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A rea Wage S urvey
The Jacksonville, Florida, M etropolitan Area
J a n u a r y 196 6

J o c k s o n v il le

B u l l e t i n No. 1 4 6 5 - 4 1




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner




Area Wage Survey
T h e Ja c k so n v ille , F lo r id a , M etropolitan A rea




J a n u a r y 19 6 6

B ulletin No. 1465-41
March 1966

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
W. Willard Wirtz, Secretary
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Arthur M. Ross, Commissioner

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, W ashington, D .C ., 2 0 4 0 2 - Price 20 cents




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P re fa c e

Contents
Page

T h e B u r e a u o f L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s p r o g r a m o f annual
o c c u p a t i o n a l w a g e s u r v e y s in m e t r o p o l i t a n a r e a s is de-r
s i g n e d to p r o v i d e data on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s , and e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s . It
y i e l d s d e t a i l e d data b y s e l e c t e d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s f o r each
o f th e a r e a s stu d ie d , f o r e c o n o m i c r e g i o n s , and f o r the
U n ite d S ta te s .
A m a j o r c o n s i d e r a t i o n in the p r o g r a m is
the n e e d f o r g r e a t e r i n s i g h t in to (1) the m o v e m e n t o f w a g e s
b y o c c u p a t i o n a l c a t e g o r y and s k i l l l e v e l , and (2) the s t r u c ­
t u r e and l e v e l o f w a g e s a m o n g a r e a s and i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s .
A t the end o f e a c h s u r v e y , an i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l ­
l e t i n p r e s e n t s s u r v e y r e s u l t s f o r e a c h a r e a s tud ie d .
A fter
c o m p l e t i o n o f a l l o f the i n d i v i d u a l a r e a b u l l e t i n s f o r a
round o f s u r v e y s , a t w o - p a r t s u m m a r y b u l l e t i n is is s u e d .
T h e f i r s t p a r t b r i n g s data f o r e a c h o f the m e t r o p o l i t a n
a r e a s stu d ie d in to one b u l l e t i n .
The second part presents
i n f o r m a t i o n w h i c h has b e e n p r o j e c t e d f r o m i n d i v i d u a l m e t ­
r o p o l i t a n a r e a d ata to r e l a t e to e c o n o m i c r e g i o n s and the
U n ite d State s .

I n t r o d u c t i o n _________________________________________________________________________
W a g e t r e n d s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s _______________________________
T ab le s :
1.
2.

A.

E s t a b l i s h m e n t s and w o r k e r s w i th i n s c o p e o f s u r v e y and
n u m b e r s t u d i e d ___________________________________________________________
I n d e x e s o f s ta n d a rd w e e k l y s a l a r i e s and s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y
e a r n i n g s f o r s e l e c t e d o c c u p a t i o n a l g r o u p s , and p e r c e n t s of
i n c r e a s e f o r s e l e c t e d p e r i o d s _________________________________________
O ccu pation al earn in g s; *
A -1. O f f i c e o c c u p a t i o n s —m e n and w o m e n ____________________________
A -2. P r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s ^ n e n ________________
A - 3 . O f f i c e , p r o f e s s i o n a l , and t e c h n i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s —
m e n and w o m e n c o m b i n e d _____ !_______________________________
A -4. M a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t o c c u p a t i o n s _____________________
A - 5 . C u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e m e n t o c c u p a t i o n s ______________

A ppendix.

O c c u p a t i o n a l d e s c r i p t i o n s _________________________________________

E i g h t y - f i v e a r e a s c u r r e n t l y a r e in c l u d e d in the
p r o g r a m . I n f o r m a t i o n on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s is c o l l e c t e d
an n u all y in e a c h a r e a . I n f o r m a t i o n on e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c ­
t i c e s and s u p p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s is ob ta in e d b i e n ­
n i a l l y in m o s t o f the a r e a s .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s r e s u l t s o f th e s u r v e y in
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , in J an u ary 1966. T h e Sta n d a r d M e t r o ­
p o l i t a n S t a t i s t i c a l A r e a , as d e fi n e d b y the B u r e a u o f the
B u d g e t th r o u g h M a r c h 1965, c o n s i s t s o f D u v a l Cou nty.
T h i s stu dy w a s c o n d u c t e d b y the B u r e a u 's r e g i o n a l o f f i c e in
A t l a n t a , G a . , B r u n s w i c k A . B a gd o n , D i r e c t o r ; b y J e r r y G.
A d a m s , u n d e r th e d i r e c t i o n o f J a m e s D . G a r l a n d .
The
stu d y w a s u n d e r th e g e n e r a l d i r e c t i o n o f D o n a l d M . C r u s e ,
A ssistan t R egio n al D ir e c to r fo r W ages
and I n d u s t r i a l
R elation s.




1
3

areas.

* NOTE:
S i m i l a r ta b u la tio n s a r e a v a i l a b l e f o r
(See in sid e back c o v e r .)

other

A c u r r e n t r e p o r t on o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s and s u p ­
p l e m e n t a r y w a g e p r a c t i c e s in the J a c k s o n v i l l e a r e a is a l s o
a v a i l a b l e f o r auto d e a l e r r e p a i r sho ps (A u g u s t 1964). Union
s 'c a ie s ,' i n d i c a t i v e o f p r e v a i l i n g p a y l e v e l s , a r e >a v a i l a b l e
f o r b u ild in g c o n s t r u c t i o n , p r i n t i n g , l o c a l - t r a n s i t o p e r a t i n g
e m p l o y e e s , and m o t o r t r u c k d r i v e r s and h e l p e r s .

iii

2

3

4
6
7
8
9
11




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Area W age Survey--The Jacksonville, Fla., M etropolitan Area
Introduction
O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and e a r n i n g s data a r e shown f o r
f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r s , i . e . , t h o s e h i r e d to w o r k a r e g u l a r w e e k l y s c h e d u le
in the g i v e n o c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n .
E a r n i n g s data e x c l u d e p r e ­
m i u m p a y f o r o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and
l a te s h if ts .
N o n p r o d u c t i o n b o n u s e s a r e e x c l u d e d , but c o s t - o f - l i v i n g
b o n u s e s and i n c e n t i v e e a r n i n g s a r e in c lu d e d .
W h e re w e e k ly hours a re
r e p o r t e d , as f o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l o c c u p a t i o n s , r e f e r e n c e is to the w o r k
s c h e d u l e s (r o u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f h o u r ) f o r w h i c h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s a r e p aid ; a v e r a g e w e e k l y e a r n i n g s f o r th e s e o c c u p a tio n s h a v e
b e e n ro u n d e d to the n e a r e s t h a l f d o l l a r .

T h i s a r e a is 1 of 85 in w h i c h the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r ' s
B u r e a u of L a b o r S t a t i s t i c s c on du cts s u r v e y s o f o c c u p a t i o n a l e a r n i n g s
and r e l a t e d w a g e b e n e f i t s on an a r e a w i d e b a s i s .
T h i s b u l l e t i n p r e s e n t s c u r r e n t o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t and
e a r n i n g s i n f o r m a t i o n ob ta in e d l a r g e l y b y m a i l f r o m the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s
v i s i t e d b y B u r e a u f i e l d e c o n o m i s t s in the l a s t p r e v i o u s s u r v e y f o r
o c c u p a tio n s r e p o r t e d in that e a r l i e r study. P e r s o n a l v i s i t s w e r e m a d e
to n o n r e s p o n d e n ts and to th o s e r e s p o n d e n t s r e p o r t i n g unusual c h a n ge s
s i n c e the p r e v i o u s s u r v e y .

T h e a v e r a g e s p r e s e n t e d r e f l e c t c o m p o s i t e , a r e a w i d e e s tim a te s .
I n d u s t r i e s and e s t a b l i s h m e n t s d i f f e r in p a y l e v e l and j o b s t a f f i n g and,
thus, c o n t r i b u t e d i f f e r e n t l y to the e s t i m a t e s f o r e a c h job .
The pay
r e l a t i o n s h i p o b ta in a b le f r o m the a v e r a g e s m a y f a i l to r e f l e c t a c c u r a t e l y
the w a g e s p r e a d o r d i f f e r e n t i a l m a i n t a i n e d a m o n g j o b s in in d i v i d u a l
e s t a b l i s h m e n t s . S i m i l a r l y , d i f f e r e n c e s in a v e r a g e p a y l e v e l s f o r m e n
and w o m e n in any o f the s e l e c t e d o c c u p a tio n s should not be a s s u m e d to
r e f l e c t d i f f e r e n c e s in p a y t r e a t m e n t o f the s e x e s w i t h i n in d i v i d u a l e s ­
t a b l i s h m e n t s . O t h e r p o s s i b l e f a c t o r s w h i c h m a y c o n t r i b u t e to d i f f e r ­
e n c e s in p a y f o r m e n and w o m e n i n c lu d e : D i f f e r e n c e s in p r o g r e s s i o n
w i th i n e s t a b l i s h e d r a t e r a n g e s , s i n c e o n l y the a c tu a l r a t e s p aid i n ­
c u m b e n ts a r e c o l l e c t e d ; and d i f f e r e n c e s in s p e c i f i c duties p e r f o r m e d ,
alth ough the w o r k e r s a r e a p p r o p r i a t e l y c l a s s i f i e d w ith in the s a m e
s u r v e y j o b d e s c r i p t i o n . Job d e s c r i p t i o n s u s e d in c l a s s i f y i n g e m p l o y e e s
in t h e s e s u r v e y s a r e u s u a l l y m o r e g e n e r a l i z e d than th o s e u s e d in
i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s and a l l o w f o r m i n o r d i f f e r e n c e s am o n g e s ­
t a b l i s h m e n t s in the s p e c i f i c duties p e r f o r m e d .

In e a c h a r e a , data a r e o b ta in e d f r o m r e p r e s e n t a t i v e e s t a b ­
l i s h m e n t s w i t h i n s i x b r o a d i n d u s t r y d i v i s i o n s : M a n u fa c t u r i n g ; t r a n s ­
p o r t a t i o n , c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and o t h e r p u b l i c u t i l i t i e s ; w h o l e s a l e t r a d e ;
r e t a i l t r a d e ; f i n a n c e , i n s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e ; and s e r v i c e s .
M a jor
i n d u s t r y g r o u p s e x c l u d e d f r o m t h e s e s tu d ie s a r e g o v e r n m e n t o p e r a ­
tio n s and the c o n s t r u c t i o n and e x t r a c t i v e i n d u s t r i e s .
Establishm en ts
h a v in g f e w e r than a p r e s c r i b e d n u m b e r of w o r k e r s a r e o m i t t e d b e c a u s e
th e y te nd to f u r n i s h i n s u f f i c i e n t e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a tio n s stu d ied
to w a r r a n t in c l u s i o n . S e p a r a t e ta b u la tio n s a r e p r o v i d e d f o r e a c h of the
b ro ad in du stry d iv isio n s which m e e t pu b lication c r i t e r i a .
T h e s e s u r v e y s a r e c o n d u cted on a s a m p l e b a s i s b e c a u s e of
the u n n e c e s s a r y c o s t i n v o l v e d in s u r v e y i n g a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s .
To
ob ta in o p t i m u m a c c u r a c y at m i n i m u m c o s t , a g r e a t e r p r o p o r t i o n of
l a r g e than o f s m a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s is stu d ie d .
In c o m b i n i n g the data,
h o w e v e r , a ll estab lish m en ts a r e g iven th eir a p p ro p ria te w eight.
Es­
t i m a t e s b a s e d on the e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s tu d ie d a r e p r e s e n t e d , t h e r e f o r e ,
as r e l a t i n g to a l l e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the i n d u s t r y g r o u p i n g and a r e a ,
e x c e p t f o r t h o s e b e l o w the m i n i m u m s i z e stu died.
O c c u p a tio n s

O c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t e s t i m a t e s r e p r e s e n t the t o ta l in a l l
e s ta b l i s h m e n ts w i t h i n the s c o p e o f the study and not the n u m b e r a c t u a l l y
surveyed.
B e c a u s e o f d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e a m o n g e s ­
t a b l i s h m e n t s , the e s t i m a t e s of o c c u p a t i o n a l e m p l o y m e n t ob ta in e d f r o m
the s a m p l e o f e s t a b l i s h m e n t s s tu d ie d s e r v e o n l y to i n d i c a t e the r e l a t i v e
i m p o r t a n c e o f the j o b s stu d ied .
T h e s e d i f f e r e n c e s in o c c u p a t i o n a l
s t r u c t u r e do not m a t e r i a l l y a f f e c t the a c c u r a c y of the e a r n i n g s data.

and E a r n i n g s

T h e o c c u p a ti o n s s e l e c t e d f o r stu d y a r e c o m m o n to a v a r i e t y
o f m a n u f a c t u r i n g and n o n m a n u fa c t u r i n g i n d u s t r i e s , and a r e of the
f o l l o w i n g t y p e s : (1 ) O f f i c e c l e r i c a l ; (2) p r o f e s s i o n a l and t e c h n i c a l ;
( 3 ) m a i n t e n a n c e and p o w e r p l a n t ; and (4) c u s t o d i a l and m a t e r i a l m o v e ­
m e n t.
O c c u p a t i o n a l c l a s s i f i c a t i o n is b a s e d on a u n i f o r m s e t o f j o b
d e s c r i p t i o n s d e s i g n e d to tak e a c c o u n t o f i n t e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t v a r i a t i o n
in du tie s w i t h i n the s a m e j o b .
T h e o c c u p a t i o n s s e l e c t e d f o r study
a r e l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d in the ap p e n d ix.
E a r n i n g s data f o r s o m e o f
the o c c u p a ti o n s l i s t e d and d e s c r i b e d a r e not p r e s e n t e d in the A - s e r i e s
t a b l e s b e c a u s e e i t h e r (1) e m p l o y m e n t in the o c c u p a tio n is to o s m a l l
to p r o v i d e enough data to m e r i t p r e s e n t a t i o n , o r (2 ) t h e r e is p o s s i ­
b i l i t y of d i s c l o s u r e o f i n d i v i d u a l e s t a b l i s h m e n t data.




