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A rea Wage S urvey

The Waterbury, Connecticut, Metropolitan Area
March 1966

Bulletin No. 1 4 6 5 - 5 2




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T I S T I CS
Ar t hur M

Ross, Commi ssi oner




Area Wage Survey
The Waterbury, Connecticut, Metropolitan Area




March 1966

Bulletin No. 1465-52
A pril 1966
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 402 - Price 25 cents




P reface

T h e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s p r o g r a m o f a nn ua l
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s i s d e ­
s ig n e d to p r o v i d e data on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , and e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s a nd s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s .
It
y i e l d s d e t a ile d data b y s e l e c t e d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s f o r e a c h
o f th e a r e a s s t u d i e d , f o r e c o n o m i c r e g i o n s , a n d f o r th e
U n ited S ta tes.
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n i n t h e p r o g r a m is
th e n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t in t o (1) th e m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s
b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y a n d s k i l l l e v e l , a n d (2) th e s t r u c ­
t u r e a n d l e v e l o f w a g e s a m o n g a r e a s a nd i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .

T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s o f t h e s u r v e y in
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , in M a r c h 1 9 6 6 .
The Standard M e t r o ­
p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d b y th e B u r e a u o f th e
B u d g e t t h r o u g h M a r c h 1965, c o n s i s t s o f th e c i t y o f W a t e r ­
b u r y ; b o r o u g h o f N a u g a t u c k ; th e t o w n s o f B e a c o n F a l l s ,
C h e s h i r e , M i d d l e b u r y , P r o s p e c t , and W o l c o t t i n N e w H a v e n
C o u n t y ; a n d th e t o w n s o f T h o m a s t o n , W a t e r t o w n , a n d W o o d ­
b u r y in L i t c h f i e l d C o u n t y .
T h i s s t u d y w a s c o n d u c t e d b y th e
B u r e a u ' s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in B o s t o n ,
M a s s . , W e n d e ll D.
M a c D o n a l d , D i r e c t o r ; b y L e o E p s t e i n , u n d e r th e d i r e c t i o n
o f Paul V. M u lkern, A s s is ta n t R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r fo r W ages
and In d u s t r ia l R e la t io n s .




O' o

E i g h t y - f i v e a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d in th e
p r o g r a m . In form a tion on o ccu p a tion a l e a rn in g s is c o lle c t e d
a n n u a l l y in e a c h a r e a .
In form a tion on e sta b lish m e n t p r a c ­
t i c e s a nd s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s i s o b t a i n e d b i e n ­
n i a l l y i n m o s t o f th e a r e a s .

P age
In tro d u c tio n ________________________________________________________________
1
W age tre n d s fo r s e le c te d o c cu p a tio n al g ro u p s__________________________ 4
T ab le s:
1. E sta b lis h m e n ts and w o rk e rs w ith in scope of su rv e y and
n u m b er s tu d ie d — 1------------------------------------------------------------------------ 3
2. Index es of s ta n d a rd w eekly s a la r ie s and s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly
e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c cu p a tio n al g ro u p s, and p e rc e n ts of
ch ange fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s _____________________________________ 4
A. O ccu p atio n al e a rn in g s:*
A - 1. O ffice o c cu p a tio n s—m e n and w om en______________________ 5
A -2 . P ro fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o ccu p a tio n s—
m en and w om en___________________________________________ 7
A -3 . O ffice, p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o ccu p atio n s—
m en and w om en c o m b in e d _______________________________
A -4 . M ain ten an ce and p o w erp lan t o c c u p a tio n s_________________
A -5 . C u sto d ial and m a te r ia l m o v em en t o c c u p a tio n s _________ 1
B. E sta b lis h m e n t p ra c tic e s and su p p le m e n ta ry w age p ro v isio n s:*
B - l. M inim um e n tra n c e s a la r ie s fo r w om en office w o r k e r s — 11
B -2 . Shift d if f e r e n tia ls _________________________________________ 12
B -3 . S ch eduled w eekly h o u r s ___________________________________ 13
B -4 . P a id h o lid a y s_______________________________________________ 14
B -5 . P a id v a c a tio n s _____________________________________________ 15
B -6 . H ealth, in s u ra n c e , and p en sio n p la n s____________________ 17
B -7 . H ealth in s u ra n c e b e n e fits p ro v id ed em p lo y e es and
th e ir d e p e n d e n ts__________________________________________ 18
B -8 . P r o f it- s h a rin g p la n s ______________________________________ 19
A ppendixes:
A. C hang es in o c cu p a tio n al d e s c rip tio n s ------------------------------------------- 20
B. O ccu p atio n al d e s c rip tio n s ________________________________________ 21
00

A t th e e n d o f e a c h s u r v e y , an i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l ­
le tin p r e s e n ts s u r v e y r e s u lts f o r e a c h a r e a studied.
A fter
c o m p l e t i o n o f a ll o f th e i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n s f o r a r o u n d
o f s u r v e y s , a t w o -p a r t s u m m a r y b u lletin is is s u e d .
The
f i r s t p a r t b r i n g s d a t a f o r e a c h o f th e m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s
s t u d i e d in t o o n e b u l l e t i n .
The s e c o n d part p r e se n ts i n fo r ­
m a tio n w h ich has b e e n p r o je c t e d f r o m in dividual m e t r o ­
p o l i t a n a r e a d a t a to r e l a t e to e c o n o m i c r e g i o n s and th e
U n ited S ta tes.

Contents

areas.

lit

*N OTE:
S im ila r ta b u lation s a re
(See in s id e b a c k c o v e r . )

available fo r

other




Area Wage Survey---The Waterbury, Conn., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
r e p o r t e d , as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the w o r k
s c h e d u l e s ( r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s a r e p a i d ; a v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t i o n s h ave
b e e n r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h i s a r e a is 1 o f 85 in w h i c h the U. S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u reau of L a b o r S tatistics co n d u cts s u r v e y s o f o ccu p a tion a l earn ings
and r e l a t e d w a g e b e n e f i t s on an a r e a w i d e b a s i s .
In this a r e a , data
w e r e o b t a i n e d by p e r s o n a l v i s i t s o f B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s to r e p r e ­
s e n t a t i v e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s : M a n u ­
f a c t u r i n g ; t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ;
w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and
s erv ices.
M a jo r industry grou ps ex clu d e d f r o m these studies are
g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s and the c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e
o m i t t e d b e c a u s e they tend to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the
o c c u p a t i o n s s tu d ie d to w a r r a n t i n c l u s i o n .
S e p a r a t e ta b u la t io n s a r e
p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f the b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h i c h m e e t p u b ­
lica tio n c r it e r ia .

The a v e r a g e s p r e s e n te d r e f l e c t c o m p o s it e , a re a w id e e s t i ­
m ates.
I n d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and j o b
s t a f f i n g and, thus, c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
in d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e pa y l e v e l s
f o r m e n and w o m e n in any o f the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s sh o u ld not b e
a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f the s e x e s w it h in
in d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . O t h e r p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w h i c h m a y c o n t r i b ­
u te to d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n and w o m e n i n c l u d e : D i f f e r e n c e s in
p r o g r e s s i o n w ith in e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n ly the a c t u a l r a t e s
p a id i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; and d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c d u t ie s p e r ­
f o r m e d , a lth o u g h th e w o r k e r s a r e a p p r o p r i a t e l y c l a s s i f i e d within the
sam e surv ey jo b d e scrip tio n .
J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g
e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d than t h o s e
u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a re co n d u cted on a s a m p le b a s is b e c a u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a in o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n o f
l a r g e than o f s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s t u d i e d . In c o m b i n i n g the data,
h o w e v e r , a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a r e g i v e n t h e i r a p p r o p r i a t e w e ig h t . E s ­
t i m a t e s b a s e d o n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d ie d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
as r e l a t i n g to a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w the m i n i m u m s i z e s t u d ie d .
O ccupations

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the to t a l in
a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in the s c o p e o f the s tu d y and not the n u m b e r
actually s u rv e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ­
t a in e d f r o m the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d ie d s e r v e o n ly to in d ic a t e
the r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s s t u d i e d .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in
o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e d o n ot m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t the a c c u r a c y o f the
e a r n i n g s da ta .

and E a r n i n g s

The o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu dy a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e o f the
follow ing ty p es:
( l ) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;
(3) m a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; and (4) c u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m en t.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d o n a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to ta ke a c c o u n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d u t ie s w ith in the s a m e j o b .
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu dy
a r e l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in a p p e n d i x B .
E a r n i n g s data f o r s o m e o f
the o c c u p a t i o n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d a r e not p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s
t a b l e s b e c a u s e e i t h e r ( l ) e m p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n is t o o s m a l l
to p r o v i d e e n o u g h da t a to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e is p o s s i ­
b ility of d i s c l o s u r e o f individual e s ta b lis h m e n t data.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s
I n f o r m a t i o n is p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) o n s e l e c t e d
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s as th ey
r e l a t e to p la n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s .
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , and
p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s , and f o r c e - a c c o u n t c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s w h o
a r e u t i l i z e d as a s e p a r a t e w o r k f o r c e a r e e x c l u d e d . " P l a n t w o r k e r s "
i n c l u d e w o r k i n g f o r e m e n and a l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s ( in c lu d in g
l e a d m e n and t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c t i o n s .
"O ffice w o rk ­
e r s " i n c l u d e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s and n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s p e r ­
f o r m i n g c l e r i c a l o r r e l a t e d f u n c t i o n s . C a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s and r o u t e m e n
a r e e x c l u d e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d in n o n m a n u ­
factu ring in d u stries.

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s da t a a r e s h o w n f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u l e
in the g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n i n g s da t a e x c l u d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la te s h i f t s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , b ut c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
b o n u s e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n c l u d e d . W h e r e w e e k l y h o u r s a r e




1

2
M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s ( t a b l e B - l ) r e l a t e o n l y t o th e e s ­
ta b lish m en ts v is ite d .
T h e y a r e p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
w it h f o r m a l m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y p o l i c i e s .
S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l d a t a ( t a b l e B - 2 ) a r e l i m i t e d to p l a n t w o r k e r s
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .
T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n is p r e s e n t e d b o t h in
t e r m s o f (1) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , 1 p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f t o t a l p l a n t
w o r k e r e m p l o y m e n t , and (2) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f
w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d o n th e s p e c i f i e d s h i f t at th e t i m e o f the
survey.
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , the a m o u n t
a p p l y i n g to a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , if no a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y ,
the c l a s s i f i c a t i o n " o t h e r " w a s u s e d . In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h i c h s o m e
l a t e - s h i f t h o u r s a r e p a i d at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d i f f e r e n t i a l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n l y i f it a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y o f th e s h i f t h o u r s .
T h e s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ( t a b l e B - 3 ) o f a m a j o r i t y o f the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t a r e t a b u l a t e d a s a p p l y i n g to
a l l o f th e p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s o f th at e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
Paid h o lid a y s ;
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ; h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , a nd p e n s i o n p l a n s ; and p r o f i t - s h a r i n g
p l a n s ( t a b l e s B - 4 t h r o u g h B - 8 ) a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y o n the b a s i s
that t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e to a l l p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s i f a m a j o r i t y
o f s u c h w o r k e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r m a y e v e n t u a l l y q u a l i f y f o r th e p r a c ­
t i c e s l i s t e d . S u m s o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2 t h r o u g h B - 8 m a y
not eq u a l tota ls b e c a u s e o f rou nd ing.
D a t a o n p a i d h o l i d a y s ( t a b l e B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d to d a t a o n h o l i ­
d a y s g ra n te d ann ually on a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i. e. , ( l ) a r e p r o v i d e d f o r
in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H olida ys
o r d i n a r i l y g r a n t e d a r e i n c l u d e d e v e n th o u g h t h e y m a y f a l l o n a n o n ­
w o r k d a y , e v e n i f the w o r k e r is n o t g r a n t e d a n o t h e r d a y o f f .
The fir s t
p a r t o f th e p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s th e n u m b e r o f w h o l e a nd h a l f
h olid a ys a ctu a lly gran ted.
T h e s e c o n d p a r t c o m b i n e s w h o l e and h a l f
h o l i d a y s to s h o w t o t a l h o l i d a y t i m e .
T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a t i o n p l a n s ( t a b l e B - 5 ) is l i m i t e d to
fo r m a l p o li c ie s , exclu din g in fo r m a l a rra n g e m e n ts w h e re b y tim e off
w it h p a y is g r a n t e d at th e d i s c r e t i o n o f th e e m p l o y e r .
E stim ates
e x c l u d e v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s p l a n s and t h o s e w h i c h o f f e r " e x t e n d e d " o r
" s a b b a t i c a l " b e n e f i t s b e y o n d b a s i c p l a n s to w o r k e r s w ith q u a l i f y i n g
lengths o f s e r v i c e .
T y p i c a l o f s u c h e x c l u s i o n s a r e p l a n s in th e s t e e l ,
a l u m i n u m , and c a n i n d u s t r i e s . S e p a r a t e e s t i m a t e s a r e p r o v i d e d a c ­
c o r d i n g to e m p l o y e r p r a c t i c e in c o m p u t i n g v a c a t i o n p a y m e n t s , s u c h as
tim e p a y m e n ts , p e r c e n t of annual e a rn in g s , o r fla t-s u m a m o u n ts . H o w ­
e v e r , in the t a b u l a t i o n s o f v a c a t i o n p a y , p a y m e n t s n o t o n a t i m e b a s i s
w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a t i m e b a s i s ; f o r e x a m p l e , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t
o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d as the e q u i v a l e n t o f 1 w e e k ' s p a y .
D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n
p l a n s ( t a b l e s B - 6 a nd B - 7 ) f o r w h i c h a t l e a s t a p a r t o f the c o s t is
b o r n e b y th e e m p l o y e r , e x c e p t i n g o n l y l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s s u c h as

* A n establishm ent was con sidered as having
conditions: (1 ) O perated late shifts at the tim e o f the
late shifts. A n establishm ent was considered as having
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2 )
late shifts.




