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A re a Wage S u rv e y
The South Bend, Indiana, Metropolitan Area
March 1966

Bulletin No. 1465—55




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S
A rth u r M

Ross, Commissioner




Area Wage Survey
The South Bend, Indiana, Metropolitan Area




March 1966

t

Bulletin No. 1 4 6 5 -5 5
M a y 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S
A rth u r M. Ross, C om m is sio ner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 25 cents




C ontents

Preface

Page
T h e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s p r o g r a m o f a nn ua l
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s i s d e ­
s i g n e d t o p r o v i d e d a t a o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , and e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s .
It
y ie ld s d e ta ile d data b y s e le c t e d in d u stry d iv is io n s f o r each
o f th e a r e a s s t u d i e d , f o r e c o n o m i c r e g i o n s , and f o r th e
U n ite d S t a t e s .
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in th e p r o g r a m is
th e n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t i n t o (1) th e m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s
b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y and s k i l l l e v e l , and (2) th e s t r u c ­
t u r e and l e v e l o f w a g e s a m o n g a r e a s and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .
A t th e en d o f e a c h s u r v e y , an i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l ­
letin p r e s e n ts s u r v e y re s u lts f o r ea ch a r e a studied.
A fter
c o m p l e t i o n of a ll o f the in d iv id u a l a r e a b u lle tin s f o r a
rou nd o f s u r v e y s , a t w o - p a r t s u m m a r y b u lle tin is is s u e d .
T h e f i r s t p a r t b r i n g s d a t a f o r e a c h o f th e m e t r o p o l i t a n
a r e a s s t u d i e d in t o o n e b u l l e t i n .
The secon d part presen ts
in fo rm a tio n w hich has b e e n p r o je c t e d f r o m in divid ua l m e t ­
r o p o l i t a n a r e a d a t a t o r e l a t e to e c o n o m i c r e g i o n s and the
U nited S ta tes.
E i g h t y - f i v e a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d in th e
p r o g r a m . In fo r m a tio n on o c c u p a tio n a l e a rn in g s is c o l l e c t e d
a n n u a l l y in e a c h a r e a . I n f o r m a t i o n o n e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c ­
t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s i s o b t a i n e d b i e n ­
n i a l l y in m o s t o f th e a r e a s .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s o f th e s u r v e y in
S o u th B e n d , I n d . , in M a r c h 1966.
The Standard M e t r o p o l­
it a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d b y t h e B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t
t h r o u g h M a r c h 1965, c o n s i s t s o f St. J o s e p h a n d M a r s h a l l
C ou nties.
T h i s s t u d y w a s c o n d u c t e d b y th e B u r e a u ' s r e ­
g i o n a l o f f i c e in C h i c a g o , 111., A d o l p h O . B e r g e r , D i r e c t o r ;
b y M a r v i n G l i c k , u n d e r th e d i r e c t i o n o f K e n n e t h T h o r s t e n .
T h e s t u d y w a s u n d e r th e g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f W o o d r o w C.
L i n n , A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r f o r W a g e s and I n d u s t r i a l
R elation s.




I n t r o d u c t i o n __________________________________________________________________________
W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s _______________________________

1
4

T a bles:
1.
2.

A.

B.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s and w o r k e r s w i t h i n s c o p e o f s u r v e y and
n u m b e r s t u d i e d ___ _____________________________________________________
I n d e x e s o f s t a n d a r d w e e k l y s a l a r i e s and s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y
e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , and p e r c e n t s o f
c h a n g e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s ___________ ________________________________
O ccu pation al earn ings: *
A - l . O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — e n an d w o m e n ____________________________
m
A - 2 . P r o f e s s i o n a l an d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — e n and w o m e n _
m
A - 3 . O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s —
m e n and w o m e n c o m b i n e d _____________________________________
A - 4 . M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s _____________________
A - 5 . C u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s _____________
E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s : *
B - l . M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s ___
B - 2 . S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l s ___________________________ ______________________
B - 3 . S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ____________________________ _____________
B - 4 . P a i d h o l i d a y s _______________________________________________________
B - 5 . P a i d v a c a t i o n s _ ______________________________ __________________
_
B - 6 . H e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n p l a n s _________________________
B - 7 . H e a l t h i n s u r a n c e b e n e f i t s p r o v i d e d e m p l o y e e s and
t h e i r d e p e n d e n t s . _______________ _________________________________
B - 8 . P r o f i t - s h a r i n g p l a n s ______________________________________________

A pp en d ixes:
A . C h a n g e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s ________________________________
B . O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _______________________________________________

areas.

* N O TE : S im ila r tabu lation s a re
(S ee in s i d e b a c k c o v e r . )

a va ila b le fo r

other

U n io n s c a l e s , i n d i c a t i v e o f p r e v a i l i n g p a y l e v e l s in
t h e S o u th B e n d a r e a , a r e a l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r b u i l d i n g c o n ­
s t r u c t i o n , p r i n t i n g , l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a t i n g e m p l o y e e s , and
m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s .

3

4

5

7

8
9
10

11
12
12
13
14
16
17
18

19
21




Area Wage Survey---The South Bend, Ind., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
r e p o r t e d , a s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e i s t o the w o r k
s c h e d u l e s ( r o u n d e d to th e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a la r ie s a re p a id ; a v e r a g e w eek ly earn ings f o r th ese occu p a tio n s have
b e e n r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h i s a r e a is 1 o f 85 in w h i c h the U. S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B ureau of L a b o r S tatistics co n d u cts s u rv e y s o f o ccu p a tion a l earn ings
and r e l a t e d w a g e b e n e f i t s o n an a r e a w i d e b a s i s .
In th is a r e a , da t a
w e r e o b t a i n e d b y p e r s o n a l v i s i t s o f B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s to r e p r e ­
sen tative e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ithin s ix b r o a d in d u stry d i v i s i o n s :
M anu­
f a c t u r i n g ; t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ;
w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and
serv ices.
M a jo r in du stry g ro u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m th ese stu dies are
g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s and th e c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g f e w e r th an a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e
o m i t t e d b e c a u s e th e y te n d to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the
o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d i e d to w a r r a n t i n c l u s i o n .
S e p a r a t e tabu lation s a re
p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f th e b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h i c h m e e t p u b ­
lica tio n c r it e r ia .

The a v era g es p re se n te d r e fle c t c o m p o site , areaw ide e s t i­
m ates.
I n d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and j o b
s t a f f i n g and , th u s, c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s
f o r m e n a nd w o m e n in any o f the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u l d n o t b e
a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f the s e x e s w it h in
in d ivid u al e s t a b lis h m e n t s . O th er p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w h ich m a y c o n t r i b ­
u te to d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n and w o m e n i n c l u d e : D i f f e r e n c e s in
p r o g r e s s i o n w it h i n e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n l y the a c t u a l r a t e s
p a i d i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; and d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r ­
f o r m e d , a l t h o u g h th e w o r k e r s a r e a p p r o p r i a t e l y c l a s s i f i e d w ith in the
sam e survey jo b d escrip tion .
J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g
e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d than t h o s e
u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .

T h ese su rv ey s a re con du cted on a s a m p le b a sis b e ca u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n o f
l a r g e th an o f s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s t u d i e d . In c o m b i n i n g th e data,
h o w e v e r, all e s ta b lis h m e n ts a r e g iv e n th eir a p p r o p r ia te w eight. E s ­
t i m a t e s b a s e d o n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
as r e l a t i n g to a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w the m i n i m u m s i z e s t u d i e d .
O ccupations

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t th e t o t a l in
a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h i n th e s c o p e o f th e s t u d y and n o t th e n u m b e r
actu a lly s u rv e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , th e e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n l y to i n d i c a t e
th e r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s s t u d i e d .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in
o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e d o n o t m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t th e a c c u r a c y o f the
ea rn in g s data.

and E a r n i n g s

T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s tu d y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s ,
and a r e o f the
follow ing ty p e s:
( l ) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;
(3) m a i n t e n a n c e a nd p o w e r p l a n t ; a nd (4) c u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m ent.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d o n a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to ta k e a c c o u n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d u t i e s w it h in the s a m e j o b .
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu dy
a r e l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in a p p e n d i x B .
E a r n i n g s da t a f o r s o m e o f
the o c c u p a t i o n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s
t a b l e s b e c a u s e e i t h e r ( l ) e m p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n i s t o o s m a l l
to p r o v i d e e n o u g h d a t a to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e is p o s s i ­
bility o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in dividual e s ta b lis h m e n t data.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s
I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d ( in th e B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) o n s e l e c t e d
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s a s t h e y
r e l a t e t o p l a n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s .
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , and
p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s , and f o r c e - a c c o u n t c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s w h o
a r e u t i l i z e d as a s e p a r a t e w o r k f o r c e a r e e x c l u d e d .
"P lan t w o r k e r s "
in clu d e w o r k in g f o r e m e n and all n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s (in clu din g
l e a d m e n a n d t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c t i o n s .
"O ffice w o r k ­
e r s " i n c l u d e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s and n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s p e r ­
f o r m i n g c l e r i c a l o r r e l a t e d f u n c t i o n s . C a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s a nd r o u t e m e n
a r e e x c l u d e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d in n o n m a n u ­
factu rin g in d u stries.

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s d a t a a r e s h o w n f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u l e
in the g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n in g s data e x c lu d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
late s h ifts.
N o n p r o d u c t io n b o n u s e s a r e e x c lu d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
b o n u s e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n c l u d e d .
W h ere w eek ly h ou rs are




1

2

M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s ( t a b l e B - l ) r e l a t e o n l y to th e e s ­
ta b lish m en ts v is ite d .
T h e y a r e p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
w ith f o r m a l m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y p o l i c i e s .
S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l d a t a ( t a b l e B - 2 ) a r e l i m i t e d to p l a n t w o r k e r s
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .
T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n is p r e s e n t e d b o t h in
t e r m s o f ( l ) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , * p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f t o t a l p la n t
1
w o r k e r e m p l o y m e n t , and (2 ) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s o f
w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d o n th e s p e c i f i e d s h i f t at the t i m e o f the
survey.
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , the a m o u n t
a p p l y i n g to a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , if no a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y ,
the c l a s s i f i c a t i o n " o t h e r " w a s u s e d . In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h i c h s o m e
l a t e - s h i f t h o u r s a r e p a i d at n o r m a l r a t e s , a d i f f e r e n t i a l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n l y if it a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y o f th e s h i f t h o u r s .
T h e s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ( t a b l e B - 3 ) o f a m a j o r i t y o f the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in an e s t a b l i s h m e n t a r e t a b u l a t e d as a p p l y i n g to
a ll o f the p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s o f th at e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
Paid h o lid a y s ;
p a i d v a c a t i o n s ; h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , a nd p e n s i o n p l a n s ; and p r o f i t - s h a r i n g
p l a n s ( t a b l e s B - 4 t h r o u g h B - 8 ) a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y o n the b a s i s
that t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e to a l l p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s i f a m a j o r i t y
o f s u c h w o r k e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r m a y e v e n t u a l l y q u a l i f y f o r th e p r a c ­
t i c e s l i s t e d . S u m s o f i n d i v i d u a l i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2 t h r o u g h B - 8 m a y
not eq u a l to ta ls b e c a u s e o f rou n d in g .
D a t a o n p a i d h o l i d a y s ( t a b l e B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d to d a t a o n h o l i ­
d a y s g r a n t e d a n n u a lly o n a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i. e . , ( l ) a r e p r o v i d e d f o r
in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H olidays
o r d i n a r i l y gra n te d a r e in clu d e d e v e n though they m a y fa l l on a n o n ­
w o r k d a y , e v e n if the w o r k e r is n o t g r a n t e d a n o t h e r d a y o f f .
The fir s t
p a r t o f th e p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s the n u m b e r o f w h o l e and h a lf
h olid a ys a ctu a lly granted .
T h e s e c o n d p a r t c o m b i n e s w h o l e and h a lf
h o l i d a y s to s h o w t o t a l h o l i d a y t i m e .
T h e s u m m a r y o f v a c a t i o n p l a n s ( t a b l e B - 5 ) is l i m i t e d to
f o r m a l p o lic ie s , exclu din g in fo r m a l a rra n g e m e n ts w h e re b y tim e off
w it h p a y is g r a n t e d at th e d i s c r e t i o n o f the e m p l o y e r .
E stim ates
e x c l u d e v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s p l a n s and t h o s e w h i c h o f f e r " e x t e n d e d " o r
" s a b b a t i c a l " b e n e f i t s b e y o n d b a s i c p l a n s t o w o r k e r s w ith q u a l i f y i n g
len gth s o f s e r v i c e .
T y p i c a l o f s u c h e x c l u s i o n s a r e p l a n s in the s t e e l ,
a l u m i n u m , and c a n i n d u s t r i e s . S e p a r a t e e s t i m a t e s a r e p r o v i d e d a c ­
c o r d i n g to e m p l o y e r p r a c t i c e in c o m p u t i n g v a c a t i o n p a y m e n t s , s u c h as
ti m e p a y m e n ts , p e r c e n t o f annual e a r n in g s , o r fla t-s u m a m o u n ts . H o w ­
e v e r , in the t a b u l a t i o n s o f v a c a t i o n p a y , p a y m e n t s n o t o n a t i m e b a s i s
w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a t i m e b a s i s ; f o r e x a m p l e , a p a y m e n t o f 2 p e r c e n t
o f a n n u a l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d as the e q u i v a l e n t o f 1 w e e k ' s p a y .
D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n
p l a n s ( t a b l e s B - 6 a nd B - 7 ) f o r w h i c h at l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t is
b o r n e b y th e e m p l o y e r , e x c e p t i n g o n l y l e g a l r e q u i r e m e n t s s u c h as

1
An establishm ent was considered as having a p o lic y if
conditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the tim e o f the survey, or (2 ) had
late shifts. An establishm ent was considered as having form al provisions
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2 ) had provisions in
1a te sh i fts.




w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l s e c u r i t y , and r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t .
Such plans in clu d e th ose u n d e r w r itte n by a c o m m e r c i a l in su ra n c e
c o m p a n y and t h o s e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h a u n i o n fu n d o r p a i d d i r e c t l y b y
th e e m p l o y e r o u t o f c u r r e n t o p e r a t i n g f u n d s o r f r o m a fund s e t a s i d e
f o r th is p u r p o s e .
D e a t h b e n e f i t s a r e i n c l u d e d as a f o r m o f l i f e i n ­
surance.
S e l e c t e d h e a l t h i n s u r a n c e b e n e f i t s p r o v i d e d e m p l o y e e s and
dependents are a lso p resen ted .
S i c k n e s s and a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e is l i m i t e d to th at t y p e o f
in su ra n ce under which p r e d e te r m in e d ca sh paym ents a re m ad e d ir e c tly
to the i n s u r e d o n a w e e k l y o r m o n t h l y b a s i s d u r i n g i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t
disa b ility.
I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s u c h p l a n s to w h i c h th e
e m p lo y e r con trib u tes.
H o w e v e r , in N e w Y o r k a n d N e w J e r s e y , w h i c h
have en acted te m p o r a r y d isa b ility in su ra n ce law s w hich re q u ire e m ­
p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 2 p l a n s a r e i n c l u d e d o n l y if th e e m p l o y e r ( l ) c o n ­
t r i b u t e s m o r e th a n is l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s the e m p l o y e e
w it h b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d the r e q u i r e m e n t s o f the l a w .
T a bu lation s
o f p a i d s i c k l e a v e p l a n s a r e l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s 3 w h i c h p r o v i d e
f u l l p a y o r a p r o p o r t i o n o f th e w o r k e r ' s p a y d u r i n g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k
b eca u se of illn ess.
S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r e s e n t e d a c c o r d i n g to
( l ) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y and n o w a i t i n g p e r i o d , and (2) p l a n s
w h ich p r o v i d e e it h e r p a r t ia l pay o r a w aitin g p e r i o d .
In a d d i t i o n
to th e p r e s e n t a t i o n o f th e p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s w h o a r e p r o v i d e d
s i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r p a i d s i c k l e a v e , an u n d u p l i c a t e d
t o t a l is s h o w n o f w o r k e r s w h o r e c e i v e e i t h e r o r b o t h t y p e s o f b e n e f i t s .
C a t a s t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e , s o m e t i m e s r e f e r r e d to as e x t e n d e d
m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e , i n c l u d e s t h o s e p l a n s w h i c h a r e d e s i g n e d to p r o t e c t
e m p l o y e e s in c a s e o f s i c k n e s s and i n j u r y i n v o l v i n g e x p e n s e s b e y o n d
the n o r m a l c o v e r a g e o f h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , and s u r g i c a l p l a n s .
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p l a n s p r o v i d i n g f o r c o m p l e t e o r p a r t i a l
paym ent of d o cto rs ' fe e s.
Such plan s m a y b e u n d e r w r itt e n by c o m ­
m e r c i a l in s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n i z a t i o n s o r they m a y
be s e lf-in s u r e d .
Tabu la tion s o f r e t ir e m e n t p e n s io n plans a r e lim ite d
t o t h o s e p l a n s th at p r o v i d e m o n t h l y p a y m e n t s f o r th e r e m a i n d e r o f
th e w o r k e r ' s l i f e .
P r o f i t - s h a r i n g p l a n s ( t a b l e B - 8 ) a r e l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s
w ith d e f i n i t e f o r m u l a s f o r c o m p u t i n g p r o f i t s h a r e s to b e d i s t r i b u t e d
a m o n g e m p l o y e e s and w h o s e f o r m u l a s w e r e c o m m u n i c a t e d to e m ­
p l o y e e s in a d v a n c e o f the d e t e r m i n a t i o n o f p r o f i t s . D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d
a c c o r d i n g to p r o v i s i o n s f o r d i s t r i b u t i n g p r o f i t s h a r e s to e m p l o y e e s :
( l ) C u r r e n t o r c a s h d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p r o f i t s h a r e s w it h i n a s h o r t p e r i o d
a f t e r d e t e r m i n a t i o n o f p r o f i t s ; (2) d e f e r r e d d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p r o f i t s h a r e s
a f t e r a s p e c i f i e d n u m b e r o f y e a r s o r at r e t i r e m e n t ; (3) c o m b i n a t i o n
c u r r e n t and d e f e r r e d p l a n s ; a nd (4) e l e c t i v e d i s t r i b u t i o n p l a n s , u n d e r
w h i c h e a c h p a r t i c i p a n t is r e q u i r e d t o s e l e c t w h e t h e r to ta k e h is s h a r e
o f th e c u r r e n t y e a r ' s p r o f i t in c a s h , h a v e it d e f e r r e d , o r p a r t in c a s h
and p a r t d e f e r r e d .

it m et eith er o f the fo llo w in g
2 The tem porary disability laws in C a liforn ia and Rhode Island do not require em p loy er
form al provisions coverin g
contributions.
if it (1 ) had operated late
3 A n establishm ent was considered as having a form al plan if it established at least the
written form fo r operating
m in im um num ber o f days o f sick lea ve ava ila b le to each e m p lo y e e .
Such a plan need not be
w ritten, but inform al sick le a v e a llow an ces, d eterm ined on an individual basis, w ere exclu d ed .

