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A r e a Wage S u r v e y

The Philadelphia, Pennsylvania—New Jersey,
Metropolitan Area
November 1967

R«.

I

MAY 2 8 1968

M.J.

DOCUMENT COLLECTION

MONTGOMERY!

5-40

CHESTER
OELAWARI

Dayton & M o n tg o m e ry Co
Public L ib rary

»HILADELPHIA
BURLINGTON
CAMDEN
GLOUCESTER

New England
J ohn F . K en n ed y F e d e r a l B u ild in g
G ov e rn m e n t C en ter
R o o m 1 6 0 3 -B
B o s t o n , M a s s . 022 03
T e l . : 2 2 3 -6 7 6 2




Mid-Atlantic
341 N inth A v e .
N ew Y o r k , N . Y . 10001
T e l . : 9 7 1 -5 4 0 5

Southern
1371 P e a c h t r e e S t . ,
A tla n ta , G a . 3 03 09
T e l . : 5 2 6 -5 4 1 8

North Central
219 S outh D e a r b o r n St.
C h i c a g o , 111. 6 06 04
T e l . : 3 5 3 -7 2 3 0

P a d lie
450 G olden G ate A v e.
Box 36017
San F r a n c is c o , C a lif. 94102
T e l .: 556-4678

Mountain-Plains
F e d e ra l O ffic e Building
T h ir d F lo o r
911 Walnut St.
K ansas C ity, M o. 64106
T e l . : 374-2481

Area Wage Survey
The Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-New Jersey,
Metropolitan Area
November 1967

Bulletin No. 1575-40
April 1968

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, W ashington, D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 30 cents







P refa ce
The B u reau o f L a b o r S ta tistics p r o g r a m of annual o c c u p a ­
tio n a l w age s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o lita n a r e a s is d esign ed to p ro v id e data
on o c cu p a tio n a l e a r n in g s , and e sta b lis h m e n t p r a c tic e s and s u p p le ­
m e n ta r y w age p r o v is io n s .
It y ie ld s d e ta ile d data by s e le c t e d in d u stry
d iv is io n fo r e a c h o f the a r e a s stu d ied, fo r g e o g ra p h ic r e g io n s , and
f o r the U nited S tates.
A m a jo r c o n s id e r a tio n in the p r o g r a m is the
n eed fo r g r e a t e r in sig h t in to (1) the m o v e m e n t o f w a g es b y o c c u p a ­
tio n a l c a t e g o r y and s k ill le v e l, and (2) the s tru ctu re and le v e l o f w ag es
am on g a r e a s and in d u s tr y d iv is io n s .

E ig h t y -s ix a r e a s c u r r e n tly a r e in clu d ed in the p r o g r a m .
In e a ch a r e a , in fo rm a tio n on o c cu p a tio n a l ea rn in g s is c o lle c t e d an­
n u ally and on e sta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p lem en ta ry w age p r o ­
v is io n s b ie n n ia lly .

T h is b u lle tin p r e s e n ts r e s u lts o f the su r v e y in P h ila d elp h ia,
P a.— .J ., in N o v e m b e r 1967.
N
The Standard M e tro p o lita n S tatistical
A r e a , as d efin ed b y the B u reau o f the Budget through A p r il 1967,
c o n s is t s o f T h re e Inner C ou n ties o f D ela w a re and P h ila delph ia
C o u n tie s , P a ., and C a m den C ou n ty, N .J .; and F iv e O uter C ounties
o f B u ck s , C h e s te r , and M o n tg o m e ry C ou n ties, P a ., and B urlington
and G lo u c e s te r C o u n tie s , N .J.
T h is study w as con d u cted by tlie*
B u r e a u 's r e g io n a l o ffic e in New Y o rk ,
N .Y .,
H e r b e r t B ien stock ,
D ir e c t o r .
The study w as under the g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n o f F r e d e r ic k W.
M u e lle r , A s s is ta n t R e g io n a l D ir e c t o r o f O p e ra tio n s.

A t the end o f e a c h s u r v e y , an in dividu al a r e a b u lle tin p r e ­
sen ts s u r v e y r e s u lt s f o r e a c h a r e a stu d ied. A fte r c o m p le t io n o f a ll
o f the in d iv id u a l a r e a b u lle tin s fo r a roun d o f s u r v e y s , a tw o -p a r t
s u m m a r y b u lle tin is is s u e d .
The f i r s t p a rt b rin g s data f o r ea ch o f
the m e t r o p o lita n a r e a s stu d ied in to one b u lletin . The se co n d p a rt
p r e s e n ts in fo r m a t io n w h ich h a s b e e n p r o je c t e d fr o m in d iv id u al m e t r o ­
p o lita n a r e a data to r e la t e to g e o g r a p h ic r e g io n s and the United States.

Contents
Page
I n t r o d u c t io n ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
W age tr e n d s f o r s e le c t e d o c cu p a tio n a l g r o u p s _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1
4

T a b le s :
1.
2.

E s ta b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f su rv e y and n u m ber s tu d ie d ___________________________________________________________________________
In d exes o f sta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la r ie s and s tra ig h t-tim e h o u r ly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c cu p a tio n a l g r o u p s , and
p e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e f o r s e le c t e d p e r io d s _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

* NOTE:

S im ilia r tabulations a r e a v a ila b le fo r oth er a r e a s .

(See in sid e b a ck c o v e r .)

C u r re n t r e p o r t s on o ccu p a tion a l ea rn in g s and su p p lem en ta ry w age p r o v is io n s in the P h ila d elp h ia
a r e a a r e a l s o a v a ila b le fo r h o sp ita ls (J u ly 1966), life in su ra n ce (O cto b e r 1966), and m e n 's and b o y s '
su its and c o a ts (A p r il 1967); and on e a rn in g s on ly fo r s e le c t e d fo o d s e r v ic e , and la u n d ry and d r y c le a n ­
ing o c c u p a tio n s (N o v e m b e r 1967).
U nion s c a le s , in d ica tiv e o f p r e v a ilin g pay le v e ls , a r e a v a ila b le fo r bu ild in g c o n s tr u c tio n ; p rin tin g;
lo c a l - t r a n s i t op era tin g e m p lo y e e s ; and m o t o r t r u c k d r iv e r s , h e lp e r s , and a llie d o c cu p a tio n s .




H
i

3
4

Contents— Continued
Page
T a b le s— Continued

.

____________________________________________________

A.

O ccu p a tion a l e a r n in g s :*
A- 1
O ffice o ccu p a tio n s—SMSA— en and w o m e n
m
6
A - l a . O ffice o c cu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—3 in n er cou n ties— en and w o m e n ______________________________________________________________________
m
m
11
A - l b . O ffic e o c cu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—5 ou ter cou n ties— en and w o m e n ______________________________________________________________________
m
m
13
A - 2.
P r o fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l occu p a tio n s—SMSA— en and w o m e n ____________________________________________________________________________
m
14
A -2 a . P r o fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o ccu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—3 in n er co u n tie s— en and w o m e n ____________*___________________________________ 15
m
m
A -2 b . P r o fe s s io n a l and te c h n ic a l o ccu p a tio n s—m an u factu rin g—5 ou ter co u n tie s— en and w o m e n _______________________________________________
m
15
A - 3.
O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l occu p a tio n s—SMSA— en and w om en c o m b in e d ________________________________________________________ 16
m
A -3 a . O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o ccu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—3 in n er cou n ties— en and w o m e n c o m b in e d __________________________
m
m
lfc
A -3 b . O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l occu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g —5 ou ter cou n ties— en and w om en c o m b in e d __________________________
m
m
19
A -4 .
M ain ten an ce and p ow er pi ant o ccu p a tio n s—SM S A _______________________________________________________________________________________________ 19
A -4 a . M ain ten an ce and p ow er plant o ccu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—3 in n er c o u n tie s _________________________________________________________________ 21
m
A -4 b . M ain ten an ce and p ow erp la n t occu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—5 ou ter c o u n tie s_________________________________________________________________ 22
m
A - 5.
C u stod ia l and m a te r ia l m o v em en t o ccu p a tio n s—SMSA_________________________________________________________________________________________ 23
A -5 a . C u stod ia l and m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t occu p a tio n s— an u factu rin g—3 in n er c o u n tie s __________________________________________________________ 25
m
A -5 b . C u stod ia l and m a te r ia l m o v e m e n t occu p a tio n s— a n u factu rin g—5 ou ter c o u n tie s __________________________________________________________ 26
m

B.

E s ta b lis h m e n t p r a c t ic e s and su p p lem en ta ry w age p r o v is io n s :*
B -l.
M inim u m en tra n ce s a la r ie s fo r w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s _______________________________________________________________________________________
B -2 .
Shift d iffe r e n t ia ls _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

27
28

B -4 .
B -5 .
B -6 .

P aid h o lid a y s ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
P aid v a c a tio n s _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
H ealth, in s u r a n ce , and p e n sio n p la n s __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

30
31
34

O ccu p a tion a l d e s c r ip t i o n s ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

35

A pp en dix.




Area W age Survey----The Philadelphia, Pa.—N.J., Metropolitan Area
Introduction
T h is a r e a is 1 o f 86 in w h ich the U .S . D epartm en t o f L a b o r ’ s
B u reau o f L a b o r S ta tis tic s con d u cts su rv e y s o f o ccu p a tio n a l earn in g s
and re la te d b e n e fits on an a re a w id e b a s is .
In this a r e a , data w e r e
ob ta in ed b y p e r s o n a l v is it s o f B ureau fie ld e c o n o m is ts to r e p r e ­
sen ta tiv e e sta b lis h m e n ts w ith in six b roa d in du stry d iv is io n s : M anu­
fa c tu r in g ; tr a n s p o r ta tio n , c o m m u n ica tio n , and oth er pu blic u tilitie s ;
w h o le s a le tr a d e ; r e t a il tr a d e ; fin a n ce , in su ra n ce , and r e a l esta te ; and
s e r v ic e s .
M a jo r in d u stry g rou ps ex clu d ed fr o m th ese stu d ies a r e
g ov ern m en t o p e r a tio n s and the c o n s tr u c tio n and e x tr a c tiv e in d u str ie s .
E s ta b lis h m e n ts h avin g fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber o f w o r k e r s a re
om itted b e c a u s e th ey tend to fu rn ish in su fficie n t em p loy m en t in the
o c cu p a tio n s stu d ied to w a r ra n t in clu s io n .
Separate tabu lation s a re
p r o v id e d fo r e a c h o f the b r o a d in du stry d iv is io n s w h ich m e e t pub­
lic a tio n c r it e r i a .

a llo w a n ce s and in cen tiv e e a rn in g s a re in clu d ed . W h ere w e e k ly hours
a re r e p o r t e d , as fo r o ffic e c le r i c a l o c c u p a tio n s , r e fe r e n c e is to the
stan dard w ork w eek (rou n ded to the n e a r e s t h a lf hour) fo r w hich e m ­
p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th eir r e g u la r s t r a ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay
fo r o v e rtim e at r e g u la r a n d /o r p r e m iu m r a te s ). A v e ra g e w e e k ly e a r n ­
in gs fo r th ese o ccu p a tio n s have b een rou n d ed to the n e a r e s t h alf d o lla r .
The a v e r a g e s p r e s e n te d r e f le c t c o m p o s ite , a reaw id e e s t i­
m a te s .
In d u stries and esta b lis h m e n ts d iffe r in p a y le v e l and jo b
staffin g and, thus, con trib u te d iffe r e n tly to the e s tim a te s fo r each jo b .
The pay r e la tio n s h ip obtain a ble fr o m the a v e r a g e s m a y fa il to r e fle c t
a c c u r a t e ly the w age sp re a d or d iffe r e n tia l m a in tain ed am ong jo b s in
in dividu al e sta b lis h m e n ts.
S im ila r ly , d iffe r e n c e s in a v era g e pay
le v e ls fo r m en and w om en in any of the s e le c t e d occu p a tion s should
not be a ssu m ed to r e fle c t d iffe r e n c e s in pa y trea tm en t o f the sex es
w ithin in dividu al e s ta b lis h m e n ts.
O ther p o s s ib le fa c t o r s w hich m ay
con trib u te to d iffe r e n c e s in pay fo r m en and w om en in clu d e: D iffe r ­
e n ce s in p r o g r e s s io n w ith in e sta b lis h e d rate r a n g e s , sin ce only the
actu al ra tes paid in cu m bents a re c o lle c t e d ; and d iffe r e n c e s in s p e c ific
duties p e r fo r m e d , although the w o r k e r s a r e c la s s ifie d a p p ro p ria te ly
w ithin the sa m e su r v e y jo b d e s c r ip tio n .
Job d e s c r ip tio n s u sed in
c la s s ify in g e m p lo y e e s in th ese su r v e y s a r e u su a lly m o r e g e n e ra lize d
than th ose u sed in in dividu al esta b lis h m e n ts and a llow fo r m in or
d iffe r e n c e s am ong e sta b lis h m e n ts in the s p e c ific du ties p e r fo rm e d .

T h e se s u r v e y s a r e con d u cted on a sa m ple b a s is b e c a u s e o f
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t in v o lv e d in su rv ey in g a ll esta b lis h m e n ts.
To
obtain op tim u m a c c u r a c y at m in im u m c o s t , a g re a te r p r o p o r tio n o f
la rg e than o f s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts is studied. In com b in in g the data,
h o w e v e r , a ll e sta b lis h m e n ts a r e given th eir a p p rop ria te w eigh t.
E s­
tim a tes b a s e d on the e s ta b lis h m e n ts studied a r e p r e se n te d , t h e r e fo r e ,
as r e la tin g to a ll e sta b lis h m e n ts in the in du stry grou pin g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t fo r th ose b elow the m in im u m s iz e studied.
O ccu p a tio n s and E a rn in g s

O ccu p ation a l em p loy m en t e s tim a te s r e p r e s e n t the total in
all e sta b lish m en ts w ithin the sc o p e o f the study and not the num ber
a ctu a lly s u rv e y e d .
B e ca u se o f d iffe r e n c e s in o ccu p a tio n a l stru ctu re
am ong e s ta b lis h m e n ts, the e s tim a te s o f occu p a tio n a l em p loym en t o b ­
tained fr o m the sa m ple o f esta b lis h m e n ts stud ied s e r v e on ly to in dicate
the re la tiv e im p o rta n ce o f the jo b s stu d ied .
T h e se d iffe r e n c e s in
o ccu p a tion a l s tru ctu re do not a ffe c t m a te r ia lly the a c c u r a c y o f the
ea rn in g s data.

The o c cu p a tio n s s e le c t e d fo r study a r e co m m o n to a v a r ie ty
o f m a n u fa ctu rin g and n on m an u fa ctu rin g in d u strie s , and a r e o f the
fo llo w in g ty p es: (1) O ffic e c le r i c a l; (2) p r o fe s s io n a l and te ch n ica l;
(3) m a in ten a n ce and p o w erp la n t; and (4) c u s to d ia l and m a te r ia l m o v e ­
m en t.
O ccu p a tio n a l c la s s ifi c a t io n is ba sed on a u n ifo rm s e t o f jo b
d e s c r ip t io n s d e s ig n e d to take a c c o u n t o f in ter esta b lish m en t v a ria tio n
in du ties w ith in the sa m e jo b .
The occu p a tion s s e le c t e d fo r study
a r e lis te d and d e s c r ib e d in the appendix.
The earn ings data fo llo w in g
the jo b title s a r e f o r a ll in d u s tr ie s com b in e d .
E arn in gs data fo r som e
o f the o c cu p a tio n s lis te d and d e s c r ib e d , o r fo r som e in du stry d iv is io n s
w ith in o c c u p a t io n s , a r e not p r e se n te d in the A - s e r i e s ta b le s , b e ca u se
e ith e r (1) e m p lo y m e n t in the o c cu p a tio n is too sm a ll to p ro v id e enough
data to m e r it p r e s e n ta tio n , o r (2) th ere is p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u r e
o f in d iv id u al e s ta b lis h m e n t data.

E sta b lish m en t P r a c t ic e s and S u p p lem en ta ry W age P r o v is io n s
In form a tion is p r e s e n te d (in the B - s e r i e s ta b les) on s e le cte d
esta b lish m en t p r a c t ic e s and su p p lem en ta ry w age p r o v is io n s as they
re la te to plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s .
A d m in is tra tiv e , e x e cu tiv e , and
p r o fe s s io n a l e m p lo y e e s , and c o n s tr u c tio n w o r k e r s who are u tilized
as a sep a ra te w ork f o r c e a re e x clu d e d .
"P la n t w o r k e r s " include
w ork in g fo r e m e n and all n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r s (in cluding le a d m en and tr a in e e s ) en gaged in n o n o ffic e fu n ction s.
"O ffic e w o r k e r s "
in clude w ork in g s u p e r v is o r s and n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r s p e rfo rm in g
c le r ic a l or re la te d fu n ction s.
C a fe te r ia w o r k e r s and rou tem en are
e x clu d ed in m anu factu ring in d u str ie s , but in clu d ed in nonm anufacturing
in d u str ie s .

O cc u p a tio n a l e m p lo y m e n t and earn in gs data a r e show n fo r
fu ll-t im e w o r k e r s , i. e . , th ose h ired to w ork a re g u la r w e e k ly sch ed u le
in the g iv en o c c u p a tio n a l c la s s ific a t io n .
E arn in gs data e x clu d e p r e ­
m iu m pay fo r o v e r t im e and fo r w ork on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and
late s h ifts .
N o n p rod u ction b on u ses a r e e x clu d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g




1

2
M inim u m en tra n ce s a la r ie s fo r w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s (table
B - l ) re la te on ly to the esta b lis h m e n ts v isite d . B eca u se o f the optim u m
sa m p lin g tech n iq u es u sed , and the p r o b a b ility that la r g e e s t a b lis h ­
m en ts a r e m o r e lik e ly to have fo r m a l en tra n ce ra te s fo r w o r k e r s
a b ove the s u b c le r ic a l le v e l than s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts, the table is
m o r e r e p r e s e n t a t iv e o f p o lic ie s in m ed iu m and la rg e e s ta b lis h m e n ts.

a paym ent o f 2 p ercen t o f annual e a r n in g s w as c o n s id e r e d as the e q u iv ­
alent o f 1 w e e k 's pay. E s tim a te s e x clu d e v a c a tio n -s a v in g s plans and
th ose w hich o ffe r "e x te n d e d " o r " s a b b a t ic a l" b e n e fits bey on d b a s ic
plans to w o rk e r s with qu alifyin g len gth s o f s e r v ic e .
T y p ic a l o f su ch
e x clu s io n s a re plans in the s te e l, alu m in u m , and can in d u s tr ie s .

Shift d iffe r e n t ia l data (ta ble B -2 ) a re lim ite d to plant w o r k e r s
in m a n u factu rin g in d u s tr ie s .
T h is in fo rm a tio n is p r e se n te d both in
te r m s o f (1) e sta b lis h m e n t p o l i c y , 1 p re se n te d in te r m s o f tota l plant
w o rk e r e m p lo y m e n t, and (2) e ffe c t iv e p r a c t ic e , p r e se n te d in te r m s of
w o r k e r s a ctu a lly e m p lo y e d on the s p e c ifie d sh ift at the tim e o f the
su r v e y .
In esta b lis h m e n ts h aving v a r ie d d iffe r e n t ia ls , the am ount
ap plying to a m a jo r ity w as u sed o r , if no am ount a p plied to a m a jo r ity ,
the c la s s ific a t io n " o t h e r " w as u se d .
In e sta b lish m en ts in w h ich som e
l a t e -s h ift h ou rs a r e paid at n o rm a l r a te s , a d iffe r e n tia l w as r e c o r d e d
on ly if it a p p lied to a m a jo r it y o f the sh ift h o u r s .

Data on h ealth, in s u r a n ce , and p e n sio n plans (ta ble B -6 ) in ­
clu d e th ose plans fo r w h ich the e m p lo y e r pays at le a s t a p a rt o f the
c o s t . Such plans in clude th ose u n d erw ritten b y a c o m m e r c i a l in su r a n ce
com p a n y and th ose p ro v id e d th rou gh a union fund o r paid d ir e c t ly b y
the e m p lo y e r out of c u r re n t op e ra tin g funds or fr o m a fund se t a s id e
fo r this p u rp ose. An e s ta b lis h m e n t w as c o n s id e r e d to have a plan
if the m a jo r ity of e m p lo y e e s w e r e e lig ib le to be c o v e r e d u nder the
plan, even if le s s than a m a jo r ity e le c t e d to p a rticip a te b e c a u s e e m ­
p lo y e e s w ere re q u ire d to con trib u te tow a rd the c o s t o f the plan.
L e­
g a lly r e q u ire d plans such as w o r k m e n 's c o m p e n s a tio n , s o c ia l s e ­
c u r ity , and r a ilr o a d r e tir e m e n t w e r e e x clu d e d .

The sch ed u led w eek ly h o u rs (table B -3 ) o f a m a jo r ity of the
f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s in an esta b lis h m e n t a r e tabulated as ap plyin g to
a ll o f the plant or o ffic e w o r k e r s o f that e sta b lis h m e n t.
Sch eduled
w e e k ly h ou rs a r e th ose w h ich fu ll-t im e e m p lo y e e s w e re e x p e cte d to
w o rk , w hether th ey w e r e paid fo r at s tra ig h t-tim e or o v e r tim e r a te s .
P a id h o lid a y s ; pa id v a c a tio n s ; and h ealth , in s u r a n c e , and
p e n sio n plans (ta b le s B - 4 th rough B -6 ) a r e tr e a te d s t a tis tic a lly on
the b a s is that th e s e a r e a p p lic a b le to a ll plant o r o ffic e w o r k e r s
i f a m a jo r ity o f such w o r k e r s a r e e lig ib le o r m ay even tu a lly qu alify
f o r the p r a c t ic e s lis t e d .
Sums o f in d iv id u al ite m s in ta b le s B -2
th rough B -6 m ay not equal to ta ls b e c a u s e o f roun din g.
D ata on paid h o lid a y s (ta ble B -4 ) a r e lim ite d to data on h o li­
days gra n ted annually on a fo r m a l b a s is ; i . e . , (1) a r e p ro v id e d fo r
in w ritten fo r m , or (2) have b e e n e s ta b lis h e d b y cu s to m .
H olid ay s
o r d in a r ily gra n ted a r e in clu d ed ev en though they m a y fa ll on a n on ­
w o rk d a y and the w o r k e r is not granted an oth er day o ff.
The f ir s t
p a rt o f the paid h o lid a y s table p r e s e n ts the n um ber o f w hole and h alf
h o lid a y s a ctu a lly g ra n ted .
The s e c o n d p a rt c o m b in e s w h ole and h a lf
h o lid a y s to show tota l h o lid a y tim e .
The su m m a r y o f v a ca tio n plans (table B -5 ) is lim ite d to a
s t a t is t ic a l m e a s u r e o f v a ca tio n p r o v is io n s .
It is not intended as a
m e a s u r e o f the p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s a ctu a lly r e c e iv in g s p e c ific b e n e ­
f it s .
P r o v is io n s o f an e s ta b lis h m e n t fo r a ll len gths o f s e r v ic e w e re
tabu lated as ap plyin g to a ll plant o r o ffic e w o r k e r s o f the e s t a b lis h ­
m en t, r e g a r d le s s o f length o f s e r v ic e .
P r o v is io n s fo r paym en t on
oth er than a tim e b a s is w e r e c o n v e r te d to a tim e b a s is ; fo r e x a m p le ,

1
An establishment was considered as having a policy if
conditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time o f the survey, or (2) had
late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions
shifts during the 12 months prior to the survey, or (2) had provisions in
late shifts.




S ick n ess and a c c id e n t in su r a n ce is lim ite d to that type o f
in su ra n ce under w hich p r e d e te r m in e d c a s h pa ym en ts a r e m ade d ir e c t ly
to the in su red on a w eek ly or m on th ly b a s is d u rin g illn e s s or a c c id e n t
d is a b ility . In form ation is p r e s e n te d f o r a ll su ch plan s to w h ich the
e m p lo y e r co n trib u te s. H ow e v e r, in N ew Y o r k and N ew J e r s e y , w h ich
have en acted te m p o ra ry d is a b ility in s u r a n c e la w s w h ich r e q u ir e e m ­
p lo y e r con trib u tion s, 2 plans a r e in clu d ed on ly i f the e m p lo y e r (1) c o n ­
trib u te s m o r e than is le g a lly r e q u ir e d , o r (2) p r o v id e s the e m p lo y e e
w ith b en efits w hich e x ce e d the r e q u ir e m e n ts o f the la w .
T a b u la tion s
of paid sick lea ve plans a r e lim ite d to fo r m a l p la n s 3 w h ich p r o v id e
fu ll pay or a p r o p o rtio n o f the w o r k e r 's pay d u rin g a b s e n c e fr o m w o rk
b e c a u s e of illn e s s .
Separate ta b u la tion s a r e p r e s e n te d a c c o r d in g to
(1) plans w hich p rov id e fu ll pay and n o w aitin g p e r io d , and (2) plans
w h ich p rov id e eith er p a rtia l pay o r a w aitin g p e r io d .
In ad d ition to
the p resen ta tion of the p r o p o r t io n s o f w o r k e r s w ho a r e p r o v id e d
s ick n e s s and a c c id e n t in su ra n ce o r paid s ic k le a v e , an u n du plica ted
total is shown o f w o r k e r s w ho r e c e iv e e ith e r o r both ty p es o f b e n e fit s .
C atastroph e in s u r a n ce , s o m e tim e s r e f e r r e d to as m a jo r m e d ­
ic a l in su ra n ce , in clu d es th ose plans w h ich a r e d e s ig n e d to p r o te c t
e m p lo y e e s in c a s e of s ic k n e s s and in ju ry in v o lv in g e x p e n s e s bey on d
the n o rm a l c o v e r a g e of h o s p ita liz a tio n , m e d ic a l, and s u r g ic a l p la n s.
M e d ica l in su ra n ce r e fe r s to plan s p r o v id in g f o r c o m p le te o r p a rtia l
paym ent of d o c t o r s ' f e e s .
Such plan s m a y be u n d e rw ritte n b y c o m ­
m e r c ia l in su ra n ce co m p a n ie s o r n o n p r o fit o r g a n iz a tio n s o r th ey m a y
be paid fo r b y the e m p lo y e r out o f a fund set a s id e f o r th is p u r p o s e .
T abu lations o f r e tir e m e n t p e n sio n plan s a r e lim ite d to th ose plans
that p ro v id e r e g u la r paym en ts f o r the r e m a in d e r o f the w o r k e r 's lif e .

2 The temporary disability laws in California and Rhode Island do not require employer
it met either of the following
contributions.
formal provisions covering
3 An establishment was considered as having a formal plan if it established at least the
if it (1) had operated late
minimum number of days of sick leave available to each em ployee. Such a plan need not be
written form for operating
written, but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, were excluded.

3

T a b le 1. E s ta b lis h m e n ts and W o r k e r s W ithin S cop e o f S u rv e y and N um ber Studied in P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .— .J . , 1 b y M a jo r In du stry D iv i s io n ,2 N ov em b er 1967
N
W o r k e r s in e sta b lish m en ts

N u m ber o f e sta b lish m e n ts

In d u stry d iv is io n

em ploym en t
in e s ta b lis h ­
m ents in s c o p e
o f study

W ithin s c o p e o f study
W ithin s c o p e
o f s tu d y ’

Studied
T o t a l4

Studied

Plant
N um ber

A ll d iv is io n s __________________________________
M an u factu rin g—. — __ . . .
- ----3 Inner C ou n ties 1__________ —--------------- —--------5 O uter C o u n t ie s 1 - - ------— —
T r a n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and
oth er p u b lic u t ilitie s 5------------------- ----------------W h o le s a le t r a d e ____________________________ ___
R e ta il t r a d e . —
—
. . .
—
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te —
—
S e r v ic e s 7
---------- ------ -------------------------------------------

_

O ffic e
T o t a l4

P ercent

2 ,0 5 8

401

7 5 4 ,2 0 0

100

4 6 0 ,2 0 0

1 4 3 ,2 0 0

4 4 4 ,4 7 0

100
100
100
-

980
642
338
1 ,0 7 8

182
119
63
219

4 4 5 ,6 0 0
2 9 5 ,4 0 0
1 5 0 ,2 0 0
3 0 8 ,6 0 0

59
39
20
41

3 0 3 ,3 0 0
2 0 2 ,2 0 0
1 0 1 ,1 0 0
1 5 6 ,9 0 0

5 8 ,1 0 0
3 9 ,9 0 0
1 8 ,2 0 0
8 5 ,1 0 0

2 4 7 ,6 8 0
168 ,360
7 9 ,3 2 0
196 ,790

100
50
100
50
50

93
319
143
235
288

33
48
38
45
55

6 8 ,0 0 0
40, 100
9 7 ,9 0 0
6 2 ,7 0 0
3 9 ,9 0 0

9
6
13
8
5

3 9 ,7 0 0
1 7 ,2 0 0
7 4 ,5 0 0
6 3 ,5 0 0
2 2 ,0 0 0

1 3 ,2 0 0
1 2 ,1 0 0
1 4 ,1 0 0
3 8 ,6 0 0
7, 100

5 7 ,5 8 0
1 2 ,650
7 6 ,7 7 0
3 4 ,7 0 0
1 5 ,090

T h e P h ila d e lp h ia Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tistica l A r e a , as defin ed b y the B u rea u o f the B u dget through A p r il 1967, c o n s is t s o f T h re e Inner C ou nties o f D ela w a re and P h ila d elp h ia C ou n ties,
P a ., and C a m d en County, N .J .; and F iv e O uter C ounties o f B u ck s, C h e s te r , and M o n tg o m e r y C o u n tie s, P a ., and B u rlin gton and G lo u c e s te r C ou n ties, N .J.
The " w o r k e r s w ithin s c o p e o f study"
e s tim a te s show n in this table p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a ccu ra te d e s c r ip tio n o f the s iz e and c o m p o s it io n o f the la b o r f o r c e in clu d ed in the s u r v e y . The e s tim a te s are not in tended, h o w e v e r , to s e r v e
as a b a s is o f c o m p a r is o n w ith o th e r e m p lo y m e n t in d exes fo r the a rea to m e a s u r e em p lo ym e n t tre n d s o r le v e ls s in c e (1) planning o f w age s u r v e y s r e q u ir e s the u s e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t data co m p ile d
c o n s id e r a b ly in adva nce o f the p a y r o ll p e r io d studied, and (2) s m a ll es ta b lis h m e n ts are e x c lu d e d f r o m the s c o p e o f the s u rv e y .
2 T h e 1967 ed itio n o f the S tand ard In du strial C la s s ific a tio n M anual w as u se d in c la s s ify in g e s ta b lis h m e n ts b y in d u s try d iv is io n .
3 In clu d es a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts w ith to ta l e m p loym en t at o r above the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A ll o u tlets (w ithin the area) o f co m p a n ie s in such in d u s tr ie s as tr a d e , fin a n c e , auto r e p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m o tio n p ic tu re th e a te r s a r e c o n s id e r e d as 1 esta b lish m e n t.
4 In clu d es e x e c u t iv e , p r o f e s s io n a l, and oth er w o r k e r s exclu ded f r o m the se p a ra te plant and o f fic e c a t e g o r ie s .
5 T a x ic a b s and s e r v ic e s in cid e n ta l to w a ter tra n sp o rta tio n w e re e x clu d e d .
6 E s tim a te r e la t e s to r e a l e s ta te e sta b lish m e n ts only. W o rk e rs fr o m the e n tire in d u stry d iv is io n a re r e p r e s e n t e d in the S e r ie s A t a b le s , but fr o m the r e a l es ta te p o r t io n on ly in " a ll
in d u s tr y " e s t im a t e s in the S e r ie s B ta b le s .
7 H otels and m o t e ls ; la u n d rie s and o th er p e r s o n a l s e r v ic e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v ic e s ; a u to m o b ile r e p a ir , re n ta l, and p arkin g; m o tio n p ic tu r e s ; n on p rofit m e m b e r s h ip or g a n iz a tio n s (exclu d in g
r e lig io u s and c h a r ita b le o r g a n iz a tio n s ); and en gin e e rin g and a rc h ite c tu r a l s e r v ic e s .
6




A lm o s t th r e e -fift h s o f the w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f the s u r v e y in the P h ila d e lp h ia
a r e a w e re e m p lo y e d in m an u factu rin g f ir m s . T he fo llo w in g table p r e s e n ts the m a jo r in d u stry
grou ps and s p e c ific in d u s tr ie s as a p e r c e n t o f all m an u factu rin g:
In du stry g ro u p s

S p e c ific in d u s trie s

E le c t r ic a l equipm ent and
s u p p lie s ________________________13
F o o d and k in d re d p r o d u c ts —, . — 9
M a ch in e ry , e x c e p t e l e c t r i c a l — 9
A p p a re l and oth er te x tile
p ro d u cts __________________________ 8
C h em icals and a llie d p rod u cts— 8
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s tr ie s _____ 8
T ra n sp o rta tio n equipm ent—— .
8
F a b r ic a te d m e ta l p r o d u c ts ------6
P rin tin g and p u b lish in g —— —— 6

B la s t fu rn a ce and b a s ic s te e l
p r o d u c ts -------------------------------— — 5
C om m u n ica tion e q u ip m e n t----------4
E l e c t r ic te s t and
d istrib u tin g e q u ip m e n t---------------- 3
M e n 's and b o y s ' suits
and c o a ts ---------------------------------------- 3
M o to r v e h ic le s and e q u ip m e n t— 3
P e t r o le u m r e fin in g —----------------—— 3
R a d io and T V r e c e iv in g
equipm ent--------------------------------------- 3

T h is in fo rm a tio n is b a s e d on e s tim a te s o f total em p lo y m e n t d e r iv e d f r o m u n iv e r s e
m a te r ia ls co m p ile d p r i o r to actual s u r v e y . P r o p o r t io n s in v a r io u s in d u stry d iv is io n s m ay
d iffe r f r o m p r o p o r tio n s b a s e d on the r e s u lts o f the s u r v e y as show n in table 1 above.