a p o lic y if it m et eith er o f the fo llo w in g
survey, or (2 ) had form al provisions co ve rin g
form al provisions if it (1 ) had operated late
had provisions in w ritten form fo r operating

w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l s e c u r i t y , and r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t .
Such plan s in clu d e th o se u n d e r w r itte n b y a c o m m e r c i a l in su r a n c e
c o m p a n y a nd t h o s e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h a u n i o n f u n d o r p a i d d i r e c t l y b y
th e e m p l o y e r o u t o f c u r r e n t o p e r a t i n g f u n d s o r f r o m a f u n d s e t a s i d e
f o r th is p u r p o s e .
D e a t h b e n e f i t s a r e i n c l u d e d as a f o r m o f l i f e i n ­
surance.
S e l e c t e d h e a l t h i n s u r a n c e b e n e f i t s p r o v i d e d e m p l o y e e s and
dependents are a lso presen ted .
S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e i s l i m i t e d to th at t y p e o f
in su ra n ce under w hich p r e d e te r m in e d ca s h p aym ents a re m ad e d ir e c tly
t o the i n s u r e d o n a w e e k l y o r m o n t h l y b a s i s d u r i n g i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t
disa b ility.
I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s u c h p l a n s to w h i c h the
e m p lo y e r con trib u tes.
H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k a n d N e w J e r s e y , w h i c h
have en acted t e m p o r a r y d is a b ility in s u ra n c e law s w hich r e q u ire e m ­
p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , * p l a n s a r e i n c l u d e d o n l y i f th e e m p l o y e r ( l ) c o n ­
2
t r i b u t e s m o r e th a n is l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s the e m p l o y e e
w it h b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d the r e q u i r e m e n t s o f th e l a w .
T a bu lation s
o f p a i d s i c k l e a v e p l a n s a r e l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s 3 w h i c h p r o v i d e
f u l l p a y o r a p r o p o r t i o n o f th e w o r k e r ' s p a y d u r i n g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k
b eca u se of illn ess.
S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r e s e n t e d a c c o r d i n g to
( l ) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y a nd n o w a i t i n g p e r i o d , and (2) p l a n s
w h ich p r o v id e e ith e r p a r t ia l pay o r a w aitin g p e r i o d .
In a d d i t i o n
to th e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f th e p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s w h o a r e p r o v i d e d
s i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r p a i d s i c k l e a v e , an u n d u p l i c a t e d
t o t a l is s h o w n o f w o r k e r s w h o r e c e i v e e i t h e r o r b o t h t y p e s o f b e n e f i t s .
C a t a s t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e , s o m e t i m e s r e f e r r e d to as e x t e n d e d
m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e , i n c l u d e s t h o s e p l a n s w h i c h a r e d e s i g n e d to p r o t e c t
e m p l o y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s a nd i n j u r y i n v o l v i n g e x p e n s e s b e y o n d
th e n o r m a l c o v e r a g e o f h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , and s u r g i c a l p l a n s .
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p l a n s p r o v i d i n g f o r c o m p l e t e o r p a r t i a l
paym ent of d o cto rs' fe e s.
Such plan s m a y b e u n d e r w r itte n by c o m ­
m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n i z a t i o n s o r they m a y
be s e lf-in s u r e d .
T a b u la tion s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s io n plan s a re lim ite d
to t h o s e p l a n s th at p r o v i d e m o n t h l y p a y m e n t s f o r th e r e m a i n d e r o f
th e w o r k e r ' s l i f e .
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g p l a n s ( t a b l e B - 8 ) a r e l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s
w it h d e f i n i t e f o r m u l a s f o r c o m p u t i n g p r o f i t s h a r e s to b e d i s t r i b u t e d
a m o n g e m p l o y e e s and w h o s e f o r m u l a s w e r e c o m m u n i c a t e d to e m ­
p l o y e e s in a d v a n c e o f the d e t e r m i n a t i o n o f p r o f i t s . D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d
a c c o r d i n g t o p r o v i s i o n s f o r d i s t r i b u t i n g p r o f i t s h a r e s to e m p l o y e e s :
( l ) C u r r e n t o r c a s h d is t r ib u t io n o f p r o fi t s h a r e s w ithin a sh o rt p e r io d
a f t e r d e t e r m i n a t i o n o f p r o f i t s ; (2) d e f e r r e d d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p r o f i t s h a r e s
a f t e r a s p e c i f i e d n u m b e r o f y e a r s o r at r e t i r e m e n t ; (3) c o m b i n a t i o n
c u r r e n t and d e f e r r e d p l a n s ; and (4) e l e c t i v e d i s t r i b u t i o n p l a n s , u n d e r
w h i c h e a c h p a r t i c i p a n t is r e q u i r e d t o s e l e c t w h e t h e r t o ta ke h is s h a r e
o f th e c u r r e n t y e a r ' s p r o f i t in c a s h , h a v e it d e f e r r e d , o r p a r t in c a s h
and p a r t d e f e r r e d .

2 The tem porary disability laws in C a liforn ia and Rhode Island do not require em p loy er
contributions.
3 A n establishm ent was considered as having a form al plan if it established at least the
m in im u m num ber o f days o f sick lea v e av a ila b le to ea ch e m p lo y e e .
Such a plan need not be
w ritten, but in form al sick le a v e allow a n ces, determ in ed on an individual basis, w ere exclu d ed .

3

T a ble 1.

E stab lish m en ts and w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f su r v e y and num ber studied in W aterbu ry, C on n ., 1 by m a jo r in d u stry d iv is io n , 2 M arch 1966
N u m b e r o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s
M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
o f s tu d y

I n d u s t r y d i v is i o n

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s
W ith in s c o p e o f s tu d y

W ith in s c o p e
o f stu d y 3

S tu d ie d
T o ta l4

S tu d ie d

P la n t
N u m ber

A l l d i v i s i o n s --------------

------------------

------------------------

M a n u fa c t u r in g — __
— ------------------------------ _
N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ------------------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and
o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5____ __ __ — ----------W h o l e s a le t r a d e — _ _______ — — --------------R e t a i l t r a d e ________________________________________
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e -------------S e r v i c e s 8_______ _______ _______________
____

O ffic e

P ercen t

T o ta l4

_

144

64

4 1 ,7 0 0

100

3 0 ,0 0 0

5, 500

3 0, 800

50
-

100
44

39
25

3 5 ,8 0 0
5 . 9 00

86
14

2 6 ,4 0 0
3 ,6 0 0

4 , 300
1, 200

2 6 ,6 0 0
4 , 200

50
50
50
50
50

7
4
19
7
7

7
2
9
3
4

1 ,8 0 0
300
2, 100
1, 100
600

4

1

5

3
1

1

1, 200
(? )
(? )
(? )
(6)

200
(? )
(? )
(? )
(6)

1 ,8 0 0
200
1, 100
700
400

The W a terb u ry Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a , as d efin ed by the B ureau o f the Budget through M arch 1965, c o n s is t s o f the c it y o f W aterbu ry; b orou gh o f N augatuck; the towns of
B e a co n F a lls , C h e s h ir e , M id dleb u ry, P r o s p e c t , and W o lco tt in New H aven County; and the towns o f T h om a ston , W atertow n, and W oodbury in L itc h fie ld County.
The " w o r k e r s w ithin scop e of
study" estim a te s show n in this table p ro v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a te d e s c r ip tio n o f the s iz e and c o m p o s it io n o f the la b o r f o r c e in clu d ed in the su rv e y .
The e stim a tes are not intended, h ow ever,
to s e r v e as a b a s is of c o m p a r is o n w ith other e m p loym en t in d e x e s fo r the area to m e a s u r e e m p loym en t tren d s o r le v e ls sin c e (1) planning o f w age su r v e y s r e q u ir e s the use o f establish m en t data
c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in advance o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d studied, and (2) sm a ll e sta b lish m e n ts are exclu d ed fr o m the s c o p e o f the s u rv e y .
The 1957 r e v is e d edition o f the Standard In du strial C la s s ific a t io n Manual and the 1963 Supplem ent w e re u sed in c la s s ify in g e sta b lish m e n ts by in d u stry d iv isio n .
Inclu des a ll esta b lish m e n ts w ith total em ploym en t at o r above the m in im um lim ita tio n . A ll ou tlets (w ithin the area) o f c o m p a n ie s in such in d u s trie s as tr a d e , fin a n ce, auto r e p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th ea ters a re c o n s id e r e d as 1 establish m en t.
Inclu des e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and oth er w o r k e r s exclu d ed fr o m the se p a ra te plant and o f fic e c a t e g o r ie s .
T a x ica b s and s e r v ic e s in cid en ta l to w ater tra n s p o rta tio n w e re excluded.
T h is in d u stry d iv is io n is r e p r e s e n te d in e stim a te s fo r " a ll in d u s tr ie s " and "n on m a n u fa ctu rin g" in the S e r ie s A ta b le s , and fo r " a l l in d u s tr ie s " in the S e r ie s B ta b le s . S eparate p resen tation
o f data fo r this d iv is io n is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g re a s o n s :
(1) E m ploym en t in the d iv is io n is to o s m a ll to p ro v id e enough data to m e r it sep a ra te study, (2) the sam ple was
not d esig n ed in itia lly to p e rm it se p a ra te p re se n ta tio n , (3) r e s p o n s e w as in s u fficie n t o r inadequate to p e rm it se p a ra te p re s e n ta tio n , and (4) th ere is p o s s ib ilit y o f d is c lo s u r e o f individual
esta b lish m en t data.
W ork ers fr o m this e n tire in d u stry d iv is io n a re r e p r e s e n te d in e stim a te s fo r " a l l in d u s tr ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa ctu rin g" in the S e r ie s A ta b le s , but fr o m the r e a l estate p o rtio n only in
e s tim a te s fo r " a l l in d u s tr ie s " in the S e r ie s B ta b le s . S ep a ra te p re se n ta tio n o f data fo r this d iv is io n is not m ade fo r one o r m o r e o f the r e a s o n s given in footn ote 6 above.
H otels; p e r s o n a l s e r v ic e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ; a u tom obile r e p a ir shops; m otion p ic tu r e s ; n o n p ro fit m e m b e r s h ip o rg a n iz a tio n s (e xclu d in g r e lig io u s and c h a r ita b le or g a n iz a tio n s ); and engineering
and a r c h ite c tu r a l s e r v ic e s .

2
3
4
5
6

7
8




O ver f o u r -fift h s o f the e m p lo y e e s w ithin s c o p e o f the su r v e y in the W aterbu ry area
w e re em p loyed in m anufacturin g fir m s .
The fo llo w in g table p r e s e n ts the m a jo r in du stry
g ro u p s and s p e c ific in d u strie s as a p e r c e n t o f a ll m anufacturin g:
Industry gro u p

S p e c ific in d u strie s

F a b r ic a te d m etal p r o d u c t s ______20
R u bber and m is c e lla n e o u s
p l a s t i c s ________________________ 18
P r im a r y m e t a ls --------------------------- 15
P r o fe s s io n a l, s c ie n tific , and
co n tr o llin g in stru m en ts;
w atch es and c l o c k s _____________ 13
M ach in ery (e x ce p t e le c t r ic a l)
—7
C h e m ic a ls _________ -_____________ 5
E le c t r ic a l m a ch in e ry - __________ 5

M etal sta m p in g s__________________ 15
R u bber fo o tw e a r __________________ 15
R o llin g , draw in g, and e x tru d ­
ing o f n o n fe rro u s m e ta ls _____ 14
W atch es, c lo c k s , and re la te d
d e v i c e s _________________________ 6
In du strial in o rg a n ic and
o r g a n ic c h e m ic a l s ____________ 5
Instrum ents fo r m e a s u rin g ,
c o n tr o llin g , and indicating
p h y s ic a l c h a r a c t e r is t i c s _____
5

This in fo rm a tio n is b a se d on e s tim a te s o f total em p lo ym e n t d e r iv e d fr o m u n iv e rs e
m a te r ia ls c o m p ile d p r io r to actu al su rv e y .
P r o p o r tio n s in v a rio u s in d u stry d iv is io n s m ay
d iffe r fr o m p ro p o rtio n s b a se d on the r e s u lts o f the s u r v e y as shown in table 1 above.

4
Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e in
a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , and
in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .

the j o b s d u r i n g the p e r i o d s u r v e y e d in 1961.
T h e s e w eigh ted earn ings
f o r i n d i v i d u a l o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e th e n t o t a l e d t o o b t a i n an a g g r e g a t e f o r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p . F i n a l l y , the r a t i o ( e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t a g e )
o f the g r o u p a g g r e g a t e f o r th e o n e y e a r t o th e a g g r e g a t e f o r the o t h e r
y e a r w a s c o m p u t e d and the d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n the r e s u l t and 100 is
the p e r c e n t a g e o f c h a n g e f r o m th e o n e p e r i o d to th e o t h e r .
The
i n d e x e s w e r e c o m p u t e d b y m u l t i p l y i n g th e r a t i o s f o r e a c h g r o u p
a g g r e g a t e f o r e a c h p e r i o d a f t e r the b a s e y e a r ( 1 9 6 1 ) .

F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , th e p e r ­
c e n t a g e s of ch an ge r e la t e to a v e r a g e w e e k ly s a l a r i e s f o r n o r m a l h o u r s
o f w o r k , that i s , the s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e f o r w h i c h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s a r e p a id .
F o r p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , t h e y m e a s u r e c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g p r e m i u m p a y f o r
o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te s h i f t s .
The
p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d on da t a f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s and i n ­
c l u d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w it h in e a c h g r o u p .

Office clerical (m en and women):
B ookkeeping-m achine operators, class B
Clerks, accounting, classes A and B
Clerks, file, classes A, B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
C om ptom eter operators
Keypunch operators, classes A and B
Office boys and girls
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Sw itchboard operators, classes A and B
T abulating-m achine operators, class B
Typists, classes A and B

T h e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e m e a s u r e , p r i n c i p a l l y ,
the e f f e c t s o f (1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and w a g e c h a n g e s ; (2 ) m e r i t o r o t h e r
i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b ;
and (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e w a g e s du e t o c h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e r e ­
s u lt in g f r o m l a b o r t u r n o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and
c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith
differen t pay le v e ls .
C h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s
o r d e c r e a s e s in the o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w i t h o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
F o r e x a m p l e , a f o r c e e x p a n s i o n m i g h t i n c r e a s e th e p r o p o r t i o n o f l o w e r
p a i d w o r k e r s in a s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t i o n a nd l o w e r th e a v e r a g e , w h e r e a s
a r e d u c t i o n in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f l o w e r p a i d w o r k e r s w o u l d h a v e the
o p p o s i t e e f f e c t . S i m i l a r l y , the m o v e m e n t o f a h i g h - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t out o f an a r e a c o u l d c a u s e th e a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s to d r o p , e v e n
th o u gh n o c h a n g e in r a t e s o c c u r r e d in o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the a r e a .
D a ta a r e a d j u s t e d w h e r e n e c e s s a r y t o r e m o v e f r o m th e i n d e x e s and
p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d b y c h a n g e s in
s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

Industrial nurses (m en and women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Skilled m aintenance (men):
Carpenters
Electricians
M achinists
M echanics
M echanics (autom otive)
Painters
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
U nskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, m aterial handling

NOTE: Secretaries, in clu d ed in the list o f job s in all previous years,
ex c lu d e d because o f a change in the description this year.

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s th e e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in the da ta .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e r e f l e c t o n l y c h a n g e s in
average pay fo r stra ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a r e not in flu e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
for overtim e.

are

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s o r a v e ra g e h ou rly earn ings w e re
c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h o f the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s .
The a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s
o r h o u r l y e a r n i n g s w e r e th en m u l t i p l i e d b y e m p l o y m e n t in e a c h of




T a ble 2.

Indexes o f standard w eek ly salaries and straigh t-tim e hourly earnings for s e le cte d o ccu p a tio n a l groups in W aterbury, Conn. ,
March 1966 and M arch 1965, and percents o f change* fo r s e le cte d periods
Indexes
(M arch 1961=100)

■Industry and o ccu p a tio n a l group
M arch 1966

M arch 1965

Percents o f change 1
M arch 1965
to
M arch 1966

March 1964
to
M arch 1965

M arch 1963
to
M arch 1964

M arch 1962
to
M arch 1963

M arch 1961
to
M arch 1962

M arch 1960
to
M arch 1961

A ll industries:
O ffice c le r ic a l (m e n and w o m e n ) --------Industrial nurses (m e n and w o m e n ) ------S k ille d m aintenance (m e n )--------------------U nskilled plant ( m e n ) ----------------------------

1 1 2 .9
1 1 0 .9
1 1 3 .0
1 0 9 .0

1 1 0 .6
1 0 8 .8
109. 5
1 0 9 .8

2. 1
1 .9
3. 1
2- 6

2 .8
2 .4
2 .6
1 .8

3. 1
0
1. 5
1 .4

2.
3.
2.
3.

7
5
2
5

1 .6
2 .6
2 .9
2. 7

2. 2
5. 5
2. 8
1 .8

M anufacturing:
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m e n and w o m e n ) --------Industrial nurses (m e n and w o m e n ) ------S k ille d m aintenance ( m e n ) -----------------U nskilled plant ( m e n ) ----------------------------

112. 2
1 1 2 .0
112. 3
1 1 1 .4

110. 2
1 0 8 .9
1 0 9 .0
109. 3

1 .8
2 .9
3 .0
2 .0

2. 3
2 .0
2 .5
1 .8

3. 0
.5
1. 3
.5

3 .0
3 .0
2. 1
3. 3

1 .6
3. 1
2 .8
3 .4

2. 3
4 .9
2 .7
2 .8

A ll changes are increases unless otherwise indicated .
This decrease la rg e ly reflects changes in em p lo ym e n t b etw een h ig h - and lo w -w a g e establishm ents rather than w age decreases.

