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AREA WAGE SURVEY
T h e M ia m i, F lo rida, M e tro p o lita n A re a .
N o v e m b e r 1971

Bul l et i n 1 7 2 5 -2 8
U .S . D E P A R T M E N T O F L A B O R

/ Bureau of Labor Statistics

BUREAU

OF

LABOR

S T A T IS T IC S

R E G IO N A L

O F F IC E S

G overnm ent Center

N ew Y o rk , N .Y . 10001

1317 F ilb ert S t.

1371 Peachtree S t .N E .

Boston, Mass. 0 2 2 0 3

Phone: 9 7 1 -5 4 0 5 (Area Code 21 2 )

Philadelphia, Pa. 19 107

A tla n ta , Ga. 3 0 3 0 9

Phone: 5 9 7 -7 7 9 6 (A rea Code 21 5)

Phone: 5 2 6 -5 4 1 8 (Area Code 404)

Phone: 2 2 3 -6 7 6 1 (Area Code 61 7)
Region V

Region V I

Regions V II and V III

Regions IX and X
4 5 0 Golden G ate Ave.

8th Floor, 3 0 0 South Wacker Drive

1 1 0 0 Commerce S t., Rm . 6B 7

Federal O ffice Building

Chicago, III. 6 0 6 0 6

Dallas, T e x . 7 5 2 0 2

911 W alnut S t., 10th Floor

Box 3 6 0 1 7

Phone: 3 5 3 - 1 8 8 0 (Area Code 312)

Phone: 7 4 9 -3 5 1 6 (Area Code 21 4)

Kansas C ity , M o . 6 4 1 0 6

San Francisco, C alif. 9 4 1 0 2

Phone: 37 4-24 81 (Area Code 81 6)

Phone: 5 5 6 -4 6 7 8 (Area Code 415)

Regions V II and V I I I w ill be serviced by Kansas C ity .
••




Regions IX and X w ill be serviced by San Francisco.

AREA WAGE SURVEY

B u lle tin 1 7 2 5 -2 8

U.S. DEPARTM ENT OF LABOR,

M arch

B U R EA U OF LABOR S TA TIS TIC S, Geoffrey H. Moore, Commissioner

1972

T h e M ia m i, F lo rid a , M e tro p o lita n A r e a , N o v e m b e r 1971
C O N TE N TS
Page

1.
4.

Introduction
W age tren d s-fo r sele c te d occupational groups
T a b le s :

3.
5.

1. E stablish m en ts and w o rk e rs within scope of su rvey and number studied
2. Indexes of standard w eek ly s a la rie s and s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupational
groups, and percen ts of in c re a s e fo r s elected period s
A.

6.

9.
10.
11.
12.

Occupational earn in gs:
A - l . O ffice occupations— en and w om en
m
A - 2. P r o fe s s io n a l and tech n ical occupations—
men and wom en
A -3 . O ffic e , p ro fe s s io n a l, and tech n ical occupations—men and wom en com bined
A -4 . M aintenance and pow erplant occupations
A - 5. C ustodial and m a te r ia l m ovem en t occupations

15. Appendix.

Occupational d escrip tio n s




For tala bv tha Superintendent ot uocuments, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 — Prlca 30 cents

J. D.

Hodgson, Secretary

P re fa c e
The Bureau o f L a b o r S tatistics p ro g ra m of annual occupa­
tional w age su rveys in m etro p o lita n a re a s is designed to p ro vid e data
on occupational ea rn in gs, and estab lish m en t p ra c tic e s and supplem en­
ta ry w age p ro v is io n s . It yie ld s d eta iled data by sele c te d in du stry
d iv is io n fo r each of the a re a s studied, fo r geograp h ic re g io n s , and
fo r the United States. A m a jo r co n sid era tio n in the p ro g ra m is the
need fo r g r e a te r in sigh t into (1) the m ovem en t of w ages by occupa­
tion al c a te g o ry and s k ill le v e l, and (2) the stru ctu re and le v e l of w ages
am ong a re a s and in d u stry d iv is io n s . A t the end of each su rvey , an individu al a re a bulletin p r e ­
sents the re s u lts . A ft e r com p letion of a ll individual a re a bulletins
fo r a round o f s u rv e y s , two su m m ary bulletins a re issu ed.
The f ir s t
b rin gs data fo r each of the m etro p o lita n a re a s studied into one bu l­
letin .
The second p resen ts in form a tion which has been p ro je c te d fr o m
in dividu al m e tro p o lita n a re a data to re la te to geograp h ic reg io n s and
the United States.
N in ety a re a s c u rre n tly a r e included in the p ro g ra m . In each
a re a , in fo rm a tio n on occupational earn in gs is c o lle c te d annually and on
estab lish m en t p ra c tic e s and su pplem en tary wage p ro visio n s b ien n ia lly.
This b u lletin p resen ts resu lts of the su rvey in M ia m i, F la .,
in N o v e m b e r 1971.
The Standard M e tro p o lita n S ta tistica l A r e a , as
d efin ed by the O ffic e o f M anagem ent and Budget (fo r m e r ly the Bureau
of the Budget) through January 1968, con sists of Dade County.
This
study was conducted b y the B u reau 's r e g io n a l o ffic e in Atlanta, Ga.,
under the g e n e ra l d ire c tio n of Donald M . C ru se, A s s is ta n t R egion a l
D ir e c to r fo r O peration s.




Note:
S im ila r re p o rts a re a v a ila b le fo r other a re a s .
back c o v e r .)

(See inside

Union w age ra te s , in d ica tive of p re v a ilin g pay le v e ls , a re
a v a ila b le fo r seven s elected building tra d es.

In tro d u c tio n
T h is a re a is 1 o f 90 in which the U.S. D epartm ent o f L a b o r 's
B ureau o f L a b o r S ta tistics conducts su rveys o f occupational earnings
and re la te d b en efits on an a rea w id e b a s is .1

the A - s e r ie s ta b les, because e ith e r (1) em ploym ent in the occupation is
too sm a ll to p ro v id e enough data to m e r it presen tation , o r (2) th ere is
p o s s ib ility of d is c lo s u re o f in d ivid u al establish m en t data. E arnings
data not shown se p a ra te ly fo r in du stry d ivision s a re included in the
o v e r a ll c la s s ific a tio n when a su b cla ssifica tio n o f s e c r e ta r ie s or tru ck d r iv e r s is not shown o r in fo rm a tio n to su b cla ssify is not ava ila b le.

T h is bu lletin p resen ts cu rren t occupational em ploym ent and
earn in gs in form a tion obtained la r g e ly by m a il fro m the establishm ents
v is ite d by Bureau fie ld econ om ists in the la st p reviou s su rvey fo r
occupations re p o rte d in that e a r lie r study. P e r s o n a l v is its w e re made
to nonrespondents and to those respondents rep o rtin g unusual changes
since the p revio u s su rvey.

O ccupational em ploym ent and earnings data a re shown fo r
fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s , i.e ., those h ire d to w o rk a regu la r w e e k ly schedule.
E arn in gs data exclude p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w ork on
w eekends, h olid a ys, and late shifts. N onproduction bonuses a re e x ­
cluded, but c o s t- o f- liv in g a llow an ces and in cen tive earnings a re in ­
cluded.
W h ere w e e k ly hours a re re p o rte d , as fo r o ffic e c le r ic a l
occupations, r e fe re n c e is to the standard w ork w eek (rounded to the
n e a re s t h a lf hour) fo r w hich em p lo yees r e c e iv e th eir reg u la r straigh ttim e s a la rie s (e x c lu s iv e o f pay fo r o v e rtim e at reg u la r and/or p r e ­
m ium ra te s ).
A v e r a g e w e e k ly earnings fo r these occupations have
been rounded to the n ea rest h a lf d o lla r.

In each a re a , data a re obtained fr o m re p re s e n ta tiv e estab ­
lishm ents w ithin six b road in du stry d iv is io n s : M anufacturing; tra n s ­
p ortation , com m unication, and oth er public u tilitie s ; w h o lesa le trad e;
r e ta il trad e; fin an ce, in su ran ce, and r e a l estate; and s e r v ic e s . M a jo r
industry groups excluded fr o m these studies a re govern m en t o p e ra ­
tions and the con stru ction and e x tra c tiv e in d u stries. E stablishm ents
having fe w e r than a p r e s c r ib e d num ber of w o rk e rs a re om itted because
they tend to fu rnish in su fficien t em ploym ent in the occupations studied
to w a rra n t inclusion. Separate tabulations a re p ro vid ed fo r each of
the broad indu stry d ivisio n s which m e e t pu blication c r ite r ia .

T h ese su rveys m easu re the le v e l of occupational earnings in
an a re a at a p a rtic u la r tim e. C om p arison s o f individual occupational
a v e ra g e s o v e r tim e m ay not r e fle c t expected w age changes.
The
a v e ra g e s fo r in dividu al jobs a re a ffe c te d by changes in w ages and
em ploym ent pattern s. F o r exam p le, prop ortion s o f w o rk e rs em ployed
by h igh- or lo w -w a g e fir m s m ay change o r h igh -w age w o rk e rs m ay
advance to b e tte r jobs and be rep la ced by new w o rk e rs at lo w e r rates.
Such shifts in em ploym ent could d e c re a s e an occupational a vera g e even
though m ost establish m en ts in an a re a in c re a s e w ages during the year.
T ren d s in earnings o f occupational grou ps, shown in table 2, a re b etter
in d ica tors o f w age trends than individual jobs w ithin the groups.

T h ese su rveys a re conducted on a sam ple b asis because of
the unn ecessary cost in vo lved in su rveyin g a ll establish m en ts.
To
obtain optim um a ccu ra cy at m inim um cost, a g r e a te r p ro p o rtio n of
la rg e than o f s m a ll establish m en ts is studied. In com bining the data,
h o w e ver, a ll establishm ents a re given th e ir ap p rop riate w eight. E s ­
tim a tes based on the establishm ents studied a re p resen ted , th e re fo re ,
as rela tin g to a ll establishm ents in the indu stry grouping and a rea ,
excep t fo r those b elow the m inim um s iz e studied.
Occupations and E arn in gs
The occupations s e le c te d fo r study a re com m on to a v a r ie ty
o f m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in d u s tries, and a re o f the
fo llo w in g typ es: (1) O ffic e c le r ic a l; (2) p ro fe s s io n a l and tech n ical;
(3) m aintenance and pow erplan t; and (4) cu stod ial and m a te r ia l m o v e ­
m ent. O ccupational c la s s ific a tio n is based on a u n iform set o f job
d escrip tio n s d esign ed to take account of in teresta b lish m en t v a ria tio n
in duties w ithin the sam e job.
The occupations s e le c te d fo r study
a re lis te d and d e s c rib e d in the appendix. U nless oth erw ise in dicated,
the earnings data fo llo w in g the job title s a re fo r a ll in du stries co m ­
bined. E arn in gs data fo r som e of the occupations lis te d and d escrib ed ,
o r fo r som e in du stry d ivisio n s w ithin occupations, a re not p resen ted in

Th e a v e ra g e s p resen ted r e fle c t com p osite, a reaw id e e s t i­
m ates.
In du stries and establish m en ts d iffe r in pay le v e l and job
staffin g and, thus, contribute d iffe r e n tly to the estim a tes fo r each job.
The pay rela tion sh ip obtainable fro m the a v e ra g e s m ay fa il to r e fle c t
a c c u ra te ly the w age spread o r d iffe r e n tia l m aintained among jo b s in
individu al establish m en ts. S im ila rly , d iffe re n c e s in a v e ra g e pay le v e ls
fo r m en and w om en in any o f the s e le c te d occupations should not be
assum ed to r e fle c t d iffe re n c e s in pay trea tm en t o f the sexes w ithin
individu al establish m en ts. O th er p o s s ib le fa c to rs which m ay con ­
tribu te to d iffe re n c e s in pay fo r m en and w om en include: D iffe re n c e s
in p ro g re s s io n w ithin estab lish ed rate ra n ges, since only the actual
rates paid incum bents a re c o lle c te d ; and d iffe re n c e s in s p e c ific duties
p e rfo rm e d , although the w o rk e rs a re c la s s ifie d a p p ro p ria te ly w ithin
the sam e s u rv e y jo b d escrip tio n . Job d escrip tio n s used in c la s s ify in g

* Included in the 90 areas are four studies conducted under contract with the New Yoiit State
Department of Labor. These areas are Binghamton (New Yoik portion only) Rochester (office occupa­
tions only); Syracuse; and U tica-R om e. In addition, the Bureau conducts more lim ited area studies in
65 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administration of the U .S . Department of Labor.




1

2

em p lo yees in th ese su rveys a re u su ally m o re g e n e ra liz e d than those
used in in d ivid u al establish m en ts and a llo w fo r m in o r d iffe re n c e s
am ong estab lish m en ts in the s p e c ific duties p e rfo rm e d .
O ccu pation al em ploym en t estim a tes re p re s e n t the total in a ll
estab lish m en ts w ith in the scope o f the study and not the number actu­
a lly su rveyed . B ecau se o f d iffe re n c e s in occupational stru ctu re among
esta b lish m en ts, the estim ates o f occu pational em ploym en t obtained from
the sam ple o f estab lish m en ts studied s e r v e only to indicate the r e la tiv e
im p ortan ce o f the job s studied.
T h ese d iffe re n c e s in occupational
stru ctu re do not a ffe c t m a te r ia lly the a c c u ra c y o f the earnings data.




E stab lish m en t P r a c t ic e s and Supplem entary W age P r o v is io n s

Tabulations on s e le c te d establish m en t p ra c tic e s and supple­
m en ta ry w age p ro v is io n s (B - s e r ie s tab les) a re not p resen ted in this
bu lletin.
In form a tion fo r these tabulations is c o lle c te d b ien n ially.
T h ese tabulations on m inim um entrance s a la rie s fo r in ex p erien ced
w om en o ffic e w o r k e r s; shift d iffe r e n tia ls ; scheduled w e e k ly hours;
paid h olid a ys; paid va ca tion s; and health, in su ran ce, and pension
plans a re p resen ted (in the B - s e r ie s tab les) in p revio u s bu lletin s
fo r this area .

T a b le

1.

E s ta b lish m en ts

and

w orkers

w ith in

b y m a jo r in d u stry d iv is io n ,“ N o v e m b e r 1971

scope

Minimum
employment
in establishments in scope
of study

Industry division

of

survey

num ber

stu d ied

ini M i a m i , F l a . , 1

Number of establishments

W orkers in establishments
Within scope of study4

Within scope
of study3

Studied

1. 145

206

210,849

100

102,224

50

387
758

58
148

47,976
162, 873

23
77

13, 228
88,996

50
50
50
50
50

75
98
254
129
202

28
14
43
20
43

44,391
10,344
57,083
19, 247
31, 808

21
5
27
9
15

39,180
2,420
30,566
5,414
11,416

A ll divisions________________________________
Manufacturing____________ _____________________
Nonmanufacturing_______________________________
Transportation, communication, and
other public u tilitie s 5 _____________________
Wholesale trade 6 ____________________________
Retail trade__________________________________
Finance, insurance, and rea l estate 6 ______
Services 6 7__________________________________

and

j

Studied
Number

Percen t

'

1 The Miam i Standard Metropolitan Statistical A re a , as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (fo rm e rly the Bureau of the Budget)
through January 1968, consists of Dade County. The "w orkers within scope of study" estim ates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate
description of the size and composition of the labor fo rce included in the survey. The estim ates are not intended, how ever, to serve as a basis of
comparison with other employment indexes fo r the area to measure employment trends or levels since (1) planning of wage surveys requires the use
of establishment data compiled considerably in advance of the payroll period studied, and (2) sm all establishments are excluded from the scope of
the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used in classifying establishments by industry division.
3 Includes a ll establishments with total employment at or above the minimum lim itation. A ll outlets (within the area) of companies in such
industries as trade, finance, auto rep air service, and motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes all w orkers in all establishments with total employment (within the a rea) at or above the minimum lim itation.
5 Abbreviated to "public u tilities" in the A -s e r ie s tables. Taxicabs and services incidental to w ater transportation w ere excluded. M iam i's
transit system is municipally operated and is excluded by definition from the scope of the study.
6 This industry division is represented in estimates for "a ll industries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the Series A tables. Separate presentation of
data fo r this division is not made for one or m ore of the following reasons: (1) Employment in the division is too sm all to provide enough data to m erit
separate study, (2) the sample was not designed initially to perm it separate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to perm it separate
presentation, and (4) there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data.
7 Hotels and m otels; laundries and other personal services; business services; automobile rep air, rental, and parking; motion pictures; nonprofit
membership organizations (excluding religious and charitable organizations); and engineering and architectural services.




One-fourth of the w orkers within scope of the survey in the Miami area w ere
employed in manufacturing firm s. The following presents the m ajor industry groups and
specific industries as a percent of a ll manufacturing:
Specific industries

Industry groups
A pparel and other textile
products__________________ ___
Transportation equipment.. ___
Fabricated m etal products- ___
Food and kindred products . ___
Printing and publishing____ ___
_ _

20
13
12
12
6
5

Women's and m isses'
outerw ear____________________ 13
A irc r a ft and p a rts____________
8
Fabricated structural m etal
products. ___________________
8
Ship and boatbuilding and
5
Household fu rniture___________ 4
Newspapers____________________ 4

This information is based on estimates of total employment derived from universe
m aterials compiled p rior to actual survey. Proportions in various industry divisions may
d iffe r from proportions based on the results of the survey as shown in table 1 above.

W a g e T re n d s fo r S e le c te d O c c u p a tio n a l G ro u p s
P r e s e n te d in table 2 a re indexes and p ercen ta ges o f change
in a v e ra g e s a la rie s o f o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and in d u stria l nu rses,
and in a v e ra g e earn in gs o f s e le c te d p la n tw ork er groups. The indexes
are a m ea su re o f w a ges at a given tim e , ex p re s s e d as a p ercen t of
w ages during the base p e rio d . Subtracting 100 fro m the index y ield s
the p ercen ta ge change in w ages fr o m the base p e rio d to the date of
the index.
The p e rcen ta g es o f change o r in c re a s e re la te to w age
changes betw een the in dicated dates. Annual ra tes of in c re a s e , w h ere
shown, r e fle c t the amount o f in c re a s e fo r 12 months when the tim e
p e rio d betw een su rveys was oth er than 12 m onths. T h ese com putations
w e re based on the assum ption that w ages in c re a s e d at a constant rate
betw een su rveys. T h ese estim a tes a re m ea su res of change in a v e r ­
ages fo r the a re a ; they a re not intended to m easu re a v e ra g e pay
changes in the establish m en ts in the area .

shows the p e rcen ta g e change. The index is the produ ct o f m u ltiplyin g
the base y e a r r e la tiv e (100) b y the r e la tiv e fo r the next succeeding
y e a r and continuing to m u ltip ly (compound) each y e a r 's re la tiv e by the
p revio u s y e a r 's index.
F o r o ffic e c le r ic a l w o rk e rs and in d u stria l n u rses, the w age
trends re la te to re g u la r w e e k ly s a la rie s fo r the n o rm a l w ork w eek ,
ex c lu s iv e o f earnings fo r o v e rtim e .
F o r p la n tw o rk er grou p s, they
m easu re changes in a v e ra g e s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs, excluding
p rem iu m pay fo r o v e rtim e and fo r w o rk on w eeken ds, h o lid a ys, and
late shifts. The p ercen ta ges a re based on data fo r s e le c te d k ey o c c u ­
pations and include m ost o f the n u m e ric a lly im p ortan t jobs w ithin
each group.
L im ita tio n s o f Data

M ethod o f Com puting
The indexes and p ercen ta g es o f change, as m ea su res of
change in a rea a v e r a g e s , a re influ enced by: (1) g e n e ra l s a la ry and
w age changes, (2) m e r it o r other in c re a s e s in pay r e c e iv e d by in d i­
vidu al w o r k e r s w h ile in the sam e job , and (3) changes in a v e ra g e
w ages due to changes in the la b or fo r c e resu ltin g fr o m la b or tu rn ­
o v e r , fo r c e expansions, fo r c e redu ction s, and changes in the p r o p o r ­
tions o f w o rk e rs em p loyed by establish m en ts w ith d iffe re n t pay le v e ls .
Changes in the la b o r fo r c e can cause in c re a s e s o r d e c re a s e s in the
occupational a v e ra g e s without actual w age changes. It is co n ceiva b le
that even though a ll establish m en ts in an a re a gave w age in c re a s e s ,
a v e ra g e w ages m ay have d eclin ed because lo w e r-p a y in g establishm ents
en tered the a re a o r expanded th e ir w o rk fo r c e s .
S im ila r ly , w ages
m ay have rem a in ed r e la t iv e ly constant, y e t the a v e ra g e s fo r an a rea
m a y have ris e n c o n sid era b ly because h ig h er-p a y in g establishm ents
en tered the area .

