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* 3:

A r e
Wage
Survey

a

Bulletin 2025-61
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

coupon

p ^ ion w ttofarv
Pi




/

Los Angeles—Long Beach,
California, Metropolitan Area
October 1978

Preface
This bulletin p ro vid es resu lts of an O ctober 1978 su rv ey of
occupational earnings and supplem entary w age benefits in the L os A n g e le s Long Beach, C a lifo rn ia, Standard M etropolitan Statistical A re a . The survey
w as m ade as part of the B u re a u of L a b o r S tatistic s' annual a re a w age survey
p ro gra m . It w as conducted by the B u re a u 's regio n al o ffice in San F ra n c isc o ,
C a lif., under the gen eral direction of M ilton Keenan, A ssistan t R egional
C om m issio n er fo r O perations. The survey could not have been accom plished
without the cooperation of the many firm s whose w age and s a la ry data
provided the b a s is fo r the statistical inform ation in this bulletin.
The
B u reau w ishes to e x p re ss sin c ere appreciation fo r the cooperation received.

M a te ria l in this publication is in the public domain and m ay be
reproduced without p e rm issio n of the F e d e r a l Governm ent.
P le a s e credit
the B u reau o f L a b o r Statistics and cite the name and num ber of this
publication.




?

Note:
A vailable fo r the L o s A n g e le s —Lon g B each and Anaheim —
Santa A n a G arden G rove areas are reports on occupational earnin gs and supplem entary
benefits fo r the contract construction (M ay 1977), contract cleaning (July
1977), wom en's and m is s e s ' d r e s s e s (A ugust 1977), and com puter and data
p ro cessin g se rv ic e s (M arch 1978) in d u strie s.
A re p o rt on occupational
earnings and supplem entary benefits fo r the L o s A n g e le s —Long B e a c h a r e a
alone is available fo r the refu se hauling industry (O cto b er 1978).
A ls o
available is a report on occupational earn in gs and supplem entary benefits
fo r m unicipal governm ent em p loyees of the city of L os A n geles (O cto b er
1977).
Listings of union w age rates are a v a ila b le fo r building tr a d e s ,
printing tra d e s, lo c a l-tra n s it operating em p lo y e e s, lo c a l tr u c k d riv e rs and
h e lp e rs, and g ro c e ry store em p lo y ees. F r e e copies of these are av aila b le
fro m the B u re a u 's regional o ffic e s. (See back co v er fo r a d d r e s s e s .)

Area
Wage
Survey
U.S. Department of Labor
Ray Marshall, Secretary
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Janet L. Norwood
Acting Commissioner
February 1979
Bulletin 2025-61

Los Angeles—Long Beach,
California, Metropolitan Area
October 1978
C o n ten ts
Introduction




Page

2
Earnings, large establishments—
Continued
A - 12. Hourly earnings of m aterial
movement and custodial
w o rk e rs _______________________ ____ . 23
A - 13. A verage hourly earnings of
maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, m aterial movement, and
custodial w orkers, by s e x _________ - 24

T ables:
A.

Earnings, all establishments;
Weekly earnings of office w o rk e rs __
A - 1.
Weekly earnings of professional
A - 2.
and technical w orkers
Average weekly earnings of
A - 3.
office, professional, and
technical w ork ers, bv sex
....
Hourly earnings of maintenance,
A - 4.
toolroom, and powerplant
w o rk e rs ______________________________
Hourly earnings of m aterial
A - 5.
movement and custodial w o rk e rs __
A verage hourly earnings of
A - 6.
maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, m aterial movement, and
custodial w orkers, by s e x __________
Percent increases in average
A - 7.
hourly earnings, adjusted for
employment shifts, for selected
occupational groups__________________
Earnings, large establishments;
Weekly earnings of office w o rk e rs __
A -8 .
Weekly earnings of professional
A - 9.
and technical w ork ers
....
A - 10. Average weekly earnings of
office, professional, and
technical w ork ers, by s e x __________
A - 11. Hourly earnings of maintenance,
toolroom, and powerplant
w o rk e rs _________________________ ___

For sale Dy the Superintendent of Docu­
ments U S Government Printing Office.
Washington D C 20402 GPO Bookstores, or
BLS Regional Offices listed on back cover
Price $1 50 Make checks payable to Super­
intendent of Documents

Page

3
6

8
B.
10
11

13

14

15

Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions;
Minimum entrance salaries for
B -l.
inexperienced typists and clerks__ L ate-shift pay provisions for
B -2 .
full-tim e manuf'acturing
production and related w o rk e rs___ Scheduled weekly hours and days of
B -3 .
full-tim e first-sh ift w orkers______ Annual paid holidays for full-tim e
B -4 .
w o rk e rs _____________________________ ..
Paid vacation provisions for
B -5 .
full-tim e w o rk e rs __________________ Health, insurance, and pension
B -6 .
plans for full-tim e w o rk e rs_______ Life insurance plans for
B -7 .
full-tim e w o rk e rs __________________ ..

25

26
27
28
29
32
33

18
Appendix A. Scope and method of s u r v e y ________ - 36
Appendix B. Occupational descriptions___________ - 41
20

22

Introduction
This a r e a is 1 of 75 in which the U.S. D epartm ent of L a b o r 's B u ­
reau of L a b o r Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnin gs and r e ­
lated benefits.
(See lis t of a re a s on inside back c o v e r .)
In each a r e a ,
occupational earnin gs data ( A - s e r i e s ta b le s ) a r e co llected annually.
In fo r­
m ation on establish m ent p ractice s and supplem entary w age benefits ( B se rie s ta b le s ) is obtained e v ery th ird y ear.
E ach y e a r afte r a ll individual a r e a w age surveys have been co m ­
pleted, two su m m ary bulletins a r e issued.
The fir s t b rin g s together data
fo r each m etropolitan a r e a surveyed; the second p resents national and r e ­
gional estim ate s, projected fro m individual m etropolitan a r e a data, fo r a ll
Standard M etropolitan Statistical A r e a s in the United States, excluding A la sk a
and H aw aii.

T able A -7 provid es percent changes in a v e ra g e hourly earn in gs of
office c le ric a l w o rk e rs , electronic data p ro c e s s in g w o r k e r s , in du strial
n u rse s, skilled maintenance trad es w o r k e r s , and un skilled plant w o rk e rs .
W here p o ssib le, data a re p resented fo r a ll in du stries and fo r m anufacturing
and nonmanufacturing separately.
Data a r e not p resen ted fo r sk illed m ain ­
tenance w o rk e rs in nonmanufacturing becau se the num ber of w o rk e rs e m ­
ployed in this occupational group in nonm anufacturing is too sm a ll to w a rra n t
separate presentation.
This table p ro v id es a m e a s u re of w age trends afte r
elim ination of changes in av e ra g e earn in gs cau sed by em ploym ent shifts
among establishm ents as w ell as tu rn o v er of establish m ents included in
su rvey sam ples.
F o r fu rth er d e ta ils, see appendix A.
B -series

tables

A m a jo r consideration in the a r e a w age su rvey p ro g ra m is the need
to d e s c rib e the le v e l and m ovem ent of w ages in a v a rie ty of la b o r m ark ets,
through the an a ly sis of (1) the le v e l and d istribution of w age s by occupation,
and (2) the m ovem ent of w ages by occupational catego ry and skill level.
The p ro g ra m develops inform ation that m ay be used fo r many p u rp o ses,
including w age and s a la r y ad m inistration, co llective b argain in g, and a s ­
sistance in determ ining plant location.
Su rvey re su lts a lso a r e used by the
U.S. D epartm ent of L a b o r to m ake w age determ inations under the S e rv ic e
Contract A ct of 1965.

The B - s e r i e s ta b les p r e s e n t i n f o r m a t i o n on m i n i m u m e n tr a n c e
s a l a r i e s f o r i n e x p e r i e n c e d ty pists and c l e r k s ; l a t e - s h i f t p a y p r o v i s i o n s and
p r a c t i c e s f o r p ro d u c tio n and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s in m an u fa c tu rin g ; and data
s e p a r a t e l y f o r p ro d u c tion and r e l a t e d w o r k e r s and o f f i c e w o r k e r s on s c h e d ­
uled w e e k l y hours and days of f i r s t - s h i f t w o r k e r s ; paid h o lid a y s ; paid v a c a ­
tions; health, insuran ce, and p e n s io n p lans; and m o r e d e t a i l e d i n f o r m a t i o n
on l i f e insuran ce plans.

A - s e r i e s tables

A p p e n d ix A d e s c r i b e s the m e t h o d s and c o n c e p ts used in the a r e a
wage survey pro gra m .
It p r o v i d e s i n f o r m a t i o n on the s c o p e o f the a r e a
s u r v e y , the a r e a ' s i n d u s tr ia l c o m p o s i t i o n in m a n u f a c tu r in g , and l a b o r m an a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t c o v e r a g e .

T a b le s A - l through A - 6 p rovid e estim ates of stra ig h t-tim e w eekly
or hourly earnin gs fo r w o rk e rs in occupations com m on to a varie ty of
m anufacturing and nonm anufacturing in du stries.
F o r the 31 la r g e s t su rvey
a r e a s , tables A - 8 through A - 13 p rovid e s im ila r data fo r establishm ents
em ploying 500 w o rk e rs o r m ore.




Appendixes

Appendix B provides job d escrip tio n s used by B u re a u
om ists to c la s s ify w o rk e rs by occupation.

fie ld econ­

A.

E a rn in g s

Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
"^"wedd^earnl ng^^™
(standard)
Number

Occu p at io n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n
workers

Average
weekly
Kruir*1
(standard)

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs of—
*

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range2

*

%

100

and
under
110

s

4

%

s

%

s

t

s

%

S

s

s

<

s

*

*

S

%

110

120

130

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

3 20

340

360

3 80

400

420

440

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

460
-

120

130

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

3 40

360

380

4 00

4 20

440

460

480

6
6

23
3
20

138
20
118
-

1580
454
1126
29

2883 2929
77 2
884
2111 2 065
165
119

2900
1278
1622
149

2892
1185
1707
165

2358
1042
1316
126

218 1
1025
1156
347

1751
798
953
120

1097
431
666
110

371
144
227
70

177
77
100
72

121
56
65
25

47
30
17
11

10
10
-

~
~

“

~

3
2
1
1

-

-

95
57
38

193
79
114
1

142
89
53
6

131
32
99
18

63
32
31
6

152
85
67
20

48
17
31
8

49
18
31
25

47
18
29
21

30
17
13
11

2
2

-

13
13

8
8

*LL WORKERS
SECRET A R I E S ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------

21.467
B . 191
13.276
1.509

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.0

$
$
245.50 241.00
254 .0 0 2 52.00
2 4 0 .5 0 2 33.00
273.00 280.00

$
$
205.50-284.00
217.50-290.50
199.50-276.50
228.00-302.50

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------

982
461
521
117

39.5
40.0
39.0
40. 0

294.00
291.50
296.50
3 47.00

253.00-331.00
250.00-333.00
253.00-327.00
319.00-390.50

2 88.00
277.00
2 93.50
3 52.00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2
-

3.263
1.716
1.547
300

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

274.50
284.00
264.50
303.00

270.00
285.00
2 53.00
311.50

234.50-309.00
254.00-312.00
226.00-299.00
266.50-336.00

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS C -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------

6.758
3.303
3.455
325

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

248.00
254.50
241.50
268.50

245.00
255.00
2 37.50
2 60.50

212.00-279.00
220.00-291.00
208.00-265.00
242.00-293.00

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS 0 -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------

6.062
1 . 8 34
4.228
461

39. 5
39. 5
39.5
39.0

229.00
236.00
226.00
256.00

2 22.00
230.00
2 18.00
249.00

196.50-255.50
210.00-259.00
194.00-255.00
211.50-297.50

-

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS E -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S --------------

2.784
877
1.907
137

39. 5
39.5
39. 5
40. 0

204.00
209.50
201.50
271.00

195.50
207.50
1 91.00
290.00

173.00-223.50
172.50-230.00
173.00-213.00
249.00-290.00

-

-

-

-

~

-

STENOGRAPHERS ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------

1.764
823
941
283

39. 5
40.0
39. 5
39. 5

225.00
240.00
211.50
244.50

2 20.00
246.00
2 06.00
249.00

184.00-264.00
203.50-278.50
172.50-249.00
211.50-274.00

-

~

-

STENOGRAPHERS. GENERAL ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------

872
292
580
247

39.5
40.0
39. 5
39. 5

208.00
204.50
209.50
237.00

1 94.50
190.00
197.50
249.00

179.00-237.00
184.00-219.00
172.50-249.50
210.00-274.00

-

STENOGRAPHERS. SENIOR ---------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

892
531
361

39. 5 2 41 .5 0
40. 0 259.50
39.0 215.00

2 45.50
265.00
209.50

208.50-278.50
240.00-280.50
172.50-236.00

-

T R ANS CR IBI N G-M ACH IN E T Y P I S T S
NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

666
598

38. 5 187 .5 0
38.0 181.00

1 84.00
179.50

161.50-201.50
159.00-196.00

“

T Y P I S T S --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

4*208
1.487
2.721

39. 0 173 .0 0
40.0 196.50
39.0 160.00

1 67.00
184.50
152.50

144.00-193.00
170.00-217.00
137.00-176.00

31

139

31

1 39

T Y P I S T S . CLASS A ----------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------

1.170
491
679

39.5
40.0
39.0

188.50
203.50
1 81.00

169.00-214.00
181.50-266.50
165.00-205.00

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

13

-

5

13

~
-

i
1
-

3
3
-

68
18
50

19
19

46

18

78
12
66

18

2
44
-

-

-

17

40
6
34

_
-

27
13
14

“

-

-

-

280
1 70
1 10
64

136
46
90
43

73
42
31
19

86 1
393
468
19

890
283
607
40

985
410
575

931
449
482
27

707
490
217
68

578
3 59
219
18

2 18
140
78
18

144
70
74
17

29
14
15
14

7
4

22

1158
549
609
80

3
2

1
“

"

529
71
458
20

1096
192
904
54

1202
351
851
64

977
449
528
69

787
298
489
28

496
179
317
12

548
166
382
165

263
68
1 95
35

67
25
42
4

11
11
-

12

2

-

~

”

-

788
241
547
-

740
145
595
8

450
142
308
21

243
187
56
2

160
66
94
6

129
26
103
20

131
28
1 03
66

50
29
21

20
11
9
4

2

-

-

“

-

-

233
51
182
24

300
129
17 1
15

242
101
141
58

201
91
110
26

1 95
113
82
41

272
188
84
67

181
1 33
4-8
19

41
3
38
33

236
125
15

129
51
78
55

77
33
44
26

59
3
56
41

107
33
74
65

33
4
29
13

8
8
8

136
110
26

1 65
155
10

148
129
19

33

-

20
-

16
10

231
142
89

2

9
8

2
2
_

-

-

-

2

6
6
6

-

“

“

~

_
-

_
-

-

“

“

-

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

“

~

“

—
“
“

-

2

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

3

_

_

_

3

2

-

-

-

30

1

-

"

-

-

1
4
4

28
28

119
119

152
152

192
183

81
60

48
42

348
3
345

334
57
277

946
145
801

835
333
502

67 8
411
267

425
208
217

123
89
34

154
89
65

71
53
18

108
97
ii

37

106
12
94

281
77
204

29 9
147
152

193
64
129

56
43
13

50
19
31

39
36
3

102
91

5

11

5

3

2
1

-

6

-

-

-

14

-

_

-

-

2
2
“

-

2
2

~

-

-

-

-

-

”

“

“

14

”

-

_

124
58
66

_

1

3

"

113
50
63

111

“

-

64
18
46

3

-

-

432
310
122
56

67
67

37

~

-

468
309
159
23

“

-

“

-

436
299
137
38

38
6
32

-

“
”

425
193
232
26

1

-

-

505
175
3 30
15

“

-

-

291
75
216
16

129
42
87

166
51
115
24

17

~

3
2
1
1

-

65
34
31

“

See footn otes at end of ta b les.




-

-

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------

199.00
219.00
185.00

-

~

~

”

“
“

-

-

~

~

~

-

-

-

“

~

Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
Weekly earnings1
(standard)
Number

Occupation and i n d u s tr y d iv i si o n
wodcers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard]

Num ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earnings of*

*
100

Mean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

and
under

%

%

%

$

%

140

s

180

130

$

%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

180

200

2 20

2 40

$

s

260

280

300

-

220

120

160

$

s

s

200

110

-

-

280

110

120

130

140

160

31
31

139

348
3
3 45

2 97
57
240

840
133
707

554
256
298

379
264
115

2 32
144
88

52
46
6

99
70
29

17
17

315
315
5

154
154

292
42
250
15

355
20
335
15

547
165
382
27

283
60
223
17

154
33
121
3

40
22
18
1

27
11
16
4

69
51
18
6

3
3

125
125

111
111

14
14

1
1

-

300

320

340

*

%

s

-

260

240

360

380

$

$
400

420

$
440

460

-

3 20

340

360

383

-

-

-

-

4 00

420

440

460

480

~
~

“

_
"

-

-

-

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
T Y P IS TS -

CONTINUED

T Y P I S T S . CLASS B -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

2.994
996
1*998

$
$
$
$
39.0 161.50 153.50 1 3 8 . 0 0 -1 8 0 . 0 0
40. 0 185.50 180.00 1 6 5 .0 0 -2 0 1 . 0 0
38. 5 149.50 145.00 1 2 9 .0 0 -1 6 1 . 0 0

F I L E CLERKS -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------

2.506
A 31
2.075
207

39.0
40. 0
39. 0
40.0

F I L E CLERKS. CLASS A ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

1 39

162.00
176.00
159.50
245.50

1 44.00
1 57.00
1 39.00
274.00

127.00-175.00
140.00-203.50
126.50-171.50
144.00-336.00

356
343

39.0 198.50
39. 0 195.50

183.50
1 83.00

171.50-197.00
171.00-197.00

F I L E CLERK S. CLASS B ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

8 40
733

39.0 166.00
38. 5 163.00

1 46.00
1 45.00

138.00-163.00
138.00-158.00

F I L E CLERK S. CLASS C ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

1.183
286
897

39.0 136.50
40. 0 170.00
3 9.0 126.00

1 29.00
157.00
118.00

108.00-146.50
145.00-187.00
107.50-132.50

315
315

134

MESSENGERS ---------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

993
319
674

39.5 162.50
39. 5 161.00
39. 0 163.50

150.00
150.00
1 53.00

135.00-191.50
132.50-179.00
136.00-199.00

28

23

28

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS -----------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

2.033
339
1.694

38. 5 177.00
40.0 214.00
38.5 170.00

1 61.50
209.50
157.50

138.00-202.00
175.00-252.50
135.00-184.00

-

SWITCHBOARD O P E R AT OR -R EC EP TI ON IS T S
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------

2.142
839
1.303
109

39. 5
40. 0
39.0
39. 5

174.00
177.50
172.00
252.00

1 61.50
166.00
157.50
261.00

149.50-185.00
156.00-195.50
144.00-183.50
150.00-356.50

-

ORDER CLERKS ----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

3.063
1.452
1.611

40. 0 206.50
40.0 186.00
40.0 225.00

196.00
1 76.00
215.00

172.50-227.00
166.50-196.00
195.50-258.50

-

14

~

OROER CLERKS. CLASS A -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------

1.184
6 06

40. 0 222.50
40. 0 189.00

218.50
1 81.00

181.00-270.50
172* 00” 1 9 6 . 0 0

-

ORDER CLERKS. CLASS B ------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------

1.878
846
1.032

ACCOUNTING CLERKS ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------------ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------

40.0
40.0
40.0

196.50
183.50
206.50

1 8 5 . 50
172.50
202.00

172.50-215.00
155.50-190.00
179.00-216.00

12.920
3.565
9* 355
799

39.5
40.0
39. 5
40. 0

201.50
201.00
201.50
242.00

1 90.00
1 90.00
190.00
250.00

165.00-221.00
168.00-220.00
162.00-221.00
200.00-282.50

5*840
1.996
3*844
330

39.5
40. 0
39.5
39. 5

217.00
218.50
216.50
258.50

202.00
207.00
201.50
277.00

184.00-239.00
185.50-235.50
184.00-240.00
221.50-289.00

~

-

-

~

_
-

_
-

-

-

"

~

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

_

"

16
16

"

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

~
“

-

~

-

-

-

72
11
61
14

18
18
2

76
76
76

2
-

5
3

47
36

18
18

_

_

-

“

16
16

63
34

202
2 02

3 32
310

71
63

9
7

7
3

1
1

35
4

74
63

14
14

134

229
13
216

125
20
105

187
118
69

87
52
35

34
31
3

19
18
1

15
11
4

24
20
4

8
3
5

6

1 94
77
117

240
86
154

161
32
129

39
21
18

164
25
139

25
10
15

25
15
10

10
7
3

1
1

1

23

82
46
36

91
91

219
219

228
228

397
37
360

397
58
339

183
41
142

99
49
50

50
40
10

93
40
53

224
61
163

47
12
35

4
4

-

36

120
120
“

169
29
140
“

587
222
365
40

574
286
288
“

219
104
115
3

245
130
115
4

22
6
16
1

2
2

106
52
54
20

6

-

6

9
2
7

-

-

238
236
2

806
530
276

574
37 7
197

624
126
498

146
17
129

145
22
123

179
140
39

203
4
199

214
214

196
72

17
17

141
22

61
22

4

-

6

1

-

203
4

56
-

_

2
-

_

118
118

_
-

_
-

_
-

238
236
2

512
275
237

360
163
197

428
54
374

129
1 29

4

-

-

65
65

385 1718
14
493
371 1 2 2 5
40
5

2762
aoi
1961
60

258 8
756
1 832
83

1 957
580
1377
116

896
308
5 88
54

604
120
484
67

647
259
3 88
1 52

440
81
359
148

418
81
337
16

234
31
203
1

151 5 1151
5 45
454
97 0
697
14
45

614
250
364
37

321
104
217

3 55
1 57
198
35

260
80
180
136

158
79
79
16

2 28
25
203
1

-

-

2
-

2

-

4

248
26

222

866
237
629
15

22

_

-

-

-

-

”

“

2

10
10

-

~

65

~

-

-

-

-

6
5

-

_
-

“

98
98
“

-

_
-

-

6

“

2
-

2 94
255

-

~

-

~

65
-

-

_

~

-

57
57

-

14

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1
~

-

“

5
5
5

-

14

14

-

42
6
36
36

“

2
2

“

10
10

See footnotes at end o f tables.




-

“

102
16
86
20

-

-

"

28
28

36
~

-

-

4
4

“
-

-

~
-

6
6
-

-

~

-

~

-

~
~
~

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

82
19
63
1

85
22
63
51

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

80
17
63
1

42

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22
20
8

-

-

Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
^^^Weekl^Tarning^^"
(standard)
Number
of
worken

Average
weekly

Nu m ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs o f*

%

S

%

%

%

%

*

%

S

$

%

s

s

s

S

%

s

$

%

%

(standard)

110

120

130

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

3 20

340

360

3 80

400

420

440

460

110

Occu p at io n and i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

120

130

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

3 40

360

380

4 00

420

440

460

480

-

6
6
5

98
98
"

383 1 470
467
14
369 1 0 0 3
40
5

1896
564
1332
45

107 3
211
862
69

806
126
680
71

282
58
224
17

263
16
247
45

277
1 02
175
1 17

175
1
174
12

220
2
218

6
6
-

2
2
-

43
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

_

-

5
5

-

9

-

-

100
Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

and
under

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
ACCOUNTING CLERKS -

CONTINUED
$
187.00
178.50
189.50
230.00

i , a . »
1 67.00
175.00
2 18.50

$
$
155.50-206.50
156.00-190.00
155.50-207.00
196.00-261.00

2 87
2 16

40. 0 205.00
40.0 218.50

1 78.50
206.00

172.50-214.00
178.50-214.00

~

3 84

40. 0 239.00

1 90.00

140.00-364.00

-

-

B IL LE R S ----------------------

382

40.0

239.00

1 90.00

140.00-364.00

-

PAYROLL CLERKS --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

1.731
729
1.002
171

39. 5
40.0
39.5
39.5

219.50
206.50
228.50
285.00

202.50
197.00
2 07.00
271.00

182.00-248.50
175.00-225.00
184.00-260.00
224.00-372.00

-

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

7.387
1.847
5.540
546

39.5
40.0
39. 5
40.0

197.50
211.00
193.00
221.50

189.00
200.00
184.00
212.50

170.50-220.00
184.00-240.00
163.50-214.00
186.50-260.00

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS' CLASS A --------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

2.713
863
1.850
130

39. 5
40. 0
39.0
39.5

214.00
226.00
208.50
238.00

205.50
2 16.00
2 01.00
234.00

185.00-232.00
192.50-257.50
183.00-230.00
206.00-271.50

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS. CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

4*489
984
3.505
416

40.0
40.0
39.5
40. 0

185.00
198.00
181.50
216.50

180.50
189.00
177.00
211.50

159.00-205.00
173.50-207.50
150.50-202.00
186.50-254.50

ACCOUNTING CLER KS ' CLASS B --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

7.000
1.569
5.431
469

BO OKK EEPING-MACHINE
OPERATORS --------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------MACHINE B I L L E R S -----------------------------------------------BILLING-M ACHINE

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

-

”

1
1

33
4

111
82

6
6

84
73

17
17

“

44

51

29

53

39

-

-

12

-

44

51

29

53

39

-

12

-

8

-

-

-

4
4

39
13
26
15

356
237
119
8

427
127
300
13

275
146
129
5

133
55
78
16

134
41
93
13

166
69
97
22

40
27
13
3

39
8
31
7

873 1234
37
256
978
836
5
85

1835
566
1269
78

1185
354
831
112

564
126
438
45

4 17
1 12
3 05
73

541
252
289
119

212
83
132
13

97
23
74

9
3
6
6

271
45
226
7

797
238
559
9

589
176
413
38

373
109
264
15

187
94
93
9

165
91
74
33

142
7R
6*1
13

97
23
74

963
211
7 52
78

1038
32 8
710
69

596
178
418
74

191
17
174
30

140
18
122
64

296
161
135
86

55
2
53

-

-

-

“

-

42

66

42

66

-

“

“

■
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

77

~

~

"

~

42

66

-

-

-

-

-

-

42

66

S ee footn otes at end o f ta b les.




304
30
274
10

5

-

304
30
274
10

77

796
37
759
5

-

1

-

-

_

43
43

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

28
28

-

-

-

-

-

-

146

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1 46

24
6
18
-

10

84

7
i

6
6

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10
-

84
69

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

_

_

_

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

2
2

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

• -

-

-

-

-

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978
Weekly earalng^^^™
Number

Occupation and i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

of
workers

(standard)

N um ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earnings o f—
$

Average
weekly

s
120

Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

and
under

S

S

%

140

160

180

S
200

*
2 20

$

s
240

260

*

$

s
2 80

300

320

S

*
340

3 60

S
380

<

s
400

420

*
4 40

*
480

%

%

520

560

600

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

4 00

4 20

440

4 80

520

560

600

over

6

140

and

12
10
2

57
27
30
6

63
12
51
4

95
27
68
2

87
17
70

224
65
159
2

180
37
143

242
91
151
12

223
70
153
10

328
103
225
17

253
98
155
9

4 10
1 47
263
38

223
90
1 33
28

129
79
50
28

50
37
13
5

34
30
4
4

42
8
34

32
1
31

69
3
66

92
29
63

1 94
57
1 37

182
69
113

2 36
76
160

161
75
86

111
76
35

49
37
12

34
30
4

151
44
107
2

126
25
101

162
82
80
12

105
35
70
6

1 02
44
58
6

60
28
32
6

1 14
71
43
20

52
15
37
17

18
3
15
15

1

i

_

_

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U S I N E S S ) ----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------------

2.616
940
1.676
165

39. 5
39.5
39. 5
40.0

407.50
426.00
397.00
454.00

I 0 6 . OO
424.50
402.00
459.50

352.00-461.00
368.00-480.50
344.00-448.50
406.50-517.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS A ------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

1.204
461
743

39. 5 451.00
39.5 482.50
39. 5 431.50

437.00
472.00
429.00

406.00-491.50
425.50-530.50
395.50-466.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U S I N E S S )* CLASS B ------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------------

1.033
378
655
91

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS C ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------

39.5
39.5
39.5
40. 0

380.00
391.00
374.00
445.50

372.50
384.50
361.50
448.50

336.50-414.00
357.00-437.00
328.00-414.00
386.00-506.50

249
148

39.5
39.0

292.50
287.50

294.50
278.50

253.00-326.50
255.00-310.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (B U S I N E S S ) MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------------

2*744
1.062
1.682
247

39. 5
40.0
39.0
40.0

333.50
348.50
324.00
378.00

337.50
350.50
3 22.00
3 74.00

287.50-375.00
308.00-385.00
276.00-365.00
328.50-428.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S )
CLASS A ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

894
445
449

39. 5 392.00
40. 0 398.50
3 9. 0 385.00

385.00
391.00
3 75.00

359.00-418.00
360.50-432.50
352.00-407.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (B U S I N E S S )
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------

1.269
417
8 52
1 00

39.
40.
39.
40.

323.00
333.00
318.00
375.00

322.00
340.50
313.00
372.00

287.50-356.50
313.50-357.00
287.50-350.00
340.50-421.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S )
CLASS C ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------

581
200
381

39. 5 267.00
4 0.0 268.50
3 9.0 266.00

264.50
261.00
266.50

241.50-287.50
230.00-288.00
241.50-287.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------

3.390
1.003
2.387
301

39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0

239.00
250.50
234.50
283.00

230.00
240.00
230.00
276.00

200.00-275.50
205.00-292.50
200.00-268.50
276.00-301.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS A ------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------

810
290
520
89

39. 5
40.0
39.0
40.0

286.00
294.00
282.00
309.50

284.00
295.00
278.50
301.50

251.00-318.50
254.00-326.00
245.50-303.50
276.00-353.50

5
0
0
0

“

~

_

_

“

_

_

_

_

_

"

"
_

_

~
-

"

"

_

_

_

-

_

"

"

"

_

_

_

“

~

-

-

”

~

“

13
4
9
“

_

_

24
10
14
4

_

2
2

54
16
38
2

64
5
59

-

16
“

-

-

-

-

-

6

38
26
12

8
8

2
2

"

"

14
3
11
11

3
~
3
3

_

_

“

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
1
-

6
6

2
2

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

2
2
-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

105
62
43

185
51
134
6

2 70
65
205
11

2 62
56
206
5

195
57
138
26

2 96
132
164
21

434
179
255
40

268
124
144
19

219
101
1 18
30

178
87
91
20

72
39
33
18

1 19
60
59
37

3
3
~

6

11
7
4

13
12
1

77
25
52

118
49
69

182
78
104

1 34
73
61

145
70
75

52
35
17

20
4
16
11

6

-

“

1 43
29
114
5

1 99
24
175
3

113
28
85
8

188
89
99
9

298
126
172
20

79
44
35
10

83
26
57
14

31
15
16
6

78
53
25

146
28
118

121
36
85

52
25
27

69
17
52

31
18
13

18
4
i«

7
2
5

2
2
~

2
2

593
218
3 75
9

653
103
550
30

322
109
213
3

387
94
293
157

214
123
91
22

181
70
111
39

154
51
103
11

57
21
36
ii

41
26
15
7

16
7
9
9

-

36
24
12

110
14
96
6

116
46
70

112
37
75
18

92
28
64
7

137
53
84
33

102
39
63
1

47
17
30
10

32
23
9
5

14
5
9
9

~

-

1 05
57
48

77
9
68
“

_

“

“

2

_

353
54
299
i

~

6
“

”

16

“

11
5

-

-

_
-

22
11

_

_

2
?

31
18

-

“

8
8
-

21
9

_

_

41
26
15
14

41
30

-

“

_
“

39
37

_

_

_

57
30

_

35
35
~

27
9
18
~

36
20
16

13
4
9

42
9
33

3 94
118
276
2
8
8

1
1

_
-

“

12
2

“

_

"

6
6

-

_

"

"

'

_

-

“

~

"

_
-

"

_

See footn otes at end o f tables.




6

-

-

_

_

-

-

~

-

_

_
“

_
“

_

_
-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

Table A-2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

Oc cu p at io n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

N u m ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earning s of—
*

Mean2

Median2

Middle range2

s

*

120

140

*

%

*

160

1 80

200

*

220

*

240

S

*

260

280

1
300

$

s

320

340

S
360

s

s

%

380

400

420

$

%

440

480

s

520

s

560

and
under
180

200

220

240

260

280

300

3 20

340

360

380

4 00

420

47

247
70
177

435
169
266

429
63
366

180
56
124

263
55
208

1 07
95
12

40
16
24

25
10
15

2
1
1

9
3
6

2
2

-

47

"

306
54
252

139
48
91

122
25
97

107
26
81

26
7
19

12
2
10

15

4

-

i

3
3

-

-

2
2

-

-

15

3

~

-

43

13

27

14

10

5

2

14

1

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

12
12

1
1

19
7

37
34

14
13

12
12

i

1

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

13
11

“

~

”

~

2

185
181
4
2

1 62
162
~

2 53
227
26
4

228
151
77
23

179
117
62
16

158
138
20
1

180
99
81
50

135
95
40
5

139
81
58
9

128
59
69
33

141
24
117
18

70
8
62
17

113
11
102
19

62
-

-

2
“

68
31
37
6

62
25

79

-

“

82
43
39

81
74
7

85
77
8

66
62
4

78
51
27

74
16
58

53
8
45

104
11
93

44

“

28
22
6

69
60

~

41
37
4

40
40

135
135

60
43
17
7

75
65
10

39
18
21
3

63
19
44
8

30
8
22
4

67
8
59
14

9

“

74
20
54
48

17

—

121
83
38
5

112
112

47
43

43
28

22
16

13
12

24
4

11

10

20

-

-

“

“

“

140

600

and
160

440

4 80

i
i

4
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

520

560

600

over

*LL UORKERS—
CONTINUED
computer

operators

-

CONTINUED

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

1.791
•545
1.246

$
39.5 234.00
40. 0 243.00
39. 5 230.50

2 30.00
231.00
230.00

$
$
203.80-261.00
205.00-276.00
201.50-248.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS C -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

752
168
584

39.5 197.00
40. 0 199.50
39. 5 196.00

187.50
1 85.00
1 90.00

175.00-210.00
174.00-216.00
175.00-205.00

PERIPHERAL EQUIPMENT OPERATORS ---------

147

39.0

232.00

215.00

173.50-269.00

COMPUTER DATA L I B R A R IA N S ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

117
90

39.5
39.5

203.00
198.50

196.50
196.50

167.00-224.00
180.00-221.50

DRAFTERS -----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

2 . 300
I t 384
9 16
228

40.0
40.0
40. 0
40.0

281.00
243.00
338.00
322.00

268.50
230.00
3 50.00
330.50

217.00-343.50
197.50-282.00
280.00-400.50
286.50-385.50

D R AFT ERS . CLASS A -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

902
461
441

40. 0 340.50
40. 0 296.00
40. 0 387.50

336.50
2 97.00
400.00

281.50-400.00
269.00-321.00
368.00-430.00

-

-

-

-

D RAF TE RS. CLASS B -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

808
497
311
99

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

267.50
234.50
320.50
306.00

258.00
225.00
320.00
289.00

217.00-320.00
200.00-262.50
284.50-360.00
289.00-348.00

-

“

“

60
58
2
2

D RAF TE RS. CLASS C -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------

458
338

40.0
40.0

210.00
194.50

196.00
193.00

170.00-235.50
170.00-208.00

-

45
14

111
109

S

“
-

16
16

-

”
-

-

“

nonma nu f ac t ur i ng :

---------------------------------

51

40.0

285.00

274.00

225.00-348.00

-

DR AF TE R -T RA CE R S -------------------------------------------

1 32

40.0

203.00

200.00

172.50-225.50

2

EL EC TR ON IC S T E C H N I C IA N S ---------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

5.379
2.066
3.313

40.0
40.0
40.0

328.00
289.00
352.50

3 58.00
298.00
363.50

292.00-367.00
236.50-338.00
358.00-373.00

-

ELE C TR ON IC S T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS A MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------

1.809
1.066

40.0
40.0

350.00
328.50

352.50
334.00

323.50-383.00
310.00-352.50

EL EC TRO NI CS T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS B HANtJF ACTUR ING ----------------------------------------------

3.213
683

40.0
40.0

327.00
257.00

3 58.00
258.50

289.50-367.00
218.00-289.00

351
317

40.0
40.0

224.50
223.00

221.00
219.00

200.50-247.50
197.00-246.00

-

REGIS TE RED IN D U S TR I A L NURSES --------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

296
226
70

39. 5 3 1 2 .0 0
40. 0 315.50
39. 0 299.50

308.50
3 11.00
292.00

284.50-336.00
289.50-336.50
276.00-336.00

-

-

-

-

-

79

-

“

-

18

-

-

-

-

-

18

-

-

79
79

-

18

_

18

18

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

44

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

“
-

-

“

“

-

4

15

6

1

2

2

1

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

30

36

15

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

46
46

209
76
133

249
234
15

1 99
179
20

175
165
10

298
168
130

249
1 95
54

266
1 85
81

402
306
96

1427
356
1071

1183
99
1084

584
41
543

53
4
49

31
4
27

8
8

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

33
33

54
52

26
25

92
84

131
116

305
263

382
339

111
97

5 84
41

53
4

24

-

-

_

6
4

”

171
38

155
153

103
92

61
59

239
1 18

136
90

132
67

95
43

1044
17

1071
2

46
46

38
38

88
77

63
54

60
54

33
25

21
21

2
2

“

-

-

-

6
3
3

19
12
7

37
27
10

53
34
19

70
65
5

49
30
19

-

“
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S ee footn otes at end o f ta b les.