5
A. Occupational Earnings
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and ea rn in g s fo r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u s t r y d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , C o n n ., M a r c h 1966)
Weekly earnings*
(standard)

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u str y d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

( standard)

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—

Median 2

Middle range 2

i

t

t

55

6C

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

t
I OC

s
105

*
110

115

120

125

130

135

t
140

145

55

6C

65

7C

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

14C-

14 5

over

-

~

2

1

i

4

3

3

2

1

2

2
-

3
3

3
2

2
2

4
4

_

4
4

i
i

_

_

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

3

4

i

3

2

7

-

-

i

3

i

*

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

23

12
10

7

6
4

ii

7
2

2
2

_

_

_

6

-

-

-

6
6

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$

$

45
M ean 2

S

$

50

2

$

Average
weekly

$

$

i

$

$

t

t

i

and
u n d er
50

MEN
ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------

21

4 0 .0

$
1 1 8 .5 0

TAEULATING—MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------

20
16

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

9 2 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

9 4 .0 0
9 7 .0 0

8 4 . 0 0 - 1 0 4 . DO
8 8 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ---------------------------------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

33
16

3 9 .0
3 8 .5

7 3 .0 0
5 9 .0 0

7 0 .0 0
6 0 .5 0

6 0 .5 0 - 9 0 .5 0
5 3 . 5 0 - 6 5 . CO

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ------------------------------------------------------

15

4 0 .0

9 1 .0 0

8 4 .5 0

8 1 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .5 0

-

BOCKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------

15

4 0 .0

7 0 .5 0

7 2 .5 0

6 0 . 0 C - 7 9 .C C

-

4 0 . 0 1 0 2 .5 0
4 0 . C 1 0 1 .0 0

1 0 2 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0

9 3 .0 0 - 1 1 3 .5 0
9 2 .5 0 -1 1 0 * 0 0

-

-

CLERKS,

$
$
$
121.511 1 1 2 . 5 0 1 3 1 . 5 0

_

_

_

_

1

_

-

W
OMEN
6
6

2
2

7
5

2

4

i

2

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

-

3

2

4

1

-

-

i

_

_

-

-

1
1

6
6

5
5

5
5

19
18

12
12

17
13
4

4
4
“

10

7
3

6
4

2

4
4

1
1

-

i

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

116

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------------

1 33
103
30

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

7 7 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
7 3 .0 0

7 6 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
7 4 .0 0

6 5 . 0 0 - 8 5 . 5C
7 0 . 5 0 - 8 7 .5 0
6 4 . 5 0 - 8 4 .0 0

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS A -------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

18
17

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

8 0 .5 0
7 8 .0 0

7 7 .5 0
7 5 .0 0

7 1 . 0 0 - 8 9 . LC
7 0 . 5 0 - 8 8 .0 0

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS B -------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

22
16

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

7 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0

7 1 .0 0
7 2 .5 0

6 4 . 5 0 - 7 9 .0 0
6 6 . 5 0 - 7 8 . 5C

-

2

2

-

-

CLERKS, O R D E R ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

36
33

4 0 .0
4 0 .D

8 6 .5 0
8 6 .0 0

8 7 .0 0
8 7 .0 0

8 1 .5 0 - 9 2 .5 0
8 2 . 0 0 - 9 2 .0 0

-

_

CLERKS, PAYR OLL--------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

82
74

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 9 .5 0
9 0 .5 0

8 9 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

7 9 .5 C -1 C C .0 0
8 1 .0 0 -1 0 0 .0 0

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

36
34

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

8 7 .5 0
8 8 .0 0

8 8 .0 0
8 8 .5 0

8 C .O 0 - 9 4 .0 0
8 2 . 0 C - 9 4 .5 0

-

-

-

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

43
38

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

7 6 .5 0
7 7 .0 0

7 5 .5 0
7 6 .0 0

7 0 . 0 0 - 8 5 .0 0
7 0 .0 0 - 8 5 .5 0

_

-

~

SECRETARIES3 * ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

276
247

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 0 7 . CO 1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0 1 0 7 .0 0

9 5 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0
9 7 .5 0 -1 2 1 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A4-----------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

18
15

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 1 4 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0

1 C 2 .0 0 - 1 2 4 . OC
1 0 1 .5 0 - 1 4 0 .C C

SECRETAR IE S , CLASS B4-----------------------MANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------

54
44

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0

5 8 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .C C
1 C 1 .0 0 - 1 3 4 . 5C

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS C4-----------------------MANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------

72
71

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 1 .5 C
1 1 1 .5 0

1 1 C . 50
1 1 0 .0 0

5 8 .5 0 -1 2 8 .5 0
5 8 .5 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0

_

S ee fo o t n o t e s at end o f ta b le .




-

6

-

-

-

-

-

21

17

3

4

5

_

5

-

2
2

5
4

3
3

4
4

2
2

-

-

i

3
3

2

2

“

2

8
8

10
10

6
6

4
4

17
15

9
8

14
14

8
8

9
9

_

2
2

2
2

i

2
2

_

_

-

11

1

2

20
15
5

-

_

25

9
7

22

22

2
2

6

_

"

5
5
-

2

1

_

_

_

i

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

i

_

_

_

8

6
6

2
2

i

1
1

i
-

_

_

i

i
i

_

7

-

-

-

i
i

3
3

23

24

18
18

11
11

16
15

5
5

8

22

23
23

8

22

4

_

_

_

_

3

i
i

-

_

-

_

-

1

-

3
3

6
4

5

8

5

8

7
7

3
3

10
8

7
6

5
5

4
3

2
2

4
4

14

20

20

8

16

13

37
34

38
35
4

3

2
2

2

1
1

-

-

-

i
1

~

3

12
10

6

3

6

5

4

_

5

2

6

5

4

-

2
2

5
5

3
3

2
2

8

8

4

in

2
2

_

4

4
4

11

8

6
6

6

8

~

3
3

-

i
i

5
4

-

_

_

_

5
5

_

-

4

”

-

-

2
2

3
3

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

1
1

2

2

2

1

4
4

3

7
7

6
6

6

e

3

6
Table A -l.

Office Occupations— M en and W o m e n -----Continued

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s fo r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u str y d iv is io n , W a t e r b u r y , C on n . , M a r c h 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a r n in g s o f —
Number

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

of
woikers

$

Average
weekly

( standard)

$
45

M ean 2

Median 2

Middle range 2

and
u n d er
50

W
OMEN SECRETARIES3 4 -

$
50

s

*
55

60

60

65

$
65

$
70

$
75

$
80

»
85

$
90

t
95

$
10C

$
105

$
110

$
1 15

s

S
120

125

s

i
130

135

$
140

145

1 45

over

and

55

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

HO

U5

120

125

130

135

4
2

70

6
6

9
5

14
11

10
6

14
13

16
15

9
9

7
7

10
10

7
7

6
6

3
3

13
13

22
22

25
25

7
7

17
13

7
7

2
2

1

_

_

_

1
1

12
10

11
11

13
13

9
9

12
12

17
17

10
10

4
2

_
-

6
5

5
4

2
2

4
4

2
2

7
7

1
1

1 40

CONTINUED
CONTINUED

SECRETARIES, CLASS D4------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

117
102

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
1 0 1 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0

$
1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

1 24
112

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

8 4 .0 0
8 4 .5 0

8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

STENOCRAPHERS, S E N IO R ---------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

111
104

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

SWITCHEOARC OPERATORS, CLASS A4-------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

27
25

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
$
8 9 .0 0 -1 1 4 .5 0
9 1 .5 0 -1 1 6 .5 0

~

7 5 . 5 0 - 9 2 . 5G
7 7 . 0 0 - 9 1 . CO

2
-

“

9 9 . 0C 1 0 1 .0 0
9 9 . 0 0 1 0 1 .0 0

8 8 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .5 0
8 8 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0

-

_

-

9 0 .5 0
9 1 .5 0

8 1 .0 0 - 1 C 1 .5 O
8 2 .0 u -1 0 2 .0 0

-

-

-

“

9 1 .0 0
9 2 .5 0

-

“
_

-

1
1

9
8

18
14

-

-

2
2

4

-

_

_

-

6

-

SWITCFECARC OPERATORS, CLASS B4--------

15

3 9 .0

6 1 .5 0

6 C .G 0

5 4 . 0 C - 7 3 . 5C

-

5

3

2

-

3

54
45

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

7 7 . 5C
7 8 .0 0

7 8 .0 0
7 8 .5 0

7 1 .0 0 - 8 7 .0 0
7 2 . C C - 8 7 . CC

-

-

3
3

9
7

11
11

6
6

9
8

2
2

3

2C
20

4 0 .G
4 0 .0

9 4 .0 0
9 4 .0 0

9 4 .5 0
9 4 .5 0

8 7 .C C - 1 0 1 .0 0
8 7 .0 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0

_

_

_

_

_

_

~

1
1

3
3

3
3

4
4

4
4

3

TRANSCR IB ING-MACH INE OPERATORS,
GENERAL-------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

36
32

4 0 .3
4 0 .0

7 6 .0 0
7 8 .0 0

7 6 .5 0
7 8 .5 0

6 4 . 0 C - 8 6 . 0C
6 6 . C C - 8 8 .0 0

TYPISTS, CLASS A -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

1 10
9C

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

7 8 .5 0
8 0 .0 0

7 8 .0 0
7 9 .5 0

7 2 .0 0 7 4 .0 0 -

8 6 .0 0
8 7 . CC

-

TYPISTS, CLASS B -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------- 1
4
*
2

1C6
81

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

7 2 .0 0
7 2 . 5C

6 9 .0 0
6 9 .5 0

6 3 .5 0 - 7 8 .0 0
6 5 .0 0 - 7 8 .0 0

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_
-

2

TAEULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

_

2

“

7
7

3

~

2
“

14
13

_

-

2

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIGNISTSMANUFACTUR INC---------------------------------------

_

2
2

_

“

_
-

-

2

-

_

i
-

-

5

“

3

9
7

5

1
1

5

5

3

5

5

5

3

2
2

3
3

13
7

24
18

26
20

24
24

6
6

_

26
23

14
12

10
10

3
2

4

3
2

-

2
2

28
21

1
1

1
1

4
2

1
1

ii
u
9
6

2

2

2

1
1

1 S ta n d a rd h o u r s r e f le c t the w o r k w e e k fo r w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t - t im e s a la r i e s and th e e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n is c o m p u te d fo r e a c h j o b b y to ta lin g the e a r n in g s o f a ll w o r k e r s and d iv id in g b y the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s .
T h e m e d ia n d e s ig n a t e s p o s it io n — h a lf o f the e m p lo y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e
than the ra te sh ow n ; h a lf r e c e iv e l e s s than the ra te sh ow n .
T h e m id d le ra n g e is d e fin e d b y 2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a fo u r th o f the w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than th e lo w e r o f t h e s e r a te s and a fou rth e a r n m o r e than
the h ig h e r r a t e .
* M a y in clu d e w o r k e r s o t h e r th a n t h o s e p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly .
4 D e s c r ip t io n fo r th is o c c u p a t io n ha s b e e n r e v i s e d s in c e th e la st s u r v e y in th is a r e a .
S ee a p p en d ix A .




7
Table A -2 .

Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and W o m e n

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a rn in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u str y d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , C on n . , M a r c h 1966)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Average
weekly
hours 1
( standard)

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly ea rn in g s of—

* $ ' $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $
U n der
90
$
and
9C
u n d er

Middle range 2

$5 5 . 0 0 $5 5 .0 0
1
1
1 5 5 .0 0

1 5 5 .0 0
1 2 4 .5 0
1 2 4 .5 0

4 0 .0 1 1 2 .0 0
4 0 . u 1 1 2 .0 0

1 1 3 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0

1 C 7 .0 C
1 0 6 .0 0

105

1 C 1 .C C -1 2 8 .5 u
1C1.0 0 -12 8 .5 0

3C
29

Iff

(DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A3------------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------------------

49
49

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B3------------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------------------

85

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

CRAFTSMEN, CLASS C3
MANUFACTURING-----

e5

l0 C

105
-

110
-

110

115

120

-

115

-

12i

125
-

125

$

1 30
-

13d

1 35
-

135

10

1
1

10

5
5

3

6

7
7

10

10

3
3

4
4

6

5
5

3
3

$

l* t »

$

1 45

5
5

6
6
5
5

8
8
4
4

14U

145

15 ;i

2
2

2
2

4
4

4
4

3
3

WOMEN
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED! -----MANUFACTURING------------------------------------------

1
2
3
4

S ta n da rd h o u r s r e f le c t the w o rk w e e k fo r
F o r d e fin itio n o f t e r m s , se e fo o tn o te 2,
D e s c r ip t io n f o r th is o c c u p a t io n has b e e n
W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d as fo llo w s :
3




9 9 .0 0 9 9 .0 0 -

1 1 5 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0

3
3

6
6

5
5

4
4

5
4

2
2

3
3

1
1

$

155

$

16J

$
165

$

$

$

170

175

180

185
and

1
1
7
7

$

1 50

-

3
2 3 8
3 -- 2 3 8

1 C 6 .C C -1 4 5 .5 0
1 0 6 . CO— 4 5 .5 0
1

37
37

-

95

$
$
1 2 2 .O C -1 8 2 .C O
1 2 3 .0 0 -1 8 2 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0

-

___________95

S ex , o c c u p a t io n , and in d u str y d iv is io n

1
1

w h ic h e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e t h e ir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t -t im e s a la r i e s and the e a rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e se w e e k ly h o u r s .
ta b le A - 1.
r e v i s e d s in c e the la s t s u r v e y in th is a r e a .
See a p p en d ix A .
at $ 185 to $ 190; 1 at $ 190 to $ 195; 2 at $ 200 to $ 205; and 3 at $ 2 1 0 and o v e r .

155

16.)

165

6
6

3
3

1
1

6
6

3

3
3

17:

1
1

175

5
5

18f.

165

over

2
2

4
4

49
9

1
1

8
Table A-3.

Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and W om en Combined

(A v e r a g e st r a ig h t -t im e w eek ly h ou rs and ea rn in g s fo r s e le c t e d o cc u p a tio n s stud ied on an a re a b a s is
b y in d u stry d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , C on n ., M a rch 1966)
Av erage
O cc u p a tio n and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard

Weekly
earnings *
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

8 0 CKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ------------------------------------------------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------

Number
of
workers

standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

Weekly

63
38

3 9 .5
6 0 .0

$
7 6 .5 0
7 7 .0 0

OFFICE BOYS ANC GIRLS----------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

33
16

15

15

137

39. y
3 8 .5

2C
18

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 9 .0 0
7 0 . CO

6 0 .0

7 0 .5 0

SECRETAR IES2 3---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

2 77
267
30

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .(

1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
9 3 .0 0

7 3 .0 0
5 9 . OL

Average

O cc u p a tio n and in d u str y d iv is io n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

CONTINUED

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

$

*
o
c

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
M A CH IN E )----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

Average

O ccu p a tion and in d u stry d iv is io n

9 1 . OC

Number
of
woikers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

CONTINUED

SWITCFBOARC OPERATORS, CLASS B 3--------

18

3 9 .5

$
6 6 . CO

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTICNI S TSMANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

56
49

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

7 7 .5 0
7 8 .0 0

TAEULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

6C
36

3 9 .5
6 0 .0

9 3 .0 0
9 5 . CO

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------

1 19

6 0 .0

1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0

SECRETAR IE S, CLASS A3------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

13
15

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 1 6 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL-----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------

36
32

6 0 .n
6 0 .0

7 6 .0 0
7 8 .0 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NCNMANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------

135
1U3
32

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

7 7 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
7 2 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B3------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------

54
44

3 9 .5
6 0 .0

1 1 2 .0 9
1 1 6 .0 0

T YP ISTS, CLASS A -----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

1 10
90

3 9 .5
6 0 .0

8 0 . on

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS A
MANUFACTUR I N G --------

19
18

4 0 .0

8 2 .0 0
7 9 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C3------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------

72
71

6 0 .0
6 0 .0

1 1 1 .5 0
1 1 1 .5 0

T YP ISTS, CLASS B -----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------

1G6
81

3 9 .5
6 0 .0

7 2 .0 0
7 2 . 5C

22

40.0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D3------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

118

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS B —
MANUFACTURING-------------

16

6 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A3------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------

45
45

4 0 .C
6 C .0

1 5 5 .0 0
1 5 5 .0 0

CLERKS, O R D E R ---MANUFACTUR ING

62

9r .o o

CRAFTSMEN, CLASS B3------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------

86
86

4 0 .0
6 0 .0

1 2 5 . UO
1 2 5 .0 0

CRAFTSMEN, CLASS C 3------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------

43
43

4 0 . 0 1 1 0 .5 0
6 0 . U l l r'. 5 0

NURSES, INCUSTR IAL (R E G IS T E R E D ) ------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------------

31
30

4 0 . n 1 0 7 .0 0
4 0 . 0 1 0 7 .0 0

6 0 .0

6 0 .0

7 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0

37

6 0 .0
4C.C

CLERKS, PAYROLL ■
MANUFACTUR ING

83

3 9 .5

9 0 .0 0

76

3 9 .5

36
36

6 0 .0

8 7 .5 0
8 8 .0 0

3 9 .5 1 0 1 .0 0
6 0 . C 1 0 3 . or.

