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A re a Wage S u rvey

The Rochester, New York, Metropolitan Area
J u ly

1968

U N I T E D S T A T E S D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS REGIONAL OFFICES

reg io n

sy-

tu

P h il a d e l p h ia

0c

Region II
Region I
341 Ninth Ave.
1603-B Federal Building
New York, N.Y. 10001
Government Center
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6762 (Area Code 617)

Region III
406 Penn Square Building
1317 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107
Phone: 597-7716 (Area Code 215)

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. NE.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)

Region VI
Region V
Federal Office Building
219 South Dearborn St.
911 Walnut St., 10th Floor
Chicago, 111. 60604
Phone: 353-7230 (Area Code 312)
Kansas City; Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

Region VII
337 Mayflower Building
411 North Akard St.
Dallas, Tex. 75201
Phone: 749-3616 (Area Code 214)

Region VIII
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)




Area Wage Survey
The Rochester, New York, Metropolitan Area




July 1 9 6 8

Bulletin No. 1 6 2 5 -2
Novem ber 1968

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W illard W irtz, S ecretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Ben Burdetsky, Acting Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price 35 cents




P r e fa c e

C on ten ts
Page

The Bureau o f L abor Statistics p rog ra m o f annual
occu pation al wage su rveys in m etropolitan a rea s is d e ­
signed to p rov id e data on occu pation al earn in gs, and estab­
lishm ent p ra ctice s and supplem entary wage p r o v isio n s. It
yield s detailed data by selected industry d ivision fo r each
of the areas studied, fo r geographic re g io n s, and fo r the
United States.
A m a jo r con sid eration in the p rog ra m is
the need for g rea te r insight into (1) the m ovem ent o f wages
by occu pation al ca teg ory and sk ill le v e l, and (2 ) the s tru c­
ture and le v e l o f w ages among areas and industry d iv isio n s.

Introduction_______________________________________________________________
T ables:
1.
A.

B.

Ninety area s cu rren tly a re included in the p r o ­
gram . In each a re a , inform ation on occu pation al earnings
is collected annually and on establishm ent p r a c tic e s and
supplem entary wage p ro v isio n s biennially.




E stablishm ents and w ork ers within scop e o f survey and
num ber stu d ied __________________________________________________
O ccupational earn in gs:*
A - 1. O ffice occupations— en and w om en_______________________
m
A - 2. P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ical occu pation s—
men and
wom en_____________________________________________________
A -3 . O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ical occupations—
m en and wom en co m b in ed _______________________
A -4 . M aintenance and powerplant occu p ation s_________
A -5 . C ustodial and m a teria l m ovem ent o ccu p a tio n s__
E stablishm ent p r a c tic e s and supplem entary wage p ro v isio n s:*
B - l . M inimum entrance sa la ries for wom en o ffic e
w o rk e rs ___________________________________________________
B - 2. Shift d iffe r e n tia ls __________________________________________
B -3 . Scheduled weekly h o u r s ___________________________________
B -4 . Paid h olida ys_______________________________________________
B -5 . Paid v a c a tio n s _____________________________________________
B -6 . Health, in su ra n ce, and pension plans____________________
B -7 . Method o f wage determ ination and frequ en cy o f
payment___________________________________________________

Appendix.

O ccupational d e scrip tio n s ___________________________________

*N O T E : S im ilar tabulations are available for other
a re a s.
(See inside back c o v e r .)
C urrent rep orts on earnings in the R och ester area
a re a lso available fo r selected food s e r v ic e and laundry and
dry cleaning occupations (July 1968). Union s c a le s , in d ic­
ative o f prevailin g pay le v e ls , a re available for building
con stru ction; printing; lo ca l-tra n sit operating em p loyees;
and m otortru ck d r iv e r s , h e lp e rs, and allied occu pation s.

iii

4
5
8
0 O' O'
0

At the end o f each su rvey, an individual area b u l­
letin p resen ts survey resu lts fo r each area studied.
A fter
com pletion o f all o f the individual area bulletins fo r a round
o f su rv ey s, a tw o-p a rt sum m ary bulletin is issu ed .
The
fir s t part brin gs data fo r each o f the m etropolitan areas
studied into one bulletin. The second part p resen ts in fo r ­
m ation which has been p ro je cte d fro m individual m e t r o ­
politan area data to relate to geographic region s and the
United States.

This bulletin p resen ts resu lts o f the survey in
R o ch e ste r, N. Y. , in July 1968, conducted under a co n ­
tra ct with the New Y ork State Departm ent o f L a b or.
The
Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A r e a , as defined by the
Bureau o f the Budget through January 1968, co n sists o f
L ivin gston , M on roe, O rlea n s, and Wayne C ounties.
This
study was conducted by the B ureau 's reg ion a l o ffic e in
New Y ork , N. Y. , H erb ert B ien stock , D ir e c to r . The study
was under the gen era l d ire ctio n o f Thom as N. Wakin,
A ssistan t R egion al D ire cto r fo r O p eration s.

1

10
11
12
13
14
17
18
19




Area Wage Survey----The Rochester, N.Y., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
This area is 1 of 90 in which the U.S. Department o f L a b o r 's
Bureau o f L abor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings
and related benefits on an areaw ide b a s is .1 In this a re a , data w ere
obtained by p erson a l v isits of Bureau field econ om ists to re p re se n t­
ative establishm ents within six broad industry d iv ision s: Manu­
facturing; tran sportation , com m unication, and other public u tilities;
w h olesale trad e; reta il trade; finan ce, in su ran ce, and rea l estate; and
s e r v ic e s . M ajor industry groups excluded fr o m these studies are
governm ent operations and the con stru ction and extractive in du stries.
E stablishm ents having few er than a p r e s c r ib e d number of w ork ers are
om itted becau se they tend to furnish insufficient em ploym ent in the
occupations studied to w arrant in clusion. Separate tabulations are
p rovided fo r each o f the broad industry d ivision s which m eet pu bli­
cation crite r ia .

Occupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown for
fu ll-tim e w o rk e rs, i.e ., those hired to w ork a regular w eekly schedule
in the given occupational cla ss ifica tio n . E arnings data exclude p r e ­
m ium pay fo r overtim e and for w ork on w eekends, h olidays, and
late sh ifts. N onproduction bonuses are. exclu ded, but c o s t-o f-liv in g
allow ances and incentive earnings are included. W here w eekly hours
are re p orted , as fo r o ffice c le r ic a l occu pation s, re fe re n ce is to the
standard w orkw eek (rounded to the nearest half hour) fo r which em ­
ployees r e c e iv e their regular straigh t-tim e sa la ries (exclu siv e of pay
fo r overtim e at regu lar a n d /o r prem ium ra tes). A verage w eekly earn ­
ings fo r these occupations have been rounded to the n earest half d ollar.
The averages presented re fle ct com p osite, areaw ide e s ti­
m ates. Industries and establishm ents d iffer in pay le v e l and job
staffing and, thus, contribute d ifferen tly to the estim ates fo r each jo b .
The pay relation sh ip obtainable fro m the averages may fail to re fle ct
a ccu ra tely the wage spread or differen tial maintained among job s in
individual establishm ents. S im ilarly, d ifferen ces in average pay le v ­
els fo r m en and wom en in any of the selected occupations should
not be assum ed to r e fle c t d ifferen ces in pay treatm ent of the sexes
within individual establishm ents. Other p ossib le fa cto rs which may
contribute to d iffe re n ce s in pay fo r m en and w om en include: D iffe r ­
en ces in p r o g r e s s io n within establish ed rate ran ges, sin ce only the
actual rates paid incumbents are collected ; and d ifferen ces in sp e cific
duties p e rfo rm e d , although the w ork ers are cla ss ifie d appropriately
within the sam e survey jo b d escrip tion . Job d escrip tion s used in
cla ssify in g em ployees in these surveys are usually m ore gen eralized
than those used in individual establishm ents and allow fo r m inor
d iffe re n ce s among establishm ents in the sp e cific duties p erform ed .

T hese surveys are conducted on a sam ple b a sis becau se of
the u n n ecessary cost involved in surveying all establish m en ts. To
obtain optim um a ccu ra cy at m inim um c o s t, a grea ter p rop ortion of
la rg e than of sm all establishm ents is studied. In com bining the data,
h ow ev er, all establishm ents are given th eir appropriate weight. E s ­
tim ates based on the establishm ents studied are presen ted , th e r e fo r e ,
as relating to all establishm ents in the industry grouping and area ,
except fo r those below the m inim um size studied.
O ccupations and E arnings
The occupations se le cte d fo r study are com m on to a v a riety
o f manufacturing and nonmanufacturing in d u stries, and are of the
follow in g types: (1) O ffice c le r ic a l; (2) p ro fe ssio n a l and tech n ical;
(3) m aintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and m a teria l m o v e ­
m en t.2 Occupational cla s s ific a tio n is based on a u niform set of job
d escrip tion s designed to take account of in terestablishm ent variation
in duties within the sam e jo b . The occupations se le cte d fo r study
are liste d and d e scrib e d in the appendix. The earnings data follow ing
the job titles are fo r all industries com bined. Earnings data fo r som e
of the occupations listed and d e s c r ib e d , or fo r som e industry division s
within occu p ation s, are not p resen ted in the A -s e r ie s ta b le s, because
either (1) em ploym ent in the occupation is too sm all to provide enough
data to m erit presen tation, o r (2) th ere is p o ssib ility of d isclo su re
of individual establishm ent data.

Occupational em ploym ent estim ates rep resen t the total in
all establishm ents within the scop e of the study and not the number
actually surveyed. B ecause of d ifferen ces in occupational structure
among establish m en ts, the estim ates o f occupational em ploym ent o b ­
tained fro m the sam ple of establishm ents studied serve only to indicate
the rela tive im portance of the job s studied. These d ifferen ces in
occupational structure do not affect m aterially the a ccu ra cy of the
Warnings data.
E stablishm ent P r a c tic e s and Supplem entary Wage P rov ision s

1

Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New Yoric State
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New York portion only); Rochester (o ffice o ccu patdons only); Syracuse; and Utica—Rome. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies
in 91 areas at the request o f the Wage and Horn and Public Contracts Divisions o f the U. S. De­
partment o f Labor.
Wage data tor maintenance and powerplant, and custodial and material movement occupa­
tions were not collected in this area.




1

Inform ation is p resen ted (in the B -s e r ie s tables) on selected
establishm ent p ra ctice s and supplem entary wage p rov ision s as they
relate to plant and o ffice w o rk e rs. A dm in istrative, execu tive, and
p ro fe ssio n a l e m p loyees, and con stru ction w ork ers who are utilized
as a separate w ork fo r c e are excluded. "P lan t w o rk e rs " include

2
working forem en and all n on su p erv isory w ork ers (including lea d men and trainees) engaged in n onoffice functions. "O ffic e w o rk e rs"
include working su p e rv iso rs and n on su p ervisory w ork ers p erform in g
c le r ic a l or related functions. C afeteria w ork ers and routem en are
excluded in m anufacturing in d u stries, but included in nonmanufacturing
in du stries.
M inim um entrance sa la rie s fo r wom en o ffice w ork ers (table
B - l ) relate only to the establishm ents v isited . B ecause of the optimum
sam pling techniques used, and the probability that large esta b lish ­
m ents are m ore lik ely to have form a l entrance rates fo r w ork ers
above the s u b cle rica l le v e l than sm all establish m en ts, the table is
m o re -re p re s e n ta tiv e of p o licie s in m edium and la rge establishm ents.
Shift d ifferen tia l data (table B -2) are lim ited to plant w ork ers
in m anufacturing in du stries. This inform ation is p resen ted both in
term s of (1) establishm ent p o lic y ,3 presen ted in term s of total plant
w ork er erhploym ent, and (2) e ffectiv e p r a c tic e , presen ted in term s
of w ork ers actually em ployed on the s p e cifie d shift at the tim e of the
su rvey. In establishm ents having v a ried d ifferen tia ls, the amount
applying to a m a jo rity was used o r , if no amount applied to a m a jority ,
the cla ss ifica tio n "o th e r " was used. In establishm ents in w hich som e
la te -sh ift hours are paid at n orm al ra te s, a differen tial was re co rd e d
only if it applied to a m a jo rity of the shift h ours.
The scheduled w eekly hours (table B -3) of a m a jo rity of the
fir s t-s h ift w ork ers in an establishm ent are tabulated as applying to
all of the plant or o ffic e w o rk e rs of that establishm ent. Scheduled
w eek ly hours are those which fu ll-tim e em p loyees w ere expected to
w ork , whether they w ere paid fo r at stra igh t-tim e or ov ertim e rates.
Paid h olidays; paid va ca tion s; health, in su ran ce, and pension
plans; and prem ium pay fo r ov ertim e w ork (tables B -4 through B -7)
are treated sta tistica lly on the b a sis that th ese are applicable to all
plant or o ffice w o rk e rs if a m a jo rity of such w ork ers are e lig ib le or
m ay eventually qualify fo r the p ra c tic e s listed . Sums o f individual
item s in tables B -2 through B -7 m ay not equal totals becau se of
rounding.
Data on paid holidays (table B -4 ) are lim ited to data on h o li­
days granted annually on a fo rm a l b a s is ; i.e ., (1) are provid ed for
in w ritten fo r m , or (2) have been establish ed by cu stom . Holidays
ord in a rily granted are included even though they m ay fa ll on a non­
w orkday and the w ork er is not granted another day off. The fir s t

part of the paid holidays table presen ts the number of whole and half
holidays actually granted. The second part com bines whole and half
holidays to show total holiday tim e .
The sum m ary of vacation plans (table B -5) is lim ited to a
statistical m easure of vacation p ro v isio n s. It is not intended as a
m easu re of the p rop ortion of w ork ers actually receivin g sp e cific ben e­
fits. P ro v isio n s of an establishm ent fo r all lengths of s e rv ice w ere
tabulated as applying to all plant or o ffice w ork ers of the esta b lish ­
m ent, r e g a rd le ss of length of s e r v ic e . P rov ision s fo r payment on
other than a tim e ba sis w ere con verted to a tim e b a sis; for exam ple,
a payment of 2 p ercen t of annual earnings was con sid ered as the equiv­
alent o f 1 w eek 's pay. E stim ates exclude va cation -savin gs plans and
those which o ffer "exten d ed " or "sa b b a tica l" benefits beyond b a sic
plans to w ork ers with qualifying lengths of s e r v ic e . T yp ical of such
exclu sion s are plans in the steel, aluminum , and can in d u stries.
. Data on health, in su ran ce, and pension plans (table B -6) in ­
clude those plans fo r which the em p loyer pays at least a part of the
co st. Such plans include those underw ritten by a co m m e rcia l insurance
com pany and those provid ed through a union fund or paid d ire ctly by
the em p loyer out of current operating funds or fro m a fund set aside
fo r this pu rp ose. An establishm ent was con sid ered to have a plan
if the m a jo rity of em p loyees was elig ib le to be cov ered under the
plan, even if le s s than a m a jority elected to p articipate because em ­
p loyees w ere req u ired to contribute tow ard the cost of the plan. L e ­
gally req u ired plan s, such as w ork m en 's com pen sation, s o cia l s e ­
cu rity , and ra ilro a d retirem en t w ere excluded.
S ickness and accident insurance is lim ited to that type of
insurance under which pred eterm in ed cash payments are made d ire ctly
to the insured during illn ess or accident disability. Inform ation is
p resen ted fo r all such plans to which the em p loyer con tribu tes. How­
e v e r , in New Y ork and New J e rs e y , w hich have enacted tem p orary
d isa b ility insurance laws which requ ire em p loyer con tribu tion s,4 plans
are included only if the em p loyer (1) contributes m ore than is lega lly
re q u ired , or (2) p rov id es the em ployee with benefits which exceed the
requirem ents of the law. Tabulations of paid sick leave plans are
lim ited to fo rm a l plans 5 which provid e fu ll pay or a p rop ortion of the
w o r k e r 's pay during absen ce fro m w ork becau se of illn e s s . Separate
tabulations are presen ted accord in g to (1) plans which provide full pay
and no waiting p e rio d , and (2) plans which provid e either partial pay
or a waiting p e rio d . In addition to the presen tation of the prop ortion s
of w o rk e rs who are p rovid ed sick n ess and accident insurance or paid
sick lea v e, an unduplicated total is shown of w ork ers who re ce iv e
either or both types of ben efits.

3
An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met either of the following con­
4 The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer
ditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering
contributions.
late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1) had operated late
5 An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form for operating
minimum number of days o f sick leave available to each employee. Such a plan need not be
late shifts.
written, but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, were excluded.




3
Catastrophe in su ran ce, som etim es r e fe r r e d to as m ajor m ed ­
ica l in su ran ce, includes those plans which are designed to p rotect
em p loyees in case of sick n ess and injury involving expenses beyond
the norm al cov era g e of h ospitalization, m e d ica l, and su rg ica l plans.
M edical insurance r e fe r s to plans providing fo r com plete or partial
payment of d o c t o r s ' fe e s . Such plans m ay be underw ritten by c o m ­
m e rcia l insurance com panies or nonprofit organizations or they may
be paid fo r by the em p loyer out of a fund set aside for this purpose.
Tabulations of retirem en t pension plans are lim ited to those plans
that provide regu lar payments fo r the rem ainder of the w o r k e r 's life .
Method of wage determ ination (table B -7) rela tes to ba sic
types of rate structure fo r w ork ers paid under variou s tim e and in ­
centive sy stem s. Under a single rate structure the same rate is paid
to all ex p erien ced w o rk e rs in the sam e job cla ss ifica tio n . An individ­
ual w ork er occa sio n a lly m ay be paid above or below the single rate




fo r sp ecia l re a so n s, but such payments are excep tion s. A r a n g e -o frates plan sp e cifie s the m inim um a n d /or m axim um rate paid e x p e r i­
enced w ork ers fo r the same jo b . Inform ation a lso is provid ed on the
method of p r o g r e s s io n through the range. In the absence of a form al
rate stru ctu re, the qualifications of the individual w ork er determ ine
the pay rate. Inform ation on types of incentive plans is p rovided only
for plant w ork ers becau se of the low incidence of such plans for o ffice
w o rk e rs. Under a piecew ork system , a pred eterm ined rate is paid
fo r each unit of output. P roduction bonuses are based on production
over a quota or com pletion of a job in le ss than standard tim e. C om ­
pensation on a co m m issio n basis rep resen ts payments based on a
percentage of value of sa le s , or on a com bination of a stated salary
plus a percen tage.
Data on frequ en cy of wage payment also are
table B -7 .

p rovided in

4

T a b le 1.

E s ta b lis h m e n t s and W o r k e r s W ithin Scope of S u rv e y and N u m b er Studied in R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . , 1 by M a jo r In d u stry D i v i s i o n ,2 J uly 1968
N u m b er o f e sta b lish m e n ts

In d u stry d iv isio n

M in im u m
e m p lo y m en t
in e s t a b lis h ­
m e n ts in scop e
o f stud y

W o r k e r s in e sta b lish m e n ts
W ith in sc o p e o f study

W ith in sc o p e
o f st u d y 2

Studied
T o t a l4

Studied

P lan t
N u m b er

O ffic e

P ercen t

T o t a l4

A ll d iv is io n s ______________________________________

_

48 0

128

1 7 9 ,3 0 0

100

110, 90 0

33 , 600

12 5, 500

M an ufactu ring
N on m an ufactu ring
T r a n sp o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and
other public u tilitie s 5 ______________________ .
W h o le sa le tra d e
____
_ _
R e ta il t ra d e _________________________________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e _________
S e r v ic e s 9 ___________________________________________

50
-

240
240

56
72

135, 80 0
4 3 , 500

76
24

8 3 , 700
2 7 , 20 0

2 4 ,8 0 0
8 , 80 0

10 0, 550
24, 95 0

50
50
50
50
50

29
36
103
22
50

11
9
22
10
20

3
2
13
3
3

3 ,8 0 0

1, 100

4 , 730
1 ,0 7 0
1 1 ,4 9 0
4 , 64 0
3, 020

5,
2,
23,
5,
6,

90 0
700
100
80 0
000

(6)
(6)
( 8)
(6)

(7 )
(7 )
(7 )
(7)

1 The R o c h e ste r S tand ard M etrop olitan S ta tistic a l A re a , as defined by the B u reau of the Budget throu gh Ja n u a ry 1968, c o n sists of L ivingston, M onroe, O rle a n s, and Wayne C ounties.
The
"w o rk e rs w ithin scope of study" e stim a te s show n in th is table provide a rea so n a b ly a c c u ra te ' d e sc rip tio n of the size and com position of the la b o r fo rce included in the su rv ey . The e stim a te s a re
not inten ded, ho w ev er, to se rv e a s a b a sis of c o m p a riso n w ith o th er em ploym ent indexes fo r the a re a to m e a su re em ploym ent tre n d s o r lev els sin ce ( 1 ) planning of wage su rv ey s re q u ire s the use
of e sta b lish m e n t data com piled c o n sid e ra b ly in advance of the p ay ro ll p eriod stu died, and ( 2 ) sm all e sta b lish m e n ts a re excluded fro m the scope of the su rv ey .
2 The 1967 editio n of the S tand ard In d u stria l C la ssific a tio n M anual w as u sed in c lassify in g e sta b lish m e n ts by in d u stry d iv ision .
3 Includes a ll e sta b lish m e n ts w ith to ta l em p loym ent a t or above the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A ll ou tlets (w ithin the a re a ) of com panies in such in d u strie s as tra d e , finance, auto re p a ir se rv ic e ,
and m otion p ic tu re th e a te rs a re c o n sid e re d as 1 e sta b lish m e n t.
4 Includes executive, profession a l, and other w orkers excluded fro m the separate plant and office ca te go rie s.
5 E le c tric and gas u tilitie s , the m u n icip ally owned And o p erated lo c a l-tra n s it sy ste m , ta x ic a b s, and se rv ic e s in cid en tal to w a ter tra n sp o rta tio n w ere excluded.
6 T his in d u stry d iv isio n is re p re se n te d in e stim a te s fo r " a ll in d u strie s" in the S e rie s B ta b le s. S ep arate p re se n ta tio n of d ata fo r th is d iv isio n is not m ade fo r one or m o re of the follow ing
re a so n s: (1) E m ploym ent in the d iv isio n is too sm all | l ^irjqyide enough data to m e rit se p a ra te study, (2) the sam ple w as not desig ned in itia lly to p e rm it se p a ra te p re se n ta tio n , (3) resp o n se w as
«
in su ffic ie n t or inadequate to p e rm it se p a ra te p re se n ta tio n , apd (4) th e re is p o ssib ility of d is c lo su re of individual e sta b lish m e n t d ata.
7 W o rk ers fro m th is e n tire in d u stry d iv isio n a re re p re se n te d in e stim a te s fo r " a ll in d u strie s" and "non m anu facturing " in the S e rie s A ta b le s and fo r " a ll in d u strie s" in the S e rie s B ta b le s.
S e p a rate p re se n ta tio n of d ata fo r th is d iv isio n is not m ade fo r one o r m o re of the re a so n s given in footnote 6 above.
8 W o rk ers fro m the re a l e sta te p o rtio n only a re re p re se n te d in e stim a te s fo r " a ll in d u strie s" in the S e rie s B ta b le s. S ep arate p re se n ta tio n of data fo r th is d iv ision is not m ade fo r one or
m o re of the re a so n s given in footnote 6 above.
9 H otels and m o te ls; la u n d ries and o th er p e rso n al se rv ic e s ; b u sin e ss s e rv ic e s ; autom obile re p a ir , re n ta l, and parkin g; m otion p ic tu re s; no np ro fit m e m b e rsh ip org an izatio n s (excluding relig io u s
and c h a rita b le o rg a n iza tio n s); and en g in eerin g and a rc h ite c tu ra l se rv ic e s .




A lm o s t th r e e -fo u r th s o f the w o r k e r s w ithin scop e of the s u r v e y in the R o c h e s te r a rea
w e r e em p lo y e d in m an u factu rin g f i r m s . The fo llo w in g p r e se n ts the m a jo r in d u str y grou p s and
s p e c ific in d u str ie s a s a p e r c e n t of a ll m a n u fa c tu rin g :
In d u stry gro u p s

S p e cific in d u str ie s

In stru m e n ts and- re la te d
p r o d u c ts _______________ ___________ 48
E le c t r ic a l eq u ipm en t and
su p p lie s___________________________ 10
M a c h in e r y , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l ... 10
Food and k ind red p r o d u c ts _____
7
A p p a r e l and other tex tile
p r o d u c ts __________________________
5

P h otograp h ic eq u ipm en t and
su p p lie s___________________________ 40
C om m u n ic a tio n eq u ipm en t______
8
O ph th alm ic g o o d s _________________
5

T h is in fo rm a tio n is b a se d on e s t im a t e s of to ta l e m p lo y m e n t d e r iv e d fr o m u n iv e rse
m a t e r ia ls co m p ile d p r io r to actu al s u r v e y .
P r o p o r tio n s in v a r io u s in d u str y d iv isio n s m a y
d iffe r f r o m p ro p o rtio n s b a sed on the r e s u lt s of the s u r v e y as shown in table 1 a b o v e.

5

A. O ccupational E arnings
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and W omen
(A verage stra ig h t-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area b asis
by industry d ivision, R o ch ester, N . Y . , July 1968)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Average
Number weekly
of
hours1
Middle range 2
( standard) Mean2 Median 2

*

60

under
65

s

65
70

$

70
75

»

75
80

$

Num ber of w orkers receiving stra ig h t-tim e weekly earnings of—

80
85

$

85
90

S

i
S
S
s
S
$
$
*
"i—
*
%
S
$
95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 160 150 160 170 180 190
and
over
95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 I W 150 199 179 190 199

90

*

HEN
CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ----------HANUFACTURING---------- -------------------OFFICE BOYS ----------------------------------------HANUFACTURING -------------------------------TABULATING-HACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ---------------------------------------------HANUFACTURING --------------------------------

$
$
$
$
72 40.0 136*50 137.00 1 3 1 .0 0 -1 4 5 .5 0
71 60 .0 8 8 . 0 0 91 .50 8 3 .5 0 - 93 .50
57 60 .0 91 .00 92 .00 9 0 .0 0 - 96.00

5

7

9
9

6
6

39
38

6
6

“

-

-

3
3

1
“

13
3

3

3
1

1
1

—

3
2

28
16

27
25

6
6

6
6

9
9

5
5

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

1

3
3

-

9
8

1

1

32 60 .0 131.00 137.50 1 1 5 .5 0 -1 6 8 .0 0
32 60 .0 131.00 137.50 1 1 5 .5 0 -1 6 8 .0 0

2
2

3
3

1
1

~

2
2

3

WOHEN
BILLERS, HACHINE (BILLING
HACHINE) -------------------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------BILLERS, HACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
HACHINE) -------------------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------BOOKKEEPING-HACHINE OPERATORS,
HANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------BOOKKEEPING-HACHINE OPERATORS,
HANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ----------HANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ----------HANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A ---------------------CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B ---------------------HANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C ---------------------HANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONHANUFACTURING -------------------------CLERKS, ORDER ------------------------------------HANUFACTURING -------------------------------See footnotes at end of table.




61 60 .0 93 .00 9 0 .00 8 6 .5 0 -1 0 2 .5 0
38 39.5 88 .50 88.50 8 6 .0 0 - 92 .50
39 .5 75 .00
68
55 39.5 72 .00

1
1

2
2

2
2

2
1

25
20

1
1

6

16
9

7
7

6 3 .5 0 - 86.50
6 3 .0 0 - 80.00

25
25

16
16

107 39.5 105.50 1 0 9 .CO 9 6 .0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0
71 60 .0 106.00 110.50 9 3 .5 0 -1 1 5 .0 0
36 39.0 106.50 107.00 1 0 1 .0 0 -1 1 2 .5 0

_

_

_

_

_

-

—

-

-

-

10
6
4

20
17
3

_

_

-

*
-

“
_
—
3
3

10
10
1
1
22
8
16
21
2
19
29
5
26
10

8
1
7
6
—
6
35
23
12
23
9
16
30
16
16
15
12

12
1
11
6
1
5
67
26
21
2
15
10
5
16
3
13
25
16

26
26

17
—
17
6
6
75
75
-

1
1
_
“
11
2
9

76
C
36
225
132
93
318
175
163
29
132
75
57
209
66
163
115
81
6

39 .5
60 .0
39.0
6 0 .0
39.5
60.5
39.5
60 .0
39.5
39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
38.5
39.5
38.5
39.5
39.5

6 8 .0 0
6 6 .0 0

89.00 91 .50
93 .50 9 6 .00
8 6 .0 0
86 .50
1 1 2 . 0 0 109.50
117.50 116.00
103.50 107.00
93.00 9 2 .00
98.50 95 .00
86 .50 89.00
105.50 103.00
86.50 85.00
91.00 91 .50
80.00 80.50
75 .00 76 .50
91 .50 91 .00
70.50 6 7 .00
93 .00 91 .00
97 .00 9 6 .00

8 5 .0 0 - 95.50
9 1 .5 0 - 97.50
7 9 .0 0 - 89.00
9 7 .5 0 -1 2 2 .5 0
9 8 .5 0 -1 3 7 .5 0
9 6 .5 0 -1 1 2 .0 0
8 6 . 0 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0
8 7 .0 0 -1 0 7 .5 0
7 7 .5 0 - 97.00
9 3 .0 0 -1 2 5 .5 0
7 7 .5 0 - 95.50
8 2 .0 0 -1 0 1 .0 0
7 6 .5 0 - 86.50
6 3 .5 0 - 86.00
8 2 .5 0 -1 0 1 .0 0
6 2 .5 0 - 78.50
8 5 .5 0 - 99.00
8 7 .5 0 -1 0 3 .5 0

—
-

_

-

-

-

6
2
2
18
18
-

16
11
3
13
13
2

_

23
16
9
55
28
27
9
18
16
6
8
6
2
26
16

_

2
2

1
1

16
7
7

11
3
8

31
21
10

16
10
6
65
25
20
35
23
12
1
13
7
6
6
6
11
11

5
4
i
5
6
1
36
16
20
5
8
8

32
13
19
13
11
2
1
4
6

39
11
2B
7
1
6
1
6
6

2
2

5
5

1
1

1
1
~

_

_

_

_

_

-

—

—

-

—

—

5
5

22
18
6

8
8
-

_

-

-

—

—

-

-

_
-

3
3
-

-

12
12

9
9
11
11

—

—

—

1

4

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
i

2
2

2
2

_

_

-

_

3
3

4
6

“

”

-

9
7
2
9
9

-

1
1

17
16
1

5
2
3
8
8

18
18
“
6
6

2
2
2

3
3

-

“

-

-

_

*

-

_

6

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and W om en— Continued
(A verage stra ig h t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area b asis
by industry d ivision , R o ch ester, N . Y . , July 1968)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number weekly
hours1
w°*“ (standard) Mean2 Median 2

S

Middle range 2

t

60 65
and under
4 5 _ 7Q

*

70
75

*

Num ber o f w orkers receiving stra ig h t-tim e weekly earnings of—

t

$
t
$
s
$
$ *
s
S
75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125
80 . <&. 90 95 too IPS n o 115 120 125 m

$

t
*
S
i
1 ------ t
130 140 150 160 170 180 190
• — — and
— 119 15Q 169 179 199 190 .over

MOHEN - CONTINUED

O
o

+

$
$
$
$
205 40 .0 111.50 11 1.50 9 8 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
CLERKS. PAYROLL ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------181 40 .0 114.00 114.50 1 0 1 .0 0 -1 3 0 .0 0
COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ----------------------30
93 .00 9 2 .00 8 9 .0 0 - 95.00
256 39.5 106.00 104.50 9 9 .0 0 -1 1 3 .0 0
KEYPUNCH OPERATORS. CLASS A -----------207 39.5 107.00 106.00 1 0 1 .0 0 -1 1 4 .5 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------49 39 .5 100.50 9 8 .50 9 5 .5 0 -1 0 6 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------573 39 .5 96 .00 97 .50 8 5 .5 0 -1 0 5 .5 0
KEYPUNCH OPERATORS. CLASS B -----------472 4 0 .0 99.50 101.00 9 1 .5 0 -1 0 7 .5 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------101 38.5 80.50 81.00 7 5 .5 0 - 86.00
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------129 40 .0 89.00 91 .50 7 8 .0 0 - 97 .50
OFFICE GIRLS ---------------------------------------112 40 .0 90.50 9 3 .00 8 3 .5 0 - 98 .00
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------1,852 39 .5 130.00 131.00 1 1 4 .5 0 -1 4 3 .5 0
SECRETARIES3 -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------- 1,500 40 .0 134.50 134.50 1 2 0 .5 0 -1 4 7 .5 0
352 3 8 .0 110.50 107.00 9 6 .0 0 -1 2 6 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------49 39 .0 102.00 9 6 .50 9 2 .0 0 -1 1 7 .5 0
PUBLIC UTILITIES 4 -----------------------109 39 .5 135.00 13 5.00 1 1 7 .0 0 -1 5 2 .0 0
SECRETARIES. CLASS A ---------------------70 40 .0 136.00 136.00 1 1 4 .0 0 -1 5 5 .0 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------39 38.5 133.00 13 5.00 1 3 0 .5 0 -1 4 5 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------348 39.5 140.00 139.00 1 2 3 .5 0 -1 5 6 .5 0
SECRETARIES. CLASS 8 ---------------------275 40 .0 148.00 145.00 1 3 0 .0 0 -1 6 4 .5 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------73 39 .0 111.50 111.50 1 0 0 .5 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------462 39.5 134.00 133.00 1 2 1 .0 0 -1 4 5 .0 0
SECRETARIES, CLASS C ---------------------389 40 .0 136.50 134.50 1 2 4 .0 0 -1 5 1 .5 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------73 38.5 120.50 123.50 1 1 4 .5 0 -1 3 2 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------933 39.5 124.00 126.50 1 0 7 .5 0 -1 3 9 .5 0
SECRETARIES, CLASS 0 ---------------------766 4 0 .0 129.00 131.00 1 1 7 .0 0 -1 4 1 .5 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------167 37.5 100.00 98 .00 9 3 .0 0 -1 0 7 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------732 39 .5 105.00 110.00 9 6 .5 0 -1 1 5 .0 0
STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ---------------------137 38 .0 98.00 91 .00 8 6 .0 0 -1 1 9 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------712 40 .0 117.00 119.50 1 0 7 .5 0 -1 2 8 .0 0
STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -----------------------658 40 .0 118.00 121.00 1 0 9 .0 0 -1 2 8 .0 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------54 38 .0 101.50 1 0 0 .CO 9 6 .0 0 -1 0 6 .0 0
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------80 40 .0 109.50 108.50 1 0 1 .0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A ------74 40 .0 110.00 109.00 1 0 2 .0 0 -1 1 8 .0 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------68 39.5 92 .50 88.50 7 8 .5 0 -1 1 5 .5 0
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ------45 39 .0 82 .50 82.00 7 6 .0 0 - 89.00
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------191 39.5 92 .00 92 .50 8 3 .5 0 - 99.50
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS111 39.5 9 3 .50 93 .50 8 4 .5 0 -1 0 1 .5 0
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------80 39 .5 89 .50 91-50 8 2 .5 0 - 98.00
NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

See footnotes at end of table.