4

W age Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n te d in ta ble 2 a r e in d e x e s and p e r c e n ta g e s o f change
in a v e r a g e s a la r ie s o f o ffic e c le r i c a l w o r k e r s and in d u s tr ia l n u r s e s ,
and in a v e r a g e ea rn in g s o f s e le c t e d plant w o r k e r g r o u p s . T h e in d e x e s
a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g iv e n tim e , e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f
w a g e s d u rin g the b a s e p e r io d (date o f the a r e a su r v e y con d u cted
b etw een July I960 and June 1961).
S u btractin g 100 fr o m the in dex
y ie ld s the p e r ce n ta g e change in w a g e s fr o m the b a s e p e r io d to the
date o f the in d ex .
The p e r c e n ta g e s o f change o r in c r e a s e r e la te to
w ag e ch a n g es betw een the in d ica te d d a te s.
T h e s e e s tim a te s a r e
m e a s u r e s o f change in a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; th ey a r e not in ten ded
to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e pay ch a n g es in the e s ta b lis h m e n ts in the a r e a .
M eth od o f C om puting

in the occu p a tion a l g rou p . T h e s e co n s ta n t w e ig h ts r e f le c t b a s e y e a r
em p loym en ts w h e r e v e r p o s s ib le .
T h e a v e r a g e (m ea n ) ea rn in g s fo r
ea ch occu p a tion w e re m u ltip lie d b y the o c c u p a tio n a l w eigh t, and the
p r o d u c ts fo r a ll o ccu p a tio n s in the g rou p w e r e to ta le d . T he a g g r e g a te s
fo r 2 c o n s e cu tiv e y e a r s w e r e r e la te d b y d iv id in g the a g g re g a te fo r
the la t e r y e a r b y the a g g re g a te fo r the e a r lie r y e a r .
T h e resu lta n t
r e la t iv e , l e s s 100 p e r c e n t, sh ow s the p e r c e n ta g e ch a n g e. The in d ex
is the p ro d u ct o f m u ltiplyin g the b a s e y e a r r e la t iv e (100) b y the r e la tiv e
f o r the next su cce e d in g y e a r and con tin u in g to m u ltip ly (com p ou n d )
ea ch y e a r 's r e la tiv e by the p r e v io u s y e a r 's in d e x . A v e r a g e ea rn in g s
f o r the follow in g o ccu p a tio n s w e r e u se d in com p u tin g the w ag e tr e n d s:

E a ch o f the s e le c t e d k ey o c cu p a tio n s w ith in an o ccu p a tio n a l
grou p w as a s s ig n e d a w eigh t b a s e d on its p r o p o r tio n a te em p lo y m e n t
Office clerical (men and women):
Bookkeeping-machine operators,
class B
Clerks, accounting, classes
A and B
Clerks, file, classes
A, B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
Comptometer operators
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
Office boys and girls

Table 2.

Office clerical (men and women)—
Continued
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators, classes
A and B
Tabulating-machine operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B

Skilled maintenance (men):
Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters
Pipefitters
T ool and die makers
Unskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, material handling

Industrial nurses (men and women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)

Indexes of Standard Weekly Salaries and Straight-Time Hourly Earnings for Selected Occupational Groups in Philadelphia, Pa. —N. J .,
November 1967 and November 1966, and Percents of Increase for Selected Periods
Indexes
(November 1960=100)

Industry and occupational group
November 1967

November 1966

Percents of increase
November 1966 November 1965 November 1964 November 1963 November 1962 November 1961 November 1960 November 1959
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
November 1967 November 1966 November 1965 November 1964 November 1963 November 1962 November 1961 November 1960

A ll industries:
Office clerical (men and w om en )-------Industrial nurses (m en and women) -----Skilled maintenance (m e n ) ----------------Unskilled plant (m e n )--------------------------

125.7
127.8
125.3
128.4

119.6
120.8
121.7
123.5

5. 1
5 .7
3 .0
4 .0

4.1
4 .6
4.1
4 .4

2.9
2.4
3.4
3.8

2.3
2.9
2.9
3. 5

3 .0
3 .0
3.2
3.9

2 .8
3.1
2.8
2 .8

3. 1
3 .2
3. 5
3 .0

3 .5
2 .8
2 .2
2. 3

Manufacturing:
Office clerical (men and w om en )-------Industrial nurses (men and w om en )-----Skilled maintenance (m en)------------------Unskilled plant (men) --------------------- -

123.3
127.0
125.2
125.4

118.0
120.2
121.5
120.8

4 .5
5 .7
3 .0
3 .9

2.8
4.1
3.9
2.8

2.7
2.8
3.4
3.3

2.9
2.9
2.9
3 .4

3. 1
2 .5
3.2
4 .0

2. 1
3.1
3.1
2 .2

3 .2
3.2
3. 4
3. 5

3 .6
2.8
1.9
1.8




5
F o r o f f ic e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and in d u stria l n u r s e s , the w age
tr e n d s r e la te to r e g u la r w e e k ly s a la r ie s fo r the n o r m a l w o rk w e e k ,
e x c lu s iv e o f e a r n in g s fo r o v e r t im e .
F o r plant w o r k e r g r o u p s , th ey
m e a s u r e ch a n g e s in a v e r a g e s tr a ig h t -tim e h o u rly e a r n in g s , e x clu d in g
p r e m iu m p a y f o r o v e r t im e and fo r w o rk on w eek en d s, h o lid a y s , and
la te sh ifts . T h e p e r c e n ta g e s a r e b a s e d on data fo r s e le c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p a tio n s and in clu d e m o s t o f the n u m e r ic a lly im p orta n t jo b s w ith in
e a c h g ro u p .

C h an ges in the la b o r fo r c e can ca u se in c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in the
o c cu p a tio n a l a v e r a g e s w ith ou t actu a l w age ch a n g es. It is c o n c e iv a b le
that e v e n though a ll e sta b lis h m e n ts in an a r e a g ave w age in c r e a s e s ,
a v e r a g e w a g e s m a y have d e c lin e d b e c a u s e lo w e r pa yin g e sta b lis h m e n ts
e n te r e d the a r e a o r expan ded th eir w o rk f o r c e s . S im ila r ly , w ag es
m a y have r e m a in e d r e la t iv e ly con sta n t, y et the a v e r a g e s fo r an a re a
m a y have r is e n c o n s id e r a b ly b e c a u s e h ig h er payin g e sta b lis h m e n ts
e n te r e d the a r e a .

L im ita tio n s o f D ata
T h e in d e x e s and p e r c e n ta g e s o f change, as m e a s u r e s o f
ch a n ge in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e in flu en ced b y : (1) g e n e r a l s a la r y and
w a g e c h a n g e s , (2) m e r it o r o th e r in c r e a s e s in pay r e c e iv e d b y in d i­
v id u a l w o r k e r s w h ile in the sa m e jo b , and (3) ch a n ges in a v e r a g e
w a g e s due to ch a n g es in the la b o r f o r c e re su ltin g fr o m la b o r tu rn ­
o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s io n s , f o r c e r e d u c tio n s , and changes in the p r o p o r ­
tio n s o f w o r k e r s e m p lo y e d b y esta b lis h m e n ts w ith d iffe r e n t p a y le v e ls .




The u se o f con sta n t e m p lo y m e n t w eig h ts e lim in a te s the e ffe c t
o f ch a n g es in the p r o p o r t io n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e a c h jo b in ­
clu d ed in the data.
The p e r c e n ta g e s o f change r e f le c t on ly changes
in a v e r a g e pa y fo r s t r a ig h t-tim e h o u r s .
T h e y a r e not in flu en ced by
ch a n g es in stan d ard w o rk s c h e d u le s , as su ch , o r b y p r e m iu m pay
fo r o v e r t im e . W h ere n e c e s s a r y , data w e r e a d ju sted to r e m o v e fr o m
the in d ex es and p e r c e n ta g e s o f change any sig n ific a n t e ffe c t ca u sed
b y ch a n g es in the s c o p e o f the su r v e y .

6

A. O ccupational E arnings
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—SMSA —Men and Women

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eek ly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area basis by industry d ivision ,
P h iladelphia (Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A re a ), P a .— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry division

mber
of
iikers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

55

60

65

Number of w ork ers receivin g sitraigh t-tim e w eek ly earnings of1
S
S
S
$
r
%
%
$
$
S
100
80
85
90
95
110
75
120
130
70
140
ifo

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100.

110.

12C

130

140

150

%

*
50
and
under
55

S

%

$

$

$

$

160

170

180

160

170

180

190

11
8
3
2

3
2
1
1

15
15
15

MEN
CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS A MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING -r------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------WHOLESALE TRACE --------

529
283
246
46
94

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 9 .C
3 7 .5

$
1 2 4 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 3 0 .0 0

$
1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0
1 2 2 .5 0

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING* CLASS B NONMANUFACTURING -r------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------WHOLESALE TRACE --------

487
231
80
79

3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .0

1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0

CLERKS* ORDER --------------MANUFACTURING -----------NCNMANUFACTURING --------WHOLESALE TRACE --------

351
127
224
202

3 9 .5 1 1 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 1 7 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 8 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 0 9 .0 0

CLERKS. PAYROLL ------------MANUFACTURING ------------

131
98

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

$
$
1 1 1 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 3 7 .5 0
1 1 4 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0 - 1 5 4 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 4 2 .0 0

“

—
~

~

-

-

-

8
8
-

10
9
1
-

14
1
13
8

19
14
5
3

67
41
26
3

146
68
78
12
24

68
32
36
4
25

90
51
39
14
6

47
36
11
7

31
13
18
14
2

1 1 5 .5 0 1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0
9 1 .0 0 - 1 2 6 .0 0
1 2 8 .5 0 1 2 6 .0 0 - 1 3 3 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0 1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 0 8 .5 0

_
-

1
-

_
-

4
4
-

5
5
-

19
19
1

10
8
l
2

39
19
1

17
15
3

22
7
-

89
71
6
63

198
13
7
5

51
42
38
4

20
16
16

12
12
12

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

1 1 2 .0 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 2 2 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0 1 0 5 .5 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0
9 8 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
1 1 1 .5 0
9 9 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

5
5
-

1
1
1

l
1
1

23
5
18
16

26
19
7
6

37
37
34

46
23
23
22

104
24
8C
80

63
29
34
26

14
12
2
1

14
8
6
5

9
4
5
5

7
2
6
5

1
1
-

~

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

“

i
-

6
4

3
1

30
20

36
30

14
2

13
13

11
11

10
10

1
1

6
6

10

5

_

_

_

1C
10

5
5

-

-

-

1 2 1 .5 0 1 1 7 .5 0 1 0 4 .5 0 - 1 3 6 .5 0
1 2 5 .5 0 1 1 8 .5 0 1 0 9 .5 0 - 1 4 2 .5 0

_

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS B —

53

3 8 .C

9 5 .5 0

9 2 .0 0

7 9 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0

-

-

-

-

7

8

1

6

13

-

-

741
255
486
93
121
131

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .C
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .5

8 0 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
7 0 .0 0

7 4 .0 0
7 5 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
7 9 .5 0
6 8 .0 0
6 9 .0 0

6 7 .0 0 6 6 .5 0 6 7 .0 0 7 1 .0 0 6 3 .0 0 6 6 .5 0 -

8 6 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
9 0 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
7 3 .5 0
7 5 .0 0

6
6
-

36
19
17

15
9
6
5
1

-

15
10

64
34
30
17
1
10

79

-

76
46
30
10
5
12

7
4
3
-

10
7

117
43
74
18
25
21

7
7

-

160
29
131
17
32
67

64
29
35

-

78
29
49
3
32
4

SECRETARIES -----------------

54

3 9 .0

1 4 4 .0 0 1 4 2 .5 0 1 2 7 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS A -------------------MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

205
108
97
27

3 9 .5
4 0 .C
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 6 .0 0
1 3 8 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0
1 4 8 .0 0

1 3 4 .5 0
1 3 8 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0

1 1 7 .5 0 - 1 5 6 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0
1 3 3 .0 0 - 1 7 5 .0 0

_

_

_

_

_

x

2

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

4
2
?

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS a -------------------MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------FINANCE----------------

331
170
161
59

3 9 . C 1 0 5 .0 0 1 0 7 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 4 .0 0 1 0 4 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 0 5 .5 0 1 1 0 .0 0
3 8 .0
8 5 .5 0
8 9 .0 0

9 5 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0
9 5 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0
9 5 .5 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0
8 0 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .5 0

2

2

6

5

-

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

6
6

5
5

21
7
14
14

27
18
9
7

19
17
2
2

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS C -------------------MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------WHOLESALE TRACE --------

199
65
134
92

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5

9 0 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
9 3 .0 0

8 9 .5 0
8 8 .5 0
9 0 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

8 1 . 0 0 - 9 9 .5 0
8 4 . 0 0 - 9 8 .5 0
7 9 . 0 0 - 9 9 .5 0
8 7 .0 0 - 1 0 1 .5 0

-

-

-

-

22
7
15
12

10
1
9
6

12
12

24
11
13

37
19
18
14

177
64
113
58

3 8 .5
3 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

8 6 .5 0
8 5 .0 0
8 7 .0 0
8 1 .0 0

8 3 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
8 2 .5 0

7 2 .0 0 7 4 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 7 1 .5 0 -

-

12
4
8

20

-

12
6
6

~

29
8
21
20

8
6
2

~

29
15
14
8

_

-

18

OFFICE BOYS ----------------MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------WHOLESALE TRACE -------FINANCE---------------SERVICES ---------------

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

17

79

17

-

-

_
-

2

22

2

6

10

1

6

-

17
5
12

32
12
20

26
21
5

41
19
22
17

12
11
1
1

36
25
11
1

6
4
2
l

15
9
6
1

10

30
22
«
4

67
35
32
6

112
57
55
10

24
9
15
1

6
5
1

16
5
11
10

34
9
25
24

34
10
24
21

4
3
1
1

2
2
2

22
9
13
8

17
11
6
6

5
1
4
4

3
3

5

15
1
14

_

10
5

2

1

3

4

_

-

-

-

-

2

1

3

4

-

2

_

2

_

2
2

-

2

-

-

-

_
_

_
_

_

.

WOMEN
CILLERS* MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) ------------------MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------WHOLESALE TRACE -------See footn otes at end of table,




9 5 .5 0
9 5 .5 0
9 6 .0 0
9 2 .5 0

—

-

20
12

“

5

_
_




7
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—SMSA—Men and W om en— Continued

rage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a s is by industry d ivision ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A r e a ), P a .-N .J ., N ovem ber 1967)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

%

Average
weekly

S

$

i

Num ber o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g straigh t-tim e w eek ly earnings of—
i
1 ------- S
$
*
1 ------- •
$
$
%
%
$
S
$
$
*
$
70
75
80
85
90
95
100
110
120
130
140
150 160
WO 180
190 200

$
7 7 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
7 3 .5 0
7 1 .0 0

Median2

$
7 7 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
7 3 .5 0
7 1 .5 0

Middle range2

$
7 0 .5 0 8 1 .0 0 6 7 .5 0 6 4 .0 0 -

$
8 7 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
8 4 .0 0
7 5 .5 0

268
79
189
123

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

269
128
141
67
67

3 7 .5
9 9 .5 0
9 8 .0 0
3 8 .0 1 0 7 .0 0 1 0 7 .5 0
3 7 .5
9 3 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
3 9 .0
9 2 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
3 6 .5
9 4 .0 0
9 3 .0 0

9 1 . 0 0 - 1 1 1 .5 0
9 6 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .5 0
8 6 . 5 0 - 9 9 .0 0
8 4 .0 0 - 1 0 0 .0 0
9 0 . 0 0 - 9 9 .0 0

511
214
297
67

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0

8 1 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
8 9 .5 0
7 7 .0 0

7 1 . 0 0 - 9 1 .0 0
7 7 . 5 0 - 9 1 .0 0
6 7 . 0 0 - 9 1 .5 0
7 6 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .5 0
6 7 . 5 0 - 9 1 .5 0

285
642
643
82
114
218
142
87

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0

1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 0 1 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0
9 6 .0 0
9 8 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0

107
680
427
150
224
573
307
173

3 8 .0
8 1 .0 0
3 9 .0
8 2 .5 0
3 8 .0
8 0 .0 0
3 8 .5 1 0 1 .5 0
3 8 .5
7 9 .0 0
3 7 .5
7 6 .5 0
3 7 .0
7 5 .0 0
3 7 .5
8 2 .5 0

7 9 .5 0
8 3 .0 0
7 8 .0 0
9 7 .5 0
8 1 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

7 2 . 0 0 - 8 8 .0 0
7 5 . 5 0 - 9 0 .0 0
7 1 . 5 0 - 8 6 .5 0
8 0 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0
6 7 . 0 0 - 8 9 .0 0
7 1 . 0 0 - 8 3 .0 0
7 0 . 5 0 - 8 0 .0 0
7 3 . 0 0 - 9 3 .0 0

339
147
192

121

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

9 1 .5 0
9 5 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
8 7 .0 0

9 0 .5 0
9 5 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
8 5 .5 0

8 1 . 5 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
8 3 . 0 0 - 1 0 6 .5 0
7 9 . 5 0 - 9 8 .0 0
7 7 . 5 0 - 9 4 .0 0

164
259
905
28
125
144
530
78

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5

7 2 .0 0
7 6 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
8 8 .0 0
6 9 .0 0
6 3 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
7 6 .5 0

7 1 .5 0
7 5 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
6 4 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
7 8 .0 0

6 6 . 0 0 - 7 8 .0 0
6 8 . 5 0 - 8 4 .0 0
6 5 . 5 0 - 7 6 .0 0
7 6 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0
6 4 . 0 0 - 7 5 .5 0
5 9 . 0 0 - 6 9 .5 0
6 7 . 0 0 - 7 5 .0 0
7 5 . 0 0 - 8 2 .0 0

645
206
439
27
99
171
061
81

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

6 4 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
6 5 .5 0

6 4 .0 0
6 2 .0 0
6 4 .5 0
7 1 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
6 2 .5 0
6 4 .5 0
6 5 .0 0

6 1 .5 0 5 8 .0 0 6 2 .0 0 6 4 .5 0 6 3 .0 0 6 0 .5 0 6 2 .0 0 6 2 .5 0 -

68

8 1 .5 0
8 5 .5 0
7 7 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
7 6 .5 0

1 0 2 .5 0 9 2 . 0 0 - 1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0 9 4 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0
1 0 1 .0 0 9 0 .0 0 - 1 1 1 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0 1 0 3 .0 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
1 0 1 .5 0 9 0 .0 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0
9 6 .5 0 8 7 .5 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 8 4 . 5 0 - 1 1 1 .5 0
1 0 1 .5 0 9 4 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .5 0

6 8 .0 0
6 6 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
7 8 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
6 4 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 8 .5 0

55

60

55

Mean2

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

110

2

2

32

-

-

2
2

25
1
24
12

61
8
53
44

27
6
21
8

32
22
10
4

38
12
26
3

15
6
9
6

16
6
10
10

18
18.

2
2

4
2
2
l
“

28
28
21
7

23
2
21
7
10

47
20
27

57
23
34
23
9

38
17
21
11
10

44
7
37
12
7

15
2
13
8

71
44
27
15
11

131
64
67
8
8
23
15
13

343
181
162
37
23
39
24
39

50
and
vinder

65

%

~

-

32
32

and

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

over

38
30
8
4
4

28
26

4
4

_

1
1

_

_

_

_

_

l
1
_
_

3

3

3
3

3
3

_
_

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

179
103
76
4
18
36
18
-

75
50
25
4
3
5
13
“

67
37
30
8
2
13
7
-

23
11
12

4
4

2
1
l

26
6
20
7
5
3

47
5
42
36
l
3

7

8

7
7

8
8

-

-

_
_

3
1
2

2
2

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

—
-

-

-

~

~

~

“

1
1
”

33

64
11
53
2
21

50
23
27
3
4

72
41
31
10
11

54
28
26
3
4

80
57
23

27
1
26
-

10

28
8
20
-

62
23
39

127
65
62

-

-

-

-

4

9
6
5

6
33
-

30
12
17
3

162
77
85
9
13
41
9
13

345
69
276
12
20
117
108
19

350
95
255
24
17
136
55
23

339
130
209
21
31
106
41
10

259
125
134
12
41
41
24
16

165
69
96
4
9
22
10
51

89
35
54
1
24
16
l
12

89
51
38
14
6
13
5

5

39
13
26
22

56
34
22
*8

41
7
34
15

46
17
29
20

38
24
14
8

60
28
32
12

26
19
7
6

11
4
7
1
6

10
4
6
6

_
-

“
_
-

21
21
5
~ -

-

33
4
6

_

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

57
4
53

117
29
88

10

-

-

26
-

-

“
_

-

208
62
146
2
21
37
57
29

6

-

-

3

-

27

-

-

-

-

-

21
27
3
2

27
52
8
1

_

_

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

~

26
2
24
18

_

67
2
65
1

168
39
129
3
40
37
47
2

273
36
237
1
32
32
162
10

271
49
222
2
20
16
177
7

158
27
131
1
20
13
65
32

118
51
67
7
5
3
30
22

62
30
32
1
2

15
9
6
2

11
8
3
3

-

-

24
5

450
21
429
4
10
16
368
31

175
16
159
7
28
8
106
10

29
5
24
3
4

10
3
7
2
4

16
4
12

7
3
4
2
2

17

1

-

_

_

_

_

_
_
_

_
_
_

_
_
_
_

2

43
17
26
12
14

.
_

_

.
_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

-

_

_

_

_

10

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

1

_
_

_

_

1

-

_
_

_
_

_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_

1

4

769
78
691
8
33
114
500
36

-

-

-

-

•-

“

43
21
-

34
21
13

152
53
99

-

13
“

-

6
33
56
4

_
-

-

12

_
-

3
2
1
1

-

8
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—SMSA—Men and Women— Continued

(A verage s tra igh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area basis by industry d ivision ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A r e a ), P a ,— .J ., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number

Sex, occupation, and industry division

woikers

i
weekly
hours1
(standard)

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

50
and
under

$

$

$
55

60

$
65

N um ber o f w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings o f—
$
4
S
S
S
S
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
180
190 200
170
95
120
140
150
160
85
100
110
130
75
80
90
70
ana

55

60

65

70

75

80

8b

90 ... 95

-

4
4

51
51
7
44

38
38
25
13

54
33
21
20
1

48
21
27
25
2

122
82
40
39
-

78
31
47
10
36

138
130
8

20
1
19

39
15
24
14

70
46
24
4

54
25
29
7
8
2
9

132
95
37
2
5
7
20

48
19
29
12
5
9
3

100 . 110

12G

130

140

150

160

190

200

over

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

170

180

-

W EN - CCNTINUEO
OM
CLERKS* ORDER ------------------- * -----MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------WHOLESALE TRACE ------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------

646
358
288
178
108

3 8 .5
3 8 ,5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

$
8 5 .5 0
8 9 .5 0
8 0 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
7 3 .5 0

$
8 5 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
8 0 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
6 7 .5 0

$
$
7 6 . 5 0 - 9 3 .5 0
8 2 .0 0 - 9 4 .0 0
6 7 . 5 0 - 8 9 .0 0
7 3 .0 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0
6 2 . 5 0 - 8 7 .5 0

CLERKS* PAYROLL ----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING - r ----------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------WHOLESALE TRACE ------------RETAIL TRACE ------------------SERVICES ---------------------------

811
502
309
61
67
84
71

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

9 1 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
8 8 .0 0
8 7 .0 0
8 6 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
9 8 .5 0 1 0 1 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
7 9 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

8 0 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0
8 2 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
7 6 . 0 0 - 9 9 .0 0
7 2 . 0 0 - 9 8 .0 0
8 5 .0 0 - 1 1 2 .0 0
6 7 . 0 0 - 9 2 .5 0
8 0 . 0 0 - 9 3 .5 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ----------MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING------- -------WHOLESALE TRACE ------------RETAIL TRACE -------------------

618
71
547
139
294

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

8 6 .0 0
9 1 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

8 5 .0 0
9 2 .0 0
8 4 .0 0
8 7 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

7 7 .5 0 8 4 .0 0 7 6 .5 0 8 3 .5 0 7 4 .0 0 -

9 4 .0 0
9 7 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS A
MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------WHOLESALE TRACE ------------FINANCE4-----------------------------

1*669
883
786
202
431

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
38. C
38.C
3 7 .0

9 4 .5 0
9 5 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
9 2 .5 0
8 6 .0 0

9 4 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
8 5 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS B
MANUFACTURING --------------------NONMANUFACTURING - j ----------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------WHOLESALE TRACE ------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------FINANCE-----------------------------

2 ,4 7 4
862
1*612
147
532
294
596

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

8 2 .0 0
8 3 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
8 5 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
7 8 .0 0
7 3 .5 0

OFFICE GIRLS — ----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------WHOLESALE TRACE -------------FINANCE------------------------------

462
191
271
62
119

3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .0

6 8 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
6 7 .0 0
6 8 .0 0
6 4 .5 0

SECRETARIES5------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING — -----------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -----------WHOLESALE TRACE ----- -------RETAIL TRADE -------------------FINANCE4-----------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------

10*245
6 ,5 5 3
3 ,6 9 2
358
704
277
1 ,8 8 3
470

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

1 1 1 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 0 5 .5 0
1 4 0 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0

SECRETARIES. CLASS A ---------MANUFACTURING ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING — -----------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S -----------FINANCE4----- - ----------------------

731
462
269
59
112

See footnotes at end o f table.




3 8 .5 1 3 2 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 3 4 .5 0
3 8 .0 1 2 9 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 6 2 .0 0
3 7 .5 1 1 4 .0 0

-

-

-

4

-

5

-

-

-

5
-

-

4

-

-

“

1

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

8 6 .0 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0
8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 2 .5 0
8 3 .0 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 0 .0 0
7 9 . 5 0 - 9 3 .0 0

6 0 .0 0
8 2 .5 0
7 8 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
8 9 .0 0
7 4 .0 0
7 3 .0 0

7 2 . 5 0 - 9 0 .0 0
7 6 . 0 0 - 9 2 .5 0
7 1 .5 0 - 8 9 .0 0
7 0 .5 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0
8 1 .5 0 - 9 8 .0 0
6 8 . 0 0 - 8 5 .0 0
7 C .0 0 - 7 8 .0 0

6 7 .0 0
6 8 .5 0
6 5 .5 0
7 0 .5 0
6 4 .0 0

6 3 .0 0 6 5 .5 0 6 2 .0 0 6 5 .0 0 6 1 .5 0 -

7 1 .5 0
7 4 .0 0
7 0 .0 0
7 3 .0 0
6 7 .0 0

1 0 9 .0 0
9 6 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0 1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 2 .5 0
9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 6 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0 1 1 3 .5 0 - 1 6 8 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0
8 7 .5 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 - 1 1 8 .0 0
8 9 .5 0 - 1 1 1 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 0 .5 0
9 4 .5 0 - 1 1 3 .5 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 2 7 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0

1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 4 6 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0 - 1 4 9 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 4 3 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0 - 1 9 7 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0 - 1 2 6 .5 0

-

_

20
15
5
5

61
14
47
47

11
11

18
18

3
3

123
75
48
3
4
17
18

67
44
23
8
7
4
3

140
98
42
6
13
6
9

85
67
18
2
14
1

10
6
4
3

13
7
6

2
2

6

_

-

_
_

8

_

-

_
_

2
1
1

-

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

1

_

_

_

_

«.

_

_

_

_
_

_
_

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

19
~

6
4

12
4

32

44
35

141
13
128
47
69

97
8
89
46
35

64
17
47
15
26

47
15
32
9
8

43
8
35
13
18

45
2
43
4
22

4

32
32

81
7
74
32

44

~

18
1
17
17

4
3

2
2

_

_
“

_
“

~

23
2
21
21

52
12
40
40

102
32
70
16
54

199
89
110
16
91

268
120
148
64
80

247
170
77
9
61

260
178
82
47
32

280
189
91
36
43

174
72
102
6
8

18
14
4
1
1

27
3
24
7

6
2
4
_

13
13

_
-

_
-

5
3
2

360
171
189
6
80
36
57

239
88
151
7
92
18
34

186
89
97
10
57
14
16

85
9
76
25
33
18

10
_
10
3
5
2

2
1
1

15
.
15

_
_

5

_

5

15

1

_

_

2

420
164
256
20
71
32
108

136
14
62
11
41
9

-

466
137
329
31
17
39
236

5

-

312
32
280
33
18
100
129

185
82
103

-

48
12
36
l
6
15
14

3
3

50
23
27

114
14
100
16
63

157
81
76
11
38

75
27
48
35
6

17
5
12

12
12

23
21
2

2
2

3
3

_

5

1

-

-

-

5

1

28

45
4
41

159
42
117

242
109
133

613
288
325
5
106
27
163
24

881
464
417
14
77
28
221
77
22
16
6
-

-

“

-

11

_

_

-

-

-

-

28
-

-

-

-

370
178
192

-

-

-

-

12
3
26

38
6
71
2

20
14
82
17

54
19
110
9

-

-

-

_

_

-

8

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

-

-

-

19
18
l

-

-

-

-

-

“

92
11

2

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

_

_

-

-

_

_
_

_

_
_

_

58
30
28
28

48
21
27
27

5
2
3
3

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

34
14
20
20

5
2
3
3

l

-

28

-

1

904 2046
523 1316
381
730
17
28
38
77
24
53
205 479
97
93
42
33
9
8

51
8
43
2
35

1799 1226
1275 921
3C5
524
59
45
49
126
17
43
133
253
57
47

800
560
240
36
61
34
78
31

535
468
67
29
13
3
12
10

260
154
66
23
21
2
18
2

146
116
30
15
8
3
4
~

80
42
38
29
4
1

143
94
49
12
23

143
100
43
4
8

82
48
34
12
6

45
31
14
2
9

22
19
3
3

26
21
5

63
33
30
-

15

_

4

-

26
25
1
1

-

9
Table A-l.

Office Occupations—SMSA—Men and W om en— Continued

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis by industry division ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a ), P a .-N .J ., N ovem ber 1967)
Weekly earnings1
(staridard)
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number Average
weekly
of
hours1
workers
(standard)

%

Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

$

%

50

55

60

1
1

1
i
65

i>

70

Num ber of w o rk e rs re ceivin g straigh t-tim e w eek ly earnings of—
!
%
%
$
S
1
$
i
i.
•
1
i
%
1
$
75
85
80
95
90
100
11C
13C
120
140
150 160 170
180

*

%

190

and
under

200
and

55
W EN OM

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

1H0

190

-

-

-

-

12
12

20
6
14

29
9
20

63
33
30

-

-

~

-

5
7
~

14
~

11
7
2

18
8
3
1

71
16
55
7
20
7
16
5

129
70
59
_
4
6
45
4

363
179
184
6
9
29
111
29

380
24G
14C
15
18
2C
75
12

446
316
130
33

250
152
98
5
5
1
70
17

94
79
15
3
4
2
6

125
56
29
10
9
1
9

82
64
18
6
3
3

13
5
8
5
3

27
3
24
24

13
6
7
7

if

_

_
_

_
_

_
_
_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

278
148
130
3
12
11

803
639
164
11
55
8
69
21

317
255
62
10
10
8
16
18

244
197
47
14
13
18

279
262
17
13
4
_

45
22
23
11
12

24
15
9
4
5

31
6
25
24
1

3
_
3
3

_
_

_

_

_
_

_
_

18

508
349
159
3
36
11
89
20

2

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

988
735
253
17
27
11
154
44

444
285
159
19
52
1
63
24

258
2 C2
56
4
35
1
16

106
55
51
13
37
1

19
18
1
1

2
2

2
2

_
_
-

_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
«
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
_
_

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_
_

_
_
_

200 over

CCNTINUEO

SECRETARIES6 - CCNTINUEO
SECRETARIES* CLASS B -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING - - -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------RETAIL TRAOE ---------------------------------FINANCE4------------------------------- ------------SERVICES ------------------------------------------

2 .1 1 7
1 . 274
843
123
109
81
437
93

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .5

SECRETARIES* CLASS C -----------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------------------—
NONMANUFACTURING - 7 --------------------------

3 .0 8 1
2 .1 2 4
957

3 9 .0 1 1 3 .0 0 1 1 1 .5 0 9 9 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 1 6 .0 0 1 1 3 .5 0 1 0 4 .5 0 - 1 2 8 .5 0
3 8 .0 1 0 6 .0 0 1 0 1 .5 0 9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0

_
-

_
-

_
-

4
4

14
8
6

45
4
41

58
25
33

169
66
103

WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------FINANCE 4— ---------------------------------------—
SERVICES ------------------------------------------

220
106
413
116

3 9 .0 1 0 7 .0 0 1 0 3 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 0 0 .0 0
9 9 .0 0
3 7 .5
9 8 .0 0
3 6 .5 1 0 2 .5 0 1 0 1 .0 0

9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0
8 5 .5 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
9 1 . 0 0 - 1 0 8 .0 0
9 3 . 5 0 - 1 1 3 .0 0

-

-

-

2

4

10
9
14

“

“

10
11
14
6

32
11
56
4

259
128
131
4
20
13
67
27

SECRETARIES. CLASS D ----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES — -------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------FINANCE 4-------------------------------------------SE RV IC ES-----------------------------------------

3 .6 5 0
2 .2 9 8
1 .3 5 2
74
348
51
653
226

3 8 .5
9 9 .5 0 1 0 0 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 0 2 .0 0 1 0 3 .0 0
3 7 .5
9 5 .0 0
9 5 .0 0
3 7 .5 1 1 0 .5 0 1 1 0 .0 0
3 8 .5
9 9 .0 0
9 5 .0 0
3 8 .0
9 0 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
9 2 .0 0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0
9 6 .0 0
9 7 .0 0

8 9 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .5 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0
8 5 . 0 0 - 1 1 7 .5 0
8 3 .5 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
m ^n«ei rvA cn
9 2 .0 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

_
“

_
-

28
28

33
4
29

-

-

-

12
1

162
99
63
10
3

260
144
116
_
33
10

330
169
161
5
55
8

483
299
184
3
32
7

-

-

2-

l-

133
34
99
33
2
AO
OC
2

11

7

19

44

402
250
152
12
22
6
37
75

STENOGRAPHERS. GENERAL -----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING - 7 -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------FINANCE--------------------------------------------

3 .5 0 4
1 .6 8 1
1 .8 2 3
336
388
163
885

3 8 .5
8 8 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
8 6 .0 0
3 8 .0 1 0 0 .0 0
3 8 .0
9 3 .5 0
3 7 .5
7 9 .5 0
3 7 .5
7 9 .0 0

7 8 . 5 0 - 9 7 .0 0
8 2 . 0 0 - 9 9 .0 0
7 6 . 0 0 - 9 4 .5 0
6 2 .5 0 - 1 2 1 .5 0
8 7 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .0 0
7 2 . 5 0 - 8 6 .0 0
7 2 . 5 0 - 8 6 .5 0

_
-

3
3

67
18
49

-

-

186
57
129
1
2
22
104

324
101
223
7
2
31
183

428
133
295
48
37
30
173

510
255
255
57
32
33
133

474
240
234
33
53
18
118

501
293
208
22
98
10
78

323
205
118
11
40
10
37

359
206
153
42
83
3
25

218
162
56
16
36
3
1

81
10
71
70
1

30
1
29
29

_
_
_

STENOGRAPHERS. SENIOR ----------- -------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING - r — -------------------—
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE---------------------------FI NANCE4 ----------------— ------------------------

2*132
1 .4 7 7
655
78
187
219

3 9 .0
9 9 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 9 0 . 0 0 - 1 0 7 .5 0
3 9 .5
9 9 .5 0
9 9 .0 0 9 1 . 0 0 - 1 0 8 .0 0
9 9 .5 0
3 7 .5
9 6 .0 0 8 7 . 5 0 - 1 0 5 .5 0
3 9 .5 1 2 8 .5 0 1 3 4 .0 0 1 0 9 .0 0 - 1 5 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 3 .0 0 9 9 .0 0 9 2 . 5 0 - 1 0 8 .5 0
n? s o
3 6 .0
9 2 . 50 9 1 .0 0 O y * 7 v l v fc •?V

_

15
4
11
3
8

13
1
12
12

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS. CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING------------------------------ -----NONMANUFACTURING------- ---------------------FINANCE--------------------------------------------

389
208
181
148

9 7 .5 0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0 1 0 0 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5
9 0 .5 0

9 7 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
9 5 .0 0
9 2 .5 0

9 0 . 0 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0
9 5 .5 0 - 1 0 8 .0 0
8 6 .5 0 - 1 0 0 .5 0
8 5 . 0 0 - 9 8 .5 0

_
-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS. CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING - 7 -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------RETAIL TIRADE----- ------------— -----------FINANCE 4— — — — — —— —
SERVICES----- -----------------------.-----------

760
162
598
81
56
177
93
191

3 8 .5
8 0 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
3 9 .5
8 9 .0 0
8 9 .5 0
3 8 .0
8 0 .5 0
7 9 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 9 .5 0 1 1 2 .0 0
3 7 .0
8 8 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
3 8 .0
7 5 .0 0 7 4 .5 0
3 8 .0
8 2 .0 0
8 4 .0 0
3 7 .5
7 0 .0 0 6 8 . 00

6 9 . 5 0 - 9 3 .5 0
7 6 . 0 0 - 9 9 .0 0
6 7 . 0 0 - 9 2 .0 0
9 8 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .5 0
7 9 .0 0 - 1 0 6 .0 0
6 6 . 0 0 - 8 2 .5 0
7 4 . 0 0 - 9 1 .5 0
5 8 . 0 0 - 8 3 .5 0

See footn otes at end of table.




$
1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0
1 4 4 .5 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0
1 1 2 .0 0

$
1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 1 2 .5 0
1 1 2 .5 0

8 7 .5 0
9 0 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
9 5 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
7 9 .5 0
7 8 .5 0

$
$
1 0 5 .0 0 - 1 3 2 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0 -1 3 4 .5 0
1 0 1 .0 0 -1 2 9 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0 - 1 8 2 .5 0
8 8 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 1 .5 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 -1 2 8 .5 0

“

-

"

4
70
23

-

_

3

4
3
30

-

_
-

-

3
1
2
-

28
16
12
-

63
47
16
4

165
91
74
-

287
175
112
3
21

350
256
94
3
44

265
185
80
1
30

518
387
131
14
44

260
199
61
16
12
41
C5

93
62
11
_
11

60
33
27
14
13

—
-

“

—
~

4
1
3
3

4
1
3
3

15
2
13
12

26
7
19
19

48
23
25
25

40
11
29
23

115
73
42
40

81
50
31
23

37
32
5

10
5
5

9
3
6

-

58

48
1
47
—
37
1

76
12
64
28
12
•A
J

78
25
53

94
13
81
2
12
33
14
20

74
17
57
2
13
21
9
15
kC

62
15
47
6
3
4
15
1a

89
29
60
_
1
18
19
22

50
13
37
17
5
3
10
2

45
23
22
2
17
3

42
9
33
29

20
1
19
19

8
4
4
4

_
_
_

-

-

16
16
16

-

58
_
1
57

_

5
25
13
10

4

_

_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_
_
_

12

_

_

_

_

_

12
12

_
_

_
_

_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

_

_
_
_

_

_
_

_
_
_

_

_

_

_

_

_

_
_
_
_

_
_
_

10
Table A-L

Office Occupations—SMSA —Men and W omen— Continued

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area basis by industry division*
P h iladelphia (Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A r e a ), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Number of w o rk e rs receivin g stra igh t-tim e w eek ly earnings of—
N um ber

Sex, occupation, and industry division
w o ik e rs

$
w e e k ly
h ou rs 1
(sta n d a rd )

t
50

M e a n 1*
24
5

M e d ia n 2

M id d le ra n g e 2

*

%

55

60

$
65

$
70

»
75

(

$
80

85

$
90

1

95

l

-------- $
lie
100

t

i

120

130

i

*
140

150

$

$

%

160

170

180

t
190

and
under

200
and

120

130

140

60
30
30
14
12
4

9
5
4
4
.

4
4
_

4
4
_

_

18
12
6

28
15
13

16
9
7

1
1

20
18

1
“

_

1
1

1

~

102
11
91
40
39

86
32
54
22
14

51
27
24
14
9

12
10
2

19
2
17
7
1

9
5
4
2

242
84
158
11
41
39
66

223
108
115
2
25
34
43

222
153
69
8
11
28
21

122
103
19
3
6
6
4

221
192
29
5
2
4
18

68
54
14
13

29
2
27
27

5
2
3
3

446
220
226
11
61
29
95
30

231
142
89
8
25
25
29
2

125
52
73
5
14
16
14
24

54
52
2

38
31
7
6
1

12
4
8
8

4
1
3
3

1
1

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

52
40
12
1
6

75
58
17
9
-

125
63
62
12
37
8

233
147
86
4
50
8

192
97
95
8
47
11

124
61
63
25
32

71
43
28
21
l
2

1
1

5
5

5
5

20
9
11

26
18
8

3
1
2

3
3

12
12

24
24

41
24

15
14

4
4

15
15
15

66
29
37
2
35

96
17
79
3
75

149
34
115
8
80

162
33
129
5
94

6
4
2
2

52
19
33
14
18

101
29
72
9
5
57
~

135
72
63
7
42
13

774
244
530
15
140
65
306
4

746
271
475
22
116
52
269
16

100 . HO

UO

170

180

190

200

ov er

1
_
1

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

_

-

-

-

-

-

3
3

1
1

.
_

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

3
3

_

_

-

-

-

_
-

_

-

_
-

_

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

150

WOMEN - CCNTINUEC
SWITCHBOARD OPERATCR-RECEPTICNISTSMANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------------WHOLESALE TRACE -------------SERVICES ---------------------

977
563
414
64
183
72

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

$
8 4 .0 0
8 3 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
8 6 .0 0

$
8 4 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
9 7 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
9 0 .5 0

$
$
7 8 . 5 0 - 9 1 .0 0
7 7 . 5 0 - 9 0 .5 0
7 9 .5 0 - 9 2 .0 0
8 4 . 0 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
8 0 .0 0 - 8 9 .5 0
8 2 .0 0 - 9 3 .0 0

-

~

27
11
16
1
1

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS#
CLASS 8 -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

127
69
58

2 8 .5
3 9 .5
2 8 .0

9 5 .0 0
9 8 .5 0
9 1 .0 0

9 6 .0 0
9 8 .0 0
8 9 .5 0

8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 5 .5 0
8 7 .5 0 - 1 0 8 .0 0
8 1 . 5 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0

_
-

_
-

-

TABOLATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS C -------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------

122
IOC

2 8 .0
3 8 .0

7 9 .0 0
7 8 .5 0

7 7 .5 0
7 7 .5 0

7 3 . 5 0 - 8 4 .0 0
7 2 . 0 0 - 8 4 .5 0

_

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------WHOLESALE TRACE -------------FINANCE----------------------

781
200
581
103
377

3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 7 .0

8 2 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
8 1 .5 0
9 1 .0 0
7 7 .5 0

8 1 .5 0
8 3 .0 0
8 1 .0 0
8 9 .0 0
7 8 .0 0

7 5 .GO7 5 .507 5 .0 0 8 6 .0 0 7 2 .0 0 -

8 9 .0 0
9 4 .0 0
8 7 .5 0
9 4 .5 0
8 3 .5 0

_
-

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES3------------WHOLESALE TRACE -------------FINANCE4---------------------SERVICES ---------------------

1 ,4 2 9
325
6C4
102
90
231
165

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

9 0 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
8 5 .5 0
9 8 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
8 0 .0 0
8 5 .5 0

8 9 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
8 4 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
7 9 .5 0
8 5 .5 0

8 1 .5 0 - 9 9 .0 0
8 5 . DO- 1 0 2 .0 0
7 8 . 5 0 - 9 1 .0 0
7 7 . 0 0 - 1 2 1 .0 0
8 2 .0 0 - 8 9 .5 0
7 3 . 5 0 - 8 7 .5 0
8 2 .0 0 - 9 0 .5 0

_

TYPISTS, CLASS B -----------------MANUFACTURING -----------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------PUBLIC UTILITIES------------WHOLESALE TRACE -------------RETAIL TRACE ----------------FINANCE4---------------------SERVICES ---------------------

3 ,9 7 6
1 ,3 6 7
2 ,6 0 9
80
462
388
1 ,5 5 3
126

3 8 .0
2 9 .0
3 7 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .C
3 8 .5
3 7 .0
2.7.0

7 3 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
7 1 .5 0
8 6 .0 0
7 4 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
7 6 .0 0

7 3 .0 0
7 6 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
8 0 .5 0
7 4 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
7 8 .5 0

6 7 .0 0 7 0 .0 0 6 6 .0 0 7 5 .5 0 7 0 .5 0 6 2 .5 0 6 5 .5 0 6 7 .5 0 -

7 9 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
7 7 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
7 9 .5 0
7 7 .5 0
7 5 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

~

_
14
-

14
14
_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

6
4
2
-

1
1
-

-

~

183
69
114
-

46
68
-

500
109
391
1
38
92
248
12

*

856
167
689
1
67
61
523
37

-

-

1

-

-

-

1
_

_

-

-

-

1
1

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r w hich em ployees re c e iv e th eir regular s traigh t-tim e s a la rie s (exclu sive of pay fo r overtim e at regu lar a n d /o r p rem iu m rates),, and the earnings c o r re s p o n d
to these w eek ly hours.
2 The m ean is com puted fo r each jo b by totaling the earnings of a ll w o rk e rs and dividing b y the num ber o f w ork ers. The m edian designates p osition — half of the em ployee^ su rveyed r e c e iv e m o r e
than the rate shown; half r e c e iv e le s s than the rate shown. The m iddle range is defined b y 2 rates of pay; a fourth of the w o rk e rs earn le s s than the lo w e r of th ese rates and a fourth ea rn m o r e than
the higher rate.
* T ran sp ortation, com m u nication, and other public u tilities.
4 F inan ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate.
5 M ay include w o rk e rs other than those presen ted separately.




11
Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Manufacturing—3 Inner Counties—Men and W om en

(A verage straigh t-tim e weekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea ba sis in m anufacturing,
Philadelphia (Delaw are and Philadelphia C ounties, P a ., and Camden County, N .J.), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
[standard)

$

$

$

$

$

Number o f w o rk e rs re ce iv in g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of1
S
t
t
S
$
$
$
$
t
$
$
S
“1
&
i ""
80
85
90
75
100 105 110 115
120 130 140 150 160 170 180
95

60

65

70

55

Sex and occu pation

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

-

1

-

-

-

“

2

50
Mean2

Middle range 2

Median 2

and
under

and
90

95

100

105

L10

115

120

130

140

150

160

8

14

1l

5

2

-

-

-

-

-

170

i 80 over

M
EN
$

$

110 • SO 1 1 3 .5 0

C» HRKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B -------------

55

3 9 .0

9 7 .0 0

9 7 .5 0

$

$
3
8 8 .0 0 — 0 4 .0 0
1

7
17

1 0 8 .5 0 110.00 1 0 1 .5 0 - 1 1 9 .0 0
171

3 9 .0

i.U U

1

12

18

11

39

8

21

2

12

10

5

2

l

3

18

-rt .0 0
1 nn

y

29

27

24

24

C.C.

T ABULATING-MACH INE OPERA!ORS.
CL A.,S \

B6

1 3 6 .5 0 13 7 .5 0

1 2 1 .5 0 - 1 5 6 .5 0

T ARUJ. AT I NG-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B

102

1 0 3 .5 0 1 0 3 .5 0

9 6 .0 0 - 1 1 4 .0 0

3

8 5 * 5 0 - 9 9 .0 0

10

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

9

il

3

2

2

19

1

16

19

9

1 ft
O

-

3

16

2

*

*

7

15

g

12

4

*7
5

5

1

3

WM
O EN
RILIFRS, MACHINE (BILLING
"fll. irNr | - - *• tJ* am J
mJ
L-

52

BILLETS. MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
ti Al.H v!>lr i — — — —
M>ri i I kiC 1 — — — —
——
——

—

RO0KKFEf>I NG-MACHINF OPFRATURS,
CLASS A

8 1 .5 0

8 1 .0 0

n n . 77lUU
fJlU V * 04 nn

66

8 7 .0 0

86.00

a-n uU—
inn ra
o ^ . nn—
1UU.!>U

1 0 8 .0 0 1 1 4 .5 0

oft nn—IC C . 7 U
i
TO# UU— 77 An

98

B( ORKFEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
Cl ASS 8

196

rni/ r
n r r m u T lNbt LLAb^ a
rKKS# AlXliUM r Atr r i acc A

447

ft
LI

—

r ji rn i/o
a r r niiAir
r r.KIvbf AuuuUIVr tai/* CLARIS n — — — —
INlit r i acc n — — —

426

Piie n i/f
L c rASf C II. r i
r f1c

11

07« 5U*1 lcl.UU
7 i c A . n o nn

1

17

*

7a
CO

49

50

2

39

35

36

53

50

16

~ ~ _

~

r nun rn»irTeo lirr IsAm n c —
UUnr 1line 1r K n lie n a lUKo

4
52

45

36

32

54

ftR
88

__
55

27

in
10

2

1

2

4

29

6

20

3

17

12

15

20

25

c

3

1

2

2

3

30

22

64

3

i

12

1
i

*

1

69

11
A7

2

37

47
Tf

20

20

a
18

*

13

g

17

15

5

3

2

6 0 .5 0

5 7 . 0 0 - 6 5 .0 0

12

4

8 1 . 0 0 - 9 4 .0 0

21

21

_
45

3 9 .0

i/runiiAiPii i.lrp KA 1U > , r i acc A --n ocn ATnnr
a
^r t
K

583

Z .00

oa nn— 7 f c;n
0*l.UU* 07 #yu

63

KFYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS

l. 0

B

-------------

o
p r ^ t KL !>
Urrcrilb r b l di C

SECRETARIES3 ---------------------------------------------

See footn otes at end of table.




136
4 ,0 8 5

9 5 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

8 2 .0 0

7 5 . 5 0 - 9 1 .5 0

6 8 .0 0

ac n n - ic.D U
05« UU" *77 cn

3 9 .0 1 1 6 .0 0 1 1 3 .5 0 1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 3 0 .5 0

Z1

j

7
C

8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 3 .0 0

7 0 .5 0

3 9 .0

9 5 .5 0

-

3

12

3

1A
14
-

~

1

ii

17

4

1

1

4

i

2

i

30

4

5

24

65

86

124

118

77

62

22

28

13

92

102

125

58

55

63

28

10

3

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
f

14

-

33

39

9 0 .0 0

—

*

65

8 8 .5 0

15

28

2

2

l

16

28

6 1 .5 0

91 .0 0

6

3

6 6 . 0 0 - 8 3 .5 0

9 1 .5 0

1

42

7 2 .5 0

3 8 .0

16

53

7 4 .5 0

3 Hi

6

58

a j . UU—1U7 •UU
o i n n « in f nn

an « R A .in i nn
ou vU—
1U7.UU

17

15

9 5 150

21

*7

27

9 4 .5 0

3 7 .0

12

l

7
_
52

106

161

CA-. on !>U
!>U- oV. c n

1i
XX

40

*9 2 .
io

3 8 .5

189

*

7 7 . 5 0 - 9 0 .0 0

8 3 .0 0

n fK v e
1,1 PpIV

r.LnKMrf n AT KUll
*i r ni/r
r Awnnt i

8 5 .5 0

l

6

2

2

8 1 .5 0

CLERKS, F IL F , CLASS C --------------------------r^

g

22

l

108. 00 1 0 6 .0 0

8 4 .5 0

6

1B8

Cl Abb A - - - - - - - - - - - bl ACC A

ci ITK* f r U r • c i acc 1
n
i, Cfti/f cti r*
3

nwnFR
UrNWrr

15

2

1o
17

2

37

57

168

279

317

434

433

345

530

375

358

139

95

34

39

126

2

1
X
315

12
Table A-la.

Office Occupations—Manufacturing—3 Inner Counties—Men and W omen— Continued

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis in m anufacturing,
Philadelphia (D elaw are and Philadelphia C ounties, P a ., and Camden County, N .J.), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
W e e k ly e arn in gs^
(s ta n d a rd )

Number o f w o rk e rs re ceivin g straigh t-tim e w eek ly earnings of—
$

A v era g e

N um ber

$

i

1

i

of
w ork ers

w e e k ly
h o u rs 1

S

t

$

(

$

$

(sta n d a rd )

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

55

Sex and occupation

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

-

-

12

12

-

M e a n 13
2

M e d ia n 2

-

-

-

-

6

1

5

8

61

1 0 6 .0 0 - 1 3 2 .5 0

-

-

-

-

8

4

5

29

65

-

-

4

29

47

120

120

16

29

83

93

194

148

f
t

8

-

50
M id d le ra n g e 2

105

f
t

110

f
t

115

f
t

120

f
t

130

f
t

140

f
t

150

f
t

160

f
t

170

and
under

ft-----180
and

170

180 •over

130

140

150

160

12

30

61

41

25

15

15

45

136

84

59

57

49

5

9

139

168

147

187

20

14

4

-

103

119

147

31

15

1

L

-

-

12

10

10

1

-

-

-

-

-

110

115

4

53

35

63

93

93

95

249

174

143

148

289

144

143

108

36

120

W
OMEN - CONTINUED
SECRETARIES

- CONTINUED

SECRETARIES. CLASS A -----------------------

262

$
$
$
$
3 9 .0 1 4 0 .0 0 1 3 9 .0 0 1 2 7 .5 0 - 1 5 7 .5 0

SECRETARIES. CLASS B ------------------------

676

3 9 .5

SECRETARIES. CLASS C -----------------------

1 .3 4 5

1 2 6 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0 1 1 0 .0 0 - 1 4 1 .5 0

3 9 .5 1 1 8 .0 0 1 1 5 .0 0

~

SECRETARIES. CLASS 0 -----------------------

1 .4 8 8

3 9 .0 1 0 2 .0 0 1 0 3 .5 0

9 1 . 5 0 - 1 1 2 .0 0

-

STENOGRAPHERS. GENERAL -----------------------

1 .0 2 7

3 9 .0

8 8 .5 0

8 1 . 0 0 - 9 7 .0 0

-

8 8 .5 0

27

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------------

920

3 9 .0

9 9 .5 0

9 9 .0 0

9 0 .5 0 - 1 0 7 .0 0

-

-

-

1

16

47

41

106

135

136

le>4

108

51

43

46

24

2

-

-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -------

146

3 9 .0

1 0 0 .5 0

9 9 .5 0

9 6 .0 0 - 1 0 7 .5 0

-

-

-

1

1

2

3

12

6

56

19

19

6

15

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS. CLASS B -------

134

3 9 .5

8 8 .0 0

8 6 .0 0

7 4 .5 0 - 9 6 . GO

-

-

1

12

24

13

15

11

23

10

6

6

3

5

1

4

-

-

-

-

-

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RFCEPTIONISTS-

42 B

3 8 .5

8 2 .5 0

8 3 .5 0

7 6 .5 0 - 9 0 .0 0

-

-

11

26

58

43

115

71

53

31

1

9

2

-

4

4

-

-

-

-

TRANSCRIBING-PACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ---------------------------------------------------

172

3 8 .0

8 3 .5 0

8 1 .0 0

7 4 . 0 0 - 9 3 .0 0

-

-

-

29

17

34

30

11

14

24

5

1

l

1

5

-

-

-

*

TYPISTS. CLASS A -----------------------------------

615

3 9 .5

9 1 .5 0

9 2 .0 0

8 4 . 5 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0

-

-

4

17

25

54

59

94

126

71

75

64

15

10

l

-

-

-

-

TYPISTS. CLASS B -----------------------------------

846

3 9 .0

7 3 .5 0

7 4 .5 0

6 7 . 0 0 - 8 0 .5 0

4

69

83

131

154

179

114

52

29

26

3

2

1
to these
2
3

Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r which em ployees re c e iv e their regular straigh t-tim e s a la rie s (exclu sive of pay fo r overtim e at regu lar a n d /o r prem iu m r a te s ), and the earnings co r re s p o n d
w eekly hours.
F or definition o f te r m s , see footnote 2, table A - l .
M ay include w o rk e rs other than those presented separately.