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL-----------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

126

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

8 6 .0 0

112

4 0 .0

9 0 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, S E M C R --------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

111
104

6 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 9 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

3 9 .5
6 C .0

9 C .5 0
9 1 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A3-------M A N U F A C T U R IN G

----------------------------------------

27
25

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

8 4 .5 0

9 0 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING----

102

1 Standard h o u r s r e f le c t the w o rk w e e k fo r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir re g u la r s t r a ig h t -t im e s a la r ie s and the ea rn in g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e se w e e k ly h o u r s .
2 M ay in clu d e w o r k e r s o th er than t h o se p r e se n te d s e p a r a te ly .
3 D e s c r ip t io n fo r th is o c c u p a tio n has b e e n r e v is e d s in c e the la s t s u r v e y in th is a re a . S e e a ppen dix A .




7 8 .5 0

9
Table A-4.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s f o r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u stry d iv is io n , W a te r b u r y , C onn. , M a r c h 1966)

Numbe r of wo r ke r s recei vi ng st rai ght - t i me hourl y earni ngs of —

Hourly ear■nings 1

Occupat i on and i ndustry di vi si on

Number
of
workers

1 .5 0
Me an13 Median 2
2

Middle range 2

and

»

1 .6 u

*

*
1 .7 0 1 .8 0

-

-

1*60

1*70

1* 80

-

-

-

*

$

1 .9 C

i

i

i

2 .0 0 2 .1 0 2 . 2 0

-

-

-

$

*

*

2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0

-

-

-

*

*

*

2 . 6 0 2 .7 0 2 . 8 0

-

-

-

*

t

T

2 .9 0 3 . 0 0 3 .1 0

-

-

-

r

3 .2 0

-

*

3 .3 0

-

3 .4 0

-

-

t

I

3 .5 0 3 .6 0

-

-

t

3 .7 0

and

u n d er

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE----------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

48

$
2.79
2.79

$
2.85
2.85

$
2 .4 9 2 .4 9 -

$
3.17
3.07

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE-----------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

187
18U

3.09
3.07

3.14
3.13

2 .9 9 2 .9 8 -

3.22
3.20

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY --------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

54
51

3.01
3.07

3.05
3.C 6

2 .9 5 2 .9 7 -

3.21
3.22

FIREMEN,

48

-

1 .9 0

2.Q C

2 .1 U

2 , 2C 2 . 3C 2 , 4 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

~

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

_

_

3

_

_

2 .5 0 2 ,6 0

2 .7 0

2 *8 0 2 ,9 0

3 ,0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

3 ,3 0

3 .4 C

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

over

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

”

i
“

-

7
2

-

_

1
1

3
3

9
9

1
1

2
2

8
8

1
1

7
7

7
7

9
9

_

1
1

3
3

7
7

4
4

13
13

5
5

14
14

19
19

70
70

26
26

9
9

7
6

_

_

1
1

_

1
1

2
2

13
13

15
15

5
5

9
9

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

STATIONARY BOILER -----------------

18

1.94

2.05

1 .5 8 -

2.26

6

-

-

-

-

7

-

2

1

1

-

1

-

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE T R A D E S-------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

44
33

2.54
2.45

2.46
2.44

2 .3 7 2 .3 1 -

2.85
2.65

-

_

X
1

-

1
1

-

-

1
1

5
5

5
5

15
11

1
1

1
1

1
1

6
6

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE----------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

263
263

3.09
3.09

3.15
3.15

2 .9 4 2 .9 4 -

3.28
3.28

_

_

_

1
1

1
1

21
21

24
24

10
10

16
16

13
13

88
88

25
25

54
54

5
5

_

2
2

-

3.3
3.0
3.3
3.3

4
2
2
2

11
2
9
9

3
1
2
2

24
10
14
14

5
5
-

2
2
-

1
1

_

21
21
21

5
5
5

ii
5
6
6

3
3
3

1
“
1
1

3
3

5
5

10
10

29
29

14
14

16
16

56
56

2
2

-

3

-

“
-

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE! -------------------MANUFACTURING--------------NONMANUFACTURING - - ---PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----

3.09

2.98

63
63

2.97
3.14
3.14

2.90
3.32
3.32

2
2
2
2

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING---------------

146
139

3.00
2.97

3.05
3.03

2 .8 5 2 .8 4 -

3.15
3.14

MILLWRIGHTS--------------MANUFACTUR I N G ----

82
82

3.00
3 . O' -

3.06
3.06

2 .9 5 2 .9 5 -

3.13
3.13

OILERS -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

27
27

2.63
2.63

2.63
2.63

2 .4 0 2 .4 C -

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE--------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

21
21

2.79
2.79

2.7 7
2.77

PLUMBERS, MAINTENANCE--------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

38
38

2.89
2.89

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

15
15

TCCL ANC DIE MAKERS -------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

612
612

91
28

.8
.8
.8
.8

2
2
2
2

-

9
9
9
9

_

_

_
-

_
-

_

_

3
3

_

*

-

_
-

-

_

1
1

3
3

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

"

-

_

-

_

-

2
2

4
4

6
6

3
3

2
2

8
8

30
30

25
25

2.78
2.78

7
7

4
4

2
2

3
3

6
6

-

_

5
5

-

2 .5 5 2 .5 5 -

3.05
3.05

i
i

4
4

i

_

-

7
7

1
1

-

i

5
5

2.98
2.98

2 .7 4 2 .7 4 -

3.12
3.12

3
3

2
2

_

-

4
4

2
2

6
6

3
3

3.08
3 . U8

3.11
3.11

3 .0 5 3 .0 5 -

3.16
3.16

-

-

-

-

I
1

-

3.19
3.19

3.19
3.19

3 .0 3 3 .0 3 -

3.37
3.37

9
9

7
7

27
27

47
47

-

_

-

_

_

-

_

-

*

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

_

-

-

1 Excludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 F or definition o f term s, see footnote 2, table A - l .
3 Tran sportation, com m unication, and other public utilities.




_
-

_

“

_

_

7

_

_

-

-

-

1
1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

_

“
1
1

-

8
8

8
8

2
2

-

-

6
6

8
8

-

-

44
44

68
68

115
115

74
74

99
99

-

-

“

“

1
1

4

“

-

-

-

”
-

-

-

-

~

~

“

~

-

-

-

-

“

”
:
45
45

:

:

34
34

31
31

ii
ii

10
Table A-5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly ea rn in g s fo r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , W a te rb u ry , C on n . , M a r c h 1966)
Hourly ea mings 2

O c c u p a tio n 1 and in d u s tr y d iv is io n

Mean 3

Median 3

Middle range'*

1 .3 C

1 • AC

1 . AC

1. 50 1 .6 0

$

JANITO RS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

$

2 .1 3

2 .2 7
2 .2 9

$
2

. JO2 .1 5 -

$
2.

AS
2.A 8

4

2 . At

-

2.20

57

2.10

2.11
1 .9 A
2 .2 A

1 .5 7 1 .9 5 -

2 .3 0
2 .4 4

496

1 .7 6 -

_

“

-

1 .7 L

5
5

23

ID

“

~

3

304

15

l . 76

1 .7 9

1 .3 7 -

2 .1 9

3

3

$

$

S

$

$

$

2.UC

2.10

2 .20

2.30

2. AO

2.50

S
2. 6 0

S
2. 70

$

1.96

2 .80

3 .00

$
3. 2 C

3 . AC

$
3.6C

ec

1. S C

2.CC

2.10

2.29

2 .30

2. AO

2.50

2.6C

2. 7 0

2. 8C

3 .00

.20

3. A C

3.6C

3.8C‘ 4.0C

over

13
13

29
20

4
4

8
8

9
9

5
5

4

_

_

_

_

_

_

"

'

13
12

282
2A2
4\.

2.21
2.22
2. 1 A

2.C 6
2 .*I 8

1 .8 5 1 .6 7 1 .6 5 -

2 .5 8
2 .5 5
3 .0 5

_

4

5

PACKERS, S H IP P IN G -----------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

129
125

2 .6 2
2 .6 5

2.A 2

2 .1 .5 2 .0 6 -

3 .2 5
3 .3 1

PACKERS, SHIPPING (W O M EN)------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

A1
A1

2 .1 3
2 .1 3

1 .8 8 1 .8 8 -

2 .2 3
2 .2 3

-

-

2.^8

~

*

RECEIVING CLERKS -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

53
A1

2 .3 5
2 .3 1

2 .1 9
2 .1 9

1 .9 5 1 .9 6 -

2 .7 ]
2 .6 7

~

SHI PPI NG

C L E R K S ----------------------------------------------------

42

2 .5 3
2 .5 6

2. 1 1

2 .1 6 -

2 .6 9
2.7

-

2.7D

2 .A 3 2 .A 3 -

2 .7 6
2 .7 6

-

4

-

_

.

3

3

8
8

8

10

3

8

8

17
16

54
53

7
6

23
23

11

3
61
60

1

2

6
6

A
1
1

_

5
3

16
12

_

-

-

_

2

2

“

6
6

-

-

_

_

3

-

-

-

-

_

2
2

4
4
2

2

2A
24

4
4

2
2

-

-

“

3
3

_

_

6

3

_

3

-

-

6

3

6
6

4
4

4

23
23

13
13

45

2 .2 9
2 .2 9

2 .2 8

A5

TRUCK CR IVER S , MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / ? TC
AND INCLUDING A TONS) --------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

16
15

2.22
2 .1 9

2 .2 8
2 .2 7

TRUCKDR IVERS, HEAVY (CVER A TCNS,
TRAILER T Y P E ) -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

191
75

2 .7 6
2 .6 2

2 .7 A

2.

AS-

2.11

2.66

2 .A 6 -

2 .7 7

TRUCKCR IVERS, HEAVY (CVER A TCNS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) --------------

36

2 .7 2

2 .5 6

2 .5 A -

3 .1 3

C6
ID 5

2 .6 3

2 .4 9

2 .2 6 -

2 .7 A

2

9

26

7 .6 3

2

2 .2 6 -

2.7

2

9

26

37

2 .4 9

2 .5 4

2 .2 1 -

2 .7 5

36

2 .4 9

2 .5 3

2 .2 0 -

2 .7 5

9
9

6

_

~
_

~
_

2
2

1
O'

(M

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

3

”

3

3

19
19

_

_

3
3

1

2

“

1

2

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

A

_

_

and la te sh ifts .

_

_

_

-

_

2

3

3
3

5

2

5

5

1

5

39
39

8

3

13

_

6

-

6

-

3
3

_

4
4

5

i

5

i

4
4

16
16

_

_

_

-

_

6
6

7
6

_

i

5

-

-

2

8

8

_

-

i
i

“

~

-

.

-

“

8

6
6

i
i

12
12

1A
1A

9
9

_

28
8

25
2A
1

2A
24

1A

58
58

-

-

-

-

14

-

-

-

-

~

1

-

-

58

-

-

-

-

-

i
i

i
i

_

_

_

_

-

10
19

6
6

_

.

1

-

"

_

_

"

”

“

_

_

_

_

_

"

'
-

6

2
2

1A
1A

21
21

ii
ii

26

_

_

21

~

~

~

-

2C

-

-

2

12

-

-

-

i
1

17
17

12
12

9
9

19
10

1
1

2
1

6

i
i

t

4

6

4

2
2

5
5

i
-

11
11

2
2

_

i

_

_

_

-

-

i

-

-

6
6

-

3

22
22

20

”

D ata lim it e d to m e n w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h e r e o t h e r w is e in d ic a te d .
E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o lid a y s ,
F o r d e fin it io n o f t e r m s , s e e fo o t n o t e 2 , ta b le A - l .
In clu d e s a l l d r i v e r s r e g a r d le s s o f s i z e and ty p e o f t r u c k o p e r a te d .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t il it i e s .




4
4

6
6

TRUCKOR IVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) ------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5

4
4

1
1

2 .6 1
2 .4 8
3 .1 3

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
FORKL )FT ) ---------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

-

_

2 «64
2 . AS
2 .9 6
3 .1 A

. A?

23
10

-

6
6

2 At
159
81
59

1

3

23
22

1
1

8

TRUCKER I VERS 4 --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING - - ---------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------

TRUCK FRS, POWER (F O R K L I F T )---------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

8
8

13
13

8

2 .5 9
2 .5 9

_

1A
1A

12
12

A8
46

2 .3 6

9
9

1
1

36

2 .1 1 -

55

1

-

“

-

3

-

_

-

-

18
18

5

2. A8
2 . AS

-

1

5

2 . 222 .2 2 -

-

12
12

MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

2 .2 8

-

1

2

-

-

10
10

2

-

4

2

9
9

2 .7 9
3 .1 7
3 .1 8

5
-

24
2A

2

2 .6 5

5
-

1

9
9

2 .4 2 -

2
55

3A
34

-

A

2 .3 2 2 .5 9 3 .1 2 -

4

1

28
16

“

S
A.00

and

35
35

AA

SHIPPING ANC RECEIVING C L E R K S ---------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

3 .1 5

$
3.80

2

23
23

?.4 r
2 .4 5

2 .7 0

t

30
23

2

12

11
5

-

19

137
13

2

LAEORFRS, MATERIAL HANDLING-------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

2 .0 3

$

i.ec

12

2

JANITORS, PORTERS, ANC CLEANERS
(WCMEN1 -------------------------------------------------------

2 .4 1

$

“

1.9 A
2 .1 8

1 .8 7

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s o f—
70

and
under

108
95

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

I *
I.5U 1 .6 C

$

1.20

1 .3 C

GUARCS AND WATCHMEN-------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------

*

$

Number
of

-

21

_

e

“

11
B.

Establishment Practices and Supplementary W age Provisions

Table B-l.

Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women Office Workers

( D i s t r i b u t i o n o f e s t a b l is h m e n t s s t u d ie d in a l l in d u s t r ie s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y m in i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y l o r s e l e c t e d c a t e g o r i e s
o f i n e x p e r i e n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s , W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r c h 1966)
In e x p e r ie n c e d ty p is ts
M a n u fa c t u r in g
M in im u m w e e k l y s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r y 1

N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g

40

A ll
s c h e d u le s

M a n u fa c t u r in g
A ll
in d u s t r ie s

B a s e d o n s t a n d a r d w e e k l y h o u r s 1 o f ---3
2

A ll
i n d u s t r ie s

A ll
sc h e d u le s

E s t a b li s h m e n t s s t u d ie d

O th er in e x p e r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

B a s e d on sta n d a rd w e e k ly h o u r s 3 o f—
A ll
s c h e d u le s

40

40

A ll
sc h e d u le s

40

XXX

64

................

. . . . . . . . . .

