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AREA W A G E SURVEY
N e w Orleans, Louisiana, M e tro p o lita n A rea,
January 1973
Bulletin 1775-47




U S. DEP ART MEN T OF LABOR
—

B u rea u of Labor S tatistics




P re fa c e
T h is b ulletin p r o v i d e s r e s u lt s o f a Jan uar y 1973 s u r v e y of occup ational
e arn in g s in the N e w O r l e a n s , L o u i s i a n a , Standard M e t r o p o l i t a n S tatis tic al A r e a
( J e f f e r s o n , O r l e a n s , St. B e r n a r d , and St. T a m m a n y P a r i s h e s ) . T h e s u r v e y was
m ad e as p art o f the Bureau of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s ' annual a r e a w ag e s u r v e y p r o g r a m .
T h e p r o g r a m is d e s ig n e d to y i e l d data f o r ind ivid ual m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s , as w e l l
as na tional and r e g i o n a l e s t i m a t e s f o r a l l Standard M e t r o p o l i t a n A r e a s in the
Unite d S tate s, exclu ding A l a s k a and H a w a i i , (a s d e fin e d b y the U.S. O f f ic e o f
M a n a ge m en t and Budget th ro ugh N o v e m b e r 1971).
A m a j o r c o n s id e r a tio n in the a r e a w a g e s u r v e y p r o g r a m is the need to
d e s c r i b e the l e v e l and m o v e m e n t of w a g e s in a v a r i e t y o f la b o r m a r k e t s , through
the a n a ly s is o f (1) the l e v e l and d is trib u tio n o f w a g e s by occ up ation, and (2) the
m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s b y oc cup ational c a t e g o r y and s k i l l l e v e l .
The p r o g r a m d e ­
v e lo p s i n f o r m a ti o n t h a t ' m a y be used f o r m a n y p u r p o s e s , including wage and
s a l a r y a d m in is tr a tio n , c o l l e c t i v e b a r g a in in g , and a s s i s ta n c e in d e te rm in in g plant
lo c a t io n . S u rv e y r e s u lt s a ls o a r e used by the U.S. D e p a rtm e n t o f L a b o r to m ak e
w ag e d e te rm in a t io n s under the S e r v i c e C o n t ra c t A c t o f 1965.
C u r r e n t l y , 96 a r e a s a r e included in the p r o g r a m .
(See l i s t o f a r e a s
on ins id e b ack c o v e r . )
In eac h a r e a , occup atio nal e arn in g s data a r e c o l l e c t e d
annually. In f o r m a tio n on e s ta b lis h m en t p r a c t i c e s and su p p le m e n ta ry w age b e n e ­
f i t s , c o l l e c t e d e v e r y second y e a r in the p ast, is no w obtained e v e r y th ird y e a r .
E ach y e a r a f t e r a l l ind iv id u al a r e a w a g e s u r v e y s have been c o m p l e t e d ,
two s u m m a r y bulle tins a r e is s u e d.
T h e f i r s t b r i n g s to g e th e r data f o r e ach
m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s u r v e y e d . The second s u m m a r y b u lle tin p re s e n ts nation al and
r e g i o n a l e s t i m a t e s , p r o j e c t e d f r o m ind iv id u al m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a data.
T h e N e w O r le a n s s u r v e y was con du cted b y the B u re a u 's r e g i o n a l ^ o f f i c e
in D a l l a s , T e x . , under the g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f B oyd B. O ' N e a l , A s s i s t a n t R e g i o n a l
D i r e c t o r f o r O p e ra t io n s .
T h e s u r v e y cou ld not have b e e n . a c c o m p l i s h e d without
the c o o p e r a tio n o f the m any f i r m s w h os e w a g e and s a l a r y data p r o v i d e d the b as is
f o r the s t a t i s t i c a l i n f o r m a ti o n in this bull etin.
T h e B ure au w is h e s to e x p r e s s
s i n c e r e a p p r e c i a ti o n f o r the c o o p e r a ti o n r e c e i v e d .

Note:
A c u r r e n t r e p o r t on occup atio nal e arn in g s and su p p le m e n ta ry w age p r o ­
v i s i o n s is a v a i l a b l e f o r the c on tra c t c le an in g (J u ly 1971) indus try. A l s o a v a i l a ­
b le f o r the N e w O r le a n s a r e a a r e l i s t i n g s o f union w a g e rate s f o r building
t r a d e s , p rin tin g t r a d e s , l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a tin g e m p l o y e e s , l o c a l t r u c k d r i v e r s
and h e l p e r s , and g r o c e r y s t o r e e m p l o y e e s .
F r e e c o p ie s o f th ese a r e a v a ila b le
f r o m the B u re a u 's r e g i o n a l o f f i c e s . (S ee b ac k c o v e r f o r a d d r e s s e s . )

AREA W AGE SURVEY

Bulletin 1775-47
;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, Peter J. Brennan, Secretary

A p r il 1 9 7 3

BUR EA U OF LABOR STATIS TIC S, Ben Burdetsky, Deputy Commissioner

N e w O rlean s, Louisiana, M e tro p o lita n A rea, Jan u ary 1973
CONTENTS
Pag*
2
5

In t r o d u c t i o n
W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g ro u p s

T a b les:
4
6
7

14
15

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y and n u m b e r stu d ied
I n d e x e s o f e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ti o n a l g r o u p s , and p e r c e n t s o f c h an ge f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s
P e r c e n t s o f i n c r e a s e in a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , a d j u s t e d f o r e m p l o y m e n t sh if ts

A.

8
11
12

1.
2.
3.

O ccupation al ea rn in g s:
A - l . O ffic e occupations: W e e k ly earnings
A -2 . P r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a ti o n s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s
A - 3 . O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s : A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s , b y s e x
A - 4 . M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a ti o n s : H o u r l y e a r n i n g s
A - 5 . C u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s : H o u r l y e a r n i n g s

18 A p p e n d i x .

Occupation al d e sc r ip tio n s




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, or BLS Regional Offices listed on back cover.
Price: 40 cents domestic postpaid or 30 cents over-the-counter. Make checks payable to Superintendent of Documents.

1

In tro d u c tio n
T h i s a r e a is 1 o f 96 in w h i c h the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s c on du cts s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a ti o n a l e a r n i n g s
on an a r e a w i d e b a s i s a n n u a l l y . 1 F i e l d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s , in p e r s o n a l
v i s i t s to e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the a r e a , c o l l e c t e m p l o y m e n t , e a r n i n g s ,
e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s , and r e l a t e d b e n e f i t s i n f o r m a t i o n e v e r y t h ird
year.
In e ach o f the i n t e r v e n i n g y e a r s , i n f o r m a t i o n on e m p l o y m e n t
and e a r n i n g s is c o l l e c t e d b y m a i l q u e s t i o n n a i r e s f r o m e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
p a r t i c i p a t i n g in the p r e v i o u s s u r v e y . T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s the r e s u l t s
o f the l a t t e r ty p e s u r v e y .

(3) m a i n te n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; and (4) c u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m e n t.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d on a u n i f o r m set o f job
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to ta k e ac c ou n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in d uties w i th i n the s a m e j o b . T h e o c c u p a tio n s s e l e c t e d f o r study a r e
l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in the a p p e nd ix.
U n l e s s o t h e r w i s e in d ic a te d , the
e a r n i n g s data f o l l o w i n g the j o b t i t l e s a r e f o r a l l i n d u s t r i e s com b ined .
E a r n i n g s data f o r s o m e o f the o c c u p a tio n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d , o r
f o r s o m e i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w i t h i n o c c u p a t i o n s , a r e not p r e s e n t e d in
the A - s e r i e s t a b l e s , b e c a u s e e i t h e r ( l ) e m p l o y m e n t in the occupation
is to o s m a l l to p r o v i d e eno ugh data to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2) t h e r e
is p o s s i b i l i t y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t data. E a r n i n g s
data not sho wn s e p a r a t e l y f o r i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s a r e in c lu d e d in a l l
i n d u s t r i e s c o m b i n e d data, w h e r e shown.
L i k e w i s e , data a r e included
in the o v e r a l l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n w h en a s u b c l a s s i f i c a t i o n o f s e c r e t a r i e s
o r t r u c k d r i v e r s is not sho w n o r i n f o r m a t i o n to s u b c l a s s i f y is not
available.

In e a c h a r e a , data a r e o b ta in e d f r o m r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w ith in s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s ; M a n u fa c t u r i n g ; t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s . M a j o r
i n d u s t r y g r o u p s e x c l u d e d f r o m th e s e s tu d ie s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a ­
tio n s and the c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s . E s t a b l i s h m e n t s
h a v in g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s a r e o m i t t e d b e c a u s e
t h e y te nd to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the oc c u p a tio n s stu died
to w a r r a n t in c l u s i o n .
S e p a r a t e ta b u la tio n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h o f
the b r o a d in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s w h i c h m e e t p u b l i c a t i o n c r i t e r i a .

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s data a r e shown f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y schedule.
E a r n i n g s data e x c l u d e p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on
w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la t e s h ifts . N o n p r o d u c t i o n bon u s es a r e e x ­
clu d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g a l l o w a n c e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e i n ­
cluded. W h e r e w e e k l y h o u r s a r e r e p o r t e d , as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u ­
p a ti o n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the s ta n d a rd w o r k w e e k (r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t
h a l f hour) f o r w h i c h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e at r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m
rates).
A v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s f o r t h e s e o c c u p a ti o n s a r e roun ded
to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u c t e d on a s a m p l e b a s i s . T h e s a m ­
pling p ro c e d u r e s in v o lve d e ta ile d s tr a tific a tio n o f a ll estab lish m en ts
w i t h i n the s c o p e o f an i n d i v i d u a l a r e a s u r v e y b y i n d u s t r y and n u m b e r
o f e m p l o y e e s . F r o m th is s t r a t i f i e d u n i v e r s e a p r o b a b i l i t y s a m p l e is
s e l e c t e d , w i t h e a c h e s t a b l i s h m e n t h a v in g a p r e d e t e r m i n e d chan c e o f
s e l e c t i o n . T o ob ta in o p ti m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r
p r o p o r t i o n o f l a r g e than s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s e l e c t e d . W h e n data
a r e c o m b i n e d , e a c h e s t a b l i s h m e n t is w e i g h t e d a c c o r d i n g to its p r o b a ­
b i l i t y o f s e l e c t i o n , so that u n b ia s e d e s t i m a t e s a r e g e n e r a t e d . F o r e x ­
a m p l e , i f one out o f f o u r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is s e l e c t e d , it is g i v e n a
w e i g h t o f f o u r to r e p r e s e n t i t s e l f plu s t h r e e o t h e r s . A n a l t e r n a t e o f the
s a m e o r i g i n a l p r o b a b i l i t y is c h o s e n in the s a m e i n d u s t r y - s i z e c l a s s i f i ­
c a tio n i f data a r e not a v a i l a b l e f o r the o r i g i n a l s a m p l e m e m b e r .
If
no s u ita b le substitu te is a v a i l a b l e , a d d itio n a l w e i g h t is a s s i g n e d to a
s a m p l e m e m b e r that is s i m i l a r to the m i s s i n g unit.

T h e s e s u r v e y s m e a s u r e the l e v e l o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s in
an a r e a at a p a r t i c u l a r t i m e .
C o m p a r i s o n s o f i n d i v i d u a l o c c u p a tio n a l
a v e r a g e s o v e r t i m e m a y not r e f l e c t e x p e c t e d w a g e c h a n g e s . T h e a v e r ­
a g e s f o r i n d i v i d u a l j o b s a r e a f f e c t e d b y c h a n g e s in w a g e s and e m p l o y ­
m ent p atterns.
F o r ex a m p le, p ro p o rtio n s o f w o r k e r s em p lo yed by
h i g h - o r l o w - w a g e f i r m s m a y c han ge o r h i g h - w a g e w o r k e r s m a y a d ­
v a n c e t o b e t t e r j o b s and be r e p l a c e d b y n e w w o r k e r s at l o w e r r a t e s .
Such s h ifts in e m p l o y m e n t c o u ld d e c r e a s e an o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e
e v e n though m o s t e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in an a r e a i n c r e a s e w a g e s during
the y e a r . T r e n d s in e a r n i n g s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , shown in t a b le 2,
a r e b e t t e r i n d i c a t o r s o f w a g e tr e n d s than i n d i v i d u a l j o b s w ith in the
g ro u p s .

O c c u p a tio n s and E a r n i n g s
T h e o c c u p a tio n s s e l e c t e d f o r study a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u fa c t u rin g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e o f the
follo w in g types;
( l ) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;

1
Included in the 96 areas are 10 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract.
These areas
A v e r a g e earn in gs r e f le c t c o m p o s ite , a r e a w id e e stim a tes. In­
are Austin, T e x .; Binghamton, N .Y . (New York portion only); Durham, N. C . ; Fort Lauderdale—
d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and j o b s ta f f in g , and
Hollywood and West Palm Beach, F la .; Huntsville, A la .; Lexington, K y .; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—
thus c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h j o b . P a y a v e r ­
Newburgh, N. Y . ; Rochester, N .Y . (o ffice occupations only); Syracuse, N. Y . ; and U tica—Rome, N .Y .
a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t a c c u r a t e l y the w a g e d i f f e r e n t i a l am on g jo b s in
In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request
of the Employment Standards Administration of the U. S. Department of Labor.
individual estab lish m en ts.




2

3
A v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s f o r m e n and w o m e n in s e l e c t e d o c c u p a ­
tio ns should not b e a s s u m e d to r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y o f the s e x e s
w i th i n i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
F a c t o r s w h ic h m a y c o n trib u t e to
d i f f e r e n c e s i n c lu d e p r o g r e s s i o n w ith in e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s in c e
o n ly the r a t e s p a id i n c u m b e n ts a r e c o l l e c t e d , and p e r f o r m a n c e o f s p e ­
c i f i c duties w i th i n the g e n e r a l s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s . J ob d e s c r i p ­
tio n s u s e d to c l a s s i f y e m p l o y e e s in th e s e s u r v e y s u s u a l l y a r e m o r e
g e n e r a l i z e d than th o s e used in in d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r
m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s a m on g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in s p e c i f i c duties p e r f o r m e d .
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the to t a l in a l l
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith in the s c o p e o f the study and not the n u m b e r a c tu ­
a l l y s u r v e y e d . B e c a u s e o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e s am on g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
d i f f e r , e s t i m a t e s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b ta in e d f r o m the s a m p l e




o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s stu d ie d s e r v e on ly to i n d i c a t e the r e l a t i v e i m p o r ­
tan c e o f the j o b s studied. T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a ti o n a l s t r u c tu r e
do not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y the a c c u r a c y o f the e a r n i n g s data.
E s t a b l i s h m e n t P r a c t i c e s and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s
T a b u l a t i o n s on s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) a r e not p r e s e n t e d in this
b u lle tin .
I n f o r m a t i o n f o r th e s e t a b u la tio n s , c o l l e c t e d e v e r y Z y e a r s
in the p a s t, is now c o l l e c t e d e v e r y 3 y e a r s .
T h e s e ta b ula tion s on
m in im u m entrance s a la r ie s fo r in e x p e rie n c e d w o m en o ffic e w o r k e r s ;
shift d i f f e r e n t i a l s ; s c h e d u le d w o r k w e e k ; p aid h o l i d a y s ; p aid v a c a t i o n s ;
and health, in s u r a n c e , and p e n s i o n plans a r e p r e s e n t e d (in the B - s e r i e s
t a b l e s ) in p r e v i o u s b u l l e ti n s f o r th is a r e a .

4




T a b le 1. E s ta b lis h m e n ts an d w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u rv e y an d n u m b e r s tu d ie d in N e w O r le a n s , L a .,‘
b y m a jo r in d u s tr y d iv is io n , J a n u a r y 1 9 7 3
Minimum
employment
in estab lish m ents in scope
of study

Industry d ivision

Within scope
of study *

W orkers in e stablish m en ts
Within scope of stud y4

Studied

Number

P ercen t

Studied

783

189

156.056

100

86.397

50
-

160
623

50
139

4 8 ,414
107,642

31
69

28,531
57,866

50
50
50
50
50

107
131
178
89
118

30
19
35
17
38

28,988
12,658
38, 007
11,662
16,416

19

24
7

20,818
2,746
21,393
4, 700
8,209

A ll d iv isio n s------------------------------------M anufacturing------------ ---------------------------Nonm anufacturing___________________________
T ran sp o rtatio n , com m unication, and
other public u tilities 5________ _________
W holesale trad e 6_________________________
R etail trad e ______________________________
F inance, in su ra n ce , and r e a l e s t a t e 6__ —
S e rv ic e s 7---------------------- ------------------- -

Number of establishm ents

8

1
1

1 The New O rlean s Standard M etropolitan S ta tistic a l A rea, a s defined by the Office of M anagement and Budget through Novem ber 1971,
c o n sists of Je ffe r so n , O rlean s, St. B ern ard , and St. Tam m any P a r is h e s. The "w o rk ers within scope of study" e stim a te s shown in th is table
provide a reaso n ably a ccu rate d escrip tion of the size and com position of the labor fo rce included in the survey . The e stim a te s a re not intended,
however, to serv e a s a b a s i s of com parison with other employment in dexes for the a re a to m ea su re employment tren d s o r le v e ls since (1) planning
of wage su rv ey s r e q u ire s the u se of establishm ent data com piled con sid erably in advance of the p ay roll period studied, and (2) sm a ll estab lish m en ts
a re excluded from the scope of the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial C la ssificatio n Manual w as used in cla ssify in g estab lish m en ts by industry division .
3 Includes a ll estab lish m en ts with total employment at or above the m inim um lim itation. All outlets (within the a re a ) of com pan ies in such
in d u strie s a s trad e , finance, auto r e p a ir se rv ice , and motion picture th e ate rs a re con sid ered a s 1 establish m en t.
4 Includes a ll w o rk ers in a ll estab lish m en ts with total employment (within the are a) at or above the minim um lim itation.
5 Abbreviated to "public u tilitie s" in the A - s e r ie s ta b le s. T axicab s and s e r v ic e s incidental to w ater tran sp ortation were excluded.
6 Th is industry division i s rep resen ted in e stim a te s for "a ll in d u strie s" and "nonm anufacturing" in the S e r ie s A ta b le s. Sep arate p resen tation
of data for this division is not m ade for one o r m ore of the following r e a so n s: (1) Em ploym ent in the d ivision i s too sm a ll to provide enough
data to m e rit sep arate study, (2) the sam ple w as not designed in itially to p erm it sep arate p resen tation , (3) resp on se w as in sufficien t o r inadequate
to p erm it sep arate p resen tatio n , and (4) there i s p o ssib ility of d isc lo su re of individual establish m en t data.
7 H otels and m o tels; laun dries and other p e rso n al se r v ic e s; b u sin e ss s e r v ic e s; autom obile r e p a ir , ren tal, and parking; m otion p ictu re s;
nonprofit m em bersh ip o rgan ization s (excluding relig io u s and ch aritable o rg an ization s); and engineering and arch itectu ral s e r v ic e s.