E stab lish m en t P r a c t i c e s

and S u p p l e m e n t a r y W a g e P r o v i s i o n s

T a b u l a t i o n s on s e l e c t e d e s t a b l i s h m e n t p r a c t i c e s and s u p p l e ­
m e n t a r y w a g e p r o v i s i o n s ( B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) a r e not p r e s e n t e d in th is
b u l l e ti n .
I n f o r m a t i o n f o r t h e s e ta b u la tio n s is c o l l e c t e d b i e n n i a l l y in
this a r e a .
T h e s e ta b u la tio n s
on m i n i m u m e n t r a n c e s a l a r i e s f o r
i n e x p e r i e n c e d w o m e n o f f i c e w o r k e r s ; s h ift d i f f e r e n t i a l s ; s c h e d u l e d
w e e k l y h o u r s ; p aid h o l i d a y s ; p a id v a c a t i o n s ; and h ealt h, i n s u r a n c e ,
and p e n s i o n p la n s ; a r e p r e s e n t e d (in tne B - s e r i e s t a b l e s ) in p r e v i o u s
b u l l e t i n s f o r th is a r e a .

1

2




T a b le 1.

E s t a b lis h m e n ts and w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s u r v e y and n u m b e r s tu d ie d in J a c k s o n v ille ,
b y m a jo r in d u s t r y d iv is io n , 2 J a n u a ry 1966

M in im u m
e m p lo y m e n t
in e s t a b lis h m e n ts in s c o p e
o f s tu d y

In d u s t r y d iv is io n

A l l d i v i s i o n s ___________________________________________
M a n u fa c tu r in g _________________________________________
N o n m a n u fa c tu r in g ----------------------------------------------T r a n s p o r t a t io n , c o m m u n ic a t io n , and
o t h e r p u b lic u t i l i t i e s 5 ________________________
W h o le s a le t r a d e 6 ________________________________
R e t a i l t r a d e 6 ______________________________________
F in a n c e , in s u r a n c e , and r e a l e s t a t e 6 ______
c e r v i c e s 6 7 ---------------------------------------------------S

_

N u m b e r o f e s t a b lis h m e n ts

F la ., 1

W o r k e r s in e s ta b lis h m e n t s
W ith in s c o p e o f s t u d y 4

W ith in s c o p e
o f stu d y *

S tu d ied

S tu d ie d
Num ber

P ercen t

341

128

62, 700

100

39, 690

50

82
259

38
90

1 7 ,1 0 0
4 5 ,6 0 0

27
73

12, 370
2 7 ,3 2 0

50
50
50
50
50

37
53
90
43
36

22

11, 300
5, 700
1 6 ,3 0 0
, 000
4, 300

18
9
26
13
7

9, 840
1, 920
7, 620
5 ,9 2 0
, 020

14

22
18
14

8

1

2

T h e J a c k s o n v ille S ta n d a rd M e t r o p o lit a n S t a t is t ic a l A r e a , a s d e fin e d b y th e B u re a u o f th e B u d g e t th ro u g h M a r c h 1965, c o n s is t s o f D u v a l C o u n ty .
T h e " w o r k e r s w ith in s c o p e o f s tu d y " e s t im a t e s sh o w n in th is t a b le p r o v id e a r e a s o n a b ly a c c u r a t e d e s c r ip t io n o f th e s i z e and c o m p o s it io n o f th e la b o r
f o r c e in c lu d e d in th e s u r v e y .
T h e e s t im a t e s a r e n ot in te n d e d , h o w e v e r , to s e r v e a s a b a s is o f c o m p a r is o n w ith o t h e r e m p lo y m e n t in d e x e s f o r the
a r e a to m e a s u r e e m p lo y m e n t tr e n d s o r le v e l s s in c e (1) p la n n in g o f w a g e s u r v e y s r e q u i r e s th e u s e o f e s ta b lis h m e n t d a ta c o m p ile d c o n s id e r a b ly in a d v a n c e
o f th e p a y r o l l p e r io d s tu d ie d , and (2 ) s m a ll e s t a b lis h m e n ts a r e e x c lu d e d f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y .
T h e 1957 r e v i s e d e d it io n o f th e S ta n d a rd I n d u s t r ia l C la s s i f i c a t i o n M a n u a l and th e 1963 S u p p le m e n t w e r e u s e d in c la s s i f y i n g e s ta b lis h m e n t s b y
in d u s t r y d iv is io n .
In c lu d e s a ll e s ta b lis h m e n t s w ith to t a l e m p lo y m e n t at o r a b o v e th e m in im u m lim it a t io n .
A l l o u tle ts (w it h in th e a r e a ) o f c o m p a n ie s in such
in d u s t r ie s as t r a d e , fin a n c e , au to r e p a i r s e r v i c e , and m o tio n p ic t u r e t h e a t e r s a r e c o n s id e r e d as 1 e s t a b lis h m e n t.
In c lu d e s a ll w o r k e r s in a ll e s t a b lis h m e n ts w ith t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t (w ith in th e a r e a ) at o r a b o v e th e m in im u m lim it a t io n .
T a x ic a b s and s e r v i c e s in c id e n t a l to w a t e r t r a n s p o r t a t io n w e r e e x c lu d e d .
J a c k s o n v ille 's e l e c t r i c u t ilit y is m u n ic ip a lly o p e r a t e d and is e x c lu d e d
b y d e fin it io n f r o m th e s c o p e o f th e stu dy.
T h is in d u s t r y d i v i s i o n is r e p r e s e n t e d in e s t im a t e s f o r " a l l in d u s t r ie s " and "n o n m a n u fa c t u r in g " in th e S e r i e s A t a b le s .
S e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n
o f d a ta f o r th is d i v i s i o n is n ot m a d e f o r on e o r m o r e o f th e fo llo w in g r e a s o n s :
(1 ) E m p lo y m e n t in th e d i v i s i o n is to o s m a ll to p r o v id e en ou gh d a ta
to m e r i t s e p a r a t e s tu d y , (2 ) th e s a m p le w a s not d e s ig n e d i n i t i a l l y to p e r m it s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n , (3 ) r e s p o n s e w a s in s u ffic ie n t o r in a d e q u a te to p e r m it
s e p a r a t e p r e s e n t a t io n , and (4 ) t h e r e is p o s s ib ilit y o f d i s c l o s u r e o f in d iv id u a l e s ta b lis h m e n t d a ta .
H o t e ls ; p e r s o n a l s e r v i c e s ; b u s in e s s s e r v i c e s ; a u to m o b ile r e p a i r s h o p s ; m o t io n p ic t u r e s ; n o n p r o fit m e m b e r s h ip o r g a n iz a t io n s (e x c lu d in g r e l i g i o u s
and c h a r it a b le o r g a n iz a t io n s ); and e n g in e e r in g and a r c h it e c t u r a l s e r v i c e s .

2

3

4
5

6

7

A b o u t o n e - fo u r t h o f th e e m p lo y e e s w ith in s c o p e o f th e s u r v e y in th e J a c k s o n v ille
a r e a w e r e e m p lo y e d in m a n u fa c tu r in g f i r m s .
T h e fo llo w in g t a b le p r e s e n t s th e m a jo r in d u s tr y
g r o u p s and s p e c if ic in d u s t r ie s as a p e r c e n t o f a l l m a n u fa c tu r in g :
In d u s tr y g r o u p

S p e c if ic in d u s t r ie s

F o o d p r o d u c t s -------------------------------23
T r a n s p o r t a t io n e q u ip m e n t ----------- 17
P a p e r and a l l i e d p r o d u c t s ----------- 15
T o b a c c o _______________________________ 9
P r in t in g and p u b lis h in g ___________
8
C h e m ic a ls ____________________________ 6
P r i m a r y m e t a l s -------------------------- 6

S h ip an d b o a t b u ild in g
and r e p a i r i n g ___________________ 16
C i g a r s ______________________________
9
7
B a k e r y p r o d u c t s _________________
D a i r y p r o d u c t s ___________________
5
Ir o n and s t e e l fo u n d r ie s --------5
N e w s p a p e r s _______________________
5
P a p e r b o a r d c o n t a in e r s and
b o x e s _____________________________
5
P a p e r m i l l s ________________________
5

T h is in fo r m a t io n is b a s e d on e s t im a t e s o f t o t a l e m p lo y m e n t d e r i v e d f r o m u n iv e r s e
m a t e r i a l s c o m p ile d p r i o r to a c t u a l s u r v e y .
P r o p o r t io n s in v a r io u s in d u s t r y d iv is io n s m a y
d i f f e r f r o m p r o p o r t io n s b a s e d on th e r e s u lt s o f th e s u r v e y a s s h o w n in t a b le 1 a b o v e .

3

Wage Trends for Selected Occupational Groups
P r e s e n t e d in t a b le 2 a r e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s of ch an ge in
a v e r a g e s a l a r i e s of o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , and
in a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s o f s e l e c t e d p lan t w o r k e r g r o u p s .
F o r o f f i c e c l e r i c a l w o r k e r s and i n d u s t r i a l n u r s e s , the p e r ­
c e n t a g e s o f c h a n g e r e l a t e to a v e r a g e w e e k l y s a l a r i e s f o r n o r m a l h o u r s
o f w o r k , that i s , the s ta n d a rd w o r k s c h e d u l e f o r w h ic h s t r a i g h t - t i m e
s a l a r i e s a r e p aid .
F o r p la nt w o r k e r g r o u p s , t h e y m e a s u r e c h a n ge s
in a v e r a g e s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r l y e a r n i n g s , e x c l u d i n g p r e m i u m p a y f o r
o v e r t i m e and f o r w o r k on w e e k e n d s , h o l i d a y s , and la te s h ifts .
The
p e r c e n t a g e s a r e b a s e d on data f o r s e l e c t e d k e y o c c u p a tio n s and i n ­
c lu d e m o s t o f the n u m e r i c a l l y i m p o r t a n t j o b s w ith in e a c h g ro u p .
Office clerical (men and women):
Bookkeeping-machine operators, class B
Clerks, accounting, classes A and B
Clerks, file, classes A , B, and C
Clerks, order
Clerks, payroll
Comptometer operators
Keypunch operators, classes A and B
Office boys and girls
Secretaries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators, classes A and B
Tabulating-machine operators, class B
Typists, classes A and B

A v e r a g e w eek ly
c o m p u te d f o r e a c h o f the
o r h ou rly earn in gs w e r e
the j o b s d u r in g the p e r i o d

Industrial nurses (m en and women):
Nurses, industrial (registered)
Skilled maintenance (men):
Carpenters
Electricians
Machinists
Mechanics
Mechanics (automotive)
Painters
Pipefitters
Tool and die makers
Unskilled plant (men):
Janitors, porters, and cleaners
Laborers, material handling

s a la r ie s or a v e ra g e h o u rly earnings w e r e
s e le c te d occupations.
The a vera ge sa la ries
then m u l t i p l i e d b y e m p l o y m e n t in e a c h of
s u r v e y e d in 1961.
T h e s e w eig h ted earn in gs

Table 2.

f o r i n d i v i d u a l o c c u p a t i o n s w e r e then t o t a l e d to ob ta in an a g g r e g a t e f o r
e a c h o c c u p a t i o n a l g ro u p . F i n a l l y , the r a t i o ( e x p r e s s e d as a p e r c e n t a g e )
o f the g r o u p a g g r e g a t e f o r the one y e a r to the a g g r e g a t e f o r the o t h e r
y e a r w a s c o m p u t e d and the d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n the r e s u l t and 100 is
the p e r c e n t a g e o f ch an ge f r o m the one p e r i o d to the o t h e r.
The
i n d e x e s w e r e c o m p u t e d b y m u l t i p l y i n g the r a t i o s f o r e ach g r o u p
a g g r e g a t e f o r e a c h p e r i o d a f t e r the b a s e y e a r (1961).
T h e i n d e x e s and p e r c e n t a g e s o f ch an ge m e a s u r e , p r i n c i p a l l y ,
the e f f e c t s o f (1) g e n e r a l s a l a r y and w a g e c h a n g e s ; (2) m e r i t o r o t h e r
i n c r e a s e s in p a y r e c e i v e d b y i n d i v i d u a l w o r k e r s w h i l e in the s a m e j o b ;
and (3 ) c h a n g e s in a v e r a g e w a g e s due to c h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e r e ­
s u ltin g f r o m l a b o r t u r n o v e r , f o r c e e x p a n s i o n s , f o r c e r e d u c t i o n s , and
c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n s of w o r k e r s e m p l o y e d b y e s t a b l i s h m e n t s w ith
d iffe re n t pay le v e ls .
C h a n g e s in the l a b o r f o r c e can c a u s e i n c r e a s e s
o r d e c r e a s e s in the o c c u p a t i o n a l a v e r a g e s w ith o u t ac tu a l w a g e ch an ge s .
F o r e x a m p l e , a f o r c e e x p a n s i o n m i g h t i n c r e a s e the p r o p o r t i o n of l o w e r
p aid w o r k e r s in a s p e c i f i c o c c u p a t i o n and l o w e r the a v e r a g e , w h e r e a s
a r e d u c t i o n in the p r o p o r t i o n of l o w e r p aid w o r k e r s w o u ld h a ve the
o p p o s i t e e f f e c t . S i m i l a r l y , the m o v e m e n t of a h i g h - p a y i n g e s t a b l i s h ­
m e n t out of an a r e a c o u ld c a u s e the a v e r a g e e a r n i n g s to d ro p , e v e n
though no c han ge in r a t e s o c c u r r e d in o t h e r e s t a b l i s h m e n t s in the a r e a .
Data a r e a d ju s te d w h e r e n e c e s s a r y to r e m o v e f r o m the i n d e x e s and
p e r c e n t a g e s of ch an ge any s i g n i f i c a n t e f f e c t c a u s e d b y ch an ge s in
s c o p e of the s u r v e y .
T h e use of c o n s t a n t e m p l o y m e n t w e i g h t s e l i m i n a t e s the e f f e c t
o f c h a n g e s in the p r o p o r t i o n o f w o r k e r s r e p r e s e n t e d in e ach j o b i n ­
c lu d e d in the data.
T h e p e r c e n t a g e s o f c han ge r e f l e c t o n ly chan ges in
a v e ra g e pay f o r s tr a ig h t-tim e hours.
T h e y a r e not i n f lu e n c e d b y
c h a n g e s in s ta n d a rd w o r k s c h e d u l e s , as such, o r b y p r e m i u m p a y
for overtim e.

Indexes of standard weekly salaries and straight-time hourly earnings for selected occupational groups in Jacksonville, Fla. ,
January 1966 and January 1965, and percents of increase for selected periods
Indexes
(D ecem ber 1960-100)

Industry and occupational group
January 1966

A ll industries:
Office clerical (m en and w o m e n )-------Industrial nurses (m en and w o m e n )-----Skilled maintenance (m en )------------------Unskilled plant (m e n )-------------------------Manufacturing:
Office clerical (m en and w o m e n )-------Industrial nurses (m en and w o m e n )-----Skilled maintenance (m en )------------------Unskilled plant (m e n )--------------------------

*

Data do not meet publication criteria.




117.4

(M
117. 2
117.7

(?)
(? )
119. 7

January 1965

113.7

Percents of increase
January 1965
to
January 1966

January 1964
to
January 1965

January 1963
to
January 1964

November 1961
to
January 1963

December 1960 December 1959
to
to
Novem ber 1961 December 1960

3.3

2. 7

2.6

5.1

2.6

(M

(M

(M

i1)

(M

(M

114. 1
115.0

2.8
2.4

5.2
1.4

2. 3
2.9

3.1
4.8

2.9
5.2

4.1
3.3

(* )
(?)
f 1)
116.2

(? )
( X)
3.7
3.1

(M

(M
(M
(M

(M
(M
(M

( X)

(* )

(?)

(M

(M
(M

2.6

4.3

5. 5

7.2

(M

(’)
3. 1
2.9

5.2

4
A. Occupational Earnings

Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women
(A v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e w e e k ly hours and ea rn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a re a b asis
by in d u stry d iv is io n , J a c k s o n v ille , F l a . , January 1966)
Weekly earnings1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and industry divis io n

Number
of
woikers

Average
weekly
hours1
standard)

MEN
CLERKS*

ACCOUNTING,

CLASS A --------------

65

4 .

48

AO. 5
1*

Number of w o rk e r s re c e iv i n g straight -t i m e w e e k ly earnings o f —
$

Mean2

Median 2

$
l 14.50

$
100.00

8 9 . OU
38 .5 0

8 8.00

60 .5 0
62 .0 0

5 9. 0 0
6 0 . UO

Middle range 2

$
$
9 3 .0 0 -1 1 9 .5 0

•U

$

t

t

t

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

145

55

60

65

70

75

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

*45

o ve r

-

-

-

~

1

1

23
22

8
8

5

7

1

4

6

6

1

2

-

-

8

12
12

_

_

2
2

-

_

-

-

*

“

-

_

4
4

2

-

2

-

“

“

“

-

and

V • 4.

30
3V

3 9. 0 112.00 108.0(1 1 0 0 .0 9 -1 1 8 .0 0
39. r: 112.00 108.00 1 0 0 .0 9 -1 1 3 .0 0

-

-

31
31

41 . r
4 1. 0

104.00
1 04 .0 0

108.50
1C 8.50

9 6 .0 9 -1 1 5 .0 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 1 5 .0 0

-

32

41.0

66.0U

64.9 0

6 0 .5 0 - 74.00

73. 00

7j . i 0

6 4 . 5 0 - 82 .0 0

74. 50
74. 00

7 .
6 7 . 00

6 4 . ' .- 80.50
6 2 . 5 i - 83 .0 0

S7. ’

6 5. 9 0

6 1 . 5 9 - 7 0. 5 0

39.
39.
39.9

a.
8 7. 5 u
1 4. t;

8 8. 5 0
7.50
. >«■

79.- i - 9 8.5 1
7 8 . 5 ) - 98 .0 0
9 7 . 5 ) —107. 50

_
-

5
~

39..

69.5i

68.00

63

39.

69.5 f

63 .*.»•:*

6 1 . 0 0 - 7 8. 5 0
6 3 . OJ- 7 5. 0 0
6 0 . 5 J - 7 9. 5 0

3

N JNMANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------

64 8
46
602

3

CLERKS, F IL E , CLASS B ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------PUBLIC UT It IT1 F S 3-----------------------

168
167
26

38. 5
38.5
39.5

44 • 5*
64 . Si
5 . 5v

6 2 .5 •
5 3.5
96.5-

5 8 . 0 0 - 6 7. 5 0
5 3 . 3 . ; - 6 7. 5 3
6 3 . J9 - 9 8 . OJ

-

TABULATING-MACFINE OPERATORS,
CLASS 8 ----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

f

70

“

T A BUL AT FNG—MAC FINC OPERATORS,
CLASS A ----------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------------

*

65

33
25

39.5
39.5

$

$

60

_

100
32

*

S

Under
$
and
under
50

55

5 4 . 0 0 - 6 4. 0 0
5 4 .0 0 - 64.50

OFFICE B O Y S ---------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------------

$

50.

~

22
17

-

6

2
1

5
5

2
2

-

22
“

-

~

-

i
i

“

-

i
i

1
1

3
3

-

1
1

5

1

1

3

3

2

3

8

11
3

3
3

9

J

7
7

17
17

19
IS

31

25

7

11
10

3

0

-

2

-

_

_

-

2

-

“

-

2

2

5
5

2
2

9
9

3
3

2
2

~

1
1

5
5

-

6

6
6

-

5
5

0

6

“

2

2

WOMEN
BILLERS,

MACHINE

(B ILL IN G

BILLERS,

MACHINE

( BOOKKFF PING

80OKK CFP ING-MACHINE GPFRATORS.
CLASS A ----------------------------------------------N0N3 AN UFACT UR I N G ---------------------------

2b

62
48

40 .
V .

7

-

12

1

6

5
5

14
14

13
13

4

21

47
45

31

14

_

7
7
-

-

78

IPS

121

bi

78

86

117

95
12
83

17
17

41
40
1

58
58
5

23
23
-

7
7
4

36

16
16

“

I

“

"

~
~

“

~

-

~
“

-

-

-

-

“

3
3

~

~

1
1
~

1
1

1

5
5
2

“

1

2

-

1
1

“

*

“

-

1

-

-

-

1
1

-

“

“
“

“

“

7
5

1
1

23
23
~

16
16
~

24
17
15

15
12
3

9
9
7

38

88

10

6

6

-

25

38

85

10

5

5

-

1

2

6

-

-

2
2
2

13
13
13

_
-

_
-

“

1

-

-

5
4

14
14

2

3

3
3

-

3

1
1

“

900KKFEP ING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
133

CLERKS, ACCOUNTING, CLASS A -----------NONMAN'J FAC T U R I N G --------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3----------------------CLERKS,

ACCOUNTING,

CLASS B ------------

CL ERK S , I l L l , CLASS C
N 1NMANUFACTUF. I N G ---------------------------

1*5
1 45
?R

f;*
4. .

....
183

33.5
Art

COMPTOMETER UPERAIURS

--------- ---------------------

See footn otes at end o f tab le.




111
92
37

55.50

r
5 3.5

-

*-n n

5 1 . 5 0 - 5 8. 0 0

18

99

\
*

CLERKS, PAYROLL -----------------------------------------------N.JNMANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3--------------------------------

8

8
100

6

39.5
39.5
38.5

T ? 4 “ 39 .17
99
39.

-7 • - 8 4 . 5t
86. 56
91 .9 0

8 5 . 5o
8 6.5 i
87.50

7 1 . JO- 96 .5 0
7 3 . 19 - 9 7 . 5 j
72.50-112.50

7’ .

7 .9
71. 50

6 6 ,0 0 - 77.00
.
- 78.r 1

7] .4

66

11

11

2

3

14
9

-

“

-

-

2~

4
4

-

-

i

6

6
6

-

ii
ii

c
5

6
6
3

3

3?

13

25

5

6
-

-

*

14
13
1

4

26

20
20

2C

2

1

~

1

1

}

J

1

-

-

“

-

“

18
11
10
1
To

21
18
13

-

-

3

1

1

3

_

9

-

8

-

7

1
1
i

-

_

-

1
1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

_

-

5
Table A-l. Office Occupations—Men and Women— Continued
(A v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly hours and earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a re a b asis
by in d u stry d iv is io n , J a c k s o n v ille , F la . , January 1966)
W eekly earnings1
(standard)

Sex, occupation, and in d u stry d iv is io n

Number
of

Average
weekly
hours1
(standard)

N u m ber o f w o rk e rs r e c e iv in g s tra ig h t-tim e w e e k ly earn in gs of—
$

Under
M ean2*4

Median

2

Middle range 2

S
50

$

50
and
under
55

WOMEN -

112

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

$
9 3 .5 0
9 3 .5 0

$
9 7 .5 0
1C4.00

$
$
7 8 .5 0 - 108.00
7 8 .5 0 - 1 0 8 .0 0

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS 8 ----------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 3 ---------------------

291
2 87
34

3 9 .5
39.5
3 9 .0

6 9 . 5C
6 9 .5 0
8 1 .5 0

6 8 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
8 6 .5 0

6 2 .5 0 - 7 7 .0 0
6 2 .5 0 - 7 6 .5 0
7 2 . 5C- 9 0 .0 0

O FFICE G I R L S -----------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

56
56

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

5 9 .5 0
5 9 .5 0

5 6 .0 0
5 6 .0 0

5 2 .5 0 - 6 3 .0 0
5 2 .5 0 - 6 3 .0 0

S E C R E T A R I E S ------------------------------------MANUFACTURING----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------PUBLIC U T I L IT I E S 3---------------------

76
610
147

9 1 .0 0
9 3 .5 0
9 7 .0 0
9 7 .uU
9 3 .0 0
9 J .5 0
1 0 7 .5U 1 1 4 .5 0

8 2 . CO- 1U5.G0
8 6 . 0 0 - 1 0 9 .0 0
8 1 .5 0 - 1 0 4 .0 0
92. 50- 1 2 4.50

$

$

95

65

73

75

80

85

90

o

65

70

75

B0

85

90

95

no

P
8

24
24

n
10

8
8

•2
1

-

50
48
6

15
15

39
38

16
15
12

6
6

3
3

-

_

~

3
3

*

-

25
1
28
4

54
2
52
11

45
4
41
5

94
9
85
7

95
11
84
3

85
7
78
13

74

27
6
21

4

65

33
8
25

57

56

58
5
5?
17

15

5

3

53
35

23

18

26
26

18
18

27
27

41
41

29
25

6
6

9
6

8
8

7
7

7
7

-

3

36
6
30

14
6

4

€

~

6
2
4

i
i

_

2

2

2

2

26
26

6

m

686

39 .5
39.5
39 .5
3 9 .5

-

-

_
-

13
10

_
-

27
27

-

4
4

-

35
35
-

55
55
4

63
63

9
9

7
-

12
12

_

_

3

6

-

-

-

-

-

“

3
-

i
5
57

39 .0
4 0 .0
3 8 .5

7 8 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
7 8 . 5C

7 4 .0 0
7 7 .0 0
7 3 .5 0

6 6

. 50— 8 7 .5 0
7 2 .0 0 - 8 4 .0 0
6 5 .5 0 - 8 8 . 0 0

_

_

31

-

-

-

U T I L I T I E S 3---------------------

412
36
376
141

3 8 .5

8 8 .5 0

8 7 . CO

7 0 .0 0 -

1 1 0 . 0 0

-

STENOGRAPHERS, S E N I O R --------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

189
173

39 .5
3 9 .5

8 1 .5 0
8 0 .0 0

8 2 .0 0
8 1 .0 0

7 4 .0 0 - 8 9 .0 0
7 2 .5 0 - 8 7 .0 0

-

_

_

8

-

~

~

8

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A -----NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

45
41

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

8 2 .5 0
8 3 .0 0

8 2 .0 0
8 3 .0 0

7 5 .5 0 - 8 9 .5 0
7 5 .5 0 - 9 1 .0 0

_

_

_

_

5

-

4

SWITCH80AR0 OPERATORS, CLASS B -----NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

73
70

4 3 .5
4 3 .5

5 4 .0 0
5 3 .5 0

5 6 .5 0
5 5 .5 0

3 4 .0 0 - 70 .5 0
3 3 .5 1 - 6 9 .0 0

9
9

b

SWITCHBOARD O PERATOR-RECEPTIGNISTS-

113
26
87

4 0 .0
40. O
4 0 .0

6 9 .0 0
73 .5 0
6 7 .5 0

6 7 .5 0
7 3 .0 0
6 6 • 50

6 2 .0 0 - 7 3 . 5u
6 7 .5 0 - 8 0 .5 0
6 0 .5 0 - 70 .0 0

STENOGRAPHERS, GENERAL ------------------MANUFACTURING----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

M A N U F A C T U R IN G

$

$

60

$
100

$
135

$
110

135

111

115

2
2

48
48

6
6

$

%

f

i

$

$

$

115

120

12b

13

135

14,

J45

12

’ 25

13.