39

XXX

25

XXX

64

39

XXX

25

24
U n d e r $50. 00

2

14

13

10

5

28

16

14

12

2

3
3

2

3
6

3
1
5
2
2
1

2
1
5
2
1
1

3
5
1

2
1
4
1
2
1
1

1

1

1

1

4
1
1
1
1
1

2

1

1

18

13

5

22

12

10

5
1
4
1
1
1

2

2

1

1

6
2
4
i
2
2
1

i

1

1

1

22

14

14

9

3
3
1
2

2

1
1
1

1
1
1

8

E s t a b li s h m e n t s w h ic h d id n o t e m p l o y w o r k e r s
XXX

1 T h e s e s a l a r i e s r e l a t e to f o r m a l l y e s t a b l i s h e d m in i m u m s t a r t i n g (h ir in g ) r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s th a t a r e p a id f o r
2 E x c l u d e s w o r k e r s in s u b c l e r i c a l j o b s s u c h a s m e s s e n g e r o r o f f i c e g i r l .
3 D a ta a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s c o m b i n e d , a n d f o r th e m o s t c o m m o n s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k r e p o r t e d .




sta n d a rd w o r k w e e k s .

XXX

5

XXX

12




Table B-2. Shift Differentials
(S h ift d iffe r e n t ia ls o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plan t w o r k e r s b y type and am ount o f d iffe r e n t ia l,
W a te r b u r y , C on n . , M a r c h 1966)
P e r c e n t o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s —
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g f o r m a l
p r o v is io n s 1 fo r —

S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l

A c t u a lly w o rk in g on —

S e co n d s h ift
w ork

T h ir d o r o t h e r
s h ift w o r k

S e c o n d s h i ft

___________________________________________________

90. 6

8 7. 3

21. 7

6. 2

W it h s h i f t p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l __________________________

88. 6

85. 4

21. 5

6. 2

U n i f o r m c e n t s ( p e r h o u r ) _______________________

6 6 .9

67. 2

16. 6

5. 6

T o ta l

3 c e n t s __________________________________________
5 c e n t s _______ __________________________________
6 c e n t s ______ „
— __
— . . ____
7 c e n t s __________________________________________
7 Vz c e n t s ________________________________________
8 cen ts
_ _ _ _
_
_
9 c e n t s ____ ___ _____ ,___ __ _______ ___ ___
_
1 0 c e n t s ____ ______ ______________________ __
12 ce n ts
„
_ __
13 c e n t s _________________________________________
1 3 V3 c e n t s _______________________________________
14 c e n t s _________________________________________
15 c e n t s _________________________________________
20 c e n ts _
_ ___________________ _
_ __________
U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e

_
_

.

_ _

5 p e r c e n t ______ __________ __________ _____
6 V2 p e r c e n t _____________________________________
7 p e r c e n t _______________________________________
7 72 p e r c e n t ______________________________________
8 V2 p e r c e n t ______________________________________
10 p e r c e n t
O t h e r f o r m a l p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l __________________
W it h n o s h i f t p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l

2. 1

_

. 6
. 5
5. 6
1. 1
2. 4
. 1
4. 3
1. 0
. 5
_
.4

T h ir d o r o t h e r
s h i ft

_

2 .9
14. 0
5. 7
9. 8
. 9
19. 3
7. 5
1. 8
1. 1

19. 6
-

-

. 3

-

9
14. 9
1. 8

-

1. 7
. 1

18. 2

18. 2

4. 1

. 6

10. 6

1.
2.
4.
2.
1.
5.

7

2. 5
1. 1
. 5

.
.
.
.

. 8

-

2. 0

. 2

(2)

1. 7

4. 0
3. 6

-

18.
6.
4.
1.

6
1
0
1

6
2
2

6
8

3. 5
2. 0

1 In c lu d e s e s ta b lis h m e n ts c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g la te s h ift s ,
e v e n though th ey w e r e not c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g la te s h ifts .
2 L e s s than 0 .0 5 p e r c e n t .

-

-

1. 8
-

1. 3
. 7
_
( 1)
2
-

1

1

2
2

and e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith f o r m a l p r o v i s io n s c o v e r in g la te sh ifts

13

Table B-3. Scheduled Weekly Hours
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r ie s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s
o f f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s f W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r c h 1 96 6)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W e e k ly h o u rs
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1

M a n u fa c t u r in g

100

5

37 h o u r s _____ _______ ___________
___ _______
3 7 V2 h o u r s . . _________________________________________
40 h o u r s

_

_

__

______________________

100

6

100

_
1
2
77
2

8
4
2

1
2
3
4

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 1
2

1
_

-

81
1
6
4
1

90
4

6

A ll in d u s t r ie s 3

100

(4 )
l‘ )
1

13
14
72

100

(4)
1
1

15
83

1

I n c lu d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; fi n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .




M a n u fa c t u r in g

sh ow n s e p a r a te ly .

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 2

100

_
3
97

14

Table B-4. Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y n u m b e r o f p a i d h o l id a y s
p r o v i d e d a n n u a lly , W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r c h 1966)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

Item
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1

A l l w o r k e r s ______________________________________

___

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p a i d h o l i d a y s ______________________________________
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
n o p a i d h o l i d a y s _____________________ _________ .

M a n u fa c t u r in g

100

100

99

100

1

1
2
3
2

29

28
6
13
19
2
1
23
-

M a n u fa c t u r in g

100

100

100

100

100

99

100

100

'

1
2
4
2

A ll in d u s t r ie s 3

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 1
2

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 2

(4 )

N um ber o f days

4 h o l i d a y s _____________________________________________
5 h o l i d a y s _____________________________________________
6 h o l i d a y s _____________________________________________
6 h o l id a y s p l u s 1 h a lf d a y _______________________ 7 h o l i d a y s _____________________________________________
7 h o l id a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y _________________ _
_
7 h o l id a y s p l u s 2 h a lf d a y s ______________________
8 h o l i d a y s ____________________________________ _____
8 h o l i d a y s p l u s 1 h a lf d a y _____________________ . .
8 h o l id a y s p l u s 2 h a lf d a y s ______________________
9 h o l i d a y s ----------------- -------- -------- -------------------------9 h o l id a y s p l u s 3 h a lf d a y s ________________________
10 h o l id a y s _ __
_
____
11 h o l i d a y s _______ _________
____ ____ - _____
12 h o l i d a y s ____________________________________________

6
11
17
2
1
22
1
-

-

_
-

9

7

49

35
-

_

(4)

(4 )

1
2

-

-

2

-

(4)

(4)
21
12
25
18
3

3

19
10
19

14
2
17
1
2
10
1

-

32
14
51

-

-

20

T o t a l h o l id a y t i m e 5

12 d a y s _________________________________________________
11 d a y s o r m o r e ____________________________________
10V2 d a y s o r m o r e _____________________________ ___
10 d a y s o r m o r e _______ ____________________________
9 d a y s o r m o r e _______________________________________
8 V2 d a y s o r m o r e _____________________________________
8 d a y s o r m o r e _______________________________________
7 7 2 d a y s o r m o r e __________________ _________________
7 d a y s o r m o r e _______________________________________
6 V2 d a y s o r m o r e _____________________________________
6 d a y s o r m o r e _______________________________________
5 d a y s o r m o r e _______________________________________
4 d a y s o r m o r e _______________________________________

1
2
3
4
5
no h alf

-

1
25
26
55
61
90
92
96
98
99

_

_

-

_

-

-

24
26
57
64
92
94
97
99
100

35

84
84
91
91
100
100
100
100
100

1
12
12
14
32
34
67
78
97
97
98
99
99

_

-

20
23
65
77
98
98
100
100
100

-

14
65
97
97
100
100
100
100
100
100
100

In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il t r a d e , r e a l e sta te , and s e r v ic e s , in ad d ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l esta te; and s e r v ic e s , in ad d ition to t h o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
A l l c o m b in a tio n s o f fu ll and h a lf days that add to the sam e am ount a r e c o m b in e d ; fo r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g a tota l o f 7 days in clu d e s th o s e w ith 7 fu ll days
d a y s , 6 fu ll d ays and 2 h a lf d a y s , 5 fu ll days and 4 h a lf d a y s , and so on. P r o p o r t io n s w e r e then cu m u lated .




and

15
T a b le B -5 .

Paid V a c a tio n s 1

( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r c h 1966)

Plant w o rk e rs

O ffic e w o rk e rs

V a ca tio n p o lic y
A ll in d u s tr ie s

M anufacturing

A ll in d u s t r ie s 2

100

A ll w o rk e rs

M anufacturin g

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

32

25
75

93
7

96
4

95
5

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

*

*

P u b lic u t i li t ie s 3

4

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

100

M ethod o f paym ent

W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m en ts pro v id in g
paid v a c a tio n s
L ,e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t__ _
P e r c e n t a g e paym en tF la t -s u m p aym ent
O th er _ .
..................
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a t io n s _______________________________

68
-

100
100
-

A m ou n t o f v a ca tio n p a y 5

A ft e r

6

m onths o f s e r v ic e

U nder 1 w eek
1 w eek
. .
. .
.................
O v e r 1 and u n d er 2 w eek s
_______ _______
2 w e e k s . _______________

48
5
___

52

_

2

1

1

39
_

73
5

79
6

32
_

9

-

-

-

-

-

12

91
3

93
3
4

61
39

9
91

4
96

54
46

73
9
18

79

17

2

11

-

2
-

6

10

83

98

94

46
9
44

50

46
9
45

50

4
4
90

3
5
92

-

-

2

1

A ft e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
O v er 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s _________________
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------

6

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
w eek
O v er 1 and und er 2 w eek s
2 w e e k s ___________________________________________
1

(6)
98

.

A ft e r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
O v er 1 and und er 2 w eek s
2 w e e k s __
________ ____ „

-

2
-

2
-

_

100

98

98

100

A ft e r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
w eek
_
O v e r 1 and under 2 w eek s
2 w eeks
._

_

1

. .

.

..

_

11

39

.

11

-

2
-

2
_

_

39

100

98

98

100

(6)

(6)

97

99

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
w e e k _____________________________________________
O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w eeks
2 w eek s
O v er 2 and u nd er 3 w eek s „
. . .
3 w eek s
1

See fo o tn o te s at end of table.




_
100
-

1
1

_

.
_
100
_

16
T a b le B -5.

Paid V a c a tio n s 1
------Continued

( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r c h 1966)

O ffic e w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
V a ca tio n p o lic y
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1
2

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u tilitie s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

A m ount o f v a c a tio n p a y 5— C ontinued
A ft e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
3
24
42
31

2
23
47
28

_
17
83

(6)
18
25
57

18
31
51

13
87

3
18
42
34
2

2
17
48
31
2

7
93
-

(6)
16
25
58
-

_
17
32
51
“

11

3
9
60
12
15

2
7
60
14
18

100
-

3
9
38
5
43
2

2
7
37
6
45
2

52
- ~

3
9
29
41
18

1 w e e k ____________ ________________________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s ___________________ _____________ ___ __

2
7
29
42
20

_
100
-

A ft e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ___________________ ___________________ ____
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s _______________ __________ _____________ _____
O v er 3 and und er 4 w e e k s ________________________

89

A ft e r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
l
2 w e e k s _________________________________ _________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s _ ____________ _______
4 w e e k s _________________________________________ —

(6)
6
81
13

5
79
16

( 6)
6
35

5
32

-

86
14

A ft e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ______________________________________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
3 w e e k s _________________________________________ ___
O v e r 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 4 w e e k s _______________ _____________________

_
48
-

_

_
31

-

-

59
*

63
-

69
-

( 6)
6
32

.
5
31
49
16

_
3
97
-

_

_
-

-

A ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ______________________________________________
2 w e e k s ______________________________ __________ 3 w e e k s _________________ _________________________
4 w e e k s ____ _______ _ __ ________________ ____
O v er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------------------------------

44

18

A ft e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ____ _________________________________ _____
2 w e e k s __________
3 w e e k s ______ _____________________ _____________
4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 4 w e e k s ______________________________________

3

*

2

9
29
41
18

7

29
42
20

_
100

(6)
6
32
44

18

5

31
49
16

3

97

1 In clu des b a s ic p lan s o n ly.
E x clu d e s p lan s such as v a c a t io n -s a v in g s and th o s e plans w h ich o f fe r " e x te n d e d 1 o r " s a b b a t ic a l" b e n e fits b ey on d b a s ic p la n s to w o r k e r s w ith qu a lifyin g lengths
'
o f s e r v ic e . T y p ic a l o f su ch e x c lu s io n s a r e p lan s in the s t e e l, alu m in u m , and ca n in d u s tr ie s .
2 Inclu des data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il t r a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s ,
in add ition to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
3 T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th er p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
4 In clu des data fo r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
5 In clu d es pa ym en ts o th e r than "le n g th o f t i m e , " such as p e r c e n ta g e o f annual e a rn in g s o r fla t -s u m p a y m e n ts , c o n v e r t e d to an equ ivalen t tim e b a s is ; fo r e x a m p le , a paym en t o f 2 p e r c e n t
of
annual ea rn in g s w a s c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e r i o d s o f s e r v ic e w e r e a r b it r a r ily c h o s e n and do not n e c e s s a r il y r e fl e c t the in d ivid u al p r o v is io n s f o r p r o g r e s s io n s . F o r ex a m p le , the
ch a n g es in p r o p o r t io n s in d ica te d at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e in clu d e ch an ges in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r in g b etw een 5 and 10 y e a r s . E s tim a te s a r e c u m u la tiv e . T h u s , the p r o p o r t io n r e c e iv in g 3 w e e k s ' pay
o r m o r e a fte r 5 y e a r s in clu d e s th o s e w ho r e c e iv e 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o r e a fte r fe w e r y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .
6 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




17
T a b le B -6 .

H e a lth , Insurance, and P ension Plans

(P e r c e n t o f plant and o f fi c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s e m p lo y e d in e s ta b lis h m en ts prov id in g
health , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n sio n b e n e f it s , 1 W a te rb u ry , Conn. , M a r c h 1966)
O ffic e w o rk e rs

Plant w o r k e r s
T y p e o f b e n e fit
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1
2

A l l w o r k e r s ________________________________________

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

M anufacturing

P u blic u tilitie s

100

100

100

100

100

L ife in s u ra n ce ___ ____________ _______ __
A c c id e n t a l death and d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u r a n c e ______________________________________
S ick n e s s and a c c id e n t in su ra n ce o r
s ic k le a v e o r b o t h 56 ___ __
__________ .