In d ustrial com position in m anufacturing
A lm ost one-third of the w ork ers within scope of the su rvey in the New O rlean s a re a
were em ployed in m anufacturing fir m s . The following p r e se n ts the m ajo r in dustry groups and
sp ecific in d u strie s a s a percent of a ll m anufacturing:
Industry groups

Specific in d u strie s

Transportation equipm ent______27
Food and kindred p ro d u c ts_____ 22
A pparel and other textile
p ro d u cts_____________________ 9
Stone, clay, and g la s s
p ro d u cts_____________________ 8
F ab ricated m etal p ro d u cts_____ 6
Ordnance and a c c e s s o r ie s _____ 6
P rim a ry m etal in d u str ie s _____ 6

Ship and boatbuilding and
r e p a ir in g _____________________27
B e v e ra g e s ____________________ 6
O rdnance______________________ 6
Secondary nonferrous
m e ta ls_______________________ 6

Th is inform ation is based on e stim a te s of total employment derived from un iverse
m a te r ia ls com piled p rio r to actu al survey. P roportion s in v a rio u s in dustry d iv isio n s m ay
d iffer from proportions b ased on the r e su lts of the survey a s shown in table 1 above.

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P r e s e n t e d in t a b l e 2 a r e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f ch an ge in
a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s o f o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l
n u r s e s , and in a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
T h e i n d e x e s a r e a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e , e x p r e s s e d as a
p e r c e n t o f w a g e s d urin g the b a s e p e r i o d .
S u b tra c tin g 100 f r o m the
i n d e x y i e l d s the p e r c e n t c han ge in w a g e s f r o m the b a s e p e r i o d to the
date o f the in dex. T h e p e r c e n t s o f c h an ge o r i n c r e a s e r e l a t e to w a g e
c h a n g e s b e t w e e n the i n d i c a t e d d a te s . A n n u a l r a t e s o f i n c r e a s e , w h e r e
sho wn, r e f l e c t the amount o f i n c r e a s e f o r 12 m on ths w h e n the t i m e
p e r i o d b e t w e e n s u r v e y s w a s o t h e r than 12 m onths .
T h ese com pu­
ta t io n s a r e b a s e d on the a s s u m p t i o n that w a g e s i n c r e a s e d at a con stant
rate b etw een su rve y s .
T h e s e e s t i m a t e s a r e m e a s u r e s o f change in
a v e r a g e s f o r the a r e a ; t h e y a r e not in ten d ed to m e a s u r e a v e r a g e p a y
c h a n g e s in the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the a r e a .

T h e i n d e x is a m e a s u r e o f w a g e s at a g i v e n t i m e and is e x ­
p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t o f w a g e s in the b a s e y e a r .
T h e b a s e y e a r is
a s s i g n e d the v a l u e o f 100 p e r c e n t .
T h e in d e x is c o m p u te d b y m u l t i ­
p l y i n g the b a s e y e a r r e l a t i v e (100 p e r c e n t ) b y the r e l a t i v e (th e p e r c e n t
ch an ge plus 100 p e r c e n t ) f o r the n e x t s u c c e e d i n g y e a r and then c o n ­
tin uing to m u l t i p l y (c om p ou n d ) e a c h y e a r ' s r e l a t i v e b y the p r e v i o u s
y e a r ' s index.
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , th e w a g e
tr e n d s r e l a t e to r e g u l a r w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r the n o r m a l w o r k w e e k ,
e x c lu s iv e o f earnings fo r o v e r tim e .
F o r p l a n t w o r k e r g r o u p s , th e y
m e a s u r e c h a n ge s in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c lu d in g
p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
la t e s hifts .
T h e p e r c e n t s a r e b a s e d on data f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u ­
p atio n s and i n c lu d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t jo b s w ith in
e a c h g ro u p .

M e t h o d o f C o m p u tin g
E a c h o f the f o l l o w i n g k e y oc c u p a tio n s w ith in an o c c u p a ti o n a l
g r o u p is a s s i g n e d a con stant w e i g h t b a s e d on its p r o p o r t i o n a t e e m ­
p l o y m e n t in th e o c c u p a t i o n a l g ro u p :
O ffice c leric a l (m en and
women):
Bookkeeping-m achine
operators, class B
Clerks, accounting, classes
A and B
Clerks, file , classes
A , B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
Keypunch operators, classes
A and B
Messengers (o ffice boys or
girls)

O ffice clerical (men and
women)— Continued
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators, classes
A and B
Tabulating-m achine operators,
class B
Typists, classes A and B
Industrial nurses (men and
women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)

L i m i t a t i o n s o f D ata
T h e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f c h a n g e , as m e a s u r e s o f c han ge
in a r e a a v e r a g e s , a r e in f l u e n c e d b y :
(1) G e n e r a l s a l a r y and w a g e
c h a n g e s , (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y in d i v i d u a l
w o r k e r s w h i l e in th e s a m e j o b , and (3) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e w a g e s due
to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e s u l t i n g f r o m l a b o r t u r n o v e r , f o r c e
e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n s o f w o r k ­
e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w i t h d i f f e r e n t p a y l e v e l s . C h a n g e s in
the l a b o r f o r c e c a n c a u s e i n c r e a s e s o r d e c r e a s e s in t h e o c c u p a t i o n a l
a v e r a g e s w ith ou t a c tu a l w a g e c h a n g e s .
It is c o n c e i v a b l e that e v e n
though a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in an a r e a g a v e w a g e i n c r e a s e s , a v e r a g e
w a g e s m a y h a ve d e c l i n e d b e c a u s e l o w e r - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e n t e r e d
the a r e a o r e xp an d e d t h e i r w o r k f o r c e s .
S im ila r ly , w a g e s m a y have
r e m a i n e d r e l a t i v e l y c o n st a n t, y e t a v e r a g e s f o r an a r e a m a y h a ve r i s e n
c o n s i d e r a b l y b e c a u s e h i g h e r - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e n t e r e d the a r e a .

Skilled maintenance (men):
Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters

Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
Unskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and
cleaners
Laborers, m aterial handling

NOTE: Comptom eter operators, used in the computation of previous trends, are no longer
surveyed by the Bureau.

T h e use o f c on sta n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
o f chan ge s in th e p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e ach j o b i n ­
c lu d e d in the data.
T h e p e r c e n t s o f ch an ge r e f l e c t o n l y ch an ge s in
a v e r a g e p ay fo r s t r a ig h t - t im e hours.
T h e y a r e not i n f l u e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s ta n d a r d w o r k s c h e d u l e s , as such, o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
fo r o vertim e.
W h e r e n e c e s s a r y , data a r e a d ju s te d to r e m o v e f r o m
the i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t s o f ch an ge any s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d b y
ch an ge s in the s c o p e o f the s u r v e y .

T h e a v e r a g e (m e a n ) e a r n i n g s f o r e a c h o c c u p a tio n a r e m u l t i ­
p l i e d b y the o c c u p a t i o n a l w e i g h t , and the p r o d u c t s f o r a l l o c c u p a tio n s
in the g r o u p a r e to t a l e d . T h e a g g r e g a t e s f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s a r e
r e l a t e d b y s u b tr a c tin g the a g g r e g a t e f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r f r o m the
a g g r e g a t e f o r the l a t e r y e a r and d i v i d i n g the r e m a i n d e r b y the a g g r e ­
g a te f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
T h e r e s u l t t i m e s 100 sh o w s the p e r c e n t
o f c han ge.




5

6




T a b le 2 . In d e x e s o f e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s in N e w O r le a n s , L a ., J a n u a r y 1 9 7 2 a n d J a n u a r y 1 9 7 3 ,
a n d p e r c e n ts o f c h a n g e ’ fo r s e le c t e d p e rio d s
A ll in du stries
Weekly earn ings
P eriod

Office
c le r ic a l
(men and
women)

In d ustrial
n u rses
(men and
women)

M anufacturing

Hourly earnings
Skilled
m aintenance
trad e s
(men)

Unskilled
plantw orkers
(men)

Weekly earn ings
Office
c le r ic a l
(men and
women)

In d u strial
n u rse s
(men and
women)

Hourly earn ings
Skilled
m aintenance
trad e s
(men)

Unskilled
plantw orkers
(men)

Indexes (F eb ru ary 1967=100)
Jan u ary 1972____________ __________________
Ja n u a ry 1973_________________________________

127.2
132.8

133.4
139.5

130.6
139.6

127.3
133.9

120.6
128.9

130.4
135.1

128.2
138.8

136.7
142.4

P erce n ts of change 1
F e b ru a ry 1960 to M arch 1961:
13-month in c r e a s e ______________
____
Annual rate of in c re a se ____________________

2.5
2.3

9.9
9.1

5.7
5.3

4.4
4.1

4.3
4.0

12.0
11.0

5.2
4.8

8.6
7.9

M arch 1961 to F e b ru ary 1962:
11-month in c r e a s e ________________________
Annual rate of in c re a se - __________ _____

3.4
3.7

1.5
1.6

3.5
3.8

2.0
2.2

2.8
3.1

.5
.6

3.4
3.7

.8
.9

F eb ru ary 1962 to F e b ru ary 1963____ .
F e b ru ary 1963 to F eb ru ary 1964______________
F e b ru ary 1964 to F eb ru ary 1965_____________
F eb ru ary 1965 to F eb ru ary 1966 _ _ _________
F eb ru ary 1966 to F eb ru ary 1967- ___________
F eb ru ary 1967 to F eb ru ary 1968______________
F e b ru ary 1968 to F eb ru ary 1969______________
F e b ru ary 1969 to Jan u ary 1970:
11-month in c r e a s e ________________________
Annual rate of in c re a se ____________________

4.5
4.1
2.5
4.4
5.3
5.8
5.3

1.5
2.0
0
3.3
5.1
9.7
3.6

4.2
3.4
2.5
3.8
4.5
4.3
6.7

4.3
4.2
6.3
3.3
3 10.8
6.3
5.1

5.2
4.3
3.7
3.5
3.5
4.7
5.0

2 - .9
2.3
.9
1.8
4.0
10.7
.4

4.3
2.9
1.9
2.9
3.7
4.3
6.5

3.2
1.1
7.2
3.6
2.6
5.9
7.3

3.8
4.2

5.8
6.3

5.2
5.7

4.7
5.1

4.7
5.1

6.6
7.2

5.7
6.2

8.0
8.8

Jan u ary 1970 to Jan u ary 1971_________________
Jan u ary 1971 to Jan u ary 1972_________________
Ja n u a ry 1972 to Jan u ary 1973_________________

5.0
4.8
4.4

5.1
5.6
4.6

5.7
5.5
6.9

3.5
5.2
5.2

1.9
2.8
6.9

4.3
5.6
3.6

4.0
5.0
8.3

3.5
7.6
4.2

1
2
3
between

AH changes a re in c re a se s u n less otherw ise indicated.
This d e c re a se r e fle c ts changes in employment among establish m en ts with different pay le v e ls, rath er than s a la r y d e c r e a s e s.
In addition to ge n e ral wage in c r e a se s , this in c re a se refle cts am endm ents to the F a ir L ab or Stan dards Act and changes in employment
high- and low-wage estab lish m en ts.




T a b le 3 . P e r c e n ts o f in c r e a s e in a v e ra g e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c t e d o c c u p a tio n a l g r o u p s ,
a d ju s te d fo r e m p lo y m e n t s h ifts , in N e w O r le a n s , La., J a n u a ry 1 9 7 2 to J a n u a ry 1 9 7 3
O ccupational group

A ll
in du stries

M anufac­
turing

Nonmanu­
facturing

Office c le r ic a l (men and w om en )__ ________ _____
Ind ustrial n u rse s (men and wom en)_________________
____ ___
Skilled m aintenance tra d e s (men)______
U nskilled plantw orkers (men)___ ___ ________ ___

4.8
4.7
8.0
5.9

6.0
5.7
8.5
7.1

4.4

1 Data do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .

NOTE: Table 3 provides p ercen ts of change in a verage hourly earn ings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted to exclude the effect of employment sh ifts. The new method
fo r computing wage trends is b a se d on changes in av erage hourly earn ings for establish m ents
reporting the index jo b s in both the curren t and previous y e ar (matched e stablish m en ts),
holding establishm ent employment in the jobs constant.
The new wage trends a re not linked to the current indexes becau se the new wage trends
m easu re changes in m atched establishm ent a v e ra g e s w hereas the curren t indexes m easu re
changes in a re a a v e ra g e s. Other c h a ra c te ristic s of the new wage tren ds which d iffer from
the current ones include (1) earnings data of office c le r ic a l w ork ers and in d u strial n u rse s
a re converted to an hourly b a s is , and (2) tren d e stim a te s a re provided for nonmanufacturing
e stabli shment s .
F o r a m ore detailed descrip tion of the new method used to compute a re a wage survey
in dexes, see "Im proving A rea Wage Survey In d e x e s," Monthly L ab or Review, Jan u ary 1973,
pp. 52-57.

(!)

(‘ )
5.8

8

A. Occupational earnings
T a b l e A -1 . O f f i c e o c c u p a tio n s : W e e k l y e a r n in g s
(Average straight-time weekly hours

and earnings of w orkers in selected occupations by industry division, New Orleans, L a ., January
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number
workeis

*

Average
weekly
Median £

Middle ranged

t

i

60

(standard)

1973)

Number of vorkers receiving straight-time wee kly ea rnings of—
65

$

%

70

75

>

80

t

%

85

90

*

95

100

*

105

»

%

no

120

t

130

1

*

140

150

160

170

t

$

180

190

%

200

and
under
70

75

80

85

93

95

103

135

no

120

130

“

“

6
6

14
14

6
6

9
9

17
17

23
23

“

“

~

_

_

_

_

“

“

“

_

_

_

65

210
and

140

150

160

170

180

“

“

4

~

10
10

4

_

“

_

_

4

~

190

200

210 over

HEN ANO WOMEN C OMBINED

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
M A C H I N E I ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

80
78

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
M A C H I N E ) ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

69
69

39.0
39.0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S A ------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

66
30

39.5 116.50 113.00 101.50-137.00
39.0 114.50 114.00 99.50-137.00

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------

131
31
100
27

40.0
99.00
95.00
86.00-110.50
40.0 102.00 107.50
84.00-125.00
40.0
98.50
92.50
86.00-104.50
39.5 105.50 103.50 100.50-115.00

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------

540
97
443
176
52

39.5
40.0
39.5
38.5
40.0

140.50
148.00
139.00
150.00
132.00

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B --M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------R E T A I L T R A O E ----------------S E R V I C E S -----------------------

905
127
778
281
250
98

39.0
40.0
39.0
38.0
39.5
40.0

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B -------------------------------

M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

40.0
40.0

$
98.00
97.00
95.50
95.50

$
96.50
96.50
89.00
89.00

$

$

8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 2 .00
85.00-102.00
85. 00- 99.50
85. 00- 99.50

_

_
-

122.50-160.00
127.50-168.00
119.50-158.00
134.00-162.50
122.50-142.50

_
-

_

-

-

99.00
104.00
89.50-115.50
108.50 103.50
93.50-129.50
103.50
98.50
88.50-114.00
119.00 116.00 101.00-146.00
95.00
93.50
84.00-104.00
92.00
91.00
85.50- 97.00

_
-

1
1
1
-

“

-

39.5 122.00 127.50 100.00-138.50
39.0 113.50 118.00 97.50-129.50

-

-

-

A ------------------------

59
43

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

B ------------------------

182
174

39.0
39.0

85.50
84.50

81.50
81.00

71. 50- 97.00
71. 00- 96.00

-

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

C ------------------------

167
166

38.5
38.5

81.00
81.00

80.50
80.00

74. 00- 86.50
74. 00- 86.50

5
5

C L E R K S , O R D E R ----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------

322
28
294
59

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

113.00
129.00
111.50
123.50

113.00 98.50-126.00
133.00 109.00-138.50
112.50
96.50-121.00
113.00 102.00-158.00

C L E R K S , P A Y R O L L -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------R E T A I L T R A O E ----------------- *

191
76
115
34
44

39.5
40.0
39.0
39.0
39.0

122.00
120.50
123.00
149.00
105.50

112.50
110.00
115.50
119.50
102.00

* All workers were at $230 to $240.

See footnotes at end of tables




“

4
4

8
5
3

28
1
27
2

-

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

102.50-139.00
101.00-141.50
103.00-136.50
114.50-230.50
90.50-122.00

_

20
20

“

”

-

139.00
144.50
137.50
153.50
129.50

18
18

~

i

9
4
5
1

_
-

_

-

2

-

95
12
83
7
41
21

11
-

11

-

18
3
15

2
3

53
5
48
11
26

5
5

2
2

_

5

“

4

9
2

10
1
9

6

22

”

_

_

10

-

-

-

-

10
6
4

4

3
2
1
1

_

4
4

”

“

“

“

“

~

63
7
56
14
2

79
18
61
8
18

74
12
62
25
6

77
15
62
28
12

53
5
48
32
1

82
15
67
38
2

20
9
11
6
i

9
5
4
3
l

12
6
6
5
1

7
“
7
7
“

i
2
”

47
22
25
18
5

88
2
86
86

3

6

-

-

4

-

-

2
1
1

2
2

-

-

-

-

113
10
103
16
48
26

_

~

10
6

38
1
31

69
5
64
4
21
23

-

~

4
2

19
3
16

1
1
-

-

4

2

1
-

_

_

“

5
5

-

i
-

~

'

-

3
3

22
12

2
1
-

“

'

5
5

4

-

_

10
6

l

2
2

i
-

_

1

~

“

“

-

-

-

“

.
-

10

4

4

-

8

132
17
115
28
24
13

79
18
61
8
32

5

56
10
46
34
9
3

106
6
100
52
34

39
11
28
11
7

5

1
1

8
7

10
10

12
8

8
i

4
“

-

-

-

“

*

*

3

9
9

6
5

i
“

2
1

-

-

-

1
1

-

-

“

93

27

-

-

3

2

-

2

-

-

-

-

5

2

-

-

-

-

5

2

8
8

i
i

36
36

34
34

12
10

33

9
7

9
9

12
12

10
9

1
1

44
44

32
32

36
36

23
23

18
18

3
3

2
1

33
33
5

5

16

18

29

5

7
7
-

12
1

18
8

25

1

16
13

5
-

21
5
16

27
16
11

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

3
3

_

20

i

4

-

-

-

-

-

20

i

“

i

4
4

-

13
13

_

2
2

4

2

33

-

5

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

2
2
2

5

-

-

7
3
4

4

3

-

-

5
1

4

3

4

-

2

10

3

4
4

4
i

93
13

23
1

29
12
17
1

33

18

10

10
23
11
4

15
2
4

-

4

3

3

7
3

10
2
8
21
10
11
5
2

-

10
10
10

2
-

5
1
4

2

-

2

2

18
2
16
10
-

2

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

10
1
9
*9

“

4
4

-

-

3

-

3
-

9
T a b l e A - 1 . O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s : W e e k l y e a r n in g s ---- C o n t i n u e d
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, New Orleans, La., January 1973)
W
eekly earnings 1
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkeis

60

weekly
(standard)

M
ean ^

M
edian *

M
iddle ranged

receiving straight-time weekly ea rnings of—

Mumber of V orker
*

t

%

65

*

%

70

75

$
80

t

%

85

t

$

6

*

t

t

$

$

$

*

95

100

105

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

$
180

65

8

%

190

70

75

-

“

80

85

90

95

103

135

3
3
3
-

2
“
2
2
-

“

“

16
16
“
5
6

53
*
*9
9
13
*

20
20
9

21
21

120

130

140

150

160

170

190

6

24

6
2
-

24
11
1
"

19
19
1
7
“

32
1
31
10
1
*

17
17
2
2
2

29
7
22
3
1
1

41
8
33
11
11

21
3
18
11
3

17
8
9
2
2
3

8
6
2
1
1

3
1
2
-

2
2
2

61
*
57
5
9

66
5
61
5
13
17

92
8
8*
3
9
11

90
1
89
14
18
35

42
42
5
1
31

100
12
88
5
3
58

32
3
29
5
1
18

8
i
7
4
3

24
«
24
23
1

3
2
1
“
1

“

32
27
5

12
9
8

*

24
22
18

9
9
7

3
2
1

15
15
*

1
1
1

3
3
3

”

"

*

“

“

“

13
1
12

15
2
13
*
9

38
2
34
7
*
20

41
8
33
6
5
9

20
2
18
5
8
1

199
34
165
20
35
18

221
37
184
38
28
12

119
23
96
30
9
15

115
24
91
23
13
7

111
35
76
15
14
10

92
15
77
27
5
3

62
14
48
30
2
6

17
*
13
11

19
6
13
10

5
5

5
5

14
14

9
9

13
9

17
13

15
15

8
2

4
3

3

28

18

11

no

190

200

210

-

90

and
under

and

200

210

2
2

16
16
16
-

-

“

-

1
1
-

*

*

“

*

30
15
15
9
1
1

28
7
21
10
1
2

2
1

5
1

11
7

IB

13

M
EN AND W EN COMBINED—
OM
CONTINUED
KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRAOE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

242
34
208
64
25
29

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.3

$
$
$
$
122.00 115.00 10 1.0 0- 13 3. 50
134.50 132.50 1 2 1 .0 0- 14 9. 00
9 9 .5 0 - 1 3 0 .0 0
120.00 110.50
9 4 .0 0 - 1 9 2 .5 0
132.50 112.50
9 9 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0
113.50 121.00
132.00 127.00 12 0.5 0- 14 2. 50

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFAC TURING-----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

613
47
566
81
69
198

39.5
40.0
39.5
38.0
40.0
40.0

103.00 100.50
113.50 105.00
102.50 100.50
124.00 120.00
92.50
94.00
105.50 107.00

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLSINONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------

199
186
66

39.0
39. 0
38.0

SECRETARIES -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE --------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

1 , 145
231
914
245
137
113

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

-

-

9 1 . 0 0 -1 1 2 .5 0
9 2 .0 0 - 1 2 0 .0 0
9 0 .5 0 - 1 1 1 .5 0
13 1.0 0- 14 7. 50
8 4 . 5 0 -1 0 2 .0 0
9 9 .5 0 - 1 1 4 .5 0

2
2
-

-

9
2
7
“
1
*

7 3 . 5 0 - 96.00
7 3 .0 0 - 96.50
79 .0 0 -1 0 0 .0 0

6
6
-

26
24
"

27
27
10

39.5
40.0
39. 0
38.5
40.0
40.0

138.50 132.00 11 8.5 0- 15 6. 50
146.00 142.00 12 2.5 0- 16 5. 00
136.50 129.50 118 .00 -15 4.0 0
150.00 146.00 12 6.5 0- 17 2. 50
125.50 123.00 113 .50 -14 2.0 0
125.00 120.00 13 0.0 0- 14 5. 50

-

108
84

39.5
39.0

159.00
152.00

154.00
147.50

132.00-1 73 .00
12 9.3 0- 16 7. 00

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------n on manu fa ct uri ng -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------

253
37

39.0
*0.0

1*6.00
153.00

136.50
136.50

12 5.0 0- 16 4. 00
11 8.5 0- 20 7. 00

213
72

39.0 1 **.5 0 137.00 125.50-160.50
38.0 150.50 138.00 126.50-184.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

384
83
301
69
*8
47

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
40.0
40.0

140.00
146.00
138.50
159.50
128.00
123.50

137.50
146.00
133.50
162.50
127.00
120.00

119.00-159.50
128.00-159.00
117.50-160.00
139.00-175.50
116.50-151.00
9 9 .0 0 -1 *5 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

*01
87
314
82
54
40

39.0
40.0
39.0
38.5
40.0
40.0

127.00
132.50
125.50
136.00
115.50
111.00

123.50
129.00
122.00
129.00
117.00
103.50

113.00-142.00
115.00-155.50
112.50-139.00
118.00-156.50
133.50-125.00
9 6 .00-129.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

588
68
520
174
36

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
40 .0

110.50
103.00
111.50
127.00
96.50
102.50

104.00 9 3 .00-126.50
101.50 9 2 .00-115.00
104.50 93.0 0 -1 2 8 .5 0
127.00 133.50-147.50
93.50 90.0 0 -1 0 9 .0 0
101.50 83.5 0 -1 2 3 .5 0

See footnotes at end of tables




33

86.00
85.50
93.50

85.00
84. 00
95.50

-

_
-

-

2
~
2
-

_

~

-

_
-

-

_

-

-

-

-

7
2
5
3
2

_
-

_

-

-

-

*
•-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

1

3

1
2
-

-

*

-

-

-

7

*

-

*

-

*

18
18
2

*

-

-

*
*

16
5
11

2

7

1

1

10
-

2

13
7

48

31

2

3

-

3

46
2
4
12

28

3
2

11
5

13

5

6

13
8

5
5

i
5
5

81
8
73
2
14
9

53
14
39
3
9
4

*0
11
29
9

*6
17
29

40
7
33
9
2

32
6
26
14
1

30
13
17
8

-

7

85
13
72
16
20
3

84
20
64
18
10
*

41
8
33
6

35
6
29
10

5

9
2
7
1
2
1

84
18
66

*9
*
45
12
-

76
8
68
18
5

19

3

76
11
65
23
5
9

54
54
16

7

63
14
*9
18
1

2

7

2

13

17
*

1

"

1
17
1

33
6
27
3
*
9

2

*

8
“
8
8

26

15

3

4
4

2
24
*

18
2
16
5

3
2

2

29

7
2
5
5
-

-

3

-

“

*
25
14

70

1

5
2
3

-

-

3
67
15

i

*
*

-

-

13
15
2

40
12
28
10
1
6

-

-

7
2
5

3

3
3

-

-

*

2

*

6

11
4

1

1

25
8
17

1

1

2

9
2
7
6
1

34
33

15
1
14
13

*
4
*
-

-

1

1

2

34

2

2

*

1

3

-

3
1

*

3
10
4

9

6

*

4
5
3

2
4
4

4
4

9
9

-

-

-

5
3
2

2

1

2

-

2
2

-

-

3

10

3
3

10
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

“
.
-

1

-

“
-

-

10
T a b l e A -1 . O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s : W e e k l y e a r n i n g s ----- C o n t i n u e d
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division. New Orleans, La., January 1973)
Weekly earnings *
(standard)

Occupation and industry division

Number

S

Average

of

standard)

$

60
Mean ^

Median £

Middle ranged

and
under
65

65

*

70

*

75

t

80

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings of—
t
(
»
$
t
S
%
t
S
t
$
*
$
%
$
*
90
85
95 100 105 110 120 130 1A0 150 160 170 180 190 200 210
and
210 over

130

1A0

150

160

170

180

190

200

5
5
~
-

15
13
2
2

3
3
-

_
-

_
*
-

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

*
-

-

-

-

1
1
1

9
8
2

13
A
9
7

7
2
5
3

23
2
21
12

31
5
26
6

29
1A
15
6

21
6
15
8

19
6
13
3

21
1A
7
7

25
2
23
-

3
1
2
2

2
2

2
2

3
2

-

9
7

18
13

12
8

8
2

A
4

-

4
A

2
1

2
2

2
2

2A
2A
15
9

35
35
15
20

2A
2A
7
17

56
56
36
13

2A
2A
3
6

18
15
5
1

22
22
1
-

s
6

2
2
1
"

2
2
1

8
8
3
1

4
4
i

1
1
-

-

_
-

-

-

11
2
9

10
10

33
33

15
4
11

12
4
8

5

26
7
19

16
10
6

4
2
2

6
6
“

1
1

-

-

10

2

5

-

1

26
10
16
1
6

-

5

-

38
1A
2A
15
3

_

3
3

3
3

10
10

4
2

4
4

3
3

4
i

23
20

i
“

-

M A O W M COMBINEDEN N
O EN
CONTINUED
$
130.50
150.00
123.50
118.50

111.00-157.50
126.00-187.50
1 0 8 .5 0 -1A6.50
106.00-1AO.00

22 A
77
1A7
59

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A ------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

68
A9

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B ------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------SERVICES -------------------------------------------

226
223
88
67

39.5
AO.O
39.5
AO.O

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TI L IT IE S -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------------

203
60
1 A3
29
27

39.5 99.00 98.00
AO.O 110.50 109.50
39.5 9A. 00 95.00
39.0 101.00 99.00
AO.O 9 *.5 0 92.00

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

33
26

39.0 127.50 125.00 112.00-1A 6.00
39.0 121.00 116.00 110.50-13A.00

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL----------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

93
93

38.0
38.0

TYPISTS, CLASS A -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------TYPISTS, CLASS B -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TI L IT IE S -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------------SERVICES -------------------------------------------

* All workers were at $220 to $230.
See footnotes at end of tables.




39.5
A 0.0
39.0
39.0

$
135.00
150.00
127.00
123.50

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUBLIC U TI LI TIE S --------------------------

38.5 1 1 1 . 0 0 105.00 100.50-118.50
38.5 111.50 10A.50 99.5 0 -1 2 2 .5 0
8A.50
8A.50
80.50
76.50

93.00
93.00

82.50
82.50
81.00
76.50

7A.507A .507 2 .5 0 72 .0 0 -

92.00
91.50
8A .00
82.00

8A.50-111.00
97.00-12A .00
82.5 0 -1 0 7 .0 0
96.5 0 -1 0 7 .5 0
8 3 .50-110.00

*
-

-

-

_
”

“

-

9
9
-

91.50
91.50

80.5 0 -1 0 5 .0 0
8 0 .5 0 -1 0 5 .0 0

266
232

38.5 110.00 106.00
38.0 105.50 103.00

9 5 .0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0
92.0 0 -1 1 6 .0 0

-

619
50
569
133
171
51

39.0 9A.50 86.00
AO.O 93.50 95.50
39.0 95.00 85.00
39.0 125.00 101.50
AO.O 89.00 83.00
AO.O 88.00 87.00

78 .5 0 - 99.50
8 7 .00-101.50
78 .0 0 - 99.00
89.5 0 -1 2 3 .5 0
7 6 .5 0 -1 1 0 .5 0
8 0 .5 0 - 97.00

-

-

20
20
3
17

_

-

-

”

_

_

•

“

”

-

1A
1A

5
5

15
15

12
12

5
5

11
11

-

11
11

_
“

3
*

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

i
i

10
10

18
18

23
23

15
15

32
32

29
29

22
21

53
39

15
11

1A
13

62
62
1
20
2

106
1
105
1
23
10

109
n
98
9
A3
8

76
2
7A
22
3
16

39
10
29
11
6
i

58
11
A7
16
11
5

32
12
20
IA
2
2

17
3
1A
9
2
2

A3

25

3

-

-

-

A3
8
27
4

25
10
1A
1

3
3

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

~

“

“

11
11

*

_

_

_
-

“

-

*

-

2

“

-

-

-

“

“

-

29
29
*29
-

11
T a b le A -2 .

P r o f e s s i o n a l a nd te c h n ic a l o c c u p a t i o n s : W e e k l y e a r n in g s

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, New Orleans, L a., January 1973)
W
eekly eam
ings 1
(standard)
Average
weekly
h rs*
ou
(standard)

Numbe r of v orker s receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
*

(

$

%

$

of

$

$

$

$

%

s

*

*

$

t

$
$
230
2*0

$
$
t
*
280
250
260
270

90

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

90

Occupation and industry division

100

110

120

130

1*0

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

2*0

250

260

270

-

-

-

-

-

*

6
6

*
*

12
8

5
5

8
8

8
8

5
5

-

1
1

-

1
1

-

-

13
13

-

-

*
2

-

-

-

-

-

16

6

10

2

2

10

i

*

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

80
Mean*

M
edian 2

M
iddle ranged

and
under

and
280 over

MEN AND WOMEN COMBINED

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

$
$
$
$
176.50 176.50 15 0.0 0 -1 9 9 .0 0
178.00 176.50 1 5 2 .5 0- 20 0. 50

CLASS B --------------

SERVICES ------------------------------------------

39.5
39.5

163
1*5
58

137.00
136.00
1*6.00

133.00

1 1 5 .00 -1 57 .0 0

1

2

30

18

2*

19

19

*0.0

1* 7.50

12 3.0 0 -1 6 5 .0 0

-

-

2

10

9

1

10

118
32
86

COMPUTER OPERATORS,

67
61

39 5 11*.00
* 0 . 0 120.50
39.5 112.00

116.00
117.50
107.50

*0.0

1 3 3 . 0 0 - 1 * 5 .5 0
9 3 . 5 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0

*J
12

17

i*

1 8 * .0 0 - 2 6 6 . 0 0
1 8 2 .5 0 - 2 * 5 . 5 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

*

-

-

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

73
*9

39.5 227.50 225.00
39.5 211.00 205.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------------- ,----------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

95
77

39.5
39.0

185.50
182.00

178.50 16 9 .0 0 -2 0 5 .0 0
176.50 1 7 0 .0 0- 19 9. 00

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

52
*7

39.0
39.0

156.00
157.50

152.50
157.50

1 * 1 . 5 0 - 1 6 9 .0 0
1 * 2 . 0 0 - 1 7 0 .0 0

-

-

ro

8

1

18

11

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

9
7

0

i*

°

c

-

3
3

2
2

21
19

-

7
7

3
1

3
3

1
1

7
6

5
2

5
1

7
1

*9
3

6
6

-

-

-

*

-

7
3

12
10

25
2*

10
9

9
8

4
4

15
12

1
1

5
-

1
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
2

11
11

4
4

4

2
2

i

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

i*
i*

-

i

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
*3

1

232.00
4.VU.UU

1

UU 2 1 6 .0 0 - 2 6 * .5 0

*0.0

211.00

208.50

1 9 7 .0 0- 21 9. 00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

1* *
92
52

*0.0
*0.0
*0.0

179.50
182.50
17 *. 00

17*.5 0
181.50
172.50

1 6 * . 5 0 - 1 9 2 .5 0
16*.00-19*.00
1 6 6 .0 0- 18 2. 00

_

_

_

-

-

-

4

-

1
1
-

7
3

“

_
-

7

-

*

3

4

31
30

40.0

138.50 138.00
1*5.00 155.00
131.50 U
128.50

1 3 7 .0 0- 16 1. 00
12*.00-1*0.50

1
15

5
5

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------------------

129

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

56
*3

See footnotes at end of tables.




*
o
o

73

* Workers were distributed as follows:
* * Workers were distributed as follows:

1

182.50

173.00

1 65 .0 0- 20 6. 50

-

-

*0.5
*1.0

158.50
157.50

156.00
1 5* .0 0

1 3 6 .0 0- 17 7. 00
1 3 * . 0 0 - 1 8 0 .0 0

-

_

-

1

0

1

1

4

i

17

18

16

1

4

2

9

-

-

35
22
13

31
1*
17

18
11
7

22
19
3

1*
10
4

2
1
1

2
2
“

3
3
“

2
2
“

-

-

•

-

“

1

1

CLASS A --------------------------------

DRAFTSMEN,

8
8

*

8

1

-

“

1

-

-

1

12

6

15

48

2

3

28

3
3

6
5

9

6
3

5
5

4

ii
6

4

4
3

2
2

8

-

3 at $ 280 to $ 290; 3 at $ 290 to $ 300; 2 at $ 300 to $310; and 1 at $310 to $ 320.
3 at $ 280 to $ 290; 1 at $ 300 to $310; 1 at $310 to $ 320; and 1 at $ 320 to $ 330.

