3,944
2,601
172
165

519
66
—48

603
75
—61

623
74
—63

837
38

Subtotal, income security
Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation:
Readjustment benefits and other
Proposed legislation

7,031

7,242

7,519

7,757

2,801

3,246

2,678
200

2,676
200

Subtotal, education, training, and rehabilitation. _
Veterans housing:
Loan guaranty revolving fund
Direct loan revolving fund
Other ( H U D participation sales trust fund)

2,801

3,246

2,878

2,876

—149
—241
9

—104
—111
11

—65
—81
—8

2

Subtotal, housing
Hospital and medical care for veterans:
Medical care and hospital services
Proposed legislation
Construction of hospital and extended care facilities. __
Medical administration, research, and o t h e r 2

-381

-203

-154

2

2,512

2,847

96
106

122
135

3, 177
—98
182
152

3, 175
—98
276
142

2,715

3,104

3,413

3,495

311
36

345
32

402
26

401
20

347

377

428

421

—2
—497

—2
—479

—2
—469

—2
—469

12,013

13,285

13,612

14,080

Subtotal, hospital and medical care
Other veterans benefits and services:
VA administrative expenses and other
Non-VA veterans support programs
Subtotal, other veterans benefits and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total
1
2

Compares with budget authority of $12,782 million in 1973 and $13,786 million in 1974.
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

133

Non-service-connected pensions.—Disabled and aged veterans whose
income falls below minimal levels are eligible for pensions, provided
they have served in wartime. The families of deceased wartime veterans also qualify for pensions if they are in financial need. Much
needs to be done to improve the pension program—notably, to raise
benefits for the neediest, to relate pension levels more closely to
need, to equalize the treatment of widows and veterans, and to adjust
pensioners' income to rising costs of living on a regular basis. The
budget provides an extra $250 million to fund these improvements.
With the enactment of these proposals, outlays for pensions will rise
to $2.9 billion in 1975.
Cemetery and burial benefits.—The National Cemeteries Act of 1973
established a National Cemetery System under VA jurisdiction. The
Act also liberalized payments to families of deceased veterans. Further
reforms of cemetery and burial benefits are proposed, based upon a
study mandated by the Act.
Life insurance.—Five life insurance programs for veterans and their
survivors provide $35.Q billion of coverage for 5.1 million families.
In addition, the Veterans Administration supervises the Servicemen's
Group Life Insurance program for active duty military personnel,
providing $37.9 billion of coverage for 3.4 million families.
Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation.—The educational benefits of the "GI bill" are varied—ranging from college courses
to vocational and on-the-job training—but all are designed to prepare
recipients for productive civilian careers. Most of the 2.1 million
current beneficiaries are Vietnam-era veterans, although servicemen
on active duty and widows, wives, and children of veterans who have
died or been totally disabled in military service are also eligible.
Service-disabled veterans with significant disability have a choice
between regular GI bill benefits or vocational education fully financed
by the Government. Outlays per beneficiary have increased sharply,
more than doubling between 1969 and 1975. To help meet the rising
cost of living, the budget reflects proposed legislation which would
provide an average 8% increase in educational benefits in 1975.




134

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

Veterans housing.—In
1975, the VA will help some 346,000
veterans to become homeowners by guaranteeing mortgage loans. This
represents a 4 6 % increase over the number of veterans assisted in
1969. Efforts to help veterans secure mortgage loans from private
lenders have greatly reduced the need for direct Government loans.
CREDIT PROGRAMS—VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES
[In millions of dollars]
Program

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

Housing:

Direct housing loans:
Approvals
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays
Housing loan guaranty and other:
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays
Other veterans benefits and services:
Insurance policy loans:
Disbursements
Repayments
Net loan outlays
Total, net loan outlays

(46)
47
-283

(48)
48
-151

(51)
51
-134

-236

-103

-83

225
-410

293
-437

312
-413

-185

-144

-101

129
-108

134
-113

139
-119

21

21

20

-400

-225

-164

Hospital and medical care for veterans.—The Veterans Administration operates the largest civilian medical care system in the
country. Outlays for medical programs will reach $3.4 billion in 1975,
a $309 million increase over 1974.
Medical care and hospital services.—Medical care will be available to eligible veterans in 170 hospitals, 87 nursing homes, and 218
outpatient clinics across the country. All veterans with serviceconnected disabilities may obtain care in VA facilities. To the extent
that available facilities and staff are not fully utilized by these veterans,
care is also provided for veterans with disabilities or illness unrelated
to service who are unable to pay the cost of care. Because many
patients receiving treatment for non-service-connected ailments have
private health insurance, legislation is proposed to require insurance
reimbursement to the VA medical system.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

135

The Health Care Expansion Act of 1973 is being used to increase the
flexibility of the medical care system. Outpatient and ambulatory
care programs will be expanded to eliminate unneeded hospitalization.
Some veterans will be admitted directly to nursing homes without
prior hospitalization being required. Emphasis will be placed on
arrangements, such as medical care in the home, which will permit
earlier discharge of patients and convalescence in a more familiar
environment. The Health Care Expansion Act also extends care to
some dependents and survivors of veterans who previously have had
no Government-sponsored health care.
In 1975, over 1 million veterans will be treated in VA hospitals with
another 30 thousand treated in other hospitals at VA expense. In
addition, an estimated 14 million outpatient visits will be funded—2
million more than in 1974. Evidence of continued advancement in
quality and efficiency of services is reflected in:
• The opening of 6 geriatric research and clinical centers;
• The addition of 119 specialized medical services, such as intensive
care units, and the upgrading of 147 others;
• Affiliation of 11 more hospitals with medical schools; and
• The consolidation of medical regions and the strengthening of
regional management to provide faster responses to problems at
individual hospitals.
MEDICAL CARE FOR VETERANS
Program indicator

Number receiving hospital care (thousands) _.
Staff patient ratio for VA hospitals
Average length of stay (days)
Number receiving extended care (thousands) Outpatient visits (millions)

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1.51
42.1

1,044
1.53
36.5

1,095
1.58
34.6

68
11

74
12

77
14

1973
ctual
1,015

Construction of hospital and extended care facilities.—Budget authority of $276 million, an increase of $165 million over 1974, will
fully fund already approved construction projects and initiate new
ones. Design or construction will progress on five replacement hospitals. $87 million is requested for modernization, air-conditioning, and
correction of safety hazards in existing facilities.




136

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

Other veterans benefits and services.—In 1973, the President's
Veterans Program placed 614,000 veterans in jobs, an 82% increase
over the number placed in 1971. Unemployment among Vietnam-era
veterans fell from 11% in February 1971 to 4% in December 1973.
Both government agencies and private industry—through Jobs for
Veterans and the National Alliance of Businessmen—have contributed
to this success. Nonetheless, much remains to be done. In fiscal year
1974, the goal is to place 1.2 million veterans in jobs or training
programs.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

137

INTEREST
Budget outlays for the interest function will rise by $4.9 billion in
1974, and by another $1.4 billion in 1975 reaching $29.1 billion. By
1976 these costs are projected to reach $30.4 billion.
INTEREST i
[In millions of dollars]
Outlays
1973
actual

1974
estimate

Recommended
budget
1975 authority
estimate for 1975 1

Interest on the public debt 2
Interest on refunds of receipts
Interest on uninvested funds

24,167
175
6

29,100
183
5

30,500
206
5

30,500
206
5

Subtotal
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental
Proprietary receipts from the public

24,349

29,289

30,711

30,711

-1,225
-311

-1,300
-235

-1,341
-249

-1,341
-249

22,813

27,754

29,122

29,122

Total

1
Excludes interest on debt issued by various agencies, which is included in the outlays of the
function served. For this function, budget authority equals outlays.
2
Includes interest paid on the public debt held by Government investment accounts.

A substantial amount of the outlays in the interest function is
paid to trust funds on Government securities held by them. These
payments, amounting to $7.1 billion in 1975, are deducted from both
outlays and budget authority in arriving at budget totals, since they
are intragovernmental transactions. Therefore, as shown in the table
below, net interest outlays are projected to be $22.0 billion in 1975.
[In millions of dollars]
1973

Outlays for the Interest function
Interest received by trust funds
Net interest outlays..
Deduct: Deposit of earnings by Federal Reserve System 1
Net impact 2
1
2

1974

1975

22,813
-5,436

27,754
-6,420

29,122
-7,140

17,377
3,495

21,335
4,400

21,982
4, 700

13,882

16,935

17,282

Shown as budget receipts.
Net amount of interest to be paid from receipts or other means of financing.

In addition, $4.7 billion of the interest paid on securities held by
the Federal Reserve banks will be returned to the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. Hence, the net impact on the 1975 budget of interest
paid will be $17.3 billion.




138

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

GENERAL GOVERNMENT
General government programs encompass many fundamental
Federal activities, including collecting revenues, enforcing Federal
laws, protecting the civil rights of Americans, and controlling the
entry of noncitizens. A number of Government-wide programs supporting effective Federal operations are also included. Outlays for
general Government programs will decrease by $26 million in 1975,
and are estimated to total $6.8 billion in 1975 and $6.9 billion in 1976.
The 1975 budget for general government highlights the Administration's determination to:
• Improve the management and organization of the Federal Government, making it more efficient and more responsive to the
needs of citizens;
• Assist State and local governments in their fight against crime
through increased funding for law enforcement assistance;
• Reduce the supply of illegal narcotics through intensive domestic
and international efforts to reduce smuggling;
• Strengthen programs to achieve equal opportunity for all, with
particular attention to the rights of women and minorities; and
• Simplify our tax system and make it more equitable.
Law Enforcement and Justice
Program Highlights
• Promoted more effective State and local criminal
justice systems through an expanded and reorganized law
enforcement assistance program.
• Consolidated all narcotics enforcement agencies into
the Drug Enforcement Administration in the Department of Justice.
• Significantly increased narcotics seizures and arrests.
New Developments
• Increase outlays for law enforcement by 25% over 1973.
• Restructure law enforcement assistance programs in
accord with New Federalism objectives.
• Intensify enforcement activities directed against drugtraffickers, illegal immigration, and tax fraud.
• Continue developing a balanced correctional system by building new community and institutional
facilities and emphasizing vocational rehabilitation
programs.
• Begin construction of the Federal Law Enforcement
Training Center.




139

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION
GENERAL GOVERNMENT
[In millions of dollars]
Program or agency

Law enforcement and justice:
Department of Justice
Other agencies
Subtotal, law enforcement and justice
Central fiscal operations:
Internal Revenue Service
U.S. Customs Service
....
Other 2
Subtotal, central fiscal operations
Executive direction and management
Central personnel management3
General property and records management:
General Services Administration:
Public buildings program
Supply and other operations 2
Other agencies 2
Subtotal, general property and records management
National Capital region:
District of Columbia
Rapid transit
Other

Outlays
1973
actual

Recommended
budget
authority
for 1975 l

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1,533
147

1,941
167

2,110
190

2,142
208

1, 680

2,108

2, 300

2, 350

1,146
205
378

1,286
245
454

1,556
286
503

1,559
286
506

1, 729
80
218

1,985
192
225

2, 345
144
289

2, 351
123
289

745
172
1

834
115
*

-110
243

9
272

918

949

133

281

361
76
1

464
183

490
184
4

448
128
3

3

Subtotal, National Capital region
Legislative functions
Judicial functions
Other general government:
Territories and possessions
Treasury claims
Other 2

438
333
188

650
418
213

678
470
311

579
439
311

105
87
216

106
149
233

116
177
258

103
173
267

Subtotal, other general government
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions 3
Proprietary receipts from the public

409

488

551

543

—143
—371

—150
—279

—149
—297

—149
—297

5,480

6,800

6,774

6,820

Total
1
2
3

Compares with budget authority of $6,260 million in 1973 and $6,714 million in 1974.
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
Excludes payments to trust fund to arrest increase in unfunded liability of the retirement program (1973, $1,761 million; 1974, $2,367 million; 1975, $2,890 million).
*Less than $0.5 million.




140

THE BUDGET EOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

Law enforcement and justice.—Federal law enforcement programs include both direct action on the Federal level and support
for law enforcement activities of State and local governments. These
programs will continue to emphasize better law enforcement, prompt
and efficient administration of justice, and more effective rehabilitation programs for criminal offenders. Outlays for these purposes will
exceed $2.6 billion in 1975. (Special Analysis M, "Federal Programs for
the Reduction of Crime," in the Special Analyses volume of the Budget
discusses all Federal activities related to the reduction of crime).
Law enforcement assistance.—The Law Enforcement Assistance
Administration (LEAA), in the Department of Justice, helps State
and local governments strengthen all phases of their criminal justice
process—police, courts, corrections, crime prevention programs, and
criminal research and statistics. Total outlays for 1975 are estimated
at $910 million, of which $774 million will be distributed as grants.
In accordance with the principles of New Federalism, State discretion in the use of LEAA funds is being increased and Federal controls
are being reduced. LEAA has also completed an internal management
review to identify ways to strengthen the agency's organization, audit
capability, financial management, evaluation and planning, and civil
rights compliance activities. These improvements will assist in a more
orderly distribution of the $592 million in bloc grants and $141
million in discretionary grants budgeted for 1975. Disbursement of
unspent prior-year funds accounts for the remainder of LEAA grants
in 1975.
Federal law enforcement.—During the past year, Federal drug
enforcement activities for the first time have been consolidated in
one agency, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in the
Department of Justice. In 1975 DEA will employ 4,148 personnel,
including 2,242 special agents, to limit the availability of illicit drugs.
An additional 116 special agents, intelligence analysts, and support
personnel will be assigned overseas in 1975 to help foreign governments restrict the flow of illicit narcotics to the United States.
DEA will coordinate Federal activities, provide technical expertise
and training to support State and local police, and assist foreign
governments in controlling the illegal production and smuggling of
dangerous drugs. During 1975, DEA will complete a national narcotics
intelligence system to coordinate the collection, analysis, and dissemination of narcotics information to all law enforcement agencies
and diplomatic services.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

141

An additional 258 personnel will be added to the FBI in 1975 to
support criminal investigative activities in 59 field offices across the
Nation. The FBI will place increased emphasis on the collection of
drug intelligence in order to support intensified drug enforcement
efforts, and will continue its expanded support of State and local
enforcement activities.
The 1975 budget provides funds for 350 additional personnel to
bolster the enforcement activities of the Immigration and Nationalization Service (INS). During 1975, INS will conduct a special study
into the nature and scope of illegal immigration, its impact on the
national economy, and the best means to control it.
Law enforcement activities in the Treasury Department will also
be broadened in 1975. The Internal Revenue Service will add over 300
personnel in 1975 for tax fraud investigations. IRS staff will also
participate in efforts to assure compliance with laws and regulations
governing energy conservation. The U.S. Customs Service's computerized system to intercept smugglers and fugitives will be improved.
Under direction of the Treasury Department, construction of the new
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center at Beltsville, Md., is
scheduled to begin in 1975.
Federal prosecution.—Outlays for the legal divisions of the Justice
Department will increase 24% in 1975 to $202 million. Staff in the
U.S. attorneys7 field offices will increase 10% to handle additional
caseloads and to deal with increasingly complex issues. The Department will also augment the economic planning and analysis capability
of its Antitrust Division.
Correctional programs.—Federal correctional programs will continue to expand in both community and institutional treatment
areas. Four additional community treatment centers and two new
correctional institutions will be opened in 1975. Increased emphasis
will be given to vocational rehabilitation of criminal offenders.
Central fiscal operations.—Outlays for operations of the Internal
Revenue Service (IRS) are expected to rise to about $1.6 billion in
1975, enabling the processing of 2 million more tax returns than in
1974. Tax forms have been simplified, and more assistance will be
provided to taxpayers by the IRS. The accuracy of tax returns prepared by private tax preparers will be increased by legislation to be
proposed which will make the preparing firms partially liable for
improper filings. In addition, a larger percentage of returns will be
audited in 1975.

540-000 O - 74 - 10




142

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

Outlays for the U.S. Customs Service are estimated at $286 million
for 1975, an increase of 17%. The Service will test a computerized
cargo control system designed to speed the movement of goods into
the United States. In addition, clearing more air passengers at foreign
airports in 1975 will alleviate congestion at domestic airports.
Under new legislation, the Department of the Treasury is authorized to require Federal agencies to borrow through the new Federal
Financing Bank. This procedure will provide for more efficient and
better coordinated financing of Federal agency obligations in a manner
consistent with overall economic policies. Additional reform legislation
resulting from the report of the President's Committee on Financial
Structure and Regulation has been submitted to the Congress. This
legislation will broaden competition among financial institutions and
will improve their services to the public.
Property management and general services.—In the past, the
General Services Administration (GSA) has borne the costs of providing office space and services for Government agencies. In order
to encourage greater efficiency, agencies using GSA space and services
in 1975 will now be required to pay rent into the Federal buildings
fund. Since this will constitute payments to GSA from other Government agencies, overall budget totals will not be affected. Rental
collections, based on commercially equivalent rates and covering
266 million square feet of Government-owned and commercially
leased space, will total $1.2 billion in 1975. During 1975, GSA will
concentrate on developing a system of incentives to encourage agencies
to effect further economies in space utilization.
The level of GSA new construction activity will rise slightly in
1975, with total project costs totaling $275 million. The program will
continue to emphasize private investment financing where it is shown
to be more economical.
The 1975 budget proposes that the Federal supply system be
reformed to give agencies more flexibility for direct procurement
from commercial sources when such actions would reduce costs.
Executive direction and management.—It has been 5 years
since any adjustment has been made in the salaries of Congressmen,
Federal judges, agency heads, and other high-level officials in the
Federal Government. Pursuant to Public Law 90-206, the Commission
on Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries has recommended
increases of 25%. The President's proposal for a 7.5% annual increase for each of the next 3 years, while smaller than the Commission's recommendation, will help to ease the inequities in the
Federal pay structure which the current system has brought about.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

143

Central personnel management.—The Civil Service Commission will intensify its efforts to assure equal employment opportunity
in the Federal work force. Measurable objectives will be developed to
evaluate agency affirmative action plans.
National Capital region.—With passage of Home Rule for the
District of Columbia, a new mechanism for local self-government will
begin in 1975. A number of local functions now carried out by Federal
agencies will be transferred to the District and, after approval of the
new charter, residents will elect their mayor and city council.
The District of Columbia's operating budget is financed by local
taxes and by an annual Federal payment to compensate for burdens
placed on the District as the Nation's capital. A Federal payment of
$230 million is requested in 1975, as authorized by the District of Columbia Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act.
This act also strengthens the District's financial management by
granting it bonding authority to finance its capital outlay program.
This authority, which will first take effect in 1975, will supplant the
Treasury loans which now finance local public works.
Construction will have begun in 1975 on some 28 miles and 31
stations of the planned regional rapid transit system, nearly a third of
the planned total. In addition, funds are requested in 1975 to provide
facilities for the handicapped in each of the system's stations. Initial
operation of the system is scheduled for June 1975.
The Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation was established in 1974 with the goal of revitalizing Pennsylvania Avenue between the White House and the Capitol. During 1975, the Corporation
will revise and begin implementation of plans for the redevelopment of
this historic area.
American Revolution Bicentennial.—The new American Revolution Bicentennial Administration will complete a master calendar of
activities for the Bicentennial observance. Federal agencies will continue to support local and nationwide participation encompassing
the themes of Heritage '76, Festival USA, and Horizons '76.
Civil rights.—The constitutional guarantees of equality are enforced through civil rights programs. To insure these rights the
Department of Justice and other Federal agencies will spend an
estimated $604 million in 1975 for civil rights enforcement, an
increase of 16% over 1974. All agencies are expected to be fully aware
of their civil rights responsibilities in carrying out the Administration's policies, and their performance will be continually reviewed
throughout the year. (See Special Analysis L for a general discussion
of Federal civil rights activities.)




144

THE BUDGET EOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Civil Rights
Program Highlights
• Established the Office of Indian Rights in the Department
of Justice.
• Expanded efforts of the Departments of Justice and
Treasury to insure that General Revenue Sharing funds
will be spent in a nondiscriminatory manner.
• Strengthened the Attorney General's authority in enforcing equal access to benefits from Federal financial
assistance programs.
New Developments
• Maintain civil rights as a high-priority responsibility of
the Federal Government.
• Strengthen Federal enforcement capability through
improved oversight of individual agency organization
and performance.
• Increase spending for civil rights enforcement by 16%
over 1974.

The Community Relations Service will expand its crisis resolution
and State liaison programs to assist State and local officials in developing crisis contingency plans. This assistance will help local communities to better utilize their resources, and eventually enable them
to conduct community relations programs without Federal assistance.
The emergency school assistance program will provide financial
assistance to local communities to aid them in the process of desegregating their school systems.
The Federal Government has a special responsibility to assure equal
opportunity in its own employment and in federally financed State
and local programs. The management-by-objectives approach is being
applied in the enforcement of equal employment opportunity in the
Federal Government. The Department of Justice will expand efforts
to coordinate the enforcement of equal access to and equal benefit from
Federal financial assistance. It will work together with the Treasury
Department to assure nondiscrimination under the General Revenue
Sharing program. (See the education and manpower section for additional discussions of equal opportunity programs.)




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

145

Outlays (or Civil Rights Activities

1

1 Minority Assistance

3.4

E'l'lft:?! Enforcement

3,5

-3

14

—t

t—
1.6

U
0,9

WO
Fiscal Ye




Etrtmafe

146

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

GENERAL REVENUE SHARING
Relieves fiscal pressures on State and local governments
and their citizens;
Cuts red tape;
Distributes funds on the basis of need and tax effort; and
Continues the development of a more effective and
flexible Federal aid system by moving spending decisions
and responsibilities closer to the people.

General Revenue Sharing, now in its second year, is a major component of the New Federalism effort and constitutes a major reform
of the fiscal relationships between the Federal Government and State
and local governments. Federal payments are made to States and
localities with minimal restrictions and controls, thus narrowing the
distance between people and the governmental authorities dealing
with their problems. By permitting State and local governments
greater latitude in setting priorities—without undue Federal interference—General Revenue Sharing is helping to restore a balanced
federal system while increasing public accountability.
GENERAL REVENUE SHARING
[In billions of dollars]
Entitlements

1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977

Outlays l

2.6
5.6
6.1
6.2
6.4
3.3
Total

6.6
6.1
6.2
6.3
5.0

30.2

30.2

1
Outlays differ from entitlements because the law permits payment of the fourth quarter entitlement in the succeeding year.

Within each State one-third of all funds go to the State government,
two-thirds to local governments. The distribution is automatic and
carries only the following minimal restrictions:
• Local governments must spend their allotments within a wide
grouping of "priority" areas: public safety, environmental pro-




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY FUNCTION

147

tection (including sanitation), public transportation, health,
recreation, libraries, social services for the poor and aged, financial administration, and "ordinary and necessary" capital expenditures. These restrictions do not apply to State governments;
• Discriminaton on the basis of race, color, national origin, or sex
is not permitted in any program financed with revenue sharing
funds;
• Funds may not be used by State and local governments to match
Federal funds provided under other grant programs;
• Under specified conditions, construction workers paid with revenue sharing funds must be paid at least the wage prevailing on
similar construction activity in the area; and
• State and local governments must publish plans and publicly account for the use of revenue sharing funds.
Through January 7, 1974, $11.2 billion has been distributed. These
funds have enabled State and local governments to provide needed
services, to reduce debt burdens, and in many cases to reduce taxes.
The following table shows how funds for the first three entitlement
periods—January 1, 1972 through June 30, 1973—have been reported
as spent in the "actual use reports" required by law. As the table
indicates, recipient governments reported spending $2.7 billion, or
4 1 % , of the $6.7 billion they had received by the end of this period.
State and local governments have 2 years from receipt of funds in
which to spend them.
GENERAL REVENUE SHARING-ACTUAL USE REPORTS1
[In millions of dollars]
State governments
Category

2

Operating
and maintenance

Capital

Education
Environment
General government
Health
Public safety
Recreation
Social services
Transportation
Other

643.0
1.3
18.5
30.0
15.1
1.4
57.5
45.5
78.6

21.3
6.1
5.9
2.7
5.0
2.3
3.7
10.1
6.4

Total

890.9

1
As provided by recipient governments. For
see the forthcoming publication of the Office of
The First Actual Use Reports."
2
These categories are not precisely additive.
are specified by law, while "State" categories




63.5

Local governments
Operating
and maintenance

Capital

91.2
0.0
71.4
481.4
34.4
30.6
138.4
69.9

22.9
89.3
177.8
63.9
153.9
78.9
9.2
222.9
58.9

917.3

877.7

a further evaluation of actual use expenditures
Revenue Sharing, "General Revenue Sharing—
"Local" operating and maintenance categories
are not.

PART 5

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM
BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT




149

EXPLANATORY NOTE
This tabulation contains information on budget authority
(BA) and outlays (O) for each appropriation and fund account. The budget authority in this tabulation takes account
of certain transfers between appropriations. All budget authority items are current and definite appropriations except
where otherwise indicated.
Functional code numbers are shown for each account as
a cross reference to table 13 (pp. 303-317), where the figures
are summarized by functional classification. Types of funds
in the budget and the deduct entries at the end of each
chapter of this tabulation are explained in Part 6 (pp.
277-282).
Congressional action in the appropriation process occasionally takes the form of a limitation on the use of a trust
fund or other fund, or of an appropriation to liquidate
contract authority. Amounts for such items, which do not
affect budget authority, are included here in parentheses
and identified in the stub column, but are not included in
the totals.
150




T H E F E D E R A L P R O G R A M B Y AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

151

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
SENATE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation and mileage of the
Vice President and Senators ....901

BA
0

4,778
4,764

4,782

4,784

Expense allowances of the Vice
President and Majority and
Minority Leaders
901

BA
0

16
16

16

16

Salaries, officers and employees..901

BA

53,982

63,3111
F
4,390J

68,426

725

0

53 791
4741
F
2\\

499

4

6201
'45}

672

7

36

36

13,4431
1,068 J

14,172

74

741

82

72

n)

474
455

BA
0

50
50

BA

620

0

Payments to estates and widows of
deceased Members of the Senate

BA
0

Office of the Legislative Counsel of
the Senate
901

2

488

..

901
Contingent expenses of the Senate:
Senate policy committees
901

Automobiles and maintenance .901

RA

0

36
37

901

Folding documents

901

BA

12,125

0

Inquiries and investigations

. .

...

12,349

BA
0

-339

1

8,4261
'2J

8,126

83
78

2

2

BA
0

212
209

26

25

-1

0

-19

0

-58
96,743
93,355

96,840
93,935

97
580

BA

6,779

0

-302

6,638

Miscellaneous items

901

Postage stamps

901

BA
0

Stationery (revolving fund)

901

...

Public enterprise funds:

Senate restaurant
fund)
Recording

studio

fund

(revolving
901

(revolving

fund)
901

BA
0

Total Federal funds Senate

79,229
78,870

BA
0

128
85

BA
0

20,262
20,149

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to widows and heirs of
deceased Members of Congress

901
Compensation of Members

See footnotes at end of table.




901

85
20,366

-85
20,374

8

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

152

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

901

BA
0

202
200

220

210

-10

Salaries, officers and employees..901

BA

26,274

26,2211
'1.533/

16,548

-11,206

0

24,892

House leadership offices

901

BA

1,096

1,096

Committee employees

901

BA

8,624

8,624

Committee on Appropriations

901

BA

1,875

1,875

Office of Legislative Counsel

901

BA

Members' clerk hire

901

BA

Mileage of Members

0
Contingent expenses of the House:
Miscellaneous items
901

1,067
64,300

901

9,100

BA

4,000

BA

1,866

0
Postage stamp allowances

901

BA
0

Government contributions

901

BA

1,890
418
382
6,005

0
committees
901

BA

Reporting hearings

901

BA
0

Furniture

901

BA

0

0
Leadership automobiles
Speaker's automobile

901
901

5,965 .
12,675
11,020
400
289
1,040
1,008

BA

19

901

New edition of the United States

Code
e footnotes at end of table.




901

4,5001
^1,500/

6,000

1,8661

2,305 ..
.
420

1

5,7701
F
487J

6,669

412

14,1751
F
745J

14,618

-302

419

422

422

733

996

19

263
61

19

-20

19

-20

191
1/

-20

17 ....

BA

18 ....

BA

19

0
Revision of laws

4,625

61

0
Minority leader's automobile....901

13,125

BA

0
Majority leader's automobile ....901

8,500

4,268

901

and select

4,222

6,968

Stationery (revolving fund)

Special

80,000

64,288

BA
0

0

Telegraph and telephone

1,067

70,0621
F
5,716J

19 ....

BA
0

40
36 ....

100

BA

0

40

45 ....

40
-100

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

153

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

New edition of the District of BA
Columbia Code
901 0
Portrait of Speaker
901 BA
0

100

150
44
8

100

1

Public enterprise funds:

House of Representatives restaurant
fund (revolving fund)
901

-24

Recording studio (revolving fund)
901

87

Beauty shop (revolving fund)

901

3

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
901
Total Federal funds House of
Representatives.

BA
0

-2
146,925

163,959

174,550

10,591

141,648

159,040

169,312

10,272

731

80

1

7681

834

9

JOINT ITEMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Joint Committee on Reduction of
Federal Expenditures
901
901

Joint Economic Committee,
Subcommittee on Fiscal Pol icy. 901
Joint Committee on Atomic Energy
901

73

0
BA

700

0

Joint Economic Committee

BA

836

71

BA

501
'16/

Joint Committee
Production

on Defense
901

Joint Committee on Congressional
Operations
901
Office of the Attending Physician.901
Capitol Police:
General expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




901

0
BA
0
BA
0
BA

143

0
BA

144
460
390

BA
BA
0

530

4

3011
'19/

322

2

845

BA

4991
'27/

291
432
938

-66

...

444

o

Joint Committee on Inaugural
Ceremonies of 1973
.901
Joint Committee on Internal Revenue
Taxation
901

499

0

901

BA

0

Joint Committee on Printing

'57J

295

-10

10
9381
'58|

1,006

10

1401
12/

154

2

5301

665

92

103
92

98

104

6

236
236

304

475

171

M3J

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

154

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
JOINT ITEMS-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Capitol Police-.—Continued
Capitol Police Board

901

Education of pages

901

Official mail costs

901

Capitol Guide Service

901

Statements of appropriations

901

Total Federal funds Joint Items.

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
BA
0
BA
0

1,010
768
136
136
21,226
24,719 .
.
322

1,214

1 214

11
6

13
4

-18

30,500

38,756

8,256

3201

347

3

1
3

1
3

26,154

36,181

29,699

35,031

44,643
43,303

8,462
8,272

2,000
1,750

5,000
4,800

3,000
3,050

289
13
6 ..
.

'24J

OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

901

BA
0

ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

901

Contingent expenses

901

Capitol buildings
Permanent, indefinite

901

B
A

1,222

1,2501

1,433

121

0
BA
0
BA
BA

1,195
75
30
8,954
10

1,329
75
89
4,535

1,433
115
115
4,440

104
40
26
-320

BA
BA

Salaries

117
3,079
1
8
1.038

115
7,436
44
1,337
E
2A

7,804

368
-44

1,421

1,202

no
Reappropriation

0
Extension of the Capitol

901

o

Capitol grounds

901

BA
0
BA
0

10
1,122
1 450
1405
50

BA
BA

Reappropriation
Acquisition of property as an
addition to the Capitol grounds

1,176
-219

45

-45

13
5
203 .
.
6,5771
*208
>74j
6,773
20,900 .
1,100

-153
-203
-625

901
Additional parking facilities
congressional employees

for
901

BA
0

Senate office buildings

901

B
A

5,228

0

5,350
47,925

Construction of an extension to the
New Senate Office Building 901
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

n

6,234
6,384
5,100

-389
-20,900
4,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

155

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Extension of additional Senate Office
Building site:
901
Reappropriation
BA
0
Acquisition of property as a site for BA
parking facilities for the United 0
States Senate
901
Plans for garage and related BA
facilities for the United States 0
901
Senate garage
901 BA
0
House office buildings

174
174
3,833

50
1
92

971
104

91
7,451

BA
0

475
7,872

8,881
£
372
100
9,766

16
7

10
9

5,282

5,207
*15

Acquisition of property, construction,
and equipment, additional House
Office Building (liquidation of
contract authority)
901

0

901 BA

Reappropriation
Expansion of facilities, Capitol Power
Plant
901
Modifications and enlargement,
Capitol Power Plant
901
John W. McCormack Residential Page
School
901
Structural and mechanical care,
Library buildings and grounds .901
Reappropriation
Library of Congress, James Madison
Memorial Building
901
Contributions to United States
Capitol Historical Society
901

BA
0
0

-174
-174
242

49

901 BA

Reappropriation

Capitol Power Plant

15
4,075

120

62

4,363
12

5,485
436

BA
0
0

17,400
213
20

BA

1,559

BA
0
0

1,287
6,301

0

-3,591

-49
103

3

103
8,6721

-1
-681

9,192
(175)
175

-574
(175)
-15

5,4431

159

J

-10

Total Federal funds Architect of BA
the Capitol.
0

5,444
50

-41
-386

510
1

7,724

7,214
-1

1,594
*37

1,6311
\

-150

2,456
20,674

1,633
30,225

-823
9,551

52,112
62,118

29,247
76,826

-22,865
14,708

917

33

919

8

150

102,583
32,540

J

BOTANIC GARDEN
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

901 BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




811
804

91
1

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Salaries

and
605

BA

37,181

0
Copyright Office-.
expenses

605

36,490

Service:
605

Distribution of catalog
Salaries and expenses

cards:
605

4,911

0
Congressional Research
Salaries and expenses

BA

4,705

BA

9,155

0
BA

8,811
10,193

39,4581
*199[
a461j
42,159

49,778

7,660

48,304

6,145

5,1391
E
n

5,962

454

>368J
5,685

0

9,508

10,9271
F
735J
11,723
10,3431
E
M\
'466J
11,512

BA
0
BA
0
BA

1,119
1,046
182
146
8,906

1,195
1,219
208
243
9,8051

expenses
605
Organizing and microfilming the
papers of the Presidents: Salaries
and expenses
605
Collection and distribution of library
materials (special foreign currency
program)
605
Indexing and microfilming the
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic
Church records in Alaska
605

0
0

9,100

9,895
4

BA
0

2,903
3,022

2,267
2,021

Furniture and furnishings

BA
0
BA

4,435
482

0
BA

46
120

Books for the general collections .605
Books for the law library.

605

Books for the blind and physically
handicapped:

Salaries

F

and

605

Revision of Annotated Constitution:
Salaries and expenses
605
Revision of Hinds' and Cannon's
Precedents: Salaries and expenses
605
Oliver Wendell Holmes devise fund
(special fund): Permanent
605

0

5,929

244

13,871

2,209

13,693
11,215

1,970
389

11,245

-267

1,458
1,458
229
229
11,490

263
239
21
-14
1,596

89j

10,557

2,014
2,088

1

662
-4

-253
67
-1

0

85

2,868
813
291
F
3J
38
1321
*11j
142

3,340
775
34

472
-38
2

34

-4
-143

7

-135

BA
0

4
20

4
20

3
20

-1

0
BA
0

-206
79,109
73,255

286
86,725
85,761

2
99,394
94,341

-284
12,669
8,580

BA
0

4,820
4,478

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
605
Total Federal funds Library of
Congress.
Trust Funds

Gift and trust fund accounts,
non-revolving: Permanent
605
See footnotes at end of table.




4,113
4,361

4,113
3,964

-397

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

157

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

901

BA
0

Office of Superintendent of
Documents: Salaries and expenses

BA

46,500
49,288
29,762

0

37,282

Printing and binding

910
Acquisition of site and general plans
and designs of buildings
910

BA
0

88,136
81,236
36,078

24,136
15,582
-901

37,078
15,500
12,500

-332
10,900
7,900

7,400
-4,326
112,979
103,338

12,000
-6,000
151,714
124,814

4,600
-1,674
38,735
21,476

123,700

13,055

126,800

16,970

64,000
65,654
36,4711
>508J
37,410
4,600
4,600

Intragovernmental funds:

Government Printing Office revolving
fund
910

BA
0

Total Federal funds Government
Printing Office.

BA
0

3,146
76,262
89,716

BA

97,794

0

95,265

103,7951
'6,850/
109,830

BA
0

1,650
1,480

1,500
1,432

1,650
1,620

150
188

5,7601
>58]
6,142

6,457

639

6,662

520

3,000
6,457
9,662

-7,576
639
-7,056

GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

..904

COST-ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

904

UNITED STATES TAX COURT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

904

BA

4,307

Construction

904

BA
0
BA
0

3,886
1,916
4,202
6,223
8,088

10,576
5,818
16,718

BA
0

73
19

71
20

BA
0

616,740
551,365

669,546
669,284

734,112
746,332

-4

-3

-390

-390

-7,509

-7,759

Total Federal funds
States Tax Court.
Trust

United

Funds

Tax Court judges survivors
fund: Permanent, indefinite

annuity
904

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
850
900
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600
See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 11




BA1

-4

BA1
0J
BA1

-427

0I
0I

-6,898

73
20 ..
..

2

64,566
77,048

-250

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

158

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
estimated

1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Federal funds:—Continued

45

-5,602

-5,434

-5,389

BA
0

603,809
538,434

656,209
655,947

720,571
732,791

64,362
76,844

BA
0

900

4,893
4,497

4,184
4,381

4,186
3,984

2
-397

BA1

0 J
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600

850

BA1
0 J
BA1

o}
BA
0

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BA1

900

0I
BA
0

Total Legislative Branch

-2,385

-2,389

-2,389

-60

-65

-65

2,448
2,052

1,730
1,927

1,732
1,530

-26

-20

-20

606,231
540,460

657,919
657,854

722,283
734,301

64,364
76,447

4,496

299

2
-397

THE JUDICIARY
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
Federal Funds #
General and special funds:

902

BA

3,784

0

Salaries

3,782

3,9641
'233J
4,153

4,477

324

Printing and binding Supreme Court
reports
902

BA
0

442
244

515
485

565
515

50
30

Miscellaneous expenses

902

BA
0

423
377

605
517

642
642

37
125

Automobile for the Chief Justice...902

BA

15

151

n\

0

14

902

BA
0

55
53

Care of the building and grounds
902
Reappropriation

BA

1,014

BA
0

Books for the Supreme Court

Total Federal funds Supreme
Court of the United States.

BA
0

16
63

16
16
63
63
-899

669

95
738

1,477
>16
75
1,649

862

-787

5,828
5,208

6,964
6,883

6,451
6,575

-513
-308

COURT OF CUSTOMS AND PATENT APPEALS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




902

BA

684

6771

816

107

0

Salaries and expenses

663

'32}
706

809

103

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

159

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
(istimated

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1
ME JUDICIARY—Continued
CUSTOMS COURT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

...902

BA

2,341

0

2,209

BA

2,139

0

2,102

2,3411
H58J
2,486

2,479

-20

2,480

-6

2,1541
F
88|
2,232

2,341

99

2,334

102

27,975
27,953
103,756

675
667
13,058

103,602
15,700

13,058
-975

15,744
18,500
18,500
15,365
14,974
6,085

-551
43
2,456
2,430
1,437

5,985
8,764

1,374
684

COURT OF CLAIMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

...902

Salaries and expenses

COURTS OF APPEALS, DISTRICT COURTS, AND
OTHER JUDICIAL SERVICES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries of judges
Salaries of supporting

902 BA
0
personnel..902
BA

Representation by court-appointed
counsel and operation of defender
organizations
902
Fees of jurors

902

Travel and miscellaneous expenses
902
Administrative Office of the United
States Courts
902
Salaries and expenses of United
States magistrates
902
Commission on Revision of the
Federal Court Appellate System of
the United States: Indefinite....902

27,000
26,843
77,208

0
BA

76,641
15,972

0
BA
0
BA
0
BA

15,724
18,218
17,566
10,626
10,292
4,122

0
BA

4,051
6,690

0
BA
0

6,090
255

27,300
27,286
83,4501
'7.248J
90,544
16,5001
F
175J
16,295
18,500
18,457
12,909
12,544
4,3461
F
302J
4,611
7,8371
'243J
7,939
168

Salaries of referees (special fund)
902
Expenses of referees (special fund)
902

BA
0
BA
0
BA

6,755
6,528
12,456

0

Space and facilities, The Judiciary
902

11,625

0

-14

198,876
197,772

775

87

-81

78,500
78,480
6,990
6,990
13,661

78,500
78,480
-1
14
586

13,565

632

19

179,302
175,346

8,714

6,991
6,976
12,2201
f
855J
12,933

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund,
Administrative Office of the
United States Courts
902
Total Federal funds Courts of
Appeals, District Courts, and
other Judicial Services.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

-19
295,296
294,594

96,420
96,822

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973

1974

1975

Increase or

actual

estimated

estimated

decrease (—)

THE JUDICIARY—Continued
FEDERAL JUDICIAL CENTER
Federal rUflCfS
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
902

BA

1,544

2,0001
'73/

2,699

626

0

1,371

1,943

2,545

602

0
BA
0

53
1,544
1,424

47
2,073
1,990

COMMISSION ON BANKRUPTCY LAWS OF THE
UNITED STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses (special fund)
BA

426

Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
Total Federal funds
Judicial Center.

902
Federal

902
JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS
Trust Funds
Judicial survivors' annuity fund:
Permanent, indefinite
701

0

:;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;:::

2,699
2,545

-47
626
555

.

441

145

-145

Judiciary

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
850
900
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts.Proprietary receipts from the
public
900
Total trust funds

2,024
1,030

2,070
1,120

46
90

BA
0

1,864
1,776

1,782
1,782

1,679
1,681

-103
-101

BA
0

3,813
2,819

3,806
2,812

3,749
2,801

-57
-11

192,264
187,393

213,363
212,214

310,082
309,337

96,719
97,123

BA1
0 J

-2

-2

-2

BA1
0 J

-5,047

-154

-54

100

BA

187,215

213,207

310,026

96,819

0

Total trust funds
Trust Funds.

1,949
1,043

BA
0

Operation of the Public Defender
Service for the District of Columbia:
Permanent, indefinite
908

BA
0

182,344

212,058

309,281

97,223

BA
0

3,813
2,819

3,806
2,812

3,749
2,801

-57
-11

BA1
0 J

-1,864

-1,782

-1,679

103

1,949

2,024

2,070

46

1,030

1,122

92

BA

0
Total The Judiciary

955

See footnotes at end of table.




BA

189,164

215,231

312,096

96,865

0

183,299

213,088

310,403

97,315

_

_

_

^

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

161

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation of the President

903

BA
0

250
250

250
250

250
250

BA

9,767

10,6101

16,510

5,232

0

9,735

'668J
11,278

16,510

5,232

THE WHITE HOUSE OFFICE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

SPECIAL PROJECTS

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Special projects

903

BA

1,500

414

-414

0

1,650

659

-659

BA

1,372

1,3701

1,695

262

0

1,057

1,728

1,695

-33

EXECUTIVE RESIDENCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

..903

Operating expenses

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO THE PRESIDENT

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

773

? 75 1

920

228

0

Special assistance to the President
903

628

704

920

216

1,607

193

1,647

234

COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

S l i
Salaries and expenses
d

903

B
A

1,369

1,3761
JOJ

0

1,502

0
B
A
0

-4

94

1,369
1,498

1,414
1,507

1,607
1,647

-94
193
140

B
A
0

2,550
2,576

2,466
2,466

2,525
2,525

59
59

0
B
A
0

2,550
2,310

2,466
2,466

2,525
2,525

59
59

1,413

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Total Council
Advisers.

of

903
Economic

COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND
OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Council on Environmental Quality
and Office of Environmental
Quality
.
903
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

903

Total Council on Environmental
Quality and Office of
Environmental Quality.
See footnotes at end of table.




-266

162

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
COUNCIL ON INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC
POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

B
A
0

1,000

650

1,3501

"1,800

424

1,548

1,800

252

Focr
my

Intragovernmental funds:

903

Total Council on International
Economic Policy.

0
B
A
0

1,000

658

1,376
1,548

1,800
1,800

424
252

B
A
0

2,122
1,627

1,100
1,091

1,331
1,331

231
240

9,360

"19,000

8,892

Consolidated working fund

18,518

9,640
9,626

8

DOMESTIC COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

FEDERAL ENERGY OFFICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

BA

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

..903

BA
0

480
414

43

-43

...

NATIONAL COUNCIL ON MARINE RESOURCES
AND ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

0

-2

NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

BA
0

2,762
2,437

2,802
2,850

2,932

2,927

130
77

B
A

19,581

18,5001

23,400

3,900

23,400

3,536

23,400
23,400

3,900
3,534

OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

0

18,573

aoooj
19,864

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

903

Total Office of Management
and Budget.
See footnotes at end of table.




0
BA
0

-29

19,500
19,866

-2

2

19,581
18,544

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

163

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT—Continued
OFFICE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

903

B
A

2,0701
'56/
2,927

2,973

0

Salaries and expenses

2,574

9,512

7,386

9,162

6,235

SPECIAL ACTION OFFICE FOR DRUG ABUSE
PREVENTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

Special fund for drug abuse

903

Total Special Action Office for
Drug Abuse Prevention.

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

26,856
4,473

25,000
21,200

7,000
17,118

-18,000
-4,082

25,000

450

26,000
33,660

11,000
21,250

-15,000
-12,410

51,856
4,923

51,000
54,860

18,000
38,368

-33,000
-16,492

BA

1,014

1,5001
19/

1,925

406

1,499

1,885

386

SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE FOR TRADE
NEGOTIATIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

967
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

-116

903

Total Special Representative for
Trade Negotiations.

BA
0

109

1,014

1,519

1,925

851

1,608

1,885

406
277

106,730
112,277

101,407
120,938

-5,323
8,661

106,730
112,277

101,407
120,938

-5,323
8,661

106,730
112,277

101,407
120,938

^5,323
8,661

-109

MISCELLANEOUS
Federal Funds
Intragovernmental funds:

National Commission on the Causes
and Prevention of Violence,
Consolidated working fund
903
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

10

BA
0

99,369
49,164

Total Federal funds

BA
0

99,369
49,164

Total Executive Office of the
President.

BA
0

99,369
49,164

See footnotes at end of table.




'

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

164

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT
APPALACHIAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
PROGRAMS

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

134,500

113,500

133,500]

20,000

BA

180,000
(205,000)
264,425

185,000
(155,000)
297,000

185,000]
(160,000)
336,300

(5,000)
39,300

3,500
505
318,000
264,930

1,500
2,000
300,000
299,000

2,000 ..
.
318,500
338,300

BA
0

592,444
358,252

400,000
450,000

100,000
250,000

BA

26,000

72,0001 ..
.
"1,000

0

Appalachian regional development
programs
507
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

26,405

80,522
*l,000

0
Public enterprise funds:

Appalachian housing fund

507

CO CD

Total Appalachian Regional
Development Programs.

BA
0

-1,500
18,500
39,300

DISASTER RELIEF

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Disaster relief

507

-300,000
-200,000

ECONOMIC STABILIZATION ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

'4,66OJ

fl

35,bdoj
\

-42,660
-46,522

*35,000J

EMERGENCY FUND FOR THE PRESIDENT

Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Emergency fund for the

President
903

BA
0

1,000
14

1,000
1,000

0

68,034

-135,099

-51,001

84,098

BA
0

700
548

350
779

500
500

150
-279

BA
BA
0

550,900

450,000
200,000
509,565

1,000
1,000 .
.

EXPANSION OF DEFENSE PRODUCTION

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund, Defense Production
Act
059

EXPENSES OF MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Expenses of management
improvement

903

FOREIGN ASSISTANCE

International Security Assistance
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military assistance
Contract authority
See footnotes at end of table.




057

"484J671

"925,0001
""644700

275,000
135,135

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

165

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Security Assistance—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Foreign military credit sales

057

Military credit sales to Israel

057

8A
0
0

400,000
232,953
123,354

325,000
292,700

"315,000
279,700

-10,000

-13,000

4,435

-4,435

670,800

-2,200,000
-20,200
-150,000

Emergency security assistance for
Israel
057

BA
0

2,200,000
691,000

Emergency military assistance for
Cambodia
057

BA

150,000

Security supporting assistance

BA
0

597,705

112,500

645,251

117,000

"63,000
117,740

-49,500
740

113,263

-106,000

-84,500

21,500

B
A

3,634,799

3,658,600

4,095,700

437,100

0

(1,729,513)
1,396,125

(2,615,000)
2,454,000

(3,250,000)
3,100,000

(635,000)
646,000

B
A
0

1,548,605
1,599,492

3,437,500
1,508,700

1,303,000
1,628,440

BAl

-89,708

-130,700

-160,700

0

BA

152

1,458,897
1,509,784

3,306,800
1,378,000

1,142,300
1,467,740

-2,164,500
89,740

B
A
0

3,634,799
1,396,125

3,658,600
2,454,000

4,095,700
3,100,000

437,100
646,000

Public enterprise funds:

Liquidation of foreign military sales
fund
057
Trust Funds
Advances, foreign military sales-. 057
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.
Liquidation of contract authority
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050

o1

BAl -1,729,513

Total trust funds

oA1
B

Total International
Assistance.

0
B
A
0

Security

-2,615,000

-3,250,000

-2,134,500
119,740
-30,000

-635,000

1,905,286
-333,388

1,043,600
-161,000

845,700
-150,000

-197,900
11,000

3,364,183
1,176,396

4,350,400
1,217,000

1,988,000
1,317,740

-2,362,400
100,740

450,000
493,000

"789,800
648,000

339,800
155,000

Indochina Post War Reconstruction
Assistance
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Indochina post war reconstruction
assistance
152
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A
0

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

166

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Development Assistance
MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

International

financial

institutions
152

6A

127,000
186,227
865,380
509,759

2,237,013
"120,635
523,400
"9,600
145,500
136,000
2,503,148
669,000

"868,300
749,902
103,400
231,000

289,601
-39,963
-181,151
17,000

738.380
323,532

International
programs

organizations

and
152

Total Federal funds,
Multilateral Assistance.

BA
0
BA
0

870,0001 -1,352,013
\ 35,635 J
76,000
598,4001
*10,600J
33,100
"178,600
27,000
163,000
1,184,235 -1,318,913
103,000
772,000
B

BILATERAL ASSISTANCE

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Functional development assistance
program
152

BA
0

Grants and other programs

152

BA
0

518,302
456,042

578,699
789,865
284,551
214,000

Alliance for Progress—development
loans
152

BA
0

Development loans—revolving fund
152

BA
0

Development loan fund (liquidation

0

150,000
188,164 .
242,235
215,552
-22,490

-23,818

-27,908

-4,090

25,000
1,444
6,767

25,000
-5,248
9,033

-6,692
2,266

Public enterprise funds:

account)
Housing guaranty fund

152
152

Overseas Private Investment
Corporation
152
The Inter-American Foundation
152

0
BA
0
0

Intragovernmental funds:

Advance acquisition of
property—revolving fund

0
152

Office of the Inspector General of
Foreign Assistance
Consolidated working fund

0

152
152

0

490
12,500
-10,060
3,982
-1,410
-13

Total Federal funds, Bilateral
Assistance.

BA
0

378 .
923,037
830,635

Trust Funds
Technical assistance: Permanent,
indefinite
152

BA
0
BA
0

Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150
See footnotes at end of table.