97

100

100

81

86

49

100

99

99

100

88

93

92

96

93

46

86

92

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e __________
S ick lea v e (fu ll pay and no
w aiting p e r io d )____________________________
S ick le a v e (p a r tia l pay o r
w aitin g p e r io d )___ ___ _____ ________ _

87

95

19

7

1

74

100

51

60

23

77

84

11

13

-

1

-

-

H o s p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e _____________
____
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e _____________________________
M e d ica l in s u ra n ce _
_______________________
C a ta strop h e in s u r a n c e ________________________
R e tir e m e n t p e n s io n __ ________________________
No health, in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n plan ______

96
96
95
34

100

100
100

100

90
51
93

99
99
99
75
97

100

100

98
98
97
74
94

3

91

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g :

86

3

36
92

1

100
100

70
89

(‘ )

1 In clu d es th os e p lan s fo r w hich at le a s t a p a rt o f the c o s t i s b o r n e by the e m p lo y e r , e x c e p t th o s e le g a lly r e q u ir e d , such as w o r k m e n 's co m p e n s a tio n , s o c ia l s e c u r it y ,
and r a ilr o a d r e tir e m e n t.
2 Inclu des data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th o se in d u s try d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
T r a n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s .
4
Inclu des data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th ose in d u s try d iv is io n s show n sep a r a te ly .
5
U nduplicated total o f w o r k e r s r e c ie v in g s ic k le a v e o r s ick n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e show n s e p a r a te ly b e lo w . S ick le a v e plans a r e lim ite d to th os e w h ich d e fin ite ly e s ta b lis h
at lea st
the m in im u m nu m ber o f d a y s ' pay that can be e x p e c te d b y each e m p lo y e e .
In fo rm a l s ic k le a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te r m in e d on an in d ivid u al b a s is a r e e x clu d ed .
6
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
3




18
T a b le B -7.

H ealth Insurance Benefits P rovided E m p loyees and T h e ir D ep end ents

(P e r c e n t o f plant and o f fi c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s e m p lo y e d in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p rov id in g health in s u ra n ce b en efits
c o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s and th e ir depen den ts, W a te rb u ry , Conn. , M a rch 1966)
Plant w o rk e rs

O ffic e w o r k e r s

T yp e o f b e n e fit , c o v e r a g e , and fin a n c in g 1
A ll in d u s tr ie s

A ll w o r k e r s
W o r k e r s in esta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g :
H o s p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s on ly
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d _
J o in tly fin a n ce d
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s and th e ir
depen dents
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d
J o in tly fin a n ce d
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r e m p lo y e e s ;
jo in tly fin a n ce d fo r depen dents
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r d epen den ts;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d fo r e m p lo y e e s

2
1

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t i li t ie s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

M anufacturin g

100

100

100

100

100

100

96
4

100

100

100

39

98
4

99

1

2

-

2

2

3

1
-

39

2

_

92
85
7

99
92
7

61
61

93

-

5

88

1

-

-

S u r g ic a l in s u ra n ce
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s o n ly
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ______________________
J o in tly fin a n c e d __________________________
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s and th eir
depen den ts
E m p lo y e r fin a n ced
J oin tly fin a n ce d
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r e m p lo y e e s ;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d f o r depen dents
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d f o r d epen den ts;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d f o r e m p lo y e e s

96

100

100

-

-

-

95

100

90
39

2

97
93
5

-

M e d ic a l in s u r a n c e
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s o n ly
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d
J o in tly fin a n c e d __________________________
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s and th eir
d e p e n d e n ts _________________________________
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ______________________
J o in tly fin a n ced
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r e m p lo y e e s ;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d fo r d e p e n d e n ts______
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r d epen den ts;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d fo r e m p lo y e e s
C a ta strop h e in s u r a n c e _________________________
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s o n l y _______________ _
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ______________________
J oin tly fin a n ce d __________________________
C o v e rin g e m p lo y e e s and th e ir
d e p e n d e n ts ______________________________ _
E m p lo y e r fin a n c e d ______________________
J oin tly fin a n ced
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r e m p lo y e e s ;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d fo r depen dents
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d fo r d epen den ts;
jo in t ly fin a n ce d f o r e m p lo y e e s

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

(5)
98
4

28
3
26
72
68

4

-

-

99

100

3
3
-

39

3
3

-

2

2

39

2

-

90
85
5

97
92
5

61
61
-

93
89
5

97
93
4

68

97
4

99

100

-

2

2
-

6

.

6

3
3
90
84
5

3
3
-

97
92
5

39

2

51
51

93

-

5

88

2

28
3
26
72
4

-

2

97
92
4

28
3
26
72
68

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

34

36

51

74

75

-

2

2

1

1

-

(5 )

(5 )

70
3
3

-

-

-

2

2

_

33
25

35
26

51
51

72
51

8

10

-

(5)

.

.

72
53
18

-

-

-

1

1

68

22

68
-

-

-

(5 )

1 In clu d es plans fo r w h ich at le a s t a p a r t o f the c o s t is b o r n e b y the e m p lo y e r . See fo o tn o te 1, ta b le B - 6 . An e s ta b lis h m e n t w as c o n s id e r e d as p rov id in g b e n e fits to e m p lo y e e s fo r th eir
depen dents if su ch c o v e r a g e w as a v a ila b le to at le a s t a m a jo r it y o f th o se e m p lo y e e s one w ou ld u s u a lly e x p e c t to have d e p e n d e n ts, e . g . , m a r r ie d m en , even though they w e r e le s s than a m a jo r it y
o f a ll plant o r o f fi c e w o r k e r s . T h e e m p lo y e r b e a r s the e n tire c o s t o f " e m p lo y e r fin a n c e d " plan s. T h e e m p lo y e r and e m p lo y e e s h a re the c o s t o f " jo in t ly fin a n c e d " pla n s.
2 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v i c e s , in add ition to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s show n se p a r a te ly .
3 T r a n s p o r ta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
4 In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v i c e s , in a d d ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
5 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t.




19

Table B-8. Profit-Sharing Plans
( P e r c e n t o f p la n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r i e s and in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s ,
b y t y p e o f p la n , W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r c h 1966)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

T y p e o f p la n
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1
2

M a n u fa c t u r in g

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

100

100

__________

3

3

P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r c u r r e n t
d i s t r i b u t i o n ______________________________________

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

1

2

-

97

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p l a n s ___________________

P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r d e f e r r e d
d i s t r i b u t i o n ______________________________________
P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r b o t h c u r r e n t
and d e f e r r e d d i s t r i b u t i o n _____________________
P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r e m p l o y e e * s c h o i c e
o f m e t h o d o f d i s t r i b u t i o n ________
______
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v id i n g n o
p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p l a n s ------------------ ---------------------------

1
advan ce
p la n t o r
2
3
4
5

97

100

A ll i n d u s t r i e s 4

M a n u fa c t u r in g

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

-

100

1
-

100

1

-

-

-

1

1

_

-

_

_

( 5)

( 5)

99

99

100

_

100

T h e s t u d y w a s li m it e d t o f o r m a l p la n s (1 ) h a v in g e s t a b l i s h e d f o r m u l a s f o r th e a l l o c a t i o n o f p r o f i t s h a r e s a m o n g e m p l o y e e s ; (2) w h o s e f o r m u l a s w e r e c o m m u n i c a t e d t o th e e m p l o y e e s in
o f th e d e t e r m in a t io n o f p r o f i t s ; (3 ) th a t r e p r e s e n t a c o m m i t m e n t b y t h e c o m p a n y t o m a k e p e r i o d i c c o n t r ib u t io n s b a s e d o n p r o f i t s ; and (4 ) in w h ic h e l i g i b i l i t y e x t e n d s t o a m a j o r i t y o f th e
o ffic e w o r k e r s .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , ’ a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s th a n 0 .5 p e r c e n t .




Appendix A. Changes in Occupational D escriptions
Since the Bureau's last survey, occupational descriptions for drafts­
m an, secretary, and sw itchboard operator w ere revised in order to obtain
salary inform ation for m ore specific categories.

of a single category, clarifying the criteria of types of calls handled and
types o f inform ation provided. The com bination of class A and class B
d ata, where both are published, is com parable to the single designation,
if previously published.

S ecretary. The revised descriptions for secretary (classes A, B,
C, and D) classify these workers according to levels of responsibility. The
<ize of the organization and the scope of the supervisor's position are con­
sidered in distinguishing these levels. D ata published under the com posite
title of secretary are not com parable to data previously published.

D raftsm an. The revised descriptions for draftsm an (classes A, B,
and C; and draftsm an-tracer) replace the previous designations for drafts­
m an (leader, senior, and junior; and tracer) and em phasize the distinction
betw een drafting and design skills. T herefore, data presented for any of
these occupations are not com parable to data previously published.

Sw itchboard operator. The revised description for sw itchboard
operator arranges these workers into two defined classes (A and B) instead




The revised occupational descriptions are included in appendix B.

20

Appendix B. Occupational D escriptions
The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the B ureau's wage surveys is to assist its field
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are em ployed under a variety of payroll titles
and different work arrangem ents from establishm ent to establishm ent and from area to area. This perm its
the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job co ntent. Because of this em phasis on
interestablishm ent and interarea co m p arab ility of occupational content, the B ureau's job descriptions m ay
differ significantly from those in use in individual establishm ents or those prepared for other purposes. In
applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field econom ists are instructed to exclude working supervisors,
apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped , p a rt-tim e , tem porary, and probationary workers.
O F F IC E
BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statem ents, bills, and invoices on a m achine other than
an ordinary or e le ctro m atic typew riter. M ay also keep records as to
billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incid en tal
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, m ach in e, are
classified by type of m achine, as follows:
B iller, m achine (billing m ach in e). Uses a special billing m a ­
chine (M oon H opkins, E lliott Fisher, Burroughs, e tc . , w hich are
com bination typing and adding m achines) to prepare bills and invoices
from custom ers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping
m em orandum s, e tc . U sually involves ap p licatio n of p redeterm ined
discounts and shipping charges, and entry of necessary extensions,
w hich m ay or m ay not be com puted on the billing m ach in e, and
totals w hich are au to m atically accum u lated by m achine. The oper­
ation usually involves a large num ber of carbon copies of the bill
being prepared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B iller, m achine (bookkeeping m ach in e). Uses a bookkeeping
m achine (Sundstrand, E lliott Fisher, R em ington Rand, e tc . , w hich
m ay or m ay not have typew riter keyboard) to prepare custom ers' bills
as p art of the accounts receivable operation. G enerally involves the
sim ultaneous entry of figures on custom ers' ledger record. The m a ­
chine au to m atically accum ulates figures on a num ber of v ertical
colum ns and com putes, and usually prints au to m atically the d eb it or
cred it balances. Does not involve a know ledge of bookkeeping.
Works from uniform and standard types of sales and cred it slips.

O perates a bookkeeping m achine (R em ington Rand, E lliott Fisher,
Sundstrand, Burroughs, N ational Cash R egister, w ith or w ithout a type­
w riter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.




Class A . Keeps a set of records requiring a know ledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and fam iliarity w ith the
structure of the p articu lar accounting system used. D eterm ines proper
records and distribution of debit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase of the work. M ay prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of
a set of records usually requiring little know ledge of basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll, cus­
tom ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing described
under b ille r, m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in ­
ventory control, e tc . M ay check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting departm ent.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A . U nder general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant,
has responsibility for keeping one or m ore sections of a com plete set
of books or records relatin g to one phase of an establishm ent's busi­
ness transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary

21

22
C L E R K , A C C O U N T I N G — C on tin u ed

led g er or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable;
ex am inin g and coding invoices or vouchers w ith proper accounting
distribution; and requires judg m ent and experience in m aking proper
assignations and allo cation s. M ay assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m ay direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. U nder supervision, perform s one or m ore routine a c ­
counting operations such as posting sim ple journal vouchers or accounts
payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling
bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting sim ple cost accounting data. This job does not
require a know ledge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but
is found in offices in w hich the more routine accounting work is
subdivided on a functional basis am ong several workers.
CLERK, FILE
Class A . In an established filing system containing a num ber
of varied subject m a tte r files, classifies and indexes file m aterial
such as correspondence, reports, technical docum ents, e tc . May
also file this m a terial. M ay keep records of various types in con­
ju n ctio n w ith the files. M ay lead a sm all group of low er lev el file
clerks.
Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified m aterial by sim ple
(su bject m atter) headings or partly classified m aterial by finer sub­
headings. Prepares sim ple related index and cross-reference aids.
As requested, locates clearly identified m a terial in files and forwards
m a te ria l. M ay perform related cle ric al tasks required to m ain tain
and service files.
Class C . Perform s routine filing of m aterial th a t has already
been classified or w hich is easily classified in a sim ple serial classi­
ficatio n system ( e .g . , alp h ab etical, chronological, or num erical).
As requested, locates readily av ailable m aterial in files and forwards
m aterial; and m ay fill out w ithdraw al charge. Perform s sim ple
c le ric a l and m anual tasks required to m aintain and service files.
CLERK, ORDER
R eceives custom ers' orders for m a terial or m erchandise by m a il,
phone, or personally. D uties involve any com bination of the follow ing:
Q uoting prices to custom ers; m aking out an order sheet listing the item s




CLERK,

O R D E R — C o n tin u ed

to m ake up the order; checking prices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departm ents to be filled.
M ay check w ith cred it departm en t to determ ine cred it rating of custom er,
acknow ledge receip t of orders from custom ers, follow up orders to see
th a t they have been filled , keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices w ith original orders.
CLERK, PAYROLL
C om putes w ages of com pany em ployees and enters the necessary
data on the payroll sheets. D uties involve: C alculating workers' earnings
based on tim e or production records; and posting ca lcu lated data on payroll
sheet, showing inform ation such as w orker's nam e, working days, tim e,
ra te , deductions for insurance, and to tal w ages due. M ay m ake out paychecks and assist paym aster in m aking up and distributing pay envelopes.
M ay use a calcu latin g m achine.
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Prim ary duty is to operate a C om ptom eter to perform m ath e­
m a tical com putations. This job is not to be confused w ith that of statis­
tic a l or other type of clerk, w hich m ay involve frequent use of a C om p­
to m eter but, in w hich, use of this m achine is incidental to perform ance
of other duties.
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
U nder general supervision and w ith no supervisory responsibilities,
reproduces m ultip le copies of typew ritten or handw ritten m atter, using a
M im eograph or D itto m ach in e. M akes necessary adjustm ent such as for
ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed. Is not required to prepare
stencil or D itto m aster. M ay keep file of used stencils or D itto m asters.
M ay sort, co lla te , and staple com pleted m a terial.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A . O perates a num erical an d /o r alp h ab etical or co m bina­
tion keypunch m achine to transcribe data from various source docu­
m ents to keypunch tab ulating cards. Perform s sam e tasks as low er
lev el keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires application

23
K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R — Continued

of coding skills and the m aking of som e determ inations, for ex am ple,
locates on the source docum ent the item s to be punched; extracts
inform ation from several docum ents; and searches for and interprets
inform ation on the docum ent to determ ine inform ation to be punched.
M ay train inexperienced operators.
Class B. Under close supervision or follow ing specific procedures
or instructions, transcribes data from source docum ents to punched
cards. O perates a num erical an d/or alp h ab etical or com bination
keypunch m achine to keypunch tab ulating cards. May verify cards.
W orking from various standardized source docum ents, follows specified
sequences w hich have been coded or prescribed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be punched.
Problem s arising from erroneous item s or codes, missing inform ation,
etc. , are referred to supervisor.
OFFICE BOY OR CIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating
m inor office m achines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing
m ail, and other m inor clerical work.
SECRETARY

SECRETARY— C ontinued
Exclusions
Not all positions th at are title d "secretary" possess the above
characteristics. Exam ples of positions w hich are excluded from the def­
inition are as follows: (a) Positions w hich do not m eet the "personal"
secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in
secretarial type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a
group of professional, tec h n ica l, or m anagerial persons; (d) secretary posi­
tions in w hich the duties are either substantially m ore routine or substan­
tia lly m ore com plex and responsible than those characterized in the def­
inition; an d (e ) assistant type positions w hich involve m ore difficult or m ore
responsible tec h n ica l, ad m inistrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical
duties w hich are not typ ical of secretarial work.
NOTE: The term "corporate officer," used in the lev el definitions
follow ing, refers to those officials who have a significant corporate-w ide
policym aking role w ith regard to m ajor com pany activ ities. The title
"vice president, " though norm ally indicative o f this role, does not in all
cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose prim ary responsibility
is to act personally on individual cases or transactions (e. g. , approve or
deny individual loan or credit actions; adm inister individual trust accounts;
directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be "corporate
officers" for purposes of applying the follow ing lev el definitions.
Class A
a. Secretary to the chairm an of the board or president of a
com pany th at em ployes, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 persons; or

Assigned as personal secretary, norm ally to one individual. M ain­
tains a close and highly responsive relationship to the d a y -to -d ay work
activities of the supervisor. Works fairly independently receiving a m in i­
m um of d e tailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied cle ric al and
secretarial duties, usually including most of the follow ing: (a) R eceives
telephone calls, personal callers, and incom ing m a il, answers routine
inquiries, and routes the tech n ical inquiries to the proper persons; (b)
establishes, m aintains, and revises the supervisor's files; (c) m aintains the
supervisor's calendar and m akes appointm ents as instructed; (d) relays
m essages from supervisor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m em ­
oranda, and reports prepared by others for the supervisor's signature to
assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) performs stenographic
and typing work.

b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairm an of
the board or president) of a com pany that em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but
fewer than 2 5 ,000 persons; or
c. Secretary to the head (im m ed iately below the corporate
officer lev el) of a m ajor segm ent or subsidiary of a com pany that em ploys,
in all, over 25, 000 persons.