Each o f the fo llo w in g k ey occupations within an occupational
group was a ssign ed a constant w eigh t based on its p rop ortion a te e m ­
ploym en t in the occupational group:
Office clerical (men and women): Office clerical (men and women)— Skilled maintenance ( men):
Carpenters
Bookkeeping-machine
Continued
Electricians
Secretaries
operators, class B
Machinists
Stenographers, general
Clerks, accounting, classes
Mechanics
A and B
Stenographers, senior
Mechanics (automotive)
Switchboard operators, classes
Clerks, file , classes
Painters
A and B
A , B, and C
Pipefitters
Tabulating-machine operators,
Clerks, order
Tool and die makers
class B
Clerks, payroll
Typists, classes A and B
Comptometer operators
Unskilled plant (men):
Keypunch operators, classes
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Industrial nurses (men and women):
A and B
Laborers, m aterial handling
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Office boys and girls

The use o f constant em ploym en t w eigh ts elim in a tes the e ffe c t
o f changes in the p ro p o rtio n o f w o rk e rs re p re s e n te d in each job in ­
cluded in the data.
The p ercen ta g es o f change r e fle c t only changes
in a v e ra g e pay fo r s tra ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a re not influenced by
changes in standard w ork sch edu les, as such, o r by p rem iu m pay
fo r o v e rtim e . W h ere n e c e s s a ry , data w e r e adjusted to rem o ve fro m
the indexes and p ercen ta ges o f change any sign ifica n t e ffe c t caused
by changes in the scope o f the su rvey.

The a v e ra g e (m ean) earn in gs fo r each occupation w e r e m u lti­
p lie d by the occu pation al w eigh t, and the products fo r a ll occupations
in the group w e r e totaled .
The a g g re g a te s fo r 2 con secu tive yea rs
w e r e re la te d by d ivid in g the a g g re g a te fo r the la te r y e a r b y the a g g r e ­
gate fo r the e a r lie r y e a r.
The resultant r e la tiv e , le s s 100 p ercen t,




4

T a b le 2 .

In d e x e s o f s ta n d a rd w e e k ly s a la rie s an d s tra ig h t-tim e

h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d o c c u p a tio n a l g ro u p s

in M ia m i, F la., N o v e m b e r 1 9 7 0 an d N o v e m b e r 1 9 7 1 , an d p e rc e n ts o f in c re a s e fo r s e le c te d p e rio d s
All in d u stries
P eriod

Office
c le r ic a l
(men and
women)

Industrial
n u rses
(men and
women)

M anufacturing

Skilled
m aintenance
trad e s
(men)

Unskilled
plant
w ork ers
(men)

O ffice
c le r ic a l
(men and
women)

Industrial
n u rse s
(men and
women)

Skilled
maintenance
trad e s
(men)

U nskilled
plant
w orkers
(men)

Indexes (D ecem ber 1967=100)
N ovem ber 1970_______________________________
Novem ber 1971_______________________________

126. 0
132.4

143. 8
149. 3

131. 3
141. 1

129. 0
134. 3

123. 9
129. 6

O
C)

128. 4
137. 3

130. 4
135. 6

P erce n ts of in c re a se
D ecem ber 1959 to D ecem ber I9 6 0 ____________
D ecem ber I960 to D ecem ber 1961____________
D ecem ber 1961 to D ecem ber 1962____________
D ecem ber 1962 to D ecem ber 1963---------------D ecem ber 1963 to D ecem ber 1964---------------D ecem ber 1964 to D ecem ber 1965____________
D ecem ber 1965 to D ecem ber 1966____________
D ecem ber 1966 to D ecem ber 1967____________
D ecem ber 1967 to D ecem ber 1968____________
D ecem ber 1968 to Novem ber 1969:
11-month in c re a se _________________________
Annual rate of in c r e a s e ____________________

2 .9
2. 8
2. 5
3. 6
3. 1
3. 7
3. 7
4. 1
6. 6

5. 0
3. 0
1. 7
6. 3
3. 8
4. 7
7. 4
9 .6
12. 1

1.
2.
1.
5.
2.
5.
5.
4.
5.

8
8
8
1
0
6
7
1
8

3. 5
3. 0
1. 7
1. 6
2 .9
.4
4. 8
4. 5
7. 9

4. 1
1.4
1. 1
3. 5
4. 8
4. 2
4. 0
5. 7
5. 0

(*)
C)
(*)
(*)
(*)
t 1)
O
( )
(l)

3. 6
2. 0
1. 3
3.9
1. 0
4. 5
3. 9
5 .9
3.4

5. 6
.4
1. 1
2. 2
4. 0
2.9
3. 4
4. 8
5.9

7. 8
8. 5

11. 5
12. 6

10. 8
11. 8

8 .9
9. 7

6. 9
7. 6

O
(*)

12. 7
13.9

8. 9
9 .7

Novem ber 1969 to N ovem ber 1970____________
Novem ber 1970 to Novem ber 1971____________

9. 7
5. 1

15. 0
3. 8

12. 0
7. 5

9 .8
4. 1

10. 4
4. 6

(M
C)

10. 2
6 .9

13. 1
4. 0




Data do not m eet publication c r ite r ia .

6

A.

Occupational earnings

T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

and

wom en

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e w e e k ly hours and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la ., N o v e m b e r 1971)
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)

Number of workers receiving straight-tim e weekly earnings of
*

Average
weekly

Sex, occupation, and industry division

$
60

Middle range2

65

199
164

$
3 7 .5 155.00 154 .50 1 3 6 .5 0 3 7 . 0 1 5 9 . 5 0 16 2 . 0 0 1 4 0 . 5 0 -

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING -------------

211
188

38.0 134.00 13 9.50
3 7 . 5 13 5.50 145 .50

172
168

38.0
38.0
37.0

CLERKS,

PAYROLL

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS)
NONMANUFACTURING -------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ----

88 .5 0
88 .5 0
93 .0 0

$

4 0 .0 1 0 9 . 5 0 1 0 1 . 5 0
4 0 .0 1 0 6 . 5 0 1 0 4. 00
3 9 . 5 112.00 9 4 . 5 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE)-----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

4 1 . 5 103.00 10 1.5 0
4 2 . 0 1 0 0 . 5 0 10 0.0 0

9 2 .5 0 9 1 .5 0 -

110

120

1 30

1 40

1 50

1 60

170

1 80

190

200

21 0

70

75

80

85

90

95

1 00

1 05

110

120

1 30

1 40

150

1 60

170

1 80

1 90

200

21 0

220

13
10

39
17

13
13

24
24

35
35

14
14

25
25

33
33

15
15

31
31
12

31
28
11

26
26
3

10
9
1

29
29
1

3
3
2

32
1

26
2
24
21
14

120.50
10 4. 00

22
22

164
40
124
40

3 9 . 5 10 0.0 0 10 2. 00
4 0 .0 1 0 4. 00 1 1 0 . 5 0
9 8 .5 0 1 0 1 . 5 0
39.5
9 5. 0 0
4 0 .0
9 9 .5 0

33
15
18
5

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ---NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE ------

397
51
346
11 2
59

39.0
4 0 .0
38.5
37.0
39.5

132.50
122.00
134.00
159 .50
1 2 5 .0 0

127.50 1 1 0 .5 0 12 9 .0 0 1 0 6 . 0 0 126.50 1 1 2 .0 0 172.50 14 3 .5 0 122.50 1 1 6 .0 0 -

154 .50
133.50
16 0 . 5 0
178.50
137.50

1,204
165
1, 039
372
182

39.0
4 0 .0
39.0
3 7.5
4 0 .0

112.00
107.50
112.50
13 8 .50
9 4 .5 0

93.50103.50
107.50
93 .00 10 3. 0 0
93.5014 6 .0 0 1 1 0 . 5 0 8 3.50 94 .0 0

12 6 . 0 0
122.50
12 9 .0 0
165.50
110.00

See fo o tn o tes at end o f ta b les.




8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

8 3. 50
8 3. 50

35
33

23
23

15
15

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---NONMANUFACTURING —
RETAIL TRADE ------

39.0
39.0

i

19
19

11
11

187
178

i ------ 1-----

1 05

39.0 119.0 0 121.00 10 3 .50 -13 4 .0 0
3 8 . 5 1 1 5 . 5 0 1 0 9. 00 1 0 2 . 0 0 - 1 3 4 . 5 0

CLERKS, FI LE, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING

i

$
100

130
100

3 9 .5 105.50 102.50 10 0 .5 0 3 9 .5 105.50 102.50 10 0 .5 0 -

I

*
95

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING —

25
25

i

$
90

9 1 .5 0 132.00
8 9 .5 0 - 131.00
9 2 .0 0 -15 1.0 0

CLERKS, FILE, CLASS A ---NONMANUFACTURING --------

I

*
85

1 6 5 .0 0

BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE ------

i

*
80

1 7 6 .0 0
17 7.5 0

82.00-100.00
8 1.50-100 .0 0
8 8.0 0 -114.0 0

9 2 .5 0 9 2 .5 0 93.00 94.0 0-

S

75

112 .50 153.50
112.00-154.50
112 .50 -

8 9 .5 0
89 .00
98. 50

$

i

70

and
under

(standard)

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A
NONHANUFACTURING -------------

*

i

65

10 9. 00
120.50
10 6. 00
102.50

13
13

22
1
15

75
12
63

150
26
124
21
12

38
38

29
26

30
27

29
27

20
19

24
10
14

13
10
3

36
2
11

80
12
68
5
20

35
16
19

177
14
163
11

136
28
108
22
25

64
33
31
13
18

49
3
46
45
1

2
2

11
11

40
18

20
10
10
2
8

40
2
38

13 3
11
122
39

4
4

10 5 . 0 0
10 5. 0 0

7 5 . 5 0 - 9 2 .0 0
7 5 . 0 0 - 9 2 .5 0

83
13
70
7
30

21
21

15
15

20
3
13

31
13

16
16

22
13
1
48
12
36
32
1

37
7
30
13

37
36

30
8
12

105
101

42
42

20
20

10
10

7
T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a sis by in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la ., N o v e m b e r 1971)
W eekly earnings 1
( standard)

Number of w o r k e r s re c e i v in g s t ra ig h t -t i m e w ee k l y earnings of—

1

*

Mean 2

M edian2

$

*

t

$

t

t

[»

70

75

80

85

90

95

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

54
54

81
81

13
6

55
49

30
30

5
5

15
15

7
7

19
19

•

“

12
12

5
5

22
22

23
23

25
25

18
15

37
37

_
“

22
22

_
-

-

2
2
2

21
—
21
21

25
3
22
16

5
5
1
4

33
3
30
7
9

26
3
23
7
13

38
11
27
2
8

9
—
9
1
4

9 2 .50 -10 8.50
89. 5 0 - 1 0 7 . 0 0
86.0 0 -103.50

2
2
2

—

-

*

10
10
10

13
13
13

7
7
7

13
13
8

17
17
4

_

-

-

6
“

6
6
2
4

27
15
4
3

16
16
—
9

5
5
1
4

6
6
4

51
6
45
2
5

42
4
38
2
31

95
6
89
7
24

11
11

3
3

10
8

5
5

*

$

$

s

$

$

i

$

r

l
l

Middle range2

105

no

no

iz o

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

■ I3Q . 1 4 0

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

29
26

_

_

1
1

_

-

1
1

_

-

~

-

-

-

40
9
31
3
5

24
4
20
4
6

27
6
21
6
10

3

8

2

_

1

-

-

1
1

-

*

33
21
5

7
1
1

7
7
4

-

_
—

24
24
5
2

45
42
4
6

58
49
—
11

32
27
4
4

104
5
99
14
14

67
13
54
4
9

16
2
14
3
5

5
5

2
2

1
1

-

1
1

93
6
87
6
12

138
10
128
4
7

135
9
126
13

and
u n der

120

|

CLERKS. F IL E , CLASS C ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

280
267

39.0
39.0

$
80.00
8 0. 50

$
7 7 .0 0
75 .0 0

$
$
7 1 . 0 0 - 8 6. 5 0
7 1 . 0 0 - 8 7 .0 0

CLERKS, ORDER -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

195
189

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

98.00
9 7 .5 0

98 .00
9 7.50

87.0 0 -111.0 0
87.0 0 -111.0 0

CLERKS, PAYROLL --------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

273
39
234
47
100

39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
38.5
39.5

10 7. 0 0
107.50
10 7 . 0 0
127.50
95.50

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS---------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------RETAIL TRAO E-----------------------------

112
94
56

40 .0 101.00 103.50
9 9 .5 0 1 0 0. 50
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
95.50
92.50

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRA DE -----------------------------

277
240
63
39

39.0
39.0
38.5
39.0

116.0 0
118.00
133.50
10 5. 0 0

11 4 .5 0 103.00-128.00
116.0 0 10 5.0 0 -131.0 0
140.50 12 2.5 0 -14 4 .5 0
106.50
96 .50 -117 .0 0

-

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

665
55
610
168
116

3 9- 0
40 .0
38.5
36.5
40 .0

106.50
105.00
10 6 . 5 0
126.50
95 .0 0

10 2. 00
93.50-119.50
102.50
93.50-116.00
10 2. 00
93.50-120 .50
127.50 114.0 0-136 .50
93 .0 0
8 7.5 0 -10 3 .0 0

-

MESSENGERS (OFFICE G I R L S ) --------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

39
37

39.5
39.5

8 1.5 0
8 1.5 0

SECRETARIES --------------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

2,421
22 8
2,193
612
276

38.5
40 .0
38.5
37.0
39.0

134.00
13 0 . 5 0
134.50
1 5 7 .0 0
126.50

131.50 114 .5 0 -15 1.0 0
131.00 117.0 0 -14 8 .5 0
131.50 11 4 .0 0 -1 5 1.5 0
1 5 4 .0 0 1 3 9 . 0 0 - 1 7 5 . 5 0
124.50 11 4 .5 0 -14 0 .5 0

—
—
-

—
—
“

—
-

_
—
-

i
i
“

15
15
1

61
11
50
4
11

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

201
39
162
56

39.0
4 0 .0
39.0
3 8 .0

166.50
135.50
1 7 4 .0 0
1 9 5 .0 0

170.50 150.50-194.00
1 4 6 .0 0 1 1 6 . 5 0 - 1 5 9 . 5 0
181.00 153.50-2 01.0 0
19 7.5 0 184.00-207.00

-

“

-

—
-

-

—
-

3
3
-

8
6
2

—

SECRETARIES, CLASS B --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

780
99
681
210
83

38.5
40 .0
38.5
37.0
39.5

1 4 4 .5 0
135.00
14 6 .0 0
16 7.50
1 3 8 .5 0

141.0 0
135.00
142.00
17 0 . 0 0
141.0 0

12 9.00 -162.0 0
123.0 0-15 1.50
12 9 .5 0 -16 3 .5 0
156 .0 0-179.00
12 9 .50-155.00

-

-

-

_
-

-

“

7
3
4

7
7

6
3
3

7

“

“

SECRETARIES, CLASS C --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------RETAIL TR A DE -----------------------------

934
47
887
111

38.0
40.0
38.0
3 9. 0

126.50
129.00
126.50
120.50

12 5.5 0 1 1 0 .5 0 -1 4 2 .0 0
124.50 119.0 0 -142.0 0
12 5.5 0 10 9.50-142.00
122.00 1 1 2 .5 0 - 1 3 1 .0 0

-

-

-

-

i

1

21

51

77

77

-

-

*

i

1
*

21
7

51
1

77
5

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

506
43
463
55
63

39.5
4 0 .0
39.5
4 0 .0
39.0

118.50
117.0 0
118.50
1 4 9 .0 0
114 .50

118.00
111.5 0
118.00
16 5.50
118.00

-

—
-

-

_
-

_
-

14
—
14
1

30
5
25

27
27
3
4

55
7
48
2

See footn otes at end o f tab les




t

65

65
W EN - CONTINUED
OM

i

o
o

60

*

1

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

p
V*

S ex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

103.50
9 2 .50 -12 4 .50
10 5 . 0 0 1 0 0 . 5 C - 1 2 6 . 0 0
102.50
9 1 .5 0 -12 4 .5 0
12 4 . 0 0
98 .0 0 -154.00
94 . 0 0
80.50-108.50

8 2. 50
8 2. 50

7 4 . 0 0 - 90 .00
7 4 . 0 0 - 90 .5 0

105.00-130.00
104.50-125.00
105.00-130.00
126.50-170.00
110.00-123.00

-

—
“
_
-

_

*

1
1

“

4

_
9

3
1
2

8
5
-

9
7

2
2
-

-

3
3
2

-

—

—
-

“

_
—
-

21
19
11

21
21
21

14
14
5

5
5
5

2
2
2

—

_

-

87
6
81
48
7

42
42
42

6
1
5
1

10
3
7
7

19
19
19

—
-

—
-

—
-

349
38
311
18
54

368
37
331
45
67

389
38
351
89
41

225
25
200
77
20

233
29
204
102
25

135
19
116
77
18

105
1
104
79
3

72
3
69
53
2

41
—
41
16
2

47
47
30

14
2
12
12
-

1
—
1

5
3
2

11
4
7

12
3
9

8
4
4

38
8
30

14
7
7
3

17
17
4

18
—
18
11

23
23
12

41
41
25

2
1
1
1

6
6

83
15
68

177
31
146
18
18

92
8
84
12
9

95
20
75
23
16

82
7
75
43
17

63
63
61
1

31
1
30
23
“

18
18
4

6

95
10
85
10
9

6
6
5

12
1
11
11
-

77
8

165
15
1 50
28

154
16
138
32

130
2
128
16

no
10
100
9

93
93
5

20
2
18
-

16
16
-

18
2
16
-

-

-

-

51
9
42
5

96
5
91
8
20

108
7
101
5
19

70
2
68
5
6

15
3
12
3
-

7
1
6
2
2

19
3
16
16

9
1
8
8
«

5
—
5
5
«

115
9
106
18
13

—
-

_

‘ —
—
-

-

—

_

_

_

-

—
-

—
-

8
T a b le

A -1 .