BA1
0 j

-12

1
2

888,250
988,270

996,700
956,779

108,450
-31,491

7,469
6,457

7,500
6,500

7,500
7,500

1,000

1,788,417
1,340,394

3,391,398
1,657,270

2,180,935
1,728,779

-1,210,463
71,509

-294,091

-58,463

-70,773

-12,310

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

167

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT—Continued
FOREIGN ASSISTANCE—Continued
International Development Assistance—Con.
BILATERAL ASSISTANCE—Continued

850

-6,830

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

1,476,123
1,028,100

3,294,672
1,560,544

2,065,069
1,612,913

-1,229,603
52,369

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-18,203

BA
0

Total Federal funds

BA
0 .

7,469
6,457

7,500
6,500

7,500
7,500

1,000

BA
0

-7,469

-7,500

-7,500

-38,263

-45,093

-1,000 ..
2,065,069
3,294,672
1,612,913
1,559,544

1,000
-1,229,603
53,369

15,000
24,000

30,000
27,000

15,000
3,000

2,960,020
2,548,419
1,905,286
-334,400
4,865,306
2,214,018

7,066,472
3,455,544
1,043,600
-162,000
8,110,072
3,293,544

4,027,169
3,755,653
845,700
-150,000
4,872,869
3,605,653

-3,039,303
300,109
-197,900
12,000
-3,237,203
312,109

789,968

346,100

782,331

611,000

235,000

-376,000

789,968
800,832

346,100
611,000

235,000

-346,100
-376,000

789,968
800,832
-20

346,100
611,000
-10

Total trust funds

0

Total International Development
Assistance.

BA
0

-1,012
1,476,123
1,027,088

BA
0

25,000
10,535

BA
0

Contingencies
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

President's foreign
contingency fund

assistance
152

SUMMARY
Total Federal funds
Assistance.
Total trust funds
Assistance.

Foreign
Foreign

Total Foreign Assistance...

BA
0
BA
0

OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Economic opportunity program:
(Community planning,
management, and
development)
551
(Elementary and
education)

secondary
601

(Manpower training and
employment services)
Total, Economic
program.

BA
0
0

15,452
0

607

opportunity

3,049
BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
550




-346,100

BA
0
BA
0

235,000

-346,100
-376,000
10

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

168

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

F U N D S APPROPRIATED T O THE P R E S I D E N T — C o n t i n u e d
OFFICE OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY—Con.
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
850
BAl

-133

-100

100

789,815
800,679

345,990
610,890

40

1.280

5,090,134

8,419,008

4,758,735

4,469,476

4,992,452

4,841,018

-3,660,273
-151,434

-89,708

-130,700

-160,700

-30,000

-294,091

-58,463

-70,773

-12,310

-20

-10

-18,336

-38,363

0 J
Total Office of
Opportunity.

Economic

BA
0

-345,990
235,000

-375,890

PUBLIC WORKS ACCELERATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Public works acceleration

507

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).

0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
.
057

150
550
850

BAl

0 I
BAl

0 J
BAl
0 J
BAl
0

J_
BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
057
150
Total trust funds
Total Funds Appropriated to the
President.

4,687,979

8,191,472

4,067,321

4,764,916

BA
0

Total Federal funds..

3,642,268
1,402,582

3,666,100
2,460,500

BAl

-1,280

10

-45,093

-6,730

4,482,169
4,564,452

-3,709,303
-200,464

4,103,200

3,107,500

437,100
647,000
-635,000

-1,729,513

-2,615,000

-3,250,000

-7,469

-7,500

-7,500

1,905,286

1,043,600

-334,400
6,593,265
3,732,921

-162,000
9,235.072
4,602,916

845,700
-150,000
5,327,869
4,414,452

0 I
BAl
0

L

BA
0
BA "
0

-197,900

12,000
-3,907,203
-188,464

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Departmental Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

.355

B
A

40,901

Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

B
A
0

37,297

BA
0

-171

Departmental Administration

39,694
'2,552
284
41,580

47,8321

5,302

J

5,249

46,829

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund
See footnotes at end of table.




355

"9.600

9,600

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

169

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT—Continued
Departmental Administration—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued
Consolidated working fund
355
0
Total Federal funds
Departmental Administration.
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous contributed funds

355

-100

BA
0

40,901
37,026

42,530
41,580

57,432
46,829

14,902
5,249

0

6
40,901
37,026
6

42,530
41,580

57,432
46,829

14,902
5,249

204,994
15,000

14,868

226,202
10,000
9,800

15,053
5,000
1,300

Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.

BA
0

Total trust funds Departmental
Management.

0

SCIENCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Agricultural Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Agricultural Research Service
355
Permanent

Reappropriation

BA
BA

190,882
15,000

BA
0

2,000
193,608
10,000
5,348

Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency progam)
355
Intragovernmental funds:
Working capital fund, Agricultural
Research Center
355

BA
0

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Research Service.
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
355

-223

378

BA
0

217,882
198,733

210,126
220,027

229,994
236,002

19,868
15,975

BA
0

405
393

436
449

437
450

1
1

394,769

91,246

329,052
327
471
395,096
329,523

20,294
227
421
91,473
20,715

1,498
1,585

38
-4

0

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Animal and Plant Health Inspection
BA
Service
355
0

304,647
308,227

Animal quarantine station (special
fund): Permanent, indefinite....355

BA
0

Total Federal funds Animal and
Plant Health Inspection
Service.

BA
0

304,647
308,227

BA
0

1,524
1,190

Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
355
See footnotes at end of table.




175,773
15,000
*1,859
1 0,494
2,000 ..
.
211,149
5,000
8,500

285,8721
>17,651}
308,758
100
50
303,623
308,808
1,460
1,589

-378

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

170

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
SCIENCE AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS—Con.
Cooperative State Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Cooperative State Research Service
BA
355
Proposed transfer for civilian pay BA
raises.
0
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous contributed funds:
BA
Permanent, indefinite
355
0
Extension Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Extension Service

355

Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

355

98,7011

8,596

82,340

148 ..
.
90,379

96,180

5,801

8
8 ..
..

8
8

BA
0

194,331
185,803

204,073
207,286

208,063
206,850

3,990
-436

0

46 ..
.
194,331
185,849

204,073
207,286

208,063
206,850

3,990
-436

BA
0

National Agricultural Ubrary
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
National Agricultural Library
355
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
BA
0

355

89,957

5
4

Total Federal funds Extension
Service.

Library facilities

91,438

0

Total Federal funds National
Agricultural Library.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Science
and Education Programs.

BA
0

Total trust funds Science and
Education Programs.

BA
0

4,227
4,195
12
4,227
4,207
812,525
779,356
1,934
1,587

4,227
242 ..
.
4,559
117 ..
.
4,469
4,676
812.396
831,176
1,904
2,046

4,8591
4,907
4,859
4,907
936,713
873,462
1,943
2,043

390
348
-117
390
231
124,317
42,286
39
-3

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
Statistical Reporting Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Statistical Reporting Service
355
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous contributed funds:
Permanent, indefinite
355

See footnotes at end of table.




22,766
21,318

22,717
1,357
24,000

BA
0

22
16

9
9

BA

18,187

0

Economic Research Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Economic Research Service
355

BA
BA
0

16,011

18,3311
1,307/
19,600

26,9381

2,864

26,852

2,852

9
9

21,831

2,193

21,828

2,228

171

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS—Continued
Economic Research Service—Continued1
Federal
Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
152
0

-662

...

Total Federal funds Economic
Research Service.

BA
0

18,187
15,349

19,638
19,600

21,831
21,828

2,193
2,228

Trust Funds
Miscellaneous contributed funds:
Permanent indefinite
355

BA
0

174
94

730
754

915
915

185
161

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Economics.

BA
0

40,953
36,667

43,712
43,600

48,769
48,680

5,057
5,080

Total trust funds Agricultural
Economics.

BA
0

196
110

739
763

924
924

185
161

BA
BA
0

2,906

3,245
214
3,354

4,3091

850

4,210

856

4,0471
'276
4,189

4,626

303

4,505

316

2,354

125

2,350

130

MARKETING SERVICES
Commodity Exchange Authority
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Commodity Exchange Authority 355
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

Packers and Stockyards Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
BA
Packers and Stockyards
Administration
355
0
Farmer Cooperative Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Farmer Cooperative Service
355

2,730

4,055
3,744

BA

2,055

0

1,871

2,088
'141
2,220

Trust Funds
Miscellaneous contributed funds:
Permanent indefinite
355

BA
0

116
73

116
110

Total Federal funds Marketing
Services.

BA
0

9,016
8,345

10,011
9,763

11,289
11,065

Total trust
Services.

BA
0

116
73

116
110

116
110

BA
BA

25,971
3,117

0

26,376

27,105
3,117
'881
30,327

funds

Marketing

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS
Foreign Agricultural Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Foreign Agricultural Service
355
Appropriation, Permanent

See footnotes at end of table.




116 .

110
1,278
1,302
. .

29,0341
3,117/

1,048

32,375

2,048

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

172

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS—Continued
Foreign Agricultural Service—Continued
Federal
Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program) 355
Total Federal funds Foreign
Agricultural Service.

0
BA
0

545

1,000

1,000

29.088
26,921

31,103
31,327

32,151
33,375

1,048
2,048

Foreign Assistance Programs and Special
Export Programs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Expenses, Public Law 480, foreign
assistance programs, Agricuture
154
Increase (-) or decrease in amount
owed by general fund to
Commodity Credit Corporation..351
Total Federal funds Foreign
Assistance Programs and
Special Export Programs.

6A
0

895,000
753,974

553,638
796,109

778,473
741,690

224,835
-54,419

0

141,026

-242,471

36,783

279,254

8A
0

895,000
895,000

553.638
553,638

778,473
778,473

224,835
224,835

Total Federal funds
International Programs.

BA
0

924,088
921,921

584,741
584,965

810,624
811,848

225,883
226,883

BA
BA
0
BA
0
BA

170,085

169,235
-2,584
162,983
88,500
90,800
15,000 ..
.

172,8671

BA

225,500
(195,500)
162,598

AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND
CONSERVATION
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
351
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).
Sugar Act program
351
Agricultural conservation program
(REAP)
354
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

0
354 BA
0
Water Bank Act program
354 BA
0
Cropland adjustment program 351 BA
Proposed transfer to other
BA
accounts for pay raises (-).
0
Conservation reserve program
351 0
Emergency conservation measures BA
354 0

163,621
84,500
87,127

160,000
(15,000)
23,160

1

51,456

10.000
2183
51.900
-1,599 ..
.
50,300

-53
25.000
9,228

32 ..
.
10,000
19,000 ..
.

10,000
833
51,650

6,634
1,700
700
-175,000

1

(90,000)
87,000
118.800
51,900

Rural environmental programs




169,617
90.200
91,500

6.216

48.6011
48,601

(75,000)
63,840

118,800
51,900
-10,000
-2183
-1,700
-1,699
-32
-10,000
-19,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

173

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND
CONSERVATION—Continued
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Dairy and beekeeper
payment program

indemnity
351

Cropland conversion program

351

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund 354
Total Federal funds Agricultural
Stabilization and
Conservation Service.

BA
0
0

3,500
6,762
107

3,775
107
212 ...
500,452
352,552

1,850
2,850
107

0
BA
0

186
570,235
481,493

BA
0

11,978
11,723

11,994
11,994

12,000
12,000

0

-12,582

-4,034

4,057

432,318
451,575

1,850
-925
-212
-68,134
99,023

CORPORATIONS
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative
expenses

and

operating
351

Public enterprise funds:

Federal Crop Insurance Corporation
fund
351
Limitation on administrative and
operating expenses.
Limitation on administrative and
operating expenses.

(3,632)

(3,632)

(5,818)

6
6
8,091
(2,186)
(-1,008)

(1,008)
BA
0

11,978
-859

11,994
7,960

12,000
16,057

6
8,097

BA

3,267,575

3,301,940

4,249,412

947,472

0

Total Federal funds Federal
Crop Insurance Corporation.

(790 377)
3,555,289

Commodity Credit Corporation
SUPPORT AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Price support and related programs:
Reimbursement for net realized
losses
351
Liquidation of contract authority....

Limitation on
expenses.

909,043

(39,900)

administrative

(39,900)

66,697
74,000

58,804
7,399

932,0321
M75.000J
(42,200)

-152,011
(2,300)

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Wool Act (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
351

B
A
0

70,000
2,704

11,196
-4,695

-25,000

-50,000

Intragovernmental funds:

(Game bird protection)

351

(Conservation loans)

354

(Domestic

research)
355

\UVIIIVwllW

consumotion
VvllvUllipilVil

i\**j\#vltWli/

(Purchase of dairy products, section
709)
351
See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 12




0
0

3

o

-37

0

100

11 .
25,000

13,836

-11

-13,836

174

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CORPORATIONS—Continued
Commodity Credit Corporation—Continued
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued

(Purchase of
donations)

commodities for
351

0

Increase or decrease (-) in amount
owed to the Corporation by Public
Law 480 general fund for foreign
assistance programs
351

0

92,931

-92,931

-141,026

242,471

-36,783

-279,254

Total Federal funds, Special
Activities.

BA
0

66,697
-66,960

58,804
381,648

70,000
-59,079

11,196
-440,727

Total Federal funds Commodity
Credit Corporation.

BA
0

3,334,272
3,488,329

3,360,744
1,290,691

4,319,412
697,953

958,668
-592,738

Total Federal funds
Corporations.

BA
0

3,346,250
3,487,470

3,372,738
1,298,651

4,331,412
714,010

958,674
-584,641

BA

400

1,300

379

0

193

1,2391

373

RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Rural Development Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Rural Development Service

355

1

a
^163

Rural Electrification Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Loans:
352
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

BA
0

Salaries and expenses

BA

352

0

633.000
484,561
16,720
14,655

16,7201
>769J
17,158

19,116

1.627

19,062

1,904

Public enterprise funds:

Rural telephone bank
352
Authority to spend agency debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

BA
BA
0

30,000
280,564
29,303

1
J

Total Federal funds Rural
Electrification Administration.

BA
0

960,284
528,519

17,489
17,158

BA
0

92,000
42,030

30,000
51,600
10,000
1,000
7,500
3,000
4.000
3,000

19,116
19,062

1,627
1,904

Farmers Home Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Rural water
grants

and waste disposal
352

Rural development grants

352

BA
0

Rural housing for domestic farm
labor
352

BA
0

Mutual and self-help housing

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




352

3.750
4,097
3,000
1,486

37,692
10.000
6,000
1,705
5,469

-30,000
-13,908
5,000
-7,500
-1,295
-4,000
2,469

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

175

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
RURAL DEVELOPMENT—Continued
Farmers Home Administration—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Salaries and expenses
352

129,112

8,370

104,068

112,3921
F
8,350J
119,692

128,632

8,940

116,539

0
Public enterprise funds:
Direct loan account

BA

351

0

Self-help housing land development
fund
352

0

-17 615
-84

879

769

-110

Rural housing insurance fund:
Indefinite
352
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

BA

53,092

90,316

126,860

-119,809

BA
0

156,353
158,934

-230,368

-389,302

Emergency credit
(disaster loans)

0

24,460
-231,801
-14 063

485,262

370,633

-38,343
17,4461

-175,068
-107,643

revolving

fund
351

Agricultural credit insurance fund:
Indefinite
351
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

BA

56,762

74,554

BA
0

82,876
194,095

40,075
136,725

Rural development insurance fund:
Indefinite
352
Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

BA

Economic opportunity loan fund ...551

0

-222,762
-6,523
432,479
-147,072

342,218
68,772
-3,616
875,758
539,986

217,129
-25,717
-2,435
985,809
-116,596

-94,489
1,181
110,051
-656,582

0

1
2
1,393,163
381,640
1
2

11
8
894,168
1,006,225
558,017
-96,288
181 .

-181
112,057
-654,305
-181

354

BA

163,371

0
401

BA
0

149,820
11,855
10,465
7,786
6,615
170,029
105,979
18,114
15,174
26,595
18,540

Total Federal funds Farmers
Home Administration.
Trust Funds
State rural rehabilitation funds

352

Total Federal funds
Development.
Total trust funds
Development.

Rural
Rural

BA
0

BA
0

0
BA
0

ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS
Soil Conservation Service
Federal

Funds

General and special funds:
Conservation operations

River basin surveys
investigations

and

Watershed planning.
Watershed and
operations
Great

401
prevention
401

flood

plains, conservation

Resource conservation
development
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0
BA
0

program
354

BA
0

and
354

BA
0

159,8661
f
5,457j
171,987
12,341
13,826
9,998
10,864
133,986
164,214
18,172
18 300
17,204
23,000

192,826

27,503

192,202
14,167
14,297
10,800
11,309
122,828
136,342

20,215
1,826
471
802
445
-11,158
-27,872
-18,172
-18,300
2,704
1,000

19,908
24,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

176

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS—Continued
Soil Conservation Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Plant materials center (special fund)
354

0

288

BA
0

397,750
306,881

357,024
402,191

360,529
378,150

BA
0

128
125

136
136

Total Federal funds
Environmental Programs.

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

Total trust funds Environmental
Programs.

BA
0

1,068
993
1,196
1,118
397,750
306,881
1,196
1,118

1,142
1,172
1,278
1,308
357,024
402,191
1,278
1,308

1,147
1,207
1,284
1,344
360,529
378,150
1,284
1,344

34,520

34,842
2,222
36,850
1,600
1,600
706,450
852,3891
^15,000]

3,505
-24,041

137
137

Total Federal funds Soil
Conservation Service.
Trust Funds

Miscellaneous contributed funds:
(Agricultural land and water
resources): Permanent,
indefinite
354
(Water resources and power):
Permanent, indefinite
401
Total trust funds Soil
Conservation Service.

5
35
6
36
3,505
-24,041
6
36

CONSUMER PROGRAMS
Agricultural Marketing Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Marketing services
355
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
BA
0

Payments to States and possessions
355

BA
0

Funds for strengthening markets,
income, and supply (section 32)
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
351

BA
0

30,301
2,500
1,600
811,763
740,222

Perishable Agricultural Commodities
Act fund (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
355

BA
0

1,793
1,723

Total Federal funds Agricultural
Marketing Service.

BA
0
BA
0

Trust Funds
Agricultural Marketing Service
funds: Permanent, indefinite

trust
355

Milk market orders assessment fund
351
Total trust funds Agricultural
Marketing Service.
See footnotes at end of table.




39,9151
J
39,702

2,851

303,529
354,978

2,852
-1,600
-1,600
-402,921
-512,411

1,460
1,449

1,582
1,571

122
122

850,576
773,846

746,574
907,288

345,026
396,251

-401,548
-511,037

0

30,154
30,578
-359

42,926
43,156
-491

45,621
45,206
-275

2,695
2,050
216

BA
0

30,154
30,219

42,926
42,665

45,621
44,931

2,695
2,266

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

177

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
CONSUMER PROGRAMS—Continued
Food and nutrition Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Child nutrition programs

703 BA

Appropriation, Permanent

Special milk program
Food stamp program

477,289

BA
0

119,165
602,402

703 BA
0
703 BA

97,123
90,858
2,495,654

Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

BA
0

2,207,532

Total Federal funds Food and BA
Nutrition Service.
0
Total Federal funds Consumer BA
Programs.
0
Total trust funds Consumer BA
Programs.
0

3,189,231
2,900,792
4,039,807
3,674,638
30,154
30,219

561,583
^71,500
199,631
748,3501
^71,500/
97,123
94,025
2,495,651
^500,000
-284
2,492,3671
^500,000}
3,925,204
3,906,242
4,671,778
4,813,530
42,926
42,665

"642,029]

515,241

"705,926}
1,269,190

449,340

120,000
120,000
3,984,9191

22,877
25,975
989,552

3,926,500

934,133

5,452,874
5,315,690
5,797,900
5,711,941
45,621
44,931

1,527,670
1,409,448
1,126,122
898,411
2,695
2,266

385,367

-77,530

387,462

-58,638

24,147
33,919
"10,240
10,214

-2,296
-16,071
240
2,199

FOREST PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT
Forest Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Forest protection and utilization...402

BA

48,795
28,085
3,500
3,255

354,937
•90,800
17,160
355,300
^90,800
26,443
49,990
10,000
8,015

(158,840)
140,618
80
87

'6,000
134,000
140,000
(92,200
126,628
94
80

393,786
374,818

Construction and land acquisition BA
402 0
Youth Conservation Corps
402 BA
0
Forest roads and trails:
402
BA
Contract authority
BA
Permanent
BA
Liquidation of contract authority....
0
Acquisition of lands for national
forests, special acts (special
fund)
402
Acquisition of lands to complete
land exchanges (special fund).402
Cooperative range improvements
(special fund)
402
Assistance to States for tree
planting
402
Construction and operation of
recreation facilities: Indefinite .402
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

700
700
1,020
898

55
55
700
700
1,013
1,090
3,278
3,128

-140,000
140,000
(121,000)
116,000
161
150
39
39
700
700
1,346
1,342
1,260
1,150

(28,800)
-10,628
67
70
-16
-16

333
252
-2,018
-1,978

THE

J78

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE—Continued
FOREST PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT
—Continued
Forest Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Other general funds
402
Forest Service permanent
appopriations (special funds):
Permanent, indefinite
402
Intragovernmental funds:

0
BA
0

8

165,363
168,184

-3,801

-3,158

402

0

-5,227

Consolidated working fund

402

0

-1,461

Federal

funds

Forest

-342

183,370
184,364

Working capital fund

Total

342

142,995
137,106

1,334

-18,007
-16,180

643
-1,334

Trust Funds
Cooperative work: Permanent, indefinite

402

BA

590,876

967,850

728,623

-239,227

0

Service.

678,887

818,025

716,002

-102,023

BA

61,639

63,700

67,600

3,900

0

44,321

57,293

60,096

2,803

Total Federal funds Forest
Protection and Management.

BA
0

590,876
678,887

967,850
818,025

728,623
716,002

-239,227
-102,023

Total trust funds Forest
Protection and Management.

BA
0

61,639
44,321

63,700
57,293

67,600
60,096

3,900
2,803

BA
0

12,165,564
10,794,324

12,257,400
9,754,050

14,521,834
9,667,274

2,264,434
-86,776

-152,602

-2,491

-2,718

-227

-483,242

-433,569

-472,484

-38,915

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
350
400

BA1
0 J
BA1

0 }
700

BA\

-39

-39

-39

-112,249

-245

-245

BA

11,417,432

11,821,056

14,046,348

2,225,292

0

10,046,192

9,317,706

9,191,788

-125,918

95,235
77,446

110,663
104,366

117,488
109,448

6,825
5,082

BA1
0 J

-32,528

-45,821

-48,741

-2,920

BA1

-62,707

-64,842

-68,747

-3,905

0 J
850

BA1

0 J
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
350
400

0I

v

Total trust funds

0

-17,789

-6,297

-8,040

-1,743

Total Department of Agriculture

BA

11,417,432

11,821,056

14,046,348

2,225,292

0

10,028,403

9,311,409

9,183,748

-127,661




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

179

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A

Special foreign currency program.506

8,328

BA
0

506

8,526

0

Salaries and expenses

7,964
'85
'559
8,526
'85

1,400
882

2,165

10,706

2,095

900

-2,940
-1,442

"100,000
B
10,000

2,940
2,342

10,773

100,000
10,000

99,225
10,653

507

BA
0

Working capital fund

;506

o

Consolidated working fund

506

0

-243

BA
0

9,926
8,720

11,548
10,953

110,773
21,606

BA
0

496
532

503
457

503
457

BA

34,323

Area and regional
adjustment

economic

Intragovernmental funds:

Total Federal funds
Administration.

General

Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
506

-247
...

..
..

BUSINESS ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Social and Economic Statistics
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

506

38,2251

49,983

8,985

F

2,740J
41,395

49,492

8,097

17,8001
F
1,310J
22,442

23,579

4,469

22,965

523

48,903
55,827

60,108
63,837

73,562
72,457

13,454
8,620

BA
0

3,035
2,775

4,400
4,274

3,800
3,900

-600
-374

Total Federal funds Business
Economics and Statistics.

BA
0

48,903
55,827

60,108
63,837

73,562
72,457

13,454
8,620

Total trust funds Business
Economics and Statistics.

BA
0

3,035
2,775

4,400
4,274

3,800
3,900

-600
-374

"16,000

-4,050

16,560

-873

0

32,638

BA

14,580

0

28,352

0

-5,163

BA
0

Special studies, services, and projects:
Permanent, indefinite
506

Periodic censuses and programs..506

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

506

Total Federal funds Social and
Economic Statistics
Administration.

...

Trust Funds

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
Economic Development Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administration of economic
development assistance programs
507
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A

18,9071

>U43J
17,433

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

180

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE—Con.
Economic Development Administration—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

220,500
256,887

BA
0

301,468
273,769
24,086
22,548

0

-18,596

-21,674

-18,050

3,624

0

2
325,554
277,723

240,550
254,491

170,000
266,850

-70,550
12,359

BA
0

41,672
40,361

41,987
42,155

"35,008
39,511

-6,979
-2,644

Regional action planning commissions:
Permanent, indefinite
507

BA
0

Total Federal funds Economic
Development Assistance.

BA
0

Total trust funds Economic
Development Assistance.

BA
0

23,243
17,673
367,226
318,084
23,243
17,673

27,300
26,050
282,537
296,646
27,300
26,050

16,823
20,462
205,008
306,361
16,823
20,462

-10,477
-5,588
-77,529
9,715
-10,477
-5,588

51,103

"59,521

5,754

60,067
1,940
9,300

5,884
-150
-5,247
-200

59,521
71,307

-23
5,604
414

4,500
4,500

1,501
1,569

Economic development
programs

assistance
507

Operations and administration

507

BA
0

"154,000
268,340

1,845

-66,500
11,453
-1,845

Public enterprise funds:

Public works grants
revolving fund

and loans
507

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

507

Total Federal funds Economic
Development Administration.

BA
0

Regional Action Planning Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Regional development programs...507
Trust Funds

PROMOTION OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
Domestic and International Business
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

506

BA

46,906

0
States
506

BA
0

45,554
11,500
506
7,208

54,183
150
7,187
9,500

BA
0

49
58,406
53,317

23 ..
..
53,917
70,893

BA
0

2,730
2,272

Operations and administration

Participation in
expositions

United

Financial and technical assistance
506

0

j

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

506

Total Federal funds Domestic
and International Business
Administration.

0

Trust Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
506
See footnotes at end of table.




2,999
2,931

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

181

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
PROMOTION OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
—Continued
Foreign Direct Investment Regulation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

0

Salaries and expenses

508

2,435

2,6001
'121J
2,716

0

22 ..
.
2,300
2,457

2,721
2,716

BA

2,300

1,971

-750

1,996

-720

1,971
1,996

-750
-720

"94,901

59,208

77,644

24,317

94,901
77,644

-90
59,208
24,227

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

508

Total Federal funds Foreign
Direct Investment Regulation.

BA
0

Minority Business Enterprise
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

63,921
39,122

35,2001
M93J
53,327

0

20
63,921
39,142

90 ..
..
35,693
53,417

BA
0

330
332

18 ..
..

BA

9,000

0

506

BA
0

Minority business development

7,588

11,0001
>147J
10,508

0

-2
9,000
7,586

15 ..
.
11,147
10,523

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

506

Total Federal funds Minority
Business Enterprise.

BA
0

National Industrial Pollution Control Council
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

506

-18

United States Travel Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

506

11,533

386

10,794

286

11.533
10,794

-15
386
271

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

506

Total Federal funds United
States Travel Service.

BA
0

Trust Funds

Special studies, services, and projects:
Permanent, indefinite
506

BA
0

Total Federal funds Promotion
of Industry and Commerce.

BA
0

Total trust funds Promotion of
Industry and Commerce.

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




133,957
102,834
2,730
2,272

3
3
103,478
137,567
3,002
2,934

3
3 ..
.
167,926
161,741
4,503
4,503

64,448
24,174
1,501
1,569

182

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Coastal zone management
Administration of
(special fund)

506

Pribilof

Islands
506

B
A

366,024

351,087
fc
350
F
14,509
G
409

"443,606

77,251

324,895

Operations, research, and facilities
506

371,936

415,120

43,184

12,000
6,055

12,000

15,545

9,490

3,113
^336

3,937

333

3,5761
^36J

200

BA
0
BA

3,232

A

0
Promote and develop fishery
products and research pertaining
to American fisheries (special
fund): Permanent, indefinite ....506

2,790

BA
0

10,042
7,437

33
122
3,112
^300
7,288
7,380

7,428

140

7,794

414

125

64
-122

Public enterprise funds:

1,325
(435)

Fisheries loan fund
506
Limitation on administrative
expenses, fisheries loan fund.

0

Fishermen's guaranty fund

BA
0

61

10

61
247

BA
0

275
1,068

50

506

Federal ship financing fund, fishing
vessels:
506
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

125

-50

Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund

506

0

Consolidated working fund

506

0

Total Federal funds National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
506

BA
0

BA
0

-121
-194 ..
.
379,634
337,210
4,658
2,534

389,308
389,080

467,096
442,196

77,788
53,116

4,400
4,375

4,400
4,400

25

"13,000

9,000

National Bureau of Fire Prevention
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations, research,
administration

and

BA
"4,000

506
0

""i',000
See footnotes at end of table.




7,0001
"2.000J

8,000

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

183

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY—Continued
Science and Technical Research
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Scientific and technical research and
services
506

B
A

144,152

128,5291

139,489

3,323

0

121,982

'7.475J
136,781

140,896

4,115

BA
0
0
BA
0

115
-111
-130 ..
.
144,267
121,741

1,335
500

3,540
2,100

2,205
1,600

137,501
137,281

143,029
142,996

5,528
5,715

8,495
8,309

9,700
9,700

1,205
1,391

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

506

Consolidated working fund
506
Total Federal funds Science
and Technical Research.
Trust

Funds

Information products and services:
Permanent, indefinite
506

BA
0

5,597
5,006

Office of State Technical Services
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Grants and expenses
506
Total Federal funds Science
and Technology.
-Total trust funds Science and
Technology.

0
BA
0
BA
0

7 ..
.
523,901
458,958
10,255
7,540

530,809
527,361
12,895
12,684

623,125
594,192
14,100
14,100

92,316
66,831
1,205
1,416

BA
0

455,000
185,878

275,000
200,000

"275,000
282,787

82,787

B
A

224,100

218,711

220,000

1,289

(232,000)

"(242,800)

(-1,715)

OCEAN SHIPPING
Maritime Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Ship construction

502

Operating-differential subsidies: 502
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.
Liquidation of contract authority....

0

34,205

(221,515)1
4
(23.000)J
235,2891
'23.000J
19,000
19,000
35,026
>213
* 1,667
37,778

0
0
0

-9,801
-640
-398

-12,004
-750 -295

0

226,711

Research and development

BA
502 BA

Operations and training

0
BA
502 BA

29,000
21,025
34,465

242,800

-15,489

"27,900
24,325
"40,462

8,900
5,325
3,556

38,848

1,070

-19,819

-7,815
750
-40

Public enterprise funds:

Federal ship financing fund
502
Vessel operations revolving fund..502
War risk insurance revolving fund
502
See footnotes at end of table.




-335

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE—Continued
OCEAN SHIPPING—Continued
Maritime Administration—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
502
Total Federal funds Maritime
Administration.
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0
BA
0

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
900

BA1

169
742,565
457,149

250
549,617
502,268

563,362
568,606

-250
13,745
66,338

205,659
186,331

1,826,478
1,401,572

1,538,097
1,538,632

1,743,756
1,724,963

-2

-1

-1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
850

BA1
0J
BA1

-23,326

-16,989

-13,373

3,616

-1,415

-1,874

-3,785

-1,911

Total Federal funds

BA
0

1,801,735
1,376,829

1,519,233
1,519,768

1,726,597
1,707,804

207,364
188,036

BA
0

39,759
30,792

48,100
46,399

39,729
43,422

-8,371
-2,977

BA1
0 J
BA
0

-17,252

-21,597

-23,703

-2,106

BA1

-22,010

-26,000

-15,523

0 }
BA
0

1,802,232
1,368,359

1,519,736
1,518,570

1,727,100
1,712,000

207,364
193,430

7,109,9501
^40,200
'611,650 j
7,666,900
4
39,100
5,261,4501
^26,500
<;432,15OJ
5,652,000
^26,000

7,914,800

153,000

7,832,0001
"1,000 J
5,765,200

127,000

5,732,6001
"400J

55,000

1,547,0001
^8,100
6
121,434J
1,640,300
^7,700

1,728,700

52,166

1,724,6001
"400J

77,000

0I

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

500

Total Department of Commerce.

22,507
13,540

26,503
24,802

16,026
19,719

-10,477
-5,083
10,477

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY
MILITARY PERSONNEL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military personnel, Army

See footnotes at end of table.




7,565,753

BA

5,454,204
5,390,172

BA

1,577,623

0

Military personnel, Marine Corps ..051

7,702,546

0

051

BA
0

Military personnel Navy

051

1,519,447

45,100

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

185

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
MILITARY PERSONNEL—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

051

051

B
A

7,341,016

0

Military personnel, Air Force

7,247,020

051

Reserve personnel, Marine Corps..051

424,752

BA

237,322
220,275

BA

76,806

0

7,450,000

-37,900

7,411,9001
"l,100J

452,4081
"600
<;41,092
457,500
"500

461,658

0

Reserve personnel, Navy...:

BA

0

Reserve personnel, Army

6,863,350
"53,300
<-571,250
7,363,800
"52,200

-3,000

490,600

-3,500

f

209,4031
13,837
218,000

6

61,1731
6
3,827
63,000

64,146

22,000

479,9001
"100/
209,700

-13,600

211,000

-7,000

73,000

8,000

...051

National Guard personnel, Army ...051

72,000

9,000

BA

124,542

126,962
"200

148,565

11,518

0

Reserve personnel, Air Force

108,129

125^800
"200

145,000

19,000

BA

583,595

555,900
51,600
578,000

621,700

14,200

619,000

41,000

177,5001
6
14,583
190,000

198,577

6,494

G

0
National Guard personnel, Air Force
051

544,337

BA

167,919

0
Military

161,710
23,727,231
23,245,741

BA

4,441,684
4,390,097

B
A

6,698,598

0

funds

BA
0

0

Total Federal
Personnel.

6,339,161

BA

5,315,082

197,000

7,000

24,600,842
24,428,000

235,478
347,000

4,681,9001
"468,800
4,676,200
"468,800.

5,687,600

536,900

5,685,000

540,000

6,211,3831
"209,040
'90,526
F
\83,634
6,545,600
"185,400

6,837,400

142,817

6,680,8001
"20.200J

-30,000

6,071,7171

7,291,000

658,183

6,691,0001
"72,0001

807,000

24,365,364
24,081,000

RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Retired pay, Defense

051

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation and maintenance, Army
nci

Operation and Maintenance, Navy

,40 cA cnn
0D3,DuU

nci

UDl

'76,895
\ 24,605
5,685,500
"270,500
F

0
See footnotes at end of table.




5,196,057

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

186

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Operation
Force

and

maintenance,

Air
051

BA

8A

379,061

410,7631
'16,800
"6,248

371,148

Operation and maintenance, Marine
Corps
051

406,100
"13,900
6,494,4901
"291,850
"37,500
'125,650
6,515,550
"256,450
1,466,6911
"830
"2,591
h
90,159
l,604,170:
"830
253,867
*1,936
'8,854
257,000
173,7501
"30,000
"1,615
"1,885
151,000
"25,000
11,0001
" 0•
3
'0
5
9,970
"30
221,900
"7,000
"2,090
'6,030
228,500
"6,500
524,400
"3,210
"5,805
'16,065
545,790^
"3,210,
514,250
"16,000
"4,660
'12,590
526,500'
"14,500
19
5
11
10
7

6,383,515

6,369,844
Operation and maintenance, Defense
agencies
051

BA

1,446,889

1,398,287
Operation and maintenance, Army
Reserve
051

BA

202,997

Operation and maintenance, Navy
Reserve
051

BA

182,946
138,419

113,864
Operation and maintenance, Marine
Corps Reserve
051

B
A

8,094
5,620

Operation and maintenance, Air
Force Reserve
051

BA

192,550

174,921
Operation and maintenance, Army
National Guard
051

BA

451,694

416,610
BA

463,226

0

Operation and maintenance, Air
National Guard
051

454,050

See footnotes at end of table.




BA

19
5

0

National Board for the Promotion of
Rifle Practice, Army
051

19
1

H.952J

446,300

4,537

434,5001
"2,500/
7,519,400

17,000
569,910

374,000

7,112,0001
"34,000/
1,876,800

316,529

1,827,000

222,000

279,700

15,043

277,000
238,400

20,000
31,150

223,0001
"5,000/
11,400

52,000

11,000

1,000

278,200

41,180

273,6001
"400/
608,400

39,000
58,920

601,000

52,000

596,100

48,600

591,1001
"900/
18
7

51,000

10
8

1
0

320

8

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

187

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Claims Defense

051

BA
0

45,000
44,919

49,100
49,000

54,600
54,400

Contingencies Defense.

051

BA
0

5,000
261

5,000
4,180

5,000
4,350

Court of Military Appeals, Defense

B
A

914

8641

0

764

850

0

37

-200

BA
0

21,731,198
21,068,608

24,151,098
23,306,000

B
A

25,600

0

14,652

Miscellaneous expired accounts....051
Total Federal funds Operation
and Maintenance.

1,065

'53J

1,070

5,500
5,400

170
148
220
200

.
26,043,943
24,917,000

1,892,845
1,611,000

138,4001
"22,000/
108,500
"1,500

"339,500

179,100

525,1001
"84,400/
733,000
"18,000

"459,200

224,3001
"121,800/
108,000
"26,000

"385,300

784,3001
'268,000!
879,000
4
56,000

1,344,800
816,0001
^131,000/

12,000

PROCUREMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Aircraft
Army
A i f procurement, A

051

Procurement of weapons and tracked
combat vehicles, Army
051

Procurement of ammunition, Army
051

657,500
652,045

BA

176,800

0

....051

B
A
0

Missile procurement, Army

150,601

BA

1,255,800

0

1,028,696

114,2001
"4,800/

633,0001
"39,000/

130,0001
"70,000/

9,000
-150,300
-79,000
39,200
66,000
292,500

051

B
A

558,500

461,6901

786,200

267,810

0

Other procurement, Army

312,205

459400
^5,600

483,7001
^20,300/

39,000

Procurement of aircraft and missiles,
Navy
051

BA
0

051

B
A

Aircraft procurement, Navy

3,521,170
3,180,688

051

0

See footnotes at end of table.




B
A

2,956,800

0

Shipbuilding and conversion, Navy
051

1,981,647

-1,627,000

"2,960,600

18,700

800,7001
"28,600/
143,000
"7,000

B
A

1,258,000

2,722,7001
"219,200/
251,000
"22,000

0
Weapons procurement, Navy

2,885,000

"833,900

3,468,1001
"24,800/
2,019,000
"1,000

"3,562,600

1,640,0001
"100,000/

535,0001
"19,000/

2,445,0001
"5,000/

1,467,000
4,600
404,000
69,700
430,000

188

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
PROCUREMENT-Continued
Federal

funds—Continued

General and special funds:—Continued

051

2,225,370
1,664,840

BA

161,200

0

Procurement, Marine Corps

051

BA
0

Other procurement, Navy

200,672

1,454,155

B
A

2,034,600
1,947,781

BA
0
0

61,830
48,142
622,488

BA
0

17,473,370
15,654,330

B
A

1,824,551

1,912,094

B
A

2,541,604
2,404,199

B
A

3,120,040

0

Procurement of equipment and
missiles, Army
051
Total Federal funds
Procurement.

1,651,400

0

Procurement, Defense agencies....051

B
A

0

051

2,395,718

0

Other procurement, Air Force

051

2,186,800

0

Missile procurement, Air Force

B
A
0

Aircraft procurement, Air Force 051

3,361,887

1,204,2001
^224,200]
1,607,000
-MO.OOO
173,9321
"40,700/
162,700
"5,300
2,720,4001
"445,000]
2,071,000
"41,000
1,393,3001
"39,000]
1,550,400
"6,600
1,542,7001
^197,700]
1,678,000
^40,000
66,000
54,000
165,000

2,703,0001
"185,OOOJ
"1,610,800

776,000

1,446,2001
"19,800]
2,071,800

-91,000

1,654,0001
^100,000]
102,017
70,000
25,000

36,000

17,997,922
15,144,000

19,866,617
16,359,000

1,868,695
1,215,000

"1,985,976

19,001

1,939,0001
"6,000]
"3,261,933

13,000

1,684,500
1,394,0001
^ 108,000]
"228,800
193,9001
"16,100]
"3,496,600

256,100
-145,000
14,168
42,000
331,200

178,500

331,400

36,017
16,000
-140,000

RESEARCH. DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND
EVALUATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Army
051

Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Navy
051

Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Air Force
051

See footnotes at end of table.




1,911,932
"19,145
"2,078
'33,820
1,922,000
"10,000
2,652,3881
"29,300
'38,528
2,555,000
"17,000
3,042,000
"54,300
£
1,817
'27,649
3,366,000'
"40,000

541,717

3,003,0001
"10,000]
"3,518,860

441,000

3,398,0001
"13,000]

5,000

393,094

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

189

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND
EVALUATION-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

B
A

446,311

0

Research, development, test, and
evaluation, Defense agencies...051

475,191

457,9001
"5,836
'5.016J
480,955
"3,045

"528,700

495,0001
"2,000/

59,948

13,000

and evaluation,
051

B
A
0

27,000
3,404

24,600
20,000

"27,000
24,000

2,400
4,000

Total Federal funds Research,
Development, Test, and
Evaluation.

B
A
0

7,959,506
8,156,775

8,306,309
8,414,000

9,322,469
8,890,000

1,016,160
476,000

B
A
0
B
A

413,955
373,261

578,120
510,000

"740,500
512,000

162,380
2,000

517,830

"643,900

5,608

0

383,487

609,2921
"29,000/
402,600
"400

B
A
0
B
A
0

265,552
263,163

247,277
261,000

"536,400
285,000

289,123
24,000

36,704
18,150

19,000

"50,600
23,000

50,600
4,000

B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0
B
A
0

40,000
27,249

35,200
36,000

"59,000
37,000

23,800
1,000

16,100
12,543

20,000
16,000

"30,000
20,000

10,000
4,000

38,200
20,946

40,700
32,000

"43,700
36,000

3,000
4,000

20,500
11,494

22,900
14,000

"20,800
17,000

-2,100
3,000

7,000
8,976

10,000
8,000

"16,000
10,000

6,000
2,000

1,355,841
1,119,269

1,592,489
1,299,000

2,140,900
1,499,000

548,411
200,000

B
A

967,362

"1,237,100

145,603

0

728,938

1,077,000

129,000

Director of test
Defense

MILITARY CONSTRUCTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Military construction, Army

051

Military construction, Navy

051

Military construction, Air Force

051

Military construction,
agencies

051

Defense

Military construction, Army National
Guard
051
Military construction, Air National
Guard
051
Military construction, Army Reserve

051
Military construction, Naval Reserve

051
Military construction,
Reserve

Air

Force
051

Total Federal funds
Construction.

Military

547,4001
"11,600/

156,000

FAMILY HOUSING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Family housing, Defense

See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 13




051

1.087,631]
fc
2,701 \
F
1,165J
948,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

190

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
FAMILY HOUSING—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Homeowners assistance fund,
Defense
051
Authority to spend agency debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.
Total Federal
Housing.

funds

7,000

"5,0001

-2,793

33
967,362
728,971

3,793
18,000
1,102,290
966,000

"3.000J
12,000
1,245,100
1,089,000

-6,000
142,810
123,000

59,994
60,000
22,000
23,000

64,300
63,000
22.000
24,000

4,306
3,000

BA

Family

BA
0
BA
0

CIVIL DEFENSE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation and maintenance, Defense
Civil Preparedness Agency
051

BA
0

Research, shelter survey and
marking, Defense Civil
Preparedness Agency
051

BA
0

60,122
53,737
23,200
20,328

BA
0

83,322
74,065

81,994
83,000

86,300
87,000

4,306
4,000

BA

3,400
4,374

2,600
7,000

"2,900
7,000

300

Total Federal
Defense.

funds

Civil

1,000

SPECIAL FOREIGN CURRENCY PROGRAM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Special foreign currency program.051

NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Naval petroleum reserve

051

6,9001
"17,300 J
5,0001
"13.000J

BA

24,200
18,000

REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Defense production guarantees....051
Laundry service, Naval Academy ..051
Naval working fund

051

Intragovernmental funds:

Army stock fund

051

Navy stock fund

051

Marine Corps stock fund

051

Air Force stock fund

051

Defense stock fund

051

Army industrial fund

051

Navy industrial fund

051

Marine Corps industrial fund

051

Air Force industrial fund

051

Defense industrial fund

051

See footnotes at end of table.




0

-469

966

1,435

0

86
_2
-1,436

6,000

5,000

-1,000

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

-283,394
-72,204
-4,322
-196,938
-154,436
-62,363
-117,408
-558
-121,609
-10,601

-31,000
-30,100
5,800
40,100
-43,000
-24,800
55,630
370
30,100
-4,161

-35,000
-34,000
4,300
-106,800
-75,000
-3,200
-41,063
63
10,900
-966

-4,000
-3,900
-1,500
-146,900
-32,000
21,600
-96,693
-307
-19,200
3,195

o

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

191

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—MILITARY—Continued
REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:—Continued

Army management fund
Navy management fund

051
051

0
0

-1,407
-6,485

Air Force management fund

051

0
0

2,997
-1,030,080

"63,600
62,400
"13,000
fl
13,000
fl
22,000
B
22,000
98,600
97,400

Total Federal funds Revolving
and Management Funds.

150
1,200

-30
1,800

1,500

800

5,550

-272,650

-700
-278,200

'2,000,000
c
'l,942,500
"153,000
fl
151,200
"55,000
B
55,000
"34,000
B
34,000
2,242,000
2,182,700

2,000,000
1,942,500
89,400
88,800
42,000
42,000
12,000
12,000
2,143,400
2,085,300

180
-600

ALLOWANCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Civilian and military pay raises ...051

BA
0

All-volunteer force

051

BA
0

Military retirement systems reform
051
Other legislation
051

BA
0
BA
0

Total Federal funds Allowances.

BA
0

TRUST FUNDS
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite

B

8,333

6,653

6,621

7,449

6,555

6,605

50

0

-9,104

11,895

-455

-12,350

8,333
-1,655

6,653
18,450

6,621
6,150

-32
-12,300

BA
0

Miscellaneous (trust revolving funds)

BA
0

BA
0

051

-32

77,742,914
73,412,150

82,849,366
78,547,950

91,262,871
84,889,050

8,413,505
6,341,100

-160,100

-288,900

-128,800

82,689,266
78,387,850

90,973,971
84,600,150

8,284,705
6,212,300

051
Total trust funds
SUMMARY
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the BA1 -105,424
public
051 0 J
Total Federal funds
BA 77,637,490
0
73,306,726
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BA
0
BA
0
051 BA1

8,333
-1,655

6,653
18,450

6,621
6,150

-32
-12,300

8,333
-1,655
-7,973

6,653
18,450
-6,300

6,621
6,150
-6,300

-32
-12,300

77,637,850
73,297,098

82,689,619
78,400,000

0I
Total Department of
Defense—Military.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

90,974,292
84,600,000

8,284,673
6,200,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

192

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL
CEMETERIAL EXPENSES. ARMY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

809

BA
0

28.920
20,170

7,811
13,620

267
5,400

-7,544
-8,220

CORPS OF ENGINEERS-CIVIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

401

BA
0

57.805
52,733

56,142
58,000

59,300
60,000

3,158
2,000

Construction, general

401

BA
0

1.203.943
943,720

873,589
913,307

927,500
935,362

53,911
22,055

Operation and maintenance, general
401

BA
0

407.100
379,904

426,625
422,000

445,000
443,000

18.375
21,000

Flood control and
emergencies

401

BA
0

136.000
190,783

107,000
6,000

15,000
10,000

-92.000
4,000

401

BA

32.183

32,8831
F

39,100

3.892

0

31,360

142j
35,710

Flood control, Mississippi River and
tributaries
401

BA
0

111,620
83,741

Special recreation use fees (special
fund)
401

BA
0

Permanent appropriations (special
funds): Permanent, indefinite...401

BA
0

coastal

General expenses

im\
6

39,000

3,290

164,600
140,000

130,000
130,000

-34.600
-10,000

700
700

300
300

-400
-400

3.723
4,154

3,700
3,771

3,825
3,700

125
-71

0

2,952

7,018

-2,662

-9,680

0

-284

BA
0

29.403
20,117

18,360
18,968

20,000
25,300

1,640
6,332

BA
0

1.952,374
1,689,063

1,667,564
1,586,792

1,620,025
1,618,700

-47,539
31,908

BA I
0

-7,701

-7,450

-8,235

-785

BA 1
0

-623

-950

-765

BA
0

1,944.050
1,680,739

1,659,164
1,578,392

1,611,025
1,609,700

^8,139
31,308

BA
0

29.403
20,117

18,360
18,968

20,000
25,300

1.640
6,332

Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund, Corps
Engineers—Civil

of

Consolidated working fund

401
401

-286

286 ..

Trust Funds

Corps of Engineers—Civil, trust funds:
Permanent, indefinite
401
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
850
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




185

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

193

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
estimated

1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
CORPS OF ENGINEERS—CIVIL—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the BA
public
400
0

-18,360

-9,286
1,944,050
1,671,453

608
1,659,164
1,579,000

5,300
1,611.025
1,615,000

4,692
-48,139
36,000

430

100

50

-50

BAl

-506

-410

-410

BA
0

-506
-76

-410
-310

-410
-360

-50

B
A

12,276

13,326

14,505

663

0
BA
0
BA ..
.
0 .
.
0

12,096
2,309
68

13,721
456
781
5
5

14,455

734
-456
664

BA
0

14,585
12,168

14,303
14,507

14,510
15,905

BAl

-142

-160

-160

BA
0

14,442
12,025

14,143
14,347

14,350
15,745

207
1,398

B
A

55,950

63,000

2,903

0
BA
0
BA
0

55,768
4,500
2,624
60,450
58,392

59,0001
1,097/
60,097
3,500
5,200
63,597
65,297

63,000
6,500
8,964
69,500
71,964

2,903
3,000
3,764
5,903
6,667

Total trust funds

0

Total Corps of Engineers—Civil

BA
0

-20,000

-1,640

-29,403

RYUKYU ISLANDS, ARMY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administration
910
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
900
Total Ryukyu Islands, Army

0I

SOLDIERS' AND AIRMEN'S HOME
Trust

Funds

Operation and maintenance

809

Capital outlay

809

Payment of
indefinite

claims:

Permanent,
809

Soldiers' and Airmens' Home revolving
fund (trust revolving fund)
809
Summary
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800
Total Soldiers' and Airmen's
Home.

0J

1,445
5
5 .
.

4

207
1,398

THE PANAMA CANAL
CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

910

Capital outlay

910

Total Federal funds,
Zone Government.
See footnotes at end of table.




Canal

194

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued
THE PANAMA CANAL—Continued
CANAL ZONE GOVERNMENT—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
900

10,967

(20,556)

(21,037)1
F
(942)J

(23,837)

(1,858)

60,450
56,007

63,597
76,264

69.500
77,530

5,903
1,266

BAl
0 J

-20,908

-23,790

-23,127

BAl
0 J

-69

-69

-69

-35,464

-37,905

-40,834

-2,929

B
A
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-2,385

8A
0

Corporation: Panama Canal Company
fund
502
Limitation on general and
administrative expenses.

4,009
-434

1.833
14,500

5,470
13,500

3,637
-1,000

B
A
0

538
512

658
798

660
760

-38

-538

-658

-660

-2

-26

140

100

-40

2,042,282
1,766,182

1,739,630
1,677,574

1,690.452
1,702,440

-49,178
24,866

BAl
0 3I

-20,908

-23,790

-23,127

BAl

-8,239

-8,108

-8,895

-692

-1,019

-834

-35,970

-38,315

-41,244

-2,929

B
A
0

1,976,472
1,700,372

1.668.398
1,606,342

1,616,352
1,628,340

-52,046
21,998

B
A
0

43.988
32,285

32.663
33,475

34,510
41,205

1,847
7,730

0

5,566

-5,401

663

** J

Proprietary receipts from the
public
850

900

BAl

o|
Total The Panama Canal

MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Wildlife conservation, etc., military
reservations: Permanent, indefinite

2

409
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Miscellaneous Accounts....
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BAl
0 J

0

B
A
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
900

663

w

Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

800

-787

or
BAl

-1

0 J
850

BAl

185

0 1
v
J
900

BAl

oJ
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

195

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE—CIVIL—Continued

of

-20,000

OO O

Total Department
Defense—Civil.

-18,360

-142

-160

-160

14,443
2,740

14,143
14,955

14,350
21,045

207
6,090

BA
0

Total trust funds

-29,403

BA
0

800

QQ O

SUMMARY—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

1,990,915
1,703,112

1,682,541
1,621,297

1,630,702
1,649,385

-51,839
28,088

-1,640

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH , EDUCATION, AND WELFARE
FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
653
Proposed transfer for wage board
pay raises.
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Proposed transfer for military pay
raises.

BA
BA ...

34,096

195,000

21,200

165,960
173,800

200,056
195,000

34,096
21,200

160,590
105

B
A
BA .
0

200,056

310
173,800

164,629

4,955

143,307

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for certification and
other services
653
Total Federal funds Food and
Drug Administration.
Trust Funds
Unconditional gift fund

653

0
BA
0

-499
164,629
142,808

.

-7

7 .

0

HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

652

BA

Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Proposed transfer for military pay
raises.

751,141

BA

Health services

.

BA .
0

859,908
"65,000
2,442

673,460

28
835,946
"7,260

Buildings and facilities

652

BA
0

12,550
2,769

652

BA

219,932

234,092
"6,591
1,189

-30,973

899,780
. "15,747

72,321
-9,500
-9,900

9,500
9,900

Indian health

"896,405

Proposed transfer for wage board
pay raises.
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Proposed transfer for military pay
raises.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA ...
BA .

30,906

282,617
"968

31,496

6,068

BA

0

280,999

197,574

2,153
246,466
"5,623

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

196

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special fund*:—Continued

Emergency health

059

Total Federal funds Health
Services Administration.

BA
0
BA
0

3,078
3,047
986,701
876,851

5,976
5,380
1,192,947
1,110,575

B
A

160,139

425
1,177,404
1,199,537

-5,976
-4,955
-15,543
88,962

"137,8141

1,572

"l36\229

134,453
1,789
168,045

135171

-32,874

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

492.250
384,310
300,042
232,921
46,998
39,413
167,348
149,528

527,306
530,998
286,465
305,801
43,949
47,381
152,941
171,514

"600,000
559,411
309,299
333,779
"43,959
50,047
"152,961
188,857

72,694
28,413
22,834
27,978
10
2,666
20
17,343

BA
0

130,694
110,755
113,434
106,394
183,212
170,841
130,450
114,718
38,570
34,325
30,960
25,849
75,091

119.903
133,500
110,369
119,566
168.329
197,515
124.867
134,125
39.938
36,187
28.386
31,370
128,313
-1,378
124,275
4,745

"119,958
153,236
"110,404
121,850
"168,329
208,505
"124.897
145,099
"39,947
38,585
"28.684
33,609
"82.700

55
19,736
35
2,284
10,990
30
10,974
9
2,398
298
2,239
-44,235

141,417
4,784

17,142
22

6,247
"27,738

1,012
1,429

31,704
3.000
13,571

-92
-5,000
5,174

CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Preventive health services
653
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Cancer Institute

651

National Heart and Lung Institute
651
National Institute of Dental Research
651
National Institute of Arthritis,
Metabolism and Digestive
Diseases
651

National Institute of General Medical
Sciences
651

BA
0

National Eye Institute

651

National Institute of Environmental
Health Sciences
651
Research resources
651
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

OOO

National Institute of Child Health
and Human Development
651

003

National Institute of Allergy and
Infectious Diseases
651

ooo

National Institute of Neurological
Diseases and Stroke
651

BA
0
BA
BA
0

0

National Library of Medicine
651
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

CD CO O

B
A

John E. Fog arty International Center
for Advanced Study in the Health
Sciences
651
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

Buildings and facilities

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




651

73,280
4,666

BA
4,253
28,568
25,018
8,500
1,336

17
5,235
25.851
458
31,796
8.000
8,397

197

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Office of the Director
651
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Proposed transfer for military pay
raises.

BA
BA .

11,755

11,972
886

18,124

5,249

BA
0

10,070

17
14,110

18,037

3,927

0
0

29,772
-2,901

-770

-1,954

-1,184

7,761
-1,652
1,762,538
1,515,991

1,559
1,781,334
1,892,559

-55
1,834,784
2,041,945

-1,614
53,450
149,386

296,299

279,905

205,890

-67,015

244,140
455,730

-7,000
254,134
466,186

268,907
432,348]

14,773
-27,643

267,037
51,713
55,807
803,742
566,984

-6,195
325,459
60,153
57,758
793,049
637,351

472^666
53,924
36,833
692,162
778,406
"42,340
"42,340

37,721

36,126

147,207
-6,229
-20,925
-100,887
141,055
42,340
42,340
-39,910

2,554

-40,095

Intragovernmental funds:

General research support grants..651
National Institutes of
Management fund

Health
651

Grants management fund

651

Service and supply fund

651

Total Federal funds National
Institutes of Health.

0
0
BA
0

ALCOHOL, DRUG ABUSE, AND MENTAL HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Alcohol, drug abuse, and mental
health:
(Development of health
resources)
651
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

BA
BA
0

(Financing or providing medical
services)
652
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

BA

(Prevention and control of health
problems)
653

BA
0

Total, Alcohol, drug abuse, and
mental health.

BA
0

Payment to Saint Elizabeths
Hospital: Indefinite
652

BA
0

Saint Elizabeths Hospital: Indefinite
652
Proposed transfer for wage board
pay raises, Current, indefinite.
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises, Current, indefinite.
Proposed transfer for military pay
raises, Current, indefinite.

B
A
B
A

BA
0

//

55
2

B
A
oco

]

3,186
37,388

73
42,649

0

1
1

3

Working capital fund, Lexington
Clinical Research Center
652

0

-27

-24

1
5

39

Total Federal funds Alcohol,
Drug Abuse, and Mental
Health Administration.

BA
0

841,463
604,356

832,959
679,979

734,502
823,315

-98,457
143,336

Public enterprise funds:

Operation of commissary, Lexington
Clinical Research Center
652

-3

Intragovernmental funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

198

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
HEALTH RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Health resources

651

BA

1,235,472

RA

Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

0

1,006,812

1,127,004
*4,500
-10,574 .
1,162,186
"4,500

"483,880
"86,000

-551,050

1,042,3091
"59,500

-64,877

Public enterprise funds:

Medical facilities guarantee and loan
fund
651

BA
0

2,500
5,064

17,065

-6,809

-23,874

Health education loans

651

BA
0

2,131
1,149

2,250
2,250

2,268
2,268

18
18

Nurse training fund

651

BA
0

1,984
-279

1,750
1,750

1,732
1,732

-18
-18

Total Federal funds Health
Resources Administration.

BA
0

1,242,087
1,012,746

1,124,930
1,187,751

573,880
1,099,000

-551,050
-88,751

BA
BA

13,403

12,000
871

52,2991

39,354

12,992

74
12,901

41,404

28,503

14,398
15,332
13,708
14,398
28,106
29,730

20,052
12,610
14,051
20,052
34,103
32,662

19,743
17,792
23,679
23,679
43,422
41,471

-309
5,182

OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR
HEALTH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Assistant Secretary for Health
653
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Proposed transfer for military pay
raises.
Retirement pay and medical
benefits for commissioned
officers:
(Financing or providing medical
services): Indefinite
652
(Retirement and
Indefinite

BA
0

BA
0

disability):
701

BA
0

Total, Retirement pay and
medical benefits for
commissioned officers.

BA
0

Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency program)
651

BA
0

25,619

11,173

9,319

8,809
-1,912

1,912

11,216

9,628
3,627

13,889

2,716

Intragovernmental funds:

Service and supply fund

652

0

-227

-30

Consolidated working funds

653

0
BA
0

-2,867
67,128
50,844

-154
48,960
56,552

57
95,721
96,821

211
46,761
40,269

BA
0

1,557
858

1,583
1,206

1,621
1,401

38
195

Total Federal funds Office of
Assistant Secretary for
Health.
Trust

Funds

Public Health Service trust
Permanent, indefinite
See footnotes at end of table.




30

funds:
652

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

199

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
EDUCATION DIVISION
Office of Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Consolidated education grants 604
Elementary and secondary education
601
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

BA

"2,851,985

BA
0

2,034,393

2,026,914

«2,875,485
"1,910,400
"117,700)

1,820,122
18,000
38
671,405
580,493
270,640
40,956
157,409
105,709
643,460

-1,746
2,062,201
40,000
16,712
593,416
547,051
258,193
193,157
147,079
96,314
588,549

683,552
42,000
38,805
"340,300
482,060
"75,000
232,955
"99,609
120,783
55,639)

-1,378,649
2,000
22,093
-253,116
-64,991
-183,193
39,798
-47,470
24,469
-540,071

7,161
582,100
1,860,247
2,700
1,521,000
168,021

323,955
2,110,0231

-258,145
247,076

Tssslbbb

605 BA

7,161
606,930
1,693,010
2,700
1,375,691
264,857

367,000
-123,124

BA
0

92,904

-4,897
218,916

BA
0
BA
0

324,055
238,644
3,000
1,862

152,683
249,499
1,000
2,677

605 BA

80,883

BA
0

66,460

BA
0

601

BA
0

in federally
601

BA
0

601

BA
0

Education for the handicapped ....601

BA
0

Indian education
School assistance
affected areas
Emergency school aid

Occupational, vocational, and adult
education
603
Permanent, indefinite
Higher education
602
Permanent
Library resources

.

Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).
Educational development

605

Educational activities overseas
(special foreign currency program)
605
Salaries and expenses

Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Civil rights education

BA
BA
0
BA
BA
0

601 0

9,721

602 BA

46,640

25,000
"15,000

23,500
1,910,400
-1,907,468

131,489
«5,000

-82,427

158,908
2,000
2,676

-152,683
-90,591
1,000
-1

86,428
^3,449
4,073
94,102
^3,139
a,821

127,284

33,334

116,817
"310

19,886

57,883
"30,785

115,0001

26,332

97,9001
"14.698J
2,701

29,383

1,500
13,527

-3,821

Public enterprise funds:

Student loan insurance fund

BA
0

15,000
43,279

Higher education facilities loan and BA
insurance fund
602
Permanent, indefinite
BA
0

2,921

67,128
"16,087
2,948

1,677
9,133

1,549
11,765

Authority to spend public debt
receipts, Permanent, indefinite.

See footnotes at end of table.




-296
1,762

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

200

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
EDUCATION DIVISION—Continued
Office of Education—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

-1,689

605

6,237,211

8,878,420

6,004,241

-2,874,179

4,990,253

5,685,669

6,221,835

536,166

BA
0

12

13
21

25
18

12
-3

605

BA

110,000

130,000

29,300

Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
0

35,830

75,000
'25,000
700
95,000
'1,000

105,000
'8,000

17,000

Total Federal funds Office of
Education.
Trust

BA
0

Funds

Special statistical compilations and
surveys-. Permanent, indefinite 605
national Institute of Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National Institute of Education

Office of Assistant Secretary for Education
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
605
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
BA
0

Improvement
education

1,495

BA
0

of

postsecondary

966

1,722
124
1,911
10,000

3,6711

1,825

'£482

1,571
5,000
8,900
6,825
10,471
-2,838,054
563,637
12
-3

1,495
966

11,846
1,911

6,348,706
5,027,048
12

8,990,966
5,783,580
13
21

6,152,912
6,347,217
25
18

BA

5,761,248

5,271,862

0

4,599,848

5,827,000

BA

6,310,824

"5,486,777

0

602

15,000
8,900
18,671
12,382

5,921,733

5,346,500

BA
0

1,886,698
1,613,557
13,958,770
12,135,138
292,420
281,055

2,092,140
1,785,500
12,850,779
12,959,000
340,443
310,000

Total Federal funds Office of
Assistant Secretary for
Education.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Education
Division.

BA
0

Total trust
Division.

BA
0

funds

Education

SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Public assistance:
(Financing or providing medical
services)
652

(Public assistance)

(Social services)

703

704

Total, Public assistance
Work incentives
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0
607

BA
0

6,592,134 , 1,265,272
*-55,000
681,000
6,563,000:
B
-55 000
"4,600,858 -1,088,919
"-203,000s
4,550,500
-999,000
"-203,000.
2,087,778
-4,362
2,083,500
298,000
171,991
13,022,770
-20,000
12,939,000
280,000
-60,443
316,500
6,500

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

201

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SOCIAL AND REHABILITATION SERVICE—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
BA
Rehabilitation services
704
704

Research and training activities
overseas (special foreign currency
program)
704
Salaries and expenses

704

Assistance to refugees in the United
States
703
Intragovemmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
704
Total Federal funds Social and
Rehabilitation Service.
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Payments to social security trust
funds:
(Financing or providing medical
services)
652
(Retirement and disability) ....701
Total, Payments to social
security trust funds.
Special benefits for disabled coal
miners
701
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.
Supplemental security income
program
703
Intragovemmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
704
Total Federal funds Social
Security Administration.

1,016,810
991,648

"769,025
995,719
"20,000

8,000
2 802

3 000

3 000

BA
0
BA
0

57,565
51,550
145,000
135,363

71,728
70,500
129,000
128,000

73,503
71,303
60,000
72,000

1,775
803
-69,000
-56,000

0
BA
0

-11
15,454,919
13,403,002

14,408,760
14,462,148

14,225,298
14,397,522

-183,462
-64,626

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA

1,863,430
1,859,866
525,645
525,645
2,389,075
2,385,511
1,520,222

BA
0

951,693

OOD

Allied services

993,164
797,105

0
B
A
BA
0

0
BA
0

Trust Funds
Limitation on salaries and expenses
Limitation on construction
Federal old-age and survivors insurance
trust fund: Permanent
701

BA
0

Federal disability insurance trust fund:
Permanent
701

8A
0

Federal hospital insurance trust fund:
Permanent
652

BA
0

Federal supplementary medical
insurance trust fund: Permanent..652

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




77,207
41,000

2,616,393
2,507,254
493,788
493,788
3,110,181
3,001,042
967,868
^44,311
1,746
957,160
^40,435
2,211,636
2,191,946

-128 .
3,986,504
6,335,742
3,378,076
6,190,583
(1,403,047)
(1,000)
43,638,814
43,623,057
5,946,452
5,467,388
8,351,603
6,841,661
2,902,113
2,637,099

(1,887,898)
52,322,394
49,801,310
6,998,665
6,433,989
11,732,514
8,773,417
3,744,162
3,406,655

-247,785
4,071
20,000

2,846,000
2,846,000
499,323
499,323
3,345,323
3,345,323
876,089]

229,607
338,746
5,535
5,535
235,142
344,281
-137,836

875,2521
^3,876/
4,774,000
4,770,035

-118,467
2,562,364
2,578,089

8,995,412
8,994,486

2,659,670
2,803,903

(2,035,571)
(8,232)
58,369,347
57,632,545
7,886,004
7,800,553
12,472,003
10,163,072
4,242,006
4,028,335

(147,673)
(8,232)
6,046,953
7,831,235
887,339
1,366,564
739,489
1,389,655
497,844
621,680

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

202

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Trust Funds—Continued
Social Security Trust Funds
(Retirement and disability) ....701 BA
0

"11,000
«-345,000

11,000
-345,000

BA
0

60,838,982

74,797,735

82,980,360

8,182,625

58,569,205

68,415,371

79,279,505

10,864,134

American Printing House for the
Blind
605

BA
0

1,697

1,817

1,967

150

1,697

1,967

150

National Technical Institute for the
Deaf
603

BA
0

6,609

9,819

17,060

1,817
6,487
14,104

Gallaudet College

BA

19,071

0

13,429

BA

Total trust funds Social
Security Administration.
SPECIAL INSTITUTIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Total Federal funds
Institutions.

..602

Special

9,819

14,5741
'488J
20,805
'468

27,476

12,414

22,6161

1,363

58,881

58,7841
'3.362J

79,194

17,048

0

Howard University..

602

3,332
-4,285

68,253

69,173
'3,193

72,9881
'169J

BA
0

86.258
100,439

85,512

118,456

109,560

107,579

32,944
-1,981

B
A

415,585

425,490

"459,0551

40,045

BA
0

383,788

-6,480
411,111

791

ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HUMAN
DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Human development:
(Elementary and secondary
education)
601
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).
(Social services)

704

439,988

j

28,877

"265,245
90,020

BA
0 ...

265,245
90,020

BA
0

415,585
383,788

419,010
411,111

724,300
530,008

305,290
118,897

Office for Civil Rights
704
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
BA
0

13,154

17,633
1,302
18,404

22,861

3,926

Departmental management

551

BA
0

Departmental management

704

B
A

59,213

Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
0

54,527

Total Federal funds Assistant
Secretary for Human
Development.
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




12,649

115,541
'5,000
5,178
107,190
'4,750

22,319

3,915

"33,000
"27,100

33,000
27,100

120,205

-5,514

8,823
120,513
'250

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

203

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE—Continued
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund
704
Consolidated working fund, Office of
the Secretary
704
Total Federal funds Office of
the Secretary.

0
0

-10,732
-1,740

5,789

2,418

-3,371

BA
0

72,367
54,704

_ ^ _ ^ ^
144,654
136,133

176,066
172,600

31,412
36,467

BA
0

31,589,024
26,686,877

35,667,976
32,362,376

35,146,605
36,140,201

-521,371
3,777,825

-15,751

-17,938

-18,270

-332

SUMMARY
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
850

BA1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
600
650

BA1
0J
BA1
0 J
BA1

-456

-304

-305

-1

-2,382

-2,128

-2,450

-322

-2,892

-3,168

-3,268

-100

0I
700

BA1

-1,411

-1,295

-1,502

-207

850

0 J
BA1

-2,542

-2,655

-2,754

-99

BA
0

31,563,590
26,661,443

35,640,488
32,334,888

35,118,056
36,111,652

-522,432
3,776,764

BA
0

60,840,551
58,570,063

74,799,331
68,416,605

82,982,006
79,280,924

8,182,675
10,864,319

-802,457

-977,000

-1,082,000

-105,000

-2,015

-4,000

-5,000

-1,000

0 J
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
701 BA1

0I

850

BA1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the BA1
public
600 0 J
650
BA1

-12
-1,263

-13
-1,259

-25
-1,274

-12
-15

0I
700

BA1

-28

-28

-28

BA 60,034,776
0
57,764,288
BA1 -1,859,866

73,817,031
67,434,305
-2,507,254

81,893,679
78,192,597
-2,846,000

8,076,648
10,758,292
-338,746

-493,788

-499,323

-5,535

106,456,477
96,768,151

113,666,412
110,958,926

7,209,935
14,190,775

0I
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

652

0I
701
Total Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare.




BA1 -525,645
0 J
BA 89,212,855
0
82,040,220

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

204

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
HOUSING PRODUCTION AND MORTGAGE
CREDIT: FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION
AND GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, housing BA
production and mortgage credit
programs
555 0

15,748
15,748

5,1201
140J
5,260

11,200

5,940

11,200

5,940

Public enterprise funds:

Nonprofit sponsor assistance

555

BA
0

Low-rent public housing—loans and
other expenses
555

0

College housing—loans and other
expenses
602
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.
Housing for the elderly or
handicapped fund
555
Federal Housing Administration fund

B
A

Authority to spend public debt
receipts.
Authority to spend public debt
receipts: Permanent, indefinite.
Limitation on administrative

B
A
0
0

1,000
241

-1,000

-1,000

13,297

14,6391

-13,402
12,395
979
4,030
-10,680

403
-27,500
-13,291

B
A

'91,968

B
A

405
-41,500
-17,163

1,344
-14,000
-3,872
176,040

'-91,968
933,880
832,791
(16,598)

903,314
1,086,306
(15,480)

1,079,354
969,313
(13,880]

-116,993
(-1,600)

(170,586)

(180,796)

(181,240)

(444)

B
A

5,255

5,434

-279,526

B
A
0
0

4,716
-200,991
-753,059

5,424
'278,797
3,805
-148,090
-64,735

3,066
-2,177
-159,045

145,913
-94,310

(7,774)

(8,080

B
A
0

A V f\ A n O A C

expenses.

Limitation on nonadministrative
expenses.
Special assistance functions fund
555
Permanent, indefinite
Management and liquidating
functions fund
556
Limitation on administrative
expenses, Government National
Mortgage Association.
Guarantees of mortgage-backed
securities
556
Participation sales fund:
(Rural housing and public
facilities)
352
(Advancement of business)....506
(Community planning,
management, and
development)
551
(Low and moderate income
housing aids)
555
(Maintenance of the housing
mortgage market)
556
(Higher education)
602
See footnotes at end of table.




(6,000)

(306)

0

-4,666

-7,187

-8,075

-888

0

-886

-7,436

-1,746

5,690

0

-1,256

0

803

-5,666
-92

-253
1,952

5,413
2,044

0

-21,292

-14,947

4,739

19,686

0

-8,593

-10,932

-1,228

9,704

0

768

-4,671

84

4,755

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

205

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
HOUSING PRODUCTION AND MORTGAGE
CREDIT: FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION
AND GOVERNMENT NATIONAL MORTGAGE
ASSOCIATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Participation sales fund:—Con.
(Development of health
resources)
651
(Veterans housing)
803

0
0

21

-32

293

11,294

-8,036

-19,330

-21,122

-32,775

-4,520

28,255

BA
0

973,973
-151,110

1,210,300
796,988

1,114,098
747,033

-96,202
-49,955

BA
0
BA

1,800,000
1,608,426
21,000

2,020,000
1,888,000
23,9001

2,425,000
2,263,000
22,450

405,000
375,000
-2,139

Total, Participation sales fund..

0

Total Federal funds Housing
Production and Mortgage
Credit: Federal Housing
Administration and
Government National
Mortgage Association.

9,313

-325

HOUSING MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Housing payments
Salaries

and expenses,

management programs

555
housing
555

0
Counseling services

21,000
1,341

F

689j

24,589
1,500

22,450
317

-2,139

555

0

-1,183

Community disposal operations fund
551
Rental housing assistance fund...555
Revolving fund (liquidating
programs)
551

0

-2,770

-2,200

-2,000

200

0
0

-6,198
-2,186

-8,000
-2,000

17,000
-2,000

25,000

52,182
1,821,000
1,671,795

-49,163
2,044,589
1,852,726

2,447,450
2,298,767

49,163
402,861
446,041

"2,300,000
560,000
"110,000
118,000
32,640

2,300,000
560,000
35,000
8,000
-813

32,640

-813
-150,000
-370,000
-25,000

Public enterprise funds:

Intragovernmentol funds:

Disaster assistance fund
507
Total Federal funds Housing
Management.

0
BA
0

COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Better Communities Act

551 BA
0
Comprehensive planning grants ...551
BA
0
Salaries and expenses, community
BA
planning and development
programs
551 0
Model cities programs
551 BA
0
Open space land programs
551 BA
0
See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 14




100,000
75,765
35,293
35,293
500,000
590,024
100,000
61,485

75,000
110,000
32,5471
'906 J
33,453
150,000
590,000
25,000
70,000

220,000
70,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

206

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Community development training and
urban fellowship programs
551

BA
0

3,500
3,011

3,500

3,307

Grants for neighborhood facilities
551

BA
0

Grants for basic water and sewer
facilities
.,
551

0

40,000
26,578
156,533

35,000
160,000

35,000
160,000

-193

Public enterprise funds:

Urban renewal fund:
Capital grants:
551
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract
authority.
Loans and planning advances.551

BA
0
0

Urban

BA
0

..555

BA
0

551

BA
BA
0

Total Federal funds Community
Planning and Development.

BA
0

Total Federal funds,
Renewal Fund.
Rehabilitation loan fund...
Public facility loans
Appropriation, Permanent,
indefinite.

1,450,000
(1,450,000)
1,018,365
-26,003
1,450,000
992,362
70,000
25,702
1,846
1,270
12,464
2,301,909
1,979,217

600,000
(600,000)
1,150,000
-25,000
600,000
1,125,000

-600,000
(-600,000)
1,150,000
-50,000
1,100,000

52,257
-6,000
1,100
2,8101
1,200
1,061]
20,000
25,000
885,753
2,446,511
2,199,210
2,317,947

-25,000
-600,000
-25,000
-58,257
1,571
5,000
1,560,758
118,737

NEW COMMUNITIES ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

New community assistance grants
551

BA
0

7,500
122

2,500

4,000

1,500

Public enterprise funds:

-3,556
7,500
-3,434

-4,606

-3,348

1,258

BA
0

-2,106

652

2,758

National insurance development fund
556

0

-6,347

-6,426

-6,040

386

National flood insurance fund

556

BA

10,000

35,000

-237,832

Authority to spend public debt
receipts.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Federal
Insurance Administration.

BA
0

20,000
^2,832
250,000
20,000
272,832
13,574

40,000
35,000
33,960

20,000
-237,832
20,386

New communities fund

551

Total Federal funds New
Communities Administration.

0

FEDERAL INSURANCE ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




14,454
10,000
8,107

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

207

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
OFFICE OF INTERSTATE U N O SALES
REGISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

1,220
2,580

230
728

70,000
67,000
6,320
6,320
76,320
73,320

5,000
9,230
6,320
6,320
11,320
15,550

9,5461
'256J
9,802

11,900

2,098

11,900

2,098

5,580

-594

5,580
3,530

-594
267

3,530
6,660

267
-67

6,660
19,810

-67
8,139

19,810
29,300

8,139
10,108

29,300
1,300

10,108
350
-1,358

-2,196
78

-6,024
222
-529
17,853
10,514

BA
0

783
627

1,852

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

53,000
47,763

65,000
57,770

53,000
47,763

65,000
57,770

BA

9,489

0

Interstate land sales (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
556

9,489

BA

5,529

0
BA

5,529
3,044

0
BA

3,044

POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and technology

551

Salaries and expenses, policy
development and research
551
Total Federal funds Policy
Development and Research.
FAIR HOUSING AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Fair housing and equal opportunity
556

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General departmental

management
551

Salaries and expenses, Office of
General Counsel
551
Salaries and expenses, Office of
Inspector General
551
Administration

and staff

services
551

Regional management and services
551
Urban transportation

503

Miscellaneous expired accounts....551

0
BA

16,475

0
BA

16,475
20,347

0
0
0

20,347
620
502

6,0421
H32J
6,174
3,1661
>97J
3,263
6,5341
>193J
6,727
11,4601
'211J
11,671
18,6991
M93J
19,192
950
1,358

0
0
0
BA
0

-15,944
2
-529
45,395
30,046

3,828
-144
529
47,027
53,548

Intragovernmental funds:

Administrative operations fund

551

Working capital fund

556

Consolidated working fund
551
Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.
See footnotes at end of table.




64,880
64,062

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

208

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT—Continued
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
550
Total Department of Housing
and Urban Development.

BA1
0 J
BA
0

5,223.049
3.592,503

4,536,293
4,983,364

6,197,379
5,550.221

-235

-30

-30

5,222,814

4,536,263
4,983,334

6,197,349

1,661,086

5,550,191

566,857

119,334

1,376

118,6981
^500/
6,655
8,095

3,898

iiuibb}

-10,000

3,592.268

1,661,086
566,857

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES
Bureau of Land Management
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Management of lands and resources
402

B
A

96,281
95,478

Construction and maintenance

402

Public lands development roads and
trails:
402
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
0

7,765
5,574

20,000

BA
BA
0

Oregon and California grant lands
(special fund): Indefinite
402

BA
0

Range improvements (special fund):
Indefinite
402

BA
0

Recreation development and
operation of recreation facilities
(special fund): Indefinite
402

BA
0

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Land Management.

(3,265)
3,518
22,324
20,599
2,714
2,618

BA
0

Permanent appropriations (special
funds): Permanent, indefinite...402

Trust

91,9581
^21,0001
'5,OOOJ
94.800
^20,500
6,800
8,400

(4,000)
4,000
28,750
26,500
3,242
3,200
165
155

(4,070)
4,070
28 750
26,825
4,503
4,278
242
230

BA
0

97,738
97,546
226,822
225,333

105,065
106,410
281,980
263,965

120,105
120,105
289,589
282,801

BA
0

434
502

510
510

16,850
17,373
18,422
17,000
600
2,000

17,030
17,000
12,025
14,000
1,200
1,200

(70)
70
325
1,261
1,078
77
75

510
510

24,142
22,480
20,380
19,307
950
569

-145
-305

15,040
13,695
7,609
18,836

Funds

Bureau of Land Management
funds: Permanent, indefinite

trust
402

Bureau of Reclamation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

401

BA
0

Loan program

401

BA
0

Recreational and fish and wildlife
facilities, Upper Colorado River
storage project
401

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




180
-373
-6,397
-3,000
600
-800

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

209

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
LAND AND WATER RESOURCES—Continued
Bureau of Reclamation—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

84
269,474
232,237
78,665
75,496
17,140

600
1,000
194,197
198,416
82,000
81,190
17,120
*775

17,044
2,887
2,847

18,485
3,300
3,290

20,400
3,300
3,290 .

11,200
17,900
(53,000)
59,797
45,770
17,601
-2,346

13,500
4,000
(52,500)
70,500
24,426
26,000
-374

17,9501
J
(31,300)
48,800
28,616
28,700

364
488,508
445,480

433 ..
.
376,250
435,313

BA
0

1,516
1,244

Salaries and expenses
401
Proposed transfer to other
accounts for pay raises (-).

BA
BA
0

14,304

Total Federal funds Land and
Water Resources.

BA
0

Total trust funds Land and
Water Resources.

Emergency fund (special fund)
Construction and
(special fund)

401

BA
0

rehabilitation
401

BA
0

Operation and maintenance (special
fund)
401

BA
0

General administrative expenses
(special fund)
401
Proposed transfer for civilian pay
raises.

BA
BA
0

Other miscellaneous appropriations
(special funds): Permanent
401

BA
0

460

1,000
1,000
233,784
247,217
94,000
91,200
20,5001
\

J

400
39,587
12,000
10,010
2,145
1,915

Public enterprise funds:

Colorado River Basin project
401
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
0

Upper Colorado River storage project
401

BA
0

Continuing fund for emergency
expenses, Fort Peck project
401

0

450
(-21,200)
-21,700
4,190
2,700
374

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

401

0

Trust

429,405
472,807

-433
53,155
37,494

3,823
3,000

6,115
6,000

2,292
3,000

12,7001

-529

* 13,970

13,689
-460
13,239

"13,000

-239

BA
0

729,634
684,783
1,950
1,746

671,459
712,517
4,333
3,510

731,694
768,608
6,625
6,510

60,235
56,091
2,292
3,000

BA

4,222

5,040

312

0

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Reclamation.

4,116

5,040

312

BA
0

Funds

Reclamation trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
401
Office of Water Resources Research
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




405

4,3961
>332J
4,728

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

210

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS—Continued
Bureau of Outdoor Recreation—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Land and water conservation
BA
(special fund): Indefinite
405
Contract authority, Permanent
BA
0
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
405
0
Total Federal funds Bureau of
Outdoor Recreation.

BA
0

299,980

76,195

300,0001

223,805

30,000
205,329

30,000
275,573

256,000

-19,573

-105
334,202
209,340

76
110,923
280,377

50
335,040
261,090

-26
224,117
-19,287

30,000 J

Trust Funds
Donations

405

0

Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Resource management
405 BA
0

1

-2

2 ..
.

76,463

80,7121

73,404
2,333
7,428
7,100

8,126
8,203
3,500

*330[
86J898

100,295

14,306

96,223
8,597
7,200

9,325
471
-1,003
-2,500

Construction and anadromous fish
405

BA
0

Migratory bird conservation account
(special fund): Indefinite
405
Permanent, indefinite

BA

Miscellaneous appropriations (special
funds): Permanent, indefinite...4O5
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund
405

BA
0

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Sport Fisheries and Wildlife.

BA
0

156,999

178,469

198,592

20,123

149,918

175,213

187,400

12,187

BA
0

1,647

1,663

1,663

1,721

1,800

1,600

-200

BA

162,666

182,733]
£
2,059l
'8,684]

210,058

16,582

0

160,879

188,175

202,946

14,771

BA
0

54,146
20,789

20,012
49,484

57,303
64,647

37,291

Contributed
indefinite

Trust Funds
funds: Permanent,
405

national Park Service
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Operation of the national park
system
405

Planning and construction

405

Road construction:
405
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
0

0

BA
BA

10,734
12,246
60,369
56,599
241

11,000
15,450
69,854
64,412
250

195,000

12.000J
17,000
77,700
66,777
200

io^obbj

1,550
7,846
2,365
-50

15,163
-90,000

0

See footnotes at end of table.




(35,000)
32,740

(23,000)
23,000

BA

11,559

15,5591
F
283j

24,375

(-12,000)
-9,740
8,533

0

Preservation of historic properties
405

(5,416)
16,352
7,277

11,267

14,952

3,685

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

211

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS—Continued
national Park Service—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Planning, development, and
operation of recreation facilities:
Indefinite
405
John F. Kennedy
Performing Arts

BA
0

30,378
20 000

BA
0

Center for the
405

Miscellaneous permanent
appropriations (special
Permanent, indefinite

funds):
405

BA
0

11,900
18 728

-18,478
-1272

2,400
2,320
336
336

2,420
2,359
290
290

20
39
-46
-46

457,444
304,322

411,346
326,922

-46,098
22,600

3,000

2,000
1,727
276
344

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

405

Totai Federal funds National
Park Service.
Trust

0
BA
0

-198 ..
.
230,647
207,170

Funds

National Park Service
Permanent, indefinite

trust

funds:
405

BA
0

1,761

3,000

1,754

3,000

3,000

Total Federal funds Fish and
Wildlife and Parks.

BA
0

721,848

746,836

944,978

198,142

BA
0

759,912
4,663
4,802

775,412
4,663
4,600

15,500

Total trust funds Fish and
Wildlife and Parks.

566,428
3,408
3,476

Surveys, investigations and research
409

BA

149,386

205,571

34,669

0

201,823

35,721

Payment from proceeds, sale of
water, Mineral Leasing Act of
1930: Permanent, indefinite 401

BA

139,305
1 .
.

161,382
*27H
'9.249J
166,102

170,902
166,102

205,571
201,823

34,669
35,721

56,167

68,146

8,433

74,230

12,410

-202

ENER6Y AND MINERALS
Geological Survey
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

409

Total Federal funds Geological
Survey.

0
BA
0

-866 .
.
149,387
138,439

Mining Enforcement and Safety
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

BA

64,720

F

53,060

3,516
61,820

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

609

Total Federal funds Mining
Enforcement and Safety
Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

175
64,720
53,235

19

10

-9

59,713

68,146
74,240

8,433

61,839

12,401

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

212

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

1974
estimated

1973
actual

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Bureau of Mines
Federal Fund*
General and special funds:

BA

92,827

0
0

81,802
90

BA

36,323

BA
0

11,177
-1,181

BA
0

2,474
140,327
83,185

403

BA
0

496
649

403

BA
0

43,490
33,034

123,400
89,000

135,000
110,000

11,600
21,000

Cosponsor funds: Permanent, indefinite
403

BA
0

3,471
3,471

10,000
10,000

13,000
13,000

3,000
3,000

BA

1,485

70,100

15,970

1,604

36,1301
^18,000/
35,983
^17,400

65,0001
^600 f

12,217

513
500
756
750
1,269
1,250

554
584
764
759
1,318
1,343

41
84
8
9
49
93

97,487
94,310

108,444
104,309

10,957
9,999

Mines and minerals

403

Miscellaneous appropriations

403

101,4001
*215[
'3.991J
103,275
200

108,847

3,241

107,756
200

4,481

640

1,756'

1,116

200
105,606
104,315

200
108,847
109,912

3,241
5,597

1,300
1,300

800
800

-500
-500

Public enterprise funds:

Helium fund:
403
Authority to spend public debt
receipts.
Contract authority, Permanent
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

403

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Mines.
Trust

Funds

Contributed funds: Permanent
Office of Coal Research
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Trust

Funds

Fuel Allocation, Oil and Gas Programs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

403

Alaska Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

General investigations

401

BA
0

Operation and maintenance

401

BA
0

Total Federal funds Alaska
Power Administration.

BA
0

597
513
631
479
1,228
992

BA
0

94,493
85,231

Bonneville Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Construction
See footnotes at end of table.




401

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

213

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
ENERGY AND MINERALS—Continued
Bonneville Power Administration—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

401

BA

31,020

33,294]
*1,090
F
803j

38,723

3,536

30,325

Operation and maintenance

35,187

38,723

3,536

fund):
401

147,167
143,032

-5,000
-5,000
9,493
8,535

Total Federal funds Bonneville
Power Administration.
Trust

BA
0
BA
0

102
102
125,615
115,658

BA
0

20,623
19,576

2,500
2,500

BA
0

900

881

900
900

BA
0
BA
0

41
41
941
922

BA
0
BA
0

Continuing fund (special
Permanent, indefinite

5,000
5,000 ..
.
137,674
134,497

Funds

Bonneville Power Administration trust
fund: Permanent, indefinite
401

2,500
2,500 ..
.

Southeastern Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation and maintenance
Continuing fund (special
Permanent, indefinite

401
fund):
401

Total Federal funds
Southeastern Power
Administration.

950

50
50

24
24
924
924

950
950

-24
-24
26
26

700
1,188
6,533

465
1,000
5,2201

630
741
5,817

15
6
-259
530

4,451
7,233
5,639

6,277
5,752
7,277

5,757
6,447
6,498

-520
695
-779

659,370
618,587
13,800
13,800

743,546
713,398
16,300
16,300

84,176
94,811
2,500
2,500

198,014]
fl
4,000l
'6.773J
203,347
B
4,000

234,7911
fl
29,000J

55,004

247,4601
B
29,000J

69,113

950

Southwestern Power Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

...401

Construction
Operation and maintenance..

401

Total Federal funds
Southwestern Power
Administration.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Energy and
Minerals.

BA
0

Total trust funds Energy and
Minerals.

BA
0

534,426
432,708
24,590
23,696

BA

211,051

INDIAN AFFAIRS
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operation of Indian programs-.
(Area and regional development)
507

194,843
See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

214

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
INDIAN AFFAIRS—Continued
Bureau of Indian Affairs—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Operation of Indian programs:
—Continued.
(Elementary and secondary
education)
601
Contract authority, Permanent,
indefinite.
Liquidation of contract
authority.
(Land management)

BA

186,801

BA

1,500

0

(271)
180,000

402

Total, Operation
programs.

of

BA
0

Indian

BA
0

Construction

601

Road construction:
507
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
0

507

BA
BA
0

(45,539)
40,631
50,065
11,070
60,053

219,0161

(793) ,
228,467
190,230
"3,000
"84
"2,916
482,807
420,066
505,011
400,493
54,607
51,875
57,100
73,400
150,000

BA
BA
0

Miscellaneous appropriations
Permanent, indefinite

399,352
374,843
56,019
42,274

198,214
'8,565
1,500

(43,000)
57,000
70,000
7,740
77,761

1
75,000/
(59,000)
63,500
70,0001
8,401/
78,961

10,737

(-793)
38,237
-3,000
-2,832
62,741
104,518
-2,732
16,300
-75,000
(16,000)
6,500
661
1,200

Public enterprise funds:

Miscellaneous revolving funds

507

0

Revolving fund for loans

507

BA
BA
0
0

-729

513

513
"900
"5,000
"900
B
l,000

*5,000J

-900
-900
*l,000J

Intergovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

507

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Indian Affairs.
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds
Current, indefinite
Permanent
Permanent, indefinite

507

0
BA
0
BA
BA
BA
BA
0

516,506
514,866
-2,206 ..
.
2,616
15.896
50,000
138,659
197,228

708,313
594,767

693,083
722,385

-15,230
127,618

3,000
15,500
70,000
150,000
330,700

3,0001
15,5001
70,000 f
87.500J
230,000

-62,500

-100,700

708,313
594,767
238,500
330,700

693,083
722,385
176.000
230,000

-15,230
127,618
-62,500
-100,700

14,500
20,800

15,000
21,700

500
900

Indian

BA
0

Total trust funds Indian Affairs.

BA
0

516,506
514,866
207,171
197,228

B
A
0

22,375
21,968

Total Federal
Affairs.

funds

TERRITORIAL AFFAIRS
Office of Territorial Affairs
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administration of territories
See footnotes at end of table.




910

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

215

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
TERRITORIAL AFFAIRS—Continued
Office of Territorial Affairs-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

3,114
-900
1,400
4,200
205
29

1
469

800
420
596

61,000
65,300
1,400
5,000
625
625

BA
0

21,134
22,409

23,200
17,329

24,900
23,300

1,700
5,971

BA
0

103,978
105,116

96,006
105,725

102,925
115,925

6,919
10,200

11,520

2,448

11,520

2,491

1,735
20,047

-8,887
-5,417
3,421

19,904
20,047
21,639

3,260
-5,466
-2,157

2,000
1,500
7,554

2,000
1,500
924

7,517
9,554
9,017
522
630
3,000
3,000
"3,029
6,429
"41,500
"35,700
15,000
10,000

775
2,924
2,275
-148
-120
1,000
1,000
-598
-6,521
41,000
35,400
15,000
10,000

Trust territory of the Pacific Islands
910

BA
0

Micronesian claims fund, Trust
Territory of the Pacific Islands.910

BA
0

Office of the Comptroller for Guam
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
910

BA
0

Internal revenue collections for the
Virgin Islands (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
910
Total Federal funds Office of
Territorial Affairs.

60,738

57,886
66,200

SECRETARIAL OFFICES
Office of the Solicitor and Office of the
Secretary
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of the Secretary, salaries
and expenses:
(Water resources and power) .401
(Other natural
programs)

resources

expenses

(special

foreign currency program)

409

Underground electric power
transmission research

401

Saline water research

401

Land Use Control

402

Energy conservation
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

15,253

BA
0

14,755
15,253
14,755

BA
0
BA

4,736

409

Total, Departmental operationsand

7,091

409

Departmental operations:
(Water resources and power) .401

Salaries

7,351

BA

resources

Total, Office of the Secretary,
salaries and expenses.

(Other natural
programs)

BA
0

Office of the Solicitor, salaries and
expenses
409

and analysis
401

0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

4,069
4,736
4,069
500
356
1,000
674
26,871
27,230

8,4771
'595J
9,029
8,887
7,152
15,5261
'U00J
16,644
25,513
23,796

6,2801
F
350J
6,742
6,630
6,742
670
750
2,000
2,000
3,627
12,950
"500
*300

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

216

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
SECRETARIAL OFFICES—Continued
Office of the Solicitor and Office of the
Secretary— Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Mined area protection
403
Litter prevention and cleanup:
Permanent, indefinite
402
Intragovemmental funds:
Working capital fund
409
Consolidated working funds
(Other natural resources
programs)
409
Total Federal funds Office of
the Solicitor and Office of
the Secretary.
Trust Funds
Cooperation with foreign agencies:
Permanent
401
Liquidation of contract authority

BA
0
BA
0

10
25

0

-344
55.721
53,589

48,537
56,590

B
A

35
(27)
72

(66)
113

62,660
46,370
-44
-113

2,930,521
2,848,098

3,327,423
3,198,688

396,902
350,590

-6,683,406

-5,733,888

949,518

-33,099

-173,760

-140,661

-60

-60

-2,887

-3,369

-7,764

-4,395

-499

-560

-584

-24

-2,247,644

-3,789,973
-3,872,396

-2,588,633
-2,717,368

1,201,340
1,155,028

237,154
226,218

261,340
352,925

203.588
257,410

-57,752
-95,515

-19,906

-24,588

-4,682

Total trust funds
Offices.

BA
0

BA
0

2,662,113
2,357,490

Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
500
600
850
900
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
See footnotes at end of table.




BA}
0 J

0

BA
0
BA
0

48,537
56,590
44
113 ..
.

94

BA} -4,590,385
0J
-11,393
BA}
0J
BA}
0 J
BA}
0 J
BA}

(-66)
-113
111,197
102,960

55,721
53,589
35
72

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
400

111,197
102,960

62,660
46,370

44

BA
0

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

-3

-595

595 ..
..

8A
0

Total Federal funds Secretarial
Offices.
Secretarial

6,500
4,600

-267

0

"7,000
"5,000
25
25

"500
"400
25
28

-64

I-1,943,021

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

217

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR—Continued
SUMMARY—Continued
Trust funds:—Continued

500

BA1

-78,942

-83,831

-83,768

63

-16,259

-18,764

-18,750

14

138,839
230,424
-132,000

76,482
130,304
-70,000

-62,357
-100,120
62,000

-3,783,134
-3,773,972

-2,582,151
-2,657,064

1,200,983
1,116,908

0I
850

BA1

0 J
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

500

Total Department of the Interior

BA
113,604
0
102,668
BA1 -107,724
0 J
BA -1,937,141
0
-2,252,700

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

BA

14,200

16,4081
'953J

22,486

5,125

0

12,996

17,334

21,536

4,202

0
BA
0

-1,163
14,200
11,833

1,000
17^361
18,334

22,486
21,536

-1,000
5J25
3,202

BA

153,113

207.364

31,608

0
BA
0
BA

151,171
11,000
10,152
6,666

203,164
14,200
14,000
4,050

28,906
1,700
1,500
537

0
BA
0

6,645
170,779
167,968

164,4741
>11,282/
174,258
12,500
12,500
3,2801
>233J
4,212
191,769
190,970

4,000
225,614
221,164

-212
33,845
30,194

BA

357,320

435,600

43.839

0

356,427

365,9731
'25,788/
388,374

425,300

36,926

Intragovemmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
908
Total Federal funds General
administration.
LEGAL ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

Fees and expenses of witnesses. .908
Salaries and expenses, Community
Relations Service
908
Total Federal
Activities.

funds

Legal

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses




BA

137,468

143,2731
n0,406J

180,400

26.721

0
See footnotes at end of table.

908

137,063

154,471

178,200

23,729

21 g

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE—Continued
FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, Bureau of
Prisons
908

908

Support of United States prisoners
908

118,281

0
Buildings and facilities

BA

BA
0
BA
0

172,500

29,173

118,183

135,2241
*7,982f
G
121j
141,222

168,900

27,678

42,616
20,189
19,500
18,242

14,800
67,500
21,500
21,014

53,200
24,300
24,700
23,700

38,400
-43,200
3,200
2,686

600

600

Intragovemmental funds:

Federal Prison Industries, Inc.:
Federal Prison industries fund .908
Limitation on administrative
expenses.
Limitation on vocational expenses.
Total Federal funds Federal
Prison System.

0

1,795
(1,348)

BA
0

(1,631)

(1,804)

(173)

(4,743)
180,397
158,410

(5,850)
179,627
229,736

(5,051)
250,400
217,500

(-799)
70,773
-12,236

Trust Funds

Commissary funds, Federal
(trust revolving fund)

prisons
908

0

-200

LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

BA

841,166

15,262

624,006

870,5261
'612J
850,000

886,400

0

910,800

60,800

BA

74,380

106,4801

140,775

28,861

0

77,330

109,538

135,875

26,337

1,775,710
1,533,037

1,917,249
1,941,423

2,141,675
2,110,375

224,426
168,952

-82

-81

-81

-2,033

-2,919

-3,919

-1,000

BA
0

1,773,595
1,530,922

1,914,249
1,938,423

2,137,675
2,106,375

223,426
167,952

0
BA
0

-200
1,773,596
1,530,722

1,914,249
1,938,423

2,137,675
2,106,375

223,426
167,952

DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

'5.434J

SUMMARY
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
850
900
Total Federal funds

BA
0
BA1
0J
BA1

0I

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Total Department of Justice
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

219

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
MANPOWER ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Program administration

607

B
A
0

63.278
62,641

67,7891
'3.932J
68,316

67,763
67,334

-982

1,350.0001
'458,584/
1,394,000
'90,000

2,050,000

241,416

1,631,4161
'368,584]

516,000

B
A

1.549.416

0

1,477,282

assistance
607

BA
0

1.249.317
1 014 174

641 000

Federal unemployment benefits and
allowances
702

BA
0

475.000
390 599

365,000
365 000

Advances to the extended
unemployment compensation
account
702

BA
0

120.000
146,298

Grants to States for unemployment
insurance and employment
services
607

BA
0

66.032
63,600

-3,958

Comprehensive manpower assistance
Cfi7
bU/

Emergency employment

-641,000
365,000
365 000 .

64,400
64,400

64,400
64,400

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

607

0

-1,531

BA
0

3.523.043
3,153,063

2,309,705
2,622,716

2,547,163
2,496,734

237,458
-125,982

Unemployment trust fund:
(Manpower training and
employment services):
Permanent, indefinite
607

BA
0

386.884
382,399

398,643
398,643

400,098
400,098

1,455
1,455

(Retirement and disability):
Permanent, indefinite
702

BA
0

6.303.065
4,971,444

6,488,941
5,451,357

6,355,725
6,765,902

-133,216
1,314,545

Total, Unemployment trust fund

BA
0

6.689.949
5,353,843

6,887,584
5,850,000

6,755,823
7,166,000

-131,761
1,316,000

Total trust funds
Administration.

BA
0

6.689.949
5,353,843

6,887,584
5,850,000

6,755,823
7,166,000

-131,761
1,316,000

BA

25,019

23.5001
F
975J

29,600

5.125

0

24,183

24,435

28,600

4,165

BA

50,438

69,775

12,347

0

52,791

55,2101
F
2,218J
56,751

69,428

12,677

Total Federal funds Manpower
Administration.
Trust

Funds

Manpower

LABOR-MANAGEMENT SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




609

220

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Total Federal funds
Employment Standards
Administration.

108,292
102,097

138,450
138,450

165,000
165,000

26,550
26,550

BA
0

701

BA
0

158,730
154,887

195,878
195,201

234,775
234,428

38,897
39,227

BA
0

2,716
633

3,997
6,202

4,347
4,260

350
-1,942

BA
0

69,373
37,428

70,408
68,530

102,500
98,000

32,092
29,470

B
A

44,451

3,385

42,984

47,4001
'2,465/
49,346

53,250

0

Special benefits

52,295

2,949

49,865
49,346

53,250
52,295

3,385
2,949

Trust Funds

Special workmen's compensation
expenses: Permanent, indefinite ...701
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

609

0

987

BA
0
BA
0

416
360

B
A

..