*
—
“
_
_
-

-

4

-

-

“
29
8
21
22
19
1
1
1
-

“

1
1

_

_

3
3
-

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

*
-

-

-

-

L

1

41
22
19
17
5
9
9
2
“
2
2
-

7
7
14
13
-

_

-

-

1
-

“
8
8
3
1

2

1

2

“
2
2
2

8
6
1

“

-

-

11
10
8
4
4

15
12
2
“
66
34
32
8
6
6
1
5
2
2
1
1
“
3
3
21
12
3
3
-

*
7
7
46
25
21

9
8
15
22
14
8
68
56
12
27
27
72
17
55
16
2
2
“
4
2
— 4
2
7
3
2
2
1
5
17 61
11 15
6 46
66 64
40 19
3
8
3
3
5
9
9
9
3
9
2
17 39
12
19
12
12
6
10
7
3
43
37
6
10
10
24
13
11
3
_

5

20

5 23
3 19
3
39 62
15 57
20
5
70 102
64 101
6
1
9
28
28
9
86 81
39 45
47 36
10
2
_
9
8
1
”
9 15
—
3
6 15
6
8
2
7
4
1
71 49
34 30
37 19
62 45
12
3
46 67
30 55
16 12
10
8
7
7
2
1
1
1
30 18
20
11
7
10

8 28 29
22 17 10
7 28 29
16 16 10
l
2
47 21 31
3
7 11
40 20 30
7
7
3
7
1 1
4
63 48 18
1 10
3
62 48 18
1 10
3
1
8
8
78 116 134 100 170 417
49 94 112 77 151 370
29 22 22 23 19 47
3 5
3
1
1 13
6
2
8 24
- 12
6
6
6
1
1 2
2 18
5 25
8 20 32 55
2 19
5 15 24 45
3
6
5
3
8 10
24 26 35 32 40 151
21 21 25 20 32 132
3
5 10 12
8 19
48 52 85 46 90 187
26 42 76 42 89 187
22 10
4
9
1
90 195 122 20 32
1
3 29
2
3
l
103 37 100 73 166 9 V
93 36 100 72 166 97
10
1 1
20 13
4
6
3
5
18 13
4
6
3
5
7
1 12. 4
1
4
1
_
7 10
9
1
5
9
1
4
2

1

5

8
6

1
1

6
6

-

—
-

1
1
7
7

1
1
-

-

_

-

--

_
-

-

-

-

21
21
-

24
24
2
2

1
1

210 175
196 165
14 10
3
“
14 17
10 11
4
6
49 40
46 37
3
3
28 31
24 30
4
1
119 87
116 87
3
-

-

“
6
6
“
2
2

*
3
3

-

-

-

-

75
74
1
“
8
7
1
19
19
37
37
“
11
11
-

53

52
1
“
3
2
1
18
18
*
32
32

20
20
1
1
*

-

-

-

-

-

-

—

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

“

-

*

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

22
22

-

-

-

-

“
-

7

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and W om en— Continued
(A verage stra igh t-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry d ivision , R o ch ester, N . Y . , July 1968)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number weekly
of
hours1
standard) Mean2 Median 2 Middle range 2

$

60
and
under
65

$

Num ber of w orkers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings o —
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
s
65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 190 150 160 170 180 190
and
70___ 75___ 80___ 85 __IS___ 25 100 105 n o 115 120
__ LM 1*0 150 160 170 180 190
*

*

t

WOKEN - CONTINUED
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------ ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL -----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------TYPISlS, CLASS A --------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------TYPISTS, CLASS B --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

$
$
$
$
92 39.5 111.50 105.00 9 9 .0 0 -1 3 6 .0C
28 90 .0 122.50 122.50 1 0 3 .5 0 -1 9 3 .0 0
105
75
30
253
232
899
596

39.5
90 .0
C
90 .0
90 .0
39.0
90 .0

95.50
99.00
‘ "-00
105.00
106.00
92.00
97.00

93 .00
96 .50
87.00
108.00
109.00
93 .50
99 .50

8 6 .5 0 -1 0 5 .0 0
8 9 .0 0 -1 0 8 .0 0
8 0 .0 0 - 95.50
9 7 .5 0 -1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0 -1 1 5 .5 0
8 3 .5 0 -1 0 1 .5 0
8 9 .5 0 -1 0 3 .5 0

-

2

-

—

-

-

-

-

5
“

2
2
66
3

2

-

4
“

11
11

2
-

2
1

1
1

5 19
8 13 21 18
8 19 15
3 12
8
5
3
2
2
7
9 19 20 19 26
9
6 10 18 19 23
2
57 199 100 109 132 199
9 75 67 72 84 199

10
8
2
93
93
66
66

8
8
97
97
11
11

5
5
99
49
5
5

-

2

1
-

3
3

1
1

2
2

9
9

-

-

-

-

1
1
9
7

1
1
-

1
1
-

-

1
1
9
9

5
5
1
1

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

“
~

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

_

_

“

1 Standard hours refle ct the workweek for which em ployees r eceive their regular stra ig h t-tim e sa la rie s (exclu sive of pay for overtim e at regular a n d /o r prem ium r a te s), and the earnings correspond
to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of a ll w orkers and dividing by the number of w ork ers.
The median d esignates position— half of the em ployees surveyed r eceive m ore
than the rate shown; half r eceive le ss than the rate shown.
The m iddle range is defined by 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the w orkers earn le ss than the low er of these rates and a fourth earn m ore than
the higher rate.
T May include w orkers other than those presented separately.
4 Tran sportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities.




8

Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men and W omen
(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an a rea basis
by industry division, R ochester, N.Y., July 1968)
Weekly eam
ings1
(stan ard)
c
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of

Number of w orkers receiving straight tim e w eekly earnings of---$

Average
weekly
fstan
dard)

*
75

Mean2

M
edian 2

M
iddle range 2

$
80

$
85

*

$

90

95

!
100

s

$
105

110

$
115

t
120

)
125

S
130

*
135

*
140

$
145

$
150

S
160

$
170

$
180

80

$

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

145

19 0

20 0

-

and
under

and

150

160

170

180

190

20 0

12

46
41

102
87

94
92

36
32

28
24

26
26

58
53

57
51

17
17

4

6
6

4

4

~

~

~

-

-

M
EN
'$

$
35 7

$

1 , 0 . , o'
1 7 2 .0 0

4 0 .0

17 •

307

'0 0

1 i ." -n
1^6 00 J / /

fn r
105

4 0 .0

ii
11n 'n n

LZ 1 .-.0

1 0 9 .0 0 -1 3 1 .0 0

87
77

40*0

1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0

1 0 6 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0

9 4 .5 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0

116

4 0 .0

1 4 2 .5 0

1 4 5 .0 0

1 2 9 .0 0 -1 5 8 .0 0

18
18

1

2
12
12

1

22 11

23 15

7
7

13
11

-

25

2t>

23
19

58
45

89
85

XL

Q0

18

13

16

12

13

10

3

21
21

W EN
OM

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)

------

1

-

-

-

3

3

12

15

19

21

3

-

Standard hours reflect the workweek for w hich em ployees receive their reg ular straight-tim e sa la rie s (exclusive of pay for overtim e at regular and /or prem ium rate s), and the earnings correspond
to these weekly hours.
F or definition of te rm s, see footnote 2, table A -l.

Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and W omen Combined
(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an area basis
by industry division, R ochester, N. Y. , July 1968)
O ccupation and industry division
OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING

Average
Number Weekly Weekly
of
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

41 40 .0
39.0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------See footnotes at end of table.




107 39.5
36 39.0

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
$
CLASS B ----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------9 1 .50j
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------73.50
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 2 ----------------------105.50
106.00 CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -----------104.50
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

Number
of

74
40
34
298
187
111
32
336
191
145

Average
Weekly Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

Occupation and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A ----------------------i
39.5 8 9 .00
40 .0 93.50 CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B ----------------------39.0 84.00
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------40 .0 118.00
4 0 .0 123.50 CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C ----------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------40 .0 108.00
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------39.5 118.00
39.5 9 4 .5C CLERKS, ORDER-------------------------------,-----40 .0 100.50
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------39.5 87.00

Average
Number Weekly
Weekly
of
hours 1
woikers (standard) earnings 1
(standard)
30
133
76
57

39.5
39.0
39.5
38.5
210
38.5
46 39.5
164 38.5
146 39.5
110
39.5

>
106.50
86.50
91.00
80.00
75.00
91.50
70.50
101.50
106.50

9

Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and W omen Combined— Continued

Occupation and industry division

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings for selected occupations studied on an a re a basis
by industry division, R ochester, N. Y. , July 1968)
Average
Average
Number Weekly Weekly
Number Weekly Weekly
O ccupation and industry division
of hours 1 earnings 1
Occupation and industry division
of
hours 1
woikers (standard) earnings 1
(standard) (standard)
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUEO

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONHANUF ACTUR1NG — — — — — — —
———— —

186
30
269
215
54

4 0 .0
40 .0
39.5
39.5
39.5

$
114.00
93.00
106.50
107.00
103.50

478 40*0 99.50
MANUFACTURING -------J-----------------------101
38.5 80.50
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------200
40 .0 88.50
OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS------------------------NONHANUFACT UR ING — — — — — — — —
—— —————
31
---------- —
— 1,853 39.5 130.00
SECRETARIES3
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — — — — 1,500 40 .0 134.50
—— —— —— — ——
50 39 .0 103.00
PUBLIC UTILITIES 2 ----------------------SECRETARIES* CLASS A — — — — — — 109 39.5 135.00
— —— ——
70 40 .0 136.00
39 38.5 133.00
____
Z^4 39*0

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUEO

NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------SECRETARIES* CLASS D ---------------- “
STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL --------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------STENOGRAPHERS* SENIOR — — — —
—
—
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS* CLASS A
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —
—————
SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS 8 ------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------SWITCHBOARD 0PERAT0R-RECEPTICNISTSCLASS A

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
462
73
933
167
732
137
712

39.5 134.00
38.5 120.50
39.5 124.00

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

39.5 105.00
38.0 98.00
40 .0 117.00

TYPISTS* CLASS B — ----------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

80 40 .0
74 40 .0
39.5
68
45 39.0
193 39.5
39.5
111
82 39.5
31

A ----------------------------109.50 DRAFTSMEN, CLASS --------------------------------MANUFACTURING
1 1 0 .0 0
92 .50 DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ----------------------------82.50
92.50
93 .50
90.50
NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----

Average
Number Weekly Weekly
of hours 1
woikers (standard) earnings 1
(standard)
74 40 .0 $ 2 0 . 0 0
1
60 40 .0 127.00
105 39.5 95 .50
75 40 .0 99.00
30 39.0 8 8 . 0 0
105.00
106.00
901 39.0 92.00
596 40 .0 97 .00
305
362
320
352
320
251
206
103
93

40 .0
40 .0
40 .0
40 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
40 .0
40 .0
40 .0

173.00
174.00
145.50
145.50
119.50
119.00
104.00
106.00
142.50

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which em ployees receive their regular straight-tim e sa la rie s (exclusive of pay for overtim e at regular an d /o r prem ium rates), and the earnings
correspond to these weekly hours.
2 T ransportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities.
3 May include w orkers other than those presented separately.




Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
Wage data for m aintenance and pow erplant occupations
w ere not collected in this area.

Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
Wage data for custodial and m aterial m ovem ent occupa­
tions w ere not collected in this area.

10
B. Establishment Practices and Supplementary Wage Provisions
Table B-l. Minimum Entrance Salaries for Women Office Workers

(D istrib u tio n of e sta b lish m e n ts stu died in a ll in d u strie s and in in d u stry d iv isio n s by m inim um e n tran c e sa la ry fo r se le cte d cate g o ries
of in ex p erien ced w om en office w o rk e rs , R o c h e ste r, N. Y. , Ju ly 1968)

M inim um w eekly stra ig h t-tim e sa la ry

E sta b lish m e n ts studied___

_ _

All
in d u strie s

___ _

E sta b lish m e n ts having a sp ec ified m in im u m .
$ 5 7 .9 0
$ 6 0 .0 0
6 2 . 50
6 5 . 00
6 7 .5 0
$ 7 0 . 00
$ 7 2 . 50
$ 7 5 . 00
$ 7 7 . 50
$ 8 0 . 00
$ 8 2 .5 0
$ 8 5 . 00
$ 8 7 .5 0
$ 9 0 . 00
$ 9 2 . 50
$ 9 5 .0 0

1

___

and un d er
and u n d er $
___________ ______________
and un d er $
________________________________
and u n d er $
_________
. __
and un der
and un d er
and un d er
and un d er
and un der
and un d er
and un d er
and un d er
and un d er
and un der
and o v e r.—------------------------------------------------ --------E sta b lish m e n ts having no sp ec ified m in im u m . ________
E sta b lish m e n ts w hich did not em ploy w o rk e rs
$
$
$

56

XXX

72

XXX

128

56

XXX

72

XXX

53

30

25

23

12

61

36

31

25

13

_

_

1

-

-

-

1
1
3

.
3
-

_
4
-

_
_
4
_

1
1
3

_
2
_

1

1
3
1
4
1
3
1
5

2
3
2

2
3
2

4
5
4
2
.
1
2
1

1
1
4

-

1

4
8
2
9
2
8
2
5
1
2
2
2

4
1
4
1
6
1
5
1
1
2
2

23

5

XXX

52

1
2
3

All
in d u strie s

O ther in ex p erien ced c le ric a l w o rk ers 2
M anufacturing
N onm anufacturing
B ased on sta n d a rd w eekly h o urs 3 of—
A ll
All
40
40
sched ules
schedules

j.2 8

............................
8 0 . 00
$ 6 2 . 5 0 ______________________________________
6 5 . 00
6 7 . 50
7 0 . 00
$ 7 2 . 5 0 ______________________________________
___
_ .
$ 7 5 . 0 0 . . . ________
$ 7 7 . 50
_______________________ . . ___
$ 8 0 . 00 ____ _
_
_____________
$ 8 2 . 50
. ___ _
_ _
_ . . . .
$ 8 5 . 0 0 ______________________________________
$ 8 7 . 50_______
_______ ___ ___ _______
$ 9 0 . 0 0 ______________________________________
$ 9 2 . 5 0 ______________________________________
_
_ _
_
_
_
$ 9 5 . 00

and u n d e r $

In exp erienced ty p ists
M anufacturing
N onm anufacturing
B ased on sta n d a rd w eekly h o urs 3 of--All
All
40
40
schedules
schedules

21

XXX

1
-

2
2

-

3

4
1
5
1
2
1
1
-

1
3
2
2
1
-

1
1
7

-

5
13

6
5
3

1
8
2
6
.
5
3
2

-

-

-

-

_

2

1

_

1

_
.

6

8
_

1
7

2
6

_

_
1

2
1

-

1

1

*

3

1
3

_

3

-

-

18

XXX

27

6

XXX

21

XXX

31

XXX

40

14

XXX

26

XXX

-

T h e se s a la rie s re la te to fo rm a lly e sta b lish e d m in im u m sta rtin g (hiring) re g u la r s tra ig h t-tim e s a la rie s th a t a re paid fo r sta n d a rd w orkw eeks.
E x clud es w o rk e rs in su b c le ric a l job s su ch a s m e ss e n g e r o r office g irl.
D ata a r e p re se n te d fo r a ll sta n d a rd w orkw eeks com bined, and fo r the m o st com m on sta n d a rd w orkw eek re p o rte d .




-




Table B-2. Shift Differentials
(L a te -s h ift pay p r o v is io n s fo r m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s b y type and am ount o f pay d iffe r e n t ia l,
R o c h e s t e r , N .Y ., July 1968)
(A ll plant w o r k e r s in m an u factu rin g : 100 p e rce n t)
P e r c e n t o f m an u factu rin g plant w o r k e r s —

ila te -s h ift pay p r o v is io n

In e s ta b lis h m e n ts having p r o v is io n s 1
fo r late sh ifts
S e co n d sh ift

76.7

T h ird o r o th er
sh ift

68.8

A c tu a lly w ork in g on late sh ifts

S econ d shift

14.9

T h ird o r oth er
shift

5.8

N o d iffe r e n t ia l f o r w o rk on late sh ift-----------------

2.4

0.8

0.4

(2)

P a y d iffe r e n t ia l f o r w o rk on late s h i ft _________

74.3

68.0

14.5

5.7

U n ifo rm cen ts (per h o u r ) _________________

59.3

54.2

12.5

5.0

2 V2 c e n t s ________________________________

3.7
2.3
.9
6.3
.8
1.9
.6
5.2
.3
37.2
-

.
5.1

1.1
.5
.4
.8
.2
.5
.4
.1
8.7
-

.4
-

T ype and am ount o f d iffe r e n t ia l:

5 cen ts
________ ______ ____
8 o r 9 c e n ts ___ . . . ___ ____ _ _.
10 c e n t s .. . .
. . _______________
11 o r 12 c e n ts _________ _________________
13 c e n t s .______________________________ __
14 cent s_______ ____________ ____ ____
15 c e n ts ______ . . ________ . . . . .
.
17 o r 19 ce n ts _____________ ________ .
20 c e n t s .___ _______________ ___ _________
25 c e n ts _________ ____
- ____ ___ ______ . . __
28 ce n ts
30 ce nt s------- ------- — —
----40 c e n ts ---------------------------------------------------

-

-

-

1.0
.9
4.0
.8
8.2
4.1
.3
3.8
26.0

-

-

-

.1
(2)
.1
.2
.2
.2
.2
3.6

U n ifo r m p e r c e nt a g e ------------------------------ -----

15.1

13.1

2.0

.6

10 p e r c e n t -______________________________
12 p e r c e n t_______ — . . . . . .
___ . . . -------15 p e r c e n t -------- --------- ------------------- 16 p e r c e n t ------------------- — — — 18 p e r c e n t_______________________________
25 p e r c e n t___ . _________ - _____ _ .
253 4 p e r c e n t ____________________________
/

10.8
1.7

4.7
3.2
1.7
2.5

1.5
.2
.3
-

(2)
.4
(2 )
.1

1.0

-

F u l l d a y 's pay fo r r e d u c e d h o u r s ___________

-

2.5
-

-

.6

-

.1

1 In clu d e s all plant w o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts c u r r e n t ly o p e ra tin g late s h ifts , and e s ta b lis h m e n ts w h ose fo r m a l p r o v is io n s
c o v e r late sh ifts e v e n though the e sta b lis h m e n ts w e r e not c u r r e n t ly o p e r a tin g late s h ifts .
2 L e s s than 0.05 p e r c e n t.