O ffic e

o c c u p a tio n s —m e n

a n d w o m e n ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e w e e k ly hours) and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a s is b y in d u s try d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la ., N o v e m b e r 1971)

Number of w o r k e r s re c e i v in g s t ra ig h t -t i m e w ee k l y earn ings of—
S ex , occupation, and ind us try division

of
woikers

t

Average
hours1
(standard)

t
60

Mean2

Median2

Middle range2

$

S

*

t

$

*

*

r

*

$

*

*

t

$

t

*

1 ------ $

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

70

75

_ao_

85

90

95

100

105

n o

120

130

n o

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

4
4
4
-

—
—

—
—
—

7
7
-

—
-

-

5

-

-

and
under
65

W EN OM

$

CONTINUED

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

500
62
438
137
31

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
4 0 .0

$
$
1 1 2 .0 0 1 0 8 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0 1 0 8 .0 0
1 1 1 .5 0 1 0 8 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0 1 2 9 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0 1 2 0 .0 0

$
$
9 6 .0 0 - 1 2 5 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0 -1 2 2 .5 0
9 3 . 5 0 -1 2 5 .5 0
1 1 3 .0 0 -1 5 0 .5 0
1 1 2 .5 0 - 1 2 4 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTIL ITIE S ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

401
346
85
30

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 3 1 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0
1 6 1 .5 0
1 2 0 .0 0

1 2 8 .0 0
1 2 6 .0 0
1 3 5 .0 0
1 6 3 .0 0
1 1 9 .0 0

1 1 4 .5 0 -1 4 6 .0 0
1 1 6 .0 0 -1 2 9 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0 -1 5 2 .0 0
1 5 7 .5 0 -1 7 0 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 3 7 .5 0

—

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

88
69
29

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .5

1 2 1 .0 0 1 0 7 .0 0
1 2 7 .0 0 1 4 0 .5 0
1 5 8 .5 0 1 5 3 .0 0

9 3 .5 0 - 1 4 8 .5 0
9 4 .0 0 - 1 5 2 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0 - 1 7 1 .0 0

-

SWITCHBOARO OPERATORS, CLASS B ------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

555
546
69

4 2 .5
4 2 .5
3 9 .5

8 9 .0 0
8 8 .0 0
8 8 .5 0
8 7 .5 0
9 9 .5 0 1 0 1 .5 0

8 1 .0 0 - 9 7 .5 0
8 1 .0 0 - 9 7 .0 0
8 6 .0 0 - 1 2 1 .5 0

SWITCHBOARO OPERATOR-RECEPTION I S TS MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------

419
124
295
56

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

9 9 .0 0
9 6 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0
9 0 .0 0

9 8 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
9 8 .5 0
9 2 .0 0

9 0 .5 0 - 1 0 5 .0 0
9 1 .0 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 - 1 0 4 .5 0
8 1 .0 0 - 9 4 .5 0

12
12
—

TY PI ST S, CLASS A ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

395
359
154

3 9 .0
3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 5 .5 0 1 1 2 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0 1 0 9 .0 0
1 2 9 .0 0 1 3 4 .0 0

9 5 .0 0 - 1 3 4 .5 0
9 3 .0 0 - 1 3 7 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 -1 5 4 .5 0

*

TYP IST S, CLASS B ------------- ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

567
47
520
124
112

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 8 .0
4 0 .0

9 9 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
9 1 .5 0
9 3 .0 0
9 1 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0 1 1 9 .5 0
9 9 .0 0
9 0 .5 0

8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 6 .5 0
8 4 .0 0 - 1 0 1 .0 0
8 5 .0 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0
9 7 .0 0 - 1 5 1 .5 0
8 2 .5 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0

-

See footnotes at end of tables




55

-

-

2

-

15

72

28

35

2
—

-

15
2

72

28

3

5

35
11
-

33
13
20
4
1

70
7
63
22
10

68
6
62
23
12

24
24
20
1

37
12
25
12
1

24
—
24
23
l

3
-

—
—
-

80
24
56
2
1

5
-

-

5
5

3
3

-

~

-

—
-

21
—
21

-

1

1

7

-

8

9
7

17
—
17
17
-

6
—

“

16
—
16
13
-

42
42
36

*

60
21
39
2
2

69
3

34

73
14
59

33

5

11
3
8

40

—

—
-

-

i
i

7
7

10
10

5
5

12
4

6

1
1

3
3
1

1
1
1

16
16
9

8
8
7

4
4
4

2
2
2

-

-

-

-

1

1

—
—

6
1

7
1

6

1

7
26
2
4

6
6

6
6
-

—
—

-

5

—
—

5

44
44
2

24
24
2

52
52
4

100
100
6

102
102
16

68
68
1

56
56
2

28
27
6

11
10
2

45
38
4

25
25
24

-

-

—
—

1
—
1
1

20
7
13
13

10
3
7

56

27
5
22
3

98
21
77
-

28
9
19
*

46

12

3

-

-

6

-

_

8

-

_

26
20
5

4
8
2

3

—

—

6

-

—

8

-

—

4

92
33
59
28

-

-

25
25

21
21
7

29
29
10

12
12
6

50
26
3

27
27

56
44
26

16
16
9

19
19
19

-

_

_

_

_

-

“

52
52
11

44
44

“

-

-

-

120
3
117
13
10

71
10
61
13

41
6
35
6

—
“

—
-

4

-

—
—
-

_
-

4

16

-

-

4

16

26

96
15
81

—
i

2

10

3
33

-

26

—

4
52

7

21

6

43
12
31

5
5

26

26

26
10
4

26
13
1

—

—

5
22

—
22
7
12

-

44
44
37

15

23

34
1

15

23

8
7

14

33
33
“

—

—
9

—
-

-

*

4
4
*

_

9
T a b le

A -2 .

P ro fe s s io n a l

and te c h n ic a l

o c c u p a tio n s —m en

and

wom en

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a sis by in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la . , N o v e m b e r 1971)

Num ber of w o r k e r s re c ei vi ng s t r a ig h t -t i m e we ek ly earnings of—
*
N u m ber

A verage

w o ik eis

h ours 1
standard)

S ex, occupation, and industry division

U n d er
M ea n 2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

t

1

90 1

*
90

HEN
$
3 8 . 5 17 0 . 0 0
3 8 . 5 1 6 9 .0 0
3 7.5 179.5 0

$
$
$
172.50 162.50-181.50
172.00 16 2.00-180.50
17 4 .50 172.00 -18 5.5 0

60
57
33

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

14 7
139

3 8 . 5 1 3 6. 00 1 3 5 . 5 0
38.5 135.50 135.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

160
152

3 8 .0 1 1 9 . 5 0
3 7.5 119.5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAHERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

89

115.0 0
113.00

12 1.50-14 7.50
120.50 -147.00
99 .50 -138.0 0
99 .50 -13 8 .0 0

*

%

s

s

*

$

$

*

%

t

*

i

*

t

«

*

$

100

11 0

120

130

140

15 0

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

110

120

130

140

150

160

170 - 1 8 P

190

200

210

220

230

240

250

260

270

280

6
6

3
3

2
2

1

3
2
2

1
1
1

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

2
2

2
2

280

and
u nder

100

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A -----------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

*

—

—

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
11
2

21
21
20

11
11
8

-

-

-

13
13

3
3

18
18

15
14

43
40

25
23

6
5

10
9

7
7

3
3

3
3

39
39

34
32

15
15

7
4

36
35

14
12

4
4

3
3

3
3
1
1

3
3

8
8

10
10

5
5

5
5

10
10

9
9

9
9

14
14

6
6
2

9
7
2

31
30

10
8

4
3

41
39
5

21
19
5

30
29
2

33
33
7

15
13
4

5
5
3

-

3
3

3
3

2
2

8
8

7
7

5
5

2
2

—
-

2
2

2
2

o ve r

-

89

38 .0 2 3 7 . 5 0 24 0 .5 0 20 9. 0 0 -2 6 6 . 0 0
38 .0 2 3 7 . 5 0 24 0. 50 20 9. 0 0 -2 6 6 . 0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

206
193
30

3 8 .0 208.00 2 1 1 . 5 0 1 8 3 . 5 0 - 2 3 0 . 5 0
3 7 . 5 2 08.00 2 1 2 . 5 0 1 8 3 . 5 0 - 2 3 1 . 0 0
3 8 . 5 2 1 8 . 0 0 22 4. 00 20 9 . 0 0 -2 4 0 . 5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

55
53

37.0 1 9 1 .5 0 194.50 18 0 .0 0 -2 11.5 0
3 7.0 19 3.50 194.50 19 0 .5 0 -2 12 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---------------------------

31

3 7 . 5 29 2 .0 0 286 .5 0 2 5 7 . 5 0 - 3 1 7 . 5 0 1

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

81
80

3 7 . 0 24 2. 00 25 0.00 2 2 4 . 0 0 - 2 6 5 .5 0
3 7 . 0 24 2 .0 0 24 9 .5 0 2 2 3 . 5 0 - 2 6 5 . 5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

125
38
87

3 9 . 5 2 1 6 . 5 0 22 5 .0 0 1 7 4 . 5 0 - 2 5 4 . 5 0
4 0 . 0 1 8 0 . 5 0 16 5. 0 0 1 6 1 . 5 0 - 1 8 9 . 0 0
3 9 . 5 2 3 2 .5 0 2 3 4 .5 0 1 9 7 . 5 0 - 2 6 7 . 5 0

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

—

-

-

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

168
140
25

3 9 . 5 1 6 7 . 5 0 16 4 .0 0 1 4 8 . 5 0 - 1 8 5 . 0 0
39.0 1 7 1 .5 0 170.50 148 .0 0 -199 .50
38.0 168.00 162.50 1 4 2 .5 0 -1 9 7 .5 0

-

-

-

—

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ----------------------------

91

4 0 .0 1 5 2 .0 0 1 5 1 . 5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

31
31

3 9 . 0 20 9. 50 202 .0 0 18 5 . 0 0 -2 4 0 . 0 0
3 9 . 0 20 9. 50 202.0 0 1 8 5 . 0 0 - 2 4 0 . 0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

63
61

18 9 .0 0 20 2 .5 0 1 5 5 . 0 0 - 2 1 7 . 5 0
3 8 .5
3 8 . 5 1 8 8 . 5 0 20 2.5 0 1 5 5 . 5 0 - 2 1 6 . 0 0

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED) ----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------- *

32
28

3 8 . 0 1 7 9 .0 0 19 2 . 5 0 1 5 6 . 0 0 - 2 1 0 . 5 0
3 7 . 5 1 8 3 .5 0 1 9 7 . 5 0 1 6 6 . 0 0 - 2 1 1 . 0 0

_

_

_

-

-

—

*

—

_

*

_

_

“

*

-

1
1

—

2
2

-

3
1

*“

19
19

6
6

7
7

_
—

1
1

_

_

*

_

2

_

_

*

-

_

_

_

-

“

_

-

14 1.0 0 -174 .5 0

1
1
*

2

2
2

11
5

3

10

-

2

—

—

-

2

2
2

_

_

_

15
14
1

-

7
7

7

2

1

*18

10
10

8
8

7
7

15
15

19
18

3
3

3
3

1

20
—
20

6

6
—
6

12

—

12

9
3
6

~

6
6

8
8

13
11
2

9
1
8

4
—
4

-

16
16
1

9
9

6
6

3
3

_

-

—

—

3

~

-

~

9
9

1
1

1
1

1
1

2

2

2

15
15

4
4

6
6

5

1
1

4
4

8
8

-

-

_
-

-

“

9
6
3

1

13
13
6

22
22
6

14

33
25

25
25

3

2

7
7
1

6
6

~

4

24

15

3

15

9

2

—

1

-

6

9
9
_
—

—

_
—

~

-

-

2

1
1

1
1

i

2

_

_

_

1

-

-

-

_

_
-

_
-

6

6
6

3
3

—

3

W EN
OM

*

W o rke rs w e r e distributed as follows:

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




2

_

_
-

2
2

-

-

6

1
~

6

2

2

2

13
13

7
7

2

2

-

-

-

_

-

3

3

3

2

-

-

-

-

3

2

2

5 at $280 to $290; 3 at $290 to $300; 4 at $310 to $320; 3 at $320 to $330; and 3 at $330 and o v er .

2

1
1

_

3
3

4
4

-

5

i

10
T a b le

A -3 .

O ffic e , p r o fe s s io n a l, a n d te c h n ic a l o c c u p a tio n s — m e n

and w o m e n

c o m b in e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t- tim e w e e k ly hou rs and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a r e a b a s is by in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la ., N o v e m b e r 1971)
Average

Occupation and indu stry divis ion

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS -

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
BILLERS, MACHINE (BILLING
MACHINE) --------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------NONMANUFACTURING --------BILLERS, MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE) ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ---------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

$
1
1 1 2 .5 0

91

4 0 .0

42

4 0 .0

1 0 6 .5 0

49

3 9 .5

1 1 7 .0 0

68

4 1 .5

46

4 2 .0

156
42
114

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

168

3 9 .5

40
128

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

41

4 0 .0

1 0 3 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0

1 1 9 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0
1 1 5 .5 0

1 0 0 .0 0
1 0 4 .0 0
9 9 .0 0
9 5 .0 0 ,

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

596

3 8 .5

1 4 0 .0 0

86

4 0 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .5

1 2 7 .0 0
1 4 2 .5 0
1 2 5 .5 0

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS 8 -----------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TR A DE -----------------------------

1 ,4 1 5
188
1 ,2 2 7
477

3 9 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0
3 7 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 5 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 1 6 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0
9 8 .5 0

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING ----

510
62

196
25
25

3 9 .5

1 0 5 . 50;

3 9 .5

1 0 5 .5 0

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS B NONMANUFACTURING ----

189
180

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

8 4 .5 0
8 4 .5 0

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING —

280

3 * ).0

8 0 .0 0

267

3 9 .0

8 0 .5 0

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 0 5 .5 0

CLERKS, ORDER --------NONMANUFACTURING
CLERKS, PAYROLL --------MANUFACTURING ------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTIL ITIE S
RETAIL TRADE -----

Average

Occupation and indu stry division

263
257
301
51
250

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 0 5 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 1 0 .5 0
1 0 9 .5 0

55

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 3 5 .0 0

100

3 9 .5

9 5 .5 0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------RETAIL T R A D E -----------------------------

11 2

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 9 .5 0

4 0 .0

9 5 .5 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING -----------PUBLIC UTILITIES --------RETAIL TR A DE ----------------

286

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 1 8 .5 0
1 3 4 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ----MANUFACTURING ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------

718
55

3 8 .5
4 0 .0

1 0 6 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0

663

3 8 .5

1 0 6 .5 0

122

4 0 .0

9 5 .5 0

Average

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

See footn otes at end o f ta b le s .




3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 0 5 .0 0

Occupation and industry division

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
standard)

Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS - CONTINUED

CONTINUED
211
205
58

3 8 .5
3 7 .0

$
8 8 .0 0
8 8 .0 0
9 6 .0 0

25

3 9 .5

SECRETARIES ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------RETAIL T RA O E -----------------------------

2 ,4 2 1

3 8 .5

1 3 4 .0 0

228
2 ,1 9 3
612

4 0 .0
3 8 .5

1 3 0 .5 0
1 3 4 .5 0
1 5 7 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------- ---------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

201

3 9 .0

1 6 6 .5 0

39
162
56

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 3 5 .5 0
1 7 4 .0 0

3 8 .0

1 9 5 .0 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS B -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------RETAIL TR A O E -----------------------------

780
99
681
210
83

3 8 .5
4 0 .0
3 8 .5
3 7 .0
3 9 .5

135
146
167
138

SECRETARIES, CLASS C --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

934
47
887
111

3
4
3
3

.0
.0
.0
.0

1 2 6 .5 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 2 6 .5 0
1 2 0 .5 0

SECRETARIES, CLASS D -------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRA DE -----------------------------

506
43
463

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 8 .5 0
1 1 7 .0 0
1 1 8 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A ---NONMANUFACTURING —

55
63

4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 4 9 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL --------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TR A DE -----------------------------

500
62

3 9 .0
4 0 .0

1 1 2 .0 0
1 1 4 .5 0

438
137
31

3 9 .0
3 7 .5
4 0 .0

1 1 1 .5 0
1 3 0 .5 0
1 1 5 .5 0

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR ---------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

404
58

3 9 .0

1 3 1 .5 0
1 2 1 .0 0
1 3 3 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A ------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

$
1 1 6 .5 0

8 3 .0 0

MESSENGERS (OFFICE BOYS AND GIRLS)—
NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

276

346

3 8 .5

3 7 .0
3 9 .0

8
0
8
9

4 0 .0

|

NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES
TY PI ST S , CLASS B -------MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE ------

402
366

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

159

3 9 .0

568

3 9 .0

47
521
124

4
3
3
4

1 1 6 .5 0
1 3 1 .0 0
9 9 .0 0

0 .0
9 .0
8 .0
0 .0

9 1 .5 0
1 0 0 .0 0
1 2 3 . 50
9 9 .0 0

3 8 .5
3 8 .0
3 7 .5

1 6 8 .0 0

66
36

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING —

169
159

3 8 .5
3 8 .5

1 3 6 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
NONMANUFACTURING ------------RETAIL TRAOE --------

176
166
25

3 B .0
3 8 .0
3 8 .5

1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 8 .5 0

120

3 8 .0

120

3 8 .0

2 3 0 .5 0
2 3 0 .5 0

269
254
30

3 8 .0

2 0 3 .5 0

3 8 .0
3 8 .5

2 0 3 .5 0
2 1 8 .0 0

72

3 7 .0

70

3 7 .0

1 9 0 .0 0
1 9 1 .0 0

112

1 2 6 .5 0

1 4 4 .5 0
.0 0
.0 0
.5 0
.5 0

85

3 9 .0
3 9 .5

30

4 0 .0

88
69

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

1 2 1 .0 0

29

3 8 .5

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS
COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A ---NONMANUFACTURING ------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------

COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B —
NONMANUFACTURING RETAIL TRAOE ---COMPUTER PROGRAMERS,
BUSINESS, CLASS C NONMANUFACTURING
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING —

69

1 6 7 .5 0
1 7 9 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0

1 5 8 .5 0

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE ----------------------------SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSMANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRAOE ----------------------------TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------

1 2 7 .0 0

555

4 2 .5

8 9 .0 0

546
69

4 2 .5
3 9 .5

8 8 .5 0
9 9 .5 0

419

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

9 9 .0 0

124
295
56

3 9 .5
4 0 .0

9 6 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0

37

3 7 .5

2 8 8 .5 0

33

3 7 .5

2 8 0 .5 0

87

3 7 .5

2 4 0 .5 0

86

3 7 .0

2 4 0 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS A MANUFACTURING ---NONMANUFACTURING

133

3 9 .5

2 1 3 .5 0

45
88

4 0 .0

1 7 7 .5 0
2 3 2 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES

186
40

3 9 .5

1 6 4 .5 0

4 0 .0

146

3 9 .5

1 4 8 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0

31

3 8 .5

1 5 7 .5 0

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS C ----------------------------

1 6 1 .5 0

1 1 6 .5 0

249
72
39

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

1 0 1 .0 0

94
56

Number
of

113

4 0 .0

1 4 8 .5 0

33

3 8 .0

28

3 7 .5

1 7 9 .0 0
1 8 3 .5 0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS,
BUSINESS, CLASS B ------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------

3 9 .5

9 0 .0 0

35

3 8 .0

1 2 5 .5 0

35

3 8 .0

1 2 5 .5 0

NURSES, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

11

T a b le

A -4 .

M a in te n a n c e

and

p o w e rp la n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a s is by in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la . , N o v e m b e r 1971)

Nu m ber of w o rk e rs re c ei vi ng s t r a ig h t -t i m e hou rly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

$

S ex , occupation, and indu stry division
woricers

M ean2

M edian2

Middle range 2

Under 2.20
and
*
i
2.20 under
2 .3 0

$
2 .3 0

$
2 .4 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2
.

