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Area Wage Survey
Kansas City, Missouri-Kansas,
Metropolitan Area, September 1976
Bulletin 1900-60
U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics




CLAY

Kac P it\/

Mn

^

Preface
This bulletin provides results of a September 1976 survey
of occupational earnings and supplementary wage benefits in the
Kansas City, Missouri—
Kansas, Standard Metropolitan Statistical
Area (Cass, Clay, Jackson, Platte, and Ray Counties, Missouri;
and Johnson and Wyandotte Counties, Kansas). The survey was
made as part of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual area wage
survey program, which is designed to yield data for individual
metropolitan areas as well as national and regional estimates for
all Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United States,
excluding Alaska and Hawaii.
A major consideration in the area wage survey program
is the need to describe the level and movement of wages in a
variety of labor markets, through the analysis of ( 1 ) the level
and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2 ) the movement
of wages by occupational category and skill level. The program
develops information that may be used for many purposes, in­
cluding wage and salary administration, collective bargaining,
and assistance in determining plant location. Survey results also
are used by the U.S. Department of Labor to make wage deter­
minations under the Service Contract Act of 1965.
Currently, 84 areas are included in the program. (See
list of areas on inside back cover.) In each area, occupational
earnings data are collected annually. Information on establish­
ment practices and supplementary wage benefits is obtained every
third year.




Each year after all individual area wage surveys have
been completed, two summary bulletins are issued. The first
brings together data for each metropolitan area surveyed; the
second presents national and regional estimates, projected from
individual metropolitan area data.
The Kansas City survey was conducted by the Bureau's
regional office in Kansas City, Mo., under the general direction
of Edward Chaiken, Assistant Regional Commissioner for Oper­
ations. The survey could not have been accomplished without
the cooperation of the many firms whose wage and salary data
provided the basis for the statistical information in this bulletin.
The Bureau wishes to express sincere appreciation for the co­
operation received.

N o te :

Reports on occupational earnings and supplementary wage
provisions in the Kansas City area are available for contract
cleaning services (July 1974), appliance repair (November 1975),
and hospitals (August 1975). Also available are listings of union
wage rates for building trades, printing trades, local-transit oper­
ating employees, local truckdrivers and helpers, and grocery
store employees. Free copies of these are available from the
Bureau's regional offices. (See back cover for addresses.)

Bulletin 1900-60

Area W age Survey:

January 1977

Kansas City, M issouri-K ansas,
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, W. J. Usery, Jr., Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

Metropolitan Area
Septem ber 1976

Contents

Page

Page

Introduction____________________________________

T ables— Continued

2

T ables:
A. Earnings:
A -l.
Weekly earnings of office
workers__________________________
A -la . Weekly earnings of office
workers—
large establishments___
A -2.
Weekly earnings of professional
and technical workers____________
A-2a. Weekly earnings of professional
and technical workers—
large
establishments___________________
A -3.
Average weekly earnings of office,
professional, and technical
workers, by sex__________________
A-3a. Average weekly earnings of office,
professional, and technical
workers, by sex—
large
establishments____________________
A -4.
Hourly earnings of maintenance,
toolroom, and powerplant
workers___________________________
A-4a. Hourly earnings of maintenance,
toolroom, and powerplant
workers—
large establishments___
A -5.
Hourly earnings of material
movement and custodial
workers__________________________
A-5a. Hourly earnings of material
movement and custodial
workers—
large establishments___
A - 6 . Average hourly earnings of
maintenance, toolroom,
powerplant, material
movement, and custodial
workers, by sex_________________




3
6
8

9
10

12

13
14
15

A. Earnings— Continued
A - 6 a. Average hourly earnings of
maintenance, toolroom,
powerplant, material
movement, and custodial
workers, by sex—
large
establishments___________________
A - l .
Percent increases in average
hourly earnings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted
for employment shifts____________
B. Establishment practices and
supplementary wage provisions:
B -l.
Minimum entrance salaries for
inexperienced typists and clerks..
B-2.
Late shift pay provisions for
full-time manufacturing plant
wo rker s __________________________
B-3.
Scheduled weekly hours and days
of full-time first-shift workers...
B-4.
Annual paid holidays for full-time
wo rker s __________________________
B-5.
Paid vacation provisions for
full-time workers________________
B - 6 . Health, insurance, and pension
plans for full-time workers______
Appendix A.
Appendix B.

19

20

21

22

23
24
25
28

Scope and method of survey_______ 31
Occupational descriptions_________ 37

17

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S . Government Printing
O ffice, Washington, D. C. 20 40 2, GPO Bookstores, or BLS Regional

18

1

Offices listed on back cover.
Superintendent of Documents.

Price $ 1 .0 5 .

Make checks payable to




Introduction
nurses, skilled maintenance trades workers, and
unskilled plant workers. Where possible, data are
presented for all industries, manufacturing, and
nonmanufacturing. This table provides a measure of
wage trends after elimination of changes in average
earnings caused by employment shifts among estab­
lishments as well as turnover of establishments in­
cluded in survey samples. For further details, see
appendix A.

This area is 1 of 84 in which the U.S.
Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics
conducts surveys of occupational earnings and re ­
lated benefits. In this area, data were obtained by
personal visits of Bureau field economists to re ­
presentative establishments within six broad industry
divisions: Manufacturing: transportation, communi­
cation, and other public utilities; wholesale trade;
retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate;
and services. Major industry groups excluded from
these studies are government operations and the con­
struction and extractive industries. Establishments
having fewer than a prescribed number of workers
are omitted because of insufficient employment in
the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are
provided for each of the broad industry divisions
which meet publication criteria.

B-series tables
The B -series tables present information on
minimum entrance salaries for office workers; late
shift pay provisions and practices for plant workers
in manufacturing; and data separately for plant and
office workers on scheduled weekly hours and days
of first-shift workers; paid holidays; paid vacations;
and health, insurance, and pension plans.

A -series tables
Tables A -l through A - 6 provide estimates
of straight-time weekly or hourly earnings for work­
ers in occupations common to a variety of manufac­
turing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupations
were selected from the following categories: (a)
Office clerical, (b) professional and technical, (c)
maintenance, toolroom, and powerplant, and (d) mate­
rial movement and custodial. In the 31 largest
survey areas, tables A- l a through A - 6 a provide
similar data for establishments employing 500 work­
ers or more.

Appendixes
Appendix A describes the methods and con­
cepts used in the area wage survey program. It
provides information on the scope of the area survey,
on the area's industrial composition in manufactur­
ing, and on labor-management agreement coverage.

Table A -7 provides percent changes in av­
erage hourly earnings of office clerical workers,
electronic data p r o c e s s i n g workers, industrial

Appendix B provides job descriptions used
by Bureau field economists to classify workers by
occupation.

2

A. Earnings
Table A-1. W e e kly earnings of office w orkers in Kansas C ity, M o . — Kans., S ep tem b er 1976
W eek ly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of
workers

A vera ge
w eek ly
h ours1
(standard)

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
s

s

$

s

Under

%

t

S

t

S

S

*

%
---------

S

M ean ^

M edian *

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

340

110

O ccupation and in d u str y d iv isio n

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

2
-

33

101

175

466

368

447

362

318

217

181

64

48

41

89

124

54

63

18

33

22

323

242

163

139

136

73

65

148

12
52

18

279

111
251

76

2
-

90
376

20
8

4

52
123
-

120
47

83

10
91
-

201
62

199

4
29

12

8

15

18

16

24

17

36

58

20

33

92

39

30
26

19
18

10

1
-

,
and
under

M id d le ranged
8
100

ALL WORKERS

S E C R E T A R I E S ------------------ *
MANUFACTURING ---- --- — ~
NONMANUF A C T U R I N G --------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S --- --- RETAIL TRADE -----------

3 9 ,5

$
1 8 2 .5 0

1 7 2 .5 0

$
$
1 5 2 .0 0 * 2 0 3 # 5 0

1 8 7 .0 0

1 7 5 .0 0

1 5 5 .0 0 -2 0 9 .5 0

-

1 5 0 .0 0 -2 0 1 .5 0

•

2 0 0 .0 0 -2 5 7 .5 0

-

3 ,4 5 0
896
2 ,5 5 4

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 8 0 .5 0

431

4 0 .0

2 3 0 .0 0

1 7 2 .0 0
2 3 0 .0 0

1

3

207

4 0 .0

1 8 7 .0 0

1 8 5 .0 0

1 6 0 . 0 0 - 2 1 1 . SO

-

-

1

4

7

17

22

29

13

20

19

16

20

11

10

15

2

-

1

*

-

SECRETARIES, CLASS A -----MANUFACTURING ------------NONMANUFACTURING — ---- —

247

4 0 .0

2 0 6 .5 0

2 0 0 .0 0

1 7 3 .0 0 -2 3 0 .0 0

•

-

23

3

8

33

21

14

44

12

4

1 7 2 .5 0 -2 2 4 .5 0

-

-

—

4

-

8

IS

3

3

6

1

9

2

1

5
-

5
■-

2

1 7 6 .0 0

11
-

28

1 9 7 .0 0

17
-

12

4 0 .0

4
-

-

53

1
—

194

3 9 .5

2 0 9 .5 0

2 0 6 .0 0

1 8 4 .5 0 -2 3 0 .0 0

-

-

1

4

*

19

3

*

18

18

11

38

17

11

11

19

10

3

5

5

1

SECRETARIES, CLASS 8 -----MANUFACTURING --- ----- --NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------RETAIL TRAOE -----------

886

3 9 .5

1 9 0 .5 0

56

68

108

134

132

51

61

68

41

19

53

16

9

2

21

10

12

5

16

20

26

3

13

1

10
7

1 8 7 .0 0

54

47

98

120

46

45

48

15

16

40

15

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 3 7 .0 0

11
-

25

30
104

9
-

13

2 0 3 . SO

11
-

34

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 8 0 .0 0
2 0 0 .0 0

1 6 1 .0 0 -2 1 0 .0 0

182

-

2

2

2

8

6

3

2

10

18

9

8

8

3

-

1 6 1 .0 0

*

5

*

8

16

2

4

3

5

7

1
2

5

1 8 2 .5 0

1

3

1

*

*

*

*

25

66

179

117

70
39

-

—

1 8 0 .0 0

1 6 1 .0 0 -2 0 6 .0 0

-

-

2 4 1 .5 0

1 9 6 .5 0 -2 7 2 .5 0

-

-

-

1 6 1 .0 0 -2 0 8 .0 0

•

*

1 ,4 8 6

3 9 .5

1 8 2 .5 0

1 7 2 .0 0

1 5 4 .0 0 -2 0 0 .0 0

•

•

2

414

4 0 .0

1 9 2 .0 0

1 8 2 .0 0

1 6 2 .0 0 -2 1 1 .0 0

-

-

3 9 .0

1 7 8 .5 0

1 6 7 .0 0

1 5 0 .5 0 -1 9 2 .0 0

-

-

2
-

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

2 2 9 .5 0

-

-

-

1 7 5 .0 0

2 3 8 .0 0
1 6 1 .0 0

2 0 2 .5 0 -2 5 3 .0 0

69

1 5 0 .0 0 -1 8 7 .0 0

•

*

807

3 9 .5

1 6 5 .5 0

1 5 2 .0 0

1 4 0 .5 0 -1 8 4 .0 0

•

247

4 0 .0

1 6 4 .5 0

1 5 6 .5 0

1 4 5 .0 0 -1 7 2 .0 0

-

2
•

30
2

560
108

3 9 .5

1 6 6 .0 0
2 1 4 .0 0

1 5 0 .0 0
2 1 2 .5 0

1 4 0 .5 0 -1 9 3 .5 0
1 9 1 .0 0 -2 1 9 .5 0

-

2

4 0 .0

-

-

524

3 9 .5

1 6 8 .0 0

1 7 0 .0 0
1 5 2 .0 0

1 3 4 .5 0 -1 7 9 .5 0

•

16

213

SECRETARIES, CLASS D — —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----- — --NONMANUFACTURING ---- ----UTILITIES

87
57

-

-

•

1 ,0 7 2

SECRETARIES, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING ----NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRAOE ----

PUBLIC

704

•

1 7 2 .0 0 -2 2 6 .5 0

--------

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL -----M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR —
-—
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----- --- --- n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

147

129

65

37

36

94

25

48

42

37

15

5

1

-

177

175

99

87

31

22

31

19

6

3

4

-

—

2

8

8

5

21

14

14

26

71

17

5

3

2

—

*

*

17

13

7

4

11
12

80
6

10
84

6

151

40
25

20
17

.

57

21
15

5

28

216
39

232

8
58

*

4

4

5

3

-

—

61

75

208

81

97

32

29

23

48

5

35

56

29

49

19

9

1

3

30
5

17

5

41
18

10

28

56

40

152

48

23

13

45

25

7

-

*

4

7

20
8

22

1

52
4

1
4

13

33

5

-

3

19

55

62

23

22

14

7

28

9

23

9

10

14

60
26

8

8

1

45

48

34

15
4

14
9

135

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

-

-

1 6 8 .0 0

1 7 3 .5 0

1 3 4 .5 0 -1 7 6 .0 0

-

16

19

2 1 0 .5 0

2 2 2 .5 0

1 7 6 .0 0 -2 4 9 .5 0

-

-

-

2

*

710
173

4 0 .0

1 8 8 .0 0

1 8 1 .5 0

1 6 0 .0 0 -2 1 4 .0 0
1 6 6 .0 0 -2 0 6 .0 0

1
-

44

1 7 4 .0 0

1
-

54

1 8 4 .0 0

1
-

2

4 0 .0

-

5

1 4 0 .5 0 -2 0 9 .5 0

3

8

3
136

13

92
28

71
39

64

32

111

16

12

537

4 0 .0

1 8 9 .0 0

1 8 5 .5 0

1 5 5 .5 0 -2 1 9 .0 0

1

1

1

2

33

163

4 0 .0

2 0 9 .5 0

2 1 9 .0 0

1 7 1 .5 0 -2 5 0 .0 0

-

-

-

-

16

7

*

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE TYPISTS
MANUFACTURING ------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------

401
64

3 9 .0

1 3 1 .5 0
1 4 5 .5 0

1 2 9 .0 0
1 5 0 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0 -1 4 2 .5 0

71
-

72

62

11

12

37
24

10

1 3 2 .5 0 -1 5 3 .0 0

7
-

58

4 0 .0

3

2

337

3 9 .0

1 2 9 .0 0

1 2 7 .5 0

1 1 5 .0 0 -1 3 9 .0 0

7

71

56

58

61

50

13

7

5

TYPISTS, CLASS A ------------MANUFACTURING --- --------NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

600
103

3 9 .5

1 4 6 .0 0

1 3 9 .0 0

1 2 6 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0

16

86

89

33

47

18

1 4 5 .5 0

1 4 5 .0 0

1 3 1 .5 0 -1 5 8 .5 0

8

6

9

30

11

16

2

497

3 9 .5

1 4 6 .0 0

1 2 6 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0

10

8

80

80

90

22

31

16

96

4 0 .0

1 9 4 .0 0

1 3 8 .0 0
1 9 6 .5 0

102
13
89

120

3 9 .5

10
-

4

1

16

TYPISTS, CLASS 8 ------------MANUFACTURING -------- —
NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

793
129

3 9 .5

1 2 1 .5 0

140

96

1 2 9 .0 0

1 1 7 .5 0 -1 3 7 .5 0

2

12

22

20

57

40
8

9
4

20
3

664

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 1 5 .0 0
1 3 1 .0 0

1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0

1 0 3 .5 0 -1 2 4 .5 0

47

222

154

32

5

17

4 0 .0

1 6 7 .5 0

1 5 1 .5 0

1 2 8 .0 0 -2 3 4 .5 0

-

3

10

120
9

39

65

7

3

2

3

12

7

9

26

-

-

12

5

9

25

10
9

See footnotes

1 5 8 .0 0 -2 1 7 .5 0

-

-

-

1 0 6 .0 0 -1 2 8 .0 0

49

234

176

143

3 9 .5

1 8 0 .5 0

1 6 8 .5 0

1 4 1 .5 0 -2 2 5 .0 0

138

3 9 .5

1 8 1 .5 0

1 6 9 .0 0

1 4 1 .5 0 -2 2 9 .0 0

63

4 0 .0

2 2 4 .0 0

2 2 9 .0 0

5

1

2 1 8 .5 0 -2 4 7 .5 0

at end o f t a b l e s .




66
8

3

2

74
IS
59

2

2
12

11

49

FILE CLERKS, CLASS A ---- — •
NONMANUFACTURING --------PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

3

5

4 0 .0

1 6 6 .5 0

8

2
2
-

20
-

421
87

103

9

5

1

5

135
24

*

*

*

*

11
3

14

•

..

2

3
-

-

—

8

12
10

3
3

-

-

6

2
-

•

1

24
4

6

19

1
8

1

6

2

-

-

-

2

4

15

*

30
26

8

3

4

-

-

*

*

37
19

45

7

43

31

19

.

5

4

22

29

1

14

21

3

4

3
2

2

3

3

-

-

2

•

-

-

-

-

41

28

16

2

-

33

18

8

*

*

*

.

3

1

•

-

_

-

*

*

3

1

*

*

*

*

6

2

8

1

•

.

_

-

•

8
-

-

-

-

-

6

2
2

8

8

1
-

-

-

-

8

a

*

*

*

*

5

.

-

.

-

-

-

-

-

*

*

*

*

-

*

*

15

18

40

8

11

14

2
2

4

1

-

.

*

4

1

*

22

8

13

1

1

11
-

17

7

12

11

3

10

7

12

10

5

3

1

2

1

-

12

4

3

1

2

1

-

12

5

-

4

3

1

2

1

*

12

5

•

17

2
2
2

-

5

-

_

8
-

31

2

7

-

5

1

11

8

2

2

2

7

28

-

11
4

7

2

2
2

2
2

7

28

•

4

3

28

17
17

T a b le A-1. W e e kly earnings of o ffice w o rkers in Kansas C ity , M o. —K ans., S ep tem b e r 1 9 7 6 — C ontinu ed
W e e k ly e a r n in g s

1

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

(sta n d a rd )
N um ber

Occupation and industry division

o
f
worken

s

A v era g e
w e e k ly
h ou rs1
M ean

(s ta n d a r d )

^

M e d ia n

*

M id d le r a n g e

^

Under
$

S
100

S

S

s

S

S

S

s

S

s

s

s

S

s

s

s

s

S

S

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

340

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

-

and
under

100
110

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
$

$

$

J.
i
rIL L

L L b K Itd i

L L A jj

L

MESSENGERS

1

1 1 5 .0 0

iC3«UV
341

4 0 .0

1 4 1 .0 0

1 2 2 .0 0

37

1 1 4 .0 0 -1 6 4 .5 0

40

24

13

11

18

24

40

81

45

41

13

20

1

J 1

1

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEP T I O N I S T S -

506

3 9 .5

1 4 3 .5 0

1 3 7 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0 -1 5 7 .5 0

2

65

80

52

63

5

-

1

13

3

-

-

3

11

1

-

54

19

10

1 3 4 .0 0
o
1

>1w 1 n l «

v K U tn

1n

L L L K rtg f

D

J

C
.J

■■ ■ ■

"

XJ
1 2 6 .5 0 -1 7 2 .5 0

1 4 8 .5 0

2 ,0 7 3

3 9 .5

2 0 0 .0 0

1 9 2 .0 0

15

15

16

1 5 6 .0 0 -2 4 0 .0 0

118

192

220

1

163

119

143

n o

79

253

180

230
202
K t l ®X L

2 ,3 6 3

3 9 .5

1 4 1 .5 0

1 3 1 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0 -1 5 4 .5 0

23

261

426

409

29

18

16

8

14

1

489

1H XU L

1 3 5 .0 0

290

250

189
9

116

74
9

76

80

16

29

26

20

12

41

21

34

32

14

c J *

1 3 1 .5 0
ML I A X L

162

1n p UL

1 1 2 .0 0 -1 5 0 .0 0

36

171

■55

38

60

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
*

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
52

8

c J l .0 0

10
30

10
10

*
Workers were at $90 to $100.
** Workers were distributed as follows:
See fo o tn o te s

2 at $80 to $90; and 61 at $90 to $100.

at end o f t a b le s .




4

T ab le A-1. W e e kly earnings of office w orkers in Kansas C ity, M o. —Kans., S ep tem b e r 1976 — Continued
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

(s ta n d a r d )
N um ber

S

A vera ge
w e e k ly

S

S

S

S

of
w orkers

Under

h ou rs1

S

S

s

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

(s ta n d a r d )

M ean *

M e d ia n *

M id d le ran g ed

r

100

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

340

110

Occupation and industry division

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

230

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

24

18

13

24

4

21

21

23

8

4

6

2

13

5

,
and
under

100

ALL WORKERS*
CONTINUED
PAYROLL CLERKS ---MANUFACTURING
NONMANUEACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE

422

4 0 .0

1 8 5 .5 0

180
242

4 0 .0

1 8 0 .0 0

1 6 7 .0 0
1 6 7 .5 0

4 0 .0

1 9 0 .0 0

1 6 7 .0 0

1 3 8 .0 0 -2 2 3 .5 0

55

2 6 4 .0 0

2 6 5 .0 0

2 5 3 .5 0 -2 9 5 .5 0

57

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 6 2 .0 0

1 6 7 .0 0

1 3 5 .0 0 -1 8 2 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS* CLASS A

810

3 9 .5

1 7 9 .0 0

1 7 0 .5 0

1 5 3 .5 0 -1 8 9 .5 0

•

manufacturing

140

1 5 3 .0 0

1 3 6 .0 0 -1 8 4 .5 0

•-

670

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 6 3 .0 0

NONMANUFACTURING ---

1 8 2 .5 0

1 7 3 .5 0

1 5 6 .0 0 -1 9 2 .0 0

-

1 .0 5 8

3 9 .5

1 4 9 .0 0

1 4 0 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0 -1 5 6 .0 0

3

191

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

1 4 8 .0 0

1 4 0 .0 0

1 2 6 .5 0 -1 5 7 .0 0

-

2

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS. CLASS B
MANUFACTURING —
n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----PUBLIC UTILITIES
RETAIL TRADE

867

1 3 8 .0 0 -^ 2 0 .0 0

-

23

1 4 0 .0 0 -2 0 2 .0 0

-

6
17

34

44

43

24

37

18

7

15

14

22

12

16

9

20
9

30

21

12
•

21
-

9

11

1

18

-

-

4

2
-

8

1

10
6

9

•

8

*

9

7

7

1

4

1

4

*

-

65

106

116

69

145

59

25

2

5

8

45

-

-

u

-

1

4

9

2

7

32
14

62
24

9

15

13

14

2

18

38

20
45

13

6
27

19

13

1

4
-

-

93

107

54

132

45

23

2

1
4

103

226

141

211

99

78

8

9

13

41

25

45

25

9

30
5

28

10

16

-

6

1

116

166

74

1

55

1 4 0 .0 0

1 2 4 .5 0 -1 5 6 .0 0

3

25

93

185

134

4 0 .0

1 9 6 .0 0

1 7 5 .0 0

1 4 5 .0 0 -2 5 4 .0 0

-

-

—

81

4 0 .0

1 4 1 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0

1 2 4 .0 0 -1 5 0 .0 0

44

1 4 9 .0 0

1

See footnotes at end of tables.




5

7

1
8

7

13
4

*

17

9

*

7

7

-

*

*

*

-

-

10
2

20

16

8

12

8

*

*

36

-

-

-

*

*

*

3

.

3

22
5

8

45

33

17

19

8

36

19

•

.

-

.

-

4

2

-

-

•

-

-

-

69

25

12

8

3

12

19

4

34

19

-

-

-

-

2

6

4

2

-

1

6

6

-

32

19

-

-

-

-

5

4

2

2

6

3

Table A-1a. W eekly earnings of o ffice w o rk e rs —large establishm ents
in Kansas C ity , M o .—Kans., S ep tem b e r 1976
Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
S

S
80

w e e k ly

Occupation and industry division
w o rk e re

h ou rs1
(s ta n d a r d )

M ean

^

M e d ia n

^

M id d le r a n g e d

s
90

$

$

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

240

4
2
2
1

33
2
31
-

74
21
53
•

108
33
75

157
42
115
17
13

157
46
111
9
13

123
38
85
16
11

111
31
80
15
11

119
44
75
26
16

127
44
83

7

137
26
111
8
14
2
2

_

1

•

—

3
1

4
2

9
5

6
6

20
-

34
6
28
1

39
2
37
2

31
1
30
1

28
4
24
2

48
23
25

57
36

$

S

S

S

$

260

280

300

320

340

M _ -.280

300

320

340

360

45
8
37
26
2

35
5
30
26

39

20
8
12
10

4

20
19
18

3
1
-

21

130
19
111
79
7

-

1

-

-

12
11

18
11

4
3

4

5
5

5
5

2
1

32
9
23
3

45
18
27
6

24
7
17

11
3
8
8

10
7
3
3

50
35
15

84

20
17
3
3

5
1
4

-

10

67
18
49
36

2

-

15

240

and
under
90

100

-

-

2
-

___ 2

ALL WORKERS

40.0
40.0

$
196.50
198.00
196.00
235.50
194.00

$
188.50
190.00
187.50
238.00
195.00

$
$
161.50-224.00
164.50-216.50
161.00-224.50
206.50-257.50
164.50-216.50

75
55

40.0
40.0

243.50
248.50

240.00
240.00

209.00-269.00
218.00-284.00

SECRETARIES* CLASS P ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----- ----------PUBLIC UTILITIES ----------- ---

326
63
263
55

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

211.50
236.00
205.50
260.00

203.00
227.00
198.00
260.00

180.00-230.00
207.50-251.50
178.00-225.50
233.50-294.50

SECRETARIES. CLASS C ------------MANUFACTURING -------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------ ---------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------

797
245
552
180

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

191.50
198.50
18 8 50
231.00

180.00
195.50
175.00
239.50

156.50-221.00
170.00-211.00
151.00-229.50
210.00-253.00

SECRETARIES, CLASS D — --MANUFACTURING ------------NONMANUFACTURING — --- — <
PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

342
101
241
91

40.0
40.0
39.5
40.0

184.00
167.00
191.00
218.50

172.50
162.00
186.00
2 1 1 . SO

188
68
120
69

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

191.50
181.50
197.50
222.50

STENOGRAPHERS, SENIOR --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------ — ----n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g — ------- -------PUBLIC UTILITIES ---------------

330
139
191
100

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

t r a n s c r i b i n g -m a c h i n f

111
104

TYPISTS, CLASS A -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------—
PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---- —
—

248
58
190
81

TYPISTS, CLASS B ---------------MANUFACTURING ----------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------ -----

250
93
157
42

FILE CLERKS, CLASS A ------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------

90
88
56

FILE CLERKS, CLASS R ------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------

127
122
50

SECRETARIES -------------------------MANUFACTURING -------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------- ----PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S ---- --------—
RETAIL TRADE ------- — — -------

1,564
429
1,135
339
140

SECRETARIES, CLASS A ------ —
—
NONMANUFACTURING --- ----- --- ----

stenographers, general —
m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------

-—
— <
NONMANUFACTUwING ----- -—
PUBLIC UTILITIES -------

-----NONMANUFACTURING ------------- --typists

40.0
40.0
40.0

2
-

-

-

-

-

*

•

.

.

-

-

*

“

*

*

*
3
•3

—
•
-

-

•

-

-

-

•
-

*
10
2
8

25
16
9

33
19
14

36
10
26
*

22
5
17
8

22
13

38
26

15

*

28
15
13
7

38

-

30
15
15
3

22

*

48
13
35
8

10

10

24
19

13
6
7

6
1

10

5
1
4
3

26

7
3
4
4

24

5
2

13
1
12
6
38
29
9
2

31
24
7

21
19

26
9
17
16

11

-

-

-

-

163.50-236.50
169.00-211.00
155.50-252.50
186.50-257.50

39.5
39.5

143.00
142.50

137.50
137.00

126.50-151.50
126.00-151.50

40.0
40.0
39.5

160.00
152.00
162.50
200.00

152.50
149,00
152.50
196.50

130.50-181.00
134.50-164.00
129.00-187.00
167.50-221.00

130.00
130.50
130.00
153.50

124.00
132.50
121.00
133.00

115.00-137.00
118.50-138.00
114.50-136.00
128.00-171.50

197.50
198.50
224.50

208.50
211.00
229.00

159.50-229.00
160.00-229.00
214.00-248.50

149.50
150.50
191.00

135.00
136.00
186.00

121.00-172.00
121.00-172.00
160.00-217.50

20

-

40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

2
-

39
5
34

•
-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2
1

•

_

2

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

3

*

*

*

*

•

-

3

2

-

1
-

1
-

1
-

1

1
*

*

26
1
25
14

17
3
14
5

23
13

1

2
2

10
*

37
22
15
4

11
11

8
8

20
20

23
21

19
16

7
7

7
7

7
5

9
1
8

14
2

25
5
20
1

37
10
27

24
14
10
1

28
10
18
16

19
6
13
5

17
2
15
3

49
15
34
9

54
38
16
7

20
7
13

9
4
5

8
3
5

3
1
2

1

2

1

2

5
5

6
6

3

2

9
9

*

*

1

11
11
4

5
4
4

17
17
9

4
4
4

5
5
4

8
7
7

*

*

_

.

-

-

10
10

12

*

-

-

-

-

9
2
7

27
5
22

61
18
43

-

-

-

10

-

-

•

-

-

*

-

10

5
5

-

-

-

-

-

*

*

*

*

6
6

13
10

11
11

20
20

17
16

-

-

-

“

-

.

-

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .




49
19

•
-

184.50
181.00
203.50
234.00

11
4
7

85
24
61
5

20
-

199.00
189.50
205.50
219.50

4

87
29
58
8

*

2
2
-

149.00-229.00
149.00-209.50
155.00-245.50
199.00-253.50

4
-

*

*

196.50
187.50
199.00
229.00

10
10
-

88
12
76
8

*
-

2

*

*

*
-

•

*

71
14
57
1

*

154.00-209.00
145.00-182.00
160.00-216.00
194.00-222.00

-

6

40
20

20
1

•

-

1
4

139
37
102
47

5

30
7

2
8

2

6

5

21
11

2
2

4
80

67

1
28
26

-

4
4

32
2
30
26

31
3
28
18

16
3
13
5

-

3
3

1
1

8

8

8

8
8

8
8

5
19
15

10
10

11
10

1

1

2

1

1
1

1
1

2

2

1
1

-

5
5

2
2
*

2
2
2

2

5
5
3

21
21
21

17
17
17

2
2
2

2
2
2

1
1
1

13
13
13

3
3
3

5
5
5

2

5

2
2
-

-

2

6
1
5
5

2

13
11

4

8
1
7
7

15
5

8
2
6

29

1
1

-

17
4

6

5

4
4

*

9
8

14
2
12
10

5
2

2
2

9
•

11
3
8

20
11
9
6

-

13
13
9

3
1
2
1

•

24

11

3

.

8
7

3
•

3
3

•

•

-

-

•

-

•

•

2

•

•

•

-

-

-

2
•

2

-

-

-

_

1
1

-

-

-

_

•

•

-

-

-

-

.

.

•

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
2

•

.

•

•

-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

•

-

-

-

5
•

-

-

Table A-1a. W eekly earnings of o ffice w o rke rs —large establishm ents
in Kansas C ity , M o .—Kans., S ep tem b e r 1 9 7 6 — C ontinued
W e e k ly e a r n in g s

1

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of —

(sta n d a rd )
N um ber

s

A vera ge
w e e k ly

s

S

s

s

s

of
w orkers

80

h ou rs1

s

s

s

s

S

$

S

s

s

S

S

S

S

M ean

(s ta n d a rd )

^

M e d ia n

*

M id d le r a n g e d

90

100

n o

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

240

260

280

300

320

100

no

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

49

Occupation and industry division

17

*

and
under
90

ALL WORKERS —
CONTINUED
$

$

$

$
J

107*00

AJ J • -*0 1 1 8 * 5 0
i
ju

106*00*140*00
106*00-140*00

1
1

1 J o o b Q " C l r » 51}
138*00

115.00-172.00

I ld * 5 0 " lO C * 3 u
i r O * 0 0 " c *50

205.00

168.00-228.00
23

563

frCTW Aw 1l\RUL
| 1 I'll}

V Aj J U ■■■■■
/w

jj

■■■ ■ m ■

150.00
138*00

107

30

J •J

137*00

125.00

111*00-164*00

208.50
211.00
198.00

183.00-

256.00

165.00-

1

122.00-187.50

2 1 3 *50

Kt 1A1!• 1H^UC ■■■■■■■■

265.00

63

£J
30

20

8
i

174.00
5

13

172*00

, , _ __

i j £ * o y * i rt*uo

JJ

._
145*00
146.00

135.00

129.00145.00125.00-

173.00
254,00
162.00

12

See footnotes at end of tables.




26

®

7

.z

T a b le A -2 .

W e e kly earnings of professional and technical w orkers in Kansas C ity , M o . —Kans., S ep tem b e r 1976
W e e k ly e a r n in g s 1

Number of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of-

(sta n d a rd )
um ber

Occupation and industry division
o r k e is

S

A v era

100

w e e k ly
h ou rs1
(s ta n d a rd )

M ean *

M e d ia n *

M id d le r a n g e *

S

S

S

s

!

s

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

460

480

T ---------500

1*0

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

420

440

460

480

500

over

3
3

9
7

42
41

22
21

55
48

39
32

71
64

8
4

5
3

17
16

14
12

37
34

13
11

12
ii

85
10
75

53
15
38

86
22
64

80
17
63

25
14
11

20
8
12

20
5
15

20
4
16

10
4
6

11
4
7

6
2
4

1
1

.

-

*

-

•

_

S

S

S

*

s

160

S

s

S

140

s

S

S

120

s

S

and
under
120

and

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U SIN E SS), CLASS A ------NONMANUFACTURING —

347
307

$
$
$
39.5 372.00 365.00 322.50-436.00
39.5 371.50 365.00 322.00-*36.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U SIN E SS), CLASS B —
MANUFACTURING ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------

437
109
328

39.5 30*.50 299.00 26*.50-322.00
40.0 313.00 303.00 278.00-335.50
39.5 301.50 297.50 253.00-316.00

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
(B U SIN E SS), CLASS C --------nonmanufactusing

—

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (B U SIN E SS),
CLASS A ---------- -------NONMANUFACTURING —

*

*

*

*

*

*

-

-

-

-

•

•

*

*

20
4
16

•

m

152
133

39.5 298.50 312.00 265.00-3*2.50
39.5 301.50 314.00 266.00-349,50

•

*

9
9

207
188

39.5 322.00 323.50 287.50-349.00
39.5 317.50 318.00 287.50-3*9.00

•

*

4
4

5
3

8
5

5
5

*

2

*

8
8

8
6

5
5

22
22

23
22

8
8

22
18

42
42

17
14

24
19

31
26

15
15

47
46

7

6

6

5

9
3

4
4

282
91
191
49

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5

252.50
271.00
2*4.00
281.00

250.00
276.00
2*7.50
272.00

211.00-286.00
228.50-299.00
202,50-270.00
249.00-321.00

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U TILITIE S

136
107
296
263
78

39.0
39.0
39.5
39.5
40.0

236.50
231.00
254.50
251.00
296.00

222.00
198.00
2*4.00
238.00
278.00

179.00-288.00
173.50-288.00
218.50-286.00
215.50-280.50
2*6.50-359.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS B
MANUFACTURING -----------NONMANUFACTURING —

501
141
360

39.5 188.50
39.0 209.50
39.5 180.00

178.50
195.50
168.50

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS C
MANUFACTURING ----------— NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U TILITIE S

203
90
113
26

39.5 164.00 160.00
39.0 166.00 155.50
39.5 162.50 161.00
40.0 192.50 203.00

DRAFTERS, CLASS A ---------m a n u f a c t u r in g -------

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (B U SIN E SS),
CLASS C ---------- a ---------- —
NONMANUFACTURING —

7

7

-

-

-

-

-

7
*

7
*

-

*

2
2

11
~

54
15
39
5

32
13
19
*

49
10
39
10

38
10
28
12

42
24
18
5

12
7
5
4

24
23

8
5

17
14

6
5

5
*

16
2

35
34

28
28

*

-

51
48
13

45
42
15

30
22
11

1
1
*

11

32
•30
24
23

-

9
3
6
3

14
3
11
10

3
2
1
*

3
3
*

1
1

1
1

24
24

-

25
17
4

10
6
5

7
6

31
30
30

2
2

1
1
-

7
4
3

1

2
2

.

'

_

.

"

1
1

10
10

-

'

2
2

12
11

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BU SIN E SS),
MANUFACTURING -------------- -----------------NONMANUFACTURING — ---------------------PUBLIC U TILITIE S ----------------------

"

‘

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

*

*

*

-

•

*

-

-

-

-

2
2

6
3

*

•

-

-

-

-

-

4
4

.

"
•

-

-

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

161.00-206.00
170.00-251.00
160.00-194.50

•

-

44
9
35

63
12
51

151
35
116

95
19
76

50
13
37

32
11
21

20
13
7

32
20
12

138.00-183.00
148.00-188.00
132.50-180.50
164.00-228.00

10
2
8
1

43
17
26
1

49
28
21
3

47
18
29
4

18
10
8
3

16
5
11
5

19
10
9
9

1
1

-

-

-

-

•

•

-

•

490
270

40.0 277.50 264.50 244,00-305.00
39.5 269.00 257.50 2*7.50-292.00

-

-

_
*

6
5

14
14

76
34

141
93

59
35

51
29

55
41

2*
9

26
3

17
6

2

-

3
1

16

*

d r a f t e r s , Cl a s s b —
m a n u f a c t u r in g --------------—
n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g ------------

443
182
261

*0.0 222.50 222.00 201.50-2*2.00
40.0 213.00 214.00 186.50-230.00
40.0 229.00 222.00 207.00-2*8.00

12
12
-

25
22
3

65
30
35

105
33
72

115
38
77

62
24
38

35
13
22

13
3
10

6
4
2

DRAFTERS, CLASS C —
MANUFACTURING -------------- ----------

489
79

40.0
40.0

163.00 156.00 138.00-178.50
172.00 171.50 147.50-193.00

2
2

139
6

118
24

113
20

47
7

28
8

27
12

15

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS --------MANUFACTURING
n o n m a n u f a c tu r in g —
PUBLIC U TILITIE S

880
256
624
585

40.0
40.0
40.0
40.0

301.00
271.00
313.00
318.50

-

-

-

10
7
3

22
14
8

2
2

53
38
15

112
111
1

7
1
6
1

2
1
1
-

388
1
387
387

264
80
184
182

4
4
2

16
3
13
13

-

-

-

-

7

IS

-

13

106

2

1

85

9

-

5

-

-

3

7

2

38

6

-

1
3
3

-

•

-

-

-

2

-

3
3
-

•

*

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS 3 -

243

ELECTRONICS TECHNICIANS, CLASS C -

57

REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSES -----------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------------

79
62

311.00-325.00
250.50-334.00
311.00-324.00
311.00-325.00
*0.0 271.50 257.00 253.00-312.00
312.00
253.00
317.00
317.00

-

*0.0 223.50 231.00 227,00-231.00

-

-

*0.0 248.50 2*7.50 230.00-266.50
*0.0 252.00 2*7.50 232.00-271.00

•

•

-

-

1
1

See fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .




8

-

3
3

6
3

6
5

14
12

24
16

12
9

-

5
5

-

•

•

•

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

•

-

-

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

.
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

.

-

_

-

*

•

2

•

2
2

3
3

•

-

-

-

Table A -2 a . W e e k ly earnings of professional and technical w o rk e rs —large establishm ents
in Kansas C ity, M o . —Kans., S ep tem b e r 1976
W e e k ly e a r n in g s

1

N u m b e r of workers receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—

(sta n d a rd )
N um ber

Occupation and industry division

S

A vera ge

100

w e e k ly

of
w orkers

S

M ean

(s ta n d a rd ]

^

M e d ia n

*

M id d le r a n g e d

ALL
SYSTEMS

140

160

180

t

S
200

220

240

S
260

280

S

300

s

S
320

340

360

380

400

S

S

420

440

S
460

T
480

and
under
120

COMPUTER

120

t

i

$

500
and

140

160

180

200

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

440

460

10

420

480

500

over

13
12

•

WORKERS
ANALYSTS

$

$_

$

$

133

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS
( B U S I N E S S ) . C L A S S H -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G - — -------------------------- —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----- ---------—

193
91
102

40.0 335.00 328.00 292.00-377.50
40.0 319.50 307.00 283.00-346.50
40.0 349.00 352.00 303.00-388.50

-

•
-

-

-

-

•
•
-

3
2
1

5
5
-

25
14
11

31
18
13

25
16
9

20

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS),
C L A S S A ••••••■••••••••••••••••■
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

155
141

40.0 327.00 335.00 283.00-359.50
40.0 321.00 327.50 281.50-359.50

-

-

-

-

*

5
5

8
8

5
5

16
15

21
21

143
101

40.0 270.00 257.50 237.00-295.00
40.0 265.00 250.00 241.50-287.50

-

-

-

1
-

4
4

10
9

22
12

36
31

20
13

39.5 264.00 253.00
39.5 272.50 281.50

-

•
-

2
2

3
2

8
7

8
5

9
6

6
5

10
9

8
8
-

21
21
11

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS).
C L A S S B ---- ----------- ----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

—

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS (BUSINESS).
CLASS C — —
—
— — — — — — —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

—

207.00-340.00
206.50-340.00

191
162
74

COMPUTER OPERATORS, CLASS A —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------------------------C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S 8 --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------------------

69
55

____

39.5 278.00 270.50 240.00-322.50
39.5 276.00 262.00 232.50-333.50
40.0 299.00 290.50 250.50-359.50

184
70
114

39.0 221.00 222.00 182.00-255.00
38.0 248.00 251.00 217.50-265.00
39.5 204.00 200.00 161#50*239*00

•
-

-

-

9
8

-

-

-

-

6

19

20

*

24

20
4
16

9
4
5

11
4
7

5
2
3

1

•
—
-

13
12

15
12

44
44

4

7
6

5
4

9
3

1
-

2
2

•
-

•
-

15
11

8
5

8
5

14
11

2
-

3
-

-

•
-

•

-

-

•
-

-

-

5
-

2
2

1
1

1
1

24
24

-

•

-

•

•

•

•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33
31
13

27
19
11

25
17
4

10
6
5

7
6

31
30
30

2
2

6
3

•

-

-

-

-

29
11
18

19
12

31
20
11

2
•

1
1

7
4

44

-

20
5
15

1
-

11

18
8
10

55

9

-

*
•

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

9

16

15

22
5
17

16

-

2

7

39
26

6

-

36
15

16

-

37
13

20

-

7

3

-

-

2
-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

19

-

-

.

•

23

90

2

1

304

261

2

13

-

•

•

•

i

6

3

13

17

12

5

2

3

3

*

*

*

*

*

4

64
40*0
D R A F T E R S , C L A S S A -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------- —

271
73

287.00 279.50 247.50-318.00
40.0 295.50 300.00 279.00-318.00
^. _

--------- —

696

40.0 309.50 317.50 311.00-325.50

ELECTRONICS

TECHNICIANS

—

40.0

-

-

-

.

*00
REGISTERED

INDUSTRIAL

NURSES

----- —

* Workers were distributed as follows:

66

40.0 252.00 247.00 232.00-268.50

*

*

i

9 at $500 to $520; and 2 at $520 to $540.

See footnotes at end of tables.




9

*

*

*

Table A -3 . A verage w e e k ly earnings of office, professional, and tech n ical w o rkers, by sex,
in Kansas C ity , M o. —K ans., S ep tem b e r 1976
Sex,

3

occupation, and industry division

of

h eu rs 1
(sta n d a rd )

W e e k ly

NUNn^nUrA

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

v 1U K I n u

"

W e e k ly

wL

Aj j

0

W e e k ly

h o u rs 1

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

e a r n in g s *

of

W e e k ly

(s ta n d a rd )

w orkers

W e e k ly

h o u rs 1

e a r n in g s 1

sta n d a rd )

(s ta n d a rd )

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS WOMEN— CONTINUED

-

$

122.00

m

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
64
330

UKULR LLtKixb t

N um ber

s t a n d a rd )

OFFICE OCCUP A T I O N S
W O MEN— CONTINUED
40.0

of
w orkers

e a r n in g s 1
(s ta n d a rd )

OFFICE OCCUPAT I O N S - MEN
148

(m e a n 2 )

(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

W e e k ly

w orkers

A v era g e

A vera ge

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

39.0

145.50
129.00

^

,,,

_

163

39.5 181.50

157
185

40.0 165.50
39.5 172.50

654

39.5

39.5 104.00

190

40.0

148.66

39.0

124
81

40.0
40.0

194^50
141.00

339
299

39.5
39.5 372.00

" "

596
ACCOUNT INU vLLHItb t CL Abb A

39.5 146.00
145.50

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS.
l 0 * »l/>

NONMANU* ACTURING

N U N M A N U "A v 1 U K I N b

* *

.............-

ACCOUNTINw CLtKKbt

CLAbb O

NO NMANUFACTURING

J r •3

641
56
30

128

40.0 246.00
40.0 284.00
NONnANUr AC

_r _ _ r „

.-.j-tjm in

Tt

s
\

1 UH

iNO

"* *

39.5 178.50

■■■■

39.5 119.50

*

NONMANUFACTURING
K l. 1 A AL

__________

1KaU L

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS.

CLASS A
163,00

^

39.5 182.00

378
H t 1 A1 L

1H

A U t-

■■■■»■■

K tTrUNCn v * L ^ A 1v “ b f

180.00
40.0 234.00
N O N M ANUFACTURING

■■■

i
*

433
410

CLAbb

U

PUBLIC UTILITIES --------------247

148

40.0 206.50

125.00

N U N M ANUrACTUKINC

1A “ i t J f

w

Lm jJ o
j

■**mmmm
*■

J

a“

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RE C E P T I O N I S T S 57
1 #443
413
1.030
KL. 1 A X C

1H A U L

■■■■•■■

•

40*0

182.50

N O N M ANUFACTURING -----------------

78

39.5 182.00
40.0 192.00
39.0

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS

luUblNwbb)

40.0

40.0 214.00

417

U

804
245
108

CL Abb

39.5 146.50
40.0 194.50
39.5 139.50

*

ORDER CLERKS*
b L C ’ 1A* I L b v
’L

39.5
323

CLASS 8 —— —

—

——

39.5 167.50

165.50
164.50

OJ

292
1.714

O

37ft
95

*
-

39.5 184.50

LUHrU 1LK rKUoKA™ntnb

(oUbl*Ttbb / y

N U N M ANUrACiUKINC • • • • • ••••■■••••
N O N M A N U r A C T U K 1NC

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e s .




10

"*

39.0 300.00
39-0 305.00

148

CLASS A
N ONMANUrAC 1U K 1NG •• J""

ACCOUNT INC CLLH*b ? CLAbb 0

KLT A1L TKAUt ™" B
"

3)7,50
39.5 30^,00

123
1Q7

39.5 194.50
40.0 160.50

130

ACCOUNTING C L E R K S » CLASS A

y CLAbb

40.0 153.00
40.0 140.50
39.5 156.50

39.5 328.00

Table A -3 . A verage w ee k ly earnings of office, professional, and technical w orkers, by sex
in Kansas C ity , M o .—Kans., S e p te m b e r 1976 — C ontinued
Average
(mean2)

Average
(mean2)
Sex,

3

occupation, and industry division

PROFESSIONAL
OCCUPATIONS -

Number
o
f

Weekly
Weekly
h u s1 e r i g ^
or
anns
(tnad (tnad
sadr) sadr)

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number
o
f
woi en
k

Weekly
Weekly
Ho u r 1
erig 1
anns
(tnad (tnad
sadr) sadr)

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

AND TECHNICAL
MEN— CONTINUED

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g

COMPUTER

OPERATORS,

39.5

254,00

------------------ —
CLASS

A

COMPUTER

O

— —
NONMANUFACTURING

m a n u f a c t u r i n g

—

—

—

—

SYSTEMS

ANALYSTS

PROGRAMMERS

-----

293.00
(BUSINESS),

--------217
55

39.5
60.0

254.50
297.00

m a n u f a c t u r i n g

Weekly
Weekly
hus1 erig 1
or
anns
(tnad (tna d
sadr) sad r )

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

COMPUTER

UKAr Itnl> f v L A j o
83
CLn

Number
o
f
wres
okr

39*5
39.5

------------------ - ---865

40,0

300.50

COMPUTER

PROGRAMMERS

237.50
237.50

m a n u f a c t u r i n g

NONMANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING
COMPUTER

OPERATORS.

--------------------CLASS

C

ELECTRONICS
56

256




"■*"

269

---------

See footnotes at end of tables.

306.00

(BUSINESS),

39.0

155.50

269,30

t e c h n i c i a n s

,

c l a s s

b

e l e c t r o n i c s

t e c h n i c i a n s

,

c l a s s

c

-

2 (i edU

57

40.0

223.50

39.5
93

175.00
172.50

40.0

167.00
169.50

40.0

248.50
2S2.00

Table A -3 a . A verage w e e k ly earnings of office, professional, and technical w o rke rs , by s e x large estab lishm ents in Kansas C ity , M o . —Kans., S e p te m b e r 1976
A v era g e

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )

(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

S ex , 3 o c cu p ation , and in d u stry d iv isio n

of

W e e k ly

w orkers

W e e k ly

OFFICE

-

OCCUPATIONS

A v v U U I t 1 Xi'iv)

j f

t L A3 b

h ou rs *

S ex, 3 o c cu p ation , and in d u stry d iv isio n

of

W e e k ly

(s ta n d a rd )

MEN

A

40.0

40.0
40.0

132.50
132.00

1 T r 1 j 1j ?

v L Aj j

vLA j j

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED

L
3

e a r n in g s *
(s ta n d a r d )

I a P

ao

10j
j j

1H A U L

J

m am m

a

*

PROFESSIONAL AND
OCCUPATIONS
I IL L

v.L C .K i\j|

LLAj j

A

i IL L

LLCKiN j o

LL Ab j

t5

r IL L

1.507

W e e k ly

h o u rs 1

-

257.00
259.50
208.00

W e e k ly
s ta n d a rd )

N L 1A I L

40.0

of
w orken

e a r n in g s 1

$

A

1Tr l j |

S e x , 3 occu p ation , and in d u stry d iv isio n

(s ta n d a rd )

-

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
WOMEN— CONTINUED
86

W e e k ly

h o u rs 1
[sta n d a rd )

e a r n in g s 1

(s ta n d a r d )

M E S S E N G E R S ------------------------------------------------- --------------------

(m e a n 2 )
N um ber

N um ber

v L L n ^ jf

LLAj j

" " "

TECHNICAL
MEN

L

V V * I U 1L

mm

* O 1 L- e' J

L U ™ r U 1t h
' D U b1N ubb * f

198.50

Am Atlw T w

A H A L T j 1j
LLAbb D •

40.0

3 L L H L 1A n l L j j

vL Abb

"

'

,

1* "

„
p

55

SECRETARIES*

CLASS

B

-----------------------------------

315
63
252
754
244
510

b u u H c . 1A n l t b f

LLAbb

U

' 1T ' * 1

*"" "

40.0
40.0

210.50
236.00

<►0.0
40.0

198.50
188.00

COMPUTER
174

A v L v U n 1 1 HU

339
99

L L L K r\

j

y

LL Ajj

149.00

331.00
323.50

97

133.00

vLA j j

PROGRAMMERS

(BUSINESS).

O

A

39.5
79

40.0
40.0

2 0 oT o O

57

184.50
167.50

40.0

227*00
253.50

4 0 •0
40.0

226.50

275.00
302.00

3 8 •0

702

287.00
297.00

208.00

. 68

118
67

40.0

138
163

40.0

181.50
196.50
221.50

UKAr I t K b f

r ATHULL
N O N H A N U r A v 1U K 1 N O

a a a

"

124
79

LLAbb

A

199.50

72

""

186.00

225.50

1n A I N j L K I U a i i U

v * 11 i i L

189.50
213.00

681

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

1 Tr 1 u 13

K f c . v l 5 1 C .K L U

See footn otes




at end of t a b le s .

12

I N U U b 1 K1 A L

N U K b tb

*

40.0
40.0

309.50
284.00

Table A -4 . H ourly earnings of m a in ten a n c e , toolroom , and p o w e rp la n t w orkers
in Kansas C ity, M o . —K ans., S ep tem b er 1976
H o u rly e a r m n gs 4

N u m b e r

o f

w o r k e r s

r e c e iv in g

s tr a ig h t-tim e

h o u r ly

S

e a r n in g s

M ean2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e 2

U n d er
*

4.60

S

$

5

9.20

9.60

8>4Q. 8 . 8 0

9.20

9.60

o v e r

•

30

19

s

S

S

7 .40

7.60

7.80

8.00

7.40

7 .60

6.00

9
9

4

7
7

1

32
27

S

$

S

S

4.80

5.00

5.20

5.40

5 .60

5 .80 6.00 6.20

6.40

i
6.60 6.80 7 . 0 0

5.00

5.20

5.40

5.60

5 .80

6. 0 0

6.20

6.40

6.60

6.80

82
73

9

•

2

-

$

8.80

S

7.20

S

4.6Q

Occupation and in du stry d ivision

S

S

o f—

s

r-

S

S

ib e r

$

$
8.40

,
an d
u n d er
o

G
O

G

G
O

7.00 7.20

ALL WORKERS
$

$

$

$

6.28-10.20
6.28- 7.18

-

-

-

2

7

-

2

2

-

-

-

2

-

*

2

*

6.296.297.30-

8.16
8.04
9.66

-

-

14
14

4
4

18
18

8.06

7.83
7.55
8.71

-

-

*

312
109

8.13
6.94

8.54
6.89

7.286.28-

9.49
7.77

445
432

7.44
7.44

7.75
7.75

7.187.21-

8.12
8.12

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY)
MANUFACTURING ------------ ------

971
871

6.77
6.64

6.69

6. 12 -

8.02

29

6.33

5.71-

7.84(

21

MAINTENANCE m e c h a n i c s
(MOTOR VEHICLES)
manufacturing —
NONMANUFACTURING ------ — ---PUBLIC UTILITIES -----------

991
225
766
695

7.12
6.94
7.17
7.17

7.17
6.28
7.17
7.17

6.806.007.177.17-

7.89
7.88
7.90
7.92

15

5

6

8

15
15

5
5

10

22

10

22

MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTERS -------MANUFACTURING ----------------

445
437

7.41
7.39

7.76
7.76

6.896.89-

7.88
7.88

•

•

-

-

-

-

MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL w o r k e r s
m a n u f a c t u r i n g ---------- ------

84
74

7.50
7.39

7.76
7.63

6.896.89-

7.91
7.91

•

-

-

-

7 • 00
*
7.00-

7*85
7.85

•

•

•

*

*

-

“

9

-

1

2

-

-

3
3

1

-

1

•

•

•

•

1

2

2

6

1

-

-

-

-

1

2

2

6

MAINTENANCE CARPENTERS MANUFACTURING —

353
117

MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIANS
MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING -----

835
658
177

7.50
7.34

MAINTENANCE PAINTERS —
MANUFACTURING ----- MAINTENANCE m a c h i n i s t s --manufacturing

millwrights

---

8.30
6.68

8.16
6.28

7
7

-

6

-

-

2

7
1

-

4
4

3

-

1

1

1

•

6

8

1

-

6

4
4

*

-

7.35
7.35

7.85
7.85

— —
MANUFACTURING ------------ ------

188
124

6.30
6.50

6.45

5.916.88 6 . 12 -

6.88

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS (TOOLROOM)
MANUFACTURING ----------- -------

118
118

6.60
6.60

6.39
6.39

6.376.37-

6.65
6.65

TOOL AND DIE M A K E R S --------------MANUFACTURING ------------ ------

285
285

7.27
7.27

7.12
7.12

6.556.55-

8.14
8.14

STATIONARY ENGINEERS ----- -------MANUFACTURING --- --------------NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC UTILITIES

698
219

7.59
7.17

479
63

7.17
7.20
7.16
6.23

5.71

6.246.335.765.71-

8.11
7.91
8.11
6.79

-

-

69
59

5.51
5.29

6.46
6.46

3.193.19-

7.13 ***28
28
7.13

•

manufacturing

------------------

trades

helpers

BOILER TENDERS ------MANUFACTURING -----

*

**
***

W o r k e r s w e r e d istrib u te d as fo llo w s:
W o r k e r s w e r e at $ 9 .6 0 to $ 10.
W o r k e r s w e r e at $ 3 to $ 3 .2 0 .

8 .1 1

6.88

8

30
28

16

56
56

8

26

51
51

38
38

29
a

-

19
4
15
15

•

.

8

28
28

-

2
2

2

•

2

•

-

5
5

2
•

-

-

*

-

-

*

3
3
-

8

*

85
85

6

-

6

6

2

-

2

58
8

*
14
1
4

-

8

2

*

86

17
17

-

23
23

•

.

-

-

3
3

82

24
24

_

82

*

60

20

8

10

-

50
9

20

14

-

4
4

4
4

•

*

10

•

22

4

21

4

64

4

11

-

-

-

-

-

4

•

4

48
47

22

4

21

4

60

4

7

1

-

-

-

35

•

•

•

-

*

*

1

4

8

-

8

199
41
158
158

74

8

22

30
44
44

•

76
59

8

35
35

78
78

136
136

38
38

8

4
4

24
24

9
9

8

14
14

-

8

•

8

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

76
•

.

-

123
123

-

17
17

14
14

8
-

8

9
9

*

•

13

10

49
49

15
15

20 at $ 9 .6 0 to $ 10; and 96 at $ 10 to $ 1 0 .4 0 .

7
7

8

.

-

12

86

*

-

-

15
15

2

•

-

*

29
29

-

-

10

•

*

•

•

-

10

-

199
199

14
14

-

294
7
287
273

6

-

.

25
24

46
3
43
25

12

53
53

*

13

25
25

-

-

155
155

61
59

14
14

*

52
52

25
25

-

-

35
35

62
62

15
5

-

6

-

9
9

18

8

2

1

16
7

«.

-

-

8

-

-

17
17

•
-

12

2

-

-

5
5

127
127

54
53

4
-

24
-

40
40

1

4

18
18
-

244
35
209

2

-

-

12

5

4

12

4

-

-

96
1

•

76
*

*

*

22

-

8

•

-

8

-

-

-

-

•

8

-

•

24
5

-

7
7

-

1
1

38
-

-

38

•

-

-

-

-

2
** **
*45

•

4
-

-

•

-

-

2

2

-

12

2

73

2 4

23

14

23
15

-

6

47

23

3
3

53

*116
1

-

7
7

7
3

8

-

107
54

43
43

3
3

8

41
3
233
224
9

-

-

15

51
51

12

23

13
13

23

*

12

71
70

-

1

84
84

29
24
5
5

-

3
3

-

5

5

23
23

183
181

•

3

-

1

4
4

6

21

-

*

*

21

-

28
23
5

39
37

38
38

6

33
33
*

2

-

1

123
123

32
32

•

-

10

3

1
1

18
18

S e e f o o t n o t e s at e n d o f t a b l e s .