13
Table A-lb.

Office Occupations—Manufacturing—5 Outer Counties—Men and W om en

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s elected occupations studied on an a re a b a sis in m anufacturing, Philadelphia (B ucks, C h ester, and
M ontgom ery Counties, P a ., and Burlington and G lo u ce ste r C ounties, N .J.), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
(stan da rd)
N um ber

Sex and occu pation

of
w ork ers

standard)

$
65

M e a n 13
24

M e d ia n 2

M id d le ra n g e 2

“ n d er

123

80

85

90

2

i

4 0 .3

f
t

8 0 .0 0

f
t

no

115

2

2

10

f
t

13

9

100

120

22

9 3 . 5 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0

125

3

1

19

20

12

7

ft

$

140

145

f
t

T ----------

ft

150

160

170

9

6

6

8

l

16

14

12

10

130

9

135

140

145

150

160

170

over

23

20

13

9

1

2

3

10

8

6

2

4

19

7 5 . 0 0 - 8 5 .5 0

1 0 5 .0 0 110.00

105

_

95

1 33 .50 1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 4 9 .0 0

8 0 .0 0

*

f
t

f
t

and
75

$
$
$
$
4 0 .0 1 2 6 .0 0 1 3 2 .0 0 1 1 4 .0 0 - 1 3 9 .0 0

1 3 3 .0 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS n

75

$

and
under
70

M EN

70

f
t

N um ber o f w ork ers re ceivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings oft
$
$
$
ft
ft
95 100 105 1)0
80
85
90
115 120 125
130
135

5

ft

A v e ra g e
w e e k ly
h ou rs1

2

2

9

10

WCREN

n cdi/ c AttuUNI I N b t
Ul cKKSf ArrniiuTTkir

ri acc o
bLAoo q

195

3 9 .5 1 0 2 .5 0

101 .50

9 4 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0

8

7

35

36

37

27

8 5 .0 0

IJ IrKKNf AULUUNI H Im L L A ii A — — — —
H
———

8 3 .5 0

7 8 . 5 0 - 9 1 .0 0

13

19

43

76

37

14

8

37

2

1

13

12

31

5

1

4

12

_

52

9

66

12

1

4

26

2

49

7

7

a

24

34

46

46

30

34

________
-—
-

■»,
f1

4 0 .0

8 1 .0 0

R1 JU
O
OA#K

7 6 . 5 0 - 8 4 .5 0

/•i c o 1/ c
n o rtco
ClrKKN, UKIJtK

16t

.3 .0

9 1 .0 0

9 1 .0 0

8 3 . 0 0 - 9 4 .0 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL --------------------------------------

155

3 9 .5

9 7 .5 0

9 4 .5 0

9 0 .5 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0

1/ CVfit 1A;/* L
»\t TrUIVuni

C 1 ACC A
tL A oo A

253

9 4 .5 0

9 5 .5 0

8 8 .5 0 - 1 0 1 .5 0

i/rwn(ii>ni nncnarnnc
r a acc o
KEYPUNCH U rrK fllu R ii CLAdo d

279

4 0 .0

8 5 .5 0

8 3 .5 0

7 7 . 0 0 - 9 3 .5 0

55

4 0 .0

7 1 .5 0

7 1 .5 0

A7 AA« 7C •UU
or^OvI** fD AA

2 , 46f

3 9 .5

CtF R* S • FILFt CLASS 8

nOCDATDOC
IJrrKAI

OFF ICE GIRLS
SECRET ARIFS

-----------------------------------------------------------—

r>r/>firr Ant rr
S rC R cl A K I r i t
PCCilCf KO c c
•ScCHtrTAA 1 ¥o ♦
t

r « AC a
P

t lA b j

n Ab C n
M
LLA Co O — —

SECRETARIES, CLASS C

^
~— —

---------------------------------

CCPO
CTAO T C I L A C
Ct r 1 Ao o U
C f\

__________

S r C .R c l A K I t o

STENOGRAPHERS. GENERAL

-------------------------------------

2
3

12 7 .5 0

9

5

1

191 C
A
i 4 l •3U

62

8

0 .5 0

9

18

13

21

8

60

41

9

16

5

j

19

33

3

1

3

l

234

331

322

175

187

10

7

1

13

l

1

2

2

1

-

i

-

52

99

oo

5 4

56

55

i i
AA

Z8

9-3

25

15

27

31

120

185

208

4

33

3

28

3

9

51

40

63

69

8Z

33

65

22

23

34

21

20

20

y

-

i

_

l 01 . 0 0
1

65«

3 9 .5

9 4 .0 0

9 3 .0 0

8 6 .0 0 -

1 0 7 .0 0 2

-

-

20

37

43

50

69

92

218

52

24

49

125

107

108

190

23

18

40

61

92

149

62

24

38

139

69

121

49

86

29

59

46

IS

4

11

5

17

6

6

9

2

9 3 .0 0 - 1 0 8 .5 0
28

-

8

12

17

3

l

*

3

39

20

1K
15

3

"

8

*

22

2

1 1 1 .0 0

-

-

l

50

3 9 .5

-

204

i

5

81C

^ .u u

_

6

52

1 1 0 .5 0 - 1 2 9 .5 0

3 9 .5 1 1 3 .0 0 112.00 1 0 3 .5 0 - 1 2 2 .0 0

1

2
1

3

77«

1

-

9

l

2

1 28 .00 1 1 3 .5 0 - 1 3 8 .0 0

5

45

20

112.00 1 10 .50 1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 2 4 .5 0

20C

A

-

3

551

4 0 .0

i nn «?u
1u u ro

9 9 .0 0

9 1 .0 0 -

------------

62

3 9 .5

9 9 .0 0

9 8 .5 0

9 1 .0 0 - 1 0 8 .5 0

-

-

-

-

SWITCHBOARD 0 FFRATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

13*

39.5

86.00

8 5 .5 0

8 0 . 0 0 - 9 6 .0 0

-

14

-

20

32

26

8 9 .5 0

8 6 . 0 0 - 1 0 5 .0 0

9

18

2

9

4

25

14

27

32

40

13

23

92

106

90

23

26

26

“

4

2

1

1

1

*

2

l

2

1

1

1
l

-

-

2

4

18

44

o ir N u G K A “ n h K o .

b r N lU K

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,

T Y P IS T S *

L

u

A bo

A

TYPISTS* CLASS B -----------------------------------1
to these
2
3
4

9 7 .0 0

21C
521

39.5

r .5

8 0 .0 0

8 1 .0 0

2

OQ« 7U Aw
H
7 4 . 0 0 - 8 7 .5 0

26

36

90

2

*

3

-

-

-

Standard h ours r e fle c t the w ork w eek fo r which em ployees re ce iv e their regular straigh t-tim e s a la rie s (e x clu siv e of pay fo r o vertim e at regular a n d /o r prem ium ra tes ), and the earnings corresp on d
w eekly h ou rs.
F or defin ition of te r m s , see footnote 2, table A - l .
A ll w o rk e rs w ere at $55 to $60 .
M ay include w o rk e rs other than those presented separately.




14
Table A-2.

Professional and Technical Occupations—SMSA—Men and W om en

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s elected occupations studied on an a rea b a sis by industry d iv ision ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a ), Pa.—
N.J., N ovem ber 1967)
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
(s ta n d a rd )

Number of w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—

A v era g e
w e e k ly
h o u rs 1

65

[stan da rd)

M ean1
2

110

120

130

110 . UQ

130

140 JL 5,0 . 1

100

16C

1 ?C

180

170

180

190 . ig-PO

111
99
12

188
101
87

161
89
72

148
49
99

3 50
2 83
67
55

219
161
58
47

77
63
14
12

42
26
16
16

1 70
1 22
48
48

49
29
20
12

28
11
17
16

5
5

61
61

10
10

29
29

8
8

10
10

2
2

3
3

1*088
736
352

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

$
1 8 5 .5 0
1 8 9 .5 0
1 7 7 .0 0

1 7 7 .5 0
1 7 4 .5 0
1 8 0 .0 0

$
$
1 6 2 .0 0 -2 0 1 .0 0
1 5 6 .5 0 -2 5 0 .0 0
1 6 5 .5 0 -1 8 9 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN* CLASS B MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING
SERVICES -----------

1 ,5 0 9
1*136
373
306

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 4 4 .5 0
1 4 5 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0
1 4 5 .0 0

1 4 3 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 4 3 .5 0

1 2 9 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0 -1 5 6 .5 0
1 2 8 .0 0 -1 5 4 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0 -1 6 0 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN* CLASS C MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING
SERVICES -----------

8 09
5 55
254
218

3 9 .5
2 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 4 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 0 8 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0

1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0
1 0 7 .0 0
1 0 7 .5 0

1 0 1 .0 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 2 5 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 -1 1 8 .5 0
9 8 .0 0 -1 1 8 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS —
MANUFACTURING -----

176
121

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

9 2 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

9 3 .0 0
9 7 .0 0

7 8 .5 0 -1 0 2 .5 0
9 0 .5 0 -1 0 8 .0 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 7 .5 0

1 3 3 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0

33
29
4

9
6
3

5
2
3

1
1
-

90

75

80

90

100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

5
4
1

42
41
1

74
73
1

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

15
15

-

-

-

-

-

23
19
4

-

-

“

86
80
6
6

280
157
1 23
88

2 47
210
37
34

-

7
5
2
2

48
21
27
25

1 23
80
43
32

159
84
75
64

211
163
48
45

1 09
87
22
22

35
2

12
2

25
23

51
41

25
25

Lb
16

2
~

7
3

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0

-

9
9
-

1
1

1 4 6 .5 0
1 4 9 .0 0

1 0 4 .5 0 389
314
75

2 C0

140

150

19C

220

230

240

-£ 4 0

1 2 8 .0 0

12

9

43

250

1 3 2 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 3 4 .0 0

64
59
5

81
67
14

90
74
16

63
52
11

79
46
33

59
13
46

15
15
-

6
6

8
8

6
6

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

186
1 86

-

-

5

1 0 9 .0 0 1 2 1 .0 0 1 0 9 . 5 0 1 2 0 .5 0 1 0 1 . 5 0 -

g o . , .l& L - ■
■

1 2 0 .5 0

32

21
11

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkweek fo r which em ployees r e c e iv e their regular straigh t-tim e sa la rie s (exclu sive of pay fo r overtim e at regu lar a n d /o r prem iu m ra te s ),
to these w eekly hours
2 F or definition o f te rm s , see footnote 2, table A - l .




210

11
11

_

-

1 2 5 .0 0 1 3 0 .5 0 -

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ------------------------------NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

80

and
under

M id d le ra n g e 2

DRAFTSMEN* CLASS A MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------

75

70

Sex, occupation, and industry division

70

and the earnings co rre s p o n d

15
Table A-2a.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Manufacturing—3 Inner Counties—Men and W om en

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s elected occupations studied on an area b a sis in m anufacturing,
.Philadelphia (Delaw are and Philadelphia C ounties, P a ., and Camden County, N .J .), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Weekly earnings ^
(standard)
Number

Sex and occupation

woikers

'N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
$

weekly
hour*1
(standard)

$

Median2

Middle range2

$

$

$

$

$

85

|;
$
80

95

100

110

120

130

140

150

95

100

110

120

1 30

140

150

16Q

3f

Under

90

90

80
Mean1
2

t

$

$

CA

♦

%
$
$
$
$
180
190
200
160
170

i

$

$

$

210

220

230

240

250

220

230

240

250

260

,

and
und er
85

170

180

1 90

200

210

M
EN
$
$
1CA AAmMft AA

500

3 9«5

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -----------------------------------

662

3 9 .5

1 4 4 .0 0

1 4 0 .0 0

1 2 9 .0 0 -1 5 8 .0 0

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C -----------------------------------

385

3 9 .5

1 1 6 .0 0

1 1 3 .0 0

1 0 1 .5 0 -1 2 5 .0 0

12

83

3 9 .5

1 0 1 .5 0

1 0 0 .5 0

9 1 .5 0 - 1 1 5 .5 0

3

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS 8 ----------------------------------

61

*

'$
$
1 8 7 . 5 0 1 7 4 .0 0

r r*Hr T r u r ti • tL arc* A
%
a
UK a r f
Cnl

1 3 8 .0 0

1 3 4 .0 0

1 3 1 .0 0 -1 5 0 .5 0

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ------

180

3 9 .5

1 2 3 .0 0

1 2 2 .5 0

1 1 1 .5 0 -1 3 7 .0 0

nnAFT^H PN

t r a t p p

*:

—

—

63

73

60

33

19

10

5

6

4

4

116

-

-

12

13

60

97

150

117

57

46

24

86

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

6

16

45

57

112

51

23

9

“

43

1

11
i 1

3

7

28

8

10

2

3

32

45

28

25

6

2

1

l ?
14

o
o

W EN
OM
-

-

-

-

-

-

3

12

26

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r which em ployees re ce iv e their regular straigh t-tim e s a la rie s (e xclu sive o f pay fo r overtim e at regu lar a n d /o r prem iu m r a tes), and the earnings corresp on d
to these w eekly h ou rs.
2 F o r defin ition o f te r m s , see footnote 2, table A - l .

Table A-2b.

Professional and Technical Occupations—Manufacturing— 5 Outer Counties—Men and Women

(A v e ra g e straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis in m anufacturing, Philadelphia (B ucks, C h ester, and
M ontgom ery Counties, P a ., and Burlington and G lo u ce ste r C ounties, N .J.), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1
(stan da rd)
N um ber

Sex and occu p ation

of
w o ik e rs

$

A v era g e
w e e k ly
h o u rs 1
sta n da rd)

M ean 2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

$

100
Under
^
if
and
95‘
under
100

M*N

$
$
$
$
1193.00 1 7 6 .5 0 1 5 8 .0 0 - 2 5 1 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------------------------------

236

3 9 .5

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B --------------------------------

474
170

4 0 .0 1 1 9 .0 0 1 1 6 .0 0 1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .5 0

134

4 3 .0

105

.

110

115

3

-

10

15

3

6

S

_

4 0 .0 1 4 5 .5 0 1 4 6 .5 0 1 3 4 .5 0 - 1 5 5 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C --------------------------------

.

105

Number o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
$
*
$
$
$
$
$
$
i
f
f
$
S
$
$
$
160
110 115 120 125 130 140 150
170 180
190 200
210 220 230 2 4 0 250

i

120

125

130

.

140

150

160. .170,

180

190

200

210

?20

4

4

23

36

28

29

16

7

3

6

14

14

46

60

166

104

17

2

36

-

-

-

6

21

28

23

24

12

6

2

5

22

12

23

18

11

24

240

260

2

70

.

_

18

11

250

4

10

6

230

4

-

WM
O EN
NURSES. INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----

1 1 6 .5 0 1 1 8 .0 0 1 0 8 .0 0 - 1 2 8 .0 0

1 Standard hou rs r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r which em ployees re ce iv e their regu lar straigh t-tim e s a la rie s (e x clu siv e o f pay fo r overtim e at regular a n d /o r prem iu m ra tes), and the earnings corresp on d
to these w eekly h ou rs.
2 F or defin ition o f te r m s , see footn ote 2, table A - l .




16
Table A-3.

O ffice, Professional, and Technical Occupations—SMSA—Men and W om en Combined

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis by industry d iv ision ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a ), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
A v e ra g e

A v era g e

Number

O ccupation and industry d ivision

W e e k ly
h ou rs 1
(stan da rd)

(sta n d a rd )

(sta n d a rd )

W e e k ly

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS* MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------

196
64
132
58

3 8 .5
3 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

$
8 9 .5 0
8 5 .0 0
9 2 .0 0
8 1 .0 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------RETAIL TRACE ---------------------------------

268
79
189
123

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0

7 7 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
7 3 .5 0
7 1 .0 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS A ---------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------FINANCE 2
-------------------------------------------

281
139
142
67
67

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 6 .5

9 9 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
9 2 .0 0
9 4 .0 0

512
214
298

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
38. C
3 7 .0

8 1 .0 0
8 4 .5 0
7 8 .5 0
8 9 .5 0
7 7 .0 0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS*
CLASS B --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRACE ---------------------------------

O ccupation and industry d ivision

e a rn in g s 1

W e e k ly
h ou rs 1

68

67

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING ----PUBLIC UTILITIES3—
WHOLESALE TRACE —
RETAIL TRACE --------FINANCE2------------------SERVICES -----------------

1 ,6 6 3
206
1 ,4 5 7
27
99
171
1,075
85

38*0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .C
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

$
6 4 .5 0
6 2 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0
6 0 .5 0
6 5 .0 0
6 5 .5 0

CLERKS* ORDER ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

997
48 5
512
380
130

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

9 4 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
9 2 .5 0
9 7 .5 0
7 8 .5 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 3------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------------

942
6C0
34 2
73
74
94
73

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0

9 5 .0 0
9 8 .5 0
8 9 .0 0
8 9 .0 0
9 9 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
8 5 .0 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS
MANUFACTURING ---------NONMANUFACTURING —
WHOLESALE TRACE RETAIL TRADE --------

619
71
548
139
294

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5

86.00

1 ,6 9 4
885
809
208
431

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0

9 5 .0 0
9 5 .5 0
9 5 .0 0
9 4 .0 0

9 1 .0 0
8 5 .5 0
8 9 .5 0
8 2 .5 0

1 ,8 1 4
925
889
128
208
238
181
134

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0

1 0 8 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------FINANCE2-------------------------------------------

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 3 ------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------FINANCE2----- -------------------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------------

2 ,5 9 4
936
1 ,6 5 8
230
303
579
342
204

3 8 .5
86.00
9 1 .0 0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
8 3 .5 0
3 9 .0 1 1 0 .5 0
3 8 .0
8 5 .5 0
3 7 .5
7 6 .5 0
3 7 .0
7 5 .5 0
3 7 .5
8 3 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------- -----NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 3 ------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE----- ---------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------FINANCE2 ------------------------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------------

2 ,5 2 7
877
1 ,6 5 0
147
563
294
596
50

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0

8 2 .5 0
8 3 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
8 5 .5 0
9 2 .5 0
7 8 .0 0
7 3 .5 0
7 7 .0 0

CLERKS* FILE, CLASS A ------------------------MANUFACTURING----------------------------- -----NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------FINANCE2--------- ----------------------------------

363
163
200
125

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

9 2 .5 0
9 6 .5 0
8 9 .0 0
8 7 .0 0

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
3 7 .5

7 2 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
7 0 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
6 3 .5 0
7 1 .0 0
7 6 .0 0

1 ,2 0 3
446
757
155
69
240
166

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

1,200

OFFICE BOYS ANO GIRLS--------------------------MANUFACTURING----------- ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------FINANCE2------------------------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------------

7 5 .5 0
7 3 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
8 0 .5 0
6 4 .0 0
6 6 .5 0
7 0 .0 0

See footn otes at end o f table.




275
925
30
127
144
532
92

1 11 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 1 7 .5 0
9 7 .5 0

102.00

SECRETARIES4----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 3--------------WHOLESALE TRACE -----------------RETAIL TRADE — -------------------FINANCE 2----- --------------------------SERVICES --------- ----------------------

O ccupation and industry d ivision

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

CONTINUED

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 3------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------------FINANCE2------------------------------------------SERVICES — * -----------------------------------

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 3 --------WHOLESALE TRADE ----------RETAIL TRADE — -------------FINANCE2- - — -------------------SERVICES----- --------------------

1 0 9 .5 0

W e e k ly
e a m in g s 1
(stan da rd)

1 0 ,2 9 9
6 ,5 8 1
3 ,7 1 8
379
708
277
1 ,8 8 3
471

38.0
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

86.00

1 1 1 .5 0
1 1 4 .5 0
1 0 6 .0 0
1 4 0 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
1 0 0 .5 0
1 0 3 .5 0 '

W e e k ly

of
w ork ers

e a r n in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

CONTINUED

SECRETARIES4 ” CONTINUED
SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------—
NONMANUFACTURING----------------- -------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3--------------------FINANCE2----------------------------------------

749
464
285
75

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 3---------------------WHOLESALE TRACE -----------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------FINANCE2---------------------------------------SERVICES --------------------------------------

112

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
28. C
3 9 .5
2 7 .5

1 3 3 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 1 4 .CO

2 ,1 4 2
1 ,2 9 4
848
128
109
81
437
93

3 8 .5
3 9 .C
2 7 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .0
3 7 .5

1 2 0 .5 0
1 2 3 .5 0
1 1 6 .5 0
1 4 4 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3---------------------WHOLESALE TRACE -----------------------RETAIL TRACE -----------------------------FINANCE2---------------------------------------SERVICES --------------------------------------

3 ,0 8 8
2 ,1 2 7
961
224
106
413
116

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
2 8 .0
2 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 6 .5

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3--------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ----------------------RETAIL TRACE -----------------------------FINANCE2---------------------------------------SERVICES --------------------------------------

3 ,6 5 2
2 ,2 9 9
1 ,3 5 3
74
34 8
51
653
227

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
2 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 3 --------------------WHOLESALE TRACE -----------------------RETAIL TRACE -----------------------------FINANCE2 ----------------------------------------

3 ,5 3 0
1*684
1 ,8 4 6
359
388
163
885

2 8 .5
8 8 .5 0
3 9 . C 9 0 .5 0
3 8 .0
8 6 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 0 1 .5 0
2 8 . C 9 3 .5 0
3 7 .5
7 9 .5 0
3 7 .5
7 9 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------.NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 3 ---------------------WHOLESALE TRACE -----------------------FINANCE2----------------------------------------

2 ,1 3 3
1 ,4 7 8
655
78
187
219

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 6 .0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------FINANCE2----------------------------------------

389
208
181
148

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .0
3 6 .5

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -----------------------RETAIL TRACE -----------------------------FINANCE2------------------------------- --------SERVICES----------------------------------—

760
162
598
81
56
177
93
191

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .5
3 7 .0
3 8 .0
2 8 .0
3 7 .5

102

112.0 0
1 1 3 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0
1 0 6 .5 0
1 4 3 .0 0
1 0 8 .5 0

100.00
9 9 .0 0
1 0 2 .5 0
9 9 .5 0

102.00
9 5 .0 0
1 1 0 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
9 5 .5 0

9 9 .5 0
9 9 .5 0
9 9 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0
1 0 3 .0 0
9 2 .5 0
9 7 .5 0

100.00
9 4 .0 0
9 0 .5 0
8 2 .0 0
8 9 .0 0
8 0 .5 0
1C 9.5 0
8 8 .5 0
7 5 .0 0
8 2 .0 0
7 0 .0 0

17
Table A-3.

O ffice, Professional, and Technical Occupations—SMSA—Men and W om en Com bined— Continued

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a sis by industry division ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a ), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
A v e ra g e

O ccupation and industry d iv isio n

N um ber
of
w ork er*

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

W e e k ly

W e e k ly

e a r n in g s 1
hou rs 1
[standard] (stan da rd)

CONTINUED

SWITCHBOARD OPERATCR-RECEPTI0N1STSMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------SERVICES — -------------------------------------

A v era g e

O ccupation and industry div isio n

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS 979
563
416
64
183
74

3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0

TRANSCR1BING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL — — — — — — — — —
MANUFACTURING------------------ — ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------FINANCE2 ----------- --------------------------------------------------

1 3 3 .0 0
1 3 8 .5 0
1 2 7 .5 0
1 4 7 .0 0
1 0 5 .5 0

247
124
123
29
58

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 7 .5

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3-----------------------WHOLESALE TRADE -------------------------FINANCE2-------------------------------------------

458
239
219
73
53

3 9 .0 102.00
3 9 .5 1 0 2 .5 0
3 8 .5 102.00
3 9 .5 1 1 4 .5 0
3 8 .5 1 0 3 .0 0
3 8 .0
9 0 .0 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS C --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------

321
87
234

r l

111

3 8 .5
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

N um ber
W e e k ly

W e e k ly

h o u rs 1
(sta n d a rd )

O ccupation and industry div ision

e a rn in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s *

of
w o rk er*

(stan da rd)

PROFESSIONAL 'AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

CONTINUED

$
8 4 .0 0
8 3 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
8 4 .0 0
8 5 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ----- ---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3------------------------FINANCE2----- ■
*-----------------------------------

N um ber
of
w o rk e rs

$

581
103
377

3 7 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5
3 8 .5
3 7 .0

8 2 .5 0
8 4 . 50
8 1 .5 0
9 1 .0 0
7 7 . 50

TYPISTS, CLASS A -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------ ---------------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 3------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------FINANCE2— ----------------- ---------------------SERVICES ------------------------------------------

1 ,4 3 6
828
608
106
90
231
165

3 8 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
3 7 .5
3 7 .5

9 0 .0 0
9 3 .0 0
8 5 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
8 4 .5 0
8 0 .0 0
8 5 .5 0

TVDHTC. r 1 ^ D
I T r lO lo t ULAdd ft
MANUFACTURING--------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 3------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------p c T1A &
!\C A Y lW T f7A CI#C
f t— lf t
A
FINANCE2
------------------------------------------SERVICES --------------------------- --------------

3 ,9 8 0
1*369
2 ,6 1 1
80
462
388
1 ,5 5 5
126

3 8 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5
3 7 .0
3 7 .0

7 3 .0 0
7 6 .0 0
7 1 .5 0

781

200

86.00
7 4 .5 0
6 9 .5 0
7 0 .0 0
7 6 .0 0

$

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A -------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

1 ,0 9 2
740
352

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS 6 ------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------------------------------------

1 ,5 8 0
379
312

40.C 1 4 4 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 4 4 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 2 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 4 4 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------SERVICES ------------------------------------------

894
584
310
274

3 9 .5 1 1 4 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 1 7 .0 0
3 9 .5 1 0 9 .5 0
4 0 .0 1 0 9 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN-TRACERS
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

251
128
123

3 9 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

8 7 . CO
9 8 .5 0
7 5 .0 0

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----MANUFACTURING — — — — —
—— ———
—
—
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

394
319
75

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .0

1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 1 9 .0 0

1 ,2 0 1

1 8 5 .5 0
1 8 9 .5 0
1 7 7 .0 0

8 5 .5 0
8 7 .0 0
8 5 .0 0
8 9 .0 0

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w ork w eek fo r which em ployees r e ce iv e their regu lar straigh t-tim e s a la rie s (e x clu siv e o f pay fo r overtim e at regular a n d /o r prem ium ra te s ), and the earnings
c o r re s p o n d to these w eek ly h ou rs.
2 Finan ce, in su ra n ce , and r e a l estate.
3 T ran sp ortation , com m u n ication , and other public u tilities.
4 M ay include w o rk e rs other than those presented separately.




18
Table A-3 %

O ffice, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Manufacturing—3 Inner Counties—Men and W om en Combined
(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area basis in m anufacturing,
Philadelphia (D elaw are and Philadelphia C ou nties, Pa. , and Camden County, N. J . ) , P a .— J. , N ovem ber 1967)
N.
Average

Average

O ccupation

N um ber
of
w ork ers

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

W e e k ly

O ccupation

e a rn in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

Number
of
workers

W e e k ly

W e e k ly

hours 1 earnings
(standard) (standard)

BILLERS* MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE I -------------------------------

$
8 1 .5 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ---------------------------------------

$

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS. CLASS A -------------

630

3 9 .0

9 5 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -------------

584

3 9 .0

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings1
(standard) (standard)

CONTINUED

STABULATING-MACHINF OPERATORS,
CLASS B ---------------------------------------------------

8 2 .5 0

OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS---------------------------

307

3 8 .5

7 1 .5 0

SECRETARIES2---------------------------------------------

4 ,1 0 4

3 9 .0

1 1 6 .0 0

SECRETARIES. CLASS A -----------------------

8 7 .0 0

O ccupation

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

Number
of
woikers

262

3 9 .0

3 9 .0

61

, TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
j CLASS C ---------------------------------------------------

121

3 9 .0

1
$

1 0 5 .0 0

1 4 0 .0 0

9 1 .5 0

693

3 8 .5

1 ,3 4 6

3 9 .5

3 9 .0

7 3 .5 0

504

3 9 .5

1 8 7 .5 0

723

3 9 .5

1 4 3 .5 0

407

3 9 .5

1 1 6 .0 0

89

3 9 .5

100.00

185

3 9 .5

1 2 3 .0 0

1 2 6 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS C -----------------------

846

iORAFTSMEN-TRACERS----------------------------------

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -----------------------

8 3 .5 0
9 1 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN. CLASS A -------------------------------

8 4 .5 0

3 8 .0

'DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C --------------------------------

3 8 .0

1 0 7 .0 0

3 9 .5

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------------

1 96

3 8 .0

615

TYPISTS, CLASS B — -------------------------------

109

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
CLASS B -----------------------------------------

1 72

T y p i s t s , c l a s s a -----------------------------------

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ------- -------------------------------------------

1 1 8 .0 0

CLERKS* ACCOUNTING. CLASS A -------------

607

3 8 .5

1 1 0 .5 0

CLERKS. ACCOUNTING. CLASS B -------------

481

3 8 .5

8 3 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -----------------------

1 ,4 8 9

3 9 .0

1 0 2 .0 0

1 ,0 3 0

3 9 .0

8 8 .5 0

CLERKS. FIL E . CLASS A -------------------------

120

3 9 .0

9 6 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----------------------

CLERKS. FIL E . CLASS B -------------------------

200

3 8 .5

7 5 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------------

921

3 9 .0

9 9 .5 0

CLERKS. F IL E . CLASS C -------------------------

161

3 7 .0

6 1 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -------

146

3 9 .0

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS

1 0 0 .5 0

CLERKS. ORDER ----------------------------------------CLERKS, PAYROLL ------------------------------------COMPTOMETER OPERATORS --------------------------

267
376
71

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0

9 4 .0 0
9 2 .5 0
9 1 .0 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ------SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

134
428

3 9 .5
3 8 .5

88.00
8 2 .5 0

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
100

3 9 .5

1 3 7 .0 0

iNURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)-----

j

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w ork w eek fo r w hich em ployees r e c e iv e their regu lar straigh t-tim e s a la rie s (exclusive o f pay fo r overtim e at regu la r a n d /o r prem iu m r a te s ), and the earnings
co rre s p o n d to these w eekly h ou rs.
2 M ay include w o rk e rs other than those presented separately.




19
Table A-3b.

O ffice, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Manufacturing—5 Outer Counties—Men and W om en Combined

(A verage straigh t-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an area basis in m anufacturing, Philadelphia (B ucks, C h ester, and
M ontgom ery Counties, P a ., and Burlington and G lo u ce ste r Counties, N .J.), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
A v era g e

A v era g e

N u m b er

O ccupation

W e e k ly

of
w orkers

N um ber
of
w o rk ers

O ccupation

W e e k ly

ea rn in g s 1
hou rs 1
[standard) (stan da rd)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS

-

A v e ra g e

W e e k ly
hou rs 1
(stan da rd)

N um ber

O ccupation

W e e k ly
e a rn in g s 1
(sta n d a rd )

W e e k ly
hou rs 1

W e e k ly
earn in gs 1

(stan da rd)

of
w orkers

(stan dard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

CONTINUED

---------------------

318

S
3 9 .5 1 1 1 .5 0

CLERKS. ACCOUNTING. CLASS 3 --------------

455

3 9 .5

9 9 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A

-------------------------------------

202

3 9 .0

75

4 0 .0

8 1 .0 0

SECRETARIES. CLASS B

-------------------------------------

601

3 9 .5 1 2 0 .5 0

CLERKS. ACCOUNTING. CLASS A

SECRETARIES2

-

CONTINUED

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CL ASS B --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

%

1 2 8 .0 0

ua

3 9 .5

$
1 00 .50

----------------------------------------

218

3 9 .0 100.00

SECRETARIES. CLASS C

-------------------------------------

781

3 9 .5

224

4 0 .0 1 0 8 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D

------------------------------------

810

4 0 .0

9 4 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL

------------------------------------

654

3 9 .5

293

4 0 .0

8 5 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------------

557

4 3 .0

OFF 1CF BOYS AND GIRLS---------------------------

139

3 9 .5

7 7 .0 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -------

62

SECRETARIES2----------------------------------------------

2 ,4 7 7

3 9 .5 1 1 2 .5 0 •SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTS-

135

-------------------------------------------------------

213

3 9 .5

9 7 .0 0

-------------------------------------------------------

52 3

3 9 .5

8 0 .0 0

3 9 .5 101.0 0

255

TYPISTS, CLASS A
TYPISTS, CLASS

CLERKS. FIL E , CLASS B
ClERKS. ORDER

-----------------------------------------------------------------

CLERKS, PAYROLL

-----------------------------------------------------------

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
KFYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS 8

-----------------------------------------

«

1 1 3 .0 0
PROFESSIONAL ANC TECHNICAL
CCCUPATICNS
DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A

-------------------------------------------------

236

3 9 .5

1 9 3 .0 0

1 0 0 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN. CLASS B -------------------------------

478

43 .0

1 4 5 .5 0

3 9 .5

9 9 .0 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C -------------------------------

17 7

4 3 .0

1 1 8 .6 0

3 9 .5

86.00

NURSES. INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) -----

134

4 0 .0

1 1 6 .5 0

9 4 .0 0

1 Standard h ours r e fle c t the w orkw eek fo r which em ployees r e ce iv e their regular straigh t-tim e sa la rie s (exclu sive o f pay fo r overtim e at regular a n d /o r prem ium ra tes), and the earnings
c o rres p on d to these w eekly h ou rs.
2 M ay include w ork e rs other than those presented separately.

Table A -4.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations—SMSA

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in s e le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis by industry division,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A re a ), P a .— J . , N ovem ber 1967)
N.
Num ber o f w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e hourly earnings o f—

H o u rly earn in gs

%
$
$
t
$
$
S
$
S
i
$
$
1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0

N um ber

O ccupation and industry d ivision

of
w ork ers

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

$
3 .4 9
3 .5 3
3 .2 6
3 .1 7
4 .7 2

$
3 .2 2 3 .4 C 3 .0 5 3 .1 C -

$
3 .8 5
3 .8 3
4 .7 0
3 .7 3

3 .4 9
3 .4 8
3 .7 9
3 .4 7
4 .0 5

3 .3 2 3 .3 3 3 .2 6 3 .3 3 4 .0 1 -

3 .8 1
3 .7 9
4 .0 7
4 .6 3
4 .0 8

*

1 and
1 •70 under
1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3-----RETAIL TRADE --------------

863
603
260
61

100

$
3 .5 8
3 .5 6
3 .6 3
3 .4 1
4 .3 7

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE
MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3-----RETAIL TRACE -------------

2 ,2 8 7
2 ,0 4 2
245
84
9C

3 .5 7
2 .5 5
3 .7 3
3 .8 6
4 .1 1

See footn otes at end o f table.




S
*
%
S
$
$
$
$
*
$
3.0C 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3.6C 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0

9
l

41
38
3

3 .2 0 3 .4 0

3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 . CO 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 over

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

5

-

3

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

5

-

3

-

8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

1

~

9

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

1

1

-

2

73
71

50
42

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

2

2

4C6
349
57
36

496
4 86

-

274
236
38

8
1

147
43
104
38

2

77

68
9

f

2

2C1
186
15
-

10
5
3

109

86

148
123

23

10

-

3
7

-

6
11
381
377
4
-

3

39
39

-

1
-

1
1

4
4

76

_

76

.

6
70

-

277
264
13
7

250
185

3
l

4

63

3
3

6

2
2

65

-

_

32

1
32
28
4

37
30
7
7

20
Table A -4.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations—SMSA— Continued

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea basis by industry div ision ,
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a ), P a .— J . , N ovem ber 1967)
N.
H o u r ly e a rn in g s

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ------------------------MANUFACTURING-----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3-------------------------

967
707
260
77

$
3 .2 1
3 .2 3
3 .1 5
3 .3 0

$
3 .1 9
3 .3 0
3 .1 6
3 .7 3

$
2 .9 9 3 .0 0 3 .0 1 2 .5 4 -

$
3 .4 8
3 .4 7
3 .5 1
3 .8 5

-

FI-REMEN, STATIONARY BO ILER--------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------

381
324
57

2 .9 3
3 .0 0
2 .5 1

2 .9 4
2 .9 7
2 .6 3

2 . 7 0 - 3 .1 7
2 . 7 6 - 3 .1 8
1 . 9 5 - 2 .6 8

“

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------- --------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3-------------------------

1 ,0 2 8
847
181

2 .8 7

120

2 .8 1
2 .9 9

2 .8 0
2 .7 9
2 .8 3
2 .8 7

2 .6 8 2 .7 C 2 .4 8 2 .8 2 -

_
~

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

453
448

3 .4 6
3 .4 7

3 .4 9
3 .4 9

3 . 0 9 - 3 .7 6
3 . 0 9 - 3 .7 6

2.88

3 .1 1
3 .1 2
2 .9 8
3 .1 4

-

“

-

1

1

39

20

2

-

-

21

-

-

1
1

1

18
“

20

2
2

-

”

16
16

-

~

12

3

4

3
9

1
2

1

-

-

-

—

~

l

14
“

8
8

~

1
2
5
5
5

4
4
“

53

-

2
2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

~

*
*

“

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

3 .7 2
3 .6 3
3 .7 1
3 .5 1

“

2 ,3 2 0
2 ,2 4 6

3 .4 5
3 .4 5

3 .4 2
3 .4 2

3 . 1 8 - 3 .7 6
3 . 1 7 - 3 .7 7

MILLWRIGHTS --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

555
554

3 .7 0
3 .7 0

3.68
3 .6 8

431
426

2 .9 1
2 .9 1

2.88
2.88

2 . 6 7 - 3 .2 4
2 . 6 7 - 3 .2 4

PAINTERS,' MAINTENANCE------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------- ------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3
------------------------dCKVIbCd •••••••••••-•••••••••

547
330
217
60
50

3 .2 9
3 .4 6
3 .0 4
3 .6 1
1 .9 2

3 .3 7
3 .4 6
2 .8 9
3 .8 1
1 .8 0

2 .8 9 3 .2 5 2 .7 5 3 .1 7 L• » 3

PIPEFITTERS* MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

1 ,2 7 6

3 .6 3
3 .6 0

3 .6 9

1,222

3.68

3 . 4 1 - 3 .8 6
3 . 4 0 - 3 .8 5

PLUMBERS, MAINTENANCE -*>-------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------- --------------

117
72

3 .5 0
3 .4 3

3 .5 3
3 .6 1

3 . 1 3 - 3 .7 5
3 . 0 4 - 3 .6 9

-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
MANUFACTURING — ----------------- — ---------

235

3 .5 2
3 .5 3

3 .4 7
3 .4 8

3 . 4 0 - 3 .6 7
3 . 4 2 - 3 .6 7

_

_

210

“

-

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING--------------------- --------------

1 ,6 6 1
1 ,6 5 9

3 .7 8
3 .7 8

3 .8 5
3 .8 5

3 . 6 3 - 3 .9 7
3 . 6 3 - 3 .9 7

.

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

~

5

3

1

12

59
59
“

79
78
l

74
71
3

20
20

142
78
64
63

246
233
13

~

236
229
7
7

33
7

10

-

2
2

14
14

49
49

-

3
3
-

6
6

-

3 . 4 4 - 4 .2 2
3 . 4 4 - 4 .2 2

OILERS
__
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

64
45
19

-

-

3 .2 9 3 .2 5 3 .3 4 3 .3 5 -

155
136
19

2

-

3 .3 9
3 .3 8
3 .4 7
3 .4 4

11

28

-

3 .4 8
3 .4 3
3 .5 5
3 .4 4

114
1C3

112

106
106
-

-

3 .8 8
3 .8 7
4 .6 3
4 .6 3

270
158

2

87
72
15

-

3 .3 3 3 .3 2 3 .3 4 3 .3 4 -

67
65

10
2

12

3
~

3 .5 9
3 .5 9
3 .9 1
3 .9 1

15
5

40

“

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE --------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3

2 ,0 3 0
1 ,8 5 3
1.77
177

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE)
----- ------------------------—
—
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 3
------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------

446
979
594
97

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

3 .6 3
3 .6 0
3 .8 9
3 .8 9

~

9 ••***
* AA

3 .6 9
3 .6 9
3 .6 5
4 .1 3
444v

~

and
4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 o v e r
—
_

-

"

_
_
-

-

_
-

_
_
*

es
59
29
24

19
19
-

15
9

_
~

6
6

~

52
47
5

4
4
-

_
-

?a
70

38
30

8

8
8

_
~

_
-

_
~

_
~

_
_
-

_
-

4

14
14
14

75
75

43
38

115
115

59
59

21
21

54
54

5
5

1
1

2
2

3
3

81
81
*

207
194
13
13

357
2 E2
75
75

388
388
-

272
272
-

)S3
380
13
13

224
224
-

12
1
11
11

3

2
1

20
20

l

64
64
64

166
24
142

560

9
17

2C2

-

14
14

-

-

26

26
-

—
-

~

“

-

-

52
46

20

22

221

296
71
225
205

6
6

1
1

53
4
49
49

_
_

_

_
_
-

6
6

_

3
3

3
3

4
4

5
5

2

5
5

3
3

3
3

8
-

3
3

-

8

-

3

9
c

o
o

3
*

_

-

-

-

1

_

_

_

_
-

-

-

”

-

-

“
_

_

_

-

_

2

_

_

-

“

35

20

~

~

236
235

267
265

488
426

402
398

333
330

251
251

2C5
205

15
13

9
9

27
27

21
21

41
40

117
117

173
173

7
7

3
3

160
160

_

77
77

21
21

30
30

_

_

43

102

33
33
-

8

18
18

-

“

106
106

-

6

~

2

-

-

“

CO
_

-

2
2

“

-

238
71
167
79
42

6
6

-

-

-

-

57
40
17
16

27
27
-

27

8
6

-

5
3

2

3
3
~

108
37
71

22
21

72
59
13

19

10

98
4
”

2
2

101
101

83
78

118
116

234
234

283
283

315
3C5

88
88

10
10

4
4

18

10

10

-

20
10

24
23

18
15

3
~

2
2

18
7

35
26

104
104

40
40

23
23

9

_

7
7.

49
49

126
126

190
188

293
293

664
664

297
297

_

_

_

_

-

“

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

2

_

_

_

2

_

-

-

_

61

-

-

_

61
61

-

_

_

66

“

-

-

58
58

_

_

19

35
35

_

-

1

358

36
36

-

E xclu des prem iu m pay fo r ove rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eekends, h o lid a ys, and late shifts.
F o r definition o f t e r m s , see footnote 2, table A - l .
T ran sp ortation, com m u nication, and other public u tilitie s.




3 .8 0 4 . CO

6
2

24

20

3 .6 0

63
57

22
2

“

-

34
30
4
4

3 .4 0

O
C
M

1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2 . 30 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0

%
S
*
$
4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0

I

Number o f w o rk e rs receivin g stra igh t-tim e hourly earnings of*—
1—
S
$
1 ------- 1 ------- $
(
$
$
$
$
t
$
$
$
1
1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2 . 20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .6 0
Under.
ra n g e 2 S
and
1 .7 0 'under

3
O

O ccupation and industry division

N um ber
of
w ork ers

a

18
18
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

35
-

9
9

_

-

2

5

-

“

-

1

3
-

_

22
22

1
1

•

8
19
15

-

12
12

21
Table A-4a.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations—Manufacturing—3 Inner Counties

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in se le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a s is in m anufacturing, P h iladelphia
(Delaw are and Philadelphia C ou n ties, P a ., and Cam den County, N .J .), P a .-N .J ., N ovem ber 1967)
H um ber o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g stra igh t-tim e h ourly earnings of-

H o u r ly e a r n in g s 1

$
$
*
$
$
$
$
»
2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .

N um ber

O ccup ation

of
w o ik e rs

M ean1
2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

10

$
t
*
$
$
$
t
$
S
%
$
3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3.501 3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0

20

3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3.6fl| 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 .2 0 over

“ nde.r and

2 ., 0 “ ” der
2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .

$
$
3 . 3 7 - 3 .8 1

356

$
3 .5 3

$
3 .5 0

«= PCTRICI ANS* MAINTENANCE----------------l

1 ,2 1 6

3 .5 8

3 .5 6

3 . 4 1 - 3 .7 9

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY -------------------------

512

3 .2 1

3 .2 5

3 . 0 2 - 3 .4 5

FIREMEN* STATIONARY BOILER ---------------

223

2 .9 8

2 .9 7

2 . 7 5 - 3 .1 9

3

7

18

9

19

35

CARPENTERS* MAINTENANCE ----------------------

1

71

-

21

26

8

3

24

27

85

40

24

19

48

2

37

86

32

255

97

4

134

18

31

6

19

18

2

6

13

1

4

-

-

-

-

-

67

25

36

62

269

21

21

41

90

11

79

95

11

12

2 0

4

51

3

12

30

-

93

49

5

69

33

5

63

5

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

21

9

8

9

8

8

43

51

17

38

8

21

31

l

11

18

60

61

47

78

156

82

92

71

92

3

23

57

HFIPFRS. MAINTENANCE TRAOES -------------

420

2 .9 1

2 .8 6

2 . 7 2 - 3 .1 3

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM —

299

3 .5 4

3 .5 6

3 . 3 6 - 3 .7 9

-

2

13

1 ,0 4 0

3 .5 8

3 .5 7

3 . 3 3 - 3 .8 4

-

3

6

37
-

7

2

18

74

76

45

18

5

15

7

81

57

89

64

27

64

95

223

36

11

231

27

21

-

-

11

37

5

MACHINISTS,
m e c h a n ic s ,

m aintenance

---------------------

26

94

117

a utom o tive

(MAINTENANCE) ---------------------------------------

290

3 .4 0

3 .3 6

3 . 2 6 - 3 .4 9

-

-

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -----------------------

1 ,2 3 6

3 .4 7

3 .4 6

3 . 1 4 - 3 .7 7

2

6

MILLWRIGHTS-----------r------------------------------- --

244

3 .5 3

3 .4 8

3 . 4 1 - 3 .7 2

O IL E R S --------------- -----------------------------------------

258

2 .9 2

3 .0 2

2 . 6 7 - 3 .2 3

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE -------------------------

205

3 .4 3

3 .4 4

PIPEFITTERS, MAINTENANCE -------------------

678

3 .6 0

3 .7 0

PLUMBERS, MAINTENANCE -------------------------

58

3 .4 0

3 .6 2

WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —

154

3 .5 0

TOOL ANO DIE MAKERS -----------------------------

1 ,2 8 0

3 . 81

SHFET-METAt

4

5

59

21

11

7

32

96

9

9

80

-

-

-

-

39

15

8

-

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

7

83

1

-

-

3 . 2 6 - 3 .6 4

-

3

3

23

8

6

-

2

49

31

31

2 . 9 8 - 3 .6 9

-

10

4

-

7

3 .4 7

3 . 4 2 - 3 .6 1

-

-

2

3 .8 7

3 . 66- 3 .9 9
'

1 E x clu d es p rem iu m pay f o r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holid ays, and late shifts.
2 F o r defin ition o f t e r m s , se e footnote 2, table A - l .




11

44

3 . 4 0 - 3 .8 3

7
'

-

22

-

32

-

19
180

10

19

24

4

5
16

15

23

9

8

34

-

-

-

4

8

4

82

13

16

49

2J

2 8

77

162

14

59
12 1

11

10

22

27

-

22

4

6

147

97

-

1

10

68

10

-

8

9

14

-

-

-

-

283

254

175

93

27

22
Table A-4b.

Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations—Manufacturing—5 Outer Counties

O ccupation

Mean1
2

Median 2

Middle range 2

CARPENTERS. MAINTENANCE --------------------

247

$
3 .5 9

$
3 .6 4

$
$
3 . 4 2 - 3 .8 5

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE ----------------

826

3 .4 9

3 .4 0

3 . 3 0 - 3 .7 5

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY------------------------

195

3 .3 0

3 .3 9

2 . 8 9 - 3 .6 9

FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER --------------

101

3 .0 4

2 .9 7

2 . 9 1 - 3 .1 5

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES ------------

427

2.86

2 .7 7

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS, TOOLROOM -

149

3 .3 1

3 .1 7

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE --------------------

813

3 .6 3

3 .6 2

t
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0
Under and
$
under
2 .4 0
2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0

_
-

.

_

_

-

-

-

30

-

1

4

-

1

37

80

3 . 0 4 - 3 .5 4

-

-

-

3 . 3 0 - 3 .8 9

-

-

-

-

1

156

3 .6 2

3 .6 9

3 . 3 5 - 3 .8 0

-

-

-

1,0 10

3 .4 2

3 .3 7

3 .1 8 - 3 .6 8

-

-

-

OILERS ------------------------------------------------------

168

2.88

2 .7 9

2 . 68-

3 .2 6

18

5

17

3

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------------------

125

3 .5 2

3 .5 6

3 . 2 5 - 3 .8 2

-

-

-

-

PIPEFITTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------------

544

3 .6 1

3 .6 6

3 . 4 0 - 3 .8 6

-

-

-

-

56

3 .6 1

3 .6 4

3 . 3 4 - 3 .8 4

-

-

-

-

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ----------------------------

379

3 .6 9

3 .7 5

_

8

27

9

8

55

6

23

20

63

25

2

13

35

109

52

199

120

11

71

19

130

33

4

15

8

4

23

6

7

30

-

19

1

32

7

-

4

4

-

42

11

5

-

5

-

17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

4

32

99

1

1

16

-

19

47

11

21

1

7

14

?

2

2

-

22

-

-

26

5

69

106

35

31

123

78

20

130

62

8

3 . 4 6 - 3 .9 0

-

2

-

4

14

38

8

-

14

37

29

6

25

1 E xcludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, holidays, and late shifts.
2 F o r definition of te r m s , see footnote 2, table A - l .




136

1

-

-

5

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE ----------------------

4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 . 50 4 .6 0

4

-

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE! --------------------------------------

3 .9 0 4 .0 0

£
£
i
$
4 .2 0 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 0

-

12

2 . 6 9 - 3 .1 1

_

3 .7 0 3 .8 0

o

Number of w orkersi receivin g straigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—
*
t
t
%
3 .6 0 3 .7 0 3 .8 0 3 .9 0

Hourly earnings1
'lumber
of
workers

■
fo
o
-P *

(A verage straigh t- tim e hourly earnings fo r m en in se le cte d occupations studied on an area b a sis in m anufacturing, Philadelphia (B ucks, C h ester, and
M ontgom ery Counties, P a ., and Burlington and G lou cester Counties, N .J.), Pa.— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N

55

34

15

159

89

178

135

4

77

11

165

38

2

47

8

11

-

7

17

6

12

1

16

-

-

-

6

10

6

18

3

10

18

19

-

22

12

20

12

26

65

9

90

1

80

29

126

75

2

-

-

-

2

11

3

5

4

10

4

9

-

4

46

44

39

12

51

72

55

19

4

•

l

11

2

-

-

2

9

_

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

7

“

6

-

-

4

_

_

-

8
25

-

-

1

1

-

121

-

-

29

1

23
Table A-5.

Custodial and Material M ovement Occupations—SMSA

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a sis by industry division«
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a ), Pa,— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Num ber of w ork ers r e ce iv in g str& ight-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

H o u rly e a r n in g s 2

%
(
$
$
%
S
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
S
$
$
$
$
$
$
1.2 0 1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .3 0 2.40, 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0
$

N u m b er

O ccu p a tion 1 and industry d ivision

of
w orkers

M ean3

M e d ia n 3

M id d le r a n g e 3

and
under

and

1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

3 ,6 8 8
1 ,6 0 7
2 ,0 8 1

$
2 .0 6
2 .6 0
1 .6 5

$
1 .9 1
2 .6 5
1 .4 9

$
1 .4 8 2 .3 9 1 .4 5 -

GUARDS:
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

1 ,2 6 3

2 .7 3

2 .7 4

2 .5 1 - 3 .0 0

WATCHMEN:
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

$
2 .6 4
2 .9 4
1 .7 0

-

9 1128
18
9 1110

344

2 .1 5

2 .1 5

1 .9 1 - 2 .4 0

*

2 .2 6
2 .4 4
2 .0 6
2 .5 7

2 .2 6
2 .4 1

1 .9 8 2 .2 6 1 .9 C 2 .3 5 1 .8 7 1 .6 4 1 . 88-

2 .5 5
2 .6 7
2 .1 3
2 .8 0
2 .4 4
2 .0 3
1 .9 7

6

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
(WOMEN) ---------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 4-------------------------RETAIL TRADE — — — — — —
SE RV IC ES__ —
_________ ,______________

2 ,7 1 3
468
2 ,2 4 5
187
285
354

1 .7 9
2 .1 6
1 .7 1
2 .3 8
1 .5 8
1 .5 8

1 .6 2 1 .8 7 1 .6 1 2 .1 4 1 .4 5 1 .5 4 —

2 .0 7
2 .4 8
1 .7 0
2 .6 1

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING------- —
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S 4-------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------—

7 ,0 9 9
3 ,5 4 7
3 ,5 5 2
1 ,6 2 3
1 ,1 8 4
735

2 .7 3
2 .5 9

2 .2 1

2 .6 3
3 .0 0
3 .3 0
2 .9 9
2 .1 4

2 .4 4 2 .3 3 2 .7 4 2 .9 8 2 .7 1 1 . 66-

3 .1 2
2 .9 1
3 .2 8
3 .3 5
3 .1 0
2 .6 9

ORDER FILLERS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

3 ,0 9 4
981
2 ,1 1 3
1 ,2 3 2
881

2 .8 2
2 .5 4
2 .9 5
2 .9 1
3 .0 1

2 .9 5
2 .5 5
3 .1 4
3 .0 2
3 .1 5

2 .3 8 2 .1 9 2 .6 5 2 .3 C 3 .1 1 -

3 .1 9
2 .7 5
3 .2 9
3 .4 4
3 .1 8

PACKERS, SHIPPING ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING-----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------------------------

1 ,8 1 6
1 ,3 1 2
504
331
171

2 .3 5
2 .4 4

2 .3 9
2 .4 2
2 .1 9
2 .4 8
1 .7 5

1 .9 9 2 .2 4 1 .7 6 1 . 86-

2 .6 5
2 .7 3
2 .5 3
2 .5 6

1 • A fv *
X D W

>

PACKERS, SHIPPING (WOMEN! — --------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

540
237
303
205

2 .1 2
2.22

RECEIVING CLERKS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE — — -------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

890
426
464
194
229

2 .7 5
2 .8 3
2 .6 9
2 .7 4
2 .5 7

2.68
2 .7 1
2 .6 2

2 .4 6 2 .5 7 2 .2 7 2 .4 1 2 . 22-

SHIPPING CLERKS «,-----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

823
378

3 .0 0
2 .7 2

3 .0 9
2 .6 1

2 . 5 8 - 3 .5 3
2 . 4 8 - 3 .0 6

d c t a i i
ISC • m x v

TRAnP
•n u u c

———______,______________________

See footn otes at end o f table.




2.22
1.86
1 .8 7

2.88
3 .2 0
2 .8 7

2 .1 2
2 .2 4

1.8 8

2 .0 5
1 .8 3

2.0 1
2 .6 2
2 .3 2
1 .7 6
1 .9 3
1 .6 7

2.22
1.6 6
2 .5 0
1 .5 8
1 - A1
1 *01

2.86

2 .1 5
2 .1 6
2 .0 7
1 .7 1
2 .7 7
2 .8 4

-

6
-

4
4
-

106
30
76

103
92

73
32
41

2

8 ,2 6 5
4 ,4 6 0
3 ,8 0 5
585
180
846
951

JANITORS, PORTERS. AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES4— ---------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

418
53
365

24

3

18

51

6

8

-

56
—
56
18
38

154

228

68
86

112
116
-

284
54
230
-

281
85
196

6

8

1
8

59
43

194

165

293
58
235
33
48
123

73
73
42

155
45

49
30

110

20

210 1333
18
12

1
X

60
25
35
-

67
28
39
-

121

57

-

64
—
64
64

147
76
71
15
56

144
27
117
-

10

6

99

33

-

-

-

33
33
33

67
18
49
40
9

54
25
29

-

_

14
14

84
44
40

-

—
5 A
J o

1.6 8
1 DO
X•AA
-

-

-

-

-

37
9
28

-

-

-

i i

21
8

136
'99
37

53
19
34

93
80
13

210

171
116
55

206
194

152

180
30

122

139
131

121
122

30

8

9

277
229
48

59
59
-

11
10

12

37

6

38

148

94

183

116

129

121

228

58

65
56
5
51

111
42
69
63

42

32

22

11

6

2

1

1

1

2

911
787
124
41
43

727
491
236
105

324
311
13
4
-

627
535

149
18
131
79
17
35

444
362
82
79

258
294
4
3
_

161
84
77
62
5

208
198

1
1

1

63
53

306
284
78

93
93
-

16
16

45
16
29
29

11

10
6

19
19
•
_

30
15
15
7

298
270
28
-

83
3
16

1
2

10

5
3

_
.
_

4
4
_
_

_

_
_

_
_

_

41

17
3
14
14

8
8

10
2

16
15

2
1

1

-

105
57
48
47

221

350
306
44
44

597
328
269
204
65

451
357
94
55
39

247
205
42
19
23

193
104
89

180
64
116
116
-

70
36
34
34
-

106
87
19
19

810
18
792
127
665

247
93
154
140

141
125
16
16

148
148

61
53

76
76

58
58

8
8

—

_

_

-

_

_

3
3

9
9
-

2
2

1
1

96
49
47
45

73
30
43
42

118

96
27
69
64
5

152
115
37
37
-

117
113
4

267
235
32
32

1

79
67
t 9
1c

12
10

lo

2

£

17

16
16

-

27
17

10

14
14

63
63
61

6

-

28
28
27

25

-

19
17

10
10

7
7

12

.
—

_
—
-

•
-

_
-

6

21

5
5
5

24
24

29
29

21

-

_

_

86
32
32
33

11
22
12
10

20

2
38
28

25
3

3

21
8

39
23
16
15

_

2

10
5

10
10

213

8

-

8
8
6
2

—

2
123

88
35
4
31

2

159
136
23
23

11
1
10
10

15

24

8

88
1

-

-

9

2
2

394 1210
254
5C8
702
140
63 454
63
216
14
32

42

62
18
44
-

7

2

1

13
13

41
-

55
35

1C4
54
50
30
58
52

12

21

22

12

21

6
21

t

69
45
24
17
7

43
25

31
24

56|
54

79
78

20

803 1330
187 214
616 1116
3 1089
541
2
25
72

22
19
_
18

_
_

1

-

168
25
143
39
104

408
15
393
390
3

20
9

20

11
11

64
64

11
11

1
l

6
6

18
18

84

_
-

_

_

1*

41
13
28

-

_
_
-

1

3
17

2

49
33
16
14

2

34
32

26

-

_

22

413
376
37
37

2

-

102

6

105
85

47
35

18

22

_
_
_
_
_
_

-

10

132
105
27
4
23

6

21

98
104
29
15

186
115
71
40
29

-

1
5
5

8

13

.

-

10

770
672
98
4
17
55

-

3 .1 8
3 .1 7
3 .1 8
3 .2 5
3 .1 0

12

62

1 . 8 2 - 2 .4 5

14

8

202

2 . 12- 2 .2 3
1 .6 5 - 2 .5 4
1 . 6 2 - 2 .1 3

10
10

28

30

77
33
44
26

201
122

20
20

I

933 1198
95
137
838 1061
81
12
4
8
87
73
664

1

128
25
103
34

192 1321
1
73
55

58
30
28

125
42
83
14

32

11

3 . CO 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 . BO jover

20

2
5

1

-

39
19

61
48
13

-

-

103
38
65

8

63
50
13
7

14

5

6

21

173
94
79
25

42

22

50

25

7
5

80

82
73

20
6

21

_
_
33
3
30
30
298

8

_
_
-

1
1
-

_
_
_
“

_
_
_
-

_

_

24
Table A-5.

Custodial and Material M ovem ent Occupations—SMSA— Continued

(A verage s traigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area ba sis by industry division*
Philadelphia (Standard M etropolitan S tatistical A re a ), Pa,— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Num ber of w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

Hourly earnings1
2

O ccu p ation 1 and industry d ivision

$
%
%
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
t
$
$
%
$
%
%
$
*
$
$
$
%
l i 20 1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1460 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .6 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0
workers

Mean3

Median3

Middle range3

and
under

and

$
2 .9 0
2 .7 0
3 .2 0
3 .2 5

$
2 .6 4 2 .5 8 2 .8 4 3 .2 1 -

$
3 .2 2

3 .4 8
3 .3 6
3 .5 4
3 .6 2
3 .4 8
3 .2 6

3 .6 1
3 .4 8
3 .6 3
3 .6 4
3 .5 5
3 .4 4

3 .4 2 3 .3 2 3 .4 8 3 .6 2 3 .3 7 3 .4 0 -

3 .6 6
3 .6 1
3 .6 7
3 .6 7
3 .6 6
3 .4 7

2 .6 2
2 .6 3
2 .6 2

2 .5 4
2 .6 3
2 .4 4

2 . 1 9 - 2 .9 3
2 . 3 1 - 2 .9 0
2 . 1 2 - 3 .3 2

_
~

“

_
“

-

3 .4 0
3 .3 9
3 .6 0
3 .6 3
3 .3 9
3 .3 2

3 .3 3 3 .3 3 3 .3 3 3 .5 7 3 .3 4 2 .5 9 -

3 .6 4
3 .6 1
3 .6 5
3 .6 7
3 .6 5
3 .3 8

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

369
748
104

3 .3 7
3 .3 7
3 .3 8
3 .4 6
3 .3 7
3 .1 1

TRUCKORIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 4-------------------------WHOLESALE TRACE ---------------------------

4 ,1 5 6
691
3*465
2 ,4 3 5
578

3 .6 0
3 .5 5
3 .6 1
3 .6 6
3 .5 6

3 .6 4
3 .6 2
3 .6 4
3 .6 5
3 .6 1

3 .6 C 3 .5 3 3 .6 1 3 .6 2 3 .4 6 -

3 .6 7
3 .6 6
3 .6 7
3 .6 7

~

TRUCKORIVERS* HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS*
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES 4------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------

1 ,2 4 2
759
489
246

3 .5 7
3 .6 7
3 .6 6
3 .7 3

3 .6 0
3 .6 5
3 .6 5
3 .6 2

3 .5 2 3 .6 1 3 .6 2 3 .4 0 -

3 .6 6
3 .6 8
3 .6 8
4 .2 4

-

TRUCKERS* POWER (FORKLIFT) --------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES 4 ------------------------WHOLESALE TRADE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

4 ,3 4 3
3*600
743
47
308
388

2 .8 9
2 .8 2
3 .2 0
3 .6 1
3 .0 4
3 .2 7

2 .8 7
2 .7 9
3 .2 7
3 .6 5
3 .2 0
3 .2 9

2 .5 5 2 .5 0 3 .2 C 3 .6 2 2 .7 0 3 .2 4 -

3 .2 3
3 .1 4
3 .3 4
3 .6 8
3 .2 8
3 .3 5

TRUCKERS* POWER (OTHER THAN
FORKLIFT) ----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

374
296

3 .0 3
2 .9 7

2 .8 9
2 .8 5

2 . 7 9 - 3 .2 6
2 . 7 6 - 3 .1 3

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ---------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------- ---------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

413
184
229
130

TRUCKORIVERS5 — *----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES4— --------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

9 ,7 3 1
3*063

TRUCKORIVERS* LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 /2 T O N S )--------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------TRUCKORIVERS* MECIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TC
ANO INCLUDING 4 TONS) ------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------- ---------—
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------PUBLIC U TILITIES4- - --------------------WHOLESALE TRACE --------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5
4

6,668
4 ,1 7 6
1*802
631
361
160

201
2*551
1*330

1 ,2 2 1

2.88
3 .2 7
3 .2 9

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

~

—

~

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

11

38
5
33

6

-

30

11

“

30
~

_
—
~

11
6
5

1

_
-

25
25

10

“

_
-

10

1

-

10
-

20
-

20
1
37

22
15

15
18

5

10

5
~

33
5
28

10

39

10

28

5
5

27

7
7

-

22
5

11

25
*
*

_
-

10

5
“

5

“

_

_

_

-

-

-

5
“
5
5
-

42
40

43
23

2

20

2

~

53
18
T5
5
~

127

88

51
41

39

5
5
“
23
15

11

2
2

60
18
42
26
16

40
32

34
18
16
26
26
26
~

53
18
35

2

34
30
4

5
3

4
4

24

2 .8 0 2 .9 0

-

20

3
3
“

2

8
8

-

8
8

“

3 . CO 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 .ov er

7
7
•

~

37
30
7
7

61
48
13

197

10

86
1 11

37

10

1
12

~

~

61
61
~

33
3
30

37
30
7

9
9
*
”

24

32

12
12

22
10

16

73
41
32

30

11
10
1
1

20
8
1

2

5
5
“

2

30

-

20
10
-

10

-

-

48
56
7

~

~

-

-

_
_
“

“

_
-

_
-

“

~

—

~

10

440
76
_
52

563
537
487
50

84
84
684

152
150

590 1055
509
541
81
514
1
75 154
6 359

74
69
5

96
52
44
44
_

83
83

_

_

_

_

_

_

17

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20
20

4
4
-

75
75
-

53
53
-

57
57
-

280
243
37
37
”

431
431
~

364
363

444
402
42
42

188
174
14
14

377
374
3

1
1

17
17

73
73

— —

~

“

~

~

~

10 at $4.40 to $4,60;

~

~

12 at $4.60 to

13
13

$ 4 .8 0 ;

970
354
616
266
333
17

35

_

-

1
1

256

l
~

_

-

-

39
7
32

81
56
56

-

_

-

_
-

“

_

-

-

_

26
4

21
104
104
~

~

_

-

_

125

25
77
77

_

-

~

156 1206 2011 5408
925
710
844
36 496 1086 4564
14 272 3780
23
10 435 342 763
47
472
21
3

120

1

8
2
6

_

“

-

27
19

_
-

“

1

22
22

7

_

“

i
-

27
7

-

3
3
3

4
_
4

7
105
105

9
9
~

28

~

112

15
15
~

_

~

78
24
54
5

13
13
~

-

3.68

Data lim ited to m en w ork ers excep t w here otherw ise indicated.
E xcludes prem ium pay fo r overtim e and fo r w ork on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
F or definition of te rm s , see footnote 2, table A - l .
T ransportation, com m unication, and other public u tilities.
Includes all d r iv e r s , as defined, re g a rd le s s o f s ize and type o f truck operated.
W orkers w ere distributed as fo llo w s: 4 at $ 3 .8 0 to $ 4 ; 16 at $ 4 to $4 .2 0 ; 16 at $ 4 .2 0 to $4,40;




-

“

-

—

-

o

, $
2*89
2 .7 1
3 .0 3
3 .2 0

1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0

C
M

1 .3 0 1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0

2

-

1

-

2

2

93
89

13
13

20
17
3

6
2
4

42
42

16 at $ 4 .8 0 to $ 5 ; and

22
987
592
395

12
336
47

102

~

95

21

222
34
34
“

853 3141
214 406
639 2735
15 2418
176
313

_

5

~

21
7
14
_
14

6
_

6

_

6

_
_

~
19
19

«

8

10 at $5 and o v e r .

25
Table

A-5a.

Custodial and Material M ovement Occupations—Manufacturing—3 Inner Counties

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r s e le cte d occupations studied on an a rea b a s is in m anufacturing, Philadelphia
(Delaw are and P h iladelphia Counties, P a ., and Cam den County, N .J .), P a .— .J., N ovem ber 1967)
N
Hourly earnings2
1
Number
of
workers

O ccu p a tion 1

Mean3 Median3

Middle range3

N um ber o f w o rk e rs r e ce iv in g s traigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings o f—
$
1
i
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
%
s
$
S
1 .4 0 1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .1 0 2.20 2 .3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3.30. 3 . 4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0
and
under
1 .5 0 1 .6 0

1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.00 2 .10 2*20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0

2 .8 0 2 .9 0 . 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 oves

SHAKOS AND WATCHMEN -----------------------------

1 ,0 3 9

$
2 ,5 0

$
2 .4 9

$
$
2 .1 5 - 2 .8 9

18

53

30

11

32

30

38

92

15

71

143

23

73

73

.78

32

123

37

37

20

2

8.

----------------------------------------------------

717

2 .6 7

2 .7 5

2 .4 3 - 3 .0 3

-

2

24

3

32

-

10

37

6

29

117

6

62

67

76

31

122

37

36

20

-

-

WATCHMEN ------------------------------------------------ ~

322

2 .1 4

2 .1 4

1 .7 7 - 2 .3 9

18

51

6

8

-

30

28

55

9

42

26

17

11

6

2

1

1

-

1

-

2

8

JANITORS, PORTERS, ANO CLEANERS -----

2 ,9 7 3

2 .4 4

2 .3 7

2 . 2 5 - 2 .8 1

68

81

36

58

52

53

80

45

591

620

178

128

205

18

269

269

5

18

8

1

-

45

-

-

-

GUARDS

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
« WOMEN1 -----------------------------------------------------

392

2 .1 4

2.20

1 .8 5 - 2 .4 5

2 , Ol 1

2 .5 9

2 .5 7

2 .3 2 - 2 .9 3

FILLERS ----------------------------------------

817

2 .4 7

2 .5 3

2 . 20— 2 .6 9

-

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING ----------------------------------

871

2 .3 2

2 .3 4

1 .9 3 — 2 . 5 3

9

-

PACKERS, SHIPPING (WOMEN) ------------------

184

2 .1 4

2 .1 4

2 . 1 1 - 2 .1 8

-

-

ffprprvTM r vLIT
;
“ rl«u 1 V1 Hu n p p h *

330

2 .8 1

2 .8 1

2 . 5 5 - 3 .2 2

SHIPPING CLERKS --------------------------------------

294

2 .6 9

2 .5 6

2 . 4 4 - 3 .0 9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ----------

63

2 .7 2

2 .6 9

2 . 5 9 - 2 .7 8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TRUCKDRIVERS4 ------------------------------------------

2 ,7 1 4

3 .4 1

3 .5 1

3 . 3 5 - 3 .6 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

22

100

2 .6 5

4 CA
2«!>V

4 AA
2 . 5 0 - £•70

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
ANO INCLUDING 4 TONS) --------------------

1 ,2 5 7

3 .4 0

3 .3 9

3 . 3 4 - 3 .6 1

-

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVFR 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ------------------------------------

651

3 .5 8

3 .6 2

3 . 5 5 - 3 .6 6

-

t AfMIftFfK
ORDER

MATPOfM ft-tAMfltTMC
nA Irn IAL HAIvl/L ArlU

1

TRUCKORIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 I f / IUNs I

ToiirtfFPtr
1

pnuFn l rUnKL I » t i
r UwCK (F h n n t f I 1

• ■

■

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
CriDV! 1tCTl . . . —
— it v r i » — ■■■ «
a
■ it
ru «M r i f

1
2
3
4

2 , 593

2 .7 6

2 .7 0

2 .9 5

12

20

25

15

53

16

63

29

15

39

7

16

9

14

1

3

27

28

62

loD

A1
Vi

99

76

4 /Q

1 Ol
i oft

4 AA
£OU

1 17
i£ 7

215

139

374

13

153

1 |A
iiU

18

25

42

19

17

86

27

115

4

185

86

53

6

85

14

22

44

122

33

35

33

11

50

233

78

24

5

52

41

44

22

16

5

6

17

10

-

135

“

-

9

-

-

7

-

33

A1
Vi

AO
VO

16

23

-

-

-

£U

4 1C

Data lim ited to m en w o rk e rs except w here otherw ise indicated.
E xcludes p rem iu m pay fo r ov e rtim e and fo r w ork on weekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.




102
-

9

2

-

2

12

-

-

12

2
-

-

CE

re g a rd le ss o f s ize and type of tru ck operated.

-

-

25

22

54

74

24

5

1

5

7

-

64

-

8

-

-

-

2

-

-

15

17

18

-

-

4

-

3

4

-

-

-

13

18

12

15

69

37

26

20

27

14

35

55

594

916

834

7

18

30

9

c

11
17

4

1 i1
i

1
i

i

*

15

9

2

4

3

7

22

-

®

41

6

*

F o r d efin ition of t e r m s , se e footn ote 2, table A - l .
Includes a ll d r iv e r s , as defin ed,

-

10
21

2 * 4 9 - 3 .0 2

£•( O

190

*

-

5
41

Ci
*7
O

11

22

20

-

-

-

-

401

341

C l3

f 73
it 71

3

565

220

354

-

-

2

4

6

7

7

214

406

144

3Z6

I M9
L3

213

162

135

119

io
J7

•

.

1f
17

lo

1
7

26
Table A-5b.

Custodial and Material Movement Occupations—Manufacturing—5 Outer Counties

(A verage straigh t-tim e hourly earnings fo r se le cte d occupations studied on an area ba sis in m anufacturing, Philadelphia (B u ck s, C h e s te r, and
M ontgom ery Cou nties, Pa. , and Burlington and G lo u ce ste r C ou nties, N. J .), P a .— J. , N ovem ber 1967)
N.
N um ber o f w ork ers receivin g straigh t-tim e h ou rly earnings o f—
S
t
%
S
$
S
$
*
t
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2.00 2 .10 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 .8 0 2 .9 0 3 .0 0 3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0
1 .5 0 1 .6 0 1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0

H o u rly e a r n in g s 1
2

N um ber

O ccu p a tion 1

of
w ork ers

M e a n 34

M e d ia n 3

M id d le ra n g e 3

and
under
1.60

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN -----------------------------

568

$
2 .7 8

$
2 . 72

546

2 .8 0

2 .7 4

2 . 6 0 - 2 .9 6

1 .7 0 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .10 2.20 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .5 0 2 .6 0 2 .7 0 2 ,8 0 . 2 .9 0

$
$
2 . 5 9 - 2 .9 6

GUARDS ------------------------- --------------------------W
ATCHM
EN -----------------------------------------------JANITORS. PORTERS. AND CLEANERS -----

22
1 ,4 8 7

-

-

2 .3 5

2 . 1 8 - 2 .5 1

-

-

-

2 . 3 3 - 2 .6 4

31

18

27

6

-

5
-

3

2 .2 7

2 . 20- 2 .5 3

8

2 .6 9

2 . 4 1 - 2.86

55

ORDER

FILLERS ---------------------------------------

164

2 .8 5

2 .7 0

2 . 0 9 - 2 .9 0

-

-

-

PACKERS. SHIPPING ---------------------------------

441

2.68

2 .6 6

2 . 5 5 - 2 .7 7

-

-

-

RECEIVING CLERKS -----------------------------------

96

2 .8 7

2 .9 3

2 . 7 3 - 3 .0 0

puvnnikip ULt o i/r
> n ir r l nlu r i c

84

2 82

2 81

2 .7 0

2 .7 4
Z .9 7

Z.B 1-

37

93

121

49

53

90

60

9

2

2

20

31

88

121

49

53

90

60

9

2

-

8

-

2

20

330

-

93

25

61

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

4

-

6

5

53

81

167

313

183

-

6

30

3

-

18

1

-

-

5

105

24

6

9

28

32

26

201

142

115

134

13

8

2

-

12

10

11

13

-

-

2

20

18

11

30

2

4

-

1

-

15

-

18

-

-

63

2

10

69

120

96

12

32

3

17

5

1

1

-

3

-

3

6
2

2

4

6

11

7

34

2

16

2

-

1

2

-

10

39

ZZ

6

3

7

-

-

18

3.ZZ

-

60

2 .5 9

2 .7 5

2 . 1 9 - 2.8 6

-

TRUCKORIVERS. MEDIUM (1 ^ 1 /2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS! -------------------

73

2 .8 2

2 .7 4

2 . 5 2 - 3 .2 5

-

TRUCKORIVERS. HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS.
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE! -------------

64

3 .0 1

3 .0 2

2 . 8 5 - 3 .0 9

-

-

-

-

-

TRUCKERS. POWER ( FORKLIFT 1*---------------

1 .0 0 7

2 .9 9

3 .1 2

2 . 6 3 - 3 .2 6

-

-

-

-

75

2 .9 9

O O*
4* OA

6

3

15

3

5

5

5

j

3

zz

12

17

7

7

20
61

5

1

15

-

19

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

25

-

22

-

70

30

22

129

30

48

13

1

58

7

9

3

30

23
*

20

-

Data lim ited to m en w o rk e rs e xce p t w here otherw ise indicated.
E xclu des prem iu m pay fo r ov e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eekends, h olid ays, and late shifts.
F o r definition o f t e r m s , see footnote 2, table A - l .
Includes a ll d r iv e r s , as defin ed, r e g a r d le s s o f sisqe and type o f truck operated.




28

on
4U

5

TRUCK DRIVERS. LtGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 /2 T O N S !---------------------------------------

1
2
3
4

8

-

2 . 5 6 - 2 .8 9

Z .9 f

9
9

2 6 5 - 3 05

121

4
-

57

-

2 .2 5
2 .5 8

7
-

42

-

2 .4 8

76

TRUCKERS. POWER (OTHER THAN
rnn isf vc t F
t
rllHlxL I**1 i
" "
■

ov er

30

2 .3 2
2 .4 5

936

n i l nn 1Nb AnIU Kr r c tIVINb UL tHKS
i#«
t
r r * a * aa r\ n tb t w f tt/* n rni/r

3 .1 0 3 .2 0 3 .3 0 3 . 4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0

4

-

LABORERS. MATFRIAL HANDLING-------------

SH I

3 .0 0

4
-

JANITORS. PORTERS. ANC CLEANERS
(WOMEN!---------------------------------------------------

rnnri/nn tticnr^
1
U I VrKS
K

$
$
t
$
3 .4 0 3 .5 0 3 .6 0 3 .7 0

17

6
1

16

8

2

23

-

8

-

4

-

-

46

88

286

1

30

-

34

83

19

5

27
B . E sta b lish m en t P ra c tic e s and S u p p le m en tary W age P ro v isio n s
Table B-l. Minimum Entrance Salaries for W om en O ffice W orkers
(Distribution of establishments studied in all industries and in industry divisions by minimum entrance salary for selected categories
of inexperienced wom en office w ork ers, Philadelphia, Pa.— .J., Novem ber 1967)
N
Inexperienced typists
Manufacturing
Minimum w eekly straight-tim e s a la ry 1

All
industries

A ll
schedules

Establishm ents studied-

$ 50.00 and under $ 52.50___________
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

52.50 and u nd er
5 5.00 and u nd er
5 7.50 and u nd er
60.00 and u n d er
6 2.50 and u n d er
65 .0 0 and u nd er
6 7.50 and un d er
7 0.00 and u nd er
72.50 and u nd er
75.0 0 and u n d er

$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$

5 5.00—
57.5 0 —
6 0 .0 0 —
6 2 .5 0 —
6 5 .0 0 —
6 7 .5 0 70.00—
72.50—
75.00—
77.50—

$ 77.50 and under $ 80.00—
$ 80.00 and under $ 82.5
$ 82.50 and under $ 85.00—
$ 85.00 and under $ 87.50—
$ 87.50 and under $ 90.00—
$ 90.00 and under $ 92.50—
$ 92.50 and under $ 95.00—
$ 95.00 and under $ 9 7 .5 0 $ 97.50 and under $ 100.00.
$ 100.00 and under $ 102.50.

Data not available..

A ll
industries
A ll
schedules

37V2

37V2 383
/4

40

181

90

91

1
2
11

3

4
42

1
11

25

3
15
9

12

21

8
3
31
9
10
12

11

9
4
5
5
3

1
2
2

20

2

6

1

4
7
8
1
2
5
3

7

1

2

4

6
3

1
1

37V2

16
3
2
16
5
62
16
38
20

2

6
6
5
4

12

12

1

17

All
schedules

219

4

1

1
2

1

2

1

1

3
1
17
6
23

13
4
45

5
1
11

4
4
3
5

10

15
9
7

11

13
7
4
3
4
6

2
1

3
2

1

1
4
3
1
1

1
1

2
27
161
1

64

46
X XX

X XX

X XX

97

X XX

X XX

X XX

67

X XX

X XX

42

XXX

XXX

X XX

X XX

X XX

1

X XX

X XX

X XX

1

X XX

X XX

1

XXX

XXX

1 These sala ries relate to form a lly established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-tim e salaries that are paid fo r standard workweeks.
E xcludes w ork ers in su b clerica l jobs such as m essenger o r o ffice girl.
3 Data are presented fo r all standard workweeks combined, and for the m ost com m on standard workweeks reported.




Nonmanufacturing'

Based on standard Ureekly h o u rs 3 of—

219

Establishm ents having no specified minimum —
Establishm ents which did not em ploy workers
_______________ ___________
in this category___—

Manufacturing-

B ased on standard weekly h o u rs 3 ofA ll
383
/4
schedules 37l/2

Establishm ents having a specified minimu

Other inexperienced c le rica l w orkers 1
2'
Nonmanufacturing'

28




Table B-2.

Shift Differentials

(S h ift d iff e r e n t ia ls o f m a n u fa c tu r in g plan t w o r k e r s b y ty p e and am ount o f d iffe r e n t ia l,
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .—N .J ., N o v e m b e r 1967)
P e r c e n t o f m a n u fa ctu rin g plant w o r k e r s —
In e s t a b lis h m e n t s h a v in g fo r m a l
p r o v i s io n s 1 f o r —

Shift d iffe r e n t ia l

A c t u a lly w o r k in g on —

S e c o n d s h ift
w ork

T h ir d o r o th er
s h ift w o rk

8 7 .0

8 2 .3

17.9

S e co n d s h ift

T h ir d o r o t h e r
s h ift

7 .4

W ith s h ift p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l -------------------------------- —

8 6 .2

8 1 .3

17.7

7 .4

U n ifo r m c e n ts (p e r h o u r ) --------------------------------

4 6 .5

4 1 .2

9 .4

4 .9

4 c e n t s --------------------------------- ----------------- -------5 c e n t s ________ ________ ___________ ____ _____
51 or 6
/}
s ________ . __________________—
7 c e n t s ------------------------------—----------------------- —
l llz c e n ts
-------—
8 c e n t s ----------------- —------------------------- ------------9 c e n t s --------- ------------— ------------- -------------------10 c e n t s -------------------------------- — --------------------11 c e n t s _____________ — ------------ ----------------- —
12 c e n t s __------------------------------- , ----------------12VZ , 13, o r 14 c e n ts
—
- _
15 c e n t s M
l
________
16, 17, 18, o r 19 c e n t s --------— ----------------20 c e n t s ---------- ------ -- ----- -------------------- --------—
O v e r 20 c e n t s -----------------------------------------------

.4
4 .5
1.0
1.8
1.2
11.1
.8
18.3
.5
2.3
.8
1.6
.2
.5
1.4

_
.6
.7
.4
.2
.9
11.2
13.3
2.2
3.5
2 .0
4 .6
1.6

.1
.8
.1
.4
.1
3 .0
.2
3.1
.1
.5
.2
.3
(2)
.1
.2

_
.1
(1
2)
.2
.9
2 .4
.2
.1
.3
.6
.1

U n ifo r m p e r c e n t a g e ---------- — -----------—-------------

3 6 .4

3 0 .9

7.3

1.6

p e r c e n t ---------------------------—----------------------—
p e r c e n t ---------------------------— -----------------------percen t
.
—
p e r c e n t ——--------—--------------------------------------l x p e r c e n t --------- —-------------------------------------fz
8 pe r c e nt ——
— ——
__ ______________
10 p e r c e n t ------------- -------------------- -------------------12 p e r c e n t _____ ____ ____________ —----------------13 p e r c e n t ___________ ___ ____ ________ — —
15 p e r c e n t --------- -------------------—------------- — —

.4
2 .7
2 .4
.7
.7
2 8 .3
1.2
-

1.2
1.3
1.7
.4
.6
20 .9
2 .4
( 2)
2.3

.1
.7
.5
.2
.2
5.4
.3
"

.1
.1
.1
( 2)
(2)
1.0
.2
(2)

O th e r f o r m a l p a y d iff e r e n t ia l— — — ------------

3.2

9 .2

1.0

.9

.8

1.0

.2

4
5
6
7

W ith no s h ift p a y d i f f e r e n t i a l —

------------- —

—

1 In c lu d e s e s t a b lis h m e n t s c u r r e n t ly o p e r a t in g la te s h ift s , and e s t a b lis h m e n t s w ith f o r m a l p r o v i s io n s c o v e r in g la te s h ifts
e v e n th ou gh th e y w e r e n ot c u r r e n t ly o p e r a t in g la te s h ift s .
2 L e s s than 0 .05 p e r c e n t .

29
Table B-3.

Scheduled Weekly Hours

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f plant and o f fic e w o r k e r s in all in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y sch e d u led w e e k ly h o u rs 1
pf f ir s t - s h if t w o r k e r s , P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .—N .J ., N o v e m b e r 1967)
Plant w o r k e r s
W e e k ly h o u r s

M anu­
A ll
in d u s t r ie s 1 factu rin g
2

100
U nder 35 h o u r s
35 h o u rs
O v er 35 and u n d er 36V4 h o u r s — ——------------------36 V4 h o u r s ----------------------------— -----------------------------O v er 36 V4 and under 37 V2 h o u r s ---------------------—
37V2 h o u r s
—
O v er 37 V2 and u nd er 383 h o u r s -----------------— —
/4
383 h ou rs
/4
—
— —
O v er 383 and under 40 h o u r s .----------------------- —
/4
40 h ou rs
O v er 40 and u n d er 48 h o u r s
_ —
48 h o u r s and o v e r — _
-

1
2
3
4
5

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W h o le sa le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u s tr ie s

100

100

100

100

100

100

4
.
.
.
7
1

.

-

3

7
3
4

-

-

-

-

1
88
4
7

68
3
2

3
70
8
5

9
( 5)
2
4
24
3
7
1
47
-

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

100

100

100

100

100

7
1
12
1
11
2
66
-

8

6

6

5
15

( 5)

.
_
36
3
55
.

1
3
( 5)
(*)
9
( 5)
( )
(5)
82
1
3

0

(5)
83
1
3

100
-

-

.

1
.
24

F in an ce 4

29
( 5)
3
61
-

(*)
38
2
10
44
-

2
6
13
29
9
5
14
-

S ch ed u led h o u r s a r e the w e e k ly h o u rs w h ich a m a jo rity o f the f u ll-t im e w o r k e r s w e r e e x p e c te d to w o r k , w h eth er th ey w e re pa id f o r at s tr a ig h t-t im e o r o v e r t im e r a t e s .
In clu d e s data f o r r e a l e s ta te in addition to th ose in du stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and oth er p u b lic u tilitie s .
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l esta te.
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t .




S e r v ic e s

100

(5)
16
_
4
_
49
_
2
28
-

30
T able B-4.

Paid H olidays

(p e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o f fic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv isio n s b y num ber o f paid h o lid a y s
p r o v id e d ann ually, P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .— .J ., N o v e m b e r 1967)
N
O ffic e w o r k e r s

Plant w o r k e r s
Item

M anu­
A ll
in d u s t r ie s 1 fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 1
2

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u strie s

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 2

W h o le s a le
tr a d e

R e ta il
tr a d e

F in a n c e 3

S e r v ic e s

100

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g
paid h o lid a y s -------------------------------------------------------W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no p aid h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

100

100

100

99

87

99

100

100

100

100

100

99

1

“

"

“

1

13

(4)

"

"

“

_

_

"

( 4)

N u m ber o f days

L e s s than 6 h o lid a y s ---------------------------------------------6 h o lid a y s __________________________________________
6 h olid a ys p lu s 1, 2, o r 3 h a lf d a y s ---------— -----7 h o lid a y s ___________________ ____ _____________ ____
7 h olid a ys plu s 1 h a lf day---------------------------- — ----7 h olid a ys plu s 2, 3, o r 4 h a lf d a y s ------------------8 h olid ays ---------------------------------------------------- —
8 h olid a ys plus 1, 2, o r 6 h a lf days
9 h olid a ys
—
—
9 h olid a y s plus 1 o r 2 h a lf d a y s_____________ ____
10 h o lid a y s ___________________________________ ._____
10 h olid a y s plu s 1 h a lf day
11 h o lid a y s _________________________________________
11 h olid a y s p lu s 1 h alf d a y — . . . -------------------------12 h o lid a y s _________________________________________
12 h olid a y s p lu s 1 h a lf d a y ----------------------------------13 h o lid a y s---------------------------------------------------- — ------

_

1
10
3
21
2
3
21
4
27
1
5
(4)
1
(4)
(4)
"

4
4
23
3
4
21
5
28
2
4
(4)
2
“

_

_

2
53
23
15
1
4
3
“

2
3
20
2
1
22
1
38
11
1
“

7
35
3
16
9
29
-

3
21
6
44
3
1
5
3
1
-

(4)
7
2
11
3
3
24
4
16
2
7
1
( 4)
1
18
1
(4)

_

.

_

7
1
13
2
3
29
8
27
3
5
1
(4)
(4)
-

3
1
( 4)
61
7
1
18
1
5
3
-

2
1
15
8
7
22
1
24
3
15
(4)
-

'

‘

(4)
25
3
30
7
4
27
2
1
“

.
2
2
2
3
3
3
7
1
6
3
(4)
64
3
1

1
25
6
11
14
2
35
6
-

T o ta l h o lid a y tim e 5

13 d ays--------------------------------------- —------ —-------------- —
I 2V2 days o r m o r e ___
----- —
12 days o r m r>r
__ —
----1IV2 days o r m o r e -------------------------------- — — --------11 days o r m o r e
_
. . .
----- .
10V2 days o r m o r e ------------------------------------------— —
10 days o r m o r e ------------------------------------------------ ----9V2 days o r m o r e ______________________________. . . .
9 days o r
8V2 days o r m o r e ----------------------—-------------------------8 days o r m o r e — ------------------------------------------- _ ----7 V2 days o r m o r e ___________ ___ _________ ___ _____
7 days o r m o r e _
._
___
6 V2 days o r m o r e __ ___
6 days o r m o r e
. . . .
—
~ 5 days o r m o r e -------------------------------------------- —------4 days o r m o r e 1. , „ __ , , „
L
, ___ L .
ll„
3 days o r m o r e ------ ------------------- — ~-----------------------

1
2
3
4
5
no h a lf

( 4)
1
2
2
8
8
37
38
62
64
87
88
98
98
98
99

2
2
8
8
40
41
67
69
94
96
100
100
100
100

.
3
7
7
7
23
23
45
45
98
98
98
98
100
100
100
100

.
1
1
12
12
49
50
73
75
95
98
100
100
100
100

.
-

_
-

-

-

-

1
1
4
5
10
14
60
64
85
85
87
87

29
29
38
38
57
57
92
96
97
99

(4)
1
19
19
20
21
28
30
49
50
77
80
92
93
98
98
99
99

(4)
(4)

1
1

8
10
43
45
77
78
93
93
100
100
100
100

3
8
9
9
28
28
35
35
96
96
97
97
100
100
100
100

(4)
( 4)
15
18
46
47
73
81
96
98
100
100
100
100

-

1
2
2
34
41
74
75
99
99
100
100

1
3
67
68
69
72
79
79
87
88
94
96
98
100
100
100
100
100

-

6
7
43
58
70
73
98
98
99
99

In clu d es data f o r r e a l esta te in add ition to th o s e in d u s tr y d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
T r a n s p o rta tio n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u tilit ie s .
F in a n ce , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s ta te .
L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t.
A ll com b in a tion s o f fu ll and h a lf days that add to the sa m e am ount a re co m b in e d ; f o r e x a m p le , the p r o p o r tio n o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g a total o f 9 d a ys in c lu d e s th o s e w ith 9 fu ll d a y s and
d a y s , 8 fu ll days and 2 h a lf d a y s , 7 fu ll days and 4 h a lf d a y s , and s o on. P r o p o r t io n s then w e r e cum ulated.




31
T able B-5.

Paid V acation s1

(P e r c e n t d istrib u tio n o f plant and o f fic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y v a c a tio n pay
p r o v is io n s , P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .—N .J ., N o v e m b e r 1967)
Plant w o r k e r s
V a c a tio n p o l ic y

A ll w o r k e r «

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2

M anu­
factu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W h o le sa le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u s tr ie s
100

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

100

100

100

100

100

100

99
82
14
4

100
75
20
5

100
100

100
98
2
.

98
98
.
.

97
78
7
12

99
99
(5)
1

-

2

3

( 5)

-

4
31
3
.
-

10
22
1
-

18
12
(5)

29
11
1
_

-

-

12
37
13
8
( 5)

16
43
12
6
( 5)

_

_
77
.
23
_
.

_
73
8
16
_
.

( 5)
21
2
75
( 5)
1
( 5)

12
3
82
(5)
2
1

83
.
17
_
_

18
_
82
_
_

-

5
73
2
19
.
.
-

-

-

46
11
43
.

30
1
65
2

29
16
52
.

-

-

-

11
89
_
_

-

-

7
1
87
1
2
1

14
21
65
_

-

6
3
88
1
2
( 5)

12
16

2

72

95
2

28
12
57
_

-

3
1
88
2
5
_
1

2
_
97

_
-

2
1
93
1
2
1
( 5)

2
( 5)
93
1
3
1
( 5)

3
1
89
2
5

97

(5)

2

97
3
( 5)

1

-

-

-

F in a n ce4

S e r v ic e s

100

100

100

100

1.00

100

100
98
1
1

100
100
_
.

100
100
.
_

100
100
_
_

100
100
_
_

99
98

M eth od o f p aym en t
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
pa id v a c a t io n s _______ ________ ___________________
L e n g t h -o f-t im e p aym en t
----P e r c e n t a g e paym en t
O ther
_ —
—
W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p r o v id in g
no paid v a c a tio n s
_

(5)

28
20
4
1
-

.

■

24
19
3
(5)

-

2
( 5)

A m oun t o f v a c a t io n p a y 6
A fte r 6 m on th s o f s e r v ic e
U n der 1 w eek
1 w e ek —------------------------------------------------------------------__
—
O v e r 1 and un d er 2 w e e k s
___
2 w eeks
. .
.Over 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s -----------------------------------

6
32
3
.
-

13
25
8
1
-

9
17
10
( 5)

7
43
22
17
-

32
30
9
15
-

(5)
"
3
97

17
2
82

A ft e r 1 y e a r o f s e r v ic e
U nder 1 w eek _______________ _____ _________________
1 w e ek —
O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s
2 w eeks.
—
O v e r 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s -----------------T
-----------—
3 w e e k s ----- -------------- . --------- ,.
------- .
—
O v e r 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s ___ ___________________

1
68
4
21
( 5)
5
-

_
67
3
21
1
7
-

38
14
40
2
6
-

42
18
30
1
8
-

11
13
66
2
8

13
18
56
2
11

86
13
2

.

.

.

.
.

-

-

-

-

10
11
69
3
8

12
15
61
2
11

86
13
2

.

.
.
.

"

-

-

-

69
13
18
.
(5)

-

_

_

4
63
3
30

_

_

_

-

( 5)

-

_
98

5
2
81
11

A fte r 2 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w e e k ______ ___ _______________ ______________ __ __
O v e r 1 and under 2 w e e k s ---------- — —. — -----— —
2 w eeks.
O v e r 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s _
3 w e e k s - -------------- ------ --------------------------------------------O v e r 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s -----------------------------------

27
5
56
13
(5)

( 5)

5
( 5)
92
3
( 5)

-

2
-

-

A ft e r 3 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek --------- — ----------------------------------- ------- ------ -----___
O v er 1 and u n d er 2 w e e k s
2 w e ek s
O v e r 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s
_
3 w e e k s ------- ------- ------ ------ ------------- -----------------. . . . . .
4 w eeks
.
_
O v e r 4 and u nd er 5 w e e k s

_

.

_

.

.

.

(5)
*

3
_
95
_
2
_
-

_

_
97
3
( 5)

98

_
2

-

5
2
82
11

_
-

A ft e r 4 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek —— —— ---------------------------------------------- --------O v e r 1 and u nd er 2 w e e k s ___ __________ __ ______
2 w e ek s
O v e r 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s ___ _______________ ____
3 w eeks
.—
4 w e ek s
--------------- ,------ —
O v er 4 and un d er 5 w e e k s
See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le




.

.

_
.

12
9
79

2

-

95
2

28
12
57

.
.

.
.
.

-

-

_

2

_
_

3
_
95

.

_

_

_
98

_
_

5
2
80
11
2

2
-

32
Table B-5.

Paid V a ca tion s'— Continued

(P e r c e n t d is trib u tio n o f plant and o f fic e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y v a c a tio n p a y
p r o v is io n s , P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .— .J ., N o v e m b e r 1967).
N
Plant w o r k e r s
V a ca tio n p o lic y

M anu­
A ll
in d u s tr ie s 2 fa c tu rin g

P u b lic
u tilitie s 3

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W h o le s a le
tra d e

R e ta il
tra d e

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u strie s

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

W h o le s a le
tr a d e

R e ta il
tra d e

F in a n ce 4

S e r v ic e s

A m oun t o f v a c a tio n p a y 6— C ontinued
A fte r 5 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek------ --------------------------------------- — ------ ------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ------------------------------- —
2 w eek s
—.
—
. . .
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w e e k s -------------------------------- i --------------------------------O ver 3 and under 4 w eek s
4 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s -----------------------------------

1
1
77
6
15
1
-

(5)
1
72
7
20
1
-

-

-

1
( 5)
17
4
69
4
5
-

( 5)
18
6
66
4
6
-

1
14
5
71
5
5
-

15
7
68
4
6
-

_
83
14
3
-

_
87
7
6
-

_
.
_

_
.
23
6
67
_
4
-

-

_
91
2
5
-

7
4
76
8
2
-

(!)
( 5)
82
3
13
( 5)
1
( 5)

_
9
2
85
2
-

7
4
46
32
8
.
-

( !)
( 5)
19
1
73
1
6
( 5)

14
2
76
1
6
1

_
8
2
86
2
-

7
43
39
8
-

( !)
( 5)
18
2
72
2
6
( 5)

12
2
74
5
6
1

_
8
2
85
2
2
-

7
20
4
57
8
1
-

(!)
( 5)
5
( 5)
80
2
13
-

_
5
70
5
19
-

( !)
( 5)

( 5)
1

7

(!)
( 5)
5
( 5)
33
1
55
(5)
6
(*)
( 5)

(5)
75
6
18
(5)
1

_
98
_
2
"

_
62
38
-

_
_
-

_
21
1
47
30
-

-

_
94
3
3
.
-

_
94
2
1
2
-

1
( 5)
58
2
40
_
-

_
_
5
3
92
-

_
37
61
2
-

1
( 5)
26
1
66
2
4
-

A fte r 10 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek--------------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w e e k s ___________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
3 w e e k s --------------- —-----_ ------ ----------- — -----------------O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w e e k s __
_
__
__
_
__
O ver 6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------

( 5)
86
13
1
-

(5)

( 5)
99
_
1
-

-

A fte r 12 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek __
____
__
__
__
O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s _______________________
------2 w eek s
_
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s _ __ _— _______________
3 w eek s
....__„ ^ ______-------------- ________ . .. ....
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s _______________________
4 w eek s _____ . . . . . _
_
O ver 6 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------

(5)

_
_
(5)
86
13
1
-

_
15
9
71
4

( 5)

( 5)
99
1
-

_
19
1
49
_
30
-

_
94
6
-

_
16
.
50
34
.
( 5)
-

_
_

_
5
3
92
.
-

_
34
3
61
_
2
-

1
( 5)
26
_
67
2
4
-

A fte r 15 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 we e k _ _ _ _ _ —
_ — ------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s ----------------------------------2 w e e k s ------ ------ ------- ------ --------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
3 w eek s — -------------------------------------------------------- -----O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ----------------------------------4 w eeks _
__
___
_
.
_
O ver 4 and under 5 w eek s
5 w eeks _ _
_
O ver 6 w e e k s ------------------------------------------------ ---------

1
_
7
1
72
6
12
1
( 5)

(5)
7
1
69
8
15
_
( 5)

_
_
75
2
11
13
-

_
_
13
75
11
.
1
-

_
_
5
3
92
(5)
-

_
_
(*>
97
1
2
.
-

1
( 5)
20
_
58
2
19
_
_
-

A fte r 20 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek__ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
O ver 1 and under 2 w eek s
__ __
—
___„_____________ ..r.i..n.r- _____________,—
2 w eek s
O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s
_
_
__
3 w e e k s ___
_ _
__ _ _
O ver 3 and under 4 w eek s _____
4 wpsks

O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s _______________________
5 w eek s — __ _
___ ___
— _
6 w eek s _ __
— _
_
__
_
____
O ver 6 w e e k s - _ __ _
__
_ _
__
S ee foo tn o te s at end o f table




1

( 5)

7
1
32
3
49
2
4
(5)

_

_

_

-

-

7
1
38
3
43
2
5
( 5)

-

-

_
_

10

-

33

8
2
17
2
70

( 5)
86
13
1

_
.

_

52
1
3
1

•

*

-

20
4
55
8
1

-

-

.

1

-

-

"

*

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

14

62

-

-

_

27
2
57
1
7
( 5)
1

2

18

5
3
13

.

-

-

_

97

5

(5)

1
( 5)
20
_

40

80

36

40
2
37

-

_

_

28
( 5)

_

_

1

2

_

_

_

_

"

-

-

-

-

33
Table B-5.

Paid V a ca tion s'— Continued

(P e r c e n t distrib u tion o f plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s in all in d u s tr ie s and in in d u stry d iv is io n s b y v a c a tio n pay
p r o v is io n s , P h ila d e lp h ia , P a .— .J ., N o v e m b e r 1967)
N
Plant vworkers
V a c a tio n p o l ic y

A ll
in d u s tr ie s 1
2

M anu­
factu rin g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

O ffic e w o rk e rs

W h olesa le
tra d e

R e ta il
trad e

S e r v ic e s

A ll
in d u s trie s

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

W h olesa le
trade

R eta il
tra d e

F in a n ce 4

S e r v ic e s

A m oun t o f v a c a tio n p a y 6— C on tinued

A ft e r 25 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 We _______ . _______ _____________ __________r
__ ___ _—
_____
2 w eeks O v e r 2 and u nd er 3 w e e k s _______________________
3 w e e k s -------_
O v e r 3 and u nd er 4 w e e k s - _
_ _ __
_
______
4 w e e k s ____
___
O v e r 4 and under 5 w e e k s , ________
5 w eeks
___
O v e r 5 and under 6 w e e k s ______ ___________________
6 w e e k s _____ __ _
__ __ __
O v er 6 w eek s __
__ __ __
_ __ __ __ _

1
7
1
23
2
56
2
7
1
(5)

(5)
7
1
26
1
52
3
9
(5)
( 5)

_
_
( 5)
84
(5)
3
13
-

_

_

6
_
30
_
60
1
3
_
1
-

8
2
15
2
71
_
_
_
-

7
20
_
46
12
10
_
1
_
.

-

-

6
_
27
_
62
1
3
_
2
-

8
2
14
2
73
_
_
_
_

7
20
_
46
12
10
_
1
_
_

-

-

6
_
25

8
2
14
2
73
_
_
_
_

7
20
_
46
8
8
4
_
_

( 5)
4
( 5)
17
1
65
1
11

_

5
_
20
2
54
1
17
_

(5)
( 5)

(5)
1

_
_
2
_
95
( 5)
4
_
_

10
18
41
_

5
3
12
80

31

_

(*)

(5)
17
76
4
3

1
20
27
2
50

_

-

-

-

(5)
"

A ft e r 30 y e a r s o f s e r v ic e
1 w eek
_____ __
2 w eeksO v er 2 and under 3
3 w e e k s — ______
O v er 3 and under 4
4 w eeks
O v e r 4 and under 5
5 w e e k s ------------_
O v e r 5 and under 6
6 w e e k s ----—
O v e r 6 w eek s

__
______ __
_ _ __
__ _
w e e k s _______________________
__ ____
_ _ __ _ _
w e e k s —------------------------------___
w e e k s . _______ ————— —
_
----w e e k s —------ -------------------------- -------——_
_____

1
7
1
23
2
57
2
6
1
1
-

( 5)
7
1
26
1
52
3
8
( 5)
2
-

_
_
_
84
(5)
3
13
-

1
7
1
23
1
56
2
6
1
1
(5)

( 5)
7
1
26
1
52
3
8
( 5)
2

_
_
84
(5)
3
13
-

-

( 5)
4
( 5)
17
1
65
1
10
_
1
( 5)

20
2
54
1
16

( 5)
4
( 5)
17
1
65
1
10
_
1
( 5)

5
_
20
2
54
1
16
_
2
1

5

_

2
1

10

_

16

5
3
12

95
( 5)
4
_
_

43

80

28

_

76
4
3

3
-

_

-

5
3
12

(*)

1
20
( 5)
27
2
50

_

-

_
2

-

17

M a x im u m v a c a tio n a v a ila b le

1 w eek— —
— __ ------- -----2 w eeks —
— — _
_
_ _ _ _ _ _ _
O v e r 2 and under 3 w e e k s ----------------------------------3 w eeks —
__ _ __ _
___
_
—
O v e r 3 and under 4 w e e k s —
4 w eeks
__ _ __ _ —
O v e r 4 and under 5 w e e k s - ____ - —
—
5 w e e k s — ___ ______—
— ___ ________ __ __ ___ _
O v e r 5 and u nd er 6 w e e k s _____________________ —
6 w e e k s ______,,_____________ _______________________
O ver 6 w eeks —
— — —
—__ __ __ _

-

64
1
3
_
2

4

_
_
2
_
95
( 5)
4
_
_

10

_

14
_
45

_
_

28

3

_
_
_
_
_

80

17
76
3
2
1

1
20
27
2
49
1
_
( 5)

1 In clu d es b a s ic p lan s o n ly. E x clu d e s plans such as v a c a tio n -s a v in g s and th o se plans w h ich o f fe r "e x te n d e d " o r " s a b b a t ic a l" b e n e fits beyon d b a s ic plans to w o r k e r s w ith qualifying lengths
o f s e r v ic e .
T y p ic a l o f su ch e x c lu s io n s are plans in the s t e e l, alum in um , and can in d u s tr ie s .
2 In clu d es d ata f o r r e a l e s ta te in addition to th ose in du stry d iv is io n s show n s e p a r a te ly .
3 T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a tio n , and other p u b lic u tilitie s .
4 F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e sta te .
5 L e s s than 0.5 p e r c e n t .
~ in c lu d e s p a y m en ts o th e r than "len gth of t i m e , " such as p e r c e n ta g e o f annual e a rn in g s o r fla t -s u m p a y m e n ts, c o n v e r te d to an e qu ivalen t tim e b a s is ; fo r e x a m p le , a paym ent o f 2 p ercen t
o f annual e a r n in g s w a s c o n s id e r e d as 1 w e e k 's pay. P e r io d s of s e r v ic e w e r e c h o s e n a r b it r a r ily and do not n e c e s s a r il y r e fle c t the individ ual p r o v is io n s fo r p r o g r e s s io n . F o r e x a m p le, the changes
in p r o p o r t io n s in d ica te d at 10 y e a r s ' s e r v ic e include changes in p r o v is io n s o c c u r r in g b etw een 5 and 10 y e a r s . E s tim a te s a re cu m u la tiv e . T h u s, the p r o p o r tio n e lig ib le fo r 3 w e e k s ' pay or m o re
a fte r 10 y e a r s in c lu d e s th o se e lig ib le f o r 3 w e e k s ' pay o r m o r e a fte r fe w e r y e a r s o f s e r v ic e .




34
Table B-6. Health, Insurance, and Pension Plans
( P e r c e n t o f p la n t a n d o f f i c e w o r k e r s in a ll in d u s t r ie s and in i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s e m p l o y e d in e s t a b l is h m e n t s p r o v i d i n g
h e a lt h , in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n b e n e f i t s , 1 P h il a d e lp h ia , P a . - N . J . , N o v e m b e r 1967)

P lant w o rk e rs
T yp e o f ben efit

A ll w o r k e r s — — .------------------- -------------------- —

A ll
in d u s t r ie s 1
2

100

M anu­
fa ctu rin g

P u b lic
u t ilit ie s 3

100

100

O ffic e w o r k e r s

W h o le sa le
trad e

100

R e ta il
trad e

S e r v ic e s

100

100

A ll
in du stries

100

M anu­
factu rin g

100

P u blic
u tilitie s 3

W h o le s a le
trad e

100

100

R e ta il
tra d e

100

F in a n c e 4

S e r v ic e s

100

100

W ork ers in e s ta b lis h m e n ts p ro v id in g :
L ife in s u r a n c e --------------------------------------------------A c c id e n ta l death and d is m e m b e rm e n t
in s u r a n c e --------------------------------------- —--------------S ick n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u ra n ce o r
s ic k le a v e o r b o t h 5- — - ------

97

99

95

99

90

86

97

97

99

95

93

99

82

54

56

56

58

45

70

50

55

66

50

27

42

62
60

93

96

93

91

90

65

82

94

75

71

99

69

S ic k n e s s and a c c id e n t in s u r a n c e --------------S ick le a v e (fu ll pay and no
w aiting p e r io d )____________________________
S ick le a v e (p a r tia l pay o r
w aiting p e r io d )— ---------------------------------------

78

91

51

75

54

60

48

71

28

38

35

31

35

16

10

34

23

23

21

64

72

67

56

31

68

54

H os p ita liz a tion in su ra n ce ------ - — - —
S u r g ic a l in s u r a n c e —__ —____________—------ ------M ed ica l in s u r a n c e -------------------------------------------C ata stroph e in s u ra n ce
- - ------ R e tire m e n t p en sion __ — —
----No health, in s u r a n c e , o r p e n s io n plan— ___

95
95
85
41
81

9

4

27

9

20

10

7

98
98
87
41
83
( 6)

100
100

95
95
82
65
71

86
86

79
70
74
30
71
3

90
89
81
75

97

68

85

1 I n c l u d e s t h o s e p la n s f o r w h ic h at l e a s t a p a r t o f th e c o s t i s b o r n e b y
2 I n c lu d e s d a t a f o r r e a l e s t a t e in a d d it io n t o t h o s e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s
3 T r a n s p o r t a t io n , co m m u n ic a tio n , and o th e r p u b lic u t ilit ie s .
4 F i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , an d r e a l e s t a t e .
5 U n d u p lic a t e d t o t a l o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s i c k l e a v e o r s i c k n e s s a n d
the m in i m u m n u m b e r o f d a y s ' p a y th a t c a n b e e x p e c t e d b y e a c h e m p l o y e e .
6 L e s s th a n 0 . 5 p e r c e n t .




73

21
77
3

88
( 6)

2
91
90
83

68
91
( 6)

th e e m p l o y e r , e x c e p t t h o s e l e g a l l y r e q u i r e d , s u c h a s w o r k m e n 's
show n s e p a r a te ly .

a c c i d e n t i n s u r a n c e sh o w n s e p a r a t e l y b e lo w .
I n f o r m a l s i c k le a v e a ll o w a n c e s d e t e r m in e d

6

2

100
100

90
90
82
72
77

99
92
70

c o m p e n s a t io n ,

2

54
91
91
56
60
93
( 6)

s o c ia l s e c u r ity ,

1

3

86

84

85
81
87
96

76
69

68
66
2

and r a i l r o a d r e t i r e m e n t .

S ic k l e a v e p la n s a r e l i m i t e d t o
t h o s e w h ic h d e f i n i t e l y e s t a b l i s h
o n an in d iv id u a l b a s i s a r e e x c l u d e d .

at l e a s t

Appendix. Occupational D escriptions

The prim ary purpose o f preparing jo b descriptions for the Bureau's w age surveys is to assist its fie ld
staff in classifying into appropriate occupations workers who are em ployed under a va riety o f payroll titles
and different work arrangements from establishm ent to establishm ent and from area to area.
This permits
the grouping o f occupational w age rates representing com parable job content.
Because o f this emphasis on
interestablishm ent and interarea com parab ility o f occupation al content, the Bureau's jo b descriptions m ay
d iffer significan tly from those in u s e 'in individual establishm ents or those prepared for other purposes.
In
applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's fie ld econom ists are instructed to exclu de working supervisors;
apprentices; learners; beginners; trainees; and handicapped, p a rt-tim e, tem porary, and probationary workers.

OFFICE
BILLER, MACHINE— Continued

BILLER, MACHINE

columns and com putes, and usually prints autom atically the debit or
credit balances.
Does not involve a knowledge o f bookkeeping.
Works from uniform and standard types o f sales and credit slips.

Prepares statem ents, b ills, and invoices on a m achine other than
an ordinary or e le c tro m a tic typewriter.
M ay also k eep records as to
b illin gs or shipping charges or perform other c le ric a l work inciden tal to
b illin g operations. For w age study purposes, billers, m achine, are c la s­
sified by type o f m ach in e, as follows:

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Operates a bookkeeping m achine (Rem ington Rand, E lliott Fisher,
Sundstrand, Burroughs, N ational Cash R egister, with or without a type­
w riter keyboard) to k eep a record o f business transactions.

B iller, m achin e (b illin g m achine). Uses a sp ecial b illin g m a­
chine (M oon Hopkins, E lliott Fisher, Burroughs, etc. , w hich are
com bin ation typing and adding machines) to prepare b ills and
in voices from custom ers' purchase orders, internally prepared orders,
shipping m em orandum s, etc.
U sually involves application o f pre­
determ ined discounts and shipping charges, and entry of necessary
extensions, w hich m ay or m ay not be com puted on the b illin g m a­
ch in e , and totals w hich are au tom atically accum ulated by m achine.
T h e operation usu ally involves a large number o f carbon copies o f the
b ill b ein g prepared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.

Class A . Keeps a set o f records requiring a knowledge o f and
experience in basic bookkeeping principles, and fa m ilia rity with the
structure of the particular accounting system used. Determines proper
records and distribution o f debit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase of the w oik. M ay prepare consolidated reports, balance sheets,
and other records by hand.
Class B. Keeps a record o f one or more phases or sections of
a set o f records usually requiring little knowledge o f basic book­
keeping. Phases or sections include accounts p ayab le, payroll, cus­
tomers' accounts (not including a sim ple type o f b illin g described
under b ille r, m achine), cost distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory control, etc.
M ay ch eck or assist in preparation o f trial
balances and prepare control sheets for the accounting department.

B iller, m ach in e (bookkeeping m achine). Uses a bookkeeping
m achin e (Sundstrand, E lliott Fisher, Remington Rand, e t c . , w hich
m ay or m ay n ot h ave typew riter keyboard) to prepare customers' bills
as part o f the accounts receiva b le operation. G enerally involves the
sim ultaneous entry o f figures on customers' ledger record. The m a­
chine a u to m a tica lly accum ulates figures on a number o f v e rtic a l




Note: Since the last survey in this area, the Bureau has discontinued c o lle c tin g data for duplicatin gm achine operators and elevator operators.

35

36
CLERK, ACCO U N TIN G
Class A . Under general direction of a bookkeeper or accountant,
has responsibility for keep in g one or more sections of a com plete set
o f books or records relatin g to one phase of an establishm ent's busi­
ness transactions.
Work involves posting and balancing subsidiary
led g e r or ledgers such as accounts receivable or accounts payable;
exam inin g and coding invoices or vouchers with proper accounting
distribution; and requires judgm ent and experience in m aking proper
assignations and allocation s. M ay assist in preparing, adjusting, and
closing journal entries; and m ay direct class B accounting clerks.
Class B. Under supervision, performs one or more routine a c ­
counting operations such as posting sim ple journal vouchers or accounts
payable vouchers, entering vouchers in voucher registers; recon cilin g
bank accounts; and posting subsidiary ledgers controlled by general
ledgers, or posting sim ple cost accounting data.
This job does not
require a know ledge o f accounting and bookkeeping principles but
is found in o ffices in w hich the more routine accounting w oik is
subdivided on a functional basis among several workers.

CLERK, FILE
Class A .
In an established filin g system containing a number
o f va ried subject m atter file s, classifies and indexes file m aterial
such as correspondence, reports, tech n ica l documents, etc.
May
also file this m aterial.
M ay k eep records o f various types in con­
junction with the files. M ay le a d a sm all group o f low er le v e l file
c l eiks.
Class B. Sorts, codes, and files unclassified m aterial by sim ple
(subject matter) headings or partly classified m aterial by finer sub­
headings. Prepares sim ple related index and cross-reference aids.
A s requested, locates c le a r ly id en tified m aterial in files and forwards
m aterial.
M ay perform related c le r ic a l tasks required to m aintain
and service files.

CLERK, ORDER

R eceives customers' orders for m aterial or merchandise by m a il,
phone, or personally. Duties involve any com bination of the follow ing:
Quoting prices to customers; m aking out an order sheet listing the item s
to make up the order; checkin g prices and quantities o f item s on order
sheet; and distributing order sheets to respective departments to be fille d .
May check with credit department to determ ine credit rating o f custom er,
acknowledge receipt o f orders from customers, follow up orders to see
that they have been fille d , keep file of orders receive d , and ch eck shipping
invoices w ith original orders.

CLERK, PAYROLL

Computes wages o f com pany em ployees and enters the necessary
data on the payroll sheets. Duties involve: C alcu latin g workers' earnings
based on tim e or production records; and posting c a lc u la te d data on payro ll
sheet, showing inform ation such as w orker's nam e, working days, tim e,
rate, deductions for insurance, and total w ages due. M ay m ake out p a y checks and assist paym aster in m aking up and distributing pay envelopes.
M ay use a calcu latin g m achine.

COMPTOMETER OPERATOR

Primary duty is to operate a C om ptom eter to perform m athe­
m a tica l computations. This job is not to be confused w ith that o f statis­
tic a l or other type o f clerk , which m ay in volve frequent use o f a C om p­
tom eter but, in which, use of this m achin e is incid en tal to perform ance
of other duties.

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR
Class C . Performs routine filin g o f m aterial that has already
b een classified or w hich is ea sily classified in a sim ple serial classi­
fic a tio n system (e. g . , alp h ab etical, chronological, or num erical).
A s requested, lo cates read ily a va ila b le m aterial in files and forwards
m aterial; and m ay f i ll out withdrawal charge.
Performs sim ple
c le r ic a l and m anual tasks required to m aintain and service files.




Class A .
Operates a n um erical and/or alp h abetical or com bin a­
tion keypunch m achine to transcribe data from various source docu­
ments to keypunch tabulating cards.
Performs sam e tasks as low er
le v e l keypunch operator but, in addition, w oik requires application

37

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR— Continued
of coding skills and the m aking of some determ inations, for exam ple,
lo cates on the source docum ent the item s to be punched; extracts
inform ation from several documents; and searches for and interprets
inform ation on the docum ent to determine inform ation to be punched.
M ay train in experien ced operators.
Class B. Under close supervision or follow ing sp ecific procedures
or instructions, transcribes data from source documents to punched
cards.
Operates a num erical and/or alphabetical or com bination
keypunch m achin e to keypunch tabulating cards. M ay ve rify cards.
W orking from various standardized source documents, follow s sp ecified
sequences w hich have been coded or prescribed in d etail and require
little or no sele ctin g , coding, or interpreting o f data to be punched.
Problem s arising from erroneous items or codes, missing inform ation,
e t c . , are referred to supervisor.
OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating
m inor o ffic e m achines such as sealers or m ailers, opening and distributing
m a il, and other m inor c le r ic a l work.
SECRETARY
Assigned as personal secretary, norm ally to one individual. M ain­
tains a clo se and h igh ly responsive relationship to the d a y-to -d a y work
a ctiv itie s o f the supervisor. Woiks fa irly independently receivin g a m in i­
mum o f d eta iled supervision and guidance. Performs varied c le ric a l and
secretarial duties, usually including most of the follow ing: (a) R eceives
telephone c a lls, personal callers, and incom ing m ail, answers routine
inquiries, and routes the tech n ical inquiries to the proper persons; (b)
establishes, m aintains, and revises the supervisors files; (c) maintains the
supervisors calen d ar and m akes appointments as instructed; (d) relays
m essages from supervisor to subordinates; (e) reviews correspondence, m em ­
oranda, and reports prepared by others for the supervisor's signature to
assure procedural and typographic accuracy; and (f) performs stenographic
and typin g work.
M ay also perform other c le ric a l and secretarial tasks o f com ­
parable nature and d ifficu lty . The woik ty p ica lly requires knowledge of
o ffic e routine and understanding of the organization, programs, and pro­
cedures related to the w oik o f the supervisor.




SECRETA RY— Continue d
Exclusions
Not a ll positions that are title d •'secretary" possess the above
characteristics. Examples of positions w hich are excluded from the def­
inition are as follows: (a) Positions w hich do not m eet the "personal"
secretary concept described above; (b) stenographers not fu lly trained in
secretarial type duties; (c) stenographers serving as o ffic e assistants to a
group of professional, tech n ica l, or m anagerial persons; (d) secretary posi­
tions in which the duties are eith er substantially more routine or substan­
tia lly more com plex and responsible than those characterized in the def­
inition; and (e) assistant type positions w hich involve more d ifficu lt or more
responsible tech n ica l, adm inistrative, supervisory, or specialized c le rica l
duties w hich are not ty p ica l o f secretarial w oik.
NOTE: The term "corporate o fficer," used in the le v e l definitions
follow ing, refers to those o fficia ls who h ave a significan t corporate-wide
policym aking role with regard to m ajor com pany a ctiv ities.
The title
" v ic e president," though norm ally ind icative o f this role, does n o tin all
cases identify such positions. V ic e presidents whose prim ary responsibility
is to a ct personally on individual cases or transactions (e. g . , approve or
deny individual loan or credit actions; administer individual trust accounts;
d irectly supervise a c le ric a l staff) are not considered to be "corporate
officers" for purposes o f applying the follow ing le v e l definitions.
Class A
a.
Secretary to the chairm an o f the board or president o f a
com pany that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but few er than 5, 000 persons; or
b.
Secretary to a corporate o ffic e r (other than the chairman of
the board or president) of a com pany that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 but
few er than 25,000 persons; or
c.
Secretary to the head (im m ed iately below the corporate
officer le v e l) of a m ajor segm ent or subsidiary o f a com pany that employs,
in a ll, over 25, O ) persons.
CX
Class B
a.
Secretary to the chairm an o f the board or president o f a
com pany that em ploys, in a ll, few er than 100 persons; or
b.
Secretary to a corporate o ffic e r (other than chairm an of the
board or president) o f a com pany that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but few er
than 5, (XX) persons; or

38
SECRETARY— Continued

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL— Continued

c.
Secretary to the head (im m ed iately b elow the o ffic e r le v e l)
over eith er a m ajor corporate-w ide functional a c tiv ity ( e . g . , m arketing,
research, operations, industrial relations, e t c .) or a m ajor geographic or
organizational segm ent (e. g . , a regional headquarters; a m ajor division)
o f a com pany that em ploys, in a ll, o ver 5,000 but few er than 25,000
em ployees; or

M ay m aintain files, keep simple records, or perform other re la tiv e ly rou­
tine c le ric a l tasks.
May operate from a stenographic pool.
Does not
include transcribing-m achine work. (See transcribing-m achine o p erato r.)

d.
S ecretary to the head o f an individual plant, factory, etc.
(or other eq u ivalen t le v e l o f o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000
persons; or

STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR
Primary duty is to take d ictatio n in volvin g a varied tech n ica l or
specialized vocabulary such as in le g a l briefs or reports on sc ien tific re­
search from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype or
sim ilar m achine; and transcribe d ictation.
M ay also type from w ritten
copy.
M ay also set up and m aintain file s, k eep records, etc.

OR
e.
S ecretary to the head o f a large and im portant organizational
Performs stenographic duties requiring sign ifican tly greater inde­
segm ent (e . g . , a m iddle m anagem ent supervisor o f an organizational seg­
pendence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evid en ced
ment often involvin g as m any as several hundred persons) o f a com pany
by the follow ing: Work requires high degree of stenographic speed and
that em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 persons.
accu racy; and a thorough w orking know ledge o f general business and
Class C
o ffic e procedures and of the sp e c ific business operations, organization,
p o lic ies, procedures, file s, workflow , etc. Uses this know ledge in per­
a.
S ecretary to an ex ecu tiv e or m anagerial person whose respon­
form ing stenographic duties and responsible c le r ic a l tasks such as, m ain­
sib ility is not eq u ivalen t to one o f the sp ecific le v e l situations in the d ef­
taining follow up files; assem bling m aterial for reports, memorandums,
inition for class B, but whose subordinate staff norm ally numbers at lea st
letters, e t c . ; composing sim ple letters from general instructions; reading
several dozen em p loyees and is usually divided into organizational segments
and routing incom ing m ail; and answering routine questions, etc.
Does
w hich are often , in turn, further subdivided. In some com panies, this le v e l
not include transcribing-m achine w ork.
includes a w ide range o f organizational echelons; in others, only one or
two; or

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR

b.
Secretary to the head o f an individual plant, factory, etc.
(or other eq u ivalen t le v e l o f o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, few er than
5,000 persons.

Class A . Operates a sin gle- or m ultiple-p osition telephone
switchboard handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or o ffic e calls. Per­
forms fu ll telephone information service or handles com plex c a lls, such as
conference, c o lle ct, overseas, or sim ilar c a lls, either in addition to doing
routine work as described for switchboard operator, class B, or as a fu ll­
tim e assignment. ("Full" telephone inform ation service occurs when the
establishm ent has varied functions that are not read ily understandable for
telephone inform ation purposes, e .g ., because o f overlapping or interrelated
functions, and consequently present frequent problem s as to w hich exten ­
sions are appropriate for c a lls .)

Class D
a.
S ecretary to the supervisor or head o f a sm all organizational
unit (e. g . , few er than about 25 or 30 persons); or
b.
S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff sp ecialist, professional
em p lo yee, adm inistrative o fficer, or assistant, sk illed techn ician or expert.
(NOTE: M any com panies assign stenographers, rather than secretaries as
described above, to this le v e l o f supervisory or nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Prim ary duty is to take dictation involving a norm al routine v o ­
cabulary from one or more persons eith er in shorthand or by Stenotype or
sim ilar m achine; and transcribe dictation.
M ay also type from w rit­
ten copy.




Class B. Operates a sin gler or m ultiple-p osition telephone
switchboard handling incom ing, outgoing, intraplant or o ffic e calls. M ay
handle routine long distance calls and record tolls. M ay perform lim ite d
telephone information service. (’'L im ited " telephone inform ation service
occurs if the functions of the establishm ent serviced are read ily understand­
able for telephone information purposes, or i f the requests are routine,
e. g. , givin g extension numbers when sp ecific names are furnished, or if
com plex calls are referred to another o p erato r.)

39

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR.RECEPTIONIST

In addition to perform ing duties o f operator on a single-position
or m onitor-type sw itchboard, acts as receptionist and m ay also type or
perform routine c le r ic a l w oik as part o f regular duties.
This typing or
c le r ic a l work m ay take the m ajor part of this w o o e r's tim e w hile at
switchboard.

TABULA TING-MACHINE OPERATOR— Continued

some filin g woik.
The woik ty p ic a lly involves portions o f a woik
unit, for exam p le, individual sorting or collatin g runs or repetitive
operations.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
TABU LATIN G -M A CHINE OPERATOR

Class A . Operates a variety o f tabulating or e le c trica l account­
ing m achines, ty p ic a lly including such machines as the tabulator,
calc u la to r, interpreter, collator, and others.
Performs com plete
reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs d ifficu lt
w irin g as required.
The com plete reporting and tabulating assign­
ments ty p ic a lly in volve a variety of long and com plex reports which
often are o f irregular or nonrecurring type requiring some planning and
sequencing o f steps to be taken. As a more experienced operator,
is ty p ic a lly in volved in training new operators in m achine operations,
or p a rtially trained operators in wiring from diagrams and operating
sequences o f long and com plex reports. Does not include working
supervisors perform ing tabulating-m achine operations and d a y-to -d ay
supervision o f the work and production of a group o f tabu latingm achine operators.

Class B. Operates more d ifficu lt tabulating or e le c tr ic a l account­
ing m achines such as the tabulator and calcu lator, in addition to the
sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is performed under sp ecific
instructions and m ay include the performance o f some wiring from
diagram s.
The work ty p ic a lly involves, for exam ple, tabulations
in volvin g a rep etitive accounting exercise, a com plete but sm all
tabu latin g study, or parts o f a longer and more com plex report. Such
reports and studies are usually o f a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are w e ll established. May also include the training o f new
em p loyees in the basic operation o f the m achine.

C lass C .
O perates sim ple tabulating or e le c tric a l accounting
m achines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, co lla to r, e t c . , with
sp e c ific instructions. M ay include sim ple wiring from diagrams and




Prim ary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from transcribing-m achine records. May also type from written
copy and do sim ple c le ric a l work. Workers transcribing dictation involving
a varied tech n ica l or specialized vocabulary such as le g a l briefs or reports
on scien tific research are not included. A worker who takes dictation in
shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ilar m achine is classified as a stenog­
rapher, general.

TYPIST
Uses a typew riter to make copies o f various m aterial or to make
out b ills after calculations have been made by another person. May in­
clude typing o f stencils, m ats, or sim ilar m aterials for use in duplicating
processes.
M ay do c le ric a l woik involving little special training, such
as keeping sim ple records, filin g records and reports, or sorting and dis­
tributing incom ing m ail.

Class A . Performs one or more o f the following: Typing m a­
terial in fin al form when it involves com bining m aterial from several
sources or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punctu­
ation, e t c . , o f tech n ical or unusual words or foreign language m a­
terial; and planning layou t and typing o f com plicated statistical tables
to m aintain uniform ity and balance in spacing.
May type routine
form letters varying details to suit circum stances.

Class B. Performs one or more of the following: Copy typing
from rough or c le a r drafts; routine typing o f forms, insurance policies,
e t c . ; and setting up sim ple standard tabulations, or copying more
com plex tables already setup and spaced properly.

40
PROFESSION AL

AND

TECHNICAL

DRAFTSMAN— Continued

DRAFTSM AN
Class A . Plans the graphic presentation o f com plex item s having
distinctive design features that d iffer sig n ifican tly from established
drafting precedents. Works in close support w ith the design originator,
and m ay recom m end m inor design changes. Analyzes the e ffe c t o f
each change on the details of form , function, and positional relation ­
ships of components and parts. Works w ith a m inim um o f supervisory
assistance. C om pleted work is review ed by design originator for con­
sistency w ith prior engineering determ inations.
M ay eith er prepare
drawings, or d irect their preparation by low er le v e l draftsmen.
Class B. Performs nonroutine and com p lex drafting assignments
that require the a p plicatio n o f m ost of the standardized drawing te ch ­
niques regularly used. Duties ty p ic a lly involve such work as: Prepares
working drawings o f subassemblies w ith irregular shapes, m ultiple
functions, and precise positional relationships betw een components;
prepares architectural drawings for construction of a building including
d etail drawings o f foundations, w a ll sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accep ted form ulas and manuals in m aking necessary com putations
to determ ine quantities o f m aterials to be used, load cap acities,
strengths, stresses, e tc.
R eceives in itia l instructions, requirem ents,
and a d vice from supervisor. C om pleted work is ch ecked for tech n ical
adequacy.
Class C .
Prepares d etail drawings o f single units or parts for
engineering, construction, m anufacturing, or repair purposes.
Types
o f drawings prepared include isom etric projections (depictin g three
dimensions in accurate scale) and sectio n al view s to c la rify positioning
o f components and con vey needed inform ation. Consolidates details
from a number o f sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required.

Suggested methods o f approach, ap p licab le precedents, and ad vice on
source m aterials are given w ith in itia l assignments. Instructions are
less com plete when assignments recur.
Work m ay be sp ot-ch ecked
during progress.
D RAFTSM AN -TR ACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by p la cin g tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracin g w ith pen or pen cil. (Does not
include tracing lim ited to plans p rim arily consisting o f straight lines and
a large scale not requiring close d e lin e a tio n .)
and/or
Prepares sim ple or repetitive drawings o f easily visu alized item s.
is c lo sely supervised during progress.

W oik

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general m ed i­
c a l direction to ill or injured em ployees or other persons who becom e ill or
suffer an accid en t on the premises o f a fa cto ry or other establishm ent.
Duties involve a com bination of the follow ing: G ivin g first aid to the i l l
or injured; attending to subsequent dressing o f employees* injuries; keep in g
records o f patients treated; preparing a ccid en t reports for com pensation
or other purposes; assisting in ph ysical exam inations and h ealth evaluations
of applicants and em ployees; and planning and carrying out programs
involving health education, a ccid en t prevention, evalu ation o f plant en­
vironm ent, or other activities a ffe c tin g the health , w elfa re, and safety
o f a ll personnel.

MAINTENANCE AND

POWERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and m aintain
in good repair building woodwork and equipm ent such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim m ade
of wood in an establishm ent. Work involves most o f the fo llo w in g P lan­
ning and lay in g out o f work from blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verbal
instructions using a v a riety o f carpenter's handtools, portable power tools,

and standard measuring instruments; m aking standard shop com putations
relatin g to dimensions o f work; and selectin g m aterials necessary for the
work.
In general, the work o f the m aintenance carpenter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and exp erien ce.




41
ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES— Continued

Performs a v a rie ty o f e le c trica l trade functions such as the in­
stallatio n , m ain ten an ce, or repair o f equipment for the generation, dis­
tribution, or u tilization o f e le c tric energy in an establishm ent.
Work
involves most o f the follow ing: Installing or repairing any o f a variety o f
e le c tr ic a l equipm ent such as generators, transformers, switchboards, con­
trollers, c irc u it breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other
transmission equipm ent; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specification s; lo catin g and diagnosing trouble in the e le c tr ic a l
system or equipm ent; working standard computations relating to load
requirem ents o f w irin g or e le c trica l equipment; and using a variety o f
e le c tricia n 's handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general,
the work o f the m aintenance electrician requires rounded training and
exp erience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and ex p erien ce.

a worker supplied with m aterials and tools; clean ing working area, m a­
chine, and equipm ent; assisting journeym an by holding m aterials or tools;
and perform ing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeym an. The kind
of work the h elp er is perm itted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confin ed to supplying, liftin g , and holding m a­
terials and tools and clean in g working areas; and in others he is perm itted
to perform sp ecialized m achine operations, or parts of a trade that are
also perform ed by workers on a fu ll-tim e basis.

ENGINEER, S T A T IO N A R Y
Operates and m aintains and m ay also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipm ent (m echanical or electrica l) to supply the
establishm ent in w hich em p loyed with power, heat, refrigeration, or
air-con d ition in g.
W oik involves: Operating and m aintaining equipm ent
such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines,
ve n tila tin g and refrigeratin g equipm ent, steam boilers and b o iler-fe d
w ater pumps; m akin g equipm ent repairs; and keeping a record of operation
o f m achin ery, tem perature, and fu el consumption. M ay also supervise
these operations.
H ead or c h ief engineers in establishments em ploying
more than one en gin eer are exclu ded .

FIREMAN, S T A T IO N A R Y BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in w hich
em p loyed w ith h ea t, pow er, or steam . Feeds fuels to fire b y hand or
operates a m e c h a n ic a l stoker, or gas or o il burner; and checks w ater
and safety v a lv e s.
M ay cle an , o il, or assist in repairing boileiTOom
equipm ent.
HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
Assists one or m ore workers in the drilled m aintenance trades,
by perform ing sp e c ific or general duties of lesser sk ill, such as keeping




MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or more types o f m achine
tools, such as jig borers, cy lin d ric a l or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or m illin g m achines, in the construction of m achine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies.
Work involves most o f the follow ing: Planning
and perform ing d ifficu lt m achining operations; processing item s requiring
com p licated setups or a high degree o f accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selectin g feeds, speeds, tooling, and oper­
ation sequence; and m aking necessary adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. M ay be required to recognize
when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to sele ct proper coolants
and cutting and lubricatin g oils. For cross-industry w age study purposes,
m ach in e-too l operators, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing shops are e x ­
cluded from this classification .

M ACH INIST, MAINTENANCE
Produces replacem en t parts and new parts in m aking repairs o f
m etal parts of m ech an ical equipm ent operated in an establishment. Work
involves m ost o f the follow ing: Interpreting written instructions and sp eci­
fications; planning and layin g out o f work; using a variety of m achinist's
handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating
standard m achine tools; shaping o f m etal parts to close tolerances; m aking
standard shop com putations relating to dimensions o f work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds o f m achining; know ledge o f the working properties of the
com m on m etals; selectin g standard m aterials, parts, and equipm ent re­
quired for his work; and fittin g and assembling parts into m echanical
equipm ent. In general, the m achinist's work norm ally requires a rounded
training in m achine-shop p ra ctice usually acquired through a form al ap­
prenticeship or equ ivalen t training and experience.

42
MECHANIC, AUTO M O TIVE (MAINTENANCE)

OILER

Repairs autom obiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tablishm ent. Work involves m ost o f the follow ing: Exam ining autom otive
equipm ent to diagnose source o f trouble; disassembling equipm ent and
performing repairs that in volve the use o f such handtools as wrenches,
gages, drills, or sp ecialized equipm ent in disassembling or fittin g parts;
replacin g broken or d efective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassem bling and installing the various assem blies in the v e h icle
and m aking necessary adjustments; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the auto­
m otive m echanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Lubricates, with o il or grease, the m oving parts or w earing sur­
faces of m echanical equipm ent o f an establishm ent.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs m achinery or m echanical equipm ent o f an establishm ent.
Work involves most o f the follow ing: Exam ining m achines and m echanical
equipm ent to diagnose source of trouble; dism antling or partly dism antling
m achines and perform ing repairs that m ain ly involve the use o f handtools
in scraping and fittin g parts; replacin g broken or d efective parts with item s
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacem ent part by a
m achine shop or sending of the m achine to a m achine shop for m ajor
repairs; preparing written specifications for m ajor repairs or for the pro­
duction o f parts ordered from m achine shop; reassem bling m achines; and
m aking a ll necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work o f
a m aintenance m echanic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equ ivalen t training and e x ­
perience.
Excluded from this cla ssification are workers whose primary
duties involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new m achines or heavy equipm ent, and dism antles and
installs m achines or h eavy equipm ent when changes in the plant layou t
are required. W oik involves most o f the follow ing: Planning and layin g
out o f the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety o f handtools and rigging; m aking standard shop com putations re­
lating to stresses, strength of m aterials, and centers of gravity; alining
and b alan cin g of equipm ent; selectin g standard tools, equipm ent, and
parts to be used; and installing and m aintaining in good order power
transmission equipm ent such as drives and speed reducers.
In general,
the m illwright*s work norm ally requires a rounded training and experience
in the trade acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq u ivalen t train­
ing and exp erien ce.




PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates w a lls, woodwork, and fixtures o f an es­
tablishm ent. Work involves the follow ing: Know ledge of surface p e c u li­
arities and types of paint required for d ifferent applications; preparing
surface for painting by rem oving old finish or by p la cin g putty or fille r
in n ail holes and interstices; and applying paint w ith spray gun or bmsh.
M ay m ix colors, oils, w hite lead, and other pain t ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency.
In general, the work o f the m aintenance
painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a form al apprenticeship or equivalen t training and exp erience.

PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam , gas, or other types o f pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment.
Work involves most of the follow ing:
Laying out of work and measuring to lo c a te position o f pipe from drawings
or other w ritten specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths w ith chisel and ham m er or o x y a cetyle n e torch or p ip e-cu ttin g
m achine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or pow er-driven machines; assembling pipe w ith couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to pressures,
flow , and size of pipe required; and m aking standard tests to determ ine
whether finished pipes m eet specifications. In general, the work of the
m aintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and exp erience usually
acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalen t training and e x ­
perience. Workers prim arily engaged in installing and repairing b uildin g
sanitation or heating systems are ex clu d e d .

PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plum bing system o f an establishm ent in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents
and traps in plum bing system; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
and opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber*s snake. In general,
the work of the m aintenance plum ber requires rounded training and e x ­
perience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalen t
training and experience.

43
SHEET-METAL W ORKER, MAINTENANCE

TOOL AND DIE MAKER— Continued

F ab ricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sh eet-m etal
equipm ent and fixtures (such as m achine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ven tilators, chutes, ducts, m etal roofing) of an establish­
m ent. Work involves m ost o f the follow ing: Planning and lay in g out a ll
types of sh e et-m eta l m aintenance work from blueprints, m odels, or other
specifications; setting up and operating a ll availab le types o f sh e et-m etal­
w orking m achines; using a variety o f handtools in cutting, bending, form ­
ing, shaping, fittin g , and assembling; and installing sh eet-m etal articles
as required. In general, the work o f the m aintenance sheet-m etal worker
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or eq u ivalen t training and experience.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(D ie m aker; jig m aker; tool maker; fixture maker;

volves most of the follow ing: Planning and layin g out o f work from
m odels, blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications;
using a va riety o f tool and die m aker's handtools and precision measuring
instruments; understanding of the working properties o f common m etals
and alloys; setting up and operating o f m achine tools and related equip­
ment; m aking necessary shop com putations relatin g to dimensions o f work,
speeds, feeds, and tooling o f m achines; heattreating o f m etal parts during
fabrication as w e ll as o f finished tools and dies to achieve required qual­
ities; working to close tolerances; fittin g and assembling o f parts to pre­
scribed tolerances and allow ances; and sele ctin g appropriate m aterials,
tools, and processes. In general, the tool and die m aker's work requires
a rounded training in m achine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired
through a form al apprenticeship or eq uivalen t training and experience.

gage maker)

Constructs and repairs m achine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fixtures
or dies for forgings, punching, and other m etal-form in g work. Work in-

CUSTODIAL AND

For cross-industry w age study purposes, tool and die makers in
tool and die jobbing shops are exclu ded from this classification.

MATERIAL

MOVEMENT

GUARD AN D W ATCH M AN

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued

Guard.
Performs routine p o lice duties, either at fix ed post or
on tour, m ain tainin g order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes
gatem en who are stationed at gate and check on identity o f em ployees
and other persons entering.

trash, and other refuse; dusting equipm ent, furniture, or fixtures; polishing
m etal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor m aintenance
services; and cle an in g lavatories, showers, and restrooms.
Woikers who
specialize in window washing are excluded.

W atchm an. M akes rounds of premises period ically in protecting
property against fire , th e ft, and ille g a l entry.

LABORER, M ATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman
or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwom an; janitress)
C leans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or prem ises o f an o ffic e , apartm ent house, or com m erical
or other establishm ent.
D uties involve a com bination o f the follow ing!
Sw eeping, m opping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; rem oving chips,




A worker em ployed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishm ent whose duties in volve one or more o f the following;
Loading and unloading various m aterials and merchandise on or from
freight cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving,
or p lacin g m aterials or m erchandise in proper storage location; and trans­
porting m aterials or m erchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow.
Longshoremen, who load and unload ships are excluded.

44

ORDER, FILLER

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued
For w age study purposes, workers are cla ssified as follow s:

(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockm an)
F ills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance w ith specifications on sales slips, customers*
orders, or other instructions. M ay, in addition to fillin g orders and in­
dicatin g item s fille d or om itted, k eep records o f outgoing orders, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related duties.

PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by p la cin g them
in shipping containers, the sp ecific operations perform ed being dependent
upon the type, size, and number o f units to be packed, the type of con­
tainer em p loyed , and m ethod of shipment. Work requires the p lacin g o f
item s in shipping containers and m ay involve one or more o f the following:
Know ledge o f various item s o f stock in order to ve rify content; selection
of appropriate type and size o f container; inserting enclosures in container;
using excelsior or other m aterial to prevent breakage or dam age; closing
and sealin g container; and applying labels or entering iden tifyin g data on
container. Packers who also m ake wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK
Prepares m erchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible
for incom ing shipments o f m erchandise or other m aterials. Shipping work
involves: A know ledge o f shipping procedures, p ractices, routes, ava ila b le
means o f transportation, and rates; and preparing records o f the goods
shipped, m aking up b ills o f lad in g, posting w eig h t and shipping charges,
and k eep in g a file o f shipping records. M ay d irect or assist in preparing
the m erchandise for shipment.
R e ce iv in g work involves: V erifyin g or
d irecting others in ve rify in g the correctness o f shipments against bills o f
lad in g, in voices, or other records; ch eckin g for shortages and rejectin g
dam aged goods; routing m erchandise or m aterials to proper departments;
and m aintaining necessary records and files.




R eceivin g clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receivin g clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
Drives a truck within a c ity or industrial area to transport m a ­
terials, m erchandise, equipm ent, or m en betw een various types o f es­
tablishm ents such as: M anufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
w holesale and retail establishments, or betw een retail establishm ents and
customers' houses or places o f business.
M ay also lo a d or unload truck
w ith or without helpers, m ake m inor m ech a n ical repairs, and k eep truck
in good working order.
D river-salesm en and o v er-th e-ro ad drivers are
excluded.
For w age study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type o f equipm ent, as follows: (T racto r-tra iler should be rated on the
basis o f trailer c a p a c ity .)
Truckdriver (com bination o f sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, lig h t (under 1V 2 tons)
Truckdriver, m edium ( 1V 2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)
TRU CKER, POWER
Operates a m anually con trolled gaso lin e- or electric-p o w ered
truck or tractor to transport goods and m aterials o f a ll kinds about a
warehouse, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
For w age study purposes, workers are classified by type o f truck,
as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

Area Wage Surveys
A lis t o f the la test av ailab le bulletins is presen ted below . A d ir e c to r y indicating dates o f e a r lie r stu d ies, and the p r ic e s o f the bulletins is
av ailab le on req u est. B u lletin s m ay be pu rch ased from the Superintendent o f D ocu m en ts, U.S. G overnm ent Printing O ffic e , W ashington, D .C ., 20402,
o r fr o m any o f the BLS r e g io n a l sa les o ffic e s shown on the in side fron t c o v e r .
A re a
A kron , O hio, Ju ly 1967 1__________
A lbany—
Sch enectady— r o y , N .Y ., A pr. 1967.
T
A lbu qu erque, N. M e x ., A p r. 1967_________________
Allentow n— ethlehem —E a ston , P a.— .J .,
B
N

Bulletin num ber
and p r ic e
1530-86,
1530-62,
1530-60,

25 cents
25 cents
20 cen ts

Atlanta, G a ., M ay 19 67_____________________________
B a ltim o r e , M d ., O ct. 1967_________________________
Beaum ont— o r t A rth u r— ra n g e, T e x ., May 1967P
O
B irm in gh am , A la ., A p r. 1967 1____________________
B o ise C ity, Idaho, July 1967_______________________
B oston , M a s s ., Sept. 1967 1----------------------------- -------

1530-53,
1530-71,
1575-18,
1530-74,
1530-63,
1575-3,
1575-13,

25
25
25
20
30
20
30

cents
cen ts
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

B u ffalo, N .Y ., D e c. 1966 1__________________________
B u rlin gton, V t ., M ar. 1967 1 __ _____________________
Canton, O hio, A p r. 19 67___________________________
C h a rleston , W. V a ., A p r. 19 6 7 ____________________
C h a rlotte, N .C ., A p r. 19 6 7 _________________________
C hattanooga, T e n n .-C a ., A u g. 1967-----------------------C h ica g o, 111., A p r. 1967 1 __________________________
C incin nati, O hio— y.— d ., M ar. 1967_______ —____
K
In
C levela n d , O hio, Sept. 1967________________________
C olu m bu s, O hio, O ct. 1967_________________________
D a lla s, T e x ., N ov. 1967____________________________

1530-38,
1530-52,
1530-58,
1530-61,
1530-64,
1575-7,
1530-73,
1530-56,
1575-14,
1575-23,
1575-20,

30
25
20
20
20
25
30
25
25
25
25

D avenport— o ck Island— olin e, Iowa—
R
M
111.,
O ct. 1967_______________________________________________
D ayton O hio, Jan. 19 67________________________________
D en v er, C o lo ., D e c. 1 9 6 7 1_____________________________
D es M oin es, Iow a, F eb. 1 9 67 ________________________ —
D e tro it, M ich ., Jan. 1967 1 ____________________________ _
F o r t W orth, T e x ., N ov. 1967^ _________________________
G reen B ay, W is ., Ju ly 1967____________________________
G re e n v ille , S .C ., M ay 1 9 67____________________________
H ouston, T e x ., June 19 6 7 ____- _________________________
In dianapolis, Ind., D e c. 19 6 7 1_________________________

1575-12,
1530-45,
1575-38,
1530-44,
1530-48,
1575-22,
1575-5,
1530-66,
1530-85,
1575-36,

Jackson , M is s ., F eb. 1 9 67_____________ - ______________ 1530-43,
J a ck son v ille, F la ., Jan. 1968__________________________ 1575-33,
Kansas C ity, M o .-K a n s ., Nov. 1 9 6 7 1__________________ 1575-30,
L aw ren ce— a v erh ill, M a ss.—
H
N.H ., June 1967---------------- 1530-77,
L ittle R ock— orth L ittle R o ck , A r k ., July 1967---------- 157 5 -2 ,
N
Santa A n a L os A n g eles—Long B each and Anaheim —
G arden G ro v e , C a lif., M ar. 1967 1 __________________ 1530-65,
L o u is v ille , K y .-In d ., F eb. 1967 1 ______________________ 1530-49,
Lubbock, T e x ., June 1 9 67______________________________ 1530-75,
M an ch ester, N .H ., July 1967___________________________ 1575-1,
M em ph is, Tenn.— r k ., Jan. 1 9 6 8 1-------------------------------- 1575-32,
A
M iam i, F la ., D e c. 1 967 1___________________ _______ —----- 157 5-28,
Midland and O d essa , T e x ., June 1967-------------------------- 1530-78,

Bulletin number
and p rice

M ilw aukee, W is ., A pr. 1967 1___________________
M in n eap olis-fit. Paul, M inn., Jan. 1967 1______
M uskegon— uskegon H eights, M ich ., May 1967
M
New ark and J e r s e y C ity, N .J ., F eb . 1967______
New Haven, C on n ., Jan. 1 9 681__________________
New O rlea n s, L a ., F eb. 1967 1 _________________
New Y ork , N .Y ., A p r. 1967 1_______ -____________
N orfolk — ortsm ou th and N ew port News—
P
Ham pton, V a ., June 1967 1_____________________
O klahom a C ity, O k la ., July 1967_______________

1530-76,
1530-42,
1530-72,
1530-55,
1575-34,
1530-51,
1530-83,

30
30
20
25
25
30
40

1530-82,
1575-4,

-25 cents
20 cents

cen ts
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

O m aha, N eb r.—
Iow a, O ct. 1967 1________________________
P aterson — lifton — a s s a ic , N .J., May 1967____________
C
P
P h iladelph ia, P a.— .J ., Nov. 1967 1______ _____________
N
P h oenix, A r i z . , M ar. 1967______________________________
P ittsbu rgh , P a ., Jan. 1967 1_____________________________
P ortla n d, M aine, Nov. 1967 1___________________________
P ortla n d , O r eg .— a sh ., M ay 1967_____________________
W
P ro v id e n ce —
Paw tucket— arw ick, R .I.— a ss .,
W
M
May 1967 1 ______________________________________________
R aleig h , N .C ., Aug. 1967 1---------------------------------------------R ich m on d, V a ., Nov. 1 9 671___
R o c k fo rd , 111., May 1967______

1575-21,
1530-67,
1575-40,
1530-59,
1530-46,
1575-16,
1530-79,

25
25
30
20
30
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1530-70,
1575-6,
1575-27,
1530-68,

30
25
25
20

cents
cents
cents
cents

25
25
25
25
30
25
20
25
25
30

cents
cen ts
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

St. L o u is, M o.—
111., O ct. 1966 1______
Salt Lake C ity, Utah, D ec. 1967 _____
San A ntonio, T e x ., June 1967 1 ______
San B ern ardin o— iv e r sid e — n ta rio, C a lif.,
R
O
Aug.
San D ieg o, C a lif., Nov. 1967______________________
San F ra n cis co -O a k la n d , C a lif., Jan. 1968 ______
San J o s e , C a lif., Sept. 1967 1_____________________
Savannah, G a., May 1967_______________________________
Scran ton , P a ., July 1967 1___________________ ___________
Seattle— v erett, W ash., N ov. 1967 1__ __ ____________
E

1530-27,
1575-35,
1530-84,

30 cents
20 cents
25 cents

1575-10,
1575-19,
1575-37,
1575-15,
1530-69,
1575
1575-9,
1575-29,

30
20
25
25
20
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

20
20
25
20
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

Sioux F a lls , S. D a k ., O ct. 1967 1________________________
South Bend, In d ., M ar. 1967_________________________

30
30
20
20
25
25
20

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

l
1575-17,
1530-57,
1530-80,
1575-8,
1530-50,
1575-24,
1575-11,
1530-54,
l
1575-26,
1575-31,
1530-81,
1530-47,
1575-25,

25
20
25
25
30
20
25
20
20
20
25
25
25

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A rea

T o le d o , Ohio— ich ., F eb. 1967 1____________
M
T renton, N .J ., Nov. 1967____________________
W ashington, D .C .—
Md.— a ., Sept. 1967_____
V
W aterbu ry, C on n ., M ar. 1967.
W a terloo, Iowa, Nov. 1967_______________________________
W ich ita, K a n s., D e c. 1967_____________ _______________
W o r c e s te r , M a ss., June 1967_______________________

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents