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Area
Wage
Surveys
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

August 1981

Bulletin 2050-73

Selected Metropolitan
Areas, 1979

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C o

Preface
\

The Bureau o f Labor Statistics’ annual area wage survey program provides
information on occupational earnings, establishment practices, and sup­
plementary wage benefits for individual metropolitan areas, in addition to na­
tional and regional estimates for all Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas of
the United States (excluding Alaska and Hawaii). This bulletin summarizes oc­
cupational earnings data for 70 metropolitan areas surveyed during calendar
year 1979, as well as establishment practices and benefits for 20 of these areas.
In each area, occupational earnings data are collected annually. Informa­
tion on establishment practices and supplementary benefits is obtained every
third year. Individual area bulletins provide survey results in greater detail
than is shown in this summary bulletin.
A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to
describe the level and movement o f wages in a variety of labor markets,
through the analysis of (1) the level and distribution of wages by occupation,
and (2) the movement of wages by occupational category and skill level. The




program develops information that may be used for many purposes, including
wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance in deter­
mining plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Department of
Labor to make wage determinations under the Service Contract Act o f 1965.
The program covers six industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation,
communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail trade;
finance, insurance, and real estate; and selected services. Major exclusions are
the mining and construction industries and governments.
The area wage surveys could not have been accomplished without the
cooperation of the many firms whose wage and salary data provided the basis
for the statistical information in this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to express
sincere appreciation for the cooperation received.
Material in this publication is in the public domain and may, with ap­
propriate credit, be reproduced without permission.

Area
Wage
Surveys

Selected Metropolitan
Areas, 1979

U.S. Department of Labor
Raymond J. Donovan
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood, Commissioner

Contents
Page

August 1981
Bulletin 2050-73

For sale by the Superintendent of
Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, GPO
Bookstores, or BLS Regional Offices
listed on back cover. Price $ 4 . 75. Make
checks payable to Superintendent of

Documents, GPO.



Introduction

2

Tables:

Page
Tables—Continued
B. Establishment practices and supplementary
wage provisions—Continued

A. Earnings:
Weekly earnings of office workers:
A- 1. All industries.....................................................
A- 2. Manufacturing...................................................
A- 3. Nonmanufacturing...........................................
A- 4. Public utilities.....................................................
Weekly earnings of professional and
technical workers:
A- 5. All industries.....................................................
A- 6. Manufacturing...................................................
A- 7. Nonmanufacturing...........................................
Hourly earnings of plant workers:
A- 8. All industries.....................................................
A- 9. Manufacturing...................................................
A-10. Nonmanufacturing
......................................
A -ll. Public utilities............. i ....................................
Percent increases in average earnings:
A-12. Selected occupational groups.............................
Interarea pay comparisons:
A-13. Selected occupational groups.............................
B. Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions:
Late-shift pay differentials:
B- 1. Manufacturing....................................................
Scheduled weekly hours and days:
B- 2. All industries ......................................................
B- 3. Manufacturing....................................................
B- 4. Nonmanufacturing............................................
B- 5. Public utilities......................................................

3
8
13
18

23
28
33
38
43
48
53
58
60

62
64
66
68
70

Paid holidays:
B- 6. All industries ......................................................
B- 7. Manufacturing....................................................
B- 8. Nonmanufacturing..................
B- 9. Public utilities......................................................
Paid vacations:
B-10. All industries ....................................................
B -ll. Manufacturing..................................................
B-12. Nonmanufacturing...........................................
B-13. Public utilities....................................................
Health, insurance, and pension plans:
B-14. All industries ....................................................
B-15. Manufacturing..................................................
B-16. Nonmanufacturing...........................................
B-17. Public utilities....................................................
Life insurance plans:
B-18. All industries ....................................................
B-19. Manufacturing..................................................

72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
88
90
92
94
96
100

Appendixes:
A. Scope and method of surveys...............................................
Tables:
1. Employment in scope of surveys................................
2. Major manufacturing industries ................................
3. Major nonmanufacturing industries..........................
4. Labor-management agreement coverage—
all industries and 2 industry divisions....................

105
110
112
113

B. Occupational descriptions.....................................................

H6

115

Introduction

Information on occupational earnings for 70 metropolitan areas is provided
in tables A -l through A - l l . The tables present average (mean) straight-time
earnings of selected office clerical, professional and technical, maintenance,
toolroom, and powerplant, and material movement and custodial occupa­
tions. Earnings data are reported by occupation for: (1) All industries combin­
ed; (2) manufacturing; (3) nonmanufacturing; and (4) public utilities. Data
were insufficient to warrant presentation of public utility averages for profes­
sional and technical occupations.
Table A -12 shows 1-year percent increases in average earnings for five oc­
cupational groups—office clerical, electronic data processing, industrial
nurses, skilled maintenance, and unskilled plant workers.
Table A -13 shows interarea pay comparisons for office clerical, electronic
data processing, skilled maintenance, and unskilled plant workers.
The B-series tables provide information on establishment practices and sup­
plementary wage provisions for production and related workers (referred to as




“ production workers” ) and office workers. Table B-l shows the percent of
production workers in manufacturing working on late shifts by type o f shift
pay differential. Tables B-2 through B-19 show data for scheduled weekly
hours and days; paid holidays; paid vacations; health, insurance, and pension
plans; and more detailed information on life insurance plans.
There are two appendixes to this bulletin. Appendix A describes the
methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program and provides in­
formation on the scope o f the individual studies. The four tables in appendix
A show (1) number o f workers employed in the six major industry divisions
studied, (2) important manufacturing industries in the area, (3) percent of
workers in key nonmanufacturing industries, and (4) extent o f labormanagement agreement coverage. Appendix B provides job descriptions used
by Bureau field representatives to classify workers in occupations for which
straight-time earnings information is presented.

2

Table A-1. Weekly earnings1 of office workers, all industries,1 January through December 1979
Northeast

Occupation

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

NassauSuffolk

Newark

March

June

January

May

$213.50
280.50
240.00
225.50
191.50
166.00
209.50
223.50
200.00
164.00
163.50
188.00
150.00
139.00
157.50
140.50
135.00
147.50
163.00

$230.50
291.50
252.50
237.00
211.50
189.00
184.00
214.50
166.50

$241.00
297.00
267.50
252.00
222.50
209.00
210.00
224.50
197.50
179.00
164.50
175.50
157.00
145.50
157.50
135.00
160.00
188.00

$244.50
308.00
271.50
241.00
218.50
201.00
205.00
211.50
197.00
195.00
166.00
190.50
153.50
150.50
181.50
160.00
137.00
147.00
189.50

175.00
199.50
243.00
182.00
199.00
225.50
183.00
181.00
_

187.50
189.00
230.50
170.50
203.00
225.00
182.50
195.50
214.00
183.50
210.00
209.50
_

157.50
166.00
161.50
161.50
200.00
145.00

218.50
191.00
198.00
185.50

168.00
156.50

Buffalo

September
Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers.............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists...............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Boston

August

October

$260.00
289.00
275.50
261.50
215.00
212.00
221.50
220.00
227.50

$229.00
287.50
258.00
235.00
207.00
194.50
222.50
224.00
222.00
177.50
173.00
192.00
162.00
155.00
196.50
147.00
135.50
138.00
179.50

$240.50
270.00
250.50
255.50
233.50
192.50
221.00
237.00
212.00
185.00
152.50
165.00
'
146.50
142.50
159.50
126.50
151.00
166.50

173.50
194.00
222.00
180.50
193.00
224.50
173.50

175.00
189.00
-

158.00
204.50
185.50
164.50
175.50
153.50

159KX)
168.50
164.50
175.50
191.50
157.00

184.50
239.00
153.50
146.00
-

160.00
138.50
178.50
191.00
184.50
198.50
163.00
183.50
209.00
170.00

-

204.00
234.00
173.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

222.00
208.50
232.00
180.50

-

205.00
188.50
203.50
172.00

244.00
188.50
222.50
165.00

Hartford

-

198.50
175.00
165.00
172.00
157.50

-

160.50
184.00
149.00
128.50
147.50
124.50
149.50
169.50

-

_
_
185.00
175.50
191.00
169.00

New York

152.00
_
_
205.00
192.00
215.00
177.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




3

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Poughkeepsie

August

June

November

January

December

$201.50
228.50
225.50
208.50
185.00
169.00
197.50
260.00
153.50
154.50
164.00
217.00
146.50
123.00
_

$221.00
287.50
244.00
218.00
193.00
205.50
195.50

$241.00
312.50
261.50
235.50
232.00
194.50
232.50
237.50
230.50
171.00
165.50
189.50
152.50
144.00
194.00
156.50
135.00
166.50
193.50

$241.00
326.50
265.50
241.50
220.00
200.00
212.00
204.50
218.50
160.50
161.00
181.00
152.50
138.00
167.00
146.50
126.00
146.00
174.00

$214.50

175.50
215.50
260.00
179.50
201.00
218.00
188.00
_
_
_

167.00
231.00
263.50
212.00
196.50
234.50
174.50
_
_
_
_
_
_

155.00
178.00
163.50
208.50
235.50
191.50
_
_
_
_
_
_

233.50
195.50
217.00
181.50

180.50
169.00
207.50
151.00

Northeast
Pennsylvania

121.50
138.00
147.50

_
_
_
_
_

-

150.00

-

199.50
168.50
149.50
172.00
144.50
156.00
_
154.00
150.00
172.50
167.00
190.00
160.50
188.50
209.00
176.50
_
_
183.00
181.50
_
202.50
178.00
190.00
165.50

_
_
213.00
187.50
215.00
171.00

-

221.00
224.00
205.50
-

201.50
-

183.50
158.00
144.50
159.00
140.00
121.50
_
120.00
156.00
153.50

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

June

June

September

_

$196.00
249.50
227.50
195.00
184.00
157.50
165.50
_

$234.00
_

-

_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
$219.50
153.50
_
_
_
185.50
216.00
157.50

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

206.00
218.50
183.50

159.00
155.50
147.00
165.00
144.00
137.50
_
141.00
131.50
150.50
171.50
164.00
163.50
184.00
154.50
177.00
196.50
163.00
_

_
_
_
179.00
162.00
179.00
155.00

272.50
246.00
224.50
188.50
203.00
200.50
204.00
_
162.50
_
159.50
_
_
_
146.50
180.50
185.50
220.50
_
217.50
205.00
227.50
176.50
_
_
_

_
219.00
176.00
198.00
165.00

Table A-1. Weekly earnings' of office workers, all industries,2 January through December 1979—Continued
South

Northeast— Continued

Occupation

Worcester

April

February

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers.............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists...........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

$222.50
279.00
243.50
223.50
198.50
163.00
185.50
169.50
167.50
153.50
169.50
141.50
137.50
142.50
127.50
139.00
189.00

$208.00
272.00
232.50
203.50
188.50
189.50
185.00
192.00
177.50
157.00
168.50
152.00
141.50
151.50
131.50
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




170.50
191.00
205.50
158.00
196.50
221.50
174.00
199.50
178.00
194.50
151.50

York

“
158.50
197.50
232.00
175.50
164.00
187.50
153.00
171.00
170.50
176.50
172.00
196.00
157.50

Baltimore

Chatta­
nooga

May

August

$237.00
274.00
256.00
233.00
224.00
188.50
238.00
251.50
221.00
168.50
167.00
212.00
156.00
144.50
-

$241.00
278.50
253.00
236.50
236.00
201.00
245.00
225.50
253.50
184.50
202.50
164.50
168.00
175.00
143.50
168.50
189.00

Atlanta

157.50
135.50
167.00
185.50
171.00
179.00
169.00
190.50
216.50
176.00
178.50
147.50
195.50
202.00
235.00
183.00

164.00
176.00
190.00
165.50
230.00
262.00
194.00
171.00
192.00
158.00
242.50
201.50
219.00
189.00

Gaines­
ville

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$232.00
279.50
247.50
230.50
224.50
205.00
242.00
275.50
216.50
178.00
166.00
179.00
157.50
145.50
154.00
139.00
157.00
172.50

$218.50
210.50
224.00
148.00

$209.50
231.50
195.00
205.50
-

$225.50
275.00
231.50
222.50
210.50
202.00
213.00
202.50
163.50
188.00
188.50
187.00
143.50
147.50
134.00
154.00
168.50

$191.50
227.50
214.00
200.50
181.00
158.50
188.50
184.50
194.00
158.00
162.50
153.50
140.00
131.00
152.50
166.00

$246.50
295.50
277.50
259.50
224.00
216.00
230.00
240.50
209.00
186.50
174.00
188.50
167.00
148.00
167.50
135.00
141.50
168.00

$222.50
221.50
246.50
212.50
185.00
199.50
149.00
129.50

$192.00
223.00
223.00
212.00
179.00
158.50
188.00
193.50
185.00
150.50
139.00
135.50
120.50
120.00
144.00
143.50

173.00
213.50
270.50
159.00
191.00
211.50
177.50
164.50
154.50
163.00
162.50
215.50
186.50
207.00
169.00

142.00
166.00
184.50
154.00
171.50
190.50

143.50
219.00
217.50
170.00
195.00
158.50
217.00
171.50
176.00
169.50

156.00
158.50
159.50
196.00
215.50
184.50
191.50
188.50
190.50
193.50
194.00
247.50
176.00

158.00
151.50
148.00
162.50
173.00
159.00
173.00
154.00
164.50
151.00

176.50
197.50
275.00
173.50
196.50
225.50
180.50
208.00
190.50
211.00
180.50

156.00
188.50
214.00
172.50
179.50
174.50
”

152.50
224.00
195.00
173.00
191.00
164.50
184.00
160.50
175.00
157.00

DallasFort
Worth

September

July

$205.50
215.50
229.50
217.00
193.50
178.50
197.00
184.00
147.50
165.50
142.00
126.50
132.50
126.50
157.50

$204.50
248.00
221.00
228.50
200.00
175.50
152.00
142.50
120.50
120.00
133.00
142.00
168.00
208.50
154.50
175.00
174.50
191.00
163.50

160.00
176.00
173.50
174.00
209.00
157.00
184.00
162.50
175.00
158.50

“

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Hunts­
ville

Daytona
Beach

Corpus
Christi

Houston

Jackson

Table A-1. Weekly earnings' of office workers, all industries,2 January through December 1979—Continued
South—Continued
New
Orleans

North Central

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

San
Antonio

Washington

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
M essengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Jacksonville

Louisville

Memphis

December

Occupation

November

November

October

January

May

August

June

May

March

$217.50
255.50
234.00
232.50
196.50
191.50
260.50
254.00
263.00
185.00
153.50
158.00
152.50
140.50
143.50
132.50
156.00
167.00

$232.00
249.50
233.50
229.50
235.00
210.50
209.50
211.50
207.00
160.50
157.00
202.00
148.50
148.00
171.00
134.50
154.50
172.50

$218.00
230.50
233.50
222.50
192.00
188.00
221.50
222.50
172.50
192.00
240.00
174.50
157.00
212.50
129.50
151.00
168.50

$231.00
272.00
252.00
231.50
206.00
203.00
228.50
252.50
210.00
177.50
194.00
163.50
146.00
157.00
135.50
160.50
138.00

$210.00
259.00
231.50
209.00
202.50
190.50
184.50
194.00
179.50
160.50
140.50
157.50
137.00
126.00
132.50
122.00
135.00
145.50

$195.00
225.50
210.00
196.50
164.00
194.00
192.50
151.50
191.00
145.00
123.00
119.50
127.50
140.00

$225.00
270.50
233.50
223.00
246.00
194.50
191.50
205.50
179.50
155.50
152.50
173.50
144.00
134.00
137.00
127.00
132.50
177.00

$208.50
251.00
233.00
212.50
206.00
165.50
209.00
229.00
198.50
164.00
152.00
163.50
146.50
142.00
202.50
143.00
132.50
158.00
165.00

$188.50
210.50
210.00
184.50
159.00
189.00
167.00
142.00
146.50
152.50
137.00
126.00
125.50
132.50

$243.00
321.50
282.00
254.50
233.00
200.00
234.50
237.00
226.50
215.50
179.50
184.00
176.50
162.00
182.50
159.00
160.00
173.00
157.50

152.00
176.50
174.50
174.50
199.00
163.50
-

160.00
210.50
228.50
206.00
210.50
246.50
192.00
201.50

172.00
207.50
178.00
194.50
217.50
177.50
215.50
183.00
218.00
162.50

178.50
188.00
183.50
206.50
228.00
189.50
167.00
170.00
164.50
179.50
199.00
184.00
193.50
178.50

154.50
170.50
148.00
174.50
202.50
163.00
_
179.00
158.50
186.00
152.00

145.00
146.00
147.50
160.00
192.50
148.50
169.00
187.50
“

170.00
177.50
208.50
167.00
199.50
229.00
186.50
185.00
158.00
155.50
208.50
186.00
206.00
176.00

162.00
199.00
216.50
178.00
179.00
197.50
165.50
152.00
138.00
196.50
168.00
174.00
162.50

148.50
151.50
141.50
171.50
190.00
165.00
149.50
149.50
175.50
159.00
177.50
150.00

163.00
186.00
196.00
194.50
228.00
173.50
211.00
171.00
204.50
163.00

182.50
212.50
251.50
187.50
207.00
228.50
191.00
185.50
190.50
183.00
259.50
261.50
_
219.50
201.50
213.00
193.00

-

190.50
186.50
194.50
180.00

-

179.50
223.50
223.50
203.00
185.50
204.00
177.50

Miami

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




5

Richmond

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

September

Octobei

February

$240.50
305.00
267.50
250.50
216.50
189.00
229.50
235.50
222.50
170.50
180.50
202.00
168.50
156.00
158.50
140.00
167.50
173.00

$222.50
269.50
241.50
225.50
215.50
194.50
220.00
230.50
195.50
155.00
173.50
189.00
156.00
142.50
153.50
132.00
135.50
169.00

$303.00
386.00
320.00
314.50
233.50
258.50
245.50
268.00
179.50
235.50
267.50
194.50
190.00
264.00
188.00
128.50
198.00
207.00

169.00
212.50
240.50
192.00
210.00
241.50
187.50
174.00
169.00
198.50
_
217.00
201.00
221.50
185.00

170.50
187.00
213.50
184.00
191.00
211.00
171.50

167.50
229.00
252.50
230.00
279.50
188.50
172.50
245.00
235.50
284.50
195.00

Cincinnati

Cleveland

May

July

$243.00
303.00
259.00
248.50
219.50
205.50
239.50
245.00
233.00
182.00
182.00
202.00
169.00
152.00
198.00
161.50
139.00
156.00
179.50

$234.50
271.00
247.50
243.00
218.50
196.00
213.00
225.00
204.00
176.50
163.50
181.00
150.50
145.50
144.00
139.00
153.50
195.00
168.00
198.00
232.00
176.00
185.00
210.50
170.50

Chicago

-

_
205.50
176.00
182.00
172.00

-

_
211.00
181.00
204.00
164.50

Table A-1. Weekly earnings' of office workers, all industries,2 January through December 1979—Continued
North Central— Continued

Occupation

Dayton

Detroit

GaryHammondEast Chicago

Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisS t Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

December
Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B ............................................ .........

March

October

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$238.50
300.50
237.50
249.00
196.00
196.00
219.00
226.50
209.50
190.00
170.50
205.50
148.50
148.50
171.50
130.50
139.00
172.00

$306.50
356.00
346.00
311.50
266.00
218.00
266.50
284.50
231.00
188.50
196.50
252.50
167.00
154.50
172.50
147.50
179.00
210.00

$275.00
296.00
285.50
187.00
285.00
290.00
291.00
233.50
239.50
149.50
218.00
225.00

$217.50
237.50
247.50
210.50
190.50
163.00
177.50
164.50.
159.50
168.00
-

$249.50
304.00
265.50
266.50
215.00
188.50
247.50
275.00
202.50
173.50
162.00
180.00
153.00
133.50
134.00
127.00
170.00
173.00

$231.50
265.00
259.00
231.50
209.00
203.50
230.50
238.50
222.00
173.50
166.00
186.50
154.00
155.50
238.00
164.50
134.00
151.00
165.00

$233.00
291.50
246.50
232.00
208.00
206.00
201.50
206.00
192.50
183.00
168.50
186.00
152.50
161.00
186.00
173.50
135.00
161.00
180.00

$215.00
260.50
231.50
204.50
192.00
196.00
189.00
185.00
196.50
168.00
158.50
163.00
154.00
146.00
208.50
149.50
127.50
141.00
165.00

$228.50
286.50
232.50
228.50
205.50
246.00
262.00
191.00
164.50
166.00
178.50
143.00
153.00
249.00
143.50
123.50
145.00
183.50

$309.50
309.00
313.00
238.50
246.00
214.00
181.50
159.50
140.50
138.00
177.00

$222.00
271.50
233.00
222.00
210.00
185.00
206.50
221.50
196.00
170.50
163.50
189.50
152.00
148.00
186.50
148.00
130.50
156.50
170.00

$228.00
233.00
218.50
225.00
210.50
267.50
198.00
189.00
180.00
199.00
166.50
155.50
132.00
180.00

$249.50
300.50
269.00
246.50
229.00
234.50
239.50
270.00
227.50
189.50
207.50
182.50
143.50
153.00
140.00
170.50
173.50

$231.00
252.00
239.50
235.00
227.50
196.00
227.50
232.50
220.50
155.00
175.50
149.50
154.00
190.00
193.00

164.50
173.50
170.50
181.50
223.50
159.00
197.00
189.50
216.00
174.50

186.00
239.50
306.00
210.00
211.00
255.00
182.50
477.00
210.00
244.00
194.00

185.00
214.50
200.00
262.50
297.00
238.00
273.00
267.00
257.50
272.50

157.00
203.50
195.50
202.50
250.00
183.00
220.50
167.50
185.00
148.00

176.50
240.50
263.50
202.50
183.00
206.50
164.50
205.00
229.50
196.50
212.00
180.00

167.50
199.00
217.00
185.50
209.00
243.00
177.00
_
_
-

169.50
188.50
192.50
184.50
193.50
212.50
178.50
190.00
199.00
406.00
191.50
207.50
177.00

163.00
191.50
204.50
167.00
188.00
214.50
169.50
179.00
196.00
162.50
230.50
214.00
173.00
188.00
161.00

163.50
197.00
205.00
187.50
205.50
218.50
189.00
_
_
241.50
165.50
189.00
150.00

191.00
165.00
158.00
227.50
261.50
182.00
_
214.50
232.00
209.50

170.50
190.00
165.50
193.00
231.00
165.00
211.50
183.00
202.50
175.50

157.00
174.00
171.00
187.50
204.50
177.00
233.50
190.50
228.50
166.50

171.50
181.00
227.00
168.50
205.50
237.50
189.50
200.00
189.00
210.00
206.50
223.50
189.00

158.50
212.00
186.00
201.50
236.00
179.50
183.50
193.50
198.50
214.00
189.00

217.00
197.50
215.50
184.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




6

Table A-1. Weekly earnings' of office workers, all industries,* January through December 1979—Continued
West

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Billings

DenverBoulder

October

Occupation

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

July

$261.00
304.50
285.00
269.00
251.00
217.50
237.50
246.00
222.50
186.00
184.00
208.00
174.50
158.00
• ~
159.00
153.00
170.00
196.50
179.50
224.00
248.00
202.00
212.50
234.50
198.00
214.00
208.00
216.00
200.50

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$198.00
214.00
187.00
200.00
254.50
132.00
150.00
140.00

$253.00
283.50
274.00
255.00
234.00
209.50
249.50
253.50
241.00
179.50
189.50
204.50
165.50
151.50
191.00
156.00
128.00
157.50
190.00

$223.00

$267.00
324.50
297.50
265.50
250.50
216.00
255.50
267.50
240.50
203.50
195.00
215.50
183.00
174.50
225.50
183.00
156.00
176.00
199.00

$241.50
281.50
274.00
247.00
220.00
192.50
. 242.00
218.50
192.50
165.50
207.50
155.00
156.00
172.50
137.50
163.50
194.50

$257.00
269.50
290.00
241.00
221.50
282.00
287.00
177.50
164.00
194.00
143.50
138.00
179.00

$219.50
232.00
268.00
235.50
197.00
190.50
229.00
225.00
233.00
192.50
159.50
187.00
151.00
151.00
146.50
141.00
146.50
160.00

$248.00
293.50
274.00
239.00
245.50
218.00
227.00
219.00
230.50
192.50
208.50
176.50
148.50
140.00
173.00

$249.50
299.50
275.00
244.50
243.50
221.00
220.00
219.50
222.00
211.50
186.50
192.50
177.50
161.00
204.00
166.50
148.00
182.00
187.00

$250.50
304.50
276.00
252.00
232.50
240.00
217.00
205.50
233.00
207.50
223.00
162.50
153.50
181.50
136.00
185.00
207.00

$277.00
314.50
302.50
265.00
253.00
291.00
253.50
226.00
206.50
197.00
210.50
180.50
159.00
_
154.50
158.50
174.00
192.50

161.50
194.50
232.00
164.00
191.50
168.50
166.50
“

183.50
196.50
189.50
207.50
228.50
187.50
_
360.50
368.50
220.50
201.00
223.50
186.00

156.00
189.50
189.50
183.50
203.50
166.50
194.00
175.50
180.00
173.00

190.00
214.50
231.50
207.50
219.50
233.50
206.50
-

175.00
223.00
273.00
190.00
221.50
260.50
199.50
-

195.00
230.50
224.50
222.50
232.00
215.50
-

172.00
227.00
257.50
216.00
201.50
235.50
174.50
_

159.50
171.50
192.50
166.50
192.00
218.50
176.50
-

191.50
232.00
251.50
213.50
223.50
238.50
209.00
-

173.00
200.00
186.00
203.50
223.00
187.00
-

189.00
287.00
310.50
269.50
219.00
234.50
201.50
-

-

236.00
229.50
219.00
183.00
189.00
155.50
181.50
147.50
179.00

_

_

288.00
288.00
238.00
219.50
237.50
206.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




7

_
225.50
192.00
208.00
184.00

_

_
240.50
190.00
247.00
152.50

_

_
_
209.00
180.50
193.00
175.00

_

_
_
203.00
197.00
209.00
176.50

_

_
289.00
255.50
239.00
228.50
244.50
224.00

_

_
217.50
208.00
246.00
192.50

_
_

_
_
241.00
208.50
221.50
197.00

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of office workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
Northeast

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .........................................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral .........................................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ...........................
Typists .................................................................................
Class A .........................................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .........................................................................
Class C .........................................................................
Messengers ....................................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ...............................................................
Order clerks ...................................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B ....................... ...iw _________ . . . . _________
Accounting clerks ......................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .........................................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators ...................
Class A .........................................................................
Class B .........................................................................
Machine billers .............................................................
Billing machine ......................................................
Bookkeeping m achine .....................................
Payroll clerks ................................................................
Key entry operators .................................................
Class A .........................................................................
Class B .........................................................................

Boston

Buffalo

September

Occupation

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

August

October

_

$227.00

$238.00
290.50
268.00
243.50
218.00

-

-

-

-

222.00
-

221.00
-

179.00
192.00
163.00
201.50

$252.00
290.00
271.00
267.00
237.50
-

257.00
287.50
243.50
-

170.00
191.50
161.50
-

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonClrftonPassaic

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

$226.50

_

$202.00

$243.50

$224.00
269.50
258.50
228.00
187.50
-

215.50
224.50

$237.50
288.00
258.00
249.00
210.50
194.50
189.00
-

-

-

-

-

-

172.00
170.50

170.00
199.50
158.00
137.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

207.50
199.50
-

176.00
204.00
206.00
202.00

146.00
163.00
198.50
187.50
193.50
220.00
184.50
187.00
210.00
167.00

-

183.00
215.00
-

230.50
263.00
191.50

-

172.00
188.50
164.50
199.00
-

190.50
185.00
205.50
162.00

131.50
151.00
-

157.50
166.00
-

165.00
180.00
201.00
157.00

$240.50
280.50
272.00
255.50
222.00
212.50
222.00
225.00
211.00
198.00
175.00
187.00
169.00
174.50

$251.00
307.00
282.50
255.50
213.00
202.50
222.50
240.50
211.00
191.00
186.00
214.50
171.50
172.50
198.50
180.00
156.50
151.50
201.00
184.00
187.00

-

168.50
151.50
164.50
199.50
174.50
204.50
230.50
189.50
200.00
226.50
183.50

160.00
172.50

-

180.50
212.50
230.00
190.50
201.50
236.50
182.50

-

210.00
229.50
190.00
-

219.00
-

165.50
223.50
146.50
-

$228.50
297.50
256.50
223.00
195.00
221.00
199.50
-

187.50
-

168.00
183.00
161.00
152.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

170.00
172.50
200.00
156.50

153.50
143.50
186.00
170.00
-

183.50
204.50
172.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

221.50
218.00
223.00
205.50

200.50
191.00
205.00
164.00

270.50
225.00
249.00
188.50

177.50
170.00
175.50
159.50

180.00
176.50
206.50
163.50

207.50
201.00
219.00
189.50

227.00
203.50
228.50
179.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$210.50

8

$252.00
309.00
270.00
250.50
236.00
214.50
247.00
245.00
248.00
174.50
183.50
220.00
163.50
164.50
-

$261.50
332.00
274.00
243.50
248.50
219.00
223.50
208.00
231.50
-

199.00
196.00
201.00
192.50
_

173.50
143.50
169.00
222.00

166.50
165.50
234.00

182.50
216.50
265.50
177.50
222.00
240.00
210.00

189.00
252.00
267.00
225.50
245.50
279.50
220.50

-

-

-

-

-

247.50
226.00

-

-

-

-

230.50
198.00
194.00
166.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

156.00
173.00
151.00
143.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

279.50
247.50
241.00
194.50
212.00
-

209.00
-

171.50
-

170.00
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

152.50
193.50

$157.00
-

-

-

-

-

193.00
207.50
181.50

203.00
222.50
-

129.50

168.00
162.00
186.50
147.50
174.50
187.00
162.00

195.50
229.50
-

227.00
208.50
225.50
184.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

171.50
165.00
193.00
154.50

193.50

204.50
180.50
191.50
174.00

222.50
197.00
221.00
179.00

244.00
229.00
233.50
225.50

182.50
174.50
-

160.00

•

-

-

204.00
212.00

-

-

175.00
165.00
178.50
159.50

-

-

228.50
193.00
197.00
189.00

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of office workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
Northeast—Continued

South

Baltimore

Chatta­
nooga

May

August

$237.50
269.00
239.50
225.00
216.50
-

$257.00
270.50
271.50
262.50
245.00
244.00
249.00
212.50
222.50
192.50
181.00
179.50
180.50
174.50
169.50
187.00
152.00
242.00
269.00
206.00
166.00

Occupation

Worcester

April

February

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ..............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine............................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

$229.00
268.50
237.50
229.00
209.50
196.00
182.00
163.50
163.50
148.00
-

$215.50
240.00
215.50
193.50
198.00
173.50
179.50
166.50
157.50
169.00
151.50
163.00
-

172.00
192.50
204.50
197.50
215.50
177.00
192.50
188.50
198.50
161.50

159.50
198.00
233.00
175.50
181.50
201.50
169.00
172.50
171.00
178.00
177.00
209.50
155.50

169.00
186.00
182.00
198.00
239.00
180.50
-

York

Atlanta

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

September

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$211.00
235.50
224.50
193.50
179.50
202.50
204.00
159.00
159.00
-

$209.00
221.50
-

$240.00
258.50
261.50
247.00
225.50
239.00
296.50
187.00
161.50
180.50
147.00
162.00
128.50
170.50
204.50

$258.00
229.00
_
-

$279.50
_
-

$237.50
271.50
257.50
231.50
232.00
206.00
217.00
-

$195.00
226.50
208.00
197.50
182.00
168.50
173.00
148.50
149.00
-

$250.50
303.00
263.00
262.00
244.00
207.50
250.50
265.00
234.00
176.50
189.00
166.50
174.00
165.00
201.50

$239.00
250.50
_
_
_

$199.50
191.50
-

166.50
195.50
192.50
189.00
215.00
169.50
-

143.50
174.50
201.00
161.00
_

168.50
185.50
214.00
173.50
190.00
220.50
172.50
_

183.00
226.00
167.00
_

172.50
178.50
_
-

159.00
173.50
177.00
208.50
220.00
197.00

165.00
155.00
150.00
173.00
185.00
167.50
-

187.00
219.00
256.00
188.00
207.50
236.50
185.50

_

188.00
193.00
233.50
176.50

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

273.50
218.00
247.50
183.50

190.50
183.50
182.50

171.00
224.50
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




_

9

203.50
209.50
244.00
183.50

184.50
-

-

-

-

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

206.50
189.00
164.00
156.50
140.50
175.50

_

_
_

161.50
_

183.50
180.00
200.50
177.50

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

_

_

_

_

176.50
159.00
170.50
155.00

226.50
198.50
208.00
190.50

Jackson

_

_
156.00
201.50
195.00
174.50
195.50
156.00
_

*
-

_

_

200.50
232.50
183.00

_

_

_
-

_

_

Hunts­
ville

_
_

185.00
180.50
182.00

_

181.00
157.00
155.00

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of office workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
South— Continued

Secretaries...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................
„ .

Louisville

Memphis

December

Occupation

Jacksonville

November

$224.50
232.00
224.50
169.00
180.00
174.50
173.00
179.50
168.50
184.00
175.50
168.50

North Central

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

November

October

January

May

$246.00
256.50
281.50
235.50
243.50
225.00
234.50
224.50
164.00
204.50
134.50
162.50
223.00

$230.00
245.50
247.50
221.50
190.50
157.50
155.50
148.50
-

$220.00
241.00
225.00
208.50
196.50
191.00
171.50
170.00
’ -

$220.00
218.00
231.50
208.00
188.50
167.50
-

169.50
224.00
211.50
246.50
178.00
211.50
195.00
205.00
202.00
207.50

178.50
177.50
172.50
202.00
228.50
185.50
235.50
192.50
223.00
179.00

164.50
183.50
175.50
180.00
196.50
169.50
-

166.00
180.00
160.00
176.00
210.50
160.00
179.00
177.00
205.50
162.50

182.00
176.50
195.00
167.50

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

August

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

$212.50
228.00
187.00
184.00
156.50
-

$217.00
270.00
225.00
204.00
224.00
210.50
173.00
169.50
175.00
-

$226.50
221.50
219.00
171.50
179.00
168.50
-

$194.50
232.00
212.00
187.00
167.00
-

$248.00
-

$245.50
314.50
263.00
254.50
217.00
206.50
249.50
260.50
232.50
192.00
190.00
212.50
171.00
169.50
218.50
152.00
167.50
171.50
200.50

$244.50
268.50
257.50
253.50
232.00
209.50
225.00
196.50
186.50
202.00
172.00
155.00
-

$260.50
313.50
287.00
266.00
234.00
205.00
228.00
230.00
225.50
204.00
187.00
203.50
174.00
176.50
180.00
175.00
214.50

$229.00
240.00
233.50
223.50
211.00
226.50
177.50
208.50
161.00
157.00
-

$317.50
323.50
236.00
292.50
309.50
285.00
254.50
278.00
209.50
234.50
-

171.50
155.50
154.50
175.50
220.50
152.00
192.50
172.50
197.00
153.00

163.50
207.50
197.00
188.00
214.00
171.00
_
205.00
186.00
200.50
176.00

180.00
200.00
203.50
200.00
226.50
180.00
_

155.50
184.00
170.00
190.00
158.00
-

169.50
235.50
226.00
248.50
205.50
_

184.50
205.00
246.50
180.00
207.50
225.00
192.50
212.50
204.00
200.50
199.00
222.50
205.50
215.50
197.00

165.50
185.50
210.00
176.50
193.50
237.50
175.00
212.00
178.50
189.00
173.00

175.50
220.50
249.00
205.50
219.00
244.00
195.00
179.50
181.00
213.00

177.50
178.00
204.50
165.50
187.00
193.00
179.50
-

189.50
227.00
273.50
320.00
205.50
259.50
255.50
289.00
207.50

See footnotes at end of B senes tables.




10

-

207.50
181.00
191.50
163.00

-

180.50
160.00
157.00

284.50
250.00
220.00
183.00
203.00
152.00
-

-

208.00
202.50

158.50
143.50
150.50
-

-

224.00
215.00
226.50
200.50

-

215.50
183.50
202.50
165.50

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of office workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central— Continued

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ...................................... .'..............
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G en eral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ..............................................
Order c le rk s ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers..............................................
Billing m achine........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisS t Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$242.00
274.50
259.50
238.50
229.00
217.50
215.50
226.00
210.00
167.00
186.00
215.00
171.50
165.50
_
164.50
155.00
220.50

$239.00
239.00
244.50
240.50
209.00
173.00
168.50
182.50
_
_
-

$262.50
318.50
279.00
252.00
249.50
226.00
223.50
212.00
207.50
262.50
191.50
_
_
169.50
233.00

$242.50
257.00
257.00
248.00
234.00
196.00
231.50
182.00
198.00
177.00
_
_
223.50
230.00

175.00
163.00
159.50
206.00
241.50
172.00
-

155.50
173.50
197.00
223.00
179.50
-

172.00
185.00
179.00
225.50
257.00
200.50

169.00
221.50
193.50
206.00
220.50
190.50
-

$248.50
309.50
252.00
259.00
186.50
205.50
219.00
247.00
184.50
164.00
194.00
143.50
147.00
139.00
139.50
191.00

$342.50
391.00
379.00
341.00
281.50
268.50
237.00
250.50
285.00
212.50
275.00
214.50
297.00

$319.50
331.50
310.00
297.50
285.50
302.00
-

$245.00
263.00
194.50
202.50
-

$298.00
332.00
336.00
324.50
247.50
252.00
283.00
196.00
196.50
155.50
-

$230.00
269.00
252.50
229.50
211.50
219.00
235.50
184.00
161.50
173.50
153.00
149.50
145.00
156.50
-

$237.50
291.50
247.50
232.00
209.50
198.00
199.00
205.00
185.00
181.00
180.00
191.50
157.50
171.00
168.00
163.50
198.00

$216.00
264.50
235.50
206.50
191.50
184.00
176.50
180.50
167.50
160.00
169.00
149.50
145.00
_
-

164.50
178.50
177.50
199.00
238.50
173.50
206.00
208.00
239.50
187.00

188.50
243.50
285.00
196.50
258.50
295.00
209.50
_
545.00
271.00
290.50
256.00

177.50
224.00
289.00
_
289.00
287.00
280.50
290.50

169.50
202.00
197.50
201.00
218.50
196.00
_
_
240.50
171.50
202.00
151.00

186.50
224.00
278.50
199.50
220.50
254.00
194.50
_

168.50
184.00
178.00
188.50
193.00
205.50
179.50
-

179.50
207.50
223.00
186.50
198.00
221.00
181.50
193.00

170.00
193.00
208.00
175.00
182.50
202.50
167.50
_

181.00
183.50
183.50
208.00
214.00
197.00
-

_
-

$285.50
314.50
199.50
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

_
263.00
222.50
250.00
204.00

_
220.50
197.00
210.00
185.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




135.50
139.00
185.00

$237.00
242.50
234.50
229.00
240.50
_
. -

_
-

11

_
410.00
192.00
206.50
179.00

_

_
218.00
176.00
179.00
170.00

231.00
182.50
185.00
181.50

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
214.00
202.00
215.50
191.50

_
233.00
196.00
218.00
175.50

_
222.00
218.00
237.00
191.00

_

_
219.00
206.50
205.50
208.00

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of office workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
West

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists...........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks.......................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................

$260.00
297.50
286.50
258.00
235.50
259.00
191.00
196.50
172.50
-

$224.50
207.50
234.50
238.50
172.00
181.50
-

$276.50
329.50
306.00
273.50
257.50
226.00
271.50
287.50
237.00
219.50
242.00
208.00
211.50
195.50
171.00
233.50

$239.50
279.00
280.00
244.00
212.50
179.50
161.00
149.50
-

$273.50
264.50
_
-

$225.00
234.50
231.50
193.50
216.00
225.00
176.00
199.50
164.00
165.00
_
-

$253.50
296.50
291.50
246.50
246.50
222.00
246.50
229.50
203.00
203.50
218.00
177.00
194.50
_
174.50
214.00

$254.50
314.50
275.50
251.50
235.50
253.50
227.00
_
231.00
250.00
176.00
190.00

_
$249.50
210.50
217.50
203.00
171.50
204.50

-

$260.00
296.50
279.50
253.00
268.50
218.00
234.50
219.00
_
204.50
239.00
183.00
_
_
250.00

183.50
193.50
219.00
175.00
216.00
199.00
215.50
207.00
216.00
197.50

162.50
173.00
172.00
198.50
213.00
172.00
_
_

188.00
200.50
211.50
193.00
219.50
238.00
199.00
-

178.00
208.00
199.00
203.50
231.50
187.50
-

174.50
204.00
192.50
216.00
255.50
189.50
_

171.50
181.50
197.00
216.50
181.50
-

202.50
247.00
267.00
225.50
224.50
233.50
212.00
_

171.50
207.00
194.50
203.00
222.00
183.50
210.50
215.50
247.00
200.00

Billings

DenverBoulder

October

Occupation

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

July

$274.50
323.50
296.50
277.00
269.00
211.00
248.50
248.50
185.00
211.50
180.50
166.50
162.50
213.50

$228.50

182.00
213.00
231.00
195.00
209.00
231.50
188.00
207.00
210.00
226.50
193.50

252.50
-

”

“

”

-

191.00
168.50
159.00

_

“
274.00
261.50
280.00
227.00
-

_
226.00
195.50
194.50
196.50

12

_

_

_

_

_
226.50
230.00
243.50
216.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




”

_

_

_

239.50
226.50
-

_
202.50
178.50
173.00

215.00
214.00
225.50

-

245.00
219.00
227.50
213.50

_

186.50
225.00

194.50
236.00
222.50
228.00
246.50
209.00
_
240.50
207.50
205.00
211.00

Table A-3. Weekly earnings of office workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
Northeast

Occupation

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

NassauSuffolk

Newark

March

June

$209.50
290.50
225.00
223.50
194.00
164.50
169.00
163.50
146.00
165.00
139.00
137.50
146.00
140.00
135.00
141.00
157.00

$223.50
294.50
247.50
222.00
212.00
186.50
181.00
162.50
151.00
174.50
142.50
127.00
145.50
123.50
148.00
165.50
160.50
173.00
187.00
156.50

Buffalo

September
Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Glass C .....................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
M essengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists...............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Boston

August

October

$254.50
278.00
264.00
209.00
215.50
211.00
225.50
165.50
222.00
152.00
141.50
151.00
137.50
157.50
”

$221.50
286.00
250.50
224.50
198.50
190.00
223.50
222.50
224.50
179.50
171.50
192.00
161.50
146.00
171.00
145.50
133.50
134.50
171.50

$218.50
222.00
230.00
215.50
167.50
192.00
205.00
183.50
142.50
152.50
137.50
137.50
159.50
124.00
126.50
146.50

169.50
198.00
175.00
211.50
162.00
- '

164.50
195.00
171.50
194.50
230.00
175.50
_

169.50
177.50
200.50
158.00
-

153.50
158.00
165.50
150.50
_

-

222.00
203.00
241.00
173.00

-

210.50
187.00
202.00
174.50

-

184.50
163.00
181.00
156.00

Hartford

-

173.50
163.00
170.50
157.00

-

-

188.50
175.00
187.00
170.50

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

$242.00
309.00
261.50
247.00
223.00
201.50
203.50
223.50
195.00
173.50
160.50
172.50
151.50
141.00
151.50
133.00
158.00
185.00

$241.50
308.50
267.00
236.00
221.00
200.50
201.00
207.50
192.50
195.50
163.00
186.50
150.50
148.50
179.50
158.00
135.50
145.50
187.50

$192.00
235.00
176.00
175.50
162.00
179.50
151.00
161.00
146.50
120.00
118.00
136.50

$206.00
224.50
200.00
189.50
193.50
212.00
137.50
136.00
157.50
157.00

$230.50
315.50
254.50
219.50
224.00
189.00
218.50
229.00
215.00
170.50
159.50
179.50
149.00
137.00
161.00
147.00
132.50
165.00
179.50

$222.50
303.00
256.00
239.00
206.00
189.00
205.00
202.50
207.50
152.50
142.00
171.50
131.00
130.00
151.00
139.00
120.50
143.00
164.00

$204.00
224.50
197.50
203.00
181.00
158.00
144.50
159.50
140.00
121.00
120.00
159.50
141.00

$231.50
217.50

$190.00
224.50
192.00
175.50
161.50
156.50
141.00
140.00
136.00
140.00
145.50
168.50

$217.50
253.50
241.00
209.50
193.50
196.00
147.00
146.00

175.00
191.50
171.50
198.50
225.00
182.50
185.50
154.50

189.50
189.50
167.00
201.00
223.50
181.00
193.50
208.00
184.00

153.00
155.00
200.00
139.50
_

161.50
194.50
202.50
219.50
191.00
-

169.00
210.50
224.00
188.00
205.50
173.50
-

152.50
219.00
208.00
174.00
208.50
156.00
_

156.50
211.00
241.00
193.00
-

153.00
149.50
-

155.50
180.00
212.00
163.50
-

195.50
233.50
161.50
_

_
201.00
184.50
212.00
167.50

214.50
188.50
191.00
187.00

_
177.00
159.50

197.00
182.50
211.00
167.00

_
223.00
175.00
205.50
157.50

_
179.00
167.50
207.00
148.00

_

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




13

_
_

_
-

161.50
153.00
147.00

_

_

_

_

_

_
-

-

_

-

191.00
159.50
180.00
151.50

_

_
167.50
199.50
157.00

Table A-3. Weekly earnings of office workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
South

Northeast—Continued

Baltimore

Chatta­
nooga

May

August

$237.00
273.50
253.50
231.00
223.00
182.50
228.00
236.50
220.50
168.50
166.00
208.50
156.00
144.00
156.50
135.50
168.00
182.50

$234.00
285.50
244.50
223.00
233.00
185.00
246.00
210.50
269.00

Occupation

Worcester

April

February

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................

$217.00
251.00
220.50
148.00
173.50
134.00
129.50
131.50
126.50
131.50
192.50

$191.00
210.00
168.00
203.50
192.00
132.50
-

166.50
196.00
225.50
172.50
214.50
171.00
191.00
147.50

155.50
168.00
162.50
160.00

171.50
174.50
161.00
190.00
214.50
175.50
173.00
_
_
197.50
204.00
235.50
184.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




York

Atlanta

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

September

July

176.00
193.50
159.00
164.00
173.00
138.50
165.00
184.50

$196.00
217.50
193.00
—
166.50
124.50
130.50
-

$203.00
222.00
221.50
192.50
178.50
120.50
133.00

153.00
181.50
193.50
175.00
224.50
258.50
189.50
_
206.00
193.00
197.50
191.00

148.00
155.50
193.50
146.50
_
168.50
151.50
171.00
144.00

141.00
166.00
212.50
152.50
_
_
_
183.00
163.50
178.50
152.50

Hunts­
ville

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$229.00
282.50
243.50
224.50
224.00
182.00
217.50
250.50
189.00
176.50
167.00
179.00
160.00
145.00
151.00
139.50
154.00
166.00

$179.50
178.00
-

$175.00
182.50
-

$210.00
284.50
213.50
209.50
178.00
188.50
176.50
187.00
168.00
199.00
140.00
146.00
132.50
163.50

$186.00
223.50
208.50
180.50
200.50
203.00
158.00
174.50
158.50
137.00
128.00
-

$246.00
294.50
281.50
258.50
220.00
217.50
224.00
235.00
197.00
187.00
174.00
188.50
167.00
146.00
167.00
134.50
138.50
163.50

$212.50
215.00
241.50
211.50
-

$191.00
229.50
218.50
216.00
179.00
158.50
193.50
203.50
150.50
138.50
134.00
120.50
120.00
144.00
144.50

175.00
221.50
152.50
191.50
207.50
180.00
164.50
_
_
_
224.50
181.50
199.50
166.00

137.50
157.00
172.00
144.50
_
_
_
-

128.00
167.50
188.50
158.00
_
_
168.00
176.00

153.50
182.50
204.50
175.50
_
_
_
225.50
210.50
263.50
173.50

150.00
154.00
159.50
152.00
165.50
150.00
157.50
148.50

172.00
190.00
170.00
193.50
221.00
179.00
199.50
189.00
212.00
178.50

173.00
195.00
156.00
175.00

150.50
172.50
189.50
166.00
184.50
160.50
175.00
157.50

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Jackson

Table A-3. Weekly earnings of office workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
South— Continued

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
M essengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Jacksonville

Louisville

Memphis

Miami

December

Occupation

New
Orleans

North Central

November

November

October

January

May

August

June

May

March

$217.00
257.00
236.00
233.00
190.00
191.00
262.00
255.50
264.50
184.00
150.00
158.00
148.50
140.00
143.00
132.50
156.00
166.00

$214.50
238.00
212.00
221.00
218.00
196.00
184.00
203.50
159.50
155.50
200.50
150.50
148.50
178.00
133.00
150.50
153.00

$214.50
232.00
229.50
215.50
177.00
192.50
236.00
228.00
239.00
179.00
209.00
247.50
191.50
157.50
218.50
124.00
148.50
159.00

$233.50
273.00
253.50
233.00
205.50
206.00
238.50
260.00
218.50
178.50
196.00
162.50
145.50
157.50
134.00
162.50
137.00

$208.50
275.00
234.00
206.00
201.50
188.50
184.00
193.50
179.50
157.00
137.50
152.50
135.00
126.00
132.50
122.00
135.00
144.50

$187.50
215.00
191.50
198.00
190.00
187.00
144.00
143.50
121.50
-

$229.00
271.00
237.00
237.00
252.00
187.50
197.00
212.50
182.50
150.50
150.50
170.00
143.50
134.00
137.00
127.00
127.50
174.00

$198.00
251.00
216.00
203.50
202.50
202.50
216.00
198.00
162.00
150.00
159.50
145.50
138.50
141.00
132.00
158.00
160.00

$186.50
205.00
209.00
184.00
156.50
189.00
165.50
146.50
153.00
137.00
126.00
125.50
131.50

$242.50
325.50
282.00
255.00
233.50
199.50
235.00
237.00
229.00
215.00
179.50
181.50
178.00
162.50
185.00
159.50
160.50
173.00
156.00

145.50
174.50
206.50
162.50
195.50
188.00
193.50
183.00

153.50
205.50
203.50
210.50
247.00
198.00
216.00
173.50
206.00
164.00

169.50
224.00
185.50
190.50
213.00
173.50
200.00
180.50
217.00
157.00

184.00
189.50
212.50
234.00
194.50
154.50
156.50
205.50
185.50
193.50
181.50

151.50
167.00
143.00
174.50
200.50
163.50
179.00
154.00
176.00
150.00

139.00
154.50
178.00
147.50
_
156.00
-

171.50
171.50
162.00
203.00
235.50
190.50
181.50
154.00
_
210.50
186.00
208.00
176.00

153.50
198.00
172.00
187.50
160.00
145.00
_
_
190.50
165.00
167.50
162.50

146.50
144.50
140.50
171.50
190.00
166.50
_
-

162.00
181.50
185.50
192.00
226.00
171.00
_
_
_
207.50
170.00
204.00
162.00

181.00
221.50
197.50
206.50
231.50
190.50
175.50
176.00
285.50
288.00
216.50
199.50
212.00
191.00

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

128.00
135.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




15

Oklahoma
City

Richmond

San
Antonio

_

169.00
159.00
179.50
148.00

Washington

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

September

October

February

$221.50
286.00
248.50
233.00
201.50
176.50
231.00
242.50
219.00
154.00
178.50
201.50
167.00
152.00
151.50
140.00
165.00
158.00

$219.00
278.00
243.00
220.00
211.50
195.00
232.50
172.50
186.00
154.00
138.50
157.00
125.50
133.50
166.50

$264.50
243.50
290.50
229.50
-

170.50
225.00
171.00
176.50
191.50
165.00
-

164.50
208.00
237.00
183.00
203.50
239.50
183.00
169.00
_
_

149.50
194.50
222.50
180.50
_
_
_

189.50
174.00
177.00
171.50

_
207.50
190.50
215.00
177.50

166.50
199.00
193.00
193.50
227.00
167.00
_
_
_
205.00
180.50
204.50
164.00

Cincinnati

Cleveland

May

July

$241.50
292.50
257.00
242.00
221.00
204.50
233.00
232.50
233.50
176.00
177.00
194.00
167.50
148.50
189.00
164.00
135.00
151.50
175.00

$222.00
274.00
239.00
227.50
198.50
195.00
222.00
225.50
220.50
155.50
155.00
171.50
143.00
141.00
138.50
137.00
156.00
186.00

Chicago

_

_

210.50
200.00
227.00
181.50
188.00
214.50
174.50
152.00
157.00
182.00
_

_

214.50
203.00
265.00
184.00

Table A-3. Weekly earnings of office workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central—Continued

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists...........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$205.50
268.50
216.00
208.50
195.00
151.50
198.50
218.50
179.00
172.50
147.50
168.00
139.50
143.00
173.50
142.00
132.00
157.50
158.00

$201.00
223.00
193.50
187.50
177.50
197.00
168.00
155.00
160.00

$222.50
219.50
231.50
197.50
254.50
247.00
176.50
180.00
175.50
140.00
152.50
137.00
173.00
152.50

$206.50
205.00
206.00
213.00
217.50
210.00
223.50
141.00
162.00
136.00
137.00
154.00
157.00

168.00
204.50
171.50
187.50
226.00
163.00
208.50
175.00
191.00
171.00

158.50
176.50
181.00
174.00
234.00
182.50
158.50

170.50
187.50
204.50
182.00
178.00
190.50
188.50
191.00
187.00

152.00
199.50
246.00
176.00
164.00
188.50
172.50

$208.50
251.50
201.00
206.00
219.50
219.00
183.50
176.00
215.50
152.00
149.50
170.00
125.00
139.00
157.50

$269.50
304.50
305.50
269.00
257.50
210.00
264.50
288.50
228.00
184.00
185.50
241.00
160.50
150.00
155.00
147.50
165.50
184.00

$187.00
184.00
176.50
193.50
193.50
132.50
167.50

$184.50
166.50
135.00
-

164.00
170.00
211.50
151.50
171.00
168.50
181.50
162.00

185.00
238.50
319.50
212.50
190.50
223.50
175.00
422.00
196.50
228.50
183.00

195.50
173.00
198.50
160.50
194.00
201.00
187.00
210.00

147.00
203.00
267.50
172.00
199.50
164.50
144.50

$210.50
276.50
230.00
209.00
182.50
179.50
241.00
255.00
229.00
172.00
155.50
171.50
150.00
131.50
133.50
125.00
166.00
156.50

$232.50
263.00
262.00
233.00
206.00
206.00
236.00
240.00
232.50
170.00
167.50
191.50
154.00
156.00
241.00
164.50
132.50
150.00
160.00

$226.00
244.00
232.00
206.50
211.00
204.50
207.50
200.50
184.00
161.50
180.50
151.00
156.00
177.00
178.00
132.00
158.50
166.00

$213.50
256.00
228.50
201.50
193.00
208.00
200.50
190.50
213.50
168.00
158.50
161.00
155.50
146.00
209.00
149.50
126.00
141.50
161.00

$226.00
291.50
229.00
226.00
197.00
247.50
263.50
183.50
164.00
164.50
177.00
141.00
152.50
250.50
143.00
123.50
145.00
185.00

$226.50
229.00
219.00
161.50
140.50
138.00
-

173.50
247.00
206.00
174.00
195.50
158.00
204.00
185.00
200.00
166.50

167.00
209.50
241.50
183.00
214.50
255.50
176.00
214.50
197.50
217.00
183.50

162.50
175.50
183.00
189.50
206.00
175.50
400.00
191.00
208.50
175.50

160.50
191.00
203.00
161.50
190.00
219.50
170.00
174.00
247.50
212.00
172.00
194.50
159.00

159.50
202.50
188.00
205.00
219.50
188.50
246.00
164.50
189.50
147.00

160.50
204.50
230.50
178.50
198.00
173.50
172.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




16

“

Toledo

Wichita

Table A-3. Weekly earnings of office workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
West

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ...............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

Billings

October

Occupation

DenverBoulder

July

$240.50
285.50
261.50
244.00
234.00
220.50
227.00
238.00
217.00
183.00
207.00
171.00
156.50
157.50
150.00
162.50
187.00
177.50
255.50
219.00
214.50
237.00
203.00
-

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$192.00
199.50
184.50
132.00
150.00
136.00

$249.50
270.50
267.00
253.00
233.50
217.50
248.00
244.00
178.50
189.00
211.00
163.50
151.50
191.00
155.50
127.50
156.50
186.00

$222.00
254.50
228.00
205.00
189.00
146.50
146.50
«163.50

$261.00
320.00
289.00
257.50
247.50
212.50
241.50
240.00
242.50
198.50
179.50
198.00
167.50
168.00
221.50
174.00
149.50
178.00
192.00

$243.00
284.50
272.00
249.00
230.50
188.00
240.50
215.50
195.00
162.50
206.50
154.00
157.50
173.50
139.00
165.50
191.00

$247.50
264.00
286.00
224.00
307.50
169.50
163.50
178.00
142.00
138.00
176.50

$217.50
231.00
270.50
236.00
186.50
188.50
231.50
225.00
237.00
192.00
153.00
178.50
147.50
145.00
139.00
146.50
154.00

$236.50
288.00
267.00
229.00
213.00
218.00
181.00
190.50
166.00
141.00
158.50

$248.50
300.50
269.50
244.00
242.50
220.50
216.50
218.50
207.50
215.50
183.00
185.00
177.50
158.50
200.00
165.00
146.00
183.50
184.50

$241.50
278.00
253.50
227.50
194.00
194.50
180.50
192.00
139.00
135.00
182.00

$264.50
330.00
270.50
271.50
239.00
265.50
249.50
226.50
270.50
206.00
193.00
206.50
174.00
157.00
152.00
159.00
160.00
181.00

152.00
184.00
218.00
-

183.00
197.50
193.50
204.00
230.50
184.50
-

150.50
174.00
191.50
165.00
-

192.00
225.00
215.50
219.50
231.00
209.50
-

173.50
229.00
227.50
271.00
204.00
-

183.50
215.00
216.00
214.00
-

171.00
254.00
197.50
230.50
170.00
-

147.00
190.50
219.50
175.50
-

188.00
215.00
232.00
200.50
223.50
241.50
207.50
293.50
236.00
230.50
249.50
225.50

175.00
204.50
226.00
192.50
-

187.00
304.00
216.50
231.50
199.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

220.00
207.00
210.50
203.50

“

366.00
223.00
199.00
227.50
183.00

_
178.50
176.00
180.00

245.00
216.00
234.00
203.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




17

_
225.00
190.50
215.00
179.00

-

241.00
186.00
249.00
148.50

-

213.50
181.00
192.00
175.50

-

_
196.50
191.00
200.50
177.50

-

228.00
201.00
245.00
186.00

-

241.00
208.50
224.00
195.50

Table A-4. Weekly earnings of office workers, public utilities, January through December 1979
Northeast
AlbanySchenectadyTroy

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists...........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................

_
152.50
187.00
189.50

-

January

$278.00
337.50
278.00
232.50
209.50
198.00
-

“

“

“

$302.00
301.50
300.50
272.00
247.00
256.50
245.00
211.50
205.50
196.00
227.50

291.00
294.00
283.00
-

263.50
274.50
245.50
258.50
235.00

235.50
-

_
-

_
-

227.00
_
-

*

363.50
363.50
240.50
-

192.50
185.50
-

226.50
231.00
220.00
178.50
219.00
218.00

274.00
282.00
270.50
247.50
230.50
248.50
-

232.50
264.50
199.50
220.00
238.00
234.00
238.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




18

“

“

September

-

_
-

“

”

“

“

$285.00
-

-

_
-

_
-

June

$263.50
263.00
-

June

December

$273.00
315.00
272.00
260.00
194.50
239.00
240.00
230.50
249.50
220.00
275.50

June

March

$290.50
281.50
286.50
252.00
248.00
-

$282.50
-

January

$319.50
363.50
333.50
283.50
285.00
274.00
260.50
259.50
271.00
238.50
184.00
-

August
$220.00
-

October

_

November

May

August
$283.50
274.50
263.50
282.50
285.50
262.00
243.00
275.50
242.00

June

Pough­
keepsie

Phila­
delphia

$308.50
280.00
290.50
290.50
-

Trenton

Portland

PatersonCliftonPassaic

New York

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Pittsburgh

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

$276.00
329.00
288.00
248.00
250.00
212.00
251.00
246.00
243.50
194.50
268.50
230.00
223.50
169.50
223.50

Newark

Buffalo

302.50
306.50
-

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Boston

September

Occupation

“
200.00
303.50
316.50
295.00
230.50
265.50
226.50

261.50
285.50
248.00
289.50
250.00
300.50
220.50

”

235.00
-

*

Table A-4. Weekly earnings of office workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
Northeast—Continued

Occupation

Worcester

April
Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A
..................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ..............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

_
-

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

Chatta­
nooga

September

February

May

August

$264.00
234.50
-

$292.00
312.50
300.00
286.00
258.00
229.00
232.00
225.50
207.00
233.50
187.00
180.50
193.50
241.50

$314.00
288.50
298.50
299.00
279.00
227.50
329.00
_
241.50
-

.
228.00
251.00
211.00

176.50
332.50
269.00

-

-

-

_

.
-

“

South

-

267.50
246.00
279.00
209.00

-

_
261.50
262.50
228.00
279.00

_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Hunts­
ville

Jackson

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$231.00
257.00
-

$269.00
328.00
290.50
276.00
238.00
252.50
261.00
217.50
281.00
260.50
321.50
_
_

-

-

205.00
155.50
200.00
255.50
_
_
_

_
_
194.50
247.50
160.00
_
_
_

-

_
_

-

-

246.50
264.50
230.50
_
_

-

-

265.00
215.50
247.50
186.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




19

_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
_
_
_

_

_
_
_
_
_

$271.50
_
_
_
_
_
_
244.50
238.00
_
_
146.00
_

_

_

_

_
_

_

208.00
270.50
_
_

_

$219.50
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
169.00
_
_
_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

-

$262.00
331.50
292.00
293.50
255.50
234.50
210.00
214.50
199.50
_
186.50
190.00
_
182.00
_
154.00
204.50

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

$240.00
_
_
253.00
214.50
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
-

_

173.50
_

_
229.00
272.50
210.50
_
_
_
_
_
257.50
209.50
243.00
194.50

_
_
_
_
_

_
_

_
_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

198.00
_

_

-

196.50

Table A-4. Weekly earnings of office workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
South-—Continued

Secretaries...................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Stenographers.............................................
Senior .......................................................
G eneral.....................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists...........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
File clerks.....................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Messengers..................................................
Switchboard operators...............................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................

Louisville

Memphis

December

Occupation

Jacksonville

November

November

North Central

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

October

January

May

August

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

$309.00
319.00
295.50
288.50
290.50
-

$315.50
338.50
300.00
-

$331.50
284.00
279.50
-

$287.00
276.00
292.50
282.50
249.00
286.50
231.00
-

$225.00
251.50
232.50
238.00
189.50
201.00
234.00
139.50
137.50
154.00
152.50
-

$227.00
247.50
186.50
-

$304.50
326.00
315.50
214.00
231.50
231.00
233.00
-

$254.00
267.00
235.50
229.00
174.50
174.00
202.00
-

$219.00
255.50
160.00
-

$282.00
373.50
336.50
297.00
276.00
289.00
286.50
210.50
210.50
186.00
219.00
246.00

$295.50
333.00
305.50
293.50
261.00
299.00
333.00
289.00
274.50
263.50
282.50
253.50
266.50
204.00
270.00

$264.00
296.00
245.00
247.00
194.00
200.00
184.50
197.00
178.00
-

$274.00
300.50
263.00
244.00
251.00
239.50
242.50
247.00

297.50
-

* 272.00
324.00
252.50
276.50
294.00
274.00

280.00
300.50
-

275.50
293.50
254.50
287.50
250.50
262.00
238.00

172.50
195.50
217.50
182.00
204.00
175.50
175.00

159.50
155.00
-

248.00
306.50
230.00
240.50
308.00
213.50

203.50
215.00

205.00
233.50
-

236.50
247.00
220.00
251.50
247.50

341.50
294.50
318.50
270.00
364.50
364.50
291.00
237.50
249.00
223.00

205.50
229.00
240.00
218.00
215.00
215.00

282.00
293.50
262.50
-

“

“

“

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




Richmond

San
Antonio

20

_

-

263.00
241.00
269.50
219.00

_
$214.00
269.00
291.00
235.50
234.00
209.50

$263.50
' 256.00
220.50
-

Table A-4. Weekly earnings of office workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central— Continued
Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers..............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers...................................................
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ...............................................
Order clerks ..................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing machine ........................................
Bookkeeping m achine............................
Payroll clerks ................................................
Key entry operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................

July

October

September

April

_
-

$241.00
283.00
255.50
192.50
268.00
267.00
177.50
184.50
173.00
172.50
209.50
-

$286.00
296.00
298.50
253.50
268.50
265.00
273.00
223.50
229.50
211.50
252.00
225.00
205.50
247.50

$279.00
309.50
254.00
235.50
274.50
208.50
185.00
185.50
224.50
220.50
-

211.00
253.00
177.50
-•
_
230.50
244.00
281.00
165.50

206.00
273.00
301.50
223.00
_
277.50
254.00
254.50

277.00
516.00
245.00
253.50
236.00

194.00
263.00
286.50
234.00
305.00
247.50
273.50
196.00

267.00
287.50
243.50
_
273.50
263.50
313.50

Detroit

GaryHammondEast Chicago

Green
Bay

December

Occupation

March

October

$227.50
202.50
217.50
-

$304.00
341.00
318.00
303.50
288.50
289.00
220.50
254.50
256.00

Dayton

.
228.00
159.00
“

249.50
256.50
264.00
611.00
270.50
301.50
244.50

_
-

$214.00
205.00
241.00
-

$310.00
_
200.50
“

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




21

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

January

October

November

$285.50
327.50
318.50
260.00
240.00
283.00
271.50
210.00
244.00
185.00
242.00
275.50
240.00
273.50

$265.00
341.00
267.00
207.50
289.50
239.00
-

"

_
-

$261.50
276.50
234.50
-

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

March

August

May

April

$292.00
349.00
307.00
273.00
236.00
242.00
335.00
209.50
211.00
204.50
282.50
293.50
260.50
221.50
272.50

$306.50
-

$212.00
200.50
241.50
232.00
-

$267.50
-

287.00
275.00
304.50
238.00
278.00
280.00
308.50
269.00

265.00
_
_
_
-

_
254.00
-

_
_
250.00
289.00
216.50
_

-

-

_
“

269.00
239.00
244.00
-

_

_
229.00
229.00

Table A-4. Weekly earnings of office workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
West

Secretaries....................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Stenographers .............................................
Senior ........................................................
G eneral......................................................
Transcribing-machine typists ....................
Typists............................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B .....................................-................
File clerks......................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Messengers_________________________
Switchboard operators................................
Switchboard operatorreceptionists ..............................................
Order clerks .................................................
Class A ...................................................
Class B ......................................................
Accounting clerks........................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Bookkeeping-machine operators..............
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Machine billers.............................................
Billing m achine___________________
Bookkeeping m achine...........................
Payroll clerks ...............................................
Key entry operators ....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................

Billings

DenverBoulder

October

Occupation

July

December

$299.50
297.00
-

$219.00
-

$290.00
311.50
292.00
255.00
285.00
338.50
257.50
188.00
-

252.50
265.00
-

272.50
293.00
323.50
383.00
383.00
296.50
262.50
299.50
233.50

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

'

-

”

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

June

October

May

December

November

November

$303.00
308.00
-

$294.50
339.00
300.00
299.00
269.50
306.50
279.50
267.00
206.00
198.00
271.00
250.00
278.00
217.00
258.00

$263.50
252.50
163.00
242.50
234.00
-

$353.50
-

$252.50
310.00
257.50
240.50
256.50
269.50
250.50
197.00
■ 183.50
-

285.50
265.50
280.50
253.00
312.50
255.50
243.00
258.00

222.50
294.50
264.00
-

Fresno

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




22

-

229.50
289.50
296.50
310.50
213.50
228.00
-

_
-

$298.50
224.00
-

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

March

March

December

$306.50
306.00
285.50
272.50
285.50
305.00
244.00
287.00
283.50
309.50
198.50
170.50
-

_
-

$302.00
319.50
302.50
280.00
281.50
227.50
227.50
-

279.00
299.50
336.00
364.00
346.50
284.50
297.00
-

-

200.50
225.50
287.50
266.50
282.50
253.00

“

Table A-5. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, all industries, January through December 1979
Northeast

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

Boston

Buffalo

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonQ iftonPassaic

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

September

Occupation

August

October

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

$435.50
469.00
406.50
-

$384.00
440.50
368.50
258.50

$399.50
449.50
387.00
-

$360.00
413.50
357.00
316.50

$419.50
472.50
385.00
-

$424.00
474.50
401.50
337.50

$450.50
475.50
450.00
366.00

$397.50
501.50
379.00
-

$428.50
477.00
368.00
-

$407.50
453.50
376.50
303.00

$421.00
483.50
421.00
360.00

$394.50
383.50
-

-

$374.50
417.50
353.50
-

$400.50
456.50
384.50
-

340.50
379.00
341.00
240.50
245.00
204.00
285.00
307.00
280.50
269.00
337.00
350.50
308.00

316.00
363.00
299.00
236.50
233.00
285.50
232.00
182.00
201.00
189.00
291.50
351.50
287.00
208.50
169.00
314.00
384.00
275.50
229.50
291.00

318.50
384.50
297.00
238.50
255.50
337.50
232.50
195.50
299.50
355.00
295.50
247.00
-

291.50
281.00
212.50
275.00
216.00
174.00
220.00
270.50
301.00
262.00
216.50
-

305.50
377.00
306.00
259.00
249.00
295.50
241.50
226.50
187.00
286.00
344.50
282.00
226.00

321.00
377.50
321.50
264.50
253.50
297.50
246.50
223.50
214.00
294.50
354.00
295.50
233.50
178.50
321.50
286.00

339.50
366.50
344.00
275.50
249.00
291.00
239.00
212.00
229.50
200.00
288.00
337.50
293.50
243.00
201.50
373.50
385.50
305.50

269.00
267.50
215.00
211.00
256.00
200.50
166.00
235.00
293.00
246.50
220.00
209.00

315.50
391.00
295.00
247.50
226.50
252.50
232.00
185.00
289.50
321.00
271.00
280.50
345.50
279.00

335.00
397.00
319.50
271.50
238.50
289.00
238.00
188.00
171.50
187.50
291.50
357.50
300.00
247.50
205.00
314.50
345.50
306.00
311.50

289.00
342.50
275.00
242.50
222.00
267.00
214.50
202.50
306.50
384.00
328.50
275.00
212.50
155.50
351.00
388.50
332.50
299.50

313.50
374.00
303.00
211.00
275.00
223.00
169.00
267.00
305.50
253.50
-

268.00
310.00
254.50
205.00
244.00
202.00
173.50
243.00
314.00
255.00
196.00
292.00
244.50

305.50
353.50
285.50
257.00
275.00
266.00
176.00
314.50
355.00
366.50
348.50
289.00

-

284.50
270.50
321.00

-

282.00
299.00
293.00
219.00
271.00

276.00
308.00
279.50
188.50
284.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




23

-

299.50
307.50
299.00
253.00

“

$286.00
277.00
274.00
256.00

Table A-5. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
.

Northeast—Continued

South

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

Chattanooga

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gainesville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Huntsville

Jackson

April

Occupation

February

May

August

September

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$362.50
442.00
362.50
-

$352.00
360.00
-

$395.00
456.50
390.00
341.00

$392.00
441.00
376.50
-

$395.00
439.00
381.00
-

$404.00
456.50
390.50
313.00

$369.00
-

$406.00
441.00
397.50
-

$364.00
340.50
-

$398.50
475.50
395.00
323.00

323.00
385.00
307.00
-

269.00
280.50
213.00
214.50
288.50
194.50
183.50
252.00
298.50
257.00
214.00
363.00
260.50

345.00
390.00
346.50
291.50
256.00
324.00
254.50
231.50
248.50
311.50
224.00
220.50
229.00
314.00
227.50
317.00

312.00
394.00
318.00
252.00
259.00
325.00
253.00
197.50
299.50
352.00
282.50
248.50
155.00
317.50
371.50
315.00
224.50
319.00

271.00
303.50
276.00
230.00
206.50
252.00
202.00
174.00
230.50
253.50
197.00
309.00
272.00

325.50
392.50
324.00
257.00
237.00
287.00
238.50
192.50
160.50
176.00
282.50
351.00
270.50
222.50
321.50
374.00
313.50
321.00

210.50
210.00
265.00
323.00
268.00
302.50
314.50
-

316.50
354.50
309.00
234.00
291.00
225.00
177.00
265.00
342.50
260.50
205.50
337.00
318.50
286.50

278.50
321.00
276.00
221.50
208.50
209.00
176.50
-

338.00
379.50
331.50
268.00
237.00
298.00
233.00
207.50
-

248.00
254.50
234.00
196.00
287.00
311.50
285.00
229.50

297.00
365.50
282.50
220.00
195.00
288.00
330.50
292.00
230.50
295.00

218.50
259.50
218.50
163.50
290.00
284.00
244.00
295.50
326.00
273.00

$310.00
195.50
198.50
165.00
243.00
307.50
262.50
191.00
347.50
399.50
“

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




24

“

$220.00
234.00
289.50
282.50
224.50
338.50
344.50
“

-

$341.50
196.50
201.50
239.50
286.50
238.50
”

$341.00
372.00
323.50

271.00
303.00
271.00
220.50
264.50
222.00
171.50
“
239.00
325.50
254.50
182.00
~

Table A-5. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South—Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Louisville

Memphis

December

Occupation

Jacksonville

November

$407.00
465.00
384.00
327.50
300.50
353.00
275.50
228.50
231.00
272.00
225.50
214.50
158.50
178.50
257.50
336.00
281.50
218.00
350.00
357.00
292.50

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

August

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

$360.00
403.50
360.00
-

$398.50
435.50
352.50
-

$384.50
427.00
376.50
337.50

$330.50
330.00
-

$396.00
452.50
402.50
280.50

$417.00
450.50
398.50
349.00

$381.00
437.50
355.00
-

$440.50
485.00
419.00
345.00

$379.50
422.00
375.00
-

$510.50
496.00
-

289.00
338.00
282.50
216.50
195.00
199.00
174.50
252.00
251.00
-

317.00
352.50
308.00
230.50
233.00
294.50
230.50
179.00
266.00
329.50
247.00
210.00
_
-

282.50
339.50
288.00
230.50
208.50
246.00
216.00
173.00
256.00
244.50
234.00

246.00
248.50
213.00
184.00
231.00
179.50
157.00
210.00
278.50
231.50
185.00
229.00
221.50
-

333.50
382.00
327.00
286.00
238.50
273.00
243.00
213.50
181.50
223.50
258.50
334.50
254.50
210.00

325.00
384.00
312.00
282.50
256.50
287.00
251.50
215.00
288.50
327.50
286.00
240.50
216.00
310.50
365.50
281.00
296.50

305.00
363.00
306.50
247.00
240.50
293.00
251.00
195.50
253.00
316.00
272.00
218.50
188.50
259.00
254.00
301.50

346.00
407.00
335.00
281.50
251.50
291.50
259.00
220.00
299.50
351.50
290.50
236.00

299.50
342.50
297.50
242.00
242.00
301.50
232.50
199.50
257.50
314.00
264.00
212.50

370.00
435.50
363.50
304.50
301.50
368.00
281.50
287.00
286.50
322.00
287.00
269.00
296.50
292.00
305.50

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

November

October

January

May

$440.50
495.00
425.00
357.50

$393.50
384.00
-

$431.50
457.00
408.00
-

$345.00
418.00
335.00
271.00

280.50
372.50
285.00
219.00
241.00
313.00
232.50
194.00
260.50
364.50
237.50
193.50
352.00
345.00
308.00

307.50
343.00
312.00
244.00
247.00
291.00
240.50
211.00
239.00
307.00
278.50
239.50
187.00
359.50
366.00
277.00

363.50
431.50
350.50
297.50
240.50
299.50
222.50
256.50
271.50
344.00
270.00
233.50
245.00
355.00
-

284.00
345.00
262.00
210.00
244.00
210.00
171.00
264.50
343.50
268.50
215.50
326.00
359.00
314.00
“

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




25

-

265.50

“

-

185.00
326.00
338.00
329.00
213.50
290.00

-

298.00
321.50
304.50
240.00
331.00

-

161.50
331.00
362.50
306.00
274.00

Table A-5. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central—Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B ......................... *...........................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Registered industrial n urses.....................

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

$445.50
445.00
448.00
-

$481.50
516.50
486.50
427.00

$427.00
470.50
418.00
-

327.50
356.00
303.00
275.00
256.50
302.00
255.50
204.00
320.00
390.50
301.00
241.00
293.00
322.00
301.00
353.50

374.50
459.00
347.00
325.50
301.00
347.50
293.50
289.00
266.00
388.50
483.00
376.00
292.00
259.50
169.50
388.00
417.50
366.00
372.50

419.00
434.00
335.50
326.50
314.00
323.50
379.50
445.00
379.00
321.00
248.00
430.50
362.50

Green
Bay

Indianapoiis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapoiisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$427.00
438.00
425.50
406.00

$419.00
461.50
391.50
371.00

$409.50
458.50
389.50
367.00

$385.00
420.50
360.00
306.00

$383.00
414.50
372.50
_

$484.50
-

$390.50
424.50
360.00
278.00

$394.00
444.00
368.00
-

$405.50
445.00
382.00
-

$373.00
426.00
362.50
-

295.50
358.50
283.50
235.00
243.00
279.00
236.00
197.50
289.50
320.00
409.50
290.50
257.00
211.50
328.00
375.50
313.00
360.50

332.00
397.00
332.00
257.00
245.50
307.00
238.00
203.50
233.00
259.50
365.50
277.50
222.00
194.00
372.00
425.00
344.50
300.50
320.00

322.50
355.50
316.50
295.50
236.00
275.50
233.50
205.00
216.00
274.50
331.00
281.50
205.50
138.00
318.50
305.00
315.50
285.50

315.50
356.00
313.00
274.50
221.00
244.00
224.00
180.50
189.00
199.50
274.00
326.00
266.00
211.00
296.00
272.50
284.50

311.00
347.00
321.50
244.50
285.00
239.00
217.50
267.50
310.50
260.50
223.50
350.50
-

358.50
314.00
304.50
325.50
350.50
365.50
274.50
-

-

-

304.00
346.00
294.00
254.50
230.50
290.00
227.00
197.00
199.50
277.00
367.00
291.00
230.00
187.50
365.00
427.50
342.50
308.00

296.50
381.50
290.00
225.00
247.50
176.00
294.00
348.00
292.00
231.00
263.50

307.00
361.00
289.00
268.00
234.50
275.00
235.50
170.00
295.00
357.50
296.00
232.00
316.00
323.50

311.50
334.00
316.50
265.00
236.50
281.00
228.50
209.00
287.50
321.00
288.00
231.50
253.50
259.00
271.00

$288.00
212.00
212.00
177.50
268.00
348.00
267.00
-

See footnotes at end of B-senes tables.




26

Table A-5. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
West

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurse s.....................

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

DenverBoulder

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FrandscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

October

Occupation

July

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$443.00
487.00
414.00
329.50

$385.50
437.00
389.50
325.50

$405.00
-

$396.00
417.50
384.50
-

$422.50
465.00
405.50
-

$403.00
448.50
377.00
341.50

$445.50
519.50
430.00
339.00

$405.50
439.50
393.50
386.00

358.00
422.50
344.50
280.50
263.50
299.00
258.50
225.50
228.00
319.00
354.50
287.00
224.00
349.50
371.00
,352.50
239.50
338.50

292.00
333.00
272.50
254.00
290.00
253.00
-

330.00
317.00
228.00
269.50
220.00
200.00
319.50
-

329.00
370.50
318.00
275.00
247.50
317.00
227.50
211.00
271.00
310.50
270.50
224.50
305.00
338.50
310.00
-

324.00
411.50
317.00
251.00
237.50
288.50
233.00
195.50
311.50
359.00
276.50
217.00
285.00
308.00
284.00
222.00
321.50

337.00
409.00
332.50
267.50
271.00
309.00
265.00
206.00
304.00
358.50
302.50
232.00
338.50
361.50
323.50
323.00

351.50
391.00
346.50
312.00
267.50
301.50
262.00
226.00
285.00
341.50
276.00
224.50
290.00
346.50
276.50
241.00
342.00

336.50
382.00
340.00
279.00
274.00
307.50
248.50
257.50
332.50
345.00
393.50
362.50
-

$437.50
502.00
421.00
355.00

268.00
305.00
261.50
222.00
275.00
346.50
270.50
218.50
-

288.50
251.00
310.50

$252.00
186.00
179.00
260.50
264.00
397.50
-

$464.50
519.00
413.00
340.50
353.50
393.00
352.50
247.00
292.00
349.00
265.50
214.50
290.50
356.00
281.00
239.50
339.00
388.50
362.50
313.50

-

$235.50
236.50
262.00
266.50
“

268.50
324.50
265.50
220.00
377.50
-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




-

380.50
-

27

Table A-6. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
Northeast

Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Boston

Buffalo

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

August

October

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

-

$406.00
452.50
362.00
-

$422.00
413.50
-

$287.50

$429.50
-

$405.50
451.50
378.50
-

$479.50
520.00
449.50
394.50

-

$483.50
521.50
-

$430.00
464.50
403.00
-

$451.00
519.00
467.00
380.00

-

-

$386.50
426.00
360.00
-

$434.50
479.50
-

$355.00

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer programmers

AlbanySchenectadyTroy
September

Occupation

345 50
389.00
319.00
259.00
238.50
293.50
236.00
186.00
297.50
360.50
286.00
211.00
271.00
336.50
251.50
222.50
289.00

365 50
419.00
335.00
293.00
364.00
268.50
307.50
367.50
301.50
259.50

306 00
334.50
322.50
243.00
232.50
180.50
270.50
301.00
261.50
215.00

290 00

354 50
431.00
326.50
255.00
297.00
245.00
273.00
327.00
272.50
224.50
264.00
265.00
285.00

356 00
378.50
342.50
280.50
256.50
305.00
260.00
175.00
257.00
303.50
277.00
203.50
317.50

$273.00

354 50
404.00
298.00
231.00
227.50
288.50
320.00
268.50
281.50
310.00
281.50

337 00
395.00
320.50
260.00
256.00
298.50
255.00
193.00
185.50
300.00
371.00
308.00
254.00
182.50
289.50
325.00
275.00
313.00

306 50
342.50
295.00
230.00
217.00
229.50
313.50
382.00
339.00
279.00
209.00
335.50

286.00

317.50

_
$222.50
274.00
305.50
259.00
-

_
$267.50
269.00
231.00
-

202.00
201.00
165.50
-

“

“

299.50
308.50
318.50
359.50
289.00

265.00
257.50
276.00
272.00
225.50
-

313.50
305.50

-

261.50
251.50
327.50

-

271.50
297.50
267.00
219.00
266.00

283.50
269.50
253.50
235.00
283.00
339.00
278.50
194.00
264.00
306.50
263.00
188.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




28

275.50
220.00
206.50
253.50
307.50
257.50
241.00
288.00
282.00
261.50

-

331.00
300.50

241.50
312.50
246.50
195.50
243.00

Table A-6. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
South

Northeast—Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

Chattanooga

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gainesville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Huntsville

Jackson

April

Occupation

February

May

August

September

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$409.00
-

$355.00
365.50
-

$419.00
439.00
408.00
-

$421.00
454.00
426.00
-

$370.00
-

$412.50
444.50
412.00
-

$378.00
353.50
-

$400.00
479.00
386.50
-

320.00
290.00
225.50
208.00
284.00
270.50
277.00

295.00
_
-

307.00
288.50
-

306.50
_
-

265.00
_
-

232.00
303.50
199.50
248.50
288.50
251.50
212.50
_
258.50

262.00
241.00
245.50
305.50
216.50
197.00
_
298.00
325.50

281.00
286.50
326.00
382.00
313.50
259.00
_
317.00
385.00
221.50
321.00

235.00
216.00
231.00
255.50
197.00
272.00

311.00
351.50
291.50
232.50
298.50
216.50
188.00
269.50
345.50
262.00
208.50
395.50
286.00

298.00
326.00
205.00
213.00
243.50
243.00
207.00
293.50
311.00
256.50
229.50

341.50
337.50
244.50
235.00
284.50
355.50
282.50
219.50
197.00
272.50
316.50
274.00
230.50
291.50

-

$425.50
475.00
413.50
332.50

$281.00
“

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




29

354.00
423.50
338.50
246.50
290.00
238.50
209.00
277.00
347.50
267.00
224.00
360.50
306.00
322.50

_
$290.00
_
-

_
$285.50
307.00
-

$230.50
199.50
217.00
“

$248.00
278.00
“

Table A-6. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South—Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A ....................... k............................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Jacksonville

Louisville

Memphis

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

December

Occupation

November

November

October

January

May

August

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

-

$379.00
_

$414.50
476.00
391.50
-

$424.00
453.00
401.00
391.50

$382.00
430.00
372.50
_

$455.50
491.50
413.50
-

$394.50
425.00
382.50
-

-

_
$230.00
-

301.50
225.50
212.50
233.00
271.50
230.00
196.00
-

321.00
-

-

-

320.00
367.00
312.50
267.50
264.00
300.50
254.50
222.00
292.00
337.00
289.00
242.50
208.50
293.00
343.50
275.50
295.00

304.00
303.50
248.00
276.50
264.00
209.00
261.50
323.00
277.50
225.00
254.50
303.50

352.50
398.50
329.50
309.50
274.00
297.50
284.50
200.50
303.00
353.00
287.50
243.50
291.50
299.00
310.50
332.50

276.00
242.50
221.50
230.00
285.00
238.00
201.50
161.50
327.00
269.00

$392.00
452.50
385.00
328.50
379.50
306.00
288.00
327.50
288.50
270.00
305.50

$237.50
240.00
259.00
328.50
266.50
219.00
-

$471.00
464.50
316.00
302.50
263.00
353.00
245.50
277.00
384.00
254.00
217.00
347.00
308.50

$249.50
232.50
241.50
267.00
235.50
188.50
277.50

_
$232.50
240.50
247.00
207.00
-

_
$258.50
266.50
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




30

318.00
232.50
233.50
200.00
263.00
259.50
234.00
_
271.50

_
_
_
$198.50
196.00
207.50
278.50
229.00
183.00
228.00
236.50
-

_
_
$361.50
287.50
274.00
334.00
255.50
196.50
“

Table A-6. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central— Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Dayton

Detroit

GaryHammondEast Chicago

Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

December

Occupation

March

October

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$449.50
453.50
448.00
-

$497.00
532.00
501.50
458.50

$470.00
-

$483.50
504.00
475.00
-

$416.50
447.50
389.50
-

$400.00
442.50
383.50
-

$401.00
429.00
371.00
315.50

$380.50
403.50
350.00
-

$396.50
438.50'
363.50
-

$406.00
449.50
358.00
-

$354.50
355.50
-

334.50
353.50
317.00
286.00
273.00
306.00
278.50
217.50
322.50
389.50
311.50
244.00
-

406.00
374.50
351.50
350.50
384.50
351.50
332.50
414.50
495.50
387.00
308.50
282.50
-

442.50
455.50
359.00
359.50
351.50
345.00
388.00
376.50
318.00
-

324.00
305.00
283.50
298.50
281.00
336.00
427.00
287.00
-

314.00
325.50
252.00
256.00
336.00
247.50
221.00
267.00
264.50
209.00
336.00
393.50
347.50
327.50

334.00
381.50
330.50
303.50
227.00
275.50
220.50
196.00
271.50
329.50
277.00
205.50
189.00
279.00
305.00
267.00
282.50

331.50
388.00
328.00
213.50
246.00
217.50
179.50
276.50
324.50
257.50
211.00
283.50
285.50

307.00
348.50
290.50
241.00
320.00
232.50
288.00
371.00
290.50
241.00
200.50
342.00
330.50
310.00

322.50
380.00
245.50
247.00
304.50
352.50
306.00
249.50
-

326.00
366.00
300.00
262.50
287.50
246.50
305.00
349.00
299.50
238.50
325.50

293.00
"
237.00
258.50
227.50
-

-

265.00
354.00

-

407.50
396.50
374.00

-

433.00
366.50

$257.00
233.50
253.50
260.50
_
-

-

-

316.50
290.50
362.00

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




31

-

-

$304.00
316.00
213.50
243.50
247.00
•
-

$348.50
- •
370.50
267.50
-

“

-

-

263.50

294.00
321.00
297.00
245.00
253.00
259.00
270.00

Table A-6. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
West

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

DenverBoulder

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

October

Occupation

July

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$454.00
516.50
426.00
328.00

$385.50
433.00
389.00
-

-

$373.50
-

$445.50
473.00
436.00
-

$434.50
496.50
410.00
-

$445.50
512.50
421.00
-

$383.00
-

375.00
435.50
361.00
291.50
271.50
307.00
262.50
227.50
276.00
327.50
273.00
220.50
312.00
361.00
288.00
243.50
345.00

295.50
333.00
266.50
251.00
253.50
266.50
322.00
259.50
229.50
-

-

335.00
237.00
217.00
268.00
323.50
269.00
211.00
282.00
329.00
270.50
-

335.00
349.00
271.00
267.50
292.00
343.50
278.00
229.50
316.00
345.00
253.50
-

358.00
400.00
354.00
278.50
323.00
270.50
237.50
285.00
342.00
273.00
217.00
287.00
342.00
274.00
240.50

308.00
282.00
254.50
-

-

*

364.50
348.00
256.50
243.00
312.50
361.50
276.00
215.00
259.50
294.50
246.00
224.00
320.50

$444.00
524.00
359.00
275.50
309.50
253.00
265.50
338.00
262.00
215.50
304.50
354.00
283.50
251.00
312.00

$391.50
-

$427.00
483.50
404.00
343.50
392.00
277.50
325.00
260.50
290.50
349.00
285.50
234.50
297.00
372.00
321.00
309.00

$262.00
266.50
_
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




32

-

294.00
-

“

Table A-7. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
Northeast

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Boston

Buffalo

September

Occupation

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsylvania

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Poughkeepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

August

October

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

$427.50
-

$376.00
434.50
370.50
251.50

$346.00
-

$355.00
404.50
361.00
320.50

$414.00
463.00
379.50
-

$430.50
484.50
408.00
346.50

$444.00
461.00
450.50
359.50

$404.50
502.00
-

$391.50
431.50
-

$397.50
448.00
365.00
298.50

$360.50
425.50
349.50
-

_

-

$360.50
-

-

322.50
213.50
214.00
205.00
306.00
308.00
-

303.50
350.50
289.00
231.00
230.00
280.50
230.00
179.50
280.50
334.50
288.00
204.00
379.00
-

271.50
260.00
209.50
196.50
275.50
322.00
274.00
383.00
-

290.50
278.00
205.00
258.00
212.50
173.00
278.00

312.00
374.00
315.50
251.50
248.00
288.50
243.00
229.50
179.50
297.00
291.00
- '
-

313.00
362.00
319.50
261.50
252.50
297.50
247.50
226.00
324.50
404.00
313.50
255.50
_
_
_

336.50
362.00
344.00
274.50
247.50
289.00
233.00
218.00
227.00
198.00
294.50
343.50
297.00
254.50
-

267.50
260.50
213.50
208.00
198.50
163.00
204.50
207.00
_

278.50
293.00
224.00
235.50
179.00
-

334.00
398.00
319.50
275.50
228.50
281.00
229.00
186.00
162.00
188.00
273.50
318.50
283.00
238.00
249.00
_

276.50
342.50
262.00
227.00
218.00
265.50
212.50
193.00
299.00
318.50
271.00
215.00
154.00
_

_
_
_

396.50

367.00
397.00
_

$318.00
374.00
308.00
208.50
218.50
168.00
_

--

257.50
300.00
240.00
208.50
232.00
204.00
_
_
-

-

306.00

“

“

-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




33

378.50
386.50
_
295.50

-

_
_
_

-

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

$296.50
273.00
226.00
245.00
233.50
-

_
_
_
_
_
-

Table A-7. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
Northeast—Continued

South

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Registered industrial nurses.....................

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

Chattanooga

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gainesville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Huntsville

Jackson

April

Occupation

February

May

August

September

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$391.50
461.50
387.00
341.50

$376.50
432.50
,357.00

354.00
390.00
362.00
298.50
255.00
324.00
258.50
232.50
249.50
315.00
227.50
229.50
-

312.50
388.00
320.50
251.00
249.00
324.00
235.00
191.50
265.00
312.00
249.50
225.00
157.00
317.50
-

$446.50
355.50
325.00
323.00
214.00
224.50
“

$232.00
180.00
“

“

-

$274.00
188.00
190.00
174.00
-

$310.00
180.50
186.00
214.50
_
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




34

$394.50
450.50
375.00
308.50

-

-

$389.50
431.00
-

315.00
382.00
317.00
244.50
234.00
. 285.50
239.00
188.00
158.00
166.00
301.00
360.50
280.50
211.50
-

-

_
_
-

322.50
322.50
236.00
241.50
_
-

-

-

-

-

$258.50
212.00
203.00
_
-

$398.00
474.50
397.50
322.00
337.50
379.50
329.50
270.00
235.00
293.00
232.50
207.00
304.00
369.50
282.50
220.50
193.00
347.00
-

$189.50
- •
270.50
-

$343.50
269.50
303.00
268.00
221.00
263.50
223.50
171.50
231.50
-

Table A-7. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South—Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians............................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians...............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Jacksonville

Louisville

Memphis

Miami

New
Orieans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

December

Occupation

November

November

October

January

May

August

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

$408.00
465.00
384.50
327.50

$404.50
369.00
-

$404.50
391.50
-

$435.00
461.50
411.00
-

$341.50
413.00
332.00
271.00

$360.50
406.50
-

$409.50
434.00
-

$366.50
401.50
356.50
335.00

$327.00
-

$390.00
445.00
398.00
280.50

$413.50
449.00
397.50
323.00

$380.50
440.50
343.50
-

$427.50
475.00
422.50
-

$374.50
420.50
373.00
-

$391.50

300.00
353.50
273.50
228.50
230.00
280.50
222.50
215.00
158.50
178.50
256.50
-

268.00
278.00
214.00
229.00
284.50
225.50
183.00
232.50
-

303.50
356.50
302.00
245.00
246.50
281.50
243.00
209.00
_
-

364.50
431.00
352.50
297.50
241.00
304.50
222.50
260.00
291.00
363.50
294.50
' -

287.00
268.00
207.50
241.50
208.00
166.50
267.00
269.50
323.00
-

290.50
281.50
188.00
191.50
163.50
207.00
-

320.50
355.00
316.00
235.00
308.50
234.00
177.00
334.00
398.50
308.50
_

274.00
329.50
282.00
226.00
197.50
227.50
209.00
159.50
-

247.50
245.50
180.00
175.00
155.50
231.50
190.00
-

331.00
383.50
325.50
286.00
236.50
272.00
241.50
210.50
181.50
223.00
249.50
335.00
254.00
217.00
185.00
340.50
363.50
333.50
286.00

327.50
395.00
312.00
289.50
251.50
279.00
249.50
211.50
285.50
319.00
282.50
238.00
-

305.50
361.00
308.00
251.50
234.50
304.50
239.50
186.00
220.00
-

339.50
421.50
339.00
260.50
236.00
283.50
230.00
225.00
293.00
294.50
220.50
-

304.50
340.00
300.50
253.00
242.00
298.50
237.50
198.50
285.50
341.00
283.00
226.00
339.00
-

281.50
243.50
252.00

'

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




35

“

-

301.50

-

-

-

-

Table A-7. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central—Continued

Computer systems analysts
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer programmers
(business) ..................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Computer operators...................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters.........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Class D .....................................................
Class E .....................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Class C .....................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

_
$307.00
282.00
222.50
205.50
-

311.50
394.50
273.00
-

$459.50
505.50
455.50
367.00

_
-

335.50
433.00
321.50
301.50
255.50
305.00
248.50
242.00
-

_
$226.50
-

-

303.00
422.00
336.00
243.50
-

-

'
-

Green
Bay

Indianapolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$383.00
396.00
383.50
-

$420.00
466.00
392.50
371.50

$420.00
482.50
394.50
389.00

$365.50
405.50
349.50
298.50

$380.00
410.50
370.50
-

$427.50
-

$407.50
460.50
378.50
“

285.00
334.00
277.00
228.00
221.50
266.00
214.00
170.00
-

339.50
395.50
334.00
262.00
241.00
298.00
234.50
194.00
255.00
298.50
228.50
-

305.00
333.50
293.00
248.00
248.50
220.00
-

304.50
341.50
301.00
258.00
227.00
243.00
228.00
182.00

312.00
346.00
322.50
248.50
292.50
243.00
218.50
-

256.50
216.00
-

299.50
341.50
299.50
243.50
222.50
273.50
222.00
184.50
171.00

274.50
319.00
-

-

258.50
359.50
292.00
215.00
173.00
-

-

405.00
-

-

$199.00
210.50
178.00
-

-

292.00
296.00
234.50
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$207.50
248.50
171.50
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

“

392.00
-

342.50
-

“

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




-

200.50
266.50
333.50
283.00
210.50
-

-

36

-

362.50
-

397.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

“

$405.00

“

411.00
-

$367.00
*

247.00

320.00
331.50
325.50
236.50
298.50
228.50
209.50
-

“
207.00
227.50
157.50
226.50
-

“
-

-

”

“

Table A-7. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
West

October

Occupation

Computer systems analysts
(business) ...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer programmers
(business)...................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Computer operators....................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Peripheral equipment operators...............
Computer data librarians...........................
Drafters..........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Class D ......................................................
Class E ......................................................
Drafter-tracers..........................................
Electronics technicians..............................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Class C ......................................................
Registered industrial nurses .....................

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

DenverBoulder

July

December

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$480.00
530.00
417.50
-

-

$437.50
471.00
408.00
-

$385.50
440.00
390.00
330.50

$395.50
-

$410.50
440.00
389.50
-

$409.00
459.00
379.00
-

$393.00
439.00
364.00
310.50

$446.00
524.00
441.00
-

$406.50
441.00
396.50
386.00

347.00
411.50
334.00
274.00
259.00
293.00
256.00
225.00
218.50
367.00
391.50
313.50
_
_
. _

289.00
333.00
277.00
255.50
253.00
272.00
329.50
275.00
_
_
_
-

312.50
300.50
222.50
213.50
_
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

327.50
371.50
314.00
271.00
251.00
329.50
231.00
196.50
275.00
245.50
_
_
_
360.00
373.50
_
-

303.50
385.00
300.50
224.50
231.00
279.50
228.50
187.50
304.00
345.00
279.00
_
_
_
_
-

337.50
408.50
327.00
270.50
271.00
308.50
264.50
208.00
319.50
389.00
321.00
236.50
_
-

-

_
_
_
-

331.50
372.00
319.50
269.50
247.50
272.00
245.00
285.00
293.50
248.00
_
365.00
419.00
-

345.00
379.00
361.00
278.50
276.50
308.00
244.50
261.50
-

_
-

357.00
393.50
358.00
296.00
353.50
267.00
210.00
291.00
366.00
271.50
247.00
_
391.50
408.00

-

“

-

$430.00
478.00
409.00
262.00
265.00
304.50
365.00
300.00
228.50
-

-

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

$253.00
186.00
178.50
-

373.50
-

-

-

320.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




381.00
-

-

-

37

-

-

358.50
396.50
346.00
-

“

344.50
343.50
_
_
-

-

Table A-8. Hourly earnings1 of plant workers, all industries, January through December 1979
Northeast
AlbanySchenectadyTroy

Boston

Buffalo

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

September

Occupation

August

October

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

$7.80
8.38
7.46
7.92
7.59
8.77
8.21
8.15
6.96
5.46

$9.63
10.08
8.80
9.43
10.39
9.47
9.51
10.28
9.41
8.51

$7^0
7.58
7.16
7.42
7.17
8.16
7.73

7.05
8.70
8.09
6.75

8.46
8.59
9.14
6.57
6.00
7.00
6.91
6.05
4.14
6.93
6.82

8.27
4.33
7.94
7.31
9.70
6.09
6.51
6.09
6.46
4.92
5.33
5.40
7.57

_

.

4.57
4.31

3.70
4.71
3.59

8.70
3.95
5.68
3.70

4.96

4.21

4.70

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerpiant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal workers...................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom)..................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material m ovement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light tru c k ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

$7.87
8.23
7.49
8.28
7.10
8.81
8.12
8.46
8.53
-

_
7.67
6.52

8.65
-

-

$7.43
7.75
7.16
7.86
7.68
7.38
-

$8.04
8.32
7.78
8.34
7.77
8.78
8.30
8.01
8.61
5.80

$7.61
8.38
7.57
9.29
8.24
9.11
8.72
8.46
6.83

-

-

5.23

5.54

5.05

7.78
7.61
6.85

8.14
9.06
8.47
7.70

8.15
8.67
8.56
7.62

7.67
7.76
7.33
6.37
8.33
5.64
5.28
5.93
5.87
5.45
5.10
7.52
6.08

6.69
6.02
5.90
5.72
8.36
5.22
5.85
5.75
5.39
6.61
5.12
5.06
6.55

9.23
5.03
8.12
10.02
9.89
6.00
6.45
6.33
6.71
6.83
5.42
6.61
7.46

8.02
7.25
7.10
8.25
8.59
6.13
6.08
6.30
6.63
6.59
6.27
7.18
7.28

8.68
3.71
5.58
3.50

8.38
3.86
5.15
3.80

5.02

4.56

-

7.49
6.26

-

10.26
10.05
9.36
-

6.61
7.85
7.41
6.57

6.42
7.77
8.80
-

8.45
8.06
8.84
7.57

7.99
8.88
8.23

-

8.86
6.63
8.39
8.68
9.83
6.60
6.73
6.86
7.93
5.19
7.51
8.17
7.92

7.00
4.97
6.85

8.69
6.01
9.34

7.93
6.47
8.00
7.68
8.56
6.06
5.87
6.50
6.11
5.50
4.85
6.39
6.37

6.57
8.21

$7.87
7.37
-

8.17
7.11
7.92
-

7.81
5.72
5.12
4.68
5.41
4.50
4.82
5.49
6.19

9.09
5.10
4.98
5.53
5.92
6.09
4.56
4.87
6.10

8.23
5.95
8.80
7.85
8.88
6.04
5.81
6.32
7.43
4.45
4.90
6.02
6.20

3.98

3.77
5.57
3.69

3.94
5.03
3.83

-

3.40

3.74
5.51
3.26

3.40

4.39
4.80
4.20

3.71

4.20

4.11

5.60

4.31

4.41

-

-

.
-

38

$8.59
8.79
8.05
9.21
8.75
8.95
8.51
8.17
8.15

$8.82
8.94
8.69
9.10
8.42
9.28
9.00
8.32
9.50
7.33

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$6.32
7.30
5.43
7.09
6.65
8.23
8.40

3.52

$5.62
7.00
7.59
6.04
7.60
-

$7.65

$6.12
7.04

-

-

7.60
7.60
-

6.74
6.36
7.21
6.30
5.20

-

-

-

-

-

7.76

$7.64
9.08
7.96
7.81
8.23
9.33
-

_
-

8.56
6.19

7.87
4.04
7.90
7.00
9.26
5.11
4.96
5.56
5.45
4.28
4.13
4.53
5.47

7.97
5.83
8.67

-

-

_

7.50
7.11
5.81

-

6.96
4.16
4.94
8.40
6.84
5.21

5.68
-

-

-

5.22
4.60

-

-

-

4.24
6.25
5.08

-

4.69

5.23
5.42

.

.

3.65

-

-

-

-

4.94
5.73
6.96
6.46
6.15
4.30
5.31
7.52

.
3.29
-

4.74
-

3.65

-

3.19

4.73

5.01

4.03

3.96

4.09

Table A-8. Hourly earnings3 of plant workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
South

Northeast—Continued

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

Chatta­
nooga

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Hunts­
ville

Jackson

April

Occupation

February

May

August

September

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$9.04
9.41
8.57
9.35
8.88
8.18
9.52
9.31
9.39
5.39

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material m ovem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy truck...............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners__________________________

$6.85
7.47
7.46
6.82
7.87
7.43

$6.70
7.73
7.27
6.73
7.71
8.15

$8.41
9.02
7.63
8.90
7.31
8.43
9.57

-

-

-

4.62

8.36
5.43

9.86
5.84

$8.33
8.88
7.08
9.46
9.59
8.74
8.75
9.16
9.39
-

6.23
6.58
7.46
6.20

7.91
8.01
8.53
5.33

9.40
7.96
-

8.77
9.52
8.14
-

6.39
4.83
6.26
5.11
7.83
5.48
5.42
4.88
5.80
5.23
4.54
5.88
6.43

6.77

_

4.07

-

4.87
5.53
7.45
6.68
5.40
5.40
5.84
5.59
5.04
6.97
5.91
6.26
5.28

7.54
4.60
6.49
-

8.73
-

7.25
6.06
6.15
6.09
4.98
5.90
5.96

.

3.81

4.60

3.32
6.07
3.22

4.35

4.39

3.51

-

-

7.79
7.04
6.26
7.60
8.62
6.66
6.43
5.48
6.16
6.94
5.52
6.60
7.91

-

-

5.70

-

6.68

-

-

5.68

$5.25
6.25
6.00
5.88
7.37
5.29
4.60

7.16
7.66
5.57

-

7.96
8.49
7.90
-

-

-

-

-

8.83
5.80

5.60
6.71
5.86
-

8.33
8.45
7.84
-

6.77
6.32
5.39
7.55
4.79
4.79
4.02
4.39
4.64
4.02
4.80
4.55

6.34
4.38
5.85
5.98
8.13
5.98
5.90
5.10
5.29
5.30
4.05
4.74
6.22

4.52
3.25

_

.

4.00

-

$7.42
7.73
7.44
6.97
-

5.49
4.40
5.10
-

5.94.
4.87
4.73
4.83
5.28
4.44
4.00
5.05
5.28
4.39
3.69

$9.31
9.36
9.68
10.11
9.15
6.67

$8.09
8.84
8.23
8.28
8.26
9.13

-

-

$6.09
-

-

$6.32
8.07

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.63
3.59
8.00
-

7.23
-

5.27
-

5.71
-

4.28
5.84

8.32
3.72
4.19
3.63

3.47

3.23

8.06
3.81
6.90
3.66

3.86

3.83

3.36

3.62

-

3.60
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




6.60
4.07
8.11
5.28
7.53
5.35
5.62
4.77
5.61
5.52
4.34
5.26
6.74

39

4.81
-

4.93
-

6.83
-

-

-

-

-

4.01
5.32
4.85

-

4.75

-

-

-

-

4.07
-

-

3.93

$6.35
7.99
6.31
8.21
8.56
8.85
-

6.52
-

6.48
-

6.84
5.27
5.84
7.18
5.82
4.45
4.37
5.91
6.93

_

_

-

-

3.59

-

-

-

-

3.73

3.89

-

-

-

3.64

3.25

3.72

3.41

-

$7.40
7.26
6.03
-

_
-

4.69
-

4.90
-

5.22
4.21
4.95
-

4.79
4.64

-

$6.42
6.78
5.82
6.62
-

_
7.24
5.77
-

5.28
3.43
6.52
3.98
6.69
-

3.91
5.29
3.91
4.26
3.74
4.13
4.44

3.12
-

4.00

3.58

3.10

3.33

3.28

3.21

Table A-8. Hourly earnings’ of plant workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South-Continued
Jacksonville

Louisville

Memphis

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

December

Occupation

November

November

October

January

May

August

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

$7.08
8.40
6.88
6.74
7.13
-

_

4.98

7.47
8.38
-

$8.78
9.07
6.64
8.81
9.10
7.26
9.03
-

$6.35
6.33
6.04
4.78

$9.19
9.81
7.45
9.66
8.38
8.46
-

$9.32
9.44
8.92
9.11
8.73
9.73
9.33
9.45
9.31
7.04

$8.81
8.72
8.10
8.29
7.97
9.31
8.92
8.86
9.27
7.14

$9.97
9.98
9.80
8.76
9.69
9.36
10.06
9.88
10.31
7.73

$8.20
8.70
8.55
8.26
9.37
9.42
9.17
-

$9.50
9.85
8.41
9.54
9.45
9.32
9.77
9.62
7.49

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom)..................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................

_

$8.21
9.46
9.18
9.23
7.44
7.94
10.49
_
5.19

$8.38
9.68
7.89
9.78
8.86
8.53
9.75
10.53
10.07
7.04

$8.09
9.19
-

$7.55
8.44

9.15
8.55
9.63
9.89
5.34

9.89
6.92
8.14
-

$7.05
8.23
6.14
8.83
7.68
8.00
_
6.05

8.12
8.21

9.61
8.93
6.77

8.33
9.00
6.11

4.80
-

7.08
5.63

6.56
6.14

8.86
7.54
-

8.07
7.14

6.26
4.43

8.46
-

8.65
9.68
9.66
8.10

8.42
9.19
8.39
7.86

9.51
9.87
9.33
8.12

10.07
10.03
8.44
6.62

9.52
10.28
9.56
8.87

6.58
4.13
6.24
5.12
8.17
5.78
5.85
4.68
5.51
4.48
3.97
4.77
6.03

7.86
3.76
7.98
7.34
9.36
6.73
7.35
5.80
5.81
5.41
5.61
6.58
7.14

7.04
3.94
5.70
5.57
7.98
6.09
6.06
7.35
5.66
5.14
4.63
4.79
5.92

6.31
4.93
5.51
6.22
7.19
4.83
5.29
4.95
6.24
5.13
4.29
4.63
5.43

6.09
3.59
5.68
6.15
7.09
5.88
4.99
4.56
4.64
4.05
4.87
5.77

4.92
3.23
4.51
4.50
6.10
4.78
6.15
4.61
4.59
5.06
4.71
5.64

7.24
4.01
7.81
8.36
5.04
4.64
4.95
5.23
6.52
5.11
5.65
6.59

6.14
4.34
5.62
5.02
6.86
6.04
5.33
5.61
4.89
5.23
6.29
5.00
5.77

5.48
3.49
5.97
4.17
5.56
4.52
4.77
4.07
3.80
4.17
3.74
4.22
4.76

7.26
5.57
7.05
7.25
9.08
5.73
6.22
4.72
5.70
7.28
5.33
5.33
6.52

9.94
7.86
9.45
9.73
10.23
7.26
6.50
6.31
6.70
7.00
5.90
7.68
7.01

8.25
7.47
6.41
7.40
9.21
5.88
5.98
6.64
6.08
5.86
5.30
6.48
6.86

8.38
6.36
8.76
7.53
9.02
6.71
6.30
6.96
6.83
6.13
5.85
7.34
7.53

8.97
4.65
8.49
7.51
9.97
6.76
6.48
5.31
6.55
6.98
7.41
6.80

7.92
4.99
7.15
8.64
6.86
7.06
5.48
7.28
6.62
7.61
7.51
7.82

3.18
3.07

8.09
4.09
7.87
3.49

7.50
3.61
4.12
3.50

3.88
3.56

3.17
3.14

3.30
3.25

3.30
3.18

4.29
4.32

3.16
3.16

3.55
4.72
3.39

6.99
4.12
4.35
4.21

6.56
3.99
3.94

8.29
4.17
5.98
3.87

3.68
4.30
3.51

7.77
-

3.43

4.45

3.56

3.58

3.19

3.25

3.18

4.02

3.19

3.24

5.30

4.21

5.04

3.87

6.32

-

$6.95
-

-

Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy tru ck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................
See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




40

8.03

Table A-8. Hourly earnings3 of plant workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central— Continued
Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

-

$8.27
9.22
8.69
9.06
7.92
8.47
9.12
9.18
9.20
7.46

$8.92
8.78
8.95
7.77
8.06
8.70
9.36
9.27
6.70

$8.71
9.25
8.39
9.18
8.81
9.76
9.30
8.80
9.44
7.41

$7.19
7.77
7.20
8.92
7.63
8.21
-

8.04
9.19
-

9.85
9.61
8.60
8.26

7.81
7.56
-

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

$9.78
10.13
9.62
9.07
9.93
8.23
10.79
11.00
10.71
-

$9.83
10.25
9.92
9.89
9.95
9.67
10.07
10.04
10.07
8.22

$9.95
10.35
9.48
10.70
10.73
10.07
9.92
9.96
8.62

$8.66
8.43
8.45
9.11
8.61
-

$9.67
9.92
9.11
9.16
9.78
9.40
10.11
10.35
10.35
6.19

$8.65
9.69
9.33
9.74
8.79
9.28
10.07
9.92
10.26
7.13

$9.01
9.64
8.87
10.18
7.96
9.10
9.80
9.31
9.46
6.97

$8.52
9.25
8.68
8.85
7.88
8.90
9.56
8.84
-

$8.49
8.77
7.61
8.96
7.97
9.48
9.55
-

11.02
10.81
8.90
7.36

10.18
10.23
10.06
8.34

8.81
10.23
9.36

7.87

10.45
10.09
7.82
7.27

9.78
9.39
9.08

8.66
9.41
8.09
7.96

7.86
8.93
8.30
7.84

7.54
-

-

8.60
9.69
8.70
8.26

7.26
5.78
6.71
7.96
5.38
5.49
6.86
6.29
6.38
8.16
7.08
7.95

8.44
6.41
7.64
9.10
8.99
8.23
7.73
7.84
7.72
7.63
7.05
8.02
8.35

9.49
9.25
10.05
9.87
7.66
8.40
7.28
6.27
8.99

8.38
5.38
8.60
7.23
8.91
6.74
6.91
8.17
6.27
4.82
6.49
6.78

8.53
7.09
8.51
8.37
9.08
6.70
5.72
7.44
6.47
6.52
7.15
7.24
7.36

8.57
7.43
7.20
8.27
9.05
5.97
6.34
6.28
6.56
5.53
4.89
7.62
7.85

7.99
7.56
7.96
9.12
6.01
5.85
5.93
7.16
5.25
5.92
7.12
6.87

8.86
7.31
8.77
9.02
8.98
7.45
6.89
6.74
7.62
6.62
6.31
7.84
7.64

8.64
4.22
8.63
9.42
5.35
5.41
6.28
8.34
6.01
5.54
5.98
7.60

$8.95
8.93
6.89
7.04
8.37
-

8.59
5.83
8.69
8.03
8.82
6.61
6.57
5.83
7.46
6.20
5.89
7.34
7.42

7.66
5.67
8.10
6.99
5.81
6.21
6.80
6.38
6.14
6.98
6.86

8.68
5.58
6.40
8.62
9.29
6.57
6.02
6.90
6.24
6.19
6.97
7.82
7.24

8.06
4.28
7.95
9.16
5.84
6.70
4.94
4.83
5.31
5.35
7.41

4.09
4.02

8.41
6.05
6.72
5.95

8.22
5.86
7.53
4.94

7.30
4.63
4.63
4.63

8.09
5.38
6.79
4.41

6.78
4.02
5.84
3.85

7.25
3.88
3.73

3.46
4.54
3.12

-

7.35
4.50
5.36
3.82

6.99
5.80

6.38
4.04
3.90

4.67
4.74
4.66

5.19

5.99

5.45

4.73

5.22

4.31

4.43

3.76

4.20

5.14

5.50

3.74

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal workers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ...............................................
Material m ovem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy tru ck..............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners......................................................

_

4.76

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




41

7.43

Table A-8. Hourly earnings3 of plant workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
West
AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

DenverBoulder

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

October

Occupation

July

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$10.02
9.94
10.08
10.14
9.24
10.50
9.90
10.64
7.90

$9.39
9.36
9.36
8.50
9.18
-

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers..................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ..................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers..................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

_

$8.73
9.14
7.69
9.13
8.26
9.34 -

$9.65
8.20
9.34
9.94
-

$8.60
9.27
8.51
9.33
8.87
9.46
9.13
9.16
7.09

9.08
9.36
8.79

9.11

9.35
9.51
8.85

8.36
4.81
8.54
8.35
9.14
6.06
6.41
5.93
7.73
6.86
4.95
5.82
7.12

8.03
8.25
7.90
6.13
5.62
4.56
-

8.60
4.86
9.47
8.75
9.07
5.97
5.59
5.88
8.00
7.24
7.13
6.80
7.97

4.24
7.31
3.89
4.31

-

4.06

3.94
4.80
3.48
4.13

_

$8.89
9.64
9.07
9.20
9.16
9.61
_
-

$9.01
9.50
9.07
10.66
-

$8.50
8.98
8.34
9.33
8.17
9.04
9.48
7.45

$8.26
9.42
8.16
9.15
9.65
_
7.30

8.03
7.95

9.11
9.40
9.33

9.73
8.84

10.57

7.99
7.86

9.10
8.61

11.18
9.99

10.44
-

10.87

7.71
5.09
7.11
8.48
7.79
5.80
6.08
5.57
4.83
5.86

8.18
7.26
7.56
8.10
8.96
6.31
6.88
6.43
6.65
5.21
4.50
5.10
7.19

9.18
6.32
9.28
9.15
9.41
8.11
7.57
8.16
8.05
8.11
5.85
8.33
8.11

9.56
8.53
8.34
10.34
8.89
8.29
8.36
8.16
7.33
8.18

7.78
4.29
8.83
7.41
7.62
5.07
5.53
5.16
5.35
4.63
4.12
7.64
6.79

8.33
4.58
7.98
9.27
9.25
5.33
5.78
6.15
7.13
8.05

9.07
5.36
7.86
9.73
9.84
7.81
7.65
6.77
8.19
8.63
7.97
8.13

8.80
6.78
8.71
9.21
9.35
6.35
7.51
4.98
6.22
5.42
7.17
7.47

10.10
7.10
9.71
11.46
10.32
7.34
8.46
8.29
8.59
8.42
7.57
8.62
8.87

4.16
6.29
3.76

7.87
3.67
3.55

“

4.09
4.47
3.46

4.49
3.83

3.96
6.96
3.77

4.08
3.76

3.76
7.33
3.32

5.07

5.25

5.00

3.57

4.24

5.92

5.27

5.81

-

4.50

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




_
$10.27
10.18
9.61
9.94
7.27

$8.66
9.78
8.68
9.47
8.31
9.41
9.39
6.28

$8.87
9.29
7.91
8.32
_
6.25

42

-

-

-

Table A-9. Hourly earnings of plant workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
Northeast
AlbanySchenectadyTroy

Boston

Buffalo

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonCliftonPassatc

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

September

Occupation

August

October

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

$7.78
8.28
7.72
7.94
7.55
8.13
8.25
8.27
6.96
-

$9.73
10.11
9.07
9.44
10.40
9.78
9.57
10.45
9.41
-

7.05
8.70
8.49
6.85

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers..............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light tru c k .................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy tru ck...............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners......................................................

$8.16
7.56
8.29
6.88
8.09
8.12
8.39
8.61
.

7.37
6.48

$7.59
7.21
7.42
7.17
8.09
7.73

$7.14
7.57
7.80
6.86
8.03
-

-

-

7.49
6.27

-

10.26
10.05
9.53
-

6.61
7.85
7.31
6.15

7.77
-

8.58

5.57
4.97
5.95

7.75
5.32
6.38

$7.83
8.14
8.02
8.26
7.65
8.05
8.14
7.89
8.61
5.69

$7.66
8.40
7.71
8.45
8.18
8.20
8.64
8.47
-

8.45
7.93
8.59
7.74

$7.87
7.37
8.17
7.18
-

-

-

5.07

5.54

$8.74
8.82
8.94
8.93
8.44
9.14
8.94
8.26
9.50
7.24

7.99
9.50
8.39

6.57
8.21
5.75

7.78
7.40
6.85

8.14
9.06
8.52
7.64

8.21
8.67
8.93
7.97

7.80
5.66
7.07
6.47
9.02
6.02
6.11
6.41
5.70
5.25
4.89
5.62
6.53

5.99
6.14
6.08
5.63
6.09
5.40
5.06
6.04
5.43
4.86
5.12
5.16
5.83

8.71
5.31

-

7.90
9.78
6.02
6.22
5.74
6.21
6.35
5.67
5.87
7.09

7.29
7.78
7.61
6.05
6.69
6.51
6.31
4.76
6.42
7.41
7.24

4.78

-

$8.55
8.78
8.01
9.29
8.77
9.10
8.53
8.14
8.27

$6.58
6.25
6.04
6.77
-

$7.10
7.60
-

$6.00
6.90
6.73
6.21
6.49
6.30

$9.46
-

7.81
8.16
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.08

-

7.50

8.56
6.20

-

7.76

-

-

-

-

5.85

-

-

-

-

5.53
3.89
7.26

-

•
7.02
-

6.29
-

6.49
5.71
7.25
6.69
6.21
5.39
6.07
6.70
_

7.62
4.91
7.88
8.24
7.68
5.94
5.35
6.01
6.02
4.69
5.56
4.92
6.39

_

-

8.16
9.27
9.11
6.62
6.73
-

7.49
6.62
-

7.26
7.97

6.41

5.70

8.70
7.64
8.24
7.42

5.80

5.36

6.73

6.38

5.75

-

-

-

-

. 7.75
-

9.17
-

4.79
5.72
5.83

8.66
5.29
4.89
5.48
6.07
5.27
4.82
4.61
6.29

6.76
6.35
6.25
6.16
6.45
5.45
5.33
4.83
6.24

.

_

5.40

6.22

6.30
-

5.65
5.71
7.51
5.21
5.54
5.65
6.59

.

5.88

5.79
5.29
5.17
5.01
-

-

4.34
5.08

-

-

-

6.03
5.63

5.27

4.92

-

5.15
4.76
6.24

_

6.12
7.15
5.80

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$6.82
7.19
7.08
6.63
6.46

43

4.72

4.52

6.62
7.48
6.27

5.12

4.96

6.06

-

4.83
-

8.61

8.39
7.00

6.07

-

6.18
5.58

-

-

-

5.99
4.86
4.75
5.42
5.22
3.81
4.10
4.33
5.31

-

-

5.22
4.85
5.53
4.44
4.48
5.26

-

5.24
-

7.00

5.24

6.51

5.35

-

-

•

-

-

5.41
-

-

5.23
5.38

4.94
5.42
6.96
-

6.15
4.29
4.87
7.49

-

4.15

6.36

-

-

-

-

4.83

3.94

6.36

4.28

5.88

Table A-9. Hourly earnings of plant workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
Northeast— Continued

South

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

Chatta­
nooga

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Hunts­
ville

Jackson

April

Occupation

February

May

August

September

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$5.27
6.25
6.00
5.92
5.45
5.29
4.60

$9.64
9.49
9.22
9.45
8.85
7.42
9.70
9.31
9.51
5.84

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal workers..................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ..................................................
Tool and die m akers..................................
Stationary engineers..................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners .....................................................

$6.85
7.47
7.46
6.72
7.67
7.43
4.69

$6.30
7.63
6.96
6.65
6.67
7.97
8.36
5.47

$8.99
9.09
7.09
7.22
9.57
-

$8.59
8.91
7.69
9.49
9.61
8.96
8.79
9.24
9.39
-

$7.42
7.73
7.46
6.71
5.70

$9.56
9.65
9.68
10.14
9.14
6.86
-

<3.23
6.58
7.47
6.20

7.91
8.01
8.53
5.33

9.47
8.79
-

8.77
9.55
8.61
-

7.16
7.66
5.57

-

7.96
8.49
8.80
-

5.97
5.98
5.33
5.03
5.22
4.37
4.43
4.66
5.10
6.15

5.38
4.97
5.43
5.85
6.70
5.98
5.46
5.93
6.02
5.22
4.95
5.63

5.65
5.17
5.77
5.44
5.19
6.49
5.91
5.09
4.28
4.09
5.51
6.14

7.25
5.31
6.96
7.64
8.06
6.86
6.27
5.12
6.81
5.06
5.34
6.52
7.88

5.33
4.92
5.00
4.97
5.16
6.05
4.95
4.02
5.07
5.50

4.58
6.42
5.89

4.71
4.41

5.30
4.60

6.76
6.70

8.41
6.68
6.63
669

4.30
4.94
4.72

4.61

4.97

5.57

5.69

4.95

-

$6.32
-

$6.40
8.01
6.30
8.24
5.96
8.85
5.68

-

.

_

-

7.24
-

4.77
3.68
5.65
4.81
4.68
4.02
4.17
4.23
4.13
4.12
4.45

5.65
5.88
5.43
5.54
5.46
6.16
6.77
4.99
5.93
6.24
5.28
6.09

4.54
5.79
4.94
4.68

4.19
3.70
3.98
4.57
4.29
5.07
4.03
3.90
4.01
4.19

4.69
5.34
4.49

4.52
3.80
3.80

7.51
7.51

-

5.26
5.26

4.57

3.89

5.03

3.59

4.06

-

-

8.90
5.80

6.22
4.61
6.94
6.70
5.54
5.82
5.25
5.16
4.99
4.38
5.04
6.45

$5.31
4.13
-

4.96
3.93

5.47
6.14
5.57
5.45
5.49
4.65
5.18
4.39
5.75
7.03

7.16
-

8.06
6.11
5.68

-

-

5.72

5.39

-

44

$6.37
6.80
5.72
5.13
-

-

-

.

3.77

5.60
6.71
5.68

$7.47
7.28
5.86
-

8.33
8.45
9.14
-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$8.33
8.76
8.47
8.27
8.22
7.44
6.77

•

.

.

.

Table A-9. Hourly earnings of plant workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South—Continued
Louis­
ville

Memphis

December

Occupation

Jackson­
ville

November

November

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

October

January

May

August

$8.60
8.65
8.89
7.92
7.36
-

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washing­
ton

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

_

_
$7.89
7.75
-

$8.36
9.19
8.52
9.02
8.62
8.91
9.08
9.43
9.32
6.95

$8.78
8.72
8.27
8.31
8.01
8.38
8.92
9.27
-

$9.50
10.00
9.99
8.77
9.68
9.90
10.06
10.74
10.31
7.79

_
$8.61
8.49
8.15
7.57
9.48
9.17
-

$9.48
9.88
8.62
9.56
9.46
9.30
9.77
9.62
7.39

8.65
9.68
9.03
7.77

8.42
9.19
8.73
7.89

9.51
9.87
9.47
8.12

10.25
10.04
8.69

9.52
10.28
9.78
8.87

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplent
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) .... ..............................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material m ovem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light truck .................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy tru ck..............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
Guards ...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners ......................................................

_
$9.54
9.23
7.69
6.72
5.24

$9.51
9.78
9.33
9.80
8.82
8.39
9.75
10.53
10.07
7.61

$8.64
9.24
9.15
8.53
8.48
9.89
-

_
$6.55
6.03
-

8.25

9.61
9.54
8.29

8.33
9.17
6.19

-

5.62
5.60
6.32
4.59
6.21
4.91
6.45

7.07
5.25
6.67
8.15
7.44
6.42
8.01
5.81
6.41
6.91
7.29

4.87
4.54
5.18

_

$8.66
6.82
6.29
7.12
-

$6.79
7.35
6.47
-

$9.38
9.16
8.15
8.81
9.18
6.32
9.03
-

$6.43
6.27
5.53
4.81

-

7.18
-

6.56
6.14

8.86
8.31
-

- '
8.16
-

6.53
-

5.50
4.87
5.66
6.08
6.25
6.15
5.50
4.47
4.27
4.66
6.48

5.45
4.41
4.75
6.25
5.05
4.92
4.25
4.50
4.13
3.98
3.53
4.10
4.33

5.60
5.64
5.62
5.84
4.86
5.04
6.02

5.16
4.77
4.32
4.41
5.66

6.27
5.77
5.49
6.06
6.30
5.30
5.30
6.70

5.52
4.91
5.02
5.85
6.47
5.94
5.06
5.49
4.72
6.51
4.83
5.74

4.02
3.79
4.22
4.18
3.95
3.85
3.97
3.99
3.87
3.62
4.41

8.24
8.49
7.75
5.84
6.38

9.47
8.09
9.19
9.44
9.78
6.52
6.31
6.19
6.20
5.93
5.76
6.11
6.81

7.46
6.55
8.22
7.88
5.83
6.13
6.65
6.00
5.94
5.30
6.09
6.70

8.15
7.40
7.63
7.79
8.72
7.18
7.35
7.34
6.87
6.81
6.48
7.56
7.56

7.09
6.95
7.23
6.54
6.23
5.82
6.64
6.46
6.46
6.64

7.24
7.15
8.06
7.01
7.03
7.57
7.90
7.61
7.43
7.81

8.23
7.24
7.89
6.36

6.63
6.79

4.04
4.09

4.96
4.56

4.27
4.28

5.48
4.56

6.21
6.21

3.79
3.79

4.32
4.43

7.11
6.12
6.75
5.90

6.07
6.12
6.10

8.85
7.33
6.94
7.57

6.69
6.32

8.03
7.80
7.98
-

6.81

5.35

3.88

4.76

4.35

4.47

5.55

3.98

5.32

5.76

6.04

6.81

5.57

6.94

-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




45

-

-

Table A-9. Hourly earnings of plant workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central—Continued

Dayton

Detroit

GaryHammondEast Chicago

Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSL Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

December

Occupation

March

October

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$10.04
10.19
9.78
9.08
10.14
8.77
10.79
11.00
10.71
-

$9.88
10.27
9.96
9.95
9.97
9.97
10.07
10.09
10.07
-

$9.95
10.36
9.48
10.70
10.85
10.28
9.97
8.95

$8.57
8.31
8.44
8.25
8.61
-

$10.21
10.12
9.60
9.16
9.78
9.50
10.17
10.35
10.38
-

$8.71
9.69
9.33
9.79
8.65
9.07
10.07
10.04
10.26
7.20

$8.86
9.59
8.92
10.19
7.88
8.55
9.82
9.32
9.45
7.02

$8.35
9.09
8.55
8.83
7.90
8.17
9.40
8.82
6.91

$8.37
8.81
7.93
7.70
-

-

$8.48
9.20
8.95
9.02
7.84
9.05
9.08
9.19
9.20
7.48

$8.93
8.90
9.32
7.77
8.42
8.98
9.36

$9.30
8.88
9.19
9.04
8.96
9.32
9.51
9.44
7.51

$7.16
7.74
7.28
7.57
7.42
-

11.02
10.81
8.90
-

10.18
10.23
10.41
-

8.81
10.24
9.38

7.90

10.45
10.09
9.48
7.27

9.78
9.70
9.11

8.66
9.41
8.06
7.97

7.82
8.92
8.87
7.79

7.52

-

8.04
9.19
-

-

8.60
9.69
8.95
8.26

-

9.85
9.61
8.77
8.26

7.81
7.60
-

7.26
6.49
7.34
5.41
6.15
6.64
7.03
8.07

8.24
7.59
7.90
8.32
8.55
7.60
7.78
7.76
7.64
8.19
8.25

9.32
8.66
8.44
7.28
7.34
9.16

7.11
6.67
6.59
7.06

7.87
7.51
6.36
6.71
8.21
6.56
6.42
7.69
6.63
7.51

7.57
6.53
7.31
7.37
6.01
7.58
5.40
6.80
5.78
6.72
7.56

6.80
6.39
7.85
6.91
6.09
6.73
5.71
6.80
4.91
6.13
6.47
6.85

8.50
7.37
8.64
6.60
6.84
6.53
5.69
5.67
6.27
6.84
7.27

6.89
6.32
6.90
5.72
6.49
5.57
6.02
7.30
6.16
6.52
7.37

$8.90
-

7.80
5.44
7.39
7.86
6.61
6.49
5.97
6.72
5.08
6.01
6.61
7.35

6.50
6.03
6.09
6.52
6.95
6.84
6.30
6.44
6.82

7.47
7.39
6.98
6.64
6.49
7.10
6.26
7.07
6.89
7.13

6.25
6.12
6.00
6.94
4.98
4.78
5.42
5.21
7.15

8.27
8.46

8.40
7.14
8.45

9.08
8.47
8.70

-

7.24
8.23
8.23

8.11
7.53
7.62
7.46

6.78
6.57
6.84

7.24
6.32
6.21

6.69
-

-

7.25
7.56
7.37
7.99

7.25
6.06

6.89
6.89

5.69
5.75

6.75

7.71

7.64

6.61

6.49

6.79

5.90

5.74

5.72

-

6.53

6.68

7.04

5.69

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers..................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom)..................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




46

-

9.27
-

_.

.

_

.

Table A-9. Hourly earnings of plant workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
West

October

Occupation

AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

DenverBoulder

July

December

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$9.82
9.62
10.09
9.26
9.99
9.87
8.58

$9.39
9.30
9.39
8.50
9.15
-

$10.01
10.09
9.59
9.26
7.29

11.21
10.03
-

10.44
-

9.74

-

-

9.36
10.08
9.65
7.47
7.00
8.09
8.07
8.61
7.17
7.83

8.82
9.01

9.77
9.26

8.10
4.94
5.20
5.07
7.42

6.85

7.20
-

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal workers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ...............................................
Material m ovem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light tru c k .................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy tru ck...............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G u ard s...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners ......................................................

$9.07
9.30
8.89
9.13
8.26
9.42
9.04
9.36
"

$8.61
9.87
8.71
9.14
8.19
9.19
9.39
6.28

$9.40
9.75
9.21
9.15
9.16

7.95

9.40
9.43

9.73
8.84

-

-

-

-

8.69
-

7.55
5.00
6.83
8.66
8.21
6.33
6.31
6.76
5.81
3.97
4.02
6.78

8.78
6.57
9.23
9.01
8.04
6.73
8.06
6.79
5.94
8.57
7.36

6.61
7.30
5.92
5.50

$9.60
8.20
9.94
-

$9.17
9.09
8.84
8.41
-

$8.25
9.20
7.94
8.21
_
6.05

9.52
-

9.35
9.51
9.30
-

8.10
5.27
6.13
10.42
7.89
5.89
5.83
5.90
6.54
4.60
4.99
5.79
6.53

7.65
-

.

-

5.37

-

-

5.94

-

-

5.61
-

5.91
7.11
5.63
5.99
7.15

5.86
5.92
5.68

6.66
5.59

..

6.26

4.97

-

.

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$8.83
8.98
9.33
8.23
8.01
9.48
8.15

$8.97
8.62
9.11
9.72
-

.

.

6.25
5.15

8.06
7.51
6.39
8.75
7.72
5.47
5.87

-

$9.40
9.03
10.21
_
-

47

8.68
9.35
8.81

7.99
7.85
-

-

7.81
6.24
7.13

6.81
5.36
6.49
6.97
7.19
5.35
5.90
5.58
5.84
5.87
4.47
4.71
6.33

5.24
6.32
6.45
7.59

7.86
5.73
5.73

7.04
7.02

5.77
6.79
4.34

6.73
6.73

7.27
6.98

5.86
4.70

5.87

6.46

4.48

6.59

7.07

5.68

-

9.23
-

-

-

-

9.44
7.97

-

-

.

Table A-10. Hourly earnings of plant workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
Northeast

Boston

Buffalo

September

Occupation

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

August

October

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsyl­
vania

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Phila­
delphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Pough­
keepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

-

-

-

-

-

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters...............................................
Electricians...............................................
Painters....................................................
Machinists ................................................
Mechanics (machinery)............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)....................
Pipefitters.................................................
Sheet-metal workers...............................
Millwrights................................................
Trades helpers.........................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) .............................................
Tool and die makers...............................
Stationary engineers...............................
Boiler tenders ..........................................
Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..............................................
Light truck ............................................
Medium tru c k .......................................
Heavy tru ck..........................................
Tractor-trailer.......................................
Shippers...................................................
Receivers..................................................
Shippers and receivers............................
Warehousemen........................................
Order fillers ..............................................
Shipping packers.....................................
Material handling laborers.......................
Forklift operators.....................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)................................
Guards .....................................................
Class A ................................................
Class B ................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners................................................

$8.66

8.97

$7.83
8.76
7.15

8.01
8.91

-

-

-

-

-

$9.26

$6.82
7.57

8.18

$7.26

$8.49
9.41
7.10

-

-

8.94
9.29

8.46
9.24

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7,66

-

-

-

7.04

8.87
-

9.25
-

8.71
-

9.16

8.40

-

-

8.98
5.27
8.62
8.49
9.96

-

9.17
6.34

8.36
4.90

7.21

-

-

9.32

7.02

7.98
7.19
9.83
6.40
6.92
6.37
6.79
5.16

7.41

8.71

$7.88

7.31

6.73
6.47
8.04

8.67
5.68
4.92
4.35
5.76

-

7.92
7.26

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

9.33
9.78

-

$8.71
8.83
8.15
8.24
8.20
8.79

$7.88

8.39
-

8.34

-

-

-

7.04

9.41

-

-

8.03
9.10

-

-

-

-

5.02
5.73
5.74

5.46
6.82

5.74
6.61
6.37
5.59
4.78
7.32
6.05

5.51
5.70
6.37
5.73

3.10
3.99
3.00

-

3.24

3.41
4.59
3.24

3.97

3.81

3.48

• 4.82
9.60
7.71

-

-

3.97

3.94
5.14
5.81

-

3.30

3.61
5.54
3.06

3.45
4.34
3.42

3.39

3.90

3.59

5.00
7.60

3.37

7.36
5.53

48

8.57
6.62
8.82

6.90

-

8.38

9.48

-

$7.11

-

-

7.98
7.02
8.21
8.18
8.30

.

3.68

-

-

$8.93
9.47
8.12

7.75
7.29
7.02
8.43
8.86
6.63
5.71
6.05
6.72
6.92
5.69
6.90
7.76

$7.68

9.04

-

3.18
4.56
3.12

_
-

3.84

4.42

8.35
6.53

5.09
5.95
7.49

8.03
10.30
9.91
5.86
6.72
7.56
6.96
7.02
4.69
7.49
8.34

.

_

_

.

3.83
4.78
3.74

3.29

3.97

-

-

3.15

3.80

3.31
4.52
3.21

5.62

3.67

3.68

4.40

-

6.41
5.90
5.10

-

4.34
8.55
7.18

4.34

7.26

-

_
-

-

8.72

7.29

-

.

-

-

-

6.42

-

$7.72

.

5.49

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$7.60
8.36
7.51

-

-

8.46
6.01

6.30
6.32

-

_
-

_

.

3.12
3.09

-

-

3.72

3.48

8.06

9.80

5.78

-

Table A-10. Hourly earnings of plant workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
South

Northeast—Continued

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

April

Occupation

Chatta­
nooga

February

May

August

September

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Hunts­
ville

Jackson

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

_
$8.89
-

$8.00
-

$8.14
8.01
9.02
8.35
5.30

”

$6.82
“

-

6.02
“

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal workers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material m ovem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light tru c k .................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy tru ck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners......................................................

_

_

$7.95
-

$8.01
-

-

-

-

-

$7.90
8.64
6.02
8.66
“

“

6.76
-

-

-

“

6.54
6.41
7.85
5.85
5.79
4.26
5.40
7.12
3.50
3.39
4.00

7.46
4.73
7.96
4.88
5.65
8.49
7.84
3.49

_

$8.53
9.07
8.49
8.62
-

-

-

$6.45
-

_

_

_

$9.41
8.72
9.73
-

-

-

"

“

“

“

“

“

-

6.12
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.09
-

$4.83
-

$4.49
-

6.90
6.72
7.32
6.18
6.37
-

7.17
5.89
7.94
4.74
4.92
4.90
5.14
4.94

6.57
3.99
5.99
8.40
5.77
5.46
5.25
4.69
5.22
4.12
4.49
6.36

$4.93
4.85
-

5.31
-

6.71
4.00
8.35
7.78
5.05
5.52
4.62
5.86
5.88
4.23
5.38
7.34

-

5.88
3.27
8.27
3.73
3.24
4.24
-

3.18
3.18

3.38
3.37

-

-

3.11
3.07

3.05
3.05

3.63
3.63

-

2.98
2.90

3.04

3.23

3.12

3.17

3.11

-

7.74
4.42
6.57
8.98
7.48
6.54
6.54
5.98
5.99
5.75

8.00
5.33
8.70
5.86
6.59
5.80
5.99
7.54
6.71
8.02

$5.61
5.20
6.60
-

3.12
3.07

3.30
3.65
3.23

3.02
3.03

3.20

3.32

-

4.57
-

-

7.44
7.97
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




49

-

3.70

-

3.55

-

-

3.18

3.00

Table A-10. Hourly earnings of plant workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South—Continued
Jackson­
ville

Louis­
ville

Memphis

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

Richmond

San
Antonio

Washing­
ton

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

December

Occupation

November

November

October

January

May

August

June

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

$6.08
7.32
5.29
6.46
8.25
-

$6.13

$9.15

$5.41
7.34
7.45

-

-

-

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal workers..................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ..................................................
Tool and die m akers..................................
Stationary engineers..................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material m ovement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)...................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

-

-

$7.70
-

$7.65
8.45

-

-

-

-

$8.25
-

$8.57
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5.45

_

.

_

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.80
4.06
6.38
-

8.41
5.63
5.85
-

5.22
4.47
3.92
4.67
5.46

_
3.14

8.06
3.40
8.26
-

9.69
-

5.85
5.15
5.81
4.92
4.47
5.22
6.31

.

-

-

-

-

-

7.22
3.60
5.82
-

8.15
6.10
6.03
-

6.49
5.43
5.57
-

5.65
-

.
7.02
-

6.20
3.47
5.70
-

7.35
5.83
4.81
-

4.23
4.62

-

-

7.14
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$9.37

-

.

.

.

.

.

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

8.81
-

“

-

-

10.55
9.03

-

-

8.55
-

7.07
5.56
7.06
6.47
9.27
5.92
6.30
4.58
5.81
7.28
5.32
5.21
6.61

10.01
7.76
9.50
9.84
10.27
7.93
6.65
6.72
7.20
7.56
6.20
8.69
7.66

8.59
7.49
6.27

8.49
5.71
9.02

9.63

4.87
3.05

7.47
3.97
7.96

-

-

-

6.14
4.73
4.70
4.35
4.38
5.34

8.79
4.55
4.55
-

4.72
6.59

6.28
4.00
5.93
5.04
7.06
4.90
-

4.79
5.36

3.08

3.49

3.07

2.99

3.13

3.24

3.55

3.08

3.10

3.11

3.28

-

-

5.07
5.56

-

5.86
3.43
6.10
-

3.08

50

8.68
7.09
6.63
8.14

_

_

3.85
4.18
3.76

3.13

3.08

3.54
4.74
3.37

3.12

3.41
4.96
3.26

3.30
3.64
3.22

-

3.11

3.21

5.08

3.19

4.39

3.48

4.70

.

-

-

-

_

.
3.56

-

8.28
-

-

_

4.46
5.39

-

-

-

7.55
8.22

-

5.51
5.91

3.14

-

-

6.81
5.76
5.22
6.71
7.33

.

.

-

10.13
7.00
6.57
5.21
6.49
8.19
7.04

6.13
5.07
5.05
4.17
3.70
4.19

6.18
6.49

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




-

-

-

3.86

3.16

$8.84
9.96
-

9.78
8.97

_

_

3.21

-

_

.

3.19

-

$11.09
-

-

-

3.14

-

-

_

-

-

-

4.67
5.41

-

6.22

$10.24
10.15
9.65
9.86
9.94
10.97

-

6.93
5.32
4.88

-

-

$9.35
7.42
9.12
8.90

$9.77
-

5.96
5.37
4.71
4.88
5.25

3.04

-

7.78
8.28

-

3.36
4.02
3.23

-

3.19

9.74

-

$8.00

3.08
-

_

9.56
5.44
-

6.20
-

-

9.19
5.86
5.18
-

-

-

Table A-10. Hourly earnings of plant workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central— Continued
Green
Bay

Indian­
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisSt. Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

$8.68
_
7.73
8.94
-

$8.29
10.18
_
_
9.72
-

_
-

$7.60
8.88
8.37
-

_
$8.60
_
-

$8.85
7.64
10.01
-

_
$8.39
-

8.14

7.57

-

7.37

-

-

-

-

-

-

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

_
$7.61
-

$9.51
9.57
9.63
8.16
9.31
-

_
$9.74
-

_
$9.41
-

_

_

$8.47
9.36
-

$9.70
9.33
- -

-

8.93

-

-

-

9.10

-

-

-

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ...............................................
Material m ovem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy tru ck..............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers..........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners......................................................

-

7.26
5.80
6.78
8.04
4.97
7.13
6.24
7.20
-

-

-

_

8.54
6.13
7.59
9.42
7.77
7.06
7.68
7.61
6.63
7.59
8.89

9.78
10.44
5.96
-

9.62
5.86
-

8.81
7.15
8.69
8.19
9.65
5.36
6.40
6.54
8.13
6.35

8.85
7.64
7.14
9.52
5.90
5.61
6.91
6.43
5.84
4.34
8.18
8.41

8.42
9.66
5.81
5.25
5.49
4.59
8.03
7.12

8.94
6.42
9.06
8.17
6.91
8.24
6.94
6.34
8.29
8.77

8.96
4.15
8.77
9.64
4.65
5.12
6.75
8.67
5.53
5.09
5.08
7.97

$8.74
8.01
5.25
-

8.76
6.09
8.20
8.89
6.59
6.84
5.71
7.98
6.57
8.48
8.10

8.38
5.73
7.91
-

9.02
5.67
9.56
6.48
5.58
6.23
9.04
8.19

-

4.41
6.66
3.89

3.35
-

-

3.28
3.50
-

4.73
3.60

3.52
3.43

3.55
3.20

3.25
3.07

-

3.36
3.88
3.09

-

3.48
3.29

3.31

4.55

“

3.65

4.42

3.25

4.09

3.51

3.34

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$9.29
_
9.35
-

51

4.32

3.24

3.40

3.94

8.34
4.19
8.16
9.45
5.03
5.41
3.24

Table A-10. Hourly earnings of plant workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
West
AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

October

Occupation

DenverBoulder

July

December

Maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal workers...................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ..................................................
Tool and die m akers..................................
Stationary engineers..................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

•

$9.44
-

$9.57
9.06
9.72
-

$8.39
-

$8.75
9.49
8.63
9.12
9.50
-

$9.70
-

.

_

_

_

_

_

_

8.73
-

-

8.04
-

9.12
“

*

9.45

-

8.40
"

9.97
_

“
-

-

8.37
-

8.47
4.27
9.60
9.37
8.30
7.87

8.09
8.48
7.90
6.13
5.60
4.56
-

8.71
4.42
9.67
9.30
6.48
5.49
5.93
8.80
7.28
7.29
8.78

6.62
6.54
7.11
-

8.37
7.79
7.79
9.11
7.28
5.76
7.09
5.91
7.89

9.27
6.17
9.34
9.12
9.48
8.22
8.30
8.30
8.85
8.12
9.23

9.92
8.56
10.82
9.10
8.41
8.31
8.59
10.23

8.14
3.80
9.06

8.16
4.50
7.96
9.33
6.36
5.94
6.55
-

9.01
5.32
7.74
9.70
9.91
8.30
7.87
6.01
8.20
8.67
8.59
8.88

8.79
8.65
9.25
7.07
7.41
7.90
8.04

.

3.79
3.75
3.93

.

3.50
4.03
3.27

5.31
6.59

.

-

-

3.76

3.81

4.29

$10.87
-

$9.27
-

_

7.70
4.78
5.25
4.77
5.21
4.43
4.01
8.84
7.43

$7.66
9.61
-

_

6.81
_

“

$9.21
-

$10.30
-

“
_

12.54
“

10.22
10.25
10.51
9.08
8.29
8.44
8.61
8.71
10.38

.

_

_

_

3.84
5.76
3.58

3.42
3.32

-

3.77
4.06
-

4.15
-

3.77
3.63

3.61
3.61

3.31
3.23

4.94

4.80

3.39

3.89

5.76

5.07

5.25

.

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$10.19
10.59
10.17
9.13
10.63
-

$9.32
-

52

4.74

_

_

_

Table A-11. Hourly earnings of plant workers, public utilities, January through December 1979
Northeast

Boston

Buffalo

September

Occupation

AlbanySchenectadyTroy

August

October

_
$9.06
-

_
$10.19
9.33
7.10

Hartford

NassauSuffolk

Newark

New York

Northeast
Pennsylvania

PatersonCliftonPassaic

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

Portland

Poughkeepsie

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Trenton

March

June

January

May

August

June

November

January

December

June

June

September

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ...............................................
Material movem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light tru c k .................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy tru ck...............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers..........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners......................................................

_
$8.96
-

_
$8.50
-

-

-

-

-

9.84
9.87
-

9.69
8.74
10.16
8.34
-

10.17
10.36
10.48
10.26
10.50

9.21
9.36
-

-

-

-

-

6.63

“

6.49

6.01

_
$7.16
-

_

$8.38
9.88
8.39
9.02
9.43
7.61

$9.07
9.05
-

_
$8.30
-

-

-

9.56

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.16
9.39
-

8.91
9.31
9.63
9.62

-

-

6.80
6.89

-

6.19

6.31

6.49

6.22

10.23
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




_
$8.93
-

53

10.10
10.21
6.97
-

8.66
6.81
-

_
$10.72
9.70
9.95
-

10.36
8.20
10.39
7.57
10.13
-

$8.17
8.64
8.96
7.03

_
$8.27
-

$7.59
-

$7.75
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.20
7.58
7.99
8.57
9.29
8.64
-

8.46
7.70
-

-

9.74
10.08
7.07
-

-

$9.67
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6.51

6.18

6.53

“

“

6.66

-

Table A-11. Hourly earnings of plant workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
Northeast—Continued

South

Worcester

York

Atlanta

Baltimore

April

Occupation

Chatta­
nooga

February

May

August

September

Corpus
Christi

DallasFort
Worth

Daytona
Beach

Gaines­
ville

GreensboroWinston-SalemHigh Point

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Houston

Hunts­
ville

Jackson

July

December

August

September

August

June

April

February

January

$8.50
-

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerpiant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom)..................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
Guards..........................................................
Class A ..................... ................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

$8.04
-

_
$9.06
-

_
$8.66
-

$8.01
8.90
/_
9.51
-

_
-

.

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
$9.51
9.84
• -

-

-

-

9.46
9.44
9.34
9.39
5.29

9.11
9.01
9.29
7.54
7.49
6.10

9.00
5.82
9.67
6.56
9.14
5.36

-

-

_
$8.90
-

$8.49
-

-

$7.42
-

_

_
-

8.90
-

.

9.68
9.78
-

.

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.93
10.31
9.31
7.65
8.13
6.26
8.68

-

-

7.39
7.29
7.45
6.27
-

8.53
8.50
-

8.00
8.53
8.93
6.88

-

-

-

5.88
5.88

-

-

-

-

5.67

-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




_
• -

.

-

$8.22
9.21
5.99
-

54

5.15

-

4.47

-

4.69

Table A-11. Hourly earnings of plant workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central

South—Continued
Louisville

Memphis

December

Occupation

Jacksonville

November

November

Miami

New
Orleans

NorfolkVirginia BeachPortsmouth

Oklahoma
City

Richmond

October

January

May

August

June

San
Antonio

Washington

Chicago

Cincinnati

Cleveland

Columbus

DavenportRock IslandMoline

May

March

May

July

September

October

February

'

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters.......... ...............................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light tru c k ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners......................................................

_
$9.21
-

_
$9.19
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.84
9.45
-

10.25
-

-

6.51

_
$10.24
-

9.98

_
$10.10
-

_
$7.58
7.32
8.35
-

_
_
$8.47
7.17
-

_
_
$9.25
-

_
_
_
$8.26
-

_
_
-

_
_
_
$8.91
-

$8.33
10.16
-

_
$9.94
7.80

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.81
-

-

-

-

-

7.16
_
6.85
-

10.13
9.73
10.31
8.41
_
9.97
-

10.15
10.26
10.23
-

8.86
_
-

10.19
10.40
7.49
_
10.17
-

-

6.80
6.80

8.00
8.24
7.66

-

-

-

4.31

5.82

6.60

10.63
10.06
5.75

9.34
8.42
10.51
5.35
-

8.34
7.70
8.41
_
-

6.28
5.73
6.45
-

9.83
10.04
9.86
_
-

7.56
-

6.24
-

-

4.10
-

-

-

6.45

5.49

4.99

4.50

7.19

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




55

4.08

7.36
8.C7
7.17
_
6.32
-

5.30

$8.28
8.77
7.01
_
-

5.43

_
$10.31
9.45
-

-

_
$10.21
-

5.63

_
$9.46
-

9.61
9.64
_
8.85
-

5.71

Table A-11. Hourly earnings of plant workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
North Central—Continued

Dayton

Detroit

December

Occupation

GaryHammondEast Chicago

March

October

Green
Bay

Indian-,
apolis

Kansas
City

Milwaukee

MinneapolisS t Paul

Omaha

Saginaw

St Louis

South
Bend

Toledo

Wichita

July

October

September

April

January

October

November

March

August

May

April

_
$9.55
-

_
$9.34
-

_
_
_
$9.54
_
-

$8.52
_
9.39
_

$7.80
_
8.98
9.00
_

$9.73
_
_

_
_
_
-

_
$8.90
8.27
-

_
_
$9.71
-

$10.20
-

-

-

9.39
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10.13
- .
-

9.88
9.93
10.25
-

9.80
8.77
10.16
10.13
10.02

9.75
9.76
9.85
-

9.35
9.28
9.16

9.96
9.93
_
-

$9.86
-

9.14
8.50
9.37
_
9.10
-

10.25
-

9.86
9.86
_
6.72
_
-

$9.58
_
10.04
-

-

6.08
-

8.13
8.13

“

5.65

7.41

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters....................................................
Electricians...................................................
Painters.........................................................
Machinists ....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)..............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers..................................
Millwrights.....................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom)..................................................
Tool and die m akers..................................
Stationary engineers..................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material m ovement and
custodial
Truckdrivers..................................................
Light truck ................................................
Medium tru ck...........................................
Heavy truck..............................................
Tractor-trailer ...........................................
Shippers........................................................
Receivers......................................................
Shippers and receivers..............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ..................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)...................................
G uards..........................................................
Class A .....................................................
Class B .....................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners.....................................................

_
$7.97
-

$8.06
8.77
9.14
9.50
-

-

-

-

-

-

8.41
10.50
-

9.40
7.72
9.40
9.36
-

10.13
•10.50
-

-

7.97
-

-

-

5.32

6.59

$10.23
9.74
-

-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




56

5.95

_

_

-

-

8.18
_
_

_
_

-

6.41
7.84
-

-

_
_

—
-

6.59

6.42

6.28

6.45

-

6.09

-

_

Table A-11. Hourly earnings of plant workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
West
AnaheimSanta AnaGarden Grove

Billings

DenverBoulder

Fresno

Los AngelesLong Beach

Portland

Sacramento

Salt Lake
City-Ogden

San
Diego

San FranciscoOakland

San Jose

SeattleEverett

October

Occupation

July

December

June

October

May

December

November

November

March

March

December

$9.95
10.69
_
_
10.60
_
-

_
_
$9.21
_
-

_
_
_
$10.22
_
-

-

-

-

-

9.23
_
-

10.82
10.82
10.59
8.95
-

Maintenance, toolroom , and
powerplant
Carpenters.....................................................
Electricians....................................................
Painters..........................................................
Machinists .....................................................
Mechanics (machinery)...............................
Mechanics (motor vehicles)......................
Pipefitters.......................................................
Sheet-metal w orkers...................................
Millwrights......................................................
Trades helpers.............................................
Machine-tool operators
(toolroom) ...................................................
Tool and die m akers...................................
Stationary engineers...................................
Boiler tenders ..............................................
Material movem ent and
custodial
Truckdrivers...................................................
Light truck .................................................
Medium tru c k ...........................................
Heavy tru ck...............................................
Tractor-trailer...........................................
Shippers.........................................................
Receivers.......................................................
Shippers and receivers...............................
Warehousemen............................................
Order fillers ...................................................
Shipping packers.........................................
Material handling laborers.........................
Forklift operators.........................................
Power-truck operators
(other than forklift)....................................
G uards...........................................................
Class A ......................................................
Class B ......................................................
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners ......................................................

_
$8.78
-

_
$9.97
-

-

_
_
_
_

_

_

_

_
-

$9.34
10.23
-

$9.96
_
-

_
_
_
-

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
_

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10.04
-

10.40
10.54
10.02
10.48
10.57

6.37
_
-

9.76
7.82
10.10
_
-

9.49
9.42
9.40
9.57
_
9.12
9.04
-

9.83
10.02

9.89
10.10
_
9.98
10.20

9.50
8.46
_
-

9.72
9.75
9.79
_
9.17
-

-

-

-

_
_

7.47
_
-

_
-

_
-

_
_
-

_
-

8.05
_

-

_
_

"

“

"

7.59

5.09

“

6.26

-

6.81

-

7.45

9.65
-

$10.61
_
-

”

8.38
-

7.11

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




$9.76
_
-

57

_

_
_
_
$10.26
_
-

9.92
_

_

_

_

_
_
$8.84
-

_
_
_
$10.31
_
-

•

T a b le A - 1 2 . P e rc e n t increases in av erag e ea rn in g s f o r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s , 1 2 m o n th p e rio d e n d in g in 1 9 7 9 4
A ll In dustries
M e tro p o lita n
area

M a n u fa c tu rin g

|

O ffic e
C lerical

E le c tro n ic
d a ta
processing

In d u s tria l
nurses

S k ille d
m a in te n a n c e
trades

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w o rk e rs

9 .4
7 .9
8 .5
6 .5
6 .9
7 .3
6.1
6. 1
6 .7
7 .9
8 .4
1 0 .5
—

9 .8
8 .0
8 .5
6 .3
9 .4
6 .9
5 .5
6. 4
6 .4
8.1
8 .2
6 .9
—

9 .3
8 .8
8 .3
9.1
7 .7
9 .2
6 .4
1 0 .0
8 .5
9 .4
8 .6
—
—

9 .5
7 .6
9 .3
8 .2
7 .4
8 .2
7 .9
7 .0
8 .7
8 .8
8 .4
1 1 .6
6 .6

9 .6
8 .0
1 0 .9
8 .2
6 .6
7 .7
7 .0
8 .2
8 .3
1 0 .0
8 .5
9 .6
6 .2

8 .3
9 .4
5 .5
6 .9
7 .9
6 .7
7 .0
7 .5
8 .4
9 .6
—
—

7 .4
8.1
7.1
7 .8

7 .7
7 .3
6.1
8 .3

6 .9
5 .4
8 .5
6 .2

9.1
9 .8
8.1
9 .0

8 .9
9.1
8 .0
10.1

6 .4
7 .9
7 .8
8 .0

7 .0
8.1
7 .8
—
9 .3

8 .2
7 .7
6 .2
—
1 0 .9

7.1
7 .3
7 .4
—
8 .8

8.1
9 .7
1 0 .0
8 .9
1 1 .0
—
—

9 .3
9 .0
9 .2
8 .7
1 0 .7
7 .6
—

1 0 .4
7 .6
8 .2
—
9 .3
1 0 .0
9 .2
9 .6
8 .9
8 .8

11.1
1 0 .3
9 .5
8 .9
1 0 .8
9 .6
9 .6
1 0 .2
8 .7
8 .5

7 .9
9 .3
8 .5
9 .8
5 .8

5 .3
1 0 .0
8 .7
7 .9
7 .6

O ffic e
clerical

E le c tro n ic
da ta
processing

In dus trial
nurses

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

S k ille d
m a in ten a n ce
trades

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w o rk e rs

O ffic e
cle ric al

1 0 .9
9 .5
1 0 .3
8 .8
7 .2
7 .4
7 .7
5 .9
8 .9
1 0 .0
8 .9
7 .9
8 .5

8.1
7 .7
7 .3
6 .8
6 .8
6 .8
5 .8
4 .5
6 .3
7 .4
7 .4
1 0 .9
—

E le c tro n ic
data
processing

In d u s tria l
nurses

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w o rk e rs

N o rth e a s t
A lb a n y —S c h e n e c ta d y —T r o y .
B o s t o n ...............................................
B u ffa lo ............................................
H a r t f o r d ............................................
N a s s a u - S u f fo lk .............................
N e w a r k ............................................
N e w Y o r k ........................................
N o rth e a s t P enn sylvan ia . . . .
P aterson—C lift o n —Passaic . . .
P h ila d e lp h ia .....................................
P it t s b u r g h ........................................
P o r t la n d ............................................
P o u g h k e e p s ie .................................
P ro vid ence—W a r w ic k —
P a w t u c k e t .................................
T re n to n ............................................
W o r c e s t e r ........................................
Y o r k ...................................................

7 .9
9 .0
8.1
—

9 .5
8 .6
8 .5
1 0 .6
—

6 .6
6 .0
—
—
7 .7
8.1
—
—

9.1
5 .8
1 0 .3
9 .5
9 .9
9.1
—
_

9 .2
7 .6
9 .3
8.1
7 .8
8 .4
7 .9
7 .0
8 .9
9 .3
8 .4
9.1
—

-

7 .3
5 .4
9 .7
5 .7

9 .5
9 .9
8 .3
9.1

8 .3
8 .9
8 .4
1 0 .2

8 .2
—
6 .5
-

7 .7
—
—
8 .5
—
—

—
—
—
9 .6
_
_

7.1
7 .2
—
8 .6
—
_

9 .1
1 0 .0
9 .9
8 .9
9 .5
—
_

9 .5
10 .1
8 .7
8 .5
1 0 .6
—
—

7 .0
8 .3
7 .8
—
9 .5

9 .5
6 .8
7 .8
_
—
—

8 .2
—
—
_
—
—
—
—
—
—

8 .4
7 .8
5 .8
_
—
_

1 0 .9
7 .5
9.1
—

1 1 .7
8 .4
8 .4
9 .6
1 1 .2
9 .7
9 .9
8 .2
6 .4
9 .7

9 .1
7 .2
8 .8
—
9 .2
8 .7
9 .9
8.1
9 .3
9 .9

1 1 .0
1 2 .9
9 .4
8 .3
7 .2

8 .7
9 .7
7 .7
8 .4
6.1

—
—

8 .0
—
5 .8
9 .9
7 .0
5 .4
—
—
9 .3
9 .3
—
—

—
5 .5
-

—
—
7.1
—
—
7 .0
—
—
7 .4
—
—
—

—
—
-

7 .6
7 .2
1 1 .4
7 .8
7 .0
7 .8
7 .0
9 .6
7 .4
1 0 .2
8.1
1 0 .4
—
9 .6
—
—
10 .1

S o u th
A tla n ta ............................................
B a l t i m o r e ........................................
C h a tta n o o g a
.................................
C orpus C h ris ti .............................
D alla s—F o r t W o r t h ......................
D a y to n a B e a c h .............................
G ainesville
.....................................
G reen sbo ro—W in s to n -S a le m High P o i n t .................................
G re e n v ille —S p a rta n b u rg . . . .
H o u s t o n ............................................
H u n t s v ille ........................................
Jackson ............................................
J a c k s o n v ille .....................................
L o u i s v i l l e ........................................
M e m p h is ............................................
M i a m i ................................................
N e w O rleans .................................
N o r fo lk —V irg in ia B each—
P o r t s m o u t h ..............................
O k la h o m a C i t y .............................
R ic h m o n d ........................................
San A n to n io
.................................
W a s h in g t o n .....................................




—

—

—

—

—

—

9 .5
7. 0
8 .6
—
8 .7
8 .6
9 .8
8 .4
9.1
9 .7

7 .9
1 1 .4
6 .6
—
9 .2
11 .1
8 .0
1 1 .8
9 .5
6 .5

8 .6
7 .8
7 .2
—
—
9 .5
1 2 .0
10.1

8.1
9 .4
8 .0
8 .5
6 .2

1 1 .0
1 0 .5
6.1
4 .4
7.1

—

—

—
6 .9
—
6 .8

9 .6
8 .5
—

—

1 2 .0
1 0 .2
—
—

9 .8
9 .9
9.1
9 .0
_
8 .6

8 .5
8 .9
—

_

_

7 .2
_

7 .4
—

8 .6
9 .5
8 .3
—

—

—

—

—

58

—

—

8 .2
7 .8
—
—

—
—
—

9 .2
8 .0
—
—
1 0 .6
—
—

1 1 .4
• —
—

—
—

—
6 .7
—
9 .3
1 1 .4
8 .2
1 1 .2
1 0 .0
6 .8

—
—
—
_
_
—
_
_
—

1 0 .1
9 .5
8 .9
1 2 .1
9 .2
8.1

1 0 .5
5 .4
—

—
—
—

3 .0
8 .5
8 .0
7 .9

6 .3

7.7

7.1

—

9 .8
—
9 .9
—

'

Table A-12. Continued—Percent increases in average earnings for selected occupational groups, 12 month period ending in 19794
A ll Industries
M e tro p o lita n
area

O ffic e
C lerica l

E lectro n ic
da ta
processing

M a n u fa c tu rin g

In d u s trial
nurses

S k ille d
m a in te n a n c e
trades

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w o rk e rs

O ffic e
clerical

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

In d u s tria l
nurses

S k ille d
m a in te n a n c e
trad es

U n s k ille d
p la n t
w o rk e rs

8 .4
9.1
1 1 .0
8 .2

8 .2
9 .6
11 .1
9.1

8 .7
7 .7
11.1
1 1 .0

7 .4
9 .2
8 .4
7 .5

7.1
7 .8
8 .4
7 .5

7 .9
—
_
—

9 .8
9 .5
1 0 .5

9 .0
1 0 .3
9.1

9 .4
1 0 .9
1 0 .6

8 .9
7 .4
7 .7

—
—

—
_

1 0 .8

1 0 .9

(5 )
—
8 .8
6 .2
7 .5
8 .5
—
—

(5 )
—
1 3 .3
9 .4
6 .6
7 .5
—

(5 )
8 .3
1 0 .8
9 .7
8 .4
8 .5
1 0 .0
—

(5 )
8 .8
12.1
9 .0
9 .2
8 .7
8 .7
—

(5 )
—
1 0 .3
6 .7
6 .4
8 .4
1 0 .7
—

8 .3
7 .4
6.1
-

9 .8
8 .0
9 .0
13 .1

8 .8
9 .7
8 .7
1 1 .5

9.1
1 0 .2
9 .6
1 0 .3

(5 )
—
7 .6
7 .5
7 .0
8 .5
9 .2
—
7 .7
—

5 .2
—
—

(5 )
—
—
—
—
—
_
_
_
—
_

-

-

9 .4
—
1 0 .6
7 .5
8 .5
7 .2
7 .6
7 .8
—

7 .6
—
1 0 .6
—

_
—
9 .8

—

1 0 .0
9 .2
9 .7
9.1
6 .5
8 .6
5 .5
9 .7

8 .7
1 0 .5
—
1 0 .7
7 .6
8 .6
1 1 .2
8 .8

E le c tro n ic
d a ta
processing

O ffic e
clerical

E le c tro n ic
da ta
processing

Industrial
nurses

U n s kille d
p la n t
w o rk e rs

N o r th C e n tra l
C h i c a g o ............................................
C i n c i n n a t i .........................................
C l e v e l a n d .........................................
C o l u m b u s .........................................
D a v e n p o r t—R o c k Is la n d —
M o l i n e .........................................
D a y to n
.............................................
D e t r o i t ................................................
G a ry —H a m m o n d —
East C h i c a g o ..........................
G re e n B a y .........................................
In d ia n a p o lis .....................................
Kansas C i t y .....................................
M il w a u k e e .........................................
M in n e a p o lis —St. Paul ...............
O m a h a ................................................
S a g i n a w .............................................
S t. L o u is .............................................
S o u th B e n d .....................................
T o l e d o ................................................
W ic h ita
.............................................

7 .3
8 .5
8 .5
7 .6

7 .0
7 .5
8 .4
7 .8

8 .3
8 .9
1 0 .5
8 .0

8 .0
9 .5
1 0 .8
9.1

8 .3
8 .2
10.1
1 0 .3

7 .2
7 .9
8 .5
7 .8

1 0 .9
7 .8
8 .3

1 1 .6
8.1
1 0 .5

9 .8
9 .4
1 0 .5

9 .0
10.1
9 .2

8 .9
1 0 .3
1 0 .2

1 1 .8
8.1
9 .0

(5 )
9 .3
9 .2
7 .7
7 .2
8 .6
9.1
9 .4
8 .0
8 .6
7 .0
1 0 .7

(5 )
—
1 0 .0
6 .7
7 .0
8 .5
1 0 .5
—
6 .9
7 .5
7 .2
8 .2

(5 )
—
1 3 .3
9 .0
6 .3
7 .6
7 .6
—
9 .7
8 .0
9 .0
1 2 .9

(5 )
8 .8
1 0 .7
8 .5
8 .5
8 .3
9 .8
—
8 .6
9 .6
8 .7
1 0 .9

(5 )
9 .0
1 0 .2
7 .9
8 .0
8.1
9.1
1 1 .0
8 .6
1 2 .2
7 .6
13.1

(5 )
—
1 1 .9
8 .6
7 .4
8 .7
—
—
8 .6
8 .7
6 .2
1 2 .3

8 .8
9 .0
1 0 .2
6 .8
9 .8
8 .5
9.1
9 .4
7 .3
8 .3
7 .3
9 .3

5 .2
—
9 .2
—
8 .6
9.1

10.1

9 .5
9 .0
1 0 .7
8 .3
9 .7
8 .5
1 0 .3
1 0 .4
8 .3
8 .5
8 .9
8 .8

8 .7
1 2 .5
1 0 .3
6 .7
1 1 .7
8 .6
8.1
1 1 .2
8 .3
9 .0
9 .2
9 .3

9 .3

7.1
6 .8
8 .3
—

—

8 .2
1 0 .6

—

7 .2
8 .6

8 .0
9 .2
8 .7
9 .8
_
9 .0
9 .7
(5 )
—
8 .6
7 .3
6 .9
7 .9
9 .3
_
8.1
_
4 .8
1 3 .7

W est
A n a h e im —S an ta A n a —
G a rd e n G ro v e ..........................
B illin g s ................................................
D e n v e r—B o u l d e r ..........................
F res n o ................................................
Los A n g e le s — L o ng B each . . .
P o r t l a n d .............................................
S a c r a m e n t o .....................................
S alt L a k e C it y —O g d e n ...............
San D i e g o .........................................
San F ra n c is c o —O a k la n d . . . .
San J o s e .............................................
S e a ttle —E v e r e t t ..............................

—

1 0 .6
8 .3
8 .4
9 .6
8 .6

—

1 1 .6
—
8 .4
—
—
—
9 .6

7.7
1 1 .3
1 0 .6

—

9 .6

9 .7

—

—

—

—

—
—
9 .7
—
—
9 .9
8 .9

9.1
—
8 .4
—
—
—

1 2 .6
—
8 .7
—
—
—

9 .5
—
8 .7
(6 )

1 0 .0
8 .3
—

7.7
8 .4
(6 >

See fo o tn o te s a t e n d o f B-series ta b le .




59

(6 )

1 1 .0
9 .1
1 0 .5
9 .4
—
1 0 .4
8 .5
8 .0
8 .8
8 .6

1 0 .0
—
1 0 .2

—

—
_
_
7 .7
_
_
_
—
—
—
<6 )

8 .3
—
10.1
_
1 2 .9
8 .8
8.1
1 2 .0
7 .8
8 .7
9 .8
• 9 .7

Table A-13. Interarea pay comparisons for selected occupational groups, January-December 1979
( 2 6 2 - a r e a a v e ra g e p a y levels f o r e a c h in d u s t r y a n d o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p = 1 0 0 )

O ffic e cle ric al
A rea

A ll m e tro p o lita n a r e a s ...............

E le c tro n ic d a ta processing

A ll
in dustries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
in dustries

Non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

A ll
in dustries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
in dustries

Non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

A ll
industries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
in dustries

A ll
in d u s tries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
in dustries

Non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g
in dus tries

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

102
97
97
91
93
104
102
86
94
98
104
90
—

—

100
92
95
93
100
105
107
91
98
97
101
—
—

—

—

93
103
92
90
101
101
85
91
99
114
—
—

102
98
89
89
94
106
103
85
95
96
99
91
—

93
—
—
—
102
106
—
—
94
104
—
—

93
—
95
101
107
108
—
—
98
93
—
—

89
90
108
88
87
96
96
82
86
96
103
71
—

87
89
109
88
85
94
94
79
86
95
104
68
—

108
89
111
86
87
96
116
103
91
105
110
102
87

97
87
113
92
82
95
92
86
83
98
120
82
84

103
92
106
81
87
100
126
103
89
105
101
103
—

86
96
94
91

83
95
92
90

88
93
95
—

86
93
97
—

—
—
—

—
—
—

—

-

76
98
82
86

75
—
82
84

82
86
97
105

73
92
82
87

92
—
—
106

102
104
87
87
95
—
90

100
105
86
—
94
—
—

105
104
85
89
96
—
—

104
97
89
—
97
—
—

97
85
104
—
88
91
98
95
97
91

94
81
102
—
—
—

96
86
105
—
90
93
97
98
101
92

95
88
10 3
—
84
91
97
94
105
91

84
95
91
84
103

87
86
93

83
98
89
86
105

89
92
93

—

91

—

—

—

N o rth e a s t
A lb a n y —S c h e n e c ta d y —T r o y .
B o s t o n ................................................
B u ffa lo ............................................
H a r t f o r d ............................................
Nassau—S u ffo lk
..........................
N e w a r k ............................................
N e w Y o r k ........................................
N o rth e a s t P ennsylvania . . . .
P aterson—C lift o n —Passaic . . .
P h ila d e lp h ia .....................................
P it t s b u r g h ........................................
P o r t l a n d ............................................
P o u g h k e e p s ie .................................
P ro vid en c e—W a r w ic k —
P a w t u c k e t .................................
T r e n to n ............................................
W o r c e s t e r ........................................
Y o r k ...................................................

U n s k ille d p la n t

S k ille d m a in te n a n c e

-

S o u th
A tla n ta ............................................
B a l t i m o r e ........................................
C h a ttan o o g a
.................................
C orpus C h ris ti .............................
D alla s—F o r t W o r t h ......................
D a y to n a B each .............................
G a in e s v ille ........................................
G ree n s b o ro —W in s to n -S a le m —
High P o i n t .................................
G re e n v ille —S p a rta n b u rg . . . .
H o u s t o n ............................................
H u n t s v i l l e ........................................
Jackson ............................................
J a c k s o n v ille .....................................
L o u i s v i l l e ........................................
M e m p h is ............................................
M i a m i ................................................
N e w O rleans .................................
N o r fo lk —V irg in ia B each—
P o r t s m o u t h .............................
O k la h o m a C i t y ..............................
R ic h m o n d .........................................
.................................
San A n to n io
W a s h in g t o n .....................................




95
92
87
—

—

—

103

_
—
—
—
99
—
—

108
98
—
—
96
—
—

96
101
81
100
93
—
—

93
102
81
102
90
—
—

85
92
81
71
78
74
—

95
99
82
—
85
65
—

83
88
—
—
76
—
—

91

—

—

—

92
70
102
—
77
93
99
96
84
94

88
67
102
—
73
93
100
95

86
76
75
76
73
73
97
75
75
76

82
67
88
70
74
82
111
84
65
85

83
77
73
—
71
71
75
72
78
75

90
85
97

89
80
97

—

—

74
77
85
70
78

75
79
90
66
95

76
81
81
72
79

—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—

106
—
—
93
—
97
108
93

—

—

—

—

—

60

104

103

—

98

—

Table A-13. Continued—Interarea pay comparisons for selected occupational groups, January-December 1979
( 2 6 2 - a r e a a v e ra g e p a y le v e ls f o r e a c h in d u s t r y a n d o c c u p a t io n a l g r o u p = 1 0 0 )

E le c tro n ic d a ta processing

O ffic e clerical
A re a

A ll m e tr o p o lita n a r e a s ...............

S k ille d m a in te n a n c e

U n s k ille d p la n t

A ll
in dus tries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

Non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

A ll
industries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
in dustries

Non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

A ll
industries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

A ll
industries

M a n u fa c tu rin g
in dustries

Non­
m a n u fa c tu rin g
industries

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

105
96
102
93

101
95
102
89

107
95
100
96

101
93
104
91

97
—
101
—

104
95
106
94

105
97
106
97

102
95
107
94

120
96
111
95

100
102
117
96

127
92
101
.9 8

124
94
121

127
93
132

112
89
114

127
99
120

—

—
—
116

112
105
116

113
107
117

136
109
133

124
110
136

121
88
114

121
96
99
98
99
95
95
116
98
97
106
102

—

97
109
91
96
90
94
—

92
—
93
102
100
98
97
—

116
—
96
101
101
98
94

99
94
108
102

96
95
101
98

94
95
96
95

—
—
90
103
102
96
96
—
99

-

111
94
106
103
104
102
96
—
101
95
105
91

112
92
107
102
103
101
92
—
102
97
105
90

109
104
106
115
104
112
85
147
104
111
124
85

124
111
107
112
105
107
98
—
114
110
119
95

—
83
100
111
98
114
79
90
101
96
113
81

102
—
98
90
108
99
■—
92
98
109
105
—

106
103
95
111
111
107
96
97
114
107
110

—
103
—
105
93
—
95
99
104
111
99

—
—
107
—
104
96
—
98
96
104
111
102

97
98
93
100
107
—
94
—
116
107
108

98
96
93
100
107
—
92
—
115
108
106

92
—
94
91
97
123
108
92
98
132
118
126

90
—
100
89
83
115
103
74
—
123
—

—
95
—
103 "
119
115
100
92
138
123
123

N o r th C e n tra l
C h i c a g o ............................................
C i n c i n n a t i .........................................
C l e v e l a n d .........................................
C o l u m b u s .........................................
D a v e n p o r t—R o c k Is la n d —
M o l i n e .........................................
............................................
D a y to n
D e t r o i t ................................................
G a r y —H a m m o n d —
East C h i c a g o ..........................
G re e n B ay .........................................
In d ia n a p o lis .....................................
Kansas C i t y .....................................
.....................................
M ilw a u k e e
M in n e a p o lis —S t. Paul ...............
O m a h a ................................................
S a g i n a w .............................................
S t. L o u is .............................................
S o u th B end .....................................
T o l e d o ................................................
W ic h ita
.............................................

—

96
121
—
—
—

95
98
98
—
—
89
—

—

93
—

—

W est
A n a h e im —S anta A n a —
G a rd e n G ro v e ..........................
B illin g s ................................................
D e n v e r—B o u l d e r ..........................
F r e s n o ................................................
Los A n g eles— L o ng B each . . .
P o r t l a n d ............................................
S a c r a m e n t o ............... ......................
S a lt L a k e C it y —O g d e n ...............
San D ieg o .........................................
San F ra n c is c o —O a k la n d . . . .
San Jose ............................................
S e a ttle — E v e r e t t ..............................




106
—
101
93
110
107
106
94
98
112
108
110

—
—
—
104
88
—
—
—
—
108
—

61

—

Table B-1. Late-shift pay differentials for full-time manufacturing production workers, January through December 1979
(All full-time manufacturing production workers in each area = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item .

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Percent of workers on late shifts:
Second s h ift.......................................................................
With shift pay differential..............................................
Uniform cents per h o u r..............................................
Under 10 cen ts.........................................................
10 and under 12 ce n ts ............................................
12 and under 14 c e n ts ............................................
14 and under 16 ce n ts ............................................
16 and under 18 ce n ts ............................................
18 and under 20 ce n ts ............................................
20 and under 22 ce n ts ............................................
22 and under 24 ce n ts ............................................
24 and under 26 ce n ts ............................................
26 and under 28 ce n ts ........ ...................................
28 cents and o v e r....................................................
Uniform percentage....................................................
Under 5 percent .......................................................
5 percent....................................................................
Over 5 and under 10 percent................................
10 percent..................................................................
Over 10 and under 15 percent..............................
15 percent and o v e r ................................................
Other7 ............................................................................
With no shift pay differential ........................................
Third shift............................................................................
With shift pay differential ..............................................
Uniform cents per h o u r..............................................
Under 10 cen ts.........................................................
10 and under 12 c e n ts ............................................
12 and under 14 c e n ts ............................................
14 and under 16 ce n ts ............................................
16 and under 18 ce n ts ............................................
18 and under 20 c e n ts ............................................
20 and under 22 c e n ts ............................................
22 and under 24 ce n ts ............................................
24 and under 26 ce n ts ............................................
26 and under 28 ce n ts ............................................
28 and under 32 c e n ts ............................................
32 cents and o v e r....................................................
Uniform percentage....................................................
Under 10 percent.....................................................
10 percent..................................................................
Over 10 and under 15 percent..............................
15 percent..................................................................
Over 15 percent .......................................................
Other7 ............................................................................
With no shift pay differential ........................................
Average differential on second shift:
Uniform cents per h o u r...............................................
Uniform percentage......................................................
Average differential on third shift:
Uniform cents per h o u r...............................................
Uniform percentage......................................................

Philadelphia

South

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Daytona Beach

15.4
14.1
12.3
.7
-

22.9
10.0
9.0
.4
3.1
-

2.7
-

17.3
15.0
15.0
4.5
4.2
5.5
-

1.6
-

.7
-

.2
-

7.3
.6
.6
-

-

-

-

1.1
1.3

-

-

2.3

12.9

4.8
4.6
4.4
4.2
.1

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

16.9
15.2
10.6
.4
4.2
1.2
1.5
1.2
1.7
.4
-

20.1
16.4
15.3
1.3
2.7
1.8
5.2
1.3
.9
.6
.9
.7
-

4.6
3.7
.9

.2
.2

17.6
16.9
15.2
3.4
3.1
1.5
1.4
1.0
.9
.8
1.8
.5
.6
.3
1.7
1.3
.5

y
14.6
12.6
9.2
.6
. .2
2.2
1.4
1.0
2.1
.2
1.2
.4
3.4
.8
.2
2.4
• 2.0
6.4
6.2
4.4
-

.2
(®
)
.4
.2
.4
1.2
.3
.6
.3
.6
.1
1.8
.1
1.7
-

.1
.1

19.0
18.0
12.3
.7
3.3
.3
1.3
.4
.8
3.2
.5
.4
1.3
4.8
.4
.8
3.0
.4
.3
.9
.9
8.4
8.4
6.8
.1
.4
1.3
.6
.3
.1
.8
.6
1.9
.6
1.1
.2
.4
.2
.3
.3
.5
-

24.9
24.9
22.0
.9
1.8
.7
2.6
.9
13.5
.7
.6
.4
2.6
.6
.3
1.6
.2

12.4
11.0
9.1
1.0
1.7
1.5
1.1
.1
.4
1.4
.2
1.0
.1
.6
1.9
.1
.4
(®
)
1.2
-

.2
-

-

1.4

14.3
14.3
13.7

4.5
4.4
3.5

-

-

-

.3
-

.8
.3
.3
.2
.5
.6
.3
.2
10.0
.6
.5
(®
)
.5
-

.1
-

.1
-

.6
1.1
.9
.1
.3
.1
.8
.2
.6
(®
)
.1
.2

-

11.3
8.6
7.4
.7
-

.9
5.8
.1
.1

3.4
-

.9
.3
.8
1.0
1.0
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.9
3.7

-

1.7

17.5
16.2
15.7
10.5
.4
2.8
1.1
.8
-

5.0
4.5
43
-

8.8
8.3
7.3
-

.4
1.9
.1
1.0
.5

.3
-

-

-

-

-

-

7.6
7.3
6.7
.1
.2
.4
1.0
1.0
.7
1.9
1.0
O

-

-

-

-

.9
.3
1.6
2.4
.5
1.2

-

-

.1
.5
.2
.3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.1
1.0
.5

-

.4
-

-

1.1
2.7

.2
.2

1.3

.2
.5

.1
-

.7

.4
.6
.3
.3
.3

18.2
8.6

17.5
9.4

18.2
8.3

15.8
9.0

36.8
10.0

13.2
-

15.9
10.0

13.1
6.0

14.6
10.0

14.9
7.1

22.6
9.7

23.3
11.3

27.8
9.9

21.6
8.7

81.5
10.0

20.3
"

8.7
8.2

19.1

19.7
20.0

20.9
7.8

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




GreenvilleSpartanburg

Corpus Christi

62

“

Table B-1. Late-shift pay differentials for full-time manufacturing production workers, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time manufacturing production workers in each area= 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item
New Orleans

West

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

19.6
19.4
10.1
.6
1.6
.7
3.0
.2
2.5
.1
1.5
9.2
7.1
1.4
.7
-

31.1
31.1
1.7
.2
1.1
.4
29.4
29.4
-

24.1
24.1
12.2
2.6
.2
2.5
.6
.2
2.6
1.5
1.2
.9
11.8
1.0
6.5
3.7
.7
.1

-

-

-

-

.6
-

Percent of workers on late shifts:
Second shift ........................................................................
With shift pay differential..............................................
Uniform cents per h o u r..............................................
Under 10 ce n ts ..........................................................
10 and under 12 c e n ts ............................................
12 and under 14 c e n ts ............................................
14 and under 16 c e n ts ............................................
16 and under 18 c e n ts ............................................
18 and under 20 c e n ts ............................................
20 and under 22 c e n ts ............................................
22 and under 24 c e n ts ............................................
24 and under 26 c e n ts ............................................
26 and under 28 c e n ts ............................................
28 cents and o v e r.....................................................
Uniform percentage.....................................................
Under 5 percent ........................................................
5 p ercent....................................................................
Over 5 and under 10 percent................................
10 percent..................................................................
Over 10 and under 15 percent...............................
15 percent and over ................................................
Other7 .............................................................................
With no shift pay differential ........................................

16.9
16.2
8.6
.7
2.9
1.4
1.2
.2
1.0
1.2
5.5
.2
.2
.4
4.7
2.0
.7

18.0
17.0
8.6
2.7
.9
2.0
.4
1.7
7.9
.3
4.3
2.1
1.3
.5
1.0

23.9
23.9
16.2
.6
1.8
1.7
3.8
.2
.3
1.6
2.8
.7
2.8
6.9
3.8
.1
3.0
.8
-

31.7
31.7
6.1
.7
.2
1.6
.2
.4
1.5
1.5
-

Third shift.............................................................................
With shift pay differential ..............................................
Uniform cents per h o u r..............................................
Under 10 cen ts..........................................................
10 and under 12 c e n ts ............................................
12 and under 14 c e n ts ............................................
14 and under 16 c e n ts ............................................
16 and under 18 c e n ts ............................................
18 and under 20 c e n ts ............................................
20 and under 22 c e n ts ............................................
22 and under 24 c e n ts ............................................
24 and under 26 c e n ts ............................................
26 and under 28 c e n ts ............................................
28 and under 32 c e n ts ............................................
32 cents and o v e r.....................................................
Uniform percentage.....................................................
Under 10 perce n t......................................................
10 percent..................................................................
Over 10 and under 15 percent..............................
15 percent..................................................................
Over 15 percent ........................................................
Other7 .............................................................................
With no shift pay differential ........................................
Average deferential on second shift:
Uniform cents per h o u r................................................
Uniform percentage.......................................................
Average differential on third shift
Uniform cents per h o u r................................................
Uniform percentage---------------------------------------------

4.9
4.9
1.3

4.2
3.8
3.1

10.1
10.1
7.7

-

-

-

.1
' .4
.3

1.0
.5
.2
.3
.5
-

-

.5
.7
.4
.3

.4
1.7
.1
1.6
1.9
-

-

1.1
.5
.8
1.4
1.0
(®
)
.2
1.4
1.3
1.6
O
1.4

15.8
15.8
15.1
.8
.4
.2
1.0
1.1
11.6
.1
.1
-

(6)
25.6
.4
24.9
.3
.1
-

-

(*)
.2

9.5
9.5
2.7
-

17.9
17.9
17.4

6.5
5.5
3.7

8.9
8.9
.1

7.1
7.1
5.0

7.5
7.5
6.6

5.5
5.5
1.6

-

-

-

(*)
.1
.1
.1
.5
.1
.1
.2
1.2
.2
6.8
.2
6.6
-

1.0
.2
-

-

.5
-

.7
.9
1.3
.2
.9
.1
.6
.9

7.9
(*)
7.9
.9
-

1.0
.5
.5
1.2
.3
1.1
.4
.8
.2
.6
1.3
-

(*)
.3
-

14.8
1.1
-

-

(*)
.4
.2
.5
.9
(*)

.1
-

-

(*)
-

-

(®
)

-

-

-

-

-

.8
2.3
(®
)
1.1
-

.4
.2
(®
)
.3
.7

-

1.5
.9
.8
.6
.1
.1
-

-

3.9
-

-

-

.4

.1
.1
.8
-

18.1
10.6

11.8
6.3

22.2
7.2

18.3
5.0

19.7
3.0

17.9
5.8

21.1
5.0

19.3
5.8

18.3
5.3

32.1
10.0

42.8
10.7

17.9
8.1

24.5
10.3

26.1
9.9

29.2
“

26.9
9.8

18.1
10.0

25.2
8.6

21.1
5.8

32.5
-

(*)
-

S e e footnotes at end of B-series tables.




17.6
17.6
15.8
1.5
2.3
.1
4.7
1.7
3.6
1.9
1.9
1.7
.1
-

27.6
27.6
27.0
.7
1.5
.6
.4
22.0
.4
1.5
.6
.6
-

63

Table B-2. Scheduled weekly hours and days' of full-time first-shift workers, all industries, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours..................................................................
4 days ...............................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
35 hours— 5 d a y s ..............................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours..................................
4 days ...............................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
37 1 /2 hours—5 d ay s......................................................
Over 37 1 /2 and under 40 hours..................................
4 days...............................................................................
5 days...............................................................................
6 days...............................................................................
40 hours..............................................................................
4 days...............................................................................
4 1/2 days .......................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1 /2 days .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..........................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
45 hours..............................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours ..........................................
5 days ...............................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
48 hours—6 d a y s ..............................................................
Over 48 hours....................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
Average scheduled weekly hours..................................

Northeast
Pennsylvania

ft
ft
15
1
1
6
ft
ft
76
1
75
1
1
1
1
-

Philadelphia

1
1
4
1
1
6
1
1
80
P)
80
3
2
1
1
1
-

P)
P)
-

-

South

Pittsburgh

6
1
5
“
2
5
5
2
1
1
83
83
P)
P)
P)
-

-

P)

2
1
P)
1
1
1
3
1
-

-

1
2
1

-

-

39.7

39.3

40.5

2
1
2
30
1
65
65
-

10
2
29
5
54
54
-

39.0

38.6

ft

Average scheduled weekly hours..................................

38.7

P)
16
7
35
6
33
33
37.9

See footnotes at end of 8-series tables.




82
3
79
-

7
7
-

-

3
3

64

1
3
2
-

1
1

-

4
14
23
5
53
53

-

2

P)
P)
-

7
1

2

5
2

1

7
1
6

4
P)
ft
-

ft
ft
-

3

P)
P)

Daytona Beach

“
"

-

1
« .
81
1
80
-

39.1

Percent of office workers
Under 35 hours— 5 days .................................................
35 hours—5 days .............................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours— 5 days ..................
37 1 /2 hours— 5 days......................................................
Over 37 1 /2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ..................
40 hours..............................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
Over 40 hours—5 days....................................................

Corpus Christi

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

1
-

Jacksonville

2
-

1
1
75
73
2
2
2
-

1
1
3

2
~
1
2
“
2

5

4
1

-

-

1

-

1
1

P)
ft

ft
-

1

-

P)
70
4
4
61
P)
2
2
-

1

P)
P)
-

79
1
1
76
1
5
4
3
2
1

3

3

3

1
2

1

P)

1
89
1
88
1
ft
P)
1
1
-

P)

3

P)

-

1
1

-

-

ft

-

40.6

39.8

39.6

2
5
28
14
51

1
16
3
79
79

-

P)

P)
P)

40.4

38.8

41.6

1

95
95
1

2
1
15
6
75
75
1

1
2
10
3
81
2
78
-

39.9

39.4

39.4

3

-

ft

-

-

79
76
1
2
7
6
1
. “
4
4
-

20

2

2

2

2
P)
P)

Memphis

2
-

1
-

P)
ft
-

P)
P)
-

1

P)

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

P)
32
10
57
57
1

ft
51
ft

39.1

38.9

39.5

Table B-2. Scheduled weekly hours and days* of full-time first-shift workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers =100 percent)
South— Continued
Item
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours............................................................
4 days ........................................................................
5 days .........................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
35 hours— 5 days ........................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1/2 hours...............................
4 days .........................................................................
5 days .........................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 d ays..................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours...............................
4 d ays....................................... ................................
5 days.........................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
40 hours........................................................................
4 days .........................................................................
4 1/2 d a y s .................................................................
5 d ays.........................................................................
5 1/2 days .................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ......................................
5 days .........................................................................
5 1/2 days .................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
45 hours........................................................................
5 days .........................................................................
5 1/2 days .................................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours ......................................
5 days .........................................................................
6 days .........................................................................
48 hours— 6 days ........................................................
Over 48 h ou rs..............................................................
5 days .........................................................................
5 1/2 d a y s .................................................................
6 days .........................................................................

69
1
68
6
2
3
1
5
4
O
11
1
(9)
(9)
-

Average scheduled weekly hours...............................

41.0
-

Percent of office workers
Under 35 hours— 5 days .............................................
35 hours— 5 days ........................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1/2 hours— 5 days ................
37 1/2 hours— 5 days..................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ................
40 hours........................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s .................................................................
5 days .........................................................................
Over 40 hours— 5 days................................................
Average scheduled weekly hours...............................

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

1

5
1
4

1
-

4

-

Cincinnati

2
2
-

5
3
-

1
2
-

3
3

2
-

3
1
-

(9)

1

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
-

4

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

(9)
(9)
-

Kansas City

Saginaw

(9)

(9)

(9)
1

2
1

-

2

2
3

1
1
1

(9)

2
-

(9)
3

91
91
1
1
2
2
(9)

St. Louis

1
1

-

-

-

(9)
(9)
(9)

-

1

38.9

-

-

(9)

-

40.0

40.2

40.0

39.9

39.8

39.6

_

_
3
2
14
8
73

1
3
11
11
O
75
_
75

_
2
4
3
6
84
84

1
2
24
8
65

1

5
23
2
68

2
2

-

-

-

65

68

73

(9)
1
-

_
_
_
(9)
_

(9)
4
22
12
62
62

_
-

_
5
2
14
8
69
_
69

-

(9)

-

(9)

-

-

-

39.1

39.2

39.4

39.2

39.6

39.1

39.2

65

2

4
_

96
96
_
-

4

-

(9)

_
_
2
_

6
1

3
93
2
91
_
_

1
1

39.0

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

7
-

93
93
1
1
-

-

1
93
93
(9)
1
(9)
(9)

(*)
(9)

-

Seattle-Everett

-

(9)
83
(9)
83
2
(9)
1
3
3
1
1
_
1
2
(9>
1
1

(9)
94
94
<
9)

South Bend

-

(9
)

3
8
21
11
56
(9)
55

1
76
(9
>
76
3
3
1
1
2
(9)
<
9)
-

Detroit

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




West

North Central

_
86
86
_
-

1
1
_
2
2
40.2

(9)
_
4
4
91
_
91
1
39.8

-

_
_
_
(9)
_
38.8
_
(9)
1

10
5
84
84
-

39.6

Table B-3. Scheduled weekly hours and days' of full-time first-shift workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers= 1 0 0 percent)

Northeast
Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours— 4 days ............................................
35 hours— 5 days ........................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1/2 hours...............................
4 days ........................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 days.................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ................
40 hours.......................................................................
4 days ........................................................................
4 1/2 days ................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ......................................
5 days ........................................................................
5 1/2 days ................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
45 hours.......................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
5 1/2 days ................................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours— 6 d ays........................
48 hours.......................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
Over 48 hours.............................................................
5 days ........................................................................
5 1/2 d a ys................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
7 days ........................................................................

18
1
1
8
73
1
72
-

Average scheduled weekly hours...............................
Percent of office workers
35 hours— 5 days ........................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1/2 hours...............................
4 days ........................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 days.................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ................
40 hours.......................................................................
4 days ........................................................................
4 1/2 d a y s ................................................................
5 days ........................................................................
6 days ........................................................................
Over 40 hours— 5 days...............................................
Average scheduled weekly hours...............................

Philadelphia "

Pittsburgh

4
2
84
1
83
3
2
1
(*)
(*)
1
1
1
1
-

2
95
95
3
1
2
-

38.9

39.9

40.1

2
4

2
11
4
7
23
10
54
54
-

4
20
73
73
-

-

/

South

4
(9)
(*)

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Daytona Beach

3
1
82
1
80
6
3
3
3
3
3
1
2
-

98
7
91
2
2
-

10
90
90
-

40.7

40.1
-

1
1
-

1
2

3
2

-

-

2
5
1
90
90
-

2
16
2
77
77
-

-

100
100
-

GreenvilleSpartanburg

-

2
2

Jacksonville

Memphis

-

-

79
79
6
6
5
5
3
2
2
2
2
-

3
79
2
3
74
12
7
2
2
4
2
2
-

1
1
93
2
92
1
1
-

39.8

42.2

41.0

40.7

40.1

-

(*)
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

17
83
83
-

5
95
2
2
91
-

2
3
92
91
1
2

2
96
1
95
-

13
1
86
86
-

-

-

40.0

39.9

39.7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39.2

38.8

39.7

39.4

40.0

39.6

39.9

66

Jackson

1
69
5
5
59
2
2
4
24
24
-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




Corpus Christi

2

3
3
-

-

Table B-3. Scheduled weekly hours and days* of full-time first-shift workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 100 percent)
South—Continued
Item
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours—4 days .................................................
35 hours—5 days ..............................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours...................................
4 days ................................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 d a y s .......................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ..................
40 hours...............................................................................
4 days ................................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..........................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1/2 days ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
45 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 days ........................................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours—6 d a y s ..........................
48 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 48 hou rs....................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
7 days ................................................................................
Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

2
74
2
72
9
7
2
9
8
1
4
4
2
1
(*)
-

West

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

2
3
93
93
2
2
(*)
P)
-

-

-

41.1

39.8

Cincinnati

2
1
1
2
89
1
88
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
40.2

Detroit

-

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

South Bend

-

Seattle-Everett

2

97
97
3
3
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

40.3

40.2

39.9

40.0

39.9

40.3

39.8

(*)
_
6

_
-

-

-

-

-

4
5
83
83
-

-

1
96
96
(9)
(*)
2
-

5
-

-

St. Louis

(*)
1
-

2
91
91
2
2
1
1

(*)
99
99
-

1
3
95
95
1
1
-

1
96
3
93
3
3
-

4
96
96
-

Percent of office workers
35 hours— 5 d a y s ..............................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1/2 hours...................................
4 days ................................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
37 1/ 2 hours— 5 day s.......................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ..................
40 hours...............................................................................
4 days ................................................................................
4 1/2 days .......................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 40 hours— 5 days.....................................................

-

-

-

-

2
87
2

70
-

80
-

97
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

39.8

39.3

39.5

39.9

39.8

40.0

39.8

39.4

39.9

40.0

8
1
89

25
4
70

o

18
2
80

O
’)
(*)
2
1
97

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




67

-

93
93
-

8

9

(”)
1
99
99
-

-

91
91
-

6
94
94
-

-

(9)
99
99
-

Table B-4. Scheduled weekly hours and days' of full-time first-shift workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South

Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours..................................................................
4 days ................................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
35 hours—5 days ..............................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours...................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 days.......................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours...................................
4 days ................................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
40 hours..............................................................................
4 days ................................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..........................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
45 hours—5 days ..............................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours— 5 d ay s..........................
48 hours..............................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
Over 48 hours....................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
6 days ...............................................................................
Average scheduled weekly hours..................................

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

1

2
-

1
-

2
4
3
3

6
3
1
1
82
82
2
2
4
-

10
1
1
73
73
3
3
1
(9)
1
1

-

-

-

Pittsburgh

14
2
12
3
12
12
4
1
1
65
64
1
1
1
(9)
-

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

5
2
-

-

4

(*)
-

(9)
(9)
78
78
1
1
(9)
5
5
3

-

(9)
-

-

-

-

39.7

39.4

38.0

-

(9)
24
24
7
42
42
1
4
22

3
1

4

4
-

GreenvilleSpartanburg

5
5

39.6

40.6

38.4

-

-

-

-

15
-

-

1
2
46
46
2
47

15
3
37
37
8
37

8
2

(9)

-

-

-

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

38.3

37.4

38.5

38.1

4
4
-

94

-

-

(9)

-

6

3
3

85
O
84
0
(9)
-

1
-

-

1

-

-

-

2
1
14
14
8
74

-

-

-

-

47

37

94
1

74
1

39.9

39.4

39.0

40.4

39.4

39.2

2

-

68

1

0
1
1

22

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.

-

79
75
1
3
6
4
2
4
2
2
2

-

2
72
1
1
1
2
-

2
4
4

5
79
77
2
2
2
2
-

(*)

-

"
1

2
~
75

3

2
2
5
1
1

2
-

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

-

(9)

1

-

Memphis

4

1

-

2

-

1

Jacksonville

-

3

Jackson

-

f9)
-

Percent of office workers
Under 35 hours— 5 days .................................................
35 hours..............................................................................
4 days ...............................................................................
4 1/2 days .......................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours— 5 days ..................
37 1 /2 hours......................................................................
5 days...............................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
Over 37 1 /2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ..................
40 hours..............................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
Over 40 hours—5 days....................................................




-

7
(9)
-

-

(9)
-

t
20
24
24
8
41
41

4
70
70
1
1
11
2
4
-

10
1
9
10
2
2
3
2
1
69
66
3
3
-

4
4

-

-

-

Daytona Beach

-

-

(9)
-

6

Corpus Christi

-

-

_
-

11
8
3
4
17
17

1
-

2
-

1
37
37

2
6
31
31

1
17
17

-

-

-

-

7
61
2
59

10
52

15
46

4
77

38.8

-

-

-

52
1

46
1

77

38.9

38.8

39.5

-

Table B-4. Scheduled weekly hours and days' of full-time first-shift workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)

New Orleans

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours............................................„....................
4 days ................................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ...........................................................................
35 hours— 5 days ..............................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours...................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
37 1 /2 hours— 5 d a y s .......................................................
Over 37 1 /2 and under 40 hours...................................
4 days ................................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
40 hours...............................................................................
4 days ................................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
5 days................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..........................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 days ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
45 hours— 5 days ..............................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours— 5 d a y s ..........................
48 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1/2 days ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 48 hours ....................................................................
4 1/2 days ......................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1/2 days ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

1
-

Cincinnati

8
-

1
- •
6
4
66
66
-

7
9
5
5
4
2
2
64

3
2
2
14
14
ft
(9)
-

Detroit

5
2
3

5

1

3
3
"
6
(9)
-

(®
)
64
4
4
1
3
3
-

(9)
73
73
7
2
4
4
1
1
-

1
1
1
3
2
2
86
85
(9)
3
2
2
1
2

5
"
9
(9)
(9)
79
79
(9)
-

1

1

40.1

-

(9)

-

64

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

38.8

39.1

1
1

-

-

-

-

39.2

3
7

5

-

-

-

-

-

4
9
24
24

1
2
24
24

-

-

9
64
-

5
2
23
23
14
56
-

7
28
18
18
-

13
50
-

3
9
27
27
2
58
58
1

56

-

38.9

39.0

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.

69

-

-

-

50
(9)

91
91
-

-

(9)

3

1
1

-

39.7

1

2
-

4
-

<
9)
16
3
76
76
1
2
-

-

38.4

4

1

St. Louis

2
-

-

(9)
-

Saginaw

1
-

4

(9)
-

1

Kansas City

-

-

(9)
-

40.9

Percent of office workers
Under 35 hours— 5 days .................................................
35 hours...............................................................................
4 days ................................................................................
4 1/2 days ........................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
Over 35 and under 37 1 /2 hours— 5 days ..................
37 1 /2 hours .......................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1/2 days ........................................................................
Over 37 1 /2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ..................
40 hours...............................................................................
4 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
5 days................................................................................
Over 40 hours— 5 d ay s.....................................................




Gary-HammondEast Chicago

1

5
-

-

5

West

North Central

South—Continued
Item

2

4
-

South Bend

5

2
-

-

6
88
88
-

6
86
86
2
1
1
-

-

-

39.8

37.9

-

(9)
-

-

-

1
5
2

-

-

79

35

3
3
20
20
11
61
61

(9)

-

-

-

38.1

39.4

38.5

39.0

-

8
33
33
-

(9)
45
-

8
79
-

23
35
-

45

(9)
-

-

39.1

3
6
4
4

77
77
-

-

40.0

3

14
11
8
-

(9)
-

39.0

-

Seattle-Everett

<
9)
ft

-

8
8
2
88
-

2
17
17
8
72
-

88
1

72

39.8

39.4

-

Table B-5. Scheduled weekly hours and days' of full-time first-shift workers, public utilities, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours— 5 days .................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 days.......................................................
40 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..........................................
5 days................................................................................
5 1/ 2 days .......................................................................
45 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours—5 d a y s ..........................
48 hours...............................................................................
5 days...............................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 48 hours....................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1/2 days .......................................................................
6 days ................................................................................

Northeast
Pennsylvania

100
100
-

Philadelphia

South

Pittsburgh

93
93
-

-

-

40.6

40.1

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

1
44

1
59

10

79

38

64

8
49

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

52
52

55
55

40
40

-

-

-

-

-

-

21
21
-

62
62
-

36
36
-

42
42
-

-

90
90
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39.5

38.5

38.8

38.5

39.7

38.0

39.1

38.4

-

-

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

40.0

40.1 ‘

40.1

39.9

Percent of office w orkers................................................

100

100

100

19
4
77
77

12
36
-

-

-

2
2

See footnotes at end of B-senes tables.

70

4
-

-

98
98
-

Memphis

40.1

-




Jacksonville

40.6

-

97
97
3
3
-

Jackson

39.8

-

o

3
95
95
1
1
1
-

GreenvilleSpartanburg

40.1

6
92
92
-

-

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

Daytona Beach

4

99
99
1
1
-

Percent of office workers
35 hours—5 days ..............................................................
37 1/2 hours— 5 day s......................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 d a y s ..................
40 hours..............................................................................
5 days ...............................................................................
5 1 /2 days .......................................................................
Over 40 hou rs....................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................

Corpus Christi

93
93
5
5
3
3
-

-

-

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

90
90
9
4
6
1
1

(9)
n
1
1
-

-

98
98
2
2
-

<
•>
0
38 4

-

-

42
58
56
2
38.9

Table B-5. Scheduled weekly hours and days' of full-time first-shift workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
Under 35 hours— 5 days ..................................................
37 1 /2 hours— 5 day s.......................................................
40 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
Over 40 and under 45 hours ..........................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
45 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s ........................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 45 and under 48 hours— 5 d a y s ..........................
48 hours...............................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
6 days ................................................................................
Over 48 hou rs....................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 days ........................................................................
6 day s................................................................................

-

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Detroit

-

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
9
(*)
(*)
-

-

-

95
95
n
n

1
-

1
4
2
1
_
-

96
95
1
_
1
1
4
4
_

Kansas City

91
91
5
5
1
1
3
3

-

-

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

-

(9)
85
85
-

92
92
8
8

Cincinnati

West

Saginaw

St. Louis

_

_
-

_
_

100
100
_
-

-

_
_
_
_

96
96
_
4
2
2
_
_
_
_
_
-

100
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

-

South Bend

_
100
100
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

Seattle-Everett

_
_
99
99
_
_
_
_
_
1
1
_
_
-

-

-

-

-

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

41.0

40.4

40.6

40.4

40.3

40.0

40.2

40.0

40.0

40.1

Percent of office w orkers................................................

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

10
52
38
38
-

46
54
54
_
-

1
2

_

_

97
97
_

36
_
64
64
_
_

_
_
_
100
100
_

1
1
_

-

-

-

-

-

38.8

39.9

39.1

Percent of office workers
35 hours— 5 days ..............................................................
37 1/2 hours—5 day s.......................................................
Over 37 1/2 and under 40 hours— 5 days ..................
40 hours...............................................................................
5 d ay s................................................................................
5 1 /2 d a y s .......................................................................
Over 40 hou rs....................................................................
5 days ................................................................................
5 1 /2 days ........................................................................

(9)
<
9)
-

Average scheduled weekly hours...................................

38.2

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




71

_

1
-

72
_

1
1
_

99
99
_

28
28
_

98
98
_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

40.0

38.2

39.9

40.0

39.9

1
(*)
99
99
_
(®
)
<*)

40.0

_

_

98
98

_
_
_

Table B-6. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

South

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

Percent of production workers

90
89
88
87
87
86
65
46
38
33
28
9
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
11

88
88
85
83
81
79
68
59
46
36
28
16
4
2
2
(9)
o
(9>
o
(9>
n
12

94
94
94
92
92
91
88
73
59
47
35
17
5
4
2
(*)
O
’)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(*)
6

7.1

7.8

7.7

8.5

94
94
94
93
93
92
72
50
29
24
24
1
6

100
100
99
99
99
96
86
72
47
37
13
3
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
88
79
45
38
30
8
2
1
"
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
94
83
62
49
33
14
11
1
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
92
83
76
59
28
10
4
3
1
-

7.1

7.5

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore...........................................................
2 holidays or m ore.........................................................
3 holidays or m ore.........................................................
4 holidays or m ore.........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore.........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore.........................................................
9 holidays or m ore.........................................................
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more .............................................. ........
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............

97
97
97
97
97
97
95
88
83
76
59
27
12
5
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3

98
98
98
98
97
97
97
92
85
78
62
40
21
8
5
3
1
(9)
(9>
2

97
97
96
95
95
95
95
92
78
75
70
23
5
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3

98
98
98
97
97
97
96
94
90
80
50
33
16
4
2
2

91
91
90
88
88
85
77
59
46
41
26
3
9

69
69
69
65
61
61
46
36
27
25
24
1
-• ■
31

99
99
98
97
96
91
77
67
36
29
9
2
- •
1

Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

9.8

10.0

9.6

9.8

7.7

7.0

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore...........................................................
2 holidays or m ore.........................................................
3 holidays or m ore.........................................................
4 holidays or m ore.........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore.........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore.........................................................
9 holidays or m ore.........................................................
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more ......................................................
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............

99
99
99
99
99
99
97
91
87
70
59
33
17
11
3
1

100
100
100
100
99
99
99
99
95
85
72
53
34
14
8
1
(9)
<
9)
(9)
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
95
89
81
59
15
6
3
1
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
98
95
76
39
24
4
1
(9)

98
98
98
98
98
97
92
79
57
49
17
2
2

Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

9.8

10.7

10.4

8.0

Percent of office workers

-

(9)

9.5

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




72

-

-

(9)

7.9

(9)

(9)

8.5

8.6

Table B-6. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item
New Orleans

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

West

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

Percent of production workers

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m o re............................................................
2 holidays or m o re..........................................................
3 holidays or m o re..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m o re..........................................................
6 holidays or m ore..........................................................
7 holidays or m ore..........................................................
8 holidays or m ore..........................................................
9 holidays or m ore..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

89
89
89
85
85
84
81
58
35
29
22
6
1
1
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
11

93
93
91
89
84
84
83
61
47
37
21
11
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
7

7.5

8.1

9.7

14.5

10.3

10.3

17.4

10.7

10.9

9.1

99
99
99
99
99
99
98
83
57
47
34
8
2
1
(9)
<
9)
(9)
(9)
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
97
80
68
64
17
4
1
1

-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
94
89
74
61
21
9
5
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
95
89
85
76
60
40
35
4
1
1

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
95
88
84
75
59
13
6
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
87
79
69
48
14
7
6
3
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
97
85
77
51
25
14
11
1
f9)
(9)

-

-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
89
85
74
57
47
42
32
26
3
_

100
100
100
100
100
98
98
98
92
80
69
39
31
(9)
n
<
9)

-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
89
87
81
80
61
47
42
37
3
(9)
(9)
_

(9)

8.3

-

!

98
98
98
96
94
94
93
82
77
64
58
31
13
9
8
7
7
7
7
7
7
2

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
94
88
79
74
65
59
55
52
51
49
48
47
47
47
(9)

99
99
99
98
98
98
98
94
90
89
82
69
4
1

97
97
97
97
97
96
96
88
75
65
52
27
18
16
13
10
10
10
10
10
10
3

97
97
97
96
96
96
96
93
91
88
86
83
77
76
69
68
64
64
63
63
63
3

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
93
89
76
65
41
23
19
10
10
10
9
9
9
9
1

98
98
98
98
98
98
96
88
81
73
62
58
49
37
26
3
2

95
95
95
93
91
89
87
87
77
55
48
28
21
(9)
5

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m o re..........................................................
3 holidays or m o re..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m o re..........................................................
6 holidays or m o re..........................................................
7 holidays or m o re..........................................................
8 holidays or m ore..........................................................
9 holidays or m o re..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

-




-

-

-

-

-

_

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

-

8.3

9.5

10.9

10.2

9.1

11.3

9.6

10.6

10.1

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.

73

-

_

(9)
-

_

Table B-7. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers= 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

South

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

Percent of production workers

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore..........................................................
3 holidays or m ore..........................................................
4 holidays or m ore..........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore.........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore..........................................................
9 holidays or m ore..........................................................
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more ......................................................
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

100
100
100
100
100
100
98
97
94
83
53
37
19
5
3
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
86
82
69
68
40
5
-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
97
97
93
28
7
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
-

-

10.2

10.6

10.3

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
95
88
65
38
20
10
P)
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
97
91
72
45
24
8
4
2
1

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
97
93
87
67
31
16
7
2
2
2
2
2
2
2

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
97
95
88
69
47
28
13
8
4
1
1
1
-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
91
85
77
66
48
41
11
3
3
-

-

100
100
100
100
99
99
82
73
59
54
48
19
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
95
88
72
53
30
11
7
3
-

8.4

7.3

9.3

9.3

9.6

100
100
100
99
99
95
87
81
54
50
12
3
-

100
100
100
100
98
98
76
68
57
55
51
15
8
8
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
94
67
56
45
36
26
8
2
2
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
93
87
66
48
23
12
7
1
_

-

-

-

-

7.8

8.4

8.4

9.4

100
100
100
99
99
93
82
75
38
32
9
2
-

-

99
99
99
99
99
99
87
72
60
60
56
1

10.0

8.5

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
96
96
90
23
6
3
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
97
91
58
44
24
8
3
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
86
83
68
67
48
5
-

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore..........................................................
3 holidays or m ore.........................................................
4 holidays or m ore.........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore.........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore.........................................................
9 holidays or m ore.........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

-

P)
P)
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

99
99
99
99
99
99
95
82
80
69
68
(®
)

10.2

10.5

10.1

10.3

8.6

9.0

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




74

<

Table B-7. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item
New Orleans

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

West

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

Percent of production workers

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m o re..........................................................
3 holidays or m o re..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m ore..........................................................
6 holidays or m o re..........................................................
7 holidays or m o re..........................................................
8 holidays or m o re..........................................................
9 holidays or m ore..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays.............

97
97
97
97
97
97
93
84
46
38
31
11
2
2
3

100
100
100
98
94
94
94
84
74
61
29
14
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
95
93
84
80
45
17
14
12
11
11
11
11
11
11

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
97
95
89
81
77
73
70
68
66
65
65
65

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
98
93
79
1
-

-

-

-

-

Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

8.2

9.6

11.1

17.1

100
100
100
100
100
100
98
92
42
35
27
9
4
4
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
98
87
55
47
25
7
5
5
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
94
78
75
34
12
9
1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.1

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
98
86
79
68
42
33
28
23
18
18
18
18
18
18
1

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
99
98
98
91
91
83
83
77
77
76
76
76
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
94
89
64
35
30
17
16
16
14
14
14
14

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
94
89
82
78
67
54
38
5
_
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
90
73
63
48
43
-

-

-

-

10.7

11.9

19.0

12.2

12.1

10.2

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
99
91
76
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
98
90
76
68
28
21
18
13
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
89
89
89
88
88
88
87
77
6
(*)
(*)
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
95
89
84
77
49
33
29
2
1
1

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
98
96
92
89
81
76
6
4
1
1
-

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
97
89
85
72
69
61
50
6
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
89
86
66
63
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8.3

10.0

12.4

10.7

13.0

10.6

12.3

11.0

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore..........................................................
3 holidays or m ore..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m o re..........................................................
6 holidays or m o re..........................................................
7 holidays or m o re..........................................................
8 holidays or m o re..........................................................
9 holidays or m o re..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays.............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




75

-

-

-

-

-

_
O

10.1

-

Table B-8. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 100 percent)
Northeast
Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

South

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

Percent of production workers

5

92
92
91
88
87
86
86
79
48
40
35
15
3
1
8

91
91
88
85
85
85
85
80
75
69
40
16
7
9

84
84
82
80
80
75
70
41
29
20
15
1
16

57
57
57
51
46
46
30
22
14
11
11
1
43

94
94
89
88
83
82
55
34
26
18
12
2
6

82
82
80
79
79
78
54
29
25
19
16
3
2
2
18

(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
0
(9)
18

88
88
88
85
85
83
78
53
33
25
19
5
1
1
1
(9)
0
(9)
(®
)
(9)
(9)
12

8.5

9.0

8.2

8.9

6.9

6.1

6.2

6.7

6.7

7.3

98
98
98
98
98
98
95
87
82
59
55
31
16
12
4
-

100
100
100
100
99
99
99
98
94
82
73
57
40
17
10
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
97
90
36
25
1
-

98
98
98
98
98
97
93
78
55
46
10
1
-

92
92
92
92
92
91
66
42
16
14
14
1
-

100
100
99
99
99
98
85
59
37
19
14
3
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
90
81
44
36
26
7
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
94
85
62
50
33
13
11
1
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
90
80
73
56
21
6
1
1
1
-

-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
94
85
71
38
10
5
2
2
(9)
(9)
<
9)
(9)
C
9)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(9)

(9)

(9).

7.9

8.5

8.3

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore.........................................................
3 holidays or m ore.........................................................
4 holidays or m ore.........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore..........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore.........................................................
9 holidays or m ore.......................................................
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more ......................................................
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............

88
88
88
88
88
88
82
65
55
46
37
17
1
1
12

Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

95
95
94
94
92
92
92
82
69
60
50
27
8
(9)
-

82
82
78
74
72
68
56
45
31
20
17
3
1
1
1

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore..........................................................
3 holidays or m ore..........................................................
4 holidays or m ore..........................................................
5 holidays or m ore..........................................................
6 holidays or m ore..........................................................
7 holidays or m ore..........................................................
8 holidays or m ore..........................................................
9 holidays or m ore............................................ .............
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more ......................................................
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

-

2

9.5

-

10.8

-

-

-

-

(9)

(9)

9.1

10.5

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




-

-

76

-

2

8

7.9

6.6

7.2

-

Table B-8. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 100 percent)

Item
New Orleans

West

North Central

South—Continued
Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

Percent of production workers

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or more .........................................................
2 holidays or m o re..........................................................
3 holidays or m o re..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m o re..........................................................
6 holidays or m o re..........................................................
7 holidays or m o re..........................................................
8 holidays or m o re..........................................................
9 holidays or m o re..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays.............

85
85
85
80
79
78
75
46
30
25
17
4
(9)
(9)
<
9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
15

87
87
85
82
77
77
74
44
28
19
16
8
2
13

96
96
94
88
83
83
81
60
49
29
19
7
6
4

99
99
99
99
99
98
98
85
64
37
24
11
9
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
(9)

92
92
92
91
90
90
89
67
48
44
29
21
17
8

95
95
95
95
93
92
92
75
61
48
32
8
5

82
82
82
80
80
76
76
61
48
34
29
10
7
4
2
18

98
98
98
98
97
97
97
81
72
47
25
5
3
1
~
2

94
94
94
94
94
94
90
64
53
36
18
14
9
6

91
91
91
87
82
80
75
75
64
39
35
10
1
(9)
9

Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

7.2

6.9

7.3

8.7

8.4

8.3

8.1

8.3

8.1

8.0

99
99
99
99
99
99
97
81
59
49
36
8
2
<
9)
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

99
99
99
99
99
99
97
79
70
66
16
4
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
92
84
70
49
11
6
1
1
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
93
83
78
65
40
12
7
2
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
87
69
60
50
32
31
15
-

100
100
100
100
100
99
99
83
75
66
41
9
2
2
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
90
86
73
72
37
8
(9)
(9>
(9)
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
98
83
73
36
10
2
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
78
72
57
27
19
12
1
-

100
100
100
100
100
97
97
96
91
74
57
20
9
(9)
(9)
(9)
-

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m o re .........................................................
3 holidays or m o re..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m o re..........................................................
6 holidays or m o re..........................................................
7 holidays or m o re..........................................................
8 holidays or m o re..........................................................
9 holidays or m o re..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays.............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

(9)

-

(9)

(9)

-

8.4

8.3

9.2

9.8

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




77

9.5

8.8

1

9.7

9.0

8.7

9.4

Table B-9. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, public utilities, January through December 1971*
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South

Northeast
Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

Percent of production workers

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore...........................................................
2 holidays or m ore.........................................................
3 holidays or m ore.........................................................
4 holidays or m ore..........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore.........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore.........................................................
9 holidays or m ore.........................................................
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more ......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays.............
Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
96
96
96
28
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
98
98
56
27
1
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
96
50
13
3
-

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
91
37
5
-

-

-

-

P)

10.1

10.8

10.6

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
96
91
5
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
97
96
89
47
24
-

-

-

-

9.8

10.6

10.5

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
90
71
52
P)
-

100
100
100
100
100
97
97
88
78
73
40
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
91
88
80
68
13
13
13
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
98
87
82
75
68
4
4
4
4
-

-

97
97
97
97
97
97
93
93
93
93
93
3

-

-

-

98
98
98
98
98
98
98
94
89
78
56
2

10.3

9.1

9.8

8.7

9.7

9.2

9.2

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99

99

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
91
91
51
35

100
100
100
100
100
99
99
81
76
72
44
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
96
94
83
70
5
5
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
93
90
87
79

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
99
98
98
98
98
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
94
83
71
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_

(9)

-

-

-

10.5

8.7

9.9

8.7

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore...........................................................
2 holidays or m ore.........................................................
3 holidays or m ore.........................................................
4 holidays or m ore.........................................................
5 holidays or m ore.........................................................
6 holidays or m ore.........................................................
7 holidays or m ore.........................................................
8 holidays or m ore.........................................................
9 holidays or m ore.........................................................
10 holidays or more ......................................................
11 holidays or more ......................................................
12 holidays or more ......................................................
13 holidays or more ......................................................
14 holidays or more ......................................................
15 holidays or more ......................................................
16 holidays or more ......................................................
17 holidays or more ......................................................
18 holidays or more ......................................................
19 holidays or more ......................................................
20 holidays or more ......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

95

37
16
2
-

95
51
8
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




78

P)

P)
P)
_
_
-

9.5

-

9.5

9.4

Table B-9. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers, public utilities, January uirougn December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item
New Orleans

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

West

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

Percent of production workers

In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore..........................................................
3 holidays or m ore..........................................................
4 holidays or m o re..........................................................
5 holidays or m ore..........................................................
6 holidays or m ore..........................................................
7 holidays or m ore..........................................................
8 holidays or m ore..........................................................
9 holidays or m ore..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for production
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
84
82
62
3
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
82
70
60
54
16
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
96
93
77
28
27
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
96
92
71
22
22
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
93
89
82
62
53
_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.3

8.8

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
96
90
77
15
7
- •
-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
84
80
79
73
21

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
95
92
75
7
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

100
100
100
100
100
98
98
96
90
90
87
20
20
9
9
_
_
_
_
_
_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
94
88
70
5
5
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

10.2

10.0

10.8

9.7

10.2

9.6

10.6

10.0

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
84
19
17

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
94
92
92
82
69
65

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
98
96
90
8

-

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
93
93
79
74
23
22

100
100
100
100
100
99
99
97
97
97
96
16
16

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
96
88
6
2

-

-

_

_

_

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
66
64
64
52
51
51
4

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
96
86
85
30
2
1

95
95
95
95
95
95
95
91
91
85
66
60
46
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
5

100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
84
81
25
3
1
_
_
_
_
_
_
_
-

Percent of office workers
In establishments providing paid holidays....................
1 holiday or m ore............................................................
2 holidays or m ore..........................................................
3 holidays or m ore..........................................................
4 holidays or m ore..........................................................
5 holidays or m ore..........................................................
6 holidays or m ore..........................................................
7 holidays or m ore..........................................................
8 holidays or m ore..........................................................
9 holidays or m ore..........................................................
10 holidays or more .......................................................
11 holidays or more .......................................................
12 holidays or more .......................................................
13 holidays or more .......................................................
14 holidays or more .......................................................
15 holidays or more .......................................................
16 holidays or more .......................................................
17 holidays or more .......................................................
18 holidays or more .......................................................
19 holidays or more .......................................................
20 holidays or more .......................................................
In establishments providing no paid holidays..............
Average number of paid holidays for office
workers in establishments providing paid holidays ..

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9.8

9.4

9.8

10.2

11.0

9.9

10.2

9.9

9.5

10.0

See footnotes at end ui 6-series tables.




-

79

Table B-10. Paid vacation provisions1 for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979
0
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item"

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months.........................................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r...............................................................................
3 y e a rs ............................................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 ye a rs ............................................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ..........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months.........................................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
3 ye a rs ............................................................................
5 ye a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 ye a rs ............................................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 years..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 years..........................................................................
30 ye a rs ..........................................................................

Northeast
Pennsylvania

99
18
98
98
23
76
96
89
32
86
89
89
57
7
36
54
57
25
1
15
24
24
3
1
1
2
99
64
99
99
73
91
97
93
13
85
92
92
78
8
27
70
78
25
1
6
17
23
6
1
1
3

South

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

99
22
99
98
35
89
97
95
27
89
94
94
78
8
49
76
78
54
1
19
49
54
14

98
12
98
97
19
85
97
93
15
86
93
93
88
8
37
87
88
68
1
15
67
68
20

99
24
99
96
22
75
95
85
15
70
85
85
62
4
32
60
61
21
1
7
21
21
4

16
32
32
4

(9)
5
11

(9)
12
19

(9)
1
4

2

100
68
100
99
83
98
99
96
37
94
96
96
86
9
56
85
85
48
4
13
40

99
66
99
99
86
99
99
98
25
95
98
98
95
11
61
94
95
55
5
16
52
54
16
1
6
14

99
76
99
99
78
98
99
93
32
87
93
93
84
5
44
76
84
29

99
37
99
98
62
95
97
79
21
76
78
79
46
11
23
40
46
21

(9)
6
19
20
3

-

-

10
21
21
2

6
26
26
12

9
23
23
3
(9)
(9)
3

44
12
2

4
7

Daytona Beach

95
26
95
93
40
85
91
76
28
69
73
76
56
17
31
54
56
32

95
17
95
91
27
87
89
64
15
58
64
64
35
4
19
35
35
14
2
2
14
14
3

-

-

-

-

1
3
99
66
99
99
81
99
99
89
13
88
89
89
54
-

38
54
54
26

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

5
12

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




Corpus Christi

80

GreenvilleSpartanburg

99
12
99
95
16
49
95
78
14
45
78
78
32
10
21
31
32
14
1
9
14
14
3
1
1
3
100
68
100
99
71
92
99
90
21
75
90
90
55
6
30
52
55
23
-

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

93
24
91
83
29
72
82
65
14
51
64
65
50
1
29
47
50
25

94
10
91
90
14
81
89
73
8
67
72
72
55
4
31
55
55
29
2
17
28
29
7
3
5
6

98
23
98
98
36
90
97
89
23
77
87
88
66
9
43
65
66
37
6
25
35
37
12
4
8
11

99
65
99
97
81
97
97
94
31
92
94
94
77
13
46
77
77
32
1
6
20
32
12
1
2
2

99
59
99
99
80
99
99
93
24
85
92
93
74
7
43
74
74
.. 30
3
11
27
30
6
2

-

9
24
25
6
O
1
6
99
48
99
97
82
94
97
87
26
67
81
87
81
7
32
55
81
32
(9)
3
29
31
1
(9)
(9)
1

4
5

Table B-10. Paid vacation provisions1 for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
0
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item"
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months..........................................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ................................................................
1 y e a r..............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 years .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 ye a rs .............................................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 yea rs...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
6 weeks or more .... ..........................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months..........................................................................
1 y e a r...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 yea rs...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

99
58
99
99
65
96
99
97
66
94
97
97
90
6
76
89
90
74
1
63
73
74
4

99
78
99
99
86
99
99
97
52
96
97
97
93
38
70
92
93
57
20
39
54
54
22
20
20
22

95
26
92
90
37
76
89
73
20
59
72
73
37
6
20
33
37
26
1
8
23
26
4
1
2
4

96
16
95
92
27
77
91
80
23
68
80
80
62
3
34
60
62
32
1
12
29
32
7

7

98
32
98
96
34
91
96
93
25
88
92
93
79
5
54
77
78
56
1
27
50
55
16
1
5
12

99
55
99
98
83
96
97
86
22
66
83
86
53
6
33
52
53
20
1
5
17
20
2
1
2
2

100
37
100
99
70
99
99
94
28
84
92
94
78
16
36
76
78
33
12
15
32
33
2
1
1
2

99
59
99
99
81
97
99
97
25
94
97
97
86
9
56
85
86
56
4
15
47
56
17
1
7
13

-

(9)
2
4

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




West

North Central

81

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

99
3
99
99
9
99
99
98
19
98
98
98
93
12
25
91
93
84
5
15
84
84
12
6
6
12
100
66
100
100
85
100
100
99
31
99
99
99
88
12
71
87
88
73
-

12
63
73
9
-

3

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

99
27
99
99
43
93
98
93
38
86
93
93
76
8
53
75
76
50

98
69
98
98
74
89
98
96
71
88
95
96
95
2
84
92
95
85
1
76
85
85
2
1
1
1

99
21
99
99
31
94
99
97
26
93
96
97
86
11
54
86
86
58
4
33
58
58
21
2
12
21

99
19
99
99
23
67
99
90
25
83
90
90
73
6
43
67
72
40
2
18
39
39
12
2
6
11

97
17
97
97
41
96
97
95
29
90
95
95
70
6
39
50
70
19
2
12
18
19
6
1
5
6

99
76
99
99
87
99
99
99
53
96
99
99
90
41
74
88
90
74
40
48
74
74
34
34
34
34

99
63
99
99
82
98
99
97
34
92
97
97
91
14
58
88
89
38
2
19
38
38
13
2
6
13

100
60
99
100
79
97
99
98
41
92
97
98
86
5
62
81
86
41

99
34
99
99
90
99
99
99
30
99
99
99
90
14
48
90
90
32
1
9
26
32
4

(9)
29
48
50
12
(*)
8
10
100
61
100
99
84
99
99
97
44
93
97
97
79
14
51
77
79
47
(9)
15
46
47
7
(9)
3
6

-

30
38
41
6
-

5

<
9)
1
4

Table B-11. Paid vacation provisions1 for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
0
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item”

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months.........................................................................
1 y e a r ..............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
3 y e a rs ............................................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ..........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 ye a rs ..........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months.........................................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r..............................................................................
3 ye a rs ............................................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 ye a rs ............................................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ..........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 ye a rs ..........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 ye a rs ..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 ye a rs ..........................................................................
30 ye a rs ..........................................................................

South
ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

100
20
98
99
21
75
97
90
38
89
90
90
54
7
34
53
54
20
1
12
20
20
3
1
1
3

100
16
99
99
31
89
98
96
26
90
96
96
78
8
47
75
78
58
1
23
53
58
15
1
4
13

100
8
100
100
11
86
100
98
15
97
98
98
98
10
38
97
98
86
1
14
83
86
26

100
22
100
96
19
72
96
85
12
69
85
85
63
1
29
61
63
18

(9)
15
26

ft
ft
4

99
64
99
99
72
90
98
90
18
87
87
88
79
10
30
76
77
37
3
10
22
35
11
3
4
9

100
59
100
99
80
99
99
97
32
93
97
97
90
13
63
88
90
62
6
25
59
62
21
6
11
20

100
82
100
100
97
99
100
100
31
99
100
100
98
15
73
97
98
78
5
22
73
78
26
2
9
26

100
62
100
99
65
95
99
89
18
76
89
89
76
7
42
71
76
22
ft
7
22
22
5

O
’)
5
18
18
4

Daytona Beach

100
35
100
100
47
94
94
95
47
84
89
95
80
33
35
80
80
52
33
52
52
8
4

99
12
99
99
22
92
99
88
2
71
88
88
50
20
50
50
10

100
42
100
100
78
95
96
97
61
85
94
97
83
50
56
83
83
69

99
34
99
99
85
95
99
95
4
90
95
95
81
-

-

50
69
69
14

-

10
10
10
10

65
81
81
51

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

100
7
99
96
11
40
96
80
15
43
80
80
31
12
20
30
31
14
1
11
14
14
4
1
1
4

100
21
99
93
27
83
91
73
15
57
71
73
57
35
51
57
26
11
26
26
9
9

100
6
100
99
9
84
99
86
11
83
86
86
79
8
45
78
79
40
4
29
39
40
18
9
11
15

100
8
100
100
28
88
100
96
25
79
93
96
75
14
44
73
75
47
12
36
44
47
20
7
11
18

100
61
100
99
67
87
99
89
31
71
89
89
52
9
34
48
52
28

100
42
98
91
69
86
90
70
13
62
70
70
60
9
33
57
60
32

100
39
100
99
82
98
99
93
12
87
93
93
87
8
66
87
87
29
6
21
28
29
14
3
11
14

100
62
100
100
80
98
100
98
46
79
94
98
69
16
58
69
69
47
9
26
38
47
21
7
17
20

-

-

-

7
51
51
34

12
28
28
5

9
32
32
5
-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

4

34

5

5

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




Corpus Christi

82

Table B-11. Paid vacation provisions'* for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South— Continued
Item "
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 m onths..........................................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 y e a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 y e a rs ...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 y e a rs ...........................................................................
30 y e a rs ...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 y e a rs ...........................................................................
25 y e a rs ...........................................................................
30 y e a rs ...........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more ..................................................................
6 m onths..........................................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................

North Central

Norfok-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

99
70
99
99
75
95
99
99
77
96
99
99
95
3
82
95
95
83
1
76
82
83
4
(»)
2
4
100
89
100
100
95
100
100
99
81
97
98
98
96
72
87
96
96
82
41
77
82
82
44
41
41
44

100
26
98
97
25
57
96
90
15
50
90
90
40
8
20
36
40
27
1
9
25
27
3
1
1
3

100
15
98
99
22
67
99
86
26
70
86
86
73
4
43
72
73
41

16

99
39
99
99
38
94
99
97
29
92
96
97
90
8
62
86
87
67
2
34
57
65
25
1
7
19

100
50
100
99
78
96
99
92
21
57
92
92
38
8
30
38
38
14
3
8
12
14
4
3
3
4

100
25
100
99
66
97
99
90
53
81
90
90
76
24
47
76
76
39
5
22
38
39
14
5
5
14

98
62
98
98
79
95
98
95
25
91
95
95
88
16
61
86
87
61
8
21
50
60
33
1
11
24

-

19
41
41
16
-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




83

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

West

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

99
1
99
99
5
99
99
99
20
99
100
99
97
12
19
96
97
93
4
14
92
93
13
6
6
13

99
29
99
99
41
93
99
93
43
90
93
93
80
10
57
79
80
53

4
8

100
78
100
100
82
91
100
100
83
91
99
100
99
1
91
97
99
93
1
89
93
93
2
1
1
1

100
21
100
100
34
95
100
100
28
99
100
100
95
13
55
95
95
66
3
38
65
66
21
3
9
21

100
16
100
100
23
57
100
92
27
85
92
92
74
7
38
70
74
41
3
20
41
41
16
3
8
16

100
16
100
100
53
98
100
100
21
91
100
100
78
10
25
39
78
12
3
11
12
12
8
3
6
8

100
83
100
100
93
100
100
100
43
100
100
100
97
18
93
97
97
89

100
50
100
100
78
100
100
95
50
88
95
95
75
14
55
74
75
43
1
26
43
43
9
1
1
9

100
98
100
100
97
98
100
99
92
93
99
99
98
80
90
93
98
90
80
86
90
90
72
72
72
72

100
63
100
100
86
96
100
97
39
92
97
97
96
24
53
95
96
46
5
25
46
46
18
5
6
18

100
73
100
100
85
98
100
99
51
92
99
99
92
4
78
92
92
60

100
26
100
100
96
99
100
99
10
99
100
99
97
21
32
97
97
16
1
15
16
16
2
1
2
2

-

19
88
89
5
-

5

-

33
51
53
10
-

-

52
55
60
10
-

10

Table B-12. Paid vacation provisions1 for full-time workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
0
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item"

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months.........................................................................
1 y e a r...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r...............................................................................
3 ye a rs .............................................................................
5 ye a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 yea rs.............................................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 yea rs......................... .................................................
20 years...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 years..........................................................................
15 years..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 years..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ............................................................. ..
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months.........................................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ..............................................................................
3 y e a rs ............................................................................
5 ye a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 ye a rs ............................................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 years ..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 yea rs..........................................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 yea rs..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
25 yea rs..........................................................................
30 yea rs..........................................................................

South

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

98
15
97
94
29
80
93
86
15
78
86
86
63
5
41
57
63
36

99
31
99
96
40
90
94
92
29
85
89
90
79
6
53
78
79
47

94
18
94
93
31
84
92
85
15
69
85
85
72
4
36
71
72
41

-

n
14
42
47
11
6
7

(9)
17
41
41
10
O
6
7

99
72
99
99
85
97
98
95
40
94
95
95
83
8
52
83
83
41
3
7
31
35
7

99
55
99
99
79
98
99
96
21
93
96
96
93
9
52
93
93
39
4
12
38
38
9
1
5
6

21
34
34
2
100
63
100
99
74
92
96
94
11
84
94
94
78
7
25
66
78
17
-

3
14
16
3
"

“

-

(9)
(9)

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

92
19
92
88
35
78
88
62
13
58
62
62
38
4
27
34
38
17
3
17
17
-

94
19
94
88
29
86
86
54
20
53
54
54
28
5
19
28
28
15
2
3
15
15
1

-

-

-

3
3

-

1
1

95
28
95
95
37
87
90
83
30
75
83
83
56
17
46
56
56
34
6
20
34
34
3

99
85
99
99
87
99
99
95
42
95
95
95
91
3
45
80
91
35
<
9)
4
17
18
1

99
36
99
98
59
95
98
75
12
74
75
75
39
3
16
31
39
12

Jacksonville

Memphis

97
34
96
91
35
87
91
65
9
53
65
65
39
3
25
38
39
16

87
27
84
74
31
63
74
58
12
46
58
58
43
2
24
43
43
24

91
13
86
86
16
79
84
67
7
59
65
65
43
2
24
43
43
24
1
11
23
24
2
2
2

97
37
95
96
43
91
94
84
22
74
82
82
57
4
42
57
57
29
1
15
28
29
6
1
5
5

99
68
99
97
81
97
97
94
33
93
94
94
75
14
45
75
75
33
1
5
19
33
12
1
1
1

99
58
99
99
80
99
99
91
17
86
91
91
76
4
39
76
76
25
2
6
24
25
2

-

-

4
16
16
1
1
1
1

7
23
24
2
1
2
2

100
78
100
99
76
99
99
93
8
81
93
93
60
3
24
59
60
17

-

-

-

2
12
12

6
20
20
6

4
17
17
(9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

<
9)
(9)
(9)
(9)

-

32
47
47
20

-

-

-

-

“

”

6
6

84

Jackson

99
49
99
98
84
95
98
89
28
68
83
89
85
7
31
55
85
32
(9)
2
28
31

-

99
74
99
99
81
99
99
88
15
87
88
88
47

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




-

GreenvilleSpartanburg

(9)
1
1

Table B-12. Paid vacation provisions1 for full-time workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
0
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)

Item”
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months..........................................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 yea rs...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 yea rs...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months..........................................................................
1 y e a r...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .......................... ..................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 yea rs...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 years...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................

92
26
90
86
43
84
86
65
23
63
63
65
35
4
20
32
35
25
ft
8
23
25
4

ft

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

94
16
94
86
29
84
86
75
21
67
75
75
54
2
27
51
54
25
1
7
21
25
-

3
4

-

99
56
99
97
84
96
97
85
22
68
81
85
55
6
34
55
55
21
1
4
18
21
2
1
2
2

100
38
100
99
71
99
99
94
25
85
92
94
78
15
35
76
78
32
13
14
31
32
(9
)
0
(9
)
(9
)

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

96
20
96
92
27
87
92
86
19
82
86
86
61
1
40
61
61
39

99
29
99
98
42
97
98
92
39
89
91
92
80
12
63
76
80
53
1
33
53
53
4
1
3
3
99
71
99
99
80
98
98
96
32
95
96
96
91
15
58
90
91
40
5
12
34
35
8
5
5
6

ft

15
38
39
1
1
1
1
99
57
99
99
82
99
99
98
25
96
98
98
85
4
53
85
85
52
1
10
43
52
4
-

4
4

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




West

North Central

South—Continued

85

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

99
12
99
98
24
98
98
91
18
88
91
91
74
11
53
70
74
45
9
17
45
45
11
4
6
11

99
25
99
98
45
92
98
94
32
82
94
94
71
6
49
71
71
46
1
24
45
46
14

90
26
90
90
35
81
86
80
14
73
75
80
75
4
51
71
71
48

99
25
95
99
22
89
97
87
20
81
86
87
69
4
55
62
67
40

ft

-

99
23
99
98
26
94
97
92
21
82
90
92
71
8
53
71
71
46
5
25
45
46
21
1
18
21

95
18
94
94
29
93
94
91
36
89
91
91
62
3
52
60
62
25
1
12
23
25
5
4
4

100
37
100
100
73
100
100
98
11
97
98
98
75
1
35
72
75
49

100
64
100
99
86
99
99
97
42
95
97
97
80
13
49
79
80
48

99
62
99
99
81
99
99
96
31
92
96
96
88
8
61
84
84
34
1
15
33
33
10
5
10

100
46
99
100
74
97
99
96
30
91
94
96
80
7
45
68
78
21

-

1
23
49
17
1

12
14

ft

12
47
48
6
ft
4
5

-

15
48
48
-

-

99
55
99
99
77
99
99
99
16
98
99
99
84
5
60
83
83
59
4
12
59
59
“

-

15
37
37
3
-

-

6
20
20
ft
“

99
39
99
99
86
99
99
99
44
99
99
99
85
9
59
85
85
44
1
5
33
44
6
-

1
6

Table B-13. Paid vacation provisions'0 for full-time workers, public utilities, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers=100 percent)
South

Northeast
Item "

Percent of production workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 m onths.........................................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r...............................................................................
3 y e a rs ............................................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
10 ye a rs ..........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 yea rs..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ..........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 y e a rs ..........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 ye a rs ..........................................................................
30 ye a rs ..........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 ye a rs ..........................................................................
30 ye a rs ..........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 m onths........................................ !................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs ............................................................................
5 y e a rs ............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 ye a rs ...........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 ye a rs ..........................................................................
15 ye a rs ..........................................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 ye a rs ...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 ye a rs ..........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ..........................................................................

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

99
34
95
99
31
99
99
98
98
98
98
92
69
92
92
78
31
78
78
-

100
60
100
100
66
100
100
99
19
99
99
99
95
2
74
95
95
93
1
29
93
93
30
15
15

100
31
100
99
38
90
99
99
13
93
99
99
99
1
46
99
99
90
18
90
90
22
9
9

99
57
99
99
74
97
99
97
32
97
97
97
96
87
96
96
91
34
91
91
-

100
48
100
100
86
97
100
94
12
94
94
94
79
11
57
79
79
57
11
57
57
-

100
58
100
100
93
100
100
100
14
100
100
100
97
62
97
97
93
7
93
93
7
7
7

100
60
100
100
57
100
100
97
1
85
97
97
76
44
73
76
61
11
61
61
3
3
3
3

100
57
100
100
72
100
100
97
15
86
97
97
95
78
94
95
88
23
79
88
7
7
7

100
40
97
100
45
92
97
95
12
84
95
95
84
6
54
84
84
75
5
16
72
75
6
6
6

98
45
98
98
56
98
98
95
30
93
95
95
94
7
85
94
94
80
3
38
76
80
11
3
9
9

100
48
100
100
51
99
100
97
97
97
97
90
48
90
90
44
1
44
44
-

100
67
100
100
80
99
100
99
9
99
99
99
93
2
75
93
93
87
2
9
87
87
22
4
4

100
56
100
100
79
99
100
99
23
99
100
99
99
59
99
99
93
22
93
93
24
7
7

99
77
99
99
89
97
99
97
50
97
97
97
95
90
95
95
94
29
94
94
-

100
36
100
100
81
95
100
91
7
91
91
91
80
6
44
80
80
40
6
40
40
-

100
81
100
100
98
100
100
100
4
100
100
100
98
81
98
98
98
1
98
98
1
1
1

100
73
100
100
73
100
100
99
1
91
99
99
75
45
72
75
63
2
63
63
1
1
1
1

100
68
100
100
92
100
100
99
7
85
99
99
98
74
97
98
90
1
7
77
90

100
53
100
100
61
98
100
96
10
93
96
96
93
2
65
93
93
87
1
9
87
87
1
~
1
1

100
67
100
100
75
100
100
99
23
99
99
99
97
2
85
97
97
84
2
14
77
84
9
2
3
3

_

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




86

~

(9)
(9)
n

Table B-13. Paid vacation provisions'0 for full-time workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item”
New Orleans

Percent of production workers
} week or more .................................................................
6 months..........................................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 y e a r ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 years...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 years...........................................................................
20 years...........................................................................
25 years...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ...............................................................
15 years...........................................................................
20 ye a rs ...........................................................................
25 ye a rs ...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
25 yea rs...........................................................................
30 ye a rs ...........................................................................
Percent of office workers
1 week or more .................................................................
6 months..........................................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
2 weeks or more ...............................................................
1 year ...............................................................................
3 y e a rs .............................................................................
5 years .............................................................................
3 weeks or more ...............................................................
5 y e a rs .............................................................................
10 yea rs...........................................................................
15 yea rs...........................................................................
20 yea rs...........................................................................
4 weeks or more ...............................................................
10 years...........................................................................
15 years...........................................................................
20 years...........................................................................
25 years...........................................................................
5 weeks or more ................................................................
15 years...........................................................................
20 years...........................................................................
25 years...........................................................................
30 years...........................................................................
6 weeks or more ...............................................................
20 years...........................................................................
25 years...........................................................................
30 yea rs...........................................................................

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

100
42
100
100
71
99
100
97
27
96
97
97
91
4
64
91
91
76
2
23
62
76
14
2
10
14

99
(*)
99
99
9
97
99
94
19
93
94
94
81
(®
)
16
81
81
69
-

100
74
100
100
87
100
100
98
23
98
98
98
89
4
56
89
89
62
3
6
53
62
4
3
4
4

100
22
100
100
35
99
100
97
13
97
97
97
87
2
24
87
87
78
73
78
-

(9)
54
69
-

North Central

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattte-Everett

100
29
100
100
31
98
100
100
2
99
100
100
97
1
52
97
97
93
24
91
93
4
3
4
4

100
41
100
100
63
98
100
100
16
100
100
100
100
2
74
100
100
95
2
33
95
95
9
9
9

100
16
100
100
25
100
100
100
2
100
100
100
99
5
70
99
99
86
12
17
86
86
21
12
16
21

100
41
100
100
53
99
100
99
32
99
100
99
94
4
64
94
94
90
2
54
90
90
30
1
30
30

100
54
100
100
62
100
100
98
96
98
98
96
74
96
96
86
9
86
86
-

100
37
100
100
41
98
100
99
22
97
100
99
99
14
77
99
99
97
14
39
94
97
29
18
29

95
46
95
95
47
95
95
95
4
92
95
95
89
64
86
89
85
17
82
85
_
-

100
48
98
100
59
98
98
93
32
93
93
93
92
4
80
92
92
74
36
74
74
27
20
23

100
53
100
100
73
100
100
99
21
99
99
99
97
8
68
97
97
88
5
29
88
88
17
17
17

100
58
100
100
80
100
100
100
5
100
100
100
100
1
68
100
100
91
1
12
91
91
2
2
2

100
27
100
100
35
100
100
99
1
99
100
99
95
1
79
95
95
82
1
81
82
1
1

100
53
100
100
64
100
100
99
22
99
100
99
96
1
58
96
96
90
30
90
90
18
18
18

100
73
100
100
76
100
100
99
99
100
99
96
91
96
96
94
-

100
50
100
100
70
99
99
99
17
99
99
99
99
4
78
99
99
99
3
26
96
97
34
15
34

100
36
99
100
69
99
99
99
39
98
99
99
98
81
98
98
60
_

100
59
99
100
74
99
99
99
31
99
99
99
88
7
79
88
88
62
4
15
62
62
15
6
14

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




West

87

(9)
94
94
-

12
60
60
-

Table B-14. Health, insurance, and pension plans1 for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979
2
(All full-time workers = 100 percent)
Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ...................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both'3 ....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ..............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance .........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
in establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ...................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both'3 ....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance ..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance .........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................

South

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

99
94
84
73
68

99
98
88
79
76

97
95
91
64
60

99
84
77
65
58

97
93
59
70
46

88
79
46
60
35

98
97
63
73
49

93
84
44
70
35

90
89
60
74
51

94
93
71
81
62

90
76
70
23
6
14
13
97
87
97
87
96
86
86
75
15
14
83
77

91
81
74
29
6
26
20
97
88
97
88
94
86
85
72
37
34
90
85

92
85
82
12
6
17
14
96
89
96
89
95
89
90
83
60
57
89
86

47
35
29
22
(9)
16
13
98
84
99
84
98
84
93
79
20
19
78
76

70
37
28
36
19
32
15
92
58
92
58
93
55
90
52
32
22
70
52

50
35
25
38
7
16
12
88
45
88
45
87
45
88
45
12
6
58
53

81
69
37
13
6
13
6
98
55
98
55
94
50
93
46
18
10
68
65

77
39
24
39
13
29
20
90
47
90
47
89
47
82
39
21
18
68
55

72
50
39
27
14
19
15
90
52
90
52
89
52
90
51
37
24
66
57

79
56
48
21
15
21
15
90
59
92
59
89
58
85
51
28
25
70
62

99
96
83
68
61

99
96
81
78
72

99
97
89
63
57

99
93
82
73
65

98
97
54
77
41

98
95
65
88
59

99
99
70
81
56

99
97
52
77
37

99
98
53
83
51

99
99
66
76
50

82
38
35
50
11
52
46
99
89
99
89
98
88
96
83
23
17
85
77

96
55
50
77
9
59
38
99
75
99
75
98
75
98
77
33
28
87
83

96
68
65
69
4
55
48
99
86
99
86
99
86
98
85
47
40
91
86

85
37
31
64
10
59
43
99
65
99
65
99
65
99
63
30
20
92
91

83
34
19
62
15
48
31
98
65
98
65
97
63
96
61
43
30
76
61

89
38
36
77
10
34
25
98
72
98
72
97
72
98
72
20
16
83
74

82
31
23
63
13
48
23
99
60
99
60
98
57
99
55
18
12
86
79

94
26
10
78
13
61
36
99
41
99
41
97
40
98
39
23
16
82
75

96
40
27
73
22
66
49
99
43
99
43
98
43
99
42
42
24
86
75

96
29
24
68
19
48
23
98
47
99
47
97
46
97
40
27
21
76
65

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




88

Table B-14. Health, insurance, and pension plans1 for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
2
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued

West

North Central

New Orleans

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPorts mouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

92
92
53
73
43

95
91
67
76
55

97
89
78
75
66

99
97
95
89
88

99
99
92
46
42

98
94
82
79
70

98
98
96
93
91

97
96
81
79
70

100
99
74
92
72

97
90
84
81
76

72
49
27
31
8
26
20
86
45
86
45
85
45
85
45
22
16
62
49

80
63
46
36
9
27
14
92
55
92
56
91
56
80
44
22
14
72
57

84
75
66
17
11
27
22
95
76
95
74
93
73
80
61
34
31
84
75

97
91
90
15
1
57
56
98
94
98
94
97
94
39
37
81
80
92
92

96
93
91
9
2
11
11
99
91
99
91
98
90
97
89
83
81
94
94

85
62
52
30
11
31
26
96
74
96
74
95
74
85
60
52
45
81
74

96
94
93
4
7
68
67
98
95
98
95
97
95
30
28
88
87
89
89

93
78
70
23
15
26
22
96
84
96
84
96
83
77
62
64
58
91
88

95
90
74
23
5
20
13
99
73
99
72
99
72
84
57
41
36
81
75

81
61
61
43
11
24
18
95
89
95
89
95
89
95
89
85
80
81
77

99
99
69
92
64

99
98
76
76
61

99
99
86
87
75

99
99
94
83
81

100
98
90
49
42

99
98
82
74
63

99
99
99
93
92

99
98
69
82
61

100
99
70
68
45

100
99
88
85
68

84
30
14
55
12
60
43
99
51
99
51
97
51
99
51
19
15
82
77

94
68
57
68
5
45
36
99
54
99
54
98
54
99
54
38
8
67
53

93
68
57
63
15
51
42
99
63
99
62
97
62
95
61
28
24
90
77

97
73
70
75
2
64
58
99
88
99
88
98
88
92
63
68
67
92
91

99
72
71
57
5
46
43
99
84
99
84
99
84
99
80
71
65
93
91

97
34
23
78
13
52
40
98
65
98
65
97
65
98
63
37
30
75
66

99
74
74
75
2
71
69
99
97
99
97
99
97
99
63
82
81
92
92

86
42
27
66
13
42
34
99
62
99
60
99
60
99
60
48
31
83
76

95
55
42
84
10
48
31
99
64
99
64
99
64
95
47
38
33
89
86

95
26
24
83
3
78
63
99
75
99
74
98
74
99
74
86
70
92
89

Item

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13.....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13.....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory p lans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance ..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Major medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




89

Table B-15. Health, insurance, and pension plans1 for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
2
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both'3 ....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elow ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ............
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................

South

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

100
96
90
75
71

100
99
90
78
75

100
100
99
56
56

100
86
79
66
60

100
100
80
77
63

99
93
86
77
70

100
99
65
74
49

100
95
65
74
53

100
100
79
83
60

100
99
75
84
65

92
83
78
15
6
9
9
100
91
100
91
99
91
86
76
8
8
89
81

96
93
83
22
3
26
21
98
91
98
91
94
87
82
71
34
32
96
89

100
99
97
7

43
35
28
16

56
44
44
56

(®
)
14
14
100
98
100
98
100
98
94
92
78
77
99
97

15
12
100
86
100
86
100
86
94
82
17
16
80
79

77
49
47
35
16
44
24
100
83
100
83
100
77
95
69
37
29
86
62

26
15
99
87
99
87
99
87
99
87
2
2
85
74

82
77
41
4
4
9
3
100
57
100
57
96
51
94
45
16
9
69
66

88
64
47
27
11
31
23
100
63
100
63
98
61
79
41
28
25
77
74

88
83
67
18
7
24
18
100
66
100
66
100
66
100
65
35
20
88
82

89
78
64
16
5
13
10
94
68
100
68
97
67
91
58
23
21
77
65

99
97
91
74
68

99
99
93
84
81

100
100
93
60
57

100
86
75
73
60

100
100
72
84
63

99
96
83
72
71

100
99
73
73
53

100
97
82
82
66

100
100
71
91
62

100
98
52
75
43

93
60
57
42
15
34
29
99
93
99
93
99
93
95
82
10
7
91
69

96
70
65
80
2
49
28
99
94
99
94
98
93
97
90
40
38
96
88

96
79
77
79

71
38
26
49

76
45
45
64
7
57
26
100
74
100
74
100
63
91
52
54
39

89
72
72
89

79
31
21
59
12
41
19
100
56
100
56
98
53
98
49
13
9
87
76

91
52
42
76
4
43
29
100
65
100
65
93
58
91
48
35
31
82
79

91
58
46
84
1
41
28
99
69
99
69
99
69
99
67
31
12
93
85

86
55
43
55
5
42
22
95
62
100
62
99
61
92
42
40
33
81
62

-

50
48
100
94
100
94
100
94
98
91
75
69
95
93

-

-

38
28
99
78
99
78
99
78
98
77
17
17
86
84

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




90

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

%

-

-

49
8
99
83
99
83
99
83
99
83
22
10
87
52

Table B-15. Health, insurance, and pension plans'2 for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item

North Central

West

New Orleans

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both'3 .....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory p lans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance ..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both'3 .....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory p lans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Major medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

96
96
54
77
35

100
98
89
78
69

99
93
80
80
70

99
99
99
94
94

100
100
98
37
36

99
95
83
80
71

100
100
100
99
99

98
98
80
86
74

100
100
75
95
76

100
97
97
90
90

86
79
40
18
1
30
24
96
45
96
45
96
45
95
44
17
13
79
68

91
82
64
33
7
34
17
100
73
100
73
100
73
74
48
21
17
93
75

92
89
78
16
7
28
24
99
82
99
82
97
79
84
68
36
33
94
86

99
99
99
4
74
74
99
98
99
98
99
98
23
23
91
90
96
96

100
99
99
5
1
11
11
100
97
100
97
100
97
100
97
93
92
100
100

88
70
57
19
10
41
37
99
84
99
84
99
84
78
60
55
49
86
83

100
100
100
(*)
6
76
76
100
100
100
100
100
100
19
19
98
98
94
94

97
93
81
17
8
30
26
98
85
98
85
98
85
76
62
72
63
95
91

97
96
83
16
4
13
9
100
80
100
80
100
80
79
59
42
40
82
79

88
80
80
54
6
18
14
100
98
100
98
100
98
100
98
88
88
93
88

98
98
49
88
39

100
100
85
62
47

99
98
79
91
74

100
100
99
96
95

100
100
98
31
30

99
98
95
60
58

100
99
99
99
99

99
99
59
87
55

100
100
74
68
44

100
100
98
96
94

88
68
20
41
4
44
37
98
33
98
33
98
33
98
33
16
6
83
79

81
56
43
60
8
34
16
97
63
97
63
97
63
97
62
23
20
92
66

90
78
57
61
6
45
33
99
72
99
72
98
70
95
65
36
29
94
78

99
93
92
75

100
84
84
48
4
46
44
100
99
100
99
100
99
100
95
88
88
95
93

96
50
43
78
2
69
61
99
86
99
86
99
86
97
72
37
24
88
86

99
84
84
94

84
67
38
67
7
36
22
99
58
99
54
99
54
99
53
58
30
87
79

99
54
40
90
16
40
22
100
77
100
77
100
77
99
46
49
48
91
90

98
19
19
84
2
93
75
100
95
100
95
100
95
100
95
97
96
96
96

-

83
78
100
99
100
99
100
99
97
51
91
89
98
98

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




91

-

81
81
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
29
95
95
98
98

Table B-16. Health, insurance, and pension plans1 for full-time workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979
2
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory p lans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ..............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance ..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ..............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................

South

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

97
90
68
68
60

98
96
83
82
78

91
88
77
76
67

95
77
68
57
51

95
88
44
65
33

84
74
30
53
22

92
87
55
70
46

89
77
30
67
24

86
84
51
69
47

88
88
67
78
60

86
57
48
44
8
26
23
90
75
90
75
89
75
86
72
31
28
68
65

83
60
58
42
13
25
18
96
83
96
83
92
83
90
74
43
38
79
77

79
61
60
19
15
20
14
91
77
90
77
88
77
83
69
31
25
74
69

62
37
33
47
2
20
16
92
73
92
73
91
73
89
68
33
33
65
63

65
28
13
36
21
23
8
87
38
87
38
88
38
85
38
29
17
59
44

48
32
18
30
10
13
11
83
28
83
28
82
28
83
28
16
8
48
45

77
36
20
49
13
32
17
88
49
88
49
84
48
88
48
26
14
60
59

71
23
9
46
14
28
18
84
38
84
38
83
38
84
38
16
13
63
42

64
33
24
31
18
16
13
86
45
86
45
84
45
85
45
38
25
55
44

71
37
34
26
24
29
19
86
51
86
51
82
51
80
45
32
28
64
59

100
96
77
64
57

99
94
74
75
67

99
95
86
65
57

99
99
87
73
68

98
96
50
76
36

97
95
60
91
56

99
99
66
92
61

99
97
48
77
32

99
98
51
82
50

99
99
71
76
53

74
25
20
55
9
63
57
99
86
99
86
97
85
97
84
32
23
82
82

95
47
43
76
12
64
43
99
66
99
66
97
65
99
70
30
23
83
81

96
60
57
62
7
59
49
99
81
99
81
98
81
98
81
28
19
87
81

95
37
34
75
18
74
53
99
55
99
55
99
55
99
52
40
22
97
96

84
32
13
61
17
46
32
97
63
97
63
96
63
97
63
41
28
73
61

89
30
28
75
13
30
29
97
70
97
70
96
70
97
70
19
18
82
79

86
31
26
68
15
57
28
99
64
99
64
97
64
99
64
24
15
84
84

94
22
6
78
14
63
37
99
38
99
38
98
38
99
38
21
14
82
74

96
38
25
72
24
69
51
99
40
99
40
98
40
99
39
43
25
86
74

99
21
18
72
23
50
23
99
42
99
42
96
42
98
40
23
17
75
67

'

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




92

Table B-16. Health, insurance, and pension plans1 for full-time workers, nonmanufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
2
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued
Item

North Central

West

New Orleans

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13.....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance ..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13.....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance ..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

91
90
53
72
47

91
86
51
74
44

92
83
75
67
58

98
94
86
79
75

99
94
65
88
67

97
92
80
79
70

87
87
76
65
57

96
91
84
68
64

100
98
71
87
64

95
84
72
73
63

64
35
21
37
11
24
17
81
45
81
45
79
45
81
45
25
18
54
39

72
49
32
38
11
22
12
86
43
87
43
84
43
85
41
24
13
57
44

71
52
45
19
17
24
18
89
67
89
62
88
62
72
50
31
27
67
58

93
72
68
41
4
17
14
96
87
96
87
92
85
76
69
58
56
83
81

76
61
55
30
9
12
11
93
61
93
61
88
57
84
54
33
25
68
64

83
52
45
43
13
19
13
93
61
93
61
91
61
92
60
48
41
75
63

79
63
59
24
9
28
22
87
72
87
72
84
72
85
71
37
32
66
66

87
52
52
33
28
19
16
93
81
93
81
91
80
78
61
51
51
86
82

90
76
55
40
5
36
23
98
56
98
53
96
53
97
53
38
29
81
66

76
44
44
34
15
29
22
91
82
91
82
90
82
91
82
81
74
70
67

99
99
73
93
69

99
98
78
77
63

99
99
91
84
75

99
98
91
74
71

100
96
78
79
62

99
98
77
79
64

99
99
98
88
85

99
98
74
79
65

100
99
66
69
45

100
99
82
77
49

84
23
13
57
13
63
44
99
54
99
54
97
54
99
54
20
17
82
77

96
70
59
69
5
46
39
99
53
99
53
98
53
99
53
40
6
64
51

95
60
56
64
23
57
49
98
55
98
55
97
55
96
58
21
20
87
76

95
59
55
75
4
51
45
99
81
99
81
97
81
88
71
53
52
88
86

97
54
51
70
6
46
42
99
59
99
59
99
59
98
57
44
26
90
89

97
28
17
78
17
46
33
98
57
98
57
96
57
98
60
37
33
70
60

98
65
64
58
4
61
58
99
94
99
94
99
94
99
94
70
67
86
86

88
28
21
66
16
45
41
99
64
99
64
99
64
99
64
42
31
81
74

90
55
44
78
4
57
42
99
49
99
49
98
49
91
48
25
18
87
83

93
31
28
83
5
67
54
99
60
99
59
96
59
99
59
79
52
89
84

,

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




93

Table B-17. Health, insurance, and pension plans1 for full-time workers, public utilities, January through December 1979
2
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast
Item

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ...................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance .........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b elo w ...................................
Life insurance..................................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both'3 ....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance ............................
Noncontributory plans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ...........
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance .........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Medical insurance..........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Major medical insurance...............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Dental insurance............................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Retirement pension .......................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................

South

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

Green vtlleSpartanburg

Jackson

Jacksonville

Memphis

100
99
86
89
81

100
100
79
93
93

100
100
88
78
73

99
99
99
90
90

100
100
63
91
54

100
100
62
93
54

100
98
77
86
65

100
100
82
93
74

100
99
96
89
87

100
100
93
95
88

94
34
34
76
6
66
66
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
58
58
94
94

83
46
46
42
26
37
37
100
93
100
93
100
93
100
92
91
86
78
78

81
41
41
37
24
36
35
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
69
68
79
78

90
81
64
79
45
45
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
78
78
86
86

66
11
10
19
42
46
16
100
64
100
64
100
64
100
64
55
55
94
73

97
62
62
46
50
50
50
100
97
100
97
100
97
100
97
58
58
97
97

97
53
53
33
46
48
46
100
89
100
89
91
89
100
89
56
55
86
86

89
36
28
24
41
85
74
100
74
100
74
100
74
100
74
76
76
84
82

90
79
77
50
29
37
36
100
94
100
94
100
94
100
94
85
83
70
65

80
60
57
33
26
31
31
100
74
100
74
100
74
94
68
87
87
72
72

100
100
73
78
56

100
100
73
98
98

100
100
75
67
61

99
99
99
75
75

100
100
47
98
45

100
100
82
99
80

100
100
80
94
74

100
100
84
99
84

100
96
95
94
93

100
100
91
99
91

96
5
5
74
22
67
67
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
45
41
94
93

94
32
32
85
8
41
38
100
92
100
92
100
92
100
90
86
80
82
82

94
21
21
93
1
44
43
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
66
65
82
82

74
61
50
74

57
5
4
29
26
50
10
100
41
100
41
100
41
100
41
47
37
91
48

98
82
82
19
79
79
79
100
98
100
98
100
98
100
98
81
81
98
98

83
47
47
22
56
50
48
100
95
100
95
96
95
100
95
64
59
93
93

94
10
6
21
64
95
83
100
83
100
83
100
83
100
83
71
71
96
94

95
64
64
37
49
58
50
100
94
100
94
100
94
100
94
94
90
66
66

96
31
25
43
44
63
57
100
78
100
78
100
78
100
78
82
82
74
74

-

-

48
48
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
82
82
90
90

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




94

Table B-17. Health, insurance, and pension plans'1 for full-time workers, public utilities, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)

South—Continued

North Central

West

New Orleans

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Detroit

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Kansas City

Saginaw

St. Louis

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

100
100
88
83
71

100
99
73
83
71

100
100
74
95
70

100
100
100
95
95

100
100
66
99
72

99
99
99
96
95

100
100
100
86
85

100
100
97
80
78

100
100
100
83
83

100
96
88
78
71

74
44
33
38
23
39
39
100
82
100
82
100
82
100
82
68
68
78
70

89
62
51
61
10
35
32
99
63
99
63
99
63
98
62
55
21
45
19

92
64
62
18
50
63
63
99
74
99
74
99
74
99
74
69
69
91
89

96
89
89
44
4
14
12
100
100
100
100
100
100
98
96
92
92
92
92

97
97
91
24

98
85
85
18

20
20
100
67
100
67
100
67
100
67
53
47
96
90

92
66
64
48
21
19
19
99
94
99
94
99
94
99
94
83
83
77
75

67
67
100
98
100
98
100
98
100
98
91
90
83
83

99
49
49
21
56
29
29
100
85
100
85
96
81
100
79
88
88
85
77

99
73
73
69
16
54
41
100
80
100
80
100
80
100
83
51
51
100
94

90
60
60
45
9
33
29
99
92
100
92
100
92
100
92
97
89
88
76

99
99
80
97
78

100
100
78
74
73

100
100
80
94
74

100
100
100
96
96

100
99
55
99
55

94
94
93
81
76

100
99
99
83
83

100
99
96
91
88

100
100
88
50
38

100
99
85
80
62

77
27
13
33
37
65
64
99
79
99
79
99
79
99
79
53
53
81
81

97
59
59
94
2
58
55
100
68
100
68
100
68
100
68
75
15
44
21

92
63
62
29
50
63
62
95
75
95
75
95
75
94
69
69
69
96
94

95
69
69
86
2
20
18
100
100
100
100
100
100
99
99
87
87
85
85

99
96
91
44
3
34
34
100
56
100
56
100
56
100
56
40
40
92
90

93
31
31
58
33
35
35
94
86
94
86
94
86
94
86
78
78
61
60

97
75
75
25

99
23
23
48
50
17
16
100
84
100
84
100
84
100
83
94
94
83
82

100
46
34
85
12
41
26
100
53
100
53
100
53
67
51
33
33
100
97

93
53
53
65
1
62
52
100
84
100
84
100
84
100
84
96
79
87
63

Item

Percent of production workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance...................................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both13.....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance .............................
Noncontributory plans...............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ............
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Hospitalization insurance..............................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Surgical insurance ..........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Major medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
Percent of office workers
In establishments providing at least
1 of the benefits shown b e lo w ....................................
Life insurance...................................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Accidental death and dismemberment insurance ....
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Sickness and accident insurance or
sick leave or both’3 .....................................................
Sickness and accident insurance .............................
Noncontributory p lans..............................................
Sick leave (full pay and no waiting period) ............
Sick leave (partial pay or waiting period) ...............
Long-term disability insurance......................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Hospitalization insurance ...............................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Surgical insurance ........................................................ :.
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Medical insurance...........................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Major medical insurance................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Dental insurance.............................................................
Noncontributory plans .................................................
Retirement pension ........................................................
Noncontributory plans ................................................
See footnotes a f end of B-series tables.




95

-

-

-

78
78
100
97
100
97
100
97
100
97
98
97
94
94

Table B-18. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast

Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

South
ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Pittsburgh

Daytona Beach

Corpus Christi

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

68
$5,000

62
$5,100

60
$5,500

57
$5,500

53
$7,400

51
$7,300

53
$5,700

48
$5,800

47
$6,500

31
$7,300

45
$5,200

27
$5,000

2

2

8

8

10

10

5

5

$2,600
3,900
8,800
11,800
13,000

$2,600
3,900
8,800
11,800
13,000

$3,600
3,800
6,800
8,200
8,300

$3,600
3,800
6,800
8,200
8,300

$4,300
4,700
6,300
7,300
7,700

$4,300
4,700
6,300
7,300
7,700

$8,800
14,300
19,300
20,200

$8,800
14,300
19,300
20,200

16

13

12

11

33

32

5

3

7

2

$7,500
11,600
16,300
19,700

$7,900
11,900
17,000
20,400

$8,300
14,300
19,400
24,500

$8,000
13,400
18,200
22,600

$8,700
10,600
13,500
16,200

$8,600
10,100
12,700
15,000

$4,200
8,400
13,500
16,200

$3,700
7,200
13,600
16,900

$8,900
14,100
21,100
28,700

GreenvilleSpartanburg
Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Jacksonville

Jackson

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Memphis

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Production workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean amount of insurance provided14.....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:14
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service..............................................
After 5 years of service ............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
If annual earnings are $5,000 ..................................
If annual earnings are $10,000 ...............................
If annual earnings are $15,000 ...............................
If annual earnings are $20,000 ...............................

(9)

(9)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

5

6

3

$6,300
6,500
8,700
10,200

$6,800
14,300
19,000
25,500
11,200

$7,700
11,000
-

11

7

18

7

$8,500 $10,700
13,300 12,700
18,000 17,700
21,300 22,000

$5,400
14,000
19,400
44,100

$6,000
11,600
14,800
22,700

-

-

-

7

4

$6,800
14,700
19,400
25,400

5

$6,300
13,700
17,900
22,800

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

50
$8,000

2

$3,100
3,600
9,900
16,800
-

22
$5000

$6,300
6,500
8,700
10,200

-

-

43
$4,700

63
$7,100

2

47
$4,400

5

$8,400
22,600
33,100
45,800

-

39
56
$8,700 $10,300

71
$4,800

$2,900
3,500
10,600
17,600
-

7

3

$9,800 $10,900
15,400 12,900
22,400 19,400
30,300 25,600

Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance14 15....................

7

6

15

11

8

7

13

13

28

21

18

13

11

8

20

9

13

12

13

9

$2

$2

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$2

$1

$2

$1

1.16

1.17

$1

$1

$1

$1

Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................

1

1

3

2

1

1

4

4

6

1

3

1

3

4

3

2

2

8

6

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




96

(9)

Table B-18. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers =100 percent)
South—Continued

New Orleans
Item
Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

West

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Detroit

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Saginaw

Kansas City

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

South Bend

St. Louis

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Seattle-Everett

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Production workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided14 .....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service ..............................................
After 5 years of service ............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
If annual earnings are $5,000 ..................................
If annual earnings are $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ................................
If annual earnings are $15,000 ................................
If annual earnings are $20,000 ................................

53
$7,200

37
$8,100

49
$4,600

35
$4,400

56
$6,600

53
$6,700

31
$8,300

30
$8,500

27
$9,000

1

1

5

4

3

3

2

2

1

$2,400
3,000
5,100
5,100
5,400

$2,500
4,500
4,600
4,900

$3,700
6,900
10,500
10,700

3

18

9

$8,000 $10,000
15,600 15,800
22,500 19,800
28,400 26,600

$9,100
13,800
19,100
24,700

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

$3,700
6,900
10,500
10,700

$2,000
2,100
3,600
5,700
6,300

$2,000
2,100
3,600
5,700
6,300

$1,100
1,600
2,500
2,900
2,900

19

13

50

49

61

$9,700
11,900
17,000
22,200

$9,700
14,000
18,300
23,500

$9,700
12,800
17,700
23,100

$11,700 $11,900
12,200 12,100
16,700 16,500
20,300 19,900

24
$9,300

44
$6,400

40
$6,500

2

1

0

.

$3,800
4,700
11,000
15,800
18,300

$5,100
4,900
12,200
13,900
18,200

61

33

$8,900
9,800
10,900
12,800

$8,700
11,900
16,300
20,400

$8,600
11,200
15,900
20,000

-

-

24
$9,000

64
$6,900

(*)

(*)

.

.

.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

68

67

$11,100 $11,100
11,600 11,500
16,300 16,200
21,500 21,400

60
$7,400

1

$3,500
3,600
5,800
6,400
6,900

-

-

75
$7,600

3

59
$6,900

.

27

$8,900
9,900
11,100
13,000

25
$8,700

14

14

$10,100 $10,100
11,900 11,600
16,500 16,100
21,200 20,600

$1,700
1,800
3,800
5,100
6,200

11

6

$9,200 $12,100
13,900 12,200
18,900 14,800
25,400 19,100

69
$7,800

1

66
$7,800

(9)

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

7

6

$11,200 $11,200
11,600
9,900
19,900 18,300
24,200 21,200

Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance1 15....................
4

18

11

19

17

11

9

11

11

8

6

14

13

5

5

17

8

5

5

11

8

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................

3

2

1

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

6

2

3

3

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




97

-

-

-

-

1

(9)

Table B-18. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers= 1 0 0 percent)
South

Northeast

Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania
Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Pittsburgh

Philadelphia/

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Daytona Beach

Corpus Christi

Jacksonville

Jackson

Memphis

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

14
$6,700

8
$5,600

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

48
$6,300

30
$4,200

23
$6,000

9
$5,400

22
$7,400

13
$7,700

1

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

GreenvilleSpartanburg

1

3

3

$5,700
7,700
8,500

$5,700
7,700
8,500

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Office workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean amount of insurance provided14.....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service..............................................
After 5 years of service ............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
If annual earnings are $5,000 .................................
If annual earnings are $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................
If annual earnings are $15,000 ...............................
If annual earnings are $20,000 ...............................
Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance1415....................
Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................

25
$5,500

22
$5,800

23
$5,000

19
$5,100

19
$7,500

1

1

2

2

$4,100
10,900
14,100
15,700

$4,100
10,900
14,100
15,700

$2,200
2,500
7,200
9,100
9,600

$2,200
2,500
7,200
9,100
9,600

29

20

17

11

45

40

$8,300
15,300
22,500
29,500

$7,800
14,100
21,200
27,800

$8,300
16,200
23,600
31,600

$7,200
14,000
20,500
27,200

$8,200
12,900
17,900
23,600

$7,900
12,200
17,100
22,300

39

37

47

41

28

24

42

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

2

2

7

7

5

5

20
$7,100

1

1

21
$6,600

20
$6,000

10
$5,900

(9)

1

1

3

3

-

-

-

-

$3,500
4,200
7,500
9,700
10,200

$3,500
4,200
7,500
9,700
10,200

$7,800
14,500
19,500
20,800

$7,800
14,500
19,500
20,800

19

14

17

7

22

17

13

8

17

2

21

6

22

11

$9,700 $11,000
18,100 20,100
26,700 30,100
34,200 38,500

$8,100
19,000
31,100
41,600

$5,700
26,100
40,300
51,000

$6,200
14,500
21,000
29,200

$5,300
13,200
19,200
26,400

$6,600
13,400
18,100
22,700

$5,900
11,900
16,000
19,700

$9,600
19,400
28,000
37,100

$7,300
14,800
23,700
30,600

$9,800
19,100
27,700
39,100

$7,800
12,700
21,300
27,800

$8,500
17,600
24,300
31,400

$6,900
14,100
21,900
27,600

37

49

34

57

38

34

30

41

34

50

30

31

26

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

152

1.51

$2

$2

$1

$1

8

8

8

1

3

2

3

1

13

4

5

4

14

8

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




30
$6,100

24
$6,400

(9)

19
$7,600

98

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table B-18. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, all industries, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South— Continued
Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

New Orleans
Item
Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncontributory
plans

All
plans

West

North Central

Cincinnati

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Gaty-HammondEast Chicago

Detroit

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

Saginaw

Kansas City

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

South Bend

St. Louis

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Seattle-Everett

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Office workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided'4 .....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service...............................................
After 5 years of service.............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
If annual earnings are $5,000 ..................................
If annual earnings are $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ................................
If annual earnings are $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 ................................
If annual earnings are $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 ..............................
Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance14 15....................
Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................

32
$8,300

22
$8,000

29
$5,000

2

2

1

-

24
$6,800

22
$6,900

2

22
$4,800

2

1

1

$3,300
8,100
12,200
12,900

$2,600
2,800
4,700
6,400
8,700

$2,600
2,800
4,700
6,400
8,700

16

14

34

33

32

21

5

5

16

11

$11,600 $12,100
16,000 15,400
23,400 22,600
31,400 30,200

$9,200
11,200
13,600
17,100

$9,200
11,100
13,400
16,900

$9,000
16,300
23,300
30,700

$9,600
16,100
23,300
29,800

$9,100
15,700
22,200
29,100

$8,900
15,200
21,500
27,900

$8,700
15,400
21,100
28,600

$7,700
14,100
19,700
26,100

<*)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

$3,300
8,100
12,200
12,900

20
$7,500

19
$7,600

13
$7,000

19
$6,000

17
$6,000

(9)

4

-

-

-

-

$3,400
5,100
11,900
13,100
13,700

15
$4,500

4

$3,400
5,700
12,200
17,400
17,900

16
$4,600

ft

25
$6,200

32
$7,800

23
$7,500

16
$7,700

14
$7,400

ft

ft

18
$6,200

9

4

2

1

$2,300
2,800
6,600
8,200
8,400

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

3

24

16

22

12

$8,400
16,100
23,800
30,300

$7,600
13,300
18,200
23,800

$8,000
15,500
22,700
29,900

$8,200
16,000
24,100
31,500

$7,400
13,000
17,300
21,800

$5,700
10,500
15,300
20,900

47

41

38

34

51

50

55

53

36

30

40

38

79

79

53

37

$1

$2

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

$1

$2

$1

$2

$2

$1

1

1

7

7

7

7

11

10

2

2

4

(”)

O

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




14
$6,800

99

-

-

16

$6,900
11,200
19,300
19,300

-

-

-

12

10

8

$11,600 $12,900
21,200 22,600
31,600 33,700
41,000 43.200

$9,500
14,900
21,900
29,100

$9,500
12,700
19,900
27,200

36

27

70

63

$2

$1

$1

$2

$2

2

8

4

3

3

Table B-19. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast

Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

South
ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Pittsburgh

Corpus Christi

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jacksonville

Jackson

Memphis

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

72
$4,900

69
$4,800

63
$5,800

59
$5,900

49
$8,300

49
$8,300

54
$5,600

49
$5,600

48
$8,500

45
$8,700

56
$5,400

53
$5,500

74
$4,400

48
$4,100

49
$4,300

34
$4,500

79
$8,600

62
$9,200

77
$6,500

61
$7,300

1

1

10

10

5

5

12

2

2

1

-

-

-

-

Production workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided'4 .....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:'4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service..............................................
After 5 years of service ............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:'4
If annual earnings are $5,000 ..................................
If annual earnings are $10,000 ...............................
If annual earnings are $15,000 ...............................
If annual earnings are $20,000 ...............................

-

-

-

-

6

6

12

12

$4,800
5,100
8,000
9,500
9,600

$4,800
5,100
8,000
9,500
9,600

$4,400
4,700
6,300
7,200
7,600

$4,400
4,700
6,300
7,200
7,600

2

-

15

14

11

11

43

43

3

$8,000
11,600
16,600
19,500

$8,600
12,400
17,800
21,000

$9,300
15,100
19,900
24,000

$9,200
15,100
20,000
24,400

$9,000
9,800
12,000
13,700

$9,000
9,800
12,000
13,700

$3,100
6,300
12,900
16,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16
$7,000
19,900
26,900
36,800

-

Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance14 15....................

5

4

15

12

7

7

12

12

35

21

$2

$2

1.41

$1

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................

2

2

4

2

5

5

3

-

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




100

-

$22,400
29,500
-

-

-

6

3

$6,000
13,900
17,400
22,500

12

$6,700
14,700
18,800
23,700

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

16

10

6

$4,500
10,900
14,600
46,000

$6,400
11,400
14,400
27,000

$10,000
11,600
16,400
21,600

4

7

$10,800 $10,800
12,300 12,300
16,600 16,600
20,900 20,900

-

-

11

7

10

7

7

7

10

5

-

-

$2

$1

$1

$1

$1

$1

$2

$1

-

-

3

8

6

3

3

3

3

21

21

-

Table B-19. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued

New Orleans
Item

Cincinnati

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Detroit

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

38
$7,400

51
$4,600

43
$4,200

52
$7,500

49
$7,700

7

7

4

$2,100
3,400
3,600
3,900

$2,100
3,400
3,600
3,900

7

15

14

$8,000 $10,200
15,400 15,000
23,000 18,400
29,100 25,400

$11,500
12,200
18,100
24,100

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Saginaw

Kansas City

4

All
plans

West

North Central

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

All
plans

St. Louis

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

South Bend

Seattle-Everett

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

55
$7,400

82
$7,900

66
$7,600

79
$9,300

79
$9,300

Production workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided14 .....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service...............................................
After 5 years of service ............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:1
4
If annual earnings are $5,000 ..................................
If annual earnings are $10,000 ................................
If annual earnings are $15,000 ................................
If annual earnings are $20,000 ................................

45
$7,200

-

-

-

-

34

Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance1 15....................
4
Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................

-

26
$9,600

18
18
$10,500 $10,500

1

63
$7,400

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22

15

68

73

73

40

34

$11,900 $11,900
12,100 12,100
16,500 16,500
20,000 20,000

$8,900
9,800
10,900
12,800

$8,900
9,800
10,900
12,800

$9,700
11,300
14,900
18,800

$9,600
11,000
15,100
19,500

6

14

13

$1

$1

68

9

23

23

14

11

3

2

7

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

$1

$2

2

2

1

1

3

3

-

35
$5,600

-

17

-

39
$5,500

2

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




20
19
$11,000 $10,900

-•
-

$9,900 $10,400
12,700 11,600
16,700 15,700
21,600 20,300

-

26
$9,600

101

-

-

-

-

-

81

81

$11,100 $11,100
11,500 11,500
16,200 16,200
21,400 21,400

16

9

$11,500 $11,500
12,100 12,100
16,400 16,400
21,500 21,500

16

$12,000
13,600
17,300
22,300

-

20

(9)

-

-

$2

-

-

-

7

3

4

$2

-

7
$8,500
10,400
14,300
20,600

4

-

7
$8,500
10,400
14,300
20,600

9

$1

(9)

7

$2

7

7

Table B-19. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All lull-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
Northeast

Item

Northeast
Pennsylvania

Philadelphia

South
ProvidenceWarwickPawtucket

Pittsburgh

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

36
$6,800

35
$6,700

24
$5,900

23
$6,000

1

1

2

2

All
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

Corpus Christi

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Daytona Beach

GreenvilleSpartanburg

Jacksonville

Jackson

Memphis

Noncon­
tributory
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

20
$7,100

12
$6,800

34
$6,400

15
$6,200

7

All
plans

7

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Office workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided'4 .....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time workers..................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:'4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service..............................................
After 5 years of service ............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................

-

$3,100
3,100
8,200
10,900
10,900

-

$3,100
3,100
8,200
10,900
10,900

14
$8,800

35
$6,700

28
$7,000

11
$5,400

10
$5,500

2

13
$9,200

2

11

11

20
$5,000

44
$7,100

31
$3,300

33
$4,600

14
$5,600

2

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

38

36

18

17

51

50

11

9

$7,500
13,500
20,600
26,800

$7,700
13,900
21,300
27,700

$7,700
14,500
21,000
27,400

$7,600
14,400
20,900
27,200

$9,200
11,900
15,300
19,100

$9,000
11,700
15,100
18,900

$9,400
17,000
27,800
33,200

$9,800
17,500
28,900
34,400

Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance14 15....................

19

16

49

44

35

29

33

30

68

46

$2

$1

$2

$1

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................

3

3

7

7

5

5

4

-

_

-

Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:'4
If annual earnings are $ 5 ,0 0 0 ..................................
If annual earnings are $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................
If annual earnings are $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 ...............................
If annual earnings are $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 ...............................

-

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




20
$5,000

102

4

36

23

15

11

12

11

31

28

26

19

$7,100
16,800
22,500
33,800

$6,000
16,400
22,000
32,400

$5,600
11,800
15,100
18,000

$5,800
12,000
15,900
19,400

$6,900
14,000
21,600
29,000

$7,300
14,900
23,000
31,100

$5,700
10,300
14,300
21,700

$5,900
10,100
13,800
18,400

$8,300
16,300
24,100
30,200

$8,700
15,100
25,300
30,700

4

-

-

-

-

-

36

31

46

43

30

25

35

18

-

-

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

$1

-

-

5

1

12

9

6

2

1

1

40

40

Table B-19. Life insurance plans for full-time workers, manufacturing, January through December 1979—Continued
(All full-time workers = 1 0 0 percent)
South—Continued

New Orleans
Item

Norfolk-Virginia
BeachPortsmouth

Cincinnati

Noncon­
tributory
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Gary-HammondEast Chicago

Detroit

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

24
$3,900

30
$7,400

26
$7,800

3

All
plans

West

North Central

3

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Saginaw

Kansas City

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

South Bend

S t Louis

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

All
plans

Seattle-Everett

Noncon­
tributory
plans

Noncon­
tributory
plans

All
plans

Office workers
All full-time workers are provided the
same flat-sum dollar amount:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided'4 .....................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified length of service:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:'4
After 6 months of service.........................................
After 1 year of service...............................................
After 5 years of service.............................................
After 10 years of service..........................................
After 20 years of service..........................................
Amount of insurance is based on a
schedule which indicates a specified
dollar amount of insurance for a
specified amount of earnings:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................
Mean amount of insurance provided:14
If annual earnings are $5,000 ..................................
If annual earnings are $10,000 .............................
If annual earnings are $15,000 ................................
If annual earnings are $20,000 ................................

20
$8,700

28
$4,300

7
$8,700

7
$9,200

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

52

15

$7,500
15,200
22,600
28,700

$7,800
14,200
19,100
26,300

6

24

12

$8,600 $11,600
13,700 16,900
20,900 25,800
28,400 34,100

16

$7,000
13,100
17,500
22,200

$5,500
10,900
15,400
20,500

14
$5,400

2

$4,400
7,500
21,400
21,900
21,900

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

19
$7,200

12
$7,300

27
18
$10,400 $10,500

8
8
$11,900 $11,900

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

51

51

9

$9,500
11,100
13,300
16,700

$8,800
12,100
15,200
22,200

$8,800
12,100
15,200
22,200

2

9

$9,500
11,100
13,300
16,700

25

1

-

$13,700 $13,700
16,300 16,300
24,100 24,100
33,000 33,000

-

-

-

-

14

10

12

9

$8,500
17,400
25,200
35,200

2

-

-

$8,500
17,200
25,200
35,400

$8,600
14,100
16,600
18,700

$9,500
14,600
15,200
15,700

-

8

8

$11,400 $11,400
18,300 18,300
26,400 26,400
34,900 34,900

26

-

21

52

51

40

38

67

67

36

35

71

70

96

96

63

35

46

40

83

81

$1

$1

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

$1

$2

$2

$2

$2

$1

$2

$1

$1

$2

$2

4

4

2

2

3

2

15

7

1

1

-

-

-

(*)

O

See footnotes at end of B-series tables.




11
$7,500

16
$5,300

3

11
$7,500

-

Amount of insurance is expressed as a
factor of annual earnings:
Percent of all full-time workers...................................
Mean factor of annual earnings used
to calculate amount of insurance'4 15....................
Amount of insurance is based on some
other type of plan:
Percent of all full-time w orkers...................................

14
$9,200

103

-

-

-

-

Footnotes
verted to an equivalent time basis— for example, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week’s pay. Peri­
ods of service were chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect individual provisions for progression. For example,
changes in proportions at 10 years’ service include changes in provisions between 5 and 10 years. Estimates are cu­
mulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for 3 weeks’ pay or more after 10 years includes those eligible for 3 weeks' pay
or more after fewer years of service.
1 Estimates listed after type of benefit include only plans for which the employer pays at least some part of the
2
cost. “ Noncontributory plans” include only those plans for which the employer pays all of the cost. Excluded are legally
required plans such as workers' disability compensation, social security, and railroad retirement.
1 Unduplicated totals of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately. Sick
3
leave plans establish the minimum number of days’ pay that each employee can expect and exclude informal sick
leave allowances determined on an individual basis.
1 The mean amount is computed by multiplying the number of workers provided insurance by the amount of insur­
4
ance provided, totaling the products, and dividing the sum by the number of workers.
1 A factor of annual earnings is the number by which annual earnings are multiplied to determine the amount of
5
insurance provided. For example, a factor of 2 indicates that for annual earnings of $10,000 the amount of insurance
provided is $20,000.

1 Earnings relate to regular average (mean) straight-time salaries that are paid for standard workweeks.
2 Exceptions to the standard industry limitations for transportation, communication, and other public utilities are
shown in footnote 3 to table 1 of appendix A.
3 Regular average (mean) straight-time earnings, excluding premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts.
4 Percent changes reflect 12-month periods ending at various times from January to December 1979.
5 A comparable survey was not conducted in this area in the previous year.
6 Less than 0.05 percent.
7 Pay at regular rate for hours exceeding those worked, a paid lunch period not given first-shift workers, a flat-sum
per shift, and other provisions. Most "other” workers, however, were in establishments which provided one such provi­
sion in combination with a cents or percentage differential for hours actually worked.
8 Hours which a majority of the full-time workers were expected to work, whether paid at straight-time or overtime
rates. Not all provisions for days worked are shown under scheduled hours.
9 Less than 0.5 percent.
,0 Includes basic plans only. Excludes plans such as vacation bonus, vacation-savings, and those plans which offer
"extended" or "sabbatical" benefits beyond basic plans to workers with qualifying lengths of service. Such provisions
are typical in the steel, aluminum, and can industries.
" Includes payments other than “ length of time,” such as percentage of annual earnings or flat-sum payments, con­




NOTE: Dashes indicate that no data were reported or that data do not meet publication criteria.

104

Appendix A.
Scope and Method of Surveys

Data on area wages and related benefits are obtained by personal visits of
Bureau field representatives at 3-year intervals. In each o f the intervening
years, information on employment and occupational earnings is collected by a
combination o f personal visit, mail questionnaire, and telephone interview
from establishments participating in the previous survey.
In each of the 70 areas currently surveyed, data are obtained from represen­
tative establishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing;
transportation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Industry divi­
sions excluded from these studies are agriculture, mining, construction, and
government. The exclusion o f government has a significant effect on the
public utilities division, because municipally operated utilities are excluded,
although privately operated utilities are n ot.1
Within each o f the six major industry divisions, establishments having fewer
than 50 workers are omitted because of insufficient employment in the occupa­
tions studied. In the 13 largest areas, the minimum establishment size for in­
clusion in the survey is 100 employees in manufacturing, public utilities, and
retail trade. These areas are Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas—Fort Worth,
Detroit, Los Angeles—Long Beach, Newark, New York, Philadelphia,
Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco—Oakland, and Washington.

The 70-area sample is based on the selection o f one area from a stratum of
similar areas. The criteria o f stratification are size o f area, region, and type of
industrial activity. Thirty-three o f the areas represent themselves in the sam­
ple, either because of population size or the unusual nature of their industrial
composition. Each of the 37 other areas represents itself and one or more
similar areas. For estimates o f all areas combined, data from each area are
weighted by the ratio o f the total nonagricultural employment in the stratum
to that in the sample area.
The establishment sampling procedures involve detailed stratification o f all
establishments within the scope o f an individual area survey by industry and
number of employees. From this stratified universe a probability sample is
selected, with each establishment having a predetermined chance of selection.
To obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion o f large
than small establishments is selected. When data are combined, each establish­
ment is weighted according to its probability o f selection, so that unbiased
estimates are generated. For example, if 1 out o f 4 establishments is selected, it
is given a weight of 4 to represent itself plus three others. An alternate of the
same original probability is chosen in the same industry-size classification if
data are not available from the original sample member. If no suitable
substitute is available, additional weight is assigned to a sample member that is
similar to the missing unit.
In the 70 areas studied in 1979, about 11,700 establishments, employing 9.3
million workers, were selected by the Bureau to represent 63,900
establishments, employing about 18.4 million workers within the scope of the
studies.

Sampling methods
The sampling plan can be described as a two-stage design consisting of an

area sample and an establishment sample. The area sample of 70 areas is
designed to permit presentation o f data for all SMSA’s of the United States; the
establishment sample is designed to present data for individual areas. As in­
dicated earlier, this bulletin is concerned primarily with data for individual
areas; limited data on national and regional earnings for 1979 are available in
Summary 80-10.

Occupations and earnings
Occupations selected for study are common to a variety o f manufacturing
and nonm^nufacturing industries, and are o f the following types: (1) Office
clerical; (2) professional and technical; (3) maintenance, toolroom, and
powerplant; and (4) material movement and custodial. Occupational
classification is based on a uniform set o f job descriptions designed to take ac-

See footnote 3, table 1 of appendix A, for areas in which public utilities are municipally
operated and have been excluded.



105

count o f interestablishment variation in duties within the same job. Occupa­
tions selected for study are listed and described in appendix B. Tlje earnings
data for each area, in tables A -l through A -l 1, may not be presented for an in­
dustry division, or for some o f the occupations listed and decribed, because
either (1) data were insufficient to provide meaningful statistical results, or (2)
there is possibility o f disclosure o f individual establishment data. Earnings
not shown separately for industry divisions are included in data for all in­
dustries combined. Likewise, for occupations with more than one level, data
are included in the overall classification when a subclassification is not shown
or information to subclassify is not available.
Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for full-time
workers, i.e., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule. Earnings data ex­
clude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late
shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living allowances and
incentive bonuses are included. Weekly hours for office clerical and profes­
sional and technical occupations refer to the standard workweek (rounded to
the nearest half hour) for which employees receive regular straight-time
salaries (exclusive o f pay for overtime at regular and/or premium rates).
Average weekly earnings for these occupations are rounded to the nearest half
dollar.
Average earnings reflect composite, areawide estimates. Since industries and
establishments differ in pay level and occupational staffing, thereby con­
tributing differently to the estimates for each occupation, pay averages may
fail to reflect accurately the wage differential among occupations in individual
establishments.
These surveys measure the level o f occupational earnings in an area at a par­
ticular time. Comparisons o f individual occupational averages over time may
not reflect expected wage changes. The averages for individual jobs are af­
fected by changes in wages and employment patterns. For example, propor­
tions o f workers employed by high- or low-wage firms may change, or highwage workers may advance to better jobs and be replaced by new workers at
lower rates. Such shifts in employment could decrease an occupational average
even though most establishments in an area increase wages during the year.
Changes in earnings o f occupational groups, shown in table A-12, are better
indicators o f wage trends than are earnings changes for individual jobs within
the groups.

shifts among establishments and turnover o f establishments included in survey
samples. The percent increases, however, are still affected by factors other
than wage increases. Hirings, layoffs, and turnover may affect an establish­
ment average for an occupation when workers are paid under plans providing
a range o f wage rates for individual jobs. In periods o f increased hiring, for ex­
ample, new employees may enter at the bottom o f the range, depressing the
average without a change in wage rates.
The percent changes relate to wage changes for a 12-month period. When
the time span between surveys is other than 12 months, annual rates are
shown. (It is assumed that wages increase at a constant rate between surveys.)
Occupations used to compute wage trends are:

Office clerical
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Typists, classes A and B
File clerks, classes A, B, and C
Messengers
Switchboard operators
Order clerks, classes A and B
Accounting clerks, classes
A and B
Payroll clerks
Key entry operators, classes
A and B

Industrial nurses
Registered industrial nurses

Skilled maintenance
Carpenters
Electricians
Painters
Machinists
Mechanics (machinery)
Mechanics (motor vehicles)
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers

Electronic data processing
Computer systems analysts,
classes A, B, and C
Computer programmers, classes
A, B, and C

Unskilled plant
Janitors, porfers, and
cleaners
Material handling laborers

Percent changes for individual areas in the program are computed as follows:
1. Average earnings are computed for each occupation for the 2 years
being compared. The averages are derived from earnings in those
establishments which are in the survey both years; it is assumed that
employment remains unchanged.
2. Each occupation is assigned a weight based on its proportionate
employment in the occupational group in the base year.

Wage trends for selected occupational groups
The percent increases presented in table A-12 are based on changes in
average hourly earnings o f men and women in establishments reporting the
trend jobs in both the current and previous year (matched establishments). The
data are adjusted to remove the effects on average earnings o f employment



Computer operators, classes
A, B, and C

106

justments are made for differences in payroll periods. It is assumed that the
wage level for all metropolitan areas combined increased uniformly during the
12 months from July 1978 to July 1979, and that this increase continued to
December 1979. Thus, by adding the appropriate number o f monthly wage in­
crements to the July 1978 pay level, the nationwide pay level is estimated for
the month between January and December 1979 in which an individual area
was studied. For example, an area study having a payroll reference month of
February 1979 is compared with the nationwide pay level as o f July 1978, plus
seven-twelfths o f the annual nationwide wage increase.

3. These weights are used to compute group averages. Each occupation’s
average earnings (computed in step l)are multiplied by its weight. The
products are totaled to obtain a group average.
4. The ratio o f group averages for 2 consecutive years is computed by
dividing the average for the current year by the average for the earlier
year. The result—expressed as a percent and less 100—is the percent
change.
For a more detailed description of the method used to compute these wage
trends, see “ Improving Area Wage Survey Indexes,” M onthly Labor Review,
January 1973, pp. 52-57.

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
The B-series tables provide information on the incidence o f selected
practices and supplementary wage provisions for production and related
workers (referred to as “ production workers” ) and office workers. Produc­
tion workers include nonsupervisory workers and working supervisors engag­
ed in non-office functions. (Cafeteria workers and sales route workers are ex­
cluded in manufacturing industries, but included in nonmanufacturing in­
dustries.) Office workers include nonsupervisory workers and working super­
visors performing clerical or related functions. Lead workers and trainees are
included among nonsupervisory workers. Administrative, executive, profes­
sional, and part-time employees as well as construction workers utilized as
separate work forces are excluded from both the production and office worker
categories.

Wage differences among metropolitan areas
Pay relatives presented in table A -13 express average earnings for an oc­
cupational group in an area as a percent of average earnings for the same
group in all Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas combined. The occupa­
tional groups are the same as those for which wage trends are computed except
that no pay relatives are computed for (1) industrial nurses or (2) skilled
maintenance workers in nonmanufacturing (where only about 20 percent of
such workers are employed). In addition, computer operators were not used in
computing pay relatives for the electronic data processing group.
The following procedure, which eliminates interarea differences in occupa­
tional compositions as a factor in pay levels, is used to construct pay relatives.
1. Each occupation is assigned a weight based on its proportionate con­
tribution to all-industry employment in its occupational group in
all metropolitan areas combined. Weights for the unskilled plant
group,for example, are 68 percent for janitors and 32 percent for
material handling laborers.
2. Average earnings for each occupation are multiplied by the corre­
sponding occupational weights, and the products are totaled to pro­
duce group averages for each area and the Nation. All-industry
occupational weights also are used to compute manufacturing and
nonmanufacturing group averages.
3. Area pay relatives are obtained by dividing the group averages for
the area by the corresponding national average. The national pay
relative equals 100. Thus, a pay relative of 80 indicates that an area’s
pay level is 80 percent o f the nationwide pay level, or 20 percent below
the national level.

Shift differentials— manufacturing (table B-l). Data are presented on practices
o f manufacturing establishments regarding pay differentials for production
workers on late shifts. When establishments have several differentials which
vary by job, the differential applying to the majority o f the production
workers is recorded. When establishments have differentials which apply only
to certain hours of work, the differential applying to the majority o f the shift
hours is recorded. Art establishment’s differentials are weighted by production
workers employed on the specified shift at the time o f the survey.
For purposes of this study, a late shift is either a second (evening) shift
which ends at or near midnight or a third (night) shift which starts at or near
midnight.

Scheduled weekly hours; paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance,
and pension plans. Provisions which apply to a majority o f the production or
office workers in an establishment are considered to apply to all production or
office workers in the establishment; a practice or provision is considered
nonexistent when it applies to less than a majority. Holidays; vacations; and

Since the Bureau collects data for individual areas at different times
throughout the calendar year, with an average month of reference o f July, ad­



107

health, insurance, and pension plans are considered applicable to employees
currently eligible for the benefits as well as to employees who will eventually
become eligible.

ticipate in it because they are required to bear part o f its cost (provided the
choice to participate is available or will eventually become available to a ma­
jority). Legally required plans such as social security, railroad retirement,
workers’ disability compensation, and temporary disability insurance2 are
excluded.
Life insurance includes formal plans providing indemnity (usually through
an insurance policy) in case of death o f the covered worker. Information is
also provided in tables B-18 and B-19 on types o f life insurance plans and the
amount o f coverage in all industries combined and in manufacturing.
Accidential death and dismemberment is limited to plans which provide
benefit payments in case o f death or loss o f limb or sight as a direct result o f an
accident.
Sickness and accident insurance includes only those plans which provide
that predetermined cash payments be made directly to employees who lose
time from work because of illness or injury, e.g., $50 a week for up to 26
weeks of disability.
Sick leave plans are limited to formal plans3 which provide for continuing
an employee’s pay during absence from work because o f illness. Data collected
distinguish between (1) plans which provide full pay with no waiting period,
and (2) plans which either provide partial pay or require a waiting period.
Long-term disability insurance plans provide payments to totally disabled
employees upon the expiration o f their paid sick leave and/or sickness and ac­
cident insurance, or after a predetermined period o f disability (typically 6

Scheduled weekly hours and days (tables B-2 through B-5). Scheduled weekly
hours and days refer to the number o f hours and days per week which full-time
first (day) shift workers are expected to work, whether paid for at straight-time
or overtime rates.
Paid holidays (tables B-6 through B-9). Holidays are included only if they are
granted annually on a formal basis (provided for in written form or established
by custom). They are included even though in a particular year they fall on a
nonworkday and employees are not granted another day off. Employees may
either be paid for the time o ff or may receive premium pay in lieu o f time off.
Data are tabulated to show the percent o f workers by total paid holiday time
provided (half days included) and the average number o f paid holidays granted
annually.
Paid vacations (tables B-10 through B-13). Establishments report their method
o f calculating vacation pay (time basis, percent of annual earnings, flat-sum
payment, etc.) and the amount o f vacation pay granted. Only basic formal
plans are reported. Vacation bonuses, vacation-savings plans, and “ extended”
or “ sabbatical” benefits beyond basic plans are excluded.
For tabulating vacation pay granted, all provisions are expressed on a time
basis. Vacation pay calculated on other than time basis is converted to its
equivalent time period. Two percent of annual earnings, for example, is
tabulated as 1 week’s vacation pay.
Also, provisions after each specified length o f service are related to all pro­
duction or office workers in an establishment regardless o f length o f service.
Vacation plans commonly provide for larger amounts of vacation pay as
service lengthens. Counts o f production or office workers by length o f service
were not obtained. The tabulations o f vacation pay granted presents,
therefore, statistical measures o f these provisions rather than proportions of
workers actually receiving specific benefits.

Health, insurance, and pension plans (tables B-14 through B-19). Health, in­

2 Temporary disability insurance which provides benefits to covered workers disabled by in­
jury or illness which is not work-connected is mandatory under State laws in California, New
Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. Establishment plans which meet only the legal requirements
are excluded from these data, but those under which (1) employers contribute more than is legally
required, or (2) benefits exceed those specified in the State law are included. In Rhode Island,
benefits are paid out of a State fund to which only employees contribute. In each of the other three
States, benefits are paid either from a State fund or through a private plan:
State fund financing: In California, only employees contribute to the State fund; In New Jersey,
employees and employers contribute; in New York, employees contribute up to a specified
maximum and employers pay the difference between the employees’ share and the total con­
tribution required.
Private plan financing: In California and New Jersey, employers cannot be required to con­
tribute more than they would if they were covered by the State fund; in New York, employees
can agree to contribute more if the State rules that the additional contribution is commensurate
with the benefit provided.

surance, and pension plans include plans for which the employer pays either all
or part of the cost. The cost may be (1) underwritten by a commercial in­
surance company or nonprofit organization, (2) covered by a union fund to
which the employer has contributed, or (3) borne directly by the employer out
o f operating funds or a fund set aside to cover the cost. A plan is included even
though a majority o f the employees in an establishment do not choose to par­

Federal legislation (Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act) provides temporary disability in­
surance benefits to railroad workers for illness or injury, whether work-connected or not. The
legislation requires that employers bear the entire cost of the insurance.
3 An establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it specifies at least the minimun
number of days of sick leave available to each employee. Such a plan need not be written, but in­
formal sick leave allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




108

months). Payments are made until the end of the disability, a maximum age,
or eligibility for retirement benefits. Full or partial payments are almost
always reduced by social security, workers’ disability compensation, and
private pension benefits payable to the disabled employee.
Hospitalization, surgical, and medical insurance plans reported in these
surveys provide full or partial payment for basic services rendered.
Hospitalization insurance covers hospital room and board and may cover
other hospital expenses. Surgical insurance covers surgeons’ fees. Medical in­
surance covers doctors’ fees for home, office, or hospital calls. Plans restricted
to post-operative medical care or a doctor’s care for minor ailments at a
worker’s place o f employment are not considered to be medical insurance.
Major medical insurance coverage applies to services which go beyond the
basic services covered under hospitalization, surgical, and medical insurance.
Major medical insurance typically (1) requires that a “ deductible” (e.g., $100)
be met before benefits begin, (2) has a coinsurance feature that requires the in­
sured to pay a portion (e.g., 20 percent) of certain expenses, and (3) has a
specified dollar maximum o f benefits (e.g., $10,000 a year).




Dental insurance plans provide normal dental service benefits, usually for
fillings, extractions, and X-rays. Plans which provide benefits for only oral
surgery or repairing accident damage are not reported.
Retirement pension plans provide for regular payments to the retiree for
life. Included are deferred profit-sharing plans which provide the option of
purchasing a lifetime annuity.

Labor-management agreement coverage. An establishment is considered to
have a contract covering all production or office workers if a majority of such
workers is covered by a labor-management agreement. Therefore, all other
production or office workers are employed in establishments that either do not
have labor-management contracts in effect, or have contracts that apply to
fewer than half o f their production or office workers. Estimates are not
necessarily representative of the extent to which all workers in the area may be
covered by the provisions o f labor-management agreements, because small
establishments are excluded and the industrial scope o f the survey is limited.

109

Appendix table 1. Number of workers within scope of surveys in 70 metropolitan areas, January 1979-December 1979
N um ber o f w orkers in establishments w ith in scope o f studies2 (in thousands)
A ll industries
M e tro p o lita n
area1

Payroll
period

M in im u m
establish­
m ent size

M anufacturing

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g
To ta l

Tota l

Pro­
d u c tio n

O ffic e

Tota l

114.1
4 88.8
241.3
184.4
290.1
354.7
1,404.3
99.8
80.7
718.5
388.5
32.1
35.5

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
66.0
—
354.2
220.2
—
—

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
11.4
—
138.1
59.7
—
—

57.1
205.9
134.8
82.6
111.7
168.4
357.4
58.8
48.5
350.9
195.1
14.4
27.4

P ro­
d u c tio n

P ublic u tilitie s 3

O ffice

T o ta l

Pro­
d u ctio n

O ffice

57.0
282.9
106.5
101.9
178.4
186.3
1,046.9
4 1.0
3 2.2
367.6
193.4
17.8
8.1

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
18.8
—
128.8
86.2
—
—

_

—
—
—
—
4 7.2
—
225.4
134.0
—
—

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
4.4
—
47.2
24.5
—
—

—
—
—
—
—
—
7.0
—
90.9
35.3
—
—

82.6
—
—

9.5
—
—

18.8
—
—

13.3
—
—

-

-

58.5
24.6
28.0
19.2

Wholesale Retail
Finance4 Services5
trade
trade

Total

Pro­
d u c tio n

O ffic e

11.5
44.9
22.4
10.0
26.3
4 3.0
197.9
8.0
4 .5
64.7
39.3
3.3
1.6

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
4 .5
—
3 4.5
19.3
—
—

_
—
—
—
—
—
—
1.4
—
12.3
6.4
—
—

5.7
21.7
8.9
8.2
20.7
22.3
101.0
3.6
3 .8
4 0 .2
16.7
1.9
.5

19.8
71.4
4 2.6
25.4
65.6
35.2
158.6
17.4
13.0
100.9
6 5.7
6.4
3.9

9.3
69.1
13.8
4 5.0
27.4
44.7
3 28 .2
5.7
5.8
80.5
26.9
4.5
.8

10.7
7 5.9
18.7
13.3
38.3
41.1
261.1
6.3
5.2
8 1.3
4 4 .9
1.8
1.3

8.9
3.7
4.5
4.6

4.3
—
—

1.2
—
—

-

-

6.4
1.8
3.7
1.8

21.2
5.9
11.4
8.4

14.9
3.9
6.1
2.0

7.1
9 .2
2.4
2.3

N ortheast
A lb a n y —Schnectady— ro y , N.V.6 ..
T
Boston, Mass.6 ....................................
B u ffa lo , N .Y .6 ....................................
H a rtfo rd , C on n .6 ................................
Nassau—S u ffo lk , N .Y .6 ....................
N ew ark, N .J.6 ....................................
New Y o rk , N .Y .- N .J .6 . .................
N ortheast P e n n s y lv a n ia ....................
Paterson—C lifto n —Passaic, N .J.6 . .
Philadelphia, Pa.—N .J..........................
P ittsb u rg h, Pa.........................................
P o rtlan d , M aine6 .................................
Poughkeepsie, N .Y .6 ..........................
Providence—W a rw ick—Paw tucket,
R .I.—Mass.........................................
T re n to n , N .J.6 ....................................
W orcester, Mass.6 .............................
Y o rk , Pa.6 .............................................

_
—

Sept.
Aug.
O ct.
Mar.
June
Jan.
May
Aug.
June
Nov.
Jan.
Dec.
June

50
<7 >
50
50
50
(7 )
(7 )
50
50
(7 )
(7 )
50
50

June
Sept.
A p r.
Feb.

50
50
50
50

169.0
54.3
65.2
76.7

101.3
—
—
-

22.9
—
—
-

110.5
29.7
37.1
57.6

May
Aug.
Sept.
Ju ly
Dec.
Aug.
Sept.

50
50
50
50
<7 >
50
50

355.8
350.2
74.5
31.3
580.7
21.7
9.4

_
—
—
18.5
—
12.4
—

_
—
—
3.6
—
2.8
—

99.5
149.4
49.1
11.1
229.6
5.6
2.7

_
—
—
7.9
—
3.5
—

_
—
—
.6
—
.5
—

256.3
200.8
25.4
20.2
351 .0
16.0
6.7

_
—
—
10.5
—
8.9
—

_
—
—
3.0
—
2.2
—

64.7
32.7
4.7
4.4
65.3
1.5
.9

_
—
—
2.6
—
1.0
—

_
—
—
.7
—
.3
—

3 3.0
21.6
2.7
.9
4 4.2
.2
.1

8 1.6
73.2
8.7
9.0
114.9
8.9
3.3

33.7
32.1
5.6
1.7
60.4
1.8
1.2

43.4
4 1.3
3.6
4 .2
6 6.2
3.6
1.2

Aug.
June
A p r.
Feb.
Jan.
Dec.
Nov.
Nov.
O ct.
Jan

50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50
50

195.7
132.3
533.7
37.7
46.4
109.7
173.9
138.4
271.6
183.7

—
94.1
—
—
26.6
59.3
—
82.8
—
99.3

—
12.8
—
—
8.4
23.6
—
19.0
—
29.3

130.1
95.6
169.3
24.5
16.3
26.9
97.8
52.3
61.5
43.0

—
76.3
—
—
12.6
20.1
—
38.7
—
31.6

—
7.4
—
—
1.2
2.1
—
4.5
—
4.2

65.6
36.7
364.4
13.3
30.1
82.7
76.1
86.1
210.1
140.8

—
17.8
—
—
14.1
39.2
—
44.1
—
67.7

—
5.4
—
—
7.2
21.5
—
14.5
—
25.0

14.3
6.5
64.8
.8
6.3
16.3
17.4
18.1
51.5
31.8

—
3.4
—
—
2.9
7.5
—
9.9
—
13.4

—
1.1
—
—
1.4
3.7
—
2.3
—
6.5

6.9
4 .6
6 3.5
.2
3 .0
6.1
10.0
10.4
19.2
14.8

26.3
16.5
115.9
4.6
9.6
29.9
28.9
33.1
65.3
4 7.2

9.3
3.4
4 5.6
1.1
6.1
18.2
11.9
9.3
23.6
18.3

8.8
5.7
74.5
6 .5
5.2
12.3
7.9
15.2
5 0.5
28.7

May
Aug.
June
May
Mar.

50
50
50
50
<7 )

78.7
114.7
126.9
118.0
390.7

41.6
—
—
—

12.5
—
—
—

23.2
35.1
51.4
33.1
29.1

17.4

1.4
—
—
—
-

55.5
79.6
75.5
84.9
361.6

24.2
—
—
—

11.1
—
—
—

8.2
16.3
13.3
12.0
48.4

3.6
—
—
—

1.8
—
—
—
-

4 .8
6.4
8.1
7.5
21.1

24.9
35.1
31.9
39.6
122.5

7.3
11.8
15.8
12.4
4 6.5

10.3
10.0
6 .4
13.4
123.1

-

-

South
A tla n ta , Ga.6 .......................................
B a ltim o re , M d.6 ................................
C hattanooga, T e n n .—Ga.6 ................
Corpus C h risti, T e x ..............................
Dallas—F o rt W o rth —T e x .6 .............
D aytona Beach, F la ..............................
Gainesville, Fla.6 ................................
Greensboro—W inston-Salem —
H igh P o in t, N.C 6 .......................
G reensville—Spartanburg, S.C. . . .
H ouston, T e x .6 ....................................
H un tsville , A la .6 ................................
Jackson, Miss..........................................
Jacksonville, F la ....................................
L ou isville , K y .—In d .6 .......................
M em phis, T e n n .—A r.—Miss................
M iam i, F I.6 ..........................................
New Orleans, La....................................
N o rfo lk —V irgin ia Beach—
P o rtsm o u th , V a .—N .C ...................
O klahom a C ity , O kla .6 ...................
R ich m o n d , V a .6 ................................
San A n to n io , T e x .6 ..........................
W ashington, D .C .—M d.—V a .6 . . . .

-

-

—

—
—
-

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




110

-

-

-

Appendix table 1. Continued—
Number of workers within scope of surveys in 70 metropolitan areas, January 1979-December 1979
N um ber o f w orkers in establishm ents w ith in scope o f studies2 (in thousands)
A ll industries
M e tro p o lita n
area1
2

Payroll
period

M anufacturing

Pro­
d uctio n

O ffic e

Tota l

Pro­
d u c tio n

establish­
m ent size

N on m a n ufacturin g
Tota l

Total

O ffice

Tota l

Pro­
d u c tio n

P ublic u tilitie s 3
O ffice

T o ta l

Pro­
d u c tio n

O ffice

Wholesale Retail
Finance4 Services5
trade
trade

N o rth C entral
Chicago, III.6 ........................................
C in c in n a ti, O h io —K y .—In d ................
C leveland, O h io 6 .................................
C olum bus, O h io 6 .................................
D a ve n p ort—R ock Island—
M o lin e , Io w a —III.6 .......................
D ayton , O h io 6 ....................................
D e tro it, M ic h ..........................................
G a ry—H am m o n d —East
C hicago, In d .....................................
Green Bay, W is.6 .................................
In d ianapolis, In d .6 ..............................
Kansas C ity , M o .—Kans.......................
M ilw aukee, Wis.6 .................................
M inn e a po lis—St. Paul, M in n .—
W is.6 .................................................
Omaha, N eb r.—Io w a 6 .......................
Saginaw, M ic h ........................................
St. Louis, M o .—I l l .................................
S outh Bend, In d ....................................
T o led o , O h io —M ic h .6 .......................
W ic h ita , Kans.6 ....................................

May
July
Sept.
O ct.

(7 )
50
<7 >
50

1,407.2
284.6
388.0
207.6

154.9
—
—

45.4
—
—

602.2
147.7
202.3
83.2

97.7
—
—

20.4
—
—

805.0
136.9
185.7
124.3

57.2
—
—

25.0
—
—

148.5
27.9
3 2.5
17.4

10.2
—
—

6.2
—
—

99.3
13.8
26.9
12.0

279.5
53.9
62.9
49.6

140.2
18.0
28.9
22.3

137.5
23.3
34.5
23.0

Feb.
Dec.
Mar.

50
50
<7 >

69.8
146.9
815.4

—
455.2

—
138.7

47.4
85.1
466.5

—
317.1

—
56.6

22.4
61.8
348.9

—
138.1

—
82.2

5.2
9.2
63.9

—
25.8

—
14.8

2.9
5.4
44.5

8.6
30.7
120.7

2.7
5.8
56.0

2.9
10.6
63.9

Oct.
Ju ly
Oct.
Sept.
A p r.

50
50
50
50
50

140.4
30.3
253.3
287.2
315.4

95.9
—
—
135.7
—

14.9
—
—
52.7
—

102.0
15.8
114.8
107.4
188.4

79.2
—
—
74.3
—

9.2
—
—
13.5
—

38.3
14.5
138.4
179.8
126.9

16.7
—
—
61.5
—

5.7
—
—
39.2
—

9.6
4.2
24.6
44.0
23.2

5.2
—
—
20.1
—

1.3
—
—
8.8
—

1.5
1.4
11.8
21.5
12.4

17.6
6.0
59.4
62.1
54.9

5.0
.9
26.6
28.3
19.9

4 .6
2.0
16.1
24.0
18.6

Jan.
Oct.
Nov.
Mar.
Aug.
May
A p r.

50
50
50
<7 )
50
50
50

498.9
104.2
48.4
427.2
44.8
132.8
87.6

—
31.1
222.7
25.6
—
-

—
5.3
73.6
6.1
—
-

208.9
30.0
34.3
214.7
26.5
75.7
55.3

—
25.7
138.9
17.6
—

—
2.5
27.7
3.2
—

—
5.4
83.9
8.0
—

—
2.7
45.9
2.9
—

—
1.2
9.0
.7
—

-

53.4
18.2
3.4
49.2
3.2
14.9
5.6

—
1.4
23.3
1.6
—

-

290.0
74.3
14.1
212.5
18.3
57.1
32.3

35.9
7.9
.7
26.4
1.9
6.9
2.8

110.7
22.8
6.5
68.9
8.6
23.4
15.8

4 2.9
15.0
1.7
3 2.2
2.6
5.2
3.8

47.0
10.4
1.7
35.8
2.0
6.8
4.4

O ct.
Ju ly
Dec.
June
O ct.
May
Dec.
Nov.
Nov.
Mar.
Mar.
Dec.

50
50
50
50
(7 )
50
50
50
50
<7 )
50
50

328.3
9.0
284.6
44.1
1,523.8
206.7
85.9
131.4
203.2
450.5
285.8
367.8

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—
—
—
—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

13.2
.9
23.0
4.1
105.7
18.3
3.4
9.6
5.9
25.9
10.1
23.5

91.5
2.7
65.9
11.8
317 .0
39.6
33.1
39.0
61.7
88.6
41.3
67.4

3 0.2
.6
28.4
4 .2
141.7
23.5
8.4
10.0
22.3
6 8.8
11.6
32.7

31.6
.7
27.5
3.4
200.6
15.5
9.8
11.9
26.4
63.7
32.5
34.9

-

-

—
—
—
—
—

—
—

—

—

—
—
—
—
101.2

—
—
—
—
45.5

-

-

—
—
—
—

—
—
—

West
A n a h e im —Santa A n a —Garden
G rove, C a lif.6 .................................
B illing s, M o n .6 ....................................
D enver—B o u ld e r, C o lo .6 .................
Fresno, C a lif.6 ....................................
Los A n g e le s -L o n g Beach, C a lif.6 . .
P o rtlan d , Oreg.—Wash.6 ....................
S acram ento, C a lif.6 ..........................
Salt Lake C ity —Ogden, U ta h 6 . . .
San Diego, C a lif.6 ..............................
San Francisco—O akland, C a lif.6 . .
San Jose, C a lif.6 .................................
S eattle—E verett, Wash.........................

—
—
—
—
181.3

—
—
—
—
74.0

144.8
2.5
93.4
15.0
600.5
89.3
18.3
41.1
66.8
116.7
177.4
151.1

—
—
—
—
80.1

—
—
—
—
28.5

1 Consists o f Standard M e tro p o lita n S tatistical Areas (SMSA's) as d efined by th e O ffic e o f
Management and Budget th ro u g h February 1974.
2 To ta ls inclu d e executive, professional, p a rt-tim e , and o th e r w orkers excluded fro m the
separate p ro d u c tio n and o ffic e categories. Numbers o f p ro d u ctio n and o ffic e w orkers n o t avail­
able fo r wholesale tra d e ; re ta il tra d e ; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services in all areas;
and fo r p u b lic u tilitie s in G ainesville and H un tsville . The estimates shown in th is ta b le provide a
reasonably accurate d e scrip tio n o f th e size and co m p o sitio n o f th e labor fo rce included in the
survey. The estimates are n o t in te n d e d , however, to serve as a basis of com parison w ith other
e m p lo ym e n t indexes fo r th e area to measure e m plo ym e nt trends o r levels since (1) planning o f
wage surveys requires th e use o f establishm ent data com piled considerably in advance o f the
p a y ro ll p e rio d stu d ie d , and (2) small establishments are excluded fro m th e scope o f th e survey.
■^Transportation, c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s . Excludes taxicabs and services
incidental to w a te r tra n s p o rta tio n . M u n ic ip a lly operated establishments are excluded by d e fin i­
tio n fro m th e scope o f th e s tu d y . A ll o r m ajor loca l-tra n sit systems were m u n ic ip a lly operated
in A lb a n y —S chenectady—T ro y , A tla n ta , B a ltim o re , Boston, B u ffa lo , C hattanooga, Chicago,
C in c in n a ti, C leveland, C olum bus, C orpus C hristi, Dallas—F o rt W orth, D a v e n p ort—R ock Island—
M o lin e , D a y to n , D e tro it, G ainesville, Green Bay, G reensboro—W inston-Salem —High Point,
In d ianapolis, Ja cksonville, Kansas C ity , Los Angeles—Long Beach, Mem phis, M iam i, M ilw aukee,
N ew Y o rk , O kla ho m a C ity , Omaha, Philadelphia, P ittsburgh, Portland (O reg.—Wash.),




183.5
6.5
191.2
29.0
923.3
117.4
67.6
90.3
136.4
333.8
108.4
216.7

—

—
—

17.0
1.6
4 6.4
5.6
127.8
20.5
12.8
19.7
20.1
86.9
12.8
58.3

—

—

—

—

—

—
—
—
—
29.7

—
—
—
—
11.0

Sacram ento, Saginaw, San A n to n io , San Diego, San Francisco—O akland, Seattle—E verett, South
Bend, T o led o , W ashington, and W ichita. M u n ic ip a lly operated e lectric u tility systems were also
excluded in C hattanooga, Cleveland, Gainesville, Greensboro—W inston-Salem —High P oint,
Jacksonville, Los Angeles—Long Beach, and Seattle—Everett. B oth th e ele ctric and gas systems
were m u n ic ip a lly operated in H un tsville , Memphis, Omaha, and San A n to n io . Gas systems
were m u n ic ip a lly operated in In dianapolis and R ich m o nd .
4 Finance, insurance, and real estate. W orkers fro m th e entire division are represented in the
A tables. P ro du ctio n w orkers in finance and insurance are n o t included in estimates fo r p roduc­
tio n w orkers in th e B tables. Data fo r p ro d u c tio n w orkers in real estate, however, are included
in "a ll in d u s trie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g " estimates.
5 Hotels and m otels; laundries and o th e r personal services; business services; a uto m ob ile
repair, rental, and p arking; m o tio n pictures; n o n p ro fit m em bership organizations (excluding
religious and charita b le o rganizations); and engineering and archite ctura l services.
^S urvey lim ite d to occupational earnings; dashes ind ica te separate p ro d u c tio n and o ffice
e m p lo ym e n t to ta ls were n o t com piled.
7 M in im u m establishm ent size was 50 w orkers in the wholesale trade, finance, and service
in d u s try groups; and 100 w orkers in th e m anufacturin g, p u b lic u tilitie s , and retail trade groups.
N O TE : The 1972 e d itio n o f th e S tandard In d u s tria l C lassification M anual was used to
classify establishm ents b y in d u s try d ivision.

111

Appendix table 2. Employment within scope of surveys1 by major manufacturing activity, January 1977 through December 1979
M a n u fa c tu rin g
e m p lo y m e n t
as p erce n t o f
e m p lo y m e n t
w ith in scope
o f surveys

M e tro p o lita n
area

SIC codes1 o f m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s try groups by
2
p e rce n t o f all m a n u fa c tu rin g e m p lo y m e n t
10
and
under
20
p e rce n t

20
30
and
and
under
und e r
30
40
p erce n t p erce n t

40
and
und e r
50
p erce n t

.

H a r t f o r d .........................................
Nassau—S u ffo lk ........................
N ew ark .........................................
. . . .

P h ila d e lp h ia ..................................
P itts b u r g h .....................................
P o r t la n d .........................................
P o u g h k e e p s ie ..............................
P rovidence—W a rw ic k —
P a w tu cke t ..............................

—

50
39
58
42
38
47
25
57

3 7 ,3 8
33
3 4 ,3 7
3 6 ,3 8
3 5 ,3 6
2 0 ,2 3 ,2 7 ,2 8
36

61
47
52
41
76

2 2 ,2 3 ,2 8 ,3 6
3 5 ,3 6
36
2 0 ,2 6 ,3 4 ,3 7
—

67
57
57
71

36
2 7 ,2 8 ,3 4 ,3 5
32

36
37
37
28

_

23

_

_
_
_

35
_

_
_

35
—
—
_
—

—
—
—
_
—

—
—
—

R ic h m o n d .....................................

10
and
u nd e r
20
p erce n t

30
20
and
and
under
under
40
30
p e rc e n t p e rce n t

40
and
under
50
p e rc e n t

50
p e rc e n t
and
over

—

_

_

—
—
—
36

—
33
—
35

—
—
—
—

39
36
3 4 ,3 5
35

—

—
_

—

_

D ayton a Beach ...........................
G a in e s v ille .....................................
G reensboro—W in sto n-S a le m —
High P o in t ...............................
G re e n v ille —S p a rta nb u rg . . . .

J a c k s o n .........................................
J a c k s o n v ille ..................................
M e m p h is .........................................
N ew Orleans ..............................
N o r fo lk —V irg in ia Beach—
P o r ts m o u th ...........................
O k la ho m a C i t y ...........................

28
42
68
36
37
24
35

2 0 ,2 3
3 6 ,3 7
2 8 ,3 4
20, 29
35
2 7 ,3 4 ,3 8
2 0 ,3 2

37
33
22
28
3 6 ,3 7

65
74
33
62
34
24
55
38
23
23

2 1 ,2 5
2 3 ,2 8 ,3 5
2 8 ,3 4
2 0 ,2 3
2 0 ,2 5 ,3 2
2 0 ,2 6 ,3 7
2 0 ,2 1 ,3 5 ,3 7
2 0 ’ 2 6 ’ 28^35

—
—
35
36
36
—
36

28
33

A tla n ta .........................................
B a lt im o r e .....................................
C hattanooga ..............................
C orpus C h ris ti ...........................

36
2 0 ,3 4 ,3 5 ,3 6 ,3 7

—

D a v e n p o rt—R ock Isla nd —
M o li n e ....................................
D a y to n ........................................
D e t r o i t ...........................................
G a ry —H a m m o n d —
East C h i c a g o .......................
Green Bay ....................................

_

M ilw a u k e e ....................................
M in n e a p o lis —St P a u l.................
O m a h a ...........................................

_

_

—
—
—

_
—
—

_
—
—

36
—

—
36

_
—

—
22

—
—

A n a h e im —Santa A n a —
G arden G rove .......................

_
—

_
—

_
—

F r e s n o ...........................................
Los A ngeles—Long Beach . . .

37
2 0 ,3 7
-

—

—

-

-

San F ra n cisco —Oakland . . . .
San J o s e ........................................
S e a ttle —E v e r e tt...........................

—

-

1 Based on estim ates o f e m p lo y m e n t derive d fro m universe m ate ria ls c o m p ile d b e fo re th e a ctual
survey. P ro p o rtio n s in various groups m ay d iffe r fro m p ro p o rtio n s based on th e results o f th e su rvey.
F o r estim ates based o n th e results o f th e survey and fo r scope o f th e su rvey, see ta b le 1 o f a p p e n d ix A.
2 M a jo r in d u s try groups, show n w ith th e ir respective 2 -d ig it S tandard In d u s tria l C lassificatio n s,
2 0 —F o o d
2 1 —To b a cco




2 2 —T e x tile s
2 3 —A p p a re l

—
—

_

_
—
—
_

_
—
—

—
—
—

—
—
—

—
—
—

35
—
37

—
20
37

—

_

—
26

33

—
35
—

_

35
—
20
37

—
—
—
33

37
35
3 2 ,3 7

37
—

—
—

—
—
—
_
—
—
—
37

—
29

—
20

21
20
36

2 0 ,3 4 ,3 5 ,3 6
2 0 ,2 8 ,3 5 ,3 7
3 3 ,3 4 ,3 5 ,3 6 ,3 7
2 0 ,3 2 ,3 4 ,3 5 ,3 6

—
—

66
59
57

33
2 7 ,3 0 ,3 6 ,3 7
3 4 ,3 5

_
_
27

_

—

70
56
47
34
57
40
27
68
50
61
57
62

35
3 5 ,3 6
2 7 ,3 6 ,3 7
3 4 ,3 6
2 0 ,2 6 ,3 6 ,3 8
3 5 ,3 6
35
33
30
34

46
28
31
32
38
41
20
32
31
23
58
42

3 5 ,3 7
27
2 0 ,3 4 ,3 5
35
36
2 0 ,2 4 ,3 7 ,3 8
2 4 ,2 7 ,3 7
20
3 5 ,3 6
2 0 ,3 4 ,3 5
38
-

_

West

22
—

_

S t. L o u is ........................................
S o u th B e n d .................................
T o le d o ...........................................

23
20

_
_

28
2 3 ,3 5
20

45
52
54
41

C in c in n a t i....................................
C le v e la n d ....................................

_

—
—
31
—

—
_
_

36
28
8

N o rth Central

S o u th

a re -

S IC codes2 o f m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s try grou p s by
p e rc e n t o f all m a n u fa c tu rin g e m p lo y m e n t

S o u th —C o n tin u ed

A lb a n y —S ch e ne cta d y—T ro y

N o rthe a st Pennsylvania
Paterson—C lift o n —

M e tro p o lita n
area

50
p erce n t
and
over

N o rth e a st

M a n u fa c tu rin g
e m p lo y m e n t
as p erce n t o f
e m p lo y m e n t
w ith in scope
o f surveys

26—
27—
28—
29—
30—

2 4 —L u m b e r
2 5 —F u rn itu re

112

Paper
P rin tin g
C hem icals
P e tro le u m re fin in g
R u b b e r and plastics

_

31 —Leather
32—
S tone, c la y , and glass
33—
P rim a ry m etals
34—
35—

_

36
_
_
—
37

_
_

_

20

_

—
_
_
—

—

—

—

—

—

20

35
37
_

3 5 ,3 7
36—
37—
38—
39—

Fab rica te d m etals
M a c h in e ry , e x c e p t e le c tric a l

36
-

—

—

-

37

E le ctrica l m a c h in e ry
T ra n s p o rta tio n e q u ip m e n t
S c ie n tific in s tru m e n ts
M iscellaneous m a n u fa c tu rin g

Appendix table 3. Employment within scope of surveys1 by major nonmanufacturing activity, January 1977 through December 1979

M e tro p o lita n
area

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g e m p lo y ­
m e n t as percent
o f e m p lo y m e n t
w ith in scope
o f surveys

P ercent d is trib u tio n o f n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g w o rke rs b y m a jo r in d u s try groups and in selected industries2
Public u tilitie s 3
T o ta l5

Railroads

T ru c k in g

F in a n c e 4

Com m u­
n ication

W holesale
trad e

R eta il
trad e

3
5
3
5

10
10
9
25
9
16
12
7

U tilitie s

Services
H otels

Personal
services

Business
services

T o t a l5

B anking

Insurance

T o t a l5

37
28
40
35
41
16
17
43

14
22
13
15
17
23
30
13

8
8
8
2
8
6
13
8

5
10
4
10
6
13
7
4

19
25
17
19
19
22
22
15

2
3
2
5
(5 )
1
2
8

1
1
1
(6 )
1
1
1
1

11
13
7
9
14
15
13
3

2
1
1
2

11
11
10
3
9

N o rth e a s t
A lb a n y —S c h e n e c ta d y —T r o y .
B o s t o n ...............................................
B u ffa lo ............................................
H a r t f o r d ............................................
Nassau—S u ffo lk
..........................
N e w a r k ............................................
N e w Y o r k ........................................
N o rth e a s t Pennsylvania .
P aterso n—C lift o n —
P a s s a ic ........................................
P h ila d e lp h ia ....................................
P it t s b u r g h ........................................
P o r t l a n d ............................................
P o u g h k e e p s ie .................................
P ro vid en c e—W a r w ic k —
P a w t u c k e t .................................
T re n to n ............................................
W o r c e s t e r ........................................
Y o r k ...................................................

5
1
5

4
3
4

3
2
4
1
1
3
1
6

8
7
5
1
6
7
8
6

3
3
2
3

4
6
5
8
8

3
4
5
2
7

12
12
10
12
7

41
30
31
35
50

18
22
14
22
11

8
8
7
9
10

8
9
4
12
1

15
19
23
14
15

1
2
3
4
3

2
2
2
7

6
7
6
6

4
4
8
6

10
9
10
10

37
29
40
50

23
12
22
7

12
7
9
7

10
4
12
—

14
35
9
11

1
3
1
3

1
1
2
2

9
26
5
2

2
3
6
1
2

6
4
5
3
5
(5 )
1

6
5
6
7
4
6
12

2
4
2
7
2
1
1

15
13
9
7
16
1
6

31
39
34
47
31
57
50

14
16
22
8
17
10
13

4
4
7
5
4
5
6

5
6
14
8
(5 )
4

17
16
16
19
18
23
17

5
1
4
4
3
19
8

1
1
4
3
1
1
—

7
8
6
10
10
2
1

1
1
2
2
4
6
3
(6 )
2

13
7
3
—
5
5
4
9
1
3

5
6
4
6
10
7
6
5
5
6

3
3
5
—
3
1
5
(5 )
3
3

10
8
18
2
12
9
13
15
9
11

41
47
34
37
31
34
36
38
33
35

14
11
11
6
20
21
15
11
12
11

6
5
3
6
7
4
7
6
4
4

5
4
4
—
10
13
5
2
2
4

10
15
20
49
16
17
15
16
21
21

2
2
3
3
4
5
3
5
7
6

1
2
1
—
3
1
3
1
1
1

5
5
10
32
7
8
6
7
10
11

3
2
3
2
1

3
8
6
3
1

5
7
6
6
6

3
4
3
<6 )
3

10
11
14
11
7

46
39
33
45
32

11
15
21
16
14

6
6
7
5
5

1
5
7
8
4

15
12
14
17
34

3
2
2
5
4

3
1
1
2
1

7
5
9
7
16

50
61
42
58
62
53
75
43

20
15
20
6
14
23
20
22

39
53
48
59
24

13
17
21
17
18

(5 )
3
5
3
2

33
43
43
29

15
15
18
22

2
2
1
1

72
58
32
64
61
76
65

23
17
18
20
18
9
14

35
26
67
38
66
76
45
62
77
77

24
19
18
6
21
19
22
20
24
22

72
67
64
72
92

17
23
18
13
13

—
—

2
1
3

—

—

—

S o u th
A tla n ta
............................................
B a l t i m o r e ........................................
C h a tta n o o g a
.................................
C orpus C hristi .............................
D alla s—F o rt W o r t h ......................
D a y to n a B e a c h .............................
G a in e s v ille ........................................
G re e n s b o ro —W in s to n -S a le m High P o i n t .................................
G re e n v ille —S p a rta n b u rg . . . .
H o u s t o n ............................................
H u n t s v i l l e ........................................
Jackson ............................................
J a c k s o n v ille ....................................
L o u i s v i l l e ........................................
M e m p h is ............................................
M i a m i ...............................................
N e w O rleans .................................
N o r f o lk —V irg in ia Beach —
P o r t s m o u t h .............................
O k la h o m a C i t y .............................
R i c h m o n d ........................................
San A n to n io
.................................
W a s h in a t o n ....................................

—
—

—

See fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




113

—

Appendix table 3. Continued—Employment within scope of surveys1 by major nonmanufacturing activity, January 1977 through December 1979

M e tro p o lita n
area

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g e m p lo y ­
m e n t as pe rc en t
o f e m p lo y m e n t
w ith in scope
o f surveys

P ercent d is trib u tio n o f n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g w orkers by m ajo r in dus try groups an d in selected in dus tries2

T o ta l5

R ailroads

T ru c k in g

Services

F in a n c e 4

P ublic u tilitie s 3
Com m u­
nicatio n

U tilitie s

W holesale
trad e

R eta il
trade

T o ta l5

B an king

Insurance

T o t a l5

H otels

Personal
services

Business
services

N o rth C en tral
C h i c a g o ...........................................
C in c in n a t i........................................
C l e v e l a n d ........................................
C o lu m b u s ........................................
D a v e n p o rt—R o c k Island—
M o l i n e ........................................
D a y to n
...........................................
D e t r o i t ...............................................
G a ry —H a m m o n d —
East C h i c a g o .........................
Green B a y ........................................
In d ia n a p o lis ....................................
Kansas C i t y ....................................
M ilw a u k e e ........................................
M in n e a p o lis —S t. Paul ..............
O m a h a ...............................................
S a g i n a w ...........................................
S t. L o u is ...........................................
South B e n d ....................................
T o l e d o ...............................................
W ich ita
...........................................

55
48
46
59

20
19
18
14

4
4
3
2

4
5
3
4

6
5
7
5

3
3
3
3

16
12
16
9

26
38
33
42

18
14
16
17

6
5
7
4

7
6
4
9

20
16
17
18

3
3
3
3

2
2
2
2

9
9
7
9

34
41
43

26
14
18

7
1
2

4
2
4

8
6
6

6
4
5

12
10
11

35
49
33

13
9
18

6
5
7

6
2
6

13
17
20

5
2
2

1
2
2

4
9
—

30
44
53
66
43
60
73
32
50
39
43
38

28
31
19
19
18
19
25
22
23
21
25
21

7
7
3
2
4
10
4
5
1
7
2

5
10
7
5
4
4
4
3
5
7
8
3

4
4
5
4
5
4
7
11
5
7
5
7

10
7
3
2
4
3
3
3
5
5
6
4

5
10
11
11
10
14
10
4
12
11
11
9

45
40
39
29
41
36
32
45
33
37
42
43

12
6
19
11
16
14
19
16
15
19
8
11

7
4
6
4
5
4
4
8
6
9
5
6

4
1
10
5
8
6
12
3
4
3
2
2

10
14
13
30
15
17
14
12
18
13
13
16

1
2
3
3
2
4
3
2
3
2
3
3

1
1
2
1
2
2
1
4
1
2
1
3

5
8
5
5
8
7
7
3
9
5
6
6

54
72
69
68
62
59
80
68
69
77
42
58

10
28
21
18
18
21
20
24
14
23
13
20

(5 )
9
2
2
1
3
5
4
(5 )
2
1
2

2
5
4
3
3
6
2
6
1
2
2
3

5
7
6
7
8
6
10
5
7
6
8
7

1
3
4
4
2
5
2
5
3
4
2
1

8
13
13
16
14
13
9
11
5
12
9
11

47
36
36
38
27
34
45
41
49
21
36
34

16
10
13
13
16
17
13
12
13
24
11
18

5
8
5
6
6
7
6
7
6
10
5
7

5
2
4
4
5
5
4
3
2
7
2
6

19
13
16
16
24
14
13
11
20
20
31
17

3
9
3
4
2
4
4
4
6
4
1
3

2
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1

11
2
8
3
11
7
4
5
9
9
23
8

—

W est
A n a h e im —Santa A n a —
G arden G r o v e .........................
B illin g s ...............................................
D enver—B o u l d e r .........................
F r e s n o ...............................................
Los A ngeles— Long Beach . . .
P o r t la n d ...........................................
S a c r a m e n t o ....................................
Salt La ke C ity —O g d e n ...............
San Diego ........................................
San Francisco—O ak lan d . . . .
San J o s e ...........................................
S e a ttle —E v e r e t t .............................

1 Based on estim ates o f e m p lo y m e n t derived fro m universe m aterials co m p ile d p rio r to
actual survey. P ro p o rtio n s in various groups m ay d iffe r fro m p ro p o rtio n s based on th e results o f
th e survey. F o r estim ates based on th e results o f th e su rvey, and fo r scope o f th e survey, see
ta b le 1 o f a p p e n d ix A .
2 T h e 2-d ig it S tandard In dus trial C lassification codes and m ore c o m p le te title s fo r th e
selected industries are:
4 0 —
42 —

R a ilro a d tra n s p o rta tio n
M o to r fre ig h t tra n s p o rta tio n and
w arehousing




60
63 —

H o tels, ro o m in g houses, cam ps, and
o th e r lodging places
7 2 — Personal services
7 3 — Business services
•^Transportation, c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s .
4 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
in c lu d e s industries in a d d itio n to th ose sh ow n s e p arate ly.
6 Less than 0 .5 percent.

4 8 — C o m m u n ic a tio n
4 9 — E lectric , gas, and sanitary services

114

Banking
Insurance

70 —

Appendix table 4. Labor-management agreement coverage,1 all industries, manufacturing, nonmanufacturing, and public utilities,
January 1977 through December 1979.
P ercent o f p ro d u c tio n w o rke rs
e m p lo ye d in —
M etropolitan
area

P ercent o f p ro d u c tio n w o rk e rs
e m p lo y e d in —

Percent o f o ffic e w o rk e rs
e m p lo y e d in —
Nonmanufacturing

Manu­
factur­
ing

Nonmanufacturing

Public
U til­
ities3

All
Indus­
tries2

M anu­
fa ctu r­
ing

68
52
80
55
55
70
85
71

76
44
88
61
53
75
90
82

54
63
61
44
56
63
82
46

98
93
99
83
88
99
99
98

21
13
15
2
9
19
13
7

11
9
10
—
1
7
11
5

25
15
20
2
13
25
13
8

79
67
86
36
28

82
76
97
42
26

73
50
67
26
37

99
85
97
85
76

6
12
21
9
13

2
16
24
6
6

10
10
19
9
31

73
57
66
82
91

- 42
77
34
50

43
86
31
52

38
59
42
39

93
97
99
85

5
11
15
14

5
7

5
15
26
3

55
92
100
16

43
60
46
23
35
17
38

63
81
52
34
47
16
71

29
35
25
15
24
17
16

64
70
86
59
83
97
(4 >

14
16
10
7
6
8
9

11
14
10
8
4
10
12

46
58
74
36
34
79
< )
4

18
10
35
33
31
33
73
58
31
26

16
9
49
37
54
60
92
84
22
37

24
15
25
19
17
19
38
35
35
20

76
71
85
(4 )
86
77
99
87
87
76

2
4
5
13
10
13
11
11
10
12

1

3
9
6
12
12
14
15
12
12
14

15
45
28
<4 )
66
82
74
72
53
51

39
30

66
40

20
24

73
22

10
11

10

12
12

M e tro p o lita n
area

92
85
83
44
67
91
57
38

72
54

A ll
Indus­
tries2

Public
u til­
ities3

Northeast
A lb a n y —Schenectady—T ro y
B o s to n ............................................
B uffalo .........................................
H a r t f o r d .........................................
Nassau—S uffolk ........................
New ark .........................................
N ew Y o r k .....................................
Northeast Pennsylvania..............
Paterson—C lifto n —
Passaic .....................................
P h ila d e lp h ia ..................................
P itts b u rg h .....................................
P o r t la n d .........................................
P o u g h k e e p s ie ...............................
Providence—W arw ick—
P a w tu c k e t...............................
T ren ton .........................................
W o r c e s te r .....................................
Y o r k ................................................

—

20

R ic h m o n d .....................................
San A n to n io ..............................
W a s h in g to n ..................................

M a nu ­
fa c tu r ­
ing

N onm anufa c tu ring

P ublic
U t il­
itie s 3

A ll
In d u s­
trie s 2

49
20
47

74
34
62

24
13
46

81
70
99

13
7
22

6
5
28

15
7
22

85
64
58

68
63
79
55

68
74
87
75

68
44
62
30

98
97
99
93

11
9
7
6

7
1
3

_

13
16
10
9

70
64
58
51

81
69
86

91
84
95

52
33
66

90
88
1 00

10
9
19

8
3
19

12
15
19

54
72
57

90
73
64
66
71
68
56
90
87
72
80
58

98
89
86
77
84
66
73
100
95
82
95
76

55
39
33
52
36
69
43
42
74
52
53
25

98
98
82
95
95
98
99
96
99
96
100
92

23
4
8
16
22
9
18
18
15
14
17
7

26

18
7
11
20
36
13
19
34
19
15
23
13

79
24
62
69
93
60
74
78
89
58
72
64

36
63
48
63
59
68
63
35
51
80
35
73

28
85
56
66
59
70
58
34
66
88
29
79

45
49
43
59
59
65
66
35
43
76
46
68

94
89
95
92
87
98
90
85
92
100
99
99

10
18
11
7
18
13
25
6
8
27
9
9

8
4
3

12
21
13
9
20
17
24
7
1
32
4
15

74
80
21
50
76
69
93
32
(5 )
56
20
72

P ublic
u til­
itie s 3

N o rth C entral
C h i c a g o .........................................
C in c in n a t i.....................................
C le v e la n d .....................................
C o lu m b u s .....................................
D a v e n p o rt—R ock Isla nd —
M o li n e .....................................
D a y to n ........................................
D e t r o i t ............................................
G a ry —H a m m o n d —
East C h i c a g o ........................
Green B a y .....................................
In d ia n a p o lis ..................................
Kansas C i t y ..................................
M ilw a u k e e .....................................
M in n e a p o lis —S t. Paul ..............
O m a h a ............................................
S a g in a w ........................................
S t. L o u is ........................................
S o u th B e n d ..................................
T o l e d o ............................................
W ic h ita ........................................

29
20
12
—

10
—
—

—

2
16
—
(5)
3
9
—

—

3
2
8
3
6
—
8
13
11

West
A n a h e im —Santa A n a —
G arden G rove ........................
B illin g s ............................................
D enver—B o u ld e r ........................
F r e s n o ............................................
Los A ngeles—Long Beach . . .
P o r t la n d ........................................
S a c r a m e n to ..................................
S alt Lake C ity —O g d e n .............
San D ie g o .....................................
San F ra n cisco —O a klan d . . . .
San J o s e ........................................
S e a ttle —E v e r e tt...........................

1 A ll p ro d u c tio n o r o ffic e w o rk e rs in e stablishm ents w ere considered to be covered b y a u n io n c o n ­
tr a c t if a m a jo rity o f such w o rk e rs in th a t esta b lish m en t w ere covered. A ll o th e r p ro d u c tio n and o ffic e
w o rk e rs w ere e m p lo ye d in e sta b lish m en ts th a t e ith e r d id n o t have labor-m anagem ent c o n tra c ts , o r had
c o n tra c ts th a t a p p lie d to fe w e r th a n h a lf o f th e ir p ro d u c tio n w orke rs o r o ffic e w o rk e rs . Estim ates d o
n o t necessarily represent th e e x te n t to w h ic h all w orke rs in th e area m ay be covered b y labor-m anage­
m e n t agreem ents because o f th e e xclu sio n o f small establishm ents. Data are lim ite d to e stablishm ents
w ith 5 0 em ployees o r m o re e xce p t in th e 13 largest areas w here th e m in im u m size a d o p te d was 100
e m plo ye es in m a n u fa c tu rin g , p u b lic u tilitie s , and re ta il tra d e . See a pp e n dix A , ta b le 1, fo r fu r th e r e x ­
p la n a tio n o f th e scope o f th e surveys.




N onM a nu ­
m anufa c tu r ­
fa c tu ring
ing

A ll
In d u s­
trie s 2

S o u th —C o n tin u e d

South
A tla nta .........................................
B a lt im o r e .....................................
Chattanooga ...............................
Corpus Christi ...........................
Dallas—Fo rt W o r t h .....................
D aytona B e a c h ...........................
G a in es ville.....................................
Greensboro—W in s to n -S a le m High P o in t ...............................
Greenville—Spartanburg . . . .
H o u s to n .........................................
H u n t s v ille .....................................
Jackson .........................................
J a c k s o n v ille ..................................
L o u is v ille .....................................
M e m p h is .........................................
M i a m i ............................................
New Orleans ...............................
N o rfo lk —Virginia Beach—
P o r ts m o u th ...........................
O klahom a C i t y ...........................

Percent o f o ffic e w ork e rs
e m p lo ye d in —

—

11
2
27
3
25
5
13
2

2 " A II in d u s trie s " and " n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g " in c lu d e data fo r d iv is io n s n o t sh ow n separately.
-^T ra n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s . E xcludes ta xicab s, services incid e ntal
to w a te r tra n s p o rta tio n , and m u n ic ip a lly o p e ra te d establishm ents.
4 Data fo r th is d iv is io n are n o t presented sepa ra te ly; how e ve r, data are in c lu d e d in "a ll in ­
d u s trie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g " .
5 Less th a n 0.5 p erce n t.
N o te : Dashes in d ic a te no data re p o rte d .

11 5

Appendix B.
Occupational
Descriptions

T h e p r i m a r y p u r p o s e i n p r e p a r i n g j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s f o r t h e B u r e a u ’ s w a g e s u r v e y s is
t o a s s is t it s f i e l d

r e p r e s e n ta tiv e s in c la s s ify in g

w h o a re e m p lo y e d

in to

P e r f o r m s v a r ie d c le r ic a l a n d s e c re ta r ia l d u tie s r e q u ir in g a k n o w le d g e o f o f fic e r o u t in e

a p p r o p r ia t e o c c u p a t io n s w o r k e r s

a n d u n d e r s ta n d in g o f th e o r g a n iz a t io n , p r o g r a m s , a n d p r o c e d u r e s r e la t e d t o t h e w o r k o f
t h e s u p e r v is o r .

u n d e r a v a r i e t y o f p a y r o ll tit le s a n d d i f f e r e n t w o r k a r r a n g e m e n ts

f r o m e s t a b lis h m e n t t o e s t a b lis h m e n t a n d f r o m a r e a t o a r e a . T h i s p e r m it s t h e g r o u p in g o f
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e s e n t i n g c o m p a r a b l e j o b c o n t e n t . B e c a u s e o f t h i s e m p h a s is

E xclusions.

o n in te r e s ta b lis h m e n t a n d in t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b il it y o f o c c u p a t io n a l c o n t e n t , t h e B u r e a u ’s
j o b d e s c r ip t io n s m a y d i f f e r s ig n if ic a n t ly f r o m

N o t a l l p o s i t i o n s t h a t a r e t i t l e d ‘s e c r e t a r y ’ p o s s e s s t h e a b o v e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s .

E x a m p l e s o f p o s it io n s w h i c h a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m t h e d e f i n i t i o n a r e a s f o l l o w s :

th o s e in u s e in i n d i v id u a l e s t a b lis h m e n t s

o r th o s e p r e p a r e d f o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s . I n a p p ly in g th e s e j o b d e s c r ip t io n s , t h e B u r e a u ’s
f ie ld

re p r e s e n ta tiv e s

a re

in s tr u c te d

to

e x c lu d e

w o r k in g

s u p e r v is o r s ;

a.

a p p re n tic e s ;

P o s it io n s

le a r n e r s ; b e g i n n e r s ; a n d p a r t - t i m e , t e m p o r a r y , a n d p r o b a t i o n a r y w o r k e r s . H a n d i c a p p e d
w o rk e rs

w hose

e a r n in g s

a re

re d u c e d

because

o f th e ir

h a n d ic a p

a re

a ls o

w h ic h

do

not

m eet

th e

‘p e r s o n a l’ s e c r e ta r y

concept

d e s c r ib e d

above;

e x c lu d e d .

T r a in e e s a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m t h e s u r v e y e x c e p t f o r th o s e r e c e i v i n g o n - t h e - jo b t r a in i n g in

b.

S te n o g r a p h e r s n o t f u ll y t r a in e d in s e c r e t a r ia l- t y p e d u tie s ;

s o m e o f th e l o w e r le v e l p r o fe s s io n a l a n d t e c h n ic a l o c c u p a t io n s .
T h e B u r e a u p e r i o d i c a l ly r e v i e w s a r e a w a g e s u r v e y j o b d e s c r ip t io n s in o r d e r t o t a k e
c.

in to a c c o u n t t e c h n o lo g ic a l d e v e lo p m e n t s a n d t o c l a r if y d e s c r ip t io n s so t h a t t h e y a r e

S te n o g ra p h e rs

s e r v in g

as

o ffic e

a s s is t a n t s

to

a

g ro u p

o f

p ro fe s s io n a l,

t e c h n ic a l, o r m a n a g e r ia l p e rs o n s ;
r e a d ily u n d e r s to o d a n d u n if o r m ly in te r p r e te d .
C h a n g e s in o c c u p a t io n a l d e s c r ip t io n s a r e p h a s e d in o v e r a 3 - y e a r p e r io d . R e v is e d
d.

o c c u p a t io n a l d e s c r ip t io n s w e r e i n t r o d u c e d in J a n u a r y 1 9 7 8 f o r c o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r a n d

A s s is ta n t- ty p e

p o s itio n s

m o re

d u tie s

or

w h ic h

m o re
a re

not

r e s p o n s ib le

s e c r e ta r ia l w o r k , e .g ., A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A s s is ta n t, o r E x e c u t i v e A s s is ta n t;

in tro d u c e d

s u p e r v is o r y

d iffic u lt

lib r a r ia n a n d p e r i p h e r a l e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t o r — w e r e a ls o i n t r o d u c e d in 1 9 7 8 . I n J a n u a r y
d e s c r ip t io n s w e r e

or

e n ta il

te c h n ic a l,

1 9 7 9 , r e v is e d

a d m in is tr a tiv e ,

w h ic h

k e y e n t r y ( k e y p u n c h ) o p e r a t o r . T w o o c c u p a t io n s n e w t o t h e p r o g r a m — c o m p u t e r d a t a

ty p ic a l

of

f o r b o ile r te n d e r , d r a f te r , a n d s t a tio n a r y

e n g in e e r .

e.

P o s it io n s w h i c h d o n o t f i t a n y o f t h e s i t u a t i o n s l i s t e d i n t h e s e c t i o n s b e l o w

T h e r e v is e d d e s c r ip t io n s r e f le c t b a s ic a lly t h e s a m e o c c u p a t io n s as p r e v io u s ly d e f in e d ,

title d

b u t s o m e r e p o r t in g c h a n g e s m a y o c c u r b e c a u s e o f t h e r e v is io n s . T h e r e v is e d d e s c r ip ­

‘ L e v e l o f S u p e r v is o r ,’ e .g ., s e c r e t a r y

to

th e p re s id e n t o f a c o m p a n y

t h a t e m p lo y s , in a ll, o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ;

t io n s f o r c o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r a n d d r a f t e r a r e n o t e q u i v a l e n t t o t h e o l d j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s .
B o t h t h e o l d a n d n e w j o b d e s c r ip t io n s f o r th e s e j o b s a r e p r e s e n te d in t h is a p p e n d ix .
f-

T r a in e e s .

Office
C lassification by Level.

SECRETARY

m a tc h e d

A s s ig n e d as a p e r s o n a l s e c r e ta r y , n o r m a l ly t o o n e i n d iv id u a l. M a in t a in s a c lo s e a n d
h ig h ly
fa ir ly

r e s p o n s iv e

r e la tio n s h ip

in d e p e n d e n tly

re c e iv in g




to
a

th e d a y -to -d a y
m in im u m

of

a c t iv it ie s
d e t a ile d

w it h in

o f th e s u p e r v is o r . W o r k s

s u p e r v is io n

and

S e c r e ta ry jo b s

w h ic h

m eet

th e

re q u ir e d

c h a r a c te r is tic s

a re

a t o n e o f f iv e le v e ls a c c o r d in g t o ( a ) t h e l e v e l o f t h e s e c r e t a r y ’s s u p e r v is o r

t h e c o m p a n y ’s o r g a n i z a t i o n a l

s tru c tu re

and,

(b )

th e

le v e l

o f th e

s e c r e ta r y ’s

r e s p o n s ib ilit y . T h e t a b u la t io n f o l l o w i n g t h e e x p la n a tio n s o f th e s e t w o f a c t o r s in d ic a te s
th e le v e l o f th e s e c re ta r y f o r e a c h c o m b in a tio n o f th e fa c to rs .

g u id a n c e .

116

L e v e l o fS ecreta ry's Supervisor (L S)

c.

S e c r e ta r y to th e h e a d , im m e d ia t e ly b e lo w

th e c o r p o r a te o ffic e r le v e l, o f a

m a j o r s e g m e n t o r s u b s id ia r y o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p lo y s , in a ll, o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0
L S -1

a.

p e rs o n s .

S e c re ta ry

to

th e

s u p e r v is o r

or

head

o f a s m a ll o r g a n iz a t io n a l

u n it

N O T E : T h e te rm

( e .g .,

b.

S e c re ta ry

to

a

a d m in is tr a tiv e

n o n s u p e r v is o r y

o ffic e r

or

s ta ff

a s s is t a n t ,

‘c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ’ u s e d i n t h e a b o v e L S d e f i n i t i o n r e f e r s t o t h o s e

o f fic ia ls w h o h a v e a s ig n ific a n t c o r p o r a t e w id e p o lic y m a k in g r o le w it h r e g a r d to m a jo r

f e w e r th a n a b o u t 2 5 o r 3 0 p e rs o n s ); o r
s p e c ia l i s t ,

s k ille d

p ro fe s s io n a l

te c h n ic ia n

or

c o m p a n y a c t i v i t i e s . T h e t i t l e ‘ v i c e p r e s i d e n t , ’ t h o u g h n o r m a l l y i n d i c a t i v e o f t h is r o l e ,

e m p lo y e e ,

e x p e r t.

d o e s n o t in a l l c a s e s i d e n t if y s u c h p o s itio n s . V i c e p r e s id e n t s w h o s e p r i m a r y r e s p o n s ib ili­

(N O T E :

M a n y c o m p a n i e s a s s ig n s t e n o g r a p h e r s , r a t h e r t h a n s e c r e t a r i e s a s d e s c r i b e d

ty

a b o v e , t o t h is l e v e l o f s u p e r v is o r y o r n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r . )

i n d i v i d u a l l o a n o r c r e d i t a c t i o n s ; a d m i n i s t e r i n d i v i d u a l t r u s t a c c o u n t s ; d i r e c t l y s u p e r v is e

is t o

act

p e r s o n a lly

on

in d iv id u a l

cases

or

tra n s a c tio n s

( e .g .,

a p p ro v e

or

deny

a c l e r i c a l s t a f f ) a r e n o t c o n s i d e r e d t o b e ‘c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r s ’ f o r p u r p o s e s o f a p p l y i n g t h e
d e f in it io n .
L S -2

L e v e l o f S ecretary's R espon sibility (L R )
a.

S e c r e t a r y t o a n e x e c u t i v e o r m a n a g e r i a l p e r s o n w h o s e r e s p o n s i b i l i t y is n o t
e q u iv a l e n t t o o n e o f t h e s p e c if ic le v e l s itu a tio n s in t h e d e f i n it i o n f o r L S - 3 ,
but

w hose

o r g a n iz a t io n a l

e m p lo y e e s

and

u n it

is u s u a l l y

n o r m a lly

d iv id e d

in to

o f t e n , in t u r n , f u r t h e r s u b d iv id e d . I n

n u m b e rs

at

le a s t

s e v e ra l

T h i s f a c t o r e v a lu a t e s t h e n a t u r e o f th e w o r k r e la t io n s h ip b e t w e e n th e s e c r e ta r y a n d

dozen

o r g a n iz a t io n a l s e g m e n ts w h i c h

t h e s u p e r v i s o r , a n d t h e e x t e n t t o w h i c h t h e s e c r e t a r y is e x p e c t e d t o e x e r c is e i n i t i a t i v e

a re

a n d ju d g m e n t.

s o m e c o m p a n ie s , th is l e v e l in c lu d e s a

S e c r e ta rie s

s h o u ld

be

m a tc h e d

at L R -1

or

L R -2

d e s c r ib e d

b e lo w

to

of

a c c o r d in g t o t h e i r le v e l o f r e s p o n s ib ilit y .

w i d e r a n g e o f o r g a n i z a t i o n a l e c h e lo n s ; i n o t h e r s , o n l y o n e o r t w o ; o r
b.

S e c re ta ry

to

th e

head

of

an

in d iv id u a l

p la n t,

fa c to ry ,

e tc .,

(o r

o th e r

L R -1

e q u iv a l e n t l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) t h a t e m p lo y s , in a ll, f e w e r t h a n 5 ,0 0 0 p e rs o n s .
P e rfo rm s

a.

S e c re ta ry

to

th e

c h a ir m a n

o f th e

or

o ffic e r

o f a com pany

d u tie s

in c lu d in g

or

c o m p a r a b le

m ost

a.

th a t

1 0 0 p e rs o n s ; o r

S e c re ta ry

p r e s id e n t

to

a

c o rp o ra te

(o th e r

th a n

c h a ir m a n

of

th e

b o a rd

th e

A n s w e r s te le p h o n e s , g r e e t s p e r s o n a l c a lle r s , a n d o p e n s in c o m in g m a il.
A n s w e rs

c.

S e c re ta ry

a t io n s ,

re q u e s ts w h i c h

to

th e

head

c o r p o r a te w id e
in d u s t r ia l

(im m e d ia t e ly b e lo w
f u n c t io n a l

r e la tio n s ,

a c t iv it y

e tc .) o r

a m a jo r

m a r k e tin g ,

g e o g r a p h ic

re s e a rc h ,

s ta n d a rd

a n s w e rs . M a y

r e p ly

to

R e v ie w s c o rre s p o n d e n c e , m e m o ra n d a , a n d re p o rts p re p a re d b y o th e rs fo r
e n s u re p r o c e d u r a l a n d t y p o g r a p h ic a l a c c u r a ­

cy.

th e o ffic e r le v e l) o v e r e ith e r a

( e .g .,

have

le tte r .

t h e s u p e r v is o r ’s s ig n a t u r e t o

p e rs o n s ; o r

m a jo r

te le p h o n e

r e q u e s ts b y s e n d in g a f o r m

or

p r e s i d e n t ) o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p lo y s , in a ll, o v e r 1 0 0 b u t f e w e r t h a n 5 ,0 0 0

c.

s e c re ta r ia l

b.

b o a rd

e m p lo y s , in a ll, f e w e r t h a n
b.

v a r ie d

fo llo w in g :

L S -3

d.

o r o r g a n iz a t io n a l

M a in t a in s s u p e r v is o r ’s c a le n d a r a n d m a k e s a p p o in tm e n t s as in s tr u c te d .

e.

o p e r­

T y p e s , t a k e s a n d t r a n s c r i b e s d i c t a t i o n , a n d f il e s .

s e g m e n t (e .g ., a r e g io n a l h e a d q u a r te r s ; a m a jo r d iv is io n ) o f a c o m p a n y th a t
L R -2

e m p lo y s , in a l l, o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 b u t f e w e r t h a n 2 5 ,0 0 0 e m p lo y e e s ; o r
d.

S e c re ta ry

to

th e

head

of

an

in d iv id u a l

p la n t,

fa c to ry ,

e tc .,

(o r

o th e r

P e r f o r m s d u tie s d e s c r ib e d

e q u iv a l e n t l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) t h a t e m p lo y s , in a ll, o v e r 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
e.

S e c re ta ry

to

th e

(e .g ., a m id d le

head

of

a

la rg e

and

im p o r ta n t

o r g a n iz a tio n a l

u n d e r L R -1

and,

in addition

p e r f o r m s ta s k s r e q u i r i n g

g r e a t e r ju d g m e n t , i n it i a t i v e , a n d k n o w l e d g e o f o f f ic e fu n c t io n s in c lu d in g o r c o m p a r a ­

segm ent

b le to m o s t o f th e f o llo w in g :

m a n a g e m e n t s u p e r v is o r o f a n o r g a n iz a t io n a l s e g m e n t o f te n

in v o l v in g as m a n y as s e v e r a l h u n d r e d p e rs o n s ) o f a c o m p a n y t h a t e m p lo y s ,

a.

in a ll, o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0 p e rs o n s .

S c r e e n s t e le p h o n e a n d p e r s o n a l c a lle r s , d e t e r m in in g w h i c h c a n b e h a n d le d
b y t h e s u p e r v is o r ’s s u b o r d in a te s o r o t h e r o ffic e s .

b.
L S -4

A n s w e r s r e q u e s ts w h ic h r e q u ir e a d e t a ile d k n o w l e d g e o f o f f ic e p r o c e d u r e s
o r c o lle c tio n

o f in fo r m a tio n

fro m

file s o r o t h e r o f fic e s .

M ay

s ig n

r o u t in e

c o r r e s p o n d e n c e i n o w n o r s u p e r v i s o r ’s n a m e .
a.

S e c re ta ry

to

th e

c h a ir m a n

o f th e

b o a rd

or

p r e s id e n t

o f a com pany

th a t

c.

e m p lo y s , in a l l, o v e r 1 0 0 b u t f e w e r t h a n 5 ,0 0 0 p e rs o n s ; o r
b.

S e c re ta ry

to a c o rp o ra te

p r e s id e n t)

o f a com pany

o f f ic e r ( o th e r th a n th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a r d o r
t h a t e m p lo y s ,

in

a ll,

o v e r 5 ,0 0 0

b u t fe w e r

d.

th a n

S c h e d u le s
n e c e s s a ry

2 5 ,0 0 0 p e rs o n s ; o r




C o m p ile s

o r a s s is ts i n

c o m p ilin g

p e r io d ic

re p o rts

on

th e

b a s is o f g e n e r a l

in s tru c tio n s .
te n ta tiv e

a p p o in tm e n t s

b a c k g ro u n d

m a te r ia l

fo r

m e n t s f o r m e e t in g s a n d c o n fe r e n c e s .

117

w it h o u t

p r io r

s c h e d u le d

c le a r a n c e .

m e e t in g s .

A s s e m b le s

M akes

a rra n g e ­

E x p la in s s u p e r v is o r ’ s r e q u ir e m e n t s t o o t h e r e m p lo y e e s in s u p e r v is o r ’s u n it.

s im ila r m a t e r ia ls f o r u s e in d u p lic a t in g p r o c e s s e s . M a y d o c l e r ic a l w o r k i n v o l v i n g l i t t l e

( A l s o t y p e s , ta k e s d i c t a t io n , a n d file s .)

e.

s p e c ia l t r a in in g , s u c h as k e e p in g s im p le r e c o r d s , f i l i n g r e c o r d s a n d r e p o r t s , o r s o r t in g
a n d d is t r ib u t in g in c o m in g m a il.

The

fo llo w in g

ta b u la t io n s h o w s th e le v e l o f th e s e c r e ta r y f o r e a c h

LS

and

C lass A.

L R

P e rfo rm s

one or m ore o f the follow in g:

T y p in g

m a t e r ia l in fin a l f o r m

w h e n it

i n v o lv e s c o m b in in g m a t e r ia l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u rc e s ; o r r e s p o n s ib ilit y f o r c o r r e c t s p e llin g ,

c o m b in a t io n :

s y lla b ic a tio n , p u n c tu a tio n , e tc .,

L R -1

L R -2

L S - 1 .....................................................................................

C la s s E

o f te c h n ic a l o r

m a te r ia l; o r p la n n in g la y o u t a n d t y p in g

u nu sual w o rd s

o f c o m p lic a te d

or

f o r e ig n

la n g u a g e

s t a t is t ic a l ta b le s t o

m a in ta in

C la s s D

u n i f o r m i t y a n d b a l a n c e i n s p a c in g . M a y t y p e r o u t i n e f o r m l e t t e r s , v a r y i n g d e t a i l s t o s u it
c ir c u m s t a n c e s .

L S - 2 .....................................................................................

C la s s D

C la s s C

L S - 3 .....................................................................................

C la s s C

C la s s B

L S - 4 .....................................................................................

C la s s B

C la s s A

C lass B.
or

P e rfo rm s

r o u tin e

ty p in g

one or m ore o f the follow in g:
o f fo rm s ,

in s u r a n c e

C o p y ty p in g f r o m r o u g h o r c le a r d ra fts ;

p o lic ie s ,

e tc .;

or

s e t t in g

up

s im p le

s ta n d a rd

t a b u la t io n s ; o r c o p y in g m o r e c o m p le x t a b le s a l r e a d y s e t u p a n d s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .

STENOGRAPHER
FILE CLERK

P r i m a r y d u t y is t o t a k e d i c t a t i o n u s i n g s h o r t h a n d , a n d t o t r a n s c r i b e t h e d i c t a t i o n . M a y
a ls o t y p e f r o m w r i t t e n c o p y . M a y o p e r a t e f r o m a s t e n o g r a p h ic p o o l. M a y o c c a s io n a lly
tr a n s c r ib e f r o m

v o i c e r e c o r d i n g s ( i f p r i m a r y d u t y is t r a n s c r i b i n g f r o m

F i l e s , c la s s if ie s , a n d r e t r i e v e s m a t e r i a l i n a n e s t a b l i s h e d f i l i n g s y s t e m . M a y p e r f o r m

r e c o r d in g s , see

c l e r i c a l a n d m a n u a l ta s k s r e q u i r e d t o m a i n t a i n f i l e s . P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d i n t o l e v e l s o n

T r a n s c r ib in g -M a c h in e T y p is t).

t h e b a s is o f t h e f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s .

C lass A.

N O T E : T h i s j o b is d i s t i n g u i s h e d f r o m t h a t o f a s e c r e t a r y i n t h a t a s e c r e t a r y n o r m a l l y

C l a s s if ie s a n d i n d e x e s f i l e m a t e r i a l s u c h a s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , r e p o r t s , t e c h n i c a l

w o r k s in a c o n f id e n t ia l r e la t io n s h ip w i t h o n l y o n e m a n a g e r o r e x e c u t iv e a n d p e r f o r m s

d o c u m e n t s , e t c . , i n a n e s t a b l is h e d f i l i n g s y s t e m c o n t a i n i n g a n u m b e r o f v a r i e d s u b j e c t

m o r e r e s p o n s ib le a n d d is c r e t io n a r y ta s k s as d e s c r ib e d in t h e s e c r e t a r y j o b d e f i n it i o n .

m a tte r

f il e s .

M ay

a ls o

f ile

t h is

m a te r ia l.

M ay

keep

re c o rd s

of

v a r io u s

ty p e s

in

c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h t h e f ile s . M a y l e a d a s m a l l g r o u p o f l o w e r l e v e l f i l e c l e r k s .

Stenographer, Senior.

D ic t a t io n

in v o lv e s a v a r ie d t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u l a r y

C lass B.

s u c h as i n l e g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s o n s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h . M a y a l s o s e t u p a n d m a i n t a i n

OR

file s , k e e p r e c o r d s , e t c .,
P e rfo rm s

s te n o g r a p h ic

S o r t s , c o d e s , a n d f il e s u n c la s s if ie d m a t e r i a l b y s i m p l e ( s u b j e c t m a t t e r ) h e a d i n g s

o r p a r t ly
d u tie s

r e q u ir in g

s ig n ific a n tly

g re a te r

in d e p e n d e n c e

and

c la s s ifie d m a t e r ia l b y

c ro s s -re fe re n c e

a id s .

As

f in e r s u b h e a d in g s . P r e p a r e s s im p le r e la t e d

re q u e s te d ,

lo c a te s

c le a r ly

id e n tifie d

m a te r ia l

in d e x a n d

in

f ile s

and

r e s p o n s ib ilit y th a n s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l, as e v id e n c e d b y t h e f o ll o w in g : W o r k r e q u ir e s

f o r w a r d s m a t e r ia l. M a y p e r f o r m r e la t e d c l e r ic a l ta s k s r e q u i r e d t o m a in t a in a n d s e r v ic e

a h ig h d e g r e e o f s t e n o g r a p h ic s p e e d a n d a c c u r a c y ; a t h o r o u g h w o r k in g k n o w l e d g e o f

f il e s .

g e n e ra l

b u s in e s s

o r g a n iz a tio n ,
p e r fo r m in g
f o llo w -u p
s im p le

and

o ffic e

p o lic ie s ,

p ro c e d u re s

p ro c e d u re s ,

s te n o g r a p h ic

d u tie s

f il e s ,

and

and

o f

th e

w o r k flo w ,

r e s p o n s ib le

s p e c if ic
e tc .

c le r ic a l

b u s in e s s

Uses
ta s k s

t h is
such

f il e s ; a s s e m b l i n g m a t e r i a l f o r r e p o r t s , m e m o r a n d a , a n d

le tte r s

fro m

g e n e ra l

in s tru c tio n s ;

r e a d in g

and

r o u t in g

o p e ra tio n s ,

k n o w le d g e
as

C lass C.

in

o r n u m e r ic a l). A s

le tte r s ; c o m p o s in g

in c o m in g

m a il;

P e r f o r m s r o u t i n e f i l i n g o f m a t e r i a l t h a t h a s a l r e a d y b e e n c l a s s i f i e d o r w h i c h is

e a s ily c la s s ifie d in a s im p le s e r ia l c la s s ific a t io n s y s te m ( e .g ., a lp h a b e t i c a l , c h r o n o lo g ic a l,

m a in ta in in g

re q u e s te d , lo c a te s r e a d ily

a v a ila b le

m a t e r ia l in f ile s a n d

fo rw a rd s

m a t e r ia l; a n d m a y f il l o u t w it h d r a w a l c h a r g e . M a y p e r f o r m s im p le c l e r ic a l a n d m a n u a l

and

a n s w e r in g r o u t in e q u e s tio n s , e t c .

t a s k s r e q u i r e d t o m a i n t a i n a n d s e r v i c e f il e s .

Stenographer, G eneral.

MESSENGER

D ic t a t io n in v o lv e s a n o r m a l r o u t in e v o c a b u la r y . M a y m a in ta in

P e rfo rm s

f il e s , k e e p s i m p l e r e c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t i v e l y r o u t i n e c l e r i c a l ta s k s .

v a r io u s

r o u t in e

d u tie s

such

as r u n n in g

m a c h i n e s s u c h a s s e a le r s o r m a i l e r s , o p e n i n g

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE TYPIST
P r im a r y d u ty

c le r ic a l

is t o t y p e c o p y o f v o i c e r e c o r d e d d i c t a t i o n

w h ic h

does

not

w o rk .

E x c lu d e

p o s it io n s

th a t

e rra n d s , o p e ra tin g

a n d d is trib u tin g

r e q u ir e

o p e ra tio n

of

m in o r o ffic e

m a il, a n d o t h e r m in o r
a

m o to r

v e h ic le

as

a

s ig n ific a n t d u ty .

in v o lv e

v a r i e d t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia liz e d v o c a b u l a r y s u c h as t h a t u s e d in l e g a l b r ie f s o r r e p o r t s o n
s c ie n t if ic r e s e a r c h . M a y a ls o t y p e f r o m

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATOR

w r i t t e n c o p y . M a y m a i n t a i n f il e s , k e e p s i m p l e

O p e r a t e s a t e le p h o n e s w it c h b o a r d o r c o n s o le u s e d w i t h

r e c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t i v e l y r o u t i n e c l e r i c a l ta s k s . ( S e e S t e n o g r a p h e r d e f i n i t i o n

(P B X )

f o r w o r k e r s in v o lv e d w it h s h o rth a n d d ic ta tio n .)

s y s te m

in fo r m a tio n

TYPIST
U s es a t y p e w r it e r

to

re la y

in c o m in g ,

o u tg o in g ,

and

a p r iv a te b ra n c h e x c h a n g e

in tra s y s te m

c a lls .

t o l l c h a r g e s . B e s id e s o p e r a t i n g a t e l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e ,
to

m ake

c o p ie s

o f v a r io u s

m a t e r ia ls

o r to

m a k e o u t b ills

p e rfo rm

a fte r

p o r t io n

c a l c u l a t i o n s h a v e b e e n m a d e b y a n o t h e r p e r s o n . M a y i n c l u d e t y p i n g o f s t e n c i ls , m a t s , o r




118

M ay

p r o v id e

to c a lle r s , r e c o r d a n d t r a n s m it m e s s a g e s , k e e p r e c o r d o f c a lls p la c e d a n d

m ay

a ls o t y p e o r

r o u t in e c le r ic a l w o r k ( t y p in g o r r o u t in e c l e r ic a l w o r k m a y o c c u p y t h e m a j o r
o f t h e w o r k e r ’ s t i m e , a n d is u s u a l l y

p e rfo rm e d

w h ile

a t th e s w itc h b o a r d

or

c o n s o le ) . C h i e f o r le a d o p e r a t o r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts e m p lo y in g m o r e t h a n o n e o p e r a t o r
a re

e x c lu d e d .

For

an

o p e ra to r

w ho

a ls o

a c ts

as

a

r e c e p tio n is t,

see

P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d i n t o l e v e l s o n t h e b a s is o f t h e f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s :

S w itc h b o a r d

C lass A.

O p e r a t o r -R e c e p t io n is t.

U n d e r g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n , p e r f o r m s

a c c o u n tin g

c le r ic a l o p e ra tio n s

w h ic h

r e q u i r e t h e a p p l i c a t i o n o f e x p e r i e n c e a n d j u d g m e n t , f o r e x a m p l e , c l e r i c a l l y p r o c e s s in g

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIO NIST

c o m p lic a te d

A t a s i n g le - p o s it io n t e le p h o n e s w it c h b o a r d o r c o n s o le , a c ts b o t h as a n o p e r a t o r — s e e

v a r ie ty

o r n o n r e p e titiv e

o f p re s c rib e d

a c c o u n tin g

a c c o u n tin g

tr a n s a c tio n s , s e le c t in g

am ong

a s u b s ta n tia l

and

codes

t r a c in g

tr a n s a c tio n s

c la s s ific a tio n s ,

S w i t c h b o a r d O p e r a t o r — a n d a s a r e c e p t i o n i s t . R e c e p t i o n i s t ’s w o r k i n v o l v e s s u c h d u t i e s

th ro u g h

a s g r e e t i n g v i s i t o r s ; d e t e r m i n i n g n a t u r e o f v i s i t o r ’ s b u s in e s s a n d p r o v i d i n g a p p r o p r i a t e

or

a s s is t e d b y o n e o r m o r e c la s s B a c c o u n t i n g c l e r k s .

in fo r m a tio n ; r e f e r r in g

p r e v io u s

C lass B.

Under

p ro c e d u re s ,

ORDER CLERK

fo llo w in g

d e te r m in e

s o u r c e o f d is c r e p a n c ie s .

M ay

be

c lo s e

p e rfo rm s

s u p e r v is io n ,
one

or

fo llo w in g

d e t a ile d

r o u tin e

a c c o u n tin g

m o re

in s tru c tio n s
c le r ic a l

and

s ta n d a r d iz e d

o p e ra tio n s ,

such

as

p o s t in g t o le d g e r s , c a r d s , o r w o r k s h e e t s w h e r e i d e n t if i c a t i o n o f ite m s a n d lo c a t io n s o f

R e c e iv e s w r i t t e n o r v e r b a l c u s to m e r s ’ p u r c h a s e o r d e r s f o r m a t e r ia l o r m e r c h a n d is e
c u s to m e rs

a c tio n s to

v i s it o r t o a p p r o p r ia t e p e r s o n in t h e o r g a n iz a t io n o r c o n t a c t in g

t h a t p e r s o n b y t e le p h o n e a n d a r r a n g i n g a n a p p o in tm e n t ; k e e p in g a l o g o f v is ito r s .

fro m

a c c o u n tin g

or

d u tie s :

s a le s p e o p l e .
Q u o t in g

W o rk

p r ic e s ;

t y p ic a lly

in v o lv e s

d e te r m in in g

som e

a v a ila b ility

c o m b in a tio n

of

o rd e re d

p o s tin g s a r e c l e a r ly in d ic a te d ; c h e c k in g a c c u r a c y a n d c o m p le te n e s s o f s ta n d a r d iz e d a n d

o f th e

ite m s

r e p e titiv e

and

re c o rd s

or

a c c o u n tin g

d o c u m e n ts ;

and

c o d in g

d o c u m e n ts

u s in g

a

fe w

p r e s c r ib e d a c c o u n tin g c o d e s .

s u g g e s t in g s u b s titu te s w h e n n e c e s s a r y ; a d v is in g e x p e c t e d d e l iv e r y d a t e a n d m e t h o d o f
d e l i v e r y ; r e c o r d i n g o r d e r a n d c u s t o m e r i n f o r m a t i o n o n o r d e r s h e e ts ; c h e c k i n g o r d e r

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

s h e e ts f o r a c c u r a c y a n d a d e q u a c y o f in f o r m a t io n r e c o r d e d ; a s c e r ta in in g c r e d it r a t in g o f

O p e r a te s a b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e ( w it h o r w it h o u t a t y p e w r it e r k e y b o a r d ) to k e e p a

c u s to m e r ; f u r n is h in g c u s to m e r w i t h a c k n o w le d g e m e n t o f re c e ip t o f o r d e r ; f o llo w in g u p

r e c o r d o f b u s in e s s t r a n s a c t i o n s .

t o s e e t h a t o r d e r is d e l i v e r e d b y t h e s p e c i f i e d d a t e o r t o l e t c u s t o m e r k n o w o f a d e l a y i n
d e liv e r y ;

m a in ta in in g

o rd e r

f ile ;

c h e c k in g

s h ip p in g

in v o ic e

a g a in s t

o r ig in a l

o rd e r.

C lass A.

E x c lu d e w orkers p a id on a com m ission basis or whose du ties include a n y o f the follow in g:
R e c e iv in g

o rd e rs

c u s to m e rs

w ith

fo r

s e r v ic e s

c o n s u lta tiv e

ra th e r

a d v ic e

th a n

fo r

u s in g

m a te r ia l

k n o w le d g e

or

m e r c h a n d is e ;

g a in e d

fro m

p r o v id in g

e n g in e e r in g

Keeps

a set o f re c o rd s

r e q u ir in g

a k n o w le d g e

o f and

e x p e r ie n c e

in

b a s ic

b o o k k e e p in g p r in c ip le s , a n d f a m il ia r i t y w i t h t h e s t r u c t u r e o f t h e p a r t ic u la r a c c o u n t in g
s y s te m u s e d . D e t e r m in e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s a n d d is t r ib u t io n o f d e b it a n d c r e d it ite m s t o b e

or

u s e d i n e a c h p h a s e o f t h e w o r k . M a y p r e p a r e c o n s o l i d a t e d r e p o r t s , b a l a n c e s h e e ts , a n d

e x t e n s i v e t e c h n i c a l t r a i n i n g ; e m p h a s i z i n g s e l l i n g s k i ll s ; h a n d l i n g m a t e r i a l o r m e r c h a n ­

o th e r re c o rd s b y h an d .

d is e as a n in t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e jo b .
P o s itio n s a r e c la s s ifie d i n t o le v e ls a c c o r d in g t o t h e f o ll o w in g d e f in it io n s :

C lass B.

K e e p s a r e c o r d o f o n e o r m o r e p h a s e s o r s e c tio n s o f a s e t o f r e c o r d s u s u a lly

r e q u i r in g l i t t l e k n o w l e d g e o f b a s ic b o o k k e e p in g . P h a s e s o r s e c tio n s i n c lu d e a c c o u n t s

C lass A .

H a n d l e s o r d e r s t h a t i n v o l v e m a k i n g j u d g m e n t s s u c h as c h o o s i n g w h i c h s p e c i f i c

p r o d u c t o r m a t e r ia l f r o m

p a y a b le , p a y r o ll , c u s to m e r s ’ a c c o u n t s ( n o t i n c lu d in g a s im p le t y p e o f b i ll in g d e s c r ib e d

t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t ’ s p r o d u c t lin e s w i l l s a t i s f y t h e c u s t o m e r ’ s

u n d e r m a c h in e b ille r ), c o s t d is trib u tio n , e x p e n s e d is tr ib u tio n , in v e n t o r y c o n tr o l, e tc .

n e e d s , o r d e t e r m in in g t h e p r ic e t o b e q u o te d w h e n p r ic in g in v o lv e s m o r e th a n m e r e ly

M a y c h e c k o r a s s is t i n p r e p a r a t i o n o f t r i a l b a l a n c e s a n d p r e p a r e c o n t r o l s h e e ts f o r t h e

r e f e r r i n g t o a p r i c e lis t o r m a k i n g s o m e s im p le m a t h e m a t ic a l c a lc u la t io n s .

C lass B.

H a n d le s

o rd e rs

a p p lic a tio n s . M a y

in v o lv in g

re fe r to

ite m s

w h ic h

have

r e a d ily

a c c o u n t in g d e p a r tm e n t.

id e n tifie d

uses

and

MACHINE BILLER

a c a t a l o g , m a n u f a c t u r e r ’s m a n u a l, o r s i m il a r d o c u m e n t t o

P re p a re s

i n s u r e t h a t p r o p e r i t e m is s u p p l i e d o r t o v e r i f y p r i c e o f o r d e r e d i t e m .

s ta te m e n ts , b ills ,

and

in v o ic e s

on

a m a c h in e

o th e r

th a n

an

o rd in a r y

or

e l e c t r o m a t i c t y p e w r i t e r . M a y a ls o k e e p r e c o r d s as t o b illin g s o r s h ip p in g c h a r g e s o r
p e rfo rm

ACCOUNTING CLERK
P e rfo rm s

one

or

m o re

a c c o u n tin g

c l e r i c a l t a s k s s u c h as p o s t i n g

to

r e g is te r s

o t h e r c le r ic a l w o r k in c id e n t a l t o b illin g o p e ra tio n s . F o r w a g e s tu d y p u rp o s e s ,

m a c h in e b ille r s a r e c la s s ifie d b y t y p e o f m a c h in e , as f o llo w s :

and

B illin g-m ach in e biller.

le d g e r s ; r e c o n c il in g b a n k a c c o u n t s ; v e r i f y i n g t h e in t e r n a l c o n s is t e n c y , c o m p le t e n e s s ,

m a c h in e ) to

d is tr ib u tio n

p r e p a r e d o r d e r s , s h ip p in g m e m o r a n d a , e tc . U s u a lly in v o lv e s a p p lic a tio n o f p r e d e te r ­

codes;

e x a m in in g

and

v e r ify in g

fo r

c le r ic a l

a c c u ra c y

v a r io u s

ty p e s

of

p re p a re

U s e s a s p e c ia l b i ll in g m a c h in e ( c o m b i n a t io n t y p i n g a n d a d d in g

a n d m a t h e m a t i c a l a c c u r a c y o f a c c o u n t i n g d o c u m e n t s ; a s s ig n i n g p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n t i n g

b ills

and

in v o ic e s

fro m

c u s to m e rs ’ p u rc h a s e o rd e rs , in te r n a lly

r e p o r t s , l is t s , c a l c u l a t i o n s , p o s t i n g , e t c . ; o r p r e p a r i n g s i m p l e o r a s s is t in g i n p r e p a r i n g

m i n e d d i s c o u n t s a n d s h i p p i n g c h a r g e s a n d e n t r y o f n e c e s s a r y e x t e n s io n s , w h i c h m a y o r

m o re

m ay

c o m p lic a te d

jo u r n a l

v o u c h e rs .

M ay

w o rk

in

e ith e r

a

m anual

or

a u to m a te d

The

w o rk

r e q u ir e s

not

be

a c c u m u la t e d

a c c o u n t in g s y s te m .
a

k n o w le d g e

of

c le r ic a l

m e th o d s

and

o ffic e

p r a c tic e s

c o m p u te d
by

on

th e

m a c h in e . T h e

b illin g

m a c h in e ,

o p e ra tio n

and

t o ta ls

w h ic h

a re

a u t o m a t ic a lly

u s u a lly i n v o lv e s a la r g e n u m b e r o f c a r b o n

c o p i e s o f t h e b i l b b e i n g p r e p a r e d a n d is o f t e n d o n e o n a f a n f o l d m a c h i n e .

and

B ookkeepin g-m ach in e biller.

p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h r e l a t e s t o t h e c l e r i c a l p r o c e s s in g a n d r e c o r d i n g o f t r a n s a c t i o n s a n d

t h e b o o k k e e p i n g a n d a c c o u n t i n g t e r m s a n d p r o c e d u r e s u s e d in t h e a s s ig n e d w o r k , b u t is

o p e r a t io n . G e n e r a l l y i n v o lv e s t h e s im u lta n e o u s e n t r y o f f ig u r e s o n c u s to m e r s ’ le d g e r

not

re c o rd .

to

have

a

k n o w le d g e

of

th e

fo rm a l

p r in c ip le s

of

b o o k k e e p in g

and

m a c h in e

p re p a re

c u s to m e rs ’

a u t o m a t ic a lly

b ills

as

a c c u m u la t e s

p a rt

of

fig u r e s

th e

on

a c c o u n ts

a

num ber

r e c e iv a b le

of

v e r tic a l

c o lu m n s a n d c o m p u t e s a n d u s u a lly p r in t s a u t o m a t ic a ll y t h e d e b it o r c r e d i t b a la n c e s .

a c c o u n tin g .




The

to

o r w ith o u t a ty p e ­

w rite r

r e q u ir e d

k e y b o a rd )

U s e s a b o o k k e e p in g m a c h in e ( w i t h

a c c o u n t in g in fo r m a t io n . W i t h e x p e r ie n c e , th e w o r k e r t y p ic a lly b e c o m e s f a m ilia r w it h

119

Professional and Technical

D o e s n o t in v o lv e a k n o w le d g e o f b o o k k e e p in g . W o r k s f r o m u n if o r m a n d s ta n d a rd ty p e s
o f s a le s a n d c r e d i t s lip s .

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYST, BUSINESS

PAYROLL CLERK
P e rfo rm s

A n a ly z e s

t h e c l e r ic a l ta s k s n e c e s s a r y t o

re c o rd s . W o r k in v o lv e s

p ro c e s s p a y r o lls

m o st o f the fo llo w in g :

and

to

m a in ta in

p a y r o ll

P r o c e s s in g w o r k e r s ’ t im e o r p r o d u c tio n

W o rk

o r ta x d e d u c t io n s ; e d i t in g p a y r o ll lis t in g s a g a in s t s o u r c e r e c o r d s ; t r a c in g - a n d c o r r e c t i n g

f o r m u la t e

p ro c e d u re s

fo r

s o lv in g

th e m

by

use o f

in v o lv e s

m ost o f the follow ing:

A n a ly z e s

s u b je c t-m a tte r

o p e ra tio n s

to

be

a u t o m a t e d a n d id e n t if ie s c o n d it io n s a n d c r i t e r i a r e q u i r e d t o a c h ie v e s a t is f a c t o r y r e s u lts ;

e r r o r s i n l is t in g s ; a n d a s s is t in g i n p r e p a r a t i o n o f p e r i o d i c s u m m a r y p a y r o l l r e p o r t s . I n a

s p e c if ie s n u m b e r a n d t y p e s o f r e c o r d s , f i l e s , a n d d o c u m e n t s t o b e u s e d ; o u t l i n e s a c t i o n s

n o n a u to m a te d p a y r o ll s y s te m , c o m p u te s w a g e s . W o r k m a y r e q u ir e a p r a c t ic a l k n o w l ­

to

e d g e o f g o v e r n m e n t a l r e g u la t io n s , c o m p a n y p a y r o ll p o l i c y , o r t h e c o m p u t e r s y s te m f o r

b e p e rfo rm e d

by

p e rs o n n e l a n d c o m p u te rs

m a n a g e m e n t a n d fo r p r o g r a m m in g

p r o c e s s in g p a y r o lls .

(ty p ic a lly

in

s u ffic ie n t d e ta il f o r p r e s e n ta tio n

t h is i n v o l v e s

p r e p a ra tio n

o f w o rk

to

and

d a t a f l o w c h a rts ); c o o r d in a t e s th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f te s t p r o b le m s a n d p a r t ic ip a t e s in t r i a l

KEY ENTRY OPERATOR— revised

r u n s o f n e w a n d r e v i s e d s y s te m s ; a n d r e c o m m e n d s e q u i p m e n t c h a n g e s t o o b t a i n m o r e

description

e f f e c t i v e o v e r a ll o p e r a tio n s . ( N O T E : W o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g b o t h s y s te m s a n a ly s is a n d

O p e r a t e s k e y b o a r d - c o n t r o ll e d d a t a e n t r y d e v ic e s u c h as k e y p u n c h m a c h in e o r k e y m a g n e tic

to

t io n s n e e d e d t o e n a b le p r o g r a m m e r s t o p r e p a r e r e q u i r e d d i g i t a l c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s .

r e c o r d s ; a d ju s t in g w o r k e r s ’ r e c o r d s f o r c h a n g e s in w a g e ra te s , s u p p le m e n t a r y b e n e fits ,

o p e ra te d

b u s in e s s p r o b l e m s

e l e c t r o n ic d a t a p r o c e s s in g e q u ip m e n t . D e v e l o p s a c o m p l e t e d e s c r ip t io n o f a l l s p e c if ic a ­

ta p e

o r d is k e n c o d e r t o

tra n s c r ib e

d a ta

in to

a fo rm

s u it a b le

p r o g r a m m i n g s h o u l d b e c l a s s i f i e d a s s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s i f t h i s is t h e s k i l l u s e d t o d e t e r m i n e

fo r

t h e ir p a y .)

c o m p u t e r p r o c e s s in g . W o r k r e q u ir e s s k ill in o p e r a t i n g a n a l p h a n u m e r i c k e y b o a r d a n d

D o e s n o t in c lu d e e m p lo y e e s p r i m a r i ly r e s p o n s ib le f o r t h e m a n a g e m e n t o r s u p e r v is io n

a n u n d e r s ta n d in g o f t r a n s c r ib in g p r o c e d u r e s a n d r e le v a n t d a t a e n t r y e q u ip m e n t .

o f o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c d a t a p r o c e s s in g e m p l o y e e s , o r s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d

P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d i n t o l e v e l s o n t h e b a s is o f t h e f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s :

w i t h s c ie n t if ic o r e n g in e e r in g p r o b le m s .

C lass A.

W o rk

r e q u ir e s

th e

a p p lic a t io n

of

e x p e r ie n c e

and

ju d g m e n t

in

F o r w a g e s tu d y p u r p o s e s , s y s te m s a n a ly s t s a r e c la s s ifie d as f o ll o w s :

s e le c t in g

p r o c e d u r e s t o b e f o ll o w e d a n d in s e a r c h in g f o r , i n t e r p r e t in g , s e le c tin g , o r c o d in g ite m s
to

b e e n te re d

fro m

a v a r ie ty

o f s o u rc e

d o c u m e n ts . O n

o c c a s io n

m ay

C lass A.

a ls o p e r f o r m

W o r k s in d e p e n d e n tly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n o n c o m p le x p r o b le m s

in v o lv in g

r o u t i n e w o r k a s d e s c r i b e d f o r c la s s B .

s o u rc e s
N O T E : E x c l u d e d a r e o p e r a t o r s a b o v e c la s s A

a l l p h a s e s o f s y s t e m s a n a ly s i s .

o f in p u t d a ta

d e v e lo p s

u s in g t h e k e y e n t r y c o n t r o ls t o a c c e s s ,

s a le s

r e a d , a n d e v a lu a t e t h e s u b s ta n c e o f s p e c if ic r e c o r d s t o t a k e s u b s ta n tiv e a c tio n s , o r t o

and

a n in te g r a te d

a n a ly s is r e c o r d

m u ltip le -u s e

p r o d u c tio n

in

w h ic h

P r o b le m s

a re

r e q u ir e m e n ts

c o m p le x

s c h e d u lin g , i n v e n t o r y

e v e ry

ite m

o f each

because

o f o u tp u t d a ta .

o f d iv e rs e

(F o r

e x a m p le ,

c o n t r o l , c o s t a n a ly s is , a n d

ty p e

is a u t o m a t i c a l l y

p ro c e s s e d

t h r o u g h t h e f u ll s y s te m o f r e c o r d s a n d a p p r o p r ia t e f o l l o w - u p a c t io n s a r e i n it ia t e d b y t h e

m a k e e n t r ie s r e q u i r in g a s im ila r l e v e l o f k n o w l e d g e .

c o m p u t e r . ) C o n fe r s w i t h p e rs o n s c o n c e r n e d t o d e t e r m in e t h e d a t a p r o c e s s in g p r o b le m s
W o r k is r o u t i n e a n d r e p e t i t i v e . U n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n o r f o l l o w i n g s p e c i f i c

a n d a d v is e s s u b je c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l o n t h e i m p li c a t io n s o f n e w o r r e v is e d s y s te m s o f

p r o c e d u r e s o r d e t a ile d in s t r u c tio n s , w o r k s f r o m v a r io u s s t a n d a r d iz e d s o u r c e d o c u m e n t s

d a t a p r o c e s s in g o p e r a t i o n s . M a k e s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s , i f n e e d e d , f o r a p p r o v a l o f m a j o r

w h ic h h a v e b e e n c o d e d a n d r e q u ir e l it t l e o r n o s e le c t in g , c o d in g , o r in t e r p r e t i n g o f d a t a

s y s te m s in s t a lla t io n s o r c h a n g e s a n d f o r o b t a i n i n g e q u ip m e n t .

C lass B.

t o b e e n t e r e d . R e fe r s t o s u p e r v is o r p r o b le m s a r is in g f r o m

M a y p r o v i d e f u n c t i o n a l d i r e c t i o n t o l o w e r l e v e l s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s w h o a r e a s s ig n e d t o

e r r o n e o u s ite m s , c o d e s , o r

a s s is t.

m is s in g i n f o r m a t i o n .

KEY ENTRY OPERATOR —previous

description

C lass B.

in
re q u ir e s , t h e

to

a n a ly z e ,

p la n ,

g e n e r a l d ir e c tio n

p ro g ra m ,

and

o n p r o b le m s th a t a re

o p e ra te .

P r o b le m s

a re

a p p lic a t io n

of

e x p e r ie n c e

and

ju d g m e n t

in

a bank,

in v e n to r y

s e le c t in g

m a in ta in in g
a c c o u n ts

r e c e iv a b le

m a n u fa c tu r in g

d e te r m in e

th e

in

or

d a ta

a r e t a il e s t a b lis h m e n t , o r

w h o le s a le

p r o c e s s in g

e s t a b lis h m e n t .)
p r o b le m s

and

m a in ta in in g

C o n fe rs

to b e k e y p u n c h e d fro m

m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l o n t h e im p lic a t io n s o f t h e d a t a p r o c e s s in g s y s te m s t o b e a p p lie d .

a d v is e s

w it h

s u b je c t -

OR

W o r k s o n a s e g m e n t o f a c o m p le x d a t a p r o c e s s in g s c h e m e o r s y s te m , as d e s c r ib e d f o r

s o m e r o u t in e k e y p u n c h w o r k . M a y t r a in in e x p e r ie n c e d k e y p u n c h o p e ra to r s .

c la s s A .
W o r k is r o u t i n e a n d r e p e t i t i v e . U n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n o r f o l l o w i n g s p e c i f i c

p r o c e d u r e s o r in s tru c tio n s , w o r k s f r o m

to

a c c o u n ts
a

p e rs o n s

a v a r i e t y o f s o u r c e d o c u m e n t s . O n o c c a s io n m a y a ls o p e r f o r m

c o n c e rn e d

in

p r o c e d u r e s t o b e f o ll o w e d a n d in s e a r c h in g f o r , i n t e r p r e t in g , s e le c t in g , o r c o d in g ite m s

C lass B.

of

a r e c lo s e ly r e la te d . ( F o r e x a m p le , d e v e lo p s s y s te m s f o r m a i n t a in in g d e p o s it o r a c c o u n ts

P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d i n t o l e v e l s o n t h e b a s is o f t h e f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s :

W o rk

u n c o m p lic a t e d

lim it e d c o m p le x ity b e c a u s e s o u rc e s o f in p u t d a t a a r e h o m o g e n e o u s a n d t h e o u t p u t d a t a

ta b u la tin g c a rd s o r o n ta p e .

C lass A.

W o r k s in d e p e n d e n tly o r u n d e r o n ly

r e la tiv e ly

O p e r a te s a k e y p u n c h m a c h in e to r e c o r d o r v e r if y a lp h a b e tic a n d /o r n u m e r ic d a ta o n

W o rk s

g u id a n c e

v a r io u s s ta n d a r d iz e d s o u rc e d o c u m e n ts w h ic h

on

in d e p e n d e n tly

c o m p le x

on

r o u t in e

a s s ig n m e n t s .

W o rk

a s s ig n m e n ts
is

re v ie w e d

and

re c e iv e s

fo r

in s tru c tio n

a c c u ra c y

and

o f ju d g m e n t,

c o m p lia n c e w it h in s tr u c tio n s , a n d t o in s u r e p r o p e r a lig n m e n t w i t h t h e o v e r a ll s y s te m .

h a v e b e e n c o d e d , a n d f o ll o w s s p e c if ie d p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h h a v e b e e n p r e s c r ib e d in d e t a il
a n d r e q u ir e l it t l e o r n o s e le c tin g , c o d in g , o r i n t e r p r e t i n g o f d a t a t o b e r e c o r d e d . R e fe r s

C lass C.

t o s u p e r v i s o r p r o b l e m s a r i s i n g f r o m e r r o n e o u s i t e m s o r c o d e s o r m i s s in g i n f o r m a t i o n .

of




120

a

W o r k s u n d e r i m m e d i a t e s u p e r v i s i o n , c a r r y i n g o u t a n a ly s e s a s a s s ig n e d , u s u a l l y

s in g le

a c tiv it y .

A s s ig n m e n t s

a re

d e s ig n e d

to

d e v e lo p

and

expand

p r a c tic a l

e x p e r ie n c e

in

th e

a p p lic a t io n

o f p ro c e d u re s

and

s k i ll s r e q u i r e d

f o r s y s t e m s a n a ly s i s

W o r k s o n c o m p le x p r o g r a m s (a s d e s c r ib e d

f o r c la s s A ) u n d e r c l o s e d i r e c t i o n o f a

w o r k . F o r e x a m p l e , m a y a s s is t a h i g h e r l e v e l s y s t e m s a n a l y s t b y p r e p a r i n g t h e d e t a i l e d

h ig h e r

s p e c if ic a tio n s

i n d e p e n d e n t l y p e r f o r m i n g le s s d i f f i c u l t t a s k s a s s ig n e d , a n d p e r f o r m i n g m o r e d i f f i c u l t

r e q u ir e d

by

p ro g ra m m e rs

fro m

in fo rm a tio n

d e v e lo p e d

by

th e

h ig h e r

l e v e l a n a ly s t .

C lass C.

in s tr u c tio n s w h ic h a re r e q u ir e d to s o lv e th e p r o b le m s b y

s u p e r v is o r .

M ay

a s s is t

h ig h e r

le v e l

p ro g ra m m e r

by

t h e a p p li c a t io n o f s t a n d a r d p r o c e d u r e s t o r o u t in e p r o b le m s . R e c e iv e s c lo s e s u p e r v is io n

m e r d e v e l o p s t h e p r e c i s e i n s t r u c t i o n s w h i c h , w h e n e n t e r e d i n t o t h e c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in
la n g u a g e ,

cause

th e

m a n ip u la tio n

m ost o f the follow in g:

ic s , l o g i c e m p l o y e d

o f d a ta

to

a c h ie v e

d e s ir e d

r e s u lts .

on

W o rk

t o a n a ly z e

d e t a ile d

flo w

c h a rts

to

show

o rd e r

in

w h ic h

d a ta

w ill

be

a s p e c ts

o f a s s ig n m e n t s ;

and

w o rk

is r e v i e w e d

to

v e r ify

it s

a c c u ra c y

and

COMPUTER OPERATOR—revised description

c h a r t s a n d d i a g r a m s o f t h e p r o b l e m t o b e p r o g r a m m e d ; d e v e lo p s s e q u e n c e o f p r o g r a m
w rite s

new

c o n fo r m a n c e w it h re q u ir e d p ro c e d u re s .

A p p li e s k n o w le d g e o f c o m p u te r c a p a b ilitie s , m a t h e m a t ­

b y c o m p u t e r s , a n d p a r t ic u la r s u b je c t m a t t e r i n v o l v e d

M a k e s p r a c t i c a l a p p lic a t io n s o f p r o g r a m m i n g p r a c t ic e s a n d c o n c e p t s u s u a lly

l e a r n e d i n f o r m a l t r a i n i n g c o u r s e s . A s s i g n m e n t s a r e d e s i g n e d t o d e v e l o p c o m p e t e n c e in

a u t o m a t ic d a t a p r o c e s s in g e q u ip m e n t . W o r k i n g f r o m c h a r ts o r d ia g r a m s , t h e p r o g r a m ­

s te p s ;

or

M a y g u id e o r in s tru c t l o w e r le v e l p r o g r a m m e r s .

C o n v e r t s s t a t e m e n t s o f b u s in e s s p r o b l e m s , t y p i c a l l y p r e p a r e d b y a s y s t e m s a n a l y s t ,
in to a s e q u e n c e o f d e t a ile d

in v o lv e s

p ro g ra m m e r

ta s k s u n d e r f a i r l y c lo s e d i r e c t io n .

COMPUTER PROGRAM MER, BUSINESS

coded

le v e l

I n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h o p e r a t i n g i n s t r u c t i o n s , m o n i t o r s a n d o p e r a t e s t h e c o n t r o l c o n s o le

p ro c e s s e d ;

c o n v e r t s t h e s e c h a r t s t o c o d e d i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r m a c h i n e t o f o l l o w ; te s t s a n d c o r r e c t s

of

p ro g ra m s ;

(p ro c e s s e s o n e p r o g r a m a t a t im e ) o r m u ltip r o c e s s in g (p ro c e s s e s t w o o r m o r e p r o g r a m s

p re p a re s

in s tru c tio n s

fo r

o p e ra tin g

p e rs o n n e l

d u r in g

p r o d u c tio n

ru n ;

W o rk e rs

m a in ta in s

p e r fo r m in g

re c o rd s

b o th

o f

p ro g ra m

d e v e lo p m e n t

and

s y s t e m s a n a ly s i s a n d p r o g r a m m i n g

r e v is io n s .

d ig ita l

c o m p u te r

to

p ro c e s s

d a ta .

E x e c u te s

ru n s

by

e ith e r

s e r ia l

p r o c e s s in g

s im u lt a n e o u s ly ). T h e f o l l o w i n g d u tie s c h a r a c t e r iz e th e w o r k o f a c o m p u t e r o p e r a to r :

a n a ly z e s , r e v i e w s , a n d a lt e r s p r o g r a m s t o in c r e a s e o p e r a t in g e f f i c i e n c y o r a d a p t t o n e w
re q u ir e m e n ts ;

a

(N O T E :

s h o u l d b e c l a s s i f i e d as

•

s y s t e m s a n a l y s t s i f t h i s is t h e s k i l l u s e d t o d e t e r m i n e t h e i r p a y . )

S tu d ie s o p e r a tin g in s tru c tio n s to d e te r m in e e q u ip m e n t s e tu p n e e d e d .

•

L o a d s e q u i p m e n t w i t h r e q u i r e d i t e m s ( t a p e s , c a r d s , d is k s , p a p e r , e t c . ) .

D o e s n o t i n c l u d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s ib le f o r t h e m a n a g e m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n

•

S w it c h e s n e c e s s a r y a u x il ia r y e q u ip m e n t in t o s y s te m .

o f o t h e r e l e c t r o n ic d a t a p r o c e s s in g e m p lo y e e s , o r p r o g r a m m e r s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d

•

S ta rts a n d o p e ra te s c o m p u te r .

w it h s c ie n tific a n d / o r e n g in e e r in g p r o b le m s .

•

R e s p o n d s to o p e r a tin g a n d c o m p u te r o u tp u t in s tru c tio n s .

F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , p r o g r a m m e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d as f o l l o w s :

•

R e v ie w s

e r r o r m e s s a g e s a n d m a k e s c o r r e c tio n s d u r in g o p e ra tio n

or

re fe rs

p r o b le m s .

C lass A.
w h ic h

W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d ir e c tio n o n c o m p le x p r o b le m s

r e q u ir e

W o r k in g fro m

c o m p e te n c e

in

a ll

phases

o f p r o g r a m m in g

c o n c e p ts

and

•

d i a g r a m s a n d c h a r t s w h i c h i d e n t if y t h e n a t u r e o f d e s ir e d r e s u lts , m a j o r

M ay

p r o c e s s in g s te p s t o b e a c c o m p lis h e d , a n d t h e r e la tio n s h ip s b e t w e e n v a r io u s s te p s o f t h e
p r o b le m

s o lv in g

r o u tin e ;

p la n s

th e

fu ll

ra n g e

o f p r o g r a m m in g

a c tio n s

needed

th is

o r g a n iz e d
d iv e r s e

le v e l,
to

d a ta

p r o g r a m m in g

p ro d u c e
e le m e n ts .

is

d iffic u lt

s e v e ra l in te rr e la te d
A

w id e

v a r ie ty

because

c o m p u te r

b u t d iv e r s e

e q u ip m e n t

p ro d u c ts f r o m

m ust

te s t-ru n

p ro g ra m s .

to

q u a lifie d

e f f i c i e n t l y u t il i z e t h e c o m p u t e r s y s te m in a c h ie v in g d e s ir e d e n d p r o d u c ts .
A t

M a in ta in s o p e r a tin g r e c o r d .

p r a c tic e s .
new

or

scope

m o d ifie d

o f t h is

p ro g ra m s .

d e f in it io n

c o m p u te r o p e ra to rs , f u lly

p ro v id in g

be

The

te c h n ic a l

a s s is t a n c e

to

M ay

in c lu d e s

q u a lifie d
lo w e r

a s s is t

t r a in e e s

in

m o d ify in g

w o r k in g

to

s y s te m s

becom e

or

f u lly

c o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r , a n d le a d o p e r a to r s

le v e l

o p e ra to rs .

It

e x c lu d e s

w o rk e rs

who

m o n ito r a n d o p e r a te r e m o t e te r m in a ls .

n u m e ro u s an d

a n d e x t e n s iv e n u m b e r o f i n t e r n a l p r o c e s s in g

C lass A.

a c t i o n s m u s t o c c u r . T h i s r e q u i r e s s u c h a c t i o n s as d e v e l o p m e n t o f c o m m o n o p e r a t i o n s

I n a d d i t i o n t o w o r k a s s ig n m e n t s d e s c r i b e d f o r a c la s s B o p e r a t o r ( s e e b e l o w ) t h e

w o r k o f a c la s s A o p e r a t o r i n v o l v e s a t l e a s t o n e o f t h e f o l l o w i n g :

w h i c h c a n b e r e u s e d , e s t a b lis h m e n t o f lin k a g e p o in ts b e t w e e n o p e r a tio n s , a d ju s tm e n ts
t o d a t a w h e n p r o g r a m r e q u ir e m e n t s e x c e e d c o m p u t e r s to r a g e c a p a c it y , a n d s u b s ta n tia l

•

m a n ip u la t io n a n d r e s e q u e n c in g o f d a t a e le m e n ts to f o r m a h ig h ly in t e g r a t e d p r o g r a m .

D e v ia te s f r o m
c o n s e rv e

M a y p r o v i d e f u n c t i o n a l d i r e c t i o n t o l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r s w h o a r e a s s ig n e d t o

s ta n d a rd p r o c e d u r e s to a v o id

c o m p u te r

tim e

even

th o u g h

th e

t h e lo s s o f i n f o r m a t i o n

p ro c e d u re s

a p p lie d

o r to

m a t e r ia lly

a l t e r t h e c o m p u t e r u n i t ’ s p r o d u c t i o n p la n s .

a s s is t.
•

T e s ts n e w p r o g r a m s , a p p lic a t io n s , a n d p r o c e d u r e s .

s im p le

•

A d v is e s p r o g r a m m e r s a n d s u b je c t - m a t t e r e x p e r ts o n s e tu p te c h n iq u e s .

p r o g r a m s , o r o n s im p le s e g m e n ts o f c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s . P r o g r a m s ( o r s e g m e n ts ) u s u a lly

•

C lass B.

W o rk s

in d e p e n d e n tly

p ro c e s s

in fo rm a tio n

R e p o rts

and

to

p ro d u c e

m ay

be

p ro c e s s e d ,

u n d e r o n ly

d a ta

lis t in g s a r e p r o d u c e d

a d d it io n s t o o r d e le t io n s f r o m
re c o rd s

or

by

in

tw o

g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n

o r th re e

v a r ie d

on

r e la tiv e ly

sequences

r e fin in g , a d a p tin g , a r r a y in g , o r m a k in g

p r o b le m

m in o r

(s u c h

in p u t d a t a w h ic h a r e r e a d ily a v a ila b le . W h i l e n u m e r o u s

th e

d a ta

have

been

r e f in e d

in

p r io r a c tio n s

A s s is t s i n ( 1 ) m a i n t a i n i n g , m o d i f y i n g , a n d d e v e l o p i n g o p e r a t i n g s y s te m s o r
p ro g ra m s ;

o r fo rm a ts .

( 2 ) d e v e lo p in g

o p e ra tin g

in s t r u c tio n s

and

a s s is t a n c e

r e q u ir e s

a

w o r k in g

k n o w le d g e

of

c o m p u t e r fe a t u r e s , a n d s o f t w a r e s y s te m s ).

so th a t th e

a c c u r a c y a n d s e q u e n c in g o f d a t a c a n b e te s te d b y u s in g a f e w r o u t in e c h e c k s . T y p i c a l l y ,
t h e p r o g r a m d e a ls w i t h r o u t in e r e c o r d k e e p i n g o p e r a tio n s .




OR

A n o p e r a t o r a t th is l e v e l t y p i c a l l y g u id e s l o w e r le v e l o p e r a t o r s .

121

te c h n iq u e s

to

cover

s itu a tio n s ; a n d / o r ( 3 ) s w it c h in g t o e m e r g e n c y b a c k u p p r o c e d u r e s
p ro g ra m

la n g u a g e ,

C lass B.

In

a d d itio n

to

e s t a b lis h e d

p ro d u c tio n

ru n s , w o r k

a s s ig n m e n t s i n c l u d e

ru n s

O p e ra te s

u n d e r d i r e c t s u p e r v is io n

in v o lv in g n e w p r o g r a m s , a p p lic a tio n s , a n d p r o c e d u r e s (i.e ., s itu a tio n s w h ic h r e q u ir e th e

p ro g ra m s

o p e r a t o r t o a d a p t t o a v a r i e t y o f p r o b le m s ) . A t th is le v e l, t h e o p e r a t o r h a s t h e t r a in in g

o p e ra to r b y

and

d i f f i c u l t ta s k s f o l l o w i n g

e x p e r ie n c e

to

w o rk

f a ir ly

in d e p e n d e n t ly

in

c a r r y in g

A s s ig n m e n ts m a y r e q u ir e t h e o p e r a t o r t o s e le c t f r o m
o p e ra tin g p r o c e d u r e s . In
tio n s ,

a p p lie s

s ta n d a rd

s ta n d a rd

out

m ost

a s s ig n m e n t s .

o p e ra tin g

p ro c e d u re s w h e n

or

s ta n d a rd

c o r r e c tiv e

p ro c e d u re s ,

p ro c e d u re s

but

m ay

fa il i f d e v ia t io n

d e v ia te

t r a in in g (s o m e t im e s a u g m e n te d b y c la s s r o o m

th e o p e ra to r b e fo re
w ith

r u n n in g
c la s s A .

le s s d i f f i c u l t

p ro g ra m s
M ay

o r s e g m e n ts

a s s is t a h i g h e r

t a s k s a s s ig n e d , a n d

d e t a ile d in s t r u c tio n s a n d w i t h

fre q u e n t r e v ie w

of

le v e l

p e r fo r m in g

o f o p e ra tio n s

in s tr u c tio n ). W h e n

le a r n in g

and

d u r in g

a

p ro g ra m ,

h o w e v e r,

s ta n d a rd

o p e ra tin g

or

th e

c o r r e c tiv e

th e

ru n . A f t e r th e

o p e ra to r

w o rk s

p ro c e d u re s

in

f a ir ly

to

in r u n n in g r o u t in e p r o g r a m s . U s u a l ly

h as r e c e iv e d

to d e te c t p r o b le m s

s o m e f o r m a l t r a in in g

in

PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
O p e r a t e s p e r ip h e r a l e q u ip m e n t w h ic h d i r e c t l y s u p p o r ts d i g i t a l c o m p u t e r o p e r a tio n s .
S u c h e q u i p m e n t is u n i q u e l y a n d s p e c i f i c a l l y d e s i g n e d f o r c o m p u t e r a p p l i c a t i o n s , b u t

to ru n

in d e p e n d e n t ly

k n o w le d g e o f th e c o m p u te r e q u ip m e n t u s e d a n d a b ilit y

c o m p u t e r o p e r a t i o n . M a y a s s is t h i g h e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r o n c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .

n e e d n o t b e p h y s ic a lly o r e l e c t r o n ic a lly c o n n e c t e d
c a rd

o p e r a to r h a s g a in e d

r e s p o n d in g

W o r k s o n r o u t in e p r o g r a m s u n d e r c lo s e s u p e r v is io n . Is e x p e c t e d t o d e v e lo p

in v o lv e d

d o e s n o t m a t e r ia lly

o r a b o rts th e p r o g r a m

p r o g r a m s , t h e s u p e r v is o r o r a h i g h e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r p r o v id e s d e t a ile d w r i t t e n o r o r a l

a p p ly in g

p e r fo r m in g

fo r

C lass C.

w h i c h p r e s e n t f e w o p e r a t i n g p r o b l e m s ) . A s s i g n m e n t s m a y c o n s is t p r i m a r i l y o f o n - t h e -

e x p e r ie n c e

in d e p e n d e n tly

a c o m p u te r

d e s c r ib e d

w o r k in g

fro m

W o r k a s s ig n m e n t s a r e l i m i t e d t o e s t a b l i s h e d p r o d u c t i o n r u n s ( i . e . , p r o g r a m s

g u id a n c e to

c h a r a c te r is t ic s

p e rfo rm e d .

a v a r ie t y o f s ta n d a rd s e tu p a n d

w h e n p r o c e d u r e s a p p lie d d o n o t p r o v i d e a s o lu t io n . M a y g u id e l o w e r le v e l o p e r a to r s .

jo b

th e

r e s p o n d in g t o c o m p u t e r o u t p u t in s t r u c tio n s o r e r r o r c o n d i­

a l t e r t h e c o m p u t e r u n i t ’s p r o d u c t i o n p la n s . R e f e r s t h e p r o b l e m

C lass C.

w it h

r e a d /p u n c h e s , ta p e re a d e rs , ta p e

to a c o m p u te r . P r in te r s , p lo tte r s ,

u n its o r d r iv e s , d is k

u n its o r d r iv e s , a n d d a t a

d is p la y u n its a re e x a m p le s o f s u c h e q u ip m e n t .

in

T h e f o ll o w in g d u tie s c h a r a c t e r iz e t h e w o r k o f a p e r ip h e r a l e q u ip m e n t o p e r a t o r :

c o m p u te r

o u t p u t in s t r u c tio n s o r e r r o r c o n d it io n s , b u t r e f e r s p r o b le m s t o a h ig h e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r o r

•

L o a d in g

t h e s u p e r v is o r w h e n s ta n d a r d p r o c e d u r e s fa il.

fo rm s ,

p r in te rs

and

t h ic k n e s s ,

p lo tte r s

te n s io n ,

w ith

p r in tin g

c o rre c t
d e n s ity ,

p a p e r;
and

a d ju s tin g

lo c a tio n ;

c o n tr o ls

and

fo r

u n lo a d in g

h a rd c o p y .

COMPUTER OPERATOR— previous
M o n ito r s

and

o p e ra te s th e

description

c o n t r o l c o n s o le

•

o f a d ig ita l c o m p u te r to

L a b e l l i n g t a p e r e e ls , d is k s , o r c a r d d e c k s .

•

p ro c e s s d a ta

C h e c k in g

a c c o r d in g to o p e r a t in g in s t r u c tio n s , u s u a lly p r e p a r e d b y a p r o g r a m m e r . W o r k in c lu d e s

m ost o f the follow in g:
lo a d s

e q u ip m e n t

S tu d ie s in s tr u c tio n s to d e t e r m in e e q u ip m e n t s e tu p a n d o p e ra tio n s :

w ith

re q u ir e d

ite m s

(ta p e

r e e ls ,

c a rd s ,

e tc .);

s w it c h e s

p ro g ra m m e r;

o p e ra tio n
and

and

m a in ta in s

d e te r m in e s
o p e ra tin g

cause

or

re c o rd s .

re fe rs

M ay

p r o b le m

te s t

and

to

a s s is t

s u p e r v is o r
in

m o u n tin g

and

d is m o u n tin g

d e s ig n a te d

•

ta p e

r e e ls

or

S e tt in g c o n tr o ls w h ic h r e g u la t e o p e r a t io n o f t h e e q u ip m e n t .
O b s e r v in g

panel

lig h ts

fo r

w a r n in g s

and

e rro r

in d ic a tio n s

and

ta k in g

a p p r o p r ia te a c tio n .
•

t o c o m p u t e r t o c o r r e c t o p e r a t i n g p r o b le m s a n d m e e t s p e c ia l c o n d it io n s ; r e v i e w s e r r o r s
d u r in g

and

•

n e c e s s a ry

a u x ilia r y e q u ip m e n t in t o c ir c u it , a n d s ta r ts a n d o p e r a te s c o m p u t e r ; m a k e s a d ju s t m e n t s

m ade

la b e ls

d is k s o n s p e c i f i e d u n i t s o r d r i v e s .

E x a m in in g

ta p e s ,

c a rd s ,

or

o th e r

m a te r ia l

fo r

c re a s e s ,

te a rs ,

or

o th e r

d e f e c t s w h i c h c o u ld c a u s e p r o c e s s in g p r o b le m s .

or

c o r r e c tin g
T h i s c la s s ific a t io n e x c lu d e s w o r k e r s ( 1 ) w h o m o n i t o r a n d o p e r a t e a c o n t r o l c o n s o le

p ro g ra m .

(s e e

F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , c o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s a r e c la s s ifie d as f o llo w s :

c o m p u te r

o p e ra to r)

or

a

re m o te

te r m in a l,

or

(2 )

w hose

d u tie s

a re

lim ite d

to

o p e r a t in g d e c o lla t e r s , b u r s te r s , s e p a r a to r s , o r s im ila r e q u ip m e n t .

C lass A.

O p e r a te s in d e p e n d e n t ly , o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n , a c o m p u te r r u n n in g

p ro g ra m s

w it h

m o s t o f th e

fo llo w in g

c h a r a c te r is t ic s :

N ew

COMPUTER DATA LIBRARIAN

p ro g r a m s a re fr e q u e n tly

M a in ta in s

te s te d a n d i n t r o d u c e d ; s c h e d u lin g r e q u ir e m e n t s a r e o f c r i t i c a l i m p o r t a n c e t o m in im iz e

p r o c e s s in g

d o w n t im e ; t h e p r o g r a m s a r e o f c o m p l e x d e s ig n s o t h a t i d e n t if i c a t i o n o f e r r o r s o u r c e

lib r a r y

o f m e d ia (ta p e s , d is k s , c a r d s , c a s s e tte s ) u s e d f o r a u t o m a t ic

a p p lic a t io n s . T h e

f o llo w in g

o r s im ila r d u tie s c h a r a c te r iz e

th e

w o rk

d a ta
of a

c o m p u t e r d a ta lib r a r ia n : C la s s if y in g , c a t a lo g in g , a n d s t o r in g m e d ia in a c c o r d a n c e w i t h a
o fte n r e q u ir e s a w o r k in g k n o w le d g e o f th e t o ta l p r o g r a m , a n d a lte r n a te p r o g r a m s m a y

s t a n d a r d iz e d s y s te m ; u p o n p r o p e r r e q u e s ts , r e le a s in g m e d ia f o r p r o c e s s in g ; m a i n t a in i n g

n o t b e a v a ila b le . M a y g i v e d ir e c t io n a n d g u id a n c e t o l o w e r l e v e l o p e r a to r s .

C lass B.

r e c o r d s o f r e le a s e s a n d r e t u r n s ; i n s p e c t i n g r e t u r n e d m e d i a f o r d a m a g e o r e x c e s s i v e w e a r
to

O p e r a te s in d e p e n d e n t ly , o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n , a c o m p u te r r u n n in g

p ro g ra m s

d e t e r m in e

w h e th e r

or

not

th e y

need

r e p la c in g .

M ay

p e rfo rm

m in o r

r e p a ir s

to

d a m a g e d ta p e s .
w it h

m ost

of

th e

fo llo w in g

c h a r a c te r is t ic s :

M ost

o f

th e

p ro g ra m s

a re

DRAFTER— revised

e s t a b l is h e d p r o d u c t i o n r u n s , t y p i c a l l y r u n o n a r e g u l a r l y r e c u r r i n g b a s is ; t h e r e is l i t t l e o r

description

n o t e s tin g o f n e w p r o g r a m s r e q u ir e d ; a l t e r n a t e p r o g r a m s a r e p r o v i d e d in c a s e o r i g in a l
p r o g r a m n e e d s m a jo r c h a n g e o r c a n n o t b e c o r r e c t e d w it h in a r e a s o n a b ly s h o rt tim e . In

P e r f o r m s d r a f t in g w o r k r e q u ir in g k n o w l e d g e a n d s k ill in d r a f t i n g m e t h o d s , p r o c e d u r e s ,

com m on

a n d te c h n iq u e s . P r e p a r e s d r a w in g s o f s tr u c t u r e s , m e c h a n ic a l a n d e le c t r ic a l e q u ip m e n t ,

e r r o r s itu a tio n s , d ia g n o s e s c a u s e a n d

ta k e s c o r r e c tiv e

a c tio n . T h is

u s u a lly

in v o lv e s a p p ly i n g p r e v i o u s l y p r o g r a m m e d c o r r e c t i v e s te p s , o r u s in g s t a n d a r d c o r r e c ­
t io n te c h n iq u e s .

p ip in g

OR




a n d d u c t s y s t e m s a n d o t h e r s i m i l a r e q u i p m e n t , s y s t e m s , a n d a s s e m b li e s . U s e s

r e c o g n i z e d s y s te m s o f s y m b o ls , l e g e n d s , s h a d i n g s , a n d l i n e s h a v i n g s p e c i f i c m e a n i n g s i n

122

d r a w i n g s . D r a w i n g s a r e u s e d t o c o m m u n i c a t e e n g i n e e r i n g i d e a s , d e s ig n s , a n d i n f o r m a ­

C lass D .

t io n in s u p p o r t o f e n g in e e r in g f u n c t io n s .

or

P r e p a r e s d r a w in g s o f s im p le , e a s ily v is u a liz e d p a r ts o f e q u ip m e n t f r o m s k e tc h e s

m a rk e d -u p

c o m p le te
T h e f o llo w in g a r e e x c lu d e d w h e n t h e y c o n s titu te th e p r im a r y p u rp o s e o f th e jo b :

p rin ts .

S e le c t s

a s s ig n m e n t s .

a p p r o p r ia te

D r a w in g s

fit

t e m p la te s a n d

fa m ilia r

p r o b le m s . S u p e r v is o r p r o v id e s d e ta ile d

p a tte rn s

o t h e r e q u ip m e n t n e e d e d
and

in s tr u c tio n s o n n e w

p re s e n t

fe w

to

te c h n ic a l

a s s ig n m e n t s , g i v e s g u i d ­

a n c e w h e n q u e s tio n s a r is e , a n d r e v i e w s c o m p l e t e d w o r k f o r a c c u r a c y .
•

D e s ig n

w o rk

r e q u ir in g

th e

te c h n ic a l

k n o w le d g e ,

s k ill,

and

a b ilit y

to

c o n c e i v e o r o r i g i n a t e d e s ig n s ;

C lass E .

•

I ll u s t r a t i n g w o r k r e q u i r in g a r t is t ic a b ilit y ;

c l e a r l y in d ic a t e d r e v is io n s . U s e s a p p r o p r ia t e t e m p la t e s t o d r a w

•

W o rk

•

C a r t o g r a p h ic

in v o lv in g

th e

p r e p a ra tio n

o f c h a r ts , d ia g r a m s , r o o m

a rra n g e m e n ts ,

c u r v e d lin e s . A s s i g n ­

m e n t s a r e d e s i g n e d t o d e v e l o p i n c r e a s i n g s k i l l i n v a r i o u s d r a f t i n g t e c h n i q u e s . W o r k is

f lo o r p la n s , e tc .;

s p o t-c h e c k e d d u r in g p ro g re s s a n d r e v ie w e d u p o n c o m p le t io n .

w o rk

in v o lv in g

t h e p r e p a r a tio n o f m a p s o r p la ts a n d r e la te d

m a t e r ia ls , a n d d r a w in g s o f g e o lo g ic a l s tr u c tu r e s ; a n d
•

W o r k i n g u n d e r c lo s e s u p e r v is io n , t r a c e s o r c o p ie s f in is h e d d r a w in g s , m a k in g

NOTE:

S u p e r v is o r y w o r k in v o lv in g th e m a n a g e m e n t o f a d r a f tin g p r o g r a m

o r th e

E x c l u d e d r a f t e r s p e r f o r m i n g e l e m e n t a r y t a s k s w h i l e r e c e i v i n g t r a i n i n g in t h e

m o s t b a s ic d r a f t i n g m e t h o d s .

s u p e r v is io n o f d r a f te r s .

DRAFTER— previous

description

P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d i n t o l e v e l s o n t h e b a s is o f t h e f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s .

C lass A.
C lass A .
or

W o r k s c l o s e l y w i t h d e s ig n o r ig in a t o r s , p r e p a r in g d r a w in g s o f u n u s u a l, c o m p l e x

o r ig in a l

d iffic u lt

d e s ig n s

a s s ig n m e n ts

w h ic h

r e q u ir e

r e q u ir in g

a

h ig h

d e g re e

c o n s id e r a b le

o f p r e c is io n .

in it ia tiv e ,

P e rfo rm s

r e s o u r c e fu ln e s s ,

u n u s u a lly

and

s u p p o rt

d r a ftin g

th e

g r a p h ic

p r e s e n ta tio n

th e

d e s ig n

of

and

change on

c o m p o n e n ts

and

o f c o m p le x

ite m s

h a v in g

d i s t i n c t i v e d e s ig n

e s ta b lis h e d d r a f t i n g p r e c e d e n t s . W o r k s in c lo s e

o r ig in a to r ,

th e e ffe c t o f e a c h

r e la tio n s h ip s

o p e r a t i o n a r e r e s o lv e d b y t h e d r a w in g s p r o d u c e d . E x e r c is e s in d e p e n d e n t j u d g m e n t in

m ay

re c o m m e n d

m in o r

d e s ig n

t h e d e t a ils o f f o r m , f u n c t io n , a n d

p a rts .

W o rk s

w it h

a

m in im u m

of

changes.
p o s it io n a l

s u p e r v is o r y

a s s is t a n c e . C o m p l e t e d w o r k is r e v i e w e d b y d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r f o r c o n s i s t e n c y w i t h p r i o r

d a t a b a s e d o n a k n o w l e d g e o f t h e d e s ig n in te n t. A l t h o u g h

w o r k i n g p r i m a r i l y as a d r a f t e r , m a y o c c a s io n a lly p e r f o r m

w it h

A n a ly z e s

e x p e r t i s e . A s s u r e s t h a t a n t i c i p a t e d p r o b l e m s i n m a n u f a c t u r e , a s s e m b ly , i n s t a l l a t i o n , a n d

s e le c t in g a n d i n t e r p r e t i n g

P la n s

fe a tu re s th a t d if f e r s ig n ific a n tly f r o m

e n g in e e r in g d e t e r m in a tio n s . M a y e it h e r p r e p a r e d r a w in g s o r d ir e c t t h e ir p r e p a r a tio n b y

e n g i n e e r i n g d e s ig n w o r k i n

lo w e r le v e l d ra fte rs .

i n t e r p r e t i n g g e n e r a l d e s ig n s p r e p a r e d b y o t h e r s o r i n c o m p l e t i n g m is s in g d e s i g n d e t a i l s .
M a y p r o v id e a d v ic e a n d g u id a n c e to lo w e r le v e l d r a fte rs o r s e rv e as c o o r d in a t o r a n d

C lass B.

p l a n n e r f o r l a r g e a n d c o m p le x d r a f t i n g p r o je c ts .

a s s e m b ly d r a w in g s . D r a w i n g s

in c lu d e c o m p le x

d e s ig n f e a t u r e s

use

of

m a th e m a tic a l

f o r m u la s

to

c o m p u te

w e ig h ts ,

lo a d

by

d r a w in g s ,

an

and

e n g in e e r o r d e s ig n e r , d e t e r m in e s
s u p p le m e n ta r y

r e q u ir e d in fo r m a tio n fr o m

in fo r m a tio n

needed

th e m o s t a p p r o p r ia t e
to

c o m p le te

fo r m u la s

t io n s ,

S e le c t s

p r e c e d e n t s , m a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ c a ta lo g s , a n d t e c h n ic a l g u id e s .

and

fo r

a

v a r ie ty

o f o r g a n iz a t io n s

w h ic h

have

w o r k in g

d r a w in g s

p r e c is e

th a t

r e g u la r ly

p o s it io n a l

r e q u ir e
used.

th e

D u tie s

o f s u b a s s e m b lie s w i t h
r e la tio n s h ip s

b e tw e e n

m a k in g

w a ll

s e c tio n s , f l o o r

p la n s , a n d

n e c e s s a ry c o m p u ta tio n s to

ro o f.

U s es a c c e p te d

d e t e r m in e q u a n tit ie s o f

and

a d v ic e

fro m

s u p e r v is o r .

C o m p le te d

w o rk

is c h e c k e d

fo r

or

r e p a ir

p u rp o s e s .

Types

o f d r a w in g s

p re p a re d

in c lu d e

is o m e tric

p r o j e c t io n s ( d e p i c t in g t h r e e d im e n s io n s in a c c u r a t e s c a le ) a n d s e c tio n a l v ie w s t o c l a r if y

N O T E : E x c l u d e d r a f t e r s p e r f o r m i n g w o r k o f s im ila r d i f f i c u l t y t o t h a t d e s c r ib e d a t th is
s u p p o rt

and

a s s ig n m e n t s

te c h n iq u e s

P r e p a r e s d e t a il d r a w in g s o f s in g le u n its o r p a r ts f o r e n g in e e r in g , c o n s tr u c tio n ,

m a n u fa c tu r in g ,

p r o v id e

as: P r e p a r e s

f u n c t io n s ,

o f fo u n d a tio n s ,

m a n u a ls in

r e q u ir e m e n ts ,

C lass C.

s u g g e s t m e t h o d s o f a p p r o a c h o r p r o v i d e a d v ic e o n u n u s u a lly d i f f i c u l t p r o b le m s .

w ho

w o rk

d r a ftin g

d r a w in g

te c h n ic a l a d e q u a c y .

In d e p e n d e n t ly r e s o lv e s m o s t o f t h e p r o b le m s e n c o u n t e r e d . S u p e r v is o r o r d e s ig n e r m a y

but

c o m p le x

m a t e r ia ls t o b e u s e d , lo a d c a p a c it ie s , s t r e n g t h s , s tre s s e s , e t c . R e c e iv e s in it ia l in s t r u c ­

v ie w s , d e ta il

a s s ig n m e n t s .

m u ltip le

d e t a il d r a w in g s

c a p a c it ie s ,

d im e n s io n s , q u a n t it ie s o f m a t e r ia ls , e t c . W o r k i n g f r o m s k e tc h e s a n d v e r b a l i n f o r m a t i o n
s u p p lie d

such

shapes,

and

s t a n d a r d iz e d

c o m p o n e n t s ; p r e p a r e s a r c h it e c t u r a l d r a w in g s f o r c o n s t r u c t io n o f a b u ild in g in c lu d in g

t h a t r e q u ir e c o n s id e r a b le d r a f t i n g s k ill to v is u a liz e a n d p o r t r a y . A s s ig n m e n t s r e g u l a r ly
th e

in v o lv e

ir r e g u la r

P r e p a r e s c o m p l e t e s e ts o f c o m p l e x d r a w i n g s w h i c h i n c l u d e m u l t i p l e v i e w s ,

d e t a il d r a w in g s , a n d

le v e l

n o n ro u tin e

o f m o s t o f th e

t y p ic a lly

C lass B .

r e q u ir e

P e rfo rm s

a p p lic a tio n

p o s it io n in g o f c o m p o n e n t s a n d c o n v e y n e e d e d in f o r m a t i o n . C o n s o lid a te s d e t a ils f r o m a

w id e ly

n u m b e r o f s o u r c e s a n d a d j u s t s o r t r a n s p o s e s s c a le a s r e q u i r e d . S u g g e s t e d m e t h o d s o f

d i f f e r i n g f u n c t io n s o r r e q u ir e m e n t s .

a p p r o a c h , a p p lic a b le p r e c e d e n ts , a n d a d v ic e o n s o u r c e m a t e r ia ls a r e g iv e n w it h in it ia l

C lass C .

a s s ig n m e n t s . I n s t r u c t i o n s a r e le s s c o m p l e t e w h e n a s s ig n m e n t s r e c u r . W o r k m a y b e s p o t -

P r e p a r e s v a r i o u s d r a w i n g s o f p a r t s a n d a s s e m b lie s , i n c l u d i n g s e c t i o n a l p r o f i l e s ,

c h e c k e d d u r in g p ro g re s s .

i r r e g u l a r o r r e v e r s e c u r v e s , h i d d e n l in e s , a n d s m a l l o r i n t r i c a t e d e t a i l s . W o r k r e q u i r e s
u s e o f m o s t o f t h e c o n v e n t io n a l d r a f t in g te c h n iq u e s a n d a w o r k in g k n o w le d g e o f th e

DRAFTER-TRACER

t e r m s a n d p r o c e d u r e s o f t h e i n d u s t r y . F a m i l i a r o r r e c u r r i n g w o r k is a s s ig n e d i n g e n e r a l

C o p ie s p la n s a n d d r a w in g s p r e p a r e d b y o t h e r s b y p l a c i n g t r a c in g c lo t h o r p a p e r o v e r

t e r m s ; u n f a m i li a r a s s ig n m e n ts i n c lu d e in f o r m a t i o n o n m e th o d s , p r o c e d u r e s , s o u rc e s o f
i n f o r m a t i o n , a n d p r e c e d e n t s t o b e f o l l o w e d . S im p le r e v is io n s t o e x is t in g d r a w in g s m a y

d r a w in g s a n d tr a c in g

b e a s s ig n e d w i t h a v e r b a l e x p l a n a t i o n o f t h e d e s i r e d r e s u lt s ; m o r e c o m p l e x r e v i s i o n s a r e

p r i m a r i l y c o n s i s t i n g o f s t r a i g h t l i n e s a n d a l a r g e s c a le n o t r e q u i r i n g c l o s e d e l i n e a t i o n . )

p r o d u c e d f r o m s k e tc h e s w h i c h c l e a r l y d e p ic t t h e d e s ir e d p r o d u c t .

A N D /O R




123

w it h

p e n o r p e n c il. ( D o e s n o t in c lu d e t r a c in g lim it e d t o p la n s

P r e p a r e s s im p le o r r e p e t i t i v e

d r a w in g s o f e a s ily

v is u a liz e d

ite m s . W o r k

is c l o s e l y

i n s t r u m e n t s ( e . g . , m u l t i m e t e r s , a u d i o s i g n a l g e n e r a t o r s , t u b e t e s t e r s , o s c i l l o s c o p e s ) . Is

s u p e r v is e d d u r i n g p r o g r e s s .

n o t re q u ir e d
h o w e v e r,

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

to

m ay

be
be

f a m ilia r
a c q u ir e d

w it h

th e

in te r r e la tio n s h ip s

th ro u g h

a s s ig n m e n t s

o f c ir c u it s .

d e s ig n e d

to

T h is

k n o w le d g e ,

in c r e a s e

c o m p e te n c e

( in c lu d in g c la s s r o o m t r a in i n g ) so t h a t w o r k e r c a n a d v a n c e t o h i g h e r l e v e l t e c h n ic ia n .

W o r k s o n v a r io u s t y p e s o f e le c t r o n ic e q u ip m e n t a n d r e la te d d e v ic e s b y p e r f o r m in g

R e c e i v e s t e c h n i c a l g u i d a n c e , as r e q u i r e d , f r o m s u p e r v i s o r o r h i g h e r l e v e l t e c h n i c i a n .

o n e o r a c o m b in a t io n o f th e f o llo w in g : In s t a llin g , m a in ta in in g , r e p a ir in g , o v e r h a u lin g ,
W o rk

t r o u b le s h o o t in g , m o d ify in g * , c o n s t r u c t in g , a n d te s tin g . W o r k r e q u ir e s p r a c t i c a l a p p li c a ­
t io n o f t e c h n ic a l k n o w l e d g e o f e le c t r o n ic s p r in c ip le s , a b i li t y t o d e t e r m in e m a lfu n c tio n s ,
a n d s k ill t o p u t e q u ip m e n t in r e q u ir e d o p e r a t i n g c o n d it io n .
The

e q u ip m e n t — c o n s is t in g

o f e ith e r m a n y

d iffe re n t

k in d s

o f c ir c u its

t r a n s m it t in g

and

r e c e iv in g

e q u ip m e n t ( e .g .,

r e v ie w

w hen new

o r advanced

REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSE

o r m u ltip le

A

r e p e t i t i o n o f t h e s a m e k i n d o f c i r c u i t — i n c l u d e s , b u t is n o t l i m i t e d t o , t h e f o l l o w i n g : ( a )
E le c tr o n ic

is t y p i c a l l y s p o t - c h e c k e d , b u t is g i v e n d e t a i l e d

a s s ig n m e n t s a r e i n v o l v e d .

r e g is te r e d

n u r s e g iv e s n u r s in g s e r v ic e u n d e r g e n e r a l m e d ic a l d ir e c t io n

to ill o r

in ju r e d e m p lo y e e s o r o t h e r p e rs o n s w h o b e c o m e i ll o r s u f f e r a n a c c id e n t o n t h e p r e m is e s

r a d a r , r a d io , te le v is io n , te le ­

a com bin ation o f the follow in g:

p h o n e , s o n a r , n a v ig a t io n a l a id s ), ( b ) d ig i t a l a n d a n a lo g c o m p u te r s , a n d ( c ) in d u s t r ia l a n d

o f a f a c t o r y o r o t h e r e s ta b lis h m e n t. D u t i e s i n v o l v e

m e d ic a l m e a s u r in g a n d c o n t r o l li n g e q u ip m e n t .

f ir s t a id t o t h e i ll o r in ju r e d ; a t t e n d in g t o s u b s e q u e n t d r e s s in g o f e m p l o y e e s ’ in ju r ie s ;

T h is

c la s s ific a tio n

e x c lu d e s

r e p a ir e r s

of

such

s ta n d a rd

e le c tr o n ic

e q u ip m e n t

k e e p in g

as

r e c o r d s o f p a tie n ts t r e a te d ; p r e p a r in g

G iv in g

a c c id e n t r e p o r t s f o r c o m p e n s a t io n

or

c o m m o n o f f i c e m a c h i n e s a n d h o u s e h o l d r a d i o a n d t e l e v i s i o n s e ts ; p r o d u c t i o n a s s e m b ­

o t h e r p u r p o s e s ; a s s is t in g i n p h y s i c a l e x a m i n a t i o n s a n d h e a l t h e v a l u a t i o n s o f a p p l i c a n t s

l e r s a n d t e s t e r s ; w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y d u t y is s e r v i c i n g e l e c t r o n i c t e s t i n s t r u m e n t s ;

a n d e m p lo y e e s ; a n d p la n n in g a n d c a r r y i n g o u t p r o g r a m s i n v o l v in g h e a lt h e d u c a t io n ,

te c h n ic ia n s

a c c id e n t p r e v e n tio n , e v a lu a t io n o f p la n t e n v ir o n m e n t , o r o t h e r a c t iv it ie s a f f e c t in g th e

w ho

have

a d m in is tr a tiv e

or

s u p e r v is o r y

r e s p o n s ib ilit y ;

and

d ra fte rs ,

d e s ig n e r s , a n d p r o f e s s i o n a l e n g i n e e r s .

h e a lth ,

P o s it io n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d i n t o l e v e l s o n t h e b a s is o f t h e f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s :

Class A.

w e lf a r e ,

s a fe ty

o f a ll p e r s o n n e l.

N u r s in g

s u p e r v is o r s

or

head

n u rs e s

in

A p p li e s a d v a n c e d t e c h n ic a l k n o w l e d g e t o s o lv e u n u s u a lly c o m p le x p r o b le m s

(i.e ., th o s e t h a t t y p i c a ll y

can n ot b e

Maintenance, Toolroom, and Powerplant

s o lv e d s o le ly b y r e f e r e n c e t o m a n u f a c t u r e r s ’ m a n u a ls

o r s im ila r d o c u m e n t s ) in w o r k i n g o n e le c t r o n ic e q u ip m e n t . E x a m p le s o f s u c h p r o b le m s
in c lu d e

and

e s ta b lis h m e n ts e m p l o y i n g m o r e t h a n o n e n u r s e a r e e x c lu d e d .

lo c a t io n

m a lfu n c tio n s ,
s ta n d in g

of

p e r f o r m in g

and

and

th e
such

d e n s it y

fre q u e n t

of

c ir c u it r y ,

e n g in e e r in g

in te r r e la tio n s h ip s
ta s k s

as

m a k in g

of

e le c t r o m a g n e t ic

changes.

c ir c u it s ;

c ir c u it

r e la tio n s h ip s in s ig n a l f l o w ; a n d r e g u l a r l y

W o rk

r a d ia t io n ,

in v o lv e s :

e x e r c is in g

A

in d e p e n d e n t

a n a ly s e s , c a l c u l a t i n g

is o la tin g

d e t a ile d

w ave

ju d g m e n t

fo rm s ,

MAINTENANCE CARPENTER

u n d e r­

P e r f o r m s th e c a r p e n t r y d u tie s n e c e s s a r y t o c o n s t r u c t a n d m a in t a in
b u ild in g

t r a c in g

m o st o f the following:

p r a c tic e s . M a y

P la n n in g

and

la y in g

out

o f w o rk

fro m

b lu e p r in ts ,

d r a w in g s ,

m o d e ls , o r v e r b a l in s t r u c tio n s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f c a r p e n t e r ’s h a n d t o o ls , p o r t a b l e p o w e r

W o r k m a y b e r e v i e w e d b y s u p e r v is o r ( f r e q u e n t ly a n e n g in e e r o r d e s ig n e r ) f o r g e n e r a l
a c c e p te d

r e p a ir

w o o d w o r k a n d e q u ip m e n t s u c h as b in s , c r ib s , c o u n t e r s , b e n c h e s , p a r t it io n s ,

d o o r s , f l o o r s , s t a ir s , c a s in g s , a n d t r i m m a d e o f w o o d i n a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s

u s in g c o m p le x te s t in s t r u m e n ts ( e .g ., d u a l

t r a c e o s c illo s c o p e s , Q - m e t e r s , d e v ia t io n m e t e r s , p u ls e g e n e r a t o r s ) .

c o m p lia n c e w it h

in g o o d

in

t o o ls , a n d s ta n d a r d m e a s u r in g in s t r u m e n ts ; m a k i n g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u t a t i o n s r e l a t i n g

p r o v id e te c h n ic a l g u id a n c e to lo w e r le v e l

t o d im e n s io n s o f w o r k ; a n d s e le c t in g m a t e r ia ls n e c e s s a r y f o r t h e w o r k . I n g e n e r a l, t h e

t e c h n ic ia n s .

w o r k o f t h e m a in te n a n c e c a r p e n te r r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly

C lass B.
th o s e

A p p lie s c o m p r e h e n s iv e te c h n ic a l k n o w le d g e to s o lv e c o m p le x p r o b le m s (i.e .,

th a t

ty p ic a lly

can

be

s o lv e d

s o le ly

by

p r o p e rly

in te r p r e tin g

a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

m a n u fa c tu re rs ’

MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIAN

m a n u a ls o r s i m i l a r d o c u m e n t s ) i n w o r k i n g o n e l e c t r o n i c e q u i p m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s : A
fa m ilia r ity

w it h

t h e in te r r e la t io n s h ip s o f c ir c u it s ; a n d j u d g m e n t in d e t e r m in in g

w o rk

P e r f o r m s a v a r ie t y o f e le c tr ic a l tr a d e fu n c tio n s s u c h as t h e in s ta lla tio n , m a in te n a n c e ,

s e q u e n c e a n d i n s e l e c t i n g t o o l s a n d t e s t i n g i n s t r u m e n t s , u s u a l l y le s s c o m p l e x t h a n t h o s e

o r r e p a ir o f e q u ip m e n t f o r th e g e n e r a tio n , d i s t r ib u t io n , o r u t il i z a t i o n o f e l e c t r ic e n e r g y

u s e d b y t h e c la s s A t e c h n i c i a n .

in a n e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o lv e s

R e c e iv e s t e c h n ic a l g u id a n c e , as r e q u ir e d , f r o m s u p e r v is o r o r h ig h e r le v e l t e c h n ic ia n ,
and

w o rk

is

r e v ie w e d

fo r

s p e c ific

c o m p lia n c e

w it h

a c c e p te d

p r a c tic e s

and

m o st o f th e follow in g:

In s ta llin g o r r e p a ir in g a n y o f a

v a r i e t y o f e le c t r ic a l e q u ip m e n t s u c h as g e n e r a to r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , s w it c h b o a r d s , c o n t r o l ­

w o rk

le rs , c ir c u it b re a k e rs ,

m o to rs , h e a tin g

e q u ip m e n t;

a s s ig n m e n t s . M a y p r o v i d e t e c h n i c a l g u i d a n c e t o l o w e r l e v e l t e c h n i c i a n s .

fro m

w o r k in g

b lu e p r in ts ,

u n its , c o n d u it s y s te m s , o r
d r a w in g s ,

la y o u ts ,

or

o th e r

o th e r

t r a n s m is s io n

s p e c if ic a tio n s ;

s im p le o r r o u t in e ta s k s in

lo c a t in g a n d d ia g n o s in g t r o u b le in t h e e l e c t r i c a l s y s te m o r e q u ip m e n t ; w o r k i n g s t a n d a r d

w o r k in g o n e le c t r o n ic e q u ip m e n t, f o llo w in g d e ta ile d in s tru c tio n s w h ic h c o v e r v ir t u a lly

c o m p u ta t io n s r e la t in g t o lo a d r e q u ir e m e n t s o f w i r i n g o r e le c t r ic a l e q u ip m e n t ; a n d u s in g

a l l p r o c e d u r e s . W o r k t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e s s u c h t a s k s as: A s s i s t i n g h i g h e r l e v e l t e c h n i c i a n s

a v a r i e t y o f e l e c t r ic ia n ’s h a n d to o ls a n d m e a s u r in g a n d te s t in g in s t r u m e n ts . I n g e n e r a l,

C lass C.

A p p lie s w o r k in g

te c h n ic a l k n o w le d g e to p e r f o r m

b y p e r f o r m in g s u c h a c t iv it ie s as r e p la c in g c o m p o n e n t s , w i r i n g c ir c u it s , a n d t a k in g te s t

th e

r e a d in g s ;

u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

r e p a ir in g

s im p le




e le c tr o n ic

e q u ip m e n t ;

and

u s in g

to o ls

and

com m on

te s t

124

w o rk

o f th e

m a in te n a n c e

e le c tr ic ia n

re q u ir e s

ro u n d ed

t r a in in g

and

e x p e r ie n c e

M AINTENANCE PAINTER
P a in ts

and

re d e c o ra te s

involves the fo llo w in g :
d iffe r e n t

MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTER

w a lls ,

w o o d w o rk , and

f ix t u r e s o f a n e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k

In s t a lls o r r e p a ir s w a t e r , s te a m , g a s , o r o t h e r ty p e s o f p ip e a n d p ip e f it t in g s in a n

K n o w l e d g e o f s u r fa c e p e c u lia r it ie s a n d ty p e s o f p a in t r e q u ir e d f o r

a p p lic a t io n s ;

p r e p a rin g

s u rfa c e

fo r

p a in t in g

by

r e m o v in g

o ld

f in is h

or

e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k in v o l v e s

by

lo c a t e p o s it io n o f p ip e f r o m

p la c in g p u t t y o r f i l l e r in n a il h o le s a n d in te rs tic e s ; a n d a p p ly in g p a in t w i t h s p r a y g u n o r
b ru s h . M a y

m ost o f the following-.

L a y in g o u t w o r k a n d m e a s u r in g to

d r a w in g s o r o t h e r w r i t t e n s p e c if ic a tio n s ; c u t t in g v a r io u s

s iz e s o f p i p e t o c o r r e c t l e n g t h s w i t h c h i s e l a n d h a m m e r o r o x y a c e t y l e n e t o r c h o r p i p e ­

m ix c o lo r s , o ils , w h i t e le a d , a n d o t h e r p a in t in g r e d ie n t s t o o b t a in p r o p e r

c u t t i n g m a c h i n e s ; t h r e a d i n g p i p e w i t h s t o c k s a n d d ie s ; b e n d i n g p i p e b y h a n d - d r i v e n o r

c o l o r o r c o n s is t e n c y . I n g e n e r a l, t h e w o r k o f th e m a in te n a n c e p a in t e r r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d

p o w e r - d r i v e n m a c h in e s ; a s s e m b lin g p ip e w i t h c o u p lin g s a n d f a s t e n in g p ip e t o h a n g e r s ;

t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t
m a k in g

t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

s ta n d a rd

r e q u ir e d ;

P ro d u c e s

r e p la c e m e n t

following-.

e q u ip m e n t

p a rts

and

o p e ra te d

new

in

an

p a rts

in

m a k in g

e s ta b lis h m e n t.

re p a irs

W o rk

shop

m a k in g

s p e c if ic a tio n s .

M AINTENANCE M A CH IN IST
m e c h a n ic a l

and

In

c o m p u ta tio n s
s ta n d a rd

g e n e r a l,

th e

r e la tin g

te s t s

w o rk

to

to

p re s s u re s ,

d e te r m in e

o f th e

f lo w ,

w h e th e r

m a in te n a n c e

and

s iz e

f in is h e d

p ip e f it t e r

o f p ip e

p ip e s

re q u ire s

m eet

ro u n d e d

of

t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t

m ost o f the

t r a i n i n g a n d e x p e r i e n c e . W orkers p rim a rily en gaged in installing a n d repairing building
sanitation or heating system s are exclu ded.

o f m e ta l

in v o lv e s

p a rts

I n t e r p r e t i n g w r i t t e n i n s t r u c t i o n s a n d s p e c if ic a t i o n s ; p l a n n i n g a n d l a y i n g o u t

o f w o r k ; u s in g a v a r i e t y o f m a c h in is t ’s h a n d to o ls a n d p r e c is io n m e a s u r in g in s tru m e n ts ;
s e t t in g

up

and

o p e r a tin g

s ta n d a rd

m a c h in e

to o ls ;

s h a p in g

o f m e ta l

p a rts

to

MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKER

c lo s e

to le r a n c e s ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u ta t io n s r e la t in g to d im e n s io n s o f w o r k , t o o lin g ,

F a b ric a te s ,

i n s t a ll s ,

and

m a in ta in s

in

good

re p a ir

th e

s h e e t- m e t a l e q u ip m e n t a n d

fe e d s , a n d s p e e d s o f m a c h in in g ; k n o w le d g e o f th e w o r k in g p r o p e rtie s o f th e c o m m o n

f ix t u r e s

m e ta ls ; s e le c t in g s t a n d a r d m a t e r ia ls , p a r ts , a n d e q u ip m e n t r e q u ir e d f o r th is w o r k ; a n d

c h u te s , d u c ts , m e t a l r o o f in g ) o f a n e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f t h e f o ll o w in g :

fit tin g

P la n n in g

and

a s s e m b lin g

p a rts

in to

m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t .

In

g e n e r a l, t h e

m a c h in is t’s

w o r k n o r m a l ly r e q u ir e s a r o u n d e d t r a in in g in m a c h in e -s h o p p r a c t ic e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d

m a c h in e r y

or

m e c h a n ic a l e q u ip m e n t o f a n e s ta b lis h m e n t. W o r k

E x a m in in g

m a c h in e s

and

m e c h a n ic a l

e q u ip m e n t

to

in v o lv e s

d e fe c tiv e

p a rts

w ith

ite m s

o b ta in e d

fro m

s to c k ;

o r d e r in g

th e

p r o d u c tio n

g re a s e

pans,

s h e lv e s ,

lo c k e r s ,

ta n k s ,

o u t a ll ty p e s o f s h e e t-m e ta l m a in te n a n c e w o r k

v e n tila t o r s ,

fro m

b lu e p rin ts ,

m a c h in e s ; u s in g a v a r i e t y

f it tin g ,

and

a s s e m b li n g ;

and

o f h a n d t o o ls in c u t t in g , b e n d in g , f o r m in g ,

in s t a llin g

s h e e t-m e ta l

a r t ic le s

as

r e q u ir e d .

In

e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g a n d

d ia g n o s e

e x p e r ie n c e .

t h a t m a i n ly i n v o l v e t h e u s e o f h a n d t o o ls in s c r a p in g a n d f it t i n g p a r ts ; r e p la c in g b r o k e n

r e p la c e m e n t p a r t b y a m a c h in e

g u a rd s ,

g e n e r a l, th e w o r k o f th e m a in te n a n c e s h e e t-m e ta l w o r k e r r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d t r a in in g a n d

s o u r c e o f t r o u b le ; d is m a n t lin g o r p a r t l y d is m a n t lin g m a c h in e s a n d p e r f o r m in g r e p a ir s

or

a n d la y in g

m e ta l w o r k in g
s h a p in g ,

M AINTENANCE M ECHANIC (M ACHINERY)
R e p a irs

as m a c h in e

m o d e ls , o r o t h e r s p e c if ic a tio n s ; s e t t in g u p a n d o p e r a t in g a ll a v a ila b le ty p e s o f s h e e t-

t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e s h ip o r e q u iv a l e n t t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

m ost o f the fo llo w in g :

(s u c h

MILLW RIG HT

of a

In s t a lls n e w

s h o p o r s e n d in g t h e m a c h i n e t o a m a c h i n e s h o p f o r

m a c h i n e s o r h e a v y e q u i p m e n t , a n d d i s m a n t l e s a n d i n s t a ll s m a c h i n e s o r

m ost o f

m a j o r r e p a ir s ; p r e p a r in g w r i t t e n s p e c if ic a tio n s f o r m a jo r r e p a ir s o r f o r t h e p r o d u c t io n

h e a v y e q u ip m e n t w h e n c h a n g e s in t h e p la n t l a y o u t a r e r e q u ir e d . W o r k in v o lv e s

o f p a r t s o r d e r e d f r o m m a c h i n e s h o p s ; r e a s s e m b lin g m a c h in e s ; a n d m a k in g a ll n e c e s s a r y

th e following-.

a d ju s t m e n t s f o r o p e r a t io n . I n g e n e r a l, t h e w o r k o f a m a c h in e r y m a in te n a n c e m e c h a n ic

t io n s ; u s i n g a v a r i e t y o f h a n d t o o l s a n d

r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n t ic e ­

r e l a t i n g t o s tre s s e s , s t r e n g t h o f m a t e r ia ls , a n d c e n te r s o f g r a v i t y ; a lig n in g a n d b a la n c in g

s h ip

e q u ip m e n t ; s e le c t in g s ta n d a r d to o ls , e q u ip m e n t , a n d p a r ts t o b e u s e d ; a n d in s t a llin g a n d

or

e q u iv a le n t

w o rk e rs w h o se

tr a in in g

p rim a ry d u tie s

and

e x p e r ie n c e .

E x c lu d e d

fro m

th is

c la s s ific a t io n

a re

i n v o l v e s e t t in g u p o r a d ju s t in g m a c h in e s .

m a in ta in in g

in v o lv e s

a u to m o b ile s , b u s e s , m o to r tr u c k s , a n d

m ost o f the fo llo w in g : E x a m

f it tin g

o f a n e s t a b lis h m e n t . W o r k

b ro k e n

v a lv e s ; r e a s s e m b lin g a n d

o r d e fe c tiv e

in s t a llin g

o r d e r p o w e r t r a n s m is s io n

e q u ip m e n t s u c h as d r iv e s a n d

speed

a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

in i n g a u t o m o t iv e e q u ip m e n t t o d ia g n o s e s o u r c e o f

as w r e n c h e s , g a u g e s , d r i ll s , o r s p e c ia liz e d

p a rts ; r e p la c in g

good

e x p e r ie n c e in t h e t r a d e a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g

tra c to rs

t r o u b le ; d is a s s e m b lin g e q u ip m e n t a n d p e r f o r m in g r e p a ir s t h a t i n v o l v e t h e u s e o f s u c h
h a n d to o ls

in

r ig g in g ; m a k in g s t a n d a r d s h o p c o m p u ta t io n s

r e d u c e r s . I n g e n e r a l, t h e m i l l w r i g h t ’s w o r k n o r m a l ly r e q u ir e s a r o u n d e d t r a in in g a n d

M AINTENANCE M ECHANIC (M OTOR VEHICLE)
R e p a ir s

P la n n in g a n d la y in g o u t w o r k ; i n t e r p r e t i n g b lu e p r in t s o r o t h e r s p e c if ic a ­

e q u ip m e n t in

p a rts fr o m

d is a s s e m b lin g

s to c k ; g r in d in g

MAINTENANCE TRADES HELPER

or

A s s is t s o n e o r m o r e w o r k e r s i n t h e s k i l l e d m a i n t e n a n c e t r a d e s , b y p e r f o r m i n g s p e c i f i c

a n d a d ju s t in g

o r g e n e r a l d u t i e s o f le s s e r s k i l l , s u c h a s k e e p i n g a w o r k e r s u p p l i e d w i t h m a t e r i a l s a n d

t h e v a r i o u s a s s e m b lie s i n t h e v e h i c l e a n d m a k i n g

t o o l s ; c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g a r e a , m a c h i n e , a n d e q u i p m e n t ; a s s is t in g j o u r n e y m a n b y h o l d i n g

n e c e s s a r y a d ju s t m e n t s ; a n d a l ig n in g w h e e ls , a d ju s t in g b r a k e s a n d lig h ts , o r t ig h t e n in g

m a t e r i a l s o r t o o l s ; a n d p e r f o r m i n g o t h e r u n s k i l l e d ta s k s a s d i r e c t e d b y j o u r n e y m a n . T h e

b o d y b o lts . I n g e n e r a l, t h e w o r k o f t h e m o t o r v e h ic le m a in te n a n c e m e c h a n ic r e q u ir e s
r o u n d e d t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h a f o r m a l a p p r e n tic e s h ip o r

k in d o f w o r k

e q u iv a le n t t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .

t r a d e s t h e h e l p e r is c o n f i n e d t o s u p p l y i n g , l i f t i n g , a n d h o l d i n g m a t e r i a l s a n d t o o l s , a n d

T h is

c la s s ific a tio n

does

not

in c lu d e

m e c h a n ic s

w ho

r e p a ir c u s to m e r s ’ v e h ic le s

to p e rfo rm

v a r ie s f r o m

tra d e to tra d e : In so m e

c l e a n i n g w o r k i n g a r e a s ; a n d i n o t h e r s h e is p e r m i t t e d t o p e r f o r m

in

s p e c ia liz e d m a c h in e

o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t s o f a t r a d e t h a t a r e a l s o p e r f o r m e d b y w o r k e r s o n a f u l l - t i m e b a s is .

a u to m o b ile r e p a ir s h o p s.




t h e h e l p e r is p e r m i t t e d

125

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR (TOOLROOM)

T h e c la s s ific a t io n e x c lu d e s h e a d o r c h i e f e n g in e e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e

S p e c ia liz e s in o p e r a t i n g o n e o r m o r e t h a n o n e t y p e o f m a c h in e t o o l ( e .g ., j i g b o r e r ,

t h a n o n e e n g in e e r ; w o r k e r s r e q u ir e d

to b e s k ille d

in t h e r e p a ir o f e le c t r o n ic c o n t r o l

g r in d in g m a c h in e , e n g in e la th e , m il li n g m a c h in e ) t o m a c h in e m e t a l f o r u s e in m a k in g o r

e q u ip m e n t ; a n d w o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o d u c in g e l e c t r i c i t y , s te a m , o r h e a t e d o r

m a in t a in in g j ig s , f ix t u r e s , c u t t in g to o ls , g a u g e s , o r m e t a l d ie s o r m o ld s u s e d in s h a p in g

c o o l e d a i r p r i m a r i l y f o r s a le .

o r fo r m in g

m e ta l o r n o n m e ta llic

typically involves:

W ork

m a t e r ia l ( e .g ., p la s t ic , p la s t e r , r u b b e r , g la s s ).

P la n n in g a n d p e r f o r m in g d iff ic u lt m a c h in in g o p e ra tio n s w h ic h r e q u ir e

STATIONARY ENGINEER —previous

c o m p lic a t e d s e tu p s o r a h ig h d e g r e e o f a c c u r a c y ; s e t t in g u p m a c h in e t o o l o r t o o ls ( e .g .,
in s t a ll c u t t in g

to o ls

and

a d ju s t g u id e s , s to p s , w o r k in g

ta b le s , a n d

o th e r c o n tr o ls

to

and

h a n d le t h e s iz e o f s t o c k t o b e m a c h in e d ; d e t e r m in e p r o p e r fe e d s , s p e e d s , t o o l in g , a n d

v a rie ty

o f p re c is io n

m e a s u rin g

in s t r u m e n ts ; m a k i n g

n e c e s s a ry a d ju s tm e n ts

t in g

d u r in g

(m e c h a n ic a l

or

e le c t r ic a l)

to

s u p p ly

th e

e s t a b lis h m e n t

in

w h ic h

and

m a in ta in in g

e q u ip m e n t s u c h as s te a m

e n g in e s , a i r c o m p r e s s o r s , g e n e r a t o r s ,

m o t o r s , t u r b in e s , v e n t i la t i n g a n d r e f r i g e r a t i n g e q u ip m e n t , s te a m b o ile r s a n d b o i l e r - f e d

m a c h in in g o p e r a t io n t o a c h ie v e r e q u is ite d im e n s io n s t o v e r y c lo s e to le r a n c e s . M a y b e

w a te r

r e q u ir e d t o s e le c t p r o p e r c o o la n t s a n d c u t t in g a n d l u b r ic a t i n g o ils , t o r e c o g n iz e w h e n

pum ps;

m a k in g

e q u ip m e n t

re p a ir s ;

and

k e e p in g

a

re c o rd

of

o p e r a tio n

of

m a c h in e r y , t e m p e r a t u r e , a n d f u e l c o n s u m p t io n . M a y a ls o s u p e r v is e th e s e o p e r a tio n s .

to o ls n e e d d r e s s in g , a n d t o d re s s t o o ls . I n g e n e r a l, t h e w o r k o f a m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r

H e a d or c h ie f engineers in establish m en ts em p lo yin g m ore than one engineer are ex clu d ed .

( t o o l r o o m ) a t t h e s k ill le v e l c a lle d f o r in th is c la s s ific a t io n r e q u ir e s e x t e n s iv e k n o w l e d g e
o f m a c h in e -s h o p a n d t o o lr o o m

e q u ip m e n t

e m p lo y e d w it h p o w e r , h e a t, r e f r ig e r a t io n , o r a ir c o n d it io n in g . W o r k in v o lv e s : O p e r a ­

o p e r a t io n s e q u e n c e o r s e le c t th o s e p r e s c r ib e d in d r a w in g s , b lu e p r in t s , o r la y o u t s ) ; u s in g
a

description

O p e r a t e s a n d m a in ta in s a n d m a y a ls o s u p e r v is e t h e o p e r a t i o n o f s t a t io n a r y e n g in e s

p r a c t ic e u s u a lly a c q u ir e d t h r o u g h c o n s id e r a b le o n - t h e -

BOILER TENDER —revised

j o b t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - in d u s t r y w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , th is c la s s ific a t io n d o e s n o t in c lu d e m a c h in e -

description

T e n d s o n e o r m o r e b o ile r s t o p r o d u c e s te a m o r h ig h - t e m p e r a t u r e w a t e r f o r u s e in a n

t o o l o p e r a to r s ( t o o lr o o m ) e m p lo y e d in t o o l a n d d ie j o b b i n g s h o p s .

e s t a b lis h m e n t . F ir e s b o ile r . O b s e r v e s a n d

in te r p r e ts r e a d in g s o n g a u g e s , m e te r s , a n d

c h a r t s w h i c h r e g is t e r v a r io u s a s p e c ts o f b o i l e r o p e r a t i o n . A d ju s t s c o n t r o l s t o in s u r e s a fe

TOOL AND DIE MAKER

and

C o n s t r u c t s a n d r e p a ir s jig s , f ix t u r e s , c u t t in g t o o ls , g a u g e s , o r m e t a l d ie s o r m o ld s u s e d
i n s h a p i n g o r f o r m i n g m e t a l o r n o n m e t a l l i c m a t e r i a l ( e . g . , p l a s t i c , p l a s t e r , r u b b e r , g la s s ) .

W ork typically involves:
m e ta ls

P la n n in g a n d la y in g o u t w o r k a c c o r d in g to m o d e ls , b lu e p r in ts ,

r e q u ir e d

c o m p le te

to

o p e r a tin g
m a k e r ’s

v a r io u s

and

a llo y s ;
ta s k ;

m a c h in e

h a n d to o ls

and

t o le r a n c e s ; h e a t - t r e a t i n g
q u a litie s ;

fittin g

and

s e le c t in g

m a k in g
to o ls

n e c e s s a ry

and

p r e c is io n

re la te d

p a rts

shop

u s in g

to o ls a n d

p re s c rib e d

to o ls , a n d

c o m p u ta tio n s ;

in s tru m e n ts ;

fin is h e d

to

m a te r ia ls ,

e q u ip m e n t ;

m e a s u rin g

m e ta l p a rts a n d

a s s e m b lin g

a p p r o p r ia te

w o r k in g

to

v e ry

d ie s t o a c h ie v e

t o le r a n c e s

and

up

p r a c tic e

u s u a lly

a c q u ir e d

th ro u g h

fo rm a l

or

c h e m ic a ls

s te a m

a r e r e c o r d e d ; c le a n , o il, m a k e

and

a n a ly z e

b o ile r

BOILER TENDER— previous

In

or

a lo g

h ig h -te m p e r a tu r e
in w h i c h

m in o r r e p a ir s

w a te r

fo r

such

th in g s

as a c id ity ,

v a r io u s

o r a s s is t i n

c a u s tic ity , a n d

description

F ir e s s t a t io n a r y b o ile r s t o fu r n is h t h e e s t a b lis h m e n t in w h ic h

e m p lo y e d

w ith

h e a t,

p o w e r , o r s te a m . F e e d s fu e ls t o f ir e b y h a n d o r o p e r a te s a m e c h a n ic a l s t o k e r , g a s , o r o il

e q u iv a le n t

b u rn e r;

not

fo r

M a in ta in

c lo s e

t r a in in g a n d e x p e r ie n c e .
F o r c r o s s - in d u s t r y w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , th is c la s s if ic a t io n d o e s

dem ands

f o llo w in g :

h e a t e d o r c o o l e d a i r p r i m a r i l y f o r s a le .

r e q u ir e d

a llo w a n c e s .

a p p r e n tic e s h ip

m eet

T h e c la s s ific a t io n e x c lu d e s w o r k e r s in e s t a b lis h m e n t s p r o d u c in g e l e c t r i c i t y , s t e a m , o r

d ie

g e n e r a l, t h e t o o l a n d d ie m a k e r ’s w o r k r e q u ir e s r o u n d e d t r a in i n g in m a c h in e - s h o p a n d
to o lr o o m

to

a lk a lin it y .

and

to o l a n d

and

r e p a ir s t o b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t ; a n d , f o l l o w i n g p r e s c r ib e d m e t h o d s , t r e a t b o i l e r w a t e r
w ith

p ro c e s s e s

s e t t in g

v a r io u s

o p e ra tio n

a ls o d o o n e o r m o r e o f t h e

a s p e c ts o f b o ile r o p e r a tio n

d r a w in g s , o r o t h e r w r i t t e n o r o r a l s p e c if ic a tio n s ; u n d e r s t a n d in g t h e w o r k i n g p r o p e r t ie s
o f com m on

e ffic ie n t b o ile r

w a te r. M a y

and

checks

w a te r

and

s a fe ty

v a lv e s .

M ay

c le a n ,

o il,

or

a s s is t i n

r e p a ir in g

b o i l e r r o o m e q u ip m e n t .

in c lu d e t o o l a n d

d ie m a k e r s w h o ( 1 ) a r e e m p lo y e d in t o o l a n d d ie j o b b i n g s h o p s o r ( 2 ) p r o d u c e f o r g in g
d ie s ( d ie s in k e r s ).

STATIONARY ENGINEER— revised

Material Movement and Custodial

description

O p e r a t e s a n d m a in ta in s o n e o r m o r e s y s te m s w h ic h

p r o v i d e a n e s t a b lis h m e n t w i t h

TRUCKDRIVER

s u c h s e r v ic e s as h e a t, a ir - c o n d it i o n i n g ( c o o l, h u m i d i f y , d e h u m id i f y , f il t e r , a n d c ir c u la t e
a ir ),

r e frig e r a tio n ,

O b s e r v in g

and

s te a m

or

in te r p r e tin g

h ig h -te m p e r a tu r e
r e a d in g s

on

w a te r,

gauges,

or

m e te rs ,

e le c t r ic ity .
and

c h a rts

D u tie s
w h ic h

in v o lv e :

D r i v e s a t r u c k w it h i n a c i t y o r in d u s t r ia l a r e a t o t r a n s p o r t m a te r ia ls , m e r c h a n d is e ,

re g is te r

e q u ip m e n t , o r w o r k e r s b e t w e e n v a r io u s t y p e s o f e s t a b lis h m e n t s s u c h as: M a n u f a c t u r i n g

v a r i o u s a s p e c t s o f t h e s y s t e m ’s o p e r a t i o n ; a d j u s t i n g c o n t r o l s t o i n s u r e s a f e a n d e f f i c i e n t

p la n ts ,

o p e r a t i o n o f t h e s y s t e m a n d t o m e e t d e m a n d s f o r t h e s e r v i c e p r o v i d e d ; r e c o r d i n g i n lo g s

r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d c u s t o m e r s ’ h o u s e s o r p l a c e s o f b u s in e s s . M a y

v a r io u s

u n lo a d t r u c k w i t h o r w i t h o u t h e lp e r s , m a k e m i n o r m e c h a n ic a l r e p a ir s , a n d k e e p t r u c k in

a s p e c ts

o f

th e

s y s te m ’s

o p e ra tio n ;

k e e p in g

th e

e n g in e s ,

m a c h in e r y ,

and

g o o d w o r k in g o r d e r .

e q u ip m e n t o f th e s y s te m in g o o d w o r k i n g o r d e r . M a y d i r e c t a n d c o o r d in a t e a c t i v it ie s o f
o th e r

w o rk e rs

(n o t

s ta tio n a r y

e n g in e e r s )

in

p e r f o r m in g

ta s k s

d ir e c t ly

re la te d

w a re h o u s e s ,

w h o le s a le

and

r e t a il e s t a b lis h m e n t s , o r b e t w e e n
a ls o

lo a d

or

S alesroute a n d over-th e-road drivers a re exclu ded.

F o r w a g e s tu d y p u rp o s e s , t r u c k d r iv e r s a r e c la s s ifie d b y t y p e a n d r a te d c a p a c it y o f

to

t r u c k , as f o llo w s :

o p e r a t i n g a n d m a i n t a in i n g t h e s y s te m o r s y s te m s .




fr e ig h t d e p o ts ,

126

ORDER FILLER

Truckdriver, ligh t tru ck

F ills

( s t r a ig h t t r u c k , u n d e r 1 1 / 2 to n s , u s u a lly 4 w h e e ls )

s h ip p in g

fo r

fin is h e d

goods

fro m

s to re d

m e r c h a n d is e

in

p e r f o r m o t h e r r e la t e d d u tie s .

(s tr a ig h t t r u c k , o v e r 4 to n s , u s u a lly 1 0 w h e e ls )

T ruckdriver, tractor-trailer

SHIPPING PACKER
P re p a re s

fin is h e d

p ro d u c ts

fo r

s h ip m e n t o r

s to ra g e

by

p la c in g

th e m

in

s h ip p in g

c o n t a in e r s , t h e s p e c if ic o p e r a t io n s p e r f o r m e d b e in g d e p e n d e n t u p o n t h e t y p e , s iz e , a n d

SHIPPER AND RECEIVER
clerical a n d p h y sic a l
w h ic h

o rd e rs

o u t g o i n g o r d e r s , r e q u i s i t i o n a d d i t i o n a l s t o c k o r r e p o r t s h o r t s u p p li e s t o s u p e r v i s o r , a n d

T ruckdriver, heavy tru ck

P e rfo rm s

tra n s fe r

M a y , in a d d it io n t o f i l l i n g o r d e r s a n d i n d i c a t i n g ite m s f il le d o r o m i t t e d , k e e p r e c o r d s o f

( s t r a ig h t t r u c k , 1 1 / 2 t o 4 to n s in c lu s iv e , u s u a lly 6 w h e e ls )

e s t a b lis h m e n t in

or

a c c o r d a n c e w i t h s p e c i f i c a t i o n s o n s a le s s lip s , c u s t o m e r s ’ o r d e r s , o r o t h e r i n s t r u c t i o n s .

T ruckdriver, m ed iu m tru ck

e m p lo y e d

ta s k s
and

in

c o n n e c t io n

re c e iv in g

w it h

s h ip p in g

goods

in c o m in g s h ip m e n ts . I n

of

n u m b e r o f u n its t o b e p a c k e d , t h e t y p e o f c o n t a in e r e m p lo y e d , a n d m e t h o d o f s h ip m e n t.

th e

W o r k re q u ir e s th e p la c in g o f ite m s in s h ip p in g c o n ta in e r s a n d

p e r fo r m in g

the follow ing:

d a y - t o - d a y , r o u t in e ta s k s , f o l l o w s e s t a b lis h e d g u id e lin e s . I n h a n d lin g u n u s u a l n o n r o u ­

o f a p p r o p r ia t e

t in e p r o b le m s , r e c e iv e s s p e c if ic g u id a n c e f r o m s u p e r v is o r o r o t h e r o f fic ia ls . M a y d ir e c t

e x c e ls io r

or

m a y involve one or m ore o f

K n o w l e d g e o f v a r io u s ite m s o f s t o c k in o r d e r t o v e r i f y c o n te n t; s e le c t io n
ty p e

o th e r

and

s iz e

m a te r ia l

o f c o n ta in e r ;
to

p re v e n t

in s e r t in g

b re a k a g e

e n c lo s u r e s

or

dam age;

in

c o n ta in e r ;

c lo s in g

a n d c o o r d in a t e t h e a c t iv it ie s o f o t h e r w o r k e r s e n g a g e d in h a n d lin g g o o d s t o b e s h ip p e d

c o n ta in e r ; a n d a p p ly in g la b e ls o r e n t e r in g i d e n t if y in g d a t a o n c o n ta in e r .

o r b e in g r e c e iv e d .

and

u s in g

s e a lin g

also m a k e wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

Shippers

t y p i c a l l y a r e r e s p o n s ib le f o r m o s t o f t h e f o ll o w in g : V e r i f y i n g t h a t o r d e r s a r e

a c c u r a te ly
a g a in s t

fille d

by

d o c u m e n ts ;

s h ip p in g

P ackers who

c o m p a r in g
in s u r in g

in fo r m a tio n ,

and

ite m s a n d q u a n tit ie s o f g o o d s g a t h e r e d

th a t

lo a d e d

s h ip m e n ts
in to

a re

p r o p e r ly

t r a n s p o r t in g

packaged,

id e n t if ie d

v e h ic le s ; p r e p a r in g

MATERIAL HANDLING LABORER

f o r s h ip m e n t

and

A

w it h

w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u f a c t u r i n g p la n t , s t o r e , o r o t h e r e s ta b lis h ­

k e e p in g

m a te r ia ls
r e c o r d s o f g o o d s s h ip p e d , e .g ., m a n ife s ts , b ills o f la d in g .

R eceivers

one or m ore o f the follow ing:

m e n t w h o s e d u tie s in v o lv e
and

m e r c h a n d is e

on

or

fro m

fr e ig h t

c a rs ,

L o a d in g a n d u n lo a d in g v a r io u s
tru c k s ,

or

o th e r

t r a n s p o r t in g

d e v ic e s ; u n p a c k in g , s h e lv in g , o r p l a c i n g m a t e r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e in p r o p e r s t o r a g e
lo c a t io n ; a n d t r a n s p o r t in g m a t e r ia ls o r m e r c h a n d is e b y h a n d t r u c k , c a r , o r w h e e l b a r r o w .

t y p i c a l l y a r e r e s p o n s ib le f o r m o s t o f t h e f o ll o w in g : V e r i f y i n g t h e c o r r e c t ­

L ongshore workers, who lo a d a n d u n load ships, are exclu ded.

n e s s o f in c o m in g s h ip m e n t s b y c o m p a r i n g ite m s a n d q u a n tit ie s u n lo a d e d a g a in s t b ills o f
la d in g , in v o ic e s , m a n ife s ts , s t o r a g e r e c e ip t s , o r o t h e r r e c o r d s ; c h e c k in g f o r d a m a g e d
goods;

in s u r in g

th a t

goods

a re

a p p r o p r ia t e ly

id e n tifie d

fo r

r o u tin g

to

POW ER-TRUCK OPERATOR

d e p a rtm e n ts

O p e ra te s

w i t h i n t h e e s ta b lis h m e n t; p r e p a r in g a n d k e e p in g r e c o r d s o f g o o d s r e c e iv e d .

a m a n u a lly

c o n tr o lle d

g a s o lin e - o r e l e c t r ic - p o w e r e d

tru c k

o r t r a c to r to

t r a n s p o r t g o o d s a n d m a t e r ia ls o f a ll k in d s a b o u t a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u f a c t u r in g p la n t , o r

F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d as f o l l o w s :

o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t .
F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , w o r k e r s a r e c la s s ifie d b y t y p e o f p o w e r t r u c k , as f o llo w s :

S h ipper
R eceiver
S h ipper a n d receiver

F o rk lift operator
P ow er-truck operator (other than fo r k lift)

W AREHOUSEMAN
A s d i r e c t e d , p e r f o r m s a variety o f warehousing d u t i e s w h i c h r e q u i r e a n understan din g
o f the establish m en t's storage p la n . W o r k i n v o l v e s m ost o f the fo llo w in g : V e r i f y i n g

GUARD

m a t e r ia ls ( o r m e r c h a n d is e ) a g a in s t r e c e i v i n g d o c u m e n t s , n o t in g a n d r e p o r t in g d is c r e p ­

D u t i e s i n v o l v e s e r v in g a t a f ix e d p o s t, m a k in g r o u n d s o n f o o t o r b y m o t o r v e h ic le , o r

a n c ie s a n d o b v io u s d a m a g e s ; r o u t in g m a t e r ia ls t o p r e s c r ib e d s to r a g e lo c a t io n s ; s t o r in g ,

e s c o r t i n g p e r s o n s o r p r o p e r t y . M a y b e d e p u t i z e d t o m a k e a r r e s t s . M a y a ls o h e l p v i s i t o r s

s ta c k in g ,

or

p a lle tiz in g

m a te r ia ls

in

a c c o rd a n c e

w it h

p r e s c rib e d

s to ra g e

P ro te c ts p ro p e rty

fro m

th e ft o r d a m a g e , o r p e rs o n s fro m

h a z a rd s o r in te rfe r e n c e .

a n d c u s to m e r s b y a n s w e r in g q u e s tio n s a n d g iv in g d ir e c t io n s .

m e th o d s ;

G u a r d s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b lis h m e n t s w h i c h p r o v i d e p r o t e c t iv e s e r v ic e s o n a c o n t r a c t

r e a r r a n g i n g a n d t a k i n g i n v e n t o r y o f s t o r e d m a t e r ia ls ; e x a m in in g s t o r e d m a t e r ia ls a n d

b a s is a r e i n c l u d e d i n t h i s o c c u p a t i o n .
r e p o r t in g d e t e r io r a tio n a n d d a m a g e ; r e m o v in g m a te r ia l fr o m

s to ra g e a n d p r e p a r in g it

F o r w a g e s t u d y p u r p o s e s , g u a r d s a r e c la s s ifie d as f o llo w s :

f o r s h ip m e n t . M a y o p e r a t e h a n d o r p o w e r tr u c k s in p e r f o r m in g w a r e h o u s in g d u tie s .
E x c lu d e
S h ip p e r

w o rk e rs

and

w hose

R e c e iv e r

p rim a ry

and

d u tie s in v o lv e

S h ip p in g

P a c k e r),

s h ip p in g a n d

o rd e r

f illin g

r e c e iv in g

(s e e

O rd e r

w o rk
F ille r ),

(s e e

C lass A.

or

ju d g m e n t

o p e r a tin g p o w e r tr u c k s (s e e P o w e r - T r u c k O p e r a t o r ).




E n fo rc e s
and

uses

r e g u la tio n s
d is c r e tio n

d e s ig n e d
in

d e a lin g

to

p re v e n t

w it h

b re a c h e s

e m e r g e n c ie s

o f s e c u r it y .
and

s e c u r it y

E x e r c is e s
v io la tio n s

e n c o u n t e r e d . D e t e r m i n e s w h e t h e r f ir s t r e s p o n s e s h o u ld b e t o i n t e r v e n e d ir e c t ly (a s k in g

127

fo r

a s s is t a n c e

w hen

deem ed

n e c e s s a ry

and

tim e

a llo w s ),

to

keep

s itu a tio n

under

d e m o n s t r a t e p r o f ic ie n c y in t h e u s e o f f ir e a r m s o r s p e c ia l w e a p o n s .

s u r v e illa n c e , o r t o r e p o r t s itu a tio n so t h a t it c a n b e h a n d le d b y a p p r o p r ia t e a u t h o r it y .
D u t ie s r e q u ir e s p e c ia liz e d

t r a in in g

in m e t h o d s a n d t e c h n iq u e s o f p r o t e c t in g

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER

s e c u r it y

a r e a s . C o m m o n l y , t h e g u a r d is r e q u i r e d t o d e m o n s t r a t e c o n t i n u i n g p h y s i c a l f it n e s s a n d

C le a n s a n d k e e p s in a n o r d e r l y c o n d it io n f a c t o r y w o r k i n g a r e a s a n d w a s h r o o m s , o r

p r o f i c i e n c y w i t h f i r e a r m s o r o t h e r s p e c ia l w e a p o n s .

C lass B.

p r e m is e s o f a n o f fic e , a p a r t m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l o r o t h e r e s t a b lis h m e n t . D u t i e s

C a r r ie s o u t in s tru c tio n s p r im a r ily o r ie n te d t o w a r d

a n d s e c u r it y v io la t io n s a r e r e a d ily d is c o v e r e d a n d r e p o r t e d
In te r v e n e s
p ro p e rty

or

d ir e c t ly
p e rs o n s .

o n ly

in

D u tie s

s itu a tio n s
r e q u ir e

w h ic h

r e q u ir e

m in im a l tr a in in g .

in v o lv e

in s u r in g t h a t e m e r g e n c ie s
to a p p r o p r ia t e a u t h o r ity .

m in im a l

a c tio n

C o m m o n ly ,

th e

to

p o lis h in g

s a fe g u a rd

g u a rd

m e ta l

f ix t u r e s

s e r v ic e s ; a n d c le a n in g

is n o t

S w e e p in g , m o p p in g o r s c r u b b in g , a n d p o lis h in g

or

128

t r im m in g s ;

p r o v id in g

la v a t o r ie s , s h o w e r s , a n d

w indow washing are exclu ded.

r e q u i r e d t o d e m o n s t r a t e p h y s i c a l f it n e s s . M a y b e a r m e d , b u t g e n e r a l l y is n o t r e q u i r e d t o




a com bination o f the following-.

f lo o r s ; r e m o v i n g c h ip s , tr a s h , a n d o t h e r r e fu s e ; d u s t in g e q u ip m e n t , f u r n it u r e , o r f ix t u r e s ;
s u p p li e s , a n d

re s tro o m s .

m in o r

m a in te n a n c e

W orkers who specialize in




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