-

“

-

“

EL EC TR ON IC S T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS C MANUF A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------------

-

14

“

-

-

“

~

-

-

-

-

_
-

-

17
8

-

23

“

P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S

9

-

7

-

-

-

8
8
_

-

-

“

“

37
31
6

-

6
6

_

-

6
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

“

“

"

_

_

-

-

-

-

7
6
1

2
2

10
10

-

-

-

-

“

-

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex,
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Average
(mean'*)

Sex, 3 occupation, and i n d u s tr y d iv i si o n

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS

Number
of
workers

Weekhr
hours
(standard]

Weekly
earnings*
(standard)

NEN

Sex, 3 occupation, and i nd us tr y div ision

Weekly
houis*
(standard)

Weekly
earnings*
(standard)

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

ORDER CLERKS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------

1.091
220
871

40.0
40.0
40.0

229.50
191.00
239.50

ORDER CLERKS* CLASS A ------------

685

40.0

248.50

ORDER CL ER KS . CLASS B ------------

406

198.00

ACCOUNTING CLERKS:
MANUFACTURING -----------------------------

329

40.0

191.00

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS A:
MANUFACTURING ------------------------------

TRA NS CR IB IN G- N AC H IN E T Y P I S T S
NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------

182

40.0

217.00

PAYROLL CLERKS -----------------------------------

123

39.5

255.00

T Y P I S T S ----------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g -----NONMANUFACTURING

3.621
1.451
2.170

39.0
40.0
38.5

T Y P I S T S . CLASS A MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING

1.092
4B6
606

39. 5 200.50
40. 0 219.50
39.0 185.50

T Y P I S T S . CLASS B
MANUFACTURING —

2.485
965

39. 0 164.00
40. 0 187.00

2.194
402
1.792
162

39.0
40. 0
39.0
40.0

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS -

o

$
173.00

WOMEN

SECRET ARIE S ---------------------------------------------------------- 2 0 . 4 0 5
8.100
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------- 1 2 . 3 0 5
1.473
PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

39.5
40.0
39.5
39. 0

248.00
254.00
243.50
273.50

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS A -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

958
461
497
117

39.5
40.0
39. 0
40. 0

294.50
291.50
297.50
347.00

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS B -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

3.055
1.707
1.348
300

39. 5 278.00
40. 0 284.00
39.0 270.50
4 0.0 303.00

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS C -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

6.425
3.252
3.173
319

39.5
40.0
39. 5
40.0

250.00
254.50
245.00
268.00

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS 0 -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

5 . 6 32
1.825
3 . 807
455

39. 5
39.5
39. 5
39. 0

232.00
236.50
230.50
256.50

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS E -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

2.732
855
1.877

39.5
39.5
39.5

204.00
210.50
201.00

STENOGRAPHERS ----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

1.733
813
920
270

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5

225.00
241.00
211.00
242.50

CONTINUED

ORDER CLERKS -

561
234

STENOGRAPHERS. SENIOR
MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------

207.50
205.50
208.00
234.00

39.5 242.00
40. 0 260.00
39.0 215.00
38.5 188.00
38. 0 181.00
176.50
197.50
162.00

161.50
176.50
158.00
244.50

F I L E CL ERK S. CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING ------

334
321

F I L E CL ERK S. CLASS B
NONMANUFACTURING ------

7 20
614

39.0
38.5

F I L E CL ERK S. CLASS C
MANUFACTURING -------------NONMANUFACTURING ------

1.035
258
777

messengers:
m anu factur in g

165.50
162.00

39.0 136.00
40. 0 170.50
39. 0 124.50

39.5

150.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS ------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

1.927
330
1.597

38. 5 1 78 .0 0
40.0 214.50
38. 5 170.50

SWITCHBOARD O P E R A T O R - R E C E P TI O N IS T S MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

2.116
8 39
1.277

39. 5 173 .0 0
40. 0 177.50
39. 0 170.50

ORDER CLERKS -----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NON MA NU FAC TUR IN G-------------------------------------

1.972
1.232
740

40.0
40.0
40.0

ORDER CL ERK S. CLASS A --------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------

499
498

193.50
185.00
208.50

40. 0 187 .0 0
40. 0 1 86 .5 0

1.472
734
738

40. 0 196.00
40. 0 183.50
40.0 208.00

11.326
3.221
8.105

ACCOUNTING CLERKS —
MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUF ACTURIN6

39. 5 198.50
40. 0 202.00
39. 5 197.50
214.00
218.50
211.50
261.50

ACCOUNTING CL ERK S. C
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S

4*990
1.811
3.179
296

39.5
40.0
39. 5
40.0

ACCOUNTING CLERK S. C
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING —

6 . 281
1.410
4.871

39. 5 185.50
40.0 180.00
39. 5 187.00

OPERATORS --------NONMANUFACTURING

281
210

40.0
40.0

281

MACHINE B IL LE R S

205.50
220.00
194.00

279

40.0

193.50

MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

1.587
681
9 06
149

39. 5
40.0
39. 5
39. 5

216.50
205.50
224.50
278.00

MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING

6*887
1.831
5.056

39.5
40.0
39.5

197.00
211.00
192.00

CLASS A ---------

2.617
849
1.768
123

39. 5
40. 0
39.0
39. 5

214.00
226.00
208.50
239.50

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS. CLASS B --------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

4,090
982
3.108

39. 5 183.00
40.0 198.00
39. 5 178.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U S I N E S S ) --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------

1.907
736
1.171
124

39.5 415.50
39.5 436.00
39.5 402.50
40. 0 464.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS A ---------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------

930
376
554

39.5 455.00
39. 5 486.50
39. 5 433.00

B IL LE R S

39. 0 1 95 .5 0
39. 0 192.00

8

Weekly
earning.*
(standard)

CONTINUED

ORDER CLE R KS . CLASS B
MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------

BILLING-MACHINE
F I L E CLERKS -----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING —
P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S

S ee footn otes at end o f tables.




39. 5
40. 0
39.5
39.5

&

40.0

o

152

STENOGRAPHERS, g e n e r a l
MANUFACTURING ------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S ------

Weekly
houia

o

MANUFACTURING ------------------------------

STENOGRAPHERS -

S e x , 3 occupation, and i n d u s tr y d iv i si o n

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

■
P
O

messengers:

verage

Averase
(mean2)

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS.
MANUFACTURING ----------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S

PROFESSIONAL AND TE C H N I C A L
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

Table A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex,
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
S e x , 1 occupation, and i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

Weekly
hour*1
standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

Sex, 3 occupation, and i nd us tr y div is ion

Number
of
workers

Weekly
hours
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U S I N E S S ) - CONTINUED

DRAFTERS ----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

I t 786
1.060
726
153

40.0
40.0
40. 0
40. 0

288.50
247.50
348.00
339.50

DRAFTERS. CLASS A ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

755
390
365

4 0.0 347.00
40. 0 300.00
40. 0 397.50

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) , CLASS B -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

761
301
A 60
67

34. 5
40.0
39. 5
40. 0

388.50
400.50
380.50
457.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS C ------------------------------

146

39.5

288.50

564
345
219

40. 0 277.00
40.0 238.00
40. 0 339.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

DRAFTERS. CLASS B ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

1.887
652
1.235
175

39.5
40. 0
39. 5
40. 0

339.00
357.50
329.50
387.00

DRAFTERS. CLASS C ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

361
263

40.0 208.00
40. 0 191.50

DRAFTER-TRACERS ------------------------------------------

106

40.0

ELECTRONICS T EC H NI CI AN S --------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

4f 299
1.906

40. 0 324.50
40.0 290.50

ELECTRONICS T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS A MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

I f 754
1.014

40.0
40.0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CLASS A ------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

882
198
684
76

40. 0 396.00
40.0 400.50
39. 5 390.50

39.5
40. 0
39.5
40.0

324.00
333.00
321.50
373.50

341
108
233

39. 5 267.50
40. 0 265.00
39. 5 268.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

2 . 386
754
1.632

39. 5 239.50
40. 0 248.50
39. 5 235.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

643
214
429

39.5
40.0
39.0

288.50
303.00
281.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

1.165
409

39.5
40.0

230.50
237.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS C -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

tec h n ic ia n s

,

class

546
131
415

39. 5 197.50
40. 0 195.00
3 9. 5 198.00

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) - CONTINUED

271
259

256.50

40.0 220.00
40. 0 219.00

PROFESSIONAL AND TEC HNI CAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS At
MANUFACTURING ------------------------COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS B ---------MANUFACTURING ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------

9

297.50

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

775
392
383

39.0
40.0
38.5

326.00
337.00
315.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CLASS A -----------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------------

230
131

39.0
38.0

380.50
372.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------------

329
201

39.5
40.0

325.50
339.00

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CLASS C ------------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

216
124

39.0
38.5

269.00
265.50

219

40. 0 255.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS B :
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

136

40. 0 259.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS C -----------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

193
159

39. 5 193.50
39.5 189.00

96
87

39.5
39.5

202.00
198.00

473
291

40.0
40.0

254.00
227.00

CLASS A -------------------------------------

128

40.0

310.50

DRAFTERS. CLASS B ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

633

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B US IN E S S ):
MANUFACTURING -------------------------

39.0

DRAFTERS ----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

351.00
329.50

91

COMPUTER DATA LIBRAR IAN S ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

207.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . CLASS C ------------------------------

238
152

40.0
40.0

242.50
226.50

REGISTERED IN DU S TR IA L NURSES -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

278
208
70

39.5 311.00
40.0 315.00
39. 0 299.50

computer

operators

$

:

:

MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




b

ELE CTRONICS T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS C MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CLASS C ------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

Weekly
hours1
(standard)

MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------electronics

O
o

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

664
346
318

S e x , 1 occupation, and i nd us tr y divi si on

Number
of
workers

PROFESSIONAL AND TEC HNI CAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN— CONTINUED

PROFESSIONAL AND TEC HNI CAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

AND T EC H NI CA L
MEN— CONTINUED

Average
(mean2)

Average
(mean2)

Avenge
(mean2)
Number
of
workers

195

79

247
74
173

39.5

389.00

DR AFTERS.

39. 5 467.50

3 9.5 360.50
39.5 353.50
39. 5 363.50

Table A-4. Hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant workers in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978
Hourly earnings

N u m ber o f w o rk ers re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e h ourly earnings of—
S

Occupation and ind us try divi si on
workers

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

%

*

s

3 .4 0

Number

3 .6 3

3 .8 0

4 .2 0

3 .8 0

4 .2 0

4 .6 0

"5 ------------- s
8 .6 0 9 . 0 0

*

*

*

s

s

%

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

0 .0 0

9 . 40

~ i--------------- 5--------------- r

S

9 . 40

------------ r -------------- *“ ------------! ----------

0 . 8 0 1 0 . 2 0 1 0 . 6011

.

0011.

9 . 8 0 1 0 . 2 0 1 0 . 6 0 1 1 . 0011

.

4011. 801 2 - ?

*

0 1 1 .8 0

and
under
3 .6 0

ALL

1 --------------- i --------------- i ------------- %
4 .6 0 5 .0 0 5 . * 0 5 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

29
25
4

1*
10
4

14
10
4

19
10
9

58
19
30

45
33
12

48
47
1

78
61
17

77
67
10

69
47
22

7
4
3

101

_

270
126
144

1 32
103
20
20

113
27
86
30

207
186
21
21

2

11
11

2

158
49
100

°

WORKERS
$

$

$

$

•MAINTENANCE C A R P E N T E R S --------------------------------• M A N U F A CT UR IN G-------------------------------------------------NONfMANUF A C T U R I N 6 -----------------------------------------

■>03
356
237

8. 0 *
7 .7 5
8 .4 8

8 . 15
8 .0 9
8 .9 9

7 . 0 77 . 0 86 . 99-

8 .9 9
8 .5 2
9 . 47

•MAINTENANCE E L E C T R I C I A N S --------------------------• MA N U F A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NONtMANUF A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

1 .6 7 0
1 .2 7 1
399
109

8 .5 0
8 .5 6
8 .7 0
0. 1*

8 . *0
8 .2 7
8 .8 3
9 .6 4

7 . 8 27 . 8 28 . 15 7 . 94 -

0. *5
0 .1 2
9. 4 7
0. 6 *

•MAINTENANCE P A I N T E R S -------------------------------------• MA N U F A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TUR IN G -----------------------------------------

580
361
210

7 .9 5
7 .6 0
8 . 39

8 .1 5
7 .8 3
0 . 37

6 . 67 6 . 477 . 20 -

MA IN TEN A N C E

M A C H I N I S T S --------------------------------m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------------------------------------------------

853
630

8 .2 7
7 .0 3

8 .0 7
7 .5 0

MA IN TEN A N C E M ECH AN IC S < MA C H IN E R Y ! MA NUF AC TU RIN G ------------------------------------------------NONMAN UFA CT UR ING -----------------------------------------

* .1 2 3
3 .3 0 0
72*

7 .6 8
7 . *0
8 .5 8

7 .6 5
7 .5 7
8 .8 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

_

_

_

-

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*7
18
20

83
82
1

21
15
6

53
40
4

160
127
42
27

256
231
25
1

221
221

-

0. *7
8 . 82
0 . 50

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

“

“

45
14
31

54
50
4

20
14
15

47
31
16

27
26
1

51
43
8

73
45
28

41
36
5

7 . 217 . 15 -

9. 3 9
8 . 59

-

-

-

18
18

37
37

50
50

161
161

104
104

06
66

36
36

24
23

164
36

112
48

-

-

6 . * 76 . * 78 . 58 -

8 . 78
8 .* 5
9 . 42

73
71
2

566
487
70

451
444
7

22o
200
20

320
316
13

305
368
27

521
510
11

150
116
41

537
352
185

63
61
2

6 36
306
3 30

19
10

63
63

“

~

10
4
6
6

28
12
16
9

133
28
105
75

105
46
50

201
52
140
51

33
20
13
12

273
177
06
52

125
53
72
69

293
52
241
221

134
55
79
22

199
31
168
08

225
36
189
151

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

4
4

7
7

17
17

2*
24

16
6

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

20
20

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

~

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11
11

n
u

12
11
1

50
55
4

i

8 .7 3
8 .4 8
8 .8 4
0 .1 1

8.
8.
8.
9.

MA IN TEN A N C E S H E E T - M E T A L WORKERS ------MA NUF AC TU RIN G --------------------------------------------------

58
58

8 . *1
8. * 1

8 . *5
8 .* 5

8. 228 . 22 -

8 .7 2
8 . 72

-

M AI NT ENA NC E TR A D E S HE L P E R S --------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------------------------------------

538
*33

5 .8 2
5 .6 0

5 .6 2
5 . 50

5 . 10 5 . 10 -

7 .0 4
6 .6 2

21
21

27
27

7
7

*0
20

10
18

68
67

97
85

57
57

28
13

24
22

132
00

2

TOOL ANO O I E MAKERS ----------------------------------------MA NUF AC TU RIN G --------------------------------------------------

1 .8 1 8
1 .8 1 8

8 .6 5
8 .6 5

8 . 65
8 .6 5

8. 068 . 06-

0 . 10
0 . 10

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

143
143

133
133

317
317

300
300

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G IN E E R S --------------------------------------MA NUF AC TU RIN G -------------------------------------------------NONMA NU FAC TUR ING -----------------------------------------

828
512
316

8 . 86
8 .8 3
8 .9 1

0 . *7
0 . 22
0 . *7

7. 907 . 00 8 . 33 -

9 . 70
0 .7 0
9 .8 8

-

22
6
16

17

122
103
19

9

17

50
51
8

2*
22
2

7.
7.
7.
8.

00 - 9 . 88
88 - 9 . 4 7
05- o . o o
58 - 1 0 .3 3

-

_

-

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

7

-

-

See footnotes at end o f tables.

10

-

-

-

i

8

-

-

-

“

“

Q

9

-

-

-

2
2

23
23

-

2 . 12 *
666
1 . * 58
1 .0 2 5




-

-

MA IN T EN A N C E MECH AN ICS
(MOTOR V E H I C L E S ) ----------------------------------------------MA NUF AC TU RIN G ------------------------------------------------NONMA NU FAC TUR ING ----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

84
18
84
38

101

-

-

66
66

12

8
8

12
12

“

“

-

3
3

-

-

-

“

“

”

_

-

43
*3

8
8

*

328
100
2 28
222

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

'
6
-

31

_

-

6
6

31
31

-

-

3
3

-

-

-

“

“

“

-

~

-

-

-

~

~

“

298
298

350
350

9
9

244
244

80
58
31

58
40
18

252
160
02

138
43
05

-

-

~

“

-

15
15

-

-

“

~

-

28
28

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

Table A-5. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978
Hourly earnings *

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s of—
%

of
workers

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

%

2 .8 0

*
3 .0 0

s
3 .2 0

%

2 .6 3

3 .4 0

S
3 .6 3

*----------- 5
3 .8 0 4 .2 0

4
4 .6 0

s
5 .0 0

2 .8 0

Occup atio n and i n d u s tr y d iv i si o n

3 .0 0

3 . 20

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 . 83

4 .2 0

4 .6 0

5 .0 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

11
11
”

61
61
-

-

67
28
39
-

58

-

240
75
165
6

260
152
108
6

294
104
1 90

7 58
106
652
368

483
346
137
9

-

39
39

58
58

64
19
45

89
46
43

66
65
1

110
71
39

35
32
3

-

146
26
120

146
8l
65

39
39
”

76
35
41

25
25

18 9

i

-----------s ----------- i ----------- $
5 .4 0 5 .80 6 .2 0
6 .6 0

S
7 .0 0

*
7 .4 0

S
7 . 83

t
8 .2 0

%

8 . 60

“t --------1 ------------f
*
9 .0 0 9 .4 0 9 .8 0 1 0 .2 0

and
under
6 .6 0

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

9 .0 0

9 .4 0

9 .8 0 1 0 .2 0 1 0 .6 0

725 1 9 1 9
2 15
313
412 1 70 4
8
24

132 0
303
101 7
11

866
168
698
57

121 5
306
909
55

974
553
421
141

638
52
586
208

963
72
888
2 72

2549
254 9
873

218 3
118
2065
2 06 5

23
23
-

-

143
103
40

24
17
7

162
8
154

42
i
41

-

214
214

-

744
74 4

-

-

-

-

-

-

9
6
3

-

-

-

172
70
102

297
132
165

1483
102
138 1

801
116
685

592
153
439

906
49
857

307
30
277

8
8

75
47
28

65
-

320
-

_
-

_
-

65

320

-

-

350

219
205

3
3

6
6

-

-

234
138

8

-

210
206

7
7

24
-

249
118

23
23

330
330

-

-

-

-

4

96

8

50
24
26
17

346
174
1 72

~

264
57
207
4

-

219
1
218
26

61
13
48
48

373
328
45
45

200
28
172
16

7 48
IB
7 30
272

6 .2 0

ALL WORKERS
TRUCKDRIVERS -------------------------------------------------------- 1 6 . 0 3 9
3* ft 30
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------- 1 2 . 6 0 9
A . 103
PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

$
7 .6 5
7 .1 2
7 . RO
8 . BO

$
7 .7 0
7 . 22
8 .1 6
9 . 50

$
6. 545 .7 2 6 .5 4 8 .6 0 -

$
9.
7.
9.
9.

TRUCKDRIVERS* L I G H T TRUCK ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

1 . R71
429
1 .4 4 2

7 .1 0
4 .9 9
7 .7 3

B . 22
5 . 20
9 . 12

5. 354 .5 0 6 .6 0 -

9 . 12
5 . 83
9 .12

-

11

-

11

61
61
“

TR UCK D R IVE RS . MEDIUM TRUCK -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

5 * A61
908
4 .5 5 3

6 .9 4
6 .2 5
7 . 08

6 . 95
6 . 35
6 . 95

6. 545. 506 .5 4 -

7 .70
7 . 26
7 . 70

-

-

“

-

28
28

T R UC KD RIV ERS . HEAVY TRUCK ----------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING:
P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

1 .9 07
1.D 9 1

7 . 42
8 .2 4

7 .71
B.oo

5 . 2 5 - 9 . 54
7 .7 0 -1 0 .4 1

-

-

-

-

-

“

”

~

30
30

613

6 . 79

5 . 25

5 .2 5 -

9 . 25

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

350

-

T R UC KD RIV ERS . T R A C T O R -T R A I L E R ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

5 .6 4 3
787
4 .8 56
1 .7 5 0

8 .5 1
7 .6 9
8 .6 4
9 . 26

9.
7.
9.
9.

08
SI
14
65

7 .8 5 6 .7 88 .6 0 9. 0 0-

9 . 30
7 . 93
9 . 54
9 .66

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

222

“

“

“

”

“

“
"

57
39
18

SHIPPERS -----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

798
614

5 .6 6
5 . 56

5 . 74
5 . 50

4 .8 24 .6 0-

6 . 35
6 . 15

-

-

-

-

75
73

104
62

63
56

82
66

183
134

24
18

75
34

58
55

25
25

16
-

_

_

-

47
45

_

-

32
32

-

-

-

RECEIVERS --------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

1 .2 6 8
523
745

6 .0 5
5 . 37
6 .5 3

6 .0 0
5 .1 0
6 . 64

4 .8 1 4 .3 0 5 .3 3-

7. 65
6 . 16
7 . 65

-

-

4
4

121
109
12

69
26
43

llfl
72
46

138
59
79

99
63
36

113
30
83

34
16
18

78
22
56

14
14

3 21
47
274

36
-

_

36

61
21
40

SHIPPERS ANO RECEIVERS -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

1 .2 23
931
292

6 .3 2
6 .4 0
6 . 38

6 . 17
6 . 46
5 . 33

5 .1 0 5 .1 9 5 .1 0 -

7 . 54
7 . 54
6 . 89

-

29
29
~

12
2
10

50
50
~

61
30
31

269
158
111

97
37
60

136
136

70
60
10

38
36
2

273
273

“

58
56
2

18
18
-

26
22
4

WAREHOUSEMEN -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

7 .B 2 7
2 . 512
5 . 315

5 . RO
5 . 27
6 . 05

5 .7 0
5 .2 3
6 . 20

4 .0 0 4 .0 0 4 .1 8 -

7 . 28
6 . 78
7 . 28

348
273
75

27 9
122
157

638
334
304

713
223
490

285
95
190

7 32
29
703

109
57
52

1381
315
106 6

1 82
125
57

91
91

91
-

ORDER F I L L E R S ----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

1 .3 9 3
502

4 . 69
4 . 46

4 . 11
4 . 38

3 .5 1 3. 55-

5 . 06
5. 03

18
10

6
-

S H IP P IN G PACKERS --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

3 . 028
2 .5 1 4

4 .1 5
3 . 69

3 . BO
3 . 55

3 .0 0 2 .9 5 -

MA TERIAL HANDLING LABORERS -------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

7 .1 71
3 .4 0 2
3 .7 69
1 .7 32

4 .7 1
3 . 80
5 . 53
6 .1 5

4 .0 0
3 . 44
4 . 84
4 .0 0

F O R K L I F T OPERATORS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

4 .1 4 1
2 .8 46
1 .2 95

6 .5 4
6 .3 0
7 .7 1

6 . 24
5 . 37
8 . 30

12
93
14
55

~

“

-

”

-

222
~

~
~

“

7
7

30
27
3

17
9
8

-

-

-

-

28
28

56
56

43
12
31

416
40
376

389
185
204

2 28 1 0 16
153
323
75
693

-

8

“

~

79
35

174
35

143
74

166
58

134
41

58
52

252
78

53
53

15
15

10
10

130
10

11
11

20
20

4. 46
4 . 38

482
482

206
206

3 20
311

177
175

121
117

166
166

2 59
252

575
572

211
85

19
15

11
4

49
48

14
14

7
7

411
60

3 .2 5 2 .9 0 3. 403 .2 5 -

5.
4.
8.
9.

63
47
00
54

272
234
38

1 003
9 12
91
“

455
364
91
”

782
172
610
585

417
167
250
210

420
117
303
60

560
305
2 55
45

833
5 94
239
30

292
129
163

161
104
57
_

2 45
39
206

184
50
134

18
16
2
2

6
5
i
-

7
5
2
-

212
58
154

~

489
125
364
3

5 .0 0 4 .9 2 6 .3 4-

8. 14
7 .69
8. 97

-

_

-

6
6

94
94

47
47

141
141

272
209
72

4 45
445

703
662
41

109
14
95

185
149
36

365
1 92
173

77
69
8

82
60
22

221
212
9

462
321
141

-

-

*

“

See footnotes at end o f ta b les.




58

1
1

”

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

24

131

-

-

1716

1282

_

105
105

-

-

1716 128 2
40 1 28 2

-

-

-

-

14
14

_

_

-

-

6
6
-

_
-

_
-

-

2
2
-

-

-

78
24
54

8
8

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

180
-

2
-

-

_
-

91

623
51
5 69

-

110

_

3

-

180

2

-

_

_

_

-

-

_

-

-

435
435
-

-

-

_
138
6
132
120
102
102

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

_
_

_
_
-

_
_
_

_
_

"

-

-

-

576
74
502

10
10

677
677
677
244
160
84

Table A-5. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued




12

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, material movement
and custodial workers, by sex, in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
S ex, 3 occupation, and indu stry division

Number
of

Average
( mean2 )
hourly
earnings 4

Sex,

occupation, and industry d ivis ion

Number
of
workers

A verage
(m e an 2 )
hourly
earnings4

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODI »L
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

MA INT EN ANC E. TOOLROOM. AND
POWERPLANT OCCUPATIONS - MEN

Sex, 3 occupation, and in du stry d ivis ion

Number
of
workers

Average
(m ean 2 )
hourly
earnings4

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTOOIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
$

MAINTENANCE CARPENTERS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

587
3 56
231

8 .05
7 .7 5
8 .51

MAINTENANCE E L E C T R I C I A N S -----------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

1 .6 5 9
1 .2 71
388
98

8 .6 0
8 .5 6
8 .7 3
9 .31

MAINTENANCE P AI N TE R S ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

578
360
218

7 .9 6
7 .6 9
8 .4 0

MAINTENANCE MA CH IN IS TS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------

853
630

8 .2 7
7 .9 3

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY! MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

4*097
3 .3 9 9
698

7 .6 8
7 .4 9
8 .61

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
(MOTOR V E H I C L E S ) -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

2*040
666
1* 3 7 4
946

8 .7 0
8 .4 8
8 .81
9 .0 8

MAINTENANCE S H E E T -M E T A L WORKERS -----MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

58
58

MAINTENANCE TRADES HELPERS ------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

537
033

5 .8 2
5 .6 9

TOOL AND D IE MAKERS ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

1 .8 0 0
1 .8 0 0

8 .6 6
8 .6 6

S T AT IO N AR Y ENGINEERS ---------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

828
512
316

8 .8 6
8. 83
8 .9 1

See footn otes at end o f tables




7 .6 6
7 . 10
7 .8 0
8. 81

8.10
8 .1 6
7 . 93

309

7 . 06

1 .3 0 5

6 . 22

1 .6 0 3
919

5 . 72
7 .0 0
0 .7 5

621

5 . 3?

J A N I T O R S . PORTERS. AND CLEANERS ------- 1 3 . 3 5 0
3 .6 1 3
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------9 .7 01
NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------360
PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

0 .5 9
5 . 20
0 .3 6
6 .5 1

TR UCK DRIVERS. L I G H T TRUCK -----MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

1 .7 6 5
390
1 .3 7 1

MANUFACTURING —
$
7 .0 7
NONMANUFACTURING
5 .0 0
7 . 66 POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS

TR UCK DRIVERS. MEDIUM TRUCK —
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

5 .0 12
908
0 .5 00

6 . 90
6 .2 5 guards:
MANUFACTURING
7 . 08

TR UCK DRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK ------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------nonmanufacturing:
P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

1 .9 0 6
1 .0 9 0

7 .0 2
a . po

613

6 . 79

TRUCK DR IVERS. T R A C T O R -T R A IL E R
MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S ----------------------

5 .6 00
787
0 ,8 53
1 .7 0 7

8 . 51
7 .6 9
8 .6 5
9 . 27

SHIPPERS ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

709
528

5 .7 2
5 .6 3

RECEIVERS ----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

1 .2 00
088
716

6 . 07
5 . 36
6 .5 6

1 .1 3 8
855
283

6 .0 0
6 .5 1
6 .0 7

(OTHER THAN F O R K L I F T )

AND RECEIVERS -------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------

GUARDS. CLASS A —
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING
GUAROS. CLASS b :
m anu factur in g -

WAREHOUSEMEN --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------

7 .6 0 8
2 .0 3 5
5 .2 1 3

5 . 79
5 . 27
6 .0 0

OROER F I L L E R S ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

913
367

5 . 05
0 .6 9

1 .6 0 5
1 .2 50

0 . 57
3 .8 1

MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS ---------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S -----------------------

6 .2 1 8
3 .0 5 0
3 .1 60
1 . 7 32

0 .6 7
3 .7 6
5 .5 0
6 .1 5

680

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CU STODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

SHIPPERS
WAREHOUSEMEN

S H IP P IN G PACKERS ----------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

15.880
3* 3 9 4
12.086
0 .0 03

3 .9 2 3
2 .8 1 3
1 .1 1 0

F O R K L I F T OPERATORS

CONTINUED

8 .4 1
8 . 4 1 SHIPPERS

MA TERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - HEN
TRUCKORIVERS ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

TRUCKORIVERS -

SH IP P IN G PACKERS
MANUFACTURING

89

5 .1 7

179

5 .9 1

1 .0 17
1 .2 5 8

3 .6 8
3 .5 5

guards:

MANUFACTURING
GUAROS. CLASS A
J A N I T O R S . PORTERS. AND CLEANERS ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

68

6.00

135

5 .0 6

2 .8 2 7
368
2 .0 59

0 .5 0
5 . 30
0 .3 8




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings, adjusted for employment shifts,
for selected occupational groups in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., for selected periods
O cto b er 1973

O cto b er 1974

O cto b er 1975

O cto b er 1976

to

to

to

to

to

O cto b er 1974

In du stry and occu pational group 5

O cto b er 1975

O cto b er 1976

O cto b er 1977

O cto b er 1978

O cto b e r 1977

A l l in du stries:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l ________________________________________
E le c tr o n ic data p ro c e s s in g __________________________
In du stria l nurses
S killed m aintenance tra d es__________________ _____
U n skilled plant w o rk ers

7.0
7.2
9.3
7.9
5.6

8.6
8.2
9.2
8.2
6.4

7.3
7.0
7.8
7.4
12.4

7.4
6.6
7.4
8.8
6.7

7.8
9.6
9.6
8.1
8.2

M anufacturing:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l ________________________________________
E le c tr o n ic data p ro c e s s in g _________________________
In d u stria l nurs es__________________________ ________
S k illed m aintenance tra d es__________________________
U n skilled plant w o r k e r s ____ ________________________

6.7
7.5
9.5
8.1
7.4

8.7
10.0
9.3
8.5
7.2

7.7
6.4
8.0
7.1
7.8

7.2
6.3
7.5
8.6
5.7

6.9
8.8
9.1
8.2
7.1

Nonm anufacturing:
O ffic e c l e r i c a l _______________________________________
E le c tr o n ic data p ro c e s s in g . ________ _____ _______
In d u stria l n u rses___________________ _________________
U n skilled plant w o r k e r s . ________ __ ____________

7.2
7.1
8.5
4.8

8.6
7.1
8.8
6.0

7.2
7.4
7.3
14.4

7.5
6.8
7.0
7.1

8.4
10.4
11.0
8.7

See footnotes at end of tables.

A re v is e d d e s crip tio n fo r com pu ter o p era to rs is being introduced in this a rea in
1978.
The re v is e d d es crip tio n is not co n sid ered equ iva len t to the previou s description.
T h e re fo r e , the earnings o f com pu ter o p era to rs a re not used in computing percen t in crea ses
fo r the e le c tr o n ic data p roce ssin g group.

14

Table A-8. Weekly earnings of office workers—large establishments in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
Weekly earnings
(standard)
Mtl_ .

Average
weekly
hours1

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s of—
s

S

worker*

$

%

$

%

%

%

s

%

s

%

S

s

s

*

s

%

%

%

%

110

120

1 30

140

160

180

200

220

240

2 60

280

300

3 20

340

360

3 80

400

420

440

460

110

Oc cup ati on and i n d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

120

130

140

160

180

2 00

220

240

260

2 80

300

320

340

360

380

4 00

4 20

440

460

480

-

-

6
6

8
3
5
”

107
20
87
~

108 0
374
706
29

1 755
5 22
1 23 3
113

197 5
672
1 30 3
108

2002
961
1041
102

2 01 7
992
102 5
124

2032
969
1 06 3
110

1990
101 2
978
332

1 70 5
786
9 19
120

1 04 3
431
6 12
106

348
144
204
49

144
77
67
40

1 06
56
50
11

46
30
16
11

10
10

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

58
22
36

60
32
28

59
32
27

115
85
30

45
17
28

49
18
31

33
18
15

30
17
13

-

~

41
6
35

2
2

~

13
13
“

-

2
~
2

57
28
2Q

158
37
121
4

246
76
170
7

283
190
93
11

399
2 99
100
28

367
303
68
21

396
298
98
56

2 72
170
102
64

1 31
46
85
38

59
42
17
5

65
34
31

13
13

8
8
-

-

-

100
Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

and
under

ALL WORKERS
I5 3 .0 0
2 59 .5 0
2 4 8 .5 0
2 73 .0 0

2 52 .0 0
259 .5 0
244 .0 0
2 85 .5 0

$
$
2 1 2 .0 0 -2 9 4 .0 0
2 2 3 .0 0 -2 9 5 .5 0
2 0 5 .0 0 -2 9 1 .0 0
2 3 0 .0 0 -3 0 1 .5 0

3 9 .5 3 2 0 .0 0
40. 0 3 24 .5 0
3 9. 5 3 1 5 .5 0

323 .5 0
3 28 .0 0
312 .5 0

2 8 8 .0 0 -3 5 5 .0 0
2 9 5 .0 0 -3 4 7 .0 0
2 6 8 .5 0 -3 5 5 .0 0

2 .4 5 6
1 .5 44
9 12
234

4 0.0
40. 0
39. 5
4 0.0

2 85 .0 0
2 90 .0 0
2 7 6 .0 0
3 1 0 .0 0

2 84 .0 0
2 89 .0 0
266 .5 0
3 13 .5 0

2 5 1 .0 0 -3 1 3 .5 0
2 6 3 .0 0 -3 1 3 .0 0
2 3 0 .0 0 -3 2 0 .0 0
2 9 2 .5 0 -3 3 6 .0 0

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS C ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

5 .0 86
2*88 0
2 .2 06
271

4 0.0
4 0.0
3 9.5
4 0.0

2 5 6 .0 0
2 6 1 .0 0
2 4 9 .0 0
2 6 0 .5 0

2 54 .5 0
264 .0 0
2 44 .5 0
2 60 .5 0

2 2 2 .0 0 -2 9 0 .0 0
2 30 .0 0 -2 9 5 .5 0
2 1 8 .5 0 -2 8 0 .0 0
2 2 9 .0 0 -2 9 0 .0 0

-

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS 0 ------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------P UB LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------

4*584
1 .6 63
2 .9 21
392

39. 5
4 0.0
39. 5
3 9.0

2 35 .5 0
2 38 .0 0
2 34 .0 0
2 6 0 .5 0

229 .0 0
2 34.00
225 .5 0
2 97 .5 0

2 0 0 .0 0 -2 6 8 .0 0
2 1 2 .0 0 -2 6 3 .0 0
1 9 6 .5 0 -2 7 6 .0 0
2 0 5 .0 0 -2 9 7 .5 0

-

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS E ------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

2 .1 17
710
1 .4 0 7

3 9. 5 2 0 8 .5 0
3 9. 5 2 1 1 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 0 7 .5 0

196 .5 0
2 10 .0 0
193 .5 0

1 7 3 .5 0 -2 3 0 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0 -2 3 0 .5 0
1 7 5 .5 0 -2 2 7 .0 0

-

STENOGRAPHERS -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S ----------------

1 .3 64
651
713
264

3 9.5
4 0.0
3 9.0
39. 5

2 31 .5 0
2 51 .5 0
2 13 .0 0
2 4 2 .0 0

2 34 .5 0
260 .0 0
208 .0 0
249 .0 0

1 9 5 .5 0 -2 7 4 .0 0
2 2 6 .0 0 -2 7 8 .5 0
1 7 0 .5 0 -2 5 4 .5 0
2 1 1 .5 0 -2 7 4 .0 0

-

2 18 .5 0
2 17.00
218 .5 0
249 .0 0

1 8 0 .0 0 -2 5 6 .0 0
1 9 0 .5 0 -2 4 9 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0 -2 6 1 .0 0
2 1 1 .5 0 -2 7 4 .0 0

-

SE CR ET AR IE S ----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

16.37 7
7 .0 6 1
9 . 316
1 .2 5 6

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

516
264
252

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS B ------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------N0NMANUFACTURIN6 --------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

3 9.5
4 0.0
3 9.5
39. 0

~
-

*

-

-

STENOGRAPHERS. 6ENERAL -------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

595
155
440
242

STENOGRAPHERS. SENIOR ---------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

769
496
273

3 9.5
4 0.0
3 9.0

2 4 1 .5 0
2 6 1 .5 0
2 05 .0 0

2 49 .5 0
2 71 .0 0
1 97.00

2 0 7 .0 0 -2 7 8 .5 0
2 4 0 .0 0 -2 8 5 .5 0
1 6 8 .5 0 -2 2 6 .0 0

-

218

3 9.0

1 9 5 .5 0

1 95 .0 0

1 4 9 .5 0 -2 1 5 .0 0

~

3 9.5 1 82 .0 0
4 0. 0 2 1 2 .0 0
3 9 .0 1 6 3 .5 0

1 71.00
201 .5 0
1 54.00

1 4 8 .5 0 -2 0 4 .0 0
1 7 7 .0 0 -2 5 4 .5 0
1 4 2 .5 0 -1 7 9 .0 0

“

~

“

“

”

-

5

-

13

7 56
369
387
22

821
467
354
54

730
443
2 87
27

690
483
207
68

5 72
359
2 13
18

2 13
140
73
18

129
70
59
3

6
4
2
2

~

-

-

13
“

571
193
378
40

-

-

4 06
2 24
1 82
19

14
14

5

160
114
46
”

-

i
i
“

3
3
-

52
18
34
-

320
59
261
20

72 4
177
5 47
54

818
2 94
524
38

718
385
333
30

557
275
282
28

4 94
179
315
12

546
166
380
165

263
68
195
35

63
25
38

11
11
-

12
3
9
8

2
-

-

~

-

-

“

-

4

511
93
418

3 46
135
211

179
131
48

146
54
92

127
26
101

131
28
103

50
29
21

20
11
9

“

-

-

4

568
201
367

-

-

"

31
2
29

-

”

18

78
12
66
“

156
10
146
24

129
53
76
10

198
72
126
58

147
91
56
26

155
87
68
41

272
188
84
67

181
133

3
2
1

-

19

27
3
24
19

40
6
34
”

89
10
79
24

74

77
33

30
10

9l
22
69
55

26

59
3
56
41

107
33
74
65

33
4
29
13

8
8
8

67

107
50
57

70
58
12

96
84
12

165
155
10

148
129
19

19
3
16

-

20

16

6

3 9.0
4 0.0
3 8.5

182 .0 0
205 .0 0
1 71 .0 0

1 6 8 .0 0 -2 1 4 .0 0
1 8 1 .0 0 -2 7 3 .5 0
1 6 1 .0 0 -1 8 7 .0 0

-

2 . 268
854
1 .4 14

17

-

“

1
1

38
6
32

67

55
9
46

-

4

28

42

24

37

35

6

180
3
177

530
53
4 77

445
175
270

329
182
1 47

214
132
82

89
65
24

131
89
42

71
53
18

108
97
ii

T Y P I S T S . CLASS A ----------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

818
390
428

1 99 .0 0
2 23 .5 0
1 77 .0 0

29

82
12
70

2 39
73
166

213
90
123

58
48
10

22
19
3

27
19
8

39
36
3

102
91
11

5
5

-

-

~

-

~

77

78
3
75

-

-

-

77

17

29

S ee footn otes at end o f ta b les.




18

4B

-

-

~

T Y P I S T S --------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------

-

3
2
1

-

-

3 9 .5 2 1 8 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 19 .5 0
3 9 .5 2 1 8 .0 0
3 9. 5 2 38 .0 0

TRA NS CR IB IN G- M AC H IN E T Y P I S T S

-

~

3
2
i
i

15

44

44

-

2
2
-

2
2

2
2
-

“

_
-

-

-

-

~
“

-

-

-

-

~
~
“

-

-

~

-

-

“

-

~

“

“
-

~

3
2
1

-

-

_
-

“

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

-

~

“

-

-

~

2
2
“

-

14

“
-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

~

Table A-8. Weekly earnings of office workers—large establishments in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
Weekly earnings
( standard)
Number
of
workers

Average
weekly
hours *
(standard)

N u m ber o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g stra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earning s o f*

%

S

*

*

%

*

*

S

1

*

i

t

%

S

s

%

*

i

%

s

110

120

130

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

3 20

340

360

3 80

400

4 20

440

4 60

110

Oc cupation and in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

120

130

140

160

180

20 0

220

240

260

280

300

320

3 40

360

380

4 00

420

4 40

4 60

4 80

-

77
77

78
3
75

151
3
148

4 48
41
4 07

206
102
104

116
92
24

156
84
72

52
46
6

99
70
29

17
17

~

“

-

-

6
6
“

-

“
157
157

31
31

127
127

128
10
118

289
49
2 40

116
50
66

105
33
72

40
22
18

27
11
16

69
51
18

102
16
86

72
11
61

18
18

4
4

2

-

-

2

4
4

3
3

30
30

63
63

14
14

1
1

-

5
3

47
36

18
18

-

-

“

”

7
3

1
1

35
4

74
63

14
14

-

-

-

6
6

100
Mean2

Middle range 2

Median 2

and
under

ALL UORKFRS—
CONTINUED
TYP IST S - C O N T I N U E D
$

$

$

T Y P I S T S . CLASS B ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

1 .4 06
464
942

3 9. 5 1 6 9 .5 0
4 0 . 0 2 0 2 .5 0
39. 5 1 5 3 .0 0

156 .5 0
197 .0 0
146 .5 0

1 4 2 .5 0 -1 9 5 .0 0
1 7 3 .5 0 -2 2 4 .5 0
1 3 6 .0 0 -1 6 0 .0 0

F I L E CLERKS ---------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

1 .2 87
253
1 .0 3 4

3 9.0
4 0.0
3 8.5

1 74 .0 0
2 01 .5 0
167 .0 0

1 49 .0 0
190 .0 0
1 4 4 .0 0

1 3 2 .0 0 -2 0 2 .0 0
1 6 5 .5 0 -2 5 1 .5 0
1 29 .0 0 -1 8 4 .0 0

F I L E CLERK S. CLASS A -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

189
176

3 8.5
3 8.5

2 21 .0 0
2 16 .0 0

184 .0 0
184 .0 0

1 8 2 .0 0 -2 9 1 .0 0
1 8 2 .0 0 -2 9 1 .0 0

-

4
4

-

-

F I L E CL ERK S. CLASS B -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

455
399

3 8 .5 1 81 .5 0
38 • 5 1 7 4 . 0 0

1 53 .0 0
1 49 .0 0

1 4 4 .0 0 -2 5 1 .5 0
1 44 .0 0 -1 6 8 .5 0

-

F I L E CL ERK S. CLASS C -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

597
413

39. 0 1 45 .5 0
39. 0 1 28 .5 0

1 29 .5 0
1 26 .5 0

1 0 9 .5 0 -1 5 7 .5 0
1 07 .0 0 -1 3 2 .5 0

157
157

MESSENGERS -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

7 32
211
521

39. 5 1 69 .5 0
4 0. 0 1 7 3 .0 0
3 9. 5 1 6 8 .0 0

1 61 .5 0
163 .5 0
1 61 .5 0

1 3 6 .0 0 -2 0 5 .0 0
1 3 9 .5 0 -2 0 2 .0 0
1 36 .0 0 -2 0 5 .0 0

SUITCHBOARO OPERATORS -------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

1 .2 5 5
305
950

3 8. 5 1 90 .5 0
40. 0 2 18 .5 0
3 8 .0 1 8 2 .0 0

1 73 .5 0
221 .0 0
157 .5 0

1 3 7 .5 0 -2 4 8 .5 0
1 8 2 .5 0 -2 5 8 .0 0
1 3 2 .5 0 -2 4 8 .0 0

-

SWITCHBOARD O P E R A T O R - R E C E P T I O N IS T S MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

408
120
288

3 8 .5 1 7 3 .5 0
4 0. 0 1 97 .0 0
3 8. 0 1 6 4 .0 0

1 50 .0 0
1 78 .0 0
147 .5 0

ORDER CLERKS ------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

228
202

4 0.0
4 0.0

1 9 7 .5 0
2 0 7 .0 0

ACCOUNTING CLERKS -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

4 .8 0 2
1 .4 87
3 . 315
609

39. 5
40. 0
3 9.5
4 0.0

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS A -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

2 .4 7 9
898
1 .5 81
247

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. CLASS B -------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

2 . 243
*589
1 .6 54
362

PAYROLL CLERKS -------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------------------------- ------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

685
231
454

-

8
8

65
65

1 98
198

44
36

27
27

1 19
119

59
49

88
39

42
-

33
2

19
i

15
4

24
4

8
5

28

23

28

23

63
36
27

89
17
72

1 50
48
102

114
32
82

39
21
18

164
25
139

25
10
15

25
15
10

10
7
3

1

1

23
23

143
143

167

127
46
81

100
41
59

72
37
35

50
40
10

93
40
53

224
61
163

47
12
35

-

-

-

1
1

167

204
27
177

4

-

1 3 8 .0 0 -1 9 1 .5 0
1 6 1 .0 0 -2 2 0 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0 -1 7 9 .5 0

-

36

93
10
83

69
36
33

23
18
5

17
6
11

16
6
10

6

7
7

-

6
6

-

38
18
20

6

36

83
18
65

2
2

“

12
12

1 88 .5 0
1 9 0 .0 0

1 6 5 .0 0 -2 5 0 .0 0
1 7 5 .0 0 -2 6 0 .0 0

-

14

10
”

-

32
30

32
32

61
61

9
9

6
6

8
8

52
52

4
4

-

“

2 22 .5 0
2 1 1 .5 0
2 2 7 .0 0
2 4 2 .0 0

2 07 .0 0
1 99 .0 0
2 1 4 .0 0
2 61 .0 0

1 7 5 .5 0 -2 7 1 .0 0
1 6 9 .0 0 -2 4 8 .5 0
1 8 0 .0 0 -2 8 3 .0 0
2 0 3 .0 0 -2 8 2 .5 0

-

538
221
317
39

6 87
283
4 04
33

733
232
501
73

668
197
471
58

322
132
190
25

259
64
195
65

4 08
177
231
151

407
55
352
148

389
53
336
15

39. 5
40. 0
3 9.5
3 9.5

2 3 1 .5 0
2 2 7 .5 0
2 3 3 .5 0
2 7 1 .5 0

2 14 .0 0
2 12 .0 0
214 .0 0
2 82 .5 0

1 8 7 .0 0 -2 8 0 .0 0
1 8 4 . 0 0 - 2 6 9 . OQ
1 9 2 .0 0 -2 8 9 .0 0
2 6 0 .5 0 -2 8 9 .0 0

76
15
61

“

457
173
28“
10

474
123
351
9

251
100
151
19

88
60
28
20

148
99
49
34

227
54
173
136

3 9.5
40. 0
39. 5
40. 0

2 1 0 .0 0
1 87 .5 0
2 1 8 .0 0
2 22 .0 0

1 9 6 .0 0
1 74 .0 0
2 0 3 .5 0
2 1 8 .0 0

1 5 8 .5 0 -2 6 1 .0 0
1 5 0 .5 0 -2 0 9 .5 0
1 6 3 .0 0 -2 7 6 .0 0
1 9 6 .5 0 -2 6 1 .0 0

“

3 9. 5 2 3 1 .0 0
4 0. 0 2 3 4 .0 0
3 9 .5 2 29 .5 0

2 2 0 .0 0
2 32 .5 0
2 0 8 .0 0

1 8 7 .0 0 -2 7 1 .0 0
1 9 7 .0 0 -2 7 3 .5 0
1 8 5 .0 0 -2 7 1 .0 0

“

-

“

-

“
-

“

1
1

11

106
14
92

“

-

-

”

“

1

11

11
-

-

-

1

11

-

-

16

-

-

“

-

i

1

-

-

-

-

-

~

*
462
2 06
2 56
39

3 27
113
2 14
31

27 b
59
217
63

194
74
120
49

71
32
39
6

151
4
147
45

245
78
167
117

175
1
174
12

4
4

12
1
n

72
25
47

l9 l
37
154

61
30
31

62
29
33

68
26
42

98
46
52

40
27
13

-

-

-

~

"

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

"
-

“

-

~

"

-

“

-

~

“
~

"
-

”

-

104
14
90

2

“

“

360
170
190
2

2

-

“

See footn otes at end o f tables.




-

9
7

“
“

-

-

"

-

-

”

“
-

-

“
”

-

-

-

“

“

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

“

~

“

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

~

“

~

"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

~

221
18
203
1

20
19
1
1

32
22
10

131
53
78
15

215
12
203
1

18
17
1
1

32
22
10

2 18

6

-

6
-

2
2

4

21 8
28

4
24

“

-

-

10

-

“

“

“
-

-

-

-

-

“

“

“

~

-

“

-

-

-

-

_
“

-

“

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

-

15

10

~

~

-

24
6
18

~

15

-

-

“

Table A-8. Weekly earnings of office workers—large establishments in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
""™WeekhTTarning^^^
(standard)
Number

Occu p at io n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n
woikers

Average
weekly
(standard)

Num ber o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs of—
*

*

Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

*

s

*

s

%

s

s

%

s

s

S

s

S

s

%

s

%

*

s

110

120

130

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

3 20

340

360

3 80

400

420

440

460

120

130

140

160

180

2 00

220

2 40

260

2 80

300

320

340

360

380

4 00

420

440

460

480

9

100

64

179
19
160

373
88
285
62

620
268
352
64

662
208
454
105

38 9
100
2 89
44

324
74
250
73

459
170
289
119

176
80
96
13

66
23
43

9
3
6
6

8
8

~

-

-

-

-

79
13
66
2

2 38
90
148
4

286
120
166
33

211
83
128
15

94
56
38
9

155
81
74
33

137
78
59
13

66
23
43

294
75
219
60

38 2
178
2 04
60

376

178
17
161
29

140
18
122
64

224
89
135
86

24
2
22

and
under
110

ALL UORKERS—
CONTINUED
KEY ENTRY OPERATORS -------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------N0NHANUFACTURIN6 -------------------------P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------

3 .3 38
1 .0 42
2 . 296
486

3 9.5
4 0.0
39. 5
40. 0

1 ,7 .0 ,
2 23 .0 0
214 .5 0
227 .5 0

$
2 12 .0 0
212 .0 0
211 .5 0
2 24 .5 0

$
$
1 85 .5 0 -2 5 4 .5 0
1 8 9 .0 0 -2 6 3 .5 0
1 83 .0 0 -2 5 2 .5 0
1 95 .5 0 -2 6 3 .0 0

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS. CLASS A
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------P U B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------

1 .2 9 5
553
742
115

3 9.5
40. 0
3 9.0
39. 5

2 3 0 .5 0
2 39 .0 0
2 24 .5 0
244 .5 0

222 .0 0
227 .0 0
2 14 .0 0
2 49 .0 0

1 99 .0 0 -2 6 4 .5 0
2 0 5 .0 0 -2 7 1 .0 0
1 95 .5 0 -2 5 6 .0 0
2 0 9 .0 0 -2 7 4 .0 0

2 00 .0 0
1 92 .0 0
205 .0 0
217 .0 0

1 7 5 .0 0 -2 2 9 .5 0
1 8 0 .0 0 -2 2 2 .0 0
1 7 2 .5 0 -2 2 9 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0 -2 5 4 .5 0

KEY ENTRY OPERATORS. CLASS B
MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------

1 .8 58
489
1*369
371

39.5
4 0.0
3 9.5
4 0.0

2 03 .5 0
205 .0 0
2 02 .5 0
2 22 .5 0

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

63
-

-

-

-

14

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

-

-

“

-

-

9

-

~

-

-

-

“

9

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




i

17

64
i

63

165
19
146

88
288
72

7
i

8
8

-

“

“
~

~

-

“

-

“
-

-

6
6

~
“

~

~

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

~

-

~

-

”
-

-

-

~
“
-

Table A-9. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers—large establishments
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Weekly earnings^^™
(standard)

Occupation and in d u s t r y d iv i s i o n

Number
of
workers

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s r e c e i v i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e we e k l y e a r n i n g s of—
S

s

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard]

Mean 2

Middle range 2

Median1

S

s

s

s

%

s

s

s

S

s

s

S

$

S

*

s

S

%

s

140

160

180

2 00

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

4 20

4 40

4 80

520

5 60

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

3 40

360

380

400

420

4 40

4 80

5 20

5 60

600 o ve r

2

120

12

2
“

12

33
2
31
4

63
16
47
2

58
17
41

1 59
51
108
2

114
37
77
“

171
60
111
12

179
63
1 16
10

251
88
163
17

144
66
78
9

363
147
216
38

181
90
91
28

1 29
79
50
28

50
37
13
5

34
30
4
4

_

_

2

~

2

35
1
34

27
1
26

50
3
47

84
22
62

147
42
105

73
37
36

1 89
76
113

1 19
75
44

111
76
35

49
37
12

34
30
4

22
5
17
2

36
5
31
~

93
37
56
2

65
25
40

110
51
59
12

69
35
34
6

72
44
28
6

60
28
32
6

1 14
71
43
20

52
15
37
17

18
3
15
15

1

-

1
1

”

-

-

-

-

8
8

2
2

~

8
8

2
2

~

6 00

and
under
140

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U S I N E S S ! --------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

1 .R A3
783
1 .1 6 0
159

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ! . CLASS A -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

920
400
520

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ! . CLASS B -----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------------------COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ! . CLASS C ------------------------------

$

719
319
400
91

174

$

$

4 19 .5 0
4 4 2 .5 0
4 0 4 .0 0
4 6 2 .0 0

413 .5 0
4 37 .0 0
4 04 .0 0
4 67 .0 0

3 6 5 .0 0 -4 6 9 .0 0
3 8 3 .0 0 -4 9 4 .0 0
3 5 4 .5 0 -4 5 6 .0 0
4 1 1 .5 0 -5 1 9 .0 0

3 9. 5 4 5 6 .5 0
3 9 .5 4 9 3 .0 0
3 9 .5 4 2 8 .5 0

4 48 .5 0
4 88 .5 0
4 14 .5 0

4 0 5 .5 0 -5 0 5 .5 0
4 3 3 .0 0 -5 3 9 .0 0
3 8 7 .5 0 -4 6 5 .5 0

_

3 4 7 .5 0 -4 4 1 .0 0
3 6 5 .0 0 -4 4 6 .5 0
3 3 6 .0 0 -4 3 2 .5 0
3 8 6 .0 0 -5 0 6 .5 0

_

3 9.5
3 9.5
39. 5
4 0.0

3 9.5
39. 5
39. 5
40. 0

3 9.0

3 9 5 .0 0
4 0 1 .5 0
3 90 .0 0
4 45 .5 0

3 12 .0 0

385 .5 0
400 .0 0
3 75 .0 0
4 48 .5 0

3 06 .5 0

$

“
~

-

_

_

—

*

"
_

_

-

-

2 8 9 .0 0 -3 3 7 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

3 53 .0 0
3 58 .5 0
3 45 .0 0

3 0 2 .5 0 -3 9 1 .0 0
3 1 5 .5 0 -3 9 6 .0 0
2 8 9 .0 0 -3 7 8 .0 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ! .
CLASS A -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

725
402
323

39. 5 3 96 .5 0
4 0 .0 4 0 5 .0 0
3 9 .5 3 8 5 .5 0

387 .5 0
3 95 .0 0
3 75 .0 0

3 6 0 .5 0 -4 2 3 .5 0
3 6 5 .0 0 -4 3 6 .0 0
3 5 3 .0 0 -4 0 8 .0 0

_

_

-

-

~

~

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ! .
CLASS B -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUF A C T U R I N 6 -------------------------------------

647
316
331

39. 5 3 3 9 .5 0
4 0. 0 3 4 3 .5 0
39. 5 3 35 .5 0

341 .5 0
346 .0 0
3 30 .0 0

3 0 7 .0 0 -3 6 5 .0 0
3 3 0 .0 0 -3 6 4 .0 0
3 0 2 .0 0 -3 6 9 .5 0

_

_

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ! .
CLASS C -----------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

384
175
209

39. 5 2 73 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 7 2 .5 0
3 9. 0 2 7 4 .5 0

276 .0 0
2 72 .0 0
276 .0 0

2 3 9 . 0 0 - 3 0 2 . 50
2 3 0 .0 0 -3 0 2 .5 0
2 4 8 .0 0 -3 0 2 .5 0

_

_

-

-

“

“

COMPUTER OPERATORS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --------------------------------

1 .7 0 8
652
1 .0 56
287

2 63 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 6 7 .5 0
39. 5 2 60 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 8 5 .5 0

2 63 .0 0
2 65 .0 0
2 62 .5 0
2 7 6 .0 0

2 2 1 .5 0 -3 0 1 .5 0
2 2 1 .5 0 -3 0 7 .0 0
2 2 2 .0 0 -2 9 8 .0 0
2 7 6 .0 0 -3 0 1 .5 0

-

16
16

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS A -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------------------PU8 LIC U T I L I T I E S -------------------;------------

663
284
379
84

3 9.5
4 0.0
3 9.5
4 0.0

2 91 .5 0
2 94 .0 0
2 89 .5 0
3 1 4 .0 0

2 98 .0 0
2 98 .0 0
2 98 .0 0
3 0 1 .5 0

2 5 4 .5 0 -3 2 5 .0 0
2 5 3 .5 0 -3 2 6 .5 0
2 5 5 .0 0 -3 1 9 .5 0
2 9 1 .0 0 -3 5 3 .5 0

-

-

“

“

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS B -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

111

3 9 .5 2 5 1 .0 0
4 0. 0 2 5 4 .5 0
39. 5 2 48 .5 0

2 44 .5 0
250 .5 0
243 .5 0

2 1 7 .5 0 -2 7 6 .0 0
2 1 7 .0 0 -2 8 7 .0 0
2 1 8 .0 0 -2 7 6 .0 0

-

-

■
C

_

-

”

~

3 9. 5 3 48 .5 0
4 0 . 0 3 5 7 .5 0
3 9 .5 3 3 9 .5 0

J\

_

~

“

_

1 .7 5 6
893
863

_

_

-

~

“

-

-

10
1
9

14
6
8

_

_

_

-

-

7
~
7
4

'

12

26

41

20

31

22

11

6

2

i

95
62
33

87
25
62

96
32
64

117
49
68

144
57
87

127
53
74

292
173
119

2 52
124
128

161
89
72

131
87
44

72
39
33

1 07
60
47

41
26
15

_

3
3

6

4

6

13
12
1

20
4
16

105
46
59

166
78
88

1 17
61
56

98

4

70
28

52
35
17

93
57
36

38
26
12

20
4
16

14
3
11

3
3

-

-

-

-

“

-

2

-

-

“

“

~

”

17
9
8

22
6
16

17
3
14

61
24
37

92
28
64

76
31
45

169
123
46

79
44
35

42
26
16

31
15
16

_

_

-

-

-

~

~

~

4
4

_

10
1
9

10
6
4

78
53
25

62
16
46

73
29
44

52
25
27

39
17
22

31
18
13

18
4
14

7
2
5

2
2
“

2
2
”

107
34
73
2

2 17
1 06
111
2

224
71
153
25

207
91
116
3

298
82
216
155

142
69
73
22

181
70
111
39

138
51
87
11

57
21
36
11

41
26
15
7

16
7
9
9

~

1
1

~

8
8
”

36
24
12
“

43
14
29
1

104
46
58

68
22
46
7

137
53
84
33

86
39
47
1

47
17
30
10

32
23
9
5

14
5
9
9

■ -

-

~

84
37
47
18

“

”

68
20
48

144
69
75

136
38
98

79
38
41

202
43
159

59
47
12

40
16
24

25
10
15

2
1
1

9
3
6

2
2

-

1
1

-

“

“

~

55
15
40
1
-

6
6

S e e fo o tn o te s at en d o f t a b le s .




_

_

-

~

_

_

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ! ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------

292
485

-

-

18

_
“

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

~
“

“

~

*
”

~

6
6
-

2
2

-

“

“

“

“
“

2
2
-

2
2
-

-

“
“

-

4
4

-

-

“

-

~

Table A-9. Weekly earnings of professional and technical workers—large establishments
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
N u m ber o f w o rk e rs re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly earn in gs o f—
N__
workers

*

%

120
Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

S
160

180

and
under
1 AO

s

%

%

*

S

s

s

s

%

220

2A0

2 60

280

-

-

-

-

300

3 20

S

S

S

t

S

s

S

s

s

3 AO

360

380

A00

420

4 40

A80

520

560

-

200
-

1 AO

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

and

A 00

A20

AAO

4 80

520

560

O
o
«c

Occu p at io n and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Average
weekly
hours 1
(standard)

over

“

-

-

~

-

-

600

160

180

200

220

2 AO

2 60

2 80

300

320

3A0

360

380

12
2
10

15
15

A
1
3

2
2

3
3
"

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

~

1

13
11

7

“

25
~
25
25

-

~
~

~
“

25

-

-

-

-

-

~

“

~

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
COMPUTER OPERATORS -

CONTINUED
$
3 9 . 5 21 A . 50
AO. 0 2 17 .0 0
3 9 .0 2 13 .5 0

$
215 .0 0
2 11.00
2 16.00

$
$
1 7 8 .5 0 -2 A 0 .0 0
1 8 9 .5 0 -2 3 6 .0 0
1 7 7 .0 0 -2 A3 .5 0

“

16
16

49
15
3A

31
1A
17

37
13
2A

A5
19
26

2A
7
17

84
57

39.5
3 9.5

2 0 8 .0 0
2 0 3 .0 0

2 00 .5 0
2 10 .0 0

1 6 1 .0 0 -2 5 7 .0 0
16 5 . 5 0 - 2 2 A . 00

12
12

1
1

19
7

9
6

9
8

12
12

1

DRAFTERS -----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

1 .0 0 7
749
258
216

AO. 0
AO.O
AO. 0
A O .O

2 79 .5 0
2 6 6 .5 0
3 17 .0 0
3 29 .0 0

2 82 .0 0
2 70 .0 0
3 09.00
3A3.50

2 28 .0 0 -3 2 1 .0 0
2 1 9 .5 0 -3 1 4 .0 9
2 7 A .0 0 -3 7 2 .0 0
2 8 9 .0 0 -3 8 5 .5 0

2
2

18
18
-

25
21
4
2

75
75
-

83
75
8
4

107
79
28
23

67
53
1A
10

106
92
1A
1

156
99
57
50

82
76
6
5

9A
81
13
9

81
4ft
33
33

42
24
18
18

25
8
17
17

19

DR AF TE R S. CLASS A -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

445
351

A O .O
AO.O

3 13 .5 0
3 0 1 .5 0

3 11.00
3 OA .O 0

2 8 0 . 0 0 “ 3 A A . 50
2 76 .0 0 -3 2 1 .0 0

-

-

-

_

1A
10

17
11

30
27

AS
A5

81
7A

59
58

66
62

49
AO

20
16

17
a

19
“

2 3 0 .0 0 -3 0 9 .0 0
2 1 9 .0 0 -3 0 0 .0 0

-

25
20

AA
3A

68
20

21
18

27
19

12
8

22
8

8
-

-

-

A8

3

8

4

14

6
4

2

1

20

_

-

-

COMPUTER OPERATORS. CLASS C -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

238
78
162

COMPUTER DATA LI B R A R IA N S ------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

OR AFT ER S. CLASS B -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------n o n m anufactur in g:
PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

318
209

D R AFT ERS . CLASS C -------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------no n m a nufa c tur in g:
PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

171
118

EL EC TR ON ICS T E C H N I C IA N S --------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------N0NMANUFACTURIN6 --------------------------------------

5 .0 1 0
1 .8 52
3*158

ELE C TR ON IC S T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS A MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

1 .6 1 6
1 .0 12

AO.O
AO.O

ELE C TR ON IC S T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS B MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

3 .0 92
567

CLASS C -

REG ISTERED I N D U S TR I A L NURSES --------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

2 75 .5 0
2 6 1 .0 0

2 78.50
26A.OO
289 .0 0

2 89 .0 0 -3 5 2 .0 0

-

225 .0 0
2 10.00

1 9 9 .0 0 -2 5 6 .5 0
1 9 3 .0 0 -2 3 5 .5 0

“

O

2 85 .0 0

27A.00

2 2 5 .0 0 -3 A8 .0 0

A O .O
AO.O
AO.O

3 31 .0 0
2 9 3 .0 0
3 53 .5 0

3 58.00
3 03.00
363 .5 0

3 0 0 .5 0 -3 6 7 .0 0
2A 5 . 0 0 — 3 A 1 . 0 0
3 5 8 .0 0 -3 7 3 .0 0

3 5 0 .0 0
3 27 .0 0

352 .5 0
33A.00

4 0.0
AO.O

3 31 .0 0
2 6 3 .0 0

296

AO.O

277
207
70

39.5
AO.O
39.0

o

O

3 1 0 .0 0
2 35 .5 0
2 1 5 .0 0

51

-

2
~

AO.O
A O .O

93

o

ELE C TR ON IC S T E C H N I C I A N S .

A O .O
AO.O

“

-

2

i
i

13
11

-

-

-

_

-

2
2

3 2 1 .0 0 -3 8 3 .0 0
3 08 .0 0 -3 5 2 .5 0

-

-

358 .0 0
265 .5 0

3 0 6 .0 0 -3 6 7 .0 0
2 21 .0 0 -2 9 9 .0 0

-

2 31 .5 0

227 .0 0

2 1 0 .0 0 —2A9 .5 0

-

-

3 13 .0 0
3 18 .0 0
2 99 .5 0

307 .5 0
3 10.00
292 .0 0

2 85 .0 0 -3 3 6 .0 0
2 9 0 .0 0 “ 3A 3 .0 0
2 76 .0 0 -3 3 6 .0 0

-

-

-

31
31

-

-

36
36

26
22

29
22
5

1

A3
28

10
4

13
12

-

”

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

”

-

-

4

15

6

1

2

2

1

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

209
76
133

186
1 76
10

165
150
15

175
165
10

2 63
139
12A

2A2
195
A7

252
185
67

3A 0
279
61

1385
356
1029

117 6
99
1 07 7

5 30
1A
516

46
4
A2

31
4
27

8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

33
33

5A
52

26
25

85
8A

117
116

2A 3
2 36

3 AO
339

10 A
97

5 30
14

A6
4

2A

132
67

95
A3

-

~

6
4

-

171
38

97
95

69
63

61
59

2 10
89

136
90

2

38

83

63

60

27

21

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
3
3

12
5
7

37
27
10

53
3A
19

58
53
5

49
30
19

37
31
6

6
6
-

7
6
i

19

~

8

“
-

-

-

-

-

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




29
29

19
19

-

1 OA A 1071
17
2

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

8
8

~

“

-

6
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

10
10
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

Table A-10. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sexlarge establishments in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Average
(mean*)

HEN

4 0.0

A C C O U N T IN G C L E R K S . C L A S S A :
M A NU F A C TU RI NG -----------------------------------

2 0 8 .0 0

o

A C C O U N T IN G C L E R K S :
M A NU F A C TU RI NG -----------------------------------

1o c c u p a t i o n ,

:
M A N U F A C T U R IN G

O C C U P A T IO N S

-

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

Sex ,

3oc c u p a ti o n ,

a nd i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Weekly
hourt
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

1 .5 31
4 87

3 9.5
4 0 .0

$
2 0 0 .0 0
2 0 5 .0 0

1 .3 8 0
6 42
7 38
118

4 2 9 .0 0
4 5 0 .5 0
3 9 . 5 4 1 0 .0 0
4 0 . 0 4 7 5 .0 0

COMPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S A ------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ------------------------------

6 78
347

4 6 3 .0 0
4 9 4 .5 0

COMPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S B ------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G -----------------------------N ON MA NU FAC TUR IN G --------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

550
2 63
2 87
67

3 9 .5 4 0 0 .5 0
40. 0 4 0 5 .5 0
3 9 5 .5 0
4 5 7 .0 0

O FFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— C O N T I N U E D

-

$
2 1 2 .5 0

39.0
4 0.0
38.5

2 01 .5 0
2 2 3 .5 0
1 77 .5 0

40.0

------------------------------------------------

2 0 3 .0 0

KEY EN TR Y

O PE RA T O RS -

-

C ONTINUED

KEY EN TR Y O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S B
MA NU F A C TU RI NG --------------------------------------

2 2 9 .0 0

WOMEN

T Y P I S T S . C L A S S A ------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G -----------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------------------------------------

15.328
6 .P 7 0
8 .3 5 8
1 .2 33

3 9.5
4 0.0
39. 5
3 9.0

S E C R E T A R I E S . CLASS A —
M A NU F A C TU RI NG -------------------NO NMA N UF A CT UR IN G ------------

402
264
228

S E C R E T A R I E S . C L AS S B —
M A N UF A C T UR IN G -------------------n o n m an u fa ctu r in g :
PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S —

2 . 248
1 . 5 35

4 0.0
4 0.0

2 9 0 .0 0
2 9 0 .5 0

2 34

4 0.0

3 10 .0 0

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS C —
M A NU F A C TU R IN G -------------------NO NMA N UF A CT UR IN G ----------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S —

4 .7 53
2 . 820
1 .0 2 4
265

2 5 9 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 6 1 .5 0
3 9 . 5 2 5 5 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 5 9 .5 0

S E C R E T A R I E S . C L A S S 0 -■
M A N UF A C T UR IN G -------------------NONMANUF A C T U R I N G -----------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S —

4 .1 54
1 .6 54
2 .5 00
386

3 9.5
4 0.0
39. 5
3 9.0

2 5 6 .5 0
2 6 0 .0 0
2 5 3 .5 0
2 7 3 .5 0

3 9 .5 3 2 2 .0 0
4 0 .0 3 2 4 .5 0
3 9 . 5 3 19 .5 0

o

o

2 4 0 .5 0
2 3 8 .0 0
2 4 2 .0 0
2 6 1 .5 0

S E C R E T A R IE S . CLASS E —
M A NU F A C TU R IN G -------------------N ON HA N U FA C T U R IN G ------------

2 .0 78
688
1 .3 00

3 9.5
3 9.5
3 9.5

2 0 8 .5 0
2 1 2 .5 0
2 0 6 .5 0

S TE NO GRA PHE RS ---------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------N ON MA NU FAC TUR IN G -----------PUB LIC U T I L I T I E S —

1 .3 3 3
641
602
251

3 9.5
4 0.0
39. 0
3 9.5

2 3 1 .5 0
2 5 2 .5 0
2 1 2 .5 0
2 4 0 .0 0

stenographers

, general
M A NU F A C TU R IN G -------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S —

567
146
421

220

39. 5
4 0.0
39. 5
39. 5

2 1 8 .0 0
2 2 2 .5 0
2 1 6 .5 0
2 3 5 .0 0

S T E N O G R A P H E R S . S EN IO R
M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G ------------

766
405
271

3 9 .5 2 4 1 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 6 1 .5 0
3 9. 0 2 0 5 .5 0

FILE

CLERKS.

747
385
362

B:
------------------------------------------------

F I L E C L ER K S -------------------------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------------------------------------

S E C R E T A R I E S ---------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G -----------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S —

C L AS S

.057
833

3 9 .0 1 73 .5 0
38. 5 164 .5 0
3 8.5

A -------------------------------

2 1 8 .0 0

F I L E C L E R K S . C L A S S B ------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------------------------------------

385
330

3 8 .5 1 83 .0 0
38i 5 174 .5 0

F I L E C L E R K S . C L AS S C ------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------------------------------------

481
325

3 9.0 1 45 .5 0
38. 5 125 .0 0

SW ITC HB OA RD OPERATO RS ---------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G -----------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------------------------------------

.1 4 9
296
853

SW ITC HB OA RO O P E R A T O R - R E C E P T I O N I S T S
M A N U F A C T U R IN G -----------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ----------------------------------------

382
120
262

3 8 .5 1 69 .0 0
4 0 .0 1 97 .0 0
38. 0 1 56 .5 0

211
185

P R O F E S S IO N A L AND T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - HEN

OMPUTER SY S T EM S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) -------------------------------------MA NU F A C TU RI NG -----------------------NO NMA N U FA CT U RI N G --------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------

40. 0 1 9 2 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 02 .0 0

ORDER C L ER K S ----------------------------------------------------------M A NU F A C TU RI NG ------------------------------------------------

3 8.0
40.0
37.5

1 9 3 .5 0
2 19 .5 0
1 84 .5 0

A C C O U N TI N G C L ER K S --------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G -----------------------------------------------NO NMA N U FA CT U R IN G ---------------------------------------

3 9.5
40.0
3 9.5

2 2 2 .0 0
2 12 .0 0
2 27 .5 0

A C C O U N T IN G C L E R K S . C L A S S A ------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G ----------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G --------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

3 9.5
40.0
3 9.5
3 9.5

2 32 .0 0
2 27 .0 0
2 3 5 .0 0
2 7 1 .5 0

A C C O U N T IN G C L E R K S . C L A S S B ------------MA N U F A C T U R IN G ----------------------------------------------N ON MA N U FA C TU RI N G ---------------------------------------

3 9.5
40.0
3 9.5

2 0 9 .5 0
1 89 .5 0
2 17 .5 0

P A YR OL L C L E R K S ----------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G ----------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ---------------------------------------

3 9.5 2 2 7 .5 0
4 0 .0 2 34 .0 0
39. 5 2 2 4 .5 0

KEY E N T R Y OP ER ATO R S --------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G ----------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ---------------------------------------

39. 5 2 17 .0 0
4 0 .0 2 23 .0 0
39. 5 2 14 .0 0

KEY E N TR Y O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S A ------MA N U F A C T U R IN G ----------------------------------------------N ON MA N U FA C TU RI N G --------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




Weekly
bourn
(standard)

t y p is t s

T Y P I S T S . C L AS S
M A NU F A C TU RI NG
OFFICE

and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

O
o

40. 0

-----------------------------------

Sex ,

O F F I C E O C C U P A T IO N S
WOMEN— C O N T IN U E D
o

-

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

0
*

O C C U P A T IO N S

HESSENGERS:
M A N UF A C TU R IN G

Weekfr
hours
(standard)

----- -------------------

OFFICE

a nd i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

o

S e x ,* o c c u p a t i o n ,

Average
(mean*)

Average
(mean2)

20

3 9.5
40.0
39.0
39.5

2 32 .0 0
2 40 .0 0
2 26 .0 0
2 47 .0 0

COMPUTER S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S C ------------(B U SIN ES S )

--------

MA NU FA CT UR IN G ------NO NMA NU FAC TU RIN G

1 .1 35
5 42
593

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CL AS S A ---------------------------------------------------------------MA NU F A C TU RI NG ----------------------------------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G --------------------------------------

5 73
318
255

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
C L AS S B ---------------------------------------------------------------MA NU F A C TU RI NG ----------------------------------------------NO NMA N U FA CT U RI N G --------------------------------------

356
138
218

3 9.5
40.
3 9.5

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) .
CL AS S C ---------------------------------------------------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G ----------------------------------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G --------------------------------------

3 5 9 .0 0
3 69 .5 0
3 4 9 .5 0

3 98 .5 0
4 0 7 .5 0
3 87 .5 0

39. 5
4 0.0
39. 5

3 43 .5 0
3 4 4 .0 0
3 4 3 .0 0

3 9 . 0 2 7 6 .5 0
4 0 . 0 2 6 9 .5 0
2 8 1 .5 0

COMPUTER o p e r a t o r s :
MA NU FA C TU RI NG —
COMPUTER O P E R A T O R S .
MA NU F A C TU RI NG ----------

CLASS

COMPUTER O P E R A T O R S .
MA NU F A C TU RI NG ----------

class

b

496
208

A

:

3 9.5
4 0.0

2 9 6 .0 0
3 0 4 .0 0

Table A-10. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, by sex—
larqe establishments in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
Average
(mean2)
Se x ,

5o c c u p a t i o n ,

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

Number
and in d u s try d ivisio n

of
workers

Weck^r
hours
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

Se x ,

3o c c u p a t i o n ,

and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Weekly
hours1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

P R O F E S S I O N A L AND TE C H N I C A L
OCCUPATIONS - M E N — CONTINUED

AND T E C H N I C A L
HEN— C O N T I N U E D

COMPUTER OPERATORS - CONTINUED
COMPU TER O P E R A T O R S . C L A S S C ------------N ON M A N U FA C TU R IN G ------------------------------------------

166
115

3 9.5
3 9.0

$
2 1 4 .0 0
2 1 3 .5 0

D R A F T E R S -------------------------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U FA C TU R IN G -----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

760
579
181
141

4 0.0
4 0.0
40. 0
4 0.0

2 8 5 .0 0
2 71 .0 0
3 3 0 .5 0
3 51 .5 0

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S A -----------------------------------------M A N U F A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

594
303

4 0.0
4 0.0

200
143

4 0.0
4 0.0

2 75 .5 0
2 61 .0 0

40 • 0
4 0.0

2 35 .5 0
2 12 .5 0

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S -----------------------------M A N U F A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

3 .9 3 0
1 .6 92

4 0.0
4 0.0

3 28 .0 0
2 95 .5 0

EL E C T R O N IC S T E C H N I C I A N S . CLASS A M A N U F A C T U R IN G --------------------------------------------------

1 .5 6 1
960

4 0.0
4 0.0

(m e a n t)

S ex ,

3o c c u p a t i o n ,

a nd i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n

Number
of
workers

Weekly
Weekly
earnings3
hour*3
(standard) (standard)

P R O F E S S I O N A L ANO T E C H NI CA L
OCCUPATIONS - M E N — CONTINUED
C OMP UT ER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) —
MA N U F A C T U R IN G -----------------------------------------------

3 51 .0 0
3 27 .5 0

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S . C L AS S B(
M A N U F A C T U R IN G -------------------------------------------------

P R O F E S S I O N A L ANO T E C H N I C A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - UOHEN

$
3 9. 5 3 37 .5 0
4 0. 0 342 .0 0

COMPU TER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) ,
C L A S S A ---------------------------------------------------------------

TECHNICIANS -

539
333

152

4 0.0

387 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS ( B U S I N E S S ) ,
C L A S S C ---------------------------------------------------------------

ELECTRONICS
CONTINUED

315 .5 0
3 0 3 .0 0

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S B -----------------------------------------M A N U F A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

Average

Average
(mean2)
Number
of
workers

154

39.5

2 74 .5 0

COMPUTER D AT A L I B R A R I A N S
N ON MA N UF A C TU R IN G -------------

63
54

3 9 .5 2 08 .5 0
39. 5 2 03 .0 0

206

D R A F T E R S . C L A S S C -----------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G --------------------------------------------------

(B U S IN E S S ):
M A NU F A C T U RI NG

3 9 .5

CO MPU TE R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S B -----------M A N U F A C T U R IN G -----------------------------

144
53

3 9 . 5 3 8 7 .0 0
3 9 .5 3 8 1 .5 0

CO MPU TE R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T S
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S C -------------

ao

3 9 . 0 3 0 5 .5 0

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




4 0 7 .0 0

132

21

D RA FTE R S. CLASS B
M A N U F A C T UR IN G ------R E G I S T E R E D I N D U S T R I A L NURSES
MA N U F A C T U R IN G -------------------------------N ON MA N U FA C TU RI N G ------------------------

4 0.0

263 .0 0

112
66

4 0.0
4 0.0

2 71 .5 0
2 6 2 .0 0

259
189
70

3 9. 5 3 12 .5 0
4 0 .0 3 17 .5 0
3 9 .0 2 99 .5 0

Table A-11. Hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant workers—large establishments
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
H ourly earnings *

Occupation and i n d u s try d iv is io n

Nurotuj
of
worker*

N u m ber o f w o r k e r s re c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e hourly earnings
S
3 .4 0

Mean *

Median*

Middle ranfe 2

---------- *----------i —
3 .6 0 3 .8 0 4 .2 0

1

4 .6 0

5 .0 0

---------- ~ i---------- S
T
5 . 4 0 5 . 8 0 6 . 2 0 6 . 60

7 .0 0

s
s
7 . AO 7 . 8 0

1 ---------- s
S
8 .2 0 8 .6 0 9 .0 0

S
i ------------r --------- *“ ---------i~~--------- C ---------s--------9 . ftO 9 . 8 0 1 0 . 2 0 1 0 . 6 0 1 1 . 0 0 1 1 . 4 0 1 1 . 8 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

7 .8 0

8 .2 0

8 .6 0

9 .8 0 1 0 .2 0 1 0 . 6011. 0011. 4011. 8 01 2 .2 0

~ i ---------- ~ i ----------i

and
under
3 .60

ALL

t

3 .8 0

4 .2 0

4 .6 0

5 .0 0

-

-

-

-

6 .2 0

6 .60

7 . 00

7 .4 0

9 .0 0

9 . 40

WORKERS

MA IN TE NA N C E C A R P E N T E R S --------------------------------MA NU F A C TU RI NG -------------------------------------------------N ON MA NU FAC TUR IN G ------------------------------------------

441
285
1 58

$
8 . 12
7 .9 *
8* ft 6

$
8 .1 5
8 .1 0
8 . 99

$
7 .2 6 7 .1 5 8 .1 * -

$
8 .8 5
8 .7 2
9 .4 7

-

M A IN T EN A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N S --------------------------MA NU F A C TU RI NG -------------------------------------------------N ON MA NU FAC TUR IN G -----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

1 .2 8*
9 92
292
109

8 .7 9
8 .7 3
8 . 99
9 .1 *

8 .6 0
8 . 27
8 . 88
9 .6 4

8 .0 2 8 .0 2 8 .8 3 7 .9 ft-

9 .5 7
9 .3 0
9 .6 *
9 .6 ft

-

-

_

-

-

-

MA IN T EN A N C E P A I N T E R S --------------------------------------MA NU F A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TU RIN G ------------------------------------------

368
2 5*
114

8 .2 2
7 . 97
8 .7 8

8 . 3*
8 .0 5
9 . 50

7 .6 9 7 .3 3 8 .3 9 -

9 .5 0
8 .8 7
9 .5 0

-

_

“

_

-

-

-

-

ft
ft

14
10
4

7
3
ft

19
10
9

29
19
10

39
33
6

48
47
1

65
50
15

50
40
10

69
ft 7
22

6
ft
2

67
67

22
22
“

_
-

7
6
i

13
12
1

21
15
6

32
28
4

90
62
28
27

256
231
25
1

210
210
-

161
79
82
1

129
103
26
20

86
86
39

207
186
21
21

_
-

17
15
2

16
7
9

27
24
3

27
26
1

ft 9
43
6

73
ft5
28

14
9
5

2
2

107
ft9
58

11
11

-

18
18

26
26

6
6

132
132

26
26

67
66

ft
ft

24
23

8
ft

1 12
48

-

-

-

-

3ft
32

312
2 98

39
32

67
47

205
196

247
220

350
341

159
116

320
2 90

7
7

636
306

19
19

_

21
20
1

26
12
14
3

9
8
i

8ft
47
37
36

117
53
6ft
61

289
52
2 37
221

9ft
35
59
22

159
5
154
8ft

223
36
187
149

2
2

-

ft
4

7
7

17
17

24
2*

-

-

~

28
13

12
10

113
71

2
“

16
6

-

-

-

1
1

2
2

61
61

23
23

199
199

121
121

169
169

328
328

9
9

2ft ft
2ft ft

14
6
R

17
17

30
19

9
1

47
39

11

8

8

24
22
2

89
58
31

22
16
6

ft9
3ft
15

97
43
5ft

-

-

-

-

8
8

13
13
”

ft
ft

-

-

-

-

MA IN TE NA N C E M A C H I N I S T S --------------------------------MA NU F A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

ft 59
189

8 .2 6
8 .0 2

8 .0 7
7 .7 0

7 .1 5 7 .1 5 -

9 .4 3
8 .9 6

-

“

M A IN T EN A N C E M EC HA N IC S ( M A C H I N E R Y ! MA NU FA C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

2 .4 00
1 .9 0*

8 .0 5
7 .8 f t

8 .0 2
7 . 97

7 .1 5 7 .0 0 -

9 .4 2
8 .6 3

-

_

-

-

“

~

”

t
-

ft

~

MA IN TE NA N C E ME C HA N IC S
(MOTOR V E H I C L E S ! ----------------------------------------------MA NU FA C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TUR IN G -----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

1 .0 88
282
806
620

9 . 08
8 .5 9
9 . 25
9 . 27

8.
8.
9.
8.

8 .5 8 - 9 .8 7
8 . 1 4 - 9 .2 3
8 .8 ft- 9 .8 8
8 .8 4 -1 0 .0 7

_

_

_

_

_

_

-

“

-

-

-

”

5
ft
i
i

8
8
i

3
3
2

MA IN T EN A N C E S H E E T - M E T A L WORKERS -------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------------------------------------

58
58

8 .4 1
8 . ftl

8 .* 5
8 .* 5

8 .2 2 8 .2 2 -

8 .7 2
8 .7 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

“

~

i
i

MA IN T EN A N C E T R A D E S HE L P E R S ---------------------MA NU FA CT UR IN G --------------------------------------------------

2 7ft
185

6 .2 2
5 . 99

6 .7 5
6 . *5

5 .4 2 4 .9 0 -

7 .1 5
7 .1 7

21
21

-

7
7

11
7

19
18

10
9

33
21

2
2

TOOL ANO D I E RAKERS -----------------------------------------MA NUF AC TUR ING --------------------------------------------------

1 .1 78
1 .1 78

8 .9 2
8 .9 2

9 .0 2
9 .0 2

8 .2 5 8 .2 5 -

9 .2 ft
9.2 ft

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S --------------------------------------MA NU F A C TU RI NG -------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TUR IN G ------------------------------------------

*20
250
170

8 .7 8
8 .8 9
8 .6 2

R. 83
8 . 85
8 .8 3

7 . 9 0 - 9 .8 7
8 .1 2 - 9 .6 7
7 . 2 8 - 1 0 . 1ft

-

_

-

84
52
30
8ft

-

-

-

3
3

7
7

-

2
2

12
12

-

~
~
“

~

40
40

8
8

12
12

”

“

~
“
-

-

-

~

“

28
28

8
8

-

-

-

-

“

~

13
10
3
3

6
6
6

31
31
31

_

-

-

-

-

“

3
3

"

“

-

-

-

-

-

15
15

“

-

-

12
12

-

~

“

~

“

6
6
-

See footnotes at end o f ta b les.




22

\

Table A-12. Hourly earnings of material movement and custodial workers—large establishments
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Hourly earnings *

Occupation and in d u s tr y d iv i si o n

of
workers

Num ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e hou rly earn in gs o f —
ft
2 .6 0

Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

ft
2 .8 0

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

f
t

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .8 0

5 .20

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

ft
ft
6* ft 0 6 . 80

ft
7.2 0

ft
7 .6 0

3 .6 0

3 . 80 4 . 0 0

4 .2 3

4 .4 0

4 .8 0

5 .2 0

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 3

i

. 63

PtQ Q

25
6
19

147
111
36

111
88
25

119
76
43

77
28
49

567
523
ftft

ft
8 . 00

f '
9 .2 0

i
8 .4 0

ft
8 .8 0

8 .8 0

■>.20 9 . 6 0 1 0 . 0 0

*

9 .6 0

and
under
2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 . 20

3 .4 0

-

~
-

-

-

7

ALL WORKERS
TRUCKORI V E R S -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

4 . 1*8
1 .2 5 1
2* 8 9 7

$
8 .5 3
7 .5 8
8 .9 3

$
9 . 12
7 .81
9 . 12

$
7 .9 2 6 .7 5 9 .1 2 -

$
9 .18
8 .0 0
9 .18

“

6
6
“

19
19
“

14
11
3

8
8

TR UCK DR IVE RS. L I G H T TR UC K:
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

63

5 . 81

6 . 20

4 .1 3 -

6 .2 5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

3

-

TRUCKDRIVERSe NEOIUH TRUCK -------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

ft 78
287

7 .0 3
6 .8 ft

7 .06
6 .8 6

5 .9 3 5 .9 3 -

8 .00
7 .8 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6
6

-

-

-

9
8

8
8

TRUCKDRIVERS* T R A C T O R -T R A I L E R ------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

2* 348
1 .9 31

8 .8 0
9 . 06

9 .1 *
9 . 18

9 .0 1 9 .0 8 -

9 .1 8
9 .18

_

_

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

-

SHIPPERS -----------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

2A3
1B3

6 .1 ft
6 .0 4

6 . 10
5 .8 5

* .8 2 4 .6 5 -

7 .1 2
7 .1 2

_

_

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

2
-

-

-

8
6

RECEIVERS --------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

590
165

6 . 89
6 .* 2

7 .6 5
6 .1 5

6 .1 5 5 .2 7 -

7 .6 5
7 .6 5

_

-

7

3

8

ft

6

9
8

SHIPPERS ANO RECEIVERS -----------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

502
165

6 • ft 2
6 . 23

6 . 17
6 .0 7

5 .0 8 5 .0 8 -

7 .5 2
7. ft 5

-

-

3
1

WAREHOUSEMEN -------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

2 .1 *5
978
1 .1 6 7

6 .6 3
5 . 60
7 .5 0

6 . 88
5 .5 0
8 . 32

5 .1 0 4 .2 5 5 .6 7 -

69
69

18
18

~

-

S H IP P IN G PACKERS --------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

B52
689

ft. ft3
* .3 6

f ftO
t.
f ftO
t.

MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS -------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------

2*585
1 .0 1 0

5 .1 2
f 90
t.

F O R K L I F T OPERATORS ---------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ----------------------------------------------

2 . TOR
1 *7 0 8

GUARDS ----------------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURINS -------------------------------------P UBL IC U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

ft * 77ft
1 .1 78
3 .5 9 6
118

-

-

59
15
44

1 25
1 25
~

8ft 2281
8ft
7
227 4

350
350

1

6

2

17

8

i

-

6

-

-

-

19

1 08
93

30
20

30
ft

39
5

28
16

61
61

15
15

47
47

65

-

_

_

18
18

55
14

59
9

1
1

39
37

328
37

15
_

18

1*6 5
1465

350
350

48
47

21
21

15
6

13
13

58
3*

3
“

17
17

15
12

13
13

16

14
14

10
9

16
13

17
10

28
16

11
5

67
29

22
4

10
10

1
1

307
33

3
1

i
i

38
13

146
115

35
34

14
14

25
24

57
56

11
3

49
49

33
25
8

118
81
37

96
73
23

125
69
56

186
46
140

179
112
67

40
3*
6

83
27
56

108
34
7ft

35
34

129
1

14
5

4
3

2
2

3
3

391
90

-

-

-

-

"

"

57
21

i
~

-

6
6

18
18

2

38
36

62

-

196
195
1

64
27
37

87

14

87

1*

610
51
5 59

~

12
12

52
52

“

-

-

-

-

1 38
2

5
4

8
8

45

162
14

6
6

-

ff
tt

_

_

-

“

-

8 .8 1
7 .2 3
8 .8 5

-

_

i

1

-

i

-

-

3 .9 5 3 .7 3 -

ft.80

7
7

7
7

46
37

72
70

38
34

26
26

*2
40

*5

fo
t

318
316

*. 73
*• *7

ft.3 5 -

38

91

50

25

-

-

49
9

23
20

173
55

98
36

1 90
41

567
561

123
26

279
94

124

4 .4 7 -

6.1f t
5 .2 7

7 . 27
6 .7 9

7 .7 0
6 . 24

5 .9 7 5 .3 7 -

8 .96
8 .14

6
6

32
32

36
36

28
28

19
19

16
14

7
7

24
22

389
387

160
127

369
192

13

Q

37
21

7*
66

329
187

* 21
321

28
26

560
48

160
160

f ft 8
t.
6 . 59
3 .7 9
7 .0 9

3 .5 3
6 . 88
3 .2 0
6 . 83

2 .8 ft5 .9 4 2 .7 7 6 .8 1 -

6 .3 6
7 .51
4 .2 0
7 .5 9

193
193

479
56
4 23

166
17
149

96
96

71
15
56

95
23
72

213
43
170

130
70
60

59
24
35

105
65
40

229
108
121
8

263
138
125
“

3 24
109
215
65

*16
388
28
28

40
4
36
17

10
10
-

108
108

“

-

23

45

44
6
38

31
2
29

33
7
26

62
55
7

1*0
137
3

89
31
58

304
302
2

35
4
31

10
10
■

108
108

~

~

"

“

'

-

“

-

-

-

ft.ftO

_

_

_

-

-

-

907

548

322

-

-

907

5ft8

322

_

_

-

_
-

“

2

110

104

42

23

45

3 69
56
3 13

62
17
45

5ft
5ft

ft 8
15
33

50
23
27

158
23
135

86
64
22

28
22
6

72
58
14

167
53
114

123
1
122

235
78
157

86
86

5

-

322

191
191

~

5

~

78
23
55

650
22
628

75
55
20

137
23
114

137
34
103

259
80
1 79

2381
79
2 30 2

2358
219
2139

291
153
138

117
76
41
2

236
9R
138
3*

501
162
339
184

391
280
111
110

1 93
190
3
2

458
447
11
10

20

58
30
28
28

-

"

"

233
33
200

-

"

~

104

6 . 78
7 . 33
* .1 5

4 .2 6 6 .7 8 3 .6 0 -

7 .3 3
7 .56
5 .4 8

-

“

GUARDS. CLASS B ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUF A C T U R I N 6 --------------------------------------

3 .5 11
*96
3 .0 1 5

3 .8 9
5 .7 0
3 . 60

3. 17
5 .8 5
3 .0 0

2 .7 5 ft • f 9 t
2 .7 5 -

4 .75
7 .0 8
3 .5 0

907
907

548
-

322

54 8

J A N I T O R S . PORTERS. AND CLEANERS ------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------------------PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

8*908
2 .0 5 7
6 .8 51
390

5 . 02
6 .1 5
ft. 67
6 . 9*

4 .9 *
6 . 60
4 .6 0
6 .7 8

ft.ftft- 5 . 3 0

ft 9
12
37

286
41
2*5

7 .2 5
5 .0 5
7 .1 1

-

110

6 .0 8
7 .2 *
f • 66
t

5 .0 5 ft.ftft6 .4 5 -

1 17
117

1

55
20
35

1 .2 37
682
555

-

-

2

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.

23

42
-

141
141

-

13
4

-

GUARDS. CLASS A ------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURINS --------------------------------------




15
5
10

20
20

“
“

“




Table A-13. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom,
powerplant, material movement, and custodial workers,
by sex—large establishments in Los AngelesLong Beach, Calif., October 1978
Sex, 3 occupation, and i nd us tr y div is io n

Number
of
workers

A v e ra g i
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings

Sex,

occupation, and i ndu str y division

Number
of
workers

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T I O N S - HEN— C O N T IN U E D

M A I N T E N A N C E . TO OL ROO M. AND
PO UE R PL A NT O C C U P A T IO N S - MEN

S H I P P E R S --------------------MA NU F A C TU R IN G

218
161

$
6 .1 2
6 .0 2

R E C E I V E R S -----------------MA NU F A C TU R IN G

5 52
156

6 .9 7
6 . *7

S H I P P E R S ANO R E C E IV E R S
M A N U F A C T U R IN G ---------------

*38
310

6 .5 8
6 .4 1

1 .9 66
901
1 .0 65

6 .7 0
5 .6 3
7 .6 0

212
208

* . 37
4 .3 7

$
8 .1 *

M A IN T E N A N C E C A R P E N T E R S --------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ------------------------------------------

*35
285
1 50

M A IN T E N A N C E E L E C T R I C I A N S ---------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G -----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------

1 .2 7 3
9 92
281

8 . 80
8 .7 3
9 .0 *
9 .3 1

M A IN T E N A N C E P A I N T E R S --------------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NM A N U FA C TU R IN G ------------------------------------------

366
2 53
113

8 . 23
7 .9 8
8 .7 9

WAREHOUSEMEN -----------------M A NU F A C T U RI NG -----NONMAN UFAC TURIN G

M A IN T E N A N C E M A C H I N I S T S --------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

059
389

8 . 26
8.02

S H I P P I N G PACKERS
MA NU F A C TU R IN G

M A IN T E N A N C E MEC HA N IC S ( M A C H I N E R Y ! M A N UF A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

2 .3 7 *
1 .9 0*

M A IN T E N A N C E MEC HA N IC S
(MOTOR V E H I C L E S ) -----------------------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G -----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

7 .9 *
8 .5 1

M A T E R I A L H A N D L IN G L A B O R E R S :
M A NU F A C TU RI NG --------------------------

1 .0 0*
2 82
7 22
5*1

9 .0 5
8 .5 9
9 . 23
9 . 25

M A IN TE N A N C E S H E E T - M E T A L WORKERS -------M A N UF A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

58

M A IN T E N A N C E T R A D E S HE L P E R S ---------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

273
185
1 .1 6 0
1 .1 60
*20
2 50
170

8 . 78
8 . 89
8 .6 2

9 .7 *
1 0.35

GUARDS ----------------------------------M A NU F A C T U RI NG -----NONMAN UFAC TURIN G

4.3 89
1 .1 37
3.2 52

* . *8
6 .5 7
3 .7 4

GU A RD S . C L A S S A —
M A NU F A C T U RI NG -----NONMA NU FAC TUR ING

1 .1 38
6*8
*90

6 .1 *
7 . 23
* .6 9

GU A RD S . C L A S S B —
M A NU F A C TU RI NG ------NONMAN UFA CT URIN G

3 . 251
*89
2 .7 6 2

3 .8 9
5 . 70
3 .5 8

7 .1 03
1.7 81
5 .3 22
308

5 .0 8
6 .1 7
* .7 2
7 . 01

8 .9 *
8 .9 4

S T A T I O N A R Y E N G I N E E R S --------------------------------------M A NU F A C T UR IN G -------------------------------------------------NO NMA N UF A CT UR IN G ------------------------------------------

5 .0 5

2 .5 17
1 .7 02

6. 21

TO O L ANO D I E M A K E R S -----------------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G --------------------------------------------------

770

F O R K L I F T OPERATO RS
M A NU F A C TU RI NG - -

8. * 1
8.* 1

5 .9 9

J A N I T O R S . P O R T E R S . ANO C L EA NE RS ------M A N U F A C T U R IN G ------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TUR IN G ----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------------------------------

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T IO N S - MEN

T R U C K D R IV E R S -------------------------------------------------------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------N O N M A N U FA C TU R IN 6 ------------------------------------------

M A T E R I A L MOVEMENT AND C U S T O D I A L
O C C U P A T IO N S - WOMEN
* .0 1 9
1 .2 * *
2 .7 7 5

8 . 5*
7 . 5 9 WAREHOUSEMEN -----------------------------------------------------------8 . 97
6UARDS ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS. L IG H T TRUCK:
M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------T R U C K D R I V E R S . MEDIUM T RU CK ---------------M A N UF A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------T R U C K D R I V E R S . T R A C T O R - T R A I L E R -------NO NM AN UFA CT UR IN G ------------------------------------------

A verage
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings 4

GUARDS.
* 30
287
2 .3 *5
1 .9 28

8 . 80
9 .0 6

CLASS

24

* . 28

B -----------------------------------------------

J A N I T O R S . P O R T E R S . AND C L EA NE RS -------M A NU F A C T U RI NG ------------------------------------------------N ON MA NU FAC TU RIN G -----------------------------------------

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.

5 .9 1

352

A -----------------------------------------------

GU A RD S .

7 .0 6
6 . 84

CLASS

179

5 .* 3
3 .8 3
1 .7 5 7
270
1 .4 8 7

* .7 1
6 .0 6
*. *7

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Table B-1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
In experien ced typists

Other in exp erien ced c le r ic a l w o rk ers 8

Manufacturing
M in im u m w e e k ly s tr a ig h t-tim e s a l a r y 7

Nonm anufacturing

Based on standard w eek ly hours 9 of—

A ll
industries
A ll
schedules

40

A ll
schedules

Manufacturing

A ll
schedules

40

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard w eek ly hours 9 of—

A ll
industries

40

A ll
schedules

40

321

114

XXX

207

XXX

321

114

XXX

2 07

XXX

E S TA BLIS H M EN TS HAVING A S P E C I F I E D
MIN IMUM ---------------------------------------------------------------------

91

37

34

54

41

124

48

44

76

61

-----------------

1

-

-

i

-

1

-

-

1

-

1
3

_
_

_
-

i

-

1

-

6

-

1

3

-

6

4

1
5

1
5

-

-

5
3

4
2
4
4
5
i

4
2
4
3
5
i
i
-

8
8
13
5
18
11
10

3
1
5
1
8
5
6
1
3
1
1
1

6
4
4
8
2
6
3
4
3
2
1
3
1
3

ESTABLISHM EN TS

* 9 7 .5 0
* 1 0 0 .0 0
* 1 0 5 .0 0
* 1 1 0 .0 0
* 1 1 5 .0 0
* 1 2 0 .0 0
* 1 2 5 .0 0
* 1 3 0 .0 0
* 1 3 5 .0 0
* 1 4 0 .0 0
* 1 4 5 .0 0
* 1 5 0 .0 0
* 1 5 5 .0 0
* 1 6 0 .0 0
* 16 5 .0 0
* 1 7 0 .0 0
* 1 7 5 .0 0
* 1 8 0 .0 0
* 1 8 5 .0 0
* 1 9 0 .0 0
* 1 9 5 .0 0
* 2 0 0 .0 0
* 2 0 5 .0 0
* 21 0 .0 0
* 21 5 .0 0
* 2 2 0 .0 0
* 2 2 5 .0 0
* 23 0 .0 0
* 2 3 5 .0 0
* 2 4 0 .0 0
* 24 5 .0 0
* 2 5 0 .0 0
* 2 5 5 .0 0
* 2 6 0 .0 0
* 2 6 5 .0 0
* 2 7 0 .0 0
* 2 7 5 .0 0
* 2 8 0 .0 0
* 2 8 5 .0 0
* 2 9 0 .0 0

S TUD IED

AND UNDER * 1 0 0 . 0 0
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
ANO
AND
ANO
ANO
ANO
ANO
AND
ANO
ANO
AND
ANO
ANO
ANO
ANO
ANO

UNDER * 1 0 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 1 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 1 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 2 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 2 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 3 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 3 5 . 0 0
UNDER C 1 A O . O O
UNDER * 1 4 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 5 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 5 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 6 0 . 0 0
UN 0ER * 1 6 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 7 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 7 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 8 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 8 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 1 9 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 1 9 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 0 0 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 0 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 1 0 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 1 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 2 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 2 2 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 3 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 2 3 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 4 0 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 4 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 5 0 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 5 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 6 0 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 6 5 . 0 0
UNDER * 2 7 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 2 7 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 8 0 . 0 0
UNDER * 2 8 5 . 0 0
UNOER * 2 9 0 . 0 0
O V E R -----------------------

_

3

ii
a
5
7
11
7
9
4
i
3
4
i
1
1
3
“

-

1
2
-

2

~

2

:

3

-

i

2
6
4

i

-

5
7
3
4
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
1

3
6
1
2
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
i

6
6

2
4
3
3

i
5
1
8
5

6
3
3
1
1
2

“
~

4
7
8
4
10
6

4
3
3
1
3
1
3

_
1

2

2

1

-

-

1

1

1
1

1
1

-

-

“

~

1
1
1

1
1
1

2
1

2
1
-

“
:

:

-

-

i

-

i
i

l

1
2
1
1

l
l

2
2

-

-

1

1
1
1

-

1

1
1

1
1

i
i

i

-

-

1

-

-

1

1
2

1
2

1

i

i
i

1
1

1
1

i
i

-

-

1
1

1
1

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

i

i

1

-

-

—

1

-

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

-

~

-

-

-

-

~

-

1

1

i

-

3

1

1

2

2

E S T A B L I S H M E N T S H A V I N G NO S P E C I F I E D
MIN IMUM ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

58

27

XXX

31

XXX

74

32

XXX

42

XXX

E S T A B L I S H M E N T S WHICH 0 1 0 NOT EMPLOY
WORKERS IN T H I S C A T EG OR Y --------------------------

172

50

XXX

122

XXX

1 23

34

XXX

89

XXX

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




25

-




Table B-2. Late-shift pay provisions for full-time manufacturing production
and related workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
j|Al^ifu ll^ tim e >
jnanufacturingj>roduction_iand_relate<^^orkers^_^00_j£ e r c e n t^
W ork ers

A ll w o rk ers 10
Second shift

PERCENT
IN

ESTA BLISHREN TS

W IT H

OF

U N IF O R R
U N IF O R H

PAY

81.1

73.4

1 6.4

1 .3
79.8
5 0.3
2 1.0
8 .6

7 3.4
1A.5
31.1

.2
16.2
10.1
4 .3
1 .9

19.1
7 .2

2 1.5
9 .6

1 9.6
6 .7

Second shift

WORKERS

LATE

S H IFT

PROVISION S

—

W I T H NO PAY D I F F E R E N T I A L FOR L A T E S H I F T WORK —
W I T H PAY D I F F E R E N T I A L FOR L A T E S H I F T WORK -------------U N IF O R H C E N T S - P E R - H O U R D I F F E R E N T I A L -------------------------U N IF O R H P E R CE N TA G E D I F F E R E N T I A L ------------------------------------OTHER D I F F E R E N T I A L -------------------------------------------------------------------------AVERAGE

T h ird shift

27 .8

5 .9

2.8
1.0
2.0

D IFFE R EN TIAL

C E N T S - P E R - H O U R D I F F E R E N T I A L ------------------------------PE R C E N TA G E D I F F E R E N T I A L -------------------------------------------

2 1.9
B.8

PE RC E NT OF WORKERS BY T Y P E AND
AHOUNT OF PAY D I F F E R E N T I A L
U N IF O R R c e n t s - p e r - h o u r :
9 C E N T S -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------11 C E N T S --------------------------------- -- ---------------------------------------------------------12 ANO UNDER 13 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------------1 » C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------15 AND UNDER 16 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------------16 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------17 AND UNDER I B C E N T S --------------------------------------------------------18 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------20 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------21 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------22 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------25 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------27 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------30 AND UNDER 31 C E N T S --------------------------------------------------------A7 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------50 C E N T S ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------U N IF O R R p e r c e n t a g e :
3 P E R C E N T ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 P E R C E N T ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------6 P E R C E N T ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------7 P E R C E N T ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------B P E R C E N T ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------10 P E R C E N T ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------15 P E R C E N T ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------other

:
PAY FOR RED UCED
PAY FOR RED UCED
PAY FOR REDU CED

1 .A
4 .1
.7
3 .8

12.4
1 .2
2 .2
1 .1
9 .6
.7
9 .2
.9

i.i
1 .9

1 .3
7 .2
3 .9
•a

i.i
6 .0
1 .2

.1
2 .7
1 .4
1 .6

1 .1
.8
9 .6
1 .8
.7
2 .9
1 .5
2 .9
. 1

•8

_
1 .3

-

.1
.7
.2
1 .0
2 .1
•4
.5
.2
2 .0
.3
1 .6
.2
.3

.1
.3
.1

.2
1 .0
.3

.5

.1
.3
.3
< 11 »
.1

.4
1 .9

.2

•8
.i

“

.8
.3

5 .4

1.5

•A

2 0 .9

.4

1 .4

1 3.2

d if f e r e n tia l

FULL
FULL
FULL

D A Y 'S
D A Y 'S
D A Y 'S

HOURS------------------------------------HOURS P L U S CEN T S
HOURS PL U S P E R C E N T

6 .0
2 .6

4 .8

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.

26

.1

Table B-3. Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-time first-shift workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
O f f ic e w o r k e r s

P r o d u c t io n a n d re la t e d w o r k e r s

It e m
A l l in d u s t r ie s

M a n u f a c t u r in g

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

P u b li c u t il i t i e s

100

100

100

100

100

100

*121
1
1
(1 2 )
1
(1 2 )
(12)
1

_

(12)
1
1
(12)
1
1
1
(1 2 )

-

_

_

A l l in d u s t r ie s

M a n u f a c t u r in g

N o n m a n u f a c t u r in g

P u b li c u t il i t i e s

P E R C E N T OF WORKERS BY S C H ED U L ED
WEEK LY HOURS AND DAYS
ALL
15
20

30

35
36
36
36
36
37
3B
38
38
39
39
40

45
48
56

FU LL-TIN E

WORKERS

-----------------------

HOURS— 5 DAYS ------------------------------------------------HOURS --------------------------------------------------------------------4 DA YS -----------------------------------------------------------------5 DAY S -----------------------------------------------------------------HOURS --------------------------------------------------------------------3 1 / 2 DAYS -----------------------------------------------------5 DAY S ---------------------------------------------------------------H O U R S - 5 DAY S -----------------------------------------------H O U R S - 4 1 / 2 DAYS ------------------------------------1/4 H O U R S - 5 DAYS ------------------------------------1 /3 H O U R S - 5 DAYS ------------------------------------1 /2 H O U R S - 5 DAYS ------------------------------------1 /2 H O U R S - 5 OA YS ------------------------------------H O U R S - 5 DAYS -----------------------------------------------3 /4 H O U R S - 5 OA YS ------------------------------------8 / 1 0 H O U R S -5 OAYS --------------------------------HOURS—5 DAYS -----------------------------------------------1/ 4 H O U R S - 5 DAYS -----------------------------------HOURS -------------------------------------------------------------------4 DA YS ----------------------------------------------------------------5 DA YS ----------------------------------------------------------------HOURS— 6 OAYS -----------------------------------------------H O U R S - 6 DA YS -----------------------------------------------H O U R S - 6 OAYS ------------------------------------------------

(1 2 )

2
( 12)

~
-

1
94
i
92
~
1

3 9 .7

4 0 .0

2

-

2

“
“

”
~
~

7
(1 2 )
(1 2 )
89
i
88
1
(1 2 )
1

-

4
“
“
~

12
~

~

(1 2 )
83
”
83
2
(1 2 )

~

95
~
95

1
1
2
(1 2 )
1
9
(1 2 )
8
2
(1 2 )
76

(1 2 )

76
—

93
—

~
2
~
6
93
-

100

100

_
_
_
_
1
2
2
(12 )
2
12
(1 2 >
8
3
_

2

(1 2 )
_

_

1
70

97

70

97

_

-

AVERAGE S C HE D UL ED
WEEK LY HOURS
A L L W EEK LY

WORK S C H E D U L E S

-------------------

3 9.8

39.3

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




27

39.4

3 9 .9

3 9 .3

3 9.9

Table B-4. Annual paid holidays for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
P ro d u c ti o n and rel ated w o r k e r s

Offi ce w o r k e r s

Ite m
A l l industries

PERCENT
ALL

F U L L-TIN E

Ma n ufa ctu ri n g

Nonma nu factu ring

Pu b lic utilities

P u b li c uti lities

A l l industries

Ma n uf a ct ur in g

No nm anu fa ctu rin g

100

100

100

100

<12 »

-

OF WORKERS
WORKERS -----------------------

E S T A B L I S H N E N T S NOT P R O V I D I N G
P A ID H O L I D A Y S -----------------------------------------------IN E S TA B L IS H N E N TS PROVIDING
P A ID H O L I D A Y S ------------------------------------------------

100

1 00

100

100

4

1

6

-

98

99

9A

100

99

100

99

100

9. 3

10. 1

8 .3

9 .5

9 .5

1 0.3

9 .2

1 0.3

(1 2 *
2
1
<12*
1
17
1
11

2
“
1
3
5
3
“
3

(1 2 *

IN

AVERAGE

NUNBER

OF P A I D

(1 2 *

-

HOLIDAYS

FOR WORKERS I N E S T A B L I S H N E N T S
P R O V ID IN G H O L I D A Y S ---------------------------------PE RC EN T OF WORKERS BY NUNBER
OF P A I D H O L I D A Y S P R O V ID E O
1
2
3
A
5
6

H O L I O A Y -----------------------------------------------------------------H O L I O A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------H O L I O A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------H O L I O A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------H O L I O A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------PLU S 1 OR NORE HA L F DAY S -------------7 H O L I O A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------PL U S 1 OR NORE HA L F DAYS -------------8 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------PL U S 1 OR NORE HA L F DAYS -------------9 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------------------------------------------PLU S 1 OR NORE HA L F DAYS -------------10 H O L ID A Y S -----------------------------------------------------------PLUS 1 OR NORE HA L F DAYS -------------11 H O L ID A Y S -----------------------------------------------------------PLU S 1 HA L F DAY ---------------------------------------12 H O L ID A Y S -----------------------------------------------------------PLU S 1 HA L F DAY ---------------------------------------13 H O L IO A Y S -----------------------------------------------------------1A H O L IO A Y S -----------------------------------------------------------15 H O L ID A Y S -----------------------------------------------------------20 H O L ID A Y S ------------------------------------------------------------

<12*
1
1
<12*
< 12*
12
1
7
2
8
3
18
1
18
<12*
12
<12*
7
(121
2
<12*
(1 2 )
3

9
i
9
i
< 121
5

96
95
99
82
73
63
93
2A
12
5
3
3

99
98
98
89
85
73
56
36
20
10
5
5

1
-

8
i
9
3
8
5
13
1
19

*
16

8

10

23
2
17
(1 2 *
6
<12*
9

“
44
22
7

-

“

<12*

-

~

<12*
<12*
5
<12*
8
1
7
6
10
19
18
3
9
2
8
i

~

1

<12*

3

<12*
< 12*

3
1
3
1
7
8
11
3
20
<12*
13
20
2
7
1
<12*

-

<12 1
6
<12 1
11
1
7
5
10
25
17
5
7
3
3

~
1

-

-

<121
(1 2 )
1

1

6

50

31

10

-

PE RC EN T OF WORKERS BY T O T A L
P A I D H O L I O A Y T I N E P R O V I D E D 13
3 OAYS OR NORE -------------------------------------------------5 OAYS OR NORE ---------------------------------------------------6 OAYS OR NORE ---------------------------------------------------7 DAYS OR NORE ---------------------------------------------------8 OAYS OR NORE ---------------------------------------------------9 DAYS OR NORE ---------------------------------------------------10 OAYS OR NORE ------------------------------------------------11 DAYS OR NORE ------------------------------------------------12 DAYS OR NORE ------------------------------------------------13 DAYS OR NORE ------------------------------------------------15 OAYS OR NORE ------------------------------------------------20 DAYS ------------------------------------------------------------------------

98
96
94
89
86
83
73
29
7

92
91
90
73
61
52
29
10
9
-

-

“

See footn otes at end o f ta b les.




28

99
99
99
94
85
75
A5
22
11
3
<12*

100
99
99
96
93
85
67
44
30

a
<12*

99
99
99
9A
82
72
37
15
4
i

-

99
99
99
98
97
96
91
A1
10

~
-

Table B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Office w o r k e r s

P r od uc tio n and related w o r k e r s
Item
A l l industries

M anuf actur ing

Nonma nu fa ctu ring

P u b lic utilities

A l l industries

M an ufa ctu ri ng

Nonmanufacturing

Pub lic utilities

100

PERCENT OF UORKERS
100

100

100

100

100

100

3

1

5

-

( 12)

-

(1 2 )

97
89
8

99
87
11

95
91
5

100
93
7

99
97
3

100
94
6

99
99
i

7
15
a
i

9
1A
5
2

5
16
3
(12)

A2
1
1

2
A7
4
3

2
27
3
6

2
5A
4
i

1
59
3
32
2
1
~

1
59
5
30
3
i
“

(12)
60
3A
(12)
1

2
34
62
~
3

(1 2 )
18
77
2
2
(12)

( 12>
22
~
68
6
4
”

17
81
(1 2 )
2
(12 )

_

_

( 12)
2
(12)
93
2
2
(1 2 )

(1 2)
6
1
83
6
4

( 12)
1
(12)
93
2
4
(12)
( 12)
( 12)

(1 2)
2
(1 2 )
84
6
6
1
( 12)
“

(12)
1
90
2
6
( 12)
(12)
(12)

(1 2)
2

UORKERS ------------------

100

IN ES TA BLI SH MEN TS NOT PROVIDING
PAID VACATIONS -------------------------------------IN ESTA BLI SH MEN TS PR OVIDING
PAIO VACATIONS -------------------------------------L E N G T H - O F - T I M E PAYMENT --------------PERCENTAGE PAYMENT -------------------------

MONTHS OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 WEEK ----------------------------1 UEEK -------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 WEEKS -----------------------------------------

1 y e a r of s e r v i c e :
UNDER 1 UEEK ----------------------------1 UEEK -------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS
2 UEEKS ----------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 UEEKS
3 UEEKS ----------------------------------------A UEEKS -----------------------------------------

ALL F U L L - T I M E

100
96
4

AMOUNT OF PA ID VACA TIO N A F T E R : 14

6

2

:
UNOER 1 UEEK ----------------------------1 UEEK -------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNOER 2 UEEKS
2 UEEKS ----------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 UEEKS
3 UEEKS ----------------------------------------A UEEKS ----------------------------------------years

of

s e r v ic e

3 YEARS OF S E R V I C E :
UNDER 1 UEEK ----------------------------1 UEEK -------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 UEEKS
2 UEEKS ----------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 UEEKS
3 UEEKS -----------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A UEEKS
A UEEKS ----------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 UEEKS
A YEARS OF S E R V IC E :
UNDER 1 UEEK ----------------------------1 UEEK -------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNOER 2 UEEKS
2 UEEKS -----------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 UEEKS
3 UEEKS ----------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A UEEKS
A UEEKS -----------------------------------------OVER S AND UNOER 6 UEEKS

(12)
16
3
7A
4
1
“

i
20
5
65
7
1
~

(12)

1
4
2
78
12
2

a

i
83
7
2
~
~

(12)
4
(12)
81
9
3
(12)
(12)

“
1
4
( 12)
75
15
2
1
1

"

8
90
3

11
84
(12)
1
"

"

_

_

3
89
i
2
~

2
92
4
3

“

~
“

_

_

3

2

~

-

87
2
3

92
4
3
-

-

S ee footn otes at end o f ta b les.




29

_

1
~

97
(12)
2
(12 )

A6

21
79

1
“
99
“
“

"

_
(1 2 )
97
(1 2 )
3

99
(12)
~
”

(12 )

(12 )

“

93
1
6

99
(12)
(12)

_

-

82
6
8
1
( 12)

_

~

~

(1 2 )

Table B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
Office w o r k e r s

P ro d u c ti o n and related w o r k e r s
It e m
A l l industries

AMOUNT OF P A I D
C O N T IN U E O

VACATION

10 YEARS OF S E R V I C E :
1 WEEK ------------------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS ---------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 ANO UNOER 3 WEEKS ---------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS ---------A WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ---------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 ANO UNOER 6 WEEKS ---------6 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------12 YEARS OF S E R V I C E :
1 UEEK ------------------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS ---------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS ---------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNOER A WEEKS ---------A WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER A ANO UNDER 5 WEEKS ---------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNOER 6 WEEKS ---------6 WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------------

20

Nonma nu factu ring

P u b lic utilities

A l l industries

Ma n uf a ct ur in g

Nonm anu fa ctu rin g

P u b li c uti lities

A F T E R 14 -

5 YE AR S OF S E R V I C E :
1 UEEK ------------------------------------------------------------OVER 1 AND UNOER 2 WEEKS ---------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNOER 3 WEEKS ---------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS ---------A WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 ANO UNDER 6 WEEKS ----------

IS

M anuf actur ing

YEARS OF s e r v i c e :
1 WEEK ------------------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNOER A WEEKS ---------A WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER A ANO UNDER 5 WEEKS ---------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER & WEEKS ---------b WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------7 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------YEARS OF S E R V I C E :
1 WEEK ------------------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS ---------3 WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS ----------A WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------------OVER A AND UNOER 5 WEEKS ----------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 ANO UNDER 6 WEEKS ----------b WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------------OVER b AND UNOER 7 WEEKS ----------8 WEEKS -----------------------------------------------------------

3
(121
53
7
33
(12)
1
~

3
~
56
13
25
1
1

2
(12)
6
i
74
6
7
(1 2 )
(1 2)

3
~
7
1
70
8
8
1

(1 2 )

1

2
(1 2 )
6
68
7
12
1
(12)

-

3
-

7
64
9
1A
1

-

(12)

2
5
44
5
30
(12)
2
(1 2 )

2
4
(1 2 )
22
3
44
i
10
(1 2)
1
(1 2 )

2

50
5
44

2
52
8
33

-

-

-

A6
3

1
(12)
5

(1 2 )
2
(1 2 )
“
84
4

78
4
6
~
(1 2 )

9
-

i
“

1
(12)
5

(1 2 )
2
(1 2 )

72
5
10
1
(12)

60

n
26
~

1

~

3
3
51
7
33
-

2
1

(1 2)
2
23
7
63

1
6
37
2
47
i
2

“

5

~

1

3
3
~

24
5
49
i
11
i
2

1
6
(12)
21
1
38
1
27

(121
(1 2 )
2
7
-

51
2
37

i
(1 2 )

4
“

(1 2 )

( 12 )

-

-

5

4

-

-

80
3
11

71
3
23

78
22
~

_

_

~
6
~
8A
3
7

(1 2 )
02
5
2
-

-

-

(1 2 )

-

-

(1 2 )
(1 2 )

(1 2 )

< 12>

-

~

"

_

_

~

5

3

6

(1 2 )

75
5
15
( 12)
(12)
(12)
( 12)

67
3
27

78
5
10
(1 2 )

80
13

(1 2 )

~

-

7
~

(1 2 )

(1 2 )

( 12)
3
49
3
A3

( 12)
3
A1
6
48
i
i
(12)
(12)
(12)

(12)
3

( 12)
3

_

_

(1 2 )
(1 2 )

-

2
-

-

-

16
1
69
2
8

18
3
6A
12

-

-

-

i

(12)
(12)
(12)

-

30

(1 2 )

-

1

1

49
A
A7
~

(12)
(12)
(1 2 )

~

See footnotes at end o f tables.




1

50

1

-

(1 2 )

2
(12)
50
1
A2
~
(12)

2
(1 2)

4
38
7
50
1
(1 2 )
(1 2 )

_
4
-

16
(1 2 )
71
3
7
-

(1 2 )
(1 2 )
“

(1 2 )
31
10
50
-

_
(121
-

2
75
1
22
-

Table B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October— Continued
Office w o r k e r s

P rod uc tio n and rel ated w o r k e r s
Ite m
A l l industries

AMOUNT OF P A I D
CONTINUED

VACATION

A F T E R 14

Pu b lic utilities

Nonma nu factu ring

YE AR S OF S E R V I C E :
1 WEEK ------------------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 a n d UNDER 3 WEEKS ---------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS ---------4 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ---------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 ANO UNDER b WEEKS --------6 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------8 WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------------

MAXIMUM V A C A T I O N A V A I L A B L E :
1 WEEK ------------------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS --------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS --------4 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS --------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER b WEEKS --------b WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------7 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------8 WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------------

2
4
112)
22
2
38
1
25
(121
4
(121

3
3
-

23
3
42
1
19
i
4
i

2
4
(121
22
2
36
i
24
1
5
1121

3
3
23
3
42
1
18
1
5
1

2
4
<12>
22
2
36
i
24
1
5

3
3
23
3
42
1
18
1
5

-

-

-

(121

1
6
(121
21
~
30
1
32
5
“

(121
(12*
2
7
~
22

1
6
(121
21
30
1
31
1
5

(121
( 121
2
7
~
2l

45
24
"

34
7
24

_

‘

1
6
(121
21
30
1
31
1
5

(121
(121
2
7
21
38
7
25
-

i

-

See fo otn otes at end of tables.




A l l industries

Manu fa ctu ri ng

Nonma nu factu ring

Pub lic utilities

(121
3
~
16
1
57
3
18
2
(121

( 12»
3
17
2
55
~
21
2
(1 21

4
~
15
(1 21
58
4
17
~
2
(121

(121

(121
3
16
1
57
2
18
1
2
(121

(121
3
“
17
2
54
20

(121
3
~
16
1
55
2
18
i
2
1
(121

(1 21
3
~
17
2
48
26

-

25 YE A R S OF S E R V I C E :
1 WEEK -------------------------------------------------------------2 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS ---------3 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER 4 WEEKS ---------4 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 4 AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ---------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------OVER 5 AND UNDER 6 WEEKS ---------6 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------8 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------------30

Manufacturing

31

3
(121

3
( 121

_

2
26
62
10
“

_

4

(121

15
(1 2 1
58
2
17
2
2
(1 2 1

2
~
25
53
10
10

_

_

4
15
(1 2 1
58
2
15
2
2
1
(1 21

(12»
2
25
52
10
10
—

Table B-6. Health, insurance, and pension plans for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Offi ce w o r k e r s

P ro d uc tio n and related w o r k e r s
It e m
A l l industries

PE R CE NT

Ma nu fa ctu ri ng

Pu b lic utilities

Nonma nu factu ring

A l l industries

Ma nu fa ctu ri ng

Nonm anu fa ctu rin g

P u b lic uti lit ies

OF WORKERS
WORKERS -----------------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

IN E S T A B L I S H M E N T S P R O V I D I N G AT
L E A S T ONE OF TH E B E N E F I T S
SHOWN BE LO W 15------------------------------------------------

96

97

9ft

100

99

99

99

100

L I F E I N S U R A N C E --------------------------------------------N O N C O N T R IB U TO R Y PLA NS --------------------

90
79

90
78

89
79

100
96

98
82

97
79

98
83

100
99

A C C I D E N T A L D EA TH AND
DISMEMBERMENT IN S U R A N C E ----------------N O N C O N T R IB U TO R Y PL A N S --------------------

71
61

79
67

62
5ft

78
75

80
68

83
69

79
68

61
61

SICKNESS
OR S I C K

63

61

6ft

90

92

90

93

96

1 ft
15

14
13

19
18

37
37

26
20

32
28

23
17

39
39

42

ft6

39

80

79

7ft

8l

72

16

8

25

n

12

12

12

24

L O N G -T E R M D I S A B I L I T Y
I N S U R A N C E ------------------------ --------------------------------N O N C O N T R IB U T O R Y PLA NS --------------------

18
12

16
10

19
14

37
29

5ft
39

37
26

60
43

50
39

H O S P I T A L I Z A T I O N I N S U R A N C E -------------N O N C O N T R IB U T O R Y PLA NS --------------------

95
80

97
8ft

93
76

100
8ft

99
58

99
78

99
51

100
81

S U R G IC A L IN S U R A N C E ---------------------------------N O N C O N T R IB U T O R Y PLA NS --------------------

95
80

97
8ft

93
76

100
8ft

99
58

99
77

99
51

100
81

M ED IC A L IN S U R A N C E ------------------------------------N O N C O N TR IB U TO R Y PLA NS --------------------

91
80

96
8ft

91
76

100
8ft

98
58

99
77

98
51

100
81

MAJOR M EO IC A L IN S U R A N C E
N O N C O N T R IB U T O R Y PLA NS

--------------------------------------

91
76

89
77

92
75

100
8ft

99
58

99
76

99
51

100
81

D EN TA L IN S UR A N C E --------------------------------------N O N C O N T R IB U T O R Y PL A N S --------------------

62
58

6ft
61

60
56

89
89

6ft
43

70
63

62
35

95
95

R E T IR E M E N T P E N S I O N ---------------------------------N O N C O N T R IB U T O R Y PLA NS --------------------

69
63

66
59

73
66

81
76

85
75

86
7ft

85
75

90
87

ALL

F U LL-TIM E

AND A C C I D E N T IN S U R A N C E
L E A V E OR BOTH 16--------------------

S I C K N E S S ANO A C C I D E N T
IN SU RA NC E --------------------------------------------------N O N C O N TR IB U T O R Y PLA N S -------------S I C K LEA V E ( F U L L PAY AND NO
W A I T I N G P E R I O O ) ---------------------------------S I C K LEA V E ( P A R T I A L PAY OR
W A I T I N G P E R I O D ) ----------------------------------

See footnotes at end o f tables.




32

Table B-7. Life insurance plans for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978
Produ ction and re la ted w o rk ers

O ffic e w o rk ers

Manufacturing

A l l industries

A ll in du stries

Manufacturing

Ite m
A ll
plans 1
7

TYPE

OF
OF

N on con tribu tory
plans 1
7

A ll
plans 1
7

N on con tribu tory
plans 1
7

A ll
plans 1
7

N on con tribu tory
plans 1
7

A ll
plans 1
7

Noncontributory
plans 1
7

22

29

25

PLAN ANO AMOUNT
INSURANCE

A L L F U L L - T I M E WORKERS ARE P R O V I O E D T H E SAME
F L A T - S U M D O L L A R A MO UN T:
P E R C E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E W ORK ERS 18--------------------------------AMOUNT OF IN S U R A N C E P R O V I D E D : 1
9
M E A N -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------MEOIAN -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) -----------------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------------------

AMOUNT OF IN S U R A N C E I S BA SED ON A S C HE D U L E
WHIC H I N D I C A T E S A S P E C I F I E D DO LL AR AMOUNT OF
I N S U R A N C E FOR A S P E C I F I E D L E N G T H OF S E R V I C E :
P E R C E N T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E WORKERS18 ----------------------AMOUNT OF I N S U R A N C E P R O V I D E O 19 A F T E R :
6 MONTHS OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N -------------------------------------------------------------------------------M EDI AN -------------------------------------------------------------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) -------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------1 YEAR OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N -------------------------------------------------------------------------------M EDI AN -------------------------------------------------------------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------5 YE A RS OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N -------------------------------------------------------------------------------M EDI AN -------------------------------------------------------------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------M IO O L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------10 Y E A R S OF s e r v i c e :
M E A N -------------------------------------------------------------------------------MED IAN -------------------------------------------------------------------------M IO O L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------M IO OL E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------2 0 YE A R S OF S E R V I C E :
M E A N -------------------------------------------------------------------------------ME OI AN -------------------------------------------------------------------------MI D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) -------------------

56
15.600
* 5.000
*2 . 0 0 0 - 8 . 0 0 0
*2 . 0 0 0 - 1 0 . 3 0 0

50
* 5.800
* 5.000
* 2 . 0 0 0 - 9 .0 00
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0

3

51
*5.400
* 5.000
* 2 .0 0 0 - 7 .5 00
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0

6

* 5.700
*5.00 0
* 2 . 0 0 0 - 7 .5 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0

4

25
* 6.100
* 5.00 0
* 2 .5 0 0 - 9 .0 00
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0

1

*6.300
* 5.000
* 2 .5 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 3 .0 0 0

1

*2.500
(6 )
(6 >
(6 )

*6.200
* 5.00 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
* 2 ,0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0

3

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

*6.600
*6.000
* 2 , 500- 1 0 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 ,0 0 0

2

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 »

* 4.800
* 5.00 0
*5 . 0 0 0 - 5 . 0 0 0
*2 . 0 0 0 - 6 . 0 0 0

*5.000
* 5.000
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 5 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 - 5 .0 00

* 4.70 0
* 5.00 0
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 5 .0 00
* 2 .0 0 0 - 6 .0 00

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

* 3.500
* 5.00 0
* 1 . 0 0 0 - 6 .0 0 0
* 1 .0 0 0 - 6 .0 00

* 4.800
* 5.000
*5 . 0 0 0 - 5 . 0 0 0
*2 . 0 0 0 - 6 . 0 0 0

*5.100
*5.000
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 5 .0 0 0
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 5 .0 00

*4.700
*5.000
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 5 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 - 6 .0 0 0

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 >

* 2.50 0
*3.00 0
* 5 0 0 - 5 .0 0 0
* 5 0 0 - 6 .0 00

*1.900
*500
* 5 0 0 - 3 .0 00
* 5 0 0 - 5 ,0 0 0

*2,30 0
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

(6 )
(6 )
(6 >
(6 )

*6.500
*5.000
$5 . 0 0 0 - 6 . 0 0 0
*5 . 0 0 0 - 1 0 . 0 0 0

*6.900
*5.000
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0

*6.100
*5.00 0
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 6 .0 0 0
* 5 .00 0 -1 0* 0 00

(6 )
(6 >
(6 )
(6 >

*6.60 0
* 6.00 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

*6.700
* 2,000
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

* 4.10 0
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

(6 >
(6 )
(6 )
(6 >

* 1 0 .1 0 0
*8.000
*8 . 0 0 0 - 1 0 . 0 0 0
*5 . 0 0 0 - 2 0 . 0 0 0

* 1 1 .5 0 0
*8.000
* 8 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 8 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0

*9.40 0
*8.000
* 6 . 0 0 0 - 8 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

* 9,10 0
* 6.00 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0

* 9.60 0
*2.000
* 2 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0

* 5,70 0
( 6)
(6 )
(6 )

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 >

*12 .1 0 0
*8.000
*8 . 0 0 0 - 1 0 . 0 0 0
*5 . 0 0 0 - 3 0 . 0 0 0

* 1 3 .5 0 0
* 8.00 0
* 8 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 8 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

* 1 1 .9 0 0
*8.000
* 8 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

* 1 1 .6 0 0
*10 .0 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -2 3 .3 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

* 1 1 .9 0 0
*2.000
* 2 .0 0 0 -2 3 .3 0 0
* 2 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

*8.10 0
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

(6 )
(6 )
(6 )
(6 )

See footn otes at end o f tables.




45

33

Table B-7. Life insurance plans for full-time workers in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif., October 1978— Continued
O ffic e w o rk e rs

Prod u ctio n and re la ted w o rk ers
Manufacturing

A l l in du stries

M anufacturing

A l l in du stries

Ite m
A ll
plans 1
7

N on con tribu tory
plans 1
7

A ll
plans 1
7

Noncontributory
plans 1
7

A ll
plans 1
7

N on con tribu tory
plans 1
7

A ll
plans 1
7

N on con tribu tory
plans 1
7

T Y P E OF PLAN AND AMOUNT
OF I N S U R A N C E - C O N T I N U E O

AMOUNT OF IN S U R A N C E I S BAS ED ON A SC HE D UL E
U H I C H I N D I C A T E S A S P E C I F I E D DOL LAR AMOUNT OF
IN SU RA N CE FOR A S P E C I F I E D AMOUNT OF E A R N I N G S :
PE RCE NT OF A L L F U L L - T I M E WORKERS18 ------------------------AMOUNT OF IN S U R A N C E P R O V ID E D 1 I F :
9
ANNUAL E A R N IN G S ARE * 5 , 0 0 0 :
M E A N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------M E DIA N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------M IO OL E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------ANNUAL E A R N IN G S ARE * 1 0 . 0 0 0 :
M E A N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------M EDIA N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------M IDD LE RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------MIO OL E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------ANNUAL E A R N IN G S ARE * 1 5 . 0 0 0 :
M E A N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------M EDIA N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------M IDD LE RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------ANNUAL EA R N IN G S ARE * 2 0 . 0 0 0 :
M E A N ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------m e d i a n ---------------------------------------------------------------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) ---------------------M IO OL E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ----------------------

AMOUNT OF IN S UR A N C E I S EX PR E S S E D AS A F A C TO R OF
ANNUAL E A R N I N G S : 20
PE R CE NT OF A L L F U L L - T I M E WORK ERS 18--------------------------F A C T O R OF ANNUAL E A R N IN G S U SED TO C A L C U L A T E
AMOUNT OF i n s u r a n c e : 1 20
9
M E A N -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------M EDIAN -----------------------------------------------------------------------------M I OO LE RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) -----------------------M I D D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) -----------------------PE RC E NT OF A L L F U L L - T I M E WORKERS COVERED BY
PLANS NOT S P E C I F Y I N G A MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF
IN SUR AN CE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------PE RC E NT OF A L L F U L L - T I M E WORKERS COVERED RY
PLANS S P E C I F Y I N G A MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF
IN SU RA N CE ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------S P E C I F I E D MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF I N S U R A N C E : 1
9
M E A N ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------M E DIA N -----------------------------------------------------------------------------M I D OL E RANGE ( 5 0 P E R C E N T ) -----------------------M ID D L E RANGE ( 8 0 P E R C E N T ) ------------------------

AMOUNT OF IN SU RA N C E I S RASED
OF p l a n :
PE RC EN T OF A L L F U L L - T I M E

ON SOME

OTHER

16

14

20

38

26

27

21

*7.10 0
*6.00 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0
* * .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0

*6.800
*5.000
* 5 .0 0 0 - 9 .5 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0

* 7 . AOO
*5.00 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0

*7.300
*5.000
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0

* 8.000
*7.000
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 2 .5 0 0

*7.50 0
* 6.000
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 0 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 2 .5 0 0

*7.100
*5.00 0
* 5 . 0 0 0 - 9 ,5 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -1 1 .0 0 0

*6,300
*5.000
* 5 ,0 0 0 - 9 .5 00
* 5 ,0 0 0 - 9 .5 00

* 1 2 .5 0 0
*11 .5 0 0
t l O . 0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 5 .0 0 0 -2 2 .0 0 0

* 11 .6 0 0
* 1 1 .5 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -1 0 .5 0 0
* 7 .5 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

* 1 2 .3 0 0
* 1 1 .5 0 0
* 10 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 7 .5 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

*11.900
*11 .5 0 0
* 10 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 8 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

* 1 8 .7 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -2 5 .0 0 0
* 10 .0 0 0 -3 7 .5 0 0

* 1 5 .1 0 0
* 1 2 .0 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -2 5 .0 0 0

* 1 3 ,9 0 0
* 12 .0 0 0
* 1 0 ,0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0
* 8 .0 0 0 -2 2 ,0 0 0

* 1 2 .5 0 0
* 1 2 .0 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -1 5 ,0 0 0
* 8 .0 0 0 -1 5 .0 0 0

* 1 8 .1 0 0
* 1 6 .5 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

* 1 6 .6 0 0
* 1 6 .0 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0-20 .00 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0-20 .00 0

* 18 .0 0 0
*16 .5 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0
* 1 0 .0 0 0 -2 1 .0 0 0

* l 6 » 900
*16*500
* 1 5 . 000- 2 0 . 0 0 0
* 1 8 .0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0

* 2 7 .2 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -3 7 .5 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0-50 .00 0

* 2 2 .2 0 0
* 16 .0 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -3 7 .5 0 0

* 2 1 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0
* 1 5 ,0 0 0 -2 1 .0 0 0
* 1 8 ,0 0 0 -3 5 .0 0 0

* 1 8 .8 0 0
* 1 5 ,0 0 0
* 18 ,0 0 0 -2 0 .0 0 0
* 1 8 ,0 0 0 -3 1 ,0 0 0

* 2 3 .* 0 0
* 2 1 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0
S 10 * 0 0 0 - 4 2 * 0 0 0

* 21 .1 0 0
* 20 .0 0 0
* 20 .0 0 0 -2 2 .0 0 0
* 12 .5 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

* 22 .9 0 0
* 22 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0 -2 5 .0 0 0
* 1 2 .5 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

* 2 1 .2 0 0
*20 .0 0 0
* 20 .0 0 0 -2 2 .0 0 0
* 18 .0 0 0 -3 0 .0 0 0

* 3 8 ,2 0 0
*25 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0-50 .00 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -6 0 .0 0 0

* 28 .5 0 0
* 2 1 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0 -8 0 .0 0 0
* 1 5 .0 0 0 -5 0 .0 0 0

* 2 7 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0
* 2 0 .0 0 0 -3 3 .0 0 0
* 1 8 .0 0 0 -8 2 .0 0 0

* 2 3 .5 0 0
* 20 ,0 0 0
* 18 .0 0 0 -3 0 ,0 0 0
* 18 .0 0 0 -3 5 ,0 0 0

8

1 .2 5
1 .0 0
1 .0 0 -1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0

7

1 .2 0
1 .0 0
1 .0 0 -1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0

5

7

1 .2 8
1 .50
1 .0 0 -1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -1 .5 0

1 .1 9
1 .0 0
1 .0 0 -1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -1 .5 0

6

5

5

3

2

2

2

2

* 6 0 .9 0 0
S 50 * 000
* 3 0 .0 0 0 - 7 5.00 0
* 3 0 .0 0 0 -1 0 0 .0 0 0

* 5 8 .8 0 0
* 5 0 .0 0 0
* 3 0 .0 0 0 - 7 5.000
* 3 0 .0 0 0 - 8 7.000

S 50*400
* 5 0 .0 0 0
* 3 0 .0 0 0 - 7 5.000
* 3 0 .0 0 0 - 7 5.000

(6
(6
(6
(6

)
)
)
)

32

1 .5 0
1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0

19

12
* 1 1 7 .7 00
* 1 0 0 .0 00
* 1 0 0 .0 0 0 -1 5 0 .0 0 0
* 5 0 .0 0 0 -2 0 0 ,0 0 0

27

1 .8 9
1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0

18

9
* 1 3 1 .3 0 0
* 1 0 0 .0 0 0
* 8 7 ,0 0 0 -2 0 0 .0 0 0
* 3 0 .0 0 0 -2 5 0 .0 0 0

30

1 .4 5
1 .5 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0

28

6

* 5 7 ,2 0 0
* 5 0 ,0 0 0
* 3 0 ,0 0 0 - 75.00 0
* 3 0 .0 0 0 -1 0 0 ,0 0 0

23

1 .8 2
1 .0 2
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0
1 .0 0 -2 .0 0

19

4
* 59 .9 0 0
* 30 ,0 0 0
* 30. 000- 100 .0 0 0
* 3 0 , 0 00 - 1 0 0 . 0 0 0

T YP E

WORKERS18-------------------------

5

5

7

See footnotes at end o f tables.




17

34

7

4

4

7

7

Footnotes

Some of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Includes payments other than "length of t i m e , " such as percentage
4
of annual earnin gs or f l a t - s u m payments, converted to an equivalent time
b a s is ; fo r exam p le, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 w eek's
pay. P e r io d s of se rv ic e are chosen a r b it r a r i ly and do not ne c e s sa rily reflect
individual p ro v is io ns fo r p ro g re s s i o n ; fo r exam ple, changes in proportions
at 10 y ears include changes between 5 and 10 y e a r s . Estimates are cumula­
tive. Thus, the pro portion el igible fo r at least 3 w e e k s ' pay after 10 years
includes those el igible fo r at least 3 w e e k s ' pay after fe w e r years of service.
1 E stim ates listed after type of benefit are fo r al l plans fo r which
5
at least a part of the cost is borne by the em plo yer .
"Noncontributory
p la n s" include only those financed entirely by the em plo yer. Excluded are
legally requ ir ed plans, such as w o r k e r s ' disability compensation, social s e ­
curity, and r a il r o a d retirement.
1 Unduplicated total of w o r k e r s receiving sick leave o r sickness and
6
accident insurance shown separa tely below. Sick leave plans are limited to
those which definitely es ta bli sh at least the m in imum nu mber of day s' pay
that each em ployee can expect. Info rm al sick leave allowances determined
on an individual b a s is ar e excluded.
1 E stim ate s under " A l l p la n s" relate to all plans for which at least
7
a part of the cost is borne by the em plo yer. Estim ate s under "N o nc on trib ­
utory p lan s" include only those financed entirely by the employer.
1 F o r " A l l i n d u s t r i e s , " all fu ll-t im e production and related w o rk e rs
8
o r office w o r k e r s equal 100 percent.
F o r " M a n u fa c tu rin g ," all fu ll-tim e
production and related w o r k e r s or office w o r k e r s in manufacturing equal 100
percent.
1 The m ean amount is computed by multiplying the number of workers
9
pro vid ed insurance by the amount of in suran ce provided , totaling the p r o d ­
ucts, and dividing the sum by the nu m ber of w o r k e r s . The median indicates
that half of the w o r k e r s ar e pro vided an amount equal to o r s m a l le r and half
an amount equal to o r l a r g e r than the amount shown. Middle range (50 p e r ­
cent)— a fourth of the w o r k e r s are pro vided an amount equal to o r le s s than
the s m a l l e r amount and a fourth ar e pro vid ed an amount equal to o r m ore
than the l a r g e r amount. M iddle range (80 percent)— 10 percent of the w o r k ­
e r s ar e p ro v id ed an amount equal to o r le s s than the s m a l l e r amount and 10
percent are pro vid ed an amount equal to or m o re than the l a r g e r amount.
2 A facto r of annual earnings is the nu m ber by which annual earnings
0
ar e multiplied to determine the amount of insurance provided. F o r example,
a factor of 2 indicates that fo r annual earnings of $ 10,000 the amount of
in suran ce pro vid ed is $ 20,000.

1 Standard hours reflect the w ork week fo r which em ployees receiv e
th eir r e g u l a r s tr aigh t-t im e s a l a r i e s (exclusive of pay fo r overt ime at r e g ­
u la r and/or p r e m i u m r a t e s ) , and the earnings corres pond to these weekly
hours.
2 The m ean is computed fo r each job by totaling the earnings of
al l w o r k e r s and dividing by the nu mber of w o rk e rs .
The median d e s i g ­
nates position— half of the w o r k e r s receiv e the same o r m o r e and half r e ­
ceive the sam e o r le s s than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates of pay; a fourth of the w o r k e r s earn the same o r le s s than
the l o w e r o f these rates and a fourth earn the same o r m o re than the
higher rate.
3 E a rn in g s data relate only to w o r k e r s whose sex identification was
pro vid ed by the es tablish ment.
4 E x clud es p r e m i u m pay fo r overtime and for w o rk on weekends,
holid ay s, and late shifts.
5 E s tim a tes fo r p e rio d s ending p r io r to 1976 relate to men only for
skilled maintenance and unskilled plant w o r k e r s .
A ll other estimates r e ­
late to m en and women.
6 Dat a do not m eet publication c r it e r ia or data not available.
7 F o r m a l l y establi sh ed minimum re g u la r str aigh t-tim e hiring s a l ­
a r i e s that a r e paid fo r stan dard work weeks.
8 E xclud es w o r k e r s in su b c le r ic a l jobs such as m e s s e n g e r .
9 Data ar e p res en t ed fo r all standard wo rk weeks combined, and for
the most common standard w ork w eeks reported.
1 Includes all production and related w o rk e rs in establishm ents
0
cu rrently ope rating late shifts, and establishments whose fo r m a l provisio ns
c o v e r late shifts, even though the establishments w e r e not currently
ope rating late shifts.
1 L e s s than 0.05 perce nt.
1
1 L e s s than 0.5 percent.
2
1 A l l combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount;
3
f o r ex am p le, the pro po rtio n of w o r k e r s receiving a total of 10 days
includes those with 10 fu ll days and no half days, 9 full days and 2
half days, 8 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
P r o po rtio ns then
w e r e cumulated.




35

Appendix A.
Scope and Method
of Survey
In each of the 75 1 ar eas cu rrently surv ey ed, the B u r e a u obtains
wages and related benefits data fr o m repr es en ta tive establishm ents within
six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transportation, communication,
and other public utilities; w holesale tr ade; retail trad e; finance, in surance,
and re al estate; and s e r v i c e s . Government operations and the construction
and extractive industries ar e excluded. Establis hm en ts having f e w e r than a
p r e s c r ib e d num ber of w o r k e r s are also excluded be cause of insufficient
employment in the occupations studied. Appendix table 1 shows the nu mber
of establishments and w o r k e r s estimated to be within the scope of this
survey, as w e l l as the num ber actually studied.
B u r e a u field repr es enta tives obtain data by p e rs o n a l visits at 3 - y e a r
in tervals. In each of the two intervening y e a r s , information on employment
and occupational earnings only is collected by a combination of p erso nal
visit, m a i l questionnaire, and telephone in terview fr o m establishments
participating in the previ ou s survey.

A sample of the establishments in the scope of the survey is
selected fo r study p r i o r to each p ers o n al visit survey .
This s am ple , less
establishments which go out of busines s o r ar e no lo n g e r within the industrial
scope of the survey, is retained fo r the following two annual surveys.
In
most cas es , establishm ents new to the a r e a ar e not cons ider ed in the scope
of the survey until the selection of a sample fo r a p e rs o n a l visit survey.
The sampling p ro ced ures involve detailed stratification of all
establishments within the scope of an individual a r e a sur vey by industry
and nu mber of em ployees.
F r o m this stratified universe a probability
sample is selected, with each establishment having a p red ete rm in ed chance
of selection.
To obtain optimum accuracy at m in im um cost, a gr e a te r
proportion of la rge than s m all es tablishments is selected.
When data are
combined, each establishment is weighted acc ordi ng to its probability of
selection so that unbiased estimates are generated.
F o r ex am ple, if one
out of four establishm ents is selected, it is given a weight of 4 to re pr es en t
it self plus three others.
An alternate of the sam e origin a l probability is
chosen in the same in d u s t ry -s i z e clas sificati on if data are not available
fr o m the origin a l sample m e m b e r .
If no suitable substitute is available,
additional weight is as signed to a sam ple m e m b e r that is s im i la r to the
m issin g unit.
1 Included in the 75 areas are 5 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract.
These areas are
Akron, Ohio; Birmingham, A la .; N orfolk—V irginia Beach—Portsmouth and Newport News—Hampton, Va. —N.C. ;
Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N . Y . ; and U tica—Rom e, N . Y .
In addition, the Bureau conducts more
lim ited area studies in approximately 100 areas at the request o f the Employment Standards Administration of
the U. S. Department o f Labor.




Occupations and earnings
Occupations selected for study are common to a varie ty of m anufa c­
turing and nonmanufacturing in dustri es, and are of the following types: (1)
Office cl eri cal; (2) p rofe ssio nal and technical; (3) maintenance, toolro om ,
and powerplant; and (4) m aterial movement and custodial.
Occupational
cl assification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to take
account of interestablishment varia tio n in duties within the sam e job.
Occupations selected fo r study are liste d and d es c rib e d in appendix B.
Unless otherwise indicated, the earnings data following the job titles
ar e fo r all industries combined. E arn in gs data fo r some of the occupations
listed and des cribed, or fo r some industry divisions within the scope of the
survey , ar e not presented in the A - s e r i e s tables because either (1) em p lo y ­
ment in the occupation is too sm all to pro vid e enough data to m erit p r e s e n ­
tation, o r (2) there is possibility of d is c lo s u re of individual establishm ent
data. Separate men's and wom en 's earnin gs data are not pre sented when the
num ber of w o rk ers not identified by sex is 20 percent o r m o re of the men
o r women identified in an occupation.
E arn in gs data not shown separa tely
fo r industry divisions are included in data fo r all in dustries combined.
L ik e w is e, for occupations with m o re than one lev el, data ar e included in
the o v e ra ll classification when a subclassificatio n is not shown or information
to s ubclassify is not available.
Occupational employment and earnin gs data ar e shown fo r fu ll-tim e
w o r k e r s , i.e., those hired to work a r e g u l a r weekly schedule.
Earn in gs
data exclude premium pay fo r overtime and fo r w o rk on weekends, holidays,
and late shifts.
Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but co s t- o f -liv in g
allowances and incentive bonuses are included.
W eekly hours fo r office
c l e ri c a l and profe ssio nal and technical occupations r e f e r to the standard
work week (rounded to the nearest half ho ur) fo r which em ployees receive
re g u l a r straight-time s alaries (exclusiv e of pay fo r overt ime at r e g u la r
and/or prem ium rates).
A v era ge w eek ly earnin gs fo r these occupations
are rounded to the nearest half dollar. V e r t ic a l lines within the distribution
of w o r k e r s on some A -t a b le s indicate a change in the size of the clas s
in t e r v a ls ,
These surveys m eas u re the lev el of occupational earnings in an a r e a
at a p artic u la r time. Com pariso ns of individual occupational a v e r a g e s o v er
time m ay not reflect expected wage changes.
The av er a g e s fo r individual
jobs are affected by changes in wages and employment patterns. F o r example,
proportions of w o rk e rs employed by h igh- o r lo w - w a g e f i r m s m ay change,
o r high-w age w o rk e rs may advance to bette r jobs and be replaced by new
w o r k e r s at low er rates.
Such shifts in employment oould d ec re a s e an
occupational av erage even though m ost esta blishments in an a r e a incre ase
w ages during the year. Changes in earnin gs of occupational gr oups, shown in
table A - 7, ar e better indicators of w age trends than are earnings changes fo r
individual jobs within the groups.

A v e r a g e earnin gs reflect composite, areawide estim ates. Industries
and establish ments d iffe r in pay level and job staffing, and thus contribute
differently to the es ti m ate s f o r each job. Pay aver ages m ay fail to re fle ct
accura te ly the w age dif fe rentia l among jobs in individual establishments.
A v e r a g e pay lev els f o r men and women in selected occupations
should not be as s u m e d to reflect differences in pay of the sex es within
individual esta bli shm ents .
F a c t o r s which m ay contribute to diffe re nces
include p r o g r e s s i o n within esta blish ed rate ranges (only the rates paid
incumbents ar e collected) and p erfo rm ance of specific duties within the
g e n e ra l survey job d escri ptio ns. Job descriptions used to c la s s ify em ployees
in these survey s usually are m o r e genera liz ed than those used in individual
esta blishments and a llo w f o r m in or differences among establish ments in
spe cif ic duties p e r fo r m e d .
Occupational employment estimates represent the total in all e s t a b ­
lishments within the scope o f the study and not the nu mber actually surveyed.
B e c a u s e occupational s tructure s among establishments diffe r, estimates of
occupational employment obtained fr o m the sample of establish ments studied
s e rv e only to indicate the rela tiv e importance of the jobs studied.
These
d iffe rences in occupational structure do not affect m at erially the accuracy of
the earnin gs data.

E le ctron ic data p r o c e s s i n g 2
Com puter system s
analysts, cla s s e s
A , B , and C
Com puter p r o g r a m m e r s ,
cla s s e s A , B , and C
Ind ustr ial n u rs es
R eg is ter ed in du strial
nu rses
Skilled maintenance
Carpenters
E le ctric ians
P e rcen t changes fo r indivic
as fo llo ws:

Skilled maintenance—
Continued
P a in t e rs
Machinists
M echan ics (machinery)
M echanics (motor vehicle)
Pipe fit ters
To ol and die m akers
U ns k illed plant
Jan it ors, p o r te r s , and
cle aners
M a t e r ia l handling la b o re r s
a r e a s in the p r o g r a m are computed

1.

A v e r a g e earnings are computed fo r each occupation for
the 2 y e a r s being co m pared . The a v er ages ar e derived
f r o m earnin gs in those establish ments which ar e in the
survey both y e a r s ; it is assum ed that employment
re m ain s unchanged.

2.

E ach occupation is assig n ed a weight b as ed on its
proportionate employment in the occupational group in
the b as e y ear.

3.

These weights ar e used to compute group averages.
E ach occupation's a v erage earnings (computed in step 1)
is multiplied by its weight.
The products are totaled
to obtain a group a v erage.

4.

The ratio of group a v e r a g e s fo r 2 consecutive years is
computed by dividing the a v erage fo r the current year
by the a v e r a g e fo r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
The result—
e x p r e s s e d as a percent— less 100 is the percent change.

W a g e trends f o r selecte d occupational groups
The p erc ent in c r e a s e s presented in table A - 7 ar e b a s e d on changes
in av er a g e ho urly earnin gs of men and women in establishm ents re porting
the trend jobs in both the current and previous y e a r (matched establishments).
The data are adjusted to re m o v e the effect on av erage earnings of e m p lo y ­
ment shifts among es ta bli sh m ents and tu rn over of establishm ents included
in s urv ey sam p les .
The p erc ent in c re a s e s , ho wever, are still affected by
fa ctors other than w age in c r e a s e s .
H irin gs, lay offs, and tu rn over may
affect an es ta blishm en t a v e r a g e fo r an occupation when w o r k e r s ar e paid
under plains p ro vid in g a range of wage rates fo r individual job s . In p eriods
of i n c re a s e d hirin g, f o r ex am p le, new employees may enter at the bottom
of the ra nge, d e p r e s s in g the a v e r a g e without a change in wage rates.

The p erc ent changes relate to wage changes between the indicated
dates. When the tim e span between survey s is other than 12 months, annual
rates ar e shown.
(It is as s u m e d that wages in cre ase at a constant rate
between s u r v e y s . )

F o r a m o re detailed description of the method used to compute
these w age trend s, see " Im p r o v in g A r e a W age Su rvey I n d e x e s ," Monthly
L a b o r R e v i e w , January 1973, pp. 52-57.
Establishm en t p ractice s and supplem en tary wage provisio ns

Occupations used to compute w age trends are:
Office c l e r i c a l

Office c lerical— Continued

Secretaries
Sten o grap h ers , g e n e ra l
Steno grap hers, s en ior
T y p is ts , c l a s s e s
A and B
F ile c l e r k s , c l a s s e s A ,
B , and C
M essengers
Sw itc hboard o p e rat o r s

O r d e r cl erks, cla s s e s
A and B
Accounting clerk s,
cla s s e s A and B
Bookkeeping-m a chine
operators, class B
P a y r o l l clerks
Key entry o pe rators,
c las s es A and B




The incidence of selected establishment p ractic es and supplementary
wage pro v is io ns is studied fo r f u ll-t im e production and related w o rk e rs and
office w o r k e r s .
Producti on and re la ted w o r k e r s ( r e f e r r e d to hereaft er as
production w o r k e r s ) include w o rk in g s u p e r v i s o r s and all no ns up ervisory
workers
(including group l e a d e rs and tr a in e e s ) engaged in fabricating,
p ro c e s s in g , as s e m b lin g , inspection, receiv ing, stora ge, handling, pack­
ing, w arehousin g, shipping, maintenance, r e p a i r , janit orial and guard s e r ­
v ic e s , product development, a u x il ia ry production fo r plant's o w n use
(e .g ., pow erp lant), and re co rd keepin g and other s e rv ic e s closely a s s o c i ­
ated with the above production operations .
( C a fe te ria and route w o rk e rs
^ The earnings o f computer operators are not included in the w age trend computation ior this group.
A revised job description is being introduced in this survey which is not equivalent to the previous description.

are excluded in manufacturing in du stries but included in nonmanufacturing
in dustri es.)
In finance and in sura nce, no w o r k e r s are consider ed to be
production w o r k e r s . Office w o r k e r s include work ing s u p e rv is o r s and all nons up erv is ory w o r k e r s
(including lead w o r k e r s and t r a in e e s ) p erfo r m in g
c le ric a l o r related office functions in such departments as accounting,
advertisin g, purc has ing, collection, credit, finance, legal, p a y ro ll, personnel,
s ales , industrial relations , public relations, executive, o r transportation.
A dm inis tra tiv e, executive, p ro fes s io n al, and p a rt -ti m e em ployees as w e l l
as construction w o r k e r s utilized as sep arat e w o r k fo rces are excluded fr o m
both the production and office w o r k e r categori es.
M in im um entrance s a l a r i e s (table B - l ) . M in im um entrance s a la ri e s
fo r office w o r k e r s relate only to the establishments visited. B ecau se of the
optimum sampling techniques used and the p ro babil it y that l a r g e e s ta b lish ­
ments are m o re likely than s m a l l es tablishments to have fo r m a l entrance
rates above the s u b c le r ic a l lev el, the table is m o r e repr es en ta tive of polic ies
in medium and l a rg e establishments.
(The " X ' s " shown under standard
weekly hours indicate that no meaningful totals are ap plic able .)
Shift diffe rentials— manufacturing (table B - 2 ) . Data w e r e collected
on policies of manufacturing es tablishments re gard in g pay differentials fo r
production w o r k e r s on late shifts.
Establishm en ts co nsid ered as having
policies ar e those which (1) have p ro v is io ns in wri ti ng covering the operation
of late shifts, or (2) have ope rated late shifts at any time during the 12
months prece ding a survey. When establishments have s e v e r a l differentials
which v ar y by job, the differential applying to the m ajorit y of the production
w o r k e r s is recorded.
When establishments have different ials which apply
only to certain hours of w ork , the different ial applying to the m ajorit y of
the shift hours is recorded.
F o r purp oses of this study, a late shift is either a second (evening)
shift which ends at o r n e a r midnight o r a third (night) shift which starts at
o r near midnight.
Differentials fo r second and third shifts ar e s u m m ar iz ed sep arat ely
fo r (1) establishm ent p olic ie s (an esta bli shm ent's different ials ar e weighted
by all production w o r k e r s in the es tablishment at the time of the survey )
and (2) effective p ractic es (an es tabli sh m ent's differentials are weighted by
production w o r k e r s employed on the spe cified shift at the time of the survey).
Scheduled week ly hours; paid holidays; paid vacations; and health,
insurance, and pension p la n s . P r o v is io n s which apply to a m ajo rit y of the
production o r office w o r k e r s in an establishment are cons ider ed to apply to
all production o r office w o r k e r s in the establishment; a pract ice o r p ro vis io n
is considered nonexistent when it applies to le s s than a m ajo rit y .
Holidays;
vacations; and health, in sura nce, and pension plans are cons ider ed applicable
to employees curre ntly el ig ible fo r the benefits as w e ll as to em ployees who
w il l eventually becom e eligible.
Scheduled weekly hours and days (table B - 3 ) . Scheduled weekly
hours and days r e f e r to the nu m b er of hours and days p er week which fu ll ­
time first (day) shift w o r k e r s ar e expected to w o rk , whether paid fo r at
str aigh t-tim e or overt im e rates.
P a id holidays (table B - 4 ) . Holidays are included if w o r k e r s who
ar e not re quir ed to w o rk ar e paid fo r the time off and those requ ir ed to
w ork receiv e p re m iu m pay o r compensatory time off.
They ar e included
only if they are granted annually on a fo r m a l b a s is
(provided fo r in




written fo r m or established by custom). Holidays ar e included even though
in a p articu lar y e a r they fall on a nonworkday and employees ar e not
granted another day off.
Paid p e rs o n a l holiday pla ns, typically found in
the automobile and related indu stries , are included as paid holidays.
Data ar e tabulated to show the percent of w o r k e r s who (1) are
granted specific numbers of whole and half holidays and (2) are granted
specified
amounts of total holiday time (whole and half holidays ar e
aggrega ted).
P a i d vacations (table B - 5 ) . Esta blis hm ents report their method of
calculating vacation pay (time b a s i s , percent of annual earnin gs, fl a t - s u m
payment, etc.) and the amount of vacation pay granted.
Only b a s ic fo r m a l
plans are reported. Vacation bo nuses, v aca tio n -s av in g s plans, and "exte nded"
o r " s a b b a ti c a l" benefits beyond b as ic plans are excluded.
F o r tabulating vacation pay granted, al l pro visio ns are e x p re s s e d
on a time bas is .
Vacation pay calculated on other than a time b a s is is
converted to its equivalent time p eriod .
Two percent of annual earnin gs,
fo r ex am ple, is tabulated as 1 w eek 's vacation pay.
A l s o , provisions after each spe cified length of serv ice are related
to all production o r office w o rk e rs in an establish ment r e g a r d l e s s of length of
s erv ice. Vacation plans commonly pro vid e fo r a l a r g e r amount of vacation
pay as serv ice lengthens. Counts of production o r office w o r k e r s by length
of s e rv ic e w ere not obtained.
The tabulations of vacation pay granted
presen t, there fore, statistical m e a s u r e s of these provis io ns rather than
proportions of w o rk e rs actually receiving specific benefits.
Health, insuran ce, and pension plans (tables B - 6 and B - 7 ) . Health,
in su rance, and pension plans include plans fo r which the em p lo y er pays
either all o r part of the cost.
The cost m ay be (1) underwritten by a
c o m m e r c ia l insurance company or nonprofit organization, (2) covered by a
union fund to which the employer has contributed, o r (3) bo rne dire ctly by
the em p lo y er out of operating funds o r a fund set aside to co v er the cost.
A plan is included even though a m ajo rity of the em plo yees in an e s t a b li s h ­
ment do not choose to participate in it b ecause they are re qu ired to b e a r
part of its cost (provided the choice to participate is availa ble o r w ill
eventually become available to a m ajo rit y ).
L e g a l ly re qu ired plans such as
social security, ra ilro ad retirement, w o r k e r s ' disability compensation, and
te m p o ra ry disability insurance 3 are excluded.
3 Temporary disability insurance which provides benefits to covered workers disabled by injury or illness
which is not work-connected is mandatory under State laws in C alifornia, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode
Island. Establishment plans which m eet only the leg a l requirements are excluded from these data, but those
trader which (1 ) employers contribute more than is le g a lly required or (2 ) benefits exceed those specified in the
State law are included.
In Rhode Island, benefits are paid out o f a State fund to which only employees
contribute. In each of the other three States, benefits are paid either from a State fund or through a private plan.
State fund financing: In California, only em ployees contribute to the State fund; in New Jersey,
employees and employers contribute; in New York, em ployees contribute up to a specified maximum
and employers pay the difference between the em ployees' share and the total contribution required.
Private plan financing: In California and New Jersey, em ployees cannot be required to contribute
more than they would i f they were covered by the State fund; in New York, em ployees can agree
to contribute more i f the State rules that the additional contribution is commensurate with the
benefit provided.
Federal legislation ( Railroad Unemployment Insurance A c t) provides temporary disability insurance benefits
to railroad workeis for illness or injury, whether w ork-connected or not. The legislation requires that employers
bear the entire cost of the insurance.

L ife in su rance includes fo rm a l plans providing indemnity (usually
through an in su rance p olic y) in case of death of the co v ered w o r k e r .
Information is al so p ro v id ed in table B - 7 on types of life in su rance plans
and the amount of c o v erage ip all industries combined and in manufacturing.
Acciden tal death and d is m em berm ent insurance is lim ited to plans
which p rovid e benefit payments in case of death o r loss of lim b o r sight as a
d irect re sult of an accident.
Sickness and accident insurance includes only those plans which
p rovid e that p re d e te rm in e d cash payments be made dire ctly to employees
who lose time fr o m w o r k because of illn es s o r injury, e .g., $ 50 a week
fo r up to 26 w eek s of disability.
Sick leave plans are limited to fo rm a l p l a n s 4 which provide fo r
continuing an e m p lo y e e 's pay during absence fr o m work b ecause of illness.
Data collected distinguish between (1) plans which provide full pay with no
waiting p eriod , and (2) plans which either provide part ia l pay o r requ ir e a
waiting peri od.
L o n g - t e r m disab il it y insurance plans provide payments to totally
d is abled em plo yees upon the expiration of their paid sick leave and/or sic k­
ness and accident in su ran ce, o r after a pred eterm ined p erio d of disability
(typically 6 months). Paym ents are made until the end of the disability, a
m a x im u m ag e, o r elig ib il it y fo r retirement benefits.
Fu ll o r p artial p ay ­
ments are al m ost al w ays re duced by social security, w o r k e r s ' disability
compensation, and p riv a te pension benefits payable to the disabled employee.
Hospitalization, s u r g ic a l, and m ed ical insurance plans re ported
in these s urv ey s p ro v id e full o r p art ial payment fo r basic s e rv ic e s re ndered.
H ospitalization in su rance co v ers hospital room and b o ard and may co ver
other hospital exp enses. S u rg ic a l insurance covers s urgeo ns' fees. M edical
in su ran ce co v ers d o c t o r s ' fees fo r home, office, or hospital calls.
Plan s
re st r i c t e d to p o s t -o p e r a t iv e m ed ic al care or a doctor's care fo r m in or
ailments at a w o r k e r ' s p lace of employment ar e not co nsid ered to be
m ed ica l in su ran ce.
M a j o r m e d ic a l in su rance cover age applies to s e r v i c e s which go
beyond the b a s ic s e r v i c e s cover ed under hospitalization, s u r g ic a l, and
m e d ic a l in su ran ce.
M a j o r m ed ica l insurance typically (1) re q u ir e s that a
" de du ctib le" (e .g., $5 0 ) be met befo re benefits begin, (2) has a coinsurance
fea ture that re q u ir e s the in su re d to pay a portion (e.g., 20 perce nt) of
ce rta in ex p en s es , and (3) has a specified d ollar m axim um of benefits (e.g.,
$ 10, 000 a y e a r ).
Dental in su ra nce plans provide norm al dental se rv ic e benefits,
usually fo r fillin g s, extra ctio ns, and X - r a y s . Plans which provide benefits
only fo r o r a l s u r g e r y o r re pairing accident damage ar e not reported.
Re tir em ent pension plans provide fo r re g u la r payments to the
re tir e e fo r life.
Included are d e fe r re d p ro fit -s h ar in g plans which provide
the option of p urchasin g a lifetime annuity.
4 A n establishment is considered as having a form al plan if it specifies at least the minimum number
o f days o f sick lea ve a vailable to each em ployee.
Such a plan need not be written, but informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t agreem en t co v erage
The following tabulation shows the percent of fu ll-t im e production and
office w o r k e r s employed in es tablishments in the L o s A n geles —
Long Beach
a r e a in which a union contract or contracts co v ered a m ajo rit y of the w o rk ers
in the respectiv e c at ego ries , October 197 8:
Pr oducti on and
re la ted w o r k e r s

Office w o rk e rs

59
59
59
87

18
11
20
76

A l l industries
M a n u f a c t u r i n g _________
Nonmanufacturing
Publi c utilities ____

A n establishm ent is co nsid ered to have a contract covering all
production or office w o r k e r s if a m a jo rit y of such w o r k e r s is covered by
a l a b o r-m a n a g e m e n t agreem en t.
T h e r e f o r e , a l l other production or office
w o r k e r s a r e employed in es tablishm ents that either do not have l a b o r management contracts in effect, or have contracts that apply to few e r than
half of their production or office w o r k e r s .
Estim ates a r e not n ec es sa rily
re presenta tive of the extent to which a l l w o r k e r s in the a r e a may be co vered
by the pro vis io ns of l a b o r-m a n a g e m e n t a gr eem en ts , because s m all e s ta b ­
lishments a r e excluded and the in du strial scope of the survey is limited.

Industrial com position in manufacturing
A lm o s t two-fifths of the w o r k e r s within the scope of the sur vey in
the L o s A n g e l e s —Long Beach a r e a w e r e employed in manufacturing firm s.
The following presents the m a j o r in dustry groups and specific industries
as a perce nt of all manufacturing:
Industry groups
Tra nspo rtatio n equipment ___ 22
E le c tr ic and electronic
equipm ent_____________________ 16
M achinery , except
e l e c t r i c a l ______________________
8
Fo od and kindred p r o d u c t s ___
7
F a b r ic a te d met al p r o d u c t s ___
7
A p p a r e l and other textile
p r o d u c t s _______________________
5

Sp ecific industries
A i r c r a f t and p a r t s ____________ 14
Communication equipment___ 10

This information is b as ed on estimates of total employment derived
fr o m un iv erse m a t e ria ls compiled b e fo r e actual survey.
Proport ions in
vario us industry divisions m ay diffe r fr o m proportions ba sed on the results
of the s urv ey as shown in appendix table 1.

Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied
in Los Angeles—Long Beach, Calif.,1 October 1978
N um ber o f establish m ents

Industry d iv is io n 2

M inim um
em ploym en t
in esta b lish ­
ments in scope
of study

W ork ers in establish m ents
W ithin scope o f study

W ithin scope
o f stu d y1
3
2

Studied
Studied
Number

ALL

F u ll- tim e

T o t a l4
P e rc e n t

re la ted w o rk e rs

F u ll-tim e
o ffic e w o rk ers

T o t a l4

ESTABLISHMENTS

-------------------------------------------------

-

4 .1 * 7

321

1 .376.317

100

6 7 1 ,9 9 *

2 *5 ,3 7 *

4 6 0 .1 0 6

MA NU F A C TU R IN G -------------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TUR IN G --------------------------------------------------T R A N S P O R T A T I O N . C O M M U N I C A T I O N . AND
OTHER P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 5 ----------------------------------------------------WHOLE SALE TR A O E
----------------------------------------------R E T A I L TR AD E
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------F I N A N C E . I N S U R A N C E . AND R EA L E S T A T E
----------S E R V I C E S 7 ------------------------------------------------------------

100

-

1 .3 8*
2 .7 63

11*
207

5 5 1 .3 7 6
82* .9 * 1

40
60

3 5 3 .5 9 6
3 1 8 .3 9 8

66.601
1 7 8 ,7 7 3

1 88 ,7 2 8
2 7 1 .3 7 8

100
50
100
50
50

152
752
473
*81
812

3*
36
35
33
63

125 .5 2 9
106 .3 5 5
238 .1 0 3
135.511
191 ,1 7 3

9
8
17
10
14

56.522

3 0 . 962

92,669
1 3,1*7
69,80 6
61.75 2
2 9,344

-------------------------------------------------

-

4 59

121

7 7 5 .2 1 0

100

3 2 3 .8 3 *

1 5 2 .7 5 9

* 19 ,7 7 8

MA NU FA CT UR IN G -------------------------------------------------------NO NMA NU FAC TUR IN G --------------------------------------------------T R A N S P O R T A T I O N . C O M M U N I C A T I O N . AND
OTHER P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S 5 --------------------------------WHOLE SALE TR A OE
--------------------------------------------------------------------------R E T A I L TRADE
----------------------------------------------------F I N A N C E . I N S U R A N C E . AND RE A L E S T A T E
----------S E R V I C E S 7 ------------------------------------------------------------

500
-

182
277

51
70

2 95 .8 7 1
*79 .3 3 9

38
62

1 5 3 .7 0 3
1 7 0 .1 3 1

*3.692
1 0 9 .0 6 7

1 73 ,3 6 1
2 *6 .4 1 7

500
5 00
500
500
500

21
22
96
29
88

15
6
19
12
1*

99.881
20.070
17* .* 0 3
7 5.057
90.*78

13
3
22
10
12

* 0.15*

27.966
t 6)

88,071
8 .3 8 9
6 6,869
5 8,178
20,520

ALL

D IV IS IO N S

<6|
C 6>
( 6)
< 6»

<61
(6 )
( 6»
<6 1

L A RG E E S T A B L I S H M E N T S
ALL D IV IS IO N S

1 Th e L o s A n g e le s — on g Beach Standard M etrop o lita n S ta tistica l A r e a , as defined by the
L
O ffic e of M anagem ent and Budget through F e b ru a ry 1974, consists o f L o s A n g eles County.
The
"w o r k e rs w ithin scope of study" estim ates shown in this table p ro vid e a reason a b ly accu rate
d es crip tio n o f the s iz e and com p o sitio n o f the la b o r fo r c e included in the su rvey.
E stim a tes a re
not intended, h o w eve r, fo r co m p a rison w ith oth er em ploym en t indexes to m easu re em ploym en t trends
or le v e ls sin ce (1 ) planning o f w age su rveys re q u ire s establish m ent data com p iled co n s id era b ly in
advance o f the p a y r o ll p eriod studied, and (2) sm a ll establish m ents a re excluded fr o m the scope
of the su rvey.
2 Th e 1972 edition o f the Standard In du strial C la s s ific a tio n Manual was used to c la s s ify
establishm ents by industry d ivis ion !
H o w e ver, a ll governm en t operations a re exclu ded fr o m the
scope o f the su rvey.
3 Includes a ll establish m ents with tota l em ploym en t at o r above the m inim u m lim ita tion .
A ll
outlets (w ith in the a re a ) o f com pan ies in in d u stries such as tra d e, fin ance, auto re p a ir s e r v ic e ,
and m otion p ictu re th eaters a re co n s id ere d as one establishm ent.




40

< 61
( 61
( 6J
< 6)

(6 )
<6 )
<61

4 Includes execu tive, p ro fe ssio n a l, p a rt-tim e , and oth er w o r k e r s exclu ded fr o m the sep ara te
production and o ffice ca tego rie s.
5 A b b revia ted to "pu blic u tilitie s " in the A - and B - s e r ie s ta b les.
T a x ica b s and s e r v ic e s
in ciden tal to w ater tra n sportation a re excluded.
E le c tr ic u t ilitie s and m o st o f the lo c a l tra n s it fo r
the c ity o f L os A ngeles a re m u n icipally operated and a re exclu ded by d efin itio n fr o m the scope of
the study.
6 Separate presen tation o f data is not m ade fo r this division .
7 H otels and m o tels; laundries and oth er p erso n a l s e r v ic e s ; bu siness s e r v ic e s ; a u tom obile
r e p a ir , ren ta l, and parking; m otion p ictu res; n on profit m e m b ersh ip o rga n iza tio n s (exclu din g re lig io u s
and ch a rita b le o rga n ization s); and en gin eering and a rc h ite c tu ra l s e r v ic e s .

Appendix B.
Occupational
Descriptions
The p r i m a r y purp ose of p repari ng job descriptions fo r the
B u r e a u 's w age
s urv ey s is to assist its field staff in clas sifyin g into
appr opr iate occupations w o r k e r s who ar e employed under a varie ty of
p a y ro ll titles and different w o rk arrangements from establishment to
es tablishment and fr o m a r e a to area.
This permits the grouping of
occupational wage rates repr es enting co mparable job content.
Because
of this em phasis on in terestablishment and in terarea comparability
of occupational
content, the B u r e a u 's job
descriptions may diffe r s i g ­
nificantly fr o m
those in use in individual establishments o r those p r e ­
p a re d fo r other p u rp o s es .
In applying these job des criptions , the
B u r e a u ' s field econo mists are instructed to exclude working s u p e r ­
v i s o r s ; appr en tices ; and p a r t -t i m e , te m po rary , and probationary w o r k e r s .
Handicapped w o r k e r s whose earnings are reduced because of their
handicap ar e al so excluded. L e a r n e r s , beginners, and tr ain ees , unless
spe cifically included in the job description, are excluded.

Office
S E C R E T A R Y — Continued

SECRETARY

Excl usio ns— Continued

A s s i g n e d as a p e rs o n a l secr e ta r y , no rm ally to one individual.
Maintains a close and highly re sp onsiv e relationship to the d a y -to -d a y act iv­
ities of the s u p e r v i s o r . W o r k s fairly independently receiving a min im um of
detailed s u p erv is io n and guidance. P e r f o r m s varie d c l e ri c a l and s e c r e t a r ia l
duties re qu ir in g a knowledge of office routine and understanding of the
org aniz ati on, p r o g r a m s , and p ro ced u r es related to the work of the sup erv is o r .

a.
b.




Steno graphers se rv ing as office assistants
fessio nal, technical, o r m an a gerial persons;

d.

Not al l positions that are titled " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the above
c h a r a c t e r i s t ic s . E x a m p le s of positions which are excluded fr o m the definition
are as fo llo w s:

Stenograp hers not fully trained in s e c r e t a r ia l -t y p e duties;

c.

E xclusio ns

Positions which do not
d es crib ed above;

meet the

"personal"

A s sistant-t yp e positions which entail m o re difficult or m ore r e ­
sponsible technical, administrative, or s up erv is ory duties which
a r e not typical' of s e c r e t a r ia l w ork , e.g., Administrative A s s i s t ­
ant, or Executive Assistant;

Liste d below are sev e r a l occupations fo r which revis ed descriptions or titles ar e being introduced
in this survey:
Gu ard
Shipper and re c e iv e r
(previously surveyed
as shipping and
receiving clerk )
Truckdriver

O r d e r clerk
P a y r o ll clerk
Secretary
Key entry operator
T ra n s crib in g-m ach in e typist
Computer operator

The B u reau has discontinued collecting data fo r tabulating-machine ope rator.
c la s s ifie d as watchmen are now clas s ified as guards under the re v ised description.

41

W o r k e r s pre viously

secretar y concept

to a group

of p r o ­

SECRETARY— Continued

SECRET ARY— Continued

Exclusio ns— Continued

C la ssif ic atio n by L e v e l— Continued

e.

Positions which do not fit any of the situations listed in the
sections below titled ' 'L e v e l of S u p e r v i s o r , " e. g., s e c r e t a r y to the
president of a company that em ploys, in all, o v e r 5,000 perso ns;

f.

T ra in e e s .

Classif ic atio n by L e v e l

e.

S e c r e t a r y jobs which meet the above cha racteristic s a r e matched at
one of five lev els according to (a) the lev el of the s e c r e t a r y 's s u p e rv is o r
within the company's organizational structure and, (b) the lev el of the
s e c r e t a r y 's responsibility. The chart following the explanations of these two
factors indicates the lev el of the s e c r e t a r y fo r each combination of the
factors.

a.

Se c re t a ry to the ch airm an of the b o a rd or president of a company
that employs, in all, over 100 but f e w e r than 5,000 p ers o n s ; or

b.

Secretary to a corp orate o f f i c e r (other than the chairm an of
the board o r presid ent) of a company that em p lo ys, in all,
over 5,000 but fe w e r than 25,000 p e rs o n s ; or

c.

LS—
4

Secretary to the head of a l a r g e and important organiz ational
segment (e.g., a middle man agem ent s u p e r v i s o r of an o r g a n i ­
zational segment often involving as many as s e v e r a l hundred
p erso ns) of a company that e m p lo y s, in all, o v e r 25,000 p e rso ns.

Secretary to the head, im m e diately b e lo w the corporate o ffic e r
level, of a m a jo r segment o r su b s id ia ry of a company that
employs, in all, o v e r 25,000 p e rs o n s .

L,evel of S e c r e t a r y 's S u p e r v is o r (LS )
S e c r e t a r i e s should be matched at one of the four LS lev els d es c rib e d
be low according to the level of the s e c r e t a r y 's s u p e r v i s o r within the company
organizational structure.

LS—2

a.

S e c re t a ry to the s u p e r v i s o r o r head of a s m a ll
unit (e.g., f e w e r than about 25 o r 30 p e rs o n s ); o r

b.

LS—1

S e c r e t a r y to a nonsupervis ory staff s p ecia lis t, p ro fe s s io n a l
em ployee, administra tive o ffic e r o r assistant, skilled technician
o r expert.
(N O T E :
M any
companies assig n sten ograp hers,
ra th er than s e c r e t a r ie s as d e s c rib e d above, to this lev el of
s u p e rv i s o r y o r no nsup erv is o ry w o r k e r . )

a.

Se c re t a ry to an executive o r m a n a g e r i a l p ers o n whose r e sp o n ­
sibility is not equivalent to one of the spe cific lev el situations in
the definition fo r LS—
3, but whose organiz ational unit n o rm a lly
nu m b ers at least s e v e r a l dozen em ployees and is usu ally divided
into organizational segments which ar e often, in turn, further
subdivided. In some companies, this lev el includes a wide range
of orga nizational echelons; in oth ers, only one o r two; or

b.

LS—3

organizational

S e c r e t a r y to the head of an individual plant, fac tory, etc., (or
other equivalent le vel of o ffi cia l) that em plo ys, in all, f e w e r
than 5,000 p ers o n s .

a.

S e c r e t a r y to the chairman of the b o a r d o r presid en t of a company
that em ploys, in all, f e w e r than 100 p ers o n s ; o r

b.

S e c re t a ry to a co rp ora te o ffi c e r (other than ch airm an of the
b o ard or presid ent) of a company that em plo ys, in all, o v e r 100
but f e w e r than 5, 000 p e rso ns; o r

c.

d.

S e c r e t a r y to the head (im med iately b elo w the o ffic e r lev el) o v e r
either a m a j o r co rp ora tewid e functional activity (e.g., m ar ket in g,
r e s e a r c h , operations, in dustri al rela tio ns, etc.) o r a m a j o r
geographic o r organiz ational segment (e.g., a re gio nal h ea d q u ar­
t e r s ; a m a j o r division) of a company that em plo ys, in all,
o v e r 5,000 but f e w e r than 25,000 em plo yees; o r
S e c r e t a r y to the head of
(o r other equivalent lev el
o v e r 5,000 p ers o n s ; or




N O T E : The te rm "co rp o ra t e o f f i c e r " used in the above LS d ef­
inition r e fe r s to those officials who have a significant co rp o ratew id e p olic y ­
making role with re g a r d to m a j o r company activities.
The title "vice
p r e s i d e n t , " though n orm ally indicative of this ro le, does not in all cas es
identify such positions. V ic e pres idents whose p r i m a r y responsib ili ty is to
act p ers o nally on individual cases o r transactio ns (e .g., approve o r deny
individual loan or credit actions; a d m in ister individual trust accounts; d i ­
rectly supervi se a c le ric a l staff) ar e not consid ered to be " c o r p o r a t e
o f f i c e r s " fo r purposes of applying the definition.
L e v e l of S e c re t a ry 's Responsibility ( L R )
This factor evaluates the nature of the w o rk relationship between
the s e c r e t a r y and the sup erv is o r , and the extent to which the s e c r e t a r y is
expected to e x e r c is e initiative and judgment. S e c r e t a r i e s should be matched
at L R —1 o r L R —2 d escrib ed below according to their lev el of responsibility.
L e v e l of Responsibility 1 ( L R —1)
P e r f o r m s v a r ie d s e c r e t a r ia l duties including o r co m p arab le to most
of the following:
a.

A n s w ers telephones,
coming mail.

b.

A n s w e rs telephone reques ts which have standard a n s w e r s .
reply to requests by sending a f o r m letter.

c.

Reviews corr es ponden ce, m e m o ra n d a , and reports p r e p a r e d by
others fo r the s u p e r v i s o r 's sig natu re to en sure p r o c e d u r a l and
typographical accuracy.

d.

Maintains s u p e r v i s o r 's
instructed.

e.

T y pe s, takes and t r a n s c r ib e s dictation, and files.

an individual plant, fa cto ry , etc.,
of official) that em plo ys, in all,

greets

personal

c alen d ar

and

callers,

mak es

and

opens

in ­

M ay

appointments

as

SECR ET AR Y— Continued

STENO G R APH ER — Continued

L e v e l of R esp o nsib il it y 2 ( L R —2)

Stenographer, Senior

P e r f o r m s duties d e s c r i b e d under L R —1 and, in addition p e r fo r m s
task s re qu iring g r e a t e r judgm ent, initiative, and knowledge of office functions
including o r c o m p a ra b le to m o s t of the following:
a.

S c re e n s telephone and p e rs o n a l c a l l e r s , determining which can
be handled by the s u p e r v i s o r 's subordinates o r other offices.

b.

A n s w e r s re quests which re quir e a detailed knowledge of o f ­
fice p r o c e d u r e s o r collection of information fr o m files or
other offices .
M a y sign routine corr es pond en ce in own or
s u p e r v i s o r 's name.

c.

C o m p iles o r a s s is t s in compiling periodic re port s on the b asis
of g e n e r a l in structions.

d.

Schedules tentative appointments without p r i o r cl earance.
As­
s e m b l e s n e c e s s a r y background m a t e ria l fo r scheduled meetings.
M a k e s a r ra n g e m e n t s fo r meetings and conferences.

e.

E xplains s u p e r v i s o r 's requirem ents to other em ployees in s u p e r ­
v i s o r ' s unit. ( A ls o types, takes dictation, and f i le s . )

Dictation involves a v a r ie d technical o r special iz ed vocabu lary
such as in l e g a l b r i e fs o r reports on scientific re se a rc h . May also set up
and maintain fi le s , keep re c o r d s , etc.

The follo win g tabulation shows the lev el of the s e c r e t a r y fo r each
LS and L R combination:

L e v e l o f s e c r e t a r y 's
______ s u p e r v i s o r ______

P e r f o r m s stenographic duties requiring significantly gr eate r in ­
dependence and re sp onsib ili ty than stenog rapher, gen eral, as evidenced by
the following:
W o r k re q u ir es a high d egree of stenographic speed and
accura cy; a thorough work ing knowledge of gen eral bu sines s and office p r o ­
cedure; and of the specific bu siness operations, organization, policies,
p r o c e d u r e s , fi le s , w o rk flo w , etc. U s e s this knowledge in p erform in g steno­
graphic duties and resp onsib le c le ric a l tasks such as maintaining fo llo w ­
up fi les ; a s s em b lin g m a t e r i a l fo r re po rts , m em oranda, and letters; com ­
posing sim ple lett ers fr o m g en eral instructions; reading and routing incoming
m ail; and answ erin g routine questions, etc.

T R A N S C R IB IN G -M A C H IN E TYPIST
P r i m a r y duty is to type copy of voice re co rd ed dictation which does
not involve v a r ie d technical o r s pecia liz ed v ocabu la ry such as that used in
l e g a l b r i e fs o r re port s on scientific re se a rc h . M ay also type fr o m written
copy. M ay maintain f i l e s , keep simple re c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m other relatively
routine c l e r i c a l tasks.
(See Steno grap her definition fo r w o rk e rs involved
with shorthand dictation.)

L e v e l of s e c r e t a r y 's resp onsibili ty
TYPIST
L R—1

LS—1
„.
LS—2_.
LS—3 LS—
4_.

OR

C la ss
C la s s
C la ss
C la ss

E
D
C
B

L R —2
C la s s
C la s s
C la s s
C la s s

D
C
B
A

STENOGRAPHER
P r i m a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to t r a n s c r ib e
the dictation.
M a y al so type fr o m written copy.
M ay operate fr o m a
stenographic pool.
M a y o ccas ion ally tr a n s c r ib e fr o m voice recordin gs (if
p r i m a r y duty is t r a n s c r ib in g fr o m re co rd in gs , see T r a n s c r i b in g - M a c h in e
T y p is t).
N O T E : This jo b is distinguished fr o m that of a s e c r e t a r y in that a
s e c r e t a r y n o r m a ll y w o rk s in a confidential relationship with only one m a n a g e r
o r executive and p e r f o r m s m o r e re sponsib le and d is cre tio n a ry tasks as
d e s c r i b e d in the s e c r e t a r y jo b definition.

U s e s a ty p ew riter to make copies of vario us m at erials o r to make
out b il ls after calculations have been made by another person. May include
typing of stencils, m ats, o r s i m i l a r m a t e ria ls fo r use in duplicating
processes.
M ay do c l e r i c a l w o rk involving little specia l training, such
as keeping sim ple re c o r d s , filing re co rd s and report s, o r sorting and
distributing incoming m ail.
C la s s A . P e r f o r m s one o r m o r e of the follo win g: Typing m aterial
in final f o r m when it involves combining m a t e ria l fr o m s e v e r a l sourc es ; or
resp onsib ili ty fo r c o rrect spelling, syllabication, punctuation, etc., of tech­
nical o r unusual w o rd s o r fore ig n language m at erial; o r planning layout
and typing of co mplicated statistical tables to maintain uniformity and
balance in spacing.
M ay type routine fo r m letters, varying details to suit
ci rcu m stances.
C la s s B . P e r f o r m s one o r m o r e of the fo llo w in g: Copy typing from
rough o r c l e a r drafts; o r routine typing of f o r m s , in suran ce polic ie s, etc.;
o r setting up sim ple standard tabulations; o r copying m o re complex tables
alrea d y set up and spa ced p ro p e rly .
F IL E CLERK

St en o gr ap h er, G e n e r a l

ke ep

Dictation in volves a n o r m a l routine vocabula ry. M ay maintain fi le s ,
sim ple r e c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m other re la tiv ely routine c l e ri c a l tasks.




F i l e s , c l a s s ifi e s , and re trie v e s m a t e r i a l in an established filing
system . M ay p e r f o r m c l e ri c a l and manual tasks re qu ired to maintain files.
Positions ar e c la s s ifie d into levels on the b a s is of the following definitions.

F IL E CLERK— Continued

ORDER CLERK— Continued

C la s s A . C la s s if ie s and indexes file m a t e r i a l such as c o rr e s p o n d ­
ence, re po rts, technical documents, etc., in an es ta bli sh ed filing system
containing a num ber of v a r ie d subject m at ter fi les .
M ay also file this
m aterial. M ay keep re c o rd s of v ario us types in conjunction with the files.
M ay lead a s m a ll group of l o w e r lev el file clerk s.

adequacy of information recorded; asce rta inin g credit rating of customer;
furnishing customer with acknowledgement of receipt of o rd e r; fo llo w in g-u p
to see that o rd er is delivere d by the spe cified date o r to let customer know
of a delay in delivery; maintaining o r d e r file; checking shipping invoice
against ori ginal o rd er.

C la s s B . So rts, codes, and files un cla ssified m a t e r i a l by simple
(subject m at ter ) headings o r partly cla s s ified m a t e r i a l by finer subheadings.
P r e p a r e s sim ple related index and c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e aids.
A s requested,
locates c le a r ly identified m a t e r i a l in files and fo r w a r d s m a t e ria l. M ay p e r ­
fo r m related c l e r i c a l tasks re q u ir ed to maintain and s e rv i c e files.

Exclude w o rk e rs paid on a co m m is sio n b a s is o r whose duties include
any of the follo wing: Receiving o r d e r s fo r s e r v i c e s rather than fo r m at erial
o r merchandise; providing customers with consultative advice using kn owl­
edge gained fr o m engineering or extensive technical training; emphasizing
selling skills; handling m aterial o r m erchand is e as an in tegr al part of the job.

C la s s C . P e r f o r m s routine filing of m a t e r i a l that has alre ady been
clas s ified o r which is easily c la s s ifie d in a sim ple s e r i a l clas sification
system (e.g., alphabetical, chr ono logical, o r n u m e r i c a l ).
A s requested,
locates readily avai la ble m a t e r i a l in files and f o r w a r d s m at e ria l; and may
fill out wit hdra w al cha rge. M ay p e r f o r m sim ple c l e r i c a l and manual tasks
requ ir ed to maintain and s e rv i c e files.

Positions
definitions:

MESSENGER
P e r f o r m s vario us routine duties such as running e r r a n d s , operating
m in or office machines such as s e a l e r s o r m a i l e r s , opening and distributing
m a il, and other m in or c l e ri c a l w ork . Exclude positions that re quir e operation
of a mo tor vehicle as a significant duty.

are

cl assified

into

lev els

according

to

the

following

C la ss A . Handles o rd e rs that involve making judgments such as
choosing which specific product o r m a t e r i a l f r o m the esta blish m en t's product
lines w ill satisfy the custom er's needs, o r determining the p ric e to be quoted
when p ricin g involves m o re than m e r e ly r e f e r r i n g to a p ric e list o r making
some sim ple mathematical calculations.
C la ss B . Handles o rd ers involving items which have readily id en­
tified uses and applications. May r e f e r to a catalog, m an u fa c t u r e r's manual,
o r s i m i l a r document to insure that p r o p e r item is supplied or to v e r ify
p ric e of o rd ere d item.
A CCO UNTING CLERK

SW ITCHBO ARD O P E R A T O R
O p erates a telephone switchbo ard o r console used with a private
branch exchange ( P B X ) system to re la y incoming, outgoing, and in trasyste m
calls.
M ay pro vide information to c a l l e r s , r e c o r d and tr ansm it m e s s a g e s ,
keep re c o rd of calls placed and toll charges. B e s id e s operating a telephone
switchbo ard o r console, m ay also type o r p e r f o r m routine c l e r i c a l w o rk
(typing o r routine c l e r i c a l w o rk m ay occupy the m a j o r portion of the w o r k e r ' s
time, and is usu ally p e r fo r m e d while at the switchboard o r console). Chief o r
lead operators in es tablishments employing m o re than one operator ar e
excluded. F o r an o p e rat o r who also acts as a receptionist, see Switchboard
Ope rato r-Recep tio nis t.
SW ITCHBO ARD O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
At a s in g le -po sit io n telephone swit ch board o r console, acts both as
an operator— see Switch boa rd O p e ra t o r— and as a receptionist. Receptionist's
w o rk involves such duties as greeti ng v is i to rs ; determining nature of v is i t o r 's
business and providing appr opr iate information; r e f e r r i n g v is ito r to ap p ro ­
priate p ers o n in the organization o r contacting that p ers o n by telephone and
arrangin g an appointment; keeping a log of v is ito rs .
ORDER CLERK
Rec eiv es written o r v e r b a l c u s t o m e rs ' purc hase o r d e r s fo r m a t e ri a l
o r m erchand is e fr o m custom ers o r sales people.
W o r k typically involves
some combination of the following duties: Quoting p r ic e s ; determining a v a i la ­
bility of o r d e r e d items and suggesting substitutes when n e c e s s a r y ; advising
expected d eliv e ry date and method of d eli v ery ; reco rd in g o r d e r and customer
information on o r d e r sheets; checking o r d e r sheets fo r accuracy and




P e r f o r m s one or m o re accounting c l e r i c a l tasks such as posting to
re g is t e r s and ledgers; reconciling bank accounts; verifyin g the internal con­
sistency, completeness, and mathematical accuracy of accounting documents;
assign ing p r e s c r ib e d accounting distribution codes; examining and ve rifyin g
fo r c l e ri c a l accuracy various types of re p o rt s , lis ts , calculations, posting,
etc.; o r pre pari ng simple or assisting in p re p a rin g m o re complicated journ al
vouchers.
May w ork in either a manu al o r automated accounting system.
The work re qu ir es a knowledge of c l e r i c a l methods and office
p ractic es and p ro cedures which re lates to the c l e r i c a l p ro c e s s in g and r e ­
cording of transactions and accounting information.
With exp erience, the
w o r k e r typically becomes fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping r.nd accounting te rm s
and pro cedures used in the as signed w o rk , but is not re qu ired to have a
knowledge of the fo rm a l prin ciples of bookkeeping and accounting.
Positions
definitions:

are

classified

into lev els

on the

b asis of the following

C la ss A . Under genera l sup ervisio n, p e r f o r m s accounting c le ric a l
operations which require the application of exp erience and judgment, for
exam ple, clerically p ro cessin g com plicated o r nonrepetitive accounting t r a n s ­
actions, selecting among a substantial v arie ty of p r e s c r i b e d accounting codes
and clas sifications , o r tracing tr an sactions through pre vious accounting
actions to determine source of dis cre pan cies .
M ay be assis te d by one or
m o re class B accounting clerks.
C la ss B . Under close superv isio n, follo win g detailed instructions
and standardized p ro ced ures , p e r fo r m s one o r m o re
routine accounting
c l e r i c a l operations, such as posting to l e d g e r s , cards , or w ork sh eets

ACCO UNTING CLER K — Continued

P A Y R O L L CLERK— Continued

w h er e identification of items and locations of postings ar e clear ly indicated;
checking accura cy and co mpleteness of standardized and repetitive record s
o r accounting documents; and coding documents using a few p r e s c r ib e d
accounting codes.

listings against source re c o rd s ; tracing and corr ecting e r r o r s in listings;
and as sisti ng in p rep aratio n of period ic s u m m ar y p ay ro ll reports. In a nonautomated p ay ro ll system , computes w age s. W o r k may require a practical
knowledge of governmental regulations, company p ay ro ll policy, or the
computer system fo r p ro c e s s in g p a y ro lls.

B O O K K E E P IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
Opera tes a bookkeeping machine (with or without a ty p ew riter k e y ­
b o a r d ) to keep a r e c o r d of b usiness transactions.
C la s s A . Keep s a set of re co rd s requiring a knowledge of and
experi ence in b a s ic bookkeeping prin cip le s, and fam ili arity with the structure
of the p a rt ic u la r accounting system used.
Determines p r o p e r re co rd s and
distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of the work .
M a y p r e p a r e consolidated r e p o rt s , balance sheets, and other re co rd s by hand.
C la s s B . Keeps a r e c o r d of one or m o re phases o r sections of a
set of re co rd s u su ally re qu ir in g little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases
o r sections include accounts pay able, payro ll, custom ers ' accounts (not in­
cluding a sim ple type of billing d escribed under machine b i l l e r ) , cost d i s ­
tribution, expense distribution, inventory control, etc. M ay check o r as sist
in p rep aratio n of t r i a l balances and p re p a re control sheets fo r the accounting
department.
M AC H INE B IL L E R
P r e p a r e s statements, b il l s , and invoices on a machine other than
an o rd in a ry o r electro m atic typewri te r. May also keep r e c o rd s as to billings
o r shipping cha rges o r p e r f o r m other c le ric a l work incidental to billing
operations. F o r w age study p u rp o s es , machine b il l e r s ar e clas s ified by type
of machine, as follo ws:
B i lli n g - m a c h i n e b i l l e r . U s e s a special billing machine (combination
typing and adding m ach ine) to p re p a re bil ls and invoices fr o m cu st o m ers '
purc hase o r d e r s , internally p re p a re d o r d e r s , shipping m em oranda, etc.
U s u a lly involves application of pre dete rm in ed discounts and shipping charges
and entry of n e c e s s a r y extensions, which may o r may not be computed on
the billin g machine, and totals which are automatically accumulated by
machine. The operation usually involves a larg e number of carbon copies of
the b ill being p r e p a r e d and is often done on a fanfold machine.

KEY ENTRY O PE R A T O R
Opera tes key b o ar d -co n t ro lled data entry device such as keypunch
machine o r k e y -o p e r a te d magnetic tape o r disk encoder to tr anscrib e
data into a fo r m suitable fo r computer p ro cessin g . W o r k requires skill in
operating an al phanumeric ke yboar d and an understanding of tran scr ibin g
pro ced ures and relevant data entry equipment.
Positions
definitions:

ar e

clas s ified

into

le vels on the b a s is of the following

C la s s A . W o r k re qu ir es the application of experience and judgment
in selecting p ro ced u res to be fo llo wed and in searching fo r, interpreting,
selecting, o r coding items to be entered fr o m a var iety of source documents.
On occasion may also p e r f o r m routine w o rk as d escrib ed for class B.
N O T E : Exclud ed are operators above clas s A using the key entry
controls to a c c e s s , read, and evaluate the substance of specific re cord s to
take substantive actions, o r to make entries requiring a sim ila r level of
knowledge.
C las s B . W o r k is routine and repetitive. U nde r close supervision
o r following specific p ro ced u r es o r detailed instructions, work s from
va rio us standardized source documents which have been coded and require
little o r no selecting, coding, o r interpreting of data to be entered. Refers
to s u p e rv is o r p ro b le m s aris in g fr o m erro neous items, codes, or missing
info rmation.

Professional and Technical
C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , B USINESS

B ookkeeping-m achine b i l l e r . U s e s a bookkeeping machine (with or
without a ty p ew riter k e yb o ard ) to p re p a re customers* b il ls as part of the
accounts re ceiv a b le operation. G en erally involves the simultaneous entry of
fi gures on c u s t o m e rs ' le d g e r reco rd . The machine automatically accumulates
fi g u r e s on a nu m b e r of v e r t ic a l columns and computes and usually prints
automatically the debit o r credit balances.
Does not involve a knowledge
of bookkeeping.
W o r k s fr o m uniform and standard types of sales and
credit slips.
P A Y R O L L CLERK
P e r f o r m s the c l e r i c a l tasks n ec es sa ry to p ro cess p ay ro lls and to
maintain p a y ro ll re c o r d s . W o r k involves most of the fo llo w in g: P r o c e s s in g
w o r k e r s ' time o r production re c o r d s ; adjusting w o r k e r s ' re co rd s fo r changes
in wage ra tes, sup plem en tary benefits, o r tax deductions; editing p ay ro ll




A nalyzes b usiness p ro b le m s to formulate p ro cedures for solving
them by use of elect ronic data p ro c e s s in g equipment. Develops a complete
description of all specifications needed to enable p r o g r a m m e r s to pre pare
requir ed digital computer p r o g r a m s . W o r k involves most of the fo llo wing:
Analyzes s u b ject-m atter operations to be automated and identifies conditions
and c r it e r ia re qu ired to achieve sa ti sfa ctory results; specifies number and
types of re c o rd s , file s , and documents to be used; outlines actions to be
p e r fo r m e d by personnel and computers in sufficient detail for presentation
to management and fo r p r o g ra m m in g (typically this involves preparation of
w o rk and data flow charts); coordinates the development of test pro ble m s and
participates in t r i a l runs of new and revis ed system s; and recommends
equipment changes to obtain m o re effective o v e r a ll operations.
(N O T E :
W o r k e r s p e rfo r m in g both systems analysis and p ro gra m m in g should be
classified as systems analysts if this is the skill used to determine their pay.)

C O M PU TE R SYSTEMS A N A L Y S T ,

B USINE S S— Continued

Does not include employees p r i m a r i l y re sp onsib le fo r the m an­
agement o r supervisio n of other elect ronic data p ro c e s s in g em ployees,
o r systems analysts p r i m a r i l y concerned with scientific o r engineering
proble m s.
F o r wage study purposes, system s analysts are c la s s ifie d as follows:
C la s s A . W o r k s independently o r under only gen eral direction on
complex p ro b le m s involving all phases of system s analysis. P r o b l e m s ar e
complex bec ause of d iv erse so urces of input data and m ultiple-u s e r e q u i r e ­
ments of output data.
( F o r exam ple, develops an integrated production
scheduling, inventory control, cost analy sis , and sales analysis re c o rd in
which e v ery item of each type is automatically p r o c e s s e d through the full
system of re co rd s and appropriate followup actions are initiated by the
com puter.) Confers with p erso ns concerned to determine the data p ro ces s in g
p ro ble m s and ad vises s u b ject-m atter pers onnel on the implications of new o r
revised systems of data p ro c e s s in g operations. Makes reco mmendations, if
needed, fo r approval of m a j o r system s installations o r changes and fo r
obtaining equipment.

C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R , B U SINE S S --- Continued
language, cause the manipulation of data to achieve d esir e d re su lt s. W ork
involves most of the fo llo w in g:
Applies knowledge of computer cap a­
bilit ie s, mathematics, logic employed by com puters, and p a rt ic u la r s u b ­
ject m atte r involved to analyze charts and d iagr am s of the p ro b le m to
be p ro gra m m ed; develops sequence of p r o g r a m steps; w rites detailed flow
charts to show o rd e r in which data w il l be p ro c e s s e d ; converts these
charts to coded instructions fo r machine to follow; tests and co rrects
p r o g r a m s ; p rep are s instructions fo r operating p ers onnel during production
run; analyzes, revie w s, and alters p r o g r a m s to in crea se operating e ff i­
ciency o r adapt to new re qu irem en ts; maintains re co rd s of p r o g r a m d e ­
velopment and revisions . (N O T E : W o r k e r s p e rfo r m in g both system s ana l­
ysis and pro gra m m in g should be c la s s ifie d as systems analysts if this is
the skill used to determine their pay.)
Does not include employees p r i m a r i l y re sponsib le fo r the m a n ­
agement o r supervision of other electro nic data p ro c e s s in g em plo yees,
or p r o g r a m m e r s p r im a r il y concerned with scientific and/or engineering
p roblem s.
F o r wage study purp oses, p r o g r a m m e r s

M ay provide functional
who ar e assig ned to assist.

direction to l o w e r

are c la s s ifie d

as

follows:

lev el system s analysts

C la s s B . W o r k s independently o r under only g en eral direction on
p ro ble m s that ar e re la tiv ely uncomplicated to analyze, plan, p r o g r a m , and
operate. P r o b l e m s are of limited complexity bec ause so urces of input data
ar e homogeneous and the output data ar e close ly related.
( F o r exam ple,
develops systems fo r maintaining deposit or accounts in a bank, maintaining
accounts receiv able in a retail establishment, o r maintaining inventory
accounts in a manufacturing o r w ho lesale esta blishment.)
Con fers with
persons concerned to determine the data p ro ces s in g p ro b le m s and advises
s ubject-m atter p ers onnel on the implications of the data p ro c e s s in g systems
to be applied.
OR
W o r k s on a segment of a complex data p ro ces s in g scheme or
system, as d es crib ed fo r class A. W o r k s independently on routine a s s i g n ­
ments and re ceiv es instruction and guidance on comp lex assignments. W o r k
is reviewed fo r accuracy of judgment, compliance with instructions, and to
insure p r o p e r alignment with the o v e r a ll system.

C lass A . W orks independently o r under only ge n e ra l direction
on complex p ro ble m s which requ ir e competence in all phases of p r o ­
gram m in g concepts and practic e s.
W orking fr o m d iagram s and charts
which identify the nature of d e s ire d re su lts , m a j o r p ro c e s s in g steps to
be accomplished, and the relationships between vario us steps of the p r o b ­
lem solving routine; plans the full range of p r o g r a m m in g actions needed
to efficiently utilize the computer s y stem in achieving d es ire d end products.
At this level, p ro g ra m m in g is difficult because computer equip­
ment must be organized to produce s e v e r a l in terrelated but d iv erse p r o d ­
ucts fr o m numerous and div erse data elem ents.
A wide v arie ty and e x ­
tensive number of internal p ro c e s s in g actions must occur.
This re qu ires
such actions as development of common operations which can be r e ­
used, establishment of linkage points between operations , adjustments to
data when p ro g ra m re quirements ex ceed computer stora ge capacity, and
substantial manipulation and rese quencing of data elements to fo rm a
highly integrated p ro g ra m .
M ay provide functional direction
ar e assig n ed to assist.

to l o w e r le vel

p r o g r a m m e r s who

C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R , B US IN E S S

C la ss B . W orks independently o r under only g en eral direction on
re la tiv ely simple p r o g r a m s , or on sim ple segments of com plex p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s (or segments) usually p r o c e s s in formation to produce data in two
o r three varie d sequences or fo rm ats . Reports and listings are produ ced by
refining, adapting, array in g, or making m in or additions to o r deletions fr o m
input data which ar e readily av aila ble .
W hil e nu m erous re co rd s m ay be
p r o c e s s e d , the data have been refined in p r i o r actions so that the a c c u ra c y
and sequencing of data can be tested by using a few routine checks. T y pically ,
the p r o g r a m deals with routine record keepin g operations.

Converts statements of business p r o b le m s , typically p r e p a r e d by a
systems analyst, into a sequence of detailed instructions which are r e ­
quired to solve the p ro b le m s by automatic data p ro c e s s in g equipment.
W orking fr o m charts or d ia g r a m s , the p r o g r a m m e r develops the p r e ­
cise instructions which, when entered into the computer system in coded

W orks on complex p r o g r a m s (as d e s c r i b e d fo r class A ) under
close direction of a higher le vel p r o g r a m m e r o r s u p e rv i s o r .
M ay assis t
hi gh er lev el p r o g r a m m e r by independently p e r fo r m in g le s s difficult tasks
as sig ned, and p erfo rm in g m o re difficult tasks under fa i r l y close direction.

C la s s C . W o r k s under immediate sup ervisio n, ca r ry in g out analyses
as assigned, usually of a single activity.
Assignm ents are designed to
develop and expand p ractica l experi ence in the application of p ro ced u r es and
skills requir ed fo r systems analysis w ork . F o r exam ple, m ay as s is t a higher
level systems analyst by p re p a rin g the detailed specifications requ ir ed by
p r o g r a m m e r s fr o m information developed by the hi gh er level analyst.




OR

C O M PU T E R PR O G R A M M E R , BUSINESS— Continued

C O M PU TE R O PER ATO R — Continued

M a y guide o r i n s t r u c t l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r s .
C l a s s C . M a k e s p r a c t i c a l appli cation s o f p r o g r a m m i n g p r a c t i c e s
and concepts u s u all y l e a r n e d in f o r m a l tr a in in g c o u r s e s .
Assign m en ts
a r e d e s i g n e d to d e v e l o p c o m p e t e n c e in the ap p li cation o f s ta n dard p r o ­
c e d u r e s to routine p r o b l e m s .
R e c e i v e s c lo s e s u p e r v i s i o n on ne w asp e cts
o f a s s i g n m e n t s ; and w o r k is r e v i e w e d to v e r i f y its a c c u r a c y and c o n fo r m a n c e
w ith r e q u i r e d p r o c e d u r e s .
COMPUTER OPERATOR
In a c c o r d a n c e w ith o p e r a t i n g in s tr u c tio n s , m o n i t o r s and o p e r a t e s
the c o n t r o l c o n s o le o f a d i g i t a l c o m p u te r to p r o c e s s data. E x e c u te s runs by
e i t h e r s e r i a l p r o c e s s i n g ( p r o c e s s e s one p r o g r a m at a t i m e ) o r m u l t i ­
p r o c e s s i n g ( p r o c e s s e s two o r m o r e p r o g r a m s s im u lta n e o u s ly ). T h e f o l l o w i n g
duties c h a r a c t e r i z e the w o r k o f a c o m p u te r o p e r a t o r :
- Studies
n e e d e d.
-

operating

L o a d s e q u ip m e n t
p ap er, etc.).

i n s tr u c tio n s
with

to

required

determ ine
item s

equ ip m en t

(ta p e s ,

cards,

setup
d is k s ,

- S w itc h e s n e c e s s a r y a u x i l l i a r y equ ipm en t into s y s t e m .
- S ta rts and o p e r a t e s com p u te r.
-

C la ss C . W o r k assignments are limited to established production
runs (i.e., p r o g r a m s which present few operating p ro b le m s).
Assignments
may consist p r i m a r i l y of o n -t h e -jo b training (som etimes augmented by
c l a s s r o o m instruction). When learning to run p r o g r a m s , the superv isor or a
higher level operator pro vid es detailed written o r o ra l guidance to the
operator b efo re and during the run. A fte r the o pe rator has gained experience
with a p r o g r a m , ho wever , the o pe rator w o rk s fa irly independently in
applying standard operating o r co rrectiv e p ro ced ures in responding to
computer output instructions o r e r r o r conditions, but re fe rs problems to a
higher lev el o p e rat o r o r the s u p e r v i s o r when standard proced ures fail.
P E R IP H E R A L E Q UIPM E N T O PE R A TO R

R e sp o n d s to o p e r a t i n g and c o m p u te r output in s tr u c tio n s ,

- R e v i e w s e r r o r m e s s a g e s and m ak es c o r r e c t i o n s
or r e fe r s p rob lem s.

C la ss B . In addition to esta blished production runs, work as s ign ­
ments include runs involving new p r o g r a m s , applications, and procedures
(i.e., situations which requ ir e the o pe rator to adapt to a variety of pro ble m s).
At this level, the operator has the training and experience to work fairly
independently in carry in g out most assignments. Assignmen ts may require
the operator to select fr o m a varie ty of standard setup and operating
p ro ced u r es .
In responding to computer output instructions or e r r o r con­
ditions, applies standard operating or correctiv e pro ced ures, but may
deviate fr o m standard p ro ced ures when standard p ro ced u res fail if deviation
does not m a t e ria lly alte r the computer unit's production plans. Refers the
p ro b le m o r aborts the p r o g r a m when pro ced ures applied do not provide a
solution. M ay guide lo w e r lev el o pe rators.

during o p e r a ti o n

- M a in ta in s o p e r a t i n g r e c o r d .
M a y te s t-ru n new or m od ified p ro gram s.
M a y a s s i s t in m o d i f y i n g
system s or p ro gra m s .
T h e s c o p e of this d e fin itio n includes t r a i n e e s w o r k i n g
to b e c o m e f u l l y q u a l i f i e d c o m p u t e r o p e r a t o r s , fu l l y q u a l i fi e d c o m p u te r
o p e r a t o r s , and le a d o p e r a t o r s p r o v i d i n g te c h n ic a l a s s i s ta n c e to l o w e r l e v e l
operators.
It e x c lu d e s w o r k e r s who m o n i t o r and o p e r a te r e m o t e t e r m i n a l s .

O p erates p e rip h e ra l equipment w h i c h directly supports digital
computer operations. Such equipment is uniquely and specifically designed
fo r computer applications, but need not be phy sically or electronically
connected to a computer.
P r i n t e r s , p lott ers, card read/punche s , tape
r e a d e r s , tape units o r d riv e s, disk units o r d riv e s, and data display units
are exam ples of such equipment.
The following duties cha racterize the w o rk of a periphe ral equipment
operator:
-

-

- T e s t s ne w p r o g r a m s ,

ap p lic a tio n s , and p r o c e d u r e s .

- A d vises p r o g r a m m e r s
te c h n iq u e s .

and

su bject-m atter

experts

o p e r a t o r at




th is l e v e l

t y p i c a l l y guides

low er

Checking labels and mounting and dismounting
reels or disks on specified units o r d riv e s.

designated tape

- Setting controls which regulate operation of the equipment.
on

setup

- O b s erv in g panel lights fo r w arnin gs
taking appropriate action.

- A s s i s t s in (1) m a i n ta i n i n g , m o d i f y i n g , and d e v e l o p i n g o p e r a ti n g
s y s t e m s o r p r o g r a m s ; (2) d e v e lo p in g o p e r a tin g i n s tr u c tio n s and
te c h n iq u e s to c o v e r p r o b l e m situations; and/or (3) s w itc h in g to
e m e r g e n c y backup p r o c e d u r e s (such as s is ta n c e r e q u i r e s a w o r k i n g
k n o w l e d g e o f p r o g r a m la n guage, c om p u te r f e a t u r e s , and s o f t w a r e
s y s t e m s ).
An

Lab ellin g tape r e e ls , disks, or card decks.

-

D e v i a t e s f r o m sta n d a rd p r o c e d u r e s to avoid the lo s s o f i n f o r ­
m a ti o n o r to c o n s e r v e c o m p u te r t i m e e v e n though the p r o c e d u r e s
ap p lie d m a t e r i a l l y a l t e r the c om p u te r unit's p ro d u c tio n plans.

Loading prin ters and plotters with co rrect paper; adjusting
controls fo r f o r m s , thickness, tension, printing density, and
location; and unloading hard copy.

-

C l a s s A. In a d d ition to w o r k a s s ign m e n ts d e s c r i b e d f o r a c l a s s B
o p e r a t o r ( s e e b e l o w ) the w o r k o f a c la s s A o p e r a t o r i n v o l v e s at l e a s t one
o f the f o l l o w i n g :

and

error

indications and

- Examining ta pes, cards , o r other m a t e ria l fo r c r eas es ,
o r other defects which could cause p ro c e s s in g pro ble m s.

te ars,

This clas sification excludes w o r k e r s (1) who monitor and operate a
control console (see computer o p e rator) o r a remote te rm in al, o r (2) whose
duties ar e limited to operating d ec o lla t e rs , b u r s t e r s , s ep arato rs , o r sim ila r
equipment.

le v e l operators.

47

COM PUTER D ATA LIB R AR IAN

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

Maintains l i b r a r y of m edia (tapes, disks, cards , casset tes) used
fo r automatic data p ro ces s in g applications. The following o r s im i la r duties
charact erize the w o rk of a computer data l ib ra ria n : C la ssif ying, cataloging,
and storing m ed ia in accorda nce with a standardized system; upon p r o p e r
requests, re le a sing m ed ia fo r p ro ces s in g ; maintaining re co rd s of r e le a s e s
and returns; inspecting returned m edia fo r damage o r ex ce ssiv e w e a r to
determine whether o r not they need replacing. M ay p e r f o r m m in or re p airs
to damaged tapes.

Works on various types of electro nic equipment and related devices
by p erfo rm in g one or a combination of the following: Installing, maintaining,
re pairin g, overhauling, troubleshooting, modifying, constructing, and testing.
W o r k re qu ir es pract ical application of technical knowledge of electronics
p rin c ip le s, ability to determine malfun ction s, and skill to put equipment in
re qu ired operating condition.

DRAFTER
C la s s A . P lans the graphic presentation of complex items having
distinctive design features that differ significantly fr o m esta blished drafting
precedents.
W o r k s in close support with the design o ri gin ato r, and may
recommend m in or design changes. Analyzes the effect of each change on the
details of fo rm , function, and positional relationships of components and
parts. W o r k s with a min im um of s u p e rv is o r y assista nce. Completed w ork
is revie w ed by design origin a to r fo r consistency with p r i o r engineering
determinations. M ay either p re p a r e drawings o r direct th eir p repara tion by
low e r lev el d ra ft e rs .
C la s s B . P e r f o r m s nonroutine and complex drafting assignments
that require the application of most of the standardized drawing techniques
regularly used.
Duties typically involve such w o rk as:
P r e p a r e s working
drawings of s u b as s em b lies with i r r e g u l a r shapes, multiple functions, and
precis e positional relationships between components; p re p a r e s architectural
drawings fo r construction of a building including detail drawings of founda­
tions, w a l l sections, flo o r plans, and roof.
U s e s accepted fo rm u la s and
manuals in making n e c e s s a r y computations to determine quantities of
m aterials to be used, load capacities, strengths, s t r e s s e s , etc.
Receives
initial instructions, re qu ir em ents, and advice fr o m s u p e rv is o r .
Completed
w ork is checked fo r technical adequacy.
C la s s C . P r e p a r e s detail drawings of single units o r part s fo r
engineering, construction, manufacturing, or re p a i r purp o ses.
Type s of
drawings p r e p a r e d include is o m e t ric projections (depicting three dimensions
in accurate sc a le ) and sectional vie w s to cl ari fy positioning of components
and convey needed information.
Consolidates details fr o m a nu m b er of
sources and adjusts o r tr ansp oses scale as required. Suggested methods of
approach, applicable p re cedents , and advice on source m a t e ria ls are given
with initial as signments. Instructions are less complete when assignments
recur. W o r k m ay be spot-che cked during p r o g r e s s .

D R A FT E R -T R A C E R
Copies plans and drawings p re p a re d by others by placing tr acing
cloth o r p ap e r o v e r drawings and tr acing with pen or pencil.
(Does not
include tr acing limited to plans p r i m a r i l y consisting of straight lines and a
l arge scale not re quir in g close delineation.)

The equipment— consisting of either many different kinds of circuits
o r multiple repetition of the same kind of circuit— includes, but is not limited
to, the following: (a) Electron ic transmitting and receiv ing equipment (e.g.,
r a d a r , radio, television, telephone, so nar, navigational ai ds), (b) digital and
analog computers, and (c) industrial and m e d ic a l m eas u rin g and controlling
equipment.
This classification excludes r e p a i r e r s of such standard electronic
equipment as common office machines and household radio and television
sets; production a s s e m b le rs and te s t e r s ; w o r k e r s whose p r im a r y duty is
servicin g electronic test instruments; technicians who have administrative
o r sup ervisory responsibility; and d r a f t e r s , d e s ig n e rs , and p ro fe s s io n a l
e n g in e e r s .
Positions
definitions:

ar e classified

into

lev els on the b a s is of the following

C lass A . Applies advanced technical knowledge to solve unusually
complex pro ble m s (i.e., those that ty pic ally cannot be solved so lely by
re fere nce to m anu fa cturers' manuals o r s i m i l a r documents^ in work in g on
elect ronic equipment.
E xamples of such p ro b le m s include location and
density of circuitry, electromagne tic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and
frequent engineering changes. W o r k involves:
A detailed understanding of
the interrelationships of circuits; e x e r c is in g independent judgment in p e r ­
form ing such tasks as making circuit a na ly ses, calculating wave fo r m s ,
tracing relationships in signal flow; and re g u l a r l y using complex test in­
struments
(e.g., dual trace o s c illo s c o p e s , Q - m e t e r s , deviation m e t e rs ,
pulse ge nera tors).
W ork may be reviewed by s u p e r v i s o r (frequently an enginee r or
d es ign e r) for genera l compliance with accepted p ract ice s.
M ay provide
technical guidance to lo w e r level technicians.
C la ss B . Applies comprehe ns ive technical knowledge to solve co m ­
ple x p ro ble m s (i.e., those that typically can be solved solely by p ro p e rly
interpreting m an u fa cturers' manuals o r s i m i l a r documents) in work in g on
elect ronic equipment. W o r k involves: A f a m i li a ri ty with the in te r re la tio n ­
ships of circuits; and judgment in determining w o rk sequence and in selecting
tools and testing instruments, usually le s s complex than those used by the
clas s A technician.
Receives technical guidance, as re q u ir e d , f r o m s u p e r v i s o r or higher
l e v e l technician, and w ork is re v ie w ed fo r s pecific compliance with accepted
practice s and w ork assignments.
M ay p ro v id e technical guidance to l o w e r
lev el technicians.

AND/OR
C la ss C . Applies working technical knowledge to p e r f o r m sim ple or
routine tasks in working on electro nic equipment, following detailed in ­
structions which cover virtu ally all p r o c e d u r e s . W o r k typically involves such

P r e p a r e s sim ple o r repetitive drawings of eas ily v is u ali zed items.
W o r k is close ly s u p erv is ed during p r o g r e s s .




48

ELEC TR O N IC S TE C H N IC IA N — Continued

M A IN T E N A N C E E L E C T R IC IA N — Continued

tasks as: A s sis tin g h ig h e r l e v e l technicians by p erfo rm in g such activities as
re placing components, w ir in g circu its, and taking test re adings ; repairing
sim ple elect ronic equipment; and using tools and common test instruments
(e . g ., m u ltim e te rs , audio signal gen erato rs , tube te sters, o s c illo s c o p e s ). Is
not re q u ir ed to be f a m i l i a r with the interrelationships of circuits.
This
know ledge, h o w ev er, m ay be acquired through assignments designed to in ­
c r e a s e competence (including c l a s s r o o m training) so that w o r k e r can advance
to higher lev el technician.

equipment; work ing
w ir in g o r e lectric al
and m e a s u rin g and
tenance el ectric ia n
through a fo r m a l

Receiv es technical guidance, as re qu ir ed , fr o m s u p e r v i s o r o r hi gh er
l e v e l technician.
W o r k is typically spot checked, but is given detailed
re v ie w when new o r advanced as signments ar e involved.
REGISTER ED IN D U S T R IA L NURSE
A r e g is t e r e d n u rse who gives nursing serv ice under g en eral m ed ica l
direction to il l o r in ju re d em plo yees or other persons who beco me il l o r
s u ffer an accident on the p r e m i s e s of a factory o r other establishment.
Duties involve a combination of the fo llo wing: Giving firs t aid to the i l l o r
in jured; attending to subsequent d ressin g of employees' in ju rie s; keeping
re c o rd s of patients tr eated; p re p a rin g accident reports fo r compensation o r
other p u rp o s e s ; a s s is tin g in physical examinations and health evaluations of
applicants and e m p lo y ees ; and planning and carry in g out p r o g r a m s involving
health education, a'ccident prevention, evaluation of plaint environment, o r
other activities affecting the health, w e l fa r e , and safety of all personnel.
N u rs in g s u p e r v i s o r s o r head n u rs e s in establishments employing m o re than
one n u rs e ar e excluded.

Maintenance, Toolroom, and Powerplant
M AIN T E N A N C E C A R PE N T E R
P e r f o r m s the carpentr y duties n e c e s s a ry to construct and maintain
in good r e p a i r building w oodw ork and equipment such as bins, c r ib s , counters,
benches, part itions , d o o r s , fl o o r s , s tairs , casings, and t r im made of wood
in an esta blishment.
W o r k involves most of the follo win g: Planning and
laying out of w o r k f r o m b luep rints, drawings , m odels, or v e r b a l instructions;
using a v ar ie t y of c a r p e n t e r 's handtools, portable power tools, and standard
m e a s u r in g instru m en ts; making standard shop computations relating to d i­
m ensions of w o rk ; and selecting m aterials n e c e s s a ry for the w ork . In gen­
e r a l , the w o r k o f the maintenance carpenter re quir es rounded training and
ex p erience usu ally acq u ire d through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent
train in g and experi ence.
M AIN TE NA N CE E LE C T R IC IA N
P e r f o r m s a v ar ie t y of e lectric al trade functions such as the in ­
stallation, maintenance, o r r e p a i r of equipment fo r the generation, d i s t r i ­
bution, o r utilization of e le c t ric en ergy in an establishment. W o r k involves
m ost of the fo llo w in g : Installing o r re pairi ng any of a v arie ty of e l e c t ric a l
equipment such as g e n e r a t o r s , t r a n s f o r m e r s , switchboards, co n t ro lle r s,
circuit b r e a k e r s , m o t o r s , heating units, conduit system s, o r other t r a n s ­
m is s io n equipment; w o rk in g f r o m bluep rints, drawings , layouts, o r other
spe cifications ; locating and diagnosing trouble in the e l e c t r ic a l system o r




standard computations relating to load requirements of
equipment; and using a v ariety of electric ian 's handtools
testing instruments. In g en eral, the w o rk of the m ain­
re q u ir es rounded training and experience usually acquired
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

M AIN TE N A N C E PA IN T E R
Paints and redecorate s w a l ls , woodwork, and fixtures of an es ta b­
lishment. W o r k involves the fo llo w in g: Know ledge of sur face peculia rities
and types of paint re qu ired fo r different applications; p rep aring surface fo r
painting by removing old finish o r by placing putty o r f i l l e r in nail holes
and inte rstic es; and applying paint with spray gun o r bru sh. May m ix co lors,
o ils , white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain p r o p e r color or con­
sistency. In g en eral, the w o rk of the maintenance painter re qu ir es rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a fo r m a l apprenticeship or
equivalent training and exp erience.
M A IN T E N A N C E M ACHINIST
P ro du ces re placement part s and new part s in making re pairs of
m et al part s of mechanic al equipment ope rated in an establishment. W ork in ­
volves most of the fo llo w in g: Interpreting written instructions and spe cifica­
tions; planning and laying out of w ork ; using a v arie ty of machinist's handtools and precis io n m eas u rin g instruments; setting up and operating standard
machine tools; shaping of metal part s to close to lera nces; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of w o rk , tooling, feeds, and speeds
of machining; knowledge of the work ing p ro pe rties of the common metals;
selecting standard m a t e r i a ls , p a rt s, and equipment requ ir ed for this work;
and fitting and a ssem b lin g parts into m echanic al equipment. In general, the
m achin ist's w o rk n o rm a lly re qu ir es a rounded training in mach ine-shop
p ract ice usually acq uired through a fo r m a l apprenticeship o r equivalent
training and experience.
M A IN T E N A N C E M EC H A N IC (M A C H IN E R Y )
R ep airs m achin ery or mec hanic al equipment of an establishment.
W o r k involves most of the fo llo w in g: Examining machines and mechanical
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling o r partly dismantling
mach ines and p erfo r m in g re pairs that mainly involve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; re placing broken o r defective parts with item s
obtained f r o m stock; ord ering the production of a replacement part by a
machine shop o r sending the machine to a machine shop fo r m a jo r re pairs;
p rep arin g written specifications fo r m a j o r re p a i r s o r fo r the production of
part s o rd e re d fr o m machine shops; re a s se m b lin g mach ines; and making all
n e c e s s a r y adjustments fo r operation. In g en eral, the w o rk of a machinery
maintenance mechanic requ ir es rounded training and experience usually
acq uired through a fo r m a l apprenticeship o r equivalent training and e x ­
p erience.
Exclud ed fr o m this cl assificati on are w o r k e r s whose p rim a ry
duties involve setting up o r adjusting machines.
M A IN T E N A N C E M ECH ANIC (M OTOR V E H IC L E )
R ep airs automobiles, b us es , m o to rt ru cks, and tractors of an e s ta b ­
lishment.
W o r k involves most of the fo llo w in g: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; d is as s em b lin g equipment and p e r ­
fo rm ing r e p a i rs that involve the use of such handtools a s 'w r e n c h e s , gauges,

M A IN T E N A N C E M ECHANIC (M OTOR V E H IC L E )— Continued

M AIN T E N A N C E TRADES H E LPE R

d r il l s , o r spe cializ ed equipment in d is a s s e m b lin g o r fitting p arts; replacing
broken o r defective part s fr o m stock; grinding and adjusting v alv es ; r e ­
assem blin g and installing the v ario u s a s s e m b l ie s in the vehicle and making
n e c e s s a r y adjustments; and aligning w h ee ls , adjusting b ra k e s and lights, o r
tightening body bolts. In g en eral, the w o rk of the m otor vehicle maintenance
mechanic re q u ir e s rounded training and experi ence usually acquired through
a fo r m a l ap pr entices hip o r equivalent training and experien ce .

A s s is ts one o r m ore w o r k e r s in the skilled maintenance t r a d e s , by
p e rfo r m in g specific o r gen eral duties of l e s s e r skill, such as keeping a
w o r k e r supplied with m aterials and tools; cleaning work in g a r e a , machine,
and equipment; assisting journeym an by holding m a t e ria ls o r tools; and
p e rfo r m in g other unskilled tasks as d ire cte d by journeym an.
The kind of
w o rk the helper is permitted to p e r f o r m v a r i e s f r o m trad e to tr ad e:
In
some trad es the hel per is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding m a t e r i a ls
and to o ls, and cleaning work ing a r e a s ; and in others he is perm itted to
p e r f o r m specialized machine opera tio ns, o r part s of a trad e that are also
p e r fo r m e d by w o r k e r s on a fu ll-tim e b a s is .

This classification d o e s not i n c l u d e
cu sto m ers ' vehicles in automobile re p a i r shops.

mechanics

who

re p a i r

M AIN T E N A N C E P IP E F IT T E R
Installs o r r e p a i rs w a t e r , steam, ga s , o r other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. W o r k involves most of the fo llo w in g: Lay in g
out w o rk and m e a s u rin g to locate position of pipe fr o m d raw ings o r other
written spe cifications ; cutting v ario us siz es of pipe to c o rr e c t lengths with
chisel and h a m m e r o r oxyacetylene to rch o r pipe-cutting m achin es ; threading
pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by h an d-driv en o r p o w e r - d r i v e n
machines; as s e m b lin g pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers;
making standard shop computations relating to p r e s s u r e s , flow, and size of
pipe re quir ed; and making standard tests to determine w het her finished pipes
meet spe cifications .
In g en eral, the w o rk of the maintenance pipefitter
re qu ir es rounded training and experi ence usually acquired through a fo r m a l
apprenticeship o r equivalent training and experi ence.
W ork ers p rim arily
engaged in installing and re p airin g building sanitation o r heating system s
are ex cluded.
M AIN TE N A N C E S H E E T -M E T A L WORKER
F a b r i c a t e s , in stalls , and maintains in good r e p a i r the sheet-m etal
equipment and fixtu res (such as machine gu ard s , g r e a s e pans, shelves,
lo c k e r s, tanks, ventil ato rs, chutes, ducts, m etal roofi ng) of an establishm ent.
W o r k involves m ost of the fo llo w in g: Pl anning and laying out all types of
sh eet-m etal maintenance w o rk fr o m blu epri nts, m o d e ls , o r other s p e c ifi c a ­
tions; setting up and operating all available types of she e t -m e t a l work ing
mach ines; using a v ariety of handtools in cutting, bending, fo rm in g, shaping,
fitting, and a s s e m b lin g ; and installing s h eet-m etal artic les as re qu ir ed. In
gen eral, the w o rk of the maintenance s h eet-m etal w o r k e r re q u ir e s rounded
training and ex p erience usually acquired through a fo r m a l apprenticesh ip o r
equivalent training and experien ce .

M A C H IN E -T O O L O P E R A T O R (T O O LR O O M )
Sp ecialize s in operating one o r m o r e than one type of machine
tool (e.g., jig b o r e r , grinding m achine, engine lathe, m il lin g machine) to
machine metal fo r use in making o r maintaining j i g s , fixtu res, cutting tools,
gau ges, o r metal dies or mo lds used in shaping o r fo rm ing m etal o r
nonmetallic m aterial (e.g., pla stic , p la s t e r , ru b b e r , g l a s s ).
W o r k typically
in v olv es : Planning and p e rfo r m in g difficult machining operations which
requ ir e complicated setups o r a high d e g re e of accuracy ; setting up machine
tool o r tools (e.g., install cutting tools and adjust gu id es , stops, work in g
ta b les , and other controls to handle the s iz e of stock to be machined;
determine p ro pe r feeds, speeds, tooling, and operation sequence o r select
those p r e s c r ib e d in dra wings, b luep rints, o r layouts); using a v ariety of
p recis io n m easu rin g instruments; making n e c e s s a r y adjustments during
machining operation to achieve requisite dimension s to v e r y close to lera n ces .
M ay be required to select p ro p e r coolants and putting and lu bricatin g o ils,
to recogniz e when tools need d re s s in g , and to d r e s s tools. In ge n e ra l, the
w o rk of a machine-tool o pera tor (to o lr o om ) at the skill l e v e l ca lled fo r in
this clas sification requ ir es extensive knowledge of m a c h in e -s h o p and to o l­
room pract ice usually acquired through co n s id er ab le o n -t h e - jo b training and
exp erien ce .
F o r c r o s s -in d u s tr y wage study p u r p o s e s , this classificatio n does not
include m ach ine-tool operators (to o lr o om ) em ployed in tool and die jobbing
s ho ps.
T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R
Constructs and re p airs j i g s , fix tu r e s , cutting to o ls, gau ges, o r
m etal dies or molds used in shaping o r fo rm in g m etal o r nonmetallic
m a t e r i a l (e.g., plastic, p la ster, r u b b e r , g l a s s ).
W o r k typically i n v o l v e s :
Planning and laying out w ork acc ordi ng to m o d e ls , b luep rints, d ra w in g s , o r
other written or o r a l specifications; understanding the w ork in g p ro p e rtie s of
common metals and alloys; selecting appropria te m a t e r i a l s , to o ls, and
p r o c e s s e s requir ed to complete task; mak ing n e c e s s a r y shop computations;
setting up and operating various machine tools and related equipment; using
v ario us tool and die m a k e r 's handtools and p r e c i s io n m e a s u rin g in struments;
w ork in g to ve ry close tolera nces; h ea t-t rea tin g metal part s and finished tools
and dies to achieve requ ir ed qualities; fitting and a s s e m b lin g p arts to p r e ­
s c ri b e d tolera nces and allowan ces.
In g e n e ra l, the tool and die m a k e r ' s
w o rk re qu ir es rounded training in m a c h in e -s h o p and t o o lro o m pra ctic e
usu ally acquired through fo r m a l ap pren tices hip o r equivalent training and
exp erien ce .

M ILLW R IGH T
Installs new machines o r heavy equipment, and dism antles and
installs machines o r heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are
required. W o r k involves most of the follo w in g: Planning and laying out w ork ;
interpreting bluep rints o r other specifications; using a v ariety of handtools
and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to s t r e s s e s , strength
of m a t e r i a ls , and centers of gravity; aligning and balan cing equipment;
selecting standard tools, equipment, and part s to be used; and installing and
maintaining in good o r d e r p o w e r tr a n s m is s io n equipment such as d riv e s and
speed re d u c e rs .
In g en eral, the m il l w r ig h t 's w o rk n o rm a lly r e q u ir e s a
rounded training and experi ence in the trade acq uired through a f o r m a l
apprenticeship o r equivalent training and experience.




F o r c r o s s -i n d u s tr y wage study p u r p o s e s , this classification does not
include tool and die m ak ers who (1) a r e em ployed in tool and die jobbing
shops o r (2) produce forging dies (die s in k e r s ).

50

STATIO NAR Y E N G IN E E R

SH IPPE R AND RECEIVER — Continued

O p erates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipment (mechanical o r electric al) to supply the
esta blishment in which em plo yed with p ow e r, heat, re frigera tio n , o r a i r conditioning. W o r k involves : Op erating and maintaining equipment such as
s tea m engines, a i r c o m p r e s s o r s , gen erato rs , m oto rs, turbines , ventilating
and r e f r i g e r a t in g equipment, stea m b o il e r s and b o i l e r - f e d w a t e r pumps;
mak in g equipment r e p a i r s ; and keeping a re co rd of operation of machin ery,
t e m p e r a tu re , and fuel consumption.
M ay also supervise these operations.
Head o r chief eng in ee rs in es tablishments employing m o re than one engineer
a r e ex cluded.

R e c e iv e r s typically are resp onsib le fo r most of the following:
V e r i fy in g the c o rrectn es s of incoming shipments by comparing items and
quantities unloaded against b ills of lading, in voices , manifests, storage
receip ts, o r other re c o r d s ; checking fo r damaged goods; insuring that
goods ar e appropria tely identified fo r routing to departments within the
establishm ent; p re p a rin g and keeping re co rd s of goods received.
F o r wage study p u rp o s e s , w o r k e r s are c la s s ifie d as follows:
Sh ipper
R e c e iv e r
Sh ipper and re c e iv e r

B O ILE R TE ND ER
F i r e s stationary b o i l e r s to fu rnish the establishment in which e m ­
ployed with heat, p o w e r , o r steam.
Feeds fuels to fi re by hand o r
operates a m ech an ic al sto ker, gas , o r oil burner; and checks w a t e r and
safety v a lv e s . M a y clean, oil, o r a ssis t in repairing b o i l e r r o o m equipment.

WAREHOUSEMAN
A s directe d, p e r fo r m s a v arie ty of w ar eh ousin g duties which require
an understanding of the esta blish m en t's stora ge p la n. W o r k involves most
of the fo llo w in g: V e rify in g m at erials (or m erchand is e) against receiving
documents, noting and reporting d iscrepan cie s and obvious damages; routing
m a t e ri a ls to p r e s c r i b e d stora ge locations; storing, stacking, or palletizing
m a t e ria ls in accorda nce with p r e s c r i b e d stora ge methods; re arranging and
taking inventory of stored m a t e r i a ls ; examining sto red m aterials and r e ­
porting deter iora tion and damage; removing m a t e ri a l fr o m storage and
p re p a rin g it fo r shipment. M ay operate hand o r p o w e r trucks in perform in g
warehousin g duties.

Material Movement and Custodial
TR U CK D R IVE R
D r iv e s a truck within a city o r indu strial a r e a to tr ansport
m a t e r i a l s , m e r c h a n d is e , equipment, o r w o r k e r s between v ario us types of
es ta bli shm ents such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, w a r e h o u s e s ,
w h o le s a le and reta il establi sh m ents, or between retail establish ments and
c u s t o m e r s ' houses o r p la c es of business.
M ay also load o r unload truck
with o r without h e l p e r s , mak e m in or mechanical r e p a i r s , and keep truck in
good w o rk in g o r d e r .
Sa le s route and o v e r - t h e - r o a d d r iv e r s are excluded .
F o r w a g e study p u r p o s e s ,
rated capacity of truck, as fo llo ws :

tru ck d riv ers

Exclud e w o r k e r s whose p r i m a r y duties involve shipping and r e ­
ceiving w o rk (see Shipper and R e c e iv e r and Shipping P a c k e r ) , o r d e r filling
(see O r d e r F i l l e r ) , o r operating p o w e r trucks (see P o w e r - T r u c k Opera tor).

are c la s s ifie d by type and

T r u c k d r i v e r , light truck
(straig ht truck , under IV 2 tons, usually 4 w heels)
T r u c k d r i v e r , m e d iu m truck
(straight truck, IV 2 to 4 tons inclusive, usually 6 w h ee ls )
T r u c k d r i v e r , heavy truck
(straight truck, o v e r 4 tons, usually 10 w hee ls )
Truckdriver, tracto r-trailer

ORDER F IL L E R
F i l l s shipping o r t r a n s f e r o r d e r s fo r finished goods fr o m stored
m erchand is e in accorda nce with specifications on sales slips, custom ers '
o r d e r s , o r other instructions.
M ay, in addition to filling o rd e rs and in ­
dicating items filled o r omitted, keep r e c o rd s of outgoing o r d e r s , requisition
additional stock o r report short supplies to s u p e rv is o r , and p e r fo r m other
related duties.

SH IPPER AN D R E C EIVER
P e r f o r m s c l e r i c a l and physical tasks in connection with shipping
goods of the esta bli sh m ent in which employed and receiv ing incoming
shipments.
In p e r f o r m in g d a y -t o - d a y , routine ta sk s, fo llo ws es ta blish ed
guidelines. In handling unusual nonroutine p ro b le m s , re ceiv e s specific guid­
ance fr o m s u p e r v i s o r o r other offi cia ls.
M ay direct and coordinate the
activities of oth er w o r k e r s engaged in handling goods to be shipped o r being
received.

SH IPPING P A C K E R
P r e p a r e s finished products fo r shipment or storage by placing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations p e r fo r m e d being dependent
upon the-type-,-^ize, and nu m b er of units to be packed, the type of container
employed , and method of shipment. W o r k re q u ir es the placing of items in
shipping containers and m ay involve one o r m o re of the fo llo wing: Knowledge
of v ario us items of stock in o r d e r to v e r ify content; selection of appropriate
type and size of container; inse rting enclo sures in container; using ex ce ls io r
o r other m a t e r i a l to prevent b re a k a g e o r damage; closing and sealing
container; and applying la bels o r entering identifying data on container.
P a c k e r s who al so make wooden boxes o r crates are excluded.

Ship pers typically a r e re sponsib le fo r most of the following:
V e r i fy in g that o r d e r s ar e acc ura tely filled by comparing items and quantities
of goods gathered f o r shipment against documents; insuring that shipments
are p r o p e r l y p ackaged, identified with shipping information, and loaded into
transporti ng v e h i c le s ; p r e p a r i n g and keeping re cord s of goods shipped, e.g.,
m an ifes ts , b i l l s of lading.




51

M A T E R IA L H AND LING LA B O R E R

GU ARD— Continue d

A w o r k e r em ployed in a w a r e h o u s e , manufacturing plant, store , or
other establishment whose duties involve one o r m o re of the fo llo w in g:
Loading and unloading v ario us rtiaterials and m erchand is e on o r fr o m freight
c a r s , tr u ck s , o r other transporti ng device s; unpacking, shelving, o r placing
m a t e ria ls o r m erchand is e in p r o p e r storage location; and transporting
m at erials o r m erchand is e by handtruck, ca r , o r w h e e lb a r r o w .
Lon gs hore
w o r k e r s , who load and unload ships, ar e ex cluded.

Gu ards employed by esta blish m en ts which provide protective
v ic es on a contract b a s is are included in this occupation.

P O W E R -T R U C K O PE R A T O R
O perates a manu ally controlled g a s o lin e - o r e l e c t r i c - p o w e r e d truck
o r tr act o r to tr ansport goods and m a t e ria ls of al l kinds about a w ar eh o u s e,
manufacturing plant, o r other establishment.
F o r wage study p u rp o s e s , w o r k e r s
truck, as follo ws:

ar e c la s s ifie d by type of p o w e r -

F o rk li ft o pe rator
P o w e r - t r u c k o p e rat o r (other than fo rklift)

ser­

F o r wage study purp oses, guard s a r e c la s s ifi e d as fo llo ws:
Cla ss A . Enfo rc es regulations des igne d to prevent b r e a c h e s of
security.
E x e rc is e s judgment and uses d is cre tio n in dealing with e m e r ­
gencies and security violations encountered.
Det erm ines whether firs t
respons e should be to intervene directl y (asking f o r as sis tance when deem ed
n e c e s s a r y and time allo w s ), to keep situation un der s u r v eilla n ce, o r to r e ­
port situation so that it can be handled by appropria te authority.
Duties
re qu ire spe cialized training in methods and techniques of protecting security
a r e a s . Commonly, the gu ard is re q u ir e d to dem ons tra te continuing physical
fitness and proficiency with f i r e a r m s o r other spe cia l weapons.
C la ss B . C a r r i e s out instructions p r i m a r i l y oriente d to w a r d in ­
suring that em ergencie s and security violations ar e readily d is c o v e re d and
re port ed to appropriate authority. Intervenes d ire ctly only in situations which
re qu ir e m in im al action to s afe guard p ro p e rty o r p e rs o n s .
Duties re quir e
m in im al training.
Commonly, the g u ard is not re qu ired to demonstrate
physical fitness. May be ar m ed, but g e n e ra l l y is not re q u ir ed to demonstrate
proficie ncy in the use of fi r e a r m s o r s p e c ia l weap ons.
JANITOR, PO R TER , OR C L E A N E R

GUARD
P r o te c t s pro pe rty fr o m theft o r dam age, o r persons fr o m haz ards
o r in te rfe re nce. Duties involve serv ing at a fixed post, making rounds on
foot or by m o to r veh icl e, o r esco rt ing p erso ns o r pro perty. M ay be deputized
to make a r r e s t s .
M ay also help v is ito rs and cu stom ers by answering
questions and giving directions.




52

Cleans and keeps in an o r d e r l y condition factory w o rk in g a r e a s and
w a s h r o o m s , o r p r e m i s e s of an o ffice, apartment house, o r c o m m e r c ia l o r
other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the fo llo w in g: Sweeping,
mopping o r scrubbing, and polishing f l o o r s ; rem oving chips, t r a s h , and other
refu se; dusting equipment, fu rniture, o r fixtures; polishing m etal fixtu res o r
t r im m in g s ; providing supplies and m in o r maintenance s e r v i c e s ; and cleaning,
la v a to r ie s , show ers , and r e st ro o m s .
W o r k e r s who spe cializ e in window
washing ar e excluded.

Area Wage
Surveys
A list of the latest bulletins available is presented below. Bulletins
may be purchased from any of the BLS regional offices shown on the back
covert or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing
Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. Make checks payable to Superintendent of
Documents. A directory of occupational wage surveys, covering the years
1970 through 1976, is available on request.
Area
A k r o n , Ohio, Dec. 1977__________________________________________
Albany—Schenectady—T r o y , N . Y . , Sept. 1978 1_______________
Anaheim^-Santa Ana—G ard e n G r o v e ,
C a li f., Oct. 1977_________________________________________________
A tlan ta, G a., M a y 1978 1--------------------------------------------------------B a l t im o r e , M d . , A u g . 1978 1-------------------------------------------------B il li n g s , Mont., July 1978_______________________________________
B ir m in g h a m , A l a . , M a r . 1978__________________________________
Boston, M a s s . , A u g. 19781---------------------------------------------------B uffalo , N . Y . , Oct. 1977 _________________________________________
Canton, Ohio, M a y 1978__________________________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.—G a . , Sept. 1978 1 ----------------------------------Chicago , 111., M a y 1978___________________________________________
Cincinnati, Ohio—Ky.—Ind., July 1978__________________________
C le vela n d, Ohio, Sept. 1978_____________________________________
C olum bu s, Ohio, Oct. 1978 1 --------------------------------------------------Corpus C hristi, T e x . , July 1978_______________________________
D a l l a s - F o r t W o r th , T e x . , Oct. 1978 1______________ _________ Davenport—Rock I s l a n d - M o l i n e , Iowa—111., Feb. 1978--------Dayton, O hio, D ec . 1977 1________________________________________
Daytona Beach , F l a . , A u g. 1978________________________________
Denver—B o u l d e r , C o lo ., Dec. 1977 1-------------------------------------D etro it , M ic h ., M a r . 1978_______________________________________
F r e s n o , C a lif., June 1978 1---------------------------------------------------G a i n e s v il l e , F l a . , Sept. 1978____________________________________
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , July 1978 1------------------------------------------------G r e e n s b o r o — in s t o n - S a l e m —
W
High Point,
N . C . , A u g. 1978__________________________________________________
G r e e n v i ll e —Sp artanb u rg , S .C ., June 1978-----------------------------H a r t f o r d , Conn., M a r . 19781------------------------------------------------Houston, T e x ., A p r . 1978________________________________________
H un ts v ille , A l a . , F e b . 1978---------------------------------------------------Indianapolis , Ind., Oct. 1978 * -----------------------------------------------Jackson, M i s s . , Jan. 1978------------------------------------------------------J acksonville, F l a . , D e c . 1977__________________________________
K an s as City, Mo.—K a n s . , Sept. 197 8--------------------------------------L o s A n g e l e s —Long Beach, C a li f., Oct. 1978 1 ---------------------L o u i s v i l l e , K y .- I n d ., N ov. 1977 1_______________________________
M e m p h is , Tenn.—A r k . —M i s s . , N ov . 1977------------------------------




Bulletin number
and price*
1950-70, 80 cents
2025-58, $1.20
1950-60,
2025-28,
2025-50,
2025-38,
2025-15,
2025-43,
1950-58,
2025-22,
2025-51,
2025-32,
2025-39,
2025-49,
2025-59,
2025-29,
2025-52,
2025-6,
1950-71,
2025-48,
1950-74,
2025-11,
2025-31,
2025-45,
2025-41,

$1.00
$1.40
$1.50
$1.00
80 cents
$1.50
$1.00
70 cents
$1.20
$1.30
$1.10
$1.30
$1.50
$1.00
$1.50
70 cents
$1.10
$1.00
$1.40
$1.20
$1.20
$1.00
$1.20

2025-46,
2025-30,
2025-14,
2025-23,
2025-4,
2025-57,
2025-1,
1950-67,
2025-53,
2025-61,
1950-66,
1950-63,

$1.00
$1.00
$1.20
$1.20
70 cents
$1.50
70 cents
70 cents
$1.30
$1.50
$1.20
70 cents

Area
M ia m i , F l a . , Oct. 1978 1 ................................................ ........ .
M il w auk ee, W i s . , A p r . 1978 1_________________________________
Minne apolis—St. P a u l, Minn.— i s . , Jan. 1978 1_____________
W
Nassau—
Suffolk, N . Y . , June 1978 1
_____________________________
N e w a r k , N .J ., Jan. 1978 1_______________________________________
N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , Jan. 1978__________________________________
N e w Y o r k , N . Y . - N . J . , M ay 1978 1...... ....................................
N orfo lk —V ir g in i a B e a c h -P o r ts m o u t h , V a N . C . , M ay 1978__________________________ ___________________ ____
N orfo lk —V ir g in i a B e a c h - P o r t s mouth and
N ew port N ew s —
Hampton, Va.—N . C . , M ay 1978____________
North eas t Pennsylvania, Aug. 1978____________________________
Oklahoma City, O kla., Aug. 1978______________________________
Om ah a, N e b r . —Iowa, Oct. 1978________________________________
Pa terso n —Clifton—P a s s a i c , N .J ., June1978 1_________________
Phil adelphia, Pa .—N .J ., Nov. 1978_____________________________
Pitt sb urg h, P a ., Jan. 1978_____________________________________
Portl and, M ain e, Dec. 1977___________________________________
Po rtl and, O re g .—W a s h ., M ay 1978____________________________
Po ugh keepsie, N . Y . , June 1978 1______________________________
Poughkeep sie—Kingston— ew b urgh, N . Y . , June 1978 1_____
N
P ro v id en ce— a rw i c k —Paw tu cket, R .I.—
W
M a s s . , June 1978_______________________________________________
Richmond, V a . , June 1978______________________________________
St. L o u is , M o . - I l l . , M a r . 1978..................................................
Sacram ento, C ali f., Dec. 1977 1_______________________________
Saginaw, M ich., Nov. 1977_____________________________________
Salt Lake City—Ogden, Utah, N ov. 1977______________________
San Antonio, T ex ., M ay 1978__________________________________
San Diego , C ali f., N ov. 1977 1..................................................
San F r a n c isc o —Oakland, C a lif., M a r . 1978 1_________________
San Jose, C alif., M a r . 19781...................................................
Seattle—Everett, W a s h ., Dec. 1977____________________________
South Bend, Ind., Aug. 1978____________________________________
Tole do, Ohio— ich., M a y 1978 1______________________________
M
Trenton, N .J ., Sept. 1978 1 _____________________________________
Utica— o m e, N . Y . , July 1978__________________________________
R
Washington, D.C.—Md.—V a . , M a r . 19781 _____________________
Wic hita , Kans., A p r . 1978______________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , A p r . 1978 1 _______________________________
Y o r k , Pa.,. Feb. 1978 1____________ ______________________________

Bulletin number
and price*
2025-60,
2025-18,
2025-2,
2025-33,
2025-7,
2025-5,
2025-35,

$1.30
$1.40
$1.40
$1.30
$1.40
$1.00
$1.50

2025-20, 70 cents
2025-21,
2025-47,
2025-40,
2025-56,
2025-36,
2025-54,
2025-3,
1950-69,
2025-25,
2025-37,
2025-42,

80 cents
$1.00
$1.00
$1.00
$1.20
$1.30
$1.10
70 cents
$1.00
$1.10
$1.20

2025-27,
2025-26,
2025-13,
1950-72,
1950-59,
1950-68,
2025-17,
1950-73,
2025-10,
2025-9,
1950-75,
2025-44,
2025-24,
2025-55,
2025-34,
2025-12,
2025-16,
2025-19,
2025-8,

$1.40
80 cents
$1.20
$1.00
70 cents
80 cents
70 cents
$1.10
$1.40
$1.20
80 cents
$1.00
$1.20
$1.20
$1.00
$1.40
80 cents
$1.10
$1.10

* Prices are determined by the Government Printing O ffice and are subject to change.
1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary w age provisions are also presented.

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300

Lab-441

Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices
Region I

Region II

Region 11
1

Region IV

1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass 02203
Phone 223-6761 (Area Code 617)

Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N Y. 10036
Phone: 399-5406 (Area Code 212)

3535 Market Street,
P O Box 13309
Philadelphia, Pa 19101
Phone :596-1154 (Area Code 215)

Suite 540
1371 Peachtree S t., N E
Atlanta, Ga 30309
Phone 881-4418 (Area Code 404)

Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Delaware
District of Colum bia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
M ississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee

Region V

Region VI

Regions VII and VIII

Regions IX and X

9th Floor, 230 S Dearborn St.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone:353-1880 (Area Code 312)

Second Floor
555 G riffin Square Building
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 767-69 71 (A reaC o de214)

Federal O ffice Building
911 W alnut St.. 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo 64106
Phone 374-2481 (Area Code 816)

450 Golden Gate Ave
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif 94102
Phone:556-4678 (Area Code 415)

Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas

VII

VIII

Iowa
Kansas
M issouri
Nebraska

Colorado
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Utah

IX
Arizona
California
Hawaii
Nevada

Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin




Wyoming

X
Alaska
Idaho
Oregon
Washington