$
2 .8 0

t

$

$

i

$

s

$

S

t

S

S

s

t

2 .6 0

$
2 .7 0

$

50

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 . 80

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

2.

60

2 .7 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 . 20

4 . 40

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 *2 9

5 *4 0

5 .6 9

5 .8 0

6.00

—

—

-

-

s

$

HEN
$

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

10
2
103

$
4 .6 7
4 .6 7

$
5 .1 3
5 .6 1

3 .3 5 3 .3 2 -

ELECTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE --------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

156
57

4 .8 1
4 .4 5

99
71

5 .0 2
5 .5 4

5 .1 4
4 .2 7
5 .6 2

4 .1 6 4 .2 0 4 .1 5 -

5 .6 9

5 .4 9 -

5 .8 1

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES-----------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

87
72

3 .0 2
3 .0 2

3 .1 2
3 .1 5

2 .3 8 2 .3 2 -

3 .7 3
3 .7 4

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE ------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING
PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------------------

254
29

5 .5 5
3 .9 9

5 .7 5
4 .0 3

5 .6 4 3 .5 9 -

5 .8 3
4 .1 0

225

5 .7 5

5 .7 7

5 .6 8 -

5 .8 4

698

4 .3 0

4 .4 1
3 .3 9
4 .4 4

3 .8 6 3 .1 3 -

576

3 .6 7
4 .4 3

$
5 .7 4
5 .7 6

—

—

—
-

2
2

2
2

1
1

—

1

_

2

2

2

1

_

5 .7 6

-

-

1

-

2

2

1

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
6

“

“

-

*

3

1

1
1

-

9
9

6
6

3
3

-

~

-

*

4 .5 4
3 .8 5

3 .7 4 -

4 .8 8
4 .1 5

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -------------------MANUFACTURING-------------------------------

307
255

3 .9 1
3 .7 3

3 .7 2

3 .3 2 3 .3 1 -

4 .4 8
3 .8 7

-

_

-

1
2
1
2

PAINTERS, MAINTENANCE ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------

130
124

3 .2 8
3 .2 7

2 .8 0
2 .7 9

2 .7 0 -

3 .7 1
3 .7 1

_

24
24

i
i

4 .0 9

-

-

-

S ee fo,otnotes at end of tab le s.




3 .9 3
3 .9 3

4 .0 0
4 .0 0

3 .9 3 3 .9 3 -

1

4 .5 9
4 .5 2
4 .5 9

4 .0 9

2

1

-

23
17

3

1
2

-

1

7

1
1

i

1
1

6

—

2
2

-

-

-

—

_

_

_

•

3

-

—

—

—

-

6
6

—

—

—

—

3

-

1
2

-

2

_

3
3

1
1

3
3

-

_

_

*

1
1
1

26

26

9
17

9
17
5

5

27

_

6
6

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

133

9
-

132

1
2

41

177
164

7

-

5

-

1
2
1
0

2
2

24

-

63

3
3

2
2

6
6

i
i

-

2

-

-

1
1

-

-

28
28

6
6

2
2

_

_

_

14

23

2
1

70
70

1
2
1
2

14

13

-

1
1

“

1
2
1
2

3
3

-

-

3
3

-

14
3
3

1
0

1
1

7

2
2

21
0

9
—

3
4

1
2

34
34

-

50
—

-

35
33

2
2

1
2
1
2

50
19

6
2
1

-

1

—

6
6

9

-

1
1

5

6
6
6

35

18

35

18

1
2

18
—
18

1
8

4

-

35
9

—

1
0

-

-

44

46

—

2

-

-

5

1
2

6

-

-

17

1
0

-

1
1

-

2
2

-

7

4

2
2

-

-

-

13

-

1
6

7
7

-

—

2
1
9
9
-

“
25

6
-

1
1

2
2
2
1
1

7

1
1

3 .8 2

72
72

3

-

3

8
8

4 .6 3

TOOL ANO DIE MAKERS -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

2
2

-

369
38

2. 6 8 -

15
14

-

4 .2 2 4 .4 1 -

3 .6 3

1
1
1
1

5 .6 8
4 .7 9

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
(MAINTENANCE) ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TR ADE -----------------------------

12
2

6
6

27
27

1

24

37

40
-

17

40
37

2
0
13

1

1 12
0 2
-

-

1 12
0 2

93
93

4
-

3
_

34
—

27
_

3

34

27

4

4
-

3

34

27

-

-

-

-

-

17

24
7

5

15

_

-

15

-

i
i

13
13

3
3

_

_

—

1
0

*

_

_

_

12

T a b le

A -5 .

C u s to d ia l

and

m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a tio n s

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly e a rn in g s fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a re a b a sis by in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la ., N o v e m b e r 1971)

Num ber of w o r k e r s re c e i v in g st ra ig h t -t i m e ho u rl y earn ings of—

Hourly earnings

1.60 1 .7 0

Middle range 2

n
o
0
0
o

Median2

1.80

1 . 9 0 2.0 0 2 . 1 0

430
10

83
6

309

Under
and
*
1. 60 under

i

t

*

*

T

3.0 0 3 .2 0 3 . 4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 2 0 4 .4 0 4 . 6 0 4. 8 0 5 . 0 0

1

Mean 2

1 . 8 0 1 . 9 0 2 .0 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 2 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 4 0 2 . 6 0

O
J
O
o

$------- $------- 1------- 1------- 1--------$------- $------- $------ R ------- $------- J------- 1--------t ------- 1------- 1------- $------- 5

1.70

S ex , occupation, and indu stry division

Number
of
workers

2. 20 2 . 3 0 2 .4 0 2 . 6 0 2 .8 0

3 . 2 0 3 .4 0 3 . 6 0 3 .8 0 4 .0 0 4 . 20 4 . 4 0 4 . 6 0 4 . 8 0 5. 00 5 . 2 0

MEN
GUARDS AND WATCHMEN -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

2 ,0 78
95

$
1.95
2.32

$
1.97
2.34

$
$
1.8 0 - 2.06
2 .2 1 - 2.49

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ----MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

2,174
382
1,792
222
401

2.17
2.43
2.12
3 .56
2.04

1.96
2.47
1.86
3.9 1
1.93

1.70 2 .12 1.68 2.90 1.73 -

2.41
2.75
2.22
3 .9 9
2.23

92
—
92
-

459
—
459
83

198
17
181
—
58

271
15
256
—
46

LABORERS, MATERIAL HANDLING -----------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

1 , 803
831
972
701

2.46
2.47
2.46
2.42

2. 48
2.51
2.37
2.27

2 .112.14 2.0 82 .0 1-

2.75
2.64
2.78
2.86

-

42
6
36
36

81
36
45
45

OROER FILLERS ----------------------------------NGNMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL T R A D E -----------------------------

776
740
285

2.74
2.74
3.0 8

2.66
2.67
3.4 7

2 . 1 3 - 3 .4 8
2 . 1 2 - 3 .50
2 .2 6 - 3 .7 3

-

-

PACKERS,

290
159

2.62
2.53

2.59
2.59

2.26- 2.91
2.38- 2.7 6

-

MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

137
124
72

3 .3 5
3 .3 6
3 .0 4

3 .2 5
3.28
3.0 3

2 .5 7 - 4.30
2.5 6 - 4.33
2 .5 3 - 3.6 3

“

SHIPPING -----------------------------

SHIPPING CLERKS ---------------------------------

43

3 .7 3

3 .3 9

122
109

3 .3 1
3.30

3.35
3 .3 3

2, 887
510
2, 377
918
585

3 .58
3 .3 2
3 .64
4.67
3 .2 1

3.43
3 .0 0
3.53
5.11
3 .5 1

2.74 2.592.794.002.45-

4.59
4.51
4.76
5.15
3 .8 4

TRUCKDRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 - 1 / 2 TONS) ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

426
79
347
125

2.51
2.58
2.49
2.58

2.52
2.65
2.27
2.29

2.0 92.53 2.0 82.09-

2.84
2.74
3 .0 0
3.06

TRUCKDRIVERS, MEDIUM ( 1 - 1 / 2 TO
AND INCLUDING 4 TONS) ----------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

1, 0 0 2
17 1
831
249
168

3.2 1
2.73
3.31
4.01
2.94

3 .0 6
2.58
3 .0 9
3 .7 9
2.64

2 .712 .5 12.78 3 .7 2 2 .3 1-

3 .7 5
2.97
3 .7 7
4.64
3 .48

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
TRAILER TYPE) ------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC UTI LITIES ---------------------RETAIL TRAOE -----------------------------

1,021
109
912
507
292

4 .17
3 .19
4.29
4.86
3 .64

4.13
3 .0 4
4.71
5 .12
3.78

3 .4 6 2.953 .5 8 4 .753 .5 4 -

5.12
3.20
5.13
5.16
3.8 7

TRUCKDRIVERS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHER THAN TRAILER TYPE) ------------

330

4.69

4.59

4.53 - 5.14

50
6

39
18

49
19

43
15

28
12

10
6

15
2

a

115
26
89
42

129
21
108
30

213
72
141
30
30

107
16
91
15
41

44
9
35
10

17 6
83
93
3
24

60
40
20
10

49
23
26
8
10

57
57
-

58
3
55
55

46
12
34
34

208
114
94
94

117
87
30
29

202
52
150
83

77
19
58
35

385
285
100
45

189
48
141
57

119
81
38
30

72
72
28

24
24
24

58
58
14

22
22
“

55
55

59
59
10

30
30
“

31
31
5

82
46
8

3
3

17
6

6
6

11
-

4
3

17
6

23
6

13
12

54
42

-

~

-

-

—

“

8
8
8

4
4
4

31
31
15

6
6

1
*

See fo o tn o tes at end o f tab les,




-

-

8

17

10

21
—
21
3
1

20
2
18
3
15

4
4
3
1

107
—
107
107

29
1
28
27
-

79
60
19
15

119
3
11 6
87

49
1
48
48

3
—
3
3

1
1
1

28
24
4
4

13
13
4

42
42
2

36
36
*

144
144
94

88
88
38

12
12

50
49

32
14

24
12

-

-

36

4
4
3

5
5
4

16
9
9

12
6
6

2
2
2

3

3 . 1 5 - 3 .59
3 . 1 1 - 3.6 0

TRUCKDRIVERS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------RETAIL TRADE -----------------------------

661
“

3 .3 3 - 4 .5 1

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERKS -------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------

318

~

3

18

3
3

3
3

21
21

37
37

122
53
69
26
7

302
51
251
—
29

199
13
186
24
16
4

i

-

“

—
—
~

—
—
-

—
~

—
-

—
-

-

-

i
i
i

-

3
3
3

4
4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

13
13
12

5
5
5

1
i
i

16
16
2

13
13
1

5
5
-

2
2
-

-

-

3

-

3

2

8

3

-

-

24
12

24
24

_

2
2

1
1

_

-

_
“

_

139
139
1
103

178
15
163
109
40

220
21
199
50
118

47
1
46
5
36

11
11
6

157
153
4
4

5

4

15

_
*

*

-

-

-

23
23
23
-

-

18
18

2
2

15
15

130
34
96

44
44

126
9
117

21
21

233
92
141

7

2

14

36

10

48

21

43

218
68
150
20
23

~

1
1
~

95
7
88
28

22
22
““

61
61
28

-

64
27
37
21

46
45
1
1

32

59

32
2

59
14

4
4

5
5

4
4

15
11

-

~

18
—
18
7

_

_

_

-

—
“

-

2
2

2
2

35
27
8

8
8

26
6
20

19
19

107
65
42

2

2

8

8

20

19

20

15 1
20
13 1
10
20

30
12
18
12
2

204
16
188
15

70
70
12
5

44
44
1
8

109
3
106
103
3

101
21
80
40
14

6
1
5
3
2

2
—
2
2

3
3
3

20
20
16
4

8
—
8
8

55
55
52
3

2
2

3
3
-

2
2

2
—
2

“

2

2

60
41
19
14
3

39
35
4
-

2

21
3
18
10
2

104
13
91
12
7

90
—
90
90

53
—
53
6
33

101
101
3
93

39
—
39
34

9
—
9
4

15
14
1
1

15 1
151
150
1

5
—
5
—
5

3 13
—
313
312
1

21

_

12

3

2

-

139

9

_

144

~

_
-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

—
-

-

-

“

"

12
12
12

_
-

_

180
—
180
175
5

_

13
13
13

512
512
508
4

_

13

T a b le

A -5 .

C u s to d ia l

and

m a te ria l

m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ----- C o n t i n u e d

(A v e r a g e s tr a ig h t-tim e h o u rly ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occu pation s studied on an a r e a b a s is by in d u stry d iv is io n , M ia m i, F la ., N o v e m b e r 1971)

N um ber of w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s t ra ig h t-tim e h o u rly earn in gs of—

Hourly earnings^

1 .8 0

1 .9 0 2.0 0 2 .1 0

Under
$
and
1 .6 0 under

2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0

3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0

4 . 20 4 .4 0 4 .6 0

o
o

Middle range 2

1
°

Median2

1
*

Mean 2

$
*
s
S
t
$
$
t
S
$
$
*
*
*
$
$
*
$
*
$
1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2.0 0 2 .1 0 2 .2 0 2 .3 0 2 .4 0 2 .6 0 2 .8 0 3 .0 0 3 .2 0 3 .4 0 3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4.0 0 4 .2 0 4 .4 0 4 .6 0 4 .8 0 5 .0 0

*
o
o

of
workers

*
1 .7 0

1 .7 0

S e x , occu p ation , and in d u stry division

$
1 .6 0

5 .0 0 5 .2 0

MEN - CONTINUED
TRUCKERS, POWER (F O R K L IF T )------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------NCNMANUFACTURING -------------------------RETAIL TRADE-----------------------------

316
103
213
150

I .1 2
3
2 .9 9
3 .1 8
3 .1 1

$
3 .2 3
2 .6 8
3 .3 0
3 .5 3

$
2 .5 2 2 .4 6 2 .5 9 2 .4 5 -

$
3 .6 4
3 .5 9
3 .6 5
3 .7 1

376
358
46

1 .9 2
1 .9 1
3 .1 6

1 .6 9
1 .6 9
3 .6 2

1 . 6 5 - 1 .9 6
1 . 6 4 - 1 .8 9
2 .0 8 - 4 . 2 1

—
“

—
-

—
-

-

-

—

-

-

—
“

21
3
18
18

14
3
11
11

5
3
2
2

-

“

6
6

30
27

40
40

11
5
1

19
19
14

13
13

12
6
2

9
9
1

6

7
7

52
33
19
19

11
5
6
i

26

2
2
1

3
3

4
4
3

7

19
5

8
3
5

38
10
28

46
4
42
40

32
2
30
29

1
-

8
8
8

8
-

8
8

30
23
7

—
-

7

2
2
2

i
-

i
i

1
1
1

8
-

8

W EN
OM
JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS ----NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




_
-

206
206

2
-

_
-

-

4
4
4

12
12
12

-

-

-

-

14

F o o tn o te s

1 S ta n d a r d h o u r s r e f l e c t the w o r k w e e k f o r w h ic h e m p l o y e e s r e c e i v e t h e i r r e g u l a r s t r a i g h t - t i m e s a l a r i e s ( e x c l u s i v e o f p a y f o r o v e r t i m e
r e g u l a r a n d / o r p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the e a r n i n g s c o r r e s p o n d to th e s e w e e k l y h o u r s .
2 T h e m e a n i s c o m p u t e d f o r e a c h j o b b y t o t a lin g the e a r n i n g s o f a l l w o r k e r s and d i v i d i n g b y th e n u m b e r o f w o r k e r s ,
T h e m ed ia n
d e s i g n a t e s p o s i t i o n — h a l f o f t h e e m p l o y e e s s u r v e y e d r e c e i v e m o r e th a n t h e r a t e s h o w n ; h a l f r e c e i v e l e s s th a n t h e r a t e s h o w n ,
T he m id d le
r a n g e is d e f i n e d b y 2 r a t e s o f p a y ; a fo u r t h o f th e w o r k e r s e a r n l e s s than th e l o w e r o f t h e s e r a t e s and a f o u r t h e a r n m o r e th an the h i g h e r r a te .
3 E x c l u d e s p r e m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la t e s h ifts .
at




A p p e n d ix . O c c u p a tio n a l D e s c rip t io n s
The p rim a ry p urp ose of p rep arin g job d escrip tio n s for the B u re a u 's wage su rvey s is to a s s i s t its field sta ff in cla ssify in g into appropriate
occupations w ork ers who a re employed under a variety of p ayroll title s and differen t work arran gem en ts from establish m en t to establishm ent and
from a re a to a re a . Th is p e rm its the grouping of occupational wage ra te s rep resen tin g com parable job content. B e cau se of this em phasis on
in terestablish m en t and in te ra re a com parability of occupational content, the B u re a u 's job d escrip tio n s m ay d iffer significan tly from those in u se in
individual e stablish m en ts or those p rep a re d for other p u rp o se s. In applying th ese job d escrip tio n s, the B u re a u 's field econom ists a re in structed
to exclude working s u p e rv iso r s; app ren tices; le a r n e r s ; beginn ers; tr a in e e s; and handicapped, p art-tim e , tem p orary , and probation ary w ork ers.

O F F IC E
C L E R K , ACCOUNTING— Continued

B IL L E R , MACHINE

P o sitio n s a re c la ss ifie d into le v e ls on the b a sis of the following definitions.
C la s s A. Under general su p ervision , p e rfo rm s accounting c le r ic a l operations which
requ ire the application of experien ce and judgm ent, for exam ple, c le ric a lly p ro cessin g com ­
plicated or nonrepetitive accounting tran sa ctio n s, selectin g among a substantial v arie ty of
p re sc rib e d accounting codes and c la ssific a tio n s, o r tracin g tran sactio n s through previous
accounting actions to determ ine sou rce of d isc re p a n c ie s. May be a ss is te d by one or m ore
c la s s B accounting c le r k s.
C la s s B . Under clo se sup ervision , following detailed in struction s and standardized p ro ­
ce d u re s, p e rfo rm s one or m ore routine accounting c le r ic a l op eration s, such as posting to
le d g e r s, c a rd s, or w orksheets where identification of item s and locations of p ostings a re
c le a rly indicated; checking a ccu racy and com p leten ess of stan dardized and repetitive reco rd s
or accounting docum ents; and coding docum ents using a few p re sc rib e d accounting cod es.

P re p a re s statem en ts, b ills, and in voices on a m achine other than an ordin ary or ele ctro m atic typew riter. May a lso keep rec o rd s a s to b illin gs or shipping ch a rg e s or p erform other
c le r ic a l work incidental to billing o p eratio n s. F o r wage study p u rp o se s, b ille r s , m achine, are
c la ssifie d by type of m achine, a s follow s:
B ille r , m achine (billing m achine). U ses a sp ec ia l billing m achine (com bination typing
and adding m achine) to p rep a re b ills and in voices from c u sto m ers' purch ase o r d e r s, in te r­
nally p rep ared o r d e r s, shipping m em oran dum s, etc. U sually involves application of p r e ­
determ ined d iscounts and shipping ch arg e s and entry of n e c e ssa ry e xten sion s, which m ay or
m ay not be computed on the billing m achine, and to tals which are autom atically accum ulated
by m achine. The operation u su ally involves a la rg e number of carbon cop ies of the b ill being
p rep ared and is often done on a fanfold m achine.
B ille r , m achine (bookkeeping m achine). U se s a bookkeeping m achine (with or without
a typew riter keyboard) to p rep a re cu sto m ers' b ills a s p art of the accounts receivab le o p e ra ­
tion. G enerally involves the sim ultaneous entry of fig u re s on cu sto m ers' ledger reco rd . The
m achine autom atically accu m ulates fig u re s on a number of v e rtica l colum ns and com putes
and usually p rin ts autom atically the debit or cred it b alan ce s. Does not involve a knowl­
edge of bookkeeping. Works from uniform and standard types of s a le s and cred it s lip s.
BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR
O perates a bookkeeping m achine (with or without a typew riter keyboard) to keep a reco rd
of bu sin e ss tran sactio n s.
C la s s A. K eeps a set of rec o rd s requ iring a knowledge of and experien ce in b a sic
bookkeeping p rin c ip le s, and fa m ilia rity with the stru ctu re of the p articu lar accounting system
used. D eterm ines proper rec o rd s and d istribution of debit and cred it ite m s to be used in each
phase of the work. May p rep a re consolidated re p o rts, balance sh e ets, and other reco rd s
by hand.
C la s s B . K eep s a reco rd of one or m o re p h ase s or section s of a set of reco rd s usually
requiring little knowledge of b a sic bookkeeping. P h ase s or section s include accounts payable,
p ay ro ll, cu sto m ers' accounts (not including a sim p le type of billing d escrib e d under b ille r,
m achine), co st d istribution, expense distribu tion, inventory control, etc. May check or a s s is t
in p rep aratio n of tr ia l b alan ce s and p rep a re control sheets for the accounting departm ent.
C L E R K , ACCOUNTING
P e rfo rm s one or m o re accounting c le r ic a l ta sk s such a s posting to r e g is t e r s and le d g e rs;
reconciling bank accounts; verifying the internal con sisten cy, com p leten ess, and m athem atical
accu racy of accounting docum ents; assig n in g p re sc rib e d accounting d istribution cod es; examining
and verifyin g for c le r ic a l accu racy v ario u s types of r e p o r ts, lis t s , calcu lation s, posting, e tc.;
or p rep arin g sim ple or a ss is tin g in p rep arin g m o re com plicated journal vouch ers. May work
in either a m anual or autom ated accounting sy stem .
The work req u ire s a knowledge of c le r ic a l m ethods and office p ra c tic e s and p roced u res
which r e la te s to the c le r ic a l p ro c e ssin g and record ing of tran sactio n s and accounting inform ation.
With experien ce, the w orker typically becom es fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping and accounting te rm s
and p ro ced u res used in the a ssig n e d work, but is not required to have a knowledge o f the form al
p rin cip le s of bookkeeping and accounting.




C L E R K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s if ie s , and re trie v e s m ate rial in an e stablish ed filing system . May perform
c le r ic a l and m anual ta sk s requ ired to m aintain file s . P osition s a re c la ssifie d into le v e ls on the
b a sis of the following definitions.
C la ss A . C la s sifie s and indexes file m a te ria l such a s correspondence, re p o rts, tech­
n ical docum ents, e tc., in an e stab lish ed filing system containing a number of varied subject
m atte r file s . May a lso file this m a te r ia l. May keep reco rd s of variou s types in conjunction
with the file s . May lead a sm a ll group of low er level file c le r k s.
C la ss B . S o rts, co d es, and file s u n cla ssifie d m a te ria l by sim ple (subject m atter) head­
ings o r p artly c la ss ifie d m a te ria l by finer subheadings. P re p a re s sim ple related index and
c r o ss - r e fe r e n c e a id s. As requ ested, lo cates cle a rly identified m ate rial in file s and fo r ­
w ards m a te r ia l. May p e rfo rm related c le r ic a l ta sk s requ ired to m aintain and se rv ic e file s.
C la ss C . P e rfo rm s routine filing of m a te ria l that has alread y been c la ssifie d or which
is e a sily c la ss ifie d in a sim ple s e r ia l c la ssific a tio n system (e.g ., alphabetical, chronological,
o r n um erical). As requ ested, lo cates read ily available m ate rial in file s and forw ards m a ­
te ria l; and m ay fill out withdrawal ch arge. May p erform sim ple c le r ic a l and m anual ta sk s
requ ired to m aintain and se rv ic e file s .
C L E R K , ORDER
R e ce iv e s cu sto m e rs' o rd e rs for m ate rial o r m erch an d ise by m ail, phone, or p erson ally .
Duties involve any com bination of the follow ing: Quoting p r ic e s to c u sto m ers; m aking out an order
sheet listin g the item s to m ake up the ord e r; checking p r ic e s and quantities of item s on order
sheet; and distribu ting order sheets to resp e ctiv e departm ents to be filled . May check with cred it
departm ent to determ ine cred it rating o^ cu stom er, acknowledge receip t of o rd e rs from cu sto m ers,
follow up o rd e rs to see that they have been filled , keep file of o rd e rs received, and check shipping
in voices with origin al o r d e r s.
C L E R K , PA Y RO LL
Com putes w ages of company em ployees and en ters the n e c e ssa r y data on the pay roll
sh e ets. Duties involve: C alculating w o rk e rs' earn ings based on tim e or production re c o r d s; and
posting calculated data on p ay roll sheet, showing inform ation such a s w o rk e r's nam e, working
d ay s, tim e, rate , deductions for in su ran ce, and total w ages due. May m ake out paychecks and
a s s i s t p ay m a ster in m aking up and distribu ting pay envelopes. May use a calculating m achine.

NOTE: The Bu reau has discontinued collecting data for o ile r s and p lu m b e rs.

15

16
COM PTOM ETER OPERATOR

S E C R E T A R Y — C o n tin u e d

P r i m a r y d u ty i s to o p e r a t e a C o m p t o m e t e r to p e r f o r m m a t h e m a t ic a l c o m p u ta tio n s . T h is
jo b i s not to b e c o n fu s e d w ith th a t o f s t a t i s t i c a l o r o th e r ty p e o f c l e r k , w h ic h m a y in v o lv e f r e ­
q uen t u s e o f a C o m p to m e t e r b u t, in w h ic h , u s e o f t h is m a c h in e is in c id e n ta l to p e r f o r m a n c e o f
o th e r d u tie s .

N O T E : T h e t e r m " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r , " u s e d in th e l e v e l d e fin itio n s fo llo w in g , r e f e r s to
th o s e o f f i c i a l s w h o h a v e a s ig n if ic a n t c o r p o r a t e - w i d e p o lic y m a k in g r o l e w ith r e g a r d to m a jo r
c o m p a n y a c t i v i t i e s . T h e t i t l e " v i c e p r e s i d e n t , " th o u gh n o r m a ll y in d ic a t iv e o f th is r o l e , d o e s not
in a l l c a s e s id e n t if y s u c h p o s it io n s . V i c e p r e s id e n t s w h o s e p r im a r y r e s p o n s i b il it y i s to a c t p e r ­
s o n a lly on in d iv id u a l c a s e s o r t r a n s a c t i o n s ( e .g ., a p p r o v e o r d e n y in d iv id u a l lo a n o r c r e d i t a c tio n s ;
a d m in is t e r in d iv id u a l t r u s t a c c o u n ts ; d i r e c t l y s u p e r v is e a c l e r i c a l s ta f f) a r e not c o n s id e r e d to b e
" c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r s " f o r p u r p o s e s o f a p p ly in g th e fo llo w in g le v e l d e f in i t io n s .

KEYPUN CH OPERATOR
O p e ra te s a keyp u n ch
ta b u la tin g c a r d s o r on t a p e .

m a c h in e

to r e c o r d

o r v e r ify

a lp h a b e t ic

a n d / o r n u m e r ic

d a ta on
C la s s A

P o s it io n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d in to l e v e l s on th e b a s is o f th e fo llo w in g d e fin it io n s .
a ll,
C la s s A . W o rk r e q u ir e s th e a p p lic a t io n o f e x p e r ie n c e and ju d g m e n t in s e le c t i n g p r o c e ­
d u r e s to b e f o llo w e d an d in s e a r c h in g f o r , in t e r p r e t i n g , s e le c t i n g , o r c o d in g it e m s to be
k e y p u n c h e d f r o m a v a r i e t y o f s o u r c e d o c u m e n ts • , o c c a s io n m a y a ls o p e r f o r m s o m e ro u tin e
keypunch w o rk .
M a y t r a i n in e x p e r ie n c e d keypv
o p e ra to rs.
C l a s s B . W o rk is r o u tin e an d r e p e t it i v e . U n d e r c lo s e s u p e r v is io n o r fo llo w in g s p e c if i c
p r o c e d u r e s o r i n s t r u c t io n s , w o r k s f r o m v a r io u s s t a n d a r d iz e d s o u r c e d o c u m e n ts w h ic h h a v e
b e e n c o d e d , and f o llo w s s p e c ifi e d p r o c e d u r e s w h ic h h a v e b e e n p r e s c r i b e d in d e t a il and r e q u ir e
l i t t le o r no s e le c t i n g , c o d in g , o r in t e r p r e t i n g o f d a ta to b e r e c o r d e d . R e f e r s to s u p e r v is o r
p r o b le m s a r i s i n g f r o m e r r o n e o u s it e m s o r c o d e s o r m i s s i n g in fo r m a tio n .

2. S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r (o th e r th a n th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t)
o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , o v e r 5, 000 b u t f e w e r th an 2 5 , 000 p e r s o n s ; o r
3. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d , im m e d ia t e ly b e lo w th e c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r l e v e l ,
s e g m e n t o r s u b s id i a r y o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
C la s s

a ll,

P e r f o r m s v a r io u s ro u tin e d u tie s s u c h a s ru n n in g e r r a n d s , o p e r a t in g m in o r o f f ic e m a ­
c h in e s s u c h a s s e a l e r s o r m a i l e r s , o p e n in g an d d is t r ib u t in g m a i l , and o th e r m in o r c l e r i c a l w o r k .
E x c lu d e p o s itio n s th a t r e q u ir e o p e r a t io n o f a m o t o r v e h ic le a s a s ig n if ic a n t d u ty .

SECRETARY
A s s ig n e d a s p e r s o n a l s e c r e t a r y , n o r m a lly to on e in d iv id u a l. M a in ta in s a c lo s e an d h ig h ly
r e s p o n s i v e r e la t io n s h ip to th e d a y - t o - d a y w o r k o f th e s u p e r v is o r . W o rk s f a i r l y in d e p e n d e n tly r e ­
c e iv in g a m in im u m o f d e t a ile d s u p e r v is io n and g u id a n c e . P e r f o r m s v a r ie d c l e r i c a l an d s e c r e t a r i a l
d u t ie s , u s u a lly in c lu d in g m o s t o f th e f o llo w in g :
a.
R e c e i v e s te le p h o n e c a l l s , p e r s o n a l c a l l e r s , an d in c o m in g m a i l, a n s w e r s ro u tin e in ­
q u i r i e s , an d r o u te s t e c h n ic a l in q u ir i e s to th e p r o p e r p e r s o n s ;
b.

E s ta b lis h e s ,

c.

M a in ta in s th e s u p e r v i s o r 's c a le n d a r and m a k e s a p p o in tm e n ts a s in s t r u c t e d ;

d.

R e la y s m e s s a g e s fro m

m a in t a in s ,

an d r e v i s e s th e s u p e r v i s o r 's f i l e s ;

by

o t h e r s f o r th e

M a y a l s o p e r f o r m o t h e r c l e r i c a l an d s e c r e t a r i a l t a s k s o f c o m p a r a b le n a tu r e and d if f ic u l t y .
T h e w o r k t y p i c a ll y r e q u ir e s k n o w le d g e o f o f f ic e ro u tin e an d u n d e rs ta n d in g o f th e o r g a n iz a t io n ,
p r o g r a m s , an d p r o c e d u r e s r e l a t e d to th e w o r k o f th e s u p e r v is o r .
E x c lu s io n s
N ot a l l p o s itio n s th a t a r e t it le d " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s th e a b o v e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s .
o f p o s itio n s w h ic h a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th e d e fin itio n a r e a s fo llo w s :
do

1 . S e c r e t a r y to th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in
f e w e r th a n 100 p e r s o n s ; o r

n ot m e e t th e

" p e r s o n a l"

3. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d , im m e d ia t e ly b e lo w th e o f f i c e r l e v e l , o v e r e ith e r a m a jo r
c o r p o r a t e - w i d e fu n c tio n a l a c t i v i t y ( e . g . , m a r k e t in g , r e s e a r c h , o p e r a t io n s , in d u s t r ia l r e l a t io n s , e t c .) or~ a m a jo r g e o g r a p h ic o r o r g a n iz a t io n a l s e g m e n t ( e . g . , a r e g io n a l h e a d q u a r t e r s ;
a m a jo r d iv is io n ) o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 ,0 0 0 but f e w e r th an 2 5 ,0 0 0
e m p lo y e e s ; o r
4. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d o f an in d iv id u a l p la n t, f a c t o r y , e t c . (o r o th e r e q u iv a le n t l e v e l
o f o f f ic ia l) th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , o v e r 5,0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r
5. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d o f a l a r g e and im p o r ta n t o r g a n iz a t io n a l s e g m e n t ( e .g ., a m id d le
m a n a g e m e n t s u p e r v is o r o f an o r g a n iz a t io n a l s e g m e n t o fte n in v o lv in g a s m a n y a s s e v e r a l
h u n d re d p e r s o n s ) o r a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , o v e r 2 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
C la s s

C

2. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d o f an in d iv id u a l p la n t, f a c t o r y , e t c . (o r o th e r e q u iv a le n t le v e l
o f o f f ic ia l) th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , f e w e r th a n 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s .
C la s s D

s t e n o g r a p h ic an d t y p in g w o r k .

w h ic h

B

1 . S e c r e t a r y to an e x e c u t iv e o r m a n a g e r ia l p e r s o n w h o s e r e s p o n s i b il it y i s not e q u iv a le n t
to on e o f th e s p e c if i c l e v e l s itu a tio n s in th e d e fin itio n f o r c l a s s B , but w h o s e o r g a n iz a t io n a l
u n it n o r m a lly n u m b e r s a t l e a s t s e v e r a l d o z e n e m p lo y e e s and is u s u a lly d iv id e d into o r g a n i z a ­
t io n a l s e g m e n t s w h ic h a r e o ft e n , in tu r n , f u r t h e r s u b d iv id e d . In s o m e c o m p a n ie s , t h is le v e l
in c lu d e s a w id e r a n g e o f o r g a n iz a t io n a l e c h e lo n s ; in o t h e r s , o n ly one o r tw o ; o r

s u p e r v is o r to s u b o r d in a te s ;

e.
R e v ie w s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , m e m o r a n d u m s , and r e p o r t s p r e p a r e d
s u p e r v i s o r 's s ig n a t u r e to a s s u r e p r o c e d u r a l and t y p o g r a p h ic a c c u r a c y ;
P e rfo rm s

o f a m a jo r

2. S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r (o th e r th a n th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a r d o r p r e s id e n t)
o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in a l l , o v e r 100 b u t f e w e r th an 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

M E S S E N G E R ( O ffic e B o y o r G ir l)

f.

1.
S e c r e t a r y to th e c h a ir m a n o f th e b o a rd o r p r e s id e n t o f a c o m p a n y th a t e m p lo y s , in
o v e r 100 but f e w e r th a n 5 ,0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r

a.

P o s it io n s

b.

s e c re ta ry

1.
S e c r e t a r y to th e s u p e r v is o r o r h e a d o f a s m a ll o r g a n iz a t io n a l u n it ( e . g . , f e w e r th an
a b ou t 25 o r 30 p e r s o n s ) ; m2. S e c r e t a r y to a n o n s u p e r v is o r y s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t , p r o f e s s io n a l e m p lo y e e , a d m i n is t r a ­
t i v e o f f i c e r , o r a s s i s t a n t , s k i ll e d te c h n ic ia n o r e x p e r t .
(N O T E : M a n y c o m p a n ie s a s s i g n
s t e n o g r a p h e r s , r a t h e r th a n s e c r e t a r i e s a s d e s c r ib e d a b o v e , to th is l e v e l o f s u p e r v is o r y o r
n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r .)

E x a m p le s

c o n c e p t d e s c r ib e d

STENOGRAPH ER

S te n o g r a p h e r s n ot f u l ly t r a in e d in s e c r e t a r i a l ty p e d u tie s ;

above;

c.
S te n o g r a p h e r s s e r v i n g a s o f f i c e a s s i s t a n t s t o a g ro u p o f p r o f e s s io n a l , t e c h n ic a l, o r
m a n a g e r ia l p e r s o n s ;
d . S e c r e t a r y p o s it io n s in w h ic h th e d u tie s a r e e it h e r s u b s t a n t ia lly m o r e r o u tin e o r s u b ­
s t a n t ia ll y m o r e c o m p le x an d r e s p o n s i b le th a n t h o s e c h a r a c t e r i z e d in th e d e fin itio n ;

P r i m a r y d u ty i s to t a k e d ic t a tio n u s in g s h o rth a n d , an d to t r a n s c r i b e th e d ic ta tio n . M a y
a l s o t y p e f r o m w r it t e n c o p y . M a y o p e r a t e f r o m a s te n o g r a p h ic p o o l. M a y o c c a s io n a l ly t r a n s c r i b e
f r o m v o ic e r e c o r d in g s ( if p r i m a r y d u ty i s t r a n s c r ib in g f r o m r e c o r d in g s , s e e T r a n s c r ib in g - M a c h in e
O p e r a t o r , G e n e r a l) .
N O T E : T h is jo b is d is t in g u is h e d f r o m th a t o f a s e c r e t a r y in th a t a s e c r e t a r y n o r m a lly
w o r k s in a c o n fid e n t ia l r e la t io n s h ip w ith o n ly on e m a n a g e r o r e x e c u t iv e an d p e r f o r m s m o r e
r e s p o n s i b le an d d i s c r e t i o n a r y t a s k s a s d e s c r ib e d in th e s e c r e t a r y jo b d e fin itio n .
S te n o g ra p h e r, G e n e ra l

e.
A s s i s t a n t ty p e p o s it io n s w h ic h in v o lv e m o r e d if f ic u l t o r m o r e r e s p o n s i b le t e c h ­
n ic a l, a d m i n is t r a t iv e , s u p e r v i s o r y , o r s p e c ia l iz e d c l e r i c a l d u tie s w h ic h a r e n ot t y p ic a l o f
s e c r e ta r ia l w o rk .




D ic t a t io n in v o lv e s a n o r m a l r o u tin e v o c a b u l a r y . M a y m a in ta in f i l e s , k e e p s im p le r e c o r d s ,
o r p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t i v e l y r o u tin e c l e r i c a l t a s k s .

17
S T E N O G R A P H E R — C o n tin u e d

T A B U L A T I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R ( E l e c t r i c A c c o u n tin g M a c h in e O p e r a to r )— C o n tin u e d

S te n o g r a p h e r , S e n io r

P o s it io n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d in to l e v e l s on th e b a s is o f th e fo llo w in g d e fin itio n s .

D ic ta tio n in v o lv e s a v a r ie d t e c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia l iz e d v o c a b u la r y su c h a s in le g a l b r ie f s
o r r e p o r t s on s c i e n t if ic r e s e a r c h .
M a y a l s o s e t up an d m a in ta in f i l e s , k e e p r e c o r d s , e t c .
OR
P e r f o r m s s te n o g r a p h ic d u tie s r e q u ir in g s ig n if ic a n t ly g r e a t e r in d e p e n d e n c e and r e s p o n ­
s ib i lit y th an s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l, a s e v id e n c e d b y th e fo llo w in g :
W o rk r e q u ir e s a h ig h
d e g r e e o f s te n o g r a p h ic s p e e d an d a c c u r a c y ; a th o ro u g h w o r k in g k n o w le d g e o f g e n e r a l b u s in e s s
and o f f ic e p r o c e d u r e : and o f th e s p e c if i c b u s i n e s s o p e r a t io n s , o r g a n iz a t io n , p o l i c i e s , p r o c e ­
d u r e s , f i l e s , w o r k f lo w , e t c .
U s e s th is k n o w le d g e in p e r f o r m in g s t e n o g r a p h ic d u tie s an d
r e s p o n s ib le c l e r i c a l t a s k s s u c h a s m a in ta in in g fo llo w u p f i l e s ; a s s e m b lin g m a t e r i a l f o r r e p o r t s ,
m e m o r a n d u m s , and l e t t e r s ; c o m p o s in g s im p le l e t t e r s f r o m g e n e r a l in s t r u c t io n s ; r e a d in g and
ro u tin g in c o m in g m a il; and a n s w e r in g r o u tin e q u e s tio n s ^ e t c .
S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R
C la s s A . O p e r a t e s a s in g le - o r m u lt ip le - p o s it io n t e le p h o n e s w it c h b o a r d h a n d lin g in c o m in g ,
o u tg o in g , in tr a p la n t o r o f f ic e c a l l s . P e r f o r m s f u ll t e le p h o n e in fo r m a t io n s e r v i c e o r h a n d le s
c o m p le x c a l l s , su c h a s c o n f e r e n c e , c o l l e c t , o v e r s e a s , o r s i m i l a r c a l l s , e it h e r in a d d itio n to
d o in g ro u tin e w o r k a s d e s c r ib e d f o r s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r , c l a s s B , o r a s a f u l l- t im e
a s s ig n m e n t. ( " F u l l " te le p h o n e in fo r m a t io n s e r v i c e o c c u r s w h en th e e s t a b lis h m e n t h a s v a r ie d
fu n c tio n s th a t a r e not r e a d il y u n d e r s ta n d a b le f o r te le p h o n e in fo r m a tio n p u r p o s e s , e . g . , b e c a u s e
o f o v e r la p p in g o r i n t e r r e la t e d fu n c tio n s , and c o n s e q u e n tly p r e s e n t fr e q u e n t p r o b le m s a s to
w h ic h e x te n s io n s a r e a p p r o p r ia t e f o r c a l ls . )
C l a s s B . O p e r a t e s a s in g le - o r m u lt ip le - p o s it io n t e le p h o n e s w itc h b o a r d h a n d lin g in c o m in g ,
o u tg o in g , in tr a p la n t o r o f f ic e c a l l s . M a y h a n d le ro u tin e lo n g d is t a n c e c a l l s and r e c o r d t o l l s .
M a y p e r f o r m lim it e d te le p h o n e in fo r m a t io n s e r v i c e . ( " L im it e d " t e le p h o n e in fo r m a t io n s e r v i c e
o c c u r s i f th e fu n c tio n s o f th e e s t a b lis h m e n t s e r v i c e d a r e r e a d il y u n d e r s ta n d a b le f o r t e le p h o n e
in fo r m a tio n p u r p o s e s , o r i f th e r e q u e s t s a r e r o u t in e , e . g . , g iv in g e x t e n s io n n u m b e rs w h en
s p e c if i c n a m e s a r e f u r n is h e d , o r i f c o m p le x c a l ls a r e r e f e r r e d to a n o th e r o p e r a t o r .)
T h e s e c la s s i f i c a t i o n s do not in c lu d e s w it c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r s in te le p h o n e c o m p a n ie s who
a s s i s t c u s t o m e r s in p la c in g c a l l s .
S W IT C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R - R E C E P T I O N I S T
In a d d itio n to p e r f o r m in g d u tie s o f o p e r a t o r on a s in g le - p o s it i o n o r m o n it o r - t y p e s w it c h ­
b o a r d , a c t s a s r e c e p t io n is t and m a y a ls o ty p e o r p e r f o r m r o u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k a s p a r t o f r e g u la r
d u tie s .
T h is ty p in g o r c l e r i c a l w o r k m a y ta k e th e m a jo r p a r t o f th is w o r k e r 's t im e w h ile at
s w itc h b o a r d .
T A B U L A T I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R

( E l e c t r i c A c c o u n tin g M a c h in e O p e r a to r )

O p e r a te s one o r a v a r i e t y o f m a c h in e s su c h a s th e t a b u la t o r , c a l c u l a t o r , c o l la t o r , i n t e r ­
p r e t e r , s o r t e r , r e p r o d u c in g p u n ch , e t c . E x c lu d e d fr o m th is d e fin itio n a r e w o r k in g s u p e r v is o r s .
A ls o e x c lu d e d a r e o p e r a t o r s o f e le c t r o n ic d ig i t a l c o m p u t e r s , e v e n th ou g h t h e y m a y a ls o o p e r a t e
E A M e q u ip m e n t.

C l a s s A . P e r f o r m s c o m p le t e r e p o r tin g and ta b u la tin g a s s ig n m e n ts in c lu d in g d e v is in g
d if f ic u lt c o n t r o l p a n e l w ir in g u n d e r g e n e r a l s u p e r v is io n .
A s s ig n m e n ts t y p ic a ll y in v o lv e a
v a r i e t y o f lo n g an d c o m p le x r e p o r t s w h ic h o fte n a r e i r r e g u l a r o r n o n r e c u r r in g , r e q u ir in g
s o m e p la n n in g o f th e n a tu r e and s e q u e n c in g o f o p e r a tio n s , and th e u s e o f a v a r i e t y o f m a ­
c h in e s .
Is t y p i c a ll y in v o lv e d in t r a in in g n ew o p e r a t o r s in m a c h in e o p e r a tio n s o r t r a in in g
lo w e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r s in w ir in g f r o m d ia g r a m s and in th e o p e r a tin g s e q u e n c e s o f lo n g and
c o m p le x r e p o r t s .
D o e s n ot in c lu d e p o s itio n s in w h ic h w ir in g r e s p o n s i b ilit y i s li m it e d to
s e le c t i o n and i n s e r t io n o f p r e w ir e d b o a r d s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s w o r k a c c o r d in g to e s t a b lis h e d p r o c e d u r e s and u n d e r s p e c if i c in ­
s t r u c t io n s . A s s ig n m e n t s t y p i c a ll y in v o lv e c o m p le te but ro u tin e and r e c u r r in g r e p o r t s o r p a r t s
o f l a r g e r an d m o r e c o m p le x r e p o r t s .
O p e r a t e s m o r e d if f ic u lt ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c ­
c o u n tin g m a c h in e s s u c h a s th e t a b u la to r and c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d itio n to th e s im p le r m a c h in e s
u s e d b y c l a s s C o p e r a t o r s . M a y b e r e q u ir e d to do s o m e w ir in g f r o m d ia g r a m s . M a y t r a i n
n e w e m p lo y e e s in b a s ic m a c h in e o p e r a t io n s .
C l a s s C . U n d e r s p e c if i c in s t r u c t io n s , o p e r a t e s s im p le ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n tin g
m a c h in e s s u c h a s th e s o r t e r , i n t e r p r e t e r , r e p r o d u c in g p u n ch , c o l la t o r , e tc . A s s ig n m e n ts
t y p i c a ll y in v o lv e p o r tio n s o f a w o r k u n it, f o r e x a m p le , in d iv id u a l s o r tin g o r c o lla t in g r u n s ,
o r r e p e t it i v e o p e r a t io n s . M a y p e r f o r m s im p le w ir in g f r o m d ia g r a m s , and do s o m e f ilin g w o r k .
T R A N S C R I B I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R , G E N E R A L
P r i m a r y d u ty is to t r a n s c r i b e d ic ta tio n in v o lv in g a n o r m a l ro u tin e v o c a b u la r y fr o m
t r a n s c r ib in g - m a c h in e r e c o r d s .
M a y a ls o ty p e f r o m w r it t e n c o p y and do s im p le c l e r i c a l w o r k .
W o r k e r s t r a n s c r ib in g d ic t a t io n in v o lv in g a v a r ie d te c h n ic a l o r s p e c ia l iz e d v o c a b u la r y su c h a s
l e g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s on s c i e n t if ic r e s e a r c h a r e not in c lu d e d .
A w o r k e r w ho t a k e s d ic ta tio n
in s h o rth a n d o r b y S te n o ty p e o r s i m i la r m a c h in e is c la s s i f i e d a s a s te n o g r a p h e r .
T Y P IST
U s e s a t y p e w r i t e r to m a k e c o p ie s o f v a r io u s m
t io n s h a v e b e e n m a d e b y a n o th e r p e r s o n . M a y in c lu d e
r i a l s f o r u s e in d u p lic a tin g p r o c e s s e s . M a y do c l e r i c a l
a s k e e p in g s im p le r e c o r d s , f ilin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s ,

a t e r i a l s o r to m a k e out b ills a f t e r c a l c u l a ­
ty p in g o f s t e n c ils , m a t s , o r s i m i la r m a t e ­
w o r k in v o lv in g l i t t le s p e c ia l t r a in in g , su c h
o r s o r tin g and d is tr ib u tin g in c o m in g m a i l.

C l a s s A . P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f th e f o llo w in g : T y p in g m a t e r ia l in fin a l f o r m w hen
it in v o lv e s c o m b in in g m a t e r i a l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s : o r r e s p o n s i b il it y f o r c o r r e c t s p e llin g ,
s y lla b ic a t io n , p u n c tu a tio n , e t c . , o f t e c h n ic a l o r u n u su a l w o r d s o r f o r e ig n la n g u a g e m a t e ­
r i a l; o r p la n n in g la y o u t and ty p in g o f c o m p lic a te d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b le s to m a in ta in u n ifo r m ity
and b a la n c e in s p a c in g . M a y ty p e r o u tin e f o r m l e t t e r s , v a r y in g d e t a ils to s u it c ir c u m s t a n c e s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f th e f o llo w in g : C o p y ty p in g f r o m ro u g h o r c l e a r
d r a ft s ; o r r o u tin e ty p in g o f f o r m s , in s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c .; o r s e ttin g up s im p le s ta n d a rd
t a b u la t io n s ; o r c o p y in g m o r e c o m p le x t a b le s a l r e a d y s e t up and s p a c e d p r o p e r ly .

P R O F E S S IO N A L A N D T E C H N IC A L
C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R — C o n tin u e d

COM PUTER OPERATOR
M o n ito r s and o p e r a t e s th e c o n t r o l c o n s o le o f a d ig it a l c o m p u t e r to p r o c e s s d a ta a c c o r d in g
to o p e r a tin g (in s tr u c tio n s , u s u a lly p r e p a r e d b y a p r o g r a m e r . W o rk in c lu d e s m o s t o f th e f o llo w in g :
S tu d ie s in s t r u c t io n s to d e t e r m in e eq u ip m e n t s e tu p an d o p e r a t io n s ; lo a d s e q u ip m e n t w ith r e q u ir e d
it e m s (ta p e r e e l s , ! c a r d s , e t c .) ; s w it c h e s n e c e s s a r y a u x il ia r y eq u ip m e n t in to c i r c u i t , an d s t a r t s
and o p e r a t e s c o m p u te r ; m a k e s a d ju s tm e n ts to c o m p u te r to c o r r e c t o p e r a t in g p r o b le m s and m e e t
s p e c ia l | c o n d itio n s ; r e v ie w s e r r o r s m a d e d u rin g o p e r a t io n and d e t e r m in e s c a u s e o r r e f e r s p r o b le m
to s u p e r v is o r o r p r o g r a m e r ; and m a in t a in s o p e r a t in g r e c o r d s . M a y t e s t an d a s s i s t in c o r r e c t i n g
p ro g ra m .
F o r w a g e stu d y p u r p o s e s ,

c o m p u te r o p e r a t o r s a r e c la s s i f i e d a s fo llo w s :

C la s s A .
O p e r a t e s in d e p e n d e n tly , o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n , a c o m p u te r ru n n in g
p r o g r a m s w ith m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s :
N e w p r o g r a m s a r e f r e q u e n t ly t e s t e d
an d in tr o d u c e d ; s c h e d u lin g r e q u ir e m e n t s a r e o f c r i t i c a l im p o r t a n c e to m in im iz e d o w n tim e ;
th e p r o g r a m s a r e o f c o m p le x d e s ig n so th a t id e n t if ic a t io n o f e r r o r s o u r c e o fte n r e q u ir e s a
w o r k in g k n o w le d g e o f th e to ta l p r o g r a m , and a lt e r n a t e p r o g r a m s m a y n ot b e a v a i la b le . M a y
g iv e d ir e c t io n and g u id a n c e to lo w e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r s .
C la s s B . O p e r a t e s in d e p e n d e n tly , o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d ir e c t io n , a c o m p u te r ru n n in g
p r o g r a m s w ith m o s t o f th e fo llo w in g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s : M o s t o f th e p r o g r a m s a r e e s t a b lis h e d
p r o d u c tio n r u n s , t y p i c a ll y ru n on a r e g u l a r l y r e c u r r i n g b a s is ; th e r e is l i t t le o r no t e s t in g




o f n ew p r o g r a m s r e q u ir e d ; a lt e r n a t e p r o g r a m s a r e p r o v id e d in c a s e o r i g in a l p r o g r a m n e e d s
m a jo r c h a n g e o r c a n n o t b e c o r r e c t e d w ith in a r e a s o n a b le t im e . In c o m m o n e r r o r s it u a ­
t io n s , d ia g n o s e s c a u s e and t a k e s c o r r e c t i v e a c tio n . T h is u s u a lly in v o lv e s a p p ly in g p r e v io u s l y
p r o g r a m e d c o r r e c t i v e s t e p s , o r u s in g s ta n d a rd c o r r e c t i o n te c h n iq u e s .
OR
O p e r a t e s u n d e r d i r e c t s u p e r v is io n a c o m p u te r ru n n in g p r o g r a m s o r s e g m e n ts o f p r o g r a m s
w ith th e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s d e s c r ib e d f o r c l a s s A . M a y a s s i s t a h ig h e r le v e l o p e r a to r b y in d e ­
p e n d e n tly p e r f o r m in g l e s s d if f ic u lt t a s k s a s s i g n e d , an d p e r f o r m in g d if f ic u lt t a s k s fo llo w in g
d e t a ile d in s t r u c t io n s and w ith fr e q u e n t r e v ie w o f o p e r a tio n s p e r f o r m e d .
C la s s C . W o rk s on ro u tin e p r o g r a m s u n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v is io n .
Is e x p e c te d to d e v e lo p
w o r k in g k n o w le d g e o f th e c o m p u te r e q u ip m e n t u s e d and a b il it y to d e te c t p r o b le m s in v o lv e d in
ru n n in g r o u tin e p r o g r a m s . U s u a lly h a s r e c e i v e d s o m e f o r m a l tr a in in g in c o m p u te r o p e r a tio n .
M a y a s s i s t h ig h e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r on c o m p le x p r o g r a m s .
COM PUTER

P R O G R A M E R , B U S IN E S S

C o n v e r t s s t a t e m e n t s o f b u s in e s s p r o b le m s , t y p i c a ll y p r e p a r e d b y a s y s t e m s a n a ly s t , in to
a s e q u e n c e o f d e t a ile d in s t r u c t io n s w h ic h a r e r e q u ir e d to s o lv e th e p r o b le m s b y a u to m a tic d a ta
p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t. W o rk in g f r o m c h a r t s o r d ia g r a m s , th e p r o g r a m e r d e v e lo p s th e p r e c i s e i n ­
s t r u c t io n s w h ic h , w h en e n t e r e d in to th e c o m p u te r s y s t e m in c o d e d la n g u a g e , c a u s e th e m a n ip u la tio n

18
COMPUTER PROGRAMER, BUSINESS— Continued
of data to achieve d e sire d r e s u lts. Work involves m o st of the follow ing: A pplies knowledge of
com puter c a p a b ilitie s, m ath e m atic s, logic employed by co m p uters, and p articu lar subject m atter
involved to analyze c h arts and d iag ram s of the problem to be p rogram ed ; develops sequence
of p ro g ram step s; w rites detailed flow ch arts to show o rd e r in which data will be p ro c e sse d ;
con verts th ese ch a rts to coded in struction s fo r m achine to follow; te sts and c o r r e c ts p ro g ra m s;
p re p a re s in struction s fo r operating p erson nel during production run; an aly zes, review s, and a lte rs
p ro g ra m s to in c re a se operating efficien cy or adapt to new requ irem en ts; m ain tain s reco rd s of
p rog ram developm ent and re v isio n s. (NOTE: W orkers perform in g both sy stem s a n aly sis and p ro ­
gram in g should be c la ss ifie d a s sy ste m s a n aly sts if th is is the sk ill used to determ ine th eir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp o n sib le for the m anagem ent or su p ervision of
other e lectro n ic data p ro c e ssin g em p lo y ees, or p ro g ra m e rs p rim a rily concerned with scien tific
an d /o r engineering p ro b le m s.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, p ro g ra m e r s a re c la ss ifie d a s follow s:
C la s s A. Works independently or under only gen eral d irection on com plex p roblem s which
req u ire com petence in a ll p h ase s of p ro gram in g concepts and p r a c tic e s. Working from d ia ­
g ram s and ch a rts which identify the nature of d esired r e s u lts, m ajo r p ro ce ssin g step s to be
acco m p lish ed, and the relatio n sh ip s between v ario u s step s of the problem solving routine;
plans the full range of p ro gram in g actions needed to efficien tly utilize the com puter sy stem
in achieving d e sire d end p ro du cts.
At th is lev el, p ro gram in g is difficult becau se com puter equipment m u st be organ ized to
produce se v e r a l in terrelate d but d iv e rse products fro m num erous and d iv e rse data elem ents.
A wide v arie ty and extensive num ber of in tern al p ro c e ssin g actions m ust occur. This req u ires
such actions a s developm ent of common operations which can be reu sed , establishm ent of
linkage points between o p e ratio n s, adjustm en ts to data when p rogram requ irem ents exceed
com puter sto ra g e cap acity, and substan tial m anipulation and resequencing of data elem ents
to form a highly in tegrated p ro g ra m .
May provide functional d irectio n to low er level p ro g ra m e r s who a re a ssig n e d to a s s is t .
C la s s B . Works independently o r under only general d irection on relativ e ly sim ple
p r o g ra m s, or on sim p le segm en ts of com plex p r o g ra m s. P ro g ra m s (or segm ents) u su ally
p r o c e s s inform ation to produce data in two o r three v arie d sequences o r fo rm ats. R eports
and listin g s a re produced by refining, adapting, a rra y in g , or m aking m inor additions to or
deletions fro m input data which a re read ily av ailab le . While num erous r e c o rd s m ay be
p r o c e sse d , the data have been refined in p rio r actions so that the accu racy and sequencing
of data can be te ste d by usin g a few routine checks. Ty p ically, the p ro g ram d eals with
routine record -k eep in g type o p eratio n s.
OR
Works on com plex p ro g ra m s (as d esc rib e d fo r c la s s A) under clo se direction of a higher
lev el p ro g ra m e r o r su p e rv iso r. May a s s i s t higher level p ro g ra m er by independently p e r ­
form ing le s s difficu lt t a s k s a ssig n e d , and p erfo rm in g m o re difficult ta s k s under fa irly clo se
direction .
May guide or in stru ct low er lev el p r o g ra m e r s.
C la s s C . M akes p ra c tic a l application s of p ro gram in g p ra c tic e s and concepts usually
learn ed in fo rm al train in g c o u r se s. A ssign m en ts a re designed to develop com petence in the
application of stan dard p ro ced u res to routine p ro b lem s. R e ce iv e s clo se su p ervision on new
a sp e c ts of a ssig n m e n ts; and work is review ed to v erify its accu racy and conform ance with
req u ired p ro c ed u re s.

COM PUTER SYSTEM S AN ALYST, BUSINESS— Continued
every item of each type is autom atically p r o c e sse d through the full sy stem of reco rd s and
app rop riate followup actions a re initiated by the computer.) C on fers with p e rso n s concerned to
determ ine the data p ro c e ssin g p roblem s and a d v ise s su b ject-m a tter person nel on the im p lic a ­
tions of new o r rev ise d sy stem s of data p ro c e ssin g o p eration s. M akes recom m en dation s, if
needed, for approval of m a jo r sy stem s in stallation s or changes and fo r obtaining equipment.
May provide functional direction to low er level sy stem s a n aly sts who a re a ssig n e d to
a s s is t .
C la ss B . Works independently or under only gen eral d irection on p roblem s that are
relativ e ly uncom plicated to analyze, plan, p ro g ram , and op erate. P ro b lem s a re of lim ited
com plexity b ecau se so u rce s of input data a re hom ogeneous and the output data a re clo sely
related . (F o r exam ple, develops sy stem s fo r m aintaining dep ositor accounts in a bank,
m aintaining accounts receivab le in a r e ta il establish m en t, or m aintaining inventory accounts
in a m anufacturing or w holesale establishm ent.) C on fers with p e rso n s concerned to d eterm ine
the data p ro c e ssin g p roblem s and a d v ise s su b ject-m atter p erson nel on the im p lication s of the
data p ro c e ssin g sy ste m s to be applied.
OR
Works on a segm ent of a com plex data p ro c e ssin g schem e or sy stem , a s d escrib e d for
c la s s A. W orks independently on routine assig n m en ts and re c e iv e s in struction and guidance
on com plex a ssig n m e n ts. Work is review ed for accu racy of judgm ent, com pliance with in ­
stru ction s, and to in su re p roper alinem ent with the o v e ra ll sy stem .
C la s s C . Works under im m ediate su p ervision , carry in g out a n aly se s a s assig n e d , u su ally
of a single activity. A ssign m en ts a re designed to develop and expand p ra c tic a l experien ce
in the application of p ro ced u res and sk ills requ ired for sy ste m s a n a ly sis work. F o r exam ple,
m ay a s s i s t a higher level sy ste m s an alyst by p rep arin g the detailed sp ecification s requ ired
by p ro g ra m e r s from inform ation developed by the higher lev el an aly st.
DRAFTSMAN
C la s s A . P lan s the graphic presentation of com plex item s having d istin ctive design
fe a tu res that d iffer sign ifican tly from e stab lish ed d raftin g p rece d en ts. Works in c lo se sup­
port with the d esign o rig in a to r, and m ay recom m end m inor d esign changes. A nalyzes the
effect of each change on the d etails of form , function, and positional relation sh ip s of com ­
ponents and p a r t s . Works with a m inim um o f su p e rv iso ry a ss is ta n c e . Com pleted work is
review ed by d esign o rigin ator for con sisten cy with p rio r engineering determ in ations. May
either p rep a re d raw in gs, o r d irect th eir p rep aration by low er level d raftsm en .
C la s s B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assig n m e n ts that requ ire the ap p li­
cation of m o st of the stan dardized drawing techniques re g u larly u sed . Duties typ ically in ­
volve such work a s: P r e p a r e s working draw ings of su b a sse m b lie s with ir r e g u la r sh ap es,
m ultiple fu nction s, and p r e c ise p ositional relation sh ip s between com ponents; p re p a re s a rc h i­
te ctu ral draw ings for construction of a building including d etail draw ings of foundations, wall
sectio n s, floor p lan s, and roof. U ses accepted form u las and m an uals in m aking n e c e ssa r y
com putations to determ ine quantities of m a te r ia ls to be u sed, load c a p a c itie s, stren gth s,
s t r e s s e s , etc. R eceives in itial in stru ctio n s, req u irem e n ts, and advice from su p e rv iso r.
Com pleted work is checked for technical adequacy.
C la s s C . P re p a re s d etail draw ings of single units or p a r ts for engineering, construction,
m anufacturing, o r re p a ir p u rp o se s. Types of draw ings p rep are d include iso m e tric p rojection s
(depicting three d im ensions in accu rate sc a le ) and section al view s to cla rify positioning of
com ponents and convey needed inform ation. C on solidates d eta ils from a number of so u rc e s
and a d ju sts o r tr a n sp o se s sc a le a s requ ired . Suggested m ethods of approach, applicable
p rece d en ts, and advice on sou rce m a te r ia ls a re given with in itial a ssig n m e n ts. Instruction s
a re le s s com plete when assig n m en ts recu r. Work m ay be spot-checked during p r o g r e s s.

COM PUTER SYSTEM S AN ALYST, BUSINESS
A nalyzes b u sin e ss p ro blem s to form ulate p ro ced u res for solving them by u se of electron ic
data p ro c e ssin g equipm ent. Develops a com plete d escrip tio n of all sp ecification s needed to enable • D RAFTSM AN -TRA CER
p ro g ra m e rs to p rep a re req u ired digital com puter p r o g ra m s. Work involves m o st of the following:
Copies plans and draw ings p rep ared by others by placing tracin g cloth or p ap er over
Analyzes su b jec t-m a tter op eration s to be autom ated and id en tifies conditions and c r ite r ia requ ired
draw ings and tracin g with pen or pencil. (Does not include tracin g lim ited to plans p rim a rily
to achieve sa tisfa c to ry r e s u lts; sp e c ifie s number and types of re c o r d s, file s , and docum ents to
con sistin g of straig h t lin es and a la rg e sc ale not requ iring clo se delineation.)
be u sed; outlines actions to be p erfo rm ed by person nel and com puters in sufficient detail for
presentation to m anagem ent and fo r p rogram in g (typically th is involves p rep aration of work and
AND/OR
data flow c h a rts); coordin ates the developm ent of te st p ro blem s and p articip a tes in tr ia l runs of
P re p a re s sim p le o r rep etitive draw ings of e a sily v isu alize d ite m s. Work is closely su p erv ised
new and rev ise d sy ste m s; and recom m ends equipment changes to obtain m ore effective o v e ra ll
during p r o g r e s s .
o p eratio n s. (NOTE: W orkers perform in g both sy ste m s a n a ly sis and p rogram ing should be c la s ­
sified a s sy ste m s a n aly sts if th is is the sk ill used to determ ine their pay.)
E LECTR O N IC TECHNICIAN
Does not include em ployees p rim a rily resp o n sib le fo r the m anagem ent or sup ervision
Works on v ariou s types of electron ic equipment or sy ste m s by perform in g one or m ore
of other electron ic data p ro c e ssin g em p lo y ees, or sy stem s a n aly sts p rim a rily concerned with
of the following o p eration s: Modifying, in stallin g , rep airin g , and overhauling. These operations
scien tific or engineering p ro b le m s.
requ ire the p erform an ce of m o st o r all of the following ta s k s : A ssem b lin g, testin g, adjusting,
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, sy ste m s an aly sts a re c la ss ifie d as follow s:
calib ratin g , tuning, and alining.
C la s s A. Works independently or under only general d irection on com plex p roblem s in ­
volving all p h ase s of sy ste m s a n a ly sis. P ro b lem s a re com plex becau se of d iv erse so u rce s of
input data and m u ltip le -u se req u irem en ts of output data. (F o r exam ple, develops an in tegrated
production scheduling, inventory control, co st a n a ly sis, and sa le s a n a ly sis reco rd in which




Work is nonrepetitive and re q u ires a knowledge of the theory and p ractice of electron ics
p ertainin g to the u se o f gen eral and sp ecia lize d e lectron ic te st equipm ent; trouble a n a ly sis; and
the operation, relation sh ip , and alinem ent of electron ic s y ste m s, su b sy ste m s, and circu its having
a v arie ty of component p a r ts .

19
ELECTR O N IC TECHNICIAN— Continued

N U RSE, INDUSTRIAL (R egistered )

E lectro n ic equipment or sy stem s worked on ty p ically include one or m ore of the following:
Ground, veh icle, or airborn e radio com m unications s y ste m s, relay s y ste m s, navigation a id s;
airborn e or ground rad a r sy ste m s; rad io and telev isio n tran sm ittin g or recording sy ste m s; e le c ­
tronic com puters; m is s ile and sp ac e c ra ft guidance and con trol sy ste m s; in d u strial and m ed ical
m easu rin g , indicating and controlling d ev ices; etc.

A re g iste re d n u rse who giv es n ursin g se rv ic e under gen eral m ed ical direction to ill or
injured em ployees or other p e rso n s who becom e ill or suffer an accident on the p r e m ise s of a
factory or other establish m en t. Duties involve a combination of the following; Giving fir s t aid
to the ill or injured; attending to subsequent d re ssin g of em ployees' in ju rie s; keeping reco rd s
of patients treated ; p rep arin g accident rep o rts fo r com pensation or other p u rp o ses; a ss is tin g in
p h ysical exam inations and health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and c a r r y ­
ing out p ro g ra m s involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environm ent,
or other a ctiv ities affecting the health, w e lfare, and safety of a ll person nel. N ursing su p e rv iso rs
or head n u rse s in e stablish m en ts employing m ore than one n urse a re excluded.

(Exclude production a ss e m b le r s and t e s t e r s , craftsm e n , draftsm en , d e sig n e rs, en gin eers,
and repairm en of such standard electron ic equipment a s office m achines, radio and television
receivin g s e t s .)

M A IN T E N A N C E A N D P O W E R P L A N T
C A R PEN TER, MAINTENANCE

MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

P e rfo rm s the carpentry duties n e c e s sa r y to con struct and m aintain in good r e p a ir build­
ing woodwork and equipment such a s bin s, c r ib s , co u n ters, benches, p artitio n s, d o o rs, flo o rs,
s t a ir s , c a sin g s, and trim m ade of wood in an establish m en t. Work involves m ost of the following:
Planning and laying out of work from b lu ep rin ts, d raw in gs, m o d e ls, or v erb al in stru ction s; using a
variety of c a rp e n te r's handtools, portable power to o ls, and stan dard m easu rin g in strum en ts; m ak ­
ing standard shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions of work; and selectin g m a te r ia ls n e c e ssa r y
for the work. In ge n e ral, the work of the m aintenance carp en ter re q u ires rounded train in g and
experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

P rod u ces replacem en t p a rts and new p arts in m aking r e p a irs of m etal p arts of m ech an ical
equipment operated in an establishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following: Interpreting written
in struction s and sp ecificatio n s; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of m ach in ist's
handtools and p recisio n m easu rin g in strum en ts; setting up and operating standard m achine to o ls;
shaping of m etal p a rts to clo se to le ran ces; m aking standard shop com putations relating to dim en­
sion s of work, tooling, fe e d s, and sp eeds of machining; knowledge of the working p ro p e rtie s of
the common m e ta ls; selectin g stan dard m a te r ia ls , p a r ts , and equipment required for his work;
and fitting and assem b lin g p arts into m ech an ical equipment. In ge n e ral, the m ach in ist's work
norm ally re q u ires a rounded train in g in m achine-shop p ractice usually acqu ired through a fo rm al
apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

ELECTRICIAN , MAINTENANCE
P e rfo rm s a v ariety of e le c tric a l trad e functions such a s the in stallation , m aintenance, or
re p a ir of equipment for the generation, d istribution, or utilization of e le ctric energy in an e sta b ­
lishm ent. Work involves m ost of the following; Installin g or rep airin g any of a variety of e le c ­
tr ic a l equipment such a s g e n e rato rs, tr a n sfo r m e r s, sw itch boards, c o n tro llers, circu it b r e a k e r s ,
m o to rs, heating un its, conduit sy ste m s, or other tra n sm issio n equipment; working from blu e­
p rin ts, draw ings, layouts, or other sp ecificatio n s; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e le ctric a l
sy stem or equipment; working standard com putations relatin g to load requ irem ents of w iring or
e le ctric a l equipment; and using a v ariety of e le c tric ia n 's handtools and m easu rin g and testin g
instrum ents. In gen eral, the work of the m aintenance e le ctricia n req u ires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent training and experien ce.
ENGINEER, STATIONARY
O perates and m aintains and m ay a lso su p e rv ise the operation of station ary engines and
equipment (m echanical or e le c tric a l) to supply the establish m en t in which employed with power,
heat, refrige ratio n , or air-conditioning. Work in volves: Operating and m aintaining equipment
such a s steam engines, a ir c o m p re sso r s, g e n e rato rs, m o to rs, turbin es, ventilating and r e fr ig ­
erating equipment, steam b o ilers and b o iler-fed w ater pum ps; making equipment r e p a ir s; and
keeping a reco rd of operation of m achinery, te m p e ratu re , and fuel consumption. May a lso su ­
p e rv ise th ese operations. Head or chief engin eers in establish m en ts employing m ore than one
engineer a re excluded.
FIREM AN, STATIONARY BO ILER
F ir e s station ary b o ilers to furnish the establishm ent in which employed with heat, power,
or steam . F eed s fuels to fire by hand or op erates a m ech an ical stoker, g a s , or oil burn er; and
checks w ater and safety v a lv e s. May clean, oil, or a s s i s t in rep airin g boilerroom equipment.
H E L P E R , MAINTENANCE TRADES
A s s i s t s one or m ore w o rk ers in the sk illed m aintenance tra d e s, by perform in g sp ecific
or g en eral duties of le s s e r sk ill, such a s keeping a w orker supplied with m a te r ia ls and to o ls;
cleaning working a re a , m achine, and equipment; a ss is tin g journeym an by holding m a te r ia ls or
to o ls; and perform ing other unskilled ta sk s a s d irected by journeym an. The kind of work the
helper is perm itted to p erfo rm v a rie s from trad e to trad e : In som e trad e s the helper is confined
to supplying, lifting, and holding m a te ria ls and to o ls, and cleaning working a r e a s ; and in others
he is perm itted to p erfo rm sp ecialized m achine o p eratio n s, or p arts of a trad e that a re a lso
p erform ed by w ork ers on a fu ll-tim e b a s is .
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
S p e c ia lize s in the operation of one or m ore types of m achine tools, such a s jig b o r e rs ,
cy lin d rical or su rface g rin d e rs, engine lath e s, or m illing m achines, in the construction of
m achine-shop t o o ls , g ag e s, ji g s , fix tu res, or d ie s. Work involves m ost of the following: Planning
and perform ing difficult machining operations; p ro c essin g item s requiring com plicated setups or
a high degree of accu racy ; using a v ariety of p rec isio n m easu rin g in strum en ts; selectin g fe e d s,
sp ee d s, tooling, and operation sequence; and m aking n e c e ssa r y adjustm en ts during operation
to achieve req u isite to le ran ces or dim en sion s. May be requ ired to recognize when tools need
d re ssin g , to d r e s s to o ls, and to selec t p ro per coolants and cutting and lubricatin g o ils. F o r
cro ss-in d u stry wage study p u rp o se s, m achine-tool o p e ra to rs, toolroom , in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from this c la ssific a tio n .




MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (Maintenance)
R e p a irs autom obiles, b u se s, m otortru ck s, and tr a c to r s of an establishm ent. Work in­
volves most_of_Uie_foUowing: Exam ining autom otive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; d is ­
assem b lin g equipment and p erform in g re p a ir s that involve the use of such handtools a s w renches,
g a g e s, d r ills , or sp ecia lize d equipment in d isa sse m b lin g or fitting p a r ts ; replacing broken or
defective p a rts from stock; grinding and adjusting v a lv e s; reasse m b lin g and installin g the variou s
a sse m b lie s in the vehicle and m aking n e c e s sa r y adjustm en ts; and alining w heels, adjusting brakes
and ligh ts, or tightening body bolts. In ge n e ral, the work of the automotive m echanic req u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acquired through a form al apprenticeship or equivalent
train in g and exp erien ce.
Th is c la ssific a tio n does not include m ech an ics who rep a ir cu sto m ers' vehicles in auto­
m obile r e p a ir shops.
MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
R e p a irs m achinery or m ech an ical equipment of an establishm ent. Work involves m ost
of the following: Exam ining m achines and m ech an ical equipment to diagnose source of trouble;
dism antling or p artly dism antling m achines and p erform in g re p a irs that m ainly involve the use
of handtools in scrap in g and fitting p a r ts ; replacin g broken or defective p arts with item s obtained
from stock; ordering the production of a replacem ent p art by a m achine shop or sending of the
m achine to a m achine shop for m ajo r r e p a ir s; p rep arin g written sp ecification s for m ajo r re p a irs
or for the production of p a rts ordered from m achine shop; reasse m b lin g m achines; and m aking
a ll n e c e ssa r y adjustm en ts fo r operation. In ge n e ral, the work of a m aintenance m echanic req u ires
rounded train in g and experien ce usually acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
training and exp erien ce. Excluded from th is cla ssific a tio n are w ork ers whose p rim ary duties
involve setting up or adjusting m achines.
MILLWRIGHT
In sta lls new m achines or heavy equipment, and d ism an tles and in sta lls m achines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout a re requ ired. Work involves m ost of the follow ing:
Planning and laying out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other sp ecificatio n s; using a variety
of handtools and riggin g; m aking stan dard shop com putations relatin g to s t r e s s e s , strength of
m a te r ia ls , and cen ters of gravity ; alining and balancing of equipment; selectin g standard to o ls,
equipment, and p arts to be u sed; and in stallin g and m aintaining in good order power tra n sm issio n
equipment such a s d riv e s and speed re d u c e rs. In ge n e ral, the m illw righ t's work norm ally req u ires
a rounded training and experience in the trad e acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experien ce.
PAIN TER, MAINTENANCE
P ain ts and red e co ra te s w a lls, woodwork, and fix tu res of an establishm ent. Work involves
the following: Knowledge of su rfa ce p e cu lia ritie s and types of paint requ ired for different a p p lica ­
tion s; preparing su rfa ce for painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or fille r in nail

2C
PAINTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

SH E E T -M E T A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE---Continued

holes and in te r s tic e s ; and applying paint with sp ra y gun or brush. May m ix c o lo rs, o ils , white
lead , and other paint in gred ien ts to obtain p ro p er co lo r o r co n sisten cy. In gen eral, the work of the
m aintenance pain ter re q u ire s rounded train in g and experien ce u su ally acquired through a form al
apprenticeship or equivalent train in g and experien ce.

up and operating a ll available types of sh eet-m etal working m ach in es: using a v arie ty of handtools
in cutting, bending, form ing,, shaping, fitting, and asse m b lin g ; and in stallin g sh eet-m etal a rtic le s
a s requ ired . In g en eral, the work of the m aintenance sh eet-m etal w orker req u ires rounded
train in g and experien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticesh ip or equivalent train in g
and experien ce.

P IP E F IT T E R , MAINTENANCE
In sta lls or r e p a ir s w ater, steam , g a s , or other typ es of pipe and pipefittings in an
establish m en t. Work involves m o st of the following: Laying out of work and m easu rin g to locate
position of pipe from draw ings or other written sp ecificatio n s; cutting v ariou s s iz e s of pipe to
c o r r e c t lengths with ch isel and h am m er o r oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting m ach in es; threading
pipe with sto ck s and d ie s; bending pipe by hand-driven or pow er-driven m ach in es; assem b lin g
pipe with couplings and fasten ing pipe to h an g e rs; m aking stan dard shop com putations relatin g to
p r e s s u r e s , flow, and siz e of pipe req u ired ; and m aking stan dard te sts to determ ine whether fin­
ished pip es m eet sp ec ific atio n s. In g en eral, the work of the m aintenance p ip efitter re q u ires
rounded train in g and exp erien ce u su ally acqu ired through a fo rm al apprenticeship or equivalent
train in g and e xp erien ce. W orkers p r im a rily engaged in in stallin g and rep airin g building sanitation
or heating sy ste m s a re excluded.
SH E E T -M E T A L WORKER, MAINTENANCE
F a b r ic a te s , in sta lls , and m ain tain s in good re p a ir the sh eet-m etal equipment and fix tu res
(such a s m achine g u a r d s , g r e a s e p an s, sh e lv es, lo c k e rs, tan ks, ve n tilato rs, chutes, ducts, m etal
roofing) of an e stablish m en t. Work involves m o st of the follow ing: Planning and laying out all
types-of sh eet-m etal m aintenance work from b lu ep rin ts, m o d e ls, or other sp ecificatio n s; setting

TOOL AND DIE MAKER
(Die m ak er; jig m ak er; tool m ak e r; fixture m ak e r; gage m ak er)
C on structs and r e p a ir s m achine-shop to o ls, g ag e s, jig s ,’ fix tu res or d ies for fo rg in g s,
punching, and other m etal-fo rm in g work. Work involves m o st of the following; Planning and
laying out of work from m o d els, blu ep rin ts, draw in gs, or other o ral and written sp ecificatio n s;
usin g a v a rie ty of tool and die m a k e r 's handtools and p recisio n m easu rin g in strum en ts; under­
standing of the working p ro p e rtie s of common m eta ls and allo y s; settin g up and operating of
m achine tools and related equipment; m aking n e c e ssa r y shop com putations relatin g to dim ensions
of work, sp ee d s, fe e d s, and tooling of m ach in es; h eat-treatin g of m etal p a r ts during fabrication
a s well a s of finished tools and d ies to achieve requ ired qu alitie s; working to clo se to le ra n c e s;
fitting and asse m b lin g of p a rts to p r e sc r ib e d to le ran ces and allow ances; and selectin g app rop riate
m a te r ia ls , to o ls, and p r o c e s s e s . In ge n e ral, the tool and die m a k e r 's work req u ires a rounded
training in m achine-shop and toolroom p ractice u sually acquired through a form al apprenticeship
o r equivalent train in g and experien ce.
F o r c r o ss-in d u str y wage study p u rp o se s, tool and die m a k e rs in tool and die jobbing
shops a re excluded from this cla ssific a tio n .

C U S T O D IA L A N D M A T E R IA L M O V E M E N T
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
G uard. P e rfo rm s routine police d u ties, either at fixed p o st or on tou r, m aintaining ord e r,
using a rm s o r fo rce where n e c e s sa r y . Includes gatem en who a re stationed at gate and check
on identity of em ployees and other p e rso n s en terin g.
W atchman. M akes rounds of p r e m is e s p e rio d ically in protecting property again st fir e ,
theft, and ille g a l entry.
JAN ITO R, P O R TER , OR CLEA N ER
(Sw eeper; charwoman; ja n itr e s s)
C leans and k eep s in an o rd e rly condition facto ry working a re a s and w ash room s, or
p r e m is e s of an o ffice, apartm ent house, or co m m ercial or other establishm ent. Duties involve
a com bination of the follow ing: Sweeping, m opping or scrubbing, and polishing flo o rs; rem oving
chips, tra sh , and other refu se; dusting equipment, furn iture, or fix tu res; polishing m etal fix ­
tu re s or trim m in g s; providing sup p lies and m inor m aintenance s e r v ic e s; and cleaning la v a to r ie s,
sh ow ers, and r e str o o m s. W orkers who sp e c ia liz e in window washing a re excluded.
LA BO RER, M A TERIAL HANDLING
(L o ader and unloader; handler and sta c k e r; sh elv er; tru ck e r; stockm an o r stock h elp er;
w arehousem an o r w arehouse helper)
A w orker em ployed in a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, sto re , or other establishm ent
wljose duties involve one o r m o re of the following; Loading and unloading variou s m a te r ia ls and
m erch an d ise on or from freigh t c a r s , tru c k s, or other tran sp ortin g d evices; unpacking, shelving,
or placing m a te r ia ls or m erch an d ise in p ro per sto ra g e location; and tran sp ortin g m a te r ia ls or
m erch an d ise by handtruck, c a r , or w heelbarrow . Longshorem en, who load and unload ships a re
excluded.
ORDER F IL L E R
(O rder p ick er; stock se le c to r; w arehouse stockm an)
F ills shipping or tr a n sfe r o r d e r s fo r finished goods from stored m erch an d ise in a c co rd ­
ance with sp ecificatio n s on s a le s s lip s, c u sto m e rs' o r d e r s, or other in stru ction s. May, in addition
to fillin g o r d e r s and indicating item s filled o r om itted, keep r e c o rd s of outgoing o r d e r s, req u i­
sition additional stock o r rep o rt short sup p lies to su p e rv iso r, and p erform other related duties.
PACK ER, SHIPPING
P re p a re s finished produ cts for shipm ent or sto ra g e by placing them in shipping con­
ta in e r s, the sp ecific operations p erfo rm ed being dependent upon the type, siz e , and number
of units to be packed, the type of container em ployed, and method of shipm ent. Work re q u ires
the placing of item s in shipping con tain ers and m ay involve one or m ore of the following:
Knowledge of v ario u s ite m s of stock in o rd e r to v erify content; selection of app rop riate type




PACK ER, SHIPPING— Continued
and size of container; in se rtin g en clo su re s in container; usin g e x c e lsio r o r other m a te r ia l to
prevent break age or dam age; closin g and sealin g container; and applying la b e ls or entering
identifying data on container. P ack e rs who a lso m ake wooden boxes o r c r a te s a re exclu ded.
SHIPPING AND RECEIVING C LE R K
P re p a re s m erch an d ise for shipment, or re c e iv e s and i s resp o n sib le fo r incoming ship­
m ents of m erch an d ise or other m a te r ia ls . Shipping work in volves: A knowledge of shipping p ro ­
ce d u re s, p r a c tic e s, rou tes, availab le m ean s of tran sp ortation , and r a t e s ; and p rep arin g re c o rd s
of the goods shipped, m aking up b ills of lading, posting weight and shipping c h a rg e s, and keeping
a file of shipping r e c o r d s. May d irect or a s s i s t in p rep arin g the m erch an d ise for shipm ent.
R eceiving work in volves: V erifying or directin g others in verifyin g the c o rre c tn e ss of shipm ents
again st b ills of lading, in voices, or other re c o r d s; checking for sh o rtag e s and rejectin g d am ­
aged goods; routing m erch an d ise or m a te r ia ls to p roper departm ents; and m aintaining n e c e ssa r y
re c o rd s and file s .
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w ork ers a re c la ss ifie d a s follow s:
R eceiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receivin g clerk
TRUCKDRIVER
D rives a truck within a city o r in du strial a re a to tran sp o rt m a te r ia ls , m erch an d ise,
equipment, or m en between v a rio u s types of establish m en ts such a s: M anufacturing plants, freight
depots, w areh ou ses, w holesale and re ta il estab lish m en ts, or between r e ta il establish m en ts and
c u sto m e rs' houses o r p la ce s of b u sin e ss. May a lso load or unload truck with or without h e lp e rs,
m ake m inor m ech an ical r e p a ir s, and keep truck in good working o rd e r. D riv e r-sa le sm e n and
ov e r-th e -ro ad d riv e rs a re excluded.
follow s:

F o r wage study p u rp o se s, tru ck d riv e rs a re c la ss ifie d by siz e and type of equipment, as
(T r a c to r - tr a ile r should be rated on the b a sis of t r a ile r capacity.)
T ru ck d river
T ru ck d riv er,
T ru ck d riv er,
T ru ck d riv er,
T ru ck d riv er,

(com bination of s iz e s liste d sep arate ly )
light (under iVz tons)
m edium (lVz to and including 4 tons)
heavy (over 4 ton s, t r a ile r type)
heavy (over 4 tons, other than t r a ile r type)

TR U CKER , POWER
O perates a m anually controlled gasoline- or electric-pow ered tru ck o r tra c to r to tran sp o rt
goods and m a te r ia ls of a ll kinds about a w arehouse, m anufacturing plant, or other establishm ent.
F o r wage study p u rp o se s, w ork ers a re c la ss ifie d by type of truck, a s follow s:
T ru ck e r, power (forklift)
T ru ck e r, power (other than forklift)

A v a ila b le O n R e q u e s t----The follow ing areas are surveyed p erio d ica lly fo r use in adm inistering the S ervice Contract A ct of 1965.
available at no cost while supplies last from any of the BLS regional o ffices shown on the inside front cover.

Alaska
Albany, Ga.
Alpena, Standish, and Tawas City, Mich.
A m a rillo , Tex.
A sh e v ille , N.C.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, G a —S.C.
Austin, Tex.
B ak ersfield , C alif.
Baton Rouge, La.
B iloxi, Gulfport, and Pascagoula, M iss.
B ridgeport, Norwalk, and Stamford, Conn.
Charleston, S.C.
C la rk s v ille , Tenn., and H opkinsville, Ky.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, G a — la.
A
Crane, Ind.
Dothan, Ala.
Duluth-Superior, Minn.—W is.
Durham, N.C.
E l Paso, Tex.
Eugene, O reg.
F argo— oorhead, N. Dak.—
M
Minn.
F a yetteville, N.C.
Fitchburg— e o m in s te r, M ass.
L
F o rt Smith, A rk.—
Okla.
F re d e ric k —
Hagerstown, M d .-P a .-W . Va.
G reat F a lls , Mont.
Greensboro—
Winston Salem—
High Point, N.C.
H arrisbu rg, Pa.
Huntsville, Ala.
K n oxville, Tenn.

Copies o f public releases are

Lared o, Tex.
Las V egas, Nev.
Lexington, Ky.
Low er Eastern Shore, M d.-V a.
Macon, Ga.
M arquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. M a rie, Mich.
M eridian, M iss.
M iddlesex, Monmouth, Ocean and Som erset
Cos., N.J.
M obile, A la ., and Pensacola, Fla.
M ontgom ery, Ala.
N ash ville, Tenn.
New London-G roton-Norw ich, Conn.
N ortheastern Maine
Ogden, Utah
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard—
Ventura, C alif.
Panama City, Fla.
Pine Bluff, A rk.
Portsm outh, N.H.—
Maine— ass.
M
Pueblo, Colo.
Reno, Nev.
Sacramento, C alif.
Santa Barbara, C alif.
Shreveport, La.
S p r in g fie ld —C h ic o p e e —H o ly o k e , M a s s .—C on n .

Stockton, C alif.
Tacom a, Wash.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, A r iz .
V a lle jo —
Napa, C alif.
Wichita F a lls , Tex.
Wilmington, D e l—
N.J.—Md.

The eleventh annual rep ort on salaries fo r accountants, auditors, chief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, d irectors o f personnel,
buyers, chem ists, engineers, engineering technicians, draftsm en, and c le r ic a l em ployees. O rder as BLS Bulletin 1693, National
Survey o f P ro fession a l, A d m in istrative, Technical, and C le ric a l Pay, June 1970. $1.00 a copy, fro m the Superintendent o f Documents,
U.S. Government Prin tin g O ffice, Washington, D .C., 20402, or any o f its region al sales o ffic e s .




☆

U. S . G O V E R N M E N T P R IN T IN G

O F F I C E : 19 7 2 —'745-1 O l/ 5 2




A re a W a g e S u rv ey s
A lis t of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A d ire c to ry of area wage studies including m ore lim ited studies conducted at
the request of the Em ploym ent Standards A dm inistration of the Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins m ay be purchased from the
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Governm ent P rin tin g O ffice, Washington, D .C ., 20402, or from any of the BLS regional sales offices shown on
the inside front cover.

A re a

Bulletin number
and p rice

_______________________________ 1685-87,
40 cents
Akron, Ohio, July 1971 1
Albany—
Schenectady— ro y, N .Y ., M ar. 1971 1---------- 1685-54,
T
35 cents
Albuquerque, N. M e x ., M ar. 1971____________________ 1685-58,
30 cents
Allentown—
Bethlehem—
Easton, Pa.—
N.J., May 1971— 1685-75,
30 cents
Atlanta, G a., May 1971----------------------------------------- 1685-69,
40 cents
B altim ore, M d., Aug. 1971 ------------------------------------ 1725-16,
35 cents
Beaumont— o r t A rthu r-O range, T ex ., M ay 1971 1--- 1685-68,
P
35 cents
Binghamton, N .Y ., July 1971 1------------------------------- 1725-6,
35 cents
Birm ingham , A la ., M ar. 1971 1 ----------------------------- 1685-63, 40 cents
B oise City, Idaho, Nov. 1971_________________________ 1725-27, 30 cents
Boston, M ass., Aug. 1971______________________________ 1725-11, 40 cents
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 19701_____________________________ 1685-43,
50 cents
Burlington, V t., Dec. 1971------------------------------------ 1725-25, 25 cents
Canton, Ohio, May 1971_______________________________ 1685-71,
30 cents
Charleston, W. V a ., M ar. 1971------------------------------ 1685-57,
30 cents
Charlotte, N.C ., Jan. 1971_____________________________ 1685-48,
30 cents
Chattanooga, Tenn.-G a., Sept. 1971------------------------ 1725-14,
30 cents
Chicago, 111., June 1970---------------------------------------- 1660-90,
60 cents
Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—
Ind., Feb. 1971 1-------------------- 1685-53, 45 cents
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1971---------------------------------- 1725-17, 40 cents
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1971------------------------------------ 1725-19,
30 cents
D allas, T ex ., Oct. 1971________________________________ 1725-26, 35 cents
Davenport—
Rock Island— oline, Iowa—
M
111.,
Feb. 1971______________________________________________ 1685-51,
30 cents
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 19701______________________________ 1685-45, 40 cents
Denver, C olo., Dec. 1970____________________________ — 1685-41, 35 cents
Des M oines, Iowa, May 1971__________________________ 1685-70, 30 cents
D etroit, M ich., Feb. 1971 1----------------------------------- 1685-77,
50 cents
F o rt Worth, T ex ., Oct. 1971---------------------------------- 1725 — t 30 cents
21,
G reen Bay, W is ., July 1971 ----------------------------------- 1725-3,
30 cents
G reen ville, S.C., May 1971 1--------------------------------- 1685-78,
35 cents
Houston, T ex ., Apr. 1971 1 ----------------------------------- 1685-67, 50 cents
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1971---------------------------------- 1725-23, 30 cents
Jackson, M iss., Jan. 1971 1 ___________________________ 1685-39, 35 cents
Jacksonville, F la ., Dec. 1970 1----------------------------- - 1685-37, 35 cents
Kansas City, M o.-K ans., Sept. 1971 ----------------------- 1725-18, 35 cents
Law rence— averh ill, M ass.— .H ., June 1971---------- 1685-83, 30 cents
H
N
L ittle Rock—
North L ittle Rock, A rk ., July 1971—----- 1725-4,
30 cents
Los Angeles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa A n aGarden G rove, C a lif., M ar. 1971 1 ----------------------- 1685-66,
50 cents
L o u isville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1970----------------------------- 1685-27, 30 cents
Lubbock, T e x ., M ar. 1971__________ _________ —____—- 1685-60, 30 cents
M anchester, N .H ., July 1971__________________________ 1725-2,
30 cents
Memphis, Tenn.— r k ., Nov. 1970--------------------------- 1685-30, 30 cents
A
M ia m i, F la ., Nov. 1971------------- ----------- —------------- 1725-28, 30 cents
Midland and Odessa, T ex ., Jan. 1971---------- ----------- 1685-40, 30 cents
Milwaukee, W is ., May 1971---------------------------------- 1685-76, 35 cents
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn., J an. 1971.------------------ 1685-44, 40 cents
l Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.




A re a
Muskegon—
Muskegon Heights, M ich., June 1971______
Newark and J e rs e y City, N.J., Jan. 1971____________
New Haven, Conn., J an. 1971----------------------------- -New O rleans, L a ., J an. 1971 1-----------------------------New York, N .Y ., Apr. 1971___________________________
N orfolk-Portsm ou th and Newport News—
Hampton, V a., J an. 1971 1 --------------------------------Oklahoma City, O kla., July 1971 1___________________
Omaha, Nebr.—
Iowa, Sept. 1971 1 -------------------------P aterson — lifton— a s s a ic , N.J., June 1971_________
C
P
Philadelphia, P a .— .J ., Nov. 1970------------------------N
Phoenix, A r i z . , June 1971____________________________
Pittsburgh, P a ., J an. 1971 1--------------------------------Portland, Maine, Nov. 1971 1________________________
Portland, O reg.— ash., May 1971------------------------W
P rovid en ce—
Pawtucket— arwick, R.I.— a ss.,
W
M
May 1971 1 -------------------------------------------------------Raleigh, N .C ., Aug. 1971-------------------------------------Richmond, V a ., M ar. 1971____________________________
R ochester, N .Y . (o ffic e occupations only),
July 1971 1 __________________________________ _____ ___
Rockford, 111., May 1971------------ ----_______ __
St. L o u is , Mo.—
111., M ar. 1971 1______________________
Salt Lake C ity, Utah, Nov. 1971------------ -------- -----San Antonio, T e x ., May 1971 1________________________
San Bernardino— iversid e— ntario, C a lif.,
R
O
Dec. 1970 1____________________________________________
San D iego, C a lif., Nov. 1970________________________ _
San F ran cisco—
Oakland, C a lif., Oct.1970---------------San Jose, C a lif., Aug. 1971 1-------------------------------Savannah, G a., May 1971-------------------------------------Scranton, P a ., July 1971-------------- --------------------—
Seattle— verett, W ash., J an. 1971 1----------------------E
Sioux F a lls , S. Dak., Dec. 1970 1 ____________________
South Bend, Ind., M ar. 1971__________________________
Spokane, W ash., June 1971___________________________
Syracuse, N .Y ., July 1971 1 --------------------------------Tampar-St. P etersb u rg, F la., Nov. 1970---------------T oledo, Ohio— ich ., A pr. 1971 1_____________________
M
Trenton, N.J., Sept. 1971_____________________________
Uticar-Rome, N .Y ., July 1971 1 _______________________
Washington, D.C.—
Md.— a ., Apr. 1971______________
V
W aterbury, Conn., M ar. 1971------------------------------W aterloo, Iowa, Nov. 1971------------ —
------ ------- ------W ichita, K an s., A pr. 1971-----------------------------------W orcester, M a ss., May 1971________________________
Y ork , P a ., Feb. 1971__________________________________
Youngstown— arren, Ohio, Nov. 1970_______________
W

Bulletin number
and p rice
1685-82,
1685-47,
1685-35,
1685-36,
1685-89,

30cents
40cents
30cents
40cents
65cents

1685-46,
1725-8,
1725-13,
1685-84,
1685-34,
1685-86,
1685-49,
1725-22,
i 685-85,

35cents
35cents
35cents
35cents
50cents
30cents
50cents
35cents
35cents

1685-80,
1725-5,
1685-62,

40cents
30cents
30cents

1725-7,
1685-79,
1685-65,
1725-24,
1685-81,

35cents
30 cents
50cents
30cents
35 cents

1685-42,
1685-20,
1685-23,
1725-15,
1685-72,
1725-1,
1685-52,
1685-38,
1685-61,
1685-88,
1725-10,
1685-17,
1685-74,
1725-12,
1725-9,
1685-56,
1685-55,
1725-20,
1685-64,
1685-73,
1685-50,
1685-24,

40cents
30cents
cents
35cents
30cents
cents
35cents
35cents
30cents
30cents
35cents
30cents
40cents
30cents
35cents
cents
30cents
cents
30cents
30cents
cents
30cents

40
30

40
30

30

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
W A S H IN G T O N , D .C . 2 0 2 1 2

O F F IC IA L B U S IN E S S

PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE, $300




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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR