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The San Francisco—
Oakland, California,
Metropolitan Area
October 1969

B ulletin




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S

Region II
Region I
341 Ninth Ave.
1603-B Federal Building
New York, N. Y. 10001
Government Center
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7796 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
Region V
337 Mayflower Building
219 South Dearborn St.
411 North Akard St.
Chicago, 111. 60604
Dallas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St. , 10th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)

* Regions VII and VIII will be serviced by Kansas City.
 * * Regions IX and X will be serviced by San Francisco.


Area Wage Survey
The San Francisco—
Oakland, California,
Metropolitan Area




O ctober 1969

B u lletin

1660-33
M arch 1970

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
George P. Shultz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Geoffrey H. Moore. Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 50 cents




P r e fa c e

The B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t is t ic s p r o g r a m of annual o c c u p a ­
t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s i s d e s i g n e d to p r o v i d e d a t a
on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , a n d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s a n d s u p p l e m e n ­
tary w age p ro v isio n s.
It y i e l d s d e t a i l e d d a t a b y s e l e c t e d i n d u s t r y
d i v i s i o n f o r e a c h o f th e a r e a s s t u d i e d , f o r g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s , a n d
f o r the U n i t e d S t a t e s .
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in t h e p r o g r a m i s the
n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t in to ( 1 ) t h e m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s b y o c c u p a ­
t i o n a l c a t e g o r y a n d s k i l l l e v e l , a n d ( 2 ) th e s t r u c t u r e a n d l e v e l o f
w a g e s am o n g a r e a s and in d u stry d iv is io n s.

a r e a s s t u d i e d in to o n e b u l l e t i n .
The secon d p r e s e n t s in fo rm atio n
w h i c h h a s b e e n p r o j e c t e d f r o m i n d i v i d u a l m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a d a t a to
r e l a t e to g e o g r a p h i c r e g i o n s a n d th e U n i t e d S t a t e s .
N i n e t y a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e i n c l u d e d in th e p r o g r a m .
In e a c h
a r e a , i n f o r m a t i o n on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s i s c o l l e c t e d a n n u a l l y a n d on
e s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p le m e n ta ry w age p r o v is io n s b ien n ially .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s o f t h e s u r v e y in S a n F r a n c i s c o —
O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , in O c t o b e r 1 9 6 9 .
The Stan d ard M etrop olitan S t a t i s ­
t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f i n e d b y th e B u r e a u o f t h e B u d g e t t h r o u g h J a n u a r y
1968, c o n s i s t s of A la m e d a , C o n tra C o s t a , M a r in , San F r a n c i s c o , and
San M ateo C ou n ties.
T h is stud y w a s co n d u cted by the B u r e a u ' s r e ­
g i o n a l o f f i c e in S a n F r a n c i s c o , C a l i f . , u n d e r th e g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f
A d o l p h O. B e r g e r , A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l D i r e c t o r f o r O p e r a t i o n s .

At t h e e n d o f e a c h s u r v e y , a n i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s
su r v e y r e s u l t s fo r e ach a r e a stu d ied .
A f t e r c o m p l e t i o n o f a l l o f th e
i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n s f o r a r o u n d o f s u r v e y s , tw o s u m m a r y b u l l e ­
tin s a r e i s s u e d .
T h e f i r s t b r i n g s d a ta fo r e a c h of the m e t r o p o lit a n

Contents

Page
I n t r o d u c t i o n ---------------------------------------------------W a g e 'tre n d s fo r se le c te d o ccu p ation al g ro u p s

1
5

T ab les:
1.
2.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y a n d n u m b e r s t u d i e d __________________________________________________________________________
In d e x e s of s ta n d a r d w eek ly s a l a r i e s and s t r a ig h t - t im e h o u rly e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s , and
p e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________




NOTE:

S i m i l a r tab u latio n s a r e a v a ila b le fo r other a r e a s .

(See in sid e b ack c o v e r.)

A c u r r e n t r e p o r t on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s a n d s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s in the S a n F r a n c i s c o —
O a k l a n d a r e a i s a l s o a v a i l a b l e f o r p o w e r l a u n d r i e s ( A p r i l 1 9 6 8 ).
U n io n s c a l e s , i n d i c a t i v e o f p r e v a i l i n g
p a y l e v e l s , a r e a v a i l a b l e for building c o n str u c tio n ; p rin tin g ; l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a t in g e m p l o y e e s ; and
m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s , h e l p e r s , and a l lie d o c c u p a tio n s .

iii

4
6

C on ten ts--- Continued
Page
T a b l e s — C on tin u ed
A.

B.

O ccu p atio n a l e a r n in g s:
A -l.
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a n d w o m e n ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
m
A -la.
O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s — e n a n d w o m e n _________________________________________________________________________________
l
m
A -2.
P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a n d w o m e n ________________________________________________________________________________
m
A -2a.
P r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s —m e n a n d w o m e n __________________________________________________________
l
A - 3.
O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — e n a n d w o m e n c o m b i n e d _______________________________________________
m
A -3a.
O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s — e n a n d w o m e n c o m b i n e d ____________________________________
l
m
A -4.
M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------A -4a.
M a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s ___________________________________________________________________________
l
A - 5.
C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ________________________________________________________________
A -5a.
C u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s — a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s _____________________________________________________________________
l

7
11
14
15
17
19
20
22
23
25

E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s io n s :
B -l.
M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s _______________________________________________________________________________________
B-2.
S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l s ______ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B-3.
S c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B-4.
P a i d h o l i d a y s ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B -5.
P a i d v a c a t i o n s _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B-6.
H e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , a n d p e n s i o n p l a n s _________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B-7.
M e t h o d o f w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n a n d f r e q u e n c y o f p a y m e n t ----------------------------------------------------

27
28
29
30
31
34
35

A p pen dix.

O ccu p atio n al d e s c r ip tio n s —




37

Area Wage Survey---The San Francisco—Oakland, Calif., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
T h i s a r e a i s 1 of 90 in w h i c h the U . S . D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r ' s
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s c o n d u c t s s u r v e y s of o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s
a n d r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s on a n a r e a w i d e b a s i s . 1 In t h i s a r e a , d a t a w e r e
o b t a i n e d b y p e r s o n a l v i s i t s o f B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s to r e p r e s e n t ­
a t i v e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s :
M anu­
f a c tu r in g ; t r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th er pu b lic u t ilit ie s ;
w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ; r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ; an d
se rv ice s.
M a jo r in d u stry g ro u p s exclu ded fr o m th ese stu d ie s a r e
g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a t i o n s an d the c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g f e w e r t h a n a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r of w o r k e r s a r e
o m i t t e d b e c a u s e t h e y t e n d t o f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the
occupati.ons stu d ie d to w a r r a n t in c lu sio n .
S e p a r a te tab u latio n s a r e
p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h of th e b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h i c h m e e t p u b l i ­
cation c r i t e r i a .

O c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t and e a r n in g s d a ta a r e shown fo r
f u ll- t im e w o r k e r s , i . e . , th o se h ir e d to w o rk a r e g u l a r w ee k ly sc h e d u le
in t h e g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a rn in g s d ata exclu de p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , an d
late sh ifts.
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
a l l o w a n c e s an d i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n c l u d e d . W h e r e w e e k l y h o u r s
a r e r e p o r t e d , a s f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e i s to the
s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k ( r o u n d e d to th e n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r) f o r w h i c h e m ­
p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u la r s tr a ig h t - t im e s a l a r i e s (e x c lu siv e of pay
f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) . A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n ­
i n g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a t i o n s h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d t o th e n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .
The a v e r a g e s p re se n ted re fle c t co m p o site, areaw id e e s t i ­
m ates.
I n d u s t r i e s an d e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l an d j o b
s t a f f i n g a n d , t h u s , c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to th e e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b .
T h e p a y r e l a t i o n s h i p o b t a i n a b l e f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t
a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v ­
e l s f o r m e n a n d w o m e n in a n y of t h e s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s h o u l d
not b e a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t of the s e x e s
w it h in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
O ther p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w hich m a y
c o n t r i b u t e to d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n an d w o m e n i n c l u d e :
D iffe r­
e n c e s in p r o g r e s s i o n w it h in e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n ly th e
a c t u a l r a t e s p a i d i n c u m b e n t s a r e c o l l e c t e d ; an d d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c
d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d , a l t h o u g h th e w o r k e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d a p p r o p r i a t e l y
w it h in the s a m e s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n .
J o b d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in
c l a s s i f y i n g e m p l o y e e s in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d
t h a n t h o s e u s e d in i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s an d a l l o w f o r m i n o r
d i f f e r e n c e s a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c d u t i e s p e r f o r m e d .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p l e b a s i s b e c a u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
o b t a i n o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n of
l a r g e t h a n of s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i s s t u d i e d . In c o m b i n i n g t h e d a t a ,
h o w e v e r , a ll e s t a b lis h m e n t s a r e given t h e ir a p p r o p r ia te w eight.
E s­
t i m a t e s b a s e d on the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
a s r e l a t i n g t o a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g an d a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w th e m i n i m u m s i z e s t u d i e d .
O c c u p atio n s and E a r n in g s
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r s t u d y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g an d n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , a n d a r e of the
follow in g t y p e s :
(1) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l a n d t e c h n i c a l ;
(3) m a i n t e n a n c e a n d p o w e r p l a n t ; a n d (4) c u s t o d i a l a n d m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m ent.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n i s b a s e d on a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d t o t a k e a c c o u n t of i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d u t i e s w it h in the s a m e j o b .
The o c c u p a tio n s s e l e c t e d fo r study
a r e l i s t e d an d d e s c r i b e d in th e a p p e n d i x . T h e e a r n i n g s d a t a f o l l o w i n g
the j o b t i t l e s a r e f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d . E a r n i n g s d a t a f o r s o m e
of th e o c c u p a t i o n s l i s t e d an d d e s c r i b e d , o r f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
w it h in o c c u p a t i o n s , a r e not p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s t a b l e s , b e c a u s e
e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n i s t o o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h
d a t a to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y of d i s c l o s u r e
of i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o t a l in
a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w it h in the s c o p e of the s t u d y an d not th e n u m b e r
actu ally su rv ey ed .
B e c a u s e of d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the e s t i m a t e s of o c c u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t o b ­
t a i n e d f r o m t h e s a m p l e of e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d s e r v e o n ly t o i n d i c a t e
th e r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e of th e j o b s s t u d i e d .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in
o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e do not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y th e a c c u r a c y of the
e a r n in g s d ata.
E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s an d S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s

1
Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New York State
Departm ent of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only); Rochester (o ffice o ccu ­
pations only); Syracuse; and U tic a —Rom e. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies
in 78 areas at the request of the Wage and Hour and Public Contracts Divisions o f the U. S. D e­
partm ent of Labor.




1

I n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) on s e l e c t e d
e s t a b lis h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p le m e n t a r y w ag e p r o v is io n s a s they
r e l a t e to p l a n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s .
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , an d
p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s , an d c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s who a r e u t i l i z e d
a s a s e p a r a t e w ork fo rc e a r e exclu d ed .
" P l a n t w o r k e r s " i n c lu d e

2
w o r k i n g f o r e m e n a n d a l l n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s (i n c l u d i n g l e a d m e n a n d t r a i n e e s ) e n g a g e d in n o n o f f i c e f u n c t i o n s .
"O ffice w o r k e r s "
in clu de w o rk in g s u p e r v i s o r s and n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g
c l e r i c a l or r e la te d fun ction s.
C a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s and r o u te m e n a r e
e x c l u d e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g
in d u stries.
M in im u m e n tr a n c e s a l a r i e s fo r w o m e n o ffic e w o r k e r s (table
B - l ) r e l a t e o n l y to th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s v i s i t e d . B e c a u s e of the o p t i m u m
s a m p l i n g t e c h n i q u e s u s e d , a n d the p r o b a b i l i t y th a t l a r g e e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n ts a r e m o r e lik e ly to h ave f o r m a l e n tr a n c e r a t e s fo r w o r k e r s
a b o v e the s u b c l e r i c a l l e v e l t h a n s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s , the t a b l e i s
m o r e - r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of p o l i c i e s in m e d i u m a n d l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .

S h i f t d i f f e r e n t i a l d a t a ( t a b l e B - 2 ) a r e l i m i t e d to p l a n t w o r k e r s
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s .
T h i s i n f o r m a t i o n i s p r e s e n t e d b o th in
t e r m s of (1) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c y , 2 p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s of t o t a l p l a n t
w o r k e r e m p l o y m e n t , a n d (2) e f f e c t i v e p r a c t i c e , p r e s e n t e d in t e r m s
of w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y e m p l o y e d on the s p e c i f i e d s h i f t a t th e t i m e of the
survey.
In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g v a r i e d d i f f e r e n t i a l s , the a m o u n t
a p p l y i n g to a m a j o r i t y w a s u s e d o r , if no a m o u n t a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y ,
th e c l a s s i f i c a t i o n " o t h e r " w a s u s e d . In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in w h i c h s o m e
la t e - sh ift h o u rs a r e paid at n o rm a l r a t e s , a d iffe r e n tia l w a s r e c o r d e d
o n l y if it a p p l i e d to a m a j o r i t y of th e s h i f t h o u r s .
T h e s c h e d u l e d w e e k l y h o u r s ( t a b l e B - 3 ) of a m a j o r i t y of the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t a r e t a b u l a t e d a s a p p l y i n g to
a l l of the p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s of t h a t e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
Sch ed u led
w e e k l y h o u r s a r e t h o s e w h i c h f u l l - t i m e e m p l o y e e s w e r e e x p e c t e d to
w o r k , w h e t h e r t h e y w e r e p a i d f o r at s t r a i g h t - t i m e o r o v e r t i m e r a t e s .
P a id h o lid a y s ; p aid v a c a tio n s ; h ealth , in su r a n c e , and p e n sio n
p l a n s ; an d f r e q u e n c y o f w a g e p a y m e n t ( t a b l e s B - 4 t h r o u g h B - 7 )
a r e t r e a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l l y on t h e b a s i s t h a t t h e s e a r e a p p l i c a b l e t o a l l
p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s if a m a j o r i t y of s u c h w o r k e r s a r e e l i g i b l e o r
m a y e v e n tu a lly q u a lify fo r the p r a c t i c e s lis te d .
S u m s of in dividual
i t e m s in t a b l e s B - 2 t h r o u g h B - 7 m a y not e q u a l t o t a l s b e c a u s e of
rounding.
D a t a on p a i d h o l i d a y s ( t a b l e B - 4 ) a r e l i m i t e d to d a t a on h o l i ­
d a y s g r a n t e d a n n u a l l y on a f o r m a l b a s i s ; i . e . , (1) a r e p r o v i d e d f o r
in w r i t t e n f o r m , o r (2) h a v e b e e n e s t a b l i s h e d b y c u s t o m .
H o lid a y s
o r d i n a r i l y g r a n t e d a r e i n c l u d e d e v e n th o u g h t h e y m a y f a l l on a n o n ­
w o r k d a y a n d t h e w o r k e r i s not g r a n t e d a n o t h e r d a y off.
The fir s t
2
An establishm ent was considered as having a policy if it
ditions: (1) O perated late shifts at the tim e of the survey, or (2) had
late shifts. An establishm ent was considered as having form al provisions
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in
late shifts.




p a r t of the p a i d h o l i d a y s t a b l e p r e s e n t s th e n u m b e r of w h o le a n d h a l f
h o l i d a y s a c t u a l l y g r a n t e d . T h e s e c o n d p a r t c o m b i n e s w h o le an d h a l f
h o lid a y s to show to ta l h o lid a y t i m e .
The s u m m a r y of v a c a tio n p la n s (table B -5 ) is lim ite d to a
s t a t i s t i c a l m e a s u r e of v a c a t i o n p r o v i s i o n s .
It i s not in t e n d e d a s a
m e a s u r e o f th e p r o p o r t i o n of w o r k e r s a c t u a l l y r e c e i v i n g s p e c i f i c b e n e ­
f i t s . P r o v i s i o n s of a n e s t a b l i s h m e n t f o r a l l l e n g t h s of s e r v i c e w e r e
t a b u l a t e d a s a p p l y i n g to a l l p l a n t o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s of th e e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t , r e g a r d l e s s of l e n g t h of s e r v i c e .
P r o v i s i o n s f o r p a y m e n t on
o t h e r t h a n a t i m e b a s i s w e r e c o n v e r t e d to a t i m e b a s i s ; f o r e x a m p l e ,
a p a y m e n t of 2 p e r c e n t of a n n u a l e a r n i n g s w a s c o n s i d e r e d a s the e q u i v ­
a l e n t of 1 w e e k ' s p a y . E s t i m a t e s e x c l u d e v a c a t i o n - s a v i n g s p l a n s and
th o s e w hich o ffe r " e x t e n d e d " or " s a b b a t i c a l " b e n e fits beyond b a s i c
p l a n s t o w o r k e r s w ith q u a l i f y i n g l e n g t h s of s e r v i c e . T y p i c a l of s u c h
e x c l u s i o n s a r e p l a n s in t h e s t e e l , a l u m i n u m , a n d c a n i n d u s t r i e s .
D a t a on h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , an d p e n s i o n p l a n s ( t a b l e B - 6 ) i n ­
c l u d e t h o s e p l a n s f o r w h i c h the e m p l o y e r p a y s a t l e a s t a p a r t of the
c o s t. Such p la n s in clu de t h o s e u n d e rw r itte n by a c o m m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e
c o m p a n y a n d t h o s e p r o v i d e d t h r o u g h a u n io n fun d o r p a i d d i r e c t l y by
the e m p l o y e r out of c u r r e n t o p e r a t i n g f u n d s o r f r o m a fun d s e t a s i d e
for this p u r p o se .
A n e s t a b l i s h m e n t w a s c o n s i d e r e d to h a v e a p l a n
if th e m a j o r i t y of e m p l o y e e s w a s e l i g i b l e t o b e c o v e r e d u n d e r the
p l a n , e v e n if l e s s t h a n a m a j o r i t y e l e c t e d to p a r t i c i p a t e b e c a u s e e m ­
p l o y e e s w e r e r e q u i r e d t o c o n t r i b u t e t o w a r d th e c o s t of the p l a n .
Le­
ga lly r e q u ir e d p la n s, such a s w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n sa tio n , s o c ia l s e ­
c u r i t y , an d r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t w e r e e x c l u d e d .
S i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e i s l i m i t e d t o t h a t ty p e of
i n s u r a n c e u n d e r w hich p r e d e t e r m i n e d c a s h p a y m e n t s a r e m a d e d i r e c t l y
to the i n s u r e d d u r i n g i l l n e s s o r a c c i d e n t d i s a b i l i t y .
In form ation is
p r e s e n t e d f o r a l l s u c h p l a n s to w h i c h th e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t e s .
How­
e v e r , in N ew Y o r k a n d N e w J e r s e y , w h i c h h a v e e n a c t e d t e m p o r a r y
d i s a b i l i t y i n s u r a n c e la w s w hich r e q u ir e e m p l o y e r c o n t r i b u t i o n s , 3 p la n s
a r e i n c l u d e d o n ly if t h e e m p l o y e r (1) c o n t r i b u t e s m o r e t h a n i s l e g a l l y
r e q u i r e d , o r (2) p r o v i d e s the e m p l o y e e w ith b e n e f i t s w h i c h e x c e e d the
r e q u i r e m e n t s of the l a w .
T a b u l a t i o n s of p a i d s i c k l e a v e p l a n s a r e
l i m i t e d to f o r m a l p l a n s 4 w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y o r a p r o p o r t i o n of th e
w o r k e r ' s p a y d u r i n g a b s e n c e f r o m w o r k b e c a u s e of i l l n e s s .
Separate
t a b u l a t i o n s a r e p r e s e n t e d a c c o r d i n g t o (1) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e f u l l p a y
a n d no w a i t i n g p e r i o d , a n d (2) p l a n s w h i c h p r o v i d e e i t h e r p a r t i a l p a y
o r a w a i t i n g p e r i o d . In a d d i t i o n to th e p r e s e n t a t i o n of th e p r o p o r t i o n s
of w o r k e r s w ho a r e p r o v i d e d s i c k n e s s a n d a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r p a i d
s i c k l e a v e , a n u n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l i s s h o w n of w o r k e r s w ho r e c e i v e
e i t h e r o r b o th t y p e s of b e n e f i t s .

m et either of the follow ing con ­
The tem porary disability laws in C alifo rn ia and Rhode Island do not require em ployer
form al provisions covering
contributions.
if it (1) had operated late
An establishm ent was considered as having a form al plan if it established at least the
w ritten form for operating
m inim um number of days o f sick leave av ailab le to each em ploy ee.
Such a plan need not be
w ritten, but inform al sick leave allow an ces, determ ined on an individual basis, were excluded.

3
M a jo r m e d ic a l i n su r a n c e in c lu d e s th o se p la n s w hich a r e d e ­
s i g n e d to p r o t e c t e m p l o y e e s i n c a s e o f s i c k n e s s an d i n j u r y i n v o l v i n g
e x p e n s e s b e y o n d the c o v e r a g e of b a s i c h o s p i t a l i z a t i o n , m e d i c a l , and
su rg ic a l plan s.
M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e r e f e r s to p l a n s p r o v i d i n g f o r c o m ­
plete or p a r t ia l paym en t of d o c t o r s ' f e e s .
Such plan s m a y be u n d e r ­
w r i t t e n by c o m m e r c i a l i n s u r a n c e c o m p a n i e s o r n o n p r o f i t o r g a n i z a t i o n s
o r t h e y m a y be p a i d f o r b y the e m p l o y e r out o f a fun d s e t a s i d e f o r
this p u r p o se .
T a b u l a t i o n s o f r e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n p l a n s a r e l i m i t e d to
t h o s e p l a n s t h a t p r o v i d e r e g u l a r p a y m e n t s f o r the r e m a i n d e r o f the
w o r k e r 1s l i f e .
M e t h o d of w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n ( t a b l e B - 7 ) r e l a t e s to b a s i c
t y p e s of r a t e s t r u c t u r e f o r w o r k e r s p a i d u n d e r v a r i o u s t i m e a n d i n ­
c e n t i v e s y s t e m s . U n d e r a s i n g l e r a t e s t r u c t u r e th e s a m e r a t e i s p a i d
to a l l e x p e r i e n c e d w o r k e r s in th e s a m e j o b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n . A n i n d i v i d ­
ual w o r k e r o c c a s i o n a l l y m a y be paid a b o v e o r below the s in g le r a te




f o r s p e c i a l r e a s o n s , but s u c h p a y m e n t s a r e e x c e p t i o n s . A r a n g e - o f r a t e s p l a n s p e c i f i e s th e m i n i m u m a n d / o r m a x i m u m r a t e p a i d e x p e r i ­
e n c e d w o r k e r s f o r th e s a m e j o b . I n f o r m a t i o n a l s o i s p r o v i d e d on the
m e t h o d of p r o g r e s s i o n t h r o u g h th e r a n g e . In th e a b s e n c e o f a f o r m a l
r a t e s t r u c t u r e , t h e q u a l i f i c a t i o n s o f the i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r d e t e r m i n e
th e p a y r a t e . I n f o r m a t i o n on t y p e s of i n c e n t i v e p l a n s i s p r o v i d e d o n ly
f o r p l a n t w o r k e r s b e c a u s e of the low i n c i d e n c e o f s u c h p l a n s f o r o f f i c e
w orkers.
U nder a p ie c e w o r k s y s t e m , a p r e d e te r m in e d r a te is paid
f o r e a c h un it of o u tp u t. P r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e b a s e d on p r o d u c t i o n
o v e r a q u o t a o r c o m p l e t i o n of a j o b in l e s s t h a n s t a n d a r d t i m e .
Com ­
p e n s a t i o n on a c o m m i s s i o n b a s i s r e p r e s e n t s p a y m e n t s b a s e d on a
p e r c e n t a g e of v a l u e o f s a l e s , o r on a c o m b i n a t i o n o f a s t a t e d s a l a r y
plus a p e r c e n ta g e .
D ata
tab le B - 7 .

on

frequency

of w a g e

paym ent

also

are

p rovided

in

4

T a b le 1.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s a n d W o r k e r s W ith in S c o p e o f S u r v e y a n d N u m b e r S tu d ie d in S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , 1 b y M a jo r I n d u s t r y D i v i s i o n , 2 O c t o b e r 1969
O
N u m b e r o f e s ta b lish m e n ts
M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s in s c o p e
o f stu d y

In d u stry d iv isio n

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
W ith in s c o p e o f s t u d y

W ith in s c o p e
of stu d y 3

S tu d ie d

S tu d ie d

T o ta l4
N um ber

P la n t

O ffic e

P ercen t

T o t a l4

A ll e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
A ll d i v i s i o n s ___________________________________

-

1 ,4 6 0

281

4 5 7 ,5 8 0

100

2 2 4 ,5 3 2

1 1 7 ,7 7 8

2 5 2 ,2 5 8

M a n u fa c t u r in g N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g __________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , a n d
o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5 _______________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e ________________________________
R e t a i l t r a d e _____________________________________
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ________
S p rv irp s7

100
-

378
1 ,0 8 2

80
201

1 3 9 ,0 7 8
3 1 8 ,5 0 2

30
70

8 6 ,5 1 4
1 3 8 ,0 1 8

24, 662
9 3 , 116

6 2 , 981
1 8 9 ,2 7 7

100
50
100
50
50

93
302
124
241
322

32
37
44
43
45

9 4 ,6 2 4
3 9 ,8 9 2
60, 670
6 9 , 250
5 4 , 066

21
9
13
15
12

1 8 ,5 6 4
1 1 ,9 9 7
7 , 919
4 8 ,2 4 2
(8)

7 9 ,2 5 2
1 0 ,0 2 7
4 2 ,3 6 2
3 9 ,2 9 0
1 8 ,3 4 6

-

148

101

2 4 7 ,3 9 6

100

1 1 6 ,3 8 3

6 5 ,3 6 0

2 1 4 ,1 4 0

500
-

59
89

34
67

6 8 ,4 0 3
1 7 8 ,9 9 3

28
72

4 3 , 950
7 2 , 433

1 1 ,2 2 6
5 4 ,1 3 4

5 1 ,7 4 3
1 6 2 ,3 9 7

500
500
500
500
500

24
5
28
16
16

18
4
23
12
10

8 1 ,5 0 5
4 , 687
4 0 , 059
3 5 ,7 0 8
1 7 ,0 3 4

33
2
16
14
7

3 2 ,6 9 8
2 , 103
3 0 , 362

1 6 ,8 3 3
1 ,2 6 4
5 ,4 4 8
2 8 ,1 2 2
(8 )

4 2 , 154
17, 877
4 5 ,8 0 7
6 2 , 171
(8 )

L a r g e e s ta b lis h m e n ts
A ll d i v i s i o n s
M a n u f a c t u r i n g ______________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c t u r in g __________________________________
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , a n d
o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5 ______
___
W h o le s a le t r a d e ________________________________
R e ta il tra d e
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a n d r e a l e s t a t e ________
S e r v i c e s 7 -----------------------------------------------------

-

(8 )

7 6 ,3 3 5
4 , 165
3 7 ,1 8 9
3 2 , 710
1 1 ,9 9 8

1 T h e S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d S t a n d a r d M e t r o p o l it a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , a s d e f in e d b y th e B u r e a u o f th e B u d g e t th r o u g h J a n u a r y 1 9 6 8 , c o n s i s t s o f A l a m e d a , C o n t r a C o s t a , M a r i n , S a n F r a n c i s c o ,
O
a n d S a n M a te o C o u n t ie s . T h e " w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s t u d y " e s t i m a t e s sh o w n in t h i s t a b l e p r o v i d e a r e a s o n a b l y a c c u r a t e d e s c r i p t i o n o f th e s i z e a n d c o m p o s it io n o f th e la b o r
f o r c e in c lu d e d in
th e s u r v e y . T h e e s t i m a t e s a r e not in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s i s o f c o m p a r i s o n w ith o th e r e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s f o r th e a r e a t o m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t t r e n d s o r l e v e l s
s i n c e (1) p la n n in g
of w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s th e u s e of e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a c o m p ile d c o n s i d e r a b l y in a d v a n c e o f th e p a y r o l l p e r i o d s t u d i e d , a n d (2) s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .
2 T h e 1967 e d itio n o f th e S t a n d a r d I n d u s t r i a l C l a s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l w a s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s b y in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n .
3 I n c l u d e s a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t a t o r a b o v e th e m in im u m l i m it a t io n . A l l o u t le t s (w ith in th e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in s u c h i n d u s t r i e s a s t r a d e , f in a n c e , a u t o r e p a i r s e r v i c e ,
a n d m o tio n p i c t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s i d e r e d a s 1 e s t a b l i s h m e n t .
4 I n c lu d e s e x e c u t i v e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , a n d o th e r w o r k e r s e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s e p a r a t e p la n t a n d o f f ic e c a t e g o r i e s .
5 T a x i c a b s a n d s e r v i c e s in c id e n t a l to w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n w e r e e x c lu d e d .
T h e l o c a l t r a n s i t s y s t e m s in th e S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d a r e a a r e m u n ic i p a ll y o p e r a t e d a n d a r e e x c l u d e d b y
O
d e f in i t io n f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e s t u d y .
6 E s t i m a t e r e l a t e s to r e a l e s t a t e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o n ly .
W o r k e r s f r o m th e e n t ir e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n a r e r e p r e s e n t e d in th e S e r i e s A t a b l e s , b u t f r o m th e r e a l e s t a t e p o r t io n o n ly in " a l l
in d u s t r y " e s t i m a t e s in th e S e r i e s B t a b l e s .
7 H o t e l s a n d m o t e l s ; l a u n d r i e s a n d o th e r p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s i n e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u t o m o b i le r e p a i r , r e n t a l , a n d p a r k in g ; m o tio n p i c t u r e s ; n o n p r o fit m e m b e r s h i p o r g a n i z a t i o n s ( e x c lu d in g
r e l i g i o u s a n d c h a r i t a b l e o r g a n i z a t i o n s ) ; a n d e n g in e e r in g a n d a r c h i t e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .
8 T h is in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n i s r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t i m a t e s f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " a n d " n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g " in th e S e r i e s A t a b l e s , a n d f o r " a l l i n d u s t r i e s " in th e S e r i e s B t a b l e s . S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n
o f d a t a f o r t h is d i v i s i o n i s n o t m a d e f o r o n e o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g r e a s o n s ; (1) E m p lo y m e n t in th e d i v i s i o n i s to o s m a l l to p r o v i d e e n o u g h d a t a to m e r i t s e p a r a t e s t u d y , (2) th e s a m p l e w a s not
d e s ig n e d i n i t i a l l y to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , (3) r e s p o n s e w a s in s u f f ic ie n t o r in a d e q u a t e to p e r m i t s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t i o n , a n d (4) t h e r e i s p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t d a t a .




fir m s.