May also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks of com parable
nature and difficulty. The work typ ically requires knowledge of office
routine and understanding o f the organization, program s, and procedures
relate d to the work of the supervisor.

b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chairm an of tIre
board or president) of a com pany that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer
than 5 ,0 0 0 persons; or




Class B
a. Secretary to the chairm an of the board or president of a
com pany that em ploys, in all, fewer than 100 persons; or

24
SECRETARY— C ontinued
c. S ecretary to the head (im m ed iately below the officer level)
over eith er a m ajor corporate-w ide functional activity (e. g. , m arketing,
research, operations, industrial relations, etc. ) or a m ajor geographic or
organizational segm ent (e. g. , a regional headquarters; a m ajor division)
of a com pany th a t em ploys, in all, over 5 ,000 but fewer than 25,000
em ployees; or
d. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc.
(or other eq uivalent lev el of o fficial) th a t em ploys, in all, over 5 ,000
persons; or
e. S ecretary to the head of a large and im portant organizational
segm ent (e. g. , a m iddle m anagem ent supervisor of an organizational seg­
m ent often involving as m any as several hundred persons) of a com pany
th at em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 persons.
Class C
a.
S ecretary to an executive or m anagerial person whose
sibility is not eq uivalent to one of the specific level situations in the def­
inition for class B, but whose subordinate staff norm ally num bers at least
several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational segm ents
w hich are often, in turn, further subdivided. In som e com panies, this lev el
includes a w ide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or
two; or

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL— C ontinued
May m ain tain files, keep sim ple records, or perform other relativ ely routine
clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include
transcribing -m achin e work. (See transcribing -m achin e operator. )
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Prim ary duty is to take dictatio n involving a varied technical or
specialized vocabulary such as in leg al briefs or reports on scien tific re­
search from one or m ore persons eith er in shorthand or by Stenotype or
sim ilar m achine; and transcribe d ictatio n . May also type from w ritten
copy. M ay also set up and m ain tain files, keep records, etc.
OR
Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater inde­
pendence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the
follow ing: Work requires high degree of stenographic speed and accuracy;
and a thorough w orking know ledge of general business and office procedures
and
respon­ of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures,
files, w orkflow, etc. Uses this know ledge in perform ing stenographic duties
and responsible c le ric al tasks such as, m aintainin g follow up files; assem bling
m aterial for reports, m em orandum s, letters, etc. ; com posing sim ple letters
from general instructions; reading and routing incom ing m ail; and answ ering
routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing -m achin e work.

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
b.
S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc.
Class A. Operates a sin g le- or m u ltip le-p o sitio n telephone sw itch­
(or other eq uivalent lev el of official) th a t em ploys, in a ll, fewer than
board handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. Performs full
5, 000 persons.
telephone inform ation service or handles com plex calls, such as conference,
co llect, overseas, or sim ilar calls, eith er in ad dition to doing routine work
Class D
as described for sw itchboard operator, class B, or as a fu ll-tim e assignm ent.
("Full" telephon e inform ation service occurs w hen the establishm ent has
a. S ecretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational
varied functions th a t are not readily understandable for telephone inform a­
unit (e. g. , fewer than about 25 or 30 persons); or
tion purposes, e. g. , because of overlapping or in te rrela ted functions, and
consequently present frequent problem s as to w hich extensions are appro­
b. S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional
priate for calls. )
em ployee, ad m inistrative officer, or assistant, skilled tech n ician or expert.
Class B. O perates a sin g le- or m u ltip le-p o sitio n telephone sw itch­
(NOTE: M any com panies assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as
board handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. May handle
described above, to this lev el of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker. )
routine long distance calls and record tolls. M ay perform lim ited telephone
inform ation service. ("L im ited" telephone inform ation service occurs if the
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
functions o f the establishm ent serviced are readily understandable for te le ­
Prim ary duty is to tak e dictation involving a norm al routine vo­
phone inform ation purposes, or if the requests are routine, e. g. , giving
cabulary from one or m ore persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
extension num bers w hen specific nam es are furnished, or if com plex calls
are referred to another operator. )
sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from w ritten copy.




25
S W IT C H B O A R D

O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T

In addition to perform ing duties of operator on a single position
or m on itor-ty pe sw itchboard, acts as receptionist and m ay also type or
perform routine c le ric al work as part of regular duties. This typing or
c le ric a l work m ay take the m ajor p a rt of this w orker's tim e w hile at
sw itchboard.

T A B U L A T I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R — C ontinued

specific instructions. M ay include sim ple w iring from diagram s and
some filing woxk. The work ty p ically involves portions of a work
u n it, for ex am p le, individual sorting or co llatin g runs or repetitive
operations.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A . O perates a variety of tabulating or e le c tric a l accoun t­
ing m achines, ty p ically including such m achines as the tab u lato r,
calcu lato r, interpreter, co llator, and others. Perform s com plete
reporting assignm ents w ithout close supervision, and perform s difficult
w iring as required. The com plete reporting and tab ulating assign­
m ents ty p ically involve a variety of long and com plex reports w hich
often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring some planning
and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a m ore experienced oper­
ator, is ty p ically involved in training new operators in m achine
operations, or p artially trained operators in w iring from diagram s
and operating sequences of long and com plex reports. Does not
include w orking supervisors perform ing tab ulating -m achin e operations
and d a y -to -d ay supervision of the work and production of a group of
tab u latin g -m ach in e operators.
Class B. O perates m ore d ifficult tab ulating or e le c tric a l accoun t­
ing m achines such as the tab u lato r and calcu lato r, in ad dition to the
sorter, reproducer, and co llator. This work is perform ed under specific
instructions and m ay include the perform ance of some w iring from
diagram s. The work ty pically involves, for ex am p le, tabulations
involving a rep etitive accounting exercise, a com plete but sm all
tab u latin g study, or parts of a longer and m ore com plex report. Such
reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are w ell established. M ay also include the training of new
em ployees in the basic operation of the m achine.
Class C . O perates sim ple tabulating or e le ctrical accounting
m achines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, co llator, e tc . , w ith




Prim ary duty is to transcribe d ictatio n involving a norm al routine
vocabulary from transcribing -m achin e records. M ay also type from w ritten
copy and do sim ple cle ric al work. W orkers transcribing dictatio n involving
a varied tech n ical or specialized vocabulary such as leg al briefs or reports
on scien tific research are not included. A w orker who takes dictation in
shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine is classified as a stenographer,
general.
TYPIST
Uses a typew riter to m ake copies of various m a terial or to m ake
out bills after calculatio ns have been m ade by another person. M ay in ­
clude typing of stencils, m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for use in duplicating
processes. M ay do c le ric a l work involving little special training, such
as keeping sim ple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and dis­
tributing incom ing m a il.
Class A . Perform s one or m ore of the follow ing: Typing m a ­
te ria l in final form w hen it involves com bining m aterial from several
sources or responsibility for co rrect spelling, syllabication, punctu­
atio n, e tc . , of tech n ical or unusual words or foreign language m a ­
terial; and planning lay out and typing of co m p licated statistical tables
to m a in tain uniform ity and balance in spacing. M ay type routine
form letters varying details to suit circum stances.
Class B. Perform s one or m ore of the follow ing: Copy typing
from rough or cle a r drafts; routine typing of form s, insurance policies,
e t c . ; and setting up sim ple standard tabulations, or copying m ore
com plex tables already setup and spaced properly.

26

PROFESSIONAL

ND

TECHNICAL

DRAFTSMAN C ontinued

DRAFTSMAN
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of com plex item s having
distinctive design features th a t differ significantly from established
drafting precedents. Works in close support w ith the design originator,
and m ay recom m end m inor design changes. Analyzes the effect of
each change on the details of form , function, and positional relatio n ­
ships of com ponents and parts. Works w ith a m inim um of supervisory
assistance. C om pleted work is review ed by design originator for con­
sistency w ith prior engineering determ inations. M ay eith er prepare
draw ings, or d irect th eir preparation by low er lev el draftsm en.
Class B. Perform s nonroutine and com plex drafting assignm ents
th a t require the ap p licatio n of m ost of the standardized draw ing te c h ­
niques regularly used. D uties typ ically involve such work as: Prepares
w orking draw ings of subassem blies w ith irregular shapes, m ultiple
functions, and precise positional relationships betw een com ponents;
prepares arch itectu ral drawings for construction of a building including
d etail drawings of foundations, w all sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accep ted form ulas and m anuals in m aking necessary com putations
to determ ine quantities of m aterials to be used, load cap acities,
strengths, stresses, e tc . R eceives in itia l instructions, requirem ents,
and advice from supervisor. C om pleted work is checked for technical
adequacy.
Class C. Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for
engineering, construction, m anufacturing, or repair purposes. Types
of drawings prepared include isom etric projections (d epicting three
dim ensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning
of com ponents and convey needed inform ation. C onsolidates details
from a num ber of sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required.
MAINTENANCE

Suggested m ethods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source m aterials are given w ith in itial assignm ents. Instructions are
less com plete w hen assignm ents recur. Work m ay be spot-checked
during progress.
DRAFTSM AN-TRACER
C opies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing w ith pen or pen cil. (Does not
include tracing lim ite d to plans prim arily consisting of straight lines and
a large scale not requiring close d elin eatio n .)
an d /o r
Prepares sim ple or rep etitive drawings of easily visualized item s. Work
is closely supervised during progress.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m ed ical
d irection to ill or injured em ployees or other persons who becom e ill or
suffer an ac cid en t on the prem ises of a factory or other establishm ent.
D uties involve a com bination of the follow ing: G iving first aid to the ill
or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees' injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accid en t reports for com pensation
or other purposes; assisting in physical exam inations and h ealth evaluations
of applicants and em ployees; and planning and carrying out program s
involving h ealth ed ucatio n, accid en t prevention, ev aluatio n of plant en ­
vironm ent, or other activ ities affecting the h e alth , w elfare, and safety
of all personnel.
AND

POWERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE— C ontinued

Perform s the carpentry duties necessary to construct and m ain tain
in good repair building woodwork and equipm ent such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitio ns, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim m ade
of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: P lan­
ning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verbal
instructions; using a variety of carp enter's handtools, portable pow er tools,

and standard m easuring instrum ents; m aking standard shop com putations
relatin g to dim ensions of work; and selecting m aterials necessary for the
work. In general, the work of the m aintenance carpenter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al ap ­
prenticeship or eq uivalent training and experience.




27

E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

Perform s a v ariety of ele c tric a l trade functions such as the in ­
stallatio n , m a in ten an ce, or repair of equipm ent for the generation, dis­
tribution, or utilization of e le ctric energy in an establishm ent. Work
involves m ost of the follow ing: Installing or repairing any of a variety of
e le c tric a l equipm ent such as generators, transform ers, sw itchboards, con­
trollers, c ircu it breakers, m otors, heating units, conduit system s, or other
transm ission equipm ent; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le ctrical
system or equipm ent; working standard com putations relating to load
requirem ents of w iring or ele c tric a l equipm ent; and using a variety of
e le c tric ia n 's handtools and m easuring and testing instrum ents. In general,
the work of the m aintenance e le ctrician requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent
training and ex perience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and m ay also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipm ent (m echanical or electrical) to supply the
establishm ent in w hich em ployed with pow er, h e a t, refrigeration, or
air-con ditioning . Work involves: O perating and m aintaining equipm ent
such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, m otors, turbines,
v entilating and refrigerating equipm ent, steam boilers and b o iler-fed
w ater pum ps; m aking equipm ent repairs; and keeping a record of operation
of m achinery, tem perature, and fuel consum ption. May also supervise
these operations. H ead or chief engineers in establishm ents em ploying
m ore than one engineer are excluded.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishm ent in which
em ployed w ith h e a t, pow er, or steam . Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a m echan ical stoker, or gas or oil burner; and checks w ater
and safety valves. May clean , o il, or assist in repairing boilerroom
eq uipm ent.
HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
Assists one or more workers in the skilled m aintenance trades,
by perform ing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping




HELPER,

M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S — C ontinued

a w orker supplied w ith m aterials and tools; cleaning working area, m a ­
ch ine, and equipm ent; assisting journeym an by holding m aterials or tools;
and perform ing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeym an. The kind
of work the h elp er is p erm itted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the help er is confined to supplying, liftin g , and holding m a ­
terials and tools and cleaning w orking areas; and in others he is perm itted
to perform specialized m achine operations, or parts of a trade th at are
also perform ed by workers on a fu ll-tim e basis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or m ore types of m achine
tools, such as jig borers, cy lindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or m illing m achines, in the construction of m achine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning
and perform ing difficult m achining operations; processing item s requiring
co m p licated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision m easuring instrum ents; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling, and oper­
ation sequence; and m aking necessary adjustm ents during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dim ensions. M ay be required to recognize
when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants
and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry wage study purposes,
m ach in e-to o l operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing shops are e x ­
cluded from this classificatio n.
M ACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces rep lacem en t parts and new parts in m aking repairs of
m etal parts of m echan ical equipm ent operated in an establishm ent. Work
involves m ost of the follow ing: Interpreting w ritten instructions and speci­
fications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m achinist's
handtools and precision m easuring instrum ents; setting up and operating
standard m achine tools; shaping of m etal parts to close tolerances; m aking
standard shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions of work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds of m achining; know ledge of the working properties of the
com m on m etals; selecting standard m aterials, parts, and equipm ent re ­
quired for his work; and fitting and assem bling parts into m echan ical
equipm ent. In general, the m achinist's work norm ally requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop practice usually acquired through a form al ap ­
prenticeship or eq uivalent training and experience.

28
MECHANIC, AUTOM OTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

OILER

R epairs autom obiles, buses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tab lishm ent. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Exam ining autom otive
eq uipm ent to diagnose source of trouble; disassem bling eq uipm ent and
perform ing repairs th a t involve the use of such handtools as w renches,
gages, drills, or specialized eq uipm ent in disassem bling or fittin g parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassem bling and installing the various assem blies in the vehicle
and m aking necessary adjustm ents; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tigh ten in g body bolts. In general, the work of the au to ­
m otive m ech an ic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and ex perience.

L ubricates, w ith oil or grease, the m oving parts or w earing sur­
faces of m ech an ical equipm ent of an establishm ent.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R epairs m achinery or m ech an ical equipm ent of an establishm ent.
Work involves m ost of the follow ing: E xam ining m achines and m e ch an ical
eq u ip m en t to diagnose source of trouble; dism antling or partly dism antling
m achines and perform ing repairs th a t m ainly involve the use of handtools
in scraping and fittin g parts; replacing broken or defective parts w ith item s
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a rep lacem en t p a rt by a
m achine shop or sending of the m achine to a m achine shop for m ajor
repairs; preparing w ritten specifications for m ajor repairs or for the pro­
duction of parts ordered from m achine shop; reassem bling m achines; and
m aking all necessary adjustm ents for operation. In general, the w oik of
a m ain ten an ce m ech an ic requires rounded training and ex perience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and ex ­
p e rie n ce. E xcluded from this classification are workers whose prim ary
duties involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new m achines or heavy eq uipm ent, and dism antles and
installs m achines or heavy eq uipm ent w hen changes in the p la n t lay out
are required. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; m aking standard shop com putations re ­
latin g to stresses, strength of m aterials, and centers of gravity; alin ing
and b alan cin g of equipm ent; selecting standard tools, eq uipm ent, and
parts to be used; and installing and m aintainin g in good order pow er
transm ission eq u ip m en t such as drives and speed reducers. In general,
the m illw rig h t's work norm ally requires a rounded training and ex perience
in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t tra in ­
ing and ex perience.




PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishm ent. Work involves the follow ing: Know ledge of surface p ecu li­
arities and types of p a in t required for different applications; preparing
surface for p ainting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or filler
in n ail holes and interstices; and applying p a in t w ith spray gun or brush.
M ay m ix colors, oils, w hite lea d , and other p a in t ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the m aintenance
p ain ter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t training and experience.
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs w ater, steam , gas, or other types of pipe and
pipe fittings in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the follow ing:
Laying out of work and m easuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other w ritten specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths w ith chisel and h am m er or oxyacetylene torch or p ip e -c u ttin g
m achine; threading pipe w ith stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or pow er-driven m achines; assem bling pipe w ith couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to pressures,
flow , and size of pipe required; and m aking standard tests to determ ine
w hether finished pipes m e e t specifications. In g eneral, the work of the
m aintenance p ip e fitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t training and e x ­
perien ce. W orkers p rim arily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or h eatin g system s are ex cluded.
PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
K eeps the plum bing system of an establishm ent in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding in stallation of vents
and traps in plum bing system ; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
and opening clogged drains w ith a plunger or plum ber's snake. In general,
the work of the m aintenance plum ber requires rounded training and e x ­
perience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t
training and ex perience.

29
S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R — C o n tinued

F ab ricates, installs, and m aintains in good repair the sh eet-m e tal
eq uipm ent and fixtures (such as m achine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, m e tal roofing) of an establish­
m en t. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying out all
types of sh e e t-m e ta l m aintenance work from blueprints, m odels, or other
specifications; setting up and operating all av ailable types of s h e e t-m e ta l­
w orking m achines; using a variety of handtools in cu tting, bending, form ­
ing, shaping, fittin g , and assem bling; and installing sh eet-m e tal articles
as required. In general, the work of the m aintenance sh eet-m e tal w orker
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and experience.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(D ie m aker; jig m aker; tool m aker; fixture m aker; gage m aker)
C onstructs and repairs m achine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fixtures
or dies for forgings, punching, and other m etal-fo rm in g work. Work in­
CUSTODIAL

AND

volves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying out of work from m odels,
blueprints, draw ings, or other oral and w ritten specifications; using a
variety of tool and die m aker's handtools and precision m easuring instru­
m ents, understanding of the w orking properties of com m on m etals and
alloys; setting up and operating of m achine tools and related equipm ent;
m aking necessary shop com putations relating to dim ensions of work, speeds,
feeds, and tooling of m achines; h e attreatin g of m etal parts during fab ri­
catio n as w ell as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities;
w orking to close tolerances; fittin g and assem bling of parts to prescribed
tolerances and allow ances; and selecting appropriate m aterials, tools, and
processes. In g eneral, the tool and die m aker's work requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through
a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die m akers in
tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.
MATERIAL

MOVEMENT

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— C ontinued

Transports passengers betw een floors of an office building, ap art­
m ent house, departm ent store, ho tel, or sim ilar establishm ent. W orkers
who operate elevators in conjunction w ith other duties such as those of
starters and janitors are excluded.

or other establishm ent. D uties involve a com bination of the following:
Sw eeping, m opping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; rem oving chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipm ent, furniture, or fixtures; polishing
m etal fixtures or trim m ings; providing supplies and m inor m aintenance
services; and cleaning lav atories, showers, and restroom s. Workers who
specialize in window w ashing are ex cluded.

GUARD
Perform s routine police duties, eith er a t fixed post or on tour,
m ain tain in g order, using arm s or force where necessary. Includes g a te m en who are stationed at gate and check on identity of em ployees and
other persons en terin g .
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sw eeper; charw om an; janitress)
C leans and keeps in an orderly condition factory w orking areas
and w ashroom s, or prem ises of an o ffic e , ap artm ent house, or co m m ercial




LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockm an
or stock helper; w arehousem an or warehouse helper)
A w orker em ployed in a w arehouse, m anufacturing p lant, store,
or other establishm ent whose duties involve one or m ore of the follow ing:
Loading and unloading various m aterials and m erchandise on or from freight
cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
m aterials or m erchandise in proper storage location; and transporting m a ­
terials or m erchandise by handtruck, car, or w heelbarrow . Longshorem en,
who load and unload ships are excluded.

30

ORDER FILLER
(O rder picker; stock selector; warehouse stockm an)
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
m erchandise in accordance w ith specifications on sales slips, custom ers'
orders, or other instructions. M ay, in addition to filling orders and in ­
d icating item s filled or o m itted , keep records of outgoing orders, requi­
sition ad ditional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other relate d duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipm ent or storage by p lacing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations perform ed being dependent
upon the type, size, and num ber of units to be packed, the type of con­
tain er em ployed, and m ethod of shipm ent. Work requires the p lacing of
item s in shipping containers and m ay involve one or m ore of the follow ing:
K now ledge of various item s of stock in order to verify content; selection
of appropriate type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container;
using ex celsior or other m a terial to prevent breakage or dam age; closing
and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
co ntainer. Packers who also m ake wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

TRUCKD RIVER
D rives a truck w ithin a city or industrial area to transport m a ­
terials, m erchandise, eq uipm ent, or m en betw een various types of es­
tablishm ents such as: M anufacturing plants, freight depots, w arehouses,
w holesale and re ta il establishm ents, or betw een retail establishm ents and
custom ers' houses or places of business. M ay also load or unload truck
w ith or w ithout helpers, m ake m inor m ech an ical repairs, and keep truck
in good w orking order. D river-salesm en and o v e r-th e -ro a d drivers are
excluded.
For w age study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type of eq uipm ent, as follows: (T ra c to r-tra ile r should be rated on the
basis of tra ile r c a p a c ity .)
T ruckdriver (com b ination of sizes listed separately)
T m ckdriver, lig h t (under 1 V 2 tons)
T ruckdriver, m edium ( 1V2 to and including 4 tons)
T ruckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, tra ile r type)
T m ckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than tra ile r type)

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK

TRUCKER, POWER

Prepares m erchandise for shipm ent, or receives and is responsible
for incom ing shipm ents of m erchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work
involves: A know ledge of shipping procedures, p ractices, routes, av ailable
m eans of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods
shipped, m aking up bills of lading, posting w eight and shipping charges,
and keeping a file of shipping records. M ay d irect or assist in preparing
the m erchandise for shipm ent. R eceiving work involves: V erifying or
directing others in verifying the correctness of shipm ents against bills of
lad ing, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejectin g
dam aged goods; routing m erchandise or m aterials to proper departm ents;
and m ain tain in g necessary records and files.

O perates a m anually controlled gasoline- or electric-p o w ered
truck or tracto r to transport goods and m aterials of all kinds about a
w arehouse, m anufacturing plan t, or other establishm ent.

For w age study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
R eceiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk




For w age study purposes, workers are classified by type of truck,
as follows:
T rucker, pow er (forklift)
T rucker, pow er (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN
M akes rounds of prem ises period ically in protecting property
against fire, th eft, and illeg al entry.




Available On Request—
The sixth annual report on salaries for accountants, auditors, attorneys, chemists,
engineers, engineering technicians, draftsmen, tracers, job analysts, directors of
personnel, managers of office services, and clerical employees.
Order as BLS Bulletin 1469, National Survey of Professional, Administrative, T ech­
nical, and C lerical Pay, February—
March 19 6 5 . 45 cents a copy.




Area Wage Surveys*
A l i s t o f the l a t e s t a v a ila b le b u ll e t in s i s p r e s e n t e d b e l o w .
A d i r e c t o r y i n d ic a t in g d a t e s o f e a r l i e r s tu d ie s , and the p r i c e s o f the b u lle tin s is
a v a ila b le o n r e q u e s t .
B u lle tin s m a y be p u r c h a s e d f r o m the S u p e rin te n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U . S . G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O f f i c e , W a sh in gton, D. C. , 20402,
o r f r o m any o f the B L S r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s s h o w n on the in s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .
B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e

A rea

Area

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e

1430-78,
1430-52,
1430-62,
1430-48,
1430-74,
1465-29,
1430-66,
1430-60,
1465-1,
1465-12,

25
25
20
20
25
25
20
25
20
30

c e n ts
cents
c e n ts
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

M ilw a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1965 1------------------------------------------M inneapolis—
St. P a u l, Minn. , Jan. 1966________________
M u s k e g o n —M u s k e g o n H e ig h t s , M i c h . , M a y 1965_______
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C ity, N. J. , F e b . 1966 1____________
N ew H aven, C o n n . , Jan. 1966 1___________________________
N ew O r l e a n s , L a . , F e b . 1966_____________________________
N ew York,\_N. Y. , A p r . 1965 1 ____________________________
N o r f o l k —P o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s —
H am pton, V a . , June 1965 1 ______________________________
O k la h o m a C it y , Okla. , Aug. 1 9 6 5 ________________________

1430-58,
1465-38,
1430-68,
1465-50,
1465-37,
1465-47,
1430-80,

25c e n t s
25ce n ts
20c e n t s
30ce n ts
25c e n ts
20ce n ts
40 c e n ts

1430-77,
1465-5,

25c e n t s
20 c e n t s

B u f f a l o , N.
, D e c . 1965__________________________________
B u r lin g t o n , Vt. , M a r . 1965 * _____________________________
C a n to n , Ohio, A p r . 1 9 6 5 __________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , A p r . 1965__________________________
C h a r l o t t e , N. C. , A p r . 1965_______________________________
C h a t ta n o o g a , T e n n. — a. , Sept. 1 9 6 5 ____________________
G
C h i c a g o , 111., A p r . 1965 1 -------------------------------------------------C in c in n a ti, Ohio—K y. , M a r . 1965_________________________
C l e v e l a n d , Ohio, Sept. 1965______________________________
C o l u m b u s , O hio, O c t .
1965______________________________
D a l l a s , T e x . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 __________________________________

1465-36,
1430-51,
1430-59,
1430-65,
1430-61,
1465-7,
1430-72,
1430-55,
1465-8,
1465-15,
1465-24,

25
25
20
20
25
20
30
25
25
25
25

c e n ts
cents
cents
c e n ts
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
c e n ts
cents

1465-13,
1430-71,
1465-35,
1430-56,
1465-46,
1465-23,
1430-70,

25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
35c e n t s
20c e n t s
25c e n ts
25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s

D a v e n p o r t —R o c k Is la n d — o lin e , Iow a—
M
111.,
O ct. 1965 ____________________________________________________
D a yton , O hio, Jan. 1966 1__________________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1965 * _______________________________
D e s M o i n e s , Iow a, F e b . 1 9 6 6 1___________________________
D e t r o i t , M ic h . , Jan. 1966__________________________________
F o r t W o rth , T e x . , N o v . 196.’ _____________________________
G r e e n B a y , W is . , A u g. 1965______________________________
G r e e n v i l l e , S. C . , M a y 1965---------------------------------------------H o u s to n , T e x . , June 1965__________________________________
I n d ia n a p o lis , Ind. , D e c . 1965 1___________________________

O m a h a , N e b r . —Iowa, O c t . 1965 1 -------------------------------------P a t e r s o n — lif to n —P a s s a i c , N. J. , M a y 1 9 6 5 ____________
C
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a . — J. , N o v . 1965 1____________________
N.
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1965________________________________
P it t s b u r g h , P a . , Jan. 1966________________________________
P o r t l a n d , M a in e , N o v . 1 9 6 5 * _____________________________
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . — a sh . , M a y 1965_______________________
W
P r o v i d e n c e —P a w t u c k e t , R. I . —M a s s . ,
M a y 1965 * __________________________________________________
R a le ig h , N. C. , Sept. 1965 1----------------------------------------------R i c h m o n d , V a . , N o v . 1965 1 ---------------------------------------------R o c k f o r d , 111. , M a y 1965-----------------------------------------------------

1430-67,
1465-10,
1465-28,
1430-63,

30 c e n t s
25c e n t s
30c e n ts
20c e n t s

1465-16,
1465-39,
1465-33,
1465-48,
1465-45,
1465-26,
1465-4,
1430-69,
1430-82,
1465-31,

20
25
30
25
25
20
20
20
25
30

cents
cents
c e n ts
ce n ts
c e n ts
cents
c e n ts
c e n ts
c e n ts
ce n ts

St. L o u i s , M o . —111. , O c t . 1965___________________________
Salt L a k e C it y , Utah, D e c . 1965------------------------- -----San A n to n io , T e x . , June 1965 1-----------------------------------------San B e r n a r d i n o —R i v e r s id e —O n t a r io , C a l i f . ,
Sept. 1965 1_________________________________________________
San D i e g o , C a l i f . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 --------------------------------------------San F r a n c i s c o —Oakla nd, C a l i f . , Jan. 1966 1____________
San J o s e , C a l i f . , Sept. 1965 1 ------------------------------------------Savannah, Ga. , M ay 1 9 6 5 __________________________________
S c r a n to n , P a . , A u g. 1965 1________________________________
Se a ttle —E v e r e t t , W a s h . , O ct. 1965 1_____________________

1465-22,
1465-32,
1430-81,

25 c e n t s
20ce n ts
25c e n ts

1465-20,
1465-21,
1465-43,
1465-19,
1 4 3 0 -6 4 ,
1465-3,
1465-9,

30c e n t s
20 c e n t s
30c e n ts
25 c e n t s
20c e n ts
25 c e n ts
30 c e n t s

1465-44,
1465-41,
1465-27,
1430-75,
1465-6,

25 ce n ts
20 ce n ts
30 c e n ts
20 c e n t s
20 c e n t s

1430-57,
1465-51,
1430-73,
1465-2,
1465-42,
1465-30,

30
20
20
20
30
25

S io u x F a l l s , S. D a k . , O c t . 1 9 6 5 1 ________________________
South Ben d, I n d . , M a r . 1965______________________________
Sp okan e, W a s h . , June 1 9 6 5 1______________________________
T o l e d o , O h io — i c h . , F e b . ^ 9 6 6 ____________________________
M
T r e n t o n , N. J. , D e c . 1965__________________________________
W a s h in g to n , D. C . —M d . — a . , O ct. 1 9 6 5 _________________
V
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r . 1 9 6 6 1__________________________
W a t e r l o o , Iow a, N o v . 1 9 6 5 ________________________________
W ic h it a , K a n s . , O ct . 1965_________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , June 1 9 6 5 ____________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1 9 6 6 1____________________________________
Y o u n g s to w n —W a r r e n , O h io , N o v . 1965 1 _________________

1465-17,
1430-54,
1430-79,
1465-49,
1465-34,
1465-14,
1465-52,
1465- 18,
1465- 11,
1430-76,
1465-40,
1465-25,

25 c e n t s
20c e n t s
25c e n ts
20c e n ts
20ce n ts
25c e n t s
25c e n ts
20c e n t s
20c e n t s
25 c e n t s
25c e n ts
25 c e n t s

A k r o n , O hio, June 1965------------------------------------------------------A l b a n y — c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N.
S
, A p r . 1965___________
A l b u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 _______________________
A lle n to w n —B e t h l e h e m —E a s to n , P a . —N . J . , F e b . 1 9 6 5 —
A tla nta, Ga. , M a y 1965____________________________________
B a l t i m o r e , Md. , N o v . 1 9 6 5 _______________________________
B e a u m o n t —P o r t A r t h u r , T e x . , M a y 1 9 6 5 ________________
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , A p r . 1965 1 __________________________
B o i s e C it y , Idaho, July 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
B o s t o n , M a s s . , O ct . 1965 1 _______________________________

Y.

Y.

J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1 9 6 6 * ______________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , Jan. 1966_____________________________
K a n s a s C it y , M o . —K a n s . , N o v . 1965 1 ---------------------------L a w r e n c e — a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N.
H
, June 1965_________
L it tl e R o c k —N o rt h L it tl e R o c k , A r k . , Aug. 1965_______
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h , C a l i f . ,
M a r . 1965 1_________________________________________________
L ou isville, K y .—
Ind. , F e b . 1966_________________________
L u b b o c k , T e x . , June 1 9 6 5 _________________________________
M a n c h e s t e r , N. H. , Aug. 1965____________________________
M e m p h i s , T e n n.—A r k . , Jan. 1966 1________________________
M i a m i , F l a . , D e c . 1965 * __________________________________
M id la n d and O d e s s a , T e x -------- — ___________---------------------—

H.

(N o t p rev iou sly su rveyed )

1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.
* Bulletins dated before July 1965 were entitled "O ccupational Wage Surveys."




cents
ce n ts
cents
c e n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts





Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102