13

2

30

•

237
237

maintenance

34

5
5

-

-

*

T a b le A -4 a . Hourly earnings of m a in ten an ce, toolroom , and p o w e rp la n t w o rk e rs —large estab lish m en ts
in Kansas C ity , M o .—Kans., S ep tem b er 1976
N u m be r of w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t -t im e h o u rly ea rn in g s of ------

H o u rly e a r n in g s *

M id d le r a n g e 2

Under
5. 4 0

5.

5.60

5. 7 0

•

•

-

-

60

S

S

S

s

S

S

$

t

t

6.30

6.40

6.60

6.80

7.00

7.20

7.40

7.60

7.80

6.40

6.60

7.00

7.20

7.40

7.60

7.80

8.00 8. 2 ?

9

s

S

5.70

5.80

5.90

5.80

5.90

6.00 6.10 6.20

6.30

17

-

i

S

S

6.00 6.10 6.20

S

S

T

8.00 8.20

8.40

$
8.60

00

M e d ia n 2

5.50

5.50

M ean 2

S

5.40

Occupation and industry division

S

S

2

S

over

and
under

and
•

O

o

SO

00

8.40

ALL WORKERS
$

$
7.79

$
7.15

$
7.18

592
512

7.66
7.56

8.02
8.02

6.926.89-

8. 0 ^

1

85
64

7.46
7.31

7.77
7.75

6.896.89-

7.91
7.77

1
1

-

.

-

-

MAINTENANCE m a c h i n i s t s — --- -----m a n u f a c t u r i n g -------------------

321
308

7.62
7.63

7.84

7.397.39-

8.12
8.12

.

•

•

8.02

-

-

-

8
8

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY)
m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------ ------

499
416

7.70
7.55

17.187.18-

8.12
8.12

•

•

•

_

•

7.91

*

*

*

6

“

*

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
(MOTOR VEHICLES) ----------------MANUFACTURING ---------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g --------PUBLIC UTILITIES ------

243
90
153

7.92
7.88
7.92
7.92

7.597.857.397.92-

8.10
8.12

-

-

-

-

4
4

-

121

7.75
7.72
7.77
7.91

334
326

7.44
7.42

7.85
7.85

6.896.89-

7.88
7.88

-

-

74
64

7.59
7.49

7.85
7.85

7.187.11-

7.91
7.91

•

•

-

“

-

-

MILLWRIGHTS ------------------MANUFACTURING --- ---- — ---

235
235

7.37
7.37

7.85
7.85

7.007.00-

7.85
7.85

•

•

-

“

-

3
3

"

“

MAINTENANCE t r a d e s h e l p e r s —
MANUFACTURING --------- ----

165

6.83

6.88
6*88

2

1

•

•

-

6.88

5.916.83-

•

112

6.45
6.72

*

*

-

-

“

*

TOOL AND DIE MAKERS ---------MANUFACTURING -------------

166
166

7.90
7.90

8.14
8.14

8.148.14-

8.35
8.35

•

1
1

STATIONARY ENGINEERS ---- ---MANUFACTURING — ---------- *
NONMANUFACTURING ---- -----

210

7.22
7.24
7.16

7.44
7.44
7.00

6.246.246.58-

8.03
7.98
8.03

MAINTENANCE CARPENTERS -----

74

MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIANS --MANUFACTURING -----------MAINTENANCE PAINTERS —
MANUFACTURING ------

MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTERS

MANUFACTURING —
MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKERS
MANUFACTURING ------

153
57

8.02

6.30-

8.32

3

6
6
1
1

6

-

-

-

-

-

•

•
-

2
2

•

•

3

“

-

3
3

-

4
4

12
12

16
7

*

15
13

9
9

•
*

62
62

3
-

5
•

-

-

-

-

-

“

-

83
83

•

•

•

-

-

“

-

2
2

7
7

-

-

-

-

30
30

*

*

7
7

6
6

-

-

•

-

•

-

-

-

-

•

•

-

-

“

-

2
2

•

-

-

•

-

•

-

*

•
-

.

*
•

“
55
55

6
6

-

3
3

-

5
5

-

.

“

-

•

-

-

58

8

-

1
1

—
13
13

3

-

•

6

1

3

1

•

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

•

-

2

1

3

1

7

5

71
70

4

14

3

*

•

185
185

48
39

62
54

8
8

3
3

7
3

3
3

-

30
30

61
59

-

21

21

1

7
14

3
18

-

3
•

“

-

-

1
1

3
3

40
75
75

29
29

15
IS

14
14

-

136
136

38
38

12
10

7
7

•

-

24
24

7
7

8
8

9
9

17
17

14
14

•

.

-

-

*

-

2
2

6
6

*

*

—

-

“

.

-

•

*

*

-

2
2

86
86

18
18

3
3

*

9
9

.

12

10

8

9

4

-

4

-

8

8

-

1

4

10

2
2

*

•

8

13

21

53
53

47
47

•

1

4
23
18

1
1

See footnotes at end o f tables.




29
29

-

2
2

•

-

3

5
26

*

_

-

•

•

7.97

8.12

7

•

-

20

6
6

11

19

7
7

25
25

35
35

2
2

117
117

38
38

25
25

13

20
20

178
178

21
21

35
35

8
8

10

*

-

115

123
123
_

*

1
1

2
47

2
2

*

4

•

*

*

76

-

*

*

-

40
30

24
-

-

1
0
10

24
24

*

“

8

•

*

*

*

2
2

8

_

*

-

8
8

•

•

-

*

2
2

.

.

•

-

*

“

•

•

*

*

-

-

-

“

*

-

5
5

78
78

49
49

7
7

40
40

29
24

25

•

_

-

1
1

-

-

5

14

.

5
5

T ab le A -5 . Hourly earnings of m a te ria l m ovem ent and custodial w orkers
in Kansas C ity , M o . —K ans., S ep tem b er 1976
H o u rly e a r n in g s

Number of workers re zeiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

4
2 .2 0

Occupation and industry division
w o rk e rs

M ean 2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e

2

5-------- ~5
2 .4 0 2 .6 0

s-------- 1

s

S

S

S

S

S

S

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

s
4 .2 0

S

2 .8 0

-------- T
3 .0 0 3 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .2 0

$
5 .6 0

2 .6 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

* .a o

o
<
M
tn

N um ber

5 .6 0

18
8
10

20
10
10

71
3
68

8
8
•

S

S

S

S

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

$
7*60

s
8 » 00

S
8 .4 0

6 .8 0

7,2_fi 7 . 6 0

8 .0 0

8 . 40

8 .8 0

and

under
o
>*

2 .8 0

o
o
•
v
O

2 .4 0

-

261
26
235
71
6

263
93
17 0
30
13

408
56
352
22
10

369
54
315
1
312

266
35
231
22
2

17

73

4

•

•

17

73

4

22
21
1

39
2
37

-

-

11
10
1

•
-

4
2
2

163
23
140
49

201
59
142
2

29
5
24
14

313

3
3
-

34
34

42
41
1
1

1
-

ALL WORKERS

A ,817
636
4 ,1 8 1
2 .4 5 3
718

$
7 .0 8
7 .1 3
7 .0 7
7 .5 6
6 .5 2

$
7 .7 6
7 .1 3
7 .7 6
7 .7 6
6 .6 2

$
6 .3
5 .8
6 .6
7 .7
6 .6

-

$
7 .7 6
8 .7 3
7 .7 6
7 .7 6
7 .2 5

-

TRUCKDRIVERS* LIGHT TRUCK
MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING —

467
57
410

5 .9 0
5 .3 5
5 .9 8

5 .8 9
6 .0 2
5 .3 5

3 .9 3 3 .9 1 3 .9 3 -

7 .7 6
6 .5 6
7 .7 6

.
*

TRUCKORIVERS. MEDIUM TRUCK
MANUFACTURING -------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S

904
160
744
165

6 .2 9
5 .9 2
6 .3 7
6 .8 9

6 .6 2
5 .6 1
6 .6 2
7 .7 6

5 .6
5 .4
5 .6
5 .3

1997-

6 .6 2
7 .1 3
6 .6 2
7 .7 6

•
-

•
•

1 ,3 8 7
110
1 ,2 7 7
714

7 .3 9
6 .2 3
7 .4 9
7 .7 3

7 .7 6
6 .1 6
7 .7 6
7 .7 6

7 .2
5 .7
7 .2
7 .7

0856-

7 .7 6
6 .3 1
7 .7 6
7 .7 6

365
264

7 .7 5
8 .6 8

8 .7 3
8 .7 3

6 .9 3 8 .7 3 -

8 .7 3
8 .7 3

288
114
174

4 .6 3

4 .9 1

_

5 .0 4
3 .9 2

3 .0 0 4 .2 5 3 .0 0 -

5 .6 5

5 .0 5
4 .3 6

5 .4 5
5 .6 5

RECEIVING CLERKS -----MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------RETAIL TRADE

397
175
222
145

5 .3 4
5 .4 7
5 .2 4
5 .2 8

5 .6 5
5 .6 5
5 .6 9
5 .7 5

4 .2 9 4 .6 8 3 .9 3 4 .A0-

6 .2 5
6 .6 5
6 .1 4
6 .1 3

SHIPPING ANO RECEIVING CLERKS
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTUPING

300
131
169

5 .1 4
4 .3 5
5 .7 5

5 .0 4
4 .3 9
7 .0 6

4 .0 0 3 .2 2 4 .8 4 -

7 .0 6
5 .3 0
7 .0 6

5 .5 3
5 .4 9

6 .1 7
5 .4 5
6 .1 7
6 .1 5

5
4
5
5

-

TRUCKDRIVERS — ------MANUFACTURING ------ -----NONMANUFACTURING —
PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S
RETAIL TRADE ---------------

TRUCKDRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK
(TRAILER)
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING -----p u b l ic

u t il it ie s

TRUCKORIVERS.
( o th er than

HEAVY TRUCK
t r a il e r ) —
m a n u f a c t u r in g ------------------------

s h ip p in g

clerks

MANUFACTURING
NONMANUFACTURING

8
5
2
6
2

-

10

66

-

1

22
2
20

18
8
10

11
1
10

71
3
68

•
-

•
-

-

1
1

.
•

9
9

.
-

-

-

-

-

*

-

24
24

-

•
-

•
-

14
14

•
•

*

-

-

-

•
-

•
-

-

•
-

-

-

-

-

6 .2 7
6 .3 8
6 .2 3
6 .2 2

•
-

81
81

121
121

20
20
-

-

-

-

20
20

24
24

48
7
41
1

60
12
48

4.444.44-

5 .0 0

3 .9 0 -

SHIPPING PACKERS —
MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING RETAIL TRADE ------

1 ,0 6 5
366
699
77

4 .5 5
4 .5 6
4 .5 4
4 .1 9

4 .5 0
4 .6 7
4 .3 2
4 .3 5

3 .3
3 .5
2 .6
3 .9

5 .2 4
5 .2 4
5 .0 0
4 .4 5

S ee fo o t n o t e s

-

-

-

4.44

-

-

1

-

6 .6 8
5 .4 6
6 .9 4

5
1
0
0

-

-

5 .1 9
4 .8 1
5 .3 5

5 .0 0

•

*

2 .3 7 2
69 1
1 .6 8 1

9
8
5
1

a
10
2
8

1

*

ORDER FILLERS
MANUFACTURING -----NONMANUFACTURING

6 .0 5

.1
.6
.4
.4

1
-

-

1 .6 9 6
595
1 .1 0 1
123

-

-

10
2
8

-

WAREHOUSEMEN -----------MANUFACTURING —
NONMANUFACTURING ---------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------

5.55

-

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

•

•

•

•
*

-

-

8
8

-

8
8

6
6

•

12 8
18
no
91

23
16
7
7

313
*

-

*

*

*

*

-

*

*

*

-

-

84
-

-

-

•

*

-

12
11
1

3
3
*

1
-

*

29
10
19

1

1
1

40
40
-

42
25
17

19

-

19

28
11
17

1
1
-

10
10
-

36
1
35
35

17
16
1
1

17
17
*

2
2
-

5
5
-

2
1
1
1

28
26
2
2

9
9
-

94
26
68
49

57
9
48
48

57
57
•

-

19
10
9
9

45
28
17

20
20
-

•
-

_
-

-

20
20
-

49
4
45

9
9
-

23
23
-

2
2

*

4
4

48
48
-

11

14

258

4

-

-

-

10
-

19
16
3

44

11

-

10
9
1
-

27
17
9

10 7
25

89
20
69
6

578
98
480
68

113
113

14
14
-

68
68

31
27

32
10
22

99
61
38

15 7
33
12 4

124
10
114

1
1
1

20
20
•

17
10
7

87

8
7
1
1

75
75

•
-

-

m

2

63

7
56

-

4

5

at e n d o f t a b l e s .




*

8
8
-

•
-

*

-

•
•
-

-

-

-

6
6
-

-

-

-

23
3
20

15

42

45
7

*

m

•

*

32
15
17

6
6
*
22
22
-

14
10

*

2
•
2
*

*

-

25
23
2
-

90
34
56

13 7
137

50
34
16

10
10

268
248
20

118
79
39

340
1
339

174
12 7
47

49
27

60

29

80
11
69
1

19
14

58

90
90
18

107
10 5

22

16
9
7
7

*

2

5

7

22
22

-

4

2
2

1
1

151

5
5

•

17
17
*

344
269
75
50
*

-

7

128
12 8

25
25

27
24
3
*

1
1
*

12 5
23
10 2
100

17
17
*

174
17 4
1

390
390

710
6
704
704

•
*

10
10
*

17
-

8
8

*

*

256
256

18
1
17

5

•

3
3
*

-

1
1
•
*

*

-

.
*

406 2190
29
8
398 2161
7 21S9
289
2
7

-

*

*

-

3
2

-

•
-

-

28
2
26
-

-

*

4
4
-

72
72

14
14

•
-

23
12

253
10 9
14 4
-

46
2

-

44
4

5
5

37
13
24

481
6
475

80

29
29

*

*

4

9
9

4

15 8
15 8

-

.
-

-

11

6

4

•

4

76

4
-

*
5

*
•
*

-

-

13

13
*
-

T a b le A -5 . H ourly earnings of m a te ria l m ovem ent and custodial w orkers
in Kansas C ity , M o . —Kans., S e p te m b e r— Continued
Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings 4

--- S
----- 1 1
--- ---- $
---- s---- 1
---- *
---- s ~ — s-----s---- s---- S
--- T$----1

I

s

s---- s---- 1
---- s---- 1
---- s—

,2 0

N um ber
of
w orkers

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

M ean 2

M e d ia n 2

M id d le r a n g e

2 .4 0

2 « 6 q2 . 8 0

2 .4 0

Occupation and industry division

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 o

3 .8 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

2
2
—
2

45
45
—
45

6
6
•
6

53
42
11
5

28
19
9
9

5
5
•
5

35
10
25
8

4
*
4
—
4

-

-

-

15
15

28
28

31
31

-

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 . 6 o 4 .8 0

5 .2 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

and
under
3 .8 0

4.

80 5 . 2 0

4 ,0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

18
8
10
•
10

57
38
19
*
19

53
22
31
•
14

168
75
93
•
21

176
23
153
133
18

a

18
18

20
20

32
32

149
149

5 .6 0

6 .0 0

6 .4 0

6 .8 0

7 .2 0

7 .6 0

313
255
58

213
149
64
15
49

342
70
272
12 0
92

211
98
113

50
50

104
24
80

113

5o

76

124
10 1
23
13

570
327
243
123

515
311
204

78

196
180
16

-

78
-

8 .0 0

8 .4 0

8 .8 0

ALL WORKERS—
CONTINUED
MATERIAL HANDLING LABORERS
MANUFACTURING — — —
NONMANUFACTURING -------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S --------RETAIL TRADE -------------------

2 .6 5 7
949
1 ,7 0 8
717
607

$
5 .9 5
5 .2 8
6 .3 2
6 .8 8
5 .6 2

$
5 .9 8
5 .3 1
6 .4 7
7 .7 6
6 .2 2

$
4 .8
4 .9
4 .8
6 .1
4 .6

0
1
0
5
0

-

$
7 .5 6
5 .8 7
7 .7 6
7 .7 6
6 .4 7

FORKLIFT OPERATORS ---------------MANUFACTURING --------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r in g - —
—
PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S ---------

2 ,0 7 7
1 ,4 2 7
650
205

6 .0 4
5 .8 3
6 .5 1
6 .3 3

6 .2 5
6 .0 0
6 .4 7
6 .2 5

5 .5
5 .0
6 .2
6 .1

8
6
0
6

-

6 .6 1
6 .6 1
6 .4 7
6 .2 5

-

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
THAN F O R K L I F T ) ------------- -------------MANUFACTURING------ -------------------

19 0
175

6 .3 2
6 .3 8

6 .0 8
6 .4 8

5 .9 2 5 .9 2 -

6 .4 8
6 .4 8

•

GUARDS AND WATCHMEN ------------------MANUFACTURING — --------------------NONMANUFACTUPING ------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S --------------

2 ,7 4 6
575
2 .1 7 1
47

3 .3 1
5 .6 2
2 .7 0
5 .2 7

2 .5 0
5 .5 8
2 .5 0
5 .9 7

2 .4 5 2 .4 0 3 .7 3 -

3 .5 0
6 .3 9
2 .5 8
6 .1 2

379
379

426

5 .9 7

5 .7 2

5 .5 8 -

6 .5 7

------ --------------------------

149

4 .6 1

4 .2 6

3 .5 8 -

5 .6 6

-

JANITORS. PORTERS, AND CLEANERS
MANUFACTURING ------------------ -------------NONMANUFACTUPING----------- -------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S --------------------RETAIL TRADE -------------------------------

3 ,5 4 8
1 ,1 7 7
2 ,3 7 1
210
350

3 .9 9
5 .0 9
3 .4 4
5 .6 1
3 .5 6

3 .3 1
5 .2 2
3 .1 2
5 .5 7
3 .6 2

3 .1 2
4 .3 7
3 .0 5
5 .5 2
2 .6 5

5 .0 1
6 .0 3
3 .4 5
5 .7 7
4 .0 7

41
2
39

5.56-

•

•

•

•

•

-

-

—

53
53
•

34
22
12
7

46
28
18
8

-

-

-

-

104
8
96
*

120
12 0
*

91
12
79

*

1290
4
1286
*

-

4

-

-

8

6
1
5

-

.

4
1
3
*

23
15
8

1

-

*

13
6
7
*

13
2
11
“*

2

6

1

153
116
37
•

37

24

95
67
28
28

140
140

10
10

7
-

76
68

4
4

52
52

a

33
33

53
1
52
*

215
209
6
-

56
43
13
9

102
79
23
23

107
107

24
24
-

-

189

20

77

97

24

10
10
10

6
6

4

119
119
-

13
13

-

502
502
449

-

-

41

17

41
41

17
-

-

-

•

•
•

•

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

9

-

-

-

6

4

8

-

GUARDSt
MANUFACTURING ------ --------------------------

1

watchmen:
m a n u f a c t u r in g

-

184
7
177

8

-

12

79
1
78

242
19
223

1050
46
1004

-

-

-

-

-

32

50

12

12

13

See footnotes at end of tables.




16

248
17
231
1
20

22

28

-

-

13

93
34
59

161
38
123

55

54
24
30

135
113
22

-

-

-

5

28

71

15

14

7

15
40

77
35
42
2
21

1

1

20

23

2

48
43

236
194
42
2
40

313
162
151
99
11

202
114
88
88

310
303
7
6

5

1
4

m
_

Table A -5 a .

Hourly earnings of m a te ria l m ovem ent and custodial w o rk e rs —large establishm ents

in Kansas C ity, M o. —Kans., S ep tem b e r 1976
Hourly earnings 4

Number of workers receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—
$
5
S
%
S
s
S
s
S
$
$

s

Occupation and industry division
M ean2

M e di a n2

Middle range 2

S

S

$

i

S

s

$

s

t

t

2 .2 0

Number

2 .4 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .0 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6*60

7 .0 0

7 .4 0

7 .8 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 .8 0

5 .Q 0

5 .2 0

5 .4 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

7.0 0

7 ,4 0

7.8Q

over

1 --------

and
under
2 .4 0

and

ALL WORKERS
$

$

$

7 .2 5

$
771

7 .2 5 -

7 .7 6

1

1

289

1

1
7• 7 6 -

RECEIVING C L E R K S --------------—

-------------- -----------------

196

5 .7 8

6 .6 5

14

-

*

-

1

NONMANUFACTURING

321

6^22

-------------------------------------------------------------

879

5 .9 0

5 ,5 0

5 .3 0

5 .8 3 -

6 .2 5

6 .0 2 -

ORDER FILLERS

-------------------------------------------

6 .9 4

-

i

-

2

3

2

2

17

53

22

50

-

105

2

3

11

-

1

-

2

1

2

-

1

1

-

1

-

-

10

-

-

-

-

2

4

5

39

12

31

44

10

263

5

1
8

10

77

16

55

92

10

6*0C -

-

1

4

5

29

46

*1

38

197

21

70

-

186
10

27
*

1
15
25

18

158

3
J

20

21

a

10

19

1
14

8

13

10

19

14

6«61
6 .9 9

28
8

6*61

6 * 0 0 "
j .9 8

21

1

22

6 .4 5

1 K Alyf.

6 .9 9

20

12

90

7

l,
5 .0 8 -

13

22

1

1

6 .4 0
6 .6 6

26

15

2

1

*? 7

39

1J
22

u
1

1A IL

8

8

*

389

r Hv * C m j

-

-

16
^ X r ^ XN U

-

6 .2 2

4 ,4 4 -

1

1
16

78

6 .1 0

5 .6 8 -

7*76

29

JO

126

12
258

JU
30

*

176

2

lot)

258

3?

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
73
527

5 .4 7

23
15

43

1

1
4 .2 4

a

13

l

8

4 .3 4

1

GUARDS:
291

w a t c h m e n

1

6 . C. C .

i

69

44

82

:
57

JANITORS. PORTERS, AND CLEANERS

--------

l, 329

i
<* • 95

5 .0 1

4 .1 4 -

5 .7 7

-

19

47

25

34

26

44

74
57

21

70

26

14

45

30

38
5 .5 2 3 .9 8

15

14

7

67

17

20

28

48

13

169

41

242

"

54

263

21

7
1

i
13

S ee footn otes at end o f t a b le s .




30
25

5 .7 7
12

20

1?

1

42

l

XJ

1

128

25

4

-

-

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom, powerplant, material movement,
and custodial workers, by sex, in Kansas City, Mo.—Kans., September 1976
Sex,

3

occupation, and industry division

Number Average
(mean2)
o
f
ory
wres hul
okr
erig
anns

m a in t e n a n c e , t o o lr o o m , and
POWERPLANT OCCUPATIONS - MEN

|L ' . M I . v i .

v n " r ui .

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number Average
(mean2)
o
f
ory
wres hul
okr
erig4
anns

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN
353
117

1L" ^

$
8 .3 0
6 .6 8

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

Number Average
(mean2)
o
f
ory
wres hul
okr
erig4
anns

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED
$
636

*

7 .1 3

ItNANCt LLLLIKlLlArw

O . 0(3
&

IA AV IHA UC
.

u t
•v ”

109

6 .9 *

*01

5 .9 5

969

6 .1 1

7*1
162

AL 1 r

1AX W 1nAUu
1

U ' L i 'A 1 w i » j

" " " ■■■■■■■■

6 .3 7
6 .9 0

n W U r Av 1UKINu

NONMANUFACTURING----------- ----------------------- ---------

650

6 .5 1

POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY) -

175

TRUCKDRIVERS. HEAVY TRUCK

l“U 1UK VCnivLCof

991
225
766

*■*••*"

NUNHArlUr Av 1UK Inu

7 .1 2
6 .9 *
7 .1 7

At. 1UKINb

NUNHANUr

7 .7 3
GUARDS!
3 .6 6
H .O l

237

MANUr

Al

1U K 1 (NO

" ■

105
92

7 .3 9

5 .2 1
5 .5 7

1*6

7*

5 .8 1

7 .3 5

JANITORS?

*

ORTERS? AN0 CLCANc a j

4 . 13

* * *

"ANUr AL 1UKlNu
5 .6 1

PUBLIC Ul1L11ltb
i *b I AIL 1iiAUC
* *
MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - W
OMEN

" " " "

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS (TOOLROOM) -

TOOL.

A NU

U ib

H A|\LKb

"•

- ,,
»

J l" "

MANUFACTURING
5 .* 8
332

*• 9 2

69

113
* * 2

See fo o tn o te s




at end o f t a b le s .

18

* .* 2
29

5 .6 2




Table A-6a. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, toolroom,
powerplant, material movement, and custodial workers, by se xlarge establishments in Kansas City, Mo. —Kans., September 1976
Sex,

3

occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

A vera ge
(m e a n 2 )
hourly
earnings4

Sex, 3 occupation, and industry division

MAINTENANCE, TOOLROOM, AND
POWERPLANT OCCUPATIONS - MEN

material

Number
of
workers

A vera ge
( m ean^)
hourly
earnings 4

mov em e nt and c us to d ia l
m e n — CONTINUED

OCCUPATIONS -

$

$
191

MAlNTuNANCt LAKrLNTuKj
592
85
UWULK r ILLtKo
MAINTENANCE MACHINISTS — — — — — —
MANUFACTURING -------------------------------------------- -—

321
308

7.62
7.63

79
370

6-53

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS (MACHINERY) MANUFACTURING • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

497
416

7.71
7.55

4(H)

5-81

243
90
153

121

7.75
7.72
7.77
7.91

326

7 ' ' POWER-TRUCK OPERATORS (OTHER
7.42 THAN FORKLIFT) — — — — —

180

6-39

335
171

6.12

MAINTENANCE MECHANICS
(MOTOR VEHICLES) ----------------- ----------- -------------------MANUFACTURING — — — — —
— —
nonmanufacturing

PUBLIC UTILITIES —

— —

—

manufacturing

MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL W O R K E R S --------

74
64
235
235

1
1
.
7.59 uUflKUb Am U 1 A 1v nn ci 1 ™
MANUFACTURING — —
7.49

— —

—

—

7.37

— — —

—

m a n u f a c t u r ing
— — —

— — — —

210
153
57

4. 0

watchmen:

JANITORS, PORTERS, AND CLEANERS

NONMANUFACTURING

—

GUARDS:

6.48

STATIONARY ENGINEERS

—

--------

7.22
7.24
7.16

1,160
710
450
136

4-31
5-68

5.03

74

5- 1Q

167

4.41

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
OCCUPATIONS - MEN

i * i jP v
lf

*

*

745
NONMANUFACTURING

--------------------------------------------

TRUCKDRIVERS * MEDIUM TRUCK

7.24 MATERIAL HANOI ING

628
321

7.38 JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CLEANERS
7.58
,

r /

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .

19

1

A R O R F R S ------------------------------




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected
occupational groups, adjusted for employment shifts,
in Kansas City, Mo.—Kans., for selected periods
September 1972
to
September 1973

September 1973
to
September 1974

All industries:
. . ___
Office clerical._ _________ _____
_
Electronic data processing ........ ... ... .. .
Industrial nurses_______
.
. _ _ .......
Skilled maintenance trades ** .
_______
Unskilled plant workers * * __ ___ _____ __ __ __

6.6
*
7.7
6.2
8.1

8.0
6.8
9.7
9.9
8.7

8.8
8.7
10.8
10.5
9.7

8.1
6.5
7.2
7.4
10.3

Manufacturing:
Office clerical.. ___ __ ______ _______________
Electronic data processing______ _ _ _ _ _ ____
_ _
Industrial nurses_______________ . ________
Skilled maintenance trades * * _______ _ _ _____
Unskilled plant workers * * ... ..... ....... ...

5.8
*
6.5
6.6
7.0

8.7
6.9
10.9
10.0
9.7

9.3
11.3
11.1
10.4

7.0
***
7.4
6.5
8.4

7.0
*
***

7.9
6.8
***
***
7.8

8.7
8.4
***
***
9.4

Industry and occupational group
(men and w o m e n combined)

Nonmanufacturing:
Office clerical______________ _____ _________
Electronic data processing__________ _________
Industrial nurses____________
Skilled maintenance trades ** _ _ __ ___________
_
Unskilled plant workers * * ____ ______ _
___

*
**
***

D ata not a v a ila b le .
P e r c e n t in c r e a s e s fo r p erio d s ending p r io r to
D ata do not m e e t p ub lication c r it e r ia .

8.9

1976 r e la te to m e n o n ly .