44,451
43,971

24,176

0

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Labor Statistics.

23,472

Trust Funds

Special statistical
indefinite

work:

Permanent,
609

-253
-457

253
457 ..

DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

Special foreign currency program.609

BA
0

31,700

6,684

31,194

5,442

181

200
195

200
14

84

-92

-176
6,884
5,280

23,3221
'1,694/
25,752

100
19

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

609

0

-766

Consolidated working fund

609

0

-3,717

BA
0

24,276
19,009

25,016
26,017

31,900
31,297

B
A

3,844,892

2,675,347

2,999,188

323,841

0

3,432,541

2,986,245

2,941,354

-44,891

Total Federal funds
Departmental Management.

.

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

221

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR—Continued
SUMMARY—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600
700

850

BA1

-467

-383

0I
BA1
0 J
BA1

0I

-8

-8

-15

-14

11

-15

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600

3,844,403
3,432,052

2,674,941
2,985,839

2,998,793
2,940,959

323,852
-44,880

BA
0

Total Federal funds....

6,693,081
5,354,836

6,891,834
5,856,659

6,760,170
7,170,260

-131,664
1,313,601

-416

-253

BA1

253

0I
BA}..

700

BA1
0

-1,000

0I

900

-1,000

-398
6,692,267
5,354,022

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

-372

701
702

BA
0
BA
0 .
BA
0

Total Department of Labor

6,891,581
5,856,406

6,759,170
7,169,260

-132,411
1,312,854

-1,200

-1,800

-1,946

-146

-146,298

-250,000

-65,000

185,000

10,389,172
8,638,578

9,314,722
8,590,445

9,691,017
10,043,273

376,295
1,452,828

"353,500

29,370

DEPARTMENT OF STATE
ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

151

BA

270,153

254,428
Acquisition, operation, and
maintenance of buildings abroad
151

B
A

30,000
13,262

Acquisition, operation, and
maintenance of buildings abroad
(special foreign currency program)
151

BA

6,920

0

5,994

Emergencies in the diplomatic and
consular service
151

BA
0

2,100
1,500

See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 15




304,000
"7,000
'12,981
309,201
"5,628
21,1731
"1,196
'185
27,853
"993
5,1381
"324
11,887
"218
2,100
2,000

356,0351
"1.372J
"22,914

42,578

23,8121
"203 J
"4,870

-4,831

5,3091
"106/
"2,100
2,100

-6,690

360

-592

10
0

222

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Payment to Foreign Service
BA
retirement and disability fund.151
Permanent, indefinite
BA
0
Intragovernmental funds:
Working capital fund

3,808
10,400
14,208

2,972
17,563
15,200
18,1721
D
17,563J
D

"20,535

4,900

20,100
40,635

4,900
-56

56

BA
0

43
5
323,381
289,441

389,981
393,571

424,019
429,572

34,038
36,001

Trust Funds
Foreign Service retirement and
disability fund: Permanent, indefinite
701

BA
0

40,216
30,754

73,273
38,046

95,921
44,635

22,648
6,589

Miscellaneous appropriations:
Permanent, indefinite

BA
0
BA
0

972
836
41,188
31,590

1,083
867
74,356
38,913

780
942
96,701
45,577

-303
75
22,345
6,664

B
A

185,358

"214,079

-5,545

0

174,887

217,3371
D
2,287J
209,7281
D
2,287J
5,7251
'226J
5,890
6,200
4,609
1,7001

214,367

2,352

"6,660

79
0

6,617
"6,400
6,941
"2,465

727
200
2,332
721

1,926
229,604
229,851

546
-3,915
5,957

Consolidated working fund

151

0

151

0

Total Federal funds
Administration of Foreign
Affairs.

Total trust funds
Administration of
Affairs.

151
Foreign

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND
CONFERENCES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Contributions to international
organizations
151

Missions to international
organizations
International conferences
contingencies

BA

5,242

0
BA
0

4,941
3,650
2,475

151
and
151

International trade negotiations. 151

BA .

n
Total Federal funds
International Organizations
and Conferences.
Trust Funds
Gifts and bequests, National
Commission on Educational,
Scientific, and Cultural
Cooperation: Permanent, indefinite
151
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

194,250
182,303

1,380
233.519
223,894

BA
0

51
51

35
35

35 .
.
35

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

223

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued
INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

International Boundary and Water
Commission, United States and
Mexico-.
Salaries and expenses 401

B
A

4,186

4,2841
E

0

4,138

>193j
4,628

m\

401

Chamizal settlement
American sections,
commissions

401
international
401

B
A
0
0

20,246
3,073

B
A

748

9501
F
53J

0

Construction

715

965

3,800
12,600

"4,701

106

4,701

73

"102,306
29,820

98,506
17,220

"1,370

367

1,325

43

Total Federal funds
International Commissions.

3,292

3,5t71

"4,030

3,268

3,573

4,030

457

B
A
0

28,472
11,238

12,973
21,766

112,407
39,876

99,434
18,110

B
A

45,250

6,913

42,509

49,8001
^787 F
47,169

"57,500

0

commissions
409

B
A
0

International fisheries

360
455

53,770

6,601

0

142

45

-20

"7,414

445

7,414

189

EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Mutual educational and cultural
exchange activities
. ..153
International educational exchange
activities (special foreign currency
program)

-*

65

153

Center for Cultural and Technical
Interchange Between East and
West
153

B
A

6,200

0

6,334

Preservation

0

of ancient

Nubian

6,7001
^269/
6,9561

25

25

monuments (special foreign
currency program)
153
Educational exchange permanent
appropriations (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite 153

B
A
0

353
383

353
400

352
375

-1
-25

Total Federal funds Educational
Exchange.

B
A
0

51,803
49,368

57,909
54,884

65,266
61,629

7,357
6,745

B
A
0

197
348

300
325

300
300

-25

B
A
0

142
137

140
140

140
140

B
A
0

339
485

440
465

440
440

Trust

Funds

Educational exchange trust funds:
(Economic and financial
assistance): Permanent,
indefinite
152
(Foreipn information
and
exchange activities)'
\l

V/l v I K I I

Ml IUI I I I U l l v l l

vAvllUII^V

WII\J

U v l l f llivv/>

Permanent, indefinite 153
Total trust funds Educational
Exchange.
IWUI

UUvl

lUIIVIw

See footnotes at end of table.




1-UUvvlllWUUl

-25

224

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (iin thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF STATE—Continued1
OTHER
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A

0

11,687

14,3041
*52J
14,648

Assistance to refugees from the
Soviet Union
. .
.152

BA
0

50,000
33,171

36,500
33,500

Payment to International
Washington DC

BA ..
0

2,200
2 200

International Center, Washington,
D.C. (special fund)
151
Permanent indefinite

BA

2,200 .

BA
0

948
1100

948]
1100

Payment to the Republic of Panama:
Permanent
151

BA
0

2.095
2,095

2,328
2,328

2,328
2,328

Total Federal funds Other

BA
0

64,661
46,953

58,532
53,776

12,746
33,082

-45,786
-20,694

B
A

662,567

752,914

844,042

91,128

0

579,303

747,891

794,010

46,119

Migration

and refugee

assistance

12,566

ICO

Center,
151

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
150
Proprietary
public

receipts from the
150

400
500
850

-4,886

"9,470
9,825

-4,823

19,829

-36,500
-13,671
-2,200
-2,200

j

-2,200

BAl
0 1

-466

-2,718

-518

2,200

BAl

-3,935

-4,830

-4,838

-8

or
BAl

-78

-79

-79

or
BAl

-789

-700

-700

-138

-133

-124

or
BAl

9

0 J
BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
701

657,161
573,896

744,454
739,431

837,783
787,751

93,329
48,320

BA
0

Total Federal funds

41,578
32,126

74,831
39,413

97,176
46,052

22,345
6,639

BAl

-129

-50

-50

-197

-300

-300

41,252
31,800

74,481
39,063

96,826
45,702

o}
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

BAl
0 [

Total trust funds

BA
0

Interfund transactions

151

BAl

22,345
6,639

-14,208

-35,735

-40,635

-4,90C

684,205
591,489

783,200
742,759

893,974
792,818

110,774
50,059

0 f
Total Department of State
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

225

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
estimated

1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

506

"33,300

14

29,150
'9,500
F
1,325
31,977
'3,000
'50,000
35,000
'15,000
22,0001
'3.500J
28,6001
'3,500J
485

0
0

1,291
-1,837

-285
-2,758

BA
0

54,103
48,140

115,475
114,519

78,800
112,700

-36,675
-1,819

B
A

548,441

544,951
*1,706

"622,791

37,999

0

Operating expenses

543,991
131,550

"34,601
582,562
75,5001
'333
134

616,870
"114,100

34,308
38,043

124,200
"6,800
9,600
95,850

5,476
2,800
1,600
8,752

BA

25,603
24,219

Interim operating assistance

BA
0

research,
506

BA

28,500

0

Transportation planning,
and development

503

24,453

Transportation research activities
overseas (special foreign currency
program)
506

33,2001
'6,500/
'35,000/
45,500
38,000

-6,675
4,723
-50,000
-15,000
20,000
5,900
-485

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund

506

Consolidated working fund,
transportation systems center..506
Total Federal funds Office of
the Secretary.

285
2,758

COAST GUARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

Acquisition, construction,
improvements

502

B
A

and
502

95,850

8,752

31,135

118,724
4,000
8,000
81,0001
'6,098
81,000
'6,098
25,000

"30,200

3,430

30,370
17,500

"1,662
26,770
14,000]

30,200
"21,000

3,430
6,842

19,000
7,500
7,500

-158
4,000
4,000

Alteration of bridges

502

0
BA
0

Retired pay

502

B
A

95,027
9,500
4,930
76,789

0

76,084

B
A
0

Reserve training

Research, development,
evaluation

502

test, and
502

State boating safety assistance...502
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A

FCH
r

o8

0
BA
0

15,165
4,500
4,264

"89
19,158
3,500
3,500

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

226

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
COAST GUARD—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

502

5,000
4,000

10,0001
5,000}
5,000

10,000

635
8,095
-574
5,442
820,050
782,794

1,333
-3,711
801,375
847,434

-400
700
913,241
908,520

-1,733
4,411
111,866
61,086

30
30
153
30
183

30
30

BA
0

23
7
-77
23
-70

BA

1,181,690

1,199,068

1.385,500
*-1,385,500

-1,282,578

0

Pollution fund (special fund)
Permanent, indefinite

1,101,047

'83,510
1,264,521

1,370,846
"-1,271,096
13,000
"-13,000
10,000
"-6,500
24,000

-1,164,771

BA
BA
0

1,000

Intragovernmental funds:

Coast Guard supply fund

502

Coast Guard yard fund
Total Federal
Guard.
Trust

502
funds

0
0

Coast

BA
0

fund:
502

BA
0

Funds

Coast Guard general
Permanent, indefinite

gift

Miscellaneous trust revolving funds .502
Total trust funds Coast Guard...

0

-153
30 .
.
30

-153

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operations

501

Facilities, engineering
development

and

11,500

BA
501

8,000

0
Civil supersonic aircraft development
termination
501

0

13,599

Federal payment to the airport and
airway trust fund
501

BA

73,397

0

37,460

73,397

"821,683/

-4,500
-13,460
821,683
821,683

""82U83J
654
23,700

0

15,239
998

5,100
17,4001
'342J
19,352
495

0

-1,657

25

25

0

-2
1,311,820
1,334,953

845.383
969,787

Safety regulation

501

0

National Capital Airports

501

BA
0

United States International
Aeronautical Exposition

-11,500

20,751
12.265

20,175

-4,446
5,958
823
-495

501

Public enterprise funds:

Aviation war risk insurance revolving
fund
501
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated
integrated
program

working fund,
grant administration
501

Total Federal funds Federal
Aviation Administration.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

1.267,352
1,223,372

-466,437
-365,166

227

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION—C on.
Trust Funds
Grants-in-aid for airports (Airport and
BA
airway trust fund)
501
Contract authority
BA
Liquidation of contract authority
0

13,0001

15,000

13,000

620,000
(100,000)
232,346

(200,000)
234,000

(280,000)
290,000

(80,000)
56,000

BA

302,650

250,000

1,759

0

321,768

265,000

250,0001
*1,759J
320,0001
*l,000J

BA

66,000

62,095

0

66,663

68,000

BA
0

77,354

5,109

BA
0

1,003,650
698,131

312,095
572,109

FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
503 BA

7,823

Facilities and equipment (Airport and
airway trust fund)
501

Research, engineering and development
(Airport and airway trust fund) ....501

Operations (Airport and airway trust
fund)
501
Total trust funds Federal
Aviation Administration.

B

\, 385,500

-20,080

5,3001
F
373J
6,001

867

0

(37,000)
37,500
(5,000)
4,800

(7,000)
-9,500
(3,000)
800

BA
0

15,000
2,227

5,000
9,000

35,000
17,200

30,000
8,200

°

0

Territorial highways:
503
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA
0

Forest highways (liquidation of
contract authority)
503

0

Public lands highways (liquidation of
contract authority)
503

0

Rail crossings-demonstration projects
503

BA
0

Railroad-highway crossings
demonstration projects

503

BA
0

Rural highway public transportation
demonstration program
503

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




-5,673

(30,000)
47,000
(2,000)
4,000

BA

152

1,419,405
1,386,487

(12,000)
16,791
(4,000)
2,798

Highway beautification.........
".503
Liquidation of contract authority....

Darien Gap Highway

1,731,500
1,958,596

1,385,500
1,265,987

1,0201

BA

Highway-related safety grants
(liquidation of contract authority)
503

1

8,500

-5,512
6,330
6,200
20

503

••'--

...

19,146

489
6,330
6,200
1,107

0
Motor carrier safety

70,0001
*11,241/
71,0001
fl
5,500J

56,000

11,060
4,500
(2,000)
1,218
(23,000)
22,622
(16,000)
12,303
1,400
1,315

(2,500)
2,600
(8,000)
8,701
(3,000)
7,856
9,800
4,000
2,000
400

iiuiiw/
(1,600)
3,000
(12,450)
8,800
(8,270)
5,000
"3,000
7,600
900
3,000
600

-1,051
(-900)
400
(4,450)
99
(5,270)
-2,856
-6,800
3,600
-2,000
500
3,000
600

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

228

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
estimated

1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Fund*—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
National scenic and recreational
highway:
503
Contract authority
BA
Permanent
BA
Miscellaneous accounts:
(Economic and financial
0
assistance)
152
(Ground transportation)

503

Total, Miscellaneous accounts...
Inter-American Highway

152

Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

503

0
0

0
BA
0

Trust Funds
Federal-aid highways (trust fund) 503
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA
BA
BA
0

Right-of-way revolving fund (trust
revolving fund) (liquidation of
0
contract authority)
503 -

Parkway

595

-2,404

5,616
8,021

9,735
12,734
^3,000
^3,000

2,720
3,315

-7,015
-9,419
-3,000
-3,000

57,620
105,292

68,446
95,404

10,826
-9,888

6 ..
.
29,590
47,221
200,000
150,000
(4,891,990)
4,729,726
(35,000)
24,904

10,6401
11,291,250 .
6,357,500
100,000
(4,315,900) (4,693,000)
4,508,900
4,695,400
(40,000)
46,000
50,200

BA
0

Trust fund share of other highway
programs
503
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA

-5,023,110
(377,100)
186,500
(40,000)
-4,200

"50,000

BA
BA

(trust
503

-10,000

2,999

0
Baltimore-Washington
fund)

iibbbj

2,405

BA
0

Total Federal funds Federal
Highway Administration.

Highway beautification (trust fund): 503
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

20,000

6,200

2,500
15,700

"50,000
fi
(8,000)
*7,800
10,700
3,100
16,600

(8,000)
7,800
10,700
600
-28,799

89,190

BA
BA
0

Other Federal Highway Administration
trust funds:
(Economic and financial
assistance): Permanent
152
Contract authority, Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

(8,000)
5,597

(5,000)
23,300

59,491
(9,000)
17,700

(4,000)
-5,600

BA

428

5,450

10,450]

5,000

(9,622)
6,337

9,247

(-9,622)
2,910

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




10,402
(2,852)
2,604

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

229

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Trust Funds—Continued
Other Federal Highway Administration
trust funds:—Continued
(Ground transportation):
BA
Permanent
503
Contract authority, Permanent
BA
Liquidation of contract authority....
0

341
448
(188)
1,706

750
(297) ..
1,563

750

753

(-297
-810

Total, Other Federal Highway
Administration trust funds.

BA
0

11,619
4,310

6,200
7,900

11,200
10,000

5,000
2,100

Total trust funds Federal
Highway Administration.

BA
0

367,819
4,764,537

11,552,340
4,592,800

6,516,131
4,780,000

-5,036,209
187,200

BA

47,695

"50,950

13,984

0

46,407

0

(40,500)
43,124

36,2411
'725J
47,586
(30,000)
30,000

44,000
(10,860)
11,097

-3,586
(-19,140)
-18,903

BA
0

47,695
89,531

36,966
77,586

50,950
55,097

13,984
-22,489

BA

29,490

38,632
1
1,000
'586
262,500

33,550

-71,168

(29,500)
50,809

(70,000)
111,914
^500

9,833

13,3001
'200J
12,500
24,450
^5,000
30,300
^5,000

NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Traffic and highway safety

503

State and community highway safety
(liquidation of contract authority)
503
Total Federal funds National
Highway Traffic Safety
Administration.
Trust

Funds

Trust fund share of highway safety
programs
503
Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority

BA
BA
0

198,000
(88,903)
119,1031
^500/

(18,903)
7,189

"15,560

2,060

15,560
64,240

3,060
34,790

52,540

17,240

"143,000

-1,000
-1,000
-2,000

143,000

-13,100

FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses

503

BA

0
Railroad research and development
503

9,088
62,850

0
Railroad research

BA

41,416

503

Grants to National Railroad
Passenger Corporation
503

BA

aooo

BA
0

0
See footnotes at end of table.




9,100

105,800

^1,000
93,0001
^52,000/
104,1001
^52000

230

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Emergency rail facilities restoration
503

34,748

8A
0

27,100

-27,100

Public enterprise funds:

Alaska Railroad revolving fund

503

Total Federal funds Federal
Railroad Administration.

BA
0
BA
0

1,548 ..
.
116,531
157,852

188,950
232,000

6,500
3,000
229,300
214,100

6,500
3,000
40,350
-17,900

URBAN MASS TRANSPORTATION
ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative expenses

503

0

Public enterprise funds:

Urban mass transportation fund..503
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

0
Total Federal funds Urban
Mass Transportation
Administration.

BA
BA

102,792
-102,792

(232,000)
415,018

40,050
2,959,950
(380,000)
488,500

88,3001
-88,300/

-3,000,000

(490,000)
700,000

(110,000)
211,500
-3,000,000
211,500

BA
0

415,024

3,000,000
488,500

700,000

-4,221

-1,550

-2,000

SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Saint Lawrence Seaway
Development Corporation
Limitation on
expenses.

0

fund
502
administrative

(797)

(820)1
F
(26)J

(886)

-450

(40)

NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

506

7,785

B

7,366
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).

850

See footnotes at end of table.




1,265

9,355

875

5,520,477
3,207,214

2,195,656

-3,324,821

3,062,963

-144,251

-20,223

-24,886

-29,045

-4,159

2.322,878

5,495,585

2,166,605

-3,328,980

2,746,851

3,182,322

3,033,912

-148,410

2,343,106

BA1

0 J
-5

BA1
0

Total Federal funds

9,536

2,767,079

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500

7,9711
'300J
8,480

BA
0

i.

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

231

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION—Continued
SUMMARY—Continued
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the BA1
public
150 0 J
500
Total trust funds

BA1

0 J
BA

Interfund transactions

500

1,400,982
5,513,407

12,167,183
5,277,506

8,479,211
6,858,229

-3,687,972
1,580,723

-3,278

-15,072

-10,450

4,622

-512

-1,047

-750

1,397,192

12,151,064
5,261,387

8,468,011
6,847,029
-821,683

-3,683,053
1,585,642
-821,683

17,646,649
8,443,709

9,812,933
9,059,258

-7,833,716
615,549

24,500

4,770

15,701

18,577
*78
1,075
19,000'

23,285

4,285

1,787

2,2001

3,200

945

1,738

2,252

0
5,509,617
BA1
-73,397

297

0I
Total Department
Transportation.

of

BA
0

3,646,673
8,183,072

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY
OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses, Office of the BA
Secretary
904
0
Salaries and expenses, Federal Law BA
Enforcement Training Center....908
0
Construction, Federal Law
Enforcement Training Center....908
Miscellaneous permanent
appropriations (special funds):
Permanent, indefinite
904

BA
0
BA
0

16,606

F

'55J

3,103

851

18,915

18,915
-5,000
1
1

5,000
22
23

23
24

1

1,524
21
20

1

Public enterprise funds:

Liquidation of Federal
Mortgage Corporation

Farm
904

0

Liquidation of Reconstruction
Finance Corporation
904
Liquidation of Home Owners' Loan
Corporation
904

0

-739

-510

-485

0

1

1

1

-5
3
18,414
18,210

-19
22,007
25,748

-17
46,638
25,912

7
7

7
7

25

Intragovernmental funds:

Working capital fund
904 0
Total Federal funds Office of BA
the Secretary.
0
Trust Funds

Pershing Hall memorial
Permanent, indefinite
See footnotes at end of table.




fund:

BA
904 0

7
7 ..
..

2
24,631
164

232

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
BUREAU OF ACCOUNTS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

904

BA

63,132
62,407

Subsidy payment to environmental
financing authority
910
Permanent, indefinite

8A
BA
0
BA

78,300

BA
0

20,810
86,835

funds:
853

BA
0

Payment of Government losses in
shipment
904

BA
0

6,535
6,462
300
293

Eisenhower College grants

602

0

506

BA

Claims, judgments, and relief acts
910
Permanent, indefinite

Interest on uninvested
Permanent, indefinite

Intragovernmental funds:

Fishermen's protective fund

Trust

BA
0

75
75
56,497
c
71,003
22,600
82,412
c
67,003
5,212
5,212
800
809

87,200

11,220

86,1001
'390J

9,656
87

1,350
1,350
'150,100
22,600
22,600
c
154,100
4,804
4,804
600
600

1,275
22,600
27,285
-408
-408
-200
-209

72
-2,500

3,000

172,077
156,069

3,0001
'2.500J
235,855
237,845

266,654
269,944

3
18
J8
~I8
21

18
1
8
18
18

18
1
8
18
18

94,400

14,647

95,200

14,100

0 ..
.
Total Federal funds Bureau of
Accounts.

70,000]
'4,590
>1,390j
72,634
'4,200
1.188

-5,500
30,799
32,099

Funds

Bureau of Accounts trust funds:
(Defense related activities)....059
(Other general government):
Permanent, indefinite
910

BA
0

Total trust funds Bureau of
Accounts.

BA
0

BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND
FIREARMS
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

76,169
70,052

74,3051
'5.448J
81,100

BA

212,978

225,8841

285,600

43.668

204,855

908

BA
0

Salaries and expenses

'15,888 J
245,400

286,100

40,700

CUSTOMS SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

See footnotes at end of table.




904

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

233

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT <OF THE TREASURY—Continued
CUSTOMS SERVICE—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Miscellaneous permanent accounts
(special funds): Permanent,
indefinite
904

BA
0

81,738
83,550

97,000
97,000

103,000
103,000

6,000
6,000

Total Federal funds Customs
Service.

BA
0

294,716
288,405

338,932
342,400

388,600
389,100

49,668
46,700

BA
0

2,476
2,749

2,500
2,500

2,500
2,500

82

69

Trust

Funds

Refunds, transfers and expenses,
unclaimed, abandoned and seized
goods: Permanent, indefinite
904
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Air-conditioning of the Bureau of
Engraving and Printing buildings
904

0

-69

Intragovernmental funds:

Bureau of Engraving and Printing
fund
904

BA
0

3,000
-1,352

Total Federal funds Bureau of
Engraving and Printing.

BA
0

3,000
-1.270

BA

22,976

0

21,099

...
4,421

-580

-5,001

4,490

-580

-5,070

23,3751
A
1,380 f
'635J
24,900

33,000

7,610

BUREAU OF THE MINT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

904

Construction of mint facilities

904

BA
0

2,000
68

Coinage profit fund (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
904

BA
0

805
1,368

Total Federal funds Bureau of
the Mint.

BA
0

BA

32,400

7,500

800

"11,800
5,000

11,800
4,200

1,610
2,407

3,000
3,000

1,390
593

25,781
22,535

27,000
28,107

47,800
40,400

20,800
12,293

71,713

76,9991
"2,250

88,400

7,271

BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administering the public debt

904

72,465

'1,880 J
78,750
"450

87,5001
'1,800 J

10,100

34,1621
fc
10

41,500

4,888

42,000

5,820

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

904

BA

34,800
34,363

See footnotes at end of table.




>2,44OJ
36,180

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

234

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE-Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

713,400

118,207

716,900

131,924

803,300

138,883

'46.483J
665,110
183,470
183,470

796,700
206,317
206,317

131,590
22,847
22,847

116,000
116,000

116,000
116,000

BA

510,854

0

513,377

BA

597,113

551,4701
"7,200
*65
>36,458j
577,776^
"7,200:
617,9131

Refunding internal revenue
collections, interest: Permanent,
indefinite
852

BA
0

597,869
175,437
175,437

Internal revenue collections for
Puerto Rico (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
910

BA
0

107,447
109,467

Accounts, collection
service

and taxpayer
904

Compliance

904

Public enterprise funds:

Federal tax lien revolving fund
Total Federal funds
Revenue Service.

904

Internal

R
A

0
BA
0

-16
1,425,651
1,430,497

500
-132 .
1,881,017
1,595,692
1,877,917
1,585,604

500
12
3
285,325
292,313

OFFICE OF THE TREASURER
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

15,500

2,285

10,824

12,4001
'815J
13,161

15,500

2,339

BA
0
BA
0

1.800
8
13,100
10,832

1
5
13,215
13,176

1
5
15,500
15,515

2,285
2,339

BA

64,573

10,612

65,683

63,2381
"2,3001
>3,350j
66,280
"2,220

79,500

0

904

79,4201
"80J

11,000

24
1,500
1,484
70,388
69,984

1,700
1,700
81,200
81,200

200
216
10,812
11,216

B
A

11.300

0

Salaries and expenses

Public enterprise funds:

Check forgery insurance fund

904

Total Federal funds Office of
the Treasurer.
SECRET SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

Construction of Secret
training facilities

Service
908

0

Contribution for annuity
Permanent, indefinite

benefits-.
903

BA
0
BA
0

Total Federal
Service.
See footnotes at end of table.




funds

Secret

1,623
2,133
66,196
67,840

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

235

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY—Continued
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE
CURRENCY
Trust

Funds

-6,069

405

2,822

2,417

BA
0

24,167,493
24,167,493

29,100,000
29,100,000

30,500,000
30,500,000

1,400,000
1,400,000

BA
0

8,294,670
8,294,670

6,054,780
6,054,780

6,204,780
6,204,780

150,000
150,000

BA
0

8,294,670
6,636,369

6,054,780
6,147,170

6,204,780
6,173,756

150,000
26,586

BA
0

Assessment funds (trust revolving fund)
508

34,628,980
34,597,798

37,618,751
37,622,434

39,614,989
39,588,688

1,996,238
1,966,254

BA1

-1,133,416

-1,157,523

-l,175,38z

-17,859

BA1
0 J

-172

-300

-320

BA1

-50,000

-50,000

-50,000

-73,406

-124,325

BA1

-3,684

-3,442

-3,946

-504

BA1
0 J
BA1
0 J
BA1

-335,909

-154,040

-173,145

-19,105

-2

-1

-1

-153,636

-167,948

-168,986

-85,813

-85,810

3

35,875,359
35,879,042

37,809,999
37,783,698

1,934,640
1,904,656

0

INTEREST ON THE PUBLIC DEBT
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interest on the public
Permanent, indefinite

debt:
851

GENERAL REVENUE SHARING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payments to State and local
government fiscal assistance trust
fund: Permanent
940
Trust Funds
State and local government fiscal
assistance trust fund: Permanent
940
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
850
900
Receipts from off-budget
Federal agencies
150
850

0I

0J
BA1

0}
Proprietary
public

receipts from the
050
150
500

0I

850
900
Total Federal funds




0I
BA1
0

-105,236

BA
0

32,773,519
32,742,337

-147,400

-20

-23,075

-1,038

L

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

236

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1974
estimated

1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OF
DEPARTMENT < THE TREASURY—Continued
SUMMARY—Continued
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

8,297,171
6,633,077

6,057,305
6,150,100

6,207,305
6,179,103

150,000
29,003

BA
0

8,297,171
6,633,077

6,057,305
6,150,100

6,207,305
6,179,103

150,000
29,003

900
940

Total Department
Treasury.

of the

125,000

-125,000

00

Interfund transactions

-121,238

O 00 O

Total trust funds

-8,294,670

-6,054,780

-6,204,780

-150,000

BA
0

32,654,782
30,959,506

35,752,884
35,849,362

37,687,524
37,633,021

1,934,640
1,783,659

"2,319,423

582,784

ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
m

85,950
79,083

Plant and capital equipment
058
Total Federal funds Atomic
Energy Commission.

BA
0

2,633,390
2,393,144

2,388,914
2,328,400

3,057,648
2,886,000

668,734
557,600

Trust Funds
Advances for cooperative work:
Permanent, indefinite
058

BA
0

291
339

235
269

235
235

-34

o oo

478,517

"738,225
684,900

2,633,390
2,393,144

2,388,914
2,328,400

3,057,648
2,886,000

668,734
557,600

o oo

2,201,100

652,275
605,817

-184
2,633,206
2,392,960

2,388,914
2,328,400

3,057,648
2,886,000

668,734
557,600

oro

494,610
425,446

1,724,9951
H 1,644]
1,722,583

291
339

235
269

235
235

-34

o oo

1,967,698

mo

058

o

Operating expenses

2,138,780

-291

-235

-235

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
058
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
058

BA
0

Total trust funds

0

Total Atomic Energy
Commission.

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




48

2,388,914
2,328,434

-34

34

2,633,206
2,393,008

3,057,648
2,886,000

668,734
557,566

237

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and development

404

BA

0

177,221

64,945

..404

BA

216,089

Contract authority
Permanent
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA

167,716]
F
1,112 r
"88J
135,000

"171,068

2,152

178,000

43,000

253,794
'2,188

"257,976

51,882

50,000

Abatement and control..

0
Enforcement

404

BA

114,403

100,000
(4,000)
220,000

150,000]
{26,000)
300,000

(22,000)
80,000

34,020

45,781]

"53,340

6,559

52,000

12,000

58,816

3,743

G

0
Agency and regional management
404

25,760

BA

45,891

0
Construction grants
404
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA
BA

39,228
1,900,000
5,000,000
684,400

Scientific activities overseas (special
foreign currency program)
404

BA
0

4,000
2,860

17
40,000
53,973]
''1,066
50,000

10,000
-4,000,000

4,000,000
(600,000)
2,000,000

181,535

2,000
4,550
108,800

209

Operations, research, and facilities
404

60,000
J
(1,650,000)
3,350,000
4,000
3,960
46,800

200

(1,050,000)
1,350,000
2.000
-590
-62,000

Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for certification and
other services
404

-200

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

Trust

405

404

Total Federal funds
Environmental Protection
Agency.

BA
0

400

200

-200

7,427,221
1,113,745

4,628,864
2,558,950

695,200
3,990,960

-3,933,664
1,432,010

15
50

15
40

-10

7,427,221
1,113,745

4,628,864
2,558,950

695,200
3,990,960

-3,933,664
1,432,010

-78

-287

-298

-11

7,427,143
1,113,667

4,628,577
2,558,663

694,902
3,990,662

-3,933,675
1,431,999

15
50

15
40

-10

Funds

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
404

BA
0

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
404
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 16




BA
0
BA1

0I
BA
0
BA
0

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

238

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY—Continued
SUMMARY-Continued
Trust funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
404

BA1
0 J

Total trust funds

0

Total Environmental Protection
Agency.

BA
0

-5

-15

-15

-3

35

25

-10

7,427,143
1,113,664

4,628,577
2,558,698

694,902

-3,933,675

3,990,687

1,431,989

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
REAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

BA

476,683

0

Public Buildings Service, operating
expenses
905

475,824
88,045
75,791
203,312
174,161
25.031
23,829
2,450
2,483
5,344
3,114
3,969
76

Repair and improvement of public
buildings
905

BA
0

Construction,
projects

905

BA
0

Sites and expenses, public buildings
projects
905

BA
0

Payments, public buildings purchase
contracts
905

BA
0

Expenses,

BA

public

United

buildings

States

court

facilities

905

0

905

0

Real property miscellaneous
accounts
905
Disposal of surplus real and related
personal property, operating
expenses
905

0

Additional court facilities

Expenses, disposal of surplus real
and related personal property
(special fund): Permanent,
indefinite
905

JJ

-535,077
-103,683
-94,308
200,740
-160,000
-500
-20,000
-7,300
-7,300
-7,000
-10,233
-7,000

535,077
103,683
94,308
-200,740
160,000
500
20,000
7,300
7,300
7,000
10,233
7,000
7,727
7,400

BA
0
BA
0

-539,340

527,7821
*5,000

7,727
7,400

601
758

1,500
1,100

1,500
1,100

-9,275
-5,238

-337
-1,180

-454

13
4

-119,000
545

-119,000
402

801,466
745,038

458,583
833,644

9,227
-109,955

-449,356
-943,599

Intragovernmental funds:

Buildings management fund
Construction

services,

buildings
Federal buildings fund

905

public

0




337
1,180

905
905

Consolidated working fund, real
property activities
905
Total Federal funds Real
Property Activities.
See footnotes at end of table.

0

0
0
BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

239

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
PERSONAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal Supply
expenses

Service, operating
905

BA

94.970

188.158

96.0001
5340
'5.783J

86.035

93,199

100,218

180,775

80,557

0

35,244

-39,000

-14,821

24,179

BA
0

94,970

102.123

188.158

128,443

61,218

165,954

86.035
104,736

BA

33,198

56,064

12,301

0

31,944

41,3251
'2.438J
43,000

53,019

10,019

National archives trust fund (revolving)
905

0

-1,135

315

31

-284

National archives gift fund: Permanent
905

BA
0

152
408

122
351

122
253

-98

BA
0

152
-111

122
666

122
284

-382

BA

6.174

8,278

1,175

0

6,110

6.6001
>503J
7,035

8,100

1,065

-2,000
8.278
6,100

5,000
1,175
6,529

Intragovernmental funds:

General supply fund

905

Total Federal funds Personal
Property Activities.
RECORDS ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

National A h i
Archives and Records
N t i l
d
Service, operating expenses 905
Trust Funds

Total trust
Activities.

funds

Records

AUTOMATED DATA AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Automated Data and
Telecommunications Service,
operating expenses
905
Intragovernmental funds:

Federal telecommunications fund.905
Automatic data processing fund ..905
Total Federal funds Automated
Data and
Telecommunications
Activities.

-27

-464

0
BA
0

-6,761
6.174
-678

-7,000
7.103
-429

B
A

30.707

29.5001
1,732/
35,724

0

464

....

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL
ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Property Management and Disposal
Service, Operating expenses
(special fund):
(defense-related activities) 059

24,252
See footnotes at end of table.




-31,232
6,605

-29,119

240

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL
ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Property Management and Disposal
Service, Operating expenses
(special fund):—Continued
(general property and records
management)
905

BA
0
BA
0

13,255
13,255
43,962
37,507

7,000
7,000
38,232
42,724

6,605

-7,000
-7,000
-38,232
-36,119

0

-8,053

-50

-2,060

-2,010

1,614

59
8

BA
0

43,962
31,068

38,232
43,263

BA

6,225

0

B
A

5,923
3,471

0
0

3,174
_9

4,8461
F
350J
5,670
3,0001
'269J
4,347
1
5

loan
059

0

-28

-27

-27

William Langer Jewel bearing plant
revolving fund
059

0

-100

43

-165

-208

Total Federal funds
Preparedness Activities.

BA
0

9,696
8,960

8,465
10,048

11,840
10,908

3,375
860

BA

1,480

905

0
BA

1,415
733

2,7501
'202J
2,888
6351

905

0
BA

482
1,264

0

506

Total, Property Management
and Disposal Service,
Operating expenses (special
fund).
Property Management and Disposal,
miscellaneous accounts (special
funds)
059
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund, Property
Management and Disposal Service
activities
059
Total Federal funds Property
Management and Disposal
activities.

-589

4,545

-38,232
-38,718

7,999

2,803

7,600
3,841

1,930
572

3,500

-847
-15

PREPAREDNESS ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of Preparedness, salaries and
expenses
059
Defense mobilization
Federal agencies

functions of
059

State and local preparedness

059

Public enterprise funds:

Defense Production Act,
guarantee activities

GENERAL ACTIVITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Office of Administrator, salaries and
expenses
905
Consumer information center

Indian tribal claims

See footnotes at end of table.




-2,952
176
886

-2,712
221

597
2,2001

902

305
-2,293

1,990

227

-1,763

>3OJ
'93J

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

241

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—Continued
GENERAL ACTIVITIES—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

and agency
905

BA
0

16,095

16,095

15,181

15,181

Federal management policy, salaries
and expenses
905

BA
0

1,820

1,820

1,820

1,820

Allowances and office
former Presidents

for
903

BA
0

408

39

60

"99
99

Expenses, presidential transition..903

BA

900

Refunds under Renegotiation Act .905

0

25

25

General management
operations

staff

206

39

Public enterprise funds:

Reconstruction Finance Corporation
liquidation fund
905

-14

-14

-13

Virgin Islands Corporation liquidation
fund
905

-1,000

-954

-918

36

-1,707
52

-300
-228

-200
-91

100
137

BA
0

4,785
-52

5,970

18,900

12,930

4,064

17,208

13,144

BA
0

994,251
944,723

664,239
994,808

292,467

-371,772

147,779

-847,029

-1,236,300

-964,800

271,500

Intragovernmental funds:

Administrative operations fund

905

0

Working capital fund

905

0

Total Federal funds
activities.

General

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
050

BA1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050

BA1
0 J

850 BA1

0I

900

BA1
0

-697
-372,489
-2,817

L -100,464

BA
0

Total General Services
Administration.

152
-727

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

468,256

BA
0

Total Federal funds....

467,529

517,784

517,936

-65,000
-637,061
-306,492

-66,000

-1,000

-738,333

-101,272

-883,021

-576,529

122

122

666
-636,939
-305,826

284

-382

-738,211

-101,272

-882,737

-576,911

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Research and development:
(Manned space flight).

251

BA
0

1,180,975
1,203,214

1,031,500
1,120,000

"1,124,800
1,190,500

93,300
70,500

(Space science and applications)
252

BA
0

904,869
877,529

706,000
751,200

"724,515
732,300

18,515
-18,900

See footnotes at end of table.




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

242

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Research and development:—Con.
(Space technology)
253

//

74,800
74,500

9,800
-7,600

143.000
149,000

"166,400
165,700

23,400
16,700

252,331
245,434

248,500
257,600

"255,500
259,900

7,000
2,300

BA
0

2.599.475
2,541,442

2,194,000
2,359,900

2,346,015
2,422,900

152,015
63,000

251

BA
0

29.325
5,138

56,300
33,000

"86,020
58,200

29,720
25,200

(Space science and applications)
252

BA
0

11.205
10,739

3.010
8,300

"18,770
7,900

15,760
-400

(Space technology)

BA
0

130

100

"660
300

660
200

254

BA
0

12.935
6,709

2.410
9,200

"9,745
9,000

7,335
-200

(Supporting space activities) .259

BA
0

25.260
21,945

39.380
24,400

"36,295
26,600

-3,085
2,200

Total, Construction of facilities.

BA
0

78,725
44,661

101.100
75,000

151,490
102,000

50,390
27,000

251

B
A

328,477

'319,224

-6,462

329,098

319,423

-6,647

(Space science and applications)

0
B
A

309.0861
n 6.600 J
326,070

"195,700

7,000

175,339

195,735

7,405

(Space technology)

253

0
R
A

179.2001
'9.500J
188,330
56.1001
F
3.000J
58,790

"58,000

-1,100

57,810

-980

(Aeronautical technology)

254

123.6001
*6,600j
130,250

"135,100

4,900

135,030

4,780

39,0141
'2.086J
40,860

"41,600

500

42,002

1,142

707,0001
'37,786/
744,300

749,624

4,838

BA
0

85.860
105,255

65.000
82,100

254

BA
0

175.440
110,010

(Supporting space activities) .259

BA
0

(Aeronautical technology)

Total, Research
development.

and

Construction of facilities-.
(Manned space flight)

(Aeronautical technology)

Research

and

253

program

(Manned space flight)

0

176.299

60,660
60,803
124.645

0
(Supporting space activities) .259

B
A

124,888

B
A

39.354

0
Total, Research and program
management.

38,932

BA

729.435

750,000

5,700

BA
0

3.407.635
3,315,163

3,039,886
3,179,200

3,247,129
3,274,900

207,243
95,700

BA
0

12.005
9,228

35,000
35,000

23,000
23,000

-12,000
-12,000

0
Total Federal funds National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration.
Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
259
See footnotes at end of table.




729,060

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

243

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION—Continued
SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
250

BA1

01

3,407,635
3,315,163

3,039,886
3,179,200

-1,386

-1,900

3,247,129
3,274,900
-2,400

207,243
95,700
-500

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
250

3,406,249
3,313,777

3,037,986
3,177,300

3,244,729
3,272,500

206,743
95,200

BA
0

Total Federal funds

12,005
9,228

35,000
35,000

23,000
23,000

-12,000
-12,000

BA1

-12,005

12,000

-35,000

-23,000

3,037,986
3,177,300

3,244,729
3,272,500

206,743
95,200

3,943,768

25,373

3,946,075

37,080

01

Total trust funds

0

Total National Aeronautics and
Space Administration.

BA
0

-2,777

.

3,406,249
3,311,000

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Compensation and pensions-.
(Income security):
Veterans service-connected
compensation
801

3,915,995
'2,400
3,906,595
'2,400

BA

2,520,212

2,456,658
'117,700

2,600,5091
"250,000/

276,151

2,564,785

2,450,760
'117,700

2,602,2021
"250,000]

283,742

BA

94,513

133,347
' 1 7,700

171,923
"-85,000

-64,124

0

94,513

133,347
'17,700

171,923
"-85,000

-64,124

BA

6,384,040
6,495,274

6,506,000
'137,800
6,490,702
'137,800

6,716,2001
"165,000/
6,720,200i
"165,000/

237,400

0

Total income security..

3,835,976

0
Other veterans income security
programs
801

3,769,315

0
Veterans non-service-connected
pension
801

BA

256,698

Total, Compensation
pensions.
Readjustment benefits

and
802

Veterans insurance and indemnities
801
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

48,960
48,960

BA
0

6,433,000
6,544,234

6,643,800
6,628,502

6,881,200
6,885,200

237,400
256,698

BA

2,707,400

2,526,000
'750,000

2,676,000

-400,000

2,751,481

(Veterans education, training and
rehabilitation)
802

2,509,000
'737,000

"200,000
2,665,000
'13,000
"200,000

-368,000

4,400
10,248

6,981

5,764

-1,217

BA
0

.

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

244

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal

Funds—Continued

General and special funds:—Continued

Medical care

804

BA

0

2,606,080

2,512,316

Medical and prosthetic research ..804

8A
0

Medical administration and
miscellaneous operating expenses
804

B
A

77,988
74,054
28,737

0
BA

24,885
319,513

0
0

314,496
71,121

BA
0
BA

125,993
14,014
55,000

0
BA
0
BA
0

10,674
6,000
2,580
2,000
1,766
38

General operating expenses

809

Construction of hospital and
domiciliary facilities
804
Construction, major projects

804

Construction, minor projects

804

Grants for construction
extended care facilities

of State
804

Grants to the Republic
Philippines
Construction,
Memorial

of the
804

Corregidor-Bataan
809

Assistance for health
training institutions

manpower
804

Payment of participation
insufficiencies

sales
803

0
BA
0

B
A

20,000

2,676,1641
"39,535
M 6,300
H27.077
2,808,720
-"38,350

3,175,0001

217,924

"-98,000
3,175,8151
'1,1851
*-98,000j
89,000
89,000
37,508

231,930

37,540
391,000

3,695
44,021

401,000
18,084

54,805
-15,107

230,850
104,230
45,150

162,507
57,530
2,932

5,772
2,000
2,091

59,686
10,000
5,500
2,100
2,100

17,577
10,000
-272
100
9

25,000
8,000

15,000

-25,000
7,000

4,400
-104,100
-110,500
-496

1,828
-65,300
-80,700
-200

-2,572
38,800
29,800
296

75,500
81,711
32,4771
F
1,463
33,845
324,956]
'22,023
346,195
33,191
68,343
46,700
41,903
F
315
42,109

13,500
7,289
3,568

499

Public enterprise funds:

Loan guaranty revolving fund

803

Direct loan revolving fund

803

Canteen service revolving fund ....809
Rental, maintenance, and repair of
quarters
809

BA
0
0
0
0

4,501
-148,783
-241,122
-1,672
1
7
-1,560

2,170

0
0

-32,652

-4
-31,344

5
-31,123

9
221

Veterans special life insurance fund
801

0

-37,313

-42,106

-42,711

-605

Vocational
fund

BA
0

12
5

50

100
50

Service-disabled veterans insurance
fund
801
Soldiers' and sailors' civil relief...801
Veterans reopened insurance fund
801

rehabilitation

See footnotes at end of table.




revolving
802

4,277

2,107

100

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

245

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
Public enterprise funds:—Continued

Servicemen's group life
fund

insurance
801

-1

0

11,363

1

BA
0

2,475
-1,403

10,576
-759

10,000
1,000

-576
1,759

Intragovernmental funds:

Supply fund:
Contract authority,
indefinite.

809
Permanent,

Consolidated working fund

809

0

3

Trust Funds

General post fund, National Homes:
Permanent, indefinite
804

BA
0

3,700
3,153

3,700
3,180

3,800
3,280

100
100

National service life insurance fund:
Permanent
801

BA
0

798,035
518,896

811,251
602,852

837,257
623,227

26,006
20,375

United States Government
insurance fund: Permanent

BA
0

39,066
66,253

38,509
75,197

38,345
73,951

-164
-1,246

BA
0

12,393,586
11,878,936

13,387,832
13,041,079

13,651,736
13,365,402

263,904
324,323

BA1
0 J

-241

-241

-241

BA1
0 J

-1,734

-1,322

-1,322

BA1

-20

-20

-20

BA
0

12,391,591
11,876,941

13,386,249
13,039,496

13,650,153
13,363,819

263,904
324,323

BA
0

840,801
588,302

853,460
681,229

879,402
700,458

25,942
19,229

-494,660

-477,176

life
801

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
800
850

0 I
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

BA1

0I

-467,809

BA
0

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

800

346,141
93,642

376,284
204,053

411,593
232,649

BA1

-2,429

-2,298

-2,197

9,367
35,309
28,596

101

0 J
Total Veterans Administration....

BA
0

12,735,303
11,968,152

13,760,235
13,241,251

14,059,549
13,594,271

299,314
353,020

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES
ACTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Operating expenses, international
programs (Peace Corps)
152
See footnotes at end of table.




B
A

80,573

73,998

75,9651
'U75J
77,974

//

82,256

5,016

83,309

5,335

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

246

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDEN1 AGENCIES—Continued
ACTION—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Trust

BA

domestic

94,026

0

Operating expenses,
programs

78,044

551

90,7541
'899J
101,324

102,344

10,691

107,950

6,626

Funds

BA
0

377
418

385
335

385
385

50

BA
0

174,599
152,042

168,893
179,298

184,600
191,259

15,707
11,961

BAl

-49

-50

-50

OJ
BA]
0 J

-2

_l

-1

BA
0

174,548
151,991

168,842
179,247

184,549
191,208

15,707
11,961

BA
0

Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
152

377
418

385
335

385
385

50

-245

-230

-230

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

550
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

BAl

0 \

Total trust funds

BA
0

132
173

155
105

155
155

50

Total Action

BA
0

174,680
152,164

168,997
179,352

184,704
191,363

15,707
12,011

BA
0

450
401

600
552

755
731

155

0
BA
0

-37
450
364

40
600
592

755
731

130

130

120

130

10

ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED
STATES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

179

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

908

Total Administrative Conference
of the United States.

-40
155
139

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON FEDERAL PAY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

903

BA
0

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

See footnotes at end of table.




809

BP

3,711

3,800)

5,465

1,312

3,415

Salaries and expenses

4,384

4,814

430

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

247

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
—Continued
Trust

Contributions:

Funds

Permanent,

BA
0

21
16

35
40

35
35

-5

BA
0

3,711
3,415

4,153
4,384

5,465
4,814

1,312
430

-4

-4

-4

BA
0

3,707
3,411

4,149
4,380

5,461
4,810

1,312
430

BA
0

indefinite
809

21
16

35
40

35
35

_5

BAl

-5

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
800

BAl

0I

0J

Total trust funds

BA
0

16
11

35
40

35
35

-5

Total American Battle
Monuments Commission.

BA
0

3,723
3,422

4,184
4,420

5,496
4,845

1,312
425

10,000

"9,500

1,435

8,686

7,7351
'330J
9,130

9,500

370

BA

39,670

45,1251

"49,840

-255

0

38,520

46i2651
^4t970J

49,825

-1,410

BA

957

1,000

"1,048

0

880

1,025

1,091

66

1,000
1,025

1,048
1,091

48
66

ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGEINCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Arms control
activities

and

disarmament
151

BA
0

BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Board for international broadcasting
153

CABINET COMMITTEE ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR
SPANISH-SPEAKING PEOPLE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

48

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

908

Total Cabinet Committee on
Opportunities for
Spanish-Speaking People.
See footnotes at end of table.




0
BA
0

50
957
930

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

248

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
508

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

850
Total Civil Aeronautics Board....
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
906
payable

14,7671

17,283

1,725

14,325
69,309
(11,491)
72,224

15,741
66,431

17,277
63,428

1,536
-3,003

67,238

66,298

-940

83,611
86,549

81,989
82,979

80,711
83,575

-1,278
596

-123

-129

-135

-6

BA

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500

Limitation
funds.

14,302

0
Payments to air carriers
501
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

under

BA1

0 J
BA1
0 J
BA
0

-9

-11

-8

3

83,479
86,417

81,849
82,839

80,568
83,432

-1,281
593

BA

65,916

66,5341
F
4,780J
71,463
(14,000)1

91,526

20,212

90,856
(18,698)

19,393
(3,681)

181,580

43,301

181,580

43,301

882,287

522,942

2,007,691
2,889,978

522,853

980

203

66,639
(12,244)

trust

Payment to civil service retirement
and disability fund
906
Permanent, indefinite

Federal Labor Relations
Salaries and expenses

Council:
906

BA

137,608

0

Government payment for annuitants,
employees health benefits
906

137,608

BA

738,549

BA
0

1,023,010
1,761,559

B
A

714

125,114
^13,165
125,114
'13,165
589,905
^292,429
1,484,702
2,074,6961
4
292,429J
7201

'57}

622
15,000
13,665

773
10,000
14,096

982
15,000
14,400

209
5,000
304

-1,419

-65

1,039

1,104

BA
0
0

7,604,041
4,523,296
19,262

9,150,691
5,949,708
-15,940

9,973.999
7,244,803
-26,742

823,308
1,295,095
-10,802

Employees life insurance fund (trust
revolving fund)
701

0

-151,057

-205,097

-229,206

-24,109

Retired employees health benefits fund
(trust revolving fund)
652

0

-1,767

4,037

3,490

-547

Intergovernmental personnel
assistance
Intragovernmental funds:

Revolving fund

906

906

Trust Funds
Civil service retirement and disability
fund: Permanent, indefinite
...701
Employees health benefits fund (trust
revolving fund)
652

See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

249

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION—Continued
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

3,179,064
3,178,835

-1,224

-615

-615

1,979,573
1,977,450

2,586,791
2,591,056

3,178,449
3,178,220

591,658
587,164

BA
0

Total Federal funds

2,587,406
2,591,671

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
900

7,604,041
4,389,734

9,150,691
5,732,708

9,973,999
6,992,345

823,308
1,259,637

-5,541

-11,164

-22,380

-11,216

7,598,500
4,384,193

9,139,527
5,721,544

9,951,619
6,969,965

812,092
1,248,421

BA1 -1,760,480

-2,367,036

-2,889,978

-522,942

9,359,282
5,945,564

10,240,090
7,258,207

880,808
1,312,643

1431

176

23

176 •

18

BA1
0 J

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
700

BA1

1,980,797
1,978,674

591,658
587,164

0I
Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BA
0
900

0I
Total Civil Service Commission..

BA
0

7,817,593
4,601,163

BA

135

0

144

158

BA

4,936

0

4,624

5,646)
>300j
5,908

COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

909

no}

COMMISSION ON CIVIL RI6HTS

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

908

6,905

959

6,740

832

"252
252

12
11

COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE OF PROOUCTS
AND SERVICES OF THE BLIND AND OTHER
SEVERELY HANDICAPPED

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609 BA
0

200
140

240
241

CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION

Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




653

BA
0

1,215
20

34,776
32,299

42,819
41,913

8,043
9,614

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

250

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDEN1' AGENCIES—Continued
CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

B
A
0

35,000
35,000

50,000
50,000

B
A

185,574

0

185,574

191,5331
^2,55OJ
191,5331
^2,550/

Loans to District of Columbia for
capital outlay ..
909

B
A
0

130,819
134 700

Advances to stadium sinking fund,
armory board:
909
Authority to spend public debt
receipts Permanent indefinite

B
A
0

60,000
60,000

10,000
10,000

"237,100

43,017

237,100

43,017

226,184
229 300

170,400
212 416

-55,784
-16,884

832
832

832
832

832
832

B
A
0

40,000
40 000

40,000
40 000

40,000
40 000

B
A
0

357,225
361,106

461,099
464,215

448,332
490,348

-12,767
26,133

BA)

-51,661

-52,943

-55,426

-2,483

305,564
309,445

408,156
411,272

392,906
434,922

-15,250
23,650

0

-2,589

-5,429

-2,900

2,529

B
A

31,758 .

12,093

28,310

42,6771
1,400/
41,100

56,170

0

Payment to the Corporation for
Public Broadcasting
605

52,760

11,660

B
A
0

31,758
28,310

44,077
41,100

56,170
52,760

12,093
11,660

-2

-1

_l

31,756
28,308

44,076
41,099

56,169
52,759

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal payment
Columbia

to

District

of
909

Repayable advances to the District
of Columbia general fundPermanent, indefinite
909
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
900

0J
B
A
0

Total District of Columbia

EMERGENCY LOAN GUARANTEE BOARD
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Emergency loan guarantee fund...506
EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600
Total Equal Employment
Opportunity Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




BA]

0I
B
A
0

12,093
11,660

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

25

1

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Revolving fund for administrative
expenses
351
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
350

0

-29

-1

-2

-1

-2
-122

-1
28

-2
-2

-1
-30

BA

34,154

39,8601
1,395/

46,847

5,592

33,888

39,653

45,000

5,347

BA
0

34,154
33,888

41,255
39,653

46,847
45,000

5,592
5,347

-19

-17

-17

-55,759

-20,000

-30,000

-10,000

-21,624
-21,890

21,238
19,636

16,830
14,983

-4,408
-4,653

-538,177

-558,016

-564,900

-6,884

-165

BA
0

-2

29

0

Total Farm Credit
Administration.

BA1
0 J

-120

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

508

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
900

BA1
0 J
BA1

0 }
Total Federal Communications
Commission.

BA
0

FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
Trust Funds
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
0
fund (trust revolving fund)
506
FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Interest adjustment payments

556

0

2,988

2,700

2,535

Board
556

0

2,702

7,193

7,721

Federal Savings and Loan Insurance
Corporation fund
556

0

-255,119

-334,451

-344,383

-9,932

Total Federal Home Loan Bank
Board.

0

-249,429

-324,558

-334,127

-9,569

7,382

956
733

Public enterprise funds:

Federal Home Loan
revolving fund

Bank

528

FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

508

BA

5,679

6,0001

*426j
0

See footnotes at end of table.




5,385

6,589

7,322

BA

5,679

6,426

7,382

956

0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

5,385

6,589

7,322

733

252

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION-Continued
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BAl
500
public
oI

28

15

-15

BA
0

5,651
5,357

6,411
6,574

7,367
7,307

956
733

BA

10,814

10,9581
^594 \
>770J
11,560
^495

15,970

3,648

15,6551
^99/

3,699

Total Federal Maritime
Commission.
FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION
SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

10,641

FEDERAL METAL AND NONMETALLIC MINE
SAFETY BOARD OF REVIEW
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

BA
0

160
37

401 BA

24,077
22,392

609

60
83

63
60

3
-23

27,0001

32,393

3,697

1,660j
29,964

32,842

2,878

FEDERAL POWER COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Federal Power commission

81
81

81
81

81
81

24,158
22,473

28,777
30,045

32,474
32,923

-13

-16

-16

BA
0

24,145
22,460

28,761
30,029

32,458
32,907

3,697
2,878

BA

30,205

5,764

26,614

30,4441
1,896/
32,130

38,104

0

Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

BA
0

Payments to States under Federal
Power Act (special fund):
Permanent, indefinite
401
Summary

37,720

5,590

BA
0

30,205
26,614

32,340
32,130

38,104
37,720

5,764
5,590

BAl
0 J

.

3,697
2,878

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




508

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

253

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
iictual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION—Continued
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the BA1
public
500
0 J

-15

-15

30,190
26,599

32,325
32,115

38,089
37,705

5,764
5,590

9051

1,250

303

944

1,215

271

5 200

7,229

2 029

16,943

947

768

6,144

1,250
8,444

2,300

6,224

7,100)

9,719

-9,905

4,440

Total Federal Trade Commission

-15

'149J
7,055
^725

9,4811
^4,900/

5,103
2,291

7,024
4,566

5,119
9,579

7

1

BA
0

11,327
6,731

26,648
12,346

14,838
23,960

-11,810
11,614

BA1
0 J

-5,103

-5,024

-5,895

-871

6,224
1,628

21,624
7,322

8,943
18,065

-12,681
10,743

BA

0
FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

151

BA

Payment of Vietnam prisoner of war
claims
151

BA
0

Payment of Korean claims

0

0

151

Total Foreign Claims Settlement
Commission.

BA
0

743
743
16,200

...

10
15

....

303

HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL COMMISSIONS
American Revolution Bicentennial
Administration
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

910

Commemorative activities (special
fund): Permanent, indefinite....910
Donations

910

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
900
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total American Revolution
Bicentennial Administration.

BA

BA
0
0

BA
0
0
BA
0

6,601
-1,905
5,013
-1

7

1

6,224
1,635

21,624
7,323

8,943
18,065

-12,681
10,742

-1

30

20

-10

Other Historical and Memorial Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Commission
910
See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 17




BA
0

38
11

..

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

254

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
HISTORICAL AND MEMORIAL COMMISSIONS
—Continued
Other Historical and Memorial Commissions
—Continued
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued
Miscellaneous appropriations
910

0

120

Trust Funds
Miscellaneous trust funds: Permanent,
indefinite
910

BA
0

52
197

BA
0

38
131

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total Other Historical and
Memorial Commissions.

BA
0

Total Federal funds Historical
and Memorial Commissions.

BA
0

Total trust funds Historical and
Memorial Commissions.

BA
0

52
197
90
328
6,262
1,759
52
204

Total Historical and Memorial
Commissions.

BA
0

6,314
1,963

INDIAN CLAIMS COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
902

BA

144

-144

-68

68 ..
..

14
7

20

68 ..
..
242
21,624
7,496

-154

-68
20
8,943
18,085

-111
-12,681
10,589

21,624

8,943

-12,681

7,565

18,085

10,520

1,075

1,086

"1,333

169

1,060

1,161

1,333

172

-69

69 ..
..

INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

Contributions:

910

Trust Funds
Permanent, indefinite
910

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




BA

806

1,0361
>70J

1,101

-5

0
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

910

761

1,055

1,194

139

0

122

75

-75

BA
0

69
92

10
0
98

100
10
0

2

BA
0

806
883

1,106
1,130

1,101
1,194

-5
64

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

255

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973

<
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES—Continued
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations— Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)..
. BA
0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the BA1
public
900
0 J

69
92

100
98

100
100

2

19 ....

Total trust funds

BA
0

50
73

100
98

100
100

2

Total Advisory Commission on
Intergovernmental Relations.

BA
0

856
956

1,206
1,228

1,201
1,294

-5
66

507

BA
0

1,217
1,216

1,492
1,492

1,740
1,740

248
248

507

0

Appalachian Regional Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

204

-533

533 .

Funds

Miscellaneous trust fund
Permanent, indefinite

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500

2,582
2,473

2,670
2,722

3,150
3,150

480
428

1,217
1,420

1,492
2,025

1,740
1,740

248
-285

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

BA
0

accounts:
507

2,582
2,473

2,670
2,722

3,150
3,150

480
428

BA1
BA
0

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

500

Total Appalachian
Commission.

Regional

-1,181

-1,215

-1,450

-235

1,401
1,292

1,455
1,507

1,700
1,700

245
193

-1,401

-1,455

-1,700

-245

0 \

BA1

o1
BA

1,217
1,311

1,492
2,077

1,740
1,740

248
-337

BA
0

69
67

69
71

78
78

9
7

BA
0

216
216

242
220

238
238

-4
18

BA
0

285
283

311
291

316
316

5
25

0

Delaware River Basin Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

401

Contribution
Total Delaware
Commission.

401
Basin




River

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

256

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES-Continued
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Contribution

909

BA
0

34
34

34
34

34
34

71
75
150
150
221
225

78
78
150
150
228
228

20,113
'13,700
131,181
171,123
'11,800

37,150]

-37,484

90.360J
182,5101
'1,900]

1,487

Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

401

BA
0

Contribution

401

BA
0
BA
0

68
71
150
150
218
221

BA

4,885

BA
0

174,321
75,825

BA
0

181,766
78,666

168,158
186,628

130,929
187,922

-37,229
1,294

BA
0

2,651
2,565

2,770
2,820

3,250
3,250

480
430

-1,181

-1,215

-1,450

-235

Total Susquehanna River Basin
Commission.

7
3

Washington Metropolitan Area Transit
Authority
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Federal contribution

909

Permanent, indefinite..

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500

900

BA1

-19

500

Total Intergovernmental
Agencies.

0 J
BA
0
BA1

1,451
1,365
-1,401

1,555
1,605
-1,455

1,800
1,800
-1,700

245
195
-245

BA
0

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

BA1

0I

181,816
78,630

168,258
186,778

131,029
188,022

-37,229
1,244

BA

33,720

43,300

800

0}

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

508

32,592
See footnotes at end of table.




34,7501
'5,150 \
'2.600J
37,572
'890

43,2221
'3.250J

8,010

257

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Payment of
P
f
Indefinite

loan
l

BA
0

12,323
12,323

BA
0

guaranties:
ti
506

46,043
44,915

BAl

-632

....

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total Interstate
Commission.

Commerce

42,500
38,462

43.300
46,472

800
8,010

42,500
38,462

43.300
46,472

800
8,010

*71,500
*33,000

71.500
33,000

412
320

1.000
920

588
600

289

..

0 \
BA
0

45,411
44,283

LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the
Corporation

Legal

Services
551

BA
0

MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

405

BA
0

NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses

Land acquisition, National Capital
park, parkway, and playground
system
909
Trust

BA

1,425

1,4401

1,840

0

909

1,209

1,650

1,842

192

48 .

0

-48

26 ....

-26

Funds

Advances from District of Columbia .909
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

BA
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0

Total National Capital Planning
Commission.

BA
0

93

1,425
1,209

93

1,551
1,698

1,840
1,842

289
144

-26

26 ....

1,425
1,302

1,551
1,724

1.840
1,842

289
118

406
277

406
393

502
430

96
37

NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND
INFORMATION SCIENCE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




605

BA
0

THE BUDGET FOR

258

FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL COUNCIL ON INDIAN OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

507

BA

0

290

2751

218

'14}
336

"300

11

300

-36

NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Operating fund

506

Credit union share insurance fund
506

0

23

-130

-377

-247

Union

-10,875

-10,888

-14,204

-3,316

0

-10,852

-11,018

-14,581

-3,563

BA
BA

74,714
7,000

105,875
13,000

155,2001
20.000J

56,325

0

Total National Credit
Administration.

0

59,834

79,545

144,000

64,455

NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE
HUMANITIES
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
Current, indefinite

605

Intragovemmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Gifts and donations:
indefinite

605

Permanent,
605

0

114

31

-31

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
850
Total Federal funds

6,988
6,988

15,424
15,424

20,000
20,000

4,576
4,576

BA
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

81,714
59,948

118,875
79,576

175,200
144,000

56,325
64,424

BA1
0 J

-2

BA

175,200

56,325

79,576

144,000

64,424

BA

Total National Foundation on
the Arts and the Humanities.

118,875

59,946
6,988

15,424

20,000

4,576

0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

81,712

0

6,988

15,424

20,000

4,576

BA
0

88,700
66,934

134,299
95,000

195,200
164,000

60,901
69,000

BA

50,394

61,400

5,384

6,111

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

55,0091

aoo7j
0

48,414

56,017

62,128

BA

50,394

56,016

61.400

5,384

0

48,414

56,017

62,128

6,111

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

259

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD—Con.
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BA]
public
600
0 J

10

-138

BA
0

50,255
48,275

55.878

61,272

5,394

55.879

62,000

6,121

B
A

2,888

276

2,814

2,8671
F
63J
2,917

3,206

0

3,200

283

B
A
0

Total National Labor Relations
Board.

-139

2,888
2,814

2,930
2,917

3,206
3,200

276
283

-18

-18

2,912
2,899

3,188
3,182

276
283

"667,100

90,840

31,001
2,000
1,000

-128

NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600

BA1

o}
B
A
0

2,888
2,814

606

B
A

640,585

574,4001
'1,860/

574,758

593,745

624,746

Scientific activities (special foreign
currency program)
606

BA
0

7,000
3,519

3,000
3,500

"5,000
4,500

606

0

6,638

1,000

1,000

606

BA
0

1
-1

1
5

4

-1

BA
0

647,585

579,260

598,245

672,100
630,246

92,840

584,915

BA1
0 }

-174

-242

-242

BA1

-6

-8

-8

647,405
584,735

579,010

671,850

92,840

597,995

629,996

32,001

Total National Mediation Board.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

Funds

Donations-. Permanent, indefinite
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600
850
Total Federal funds..
See footnotes at end of table.




0I
BA
0

1

32,001

260

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION—Continued
Summary—Continued
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
BA
0

1
-1

1
5

4

-1

BA
0

647,406
584,734

579,011
598,000

671,851
630,000

92,840
32,000

3,850
3,934

4,741
4,635

5,720
5,620

979

-10

-20

-10

4,731
4,625

5,700
5,600

969

500
725

"831

331

906

181

1,478,000
^236,018
"284,667
1,478,000s

1,552,607

-446,078

1,552,607

-446,078

1,998,685
1,998,685

1,552,607
1,552,607

-446,078
-446,078

22,478
22,478

3,516
3,516

-18,962
-18,962

Total National
Foundation.

Science

1

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW
COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

609

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600
Total Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission.

BA
0
BA1..
0
BA
0

I

3,850

3,934

985

975

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION
Federal
Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

..909

BA
0

350

BA

1,410,000

0

1,410,000

POSTAL SERVICE
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment to the Postal Service fund
505

^236,018
"284,667
Public enterprise funds:

Postal Service fund

505

0
BA
0

Total Postal Service

156,719

.

1,410,000
1,566,719

PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL ON YOUTH
OPPORTUNITY
Federal Funds
Intragovernmental funds:

Consolidated working fund

609

0

6

.

RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Payment for military service credits
701
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
0

21,645
21,645

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

261

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD—Continued
Trust

Funds

Railroad retirement account
Permanent, indefinite

701 BA
BA
0

2,611,528
2,684,232

"238,000
2,781,416
2,805,576
B
198,000

407,888

2,265,658
2,444,955

BA
0

21,645
21,645

22,478
22,478

3,516
3,516

-18,962
-18,962

319,344

Summary
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the BA1
public
700 0 J

-1

BA
0

21,644
21,644

22,478
22,478

3,516
3,516

-18,962
-18,962

BA
0

Total Federal funds

2,265,658
2,444,955

2,611,528
2,684,232

3,019,416
3,003,576

407,888
319,344

Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
702 BA1

-5,572

-5,000

-5,000

0I
3,850

5,000

1,150

2,259,857
2,439,154
-21,645

2,610,378
2,683,082
-22,478

3,019,416
3,003,576
-3,516

409,038
320,494
18,962

BA
0

2,259,856
2,439,153

2,610,378
2,683,082

3,019,416
3,003,576

409,038
320,494

BA

4,887

4,6901
H I 5]

"5,195

390

0

4,721

4,790

5,190

400

BA
0

4,887
4,721

4,805
4,790

5,195
5,190

390
400

-2

-1

-1

4,885
4,719

4,804
4,789

5,194
5,189

390
400

B
A

30,138

5,702

29,865

34,0021
*2,427J
36,053

42,131

0

41,705

5,652

850 BA1
0
J_
BA
0

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions

701

BA j

-229

0f
Total Railroad
Board.

Retirement

RENEGOTIATION BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

904

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public.
900

BA1
0 J

BA
0

Total Renegotiation Board

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
See footnotes at end of table.




508

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

262

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
1973
actual

Account and functional code

1974
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SECURITIES AND EXCHAN6E COMMISSION
—Continued
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
BA

42,131
41,705
-11 .
.

5,702
5,652

-15

36,429
36,053
-11

BA
0

30,123
29,850

36,418
36,042

42,120
41,694

5,702
5,652

BA

83,344

47,163

-6,597

78,988

47,500
^2,010
F
3,447
'803
65,499:

46,909

-20,600

83,344
78,988

53,760
67,509

47,163
46,909

-6,597
-20,600

0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total Securities and Exchange
Commission.

BAl

30,138
29,865

0 I

SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

059

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

BA
0

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050

BAl

-14

-9

-9

0 J
BA
0

83,330
78,974

53,751
67,500

47,154
46,900

-6,597
-20,600

506

BA

22,560

27,100

4,100

0
BA

19,392
349

25,900

sales
506

22,1501
F
850J
26,700
973

-800
-973

Business loan and investment fund

BA

395,621

225,000

328,0001

103,000

BA
0

148,563
1,777
572,000
2,550

205,885
91,0001
1,826]
235,000
4,000

57,322
91,049

0

1,063
153,438
1,855,000
2,248
1,145,622
-1,771

-337,000
1,450

BA
0

2,276,841
1,316,681

250,750
749,813

447,926
470,785

197,176
-279,028

Total Selective Service System...

SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses

Payment of participation
insufficiencies
Public enterprise funds:

506
Appropriation,
indefinite.

Permanent,

Disaster loan fund
Permanent, indefinite

506

Lease and surety bond guarantees
revolving fund
506
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
See footnotes at end of table.




BA
BA
0

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

263

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—Con.
Summary—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
BAI
public
500
0 f

-11
447,926
470,785

197,176
-279,028

"71,359

11,268

6,060

4,500
3,489

68,194
4,500
3,600

4,860

11,3251

6,465

9,688

(17,000)
34,191

(10,000)
20,206

67

100

Total Small Business
Administration.

BA
0

2,276,830
1,316,670

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Salaries and expenses
605

B
A

53,033

0

250,750
749,813

56,8881
F

Museum programs and related
research (special foreign currency
program)
605

BA
0

50,347
3,500
2,725

Construction, restoration, repair, and
improvements
605
Contract authority
Liquidation of contract authority....

BA

18,689

BA

2,562J
62,134

27,000

0
Miscellaneous appropriations

605

0

iii

J

(-7,000)
-13,985
-100

The John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts
605

BA
0

1,500

1,482

21

Salaries and expenses,
Gallery of Art

National
605

BA

5,420

5,8321
*49f
'321J

6,673

471

0

5,515

6,144

6,725

581

Salaries and expenses, Woodrow
Wilson International Center of
scholars
605

BA
0

800

800

1,010

210

686

805

1,010

205

BA
0

47
45

40
40

40
40

BA
0

109,942
70,510

76,453
106,884

94,867
99,735

BA
0

-11

11

-11

BA
0

109,931
70,499

76,442
106,873

94,856
99,724

BA
0

47
45

40
40

40
40

BA
0

109,978
70,544

76,482
106,913

94,896
99,764

Trust Funds
Smithsonian Institution trust
Permanent, indefinite

funds:
605

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
600
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Total Smithsonian Institution

See footnotes at end of table.




-21

...

18,414
-7,149
.
18,414
-7,149

...
18,414
-7,149

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES CONTROL BOARD
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Salaries and expenses
S l i
d

BA
0

350
338

BA

6,000

7,1001

9,000

1,557

0

5,579

7,519

9,003

1,484

501

0

115

Salaries and expenses (Airport and
airway trust fund)
501

0

1,075

16

-16

0

1,190

16

-16

908

-20

20

TARIFF COMMISSION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

151

Salaries and expenses

TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS
Aviation Advisory Commission
Federal Funds
Intragovemmental funds:

Consolidated working fund
Trust

Funds

Total Aviation
Commission.

Advisory

Joint Federal State Land Use Planning
Commission for Alaska
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Cooperative
indefinite

507

Trust Funds
funds:
Permanent,
507

B
A
0

709
536

613
613

694
744

B
A
0

400
400

500
500

500
500

B
A
BA
0

Salaries and expenses

709
536

613
613

694
744

BA
0

400
400

500
500

500
500

-400

-500

-500

B
A
0

709
536

613
613

694
744

BA
0

550
524

205
407

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
500
Total Joint Federal-State Land
Use Planning Commission
for Alaska.

BA1
0 J

81
131

81
131

81
131

Other Temporary Study Commissions
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Commission on American
Shipbuilding: Salaries and
expenses
502
See footnotes at end of table.




-205
-407

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

265

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TEMPORARY STUDY COMMISSIONS—Con.
Other Temporary Study Commissions—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

Commission on Executive,
Legislative, and Judicial Salaries:
Salaries and expenses
906

BA
0

Commission on Government
Procurement: Salaries and
expenses
905

0

Commission on Highway
Beautification: Salaries
expenses

BA
0

and
503

100
31

7

-7

1,449

70

-70

250
102

255

-255

69

-69

Commission on Obscenity and
Pornography: Salaries and
expenses
903

0

16

Commission on Population Growth
and the American Future: Salaries
and expenses
910

0

63

Commission on Railroad Retirement:
Salaries and expenses
701

BA
0

152
223

9

Commission on the Organization of
the Government for the Conduct
of Foreign Policy: Salaries and
expenses
151

BA
0

200
13

1,050
938

1,600
1,590

550
652

Commission on the Organization of
the Government of the District of
Columbia: Salaries and expenses
909

0

Commission on the Review of the
National Policy toward Gambling:
Salaries and expenses
908

BA
0

250
242

1,281
1,090

1,031
848

Defense Manpower Commission-.
Salaries and expenses
059

BA
0

50

Joint Commission on the Coinage:
Salaries and expenses
904

0

400 .
350
1

-400
-300
-1

National Commission for the Review
of Federal and State Laws
Relating to Wiretapping and
Electronic Surveillance: Salaries
and expenses
908

BA
0

332
312

500
470

168
158

National Commission on Consumer
Finance: Salaries and expenses

BA
0

365
428

87

-87

National Commission on Fire
Prevention and Control: Salaries
and expenses
506

BA
0

450
393

60

-60

National Commission on Marihuana
and Drug Abuse: Salaries and
expenses
653

BA
0

1,140
1,497

198

-198

National Commission on Materials
Policy: Salaries and Expenses..506

BA
0

1,259
1,077

371

-371

-9

57

609




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

266

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
TEMPORARY STUOY COMMISSIONS—Con.
Other Temporary Study Commissions—Con.
Federal Funds—Continued
General and special funds:—Continued

National Commission on Productivity:
Salaries and expenses
903

BA
0

1,207

National Commission on Reform of
Federal Criminal Laws: Salaries
and expenses
908

0

BA
0

1,500
441

National Commission on Water
Quality: Salaries and expenses
404

BA
0

200

National Tourism Resources Review
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
506

BA
0

400
432

National Water Commission: Salaries
and expenses
401

BA
0

760
836

Public Land Law Review
Commission: Salaries and
expenses
402

0

2,500

-885

1,9101
^900J

-843

763

296

^67

10,000
5,356

4,800
8,500

-5,200
3,144

18

National Commission on the
Financing of Postsecondary
Education: Salaries and expenses
605

8851
^2,500/
2,053
^1,600

74

-74

137
1

-137
-1

Intragovernmental funds:

Miscellaneous consolidated working
funds
903

0

11
8

Summary
Total Other Temporary Study
Commissions.

BA
0

7,326
8,988

15,622
13,360

10,681
14,806

-4,941
1,446

Total Federal funds Temporary
Study Commissions.

BA
0
0

16,235
13,973
1
6

11,375
15,550

Total trust funds Temporary
Study Commissions.

8,035
9,639
1,075

-4,860
1,577
1
6

BA
0

8,035
10,714

16,235
13,989

11,375
15,550

-4,860
1,561

BA
0

64,550
367,490

45,676
420,000

74,600
458,200

367,490

420,000

458,200

28,924
38,200
38,200

-26

-24

-24

64,524
367,464

45,652
419,976

74,576
458,176

Total Temporary
Commissions.

Study

TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
Federal Funds
Public enterprise funds:

Payment to Tennessee
Authority fund

Valley
401

0
Deductions for offsetting receipts-.
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400
Total Tennessee Valley Authority

See footnotes at end of table.




BA^
0
BA
0

28,924
38,200

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

267

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

1975
estimated

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

153

BA

190,741

195,9881

"222,091

19,041

Salaries and expenses (special
foreign currency program)
153

0
BA
0

Special international exhibitions...153

B
A

186,952
12,500
11,577
5,061

200,858
6,000
9,549
4,336]
^700
"5,600

220,484
"9,377
9,685
"6,770

19,626
3,377
136
-4,004

Salaries and expenses

Special international exhibitions
(special foreign currency program)
153

BA
0

357
255

H35
5,435
^567
B
296
78
219

Acquisition and construction of radio
facilities
153

BA

1,000

1,000

0

2,388

2,437

BA
0

33
17

33
72

33
33

BA

220,902
219,361
-381

256,478
246,891
-381

35,576
27,530

BAl

209.659
206,507
-381

BA
0

209,278
206,126

220,521
218,980

256,097
246,510

35,576
27,530

BA
0

33
17

33
72

33
33

-39

BAl
0J

30

30

0

Trust

5,335

6,585]
A
U3 \
3,283J

3,703

B

62
"4,4001
\ 3,840 J
2,4941
*4,165J

B

-78
-157
17,240
4,222

Funds

United States Information Agency trust
funds: Permanent, indefinite
153
Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

0
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150
Total Federal funds
Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150
Total trust funds
Total United States Information
Agency.

0I

BA
0
BA
0

3
-13
209,281
206,113

3
42
220,524
219,022

-39

-30 .
3
3
256,100
246,513

-39
35.576
27,491

UNITED STATES RAILWAY ASSOCIATION
Federal Funds
General and special funds:

Administrative expenses

503

BA
0

See footnotes at end of table.




6,000)
^20,000/
6,000
H000

-26,000
sobbj
^16,000

6,000

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

268

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL
Federal Funds
General and special funds:
Water resources planning
401
Intragovernmental funds:
Consolidated working fund

401

Trust Funds
River Basin Commissions: Permanent,
indefinite
401

-17

7,417
8,400

6,865
8,960

20 ....

-552

560
-20

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
400

B
A
0

2,732
2,296

3,235
3,695

2,873
3,368

-362
-327

7,336
6,359

7,417
8,420

6,865
8,960

-552

B
A
0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above)

2,732
2,296

3,235
3,695

2,873
3,368

-362
-327

BA1

-923

-984

-1,143

-15S

1,809
1,373

2,251
2,711

1,730
2,225

400

-1,809

-2,251

-1,730

540

oJ
BA
0

Total trust funds

BA1

01

-521
-486

521

SUMMARY
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
050

150
350

BA
0

7,336
5,923

7,417
8,880

6,865
9,455

-552
575

BA
0

Total Water Resources Council..




0

7,336
6,376

B
A
0

Summary
Federal funds:
(As shown in detail above)

Interfund transactions

B
A
0

8,108,255
7,053,619

8,003,579
8,084,914
-9

612,347
135,698

-14

7,391,232
7,949,216
-9

-430

-431

-431

-2

-1

-2

-39

-40

-40

-843

-187

-193

-2

-1

-1

-326

-420

-420

BA1

0I
BA}
0I
BA1
0I
BA1

400

0j

500

0J

550

0J

600

0}

700

0I

800

0}

BA1
BA1
BA1
BA1

BA1
850

-1
-4

-4

-4

-17

-19

-16

BA1

0I

-1

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

269

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1973
actual

1974
estimated

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

OTHER INDEPENDENT AGENCIES—Continued
SUMMARY—Continued
Federal funds:—Continued

900

-78,583

-91,937

-13,354

BA

7,910,526
7,991,861

598,989

7,869,521

BA

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrafund transactions
701

7,311,537

6,938,192
9,883,001

11,784,642

13,020,532

1,235,890

0

Trust funds:
(As shown in detail above).

7,992,828

0

Total Federal funds..

6,310,628

7,881,966

9,458,636

1,576,670

-11,113

-16,164

-27,380

-11,216

-229

3,850

5,000

-275

-260

-260

-923

-984

-1,143

-159

-1,581

-1,715

-1,950

-235

11,769,369

12,994,799

1,225,430

7,866,693

9,432,903

1,566,210

BA1

0 }
850
Proprietary receipts from the
public
150

BA1

0I
BA1

0 J
BA1

400

0I

500

0 J

800

0 I

..400
500
701
906

Total Other
Agencies.

BA1
BA1
BA1

BA
0

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions..

1,150

0 J

900

122,340

Independent

-5
-19
9,868,856
6,296,483

BA
-1,809
0
BA
-1,401
0
-21,645
BA
0
BA
-1,760,480
0 ,_
BA ~ 16,076,349

0

11,449,340

-2,251

-1,730

-1,455

-1,700

-245

-22,478

-3,516

18,962

-2,367,036

-2,889,978

-522,942

16,687,686
13,342,994

18,008,401

1,320,715

14,527,840

1,184,846

809,000
461,000
625,000
600,000
350,000
200,000
1,784,000
1,261,000

521

ALLOWANCES
Allowances for:
Acceleration of energy research and
development

0

400,000
300,000

809,000
461,000
625,000
600,000
750,000
500,000

BA
0

400,000
300,000

2,184,000
1,561,000

BA
0

Civilian agency pay raises

BA
0

Contingencies

BA

Total allowances..

540-000 O - 74 - 18




THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

270

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1974
estimated

1973
actual

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

BUDGET TOTALS
Federal funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
(As shown in detail above):
Intrafund transactions

BA
0

217,469,524
194,877,584

231,313,635
214,555,131

238,721,965
230,698,807

16,143,676

7,408,330

BA1 -1,171,749

-1,202,664

-1,218,011

-15,347
-23,075

0 J
Receipts from off-budget
Federal agencies.

BA1
0 J

-123,406

-174,325

-197,400

Proprietary receipts .from the
public.

BA1 -7,179,128
0 J

-9,463,507

-8,647,861

815,646

BA1 -8,474,283

-10,840,496

-10,063,272

777,224

Total deductions

0 J
BA

208,995,241

220,473,139

228,658,693

8,185,554

0

186,403,301

203,714,635

220,635,535

16,920,900

BA

92,085,061

116,797,467

122,962,245

6,164,778

0

84,786,065

97,362,771

113,289,141

15,926,370

-815,943

-993,364

-1,109,430

-116,066

BA1 -2,522,741
0 J

-3,433,374

-4,058,329

-624,955

-861,455

-736,820

-5,288,193

-5,904,579

-616,386

88,746,377
81,447,381

111,509,274
92,074,578

117,057,666
107,384,562

5,548,392

Interfund transactions (-):
Employer share, employee
retirement
951

BA1 -2,926,604
0 J

-2,681,589

-2,839,967

Interest received by trust funds
952

BA1 -5,436,070
0 J

-6,419,517

-7,139,905

Applied by agency above

BA1 -12,962,019

-12,028,195

-13,595,331

-21,129,301

-23,575,203

Federal fund totals
Trust funds:

(As shown in detail above)
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
(As shown in detail above):
Intrafund transactions

BA1

0I
Proprietary receipts from the
public.
(Undistributed by agency and
function):
Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies:
Employer share, employee
retirement
951
Total deductions

BA
0
BA\ -3,338,684

0I
Trust fund totals

BA
0

15,309,984
-158,378
-720,388

0 J
Total interfund transactions

-1,567,136

BA1 -21,324,693

o}
Budget totalsA




124,635

BA

276,416,925

310,853,112

322,141,156

0

246,525,985

274,659,912

304,444,894

-2,445,902
11,288,044

29,784,982

THE FEDERAL PROGRAM BY AGENCY AND ACCOUNT

271

BUDGET ACCOUNTS LISTING (in thousands of dollars)—Continued
Account and functional code

1975
estimated

Increase or
decrease (—)

BA

1974
estimated

1973
actual

Outlays

BUDGET TOTALS—Continued
ABudgct totals are distributed as follows:

BA

Outlays

Federal funds:
Enacted (1974) / recommended herein (1975)
1974 changes now requested:
Supplemental requests:

228,876,482

222,960,901

217,047,396

206,045,649

(A) Program supplemental, existing legislation

5 132 408

3 924 525

627,622

(D) Program supplemental, additional authorizing
legislation required.

1,197,751

228,754

505,061

271435

254 326

18 928

(F) Civilian pay raises

1,444,603

1,373,882

109,442

(°) Military pay raises

1,909,536

1.864,048

48,143

462,516

93,781

368,735

3,278,387

305,763

5,269,383

71,003

67,003

150,100

154.100

498,600

397,400

4,426,000

3,743,700

-10,840,496

-10,840,496

-10,063,272

-10.063,272

220,473,139

203,714,635

228,658,693

220,635,535

116,745,365

97,361,207

121,264,745

112,150,207

(*) Wage-board pay raises

Amendments to pending requests
Proposed for later transmittal:
(*) Under proposed legislation
( r ) Under existing legislation
Allowances
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total Federal funds

2,162,175

Trust funds:
Enacted (1974) / recommended herein (1975)
1974 supplemental now requested:
(A) Program supplemental, existing legislation

500

1,000

500

(*•') Wage-board pay raises

16
3

18
2

8

C) Civilian pay raises

966

936

30

Proposed for later transmittal:
1 697 500

1 138 396

-5,288,193

-5,288,193

-5,904,579

-5,904,579

111,509,274

92,074,578

117,057,666

107,384,562

-21,129,301

-21,129,301

-23,575,203

-23,575,203

310,853,112

(") Under proposed legislation
Deductions for offsetting receipts

274,659,912

322,141,156

304,444,894

50 000

Total trust funds
Interfund transactions (-)
Budget totals
^Supplemental now requested under existing legislation.
"Proposed for later transmittal under proposed legislation.
'Proposed for later transmittal under existing legislation.
:ion required.
"Supplemental now requested. Additional authorizing legislati
'Supplemental now requested, wage-board pay raises
'Supplemental now requested, civilian pay raises.
''Supplemental now requested, military pay raises.
"Additional authorizing legislation required.
'Amendment to 1974 budget now proposed.







PART 6

THE BUDGET SYSTEM
AND CONCEPTS




273

THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS
The budget system of the U.S. Government is based upon a structure for financial administration that has as objectives the efficient
management of programs in relation to the requirements of the
Nation, and effective.financial control.
THE BUDGET PROCESS
The budget process has four identifiable phases: (1) Executive
formulation and transmittal; (2) congressional authorization and
appropriation; (3) budget execution and control; and (4) review and
audit. Each of these phases interrelates and overlaps with the others.
Executive formulation and transmittal.—The President's transmittal of his budget proposals to the Congress early in each calendar
year climaxes many months of planning and analysis throughout the
executive branch. The budget sets forth the President's financial
plan of operation and thus indicates national budget priorities for the
coming year. Formulation of the 1975 budget, which covers the fiscal
year beginning July 1, 1974, and ending June 30, 1975, began in the
spring of 1973.
During the period when a budget is being formulated in the executive branch, there is a continuous exchange of information, proposals,
evaluations, and policy determinations among the President, the Office
of Management and Budget, and the various Government agencies.
In the spring, agency programs are evaluated, policy issues are
identified, and budgetary projections are made, giving attention both
to important modifications and innovations in programs and to alternative long-range program plans. Preliminary plans are then presented
to the President for his consideration. At about the same time, the
President receives projections of the economic outlook and revenue
estimates prepared jointly by the Treasury Department, the Council
of Economic Advisers, and the Office of Management and Budget.
Following a review of both sets of projections, the President establishes general budget and fiscal policy guidelines for the fiscal year
that will begin about 12 months later. Tentative policy determinations
and planning ceilings are then given to the agencies as guidelines for
the preparation of their budgets.
Proposed agency budgets are reviewed in detail by the Office of
Management and Budget throughout the fall and early winter, and
are presented to the President for decision. Overall fiscal policy
274




THE, BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

275

issues—relating to total budget receipts and outlays—are again
examined. The actual budget data from the most recently completed
fiscal year are essential to this review and decision process. Thus, the
budget process involves the consideration simultaneously of individual
program levels and of total outlays and receipts in relation to the
condition of the national economy. The budget reflects the results of
both of these considerations.
Congressional authorization
and
appropriation,—Congressional review begins when the President sends his budget to the Congress. The Congress can change programs, eliminate them, or add
programs not requested by the President. It can increase or decrease
the amounts recommended by the President to finance existing and
proposed new programs. It may also act upon legislation determining
taxes and other means of raising revenues.
The Congress does not normally vote on outlays directly, but
rather upon budget authority. Under the traditional procedures, the
Congress first enacts legislation which authorizes an agency to carry
out a particular program and, in some cases, sets a limit on the amount
that can subsequently be considered for appropriation for the program.
Many programs are authorized for a specified number of years, or
even indefinitely; other programs, such as atomic energy, space
exploration, defense procurement, foreign affairs, and some construction programs, require annual authorizing legislation.
The granting of budget authority usually is a separate subsequent
action. In most cases, budget authority becomes available each year
only as voted by the Congress. However, in some cases, the Congress
has voted "permanent" budget authority, under which funds become
available annually without further congressional action. Most trust
fund appropriations are "permanent," as is the appropriation to pay
interest on the public debt.
Congressional consideration of requests for changes in revenue laws
and for appropriations follows an established pattern. They are considered first in the House of Representatives. The Ways and Means
Committee reviews proposed revenue measures; the Appropriations
Committee, through its 13 subcommittees, studies the proposals for
appropriations and examines in detail each agency's performance.
Each committee then recommends the action to be taken by the
House of Representatives.
As parts of the budget are approved by the House, the appropriation and tax bills are forwarded to the Senate, where a similar
process is followed. In case of disagreement between the two Houses
of Congress, a conference committee (consisting of Members of both
bodies) meets to resolve the issues. The report of the conference
committee is returned to both Houses for approval, and the measures




276

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

are then transmitted to the President in the form of an enrolled
bill, for his approval or veto. When action on appropriations is not
completed by the beginning of the fiscal year, the Congress may enact
a "continuing resolution'' to provide authority for the affected agencies
to continue operations until their regular appropriations are enacted.
Budget execution and control.—Once approved, the budget
becomes the financial basis for the operations of each agency during
the fiscal year.
Under the law, most budget authority is made available to the
executive branch under a system of "apportioning" the authority.
Under authority delegated by the President, the Director of the Office
of Management and Budget distributes appropriations and other
budget authority to each agency by time periods (usually quarterly)
or by activities. Obligations may not be incurred in excess of the
amount apportioned. The objective of the apportionment system is to
assure the effective and orderly use of available authority and—for
annual appropriations—to prevent the need for requesting additional
or supplemental authority where possible.
It is, of course, necessary to insure flexibility if circumstances change.
Under certain circumstances (for example, if developments indicate
that an agency will not require all the authority made available during
the immediate fiscal year, or if plans for use of the authority are not
complete), "reserves" are established by the Director of the Office of
Management and Budget (under authority set forth in law and
delegated by the President) to withhold some of these amounts not
needed. Such reserves may be released subsequently, if necessary, but
only for the purposes of the appropriation. On the other hand, changes
in laws or other factors may indicate the need for more authority, and
supplemental requests may have to be submitted to the Congress.
Review and audit.—This is the "final" step in the budget process.
The individual agencies are responsible for assuring—through their
own review and control systems—that the obligations they incur and
the resulting outlays are in accordance with the provisions of the
authorizing and appropriating legislation, as well as other laws and
regulations relating to the obligation and expenditure of funds. The
Office of Management and Budget reviews program and financial
reports and keeps abreast of agency programs in attainment of program
objectives.
In addition, the General Accounting Office, an arm of the Congress,
regularly audits, examines, and evaluates Government programs, and
its findings and recommendations for corrective action are made to the
Congress, to the Office of Management and Budget, and to the agencies
concerned.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

277

COVERAGE OF THE BUDGET TOTALS
Agencies and programs.—The budget totals cover all agencies and
programs (including Government corporations) administered by the
Federal Government, no matter how funded, except for the following:
the Rural Electrification and Telephone Revolving fund (after
May 11, 1973),
the Rural Telephone Bank (after May 11, 1973),
the Environmental Financing Authority (established in 1974),
the Exchange Stabilization Fund,
the Export-Import Bank of the United States (after August 16,
1971),
the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System,
the Postal Service fund (beginning in 1974),
the United States Railroad Association,1
the Federal Financing Bank.1
In addition to these exceptions, the totals exclude privately owned,
Government-sponsored enterprises, such as the Federal land banks and
Federal home loan banks. Information on the excluded Government
agencies and on the Government-sponsored agencies is presented in
the form of "annexed budgets" in Part IV of the Budget Appendix.
Types of funds.—Agency activities are financed through Federal
(Government-owned) funds and through trust funds, both of which
are included in the budget.
Federal funds are of four types. The general fund is credited with
receipts not earmarked by law, and is charged with payments from
such revenues and from general borrowing. Special funds contain
Federal receipts earmarked for specific purposes, other than for
carrying out a cycle of operations. Public enterprise (revolving) funds
finance a cycle of business type operations in which outlays generate
receipts, primarily from the public. Intragovernmental revolving and
management funds facilitate financing operations within and between
Government agencies.
Trust funds are established by law to account for receipts which
are held in a fiduciary capacity by the Government for use in carrying
out specific purposes and programs. Within the category of trust
funds there is a special subcategory of trust revolving funds which
carry on a cycle of business-type operations.
1
These agencies were only recently established by law and have not had an opportunity to plan
their operations.




278

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Current expense and capital outlay.—The budget includes
spending for both current operating expenses and capital outlays
such as the purchase of lands, structures, and equipment. It also
includes capital outlays in the form of lending and the purchase of
investments. However, it excludes from obligations and outlays the
acquisition of Federal securities issued by the Government itself
(either by the Treasury Department or other Federal agencies).
BUDGET AUTHORITY AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS
Budget authority.—Government agencies are permitted to enter
into obligations, requiring either immediate or future payment of
money, only when they have been granted authority to do so by
law. The amounts thus authorized by the Congress are called budget
authority (BA).
Budget authority permits obligations to be incurred, and for most
accounts the amount of the authority is related to the obligations
expected to be incurred during the year. In some cases—especially
construction (other than water resource projects), research, and
procurement—budget authority is requested and granted to finance
the full cost of each project at the time it is started, regardless of
when obligations are expected to be incurred and the expected time
of completion.
Budget authority usually takes the form of appropriations which
permit obligations to be incurred and payments to be made. Some
budget authority is in the form of contract authority which permits
obligations, but requires an appropriation or receipts to "liquidate"
(pay) these obligations. There is also authority to spend debt receipts;
such budget authority permits the use of borrowed money to incur
obligations and make payments. Where such authority pertains to
the use of Treasury borrowing, it is authority to spend public debt
receipts; authority for a Government agency to borrow directly from
the public or from a Government-administered fund available for
investment, is authority to spend agency debt receipts.
Most appropriations for current operations are made available for
obligation only within the year (1-year appropriations). Some are for
a specified longer period (multiple-year appropriations). Others, including most of those for construction, some for research, and nearly
all trust fund appropriations are made available for obligation (noyear appropriations) until the objectives have been attained.
When budget authority is made available by the Congress for a
specific period of time, any part which is not used for obligations during
that period lapses, and cannot be used later. However, reappropriations—congressional actions tc continue availability of unused balances
which would otherwise lapse—are counted as budget authority in the
year of the congressional action.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

279

A rescission is an action of the Congress which cancels budget authority previously granted and remaining available, but still unused. Such
rescissions are offset against new budget authority in arriving at the
total of budget authority for each year.
Most authority to obligate funds is granted year by year (current
authority). Under certain laws, some budget authority in Federal
funds and most budget authority in the trust funds becomes available
from time to time without further action by the Congress (permanent
authority).
The amount of budget authority is usually named specifically in
the legislation which makes it available (definite authority). In a few
cases the amount is left indefinite to be determined by subsequent
circumstances (indefinite authority). Examples of the latter type are
the appropriation for interest on the public debt, and the trust fund
appropriation equal to receipts under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (Social Security).
While budget authority is normally granted with the intention
that spending will occur in a similar amount, certain insurance or
other programs are provided with standby budget authority which
may never be used fully but is available if certain contingencies
should arise.
Obligations incurred.—Following the enactment of budget
authority, obligations are incurred by Government agencies. Such
obligations include the currently accruing liabilities for salaries and
wages, certain contractual services, and interest; entering into contracts for the purchase of supplies and equipment, construction,
and land; entering into contracts to make loans; and other commitments requiring the payment of money.
Outlays.—Obligations generally are liquidated by the issuance of
checks or the disbursement of cash; such payments are called outlays
(O). In lieu of issuing checks, obligations may also be liquidated (and
outlays occur) by the maturing of interest coupons in the case of
some bonds, or by the issuance of bonds or notes (or increases in the
redemption value of bonds outstanding).
Outlays during any fiscal year may be payments of obligations
incurred in prior years or in the same year. Such outlays, therefore,
flow in part from unexpended balances of prior year budget authority
and in part from budget authority provided for the year in which
the money is spent.2
Balances of authority.—Not all budget authority enacted for a
fiscal year is obligated and paid out in the same year. In the case
2
This process is depicted on a chart "Relation of Budget Authority to Outlays—1975 Budget"
on page 25 of this volume.




280

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 19 75

of salaries and wages, 1 to 3 weeks elapse between the time of
obligation and the time of payment. In the case of major procurement and construction, up to several years may elapse. Amounts
which have been obligated, and the balances of budget authority
to cover such obligations, are always carried forward until the obligations are subsequently paid. Such amounts are known as obligated
balances.

In addition, in multiple-year or no-year accounts, amounts may
also be carried forward which are still available for obligation. These
are unobligated balances. Therefore, a change in the amount of budget
authority for a given year does not necessarily result in a similar
change either in the obligations incurred or the budget outlays in that
same year. A change in budget authority in any one year may have an
effect on obligations for 2 or more years, and may affect budget
outlays for an even longer period. In the case of standby budget
authority, obligations or outlays may never materialize.
Allocations between agencies.—In some cases, one or more
agencies may share in the administration of a program for which
appropriations are made to another agency or to the President. This
is made possible, in the accounts, by the establishment of allocations
from the "parent" account. (This would be the account to which the
appropriation was made.) Such allocations permit the other agencies
to incur obligations which are included with the parent account in the
Budget (without separate identification) and in the Budget Appendix
(where the total obligations of each participating agency are identified
separately).
RECEIPTS
In general.—Receipts represent collections during the year, and
are classified into two types:
• Budget receipts, which are compared with total outlays in calculating the budget surplus or deficit.
• Offsetting receipts, which are deducted from spending in calculating
total outlays. Corresponding offsets are made in arriving at total
budget authority and net obligations incurred.
Budget receipts.—The fundamental characteristic of budget
receipts is that they are collections from the public that result from the
exercise of the Government's sovereign or governmental powers. These
consist primarily of tax revenues, but also include receipts from court
fines, regulatory requirements for certain licenses, war reparations
(in applicable years), and the like. Gifts and contributions (as dis-




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

281

tinguished from payments for services or cost-sharing deposits by
State and local governments) are also counted as budget receipts.
Offsetting
cumstances :

receipts,—Offsetting

receipts occur in four

cir-

Revolving funds.—For three types of funds—public enterprise,
intragovernmental, and trust revolving funds—outlays are regularly
stated net of receipts collected by the fund.
Reimbursements and refunds.—Some incidental sums received are,
when authorized by law, treated as reimbursements to appropriations;
these are netted in determining outlays from such appropriations. The
collection of refunds, representing a return of previous erroneous
outlays, is also usually offset against outlays of the account involved.
Other proprietary receipts from the public.—Receipts which arise
out of the businesslike and market-oriented activities of the Government (e.g., loan repayments, interest, sale of property and products,
charges for nonregulatory services, rents and royalties, etc.) are
placed in the general fund, special funds, or trust funds. Such collections are not counted as budget receipts, but are offset against total
budget authority and outlays for each agency and for each "function."3
Intragovernmental transactions.—Any payment from a federally
owned or administered account to another Federal account is treated
as an offset to budget outlays rather than as a receipt. As previously
described, many such transactions occur in the case of payments to
revolving funds or as reimbursements to appropriations. All such
transactions not falling into either of these categories are classified as
intragovernmental transactions. Intragovernmental transactions may be
either intrabudgetary (in cases where the payment and receipt both
occur within the budgetary universe) or result from receipts from
of-budget Federal agencies in those cases where the payment comes
from a Federal agency whose funds are excluded from the budget
totals.
Intrabudgetary transactions are further subdivided into three
groups: (1) interfund transactions, where the payment is from one fund
group (either Federal funds or trust funds) and the receipt is by the
other fund group; (2) Federal intrafund transactions, in those cases
where the payment and receipt both occur within the Federal fund
group; and (3) trust intrafund transactions, in those cases where the
3
The functional classification of programs relates to their purposes. A further discussion of this
subject is found in Part 4 of this volume.




282

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

payment and receipt both occur within the trust fund group. Normally
intrabudgetary transactions are deducted from both the outlays and
the budget authority for the agency receiving the payment.4
OTHER TRANSACTIONS
Borrowing and repayments.—Borrowing and debt repayment are
not treated as receipts or outlays, since if they were the budget could
be balanced simply by borrowing. This applies both to borrowing in
the form of public debt securities and to specialized forms of borrowing—such as agency securities, military family housing mortgages, and
certificates representing participation in a pool of loans.
Exercise of the monetary power.—Seigniorage is the profit from
coining money; it is the difference between the value of coins as
money and their cost, including the cost of manufacturing. Seigniorage
on coins arises from the exercise of the Government's monetary powers
and differs from receipts coming from the public, since there is no
corresponding payment on the part of another party. Therefore,
seigniorage is excluded from receipts and treated as a means of
financing a budget deficit, or as a supplementary amount to be applied
(to reduce debt or to increase the cash in Treasury) in the years of a
budget surplus. The increment (profit) resulting from the revaluation
of gold is treated like seigniorage.
Liabilities in deposit fund accounts.—Accounts outside the
budget, known as deposit funds, are established to record certain
unearned income and certain unpaid liabilities, including savings
accounts for military personnel, State and local income taxes withheld
from Federal employees' salaries, and payroll deductions for the
purchase of savings bonds by civilian employees of the Government.
Such transactions affect Treasury's cash balances even though they
are not a part of the budget.
Exchange of cash.—The Government's deposits with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are considered similar to cash assets.
Therefore, the movement of money between the IMF and the Treasury
Department is not in itself considered a receipt or an outlay, borrowing
or lending.
Obligations to international lending organizations.—Debt
instruments issued (in lieu of checks) in payment of subscriptions to
4
In two situations intrabudgetary transactions are not deducted from the figures of any agency or
function, but appear as special deduct lines in computing total budget authority and outlays for the
Government as a whole. One of these consists of the agencies' payments as employers into trust funds
for retirement of employees. These payments are known as "undistributed interfund transactions"
(i.e., those not distributed by agency and function). Payments by off-budget Federal agencies as
employers into employee retirement trust funds are also "undistributed" by agency or function, and
are deducted in arriving at the Government-wide total of the trust fund group.




THE BUDGET SYSTEM AND CONCEPTS

283

international lending organizations are not considered borrowing or
an outlay, but remain a part of the obligated balances until they are
cashed—at which time they become an outlay. These differ only in
form, and not in substance, from ordinary balances for unpaid
obligations.
BASIS FOR BUDGET FIGURES
In general.—Keceipts and repayments reflect collections. Outlays
are stated in terms of checks issued, including cash paid in lieu of
checks. The accrual basis is generally used for interest on the public
debt. In the case of bonds and notes where interest expense of the
Government is reflected in periodic changes in redemption value,
the interest expenditure is counted when the redemption value
changes.
Data for 1973.—The 1973 column of this budget generally presents
the actual transactions and balances for that year, as recorded in
agency accounts and as summarized in the central financial reports
prepared by the Treasury Department. For those accounts for which
no regular 1973 appropriations were enacted, however, the amounts
shown in this budget are the maximum amounts authorized by
continuing resolutions.
Data for 1974.—The amounts for 1974 include budget authority
actually made available by the Congress, and estimates of the budget
outcome for the year as a whole, taking account of action up to the
time the budget schedules were prepared. The Congress has, by now
(January 1974), completed action on all regular appropriations for
1974, except a few accounts for which a continuing appropriation was
provided. However, additional supplemental appropriations will be
required in certain cases. Part III of the Budget Appendix includes
supplemental now requested. These supplemental represent the
amounts required for various pay raises including those of January
and October 1973 and the additional amounts requested to meet unforeseen program costs.
Where the word "enacted" is used with reference to 1974, as in
tables 4 and 5, the amount represents budget authority already voted
by the Congress, except in the case of the accounts for which regular
appropriations are still pending. The enacted sums include the amounts
likely to be required in the case of indefinite appropriations. Where
the word "estimate" is used, the amounts include needed supplemental
as well as enacted budget authority. Certain standard footnotes
(explained at the end of the table) are used in Part 5 of the Budget to
distinguish the status of these additional items for 1974.




284

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Data for 1975.—This budget is complete as to the estimates for
1975. Part I of the Budget Appendix generally includes the proposed
appropriation language for the various items identified in the budget.
However, in some instances, estimates are included in the budget
tables without appropriation language for 1974 and 1975 supplementals.
For these, proposed legislation may be required and/or the estimated
amounts will be requested later when the requirements are known. In
certain tables of the budget these items for later transmittal and the
related outlays are separately identified. Estimates of the total
requirements for 1975 include both the amounts formally proposed
and the amounts planned for later transmittal.
Allowances.—Lump-sum allowances are included in the tables to
cover possible additional supplemental proposals that may be required
for 1974 and 1975. An allowance is also shown for the acceleration
of energy research and development. The allowance for contingencies
anticipates the need for supplemental appropriations to meet requirements not now foreseen for existing programs or resulting from the
enactment of legislation not specifically provided for in the budgets
of the agencies concerned. The allowance for civilian agency pay
raises includes an estimate of the additional amounts that will be
required for pay raises anticipated in October 1974 for employees
of civilian Government agencies. A separate allowance for pay
raises is shown for the military and civilian employees of the Department of Defense and is included in its figures. These increases could
not be reflected in the various program appropriation requests since
the applicable detailed amounts have not yet been determined.




PART 7

SUMMARY TABLES

285

540-000 O - 74 - 19




EXPLANATORY NOTE RELATING TO THE
SUMMARY TABLES
Types of tables.—This part of the budget consists of tables
as follows:
• Tables 1 through 10 are short summary tables of the
budget, often only one page each.
• Tables 11 through 13 provide greater detail in support
of data in the first three tables.
• Table 15 presents 5-year projections of the estimated
costs of proposed legislation pursuant to section 221 (a)
of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970.
• Table 14 and tables 16 through 20 are historical in
nature, giving data, for earlier years, comparable to
that data in the preceding tables, and also giving information on the national income accounts and the
gross national product over a longer period.
Concepts followed.—The concepts used in the current and
historical tables are discussed in part 6 of this volume.
Other sources of data.—The Special Analyses volume, part
1, presents a series of data covering Government finances
and operations as a whole. These include, for example:
• Special Analysis A—which compares budget totals with
the Federal sector of the national income accounts.
• Special Analysis B—which provides a breakdown of
selected data between Federal funds and trust funds.
• Special Analysis C—which gives the detail of the
agency debt and the holdings of U.S. securities which
are summarized here in table 10.
• Special Analysis D—which focuses on the distinction
between outlays that are of an investment or "capital"
nature and outlays for operating or "current" purposes.
• Special Analysis G—which presents information on
civilian employment in the executive branch.
286




SUMMARY TABLES
Table 1. BUDGET SUMMARY

287

(in millions of dollars)
1974

1975

128.137
-33.138

188,257
14.318
145.536
-37.258

197,741
163,943
-39,543

276,417

310,853

322,141

161,357
92,193
-21.325

185.581
105,548
-21,129

202,757
115,818
-23,575

232.225

270.000

295,000

186,403
81,447
-21.325

203,715
92,075
-21,129

220,636
107,385
-23,575

246,526

274,660

304.445

-25.046
10,746

-18,133
13,473

-17,878
8,433

-14,301

-4,660

-9,445

437,329

468,426

486.350

507.973

113.559
323,770

125.381
343,045

139,806
346,545

148,929
359,045

71,426
252,344

75,182
267,863

50,103
133.711
48,924

43,891
147,684
67,230

45,874
159,725
83,317

48,215
170,724
86,801

1973

Description

Budget authority (largely appropriations):
Available through current action by Congress:
Enacted and pending
Proposed in this budget
Available without current action by Congress
Deductions for offsetting receipts*

181,417
____

Total budget authority.
Receipts and outlays:

Receipts:
Federal funds _
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

_

Total budget receipts
Outlays:
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

_____
_
__

___.
___

.___

Total budget outlays
Surplus or deficit (—):
Federal funds
Trust funds
Total budget

1972
actual
Outstanding debt, end of year:

Gross Federal debt
Held by:
Government agencies
The public
Federal Reserve System
Others
MEMORANDUM
Outstanding loans, end of year:

Direct loans
Guaranteed and insured loans 2
Government-sponsored agencies loans 3
1
3

These consist of intragovernmental transactions and proprietary receipts from the public.
Excludes loans held by Government accounts and special credit agencies.
* Excludes Federal Reserve banks, but includes off-budget Federal agencies.




288

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975

Table 2. BUDGET RECEIPTS, OUTLAYS, AND BUDGET AUTHORITY
(in millions of dollars)
1973
actual

Description
Receipts by source:
Individual income taxes.
Corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions:
Employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance
Contributions for other insurance and retirement
Excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customsduties
Miscellaneous receipts

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

103,246
36,153

118,000
43,000

129,000
48,000

54,876
6,051
3,614
16,260
4,917
3,188
3,921

67,664
6,198
4,046
17,144
5,400
3,500
5,049

75,298
5,975
4,330
17,444
6,000
3,800
5,153

232,225

270,000

295,000

76,021
2,957
3,311
6,191
589
13,070
4,132
10,185
18,417
73,073
12,013
22,813
5,480
6,636

80,573
3,886
3,177
4,039
609
13,521
5,450
10,819
23,268
84,995
13,285
27,754
6,800
6,147
300

87,729
4,103
3,272
2,729
3,128
13,400
5,667
11,537
26,282
100,071
13,612
29,122
6,774
6,174
1,561

—2,927
-5,436

— 3,543
-6,420

— 3,577
-7,140

Total outlays

246,526

274,660

304,445

Budget surplus or deficit ( - )

-14,301

-4,660

-9,445

82,787
3,628
3,406
7,148
7,183
10,543
6,093
12,049
22,226
79,818
12,783
22,813
6,007
8,295
—8,363

88,177
5,322
3,038
6,652
2,483
22,822
4,960
13,782
26,153
93,015
13,787
27,754
6,417
6,055
400
—9,963

95,047
4,680
3,245
7,411
—306
14,459
6,389
11,489
28,022
104,012
14,080
29,122
6,820
6,205
2,184
— 10,717

276,417

310,853

322,141

_

Total receipts
Outlays by function:
National defense !
International affairs and
finance
Space research and technology.._..._
Agriculture and rural development
Natural resources and environment
Commerce and transportation
Community development and housing
Education and manpower
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Interest
General government
General revenue sharing.
___
_
Allowances2
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds

_.

Budget authority by function:
National defense!
International affairs and
finance
Space research and technology
Agriculture and rural development
Natural resources and environment
Commerce and transportation
Community development and housing
Education and manpower
Health
Income security
Veterans benefits and services
Interest
General government
General revenue sharing _ _
_ ________
Allowances 2
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions
Total budget authority

1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
3
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay
raises, and contingencies.




SUMMARY TABLES

289

Table 3. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY AGENCY
(in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Off. of the President.
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense—Military i
Defense—Civil
Health, Education, & Welfare..
Housing & Urban Development.
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Atomic Energy Commission
Environmental Protect. Agency.
General Services Admin
Nat'l Aero. & Space A d m i n . . _
Veterans Administration
Other independent a g e n c i e s . . . .
Allowances 2
Undistributed intragovemmental transactions:
Employer share, employee
retirement
Interest received by trust
funds

Total budget authority
and outlays
MEMORANDUM
Portion available through current action by Congress 3 ....
Portion available without current action by Congress
Outlays from obligated balances.
Outlays from unobligated balances
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the
public
Total budget authority
and outlays

1973

Budget authority
1974
1975

606
189
99
6,593
11,417
1,802
77,638
1,991
89,213
5,223
-1.937
1,774
10,389
684
3,647
32,655
2,633
7,427
518
3,406
12,735
16,076

658
215
107
9,235
11.821
1.520
82,690
1,683
106,456
4,536
-3.783
1,914
9,315
783
17,647
35,753
2,389
4,629
— 637
3,038
13,760
16,688
400

722
312
101
5,328
14.046
1,727
90,974
1,631
113,666
6,197
-2,582
2,138
9,691
894
9,813
37,688
3,058
695
— 738
3,245
14,060
18,008
2.184

-2,927

-3.543

-3.577

-5,436

-6,420

276,417

1973

Outlays
1974

1975

540
183
49

658
213
112

734
310
121

3,733
10,028
1,368
73,297
1.703
82.040
3.592
-2.253
1.531
8,639

4.603
9.311
1.519
78,400
1,621
96,768
4,983
-3.774
1.938
8,590

4,414
9,184
1.712
84.600
1.649
110.959
5,550
-2.657
2,106
10,043

591

743

793

8,183
30,960
2,393
1,114

8,444
35,849
2,328

468

-306
3,177
13,241
13,343

300

9,059
37,633
2.886
3,991
-883
3,272
13,594
14,528
1,561

-2.927

-3.543

-3,577

-7,140

-5.436

-6.420

-7,140

310,853

322,141

246,526

274,660

304,445

181,417

202,575

197.741

118,310

127,102

139,792

128,137

145,536

163,943

68,037
49,719

78,518
56,260

86,989
65,701

43,598

50,038

51,506

.

3,311
11,968
11,449

2,559

-23,436 -24,361 -26,837 -23,436 -24,361 -26,837
- 9 , 7 0 2 -12,897 -12,706

- 9 , 7 0 2 -12,897 -12,706

276,417

246,526

310,853

322,141

274,660

304,445

1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay
3
Budget authority excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations. Outlays from
such appropriations are included as outlays from balances below.




290

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

Table 4. BUDGET AUTHORITY AVAILABLE THROUGH CURRENT ACTION
BY CONGRESS (in millions of dollars)
1974 estimate
Department or other unit

Legislative branch.....
_
The Judiciary
Executive Off. of the President
Funds approp. to the President
Agriculture
Commerce...
Defense—Military i
Defense-Civil...
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State....
Transportation
Treasury Department
Atomic Energy Commission...
Environmental
Protection
Agency
—
General Services Admin
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies. ._
Allowances2

1973
actual

Enacted
and
pending

Proposed
changes

1975 estimate

Total

Recommended
herein

Proposed
changes

Total

617
192
99
4,910
10,617
1.592
77,743
2,053

641
204
105
8,108
9.675
1.274
76.514
1,746

29
9
2
126
735
39
6.332
4

670
213
107
8,234
10,411
1.312
82,846
1,750

734
310
101
4.403
12,890
1,416
89,001
1,700

31,562

32,616

3,040

35,657

32,331

2,825

35,156

4.281
2.415
1,776
3.845
650
3,577
1,772
2,633

3.342
2,576
1,854
2,205
691
17,266
1,829
2,377

285
112
63
470
43
311
207
12

3.627
2,688
1,917
2,675
734
17.576
2,036
2,389

2.812
2,796
2.142
2.999
820
3.152
2.301
3,058

2.300
82

5.112
2,879
2.142
2.999
820
4,024
2,451
3,058

7,427
994

4.523
639

6
23

4.529
663

545
291

3,408
12,391
6.862

3,002
12,283
4.788

38
1,095
938
400

3,040
13,377
5,726
400

3,247
13,375
5,772

171
10
100
2,259

872
150

734
310
101
4,574
12,900
1,516
91,260
1.700

545
291
267
323
2.184

3,247
13,642
6,096
2,184

Total budget authority
available through current action by Congress
181,417 188,257 14,318 202,575 186,198 11,543

197,741

MEMORANDUM
Appropriations to liquidate contract authority:
Legislative branch
__
Funds approp. to the President
Agriculture..
Commerce
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Transportation
.....
Environmental
Protection
Agency
Other independent agencies...
Total appropriations to
liquidate
contract
authority

205
1.145
232

_
155
107
222

1,450
107
5,394

155
107
245

600
135
5,046

600
135
5,046

17
1
5,676

11

604
17

604
17

8,545

6,886

10
6
21
1
243

10
6
21
1
23
4

23

23

6.909

8

1,676
1
0

1,676
10 .
.

8.093

17
1
5,684

8

8.101

•Lets than $500 thousand.
1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
9
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay




SUMMARY TABLES

291

Table 5. OUTLAYS FROM BUDGET AUTHORITY AVAILABLE THROUGH
CURRENT ACTION BY CONGRESS (in millions of dollars)
1974 estimate
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Off. of the President.
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense-Military *
Defense-Civil
Health, Education and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury Department
Atomic Energy Commission. __
Environmental
Protection
Agency
General Services Admin
National Aeronautics and
Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Other independent agencies....
Allowances2

1973
actual

1975 estimate

Enacted
and
pending

Proposed
changes

466
173
44
1,634
8,736
616
55,833
1,209

534
185
68
2,143
8,671
612
54,171
970

25
9
2
15
737
34
4,468
4

559
194
69
2,158
9,408
645
58,639
973

645
290
97
1,302
11.631
744
61,694
924

19,269

22,409

123

22,532

23,275

134

23,409

1,362
1,441
957
2,212
513
1.973
1,575
1,208

1,545
1,618
1,081
1,485
585
2,024
1,647
906

3
105
59
101
41
213
195
12

1,548
1,723
1,140
1,585
626
2,237
1,842
917

1,811
1,915
1,331
1,730
664
2,408
2,092
1,423

560
69

2,371
1,984
1,331
1,730
664
3,236
2,242
1,423

245
692

310
747

5
23

315
769

394
263

2,149
11,230
4,773

1,931
11,230
3,759

35
1,070
895
300

1,966
12,300
4,654
300

2,202
12,195
4,709

8,473

127,102

133,739

23

20
107
245

Total outlays from budget authority available
through current action
by Congress
118,310 118,629

Total

Recommended
herein

Proposed
changes

46
10
2,194

828
150

Total

645
290
97
1,348
11,631
754
63,888
924

394
263
365
235
1,461

2,202
12,560
4,944
1,461

6,053

139,792

MEMORANDUM
From appropriations to liquidate contract authorizations:
Legislative branch
Funds approp. to the President.
Agriculture
Commerce
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Transportation
Environmental Protection
Agency
General Services Admin
__
Other independent agencies
Total outlays from appropriations to liquidate contract authority

_
20
326
218

__
20
107
222

1,450
84
5,128

600
124
5,034

600
124
5,034

*
11

501
*
15

501
*
15

7,237

6,623

23

6,646

20
206
23
4

20
206 _
.
23
4
109
5,658

8

1,779
*
9

1,779
*
9 _
.

8,024

109
5,666

8

8,032

*Less than $500 thousand.
1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay




292

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

1975

Table 6. RELATION OF BUDGET AUTHORITY TO OUTLAYS
(in millions of dollars)
Description

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

Budget authority available through current action by Congress:

Enacted or recommended herein:
Appropriations1
Authority to spend debt receipts
Contract authority
„__-.
Reappropriations and reauthorizations
Proposed changes:
Appropriations1
Contract authority
Authority to spend debt receipts
Total budget authority available through current action
by Congress (table 4)

173,275
670
7,470
3

167,912
250
20,093
3

186,287

14,360
50
—92

11,493
50

181,417

202,575

197,741

122,532
1,338
4,267

139,641
1,447
4,448

150,987
1,300
11,656

—23,436
-9,702

—24,361
-12,897

—26,837
-12,706

276,417

310,853

322,141

177,237
-3,662
-186,961

186,961
-9,882
-193,673

193,673
-1,031
-202,506

—3,338
2, 625

—2,625
3,262

—3,262
3,362

262,318

294,897

312,378

92,520
—1,642
58
-106,728

106,728
—811
10
-126,164

126,164
—425
51
-133,723

246,526

274,660

304,445

180,145
208,995
198,683
186,403

190,482
220,473
221,253
203,715

195,606
228,659
226,779
220,636

-88

Budget authority available without current action by Congress
(permanent authorizations):

Appropriations 1
Authority to spend debt receipts
Contract authority

Deductions for offsetting receipts (table 12):

Intragovernmental transactions
Proprietary receipts from the public
Total budget authority for the year (table 3)
Unobligated balances and adjustments:

Unobligated balances:
Brought forward at start of year (table8)
Written off (rescinded, lapsed, etc.)2
Carried forward at end of year (table8)...
Application of new authority to prior obligations:
Budget authority of year, obligated previously
Budget authority of subsequent year, obligated currently.
Obligationsincurred.net (table 7)
Obligated balances:
Brought forward at start of year, funded (table 8)
Adjustments in expired accounts 2
Deficiency appropriations
Carried forward at end of year (table 8)

Outlays (table 3)
MEMORANDUM
Federal funds included above:
Budget authority available through current action by
Congress
Budget authority 3
Obligations incurred 3
Outlays 3
_
1

Excludes appropriations to liquidate contract authority:

1973
1974
1975
actual
estimate
estimate
For later transmittal
23
8
All other
10,277
9,511
11,243
2
Includes writeoff of balances of the Rural Electrification Administration and the Postal Service
fund resulting from removal from the budget totals.
3
Amounts are net of intragovernmental transactions and proprietary receipts from the public.




SUMMARY TABLES

293

Table 7. OBLIGATIONS INCURRED, NET (in millions of dollars)
Department or other unit

Legislative branch
The Judiciary
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
International security assistance
International development assistance
Other
Agriculture
Commerce
Defense-Military i
Defense-Civil
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Atomic Energy Commission
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Veterans Administration
Civil Service Commission
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Federal Home Loan Bank Board
Postal Service
Railroad Retirement Board
Other independent agencies
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions
Allowances*

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

687
214
109

718
311
101

2,890
1,798
1,697
9,365
1,707
76,372
1,823
85,136
5,157
-2,051
1,870
8,825
650
8,053
32,643
2,385
3,441
385
3,131
11,909
4,777
—524
-317
2,129
2,477
4,131
—8,363

3,955
2,347
1,730
7,579
1,618
85,273
1,943
102,815
5,334
-3,545
1,953
8,416
719
9,253
35,782
2,887
4,521
-359
3,486
13,336
6,308
—518
-316
1,999
2,704
4,227
—9,963
400

1,727
1,933
589
9,551
1,705
90,949
1,753
110,824
3,789
-2,642
2,125
10,101
812
9,704
37,688
3,058
5,149
-919
3,275
13,707
7,589
—541
-335
1,553
3,014
3,622
—10,717
2,184

262,318

Total

553
185
85

294,897

312,378

198,683
84,960
-21,325

221,253
94,774
-21,129

226,779
109,174
-23,575

262,318

294,897

312,378

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds
Trustfunds
Interfund transactions
Total

1
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform, and civilian
and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
2
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay
raises, and contingencies.




294

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
Table 8. BALANCES OF BUDGET AUTHORITY (in millions of dollars)
Start 1973

Department or other unit

Obli-

Legislative branch
57
The Judiciary
_ __
16
6
Executive Office of the President
Funds appropriated to the President:
International security assistance
5.890
International
development
assistance
3.788
Other
1.818
Agriculture
6.955
Commerce
1,333
Defense—Military1
24.005
Defense—Civil
419
Health. Education, and Welfare. 13.834
Housing and Urban Development
8.666
Interior. _
__
1.017
Justice. _
...
__
819
Labor.. .
._
1,580
73
State . . .
-.
.10.099
Transportation
Treasury. _
189
Atomic Energy Commission
1,117
Environ. Protection Agency
2,028
General Services Administration
506
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
_
1.271
1.498
Veterans Administration
1.506
Civil Service Commission
Federal Deposit Insurance Cor310
poration
Federal Home Loan Bank
4
Board
1.355
Postal Service
172
Railroad Retirement Board
2.149
Other independent agencies
Allowances ^
Total

Jnobli-

End 1974

End 1973
Obli-

Jnobli-

Obli-

152
8
2

69
18
42

191
9
3

99
19
39

916

7,599

1,318

9,950

End

Unobli-

Obli-

975
Unobligated

83
20
19

153
10

1,426 10,338

1,581

159
10

9,159 4,524 8.872 6,530 9,810 6,482 9,863
184
- 6 8 1,342
27 1,964
80 2.237
1,643 5,199 3,205 3.467 7,094 3,849 11,458
281
258 1,772
283 1,679
357 1,779
11,872 26,941 12,689 33,813 10,054 40,162 9,909
12
962
135
230
398
858
537
44,277 16,694 46,283 22,705 51,075 22,570 54,010
13,214 10,233 12,818 10,583 12,307 8,822 15,123
743 1,456
750
980 1,212 1,023 1,441
65 1,183
78
205 1,150
104 1,165
10,204 1,730 11,576 1,530 12,468 1,588 12,058
122
238
156
102
126
75
109
10,403 9,959 5,984 10,769 14,242 11,413 14,331
42 1,859
41
65 1,871
73 1,804
1,840
250 1,110
498 1,668
""995
1,534 4,355 5,467 6.317 "5,"506 7,476
332
256
155
422
382
369
101
253
8,895
27,842

523
1,091
1,429 9,378
1,682 30,882

1.399
75
1,524 9,747
2,044 33,934

45
1,402
1,637 9.987
2,375 36.585

7,795

325

8,318

364

8,837

388

9.378

7,545
10,216
4,583
4,354

-26

7,854
9,498
4,41
4,658

-17

8,169

-18

8,503

1,940
209
2,646

230
3,275
100

4,322
3,013

240
3,285
723

4.328
2,450

92,52 177,237 106,728 186,96 126,164 193,673 133,723 202,506

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds .Trust funds
Total

73.61 71,084 84,31 77.02 101,047 67,125 106,817 68,089
18.90 106,153 22,417 109,939 25,117 126,548 26.906 134,417
92,52 177.237 106,728 186.96 126,164 193,67 133,723 202,506

1
Includes balance* of allowances for All-Volunteer Force, military retirement systems reform,
and civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
3
Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay raises,
and contingencies.




295

SUMMARY TABLES

Table 9. FULL-TIME PERMANENT CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT IN THE
EXECUTIVE BRANCH
As of June 30 l
Agency

Agriculture
Commerce
.
Defense—military functions
Defense—civil functions
Health, Education, and Welfare
Housing and Urban Development
Interior
Justice
Labor
State
Transportation
Treasury
Atomic Energy Commission
Environmental Protection Agency
General Services Administration
National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Veterans Administration
Other:
Agency for International Development
Civil Service Commission
Selective Service System
Small Business Administration
Tennessee Valley Authority
Panama Canal
United States Information Agency
Miscellaneous

1973
actual

1974 estimate
In 1974
budget

Current

81,715
28,300
957,310
29,971
114,307
15,820
56,771
45,496
12,468
22,578
67,885
98,087
7,145
8,270
35, 721
25,955
170,616

78,800
28,400
987,000
30,800
3
M20,200
13,900
56,900
47,100
12,400
23,400
69,400
104,000
7,400
9,200
37,800
25,000
170,000

80,200
28,600
996, 600
28,700
* 123,900
14,800
58,900
48,900
12,700
23,400
69,500
104,700
7,400
9,200
37,200
25,000
173,400

10,108
5,911
4,607
4,050
13,995
13,680
9,048
34,603

9,900
6,000
3,900
4, 100
14,000
14,000
9, 100
35,800

9,900
6,100
3,100
4, 100
14,000
14,000
9, 100
37,300

2

1975
estimate

4

80,200
29,100
995,900
29,100
126,200
14,200
59,400
51,000
13,000
23,400
71,300
111,400
7,800
9,200
38,000
24, 600
181,800
9,500
6,300
2,200
4,300
14,400
14,100
9,100
37,600

Subtotal
Contingencies5

1,874,417 1 ,918,500 1,940,700 1,963,100
5,000
2,000
5,000

Subtotal....
Postal Service

1,874,417
547,283

1,923,500 1,942,700 1,968,100
564,500
537,900
534,700

Total

2,421,700

2,488,000 2,480,600

2,502,800

1
Excludes disadvantaged youth, Public Service Careers trainees, and developmental positions
under the Worker-Trainee Opportunity Program.
2
Includes an adjustment of 31,000 for civilianization program.
3
Includes an increase of 15,000 for assumption of adult welfare programs by the Federal Government, and restoration of 3,400 for planned phasedown in Public Health Hospitals in 1974 (prevented
by4 legislative enactment).
Excludes 4,000 positions involved in proposed transfer of St. Elizabeths Hospital to the
District of Columbia.
5
Subject to later distribution.




296

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAR 1975
Table 10. BUDGET FINANCING AND OUTSTANDING DEBT
(in millions of dollars)
BUDGET FINANCING
1973
actual

Borrowing from the public:
Increase or decrease (—) in debt held by the public:
Nonbank investors
Commercial banks
Federal reserve banks
Net borrowing from the public

1975
estimate

18,049
—2,530
3,756

_

19,275

-126
-672
448
1,219
-2,709

-2,821

-4,974
_

3,000

-3,035
-886
400
___
-608

Subtotal, other means of financing

3,500

-846

Other means of financing (or disposition of surplus (—)):
Decrease or increase (—) in available cash and monetary
assets
Increase or decrease (—) in liabilities for:
Checks outstanding, etc.1
Deposit fund balances
Seigniorage on coins
Increment on gold
Outlays of off-budget Federal agencies2

Total, financing transactions

1974
estimate

12,500

1,160

-3,055

14,301

4,660

9,445

-109
-830
705

OUTSTANDING DEBT, END OF YEAR
1972
actual
Gross Federal debt:
Public debt (issued by Treasury)
Agency debt (issued by agencies)
Total gross Federal debt
Held by:
Government agencies
Thepublic
Federal Reserve System
Others

1973
actual

1974
1975
estimate estimate

426,435 457,317 473,636 493,433
10,894 11,109 12,715 14, 540
437,329 468,426 486,350 507,973
113,559 125,381 139,806 148,929
323,770 343,045 346,545 359,045
71,426 75,182
252,344 267,863

DEBT SUBJECT TO STATUTORY LIMITATION, END OF YEAR
Public debt (issued by Treasury)
426,435 457,317 473,636 493,433
Notes issued by Treasury to International Monetary Fund
(not in debt above)....
825
825
825
825
Agency and District of Columbia debt subject to statutory
limitation
1,939
1,567
1,562
1,556
Portion of public debt not subject to limit
-623
-620
-618
-618
Total, debt subject to statutory limitation3

428,576 459,089 475,405 495,196

1
Includes military payment certificates, accrued interest (less unamortized discount) on public
debt, and as offset certain collections in transit.
2
Positive outlays are recorded with a negative sign.
3
By act of Dec. 3, 1973, the statutory debt limit was established at $400 billion and temporarily
ncreased to $475.7 billion through June 30, 1974. Legislation is needed to change the limitation




SUMMARY TABLES

297

Table 11. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)
1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

Individual income taxes:

Withheld
Other
Proposed legislation
Gross individual income taxes
Refunds

98,093
27,019

112,500
28,400

125,112
-21,866

140,900
-22,900

128,500
29,900
—1,900
156,500
-27,500

Net individual income taxes

103,246

118,000

129,000

39,045
-2,893

45,000
1,000
-3,000

48,100
3,000
-3,100

36,153

43,000

48,000

40,703
5,381
7,603
1,189

49,205
6,379
10,740
1,340

55,081
7,240
11,303
1,436
238

54,876

67,664

75,298

4,634
1,297
120

4,600
1,483
115

4,600
1,265
110

6,051

6,198

5,975

1,427
2,146
41

1,683
2,319
44

1,845
2,439
46

3,614

4,046

4,330

64,542

77,907

85,603

3,708
1.198
35
188
21
-109

3,876
1,260
28
195
23
-113

4,070
1,317
29
208
25
-115

Total alcohol taxes

5,040

5,269

5,534

Tobacco taxes:
Cigarettes
Cigars
".
Cigarette papers and tubes
Other
Refunds

2,221
54
1
1
-3

2,331
48
2
3
-2

2,350
48
2
4
-2

2,274

2,382

2,402

Corporation income taxes
Proposed legislation1
Refunds
Net corporation income taxes
Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds):

Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Disability insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement
Proposed legislation
Total employment taxes and contributions
Unemployment insurance:
State taxes deposited in Treasury 2
Federal unemployment tax receipts 2
Railroad unemployment tax receipts 2

-

Total unemployment insurance
Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
Federal employees' retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions 3
Total contributions for other insurance and retirement
Total social insurance taxes and contributions
Excise taxes:

Federal funds:
Alcohol taxes:
Distilled spirits
Beer
Rectification tax
Wines
Special taxes in connection with liquor occupations
Refunds

Total tobacco taxes
See footnotes at end of table.




_

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAR 1975

298

Table 1 1. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)—(Continued
1973

1974

1975

Excise taxes—Continued

Federal Funds—Continued
Manufacturers' excise taxes:
Gasoline
Firearms, shells, and cartridges.
Fishing rods, creels, etc
Pistols and revolvers
Other
Refunds

_

30
41
16
8
-68
-25

30
42
16
9
*
-5

29
43
17
10
*
-6

__

3

92

93

__

1,885

2,102

2,124

6
114
7
69
77
15
*
-22

5
118
6
44
80
16
*
-15

6
123
7
5
80
17
*
-15

2,356

2,347

368

193

277

9,836

10,292

10,653

3,949

4,045

3,830

386
781
337
162
104
99

559
795
370
170
111
100

622
757
390
180
117
93

__

Total manufacturers' excise taxes
Miscellaneous excise taxes:
General and toll telephone and teletype service
Wagering taxes, including occupational taxes
Sugar tax
Coin-operated gaming devices
Interest equalization tax
Tax on foundations
Foreign insurance policies
Other

_-

Refunds

2,151

Total miscellaneous excise taxes
Undistributed Federal tax deposits and unapplied collections
Total Federal fund excise taxes
Trust funds:
Highway:
Gasoline
Trucks, buses, and trailers
Tires, innertubes, and tread rubber
Diesel fuel used on highways
Use-tax on certain vehicles
Truck parts and accessories
Lubricating oils
Refunds

-153

-149

-149

Total highway trust fund

5,665

6,001

5,840

Airport and airway:
Transportation of persons
Waybill tax
Tax on fuels
International departure tax
Aircraft registration fees
Tires and innertubes
Refunds..

609
36
47
47
18
2
-2

697
39
45
52
19
1
-2

784
44
47
57
20
1
-2

758

851

951

6,424

6,852

6,791

16,260

17,144

17,444

4,917

5,400

6,000

3,188

3,500

3,800

__

Total airport and airway trust fund
Total trust fund excise taxes
Total excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes. _
Customs duties
See footnotes at end of table.




_

SUMMARY TABLES

299

Table 11. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
1973

1975

1974
m

Miscellaneous receipts: 4
Miscellaneous taxes
__
Deposit of earnings, Federal Reserve System__
Fees for permits and regulatory and judicial services:
Immigration, passport, and consular fees
Patent and copyright fees
Proposed legislation
Registration and filing fees
Miscellaneous fees for permits, licenses, etc..
Miscellaneous fees for regulatory and judicial services
Fees for legal and judicial services

Total fines, penalties, and forfeitures
War reparations and recoveries under military occupation
Gifts and contributions
Undistributed collections
Refunds

113
4,700

53
28

55
29

39
27
20
*

38
28
20
*

168

171

188

63
228

67

60

Fines, penalties, and forfeitures
Proposed legislation

107
4,400

60

Total fees for permits and regulatory and judicial services

91
3,495

291

67

52
14

56
23

56
28

58

28
13
40
28
22
*

__ ___ _

Total budget receipts

1

3,921

5,049

5,153

232,225

Total miscellaneous receipts

40
-1

270,000

295,000

161,357
92.193
-21.325

185.581
105.548
-21.129

202.757
115.818
-23.575

2

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
_
_ _ _
Trust funds. _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Interfund transactions __ _ _ _ _

. .
__

"Less than $500 thousand.
1
The estimates for this proposal are shown net of the impact on regular corporation income taxes.
The gross impact in 1975 is $5 billion.
2
Deposits by States are State payroll taxes that cover the benefit part of the program. Federal
unemployment tax receipts cover administrative costs at both the Federal and State level. Railroad unemployment tax receipts cover both the benefits and administrative costs of the program
for3 the railroads.
Represents employer and employee contributions to the civil service retirement and disability
fund for covered employees of Government-sponsored, privately owned enterprises and the District of Columbia municipal government.
4
Includes both Federal and trust funds. Trust fund amounts in miscellaneous receipts are: 1973.
$24 million; 1974, $34 million; 1975, $39 million.
Note.— Estimates for 1974 and 1975 include effects of proposed legislation.




300

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YE/AR

Table 12. OFFSETTING

1975

RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)

Type

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

INTRAGOVERNMENTAL TRANSACTIONS
Intrabudgetary transactions:
Federal intrafiind transactions:

1 149
.
23

Trust intrafund transactions:

1.194
24

12 3
,0

1.218

808
8

982
11

1.087
22

86
1

993

1.109

1 988
.

2, 1 6
9

2.327

1,775
1,430
381
337
259
146

Total Federal intrafunds

1 175
.
27

1 12
.7

Interest on Government capital in enterprises
Other

2,403
2,008
451
303
261

2,931
2,327
471
307
244

1

Railroad retirement/social security
Other
Total trust intrafunds...

_

Total intrafund transactions
Interfund transactions:
Distributed by agency and function:
Federal fund payments to trust funds:
Contributions to insurance programs:
Supplementary retirement contributions
Supplementary medical insurance
Hospital insurance
Old-age and survivors insurance
Military service credits, various programs
Unemployment insurance
pther
Miscellaneous:
State and local government fiscal assistance
Payments to airport and airway trust fund
Other

4

4

4

8,295
73
141

121

125
250

125
65

375

190

12,962

12,028

13,595

2,101

1, 759

1,847

816
10

911
11

978
15

2.682

2,840

5,436

6.420

7,140

8,363

9,101

9,980

21.325

Total interfunds distributed by agency and
function

13.405

2,927

Subtotal

11.653

121

Trust fund payments to Federal funds:
Charges for services to trust funds
Repayment of loans on advances to trust funds. _

168

6,205
822
95

12,841

Subtotal

6,055

21,129

23,575

23.312

23,325

25,903

Undistributed by agency and function:

Employer share, employee retirement:
Civil Service retirement and disability insurance..
Old-age, survivors, disability, and hospital insurance (contribution as employer) 2
Other Federal employees retirement
Total employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Total interfunds undistributed by agency and
function
Total interfund transactions
Total intrabudgetary transactions
See footnotes at end of table.




_.

SUMMARY TABLES

301

Table 12. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in Bullions of dollars)-Continued
1973
estimate

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

INTRAGOVERNMENTAL TRANS ACT IONS—Con.
Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies:
Distributed by agency and function:
Interest on loans to Government-owned enterprises
Dividends and other earnings

Undistributed by agency and function:
Employer share, employee retirement:
Contributions to retirement and disability insurance.
Supplementary retirement contributions

124
50

147
50

123

Total distributed by agency and function

73
50

174

197

_

355
507

204
533

861

737

1,036

934

Total, employer share, employee retirement
Total receipts from off-budget Federal agencies
Total intrago vernmental transactions

123
23,436

24,361

26,837

PROPRIETARY RECEIPTS FROM THE PUBLIC
Interest:
Interest on Rural Electrification Administration loans
Interest on foreign loans and deferred foreign collections.
Other interest (domestic)3

Sale of products:
Sale of timber and other natural land products
Sale of power and other utilities
Sale of other products
Recovery of mint manufacturing expense

3

Total sale of products
Fees and other charges for services and special benefits:
Veterans life insurance
Other 3
Total fees and other charges
See footnotes at end of table.

540-000 O - 74 - 20




1

5,700
58
25

4,700
63
26

5,783

4,788

300
172

300
179

1,187

Total royalties

1

1,027
160

Royalties:
Royalties on Outer Continental Shelf lands
Miscellaneous royalties 3

311

3,013

Total rents

287

2,929
60
24

Rents:
Rent on Outer Continental Shelf lands
Rent of land and other real property 3
Rent of equipment and other personal property

232
79

2

Dividends and other earnings

212
75

346

Total interest

112
175
60

472

479

614
344
43
24

654
338
43
27

821
388
43
33

1.025

1,062

1,285

495
346

477
406

468
551

841

884

1,019

302

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAB 1975

Table 12. OFFSETTING RECEIPTS BY TYPE (in millions of dollars)—Continued
1973
estimate

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

PROPRIETARY RECEIPTS FROM THE PUBLIC—
Continued

Sale of Government property:
Sale of land and other real property 3
Sale of equipment and other personal property:
Military assistance program sales (trust fund)
Sale from the stockpile of strategic and critical materials
Other
Sale of scrap and salvage material 3
Total sale of property.__
Realization upon loans and investments:
Rural Electrification Administration
Recoveries from Japan
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (dollar conversions of
foreign currency)
_
Foreign military credit sales (trust fund)
Repayment of loans to United Kingdom
Recoveries under Lend-Lease program
Other 3
Total realization upon loans and investments
Recoveries and refunds

3

Undistributed collections
Total proprietary receipts from the public *
Total offsetting receipts

3
1

22

2
1

1,730
32
7
50
1

2,615
1,236
50
1

3,250
95
6
42
1

2,184

3,925

4,279

9
4
5
9
67
6
1
19
8

11
0
80
6
9
2
5
11
5

19
1
10
0
7
0
37
19
5

76
6

46
2

45
8

32
3

5
8

5
9

7

*

9,702

12,897

12,706

33,138

37,258

39,543

10
5
16
4

* Less than $500 thousand.
1
Interchange receipts between the social security and railroad retirement funds place the social
security funds in the same position they would have been in if there were no separate railroad retirement system. Interchange receipts between Federal retirement funds occur when an employee transfers from coverage by one system to coverage by another system.
3
Includes provision for covered Federal civilian employees and military personnel.
3
Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.
« Consists of:
1973
1974
1975
Federal funds
._ 7, 179
9,464
8,648
Trust funds
_
2,523
3,433
4,058




SUMMARY TABLES

303

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

050

1973

OUTLAYS

1974
mate

1975
mate

1973

1974
mate

1975
mate

24,365
5.151
24,151
17,998

24,601
5,688
26,044
19,867

23,246
4,390
21,069
15,654

24,081
5,145
23,306
15,144

24,428
5,685
24,917
16,359

8,306
1,592
1,194

9,322
2,141
1,365

8.157
1,119
-224

8,414
1,299
1,080

8,890
1,499
934

64

2,000
153

_
62

1,942
151

13
22

55
34

13
22

55
34

—6

—6

-160

-289

77,638

82.690

90,974

73,297

78,400

84,600

2.766

4.238

1.925

531

1,100

1.200

2.633

2,389

3,058

2,393

2,328

2,886

68

-135

-51

3

5

*

NATIONAL DEFENSE

051 Department of DefenseMilitary:
Military personnel
23,727
Retired military personnel.
4,442
Operation and maintenance
21,731
Procurement
17,473
Research, development, test, and
evaluation
7,960
Military construction
1.356
1
Other
1,062
Allowances for:
Civilian and military pay raises
All-volunteer force
_
Military retirement systems reform...
Other legislation....
._
._
Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrabudgetary transactions
—8
Proprietary receipts from the
public.
_
_
-105
Total 051
057 Military assistance:
Funds appropriated to
President* 2

_

the

058 Atomic energy:
AtomicEnergyCommission 12 ...

059 Defense-related activities:
Funds appropriated to the
President
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare.
Department of the Treasury
(trustfund)
General Services Administration..
Other independent agencies:
Selective Service System
Other temporary study commissions
__

3

6

40

_
40

12

*
27

46

15

83

54

47

79

68

47

*

*

-16

12

*

127

Total 059..

100

59

177

4

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrabudgetary transactions
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-376

- 1 , 240

-969

-376

-1,240

-969

Total national defense

82,787

88,177

95,047

76,021

80,573

87,729

See footnote at end of table.




-1

-1

304

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAH 1975
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

1974
estimate

OUTLAYS

1975
estimate

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

150 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
AND FINANCE
151 Conduct of foreign affairs:
Department of State 13
_
Other independent agencies:
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Foreign Claims Settlement
Commission
Tariff Commission
Other temporary study commissions

10

594

617

461

586

623

8

10

9

9

10

153 Foreign information and exchange activities:
Department of State *
Other independent agencies:
Board for International Broadcasting
United States Information
Agency 1
_._

154 Food for Peace:
Department of Agriculture

1
9

1
6

6
8

8
9

*

1

2

*

1

2

612

638

476

610

652

2,419

3,976

3,071

2,298

2,529

63
26

51
13

10
45

2,003
—1
45
7

48
21

30
27

81

78

83

74

78

84

4,119

3,209

2,129

2,446

2,670

52

58

65

50

55

62

40

50

50

39

51

50

210

221

257

207

219

247

301

329

372

295

326

359

895

Total 152

1
7

2,588

152 Economic and financial assistance:
Funds appropriated to the
President^
Department of Agriculture
Department of State 1
Department of Transportation 1 .
Other independent agencies: Actioni

17
6

540

Total 151

Total 153

507

554

778

754

796

742

—*

—1

—1

—*

—1

—1

5

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
I ntrabudgetary transactions
Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies
.
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-50

-50

-50

-50

-50

-50

-646

-241

-268

-646

-241

-268

Total international affairs
and
finance

3,628

5,322

4,680

2,957

3,886

4,103

See footnotes at end of table.




SUMMARY TABLES

305

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1974

OUTLAYS

1975

mate
250 SPACE RESEARCH
TECHNOLOGY

1973

1973

mate

1974

1975

mate

mate

AND

251 Manned space flight:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration

1,539

1,413

1,530

1,537

1,479

252 Space science and applications:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
.

1,092

898

939

1,064

948

253 Space technology:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration

147

124

133

166

141

133

254 Aeronautical technology:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration
._.

313

276

311

242

288

310

259 Supporting space activities:
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration^

329

364

356

316

358

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-13

-37

-25

-13

-37

-25

Total space research and
technology

3,406

3,038

3,245

3,311

3,177

3,272

4,607

4,499

5,434

4,840

2,343

1,405

—*

*

1,568

936

352

350 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
351 Farm income stabilization:
Department of Agriculture 1 -.Other independent agencies: Farm
Credit Administration
Total351
352 Rural housing and public facilities:
Department of Agriculture i _ —
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Total 352
See footnotes at end of table.




4,607

4,499

5,434

4,840

2,343

1,405

1,253

779

520

226

424

-57

--

—1

—7

—2

520

225

417

-59

1,253

779

306

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YElAJl

1975

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
1973

1974
mate

OUTLAYS

1975

1973

mate

1974

1975

mate

mate

350 AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT—
Continued
354 Agricultural land and water
resources;

Department of Agriculture 1

469

396

332

355 Research and other agricultural services:
Department of Agriculture *

1,004

1,026

1,178

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-185

-48

-51

7,148
7,148

6,652

7,411

Total agriculture and rural
development

356

955

283

330

1,044

1,104

-185

-48

-51

6,191

4,039

2,729

400 NATURAL RESOURCES AND
ENVIRONMENT
401 Water resources and power:
Department of Agriculture *
Department of Defense—Civil1 _
Department of the Interior l
Department of State
Other independent agencies:
Federal Power Commission
Delaware River Basin Commission
Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Other temporary study commissions
Tennessee Valley Authority
Water Resources Council1
Total 401
402 Land management:
Department of Agriculture*
Department of the Interior 1
Other independent agencies: Other
temporary study commissions.
Total 402
403 Mineral resources:
Executive Office of the President.
Department of the Interior 1
Total 403
See footnotes at end of table.




191

157

149

124

190

163

1,982

1,686

1,640

1,709

1,606

1,644

688
25

556
9

630
108

631
8

620
18

669
36

24

29

32

22

30

33

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

1
65
10

46
11

75
10

1
367
9

*
420
12

458
12

2,986

2,494

2,644

2,873

2,897

3,016

653
111

1.032

796
332

723
226

875
268

776
319

*

286

*

880

1,318

1,128

949

1,143

1,095

189

9
295

19
335

122

9
258

19
304

189

304

354

122

267

323

SUMMARY TABLES

307

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1974

OUTLAYS

1975

mate
400

1973

1973

mate

1974

1975

mate

mate

NATURAL RESOURCES AND
ENVIRONMENT—Continued

404

Pollution control and abatement:
Environmental Protection Agency12
Other independent agencies: Other
temporary study commissions.

405 Recreational resources:
Department of the Interior !
Other independent agencies: Marine Mammal Commission

4,629

695

*

10

5

7,427

Total 404

7,427

4,639

700

725

751

950

*

1,114

2,559

3,991

5

8

1,114

2,564

3,999

570

765

780

*

1

1 _

725

Other natural resources programs:
Department of Defense—Civil
Department of the Interior
Department of State

752

91
5

570

765

71
8

1
177
3

1
204
4

1
245
4

1
14
6
3

1
200

4

1
21
4
4

11
8

Total 405.

208

250

18
6

204

246

-2

-2

-2

-2

_2

-2

-5,204 -7,230 -6,330 -5,204 -7,230

-6,330

409

Total 409
8

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrabudgetary transactions
Proprietary receipts from the
public
Total natural resources and
environment

7,183

2,483

-306

589

2,198

1,624

1,755

1,848

1,907

2,107

69

66

63

72

67

66

1

*

609

3,128

500 COMMERCE AND
TRANSPORT ATI ON
501 Air transportation:
Department of Transportation 13 .
Other independent agencies:
Civil Aeronautics Board
Aviation Advisory Commission 1

Total 501
502 Water transportation:
Department of Commerce
Department of Defense—Civil.._
Department of Transportation 1 .
Other independent agencies: Other
temporary study commissions _

Total 502
See footnotes at end of table.




2,267

1,690

1,819

1,922

1,974

2,173

743

550

563

820

801

913

457
-2
779

502
11
846

569
6
907

1

*

1

*

1,563

1,351

1,477

1,234

1,360

1.481

308

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAR 1975
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

OUTLAYS

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

1973
actual

15,175

7,051

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

500 COMMERCE AND
TRANSPORTATION—
Continued
503

Ground transportation:

Department of Transportation x _
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Other independent agencies:
Other Temporary Study Commissions
United States Railway Association
__

506

5,972

1

1

*

*
10

26

16

15,201

7,051

5,518

5,648

5,989

1,410

1,999

1,553

1,567

1,999

1,553

731
3
62

724
2
74

896

637

861

88

56

757
6
73

agencies:

Advancement of business:

Department of Commerce*
Department of the Treasury
Department of Transportation
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Other independent agencies:
Emergency Loan Guarantee
Board
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (trust fund)
Interstate Commerce Commission
National Credit Union Administration
Small Business Administration.
Other Temporary Study Commissions
Total 506
507

5,637

566

Total 503
505 Postal Service:
Other independent
Postal Service

5,518
1

565

-1
-3
-538

12
2,277

87
*

-6
-5
-558

-3
-565

12

251

448

-11

-11

1,317

750

2

2

-15
471

1 .

3,087

1,051

1,433

1,471

1,006

836

910
390
479

700
310
681

418
322
598

623
336
490

750
323
675

588

52

-49

Area and regional development:

Funds appropriated to the President. __
Department of Commerce1
Department of the Interior 1
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Other independent agencies:
Appalachian Regional Commission *
National Council on Indian Opportunity
Joint Federal-State Land Use
Planning Commission for
Alaska 1 .
Total 507
See footnotes at end of table.




337
650

4

4

5

4

5

5

*

*

*

*

*

*

1

1

1

1

1

1

1,785

1,696

1,345

1,506

1,705

1,582

SUMMARY TABLES

309

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

1974
estimate

OUTLAYS

1975
estimate

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1c75
estimate

500 COMMERCE AND
TRANSPORTATION—
Continued
508 Regulation of business:
Department of Commerce
Department of the Treasury
(trust fund)
Other Independent Agencies:
Civil Aeronautics Board
Federal Communications Commission
Federal Maritime Commission _
Federal Trade Commission
Interstate Commerce Commission
Securities and Exchange Commission

2

3

2

2

3

2

-6

*

3

16

17

14

16

17

34
6
30

41
6
32

47
7
38

34
5
27

40
7
32

45
7
38

34

42

43

33

38

46

30

36

42

30

36

42

150

Total 508

14

177

197

139

172

200

7

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrabudgetary transactions
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-131

-159

-87

-131

-159

-87

-155

-184

-327

-155

-184

-327

Total commerce and transportation

10,543

22,822

14,459

13,070

13,521

13,400

790

346

782
-7

611
-4

235
-2

550 COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING
551 Community planning, management, and development:
Funds appropriated to the President _
Department of Agriculture
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Other independent agencies:
Action
Legal Services Corporation
Total 551
555 Low and moderate income
housing aids:
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
See footnotes at end of table.




27

33
2,338

998

2,588

2,023

2,251

2,459

94

92

102

78

101

108

33

11
3,222

1,436

2,795

2,877

2,960

2,859

1,918

2,338

2,467

1,420

1,786

2,292

310

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAB 1975
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

OUTLAYS
1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

550 COMMUNITY
DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING—
Continued
556 Maintenance of the housing
mortgage market:
Department of Housing and Urban development. _ _ Other independent agencies: Federal Home Loan Bank Board..

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
Total community developAND

1,127

85

1,029

849

-249

-325

-334

1,187

1,127

-165

704

55
1

—*

_*
_

—*
.

_*
_

_*

_*
_

6,093

4,960

6,389

4,132

5,450

5,667

3,567
244

3,483
263

,134
1
271

2,941
222

3,330
247

1,998
302

3,812

3,746

1
,405

3,179

3,578

2,300

1,840

2,043

2,351

1,510
*

1,710

2,119

1
3
1,853

1
4
2,057

1
5
2,366

5
1,515

-32
1,677

-41
2,077

657

602

6
5

64
2

56
9

334

2,852

2,875

MAN-

601 Elementary and secondary education:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Interior
Total 601
602 Higher education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of the Treasury
Department of Housing and Urban Development
Total 602
603 Vocational education:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
._
604 Consolidated education grants:
Department of Health, EducaSee footnotes at end of table.




1,187

954

Total 556

600 EDUCATION
POWER

954

15

1,910

SUMMARY TABLES

311

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued

Function and department or other unit

BUDGET AUTHORITY
1973
1974
1975
actual
estiestimate
mate

OUTLAYS
1974
1975
estiestimate
mate

1973
actual

600 EDUCATION AND MANPOWER—C onti nued
605 Other education aids:
Legislative branch *
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare *
..
Other independent agencies:
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. __
National Foundation on the
Arts and the Humanities!__
Smithsonian Institution J
Other Temporary Study Commissions
___
Total605
606 General science:
Other independent agencies: National Science Foundation *_607 Manpower training and employment services:
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Department of Labor *
Total 607
609 Other manpower aids:
Department of the Interior
Department of Labor 1
Other independent agencies:
Committee for Purchase of
Products and Services of the
Blind and Other Severely
Handicapped
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Board of
Review
...
National Labor
Relations
Board
National Mediation B o a r d . . . _ '
Occupational
Safety
and
Health Review Commission.
See footnotes at end of table.




84

91

104

78

90

98

786

515

305

437

668

533

35

50

60

35

50

60

*
89
110

*

134
76

!

195
95

*

*

*

67
71

164
100

*

2

95
107
1

*

1,011

96
5

58
9

60
3

1,106

867

759

688

648

579

672

585

__

3

292
3,315

340
2,343

280
2,582

281
2,999

310
2,656

316
2,532

3,607

2,684

2,862

3,283

2,966

2,848

60
227

68
287

65
214

*

*

*

53
178

*

62
226

*

74
280

*

32

44

56

28

41

53

11

12

16

11

12

16

*.

*

*

*

*

*

50
3

56
3

61
3

48
3

56
3

62
3

4

5

6

4

5

6

312

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

1974
estimate

600 EDUCATION AND MANPOWER—Continued
609 Other manpower aids—Con*
President's Council on Youth
Opportunity
Other Temporary Study Commissions.
Total 609

1975
estimate

___

OUTLAYS
1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

*
*

*

379

408

498

326

405

494

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-13

-13

-13

-13

-13

-13

Total education and manpower

12,049

13,782

11,489

10,185

10,819

11,537

3,327

3,181

2,615

2,784

3,346

3,424

*

—*

—*

650 HEALTH
651 Development of health resources:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare....
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
_
Total 651

3,327

652 Financing or providing medical services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare * 3
...
Other independent agencies: Civil
Service Commission (trust
fund)
Total 652

3,181

2,615

2,784

3,345

3,424

18,512

22,566

24,925

15,273

19,494

22.435

17

-12

-23

18,512

653 Prevention and control of
health problems:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare L . . . .
Other independent agencies:
Consumer Product Safety
Commission
Other temporary study commissions

22,566

24,925

15,290

19,482

22,412

390

375

444

345

413

408

1

35

43

*

32

42

1

1

*
450

392

Total 653

410
410

487
487

346
346

445

-4

-4

-5
-5

-4
-4

-4

-5

22,226

26,153

28,022

18,417

23,268

26,282

8

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
Totalhealth
See footnotes at end of table.




SUMMARY TABLES

313

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

700

1973
actual

1974
estimate

OUTLAYS

1975
estimate

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

INCOME SECURITY

701 Retirement and disability:
The Judiciary (trust fund)
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare * 3
Department of Labor* 2
Department of State (trust
fund) 3
Other independent agencies:
Civil Service Commission
(trust fund) 3_
Railroad Retirement Board 13.
Other temporary study commissions

2

2

2

1

1

1

50,317
110

59,372
141

66,084
167

49,254
102

56,276
143

64,909
167

40

73

96

31

38

45

7,598
2,260

9,140
2,607

9,952
3,014

4,367
2,439

5,733
2,679

6,993
2,999

*

*

60,327

71,334

79,315

56,194

64,871

75,114

6,752

6,604

6,655

5,362

5,566

7,065

3,189

3,925

5,453

2,901

3,906

5,316

6,532

7,827

9,232

6,098

7,666

9,190

9,722

11,753

14,685

8,999

11,573

14,505

3,018

3,325

3,359

2,520

2,987

3,389

-1

-1

-2

-1

-1

-2

79,818

93,015

104,012

73,073

84,995

100,071

801 Income security for veterans:
Veterans Administration1

7,226

7,494

7,757

7,031

7,242

7.519

802 Veterans education, training,
and rehabilitation:
Veterans Administration

2,756

3,276

2,876

2,801

3,246

2,878

Total 701
702 Unemployment insurance:
Department of Labor!
703 Public assistance:
Department of Agriculture.
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Total 703_.__
704 Social services:
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

*

9

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Proprietary receipts from the
public
Total income security
800 VETERANS BENEFITS
AND SERVICES

See footnotes at end of table.




314

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1975
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

1974
estimate

OUTLAYS

1975
estimate

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

800 VETERANS BENEFITS
AND SERVICES—Con.
803 Veterans housing:
Department of Housing and
Urban Development
Veterans Administration
Total 803
804 Hospital and medical care for
veterans:
Veterans Administration»
809 Other veterans benefits and
services:
Department of Defense—Civil *_
Veterans Administration
_..
Other independent agencies:
American Battle Monuments
Commission1
Total 809

5

4

2

9
-390

11
—215

—8
-146

5

4

2

-381

-203

-154

2,925

3,110

3,495

2,715

3,104

3,413

44
322

22
358

15
401

32
311

28
345

21
402

4

4

6

3

4

5

369

384

421

347

377

428

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrabudgetary transactions
Proprietary receipts from the
public

—2

—2

—2

—2

—2

—2

-497

-479

-469

-497

-479

-469

Total veterans benefits and
services

12,783

13,787

14,080

12,013

13,285

13.612

851 Interest on the public debt:
Department of the Treasury....

24,167

29,100

30,500

24,167

29,100

30,500

852 Interest on refunds of receipts:
Department of the Treasury_...

175

183

206

175

183

206

853 Interest on uninvested funds:
Department of the Treasury

7

5

5

6

5

5

-1,176

-1,194

-1,151

-1,176

-1,194

-124

-147

-73

-124

-147

-235

-249

-311

-235

-249

27,754

29,122

22,813

27,754

29,122

850 INTEREST

Deductions for offsetting receipts:
Intrabudgetary transactions.... -1,151
Receipts from off-budget Federal
agencies
-73
Proprietary receipts from the
public
-311
Total interest
See footnotes at end of table.




22,813

SUMMARY TABLES

315

Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

1973
actual

1974
estimate

OUTLAYS

1975
estimate

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

900 GENERAL GOVERNMENT
901 Legislative functions:
Legislative branch
902

46
1

49
3

33
3

418

470

192

213

310

187

212

309

1

1

1

1

1

1

13
9

The Judiciary
Other independent agencies: Indian Claims Commission
Total 902
903 Executive direction and management:
Executive Office of the President.
Funds appropriated to the President
Department of the Treasury
General Services Administration.
Other independent agencies:
Advisory Committee on Federal Pay
Other Temporary Study Commissions
Total 903
904

402

25
1

31
1

18
8

213

31
1

99

97

82

49

103

102

28
2
1

79
2
*

3
6
2
*

27
2
*

83
1
*

3
6
2
*

*

*

*

*

3

2

4

3

Judicial functions:

1

130

181

123

80

192

144

106
1,634

118
1,856

132
2,214

105
1,619

128
1,852

138
2,202

5

5

5

5

5

5

Central fiscal operations:

Legislative branch i
Department of the Treasury L-Other independent agencies:
Renegotiation Board
Other temporary study com-

*

missions _

Total
905

904

1,744

1,978

2,351

1,729

1,985

2,345

625

281

917

949

133

1

*

General property and records
management:

General Services Administration i
Other independent agencies:
Other temporary study commissions
Total 905
Central personnel management:
Other independent agencies:
Civil Service Commission i 3 . _ _
Other temporary study commissions

953

953

625

281

918

949

133

220

220

289

218

225

289

*

*

218

225

906

Total 906
footnotes at end of table.




*

220

220

289

289

316

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YE)AR 1975
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY

Function and department or other unit

900

1973
actual

1974
estimate

OUTLAYS

1975
estimate

1973
actual

1974
estimate

1975
estimate

GENERAL GOVERNMENT—
Continued

908

Law enforcement and justice:

The Judiciary (trust fund)
Department of Justice 1
Department of the Treasury
Other independent agencies:
Administrative Conference of
the United S t a t e s . . . .
Cabinet Committee on Opportunities
for
SpanishSpeaking People
Commission on Civil Rights. __
Subversive Activities Control
Board
Other temporary study commissions
Total 908
909

2
1,917
151

2
2,142
196

2
1,533
139

2
1,941
157

2
2,110
178

*

1

1

*

1

1
1
7

1
5

1

1
6

1

1
5

6

._

*

7

*

*

1
2,078

2
2,350

*
1,680

1
2,108

2
2,300

*

*

41
6
*

*
48
4
*

*
31
6
*

*
44
6
*

490
*

179

15
6

18
2

7
6

13
8

14
8

1

2
1

2

1

2

2

1

1

19 7
,2

National capital region:

Other independent agencies:
Commission of Fine Arts
District of Columbia
Interstate Commission on the
Potomac River Basin
Washington Metropolitan Area
Transit Authority
National Capital Planning
Commission1
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation
Other temporary study commissions
Total 909.
910

2
1,776
143

*
357

*

1
*

538

628

579

438

650

678

3
0
6
0
14
0
207

49
64
9
6
267

64
7
0
13
0
20
9

40
5
9
15
0
16
9

38
6
5
16
0
26
6

44
7
2
16
1
294

1
1
*

27

1
5

7

1
2

24
*

1

1

1

1

1

1

542

409

488

Other general government:

Legislative branch
Department of Defense—Civil. _ _
Department of the Interior
Department of the Treasury l
Other independent agencies:
American Revolution Bicentennial Administrationx
Other historical and memorial
commissions1
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations l
Other temporary study commissions
Total 910
See footnotes at end of table.




413

504

551

317

SUMMARY TABLES
Table 13. BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION
AND AGENCY (in millions of dollars)—Continued
BUDGET AUTHORITY
Function and department or other unit

900

1973
actual

OUTLAYS

1974 1975 1973 1974
1975
estiestiactual
estiestimate
mate
mate
mate

GENERAL GOVERNMENT—
Continued

Deductions for offsetting receipts:10
Intrabudgetary transactions
Proprietary receipts from the
public

-143

-150

-149

-143

-150 - 1 4 9

-371

-279

-297

-371

-279 - 2 9 7

Total general government.....

6,007

6,417

6,820

5,480

6,800

6,774

8,295

6,055

6,205

6,636

6,147

6,174

940

GENERAL REVENUE
SHARING

Department of the Treasury * 3_.__

Allowances for:
Acceleration of energy research and
development
Civilian agency pay raises
Contingencies.....
Undistribted intragovernmental transactions:
Employer share, employee retirement:
Interfund transactions
-2,927
Receipts from off-budget Federal agencies
Interest received by trust funds... -5,436

-400

-2,682

809
625
750

-2,840

-2,927

-861
-737
-6,420 -7,140 -5,436

461
600
300 500

-2,682

-2,840

-861
-737
-6,420
-7,140

Total budget authority and outlays
276,417 310,853 322,141 246,526 274,660

304,445

MEMORANDUM

Federal funds.
Trustfunds.
Interfund transactions

208,995 220,473 228,659 186,403 203.715
88,746 111,509 117,058 81,447 92,075
-21,325 - 2 1 , 1 2 ^ - 2 3 , 5 7 5 -21,325 -21,129

1
2
3
4

220,636
107,385
-23,575

Includes both Federal and trust funds.
Net of intrafund and interfund transactions, and proprietary receipts from the public.
Net of intrafund and interfund transactions.
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfunction above: 1973, $1,;
lillion; 1974, $2,912 million; 1975, $3,706 million.
5
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfunction above: 1973, $14 milli
974, $38 million; 1975, $41 million.
8
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfuctions above: Less than $'
intisand
thousand in all 3 years.
all 3 vears.
7
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfunction above: 1973, $73 mil
l.* nn . 1074 $0; 1Q7*> $822 million.
tft- 1975, $822 million
lion; 1974,
UAV1UUVU

*" C X C 1 U Q C 5

V U 0 V VVlIt A

U U S C L l l U g

M ****>*» f* *r %*

J CV.C1 L H 5

"

•»»>

WHICH

I i a V C

UCCII

illion; 1974. $2,367 million; 1975, $2,890 million.

540-000 O - 74 - 21




CO

00

Table 14. CONTROLLABILITY OF BUDGET OUTLAYS (dollars in billions)
Estimate

Actual
1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

w
d
o

Relatively uncontrollable under present law:

Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals:
Social security and railroad retirement
_
__
Federal retirement and insurance..
_.
(Military retired pay)
_
(Civilian)
__
Unemployment assistance
_._
Veterans benefits: Pensions, compensation, education, and insurance._
Medicare and Medicaid
Housing payments
... ..
Public assistance and related programs
Subtotal, payments for individuals

."..

Total, open-ended programs andfixedcosts
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations:

$28.3
4.8
(2.4)
(2.4)
2.9
5.7
8.9
.3
3.9

$31.3
5.6
(2.8)
(2.7)
3.7
6.6
9.9
.5
4.7

$37.2
$41.5 $50.7
$57.9
6.6
7.7
8.9
11.0
(3.4) (3.9) (4.4) (5.1)
(3.2) (3.8) (4.5) (5.9)
6.6
7.5
5.7
6.0
7.6
8.3
9.3
10.0
11.2
13.4
14.1
18.0
.7
1.1
1.6
1.9
7.4
8.9
9.1
11.5

$67.2
12.8
(5.7)
(7.1)
7.5
9.6
20.8
2.3
J4J

41.8

47.6

^54.9

62.2

77.3

88.4

99.5

116.3

134.2

10.3

11.1

12.7

14.4

14.8

15.5

3.2
3.0

4.1
2.8

3.8
3.8

2.8
5.2

4.0
6.4

17.4
6.6
3.6
6.3

21.3
6.1
.9
8.0

22.0
6.2
.9
8.1

~56~8

. . . .

$24.8
4.3
(2.1)
(2.2)
2.9
4.9
7.2
.3
3.4

1.7
3.0

_

Netinterest
General revenue sharing
Farm price supports (CCC)
Other open-ended programs andfixedcosts

$22.5
3.8
(1.8)
(2.0)
2.8
5.0
4.6
.3
2.8

64.8

74.5

84.2

100.1

114.3

133.3

152.7

171.4

23.7
28.6

tn

National defense.

t

21.6

25.0

25.5

24.9

22.1

20.2

19.1

20.9

15.4

17.3

16.4

16.6

18.2

19.0

20.5

23.4

Total, outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations....

37.0

42.3

41.9

41.5

40.2

39.2

39.6

44.4

Total, relatively uncontrollable outlays

93^8

107.2

116.4

125.7

140.4

153.5

172.9

Civilian programs




__

52.3

197.1 223.6

i
3

Relatively controllable outlays:
National defense
Civilian programs
Total, relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement
Total budget outlays
MEMORANDUM
Percent of total outlays:
Relatively uncontrollable under present law:
Open-ended programs and fixed costs:
Payments for individuals
Other

46.6
19.5

53.3
20.2

53.1
17.0

52.4
20.9

52.2
21.5

54.1
27.1

53.4
23.2

54.6
26.5

58.5
25.9

66.1
—1.7

73.5
-1.8

70.1
-2.0

73.3
-2.4

73.7
-2.6

81.1
-2.8

76.5
-2.9

81.0
-3.5

84.4
-3.6

158.3

178.8

184.5

196.6

211.4

231.9

246.5

274.7

304.4

26.4%
9.5

26.6%
9.6

29.8%
10.6

31.7%
11.2

36.6%
10.8

38.1%
11.1

40.4%
13.7

42.4% 44.1%
13.2
12.2

Total open-ended programs and fixed costs
Outlays from prior-year contracts and obligations

35.9
23.4

36.3
23.7

40.4
22.7

42.9
21.1

47.4
19.0

49.3
16.9

54.1
16.1

55.6
16.2

56.3
17.2

Total relatively uncontrollable outlays
Relatively controllable outlays
Undistributed employer share, employee retirement

59.3
41.8
—1.1

59.9
41.1
-1.0

63.1
38.0
—1.1

64.0
37.3
—1.2

66.4
34.9
—1.2

66.2
35.0
—1.2

70.1
31.0
—1.1

71.8
29.5
-1.3

73.5
27.7
—1.2

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

100.0

W
Total budget outlays




CO

CO
CO

Table 15. LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS FOR MAJOR NEW AND EXPANDED PROGRAMS IN THE 1975 BUDGET

CO

PROJECTION OF COSTS 1 (in millions of dollars)

o

Fiscal year estimate
Dep artment or agency

Funds appropriated to the President:
International financial institutions. BA*
2

0

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

121
10

136
11

546
66

375
213

375
356

375
407

(100)
(10)
13
9

(220)
(130)
13
11

(350)
(250)

(350)
(275)

13
13

13
13

220
220

220
220

130
130

20
20

-173
-177
242
240

27
26
229
229

24
25
169
169

25
25
111
111

67
40

67
50

67
60

(2,875)
(1,910)

(2,875)
(2,870)
360
360
55
55

(2,875)
(2,870)
750
750
55
55

(2,875)
(2,870)
750
750
40
50

(2,875) Provides for reform of elementary, secondary, adult, and
(2,870)
vocational education grants.
1,450 Legislation will provide for automatic cost-of-living ad just1,450
ments to benefits.
40 Includes National Health Service scholarships, Allied
40
Services, and a 3-year library resources demonstration
program.

(2,300)
(1,700)

(2,300)
(2,200)

(2,300)
(2,300)

(2,300) Provides for broad-based grants for locally determined com(2,300)
munity development.

Commerce:
Economic adjustment assistance 3 _ BA

0
National Bureau of Fire Prevention BA
0

Commerce and Labor:
Trade Reform Act
Defense:
Naval petroleum reserve.
Other legislation

BA
0
BA
0
BA
0

-62
-62

99
97

Health, Education, and Welfare:
Health resources planning

BA
0
National health insurance
BA
0
3
Consolidated education grants . BA
0
Supplemental security income. _ _ BA
0
Other legislation
BA
0

Housing and Urban Development:
Better Communities Act 3




Explanation

1974

BA
0

(2,852)

55
25
(2,300)
(560)

Contributions to International Development Association,
Asian Development Bank, and African Development Fund.

(350) New program would help States and communities adjust to
(275) economic change.
13 Provides assistance for fire prevention and control.
13
20
20

d

§

Provides for trade adjustment assistance.

20 Provides for exploration of reserves.
20
22 Amounts represent additional costs of All-Volunteer
Armed Force, reform of retirement pay systems, and
24

flight pay.

()

67
65

()

67 Provides support for State and local health services planning
70
and regulation.
( ) Proposal would provide health insurance coverage nationally.
4

CO

OX

Responsive Governments Act 3
Interior:

Indian programs
Land use control and mined area
protection.
Labor:
Unemployment insurance reform __
State:
International salinity control project, Colorado River.
Transportation:
Unified transportation assistance
program.
Environmental Protection Agency
Veterans Administration:

BA
0
BA
BA

0
BA
0

(110)
(118)

(110)
(110)

(110)
(110)

34
30
49
41

39
34
49
49

39
34
40
40

39
39
40
40

39 Provides loans and grants to Indians for resource, economic
39 and human development.
40
40

215
40
3

9
5
1
1

(110)
(110)

600
80
5

850 Provides for higher maximum benefit levels and extends
9 0 coverage to farm workers.
0

BA
0

BA

Pension system improvements

BA

Other independent agencies:
BA
Payments to Legal Services Cor- 0
poration.
Allowance for relatively small and un- BA
0
forseen items.

150
100

20

23

20
0
32
27

30
0
40
35

30
0
45
40

400
45
45

400
45 Provides for new programs for toxic substances, hazardous
45 wastes and safe drinking water.

275
275
14
9
14
9

318
318
12
7
12
7

364
364
12
5
12
5

412 Provides for more adequate and equitable pensions.
412
1 5 Increases veterans education benefits.
3
15
3

7
2
33

BA
0

2
9

250
250
20
0
20
0

24
23

BA
0

Readjustment benefits

for planning and

9
5
1
3

0
BA*
0
BA
0

(110) Provides for expanded Federal support
(110) management at State and local levels.

72
11

72
72

72
11

250
150

350
250

400
300

450
350

1
0

Provides for reduction of salinity in waters going to Mexico.
Provides grants for highway and mass transit systems.

d

72 Proposal would establish an independent, nonprofit corpora72 tion to provide legal aid to low-income individuals.

500
400

1
This table is supplied pursuant to the requirements of sec. 221(a) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 (Public Law 91-510). The estimates represent simple
projections of cost expressed in constant dollars at prices existing at the time the estimates are prepared. They are not intended to predict future economic conditions;
they do not reflect possible changes in the scope or quality of the proposal which might result from experience gained in actual practice; nor do they reflect in all cases
possible reductions in the costs of other programs that may come about as a result of adoption of the proposals. Further, the resources which might appropriately be applied in later years will require a reexamination of the relative priorities of these and other Government programs, in the light of economic and other circumstances then
prevailing. Thus, the estimates do not represent a commitment as to amounts to be included in future budgets.
2
BA represents budget authority and O represents outlays.
3
The incremental costs of these new programs are less than the amounts shown, since they would replace existing narrower categorical grant programs.
4
The present estimate of the incremental annual Federal cost of this proposal, which is still under development, is $6 billion. The program is expected to begin in 1977.
6
Many of the authorizations for this program have already been enacted.




GO

00

to

00

to
to

Table 16. BUDGET RECEIPTS BY SOURCE, 1965-1975 (in millions of dollars)
1965

1966

1967

1968

Actual
1969

1970

1971

1972

Individual income taxes
Corporation income taxes

48,792
25,461

55,446
30,073

61,526
33,971

68,726
28,665

87,249
36,678

90,412
32,829

86,230
26,785

94,737 103.246 118,000 129,000
32.166 36,153 43,000 48,000

Social insurance taxes and contributions (trust funds):
Employment taxes and contributions:
Old-age and survivors insurance
Disability insurance
Hospital insurance
Railroad retirement

15,567
1.156
636

17,556
1,530
893
683

22,197
2,204
2,645
776

22,265
2,651
3,493
814

25,484
3,469
4,398
885

29,396
4,063
4,755
919

31.354
4,490
4,874
980

35.132
4,775
5,205
1,008

40,703
5,381
7,603
1.189

49.205
6,379
10,740
1,340

55.081
7.240
11,303
1,674

17,359

20,662

27,823

29,224

34,236

39,133

41.699

46.120

54.876

67.664

75,298

Unemployment insurance

3~8r9

3,777

3,659

3,346

3,328

3.464

3,674

4,357

6,051

6,198

5.975

Contributions for other insurance and retirement:
Supplementary medical insurance
Employees'retirement—employee contributions
Other retirement contributions

1,065
16

1,111
18

647
1,201
19

698
1,334
20

903
1,426
24

936
1,735
29

1,253
1,916
37

1.340
2,058
39

1,427
2,146
41

1,683
2,319
44

1,845
2,439
46

Total contributions for other insurance and retirement

1,081

1,129

1,867

2,052

2,353

2,701

3,205

3,437

3,614

4,046

4,330

Total social insurance taxes and contributions..-.

22,258

25,567

33,349

34,622

39,918

45,298

48,578

53,914

64,542

77,907

85,603

Source

Total employment taxes and contributions




_.

1973

Estimate
1974
1975

^
Q

Excise taxes:
Federal funds:
Alcohol
Tobacco .
Other

.

__

Total trust excise taxes
Total excise taxes
Estate and gift taxes
Customs duties

,

Miscellaneous receipts:
Deposit of earnings by Federal Reserve System
Other miscellaneous receipts i
Total miscellaneous receipts
Total budget receipts

3,980
2,077
3,221

4,189
2,121
3,390

4,482
2,136
3,967

4,610
2,093
3,649

4,696
2,205
3,609

5,004
2,205
2,297

5,040
2,274
2,522

5,269
2,382
2,641

5,534
2,402
2,717

9,145

9,278

9,700

10,585

10,352

10,510

9,506

9,836

10,292

10,653

3,659

3,917

4,441

4,379

4,637

5,354

5,542
563

5,322
649

5,665
758

6,001
851

5,840
951

3,917

4,441

4,379

4,637

5,354

6,104

5,971

6,424

6,852

6,791

14,570

Total Federal excise taxes
Trust funds:
Highway
Airport and airway

3,720
2,066
3,358

3,659

I

3,689
2,142
5,081
10,911

.

13,062

13,719

14,079

15,222

15,705

16,614

15,477

16,260

17,144

17,444

2,716
1,442

3,066
1,767

2,978
1,901

3,051
2,038

3,491
2,319

3,644
2,430

3,735
2,591

5,436
3,287

4,917
3,188

5,400
3.500

6,000
3,800

1,372
222

1,713
162

1,805
303

2,091
400

2,662
247

3,266
158

3,533
325

3,252
381

3,495
426

4,400
649

4,700
453

1,594

1,875

2,108

2,491

2,908

3,424

3,858

3,633

3,92!

5,049

5,153

116,833

130,856

149,552

153,671

187,784

193,743

188,392 208,649 232,225

270,000

295,000

MEMORANDUM
Federal funds
Trustfunds
Interfundtransactions
1

90,943 101,427 111,835 114,726 143,321 143,158 133,785 148,846 161,357 185,581 202,757
29,230 32,997 42,935 44,716 52,009 59,362 66,193 72,959 92,193 105,548 115,818
-3,339 -3,568 -5,218 -5,771 -7,547 - 8 , 7 7 8 - 1 1 , 5 8 6 - 1 3 , 1 5 6 - 2 1 , 3 2 5 - 2 1 , 1 2 9 - 2 3 , 5 7 5

Includes both Federal funds and trust funds.




00
to
CO

CO

to

Table 17. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1965-1975 (in millions of dollars)
Actual
1965

150 International affairs and finance:
151 Conduct of foreign affairs i
152 Economic and financial assistance
153 Foreign information and exchange activities....
154 Food for Peace
Deductions for offsetting receipts 3

250 Space research and technology:
251 Manned space
flight
252 Space science and applications
253 Space technology
254 Aeronautical technology




17,956 19,859
1,830 2,095
19,000 20,578
19,012 23,283
7,160 7,747
2,636
3,975

-160

-138

1968

-164

1969

Estimate
1970

1971

21,374 23,031 22,633
2,444
2,849
3,386
22,227 21,609 20,941
23,988 21,584 18,858
7,457
7,166 7,303
525 1,059 1,552
-143

-148

-126

1972

1973

1974

1975

23,036 23,246 24,081 24,428
3,885
4,390
5,145 5,685
21,675 21,069 23,306 24,917
17,131 15,654 15,144 16,359
7,881 8,157 8,414 8,890
1.655
895 2,379
2,434
97 2,183
-113 -113 -166 -295

finance

45,973 54,178 67,457 77,373 77,872 77,150 74,546 75,151 73,297 78,400
1,125 1,003
858
654
789
731
999
806
531
1,100
2,625
2,403
2,264
2,466
2,450
2,453
2,275
2,392
2,393
2,328
136
-62
-17
139
260
79
-70
95
177
-16
-281
- 7 3 8 -481
-116 -138 -118
-89
- 1 0 8 - 3 7 7 -1,240

84,600
1,200
2,886
12
-969

49,578

Total national defense

Total international affairs and

15,162
1,591
14,710
14,339
6,259
2,279

-150

Subtotal, Department of Defense-Military.
057 Military assistance *
058 Atomic energy i
059 Defense-related activities 3
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1967

13,387
1,384
12,349
11,839
6,236
928

050 National defense:
051 Department of Defense—Military 1
Military personnel
Retired military personnel
Operation and maintenance
Procurement
Research and development
Military construction and other
Allowances2
Deductions for offsetting receipts

1966

56,785

70,081

80,517

81,232

80,295

77,661

78,336

80,573

87,729

347
2,041
223
1,852
-123

315
2,329
227
1,784
-165

336
3,057
245
1,452
-542

354
3,053
253
1,204
-245

371
2,420
237
975
-217

398
2,231
235
937
-232

405
1,807
242
918
-276

452
2,287
274
993
-280

476
2,129
295
754
-696

610
2,446
326
796
-291

652
2,670
359
742
-318

4,340

4,490

4,547

4,619

3,785

3,570

3,095

3,726

2,957

3,886

4,103

3,538
751
484
58

4,210
778
435
75

3,649
796
440
89

3,096
700
410
128

2,781
569
344
168

2,209
656
328
188

1,885
661
272
210

1,740
890
228
227

1,537
1,064
166
242

1,479
948
141
288

1,568
936
133
310

W
g
§

76,021

2
*j

*
c*

259 Supporting space activities
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total space research and technology
350 Agriculture and rural development:
351 Farm income stabilization
352 Rural housing and public facilities
354 Agricultural land and water resources
355 Research and other agricultural services
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total agriculture and rural development
400 Natural resources and environment:
401 Water resources and power
402 Land management
403 Mineral resources
404 Pollution control and abatement!
405 Recreational resources
409 Other natural resources programs
Deductions for offsetting receipts 3
Total natural resources and environment
500 Commerce and transportation:
501 Air transportation i.._
502 Water transportation
503 Ground transportation
505 Postal Service
506 Advancement of business
507 Area and regional development
508 Regulation of business
Deductions for offsetting receipts 3
Total commerce and transportation

__

262
-2

435
-1

452
-2

390
-3

390
-6

374
—6

365
-11

349
-13

316
-13

358
-37

352
-25

5,091

5,933

5,423

4,721

4,247

3,749

3,381

3,422

3,311

3,177

3,272

3,667
569
342
483
-257

2,536
468
347
528
-203

3,167
511
353
567
-224

4,542
678
351
615
-246

5,000
490
343
642
-258

4,589
754
344
730
-216

3,651
503
346
813
-217

5,146
877
354
916
-230

4,840
225
356
955
-185

2,343
417
283
1.044
-48

1,405
-59
330
1,104
-51

4,805

3,676

4,373

5,940

6,218

6,201

5,096

7,063

6,191

4,039

2,729

1,761
1,940
2,025
2,070
2,042
1,984
2,390
2,664
2,873
2,897
3,016
509
556
618
639
643
754
837
892
949
1,143
1.095
59
62
73
85
71
94
130
112
122
267
323
134
158
190
249
303
350
701
763
1.114
2.564
3.999
215
241
285
331
372
370
479
524
570
765
781
79
90
93
102
107
122
136
153
168
204
246
-701 -1,011 -1,408 -1,754 -1,369 -1,106 -1.959 -1,347 -5.206 -7,232 -6,332
2,056

2,036

1,878

1,722

2,169

2,568

2,716

3,761

589

609

3,128

875
728
4,093
805
404
601
95
-161

879
708
4,044
888
351
447
98
-112

945
773
4,093
1,141
349
372
101
-127

951
852
4,367
1,080
448
504
98
-173

1.042
870
4,413
920
172
584
108
-170

1.223
909
4,632
1,510
632
590
121
-162

1,602
1,049
5,070
2,183
863
710
181
-230

1,685
1,106
5,210
1,772
737
808
168
-203

1,922
1,234
5,518
1,567
1,471
1,506
139
-286

1.974
1,360
5,648
1,999
1.006
1,705
172
-344

2,173
1.481
5,989
1,553
836
1,582
200
-414

7,440

7,302

7,647

8,126

7,942

9,455

11,428

11,284

13,070

13,521

?

13,400

See footnotes at end of table.




Cn

Table 17. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1965-1975 (in millions of dollars)—Continued

to

Actual
1965

550 Community development and housing:
551 Community planning, management, and development
555 Low and moderate income housing aids
556 Maintenance of the housing mortgage market....
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total community development and housing
600 Education and manpower:
601 Elementary and secondary education
602 Higher education
_...
603 Vocational education
604 Consolidated education grants
605 Other education aids
606 General science
607 Manpower training and employment services
609 Other manpower aids
Deductions for offsetting receipts
Total education and manpower
650 Health:
651 Development of health resources
652 Financing or providing medical services *
653 Prevention and control of health problems
Deductions for offsetting receipts 3._
Total health
700 Income security:
701 Retirement and disability 1
702 Unemployment insurance 1




1966

1967

1968

1969

Estimate
1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

460
81
-237
-16

721
391
1,545
-13

1,023
478
1,133
-19

1,277
948
1,864
-13

1,509
871
-406
-13

2,171
1,280
-487
-*

2,486
1,243
-319
-53

2,878
1,595
-191
-*

2,877
1,420
-165
-*

2,960
1,786
704
-*

2,859
2,292
515
-*

288

2,644

2,616

4,076

1,961

2,965

3,357

4,282

4,132

5,450

5,667

645
414
132

1,804
705
136
_
155
368
989
118
-11

2,441
1,159
250
.__
264
415
1,236
127
-14

2,595
1,392
265

2,451
1,231
307

2,802
1,382
338

3,164
1,429
415

3,490
1,434
521

3,179
1,515
624

3,578
1,677
596

334
449
1,587
136
-16

359
490
1,560
147
-15

546
464
1,602
169
-15

534
522
1,952
223
-13

541
567
2,894
318
-13

688
585
3,283
326
-13

1,011
598
2,966
405
-13

2,300
2,077
334
1,910
956
630
2,848
494
-13

2,290

4,265

5,880

6,743

6,529

7,289

8,226

9,752

10,185

10,819

11,537

1,023
496
182
-1

1,124
1,168
213
-1

1,408
5,002
253
-2

1,814
7,573
219
-3

1,911
9,458
237
-2

2,113 2,211
10,541 12,008
250
235
-6
-3

2,464
14,397
242
-3

2,784
15,290
346
-4

3,345
3,424
19,482 22,412
445
450
-4
-5

1,700

2,505

6,661

9,603

11,604

12,898

14,452

17,099

18,417

23,268

26,282

19,603
2,980

23,173
2,440

24,856
2,552

27,218 30,028
2,412 2,583

33,995
3,369

40,676 45,756
6,179 7,088

56,194
5,362

64,871
5,566

75,114
7,065

158
309
534
107
-9

§

<o
£

703 Public assistance
704 Social services
Deductions for offsetting receipts 3

3,119
205
-196

Total interest
900 General Government:
901 Legislative functions
902 Judicial functions
903 Executive direction and management
904 Central fiscal operations
:
905 General property and records management
906 Central personnel management 1
908 Law enforcement and justice
909 National capital region
910 Other general government
Deductions for offsetting receipts 3
Total general government
See footnotes at end of table.




_...
_.

___

5,186
1,186
-1

7,775
1,499
-1

9,313
2,755
-3

8,999
2,520
-1

28,932

31,168

34,139

37,748

43,734

56,128

64,909

73,073

4,710
58
*
1,271
179
-497

4,700
54
169
1,320
196
-518

5,209
305
304
1,393
195
-507

4,997
478
210
1,472
218
-492

5,528
701
102
1,566
237
-493

6,021
1,015
54
1,802
260
-477

6,448
1,659
-179
2,038
294
-484

6,833
1,960
-317
2,428
318
-491

7,031
2,801
-381
2,715
347
-499

7,242
3,246
-203
3,104
377
-481

7,519
2,878
-154
3,413
428
-471

5,921

6,899

6,882

7,640

8,677

9,776

10,731

12,013

13,285

13,612

12,014
104
14
-847

13,391
120
13
-936

14,573
120
10
-957

16,588 19,304 20,959 21,849 24,167 29,100
120
113
132
182
175
183
7
6
6
6
6
5
- 9 2 5 - 1 , 1 1 0 - 1 , 4 8 7 - 1 , 4 5 5 - 1 , 5 3 6 -1,535

30,500
206
5
-1,590

10,358

850 Interest:
851 Interest on the public debt
852 Interest on refunds of receipts.__„_
853 Interest on uninvested funds
Deductions for offsetting receipts

4,273
867
-2

11,346
77
12
-1,078

Total veterans benefits and services....

3,726
799
-16

5,722

800 Veterans benefits and services:
801 Income security for veterans
802 Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation..
803 Veterans housing
804 Hospital and medical care for veterans
809 Other veterans benefits and services
Deductions for offsetting receipts

3,180
638
-59

25,711

Totalincome security

3,151
278
-109

11,285

12,588

13,746

15,791

29,122

18,312

19,609

20,582

22,813

11,573
2,987
-1

14,505
3,389
-2

84,995 100,071

27,754

142
76
23
844
606
52
366
61
190
-200

159
79
24
886
585
55
385
73
192
-197

167
87
25
969
658
61
426
87
218
-269

180
94
27
1,024
591
79
452
143
243
-333

192
110
31
1,094
590
80
534
205
268
-305

229
133
37
1,271
619
85
666
265
273
-322

256
146
45
1,414
640
123
959
275
341
-324

311
173
68
1,647
725
171
1,233
450
345
-335

333
188
80
1,729
918
218
1,680
438
409
-514

418
213
192
1,985
949
225
2,108
650
488
-428

470
311
144
2,345
133
289
2,300
678
551
-445

2,160

2,240

2,429

2,500

2,800

3,255

3,875

4,787

5,480

6,800

>

6,774
00

to

00

to
00

Table 17. BUDGET OUTLAYS BY FUNCTION, 1965-1975 (in millions of dollars)—Continued
Actual

Function
1966

1967

1968

1969

Estimate
1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

6,636

6,147

6,174

300

1965

1,561

-3,543
-6,420

-3,577
-7J40

1975

d
940 General revenue sharing

._..

Allowances4
Undistributed intragovernmental transactions:
Employer share, employee retirement
Interest received by trust funds
Total outlays
Federal funds
Trust funds
Interfund transactions

-1,329
-1,780

-1,447
-1,917

-1,661
-2,275

-1,825
-2,674

-2,018
-3,099

-2,444
-3,936

-2,611
-4,765

-2,768
-5,089

-2,927
-5,436

118,430 134,652 158,254 178,833 184,548 196,588 211,425 231,876 246,526 274,660 304,445
94,807 106,512 126,779 143,105 148,811 156,301 163,651 177,959 186,403 203,715 220,636
26,962 31,708 36,693 41,499 43,284 49,065 59,361 67,073 81,447 92,075 107,385
-3,339 -3,568 -5,218 -5,771 -7,547 - 8 , 7 7 8 - 1 1 , 5 8 6 - 1 3 , 1 5 6 - 2 1 , 3 2 5 - 2 1 , 1 2 9 - 2 3 , 5 7 5

* Less than $500 thousand.
Entries net of offsetting receipts.
Includes allowances for All-Volunteer Forces, military retirement systems reform, and civilian and military pay raises for Department of Defense.
Excludes offsetting receipts which have been distributed by subfunction above.
* Includes allowances for acceleration of energy research and development, civilian agency pay raises, and contingencies.
1
2
3




1
CO

Ox

Table 18. FEDERAL TRANSACTIONS IN THE NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS, 1964-1975 (in billions of dollars)
Description

Estimate

Actual
1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

RECEIPTS, NATIONAL INCOME BASIS

Personal taxes and nontaxes
Corporate profits tax accruals
Indirect business tax and nontax accruals
Contributions for socialinsurance
Total receipts, national income basis....

50.7
25.7
15.6
23.5

51.3
27.7
16.9
24.6

57.6
31.0
15.7
28.5

64.5
31.2
15.8
35.7

71.4
33.7
17.1
38.3

90.0
37.4
18.6
44.4

93.6
33.3
19.2
49.1

87.4
32.2
20.1
52.9

100.1
34.7
19.9
59.0

107.2
43.8
20.9
71.4

123.7
50.3
23.3
83.2

135.3
50.2
27.5
91.8

115.5

120.5

132.8

147.2

160.6

190.4

195.2

192.6

213.7

243.3

280.5

304.8

EXPENDITURES, NATIONAL INCOME
BASIS

Purchases of goods and services
Defense
.
_
Nondefense
Transfer payments
Domestic ("to persons")
Foreign
Grants-in-aid to State and local governments..
Net interest paid
Subsidies less current surplus of Government
enterprises
.
Wage accruals less disbursements

—

65.7
(50.9)
(14.7)
29.5
(27.3)
(2.2)
9.8
8.1

64.4
(48.9)
(15.5)
30.5
(28.3)
(2.2)
10.9
8.5

71.7
(54.4)
(17.3)
34.2
(31.8)
(2.3)
12.7
9.0

85.3
(67.7)
(17.6)
39.4
(37.2)
(2.2)
14.8
0.9

94.9
(75.9)
(18.9)
44.8
(42.7)
(2.1)
17.8
10.9

99.4
(78.0)
(21.4)
50.7
(48.5)
(2.2)
19.2
12.3

98.0
(77.0)
(21.0)
56.8
(54.8)
(2.0)
22.6
14.0

95.9
(73.2)
(22.8)
69.7
(67.4)
(2.3)
26.8
14.3

103.2
(73.9)
(29.3)
78.6
(75.8)
(2.8)
32.9
13.4

104.5
(73.9)
(30.6)
89.4
(86.8)
(2.6)
40.4
14.4

111.5 121.6
(75.3) (82.0)
(36.2) (39.6)
107.2 123.5
(102.5) (120.7)
(4.7)
(2.8)
44.1
46.6
18.2
19.6

3.8

4.1

4.5

5.1

4.1

4.1

4.7
—.1

5.8
.1

5.2

6.4

4.2

2.1

Total expenditures, national income
basis

116.9

118.5

131.9

154.5

172.5

185.7

195.9

212.6

233.2

255.1

285.2

313.4

Excess of receipts ( + ) or expenditures (—),
national income basis

-1.4

+2.0

+.9

-7.3

-11.9

+4.7

-.7

-19.9

-19.5

-11.8

-4.7

-8.6

Source.—Actual data for 1964-73 are based on the estimates prepared by the Department of Commerce. Data for 1974 and 1975 are based on estimates
by the Office of Management and Budget in cooperation with the Department of Commerce.




M

3
g
w
£
§

CO
fcO
CD

CO
CO

Table 19. FEDERAL FINANCES AND THE GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT, 1954-1975 (dollar amounts in billions)

°

Federal debt, end of year
Gross
national
product

Fiscal year

1954__.
1955

.___
___

Budget receipts
Amount

Percent
of GNP

Budget outlays
Amount

Percent
of GNP

Total
Amount

Held by the public

Percent
of GNP

Amount

Percent
of GNP

362.1
378.6

69.7
65.5

19.3
17.3

70.9
68.5

19.6
18.1

270.8
274.4

74.8
72.5

224.5
226.6

62.0
59.9

1956
1957
1958
1959.
1960

409.4
431.3
440.3
469.1
495.2

74.5
80.0
79.6
79.2
92.5

18.2
18.5
18.1
16.9
18.7

70.5
76.7
82.6
92.1
92.2

17.2
17.8
18.8
19.6
18.6

272.8
272.4
279.7
287.8
290.9

66.6
63.1
63.5
61.3
58.7

222.2
219.4
226.4
235.0
237.2

54.3
50.9
51.4
50.1
47.9

1961
1962
1963
1964
1965

506.5
542.1
573.4
612.2
654.2

94.4
99.7
106.6
112.7
116.8

18.6
18.4
18.6
18.4
17.9

97.8
106.8
111.3
118.6
118.4

19.3
19.7
19.4
19.4
18.1

292.9
303.3
310.8
316.8
323.2

57.8
55.9
54.2
51.7
49.4

238.6
248.4
254.5
257.6
261.6

47.1
45.8
44.4
42.1
40.0

*j
S
P

1966.
1967
1968
1969.
1970

721.2
769.8
826.0
898.3
954.6

130.9
149.6
153.7
187.8
193.7

18.1
19.4
18.6
20.9
20.3

134.7
158.3
178.8
184.5
196.6

18.7
20.6
21.6
20.5
20.6

329.5
341.3
369.8
367.1
382.6

45.7
44.3
44.8
40.9
40.1

264.7
267.5
290.6
279.5
284.9

36.7
34.8
35.2
31.1
29.8

"

1,012.5
1,100.0
1,220.0
1,340.0
1,455.0

188.4
208.6
232.2
270.0
295.0

18.6
19.0
19.0
20.1
20.3

211.4
231.9
246.5
274.7
304.4

20.9
21.1
20.2
20.5
20.9

409.5
437.3
468.4
486.4
508.0

40.4
39.8
38.4
36.3
34.9

304.3
323.8
343.0
346.5
359.0

30.1
29.4
28.1
25.9
24.7

1971
1972
1973
1974estimate-.__
1975 estimate




-

_
__

u
d
2
'•

SUMMARY

331

TABLEiS

Table 20. BUDGET RECEIPTS AND OUTLAYS, 1789-1975
(in millions of dollars)

Fiscal year

Receipts

Outlays

Surplus
or

Fiscal year

Receipts

Outlays

deficit(-)

1,160
14,462

1,090
15,453

+70
-991

525
485
517
584
567

+63
+77
+45
-43
-23

1906.
1907.
1908.
1909.
1910.

588
562
562
541
544
595
666
602
604
676

570
579
659
694
694

+25
+87
-57
-89
-18

1911.
1912.
1913.
1914.
1915.

702
693
714
725
683

691
690
715
726
746

+11
+3
_*
_*

1916.
1917.
1918.
1919.
1920.

761
1.101
3,645
5,130
6,649

713
1,954
12,677
18,493
6,358

+48
-853
-9,032
-13,363
+291

1921.
1922.
1923.
1924.
1925.

5,571
4,026
3,853
3,871
3,641

5,062
3,289
3,140
2,908
2,924

+509
+736
+713
+963
+717

1926.
1927.
1928.
1929.
1930.

3,795
4,013
3,900
3,862
4,058

2,930
2,857
2,961
3,127
3,320

+865
+1,155

1931.
1932.
1933.
1934.
1935.

3,116
1,924
1,997
3,015
3,706

3,577
4,659
4,598
6,645
6,497

-462
-2,735
-2,602
-3,630
-2,791

1936.
1937.

3,997
4,956

8,422
7,733

Surplus
or
dencit(-)

-4,425
-2,777

1789-1849
1850-1900
1901...
1902...
1903_._
1904...
1905..

-63

1938.
1939.
1940.
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947.
1948
1949
1950....
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960

5,588
4,979
6,879

6,765
8,841
9,589

-1,177
-3,862
-2,710

9,202 13,980
15,104 34,500
25,097 78,909
47,818 93,956
50,162 95,184

-4,778
-19,396
-53,812
-46,138
-45.022

43,537 61,738
_ 43,531 36,931
.
45,357 36,493
41,576 40,570
_ 40,940 43,147

-18,201
+6,600
+8,864
+1,006
-2,207

53,390
68,011
71,495
69,719
65,469

45,797
67,962
76,769
70,890
68,509

+7,593
+49
-5,274
-1,170
-3,041

74,547 70,460
79,990 76,741
79,636 82,575
79,249 92,104
_ 92,492 92,223

+4.087
+3,249
-2,939
-12,855

+269

1961
1962
1963
1964
1965..

94,389
99,676
106,560
112,662
116,833

97,795
106,813
111,311
118.584
118,430

-3.406
-7,137
-4,751
-5,922
-1.596

1966

130,856
149,552
153,671
187,784
193,743

134,652
158,254
178,833
184,548
196,588

-3.796
-8,702
-25,161
+3,236
-2,845

188,392 211,425
208,649 231,876
232,225 246,526
270,000 274,660
295,000 304,445

-23,033
-23,227
-14,301
-4,660
-9,445

+939 1967
+734 1968
+738 1969

1970

1971
1972
1973
1974 est
1975 est

•Less than $500 thousand.
Notes.—Certain interfund transactions are excluded from receipts and outlays starting in 1932.
For years prior to 1932 the amounts of such transactions are not significant.
Refunds of receipts are excluded from receipts and outlays starting in 1913; comparable data are
not available for prior years.
Data for 1789-1939 are for the administrative budget; 1940-1953 are consolidated cash data;
and 1954-1975 are for the unified budget.




INDEX
Accounts, Bureau of, 232
Action, 19,75, 101,107,245-246
Administrative Conference of the United
States, 246
Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, 159
Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental
Relations, 254-255
Aeronautical Exposition, United States International, 226
Aeronautical technology, 78, 242
Aeronautics Board, Civil, 248
Aeronautics and Space Administration, National, 241-243
Aeronautics and Space Council, National, 162
African Development Bank, 74, 75
Assistance, 18, 125, 127-129,201
Housing, 204
Insurance, 201
Property tax credit, 44
Agency for International Development, see Foreign assistance
Agricultural commodities:
Exports, 81, 84, 172
Marketing, income, and supply, 84
Price support, 80, 82, 173
Surplus, removal of, 80
Agricultural conservation, 84
Agricultural credit, 80, 83
Agricultural Library, National, 170
Agricultural marketing services, 176
Agricultural research, 84
Agricultural Research Center, 169
Agricultural Research Service, 169
Agricultural Service, Foreign, 171-172
Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation
Service, 172-173
Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance
Act (Public Law 83-480) programs, 76, 172
Agriculture and Consumer Protection Act, 79
Agriculture, Department of, 29, 168-178
Agriculture and rural development, outlays and
recommended budget authority, by program
or agency, 80
Agriculture and rural development, program
analysis, 79-84
Aid, foreign, see Foreign assistance
Air carriers, payments to, 92
Air Forces, tactical, 64, 65-66
Air pollution control, 87
Aircraft, supersonic development termination,
226
Airlift, defense, 59, 64, 66

Airmen's Home, U.S. Soldiers' and, 193
Airport and Airways Cost Allocation Study, 94
Airport and airway trust fund, 92, 94, 226, 227
Airport security program, 94-95
Airports, National Capital, 226
Alaska:
Claims, native, 122
National Forest, 85
National Parks, 85
Wild and scenic rivers system, 85
Wildlife refuge, 85
Alaska, Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning
Commission for, 264
Alaska pipeline, 56
Alaska Power Administration, 212
Alaska Railroad, 230
Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health
Administration, 197
Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, Bureau of, 232
Alcoholism, 119, 121
Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National
Institute of, 196
Alliance for Progress, 166
Allied services, 130,201
All-volunteer armed forces, 5, 10, 59, 67
American Battle Monuments Commission,
246-247
American combat involvement in the Vietnam
War, 5, 9, 59
American Future, Commission on Population
Growth and the, 265
American Printing House for the Blind, 202
American Revolution Bicentennial Administration, 88, 112, 143,253
American Shipbuilding, Commission on, 264
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service,
169
Animal and plant production efficiency, 84
Animal Quarantine Station, 169
Appalachian Development Highway System, 99
Appalachian Regional Commission, 99, 255
Appalachian regional development programs,
164
Appeals, Military Court of, 187
Appeals courts, 159
Appellate Court System of the United States,
Commission on Revision of the Federal, 159
Architect of the Capitol, 154-155
Archives and Records Service, National, 239
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 247
Army:
Cemeterial expenses, 192
Civil functions, 192-195
Corps of Engineers, 192-193
Art, National Gallery of, 263

333

540-000 O - 74 - 22




334

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Arthritis, Metabolism, and Digestive Diseases,
National Institute of, 196
Arts, Commission on Fine, 249
Arts, Kennedy Center for the Performing, 211,
263
Arts and the Humanities, National Foundation
on the, 108, 112,258
Asian Development Bank, 75
Assessment, Office of Technology, 154
Atmospheric Administration, National Oceanic
and,19, 182
Atomic Energy Commission, 60, 69-70, 236
Atomic Energy Commission, outlays by program, table, 69
Automatic data processing activities, General
Services Administration, 239
Aviation Administration, Federal, 226-227
Aviation Advisory Commission, 264
Aviation safety, 226
B
Balances, budget authority, explanation, 279—
280
Balances, budget authority, summary, table, 294
Baltimore-Washington Parkway, 228
Bankruptacy Laws of the United States, Commission on, 160
Bank:
For cooperatives, 31
Federal home loan, 31, 101, 103,277
Federal intermediate credit, 31
Federal land, 31, 277
Basis for budget figures, 283-284
Beautification, Commission on Highway, 265
Better Communities Act, 15, 100, 101, 106-107,
205
Bicentennial Administration, American Revolution, 88, 112, 143, 253
Bilateral assistance, 71, 72, 74, 75, 166-167
Biomedical research, 70, 118, 119
Blind, aid to, 127-128
Blind, American Printing House for the, 202
Blind and Other Severely Handicapped, Committee for the Purchase of Products and
Services of the, 249
Bonneville Power Administration. 212-213
Botanic Garden, United States, 155
Bridges, alteration of, 225
Broadcasting, Board for International, 72, 247
Broadcasting, Corporation for Public, 250
Budget:
1976,39
Congressional authorization and appropriation, 275-276
Controllability, 8
Coverage, 277-278
Discussion, 30-34
Execution and control, 276
Executive formulation and transmittal, 274275
Financing, 296
Legislative proposals for major new and
expanded programs, 320-321
Message of the President, 3-21
Outlook, 1979,34-39
Outlook, 1979, table, 1973-79, 35




FISCAL

YElAR

1975

Budget—Continued
Process, discussion, 274-276
Receipts, discussion, 44-48
Receipts and outlays, 1789-1975, table, 331
Reform, 20
Review and audit, 276
Summary of, table, 287
System and concepts, explanation of, 274-284
Totals, table, 1973-75, 6
Budget, Office of Management and, 19, 162
Budget in 1976, 39
Budget authority:
Available through current action by Congress,
table, 24, 290
Available without current action, by Congress, table, 24
Balances, by agency, summary, table, 294
Balances, explanation, 279-280
By agency, for each account and functional
code, 151-271
By function and agency, summary, table,
303-317
Defense, national, table, 1975, 60
Discussion, 24-26
Energy research and development, 12
Explanation, 278-279
Increase, 10
Relation to outlays, chart, 25
Relation to outlays, summary, table, 292
Rescission, 279
Total, table, 1973-76,40
Summary:
By agency, table, 1973-76, 40, 289
By function, table, 1973-76, 40, 288
Table, 24, 287
Total, table, 1973-75, 6, 24
Budget and the economy, discussion, 5-9
Budget outlays, see Outlays
Buildings, construction of, see Construction
Buildings Service, Public, 139, 238
Bus systems, improvement of, 91, 93
Business, advancement of, 97-99
Business Administration, Domestic and International, 180
Cabinet Committee on Opportunities for
Spanish-Speaking People, 247
Cambodia, emergency military assistance for,
73
Canal Zone Government, 193-194
Cancer Institute, National, 196
Cancer research, 118
Capitol, Architect of the, 154-155
Cash assistance, 18, 105, 107, 128
Causes and Prevention of Violence, National
Commission on, 163
Cemeterial expenses, Army, 192
Censuses, periodic, 179
Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange
between East and West, 223
Center for Disease Control, 196
Chamizal settlement, 223
Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of, 196

335

INDEX
Children:
Dependent, aid to families, 114, 124, 128
Development, 109, 111
Cities, Model, 101,205
Civil Aeronautics Board, 248
Civil Defense Preparedness Agency, 190
Civil disorder insurance, 104
Civil Rights:
Education, 17, 199
Employment, 17
Enforcement activities, 140, 143-145
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 143-145
Housing, 17, 101,104,207
Program analysis, 144
Civil Rights, Commission on, 249
Civil Rights, Office for, 202
Civil Service Commission, 143, 248-249
Civil Service retirement and disability fund, 125
Claims:
Defense, Department of, 187
Indian, 240, 254
Korean, 253
Prisoners of war, 253
Claims, Court of, 159
Claims Commission, Indian, 254
Claims Settlement Commission, Foreign, 253
Coal Research, Office of, 212
Coal resources and technology, 11-12, 56
Coast Guard, 92, 95, 225-226
College housing, 204
Combat readiness, 10
Commerce, Department of, 98, 179-184
Commerce, promotion of, 180-181
Commerce Commission, Interstate, 256-257
Commerce and transportation, outlays and
recommended budget authority, by program
or agency, 92
Commerce and transportation, program analysis, 91-96
Commissions and committees, see under more
specific titles
Commodity Credit Corporation, 82, 83, 173174
Commodity Credit Corporation, outlays by
program or agency, 82
Commodity Exchange Authority, 171
Communications Commission, Federal, 251
Community development:
Economic, 107
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by program or agency, 101
Planning and management, 101, 103, 106—
107, 205-206
Program analysis, 100-107
Community facilities and industrial development, 80, 83
Community Relations Service, 144, 217
Comprehensive Employment and Training
Act, 15, 114
Comprehensive national energy policy, 55-56
Conciliation Service, Federal Mediation and,
252
Congress, Library of, 156
Congress of the United States, 151-154
Congressional procedures reform, 20




Conservation:
Agricultural, 84, 172-173
Fish and wildlife. 194
Soil, 175-176
Conservation Corps, Youth, 177
Construction grants, hospitals and health
facilities, 119, 120-121,244
Construction programs:
Defense—Military, 189
General Services Administration, 139, 142
Housing and Urban Development, Department of, 105-106
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 242
Veterans Administration, 132, 135, 244
Construction projects:
Atomic Energy Commission, 69
Corregidor-Bataan Memorial, 244
Consumer Finance, National Commission on,
265
Consumer health and safety, 118, 122
Consumer Information Center, 240
Consumer Product Safety Commission, 19, 249
Consumer protection, 119, 176-177
Contract authority, 278
Contract compliance program, Federal, 117
Cooperative State Research Service, 170
Corporations, Government-owned, see under
particular name
Corps of Engineers—Civil, 86, 88, 192-193
Correction programs, 141
Corregidor-Bataan Memorial, 244
Cost-Accounting Standards Board, 157
Council of Economic Advisers, 161
Council on Environmental Quality, 19, 161
Council on International Economic Policy, 19,

162
Courts, see under particular kind
Credit Administration, Farm, 251
Credit guarantees, 34
Credit programs, Federal:
Agriculture and rural development, by program or agency, 80, 83
Commerce and transportation, 98
Housing and community development, 103
Veterans, 134
Credit Union Administration, National, 258
Crime prevention, 140
Criminal Laws, Federal, National Commission
on Reform of, 266
Crop Insurance Corporation, Federal, 173
Cultural Cooperation, National Commission on,
222
Cultural exchange activities, 76, 109, 223
Customs, Bureau of, 139, 142
Customs Service, U.S., 232-233
Customs Court, 159
Customs duties, 45, 48
Customs and Patent Appeals, Court of, 158
D
Darien Gap Highway, 227
Deaf, National Technical Institute for the, 202
Debt, public, see Public debt
Defense, Department of—Civil, 192-195

336

THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR

Defense, Department of—Military, 60-68, 184191
Construction, 189
Operation and maintenance, 185-187
Outlays and budget authority for, 60
Pay increases, 67-68
Procurement, 187-188
Program analysis, 60-68
Receipts and outlays, Federal funds, 29
Research and development, 62, 66-67, 188189
Revolving and management funds, 190-191
Summary, obligational authority, table, 63
Support activities, 68
Defense Manpower Commission, 265
Defense, national:
Outlays, table 60
Outlays and recommended budget authority
for, by program or agency, 60
Program analysis, 59-68
Defense preparedness, 4
Defense production, expansion of, 164
Defense spending, 4, 8, 9, 51, 54, 60
Deficit or surplus, table, 6, 26, 30
Deficit or surplus, budget 1789-1975, table, 331
Definition of terms, 277-283
Delaware River Basin Commission, 255
Dental Research, National Institute of, 196
Development assistance, economic, 179-180
Development assistance, international, 72, 7475, 166-167
Development loans, international, 166
Development Service, Rural, 174
Direct loans, 6
Disability fund, Civil Service, 125
Disability insurance, Federal, 201
Disabled, aid to, 127-129
Disarmament, see Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
Disaster Preparedness and Assistance Act, 97
Disaster relief, 10, 71, 92, 97, 98, 100, 130, 164
Discrimination, see Civil Rights
Disease Control, Center for, 196
Diseases:
Blood, 118
Cystic fibrosis, 118
Digestive, 118
Heart and lung, 118
Neurological, 118
Prevention and control, 118, 119
Sickle cell anemia, 118
Venereal, 119
District of Columbia, Commission on the
Organization of the Government of the, 265
District of Columbia, rapid transit, 139
District of Columbia construction projects, 88
District of Columbia Self-Government and
Governmental Reorganization Act, 143
District courts, 159
Domestic affairs spending, 1950-75, 53, 55
Domestic Council, 19, 162
Domestic and International Business Administration, 180
Domestic programs, 3
Drug Abuse, Mental Health, and Alcohol
Administration, 197




19 75

Drug Abuse, National Commission on Marihuana and, 265
Drug abuse and control, 140-141
Drug Abuse Prevention, Special Action Office
on, 163
Drug abusers, treatment for, 119
Drug addiction, 119
Drug Enforcement Administration, 19, 138, 140,
218
Earth orbital programs, 78
Earth Resources Technology Satellite, 78
Earthquake engineering, 113
Economic adjustment assistance, 16, 97
Economic Advisers, Council of, 161
Economic assistance, foreign, see Foreign
assistance,
Economic assumptions, discussion, 45-46
Economic Development Administration, 179180
Economic development assistance, 98, 179-180
Economic Opportunity, Office of, 101, 107,
167-168
Economic Policy, Council on International, 162
Economic Research Service, Agriculture Department, 170-171
Economic stabilization, 3, 164
Economic Statistics Administration, Social and,
179
Education:
Aid to school districts, 111
Black institutions, 1 \ 2
Child development, 109, 111
Civil rights, 17, 199
Disadvantaged, 108, 110
Elementary and secondary, 15, 108, 109, 111,
199
Federally impacted areas, 110
Grants to States, 109
Handicapped, 110, 199
Health manpower, 118, 119-120
Higher, 108, 109, 111-112, 119-120, 199
Indians, 199
International exchange activities, 76, 223
Occupational, 199
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by program or agency, 109
Postsecondary, 108
Program analysis, 108-112
Reform, 108
Research, 108
Science, 113
Student aid, 109,111-112, 119-120, 199
Veterans, 131,132, 133
Vocational and adult, 109, 110, 111, 199
Work Study program, 111-112
Education, National Commission on the Financing of Postsecondary, 266
Education, National Institute of, 108, 109, 112,
200
Education, Office of, 112, 199-200
Educational Cooperation, National Commission
on, 222
Eisenhower College, grants, 232
Elderly, see Aged

337

INDEX
Electronic Surveillance, National Commission
for the Review of Federal and State Laws
Relating to Wiretapping and, 265
Emergency credit programs, 80, 83
Emergency employment assistance, 109, 116
Emergency funds, Presidential, 164
Emergency Loan Guarantee Board, 250
Emergency preparedness, see Civil defense
Emergency rail facilities restoration, 230
Emergency school assistance, 144, 199
Emergency Windfall Profits Tax Act, 7, 11, 44,

46
Employees, Federal, see Federal employees
Employment, equal opportunity in, 144-145
Employment, Federal civilian, summary, by
agency, table, 295
Employment, full:
Discussion, 4, 6
Surplus and deficit, table, 1973-76, 7
Table, 1973-76, 7
Employment Opportunity Commission, Equal,
250
Employment services, Federal-State, 109, 114
Employment Standards Administration, 219—
220
Energy:
Conservation, 11,16,85, 91,215
Conversion and technology, 55-58
Discussion, 6, 10-13
Outlays and recommended budget authority
by program or agency, 57 '
Research and development, 55-58, 85, 90, 113
Resources, 10-13,56
Resources and development, 4, 11, 12, 70
Solar and geothermal, 12, 58, 113
Energy and minerals, 211-213
Energy Office, Federal, 19, 56, 162
Energy programs, 3, 70
Engineers, Corps of, see Corps of Engineers
Engraving and Printing, Bureau of, 233
Environmental assistance, rural, 80
Environmental control, 58
Environmental Financing Authority, 31, 277
Environmental health, 70
Environmental Health Science, National Institute of, 196
Environmental protection, 85
Environmental Protection Agency, 16, 19, 85,
88, 237-238
Environmental Quality, Office of and Council
on, 19, 161
Equal employment, ]]7, 143
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,
114, 117,250
Estate and gift taxes, 45, 48
Exchange Commission, Securities and, 261-262
Exchange stabilization fund, 277
Excise tax, 45, 47
Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Salaries,
Commission on, 142, 265
Executive Office of the President, 161-163
Executive Residence, 161
Expenditures:
As a percent of GNP, 1954-75, table, 330
National income accounts, 1964-75, table, 329
Export-Import Bank, 30, 277




Export programs, Agriculture Department, 81,
Export promotion program, 71, 92
Extension Service, Agriculture Department, 170
Eye Institute, National, 196

Facilities, construction of, see Construction
Fair housing, 101, 104,207
Family housing, Defense Department, 189-190
Family planning services, 121
Farm Credit Administration, 251
Farm Mortgage Corporation, Federal, 231
Farmer Cooperative Service, 171
Farmers Home Administration, 82,102,174-175
Farms:
Income stabilization, 79, 80, 83
Loans, 80
Federal assistance, 4, 93
Federal Aviation Administration, 226-227
Federal buildings fund, 142
Federal Bureau of Investigation, 217
Federal Communications Commission, 251
Federal contract compliance program, 117
Federal Criminal Laws, National Commission
on Reform of, 266
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, 173
Federal debt, 26-30, 287, 296, 330
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 92, 251
Federal employees:
Health benefits, 119
Retirement and disability fund, 125
Federal Energy Administration, 85
Federal Energy Office, 19, 56
Federal Farm Mortgage Corporation, 231
Federal finances and gross national product,
1954-75, table, 330
Federal Financing Bank, 31, 142, 277
Federal funds, explanation, 26, 277
Federal Government, improved management of,
3, 19-20, 164
Federal Highway Administration, 227-229
Federal Home Loan Bank Board, 100, 101,
103, 251
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 31,

103

Federal Housing Administration, 204-205
Federal Insurance Administration, 206
Federal Judicial Center, 160
Federal Labor Relations Council, 248
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, 138,

141,231

Federal Maritime Commission, 251-252
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, 252
Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety
Board of Review, 252
Federal National Mortgage Association, 31, 103
Federal Pay, Advisory Commission on, 246
Federal payments to individuals and aid to
State and local governments, 37-38
Federal Power Commission, 86, 252
Federal Prison System, 218
Federal program, analysis by function, 49-147
Federal program, by agency, account, and
functional code, 151-271

338

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEiAR 19 7 5

Federal Railroad Administration, 229-230
Federal Regional Councils, 16
Federal Reserve System, 277
Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation, 101, 103,251
Federal spending, 3, 5, 53
Federal Supply Service, 239
Federal supply system, 142
Federal Trade Commission, 252-253
Financial institutions, international, 75
Financing, means of, 296
Fine Arts, Commission of, 249
Fire Prevention, National Bureau of, 96, 97, 182
Fire Prevention and Control, National Commission on, 265
Firearms, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and, 232
Fiscal activities of the Federal Government,
30-34
Fiscal policy, discussion, 3
Fisheries, International commissions, 223
Fisheries and Wildlife, Bureau of Sport, 86, 210
Flood control, 88-89
Flood Disaster Protection Act, 100
Flood insurance, 104-105, 206
Fogarty International Center for Advanced
Study in the Health Sciences, 196
Food assistance, 124, 128
Food and Drug Administration, 122, 195
Food and Nutrition Service, 177
Food for Peace, 72, 76, 82
Food stamp program, 18, 124, 125, 128, 177
Forces, combat and support, 59, 60
Foreign affairs, administration of, 221-222
Foreign agricultural assistance, 172
Foreign Agricultural Service, 171-172
Foreign assistance, 10, 53, 71, 72, 75, 164-167
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission, 253
Foreign direct investment control, 181
Foreign information and exchange activities, 72,
76
Foreign military sales, 73
Foreign Policy, Commission on the Organization
of the Government for the Conduct of, 265
Forest Service, 86, 177-178
Forests, protection and management, 177-178
Former Presidents, see President, The:
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission, 253
Fuel allocation, oil and gas programs, 212
Full-employment, 35-36, 37
Funds appropriated to the President, 164-168
Funds, types of, explanation, 277

Gallaudet College, 112,202
Gambling, Commission to Review National
Policy Toward, 265
Gas deregulation, natural, 85
General Accounting Office, 157
General government, outlays and recommended
budget authority, by function or agency, 139
General government, program analysis, 138—
143
General purposes forces, defense, 63, 64-65




General Revenue Sharing:
Education, 147
Environment, 147
General government, 147
Health, 147
Public safety, 147
Recreation. 147
Social services, 147
Transportation, 147
General Services Administration, 139, 142, 238—

241

Geological Survey, 211
Government improvement, discussion, 19-20
Government National Mortgage Association,

104, 204-205
Government Printing Office, 157
Government Procurement Commission, 265
Government-sponsored agency loans, 6
Grants, see under particular purpose
Gross national product:
Discussion, 53
Federal debt as a percent of, 27
Federal finances and, 1954-75, table, 330
Increase, 45
Public debt as a percent of, 1954-75, table,
330
Guaranteed and insured loans, 6
H
Handicapped:
Assistance, 18
Cost of living increases, 124
Education of, 110, 199
Housing for, 204
Handicapped, Committee for the Purchase of
Products and Services of the Blind and
Other Severely, 249
Head Start, 108, 111
Health:
Education and training, 119
Environmental, 70, 119
Facilities, see Hospital and health facilities
Indians, 122, 195
Insurance, national, 4, 17, 118, 119, 121, 201
Manpower, 119-120
Maternal and child, 121
Mental, 121,122
Merchant seamen, 122
Mining and minerals industries, 201
Occupational, 114, 122
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 119
Program analysis, 118-123
Projects, 107
Research, 118-121
Resources, 118-121
Services and planning, 121
Health Administration, Occupational Safety
and, 220
Health Care Expansion Act, 131, 135
Health, Education, and Welfare, Department
of, 29, 195-203
Health, National Institutes of, 196-197
Health maintenance organizations, 121
Health Resources Administration, 198
Health Resources Planning Act, 17

339

INDEX
Health Safety Review Commission, Occupational, 260
Health Sciences, Fogarty International Center
for Advanced Study in the, 196
Health Services Administration, 195-196
Heart diseases, 118
Heart and Lung Institute, National, 196
Heritage 76, Festival USA, Horizons 76, 143
Higher education, 108, 109, 111-112, 119-120,
199
Highway Administration, Federal, 227-229
Highway Beautification, Commission on, 265
Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 229
Highways:
Baltimore-Washington Parkway, 228
Darien Gap, 227
Inter-American, 228
Outlays and budget authority for, 92
Safety, 91,92,93,229
Scenic and recreational, 228
See also Roads
Historical commissions, 253-254
Home Loan Bank Board, Federal, 101, 103, 251
Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, Federal, 103
Home Owners' Loan Corporation, 231
Home Rule, District of Columbia, 143
Homeownership assistance, 100, 106
Hospitals and health facilities:
Construction, 119, 120-121, 132, 135
Mental health centers, 122
Outlays and budget authority for, 119
Public Health Service, 198
Veterans, 132, 134-135,244
Hospital insurance, Federal, 201
House of Representatives, 151-153
Housing:
Assistance, 101
Cash assistance, 100, 105, 107
College, 204
Disaster loans, 105, 205
Elderly, 204
Equal opportunity in, 17, 101, 104, 207
Grants and loan payments, 100
Handicapped, 204
Homeownership and rental assistance, 205
Industry, private, 102
Low and moderate income, 100, 101, 103,
105-106
Mortgage market, 101, 103
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 101
Program analysis, 100-107
Public, low-rent, 204
Rehabilitation, 101
Research, 101
Rural, 80,81,83
Tandem plan, 104
Veterans, 132, 134
Housing Administration, Federal, 204-205
Housing and Urban Development, Department
of, 29, 100, 101,103,204-208
Howard University, 112, 202
Human development, 202
Human resources programs, discussion, 8, 17,

54




Humanitarian assistance, 10, 75, 124
Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts
and the, 112,258
I
Immigration and Naturalization Service, 217
Income security, 201
Income security, outlays and recommended
budget authority, by program or agency, 125
Income security, program analysis, 124-130
Income tax, 44, 45, 47
Indian Affairs, Bureau of, 213-214
Indian Claims Commission, 254
Indian Opportunity, National Council on, 258
Indian Rights, Office of, 144
Indian Trust Counsel Authority, 99
Indians:
Claims, 240
Education and welfare, 199
Health services and facilities, 118, 119, 121,
122, 195
Klamath, forest lands, 89
Programs, 99
Individuals, strengthening role of, 16-18
Indochina post war reconstruction assistance,
71,72,73-74, 165
Industrial Pollution Control Council, National,

181
Industry and commerce, promotion of, 180-181
Information Agency, United States, 72, 76, 267
Information Science, National Commission on
Libraries and, 257
Inspection activities, Agriculture Department,
84
Insurance:
Agricultural crops, 173
Disability, Federal, 125,201
Flood, 104-105, 206
Health, 4, 17,201
Hospital and medical, 201
Life, 132, 133
Mortgage, 101, 103,104
Old-age and survivors, Federal, 125, 201
Riot and civil disorder, 104
Savings and loan accounts, 101
Social, 44, 45, 47
Unemployment, 6, 124, 125, 127
Veterans, 132, 133, 243, 244-245
Insurance Administration, Federal, 206
Insurance Corporation, Federal Deposit, 251
Intelligence and communications, 63
Inter-American Development Bank, 74, 75
Inter-American Foundation, 74, 166
Inter-American Highway, 228
Interest:
Public debt, 137,235
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 137
Intergovernmental agencies, 254-256
Intergovernmental Relations, Advisory Commission on, 254-255
Interior, Department of the 86, 208-217
Internal Revenue Service, 139, 141, 233-234
International Aeronautical Exposition, United
States, 226

340

THE

BUDGET

FOR

International affairs and finance, outlays and
recommended budget authority by function
or agency, 72
International affairs and finance, program
analysis, 71-76
International Bank for Reconstruction and
Development, 75
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, 223
International Broadcasting, Board for, 72, 247
International Business Administration, Domestic, and, 180
International Center, Washington, D.C., 224
International commissions, 223
International cooperation, 71
International desalting plant on Colorado
River, 89
International Development, Agency for, 74
International development assistance, 72,74-75,
166-167
International Development Association, 75
International Economic Policy, Council on,
19, 162
International educational exchange activities,
76,223
International financial institutions, 71, 74, 75,
166,223
International monetary reform, 10, 20
International monetary system, 71
International organizations and conferences, 75,
222
International organizations and programs, 74,
166
International Broadcasting, Board for, 72, 247
International security assistance, 71-72, 73,
164-165
International trade promotion, 71, 222
Interstate Commerce Commission, 256-257
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River
Basin, 256
Interstate Land Sales Registration, Office of,
207
Israel, emergency security assistance for, 71, 72,
73
Israel, military credit sales, 73, 165
j
Jobs for Veterans, 136
Judicial Center, Federal, 160
Judicial Salaries, Commission on Executive,
Legislative, and, 142, 265
Judiciary, The, 139, 158-160
Justice, Department of, 140, 141, 144, 217-218
Juvenile crime and delinquency, 130
K
Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 211,
263
L
Labor, Department of, 219-221
Labor-Management Services Administration,
219
Labor Relations Board, National, 258-259
Labor Relations Council, Federal, 248




FISCAL

YElAR

19 7 5

Labor Statistics, Bureau of, 220
Land:
Open-space, 101
Retirement programs, long-term, 80
Sales, interstate, 207
Land forces, defense, 64, 65
Land Law Review Commission, Public 266,
Land Management, Bureau of, 86, 208
Land management, public, 86, 89
Land use planning, 85
Land Use Planning Commission for Alaska,
Joint Federal-State, 264
Land and water conservation fund, 85, 88
Law enforcement:
Activities, 138, 139, 140-141
Assistance, State and local governments, 15,
138, 140-141
Law Enforcement Assistance Administration,
140-141,218
Law Enforcement Training Center, Federal, 231
Legal activities, Justice, Department of, 217
Legal Services Corporation, 101, 107, 257
Legislative, and Judicial Salaries, Commission
on Executive, 142, 265
Legislative branch, 139, 151-158
Legislative proposals for major new and
expanded programs, 1974-79, 320-321
Lexington Clinical Research Center, 197
Libraries and Information Science, National
Commission on, 257
Libraries and library services, 112, 199
Library, National Agricultural, 170
Library of Congress, 156
Library of Medicine, National, 196
Life Insurance, see Insurance
Loan Bank Board, Federal Home, 251
Loan Guarantee Board, Emergency, 250
Loan guarantees, Veterans Administration
131,132,134,244
Loans, see particular kind
Low-rent public housing, 204
Lunar exploration, 78
Lung disease, 118

M
Mammal Commission, Marine, 257
Management and Budget, Office of, 19, 162
Management improvement, Federal Government, 3, 19-20, 164
Manned space flight, 77, 78, 241-242
Manpower, armed forces, 53
Manpower Administration, 219
Manpower development and training, 109, 114
Manpower programs, analysis, 108-112, 114117
Manpower programs, outlays and recommended
budget authority, by program or agency, 109
Marihuana and Drug Abuse, National Commission on, 265
Marine Mammal Commission, 257
Marine Resources and Engineering Development, National Council on, 162
Maritime Administration, 95, 183-184
Maritime Commission, Federal, 251-252
Marketing services, agricultural, 171, 176
Materials Policy, National Commission on, 265
Maternal and child health, 121

341

INDEX
Means of financing budget, 296
Meat and poultry inspection, 84
Mediation Board, National, 259
Mediation and Conciliation Service, Federal,
252
Medicaid, 118, 119, 121
Medical care, armed forces, 67
Medical care, veterans, 132, 134-135, 244
Medical insurance, Federal, 201
Medical research, Veterans Administration, 132,
244
Medical Sciences, National Institute of General,
196
Medicare, 17,46, 118, 119,121
Medicine, National Library of, 196
Memorial commissions, 253-254
Mental Health Administration, Alcohol, Drug
Abuse and, 197
Mental health centers, 122
Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Board of
Review, Federal, 252
Mexico, International Boundary and Water
Commission, United States and, 223
Middle-East crisis, 61
Middle-East peace settlement, 9
Migrant and refugee assistance, 107, 224
Military Appeals, Court of, 187
Military assistance, 60, 72, 73, 164-165
Military assistance program, 68
Military construction, see Construction, Defense—Military
Military personnel:
Active forces, 64
Pay increases, 67-68
Retired forces, 185
Summary, table, 64
Training, 63, 67-68
Military programs, 69-70
Military readiness, 59
Military strength, 59
Milk program, special, 177
Mine Safety Board of Review, Federal Metal
and Nonmetallic, 252
Mineral resources:
Programs, 86
Research, 90
Miners, disabled, benefits for, 125
Mines, Bureau of, 212
Mining Enforcement and Safety Administration, 211
Mining health and safety, 201
Minority Business Enterprises, Office of, 96,
97, 107, 181

Minority groups, business loans to, 97, 98
Mint, Bureau of the, 233
Missiles, 62-63, 64, 65
Model Cities programs, 101, 205
Mortgage Association, Government National,
104, 204-205

Mortgage insurance, 100, 101, 103, 104
Mortgage market, 101, 103
Multilateral assistance, 72, 74, 75, 166
Multilateral trade negotiations, 71
Mutual and balanced force reductions in
Europe with the Warsaw Pact countries, 60,
61




N
Narcotic addicts, treatment for, 121-122
Narcotics and dangerous drugs, 140-141
National Accelerator Laboratory, 69
National advisory commission, see under more
specific titles
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 241-243
National Aeronautics and Space Council, 162
National Agricultural Library, 170
National Alliance for Businessmen, 136
National Archives and Records Service, 239
National Board for Promotion of Rifle Practice,
186
National Bureau of Fire Prevention, 96, 97
National Bureau of Standards, 97
National Capital airports, 95, 226
National Capital Planning Commission, 257
National Capital Region, 139, 143
National Cemetery System, 133
National Center for Educational Statistics, 112
National commissions, committees and councils,
see under more specific titles
National Credit Union Administration, 258
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities, 112, 258
National Gallery of Art, 263
National Guard, 63, 66
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 229
National income accounts, transactions in,
1964-75, table, 329
National Industrial Pollution Control Council,
181
National Institute of Education, 109, 200
National Institutes of Health, 196-197
See under particular name
National Labor Relations Board, 258-259
National Library of Medicine, 196
National Mediation Board, 259
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 19,97, 182
National Park Service, 86, 88, 210-211
National Railroad Passenger Corporation, 229
National Science Foundation, 113, 259-260
National Security Council, 162
National security programs, 59
National security and international spending,
54
National Service Life Insurance, 132, 245
National Technical Institute for the Deaf, 202
National Transportation Safety Board, 230
National Water Commission, 266
National Wool Act, 80
Native American program, 107
Natural resources and environment, outlays and
recommended budget authority, by program
or agency, 86
Natural resources and environment, program
analysis, 85-90
Naval forces, 64, 65
Naval Petroleum Reserve, 11, 56, 190
Neighborhood facilities grants, 101
Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National
Institute of, 196

342

THE

BUDGET FOR FISCAL YElAR

New Communities Administration, 206
New Federalism, 3-5, 14, 16, 19, 121, 140
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO),
61,68
Northeast railroads, 94
Nuclear power plants, 12, 56, 69
Nuclear reactors, 12, 58, 69
Nuclear weapons, 69-70
Nutrition, 125, 130
Nutrition Service, Food and, 177

0
Obligations, explanation, 279
Obligations incurred, by agency, summary,
table, 293
Obscenity and Pornography, Commission on,
265
Occupational education, 199
Occupational health and safety, 114, 122
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 220
Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission, 260
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
National, 182
Offsetting receipts, by type, 300-302
Oil, crude, 44
Oil and gas leasing, Outer Continental Shelf, 90
Oil production, 56
Oil shale exploitation, 90
Old-age and survivors insurance, Federal, 125,
201
Older Americans volunteer program, 107
Open space land, 101
Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy, Commission on the,
265
Organization of the Government of the District
of Columbia, Commission on the, 265
Outdoor Recreation, Bureau of, 86, 209-210
Outer Continental Shelf 56, 86, 89
Outlays:
1947-50, 51
1973 actual, 60
1974 estimate, 60
1975 estimate, 60
1975 budget, distribution, 50
Agriculture and rural development, by program or agency, 80
Atomic Energy Commission, by program, 69
As a percent of GNP, 1954-75, table, 330
By agency, for each account and functional
code, 151-271
By agency, table, 1973-76, 41
By function, 1950-75, table, 52
By function, table, 1973-76, 41
By function, 1965-75, totals, table, 324-328
By function and agency, 303-317
Commerce and transportation, by program
or agency, 92
Commodity Credit Corporation, by program
or agency, 82
Community development and housing, by
program or agency, 101
Controllability, chart, 8
Controllability, table, 1967-75, 318-319




1975

Outlays—Continued
Controllability, table, 1975-79, 39
Defense, 5
Defense, national, table, 60
Education and manpower, by program or
agency, 109
Energy research and development, by program or agency, 57
Explanation, 279
Federal funds, table, 1973-75, 29
Federal payments to individuals and aid to
State and local governments, table, 1959—
79, 38
From budget authority available through
current action by Congress, table, 291
Full-employment, 8, 35, 50
Full-employment, table, 1973-76, 7
Full-employment, table, 1975-79, 37
General Government, by program or agency,
139
General Revenue Sharing, 146
Health, by program or agency, 119
Income security, by program or agency, 125
Increase, 3, 7, 50
Interest, 137
International affairs and finance, by program
or agency, 71
Manpower and education, by program or
agency, 108
Manpower, defense, table, 1968-75, 62
Natural resources and environment, by program or agency, 86
Off-budget agencies and Government-sponsored enterprises, 30-33
Projected, table, 1975-79, 37
Relation to budget authority, chart, 25
Relation to budget authority, summary,
table, 292
Summary:
By agency, table, 289
By function, 50-51
By function, table, 51, 288
Table, 287
Table, 1973-75, 3
Tennessee Valley Authority, by program, 89
Total, by function, 1950-75, 52
Total, table, 1973-75,6
Total, table, 1973-76,41
Uncontrollable, 3, 8
Uncontrollable, table, 1975-79, 39
Unified budget, table, 1954-75, 32
Veterans benefits and services, by program
or agency, 132
Total, 3, 50, 51
Totals, 1789-1975, table, 331
Trends, post-World War II period, 51-55
Overseas Private Investment Corporation, 74,
166
P
Pacific coastal region, 91, 95
Packers and stockyards, 171
Panama, Republic of, payment to, 224
Panama Canal, 193-194
Panama Canal Company, 194
Paris Agreement, 68
Park Service, National, 86, 210-211

343

INDEX
Participation sales authorizations, Government
National Mortgage Association, 204-205
Patent Appeals and Customs, Court of, 158
Patent laws, 97
Patent reform, 97
Pay, Advisory Committee on Federal, 246
Peace Corps, 72, 75, 245
Peace, discussion, 9-10
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, 143, 260
Pension reform, Veterans Administration, 131
Pensions, 44, 46, 47
Pensions, veterans, 131-133, 243-244
Personal property activities, General Services
Administration, 239
Personnel, full-time permanent, summary,
table, 295
Pesticides control, 87
Petroleum, allocation of, 56
Petroleum Allocation, Office of, 90
Philippines, Veterans Administration grants,
244
Planning Commission, National Capital, 257
Plant Health Inspection Service, Animal and,
169
Policy development and research, 207
Pollution:
Abatement and control, 85, 86, 87, 237
Water, 85, 87
Pollution Control Council, National Industrial,
181
Population Growth and the American Future,
Commission on, 265
Pornography, Commission on Obscenity and,
265
Postal Rate Commission, 95
Postal revenues, 95
Postal Service, 30, 31, 92, 95, 260, 277
Postsecondary education, 266
Potomac River Basin, Interstate Commission
on the, 256
Power Commission, Federal, 86, 252
Power development, 86, 88-89
Preparedness, Office of, 240
President, The:
Budget message of, 3-21
Compensation, 161
Emergency fund, 164
Funds appropriated to, 164-168
Special assistance, 161
Special projects, 161
President, Executive Office of the, 161-163
Presidential Reorganization Plan Authority, 19
President's Committee on Financial Structure
and Regulation, 142
President's Council on Youth Opportunity, 260
President's Veterans Program, 136
Price support program, 79, 80, 173
Printing and Engraving, Bureau of, 233
Prison System, Federal, 218
Prisons, Bureau of, 218
Procurement, Commission on Government, 265
Procurement, Defense, 187-188
Product Safety Commission, Consumer, 19, 249
Productivity, National Commission on, 266




Professional Standards Review Organization
(PSRO's), 118, 122
Project Independence, 4, 11-12, 55
Property:
Management and disposal, 139, 142, 239-240
Personal, 239
Real, 238
Property tax credit for elderly, 44
Prosthetic research, Veterans Administration,
244
Public assistance, 125, 127-129,200-201
Public buildings, see Buildings, grounds, and
sites
Public Buildings Service, 238
Public debt:
As a percent of GNP, 1954-75, table, 330
Increase in, 26
Interest, 137,235
Limit, table, 1973-75,28
Outstanding, table, 1973-75, 6, 26
Outstanding, 287, 296
Public Debt, Bureau of the, 233
Public Health Service, 198
Public housing, low-rent, 100, 106, 204
Public Land Law Review Commission, 266
Public Law 480, 84th Congress, see Agricultural
Trade Development and Assistance Act
Public works:
Acceleration, 168
Economic Development Administration Regional Action Planning Commissions, 98
R
Radiation protection, 97
Railroad Administration, Federal, 229-230
Railroad Passenger Corporation, National,
(AMTRAK), 91,94,229
Railroad Retirement, Commission on, 265
Railroad Retirement Board, 260-261
Railroads:
Crossings, 227
Northeast, 91
Outlays and budget authority for, 92
Research, 94, 229
Retirement, 46, 47, 125, 126-127
Railway Association, United States, 31, 267, 277
Rapid transit system, District of Columbia, 139
Readjustment benefits, Veterans, 243
Real property activities, General Services
Administration, 238
Receipts:
Analysis, 44-48
Authority to spend debt, 278
Budget, 280-282
By source, 47-48
By source, 1965-75, table, 322-323
By source, summary, table, 297-299
Changes in, 1973-75, table, 46
Chart, 48
Discussion, 280-282
Federal funds, table, 1973-75, 28
Full employment, 9, 35, 45-46
Full-employment, table, 1973-76, 7
Increase, 3, 7, 44, 46, 48
National income accounts, 1964-75, table, 329

344

THE

BUDGET

FOR

Receipts—Continued
Offsetting, by type, summary, table, 300-302
Offsetting, discussion, 280-281
Relation to GNP, 1954-75, table, 330
Summary, by source, table, 1973-75, 45, 288
Summary, table, 287
Total, 3, 44
Total, 1973-75, table, 3, 45, 46
Totals, 1789-1975, table, 6, 331
Rescission, definition, 279
Reclamation, Bureau of, 86, 88, 20&-209
Reconstruction Finance Corporation, liquidation fund, 231, 241
Records activities, 139
Recreation, Bureau of Outdoor, 86, 209-210
Recreational facilities, 86
Reform of Federal Criminal Laws, National
Commission on, 266
Refugees, assistance to, 125, 201, 224
Regional Action Planning Commissions, 180
Regional Councils, Federal, 16
Regional development, 92
Regional Management, Agency for, 237
Rehabilitation:
Housing, 101
Services and facilities, grants for, 201
Vocational, 129-130, 132, 133
Renegotiation Board, 261
Rental assistance, housing, 106
Rental collections, General Services Administration, 142
Research:
Agricultural, 80, 84, 169-170
Biomedical, 118, 119
Economic, Agriculture Department, 170-171
Educational, 108
Energy, 90
Health, 132
Housing and community development, 107,
207
Medical and prosthetic, Veterans Administration, 244
Mineral resources, 90
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 241-242
National Bureau of Standards, 97
National Science Foundation, 113
Railroad, 94, 229
Water resources, 209
Research applied to national needs, 113
Research and development:
Atomic Energy Commission, 69, 70
Defense-Military, 9, 59, 62, 63, 66-67, 188189
Energy, 55-58
Environmental Protection Agency, 85
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 241-242
Reserve forces, 63, 66
Reserve personnel, see Military personnel
Resources Council, Water, 268
Responsive Government Act, 16, 100, 101, 107
Retired pay, Defense, Department of, 67-68
Retirement fund, Civil Service, 125
Revenue sharing, 15, 144, 146-147, 235
Revolution Bicentennial Administration, American, 88, 112, 143, 253




FISCAL

YEiAR

1975

River basin commissions, 268
Roosevelt, Franklin Delano, Memorial Commission, 253
Rural Development Act, 15
Rural development, outlays and recommended
budget authority, by program or agency, 80
Rural development, program analysis, 79-84
Rural Development Service, 174
Rural electrification, 83
Rural Electrification Administration, 31,80,174
Rural electrification and telephone revolving
fund, 30-31,277
Rural environmental assistance, 80
Rural housing, 80, 8 1 , 8 3
Rural housing assistance programs, 82
Rural Telephone Bank, 30, 277
Rural telephone program, 83
Ryukyu Islands, Government of, 193

Safety:
Aviation, 91,226
Boating, 225
Highway and motor carrier 91, 92, 93, 229
Mining and minerals industries, 86, 201
Nuclear power industry, 70
Occupational, 114
Safety Administration, Mining Enforcement
and, 211
Safety Board, National Transportation, 230
Safety Board of Review, Federal Metal and
Nonmetallic Mine, 252
Safety Commission, Consumer Product, 249
Safety and Health Administration, Occupational, 220
Safety Review Commission, Occupational
Health, 260
Saint Elizabeths Hospital, 122, 197
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation, 230
Salaries, Commission on Executive, Legislative,
and Judicial, 265
Saline Water, Office of, 215
School assistance in federally affected areas, 199
School Lunch program, 128-129
Science, National Commission on Libraries and
Information, 257
Science, program analysis, 113
Science education, 113
Science Foundation, National, 113, 259-260
Science and Technology, Office of, 113
Scientific Cooperation, National Commission
on. 222
Sea Grant program, 97
Sealift, defense, 63, 64, 66
Secret Service, U.S., 234
Securities and Exchange Commission, 261-262
Security assistance, international, 71-72, 73,
164-165
Security Council, National, 162
Security income program, supplemental, 17-18
Seigniorage, 282
Selective Service System, 262
Senate, U.S. 151
Servicemen's group life insurance fund, 133,
245

345

INDEX
Sewage facilities grants, 16, 81, 85, 86, 87, 101
Shipbuilding, American Commission on, 264
Shipping, ocean, 92, 183-184
Ships:
Construction, 95
See also Vessels
Small Business Administration, 96, 97, 98, 262-

263

Smithsonian Institution, 112, 263
Social and Economic Statistics Administration,

179

Social insurance, 44, 45, 47
Social and Rehabilitation Service, 200-201
Social security, 46, 47, 124, 125, 126
Social Security Advisory Council, 126
Social Security Administration, 201-202
Social services, 129-130
Soil Conservation Service, 80, 86, 175-176
Solar and geothermal energy, 56, 58
Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, U.S., 193
South Vietnam, assistance to, 68
Southeast Asia:
See also Vietnam conflict
Support of operations, 61
Southeastern Power Administration, 213
Southwestern Power Administration, 213
Space program, 241-242
Space research and technology:
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program, 78
Program analysis, 77-78
Space technology, 242
Spanish-Speaking People, Cabinet Committee
on Opportunities for, 247
Special Representative for Trade Negotiations,
163
Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Bureau of, 86, 88,

210
Standards, National Bureau of, 97
State, Department of, 72, 76, 221-224
State and local governments, discussion, 13-16
State Technical Services, Office of, 183
States:
Boating safety assistance, 225
Education grants, 108
Employment service, 116
Grants to, 8, 14
Highway safety programs, 227, 229
Law enforcement assistance, 138, 140-144
Nursing homes, veterans, 135
Parks and recreation areas, 88
Pollution control programs, 85, 87
Public assistance grants, 125, 128, 200-201
Recreation grants, 85
Revenue sharing, 89, 146-147
Social services, grants to, 129-130
Urban transportation, 91
Statistical activities:
Agriculture, Department of, 170
Commerce, Department of, 179
Labor, Department of, 220
Statistical Reporting Service, 170
Statistics, Bureau of Labor, 220
Statistics Administration, Social and Economic,
179
Stockyards, 171




Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT), 9,
62-63
Strategic arms limitation with the Soviet Union,
59,60
Strategic forces, defense, 62-63
Strategic systems, 59
Student aid, 109, 111-112,119-120
Student loan insurance fund, 199
Student Loan Marketing Association, 31, 112
Submarines, 65, 70
Subversive Activities Control Board, 264
Sugar Act program, 80
Summary tables, explanation of, 286
Supersonic aircraft development termination,

226

Supplemental security income, 18, 124, 127
Supply Service, Federal, 239
Supreme Court of the United States, 158
Surplus or deficit, table, 6, 26, 30
Surplus or deficit, 1789-1975, table, 331
Susquehanna River Basin Commission, 256

Tariff Commission, 264
Tax administration, see Internal Revenue
Tax Court, United States, 157
Tax expenditures, 34-35
Tax reform, 7
Taxes:
Estate and gift, 45, 48
Excise, 45, 47
Income, 44, 45, 47
Insurance, social, 44, 45, 47
Payroll, 44, 47
Social security, 46, 47
Telephone excise, 46, 47
Unemployment, 47
Technical Services, Office of State, Commerce
Department, 183
Technology Assessment, Office of, 154
Telecommunications Policy, Office of, 163
Telecommunications service, General Services
Administration, 239
Tennessee Valley Authority, 86, 89, 266
Territorial affairs, 214-215
Territories, Office of, 139
Tobacco and Firearms, Bureau of Alcohol, 232
Tourism Resources Review Commission, National, 266
Trade, foreign, promotion of, 71
Trade adjustment assistance, 98
Trade barriers, 71
Trade Commission, Federal, 252-253
Trade negotiations, international, 222
Trade Negotiations, Special Representative for

163
Trade Reform Act, 10
Traffic safety, 229
Training:
Health manpower, 118, 119-120
Law enforcement, 140-144
Manpower development, 109, 114
Military personnel, 63, 67-68
On-the-job, 115
Veterans, 132, 133

346

THE

BUDGET

FOR

FISCAL

Transit Authority, Washington Metropolitan
Area, 256
Transit system, rapid, District of Columbia, 139
Transportation:
Air, 92, 94-95
Assistance, 15-16
Bus systems, 91,93
Ground, 92, 93
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 92
Program analysis, 91-96
Urban, 91, 207
Water, 92, 95
Transportation, Department of, 225-231
Transportation Safety Board, National, 230
Travel Service, United States, 181
Treasurer, Office of the, 234
Treasury, Department of the, 29, 141, 231-236
Trust funds, explanation, 26, 277

19 75

Veterans—Continued
Income security, 131-133
Insurance, 132, 133, 243, 244-245
Loans, 131, 132, 134,244
Medical care, 131, 132,134-135,244
Outlays and recommended budget authority,
by program or agency, 132
Pensions, non-service-connected, 132
Program analysis, 131 -136
Readjustment benefits, 243
State nursing homes, 135
Unemployment, 136
Vocational rehabilitation, 129-130, 132, 133
Veterans Administration, 29, 243-245
Vice President, The, 151
Vietnam war, American involvement in the, 59
Violence, National Commission on the Causes
and Prevention of, 163
Virgin Islands Corporation, liquidation, 241
Vocational education, 109, 110, 111, 199
Vocational rehabilitation, 132, 133
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA), 107

U
Unemployment, 5
Unemployment insurance, 6, 124, 125, 127
Unified budget, 27
Unified transportation assistance program, 1516
United Nations, 71
United Nations Development Program, 74
United Nations Relief and Works Agency, 74
United States Government Life Insurance, 132,
245
United States International Aeronautical Exposition, 226
United States Information Agency, 72, 76, 267
United States Railway Association, 31, 267, 277
United States Tax Court, 157
United States Travel Service, 181
Uranium, 70
Urban Development, Department of Housing
and, 204-208
Urban mass transportation, 91, 92
Urban Mass Transportation Administration,
230
Urban renewal, 101, 103,206
Urban transportation, 207
Urban Transportation Assistance Program, 93

W
Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, 256
Waste treatment and disposal, 85, 87-88
Water Commission, National, 89, 266
Water facilities, grants for, 101
Water Quality, National Commission on, 266
Water ports, deep, 85
Water resources:
Agricultural, 80, 84
Development, 88-89
Programs, 84, 86
Water Resources Council, 268
Water resources projects, 88-89
Water Resources Research, Office of, 209
Watershed planning and improvement, 86
Weapon systems, development and deployment,
61
Weapons, strategic, development of, 62-63
Weather programs, 97
Welfare system, 4, 18, 124, 129
White House Office, 161
Wildlife, conservation, 194
Wildlife, Bureau of Sport Fisheries and, 210
Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance,
National Commission for the Review of
Federal and State Laws Relating to, 265
Woodrow Wilson International Center for
Scholars, 263
Work incentives, 18, 109, 116, 200
World Bank Group, 74

Venereal disease, 123
Veterans:
Compensation and pensions, 18, 131-133,
243-244
Disability, non-service-connected, 133
Disability, service-connected, 131, 132
Education and training, 18, 131, 132, 133
Employment, 136
Hospital and domiciliary facilities, 131, 132,
134-135,244
Housing, 132, 134




YElAR

Youth Conservation Corps, 177
Youth Opportunity, President's Council on, 260

o


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102