View original document

The full text on this page is automatically extracted from the file linked above and may contain errors and inconsistencies.

A rea Wage S urvey

The Scranton, Pennsylvania, Metropolitan Area

Bul l eti n No.

1530-3




U N IT E D STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU
Art hur

OF

LABOR

M

Ross, C o m m i s s i o n e r

STATISTICS




Area Wage Survey

The Scranton, Pennsylvania, Metropolitan Area




August 1966

Bulletin No. 1530-3
O c t o b e r 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 20 cents




Preface

Contents
Page

The B u r e a u o f L a b o r S ta tistics p r o g r a m of annual
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s is d e ­
s i g n e d to p r o v i d e d a t a o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , and e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a ge p r o v i s i o n s .
It
y i e l d s d e t a ile d data b y s e l e c t e d in du stry d iv is io n s fo r e a ch
o f the a r e a s s t u d i e d , f o r g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s , a nd f o r the
U n i t e d S t a t e s . A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in the p r o g r a m is the
n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t in to (1) the m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s b y
o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y a n d s k i l l l e v e l , a n d (2) the s t r u c t u r e
a n d l e v e l o f w a g e s a m o n g a r e a s a nd i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .
A t th e e n d o f e a c h s u r v e y , a n i n d i v i d u a l a r e a
b u lle tin p r e s e n t s s u r v e y r e s u l t s fo r ea ch a r e a studied.
A f t e r c o m p l e t i o n o f a l l o f the i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n s f o r
a r o u n d o f s u r v e y s , a t w o - p a r t s u m m a r y b u l l e t i n is i s s u e d .
T h e f i r s t p a r t b r i n g s d a t a f o r e a c h o f the m e t r o p o l i t a n
a r e a s s t u d i e d in to o n e b u l l e t i n .
The s e c o n d pa rt p r e s e n ts
i n f o r m a t io n w h i c h has b e e n p r o j e c t e d f r o m in dividual m e t ­
r o p o l i t a n a r e a d a t a to r e l a t e to g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s and
the U n i t e d S t a t e s .

I n t r o d u c t i o n ________________________________________________________________________
W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s ______________________________
T ables:
1.
2.

A.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y and
n u m b e r s t u d i e d __________________________________________________________
In dexes o f sta n d a rd w e e k l y s a l a r i e s and s t r a i g h t - t i m e
h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , a nd
p e r c e n t s o f c h a n g e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s ____________________________
O c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s :*
A - 1. O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a nd w o m e n ___________________________
m
A - 2. P r o f e s s i o n a l a nd t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — e n _______________
m
A -3.
O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a nd t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s —
m e n a n d w o m e n c o m b i n e d ____________________________________
A - 4. M a i n t e n a n c e a nd p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a t i o n s ____________________
A -5.
C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ____________

A pp end ix.

O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _________________________________________

E i g h t y - s i x a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d in the
program .
I n f o r m a t i o n o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s is c o l ­
l e c t e d a n n u a l l y in e a c h a r e a .
In form a tion on e sta b lish m en t
p r a c t i c e s a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s is o b t a i n e d
b i e n n i a l l y in m o s t o f the a r e a s .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s o f the s u r v e y in
S c r a n t o n , P a . , in A u g u s t 1 9 6 6.
The Standard M e t r o p o lit a n
S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d b y the B u r e a u o f the B u d g e t
th ro u g h A p r i l 1966, c o n s i s t s o f L ack aw an na County.
Th is
s t u d y w a s c o n d u c t e d b y the B u r e a u ' s r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in
N e w Y o r k , N. Y . , H e r b e r t B i e n s t o c k , D i r e c t o r ; b y A l v i n I.
M a r g u l i s , u n d e r the d i r e c t i o n o f T h o m a s N. W a ik e n .
The
s t u d y w a s u n d e r the g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f F r e d e r i c k W.
M u e l l e r , A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r f o r W a g e s and I n ­
du stria l R elations.




1
3

areas.

* N O T E : S im ila r tabu lation s a r e a v a ila b le
(See in sid e b a c k c o v e r . )

for other

A c u r r e n t r e p o r t o n o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s and s u p ­
p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r a c t i c e s in the S c r a n t o n a r e a is a l s o
availa b le fo r synthetic tex tiles
( F e b r u a r y 1 9 6 6).
U nion
s c a l e s , in dica tive o f p r e v a ilin g pay le v e ls a re a v ailable
fo r building c o n s t r u c tio n , printing, l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a tin g
e m p l o y e e s , and m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s .

m

2

3

5
6
7
8
8
10




Area Wage Survey—
The Scranton, Pa., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s da ta a r e s h o w n f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u l e
in th e g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n i n g s da ta e x c l u d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la te s h i f t s .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
b o n u s e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n c l u d e d .
W h ere w e e k ly hours are
r e p o r t e d , as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the s t a n d ­
a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s
r e c e i v e th eir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t -t im e s a la r ie s ( e x c l u s i v e of pay fo r
o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) . A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s
f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t i o n s h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h i s a r e a i s 1 o f 86 in w h i c h the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u reau of L a b o r S ta tistics con du cts su rv eys of occu p a tion a l earn ings
and r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s o n an a r e a w i d e b a s i s .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s c u r r e n t o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and
e a r n i n g s i n f o r m a t i o n o b t a i n e d l a r g e l y b y m a i l f r o m th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
v i s i t e d b y B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s in the l a s t p r e v i o u s s u r v e y f o r
o c c u p a t i o n s r e p o r t e d in that e a r l i e r s tu d y.
P e r so n a l visits w e re m ade
to n o n r e s p o n d e n t s and to t h o s e r e s p o n d e n t s r e p o r t i n g u n u s u a l c h a n g e s
s i n c e the p r e v i o u s s u r v e y .
In e a c h a r e a , d a t a a r e o b t a i n e d f r o m r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b ­
lis h m e n ts w ithin s ix b r o a d in d u stry d iv is io n s :
M anufacturing; t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s .
M ajor
in d u st r y g r o u p s e x c lu d e d f r o m th ese stu dies a re g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a ­
t i o n s and th e c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E sta b lish m en ts
h a v i n g f e w e r th an a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e o m i t t e d b e c a u s e
t h e y te n d to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d
to w a r r a n t i n c l u s i o n .
S e p a r a t e t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f the
b r o a d in d u str y d iv is io n s w hich m eet publication c r it e r ia .

The a v e ra g e s p re se n te d r e fle c t c o m p o s ite , area w ide e s t i ­
m ates.
In dustries
and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and jo b
s t a f f i n g and , th u s , c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h jo b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y th e w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s
f o r m e n and w o m e n in any o f the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u ld n ot b e
a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f the s e x e s w ith in
in divid u al e s t a b lis h m e n t s .
O ther p o s s ib le f a c t o r s w h ich m a y c o n t r ib ­
ute to d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n and w o m e n i n c l u d e : D i f f e r e n c e s in
p r o g r e s s i o n w ith in e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n l y th e a c t u a l r a t e s
p a id i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; and d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c d u t ie s p e r ­
f o r m e d , a lt h o u g h the w o r k e r s a r e a p p r o p r i a t e l y c l a s s i f i e d w ith in the
sa m e s u r v e y job d e s c r i p t i o n .
J ob d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e m ­
p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d th an t h o s e u s e d
in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p l e b a s i s b e c a u s e o f
th e u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n o f
l a r g e th an o f s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s t u d ie d . In c o m b i n i n g the d a t a ,
h o w e v e r , all e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e given th eir a p p ro p ria t e w eigh t.
E s­
t i m a t e s b a s e d o n th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
as r e l a t i n g to a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w th e m i n i m u m s i z e s tu d ie d .
O ccu pations

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t th e t o t a l in a ll
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h in th e s c o p e o f th e s tu d y and n ot th e n u m b e r a c ­
tu ally s u r v e y e d .
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , th e e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m th e s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n l y to i n d i c a t e
the r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s s t u d i e d . T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u ­
p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e d o n o t m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t the a c c u r a c y o f the e a r n ­
i n g s da t a .

and E a r n in g s

T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu dy a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y o f
m a n u f a c t u r i n g a n d n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e o f the f o l l o w ­
in g t y p e s : ( l ) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ; (3) m a i n ­
t e n a n c e a nd p o w e r p l a n t ; a nd (4) c u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t . O c ­
c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d o n a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s
d e s i g n e d to t a k e a c c o u n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n in d u t i e s w it h in
th e s a m e j o b .
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu dy a r e l i s t e d and d e ­
s c r i b e d in th e a p p e n d i x .
T h e e a r n i n g s data f o l l o w i n g the j o b t i t l e s a r e
f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d . E a r n i n g s data f o r s o m e o f the o c c u p a t i o n s
l i s t e d a nd d e s c r i b e d , o r f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w i t h i n o c c u p a t i o n s ,
a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in th e A - s e r i e s t a b l e s b e c a u s e e i t h e r ( l ) e m p l o y ­
m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n is t o o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h da ta to m e r i t
p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f i n d i v i d u a l e s ­
t a b lis h m e n t data.




E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s
T a b u l a t i o n s on s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) a r e n o t p r e s e n t e d in th is
bulletin.
I n f o r m a t i o n f o r t h e s e t a b u l a t i o n s is c o l l e c t e d b i e n n i a l l y in
th is a r e a .
T h e s e t a b u l a t i o n s on m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r i n e x ­
p e r i e n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s ; s h if t d i f f e r e n t i a l s ; s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y
h o u r s ; p a id h o l i d a y s ; p a id v a c a t i o n s ; and h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n
p la n s
a r e p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) in p r e v i o u s b u l l e t i n s
f o r th is a r e a .