135

140

145

o ve r

J
i

-

CONTINUED

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ----------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

PUBLIC

*

55

-----------------------------------

NONMANUFACTUR I N G -----------------------TABULATING-MAChINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

35
34

3 8 .0
3 8 .0

9 1 .0 0
9 0 .5 0

8 8 . 0 0

8 7 .5 0

8 4 .0 0 - 9 5 .n o
8 4 .0 0 - 9 4 .0 0

4

34
34
_

”

_

_

“

“

~

_

_

_

8 0 .5 0
8 0 .5 0

8

3.5 0
8 4 .0 0

7 5 .0 0 7 5 .5 0 -

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
G E N E R A L -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

187
177

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

7 1 .5 0
7 2 .0 0

7 1 .0 0
7 1 .0 0

6 5 . 5C- 7 8 .5 0
6 5 .0 0 - 7 9 .U0

T Y P IS T S , CLASS A ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3 ---------------------

141
133
25

3 8 .0
3 8 .0
3 9 .0

6 8 .5 0
6 8 .5 0
7 9 .5 0

6 8 . 0 0

7.50
7 9 .5 0

6 0 .0 0 - 7 5 .5 0
5 9 .5 0 - 7 6 .0 0
7 5 .5 0 - 8 6 . 0 0

TY P IS TS , CLASS B ----------------------------M ANUFACTURING----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------------------------

425

38 .5
3 9 .5
3 8 .5

6 0 .0 0

5 9 .5 0
6 6 . 50
5 9 .5 0

5 6 .0 0 - 6 4 .5 0
6 0 .5 j - 7 1 .5 0
5 6 . DC- 6 4 .0 0

_

33

6 5 . DC
6 0 . oO

6

_

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

352

1

4
-

6

4

-

43
42

6

1

17
17

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS C -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING------------------------

8 8 . 0 0

31

-

8 8 . 0 0

1

19
4
15

_

_
-

18
18

_
-

3
3

33

21

33

20

-

-

-

77
-

“

77

145
8
137

i

4

2

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

30
3
22
7

30
4
26
14

?8
7
21
17

34
3
31
20

21
3
28
25

15

5

49
7
42
7

15
8

23

3

4

10

21

9

-

-

3

1
1
1

-

-

-

-

_

_

-

2
2
57
9
48

4

-

4

3.0

4

i

-

-

in

21
21

9

i

9

*

1

-

-

“

22
18

10

6
2

_

1

1
1

_

-

_

-

-

-

2
2

8

5

3

2

-

_

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

~

!

~

“

_

_

_

_

_

_

~

“

7

-

-

8

8
8
2
2
“

2
3

7
6

9
9

3

17
17

3
3

43

37

38

33

23
23

24
21

24
20
2

15
15
8

9
9

3

4

28
5
23

9

4

3

i

6

3

55

-

-

2

3
3

lb
?

-

b

14

4

-

“

_

6
6

1

109
6
103

9

-

-

2
2

1
1

-

-

4

-

-

14

22

9

2

22

9

2

7
7

4
4

6

*

3

2

_

_

3

“

“

2

l

_
-

1

5

1

5

-

i

-

i
i

“

3
3

2
2

~

"

1 Standard hours r e fle c t the w o rk w eek fo r w h ich e m p lo y e e s r e c e iv e th e ir re g u la r s tra ig h t-tim e s a la r ie s and the earn in gs c o rre s p o n d to th ese w e e k ly hours.
2 The m ea n is com puted fo r each jo b by tota lin g the ea rn in gs o f a ll w o rk e rs and divid in g by the num ber o f w o r k e r s .
Th e m ed ian d esign ates p ositio n — h a lf o f the e m p lo y ees s u rvey ed r e c e iv e m o re
than the ra te shown; h a lf r e c e iv e le s s than the ra te shown.
Th e m id d le range is d efin ed by 2 ra te s o f pay; a fou rth o f the w o r k e r s e a rn le s s than the lo w e r o f these ra te s and a fou rth ea rn m o re than
the h igh er ra te .
T ra n s p o rta tio n , com m u n ication , and oth er public u tilitie s .
4 W o rk e rs w e r e d istrib u ted as fo llo w s :
24 at $30 to $35; and 10 at $45 to $50.




Table A-2. Professional and Technical Occupations—Men
(A v e ra g e straight-tim e w eekly hours and earnings fo r selected occupations studied on an a rea basis
by industry division, Jacksonville, F la ., January 1966)
W eekly earnings1
(standard)
Number

Occupation

of
workers

Average
weekly
hours1
( standard)

d u m b e r of w o rk ers receiving straigh t-tim e w eekly earnings of—
*

1

75
M ean2

Median 2

Middle range 2

and
under
80

$
$
1 2 0 .5 0 1 3 0 .0 0

45

40*0

42

40 •(! 1 1 2 .5 0

1 2 2 .0 0

$

i
80

i

*

5

i

i

i

I

85

90

95

100

105

110

115

i
120

125

i
130

*

~$
i
i
$
*
i
135
140
145
150
155
160
165

90

95

100

105

110

115

120

125

130

135

140

__
85

150

5

-

155

16G

165

170

S

1 0 7 .G U -1 4 7 .5 0

”

“

*

4

-

6

4

9 5 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0

1

2

1

7

-

5

1

3
2

1
-

3
7

2
14

6

-

1

1

* Standard hours reflect the workweek fo r which employees receive their re gu lar straight-tim e s a la rie s and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 F o r definition of term s, see footnote 2, table A - l .
7




145

-

-

2

3

4

2

-

-

-

-

7
Table A-3. Office, Professional, and Technical Occupations—Men and Women Combined
(A v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e w eek ly hours and earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a re a b asis
by in d u stry d iv is io n , J a c k s o n v ille , F la . , January 1966)

Average
Occupation and industry division

Number
of
woiken

Weekly
earnings *
(standard] (standard)

Occupation and industry division

41 .0

COMPTOMETER OPERATORS-----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

CFFIC E OCCUPATIONS
B I L L E R S , MACHINE ( B I L L I N G
N AC HI N EI ---------------------------------------------------------B I L L E R S , MACHINE (BOOKKEEPING
MACHINE I -----------------------------------------------------------------

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS -

33

$
67.50

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS B ------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------CLERKS, ACCO UNT ING, CLASS A
NONMANUFACTURING ------------------P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S 1
2 -------------

Number
of

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

CONTINUED

39.0
39. )

$
71.00
71.50

74.50

114
112

39.0
39.

9 3 •5v
93.50

48

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

75.00
7 4 . CO

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS B ---------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2------------------------------

291
287
34

39.5
39.5
39. U

6 9 . 5f'
69.50
81.50

133
119

4 0 .0
40 .0

67.00
66.00

OFFICF SOYS AMD GIRLS-------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

156
1 38

39.0
39.

60.50
6 1 .00

220

39.5
9 3.0 0
39.0
92.00
39.0 107.50

SECRETARIES -----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTUR I N G ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2 ------------------------------

714
76
638
175

39.5
95.00
39.5
97.00
94.5 0
39.5
39.5 110.50

STENOGRAPHERS! GENERAL---------------------------MANUFACTURING -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING----------------------------------PU8LIC U T I L I T I E S 2------------------------------

425
36
389
154

39. u
40.H
38.5
38.5

27

40 .0

203
39

79.00
77.!,G
79.50
90.5 U

CLERKS, A C CO UN TIN G, CLASS B -----------------M A N U F A C T U R IN G ----------------------------------------------NO NM A N UF A C TU RI N G---------------------------------------

670
51
619

39.0
40 .0
39.0

70.50
73.00
70.50

CL ER K S, F I L E , CLASS B --------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING --------------------------------------P U B L IC U T I L I T I E S 2 ---------------------------------

175
174
33

38 .5
39 .0
39.5

66.00
6 6 .0 0
88.50

STENOGRAPHERS, S E N I O R -----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------------

1 89
1 73

39.5
39.5

81.50
80.00

CLERKS, F I L E , CLASS C ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------------------

183
1 83

38.5
38.5

55.5 0
55.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS A --------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

45
41

39.5
39.5

82.5 0
83.00

CLERKS, O R O E R -----------------------N ON MA NU FAC TUR IN G --------

107
96

40 .5
4 0 .5

78.00
77.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS, CLASS B -------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

73
7:i

43.5
43.5

54.06
53.50

39.5
39.5
38.5

87.00
80.00
96.00

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECE PTIONI S T SMANUFACTUR I N G -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

113
26
87

40*
4 0 .0

69 .00
73.50
67.50

PAYROLL ---------------

124

NONMANUFACTURING----

101

PU B LI C U T I L I T I E S 2

46

C LER KS,

Average
Occupation and industry division

O F F I C E OCCUPATIONS

124
99

KEYPUNCH OPERATORS, CLASS A ---------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------------

BOO KK EEPING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
NO NMA N UF A CT UR IN G---------------------------------------

Average

Weekly

4

-

Weekly
Weekly
hours 1 earnings 1
(standard) (standard)

CONTINU ED

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS,
CLASS A --------------------------------------- -------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------------

$

11 J.OC

77

3 3.5

37

3 8.5 l ! J.Ol

66
65

39.5
39.5

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATORS y
CLASS C ------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

49
48

39.
39.

TRANSCRIBINC-MACHINE OPERATORS,
GENERAL ------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------------

167
177

39.
39.

7 1 .5 0

TY P IS TS , CLASS A -----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ----------------------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 2------------------------------

141
133
25

36.
38.
39.

6 8 .5 0
6 8 .5 1.
7 9 .5 0

T Y P IS T S , CLASS 9 -----------------------------------------MANUFACTURING-----------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -----------------------------------

437
33

404

38.7.
3 9 .5
36.5

6 1 . 5S
65.cO
6 1 .5 0

T AeUL ATING-MACFINF OPERATORS ?
c i a s s e ------------------------------------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-----------------------------------

9 7 ,0 ■

r 7.
7 .
7 9.i/y

7' . *

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
CCCUPATIONS

DRAFTSMEN, CLASS B -------------------------------------

47

4 ‘.

1 2 5.50

DRAFTSMEN,

4?

4- .

112.5

CLASS C -------------------------------------

1 Standard hours reflect the w o rk w eek .fo r which em ployees receive their regu lar straight-tim e sa la rie s and the earnings correspond to these w eekly hours.
2 Transportation, communication, and other public utilities.




Number
of
workers

8
Table A-4. Maintenance and Powerplant Occupations
(A v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earn in gs fo r m en in s e le c te d occupations studied on an a re a b asis
by in du stry d iv is io n , J a c k s o n v ille , F la . , January 1966)
Hourly earnings 1

N um ber of w o rk e rs receiving straight-tim e hourly earnings of—
$

O ccupation and in d u stry d iv is io n

workers

Mean23 Median 2

Middle range2

t

Unde*.1* 23
i
and
1.20 under
1.30

CARPENTERS, MAINTENANCE ------------

29

$
2.82

$
3.05

$
$
2 .2 8 - 3.38

ELE CTRICIANS, MAINTENANCE ------MANUFACTURING-----------------------------

76
64

3.1 8
3.23

3.29
3.54

2 .7 6 - 3.64
2 .7 6 - 3.66

ENGINEERS, STATIONARY ----------------MANUFACTURING---------------------------NONMANUFACTURING---------------------

66
31
35

2.79
3.21
2.42

2.76
3.16
2.53

2 .4 5 - 3.15
3 .0 2 — 3.73
2 .1 7 - 2.74

FIREMEN, STATIONARY BOILER ----MANJFACTUR I N G -----------------------------

62
36

2.08
2.15

1.69
2.28

1 .2 9 - 2.93
] . 2 8 - 2.55

-

HELPERS, MAINTENANCE TRADES MANUFACTUR I N G ---------------------------NUNMANUFACTURING ---------------------

84
53
31

2.31
2.32
2.33

2.15
2.1 4
2.27

1 .9 4 - 2. 88
1 .9 9 - 3.02
1 .7 9 - 2.6 9

-

MACHINISTS, MAINTENANCE -----------MANUFACTURING----------------------------

53
44

2.96
2.96

3.08
3.23

2 .4 4 - 3.52
2 .3 9 - 3.53

MECHANICS, AUTOMOTIVE
( MAINTENANCE) --------------------------------MANUFACTURING----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------PUBLIC U T I L I T I E S 3-----------------

239
52
187
125

MECHANICS, MAINTENANCE -------------MANUFACTUR I N G ----------------------------NONMANUFACTURING----------------------

184
156
28

OILERS ----------------------------------------------------MANUFACTUR I N G ----------------------------PAINTERS,

MAINTENANCE -----------------

2.68

2.58

2.45
2.75
2.90

2.21
2.6 3
2.98

2 .1 8 2 .1 4 2 .5 1 2 .5 4 -

2.70

2.90

2.58
2.48
3. 2

2 .2 2 - 3.08
2 .2 1 - 3.04
2 .2 8 - 3.45

36
32

2.40
2.38

2.65
2.55

1 .7 0 - 2.93
1 .6 9 - 2.96

29

2.67

3.24

2 . 3 8 - 3.34

2.66

3.31
2.68
3.32
3.34

1 E x clu d es p rem iu m pay fo r o v e r t im e and fo r w o rk on w eeken ds,
2 F o r d e fin itio n o f te r m s , see fo o tn o te 2, tab le A - l .
3 T ra n s p o rta tio n , com m u n ication , and o th er public u tilitie s .




1.4C

$
$
5
$
1.40 1.5C 1.6f: 1. 70

1.

1.59

1.90

3

_
-

-

_

~

_

12
12

4
4

-

1.60 1.7C

8'

“

_

3
6

-

$
8C 1.90

1

2

5
5

_
9

-

5

-

_
4
i
3

t

$

~

_
_
8
8
-

_
~

~

-

~

-

-

_

-

_

_
~

_
-

6

2

and la te sh ifts.

_
~

6

3
3

4

h o lid a y s ,

_
~

_

6

-

6

-

6

4

-

4

“

-

-

13

2.30

2.40

_

$

S
3.00

50 2.60

2.80

3,00

3.20 3.40 3.6*. 3 . 8C 4.00 4 .2 v

4

2

8

5

~

~

~

9
7

_
-

13
5

5
4

11
11

22
22

4
4

“

-i

16

12

_
-

4
4

i

4

-

4
4
-

4
4
-

_

_

-

-

l

“

1

1

_

-

-

7
7

6

3

_

6
4

2

7
7

_

_

-

-

6

_
12
11
1

14
3

11
-

11
9

11

1
1

37
37

32

21

-

4
4

$

id

3
7

3

-

3
3

1
1

-3

—

2
2

i

1

3

-

-

-

10
10

4
4

i

4
4

~

3
3

47
i
46
38

26

7

1

1

3
3

11

~

8
8

6
1

-

5
3

-

22
22

12
8

14
14

4

~

-

“

_

2.60 2.8).

3

-

9
i

$
40 2.50

_

10

$

2

1

2

_
“
-

$
2.30

4
4

2
2

_
~

$

2.00 2.10 2.20

2.00 2. 10 2.20

2

3

-

-

1.

$

_

_

-

“

3
3

2

1

t
3.23

t
t
$
$
3.4 C 3.69 3.80 4 . <!0

_
-

4
4

_

_

-

-

_
-

_
-

_
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

8

9
9

15
15

-

_

_

57

7
7

-

_
-

_
-

-

6
6

13
4
9
5

-

-

-

-

17
13
4

8

25

7
4

22
20
2

5
3

22

4
4

3

_

6

4

8

-

-

~

4

4

e

4
4

8
8

-

9

-

9

3

2

-

25

2

3

3

18
16

i

-

57
56

16

_

_
“
_

_
-

_
4

-

4

_

9
Table A-5. Custodial and Material Movement Occupations
(A v e r a g e s tra ig h t-tim e h o u rly earn in gs fo r s e le c te d occupations studied on an a re a b asis
by in d u stry d iv is io n , J a c k s o n v ille , F la ., January 1966)

Num ber of w orkers receiving stra ig h t-tim e h ou rly earnings of—

Hourly earnings 2

Occupation 1 and industry division

Number
of
workers

M ean3

M edian3

Middle range3

t

1.00

1...0

1.3C 1 .4 i. 1 .5 (

l.K

and
under

_

_

_

1 .1 3

1 .20

1 .30

1.4C

1 19
97

$
1.55
1 .5 >

$
1.2 9
1.28

$
$
1 .2 4 - i . 78
1 .2 4 - 1 .7 5

3
3

-

_

61
59

5
5

J A N IT fR S , PORTERS, ANC CLEANERS —
MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONM ANUF ACTUR I N G -------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S 4----------------------

733
154
•579
95

1.41
1 .7 7
1 .32
2.1<

1 .2 9
1.6 7
1.27
2 .4 2

1 .2 3 - 1 .5 9
1 .6 U - 1 .9 7
1 .2 2 - 1 .3 6
1 .7 3 - 2 .4 6

45

45

33
33

3L4
3'. 4

SC
18
72

311
?! 7

1.2 7
1 .2 7

1 .2 6

1 .2 3 -

1 .2 9

25 2

NON MANUFACTURING----------------------------------

1 .2 6

1 .2 3 -

1 .2 9

252

LABORERS*.. MATER IAL H AND LING ----------MANUFACTUR IM G ------------------------------NON 'I ANUF ACT UR I N G -------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IF S 4 ----------------------

870
326
544
21b

1 .7 7
5 .6 b
i . 84
2.2<

1.6 2
1.6 2
1 .6 5
2.51

1 .3 6 - 2 .2 3
1 .4 7 - 1.71
1 .2 7 - 2.51
1 . 8 5 - 2 .5 6

2'!4
7
197

ORDER
N

F IL L E R S ----------------------------------ANUFACTUKING--------------------------

574
54?

1.5 3
1 .3 3

1.8 7
1 .8 3

1 .5 9 )8
1 .5 9 - 2 .7 8

P ACKER S* SHIPP I N G -----------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTUPING --------------------------

69
31
38

1.7 1
i.5 7
1.8 2

1.5 8
1.5 3
1.85

1 .4 9 1 .4 6 1 .5 5 -

RECEIVING CLERKS ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------

127
i .6

2 .0 7
J.'-h

2 • u8
2 .1

1 .8 2 - 2 . 75
1 .7 9 - 2 .2 5

SH IPPING ANC RECEIVING C L E R K S ------NONMANUFACTURING--------------------------

42
5C

7.2 7
2 .2 8

2 .1 2
2 .' 9

1 .9 1 1 .8 8 -

TRUCKER IVERS5 -----------------------------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IF S 4----------------------

1 * 74
1b i
915
412

2.16
1 .7 6
i.2 3
2 .8 3

1.9 5
1 .6 9
2 .0 1
3 .2 2

1 .4 9 - 3.1*3
1 .5 2 - 1 .9 6
1 .4 3 - 3.2 1
2 . 2 7 - 3 .2 6

$

1 .20

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .6 I 2 .6 0

2 . 7C

2.8C

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3.4.*

2 .3 0

2 .4 0

2 .5 0

2 .6 0

2 .7 0

2.8*.

3 .0 0

3 .2 0

3 .4

3 .6 0

2

14
14

7
3

-

2
2

-

-

TRUCKCRIVERS, LIGHT (UNDER
1 -1 H
T U N S )----------------------------------NQNMANUFACTUR I N G -------------------------

175
154

1.5 9
1.5 5

1.4 5
1.4-j

1 .3 0 1 .3 0 -

1 .9 5
1.9 3

TRUCKCRIVERS, MEDIUM (1 - 1 / 2 TO
ANC INCLUDING 4 TONS) ---------------MANUFACTUR I N G ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING -------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S 4----------------------

541
90
451
239

2.1 0
1.65
2.15
2.78

1.83
1 .5 7
1 .9 2
3 .2 1

1 .4 4 1 .4 7 1 .4 3 2 .2 1 -

2 .8 9
1 .5 7
3 .2 2
3 .2 6

TPUCKDR IVFRS, HEAVY (OVER 4 TONS
TRA ILER TYPE I ------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------PUBLIC U T IL IT IE S 4----------------------

295
274
146

2 .6 3
2 .7 0
3 .0 7

3 .0 7
3 .0 9
3 .2 5

1 .9 9 - 3.2 5
2 .1 0 - 3 .2 5
3 .2 2 - 3 .2 7

6
6
6

TRUCKERS, POWER (F O R K L IF T ) ------------MANUFACTURING------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING-------------------------

255
128
127

1.9 0
2.9 1
1 .8 0

2 .0 5
3 .1 0
2 .0 0

1 .3 8 - 2 .2 5
1 .5 4 - 2 .4 6
1 .3 5 - 2 .1 4

32
11
21

41
20
21

TRUCKERS, POWER (OTHER THAN
F O R K L I F T )------------------------------------------

59

2 .4 4

2 .5 3

2 .4 4 - 2 .5 7

-

-

9
9

6
6
-

34
1
33

8

31
31
31

S

(

s

t

s

1 .7 0

l.e t

1 .9 0

2 .0 0

5

8

-

10

-

“

4

-

5

1
1

24

10

13

11
13

4

6
7

1.5C

31
8
23

1.6(

41
12
25

63
57
6

6

2 .1 0
-

1
1

2 .2 0

1!
1
19
19
-

~
1C
10

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2
-

_
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

“

“

-

-

-

-

~
"

PORTERS* AND CLEANERS

N U N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------------------------------

1
2
3
4
5

t

$

1 .7 C 1 .8 0 1 .9 0 2 .0 0 2 .1 0

_

GUARGS AND WATCHMEN-------------------------n u n m a n u f a c t u r in g --------------------------

J A M TCP Sf

$

1 .6 0

1
Under

80
23

48
37
11
4

2
14
14

13
13

146
146

110
110

-

8
-

123
1
122
n o

-

c
9

-

9
9
~

2

1 .8 7
1 .5 5
1 .9 6

3
3

-

2 .5 7
2 .5 5

5
5
-

38
38
-

1 34
134
134

5
5

-

2

_

-

-

-

“

2

-

-

6
3
3

6
6
2

?6
i
35

4

3

10

13

i

3
2

32
32
?

74
27
47

?2
8

45
2)
24

4
4

4
-

29
8
6

-

-

133
133

7
5
2
2

4
4

14

-

6
2
4

ICO

-

13
2

19
3
lo

2
~

j
3

_
-

-

5
5

-

267
~
267
267

-

4
5

14

38
~
38

_

3
8

-

21
21
2

_

41
40

26

3

5
5

43
39

-

6
6

-

26
14
1?
6

-

-

3
3

-

3
-

54
25
29
~

io n

-

i
i

5

3
3
65
2?
43
~

-

-

1

4
4

82
27
55
"

35

-

4
4

45
5
40
“

1C8

4
i

25
2i

145
4
14 5
6

Data lim ited to men w orkers except where otherwise indicated.
Excludes pre m ium pay for overtim e and for w ork on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
F o r definition of te rm s , see footnote 2, table A - l .
Tran sp ortation , com m unication, and other public utilities
Includes a ll d riv e rs regardless of size and type of truck operated.




34
32

103

3

6

2

6

5

4
~

?
2

_

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
*

23
14
Q

20
20
”

_

-

-

-

“

”

5

38

3

-

13
13
9

3

“

2

8

-

-

”

12
10
2

2

8

9
9
”

3

-

-

-

5

-

133
_

_
-

-

-




.

■

Appendix. Occupational D escriptions

The p rim ary purpose o f p reparin g jo b descriptions for the B ureau's w age surveys is to assist its fie ld
sta ff in cla ssify in g into appropriate o c cu p atio n s workers who are em p lo y e d under a v a riety o f p ay roll title s
and differen t work arran gem en ts from esta b lish m en t to estab lish m en t and from area to a re a .
T h is p erm its
the grouping of o c cu p a tio n a l w age rates representing co m p arab le jo b con ten t.
Because of this em ph asis on
in terestab lish m en t and in terarea co m p a rab ility of o c cu p atio n al conten t, the B ureau's jo b descriptions m ay
d iffer sig n ifica n tly from those in use in in d iv id u al estab lish m en ts or those p rep ared for other purposes.
In
app ly in g these jo b descriptio n s, the B u reau 's fie ld eco n o m ists are instructed to ex clu d e w orking supervisors,
ap p ren tices, learn ers, begin n ers, train e es, h an d icap p ed , p a r t- tim e , tem porary , and probationary workers.

OFFICE

BILLER, M ACHINE

BOOKKEEPING-M ACHINE OPERATOR

P repares statem en ts, b ills, and in vo ices on a m ach in e other than
an ordinary or e le c tro m a tic typew riter.
M ay also k eep records as to
b illin g s or shipping ch arges or perform other c le r ic a l work in cid en tal
to b illin g op eration s. For w age study purposes, b ille rs, m a c h in e , are
c la ssifie d by type of m ach in e, as follow s:

O perates a book k eepin g m ach in e (R em in gton Rand, E llio tt Fisher,
Sundstrand, Burroughs, N atio n al C ash R e g ister, with or w ithout a ty p e­
w riter k eyboard ) to k eep a record of business transactions.
C la ss A . K eep s a set of records requiring a know ledge o f and
exp erien ce in b a sic book k eepin g p rin cip le s, and fa m ilia rity with the
structure o f the p a rtic u la r accou n tin g system u sed . D eterm in es proper
records and distribution of d ebit and cred it item s to be used in each
phase of the work. M ay prepare co n so lid ated reports, b alan ce sheets,
and other records by hand.

B ille r, m ach in e (b illin g m a c h in e ). U ses a sp e c ia l b illin g m a ­
chine (M oon H opkin s, E llio tt F isher, Burroughs, e tc . , which are
co m b in atio n typing and addin g m ach in es) to prepare b ills and in v o ices
from cu stom ers' purchase orders, intern ally p rep ared orders, shipping
m em oran du m s, e tc . U su ally in volves a p p lic a tio n of p red eterm in ed
discounts and shipping ch arges, and entry of n ecessary exten sio n s,
w hich m a y or m ay not be com pu ted on the b illin g m a c h in e , and
to ta ls which are a u to m a tic a lly a c c u m u la te d by m a c h in e. The op er­
atio n u su ally in volves a large num ber o f carbon co p ies o f the b ill
bein g p rep ared and is often done on a fan fo ld m ach in e.

C lass B.
K eep s a record of one or m ore phases or sections of
a se t of records u su ally requiring little know ledge o f b a sic book ­
k ee p in g . Phases or section s include accoun ts p a y a b le , p ay ro ll, cu s­
tom ers' accou n ts (n ot in clu din g a sim ple type of b illin g described
under b ille r, m a c h in e ), co st distribution, expense distribution, in­
ventory con trol, e tc .
M ay ch eck or assist in p reparation of trial
b a lan ce s and prepare control sheets for the accoun tin g departm en t.

B ille r, m ach in e (b o ok keep in g m a c h in e ).
U ses a b ookkeepin g
m ach in e (Sundstrand, E llio tt F isher, R em in gton R and, e t c . , which
m a y or m a y not have typew riter k eyboard ) to prepare cu stom ers' b ills
as p art o f the accoun ts re c e iv a b le op eration . G en erally in vo lv es the
sim u ltan eo u s entry o f figures on custom ers' le d g e r record. Th e m a ­
chine a u to m a tic a lly a c c u m u la te s figures on a num ber o f v e rtic a l
colum ns and co m pu tes, and u su ally prints a u to m a tic a lly the d e b it or
cred it b a la n c e s.
D oes not involve a know ledge of b ook k eepin g.
Works from uniform and standard types o f sa le s and c re d it slip s.




C LER K, A CCO UN TIN G
C lass A . U nder ge n e ral d irection o f a bookkeeper or accou n tan t,
has resp on sib ility for k ee p in g one or more section s of a co m p lete set
o f books or records re latin g to one phase of an estab lish m en t's b u si­
ness tran saction s.
Work in volves posting and b a lan cin g subsidiary

11

12
C LER K , A C C O U N T IN G — C ontinued
le d g e r or le d g e rs such as accou n ts re c e iv a b le or accou n ts p a y a b le ;
e x a m in in g and co d in g in v o ices or vouchers with proper acco u n tin g
distribu tion ; and requ ires ju d gm en t and exp erien ce in m a k in g proper
assig n atio n s and a llo c a tio n s.
M ay assist in p rep arin g, a d ju stin g , and
clo sin g jo u rn al en tries; and m a y d ire ct cla ss B acco u n tin g cle rk s.
C la ss B. U n d er su p ervision , perform s one or m ore routine a c ­
coun tin g o p eration s such as p ostin g sim p le journ al vouch ers or accou n ts
p a y a b le vo uch ers, en terin g vouch ers in vouch er registers; re c o n c ilin g
bank accou n ts; and p ostin g subsidiary led gers co n tro lled by ge n e ral
le d g e r s, or p osting sim p le co st accou n tin g d a ta .
T h is jo b does not
require a know ledge o f acco u n tin g and b ookkeepin g p rin cip le s but
is found in o ffic e s in w hich the m ore routine acco u n tin g work is
su b d ivid ed on a fu n ctio n al b a sis am on g sev eral w orkers.
C LER K , FILE
C la ss A .
In an esta b lish ed filin g system co n tain in g a num ber
o f v a rie d su b je c t m a tte r file s, c la ssifie s and in dexes file m a te r ia l
such as co rresp o n d en ce, reports, te c h n ic a l docu m en ts, e t c .
M ay
a lso file this m a t e r ia l. M ay k ee p records o f various types in co n ­
ju n c tio n w ith the file s . M ay le a d a sm a ll group o f low er le v e l file
c le rk s.
C la ss B.
Sorts, co d es, and file s u n cla ssifie d m a te r ia l by sim p le
(s u b je c t m a tte r) h e ad in gs or p artly c la ssifie d m a te ria l by fin er sub­
h e a d in g s.
P rep ares sim p le re la te d in d ex and cro ss-referen ce a id s.
A s re q u este d , lo c a te s c le a r ly id e n tifie d m a te r ia l in file s and forw ards
m a t e r ia l.
M ay perform re la te d c le r ic a l task s required to m a in ta in
and se rv ice file s .
C la ss C . Perform s routine filin g o f m a te r ia l th at h as alread y
b een c la ss ifie d or w hich is e a sily c la ss ifie d in a sim p le se ria l c la s s i­
fic a tio n system ( e . g . , a lp h a b e tic a l, ch ro n o lo g ica l, or n u m e ric a l).
A s re q u este d , lo c a te s re a d ily a v a ila b le m a te r ia l in file s and forw ards
m a te r ia l; and m a y f il l out w ithdraw al ch a rg e.
Perform s sim p le
c le r ic a l and m an u al tasks required to m ain tain and se rv ice file s .

C LER K , O RDER— C ontinued
to m ak e up the order; ch eck in g p ric e s and qu an tities o f item s on order
sh eet; and distributin g order sh eets to re sp ectiv e departm en ts to be fille d .
M ay ch eck w ith cre d it departm en t to determ in e cred it ratin g of custom er,
ack n ow led ge re c e ip t o f orders from cu stom ers, follow up orders to see
th at they h ave b een fille d , k eep file o f orders re c e iv e d , and check shipping
in v o ices with o rig in a l orders.

C LER K , PAYRO LL
C om p u tes w age s o f co m pan y em p lo y e e s and en ters the necessary
d ata on the p ay ro ll sh eets. D u ties invo lv e: C a lc u la tin g workers' earnings
b ase d on tim e or production records; and posting c a lc u la te d data on p ay ro ll
sh eet, showing in form ation such as w orker's n am e , w orking days, tim e ,
ra te , dedu ction s for insuran ce, and to ta l w ages due. M ay m ake out p ay ch eck s and assist p ay m aste r in m ak in g up and distributin g pay en v e lo p e s.
M ay use a c a lc u la tin g m a c h in e .
CO M PTO M ETER O PERATOR
P rim ary duty is to op erate a C o m p to m ete r to perform m a th e ­
m a tic a l co m p u tatio n s.
Th is jo b is not to be confused w ith th at o f sta tis­
tic a l or other type o f cle rk , which m a y involve frequ en t use of a C o m p ­
to m e ter bu t, in w hich, use o f this m ach in e is in c id en tal to p erform ance
o f other d u ties.

D U PLICA TIN G -M A C H IN E O PERATOR (MIMEOGRAPH OR D IT T O )
U n d er g e n e ra l supervision and with no supervisory resp o n sib ilities,
reprodu ces m u ltip le co p ies o f typew ritten or handw ritten m a tte r, using a
M im eograp h or D itto m a c h in e .
M ak es n ecessary ad ju stm en t such as for
ink and p ap e r fe e d counter and cy lin d er sp eed .
Is not required to prepare
ste n c il or D itto m a ste r.
M ay k eep file o f u sed ste n c ils or D itto m asters.
M ay sort, c o lla t e , and stap le co m p le te d m a te r ia l.

KEYPUNCH OPERATO R
C LER K , ORDER
R e c e iv e s cu stom ers' orders for m a te r ia l or m erch andise b y m a il,
phon e, or p erso n ally .
D u ties involve any co m b in atio n o f the follow in g:
Q uoting p ric e s to cu stom ers; m ak in g out an order sh eet listin g the ite m s




C la ss A . O perates a n u m e rical a n d /o r a lp h a b e tic a l or co m b in a ­
tion keypun ch m ach in e to transcribe d ata from various source docu ­
m ents to keypunch tab u la tin g card s. Perform s sam e tasks as low er
le v e l keypun ch op erator bu t, in add ition , work requires a p p lic a tio n

13

KEYPUNCH OPERATOR—Continued

STENOGRAPHER, SENIOR

of coding skills and the making of some determinations, for example,
locates on the source document the items to be punched; extracts
information from several documents; and searches for and interprets
information on the document to determine information to be punched.
May train inexperienced operators.

Primary duty is to take dictation involving a varied technical
or specialized vocabulary such as in legal briefs or reports on scientific
research from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype
or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy. May also set up and maintain files, keep records, etc.

Class B. Under close supervision or following specific procedures
or instructions, transcribes data from source documents to punched
cards. Operates a numerical and/or alphabetical or combination
keypunch machine to keypunch tabulating cards. May verify cards.
Working from various standardized source documents, follows specified
sequences which have been coded or prescribed in detail and require
little or no selecting, coding, or interpreting of data to be punched.
Problems arising from erroneous items or codes, missing information,
etc. , are referred to supervisor.

OR

OFFICE BOY OR GIRL
Performs various routine duties such as running errands, operating
minor office machines such as sealers or mailers, opening and distributing
mail, and other minor clerical woik.

Performs stenographic duties requiring significantly greater inde­
pendence and responsibility than stenographers, general as evidenced by
the following: Work requires high degree of stenographic speed and accu­
racy; and a thorough working knowledge of general business and office
procedures and of the specific business operations, organization, policies,
procedures, files, workflow, etc. Uses this knowledge in performing
stenographic duties and responsible clerical tasks such as, maintaining
followup files; assembling material for reports, memorandums, letters,
etc.; composing simple letters from general instructions; reading and
routing incoming mail; and answering routine questions, etc. Does not
include transcribing-machine work.

SECRETARY

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR

Performs secretarial and clerical duties for a superior in an ad­
ministrative or executive position. Duties include making appointments
for superior; receiving people coming into office; answering and making
phone calls; handling personal and important or confidential mail, and
writing routine correspondence on own initiative; and taking dictation
(where transcribing machine is not used) either in shorthand or by
Stenotype or similar machine, and transcribing dictation or the recorded
information reproduced on a transcribing machine. May prepare special
reports or memorandums for information of superior.

C lass A . O perates a sin g le- or m u ltip le -p o sitio n telephone
sw itchboard han dlin g in co m in g, o u tgoin g, intraplan t or o ffice c a lls. P er­
form s fu ll telephone inform ation serv ice or han dles co m p le x c a lls, such
as co n feren ce, c o lle c t , o v erseas, or sim ila r c a lls, eith er in addition to
doing routine work as d escrib ed for sw itchboard operator, cla ss B, or as a
fu ll- tim e assign m en t.
(" F u ll" telephone inform ation service occurs when
the estab lish m en t has v a rie d functions that are not read ily understandable
for telephone inform ation purposes, e . g . , b ecau se o f overlapp in g or
in terrelated fun ction s, and consequently present frequent p roblem s as to
which exten sion s are appropriate for c a l l s . )

STENOGRAPHER, GENERAL
Primary duty is to take dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from one or more persons either in shorthand or by Stenotype
or similar machine; and transcribe dictation. May also type from written
copy. May maintain files, keep simple records, or perform other rela­
tively routine clerical tasks. May operate from a stenographic pool.
Does not include transcribing-machine work. (See transcribing-machine
operator.)




C lass B.
O perates a sin g le- or m u ltip le -p o sitio n telephone
sw itchboard h an dling in co m in g, ou tgoin g, intraplan t or o ffice c a lls . M ay
han dle routine lon g distan ce c a lls and record to lls. M ay perform lim ite d
telephone in form ation se rv ic e . ("L im ite d " telephone inform ation service
occurs if the functions of the estab lish m en t serviced are read ily under­
stan dab le for telephone inform ation purposes, or if the. requests are routine,
e . g . , givin g exten sio n num bers when sp e c ific n am es are furnished, or
if co m p le x c a lls are referred to another o p e r a to r .)

14

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONIST
In addition to performing duties of operator on a single position
or monitor-type switchboard, acts as receptionist and may also type or
perform routine clerical work as part of regular duties. This typing or
clerical work may take the major part of this worker's time while at
switchboard.

TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR— Continued
specific instructions. May include simple wiring from diagrams and
some filing work. The work typically involves portions of a work
unit, for example, individual sorting or collating runs or repetitive
operations.

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR, GENERAL
TABULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR
Class A. Operates a variety of tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines, typically including such machines as the tabulator,
calculator, interpreter, collator, and others. Performs complete
reporting assignments without close supervision, and performs difficult
wiring as required. The complete reporting and tabulating assign­
ments typically involve a variety of long and complex reports which
often are of irregular or nonrecurring type requiring some planning
and sequencing of steps to be taken. As a more experienced oper­
ator, is typically involved in training new operators in machine
operations, or partially trained operators in wiring from diagrams
and operating sequences of long and complex reports. Does not
include working supervisors performing tabulating-machine operations
and day-to-day supervision of the work and production of a group of
tabulating-machine operators.
Class B. Operates more difficult tabulating or electrical account­
ing machines such as the tabulator and calculator, in addition to the
sorter, reproducer, and collator. This work is performed under specific
instructions and may include the performance of some wiring from
diagrams. The work typically involves, for example, tabulations
involving a repetitive accounting exercise, a complete but small
tabulating study, or parts of a longer and more complex report. Such
reports and studies are usually of a recurring nature where the pro­
cedures are well established. May also include the training of new
employees in the basic operation of the machine.
Class C. Operates simple tabulating or electrical accounting
machines such as the sorter, reproducing punch, collator, etc. , with




Primary duty is to transcribe dictation involving a normal routine
vocabulary from transcribing-machine records. May also type from written
copy and do simple clerical work. Workers transcribing dictation involving
a varied technical or specialized vocabulary such as legal briefs or reports
on scientific research are not included. A worker who takes dictation in
shorthand or by Stenotype or similar machine is classified as a stenographer,
general.

TYPIST
Uses a typewriter to make copies of various material or to make
out bills after calculations have been made by another person. May in­
clude typing of stencils, mats, or similar materials for use in duplicating
processes. May do clerical work involving little special training, such
as keeping simple records, filing records and reports, or sorting and dis­
tributing incoming mail.
Class A. Performs one or more of the following: Typing ma­
terial in final form when it involves combining material from several
sources or responsibility for correct spelling, syllabication, punctu­
ation, etc. , of technical or unusual words or foreign language ma­
terial; and planning layout and typing of complicated statistical tables
to maintain uniformity and balance in spacing. May type routine
form letters varying details to suit circumstances.
Class B. Performs one or more of the following: Copy typing
from rough or clear drafts; routine typing of forms, insurance policies,
e t c .; and setting up simple standard tabulations, or copying more
complex tables already setup and spaced properly.

15

PROFESSIONAL

ND

TECHNICAL

DRAFTSMAN

DRAFTSMAN
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of complex items having
distinctive design features that differ significantly from established
drafting precedents. Works in close support with the design originator,
and may recommend minor design changes. Analyzes the effect of
each change on the details of form, function, and positional relation­
ships of components and parts. Works with a minimum of supervisory
assistance. Completed work is reviewed by design originator for con­
sistency with prior engineering determinations. May either prepare
drawings, or direct their preparation by lower level draftsmen.
Class B. Performs nonroutine and complex drafting assignments
that require the application of most of the standardized drawing tech­
niques regularly used. Duties typically involve such work as: Prepares
working drawings of subassemblies with irregular shapes, multiple
functions, and precise positional relationships between components;
prepares architectural drawings for construction of a building including
detail drawings of foundations, wall sections, floor plans, and roof.
Uses accepted formulas and manuals in making necessary computations
to determine quantities of materials to be used, load capacities,
strengths, stresses, etc. Receives initial instructions, requirements,
and advice from supervisor. Completed work is checked for technical
adequacy.
Class C. Prepares detail drawings of single units or parts for
engineering, construction, manufacturing, or repair purposes. Types
of drawings prepared include isometric projections (depicting three
dimensions in accurate scale) and sectional views to clarify positioning
of components and convey needed information. Consolidates details
from a number of sources and adjusts or transposes scale as required.
MAI NTENANCE

Continued

Suggested methods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source materials are given with initial assignments. Instructions are
less complete when assignments recur. Work may be spot-checked
during progress.
DRAFTSMAN-TRACER
Copies plans and drawings prepared by others by placing tracing
cloth or paper over drawings and tracing with pen or pencil. (Does not
include tracing limited to plans primarily consisting of straight lines and
a large scale not requiring close delineation.)
and/or
Prepares simple or repetitive drawings of easily visualized items.
is closely supervised during progress.

Work

NURSE, INDUSTRIAL (REGISTERED)
A registered nurse’Who gives nursing service under general medical
direction to ill or injured employees or other persons who become ill or
suffer an accident on the premises of a factory or other establishment.
Duties involve a combination of the following: Giving first aid to the ill
or injured; attending to subsequent dressing of employees' injuries; keeping
records of patients treated; preparing accident reports for compensation
or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and health evaluations
of applicants and employees; and planning and carrying out programs
involving health education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant en­
vironment, or other activities affecting the health, welfare, and safety
of all personnel.
AND

POWERPLANT

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE

CARPENTER, MAINTENANCE— Continued

Performs the carpentry duties necessary to construct and maintain
in good repair building woodwork and equipment such as bins, cribs,
counters, benches, partitions, doors, floors, stairs, casings, and trim made
of wood in an establishment. Work involves most of the following: Plan­
ning and laying out of work from blueprints, drawings, models, or verbal
instructions; using a variety of carpenter's handtools, portable power tools,

and standard measuring instruments; making standard shop computations
relating to dimensions of work; and selecting materials necessary for the
work. In general, the work of the maintenance carpenter requires
rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience.




16

ELECTRICIAN, MAINTENANCE

HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES— Continued

Performs a variety of electrical trade functions such as the in­
stallation, maintenance, or repair of equipment for the generation, dis­
tribution, or utilization of electric energy in an establishment. Work
involves most of the following: Installing or repairing any of a variety of
electrical equipment such as generators, transformers, switchboards, con­
trollers, circuit breakers, motors, heating units, conduit systems, or other
transmission equipment; working from blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specifications; locating and diagnosing trouble in the electrical
system or equipment; working standard computations relating to load
requirements of wiring or electrical equipment; and using a variety of
electrician's handtools and measuring and testing instruments. In general,
the work of the maintenance electrician requires rounded training and
experience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

a woiker supplied with materials and tools; cleaning working area, ma­
chine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding materials or tools;
and performing other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind
of work the helper is permitted to perform varies from trade to trade: In
some trades the helper is confined to supplying, lifting, and holding ma­
terials and tools and cleaning working areas; and in others he is permitted
to perform specialized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are
also performed by workers on a full-time basis.

ENGINEER, STATIONARY
Operates and maintains and may also supervise the operation of
stationary engines and equipment (mechanical or electrical) to supply the
establishment in which employed with power, heat, refrigeration, or
air-conditioning. Work involves: Operating and maintaining equipment
such as steam engines, air compressors, generators, motors, turbines,
ventilating and refrigerating equipment, steam boilers and boiler-fed
water pumps; making equipment repairs; and keeping a record of operation
of machinery, temperature, and fuel consumption. May also supervise
these operations. Head or chief engineers in establishments employing
more than one engineer are excluded.

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATOR, TOOLROOM
Specializes in the operation of one or more types of machine
tools, such as jig borers, cylindrical or surface grinders, engine lathes,
or milling machines, in the construction of machine-shop tools, gages,
jigs, fixtures, or dies. Work involves most of the following: Planning
and performing difficult machining operations; processing items requiring
complicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; using a variety of pre­
cision measuring instruments; selecting feeds, speeds, tooling, and oper­
ation sequence; and making necessary adjustments during operation to
achieve requisite tolerances or dimensions. May be required to recognize
when tools need dressing, to dress tools, and to select proper coolants
and cutting and lubricating oils. For cross-industry wage study purposes,
machine-tool operators, toolroom, in tool and die jobbing shops are ex­
cluded from this classification.
MACHINIST, MAINTENANCE

FIREMAN, STATIONARY BOILER
Fires stationary boilers to furnish the establishment in which
employed with heat, power, or steam. Feeds fuels to fire by hand or
operates a mechanical stoker, or gas or oil burner; and checks water
and safety valves. May clean, oil, or assist in repairing boilerroom
e quipme nt.
HELPER, MAINTENANCE TRADES
Assists one or more workers in the skilled maintenance trades,
by performing specific or general duties of lesser skill, such as keeping




Produces replacement parts and new parts in making repairs of
metal parts of mechanical equipment operated in an establishment. Work
involves most of the following: Interpreting written instructions and speci­
fications; planning and laying out of work; using a variety of machinist's
handtools and precision measuring instruments; setting up and operating
standard machine tools; shaping of metal parts to close tolerances; making
standard shop computations relating to dimensions of work, tooling, feeds,
and speeds of machining; knowledge of the working properties of the
common metals; selecting standard materials, parts, and equipment re­
quired for his work; and fitting and assembling parts into mechanical
equipment. In general, the machinist's work normally requires a rounded
training in machine-shop practice usually acquired through a formal ap­
prenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

17

MECHANIC, AUTOMOTIVE (MAINTENANCE)

OILER

Repairs automobiles, buses, motortrucks, and tractors of an es­
tablishment. Work involves most of the following: Examining automotive
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassembling equipment and
performing repairs that involve the use of such handtools as wrenches,
gages, drills, or specialized equipment in disassembling or fitting parts;
replacing broken or defective parts from stock; grinding and adjusting
valves; reassembling and installing the various assemblies in the vehicle
and making necessary adjustments; and alining wheels, adjusting brakes
and lights, or tightening body bolts. In general, the work of the auto­
motive mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually acquired
through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Lubricates, with oil or grease, the moving parts or wearing sur­
faces of mechanical equipment of an establishment.

MECHANIC, MAINTENANCE
Repairs machinery or mechanical equipment of an establishment.
Work involves most of the following; Examining machines and mechanical
equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling or partly dismantling
machines and performing repairs that mainly involve the use of handtools
in scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with items
obtained from stock; ordering the production of a replacement part by a
machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop for major
repairs; preparing written specifications for major repairs or for the pro­
duction of parts ordered from machine shop; reassembling machines; and
making all necessary adjustments for operation. In general, the woik of
a maintenance mechanic requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Excluded from this classification are workers whose primary
duties involve setting up or adjusting machines.
MILLWRIGHT
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dismantles and
installs machines or heavy equipment when changes in the plant layout
are required. Work involves most of the following; Planning and laying
out of the work; interpreting blueprints or other specifications; using a
variety of handtools and rigging; making standard shop computations re­
lating to stresses, strength of materials, and centers of gravity; alining
and balancing of equipment; selecting standard tools, equipment, and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good order power
transmission equipment such as drives and speed reducers. In general,
the millwright's work normally requires a rounded training and experience
in the trade acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent train­
ing and experience.




PAINTER, MAINTENANCE
Paints and redecorates walls, woodwork, and fixtures of an es­
tablishment. Work involves the following: Knowledge of surface peculi­
arities and types of paint required for different applications; preparing
surface for painting by removing old finish or by placing putty or filler
in nail holes and interstices; and applying paint with spray gun or brush.
May mix colors, oils, white lead, and other paint ingredients to obtain
proper color or consistency. In general, the work of the maintenance
painter requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
PIPEFITTER, MAINTENANCE
Installs or repairs water, steam, gas, or other types of pipe and
pipefittings in an establishment. Work involves most of the following:
Laying out of work and measuring to locate position of pipe from drawings
or other written specifications; cutting various sizes of pipe to correct
lengths with chisel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting
machine; threading pipe with stocks and dies; bending pipe by hand-driven
or power-driven machines; assembling pipe with couplings and fastening
pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relating to pressures,
flow, and size of pipe required; and making standard tests to determine
whether finished pipes meet specifications. In general, the work of the
maintenance pipefitter requires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and ex­
perience. Workers primarily engaged in installing and repairing building
sanitation or heating systems are excluded.
PLUMBER, MAINTENANCE
Keeps the plumbing system of an establishment in good order.
Work involves: Knowledge of sanitary codes regarding installation of vents
and traps in plumbing system; installing or repairing pipes and fixtures;
and opening clogged drains with a plunger or plumber's snake. In general,
the work of the maintenance plumber requires rounded training and ex­
perience usually acquired through a formal apprenticeship or equivalent
training and experience.

18

TOOL AND DIE MAKER— Continued

SHEET-METAL WORKER, MAINTENANCE
Fabricates, installs, and maintains in good repair the sheet-metal
equipment and fixtures (such as machine guards, grease pans, shelves,
lockers, tanks, ventilators, chutes, ducts, metal roofing) of an establish­
ment. Work involves most of the following: Planning and laying out all
types of sheet-metal maintenance work from blueprints, models, or other
specifications; setting up and operating all available types of sheet-metal­
working machines; using a variety of handtools in cutting, bending, form­
ing, shaping, fitting, and assembling; and installing sheet-metal articles
as required. In general, the work of the maintenance sheet-metal worker
requires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a formal
apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
TOOL AND DIE MAKER

volves most of the following: Planning and laying out of work from models,
blueprints, drawings, or other oral and written specifications; using a
variety of tool and die maker's handtools and precision measuring instru­
ments, understanding of the working properties of common metals and
alloys; setting up and operating of machine tools and related equipment;
making necessary shop computations relating to dimensions of work, speeds,
feeds, and tooling of machines; heattreating of metal parts during fabri­
cation as well as of finished tools and dies to achieve required qualities;
working to close tolerances; fitting and assembling of parts to prescribed
tolerances and allowances; and selecting appropriate materials, tools, and
processes. In general, the tool and die maker's work requires a rounded
training in machine-shop and toolroom practice usually acquired through
a formal apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

(Die maker; jig maker; tool maker; fixture maker; gage maker)
Constructs and repairs machine-shop tools, gages, jigs, fixtures
or dies for forgings, punching, and other metal-forming work. Work inCUSTODIAL

AND

For cross-industry wage study purposes, tool and die makers in
tool and die jobbing shops are excluded from this classification.
l

TERIAL

MOVE ME NT

ELEVATOR OPERATOR, PASSENGER

JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER— Continued

Transports passengers between floors of an office building, apart­
ment house, department store, hotel, or similar establishment. Workers
who operate elevators in conjunction with other duties such as those of
starters and janitors are excluded.

or other establishment. Duties involve a combination of the following:
Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing floors; removing chips,
trash, and other refuse; dusting equipment, furniture, or fixtures; polishing
metal fixtures or trimmings; providing supplies and minor maintenance
services; and cleaning lavatories, showers, and restrooms. Workers who
specialize in window washing are excluded.

GUARD
Performs routine police duties, either at fixed post or on tour,
maintaining order, using arms or force where necessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on identity of employees and
other persons entering.
JANITOR, PORTER, OR CLEANER
(Sweeper; charwoman; janitress)
Cleans and keeps in an orderly condition factory working areas
and washrooms, or premises of an office, apartment house, or commercial




LABORER, MATERIAL HANDLING
(Loader and unloader; handler and stacker; shelver; trucker; stockman
or stock helper; warehouseman or warehouse helper)
A worker employed in a warehouse, manufacturing plant, store,
or other establishment whose duties involve one or more of the following:
Loading and unloading various materials and merchandise on or from freight
cars, trucks, or other transporting devices; unpacking, shelving, or placing
materials or merchandise in proper storage location; and transporting ma­
terials or merchandise by handtruck, car, or wheelbarrow. Longshoremen,
who load and unload ships are excluded.

19

ORDER FILLER
(Order picker; stock selector; warehouse stockman)
Fills shipping or transfer orders for finished goods from stored
merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips, customers'
orders, or other instructions. May, in addition to filling orders and in­
dicating items filled or omitted, keep records of outgoing orders, requi­
sition additional stock or report short supplies to supervisor, and perform
other related duties.
PACKER, SHIPPING
Prepares finished products for shipment or storage by placing them
in shipping containers, the specific operations performed being dependent
upon the type, size, and number of units to be packed, the type of con­
tainer employed, and method of shipment. Work requires the placing of
items in shipping containers and may involve one or more of the following:
Knowledge of various items of stock in order to verify content; selection
of appropriate type and size of container; inserting enclosures in container;
using excelsior or other material to prevent breakage or damage; closing
and sealing container; and applying labels or entering identifying data on
container. Packers who also make wooden boxes or crates are excluded.

TRUCKD RIVER
Drives a truck within a city or industrial area to transport ma­
terials, merchandise, equipment, or men between various types of es­
tablishments such as: Manufacturing plants, freight depots, warehouses,
wholesale and retail establishments, or between retail establishments and
customers' houses or places of business. May also load or unload truck
with or without helpers, make minor mechanical repairs, and keep truck
in good working order. Driver-salesmen and over-the-road drivers are
excluded.
For wage study purposes, truckdrivers are classified by size and
type of equipment, as follows: (Tractor-trailer should be rated on the
basis of trailer capacity.)
Truckdriver (combination of sizes listed separately)
Truckdriver, light (under lVz tons)
Truckdriver, medium ( 1V2 to and including 4 tons)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, trailer type)
Truckdriver, heavy (over 4 tons, other than trailer type)

SHIPPING A N D RECEIVING CLERK

TRUCKER, POWER

Prepares merchandise for shipment, or receives and is responsible
for incoming shipments of merchandise or other materials. Shipping work
involves: A knowledge of shipping procedures, practices, routes, available
means of transportation, and rates; and preparing records of the goods
shipped, making up bills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges,
and keeping a file of shipping records. May direct or assist in preparing
the merchandise for shipment. Receiving work involves: Verifying or
directing others in verifying the correctness of shipments against bills of
lading, invoices, or other records; checking for shortages and rejecting
damaged goods; routing merchandise or materials to proper departments;
and maintaining necessary records and files.

Operates a manually controlled gasoline- or electric-powered
truck or tractor to transport goods and materials of all kinds about a
warehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
For wage study purposes, workers are classified by type of truck,
as follows:
Trucker, power (forklift)
Trucker, power (other than forklift)

For wage study purposes, workers are classified as follows:
WATCHMAN
Receiving clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and receiving clerk




Makes rounds of premises periodically in protecting property
against fire, theft, and illegal entry.




Available On Request—
The

six th

annual

re p ort on s a l a r i e s

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person n el,

m a n a g e rs o f o f f i c e

O rd e r a s B L S
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tech n ician s,

fo r a c c o u n t a n t s , a u d it o r s , a t t o r n e y s , c h e m i s t s ,
d r a f ts m e n ,

tracers,

job

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of

s e r v i c e s , and c l e r i c a l e m p l o y e e s .

1469, N a t i o n a l S u r v e y o f P r o f e s s i o n a l , A d m i n i s t r a t i v e , T e c h ­

and C l e r i c a l P a y ,

F e b r u a r y —M arch 1 9 6 5 . 45 c e n t s

a copy.

Area Wage Surveys*
A l i s t o f th e l a t e s t a v a i l a b l e b u l l e t i n s i s p r e s e n t e d b e l o w .
A d i r e c t o r y i n d i c a t i n g d a t e s o f e a r l i e r s t u d i e s , a n d th e p r i c e s o f th e b u l l e t i n s i s
a v a ila b le on r e q u e s t.
B u l l e t i n s m a y b e p u r c h a s e d f r o m th e S u p e r i n t e n d e n t o f D o c u m e n t s , U . S . G o v e r n m e n t P r i n t i n g O f f i c e , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . , 2 0 4 0 2 ,
o r f r o m a n y o f th e B L S r e g i o n a l s a l e s o f f i c e s s h o w n on t h e i n s i d e f r o n t c o v e r .

A rea

B u lletin n um ber
and p r i c e

A rea

B u lletin num ber
an d p r i c e

A k r o n , O h io, J u n e 1 9 6 5 ----------------------------------------------A l b a n y —S c h e n e c t a d y —T r o y , N. Y. , A p r . 1 9 6 5 ___________
A l b u q u e r q u e , N . M e x . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 ______________________
A l l e n t o w n —B e t h l e h e m —E a s t o n , P a . —N . J . , F e b . 1 9 6 5 —
A t l a n t a , G a . , M a y 1 9 6 5 ____________________________________
B a l t i m o r e , M d . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
B e a u m o n t —P o r t A r t h u r , T e x . , M a y 1 9 6 5 _________________
B i r m i n g h a m , A l a . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 1 __________________________
B o i s e C i t y , I d a h o , J u l y 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
B o s t o n , M a s s . , O c t . 1 9 6 5 * ______________________________

1430-78,
1430-52,
1430-62,
1430-48,
1430-74,
1465-29,
1430-66,
1430-60,
1465-1,
1465-12,

25
25
20
20
25
25
20
25
20
30

cents
cen ts
cents
cents
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cents
cen ts

M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 1------------------------------------M i n n e a p o l i s —S t . P a u l , M i n n . , J a n . 1 9 6 6 -------------------M u s k e g o n —M u s k e g o n H e i g h t s , M i c h . , M a y 1 9 6 5 _______
N e w a r k a n d J e r s e y C i t y , N. J . , F e b . 1 9 6 5 -----------------N e w H a v e n , C o n n . , J a n . 1 9 6 6 1-----------------------------------N e w O r l e a n s , L a . , F e b . 1 9 6 5 1 ---- -----------------------------N e w Y o r k , N . Y. , A p r . 1 9 6 5 1 ____________________________
N o r f o l k —P o r t s m o u t h a n d N e w p o r t N e w s —
H a m p t o n , V a . , J u n e 1 9 6 5 1 _____________________________
O k l a h o m a C i t y , O k l a . , A u g . 1 9 6 5 -------------------------------

1430-58,
1465-38,
1430-68,
1430-45,
1465-37,
1430-53,
1430-80,
1430-77,
1465-5,

25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s

B u f f a l o , N . Y. , D e c . 1 9 6 5 _________________________________
B u r l i n g t o n , V t . , M a r . 1 9 6 5 1 _____________________________
C a n t o n , O h io, A p r . 1 9 6 5 __________________________________
C h a r l e s t o n , W. V a . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 __________________________
C h a r l o t t e , N . C . , A p r . 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
C h a t t a n o o g a , T e n n . - G a . , S e p t . 1 9 6 5 -------------------------C h i c a g o , 111., A p r . 19 6 5 1 ------------------------------------------C i n c i n n a t i , O h io—K y . , M a r . 1 9 6 5 ________________________
C l e v e l a n d , O h io, S e p t . 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
C o l u m b u s , O h io , O c t . 1 9 6 5 _______________________________
D a l l a s , T e x . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 __________________________________

1465-36,
1430-51,
1430-59,
1430-65,
1430-61,
1465-7,
1430-72,
1430-55,
1465-8,
1465-15,
1465-24,

25
25
20
20
25
20
30
25
25
25
25

cents
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts

1465-13,
1430-71,
1465-35,
1430-56,
1430-41,
1465-23,
1430-70,

25 c e n t s
25c e n t s
35 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
30c e n t s
25c e n t s
25 c e n t s

D a v e n p o r t —R o c k I s l a n d —M o l i n e , I o w a —111.,
O c t . 1 9 6 5 ___________________________________________________
D a y t o n , O h io, J a n . 19 6 6 1_________________________________
D e n v e r , C o l o . , D e c . 1 9 6 5 1 __________ ________ ___________
D e s M o i n e s , I o w a , F e b . 1 9 6 5 _____________________________
D e t r o i t , M i c h . , J a n . 1 9 6 5 1 ______________________________
F o r t W o r th , T e x . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 _____________________________
G r e e n B a y , W i s . , A u g . 1 9 6 5 _____________________________
G r e e n v i l l e , S . C . , M a y 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
H o u s t o n , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 5 _________________________________
I n d i a n a p o l i s , In d. , D e c . 1 9 6 5 1 ___________________________

O m a h a , N e b r . —I o w a , O c t . 1 9 6 5 1 ________________________
P a t e r s o n —C l i f t o n —P a s s a i c , N . J . , M a y 1 9 6 5 ____________
P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . —N . J . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 1-------------------------P h o e n i x , A r i z . , M a r . 1 9 6 5 _______________________________
P i t t s b u r g h , P a . , J a n . 1 9 6 5 1 _____________________________
P o r t l a n d , M a i n e , N o v . 1 9 6 5 1-------------------------------------P o r t l a n d , O r e g . —W a s h . , M a y 1 9 6 5 ______________________
P r o v i d e n c e —P a w t u c k e t , R . I . —M a s s . ,
M a y 1 9 6 5 1 _________________________________________________
R a l e i g h , N . C . , S e p t . 1 9 6 5 1---------------------------------------R i c h m o n d , V a . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 1 _____________________________
R o c k f o r d , 111. , M a y 1 9 6 5 ---------------------------------------------

1430-67,
1465-10,
1465-28,
1430-63,

30 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
30 c e n t s
20 c e n t s

1465-16,
1465-39,
1465-33,
1430-47,
1430-43,
1465-26,
1465-4,
1430-69,
1430-82,
1465-31,

20
25
30
20
30
20
20
20
25
30

cents
cen ts
cents
cents
cents
cen ts
cents
cen ts
cen ts
cents

S t . L o u i s , M o . —111. , O c t . 1 9 6 5 ___________________________
S a l t L a k e C i t y , U t a h , D e c . 1 9 6 5 -------------------------------- S a n A n t o n i o , T e x . , J u n e 19 6 5 * ___________________________
S a n B e r n a r d i n o —R i v e r s i d e —O n t a r i o , C a l i f . ,
S e p t . 1 9 6 5 1________________________________________________
S a n D i e g o , C a l i f . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 _____________________________
S a n F r a n c i s c o —O a k l a n d , C a l i f . , J a n . 19 6 5 1 ---------------S a n J o s e , C a l i f . , S e p t . 1 9 6 5 1 ------------------------------------S a v a n n a h , G a . , M a y 1 9 6 5 -------------------------------------------S c r a n t o n , P a . , A u g . 1 9 6 5 1 ----------------------------------------S e a t t l e —E v e r e t t , W a s h . , O c t . 19 6 5 1---------------------------

1465-22,
1465-32,
1430-81,

25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25 c e n t s

1465-20,
1465-21,
1430-37,
1 4 6 5 - 19.
1430-64,
1465-3,
1465-9,

30 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25c e n t s
30 c e n t s

1430-44,
1465-41,
1465-27,
1430-75,
1465-6,

20
20
30
20
20

cen ts
cents
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts

1430-57,
1430-42,
1430-73,
1465-2,
1430-40,
1465-30,

30
25
20
20
25
25

cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts

S i o u x F a l l s , S . D a k . , O c t . 1 9 6 5 1 ------------------------------S o u t h B e n d , I n d . , M a r . 1 9 6 5 _____________________________
S p o k a n e , W a s h . , J u n e 1 9 6 5 1 _____________________________
T o l e d o , O h i o , F e b . 1 9 6 5 1 ________________________________
T r e n t o n , N . J . , D e c . 1 9 6 5 ________________________________
W a s h i n g t o n , D. C . —M d . —V a . , O c t . 1 9 6 5 --------------------W a t e r b u r y , C o n n . , M a r . 1 9 6 5 ____________________________
W a t e r l o o , I o w a , N o v . 1 9 6 5 _______________________________
W i c h i t a , K a n s . , O c t . 1 9 6 5 ________________________________
W o r c e s t e r , M a s s . , J u n e 1 9 6 5 —__________________________
Y o r k , P a . , F e b . 196 6 1____________________________________
Y o u n g s t o w n —W a r r e n , O h i o , N o v . 1 9 6 5 1 ________________

1465-17,
1430-54,
1430-79,
1430-50,
1465-34,
1465-14,
1430-49,
1465-18,
1465-11,
1430-76,
1465-40,
1465-25,

25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
25c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
20 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
25 c e n t s
25c e n t s

J a c k s o n , M i s s . , F e b . 1 9 6 5 _______________________________
J a c k s o n v i l l e , F l a . , J a n . 1 9 6 6 _____________________________
K a n s a s C i t y , M o . - K a n s . , N o v . 1 9 6 5 1 __________________
L a w r e n c e —H a v e r h i l l , M a s s . —N . H. ,J u n e 1 9 6 5 ___________
L i t t l e R o c k —N o r t h L i t t l e R o c k , A r k . , A u g . 1 9 6 5 _______
L o s A n g e l e s —L o n g B e a c h , C a l i f . ,
M a r . 19 65 * ________________________________________________
L o u i s v i l l e , K y . —In d. , F e b . 1 9 6 5 1_______________________
L u b b o c k , T e x . , J u n e 1 9 6 5 ________________________________
M a n c h e s t e r , N . H. , A u g . 1 9 6 5 ____________________________
M e m p h i s , T e n n . , J a n . 1 9 6 5 ______________________________
M i a m i , F l a . , D e c . 1 9 6 5 * _________________________________
M i d l a n d a n d O d e s s a , T e x ---------- ----- _____—___— ------------ -

(N o t previously surveyed)

1 Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.
* Bulletins dated before July 1965 were entitled "Occupational Wage Surveys."




25
20
25
25
30

25 c e n t s
cents
cen ts
cen ts
cen ts
cents
40c e n ts