A b o u t o n e - t h i r d o f th e w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y in th e S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d a r e a w e r e e m p lo y e d in m a n u f a c t u r i n g
O
T h e fo llo w in g p r e s e n t s th e m a j o r in d u s t r y g r o u p s a n d s p e c i f i c i n d u s t r i e s a s a p e r c e n t o f a l l m a n u f a c t u r i n g :
In d u stry g ro u p s

S p e c ific in d u s tr ie s

F o o d a n d k in d r e d p r o d u c t s __ _______________________________ 17
E l e c t r i c a l e q u ip m e n t a n d s u p p l i e s _________________________ 11
F a b r i c a t e d m e t a l p r o d u c t s ----------------------------------------------11
P r in t in g a n d p u b li s h in g ___ —__________________________________ 9
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n e q u ip m e n t ____________________________________ 9
P r i m a r y m e t a l i n d u s t r i e s __________________________________ 8
C h e m i c a l s a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s _______________________________7
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ______________________________ 7
P e t r o l e u m a n d c o a l p r o d u c t s ___________________________
7
P a p e r a n d a l l i e d p r o d u c t s _______
5

M o to r v e h i c l e s a n d e q u ip m e n t_______
7
P e t r o l e u m r e f i n i n g ____________________________________________ 7
C o m m u n ic a t io n e q u ip m e n t____________________________________ 5
B l a s t f u r n a c e a n d b a s i c s t e e l p r o d u c t s _____________________ 4
C a n n e d , c u r e d , a n d f r o z e n f o o d s ____________________________ 4
C o m m e r c i a l p r in t i n g __________________________________________ 4
F a b r i c a t e d s t r u c t u r a l m e t a l p r o d u c t s ______________________ 4

T h i s in f o r m a t io n i s b a s e d on e s t i m a t e s o f t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t d e r i v e d f r o m u n i v e r s e m a t e r i a l s c o m p ile d p r i o r to a c t u a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t i o n s in v a r i o u s in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s m a y d i f f e r f r o m p r o p o r t i o n s b a s e d o n th e r e s u l t s o f th e s u r v e y a s sh o w n in t a b le 1 a b o v e .

Wage Trends for
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e
in a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s ,
a n d in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
Th e i n d e x e s
a r e a m e a s u r e of w a g e s a t a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d a s a p e r c e n t o f
w a g e s d u r i n g the b a s e p e r i o d ( d a t e o f th e a r e a s u r v e y c o n d u c t e d
b e t w e e n J u l y I 9 6 0 a n d J u n e 1 9 6 1 ).
S u b t r a c t i n g 100 f r o m the i n d e x
y i e l d s the p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e in w a g e s f r o m the b a s e p e r i o d to the
d a t e o f the i n d e x .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to
w a g e c h a n g e s b e t w e e n the i n d i c a t e d d a t e s .
These estim ate s are
m e a s u r e s o f c h a n g e in a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; t h e y a r e not in t e n d e d
to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y c h a n g e s i n the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in th e a r e a .

Occupational Groups
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s a n d i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the w a g e
t r e n d s r e l a t e to r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x c lu s iv e of e a r n in g s for o v e r tim e .
F o r p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y
m e a s u r e c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a n d f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , a n d
late s h ifts.
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d on d a t a f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a t i o n s a n d i n c l u d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w ith in
each group.
L im it a t io n s of D ata

M ethod of C o m p u tin g
E a c h o f the s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a t i o n s w ith in a n o c c u p a t i o n a l
g r o u p w a s a s s i g n e d a w e i g h t b a s e d on i t s p r o p o r t i o n a t e e m p l o y m e n t
in the o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p .
T h e se con stan t w eights r e fle c t b a s e y e a r
em ploym en ts w h erev er p o ssib le .
The a v e r a g e (m ean) e a r n in g s fo r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n w e r e m u l t i p l i e d b y the o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , a n d the
p r o d u c t s f o r a l l o c c u p a t i o n s in th e g r o u p w e r e t o t a l e d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s
f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s w e r e r e l a t e d b y d i v i d i n g the a g g r e g a t e fo r.
the l a t e r y e a r by the a g g r e g a t e f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
The r e s u lt a n t
r e l a t i v e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t , s h o w s the p e r c e n t a g e c h a n g e . . T h e i n d e x
i s the p r o d u c t o f m u l t i p l y i n g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e (100) b y the r e l a t i v e
f o r the n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r a n d c o n t i n u i n g to m u l t i p l y (c o m p o u n d )
e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the p r e v i o u s y e a r ' s i n d e x .
A v e ra g e e arn in g s
f o r the f o l l o w i n g o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e u s e d in c o m p u t i n g the w a g e t r e n d s :
O ffic e c l e r i c a l (m e n an d w o m en ): O ffic e c l e r ic a l ( m e n a n d w o m e n )— S k ille d m a in te n a n c e (m e n ):
C o n tin u ed
C a rp e n te rs
B o o k k e e p in g - m a c h in e
o p e ra to rs, c la s s B
S e c r e ta r ie s
E le c tr ic ia n s
C le ik s , a c c o u n tin g , c la s se s
S te n o g ra p h e rs, g e n e ra l
M a ch in ists
A an d B
S te n o g ra p h e rs, se n io r
M e c h a n ic s
C le ik s , f i l e , c la s s e s
S w itc h b o a rd o p e ra to rs, c la s se s
M e c h a n ic s (a u t o m o tiv e )
A , B, and C
A an d B
P a in ters
C le ik s , o rd er
T a b u la t in g - m a c h in e o p e ra to rs,
P ip e fitte rs
C le ik s , p a y ro ll
c la s s B
T o o l a n d d ie m a k e rs
T y p is ts, c la s s e s A an d B
C o m p to m e te r o p e ra to rs
K e y p u n ch o p e ra to rs, c la s se s
U n sk ille d p la n t (m e n ):
A an d B
In d u strial nurses ( m e n an d w o m en ):
Ja n ito r s , p o rte rs, and c le a n e r s
O ffic e b oys an d g irls
N u rses, in d u stria l ( r e g is te r e d )
L ab o re rs, m a t e r ia l h a n d lin g




T h e i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e , a s m e a s u r e s of
c h a n g e in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e i n f l u e n c e d by:
(1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y a n d
w a g e c h a n g e s , (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i ­
v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h ile in the s a m e j o b , a n d (3) c h a n g e s i n a v e r a g e
w a g e s due to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , a n d c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r ­
t i o n s o f w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s .
C h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t a c t u a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
It i s c o n c e i v a b l e
t h a t e v e n t h o u g h a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in a n a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w ag e s m a y have declined b e c a u s e lo w e r-p ay in g e sta b lish m e n ts
e n t e r e d the a r e a o r e x p a n d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ilarly, w ages
m a y have r e m a in e d r e la t iv e ly co n sta n t, yet the a v e r a g e s f o r a n a r e a
m a y have r is e n c o n s id e r a b ly b e c a u s e h ig h e r-p ay in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts
e n t e r e d the a r e a .
T h e u s e o f c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h j o b i n ­
c l u d e d in the d a t a .
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e r e f l e c t o n ly c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e p a y f o r s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not i n f l u e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s t a n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , a s s u c h , o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
for ov ertim e.
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , d a t a w e r e a d j u s t e d to r e m o v e f r o m
the i n d e x e s a n d p e r c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e a n y s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d
b y c h a n g e s in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

6

T a b l e 2. I n d e x e s o f S t a n d a r d W e e k l y S a l a r i e s a n d S t r a i g h t - T i m e H o u r l y E a r n i n g s f o r S e l e c t e d O c c u p a t i o n a l G r o u p s in
S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k l a n d , C a l i f . , O c t o b e r 1969 a n d O c t o b e r 19 6 8 , a n d P e r c e n t s o f I n c r e a s e f o r S e l e c t e d P e r i o d s
O
A ll in d u str ie s
O ffice
c le rical
(m e n and
women)

P eriod

In d u strial
nurses
( m e n an d
women)

M an u factu rin g

S k ille d
m a in te n a n ce
trades
(m e n )

U n sk illed
p lan t
w orkers
(m e n )

O ffice
clerical
(m en and
women)

In dustrial
nurses
(m en and
women)

S k illed
m a in ten a n ce
trad es
(m e n )

U n sk illed
plant
w orkers
(m e n )

149. 3
142. 7

143. 3
133. 7

142. 3
133. 5

I n d e x e s ( J a n u a r y 1961 = 100)
O c t o b e r 1 9 6 9 __________________________
O c t o b e r 1 9 6 8 ________________________

__

140. 4
132. 8

149. 3
141.6

145. 0
135. 6

140. 9
134. 1

134. 8
129. 4

P e r c e n t s of i n c r e a s e
O ctober
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary

1968
1968
1967
1966
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
I960




to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

O ctober
O ctober
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary
Jan u ary

1 9 6 9 ___________
1 9 6 8 ___________
1 9 6 8 ___________
1 9 6 7 ___________
1966 --------------1 9 6 5 ___________
1 9 6 4 ___________
1 9 6 3 --------------1 9 6 2 ________ _
1 9 6 1 ___________

5.
4.
5.
3.
2.
3.
3.
3.
3.
4.

7
3
4
6
9
4
1
2
0
1

5.
6.
10.
4.
3.
2.
2.
3.
2.
8.

4
5
8
6
0
2
7
7
4
3

7.
6.
5.
3.
4.
1.
3.
3.
3.
3.

0
2
1
5
9
3
6
2
2
2

5.
3.
6.
3.
2.
3.
3.
4.
3.
4.

0
8
2
2
6
2
5
5
0
8

4. 1
4. 0
5. 8
3. 0
1. 6
3. 4
3. 5
2. 4
2. 6
4. 2

4.
6.
11.
4.
2.
2.
3.
4.
2.
8.

7
4
9
1
5
2
1
2
4
2

7. 2
6. 3
4. 8
2. 8
4. 7
1. 2
4. 1
2 .9
2. 9
5. 1

6.
4.
5.
3.
1.
2.
4.
3.
2.
4.

6
8
9
7
8
6
3
7
7
5

7

A. Occupational Earnings
Table A-l. Office Occupations—
Men and Women
( A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t im e w eekly h o u rs and e a r n in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s try d iv is io n , S an F r a n c is c o — a k lan d , C a lif . , O cto b e r 1969)
O
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

Sex,

o ccu pation,

and in d u s try d ivisio n

Number
of
workers

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs
t

Average
weekly
[ standard)

$
65

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

$
70

$

$
75

80

$
85

90

*
95

receiving stra ig h t-tim e w ee k ly earnings
S

*
100

105

S
110

of—
%

S
120

130

140

150

160

170

180

$
190

%

$
200

210

and
under
70

220
an d

75

85

90

95

10 0

105

“

80

“

~

120

130

”

110

“

150

16 0

170

63

*

180

200

210

22 0

over

*

-

-

-

16

_

_

-

11
11
-

_

10
10

-

-

190

MEN
B ILLERS,

MA CH INE

(B ILL IN G

M A C H I N E ! ---------------------------------------------------------------NO NM ANU FA CTURIN G
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

67

4 0 .0

$
149.50

$
152.50

$
$
1 5 1.00 -1 5 3.50

~

67

4 0 .0

149.50

46 1
196
245

3 9 .0
3 9.5
38.5

146.50
155.50
139.00

143.00
149.00
135.00

132.00 -1 6 1.00
1 4 1.50 -1 7 0.00
127.50 -1 5 5.00

-

F I N A N C E 4--------------------------------------------------------

67

3 8 .0

127.50

129.00

1 2 1.50 -1 3 6.50

-

~

-

*

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------

225
79
146
77

3 9.5
4 0 .0
3 9.5
4 0 .0

131.50
128.50
133.50

133.50
131.00
140.50

-

-

-

4

10

-

-

4

10

12

-

154.50

160.00

1 0 8.50 -1 5 4.00
1 0 9.00 -1 4 6.00
1 0 7.00 -1 6 5.50
1 4 5.50 -1 6 7.50

462
183
279

4 0 .0
3 9.5

147.50
146.50

145.00

267

4 0 .0

146.00

143.50

1 3 3.00 -1 6 2.50

*

65

3 9.5

145.00

147.50

1 3 0.50 -1 6 1.00

-

834

3 8.5

89.0 0

88.5 0
8 7 .0 0

“

4

h ? ”
152.50

CLERKS,

ACCOUNTING,

NO NM ANU FA CT URIN G

PUBLIC

CLASS

A -----------------

--------------------------------------

U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------------

C L E R K S , O RDER ----------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------------WH OLE SALE
CLERKS,

TRADE

PAYR O LL

-----------------------------------

------------------------------------------------

269

142.50
146.00

1 3 3.00 -1 6 3.00
1 3 0.50 -1 6 3.50

-

-

-

3

10

22

44

108

79

55

31

56

3

10

20

42

36
72

65
14

21
34

21
10

32
24

-

-

-

9

22

22

2

2

4

-

-

-

-

-

12
-

-

21
11
10
3

13
11
2

16
3

23

30
21

30
8

40
2

1

_

-

-

_

_

22
17

1
-

-

-

9
7

25
11
14

-

-

-

-

1
1

5

125

34

40

45

6

26

1 32
57

28

-

*
-

-

6

-

6
6

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1
1

-

1
1

TABULATING -M AC H INE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B -----------------------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------

357

3 8.5

88.0 0

88.0 0

89

3 9.5

157.00
i-»2.U U

139.00

23

8 3 .0 0 -

-

■

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

63
14

9 4 .5 0

28

187
63

208
114

155
26

106
14

32
10

8 2 .5 0 -

94.5 0

-

156.00
151.50

1 4 0.50 -1 8 0.50

34

139
95

3 9.5
4 0 .0

144.00

136.50
143.00

4 0 .0

103.00

9 7 .5 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

111.50
111.50
*

103.00
103.00

1 0 1 .00 -1 0 4.50
1 0 1.00 -1 0 4.50

-

-

-

-

-

13
4

15

12
-

_

_

-

-

-

1
14

_

80

28

14
14

75

9

14

-

-

-

-

6

1

7

7

18

7

9

2

6

-

-

-

-

30
17

19

3

15
15

12

20
17

7

5

23
13

-

-

-

-

11

15
15

7

33
33

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

*

“

“

“

”

“

2

7

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

-

12
12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

75

12

19

59

14

3

3

4

~

23
14

45

2

5
2

9

*

9

13

24

16

8

5

8

8
8
8

53
53

1
1

-

17
11
6

5
5

3

11

2

9 2 .5 0 -1 0 6 .0 0

74
74

72

38
38

13

-

70

1 2 6.00 -1 5 4.50
1 2 7.00 -1 6 6.50

115

87

-

-

15

60
41

10

23

5

“

11
12
2

19
19

13

F I N A N C E 4--------- ---------------------------------------------

13

23

1

TABULATING -M AC H INE OPERATORS,
C L A S S A -----------------------------------------------------------------N U N M A N U r A C 1 U K I N G ———————————————

-

63

WOMEN
B I L L E R S , M ACH INE ( B I L L I N G
M A C H I N E ) ---------------------------------------------------------------B ILLERS,

M ACH INE

“

“

”

-

-

-

-

-

-

30

-

-

15

(BOOKKEEPING

M A C H I N E ) ---------------------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------R E T A I L TRADE
BO OKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S A -----------------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




- r U .U

189
73

3 9 .0

126.50

128.00

12 0. 50 -1 37 .0 0

3 9 .0

123.50

39.5

128.50

124.50
129.50

1 1 6.50-137.00

11 6

-

1 2 2.50 -1 3 7.00

-

-

6
6

~

4

5

9

63
19

71

-

28

1

-

-

3

2

44

43

3

5

4

-

8
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—Men and W omen— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif. , October 1969)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
S e x , o ccu p a tio n , and in d u stry d iv isio n

Number
of
workers

$

Average
weekly
standard)

65
Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

75

$

$
80

85

t
90

S

$
95

100

$
105

$
n o

t
120

t

$
130

140

$
150

$
160

S

$
170

18 0

t
190

$
200

$

105

n o

12 0

85

90

95

100

32
32

3
1
2

2
“

21
14

-

2

7

-

“

~

12

30

35

-

-

1

33
5
28

76
11
65
14

-

72
3
69
-

3
25

3
64

4
44

231
40
1 91
15
51
15

398
84

394

53
34

314
101
60
31

34 7
202
30

190
55
135
16

80

130

140

15 0

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

75

210

an d

220

over

CONTINUED

BOOKKEEPING-M ACHINE O PERA TO RS,
C L A S S B -----------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M AN U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------W H O L ES A L E T R A D E -----------------------------

$
110.50
97.5 0

3 9 .0

117.00

1 0 8.50 -1 2 4.00

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

130.00
135.00
127.50
139.50
129.50
136.00

128.50
133.50
125.00
143.00
131.00
138.00

1 1 9.50-142.50
1 2 4.00 -1 4 5.50
1 1 7.00-139.00

120.50

121.00

1 2 2.50-150.50
106.50 -1 2 9.50

109.00
112.50
108.00
111.50

104.00
111.00

9 6 .5 0-1 2 1 .0 0
9 8 .0 0-1 3 0 .0 0

103.00
102.50

109.00

107.50
115.50

9 6 .0 0 -1 1 9 .0 0
9 8 .5 0 -1 2 2 .0 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
104.50 -1 2 2.00

3 9 .0
39.0

196
132

3 8 .5

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M AN U F A C T U R I N G - - --------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -------------- -----------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------------------------

1,583
534
1,049

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G - - --------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------W H O L ES AL E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ----------------------------------------------

2 ,3 4 3

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S A --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------F I N A N C E ---------------------------------------------C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S B --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------W H O L ES A L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ----------------------------------------------

777
73
704

19 3
201
n o
419

57 2
1 ,771

39.5
38.5
39.5
39.5
3 9 .5

346
367

3 8 .5

114.50
9 9 .5 0

249
60
189

38.0
3 9 .0

105.50
108.50

3 8 .0
38.0

104.50
103.50

3 9 .0

9 0 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
90.5 0

12 7

43
76
10 4
470

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S C --------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ----------------------------F I N A N C E ----------------------------------------------

878
827

C L E R K S , OR DE R -------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------------------

39.5
3 9 .0
39.5
3 9 .0
39.5
3 9 .0

128.00
92.5 0
93.5 0
85.5 0

116.00

105.50

125

-

-

9 4 .0 0 -1 1 3 .0 0

123.00
119.00
141.50
114.50

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

-

103.00

118.00

188

1
-

“

1

37

108
36

281
27
254

2
35
6
-

79.0 0
7 8 .5 0
85.0 0
7 7 .5 0
124.00
134.50
122.50

8 1 .5
8 3 .0
8 1 .5
125.5
8 9 .5
8 7 .0
7 9 .0

0000 -1
000-

94.0 0
9 3 .5 0
94.0 0
33.00
96.5 0
9 6 .0 0
89.00

*
35
-

56
-

35
-

56
-

35

51

114

41
10

-

28
16

31
19

26
2
24
10

165
25
140
-

201
6
195
-

1 01
30
71
-

1
42

35
7
27

6
12
23

57
46

18
18
-

47

44

14 0

302
297

146

48

145
24

42
-

12 0

37

6
34

-

1
1
-

1
1
-

n o
n o
-

82

n o

1 1 5.00 -1 3 8.00
1 2 2.00 -1 4 9.50

_

-

-

0
0
0
0

-1
-1
-1
-1

5
4
2
4

1
6
8
1

.5
.5
.5
.5

0
0
0
0

24
267
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

110.00 -1 4 4.50
138.0
103.0
107.0
111.0

-

-

146.00
117.00

-

-

9 9 .5 0

9 4 .5 0 -1 1 6 .0 0

-

-

-

-

43

38
11
27

47

38
3
35

21
62

59
16
43

55
272
80
192
5
44
98

22
64

30

31

40
4

39
28

31
8

36
34

11
10

23
22

22
-

20
2
18
-

28
3
25
6

2

3
14

22
9
-

3
1
2
-

-

1
-

-

-

-

15
20
6

11

37
8

36

9

1
35

1
8
8

23
11
12
10

35

“

38

31
7
24
-

59
7

58
14

52
30
10

44

40
30

11 3

4

-

58

-

10
48
-

-

15

2

15

2

*

283
10 6
17 7

25 1
13 8
113
35
24
17
37

148
51
97
47
22

78
14
64

25
9

2
45

-

433
16 3
270
36
41
13
128
314
71
243
64
105
42
18
16
2
14
11
34
3
31
12

22
79
26
38
167
116

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

31
6
25
14
4
2

16

8
-

-

_

11
5
2
2
1

-

_

-

-

*
-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

47

_

-

26

8
8
-

-

_
-

_

1
1
-

-

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

8
7

18
-

-

-

1
1
-

18

-

-

18
-

-

51
17

35

16
5

15
19

2
26

2
9

21
6
15
5

7
-

_

_

-

-

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

63

28
6
22
17

18
18
-

17
-

-

23
40

45
-

_

25
25
25

2
17

2

6
2
4
-

64
1
63
55

2
2

17
21
9
5

“

*
1

12
68
68

“

-

1 1 2.00 -1 4 6.00
1 2 0.50-147.50

-

12
69
110

82
82
-

1 0 9.50-135.00
1 2 0.00 -1 3 8.50
9 7 .0 0 -1 3 3 .0 0

3
41

-

87.00
84 .5 0
0 2 .0 0
82 .0 0

7 5 .5 0 7 5 .0 0 8 0 .0 0 -1
7 4 .0 0 -

18

75

9
-

1 0 4.00 -1 3 6.50
109.00 -1 3 8.00
1 0 0.00-133.00
132.50 -1 4 9.00
114.00 -1 1 9.50

120.00
117.50

47
3
44

72
-

28
-

17

-

120.50

115
99

2
-

-

132.00
132.50
132.00
145.00
122.00
112.50
126.50

362

11
10

-

130.00
131.00
130.00
148.00
124.00
116.00
126.50

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

16
14

1

8 7 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
87.0 0
131.00
9 2 .5 0
89.0 0
84 .0 0

1
-

“

4
4
-

-

124.00
99.0 0

55 0

-

~

3 9.5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

C O M P T OM E TE R O P E R A T O R S --------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------WH O L E SA L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------------------------

-

-

-

215
14 4

53

-

-

-

126.50
133.00
124.50
129.50
110.50

37.5
4 0 .0
38.5

-

~

-

3 9.5
3 9.5

126
74
104

-

-

9 3 .0 0-1 0 4 .0 0

292
77

3 9 .0
39.5
3 8.5
38.5

-

9 4 .0 0 -1 1 5 .0 0
104.00 -1 1 4.50
9 3 .0 0 -1 1 5 .0 0

93
67 1

647
242
405

-

9 8 .0 0

82.0 0
81.0 0
90.0 0
78.0 0

56

1 2 7.00-153.00
120.00 -1 3 7.50

-

104.00
107.50
101.50

3 8.5
38.5
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L --------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------W H O L E S A L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ----------------------------------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .

3 9 .0
39.5
38.5

4 0 .0
39.0
39.5

565
356

$
$
1 0 1.50-122.00
8 3 .0 0-1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 6.50-124.50

$
110.00
95.0 0
115.50
116.50

274
78




70

$

and
under
_____ I 2 _

WOMEN -

s

»

3
34

41
41
2
6
31

17
5
2
49
12
37
4
10
18

9
9

18
4

29
-

67
15
52
52

29
19

3
8
20
11

10
-

42
71
2
61

5

8

21
19

85
43
42

126
52
74

131
47

3
12

39

47
16
4
14

20
6
66
19
47
11
15
21

1
16
7
81
45
36
24
4
8

84

61
22
39
15
11
-

17
17

13
13
-

3

82
27
55

4

55

2

2
2

-

_
•

_
-

-

-

•

-

-

-

•

-

_

15
-

-

15
15

-

•
-

-

-

_
_

_
_
_

9
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif. , October 1969)
W eekly e arn in g s1
(standard )

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

*

A verage
w eekly
h ou rs1
(standard)

S ex , o ccu p a tio n , and in d u stry d iv isio n

65

70

$

75

S

S
80

s
85

s
90

$
95

s
100

Ts
105

$
n o

$
120

$
130

$
140

I

$

150

160

$
170

$
180

—
190

$
200

$

210

220

and

under
70

WOMEN -

*

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

25

-

-

25

15
3
12

42
1
41

-

1
24

349
85
264
32
71
15
130

488
141
347
26
103
31
176

276
78
1 98
18
69
18
93

38
10
28
18
4
1
3

91
23
68
68

*

230
88
142
20
42
15
64

24

-

_

24
10
14

74
4
70

232
3
229
223

84
12
72
72

*
•
4

6

180

190

200

210

220

over

CON TINU ED
$
121.00
120.50

118.50

610

3 9.5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9.5
3 9 .0

$
120.50
120.50
121.00
135.50
124.50
121.50

116.00

117.50

1 1 5.50-130.00
1 0 8.00-129.00
105.50 -1 2 6.50

1 ,806
300

3 9 .0
39.0

110.00
103.50

106.00
102.00

9 8 .0 0 -1 2 2 .0 0
9 4 .0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0

1 ,506
509

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
39.0
4 0 .0
38.5

111.50
126.00
107.50
107.50
100.50

107.00
135.50
106.50
107.50
99.0 0

1 0 7.50-138.50
1 0 1.50 -1 1 4.00
1 0 0.50-114.00
9 1 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0

8 6 .5 0
88.50
8 5 .0 0
80.5 0

86 .0 0

8 0 .0 0 -

90 .0 0

25

87 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

8 2 .0 0 7 8 .5 0 7 4 .5 0 -

89.50
9 0 .0 0
87.50

25
25

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------W H O L ES A L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A DE ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ----------------------------------------------

1,754
48 1
1,273
232
304
96

K E YP U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M AN U F A C T U R I N G - - --------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------W H O L ES A L E T R A D E -------- ' -------------------R E T A I L T R A DE ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ----------------------------------------------

31 2
200
454

3 9 .5
3 9.0

121.50
137.00
121.50

$
1
1
1
1

0
0
0
1

9.00
8.50
9.00
2.50

$
-1 3 0.00
-1 2 7.50
-130.00
-1 6 6.00

9 8 .5 0 -1 2 5 .0 0

O F F I C E G I R L S ---------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N ON M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------F I N A N C E 4----------------------------------------------

314
11 7
197
113

38.5
38.0
3 9 .0
3 8.5

S E C R E T A R I E S 5 -----------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------W H O L ES A L E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4----------------------------------------------

7 , 185
1,956
5 ,2 2 9

3 9.0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

133.50
137.00
132.00

131.00
135.00
129.50

621
1 , 188
411
2 ,0 9 6

3 9.5
3 8.5

144.00
130.00

3 9.5
3 9.0

145.50
133.00
135.00
128.50

1 2 0.00 -1 4 4.50
124.50 -1 4 7.00
118.50 -1 4 4.00
127.50 -1 6 0.00
120.00 -1 4 4.50

135.00
126.50

1 2 3.00 -1 4 5.00
116.50-139.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F AC TU R I NG ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------F I N A N C E 4 ----------------------------------------------

408
81
327
49
147

3 9.0
3 9.5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8.5

158.50
158.50
158.50
180.50
158.00

160.50
144.50
161.00
170.00

1 4 1.00 -1 7 2.00
1 3 8.50-173.50
1 4 2.50-171.50
1 6 1.00 -2 1 2.50
1 4 4.00 -1 7 1.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S B -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F AC TU R I NG ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------WH O L E SA L E T R A DE ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4----------------------------------------------

1,578
357
1 ,2 2 1
1 21
206
67
599

3 9 .0
3 9.5
3 9 .0
39.0
3 9.5
3 9 .0
38.5

142.50
150.50
140.50
162.00
145.50
145.50
135.00

141.00
146.50
139.00
160.00
145.00
144.00
134.50

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S C -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F AC TU R I NG ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------W H O L ES AL E T RA DE ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4----------------------------------------------

2 ,4 0 7
724

3 9 .0
3 9.0
3 9.0

134.50
136.50

134.00
135.50

39.5
3 9.0
3 9.5
3 9.0

134.00
141.50
136.50
136.50
130.50

3 9.0
3 9 .0

122.50
126.50

121.50
126.50

3 9 .0
3 9.5

121.00
131.00
123.00
121.50
113.50

120.50
129.00
123.00
122.00

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S D ------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------N O N M A N U F AC TU R I NG ------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 --------------------------W H O L ES AL E T R A D E ----------------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------------------F I N A N C E 4----------------------------------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s a t end o f ta b le .




1,683
237
414
144
712
2 ,6 7 5
702
1,9 7 3
202
528
14 6
638

3 8 .0
39.5
3 9 .0

80 .5 0

159.50

1 2 6.50 -1 5 7.00
1 3 3.00 -1 6 3.00
1 2 4.50-155.50
1 4 6.50-195.00
1 2 4.50-166.50
1 3 9.00-156.50
1 2 1.00-148.00

*
_

*

8
33
230
39
19 1
61
22
23
84

285
52
233
53
75
16
68

277
58
219
21
84
75
39

195
38
157
10
52
41
54

175
8
167
63
46
13
45

5

4
2
2

13
10
3

11

6
6

11

325
15
310
60
47
12
122

404
86
318
18
46
27
167

929
212
717
31
159
35
355

1663
475
1188
62
299
87
502

-

-

_
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

-

-

_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

18
1
17
3
12
1

9
1
8
7

-

10
4
6
5

-

1

1

5

7

8
3
5
5

_

_

_

4

-

•
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1239
372
867
75
187
95
353

1177
352
825
135
248
77
229

494
181
313
84
46
37
107

347
134
213
40
40
24
86

235
32
203
31
52
9
78

128
69
59
33
8

19

42
6
36
3
28

38
14
24
2
9

-

-

19
4
12

97
13
84
14
33

10
4
2

5
3

36

12
1
11

14

6
3
61

46
18
28
26

51
19
32
21

111
53
58
18

34
6
28
18

_

_

-

-

-

*

13
3
10

34
10
24
1

10

23

39
3
50

-

-

_

_

-

-

5

41

-

-

-

5

41

49
28
21
7

87
17
70
7
50

272
59
213
12
45
1
95

255
63
192
5
3
15
143

311
72
239
13
44
29
91

191
60
13 1
22
25
11
64

88
35
53
13
5
3
29

114
13
1 01
6
31
5
33

61
48
13
9
3

36
32
4

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

7
7

1

_

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

-

-

12

-

-

8
3
5
4

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

~

134.00

126.00 -1 4 4.50
1 2 3.50-144.00

142.00
140.50
136.00
128.50

130.00 -1 4 4.50
1 2 1.50-138.50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

54

34

-

-

12

54

34
9

-

-

-

-

“
1

21

1
1
-

21

-

-

*

-

1 1 6.50-136.50
1 0 9.00 -1 3 0.50
1 0 4.00 -1 5 3.00

-

-

1 1 5.50 -1 3 2.00

-

-

-

13
3
10
-

-

-

11

*

_

33
10
23

-

-

10

23

-

135
5
130

-

-

-

10

31

12

-

-

*

112
9
103

-

_

-

5
1

*
-

1 1 1.50-131.50

-

-

25

24
3
85

32
32

211
60
151
12
19
6
94

640
211
429
33
111
26
244

486
139
347
50
47
57
167

571
155
416
89
183
26
85

179
73
106
28
18
20
31

100
46
54
5
12
4
24

56
6
50
18
8

1
10

1 01
26
75
1
16
4
29

17

-

237
15
222
60
45
11
81

269
60
209
8
30
23
113

578
147
431
19
116
25
176

709
205
504
17
140
50
157

414
n o
304
20
128
15
36

174
84
90
20
15
15
3

96
42
54
27
3
4

34
16
18
5
12

17
1
16
4
12

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“
_

-

-

-

_

1 1 0.00 -1 2 9.50
1 0 5.50-122.00

-

6

-

-

115.50

12

-

-

24
22
2

214
76
138
2
27
23
77

12

1 2 4.50-144.00

131.50 -1 4 8.50
1 2 7.00-146.00

-

176
52
124
28
13
7
75

79
9
70
27
3
39

-

-

-

48
36
5
4
2
10

-

1

-

-

7
7

-

-

-

_

2
1
1

1

-

1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

22
22

-

-

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

10
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—Men and W om en— Continued

( A v e r a g e s t r a ig h t - t i m e w eek ly h o u rs and e a rn in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n s stu d ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s try d iv is io n , S an F r a n c is c o — a k la n d , C a lif . , O c to b e r 1969)
O
W eekly e a r n in g s1
(standard )

Sex,

o ccu pation,

and in d u s try div isio n

A ve rage
w eek ly
h ou rs1
rstandard)

N um ber
of
workers

N u m b e r of w o rk e rs

65
M e d ian 2

M ean2

-

CONTINUED

$
$
9 7 .5 0 -

$

$
108.00
103.50
122.00
115.00

10 3.00 9 4 .5 0 -

4 0 .0
39.5
3 9 .0

109.00
107.50
119.50
111.00

549

3 9 .5

101.50

100.00

123.00
121.00

122.00
121.50

1,177

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

192

80

85

$
90

receiving
$

$
95

100

105

stra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earnings
t

110

$
120

$
130

140

$
150

o f—

S

$
160

170

s

t
180

190

s

i

200

210

13^^00
124.50

134.50
125.00

85

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

15 0

22 2
29
193

233
46
187

139
47
92

27

116
46
70
33

20
44

43

269
69
200
16

-

12
64

79
79

14
21

164
56
108

392
125
267

395
147
248

17
32
178

18
64

68

21
78

32

11
40

24

11 1.50 132.50
11 1.50 131.50
1 1 2.00 -1 3 3.00

129

49
31
18

64
10
54

100
23
77

150.50

11 6.50 10 7.50 -

126

41
101

8

118.00
107.50

133.00
126.50

1
15

24

5

170

180

51
49

4

-

-

110
39

44

52

71

35

160

25
18

190

200

210

220

over

-

-

-

-

51

28

19 0
39
1 51
14

64

3

80

90

32

75

117.00

13 0.50 -

220

and

10 0.00 118.50
9 7 .0 0 -1 1 7 .0 0 9 9 .5 0 136.00

' 3oI
1,023

1,723

75

$

under

165

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G - - --------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

70

S

t

and

M iddle range 2

70
WOMEN

s

s

$

-

1
3
329
91
80
45

21
14

19

12
1

52
18

3

w
12

1

101

34

2-5
1 11
250
13 0

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

120*00

117.00

1 0 7.50-

116.50

3 9 .0

113.50

108.00

106.00

1 0 3.50128.50
1 1 7.00 -1 4 2.00
1 0 0.50 118.00

QQ

94

136.50

9 4 .0 0
9 9 .0 0
1 0 2 . ->0

9 1 .5 0 9 6 .5 0 -

868

3 9 .0

110.50

106.00

9 9 .0 0 -

3 8.5
1 3 " * 00
39*0
3 8 .0

114.00

107.00
138.50
110.50

3

.5

128.50

125.00

459

3 7 .5

103.00
102.50
9 8 .0 0

9 9 .5 0

9 4 .0 0 -1 1 1 .5 0

3 7 .5

1 ,5 7 3

3 8 .5

103.50
112.50

101.50

1 ,3 7 4

3 8 .5

102.50

325
824

3 C * '"
3 8 .5

9 0 0 0

1 0 0 .j

0

101.00
106.00

26

24

1
1

18
30

1

'- .
iL

34

293

83
48

33

48

44

16
1

12

11

12
13
W

^5

LQ
10

5b

1 1 4.00 -1 4 4.00

283

1 Kn

9 7 .5 0
101.50
1 0 1 . ->0

250

ffTrotl- j m L L

3

59
46
16

24

3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

603
51
249
145

O PER ATO R -REC EPTIO N ISTS-

10
15

1

50

578
86
113
SWIT CH BO A RD

25

1

1
1

13

8
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

3

5

3

177

79

194

37

77

40

20

65
1 12

17

22

121
23
98

62

50
144

11
26

37

34

20

24
14

15
27

55
30

75
29

8

10

21

12

25

-

96
48
48

22

9 8 .0 0 9 9 .0 0 -

118.00 118.50
117.50

18

26
22

67

25

11 4
103
74

4

-

24

1 0 2.00 -1 1 9.00

101.00

13

9

29

2

i

T A B U LA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,

T R AN SC RI BI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
GENERAL --------------------------------------------------

9 3 .0 0 9 8 .0 0 -

101.00

9 7 .0 0

Art

^

33

5

105*50

1

3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

9 7 .0 0
105.00
9 0 .5 0

66

189

182

20

109.00
119.50

39
36

184

176

16

36

-

8 9 .5 0 -1 0 5 .5 0

50

70

225

455

a jj
211

430

81
516

69
57
44

27
26

66
61
22

43
32

8

31 0
10
300

163
13

23 1

250
96

98

51

14

11

11

24
74

21
30

12

11

11

104
15 0

28

154
16
34

150
15

12

15
216
10
81

71

8

3

8
24

i

77

9 9 .5 0
9 0 .0 0

8 7 .0 0 -

99.0 0

52

79

2

82

11 4

13

1 61
59

30 4

202

102

43
47

100.00

91

66

60
59
59

15
14

14

1

94*00

1,5 0 5

™
™

-

24

9 6 .5 0 -1 0 8 .5 0

nn

2 ,0 7 7

RETAIL TRAD E

-

9 4 . 0 0 - 111.50
1 0 8.00 -1 1 9.50

104*00

5

-

9 3 .5 0 -1 1 0 .5 0
.0 0

12
12

58

19

15

3

^3
9 4 .0 0 -1 1 8 .5 0
8 5 .5 0 -

9 5 .5 0

r -i

_

2

28
350

£7

1

\r "
135

11
77

8
t6

10

10

1

1 S ta n d a r d h o u rs r e f le c t th e w o rk w ee k fo r w hich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir r e g u l a r s t r a ig h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s (e x c lu s iv e o f p a y fo r o v e r t im e a t r e g u la r a n d /o r p r e m iu m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n in g s c o r r e s p o n d
to th e se w ee k ly h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n is co m p u te d fo r e a c h jo b by to ta lin g the e a r n in g s o f a ll w o r k e r s and d iv id in g by the n u m b er o f w o r k e r s .
T h e m e d ia n d e s ig n a t e s p o s itio n — h a lf of the e m p lo y e e s su r v e y e d r e c e iv e m o re
than th e r a t e show n; h a lf r e c e iv e l e s s th an th e r a t e show n.
T h e m id d le ra n g e i s d e fin e d by 2 r a t e s of p a y ; a fo u rth o f the w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than the lo w e r o f th e se r a t e s and a fo u rth e a r n m o r e than
the h ig h e r r a te .
J T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t il it i e s .
4 F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .
5 M a y in clu d e w o r k e r s o th e r th an th o se p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e ly .




11
Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers orjmore,
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
W eekly e a r n in g s1
(sta idard)

S e x , o c c u p a t i o n , an d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

N um ber
of
w orkers

A verage
w eekly
hours1
(standard)

$

Under
M ean 3

M e d ian 2

M iddle range 2

$
75

80

Numbe r of w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g stra igh t -t im e we e kl y ear ni ngs of—
S
t
*
$
$
t
s
$
t
*

*

%

85

90

95

100

105

n o

115

120

130

140

150

160

$

170

180

and
under

$
75

85

90

95

100

105

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3
-

2
-

n o

115

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

5
5
2

9
2
7
5

13
2
11
7

40
23
17
10

52
45
7
7

32
21
11
9

16
10
6
5

27
21
6
3

16
6
10
10

1
~

5
5

11
11

23
2

20
18

7
7

40
38

1

6

12

1
1

3
3

-

3
2

11
11

12
11

12
9

2
2

5
5

13
13

28
28

_

_

_

_

MEN

215
13 0
85
58

3 9.5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
148 .0 0
1 5 1.00
1 4 2.50
148.00

$
145.00
148.00
138.00
144.00

$
$
1 3 4 .0 0 -1 6 3 .5 0
1 4 1 .0 0 -1 6 6 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0 -1 6 1 .5 0
1 3 0 .5 0 -1 6 4 .0 0

C L E R K S , ACCOUNTING,
N ON MA NU F A C T U R I NG

CLASS B
---------------

133
10 5

3 9.5
3 9.5

138.00
138.50

141.00
1 4 6.50

1 2 5 .5 0 -1 6 6 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0 -1 6 6 .5 0

O F F I C E BOY S -------------------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N ON MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

232
79
153
100

3 9.5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

94.0 0
92.0 0
95.0 0
92.5 0

93.0 0
88 .0 0
95.5 0
93.5 0

8 4 .5 0 -1 0 1 .0 0
8 3 .5 0 -1 0 0 .5 0
8 6 .5 0 -1 0 2 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 - 9 8 .0 0

TABUL ATI NG- MACHINE OPE RAT ORS ,
C L A S S A -----------------------------------------N O N MA NU F A C T U R I NG -------------------

58
53

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

155.00
155.50

152 .0 0
151.50

1 4 0 .5 0 -1 7 8 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0 -1 8 0 .0 0

TABUL ATI NG- MACHINE OPE RAT ORS ,
C L A S S B -----------------------------------------N ON MA NU F A C T U R I NG -------------------

11 2
79

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

139.00
144.50

134.50
143.50

1 2 5 .0 0 -1 6 2 .5 0
1 2 9 .0 0 -1 6 6 .5 0

108.50

102 .0 0

9 0 .5 0 -1 2 1 .5 0

3

2

-

-

-

*

-

_

_

-

-

4
4

4
4

5
5

-

10
10

2
2

5
1
4
1

21
7
14

9

34
17
17
13

38
26
12
11

29
1
28
23

43
7
36
30

21
10
11
7

19
6
13
3

~

“

“

“

“

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

15

2

-

_

-

-

-

6
6

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

6
3

-

-

-

■
-

-

12

“

~

2
2

5
2

8
1

9
7

9
9

34
13

10
10

7
7

9

5

2

_

8

_

2

7

12

2

3

17
3
14
5
2

23
4
19
10
2

44
19
25
5
9

113
40
73
36
7

92
55
37
22
10

124
89
35
33
1

38
20
18
3
11

18
6
12
6
2

16
11
5
2
1

203
32
1 71
1 01
31

294
30
264
202
22

n o
22
88
16
59

46
20
26
1
15

80
22
58
4
38

1 01
15
86
57
15

105
79
26
10
9

62
8
54
25
26

12
5
7
5
~

47
2
45
45

-

WOMEN

60

o
o

B I L L E R S , MA CHI NE ( B I L L I N G
MA C H I N E ) -----------------------------------C L E R K S , ACCOUNTING, C L A S S A
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NON MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ----------R E T A I L T R A DE -------------------

511
247
264
13 0
50

3 9.5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

134 .5 0
138.50
1 30.50
136.00
131.00

134 .0 0
140 .0 0
127 .5 0
132 .5 0
131 .0 0

1 2 2 .0 0 -1 4 5 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
1 1 8 .0 0 -1 4 3 .5 0
1 2 5 .5 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0 -1 5 1 .0 0

C L E R K S , ACCOUNTING, C L A S S B
MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------------NON MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ----------R E T A I L T R A DE -------------------

1,261
256
1 ,0 0 5
5 41
241

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9.5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 0.50
116.50
109.00
1 1 0.50
1 1 1.50

104.00
116 .0 0
103 .0 0
102.50
1 0 8.50

9 8 .0 0 -1 2 1 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 -1 1 7 .0 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 2 0 .5 0
1 0 1 .0 0 -1 1 9 .0 0

12
10
2
“

-

-

_
-

14
2
12
-

28
5
23
“

3

-

146
3
143
75
23

10

A -----------

80

3 8.5

112.00

108.00

1 0 5 .0 0 -1 1 8 .0 0

-

-

-

-

2

7

10

34

4

6

5

6

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S B ----------N O N MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ----------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

366
311
39
18 0

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

9 3 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
1 2 7.50
85.5 0

8 8 .0 0
87.50
130.50
85.0 0

8 4 .0 0 - 94.0 0
8 4 .0 0 - 9 3 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
8 1 .0 0 - 89.00

3
3

31
28

71
62

133
127

49
19

8
7

8
8

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
11
4

7
6
2

17
14
12

21
21
21

3

28

62

54

15

7

8

C L E R K S , F I L E , C L A S S C ----------NON MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------F I N A N C E 4 ------------------------------

207
205
158

3 8 .5
3 8.5
3 8 .0

86.00
8 6 .0 0
80.50

8 0 .0 0
80.0 0
7 8 .5 0

9 7 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
83.00

9
9
9

96
96
96

25
24
24

6
5
3

14
14

15
15
8

23
23
8

6
6
2

5
5

4
4

C L E R K S , ORDER --------------------------NON MA NU F A C T U R I NG ---------------

91
65

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 2 2.50
114.50

1 2 8.00
99.5 0

9 8 .0 0 -1 4 2 .0 0
9 7 .5 0 -1 3 6 .0 0

-

_

-

1
~

1
“

36
35

1

2
2

_

-

8
4

17

-

C L E R K S , P A Y R OL L ----------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NON MA NU F A C T U R I NG --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ---------R E T A I L T R A DE -------------------

303
88
215
109
53

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 1.50
1 3 0.00
132.00
147.50
108 .0 0

135.50
133.50
136.00
143.00
108 .5 0

1 1 1 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0 -1 4 7 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0 -1 4 5 .0 0
1 3 7 .0 0 -1 5 0 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0 -1 1 2 .5 0

_

6
2

38

18
9

73
22

3

36

20
5
15

8

4

10
1
9

4
1

-

3
1
2

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

“

4

5

1

25

12

2

_
-

8
-

8
8

1
1
-

-

4
4

8

_

3

CLERKS,

FILE,

CLASS

See footnotes

at e n d o f t a b l e .




7 7 .0 0 7 7 .0 0 7 6 .5 0 -

-

"
_

-

-

-

-

i----220
and

80

C L E R K S , ACCOUNTING, C L A S S A
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NONMANUF " C T U R I N G --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 -----------

----- i ------ 1 -----1 9 0 200
210

10
10

2

2

9
3
“

17

51
39
4

6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

18

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

65
16
49
38

19
7

8
8

3
2

18

12
7

-

1
1

18
18

-

-

-

200

210

220 o v e r

12
Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more,
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif. October 1969)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number
of

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly e a r n i n g s of—

t

Average
weekly

$

t

$

90

i
95

t

S
100

105

$
no

t
115

i
120

i
130

t
140

S
150

*

3

$

$

210

T --220

-

and

i

(standard)

WCMEN -

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range ^

75
Under
and
S
under
75

80

85

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

80

S ex, occup ati on, and in d u s tr y di v i si on

85

90

95

100

105

no

115

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

"

1
1
-

-

-

45

-

-

29
29
4
18

18
8
10
5

25
24
1
1

10
4
6
i
2

39
6
33
11
21

38
5
33
24
8

54
1
53
53

4
2
2
2

15
15
15

-

34

35
35
2
31

"

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

16
1
15
8
7

68
13
55
28
7
19

116
42
74
20
15
38

102
24
78
13
6
55

100
28
72
13
3
43

227
50
177
26
24
113

144
17
127
18
15
89

18
2
16
8
3

20
20
18
-

71
3
68
68
-

-

_
-

-

*

6
3
3
3

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

224
3
221
221

46
6
40
40

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

_
-

-

160

170

180

190

200

220 ov er

CONTI NUED

C OMP T OME T E R O P E R A T O R S ------MA N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------NON MA N U F A C T U R I N G -----------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3------R E T A I L T R A DE ----------------

313
51
262
113
119

3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

$
1 2 0 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 4 1.50
1 0 5 .0 0

$
11 7 .0 0
1 1 3.50
1 2 4.00
1 4 6.50
9 9 .0 0

$
$
9 9 .5 0 -1 3 7 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0 -1 4 9 .0 0
9 4 .5 0 -1 2 0 .0 0

KEYPUNCH O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NON MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3----------R E T A I L T R A DE ------------------F I N A N C E 4------------------------------

888
183
705
212
78
370

3 9.5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

124 .0 0
117.00
125 .5 0
137 .0 0
117 .0 0
121 .0 0

1 2 1.50
1 1 6.50
1 2 3.50
1 3 3.00
1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 2 .0 0

1 1 1 .0 0 -1 3 4 .5 0
1 0 8 .5 0 -1 2 4 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 -1 3 6 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0 -1 6 6 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0 -1 3 0 .0 0

_
-

KEYPUNCH O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------NONMANUF A C T U R I N G --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3----------R E T A I L T R A DE ------------------F I N A N C E 4------------------------------

1,009
136
873
459
147
225

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8.5

114 .5 0
106 .5 0
115 .5 0
125 .0 0
1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 3.50

1 1 0.00
105.50
113 .5 0
1 3 5.00
106.50
9 9 .5 0

9 9 .5 0 -1 3 3 .5 0
9 6 .5 0 -1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0 -1 3 5 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0 -1 3 8 .0 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 1 0 .0 0
9 3 .5 0 -1 1 3 .0 0

_
-

“

1
1
1

34
4
30
3
27

93
25
68
2
23
42

136
18
118
49
18
49

126
19
107
53
16
31

121
31
90
21
51
14

42
8
34
7
13
10

70
16
54
3
22
8

116
6
no
63
1
43

O F F I C E G I R L S --------—-------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------F I N A N C E 4------------------------------

196
108
88
50

3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

89.0 0
8 9 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
82.0 0

8 7 .0 0
87.0 0
87.5 0
82.0 0

92.5 0
90.0 0
95 .0 0
87.00

1
i
-

40
18
22
21

32
19
13
12

65
47
18
13

19
6
13
3

5
5
1

4
2
2

13
10
3

4
4

7
7

6
6

S E C R E T A R I E S 5 -------------------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------NON MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 ----------WH OL E S A L E T R A DE ------------R E T A I L T R A D E ------------------F I N A N C E 4------------------------------

3 ,0 7 6
974
2 ,1 0 2
490
145
196
929

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 5.50
135 .0 0
1 4 7.50
1 4 5.50
1 3 1.00
1 2 9 .0 0

1 3 2 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0
1 3 2.00
144.00
1 4 3.00
133 .0 0
127 .0 0

1 2 0 .5 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0 -1 6 8 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0 -1 5 9 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0 -1 4 1 .5 0
1 1 7 .5 0 -1 3 9 .5 0

_
*

_
-

_
-

1
1
-

32
6
26

1

2
2
1
1

3
12

153
12
141
60
2
12
59

119
27
92
9
16
53

145
48
97
13
6
9
51

278
87
191
11
12
11
111

654
256
398
39
20
30
246

582
168
414
58
25
62
169

500
171
329
100
31
34
119

254
no
144
48
14
5
60

136
46
90
36
n
6
26

87
22
65
31
8
6
13

60
15
45
33
8
4

45
45
36
5
1
2

9
i
a
3
3
1
“

9
i
8
7
1

10
4
6
5
1

S E C R E T A R I E S , C L A S S A --------N O N MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 3 -----------

96
82
34

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 7 6 .0 0
1 7 5.00
1 9 4.00

172 .0 0
172 .0 0
194 .0 0

1 6 0 .0 0 -1 9 4 .5 0
1 6 0 .5 0 -1 9 5 .5 0
1 6 9 .0 0 -2 1 7 .5 0

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

“

_
-

-

*

-

5
5

-

5
5
“

10
6
*

4
4

22
20
10

11
8
3

12
10
2

7
7
4

5
5
3

7
7
7

8
5
5

SECRET ARIE S, CLASS B
MA N U F A C T U R I N G ----------NO N MA N U F A C T U R I N G ---PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3F I N A N C E 4-------------------

492
203
289
91
137

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 5 4 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0
1 5 9.50
1 7 2 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0

1 5 3 .5 0
1 4 7 .5 0
157 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0
1 5 1 .0 0

1 3 8 .0 0 -1 6 5 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0 -1 5 8 .5 0
1 4 4 .5 0 -1 7 2 .0 0
1 5 7 .5 0 -1 9 6 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0 -1 5 9 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

64
52
12
5
6

69
33
36
5
19

87
27
60
4
41

113
50
63
17
39

57
19
38
13
20

38
13
25
6
9

20
7
13
9
1

36
36
32
-

3
1
2
-

2
1
1
1

i
i
i

SECRET ARIE S, CLASS C
MA N U F A C T U R I N G ----------N O N MA N U F A C T U R I N G ---PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 WH OL E S A L E T R A OE —
R E T A I L T R A DE --------F I N A N C E " -------------------

1,140
314
826
175
64
74
455

3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 3 6 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 4 4 .5 0
144 .0 0
133 .5 0
130 .0 0

1 3 6.00
1 4 0.50
1 3 4.00
1 4 3.50
1 4 3.00
1 3 4 .0 0
1 2 9.50

1 2 6 .0 0 -1 4 4 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0 -1 4 4 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0 -1 5 1 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0 -1 5 3 .0 0
1 2 8 .5 0 -1 3 9 .0 0
1 2 2 .5 0 -1 3 8 .0 0

-

-

_
-

-

1
1
1

12
12
-

11
11
-

12
1
11
1

13
1
12
-

80
15
65
5

-

-

-

*

*

2

1
6

4
4

12

3
55

278
71
207
17
13
14
160

276
57
219
33
13
38
127

283
107
176
71
21
7
71

94
33
61
24
7
3
18

38
16
22
5
7
4
-

34
6
28
18
3
-

6
6
"

1
1
-

_
-

_
-

i
i
-

SECRET ARIE S, CLASS D
MA N U F A C T U R I N G ----------NO N MA N U F A C T U R I N G —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3R E T A I L T R A DE --------F I N A N C E 4 -------------------

1,3 0 9
429
880
178
72
314

3 9 .5
39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 4 .0 0
1 2 5 .5 0
1 2 3.00
128 .0 0
118.50
115 .0 0

1 2 2.00
1 2 5.50
1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 2.00
1 1 6.50
1 1 5 .5 0

1 1 2 .0 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0 -1 3 3 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0 -1 4 3 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 3 1 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0 -1 2 2 .5 0

-

-

-

1
1
-

20
6
14
3
10

140
12
128
60
11
53

107
26
81
8
12
49

132
47
85
13
9
39

191
72
119
6
5
56

311
133
178
17
14
80

215
64
151
20
6
22

no
33
77
19
12
3

40
27
13
4
-

15
9
6
5
-

4
4
4

22
22
22

_

_

-

-

S e e fo o tn o te s at end of ta b le .




8 1 .5 0 8 2 .5 0 8 0 .0 0 7 8 .0 0 -

-

-

45

-

-

“

1
1
1

-

1

2

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Womeni— Continued

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k ly h o u r s an d e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n s s t u d ie d i n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g 5 0 0 w o r k e r s o r m o r e ,
b y i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , O c t o b e r 1 9 6 9 )
O
Weekly earnings*
(standard)
Number
S e x , o c c u p a t io n , a n d i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

woikers

weekly
(standard)

Under
Mean2

Median 2

o f wc) r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s o f —

Numbe
$

Middle range ^

*

75
an d
under

75

$

$
80

t
85

t

i

90

95

$
100

s

*
105

n o

$
115

s
120

130

t

i

1 40

150

$
160

t
17 0

*-----I-----i---

t

180

190

200

-

210

220
an d

80

85

90

95

100

105

1 10

115

120

130

140

150

-

~
-

7
4
3
~
2

23
1
22
4
18

95
7
88
14
72

16 1
10
1 51
43
96

144
23
12 1
27
75

11 3
31
82
5
64

50
7
43
7
31

54
15
39
9
18

77
21
56
33
11

49
5
44
35
3

29

4

29
27

4
4

-

-

-

5
4
i
i

2
1
1
~
1

16
3
13
1
9

57
6
51
5
42

73
17
56
5
48

68
9
59
6
42

114
29
85
11
61

163
46
117
14
66

150
32
118
80
16

68
29
39
18
1

31
12
19
18

18
18
18

4
1
3
2

12
12

i
i

B
3
5
3

21
10
11
4

15
7
8
3

25
11
14
-

24
14
10
3

23
9
14
7

23
4
19
17

30
7
23
18

7
3
4
2

1

13

-

-

1
1

13
13

-

-

2
2

3
3
-

57
57
3
13

50
50
41
7

26
23
6
12

33
33
11
21

12
11
1
6

18
15
5
2

32
12
1
1

7
6
i

3
1

-

8
8

3
3

20
13

5
1

3
3

9
7

7
7

12
5

4
4

_

_

_

“

“

160

170

180

1 90

210

220 over

W EN - CONTINUED
OM
STENOGRAPHERS. GENERAL -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------FINANCE 4------------------------------- ;------

806
124
682
208
390

3 9.5
4 0 .0
39.5
39.5
4 0 .0

$
$
10 7 .5 0 1 0 4 .0 0
110.00 1 0 8.00
107.00 1 0 3.00
1 1 6.50 1 1 7.50
101.50 100.50

$
$
9 7 .5 0 -1 1 6 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0 -1 1 8 .5 0
9 7 .0 0 -1 1 5 .5 0
9 9 .0 0 -1 3 2 .5 0
9 5 .5 0 -1 0 7 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 ---------------------FINANCE4 --------------------------------------

781
189
592
190
287

39.5
39.5
39.5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 2 5.00
126.00
125.00
139.50
114.50

123.00
124.00
122.50
134.50
115 .0 0

1 1 3 .0 0 -1 3 4 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0 -1 3 9 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 -1 3 3 .5 0
1 3 0 .5 0 -1 5 1 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 2 1 .5 0

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3----------------------

191
68
123
71

3 9 .0
3 9.0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 19.00
112.00
1 23.00
131 .5 0

115.50
111.00
119.50
129.50

1 0 5 .5 0 -1 3 2 .0 0
1 0 3 .0 0 -1 1 9 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 3 6 .5 0
1 1 8 .5 0 -1 3 9 .5 0

_
-

_

_

~
-

-

“

-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

244
214
69
67

3 9 .5
3 9.5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

105.50
1 03.00
101.50
102.00

102.00
99.5 0
99.0 0
104.00

9 5 .0 0 -1 1 5 .0 0
9 4 .0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 -1 0 6 .0 0
9 4 .5 0 -1 0 8 .5 0

1
1

_

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSNONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

73
51

4 0 .0
3 9.5

1 1 3.00
113.50

109.00
111 .5 0

1 0 1 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
1 0 1 .0 0 -1 2 8 .0 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

160
157

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

118.00
117.50

121.00
121 .0 0

1 0 4 .0 0 -1 2 4 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 2 4 .0 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

75
65
52

3 8 .5
3 8.5
3 8 .0

108.50
109.50
105.00

105.00
104.50
100 .5 0

9 6 .0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0
9 5 .5 0 -1 2 2 .5 0
9 4 .0 0 -1 1 4 .0 0

_

_

1

-

-

-

TY PI S T S, CLASS A ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

775
160
615
102
445

3 9.5
3 9 .0
3 9.5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 0 3.50
110.50
1 0 1.50
111.50
9 7 .0 0

101.50
112.00
98.5 0
103.00
9 5 .0 0

9 2 .0 0 -1 1 2 .5 0
1 0 4 .5 0 -1 1 7 .5 0
9 1 .0 0 -1 0 8 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 1 4 .5 0
8 9 .0 0 -1 0 4 .0 0

-

T Y P I S T S, CLASS B ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

1,163
287
876
211
56
520

3 9.5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9.5

95.5 0
96.0 0
95.0 0
1 0 2.00
1 0 3.00
90.5 0

9 3 .0 0
96.5 0
92.5 0
9 3 .5 0
94.5 0
9 0 .0 0

8 8 .5 0 - 9 9 .0 0
9 0 .5 0 -1 0 0 .5 0
8 8 .0 0 - 9 8 .0 0
9 1 .5 0 -1 1 3 .0 0
9 2 .0 0 -1 2 1 .0 0
8 5 .5 0 - 9 4 .5 0

1
to t h e s e
2
3
4
5

S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t th e w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e
w e e k ly h o u r s .
F o r d e f i n it i o n o f t e r m s , s e e f o o tn o te 2 , t a b l e A - 1.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , an d o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .
M a y in c lu d e w o r k e r s o t h e r th a n t h o s e p r e s e n t e d s e p a r a t e l y .




th e ir

re g u la r

-

-

-

1

-

2

2

-

_

-

2

“

"

“

_

_

_

~
-

12

6
4
2

18
3
15

_

”

_

_

“

25
25

18
18

12
12

12
12

3
2

65
65

17
15

7
7

1
1

7
6
6

9
9
9

13
12
11

8
7

4
3
3

9
6
5

7
5
5

7
7
”

5
5
3

4
4
2

*

1
1
1

127
5
12 2

96
6
90

116
10
106
43
60

96
13
83
15
60

71
12
59
10
41

100
62
38
10
19

54
11
43
6
25

51
21
30
4
11

23
11
12

4
2
2
1

2

11

_

2
2

11
11

-

203
10 1
102
10
6
60

69
13
56

71
41
30
2
2
10

25
4
21
9

20
9
11
6
i
2

37
4

17

10

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

33

17

23
6
i

9

10
10

-

~

-

-

-

2

15

122

86

2

14

211
41
170
15
2
145

360

-

-

2

14

123
24
99

-

-

-

14

98

2

str a ig h t- tim e

sa la rie s

49
311
124
28
146

7

3
3
36

-

6

( e x c lu s iv e o f p a y fo r o v e r tim e

-

_

_

_
_

-

4

8

at r e g u la r a n d /o r p re m iu m

ra tes),

an d th e e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d

14
Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and Women
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco—Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
Weekly earnings1
(star dard)

S ex, occup ati on, and in d u s tr y di v i si on

Number
of
workers

weekly
hours1
(standard)

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of—
90

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

»
100

*

t

i

110

120

i
130

*
140

i
150

160

i
170

*
180

t
190

$
200

I
210

t
220

t
230

$
240

i

t
250

$

i

$

260

270

280

an d
under
100

290
an d

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

2

2
2
2

30
16
14

17
11
6

5

3
1
2
1
1

290

over

MEN
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A ----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3----------------------

206
64
142
37

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
1 6 2.50
1 6 3.00
1 6 2.00
1 7 7.00

$
$
$
1 5 7 .5 0 1 4 7 .0 0 -1 7 6 .0 0
1 6 1.00 1 4 8 .0 0 -1 7 6 .5 0
1 5 7.00 1 4 6 .0 0 -1 7 5 .5 0
1 7 6 .5 0 1 5 9 .0 0 -1 8 7 .0 0

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

423
114
309
28
81
144

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

1 4 2 .5 0
1 4 3 .5 0
142 .5 0
1 5 4.00
1 3 9 .0 0
143.00

1 3 9.50
141.50
1 3 9.00
1 5 2.50
1 3 8.00
1 3 9.50

1 3 3 .5 0 -1 4 9 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 4 8 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 -1 5 1 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0 -1 6 9 .0 0
1 1 9 .5 0 -1 5 1 .0 0
1 3 4 .5 0 -1 4 9 .5 0

*

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -----------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

142
11 1
69

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 2 2 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0
120 .5 0

124.50
1 2 2 .5 0
1 2 3.50

1 1 1 .0 0 -1 3 0 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0 -1 3 1 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0 -1 3 0 .0 0

5
5
5

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS A ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

227
178
53
92

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

2 1 2 .5 0
2 1 1 .0 0
2 1 9 .5 0
20 7 .0 0

2 1 1 .5 0
2 1 1 .5 0
21 7 .5 0
20 8 .0 0

1 9 7 .5 0 -2 2 8 .5 0
1 9 6 .5 0 -2 2 5 .0 0
1 9 7 .5 0 -2 4 1 .5 0
1 9 6 .0 0 -2 1 7 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BU S I N E S S , CLASS B ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

537
189
348
140
71
123

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

1 8 3.00
1 8 5 .0 0
1 8 2 .0 0
1 8 4.50
1 8 1.00
1 7 8 .5 0

1 8 1 .0 0
1 8 3 .5 0
180.00
182.00
179 .5 0
176 .5 0

1 7 2 .5 0 -1 9 4 .5 0
1 7 4 .5 0 -1 9 7 .5 0
1 7 1 .5 0 -1 9 2 .0 0
1 7 1 .0 0 -1 9 9 .5 0
1 7 6 .0 0 -1 8 8 .0 0
1 6 5 .0 0 -1 9 1 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS C ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

149
100

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 4.00
1 5 2 .0 0

157 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS A ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

222
1 21
101

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

2 5 2 .0 0
25 4 .0 0
25 0 .0 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S I N E S S , CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------FINANCE4--------------------------------------

196
73
123
47
52

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS C ---------------------------

8

-

-

8

8

~

1.

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

15
14
2
11

36
27
10
15

38
29
3
23

48
44
11
23

21
19
4
9

19
11
5
1

23
15
9
6

6
4
4
-

1 09
30
79
41
20
18

75
41
34
7
12
13

67
24
43
21

22
5
17
13

4
3
1

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

15

4

-

-

-

-

0

-

2

3

2
2

4
i
-

-

17
13
4

1
1
1

~

*
*

-

-

9
9

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

8
4
3
1

14
2
12

161
57
104
26
36
42

12
3

21 2 .0 0
2 2 6 .5 0
2 0 9 .0 0
2 1 0 .0 0
2 1 0 .5 0

3
2

14
2
12
1
2
9

17
15
11

21 6 .5 0
2 2 2 .5 0
21 3 .0 0
21 6 .5 0
2 1 2 .0 0

_

48
18
30
7
16

57
33
27

2 4 5 .0 0
24 4 .5 0
2 4 6 .0 0

-

33
1
32
1
2
21

14
14
10

1 4 1 .5 0 -1 6 5 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0 -1 6 3 .0 0

-

4
1
3
2

30
30
11

-

-

13
3
10
1

27
57

-

i

13
11
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i

2

11

68
13
55
32
3
17

-

-

i
i

12
12

20
15

15
7

41
32

38
23

2 3 3 .0 0 -2 7 0 .0 0
2 3 6 .0 0 -2 6 9 .5 0
2 2 9 .5 0 -2 7 5 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 9 9 .5 0 -2 3 5 .0 0
2 0 2 .5 0 -2 4 2 .0 0
1 9 8 .0 0 -2 2 0 .0 0
1 9 8 .0 0 -2 3 3 .5 0
1 9 5 .5 0 -2 2 9 .5 0

-

-

-

*

-

-

1
1
1

-

2
1
1
1

-

1

1

4

7

14

6

1

9

5

2

_

_

-

_

“

-

-

-

*

-

-

1
1
-

16
16
-

18
18
-

44
40
4

100
83
17

61
18
43

155
91
64

94
31
63

36
16
20

41
23
18

-

_

*

42
41
1

48
48
-

68
46
22

53
24
29

58
18
40

99
32
67

57
32
25

5
1
4

11
11
-

14
13
1

_

-

5
5
-

1
1
-

52

3 9 .5

1 8 4 .5 0

1 7 9 .5 0

1 7 0 .0 0 -2 0 3 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 9 0 .5 0
1 8 5 .5 0
1 9 7 .5 0

1 9 3.00
1 8 6.50
1 9 8 .5 0

1 7 6 .0 0 -2 0 3 .5 0
1 7 1 .0 0 -1 9 9 .0 0
1 8 8 .0 0 -2 0 5 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

461
272
189

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 6 1 .5 0
1 5 6.50
1 6 8.50

1 6 2 .5 0
1 4 9.50
1 7 0 .5 0

1 4 6 .0 0 -1 7 6 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 7 4 .0 0
1 5 8 .5 0 -1 7 8 .0 0

-

-

-

-

14
2
12
10

25
2
22
1

-

1

24
14
10
5

*

-

-

-

1

23
13
10
5

104
45
59
8
9
35

l

I
-

5
2

46
6
40
9

1 53
38
11 5

-

5

59
25
34
1

40
10
30
3
3
17

25

-

576
344
232




8

-

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

S e e f o o tn o te s at end of table,

-

-

-

i
-

-

1

-

—

-

7

—

—

-

i

2

-

i

2

3
1
2

14
3
11

23
13
10

20
7
13
9
4

28
8
20
5
9

40
9
31
10
11

38
11
27
10
12

5
3
2
2

-

-

-

1
1

—

-

1

-

-

43
29
14

36
22
14

16
9
7

17
8
9
3
3

33
21
12
5
7

3
2
1
1
-

1

1

-

7
6
1

1
1

2

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2

2
3
2

1

14
2
12

23
15
8

1
1
1

15
Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and Womenj— Continued
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s s t ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s tr y di v i si o n , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a kl an d, C a l i f ., O c t o b e r 1969)
O
W eekly e arn in g s1
(standard )
N um ber
of
w orkers

S ex, occup ati on, and in du st ry di v i si on

A verage
w eek ly
h ou rs1
( standard)

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s re c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of—
t

$
90

M ean2

M e d ian 2

*

$

*

$

t

$

$

$

t

t

$

i

i

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

*
240

250

260

270

t
280

—

100

*
-

-

-

260

270

280

and
under

M iddle range 2

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

1
1

23
23

13
13

19
12
7

57
28
29

59
23
36

36
13
23

5
4

41
18

7
7

63
62

13
1

10

1
2
2

17
11

29
22

290
and

3

2

t

22
20
2

5
5

$

180

190

200

210

220

21

12
6

6
4

240

230

250

2
2

290 o v er

MEN - C0NTINUE0
DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ------------------------------------MANU FA CT UR IN G -----------------------------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------------------------

230
133
97

$
$
$
$
40.0 138.00 140.50 130.50-150.50
40.0 134.00 136.50 118.00-150.50
40.0 143.50 142.50 137.00-151.00

137
97

39.5 147.50 151.00 136.00-154.00
40.0 146.50 151.50 134.50-153.50

-

_

-

-

51

39.5 122.50 121.00 115.00-135.00

2

5

16

15

89
65

39.5 179.50 178.50 171.00-189.00
39.5 179.50 177.50 171.00-186.50

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

“

“

“

~

“

WOMEN
COMP UT ER OPERATORS, CLASS B ---------------NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------------------------C O MP UT ER OPERATORS, CLASS C

----------------••

COMP UT ER PR0GRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------------------------COMP UT ER PR0GRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C -------------------------------------

80

39.5 151.00 150.00 141.50-159.50

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----MA NU FACTURING ------------------------------------------

133
94

40.0 156.00 153.00 147.00-165.00
40.0 157.50 153.50 147.50-167.50

1
to th e se
2
3
4

18

“

-

-

1

12

27

22

15

1

2

-

_

-

5
2

7
4

39
27

34
27

26
15

13

9
7

-

”

12

S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o rk w ee k f o r which e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e th e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of p a y fo r o v e r t i m e a t r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d
w e e kl y h o u rs .
F o r de finition of t e r m s , s e e footnote 2, tab le A - l .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , co m m u n i ca t io n , and o th er pu bli c u ti l it i e s .
F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .

Table A-2a.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women

( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w ee kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o cc u p a ti o n s s t ud ie d in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s em pl o y in g 500 w o r k e r s o r m o r e ,
by in d u s tr y di v i si o n , S an F r a n c i s c o — kl an d, C a l i f . , O c to b e r 1969)
Oa
W eekly e a r n in g s1
(standard )

Se x , occup ation, and in du st ry di v i si on

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e kl y e a r n i n g s of—

»

A ve rage
w eekly
h ou rs1
( standard)

M iddle range 2

90

109
69
37

$
$
$
39.5 169.50 164.50 1 5 7. 00 39.5 169.00 162.00 1 5 6. 00 40.0 177.00 176.50 1 5 9 . 0 0 -

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS B
MA NU FA CT UR IN G -----------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG --------FI NA NC E4 -----------------

179
53
126
63

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.5

S e e foo tno te s at end of tab le .




147.00
147.50
146.50
144.50

144.00
145.00
143.50
142.50

1 3 6. 50 1 3 9. 00 13 5. 50 1 3 6. 00 -

100

$

110

i

120

and
u nde r
100

CO MPUTER OPERATORSt CLASS
NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG -----PUBLIC UT I L I T I E S 3----

i

»

130

5

140

i

150

i

160

$

170

i

180

i

190

i

200

i

210

i

220

»

230

i

240

i

250

i

260

5

270

$

280

i

290

—
110

120

130

—

-

—

—

—

-

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

—

and

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

290

o v er

29
23
9

21
10

21

14

7

12
10

180.00
182.50
187.00

2
2
1

9
6
1

154.00
150.00
154.50
149.00

46
15
31
22

63
26
37
24

16
Table A-2a.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women|— Continued

(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more,
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )
N um ber
of

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
$

A verage
w e e k ly

t

$

w orkers

h o u rs1
( s ta n d a r d )

M ""2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

90
and
under

10 0

100

Se x , o ccu pa tio n, and in d u s tr y di v i si on

110

$

110

$

12 0

$

130

I

14 0

$

150

$

160

$

17 0

$

180

$

190

I

2 00

i

210

I

2 20

I

2 30

t

$

2 40

250

7

2 60

$

270

$

280

29 0
and

120

130

140

150

16 0

17 0

18 0

1 90

2 00

21 0

2 20

230

240

250

2 60

270

2 80

290

o v er

5

37

13

12

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
4
3

4
3
2

22
13
10

26
17
3

34
30
11

17
15
4

16
11
5

18
13
9

6
4
4

2

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

-

49
13
36
28
2

61
13
48
26
17

65
4
61
41
12

25
3
22
7
10

42
9
33
21
11

22
5
17
13
4

2
1
1

1
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

20

8

6
1

2

i

2

3
i
2

11
3
8

7
3
4

24
18
6

30
22
8

13
8
5

26
15
11

12
11
1

2
2

7
5
2

28
23
10

5
2

14
9
3

6

3
1
1

4
2
2

2

-

1
1
1

12
6
6

20
2
18

1
1

_

1
1

MEN - CONT IN UE D
$
$
$
128.50 1 2 5 .0 0 -1 3 6 .0 0

C O MP UT ER OPERATORS, CLASS C --------

69

39.0

$
130.50

C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------

155
112
53

39.5
40.0
4 0.0

216.50 214.50 2 0 2 .0 0 -2 3 4 .0 0
217.50 216.00 2 0 6 .5 0 -2 3 2 .5 0
219.50 217.50 197 .5 0 -2 4 1 .5 0

C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------F I NA NC E4 --------------------------

271
51
22 0
136
57

39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5

185.00 182.00
185.00 178.00
185.00 182.50
185.00 182.00
186.50 185.00

172.00-200.00
168.50-205.00
173.00-198.00
172.00-200.50
175.00-201.00

C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C -------------------

85

39.5

157.00 157.50

145.00-165.00

COMP UT ER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

138
88
50

39.5 2 4 8.00 246.00 2 3 4 .0 0 -2 6 7 .0 0
4 0.0 253.00 248.00 2 3 8 .5 0 -2 6 9 .0 0
3 9.5 240.00 2 4 3.00 2 2 0 .0 0 -2 6 3 .0 0

CO MP U T E R SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3---------------

138
95
47

39.5
39.5
40.0

212.00 208.50
211.50 209.00
216.50 210.00

196.00-226.00
196.50-219.00
198.00-233.50

-

DRAFTSMEN, CL AS S A ------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

290
157
133

40.0
40.0
40.0

191.50 193.50
184.50 191.00
200.00 201.50

1 80.50-203.50
169.00-196.50
190.50-205.00

_

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ------------------M A N U FA CT UR IN G --------------------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

27 3
140
133

40.0
39.5
40 .0

160.50 162.00
152.50 149.50
169.50 169.00

148.00-175.00
137.50-169.50
160.50-179.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ------------------M A NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

16 6
95

40.0
40 .0

138.50
133.50

75
51

39.5
39.5

178.50 177.00
178.00 174.50

141.00 1 3 0 .0 0 -1 4 9 .5 0
137.00 1 2 0 .0 0 -1 4 6 .0 0

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

-

3
2
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
9

“

1
1
-

2
2
10
10

-

-

1
1

-

12
11
1

13
13

15

-

27

1
1

-

2
1

19
13
9

22
14
5

31
22
10

13
13
-

12
12

19
15
4

26
18
8

32
12
20

79
56
23

74
21
53

32
32
-

29
27

52
13
39

58
22
36

34
9
25

3
1

1
1

-

2

49
21
28

18
12

37
21

48
23

31
8

-

-

-

2
2

15
9

27
20

15
12

10
4

6
4

-

-

1

6

23

13

10

1

2

-

-

-

-

_

3
-

7
4

20
13

34
27

23
12

13
12

9
7

-

—
-

-

8
7

-

-

V

-

5
5

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

2

WOMEN
C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

1 70.50-189.00
170.50-186.00

C O MP UT ER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C -------------------

56

39.5

151.50 149.00

1 42.00-160.00

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) --M A N U FA CT UR IN G ---------------------

10 9
75

40.0
40.0

157.50 155.00
160.00 155.50

1 49.00-168.00
150.50-170.50

1
to th e s e
2
3
4

-

-

-

—

-

—

-

—

-

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

—
-

—
-

-

—

S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o rk w e e k f o r which e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e ir r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e of p a y f o r o v e r t i m e a t ! r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d
weekly hours.
F o r defi ni tio n of t e r m s , s e e foo tnote 2, t a b le A - l .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and o th er pu b li c u ti l it i e s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e .




17
Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e kl y h o u r s and e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n s st ud ie d on an a r e a b a s i s
by in d u s t r y di v i si o n , San F r a n c i s c o , C a l i f . , O ct o b e r 1969)
A v erage

O ccu pa ti on and in d u s tr y di v i si o n

Num ber
of

W eekly
(standard'

W eekly
e arnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS,
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ----------------------------N O N M A N UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S2---------------

182
116
78

6 0 .0
6 0 .0
6 0 .0

76
76
66

6 0 .0
6 0 .0
6 0 .0

1 1 1 .0 0
1 1 1 .0 0

BOOKKE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
CLASS A -----------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----------------

196
73
123

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9.5

126.00
123.50
1 2 8.00

BO OK KE EP IN G- MA CH IN E OPERATORS,
CLASS B -----------------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------

281
78
203
132

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0

110.50
95.0 0
1 1 6.50
116.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRAOE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------FI NA NC E3 --------------------------

2 ,0 2 6
730
1,296
259
259
120
686

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
39.5
38.5

133 .5 0
160.50
129 .5 0
162 .0 0
136.50
135.50
1 2 1.50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I NA NC E3 --------------------------

2 ,5 6 8
651
1 ,917
662
377
368
605

3 9.5
3 9.5
3 9.5
6 0 .0
3 9 .0
39 .5
3 8.5

1 1 1 .0 0

1 1 6.50
11 0 .0 0
1 1 6.50
110.50
116 .5 0
100 .0 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A --------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------FI NA NC E3 --------------------------

256
61
195
127

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

1 0 6.00
108.50
1 0 5.50
103.50

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UT I L I T I E S 2--- ----------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------FI NA NC E3 --------------------------

789
73
716
68
76
106
677

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

9 0 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
90.5 0
1 2 6.50
9 2 .5 0
9 3 .5 0
85 .5 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C --------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UT I L I T I E S 2 --------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------F I NA NC E3 --------------------------

896
865
26
93
672

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9.5
6 0 .0
3 8 .0

83.0 0
81.5 0
1 1 7 .0 0
90.0 0
78.0 0

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMANUF AC TU RI NG ----------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

756
260
494
611
68

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9.5
6 0 .0

139.50
1 6 2.50
1 3 8.00
160.00
125 .5 0




at end of ta b le .

Num ber

of

W eekly
hours 1
(stan dard’

W eekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OC CUPATIONS - CONTINUED
$
120 .0 0
135.00
168.50

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ----------------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------

S e e fo o tn o te s

A verage

O c c u p a t i o n and in du s tr y di v i si on

100.00

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

53

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8.5
3 8.5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

$
1 31.50
133.00
131 .0 0
169 .5 0
1 2 6.50
1 1 6.00
1 2 6.50

550
188
362
115
99
125

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9.5
6 0 .0

120.50
123 .0 0
119.00
161 .5 0
116 .5 0
105 .5 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL ------MANU FA CT UR IN G -----NO NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2WHOLESALE TRADE —
RETAIL TRAOE ----FI NA NC E3 -----------

712
267
AA 5

CO MP TO ME TE R OPERATORS
MA NU FA CT UR IN G ----NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
WHOLESALE TRAOE RETAIL TRADE ----

1A8
79

110

KE YPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC UT I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I NA NC E3 --------------------------

1,75 8
A81
1,277
235
30A
96
611

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
6 0 .0
6 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

121 .0 0
120.50
121.50
1 3 6.50
121.50
11 8 .5 0
1 1 6.00

KEYP UN CH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------F I NA NC E3--------------------------

1,808
301
1,5 0 7
509
312
655

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
6 0 .0
3 9 .0
6 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 1 0.00
1 0 6 .0 0
1 1 1.50
1 2 6.00
107.50
1 0 7.50
1 0 0 .5 0

OFFICE BOYS AND GI RL S---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G - --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------FI NA NC E3--------------------------

1,1 6 8
386
762
63
157
670

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

8 8 .5 0
88.5 0
88 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0
88.0 0
8 6 .0 0

SE CR ET AR IE S4 --------------------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------FI NA NC E3 --------------------------

7 ,2 2 7
1,9 6 7
5 ,2 6 0
638
1,1 8 9
611

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .0

133.50
1 3 7.00
1 3 2.50
1 6 6.00
1 3 3.00
1 3 5.00
128 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------F I NA NC E3 --------------------------

620
81
52
167

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 5 8 .5 0
158 .5 0
158 .5 0
181 .5 0
158 .0 0

1,585
357
1,228
128
206
67
599

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

163 .0 0
1 5 0.50
160.50
163 .0 0
1 6 5.50
1 6 5.50
1 3 5.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS B --MANUFA CT UR IN G ---------N O NM AN UF AC TU RI NG -----PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---WHOLESALE TRADE ----RETAIL TRADE --------F I NA NC E3---------------

Average

Occu pat ion and in du s tr y di v i si on

200

2 , 100

339

SE CR ET AR IE S4 - CONTINUED
SECRETARIES, CLASS
MANUFA CT UR IN G ----NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
WHOLESALE TRADE RETAIL TRADE ---F I N A N C E 3----------

2 ,6 1 6
726
1,692
262
615
166
715

3 9 .0
3 9.0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 3 6.50
136 .5 0
1 3 6 .0 0
1 6 1.50
136 .5 0
136.50
1 3 0.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS D
MANUFA CT UR IN G -----NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG --PUBLIC UTIL IT IE S2 WHOLESALE TRADE —
RETAIL TRADE ----F I N A N C E 3-----------

2 ,6 8 9
713
1,976
206
528
166
639

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9.5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

12 2 .5 0
12 7 .0 0
1 2 1.00
13 1 .5 0
1 2 3.00
121.50
113 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL
MANUFA CT UR IN G -----NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG --PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2WHOLESALE TRADE —
F I N A N C E 3-----------

1,3 3 6
305
1,029
236
165
569

3 9 .5
6 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

1 0 8.00
1 0 9.00
1 0 8 .0 0
120 .0 0
111 .0 0
1 0 1 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ---------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------F I N A N C E 3---------------------

1 ,728
567
1 , 181
201
1 92
587

3 9.0
3 9.5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 2 3.00
12 1 .0 0
1 2 6.00
1 3 9.00
1 2 6.50
1 1 9 .0 0

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS
MANU FA CT UR IN G -------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ---------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2------F I N A N C E 3------------------

361
111
250
85
130

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

1 1 8 .0 0
12 0 .0 0
1 1 6.50
1 3 1 .5 0
1 0 8 .0 0

SW ITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CL AS S B ---NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------F I N A N C E 3-------------------------

612
578
86
113

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
6 0 .0
3 9 .5

99.0 0
9 7 .5 0
1 0 1.50
1 0 1 .5 0

SW IT CH BO AR D OPER AT OR -R EC EP TI ON IS TS MANUFA CT UR IN G --------------------NONMAN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

868
265
603
51
269
165

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1 1 0 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 1 1.00
13 5 .0 0
1 1 6.00
100.50

TA BU LA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -----------------------------NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------

127
96
60

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
6 0 .0

152 .0 0
151 .0 0
166 .0 0

602
353
182
52

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
6 0.0
3 9 .5

1 3 2.50
1 3 3.00
1 2 7.50
1 2 6 .5 0

TA BU LA TI NG -M AC HI NE OPERATORS,
NONM AN UF AC TU RI NG ----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------F I N A N C E 3--------------------------

18
Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined--- Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco, Calif., October 1969)
Average

O cc up ati on and in d u s tr y d iv i si o n

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

116
116

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$
1 2 0.00
1 2 0 .0 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------FINANCE3 -------------------------------

459
417
283

3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

1 0 3.00
1 0 2 .5 0
9 8 .0 0

T Y P I S T S , CLASS A -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------FINANCE3 --------------------------------

1 ,621
1,4 2 1
112
328
86 6

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 6.5
3 8 .5

103.50
112 .5 0
102 .5 0
1 1 3.00
1 0 3.00
98.5 0

T Y P I S T S , CLASS B ------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------

2 ,596
446
2 ,1 5 0
240
77
91
1 ,5 7 8

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

94.5 0
9 7 .0 0
93.5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
9 7 .0 0
1 0 5.00
90.5 0

200

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

1 6 2.00
1 6 2.00
1 6 2.00
1 7 2.50

W eekly
hours 1
(standard1

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0

$
1 4 4.00
1 4 5 .0 0
143.50
139 .0 0
142 .0 0

W eekly
earnings 1
(standard)

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C ---MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------FINANCE3-------------------------------

193
58
135
76

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 2 2 .0 0
1 2 8.00
1 1 9.50
1 2 0.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS A -------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------FINANCE 3-------------------------------

258
58
200
59
105

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .0

2 1 2 .0 0
2 1 6 .5 0
2 1 0.50
2 1 6 .5 0
20 9 .0 0

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------FINANCE3-------------------------------

626
213
413
164
73
160

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 8 2.50
1 8 4 .5 0
1 8 1 .5 0
1 8 3.00
181 .0 0
179 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS C -------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------FINANCE3-------------------------------

229
145
75

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

153 .0 0
1 5 2 .0 0
150.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS A -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------FINANCE3 ----------------------------------------------------

252
133
119
57

$
39.5 250 .0 0
39.5 253.00
39.5 247.00
39.0 243.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------FINANCE3--------------------------------------

206
73
133
48
60

39.0
39.0
39.5
40.0
38.5

215.00
222.50
211.00
215.50
209.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS C ---------------------------

64

39.0

179.00

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

587
354
233

40.0
40.0
40.0

190.00
185.00
197.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

4 93
281
212

40.0
39.5
40.0

161.00
156.00
167.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

24 4
137
107

40.0
40.0
40.0

137.50
133.50
142.50

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS

----------------------------------------

72

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

133
94

o
o

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

560
154
406
95
154

NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

N um ber
of

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ---MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------FINANCE3-------------------------------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U S I N E S S , CLASS B -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------

A verage

O ccu pat ion and in du s tr y d iv i si o n

*

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2 ---------

O ccu pa ti on and in d u s tr y di v i si on

Weekly
Weekly
hours * earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS C -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------

F IN AN C E3 ------------------------------------

Average
Number
of

40.0
40.0

112.50
156.00
157.50

1 Standard hours reflect the w o r k w e e k for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or p r e m i u m rates), and the earnings
correspond to these weekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
3 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
M a y include workers other than those presented separately.

4




19
Table A-3a. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women Combined
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more,
by industry division, San Francisco—Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
Av« rage

Average

Occupation and industry division

N um ber

of
workers

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard] (standard)
Weekly

63

40

$
0 110

50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------RETAIL TRADE ---------------FINANCE3 ------------------------

726
377
349
188
54
60

39 5
39 0
39 5
39 5
40 0
39 5

138
143
133
139
130
119

50
00
50
50
50
50

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------RETAIL TRADE ----------------

1,394
283

39 5
39 5
39 5
40 0
39 5

113
118
ill
115
11 1

00
50
50
00
50

38
39

113
118

50
00

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING —

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
B I L L E R S , MACHINE (BIL LING
MACHINE) --------------------------

Occupation and industry division

1,111
600
243
87
50

5
0

428
187
241
36
150

3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

9 2 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
93.0 0
1 0 6.00
89.00

SECRETARIES4 -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -------------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------------FINANCE3----------------------------------

3 ,0 9 6
975
2,121
507
146
196
930

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9.5

1 3 5.50
135.50
135.00
1 4 8.00
145 .5 0
1 3 1.00
1 2 9.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2------------------

99
85
37

3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

176.50
175.50
1 9 4 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2-----------------FINANCE3----------------------------------

499
203
296
98
137

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9.5

154.50
146.50
1 6 0 .0 0
172 .5 0
152 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE3--------------------------------------

1 ,1 4 6
314
832
180
65
74
455

3 9 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9.5

136.50
140.00
1 3 5.00
144.50
1 4 3.50
133.50
1 3 0.00

372
317
44
1 81

39
39
39
39

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
FINANCE3 ---------------

225
223
26
159

38 5
38 5
39 5
38 0

88
88
117
80

00
00
00
50

CLERKS, ORDER --------MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING

128
52
76

40 0
40 0
40 0

129
146
117

00
50
00

CLERKS, PAYROLL ---------MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
RETAIL TRADE ------

332
100
232
1 20
54

39 0
39 5
39 0
38 0
40 0

133
132
133
148
108

00
50
50
50
00

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE3--------------------------------------

1,313
430
883
180
72
315

3 9.5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9.5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 4.00
1 2 5.50
123.00
1 2 8 .5 0
118.50
1 1 5 .0 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS
MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
RETAIL TRADE ------

313
51
262
113
119

39 5 1 2 0
38 5 1 1 7
39 5 1 2 0
39 0 1 41
40 0 105

00
50
50
50
00

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------FINANCE3--------------------------------------

813
1 25
688
214
390

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

108 .0 0
110.00
107 .5 0
117 .0 0
101 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------RETAIL TRADE ---------------FINANCE3-------------------------

891
183
708
215
78
370

39
39
40
40,
40
40

5 124
0 117
0 125
0 136
0 117
0 1 21

00
00
50
50
00
00

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------FINANCE3--------------------------------------

786
190
596
194
287

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

125 .0 0
126 .0 0
125 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS 8
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------RETAIL TRADE ---------------FINANCE3-------------------------

1,011

39
39
39
39.
40
38

5
5
5
5
0
5

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2----------------------

191
68
123
71

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 9.00
112 .0 0
1 2 3.00
1 3 1 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------FINANCE3--------------------------------------

244
214
69
67

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

105 .5 0
103 .0 0
101 .5 0
102 .0 0

See footnotes at end of table.




137
874
459
147
226

114 50
106 50
115 50
125 00
105 00
103 00

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE BOYS AND G IR LS -------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2-----------------FINANCE3----------------------------------

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
FINANCE3 ----------------

93 00
5
93 0 0
5
5 126 00
5
85 50

Average

Occupation and industry division

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSNONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

73
51

4 0 .0
3 9.5

$
1 1 3 .0 0
113 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

85
78

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

153.00
1 5 3.00

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------

272
236
178

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

126.50
126 .5 0
1 2 6.50

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS C -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------

50
50

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

120.50
120 .5 0

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------FINANCE3-------------------------------

75
65
52

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

108 .5 0
109 .5 0
105.00

T Y P I S T S , CLASS A -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2--------------FINANCE3-------------------------------

7 81
161
620
104
445

3 9.5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9.5

1 0 3.50
110.50
1 0 1.50
111.50
97.0 0

1 ,164
288
876
2 11
56
520

3 9 .5
39.5
3 9.5
3 9 .0
4 0.0
3 9 .5

9 5 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
95.0 0
1 0 2.00
1 0 3 .0 0
9 0 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2 ---------

1 32
53
79
47

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

167 .5 0
1 6 8.00
1 6 7.50
1 7 2.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------FINANCE3-------------------------

268
60
208
69

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

147 .5 0
147.50
148.00
143 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING ------------

98
61

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

128 .5 0
1 2 6.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2 ---------

184
52
132
59

3 9 .5
3 9.5
3 9 .5
4 0.0

2 1 5 .5 0
2 1 3 .5 0
2 1 6 .5 0
21 6 .5 0

T Y P I S T S , CLASS B -------MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2
RETAIL TRADE -----FINANCE3 ---------------

PROFESSIONAL ANO TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

20
Table A-3a. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Large Establishments—Men and Women Combined!--- Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more,
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
A verage

O ccu pat ion and in d u s tr y di v i si o n

N um ber
of

W eekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)
W eekly

Ave rage

O ccu pat ion and in du s tr y d iv i si o n

Num ber

of

W eekly
hours 1
(standard)

W eekly
e am in g s 1
(standard)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
39.5
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.0

183.50
183.00
183.50
183.50
185.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
B U SI N ES S, CLASS C ------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

141
65

39.5
39.5

155.00
156.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS A ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

148
97
51

39.5
40.0
39.5

of

W eekly
hours 1
(standard)

W eekly
e am in gs 1
(standard)

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS 8 ---------------------------

280

40.0

$
160.50

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C --------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

167
96

247.00
251.00
239.50

PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2---------------------COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS C ---------------------------

148
105
48

39.5
39.5
40.0

$
210.50

40.0

52

39.0

181.00

301
167
134

40.0
39.5

190.50
183.50

----------------------------------------

72

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----

109
75

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS
DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

169.00

40.0
40.0

138.00
133.50

215.50

NURSES,

o
o

346
75
271
160
80

N um ber

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BU S IN ES S , CLASS B --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2 ---------------------FINANCE 3--------------------------------------

A verage

O cc up ati on and in du st ry di v is io n

40.0
40.0

112.50
157.50
160.00

1 Standard hours reflect the w o r k w e e k for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or p r e m i u m rates), and the earnings
correspond to these weekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
3 Finance, insurance, and real estate.
4 M a y include workers other than those presented separately.

Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(Average straight-time hourly earnings for m e n in selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Franci sco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)

See footnotes at end of table.




21
Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations— Continued
(Average straight-time hourly earnings for m e n in selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
H ourly e a m in gs

1

Mumb e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e ho u r l y e a r n i n g s o f —

$
i
4 .10 4 .2 0

s
4 .30

S
3.20

$
3.30

$
3.43

t
3.53

t
3.63

$
3.70

s
3.80

$
i
3.90 4 .00

3.20

3.3 C

3.40

3.53

3.63

3.73

3.83

3.90

4.00

-

6
6

-

8
8

-

30
30

1
1

24
20
4

-

-

Occupation and industry division
M ean2

M e d ian 2

M iddle range 2

56 4
321
243

$
4.84
4.99
4.64

$
4.91
5.15
4.57

$
4.474.694.4 6 -

FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

62
50

3.78
3.80

3.63
3.60

3 .5 4 - 4.31
3 .5 3 - 4.33

"

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4----------------------

316
150
166
146

3.60
3.74
3.47
3.51

3.64
3.82
3.46
3.57

3.403.603.253.27-

6
6
i

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

83
76

4.60
4.62

4.49
4.83

4 .2 0 - 4.95
4 .1 9 - 4.96

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE -----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

1,404
1,311
93

4.75
4.74
4.87

4.77
4.76
5.13

4.354.344.38-

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE! ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------

1,196
189
1,007
883
51

5.02
4.95
5.03
5.08
4.35

5.00
4.79
5.00
5.03
4.28

4 .8 0 - 5.52
4 .6 2 - 5.53
4 .8 4 - 5.52
4 .8 6 - 5.53
3 .8 5 - 4.87

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4----------------------

1,169
1,057
112
75

4.39
4.38
4.45
4.48

4.17
4.15
4.40
4.37

4 .0 6 - 4.75
4 .0 6 - 4.75
4 .3 0 - 4.81
4 .1 9 - 4.84

MILLWRIGHTS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

167
167

4.54
4.54

4.65
4.65

4 .6 1 - 4.70
4 .6 1 - 4.70

OILERS ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

133
133

3.56
3.56

3.60
3.60

3 .323.32-

-

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

253
123
130

4.82
4.70
4.94

4.56
4.40
4.64

4 .2 7 - 6.00
4 .1 3 - 5.14
4 .3 2 - 6.02

P I P E F I T T E R S , MAINTENANCE ----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

471
445

4.37
4.37

4.31
4.31

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

69
57

4 .23
4.20

47 5
47 5

5.29
5.29

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS
MANUFACTURING —

1
2
3
4
5
6

$
5.17
5.33
4.79

U n d e r |3. 1 0
$
an d
3 . 1 0 un de r

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

3.84
3.87
3.67
3.68

—
-

4 .1 0 4 .20 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

8
8

19
18

11
5

3
3

1

3
“

_

21
21
18

27
27
26

26
1
25
21

41
34
7
-

13
2
11
11

64
21
43
43

10
2
8
8

83
78
5
5

24
12
12
12

$
s
1
4.50 4.60 4.80

t
$
5.00 5 .2 0

t
5.40

i

5.60

$
5.80

4.60 4 .8 0

5.00

5.20 5 .40

5.60

5.80

over

65
12
53

40
12
28

56
51
5

48
45
3

-

~

“

“

-

27
27
*

1

_

_

_

_

_

4

11

43

-

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

11
11
“

43
25
18
44
42
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

"

-

-

"

*

*

30
30

-

4
4

26
26

16
16

20
20

-

22
22

20
20

-

6
5
1

151
131
20

*

*

~
7
1

_

-

-

-

2
2
“

84
84
*

1

30
30

8
8

3
3

-

181
180
1

181
181

345
282
63

16
16
~

85
85
~

-

9
4
5
5
-

127
58
69
67
“

307
3
304
284
12

136
16
120
65
8

74
4
70
70
-

376
62
314
313
*

-

-

*

“

13
5
8

33
20
13
3

197
193
4
-

47
17
30
29

120
120
-

-

“

24
24

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

-

133
133

-

-

-

-

_

-

17
16
1

33
1
32

5
5
“

2
2
-

-

-

-

3
1
2

_

_

6
6

3
3

_

_

-

26
26

_

_

10
10

-

-

2

-

-

3
3

-

12
12

_

36
36

12
12

1
22

5.12
5.11
5.16

99
6
93

1
1

22
6
6

124
123
1

84
84
~

257
229
28

10
8
2
2
*

4
3
1
1

15
15
15
-

36
8
28
23
5

35
15
20
2
4

46
44
2
2

315
312
3
1

263
247
16
16

8
3
5
5

59
30
29
19

-

-

-

-

*

-

"

-

12
12

_

31
23
8

-

4 .2 5 - 4.37
4 .2 5 - 4.36

14
14

_

4.32
4.31

3 .9 6 - 4.38
3 .9 6 - 4.38

27
26

1
*

5.44
5.44

5.355.35-

-

1

-

-

-

5
5

3
3

-

-

-

~
~

-

13
13

3.76
3.76

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

-

-

-

5.47
5.47

Excludes p r e m i u m pay for overtime and for w o r k on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A-l.
All workers we re at $6.20 to $6.40.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
All workers we re at $ 6 to $6.20.
Wo rk er s were distributed as follows: 39 at $6 to $6.20; and 2 at $6.40 to $6.60.




$
4.40

16
16

S

Num ber

-

-

10
10

“
"

-

21
11
10

8
1
7

51
23
28

6
4

195
195

211
187

2

1

26
21

-

_

_

u
u
-

~

65
5 24
64 1

*

78
78

_

10
10

-

-

“
14
14

21
21

334

334

15
15

-

22
Table A-4a.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations—Large Establishments

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for m e n in selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more,
by industry division, San Francisco—Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

H ourly e im in gs 1

Occupation and industry division

N um ber
pf
woifcers

%
3 .1 0
M ean2

M edian ^

M iddle range 2

t
3 .1 0

*
3 .30

$
3 .4 0

S
3 .5 0

s

3 .60

$
3 .70

1
3 .8 0

$
3 .90

»
4 .0 0

4 .1 0

$
4 .2 0

$
4 .3 0

4 .40

S
4 .50

$
4 .6 0

$
4 .8 0

i
5 .00

*
5 .20

5 .4 0

$
5 .60

5 .8 0

3 .3 0

3 .4 0

3 .5 0

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

3 .8 0

3 .9 0

4 .0 0

4 .1 0

4 .2 0

4

30

4 .4 0

4 .50

4 .60

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .20

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

over

1
~
1
-

11
1
10
9

22
7
15
15

66
62
4
~

12
6
6

2
2
2

12
9
3
3

18
17
1
“

3
3
-

-

-

-

*

11
10
1
-

-

-

*

-

21
2
3 19
-

46
24
22
21

12
12
-

30
18
12
12

92
71
21
-

6
2
4
-

35
27
8
7

46
43
3
2

91
89
2
-

131
30
101
1 00

_
-

_
-

_
-

34
34
-

*

-

-

-

6
6

6
6

35
12
23

11
11

4
i
3

5
5

1
1

_
-

_
-

-

-

_

20
20

8
8

3
3

_

_

_

-

-

s

s

and
an d

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4-----------------

20 7
117
90
57

$
4.45
4.46
4.44
3.87

$
4.35
4.37
4.24
4.11

$
4.2 0 4.3 2 3.483.45-

$
4.63
4.63
4.74
4.24

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE ---------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4-----------------

64 7
42 5
222
190

4.65
4.69
4.59
4.62

4.54
4.54
4.54
5.11

4.1 8 4.1 9 4.1 5 4.13-

5.04
4.85
5.15
5.15

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ----------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

137
83
54

4.45
4.25
4.77

4 . 39
4.19
4.69

4 .1 7 - 4.68
4 .1 2 - 4.40
4 .6 2 - 4.97

FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER --------MANUFACTURING --------------------------

56
50

3.79
3.80

3.61
3.60

3 .5 3 - 4.32
3 .5 3 - 4.33

“

-

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4------------------

208
166
146

3.49
3.47
3.51

3.51
3.46
3.57

3 .2 9 - 3.66
3 .2 5 - 3.67
3 .2 7 - 3.68

6
6
i

21
21
18

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM
MANUFACTURING --------------------------

73
66

4.56
4.58

4.43
4.40

4 .1 8 - 4.97
4 .1 8 - 4.98

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE -------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

85 2
7 59
93

4.71
4.69
4.87

4.80
4.60
5.13

4 .3 5 - 5.05
4 .3 5 - 4.98
4 .3 8 - 5.16

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4------------------

7 64
112
65 2
581

5.11
4.77
5.17
5.20

5.24
4.65
5.28
5.51

4.764.384.8 4 4.84-

5.54
5.43
5.55
5.55

_

_

-

~

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ---------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4------------------

706
6 45
61
46

4.16
4.15
4.27
4.27

4.11
4 . 10
4.31
4.29

4.0 4 4.034.1 5 4.1 5 -

4.18
4.17
4.36
4.36

-

-

MILLWRIGHTS ---------------MANUFACTURING -------

167
167

4 .54
4.54

4.65
4.65

4 .6 1 - 4.70
4 .6 1 - 4.70

-

_

OILERS ------------------------MANUFACTURING -------

106
106

3.53
3.53

3.45
3.45

3.293.29-

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING -------

126
82

4.53
4.43

4.34
4.36

4 .1 4 - 4.63
4 .1 5 - 4.58

P I P E F I T T E R S , MAINTENANCE -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------

34 2
31 6

4.40
4.41

4.34
4.34

4 .3 0 - 4.38
4 .2 9 - 4.38

14
14

-

-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING --------------------------

69
57

4.23
4.20

4.32
4.31

3 .9 6 - 4.38
3 .9 6 - 4.38

27
26

1

TOOL ANO DIE MAKERS --------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------

378
378

5.27
5.27

5.43
5.43

5 .235.23-

3.79
3.79

s

under
3 .2 0

28
~

%

$
3 .2 0

~

28
28

“

“

_

-

-

-

2

14

3

-

-

-

-

2
2

14
14

3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

105
75
30
29

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

6
6

-

8
8

-

30
30

1
1

24
20
4

-

_

-

1
"

8
8

19
18

5
5

3
3

1

3
~

-

-

_

16
16

27
27
26

26
25
21

23
7

13
11
11

64
43
43

10
8
8

5
5
5

12
12
12

1
1
1

~

-

12
12

7
1

_

12
12
~

236
208
28

2
2
~

84
84
~

17
16
1

1 81
181
~

1 95
13 2
63

_
-

28
28

31
8
23
23

31
15
16
2

1
1
*

9
4
5
5

109
40
69
67

85
3
82
74

52
6
46
-

70
70
70

34 1
28
313
313

8
3

39
10
29
19

5
5
-

13
13
-

_
-

_
-

24
24
-

-

-

6
5
1
"

-

-

-

-

133
133

4
4

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
11

_

_

_

3

14

-

-

-

1

_

3
3

_

_

-

-

10
10

2

_

-

_

_

22
22
12
12

_

-

-

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

11
11

-

-

_

44
42
2

“

“

“
4

-

4

24
24

16
16

20
20

_

_

-

-

-

“

“

~

-

9
9

8
8

-

6
5

_

“

“

9
8
i
i

_
-

36
34
2
2

255
252
3
1

58
57
1
15
15
15
253
237
16
16

5
5

”

”

12
12

23
20
3
3

18

-

_
-

_
-

21
21
“

.
-

_
-

13
13

25
23

-

17

3

-

16

1

_

_

26

-

-

26

6
6

-

10
10

-

_

1
1

_

21

8

11

10

1

6

211

4

66
66

187

2

i

26
21

-

_

_

~

10
10

5.47
5.47

-

-

30
30

-

*

_

“

11

”

-

_

6
6

1

*
68

68

14
14

3

~

21
21

249

249

15
15

_

"

1
2
3
4

E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s,
F o r de fin it ion of t e r m s , s e e footnote 2, t a b le A - l .
A l l w o r k e r s w e r e a t $ 6 . 2 0 to $ 6 . 4 0 .
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t io n , and o th er pub li c u ti l it i e s .




h o li d a y s ,

and la te sh i f ts .

23
Table A-5.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations

(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
;traight-time hourly earnings of—
N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving s

Hourly earnings
Number

O c c u p a ti o n 1 and in dus try div is ion

worisers

Mean

3

Median

3

Middle range

U n d e r 2 * 00 2 * l °
an d
2 .0 0 under

3$

$
A
2.20 2 .30

T
$
2 .40 2 .50

2.30

2.40

2.50

2 .60

21 0
210

72
1
71

153
2
151

38
38

1

2

-

“

-

1

4

2

3

21

42

8

39

6

-

*

-

4

1

10

-

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING--------------------------- —

85

3.36

3.43

3.14-

3.66

_

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ---MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

7,605
1,378
6,227
354
121
510

2.98
3.28
2.91
2.89
3.23
2.87

3.03
3.31
3.01
2.86
3.11
2.94

2 .8 2 - 3.10
3 .0 7 - 3.52
2 .8 0 - 3.07
2 .6 0 - 3.03
2 .9 0 - 3.58
2 .8 2 - 3.12

46

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
(WOMEN) --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

865
54
811

2.85
3.02
2.84

2.94
2.86
2.94

2.822.742.83-

3.00
3.24
2.99

-

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

4,112
2,021
2,091
1,182
62 0
289

3.69
3.58
3.80
3.79
3.78
3.86

3.71
3.58
3.75
3.68
3.74
3.85

3 .443.183.613.453.703 .77-

3.88
3.84
4.11
4.15
3.78
4.00

-

-

-

-

ORDER FILLER S ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

1,740
330
1,410
857
4 67

3.88
3.68
3.93
3.79
4 .24

3.77
3.72
3.79
3.76
4.25

3 .7 2 - 4.07
3 .6 4 - 3.77
3 .7 4 - 4.22
3 .7 2 - 3.80
4 .0 6 - 4.36

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

PACKERS, SHIPPING ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------

76 8
343
425
394

3.70
3.71
3.69
3.74

3.76
3.79
3.76
3.76

3.713.403.733.73-

i

-

1

-

3.83
3.95
3.79
3.79

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

30

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

179
81
98
1
3
4

127
86
41
24
6

4
4
“

24
24
-

-

_
”

*

~

"

184

6

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

750 11 18
48 2
295
268
823
238
23 4
30
523
66
-

566
4 29
137
1
6
130

473
10
46 3
421
15
27

237
104
133
88
45

142
142
-

41
41
4
37
*

-

*

-

90

-

8

90

-

8

i
i

11
~
11

37
8
29

27
27

30
16
14

74
6
68

388
38 8

_

_

_

_

_

13

-

-

-

-

-

-

n o

-

“

-

-

-

-

8
2
6

119

-

175

9

13

420
418
2

6

9

9
4

2

3

4

10

3

4

10

23
11
12

32
32
30

3

9

8

15

-

-

15

1

~

16

1

i

o ver

455
369
86
47
10
2

431
43
388
14
12

-

5,20

9

-

271
29
242
47
26

-

-

79
79
-

-

6
6

a nd

5.00

5 59
40 0
159
10
11
12

-

32
32
21
-

_

3.20 3 .4 0 3 .60 3 .80 4 .0 0 4 ,2 0 4 ,4 0 4 .6 0 4 ,8 0

5.20

_

15

180
180
19
5
6

-

_

{--------s------

368 3 1 0 4
180
65
303 29 24
41
26
42
149
143

23 8
238
2
1

29 0 1135
71
50
219 1085
140
10
2
87
15

I

4 .8 0 5.00

_

”

3.73

-

_

~

3.19-

-

_

112
69
43

3.31

-

_

52
24
28

3.39

-

_

t
4.60

93
51
42

129

-

_

$

4.20 4 .40

94
36
58

GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

-

_

i

39
13
26

44 1 6
416

27
-

_

i

3.80 4 .00

761
3
758

$
2.86
3.71
2.84

46
46

i

146
8
138

$
2.143.172.13-

-

$

54
1
53

$
2.51
3.34
2.43

27

t

3 . 2 0 3 . AO 3 . 6 0

3.00

$
2.55
3.38
2.48

135
135
-

»

2.90

2,785
214
2,571

445
~
445

s
1
2.90 3.00

2.80

2.70

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

94
~
94

$
2.70 2 .80
s

2.60

_

-

2.10 2.20

s

225
29
196
196
-

*

*

9 75
23 8
737
631
29

131
35
96
75
21

123
123
51
72

302
302
70
232

7
6
1
1

20
20
20

70
70
70

_
-

2

40
40
-

*

6
6
-

43
43
-

391
51
340
326

167
99
68
68

-

45
45
-

-

20
20
-

-

-

-

_
-

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING (WOMEN) ---------------

246

3.19

3.18

3.12-

3.43

-

2

i

1

1

-

6

1

26

104

12

90

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

583
281
302
141
146

3.88
3.79
3.96
3.94
4.03

3.92
3.77
3.99
3.96
4.04

3.723.643.913 .913.95-

4.05
3.93
4.09
4.04
4.10

-

-

_

_

1

-

i

2

2

-

-

-

1

-

i

2

2

132
112
20
17

-

*

1

*

1

*

3

3

182
76
106
75
31

100
5
95
21
69

20
2
18
18

62
33
29
16
13

“

2
2
2

_
-

-

41
24
17
12
4

22

-

16
13
3

_
*

SHIPPING CLERKS --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ------------------------

363
226
137
119

3.86
3.80
3.94
3.95

3.85
3.76
3.97
3.97

3 .7 2 - 3.98
3 .7 0 - 3.88
3 .9 2 - 4.23
3 .9 3 - 4.21

25
12
13
12

3

122
50
72
71

13

43
10

15
10

_

3
-

135
134
1
-

8
6

33

5

-

_
*

~
*

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS -------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

514
96
418
231
99

3.85
3.75
3.87
3.82
4.08

3.93
3.76
3.93
3.94
3.99

3.793.533.853.903.9 4 -

45
18
27
24
1

29
25
4
4

2 75
12
263
141
52

69
12
57
36
17

20
10
10
10

1
1
1

-

-

S ee fo o tn o te s at end of tab le




3.99
4.01
3.99
3.99
4.31

1
7
2
5

-

_
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

4
4

22
3
19
15

30
11
19
15

16
6
-

5

30

*

11
3
8

6
6

-

-

8

6

24
Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations--- Continued
(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of

H ourly e . m in gs 2

O c c u p a ti o n 1 and in du st ry di v is io n

1

N um ber
of
M e an 3

M e d ian 3

M iddle ran ge 3

>

2.00 2.10
and
under
2.1 0 2.20

TRUCKDRIVERS6 ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 --------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

6,490
1,469
5,021
3,298
1,024
30 4

$
4.29
4.37
4.26
4.22
4.30
4.78

$
4.25
4.35
4.24
4.24
4.29
4.87

$
4.174.2 0 4.1 7 4.184.1 2 4.8 1 -

4 34
275
159
103

4.13
4.23
3.96
3.89

4.18
4.43
4.10
4.06

4.0 2 4.1 1 4.0 1 3.59-

2,496
165
2,331
1,545
38 3

4.18
4.21
4 . 18
4.19
4.19

4.22
4.21
4.22
4.24
4.20

4 .154.1 3 4.154.2 1 4.0 7 -

2 , 133
544
1,589
1,176
26 7

4.39
4.41
4 .38
4.28
4.84

4.28
4.36
4.27
4.26
4.88

4.224.2 4 4.2 2 4.2 1 4.83-

1,107
24 0
86 7
444
419

4 .40
4.64
4 .34
4 .29
4.38

4.35
4 .64
4.30
4.18
4.38

4.1 6 4.0 9 4.164.144.3 0 -

2,274
1,506
768
155
451
160

3.74
3.63
3.95
4.23
3.75
4.25

3.81
3.67
3.88
4.25
3.83
4.32

3.513.423.824.223.784.13-

2 73

3.71

3.75

2.40

*

t

i

f$

2.50 2.60

$

i

2.70

2.60

2.70 2 .80 2 .90

3 .7 1 - 3.78

3.00

t

1 Data limited to m e n workers except where otherwise indicated.
2 Excludes p r e m i u m pay for overtime and for w o r k on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
3 Fo r definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A - 1
.
Wo rk er s were distributed as follows: 118 at $ 1.70 to $ 1.80; 168 at $ 1.80 to $ 1.90; and 130 at $ 1.90 to $ 2 .
5 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
6 Includes all drivers, as defined, regardless of size and type of truck operated.
7 Wo rk er s were distributed as follows: 36 at $5.40 to $5.60; and 10 at $5.60 to $5.80.

4




10
10

—

3.20 3.40

17
11
6
6

t

2.80
-

2.30 2.40 2.50

3.89
3.85
4.25
4.27
3.87
4.37

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
FORKLIFT) ----------------------------------------

«

34
34
33

-

17
11
6
6

378
308
70
1
66
3

231
56
175

62

-

18
18

-

175

51
43
8
3
34
14
20
15

41
14
27
25

-

-

1
1

-

21

3.80

62

69
35
34
32

17
17
17

297
293
4
4

3.60
and

-

143 1653 3111
36
222
462
107 1431 26 4 9
40
811 21 3 7
27
326
4 19
4
36
6
-

6
4
83
-

83
27
18
11
4
7
7

32
23
9
9

30
30

$------- $ ------ $ ------

3.40

651
226
425
220
186
19

85
57
28
18

5
5

30
30

s

5.20

16

18

i

5.00

17

-

$

3.00 3 .2 0

—

5
10
10

i

2.90

3.60 3 .80 4 .0 0 4 .20 4 .4 0 4 .60 4 .8 0

4.57
4.69
4.53
4.51
4.54

TRUCKERS, POWER (FORKLIFT) -----------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 --------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

1

2.30

4.52
4.62
4.41
4.31
4.98

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ---------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5--------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------

*

4.27
4.28
4.27
4.27
4.31

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
TRAILER TYPE) -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5--------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

*

4.45
4.48
4.15
4.13

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ---------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5--------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------

2 .20

$
4.36
4.61
4.30
4.28
4.40
4.97

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) --------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 5 ---------------------

»

373
308
65

-

159
159

i

31
31

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
i

-

-

-

-

740 153 5
51
58
689 1477
237 122 5
176
189

21
3
18

-

25
25
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

330 1146
246
52
2 78
900
208
860
30

165
64
101
100
1

247
178
69

175

58

-

-

-

-

175

58

-

-

-

-

~

357
36
321
272
49

227

306

-

-

227
52
175

306
120
186

31
2
29
3

_

2
2

936
6 06
330

60
3

304
26

26

263
6
257
146
24
87

21

201

27

1

2

-

-

46
46

-

140
19
121
72

282
231
51
2
45
4

-

-

62

over

-

-

3

175

58

130
130

-

4

-

-

4
-

-

-

-

-

46
7 46
-

3

11

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

11

-

-

-

3

11

_

_

-

~

-

-

_

4.0 0

25
Table A-5a. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations—Large Establishments
( A v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u rl y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o cc u p a ti o n s st u d i ed in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s em pl o y in g 500 w o r k e r s or m o r e ,
by in d u s t r y d iv i si o n , San F r a n c i s c o —
Oakl an d, C a l i f . , Oc to b e r 1969)
Hourly eamings2

Num ber
1

Median3

Middle range3

$

S

2 .10
Mean3

*
2 .20

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ---MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4 --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------FINANCE6 ------------------------------------JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
(WOMENI -------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ----------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4 -------------- -----RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

393
146
247

3 .08

$
2 .8 6 3 .1 5 2 .7 6 -

$
3 .52
3 .72
3 .30

2 .30

2 .50

2 .40

2 .50

2 .6 0

of w orkers

re c e iv in g

st r a i g h t - t im e h o u r l y e a r nings

$

s

2 .80

i
2 .90

3 .00

3 .10

«
3 .20

2 .80

2 .90

3 .0 0

3 .1 0

3 .2 0

42
8
34

21
3
18

20
3
17

2 .6 0

$
2 .70

2 .7 0

8

%

-

1
-

-

1

”

14
1
13

10
2
8

11
11

1
7

s

$

$

$

l

s

$

$

3 .30

3 .40

3 .60

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .20

4 .40

4 .60

4 .80

5 .0

3 .3 0 J jtlO

3 .6 0

3 .80

A . 20

4 .4p

4 .6 0

4 .80

5 .00

5.2

21
2
19

54
34
20

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

78
39
39

3
-

25
8

79
39

3

17

40

117

3 .40

3.28

3 .1 8 -

3 .74

-

-

-

1

2

-

1

4

2

3

2

19

30

-

8

39

6

-

-

-

-

-

3 .01

3 .03

2 .8 5 -

3 .10

194
-

273
7

240
149

170
157

46
-

1
-

3
2

35
19

21
21

194
29

244
-

24
-

-

1

6

26

3

9

9
1

-

1

47
2

-

546

266
7
35

13

4

-

~

~

81

3 .01

3 .01

2 .98
3 .14

1311
34
5

91

2 .5 1 2 .9 1 -

185
26
62

95
55
40
-

_

3 .08
3 .04

198
148
50

_

61
44
-

1397
86

_

20

219
34

2 .8 3 2 .8 1 -

670
46
624

24

3 .4 1

21
-

-

3 .0 3 -

35
-

_

3 .29
3 .02
2 .87
2 .88

3
-

105

3 .22
2 .95
2 .91
2 .71

1
-

264

763
3 , 192
335
229

46
-

~

“

“

1

22

10

31

251
54
197

2 .92
3 .02
2 .89

3 .02
2 .8 6
3 .03

2 .7 1 2 .7 4 2 .6 0 -

3 .09
3 .24
3 .08

1
-

8
-

1
-

11
-

99

34

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

8

1

11

6
28

-

1

3
96

1 ,426
771

3 .62
3 .38
3 .9 0
3 .92
3 .86

3 .5 0
3 .4 4

3 .3 5 3 .1 2 -

4 .10
3 .5 1

_

_

_

_

-

173
173

88

-

_

-

-

-

-

133
133

207
10
197

4
-

-

87
39
48
-

159
26

4 .19
4 .20
4 .04

408
408
-

119
-

3 .6 5 3 .3 8 3 .7 9 -

-

162
29

_

86

4 .1 0
4 .14
3 .8 6

4

"

42

119

180
17

~
-

-

133
88
45

44
9

72
72

183

1

183

1

655
405
244

_
-

“

10

140
28
7

37
8
29

4
-

13
6
7

9
~

4

19
16
3

-

-

6

9

4

6

9

4

2

6

9

4

2

3
3

4

10

-

4

10

4
4

8
8

-

15

-

-

-

-

589

4 .06

4 .07

3 .7 6 -

4 .27

-

-

-

-

_

451

4 .1 7

4 .23

4 .0 1 -

4 .2 9

-

-

-

-

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------

172
123

3 .70
3 .84

3 .76
3 .93

3 .4 2 3 .4 5 -

4.31
4 .33

-

_

_

1

_

RECEIVING CLERKS -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

141
61
80
61

3 .79
3 .66
3 .8 8
3 .98

3 .78
3 .73
4 .0 4
4 .07

3
3
3
3

-

4 .07
3 .77
4 .24
4 .28

SHIPPING CLERKS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------

128
107

3 .78
3 .74

3 .76
3 .75

3 .7 2 3 .7 2 -

3 .79
3 .78

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

134
67
67
65

3 .9 1
3 .83
3 .98
4 .00

3 .95
3 .9 1
3 .96
3 .96

3
3
3
3

-

4 .02
4 .07
3 .99
3 .9 9

TRUCKDRIVERS7 ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

2 ,5 5 6

4 .29
4 .2 8
4 .3 0

4 .26

4 .2 1 -

4 .41

3

3

4 .34
4 .2 6

4 .0 5 4 .2 1 -

4 .46
4 .3 3

27

3

S ee foo tno te s at end of table,




515
2 ,041

.5
.4
.6
.8

.7
.5
.9
.9

3
7
1
3

7
8
2
2

281
73

4 .2 8
3 .78

4 .4 3
4 .01

4 .0 6 3 .2 7 -

4 .48
4 .0 6

71

3 .78

4 .02

3 .2 7 -

4 .49
4 .25
4 .57

4 .38
4 .28
4 .44

4 .2 7 4 .0 8 -

4 .37

4 .3 4

4 .86
4 .42

-

"

-

-

-

-

*

1
1
1

6
6

_

9

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

162
535
317

-

-

-

-

-

4
-

2

2

2

1

2

2

2

1

*

-

_

-

-

-

2
2

3
3

-

2

40

128

-

2

~

65

24
24

_

-

19
19

43
u

24
24

-

45
45

4
3
1
1

5
“

40
37

16
4

20
-

17
-

6
-

5
4

-

22
16
6
3

3
3

12
8

20
15

17
17

6
6

3
2

1

1

-

119
-

-

99
98

11
4

3

5

-

-

-

3
3

2

“

“

“

-

*

-

-

-

_
-

18
14
4
4

59
12
47
47

13
9
4
4

10
10
-

11
3
8
8

-

-

17
14
1

-

37

38

40

1361

388

10

8

32
8

379
96
283

111
1250

159
229

6
6

40
40

2
-

159
-

1

4

40

“

1

100
-

7
4

175
-

3

3

175

3

1
1
-

1

3

_

34
3

3

34

3
3

4 .83
4 .35

4 .3 1 4 .2 7 -

_

1

-

4 .0 6

697

_
-

_

9

1

30

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER A TONS
TRAILER TYPE) -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------ :----PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4!---------------------

“

~

3 ,95 5

ORDER FILLE RS --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 4---------------------

of—

*

under
2 .2 0

$
3.19
3 .25
3 .08

t

an d

2 .10

$
3 .1 8
3 .34

t

2 .30

$
2 .40

o
o

O c c u p a ti o n 1 and in dus try di vi si on

Number
of
workers

3
3
3

17

17
17

_
*

19

3
3

_
-

-

49
49
227

336

109

100

70

-

100
217

70

20
20

-

-

2
-

-

-

2
2

1
1
1

8
4

231
56

3

4

175

3

1

31
-

26
Table A-5a. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations—Large Establishments!— Continued
(Average straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupations studied in establishments employing 500 workers or more,
by industry division, San Francisco— Oakland, Calif., October 1969)
N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hour y earnings of—

H ourly e m in gs z

$

s

s

T R U C K E R S , POWER ( F O R K L I F T )
MA N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------NO N MA N U F A C T U R I N G -----------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 4 -------R E T A I L T R A DE -----------------

1
2
3
4
5
6
7

of
w orkers

940
762
178
38
98

M e an 3

$
3.72
3.62
4 .14
4.15
4.29

M e d ia n 3

$
3.80
3.55
4.23
4.2 4
4.33

M iddle ran ge 3

$
3.403.3 8 3.8 7 4.2 1 4.1 5 -

Under i!*10 2 . 2 0
$
and
2 * 1 0 under
2.20

Occupation1 and industry division

2.30

2.40

2.30

$
2.40 2.50

*
2.60

2.70

$
$
2.80 2.90

*
3.00

$
$
3.10 3 .2 0

*
3.30

3.40

2.50 2 .6 0

2.70

2.80 2.90 3.00

3.10

3.20 3 .30

3.40

3.60 3.80 4.00

$

t

3.60

$
t
%
$
3.80 4 .0 0 4 .20 4 .4 0

$
s
4.60 4.80

i

5.00
“

$
3.90
3.86
4.34
4.27
4.38

Data limited to m e n workers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes p r e m i u m pay for overtime and for wo r k on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
For definition of terms, see footnote 2, table A-l.
Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.
All workers were at $1.90 to $2.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
Includes all drivers, as defined, regardless of size and type of truck operated.




s

8
8

-

2
2

234
230
4
4

196
191
5
3

22
18
4
4

355
305
50
10

4.20

20
2
18
3
15

4.40 4.6 0 4.8 0

89
6
83
31
52

-

3
3
-

3

5.00

5.20

11
11
11

-

-

-

27
B.

E sta b lish m e n t P ra c tic e s and S u p p le m e n ta ry Wage P ro v isio n s

Table B-l.

Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women Office Workers

( D is t r ib u t io n o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y m in im u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r y f o r s e l e c t e d c a t e g o r i e s
o f i n e x p e r i e n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , O c to b e r 1969)
O
Other i n e x p e r ie n c e d c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s 2

Inexperienced ty p ists
Nonm anufacturing

M anufacturing
M inim um w eekly st r a ig h t- ti m e s a l a r y 1

A ll
schedules

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s s t u d i e d -------------------------------------------------

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g a s p e c i f i e d m i n i m u m __

_____________

40

All
schedules

37

N onm anufacturing

M anufacturing

B a s e d on s t a n d a r d w e e k l y h o u r s 3 o f —

A ll
in d u strie s

B a s e d on s t a n d a r d w e e k l y h o u r s 3 of—

A ll
in d u strie s
A ll
schedules

40

40

A ll
sc hed ules

37 V2

40

281

80

XXX

201

XXX

XXX

281

80

XXX

201

XXX

XXX

124

38

29

86

21

55

160

45

31

115

26

76

1
1
2
3
4
1
5
3
1
3
2
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1

1
1
2
4
1
4
2
3
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1

_
1
3
3
9
2
4
15
5
9
3
13
4
2
5
1
1
2

_
2
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1

1
2
2
2
3
2
4
2
2
1
1
1
2
2
1

-

-

-

_
2
1
2
4
1
5
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
-

4

-

$ 6 2 . 50 a nd u n d e r $ 6 5 . 0 0 ______
— - ______________
$ 65 . 00 a nd u n d e r $ 67 . 5 0 _________ __ — __ ____ __ ___
$ 6 7 . 5 0 a nd u n d e r $ 7 0 . 0 0 ________ ___ _________________
$ 7 0 . 00 a n d u n d e r $ 7 2 . 5 0 ____ ____ ____ _______________
$ 72 . 50 a nd u n d e r $ 7 5. 0 0 ____________
____________________
$ 7 5 . 00 a n d u n d e r $ 7 7 . 5 0 ___________________________________
$ 7 7 . 50 an d u n d e r $ 80 . 00 __ ___ _
_ ________ ___
$ 8 0 . 0 0 a n d u n d e r $ 8 2 . 5 0 _ _____ __ __ — _
__
____
$ 8 2 . 50 a n d u n d e r $ 8 5. 00_ ___ —
_
.— ______
$ 85 . 00 an d u n d e r $ 8 7 . 5 0 ___________________________________
$ 87. 50 an d u n d e r $ 9 0. 0 0 . _________ ~ __ ___________
$ 9 0 . 00 a n d u n d e r $ 9 2 . 50 _____________ — — ________ ___
$ 92 . 50 a n d u n d e r $ 9 5. 0 0 ______ ____ _____________________
$ 9 5 . 00 an d u n d e r $ 9 7 . 50----------------------------------------------$ 9 7 . 5 0 a nd u n d e r $ 100. 0 0 _________________________________
$ 1 0 0 . 0 0 an d u n d e r $ 102. 50 -------------------------------------------$ 102. 50 a nd u n d e r $ 105. 0 0 --------—
----------------$ 105. 00 and u n d e r $ 107. 5 0 --------------- _ _____ ________
$ 107. 50 a nd u n d e r $ 110. 0 0 ____________ __ ___ ___ __
$ 110. 00 and u n d e r $ 112. 5 0 _________ _________ __________
$ 112. 50 and u n d e r $ 115. 0 0 _________________________________
$ 115. 00 and u n d e r $ 117. 50 —
__
____
_
____
$ 117. 50 and o v e r -----------------------------------------------------------

1
1
4
3
11
5
8
16
10
12
4
16
6
6
6
2
2
2
3
1
5

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v i n g no s p e c i f i e d m i n i m u m _______________

37

13

XXX

24

120

29

XXX

91

•

_
1
1
2
6
2
3
8
3
6
1
10
2
2
3
1
-

-

-

3

3

_
2
4
4
18
15
4
19
9
7
14
4
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
4

-

_
2
2
3
10
9
3
13
6
5
10
2
2
2
1
1
1
4

43

14

XXX

29

XXX

XXX

78

21

XXX

57

XXX

XXX

1
2
7
3
4
3
5
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
1

4

1
2
4
6
25
18
8
22
5
12
8
14
6
5
3
1
2
1
3
4
2
1
7

XXX

XXX

XXX

XXX

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s w h ic h did not e m p l o y w o r k e r s

T h e s e s a l a r i e s r e l a t e to f o r m a l l y e s t a b l i s h e d m in im u m s t a r t i n g ( h ir in g ) r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s th a t a r e p a id f o r s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s .
E x c l u d e s w o r k e r s in s u b c l e r i c a l j o b s s u c h a s m e s s e n g e r o r o f f ic e g i r l .
D a t a a r e p r e s e n t e d f o r a ll s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s c o m b in e d , an d f o r th e m o s t c o m m o n s t a n d a r d w o r k w e e k s r e p o r t e d .




28




Table B-2.

Shift Differentials

( L a t e - s h ift pay p r o v isio n s fo r m a n u factu rin g p lan t w o r k e r s by type and am ount of pay d iffe r e n tia l,
San F r a n c is c o — aklan d, C a lif., O ctob er 1969)
O
(A ll p lan t w o r k e r s in m a n u factu rin g = 100 p e r c e n t)
P e r c e n t of m a n u factu rin g plan t w o r k e r s—
L a t e - s h ift pay p r o v isio n

In e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h a v in g p r o v i s i o n s 1
fo r la te sh ifts
S eco n d sh ift

T o t a l ---------------------------------------------------------

9 4 .3

A c t u a ll y w o r k in g on la t e s h i f t s

T h ir d o r o th e r
sh ift

S e c o n d s h if t

8 7 .7

1 9 .2

7 .2

N o p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l f o r w o r k on l a t e s h i f t ---------

_

P a y d i f f e r e n t i a l f o r w o r k on l a t e s h i f t -------------

9 4 .3

8 7 .7

19 .2

7 .2

5 4 .7

4 4 .2

10.8

4 .5

-

_

T h ir d o r o t h e r
s h ift

-

T y p e and am o u n t o f d iffe r e n tia l:
U n if o r m c e n t s ( p e r h o u r ) ----------------------8 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------8 V2 c e n t s _________________________________
10 c e n t s __________________________________
11 c e n t s --------------------------------------------12 o r I 2 V2 c e n t s --------------------------------

13
14
15
17
18
20
22

23
25
30
31
49

c e n t s __________________________________
o r 1»4V4 c e n t s _ _
__ __ __ __
c e n t s -------------------------------------------c e n t s --------------------------------------------c e n t s ---- ---------------------------------------c e n t s --------------------------------------------c e n t s -------------------------------------------c e n t s -------------------------------------------o r 26 c e n t s -----------------------------------c e n t s --------------------------------------------o r 33 c e n t s -----------------------------------c e n t s ---------------------------------------------

6 .7

-

1.5

2.2

2.2
.1

-

-

1.9

-

1 0 .4
3 .2
1.7
1.6

3 .3
1 0 .3
1.5
-

7 .9
-

2.2

2 .5
1 .1

-

-

6 .9
-

5 .4
4 .7
1.7
3.1
.8

2 .4
3 .4
1.5
10.2
.8
1 .1

1 6 .4

U n if o r m p e r c e n t a g e --------------------------------

20.8

5 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------6 V p e r c e n t --------------------------------------3
8 p e r c e n t -------------------------------------------10 p e r c e n t -----------------------------------------15 p e r c e n t ------------------------------------------

6.0

-

1.3
1.7

1.3
7 .0

O th e r f o r m a l p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l 3 ----------------

11.8

8.2

1 8 .8

2 7 .1

-

.8

-

.4

1 .2

-

-

.2

.8
.3
.4

2 .7
.2

1.5
-

.2

(2)
.1
.5

.7
.5
.4

.1
1 .0

5 .0

1.3

2.1
.1

-

-

.5
2.2

.6

"

.7

3 .5

1.4

1 In c lu d e s a ll p lan t w o r k e r s in e st a b lis h m e n t s c u r r e n tly o p e r a tin g , o r h av in g fo r m a l p r o v isio n s c o v e rin g la te s h ift s ,
even though the e st a b lis h m e n t s w ere not c u r r e n tly o p e ra tin g la te s h ift s .
2 L e s s than 0.05 p e r c e n t.
3 P r im a r ily co m b in atio n p lan s p ro v id in g fo r fu ll d a y 's pay fo r re d u c e d h o u rs p lu s c e n t s - p e r - h o u r d iffe r e n tia l, o r p e r c e n t
d iffe r e n tia l, a n d /o r a p aid lunch p e rio d not giv en f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s . So m e of the p lan s p ro v id e fo r fla t - s u m p a y m e n ts p e r
sh ift o r p e r w eek, o r fo r a co m b in atio n of e ith e r c e n t s - p e r - h o u r o r p e rc e n t d iffe r e n tia l p lu s a paid lunch p e r io d not giv en
fir s t-s h ift w o rk ers.

29
Table B-3. Scheduled Weekly Hours
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t an d o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a ll i n d u s t r i e s an d in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y s c h e d u l e d w e e k ly h o u r s 1
o f f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s , S a n F r a n c i s o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , O c to b e r 1969)
O

O ffice w o rk e rs

P la n t w o r k e r s
W eekly h o u rs

A ll w o r k e r s -------

------

----------

M an u­
A ll
in d u st r ie s 2 fa c tu rin g

---------------

35 h o u r s __________
_______ — ___________ ___
O ver 35 and under 3 7 V2 h o u r s ___________________
_____________________
3 7 V2 h o u r s - _______ ___
O ver 3 7 V2 and under 3 8 3/4 h o u r s _________________
3 8 3 h o u r s __________________ __ _________________
/4
O ver 3 8 3/4 and un der 40 h o u r s -------------------------40 h o u r s ________________ ____________________




100

4
( 6)
6
( 6)
( 6)
90

100

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

100

W h o lesale
tr a d e

100

R e ta il
tr a d e

100

9
-

-

-

-

-

3
-

4
-

3
-

( 6)
91

-

97

2

94

( 6)
97

A ll
M an u­
in d u st r ie s 4 fa c tu rin g

100

4
2
19
2
5
(6)
68

1 S c h e d u le d h o u r s a r e th e w e e k ly h o u r s w h ic h a m a jo r i t y o f th e f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s w e r e e x p e c t e d to w o r k ,
2 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e an d s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , an d o th e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s .
4 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r s e r v i c e s in a d d it io n to t h o s e in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .
6 L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

W h o lesale
tr a d e

100

100

100

1
4
19
11

4

15

( 6)

65

90

-

-

-

6
-

17
3
1
64

R e ta il
tr a d e

100

13
2
4
81

F in an c e 5

100
2
2
26
4
4

-

61

w h e th e r th e y w e r e p a id f o r a t s t r a i g h t - t i m e o r o v e r t i m e r a t e s .

30

Table B - 4 . Paid Holidays
( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n of p l a n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y n u m b e r of p a i d h o l i d a y s
p r o v i d e d a n n u a l l y , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k l a n d , C a l i f . , O c t o b e r 1969)
O
P lant w o r k e r s
Item

All w o rk e rs

____

__

Manu­
All
in d u s tr ie s 1 facturing

__

_______ . .

___

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
paid holid ays
_
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
no p a i d h o l i d a y s ---------------------------------------------

Public
u tilities 2

O ffice w o r k e r s
W holesale
trade

Retail
trade

All
in d u strie s 3

M anu­
facturing

Public
u tilities 2

W holesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance 4

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

98

99

100

100

98

100

100

100

100

100

100

2

1

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
4
17
1
39
(5)
1
27
1
(5 )
5
2
(5)
-

10
2
26
(5)
3
42
(5)
1
11
3
1
-

3
3
73
22
-

_
2

3
3
48
26
"
15
2
(5 )
-

(5)
1
1
9
2
47
2
3
21
1
3
1
3
1
1
2
2
1

_
1
12
4
27
4
6
34
1
(5 )
“
5
4
(5)
2

_
1
82
15
1
-

_
3
6
4
51
13
14
2
3
2
2
-

-

1
1
4
4
16
16
61
61
89
89
99
99
99
99
99

-

_
2
2
4
4
9
9
36
36
91
91
97
100
100
100
100

N u m b e r of d a y s
L e s s th a n 6 h o l i d a y s _ . . .
6 holid ays
____
_
__
6 holid ays plus 2 or 4 half day s
__ _
7 holid ays
__ __
_ __
____ __
7 h o l i d a y s p l u s 1, 2, o r 3 h a l f d a y s _ _ __
8 h o l i d a y s ___________________________________________
8 h o l i d a y s p l u s 1 h a l f d a y _________________________
8 h o l i d a y s p l u s 2 h a l f d a y s _______________________
9 holid ays
- 9 ho lid ay s plus 1 h alf day
9 holid ays plus 2 half days
9 h o l i d a y s p l u s 3 h a l f d a y s _______________________
10 h o l i d a y s _______________________________ __ _______
10 h o l i d a y s p l u s 1 h a l f d a y _______________________
11 h o l i d a y s . . ___ _________
_
11 h o l i d a y s p l u s 1 o r 2 h a l f d a y s ________________
12 h o l i d a y s _____ . . __
. ___
12 h o l i d a y s p l u s 2 h a l f d a y s _

7
30
2
38
2
5
13
-

-

1
5
(5)
43
34
2
13
1
2
-

(5 )
3
2
1
47
2
2
21
2
6
1
2
2
i
3
3
2

T otal holid ay tim e 6
1 3 d a y s _____ ______, __ . _ _ _____
_ _________
_
12 d a y s o r m o r e
_ ____ ______ ______ - ____
ll V z d a y s o r m o r e
_______ __ __ ____ ___
__ __ ________
11 d a y s o r m o r e
_ — ____
IOV2 d a y s o r m o r e _______ ____ ____ ___ __
10 d a y s o r m o r e
. 9 V2 d a y s o r m o r e
_ _
9 d ays or m o r e — — _
_____ _
__
8 V2 d a y s o r m o r e ____ _____ ___________________ _
8 d a y s o r m o r e - __ ___ _______ ___________________ _
7 V2 d a y s o r m o r e
_ _
_
—
_7 days or m o re
- __
6 days or m o re
5 days or m o re
_
_
4 days or m o re
_ _
_
____ ____ __
2 H ay s n r m nr*»

0
(5 )
3
3
8
8
37
37
76
76
93
96
96
97
98

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

13
13
21
21
61
61
91
91
98
100
100
100
100

-

22
22
95
95
97
97
97
100
100

(5 )
3
18
18
43
43
92
94
94
96
98

1
4
4
5
7
13
14
38
40
89
90
99
99
100
100
100

2
2
2
6
12
12
52
56
83
87
99
100
100
100
100

-

1
1
16
16
99
99
100
100
100
100
100

_
-

2
2
2
3
16
18
52
52
95
99
100
100
100

2
7
7
8
11
20
22
45
48
96
96
99
100
100
100
100

1 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
2 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , co m m u n ic at io n , and other public u t i l i t i e s .
3 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
4 F in a n c e , in su ran c e, and r e a l estate.
5 L e s s th a n 0. 5 p e r c e n t .
6 A l l c o m b i n a t i o n s o f f u l l a n d h a l f d a y s th a t a d d t o th e s a m e a m o u n t a r e c o m b i n e d ; f o r e x a m p l e , th e p r o p o r t i o n of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g a t o t a l o f 9 d a y s i n c l u d e s
t h o s e w it h 9 f u l l d a y s a n d no h a l f d a y s , 8 f u l l d a y s a n d 2 h a l f d a y s , 7 f u l l d a y s a n d 4 h a l f d a y s , a n d s o on. P r o p o r t i o n s t h e n w e r e c u m u l a t e d .




31

Table B-5. Paid Vacations1
(Percen t d istribution of plant and office w ork ers in all in du stries and in industry d ivisions by vacation pay
p ro v isio n s, San F ra n c is co-Oakland, C a lif., October 1969)
O ffice w o r k e r s

P lant w o r k e r s
V acatio n po licy

M anu­
All
in d u s tr ie s 2 facturing

Public
u tilities 3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

All
M anu­
in d u s t r ie s 4 factu ring

Public
utilities3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

F inance 5

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100
95
5
( 6)

100
92
8
-

100
99
1
-

100
100

100
93
7
-

100
99
( 6)
-

100
100

100
100

-

100
99
1
-

-

100
99
1
-

100
100
-

-

-

M e t h o d of p a y m e n t

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
paid v a catio n s
____ _________________ ____
L e n g t h - o f - t i m e p a y m e n t __ _ ___ _ _____ _
P e r c e n t a g e p a y m e n t __
________
O ther
____ ______
__
W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
no p a i d v a c a t i o n s _________________________________

-

-

-

"

"

■

■

12
12
2

-

2
50
7
8
(6)

3
53
8

1
47
(6)

-

A m o u n t of v a c a t i o n p a y 7
A f t e r 6 m o n th s of s e r v i c e
U n d e r 1 w e e k _ -----------------— ----- — ---_
—
—
1 w e e k _ ____
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s ___ ______________ __________________ ____ ___
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________________

1
33
5

7
19
5
0)
(6)

6
17
7
1

1 w e e k ___
56
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
4
2 w e e k s _____ ______ __ _____ ____________ ________ _
34
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s __________________________________ 3
^ weeks
_
1
4 w eeks _ _ — — — — - —
—
1
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s -----------------( 6)

59
9
24
3
3
3
-

47
1
44
8

12
2
79
3
2
1
( 6)

24
5
61
3
5
3
“

2
1
89
8
“

w e e k s ________________________
_
_
_
w e e k s _________________ ______

1
4
86
2

8
80
4

w eeks
— _ ---_
___
w e e k s ________________________

1
( 6)

-

5
23
5
-

-

-

-

-

"

_

11
16
10

54
-

( 6)
55
11
20

-

-

-

A f t e r 1 y e a r of s e r v i c e
53

63

-

16
( 6)
80
3
1

-

37

40
6

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
-

13

52

-

-

31
-

-

-

-

94
6

-

-

-

_

48

87

69
-

97
1
( 6)

-

-

-

-

-

(6)

-

-

-

-

-

_

5
95
-

(6)
95
3
1
(6)

1
92
3
4
“

1
99
-

-

100
-

1
99
_

94
6
“

5
95
-

(?)
( 6)
89
2

1
98
( 6)
-

92
3
5
-

A f t e r 2 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ____ ___
_
— - _
— — — _
O v er 1 and under 2 w ee k s _
2 w e e k s ______
__ _
_
O v er 2 and under 3 w e e k s
_ _
---- _
3 w p p Vs ______
_.
4 w e e k s ________________ ________ ___ ___ __ _____ __
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ________________________

94
6
-

_

A f t e r 3 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k__
O v e r 1 a nd u n d e r 2
2 w e e k s ____
___
O v e r 2 a nd u n d e r 3
3 w eeks .
__ _
O v er 3 and under 4
4 weeks
____
_
O v er 4 and under 5




S e e f o o t n o t e s at end o f t a b l e .

6

_
6
3

_
1
85
13
-

94
-

6
-

6

2
(6)

-

84
5
11
-

-

-

1
91
8
-

87
13
-

Table B-5. Paid Vacations1 Continued
--(Percen t d istribution of plant and office w ork ers in all in du stries and in industry d ivisions by vacation pay
p ro v isio n s, San F ra n c isc o —
Oakland, C a lif., October 1969)
O ffice w o r k e r s

P lant w o r k e r s
V a c a tio n policy

All
in d u strie s 2

M anu­
factu ring

Public
utilities 3

1
4
84
3
6
1
( 6)

_
8
75
9
6
3
-

_
i
85
13
-

_
94
6
-

5
95
-

-

-

-

(6)
1
56
4
37
2
( 6)

_
62
9
25
3
"

_
1
77
22
-

_
48
47
5

2
2
25
70
-

(‘ )
( 6)
2
5
81
1
10
( 6)

_
9
74
3
14
-

_
1
85
13
-

_
5
86
9
-

2
2
95
-

_
-

_
1
84
1
13
"

_

2
2
-

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

All
M anu­
in d u s tr ie s4 facturing

Public
utilities 3

W holesale
trad e

Retail
trade

Finance 5

A m o u n t of v a c a t i o n p a y 7— C o n t i n u e d
A f t e r 4 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ____
_
____
O ver 1 and under 2 w ee k s
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 a nd u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w p p Vs
—
. , _
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s ___
_ _
O ver 4 and under 5 w eek s -

(‘ )
( 6)
89
2
6
2
(6)

_
84
5
11
-

_
i
91
8
-

.
87
13
-

1
_
98
_
-

_
92
3
_
5
_

-

-

-

-

-

_
1
80
20
_

_
46
54
_

.
1
38
60
_

_
79
5
11
5
_

-

-

-

-

_
1
1
72
4
22
-

_
1
_
90
9
-

_
17
76
6
-

1
5
94

_
15
(6)
77
5
3
-

_
1
1
72
4
22
_

_

_

-

-

(6)

A fter 5 y e a r s of se rv ic e
1 We e k _______________________________________________
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w eeks
___
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
_ _
3 w e e k s _____ __
_
___
____
O v e r 3 a nd u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w eeks
_
_ __
O v e r 4 a nd u n d e r 5 w e e k s ________________________

_
(6)
67
3
28
2
(‘ )
(6)

_
58
2
40
( 6)

A f t e r 10 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k _____
__ __
— —
_
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 weeks
O v er 2 and u n der 3 w e e k s
3 weeks
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s ________ _______________ _________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ________________________

-

_
( 6)
9
(6)
79
3
8
(6)

-

-

A f t e r 12 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w eek_
_
_ _
_
_ _
O v e r 1 a n d u n d e r 2 w e e k s ________________________
?. w e e k s __ ____ - __,
O v e r 2 a nd u n d e r 3 w e e k s
3 w eeks
_
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s
_ _
4 w e e k s _ __ _____________ ________________— _
---O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s _______________________

(*)
(6)
2
5
80
2
10
( 6)

-

9
71
5
15

-

5
86
9
“

95
-

_
2

2
2

-

_
(6)
8
1
79
3
8
(6 )

1
88
2
9
“

17
74
9
-

_
1

_
10
44
47
-

.
1
5
_
94
-

_
14
1
77
5
3
-

A f t e r 15 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k _______________________________________________
2 w eeks _
_
_
_ _
O v e r 2 a nd u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s _____ ___ ___ _______________________________
O v er 3 and under 4 w ee k s
4 w eeks
O v er 4 and un d er 5 w ee k s
5 w eeks
—
O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ______ _
_

( 6)
2
2
54
2
39
(6)

_
2
55
6
36
-

_
1
22
77
-

-

-

64
34
-

66
29
-

_
3
(6)
66
2
28
o
(‘ >
(6)

_
-

1
57
42
1

-

32
66
-

_
6
73
21
'

S e e f o o t n o t e s a t en d o f t a b l e .




.
2
_
85
6
7
1

Table B-5. Paid Vacations1 Continued
--( P e r c e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y v a c a t io n p a y
p r o v i s i o n s , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k la n d , C a l i f . , O c to b e r 1969)
O
P lant w o r k e r s
V a c a tio n policy

O ffice w o r k e r s

Manu­
factu ring

Public
utilities 3

( 6)
2
2
22
3
62
( 6)
9
-

2
29
7
53
10
-

_
i
5
91
3
-

_
2
31
59
8
-

2
2
19
57
20
-

_
2
( 6)
35
3
53
(6)
6
(6)

_
i
16
70
14
-

_
i
94
4
-

_
10
26
55
9
-

_
6
7
82
5
-

(6)
2
2
17
1
59
( 6)
18
-

_
2
19
2
60
16
-

_
1
5
66
28
-

_
2
31
48
19
-

2
2
17
57
21
-

_
2
(6)
19
3
61
(6)
13
( 6)
1

_
1
15
(6)
65
19
-

_
1
58
41
-

_
10
26
44
21
-

_
6
5
84
5
-

23
7
66
(6)
1
1
2

(‘ )
2
2
17
1
59
(6)
18
-

2
19
2
60
16
-

1
5
64
30
-

2
31
48
19
-

2
2
17
57

_
2
(6)
16
3
63
( 6)
14
( 6)
1

_
1
15
( 6)
65

_
1
_
55

_
10
26
44

_
6
5
84

(6)
16
7
72

( 6)
2
2
17
1
59
( 6)
18

_
2
19
2
60

_
1
5
64

_
2
31
48

_
2
( 6)
16
3
62
( 6)
15
(6)
1
( 6)

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

All
Manu­
in d u s tr ie s4 facturing

Public
u tilities 3

All
in du stries 2

W holesale
trade

Retail
trade

F in a n e e 5

A m o u n t of v a c a t i o n p a y 7— C o n t i n u e d
A f t e r 20 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k __
_
2 w eeks
_
_
___ _ _
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ___ __
3 w eeks
O v e r 3 a nd u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v e r 4 a n d u n d e r 5 w e e k s ________________________
5 w eeks
O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ________________________

_
(6)
62
7
27
3
1

A f t e r 25 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ___
_
_ _
2 w eeks
O v e r 2 a n d u n d e r 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 weeks
_
__ . . .
. . . _
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s _______________________ ___ ______ _____ ___
O v e r 4 and under 5 w ee k s
____ .
5 w eeks
___
O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ________________________
6 weeks

_
(6)

A f t e r 30 y e a r s of s e r v i c e
1 w e e k ____
_ _
2 weeks
O v e r 2 and under 3 w ee k s
3 weeks
O v e r 3 a n d u n d e r 4 w e e k s ___
4 w e e k s ____________________________________________
O v er 4 and under 5 w ee k s _
_ _ _
5 w eeks
O v e r 5 a n d u n d e r 6 w e e k s ________________________
6 w eeks

-

21
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

18
(6)

44
-

21
-

5
-

1
1
2

_
1
15
(6)
65

_
1
55

_
10
26
44

_
6
5
84

M ax im u m vacation av ailab le
1 week_
2 w eeks
_ _
O v er 2 and under
3 w eeks _
___
O v er 3 and under
4 w eeks
O v er 4 and under
5 w p p Vs .
O v er 5 and under
6 w eeks
Over 6 weeks

3 w e e k s ________________________
_
4 w e e k s __ _____________________
5 w eeks

.

6 w e e k s ________________________

2
2
17
57

-

-

-

-

16

30

19

21

-

-

-

“

•

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

18

44

21

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

( 6)

_
( 6)
16
7
69

-

-

5

3
1
2
(‘ )

-

1 Includes b a sic plans only. E xcludes plans such as vacation bonus, vacatio n -sav in g s, and those plans which offer "extended" or "sa b b a tica l" benefits beyond b asic
plans to w orkers with qualifying lengths of se rv ic e . T ypical of such exclu sion s are plans in the ste e l, alum inum , and can in du stries.
2 Includes data for re a l e state and se r v ic e s in addition to those industry d ivisions shown sep arate ly .
3 T ran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public u tilities.
4 Includes data for se r v ic e s in addition to those industry d ivisions shown sep arately .
5 Fin an ce, in su ran ce, and re a l e state.
6 L e s s than 0.5 percent.
7 Includes payments other than "length of t im e ," such a s p ercentage of annual earn ings or flat-su m paym ents, converted to an equivalent tim e b a sis; for exam ple,
a payment of 2 percent of annual earnings was con sidered as 1 w eek's pay. P erio d s of se rv ice were chosen a rb itra r ily and do not n e c e ssa r ily refle ct the individual
p ro v isio n s for p ro g re ssio n . F o r exam ple, the changes in proportions indicated at 10 y e a r s ' se rv ice include changes in p rovision s occurring between 5 and 10 y e a rs.
E stim a te s are cum ulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for 3 w eeks' pay or m ore a fter 10 y e a rs includes those eligible for 3 w eeks' pay or m ore a fter fewer years
of se rv ic e .




Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
( P e r c e n t o f p l a n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a nd in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
h e a l t h , i n s u r a n c e , o r p e n s i o n b e n e f i t s , S a n F r a n c i s c o — a k l a n d , C a l i f . , O c t o b e r 1969)
O
P lan t w o rk e rs
T y p e of b e n e f i t an d
fin an cing 1

O ffice w o rk e rs
M anu­
factu ring

Public
u tilities3

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

100

100

100

100

99

76

96
80

97
56

98
75

99
41

92
55

94
59

99
52

77
45

74
64

61
50

72
38

66

82

80
39

79
47

62
38

64
17

77

89

98

87

93

98

99

93

80

91

28

22

39
36

27
25

12
12

32
23

33
19

56
52

28
27

11
2

25
16

90

83

All
in d ustries2

Manu­
factu ring

Public
u tilities3

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

---------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

W o r k e r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g a t
l e a s t 1 o f the b e n e f i t s s h o w n b e l o w ____________

100

100

100

100

96
79

97
87

97
53

86

76
64

83
78

83
25

All w o rk e rs

L i f e i n s u r a n c e - - ------------ ---------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ----------------------------A c c i d e n t a l d e a t h an d d i s m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e -------------------------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s -----------------------S i c k n e s s a nd a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e o r
s i c k l e a v e o r b o t h 6---- _ ------------ --------S i c k n e s s a nd a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e -----------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s -----------------------S i c k l e a v e ( f u l l p a y a n d no
w a i t i n g p e r i o d ) ------------------------------------S ick le a v e (p a r t ia l pay or
w a i t i n g p e r i o d ) ------------------------------------H ospitalization in su ran ce
-----------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ----------------------------S u r g i c a l i n s u r a n c e -------------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ----------------------------M e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e ------------------------- ----N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ----------------------------M a j o r m e d i c a l i n s u r a n c e — _________________
N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s ----------------------------R e t i r e m e n t p e n s i o n ------------------------------------N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s -----------------------------

22

All
in dustries*

W holesale
trade

R etail
trade

Fin an ce5

32

20

56

35

23

77

57

84

37

40

36

34

56

55

12

1

41

9

43

3

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

90
97
87
71
59
97
81

56

87

87
97
87
83
71
91
75

98
48
98
48
98
47
98
53
92
71

96
25
96
25
96
25
98
35
97
89

82

82
98
81
81
67
93
73

90

56

87

100

100

56
98
76
96
52

87
94
81
95

86

87

80

28

79

67

100

100

80

100

100

28

79

67
89
65
89
59
97
58

100

100

80
97

100

28
99
62
85
50

79

66
96
67

100
77

88

60

1
E s t i m a t e s l i s t e d a f t e r t y p e o f b e n e f i t a r e f o r a l l p l a n s f o r w h ic h a t l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t i s b o r n e b y the e m p l o y e r .
" N o n c o n t r i b u t o r y p l a n s " i n c l u d e o nl y
t h o s e p l a n s f i n a n c e d e n t i r e l y b y the e m p l o y e r .
E x c l u d e d a r e l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d p l a n s , s u c h a s w o r k m e n ' s c o m p e n s a t i o n , s o c i a l s e c u r i t y , a nd r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t .
* I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e a n d s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , a n d o t h e r p u b li c u t i l i t i e s .
4 I n c l u d e s d a t a f o r s e r v i c e s in a d d i t i o n to t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s s h o w n s e p a r a t e l y .
5 F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , a nd r e a l e s t a t e .
6 U n d u p l i c a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s i c k l e a v e o r s i c k n e s s a nd a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y b e l o w . S i c k l e a v e p l a n s a r e l i m i t e d to t h o s e w h i c h d e f i n i t e l y
e s t a b l i s h a t l e a s t the m i n i m u m n u m b e r o f d a y s * p a y th a t c a n b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e .
I n f o r m a l s i c k l e a v e a l l o w a n c e s d e t e r m i n e d on a n i n d i v i d u a l b a s i s a r e e x c l u d e d .




35

Table B-7.

Method of Wage Determination and Frequency of Payment

( P e r c e n t d is t r i b u t i o n o f p la n t a n d o f f ic e w o r k e r s in a l l i n d u s t r i e s a n d in in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s b y m e th o d o f w a g e d e t e r m i n a t i o n 1
a n d f r e q u e n c y o f w a g e p a y m e n t , S a n F r a n c i s c o - O a k la n d , C a l i f ., O c to b e r 1969)
Plant w o r k e r s
Item

All w o r k e r s




_

Manu­
All
industries z facturing

__

_ ___

Public
utilities 3

Office w o r k e r s
Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

All
Manu­
industries4 facturing

Public
utilities3

Wholesale
trade

Retail
trade

Finance

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

95
92
75
16

96
94
88
6

100
98
56
42

94
85
64
21

87
83
70
13

99
81
8
73

100
85
2
82

100
98
27
71

100
65
7
58

100
88
33
55

10

2

32

10

8

20

16

46

2

24

18

4

3

3

12

4

37

37

15

34

21

48

8
6

2
4
13

16
19
(6)

29
15

10
2

22
35

11
12

13
21
(6)

M e t h o d of w a g e d e termination1
99
79
(6)
79

P r og re ss io n ba s e d on automatic
a d v a n c e m e n t according to
P r og re ss io n ba s e d on merit
Pr o g r e s s i o n ba s e d on a
combination of length of
2
4
5
(!)
H
(|)
i

2
4
1
1

7
2

M e t h o d of determining incentive pa y of
office w o r k e r s not presented

1
1

(?)
(6)
2

3

5

13

74
11
15

59
13
29

F r e q u e n c y of w a g e p a y m e n t
57
27
16

74
18
8

20
73
7

12
31
57
(6)

1
2
3
4
5
6

F o r a description of the m e t h o d s of w a g e determination, see Introduction.
Includes data for real estate a nd services in addition to those industry divisions s h o w n separately.
Transportation, c o mm un ic at io n, and other public utilities.
Includes data for services in addition to those industry divisions s h o w n separately.
Finance, insurance, and real estate.
L e s s than 0.5 percent.

25
24
50

10
68
22

12
17
69
2

52
16
32

25
75




Appendix. Occupational Descriptions
Th e p r i m a r y purpose of preparing job descriptions for the Bureau's w a g e surveys is to assist its field staff in classifying into appropriate
occupations w o r k e r s w h o are e m p l o y e d under a variety of payroll titles an d different w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m establishment to establishment and
f r o m area to area.
This permits the grouping of occupational w a g e rates representing c o m p a r a b l e job content.
B e c a u s e of this em ph a s i s on
interestablishment and interarea comparability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions m a y differ significantly f r o m those in use in
individual establishments or those pr epared for other purposes.
In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's field economists are instructed
to exclude working supervisors; apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, part-time, temporary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER,

CLERK,

MACHINE

Biller, m a c h i n e (billing m a c h i n e ) . U s e s a special billing m a c h i n e ( M o o n Hopkins, Elliott
Fisher, Burroughs, etc., which are combination typing and adding machines) to prepare bills
and invoices f r o m customers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders, shipping m e m o ­
r a n d u m s , etc. Usually involves application of pr ed et er mi ne d discounts and shipping charges,
and entry of n e ce ss ar y extensions, which m a y or m a y not be c o m p u t e d on the billing machine,
and totals which are automatically ac cu mu la te d by machine. T h e operation usually involves
a large n u m b e r of carbon copies of the bill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold
machine.

Class B . Sorts, codes, and files unclassified material by simple (subject matter) h e a d ­
ings ~or partly classified material by finer subheadings. Pr ep a r e s simple related index and
cross-reference aids. A s requested, locates clearly identified material in files and forwards
material.
M a y p e r f o r m related clerical tasks required to maintain and service files.
Class C . P e r f o r m s routine filing of material that has already be e n classified or which
is easily classified in a simple serial classification s y s t e m (e.g., alphabetical, chronological,
or numerical). A s requested, locates readily available material in files and forwards m a ­
terial; and m a y fill out withdrawal charge. P e r f o r m s simple clerical and m a n u a l tasks re­
quired to maintain and service files.

Biller, m a c h i n e (bookkeeping m a c h i n e ) . U s e s a bookkeeping m a c h i n e (Sundstrand, Elliott
Fisher, R e m i n g t o n Rand, etc., which m a y or m a y not have typewriter keyboard) to prepare
customers' bills as part of the accounts receivable operation. Generally involves t;he simulta­
neous entry of figures on customers' ledger record. T h e m a c h i n e automatically accumulates
figures on a n u m b e r of vertical c o l u m n s and computes, and usually prints automatically the
debit or credit balances. D o e s not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. W o r k s f r o m un if or m
and standard types of sales and credit slips.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE

OPERATOR

Operates a bookkeeping m a c h i n e (Remin gt on Rand, Elliott Fisher, Sundstrand, Burroughs,
National C a s h Register, with or without a typewriter keyboard) to keep a record of business
transactions.

CLERK,

Class B. K e e p s a record of one or m o r e phases or sections of a set of records usually
requiring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Ph a s e s or sections include accounts payable,
payroll, customers' accounts (not including a simple type of billing described under biller,
machine), cost distribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. M a y check or assist
in preparation of trial balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.
ACCOUNTING

Class A. Un d e r general direction of a bo ok ke ep er or accountant, has responsibility for
keeping one or m o r e sections of a complete set of books or records relating to one phase
of an establishment's business transactions. W o r k involves posting and balancing subsidiary
ledger or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable; examining and coding
invoices or vouchers with proper accounting distribution; and requires judg me nt and experi­
ence in m a k i n g proper assignations and allocations. M a y assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m a y direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. U n d e r supervision, pe rf o r m s one or m o r e routine accounting operations such
as posting simple journal vouchers or accounts payable vouchers, entering vouchers in
voucher registers; reconciling ba nk accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by
general ledgers, or posting simple cost accounting data. This job does not require a k n o w l ­
edge of accounting and bookkeeping principles but is found in offices in which the m o r e routine
accounting w o r k is subdivided on a functional basis a m o n g several workers.




ORDER

Receives customers' orders for material or m e r c h a n d i s e b y mail, phone, or personally.
Duties involve an y combination of the following: Quoting prices to customers; m a k i n g out an order
sheet listing the items to m a k e up the order; checking prices and quantities of items on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective de partments to be filled. M a y check with credit
d e pa rt me nt to determine credit rating of customer, acknowledge receipt of orders f r o m customers,
follow up orders to see that they have be en filled, ke ep file of orders received, and check shipping
invoices with original orders.

Class A.
Ke e p s a set of records requiring a knowledge of and experience in basic
bookkeeping principles, and familiarity with the structure of the particular accounting s y s t e m
used. De te r m i n e s proper records and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each
phase of the work.
M a y prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets, and other records
by hand.

CLERK,

FILE

Class A. In an established filing s y s t e m containing a n u m b e r of varied subject matter
files, classifies and indexes file material such as correspondence, reports, technical d o c u ­
ments, etc. M a y also file this material. M a y ke ep records of various types in conjunction
with the files. M a y lead a small group of lower level file clerks.

P r e p a r e s statements, bills, and invoices on a m a c h i n e other than an ordinary or electromatic typewriter.
M a y also ke ep records as to billings or shipping charges or p e r f o r m other
clerical w o r k incidental to billing operations. F o r w a g e study purposes, billers, machine, are
classified b y type of machine, as follows;

37

CLERK,

PAYROLL

C o m p u t e s w a g e s of c o m p a n y e m p l o y e e s and enters the n e ce ss ar y data on the payroll
sheets. Duties involve: Calculating workers' earnings based on time or production records; and
posting calculated data on payroll sheet, showing information such as worker's n a m e , working
days, time, rate, deductions for insurance, and total w a g e s due. M a y m a k e out paychecks and
assist p a y m a s t e r in m a k i n g up and distributing pay envelopes.
M a y use a calculating machine.
COMPTOMETER

OPERATOR

P r i m a r y duty is to operate a C o m p t o m e t e r to p e r f o r m ma th ematical computations. This
job is not to be confused with that of statistical or other type of clerk, which m a y involve fre­
quent use of a C o m p t o m e t e r but, in which, use of this m a c h i n e is incidental to pe rf or ma nc e of
other duties.
KEYPUNCH

OPERATOR

Class A . Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination k e yp un ch m a c h i n e to
transcribe data f r o m various source d o c u m e n t s to keyp un ch tabulating cards. P e r f o r m s s a m e
tasks as lower level keyp un ch operator but, in addition, w o r k requires application of coding
skills and the m a k i n g of s o m e determinations, for example, locates on the source d o c u m e n t
the items to be punched; extracts information f r o m several documents; and searches for and
interprets information on the d o c u m e n t to determine information to be punched. M a y train
inexperienced operators.

38
KEYPUNCH

S E C R E T A R Y -- Continued

O P E R A T O R -- Continued

Class B. U n d e r close supervision or following specific procedures or instructions,
transcribe s data f r o m source d o c u m e n t s to punched cards.
Operates a nume ri ca l and/or
alphabetical or combination k e yp un ch m a c h i n e to keyp un ch tabulating cards. M a y verify cards.
Wo rk in g f r o m various standardized source d ocu me nt s, follows specified sequences w hich have
be e n coded or prescribed in detail and require little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting
of data to be punched. P r o b l e m s arising f r o m er roneous items or codes, missing information,
etc., are referred to supervisor.

d. Secretary to the he a d of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that employs, in all, over 5,000 p e r s o n s ; or
e. Secretary to the he ad of a large and important organizational s e g m e n t (e.g., a middle
m a n a g e m e n t supervisor of an organizational s e g m e n t often involving as m a n y as several
hu nd re d persons) of a c o m p a n y that employs, in all, over 25, 000 p e r s o n s .
Class C

OFFICE

BOY

O R GIRL

P e r f o r m s various routine duties such as running errands, operating m i n o r office m a ­
chines such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing mail, and other m i n o r clerical work.

SECRETARY
Assi gn ed as personal secretary, n o rm al ly to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day w o r k activities of the supervisor. W o r k s fairly inde­
pendently receiving a m i n i m u m of detailed supervision and guidance.
P e r f o r m s varied clerical
and secretarial duties, usually including m o s t of the following: (a) Receives telephone calls,
personal callers, and incoming mail, a n s w e r s routine inquiries, and routes the technical inquiries
to the proper persons; (b) establishes, maintains, and revises the supervisor's files; (c) maintains
the supervisor's calendar and m a k e s appointments as instructed; (d) relays m e s s a g e s f r o m su pe r­
visor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m e m o r a n d a , and reports prepared b y others
for the supervisor's signature to assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) p e r f o r m s
stenographic and typing work.
M a y also p e r f o r m other clerical and secretarial tasks of c o m p a r a b l e nature and difficulty.
Th e w o r k typically requires kn owledge of office routine and understanding of the organization,
p r o g r a m s , and procedures related to the w o r k of the supervisor.
Exclusions
Not all positions that are titled "secretary" possess the above characteristics. E x a m p l e s
of positions which are excluded f r o m the definition are as follows: (a) Positions which do not m e e t
the "personal" secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fully trained in secretarial
type duties; (c) stenographers serving as office assistants to a gr ou p of professional, technical,
or ma na ge ri al persons; (d) secretary positions in wh ic h the duties are either substantially m o r e
routine or substantially m o r e c o m p l e x and responsible than those characterized in the definition;
and (e) assistant type positions wh ic h involve m o r e difficult or m o r e responsible technical, a d m i n ­
istrative, supervisory, or specialized clerical duties wh ic h are not typical of secretarial work.
N O T E : Th e t e r m "corporate officer," used in the level definitions following, refers to
those officials w h o have a significant corporate-wide policymaking role with regard to m a j o r
c o m p a n y activities. T h e title "vice president," though no rm a l l y indicative of this role, does not
in all cases identify such positions. Vice presidents w h o s e p r i m a r y responsibility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual cases or transactions (e.g., approve or de n y individual loan or credit actions;
administer individual trust accounts; directly supervise a clerical staff) are not considered to be
"corporate officers" for purposes of applying the following level definitions.
Class A
a ll,

a.
S e c r e t a r y to th e c h a i r m a n o f th e b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s , in
o v e r 100 b u t f e w e r th a n 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

b.
S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r th a n th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t )
o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 b u t f e w e r th a n 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
c.
S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d ( im m e d i a t e l y b e lo w
s e g m e n t o r s u b s i d i a r y o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s ,

th e c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r le v e l ) o f a m a j o r
in a l l , o v e r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

C la ss B
a. Secretary to the c h a i r m a n of the bo a r d or president of a c o m p a n y that employs, in
all, fewer than 100 p e r s o n s ; or
b.
S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r th a n th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t )
o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 100 b u t f e w e r th a n 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
c.
S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d ( i m m e d i a t e l y b e lo w th e o f f i c e r le v e l ) o v e r e i t h e r a m a jo r
c o r p o r a t e - w i d e f u n c t io n a l a c t i v i t y ( e . g . , m a r k e t i n g , r e s e a r c h , o p e r a t i o n s , i n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s , e t c .) o r a m a j o r g e o g r a p h i c o r o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t ( e . g . , a r e g i o n a l h e a d q u a r t e r s ;
a m a j o r d iv i s i o n ) o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 b u t f e w e r th a n 2 5 ,0 0 0
e m p lo y e e s; o r




a. Secretary to an executive or m a n a ge ri al p e r s o n w h o s e responsibility is not equivalent
to one of the specific level situations in the definition for class B, but w h o s e subordinate staff
n o rm al ly n u m b e r s at least several do ze n e m p l o y e e s and is usually divided into organizational
s e g m e n t s wh i c h are often, in turn, further subdivided. In s o m e co mpanies, this level includes
a wide range of organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; o £
b. Secretary to the he a d of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that employs, in all, fe we r than 5, 000 p e r s o n s .
Class D
a. Secretary to the supervisor or he a d of a small organizational unit (e.g., fewer than
about 25 or 30 persons); o £
b. Secretary to a nonsupervisory staff specialist, professional employee, administra­
tive officer, or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
(NOTE;
M a n y c o m p a n i e s assign
stenographers, rather than secretaries as described above, to this level of supervisory or
nonsupervisory worker.)
STENOGRAPHER,

GENERAL

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation involving a n o r m a l routine vocabulary f r o m one or m o r e
persons either in shorthand or b y Stenotype or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. M a y
also type f r o m written copy. M a y maintain files, ke e p simple records, or p e r f o r m other relatively
routine clerical tasks. M a y operate f r o m a stenographic pool. D o e s not include transcribingm a c h i n e work.
(See transcribing-machine operator.)
STENOGRAPHER,

SENIOR

P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical or specialized vocabulary
such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific re search f r o m one or m o r e persons either in short­
hand or b y Stenotype or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. M a y also type f r o m written
copy.
M a y also set up and maintain files, ke ep records, etc.
OR
P e r f o r m s stenographic duties requiring significantly greater independence and responsi­
bility than stenographers, general as evidenced b y the following: W o r k requires high degree of
stenographic speed and accuracy; and a thorough working kn ow le dg e of general business and office
pr ocedures and of the specific business operations, organization, policies, procedures, files,
workflow, etc. U s e s this kn owledge in pe rf or mi ng stenographic duties and responsible clerical
tasks such as, maintaining followup files; as se mb li ng material for reports, m e m o r a n d u m s , letters,
etc.; c o m p o s i n g simple letters f r o m general instructions; reading and routing in coming mail; and
an swering routine questions, etc. D o e s not include transcribing-machine work.
S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R
C l a s s A . O p e r a t e s a s i n g l e - o r m u lt ip l e - p o s it i o n te le p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d h a n d lin g in c o m in g ,
o u t g o in g , i n t r a p l a n t o r o f f ic e c a l l s . P e r f o r m s f u l l te le p h o n e i n f o r m a t io n s e r v i c e o r h a n d le s
c o m p le x c a l l s , s u c h a s c o n f e r e n c e , c o l l e c t , o v e r s e a s , o r s i m i l a r c a l l s , e i t h e r in a d d it io n to
d o in g r o u t in e w o r k a s d e s c r i b e d f o r s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r , c l a s s B , o r a s a f u l l - t i m e
a s s i g n m e n t . ( " F u l l " te le p h o n e in f o r m a t io n s e r v i c e o c c u r s w h en th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t h a s v a r i e d
f u n c tio n s th a t a r e n o t r e a d i l y u n d e r s t a n d a b le f o r te le p h o n e i n f o r m a t io n p u r p o s e s , e . g . , b e c a u s e
o f o v e r l a p p i n g o r i n t e r r e l a t e d f u n c t io n s , a n d c o n s e q u e n t l y p r e s e n t f r e q u e n t p r o b l e m s a s to
w h ic h e x t e n s io n s a r e a p p r o p r i a t e f o r c a l l s . )
C l a s s B . O p e r a t e s a s i n g l e - o r m u l t ip l e - p o s it i o n t e le p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d h a n d lin g in c o m in g ,
o u t g o in g , i n t r a p l a n t o r o f f i c e c a l l s . M a y h a n d le r o u t in e lo n g d i s t a n c e c a l l s a n d r e c o r d t o l l s .
M a y p e r f o r m l i m i t e d te le p h o n e i n f o r m a t io n s e r v i c e . ( " L i m i t e d " te le p h o n e in f o r m a t io n s e r v i c e
o c c u r s if th e f u n c tio n s o f th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e r v i c e d a r e r e a d i l y u n d e r s t a n d a b le f o r te le p h o n e
i n f o r m a t io n p u r p o s e s , o r i f th e r e q u e s t s a r e r o u t in e , e . g . , g iv in g e x t e n s io n n u m b e r s w h en
s p e c i f i c n a m e s a r e f u r n is h e d , o r i f c o m p le x c a l l s a r e r e f e r r e d to a n o th e r o p e r a t o r .)

39
S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R - R E C E P T I O N I S T

T A B U L A T I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R --- C o n tin u e d

In a d d it io n to p e r f o r m i n g d u t ie s o f o p e r a t o r on a s i n g l e - p o s i t i o n o r m o n i t o r - t y p e s w i t c h ­
b o a r d , a c t s a s r e c e p t i o n i s t a n d m a y a l s o ty p e o r p e r f o r m r o u t in e c l e r i c a l w o rk a s p a r t o f r e g u l a r
d u tie s.
T h is ty p in g o r c l e r i c a l w o rk m a y ta k e th e m a jo r p a r t o f th is w o r k e r ^ tim e w h ile at
sw itc h b o a rd .

T R A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R ,

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
C l a s s A . O p e r a t e s a v a r i e t y o f t a b u la t in g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t in g m a c h i n e s , t y p ic a ll y
in c lu d in g su c h m a c h in e s a s th e t a b u l a t o r , c a l c u l a t o r , i n t e r p r e t e r , c o l l a t o r , a n d o t h e r s .
P e r f o r m s c o m p le te r e p o r t i n g a s s i g n m e n t s w ith o u t c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n , an d p e r f o r m s d if f ic u lt
w ir i n g a s r e q u i r e d .
T h e c o m p le t e r e p o r t i n g a n d t a b u la t in g a s s i g n m e n t s t y p ic a ll y in v o lv e a
v a r i e t y o f lo n g a n d c o m p le x r e p o r t s w h ic h o fte n a r e of i r r e g u l a r o r n o n r e c u r r in g ty p e r e ­
q u i r in g s o m e p la n n in g an d s e q u e n c in g o f s t e p s to b e ta k e n . A s a m o r e e x p e r i e n c e d o p e r a t o r ,
i s t y p i c a l l y in v o lv e d in tr a i n in g new o p e r a t o r s in m a c h in e o p e r a t i o n s , o r p a r t i a l l y t r a i n e d
o p e r a t o r s in w ir in g f r o m d i a g r a m s a n d o p e r a t in g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g a n d c o m p le x r e p o r t s .
D o e s not in c lu d e w o r k in g s u p e r v i s o r s p e r f o r m i n g t a b u l a t in g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t io n s a n d d a y - t o d a y s u p e r v i s i o n o f th e w o rk a n d p r o d u c tio n of a g r o u p o f t a b u l a t in g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r s .
C l a s s B . O p e r a t e s m o r e d if f i c u l t t a b u la t in g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t in g m a c h in e s s u c h a s th e
t a b u l a t o r a n d c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d it io n to th e s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c e r , an d c o l l a t o r .
T h is w o rk i s
p e r f o r m e d u n d e r s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s a n d m a y in c lu d e th e p e r f o r m a n c e o f s o m e w ir in g f r o m
d i a g r a m s . T h e w o rk t y p ic a ll y in v o l v e s , f o r e x a m p le , t a b u l a t io n s in v o lv in g a r e p e t it i v e
a c c o u n t in g e x e r c i s e , a c o m p le te b u t s m a l l t a b u la t in g s t u d y , o r p a r t s o f a lo n g e r a n d m o r e
c o m p le x r e p o r t . S u c h r e p o r t s an d s t u d i e s a r e u s u a l l y o f a r e c u r r i n g n a tu r e w h e r e th e p r o ­
c e d u r e s a r e w e ll e s t a b l i s h e d .
M a y a l s o in c lu d e th e t r a i n in g o f new e m p l o y e e s in th e b a s i c
o p e r a t io n o f th e m a c h in e .

PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER

c o m p u t e r operators are classified as follows:

Class A . Oper at es independently, or under only general direction, a c o m p u t e r running
p r o g r a m s with m o s t of the following characteristics: N e w p r o g r a m s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requirements are of critical im po rt an ce to m i n i m i z e do wntime; the
p r o g r a m s are of c o m p l e x design so that identification of error source often requires a wo rk in g
know le dg e of the total p r o g r a m , and alternate p r o g r a m s m a y not be available. M a y give
direction and guidance to lower level operators.
Class B . Oper at es independently, or under only general direction, a c o m p u t e r running
p r o g r a m s with m o s t of the following characteristics: M o s t of the p r o g r a m s are established
production runs, typically run on a regularly recurring basis; there is little or no testing
of n e w p r o g r a m s required; alternate p r o g r a m s are provided in case original p r o g r a m needs
m a j o r change or cannot be corrected within a reasonable time. In c o m m o n error situations,
diagnoses cause and takes corrective action. This usually involves applying previously p r o ­
g r a m e d corrective steps, or using standard correction techniques.

GENERAL

P r i m a r y d u ty i s to t r a n s c r i b e d ic t a t io n in v o lv in g a n o r m a l r o u t in e v o c a b u la r y f r o m
tr a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e r e c o r d s .
M a y a l s o ty p e f r o m w r it t e n c o p y an d d o s i m p le c l e r i c a l w o r k .
W o r k e r s t r a n s c r i b i n g d ic t a t io n in v o lv in g a v a r i e d t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u la r y su c h a s le g a l
b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s on s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h a r e no t in c lu d e d . A w o r k e r w ho t a k e s d ic t a t io n in s h o r t ­
h an d o r b y S te n o ty p e o r s i m i l a r m a c h in e i s c l a s s i f i e d a s a s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l .
T Y P IS T
U s e s a t y p e w r it e r to m a k e c o p i e s o f v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l o r to m a k e out b i l l s a f t e r c a l c u l a ­
t i o n s h a v e b e e n m a d e b y a n o th e r p e r s o n . M a y in c lu d e ty p in g o f s t e n c i l s , m a t s , o r s i m i l a r m a t e ­
r i a l s f o r u s e in d u p lic a t in g p r o c e s s e s . M a y do c l e r i c a l w o r k in v o lv in g li t t l e s p e c i a l t r a i n in g , su c h
a s k e e p in g s i m p l e r e c o r d s , f il in g r e c o r d s a n d r e p o r t s , o r s o r t i n g a n d d is t r i b u t i n g in c o m in g m a i l .
C l a s s A . P e r f o r m s one o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g : T y p in g m a t e r i a l in f in a l f o r m w h en it
in v o l v e s c o m b in in g m a t e r i a l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s o r r e s p o n s i b i l i t y fo r c o r r e c t s p e l l i n g ,
s y l l a b i c a t i o n , p u n c t u a tio n , e t c ., o f t e c h n ic a l o r u n u s u a l w o r d s o r f o r e i g n la n g u a g e m a t e r i a l ;
a n d p la n n in g la y o u t a n d ty p in g o f c o m p lic a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b l e s to m a in t a in u n if o r m i t y a n d
b a l a n c e in s p a c in g .
M a y ty p e r o u t in e f o r m l e t t e r s v a r y in g d e t a i l s to s u it c i r c u m s t a n c e s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g : C o p y ty p in g f r o m r o u g h o r c l e a r d r a f t s ;
r o u t in e ty p in g o f f o r m s , i n s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c .; a n d s e t t in g up s i m p le s t a n d a r d t a b u l a t io n s ,
o r c o p y in g m o r e c o m p le x t a b l e s a l r e a d y s e t u p a n d s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .

TECHNICAL
COMPUTER

OPERATOR

Mo nitors and operates the control console of a digital c o m p u t e r to process data according
to operating instructions, usually pr ep a r e d b y a p r o g r a m e r . W o r k includes m o s t of the following:
Studies instructions to de termine equi pm en t setup and operations; loads equi pm en t with required
items (tape reels, cards, etc.); switches n e ce ss ar y auxiliary equi pm en t into circuit, and starts
and operates computer; m a k e s adjustments to c o m p u t e r to correct operating p r o b l e m s and m e e t
special conditions; reviews errors m a d e during operation and de termines cause or refers p r o b l e m
to supervisor or p r o g r a m e r ; and maintains operating records. M a y test an d assist in correcting
program.
F o r w a g e study purposes,

C l a s s C . O p e r a t e s s i m p le t a b u la t in g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t in g m a c h in e s su c h a s th e
s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c in g p u n ch , c o l l a t o r , e t c ., w ith s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s .
M a y in c lu d e s i m p le
w ir in g f r o m d i a g r a m s a n d s o m e f il in g w o r k . T h e w o rk t y p ic a ll y in v o lv e s p o r t io n s o f a w o r k
u n it, f o r e x a m p le , in d iv id u a l s o r t in g o r c o ll a t in g r u n s o r r e p e t it i v e o p e r a t io n s .

PROGRAMER,

BUSINESS

Converts statements of business pr oblems, typically pr ep a r e d b y a s y s t e m s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed instructions wh i c h are required to solve the p r o b l e m s b y automatic data
processing equipment.
W o r k i n g f r o m charts or diagrams, the p r o g r a m e r develops the precise
instructions which, w h e n entered into the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in co de d language, cause the m a n i p u ­
lation of data to achieve desired results. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Applies know le dg e
of c o mp ut er capabilities, ma th em at ic s, logic e m p l o y e d b y computers, and particular subject matter
involved to analyze charts and d i a g r a m s of the p r o b l e m to be p r o g r a m e d .
De velops sequence
of p r o g r a m steps, writes detailed flow charts to s h o w order in wh i c h data will be processed;
converts these charts to coded instructions for m a c h i n e to follow; tests an d corrects p r o g r a m s ;
pr epares instructions for operating personnel during production run; analyzes, reviews, and alters
p r o g r a m s to increase operating efficiency or adapt to n e w requirements; maintains records of
p r o g r a m d e ve lo pm en t and revisions. ( N O T E : W o r k e r s pe rf or mi ng both s y s t e m s analysis a nd p r o ­
g r a m i n g should be classified as s y s t e m s analysts if this is the skill us ed to dete rm in e their pay.)
D o e s not include e m p l o y e e s primarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of
other electronic data processing ( E D P ) em ployees, or p r o g r a m e r s primarily co ncerned with
scientific an d/ or engineering pr ob le ms .
F o r w a g e study purposes,

p r o g r a m e r s are classified as follows:

Class A . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s wh ic h
require c o m p e t e n c e in all phases of p r o g r a m i n g concepts and practices. W o r k i n g f r o m dia­
g r a m s a nd charts wh i c h identify the nature of desired results, m a j o r processing steps to be
accomplished, an d the relationships b e t w e e n various steps of the p r o b l e m solving routine;
plans the full range of p r o g r a m i n g actions ne e d e d to efficiently utilize the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m
in achieving desired end products.

OR
O p er at es under direct supervision a c o m p u t e r running p r o g r a m s or s e g m e n t s of p r o g r a m s
with the characteristics described for class A. M a y assist a higher level operator b y inde­
pendently p e rf or mi ng less difficult tasks assigned, and p e rf or mi ng difficult tasks following
detailed instructions and with frequent review of operations pe rformed.
Class C . W o r k s on routine p r o g r a m s under close supervision.
Is expected to develop
w o rk in g k n ow le dg e of the c o m p u t e r equi pm en t us ed and ability to detect p r o b l e m s involved in
running routine p r o g r a m s . Usually has received s o m e f o rm al training in c o m p u t e r operation.
M a y assist higher level operator on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .




At this level, p r o g r a m i n g is difficult be ca us e c o m p u t e r e q ui pm en t m u s t be organized to
pr od uc e several interrelated but diverse products f r o m n u m e r o u s and diverse data elements.
A wi de variety and extensive n u m b e r of internal processing actions m u s t occur. This requires
such actions as d e ve lo pm en t of c o m m o n operations w h i c h can be reused, establishment of
linkage points b e t w e e n operations, adjustments to data w h e n p r o g r a m requirements exceed
c o m p u t e r storage capacity, and substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elements
to f o r m a highly integrated p r o g r a m .
M a y provide functional direction to lower level p r o g r a m e r s w h o are assigned to assist.

40
COMPUTER

PROGRAMER,

COMPUTER

B U S I N E S S — Continued

Class B . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on relatively simple
p r o g r a m s , or on simple s e g m e n t s of c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s (or segments) usually
process information to pr od uc e data in two or three varied sequences or formats. Reports
and listings are pr od u c e d b y refining, adapting, arraying, or m a k i n g m i n o r additions to or
deletions f r o m input data wh i c h are readily available.
While n u m e r o u s records m a y be
processed, the data have be e n refined in prior actions so that the accu ra cy and sequencing
of data ca n be tested b y using a few routine checks.
Typically, the p r o g r a m deals with
routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s (as described for class A) under close direction of a higher
level p r o g r a m e r or supervisor.
M a y assist higher level p r o g r a m e r b y independently p e r ­
forming less difficult tasks assigned, and pe rf or mi ng m o r e difficult tasks under fairly close
direction.
M a y guide or instruct lower level p r o g r a m e r s .

SYSTEMS ANALYST,

BUSINESS

Analyzes business p r o b l e m s to formulate pr oc ed ur es for solving t h e m b y use of electronic
data processing equipment. De velops a co mplete description of all specifications ne ed ed to enable
p r o g r a m e r s to pr ep ar e required digital c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s . W o r k involves m o s t of the following:
An alyzes subject-matter operations to be a u to ma te d and identifies conditions and criteria required
to achieve satisfactory results; specifies n u m b e r and types of records, files, and d o c u m e n t s to
be used; outlines actions to be p e r f o r m e d b y personnel and c o m p u t e r s in sufficient detail for
presentation to m a n a g e m e n t and for p r o g r a m i n g (typically this involves preparation of w o r k and
data flow charts); coordinates the d e ve lo pm en t of test p r o b l e m s and participates in trial runs of
n e w and revised systems; and r e c o m m e n d s equi pm en t changes to obtain m o r e effective overall
operations. ( N O T E : W o r k e r s p e rf or mi ng both s y s t e m s analysis and p r o g r a m i n g should be clas­
sified as s y st em s analysts if this is the skill us ed to de termine their pay.)
D o e s not include e m p l o y e e s p rimarily responsible for the m a n a g e m e n t or supervision of
other electronic data processing ( E D P ) employees, or s y st em s analysts primarily conc er ne d with
scientific or engineering problems.
F o r w a g e study purposes,

s y s t e m s analysts are classified as follows:

Class A . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s
involving all phases of s y s t e m s analysis. P r o b l e m s are c o m p l e x be ca us e of diverse sources
of input data and multiple-use requirements of output data. (For example, develops an inte­
grated production scheduling, inventory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis record in
wh i c h every item of each type is automatically p r oc es se d through the full s y s t e m of records
and appropriate followup actions are initiated b y the computer.) Confers with pe rs on s c o n ­
cerned to de termine the data processing p r o b l e m s and advises subject-matter personnel on
the implications of n e w or revised s y st em s of data processing operations.
Makes re co m­
mendations, if needed, for approval of m a j o r s y st em s installations or changes and for
obtaining equipment.
M a y provide functional direction to lower level s y st em s analysts w h o are assigned to
assist.
Class B . W o r k s independently or under only general direction on p r o b l e m s that are
relatively uncomplicated to analyze, plan, p r o g r a m , and operate. P r o b l e m s are of limited
complexity be ca us e sources of input data are h o m o g e n e o u s and the output data are closely
related. (For example, develops s y st em s for maintaining depositor accounts in a bank,

MAINTENANCE
CARPENTER,

MAINTENANCE

P e r f o r m s the carpentry duties n e ce ss ar y to construct and maintain in good repair building
w o o d w o r k and eq uipment such as bins, cribs, counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs,
casings, and trim m a d e of w o o d in an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Planning
and laying out of w o r k f r o m blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions using a variety




B U S I N E S S — Continued

OR
W o r k s on a s e g m e n t of a c o m p l e x data processing s c h e m e or system, as described for
class A. W o r k s independently on routine assignments and receives instruction and guidance
on c o m p l e x assignments. W o r k is re viewed for a c cu ra cy of judgment, co mpliance with in­
structions, and to insure pr op er alinement with the overall system.
Class C . W o r k s under i m m e d i a t e supervision, carrying out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. A s s i g n m e n t s are designed to develop and expand practical experience
in the application of pr oc ed ur es and skills required for s y s t e m s analysis work. F o r example,
m a y assist a higher level s y st em s analyst b y preparing the detailed specifications required
b y p r o g r a m e r s f r o m information developed b y the higher level analyst.
DRAFTSMAN

Class C . M a k e s practical applications of p r o g r a m i n g practices and concepts usually
learned in fo rm al training courses. A s s i g n m e n t s are designed to develop c o m p e t e n c e in the
application of standard proc ed ur es to routine pr oblems. Receives close supervision on n e w
aspects of assignments; and w o r k is re viewed to verify its a c cu ra cy and c o n f o r m a n c e with
required procedures.
COMPUTER

SYSTEMS ANALYST,

maintaining accounts receivable in a retail establishment, or maintaining inventory accounts
in a manufacturing or wholesale establishment.) Confers with p e rs on s co ncerned to determine
the data processing p r o b l e m s and advises subject-matter personnel on the implications of the
data processing s y s t e m s to be applied.

Class A . Plans the graphic presentation of c o m p l e x items having distinctive design
features that differ significantly f r o m established drafting precedents. W o r k s in close su p ­
port with the design originator, and m a y r e c o m m e n d m i n o r design changes.
Analyzes the
effect of each change on the details of form, function, and positional relationships of c o m ­
ponents and parts.
W o r k s with a m i n i m u m of supervisory assistance.
C o m p l e t e d w o r k is
reviewed b y design originator for consistency with prior engineering determinations.
May
either pr ep ar e drawings, or direct their preparation b y lower level draftsmen.
Class B . P e r f o r m s nonroutine and c o m p l e x drafting as si gn me nt s that require the appli­
cation of m o s t of the standardized dr aw in g techniques regularly used.
Duties typically in­
volve such w o r k as: P r e p a r e s wo rk in g dr awings of su bassemblies with irregular shapes,
multiple functions, and precise positional relationships b e tw ee n compon en ts ; prep ar es archi­
tectural drawings for construction of a building including detail dr awings of foundations, wall
sections, floor plans, and roof. U s e s accepted form ul as and m a n u a l s in m a k i n g nece ss ar y
computations to de termine quantities of materials to be used, load capacities, strengths,
stresses, etc.
Receives initial instructions, requirements, and advice f r o m supervisor.
C o m p l e t e d w o r k is ch ec ke d for technical adequacy.
Class C . P r e p a r e s detail drawings of single units or parts for engineering, construction,
manufacturing, or repair purposes. T y p e s of dr awings pr ep a r e d include isometric projections
(depicting three diminsions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning of
c o m p o n e n t s and co nv ey ne e d e d information. Consolidates details f r o m a n u m b e r of sources
and adjusts or transposes scale as required. Suggested m e t h o d s of approach, applicable
precedents, an d advice on source materials are given with initial assignments. Instructions
are less complete w h e n assignments recur.
W o r k m a y be spot-checked during progress.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings pr ep a r e d b y others b y placing tracing cloth or pa pe r over
drawings and tracing with pe n or pencil.
(Does not include tracing limited to plans primarily
consisting of straight lines and a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
a n d /or
P r e p a r e s simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
during progress.
NURSE,

W o r k is closely supervised

INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

A registered nurse w h o gives nursing service under general m e di ca l direction to ill or
injured e m p l o y e e s or other pe rs on s w h o b e c o m e ill or suffer an accident on the p r e m i s e s of a
factory or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping records
of patients treated; preparing accident reports for c o m p en sa ti on or other purposes; assisting in
physical examinations and health evaluations of applicants and employees; and planning an d c a r r y ­
ing out p r o g r a m s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.

D POWER PLANT
CARPENTER,

M A I N T E N A N C E — Continued

of carpenter's handtools, portable p o w e r tools, and standard m e a s u r i n g instruments; m a k i n g
standard shop computations relating to di me ns io ns of work; and selecting materials ne cessary
for the work. In general, the w o r k of the ma in te na nc e carpenter requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

41
ELECTRICIAN,

MAINTENANCE

MECHANIC,

P e r f o r m s a variety of electrical trade functions such as the installation, maintenance,
or repair of equipment for the generation, distribution, or utilization of electric en er gy in an
establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of
electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, controllers, circuit b r e a k ­
ers, mo to rs , heating units, conduit systems, or other transmission equipment; w o rk in g f r o m
blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the
electrical s y s t e m or equipment; w o rk in g standard computations relating to load requirements of
wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician's handtools and m e a s u r i n g and
testing instruments. In general, the w o r k of the ma intenance electrician requires rounded train­
ing and experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
ENGINEER,

STATIONARY

Operates and maintains and m a y also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the establishment in w h i c h e m p l o y e d with power,
heat, refrigeration, or air-conditioning. W o r k involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as s t e a m engines, air co m p r e s s o r s , generators, motors, turbines, ventilating and refrig­
erating equipment, s t e a m boilers and boiler-fed wa te r p u m p s ; m a k i n g equipment repairs; and
keeping a record of operation of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. M a y also s u ­
pervise these operations. H e a d or chief engineers in establishments employing m o r e than one
engineer are excluded.
FIREMAN,

STATIONARY

BOILER

Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in wh i c h e m p l o y e d with heat, power,
or steam. F e e d s fuels to fire b y ha nd or operates a me ch an ic al stoker, or gas or oil burner;
and checks water and safety valves. M a y clean, oil, or assist in repairing bo il er ro om equipment.
HELPER,

MAINTENANCE

TRADES

Assists one or m o r e w o r k e r s in the skilled ma intenance trades, b y pe rf or mi ng specific
or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a w o r k e r supplied with materials and tools;
cleaning w o rk in g area, machine, and equipment; assisting j o u r n e y m a n by holding materials or
tools; and perf or mi ng other unskilled tasks as directed b y jo ur ne ym an .
T h e kind of w o r k the
helper is permitted to p e r f o r m varies f r o m trade to trade: In s o m e trades the helper is c o n ­
fined to supplying, lifting, and holding materials and tools and cleaning w o rk in g areas; and in
others he is permitted to p e r f o r m specialized m a c h i n e operations, or parts of a trade that are
also p e r f o r m e d by w o r k e r s on a full-time basis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR,

TOOLROOM

Specializes in the operation of one or m o r e types of m a c h i n e tools, such as jig borers,
cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes, or milling machines, in the construction of
m a c h i n e - s h o p tools, gages, jigs, fixtures, or dies. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: P l a n ­
ning and performing difficult m a chining operations; processing items requiring complicated setups
or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; selecting feeds,
speeds, tooling, and operation sequence; an d m a k i n g nece ss ar y adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. M a y be required to recognize w h e n tools need d r e s s ­
ing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils. F o r cr o s s ­
industry w a g e study purposes, machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops
are excluded f r o m this classification.
MACHINIST,

MAINTENANCE

P r o d u c e s re placement parts and n e w parts in m a k i n g repairs of metal parts of m e c h a n ­
ical equipment operated in an establishment. W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Interpreting
written instructions and specifications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m a ­
chinist's handtools and precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; setting up and operating standard m a c h i n e
tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating to
dimensions of work, tooling, feeds, and speeds of machining; know le dg e of the w o rk in g properties
of the c o m m o n metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and as se mb li ng parts into me ch an ic al equipment.
In general, the machinist's w o r k
norm al ly requires a r ounded training in m a c h i n e - s h o p practice usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
MECHANIC,

AUTOMOTIVE

(MAINTENANCE)

Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an establishment. W o r k in­
volves m o s t of the following: E x a m i n i n g automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
disassembling equipment and p e rf or mi ng repairs that involve the use of such handtools as
w r en ch es , gages, drills, or specialized eq uipment in disassembling or fitting parts; replacing
br o k e n or defective parts f r o m stock; grinding and adjusting valves; re as se mb li ng and installing




AUTOMOTIVE

( M A I N T E N A N C E ) — Continued

the various assemblies in the vehicle and m a k i n g nece ss ar y adjustments; and alining wheels,
adjusting brakes and lights, or tightening bo d y bolts. In general, the w o r k of the automotive
m e c h a n i c requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal a p p r e n ­
ticeship or equivalent training and experience.
MECHANIC,

MAINTENANCE

Repairs m a c h i n e r y or me ch an ic al equipment of an establishment.
W o r k involves m o s t
of the following: E x a m i n i n g m a c h i n e s and mechanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dismantling or partly dismantling m a c h i n e s and pe rf or mi ng repairs that ma i n l y involve the use
of handtools in scraping and fitting parts; replacing b r ok en or defective parts with items obtained
f r o m stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a m a c h i n e shop or sending of the
m a c h i n e to a m a c h i n e shop for m a j o r repairs; preparing written specifications for m a j o r repairs
or for the production of parts ordered f r o m m a c h i n e shop; reassembling machines; and m a k i n g
all n e ce ss ar y adjustments for operation. In general, the w o r k of a ma in te na nc e m e c h a n i c r e ­
quires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience. Ex cluded f r o m this classification are w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y
duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs n e w m a c h i n e s or he av y equipment, and dismantles and installs ma ch i n e s or
he a v y equipment w h e n changes in the plant layout are required. W o r k involves m o s t of the fol­
lowing: Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using
a variety of handtools and rigging; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating to stresses,
strength of materials, and centers of gravity; alining and balancing of equipment; selecting stand­
ard tools, equipment, and parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order p o w e r
transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers.
In general, the millwright's w o r k
n o rm al ly requires a rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a fo rm al
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
OILER
Lubricates, with oil or grease, the m o v i n g parts
equipment of an establishment.
PAINTER,

or we ar in g surfaces

of me chanical

MAINTENANCE

Paints and redecorates walls, w o o d w o r k , and fixtures of an establishment.
W o r k in­
volves the following: K n o w l e d g e of surface peculiarities and types of paint required for different
applications; preparing surface for painting by r e m o v i n g old finish or b y placing putty or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. M a y m i x colors, oils,
white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency. In general, the
w o r k of the ma in te na nc e painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
PIPEFITTER,

MAINTENANCE

Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establishment.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Laying out of w o r k and m e a s u r i n g to lo­
cate position of pipe f r o m drawings or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe
to correct lengths with chisel and h a m m e r or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machine; th read­
ing pipe with stocks a nd dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or p o w e r- dr iv en machines; as se mb li ng
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers; m a k i n g standard shop computations relating
to pressures, flow, and size of pipe required; and m a k i n g standard tests to determine wh et he r
finished pipes m e e t specifications. In general, the w o r k of the ma intenance pipefitter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience. W o r k e r s primarily engaged in installing and repairing building sanita­
tion or heating s y s t e m s are excluded.
PLUMBER,

MAINTENANCE

K e e p s the pl umbing s y s t e m of an establishment in good order. W o r k involves: K n o w l e d g e
of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents and traps in plumbing system; installing or r e ­
pairing pipes and fixtures; and opening clogged drains with a plunger or p l u m b e r ' s snake. In
general, the w o r k of the maintenance p l u m b e r requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
SHEET-METAL

WORKER,

MAINTENANCE

Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal equipment and fix­
tures (such as m a c h i n e guards, grease pans, shelves, lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts,
metal roofing) of an establishment.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Planning and laying
out all types of sheet-metal ma in te na nc e w o r k f r o m blueprints, models, ox other specifications;
setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal wo rk in g machines; using a variety of

42
SHEET-METAL

WORKER,

M A I N T E N A N C E -- Continued

TOOL AND

handtools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing sheetmetal articles as required. In general, the w o r k of the m a in te na nc e sheet-metal w o r k e r requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.
TOOL AND

DIE M A K E R

(Die ma k e r ; jig m a k e r ; tool m a k e r ; fixture m a k e r ; gage m a ke r)
Constructs and repairs m a c h i n e - s h o p tools, gages, jigs, fixtures or dies for forgings,
punching, and other m e t a l- fo rm in g work.
W o r k involves m o s t of the following: Planning and
laying out of w o r k f r o m models, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;

D I E M A K E R -- Continued

using a variety of tool and die m a k e r ' s handtools and precision m e a s u r i n g instruments; u n d e r ­
standing of the w o rk in g properties of c o m m o n metals and alloys; setting up and operating of
m a c h i n e tools and related equipment; m a k i n g n e ce ss ar y shop computations relating to dimensions
of work, speeds, feeds, and tooling of machines; heat-treating of metal parts during fabrication
as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities; wo rk in g to close tolerances;
fitting and as se mb li ng of parts to prescribed tolerances and allowances; and selecting appropriate
materials, tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die m a k e r ' s w o r k requires a rounded
training in m a c h i n e - s h o p and t o ol ro om practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experience.
F o r cross-industry w a g e study purposes,
shops are excluded f r o m this classification.

tool and

die m a k e r s in tool and die jobbing

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND

SHIPPING A N D

WATCHMAN

G u a r d . P e r f o r m s routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour, maintaining
order, using a r m s or force w h e r e necessary.
Includes g a t e m e n w h o are stationed at gate
and check on identity of e m p l o y e e s and other persons entering.
W a t c h m a n . M a k e s rounds of p r e m i s e s periodically in protecting property against fire,
theft, and illegal entry.
JANITOR,

PORTER,

OR

CLEANER

RECEIVING CL E R K

P r e p a r e s m e r c h a n d i s e for shipment, or receives and is responsible for incoming ship­
m e n t s of m e r c h a n d i s e or other materials. Shipping w o r k involves: A knowledge of shipping
procedures, practices, routes, available m e a n s of transportation, and rate; and preparing re c ­
ords of the goods shipped, m a k i n g up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and
keeping a file of shipping records. M a y direct or assist in preparing the m e r c h a n d i s e for ship­
ment.
Receiving w o r k involves: Verifying or directing others in verifying the correctness of
shipments against bills of lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting
d a m a g e d goods; routing m e r c h a n d i s e or materials to proper departments; and maintaining n e c e s ­
sary records and files.

(Sweeper; c h a r w o m a n ; janitress)
F o r w a g e study purposes,
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory wo rk in g areas and w a s h r o o m s , or
p r e m i s e s of an office, apar tm en t house, or c o m m e r c i a l or other establishment. Duties involve
a combination of the following; Sweeping, m o p p i n g or scrubbing, and polishing floors; r e m o v i n g
chips, trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures
or tr immings; providing supplies and m i n o r mainte na nc e services; and cleaning lavatories, s h o w ­
ers, and restrooms. W o r k e r s w h o specialize in w i n d o w wa sh in g are excluded.
LABORER,

MATERIAL HANDLING

(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; s t o c k m a n or stock helper; w a r e ­
h o u s e m a n or w a r e h o u s e helper)
A w o r k e r e m p l o y e d in a w a re ho us e, manufacturing plant, store, or other establishment
w h o s e duties involve one or m o r e of the following: Loading and unloading various materials and
m e r c h a n d i s e on or f r o m freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing materials or m e r c h a n d i s e in proper storage location; and transporting materials or
m e r c h a n d i s e by handtruck, car, or whee lb ar ro w. L o n g s h o r e m e n , w h o load and unload ships are
excluded.
ORDER,

Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport materials, me rc ha nd is e,
equipment, or m e n b e tw ee n various types of establishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight
depots, w a re ho us es , wholesale an d retail establishments, or b e tw ee n retail establishments and
cu st om er s' houses or places of business. M a y also load or unload truck with or without helpers,
m a k e m i n o r me ch an ic al repairs, and ke ep truck in good wo rk in g order.
D r i v e r - s a l e s m e n and
over-the-road drivers are excluded.
F o r w a g e study purposes, truckdrivers are classified b y size and type of equipment,
as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on the basis of trailer capacity.)

FILLER

(Order picker; stock selector; w a r e h o u s e stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods f r o m stored m e r c h a n d i s e in a c c o r d ­
ance with specifications on sales slips, cu stomers' orders, or other instructions. M a y , inaddition
to filling orders and indicating items filled or omitted, ke ep records of outgoing orders, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and p e r f o r m other related duties.

Tr uckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under lV2 tons)
Truckdriver, m e d i u m (lV2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, he a v y (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, he av y (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

TRUCKER,
PACKER,

w o r k e r s are classified as follows:

POWER

SHIPPING

Pr ep a r e s finished products for shipment or storage by placing t h e m in shipping co n ­
tainers, the specific operations p e r f o r m e d being dependent upon the type, size, and n u m b e r of
units to be packed, the type of container employed, and m e t h o d of shipment. W o r k requires the
placing of items in shipping containers and m a y involve one or m o r e of the following: K n o w l ­
edge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate type and size
of container; inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior or other material to prevent
br eakage or d a m a g e ; closing and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying
data o n container. P a c k e r s w h o also m a k e w o o d e n boxes or crates are excluded.




Op erates a
transport goods and
establishment.

m a nu al ly controlled gasoline- or electric-powered truck or tractor to
materials of all kinds about a wa re ho us e, manufacturing plant, or other

F o r w a g e study purposes, w o r k e r s a^e classified by type of truck, as follows:
Tr ucker,
Tr ucker,

p o w e r (forklift)
p o w e r (other than forklift)




A v a i l a b l e O n R e q u e s t ----T h e te n th a n n u a l r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s f o r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d i t o r s , a t ­
to rn e y s, c h e m is t s , e n g in e e r s, en gin eerin g te c h n ic ia n s, d ra ftsm e n ,
t r a c e r s , jo b a n a l y s t s , d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l , b u y e r s , an d c l e r i c a l
e m p lo y e e s.
O r d e r a s B L S B u l l e t i n 16 5 4 , N a t i o n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d ­
m i n i s t r a t i v e , T e c h n i c a l , an d C l e r i c a l P a y , J u n e 1 9 6 9 . S e v e n t y - f i v e
c e n ts a copy.




Area Wage Surveys
A l i s t of the l a t e s t a v a i l a b l e b u l l e t i n s i s p r e s e n t e d b e low . A d i r e c t o r y of a r e a w a g e s t u d i e s in c lu d in g m o r e l i m i t e d s t u d i e s c o n d u c t e d at the
r e q u e s t of the W age an d H o u r an d P u b l i c C o n t r a c t s D i v i s i o n s of the D e p a r t m e n t of L a b o r i s a v a i l a b l e on r e q u e s t . B u l l e t i n s m a y be p u r c h a s e d f r o m
the S u p e r i n t e n d e n t of D o c u m e n t s , U .S. G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h in g to n , D . C . , 204 0 2 , o r f r o m an y of the B L S r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s shown on
the i n s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .
A rea
A k r o n , O hio, J u l y 1969 1 ________________________________
A lb a n y — c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N . Y . , M a r . 1969 1_________
S
A l b u q u e r q u e , N. M e x . , A p r . 1969_______________________
A lle n to w n — e t h l e h e r r r - E a s t o n , P a . — . J . , M a y 1969----B
N
A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 1969 --------------------------------------------B a l t i m o r e , M d ., Aug. 1 9 6 9 ______________________________
B e a u m o n t — o r t A r th u r— r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1969 1____
P
O
B i n g h a m t o n , N . Y . , J u l y 1969____________________________
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , A p r . 1969 1_________________________
B o i s e C ity , Idaho, J u l y 1968 1 __________________________
B o s t o n , M a s s . , Aug. 1 9 6 9 _______________________________
B u f f a l o , N . Y . , O c t. 1 9 6 9 _________________________________
B u r l i n g t o n , V t . , M a r . 1969 1 ____________________________
C a n to n , O hio, M a y 1 9 6 9 _________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , A p r . 1 9 6 9 ---------------------------------C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , M a r . 1969______________________________
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , S e p t . 1969____________________
C h i c a g o , 111., A p r . 1969 1 _______________________________
C i n c in n a ti , O hio— y .—I n d . , M a r . 1969 1 ________________
K
C l e v e l a n d , Ohio, S e p t . 1 9 6 9 _____________________________
C o l u m b u s , O h io, O c t. 1969 ______________________________
D a l l a s , T e x . , O c t. 1 9 6 9 __________________________________
D a v e n p o r t — o c k I s l a n d — o l in e , Iow a—
R
M
111.,
O c t. 1969 1 -------------------------------------------------------------D ay to n , O h io, J a n . 1969 1 _______________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 6 8 _______________________________
D e s M o i n e s , Io w a, M a r . 1969___________________________
D e t r o i t , M i c h ., J a n . 1969 1 ______________________________
F o r t W o rth, T e x . , O c t. 1 9 6 9 ____________________________
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , J u l y 1 9 6 9 _____________________________
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1969 1-------------------------------------H o u st o n , T e x . , M a y 1969 1----------------------------------------I n d i a n a p o l i s , Ind., O ct. 1 9 6 9 ____________________________
J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1969 1_____________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , J a n . 1969 1 ---------------------------------K a n s a s C ity , M o . - K a n s . , S e p t . 1 9 6 9 ____________________
L a w r e n c e — a v e r h i l l , M a s s . — .H ., J u n e 1 9 6 9 ------------H
N
L i t t l e R o c k — o r t h L i t t l e R o c k , A r k . , J u l y 1 9 6 9 _______
N
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h and A n a h e im — a n t a A n a S
G a r d e n G r o v e , C a l i f . , M a r . 1969 1 ____________________
L o u i s v i l l e , K y .—
Ind., Nov. 1969 1 _______________________
L u b b o c k , T e x . , M a r . 1 9 6 9 ______________________________
M a n c h e s t e r , N .H ., J u l y 1969____________________________
M e m p h i s , T e n n .— r k . , N ov. 1968_______________________
A
M i a m i , F l a . , Nov. 1 9 6 9 --------------------------------------------M i d l a n d an d O d e s s a , T e x . , M a r . 1969__________________
M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1969_____________________________
M in n eap olis—
St. P a u l , M in n ., J a n . 1969________________

B u lletin n um ber
and p r i c e
1625-89,
1625-56,
1625-67,
1625-86,
1625-77,
1660-11,
1625-75,
1660-5,
1625-65,
1625-6,
1660-16,
1660-29,
1625-54,
1625-73,
1625-71,
1625-61,
1660-9,
1625-82,
1625-63,
1660-22,
1660-27,
1660-23,

35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n ts
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n ts
35 c e n t s
45 c e n t s
45 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
65 c e n t s
45 c e n t s
40 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s

1660-20,
1625-42,
1625-39,
1625-62,
1625-58,
1660-18,
1660-8,
1625-70,
1625-83,
1660-25,
1625-45,
1625-37,
1660-10,
1625-79,
1660-2,

35
35
30
30
50
30
30
35
45
30
35
35
35
30
30

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
c ents
cents
cents
c ents
cents
cents
c e n ts
cents
cents
cents

1625-78,
1660-28,
1625-53,
1660-3,
1625-30,
1660-32,
1625-49,
1625-66,
1625-47,

50
40
30
30
30
30
25
35
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A rea
M u s k e g o n — u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h ., M a y 1 9 6 9 _______
M
N e w a r k and J e r s e y C ity , N . J . , J a n . 1969______________
New H a v e n , Con n ., J a n . 1 9 6 9 ___________________________
N ew O r l e a n s , L a . , F e b . 1969 1 _________________________
N ew Y o r k , N . Y . , A p r . 1969______________________________
N o r f o l k — o r t s m o u t h and N e w p o r t N e w s—
P
H a m p to n , V a . , J u n e 1968______________________________
O k l a h o m a C ity , O k l a . , J u l y 1969 1______________________
O m aha, N ebr.—
Iow a, S e p t . 1 9 6 9 ________________________
P a t e r s o n — l i ft o n — a s s a i c , N . J . , M a y 1 9 6 9 ____________
C
P
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . — . J . , Nov. 1968______________________
N
P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1969______________________________
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , J a n . 1969______________________________
P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , Nov. 1969 1 ___________________________
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . — a s h . , M a y 1969______________________
W
P r o v i d e n c e — a w t u c k e t — a rw ic k , R .I .— a s s .,
P
W
M
M a y 1969 1 ______________________________________________
R a l e i g h , N . C . , A ug. 1969________________________________
R i c h m o n d , V a . , M a r . 1969______________________________
R o c h e s t e r , N .Y . (o f f ic e o c c u p a t i o n s only),
J u l y 1 9 6 9 ________________________________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111., M a y 1 9 6 9 ________________________________
St. L o u i s , M o.—
111., M a r . 1969 1________________________
S a l t L a k e C i ty , U tah, Nov. 1969 1_______________________
S a n A n ton io, T e x . , J u n e 1969 1 _________________________
San B e r n a rd in o — iv e r sid e — n tario , C alif.,
R
O
O ct. 1 9 6 8 1 -------------------------------------------------------------S a n D ie g o , C a l i f . , Nov. 1 9 6 8 ____________________________
S a n F r a n c i s c c r - O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , O c t. 1969 1____________
S a n J o s e , C a l i f . , S e p t . 1969 1 ___________________________
S a v a n n a h , G a . , M a y 1969------------------------------------------S c r a n t o n , P a . , J u l y 1 9 6 9 ------------------------------------------S e a t t l e — v e r e t t , W a s h . , Nov. 1968 1 ___________________
E
S i o u x F a l l s , S. D a k ., S e p t . 1969 ________________________
South B e n d , Ind., M a r . 1969_____________________________
S p o k a n e , W a s h . , J u n e 1 9 6 9 ---------------------------------------S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 6 9 ______________________________
Tam pa—
St. P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , A ug. 1969 1 ______________
T o l e d o , Ohio— i c h ., F e b . 1969 1________________________
M
T r e n t o n , N . J . , S e p t . 1 9 6 9 _______________________________
U t i c a — o m e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 6 9 ___________________________
R
W a s h in g t o n , D .C . —
Md.— a . , S e p t . 1969 1_______________
V
W a t e r b u r y , C o n n ., M a r . 1969___________________________
W a t e r l o o , Iow a, Nov. 1968 1--------------------------------------W ic h it a , K a n s . , D e c . 1 9 6 8 ----------------------------------------W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , M a y 1 9 6 9 ___________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1969------------------------------------------------Y o u n g s to w n — a r r e n , O hio, Nov. 1968__________________
W

B u lletin num ber
and p r i c e
1625-80,
1625-46,
1625-38,
1625-51,
1625-88,

30 c e n t s
40 c e n ts
30 c e n ts
35 c e n t s
60 c e n t s

1575-85,
1660-17,
1660-12,
1625-87,
1625-48,
1625-60,
1625-59,
1660-26,
1625-76,

30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n ts
35 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

1625-74,
1660-6,
1625-69,

35 c e n t s
30 c e n ts
30 c e n ts

1660-4,
1625-72,
1625-64,
1660-30,
1625-85,

30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
35c e n ts
35 c e n t s

1625-25,
1625-32,
1660-33,
1660-24,
1625-68,
1660-15,
1625-43,
1660-14,
1625-55,
1625-81,
1660-13,
1660-7,
1625-57,
1660-21,
1660-1,
1660-19,
1625-50,
1625-31,
1625-41,
1625-84,
1625-52,
1625-34,

40 c e n ts
30 c e n ts
50 c e n t s
35 c e n ts
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
30 c e n ts
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
50 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
35 c e n ts
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS




W A S H IN G T O N , D .C .

20212

O F F I C I A L BUSI NESS
P O S T A G E AND F E E S PAI D
U. S. D E P A R T M E N T OF L A B O R

FIRST CLASS MAIL