1

2




T a b le

1.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s w it h in s c o p e o f s u r v e y an d n u m b e r stu d ie d in S c r a n t o n ,
b y m a j o r in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , 2 A u g u s t 1 9 6 6

Minimum
employment
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
of study

Industry division

A l l d i v i s i o n s ________________________________________________
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________________
N o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ________________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and
o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s 5 _____________________________
W h o l e s a l e t r a d e ______________________________________
R e t a i l t r a d e _____________________________________________
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e __________
S e r v i c e s 6 7 ______________________________________________

N u m b er of e stablishm ents

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s

1

W it hin sc o p e
of study 3

_

Pa. , 1

W ith in sco p e of s t u d y 4
Studied

Stu died
Number

Percent

2 30

97

38,700

100

2 4,0 7 0

50
-

166
64

55
42

2 8,700

74
26

16,0 1 0
8 ,06 0

50
50
50
50
50

19

5

15
4
13
4

3 ,400
1 , 100
3, 8 0 0
7 00

9
3

22
10

6

1,000

3, 1 3 0
650
3,00 0
670
610

8

10,000

10
2
2

1 T h e S c r a n t o n S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d b y the B u r e a u o f the B u d g e t t h r o u g h A p r i l 1 9 6 6 , c o n s i s t s o f L a c k a w a n n a C o u n t y .
T h e " w o r k e r s w i t h i n s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s s h o w n in t h i s t a b l e p r o v i d e a r e a s o n a b l y a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f the s i z e a n d c o m p o s i t i o n o f the l a b o r
f o r c e i n c l u d e d in the s u r v e y .
T h e e s t i m a t e s a r e n o t i n t e n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w i t h o t h e r e m p l o y m e n t i n d e x e s f o r the
a r e a to m e a s u r e e m p l o y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s
s i n c e ( 1 ) p l a n n i n g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s the u s e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t d at a c o m p i l e d c o n s i d e r a b l y in
a d v a n c e o f the p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d i e d , a n d ( 2 ) s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .
2 The
1 9 5 7 r e v i s e d e d i t i o n o f the S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l a nd the 1 9 6 3 S u p p l e m e n t w e r e u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
by i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n .
3 Include s a l l
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t a t o r a b o v e th e m i n i m u m l i m i t a t i o n .
A l l o u t l e t s ( wi t h i n the a r e a ) o f c o m p a n i e s i n s u c h
i n d u s t r i e s a s t r a d e , f i n a n c e , a u t o r e p a i r s e r v i c e , a nd m o t i o n p i c t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
4 I n c l u d e s a l l w o r k e r s in a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h t o t a l e m p l o y m e n t ( w i t h i n the a r e a ) a t or a b o v e the m i n i m u m l i m i t a t i o n .
5 T a x i c a b s a n d s e r v i c e s i n c i d e n t a l to w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w e r e e x c l u d e d .
6
T h i s i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n i s r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a nd " n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g " i n the S e r i e s A t a b l e s .
Separate p r e s e n ta ­
t i o n o f da ta f o r t h i s d i v i s i o n i s not m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g r e a s o n s : ( l ) E m p l o y m e n t i n the d i v i s i o n i s t oo s m a l l t o p r o v i d e e n o u g h
da ta to m e r i t s e p a r a t e s t u d y , (2 ) the s a m p l e w a s not d e s i g n e d i n i t i a l l y to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , (3) r e s p o n s e w a s i n s u f f i c i e n t o r i n a d e q u a t e
to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , a nd (4) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e on i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a .
7
H o t e l s ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u to m o b il e r e p a i r sh op s; m o tio n p i c t u r e s ; n onp rofit m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t i o n s ( e x c lu d in g r e ­
l i g i o u s a n d c h a r i t a b l e o r g a n i z a t i o n s ) ; a nd e n g i n e e r i n g a nd a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .

O v e r t w o - t h i r d s o f the w o r k e r s w i t h i n s c o p e o f the s u r v e y in S c r a n t o n w e r e e m p l o y e d
in m a n u fa c t u r in g f i r m s .
T h e f o l l o w i n g t a b l e p r e s e n t s the m a j o r i n d u s t r y g r o u p s a nd s p e c i f i c
industries as a percent of all manufacturing:
Industry groups

S p e c ific in du str ie s

34
A p p a r e l _____________________________
E l e c t r i c a l m a c h i n e r y __________
1 1
T e x t i l e m i l l p r o d u c t s __________
10
P r i n t i n g a n d p u b l i s h i n g _______ —
9
F abricated m eta l products
8

W o m e n ' s , m i s s e s ' , and
14
j u n i o r s ' o u t e r w e a r _____________
11
M e n ' s and b o y s ' f u r n i s h i n g s . . .
E l e c t r o n i c c o m p o n e n ts and
a c c e s s o r i e s _______________________
5
Y a r n a n d t h r e a d m i l l s ---------------G i r l s ' , c h i l d r e n ' s , a nd
5
i n f a n t s ' o u t e r w e a r _____________
B o o k s ----------------------------------------------------. . . 5

T h is in f o r m a t i o n is b a s e d on e s t i m a t e s of tota l e m p l o y m e n t d e r i v e d f r o m u n i v e r s e
m a t e r i a l s c o m p i l e d p r i o r to a c t u a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t i o n s in v a r i o u s g r o u p s m a y d i f f e r f r o m
p r o p o r t i o n s b a s e d o n the r e s u l t s o f the s u r v e y a s s h o w n i n t a b l e 1 a b o v e .

3

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a nd i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ,
and in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d pla n t w o r k e r g r o u p s . T h e i n d e x e s
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t o f
w a g e s d u r i n g th e b a s e p e r i o d (d a te o f th e a r e a s u r v e y c o n d u c t e d
b e t w e e n J u l y I 9 6 0 a nd June 1961).
S u b t r a c t in g 100 f r o m th e i n d e x
y i e l d s th e p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e in w a g e s f r o m th e b a s e p e r i o d to the
date o f the in d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to
wage
c h a n g e s b e t w e e n th e i n d i c a t e d d a t e s .
T h ese estim ates are
m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e in a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; t h e y a r e n ot in t e n d e d
to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y c h a n g e s in th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e a r e a .
M ethod o f C om putin g

in th e o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p . T h e s e c o n s t a n t w e i g h t s r e f l e c t b a s e y e a r
em p loym en ts w h e r e v e r p o s s ib le .
The a v e r a g e (m ean) earn ings fo r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n w e r e m u l t i p l i e d b y th e o c c u p a t i o n w e i g h t , and the
p r o d u c t s f o r a ll o c c u p a t i o n s in th e g r o u p w e r e t o t a l e d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s
for

2 con secu tive y e a rs w e r e

related

by

dividin g

th e

aggregate for

th e l a t e r y e a r b y the a g g r e g a t e f o r th e e a r l i e r y e a r .
The resultant
r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t , s h o w s the p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e . T h e i n d e x
i s th e p r o d u c t o f m u l t i p l y i n g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e ( 1 0 0 ) b y the r e l a t i v e
f o r the n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r a nd c o n t i n u i n g to m u l t i p l y ( c o m p o u n d )
e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the p r e v i o u s y e a r ' s i n d e x .
A v e r a g e earn ings
f o r th e f o l l o w i n g o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e u s e d in c o m p u t i n g th e w a g e t r e n d s :

E a c h o f th e s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w it h in an o c c u p a t i o n a l
g r o u p w a s a s s i g n e d a w e i g h t b a s e d o n its p r o p o r t i o n a t e e m p l o y m e n t
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m e n and w o m en ):
B o o k k e e p in g - m a c h in e o p e ra to rs,
c la s s B
C le rk s, a c c o u n t in g , c la sse s
A an d B
C le rk s, f i l e , c la s s e s
A , B, and C
C le rk s, o rd er
C le r k s, p a y ro ll
C o m p to m e te r o p e ra to rs
K e y p u n c h o p e ra to rs, c la sse s
A an d B
O ffic e b o y s and g irls

T a b le 2.

O ffic e c l e r ic a l (m e n and w o m en )—
C o n tin u ed
S e c r e ta r ie s
S te n o g ra p h e rs, g e n e ra l
S te n o g ra p h e rs, se n io r
S w itch b o a rd o p e ra to rs, c la s se s
A and B
T a b u la t in g - m a c h in e o p e ra to rs,
c la s s B
T y p ists, c la s se s A and B

S k ille d m a in te n a n c e (m e n ):
C a rp e nters
E le c tr ic ia n s
M ach in ists
M e c h a n ic s
M e c h a n ic s (a u to m o tiv e )
P ain ters
P ip e fitte rs
T o o l and d ie m ak e rs
U n sk ille d p la n t (m e n ):
Ja n ito rs, p o rters, and c le a n e r s
L ab o re rs, m a te r ia l h a n d lin g

In d u stria l nurses (m e n and w o m en ):
N urses, in d u stria l (re g iste re d )

In dexes o f stan d ard w ee k ly sa la r ie s and s t r a ig h t- tim e h o urly e a rn in g s for s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l grou ps in S c ra n to n , P a. ,
A u gust 1966 and A u gu st 19 6 5 , and p e rc e n ts o f c h a n g e for s e le c t e d p e rio d s
In d e xe s
(A u g u st 1 9 6 0 = 1 0 0 )
A u gu st 196 5

111. 7

1 1 1 .0

0. 6

3 .9

3. 4

( 3)
118. 5
122. 7

(3)
116. 2
12 2 . 7

( 3)
2. 0
0

(3)
2. 2
. 7

(3 )
3 .0
5. 2

(3 )
3 .6
6. 7

122. 2

119. 3

2. 5

1. 8

3. 5

5. 3

( 3)
117. 7
1 2 3 .9

(3)
115. 6
1 2 5 .6

( 3)
1. 8
2 -1. 4

(3)
3. 0
6. 3

(3 )
2 .4
5. 2

(3 )
3 .0
2 .4

A u gu st 1966

A ll in d u strie s:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m e n an d w o m e n ) ---------------------------------------------In d u stria l nurses (m e n an d w o m e n ) --------------------------------------------S k i lle d m a in te n a n c e ( m e n ) --------------------------------------------------------U n s k ille d p la n t ( m e n ) ---------------------------------------------------------------M a n u fa c tu rin g :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m e n an d w o m e n ) ---------------------------------------------In d u stria l nurses (m e n an d w o m e n ) --------------------------------------------S k i lle d m a in te n a n c e ( m e n ) ----------------------------------- ---------------------U n s k ille d p la n t ( m e n ) ----------------------------------------------------------------

2
3

P erc en ts of ch a n g e 1
A u gu st 1965
to
A u gu st 1966

Industry an d o c c u p a tio n a l group

A u gu st 1 964
to
A u gu st 1965

2 - 3 .7

A ll c h a n g e s a re in c r e a se s u n le ss o th erw ise in d ic a te d .
T h is d e c r e a s e la r g e l y r e f le c ts c h a n g e s in e m p lo y m e n t a m o n g e sta b lish m e n ts w ith d iffe re n t p a y le v e ls ra th er th an w a g e d e c r e a se s.
D a t a do n o t m e e t p u b lic a t io n c r ite r ia .




A u gu st 1963
to
A u g u st 196^

A u g u st 1962
to
A u g u st 1963

A u gu st 1961
to
A u gu st 1962

3.
2.
2.
2.

A u gust 1960
to
A u gust 1961

3
6
7
1

3 .9
3. 3
3. 7
6. 3

1. 6
2. 6
2 .8
2 .8

5. 7
3. 3
3. 5
6 .8

4
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e to w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r th e n o r m a l w o r k w e e k , e x c l u s i v e
o f e a r n i n g s at o v e r t i m e p r e m i u m r a t e s .
F o r p la n t w o r k e r g r o u p s ,
they
m easure
c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
stra ig h t-tim e h ourly earn ings,
exclu din g p r e m iu m
pay fo r o v e r t im e
and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
h o lid a y s , and la te sh ifts.
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d o n data f o r
s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s and i n c l u d e m o s t o f th e n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t
jo b s w ithin e a ch g rou p .
L im itation s

o f D ata

T h e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s
o f ch a n g e, as m e a s u r e s of
c h a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e i n f l u e n c e d b y :
( l ) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and
wage changes,
(2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y
i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b , and (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e
w a g e s du e to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r ­
t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .




C h a n g e s in th e l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in th e
o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s . It i s c o n c e i v a b l e
that e v e n th ough a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n an a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w a g e s m ay have d e c lin e d b e c a u s e l o w e r - p a y i n g e s t a b lis h m e n t s
e n t e r e d the a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ila rly , w ages
m a y h a v e r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y c o n s t a n t , y e t th e a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a
m ay have rise n co n s id e r a b ly b e c a u s e h ig h e r -p a y in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts
e n t e r e d the a r e a .