12

Table B-3. Scheduled W eekly H ours
( P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s by s ch e d u le d w eek ly h ou rs 1
o f f i r s t - s h if t w o r k e r s , R o c h e s t e r , N . Y . , July 1968)
Plant w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o rk e rs

W eekly h ou rs
A ll in d u s t r ie s 2

A ll w o r k e r s ______________________

____

30 hou rs
35 h o u r s ___________________________________________
36Vz h o u r s ____________________ ___________________
37 h o u r s ________________________________________ —
3 7 V2 h o u r s _________________________________________
O v e r 37V2 and under 40 h o u r s ___________________
40 h o u r s ___ ___________________________ __ _
O v e r 40 and under 45 h o u r s _____________________
45 h ou rs ________________ __ ___ _______ ____________
O v e r 45 h o u r s ____________ __________________ __

1
2
3
4
5

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u tilit ie s 3

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

100

100

100

100

3
-

3
-

-

-

-

5
(5 )
84
3
2
3

3
87
1
2
4

-

100
-

(5)
1
2
4
9
2
80
2
(?)
(5)

M anufacturing

P u blic u t ilit ie s 3

100

(5 )
4
(5)
96
-

S ch ed u led h ou rs a r e the w e e k ly h o u rs w h ich a m a jo r it y o f the fu ll- t im e w o r k e r s w e r e e x p e cte d to w o r k , w h ether they w e r e paid f o r at s t r a ig h t-t im e o r o v e r t im e r a te s .
In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il t r a d e , r e a l e s t a t e , and s e r v i c e s , in a d d ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
In clu d es data fo r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e r v i c e s , in a d d ition to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




100

68
29
2

13

Table B-4. Paid Holidays
(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o f fi c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s by nu m ber o f paid h olid a y s
p r o v id e d ann ually, R o c h e s t e r , N .Y ., July 1968)
Plant w o rk e rs

O ffice w o rk e rs

Item
A ll in d u s t r ie s 1

100

100

99

W o r k e r s in esta b lis h m e n ts pro v id in g
paid h o lid a y s --------------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in esta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
no paid h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------------

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 2

100

A ll w o r k e r s ___________________________________

M anufacturin g

100

95

A ll in d u s t r ie s 3

M anufacturing

P u blic u t ilit ie s 2

100

100

100

99

100

100

-

-

5

1

(4)

5
15
32
38
6

(4)
8
(4)
(4)
4
(4)
1
(4)
8
1
4
53
1
9
(4)
9
(4)

6
6
6
44
44

(4)
9
9
17
19
76
77
87
87
91
91
98
98
98
98
99

N um ber o f days
L e s s than 6 h o lid a y s ____________ _____________ —
6 h o lid a y s ______ ________________ _____ _______ _
6 h olid a y s plus 1 h a lf day_________________________
6 h olid a y s plus 2 o r 3 h a lf d a y s______________ ___
7 h o lid a y s __________________________________________
7 h olid a y s plus 1 h a lf day______ ___________
____ __
7 h olid a y s plus 2 h alf d a y s ______ __r
7 h olid a y s plus 4 h alf d a y s _______________________
8 h o lid a y s . ____ -_________ ____________________ __
8 h olid a y s plus 1 h alf d a y . . . . .
___ ____ .
8 h olid a y s plus 2 h a lf d a y s ___________________ __
9 h o lid a y s ____ -_____________ _ ______________
9 h olid a y s plus 1 h a lf day_________________________
10 h o lid a y s__ _______ ___ ____________ __
___
10 h olid a y s plus 1 h a lf d a y _______________________
11 h o lid a y s__ _________ __ ____ _______ _ ___
_______ 11 h o lid a y s plus 1 h a l f d a y _________

1

16
(4)
(4)
14
2
10
3
41
1
10
1
(4)

_
4
(4)
12

1

11

4
54
2
11

1

*

_

_

1

6
10
7
8
68
(4)

(4)
3

2

9

(4)
6
72
2
5
(4)

T o ta l h o lid a y tim e 5
1 p / 2 d a y s______
11 days o r m o r e _____________ ________________ —
lOVz days o r m o r e - — _____ _ ___ ____ _
1 0 days o r m o r e ___________________________________
9V2 days o r m o r e _________________________________
9 days o r m o r e ------------------------------------------------------8l/z days o r m o r e _________________________________
8 days o r m o r e -------------------------------------------------------7 V2 days o r m o r e ________ — — ------- —
----7 days o r m o r e _ __ __ ___ — — —
— _ —
6V2 days o r m o r e --------- ------- -------------- ----6 days o r m o r e ----------- -------------------------------------------4 days o r m o r e ________
________ ___ _____ —
3 days o r m o r e ____________________________________
2 days o r m o r e __ __ — —. . . — ____ _______ __ __
1 day o r m o r e ______________________________________

1
2
3
4
5
no h alf

■

(4)
1
1
11
12
56
56
68
68
82
82
98
98
98
99
99

_
1
1
12

14
72
72
84
84
96
96
100
100
100
100
100

44
44

76
76
91
91
95
95
95
95
95

_
(4)
(4)
5
7
85
85
96
96
99
99
100
100
100
100
100

(4)
(4)
(4)
68
68
68
68
77
77
83
94
100
100
100
100
100

In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v i c e s , in add ition to th ose in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilitie s
In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v i c e s , in a d d ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t .
A ll c o m b in a tio n s o f fu ll and h alf days that add to the sa m e am ount a r e c o m b in e d ; fo r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g a total o f 9 days in clu d es th ose w ith 9 fu ll days and
d a y s , 8 fu ll days and 2 h alf d a y s , 7 fu ll days and 4 h a lf d a y s , and s o on.
P r o p o r t io n s then w e re cu m u lated .




14

Table B-5. Paid V acations'
(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s by va ca tion pay
p r o v is io n s , R o c h e s t e r , N .Y ., J u ly 1968)
Plant w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk e rs

V a ca tion p o lic y
A ll in d u s tr ie s 2

A ll w o r k e r s __________ _______ _______ ____ _

All in d u s t r ie s 4

M anufacturing

M anufacturin g

P u blic u t i li t ie s 3

100

100

100

99
97
3

100
97
3

100
100
-

-

-

-

( 5)

"

■

( 5)

-

-

18
18
-

22
15
-

_
56
_

-

-

8
27
( 5)
(5)

72
_

-

7
35
( 5)
( 5)

1
53
3
42

1
46
4
47

-

-

-

2

2

-

_
14
2
83
1
( 5)

_
8
1
88
2
( 5)

32
4
58
1
4

31
6
57
1
6

85

4
( 5)
93
1
1

3
( 5)
93
2
2

6
8
80
1
4

5
10
79
1
6

100

1
( 5)
94
3
1

(5)
(5)
94
4
2

6
8
80
1
5

5
10
79
1
6

95

1
( 5)
94
3
2

( 5)
( 5)
94 •
4
2

100

P u blic utilitie s 3

100

100

100
99
1
-

100
100

M ethod o f paym ent

W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m e n ts pro v id in g
paid v a c a t io n s ..___________________________________
L e n g th -o f-tim e p a y m e n t______________________
P e r c e n ta g e paym ent___________________________
O th e r ___________________________ ________________
W o r k e r s in es ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s ________________________________

99
99
1
( 5)

-

_

A m oun t of v a ca tio n pay 6
A fte r 6 m onths o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek ________________________ ____________
1 w eek____________ _______
__ ______
. ..
O ver 1 and u n d er Z w e e k s .. .................. ......... ...
__
Z w e e k s ____________________________

_

-

A fte r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek _______________________________________
1 w eek ___
O ver 1 and under Z w e e k s _________________ _
Z w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver Z and u nd er 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s _______________ _____________________________

_

50
-

50

_
27
-

73
-

-

A fte r Z y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek ____________________________ __________________
O ver 1 and under Z w e e k s ________________________
Z w eeks
O ver Z and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w eek s _ _
__
__ _ _

15
-

-

4
-

96
-

-

A fte r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
_
___
_ ___
O v er 1 and under Z w e e k s .
.......
Z w eeks
. _
_ _ _ _ ___ __ .
_
O ver Z and under 3 w eek s ___ ____
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________

_
-

*

_
-

100
-

-

A fte r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
_
___ __
O ver 1 and under Z w eek s
_
_
Z w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v er Z and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w eeks __ __
_ __

See footn otes at end of table.




_
-

5

_
-

90
-

10

15
Table B-5.

Paid Vacations1 Continued
----

(P e rc e n t d istrib u tio n of plan t and office w o rk e rs in a ll in d u strie s and in in d u stry d iv ision s by vacation pay
p ro v isio n s, R o ch e ster, N .Y ., Ju ly 1968)
Plant w o r k e r s

O ffic e w o rk e rs

V a ca tio n p o lic y
A ll in d u s tr ie s 3

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t i li t ie s 3

1
2
77
7
11

_
3
77
10
11

_
95

1
1
16
10
71
1

_
1
11
13
75
1

_
5
95
-

1
1
14
11
70
2
1

_

_

1
9
15
72
3
1

-

1
1
10

1
5

-

-

72
3
13
1

79
4
11
1

1
1
8
27
3
55
4
1

-

A ll in d u s t r ie s 4

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

A m ou n t o f v a c a tio n pay 6— Con tinued

A ft e r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
. . .
. .
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v er 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________

-

5

( 5)
( 5)
80
5
14

_

(5)
(5)
77
6
17

88

_
6
5
85
4
-

_
4
94
2

-

12

A ft e r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_______________________________________________
O v er 1 and tinder 2 w eek s
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v er 2 and u nd er 3 w eek s
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w eek s
__ _____
_ _
_
__ _ _

(5)
12
6
79
3
1

A ft e r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_______________________________________________
O v er 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ______________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O v e r 3 and u n d er 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s _____________________________________________

5

_

( 5)
-

10
6
78
5
1

4
6
83
7
“

5
83
13
“

( 5)
5
1
78
1
15
"

1
( 5)
80
1
18
“

5
5
91
-

( 5)
•a5
1
20
1
62
10

1
( 5)
12
1
71
14

-

95
-

_
-

4
94
2

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_______________________________________________
O ver 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s _________________________________ i __________
O ver 2 and u n d er 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
5 w e e k s _____________________________________________

-

-

4
94
2
“

A ft e r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek_______________________________________________
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s __________ __ _____________________________
O ver 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s ________________________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s ________________________
4 w e e k s _____________________________________________
5 w e e k s _____________________________________________
6 w e e k s _____________________________________________

See fo o tn o te s at end o f table.




1
3
27
4
59
6
1

-

“
4
13
83
-

16

Table B-5. Paid V acatio ns'---- C ontinued
(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y v a ca tion payp r o v is io n s , R o c h e s t e r , N .Y ., J u ly 1968)
Plant w o r k e r s

O ffice w o rk e rs

V a ca tio n p o lic y
A ll in d u s tr ie s 2

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u tilitie s 3

All in d u s tr ie s 4

M anufacturing

P u blic u t ilit ie s 3

A m oun t o f v a ca tio n p a y 6— C on tinued

A ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek ______________________________________________
O v er 1 and under 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
4 w e e k s ___________________________________________ .
O ver 4 and u nd er 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w e e k s _____________________________________________
6 w e e k s _____________________________________________

i
i
8
22
58
1
8
1

_
i
3
21
64
2
10
1

5
5
85
6
*

( 5)
5
( 5)
12
67
2
14
-

_

_

-

-

i
( 5)
5
73
2
19
-

4
13
83
-

1
1
8

5
5
83
8
-

( 5)
5
( 5)
12
67
2
14
-

_
1
( 5)
5
72
2
19
-

_
4

22
55
3
9
1

1
3
21
60
4
11
1

1
1
8

1
3

_

( 5)

A ft e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
_
_ _
O ver 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ________________________
2 w eek s
_ _
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ________________________
_ _ _
_ _
3 w eeks _ _ __
4 w e e k s _________________________ __
_ _____ _
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ________________________
5 w e e k s _____________________________________________
6 w e e k s _____________________________________________

-

-

-

13
83
1
-

M axim u m v a ca tio n a v a ila b le
1 w eek _______________________________________________
O ver 1 and u n d er 2 w eeks
2 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eeks
3 w e e k s _____________________________________________
4 w eek s ___
O ver 4 and u nd er 5 w e e k s ________________________
5 w e e k s _____________________________________________
6 w e e k s _____________________________________________
O ver 6 w e e k s _______________________________________

-

-

22
55
3
9
1
1

21
60
4
10
1
1

( 5)

_

-

-

-

5
5
83
8
-

5
( 5)
12
67
2
14

1
( 5)
5
72
2
19

-

-

_
4
13
83
1
-

( 5)

1 In clu d es b a s ic plans o n ly . E x clu d e s plans su ch as v a c a t io n -s a v in g s and th o s e plans w h ich o ffe r "e x t e n d e d " o r " s a b b a t ic a l" b e n e fits b ey on d b a s ic plans to w o r k e r s w ith q u a lify in g lengths
o f s e r v ic e .
T y p ic a l o f such e x c lu s io n s a r e plans in the s t e e l, a lu m in u m , and can in d u s t r ie s .
2 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le t r a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s , in a d d ition to th o s e in d u s try d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 T r a n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilit ie s .
4 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s , in a d d itio n to th o se in d u s tr y d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
5 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
6 In clu d es paym en ts o th er than "le n g th o f t i m e , " such as p e r c e n ta g e o f annual e a r n in g s o r fla t - s u m p a y m e n ts , c o n v e r t e d to an e q u iv a len t tim e b a s is ; f o r e x a m p le , a paym ent o f 2 p e r c e n t
o f annual ea rn in g s w as c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e r io d s o f s e r v ic e w e re c h o s e n a r b i t r a r i l y and d o not n e c e s s a r il y r e f l e c t the in d ivid u al p r o v is io n s f o r p r o g r e s s io n . F o r e x a m p le , the ch an ges
in p r o p o r tio n s in d ica te d at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e in clu d e ch an ges in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r in g b e tw e e n 5 and 10 y e a r s . E s tim a te s a r e c u m u la tiv e . T h u s, the p r o p o r t io n e lig ib le f o r 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o r e '
a fte r 10 y e a r s in clu d e s th o se e lig ib le f o r 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o r e a fte r fe w e r y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .




17

Table B-6. H ealth, Insurance, and Pension Plans
(P e r c e n t o f plant and o f fi c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u s try d iv is io n s e m p lo y e d in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
h e a lth , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e f it s , 1 R o c h e s t e r , N .Y ., July 1968)
Plant w o rk e rs

O ffic e w o rk e rs

T y p e o f b e n e fit
A ll in d u s t r ie s 2

A ll w o r k e r s ___________________________________

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g at
le a s t 1 o f the b e n e fits show n b e l o w ____________
L ife in s u r a n c e --------------------------------------------------A c c id e n t a l death and d is m e m b e r m e n t
i n s u r a n c e ...___________________________________
S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e o r
s ic k lea v e o r b o t h 5________________ ________

M anufacturin g

P u b lic u t ilit ie s 3

100

100

100

100

All in d u s tr ie s 4

M anufacturing

P u blic u t ilit ie s 3

100

100

97

99

100

99

99

100

90

95

100

95

99

100

54

56

59

43

44

31

76

79

70

92

93

99

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e
S ick le a v e (fu ll pay and no
w aitin g p e r io d )____________________________
S ick le a v e (p a r t ia l p a y o r
w aiting p e r io d )____________________________

59

68

26

70

81

24

22

12

63

49

40

94

7

7

2

3

3

H o s p ita liz a tio n in s u r a n c e __ _________________
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e _____________________________
M e d ica l i n s u r a n c e _____________________________
C a ta s tr o p h e in s u r a n c e _________________________
R e tir e m e n t p e n sio n ____________________________

88
87
72
69
78

95
95
77
77
78

100
100
62
100
68

94
94
79
87
91

99
99
85
93
96

(6 )
100
100
32
98
83

1 In clu d es th o s e p lan s f o r w h ic h at le a s t a p a rt o f the c o s t is b o r n e b y the e m p lo y e r , e x c e p t th o se le g a lly r e q u ir e d , such as w ork m en *s c o m p e n s a tio n , s o c ia l s e c u r it y , and r a ilr o a d
r e tir e m e n t.
2 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e , r e t a il tr a d e , r e a l e s ta te , and s e r v ic e s , in a d d itio n to th o s e in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 T r a n sp o rta tio n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
4 In clu d es data f o r w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te ; and s e r v ic e s , in ad d ition to th o se in d u stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
5 U n du plica ted to ta l o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s ic k le a v e o r s ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e show n s e p a r a t e ly b e lo w .
S ick le a v e p lan s a r e lim ite d to th ose w h ich d e fin ite ly e s ta b lis h at lea s
the m in im u m n u m b e r o f days* pay that c a n b e e x p e c te d b y e a c h e m p lo y e e .
In fo rm a l s ic k le a v e a llo w a n c e s d e te r m in e d on an in d ivid u a l b a s is a r e e x clu d ed .
6 L e s s than 0. 5 p e r c e n t .




18

Table B-7. M ethod of W age Determ ination and Frequency of Payment
(P e rc e n t d istrib u tio n of plant and office w o rk e rs in a ll in d u strie s and in in d u stry d iv ision s by m ethod of w age d e te rm in a tio n 1
and frequ en cy of w age paym ent, R o ch e ster, N .Y ., July 1968)
Item

P lant w o rk ers
All in d u s trie s 2

M anufacturing

Office w orkers
Public u tilitie s 3

All in d u s trie s 4

M anufacturing

Public u tilitie s 3

10
0
M ethod of wage d e te rm in a tio n 1
P aid tim e ra te s -------------------------------------------------F o rm a l ra te p o lic y -------------------------------------Single r a t e . ___ __
_ __ ____ — .
Range of r a t e s ___________________________
P ro g re s s io n b ased on auto m atic
advancem ent acco rd ing to
length of s e r v ic e ______-_____________
P ro g re ssio n based on m e rit
re v ie w .__________ _______ - ----------P ro g re ssio n b ased on a
com bination of length of
se rv ic e and m e rit rev iew ___—______
No fo rm a l ra te policy_______________________
P aid by incentive m eth ods__________________ ___
P ie c e ra te ---------------------------------------------- — —Individual
_
___ ... . . .. .
G roup-------------------------------------------------------P ro d u ctio n bonus__
___
Individual_____ _ _ .
G roup_____________________________________
C o m m issio n -------------------------------------------------F req u e n c y of wage paym ent
W eekly__________________________________________
Riw eekly
Sem im onthly
M onthly_________________________________________
O ther fre q u e n c y ________________________________

1
2
3
4
5

10
0

1
00

1
00

100

1
00

71
63
18
46

64
61
19
42

1
00
95
45
50

99
83
(5)
82

99
89
89

100
81
5
75

7
2
0

5
2
1

8
38

1
67

1
79

7
6
8

19
8
29
1
1
1
0
(5)
17
4
13
1

16
3
36
14
14
(5)
22
6

5
5
“
“

14
17
(5)

9
1
1
(! )

(5)
19
-

99
(5)
-

1
00
-

17

“

100
-

M ethod of d eterm in in g incentive pay of office w o rk e rs not p re se n te d .

92
5
3
-

F o r a d e sc rip tio n of the m ethods of w age d e te rm in a tio n , see Introdu ction.
Includes data for w ho lesale tra d e , r e ta il tra d e , re a l e s ta te , and s e rv ic e s , in addition to tho se in d u stry d iv ision s show n se p a rate ly .
T ra n sp o rta tio n , com m un icatio n, and o th er public u tilitie s.
Includ es d ata fo r w ho lesale tra d e ; r e ta il tra d e ; finance, in su ra n c e , and r e a l e sta te ; and s e rv ic e s , in addition to tho se in d u stry d iv ision s show n se p a ra te ly .
L ess than 0.5 p e rce n t.




94
4
2

-

99
(5)
-

A p p e n d ix .

O c c u p a t io n a l D e s c r i p t i o n s

The p rim a ry pu rp ose of p re p a rin g job d e sc rip tio n s for the B u re a u 's wage su rv ey s is to a s s is t its field staff in classify in g into ap p ro p ria te
occupations w o rk e rs who a re em ployed under a v a rie ty of p ay ro ll title s and differen t w ork a rra n g e m e n ts fro m e stab lish m en t to e stab lish m en t and
fro m a re a to a re a . T his p e rm its the grouping of occupational wage ra te s rep re se n tin g co m p arab le job content. B ecause of this em p hasis on
in te re sta b lish m e n t and in te ra re a co m p a ra b ility of occupational content, the B u re a u 's job d e sc rip tio n s m ay differ sig nifican tly fro m those in use in
individual e sta b lish m e n ts o r those p re p a re d for o th er p u rp o se s. In applying th ese job d e sc rip tio n s, the B u re a u 's field eco no m ists a re in stru cte d
to exclude w orking su p e rv iso rs; a p p re n tic e s; le a rn e rs ; beg in n ers; tra in e e s; and handicapped, p a rt-tim e , te m p o rary , and p ro b atio n ary w o rk e rs.
OFFICE

B ILLER , MACHINE
P re p a re s sta te m e n ts, b ills , and invoices on a m achine oth er than an o rd in a ry or e le c tro m atic ty p e w rite r. M ay a lso keep re c o rd s as to b illin g s or shipping c h arg es or p e rfo rm other
c le ric a l w ork in cid en tal to billing o p eratio n s. F o r wage study p u rp o se s, b ille rs , m achin e, a re
c la ssifie d by type of m achin e, as follow s:
B ille r, m achine (billing m achine). U ses a sp ecial billing m achine (Moon H opkins, E llio tt
F is h e r, B u rro u g h s, e tc ., w hich a re com bination typing and adding m achines) to p re p a re bills
and invoices fro m c u sto m e rs ' p u rch ase o rd e rs , in te rn a lly p re p a re d o rd e rs , shipping m em o­
ran d u m s, etc. U sually involves ap p lication of p re d e te rm in e d d isco un ts and shipping c h a rg e s,
and e n try of n e c e s s a ry exten sio n s, w hich m ay or m ay not be com puted on the billing m achin e,
and to ta ls w hich a re au to m atically accu m ulated by m achin e. The o p eration u sually involves
a la rg e num ber of carbo n copies of the bill being p re p a re d and is often done on a fanfold
m achin e.
B ille r, m achine (bookkeeping m achine). U ses a bookkeeping m achine (S undstrand, E llio tt
F is h e r, R em ington Rand, e tc ., w hich m ay or m ay not have ty p e w rite r keyboard) to p re p a re
c u sto m e rs ' b ills as p a rt of the accounts rec e iv a b le o p eratio n . G enerally involves the sim u lta ­
neous e n try of fig u re s on c u sto m e rs ' led g er re c o rd . The m achine au to m a tica lly accu m u lates
fig u re s on a num ber of v e rtic a l colum ns and com putes, and usu ally p rin ts au to m a tica lly the
deb it or c re d it b a lan ces. D oes not involve a know ledge of bookkeeping. W orks fro m uniform
and stan d ard types of sa le s and c re d it slip s.
BOOKKEEPING-M ACHINE OPERATOR
O p erates a bookkeeping m achine (R em ington Rand, E llio tt F is h e r, S u ndstrand , B u rrou ghs,
N ational C ash R e g iste r, w ith or w ithout a ty p e w rite r keyboard) to keep a re c o rd of b u sin e ss
tra n sa c tio n s.
C la ss A. K eeps a se t of re c o rd s req u irin g a know ledge of and ex p erien ce in basic
bookkeeping p rin c ip les, and fa m ilia rity w ith the stru c tu re of the p a rtic u la r accounting sy stem
used . D eterm in es p ro p e r re c o rd s and d istrib u tio n of deb it and c re d it ite m s to be used in each
phase of the w ork. M ay p re p a re consolid ated re p o rts , balance sh e e ts, and o th er re c o rd s
by hand.
C la ss B. K eeps a re c o rd of one or m o re p h ases or sectio n s of a se t of re c o rd s usually
req u irin g little know ledge of basic bookkeeping. P h ase s or sectio n s include accounts payable,
p ay ro ll, c u sto m e rs ' acco unts (not including a sim ple type of billing d e sc rib e d under b ille r,
m achine), c o st d istrib u tio n , expense d istrib u tio n , inventory co n tro l, e tc. M ay check or a s s is t
in p re p a ra tio n of tr ia l b alances and p re p a re co n tro l sh eets for the accounting d e p artm e n t.
CLER K , ACCOUNTING
C lass A. U nder g e n era l d ire c tio n of a oookkeeper or acco untan t, has re sp o n sib ility for
keeping one or m o re sectio n s of a c'om plete se t o i books or re c o rd s rela tin g to one phase
of an e sta b lish m e n t's b u sin e ss tra n sa c tio n s. W ork involves posting and balancing su b sid iary
ledg er or le d g ers such as acco unts rec e iv a b le or acco unts payable; exam ining and coding
invoices or v o uchers w ith p ro p er accounting d istrib u tio n ; and re q u ire s judgm ent and e x p e ri­
ence in m aking p ro p e r a ssig n a tio n s and allo c a tio n s. M ay a s s is t in p re p a rin g , a d ju sting , and
closing jo u rn al e n trie s ; and m ay d ire c t c la ss B accounting c le rk s .
C la ss B. U nder su p e rv isio n , p e rfo rm s one or m o re routine accounting o p eratio n s such
as posting sim ple jo u rn al vo uchers or accounts payable vo u ch ers, en terin g vo uchers in
voucher re g is te rs ; recon ciling bank acco unts; and posting su b sid iary le d g ers c o n tro lled by
g e n era l le d g e rs, or posting sim ple c o st accounting d ata. T his job does not re q u ire a know l­
edge of accounting and bookkeeping p rin c ip les but is found in offices in w hich the m o re routine
accounting w ork is subdivided on a functional b a sis am ong se v e ra l w o rk e rs.




CLER K , F IL E
C la ss A . In an esta b lish e d filing sy stem containing a num ber of v aried subject m a tte r
file s , c la s sifie s and indexes file m a te ria l such as co rre sp o n d e n c e, re p o rts, ^technical docu­
m en ts, e tc. M ay a lso file th is m a te ria l. M ay keep re c o rd s of v ariou s types in conjunction
w ith the file s . M ay lead a sm all group of low er level file c le rk s .
C la ss B. S o rts, cod es, and file s u n c lassifie d m a te ria l by sim ple ( su bject m a tte r) head ­
ings ~or~~paftly c la ssifie d m a te ria l by fin e r subheadings. P re p a re s sim ple re la te d index and
c ro s s -re fe re n c e a id s. As req u e ste d , lo c a te s c le a rly identified m a te ria l in file s and fo rw ard s
m a te ria l. M ay p e rfo rm re la te d c le ric a l ta sk s req u ired to m ain tain and se rv ic e files.
C la ss C. P e rfo rm s routin e filing of m a te ria l th at has a lre a d y been c la ssifie d or which
is e a sily c la ssifie d in a sim ple s e ria l c la ssific a tio n sy stem (e.g ., a lp h ab etical, chron olog ical,
or n u m e rica l). As req u e ste d , lo c a te s re a d ily av ailable m a te ria l in file s and fo rw ard s m a ­
te ria l; and m ay fill out w ithdraw al c h arg e. P e rfo rm s sim ple c le ric a l and m anual ta sk s r e ­
q u ired to m ain tain and se rv ic e file s.
CLER K , ORDER
R eceiv es c u sto m e rs ' o rd e rs fo r m a te ria l or m e rch an d ise by m a il, phone, or p erso n ally .
D uties involve any com bination of the follow ing: Quoting p ric e s to c u sto m e rs; m aking out an o rd e r
sh eet listin g the ite m s to m ake up the o rd e r; checking p ric e s and q u an tities of itgm s on o rd e r
sheet; and d istrib u tin g o rd e r sh eets to resp e ctiv e d e p artm e n ts to be filled . M ay check w ith c re d it
d e p artm e n t to d e te rm in e c re d it ratin g of c u sto m e r, acknow ledge re c e ip t of o rd e rs fro m c u sto m e rs,
follow up o rd e rs to see th at they have been filled , keep file of o rd e rs receiv ed , and check shipping
invoices w ith orig in al o rd e rs.
C LER K , PAYROLL
C om putes w ages of com pany em ployees and e n te rs the n e c e ssa ry data on the payroll
sh ee ts. D uties involve: C alculating w o rk e rs ' e arn in g s b ased on tim e or production re c o rd s; and
posting c alcu lated data on pay ro ll sh eet, showing inform atio n such as w o rk e r's nam e, w orking
days, tim e , ra te , deductions for in su ran ce , and total w ages due. May m ake out paychecks and
a s s is t p a y m a ste r in m aking up and d istrib u tin g pay env elo pes. May use a calcu latin g m achine.
CO M PTO M ETER OPERATOR
P rim a ry duty is to o p erate a C om pto m eter to p e rfo rm m a th em atical com putatio ns. T his
job is not to be confused w ith that of sta tistic a l or o th er type of c le rk , which m ay involve f r e ­
quent use of a C om pto m eter but, in w hich, use of this m achine is incidental to perfo rm an ce of
oth er du ties.
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
C la ss A. O p erates a n u m erical a n d /o r a lp h ab etical or com bination keypunch m achine to
tra n sc rib e data fro m vario u s so urce docum ents to keypunch tabulating c a rd s . P e rfo rm s sam e
ta sk s a s low er level keypunch o p e ra to r but, in addition, w ork re q u ire s app lication of coding
sk ills and the m aking of som e d e te rm in a tio n s, for exam p le, lo c a te s on the so urce docum ent
the ite m s to be punched; e x tra c ts inform atio n fro m se v e ra l docum ents; and se a rc h e s for and
in te rp re ts inform atio n on the docum ent to d e te rm in e inform atio n to be punched. M ay tra in
inex p erien ced o p e ra to rs.

19

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KEYPUNCH OPERATOR— Continued
C la ss B. U nder close su p e rv isio n or follow ing sp ecific p ro c e d u re s or in stru c tio n s,
tr a n s c rib e s data fro m so u rce docum ents to punched c a rd s . O p erates a n u m e rica l a n d /o r
alp h ab etical or com bination keypunch m achine to keypunch tabulating c a rd s. M ay v e rify c a rd s .
W orking fro m vario u s stan d a rd iz e d so u rce d o cum en ts, follow s sp ecified sequ ences w hich have
been coded or p re sc rib e d in d e ta il and re q u ire little o r no selectin g , coding, or in te rp retin g
of data to be punched. P ro b lem s a ris in g fro m e rro n eo u s ite m s or cod es, m issin g in form atio n,
e tc ., a re re fe rre d to su p e rv iso r.
O FFIC E BOY OR GIRL
P e rfo rm s v ariou s routin e d u ties such as running e rra n d s , op erating m in o r office m a ­
chines such as se a le rs or m a ile rs , opening and d istrib u tin g m a il, and oth er m in o r c le ric a l w ork.
SECRETARY
A ssigned as p erso n al se c re ta ry , n o rm a lly to one individual. M aintains a close and highly
resp o n siv e rela tio n sh ip to the d a y -to -d a y w ork a c tiv itie s of the su p e rv iso r. W orks fa irly ind e­
pendently receiv in g a m inim um of detailed su p e rv isio n and guidance. P e rfo rm s v a ried c le ric a l
and s e c re ta ria l d u tie s, u su a lly including m o st of the follow ing: (a) R eceiv es telephone c a lls ,
p e rso n al c a lle rs , and incom ing m a il, a n sw e rs routin e in q u irie s, and ro u te s the tech n ical in q u irie s
to the p ro p e r p e rso n s; (b) e sta b lish e s, m a in tain s, and re v ise s the su p e rv is o r's file s; (c) m ain tain s
the su p e rv is o r's c alen d ar and m ak es app ointm ents a s in stru cte d ; (d) re la y s m e ssa g e s fro m su p e r­
v iso r to su b o rd in ates; (e) rev iew s c o rre sp o n d e n c e, m em o ran d a, and re p o rts p re p a re d by o th e rs
for the s u p e rv is o r's sig n atu re to a s s u re p ro c e d u ra l and typographic accu racy ; and (f) p e rfo rm s
steno grap hic and typing w ork.
M ay a lso p e rfo rm o th er c le ric a l and s e c re ta ria l ta sk s of com parable n atu re and difficulty.
The w ork ty p ically re q u ire s know ledge of office routin e and understan din g of the o rg an ization ,
p ro g ra m s, Sind p ro c e d u re s re la te d to the w ork of the su p e rv iso r.
E xclusio ns
Not all po sition s th at a re title d " s e c re ta ry " p o sse ss the above c h a ra c te ris tic s . E xam p les
of po sition s w hich a re excluded fro m the definitio n a re a s follow s: (a) P o sitio n s w hich do not m eet
the "p e rso n a l" s e c re ta ry concept d e sc rib e d above; (b) ste n o g rap h e rs not fully train ed in s e c re ta ria l
type du ties; (c) ste n o g rap h e rs se rv in g a s office a s s is ta n ts to a group of p ro fe ssio n a l, tech n ical,
or m a n ag eria l p e rso n s; (d) s e c re ta ry po sition s in w hich the du ties a re e ith e r su b sta n tia lly m o re
routine or su b sta n tia lly m o re com plex and resp o n sib le than those c h a ra c te riz e d in the definition;
and (e) a s s is ta n t type po sition s w hich involve m o re d ifficu lt or m o re resp o n sib le tech n ical, adm in­
is tra tiv e , su p e rv iso ry , or sp ec ia liz ed c le ric a l d u ties w hich a re not ty p ical of s e c re ta ria l w ork.
N O TE : The te rm " c o rp o ra te o ffic e r," u sed in the level definitio ns follow ing, re fe rs to
those o fficials who have a sig nifican t c o rp o ra te -w id e policym aking role w ith re g a rd to m ajo r
com pany a c tiv itie s. The title "vice p re s id e n t," though n o rm a lly indicative of th is ro le , does not
in all c a se s identify such po sitio n s. Vice p re sid e n ts w hose p rim a ry re sp o n sib ility is to a ct p e r­
sonally on individual c a se s o r tra n sa c tio n s (e.g ., approve or deny individual loan or c re d it actio ns;
a d m in iste r individual tr u s t acco unts; d ire c tly su p e rv ise a c le ric a l staff) a re not co n sid e re d to be
" c o rp o ra te o ffice rs" fo r p u rp o ses of applying the follow ing level d e fin itio n s.
C la ss A
a. S e c re ta ry to the c h a irm a n of the bo ard or p re sid e n t of a com pany th a t em p loys, in all,
over 100 but few er than 5,0 00 p e rs o n s ; or
b. S e c re ta ry to a c o rp o ra te officer (o th er than the c h airm an of the b o ard or p resident)
of a com pany th at em p loyes, in a ll, ov er 5, 000 but few er than 25, 000 p e rs o n s ; or
c. S e c re ta ry to the head (im m ed iately below the c o rp o ra te officer level) of a m a jo r se g ­
m ent or su b sid iary of a com pany th a t em p loys, in a ll, ov er 25-, 000 p e rso n s.
C la ss B
a. S e c re ta ry to the ch a irm a n of the bo ard or p re sid e n t of a com pany th a t em p loys, in a ll,
few er than 1 0 0 p e rso n s; or
b. S e c re ta ry to a c o rp o ra te officer (other than c h a irm a n of the bo ard or p resid en t) of
a com pany th a t em p loys, in a ll, over 100 but few er than 5, 000 p e rs o n s ; or
c. S e c re ta ry to the head (im m ed iately below the o fficer level) ov er e ith e r a m ajo r
c o rp o ra te -w id e functional a ctiv ity (e.g ., m ark etin g , re s e a rc h , o p e ra tio n s, in d u stria l re la tio n s, etc.)
or a m a jo r geographic or o rg an izatio n al segm ent (e.g ., a reg io n al h e a d q u a rte rs; a m a jo r division)
oFa com pany th at em ploys, in a ll, over 5, 000 but few er than 25, 000 em p loyees; or




SECRETARY— Continued
d. S e c re ta ry to the head of an individual plant, fa c to ry , e tc. (or o th er equivalent level
of official) th at em p loys, in a ll, o v er 5, 000 p e rso n s; or
e. S e c re ta ry to the head of a la rg e and im p o rta n t o rg an izatio n al segm ent (e.g ., a m iddle
m anagem ent su p e rv iso r of an organ izatio n al segm ent often involving a s m any as se v e ra l hundred
person s) of a com pany th at em p loys, in a ll, ov er 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la ss C
a. S e c re ta ry to an executive or m a n ag eria l p e rso n w hose resp o n sib ility is not equivalent
to one of the sp ecific level situ atio n s in the definition fo r c la s s B, but w hose su bordin ate staff
n o rm a lly nu m b ers a t le a s t se v e ra l dozen em ployees and is u su ally divided into o rgan ization al
segm ents w hich a re often, in tu rn , fu rth e r subdivided. In som e com panies, th is level includes a
wide ran ge of o rg an izatio n al ech elons; in o th e rs, only one or two; or
b. S e c re ta ry to the head of an individual plant, fa c to ry , e tc. (o r oth er equ ivalen t level of
official) th a t em p loys, in a ll, few er than 5, 000 p e rso n s.
C la ss D
a. S e c re ta ry to the su p e rv iso r or head of a sm all organ izatio n al u n it (e.g ., few er than
about 25 or 30 p e rso n s); or
b. S e c re ta ry to a n o n su p e rv iso ry staff sp e c ia list, p ro fe ssio n a l em ployee, a d m in istra tiv e
o ffice r, or a s s is ta n t, sk illed tech n ician or e x p ert. (NO TE: M any com panies a ssig n ste n o g rap h e rs,
ra th e r than s e c re ta rie s as d e sc rib e d above, to this level of su p e rv iso ry o r n o n su p e rv iso ry w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER, GEN ERA L
P rim a ry duty is to take dictatio n involving a n o rm a l routin e v o cab ulary fro m one or m o re
p e rso n s e ith e r in sh orthand or by Stenotype or sim ila r m achine; and tra n sc rib e d ictatio n . May
a lso type fro m w ritte n copy. M ay m ain tain file s , keep sim ple re c o rd s , or p e rfo rm o th er re la tiv e ly
routin e c le ric a l ta sk s . M ay o p erate fro m a steno grap hic pool. Does not include tra n sc rib in g m achine w ork. (See tra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e o p e ra to r.)
STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
P rim a ry duty is to take d ictatio n involving a v a ried tech n ical or sp ecialized v o cab ulary
such as in legal b rie fs or re p o rts on scien tific r e s e a rc h fro m one or m o re p e rso n s e ith e r in sh o rt­
hand or by Stenotype or sim ila r m achin e; and tra n s c rib e d ictatio n . M ay a lso type fro m w ritten
copy. M ay a lso se t up and m ain tain file s , keep re c o rd s , etc.
OR
P e rfo rm s steno grap hic d u ties req u irin g sig n ifican tly g re a te r independence and re s p o n si­
b ility than ste n o g ra p h e rs, g e n era l as evidenced by the follow ing: W ork re q u ire s high" deg ree of
steno grap hic speed and a cc u ra c y ; and a thorough w orking know ledge of g en eral b u sin e ss and office
p ro c e d u re s and of the sp ecific b u sin e ss o p e ra tio n s, org an izatio n , p o lic ies, p ro c e d u re s, file s,
w orkflow , e tc. U ses th is know ledge in p erfo rm in g steno grap hic du ties and resp o n sib le c le ric a l
ta sk s such a s, m ain tain ing follow up file s ; a ssem b lin g m a te ria l fo r re p o rts , m em o ran d u m s, le tte r s ,
e tc .; com posing sim ple le tte r s fro m g e n era l in stru ctio n s; read in g and routing incom ing m ail; and
answ erin g routin e qu estio n s, e tc. D oes not include tra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e w ork.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
C la ss A . O p erates a single- or m u ltip le -p o sitio n telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, in tra p la n t or office c a lls . P e rfo rm s full telephone in form atio n se rv ic e or handles
com plex c a lls , such as c o n feren ce, c o lle c t, o v e rse a s, o r sim ila r c a lls , e ith e r in addition to doing
routine w ork as d e sc rib e d fo r sw itchboard o p e ra to r, c la s s B, o r as a fu ll-tim e assig n m en t.
("F u ll" telephone in form atio n se rv ic e o c c u rs w hen the e sta b lish m e n t has v aried functions th a t a re
not rea d ily u n derstan dable fo r telephone in form atio n p u rp o se s, e .g ., because of overlapping or
in te rre la te d functio ns, and con sequen tly p re se n t freq u en t pro b lem s as to w hich ex tensions a re
a p p ro p ria te fo r c alls.)
C la ss B. O perates a single- or m u ltip le -p o sitio n telephone sw itchboard handling incom ing,
outgoing, in tra p la n t or office c a lls . M ay handle routin e long distan ce c alls and re c o rd to lls. May
p e rfo rm lim ited telephone inform atio n se rv ic e . ("L im ited " telephone inform atio n se rv ic e o ccu rs
if the functions of the e sta b lish m e n t se rv ic e d a re re a d ily un d erstan d ab le fo r telephone inform atio n
p u rp o se s, o r if the re q u e sts a re ro u tin e, e .g ., giving extension n u m b ers w hen sp ecific nam es a re
fu rn ish ed , or if com plex c a lls a re re f e rr e d to an o th er o p e ra to r.)

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SWITCHBOARD O PER A TO R -R EC EPTIO N IST
In addition to p e rfo rm in g du ties of o p e ra to r on a sin g le -p o sitio n or m o n ito r-ty p e sw itch­
b o ard , a cts as re c e p tio n ist and m ay a lso type or p e rfo rm routine c le ric a l w ork as p a rt of reg u la r
d u tie s. T his typing o r c le ric a l w ork m ay take the m ajo r p a rt of th is w o rk e r's tim e w hile at
sw itchboard.
TABULATING-M ACHINE O PERATO R
C lass A . O p e ra te s a v a rie ty of tabu latin g or e le c tric a l accounting m ach in es, ty p ically
including such m achin es as the ta b u lato r, c alc u lato r, in te rp re te r, c o lla to r, and o th e rs.
P e rfo rm s com plete rep o rtin g assig n m en ts w ithout close su p e rv isio n , and p e rfo rm s difficult
w irin g as re q u ire d . The com plete rep o rtin g and tabulating assig n m e n ts typ ically involve a
v a rie ty of long and com plex re p o rts w hich often a re of irre g u la r o r n o n re cu rrin g type r e ­
quiring som e planning and sequencing of step s to be taken. A s a m o re exp erien ced o p e ra to r,
is typ ically involved in train in g new o p e ra to rs in m achine o p e ra tio n s, or p a rtia lly train ed
o p e ra to rs in w irin g fro m d ia g ra m s and o p erating sequ ences of long and com plex re p o rts.
D oes not include w orking su p e rv iso rs perfo rm in g tab u latin g -m ach in e o p eratio n s and d a y -to day su p e rv isio n of the w ork and prod uction of a group of tab u latin g -m ach in e o p e ra to rs.
C la ss B. O p erates m o re difficult tabulating or e le c tric a l accounting m achines such as the
tab u lato r and c a lc u la to r, in addition to the s o rte r, re p ro d u c e r, and c o lla to r. T his w ork is
p e rfo rm ed under sp ecific in stru ctio n s and m ay include the p e rfo rm an c e of som e w irin g fro m
d ia g ra m s. The w ork typ ically involves, for exam p le, tabu latio ns involving a rep etitiv e
accounting e x e rc ise , a com plete but sm all tabu latin g study, o r p a rts of a longer and m o re
com plex re p o rt. Such re p o rts and stu dies a re usually of a re c u rrin g n atu re w here the p ro ­
c ed u res a re w ell e sta b lish e d . M ay a lso include the train in g of new em ployees in the basic
o p eratio n of the m achine.
PROFESSIONAL

DRAFTSMAN
C lass A . P la n s the graph ic p re se n ta tio n of com plex item s having d istin ctiv e design
fea tu re s that d iffer sig nifican tly fro m esta b lish e d d raftin g p re ce d en ts. W orks in close su p­
p o rt w ith the desig n o rig in a to r, and m ay recom m end m in or desig n changes. A nalyzes the
effect of each change on the d e ta ils *of fo rm , function, and p o sition al re la tio n sh ip s of co m ­
ponents and p a rts. W orks w ith a m inim um of su p e rv iso ry a ssista n c e . C om pleted w ork is
review ed by design o rig in a to r for c on sistency w ith p rio r eng ineering d e te rm in a tio n s. May
e ith e r p re p a re draw in gs, or d ire c t th e ir p re p a ra tio n by low er level d ra ftsm e n .
C lass B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex d raftin g assig n m e n ts that re q u ire the a p p li­
cation of m ost of the stan d ard ized draw ing techniques re g u la rly used. D uties ty p ically in ­
volve such w ork as: P re p a re s w orking draw ings of su b a sse m b lie s w ith irre g u la r sh ap es,
m ultiple functio ns, and p re c is e positional rela tio n sh ip s betw een com ponents; p re p a re s a rc h i­
te c tu ra l draw ings for co n stru ctio n of a building including detail draw in gs of foundations, w all
se c tio n s, floor plan s, and roof. U ses accepted fo rm u la s and m anuals in m aking n e c e ssa ry
com putations to d eterm in e q u antities of m a te ria ls to be u sed , load c a p a c itie s, stre n g th s,
s tr e s s e s , etc. R eceiv es initial in stru c tio n s, re q u ire m e n ts, and advice fro m su p e rv iso r.
C om pleted w ork is checked for tech n ical adequacy.
C lass C. P rep a re s- detail draw in gs of single units or p a rts for en g in eerin g , co n stru ctio n ,
m an ufacturing , or re p a ir p u rp o se s. T.ypes of draw ings p re p a re d include iso m e tric pro jectio n s
(depicting th re e dim ensio ns in a c c u ra te scale) and sectio n al view s to c la rify positioning of

TABULATING-M ACHINE O PERATO R— Continued
C lass C. O p e ra te s sim ple tabulating or e le c tric a l accounting m achin es such as the
s o rte r, rep ro ducin g punch, c o lla to r, e tc ., w ith sp ecific in stru ctio n s. M ay include sim ple
w iring fro m d ia g ra m s and som e filing w ork. The w ork typ ically involves p o rtio n s of a w ork
un it, for exam p le, individual so rtin g o r collating runs or rep etitiv e o p eratio n s.
TRANSCRIBING-M ACHINE O PER A TO R, GENERAL
‘ ♦ *
P rim a ry duty is to tra n s c rib e d ictation involving a no rm al routin e vocab ulary from
tra n sc rib in g -m a c h in e re c o rd s . M ay a lso type from w ritte n copy and do sim ple c le ric a l w ork.
W o rk ers tra n sc rib in g d ictatio n involving a v a ried tech n ical or sp ecialized v o cab ulary such as legal
b rie fs o r re p o rts on sc ie n tific r e s e a rc h a re not included. A w o rk er who tak es d ictation in s h o rt­
hand or by Stenotype or sim ila r m achine is c la ssifie d as a ste n o g rap h e r, g en eral.
TYPIST
U ses a ty p e w rite r to m ake copies of vario u s m a te ria l or to m ake out b ills a fte r c a lc u la ­
tions have been m ade by another p e rso n . M ay include typing of ste n c ils, m a ts, or sim ila r m a te ­
r ia ls fo r use in duplicating p ro c e sse s. May do c le ric a l w ork involving little sp ec ia l train in g , such
as keeping sim ple r e c o rd s , filing re c o rd s and re p o rts, or so rtin g and d istrib u tin g incom ing m ail.
C lass A . P e rfo rm s one or m o re of the follow ing: Typing m a te ria l in final form w hen it
involves com bining m a te ria l fro m se v e ra l so u rc e s or re sp o n sib ility for c o rre c t sp ellin g,
sy llab icatio n , punctuation, e tc ., of tech nical or unusual w ords or foreig n language m a te ria l;
and planning layout and typing of com plicated sta tistic a l tab les to m ain tain un ifo rm ity and
balance in spacing. M ay type routin e form le tte rs varying d e ta ils to su it c irc u m sta n c e s.
C lass B . P e rfo rm s one or m o re of the follow ing: Copy typing fro m rough or c lea r d ra fts;
routin e typing of fo rm s, in su ran ce p o lic ies, e tc.; and setting up sim ple sta n d a rd tab u latio n s,
or copying m o re com plex ta b le s a lre a d y setup and spaced p ro p e rly .
TECHNICAL

DRAFTSMAN— Continued
com ponents and convey needed inform atio n. C onsolidates d e ta ils from a num ber of so u rce s
and ad ju sts or tra n sp o se s scale as req u ired . Suggested m ethods of ap p ro ach, applicable
p re c e d e n ts, and advice on so u rce m a te ria ls a re given w ith in itial assig n m e n ts. In stru ctio n s
a re le ss com plete w hen assig n m en ts re c u r. W ork m ay be sp ot-ch eck ed during p ro g re ss .
DRA FTSM A N -TRA CER
C opies plans and draw ings p re p a re d by o th e rs by placing trac in g cloth or p ap er over
draw ings and tra c in g w ith pen or pen cil. (Does not include tra c in g lim ited to plans p rim a rily
co n sisting of stra ig h t lines and a la rg e sc a le not req u irin g close delineation.)
a n d /o r
P re p a re s sim ple or re p etitiv e draw in gs of e asily v isu alized ite m s. W ork is c lo sely su p erv ised
during p ro g re ss .
NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A re g iste re d n u rse who gives nu rsin g se rv ic e under g en eral m ed ical d ire ctio n to ill or
inju red em ployees or o th er p e rso n s who becom e ill or su ffer an accid en t on the p re m ise s of a
fac to ry or o th er e sta b lish m e n t. D uties involve a com bination of the follow ing: G iving f irs t aid
to the ill or inju red ; attending to subsequent d re ssin g of em p lo y e e s' in ju rie s; keeping re c o rd s
of p atien ts tre a te d ; p re p a rin g accid en t re p o rts for com pensatio n or oth er p u rp o se s; a ssistin g in
ph ysical exam in atio ns and health evaluation s of ap p licants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p ro g ra m s involving health edu cation , accid en t prev en tio n , evaluation of plant env iro nm en t,
or o th er a ctiv itie s affecting the h ealth , w e lfa re , and safety of all perso n n el.

MAINTENANCE AND PQWERPLANT

C A RPEN TER, MAINTENANCE
P e rfo rm s the c a rp e n try du ties n e c e ssa ry to c o n stru ct and m ain tain in good re p a ir building
w oodw ork and equipm ent such as b in s, c rib s , c o u n te rs, b en ch es, p a rtitio n s, d o o rs, flo o rs, s ta ir s ,
c asin g s, and trim m ade of wood in an e sta b lish m e n t. W ork involves m ost of the follow ing: P la n ­
ning and laying out of w ork fro m b lu e p rin ts, draw in gs, m o d els, or v e rb a l in stru ctio n s using a
v a rie ty of c a rp e n te r's handtoo ls, p o rtab le pow er to o ls, and stan d ard m easu rin g in stru m e n ts;



C A R PEN TER , MAINTENANCE— Continued
m aking sta n d a rd shop com putations rela tin g to d im ensio ns of w ork; and selectin g m a te ria ls n e c e s­
sa ry for the w ork. In g e n era l, the w ork of the m ain ten an ce c a rp e n te r re q u ire s rounded tr a in ­
ing and exp erien ce usu ally acq u ired through a fo rm al a p p re n tic e sh ip or equivalent train in g and
e x p erien ce.

22

ELECTRICIA N , MAINTENANCE
P e rfo rm s a v a rie ty of e le c tric a l tra d e functions such as the in stalla tio n , m ain ten an ce,
or re p a ir of equipm ent for the g e n era tio n , d istrib u tio n , o r u tiliz a tio n of e le c tric en erg y in an
e sta b lish m e n t. W ork involves m o st of the follow ing; In stallin g o r re p a irin g any of a v a rie ty of
e le c tric a l equipm ent such as g e n e ra to rs, tra n s fo rm e rs , sw itch b o ard s, c o n tro lle rs, c irc u it b re a k ­
e rs , m o to rs, heating u n its, conduit sy ste m s, o r o th er tra n sm is sio n equipm ent; w orking fro m
b lu e p rin ts, d raw in gs, layo uts, or o th er sp ec ifica tio n s; locating and diagnosing tro u b le in the
e le c tric a l sy ste m o r equipm ent; w orking sta n d a rd com putations rela tin g to load req u irem e n ts of
w irin g or e le c tric a l equipm ent; and using a v a rie ty of e le c tric ia n 's handtools and m e a su rin g and
te stin g in stru m e n ts. In g e n era l, the w ork of the m ain ten an ce e le c tric ia n re q u ire s rounded tr a in ­
ing and ex p erien ce u sually a cq u ired throu gh a fo rm al a p p re n tic e sh ip o r equivalent tra in in g and
ex p erien ce.
EN G INEER, STATIONARY
O p erates and m ain tain s and m ay also su p e rv ise the o p eratio n of sta tio n a ry engines and
equipm ent (m ech anical or e le c tric a l) to supply the e sta b lish m e n t in w hich em ployed w ith pow er,
heat, re frig e ra tio n , or a ir-c o n d itio n in g . W ork involves: O perating and m ain tain ing equipm ent
such as steam en g ines, a ir c o m p re ss o rs, g e n e ra to rs, m o to rs, tu rb in e s, v en tilatin g and r e f rig ­
era tin g equipm ent, ste a m b o ile rs and b o ile r-fe d w a ter pum ps; m aking equipm ent re p a irs ; and
keeping a re c o rd of o p eratio n of m a c h in ery , te m p e ra tu re , and fuel consum ption. M ay a lso su ­
p e rv ise th ese o p e ra tio n s. H ead o r chief en g in e ers in e sta b lish m e n ts em ploying m o re than one
eng ineer a re exclud ed.
FIREM A N , STATIONARY BOILER
F ir e s sta tio n a ry b o ile rs to fu rn ish the esta b lish m e n t in w hich em ployed w ith h eat, pow er,
or steam . F eed s fuels to fire by hand o r o p e ra te s a m echanical sto k e r, or gas o r oil b u rn e r;
and checks w ater and safety v alv es. M ay clean , oil, or a s s is t in re p a irin g b o ile rro o m equipm ent.
H E L P E R , M AINTENANCE TRADES
A ssists one or m o re w o rk e rs in the sk illed m ain ten an ce tr a d e s , by p e rfo rm in g sp ecific
or g e n era l du ties of le s s e r sk ill, such as keeping a w o rk er supplied w ith m a te ria ls and too ls;
cleaning w orking a re a , m achin e, and equipm ent; a ssistin g jo u rn ey m an by holding m a te ria ls or
to o ls; and p e rfo rm in g o th er u n skilled ta sk s as d ire c te d by jo u rn eym an . The kind of w ork the
h e lp er is p e rm itte d to p e rfo rm v a rie s fro m tra d e to tra d e : In som e tra d e s the h e lp er is con­
fined to supplying, lifting, and holding m a te ria ls and too ls and cleaning w orking a re a s ; and in
o th e rs he is p e rm itte d to p e rfo rm sp ec ia liz ed m achin e o p e ra tio n s, or p a rts of a tra d e th a t a re
also p e rfo rm ed by w o rk e rs on a fu ll-tim e b a sis .
M ACHINE-TOOL O PER A TO R, TOOLROOM
S p ecializes in the o p e ra tio n of one or m o re typ es of m achine to o ls, such as jig b o re rs ,
cy lin d rica l or su rfac e g rin d e rs, engine la th e s, or m illin g m ach in es, in the co n stru ctio n of
m ach in e-sh o p to o ls, gag es, jig s , fix tu re s, or d ie s. W ork involves m o st of the follow ing: P la n ­
ning and perfo rm in g difficult m achining o p e ra tio n s; p ro c e ssin g ite m s req u irin g com plicated setups
or a high d eg ree of a cc u ra c y ; using a v a rie ty of p re c is io n m e a su rin g in stru m e n ts; selectin g fee d s,
sp eed s, too ling , and o p eratio n sequence; and m aking n e c e ssa ry adju stm en ts during o p e ra tio n to
achieve req u isite to le ra n c e s or d im en sio n s. M ay be re q u ire d to reco g n ize w hen to o ls need d r e s s ­
ing, to d re ss to o ls, and to se le c t p ro p e r coolants and cutting and lu b ric a tin g o ils. F o r c ro s s ­
in d u stry w age study p u rp o se s, m ach in e-to o l o p e ra to rs, to o lro o m , in tool and die jobbing shops
a re excluded fro m th is c lassific a tio n .
MACHINIST, M AINTENANCE
P ro d u c es rep lac e m e n t p a rts and new p a rts in m aking re p a irs of m etal p a rts of m e ch an ­
ical equipm ent o p erated in an e sta b lish m e n t. W ork involves m o st of the follow ing: In te rp re tin g
w ritte n in stru ctio n s and sp ec ifica tio n s; planning and laying out of w ork; using a v a rie ty of m a ­
c h in ist's handtools and p re c isio n m e a su rin g in stru m e n ts; settin g up and o p erating sta n d a rd m achine
to o ls; shaping of m etal p a rts to close to le ra n c e s; m aking sta n d a rd shop com putations re la tin g to
dim ensio ns of w ork, tooling, fee d s, and speeds of m achining; know ledge of the w orking p ro p e rtie s
of the com m on m e ta ls; selectin g sta n d a rd m a te ria ls , p a r ts , and equipm ent re q u ire d for his w ork;
and fitting and assem b lin g p a rts into m ech an ical equipm ent. In g e n era l, the m a c h in ist's w ork
n o rm ally re q u ire s a rounded train in g in m ach in e-sh o p p ra c tic e usu ally acq u ired throu gh a fo rm al
ap p re n tic e sh ip or equivalent train in g and ex p erien ce.
M ECHANIC, AUTOM OTIVE (MAINTENANCE)
R e p a irs au to m ob iles, b u se s, m o to rtru c k s, and tr a c to r s of an esta b lish m e n t. W ork in ­
volves m o st of the follow ing: E xam ining autom otive equipm ent to diagnose so u rce of troub le;
d isasse m b lin g equipm ent and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs th a t involve the use of such handtools as
w re n c h es, g ag es, d r ills , or sp ec ia liz ed equipm ent in d isasse m b lin g o r fittin g p a rts ; rep lacin g
b rok en o r defective p a rts fro m stock; grinding and adju sting valv es; re a sse m b lin g and installin g




MECHANIC, AUTOM OTIVE (MAINTENANCE)--- C ontinued
the v ario u s a sse m b lie s in the vehicle and m aking n e c e ssa ry ad ju stm ents; and alining w heels,
adju sting b ra k e s and lig h ts, o r tightening body bo lts. In g e n era l, the w ork of the autom otive
m echanic re q u ire s rounded train in g and e x p erien ce usu ally a cq u ired through a fo rm al a p p re n ­
tic esh ip o r equivalent tra in in g and ex p erie n c e.
M ECHANIC, M AINTENANCE
R e p a irs m a ch in ery or m echanical equipm ent of an e sta b lish m e n t. W ork involves m ost
of the follow ing: E xam ining m achin es and m ech an ical equipm ent to diagnose so urce of troub le;
d ism antlin g o r p a rtly dism antlin g m achin es and p e rfo rm in g re p a irs th a t m ainly involve the use
of handtools in sc rap in g and fitting p a rts; rep lacin g b rok en o r defective p a rts w ith item s obtained
fro m stock; o rd e rin g the prod uction of a rep lac e m e n t p a rt by a m achine shop or sending of the
m achine to a m achine shop for m a jo r re p a irs ; p re p a rin g w ritte n sp ecificatio ns for m ajo r re p a irs
or for the prod uction of p a rts o rd e re d fro m m achine shop; re a sse m b lin g m achin es; and m aking
all n e c e ssa ry adju stm en ts fo r o p eration . In g e n era l, the w ork of a m aintenance m echanic r e ­
q u ire s rounded train in g and ex p erien ce u su ally acq u ired through a fo rm al ap p re n tic e sh ip or
equivalent train in g and ex p erie n c e. E xcluded fro m th is c la ssific a tio n a re w o rk e rs w hose p rim a ry
du ties involve setting up or adju sting m achin es.
MILLW RIGHT
In sta lls new m achin es or heavy equipm ent, and d ism a n tle s and in sta lls m achines or
heavy equipm ent w hen changes in the plant layout a re re q u ire d . W ork involves m ost of the fol­
low ing: P lanning and laying out of the w ork; in te rp re tin g b lu e p rin ts or o th er sp ecificatio n s; using
a v a rie ty of handtools and rigging; m aking sta n d a rd shop com putations rela tin g to s tr e s s e s ,
stre n g th of m a te ria ls , and c e n te rs of g ravity ; alining and balancing of equipm ent; selectin g stan d ­
a rd to o ls, equipm ent, and p a rts to be used; and in stallin g and m aintaining in good o rd e r pow er
tra n s m is s io n equipm ent such as d riv e s and speed re d u c e rs. In g e n era l, the m illw rig h t's w ork
n o rm a lly re q u ire s a rounded train in g and ex p erien ce in the tra d e a cq u ired throu gh a form al
ap p re n tic e sh ip or equivalent tra in in g and exp erien ce.
O ILER
L u b ric a te s, w ith oil or g re a s e , the m oving p a rts o r w earing su rfa c e s of m echanical
equipm ent of an e stab lish m en t.
PA IN TER , MAINTENANCE
P a in ts and re d e c o ra te s w a lls, w oodw ork, and fix tu re s of an esta b lish m e n t. W ork in ­
volves the follow ing: Knowledge of su rfac e p e c u lia ritie s and types of paint re q u ire d for different
ap p lication s; p re p a rin g su rfac e for painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or fille r
in nail holes and in te rs tic e s ; and applying paint w ith sp ra y gun or b ru sh . M ay m ix c o lo rs, o ils,
w hite lead , and oth er paint in g red ien ts to obtain p ro p e r color or co n sistency. In g e n era l, the
w ork of the m ain ten an ce p a in ter re q u ire s rounded train in g and exp erien ce usually acq u ired through
a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e sh ip or equivalent train in g and e x p erien ce.
P IP E F IT T E R , M AINTENANCE
In sta lls or re p a irs w a te r, ste a m , g a s, or o th er types of pipe and pipefittin gs in an
esta b lish m e n t. W ork involves m o st of the follow ing: L aying out of w ork and m e a su rin g to lo ­
cate p o sition of pipe fro m draw in gs or o th er w ritte n sp ecificatio n s; cutting v ario u s siz e s of pipe
to c o rre c t lengths w ith ch isel and h am m er or oxyacetylene to rc h or p ip e-cuttin g m achine; th re a d ­
ing pipe w ith sto ck s and dies; bending pipe by h a n d -d riv e n or p o w er-d riv e n m achin es; assem b lin g
pipe w ith couplings and fasten ing pipe to h a n g e rs; m aking sta n d a rd shop com putations relatin g
to p r e s s u re s , flow , and size of pipe req u ired ; and m aking sta n d a rd te s ts to d eterm in e w hether
finish ed pipes m eet sp ec ifica tio n s. In g e n era l, the w ork of the m aintenance p ip e fitte r re q u ire s
rounded train in g and ex p erien ce u sually a cq u ired throu gh a fo rm al ap p re n tic e sh ip or equivalent
train in g and ex p erien ce. W o rk ers p rim a rily engaged in installin g and rep airin g building sa n ita ­
tion or heating sy ste m s a re exclud ed.
PLU M B ER , M AINTENANCE
K eeps the plum bing sy ste m of an e stab lish m en t in good o rd e r. W ork involves: Knowledge
of sa n ita ry codes reg ard in g in stalla tio n of vents and tra p s in plum bing sy stem ; in stallin g or r e ­
p airin g pipes and fix tu re s; and opening clogged d ra in s w ith a plunger or p lu m b e r's snake. In
g e n era l, the w ork of the m aintenance plum ber re q u ire s rounded train in g and exp erien ce usually
a cq u ired through a fo rm al a p p re n tic e sh ip o r equivalent train in g and ex p erience.
SH EE T -M ET A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b ric a te s , in s ta lls , and m ain tain s in good re p a ir the sh e e t-m e ta l equipm ent and fix ­
tu re s (such as m achine g u a rd s, g re a se p an s, sh elv e s, lo c k e rs, ta n k s, v e n tila to rs, chu tes, du cts,
m e ta l roofing) of an esta b lish m e n t. W ork involves m ost of the follow ing: Planning and laying
out all types of sh e e t-m e ta l m ain ten an ce w ork fro m b lu e p rin ts, m o dels, or o th er sp ecificatio n s;
setting up and op eratin g all available types of sh e e t-m e ta l w orking m achin es; using a v a rie ty of

23
SH E E T -M E T A L W ORKER, M AINTENANCE----Continued
handtools in cutting, bending, fo rm in g , shaping, fittin g , and assem b ling ; and installin g sh ee tm e ta l a rtic le s a s re q u ire d . In g e n era l, the w ork of the m ain ten an ce sh e e t-m e ta l w o rk er re q u ire s
rounded tra in in g and e x p erien ce u su a lly a cq u ired throu gh a fo rm a l a p p re n tic e sh ip or equivalent
train in g and ex p erie n c e.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(Die m a k er; jig m a k er; tool m a k er; fix tu re m a k er; gage m aker)
C o n stru cts and re p a irs m ach in e-sh o p to o ls, gag es, jig s , fix tu re s or dies fo r forg in g s,
punching, and o th er m e ta l-fo rm in g w ork. W ork involves m o st of the follow ing: P lanning and
laying out of w ork fro m m o d els, b lu e p rin ts, d raw in gs, or o th er o ra l and w ritte n sp ecificatio n s;

TOOL AND DIE MAKER— Continued
using a v a rie ty of tool and die m a k e r's handtools and p re c isio n m easu rin g in stru m e n ts; u n d e r­
standing of the w orking p ro p e rtie s of com m on m e ta ls and alloy s; setting up and o p erating of
m achine too ls and re la te d equipm ent; m aking n e c e ssa ry shop com putations rela tin g to dim ensions
of w ork, sp eed s, fee d s, and tooling of m achin es; h e a t-tre a tin g of m etal p a rts during fab ric a tio n
as w ell as of fin ish ed too ls and dies to achieve re q u ire d q u alities; w orking to close to le ra n c e s;
fitting and assem b lin g of p a rts to p re sc rib e d to le ra n c e s and allow ances; and selectin g ap p ro p ria te
m a te ria ls , to o ls, and p ro c e sse s. In g e n era l, the tool and die m a k e r's w ork re q u ire s a rounded
tra in in g in m ach in e-sh o p and to o lro o m p ra c tic e usu ally a cq u ired throu gh a fo rm a l a p p ren ticesh ip
or equivalent train in g and exp erien ce.
F o r c ro s s -in d u s try w age study p u rp o se s, tool and die m a k ers in too l and die jobbing
shops a re excluded fro m th is c lassific a tio n .

C ST D L AND M TE IA M V M N
U O IA
A R L OE ET
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
G u ard . P e rfo rm s routin e police d u tie s, e ith e r at fixed post or on to u r, m aintaining
o rd e r, using a rm s or fo rce w h ere n e c e ssa ry . Includes gatem en who a re station ed at gate and
check on iden tity of em ployees and o th er p e rso n s e n te rin g .
W atchm an. M akes rounds of p re m ise s p e rio d ica lly in p ro tectin g p ro p e rty ag ain st fire ,
th e ft, and illeg al en try .
JA N ITO R, P O R T E R , OR CLEANER
(Sw eeper; charw om an; ja n itre s s)
C leans and keeps in an o rd e rly condition fac to ry w orking a re a s and w a sh ro o m s, or
p re m ise s of an office, a p a rtm e n t h o use, o r c o m m e rc ia l or o th er e sta b lish m e n t. D uties involve
a com bination of the follow ing: Sw eeping, m opping or scrubb ing , and polishing flo o rs; rem oving
chip s, tra s h , and o th er refu se ; dusting equipm ent, fu rn itu re , or fix tu re s; polishing m e ta l fix tu re s
or trim m in g s; providing su pplies and m in or m ain ten an ce se rv ic e s ; and cleaning la v a to rie s, show ­
e rs , and re s tro o m s . W o rk ers who sp ec ia liz e in window w ashing a re exclud ed.
LABORER, M ATERIA L HANDLING
(L o ad er and u n loader; h a n d le r and sta c k e r; sh elv e r; tru c k e r; stockm an o r sto ck h e lp er; w a re ­
ho usem an or w areho use helper)
A w o rk e r em ployed in a w areh o u se, m an ufacturing p lan t, s to re , o r o th er esta b lish m e n t
w hose du ties involve one or m o re of the follow ing: Loading and unloading v ario u s m a te ria ls and
m e rch a n d ise on or fro m fre ig h t c a r s , tru c k s , or o th er tra n sp o rtin g d ev ices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m a te ria ls or m e rch a n d ise in p ro p e r sto ra g e location; and tra n sp o rtin g m a te ria ls or
m e rch an d ise by h an dtruck, c a r, or w heelb arro w . L ongshorem en, who load and unload ships a re
exclud ed.
ORDER, F IL L E R
(O rder pick er; sto ck se le c to r; w areho use stockm an)
F ills shipping or tr a n s fe r o rd e rs for fin ish ed goods fro m sto re d m e rch a n d ise in a c c o rd ­
ance w ith sp ecificatio n s on sa le s slip s, c u s to m e rs ' o rd e rs , or o th er in stru c tio n s. M ay, in a d d itio n
to filling o rd e rs and indicating ite m s filled or o m itted, keep re c o rd s of outgoing o rd e rs , re q u i­
sitio n additional sto ck or re p o rt sh o rt su pplies to su p e rv iso r, and p e rfo rm o th er re la te d d u ties.
PA CK ER , SHIPPING
P re p a re s finish ed p rod ucts for shipm ent or sto ra g e by placing them in shipping con­
ta in e rs , the sp ecific o p eratio n s p e rfo rm ed being dependent upon the typ e, siz e , and num ber of
un its to be packed, the type of con tain er em ployed, and m ethod of shipm ent. W ork re q u ire s the
placing of ite m s in shipping co n tain ers and m ay involve one or m o re of the follow ing: K nowl­
edge of v ario u s item s of sto ck in o rd e r to v e rify content; se le ctio n of a p p ro p ria te type and size
of c on tain er; in sertin g e n c lo su re s in co n tain er; using e x c e lsio r or o th er m a te ria l to prev en t
b reak age or dam age; closing and sealing con tain er; and applying la b e ls or en te rin g identifying
data on con tain er. P a c k e rs who also m ake w ooden boxes or c ra te s a re excluded.




SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
P re p a re s m e rch an d ise for sh ipm en t, or re c e iv e s and is resp o n sib le for incom ing sh ip ­
m en ts of m e rch a n d ise o r o th er m a te ria ls . Shipping w ork inv olv es: A know ledge of shipping
p ro c e d u re s, p ra c tic e s , ro u te s, av ailab le m eans of tra n sp o rta tio n , and ra te ; and p re p a rin g r e c ­
o rd s of the goods shipped, m aking up b ills of lading, posting w eight and shipping c h a rg e s, and
keeping a file of shipping re c o rd s . M ay d ire c t o r a s s is t in p re p a rin g the m erch a n d ise for sh ip­
m ent. R eceiving w ork inv o lv es: V erifying o r d ire ctin g o th e rs in verify ing the c o rre c tn e ss of
sh ipm en ts ag a in st b ills of lading, in v oices, o r o th er re c o rd s ; checking for sh o rtag es and re je c tin g
dam aged goods; routin g m e rch a n d ise or m a te ria ls to p ro p e r dep artm en ts; and m aintaining n e c e s­
sa ry re c o rd s and file s.
F o r w age study p u rp o se s, w o rk e rs a re c la ssifie d as follow s:
R eceiving c lerk
Shipping c lerk
Shipping and receiv in g clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
D riv es a tru c k w ithin a city o r in d u stria l a re a to tra n sp o rt m a te ria ls , m erch a n d ise,
equipm ent, or m en betw een v ario u s types of e sta b lish m e n ts such as: M anufacturing plan ts, freig h t
d ep o ts, w a re h o u se s, w ho lesale and re ta il e sta b lish m e n ts, or betw een re ta il e sta b lish m e n ts and
c u s to m e rs ' ho uses or p laces of b u sin e ss. M ay a lso load or unload tru c k w ith or w ithout h e lp e rs,
m ake m in or m ech an ical r e p a ir s , and keep tru c k in good w orking o rd e r. D riv e r-sa le s m e n and
o v e r-th e -ro a d d riv e rs a re exclud ed.
F o r w age study p u rp o se s, tru c k d riv e rs a re c la ssifie d by size and type of equipm ent,
as follow s: (T r a c to r- tra ile r should be ra te d on the b a sis of tr a ile r capacity.)
T ru c k d riv e r (com bination of siz e s liste d s ...a ra te ly )
T ru c k d riv e r, light (under IV2 tons)
T ru c k d riv e r, m edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy (over 4 to n s, tr a ile r type)
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy (over 4 to n s, o th er than tr a ile r type)
TRU CK ER, POW ER
O p erates a m anually c o n tro lled g aso line- or e le c tric -p o w e re d tru c k or tra c to r to
tra n s p o rt goods and m a te ria ls of all kinds about a w areh o u se, m an ufacturing plant, or oth er
esta b lish m e n t.
F o r w age study p u rp o se s, w o rk e rs a re c la s sifie d by type of ' -'-k, as follow s:
T ru c k e r, pow er (forklift)
T ru c k e r, pow er (other than forklift)




A v a i l a b l e O n R e q u e s t -------

The
eighth annual
r e p o r t on s a l a r i e s
fo r a ccou n tan ts,
au ditors,
a t t o r n e y s , c h e m i s t s , e n g i n e e r s , e n g in e e r in g t e c h n i c i a n s , d r a f t s m e n ,
t r a c e r s , jo b a n a l y s t s , d i r e c t o r s o f p e r s o n n e l , m a n a g e r s o f o f f i c e
s e r v i c e s , b u y e r s , and c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s .
O r d e r a s B L S B u l le t i n 1 5 8 5 , N a t io n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d ­
m i n i s t r a t i v e , T e c h n i c a l , and C l e r i c a l P a y , June 1 9 6 7 .
F i f t y c e n ts
a copy.

Area Wage Surveys
A

list

of

request

the

of

the la te s t

W age

the

S u p erin ten d en t

the

in sid e

fron t

and

of

available

H our and

D ocu m en ts,

bu lletin s

P u b lic
U .S .

is

presented

C on tracts

below .

D iv isio n s

G overnm ent

P rin tin g

of

d ire cto ry

of

area

the D e p a r tm e n t

A

of

Labor

O ffice ,

W ash in gton ,

D .C .,

wage
is

stu d ies

in clu d in g

ava ila b le

20402,

on

or from

m ore

request.

any of

lim ite d

B u lle tin s

the B L S

stu d ies

con d u cted at

m ay

purchased

reg ion a l

sales

show n

on

B u lletin n u m b e r

B u lle tin n u m b e r

O h io ,

o ffice s

the

from

cover.

A rea
A kron,

be

Ju ly

A rea

and p rice

1 9 6 8 ----------------------------------------------------------------------

A l b a n y —S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N . Y. , A p r . 1 9 6 8 1 ____________
A l b u q u e r q u e , N . M e x . , A p r . 1 9 6 8 1 ___________________________
A l l e n t o w n —B e t h l e h e m —E a s t o n ,

1 5 7 5 -8 4 ,

35 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -6 8 ,

30 ce n ts
30 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -5 8 ,

P a . —N . J . ,

1 9 6 8 1 _______________

1 5 7 5 -5 4 ,

Jan.

1 9 6 8 1 _________________________________

1 5 7 5 -3 4 ,

Feb.

N ew ark and J e rse y
H aven,

J a n . 1 9 6 8 ____________________
M i c h . , M a y 1 9 6 8 1 ------------

30
30
35
25

1 9 6 8 ____________________________________

1 5 7 5 -4 6 ,
1 5 7 5 -7 8 ,

30 c e n t s
50 cen ts

M i n n e a p o l i s —S t . P a u l , M i n n . ,
M u s k e g o n —M u s k e g o n H e i g h t s ,
N ew

and p rice

C ity,

C o n n .,

N. J . ,

Feb.

1 9 6 7 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 5 3 0 -5 3 ,

25 ce n ts

N ew

O rlea n s,

A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 1 9 6 8 1 ------------------------------------------------------------------B a l t i m o r e , M d . , O c t . 1 9 6 7 -------------------------------------------------------------B e a u m o n t —P o r t A r t h u r —O r a n g e , T e x . , M a y 1 9 6 8 1 _____

1 5 7 5 -7 1 ,

35 c e n ts

N ew

Y ork,

1 5 7 5 -1 8 ,

25 cen ts

1 5 7 5 -4 7 ,
1 5 7 5 -6 0 ,

cents
cents
cents
cents

N o r f o l k —P o r t s m o u t h a n d N e w p o r t N e w s —

Feb.

1 5 7 5 -7 5 ,
30 cen ts
(Not previously surveyed)

L a .,

N. Y .,

H am pton,

Va. ,

A pr.
June

1 9 6 8 ----------------------------------------------------------1968

______________________________________

1 5 7 5 -8 5 ,

30 ce n ts

1 5 7 5 -4 ,

20 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -2 1 ,

30 ce n ts

1 9 6 7 ----------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -5 9 ,
1 5 7 5 -3 ,

O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k l a . , J u l y 1 9 6 7 -----------------------------------------------O m a h a , N e b r . —I o w a , O c t . 1 9 6 7 1 ------------------------------------------------

20 c e n ts

P a t e r s o n —C l i f t o n —P a s s a i c ,

1 9 6 8 1 --------------------

1 5 7 5 -8 3 ,

25 c e n t s
40 cen ts

1 9 6 7 1 ----------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -1 3 ,

30 c e n t s

30 c e n t s

1 5 7 5 -4 1 ,

30 c e n t s

P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . —N . J . , N o v . 1 9 6 7 1 --------------------------------------P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1 9 6 8 1 -------------------------------------------------------—

1 5 7 5 -4 0 ,

, D e c . 1 9 6 7 ----------------------------------------------------------------V t . , M a r . 1 9 6 8 ------------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -5 5 ,

30 ce n ts

1 5 7 5 -4 8 ,

Pittsburgh,

1 9 6 8 --------------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -4 4 ,

30 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -6 5 ,

20 c e n t s
30 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -1 6 ,

25 c e n ts

1 9 6 8 1 ------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -6 3 ,

30 c e n t s

1 5 7 5 -8 0 ,

40 cen ts

C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , A p r . 1 9 6 8 1 --------------------------------------------------------C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . —G a . , A u g . 1 9 6 7 ---------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -5 7 ,
1 5 7 5 -7 ,

30 ce n ts
25 c e n ts

P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , N o v . 1 9 6 7 1 _____________________________________
P o r t l a n d , O r e g . —W a s h . , M a y 1 9 6 8 * ----------------------------------------P r o v i d e n c e —P a w t u c k e t —W a r w i c k , R . I . —M a s s . ,

1 5 7 5 -6 1 ,

30 c e n t s

C h ica g o ,

1 5 7 5 -8 1 ,
1 5 7 5 -6 2 ,

50 c e n ts
30 c e n t s

1 5 7 5 -6 ,

25 c e n t s

1 5 7 5 -2 7 ,

25 ce n ts

1 5 7 5 -1 4 ,

25 ce n ts

R a l e i g h , N . C . , A u g . 1 9 6 7 1 -----------------------------------------------------------R i c h m o n d , V a . , N o v . 1 9 6 7 1 ______________________________________
R o c h e s t e r . N .Y ., ( o f f i c e o c c u p a t io n s on ly), J u ly 1968

1 9 6 7 ________________________________________

1 5 7 5 -2 3 ,

25 c e n t s

R ock ford ,

1 9 6 8 * _________________________________________

1 6 2 5 -2 ,
1 5 7 5 -7 0 ,

1 9 6 7 -------------------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -2 0 ,

25 c e n t s

S t . L o u i s , M o . —111. , J a n . 1 9 6 8 ----------------------------------------------------S a l t L a k e C i t y , U t a h , D e c . 1 9 6 7 ________________________________

1 5 7 5 -3 9 ,
1 5 7 5 -3 5 ,

1 5 7 5 -1 2 ,

25
30
25
30
35

S a n A n t o n i o , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 8 _____________________________________
S a n B e r n a r d i n o —R i v e r s i d e —O n t a r i o , C a l i f . ,

1 5 7 5 -6 9 ,

20 ce n ts
30 c e n t s

1 5 7 5 -1 0 ,

30 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -1 9 ,
1 5 7 5 -3 7 ,
1 5 7 5 -1 5 ,
1 5 7 5 -7 3 ,

20 c e n t s
25 cen ts
25 cen ts

B irm in g h a m ,
B oise

C ity,

B oston,

M ass. ,

A pr.
Ju ly

S ept.

1 9 6 8 ____________________________________

Y.

B u ffa lo, N.
B u rlin gton ,
C anton,

A la. ,

Idaho,

O h io ,

C h a rle sto n ,

June

W.

1 9 6 8 1 ___________________________________________

Va. ,

111. , A p r .

A pr.

1 9 6 8 -------------------------------------------------------------------

C in cin n a ti,
C levelan d ,

O h i o ^ K y . —I n d . , M a r . 1 9 6 8 1 -------------------------------O h i o , S e p t . 1 9 6 7 ------------------------------------------------------------

C olu m b u s,

O h io ,

D a lla s,

T e x .,

O ct.

N ov.

D a v e n p o r t —R o c k I s l a n d —M o l i n e ,
D ayton,
D enver,

I o w a —111. ,

O h i o , J a n . 1 9 6 8 * ----------------------------------------------------------------C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 6 7 1 ------------------------------------------------------------

D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , F e b . 1 9 6 8 1 ----------------------------------------------------D e t r o i t , M i c h . , J a n . 1 9 6 8 1 -----------------------------------------------------------F o r t W o r t h , T e x . , N o v . 1 9 6 7 -------------------------------------------------------G reen

Bay,

W is. ,

Ju ly

1 9 6 7 ------------------------------------------------------------

G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1 9 6 8 1 --------------------------------------------------------H o u s t o n , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 8 1 -------------------------------------------------------------I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d . , D e c . 1 9 6 7 1 ----------------------------------------------------Jackson,

M is s .,

Feb.

1 9 6 8 1 ----------------------------------------------------------

J a ck so n v ille ,

F la .,

Jan.

K a n sa s C ity,

M o . —K a n s . ,

L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h i l l ,
L ittle

N ov.

1 9 6 7 1 ------------------------------------

M a s s . —N . H . ,

R o c k —N o r t h L i t t l e

L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g

1 9 6 8 -------------------------------------------------------

R ock,

June

A rk. ,

1 9 6 8 1 ---------------

Ju ly

1 9 6 7 __________

1 5 7 5 -5 1 ,
1 5 7 5 -3 8 ,
1 5 7 5 -5 2 ,
1 5 7 5 -4 5 ,
1 5 7 5 -2 2 ,

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s

Pa. ,

1 1 1 .,

30 c e n t s
45 cen ts
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

S iou x F a lls ,
S outh B en d,

20 c e n t s

Spokane,

1 5 7 5 -3 0 ,

25 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -7 4 ,
1 5 7 5 -2 ,

30 c e n t s
25 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -3 6 ,
1 5 7 5 -4 9 ,
1 5 7 5 -3 3 ,

B e a c h a n d A n a h e i m —S a n t a A n a -

M ay

San D ie g o , C a lif., N ov.
S a n F r a n c i s c o —O a k l a n d ,
San J ose,
Savannah,
S cranton,
S e a t t l e —E v

1 5 7 5 -5 ,
1 5 7 5 -6 6 ,
1 5 7 5 -8 2 ,

Jan.

N. J. ,

M ay

1 9 6 7 _____________________________________
C a l i f . , J a n . 1 9 6 8 ---------------------------

C a l i f . , S e p t . 1 9 6 7 1 ____________________________________
G a . , M a y 1 9 6 8 1 -------------------------------------------------------------P a . , J u l y 1 9 6 7 1 _________________________________________
e r e t t , W a s h . , N o v . 1 9 6 7 1 __________________________
S . D a k . , O c t . 1 9 6 7 1 ---------------------------------------------I n d . , M a r . 1 9 6 8 1 ____________________________________

30 c e n ts
30 c e n ts

S y r a c u s e , N . Y . , J u l y 1 9 6 8 1-----------------------------------------------------------T a m p a —S t . P e t e r s b u r g , F l a . , A u g . 1 9 6 7 ------------------------------T oled o,

1 9 6 8 _________________________________

1 5 7 5 -4 3 ,

30 c e n t s

1 9 6 7 _________________________________________

1 5 7 5 -2 4 ,

20 c e n t s

O h i o —M i c h . ,

T renton,

N. J . ,

1 9 6 8 -------------------------------------------------------------

Feb.

N ov.

35 c e n t s

1 9 6 7 -------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -1 1 ,

25 c e n ts

U tica -R om e,

1 9 6 8 ---------------------------------- --------------

1 5 7 5 -5 0 ,

30 c e n t s

W a sh in gton ,

L u b b o c k , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 8 1 -----------------------------------------------------------M a n c h e s t e r , N . H . , J u l y 1 9 6 7 ---------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -7 7 ,
1 5 7 5 -1 ,
1 5 7 5 -3 2 ,

30 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25 c e n t s

W aterbury,

25 c e n t s

W orcester,

1 9 6 8 1----------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -2 8 ,
1 5 7 5 -7 2 ,

1 9 6 8 ----------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -6 7 ,

30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 1 9 6 8 * ----------------------------------------------------------------------Y o u n g s t o w n —W a r r e n , O h i o , N o v . 1 9 6 7 1 _____________________

L o u isv ille ,

M em p h is,
M ia m i,

K y . —I n d . ,

T e n n . —A r k . ,

F la .,

D ec.

W is. ,

Jan.

1 9 6 8 1 -------------------------------------------

1 9 6 7 * -----------------------------------------------------------------

M id la n d an d O d e s s a ,
M ilw a u k e e ,

Feb.

T e x .,

A pr.

June

Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.



J u ly

1 9 6 8 1-----------------------------------------------------

D . C . —M d . —V a . ,

S ept.

1 9 6 8 1 ----------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -5 3 ,

30 c e n ts

Iow a,

N ov.

1 9 6 7 --------------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -2 6 ,

20 c e n ts

K a n s .,

D ec.

1 9 6 7 --------------------------------------------------------------

1 5 7 5 -3 1 ,

20 ce n ts

1 5 7 5 -7 6 ,
1 5 7 5 -4 2 ,

30 c e n t s
30 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -2 5 ,

25 ce n ts

W a te rlo o ,
W ich ita ,

N. Y .,

35 ce n ts
25 c e n t s

1 6 2 5 -1 ,

30 c e n ts

M ar.

25 ce n ts
25 c e n ts

1 5 7 5 -7 9 ,
1 6 2 5 -5 ,
1 5 7 5 -8 ,

June

1 5 7 5 -6 4 ,

C a lif.,

30 c e n t s
25 c e n t s

1 5 7 5 -5 6 ,

W ash. ,

1 9 6 8 ____________________________

G arden G rove,

1 5 7 5 -9 ,
1 5 7 5 -2 9 ,
1 5 7 5 -1 7 ,

35 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
30 c e n t s

C o n n .,

M a s s .,

A pr.

June

1 9 6 8 1 __________________________________

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U. S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LABOR

WASHINGTON, D .C . 20212
O F F I C I A L




B U S I N

E SS

TIRST CLASS MAIL~!
I___________________________________________ I