20

September 1974
to
September 1975

September 1975
to
September 1976

8.4
6.2
***
11.7

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
T ab le B-1. M in im u m entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks in Kansas C ity, M o. —Kans., S ep tem b er 1976
In exp erien ced ty p ists
M an ufactu ring

M i n i m u m weekly straight-time salary 5

A ll
in d u strie s
A ll
sch e d u les

e s t ab l is hm e nt s

st ud i ed

es ta bl i sh m en ts having a s p e c i f i e d
minimum ------------------------------------- --------

$87 .5 0
S90.00
$92 .5 0
$95 .0 0
$ 97 .5 0
$100 ,0 0
.
$105, .0 0
$110, .0 0
$115, .0 0
$ i ?n , .0 0
$125, .0 0
$130, .0 0
$135, .0 0
$ 1A0 ,. 0 0
$ 1M5,. 0 0
$150, .0 0
$155, .0 0
$160, .0 0
$165, .0 0
$170, .0 0
$175, .0 0
$180, .0 0
$185, .0 0
$190, .0 0
$195, .0 0
$200, .0 0

AND
ANO
AND
AND
AND

UNDER
UNOER
UNDER
UNOER
UNDER

AND
AN
D
AND
AND
ANO
AN
D
AN
D
AN
D
AN
D
ANO
AN
D
AN
D
AND
AND
AN
O
AND
AND
AN
D
AND
AND
AND

$ 90 .0 0 -------------$ 99 .5 0 ------------*9 9 .0 0 -------------$ 97 .5 0 — — -----$10 0.0 0 ------------

UNDER $10 5.0 0
UNDER $11 0.0 0
UNDER $11 5.0 0
UNDER $12 0.0 0
UNOER $19 5.0 0
UNDER $130 .00
UNDER $135 .00
UNDER S1M0.00
UNDER $ 145.00
UNDER $15 0.0 0
UNDER $15 5.0 0
UNDER $160 .00
UNDER $16 5.0 0
UNDER $17 0 .0 0
UNDER $17 5.0 0
UNDER $180 .00
UNDER $185 .00
UNDER $190 .00
UNDER $19 5.00
UNDER $90 0.0 0
OVER----------------

ESTABLISHMENTS HAVING NO SPECIFIED
MINIMUM -----------------------------------------------ESTABLISHMENTS WHICH DID NOT EMPLOY
WORKERS IN THIS CATEGORY -----------------

O th e r in ex p erien c ed c le r ic a l w o r k e r s 6
Non m an ufacturin g

B a sed on stand ard w ee k ly hours 7 of—
indust r ie s
A ll
40
40
sc h e d u les

A ll
sc h e d u les

3772

Nonm anufactu r ing

B a se d on standard w eekly h o u r s 7 of—
40

A ll
sch e d u les

40

37 Va

XXX

237

92

XXX

1M5

XXX

XXX

33

7

88

33

30

55

M2

8

-

6

1
“

_
1
-

2
11
2
M
6

10
3
4

1
-

2
4

2
11
2
5
7

_
-

6
4
2
1
3
4
3
1
1
2

4
i
i
i
3
4
3
1
“
-

2
2
1

13
4
3
10
4
3
7
1
1
.

3
3
-

1
1

1

1

-

3
1
1
1

-

-

2
3
1
1
1

7
1
2
2
3
j
3
1
1
.
-

-

2
3
3
1
1

10
1
3
2
3
3
3
1
1
-

2
_

8
1
4
.

3
2
8
i
-

-

1
2

1
2

1
1

1
“

237

92

XXX

IMS

XXX

68

2M

22

44

-

-

1
7
1
3
5

1

-

1

-

6
2
1
3
“
-

1
6
2
1
2
-

2
A
3
1

2
3
1
1

2
3
1
1

7
4
2
7
5
5
6
1

i
7
1
3
4

-

-

1
1

3
_
?

_

2

1

-

-

1
"

-

-

-

1

1
_
-

-

1
2

1
2

1

-

2

2

2

-

-

1
1

1
“

1

-

-

-

1

1

“

56

25

XXX

31

XXX

XXX

86

37

XXX

M9

XXX

XXX

11 3

m3

XXX

70

XXX

XXX

63

22

XXX

Ml

XXX

XXX

See footnotes at end of tables.




M an ufactu ring
A ll

21




Table B -2 . Late s h ift pay provisions for fu ll-tim e m a n u fa ctu rin g p lan t
w o rke rs in Kansas C ity , M o .—K ans., S ep te m b e r 1976
_[AUL UL_tirne manufacturing plant workers = 100 percent)
^u: 2
All workers 8

Workers on late shifts

Item
Second shift

Third shift

IN ESTABLISHMENTS WITH LATE SHIFT PROVISIONS -----

94.1

89.2

20.5

4.8

WITH NO PAY DIFFERENTIAL FOR LATE SHIFT WORK ----WITH PAY DIFFERENTIAL FOR LATE SHIFT WORK -------UNIFORM CENTS-PFR-HOUR DIFFERENTIAL -----------UNIFORM PERCENTAGE DIFFERENTIAL ----------------OTHER DIFFERENTIAL -------------------------------

.5
93.6
63.9
29.1
.6

.5
88.6
50.5
29.1
9.1

.1
20.4
12.0
8.3
.1

.1
4.7
3.7
.8
.2

15.1
6.0

20.8
9.8

15.5
5.7

20.5
10.0

Second shift

Third shift

PERCENT OF WORKERS

AVERAGE PAY DIFFERENTIAL
UNIFORM CENTS-PER-HOUR DIFFERENTIAL -------------UNIFORM PERCENTAGE DIFf E R E N T I A L ------------------PERCENT OF WORKERS BY TYPE AND
AMOUNT OF PAY DIFFERENTIAL
UNIFORM c e n t s -p e p - h o u r :
5 CENTS --------------------------------------7 CENTS --------------------------------------8 CENTS --------------------------------------9 CENTS --------------------------------------10 CENTS -------------------------------------12 ANO UNDER 13 CENTS -----------------------13 CENTS -------------------------------------14 CENTS -------------------------------------15 AND UNDER 16 CENTS -----------------------16 CENTS -------------------------------------17 CENTS -------------------------------------18 CENTS -------------------------------------20 CFNTS -------------------------------------25 CENTS -------------------------------------30 CENTS -------------------------------------35 CENTS -------------------------------------37 ANO UNDER 38 CENTS -----------------------AO CENTS -------------------------------------50 CENTS -------------------------------------53 CENTS -------------------------------------70 C E N T S -----*
---------------------------------

1.5
1.3
2.0
2.1
17.9
3.4
.9
15.9
.8
.4
13.8
.9
.6
1.1
1.3
-

UNIFORM PERCENTAGE!
5 PERCENT ------------------------------------6 PERCENT ------------------------------------7 AND UNDER 8 PERCENT -----------------------10 PERCENT ------------------------------------

20.9
1.1
3.5
3.6

FULL DAYS PAY FOR REDUCED HOURS
PLUS CENTS DIFFERENTIAL--------------------------

.6

See footnotes at end of tables.

22

5.4
2.6
1.3
1.5
12.1
1.1
11.8
4.9
6.1
.6
1.6
.1
1.3

1.1

.3
.3
.6
.4
3.1

.s

•c
2.6
•c
2.5
.1
.2
•3
.3
-

.2
.3
.3
(9)
1.3
.5
.1
.7
.1
.2
.1

27.9

6.7
.9
.7

*
.8

9.1

.1

.2

Table B -3 . Scheduled w ee k ly hours and days of fu ll-tim e firs t-s h ift w o rkers
in Kansas C ity, M o . —K ans., S ep tem b e r 1976
O ffic e w o r k e r s

P lan t w o r k e r s
Item
A ll in d u strie s

M an ufactu ring

N onm anu­
factu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

R e ta il trade

100

100

A ll in d u stries

M an ufactu ring

N onm anu­
factu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

Retail tra d e

PERCENT OF WORKERS RY SCHEDULED
WEEKLY HOURS AND DAYS
ALL FULL-TIME WORKERS ----------20
24
32
32
35
36
36
37
38
40
42
45
46

HOURS-2 1/2 DAYS ---------------HOURS-5 DAYS --------------------HOURS-5 DAYS --------------------1/2 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------HOURS-5 DAYS --------------------HOURS-4 DAYS --------------------1/4 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------1/2 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------3/4 HOURS-5 D A Y S ----------- ----HOURS-5 DAYS --------------------1/2 HOURS-5 DAYS ---------------HOURS-5 1/2 DAYS ---------------HOURS ---------------------------5 1/2 OAYS ----------------------6 OAYS --------------------------48 HOURS-6 DAYS ---------------------

loo

100

100

90
1
1
1
(10)
1
1

7
1
2
88
1
1
-

(10)
(10)
1
(10)
1
1
92
2
1
2
2

100
-

39.8

39.7

40.0

40.0

(10 >
(10)
1
(10)
4
-

1
1
-

-

100

100

100

100

100

-

3
1
(10)
13
5
79
-

(10)
99
-

1
99
*

39.4

40.0

40.0

-

3
1
3

2
1
(10)
11
4
82
-

-

-

-

-

5

-

4
4
92
-

39.9

39.5

39.8

“
89

AVERAGE SCHEDULED
WEEKLY HOURS
ALL WEEKLY WORK SCHEDULES ----------

S ee footnote at end of t a b le s .




23

T a b le B -4 . A nnual paid holidays for fu ll-tim e w o rke rs in Kansas C ity , M o .—Kans., S e p te m b e r 1976
Plant workers
Item
All industries

PERCENT
ALL

FULL-TIME

OF

Manufacturing

Nonmanu­
facturing

Office workers
Public utilities

Retail trade

All industries

Manufacturing

Nonmanu­
facturing

Public utilities

Retail trade

WORKERS

WORKERS

---— ------

ESTABLISHMENTS NOT PROVIDING
P A I O H O L I D A Y S --------- ----------IN E S T A B L I S H M E N T S P R O V I D I N G
P A I D H O L I D A Y S ------------ --------

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

1

(10)

3

-

1

1

(10)

1

-

-

99

99

97

100

99

99

99

99

100

100

8.9

10.2

7.8

9.6

7.1

8.7

9.7

8.3

9.7

7.3

1
-

.
3
1
3
25

3

(10)
(10)
(10)
12
(10)
14
2
2
(10)
12
1
27
1
22
3
1
3

.
5
«
8
-

.
(10)
(10)
(10)
14
(10)
15
2
2
(10)
13

-

IN

AVERAGE

NUMBER

FOR WORKERS
PROVIDING

OF

PAID

HOLIDAYS

IN F S T A B L I S H M E N T S
H O L I D A Y S — -------------

PERC E N T OF W O R K E R S BY NUMB E R
OF PAID HOLIDAYS PROVIDED

1

H O L I D A Y ------------ ------ — -----P L U S 5 H A L F D A Y S ----- ----------2 HOLIOAYS — — — — — — — — — —
3 H O L I O A Y S --------------- -------------6 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------P L U S 2 H A L F D A Y S ---------------7 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------P L U S 1 H A L F D A Y -----------------P L U S 2 H A L F D A Y S ----------------P L U S 3 H A L F D A Y S ----------------8 H O L I D A Y S -------------------------PLUS 1 HALF D A Y -----------------9 H O L I D A Y S ----------------------------P L U S 2 H A L F D A Y S -----------------IQ H O L I D A Y S --------------------------11 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------12 H O L I O A Y S --------------------------13 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------1 A H O L I D A Y S --------------------------15 H O L I D A Y S --------------------------P E R C E N T OF WORK E R S
PAID HOLIDAY TIME

1
3
6

O R M O R E -----------------------O R M O R E -----------------------1/2 D A Y S O R M O R E ------------------D A Y S O R M O R E -----------------------1/2 D A Y S O R M O R E ------------------D A Y S O R M O R E ------------------------

DAYS
7 DAYS

8
8
9
10

13
14

DAYS
DAYS
DAYS
OAYS
DAYS

15

OAYS

11

12

----------------------------------- -------—
------ ------------------- ------------ — - —
------------------------------------------------------

OR
OR
OR
OR
OR

-

1
14
(10)
10
(10)
-

2

-

-

-

19
1
19

11
2
26

2
24
(10)
12
1
25
12

-

•

-

19
3
1
3

17

61

2

7

9

20
4
2
6
18

*

*

4
25
9
-

-

8
-

-

43
13
-

2

1
*

*
“

9
4
31
19

7
2
11

“

1
1

-

-

-

25

19

15

1
23
2
(10)

-

-

1

3

-

(10)
(10)
1
33
18
31

69

1

7

5

-

“
“
”

BY T O T A L
P R O V I D E D 11

D A Y O R M O R E ------------------------O A Y S O R M O R E ------------------------

7

1
-

MORE
M O R E
MORE
M O R E
MORE

99

99

98
97
83
73
73
54
53
35
16
13

99
99
98
90
90
79

11

24

9

18

77

51
31
26

97
96
94
70
58
57
32
32
20
3
1
*

100
100
100
97
96
96
93
93
68
7
“
*

99

99

99

99

96
92
66
58
58
15
15
2

99
99
87
73
72
58
57
30

99
99
85
69
67
52
52
26

“
“
*

5
4

99
99
95
87
87
78
74
43
24
18
15
5
5

7

1
1

2

(10)
-

100
100
100
97
96
96
95
95
76

100
99
98
66
48
48
17
17
1

7
-

‘

S ee fo o tn o te s at end o f t a b le s .




24

T able B -5 .

Paid vacation provisions for fu ll-tim e w o rkers in Kansas C ity , M o . —Kans., S e p te m b e r 1976
Plant workers
Item
All industries

M anufactur ing

Nonmanu­
facturing

Office workers
Public utilities

Retail trade

All industries

M anufactur ing

Nonmanu­
facturing

Public utilities

Retail trade

PERCENT OF WORKERS
100

100

100

ALL FULL-TIRE WORKERS -----------

100

100

IN ESTABLISHMENTS NOT PROVIDING
PAID VACATIONS -------------------IN ESTABLISHMENTS PROVIDING
PAID VACATIONS -------------------LENGTH-OF-TIME PAYMENT ---------PERCENTAGE PAYMENT -------------OTHER PAYMENT --------------------

-

-

-

-

-

100
96
3
1

100
95
5
1

100
97
2
1

100
100
-

100
98
2

100
99
(10)

100
99
(10)

100
99
(10)

100
100

7
20
1
(10)

7
25
1
(10)

7
15
2
*

7
A2
1
-

11
A
A
*

5
29
11
5

5
28
10
6

5
29
11
5

7
51
3
*

19
6
1A
*

60
2
37
(10)

59
1
39
-

61
3
3b
(10)
*

32
11
56
“

75
25
"

22
(10)
75
(10)
3

25

21
(10)
7A
(10)
A

29
1
70
*

A0
60
-

2 YEARS OF SERVICE!
1 WEEK ------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS ------------------------

30
1
66
2
1

38
(10)
57
1
2

23
1
73
2
(10)

7
5
82
6
*

2A

3
(10)
92
2
3

3
96
1
(10)

3
(10)
90
2
A

1
(10)
97
1
*

9
91
*

3 YEARS OF SERVICE!
1 WEEK ------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------A WEEKS ------------------------

3
2
79
1A
1
1

2
4
70
21
1
1

A
88
7
1
*

-

5
89
6

(10)
90
A
6
-

(10)
93
5
2
-

(10)
89
A
7
-

96
1
3
-

3
92
6
*

A YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----2 WEEKS ------- ----------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------A WEEKS ------------------------

2
2
80
1A
1
1

•
A
72
21
1
1

A
87
8
1
*

5
89
6
*

(10)

-

(10)

-

-

-

-

88
6
6
-

92
5
3
*

86
7
7
-

92
6
3
-

3
92
6
-

5 YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ------------------------2 W E E K S ---------- ---- --------OVER 2 AND UNDtR 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----A WEEKS ------------------------

1
70
5
23
1

64
3
32
1

2
76
7
15
-

5
81
6
8

(10)
67
3
26
3

67
1
32
•

(10)
67
A
25
A

72
5
22
(10)

3
81
6
10
-

100

100
-

100
-

100
-

100
-

-

-

100
100
-

AMOUNT OF PAID VACATION AFTER:1
2
6 MONTHS OF SERVICE!
UNDER 1 WEEK -----------------1 WEEK ------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----2 WEEKS -----------------------1 YEAR OF SERVICE!
1 WEEK ------------------------OVER 1 AND UNDER 2 WEEKS -----2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS ------------------------

85
11
A

81
15
A

53
15
31

76
*

-

75
(10)

'
See footnotes at end of tables.




25

T ab le B -5 .

Paid vacation provisions for fu ll-tim e w orkers in Kansas C ity , M o .—K ans., S ep tem b e r 1 9 7 6 — C ontinu ed
Plant workers
Item
All industries

Manufacturing

Office workers

Nonmanu­
facturing

Public utilities

Retail trade

All industries

M anuf actur ing

Nonmanu­
facturing

Public utilities

Retail trade

-

3
17

AMOUNT OF PAID VACATION AFTER 12 CONTINUED
10 YEARS OF SERVICES
1 WEEK ------------------------2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDFR 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----A WEEKS -----------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WttKS ------

i
IS
(10)
66
12
S
*

12
56
21
10
-

2
18
1
7A
3
1
*

2
2
8A
9
A
“

5
31
6A
*
*

(10)
8
2
75
6
8
(10)

10
2
69
8
11
-

(10)
7
2
77
6
e
(10)

2
(10)
9A
(10)
3
(10)

12 YEARS OF SERVICES
1 WEEK ------------------------2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----A WEEKS -----------------------OVER A AND UNDER b WEEKS ------

1
12
1
62
13
11
-

8
1
55
23
12
-

2
16
(10)
68
4
9
*

1
5A
11
3A

5
27
68

(10)
7
2
70
7
1A
(10)

8
2
63
10
16
-

(10)
6
2
72
6
13
(10)

2
68
1
28
(10)

15 YEARS OF SERVICFS
1 WEEK ------------------------2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WttKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----A WEEKS -----------------------OVER A AND UNOER 5 WEEKS -----5 WEEKS ------------------------

1
D
(10)
AA
3
A5
2
(10)

1
3R
6
5A
(10)
-

2
8
(10)
A9

2
A1
(10)
53
A
-

(10)
A
2
51
4
37
1
1

1

36
3
1

(10)
3
1
A9
3
A1
1
(10)

-

1
31
5A
11
A

33
63
1
3

20 YEARS OF SERVICES
1 WEEK ------------------------2 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----A WEEKS -----------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----5 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 5 ANO UNDER 6 WEEKS -----6 WEEKS ------------------------

1
5
(10)
27
37
2
27
1
(10)

-

1
22
AA
3
31
(10)
(10)

2
8
(10)
33
31
1
23
2

1
3
AA
2
AA
6

(10)
3
1
2A
3
52
1
1A
(10)

2
26
A8
4
20
1

(10)
A
2
23
A
5A
(10)
13
(10)

1
A
62
(10)
32
1

*

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
16

(10)
3
1
20
2
29
1
38
(10)

-

(10)
A

-

3
13

25 YEARS OF SERVICES
1 WEEK -----------------------------2 WEEKS ----------------------------OVER 2 ANO UNDER 3 WEEKS ------3 WEEKS ----------------------------OVER 3 AND UNOER A WttKS ------A WEEKS ----------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ------5 WEEKS ----------------------------OVER 5 ANO UNDER 6 WEEKS ------6 WEEKS -----------------------------

-

-

5
16
46
33
*
5
16
36
19
2A

1
5
(10)
2A

21

2
8
(10)
26

3

26

-

-

-

-

-

2A
1
38

28

21
1
33

8
2
53
6
28

22

2
5

-

1
-

1
AA

2
3

2

7

1

«

-

32

A

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .




*

26

-

2
-

25
-

26
4
39
1
4

2

18
3
31
(10)
38
(10)
A

-

1

-

80
-

3
17
-

80
-

3
13
.
55
30
3
13
-

33
A7
A
-

-

-

A

12

-

-

5
(10)
69
1
19

35
-

37
-

T able B -5 .

Paid vacation provisions fo r fu ll-tim e w orkers in Kansas C ity , M o .—K ans., S ep tem b e r 1 9 7 6 — Continued
Plant workers
Item
Ail industries

AMOUNT OF PAID VACATION AFTER12
CONTINUED
30

YEARS OF SERVICE:
1 WEEK ------------------------WEEKS -----------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS -----3 WEEKS -----------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS -----A WEEKS -----------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS -----5 WEEKS -----------------------OVER S AND UNDER 6 WEEKS -----6
WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------vacation

Office workers
Public utilities

Retail trade

i

5
16

All industries

M anufactur ing

Norm* “i vVi
facturing

Public utilities

Retail trade

-

2

maxi mum

Manufacturing

Nonmanu­
facturing

i
5
(10)
2A
2A
1
37
2
b

2

i
-

21
-

28
1
A2
2
5

8
(10)
26
21
1
33
2

7

-

-

26

3

-

-

8
2
53
6
28

22
32
-

(10)
3
1
20
2
28
(10)
38
(10)
6

2
25
25
38
1
9

(10)
A
2
18
3
29
(10)
38
(10)
5

i
A
5
(10)
65
1
23

3
13

12

•
35

37
•
-

available:

1 WEEK ------------------------------------------------------WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------OVER 2 AND UNDER 3 WEEKS ------------3 WEEKS ----------------------------------------------------OVER 3 AND UNDER A WEEKS ------------A WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------OVER A AND UNDER 5 WEEKS ------------5 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------OVER S ANO UNDER 6 WEEKS ------------6 WEEKS ---------------------------------------------------2

1
5
(10)
2A
2A
1
36

21
-

2
8

2
7

1
-

28
1

2
8
(10)
26
21
1
32
2

1
3
8
2
53

8

28

6

See footnotes at end of tables.




27

5
16
26
22
31
1

(10)
3
1
20

2
-

2

25
-

28
(10)

25
-

37

36
1
11

(10)
7

(10)
A
2
16
3
29
(10)
37
(10)

6

1
A
5
(10)
65
1
23

3
13
12
35
-

28
-

9

Table B-6.

H ealth, insurance, and pension plans for full-tim e w orkers in Kansas City, M o . — Kans., Septem ber 1976
P lan t w o r k e r s
Item
A ll in d u strie s

M an ufactu ring

N onm anu­
factu rin g

O ffic e w o r k e r s
P u b lic u tilitie s

R e ta il trade

A ll in d u strie s

M an ufactu ring

N on m an u ­
fac tu rin g

P u b lic u tilitie s

R e ta il trade

PERCENT OF WORKERS
ALL FULL-TIME WORKERS ----------IN ESTABLISHMENTS PROVIDING AT
LEAST ONE OF THE BF.NFFITS
SHOWN BELOW13-----------------------

loo

98

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

99

98

100

97

99

99

100

100

100

95
73

96
61

99
97

90
34

LIFE INSURANCE ---------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS ------------

92
77

90
77

94
77

100
99

90
57

96
64

ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND
DISMEMBERMENT INSURANCE ----------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS ------------

7S
66

75
67

74
64

93
92

65
46

70
46

66
47

71
45

80
76

50
24

SICKNESS AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE
OR SICK LEAVE OR BOTH14------------

87

91

83

92

81

92

93

91

98

91

66
56

77
68

56
46

64
61

48
29

45
29

60
42

40
25

43
42

47
12

22

12

32

46

27

60

75

56

69

38

10

7

13

12

14

14

l

19

26

27

LONG-TERM DISABILITY
INSURANCE ------------------NONCONTRIDUTORY p l a n s ---------

24
20

30
27

18
13

11
9

27
19

50
30

60
46

47
24

22
21

44
11

HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE ------NONCONTRIHUTORY PLANS ---------

95
76

95
82

96
71

100
94

97
06

98
56

98
75

98
50

99
91

96
25

SURGICAL INSURANCE ------------NONCONTRIHUTORY PLANS ---------

95
76

95
82

96
71

100
94

97
56

98
56

98
75

98
SO

99
91

96
25

MEDICAL INSURANCE -------------NONCONTRIHUTORY PLANS ------- -—

94
76

95
82

94
71

100
94

94
56

96
55

98
75

95
49

99
91

82
25

--- -------------

79
60

68
57

89
64

100
94

91
51

96
52

94
63

97
49

99
91

94
24

DENTAL INSURANCE --------------NONCONTRIHUTORY PLANS ---------

32
29

34
33

30
26

46
46

3b
28

20
17

27
23

ie
15

40
*+0

16
9

RETIREMENT PENSION ------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS ---------

78
74

87
85

70
64

80
80

71
58

84
74

91
82

82
71

71
71

74
43

SICKNESS ANO ACCIDENT
INSURANCE -----------------------NONCONTRIBUTORY PLANS ---------SICK LEAVE (FULL PAY ANO NO
WAITING PERIOD) ----------------SICK LEAVE (PARTIAL PAY OR
WAITING PERIOD) -------------

MAJOR MEDICAL INSURANCE
NONCONTRIHUTORY PLANS

S ee footn otes at end o f t a b le s .




28

Footnotes
All of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

Less than 0.05 percent.
Less than 0.5 percent.
11
All combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount
are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving a total of
1 0 days includes those with 10 full days and no half days, 9 full days
and
2 half days, 8 full days and 4 half days, and so on. Proportions then were
cumulated.
12
Includes payments other than "length of tim e ," such as percentage
of annual earnings or flat-sum payments, converted to an equivalent time
basis; for example, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week's
pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily and do not necessarily reflect
individual provisions for progression; for example, changes in proportions
at 10 years include changes between 5 and 10 years. Estimates are cumu­
lative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 weeks' pay after 10 years
includes those eligible for at least 3 weeks' pay after fewer years of service.
13
Estimates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which
at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer."Noncontributory
plans" include only those financed entirely by the employer. Excluded
are legally required plans,-, such as workers disability compensation, social
security, and railroad retirement.
14
Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and
accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are limited to
those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay
that each employee can expect. Informal sick leave allowances determined
on an individual basis are excluded.
9

10

1
Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive
their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at reg­
ular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly
hours.
2
The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all
workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median designates
position— half of the workers receive more and half receive less than the
rate shown. The middle range is defined by two rates of pay: a fourth of
the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn more
than the higher rate.
3
Earnings data relate only to workers whose sex identification was
provided by the establishment.
4
Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends,
holidays, and late shifts.
Formally established minimum regular straight-time hiring salaries
that are paid for standard workweeks.
6
Excludes workers in subclerical jobs such as messenger.
7
Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for
the most common standard workweeks reported.
8
Includes all plant workers in establishments currently operating
late shifts, and establishments whose formal provisions cover late shifts,
even though the establishments were not currently operating late shifts.




29




Appendix A
Area wage and related benefits data are obtained by personal visits
of Bureau field representatives at 3-year intervals. 1 In each of the interven­
ing years, information on employment and occupational earnings is collected
by a combination of personal visit, mail questionnaire, and telephone inter­
view from establishments participating in the previous survey.
In each of the 841 areas currently surveyed, data are obtained
2
from representative establishments within six broad industry divisions:
Manufacturing; transportation, communication, and other public utilities;
wholesale trade; retail trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and
services. Major industry groups excluded from these studies are government
operations and the construction and extractive industries. Establishments
having fewer than a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of
insufficient employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are
provided for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication
criteria.
These surveys are conducted on a sample basis. The sampling
procedures involve detailed stratification of all establishments within the
scope of an individual area survey by industry and number of employees.
From this stratified universe a probability sample is selected, with each
establishment having a predetermined chance of selection. To obtain optimum
accuracy at minimum cost, a greater proportion of large than small establish­
ments is selected. When data are combined, each establishment is weighted
according to its probability of selection, so that unbiased estimates are
generated. For example, if one out of four establishments is selected, it is
given a weight of four to represent itself plus three others. An alternate of
the same original probability is chosen in the same industry-size classifi­
cation if data are not available from the original sample member. If no
suitable substitute is available, additional weight is assigned to a sample
member that is similar to the missing unit.
Occupations and earnings
Occupations selected for study are common to a variety of manu­
facturing and nonmanufacturing industries, and are of the following types: (1)
Office clerical; (2) professional and technical; (3) maintenance, toolroom,
and powerplant; and (4) material movement and custodial. Occupational
classification is based on a uniform set of job descriptions designed to
take account of interestablishment variation in duties within the same job.
Occupations selected for study are listed and described in appendix B.
Unless otherwise indicated, the earnings data following the job titles are for
1 Personal visits were on a 2-year cycle before July 1972.
2 Included in the 84 areas are 14 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract. These areas are Akron,
Ohio; Austin, T ex .; Binghamton, N .Y. —Pa. ; Birmingham, A la .; Fort Lauderdale—Hollywood and West Palm
Beach—Boca Raton, F la .; Lexington—Fayette, Ky.; Melbourne—Titusville—C ocoa, Fla.; Norfolk—Virginia Beach—
Portsmouth and Newport News—Hampton, Va. —N. C. ; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N .Y .; Raleigh—
Durham, N .C .; Stamford, Conn.; Syracuse, N .Y .; Utica—Rome, N .Y .; and Westchester County, N .Y. In
addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies in approximately 100 areas at the request of the
Employment
Administration of the U. S. Department of Labor.




31

all industries combined. Earnings data for some of the occupations listed and
described, or for some industry divisions within the scope of the survey, are
not presented in the A-series tables, because either (1) employment in the
occupation is too small to provide enough data to merit presentation, or (2)
there is possibility of disclosure of individual establishment data. Separate
men’s and women's earnings data are not presented when the number of
workers not identified by sex is 20 percent or more of the men or women
identified in an occupation. Earnings data not shown separately for industry
divisions are included in data for all industries combined. Likewise, data
are included in the overall classification when a subclassification of elec­
tronics technicians, secretaries, or truckdrivers is not shown or information
to subclassify is not available.
Occupational employment and earnings data are shown for full-time
workers, i.e ., those hired to work a regular weekly schedule. Earnings data
exclude premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and
late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but cost-of-living allowances
and incentive bonuses are included. Weekly hours for office clerical and
professional and technical occupations refer to the standard workweek
(rounded to the nearest half hour) for which employees receive regular
straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime at regular and/or
premium rates). Average weekly earnings for these occupations are rounded
to the nearest half dollar.
These surveys measure the level of occupational earnings in .an area
at a particular time. Comparisons of individual occupational averages over
time may not reflect expected wage changes. The averages for individual
jobs are affected by changes in wages and employment patterns. For example,
proportions of workers employed by high- or low-wage firms may change,
or high-wage workers may advance to better jobs and be replaced by new
workers at lower rates. Such shifts in employment could decrease an
occupational average even though most establishments in an area increase
wages during the year. Changes in earnings of occupational groups, shown in
table A - 7, are better indicators of wage trends than are earnings changes for
individual jobs within the groups.
Average earnings reflect composite, areawide estimates. Industries
and establishments differ in pay level and job staffing, and thus contribute
differently to the estimates for each job. Pay averages may fail to reflect
accurately the wage differential among jobs in individual establishments.
Average pay levels for men and women in selected occupations
should not be assumed to reflect differences in pay of the sexes within
individual establishments. Factors which may contribute to differences
include progression within established rate ranges (only the rates paid
incumbents are collected) and performance of specific duties within the
general survey job descriptions. Job descriptions used to classify employees
in these surveys usually are more generalized than those used in individual
establishments and allow for minor differences among establishments in
specific duties performed.

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the to t a l in a ll e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w ith in th e s c o p e o f th e s tu dy and not the n u m b e r a c t u a lly s u r v e y e d .
B e ca u se o ccu pa tion a l s tru ctu res among establish m en ts d iffe r, estim ates of
o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t o b t a i n e d f r o m th e s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s tu d ie d
s e r v e o n l y to i n d i c a t e the r e l a t i v e i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s s tu d ie d .
These
d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e do not a f f e c t m a t e r i a l l y the a c c u r a c y o f
the e a r n i n g s data.

Percent
as f o l l o w s :

c h a n g e s f o r in d iv id u a l a r e a s

in the p r o g r a m

are

1.

E a c h o c c u p a t i o n is a s s i g n e d a w e ig h t b a s e d o n its p r o ­
p o r t i o n a t e e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p in the
base year.

2.

T h e s e w e i g h t s a r e u s e d to c o m p u t e g r o u p a v e r a g e s .
E a c h o c c u p a t i o n ' s a v e r a g e ( m e a n ) e a r n i n g s is m u l t i p l i e d
b y its w e i g h t . T h e p r o d u c t s a r e t o t a l e d to o b ta in a g r o u p
average.

3.

T h e r a t i o o f g r o u p a v e r a g e s f o r 2 c o n s e c u t i v e y e a r s is
c o m p u t e d b y d iv id in g th e a v e r a g e f o r th e c u r r e n t y e a r
b y the a v e r a g e f o r the e a r l i e r y e a r .
The result—
e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t — l e s s 100 is th e p e r c e n t c h a n g e .

Wage trend s fo r se le c t e d occu p a tion a l groups
T h e p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s p r e s e n t e d in t a b l e A - 7 a r e b a s e d on c h a n g e s
in a v e r a g e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s f o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e p o r t i n g th e t r e n d j o b s in b o th
the c u r r e n t and p r e v i o u s
y ea r (m atched esta b lish m en ts).
T h e data a r e
a d j u s t e d to r e m o v e the e f f e c t o n a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f e m p l o y m e n t s h ifts
a m o n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and t u r n o v e r o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s i n c l u d e d in s u r v e y
sa m p les.
The p e r c e n t i n c r e a s e s , h o w e v e r , are still a ffected by f a c to r s
o t h e r than w a g e i n c r e a s e s .
H i r i n g s , l a y o f f s , and t u r n o v e r m a y a f f e c t an
e s t a b l i s h m e n t a v e r a g e f o r an o c c u p a t i o n w h e n w o r k e r s a r e p a id u n d e r p la n s
p r o v i d i n g a ra n g e o f w a g e r a t e s f o r i n d iv id u a l j o b s . In p e r i o d s o f i n c r e a s e d
h i r i n g , f o r e x a m p l e , n e w e m p l o y e e s e n t e r at th e b o t t o m o f the r a n g e ,
d e p r e s s i n g the a v e r a g e w it h ou t a ch a n g e in w a g e r a t e s .

com puted

F o r a m o r e d e t a i l e d d e s c r i p t i o n o f the m e t h o d u s e d to c o m p u t e
t h e s e w a g e t r e n d s , s e e " I m p r o v i n g A r e a W a g e S u r v e y I n d e x e s , " M o n th ly
L a b o r R e v i e w , J a n u a r y 1973, pp, 5 2 - 5 7 .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s

T h e p e r c e n t c h a n g e s r e l a t e to w a g e c h a n g e s b e t w e e n the i n d i c a t e d
dates.
W h e n th e t i m e spa n b e t w e e n s u r v e y s is o t h e r than 12 m o n t h s ,
annual r a t e s a r e s h o w n .
(It is a s s u m e d that w a g e s i n c r e a s e at a co n s t a n t
ra te b e t w e e n s u r v e y s . )

T h e i n c i d e n c e o f s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y
w a g e p r o v i s i o n s is s t u d ie d f o r plant w o r k e r s and o f f i c e w o r k e r s .
P la n t
w o r k e r s in c lu d e n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r s and w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s e n g a g e d in
n on o ffic e fun ction s.
( C a f e t e r i a w o r k e r s and r o u t e w o r k e r s a r e e x c l u d e d
in m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , but i n c l u d e d in n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s . )
O f f i c e w o r k e r s in c lu d e n ons upe r v i s o r y w o r k e r s and w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s
p e r fo r m in g c l e r i c a l o r related fun ction s.
L e a d w o r k e r s and t r a i n e e s a r e
in clu d ed am ong n o n s u p e r v is o r y w o r k e r s .
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , e x e c u t i v e , and
p r o f e s s i o n a l e m p l o y e e s and c o n s t r u c t i o n w o r k e r s u t i l i z e d as s e p a r a t e w o r k
f o r c e s a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m b o th the plant and o f f i c e w o r k e r c a t e g o r i e s .

O c c u p a t i o n s u s e d to c o m p u t e w a g e t r e n d s a r e :
O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ( m e n and
w om en):
S ecretaries
Stenographers, general
Sten ograp h ers, sen ior
T y p i s t s , c l a s s e s A and B
F ile c le r k s , c la s s e s A,
B , and C
M essengers
O rder clerk s, cla sses A
and B
A ccou ntin g c le r k s ,
c l a s s e s A and B
B ook k eepin g-m a ch in e
o p e r a to rs , class B
P a y r o ll clerks
Keypunch o p e r a t o r s ,
c l a s s e s A and B
T abulating-m achin e
o p e r a to rs , cla ss B

E l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g
( m e n and w o m e n ) :
C om puter system s
analy sts, cla s s e s
A , B , and C




E l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g
( m e n and w o m e n ) —
C o n tin u e d
Com puter p r o g ra m m e rs ,
c l a s s e s A , B , and C
C om puter o p e r a to rs,
c l a s s e s A , B , and C

M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s ( ta b le B - l ) . M i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s
f o r o f f i c e w o r k e r s r e l a t e o n l y to th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s v i s i t e d . B e c a u s e o f the
o p t i m u m s a m p l i n g t e c h n i q u e s u s e d and the p r o b a b i l i t y that l a r g e e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t s a r e m o r e l i k e l y th an s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s to h ave f o r m a l e n t r a n c e
r a t e s a b o v e the s u b c l e r i c a l l e v e l , the t a b l e is m o r e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e o f p o l i c i e s
in m e d i u m and l a r g e e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .

I n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s (m e n and
w om en ):
R e g is t e r e d in du strial
nurses

Sh ift d i f f e r e n t i a l s — m a n u f a c t u r i n g ( ta b le B - 2 ) .
Data w e r e c o l l e c t e d
on p o l i c i e s o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g e s t a b l i s h m e n t s r e g a r d i n g pa y d i f f e r e n t i a l s f o r
plant w o r k e r s o n la te s h i f t s .
E s t a b l i s h m e n t s c o n s i d e r e d as having p o l i c i e s
a r e t h o s e w h i c h (1) h av e p r o v i s i o n s in w r i t i n g c o v e r i n g the o p e r a t i o n o f late
s h i f t s , o r (2) h av e o p e r a t e d la te s h ift s at any t i m e d u rin g the 12 m o n th s
precedin g a survey.
W h e n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h av e s e v e r a l d i f f e r e n t i a l s w h i c h
v a r y b y j o b , the d i f f e r e n t i a l a p p ly in g to th e m a j o r i t y o f the plant w o r k e r s is
r e c o r d e d . W h e n e s t a b l i s h m e n t s h ave d i f f e r e n t i a l s w h i c h app ly o n ly to c e r t a i n
h o u r s o f w o r k , th e d i f f e r e n t i a l a p p ly in g to the m a j o r i t y o f the shift h o u r s is
r e co r d e d .

S k illed m a in ten a nce (men
and w o m e n ) :
C a r p e n t e rs
E lectrician s
P a in ters
M a ch inists
M ech a nics (m achinery)
M ech anics (m otor veh icle)
P ip efitters
T o o l and die m a k e r s

F o r p u r p o s e s o f th is s tu d y , a la te s h ift i s e i t h e r a s e c o n d ( e v e n in g )
s hif t w h i c h e n ds at o r n e a r m i d n i g h t o r a t h i r d (night) s hif t w h i c h s t a r t s at o r
n ear midnight.

U n s k i l l e d plant ( m e n and
w om en ):
J a n i t o r s , p o r t e r s , and
cle a n e rs
M a t e r i a l h an dlin g l a b o r e r s

D i f f e r e n t i a l s f o r s e c o n d and t h i r d s h if t s a r e s u m m a r i z e d s e p a r a t e l y
f o r (1) e s t a b l i s h m e n t p o l i c i e s (an e s t a b l i s h m e n t ' s d i f f e r e n t i a l s a r e w e i g h t e d by

32

all plant workers in the establishment at the time of the survey) and (2)
effective practices (an establishment's differentials are weighted by plant
workers employed on the specified shift at the time of the survey).
Scheduled weekly hours; paid holidays; paid vacations; and health,
insurance, and pension plans. Provisions which apply to a majority of the
plant or office workers in an establishment are considered to apply to all
plant or office workers in the establishment; a practice or provision is
considered nonexistent when it applies to less than a majority. Holidays;
vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans are considered applicable
to employees currently eligible for the benefits as well as to employees who
will eventually become eligible.
Scheduled weekly hours and days (table B -3 ). Scheduled weekly
hours and days refer to the number of hours and days per week which full­
time first (day) shift workers are expected to work, whether paid for at
straight-time or overtime rates.
Paid holidays (table B -4). Holidays are included only if they
are granted annually on a formal basis (provided for in written form or
established by custom) and employees are paid for the time off. They are
included even though in a particular year they fall on a nonworkday and
employees are not granted another day off.
Data are tabulated to show the percent of workers who (1) are granted
specific numbers of whole and half holidays and (2) are granted specified
amounts of total holiday time (whole and half holidays are aggregated).
Paid vacations (table B -5 ). Establishments report their method of
calculating vacation pay (time basis, percent of annual earnings, flat-sum
payment, etc.) and the amount of vacation pay granted. Only basic formal
plans are reported. Vacation bonuses, vacation-savings plans, and "extended"
or "sabbatical" benefits beyond basic plans are excluded.
For tabulating vacation pay granted, all provisions are expressed
on a time basis. Vacation pay calculated on other than a time basis is
converted to its equivalent time period. Two percent of annual earnings,
for example, is tabulated as 1 week's vacation pay.
Also, provisions after each specified length of service are related
to all plant or office workers in an establishment regardless of length of
service. Vacation plans commonly provide for larger amount of vacation pay
as service lengthens. Counts of plant or office workers by length of service
were not obtained. The tabulations of vacation pay granted presents, there­
fore, statistical measures of these provisions rather than proportions of
workers actually receiving specific benefits.
Health, insurance, and pension plans (table B -6 ). Health, insurance,
and pension plans include plans for which the employer pays either all or
part of the cost. The cost may be (1) underwritten by a commercial
insurance company or nonprofit organization, (2) covered by a union fund to



which the employer has contributed, or (3) borne directly by the employer
out of operating funds or a fund set aside to cover the cost. A plan is
included even though a majority of the employees in an establishment do not
choose to participate in it because they are required to bear part of its cost
(provided the choice to participate is available or will eventually become
available to a majority). Legally required plans such as social security, rail­
road retirement, workers' disability compensation, and temporary disability
insurance3 are excluded.
Life insurance includes formal plains providing indemnity (usually
through an insurance policy) in case of death of the covered worker.
Accidental death and dismemberment is limited to plains which
provide benefit payments in case of death or loss of limb or sight as a
direct result of an accident.
Sickness and accident insurance includes only those plans which
provide that predetermined cash payments be made directly to employees
who lose time from work because of illness or injury, e.g., $50 a week for
up to 26 weeks of disability.
Sick leave plans are limited to formal plans4 which provide for
continuing an employee's pay during absence from work because of illness.
Data collected distinguish between (1) plans which provide full pay with no
waiting period, and (2) plans which either provide partial pay or require a
waiting period.
Long-term disability insurance plans provide payments to totally
disabled employees upon the expiration of their paid sick leave and/or sick­
ness and accident insurance, or after a predetermined period of disability
(typically 6 months). Payments are made until the end of the disability, a
maximum age, or eligibility for retirement benefits. Full or partial pay­
ments are almost always reduced by social security, workers' disability
compensation, and private pension benefits payable to the disabled employee.
Hospitalization, surgical, and medical insurance plans reported
in these surveys provide full or partial payment for basic services rendered.
3 Temporary disability insurance which provides benefits to covered workers disabled by injury or illness
which is not work-connected is mandatory under State laws in California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode
Island. Establishment plans which meet only the legal requirements are excluded from these data, but those
under which (1) employers contribute more than is legally required or (2) benefits exceed those specified in the
State law are included. In Rhode Island, benefits are paid out of a State fund to which only employees
contribute. In each of the other three States, benefits are paid either from a State fund or through a private plan:
State fund financing: In California, only employees contribute to the State fund; in New Jersey, employees
and employers contribute; in New York, employees contribute up to a specified maximum and employers
pay the difference between the employees' share and the total contribution required.
Private plan financing: In California and New Jersey, employees cannot be required to contribute more
than they would if they were covered by the State fund; in New York, employees can agree to contribute
more if the State mles that the additional contribution is commensurate with the benefit provided.
Federal legislation (Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act) provides temporary disability insurance benefits
to railroad workers for illness or injury, whether work-connected or not. The legislation requires that employers
bear the entire cost of the insurance.
4 An establishment is considered as having a formal plan if it specifies at least the minimum number of
days of sick leave available to each employee. Such a plan need not be written, but informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.

Hospitalization insurance covers hospital room and board and may cover
other hospital expenses. Surgical insurance covers surgeons' fees. Medical
insurance covers doctors' fees for home, office, or hospital calls. Plans
restricted to post-operative medical care or a doctor's care for minor
ailments at a worker's place of employment are not considered to be
medical insurance.

"deductible" (e.g., $ 50) be met before benefits begin, (2) has a coinsurance
feature that requires the insured to pay a portion (e.g., 20 percent) of
certain expenses, and (3) has a specified dollar maximum of benefits (e.g.,
$ 10, 000 a year).

Major medical insurance coverage applies to services which go
beyond the basic services covered under hospitalization, surgical, and
medical insurance. Major medical insurance typically (1) requires that a

Retirement pension plains provide for regular payments to the retiree
for life. Included are deferred profit-sharing plans which provide the option
of purchasing a lifetime annuity.




Dental insurance plans provide normal dental service benefits,
usually for fillings, extractions, and X-rays. Plans which provide benefits
only for oral surgery or repairing accident damage are not reported.

34

Appendix table 1. Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied
in Kansas City, Mo.—Kans.,1 September 1976
Workers in establishments

Number of establishments
employment
in establish­
ments in scope
of study

Industry division2

Within scope of study
Within scope
of study3

Studied
Total4

Studied
Number

Percent

Full-time
plant workers

Full-time
office workers

Total4

ALL ESTABLISHMENTS
ALL DIVISIONS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------TRANSPORTATION. COMMUNICATION, AND
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES* -------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ------SERVICES8 ------------------------------------

-

1,121

237

261,245

100

144,808

49,566

144,543

50
-

352
769

92
145

99,499
161,746

38
62

69,058
75,750

12,081
37,485

63,333
81,210

SO
50
50
50
50

113
153
222
137
144

36
19
31
23
36

42,149
22,186
48,867
23,996
24,548

16
8
19
9
9

19,977
(
6)
31,265

8,632
.(
6)
3,799
(
6)
(
6)

32,834
6,223
22,046
8,749
11,358

(7 )

(6)

LARGE ESTABLISHMENTS
ALL DIVISIONS ----------------------------MANUFACTURING --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------- — ------ -----------TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, AND
OTHER PUBLIC UTILITIES* -------------------WHOLESALE TRADE ---------------------------RETAIL TRADE ------------------------------f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and real e st at e
------SERVICES8 -----------------------------------

92

77

126.924

100

68,691

24,756

114,057

500
-

26
66

25
52

49,099
77,825

39
61

33,870
34,821

6,537
18,219

48,588
65,469

500
500
500
500
500

16
9
23
10
8

16
6
15
9
6

28,976
6,486
27,736
7,214
7,413

23
5
22
6
6

6,732

16,584
(7)
(6)

28,976
4,575
19,398
6,407
6,113

-

13,655
(6 )

(*)

2,631
(*)
(6 )

1 T h e K a n sa s C ity Standard M e tr o p o lita n S ta tis tic a l A r e a , as d efined b y the O ffic e o f M a n a g em en t and Budget throu gh F e b r u a r y 19 7 4 , c o n s is t s o f C a s s , C la y , J ack son ,
M o .; and Johnson and W yan dotte C o u n tie s, K a n s . T h e "w o r k e r s w ithin scope o f s tu d y " e s t im a t e s shown in th is ta b le p ro v id e a r e a so n a b ly a c c u r a te d e sc r ip tio n o f the s iz e and
fo r c e in clu d ed in the s u r v e y . E s tim a te s a r e n ot intended, h o w e v e r , fo r c o m p a r iso n with o th e r em p lo y m e n t in d e x es to m e a s u r e em p lo y m e n t tre n d s o r le v e ls sin ce (1) planning
e sta b lish m e n t data co m p ile d c o n sid e r a b ly in ad vance o f the p a y r o ll p erio d stud ied , and (2) s m a ll e s ta b lis h m e n ts a r e exclu d ed f r o m the sc o p e o f the su rv e y .
2 T h e 1967 ed ition o f the Standard In d u str ia l C la s s ific a tio n M an ual w as u se d to c la s s i f y e sta b lis h m e n ts b y in d u str y d iv is io n .
3 In clu d es a ll e sta b lish m e n ts w ith to ta l e m p lo y m e n t at o r ab ove the m in im u m lim ita tio n . A l l ou tle ts (within the a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in in d u str ie s su ch as tra d e , fin a n c e,

P la tte , and R a y C o u n tie s,
c o m p o sitio n o f the la b o r
o f w age su rv e y s r e q u ir e s

auto re p a ir s e r v ic e , and

motion picture theaters are considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes executive, professional, part-time, and other workers excluded from the separate plant and office categories.
5 A b b r e v ia te d to "p u b lic u t i li t i e s " in the A - and B - s e r i e s t a b le s . T a x ic a b s and s e r v ic e s in cid en ta l to w a te r tra n sp o r ta tio n a re ex clu d e d . The K a n sa s C ity tr a n sit s y s t e m is m u n ic ip a lly op erated
and i s ex clu d ed f r o m the scop e o f the su r v e y .
6 T h is d iv isio n is r e p r e se n te d in e s t im a t e s fo r " a l l i n d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g " in the A - s e r i e s t a b le s , and fo r " a l l i n d u s t r ie s " in the B - s e r i e s t a b le s . S ep a ra te p r e se n ta tio n o f data is
not m ad e fo r one o r m o r e o f the follow in g r e a s o n s :
(1) E m p lo y m e n t is too s m a ll to p r o v id e enough data to m e r it se p a r a te study, (2) the sa m p le w as n ot d esig n ed in itia lly to p e r m it sep a ra te
p r e se n ta tio n , (3) resp o n se w as in su fficie n t o r inadequate to p e r m it sep a r a te p r e se n ta tio n , and (4) th e re i s p o s s ib ility o f d is c lo s u r e of in divid u al e sta b lis h m e n t d ata.
7 W o r k e r s f r o m this en tire d iv isio n a r e r e p r e se n te d in e s t im a t e s fo r " a l l i n d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g " in the A - s e r i e s t a b le s , but f r o m the r e a l e sta te p o rtio n on ly in e s t im a t e s fo r " a l l
in d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c tu r in g " in the B - s e r i e s t a b le s .
S ep a ra te p r e se n ta tio n of data is n ot m ad e fo r one o r m o r e of the r e a s o n s given in footn ote 6 .
8 H o te ls and m o t e l s ; la u n d ries and o th er p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u to m o b ile r e p a ir , r en ta l, and p a rk in g ; m o tio n p ic t u r e s ; n on p rofit m e m b e r s h ip o rg a n iza tio n s (exclu din g r e lig io u s
and c h a r ita b le o r g a n iz a tio n s ); and en gin eerin g and a r c h ite c tu r a l s e r v i c e s .

In d u str ia l c o m p o sitio n in m an u factu rin g

L a b o r -m a n a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t c o v e r a g e

A lm o s t tw o -fifth s of the w o r k e r s w ithin sc o p e o f the s u r v e y in the K a n sa s C ity a r e a
w e r e em p lo y e d in m an u factu rin g f i r m s .
The follow in g p r e s e n t s the m a jo r in d u str y grou ps
and s p e c ific in d u str ie s as a p e r c e n t o f a ll m an u fac tu rin g:
In d u stry grou ps

S p e cific in d u str ie s

E l e c t r i c a l eq u ipm en t and
s u p p l i e s ____________________________ 18
P rin tin g and p u b lis h in g ___________ 12
T r a n sp o r ta tio n eq u ip m en t________ 12
F o o d and k in d red p r o d u c ts ______ 10
M a c h in e r y , ex ce p t e l e c t r i c a l _ 9
_
C h e m ic a ls and a llie d p rod u cts _ 6
F a b r ic a te d m e t a l p r o d u c ts ______ 6
P r im a r y m e ta l in d u s t r ie s _________ 6
A p p a r e l and o th er textile
p r o d u c t s ____________________________
5
P a p e r and a llie d p r o d u c ts ________ 5

The follow in g tabu lation show s the p e r c e n t o f f u l l-t im e plant and o ffic e w o r k e r s
e m p lo y ed in e sta b lis h m e n ts in the K a n sa s C ity a r e a in w hich a union c o n tra ct o r c o n tr a c ts
c o v e r e d a m a jo r it y o f the w o r k e r s in the r e s p e c tiv e c a t e g o r ie s , S ep te m b e r 19 76 :

M o to r v e h ic le s and
e q u ip m e n t _________________________ 11
C om m u n ic a tio n eq u ip m en t______ 8
E le c t r o n ic com p on en ts and
a c c e s s o r i e s ________________________ 7
G r e e tin g c a r d p u b lish in g ________ 6

P lan t w o r k e r s
A l l i n d u s t r ie s ______________________
M a n u fa c tu r in g __________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g _____________
P u b lic u t i l i t i e s _____________
R e ta il t r a d e _________________

13
1
16
61
12

A n e sta b lis h m e n t i s c o n sid e r e d to h ave a c o n tr a ct c o v e r in g a ll plant o r o ffic e w o r k e r s
if a m a j o r it y o f su ch w o r k e r s is c o v e r e d by a la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t a g r e e m e n t.
T h e r e fo r e ,
a ll o th er p lant o r o ffic e w o r k e r s a r e e m p lo y ed in e s ta b lis h m e n ts that eith er do not have
la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t c o n tr a c ts in e ffe c t , o r h a v e c o n tr a c ts that ap ply to fe w e r than h a lf of
th e ir plant o r o ffic e w o r k e r s .
E s tim a te s a r e not n e c e s s a r ily r e p r e se n ta tiv e o f the extent
to w hich a ll w o r k e r s in the a r e a m a y be c o v e r e d b y the p r o v is io n s o f la b o r -m a n a g e m e n t
a g r e e m e n t s , b e c a u se s m a l l e s ta b lis h m e n ts a r e exclu d ed and the in d u str ia l scop e o f the su rv e y
is lim ite d .

T h is in fo rm a tio n i s b a se d on e s tim a te s of to ta l em p lo y m e n t d er iv e d f r o m u n iv e r se
m a t e r ia ls c o m p ile d b e fo r e a c tu a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r tio n s in v a r io u s in d u str y d iv isio n s m a y
d iffe r f r o m p r o p o r tio n s b a se d on the r e s u lt s o f the su r v e y as shown in appendix table 1.




Office workers

71
82
61
99
43

35




Appendix B.

Occupational Descriptions

T h e p r i m a r y p u r p o s e o f p r e p a r i n g j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s f o r the B u r e a u ' s w a g e s u r v e y s is to a s s i s t its
f i e l d s t a f f in c l a s s i f y i n g in to a p p r o p r i a t e o c c u p a t i o n s w o r k e r s w h o a r e e m p l o y e d u n d e r a v a r i e t y o f p a y r o l l
t i t l e s and d i f f e r e n t w o r k a r r a n g e m e n t s f r o m e s t a b l i s h m e n t to e s t a b l i s h m e n t and f r o m a r e a to a r e a . T h is
p e r m i t s the g r o u p in g o f o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e r a t e s r e p r e s e n t i n g c o m p a r a b l e j o b c o n te n t.
B e c a u s e o f th is
e m p h a s i s on i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t and i n t e r a r e a c o m p a r a b i l i t y o f o c c u p a t i o n a l co n t e n t , the B u r e a u ' s j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s m a y d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m t h o s e in u se in i n d iv id u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s o r t h o s e p r e p a r e d f o r
o t h e r p u r p o s e s . In a p p ly in g t h e s e j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s , the B u r e a u ' s f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s a r e i n s t r u c t e d to e x c l u d e
w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s ; a p p r e n t i c e s ; l e a r n e r s ; b e g i n n e r s ; t r a i n e e s ; and h a n d i c a p p e d , p a r t - t i m e , t e m p o r a r y ,
and p r o b a t i o n a r y w o r k e r s .

OFFICE
SECRETARY

S E C R E T A R Y — C o ntin ued

A s s i g n e d as p e r s o n a l s e c r e t a r y , n o r m a l l y to on e in d iv id u a l. M a i n ­
ta in s a c l o s e and h ig h ly r e s p o n s i v e r e l a t i o n s h i p to th e d a y - t o - d a y w o r k o f
the s u p e r v i s o r . W o r k s f a i r l y in d e p e n d e n t ly r e c e i v i n g a m i n i m u m o f d e t a ile d
s u p e r v i s i o n and g u id a n c e . P e r f o r m s v a r i e d c l e r i c a l and s e c r e t a r i a l d u t i e s ,
u s u a l l y i n c lu d in g m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g :

d.

e . R e v i e w s c o r r e s p o n d e n c e , m e m o r a n d u m s , an d r e p o r t s p r e p a r e d b y
o th e r s fo r the s u p e r v i s o r 's
s i g n a t u r e to a s s u r e p r o c e d u r a l an d t y p o g r a p h i c
accuracy;

a. R e c e i v e s t e l e p h o n e c a l l s , p e r s o n a l c a l l e r s , and i n c o m i n g m a i l ,
a n s w e r s ro u tin e i n q u i r i e s , and r o u t e s t e c h n i c a l i n q u i r i e s to the p r o p e r
pe r s o n s ;
b.
c.
in stru cted;

E sta b lish es,




f.

m a i n t a i n s , and r e v i s e s the s u p e r v i s o r ' s f i l e s ;

M a in ta in s th e s u p e r v i s o r ' s

c a l e n d a r and m a k e s

a p p o in t m e n t s

R e l a y s m e s s a g e s f r o m s u p e r v i s o r to s u b o r d i n a t e s ;

P erform s

s t e n o g r a p h i c an d t y p i n g w o r k .

M a y a l s o p e r f o r m o t h e r c l e r i c a l and s e c r e t a r i a l t a s k s o f c o m p a r a b l e
na tu re and d iffic u lt y .
T h e w o r k t y p i c a lly r e q u i r e s k n o w le d g e of o ffic e routin e
an d u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n , p r o g r a m s , a n d p r o c e d u r e s r e l a t e d to
the w o r k o f the s u p e r v i s o r .

as

B e g in n i n g w ith c a l e n d a r y e a r 1976 s u r v e y s , the B u r e a u has g r o u p e d o c c u p a t i o n s s tu d ie d in its
a r e a w a g e s u r v e y s into j o b f a m i l i e s in o r d e r to p r e s e n t i n f o r m a t i o n o n r e l a t e d o c c u p a t i o n s in s e q u e n c e .
J o b f a m i l i e s h av e not b e e n t i t l e d , h o w e v e r , s i n c e do in g s o m i g h t h a v e a d d e d e x t r a n e o u s e l e m e n t s t o the
jo b m atching p r o c e s s .
T h e B u r e a u has a l s o r e v i s e d s e v e r a l o c c u p a t i o n a l t i t l e s .
u s u a l w o r d o r d e r and a r e m o r e d e s c r i p t i v e o f the s u r v e y j o b s .

The r e v is e d titles m o r e n early r e fle ct

R e v i s e d o c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s a r e b e in g i n t r o d u c e d th is y e a r f o r : O r d e r c l e r k ; p a y r o l l c l e r k ;
s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r ; s w i t c h b o a r d o p e r a t o r - r e c e p t i o n i s t ; t r a n s c r i b i n g - m a c h i n e t y p i s t ( p r e v i o u s l y t i t le d
t r a n s c r i b i n g - m a c h i n e o p e r a t o r ) ; m a c h i n e - t o o l o p e r a t o r ( t o o l r o o m ) ; and t o o l and die m a k e r . T h e y a r e the
r e s u l t o f the B u r e a u ' s p o l i c y o f p e r i o d i c a l l y r e v i e w i n g a r e a w a g e s u r v e y o c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s in
o r d e r to ta ke in to a c c o u n t t e c h n o l o g i c a l d e v e l o p m e n t s and to c l a r i f y d e s c r i p t i o n s s o that t h e y a r e m o r e
r e a d i l y u n d e r s t o o d and u n i f o r m l y i n t e r p r e t e d . E v e n th o u gh th e r e v i s e d d e s c r i p t i o n s r e f l e c t b a s i c a l l y the
s a m e o c c u p a t i o n s as p r e v i o u s l y d e f i n e d , s o m e r e p o r t i n g c h a n g e s m a y o c c u r b e c a u s e o f the r e v i s i o n s .
37

S E C R E T A R Y — C on tin u ed

S E C R E T A R Y — C ontinued

E xclusions

Not a ll
ch aracteristics.
a r e as f o l l o w s :

p o s i t i o n s that a r e t i t l e d " s e c r e t a r y " p o s s e s s the a b o v e
E x a m p l e s o f p o s i t i o n s w h i c h a r e e x c l u d e d f r o m th e d e f in it io n

a. P o s i t i o n s
d es crib e d above;
b.

w hich

do not

m e e t th e

"p erson a l"

secretary

concept

4 . S e c r e t a r y t o th e h e a d o f an i n d i v i d u a l p la n t, f a c t o r y , e t c . ( o r
o t h e r e q u iv a le n t l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) th at e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; o r

of p r o ­

5. S e c r e t a r y t o th e h e a d o f a l a r g e and i m p o r t a n t o r g a n i z a t i o n a l
s e g m e n t ( e . g . , a m i d d l e m a n a g e m e n t s u p e r v i s o r o f an o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t
o f t e n i n v o l v i n g as m a n y as s e v e r a l h u n d r e d p e r s o n s ) o r a c o m p a n y that
e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .

S t e n o g r a p h e r s not f u l l y t r a i n e d in s e c r e t a r i a l - t y p e d u tie s ;

c . S t e n o g r a p h e r s s e r v i n g as o f f i c e
fe ssio n a l, tech n ica l, o r m a n a g eria l p e r so n s ;

assistants

d. S e c r e t a r y p o s i t i o n s in w h i c h the du tie s
m o r e r o u tin e o r s u b s t a n t i a l l y m o r e c o m p l e x and
c h a r a c t e r i z e d in the d e f in it io n ;

to a g r o u p

3. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d , i m m e d i a t e l y b e l o w th e o f f i c e r l e v e l , o v e r
e i t h e r a m a j o r c o r p o r a t e w i d e f u n c t io n a l a c t i v i t y ( e . g . , m a r k e t i n g , r e s e a r c h ,
o p e r a t i o n s , i n d u s t r i a l r e l a t i o n s , e t c . ) ojr a m a j o r g e o g r a p h i c o r o r g a n i z a t i o n a l
s e g m e n t ( e . g . , a r e g i o n a l h e a d q u a r t e r s ; a m a j o r d i v i s i o n ) o f a c o m p a n y that
e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 but f e w e r th an 25 , 000 e m p l o y e e s ; o r

a r e e i t h e r s u b s t a n t ia lly
r e s p o n s i b l e than t h o s e

e. A s s i s t a n t - t y p e p o s i t i o n s w h i c h i n v o l v e m o r e d if f i c u l t o r m o r e
re spon sib le tech n ica l, a d m inistrative, su p e rv is o ry , o r sp e cia liz e d c le r ic a l
d u tie s w h i c h a r e n ot t y p i c a l o f s e c r e t a r i a l w o r k .
N O T E : T h e t e r m " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r , " u s e d in the l e v e l d e f i n i t i o n s
fo llo w in g , r e f e r s to th o s e o f fic i a l s who have a sign ifican t c o r p o r a te w id e
p o l i c y m a k i n g r o l e w ith r e g a r d to m a j o r c o m p a n y a c t i v i t i e s . T h e t i t le " v i c e
p r e s i d e n t , " th o u g h n o r m a l l y i n d i c a t i v e o f th is r o l e , d o e s not in a ll c a s e s
id e n t i f y s u c h p o s i t i o n s . V i c e p r e s i d e n t s w h o s e p r i m a r y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y is to
a ct p e r s o n a l l y o n i n d i v i d u a l c a s e s o r t r a n s a c t i o n s ( e . g . , a p p r o v e o r deny
in d iv id u a l l o a n o r c r e d i t a c t i o n s ; a d m i n i s t e r i n d iv id u a l t r u s t a c c o u n t s ; d i r e c t l y
s u p e r v i s e a c l e r i c a l s t a f f) a r e n o t c o n s i d e r e d to b e " c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r s " f o r
p u r p o s e s o f a p p ly in g th e f o l l o w i n g l e v e l d e f i n i t i o n s .
C lass A
1 . S e c r e t a r y t o th e c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y
that e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 100 but f e w e r than 5, 000 p e r s o n s ; o r

2. S e c r e t a r y t o a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r th an the c h a i r m a n o f the
b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t ) o f a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s , in a ll, o v e r 5 , 0 0 0 but
f e w e r than 25 , 000 p e r s o n s ; o r
3. S e c r e t a r y to the h e a d , i m m e d i a t e l y b e l o w th e c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r
l e v e l , o f a m a j o r s e g m e n t o r s u b s i d i a r y o f a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s , in a ll,
o v e r 2 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s .*
1

C lass B
1. S e c r e t a r y to th e c h a i r m a n o f the b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t o f a c o m p a n y
that e m p l o y s , in a l l , f e w e r than 100 p e r s o n s ; o r

C lass C
1. S e c r e t a r y to an e x e c u t i v e o r m a n a g e r i a l p e r s o n w h o s e r e s p o n ­
s i b i l i t y i s n o t e q u iv a le n t to o n e o f th e s p e c i f i c l e v e l s it u a t io n s in the d e f in it io n
f o r c l a s s B , but w h o s e o r g a n i z a t i o n a l unit n o r m a l l y n u m b e r s at l e a s t s e v e r a l
d o z e n e m p l o y e e s and is u s u a l l y d i v i d e d in to o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s e g m e n t s w h i c h
a r e o f t e n , in tu r n , f u r t h e r s u b d i v i d e d . In s o m e c o m p a n i e s , this l e v e l i n ­
c l u d e s a w i d e ra n g e o f o r g a n i z a t i o n a l e c h e l o n s ; in o t h e r s , o n l y o n e o r t w o ; o r
2. S e c r e t a r y to th e h e a d o f an i n d i v i d u a l p la n t, f a c t o r y , e t c . ( o r
o t h e r e a u iv a le n t l e v e l o f o f f i c i a l ) that e m p l o y s , in a l l , f e w e r th an 5 , 0 0 0
persons.
C lass D
1. S e c r e t a r y to th e s u p e r v i s o r o r h e a d
unit ( e . g . , f e w e r th an ab out 25 o r 30 p e r s o n s ) ; o^r

o f a sm a ll org a n izational

2. S e c r e t a r y t o a n o n s u p e r v i s o r y s t a f f s p e c i a l i s t , p r o f e s s i o n a l e m ­
p lo y e e , a dm inistrative o f f i c e r , o r assistant, sk illed te c h n icia n , o r expert.
(NOTE:
M a n y c o m p a n i e s a s s i g n s t e n o g r a p h e r s , r a t h e r th an s e c r e t a r i e s as
d e s c r i b e d a b o v e , to th is l e v e l o f s u p e r v i s o r y o r n o n s u p e r v i s o r y w o r k e r . )
STENOGRAPHER
P r i m a r y duty i s to ta k e d i c t a t i o n u s in g s h o r t h a n d , and to t r a n s c r i b e
th e d i c t a t i o n .
M a y a l s o ty p e f r o m w r i t t e n c o p y .
May operate fr o m a
sten ograph ic po o l.
M a y o c c a s i o n a l l y t r a n s c r i b e f r o m v o i c e r e c o r d i n g s (if
p r i m a r y duty is t r a n s c r i b i n g f r o m r e c o r d i n g s , s e e T r a n s c r i b i n g - M a c h i n e
Typist).
N O T E : T h is j o b i s d i s t i n g u i s h e d f r o m that o f a s e c r e t a r y in that a
s e c r e t a r y n o r m a l l y w o r k s in a c o n f i d e n t i a l r e l a t i o n s h i p w ith o n ly on e m a n a g e r
o r e x e c u t i v e and p e r f o r m s m o r e r e s p o n s i b l e and d i s c r e t i o n a r y t a s k s as
d e s c r i b e d in the s e c r e t a r y j o b d e f in it io n .
Stenographer, G eneral

2. S e c r e t a r y to a c o r p o r a t e o f f i c e r ( o t h e r than the c h a i r m a n o f the
b o a r d o r p r e s i d e n t ) o f a c o m p a n y that e m p l o y s , in a l l , o v e r 100 but f e w e r
tha n 5 , 0 0 0 p e r s o n s ; o r




keep

D i c t a t i o n i n v o l v e s a n o r m a l ro u tin e v o c a b u l a r y . M a y m a in ta in f i l e s ,
s i m p l e r e c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t i v e l y r o u tin e c l e r i c a l t a s k s .

S T E N O G R A P H E R — Continued

F I L E C L E R K — Continued

S t e n o g r a p h e r , S e n io r
D ic t a t io n i n v o l v e s a v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u l a r y
s u c h as in l e g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s on s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h . M a y a l s o s e t up
and m a in ta in f i l e s , k e e p r e c o r d s , e t c .

C l a s s B . S o r t s , c o d e s , and f i l e s u n c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l b y s i m p l e
( s u b j e c t m a t t e r ) h e a d in g s o r p a r t l y c l a s s i f i e d m a t e r i a l by f i n e r s u b h e a d in g s .
P r e p a r e s s i m p l e r e l a t e d in d e x and c r o s s - r e f e r e n c e a id s .
As r e q u e s t e d ,
l o c a t e s c l e a r l y i d e n t i f i e d m a t e r i a l in f i l e s and f o r w a r d s m a t e r i a l . M a y p e r ­
f o r m r e l a t e d c l e r i c a l ta s k s r e q u i r e d to m a in t a in and s e r v i c e f i l e s .

OR
P e r f o r m s s t e n o g r a p h i c d u tie s r e q u i r i n g s i g n i f i c a n t l y g r e a t e r i n ­
d e p e n d e n c e and r e s p o n s i b i l i t y than s t e n o g r a p h e r , g e n e r a l , as e v i d e n c e d b y
the f o l l o w i n g :
W o r k r e q u i r e s a high d e g r e e o f s t e n o g r a p h i c s p e e d and
a c c u r a c y ; a t h o r o u g h w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e o f g e n e r a l b u s i n e s s and o f f i c e p r o ­
c e d u r e ; and o f the s p e c i f i c b u s i n e s s o p e r a t i o n s , o r g a n i z a t i o n , p o l i c i e s ,
procedures, f i l e s ,
w o r k f l o w , e tc .
U s e s this k n o w l e d g e in p e r f o r m i n g
s t e n o g r a p h i c d u tie s and r e s p o n s i b l e c l e r i c a l ta s k s s u c h as m a in ta in in g
f o l l o w u p f i l e s ; a s s e m b l i n g m a t e r i a l f o r r e p o r t s , m e m o r a n d u m s , and l e t t e r s ;
c o m p o s i n g s i m p l e l e t t e r s f r o m g e n e r a l i n s t r u c t i o n s ; r e a d in g and rou tin g
i n c o m i n g m a i l ; and a n s w e r i n g r o u tin e q u e s t i o n s , e t c .
T R A N SC R IB IN G -M A C H IN E TY PIS T
P r i m a r y du ty is to ty p e c o p y o f v o i c e r e c o r d e d d i c t a t i o n w h i c h d o e s
not i n v o l v e v a r i e d t e c h n i c a l o r s p e c i a l i z e d v o c a b u l a r y s u c h as that u s e d in
l e g a l b r i e f s o r r e p o r t s on s c i e n t i f i c r e s e a r c h . M a y a ls o ty pe f r o m w r it t e n
c o p y . M a y m a in t a in f i l e s , k e e p s i m p l e r e c o r d s , o r p e r f o r m o t h e r r e l a t i v e l y
ro u tin e c l e r i c a l t a s k s .
(See S t e n o g r a p h e r d e f in it io n f o r w o r k e r s i n v o l v e d
with s h o r t h a n d d ic t a t i o n . )
TYPIST
U s e s a t y p e w r i t e r to m a k e c o p i e s o f v a r i o u s m a t e r i a l s o r to m a k e
out b i l l s a f t e r c a l c u l a t i o n s h av e b e e n m a d e b y a n o t h e r p e r s o n .
May in ­
c lu d e ty pin g o f s t e n c i l s , m a t s , o r s i m i l a r m a t e r i a l s f o r u s e in d u p lic a t in g
processes.
M a y do c l e r i c a l w o r k i n v o l v i n g lit tle s p e c i a l t r a i n i n g , s u c h as
k e e p in g s i m p l e r e c o r d s , f ilin g r e c o r d s and r e p o r t s , o r s o r t i n g and d is t r ib u t in g
incom ing m ail.
C l a s s A. P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g : T y p in g m a t e r i a l
in f in a l f o r m w hen it i n v o l v e s c o m b i n i n g m a t e r i a l f r o m s e v e r a l s o u r c e s ; o r
r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r c o r r e c t s p e l l i n g , s y l l a b i c a t i o n , p u n c tu a t io n , e t c . , o f t e c h ­
n i c a l o r u nusu al w o r d s o r f o r e i g n la n g u a g e m a t e r i a l ; o r p la n nin g la yo u t and
t y p in g o f c o m p l i c a t e d s t a t i s t i c a l t a b l e s to m a in t a in u n i f o r m i t y and b a l a n c e in
s p a c i n g . M a y ty p e r o u tin e f o r m l e t t e r s , v a r y i n g d e t a ils to suit c i r c u m s t a n c e s .
C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s on e o r m o r e o f the f o l l o w i n g : C o p y ty p in g f r o m
r o u g h o r c l e a r d r a f t s ; o r ro u tin e ty pin g o f f o r m s , i n s u r a n c e p o l i c i e s , e t c . ;
o r s e tt in g up s i m p l e s t a n d a r d t a b u la t io n s ; o r c o p y i n g m o r e c o m p l e x t a b le s
a l r e a d y s e t up and s p a c e d p r o p e r l y .
FILE CLERK
F i l e s , c l a s s i f i e s , and r e t r i e v e s m a t e r i a l in an e s t a b l i s h e d filin g
s y s t e m . M a y p e r f o r m c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l t a s k s r e q u i r e d to m a in t a in f i l e s .
P o s i t i o n s a r e c l a s s i f i e d into l e v e l s on the b a s i s o f the f o l l o w i n g d e f i n i t i o n s .
C l a s s A. C l a s s i f i e s and i n d e x e s f i l e m a t e r i a l s u c h as c o r r e s p o n d ­
e n c e , r e p o r t s , t e c h n i c a l d o c u m e n t s , e t c . , in an e s t a b l i s h e d f ilin g s y s t e m
c o n ta in in g a n u m b e r o f v a r i e d s u b j e c t m a t t e r f i l e s .
M a y a l s o f i l e th is
m a teria l.
M a y k e e p r e c o r d s o f v a r i o u s t y p e s in c o n j u n c t i o n with the f i l e s .
M a y le a d a s m a l l g r o u p o f l o w e r l e v e l f i l e c l e r k s .




39

C l a s s C . P e r f o r m s r o u tin e filin g o f m a t e r i a l that has a l r e a d y b e e n
c l a s s i f i e d o r w h i c h is e a s i l y c l a s s i f i e d in a s i m p l e s e r i a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n
system
(e .g ., alphabetical, c h r o n o lo g ic a l, o r n um erical).
As requested,
l o c a t e s r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e m a t e r i a l in f i l e s and f o r w a r d s m a t e r i a l ; and m a y
f i l l out w i t h d r a w a l c h a r g e .
M a y p e r f o r m s i m p l e c l e r i c a l and m a n u a l ta s k s
r e q u i r e d t o m a i n t a i n and s e r v i c e f i l e s .
MESSENGER
P e r f o r m s v a r i o u s r o u tin e d u tie s s u c h as ru nnin g e r r a n d s , o p e r a t i n g
m i n o r o f f i c e m a c h i n e s s u c h as s e a l e r s o r m a i l e r s , o p e n in g and d is t r ib u t in g
m a i l , and o t h e r m i n o r c l e r i c a l w o r k . E x c l u d e p o s i t i o n s that r e q u i r e o p e r a t i o n
o f a m o t o r v e h i c l e as a s i g n i f i c a n t duty.
SW ITCH BOARD O P E R A T O R
O p e r a t e s a t e l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e u s e d w ith a p r i v a t e
b r a n c h e x c h a n g e ( P B X ) s y s t e m to r e l a y i n c o m i n g , o u t g o i n g , and i n t r a s y s t e m
calls.
M a y p r o v i d e i n f o r m a t i o n to c a l l e r s , r e c o r d and t r a n s m i t m e s s a g e s ,
k e e p r e c o r d o f c a l l s p l a c e d and t o l l c h a r g e s . B e s i d e s o p e r a t i n g a t e l e p h o n e
s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e , m a y a l s o ty p e o r p e r f o r m r o u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k
(ty pin g o r ro u tin e c l e r i c a l w o r k m a y o c c u p y the m a j o r p o r t i o n o f the w o r k e r ' s
t i m e , and is u s u a lly p e r f o r m e d w h i le at the s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e ) .
C h ie f o r
le a d o p e r a t o r s in e s t a b l i s h m e n t s e m p l o y i n g m o r e than on e o p e r a t o r a r e
e x c l u d e d . F o r an o p e r a t o r w h o a l s o a c t s as a r e c e p t i o n i s t , s e e S w i t c h b o a r d
O perator-R eceptionist.
SW ITC H B O A R D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
At a
an o p e r a t o r —
w ork in volves
b u s i n e s s and
priate p e r so n
a r r a n g i n g an

s i n g l e - p o s i t i o n t e l e p h o n e s w i t c h b o a r d o r c o n s o l e , a cts b o th as
s e e S w i t c h b o a r d O p e r a t o r — and as a r e c e p t i o n i s t . R e c e p t i o n i s t ' s
s u c h du tie s as g r e e t i n g v i s i t o r s ; d e t e r m i n i n g n a tu r e o f v i s i t o r ' s
p r o v i d i n g a p p r o p r i a t e i n f o r m a t i o n ; r e f e r r i n g v i s i t o r to a p p r o ­
in the o r g a n i z a t i o n o r c o n t a c t in g that p e r s o n by t e l e p h o n e and
a p p o in t m e n t; k e e p i n g a l o g o f v i s i t o r s .

ORDER CLERK
R e c e iv e s w ritten o r v e r b a l c u s t o m e r s ' p u rch a se o r d e r s f o r m a te ria l
o r m e r c h a n d is e fr o m cu sto m e r s o r sales p eop le.
W ork typically in volves
s o m e c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g d u t ie s : Q uotin g p r i c e s ; d e t e r m i n i n g a v a i l a ­
b i l i t y o f o r d e r e d i t e m s and s u g g e s t in g s u b s ti tu te s w hen n e c e s s a r y ; a d v i s in g
e x p e c t e d d e l i v e r y date and m e t h o d o f d e l i v e r y ; r e c o r d i n g o r d e r and c u s t o m e r
i n f o r m a t i o n on o r d e r s h e e t s ; c h e c k i n g o r d e r s h e e t s
f o r a c c u r a c y and
a d e q u a c y o f i n f o r m a t i o n r e c o r d e d ; a s c e r t a i n i n g c r e d i t rating o f c u s t o m e r ;
f u r n i s h i n g c u s t o m e r w ith a c k n o w l e d g e m e n t o f r e c e i p t o f o r d e r ; f o l l o w i n g - u p
to s e e that o r d e r i s d e l i v e r e d by the s p e c i f i e d date o r to let c u s t o m e r know
o f a d e la y in d e l i v e r y ; m a in t a in in g o r d e r f ile ; c h e c k i n g sh ip p in g i n v o i c e
a g a in s t o r i g i n a l o r d e r .

O R D E R C L E R K — C ontinued

B O O K K E E P I N G -M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R

E x c l u d e w o r k e r s p a i d on a c o m m i s s i o n b a s i s o r w h o s e d u tie s i n c lu d e
any o f th e f o l l o w i n g : R e c e i v i n g o r d e r s f o r s e r v i c e s r a t h e r th an f o r m a t e r i a l
o r m e r c h a n d i s e ; p r o v i d i n g c u s t o m e r s w ith c o n s u l t a t i v e a d v i c e u sin g k n o w l e d g e
g a in e d f r o m e n g i n e e r i n g o r e x t e n s i v e t e c h n i c a l t r a i n i n g ; e m p h a s i z i n g s e l l i n g
s k i l l s ; h an d lin g m a t e r i a l o r m e r c h a n d i s e as an i n t e g r a l p a r t o f the j o b .

O p e r a t e s a b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e (w ith o r w ith o u t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y ­
b o a r d ) to k e e p a r e c o r d o f b u s i n e s s t r a n s a c t i o n s .

P osition s
d efin ition s:

are

cla ssified

in to

levels

accord in g

to

the

follow ing

C l a s s A . H a n d le s o r d e r s that i n v o l v e m a k in g ju d g m e n t s s u c h as
c h o o s i n g w h i c h s p e c i f i c p r o d u c t o r m a t e r i a l f r o m th e e s t a b l i s h m e n t ' s p r o d u c t
li n e s w i l l s a t i s f y the c u s t o m e r ' s n e e d s , o r d e t e r m i n i n g the p r i c e to b e q u o t e d
w h e n p r i c i n g i n v o l v e s m o r e th an m e r e l y r e f e r r i n g to a p r i c e l i s t o r m a k in g
so m e sim ple m a th em a tica l calcu la tion s.
C l a s s B . H a n d le s o r d e r s i n v o l v i n g i t e m s w h i c h have r e a d i l y i d e n ­
t i f i e d u s e s and a p p l i c a t i o n s . M a y r e f e r to a c a t a l o g , m a n u f a c t u r e r ' s m a n u a l,
o r s i m i l a r d o c u m e n t to i n s u r e that p r o p e r i t e m i s s u p p lie d o r to v e r i f y
p r ic e o f o r d e r e d item .

ACCOUNTING C L E R K
P e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e a c c o u n t i n g c l e r i c a l t a s k s s u c h as p o s t i n g to
r e g i s t e r s and l e d g e r s ; r e c o n c i l i n g b a nk a c c o u n t s ; v e r i f y i n g the in t e r n a l c o n ­
s i s t e n c y , c o m p l e t e n e s s , and m a t h e m a t i c a l a c c u r a c y o f a c c o u n t in g d o c u m e n t s ;
a s s i g n i n g p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n t i n g d i s t r i b u t i o n c o d e s ; e x a m i n i n g and v e r i f y i n g
f o r c l e r i c a l a c c u r a c y v a rio u s types o f r e p o r t s , lis t s , ca lcu la tio n s, p osting,
e t c . ; o r p r e p a r i n g s i m p l e o r a s s i s t i n g in p r e p a r i n g m o r e c o m p l i c a t e d j o u r n a l
vouchers.
M a y w o r k in e i t h e r a m a n u a l o r a u t o m a t e d a c c o u n t in g s y s t e m .
T h e w o r k r e q u i r e s a k n o w l e d g e o f c l e r i c a l m e t h o d s and o f f i c e
p r a c t i c e s and p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h r e l a t e s to the c l e r i c a l p r o c e s s i n g and r e ­
c o r d i n g o f t r a n s a c t i o n s and a c c o u n t i n g i n f o r m a t i o n .
W it h e x p e r i e n c e , the
w o r k e r t y p i c a l l y b e c o m e s f a m i l i a r w ith th e b o o k k e e p i n g and a c c o u n t i n g t e r m s
and p r o c e d u r e s u s e d in the a s s i g n e d w o r k , but is not r e q u i r e d to h a v e a
k n o w l e d g e o f the f o r m a l p r i n c i p l e s o f b o o k k e e p i n g and a c c o u n t i n g .
P osition s
defin ition s.

are

cla ssified

in to

l e v e l s on

the b a s i s

of

the f o l l o w i n g

C lass A . U nder g e n e ra l s u p e r v is io n , p e r f o r m s accounting c l e r i c a l
o p e r a t i o n s w h i c h r e q u i r e th e a p p l i c a t i o n o f e x p e r i e n c e and ju d g m e n t , f o r
e x a m p le , c le r ic a l ly p r o c e s s in g co m p lic a t e d o r n on rep etitive accounting t r a n s ­
a c t i o n s , s e l e c t i n g a m o n g a s u b s t a n t ia l v a r i e t y o f p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n t in g c o d e s
and c l a s s i f i c a t i o n s , o r t r a c i n g t r a n s a c t i o n s th o u gh p r e v i o u s a c c o u n t i n g a c t i o n s
to d e t e r m i n e s o u r c e o f d i s c r e p a n c i e s .
M ay be a ssiste d by one o r m o r e
c la s s B accou nting c le r k s .
C la ss B . Under c lo s e s u p e r v is io n , follow ing detailed in stru ction s
and s t a n d a r d i z e d p r o c e d u r e s , p e r f o r m s o n e o r m o r e
r o u tin e a c c o u n t in g
c l e r i c a l o p e r a t i o n s , s u c h as p o s t i n g t o l e d g e r s , c a r d s , o r w o r k s h e e t s w h e r e
i d e n t i f i c a t i o n o f i t e m s and l o c a t i o n s o f p o s t i n g s a r e c l e a r l y i n d i c a t e d ; c h e c k ­
ing a c c u r a c y and c o m p l e t e n e s s o f s t a n d a r d i z e d and r e p e t i t i v e r e c o r d s o r
a c c o u n t i n g d o c u m e n t s ; and c o d i n g d o c u m e n t s u s in g a f e w p r e s c r i b e d a c c o u n t ­
ing c o d e s .




C l a s s A . K e e p s a s e t o f r e c o r d s r e q u i r i n g a k n o w l e d g e o f and
e x p e r i e n c e in b a s i c b o o k k e e p i n g p r i n c i p l e s , and f a m i l i a r i t y w ith the s t r u c t u r e
o f the p a r t i c u l a r a c c o u n t i n g s y s t e m u s e d .
D e t e r m i n e s p r o p e r r e c o r d s and
d i s t r i b u t i o n o f d e b it and c r e d i t i t e m s to b e u s e d in e a c h p h a s e o f th e w o r k .
M a y p r e p a r e c o n s o l i d a t e d r e p o r t s , b a l a n c e s h e e t s , and o t h e r r e c o r d s b y hand.
C lass B . K eeps a r e c o r d o f one o r m o r e phases o r sections of a
s e t o f r e c o r d s u s u a lly r e q u i r i n g lit t le k n o w l e d g e o f b a s i c b o o k k e e p i n g . P h a s e s
o r s e c t i o n s i n c l u d e a c c o u n t s p a y a b l e , p a y r o l l , - c u s t o m e r s ' a c c o u n t s (not i n ­
c lu d in g a s i m p l e t y p e o f b i l l i n g d e s c r i b e d u n d e r m a c h i n e b i l l e r ) , c o s t d i s ­
tribu tion , e x p en se distribu tion , in v en tory c o n tr o l, etc. M ay ch eck o r a s sist
in p r e p a r a t i o n o f t r i a l b a l a n c e s and p r e p a r e c o n t r o l s h e e t s f o r the a c c o u n t in g
departm ent.

M ACH INE B I L L E R
P r e p a r e s s t a t e m e n t s , b i l l s , and i n v o i c e s o n a m a c h i n e o t h e r than
an o r d i n a r y o r e l e c t r o m a t i c t y p e w r i t e r . M a y a l s o k e e p r e c o r d s as to b i l l i n g s
o r s h ip p in g c h a r g e s o r p e r f o r m o t h e r c l e r i c a l w o r k i n c i d e n t a l to b i l l i n g
o p e r a t i o n s . F o r w a g e stu dy p u r p o s e s , m a c h i n e b i l l e r s a r e c l a s s i f i e d b y ty p e
o f m a c h i n e , as f o l l o w s :
B illin g -m a c h in e b i l l e r . U ses a s p e c ia l b illin g m ach in e (com bin ation
t y p in g and addin g m a c h i n e ) to p r e p a r e b i l l s and i n v o i c e s f r o m c u s t o m e r s '
p u r c h a s e o r d e r s , i n t e r n a l l y p r e p a r e d o r d e r s , s h ip p in g m e m o r a n d u m s , e t c .
U s u a l l y i n v o l v e s a p p l i c a t i o n o f p r e d e t e r m i n e d d i s c o u n t s and s h ip p in g c h a r g e s
and e n t r y o f n e c e s s a r y e x t e n s i o n s , w h i c h m a y o r m a y not b e c o m p u t e d on
th e b i l l i n g m a c h i n e , and t o t a l s w h i c h a r e a u t o m a t i c a l l y a c c u m u l a t e d by
m a c h i n e . T h e o p e r a t i o n u s u a lly i n v o l v e s a l a r g e n u m b e r o f c a r b o n c o p i e s o f
the b i l l b e i n g p r e p a r e d and is o f t e n d o n e on a f a n f o l d m a c h i n e .
B ook k eepin g-m a ch in e b il l e r .
U s e s a b o o k k e e p i n g m a c h i n e (with o r
w it h ou t a t y p e w r i t e r k e y b o a r d ) t o p r e p a r e c u s t o m e r s ' b i l l s as p a r t o f the
a c c o u n t s r e c e i v a b l e o p e r a t i o n . G e n e r a l l y i n v o l v e s th e s im u l t a n e o u s e n t r y o f
fig u r e s on c u s t o m e r s ' le d g e r r e c o r d . The m a c h in e a u tom a tica lly accu m u la tes
f i g u r e s o n a n u m b e r o f v e r t i c a l c o l u m n s and c o m p u t e s and u s u a lly p r in t s
a u t o m a t i c a l l y th e d e b it o r c r e d i t b a l a n c e s .
D o e s not i n v o l v e a k n o w l e d g e
o f bookkeeping.
W o r k s f r o m u n i f o r m and s t a n d a r d t y p e s o f s a l e s and
credit slips.

P A Y R O L L CLERK
P e r f o r m s th e c l e r i c a l t a s k s n e c e s s a r y to p r o c e s s p a y r o l l s and to
m a in t a in p a y r o l l r e c o r d s . W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : P r o c e s s i n g
w o r k e r s ' tim e o r p r o d u c tio n r e c o r d s ; adjusting w o r k e r s ' r e c o r d s f o r changes
in w a g e r a t e s , s u p p l e m e n t a r y b e n e f i t s , o r t a x d e d u c t i o n s ; e dit in g p a y r o l l
l i s t i n g s a g a in s t s o u r c e r e c o r d s ; t r a c i n g and c o r r e c t i n g e r r o r s in l i s t i n g s ;
and a s s i s t i n g in p r e p a r a t i o n o f p e r i o d i c s u m m a r y p a y r o l l r e p o r t s . In a n o n autom ated p a y r o ll s y s te m , com pu tes w a g es. W ork m a y requ ire a p r a c tic a l
k n o w l e d g e o f g o v e r n m e n t a l r e g u l a t i o n s , c o m p a n y p a y r o l l p o l i c y , o r the
com puter sy stem for p r o ce ss in g p a y rolls.

KEYPUNCH O P E R A T O R

T A B U L A T I N G - M A C H I N E O P E R A T O R — C o n tin u e d

O p e r a t e s a k e y p u n c h m a c h i n e to r e c o r d o r v e r i f y a l p h a b e t i c a n d / o r
n u m e r i c data on ta b u la tin g c a r d s o r on tape.

f r o m th is d e f in it io n a r e w o r k i n g s u p e r v i s o r s . A l s o e x c l u d e d a r e o p e r a t o r s
o f e l e c t r o n i c d ig it a l c o m p u t e r s , e v e n th o u gh th e y m a y a l s o o p e r a t e e l e c t r i c
a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e e q u ip m e n t .

P ositions
definitions.

are

classified

in to

l e v e l s o n the

basis o f

P osition s
d efin ition s.

the f o l l o w i n g

cla ssified

into l e v e l s

o n the

b a s i s o f the f o l l o w i n g

C l a s s A . P e r f o r m s c o m p l e t e r e p o r t i n g and ta bu la tin g a s s i g n m e n t s
i n c lu d in g d e v i s i n g d if f i c u l t c o n t r o l p a n e l w i r i n g u n d e r g e n e r a l s u p e r v i s i o n .
A s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e a v a r i e t y o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s w h i c h
o f t e n a r e i r r e g u l a r o r n o n r e c u r r i n g , r e q u i r i n g s o m e pla n nin g o f the n a t u r e
and s e q u e n c i n g o f o p e r a t i o n s , and the u se o f a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n e s .
Is
t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e d in t r a i n i n g n e w o p e r a t o r s in m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s o r t r a i n i n g
l o w e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r s in w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s and in the o p e r a t i n g s e q u e n c e s
o f lo n g and c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
D o e s not in c lu d e p o s i t i o n s in w h i c h w i r i n g
r e s p o n s i b i l i t y i s l i m i t e d to s e l e c t i o n and i n s e r t i o n o f p r e w i r e d b o a r d s .

C l a s s A . W o r k r e q u i r e s th e a p p l i c a t i o n o f e x p e r i e n c e and ju d g m e n t
in s e l e c t i n g p r o c e d u r e s to b e f o l l o w e d and in s e a r c h i n g f o r , i n t e r p r e t i n g ,
s e l e c t i n g , o r c o d in g i t e m s to b e k e y p u n c h e d f r o m a v a r i e t y o f s o u r c e
docum ents.
On o c c a s i o n m a y a l s o p e r f o r m s o m e r o u tin e k e y p u n c h w o r k .
M ay train in e x p e r ie n c e d keypunch o p e r a t o r s .
C l a s s B . W o r k is r o u tin e and r e p e t i t i v e . U n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n
o r follow ing s p e c i f i c p r o c e d u r e s o r in st r u c tio n s , w o rk s f r o m v a rio u s stand­
a r d i z e d s o u r c e d o c u m e n t s w h i c h h av e b e e n c o d e d , and f o l l o w s s p e c i f i e d
p r o c e d u r e s w h i c h h a v e b e e n p r e s c r i b e d in d e t a i l and r e q u i r e lit tle o r no
s e l e c t i n g , c o d i n g , o r i n t e r p r e t i n g o f data to b e r e c o r d e d .
R e f e r s to s u ­
p e r v is o r p r o b le m s a risin g f r o m erro n e o u s item s o r codes o r m iss in g
in form a tion .

C lass B.
P e r f o r m s w o r k a c c o r d i n g to e s t a b l i s h e d p r o c e d u r e s and
under s p e c if ic in stru ctio n s.
A s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e c o m p l e t e but
r o u tin e and r e c u r r i n g r e p o r t s o r p a r t s o f l a r g e r and m o r e c o m p l e x r e p o r t s .
O p e r a t e s m o r e d if f i c u l t ta b u la tin g o r e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h as
the t a b u l a t o r and c a l c u l a t o r , in a d d itio n to the s i m p l e r m a c h i n e s u s e d b y
cla ss C o p e r a to rs .
M a y b e r e q u i r e d to do s o m e w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s .
M a y t r a i n n e w e m p l o y e e s in b a s i c m a c h i n e o p e r a t i o n s .

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R

cu la tor,

are

C l a s s C . U n d e r s p e c i f i c i n s t r u c t i o n s , o p e r a t e s s i m p l e t a b u la tin g o r
e l e c t r i c a l a c c o u n t i n g m a c h i n e s s u c h as th e s o r t e r , i n t e r p r e t e r , r e p r o d u c i n g
p u n c h , c o l l a t o r , e t c . A s s i g n m e n t s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e p o r t i o n s o f a w o r k unit,
f o r e x a m p l e , i n d iv id u a l s o r t i n g o r c o l l a t i n g r u n s , o r r e p e t i t i v e o p e r a t i o n s .
May p e r fo r m
s i m p l e w i r i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s , and do s o m e f ilin g w o r k .

O p e r a t e s o n e o r a v a r i e t y o f m a c h i n e s s u c h as th e t a b u l a t o r , c a l ­
c o lla t o r , i n te r p r e te r , s o r t e r , re p ro d u cin g punch, e tc.
Excluded

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS---- C o n tin ue d

C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS
A n a l y z e s b u s i n e s s p r o b l e m s to f o r m u l a t e p r o c e d u r e s f o r s o l v i n g
t h e m b y u s e o f e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t . D e v e l o p s a c o m p l e t e
d e s c r i p t i o n o f a ll s p e c i f i c a t i o n s n e e d e d to e n a b le p r o g r a m m e r s to p r e p a r e
r e q u i r e d d ig it a l c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m s .
W o r k i n v o l v e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g :
A n a l y z e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r o p e r a t i o n s to b e a u t o m a t e d and i d e n t i f i e s c o n d it io n s
and c r i t e r i a r e q u i r e d to a c h i e v e s a t i s f a c t o r y r e s u l t s ; s p e c i f i e s n u m b e r and
t y p e s o f r e c o r d s , f i l e s , and d o c u m e n t s t o b e u s e d ; o u tlin e s a c t i o n s to be
p e r f o r m e d b y p e r s o n n e l and c o m p u t e r s in s u f f i c i e n t d e t a il f o r p r e s e n t a t i o n
to m a n a g e m e n t and f o r p r o g r a m m i n g ( t y p i c a l l y th is i n v o l v e s p r e p a r a t i o n o f
w o r k and data f l o w c h a r t s ) ; c o o r d i n a t e s the d e v e l o p m e n t o f t e s t p r o b l e m s and
p a r t i c i p a t e s in t r i a l ru ns o f n e w and r e v i s e d s y s t e m s ; and r e c o m m e n d s
e q u ip m e n t c h a n g e s to o b ta in m o r e e f f e c t i v e o v e r a l l o p e r a t i o n s .
(NOTE:
W o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g b o t h ~ s y s t e m s a n a l y s i s and p r o g r a m m i n g s h o u ld be c l a s ­
s i f i e d as s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s i f th is is the s k i l l u s e d to d e t e r m i n e t h e i r p a y . )

F o r w a g e stu dy p u r p o s e s , s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s a r e c l a s s i f i e d as f o l l o w s :
C l a s s A . W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s i n v o l v i n g a ll p h a s e s o f s y s t e m a n a l y s i s .
P r o b le m s are
c o m p l e x b e c a u s e o f d i v e r s e s o u r c e s o f input data and m u l t i p l e - u s e r e q u i r e ­
m e n t s o f output data.
(F o r e x a m p le , develops
sin i n t e g r a t e d p r o d u c t i o n
s c h e d u l i n g , i n v e n t o r y c o n t r o l , c o s t a n a l y s i s , and s a l e s a n a l y s i s r e c o r d in
w h i c h e v e r y item, o f e a c h t y p e is a u t o m a t i c a l l y p r o c e s s e d t h r o u g h th e fu ll
s y s t e m o f r e c o r d s and a p p r o p r i a t e f o l l o w u p a c t i o n s a r e in it ia t e d b y the
c o m p u t e r . ) C o n f e r s w ith p e r s o n s c o n c e r n e d to d e t e r m i n e the data p r o c e s s i n g
p r o b l e m s and a d v i s e s s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l on th e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f n e w o r
r e v i s e d s y s t e m s o f data p r o c e s s i n g o p e r a t i o n s . M a k e s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s , if
n e e d e d , f o r a p p r o v a l o f m a j o r s y s t e m s i n s t a l l a t i o n s o r c h a n g e s and f o r
o b ta in in g e q u ip m e n t .
M ay p r o v id e fun ction al
w ho a r e a s s i g n e d to a s s i s t .

D o e s not in c lu d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r the m a n ­
a g e m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n o f o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g e m p l o y e e s ,
or system s
a n a ly s t s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d w ith s c i e n t i f i c o r e n g i n e e r i n g
p rob lem s.




41

direction

to

lo w e r le ve l

system s

a n a ly s t s

C lass B.
W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t l y o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
p r o b l e m s that a r e r e l a t i v e l y u n c o m p l i c a t e d to a n a l y z e , p la n , p r o g r a m , and
o p e r a t e . P r o b l e m s a r e o f l i m i t e d c o m p l e x i t y b e c a u s e s o u r c e s o f input data
a r e h o m o g e n e o u s and th e output data a r e c l o s e l y r e l a t e d .
(F o r exam ple,

C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S A N A L Y S T , B U S IN E SS — C ontinued

C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R , B U S IN E SS — C ontinued

d e v e l o p s s y s t e m s f o r m a in t a in in g d e p o s i t o r a c c o u n t s in a b a n k , m a in ta in in g
accounts
r e c e i v a b l e in a r e t a i l e s t a b l i s h m e n t , o r m a in t a in in g i n v e n t o r y
a c c o u n t s in a m a n u f a c t u r i n g o r w h o l e s a l e e s t a b l i s h m e n t . )
C o n f e r s w ith
p e r s o n s c o n c e r n e d to d e t e r m i n e th e data p r o c e s s i n g p r o b l e m s and a d v i s e s
s u b j e c t - m a t t e r p e r s o n n e l on th e i m p l i c a t i o n s o f the data p r o c e s s i n g s y s t e m s
to b e a p p lie d .

At th is l e v e l , p r o g r a m m i n g i s d i f f i c u l t b e c a u s e c o m t
equip­
m e n t m u s t b e o r g a n i z e d to p r o d u c e s e v e r a l i n t e r r e l a t e d but d i v e r s e p r o ­
d u ct s f r o m n u m e r o u s and d i v e r s e data e l e m e n t s .
A w id e v a r i e t y and e x ­
ten siv e n u m ber o f internal p r o c e s s in g actions m ust o c c u r .
T h is r e q u i r e s
s u c h a c t i o n s as d e v e l o p m e n t o f c o m m o n o p e r a t i o n s w h i c h can b e r e ­
u s e d , e s t a b l i s h m e n t o f lin k a g e p o in t s b e t w e e n o p e r a t i o n s , a d j u s t m e n t s to
data w h e n p r o g r a m r e q u i r e m e n t s e x c e e d c o m p u t e r s t o r a g e c a p a c i t y , and
s u b s t a n t ia l m a n i p u l a t i o n and r e s e q u e n c i n g o f data e l e m e n t s to f o r m a
h ig h ly i n t e g r a t e d p r o g r a m .

OR
W o r k s on a s e g m e n t o f a c o m p l e x data p r o c e s s i n g s c h e m e o r s y s t e m ,
as d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A . W o r k s i n d e p e n d e n t ly o n ro u tin e a s s i g n m e n t s and
r e c e i v e s i n s t r u c t i o n and g u i d a n c e o n c o m p l e x a s s i g n m e n t s . W o r k i s r e v i e w e d
f o r a c c u r a c y o f j u d g m e n t , c o m p l i a n c e w ith i n s t r u c t i o n s , and to i n s u r e
p r o p e r a lig n m e n t w ith th e o v e r a l l s y s t e m .
C l a s s C . W o r k s u n d e r i m m e d i a t e s u p e r v i s i o n , c a r r y i n g out a n a l y s e s
as a s s i g n e d , u s u a lly o f a s i n g l e a c t i v i t y . A s s i g n m e n t s a r e d e s i g n e d to d e v e l o p
and e x p a n d p r a c t i c a l e x p e r i e n c e in the a p p l i c a t i o n o f p r o c e d u r e s and s k i l l s
r e q u ire d f o r s y s te m s a nalysis w o r k . F o r e x a m p le , m a y a ssist a h ig h er le v e l
s y s t e m s a n a ly s t b y p r e p a r i n g the d e t a i l e d s p e c i f i c a t i o n s r e q u i r e d b y p r o ­
g r a m m e r s f r o m i n f o r m a t i o n d e v e l o p e d b y th e h i g h e r l e v e l a n a ly st .

M a y p r o v i d e f u n c t io n a l d i r e c t i o n
a r e a s s i g n e d to a s s i s t .

C l a s s B . W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n on
r e l a t i v e l y s i m p l e p r o g r a m s , o r on s i m p l e s e g m e n t s o f c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .
P r o g r a m s ( o r s e g m e n t s ) u s u a lly p r o c e s s i n f o r m a t i o n t o p r o d u c e data in tw o
o r t h r e e v a r i e d s e q u e n c e s o r f o r m a t s . R e p o r t s and l i s t i n g s a r e p r o d u c e d b y
r e f i n i n g , a d a p tin g , a r r a y i n g , o r m a k i n g m i n o r a d d it io n s t o o r d e l e t i o n s f r o m
input data w h i c h a r e r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e .
W hile n u m erou s
r e c o r d s m a y be
p r o c e s s e d , the data h a v e b e e n r e f i n e d in p r i o r a c t i o n s s o that the a c c u r a c y
and s e q u e n c i n g o f data ca n b e t e s t e d b y u s in g a f e w ro u tin e c h e c k s . T y p i c a l l y ,
th e p r o g r a m d e a ls w ith r o u tin e r e c o r d k e e p i n g o p e r a t i o n s .

C O M P U T E R P R O G R A M M E R , BUSINE SS

OR

C on verts statem ents o f b u s in e s s p r o b l e m s , ty p ica lly p r e p a r e d by a
s y s t e m s a n a ly s t , in to a s e q u e n c e o f d e t a i l e d i n s t r u c t i o n s w h i c h a r e r e ­
q u i r e d to s o l v e th e p r o b l e m s b y a u t o m a t i c data p r o c e s s i n g e q u ip m e n t .
W orking f r o m charts o r
d i a g r a m s , th e p r o g r a m m e r d e v e l o p s th e p r e ­
c i s e i n s t r u c t i o n s w h i c h , w hen e n t e r e d in to the c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in c o d e d
la n g u a g e , c a u s e th e m a n i p u l a t i o n o f data to a c h i e v e d e s i r e d r e s u l t s .
W ork
i n v o l v e s m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g : A p p l i e s k n o w l e d g e o f c o m p u t e r c a p a ­
b i l i t i e s , m a t h e m a t i c s , l o g i c e m p l o y e d b y c o m p u t e r s , and p a r t i c u l a r s u b ­
j e c t m a t t e r i n v o l v e d to a n a ly z e c h a r t s and d i a g r a m s o f th e p r o b l e m to
b e p r o g r a m m e d ; d e v e l o p s s e q u e n c e o f p r o g r a m s t e p s ; w r i t e s d e t a i l e d f lo w
c h a r t s t o s h o w o r d e r in w h i c h data w i l l b e p r o c e s s e d ;
con verts these
c h a r t s t o c o d e d i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r m a c h i n e to f o l l o w ; t e s t s and c o r r e c t s
p r o g r a m s ; p r e p a r e s i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r o p e r a t i n g p e r s o n n e l d u r in g p r o d u c t i o n
ru n; a n a l y z e s , r e v i e w s , and a l t e r s p r o g r a m s to i n c r e a s e o p e r a t i n g e f f i ­
c i e n c y o r adapt t o n e w r e q u i r e m e n t s ; m a i n t a i n s r e c o r d s o f p r o g r a m d e ­
v e l o p m e n t and r e v i s i o n s . ( N O T E :
W o r k e r s p e r f o r m i n g b o th s y s t e m s a n a l­
y s i s and p r o g r a m m i n g s h o u ld b e c l a s s i f i e d as s y s t e m s a n a ly s t s i f th is is
the s k i l l u s e d to d e t e r m i n e t h e i r p a y . )
D o e s not i n c l u d e e m p l o y e e s p r i m a r i l y r e s p o n s i b l e f o r th e m a n ­
a g e m e n t o r s u p e r v i s i o n o f o t h e r e l e c t r o n i c data p r o c e s s i n g e m p l o y e e s ,
o r p r o g r a m m e r s p r i m a r i l y c o n c e r n e d w ith s c i e n t i f i c a n d / o r e n g i n e e r i n g
p rob lem s.
F o r w a g e s tu dy

purposes,

program m ers

a r e c l a s s i f i e d as f o l l o w s :

C l a s s A . W o r k s in d e p e n d e n t ly o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n
o n c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s w h i c h r e q u i r e c o m p e t e n c e in all p h a s e s o f p r o ­
g r a m m i n g c o n c e p t s and p r a c t i c e s .
W o r k i n g f r o m d i a g r a m s and c h a r t s
w h i c h i d e n t i f y th e n a t u r e o f d e s i r e d r e s u l t s , m a j o r p r o c e s s i n g s t e p s to
b e a c c o m p l i s h e d , and the r e l a t i o n s h i p s b e t w e e n v a r i o u s s t e p s o f th e p r o b ­
l e m s o l v i n g r o u t in e ; p la n s th e fu ll ra n g e o f p r o g r a m m i n g a c t i o n s n e e d e d
t o e f f i c i e n t l y u t iliz e th e c o m p u t e r s y s t e m in a c h i e v i n g d e s i r e d en d p r o d u c t s .




t o l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r s who

W o r k s on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s
(as d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A) u n d e r
c lo s e dir e ctio n o f a higher le v e l p r o g r a m m e r o r s u p e r v is o r .
May a ssist
h i g h e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r b y in d e p e n d e n t ly p e r f o r m i n g l e s s d if f i c u l t ta s k s
a s s i g n e d , and p e r f o r m i n g m o r e d i f f i c u l t t a s k s u n d e r f a i r l y c l o s e d i r e c t i o n .
M a y g u id e o r i n s t r u c t l o w e r l e v e l p r o g r a m m e r s .
C lass C . M akes p r a c tic a l applications o f p r o g ra m m in g p r a c tic e s
and c o n c e p t s u s u a lly l e a r n e d in f o r m a l t r a i n i n g c o u r s e s .
A ssign m en ts
a r e d e s i g n e d to d e v e l o p c o m p e t e n c e in the a p p l i c a t i o n o f s t a n d a r d p r o ­
c e d u r e s to ro u tin e p r o b l e m s .
R e c e i v e s c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n on n e w a s p e c t s
o f a s s i g n m e n t s ; and w o r k i s r e v i e w e d t o v e r i f y it s a c c u r a c y and c o n f o r m a n c e
w it h r e q u i r e d p r o c e d u r e s .
COMPUTER OPERATOR
M o n i t o r s and o p e r a t e s th e c o n t r o l c o n s o l e o f a d ig it a l c o m p u t e r to
process
data a c c o r d i n g to o p e r a t i n g i n s t r u c t i o n s , u s u a lly p r e p a r e d b y a
p r o g r a m m e r . W o r k i n c l u d e s m o s t o f th e f o l l o w i n g : S tu d ie s i n s t r u c t i o n s to
d e t e r m i n e e q u ip m e n t se tu p and o p e r a t i o n s ; l o a d s e q u ip m e n t with r e q u i r e d
i t e m s (tape r e e l s , c a r d s , e t c . ) ; s w i t c h e s n e c e s s a r y a u x i l i a r y e q u ip m e n t into
c i r c u i t , and s t a r t s and o p e r a t e s c o m p u t e r ; m a k e s a d j u s t m e n t s to c o m p u t e r to
c o r r e c t o p e r a t i n g p r o b l e m s and m e e t s p e c i a l c o n d i t i o n s ; r e v i e w s e r r o r s
m a d e d u r in g o p e r a t i o n and d e t e r m i n e s c a u s e o r r e f e r s p r o b l e m to s u p e r ­
v i s o r o r p r o g r a m m e r ; and m a in t a in s o p e r a t i n g r e c o r d s . M a y t e s t and a s s i s t
in c o r r e c t i n g p r o g r a m .
For

wage

s tu d y

purposes,

com puter

operators

are

cla ssified

as

follow s:
C l a s s A . O p e r a t e s in d e p e n d e n t l y , o r u n d e r o n l y g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n , a
c o m p u t e r ru nn in g p r o g r a m s w ith m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s : N ew
p r o g r a m s a r e f r e q u e n t l y t e s t e d and i n t r o d u c e d ; s c h e d u l i n g r e q u i r e m e n t s a r e

C O M P U T E R O P E R A T O R — Continued

D R A F T E R — Continued

o f c r i t i c a l i m p o r t a n c e to m i n i m i z e d o w n t i m e ; the p r o g r a m s a r e o f c o m p l e x
d e s i g n so that i d e n t i f i c a t i o n o f e r r o r s o u r c e o f t e n r e q u i r e s a w o r k i n g k n o w ­
l e d g e o f the t o t a l p r o g r a m , and a lt e r n a t e p r o g r a m s m a y n ot b e a v a i l a b l e .
M a y g iv e d i r e c t i o n and g u id a n c e to l o w e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r s .

m a t e r i a l s to b e u s e d , lo a d c a p a c i t i e s , s t r e n g t h s , s t r e s s e s , e t c .
R eceives
in it ia l i n s t r u c t i o n s , r e q u i r e m e n t s , and a d v i c e f r o m s u p e r v i s o r .
C om pleted
w o r k is c h e c k e d f o r t e c h n i c a l a d e q u a c y .

C l a s s B . O p e r a t e s in d e p e n d e n t ly , o r u n d e r o n ly g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n , a
c o m p u t e r running p r o g r a m s w ith m o s t o f the f o l l o w i n g c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s : M o s t
o f the p r o g r a m s a r e e s t a b l i s h e d p r o d u c t i o n r u n s , t y p i c a l l y run on a r e g u l a r l y
r e c u r r i n g b a s i s ; t h e r e is li ttle o r no t e s t i n g o f n e w p r o g r a m s r e q u i r e d ;
a lte r n a te p r o g r a m s a r e p r o v i d e d in c a s e o r i g i n a l p r o g r a m n e e d s m a j o r ch a n g e
o r ca nnot b e c o r r e c t e d w ithin a r e a s o n a b l y s h o r t t i m e .
In c o m m o n e r r o r
s i t u a t io n s , d i a g n o s e s c a u s e and t a k e s c o r r e c t i v e a c t i o n .
T h is u s u a lly i n ­
v o l v e s a pp lyin g p r e v i o u s l y p r o g r a m m e d c o r r e c t i v e s t e p s , o r u sin g s ta n d a r d
c o r r e c tio n techn iques.
OR
O p e r a t e s u n d e r d i r e c t s u p e r v i s i o n a c o m p u t e r running p r o g r a m s o r
s e g m e n t s o f p r o g r a m s w ith the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s d e s c r i b e d f o r c l a s s A. M ay
a s s i s t a h i g h e r l e v e l o p e r a t o r b y in d e p e n d e n t ly p e r f o r m i n g l e s s d if f i c u l t ta s k s
a s s i g n e d , and p e r f o r m i n g d if f i c u l t t a s k s f o l l o w i n g d e t a i l e d i n s t r u c t i o n s and
w ith f r e q u e n t r e v i e w o f o p e r a t i o n s p e r f o r m e d .

expected
a b ilit y to
receiv ed
operator

C l a s s C . W o r k s on ro u tin e p r o g r a m s u n d e r c l o s e s u p e r v i s i o n .
Is
to d e v e l o p w o r k i n g k n o w le d g e o f the c o m p u t e r e q u ip m e n t u s e d and
d e t e c t p r o b l e m s i n v o l v e d in running r o u tin e p r o g r a m s . U s u a l l y has
s o m e f o r m a l t r a i n in g in c o m p u t e r o p e r a t i o n . M a y a s s i s t h i g h e r l e v e l
on c o m p l e x p r o g r a m s .

DRAFTER

C l a s s A . P la n s th e g r a p h i c p r e s e n t a t i o n o f c o m p l e x i t e m s h av in g
d i s t i n c t i v e d e s i g n f e a t u r e s that d i f f e r s i g n i f i c a n t l y f r o m e s t a b l i s h e d d r a ftin g
precedents.
W o r k s in c l o s e s u p p o r t w ith the d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r , and m a y
r e c o m m e n d m i n o r d e s i g n c h a n g e s . A n a l y z e s the e f f e c t o f e a c h ch a n g e on the
d e t a ils o f f o r m , f u n c t io n , and p o s i t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s o f c o m p o n e n t s and
parts.
W o r k s w ith a m i n i m u m o f s u p e r v i s o r y a s s i s t a n c e . C o m p l e t e d w o r k
is r e v i e w e d b y d e s i g n o r i g i n a t o r f o r c o n s i s t e n c y with p r i o r e n g i n e e r i n g
d e t e r m i n a t i o n s . M a y e i t h e r p r e p a r e d r a w in g s o r d i r e c t t h e i r p r e p a r a t i o n b y
low er level d rafters.

C l a s s B . P e r f o r m s n o n r o u t in e and c o m p l e x d r a ftin g a s s i g n m e n t s
that r e q u i r e the a p p l i c a t i o n o f m o s t o f the s t a n d a r d i z e d d r a w in g t e c h n i q u e s
r eg u la rly used.
D utie s t y p i c a l l y i n v o l v e s u c h w o r k as:
P r e p a r e s w orkin g
d r a w i n g s o f s u b a s s e m b l i e s with i r r e g u l a r s h a p e s , m u lt ip le f u n c t i o n s , and
p r e c i s e p o sitio n a l rela tionsh ips betw een co m p o n e n ts; p r e p a r e s a rch ite ctu r a l
d r a w i n g s f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a b u ild in g in c lu d in g d e t a il d r a w in g s o f f o u n d a ­
t i o n s , w a l l s e c t i o n s , f l o o r p la n s , and r o o f .
U s e s a c c e p t e d f o r m u l a s and
m a n u a ls in m a k in g n e c e s s a r y
c o m p u t a t i o n s t o d e t e r m i n e q u a n tit ie s o f




C l a s s C . P r e p a r e s d e t a il d r a w i n g s o f s in g le units o r p a r t s f o r
en gineering, con stru ction , m anufacturing, o r rep air pu rp o se s.
Types of
d r a w i n g s p r e p a r e d in c lu d e i s o m e t r i c p r o j e c t i o n s ( d e p ic tin g th r e e d i m e n s i o n s
in a c c u r a t e s c a l e ) and s e c t i o n a l v i e w s to c l a r i f y p o s i t i o n i n g o f c o m p o n e n t s
and c o n v e y n e e d e d i n f o r m a t i o n .
C o n s o l i d a t e s d e t a ils f r o m a n u m b e r o f
s o u r c e s and a d ju s ts o r t r a n s p o s e s s c a l e as r e q u i r e d . S u g g e s t e d m e t h o d s o f
a p p r o a c h , a p p l i c a b l e p r e c e d e n t s , and a d v i c e o n s o u r c e m a t e r i a l s a r e g iv e n
w ith in itia l a s s i g n m e n t s .
I n s t r u c t i o n s a r e l e s s c o m p l e t e w hen a s s i g n m e n t s
r e c u r . W o r k m a y b e s p o t - c h e c k e d d u rin g p r o g r e s s .
D R A F T E R -T R A C E R
C o p i e s p la n s and d r a w in g s p r e p a r e d b y o t h e r s b y p l a c i n g t r a c i n g
c lo t h o r p a p e r o v e r d r a w in g s and t r a c i n g w ith p e n o r p e n c i l .
( D o e s not
in c lu d e t r a c i n g l i m i t e d to p la n s p r i m a r i l y c o n s i s t i n g o f s tr a ig h t li n e s and a
l a r g e s c a l e not r e q u i r i n g c l o s e d e l i n e a t i o n . )
A N D /O R
P r e p a r e s s i m p l e o r r e p e t i t i v e d r a w in g s o f e a s i l y v i s u a l i z e d i t e m s .
W o r k is c l o s e l y s u p e r v i s e d d u rin g p r o g r e s s .
E L E C T R O N IC S TEC HNICIAN
W o r k s on v a r i o u s t y p e s o f e l e c t r o n i c e q u ip m e n t and r e la t e d d e v i c e s
b y p e r f o r m i n g on e o r a c o m b i n a t i o n o f the f o l l o w i n g : I n s t a llin g , m a in t a in in g ,
r e p a i r i n g , o v e r h a u l i n g , t r o u b l e s h o o t i n g , m o d i f y i n g , c o n s t r u c t i n g , and te s t in g .
W o rk r e q u ire s p r a c t ic a l application o f tec h n ica l knowledge of e le c t r o n ic s
p r i n c i p l e s , a b ilit y to d e t e r m i n e m a l f u n c t i o n s , and s k i l l to put e q u ip m e n t in
r e q u i r e d o p e r a t i n g co n d it io n .
T h e e q u ip m e n t ----c o n s i s t i n g o f e i t h e r m a n y d i f f e r e n t kin ds o f c i r c u i t s
o r m u l t i p l e r e p e t i t i o n o f the s a m e kin d o f c i r c u i t — i n c l u d e s , but is not l i m i t e d
t o , the f o l l o w i n g :
(a) E l e c t r o n i c t r a n s m i t t i n g and r e c e i v i n g e q u ip m e n t ( e . g . ,
radar,
r a d i o , t e l e v i s i o n , t e l e p h o n e , s o n a r , n a v ig a t io n a l a id s ) , (b) d ig ita l
and a n a lo g c o m p u t e r s , and (c) i n d u s t r i a l and m e d i c a l m e a s u r i n g and c o n ­
t r o l l i n g e q u ip m e n t .
T h is c l a s s i f i c a t i o n e x c l u d e s r e p a i r e r s o f s u c h s ta n d a rd e l e c t r o n i c
e q u ip m e n t as c o m m o n o f f i c e m a c h i n e s and h o u s e h o l d r a d io and t e l e v i s i o n
s e t s ; p r o d u c t i o n a s s e m b l e r s and t e s t e r s ; w o r k e r s w h o s e p r i m a r y duty is
s e r v i c i n g e l e c t r o n i c t e s t i n s t r u m e n t s ; t e c h n i c i a n s who h av e a d m i n i s t r a t i v e
o r s u p e r v i s o r y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y ; and d r a f t e r s , d e s i g n e r s , and p r o f e s s i o n a l
e n g in e e r s .
P ositions
d efin ition s.

are

cla ssified

into l e v e l s

on

the

basis

of

the f o llo w in g

C l a s s A . A p p l i e s a d v a n c e d t e c h n i c a l k n o w le d g e to s o l v e u nu su ally
c o m p l e x p r o b l e m s ( i . e . , t h o s e that t y p i c a l l y ca nnot be s o l v e d s o l e l y by
r e f e r e n c e to m a n u f a c t u r e r s ' m a n u a ls o r s i m i l a r d o c u m e n t s ) in w o r k i n g on

E L E C T R O N IC S T E C H N I C I A N — C ontinued

E L E C T R O N IC S T E C H N IC IA N — C ontinued

electronic equipment. Examples of such problems include location and
density of circuitry, electromagnetic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and
frequent engineering changes. Work involves: A detailed understanding of
the interrelationships of circuits; exercising independent judgment in per­
forming such tasks as making circuit analyses, calculating wave forms,
tracing relationships in signal flow; and regularly using complex test in­
struments (e.g., dual trace oscilloscopes, Q-m eters, deviation meters,
pulse generators).
Work may be reviewed by supervisor (frequently an engineer or
designer) for general compliance with accepted practices. May provide
technical guidance to lower level technicians.

Class C. Applies working technical knowledge to perform simple or
routine tasks in working on electronic equipment, following detailed in­
structions which cover virtually all procedures. Work typically involves such
tasks as: Assisting higher level technicians by performing such activities as
replacing components, wiring circuits, and taking test readings; repairing
simple electronic equipment; and using tools and common test instruments
(e.g., multimeters, audio signal generators, tube testers, oscilloscopes). Is
not required to be familiar with the interrelationships of circuits. This
knowledge, however, may be acquired through assignments designed to in­
crease competence (including classroom training) so that worker can advance
to higher level technician.
Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher
level technician. Work is typically spot checked, but is given detailed
review when new or advanced assignments are involved.

Class B. Applies comprehensive technical knowledge to solve com­
plex problems (i.e., those that typically can be solved solely by properly
interpreting manufacturers' manuals or similar documents) in working on
electronic equipment. Work involves: A familiarity with the interrelation­
ships of circuits; and judgment in determining work sequence and in selecting
tools and testing instruments, usually less complex than those used by the
class A technician.
Receives technical guidance, as required, from supervisor or higher
level technician, and work is reviewed for specific compliance with accepted
practices and work assignments. May provide technical guidance to lower
level technicians.

REGISTERED INDUSTRIAL NURSE
A registered nurse who gives nursing service under general medical
direction to ill or injured employees or other persons who become ill or
suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill or
injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation or
other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and health evaluations of
applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs involving
health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environment, or
other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety of all personnel.
Nursing supervisors or head nurses in establishments employing more than
one nurse are excluded.

MAINTENANCE, TOOLROOM, AND POWERPLANT
MAINTENANCE CARPENTER

MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIAN— Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain
in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs, counters,
benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim made of wood
in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and
laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal instructions;
using a variety of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools, and standard
measuring instruments; making standard shop computations relating to
dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary for the work. In
general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires rounded training
and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of electrician's handtools
and measuring and testing instruments. In general, the work of the main­
tenance electrician requires rounded training and experience usually acquiiod
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

MAINTENANCE ELECTRICIAN
Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the in­
stallation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, distri­
bution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work involves
most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of electrical
equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, controllers,
circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other trans­
mission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or other
specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical system or
equipment; working standard computations relating to load requirements of




44

MAINTENANCE PAINTER
Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an estab­
lishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface peculiarities
and types of paint required for different applications; preparing surface for
painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler in nail holes
and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush. May mix colors,
oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain proper color or con­
sistency. In general, the work of the maintenance painter requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
MAINTENANCE MACHINIST
Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work in­
volves most of the following: Interpreting written instructions and specifica­
tions; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's handtools

M A IN T E N A N C E M A C H IN IS T — C ontinued

M A I N T E N A N C E P I P E F I T T E R — Continued

and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating standard
machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making standard
shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds, ana speeds
of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the common metals;
selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment required for this work;
and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical equipment. In general, the
machinist's work normally requires a rounded training in machine-shop
practice usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

meet specifications. In general, the work of the maintenance pipefitter
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Workers primarily
engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating systems
are excluded.

MAINTENANCE MECHANIC (MACHINERY)
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Examining machines and mechanical
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a
machine shop or sending the machine to a machine shop for major repairs;
preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the production of
parts ordered from machine shops; reassembling machines; and making all
necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the work of a machinery
maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary
duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC (MOTOR VEHICLE)
Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an estab­
lishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and per­
forming repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches, gauges,
drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts; replacing
broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting valves; re­
assembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle and making
necessary adjustments; and aligning wheels, adjusting brakes and lights, or
tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the motor vehicle maintenance
mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
This classification does not include mechanics who repair customers'
vehicles in automobile repair shops.
MAINTENANCE PIPEFITTER
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Laying
out work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings or other
written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct lengths with
chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting machines; threading
pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or power-driven
machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening pipe to hangers;
making standard shop computations relating to pressures, flow, and size of
pipe required; and making standard tests to determine whether finished pipes




MAINTENANCE SHEET-METAL WORKER
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an establishment.
Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out all types of
sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models, or other specifica­
tions; setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal working
machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending, forming, shaping,
fitting, and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles as required. T
n
general, the work of the maintenance sheet-metal worker requires rounded
training and experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout are
required. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out work;
interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a variety of handtools
and rigging; making standard shop computations relating to stresses, strength
of materials, and centers of gravity; aligning and balancing equipment;
selecting standard tools, equipment, and parts to be used; and installing and
maintaining in good order power transmission equipment such as drives and
speed reducers. In general, the millwright's work normally requires a
rounded training and experience in the trade acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
MAINTENANCE TRADES HELPER
Assists one or more workers in.the skilled maintenance trades, by
performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping a
worker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, machine,
and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools; and
performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of
work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding materials
and tools, and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted to
perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also
performed by workers on a full-time basis.
MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR (TOOLROOM)
Specializes in operating one or more than one type of machine
tool (e.g., jig borer, grinding machine, engine lathe, milling machine) to
machine metal for use in making or maintaining jigs, fixtures, cutting tools,
gauges, or metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or
nonmetallic material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically
involves: Planning and performing difficult machining operations which
require complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; setting up machine

M A C H I N E -T O O L O P E R A T O R (T O O L R O O M )— C ontinued

T O O L A N D DIE M A K E R — C ontinued

tool or tools (e.g., install cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working
tables, and other controls to handle the size of stock to be machined;
determine proper feeds, speeds, tooling, and operation sequence or select
those prescribed in drawings, blueprints, or layouts); using a variety of
precision measuring instruments; making necessary adjustments during
machining operation to achieve requisite dimensions to very close tolerances.
May be required to select proper coolants and cutting and lubricating oils,
to recognize when tools need dressing, and to dress tools. In general, the
work of a machine-tool operator (toolroom) at the skill level called for in
this classification requires extensive knowledge of machine-shop and tool­
room practice usually acquired through considerable on-the-job training and
experience.

working to very close tolerances; heat-treating metal parts and finished tools
and dies to achieve required qualities; fitting and assembling parts to pre~
scribed tolerances and allowances. In general, the tool and die maker's
work requires rounded training in machine-shop and toolroom practice
usually acquired through formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and
experience.
For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not
include tool and die makers who (1) are employed in tool and die jobbing
shops or (2) produce forging dies (die sinkers).
STATIONARY ENGINEER

For cross-industry wage study purposes, this classification does not
include machine-tool operators (toolroom) employed in tool and die jobbing
shops.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER
Constructs and repairs jigs, fixtures, cutting tools, gauges, or
metal dies or molds used in shaping or forming metal or nonmetallic
material (e.g., plastic, plaster, rubber, glass). Work typically involves:
Planning and laying out work according to models, blueprints, drawings, or
other written or oral specifications; understanding the working •
properties of
common metals and alloys; selecting appropriate materials, tools, and
processes required to complete task; making necessary shop computations;
setting up and operating various machine tools and related equipment; using
various tool and die maker's handtools and precision measuring instruments;

Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the
establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigeration, or airconditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment such as
steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines, ventilating
and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed water pumps;
making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation of machinery,
temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise these operations.
Head or chief engineers in establishments employing more than one engineer
are excluded.
BOILER TENDER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which em­
ployed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, gas, or oil burner; and checks water and
safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom equipment.

MATERIAL MOVEMENT AND CUSTODIAL
TRUCKDRIVER

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK— Continued

Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport materials,
merchandise, equipment, or workers between various types of establishments
such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses, wholesale and
retail establishments, or between retail establishments and customers' houses
or places of business. May also load or unload truck with or without
helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck in good working
order. Sales-route and over-the- road drivers are excluded.

involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices, routes, available
means of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods
shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and
keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or assist in preparing the
merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or directing
others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of lading, in­
voices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting damaged goods;
routing merchandise or materials to proper departments; and maintaining
necessary records and files.

For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on the basis
of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,
Truckdriver,

light truck (under lVz tons)
medium truck (IV2 to and including 4 tons)
heavy truck (trailer) (over 4 tons)
heavy truck (other than trailer) (over 4 tons)

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
Shipping clerk
Receiving clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk

SHIPPING AND RECEIVING CLERK

WAREHOUSEMAN

Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work

As directed, performs a variety of warehousing duties which require
an understanding of the establishment's storage plan. Work involves most




46

W A R E H O U S E M A N — C ontinued

M A T E R I A L H A N D L IN G L A B O R E R — Continued

of the following: Verifying materials (or merchandise) against receiving
documents, noting and reporting discrepancies and obvious damages; routing
materials to prescribed storage locations; storing, stacking, or palletizing
materials in accordance with prescribed storage methods; rearranging and
taking inventory of stored materials; examining stored materials and re­
porting deterioration and damage; removing material from storage and
preparing it for shipment. May operate hand or power trucks in performing
warehousing duties.

cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
materials or merchandise in proper storage location; and transporting
materials or merchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow. Longshore
workers, who load and unload ships, are excluded.

Exclude workers whose primary duties involve shipping and receiving
work (see Shipping and Receiving Clerk and Shipping Packer), order filling
(see Order Filler), or operating power trucks (see Power-Truck Operator).

POWER-TRUCK OPERATOR
Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered truck
or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a warehouse,
manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of powertruck, as follows:

ORDER FILLER
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers'
orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and indicating
items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requisition addi­
tional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform other related
duties.
SHIPPING PACKER
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being dependent
upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the type of container
employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the placing' of items in
shipping containers and may involve one or more of the following: Knowledge
of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection of appropriate
type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container; using excelsior
or other material to prevent breakage or damage; closing and sealing
container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on container.
Packers who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.
MATERIAL HANDLING LABORER
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store, or
other establishment whose duties involve one or more of the following:
Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or from freight




Forklift operator
Power-truck operator (other than forklift)
GUARD AND WATCHMAN
Guard. Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on
tour, maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes
guards who are stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and
other persons entering.
Watchman. Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting
property against fire, theft, and illegal entry.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas and
washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial or
other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following: Sweeping,
mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips, trash, and other
refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing metal fixtures or
trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance services; and cleaning
lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who specialize in window
washing are excluded.

Available On Request
The follow in g a r e a s a r e su rv e y e d p e r io d ic a lly fo r u se in ad m in iste r in g the S e r v ic e
a vaila b le at no c o s t f r o m any of the B L S r eg io n a l o ffic e s show n on the back c o v e r .

C o n tract

A la s k a
A lb a n y , Ga.
A lb u q u erq u e , N . M e x .
A le x a n d r ia , La.
A lp e n a , S tan d ish , and T a w a s C ity , M ic h .
Ann A r b o r , M ic h .
A s h e v ille , N .C .
A tla n tic C ity , N .J .
A u g u sta , G a.—S .C .
B a k e r s f ie ld , C a lif.
Baton R o u ge, La.
B a ttle C r e e k , M ic h .
B eau m on t—P o rt A r th u i^ -O ra n g e , T e x .
B ilo x i—G u lfp ort and P a s c a g o u la , M is s .
B o is e C ity , Idaho
B r e m e r to n , W a sh .
B r id g e p o r t, N o r w a lk , and S ta m fo r d , Conn.
B r u n sw ick , G a.
B u rlin g to n , V t.—N. Y.
C ap e C od , M a s s .
C e d a r R a p id s, Iowa
C ham paign —Urbana—R antoul, 111.
C h a r le s to n , S .C .
C h a r lo tte —G a sto n ia , N .C .
C h e y en n e , W yo.
C la r k s v ilie —H o p k in sv ille , T e n n .—K y .
C o lo r a d o S p r in g s, C o lo .
C o lu m b ia , S .C .
C o lu m b u s, G a .—A la .
C o lu m b u s, M i s s .
C r a n e , Ind.
D e c a tu r, 111.
D c s M o in e s, Iowa
Dothan, A la .
Duluth—S u p e r io r , M in n .- W is .
E l P a s o , T e x ., and A la m o g o r d o - Las C r u c e s , N. M e x .
E u ge n e - S p r in g fie ld , O r e g .
F a y e tt e v ille , N .C .
F itch b u rg- L e o m in s te r , M a s s .
F o r t S m ith , A r k .- O k l a .
F o r t W ayn e, Ind.
F r e d e r ic k — age rstow n , M d .— h a m b e r s b u r g , P a .—
H
C
M a r t in s b u r g , W . V a .
G ad sd en and A n n isto n , A la .
G o ld s b o r o , N .C .
G ran d Island—H a stin g s, N e b r.
G r e a t F a l ls , M ont.
G u a m , T e r r it o r y of
H a r r is b u r g —Lebanon , P a.
Huntington—A sh la n d , W . V a .—K y .—Ohio
K n o x v ille , T enn .
La C r o s s e , W is.
L aredo, T ex.
L as V e g a s , N ev.
Law ton, O k la.
L im a , Ohio
L ittle Rock—N orth L ittle R o ck , A r k .

A ct

of

1965.

S u rvey r e s u lt s a r e p ub lish ed

in r e l e a s e s w h ich ,

w hile su p p lies

la s t ,

a re o r w ill

be

Logan sp ort—P e r u , Ind.
L orain —E ly r ia , Ohio
L ow e r E a s te r n S h o r e , M d.—V a .—D e l.
L yn ch b u rg, V a.
M a c o n , Ga.
M a d iso n , W is .
M a n s fie ld , Ohio
M a r q u e tte , E sc a n a b a , Sault Ste. M a r ie , M ic h .
M c A lle n —P hari^-E d inb u rg and B r o w n sv ille —
H a rlin g en —San B e n ito , T e x .
M e d fo rd —K lam ath F a lls —G ra n ts P a s s , O r e g .
M e rid ia n , M i s s .
M id d le s e x , M on m ou th , and O cean C o s ., N .J .
M o b ile and P e n s a c o la , A la .—F la .
M o n tg o m e r y , A la .
N a s h v ille —D a v id so n , T enn .
New B ern —J a c k so n v ille , N .C .
N ew London—N o rw ic h , Conn.—R .I.
N orth D ak ota, State of
O r la n d o , F la .
O xnard—S im i V a lle y —V en tu ra , C a lif.
P an a m a C ity , F la .
P a r k e r sburg—M a r ie tta , W . V a .—Ohio
P e o r ia , III.
P h o e n ix ,

A r iz .

Fhne B lu ff, A r k .
P o c a te llo —Idaho F a l l s , Idaho
P o r tsm o u th , N .H .—M ain e—M a s s .
P u e b lo , C o lo .
P uerto R ico
Reno, N ev.
R ich land —K enn ew ick —W a lla W alla—
P en d leton , W a sh .—O r e g .
R iv e r sid e—San B ern a rd in o —O n ta r io , C a lif.
S a lin a , K a n s .
S a lin a s—S ea sid e—M o n te r e y , C a lif.
S andusky, Ohio
Santa B a r b a r a —Santa M a r ia —L o m p o c , C a lif.
Savannah, G a.
S e lm a , A la .
S herm an —D e n iso n , T e x .
S h r e v e p o r t, La.
Sioux F a l l s , S. Dak.
Spok an e, W a sh .
S p r in g fie ld , 111.
S p rin g field —C h ic o p ee—H olyok e , M a s s .—C onn.
S tock ton , C a lif .
T a c o m a , W a sh .
T am pa—St. P e t e r s b u r g , F la .
T o p e k a , K a n s.
T u cson , A r iz .
T u ls a , O k la .
V a lle jo —F a ir fie ld —N apa, C a lif.
W aco and K ille e n —T e m p le , T e x .
W a te r lo o —C e d a r F a l l s , Iowa
W e st T e x a s P la in s
W ilm in g to n , D e l.—N.J .—M d.

An annual r e p o r t on s a la r ie s fo r a c c o u n ta n ts, a u d it o r s , c h ie f a c co u n ta n ts, a t to r n e y s , job a n a ly s t s , d ir e c to r s of p e r s o n n e l, b u y e r s , c h e m is t s , e n g in e e r s , en g in eerin g tec h n icia n s, d r a f te r s , and
c le r ic a l e m p lo y e e s is a v a ila b le .
O r d e r as B L S B u lletin 1 8 9 1 , N ation al Survey o f P r o f e s s io n a l, A d m in is t r a t iv e , T e c h n ic a l, and C le r ic a l P a y , M a r c h 1 9 7 5 . $ 1 .3 0 a c o p y , fr o m any ol the BLS reg io n a l s a le s
o ffic e s shown on the back c o v e r , o r from the Superintendent of D o c u m e n ts, U .S . G o v e rn m en t P rin tin g O ffic e , W ash in gton , D .C . 2 0 4 0 2 .




Area Wage Surveys
A list of the latest available bulletins is presented below. A directory of area wage studies including more limited studies conducted at the request ot tne
Employment Standards Administration of the U.S. Department of Labor is available on request. Bulletins may be purchased from any of the BLS regional offices shown
on the back cover or from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402
Area
Akron, Ohio, Dec. 1975______________________________________
Albany—
Schenectady—
Troy, N.Y., Sept. 1976___________________
Anaheim—
Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif., Oct. 19751
_________
Atlanta, Ga.,
May
1976______________________________
Austin, Tex., Dec.
19751 _____________________________
Baltimore, Md., Aug. 1976___________________________________
Billings, Mont., July 1976____________________________________
Binghamton, N.Y.—
Pa., July 1976 1____________________________
Birmingham, Ala., Mar. 19761
_______________________________
Boston, Mass., Aug. 1976____________________________________
Buffalo, N.Y., Oct.
19751_____________________________
Canton, Ohio, May
1976___________ ___________________
Chattanooga, Tenn^-Ga., Sept. 1976___________________________
Chicago, 111., May 1976______________________________________
Cincinnati, Ohio—
Ky.—
Ind., Mar. 1976_________________________
Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1975_________________ _________________
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 19751 _________________________________
Corpus Christi, Tex., July 1976______________________________
Dallas-Fort Worth, Tex., Oct. 19751 _________________________
Davenport—
Rock Island—
Moline, Iowa-Ill., Feb. 1976__________
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1975___________________________________ _
_
Daytona Beach, Fla., Aug. 1976______________________________
Denver—
Boulder, Colo., Dec. 1975______________ _____________
Detroit, Mich., Mar. 19761
___________________________________
Fort Lauderdale—
Hollywood and West Palm Beach—
Boca Raton, Fla., Apr. 1976____ __________ _________________
Fresno, Calif., June 1976____________________________________
Gainesville, Fla., Sept. 1976_________________________________
Green Bay, Wis., July 1976__________________________________
Greensboro—
Winston-Salem—
High Point, N.C., Aug. 1976______
Greenville—
Spartanburg, S.C., June 1976 1____________________
Hartford, Conn., Mar. 1976__________________________________
Houston, Tex., Apr. 1976____________________________________
Huntsville, Ala., Feb. 1976 __________________________________
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1976_________________________________
Jackson, Miss., Feb. 1976____________________________________
Jacksonville, Fla., Dec. 1975_________________________________
Kansas City, Mo.—
Kans., Sept. 1976 1
_________________________
Lexington—
Fayette, Ky., Nov. 19751__________________________
Los Angeles—
Long Beach, Calif., Oct. 1975 1_________________
Louisville, Ky.—
Ind., Nov. 1975______________________________
Melbourne—
Titusville—
Cocoa, Fla., Aug. 1975_________________
Memphis, Tenn.—
Ark«—
Miss., Nov. 1975_______________________
* Prices are determined by the Government Printing Office and are subject to change.

Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.



Bulletin number
and price*
1850-80,
1900-59,
1850-75,
1900-30,
1850-83,
1900-52,
1900-39,
1900-49,
1900-11,
1900-53,
1850-69,
1900-28,
1900-57,
1900-32,
1900-7,
1850-64,
1850-78,
1900-41,
1850-59,
1900-25,
1850-73,
1900-45,
1850-82,
1900-15,

45 cents
55 cents
85 cents
85 cents
75 cents
85 cents
55 cents
85 cents
95 cents
85 cents
95 cents
55 cents
55 cents
$1.05
75 cents
$1.30
95 cents
55 cents
$1.50
55 cents
45 cents
45 cents
75 cents
$1.25

1900-20,
1900-29,
1900-54,
1900-37,
1900-47,
1900-36,
1900-14,
1900-26,
1900-17,
1900-58,
1900-8,
1850-81,
1900-60,
1850-84,
1850-86,
1850-79,
1850-54,
1850-85,

55 cents
55 cents
45 cents
55 cents
65 cents
85 cents
55 cents
85 cents
55 cents
75 cents
55 cents
45 cents
$1.05
75 cents
$1.15
45 cents
65 cents
45 cents

Area
M ia m i, F l a ., O c t. 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________ _____________
M ilw a u k e e , W i s ., A p r . 1 9 7 6 _______________________________________ ____
M in n ea p o lis—St. P a u l, M in n — W i s ., J an . 1 976_______________________
N a s s a u -S u ffo lk , N .Y ., June 1 9 7 6 _______________________________________
N e w a rk , N .J ., J an . 1 9 7 6 ____________________________________________ _____
N ew O r le a n s , L a ., J an. 1 9 7 6 ____________________________________________
N ew Y o r k , N . Y - N . J . , M ay 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________
N orfo lk —V ir g in ia B e a ch —P o r ts m o u th , V a — N .C ., M a y 1 9 7 6 1_____
N orfo lk —V ir g in ia B ea ch —P o r ts m o u th and N e w p ort N ew s—
H am p ton, V a — N .C ., M ay 1976 1 ______________________________________
N o r th e a s t P e n n sy lv a n ia , A u g . 1 9 7 6 ____________________________________
O k la h o m a C ity , O k la ., A u g . 1976 ____________________ _________________
O m a h a , N e b r — Iow a, O c t. 1975__________________________________________
P a t e r s o n - C l i f t o n - P a s s a i c , N .J ., June 1 9 7 6 _________________________
P h ila d e lp h ia , P a — N .J ., N o v . 1 9 7 5 _____________________________________
P itts b u rg h , P a ., J an . 1 9 7 6 1 ____________________________________________
P o r tla n d , M a in e , N o v . 197 5______________________________________________
P o r tla n d , O r e g — W a s h ., M a y 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________
P o u g h k e e p sie , N .Y ., June 1 9 7 6 __________________________________ _ ___
_
P o u g h k e e p s ie -K in g s to n —N ew bu rgh, N .Y ., June 1 9 7 6_______________
P ro v id e n c e —W a rw ic k —P aw tu ck et, R .I —M a s s ., June 1 9 7 6_____ ___
R a le ig h —D u rh a m , N .C ., F e b . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________
R ic h m o n d , V a ., June 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________________
St. L o u is , M o — 111., M a r . 1 9 7 6 1 ________________________________________
S a c ra m e n to , C a lif ., D e c . 1 9 7 5 __________________________________________
Saginaw , M ic h ., N o v . 1 9 7 5 _______________________________________________
Salt L ak e C ity—O gd en , U tah , N o v . 1 975 1_____________________________
San A n to n io , T e x ., M ay 1 9 7 6 ____________________________________________
San D ie g o , C a li f ., N o v . 1975_____________________________________________
San F r a n c is c o —O ak land , C a li f ., M a r . 1 9 7 6 __________________________
San J o s e , C a li f ., M a r . 1 976______________________________________________
S eattle—E v e r e t t, W a s h ., J an . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________
South B en d , Ind ., M a r . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________________
S ta m fo rd , C o n n ., M a y 1 9 7 6 1____________________________________________
S y r a c u s e , N .Y ., J u ly 1976 ______________________________________________
T o le d o , O hio—M i c h ., M ay 1976__________________________________________
T re n to n , N .J ., Sept. 1 9 7 6 ________________________________________________
U t ic a -R o m e , N .Y ., J u ly 1 9 7 5 1__________________________________________
W a sh in g to n , D .C — M d — V a ., M a r . 1976________________________________
W e s tc h e s te r C ounty, N .Y ., M a y 1 9 7 6 _________________________________
W ic h ita , K a n s ., A p r . 1 9 7 6 _______________________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s ., A p r . 1 9 7 6 ___________________________________________
Y o r k , P a ., F e b . 1 9 7 6 _____________________________________________________

Bulletin number
and price*
1 8 5 0 -7 6 ,
1 9 0 0 -2 2 ,
1 9 0 0 -3 ,
1 9 0 0 -3 5 ,
1 9 0 0 - 10,
1 9 0 0 -2 ,
1 9 0 0 -4 8 ,
1 9 0 0 -2 7 ,

95 cents
8 5 cents
95 cents
8 5 cen ts
85 cents
75 cen ts
$ 1 .0 5
8 5 cents

1 9 0 0 -3 3 ,
1 9 0 0 -4 3 ,
1 9 0 0 -4 2 ,
1 8 5 0 -5 6 ,
1 9 0 0 -3 8 ,
1850- 6 5,
1 9 0 0 -1 ,
1 8 5 0 -7 2 ,
1 9 0 0 -5 1 ,
1 9 0 0 -5 0 ,
1 9 0 0 -5 5 ,
1 9 0 0 -3 1 ,
1 9 0 0 - 18,
1 9 0 0 -3 4 ,
1 9 0 0 -1 9 ,
1 8 5 0 -8 7 ,
1 8 5 0 -7 1 ,
1 8 5 0 -7 4 ,
1 9 0 0 -2 3 ,
1 8 5 0 -7 7 ,
1 9 0 0 -9 ,
1 9 0 0 - 13,
1 9 0 0 - 6,
1 9 0 0 - 5,
1 9 0 0 -4 0 ,
1 9 0 0 -4 4 ,
1 9 0 0 -2 4 ,
1 9 0 0 -5 6 ,
1 8 5 0 -4 8 ,
1 9 0 0 - 12,
1 9 0 0 -4 6 ,
1 9 0 0 -2 1 ,
1 9 0 0 - 16,
1 9 0 0 -4 ,

8 5 cents
65 cents
55 ce n ts
$ 1 .1 0
55 cen ts
85 cents
$ 1 .1 5
4 5 cents
75 c e n ts
4 5 cen ts
55 cents
75 cents
55 cents
65 cents
$ 1 .2 5
4 5 cents
35 cents
7 5 cents
65 cents
4 5 cents
95 cents
75 cents
65 cents
55 cents
85 cents
55 cents
55 cents
55 cen ts
80 cents
8 5 cents
55 cen ts
55 cents
55 cents
55 cents

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Washington, D.C. 20212

Postage and Fees Paid
U.S. Department of Labor
Third Class Mail

Official Business
Penalty for private use, $300

Lab-441

Bureau of Labor Statistics Regional Offices
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