T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b
i n c l u d e d in th e da t a . T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e r e f l e c t o n l y c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not in flu e n c e d by
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , as s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
fo r ov ertim e.
Data w e r e a d j u s t e d w h e r e n e c e s s a r y to r e m o v e f r o m
th e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e any s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s in th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .

5

A. Occupational Earnings
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u r s and e a rn in g s fo r se le c te d ' o ccu p a tio n s stu died on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u str y d iv is io n , S cr a n to n , P a ., A u g u st 1966)
Week l y earnings1
(standard)
Number

Ave rage
weekly
hours1
( standard)

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a rn i n g s of—
$

$

$

occupation,

and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

of
workers

Me an 2

Median 2

Middle range 2

45

50

55

45

S e x,

40

$

50

55

60

.

.

.

.

-

5

1

and

and

under

o ve r

MEN
18

3 8 .0

$
1 0 2 .5 0

$
1 0 3 .0 0

15

3 8 .5

7 1 .0 0

6 7 .5 0

5 4 .0 0 -

23

4 0 .0

9 8 .0 0

9 8 .5 0

8 7 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0

BI L LE R S, MACHINE ( B I L L I N G
MACHINE) -----------------------------------------------

39

3 7 .0

6 7 .0 0

7 0 .0 0

5 5 .0 0 -

7 7 .0 0

I

9

B I LL ER S , MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) -----------------------------------------------

21

3 7 .0

6 5 .0 0

6 4 .0 0

5 7 .0 0 -

7 2 .5 0

2

2

89

3 8 .0

6 3 .5 0

6 0 .0 0

5 6 .0 0 -

6 8 .0 0

4

12

26

3 7 .0

6 5 .0 0

6 6 .0 0

5 7 .0 0 -

7 7 .0 0

63

3 8 .5

6 3 .0 0

5 9 .5 0

5 5 .5 0 -

6 4 .5 0

52

39. 0

9 6 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0

CLERKS,
OFFICE

ACCOUNTING,

CLASS

A -

BOYS ------------------------------------------

TABULATING- MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B --------------------------------------------------

9 9 .0 0 -1 1 5 .5 0
9 6 .0 0

2

L

1

1 7

1

1

2

2

L

4

2

3

WOMEN

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS
CLASS B -------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A —
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

3 3 .0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0

_
-

30

-

3
9

21

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

16

9

4

18

16

1

26

3 9 .0

9 1 .5 0

9 4 .5 0

8 3 .0 0 -1 0 2 .5 0

112

3 7 .0

6 6 .0 0

6 4 .0 0

6 0 .0 0 -

35

3 9 .0

7 9 .0 0

7 5 .0 0

6 4 .5 0 -1 0 1 .0 0

CLASS B -----------------

22

3 8 .0

6 0 .5 0

5 3 .5 0

4 3 .0 0 -

7 6 .0 0

3

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS C ----------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------

99

3 8 .0

6 8 .5 0

5 9 .0 0

5 3 .0 0 -

9 6 .0 0

-

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------CLERKS,

CLERKS,

FILE,

ORDER

------------------------------------

7 5 .5 0

13

10
10

1

~
5

5
21

1

3

12

20
18

38

3 6 .0

5 7 .5 0

5 7 .5 0

5 5 .0 0 -

6 1 .0 0

-

1

9

61

39. 5

7 5 .0 0

8 5 .0 0

5 2 .0 0 -

9 7 .5 0

-

1 1

12

2

114

3 7 .0

6 6 .0 0

6 3 .5 0

5 9 .5 0 -

7 1 .5 0

-

-

6

24

3 8 .5

6 4 .5 0 -

10

29

CLERKS, PAYROLL -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------

7 2 .5 0

7 2 .5 0

6 1 .0 0

_

2

1

75

3 9 .0

7 2 .5 0

7 2 .5 0

6 5 .5 0 -

8 1 .0 0

-

1

-

5

20

3 8 .0

7 1 .0 0

7 2 .5 0

5 8 .0 0 -

8 4 .5 0

1

1

5

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS,

A -

39

3 6 .5

7 9 .5 0

7 6 .5 0

6 8 .0 0 -

9 3 .0 0

-

*

-

-

KEYPUNCH OP ER AT OR S , CLASS B MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

133

38. 0

7 7 .5 0

7 2 .0 0

6 3 .0 0 -1 0 1 .0 0

-

-

1

8

64

3 o . 0

6 5 .5 0

6 4 .5 0

u 2 .0 0 -

1

3

SECRET AR I ES 3 ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------

143

3 8 .0

9 1 .0 0

8 8 .0 0

7 6 .0 0 -1 0 6 .0 0

_

_

_

2

37. 5

9 3 .5 0

8 9 .5 0

7 8 .0 0 -1 1 0 .0 0

-

-

-

1

43

3 8 .5

8 6 .0 0

8 5 .5 0

7 4 .0 0 -1 0 1 .5 0

~

-

1

A --------------

16

3 7 .5

1 0 4 .5 0

1 0 4 .0 0

8 4 .0 0 -1 1 7 .0 0

SECRETARI ES, CLASS C -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

35

3 8 .5

9 4 .5 0

8 9 .5 0

3 2 .5 0 -1 0 5 .0 0

2 9

3 8 .0

9 3 .5 0

8 9 .0 0

3 0 .5 0 -1 0 2 .5 0

62

3 8 .5

8 0 .0 0

7 8 .5 0

7 0 .5 0 -

8 9 .5 0

37

3 8 .5

8 1 .0 0

7 9 .0 0

7 0 .5 0 -

25

38 .5

7 9 .0 0

7 9 .0 0

6 7 .5 0 -

29

SECRETARI ES,

CLASS

CLASS

SECRETARI ES, CLASS 0 -------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s




at end o f ta b le .

95

100

7 2 .0 0

12
12

13

20

11

11

17

9

14
12

2
5
39
32

10

24
14
12
7
5

16
12
4

19
12
7

11
8
3

10
7
3

10
9

1

3
-

-

_

~

-

-

-

-

-

2

9 0 .5 0

-

-

-

1

8 9 .0 0

'

'

1

-

1 1

6

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
(A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t -t im e w e e k ly h o u rs and e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o ccu p ation s stu died on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u str y d iv is io n , S cr a n to n , P a ., A u g u st 1966)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

S ex ,

o c c u pa ti o n ,

and i n d us t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a : ight-- t i m e
$

weekly
hours1
( standard)

Median 2

Middle range 2

$

$

$

$

$

50

55

60

65

70

75

80

50

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

4

*

v
\ eek ly

$

e a r n i n g s of$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

85

90

95

100

105

n o

115

120

125

130

135

50

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

over

a nd
*

CONTINUED

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

92

38. 5

$
t>9 • 5 0

$
6 5 .0 0

$
5 8 .5 0 -

$
7 6 .0 0

-

7

7

13

20

15

7

5

33

3 9 .0

7 3 .0 0

6 7 .5 0

6 2 .0 0 -

7 6 .5 0

-

-

-

5

1 1

7

5

4

54

3 8 .0

6 7 .0 0

6 3 .0 0

5 5 .0 0 -

7 6 .0 0

7

7

3

9

8

2

85

3 7 .5

7 2 .0 0

6 9 .5 0

6 6 .0 0 -

7 5 .0 0

-

-

-

58

3 7 .0

7 4 .0 0

7 0 .5 0

6 7 . CO-

7 6 .5 0

~

1

1

8

-

-

-

1

1

2

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

2

-

-

2

1

1

8

'

'

'

1

-

2

2

-

-

*

6

4

-

3

-

-

-

7

30

20

5

5

1

9

4

24

15

4

1

1

9

3

12

12

14

4

4

4

-

1

1

12

7

12

2

4

2

3

6

10

1

-

5

4

14

20

_

8

~

38

15

1 1

1 1

5
6

SWITCHfiQARD UP ERA TOR-RECEPTION I S T S MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

54

3 9 .5

6 6 .0 0

6 5 .0 0

59. 5 0 -

7 0 .5 0

_

40

39. 5

6 5 .0 0

6 5 .0 0

5 9 .0 0 -

6 9 .5 0

~

TRANSCRIeiNG- MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ---------------------------------------------------------------

26

3 3 .0

6 9 .0 0

6 2 .0 0

5 6 .0 0 -

7 4 .0 0

TYPISTS,

A -------------------------------------------

38

3 8 .0

7 9 . 50

6 9 .0 0

6 5 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .5 0

-

-

T Y P I S T S , CLASS B ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

116

38 .0

6 1 .5 0

5 8 .5 0

5 4 .5 0 -

6 6 .5 0

-

i 1

64

3 8 .0

6 4 .0 0

6 0 .0 0

5 7 . DO-

7 0 .5 0

-

2

2

2b

52

3 8 .5

5 8 .0 0

5 5 .0 0

5 1 .0 0 -

6 3 .5 0

'

9

16

10

CLASS

$

a nd
under
45

WOMEN -

$

45

40

M ean2

t

$

-

-

1

-

-

2

*

-

10

3

5

9

2
-

3

4

1

2

-

1

1

1

1 St an da rd h o ur s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f or wh ich e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t he i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of pay fo r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e spond to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
The m e d i a n d e s i g n a t e s p o s it i on — h a lf of the e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e
2 The m e a n is c om p u t e d f or e ach j ob by t ot ali ng the e a rn i n g s of all w o r k e r s and div iding by the n u m b e r of w o r k e r s .
than the r ate s ho wn; h al f r e c e i v e l e s s than the r at e sh own.
T he m i d d l e r a ng e is de fi ned by 2 r a t e s of pay; a f ourt h of the w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than the l o w e r of t h e s e r a t e s and a f ou rt h e a r n m o r e than
the h i g he r r at e.
* M a y i ncl ude w o r k e r s o th er than t h o s e p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y .

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o ur s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o cc upa ti on s studied on an a r ea b a s i s
by i n d us t r y d i v i s i o n , S c r an t on , P a . , A u g u s t 1966)
W eekly earnings1
(standard)

O c c u pa t i on and i n d us t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t ra ig h t-- t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of -------s

Average
w eekly
M ean2

(standard)

M ed ian 2

M iddle range 2

C L A S S

H h Am
u D o CT

CL

CMCM

SS

C L A SS
D R A FTSM E N *
1 r I M Lj
M A N U F A C T tUI D\ 1 IN P

1

e a rn i n g s
2

A

$

$

40.0

1 39.00

1 41.00

40. 0

113.

0

113 .5 0

40
40*0

92
92 * 0 0

96 *00

37

Sta nd ar d h ou rs r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r which e m p l o y e e s
c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
F o r d ef in it i on of t e r m s , s e e fo ot no te 2, t ab le A - l .