3

T a b le 1.

E sta b lish m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ithin sco p e of su r v e y and n um ber studied in South Bend, Ind., 1 b y m a jo r in d u stry d iv is io n , 2 M a rch 1966
W o r k e r s in esta b lish m en ts

N um ber o f esta b lish m en ts
M inim um
e m p loym en t
in e s t a b lis h ­
m ents in s c o p e
o f study

Industry d iv isio n

W ithin s c o p e o f study
W ithin s c o p e
o f study*

Studied
T o t a l4

Studied

Plant
N um ber

O ffic e

P ercent

T o t a l4

.

81

44, 100

100

28, 800

7, 000

33, 850

79
111

38
43

2 9 ,7 0 0
1 4 ,400

67
33

21, 000
7, 800

3, 500
3, 500

25, 340
8, 510

50
50
50
50
50

M anufacturin g__ _______________________ _______
N onm anufacturing_________________________________
T ra n sp o rta tio n , com m u n ica tio n , and
oth er p u b lic u tilitie s 5 _____________ „ . . .
W h olesale t r a d e _______________ ___________ .
R e ta il tra d e_____ — —
_____ — — __
F in a n ce, in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e _____
S e r v ic e s 8 . .
. . . . . . _____ - ________

190

50
-

A ll d iv is io n s _____________________________________

21
19
39
11
21

12
6
11
6
8

3 ,4 0 0
2, 000
4, 200
3, 000
1, 800

7
5
10
7
4

1,9 0 0
o
( !)
(!)
(6)

500
(‘ )

c>

(!)
(6)

2, 550
840
1,990
2, 280
850

1 The South Bend Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a , as defin ed b y the B ureau of the Budget through M a rch 1965, c o n s is t s o f St. J osep h and M a rsh a ll C ou nties. The " w o r k e r s w ithin
scop e o f study" e s tim a te s show n in this table p r o v id e a re a s o n a b ly a ccu ra te d e s c r ip tio n of the s iz e and c o m p o s itio n o f the la b o r f o r c e in clu d ed in the su rvey.
The estim a te s a r e not intended,
h o w e v e r , to s e r v e as a b a s is of c o m p a r is o n w ith o th e r e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s f o r the a re a to m e a s u r e em p lo ym e n t tren d s o r le v e ls sin c e (1) planning of w age s u rv ey s r e q u ir e s the u se of esta b lish m en t
data c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in advance o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d stu died, and (2) s m a ll e sta b lish m e n ts a r e e x clu d e d fr o m the s c o p e o f the su rvey.
2 The 1957 r e v is e d e d ition o f the Standard In du strial C la s s ific a t io n Manual and the 1963 Supplem ent w e re u sed in c la s s ify in g e sta b lish m en ts b y in d u stry d iv ision .
3 Inclu des all esta b lish m e n ts w ith total em p lo ym e n t at o r above the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A ll ou tlets (within the a rea ) o f c o m p a n ie s in such in d u s tries as tra d e, fin a n ce, auto r e p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ic tu re th ea te rs a re c o n s id e r e d as 1 esta b lish m e n t.
4 Inclu des e x e c u tiv e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and o th er w o r k e r s ex clu d e d fr o m the se p a ra te plant and o ffic e c a t e g o r ie s .
5 T a x ic a b s and s e r v ic e s in cid e n ta l to w ater tra n s p o rta tio n w e r e exclu ded.
6 T h is in d u stry d iv is io n is r e p r e s e n te d in e s tim a te s f o r " a ll in d u s tr ie s " and "n o n m an u factu rin g" in the S e r ie s A ta b le s , and f o r " a ll in d u s t r ie s " in the S e r ie s B ta b le s . S epa ra te p resen ta tion
of data fo r this d iv is io n is not m ade f o r
one o r m o r e o f the fo llo w in g r e a s o n s : (1) E m ploym en t in the d iv is io n is to o s m a ll to p r o v id e enough data to m e r it sep a ra te study, (2) the sam ple w as not
design ed in itia lly to p e r m it se p a ra te p r e s e n ta tio n , (3) r e s p o n s e w as in s u ffic ie n t o r inadequate to p e r m it se p a ra te p re s e n ta tio n , and (4) th ere is p o s s ib ilit y o f d is c lo s u r e o f individ ual esta b lish m en t data.
7 W o r k e r s fr o m this e n tire in d u stry d iv is io n a re r e p r e s e n te d in e stim a te s
fo r " a ll in d u s t r ie s "
and "n on m a n u fa ctu rin g" in the S e r ie s A ta b le s , but fr o m the r e a l estate p o r tio n only in estim a te s
f o r " a ll in d u s t r ie s " in the S e r ie s B ta b le s .
S epa ra te p re s e n ta tio n o f data fo r
this d iv isio n is not
m ade fo r one o r m o r e of the re a s o n s given in footn ote 6 above.
8
and

H o t e ls ;

p e rs o n a l s e r v ic e s ;

a r c h it e c t u r a l

b u s in e s s

s e r v ic e s ;

a u t o m o b ile

r e p a ir

s h o p s ; m o t io n p i c t u r e s ;

n o n p r o f it m e m b e r s h ip

o r g a n iz a t io n s

(e x c lu d in g

r e lig io u s

s e r v ic e s .




%
T w o -th ir d s of the w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f the s u r v e y in the South Bend a r e a w e re
em p lo y e d in m anufacturin g f ir m s .
The fo llo w in g table p r e s e n ts the m a jo r in d u stry gro u p s
and s p e c ific in d u s trie s as a p e r c e n t o f a ll m anufacturin g:
Industry group
T r a n sp o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t_____ 31
M a ch in e ry (e x ce p t e le c t r ic a l) — 20
R u bber and m is c e lla n e o u s
p l a s t i c s ------------------------------------- 18
E le c t r ic a l m a c h in e r y ___________ 6
F o o d p r o d u c ts ___________________ 5

S p e c ific in d u strie s
M is c e lla n e o u s ru bber
p r o d u c t s _______________________
M otor v e h ic le s and equipm ent—
A ir c r a ft and p a r t s ______________
G e n e ra l in d u stria l m a ch in e ry
and equipm ent_________________

17
16
13
12

T h is in fo r m a tio n is b a se d on e s tim a te s o f total em p lo ym e n t d e r iv e d fr o m universe,
m a te r ia ls c o m p ile d p r io r to actual su rv e y .
P r o p o r t io n s in v a rio u s in d u stry d iv is io n s m ay
d iffe r fr o m p r o p o r tio n s b a se d on the r e s u lts o f the s u r v e y as show n in table 1 above.

and

c h a r it a b le

o r g a n iz a t io n s );

a n d e n g in e e rin g

4
Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s a nd p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e in
a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , and
in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .

th e j o b s d u r i n g th e p e r i o d s u r v e y e d in 19 6 1.
T h e s e w eigh ted earn ings
f o r i n d i v i d u a l o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e th e n t o t a l e d t o o b t a i n an a g g r e g a t e f o r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p . F i n a l l y , th e r a t i o ( e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t a g e )
o f the g r o u p a g g r e g a t e f o r th e o n e y e a r t o th e a g g r e g a t e f o r the o t h e r
y e a r w a s c o m p u t e d and the d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n th e r e s u l t and 100 is
th e p e r c e n t a g e o f c h a n g e f r o m th e o n e p e r i o d t o th e o t h e r .
The
i n d e x e s w e r e c o m p u t e d b y m u l t i p l y i n g th e r a t i o s f o r e a c h g r o u p
a g g r e g a t e f o r e a c h p e r i o d a f t e r th e b a s e y e a r ( 1 9 6 1 ) .

F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the p e r ­
c e n ta g e s of ch a n ge r e la t e to a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r n o r m a l h o u r s
o f w o r k , that i s , th e s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e f o r w h i c h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s a r e paid.
F o r plan t w o r k e r g r o u p s , they m e a s u r e ch a n g e s
in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g p r e m i u m p a y f o r
o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and l a t e s h i f t s .
The
p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d o n d a t a f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s a nd i n ­
c l u d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w i t h i n e a c h g r o u p .
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m e n and w om en ):
B ook k ee p in g -m a ch in e operators, class B
Clerks, a cco u n tin g, classes A and B
Clerks, f ile , classes A , B, and C
Clerks, order
C leiks, payroll
C om p tom e te r operators
K eypunch operators, classes A and B
O ffic e boys and girls
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Sw itchboard operators, classes A and B
T a b u la tin g -m a ch in e operators, class B
Typists, classes A and B

T h e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e m e a s u r e , p r i n c i p a l l y ,
th e e f f e c t s o f (1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and w a g e c h a n g e s ; ( 2 ) m e r i t o r o t h e r
i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b ;
and (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e w a g e s du e t o c h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e r e ­
s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and
c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h
d ifferen t pay le v e ls.
C h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s
o r d e c r e a s e s in th e o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w i t h o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
F o r e x a m p l e , a f o r c e e x p a n s i o n m i g h t i n c r e a s e th e p r o p o r t i o n o f l o w e r
p a i d w o r k e r s in a s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t i o n and l o w e r th e a v e r a g e , w h e r e a s
a r e d u c t i o n in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f l o w e r p a i d w o r k e r s w o u l d h a v e the
o p p o s i t e e f f e c t . S i m i l a r l y , th e m o v e m e n t o f a h i g h - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t out o f an a r e a c o u l d c a u s e th e a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s to d r o p , e v e n
t h o u g h n o c h a n g e in r a t e s o c c u r r e d in o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the a r e a .
D a ta a r e a d j u s t e d w h e r e n e c e s s a r y t o r e m o v e f r o m th e i n d e x e s and
p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d b y c h a n g e s in
s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .

Industrial nurses (m e n and w om en ):
Nurses, industrial (registered)
S killed m aintenance (m en ):
Carpenters
E lectricians
M achinists
M echanics
M echanics (a u to m o tiv e )
Painters
Pipefitters
T o o l and die makers
U nskilled plant (m en ):
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, m aterial handling

NOTE: Secretaries, in clu d ed in the list o f job s in all previous years,
ex c lu d e d because o f a change in the descrip tion this year.

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s th e e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in the da ta .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e r e f l e c t o n l y c h a n g e s in
average pay fo r stra ig h t-tim e h ours.
T h e y a r e not in flu e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
for overtim e.

are

A v e r a g e w e e k ly s a la r ie s o r a v e ra g e h o u rly ea rn in gs w e r e
c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h o f th e s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s .
The a v e r a g e s a la r ie s
o r h o u r l y e a r n i n g s w e r e th e n m u l t i p l i e d b y e m p l o y m e n t in e a c h o f
T a b le 2.

Indexes o f standard w e ek ly salaries and straigh t-tim e hourly earnings for s e le cte d o c c u p a tio n a l groups in South Bend, I n d .,
M arch 1966 and M arch 1965, and percents o f change 1 for s e le cte d periods
Indexes
(M arch 1961=100)

Percents o f change 1

Industry and o c c u p a tio n a l group

M arch 1965
to
M arch 1966

M arch 1966

M arch 1965

A ll industries:
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m e n and w o m e n ) --------Industrial nurses (m e n and w o m e n ) ------S k ille d m ain ten an ce (m e n )--------------------U nskilled plant ( m e n ) ----------------------------

1 1 1 .5
1 1 3 .2
1 1 0 .8
1 0 7 .4

1 0 9 .0
111. 1
107. 7
1 0 7 .2

2 .3
1 .9
2 .8
.2

M anufacturing:
O ffic e c le r ic a l (m e n and w o m e n ) --------Industrial nurses (m e n and w o m e n ) ------S k ille d m aintenance (m e n )--------------------U nskilled plant ( m e n ) ----------------------------

1 1 2 .4
113. 1
1 1 0 .4
107. 2

108.
110.
107.
107.

3 .4
2 .4
3. 2




7
5
1
3

2-.2

M arch 1964
to
M arch 1965

M arch 1963
to
M arch 1964

M arch 1962
to
M arch 1963

M arch 1961
to
M arch 1962

2 .3
4 .7
3 .3
2 .6

2 .8
2 .7
2 .9
1 .8

4 .1
4 .2
3. 1
2 .2

3. 3
3. 2
2 .9
2 .9

1. 1
4. 5
. 5

2 .8
2-1 .0

2- . 6

1 .2

2. 5
2. 5
2. 5
3 .8

.8
3 .9
. 1
2- 2

1. 5
Z- . 5
1 .4
1 .5

2. 1
2. 5
2. 3
3 .7

1.3

A l l changes are increases unless otherwise in dica ted .
decrease la r g e ly re fle cts changes in em p lo ym e n t am ong establishm ents w ith d iffe re n t pay le v e ls rather than w age decreases.

2 This

A p ril 1960
to
M arch 1961

5
A. Occupational Earnings
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u s tr y d iv is io n , South B en d , Ind. , M a r c h 1966)
W eekly earnings1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
( standard)

$
M ean 2

M edian 2

Middle range 2

1
45

and
u nder

Number o f w ork ers re ce ivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—

50
-

i 55 $ 60 $ 65 $ 70 $ 75 $ 80 i 85 i
-

50

55

-

-

60

65

-

-

-

-

75

70

80

85

90

95

I

95

i100 $ t110 $ i120 s125 i130 $135 i140 i 145
105
115

-

90

-

100

105

-

110

115

-

120

125

-

130

135

-

140

145

and
over

MEN
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

82
AC
42

$
4 0 .0 1 1 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 3 .0 0
4 0 .5 1 0 2 .0 0

CLERKS,

8 6 .5 0

$
$
$
1 1 8 .5 0 1 0 0 .0 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
1 2 8 .5 0 1 1 8 .0 0 -1 4 1 .0 0
8 5 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0

-

-

-

1

2

5

i

4

6

6

9

-

i

-

-

-

1

z

5

3

4

5

2
4

4

-

-

3

4

1

2

5

4

i

4

i

1

7

2

-

i

5

1

-

_

1

25

4 0 .0

8 8 .0 0

7 4 .5 0 - 9 7 .5 0

20
17

4 0 .0 1 0 9 .0 0 1 0 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 1 0 .5 0 1 1 5 .0 0

9 8 .0 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0
9 8 .5 0 - 1 1 9 .5 0

OFFICE BOYS -------------------------------------------------

24

4 0 .0

6 5 .5 0

5 8 .0 0 - 6 5 .0 0

MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

27
21

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 2 0 .5 0 1 1 8 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0

TAEULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

40
18

4 0 .0 1 1 2 .5 0 1 1 3 .0 0 1 0 5 .0 0 -1 2 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 1 3 .0 0 1 1 2 .5 0 1 0 4 .5 0 - 1 2 6 .0 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
M A CH IN E ! -----------------------------------------------------

22

4 0 .0

7 7 .0 0

7 4 .5 0

6 9 .0 0 - 7 9 .5 0

-

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------------------

36
16

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

8 1 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

8 2 .5 0
9 4 .5 0

6 6 .0 0 - 9 4 .5 0
8 9 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0

_

_

_

8

7

2

_

~

”

“

”

“

”

”

1

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

115
21
94

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 8 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
6 5 .0 0

6 7 .5 0
8 0 .0 0
6 4 .5 0

6 0 . 5 0 - 7 4 .5 0
7 6 . 5 0 - 8 4 .5 0
5 9 .5 0 - 7 1 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

85
24
61

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

~

-

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

257
82

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

7 4 .0 0
7 9 .0 0

7 3 .5 0
8 0 .5 0

6 6 . 0 0 - 8 1 .0 0
7 3 .0 0 - 8 6 .5 0

_

4

CLERKS, FIL E, CLASS B ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 4----------------------------

124
110
31

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 6 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
7 1 .5 0

6 5 .0 0
6 4 .0 0
6 9 .0 0

6 0 . 0 0 - 7 0 .0 0
5 9 .5 0 - 6 9 .0 0
6 6 .0 0 - 8 0 .0 0

_

-

-

-

1C

2

9

i

l

~

-

8

5

5

6
6

2

3
3

37

7

3

“

“

-

-

2
2

5
5

-

1

2

_

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

13
9

1

2

1
1

1

3

2
2

1

i

l

4

1

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

.

_

~

~

“

“

~

5

1 1 5 .5 0 -1 2 7 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0

-

12

5
3

5

ACCOUNTING, CLASS B --------------

CLERKS, PA YROLL----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

6 4 .5 0

8

6

-

2

7

TAeULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

4

_

4

7

6

4

3

3

3

2

-

2
2

4

-

-

_

1
1

g
5

W
OMEN

8 9 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
7 8 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0 1 0 6 .5 0 1 C 2 .0 0 -1 1 4 .0 0
8 3 .0 0
8 1 .5 0
7 6 .0 0 - 8 7 .5 0

6

6

2

24
-

24
-

16
-

23

15

3

“

2

24

24

16

20

3
7

_

-

-

_

-

13

13

-

2
2

37

6

47
4

30
29

30

32
31
13

4 0 .0

5 5 .0 0

5 5 .0 0

5 2 .5 0 - 5 7 .5 0

-

7 0 .0 0
8 3 .0 0

6 9 .0 0
8 2 .5 0

6 1 . CO- 7 9 .0 0
7 7 . 5 0 - 9 2 .5 0

_

CLERKS, PAYR OLL ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------------------

103
90

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 1 .5 0
9 2 .0 0

9 1 .5 0
9 1 .0 0

8 0 .C 0 -1 0 2 .5 0
8 2 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .5 0

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

88
32

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

8 7 .0 0
9 3 .5 0

8 7 .0 0
9 3 .0 0

8 1 .0 0 - 9 2 .5 0
8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0

-

29

6

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

-

-

3

4
4

4
4

2

1

i

i

4
4

6
6

2

1

_

_

i

i
i

_

i

-

-

-

-

1

18

5

5

5

6

13

3

a

1
1

2

-

5

2

10
6

13

18

5

)
4

40

34
19

15

8

13

47
14

10

10

-

7

5
5

-

4
4

-

_

.

1

-

-

6

_

_

5

-

-

"

1

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

12

2
2

5
5

M

i

c

8

i

5
5

3
-

-

-

_

6

12

3

9
7

-

_

1
1

-

i

18

10

13

18

9

: ?

23

16

6

9

4

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

_

i

2

.
-

7

33

6
2

8

8

6

5

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

7

i

9

7

-

_

-

-

-

4

-

"

-

13
13

3

47
17




1

-

63

See footn otes at end o f table.

3

_

CLASS C ----------------------------

FIL E,

2

-

CLERKS, O RD ER --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------------------

CLERKS,

-

3

3

9

6

5
5

_

6
-

14

15

2

1

2

8

i

6

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
Table A -l.

Office Occupations—Men and W om e n — Continued

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u s tr y d iv is io n , South B en d , Ind. , M a r c h 1966)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a rn i n g s o f—

$

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

s

$
45

75

$ 80 i

85

90

75

80

85

90

95

10 0

10 5

110

32
13
19

22

6

-

-

-

4

4
4

-

i
4

3
3

4

18
4

12
11
1

5

3
16

6

3

_

3
3

2

3

18
-

25
-

29
4

36
7

54
7

32

54
35

36

41

45
30

31
25

25

29

47

24

19
3

15

32
9

35
30

20

21

18

5

15

6

6
1

$

*

W
OMEN -

Median 2

M ean 2

CONTINUED

142
61
81

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$
7 4 .0 0
8 0 .5 0
6 9 .0 0

$
7 2 .5 0
7 8 .5 0

68.00

$
6 5 .0 0 7 3. 5 0 6 1 .0 0 —

OFFICE G I R L S ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

26
17

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 9 .5 0
6 3 .5 0

6 9 .0 0
6 5 .0 0

SECRETAR IES5 6 ---------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------NGNMANUFACTUR I N G --------------PUBLIC UT IL IT IE S 4 ----------

499
244
255
17

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A6 -------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

38

20
la

SECRETARIES, CLASS B6--------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------NGNMANUFACTUR I N G ---------------

110
41
69

SECRETAR IES, CLASS C6 -------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------SECRETAR IES, CLASS D6--------MANUFACTUR I N G ----------------------

2 05

98
36

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

88.00 88.00

8 0 .0 0 - 9 6 .0 0
8 1 . 0 0 - 9 7 .5 0

247
42
205

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

6 4 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
6 3 .0 0

5 8 . 5C- 6 9 .5 0
6 4 .5 0 - 7 4 .0 0
5 7 . 5C- 6 8 . CC

t o t a lin g

th e

sh o w n .

W o r k e r s w e r e d is t r ib u t e d a s f o llo w s :
3 a t $ 145
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d o t h e r p u b lic




o th e r

th a n

th o se
has

p re s e n te d

been

4

8

4

12
2
10

8

-

-

6

3
5

8
2
6

4

5

5

15

13

6

r e v is e d

The

to $ 15 0;
u t ilit ie s .

of

m id d le
2

at

-

2 6
“
*
10 12
3
10 9
"
1 7

t h e ir

a ll

$ 150

to

is

2
2
6

-

th e

la s t

su rv e y

in

th is

2
2

5

-

7

145

140

145

over

10
10

5
5

6
6

3
3

2
2

3
3

7
7

1
1

4
4

5
4

10
7

3

15
4

5

7

13

20

22

7

1

5

11

17

19

6

28
27

19
15

21
21

14
14

12
8

4
4

1
1

2

7

4

_

_

_

_
-

31
15
16

26
15

29

1 1

11

3

6

2

-

3

-

12
10
2
2

15

18

14
\i

4

6
6

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

15
3

17

15
9

19

10

17
13

18
18

10
10

11
6

_

9

14
33

_

15

15
14

-

-

_

2

3

3

3

2

2
2

1
1

_

2

2
2

_

2

i
i

_

i

2
2

-

-

-

3
3

2
2

2
2

2
1

2

15

5
i
4

4

4

3

_

_

2
2

2
2

_

i
3

-

-

-

i
i

-

2

1
1

-

10
10

13
13

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

57

22

56

9

1
by

8
2

10

4

2

3

4

u

20

17

16

15

43
15

4

4

10

56
9

3

46

47

28

1

2
2

1
1

and

num ber

2

ra te s

of

p ay;

2

at

$ 155

to

$ 160.

a p p e n d ix

A .

of

th e

e a r n in g s

w o rk e rs.

a fo u rth

of

th e

m e d ia n

w o rk e rs

-

3
3

i

_

3
l

1

1C

4
4

_

i

10

3

-

c o rre s p o n d

The

8
7

i

3

3

8

by

See

~

4

s a la r ie s

th e

-

5
5

-

1

s t r a ig h t - t im e

-

9
13

3

-

4
i

22

16

2

1C
3

7

i

5

56

d iv id in g

2

10

-

”

2

_
_

38
24
14

1

-

*

_

i

3
3
_

-

_

16

-

a re a .

2

2

28
5

-

and

5
3

17
7

_

and

5

6

u

18
4

-

3
3

d e f in e d

$ 155;

8

13

s e p a r a t e ly .
s in c e

140

u
10
l
1

1
2

-

1
1

r e g u la r

w o rk e rs

ra n g e

i

135

135

3

7

-

-

-

68

re c e iv e

e a r n in g s

-

4
3

TYP ISTS, CLASS A -----------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------

o c c u p a t io n

6

_

6 3 . 0C - 7 8 . 0C
6 6 . 0 0 - 8 7 .5 0

th is

7
7

“

6 9 .0 0
7 6 . 50

w o rk e rs

5
5

2
2

-

-

7 1 .5 0
7 6 .5 0

fo r

3

“

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

in c lu d e

3

“

66
21

M ay

i

-

TRANSCRI8ING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ----------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------

D e s c r ip t io n

1

“

. 0C - 6 4 .0 0
6 8 .5 0 - 9 1 .0 0
6 8 .0 0 - 8 3 . 0C

3
4
5
6

2

_

7 2 .5 0
7 3 .0 0
7 2 .5 0

ra te

1

2
1

3

“

-

7 4 .5 0
7 6 .5 0
7 3 .5 0

by

i

“

i
?

3

2

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

e m p lo y e e s

$

t

130

14

3
-

-

62
25
37

th e

6

7 6 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIGNISTSMANUFACTURING--------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

jo b

3

~

6 4 . 0 0 - 8 7 .5 0
6 3 . 0 0 - 8 6 .0 0

6 4 .0 0
7 0 .0 0
6 2 .5 0

$

130

-

2

_

7 5 .0 0
7 1 .0 0

th a n

3

4

-

7 4 .0 0
7 2 .5 0

each

1

3

-

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

le s s

-

2

-

23
13

fo r

1

1

66

SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS, CLASS B6-------NGNMANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------

r e c e iv e

“

-

_

81 .5 0 - 1 0 2 .5 0
8 2 .5 0 - 1 0 5 .0 0

c o m p u te d

3

-

“

9 0 .0 0
9 2 .5 0

h a lf

1

-

_

9 0 .5 0
9 2 .5 0

is

“

2

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

sho w n;

“

i

6 9 . 0 0 - 8 7 .0 0
7 0 . 0 0 - 8 9 . CO
. 5 0 - 8 4 .0 0
7 1 .0 0 -1 0 2 .0 0

15
15

m ean

_

102.00 102.00
7 7 . OC
7 9 .5 0
7 4 .0 0
9 5 .0 0

8

125

-

-

8 1 . 5 0 - 1 0 5 . 0C
9 6 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0

7 8 .5 0
8 0 .5 0
7 6 .0 0

2

120

_

_

9 4 .0 0

i
3

115

_

i

8 6 .5 0

$1 00 t 105 $110 $115 $1 2 0 $125

95

-

-

8 6 .5 0

i

25
3

1 0 4 .0 0 1 0 8 .0 0
8 7 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .5 0
1 1 8 .5 0 1 1 9 .0 0 1 1 3 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .0 0

112

The

8

-

SWITCHBOARC OPERATORS, CLASS A6-------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------------------

th a n th e r a t e
h ig h e r r a t e .

2

-

“

88.00

i

i
-

-

9 3 .0 0

5

s
-

_

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

w h ic h

-

-

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

fo r

i

18

-

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

w o rk w e e k

3
3

2
2
6
6

_

9 0 .5 0
9 6 .5 0

th e

19

i

and

-

8 9 .5 0
9 6 .0 0

r e f le c t

1
14

70

~

102.00

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

h o u rs

2
16

15

-

i

7C

-

1 0 3 .0 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 1 .5 0 1 2 6 .5 0 1 0 8 .5 0 -1 3 7 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
7 8 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
9 0 .5 0

169

S ta n d a rd

65

-

4 0 .0 1 1 5 .0 0 1 1 7 .0 0 1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 2 5 .0 0 1 2 2 .5 0 1 1 0 .5 0 - 1 3 9 .5 0
9 4 .5 0 - 1 2 2 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 0 4 .5 0 1 1 2 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, S E N IO R ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

1
2

60

“

100

112
201
110

TYP ISTS, CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING--------NONMANUFACTURING -

55

-

8 5 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0
.0 0 - 1 2 2 .0 0
7 7 . 0 0 - 9 8 .5 0
3 6 .0 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

91
25

65

-

$
8 0 .0 0
84. 50
7 3 .5 0

146
71

STENOGRAPHERS, GFNERAL-------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 4 -----------

60

-

5 9 .0 0 - 8 4 .0 0
5 4 . 0C - 6 9 .5 0

9 9 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
9 9 . 50
9 8 .5 0

55

and
under

Middle range 2

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING---------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------

100.00
112.00
8 8 .5 0

50

50

Sex, oc c u p a t io n , and in du st r y d i v is i o n

3
to

th e s e

w e e k ly

d e s ig n a t e s

e a r n le s s

th a n

h o u rs,

p o s it io n — h a lf

th e

lo w e r

of

of

th e se

th e

e m p lo y e e s

ra te s

and a

su rv e y e d

fo u rth

e a rn

r e c e iv e
m o re

m o re

th a n

th e

7
Table A -2.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and W om en

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t im e w e e k l y ho ur s and e a rn in gs f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stud ied on an a r e a b a s i s
b y in du st r y di v is i on , South Bend, Ind. , M a r c h 1966)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Sex, oc c u p a t io n , and in du st r y d i v is i o n

Number
of
woikers

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g str aig ht - t i m e w e e k l y ea rn in gs o f—
$

s

weekly
hours1
( standard)

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

80

85

90

$
95

ICO

105

110

115

A
120

90

95

1 00

105

110

115

1 20

s

*

$

i

!

(

%

t

%

S

S

$

S

1

s

s

B0

125

130

135

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

125

130

135

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

2 10

220

4
4

Under
$

2
2

8
8

8
8

8
8

64
20

35
19

13
1

4
-

5
5

3
3

7
7

7
7

6

3

_

and
und er
85

MEN
DRAFTSMEN, CLASS
MANUFACTUR 1NG

168
92

40.0
40.0

$
1 52.50
155.00

$
145.00
1 45.00

$
$
1 4 1 .00 -1 59 .50
1 36.00-164.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS 8 3---------------------------------M ANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

154
91

40.0
40.0

131.50
137.50

124.00
128.00

1 18 .00 -1 45 .50
1 18 .00 -1 62 .00

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C3---------------------------------M ANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

101
61

40.0
40.0

106.00
117.50

101.50
110.00

8 9 .0 0-11 8.0 0
1 00 .00 -1 43 .00

10

22
21

4 0.0
4 0 .0

107.50
108.00

115.00
115.50

101 .00 -1 18 .00
1 0 0 .50 -1 18 .00

2

_

7
3

-

10
2

2
2

2
2

10
2

16
8

14
14

41
13

9
7

15
2

5
5

5
5

<
>

15
11

8
8

3
3

1
1

1

-

8
4

8
4

24
12

4
4

3
3

4
4

_

3

2
2

1
1

6
6

6
6

4
4

1

_

_

_

_

4
4

i
i

5
4

1
1

WOMEN
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (R EGISTER ED ) —
MANUFACTURING---------------------------------------

i
i

u
u

Standard h o ur s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e th eir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t im e s a l a r i e s and the e a rn in gs c o r r e s p o n d to t h e se w e e k l y ho u r s .
F o r def in it ion o f t e r m s , s e e fo ot not e 2, t a bl e A - l .
D e s c r i p t i o n f o r this o c c u p a t io n has b e e n r e v i s e d s i n ce the la s t s u r v e y in this a r e a .
See appe nd ix A.




1

Table A -3.

Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and W om en Combined

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a r n in g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s t r y d iv is io n , South B en d , Ind. , M a r c h 1966)
Average

O c c u p a t io n and in d u st r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

BOCKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------

36
16

O

O

22

4 0.0
40.0

Number
of
workers

Weekly
[standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

$
6 7 .5 0

OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------

50
19

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

500
244

4 0 .0

S I . 50
96.50

SECRETARIES3 4 ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 2 -----------------------

4 0 .0

2 56

4 0 .0

11 2.00
8 9 .0 0

18

4 0 .0

102.50

39
20

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

116.00

19

4 0 .0

4C.0
4 0.0
40.0

68.00
81.00
65.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS A4 -------------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------------

103

40.0
4 0.0
4 0.0

102.00
119.50
90.5 C

SECRETARIES, CLASS B4 -------------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------------NONMANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B
MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------NONMANUFACTUR ING:
PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S 1 3
2 -----------

28?
93

40.0
4 0.0

75.00
80.00

16
125

31

40.0
39 . 5
40.0
4 0.0

66.50
75.00
65.00
71.50

63

40.0

97
28

7 6 .5 0

-

Number
of
workers

Weekly

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

CONTINUED

T ABUL AT ING—
MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------------------

32
24

4 0.0
40.0

120.50
120.50

TAEULATING-MACFINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

53
28

4 0.0
40.0

109.50
108.50

TRANSCRIB ING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL-------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------------------

66
21

40.0
40.0

71.50
76.50

TYP IS TS, CLASS A --------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------------------

98
86

40.0
40.0

86.50
88.0 0

TYP IS TS, CLASS B --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

247
42
2 05

40.0
40.0
40.0

64.00
69.00
63.00

ORAFTSMEN, CLASS A4 ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

168
92

40.0
40.0

152.50
155.00

ORAFTSMEN, CLASS B4 ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

155
92

40.0
40.0

1 32.00
137.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C4 ---------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------------------

103
63

40.0
40.0

106.00
117.50

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL ( R E G I S T E R E D ) -----MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

22

1 0 0.00

83.50

CLERKS, FIL E, CLASS 3
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTUR ING —
PUBLIC U T I L IT I ES 2

O c c u p a t io n and in d u st r y d i v i s i o n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

CONTINUED

$
77.00

o
o
>•
*

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B --------------------------------------------.MANUFACTURING---------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING ---------------------

O c c u p a t io n and in d u st r y d i v i s i o n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ------------------------------------------------------

Average

Average

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)
Weekly

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ---------------------NCNMANUFACTUR I N G ---------------

115

21
94

167

no

125.00
1 0 7.00
1 0 3.00

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

65

4 0 .0

1 2 1.50
9 1 .5 0

SECRETAR IE S, CLASS C4 -------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ----------------------------------

146

4 0 .0

104.00

71

4 0 .0

118.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS D4 ------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------------------

2 05
112

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 3 .0 0
102.00

201
110

55.00

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBL IC UT IL ITI ES2 ----------------------------

4
4
4
4

40.0
4 0.0

95.00
96.00

STENOGRAPHERS, S E N I O R ---------------------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------------------

169
112

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

8 9 .5 0
9 6 .0 0

123
107
16

40.0
4 0.0
40.0

94.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A4 -------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

19
15

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 0 .5 0
9 2 .5 0

4 0.0
40.0

87.00
93.5 0

23
18

7 4 .0 0

39
32

SWITCFBOARC OPERATORS, CLASS B4 -------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

3 9 .5

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTUR I N G ----------------------

39 .5

7 2 .5 0

142
61

40.0
40.0
4 0.0

74.00
80.50
69.00

SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSM ANUFACTUR I N G --------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

62
25
37

4 0 .0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTUR ING

4 0 .0

7 ^ .5 0
7 6 .5 0

4 0 .0

7 3 .5 0

CLERKS,

FILE ,

CLASS C

CLERKS, ORDER ----MANUFACTUR ING
CLERKS, PA YR OL L ----------MANUFACTUR I N G --------NONMANUFACTUR ING -

11C
15

81

o
o

41

64

91

25

0
0
0
0

.0
.0
.0
.0

7
8
7
8

8
0
6
8

.5
.5
.0
.0

0
0
0
0

89.50

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

1 Standard h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t he ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s and the e a rn in gs c o r r e s p o n d to t h e se w e e k l y ho u r s .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r pu bl ic utili ti es.
3 M a y in clu de w o r k e r s o t h e r than t h o s e p r e s e n t e d s ep ar at el y.
4 D e s c r i p t i o n f o r this o c c u p a t io n has b e e n r e v i s e d si n ce the la st s u r v e y in this a r e a .
See a pp en dix A.




21

40.0 107.50
4 0 . C 1C8.00

Table A -4.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u r ly e a rn in g s fo r m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s tr y d i v is i o n . South B en d , I n d ., M a rc h 1966)
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y ea r n i n g s of—

Hourly earnings 1

2 .5 0 2 .6 0
Under
t
and
2 . 5 0 under

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE----------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

3.4 5
3.4 5

3 .1 8 3 .1 9 -

3 .6 3
3 .6 2

3 .1 0

3 .2 0 3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3.7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

2 .8 0

2 .9 C

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .3 0 3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0 4 .0 0

over

2 .7 0

3 .0 6
3.0 7

3 .1 5
3.1 4

2 .7 0 2 .6 9 ?.1 2 3 .1 2 -

20

3 .4 0
3 .3 5

3.1 7
3 .1 7

20

3 .3 3
3.3 3

22

22

12
12

3.24

3 .2 6
3 .2 3
3.2 3

3 .5 1
3.1 9
3 .5 2
3.5 2

2 .7 5 - 3 .5 7
2 .9 3 - 3.6 4
2 .5 8 - 3.5 6
2 .5 8 - 3.5 6

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E -------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------

167
.167

3 .2 1
3 .2 1

3 .3 1
3 .3 1

3 .0 1 3 .0 1 -

3 .3 7
3 .3 7

3

-

3

3

“

3

M I L L W F 1 G H T S ---------------------------------------------------------------

3 .4 1
3 .4 1

3 .3 8
3 .3 8

3 .1 7 -

3 .6 5

_

_

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------

153
158

3 .1 7 -

3 .6 5

O I L E R S ----------------------------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------

37
37

2 .9 3
2 .9 3

2 .9 5
2 .9 5

2 .9 1 2 .9 1 -

2 .3 9
2 .9 9

_

4
4

1
2
2

3 .5 1
3 .5 1

3 .5 6
3 .5 6

3 .5 1 -

3 .3 2

-

3 .5 1 -

3 .8 2

3 .6 3

3 .6 7
0 .6 7

_

5 .9 3
3 .9 3

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

“

M A NU FA CTU RIN G

-------------------------------------------------

22
22

P I P F F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------

I 08
108

3 .5 6
3 .5 5

3 .6 3

3 .3 2 3 .3 2 -

T OO L AND D I E M A K E R S ----------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------------------

139
189

3 .6 3
3 .6 3

3 .6 6
3 .6 6

3 .4 7 3 .4 7 -

E x cl u d e s p r e m i u m pay f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
F o r d e f in it io n o f t e r m s , s e e foo tn o te 2, ta ble A - l .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r pu blic ut ilities.




-

13
13

3
3

1
1

173
51
12?
119

M A I N T E N A N C E -----------------------------------

4
4

4
4

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE)-----------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------NONMANUFACTURING-----PUBLIC UT I L IT I E S 3-

P A INTERS,

3 .1 0

3 . 5 4 - 3.6 6
3 .5 5 - 3 .6 6

3.1 9
3.1 9

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING-------------

2 .9 C 3 .0 0

3.6 4
3 .6 4

3 .4 1
3.4 1

3 .5 6
57
51

2 .8 0

3 .5 6
3 .5 5

3.64

177
176

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ---------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER
MANUFACTURING--------------------

3 .3 1 3 .3 1 -

3 . 39

J .3 9

2 .7 C

2 .6 0

O cc u p a t io n and in d u st r y d i v is i o n

3
3

2
?

22
22

1
1

4
4
11

11

14
10

2
2
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

_

-

_

4

-

-

-

4

_

_

_

_

39

9
9

3
3

3

-

li

4

7
4

5
-

72
-

-

11
-

1

-

3
-

-

39
39

3

3

72

20
20
-

-

-

5
5

72

-

-

i

-

_

-

-

-

_

-

3
3

_

_

and late shifts.

-

-

3

24
24

-

72
72

-

12
12

45
45

_

34
34

_

-

72

-

72

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

5

26
26

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
5

-

_

i
i

4
4

_

-

10
10

i
i

2
2
2
2

-

“

-

h o l id a y s ,

3C
30

“

-

“
_

2
2

-

5

-

-

10
1C

2
2
22
22
_
-

-

1 12
1 12
11
11

3
3

~

12
12

_

_

63

_

-

63
oO
60

28
28

2
2

-

_
-

6
6

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

70
70

8
8

_
-

10
Table A -5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations

(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u r ly e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a t io n s stu d ied on an a r e a b a s is
b y in d u s tr y d iv is io n , South B end, Ind. , M a r c h 1966)
Hourly ea *nings2

O c c u p a t i o n 1 and in du st r y di v is i o n

Number
of
woricers

M ean3

M edian5

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g st r a i g h t - t im e h ou r ly e a rn in gs o f—

$. 9 0 $1 . 0 0 $1 . 1 0$ 1 . 2 0 1 . 3$0 1 . $0 1 $5 0
$
4
.

Middle range3

172
163

$
2.71
2.7 6

$
2.7 3
2 .7 7

$
2 .6 2 2 .6 3 -

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2.3 0

2 .4 0

* $2 . 6 0 $2 . 8 0* 3 . 0 0 3 . 2$0 3 . 4 0 3 .*6 0
*
$

3.8 0

1 . 7C 1 . 8 C 1 . 9 0 2 . 0 0

2 .1 0

2.2 0

2.3 0

2.4 0

2 .6 0

4 .0 0

4
4

4
4

1 .8 0

i

$

1.1 0

1.2 0

1.3 0

1 .4 0

1 .5 0

1.6 0

$
3 .0 6
3 .0 6

GUARDS:
MANUFACTUR I N G ---------

2 .0 0

i

1 .7 0

s

i

t

and
under
1 .0 0

GUAROS AND WATCHMEN MANUFACTURING--------

1.9 0

t
1 .6 0

4
4

3
4

6
2

-

5
5

l

129

2 .8 9

3.0 2

2 .6 8 -

3 .0 8

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

34

2.2 4

2 .3 1

1 .9 4 -

2 .6 3

-

JANITORS, PORTERS. AND CLEANERS -----MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

349
241
) 08

1 .7 3

2.3 1
2.5 3
1 .7 0

1 .8 0 2 .2 3 1 .4 3 -

2 .6 5
2 .3 1
2.0 8

4
- '
4

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING-------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------------

435
310
12 5

2 .7 0
2.6 4
2.8 5

2.66
2.9 6

2 .4 6 2 .4 8 2 .4 4 -

2 .8 7
2.3 2
3.35

ORDER
F I L L E R S ------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

356
149
2 07

2.8 5
3 .0 5
2.7 0

?.b l
2.8 1
2.8 1

2 . 7 4 - 2.8 7
2 .7 5 - 2.8 9
2 .7 3 - 2 .8 6

PACKERS, S H I P P I N G -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

22 6
i

? 64
21 2.•62

2 .7 0
? .6 3

2 .3 5 2 .3 5 -

2.9 3
2.91

RECEIVING C L E R K S -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

67
40
27

2.7 1
2.7 6
2 .6 2

2.7 3
2 .8 9
2.5 9

2 .5 5 2 .6 3 2 .5 3 -

2.9 2
2 .9 6
2 .7 6

SHIPPING CL E R K S ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

33
25

2 .6 7
2 .7 1

2 .6 9
2.6 9

2 .2 6 2 .3 3 -

3.0 6
3.0 6

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING C L E R K S ----------

IS

2.9 7

3.0 2

2 .6 9 -

3.2 5

-

-

-

-

-

-

TRUCKDR IVERS4 --------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------------PUBLIC UT IL IT IE S 5----------------------------

397
96
2 99
134

3.0 3
2.7 2
3 .1 3
3.3 9

3.0 8
2.7 8
?.41
3 .4 5

2 . 7 9 - 3.4 4
2 . 5 3 - 3 .0 1
2 . 8 5 - 3 .4 6
3 . 4 2 - 3.4 7

-

-

-

-

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) -------------------------------------------

40

2.6 9

2 .5 0

2 .4 1 -

3.4 2

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) --------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

85
32
53

2 .7 4
2 .6 4
2 .7 9

2.7 8
2 .7 5
2.8 3

2 .4 7 2 .4 4 2 .4 8 -

2.9 4
2.3 2
3.14

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAIL EP T Y P E ) -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

36
24

2 .6 7
2.5 6

2.7 0
2.5 6

2 .5 3 2 .4 3 -

2.78
2 .7 3

TRUCKERS, POWER ( F O R K L I F T ) ---------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------------

372
366

2 .7 1
2.7 1

2 .7 0
2.6 9

2 . 6 1 - 2.9 2
2 . 6 0 - 2 .3 1

2.21
2 .4 3

2 .6 7

-

-

-

3

3

4
4

5
5

13

-

3

13

-

12
12

9
4
5

4

-

11
5
12 6
5
2
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36
30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

?

2

_

4

4
4

2
2

i

-

4

-

-

_

4
4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

5

3

3

2
2

-

-

-

48

-

1

104
55
49

35
34

1
112
112
-

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

78
78

78

70
65
5
76
69
7

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

4

45

20
10

-

-

4

-

45

30

-

_

_

-

-

2

88
78
16
20 22
6 8
10 12 21
1
_

-

-

1

37
13
24

31
31

5
4

_

_

-

5
5

3
3

iO

6

3
3

3

4

5

3

21
18

77
19
58

6

40
27
13
-

-

2

3

4

22
13

19
9

13

12

2
2
68
68

3
3

-

15
3

3
-

10
10
20
20

9

14
5
167
167

10
1
1
88

84

-

27
27

_

_

-

“

_

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

-

175

_

_

-

-

-

175
175

-

-

-

-

_

12
_

5

_

-

-

-

13

2
2

_

3
3
~

39

34
34

12

-

2
2

and late shi fts.

4
4

-

-

2

-

10
10

-

-

—

-

_

_

-

-

97
97

4
4

*

59
59

2 11
38
37

3.0 0

122
62
60

l

-

-

-

2
2

i

-

-

-

i
i

-

4

6

-

_

-

2
2
2

4

“

2
2
-

27

15

3

-

-

4

20
4
11 11 7
3
21 17
17
5
17

13
13
-

2
2

4

-

24
13

i

-

_

1

4

6
5

29
17

i
i

1 Data l i m i t e d to m e n w o r k e r s 2 F ox rc l udefin it ionm iouf mt e pays ,f o rs e eo v forotinot e and tabl ew oAr k1.on w e e ke nd s, h o lid a y s,
d
p
fo
3 E udeess allr ed r i v e r s r me g a r d l e ses to fm es i z e2, and r type -o f t r u c k o per ate d.
4 Incl
r
5 T ra n sp or t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and ot he r public u til iti es.




8
8

2

2 .8 0

5

-

“

-

-

_

_

-

3

_

_

-

-

-

2

_

11
B.

Establishment Practices and Supplementary W age Provisions

Table B-l.

Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women Office Workers

(D is trib u tio n o f e s ta b lis h m e n ts studied in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u s try d iv is io n s b y m in im u m e n tra n ce s a la r y f o r s e le c t e d c a t e g o r ie s
o f in e x p e r ie n c e d w o m e n o f fic e w o r k e r s , South Ben d, Ind., M a rch 1966)
In e x p e r ie n c e d typ ists

M inim um w eekly s tra ig h t-tim e s a la r y 1

O ther in e x p e r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s ‘

M an u factu rin g
A ll
in d u s trie s

N o n m an u fa c tu rin g
B a se d on sta n d a rd w eekly h o u rs 1 of--3
2

A ll
sch ed u le s

40

A ll
sc h e d u le s

M an u fa c tu rin g
A ll
in d u s tr ie s

40

N o n m an u factu rin g
B a se d on s ta n d a rd w eekly h o u rs 3 of—

A ll
sc h e d u le s

40

A ll
sch ed u le s

40

E sta b lis h m e n ts stu d ie d ________________________________________

81

38

XXX

43

XXX

81

38

XXX

43

XXX

E sta b lish m e n ts having a sp e c ifie d m in im u m ________________

26

13
_
2
1
2
5

12
_
2
1
2
4

13

10
_
3
1
-

34

14
_
2
_
2
2
5

13
.
_
2
_
2
2
4

20

15

1
_
6
3
1
2
2

6
2
_
1
2

-

-

$45.00
$47.50
$50.00
$52.50
$55.00
$57.50
$60.00
$62.50
$65.00
$67.50
$70.00
$72.50
$75.00

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under
under

$47.50___________________________________
$50.00___________________________________
$52.50---------- -------- ------------------- $55 .0 0 . _________________________________
$57.50 __________________________________
$60.00-----------------------------------------------------$62.50-----------------------------------------------------$65.00___________________________________
$67.50 --------------------------------------------------$70.0 0___________________________________
$72.50___________________________________
$75.00— -----------------------------------------------$77.5 0___________________________________

E sta b lish m e n ts having no sp e c ifie d m in im u m ______________
E sta b lish m e n ts w hich did not em p lo y w o rk e rs
in th is c a te g o ry ______________________________________________

1
-

5
1
2
3
7
-

1
1
2

2

2

3

-

-

-

8

4

47

-

-

-

-

1

21

1
3
1
1
1
2
-

-

2
-

1
1

1
1

-

-

1
8
3
3
4
7
2
2
2

-

-

_

-

1

2

-

2

2

1
1
1

XXX

4

XXX

13

9

XXX

34

'5

XXX

26

-

-

1 T h ese s a la r ie s r e la te to fo r m a lly e s ta b lis h e d m in im u m startin g (h irin g) re g u la r s t r a ig h t-t im e s a la r ie s that a re paid f o r stan dard w o rk w e e k s .
2 E x clu d es w o r k e r s in s u b c le r ic a l jo b s such as m e s s e n g e r o r o ffic e g ir l.
3 D ata a re p res en ted fo r a ll standard w o rk w e e k s c o m b in e d , and fo r the m o s t c o m m o n stan dard w o rk w e e k r e p o r te d .




-

2
1
1

-

1
1
-

-

-

1
XXX
XXX

1

1
1
1

4

1
XXX

19

XXX

12
Table B-2. Shift Differentials
(Shift d iffe r e n tia ls o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s by type and am ount o f d iffe r e n t ia l,
South Bend, Ind., M a rch 1966)
P e r c e n t o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s —
In e s t a b l is h m e n t s h a v in g f o r m a l
p r o v is io n s 1 fo r —

S h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l

S e c o n d s h ift
w ork

T h ir d o r o t h e r
s h ift w o r k

A c t u a l l y w o r k in g o n —

S e c o n d s h ift

T h ir d o r o t h e r
s h ift

-------------------------

9 6 .0

9 3 .8

2 4 .6

W ith s h ift p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l --------------------------------------

9 6 .0

9 3 .8

2 4 .6

7 .5

U n ifo r m c e n t s ( p e r h o u r )-----------------------------------

8 2 .2

8 0 .0

2 1 .5

7 .3

5 c e n t s _________________________________________
6 c e n t s _________________________________________
7 c e n t s _________________________________________
8 c e n t s _________________________________________
10 c e n t s ________________________________________
I 0 V2 c e n t s _____________________________________
12 c e n t s ______________________________________
15 c e n t s ________________________________________
151 s c e n t s _____________________________________
2
/
16 c e n t s -------------------------------------------------------------

3.1
17.0
3 .3
1 1 .4
19.1
2 1 .4
.7
1.5
4 .5

16.9
1.8
2 7 .9
8 .4
1.5
4 .5

U n if o r m p e r c e n t a g e ------- ----------------------------------

13.8

13.8

3 .1

5 p e r c e n t ______________________________________
8 p e r c e n t ____________
_______________________
10 p e r c e n t _____________________________________

8 .1
.4
5 .3

1 3.8

2 .6
-

T o t a l ______

_____

—

-

-----------

W ith n o s h i ft p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l _____________________

-

17.0
1.8
-

-

-

1
In clu d es e s ta b lis h m e n ts c u r r e n tly op era tin g late s h ifts ,
e ven though they w e r e not c u r r e n tly op e ra tin g late sh ifts.

Table B-3.

7 .5

-

1 .0
4 .2
1 .3
3 .4
4 .4
6 .0
.1
.6
.4

2 .5
.1
-

1 .4
.4
1.6
.8
.3
.1
.2
-

-

.5

.2

-

-

and e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith fo r m a l p r o v is io n s c o v e r in g late shifts

Scheduled Weekly Hours

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s in all in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s by sch ed u led w e e k ly h ou rs
o f f ir s t - s h if t w o r k e r s , South Bend, Ind., M arch 1966)
Plant w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o rk e rs

W eek ly h o u rs
A ll in d u s tr ie s 1

M anufacturin g

P u blic u t ilit ie s 2

A ll w o r k e r s ________________________________________

100

100

100

U nder 37V2 h o u r s _________________________________
37V2 h o u r s _________________________________________
O v er 37V2 and under 40 h o u r s ------- ------------------40 h o u r s ______________ ___________________________
O v er 40 and under 44 h o u r s ______________________
44 h o u r s ____________________________________________
O v er 44 and under 48 h o u r s __________________ —
48 h o u r s ____________________________________________
50 h ou rs and o v e r --------------------------------------------------

3
2

.
-

.
-

-

-

-

77
3
1
2
9
2

90
1
8
2

1
2
3
4

78
22
-

A ll in d u s t r ie s 3

100

2
4
91
(4)
1
(4)
“

M anufacturin g

100
.
7
93
_

In clu des data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s .
In clu des data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e ; r e t a il tra d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.




P u b lic u t i li t ie s 2
100
.
-

100
'

13
Table B-4. Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r i e s and in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y n u m b e r o f p a id h o l id a y s
p r o v id e d a n n u a lly , S ou th B e n d , I n d ., M a r c h 1966)

Plant w o rk e rs

O ffic e w o rk e rs

Item
A ll in d u s tr ie s 1

A ll w o r k e r s ________________________________________

W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m en ts pro v id in g
paid h o l id a y s ____________________________________
W o r k e r s in e sta b lish m en ts provid in g
no paid h o l id a y s _________________________________

M anufacturing

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 1
2

A ll in d u s t r ie s 3

M anufacturing

P u blic u tilit ie s 2

100

100

100

100

100

100

98

100

100

100

100

100

-

-

-

( 4)

-

-

39
1

3

38

_

2

1

2

N um ber o f days

1 h o lid a y ___________________________________________
___________ ___________________________
h olid a y s plus 1 h alf day ______________________
h o lid a y s ____________________ __ ________________
h olid a y s plus 1 h alf day _______________________
h olid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s _______________________
h o lid a y s plus 3 h a lf days _____________________
h o l id a y s ______ — ______________________________
7 h o lid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s _______________________
8 h o l id a y s _____
___________ ____________________
h olid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s ------ ----------- ----------9 h o lid a y s _ ________ __ _____ _______ _______
10 h o lid a y s _____ ________ ____________ ________
11 h o lid a y s --------- ------------------------------------------12 h olid a y s ------------------- ------------------------------3 h olid a y s

5
6
6
6
6
7

8

1
1
19

1

-

4

37

(4)

3

3

15

19

8
27
17

1

-

11

49

-

0
(4)
2
17

37
1

1

2
19

2
1

-

( 4)
-

-

_
_
7
19
22
14
_
_
-

-

-

(4)
(4)

62
80
81
97

14
35
43

1

1

10

14
1
17
62
_

1
12

1
33

.

T ota l h olid a y tim e 5

12 d a y s _____________________________________________
11 days o r m o r e ___________________________________
10 days o r m o r e ___________________________________

8

9 days o r m o r e ____________________________________
d ays o r m o r e ____________________________________
7*/2 days o r m o r e _________________________________
7 d ays o r m o r e ____________________________________
6 V2 days o r m o r e _________________________________
6 days o r m o r e ____________________________________
5 V2 d ays o r m o r e _____ __________________________
3 d ays o r m o r e --- -----------------------------------------------1 day o r m o r e ______
____________
___ — —

1
2
3
4
5
n o h a lf

1
1

1
1

2
40
58
60

2
51
74
'76
95
95

77
77
96
97
97

98

99
100
100
100

.
11

27
36
63
63

100
100
100
100

35
47
48

60
61

100

97

100

100

100

100
100

100
100

62
62

100
100
100
100

I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s th a n 0 .5 p e r c e n t .
A l l c o m b i n a t i o n s o f f u l l and h a lf d a y s th a t a dd t o th e s a m e a m o u n t a r e c o m b i n e d ; f o r e x a m p l e , th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g a t o t a l o f 7 d a y s i n c lu d e s t h o s e w ith 7 f u l l d a y s
d a y s , 6 f u l l d a y s and 2 h a lf d a y s , 5 f u l l d a y s and 4 h a lf d a y s , and s o o n .
P r o p o r t i o n s w e r e th e n c u m u l a t e d .




and

14
Table B-5. Paid Vacations1
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r i e s and in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , S o u th B e n d , I n d ., M a r c h 1966)

Plant w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

M ethod o f paym ent
A ll in d u s t r ie s 2

A ll w o r k e r s ________________________________________

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
45
54
1

100
30
69
"
1

100
100
-

100
98
2
-

100
96
4
-

100
100
-

-

-

-

-

M ethod o f paym ent
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid v a c a t io n s ____________________________________
L e n g t h -o f-t im e p a y m e n t______________________
P e r c e n t a g e p aym en t___________________________
F la t -s u m p a y m e n t_____________________________
O t h e r ____________________________________________
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid v a c a t io n s _________________________________

1

A m ount o f v a ca tio n pay 5
A fte r 6 m onths o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w e e k _______________________________________
1 w e e k _______________________________________________
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------2 w e e k s _____________________________________________

14
3
-

19
-

39
-

4
38
7
1

6
59
14
-

37
-

71
25
3

65
33
2

79
21

25
( 6)
75

19
(6)
81

75
25

46
29
25

53
38
9

38
62

8
1
91

4
2
94

47
4
49

8
43
47
1

8
59
33
1

100
*

2
2
96
(6)

1
3
95
1

100
-

8
40
50
1

8
54
37
1

100
-

1
( 6)
98
( 6)

1
1
98
1

100
-

4
68
25
2

60
33
1

6

100
-

(.6)
(6)
94
1

1
(6)
94
( 6)

5

5

15
45
36
2
2

50
50
“

(6)
18

1
10
12
76
1

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k _______________________________________________
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ______________________________________________
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k _______________________________________________
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
A fte r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k _____________________________________________ —
O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ------------------------------------2 w e e k s --------------------------------------------------------------------O v er 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________

-

A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ____________
__________________________ —
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v er 2 and under 3 w e e k s _____________________ 3 w e e k s _____________________________________________

-

100
-

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ______________________________________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s ------------------------------------3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v er 3 and under 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s _____________________________________________

See

fo o tn o te s




at end

o f t a b le .

-

25
34
37
1
1

6

73
2

50
50

15
Table B-5. Paid Vacations1----Continued
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t i o n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , S ou th B e n d , In d . , M a r c h 1 96 6)

Plant w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk e rs

V a ca tio n p o lic y
M anufacturing

P u blic u tilitie s 3

( 6)
15
6
76
3

1
10
12
77
1

15
85
-

1
4
( 6)
70
25
-

_
4
96
-

-

( 6)
6
( 6)
78
( 6)
15
-

50

( 6)
6
( 6)
46

1
4
( 6)
21

4

A ll in d u s tr ie s 1
2

M anufacturin g

_
22
31
40
3
3

_
13
42
39
5
2

_
13
87
-

_
16
20
31
12
20
1

_
7
26
23
16
25
2

_
100
-

_
16
3
39
9
27
5

_
7
4
42
12
26
7

_
16
3
30
5
27
19

_
7
4
34
6
23
25

16
3
30
5
27
19

7
4
34
6
23
25

P u b lic u t i li t ie s 3

A ll in d u s tr ie s 4

A m ount o f v a c a tio n pay 5— C ontinued
A fte r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek------- -----------------------------------------------------------2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s --------------------- ------------3 w e e k s --------- ----- -----------------------------------------------O v er 3 and und er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w e e k s ----- -----------------------------------------------------------A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_________________________________ ___________
2 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------4 w e e k s ___________ ___ ____ _________ ____ ____ __ __
O ver 4 w e e k s ________________________ ____________

-

A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek______________________________________________
2 w e e k s __________ — ------------- ---------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------3 w e e k s _______ __________________ ___ _________
O v er 3 and under 4 w e e k s _____________ ________
4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 4 w e e k s ______________________________________

-

40

-

-

-

-

50
-

45
2

73
1

56
-

( 6)
6
( 6)
22
61
10

1
4
( 6)
11
68
17

_
4
21
75
-

( 6)
6
( 6)
22
61
10

4

1

4
21
-

A fte r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek______________________________________________
2 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ____________________ —
3 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s -------------------------------------------------------------------O v er 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------

_
-

23
77
-

A fte r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek---------------------- -----------------------------------------------2 w e e k s __________________ ______________ ________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s ______________________________ __ ___________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O ver 4 w e e k s ______________________________________

23
-

77
’

( 6)
11
68
17

75

1 In clu d es b a s ic plans o n ly. E x clu d e s plans such as v a c a t io n -s a v in g s and th o s e plans w h ich o ffe r " e x te n d e d " o r " s a b b a t ic a l" b e n e fits b eyon d b a s ic plans to w o r k e r s w ith qu a lifyin g lengths
o f s e r v ic e .
T y p ic a l o f su ch e x c lu s io n s a r e plans in the s t e e l, alum inum , and ca n in d u s tr ie s .
2 In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e , r e t a il tra d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 T r a n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and oth er pub lic u t ilit ie s .
4 In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tra d e ; r e t a il tra d e ; fin a n ce , in s u ra n ce , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v ic e s , in add ition to th o s e in d u s try d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
5 Inclu des paym ents o th e r than "len gth o f t im e , " such as p e rce n ta g e o f annual ea rn in gs o r fla t -s u m p a ym e n ts, c o n v e r t e d to an equ ivalen t tim e b a s is ; f o r e x a m p le, a paym ent o f 2 p e r c e n t
o f annual e a rn in g s w as c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e w e re a r b it r a r ily c h o s e n and do not n e c e s s a r ily r e fl e c t the in divid u al p r o v is io n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n s .
F o r ex a m p le, the ch an ges
in p r o p o r t io n s in d ica ted at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e in clu d e ch an ges in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r in g be tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s . E s tim a te s a r e c u m u la tiv e .
Th us, the p r o p o r t io n r e c e iv in g 3 w eek s' pay o r m o r e
a fter 5 y e a r s in clu d es th o se who r e c e iv e 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o r e a fte r fe w e r y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .
6 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.




16
Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
( P e r c e n t o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id i n g
h e a lt h , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e f i t s , 1 S ou th B e n d , In d . , M a r c h 1 96 6)
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

T y p e o f b e n e fit
A l l in d u s t r i e s 1
2

M a n u fa c t u r in g

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

100

100

100

100

L i f e i n s u r a n c e _____________________________________
A c c id e n t a l d ea th and d is m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e __________________________________________
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s i c k l e a v e o r b o t h 5 --------------------------------------------

95

99

100

80

88

62

96

99

S ic k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e ___________
S ic k l e a v e ( f u ll p a y a n d no
w a it in g p e r i o d ) . ________________ __________
S ic k le a v e (p a r tia l p a y o r
w a it in g p e r i o d ) ___________________ __________

90

99

H o s p i t a l iz a t io n i n s u r a n c e -----------------------------------S u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------------------------M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e ------------------------------------------------C a t a s t r o p h e i n s u r a n c e ----------------------------------------R e t i r e m e n t p e n s io n ----------------------------------------------N o h e a lt h , i n s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n p la n -----------

97
97
80
26
69

A l l w o r k e r s __________

________________________________

M a n u fa c t u r in g

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

100

100

98

99

100

67

93

74

96

95

97

96

37

53

78

35

35

71

71

36

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id i n g :

7
5

23
100
100
86
20
76

11

9

50

92
92
54
54
96

99
99
93
74
78

100
100
96
62
84

93
93
83
83
84

( 6)

1 I n c lu d e s t h o s e p la n s f o r w h ic h at l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t i s b o r n e b y th e e m p l o y e r , e x c e p t t h o s e l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l s e c u r i t y , a n d r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t .
2 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
4 I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; fi n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 U n d u p lic a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s i c k l e a v e o r s i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y b e l o w .
S i c k l e a v e p la n s a r e l i m i t e d t o t h o s e w h ic h d e f i n i t e l y e s t a b l i s h a t l e a s t
th e m in i m u m n u m b e r o f d a y s ' p a y th a t c a n b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e .
I n f o r m a l s i c k l e a v e a l l o w a n c e s d e t e r m i n e d o n a n in d iv i d u a l b a s i s a r e e x c l u d e d .
6 L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .




17
Table B-7. H ealth Insurance Benefits Provided Employees and T heir D ependents
( P e r c e n t o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l in d u s t r ie s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g h e a lt h in s u r a n c e b e n e f it s
c o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s a n d t h e i r d e p e n d e n t s , S ou th B e n d , In d . , M a r c h 1 96 6)
O ffic e w o r k e r s

P la n t w o r k e r s
T y p e o f b e n e fit, c o v e r a g e , and fin a n c in g 1

M a n u fa c t u r in g

M a n u fa c t u r in g

100

100

100

100

100

100

H o s p i t a l iz a t io n i n s u r a n c e _____________ _____ _
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s o n l y ___________________
E m p l o y e r f i n a n c e d . _____________________
J o in t l y fi n a n c e d ____________________________
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s a n d t h e ir
d e p e n d e n t s ____________________________________
E m p l o y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________
J o in t l y fi n a n c e d ______ ___________________
E m p l o y e r fi n a n c e d f o r e m p l o y e e s ;
j o i n t l y f i n a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s . ____

97
16
13
2

100
11
11
-

92
14
14

99
6
3
3

100
1
1
-

93
5

81
53
24

89
64
21

77
27
50

93
41
50

99
73
24

88
25
63

4

4

-

1

1

-

S u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e _____________________ ________
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s o n l y ___________________
E m p l o y e r f i n a n c e d ____ . . ___ ________
J o i n t l y fi n a n c e d ____
. . . . _________ _
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s a n d t h e ir
d ep en d en ts
E m p l o y e r fi n a n c e d _______ ___ ______
J o in t l y fi n a n c e d _______________________ _
_
E m p l o y e r fi n a n c e d f o r e m p l o y e e s ;
j o i n t l y f i n a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s _______

97
16
13
2

100
11
11
-

92
14
14

99
6
3
3

100
1
1
-

93
5
4
1

81
53
24

89
64
21

77
27
50

93
41
50

99
73
24

88
25
63

4

4

M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e ________________________________
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s o n l y ________ __ __ _
E m p l o y e r fi n a n c e d
J o in t l y f i n a n c e d ____________________________
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s a n d t h e ir
d e p e n d e n t s ____________________________________
E m p l o y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________
J o in t l y f i n a n c e d ______ ___ ______________
E m p l o y e r fi n a n c e d f o r e m p l o y e e s ;
j o i n t l y fi n a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s ___ ___

80
9
8
1

86

71
45
22

A l l w o r k e r s __________________________________________ .

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

A ll in d u s t r ie s 1
2

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id i n g :

C a t a s t r o p h e in s u r a n c e . ______ . . . . . . .
C o v e r in g e m p lo y e e s o n ly
________________
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d
_______________ __
J o in t l y f i n a n c e d ____________________________
C o v e r i n g e m p l o y e e s a n d t h e ir
d e p e n d e n t s ____________ _________ __________
E m p l o y e r f i n a n c e d ________________________
J o in t ly fin a n e e d ___________________________
E m p lo y e r fin a n ce d f o r e m p lo y e e s ;
j o i n t l y f i n a n c e d f o r d e p e n d e n t s _______

-

1

1

-

4
4

93

83

3
2

96
1
1
-

82
57
21

54

89
39
49

95
71
23

80
17
63

-

4

4
20
3
3

-

-

16
3
14

1

1

54
-

26
3
3

24
6
16

4

4

50

4

4
4
-

-

1

1

-

54
-

62
1
1

83

-

74
2
1
1

54
31
23

72
6
65

61

-

1

-

4
4
-

4

80
36

56

44

(5 )

1 I n c l u d e s p l a n s f o r w h ic h a t l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t is b o r n e b y t h e e m p l o y e r . S e e f o o t n o t e 1, t a b l e B - 6 . A n e s t a b l is h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s p r o v id i n g b e n e f i t s to e m p l o y e e s f o r t h e i r
d e p e n d e n t s i f s u c h c o v e r a g e w a s a v a il a b l e t o a t l e a s t a m a j o r i t y o f t h o s e e m p l o y e e s o n e w o u ld u s u a l ly e x p e c t t o h a v e d e p e n d e n t s , e. g . , m a r r i e d m e n , e v e n t h o u g h t h e y w e r e l e s s than a m a j o r i t y
o f a l l p la n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s . T h e e m p l o y e r b e a r s th e e n t ir e c o s t o f " e m p l o y e r fi n a n c e d " p l a n s . T h e e m p l o y e r a n d e m p l o y e e s h a r e th e c o s t o f " j o i n t l y f i n a n c e d " p la n s .
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
4 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; fi n a n c e , in s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d it io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 L e s s th a n 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




18
Table B-8. Profit-Sharing Plans
( P e r c e n t o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r i e s a n d in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v id i n g p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p l a n s , 1
b y t y p e o f p la n , S o u th B e n d , I n d ., M a r c h 1 9 6 6 )
P la n t w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o r k e r s

T y p e o f p la n
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1
2

A l l w o r k e r s _________

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s - ________ _____
P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r c u r r e n t
d i s t r i b u t i o n _______
___

100

11

______________________________

M a n u fa c t u r in g

4

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

100

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

M a n u fa c t u r in g

P u b l ic u t i l i t i e s 3

100

100

100

39

15

13

(5)

13

2

_
_

1

-

-

__________

10

4

-

37

14

_

P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r b o t h c u r r e n t
a n d d e f e r r e d d i s t r i b u t i o n _____________________

-

-

-

-

-

_

P la n s p r o v id i n g f o r e m p l o y e e 's c h o i c e
o f m e t h o d o f d i s t r i b u t i o n _____
—

-

-

-

-

-

-

89

96

100

61

85

87

___

P la n s p r o v i d i n g f o r d e f e r r e d
d i s t r i b u t i o n ___
_____
_______

_______

_ _

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g n o
p r o f i t - s h a r i n g p la n s
____
___
_ _ _

1
advance
p la n t o r
2
3
4
5

T h e s tu d y w a s l i m i t e d t o f o r m a l p la n s (1 ) h a v in g e s t a b l i s h e d f o r m u l a s f o r th e a l l o c a t i o n o f p r o f i t s h a r e s a m o n g e m p l o y e e s ; (2 ) w h o s e f o r m u l a s w e r e c o m m u n i c a t e d t o th e e m p l o y e e s in
o f t h e d e t e r m in a t io n o f p r o f i t s ; (3 ) th a t r e p r e s e n t a c o m m i t m e n t b y th e c o m p a n y t o m a k e p e r i o d i c c o n t r ib u t io n s b a s e d o n p r o f i t s ; a n d (4 ) in w h ic h e l i g i b i l i t y e x t e n d s t o a m a j o r i t y o f the
o ffic e w o r k e r s .
I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e , r e t a i l t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b l ic u t i l i t i e s .
I n c l u d e s d a ta f o r w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; a n d s e r v i c e s , in a d d i t io n t o t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
L e s s th a n 0 .5 p e r c e n t .




Appendix A. Changes in Occupational Descriptions
o f a single category, clarifying the criteria of types of calls handled and
types of inform ation provided. The com bination of class A and class B
d ata, w here both are published, is com parable to the single designation,
if previously published.

Since the Bureau's last survey, occupational descriptions for drafts­
m an, secretary , and sw itchboard operator w ere revised in order to obtain
salary inform ation for m ore sp ecific categories.
S ecretary. The revised descriptions for secretary (classes A, B,
C, and D) classify these workers according to levels of responsibility. The
size of the organization and the scope of the supervisor's position are con­
sidered in distinguishing these levels. D ata published under the com posite
title of secretary are not com parable to data previously published.

D raftsm an. The revised descriptions for draftsm an (classes A, B,
and C; and d raftsm an-tracer) replace the previous designations for drafts­
m an (leader, senior, and junior; and tracer) and em phasize the distinction
betw een drafting and design skills. T herefore, data presented for any of
these occupations are not com parable to data previously published.

Sw itchboard operator. The revised description for sw itchboard
operator arranges these workers into two defined classes (A and B) instead




The revised occupational descriptions are included in appendix B.

19




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
The prim ary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the B ureau's w age surveys is to assist its field
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are em ployed under a v ariety of payroll titles
and different work arrangem ents from establishm ent to establishm ent and from area to area. This perm its
the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job co ntent. Because of this em phasis on
interestablish m ent and interarea co m p arab ility of occupational co ntent, the B ureau's job descriptions m ay
differ significantly from those in use in individual establishm ents or those prepared for other purposes. In
applying these job descriptions, the B ureau's field econom ists are instructed to exclude w orking supervisors,
apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped , p a rt-tim e , tem porary, and probationary workers.
O F F IC E
BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statem ents, bills, and invoices on a m achine other than
an ordinary or ele c tro m a tic typew riter. M ay also keep records as to
billings or shipping charges or perform other c le ric a l work in cid en tal
to b illin g operations. For wage study purposes, billers, m ach in e, are
classified by type of m ach in e, as follows:
B iller, m achine (b illing m ach in e). Uses a special billin g m a ­
chine (M oon H opkins, E llio tt Fisher, Burroughs, etc . , w hich are
co m bination typing and adding m achines) to prepare bills and invoices
from custom ers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping
m em orandum s, e tc . U sually involves ap p licatio n of pred eterm in ed
discounts and shipping charges, and entry of necessary extensions,
w hich m ay or m ay not be com puted on the billing m ach in e, and
totals w hich are au to m atically accum u lated by m achine. The oper­
ation usually involves a large num ber of carbon copies of the bill
being prepared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B iller, m achine (bookkeeping m ach in e). Uses a bookkeeping
m achine (Sundstrand, E lliott Fisher, R em ington Rand, e tc . , w hich
m ay or m ay not have typew riter keyboard) to prepare custom ers' bills
as p art of the accounts receivable operation. G enerally involves the
sim ultaneous entry of figures on custom ers' led ger record. The m a ­
chine a u to m atic ally accum ulates figures on a num ber of v e rtic al
colum ns and com putes, and usually prints au to m atically the d eb it or
cred it balances. Does not involve a know ledge of bookkeeping.
Works from uniform and standard types of sales and cred it slips.

O perates a bookkeeping m achine (R em ington Rand, E lliott Fisher,
Sundstrand, Burroughs, N ational Cash R egister, w ith or w ithout a type­
w riter keyboard) to keep a record of business transactions.




Class A . K eeps a set of records requiring a know ledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and fam ilia rity w ith the
structure of the p a rtic u lar accounting system used. D eterm ines proper
records and distribution of d ebit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase of the work. M ay prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B. K eeps a record of one or m ore phases or sections of
a set of records usually requiring little know ledge of basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts p ayable, payroll, cus­
tom ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of b illin g described
under b ille r, m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, e tc . M ay check or assist in preparation of trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting departm ent.
CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A . U nder general d irection of a bookkeeper or accountant,
has responsibility for keeping one or m ore sections of a com plete set
of books or records relatin g to one phase of an establishm ent's busi­
ness transactions. Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary

21

22
C L E R K , A C C O U N T I N G — C on tin u ed

led ger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable;
exam ining and coding invoices or vouchers w ith proper accounting
distribution; and requires judg m ent and experience in m aking proper
assignations and allo cation s. M ay assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m ay d irect class B accounting clerks.
Class B. U nder supervision, perform s one or m ore routine a c ­
counting operations such as posting sim ple journal vouchers or accounts
payable vouchers, en tering vouchers in voucher registers; reco nciling
bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting sim ple cost accounting d ata. This job does not
require a know ledge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but
is found in offices in w hich the m ore routine accounting work is
subdivided on a functional basis am ong several workers.
CLERK, FILE
Class A . In an established filing system containing a num ber
of varied subject m a tte r files, classifies and indexes file m aterial
such as correspondence, reports, tech n ical docum ents, e tc . M ay
also file this m a te ria l. M ay keep records of various types in con­
ju n ctio n w ith the files. M ay lead a sm all group of low er lev el file
clerks.
Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified m a terial by sim ple
(su bject m a tter) headings or partly classified m a terial by finer sub­
headings. Prepares sim ple relate d index and cross-reference aids.
As requested, lo cates clearly identified m a terial in files and forwards
m a te ria l. M ay perform relate d c le ric al tasks required to m a in tain
and service files.
C lass C . Perform s routine filing of m aterial th a t has already
been classified or w hich is easily classified in a sim ple serial classi­
ficatio n system ( e .g . , alp h ab etical, chronological, or n u m erical).
As requested, lo cates read ily av ailable m a terial in files and forwards
m a terial; and m ay fill out w ithdraw al charge. Perform s sim ple
cle ric a l and m anual tasks required to m aintain and service files.
CLERK, ORDER
R eceives custom ers' orders for m aterial or m erchandise by m a il,
phone, or personally. D uties involve any com bination of the follow ing:
Q uoting prices to custom ers; m aking out an order sheet listing the item s




CLERK,

O R D E R — C on tin u ed

to m ake up the order; checking prices and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departm ents to be filled .
M ay check w ith cred it d epartm en t to determ ine cred it rating of custom er,
acknow ledge receip t of orders from custom ers, follow up orders to see
th a t they have been filled , keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices w ith original orders.
CLERK, PAYROLL
C om putes w ages of com pany em ployees and enters the necessary
data on the payroll sheets. D uties involve: C alculating workers' earnings
based on tim e or production records; and posting ca lcu late d data on payroll
sheet, showing inform ation such as w orker's n am e, w orking days, tim e,
ra te , deductions for insurance, and to tal w ages due. M ay m ake out paychecks and assist paym aster in m aking up and distributing pay envelopes.
M ay use a calcu latin g m ach in e.
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Prim ary duty is to operate a C om ptom eter to perform m a th e­
m a tical com putations. This job is not to be confused w ith th at of statis­
tic a l or other type of clerk , w hich m ay involve frequent use of a C om p­
to m e ter but, in w hich, use of this m achine is in cid en tal to perform ance
of other duties.
DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
U nder general supervision and w ith no supervisory responsibilities,
reproduces m ultip le copies of typew ritten or handw ritten m a tter, using a
M im eograph or D itto m ach in e. M akes necessary adjustm ent such as for
ink and paper feed counter and cy linder speed. Is not required to prepare
stencil or D itto m aster. M ay keep file of used stencils or D itto m asters.
M ay sort, co lla te , and staple co m pleted m a te ria l.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class A . O perates a num erical an d /o r alp h ab etical or co m bina­
tion keypunch m achine to transcribe data from various source docu­
m ents to keypunch tab u latin g cards. Perform s sam e tasks as low er
lev el keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires ap p licatio n

23
K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R — Continued

of coding skills and the m aking of som e determ inations, for ex am ple,
locates on the source docum ent the item s to be punched; extracts
inform ation from several docum ents; and searches for and interprets
inform ation on the docum ent to determ ine inform ation to be punched.
M ay train inexperien ced operators.
Class B. Under close supervision or follow ing specific procedures
or instructions, transcribes data from source docum ents to punched
cards. O perates a num erical an d/or alp h ab etical or com bination
keypunch m achine to keypunch tab u latin g cards. May verify cards.
W orking from various standardized source docum ents, follows specified
sequences w hich have been coded or prescribed in detail and require
little or no selectin g , coding, or interpreting of data to be punched.
Problem s arising from erroneous item s or codes, missing inform ation,
etc. , are referred to supervisor.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Perform s various routine duties such as running errands, operating
m inor office m achines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing
m a il, and other m inor clerical work.
SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secretary, norm ally to one individual. M ain­
tains a close and highly responsive relationship to the d ay -to -d ay work
activities of the superj/isor. Works fairly independently receiving a m in i­
m um of d e tailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical and
secretarial duties, usually including most of the follow ing: (a) R eceives
telephone calls, personal callers, and incom ing m a il, answers routine
inquiries, and routes the tech n ical inquiries to the proper persons: (b)
establishes, m aintains, and revises the supervisor's files.; (c) m aintains the
supervisor's calendar and m akes appointm ents as instructed; (d) relays
m essages from supervisor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m em ­
oranda, and reports prepared by others for the supervisor's signature to
assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) performs stenographic
and typing work.
M ay also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks of com parable
nature and difficulty. The work typ ically requires knowledge of office
routine and understanding o f the organization, program s, and procedures
related to the work of the supervisor.




SECRETARY— C ontinued
Exclusions
Not all positions th at are title d "secretary" possess the above
characteristics. Exam ples o f positions w hich are excluded from the def­
inition are as follows: (a) Positions w hich do not m e et the "personal"
secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in
secretarial type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a
group o f professional, tec h n ic a l, or m anagerial persons; (d) secretary posi­
tions in w hich the duties are either substantially m ore routine or substan­
tia lly m ore com plex and responsible than those characterized in the def­
inition; an d (e ) assistant type positions w hich involve m ore difficult or m ore
responsible tec h n ica l, ad m inistrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical
duties w hich are not ty p ical of secretarial work.
NOTE: The term "corporate officer," used in the lev el definitions
follow ing, refers to those officials who have a significant corporate-w ide
policym aking role w ith regard to m ajor com pany activ ities. The title
"vice president, " though norm ally indicative o f this role, does not in all
cases identify such positions. V ice presidents whose prim ary responsibility
is to act personally on individual cases or transactions (e. g. , approve or
deny individual loan or cred it actions; adm inister individual trust accounts;
directly supervise a cle ric al staff) are not considered to be "corporate
officers" for purposes of applying the follow ing lev el definitions.
Class A
a. Secretary to the chairm an of the board or president of a
com pany that em ployes, in all, over 100 but fewer than 5,0 0 0 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairm an of
the board or president) of a com pany th at em ploys, in all, over 5, 000 but
fewer than 25,000 persons; or
c. Secretary to the head (im m ed iately below the corporate
officer lev el) of a m ajor segm ent or subsidiary of a com pany that em ploys,
in all, over 25,000 persons.
1
Class B
a. Secretary to the chairm an of the board or president of a
com pany th at em ploys, in all, fewer than 100 persons; or
b. Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chairm an of the
board or president) of a com pany that em ploys, in all, over 100 but fewer
than 5,0 0 0 persons; or

24
SECRETARY— C ontinued
c. S ecretary to the head (im m ed iately below the officer lev el)
over eith er a m ajor co rpo rate-w ide functional activity (e. g. , m arketing,
research, operations, industrial relations, etc. ) or a m ajor geographic or
organizational segm ent (e. g. , a regional headquarters; a m ajor division)
of a com pany th a t em ploys, in all, over 5,0 0 0 but few er than 25,000
em ployees; or
d. S ecretary to the head of an individual plan t, factory, etc.
(or other eq uivalent lev el of official) th at em ploys, in a ll, over 5,0 0 0
persons; or
e. S ecretary to the head of a large and im portant organizational
segm ent (e. g. , a m iddle m an ag em en t supervisor o f an organizational seg­
m ent often involving as m any as several hundred persons) of a com pany
th a t em ploys, in a ll, over 2 5 ,000 persons.

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL— C ontinued
M ay m ain tain files, keep sim ple records, or perform other relativ ely routine
c le ric a l tasks. M ay operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include
transcrib in g -m ach in e work. (See transcribing -m achin e operator. )
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Prim ary duty is to tak e dictatio n involving a varied tech n ical or
specialized vocabulary such as in leg al briefs or reports on scien tific re­
search from one or m ore persons eith er in shorthand or by Stenotype or
sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictatio n . M ay also type from w ritten
copy. M ay also set up and m ain tain files, keep records, etc.

OR
Performs stenographic duties requiring significan tly greater inde­
pendence and responsibility th an stenographers, general as evidenced by the
follow ing: Work requires high degree o f stenographic speed and accuracy;
Class C
and a thorough w orking know ledge of general business and office procedures
and
a.
Secretary to an executive or m anagerial person whose respon­ of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures,
files, w orkflow , etc. Uses this know ledge in perform ing stenographic duties
sibility is not eq uivalent to one of the specific lev el situations in the def­
and responsible c le ric a l tasks such as, m aintainin g follow up files; assem bling
inition for class B, but whose subordinate staff norm ally num bers at least
m a t e r ia l for rep orts, m e m o ra n d u m s , le tte rs , e t c . ; c o m p o s in g s im p le letters
several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational segm ents
from general instructions; read ing and routing incom ing m ail; and answ ering
w hich are often, in turn, further subdivided. In som e com panies, this lev el
routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing -m achin e work.
includes a w ide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or
two; or
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
b.
Secretary to the head of an individual plan t, factory, etc.
Class A. O perates a sin g le- or m u ltip le-p o sitio n telephone sw itch­
board handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. Performs full
(or other eq uivalent lev el of official) th a t em ploys, in all, fewer than
telephone inform ation service or handles com plex calls, such as conference,
5 ,0 0 0 persons.
c o llect, overseas, or sim ilar calls, eith er in addition to doing routine work
as described for sw itchboard operator, class B, or as a fu ll-tim e assignm ent.
Class D
("F ull" telephon e inform ation service occurs w hen the establishm ent has
a. S ecretary to the supervisor or head of a sm all organizational
varied functions th a t are not read ily understandable for telephone inform a­
unit (e. g. , few er th a n about 25 or 30 persons); or
tio n purposes, e. g. , because of overlapping or in te rrela ted functions, and
consequently present frequent problem s as to w hich extensions are appro­
priate for calls. )
b. S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional
em ployee, ad m inistrative officer, or assistant, skilled tech n ician or expert.
Class B. O perates a sin g le- or m u ltip le-p o sitio n telephone sw itch­
(NOTE: M any com panies assign stenographers, rather th an secretaries as
board handling incom ing, outgoing, in trap lan t or office calls. M ay handle
described above, to this lev el of supervisory or nonsupervisory worker. )
routine long distance calls and record tolls. M ay perform lim ited telephone
inform ation service. ("L im ited" telephon e inform ation service occurs if the
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
functions of the establishm ent serviced are read ily understandable for te le ­
phone inform ation purposes, or if the requests are routine, e. g. , giving
Prim ary duty is to tak e d ictatio n involving a norm al routine vo­
extension num bers w hen sp ecific nam es axe furnished, or if com plex calls
cabulary from one or m ore persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
are referred to another operator. )
sim ilar m achine; and transcribe d ictation. May also type from w ritten copy.




25
S W IT C H B O A R D

OPERA T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T

In ad dition to perform ing duties of operator on a single position
or m o n itor-ty pe sw itchboard, acts as receptionist and m ay also type or
perform routine c le ric a l work as part of regular duties. This typing or
cle ric al work m ay take the m ajor p art of this w orker's tim e w hile at
sw itchboard.

T A B U L A T I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R — C on tin u ed

specific instructions. M ay include sim ple w iring from diagram s and
some filing work. The work ty p ically involves portions of a work
u n it, for ex am p le, individual sorting or co llatin g runs or repetitive
operations.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A . O perates a variety of tab ulating or e le c tric a l acco u n t­
ing m achines, ty p ic ally including such m achines as the tab u lato r,
c a lcu lato r, interp reter, co llator, and others. Perform s com plete
reporting assignm ents w ithout close supervision, and perform s difficu lt
w iring as required. The com plete reporting and tab ulating assign­
m ents ty p ic ally involve a variety of long and com plex reports w hich
often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring som e planning
and sequencing of steps to be tak en. As a m ore ex perienced oper­
ato r, is ty p ic ally involved in training new operators in m achine
operations, or p a rtia lly trained operators in w iring from diagram s
and operating sequences of long and com plex reports. Does not
include w orking supervisors perform ing tab u latin g -m ach in e operations
and d a y -to -d a y supervision of the work and production of a group of
tab u latin g -m ach in e operators.
Class B. O perates m ore d ifficult tab ulating or e le c tric a l acco u n t­
ing m achines such as the tab u lato r and calcu lato r, in addition to the
sorter, reproducer, and co llator. This work is perform ed under specific
instructions and m ay include the perform ance of some w iring from
diagram s. The work ty p ically involves, for ex am p le, tabulations
involving a rep etitiv e accounting exercise, a com plete but sm all
tab u latin g study, or parts of a longer and m ore com plex report. Such
reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are w ell established. M ay also include the training of new
em ployees in the basic operation of the m ach in e.
Class C . O perates sim ple tab ulating or ele c tric a l accounting
m achines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, co llator, e tc . , w ith




P rim ary duty is to transcribe d ictatio n involving a norm al routine
vocabulary from transcribing -m achin e records. M ay also type from w ritten
copy and do sim ple c le ric a l work. W orkers transcribing d ictatio n involving
a varied tec h n ica l or specialized vocabulary such as leg al briefs or reports
on scien tific research are not included. A w orker who takes dictatio n in
shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine is classified as a stenographer,
general.
TYPIST
Uses a typew riter to m ake copies of various m a terial or to m ake
out bills after calculatio ns have been m ade by another person. M ay in ­
clude typing of stencils, m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for use in duplicating
processes. M ay do c le ric a l work involving little special training, such
as keeping sim ple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and dis­
tributing incom ing m a il.
Class A . Perform s one or m ore of the follow ing: Typing m a ­
te ria l in final form w hen it involves com bining m a terial from several
sources or responsibility for co rrect spelling, syllabication, punctu­
atio n, e tc . , of tech n ical or unusual words or foreign language m a ­
te rial; and planning lay out and typing of co m p licated statistical tables
to m a in tain uniform ity and b alance in spacing. M ay type routine
form letters varying details to suit circum stances.
Class B. Perform s one or m ore of the follow ing: Copy typing
from rough or c le a r drafts; routine typing of form s, insurance policies,
e t c . ; and setting up sim ple standard tabulations, or copying m ore
com plex tables already setup and spaced properly.

26
PROFESSIONAL

ND

TECHNICAL

DRAFTSMAN C ontinued

DRAFTSMAN
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of com plex item s having
distinctive design features th a t differ significantly from established
drafting precedents. Works in close support w ith the design originator,
and m ay recom m end m inor design changes. Analyzes the effect of
each change on the details of form , function, and positional re latio n ­
ships of com ponents and parts. Works w ith a m inim um of supervisory
assistance. C om pleted work is review ed by design originator for con­
sistency w ith prior engineering determ inations. M ay eith er prepare
draw ings, or d irect their preparation by low er lev el draftsm en.
Class B. Perform s nonroutine and com plex drafting assignm ents
th a t require the ap plicatio n of m ost of the standardized draw ing te c h ­
niques regularly used. D uties ty p ically involve such work as: Prepares
w orking draw ings of subassem blies w ith irregular shapes, m ultiple
functions, and precise positional relationships betw een com ponents;
prepares arch itectu ral drawings for construction of a building including
d e tail drawings of foundations, w all sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accep ted form ulas and m anuals in m aking necessary com putations
to determ ine quantities of m aterials to be used, load cap acities,
strengths, stresses, e tc . R eceives in itia l instructions, requirem ents,
and advice from supervisor. C om pleted work is checked for tech n ical
adequacy.
Class C . Prepares d etail drawings of single units or parts for
engineerin g, construction, m anufacturing, or repair purposes. Types
of drawings prepared include isom etric projections (d epicting three
dim ensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning
of com ponents and convey needed inform ation. C onsolidates details
from a num ber of sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required.
MAINTENANCE

Suggested m ethods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source m a terials are given w ith in itial assignm ents. Instructions are
less co m plete w hen assignm ents recur. Work m ay be spot-checked
during progress.
DRAFTSM AN-TRACER
C opies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing w ith pen or p e n cil. (Does not
include tracing lim ite d to plans prim arily consisting of straight lines and
a large scale not requiring close d e lin eatio n .)
an d /o r
Prepares sim ple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized item s. Work
is closely supervised during progress.
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m ed ical
d irection to ill or injured em ployees or other persons who becom e ill or
suffer an a c cid en t on the prem ises of a factory or other establishm ent.
D uties involve a com bination of the follow ing: G iving first aid to the ill
or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees' injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accid en t reports for com pensation
or other purposes; assisting in physical exam inations and h ealth evaluations
of applicants and em ployees; and planning and carrying out program s
involving h ealth ed u catio n , accid en t prevention, ev aluatio n of p lan t en ­
vironm ent, or other activ ities affecting the h e alth , w elfare, and safety
of all personnel.
AND

POWERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE— C ontinued

Perform s the carpentry duties necessary to construct and m ain tain
in good rep air building woodwork and equipm ent such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitio ns, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim m ade
of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: P lan­
ning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verbal
instructions; using a variety of carp enter's handtools, portable pow er tools,

and standard m easuring instrum ents; m aking standard shop com putations
relatin g to dim ensions of work; and selecting m aterials necessary for the
work. In g eneral, the work of the m aintenance carpenter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al ap­
prenticeship or eq u iv alen t training and experience.




27

E L E C T R IC IA N ,

M A IN T E N A N C E

Perform s a variety of ele c tric a l trade functions such as the in ­
stallatio n , m a in ten an ce, or repair of equipm ent for the generation, dis­
tribution, or u tilization of ele ctric energy in an establishm ent. Work
involves m ost of the follow ing: Installing or repairing any of a v ariety of
e le c tric a l eq uipm ent such as generators, transform ers, sw itchboards, con­
trollers, circu it breakers, m otors, heating units, conduit system s, or other
transm ission eq uipm ent; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locatin g and diagnosing trouble in the ele c tric a l
system or equipm ent; working standard com putations relating to load
requirem ents of w iring or e le c tric a l equipm ent; and using a variety of
e le c tric ia n 's handtools and m easuring and testing instrum ents. In general,
the work of the m aintenance ele c tric ia n requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent
training and ex perience.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and m ay also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipm ent (m ech an ical or e le ctrical) to supply the
establishm ent in w hich em ployed with pow er, h e at, refrigeration, or
air-co n d itio n in g . Work involves: O perating and m aintaining equipm ent
such as steam engines, air com pressors, generators, m otors, turbines,
v e n tilatin g and refrigerating equipm ent, steam boilers and b o iler-fed
w ater pum ps;, m aking equipm ent repairs; and keeping a record of operation
of m achinery, tem p eratu re, and fuel consum ption. May also supervise
these operations. H ead or ch ief engineers in establishm ents em ploying
m ore than one en gineer are excluded.
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishm ent in w hich
em ployed w ith h e a t, pow er, or steam . Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a m ech an ical stoker, or gas or oil burner; and checks w ater
and safety valves. M ay clean , o il, or assist in repairing boilerroom
eq uipm ent.
HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
Assists one or m ore workers in the skilled m aintenance trades,
by perform ing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping




HELPER,

M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S — C ontinued

a w orker supplied w ith m aterials and tools; cleaning w orking area, m a ­
chine, and equipm ent; assisting journeym an by holding m aterials or tools;
and perform ing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeym an. The kind
of work the h elp er is p erm itted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the h elp er is confined to supplying, liftin g , and holding m a ­
terials and tools and cleaning w orking areas; and in others he is p erm itted
to perform specialized m achine operations, or parts of a trade th at are
also perform ed by workers on a fu ll-tim e basis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or m ore types of m achine
tools, such as jig borers, cy lindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or m illing m achines, in the construction of m achine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning
and perform ing difficult m achining operations; processing item s requiring
co m p licated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision m easuring instrum ents; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling, and oper­
ation sequence; and m aking necessary adjustm ents during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dim ensions. M ay be required to recognize
when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants
and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry w age study purposes,
m ach in e-to o l operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing shops are e x ­
cluded from this classificatio n.
M ACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces rep lacem en t parts and new parts in m aking repairs of
m e tal parts of m echan ical eq uipm ent operated in an establishm ent. Work
involves m ost of the follow ing: Interpreting w ritten instructions and speci­
fications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m achinist's
handtools and precision m easuring instrum ents; setting up and operating
standard m achine tools; shaping of m etal parts to close tolerances; m aking
standard shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions of work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds of m achining; know ledge of the working properties of the
com m on m etals; selecting standard m aterials, parts, and equipm ent re ­
quired for his work; and fitting and assem bling parts into m echanical
equipm ent. In g eneral, the m achinist's work norm ally requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop p ractice usually acquired through a form al ap ­
prenticeship or eq uivalent training and experience.

28

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

OILER

R epairs au tom obiles, buses, m otortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tablishm ent. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Exam ining autom otive
equipm ent to diagnose source of trouble; disassem bling eq uipm ent and
perform ing repairs th a t involve the use of such handtools as w renches,
gages, drills, or specialized equipm ent in disassem bling or fittin g parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassem bling and installing the various assem blies in the vehicle
and m aking necessary adjustm ents; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tigh ten in g body bolts. In general, the work of the au to ­
m otive m ech an ic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and ex perience.

L ubricates, w ith oil or grease, the m oving parts or w earing sur­
faces of m ech an ical equipm ent of an establishm ent.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R epairs m achinery or m ech an ical equipm ent of an establishm ent.
Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Exam ining m achines and m ech an ical
eq uipm ent to diagnose source of trouble; dism antling or partly dism antling
m achines and perform ing repairs th a t m ainly involve the use of handtools
in scraping and fittin g parts; replacing broken or defective parts w ith item s
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a rep lacem en t p art by a
m achine shop or sending of the m achine to a m achine shop for m ajor
repairs; preparing w ritten specifications for m ajor repairs or for the pro­
duction of parts ordered from m achine shop; reassem bling m achines; and
m aking all necessary adjustm ents for operation. In general, the work of
a m aintenance m ech an ic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and ex ­
perien ce. Excluded from this classification are workers whose prim ary
duties involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new m achines or heavy equipm ent, and dism antles and
installs m achines or heavy equipm ent w hen changes in the p la n t lay out
are required. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; m aking standard shop com putations re­
latin g to stresses, strength of m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining
and b alancin g of eq uipm ent; selecting standard tools, eq uipm ent, and
parts to be used; and installing and m aintainin g in good order pow er
transm ission eq uipm ent such as drives and speed reducers. In general,
the m illw rig ht's work norm ally requires a rounded training and experience
in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t tra in ­
ing and ex perience.




PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates w alls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishm ent. Work involves the follow ing: K now ledge of surface p e cu li­
arities and types of p ain t required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or filler
in n ail holes and interstices; and applying p ain t w ith spray gun or brush.
M ay m ix colors, oils, w hite lea d , and other p a in t ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the m aintenance
p ain ter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent training and ex perience.
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs w ater, steam , gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the follow ing:
Laying out of work and m easuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other w ritten specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths w ith chisel and h am m er or oxyacetylene torch or p ip e-cu ttin g
m achine; threading pipe w ith stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or pow er-driven m achines; assem bling pipe w ith couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to pressures,
flow , and size of pipe required; and m aking standard tests to determ ine
w hether finished pipes m e et specifications. In g eneral, the work of the
m aintenance p ip e fitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t training and e x ­
perien ce. W orkers prim arily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heatin g system s are ex clu d ed .
PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plum bing system of an establishm ent in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding in stallation of vents
and traps in plum bing system ; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
and opening clogged drains w ith a plunger or plum ber's snake. In general,
the work of the m aintenance plum ber requires rounded training and e x ­
perience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalent
training and experience.

29
S H E E T -M E T A L W O R K E R ,

T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R — C o n tin u e d

M A IN T E N A N C E

F ab ricates, installs, and m aintains in good repair the sh eet-m e tal
eq uipm ent and fixtures (such as m achine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ven tilato rs, chutes, ducts, m e tal roofing) of an establish­
m en t. Work involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying out all
types of sh e e t-m e ta l m aintenance work from blueprints, m odels, or other
specifications; setting up and operating all av ailab le types of sh e e t-m e ta l­
w orking m achines; using a variety of handtools in cu tting, bending, form ­
ing, shaping, fittin g , and assem bling; and installing sh eet-m e tal articles
as required. In g en eral, the work of the m aintenance sh eet-m e tal w orker
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t training and ex perience.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(D ie m aker; jig m aker; tool m aker; fixture m aker; gage m aker)
C onstructs and repairs m achine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fixtures
or dies for forgings, punching, and other m etal-fo rm in g work. Work in­
CUSTODIAL

AND

volves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying out of work from m odels,
blueprints, draw ings, or other oral and w ritten specifications; using a
variety of tool and die m aker's handtools and precision m easuring instru­
m ents, understanding of the working properties of com m on m etals and
alloys; setting up and operating of m achine tools and related equipm ent;
m aking necessary shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions of work, speeds,
feeds, and tooling of m achines; h e attreatin g of m etal parts during fab ri­
catio n as w ell as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities;
w orking to close tolerances; fittin g and assem bling of parts to prescribed
tolerances and allow ances; and selecting appropriate m a terials, tools, and
processes. In general, the tool and die m ak er's work requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom p ractice usually acquired through
a form al apprenticeship or eq u iv alen t training and experience.
For cross-industry w age study purposes, tool and die m akers in
tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.
MATERIAL

MOVEMENT

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— C ontinued

Transports passengers betw een floors of an office building, ap a rt­
m ent house, dep artm en t store, ho tel, or sim ilar establishm ent. W orkers
who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as those of
starters and janitors are excluded.

or other establishm ent. D uties involve a co m bination of the follow ing;
Sw eeping, m opping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; rem oving chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting eq uipm ent, furniture, or fixtures; polishing
m etal fixtures or trim m ings; providing supplies and m inor m aintenance
services; and cleaning lav atories, showers, and restroom s. Workers who
specialize in window w ashing are ex cluded.

GUARD
Perform s routine police duties, eith er a t fixed post or on tour,
m aintainin g order, using arm s or force where necessary. Includes g a tem en who are stationed a t gate and check on identity of em ployees and
other persons en terin g .
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sw eeper; charw om an; janitress)
C leans and keeps in an orderly condition factory w orking areas
and washroom s, or prem ises of an office, ap artm en t house, or co m m ercial




LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockm an
or stock helper; w arehousem an or warehouse helper)
A w orker em ployed in a w arehouse, m anufacturing plan t, store,
or other establishm ent whose duties involve one or m ore of the follow ing:
Loading and unloading various m aterials and m erchandise on or from freight
cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
m aterials or m erchandise in proper storage location; and transporting m a­
terials or m erchandise by handtruck, car, or w heelbarrow . Longshorem en,
who load and unload ships are excluded.

30

ORDER FILLER
(O rder picker; stock selector; warehouse stockm an)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
m erchandise in accordance w ith specifications on sales slips, custom ers'
orders, or other instructions. M ay, in addition to filling orders and in ­
dicating item s filled or o m itte d , keep records of outgoing orders, requi­
sition ad ditional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipm ent or storage by p lacing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations perform ed being dependent
upon the type, size, and num ber of units to be packed, the type of co n­
tain er em ployed, and m ethod of shipm ent. Work requires the placing of
item s in shipping containers and m ay involve one or m ore of the follow ing:
K now ledge of various item s of stock in order to verify content; selection
of appropriate type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container;
using ex celsior or other m a terial to prevent breakage or dam age; closing
and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
co ntainer. Packers who also m ake wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

TRUCKD RIVER
D rives a truck w ithin a city or industrial area to transport m a ­
terials, m erchandise, eq uipm ent, or m en betw een various types of es­
tablishm ents such as: M anufacturing plants, freight depots, w arehouses,
w holesale and retail establishm ents, or betw een retail establishm ents and
custom ers' houses or places of business. M ay also load or unload truck
w ith or w ithout helpers, m ake m inor m ech an ical repairs, and keep truck
in good working order. D river-salesm en and o v e r-th e -ro a d drivers are
excluded.
For w age study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type of eq uipm ent, as follows: (T ra c to r-tra ile r should be rated on the
basis of tra ile r c a p a c ity .)
T ruckdriver (com bination of sizes listed separately)
T ruckdriver, lig h t (under 1 V 2 tons)
T ruckdriver, m edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
T ruckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, tra ile r type)
T ruckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than tra ile r type)

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK

TRUCKER, POWER

Prepares m erchandise for shipm ent, or receives and is responsible
for incom ing shipm ents of m erchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work
involves: A know ledge of shipping procedures, p ractices, routes, av ailable
m eans of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods
'■ hipped, m aking up bills of lading, posting w eight and shipping charges,
and keeping a file of shipping records. M ay d irect or assist in preparing
the m erchandise for shipm ent. R eceiving work involves: V erifying or
directing others in verifying the correctness of shipm ents against bills of
lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejectin g
dam aged goods; routing m erchandise or m aterials to proper departm ents;
and m aintainin g necessary records and files.

O perates a m anually controlled gasolin e- or electric-p o w ered
truck or tracto r to transport goods and m aterials of all kinds about a
w arehouse, m anufacturing p lant, or other establishm ent.

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
R eceiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk




For w age study purposes, workers are classified by type of truck,
as follows:
T rucker, pow er (forklift)
T rucker, pow er (other than forklift)
WATCHMAN
M akes rounds of prem ises p eriod ically in protecting property
against fire, th eft, and illeg al entry.




Available On Request—
The

s ix th

e n g in e e r s ,

annual

rep ort on s a la r ie s fo r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d ito r s , a tto r n e y s , c h e m is t s ,

e n g in e e r in g

t e c h n ic ia n s ,

d ra fts m e n ,

t r a c e r s , jo b

a n a ly s t s ,

d ir e c t o r s o f

p e r s o n n e l, m a n agers o f o f f i c e s e r v i c e s , and c l e r i c a l e m p lo y e e s .

O rder a s B L S B u lle tin

1 4 6 9 , N a tio n a l S u rv ey o f P r o f e s s io n a l, A d m in is tr a tiv e , T e c h ­

n ic a l , and C l e r i c a l P a y , F e b ru a ry —M arch 1 9 6 5 . 45 c e n t s a c o p y .




Area Wage Surveys*
A l i s t o f the la te s t a v a ila b le b u lle tin s i s p r e s e n t e d b e l o w .
A d i r e c t o r y in d ica t in g da tes o f e a r l i e r s tu d ie s , and the p r i c e s o f the b u ll e tin s is
a v a ila b le o n r e q u e s t .
Bu lle tin s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m the Superin ten den t o f D o c u m e n t s , U . S . G o v e r n m e n t P r in t in g O f f i c e , W ashin gton, D. C. , 20402,
o r f r o m any o f the BL S r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s shown on the in s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

Area

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e

A rea

B u lle tin n u m b e r
and p r i c e

A k r o n , Ohio, June 1965____________________________________
A lb any—S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N. Y. , A p r . 1965___________
A lb u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 ______________________
A l l e n t o w n - B e t h l e h e m — a s to n , Pa. — J. , F e b . 1966 1__
E
N.
Atlant a, Ga. , M a y 1965____________________________________
B a l t i m o r e , Md. , N o v. 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
B e a u m o n t—P o r t A r t h u r , T e x . , M a y 1 9 6 5 _________________
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 1__________________________
B o i s e Cit y, Idaho, July 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
B o s to n , M a s s . , O ct. 1 9 6 5 * ______________________________

1 4 3 0 -7 8 ,
1 4 3 0 -5 2 ,
1 4 3 0-6 2 ,
1465-53,
1 4 3 0-7 4 ,
1 4 6 5-2 9 ,
1 4 3 0 -6 6 ,
1 4 3 0 -6 0 ,
1 4 6 5 -1 ,
1 4 6 5 -1 2 ,

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M ilw a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 1____________________________
M in n e a p o lis —
St. Paul, Minn. , Jan. 1966________________
M u sk e g o n —M u s k e g o n H e ig hts, M ic h . ,M ay 1965_________
N e w a r k and J e r s e y City, N. J. , F e b . 1966 1_____________
New Haven, C o n n . , Jan. 19661___________________________
New O r l e a n s , L a . , F e b . 1966_____________________________
New Y o r k , N. Y. , A p r . 1965 1 ____________________________
N o r f o lk —P o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s —
Ham pton , V a . , June 1965 1 ______________________________
O k la h o m a C ity, Okla. , Aug. 1 9 6 5 _______________________

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1 4 6 5 -3 8 ,
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1 4 6 5-3 7 ,
1 4 6 5 -4 7 ,
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B u ffa lo , N. Y. , D e c . 1965_________________________________
B u rlin g to n , Vt. , M a r . 1966_______________________________
Canton, O hio, A p r . 1 9 6 5 __________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , A p r . 1965__________________________
C h a r lo t t e , N . C . , A p r . 1965______________________________
Ch atta n o o ga , T e n n . - G a . , Sept. 1 9 6 5 ____________________
C h i c a g o , 111., A p r . 1965 1 ------------------------------------------------C in cin n a ti, Ohio—Ky. , M a r . 1965________________________
C le v e la n d , Ohio, Sept. 1965______________________________
C o lu m b u s , Ohio, O ct. 1965_______________________________
D a lla s , T e x . , N o v. 1 9 6 5 __________________________________

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1 4 6 5 -5 4 ,
1 4 3 0 -5 9 ,
1 4 3 0 -6 5 ,
1 4 3 0 -6 1 ,
1 4 6 5 -7 ,
1 4 3 0 -7 2 ,
1 4 3 0 -5 5 ,
1 4 6 5-8 ,
1 4 6 5 -1 5 ,
1 4 6 5 -2 4 ,

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1 4 6 5 -3 5 ,
1 4 3 0 -5 6 ,
1 4 6 5 -4 6 ,
1 4 6 5 -2 3 ,
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D a v e n p o rt—R o c k I sla nd— o lin e , Iowa—
M
111.,
O ct. 1965 ___________________________________________________
D ayton, O hio, Jan. 1 9 6 6 1_________________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1965 1 _______________________________
D e s M o in e s , Iowa, F e b . 1 9 6 6 * ___________________________
D e t r o it , M ic h . , Jan. 1966_________________________________
F o r t W orth, T e x . , N o v. 1965_____________________________
G r e e n Bay, W is . , Aug. 1965______________________________
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , May 1965----------------------------------------------H ouston , T e x . , June 1965_________________________________
I n d ia n a p o lis , Ind. , D e c . 1965 1___________________________

O m a h a , N e b r . —Iowa, O ct . 1965 1 ------------------------------------P a t e r s o n — lifto n —P a s s a i c , N. J. , M a y 1 9 6 5 -----------------C
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a . - N . J . , N o v. 1 9 6 5 1____________________
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1965_______________________________
P it ts b u r g h , P a . , Jan. 1966_______________________________
P o r tla n d , M a in e , N o v. 1 9 6 5 1_____________________________
P o r t la n d , O r e g . —
Wash. , M a y 1965______________________
P r o v i d e n c e —P a w t u ck e t , R. I . — a s s . ,
M
May 1965 1 _________________________________________________
R a le ig h , N. C. , Sept. 1965 1______________________________
R ic h m o n d , V a . , Nov. 1 9 6 5 1 ______________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111. , M a y 1965----------------------------------------------------

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1465-39,
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1 4 6 5 -4 8 ,
1 4 6 5 -4 5 ,
1 4 6 5 -2 6 ,
1 4 6 5 -4 ,
1 4 3 0 -6 9 ,
1 4 3 0 -8 2 ,
1 4 6 5 -3 1 ,

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St. L o u i s , M o . —111. , O ct. 1 9 6 5 ™ _. . . . . . . . ___ ____________
Salt L a ke C ity, Utah, D e c . 1965____________________ ___
San A n to n io , T e x . , June 1965 1----------------------------------------San B e r n a r d i n o —R iv e r s id e — n t a rio , C a lif . ,
O
Sept. 1965 1________________________________________________
San D ie g o , C a l i f . , N o v. 1 9 6 5 -------------------------------------------San F r a n c i s c o —Oakland , C a l i f . , Jan. 1966 1_____________
San J o s e , C a l i f . , Sept. 1965 1 ------------------------------------------Savannah, Ga. , May 1 9 6 5 --------------------------------------------------S c r a n to n , P a . , Aug. 1965 *-----------------------------------------------Seattle—E v e r e t t , W a s h . , O ct. 1965 1--------------------------------

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1 4 6 5 -2 1 ,
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1 4 6 5 -9 ,

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1 4 6 5 -6 ,

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Sio ux F a l l s , S. D a k . , O ct. 1 9 6 5 1 _______________________
South Bend, I n d . , M a r . 1966 1-----------------------------------------Spokane, W a s h . , June 1 9 6 5 1______________________________
T o l e d o , O h io — i c h . , F e b . 1966___________________________
M
T r e n t o n , N. J. , D e c . 1965_________________________________
W a sh in gton, D. C. —Md. —V a. , O ct. 1 9 6 5 ________________
'
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r . 1 9 6 6 1__________________________
W a t e r l o o , Iowa, N o v. 1 9 6 5 _______________________________
W ic h ita , K a n s . , O ct. 1965------------------------------------------------W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , June 1 9 6 5 ____________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1966 1____________________________________
Y o un gsto w n —W a r r e n , Ohio, Nov. 1 9 6 5 * ________________

1 4 6 5 -1 7 ,
1 4 6 5 -5 5 ,
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1 4 6 5-4 9 ,
1 4 6 5 -3 4 ,
1 4 6 5 -1 4 ,
1 4 6 5-5 2 ,
1 4 6 5 -1 8 ,
1 4 6 5 -1 1 ,
1 4 3 0 -7 6 ,
1 4 6 5 -4 0 ,
1 4 6 5 -2 5 ,

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J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1966 1______________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F la . , Jan. 1966_____________________________
K a n s a s Cit y, M o . - K a n s . , Nov. 1965 * ___________________
L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h il l, M a s s . — . H . ,June 1965___________
N
L ittle R o c k — o rt h L it tle R o c k , A r k . , Aug. 1965_______
N
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a ch , C a lif. ,
M a r . 1965 1________________________________________________
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . —Ind. , F e b . 1966_________________________
L u b b o c k , T e x . , June 1 9 6 5 ________________________________
M a n c h e s t e r , N. H. , Aug. 1965____________________________
M e m p h i s , Ten n.— r k . , Jan. 1966 1_______________________
A
M ia m i, F l a . , D e c . 1 9 6 5 1_________________________________
M id la n d and O d e s s a , T eX------------------------------ ---------------------

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1 4 3 0 -7 3 , 20 ce n ts
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(Not previously surveyed)

Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.
* Bulletins dated before July 1965 were entitled "Occupational Wage Surveys."




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