3

4

8

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

_

-

-

-

12
T a b le A -3 .

O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s :

A v e r a g e w e e k ly e a rn in g s , by sex

(Average straight-tim e weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division. New Orleans, L a., January 1973)
Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

W
eekly
W
eekly
h
ours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - M
EN
C L E R K S t A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S A --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

262
53
209
119

$
39.5 166.00
39.5 158.50
39.0 162.50
38.5 150.00

C L E R K S , A C C O U N T I N G , C L A S S B --------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

1AO
126
65

39.5
39.0
38.5

106.50
105.00
110.50

C L E R K S , O R D E R -----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

169
127

60.0
60.0

128.50
129.00

---------------------------

26

39.5

113
103
58

39.0
39.0
38.0

91.00
91.00
91.50

Num
ber
of

W
eekly

W
eekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W EN— CONTINUED
OM

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

W
eekly

W
eekly
earnings*
standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS W EN— CONTINUED
OM

183.00

M E S S E N G E R S ( O F F I C E B 0 Y S 1 ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

CLERKS,

PAYROLL

99.50
98.00
101.50

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------

586
68
516
170
36
33

39.0
39.5
39.0
38.5
39.5
60.0

110.00
103.00
110.50
125.50
96.50
102.50

39.5
60.0
39.0
39.0

112.50
111.00
113.50
105.50

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------

226
77
167
59

39.5
60.0
39.0
39.0

135.00
150.00
127.00
123.50

226
36
192
68
25
29

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
60.0
60.0

116.00
136.50
113.00
108.00
113.50
132.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

68
69

38.5
38.5

111.00
111.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES -----------------------------------

226
223
88
67

39.5
60.0
39.5
60.0

86.50
86.50
80.50
76.50

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------RETAIL TRADE --------------SERVICES ----------------------

607
67
560
77
69
196

39.5
60.0
39.5
38.0
60.0
60.0

102.50
113.50
101.50
120.50
92.50
105.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

203
60
163
29
27

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0
60.0

99.00
110.50
96.00
101.00
94.50

MESSENGERS (OFFICE GIRLS) NONMANUFACTURING ------------

86
83

39.0
39.0

79.00
78.50

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

93
93

38.0
38.0

93.00
93.00

SECRETARIES ------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------RETAIL TRADE --------------95.00
SERVICES ----------------------

1,163
231
912
263
137
113

39.5
60.0
39.0
38.5
60.0
60.0

138.50
166.00
136.50
169.50
125.50
125.00

TYPISTS, CLASS A ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------

259
228

38.0
38.0

109.50
105.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------NONMANUFACTURING ------------

108
86

39.5
39.0

159.00
152.00

TYPISTS, CLASS 8 -----------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

596
66
568
112
171
51

39.0
60.0
39.0
38.5
60.0
60.0

90.00
93.00
90.00
106.50
89.00
88.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS B ------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------

250
37
213
72

39.0
60.0
39.0
38.0

166.00
153.00
166.50
150.50

SECRETARIES, CLASS C ------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------RETAIL TRADE --------------SERVICES ----------------------

383
83
300
68
48
67

39.5
39.5
39.5
39.0
60.0
60.0

160.00
166.00
138.50
159.00
128.00
123.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A —
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------

66
60

39.5
39.5

177.00
178.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B ---NONMANUFACTURING ----------------SERVICES ---------------------------

165
129
55

60.0
39.5
60.0

138.00
136.50
167.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS D ------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------RETAIL TRADE --------------SERVICES ----------------------

600
87
313
81
56
60

39.0
60.0
39.0
38.5
60.0
60.0

127.00
132.50
125.00
135.50
115.50
111.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C —
NONMANUFACTURING -----------------

78
72

39.5
39.5

109.50
108.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------

63
61

60.0
39.5

233.00
216.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS C -------NONMANUFACTURING -----------

167
166

33.5
38.5

81.00
81.00

CLERKS, ORDER --------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------RETAIL TRADE ---------------

173
167
39

60.0
60.0
60.0

CLERKS, PAYROLL -----------------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------RETAIL TRADE ---------------

165
62
103
44

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------RETAIL TRADE --------------SERVICES ----------------------

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - W EN
CM
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
M A C H I N E ) ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

76
76

60.0
60.0

96.50
93.50

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
M A C H I N E ) ----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

67
67

39.0
39.0

95.50
95.50

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S A -----------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

63
27

39.5
39.0

115.00
112.00

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
C L A S S B -----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------R E T A I L T R A D E -----------------

111
31
80
26

60.0
60.0
39.5
39.5

102.00
92.00
106.00

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------R E T A I L T R A O E -----------------

278
66
236
57
32

39.5
60.0
39.5
38.5
60.0

135.50
135.50
135.50
169.50
129.00

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------S E R V I C E S -----------------------

765
113
652
216
232
83

39.0 106.00
60.0 109.00
39.0 103.00
38.0 122.00
39.5
96.50
60.0
91.50

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

A ------------------------

56
60

39.0
39.0

121.00
112.00

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS
NONMANUFACTURING

B ------------------------

176
166

39.0
39.0

86.50
86.00

See footnote at end of tables.




PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - M
EN

13

Table A-3. Office, professional, and technical occupations: Average weekly earnings, by sex----Continued
(Average straight-time weekly hours and earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, New Orleans, L a., January 1973)
Average

Average
Num
ber

of

W
eekly

W
eekly
w
orkers
earnings *
(standard) (standard)

of

W
eekly

W
eekly
earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

81
65

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------

61
36

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

39
37

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------- ,---------------------$
39.5 188.00
39.5 186.00 DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------39.0 156.50
39.0 155.50 DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C -------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------39.5 239.50
39.5 262.50

Average

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number

of

workers

Weekly
hours1
standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

182.50

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
73

60.0 211.00

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS ----------------------

163
91
52

60.0 179.50
60.0 182.50
60.0 176.00

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - W M
O EN

61
31
30

60.0 138.50
60.0 165.00
60.0 131.50

129

O

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B -------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------




Num
ber

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

See footnote at end of tables.

Sex, occupation, and industry division

O

Sex, occupation, and industry division

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

60
26

60.0 123.00
60.0 120.00

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ---MANUFACTURING ------ -----------------------

56
63

60.5 158.50
61.0 157.50

14

T a b le A -4 .

M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p la n t o c c u p a tio n s :

H o u r ly e a rn in g s

(A verage straight-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations by industry division, New Orleans, L a., January 1973)
Hourly earnings^

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
t

Sex, occupation, and industry division

U n der

Mean *

Median^

Middle range ^

<

2.60

2.70 2.80

t

t

t

T

t

(

(

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.23

3.30

3 . AO 3 . 5 0

t

i

1

i

3.60 3.70

t

3.80

t

A .

00 A

*

t

*

*

i

*

A .A 0

.20

A .6 0

A .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .

I
A0

5.60

5.60

over

and
2.60 under
%

and

2.70 2.80

2.90

3.00

3.10

3.20

3. 3 3

3. 4 0

3.50

3.60

3.70

3 . 8 0 <>.00 <>.20 *.<>0 4 . 6 0

4.80

5.00

5.20

5,40

MEN

C A R P E N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N D N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

130
52
78
31

$
A . 61
A . 68
A . 57
3. 9 2

$
4. 4 8
A . 93
A . 27
3.87

$
$
3 . 8 9 - A . 98
A . 19- A . 98
3 . 8 2 - A . 88
3 . 4 5 - 4. 4 3

E L E C T R I C I A N S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------

444
301
1A3
58

A. 72
A. 79
A. 57
A . 72

A . 75
5.05
4. 6 4
A . 76

E N G I N E E R S , S T A T I O N A R Y ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------R E T A I L T R A D E ---------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

275
144
131
A7
79

4.42
A . 65
A. 17
A. 39
3.98

FIREMEN,

-----------------------------------------

113
110

H E L P E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E T R A D E S --------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------------

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

5

6

3

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

5
5

6
2

3
-

4
4
“

2
2
-

13
2
11
10

9
8
1
-

1A
1A
2

12
1
11
10

3
2
1

32
28
A

A
1
3

A
A
-

A
2
2
“

13
*13
“

A . 27- 5.15
A . 25- 5.16
A . A 2 - A . 77
A . 3 3 - 5.23

-

-

2
2

-

~

-

_
-

2
2

-

-

-

i
i

32
32
-

20
5
15
12

29
21
8
1

A3
39
A
4

36
15
21
A

69
10
59
13

20
16
A
2

139
132
7
4

16
16
1A

12
8
A
A

23
23
“

A . 55
4.59
4.43
A . 82
A. A1

A . 12- A.B A
A . 1 9 - 5.01
3 . 5 9 - A . 82
3 . 6 5 - 5.21
3 . 0 9 - A . 71

4
4
4

-

-

-

*

16
16
16

-

7
7
2
5

.
-

“

6
6
5
1

12
12
11
1

8
3
2
6

4
A
3

AA
A0
4
2
2

i
i
-

57
36
21
20

A1
26
15
15

16
4
12
12
-

39
32
7
1
6

10
10
10
-

A
A
1

6
5
1
1

3.7A
3.75

3.6 8
3.6 9

3.A23.44-

A . 29
4.30

n
11

-

-

-

-

A
4

"

4
4

7
4

12
12

4
4

18
18

-

30
30

16
16

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

7
7

-

-

268
115
153
1A5

3. 53
A . 02
3.17
3.21

3.28
4.47
3.15
3. 16

2 . 9 3 - 4.42
3 . 5 9 - A . 55
2 . 7 7 - 3.32
2 . 7 9 - 3.38

2A
12
12
6

1A
1A
14

18
18
18

11
11
11

"

21
12

27
2
25
25

26
25
2A

3
3
3

5
5
5

3
3

6
6
6

-

15
15
-

18
2
16
16

8
8
8

66
66
-

3
3
*

_
“

.1
-

-

“

*

M A C H I N I S T S . M A I N T E N A N C E -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

2A8
227

A . 75
A . 72

5.0A
5.01

A . 20- 5.18
A . 18- 5.16

12
12

25
25

26
2A

31
31

9
8

9
8

5

81
81

16

4

32
32

2
2

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( M A I N T E N A N C E ! -------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------R E T A I L T R A D E ----------------------

6A1
105
536
448
38

4.47
A . 06
A. 55
4.63
3.80

A . 56
3.89
A . 63
A . 81
3. 7 6

3.733.623.97A . 023.56-

A . 89
A.A5
4. 8 9
A . 93
A . 13

27
26
1
1

20
3
17
11
6

21
7
1A
10
4

38

A3
1
A2
A1
-

39
39
12
-

155

-

30
22
8

61
13
48
2A
A

*

1
80
80
*

M E C H A N I C S , M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

922
798
12A

A.A6
4.48
A. 33

A . 30
4.34
A . 26

A . 08A . 06A . 21-

5.13
5.1 A
A . 39

17
16
1

83
80
3

5A
A5

125
122
3

209
136
73

A3
38
5

23
18
5

20
16

M I L L W R I G H T S -----------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

91
70

A . 75
A . 97

5.03
5. 0 6

A.A2A . 90-

5.11
5.1 A

-

13
8

_

P A I N T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------S E R V I C E S ---------------------------

1AA
63
81
44

A. 15
4.64
3. 77
3.57

4. 34
A . 71
3.71
3. 36

3.384.393.273.25-

A . 73
4. 7 9
A.A 1
A . 28

9

23
21

P I P E F I T T E R S , M A I N T E N A N C E ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

129
117

A . 85
A . 88

5.12
5.13

A.A6A.A8-

5.19
5.19

ii
ii

51

A6
29

A . 21
A . 27

3. 9 0
A. A3

3.823.69-

A. A 7
4.49

i
-

3
3

STATIONARY

MANUFACTURING

BOILER

----------

SHEET-METAL WORKERS, MAINTENANCE —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------

* All workers we re at $6.80 to $7.
** W o r k e r s we r e distributed as follows:
See footnotes at end of tables.




~

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

~
"

"

-

17
8
9
9

.
-

9
9

11
ii
9

"

9
9

19
19
19

_
-

2
2

9

-

1A
4

10
9
i
5
5

15
6
9
9

20
20

A2
4

38
2A
1A
9
9

“

-

9

20
4
2

-

3

2

.

-

.

19

13

-

A

2

-

3
3

2

-

"

-

19
8

13
13

-

-

2

_

_

-

2

-

_

1 at $5.80 to $6; 74 at $ 6 to $6.20; and 6 at $6.40 to $6.60.

-

_

-

-

.

11
11

16
16

4

1
1
1

-

8

-

8

6
2

8

_

-

*

-

7
3
4
-

8
i
-

22
10
12
11

A

-

-

21

4

-

-

12

1
-

16
4

-

-

16
12

1
1

4

A

2

-

*

_ **81

4

29
20

151
151
“

9
“

-

4

261
257
A

38
6

6
6

1
1
“

6
6

A8
A8

_
“

*

A

12
10

5
5
-

A
A

1
1
-

-

9

2

50

AA

-

A

1
-

20

20

A
A

-

-

1
1

15

Table A-5. Custodial and material movement occupations: Hourly earnings
(A verage straight-tim e hourly earnings of w orkers in selected occupations by industry division, New Orleans, L a., January 1973)
N u m b e r of worker s rece iving straight -tim e hour ly earnings of--t
i
S
t

H
ourly earnings3

i

i

$

i

»

3

2 *0 2.50 2.50

2.70

2.80

3.00

3. 20 3 . * 0

*

2.30

M
iddle range 2

3.60

3.80

* .0 0

*.20

*.*0

*.60

*.80

2 .20 2.30

2 .* 0

2 50 2.60 2.70

2 .80

3.00

3.20

3. *0

3.60

3.80 * . 0 0

*.20

*.*0

* .6 0

* . 8 0 over

-

12
9
3

-

29

19

“

29

19

33
8
25

$

*

1.60
Mean2 M
edian^

i
1.70

1.80

1.90 2.00 2 .10

1.80

1.90

2.00

2.10

1003

206
12
19*

**5
** 5

270
270

129
6
123

*

i

t

2.20

*

1.70

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Num
ber
of
w
orkers

(

t

$

i

and
under

and

M
EN

120
2 , 21 *

$
1.89
2.89
1.83

GUARDS
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

97

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ---MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------SERVICES ----------------------------------

2,351
375
1,976
51
702
1,001

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING ----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

$

$

1.78
2.57
1.75

$
1.662.501.66-

2.95

2.57

2.51-

2.21
3.13
2.0*
3.02
1.92
2.00

2.00
3.11
1.90
3.05
1.79
1.90

1 . 8 0 - 2.50
2 . 9 0 - 3.58
1 .7 8 - 2.12
2 . * 6 - 3 .* 7
1 . 7 1 - 2.05
1 . 8 2 - 2.08

1,752
672
1,080
503

2.59
2.8*
2 .**
2. * 5

2.35
3.02
2.1*
2.29

1.9*2.131.891.98-

ORDER FILLERS --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

761
52
709
255

2.66
3. 30
2.62
3.39

2 . *3
3.65
2.38
3.55

2.082.732.053.17-

PACKERS, SHIPPING --------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

259
89
170

2.09
3. 0 *
1.89
2.21

1 . 8 * - 3.02
3 . 0 1 - 3.08
1 . 8 1 - 2.28
1 .8 7 - 2 . * *

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN -----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

2,3 3*

1.9*
3.60
1.91

3.96

-

1003

-

12

235

33*

231

330

11
7

*

3

3

53
*5
8

-

-

-

-

-

*5

-

1

100
22
78

15
15

*6
5
*1
2
5
23

39
6
33

*2
13
29

*

50
**

51
267

16
37

37
22

3

*

121
**
77
17

266
95
171
*2

86
7
79
72

52
21
31
6

11*
20
9*
*5

*1
25
15
16

*9
20
29
19

16
16
-

87
87
-

50
50
-

*9
*9
-

*8
*8
*

67
*
63
-

55
*
52
1

3*
*
30
1

50

28

10
1

50
15

28

‘8
*
*
*

3
3
3

*
*
*

5

2

2

_

6

2

5
5

2

2
2

-

6
6

2
-

151
80

215
109

86
315

3.10
3.16
3.02
3.03

52
52
10

163
15
1*8
6*

3.53
3.86
3.51
3.60

10

2.88
3.A0
2.76
2.77

2.66
3. 5 *
2.57
2.66

2 . 3 5 - 3.58
2.6 8 - *.03
2 . 3 1 - 3.25
2 . 3 * - 3.25

SHIPPING CLERKS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

68

35
33

3.67
3.99
3.3*

3.62
3.95
3 . *9

3 .3 *3.352.85-

3.99
* .6 9
3.75

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS ------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

152
**
108

2.98
3.0*
2.96

3.00
3. 0 *
2.92

2.622 .8 *2.53-

3 .* 9
3.32
3.55

-

9

-

9

TRUCKDRIVERS ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

2,968
50*
2 ,* 6 *
1,0*9
59*

3.79
3.12
3.92
5.68
2.56

3.53
3.38
3.66
5.9*
2.30

2.192.002.215.921 .9 3 -

5.92
3.78
5.93
5.97
3.27

117

56

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS) --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

76*
572
27
185

2.19
2.19
3.*7
1.89

1.99
2.03

1.861.762.381 .6*-

2.*9
2 .* 9
* .1 8
2.01

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

335

“

75
75

-

*8




36
*
32

-

*

-

173
3*
139
98

* All workers were at $5.80 to $6.

6
339

-

-

*

RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.

1*8
12
136

-

RECEIVING CLERKS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ---------------------------

*.1 2
1.68

**3
7
*36

29
29

75
11
65
1*
3*
6

2.33
2.9*
2.00
2.25

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------

-

2
21

19
25
11
1*
~

“

8
8

-

“

5
5

“

-

10

8

6

-

5

-

7
5
2

7
3
*

11
11

-

-

-

-

“
-

*

3
3
3

-

-

*

*

*

"

7*
2
72
**

8
5
3
3

*7
21
26
26

38
3e
-

282
222
60
*6

27
16
11
1

97
2
95
92

38
29
9
"

128
5*
7*

16
16
~
"

23
20
3
“

30

2*
*
20
7

2*
2*
3

39
39
5

22
*
18
6

5
*
i
i

**
**
**

9
*
5
5

120
2
118
118

55
55
55

*0
2*
16
6

3
3
3

1
1
1

3
8
8

11
~
11
2

15

2
2
2

_

10
10
-

70
70
"

-

-

-

-

"

5
5
5

-

15
3

-

~

-

15

25

2

25
7

2

18
8
10
10

*
2
2
2

15

15
9

13
2
16
15

8
*
*
*

8
*
*
2

18
3
15
15

9
3
6
2

5
*
i
i

5
*
1
1

12
10
2

9
2
7

12

6
*
2

-

i

*
*

12

9
8
1

26

5

-

-

-

16

26

5

221
113
108

18
3
15

-

87
33
5*
12

-

50

22

9*

-

2

-

2
2

-

_

_

2

2

_

2

2

-

-

*

-

2

2

-

2

2

-

9

_

-

_
-

9

20

-

-

-

9

*
*
-

_
-

-

*
*
-

-

-

9

-

20

6

79

127
16
111

189
11
1 78

91
5
86

25

62

35

-

-

*

117

56

75

198
128
70

-

-

-

no

20

15

11

59

72

11

117
117
-

*1
*1
-

53
53

187
59

79

63

35
35

no

15

6

26

*2
*2
2

-

6

-

~

52

35

56
8
*8

**

25
9
7

-

-

13

5

28

22

16
16
9
5

*
*
-

*
*

28
20

-

11
33

22
11
-

*
*
-

-

15
15
1

-

1

15
6
7

16
16

136
15
121

122
28
9*
59
16

2*

73
58

1

13
13
2
2

-

86
29
57

16

-

_

-

-

-

“
“

-

-

2
2
-

"

-

“

-

1
l
“

“

2

2

2

2

-

3
3

8
8

30
“

-

-

_

i
*
*
191

-

-

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

27
2*
3
3

22

1*5
15

15

“

”

*

3
3
3

*6

9

13
7

“

125
106
19

2
15

_

5

33
7
26

“

-

18
2

*

-

101
76
25
8
13
1

25
10
15

12

-

-

-

*
**

-

6
6

12

*

-

-

-

128
60
68
1
5
55

-

-

-

10

15

3
3

10

13

10

13

*
18
18

*8 *931
26
22
931
2 931

~
_
-

-

16

T a b le A -5 .

C u s to d ia l and m a te ria l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s :

H o u rly e a rn in g s — C o n tin u e d

(Average straight-time hourly earnings of workers in selected occupations by industry division, N e w Orleans, La., January 1973)
Number of wor kers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Sex, occupation, and industry division

of
workers

s
%
%
i
t
s
*
1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20
Mean *

Median2

Middle range *

1
.33

\
$
A
$
.40 2.53 2.63
.70 2.80

A
A
A
t
A
A
i
A
$
V
3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80

.40

.50 2.60 2.70 2.80 3.00

3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4.20 4.40 4.60 4.80 over

i

and
under
1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30

M
EN - CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS - CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM (1-1/2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ---------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ----------TRUCKERS t POWER (FORKLIFT) -----------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

$
3.70
3.62
3.76
2.95

$
2. 5 53.1 22.5 12.6 4-

$
5.9 *
3.79
5.94
3.27

-

15
15
5

26
*
22
10

11
11
5

18
18
3

77
11
66
-

46
5
41
11

8
8
1

48
48
3

30
30
*

28
_
28
28

22
22
22

63
63
23

24
17
7
7

68
20
48
*8

19
7
12
-

70
37
33
33

5

587
67
520
379

4.84
3.86
4.96

5.91
3.48
5.92
5. 9 *

3.5 53.4 23. 7 15. 9 1 -

5.95
*.6*
5.96
5.97

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
10

-

-

1
1

-

-

-

85
11
74

2
1
1

66
26
40

72
72

3
3
-

_

316

3.30

3.76

2. 1 7-

*.o*

-

-

*

-

30

70

-

I

10

-

“

-

-

-

3

2

70

-

871
6*2
229
40

3 • *0
3. *8
3.20

3.30
3. 32
3.06

2.9 93.1*2.5 33.0 5-

3.95
*.0*
3.58
5.95

_

_

_

~

6
2
*

15
I
14

31
25
6

-

26
19
7

_

-

*
2
2

36

-

22
2
20

84
72
12

124
101
23

138
138
-

98
*0
58

54
26
28

35
35
-

12

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) -----------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

$
4.08
3.42
4.17
2.93

36

1,059
131
928
208

*

**• 1

-

36

-

5
5

TRUCKERS, POWER I OTHER THAN
...»

'

’

W EN
OM
JANITORS, PURTERS, AND CLEANERS ----

5* *
527
83

0
54

* All workers were at $5.80 to $6.
See footnotes at end of tables.




1.89

1.86

1.84
1.82

1.79

2.28

2.25

1.74- 2.33
2.02
1.75- 1.89
1.69- 2.31

110

1.75- 2.78

11

114

no

62
62
45

6

161
161
19
1 '

2

37
37

106
106

6

100

2

29
29

i

1

_

_

8

_

1

16

10

1

10

9

8
6
2

22 *409
22 409
-

20
20
-

22
4
18

_

_

26
26
-

130

-

*

-

-

100
100
-

68
68
-

8
8
-

4
3
i

18

322
322

-

18

17

F o o tn o te s

1 S t a n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ich e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e
a t r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , an d the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to t h e s e w e e k ly h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n i s c o m p u te d f o r e a c h jo b b y t o ta lin g the e a r n i n g s o f a l l w o r k e r s a n d d iv id in g b y the n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ,
The m ed ian
d e s i g n a t e s p o s i t io n — h a lf o f the e m p lo y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e th an the r a t e sh o w n ; h a lf r e c e i v e l e s s th an the r a t e sh ow n ,
The m id d le
r a n g e i s d e f in e d b y 2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a fo u r t h o f th e w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s th a n th e l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s a n d a fo u r t h e a r n m o r e th a n the h ig h e r r a t e .
3 E x c lu d e s p r e m iu m p a y fo r o v e r tim e and fo r w o rk on w e e k e n d s, h o lid a y s, and la te sh ifts.




A p p e n d ix . O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c rip tio n s
The p rim ary purpose of p rep arin g job d escrip tion s for the B u re a u 's wage survey s is to a s s i s t its field staff in cla ssify in g into appropriate
occupations w orkers who a re employed under a variety of payroll title s and different work arran gem en ts from establishm ent to establish m ent and
from a re a to a re a . This p e rm its the grouping of occupational wage rate s represen ting com parable job content. B ecau se of this em phasis on
in terestablishm ent and in te ra re a com p arab ility of occupational content, the B u re a u 's job d escrip tio n s m ay differ significantly from those in use in
individual e stablish m en ts or those p rep ared for other p u rp o ses. In applying these job d escrip tio n s, the B u re a u 's field econ om ists a re instructed
to exclude working s u p e rv iso r s; app ren tices; le a r n e r s; beginners; tra in e e s; and handicapped, p art-tim e , tem p orary , and probation ary w ork ers.

OFFICE
B IL L E R , MACHINE

C L E R K , ACCOUNTING— Continued

P re p a re s statem en ts, b ills, and in voices on a m achine other than an ordin ary or e lectrom atic typew riter. May a lso keep rec o rd s as to b illin gs or shipping ch arges or perform other
c le r ic a l work incidental to billing op eratio n s. F o r wage study p u rp o se s, b ille r s , m achine, a re
c la ssifie d by type of m achine, a s follow s:

P osition s a re c la ssifie d into le v e ls on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la s s A . Under general sup ervision , p e rfo rm s accounting c le r ic a l operations which
requ ire the application of experien ce and judgm ent, for exam ple, c le ric a lly p ro cessin g com ­
p licated or nonrepetitive accounting tran sa ctio n s, selectin g among a substan tial variety of
p re sc rib e d accounting codes and c la ssific a tio n s, o r tracin g tran sactio n s through previous
accounting actions to determ ine source of d isc re p a n c ie s. May be a ss is te d by one or m ore
c la s s B accounting c le rk s.
C la ss B . Under clo se sup ervision , following detailed in struction s and standardized p ro ­
ce d u re s, p e rfo rm s one or m ore routine accounting c le r ic a l o p eration s, such as posting to
le d g e r s, c a rd s, or w orksheets where identification of item s and locations of postings are
c le a rly indicated; checking accu racy and com p leten ess of stan dardized and repetitive reco rd s
or accounting docum ents; and coding docum ents using a few p re sc rib e d accounting codes.

B ille r , m achine (billing m ach ine). U se s a sp ec ia l billing machine (combination typing
and adding m achine) to p re p a re b ills and in voices from cu sto m ers' purch ase o r d e r s, in ter­
nally p rep are d o r d e r s, shipping m em oran dum s, etc. U sually involves application of p r e ­
determ ined d iscounts and shipping ch a rg e s and entry of n e c e ssa ry extension s, which m ay or
m ay not be computed on the billing m achine, and to tals which a re autom atically accum ulated
by m achine. The operation u su ally involves a la r g e number of carbon cop ies of the bill being
p rep ared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B ille r , m achine (bookkeeping m achine). U se s a bookkeeping m achine (with o r without
a typew riter keyboard) to p rep are cu sto m e rs' b ills a s p art of the accounts receivable o p e ra ­
tion. G enerally involves the sim ultaneous entry of fig u re s on c u sto m ers' ledger reco rd . The
m achine autom atically accu m ulates fig u re s on a number of v e rtica l colum ns and com putes
and u su ally p rin ts autom atically the debit or cred it b alan ce s. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of s a le s and cred it s lip s.
BOOKKEEPING-M ACHINE OPERATOR
O perates a bookkeeping m achine (with or without a typew riter keyboard) to keep a record
of b u sin ess tran sa c tio n s.
C la s s A. K eep s a set of rec o rd s requiring a knowledge of and experience in b asic
bookkeeping p rin c ip le s, and fa m ilia rity with the stru cture of the p articu lar accounting system
used. D eterm ines p ro per rec o rd s and d istribution of debit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase of the work. May p rep a re consolidated re p o rts, balance sh eets, and other reco rd s
by hand.
C la s s B. K eeps a reco rd of one or m ore p h ases or section s of a set of reco rd s usually
requiring little knowledge of b a sic bookkeeping. P h ases or section s include accounts payable,
p ay roll, cu sto m e rs' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing d escrib ed under b iller,
m achine), co st distribu tion, expense d istribution, inventory co n tro l, etc. May check or a s s is t
in p rep aration of tr ia l balan ces and p rep are control sheets for the accounting departm ent.
C L E R K , ACCOUNTING
P e rfo rm s one o r m o re accounting c le r ic a l ta sk s such a s posting to r e g is te rs and le d g e rs;
reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal con sisten cy, com pleten ess, and m athem atical
accu racy of accounting docum ents; assign in g p resc rib e d accounting distribution codes; examining
and verifying for c le r ic a l accu racy v ariou s types of r e p o r ts, lis t s , calculations, posting, e tc.;
or prep arin g sim ple or a ss is tin g in prep arin g m ore com plicated journal vouch ers. May work
in either a m anual or autom ated accounting system .
The work r e q u ire s a knowledge of c le r ic a l methods and office p rac tic e s and p roced ures
which re late s to the c le r ic a l p ro c essin g and recording of tran saction s and accounting inform ation.
With experien ce, the w orker typically becom es fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping and accounting te rm s
and p ro ced u res used in the assig n e d work, but is not required to have a knowledge of the form al
p rin cip les of bookkeeping and accounting.




C L E R K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s if ie s , and re trie v e s m ate rial in an e stab lish ed filing sy stem . May perform
c le r ic a l and m anual ta sk s required to m aintain file s . P osition s a re c la ss ifie d into levels on the
b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A . C la s sifie s and indexes file m ate rial such a s corresp on d en ce, rep o rts, tech­
n ical docum ents, e tc., in an e stablish ed filing system containing a number of varied subject
m atte r file s . May a lso file this m a te ria l. May keep reco rd s of vario u s types in conjunction
with the file s . May lead a sm all group of low er level file c le r k s .
C la ss B . S o rts, cod es, and file s u n classifie d m ate rial by sim p le (subject m atter) head­
ings or p artly c la ssifie d m ate rial by finer subheadings. P re p a re s sim ple related index and
c r o ss -r e fe re n c e a id s. As requ ested, locates c le arly identified m ate rial in file s and fo r ­
w ards m a te r ia l. May p erform related c le r ic a l ta sk s requ ired to m aintain and serv ice file s .
C la s s C . P e rfo rm s routine filing of m ate rial that has alread y been c la ssifie d or which
is e a sily c la ss ifie d in a sim ple s e r ia l cla ssific a tio n system (e.g ., alphabetical, chronological,
or n um erical). A s requested, lo cates read ily available m ate rial in file s and forw ards m a ­
te ria l; and m ay fill out withdrawal ch arge. May p erform sim ple c le r ic a l and manual ta sk s
requ ired to m aintain and se rv ic e file s.
C L E R K , ORDER
R eceives cu sto m ers' o rd e rs for m ate rial or m erch an d ise by m ail, phone, or p erson ally .
Duties involve any combination of the follow ing: Quoting o r ic e s to c u sto m ers; m aking out an order
sheet listin g the item s to m ake up the o rd e r; checking p r ic e s and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and d istributing order sheets to resp ectiv e departm ents to be filled . May check with cred it
departm ent to determ ine cred it rating of cu stom er, acknowledge receip t of o rd e rs from cu sto m ers,
follow up o rd e rs to see that they have been filled , keep file of o rd e rs received, and check shipping
in voices with original o r d e r s.
C L E R K , PAYROLL
Com putes w ages of company em ployees and enters the n e c e ssa r y data on the payroll
sh e ets. Duties involve: C alculating w ork ers' earn ings based on tim e or production reco rd s; and
posting calculated data on p ayroll sheet, showing inform ation such a s w o rk e r's nam e, working
day s, tim e, rate , deductions fo r in su ran ce, and total w ages due. May m ake out paychecks and
a s s is t p ay m aster in m aking up and d istributing pay envelopes. May u se a calculating m achine.

NOTE: The Bureau has discontinued collecting data for com ptom eter o p e ra to rs.

18

19
KEYPUNCH OPERATOR

SEC RET A R Y — Continued

O p erates a keypunch m achine to rec o rd or verify alphabetic an d /or num eric data on
tabulating c a rd s or on tap e.

NO TE: The term "co rp o rate o fficer, " used in the level definitions following, r e fe r s to
those o fficials who have a significant corporate-w ide policym aking role with regard to m ajor
company activ itie s. The title "v ice p r e sid e n t," though norm ally indicative of this role, does not
in all c a se s identify such p o sition s. Vice p resid en ts whose p rim ary resp on sibility is to act p e r ­
sonally on individual c a s e s or tran sactio n s (e.g ., approve or deny individual loan or cred it actions;
adm in ister individual tru st accounts; d irectly su p erv ise a c le r ic a l staff) a re not con sidered to be
"co rp o rate o ffic e r s " for p u rp oses of applying the following level d efinition s.

P o sitio n s a re c la ss ifie d into lev els on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la s s A . Work re q u ires the application of experien ce and judgment in selectin g p ro ce ­
d ures to be followed and in search in g fo r, in terpretin g, selectin g, or coding item s to be
keypunched fro m a v ariety of source docum ents. On o ccasio n m ay a lso p erform som e routine
keypunch work. May train in experienced keypunch o p e ra to rs.

C la s s A
1. S ec re ta ry to the chairm an of the board or p resid en t of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, over 100 but fewer than 5,000 p e rso n s; or *
1

C la s s B . Work is routine and rep etitiv e. Under c lo se sup ervision or following sp ecific
p ro ced u re s or in stru ctio n s, works from v ario u s stan dardized source docum ents which have
been coded, and follows sp ecified p ro ced u res which have been p rescrib e d in d etail and require
little or no selectin g , coding, or in terpretin g of data to be record ed . R e fe rs to su p e rv iso r
p roblem s a risin g from erron eous item s or codes o r m issin g inform ation.
M ESSEN GER (Office Boy o r G irl)
P erfo rm s v ario u s routine duties such a s running e rra n d s, operating m inor office m a ­
chines such a s s e a le r s or m a ile r s , opening and distribu ting m ail, and other m inor c le r ic a l work.
Exclude p ositions that req u ire operation of a m otor vehicle a s a significant duty:

2. S e cre ta ry to a corp orate officer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 but few er than 25,000 p e rso n s; or
3. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ediately below the corp orate officer level, of a m ajor
segm ent or su b sid iary of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 p e rso n s.
C la s s B
1. S e c re ta ry to the chairm an of the board or p resid en t of a company that em ploys, in
a ll, fewer than 100 p e rs o n s ; or
2. S e cre ta ry to a corp orate officer (other than the chairm an of the board or president)
of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 100 but few er than 5,000 p e rso n s; or

A ssign ed a s p e rso n al se c r e ta r y , norm ally to one individual. M aintains a clo se and highly
resp on siv e relation sh ip to the d ay-to-d ay work of the su p e rv iso r. Works fa irly independently r e ­
ceiving a m inim um of detailed su p erv isio n and guidance. P erfo rm s v a rie d c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l
d uties, usually including m o st of the follow ing:

3. S e c re ta ry to the head, im m ediately below the officer lev el, over either a m ajor
corporate-w ide functional activity (e.g ., m arketing, re se a rc h , op eration s, in dustrial relation s, etc.) or a m a jo r geographic or organizational segm ent (e .g ., a region al h ead quarters;
a m ajo r division) of a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 but fewer than 25,000
em p loy ees; or
4. S e c re ta ry to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, over 5,000 p e rso n s; or

a. R eceiv es telephone c a lls , p e rso n al c a lle r s , and incoming m ail, an sw ers routine
in q u ires, and routes technical in q u iries to the proper p e rso n s;

5. S e c re ta ry to the head of a la rge and im portant organ izational segm ent (e.g ., a middle
m anagem ent su p e rv iso r of an organ izational segm ent often involving a s many a s sev e ral
hundred p e rso n s) or a company that em ploys, in a ll, over 25,000 p e rs o n s .

SEC RETA R Y

b.

E sta b lish e s, m ain tain s, and r e v ise s the s u p e rv iso r 's file s;

c.

M aintains the su p e rv iso r 's calen dar and m akes appointm ents a s in structed;

d.

R elay s m e s s a g e s from su p e rv iso r to subordinates;

e. Review s correspond ence, m em oran dum s, and rep o rts p rep ared by others for the
s u p e r v is o r 's sign ature to a ss u r e proced ural and typographic accu racy;
f.

P e rfo rm s stenographic and typing work.

May a lso p erfo rm other c le r ic a l and s e c r e ta r ia l ta sk s of com parable nature and difficulty.
The work typ ically req u ire s knowledge of office routine and understanding of the organ ization,
p r o g ra m s, and p ro ced u re s related to the work of the su p e rv iso r.
E xclu sio n s
Not a ll po sitio n s that a re titled "s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the above c h a ra c te ris tic s . E xam ples
of positions which a re excluded from the definition a re as follow s:
a.

P o sitio n s which do not m eet the "p e rso n a l" se c r e ta r y concept d escrib ed above;

b.

Sten ograp h ers not fully train ed in s e c r e ta r ia l type duties;

c. Sten ograp h ers servin g a s office a ss is ta n ts to a group of p ro fe ssio n al, technical, or
m an ag e rial p e rso n s;
d. S e c r e ta r y positions in which the duties a re either substan tially m ore routine or
su bstan tially m ore com plex and resp o n sible than those c h a ra c te riz e d in the definition;
e. A ssista n t type positions which involve m o re d ifficult or m ore resp on sible tech­
n ical, ad m in istrativ e, su p e rv iso ry , or sp e c ia lize d c le r ic a l duties which a re not typical of
s e c r e t a r ia l work.




C la s s C
1. S e c re ta ry to an executive or m an agerial person whose resp on sib ility is not equivalent
to one of the sp ecific level situations in the definition for c la s s B, but whose organizational
unit norm ally num bers at le a st sev e ral dozen em ployees and is usually divided into o rg an iza ­
tional segm ents which a re often, in turn, furth er subdivided. In som e com panies, th is level
includes a wide range of organ izational echelons; in oth ers, only one or two; or
2. S e cre ta ry to the head of an individual plant, factory, etc. (or other equivalent level
of official) that em ploys, in a ll, few er than 5,000 p e rs o n s .
C la s s D
1. S e c re ta ry to the su p e rv iso r or head of a sm all organ izational unit (e.g., fewer than
about 25 or 30 p e rso n s); or
2. S e cre ta ry to a n onsupervisory staff sp e c ia list, p ro fe ssio n al em ployee, a d m in istra ­
tive o ffic e r, or a ss is ta n t, sk illed technician or expert. (NOTE: Many com panies a ssig n
sten ograp h ers, rath er than s e c r e ta r ie s a s d escrib e d above, to this level of su p erv iso ry or
nonsupervisory w orker.)
STENOGRAPHER
P rim ary duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to tra n sc rib e the dictation. May
a lso type from written copy. May operate from a stenographic pool. May o ccasion ally tran scrib e
from voice record in gs (if p rim ary duty is tran scrib in g from reco rd in g s, see T ranscribing-M achine
O perator, G eneral).
NOTE: This job is distinguished from that of a se c re ta ry in that a se c re ta ry norm ally
works in a confidential relation sh ip with only one m an ager or executive and perform s m ore
resp on sible and d iscre tio n ary ta sk s as d escrib e d in the se c r e ta r y job definition.
Stenographer, General
Dictation involves a norm al routine vocabulary. May m aintain file s , keep sim ple re c o rd s,
or perform other relatively routine c le r ic a l ta sk s.

20
STENOGRAPHER— Continued

TABULATING-M ACHINE OPERATOR (E lectric Accounting Machine O perator)— Continued

Sten ographer, Senior

P osition s are c la ss ifie d into lev e ls on the b a sis of the following definitions.

Dictation involves a v aried technical or sp ec ia lize d vocabulary such a s in legal b rie fs
or rep o rts on scien tific r e se a r c h . May a lso set up and m aintain file s , keep re c o r d s, etc.
OR
P e rfo rm s stenographic duties requ iring significan tly g re a te r independence and resp on ­
sibility than sten ograp h er, ge n e ral, a s evidenced by the following: Work re q u ires a high
degree of stenographic speed and a c cu rac y : a thorough working knowledge of general b u sin ess
and o ffice procedure: and of the sp ecific b u sin e ss o p eration s, organization, p o licie s, p ro c e ­
d u res, file s , workflow, etc. U se s this knowledge in p erform in g stenographic duties and
resp o n sible c le r ic a l ta sk s such a s m aintaining followup file s; asse m b lin g m ate rial for rep o rts,
m em orandum s, and le tte r s ; com posing sim ple le tte rs from general in stru ction s; reading and
routing incoming m ail; and answ ering routine q uestion s, etc.
SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
C la s s A . O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls . P e rfo rm s full telephone inform ation se rv ic e or handles
com plex c a lls , such a s conference, co lle ct, o v e r s e a s , or sim ila r c a lls , either in addition to
doing routine work as d esc rib e d for sw itchboard o p e rato r, c la ss B, or a s a fu ll-tim e
assign m en t. ( " F u ll’1 telephone inform ation s e rv ic e o ccu rs when the establishm ent has varied
functions that a re not read ily understandable for telephone inform ation p u rp o se s, e .g ., because
of overlapping or in terrelated functions, and consequently p resen t frequent problem s a s to
which extensions a re app ro p riate fo r c a lls .)
C la ss B. O perates a single- or m ultiple-position telephone switchboard handling incoming,
outgoing, intraplant or office c a lls . May handle routine long distance c a lls and reco rd to lls.
May p erfo rm lim ited telephone inform ation s e r v ic e . ("L im ite d " telephone inform ation se rv ice
o ccu rs if the functions of the establishm ent serv ic e d a re read ily understandable for telephone
inform ation p u rp o se s, or if the req u ests a re routine, e .g ., giving extension num bers when
sp ecific nam es a re furn ished, or if com plex c a lls a re re fe rre d to another o p erator.)
T h ese c la ssific a tio n s do not include sw itchboard o p e rato rs in telephone com panies who
a s s i s t cu sto m ers in placing c a lls.
SWITCHBOARD O PERATO R-RECEPTIO N IST
In addition to p erform in g duties of o p erato r on a sin gle-p osition o r m onitor-type sw itch­
board, a c ts a s recep tio n ist and m ay a lso type or p erfo rm routine c le r ic a l work a s p art of reg u lar
duties. This typing or c le r ic a l work m ay take the m ajo r p art of this w o rk e r's tim e while at
sw itchboard.
TABULATING-M ACHINE OPERATOR (E lec tric Accounting Machine Operator)
O perates one or a v ariety of m achines such a s the tab ulator, ca lcu la to r, collato r, in ter­
p rete r, s o rte r , reproducing punch, etc. Excluded from this definition a re working su p e rv iso r s.
A lso excluded a re o p e rato rs of electron ic digital co m p u ters, even though they m ay a lso operate
EAM equipment.

C la s s A. P e rfo rm s com plete reporting and tabulating assig n m e n ts including devising
difficult control panel wiring under general sup ervision . A ssign m en ts typically involve a
variety of long and com plex rep o rts which often a re ir r e g u la r o r nonrecurring, requiring
som e planning of the nature and sequencing of op eration s, and the u se of a variety of m a ­
chines. Is typically involved in training new o p e rato rs in m achine operations or train in g
lower level o p e rato rs in wiring from d iag ram s and in the operating sequences of long and
com plex re p o rts. Does not include p ositions in which wiring resp o n sib ility is lim ited to
selection and in sertion of prew ired board s.
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s work accordin g to e stablish ed p ro ced u res and under sp ecific in­
stru ctio n s. A ssignm ents typically involve com plete but routine and recu rrin g rep o rts or p a rts
of la r g e r and m ore com plex rep o rts. O p erates m ore difficult tabulating or e le ctr ic a l a c ­
counting m achines such a s the tabulator and ca lcu la to r, in addition to the sim p ler m achines
used by c la s s C o p e ra to rs. May be required to do som e wiring from d iag ram s. May train
new em ployees in b asic m achine operations.
C la s s C . Under sp ecific in stru ction s, o p erates sim ple tabulating or e le ctric a l accounting
m achines such a s the s o rte r , in terp rete r, reproducing punch, co lla to r, etc. A ssignm ents
typically involve portions of a work unit, for exam ple, individual sortin g or collating runs,
or repetitive op eration s. May p erform sim ple wiring from d ia g ra m s, and do som e filing work.
TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, G EN ERAL
P rim a ry duty is to tra n sc rib e dictation involving a norm al routine vocabulary from
tran scrib in g-m ach in e re c o r d s. May a lso type from written copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l work.
W orkers tran scrib in g dictation involving a varied technical or sp ecia lize d vocabulary such as
le g al b rie fs or rep o rts on scien tific re se a r c h a re not included. A w orker who takes dictation
in shorthand or by Stenotype or sim ila r m achine is c la ss ifie d a s a sten ographer.
TY PIST
U se s a typew riter to m ake copies of v ariou s m a te r ia ls or to m ake out bills a fter ca lc u la ­
tions have been m ade by another p erson . May include typing of ste n c ils, m a ts, or sim ila r m ate ­
r ia ls for u se in duplicating p r o c e s s e s . May do c le r ic a l work involving little sp e c ia l training, such
a s keeping sim p le re c o r d s, filing reco rd s and re p o rts, o r sortin g and distribu ting incoming m ail.
C la s s A. P e rfo rm s one or m ore of the following: Typing m ate rial in final form when
it involves combining m ate rial from se v e ral so u rc e s: or resp o n sib ility fo r c o rre ct spelling,
syllabication , punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or foreign language m ate ­
ria l; or planning layout and typing of com plicated sta tistic a l tab le s to m aintain uniform ity
and balance in spacin g. May type routine form le tte r s , varying d etails to suit c ircu m sta n ce s.
C la s s B . P erfo rm s one or m ore of the following: Copy typing from rough or c le ar
d ra fts; or routine typing of fo rm s, in su ran ce p o lic ie s, e tc.; or setting up sim ple standard
tabulations; or copying m ore com plex tab les alrea d y set up and spaced properly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COMPUTER OPERATOR
M onitors and o p erates the control console of a digital com puter to p ro c e ss data according
to operating in stru c tio n s, usually p rep ared by a p ro g ra m er. Work includes m ost of the following:
Studies in struction s to determ ine equipment setup and o p eration s; loads equipment with required
item s (tape r e e ls , c a rd s, e tc.); sw itches n e c e ssa r y au xiliary equipment into c ircu it, and sta r ts
and op erates com puter; m ak es adjustm en ts to com puter to co rre c t operating p roblem s and m eet
sp ec ia l conditions; review s e r r o r s m ade during operation and d eterm in es cau se or r e fe r s problem
to su p e rv iso r or p ro g ra m er; and m ain tain s operating re c o r d s. May te st and a s s is t in correctin g
p ro gram .
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, com puter o p e rato rs are c la ssifie d as follows:
C la ss A. O perates independently, or under only general direction, a com puter running
p ro g ram s with m o st of the following c h a ra c te ristic s: New p rogram s a re frequently tested
and introduced; scheduling req u irem en ts a re of c ritic a l im portance to m inim ize downtime;
the p ro g ra m s a re of com plex design so that identification of e rr o r sou rce often req u ires a
working knowledge of the total p ro g ram , and altern ate p rogram s m ay not be av ailable. May
give direction and guidance to lower level o p e ra to rs.
C la s s B. O perates independently, o r under only general direction, a com puter running
p ro g ra m s with m o st of the following c h a ra c te ristic s: M ost of the p ro g ram s a re establish ed
production ru n s, typically run on a reg u larly recu rrin g b a sis; there is little or no testin g




COM PUTER OPERATOR— Continued
of new p ro g ram s requ ired ; altern ate p ro g ra m s a re provided in c a se original p rogram needs
m ajo r change or cannot be co rrecte d within a reason able tim e. In common e rr o r situ a ­
tion s, d iagn oses cause and tak es co rrectiv e action. This usually involves applying previously
p rogram ed c o rrectiv e ste p s, or using stan dard co rrectio n techniques.
OR
O perates under d ire ct sup ervision a com puter running p ro g ram s or segm ents of p ro g ram s
with the c h a ra c te ristic s d escrib ed for c la s s A. May a s s is t a higher level operator by inde­
pendently p erform in g le s s difficult ta sk s a ssig n e d , and perform in g difficult ta s k s following
detailed in struction s and with frequent review of operations perform ed.
C la s s C . Works on routine p ro g ram s under clo se sup ervision . Is expected to develop
working knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in
running routine p ro g ra m s. U sually has received som e form al train in g in com puter operation.
May a s s i s t higher level operator on com plex p ro g ra m s.
COM PUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS
Converts statem en ts of b u sin e ss p roblem s, typ ically p rep ared by a sy stem s analyst, into
a sequence of detailed in struction s which a re requ ired to solve the p roblem s by autom atic data
p ro c e ssin g equipm ent. Working from ch arts or d ia g ra m s, the p ro g ra m er develops the p re c ise in­
stru ction s which, when entered into the com puter system in coded language, cause the m anipulation

21
COM PUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS— Continued

COMPUTER SYSTEM S ANALYST, BUSINESS— Continued

of data to achieve d esired r e su lts. Work involves m ost of the following: Applies knowledge of
com puter c a p a b ilitie s, m ath em atics, logic employed by com puters, and p articu lar subject m atter
involved to analyze ch arts and d iag ram s of the problem to be program ed: develops sequence
of p rogram step s: w rites detailed flow charts to show o rder in which data will be p ro cessed ;
converts th ese ch arts to coded instructions for machine to follow; te sts and c o r r e c ts p rog ram s;
p re p a re s in struction s for operating personnel during production run; an alyzes, review s, and a lte rs
p ro g ra m s to in c re a se operating efficiency or adapt to new requirem ents; m aintains record s of
p rogram developm ent and rev isio n s. (NOTE: W orkers perform ing both sy stem s an aly sis and p ro ­
gram in g should be c la ssifie d a s sy stem s an alysts if this is the skill used to determ ine their pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp on sible for the m anagem ent or supervision of
other electro n ic data p ro c essin g em ployees, or p ro g ra m ers p rim arily concerned with scientific
an d /or engineering p ro blem s.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, p ro g ra m ers are c la ssifie d as follows:
C la ss A. Works independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s which
requ ire com petence in all p h ases of program ing concepts and p ra c tic e s. Working from d ia ­
g ram s and ch arts which identify the nature of d esired r e su lts, m ajor p ro cessin g steps to be
accom plished, and the relation sh ips between variou s step s of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of program ing actions needed to efficiently utilize the com puter system
in achieving d esired end products.
At this level, program ing is difficult because com puter equipment m ust be organized to
produce sev e ral in terrelated but d iv erse products from num erous and d iv erse data elem ents.
A wide v ariety and extensive number of internal p ro cessin g actions m ust occu r. This requ ires
such actions a s developm ent of common operations which can be reu sed , establishm ent of
linkage points between op eratio n s, adjustm ents to data when program requirem ents exceed
com puter sto rag e capacity, and substan tial manipulation and resequencing of data elem ents
to form a highly integrated p ro gram .

every item of each type is autom atically p ro cessed through the :‘ull system of reco rd s and
appropriate followup actions are initiated by the computer.) C on fe/s with person s concerned to
determ ine the data p ro cessin g problem s and ad v ise s su bject-m atter personnel on the im p lica ­
tions of new or rev ised sy stem s of data p ro cessin g operations. Makes recom m endations, if
needed, for approval of m ajor sy stem s in stallation s or changes and for obtaining equipment.
May provide functional d irection to lower level sy stem s an alysts who are assig n e d to
as si st.
C la ss B. Works independently or under only general direction on problem s that are
relatively uncom plicated to analyze, plan, p rogram , and operate. P roblem s a re of lim ited
com plexity becau se so u rces of input data are homogeneous and the output data are closely
related. (F o r exam ple, develops sy stem s for m aintaining depositor accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts receivable in a reta il establishm ent, or m aintaining inventory accounts
in a m anufacturing or w holesale establishm ent.) Confers with p erson s concerned to determ ine
the data p ro cessin g problem s and ad v ise s su b ject-m atter personnel on the im plications of the
data p ro cessin g sy stem s to be applied.
OR

May provide functional d irection to lower level p ro g ra m ers who a re assig n e d to a s s is t .

DRAFTSMAN
C la s s A. Plans the graphic presentation of com plex item s having distinctive design
featu res that d iffer significantly from established drafting p receden ts. Works in clo se sup­
port with the design orig in ator, and m ay recom m end m inor design changes. Analyzes the
effect of each change on the d etails of form , function, and positional relation sh ips of com ­
ponents and p a r ts. Works with a minimum of su p erv iso ry a ss is ta n c e . Completed work is
reviewed by design originator for con sisten cy with p rior engineering determ inations. May
either p rep are draw in gs, or d irect their preparation by lower level draftsm en.
C la ss B . P erfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assig n m en ts that require the app li­
cation of m ost of the standardized drawing techniques regu larly used. Duties typically in­
volve such work a s: P re p a re s working draw ings of su b a sse m b lie s with irre g u la r shapes,
m ultiple functions, and p re c ise positional relation sh ips between com ponents; p rep a re s a rc h i­
tectu ral draw ings for construction of a building including detail draw ings of foundations, wall
sectio n s, floor plan s, and roof. U ses accepted form ulas and m anuals in making n ece ssa ry
com putations to determ ine quantities of m a te ria ls to be used, load ca p a citie s, stren gth s,
s t r e s s e s , etc. R eceives initial in struction s, requ irem en ts, and advice from su p e rv iso r.
Com pleted work is checked for technical adequacy.
C la ss C . P re p a re s detail draw ings of single units or p arts for engineering, construction,
m anufacturing, or rep air p u rp o se s. Types of draw ings prepared include isom etric projections
(depicting three dim ensions in accu rate scale ) and sectional views to cla rify positioning of
components and convey needed inform ation. C on solidates d etails from a number of so u rces
and ad ju sts or tra n sp o se s sc a le as required. Suggested m ethods of approach, applicable
p reced en ts, and advice on source m a te ria ls a re given with initial assig n m en ts. Instructions
a re le s s com plete when assign m en ts recu r. Work m ay be spot-checked during p r o g re s s.

C la s s B .~ Works independently or under only general direction on relatively sim ple
p ro g ra m s, or on sim ple segm ents of com plex p ro g ra m s. P ro g ra m s (or segm ents) usually
p r o c e ss inform ation to produce data in two or three varied sequences or fo rm ats. R eports
and listin g s a re produced by refining, adapting, arrayin g, or making m inor additions to or
deletions from input data which a re readily av ailable. While num erous reco rd s m ay be
p ro c e sse d , the data have been refined in p rio r actions so that the accu racy and sequencing
of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. Typically, the program d eals with
routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
Works on com plex p ro gram s (as d escribed for c la ss A) under close direction of a higher
level p ro g ram er or su p e rv iso r. May a s s i s t higher level p rog ram er by independently p e r ­
form ing le s s difficult ta sk s assig n ed , and perform ing m ore difficult ta sk s under fa irly close
direction.
May guide or in struct lower level p ro g ra m e rs.
C la ss C. M akes p ractical applications of program ing p ractice s and concepts usually
learn ed in form al training c o u rse s. A ssignm ents are designed to develop com petence in the
application of standard proced ures to routine p ro blem s. R eceives close supervision on new
a sp e c ts of assign m en ts; and work is reviewed to verify its accu racy and conform ance with
required p ro ced u res.
COM PUTER SYSTEM S ANALYST, BUSINESS
A nalyzes bu sin e ss problem s to form ulate p ro ced u res for solving them by use of electronic
data p ro c e ssin g equipment. Develops a com plete d escription of all sp ecification s needed to enable
p ro g ra m e rs to p rep are required digital com puter p ro g ra m s. Work involves m ost of the following:
Analyzes su b ject-m atter operations to be autom ated and identifies conditions and c r ite r ia required
to achieve sa tisfa c to ry r e su lts; sp ec ifies number and types of r e c o rd s, file s, and documents to
be used; outlines actions to be perform ed by personnel and com puters in sufficient detail for
presentation to m anagem ent and for program ing (typically this involves preparation of work and
data flow c h a rts); coordinates the development of te st problem s and p articip ates in tr ia l runs of
new and rev ised sy ste m s; and recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective ov erall
o p eratio n s. (NOTE: W orkers perform ing both sy stem s a n aly sis and program ing should be c la s ­
sified a s sy ste m s an alysts if this is the sk ill used to determ ine their pay.)

Works on a segm ent of a com plex data p ro cessin g schem e or system , as d escribed for
c la s s A. Works independently on routine assign m en ts and rece iv e s instruction and guidance
on com plex assig n m en ts. Work is reviewed for accu racy of judgm ent, com pliance with in­
stru ction s, and to insure proper alinem ent with the overall system .
C la s s C . Works under im m ediate supervision , carryin g out an alyses as assign ed , usually
of a single activity. A ssignm ents are designed to develop and expand p ractical experience
in the application of p roced ures and sk ills required for sy stem s a n aly sis work. F or exam ple,
m ay a s s is t a higher level sy stem s analyst by preparing the detailed specification s required
by p ro g ra m e rs from inform ation developed by the higher level analyst.

DRAFTSM AN-TRACER
Copies plans and draw ings p rep ared by others by placing tracin g cloth or paper over
draw ings and tracin g with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracin g lim ited to plans p rim arily
con sisting of straigh t lines and a la rge sc a le not requiring clo se delineation.)
AND/OR
P re p a re s sim ple or repetitive draw ings of e asily v isu alized item s. Work is closely sup ervised
during p r o g re s s.

Does not include em ployees p rim arily resp o n sible fo r the m anagem ent or supervision
of other electron ic data p ro cessin g em ployees, or sy stem s an aly sts p rim arily concerned with
scien tific or engineering problem s.
F o r wage study p u rp o ses, sy stem s an alysts are c la ssifie d as follows:

ELECTR O N IC S TECHNICIAN
Works on variou s types of electron ic equipment or sy stem s by perform ing one or m ore
of the following operations: Modifying, in stallin g, rep airin g, and overhauling. These operations
require the perform ance of m ost or all of the following ta sk s: A ssem blin g, testin g, adjusting,
calibratin g, tuning, and alining.

C la s s A . Works independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s in­
volving all p h ases of sy stem s a n a ly sis. P ro b lem s are com plex because of d iv erse so u rces of
input data and m ultip le-u se requirem ents of output data. (F or exam ple, develops an integrated
production scheduling, inventory control, co st a n a ly sis, and s a le s an aly sis record in which

Work is nonrepetitive and req u ires a knowledge of the theory and p ractice of electron ics
pertaining to the use of general and sp ecialized electron ic te st equipment; trouble an aly sis; and
the operation, relation sh ip, and alinem ent of electron ic sy ste m s, su b sy ste m s, and circu its having
a variety of component p a rts.




22
ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN—Continued

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (Registered)

E lectro n ic equipment or sy ste m s worked on typ ically include one or m ore of the following:
Ground, vehicle, or airb o rn e rad io com m unications s y ste m s, relay sy ste m s, navigation a id s;
airborne or ground ra d a r sy ste m s; radio and telev isio n tran sm ittin g or recording sy ste m s; e le c ­
tronic com puters; m is s ile and sp ac e c ra ft guidance and control sy ste m s; in du strial and m ed ical
m easu rin g , indicating and controlling d ev ices; etc.

A re g iste re d n urse who gives n ursing se rv ic e under gen eral m ed ical direction to ill or
injured em ployees or other p erson s who becom e ill or suffer an accident on the p re m ise s of a
factory or other establishm ent. Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving f ir s t aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent d re ssin g of em ployees' in ju rie s; keeping reco rd s
of patients treated ; preparing accident rep orts for com pensation or other p u rp o ses; a ssistin g in
physical exam inations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p ro g ram s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment,
or other activ ities affecting the health, w e lfa re, and safety of a ll person nel. N ursing su p e rv iso rs
or head n u rse s in establish m en ts employing m ore than one n urse a re excluded.

(Exclude production a ss e m b le r s and t e s t e r s , craftsm e n , d raftsm en , d e sig n e rs, e n gin eers,
and rep airm en of such standard electron ic equipment a s office m achines, radio and television
receivin g s e t s .)

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
CA R PEN TER, MAINTENANCE

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

P erfo rm s the carpentry duties n e c e s sa r y to con struct and m aintain in good re p a ir build­
ing woodwork and equipment such a s bins, c r ib s , co u n ters, benches, p artition s, d o o rs, flo o rs,
s t a ir s , c a sin g s, and tr im m ade of wood in an establish m en t. Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of work from blu ep rin ts, draw in gs, m o d els, or verb al in struction s; using a
variety of c a rp e n te r's handtools, portable power to o ls, and stan dard m easurin g in strum en ts; m ak ­
ing standard shop com putations relatin g to d im ensions of work; and selectin g m a te r ia ls n e c e ssa r y
for the work. In g e n e ral, the work of the m aintenance carp en ter req u ires rounded train in g and
experience usually acqu ired through a fo rm al app ren ticesh ip or equivalent train in g and experien ce.
ELECTR ICIA N , MAINTENANCE

P rod uces replacem en t p arts and new p arts in m aking r e p a irs of m etal p arts of m echanical
equipment operated in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Interpreting written
in struction s and sp ecificatio n s; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m ach in ist's
handtools and p recision m easu rin g in strum en ts; setting up and operating standard machine tools;
shaping of m etal p arts to clo se to le ran ces; m aking standard shop com putations relating to dim en­
sions of work, tooling, fe e d s, and sp eeds of m achining; knowledge of the working p ro p e rtie s of
the common m e ta ls; selectin g stan dard m a te r ia ls , p a r ts , and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assem b lin g p arts into m ech an ical equipment. In ge n e ral, the m ach in ist's work
n orm ally req u ires a rounded train in g in m achine-shop p ractice usually acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

P e rfo rm s a v ariety of e le c tr ic a l trad e functions such a s the in stallation, m aintenance, or
re p a ir of equipment for the generation, d istribu tion, or utilization of e le ctric energy in an e sta b ­
lishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Installin g or repairing any of a variety of e le c ­
tr ic a l equipment such a s g e n e rato rs, tr a n sfo r m e r s, sw itch boards, c o n tro llers, circu it b r e a k e r s ,
m o to rs, heating un its, conduit s y ste m s, or other tra n sm issio n equipment; working from blue­
p rin ts, draw ings, layouts, or other sp ec ific atio n s; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le ctric a l
sy stem or equipment; working standard com putations relatin g to load requ irem ents of wiring or
e le c tric a l equipment; and using a v ariety of e le c tric ia n 's handtools and m easu rin g and testin g
in strum ents. In ge n e ral, the work of the m aintenance e le ctricia n req u ires rounded training and
experience usually acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experien ce.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and m ay a lso su p e rv ise the operation of station ary engines and
equipment (m echanical or e le c tric a l) to supply the establishm ent in which employed with power,
heat, refrige ratio n , or air-conditioning. Work in volves: Operating and m aintaining equipment
such a s steam engines, a ir c o m p re s so r s , g e n e rato rs, m o to rs, turbin es, ventilating and r e fr ig ­
erating equipment, steam b o ile rs and b o iler-fed w ater pum ps; making equipment r e p a ir s; and
keeping a reco rd of operation of m achinery, tem p eratu re, and fuel consumption. May a lso su ­
p e rv ise th ese o p eration s. Head or chief engineers in establish m ents employing m ore than one
engineer a re excluded.
FIREM AN, STATIONARY BO ILER
F ir e s station ary b o ilers to furnish the establishm ent in which employed with heat, power,
or steam . F ee d s fu els to fire by hand or o p erates a m ech an ical stoker, g a s , or oil burner; and
checks w ater and safety v a lv e s. May clean, oil, or a s s i s t in repairing boilerroom equipment.
H E L P E R , MAINTENANCE TRADES
A s s is t s one or m ore w o rk ers in the sk illed m aintenance tra d e s, by perform ing sp ecific
or gen eral duties of le s s e r sk ill, such a s keeping a w orker supplied with m a te ria ls and to o ls;
cleaning working a re a , m achine, and equipment; a ss is tin g journeym an by holding m a te r ia ls or
tools; and p erform in g other unskilled ta s k s a s directed by journeym an. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to p erfo rm v a rie s from trad e to trad e : In som e trad es the helper is confined
to supplying, lifting, and holding m a te r ia ls and to o ls, and cleaning working a r e a s ; and in others
he is perm itted to p erfo rm sp ecialized m achine o p eration s, or p arts of a trad e that a re a lso
perform ed by w ork ers on a fu ll-tim e b a sis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
S p e c ia lize s in the operation of one or m ore types of machine to o ls, such a s jig b o r e rs,
cylind rical or su rface g rin d e rs, engine lath e s, or m illing m achines, in the construction of
m achine-shop t o o ls , g ag e s, ji g s , fix tu re s, or d ies. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning
and perform ing difficult machining operations; p ro c essin g item s requiring com plicated setups or
a high degree of accu racy ; using a v ariety of p recisio n m easu rin g in strum ents; selectin g fe e d s,
sp eed s, tooling, and operation sequence; and m aking n e c e ssa r y adjustm ents during operation
to achieve req u isite to le ran c es or dim en sion s. May be required to recognize when tools need
d re ssin g , to d r e s s to o ls, and to selec t p roper coolants and cutting and lubricatin g o ils. F or
c ro ss-in d u stry wage study p u rp o se s, m achine-tool o p e ra to rs, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from this c la ssific a tio n .




MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (Maintenance)
R e p a irs autom obiles, b u se s, m otortru ck s, and tr a c to r s of an establishm ent. Work in ­
volves m ost of the following: Exam ining autom otive equipment to diagn ose sou rce of trouble; d is ­
assem b lin g equipment and perform in g re p a ir s t h a t involve th e u s e of such handtools a s w renches,
g a g e s, d r ills , or sp ecia lize d equipment in d isa sse m b lin g or fitting p a r t s ; replacin g broken or
defective p arts from stock; grinding and adjusting v a lv es; rea sse m b lin g and in stallin g the variou s
a sse m b lie s in the vehicle and m aking n e c e ssa r y adjustm en ts; and alining w h eels, adjusting brak es
and ligh ts, or tightening body bolts. In g en eral, the work of the autom otive m echanic req u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experien ce.
This cla ssific a tio n does not include m ech an ics who re p a ir c u sto m e rs' veh icles in auto­
m obile re p a ir shops.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R e p a irs m achinery or m ech an ical equipment of an establishm ent. Work involves m ost
of the following: Exam ining m achines and m ech an ical equipment to diagn ose source of trouble;
dism antling or p artly dism antling m achines and perform ing re p a irs that m ainly involve the use
of handtools in scrap in g and fitting p a rts; replacing broken or defective p a rts with item s obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacem ent p art by a m achine shop or sending of the
m achine to a m achine shop for m ajo r r e p a ir s; preparing written sp ecification s for m ajor re p a irs
or for the production of p arts ordered from m achine shop; reasse m b lin g m achines; and making
all n e c e ssa r y adjustm en ts for operation. In ge n e ral, the work of a m aintenance m echanic req u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acqu ired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experien ce. Excluded from this cla ssific a tio n a re w ork ers whose p rim ary duties
involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
In sta lls new m achines or heavy equipm ent, and d ism an tles and in sta lls m achines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout a re requ ired. Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecification s; using a variety
of handtools and rigging; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to s t r e s s e s , strength of
m a te r ia ls , and cen ters of gravity ; alining and balancing of equipment; selectin g standard to o ls,
equipment, and p arts to be used; and in stallin g and pnaintaining in good order power tran sm issio n
equipment such a s d riv e s and speed red u ce rs. In ge n e ral, the m illw righ t's work norm ally req u ires
a rounded training and experien ce in the trad e acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and exp erien ce.
PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
P ain ts and red e co ra te s w a lls, woodwork, and fix tu res of an establishm ent. Work involves
the following: Knowledge of su rfa ce p e cu lia ritie s and types of paint requ ired for different ap p lica­
tion s; prep arin g su rfa ce for painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or fille r in n ail

23
PAINTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

SH E E T -M E T A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

holes and in te r s tic e s ; and applying paint with sp ray gun or brush. May m ix c o lo rs, o ils, white
lead , and other paint in gredien ts to obtain proper color or con sisten cy. In gen eral, the work of the
m aintenance painter req u ires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a form al
apprenticesh ip or equivalent training and experience.

types of sh eet-m etal m aintenance work from blueprints, m od els, or other sp ecification s; setting
up and operating a ll av ailable types of sh eet-m etal working m achines; using a variety of handtools
in cutting, bending, form ing, shaping, fitting, and assem b lin g; and installin g sheet-m etal a rtic le s
a s requ ired . In gen eral, the work of the m aintenance sh eet-m etal worker req u ires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experien ce.

P IP E F IT T E R , MAINTENANCE
In sta lls o r r e p a ir s w ater, stea m , g a s, or other types of pipe and pipefittings in an
establish m en t. Work involves m o st of the follow ing: Laying out of work and m easu rin g to locate
position of pipe from draw ings or other written sp ecificatio n s; cutting variou s s iz e s of pipe to
c o rre c t lengths with ch isel and ham m er or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting m achines; threading
pipe with sto ck s and d ies; bending pipe by hand-driven or pow er-driven m achines; assem blin g
pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to h an g ers; m aking standard shop com putations relatin g to
p r e s s u r e s , flow, and size of pipe required; and m aking standard te sts to determ ine whether fin­
ished p ipes m eet sp ecificatio n s. In ge n e ral, the work of the m aintenance p ipefitter req u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usu ally acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
train in g and exp erien ce. W orkers p rim a rily engaged in installin g and repairing building sanitation
or heating sy ste m s a re excluded.
S H E E T -M E T A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b r ic a te s, in sta lls , and m aintains in good r e p a ir the sh eet-m etal equipment and fixtures
(such a s m achine g u a rd s, g r e a se pan s, sh e lv es, lo c k e rs, tan k s, v en tilators, chutes, ducts, m etal
roofing) of an establish m en t. Work involves m o st of the following: Planning and laying out all

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
C on structs and r e p a ir s m achine-shop to o ls, g ag e s, jig s , fix tu res or dies for forgin gs,
punching, and other m etal-form in g work. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning and
laying out of work from m o d els, blu eprin ts, draw ings, or other o ral and written specification s;
using a variety of tool and die m a k e r's handtools and p recisio n m easurin g instrum ents; under­
standing of the working p rop erties of common m etals and allo y s; setting up and operating of
m achine tools and related equipment; m aking n e c e ssa ry shop com putations relating to dim ensions
of work, sp ee d s, fe e d s, and tooling of m achines; h eat-treatin g of m etal p a rts during fabrication
a s well as of finished tools and d ies to achieve required qu alitie s; working to close to le ran ces;
fitting and assem b lin g of p arts to p rescrib e d to le ran ces and allow ances; and selectin g appropriate
m a te r ia ls , to o ls, and p r o c e s s e s . In gen eral, the tool and die m a k e r's work req u ires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom p ractice usually acqu ired through a form al apprenticeship
or equivalent training and experien ce.
F or c ro ss-in d u str y wage study p u rp oses, tool and die m ak ers in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from th is cla ssific a tio n .

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
G uard. P e rfo rm s routine police duties, either at fixed p ost or on tour, m aintaining o r^ er,
using a rm s or fo rce where n e c e ssa r y . Includes gatem en who are stationed at gate and check
on identity of em ployees and other p e rso n s en terin g.
W atchman. M akes rounds of p re m ise s p erio d ically in protecting p roperty again st fir e ,
theft, and illeg al entry.
JANITOR, PO R TER , OR CLEANER
Cleans and keeps in an o rd erly condition facto ry working a re a s and w ash room s, or
p r e m ise s of an o ffice, apartm ent house, or co m m ercial or other establishm ent. Duties involve"
a combination of the follow ing; Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing flo o rs; rem oving
chips, tra sh , and other refu se; dusting equipment, furniture, or fix tu res; polishing m etal fix ­
tu re s or trim m in g s; providing supplies and m inor m aintenance s e r v ic e s; and cleaning la v a to rie s,
show ers, and re stro o m s. W orkers who sp ec ia lize in window washing a re excluded.
LABO RER, M ATERIAL HANDLING
A w orker employed in a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, sto re , or other establishm ent
whose duties involve one or m ore of the follow ing: Loading and unloading v ariou s m a te r ia ls and
m erchandise on or from freight c a r s , tru c k s, or other tran sportin g devices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m a te r ia ls or m erch an d ise in p roper sto ra g e location; and tran sportin g m a te r ia ls or
m erch an d ise by handtruck, c a r, or w heelbarrow . Longshorem en, who load and unload ships a re
excluded.
ORDER F IL L E R
F ills shipping or tr a n sfe r o rd e rs for finished goods from stored m erchandise in a c co rd ­
ance with sp ecificatio n s on s a le s s lip s, cu sto m ers' o r d e r s, or other in stru ction s. May, in addition
to filling o rd e rs and indicating item s filled or om itted, keep reco rd s of outgoing o r d e r s, requ i­
sition additional stock or rep o rt short supplies to su p e rv iso r, and perform other related duties.
PACK ER, SHIPPING
P re p a re s finished products fo r shipment or sto rag e by placing them in shipping con­
ta in e r s, the sp ecific operations perform ed being dependent upon the type, s iz e , and number
of units to be packed, the type of container em ployed, and method of shipment. Work req u ires
the placing of item s in shipping containers and m ay involve one or m ore of the follow ing:
Knowledge o f v ario u s item s of stock in o rd e r to v erify content; selection of app rop riate type
and size of container; in sertin g en clo su re s in container; using e x c e lsio r or other m ate rial to
prevent break age or dam age; clo sin g and sealin g container; and applying la b e ls or entering
identifying data on container. P ac k e rs who a lso m ake wooden boxes or c r a te s a re excluded.




SHIPPING AND RECEIVING C LER K
P re p a re s m erch an d ise for shipment, or rece iv e s and is resp on sible for incoming ship­
m ents of m erchand ise or other m a t e r ia ls . Shipping work in volves: A knowledge of shipping p ro ­
ce d u re s, p r a c tic e s, rou tes, available m eans of tran sp ortation , and r a te s; and preparing record s
of the goods shipped, m aking up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping ch arg e s, and keeping
a file of shipping re c o r d s. May d irect or a s s i s t in p rep aring the m erchandise for shipment.
R eceiving work in volves: Verifying or d irectin g others in verifying the c o r re c tn e ss of shipm ents
again st bills of lading, in voices, or other re c o rd s; checking for sh o rtag e s and rejecting dam ­
aged goods; routing m erch an d ise or m a te r ia ls to proper departm ents; and m aintaining n e c e ssa ry
reco rd s and file s .
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w ork ers a re c la ss ifie d a s follow s:
Receiving clerk
Shipping cle rk
Shipping and receivin g clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
D rives a truck within a city or in du strial a re a to tran sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m erchandise,
equipm ent, or men between variou s types of establish m en ts such a s : M anufacturing plants, freight
depots, w arehou ses, w holesale and re ta il estab lish m en ts, or between re ta il establishm ents and
cu sto m e rs' houses o r p la ce s of b u sin e ss. May a lso load or unload truck with or without h elp ers,
m ake m inor m ech an ical r e p a ir s, and keep truck in good working o rd e r. D riv e r-sa le sm e n and
o v er-th e-ro ad d riv e rs a re excluded.
follow s:

F o r wage study p u rp o se s, tru ck d riv e rs a re c la ss ifie d by siz e and type of equipment, as
( T r a c to r -tr a ile r should be rated on the b a sis of tr a ile r capacity.)
T ru ck d river
T ru ck d river,
T ru ck d riv er,
T ru ck d river,
T ru ck d riv er,

(com bination of s iz e s liste d sep arately)
light (under 1V2 tons)
m edium (IV 2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 tons, tr a ile r type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other than tr a ile r type)

TRU CKER, POWER
O perates a m anually controlled gasoline- or electric-pow ered truck or tra c to r to tran sp ort
goods and m a te r ia ls of all kinds about a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w ork ers a re c la ss ifie d by type of truck , as follow s:
T ru ck er, power (forklift)
T ruck er, power (other than forklift)

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t----T h e fo llo w in g a r e a s a r e s u rv e y e d p e r io d ic a lly fo r use in a d m in is te rin g the S e r v ic e C o n tra c t A c t o f 1965.
w ill be a v a ila b le at no c o s t w h ile su p p lies la s t fr o m any o f the B L S r e g io n a l o ffic e s shown on the b ack c o v e r .
A la m o g o r d o — a s C ru c e s , N . M e x .
L
A la s k a
A lb a n y , G a .
A m a r illo , T e x .
A tla n tic C ity , N .J .
A u gu sta, G a.— C.
S.
B a k e r s fie ld , C a lif.
Baton R ou ge, L a .
B ilo x i, G u lfp o rt, and P a s c a g o u la , M is s .
B r id g e p o r t, N o r w a lk , and S ta m fo rd , Conn.
C ed ar R a p id s , Iowa
C ham paign—U rb ana, 111.
C h a rle s to n , S .C .
C la r k s v ille , T e n n ., and H o p k in s v ille , K y.
C o lo ra d o S p rin g s , C olo.
C olu m b ia , S .C .
C olum bus, G a —A la .
C orpu s C h r is t i, T e x .
C ra n e , Ind.

C op ies o f p ublic r e le a s e s a r e or

Laredo, Tex.
Las V ega s, N ev.
L o w e r E a s te rn S h o re , M d __V a.
M a c o n , Ga.
M a rq u e tte , E sca n ab a, Sault Ste.
M a r ie , M ic h .
M elb o u rn e —T it u s v ille —C o c o a , F la .
(B r e v a r d C o.)
M e rid ia n , M is s .
M id d le s e x , M onm outh, O cean, and S o m e r s e t
C o s ., N .J.
M o b ile , A la ., and P e n s a c o la , F la .
M o n tg o m e r y , A la .
N a s h v ille , Tenn.
N o r th e a s te r n M ain e
N o r w ic h —G roton— e w Lon don, Conn.
N
O gden, Utah
O rla n d o , F la .
O xnard— im i V a lle y — e n tu ra , C a lif.
S
V
Panam a C ity , F la .
P o rts m o u th , N .H .— a in e — ass .
M
M
P u e b lo , C o lo .
R e n o, N e v .
S a cra m e n to , C a lif.
Santa B a rb a ra —
Santa M a r ia —L o m p o c , C a lif.
Sherm an—D en ison , T e x .
S h re v e p o r t, L a .
S p r in g fie ld — h ic o p e e — o ly o k e , M a s s .—Conn.
C
H
T op e k a , K ans.
Tucson, A r iz .
V a lle jo — a ir f ie ld — a p a , C a lif.
F
N
W ilm in g to n , D e l.— .J<-M d.
N
Yum a, A r iz .

D othan, A la .

Duluth— u p e rio r , M in n —W is .
S
E l Paso, T ex.
E ugene— p r in g fie ld , O r e g .
S
F a r g o — o o rh e a d , N . Dak.— inn.
M
M
F a y e t t e v ille , N. C.
F itc h b u rg —L e o m in s t e r , M a s s .
F r e d e r ic k — a g e rs to w n , M d .—P a —W. V a.
H
F r e s n o , C a lif.
Grand F o r k s , N . Dak.
G rand Island — astin gs , N e b r .
H
G ree n b o ro — in ston S a lem — igh P o in t, N .C .
W
H
H a r r is b u r g , P a .
K n o x v ille , Tenn.

R e p o rts fo r the fo llo w in g s u rve y s conducted in the p r io r y e a r but sin ce discon tin u ed a re a ls o a v a ila b le :
A lp e n a , Standish, and T a w a s ”C ity , M ic h .
A s h e v ille , N .C .
A u stin , T e x . *
F o r t Sm ith, A r k —O kla.
G rea t F a lls , M ont.
*

Expanded to an a r e a w a g e s u rv e y in f is c a l y e a r

1973.

L e x in g to n , K y . *
P in e B lu ff, A r k .
Stockton, C a lif.
T a c o m a , W ash.
W ich ita F a lls , T e x .
See in sid e b ack c o v e r .

T he tw e lfth annual r e p o r t on s a la r ie s fo r accoun tan ts, a u d ito rs , c h ie f accoun tan ts, a tto r n e y s , job a n a ly s ts , d ir e c to r s o f p e rs o n n e l, b u y e rs , c h e m is ts ,
e n g in e e rs , e n g in e e rin g te c h n icia n s , d ra fts m e n , and c le r ic a l e m p lo y e e s . O rd e r as B L S B u lle tin 1742, N a tio n a l S u rv e y o f P r o fe s s io n a l, A d m in is tr a tiv e ,
T e c h n ic a l, and C le r ic a l P a y , June 1971, 75 cents a cop y, fr o m any o f the B LS r e g io n a l s a le s o ffic e s shown on the b ack c o v e r , or fr o m the
Su perintendent o f D o c u m e n ts , U.S. G overn m en t P rin tin g O ffic e , W ash ington , D .C ., 20402.




☆ u.s.

GOVERNMENT P R I N T I N G

O FF IC E :

1973— 7 4 6 -1 9 0 /7 9

A re a W a g e S u rv ey s
A lis t o f the la te s t a v a ila b le b u lle tin s is p re s e n te d b e lo w . A d ir e c t o r y o f a r e a w a g e studies including m o r e lim ite d studies conducted at the
r e q u e s t o f the E m p lo ym e n t Standards A d m in is tr a tio n o f the D ep a rtm en t o f L a b o r is a v a ila b le on req u e st. B u lle tin s m a y be p u rch ased fr o m any o f the B L S
r e g io n a l s a le s o ffic e s shown on the b ack c o v e r , o r fr o m the Superinten den t o f D ocu m ents, U.S. G o v e rn m en t P r in tin g O ffic e , W ashington, D .C ., 20402.
A rea

A kron , O hio, D ec. 1972— ---------------------------------------A lb a n y -S c h e n e c ta d y -T ro y , N .Y ., M ar. 1 972-------------A lb u q u erq u e, N. M e x ., M ar. 1972 1--------------- ----------A llentow n— eth leh em — a sto n , P a .— .J ., M ay 1972 1 —
B
E
N
A tlan ta, G a ., M ay 1972 1----------------------------------------A u stin , T e x ., D ec. 1972 1---------------------------------------B a lt im o r e , M d ., Aug. 1972 1___________________________
B eaum on t— o r t A rthur— ran ge, T e x ., M ay 1 9 7 2-------P
O
B in gh am ton , N .Y ., Ju ly 1 972__________________________
B irm in g h a m , A la ., M ar. 1972_________________________
B o is e C ity , Idaho, Nov. 1972 1_______ —
--------------------B o sto n , M a s s ., Aug. 1972 1_________________________ —
B u ffa lo , N .Y ., O ct. 1972 1_____________________________
B u rlin gto n , V t., D ec. 1972 1___________________________
C anton, Ohio, M ay 1972 1----------- — ---------------------—
C h a rle sto n , W. V a ., M a r. 1972 1 ---------— --------------—
C h a rlo tte , N .C ., Ja n . 1973____________________ ______ —
C h attan ooga, Tenn.— a ., Sept. 1972 1-----------------------G
C h ic a g o , 111., Ju n e 1972----------------------------- ----- -------C in cin n ati, Ohio—
Ky.— d ., F e b . 1972 _ _ _ -----------------In
C le v ela n d , Ohio, Sept. 1972 1----------------------------------C o lu m b u s, Ohio, O ct. 1972 1------------ ------------ ----------D a l la s , T e x ., O ct. 1972 1---------------------------------------D aven port— ock Isla n d -M o lin e, Iowa—
R
111., F e b . 1972 1—
D ayton, Ohio, D ec. 1972--------------------- — —
--------------D en v er, C o lo ., D ec. 1972----------------------- ---------------D e s M o in e s, Iowa, M ay 1972 1 --------------------------------D e tro it, M ic h ., F e b . 1 9 7 2--------------------------------------D u rh am , N .C ., A pr. 1972 1------— ------------- ------- -------F o r t L a u d e rd a le — ollywood and W est P a lm
H
B e a c h , F l a ., A pr. 1972 1--------------------------------------F o r t W orth, T e x ., O ct. 1972 1---------------------------------G reen B a y , W is., Ju ly 1972 1----------------------------------G r e e n v ille , S .C ., M ay 1 9 7 2 ------------------------------------H ouston, T e x ., A pr. 1972---------------------------------------H u n tsv ille, A la ., F eb . 1972 1 ----------------------------------In d ian ap o lis, In d., O ct. 1972 1
-----------------------------J a c k s o n , M i s s ., J a n . 1973_____________________________
J a c k s o n v ille , F l a . , D ec. 1 9 7 2 ---------------------------------K a n s a s C ity , M o .-K a n s., Sept. 1972-------------------------L a w ren ce— a v e rh ill, M a s s ,— .H ., Ju n e 1972 1_ _ _ _ _ _ _
H
N
L exin gton , K y ., Nov. 1972 1------------------------------------L ittle R ock— orth L ittle R ock, A rk ., J u ly 1972 1-------N
L o s A n g e les—
Long B e a ch and A naheim —
San ta A na—
G ard en G ro v e , C a lif., Oct. 1 9 7 2 1--------------------------L o u is v ille , Ky.— d ., Nov. 1972----------- _____-------------In
Lu bbock . T e x ., M ar. 1972 1------------------------------------M a n c h e ste r, N .H ., J u ly 1972 1— _ _ _ _ _ _---------- ---------M e m p h is, Tenn.— r k ., Nov. 1972----------------- ----------A
M ia m i, F l a . , Nov. 1972 1------------- ----------------- --------M idlan d and Ode s s a , T e x ., J an. 1973____ ------------- ---i Data on establishment


B u lle tin num ber
and p r ic e
1775-36,
1725-49,
1725-59,
1725-87,
1725-77,
1775-42,
1775-20,
1725-69,
1775-5,
1725-58,
1775-32,
1775-13,
1775-18,
1775-28,
1725-75,
1725-63,
1775-39,
1775-14,
1725-92,
1725-56,
1775-15,
1775-23,
1775-25,
1725-55,
1775-34,
1775-35,
1725-86,
1725-68,
1725-64,

40
30
35
35
45
40
75
30
45
30
50
75
65
50
35
35
40
55
70
35
75
55
75
35
40
40
35
40
30

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cen ts
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents

1725-74,
1775-24,
1775-1,
1725-66,
1725-79,
1725-50,
1775-27,
1775-44,
1775-31,
1775-17,
1725-81,
1775-22,
1775-2,

35
50
55
30
35
35
55
40
40
50
35
50
55

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
c en t?
cents
cents
cents
cents

1775-38,
1775-37,
1725-57,
1775-8,
1775-30,
1775-29,
1775-41,

75
40
35
55
40
55
35

cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cents
cen ts

practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.

A rea
M ilw a u k e e , W is ., M a y 1972 1--------------------------------------M in n ea p o lis —St. P a u l, M in n ., J an. 1972 1 __ ______________
M u skegon— u skegon H e igh ts , M ic h ., June 1 9 7 2 * ____ _
M
N e w a rk and J e r s e y C ity , N .J ., Jan. 1972 * _ _______ _
N ew H aven, C on n ., J an. 1973_______________________ _
N ew O r le a n s , L a . , Jan. 1973______________________ — ---- —
N ew Y o r k , N .Y ., A p r . 19721
________________________________
N o r fo lk — ir g in ia B ea ch — o rts m o u th and
V
P
N e w p o rt N ew s—H am pton, V a ., Jan. 1972________________
O klah om a C ity , O k la ., Ju ly 1972------------ — ......................
O m aha, N e b r.—Iow a, Sept. 1972----- ------------ — ---- ----- —
P a te r s o n — lifto n — a s s a ic , N .J ., June 1972 1 --------------C
P
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a . - N . J . , N ov. 1972________________________
P h o e n ix , A r i z . , June 1972 1------------- ----- ------------ _______
P itts b u r g h , P a ., J an. 1972_______________________ __________
P o r tla n d , M a in e , N o v . 1972________________________________
P o r tla n d , O r e g .—W a s h ., M a y 1972 1 __________ ____________
P o u g h k e e p s ie ^ K in g s to n — ew b u rg h , N . Y . ,
N

B u lle tin num ber
and p ric e
1725-83,
1725-45,
1725-85,
1725-52,
177 5-46,
1775-47,
1725-90,

45
50
35
50
40
40
50

cen ts
ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cen ts

1725-42,
1775-6,
1775-16,
1725-88,
1775-45,
1725-94,
1725-46,
1775-21,
1725-89,

30
45
40
40
55
55
40
40
35

ce n ts
ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts

35 cen ts
P r o v id e n c e — a rw ic k — a w tu ck e t, R. I.—M as s . ,
W
P
M a y 1972_____________________________________________________
R a le ig h , N .C ., Aug. 1972___________________________________
R ichm ond, V a . , M a r. 1972 1 ----------------------------------------R iv e r s id e —
San B ern a rd in o — n ta rio . C a lif.,
O
D ec. 1971____________________________________________________
R o c h e s te r , N .Y . (o f f ic e occu p ation s o n ly ), J u ly 1972---R o c k fo r d , 111., June 19721 __________________________________
St. L o u is , M o.—111., M a r. 1972-------------------------------------Salt L ak e C ity , Utah, N o v . 1972 1____________ ____ ___ _____
San A n ton io, T e x . , M a y 1972______________ __ _____ ___ _____
San D ie g o , C a l i f . , N ov. 1972____________ ___ ________________
San F r a n c is co-O a k la n d , C a lif., O ct. 1971 1 — _____ _
San J o s e , C a lif . , M a r. 1972— -------------------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
Savannah, G a ., M a y 1972 1 ----------_______---------------------S cranton, P a . , J u ly
1972—S e a ttle — v e r e t t , W ash ., Jan. 1972
E
................ — Sioux F a lls , S. D ak., D ec. 1972 1___________________________
South B end, In d ., M a y 1972 1 --------------------------------------Spokane, W a s h ., June
1972 1—
— ___________
S y ra c u s e , N .Y ., J u ly 1972___________________________________
Tam pa—
St. P e te r s b u r g , F la ., A u g. 1972------------- ---------T o le d o , O h io -M ic h ., A p r . 1972 1 __________________________
T ren t on, N . J . , Sept. 1972 1______________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
U tica—R o m e , N .Y ., Ju ly 1972_---- ------------- ------ ---------—
W ash ington , D .C .—M d.—V a . , M a r . 1972 1 ---------------------W a te rb u ry , C onn., M a r. 19721 -----------------------------------W a te rlo o , Iow a, N ov. 1972------------------------------------------W ic h ita , K a n s ., A p r . 1972 1_________ ____ __________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., M a y 1972 1_____________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F eb . 1 9 7 2 * _____________________________________
Y ou n gsto w rr-W a rren , O hio, N o v . 1972_____________ __ ____

1725-70,
1775-7,
1725-72,
1725-43,
1775-4,
1725-84,
1725-61,
1775-33,
1725-67,
1775-40,
1725-33,
1725-65,
1725-73,
1775-10,
1725-47,
1775-43,
1725-60,
1725-91,
1775-11,
1775-9,
1725-78,
1775-12,
1775-3,
1725-93,
1725-53,
1775-26,
1725-82,
1725-71,
1725-54,
1775-19,

30 cen ts
45 cen ts
35 cen ts
30
45
35
35
50
30
40
50
30
35
45
30
40
35
35
45
45
35
55
45
70
35
40
35
35
35
40

ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts
ce n ts

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212

L A B -441

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

THIRD CLASS MAIL

BUREAU OF LABOR S T A T IS T IC S REGIONAL OFFICES
Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region II
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)
New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region III
P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Region V
8th Floor, 300 South Wacker Drive
Chicago, III. 60606
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin

Region Vi
1100 Commerce St. Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St.. 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
VII
VIII
Iowa
Colorado
Kansas
Montana
Missouri
North Dakota
Nebraska
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming

Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code
IX
X
Alaska
Arizona
Idaho
California
Oregon
Hawaii
Washington
Nevada