$

$

$

$

o n
o n —
a 7 n n
£)o » U U —

r ece iv e

th ei r

q t
q q
7O

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

%

90

95

1 00

105

110

1 15

120

125

130

135

140

145

1 50

155

1 60

85

90

95

100

1 05

n o

115

120

1 25

130

135

140

1 45

150

155

1 60

165

18

1

1

2

1 07 .0 0-1 2 2.0 0

49
26

*

85

$
$
i
n
n n
L 9 / , mU nU - " i 1 a H, t U U
H/

1 21

$

80

and
unde r
80

n O A lCr T1C oM fC » N f
U K f
" cM

$

$
75

c;n
1 n n
UU

regular

3
1

2

10

2

16

23

23

21

10

8

15

16
1

2

5

str aig h t- tim e

salaries

( e x c l u s i v e of pa y

f or o v e r t i m e

at r e g u l a r

a n d /o r

premium

rate s),

and

the

7

Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s tu d i e d on an a r e a b a s i s
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S c r a n t o n , P a . , A u g u s t 1966)
Ave rage

Average

Average

Number

O c c u p a t i o n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

O FFIC E

of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings 1
hours '
(standard) (standard)

B I LL ER S , MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) -------------------------------------------------------------

21

37.0

3 7.0

89
26
6 3

3 B.0
37.0
3 8.5

63.5 0
6 5.00
6 3 .0 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

70
39
31

39.0
39.0
38.0

9 8.0 0
93.0 0
104.00

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

127
36

3 7.0
39. 0

6 8 .5 0
7 9.50

B -------------------------------

23

38.0

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS C ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

102

38. C
3o. 5
3 9.5

CLASS

3 6.5

<
t
-P
79.5 0

133
64

38. 0
3 6.0

7 7 .5 0
65.5 0

21

38.0

AND GI RL S---------------------------------

c tlK t T
t t ^ ---------------- ---- ---- ——------— ————--------.. . .
u c r n c r 1 A o 1 r co .

-

earnings *
(standard)

CO NTINUED

1 45
iOO
45

3 8.0
3 7.5
38. 5

9 1.0 0
93.5 0
86.5 0

A ----------------------------

17

3 7.5

104.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ---------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

36
29

38. 5
38.0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

62

37
25

38.5
38.5
38. 5

80.0 0
8 1.0 0
7 9 . 00

69.0 0
5 7 .5 0
7 5.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------------------------------M AIV Jr AC lUk I N C -------------------------------—
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

92
38
5A

38.5
39.0
3 8.0

6 9 . 50
7 3.00
6 7.0 0

2 8

4 0 .0

$
9 9 . 00

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ---------------------------------------------------------------

26

38.0

69.0 0

T Y P I S T S , CLASS A ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURI NG__
____
— ______

39
23

38.0
3 7.0

80.5 0
7 5.50

____
T Y P I S T S , CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

116
64
52

38.0
3 8.0
3 8.5

61.5 0
6 4.0 0
5 8.0 0

37

40. 0

139 .0 0

9 4.5 0
9 3.50

6 1.5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ---------------------------------------------------------------

MANUFACTURINC ------------------------------------------fNUiNP’ A N U r A L 1 UK H v l j -------------- --------------- ------------—
SECRETARI ES,

CLASS

PR O FES S IO N A L

AND

TEC H N IC A L

OCCUPATIONS

37.0
39.0

6 8 .5 0
6 5.5 0

STENOGRAPHERS,

n AiXUr QL 1 U K 1 N b ----------------------- --------------------- ---------

85
58

37.5
37.0

7 2.0 0
7 * . 00

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

97
76

38.5
39.0
38.0

7 3.00
7 3.00
7 2.5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR- RECEPTI ONI STSMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

54
<t0

39.5
39. 5

-

__ ____________ -

122

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C
—
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

51
26

113.00

40.0
4 0 .0

91.5 0
92.0 0

65.0 0

o f pay

B --------------------------------------

6 6 .0 0

salaries (exclusive

A

CLASS

o

126
31

CLASS

o

CLERKS, ORDER --------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

DRAFTSMEN,
DRAFTSMEN,

39
63

Weekly

(standard)

O CCUPATIO NS

Weekly

6 4.5 0

39

BUYS

Number
of
workers

O c c u p a t i o n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

O FFICE

C O NTINUED

CLASS

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

65.0 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A --------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

FILE,

-

A ----------------

OFFICE

CLERKS,

O CCUPATIO N S

hours 1
(standard)

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS. CLASS B ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

39

$
67.0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS,

Weekly

workers

O FFICE

O CCUPATIO NS

B I LL ER S , MACHINE ( B I L L I N G
MACHINE) -------------------------------------------------------------

of

O cc u p a t i o n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

21

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t t he w o r k w e e k f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e
c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
z M a y i n c l u d e w o r k e r s o t h e r th an t h o s e p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y .




t h eir

SENIOR -------------------------------

regular

straight-tim e

for o v e r t im e

at r e g u l a r

a n d /or

prem ium

rates),

and

the

earnings

8

Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o ur l y e a r n i n g s for m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u pa t i on s studied on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d us tr y d i v i s i o n , S c r a n t o n , P a. , A u g u s t 1966)
N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f—

Hourly ea mings 1

of
workers

t

$

$

2 .2 0

2.30

$
2 .50

iI
.
2 .60

$
$
2 . 70 2 . 8 0

i

2 . 10

$
2 .40

$

2 .00

2 .90

3 .00

$
3 .10

$
3.20

s
3 .3 0

$
3.40

$
3 .5 0

$
3 .60

2 .0 0

O c c u p a t i o n and i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

$

2 .1 0

2 .2 0

2 .3 0

2 .40

2 .50

2 .60

;2 . 7 0

2 . 80

2 .90

3 .00

3i . 1 0

3.20

3 .30

3 .40

3 .50

3 .60

3 .70

_

-

2

_

_

_

-

"

-

-

2
2

_

-

2
2

_
-

-

1
1

2
2

1
1

_
_

_
_

15
15
15

6
6
6

_
_

_

_

S
1 .90
M ean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$

2.88
2.86

2 .7 4 2 .7 2 -

3.50
2.99

-

23

2.22
2.21

2 .34
2 .36

2 .0 7 -

2 .43

2 1

MACHI NI STS, MAINTENANCE -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

61
61

2 .92
2.92

3.01
3.01

2 .9 0 2 .9 0 -

3 .07
3.07

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) -----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 -------------------------------

72
62
6 2

3.04
3.08
3.08

3 .25
3.27
3 .2 7

2 .8 5 3 .0 9 3 .0 9 -

3 .35
3 .36
3 .36

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

91
80

2 .92
2 .93

2.86
2.86

2 .8 1 2 .8 3 -

2 .89
2 .98

OILERS ------------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURI NG-------------------------------------------

20
2 0

2.20

2.28

1 .9 8 -

2 .45

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

89
89

3 . 34

3.33

3 .1 6 -

1

1

1
-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

10
10
10

_

_
_

-

-

_
-

1
1

5
2
2

4
4

9
9

holi days,

9
9

2
2

10
10

12
12

30
30

6

1
1

1
1
1

22
22
22

1
1

2
2

_
_
-

7
-

-

1

3
3
3

5
3

53
53

1
1

5
5

7

s h i f ts .

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o ur l y e a r n i n g s for s e l e c t e d o c c u p at io n s studied on an a r e a b a s i s
by i n d us tr y d i v i s i o n , S c r a n t o n , Pa. , A u g u s t 1966)




3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .00

2
2

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

6
6

7

3

_
_

_

4

"
_
_

13
13

-

1
1

5
5
and l ate

_

7
7

3 .40

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m pay f o r o v e r t i m e and f or w o r k on w e e k e n d s ,
F o r d ef in it i on o f t e r m s , s e e f ootnote 2 , table A - l .
T rans po rtation, com munication
and o th er public u t il i t i e s .

at end o f ta b le .

$
3 .90

3

HELPERS* MAINTENANCE TRADES ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

fo o tn o te s

S
3 .80

$

$

61
53

See

3.70

j U 61 and
1 . 9 0 unde r

$
3 .02
2 .94

ELECTRI CI ANS* MAINTENANCE --------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

1
2
3

1

29
29

_
-

9
9

33
33

12
12

“
—
—

-

2
2

_

_

3

-

-

1

1
1

_
-

9

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations— Continued
(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -t im e h ou rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o cc u p a tio n s stu died on an a r e a b a s is
by in d u stry d iv is io n , S c r a n to n , P a . , A u g u st 1966)
Num ber o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tra igh t-tim e h ourly earnings of—

Iarmings1

O ccu pation

and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

$
1 .20

Number
of
workers

M iddle range3

Under

$

1.20

$
$
$
$
$
$
1 . 30 1 . 4 0 1 . 5 C 1 . 6 0 1 . 7 0

1 .30

J A NI TOR S. PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 -----------------------J A NI TOR S, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
(wOMEN) --------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING - - ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------ORDER
FILLERS -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PACKERS, SHIPPING ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------PACKERS, SHI PPI NG ( W O M E N ) -------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------SHI PPI NG CLERKS --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------SHI PPI NG AND RECEI VI NG CLERKS —
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------T RUCK DR IVERS 7 -------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PU 8 L IC UT IL I T I E S 5 ------------------------TRUCKDR I VERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 ------------------------TRUCKERS, POWER ( F OR K L I F T ) -----------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

1.40

1 .50

1 .60

1 .70

$
1.00

$
2 .0 0

$
2 .10

*
2 .20

S

%

2 .30

2.40

2 .5 0 2 .60

1.8 0

1 .9 0

2 .00

2.10

2 .20

2 .3 0

2.40

2 .50

2 .6 0

11

25

8
5
3

11

270

1

79

1

1

5 1 -

2 ,.1 1

16

19

20

17

36

17

7

33

28

19

169

1

92

1

9w

1

7 1 -

-

4

15

8

7

5

28

15

5

31

28

13

101

1

59

1

57

1

2 6 -

,
1 ,7 v

16

15

5

3

18

12

8

2

2

2

-

6

$

$

$

$

2.70

2 .8 0

2.9C

2 .8 0

2 .9 0

$
3 .00

$
3.20

$
3 .40

21

2

19

2

25

1

9 5 -

2 ,.5 5

“

~

~

2

1

2

1

2

~

6

3 .00

3 .20

3 .40

3 . 6 C 3 .80

~

63 1

2 .70

-

"

1 .2 3

1

14-

1.. 5 5

12

5

4

64

1

4

3 -

1., 7 9

-

2

2

4

1 .1 2 -

1.. 2 7

31

10

3

_
-

_

"

69

1

29

20

1

62

1

49

1

16

1 .1 7

394

2

30

2

26

1

8 2 -

3 ,. 1 2

166

2

02

2

14

1

8 4 -

2 ,.2 5

228

2

50

3 .1 0

1 .4 9 -

3,. 1 5

132

3

07

3

14

3 .1 2 -

2,. 1 8

2,. 15

2 ,. 0 4 -

2 .. 4 4

97

1.. 9 9

2,. 1 1

1.. 8 8 -

3

■2

1

2

1

1

2

1

~

2
28

21

4

12

13

7

18

34

48

3

12

6

-

4

12

12

6

18

30

48

7

9

9

1

-

-

1

1

-

4

-

21

4

2.. 1 6

4 3

"

_

_

11

-

-

3.. 1 7

202

2
6
3

-

1

40

1

1

1

15

_

1

_

7

4

14

11

34

55

7

1

4

14

11

4

119
1 19

55

139

1,. 9 3

2,. 0 3

1,. 6 5 -

2 ,, 0 9

_

a

2

11

9

11

4

9

-

54

-

8

7

124

1,. 9 4

2,. 0 3

1.. 7 1 -

2 ..0 9

-

6

1

10

3

11

4

9

~

54

-

8

7

108

1,. 7 6

1 .7 9

1.. 5 4 -

2,. 1 0

-

7

14

1

71

1,. 8 7

1,. 8 5

1.. 7 5 -

2 .. 1 2

"

39

2,.2 1

2 ,. 3 2

1 .. 9 5 -

2 ., 4 6

_

20

2., 1 3

2 ,.0 8

1., 9 5 -

2 ..3 6

-

19

2 .. 2 9

2 .. 4 4

1 . .<3 9 -

2 ..5 9

"
-

32

2 ,. 2 5

2.. 4 0

1.. 9 4 -

2 ..4 7

24

2 .. 2 9

2 ,. 4 0

2 ,. 0 5 -

2 ..0 4

2 ,. 0 9

1 ,. 7 2 -

34

1 .. 8 8

1 ,. 9 5

500

2 .. 9 7

45
398

2 .. 6 1
3, . 0 0
,12

46

2 .. 5 7

26

1 ., 9 7

455

3, . 2 1
2 ,. 3 5
3. . 2 2
3, . 2 3

3. . 2 7

1 ,. 9 6 2 ,. 9 4 2 ,. 9 7 -

3 ., 5 5
3. , 2 7
3 .. 2 8

_
-

2 .. 3 9
1 .. 8 5

1 ., 6 9 1 ., 6 4 -

3 .. 5 5

_

2 ., 3 5

~

1
1

_

_

3.. 0 1

3, . 2 1
3, . 2 2
3.. 2 2

2 .. 9 5 2 ,, 9 6 2 ,. 9 7 -

3. , 2 6
3. . 2 6
3. , 2 6

2 ., 3 4
2 ., 3 3

2 .. 3 7
2 ,. 3 6

2 ,. 3 1 2 .. 3 1 -

2 .. 4 7
2 ., 4 6

112
96

_

2 .. 9 3 -

3 . , 0 f>
c
3.. 1 1

182

-

-

27

10

11

5

25

27

10

4

4

1

_
-

2

1

1

8

2

2

1

6

1

-

-

-

8

2

-

1

6

1

2

1

1

2

~

~

1

1

3

3

3

3

1
1

1
1

4
4

11
11

6

7

3

20

3

22

6

7

-

1
2

4

-

16

2
1
1

18

2

_

2

-

_

_

7

-

-

1
1

1

-

_

1

1

7

-

_

3
3
11

11

6
6

-

_

_

_

”

~

~

2
2

_

3

4

_

-

2

4

13

“

-

2

4

12

-

-

_

-

_

~

1
1

~

_

_

_

_

_

$ 1. 10;

11
11

_

_
_

and

_

3
3

7

_

7

3 at $ 1. 10 to $ 1. 2 0.

11
11

4
137
137

~

~

2

3

10

1
1

“

6
6

42

258
2 58

10
10

2

_

11
11

22

-

~
-

192

“

~

2 .. 1 9
1 ., 6 6 — 2 .. 1 4

203

_
-

3

~

-

2 .,4 6

43

_
-

5
4

Da ta l i m i t e d to m e n w o r k e r s e x c e p t w h e r e o t h e r w i s e i ndica ted.
E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m pay f or o v e r t i m e and for w o r k o n w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and l ate s h i f ts .
F o r d e f in i t i o n o f t e r m s , s e e f oo tn ot e 2, table A - l .
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s : 1 at $ 0. 70 to $ 0. 80; 10 at $ 0. 80 to $ 0. 9 0; 2 at $1 to
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o th e r publ ic u t il i t i e s .
W o r k e r s w e r e d i s t r i b u t e d as f o l l o w s : 9 at $ 0 . 8 0 to $ 0 . 9 0 ; and 22 at $ 1. 10 to $ 1 . 2 0 .
I n c l u de s a l l d r i v e r s , a s d e f i n e d , r e g a r d l e s s o f s i z e and type o f t ru ck o p e r a t e d .




$
1 .8 0

$
3.60

and
under

10
6

1 18
118
118

8

43

22
15

18
15

Appendix. Occupational Descriptions

The primary purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its field
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are employed under a variety o f payroll titles
and different work arrangements from establishment to establishment and from area to area.
This permits
the grouping of occupational wage rates representing comparable job content.
Because of this emphasis on
interestablishment and interarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau’ s job descriptions may
differ significantly from those in use in individual establishments or those prepared for other purposes.
In
applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed to exclude working supervisors,
apprentices, learners, beginners, trainees, handicapped, part-tim e, temporary, and probationary workers.

O F F IC E

BILLER, MACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Prepares statements, bills, and invoices on a machine other than
an ordinary or electrom atic typewriter. ' May also keep records as to
billings or shipping charges or perform other clerical work incidental
to billing operations. For wage study purposes, billers, m achine, are
classified by type o f m achine, as follows:

Operates a bookkeeping machine (Rem ington Rand, Elliott Fisher,
Sundstrand, Burroughs, National Cash Register, with or without a type­
writer keyboard) to keep a record o f business transactions.
Class A . Keeps a set of records requiring a knowledge of and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and fam iliarity with the
structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines proper
records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each
phase of the work. May prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.

Biller, machine (billing m achine). Uses a special billing m a­
chine (M oon Hopkins, Elliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc. , which are
com bination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills and invoices
from customers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping
memorandums, etc. Usually involves application of predetermined
discounts and shinning; charges, and entrv of necessarv extensions.
which may or may not be computed on the billing m achine, and
totals which are automatically accumulated by m achine. The oper­
ation usually involves a large number of carbon copies o f the bill
being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.

Class B. Keeps a record of one or more phases or sections o f
a set of records usually requiring little knowledge o f basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, payroll, cus­
tomers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described
under biller, machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc.
May check or assist in preparation o f trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

Biller, machine (bookkeeping m achine).
Uses a bookkeeping
machine (Sundstrand, Elliott Fisher, Remington Rand, etc. , which
may or may not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare customers' bills
as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves the
simultaneous entry o f figures on customers' ledger record. The m a­
chine autom atically accumulates figures on a number o f vertical
columns and computes, and usually prints automatically the debit or
credit balances.
Does not involve a knowledge o f bookkeeping.
Works from uniform and standard types of sales and credit slips.




CLERK, ACCOUNTING
Class A . Under general direction o f a bookkeeper or accountant,
has responsibility for keeping one or more sections of a com plete set
o f books or records relating to one phase o f an establishment's busi­
ness transactions.
Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary
10

11

CLERK, ACCOUNTING— Continued
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable;
examining and coding invoices or vouchers with proper accounting
distribution; and requires judgment and experience in making proper
assignations and allocations.
May assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and may direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. Under supervision, performs one or more routine a c­
counting operations such as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts
payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers; reconciling
bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not
require a knowledge o f accounting and bookkeeping principles but
is found in office s in which the more routine accounting work is
subdivided on a functional basis among several workers.
CLERK, FILE
Class A .
In an established filing system containing a number
of varied subject matter files, classifies and indexes file material
such as correspondence, reports, technical documents, etc.
May
also file this m aterial.
May keep records o f various types in con ­
junction with the files.
May lead a small group o f lower level file
clerks.
Class B.
Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple
(subject matter) headings or partly classified material by finer sub­
headings. Prepares simple related index and cross-reference aids.
As requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards
material. May perform related clerical tasks required to maintain
and service files.
Class C. Performs routine filing of material that has already
been classified or which is easily classified in a simple serial classi­
fication system (e .g . , alphabetical, chronological, or num erical).
As requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards
material; and may fill out withdrawal charge.
Performs simple
cleric.al and manual tasks required to maintain and service files.

CLERK, ORDER— Continued
to make up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be filled.
May check with credit department to determine credit rating of customer,
acknowledge receipt o f orders from customers, follow up orders to see
that they have been filled , keep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.

CLERK, PAYROLL
Computes wages of company employees and enters the necessary
data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers' earnings
based on time or production records; and posting calculated data on payroll
sheet, showing information such as worker's name, working days, time,
rate, deductions for insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and assist paymaster in making up and distributing pay envelopes.
May use a calculating m achine.
COMPTOMETER OPERATOR
Primary duty is to operate a Comptometer to perform mathe­
matical computations.
This job is not to be confused with that of statis­
tical or other type of clerk, which may involve frequent use of a Comp­
tometer but, in which, use of this machine is incidental to performance
of other duties.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR DITTO)
Under general supervision and with no supervisory responsibilities,
reproduces multiple copies o f typewritten or handwritten matter, using a
Mimeograph or Ditto machine. Makes necessary adjustment such as for
ink and paper feed counter and cylinder speed.
Is not required to prepare
stencil or Ditto master.
May keep file of used stencils or Ditto masters.
May sort, colla te, and staple com pleted material.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
CLERK, ORDER
Receives customers’ orders for material or merchandise by m ail,
phone, or personally. Duties involve any combination of the following:
Quoting prices to customers; making out an order sheet listing the items




Class A . Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combina­
tion keypunch machine to transcribe data from various source docu­
ments to keypunch tabulating cards. Performs same tasks as lower
level keypunch operator but, in addition, work requires application

12

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR— Continued
o f coding skills and the making o f some determinations, for exam ple,
locates on the source document the items to be punched; extracts
information from several documents; and searches for and interprets
information on the document to determine information to be punched.
May train inexperienced operators.
Class B.
Under close supervision or following sp ecific procedures
or instructions, transcribes data from source documents to punched
cards.
Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination
keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards.
May verify cards.
Working from various standardized source documents, follows specified
sequences which have been coded or prescribed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting o f data to be punched.
Problems arising from erroneous items or codes, missing information,
etc. , are referred to supervisor.

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating
minor o ffice machines such as sealeis or mailers, opening and distributing
m ail, and 'other minor clerical work.

SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secretary, normally to one individual. Main­
tains a close and highly responsive relationship to the day-to-day work
activities o f the supervisor. Works fairly independently receiving a mini­
mum o f detailed supervision and guidance. Performs varied clerical and
secretarial duties, usually including most o f the follow ing: (a) Receives
telephone calls, personal callers, and incoming m ail, answers routine
inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries to the proper persons; (b)
establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor's files; (c ) maintains the
supervisor's calendar and makes appointments as instructed; (d) relays
messages from supervisor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m em ­
oranda, and reports prepared by others for the supervisor's signature to
assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) performs stenographic
and typing work.
May also perform other clerical and secretarial tasks o f comparable
nature and difficulty.
The work typically requires knowledge of office
routine and understanding o f the organization, programs, and procedures
related to the work o f the supervisor.




SECRETARY— Continued
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "secretary" possess the above
characteristics. Examples o f positions which are excluded from the def­
inition are as follows: (a) Positions which do not m eet the "personal"
secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in
secretarial type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a
group o f professional, technical, or managerial persons; (d) secretary posi­
tions in which the duties are either substantially more routine or substan­
tially more com plex and responsible than those characterized in the def­
inition; and(e) assistant type positions which involve more difficult or more
responsible technical, administrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical
duties which are not typical o f secretarial work.
NOTE: The term "corporate o ffice r," used in the level definitions
following, refers to those officials who have a significant corporate-wide
policymaking role with regard to major company activities.
The title
"v ice president, " though normally indicative o f this role, does not in all
cases identify such positions. Vice presidents whose primary responsibility
is to act personally on individual cases or transactions (e. g. , approve or
deny individual loan or credit actions; administer individual trust accounts;
directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be "corporate
officers" for purposes o f applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a.
Secretary to the chairman o f
company that employes, in all, over 100 but

the board or president o f a
fewer than 5,000 persons; or

b.
Secretary to a corporate officer (other than the chairman o f
the board or president) o f a company that employs, in all, over 5, 000 but
fewer than 25, 000 persons; or
c.
Secretary to the head (im m ediately below the corporate
officer level) o f a major segment or subsidiary o f a company that employs,
in all, over 25,000 persons.
Class B
a.
Secretary to the chairman o f
the board or president o f a
company that employs, in all, fewer than 100 persons; or
b.
Secretary to a corporate officer (other than chairman o f the
board or president) of a company that employs, in all, over 100 but fewer
than 5,000 persons; or

13
SECRETARY— Continued

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL— Continued

c.
Secretary to the head (immediately below the officer level)
over either a m ajor corporate-w ide functional activity (e. g. , marketing,
research, operations, industrial relations, etc. ) or a major geographic or
organizational segment (e. g. , a regional headquarters; a major division)
o f a company that em ploys, in all, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
em ployees; or

May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other relatively routine
clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool. Does not include
transcribing-machine work. (See transcribing-machine operator. )
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR

Primary duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or
specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific re­
search from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
similar machine; and transcribe dictation.
May also type from written
copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.
e.
Secretary to the head o f a large and important organizational
OR
segment (e. g. , a m iddle management supervisor o f an organizational seg­
ment often involving as many as several hundred persons) o f a company
Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater inde­
that employs, in a ll, over 25,000 persons.
pendence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evidenced by the
following: Work requires high degree o f stenographic speed and accuracy;
Class C
and a thorough working knowledge o f general business and office procedures
and o f the sp ecific business operations, organization, policies, procedures,
a.
Secretary to an executive or managerial person whose respon­
files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing stenographic duties
sibility is not equivalent to one o f the specific level situations in the def­
and responsible clerical tasks such as, maintaining followup files; assembling
inition for class B, but whose subordinate staff normally numbers at least
material for reports, memorandums, letters, etc. ; composing simple letters
several dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organizational segments
from general instructions; reading and routing incoming m ail; and answering
which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some companies, this level
routine questions, etc. Does not include transcribing-machine work.
includes a wide range o f organizational echelons; in others, only one or
d.
Secretary to the head o f an individual plant, factory, etc.
(or other equivalent lev el o f o fficia l) that employs, in all, over 5,000
persons; or

two; or

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR

b.
Secretary to the head o f an individual plant, factory, etc.
(or other equivalent lev el o f officia l) that employs, in all, fewer than
5 ,0 0 0 persons.
Class D
a.
Secretary to the supervisor or head o f a small organizational
unit (e. g. , fewer than about 25 or 30 persons); or
b.
Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional
em ployee, administrative office r, or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
(NOTE: Many companies assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as
described above, to this level o f supervisory or nonsupervisory worker. )
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

Primary duty is to take dictation involving a normal routine vo­
cabulary from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
similar m achine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written copy.




Class A . Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switch­
board handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. Performs full
telephone information service or handles com plex calls, such as conference,
co lle ct, overseas, or similar calls, either in addition to doing routine work
as described for switchboard operator, class B, or as a full-tim e assignment.
("Full" telephone information service occurs when the establishment has
varied functions that are not readily understandable for telephone informa­
tion purposes, e. g. , because o f overlapping or interrelated functions, and
consequently present frequent problems as to which extensions are appro­
priate for calls. )
Class B. Operates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switch­
board handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or office calls. May handle
routine long distance calls and record tolls. May perform lim ited telephone
information service. ("Lim ited” telephone information service occurs if the
functions o f the establishment serviced are readily understandable for tele­
phone information purposes, or if the requests are routine, e. g. , giving
extension numbers when sp ecific names are furnished, or if com plex calls
are referred to another operator. )

14

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST

In addition to performing duties o f operator on a single position
or m onitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type or
perform routine clerica l work as part of regular duties.
This typing or
clerical work may take the m ajor part o f this worker’ s time while at
switchboard.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR— Continued

specific instructions. May include simple wiring from diagrams and
some filing work.
The work typically involves portions o f a work
unit, for exam ple, individual sorting or collating runs or repetitive
operations.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
TABULA TING-MACHINE OPERATOR

Class A . Operates a variety o f tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines, typically including such machines as the tabulator,
calculator, interpreter, collator, and others.
Performs com plete
reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs difficult
wiring as required.
The com plete reporting and tabulating assign­
ments typically involve a variety of long and com plex reports which
often are o f irregular or nonrecurring type requiring some planning
and sequencing o f steps to be taken. As a more experienced oper­
ator, is typically involved in training new operators in machine
operations, or partially trained operators in wiring from diagrams
and operating sequences of long and com plex reports.
Does not
include working supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations
and d a y -to-d ay supervision of the work and production o f a group of
tabulating-m achine operators.

Class B. Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the
sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is performed under specific
instructions and may include the performance of some wiring from
diagrams.
The work typically involves, for exam ple, tabulations
involving a repetitive accounting exercise, a com plete but small
tabulating study, or parts of a longer and more com plex report. Such
reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are w ell established.
May also include the training o f new
em ployees in the basic operation of the machine.

Class C .
Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting
machines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc. , with




Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written
copy and do simple clerical work. Workers transcribing dictation involving
a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal briefs or reports
on scientific research are not included. A worker who takes dictation in
shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine is classified as a stenographer,
general.

TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies o f various material or to make
out bills after calculations have been made by another person. May in­
clude typing of stencils, mats, or similar materials for use in duplicating
processes. May do clerical work involving little special training, such
as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and dis­
tributing incoming m ail.

Class A . Performs one or more o f the follow ing: Typing m a­
terial in final form when it involves com bining material from several
sources or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punctu­
ation, etc. , o f technical or unusual words or foreign language m a­
terial; and planning layout and typing o f com plicated statistical tables
to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type routine
form letters varying details to suit circumstances.

Class B. Performs one or more o f the follow ing: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; routine typing o f forms, insurance p olicies,
e t c . ; and setting up simple standard tabulations, or copying more
com plex tables already setup and spaced properly.

15

PROFESSIONAL

AND

TECHNICAL

DRAFTSMAN

DRAFTSMAN
Class A . Plans the graphic presentation o f com plex items having
distinctive design features that differ significantly from established
drafting precedents. Works in close support with the design originator,
and may recom m end minor design changes. Analyzes the e ffect of
each change on the details o f form, function, and positional relation­
ships of components and parts. Works with a minimum o f supervisory
assistance. C om pleted work is reviewed by design originator for con ­
sistency with prior engineering determinations. May either prepare
drawings, or direct their preparation by lower level draftsmen.
Class B.
Performs nonroutine and com plex drafting assignments
that require the application of most of the standardized drawing tech­
niques regularly used. Duties typically involve such work as: Prepares
working drawings o f subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple
functions, and precise positional relationships between components;
prepares architectural drawings for construction of a building including
detail drawings o f foundations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary computations
to determine quantities of materials to be used,, load capacities,
strengths, stresses, e tc .
Receives initial instructions, requirements,
and advice from supervisor. Completed work is checked for technical
adequacy.
Class C .
Prepares detail drawings o f single units or parts for
engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types
o f drawings prepared include isometric projections (depicting three
dimensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning
o f components and convey needed information. Consolidates details
from a number o f sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required.

MAINTENANCE

Continued

Suggested methods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source materials are given with initial assignments.
Instructions are
less com plete when assignments recur.
Work may be spot-checked
during progress.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not
include tracing lim ited to plans primarily consisting of straight lines and
a large scale not requiring close delineation .)
and/or
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
is closely supervised during progress.

Work

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse-who gives nursing service under general m edical
direction to ill or injured employees or other persons who becom e ill or
suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill
or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees’ injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation
or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and health evaluations
o f applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs
involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant en­
vironment, or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety
of all personnel.

AND

PQWERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain
in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs,*
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim made
of wood in an establishment. Work involves most o f the follow ing: Plan­
ning and laying out o f work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal
instructions; using a variety o f carpenter's handtools, portable power tools,

and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations
relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary for the
work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience.




16

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES— Continued

Performs a variety o f electrical trade functions such as the in­
stallation, maintenance, or repair o f equipment for the generation, dis­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment.
Work
involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any o f a variety of
electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, con­
trollers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other
transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical
system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load
requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electrician's handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general,
the woik of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

a woiker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, m a­
chine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools;
and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind
o f work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding m a­
terials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted
to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are
also performed by workers on a fu ll-tim e basis.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipment (m echanical or electrical) to supply the
establishment in which em ployed with power, heat, refrigeration, or
air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines,
ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and b oiler-fed
water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record o f operation
of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise
these operations. Head or ch ief engineers in establishments em ploying'
more than one engineer are excluded.

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or more types o f machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or m illing machines, in the construction of m achine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves most of the follow ing: Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing items requiring
com plicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling, and oper­
ation sequence; and making necessary' adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions.
May be required to recognize
when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants
and cutting and lubricating oils.
For cross-industry wage study purposes,
m achine-tool operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing shops are e x ­
cluded from this classification.

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE
FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, or gas or oil burner; and checks water
and safety valves.
May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom
equipment.

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades,
by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping




Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves most of the following: Interpreting written instructions and speci­
fications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's
handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating
standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to ciose tolerances; making
standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the
com m on metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment re­
quired for his work; and fitting and assembling parts into m echanical
equipment. In general, the machinist's work normally requires a rounded
training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

17

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

OILER

Repairs autom obiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors o f an es­
tablishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; and alining wheels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work o f the auto­
motive m ech an ic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces of m echanical equipment of an establishment.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs m achinery or m echanical equipment o f an establishment.
Work involves most o f the follow ing: Examining machines and m echanical
equipment to diagnose source o f trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use o f handtools
in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacem ent part by a
machine shop or sending o f the machine to a machine shop for major
repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the pro­
duction o f parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling machines; and
making all necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of
a maintenance m ech an ic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex ­
perience.
Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary
duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout
are required. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying
out o f the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety o f handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to stresses, strength o f materials, and centers o f gravity; alining
and balancing o f equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power
transmission equipm ent such as drives and speed reducers.
In general,
the m illw right's work normally requires a rounded training and experience
in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent train­
ing and experien ce.




PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishment. Work involves the follow ing: Knowledge of surface peculi­
arities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush.
May m ix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency.
In general, the work of the maintenance
painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the following:
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting
machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures,
flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine
whether finished pipes m eet specifications.
In general, the work of the
maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heating systems are excluded.

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge o f sanitary codes regarding installation of vents
and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
and opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber's snake. In general,
the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training and ex ­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

18
TOOL AND DIE MAKER— Continued

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b r ic a t e s , installs, and m a in ta in s in g o o d rep air the s h e e t - m e t a l
equipm ent

and

fixtures

(su ch as m a c h i n e

guards,

grease pans,

she lv e s,

l o c k e r s , tanks, ve n tila t o rs , ch utes, ducts, m e t a l ro o f in g ) o f an e s ta b lis h ­
m ent.
W ork in v o l v e s m ost o f the f o l l o w i n g : Pla n nin g and l a y i n g ou t all
types o f s h e e t - m e t a l m a in t e n a n c e work fro m blueprints, m o d e ls ^ or oth er
s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; sett in g up and o p e r a t in g all a v a ila b le types o f s h e e t - m e t a l ­
w o rk in g m a c h i n e s ; using a v a r ie t y o f h a n d to o ls in cu tt in g , b e n d in g , f o r m ­
in g, s ha p in g, f itt in g , and a s se m b lin g; and installing s h e e t - m e t a l a rticle s
as re q u ire d .
In g e n e r a l , the work o f the m a in t e n a n c e s h e e t - m e t a l w o rk e r
requires ro u nd e d trainin g and e x p e r i e n c e usually a c q u ir e d through a f o r m a l

T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R

Constru cts and repairs
or dies for fo rgin gs , p u n c h in g ,

m a c h i n e - s h o p to o ls , ga g e s , ji g s , fixtures
and oth er m e t a l - f o r m i n g w o rk .
Work in ­

AND

PASSENGER

Transports passengers b e t w e e n flo ors o f an o f f i c e b u i l d i n g ,

apart­

GUARD AND W ATCH M AN
Per form s routine

police

duties,

e it h e r at f i x e d

o n tour, m a i n t a i n i n g ord er, using arms or f o r c e w he re n e ce ss a ry.
g a t e m e n w h o are s ta tio n e d
and o th e r persons e n t e r in g .
W atchm an.
property again st f ire ,
JANITOR,

PORTER,

at gate and c h e c k on

post o r
In clu d e s

id e n tity o f e m p l o y e e s

M akes rounds o f p rem is es p e r i o d i c a l l y
th e ft, and i l l e g a l entry.

For cross-ind ustry w a g e study purposes, t o o l a nd die m a k e rs in
t o o l and die j o b b i n g shops are e x c l u d e d f r o m this c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .

MATERIAL

MOVEMENT
PORTER,

O R CLEANER— C o n t i n u e d

or o th e r esta blishment.
Duties i n v o l v e a c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g :
S w e e p i n g , m o p p in g or scru bbin g, and p o li s h in g floors ; r e m o v i n g ch ip s ,
trash, and other refuse; dusting e q u i p m e n t , furniture, o r fixtures; p o li s h in g
m e t a l fixtures or tr im m in gs; p r o v id in g sup plies and m i n o r m a i n t e n a n c e
s e rvic es; and c l e a n i n g la v a to r ie s , show ers , and restr oom s.
Workers w h o
s p e c ia liz e in w in d o w washing are e x c l u d e d .
LAB OR ER, M A T E R IA L HANDLING
( L o a d e r and u nlo a der; h a n d le r and s ta cke r; sh e lv e r; tr uck er; s t o c k m a n
or stock h e lpe r; w a r e h o u s e m a n or w a re h o u s e h e lp e r)

in p r o t e c t i n g

O R CLEANER

( S w e e p e r ; c h a r w o m a n ; janitress)
Cle an s and ke e p s in an o rd e rly c o n d i t i o n f a c t o r y w o r k in g areas
and w a s h r o o m s , or p rem is es o f an o f f i c e , a p a rt m e n t h o u s e , o r c o m m e r c i a l




fe e ds , and t o o l i n g o f m a ch in e s; h e a t tr e a t in g o f m e t a l parts during f a b r i ­
c a t i o n as w e l l as o f finished to o ls and dies to a c h i e v e re q u ire d q u a litie s;
w o rk in g to clo s e t o le ra n ce s ; fitt in g and a s s e m b lin g o f parts to p r e s c r ib e d

JANITOR,

m e n t h o u s e , d e p a r tm e n t store, h o t e l , o r s im il a r es ta b lis h m e n t.
Workers
w h o o p e r a t e e le v a t o r s in c o n j u n c t i o n with o th e r duties such as those o f
starters a nd ja n it ors are e x c l u d e d .

G uard.

a lloys; setting up and o pe r atin g o f m a c h i n e to o ls and r e la t e d e q u i p m e n t ;
m a k in g n ecessary shop c o m p u ta tio n s r e la t in g to d i m e n s i o n s 'o f w o rk , speeds,

g a ge m a k e r )

CUSTODIAL
ELEVATOR OPERATOR,

variety of tool and die m a k e r ’ s h a n d t o o ls and p r e c is io n m e a s u rin g instru­
m en ts, understanding o f the w o r k in g p ro pe rtie s o f c o m m o n m e t a ls and

t o l e r a n c e s and a llo w a n c e s ; and s e l e c t i n g app ropria te m a t e r i a l s , to o l s , and
p r ocesses.
In g e n e r a l, the to o l and die m a k e r ’ s w o rk req uires a ro u n d e d
training in m a c h i n e - s h o p and t o o l r o o m p r a c t i c e u su a lly a c q u i r e d through
a f o r m a l a pp rentic eship or e q u i v a l e n t trainin g and e x p e r i e n c e .

a p p r e n t ic e s h ip or e q u i v a l e n t training and e x p e r i e n c e .

( D i e m a k e r ; j i g m a k e r; t o o l m a ke r; fixture m a ke r;

v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : Pla n n in g and la y i n g o u t o f work fro m m o d e l s ,
blueprints, drawings, or oth er o ra l and w ritte n s p e c i f i c a t i o n s ; using a

A w o rke r e m p l o y e d in a w a r e h o u s e , m a n u f a c t u r in g p la n t, store,
or o th e r es ta b lis h m e n t whose duties i n v o l v e o n e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g :
L o a d in g and u n lo a d in g various m a t e ria ls and m e r c h a n d is e o n o r f r o m f r e ig h t
ca rs, trucks, or oth er transporting d e v i c e s ; u n p a c k i n g , s h e lv in g , or p l a c i n g
m a teria ls or m er ch a n d is e in p r o p e r sto rage l o c a t i o n ; and transportin g m a ­
terials or m e rcha n dis e b y h andtruck, c a r , o r w h e e l b a r r o w .
Longshorem en,
w ho l o a d and u n lo a d ships are e x c l u d e d .

19

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued

ORDER FILLER

For w a g e study purposes,

workers are c l a s s i f i e d as f o llo w s :

( O r d e r p i c k e r , s t o c k s e l e c t o r ; w are house s to ck m a n )
R e c e i v i n g c le r k
F il ls

s h ip p in g

o r transfer orders

for

finished

go o d s f r o m stored

m e r c h a n d i s e in a c c o r d a n c e w ith s p e c if ic a t io n s on sales slips, customers*
ord ers, o r o t h e r in stru ctio n s.
M a y , in a d d itio n to f i l l i n g orders and in ­
d i c a t i n g i t e m s f i l l e d o r o m i t t e d , k e e p re co rd s o f o u t g o in g orders, r e q u i­
s it io n a d d i t i o n a l s t o c k o r re p o rt short supplies to supervisor, and p e r fo r m

Sh ip p in g c le r k
Sh ipp in g and r e c e i v i n g c le rk
TRU CKDR IVER
D riv e s a truck w ith in a c i t y o r industrial area to transport m a ­
m e r c h a n d is e , e q u i p m e n t , o r m e n b e t w e e n various types o f es­

o t h e r r e l a t e d du ties.
te ria ls,
PACKER,

SHIPPING

Prepares f i n i s h e d products for s h ip m e n t o r storage b y p l a c i n g th e m
in s h ip p in g c o n t a i n e r s , th e s p e c i f i c o p eratio ns p e r fo r m e d b e i n g d e p e n d e n t
u p o n the t y p e , size, and n u m b e r o f units to b e p a c k e d , the ty pe o f c o n ­
ta in e r e m p l o y e d , a n d m e t h o d o f s hip m e n t.
W ork requires the p l a c i n g o f
it e m s in s h ip p in g c o n t a in e r s and m a y i n v o l v e o n e or m ore o f the f o l l o w i n g :
K n o w l e d g e o f v a rio u s it e m s o f sto ck in ord er to ve rify c o n t e n t ; s e l e c t i o n
o f a p p r o p r ia t e ty p e and size o f c o n ta in e r; inserting en clo sures in c o n ta in e r ;

ta blishmen ts such as: M a n u f a c tu r in g plants, fre igh t d ep ots, ware houses,
w h o l e s a le and re t a il e sta b lish m e n ts, or b e t w e e n retail esta blishments and
cu sto m e r s' houses or p l a c e s o f business.
M a y also l o a d or u n lo a d truck
w ith or w ith o u t h e lp e rs , m a k e m i n o r m e c h a n i c a l repairs, and k e e p truck
in g o o d w o r k in g ord er.
D r i v e r - s a l e s m e n and o v e r - t h e - r o a d drivers are
excluded.
For w a g e study purposes , truckd rivers are c la s s ifi e d b y size and
type o f e q u i p m e n t , as fo llo w s : ( T r a c t o r - t r a i l e r shou ld be ra ted o n the
basis o f traile r c a p a c i t y . )

using e x c e l s i o r or o t h e r m a t e r i a l to pr e v e n t b re a ka ge o r d a m a g e ; c l o s i n g
and s e a l i n g c o n t a i n e r ; and a p p ly in g labels or entering i d e n t i f y i n g data o n
con tain er.
P a ck e r s w h o also m a k e w o o d e n b o x e s or cr a tes are e x c l u d e d .

SHIPPING A N D

T r u c k d r iv e r ( c o m b i n a t i o n o f sizes lis te d s e p a ra te ly)
T r u ck d riv e r,
T r u c k d r iv e r ,
T r u ck d riv e r,
T r u c k d r iv e r ,

RECEIVING CLERK

Prepares m e r c h a n d i s e for s hip m en t, o r r e c e iv e s and is respon sib le
fo r i n c o m i n g s h ip m e n ts o f m e r c h a n d is e or o th e r m a te ria ls .

lig h t (u n d e r 1 */2 tons)
m e d i u m ( l V 2 to and i n c l u d i n g 4 tons)
h e a v y ( o v e r 4 tons,
h e a v y ( o v e r 4 tons,

TRUCKER,

truck

s h ip p e d , m a k i n g u p b i l l s o f la d in g , po stin g w e i g h t and ship p in g ch a r g e s ,

w a re h o u s e ,

and k e e p i n g a f ile o f ship p in g re co rd s.
M a y d ir e c t o r assist in pr e p a rin g
the m e r c h a n d i s e f o r s h ip m e n t.
R e c e i v i n g work in v o l v e s : V e r i f y i n g o r
d i r e c t i n g others in v e r i f y i n g the co rrectn ess o f shipments a gain st b ills o f
in voices,

or other

re cord s; c h e c k i n g

PO W ER

S h ip p in g w ork

in v o lv e s : A k n o w l e d g e o f ship pin g p rocedu res, p r a c t ic e s , routes, a v a i l a b l e
m e a n s o f tran s po rta tio n , and rates; and pr ep aring re cords o f the go o d s

ladin g,

tr aile r ty p e )
o th e r than tr a ile r ty pe )

for shortages and

Opera tes
or

a

tr a c to r to

m a n u a lly
transport

con trolled
good s

m a n u f a c tu r in g p la n t,

and

gasoline-

electric-pow ered
all kin ds

ab out a

or o th e r e sta b lish m e n t.

For w a g e study pu rposes, work ers are c l a s s i f i e d b y ty pe o f truck,
as fo llo w s :

rejectin g

d a m a g e d g o o d s ; r o u tin g m e r c h a n d is e or m a te ria ls to p r o p e r d ep a rtm ents;

T r u ck e r,

p o w e r ( fo r k l i f t )

a nd m a i n t a i n i n g n e c e s s a r y reco rd s and file s.

Trucker,

p o w e r ( o t h e r than fork lift)




or

m a te ria ls o f




A v a i l a b l e On R e q u e s t —

The sixth annual report on salaries for accountants, auditors, attorneys, chemists,
engineers, engineering technicians, draftsmen, tracers, job analysts, directors of
personnel, managers of office services, and clerical employees.
Order as BLS Bulletin 1469, National Survey of Professional, Administrative, Tech­
nical, and Clerical Pay, February—
March 1965. 45 cents a copy.

Area Wage Surveys
A lis t of the l atest av aila ble bulletins is pre sen te d be low . A d ir e c t o r y indicating dates of e a r l i e r stu d ie s, and the p r i c e s of the bulletins is
av ail a ble on r e q u e s t.
Bul letins may be purc hased f rom the Superintendent of D o c u m e n t s , U .S . G o v e rn m e n t Printing O ffi c e , W ash ingto n, D . C . , 202 0 4,
or f r o m any of the BLS re g io n a l sales offices shown on the inside front c o v e r .

Area

Bulletin number
and p ri ce

A k r o n , Ohio, June 1966 1___________________________________
A lb a n y — c h e n e c t a d y - T r o y , N . Y . , A pr . 1966 1 --------------S
A lb u q u e rq u e , N. M e x . , A p r . 1966 1________ ...____________
A llento wn—B e th l e h e m —E a s t o n , P a .—N. J . ,
F e b. 1966 1____________________________________________________
A tlan t a, G a . , M ay 1966 1 _______________________ ____________
B a l t i m o r e , M d ., No v. 1965 ------------------------------------------------Be aum o nt—P o r t A r t h u r - O r a n g e , T e x . , May 1966 1____
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , A p r . 1 96 6 ______________________________
B o i s e C it y, Idaho, July 1966 1______________________________
B o sto n , M a s s . , Oct. 1965 1 ________________________________

1 465-81,
1465-60,
146 5 -6 4,

30 cents
25 cents
25 cents

146 5 -5 3,
1 4 6 5 - 7 1,
146 5 -2 9,
146 5 -6 3,
1465-56,
1530-2,
1 465-12,

25 cents
30 cents
25 cents
25 cents
20 cents
25 cents
30 cents

B u ffa lo, N . Y . , D e c . 1965 ___________________________________
Bur ling to n, V t . , M a r . 1966 ________________________________
Ca nton, Ohio, A p r . 1966 1__________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , A pr. 1966 1 __________________________
C h a r l o t te , N . C . , A p r . 1966 1
_______________________________
Cha tta no oga , T e n n . - G a . , Sept. 1 96 5--------------------------------C h ic a g o , 111., A p r . 1966 1 __________________________________
Cinc inna ti, Oh io—K y .—I n d ., M a r . 1966 1 _______ __________
C l e v e la n d , Ohio , Sept. 1965 _______________________________
C o lu m b u s , Ohio, Oc t.
1965 ----------------------------------------------D a l l a s , T e x . , Nov. 1965 ____________________________________

1 465-36,
1 465-54,
1 465-58,
1 465-70,
146 5 -6 7,
1 465-7,
1 465-68,
1 465-57,
1 465-8,
1 465-15,
1465-24,

25
20
25
25
25
20
30
25
25
25
25

D a ve n p ort—R oc k Is land—M oline , Iowa—111.,
Oct. 1965 ______________________________________________________
Da yton, Ohio, .Jan. 1966 1 __________________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1965 1 ___________________________ ______
D e s M o i n e s , Iowa, Feb. 1966 1 ____________________________
D e t r o it , M i c h ., Jan. 1966 ___________________________________
F o r t W ort h, T e x . , Nov. 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
G r e e n B ay, W i s ., Aug. 1 96 5 ________________________________
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M ay 1966 1--------------------------------------------Ho us ton, T e x . , June 1966 1 ________________________________
Indi an ap olis, Ind., D e c . 1965 1-------------------------------------------

1465-16,
1 465-39,
1 465-33,
1465-48,
146 5 -4 5,
1 465-26,
1 465-4,
1 465-74,
1 465-85,
1 465-31,

1 465-44,
Ja ck so n, M i s s . , F e b. 1966 1_______________________________
Ja c k s o n v ill e , F l a . , Jan. 1966 ______________________________ 1 4 6 5 - 4 1 ,
K a n sa s C it y, M o . - K a n s . , No v. 1965 1------------------------------- 1 4 6 5 - 2 7 ,
L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N . H . , June 1966 1 ------------ 1 4 6 5 - 8 0 ,
Litt le Rock—Nort h L itt le R o c k , A r k . , Aug. 1966 1-------- 1 5 3 0 - 1 ,
L o s A n g e l e s —Long B e a ch and A n ah e im —
Santa A n a Garden G r o v e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1966 1
______________________ 1 4 6 5 - 5 9 ,
L o u i s v i l l e , K y .—I n d . , F eb. 1966 ______________ __________1 4 6 5 - 5 1 ,
Lubbo ck, T e x . , June 1966 1________________________________
1465-79,
M a n c h e s t e r , N . H . , Aug. 1965 --------------------------------------------- 1 4 6 5 - 2 ,
M e m p h i s , T e n n . - A r k . , Jan. 1966 1 ----------------------------------- 1 4 6 5 - 4 2 ,
M i a m i , F l a . , D e c . 1965 1___________________________________
1 465-30,
Midland and O d e s s a , T e x . , June 1966 1 -------------------------- 1 4 6 5 - 8 4 ,

 oi e sta b lish m e n t
D ata


Area

Bullet in number
___ and pric e __

M il w auk e e, W i s . , A p r . 196 6 _________________________________
M in nea p olis —
St. Paul, M inn., Jan. 196 6_______________ __
_
M uskegon—Musk ego n H e ig hts, M ic h ., M ay 1966 1 ______
Ne wark and J e r s e y C it y, N . J . , F e b . 1966 1 ______________
New Haven, C o nn., Jan. 1966 1 ____ ________________________
New O r l e a n s , L a . , F e b. 1 9 6 6 _______________________________
New Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r . 1966 1___________ ______ ______________
N o rfo lk —P o r tsm o u th and Ne wpo rt N ew s—
Ha mpton, V a ., June 196 6___________________________________
O k laho ma Cit y, O k l a . , Aug. 1965 __________________________

1465-61,
1 465-38,
1 465-72,
1 465-50,
1 465-37,
1 465-47,
1465-82,

20
25
25
30
25
20
40

1 465-77,
1 465-5,

20 cents
20 cents

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

O m a h a , N e b r .—Iowa, Oct. 1965 1 ----------------------------------------Pater son— lifton—P a s s aic , N .J ., May 1966 1 ____________
C
Philad elphia, P a .—N .J ., Nov. 1965 1 ___ __________________
P hoenix, A r i z . , M a r . 1966 1_________________________________
Pit ts b urg h, P a ., Jan. 1 96 6___________________________________
Portland , M ain e , Nov. 1965 1 _______________________________
Portl and , O r e g . - W a s h , , M ay 1966 1_______________________
P r o v id e n c e —Pawtucket—W a r w ic k , R . I . —M a s s . ,
May 1966 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------R ale ig h , N . C . , Sept. 1965 1 __________________________________
R ic hm on d, V a . , Nov. 1965 1 _________________________________
R o c k fo r d , 111., May 1966 1 ___________________________________

1 465-13,
146 5 -7 6,
146 5 -3 5,
1465-62,
1 465-46,
1465-23,
146 5 -7 3,

25
25
35
25
25
25
25

1 465-65,
1 465-10,
1 465-28,
1 465-66,

25 cents
25 cents
30 cents
25 cents

20
25
30
25
25
20
20
25
30
30

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

St. L o u i s , M o .—
111., Oct. 196 5 _______________________________
Salt Lake Cit y, Utah, D e c . 196 5 ____________________________
San Antonio, T e x . , June 1 9 6 6 _______________________________
San B e rn a rd in o —R iv e r side— n t a r io , C a l i f . ,
O
Sept. 1965 1 _______________________ __________ __________________
San D i e g o , C a l i f . , No v. 1965 ________________________________
Oakla nd, C a l i f . , Jan. 1966 1______________
San F r a n c i s c o —
San J o s e , C a l i f . , Sept. 1965 1 _______________________________
Savannah, G a . , May 1966 1___________________________________
Scra nton, P a ., Aug. 1 96 6_____________________________________
Seattle —E v e r e tt , W a s h ., O c t. 1965 1_______________________

1 465-22,
1 465-32,
1 465-78,

25 cents
20 cents
20 cents

146 5 -2 0,
1 465-21,
146 5 -4 3,
146 5 -1 9,
1 465-69,
1530-3,
1 465-9,

30
20
30
25
25
20
30

25
20
30
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1 4 6 5 - 17,
146 5 -5 5,
1465-75,

25 cents
25 cents
20 cents

30
20
25
20
30
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Sioux F a l l s , S. D a k . , Oc t. 1965 1___________________________
South Bend, Ind., M a r . 1966 1_______________________________
Spokane, W a s h . , June 1 9 6 6 __________________________________
Tampa—
St. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a __________________________________
T o l e d o , Ohio—M i c h . , F e b. 196 6 _____________________________
T re nto n, N . J . , D e c . 1 96 5_____________________________________
W as hing ton, D .C .—M d . ~ V a . , O c t. 196 5 ____________________
W a te r b u r y , Co n n ., M a r . 1966 1_____________________________
W a t e r l o o , Iowa, Nov. 196 5___________________________________
W ic hit a , K a n s ., Oc t. 1 96 5____________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , June 1966 1_____________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1966 1
------ ------------------------------------------------Young sto wn—W a r r e n , Ohio, Nov. 1965 1__________________

p r a c tic e s and supplem entary w age provisions are also presented.

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

( N o t previ ousl y surveyed)

146 5 -4 9,
1 465-34,
1 465-14,
1 465-52,
146 5 -1 8,
1 4 6 5 - 1 1,
1465-83,
1 465-40,
1 465-25,

20
20
25
25
20
20
25
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents