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L V.3;

AR EA WAG E SURVEY
Dayton, Ohio, Metropolitan Area
December 1974
Bulletin 1850-14




MIAMI

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
Bureau of Labor Statistics




ANNOUNCEMENT
Area Wage Survey bulletins will be issued once every 3 years.
These bulletins will contain information on establishment practices and
supplementary benefits as well as earnings. In the interim years,
supplements containing data on earnings only will be issued at no
additional cost to holders of the Area Wage bulletin. If you wish to
receive these supplements, please complete the coupons listed on
page 31 of this bulletin and mail to any of the BLS regional addresses
listed on the back cover. No further action on your part is necessary.
Each year, you will receive the supplement when it is published.

Preface
This bulletin provides results of a December 1974 survey of occupational earnings
and supplementary wage benefits in the Dayton, Ohio, Standard Metropolitan Statistical
Area (Greene, Miami, Montgomery, and Preble Counties). The survey was made as part
of the Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual area wage survey program. The program is
designed to yield data for individual metropolitan areas, as well as national and regional
estimates for all Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United States, excluding
Alaska and Hawaii.
A major consideration in the area wage survey program is the need to describe the
level and movement of wages in a variety of labor markets, through the analysis of (1) the
level and distribution of wages by occupation, and (2) the movement of wages by occupational
category and skill level. The program develops information that may be used for many
purposes, including wage and salary administration, collective bargaining, and assistance in
determining plant location. Survey results also are used by the U.S. Department of Labor
to make wage determinations under the Service Contract Act of 1965.
Currently, 82 areas are included in the program. (See list of areas on inside back
cover.) In each area, occupational earnings data are collected annually. Information on
establishment practices and supplementary wage benefits is obtained every third year.
Results of the next two annual surveys, providing earnings data only, will be issued as free
supplements to this bulletin. The supplements may be obtained from the Bureau's regional
offices. (See back cover for addresses.)
Each year after all individual area wage surveys have been completed, two summary
bulletins are issued. The first brings together data for each metropolitan area surveyed.
The second summary bulletin presents national and regional estimates, projected from
individual metropolitan area data.
The Dayton survey was conducted by the Bureau's regional office in Chicago, 111.,
under the general direction of Lois L. O rr, Associate Assistant Regional Director for
Operations. The survey could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the
many firms whose wage and salary data provided the basis for the statistical information in
this bulletin. The Bureau wishes to express sincere appreciation for the cooperation received.

Note:
A current report on occupational earnings and supplementary wage provisions in the
Dayton area is available for the laundry industry. Also available are listings of union wage
rates for building trades, printing trades, local-transit operating employees, local truckdrivers and helpers, and grocery store employees. Free copies of these are available
from the Bureau's regional offices. (See back cover for addresses.)

AR EA W A G E S U R V E Y

Bulletin 1850-14

U.S. D E P A R T M E N T OF LA B O R , John T . Dunlop, Secretary

April 1975

BUR EA U OF LABOR STATISTIC S, Julius Shiskin, Commissioner

D ayton , O hio, M etro p o litan A rea, D ecem ber 1974
CONTENTS

Page

Introduction

.

2

T able s:
A.

Earnings:
A -I. Weekly earnings of office workers----------------------------------3
A - 2. Weekly earnings of professional and technical w orkers-----------5
A-3. Average weekly earnings of office, professional, and technical workers, bysex-------------------------------------------------- 6
A-4. Hourly earnings of maintenance and power plant w orkers-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 7
A - 5. Hourly earnings of custodial and material movement w orkers------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 8
A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and materialmovement workers, by sex--------- 10
A - 7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for selected occupationalgroups, adjusted for employment shifts 1
1

B.

Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions:
B - 1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks_____________________________________________________ 1
2
B -2. Late-shift pay provisions for full-time manufacturing plant w orkers_________________________________________________ 13
B-3. Scheduled weekly hours and days of full-time first-shift workers____________________________________________________ 14
B-4. Annual paid holidays for full-time w orkers___________________________________________________________________________ 1
5
B-4a. Identification of major paid holidays for full-time w orkers__________________________________________________________ 16
B-5. Paid vacation provisions for full-time workers____________________________________________________
17
B-6. Health, insurance, and pension plan provisions for full-time w orkers-------------------------------------------------------------------19

Appendix A. Scope and method of survey
Appendix B. Occupational descriptions..-




For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U .S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402, GPO Bookstores, or
BLS Regional Offices listed on back cover. Price 80 centsl Make checks payable to Superintendent o f Documents.

21

25

Introduction
This area is 1 of 82 in which the U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts surveys of occupational earnings and
related benefits on an areawide basis. In this area, data were obtadned
by personal visits of Bureau field economists to representative estab­
lishments within six broad industry divisions: Manufacturing; transpor­
tation, communication, and other public utilities; wholesale trade; retail
trade; finance, insurance, and real estate; and services. Major industry
groups excluded from these studies are government operations and the
construction and extractive industries. Establishments having fewer than
a prescribed number of workers are omitted because of insufficient
employment in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provided
for each of the broad industry divisions which meet publication criteria.
A-series tables
Tables A - 1 through A-6 provide estimates of straight-time
hourly or weekly earnings for workers in occupations common to a
variety of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries. Occupations
were selected from the following categories: (a) Office clerical, (b) pro­
fessional and technical, (c) maintenance and powerplant, and (d) custodial
and material movement. In the 31 largest survey areas, tables A - la
through A-6a provide similar data for establishments employing 500
workers or more.
Following the occupational wage tables is table A - 7 which
provides percent changes in average earnings of office clerical work­
ers, electronic data processing workers, industrial nurses, skilled




maintenance workers, and unskilled plant workers. This measure of
wage trends eliminates changes in average earnings caused by employ­
ment shifts among establishments as well as turnover of establishments
included in survey samples. Where possible, data are presented for all
industries, manufacturing, and nonmanufacturing. Appendix A discusses
this wage trend measure.
B-series tables
The B-series tables present information on minimum entrance
salaries for office workers; late-shift pay provisions and practices for
plant workers in manufacturing; and data separately for plant and office
workers on scheduled weekly hours and days of first-shift workers; paid
holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans.
Appendixes
This bulletin has two appendixes. Appendix A describes the
methods and concepts used in the area wage survey program. It provides
information on the scope of the area survey and information on the area's
industrial composition in manufacturing. It ailso provides information
on labor-management agreement coverage. Appendix B provides job
descriptions used by Bureau field economists to classify workers in
occupations for which straight-time earnings information is presented.

A. Earnings
Table A-1. Weekly earnings of office workers in Dayton, Ohio, December 1974
Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number

O ccu p ation and in d u s try d iv is io n
workers

'\vcrage
weekly
hours1
(sta ndard)

N u m b e r of wo rk er s receiving straight-time weekly earnings of—
S

S
70

Mean ^

Median l

Middle ranged

S
80

S

$
90

100

S
110

S

$
120

130

S

S
140

ISO

S
160

S

S
170

180

S
190

S

S

20 0

21 0

S

S
220

230

S

S

$
240

250

260

and
under

270

and
90

-

2

no

120

130

140

150

160

34
34

7
7

10
9

18
18

7

~

80

—

1

1

9

13

6

63
31
32
3

13
8
5

20

over

16
16

100

170

180

190

20 0

-2 1 0

22 0

230

240

250

260

270

26
18
8
6

21
15

13
13
-

16

23
23
.

17
17

14
14
-

-

9
4
5
5

10
8

4

21
8
13
10

22

6

-

-

18
14
4

23

3
-

7

3

8
8

5
1
4

1

3

ALL W O R K E R S
BILL ER S* M A C H I N E (B O O K K E E P I N G
MA CHINE) ------- ------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------

94
84

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

$
1 2 3 .0 0
1 2 2 .5 0

$
1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0

$
$
1 0 5 .0 0 -1 3 7 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0 -1 3 5 .0 0

-

B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E OP ER A T O R S *
CL A S S A ---------------------------

30

3 9 .5

1 5 2 .5 0

1 5 9 .0 0

1 4 0 .0 0 -1 5 9 .0 0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

5

2

9

7
6

35
10
25
4

31
8
23

24

-

3
—
3

46
28
18

66
44

2
2

7
7

-

”

19
9

26
26

3
3

5
5

-

10

-

-

“

3

13
8

10

B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E OP ER A T O R S *
C L A S S B ---------------------------

31

3 9 .5

1 2 6 .0 0

1 2 1 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0 -1 4 8 .0 0

-

CL ER KS * AC C O U N T I N G * C L A S S A ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- — — — -----N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------

368
204
164
60

4 0 .0
4 0 *0
4 0 *0
4 0 .0

1 8 2 .5 0
1 9 3 .5 0
1 6 8 .5 0
2 0 1 .5 0

1 7 4 .5 0
1 8 6 .5 0
1 5 2 .0 0
2 2 4 .0 0

1 4 6 .0 0 -2 2 3 .5 0
1 5 4 .0 0 -2 2 8 .5 0
1 3 0 *0 0 -2 0 1 *5 0
1 7 1 .5 0 -2 4 1 * 5 0

«

-

-

CL ER KS * A C C O U N T I N G * C L A S S B ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------— ----

662
295
36 T

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 2 0 *5 0
1 2 9 .0 0
1 1 3 .5 0

1 1 2 .5 0
1 2 4 .0 0
1 0 5 .0 0

1 0 0 *0 0 -1 3 5 *0 0
1 0 8 *0 0 -1 4 3 *0 0
9 6 .0 0 -1 2 1 * 0 0

•
-

21
-

“

21

CL ER KS , FILE, C L A S S B --- — ----M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

64
39
25

4 0 .0
4 0 *0
3 9 .5

1 2 5 .0 0
1 2 0 .5 0
1 3 2 .5 0

1 2 3 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0
1 5 2 .5 0

1 0 0 .0 0 -1 4 8 .5 0
1 0 2 .0 0 -1 3 7 .5 0
1 0 0 * 0 0 -1 6 0 .5 0

_
-

3
-

-

CL ER KS , FILE , C L A S S C --- --- ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------- —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

11 5
31
84

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

9 5 .5 0
1 0 0 *5 0
9 3 .5 0

9 0 .0 0
9 0 .0 0
9 2 .5 0

8 5 * 0 0 -1 0 3 * 5 0
8 8 .0 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0
8 5 .0 0 -1 0 0 .0 0

_
-

CL ER KS * O R D E R ------- ----- ------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

152
10 6
46

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
4 0 .0

1 3 5 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0
1 2 2 .0 0

1 2 7 .0 0
1 3 9 .0 0
1 2 0 .0 0

1 1 0 * 0 0 -1 4 7 .5 0
1 0 4 .0 0 -1 4 8 .0 0
1 1 5 * 0 0 -1 3 0 .0 0

.
-

CL ER KS , P A Y R O L L ---- ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

128
93
35

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 *0

1 5 0*50
1 5 4 .0 0
1 4 1 .0 0

1 5 6 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0
1 2 5 .0 0

1 2 0 * 0 0 -1 8 3 .5 0
1 3 0 * 0 0 -1 8 4 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 -1 5 7 .0 0

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S A --M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------- -----

24 1
12 5
11 6

4 0 .0
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 5 0 .0 0
1 6 9 .5 0
1 2 8 .5 0

1 3 5 .5 0
1 5 6 *5 0
1 2 4 .0 0

1 2 1 .0 0 -1 6 1 * 5 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 9 3 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 -1 3 5 .5 0

K E Y P U N C H O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B --M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

363
248
11 5

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 3 7 .5 0
14 0 *5 0
13 0 *5 0

1 2 6 .0 0
1 3 2 .0 0
1 2 4 .0 0

1 1 4 .0 0 -1 5 4 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 -1 5 7 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0 -1 4 2 .5 0

M E S S E N G E R S ------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------

77
39
38

3 9 .5
3 9 .0
3 9 .5

10 1 *5 0
1 0 4 .5 0
9 8 .5 0

9 8 .0 0
1 0 3 .5 0
9 0 .0 0

8 5 .0 0 -1 0 9 .5 0
8 8 .5 0 -1 1 5 * 5 0
8 4 .0 0 -1 0 2 * 5 0

S E C R E T A R I E S ----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ---- ------—
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------- ---P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S -----------

1*3 1 7
875
442
127

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 8 1 .5 0
1 9 2 .0 0
16 0 *5 0
1 8 5 .5 0

1 7 7 .0 0
1 8 9 .0 0
1 5 0 *0 0
1 9 1 .0 0

1 4 0 .0 0 -2 1 1 * 0 0
1 5 2 .5 0 -2 2 5 .5 0
1 3 5 .0 0 -1 8 5 .5 0
1 6 0 .0 0 -2 0 4 .5 0

-




-

—
-

-

-

1
-

2

12 6
46
80

159
35
124

78
35
43

80
58

14
6
8

3
3

10

3

9
8
1

-

50
9
41

31
10
21

12

16

-

6

12

6
6

14
9

15
4
11

29
13
16

.
-

.
-

5
5

15
13

10

13

-

-

—

2

3
7

11

-

•
-

.

_

10

-

-

-

—
-

10

35
7
28

47
7
40

-

4
1

-

3

18
17
1

39
26
13

60
30
30

73
46
27

-

26
12
14

14
2
12

18
13

6
5

5
3

5

1

2

2
1
1

14

129

5
9

27
16
11

1

3

13
4

2

6
10
3

-

4
18
17

2
-

_

_

-

-

.

-

-

-

5
5

-

1
1

1
1

•

-

.

_

-

-

-

-

9
9

9
9

-

_

_

_

-

.

10

15
14
1

11

-

-

_
-

_
-

—

-

5

-

22

10
-

22

4
16

2
1
1

21
2

1
1

3
3

1

3

2

7
-

1

5

7

-

-

-

3
-

3
3

1
1

1
1

1
1

3
3

1
1

8
7
1

-

•

2
2

5

-

-

_

8

1
1

2
2

4
4

1

6
6

2

66
63
15

9
1

12
11
1

7
6
1

22

5

43
24
19

21
13
8

21
20
1

13
12
1

5

5

3
3

-

5
9

-

-

30
21
9

17

42
41
1

13
13

33
14
19

9
5

2
2

6
6

5
5

8

3

3
3
117

83
49
34

119
88
31
14

115

55

76
56
20
1

70
51
19
17

45
36

64
52
12
5

_

2
2

6
6

2
1
133
59
74

9

9
8

62
2

21
1

14

5

8

_

97
59
38

9

-

-

*

-

8

-

-

42
36

71
55

33
25

21
21

59
59

6

16

8

4

16

4

86
29
25

9
6

W eekly earnings
(standard)

*

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s tr a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly e a rn in g s o f—
$

umber

70

w e ek ly

O ccupation and in d u s try d iv is io n

(standard’

M ean

^

M edian

^

M iddle ranged

S

s
80

S

S
90

100

S
no

S
120

S
130

S

S
140

iso

$
160

S

$

s
170

180

190

S

S

$
200

210

220

S

S

S
230

240

250

$
260

and
under
80

270
and

90

100

— 250 — 26(L.__2TQ_ o v e r

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

?QP

21Q

-

-

9
9

-

2
1

5
5

9
4

4
3

8
8

9
8

5
4

3
2

3
2

4
2

5
5

a
-

6
6

6
6

8
8
-

31
*3 1
-

7
7

22
22

220_

23JL

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
SECRETARIES - CON TIN UED
SECRET AR IE S* C L AS S A ------- -----MA NU F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

86
65

3 9 .5
3 9 .0

$
2 0 5 .5 0
2 0 3 .5 0

$
1 9 5 .5 0
1 9 4 .5 0

$
$
1 6 6 .0 0 - 2 4 8 .0 0
1 6 6 .0 0 - 2 4 1 .5 0

SE CR ET AR IE S* CL A S S B ------------MA NU F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

338
222
116

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 9 2 .0 0
2 0 6 .5 0
1 6 4 .0 0

1 8 4 .0 0
1 9 9 .5 0
1 5 6 .5 0

1 5 0 .0 0 - 2 2 5 .0 0
1 6 7 .0 0 - 2 3 2 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0 - 1 7 5 .5 0

SE CR ET AR IE S* C L AS S C ------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S ----------- —

629
438
191
48

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 8 4 .0 0
1 9 6 .0 0
1 5 6 .0 0
1 8 2 .5 0

1 8 2 .5 0
1 9 2 .0 0
1 4 2 .0 0
1 9 0 .0 0

1 4 1 .5 0 - 2 2 1 .0 0
1 6 2 .5 0 - 2 3 6 .0 0
1 3 1 .5 0 - 1 7 0 * 0 0
1 3 5 .0 0 - 2 2 8 .5 0

SE CRETARIES* CL AS S D ------------MA NU F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

264
150
114

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 5 4 .0 0
1 5 3 .0 0
1 5 6 .0 0

1 4 6 .5 0
1 5 1 .0 0
1 4 0 .0 0

1 2 7 .0 0 - 1 8 4 .5 0
1 3 1 .5 0 - 1 7 1 .5 0
1 2 5 .0 0 - 1 9 1 .0 0

ST EN OG RA PH ER S* G E NE RA L ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

315
112
203

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 3 5 .5 0
1 3 3 .5 0
1 3 7 .0 0

1 2 5 .0 0
1 2 8 .0 0
1 2 3 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 5 7 .0 0
1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 4 1 .0 0
1 1 5 .0 0 - 1 6 4 .5 0

•

STENOG RA PH ER S* SE N I O R --------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --- — -------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

358
287
71

3 9 .5
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 7 0 .0 0
1 7 2 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 0

1 6 8 .0 0
1 7 4 .0 0
1 5 3 .0 0

1 4 5 .0 0 - 1 9 3 .5 0
1 4 3 .5 0 - 1 9 5 .0 0
1 4 6 .5 0 - 1 7 7 .5 0

_

.

-

SW IT CH BO AR D O P E R A T O R S ---------- -—
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G — — - — -------

148
52
96

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
4 0 .0

1 3 1 .0 0
1 6 3 .5 0
1 1 3 .5 0

1 1 9 .0 0
1 6 9 .5 0
1 0 8 .0 0

1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 6 4 .5 0
1 2 9 .0 0 - 1 9 5 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .5 0

15
15

-

SWIT CH BO AR D OPERATOR -R EC EP TI ON IS TS MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

214
114
100

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 2 0 .0 0
1 2 9 .5 0
1 0 9 .0 0

1 1 5 .0 0
1 2 3 .5 0
1 1 0 .0 0

1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 2 7 .0 0
1 0 2 .0 0 - 1 4 7 .0 0
1 0 0 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0

-

-

“

TYPISTS* CL AS S A --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

219
178
41

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
3 9 .0

1 5 4 .0 0
1 6 1 .5 6
1 2 1 .0 0

1 3 8 .0 0
1 5 2 ,0 0
1 1 5 .0 0

1 1 7 .0 0 - 1 8 5 .0 0
1 2 1 .0 0 - 1 9 9 .0 0
1 1 2 .0 0 - 1 2 5 ,0 0

TYPISTS* CL AS S B --------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- -------------

290
192
98

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .0

1 0 9 .0 0
1 0 9 .5 0
1 0 7 .5 0

1 0 5 .0 0
1 0 4 .5 0
1 0 5 .0 0

9 6 .0 0 - 1 1 5 .0 0
9 0 .0 0 - 1 1 7 .0 0
1 0 0 .5 0 - 1 1 0 .0 0

*

W o r k e r s w e r e d is trib u te d as fo llo w s ;

See fo o tn o te s at end o f ta b le s .




“

-■
-

—
-

.

_

.

.

l

“

-

-

“

“

—
-

-

23
16
7

26
4
22

34
14
20

33
14
19

21
10
11

20
11
9

19
12
7

38
32
6

17
16
1

10
8
2

31
27
4

7
5
2

17
11
6

2
2
-

-

“

1
1
-

10
3
7
-

8
3
5
“

45
21
24
8

77
34
43
9

52
25
27
1

26
14
12
“

45
23
22
5

35
26
9
-

70
59
11
1

37
36
1
-

35
30
5
5

27
22
5
3

29
22
7
4

31
29
2
2

49
39
10
10

23
23

1
1
-

4
2
2

18
12
6

52
20
32

30
21
9

29
15
14

19
16
3

22
22
"

17
16
1

22
9
13

31
10
21

13
1
12

5
4
1

1
1
-

1
1
-

31
6
25

66
26
40

82
28
54

23
11
12

23
21
2

12
5
7

26
4
22

16
1
15

31
8
23

3
-

1
1

-

-

14
14

-

-

“

10
10
-

20
16
4

17
15
2

50
28
22

38
23
15

34
27
7

35
31
4

34
27
7

29
28
1

40
32
8

7

14
14

21
2
19

18
9
9

13
3
10

14
5
9

6
4
2

2
2
“

1
1
-

2
2
-

9
9
-

14
3
11

26
10
16

45
24
21

51
8
43

38
27
11

4
3
1

26
24
2

6
6
-

6
4
2

3
3

.

_

-

4

_

”

-

-

-

57
40
17

27
20
7

16
11
5

14
13
1

12
10
2

8
8
-

15
14
1

11
11

-

11
3
8

-

23
17
6

70
65
5

74
24
50

74
46
28

14
11
3

12
11
1

9
5
4

6
6

3
3

2
2

1
1

_
-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

7
4

_

-

-

i

-

-

-

-

-

_
-

.

-

_

-

_

-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

•

9
9

6
5
1

16
16

6
6

-

_

“

-

-

—

-

-

8
8

1
1

3
3

_

_

_

_

-

•

_

-

1
1

3
3

-

-

1
1

3
3

8
8

10
10

12
12

8
8

7
7

1

1
1

3

.

-

-

1

6 at $270 to $280; 5 at $280 to $ 2 90; 3 at $290 to $ 300; 5 at $ 300 to $310; 2 at $310 to $ 320; 3 at $ 320 to $ 330; and 7 at $330 to $ 340.

*

_

•

M
l
.

_
-

_

•

_

_

«•
-

_

_

Weekly earnings 1
(standard)
Number
of

O ccu p ation and in d u s try d iv is io n

N u m b er o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv in g s t r a ig h t - t im e w e e k ly ea rn in gs o f—
s

S
120

weekly
Median ^

(standard)

Middle range ^

Under
and
$
under
120
130

S

S
130

140

$

$
150

160

$
170

5

S

$
180

190

200

S

$
210

220

i

$
240

260

S

$
280

300

$

S

$
320

340

360

$
380

400
and

140

150

160

170

180

190

200

210

220

240

260

280

300

320

340

360

380

400

over

ALL WORKERS
COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS A ------------M ANU FACTU RING ---------------------------------

68
48

3 9 .0
3 9 .0

$
2 1 9 .0 0
2 2 5 .0 0

$
2 1 2 .0 0
2 2 5 .5 0

$
$
1 7 7 .0 0 - 2 5 3 .5 0
1 8 7 .0 0 - 2 4 7 .0 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS 8 ------- ™
MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING ---------------------------

117
65
52

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 8 0 .0 0
1 9 6 .0 0
1 6 0 .0 0

1 7 7 .0 0
1 9 2 .0 0
1 5 1 .0 0

1 5 1 .0 0 - 1 9 7 .0 0
1 7 7 .0 0 - 2 0 7 .0 0
1 4 3 .0 0 - 1 6 5 .5 0

COMPUTER OPERATORS* CLASS C ------------MANUFACTURING — ------- — ----- ----- -------

86
51

3 9 .5
3 9 .5

1 5 4 .5 0
1 7 0 .5 0

1 3 8 .5 0
1 7 9 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS A ------------------------------

84

3 9 .5

2 8 0 .5 0

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS B -----------------------------MANUFACTURING ---------------------------------NONMANUFACTURING — -----------------------

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
1

2
-

9
5

7
6

2
1

4
3

8
3

4
4

9
9

13
7

3
3

3
3

-

-

-

13
5
8

14
5
9

10
6
4

13
10
3

15
15
-

6
6
-

6
6
-

7
2
5

3
3

1
1

2
2

-

16
1
15

1
1

-

10
2
8

1 2 5 .5 0 - 1 8 9 .0 0
1 3 0 .5 0 - 2 0 9 .5 0

12
9

20
3

12
5

8
1
7
f

2
2

2
2

4
4

6
6

5
4

2
2

7
7

5
5

1
1

2 9 1 .0 0
tv i.u u

2 1 6 .0 0 - 3 2 2 .5 0

-

-

-

•

-

1

-

-

8

10
9

4

2
c

5
c

5

**

*

12
A
o

13
11
2

12
12

128
98
30

3 9 .5
3 9 .5
3 9 .5

2 2 2 .0 0
2 3 2 .5 0
1 8 8 .5 0

2 1 6 .5 0
2 3 3 .5 0
1 7 6 .0 0

1 7 7 .5 0 - 2 6 1 .0 0
1 8 6 .5 0 - 2 7 8 .0 0
1 7 1 .0 0 - 2 1 5 .0 0

-

-

COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS*
BUSINESS* CLASS C -------------------------- —

28

3 9 .5

1 8 1 .0 0

1 8 9 .5 0

1 6 2 .0 0 - 2 0 5 .5 0

-

1

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
BU SIN E SS, CLASS A ------------------------------

-

3

-

•

-

-

3

-

-

-

_

_

_

_

•

.

-

-

15
11

9
*

5
3

4

4

*

14
14

8
8

1
1

-

-

-

_

-

-

-

•

2
2

11
9
2

2
1
1

20
9
11

12
8
4

6
4
2

5
5

8
8

-

-

14
8
6

2

1

3

2

3

2

6

6

-

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

73

3 9 .5

3 2 3 .0 0

3 1 0 .0 0

2 9 2 .0 0 - 3 5 1 .0 0

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

5

24

11

7

10

5

2

7

COMPUTER SYSTEMS ANALYSTS*
B U SIN E SS, CLASS B ---------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

126
76

4 0 .0
3 9 .5

2 6 8 .5 0
2 7 6 .5 0

2 6 4 .0 0
2 6 6 .0 0

2 4 0 .5 0 - 2 8 5 .5 0
2 4 3 .5 0 - 2 9 9 .0 0

-

-

-

-

“

-

-

-

4
2

5
1

21
13

32
18

20
14

22
10

10
6

2
2

2
2

5
5

2
2

l
1

ORAFTERS, CLASS A ----------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

526
491

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 9 2 .5 0
2 9 6 .0 0

2 7 9 .5 0
2 9 0 .5 0

2 5 1 .0 0 - 3 3 6 .5 0
2 5 2 .5 0 - 3 3 9 .5 0

.
-

_
-

-

-

3
3

_

-

_
-

-

14
10

16
12

48
39

96
87

90
81

28
28

64
64

47
47

49
49

41
41

17
17

12
12

DRAFTERS* CLASS B -------------------------------M AN U FAC TU RIN G ------------------ --------------

215
191

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 2 7 .0 0
2 3 2 .0 0

2 1 6 .0 0
2 1 6 .0 0

1 9 1 .0 0 - 2 6 6 .0 0
1 9 3 .0 0 - 2 6 6 .0 0

“

-

-

1
1

6
4

6
3

14
13

25
21

31
23

16
12

24
24

11
9

10
10

35
35

15
15

16
16

5
5

_
-

_
-

DRAFTERS* CLASS C -------------------------------MANUFACTURING ------------------

289
230

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

1 7 2 .0 0
1 7 3 .5 0

1 6 2 .0 0
1 6 0 .5 0

1 5 4 .0 0 - 1 8 0 .0 0
1 5 4 .0 0 - 1 8 2 .0 0

6
6

12
5

52
43

38
32

78
68

28

23
13

2
2

13
11

6
4

13
13

10
10

5
5

3
3

-

-

-

-

_
_
-

1A
c
D

8

1
1
«
1

i
i
*

1
1
1
1

14
9

11
1
10
10

96
17
79
79

137
20
117
117

19
6
13
11

17

S
s

12
8
4
4

_
.
_
-

_
•
.
_
-

_
.
_
_
.

_
.
_
_
_

DRAFTFR^—TRATFRC
l nM 1LiaO fH
/ l
J
nwriur Mv iUn inv

74
34

- ••

.UV 1
A A*
“ w •U 14 A aCA 1 4 ^ •Aft 1C ftUU 1
DU
AA •A 1 4 2 .0 0 1 3 4 .0 0 1 2 7 .0 0 - 1 4 8 .5 0
•*U _v

_
_
-

7
f

cc

310
63
247
245

4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 3 8 .5 0
2 2 8 .5 0
2 4 1 ,0 0
2 4 0 .5 0

2 4 5 .0 0
2 3 2 .5 0
2 4 6 .0 0
2 4 6 .0 0

2 2 6 .0 0 - 2 4 7 .0 0
2 0 5 .5 0 - 2 4 3 .5 0
2 2 6 .0 0 - 2 4 7 .0 0
2 2 6 .0 0 - 2 4 7 .0 0

-

ELECTRONICS T E C H N IC IA N S , CLASS A MANUFACTURING ------------------

48
32

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 5 6 .0 0
2 4 0 .5 0

2 5 8 .5 0
2 4 1 .5 0

2 3 4 .5 0 - 2 8 8 .0 0
2 2 5 .0 0 - 2 5 8 .5 0

_
-

»
_
-

---

75
70

4 0 .0
4 0 .0

2 3 1 .0 0
2 3 1 .0 0

2 4 1 .5 0
2 3 0 .0 0

1 9 9 .5 0 - 2 6 8 .0 0
1 9 9 .5 0 - 2 6 8 .5 0

.

1

NURSES, IN D U STR IAL (REG ISTERED )
M ANU FACTU RING -------- -----—

* W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows:




5 at $100 to $110; and 7 at $110 to $120.

7
»

16

ELECTRONICS TECH NICIANS ----------MANUFACTURING --------- ----------------------NONMANUFACTURING ------ ------ -----------PU B LIC U T I L I T I E S ------------------------

_
•
“
_

_
_
2
2

_
_
-

1
1

_
_
2
2

_

IS

4
2
2
2

-

-

-

_
-

4
4

1
1

9
9

12
12

6
6

7
7

3
3

7
7

5
5

4
4

6
6

15
12

12
11

17
17

_

16
-

n
n

.

_
-

.
_
-

.
_
-

.

-

.

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Weekly
hours 1
[standard)

Weekly
earnings1
(standard)

OF F I C E O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN
82
50

$
40.0 21 9. 50
40.0 215.00

CLERKS* O R DE R ----------------------

32

40.0 166.50

ME SS E N G E R S --------------------------

46

39.0

CLERKS* A C CO UN TI NG . CL A S S A ----M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

Sex, occupation, and industry division

OFFICE OCCUPATIONS
W O M E N — CO N T I N U E D

Number
of

Weekly
hours 1
(standard)

Weekly
earnings *
(standard)

39,5
39.5
39.5
39.5

$
181.00
191.50
160.50
185.00

94
84

40.0 123.00
40.0 122.50

B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E OPERAT OR S*
CLASS A -------------------------------

30

39.5 152.50

B O O K K E E P I N G - M A C H I N E OP ER AT OR S*
CLASS B -------------------------------

31

39.5 126.00

CLERKS* A C CO UN TI NG . CL AS S A -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---------------

286
154
132
34

40.0 171.50
40.0 187.00
40.0 154.00
40.0 181.50

<
f
c
4
>
40 .0 183.00
39.5 196.50
40 .0 164.00

39.5 205.50
39.0 203.50

CO MP UT ER O P E R A T O R S , CL A S S C ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------- -------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

61
32
29

39 .5 157.00
39.0 182.00
39.5 130.00

334
218
116

39.5 191.50
39.5 206.50
40.0 164.00

CO MP U T E R P R O G R A M M E R S .
BUSINESS. CL A S S A ------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

77
65

3 9 .5 28 2. 50
39 .5 28 8. 50

SE CR ET AR IE S. CLAS S C ------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------ --------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------- ----------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ---------------------------------

629
438
191
48

39.5
40.0
39.5
39.5

CO MP UT ER P R O G R A M M E R S ,
BUSINESS. C L A S S B -----------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------------

105
84

39 .5 22 4. 50
39 .5 2 3 4. 00

SE CR ET A R I E S . CLASS D ------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

263
150
113

39.5 154.00
39.5 153.00
39.0 155.50

CO MP UT ER S Y S T E M S AN AL YS TS ,
BUSINESS, CLAS S A --------------------------------------- -

71

4 0 .0 32 4. 00

ST E N O G R A P H E R S . G E NE RA L -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---- ---- -----------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------

313
112
201

39.5 135.50
40.0 133.50
39.0 136.50

CO MP UT ER S Y S T E M S A N AL YS TS ,
BUSINESS, CL A S S B -----------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------------

116
68

39 .5 26 9. 50
3 9 .5 279.00

DRAFTERS, C L A S S A -------------------------------------------1
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------- -— ---------

508
47 5

357
286
71

39.5 169.50
40.0 172.00
39.0 161.50

40 .0 29 4.00
40.0 29 7.50

ST E N O G R A P H E R S . S E NI OR --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------n o n m a n u f a c t u r i n g ------------------

DRAFTERS, CL A S S B -------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------------

214
191

40 .0 22 7, 50
40.0 23 2. 00

DRAFTERS, CL AS S C --------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------------------------------------

257
228

40.0
40.0

172.00
173.50

D R A F T E R S - T R A C E R S ---------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

38
33

40.0
40.0

136.50
140.00

E L EC TR ON IC S T E C H N I C I A N S ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------- -----— - — N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU B L I C U T I L I T I E S ----------------

309
63
246
244

40.0
40 .0
40 .0
40 .0

23 8. 50
22 8, 50
241.00
24 1. 00

E L E C T R O N I C S T E C H N I C I A N S , CL A S S AM A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

48
32

86
65

184.00
196.00
156.00
182.50

CLERKS* ACCO UN TI NG . CL AS S B -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------

644
291
353

40.0 118.50
40.0 128.00
40.0 111.00

CLERKS. FILE. CL A S S B --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- — — — — ---- ---

59
38

39.5 122.50
40.0 120.50

S W I T C H B O A R D O P E R A T O R S --- -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

146
52
94

39.5 130.00
39.5 163.50
40.0 112.00

CLERKS. FILE. CL AS S C ---------- ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

114
31
83

40.0
95.50
40.0 100.50
40.0
93.50

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR-RECEPTIONISTSM A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ----- — — ------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

214
114
100

40.0 120.00
40.0 129.50
40.0 109.00

CLERKS. O R DE R ------------- -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

120
91
114
79
35

216
175
41

CLERKS. P A Y R O L L ---- --------- --- ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------- ---------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

40.0 153.50
40.0 161.00
39.0 121.00

241
125
116

290
192
98

K E YP UN CH O P E R AT OR S. C L AS S A -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------- ------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

39.5 109.00
39.5 109.50
39.0 107.50

KE YP U N C H O P ER AT OR S. C L AS S B — — —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------- — — ------- —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------- ---- ---

362
247
115

39.5 127.00^ TY PI ST S, C L AS S A --------------------39.0 130.50
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------39.5 147.50
39.5 150.50 TYPI ST S. C L AS S B --------------------40.0 141.00
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------40.0 150.00
39.5 169.50
40.0 128.50
P R O F E S S I O N A L AND T E CH NI CA L
39.5 137.50
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN
40.0 141.00
39.fr 130.50
CO M P U T E R OP ER A T O R S , CL AS S A ™
------40.0 105.00
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------- ------- ------- -----------------------

M E S S E N G E R S ------------- ---------------

31

40 .0 25 6. 00
40 .0 24 0. 50

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN
C O M P UT ER O P E R A T O R S ,

51
41

39.0 222.00
39.0 226.50

C L A S S C --------

25

39 . 5 148.50

DRAFTERS. CL A S S C --------------------

NOTE:
Earnings data in table A-3 relate only to workers w h o s e sex identification w a s provided by the establishment.
all workers in an occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)




Weekly
earnings 1
(standard)

97
57
40

1,312
871
441
126

S E C R ET AR IE S. C L AS S 8 -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- --------- --------------- —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------------------------

BILLERS. M A CH IN E (BOOKK EE PI NG
MACHINE) ------------------------- ---N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

Weekly
(standard)

COMPUTER O P E R A T O R S , C L A S S B -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------- -----------------

S E C R E T A R I E S -----------------------------------------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------------------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------------------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------ ---------------------

99.50

WO ME N

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

P R O F E S S I O N A L AN D T E C H N I C A L
OCCUPATIONS - MEN— CONTINUED

-

SE CR ET A R I E S . CLAS S A -------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------O F FI CE O C C U P A T I O N S -

Average
(m ean2)

Average
(mean2 )

Average
(mean2 )
Number
of
workers

32

4 0 .0

NURSES, I N D U S T R I A L (R EGISTERED) —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------- —

75
70

4 0 .0 2 3 1. 00
4 0 .0 2 3 1. 00

Earnings data in tables A - 1 and A-2,

on the other hand,

172.50

relate to

N u m b e r of w o r k e r s receiving straight-time hourly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Middle range

2

S
S
5 .8 0 6 ,0 0

S

S
S
s
S
6 • ^0 6 .6 0 6 .8 0 7 .0 0

S
7 .2 0

S
under
4 .0 0
4 .1 0 4 .2 0 4 • 30 4 .4 0 4 . 5 0

4.6Q 4 *8 0 5 • 90 5 .2 0 5 .4 0 5 .6 0 5 • 80

s .o o

6 .2 0 6 .4 0 6 • 60 6 ,8 0

7*0 0 7 .2 0

V

Median2

$
S
5 .4 0 5 .6 0

s
s
7 .4 0 7 ,6 0

U n der

o

M ean2

S
S
S
4 .8 0 5 .0 0 5

o
C
M
.

S
S
S
S
S
S
S
4 .0 0 4 .1 0 4 • 20 4 .3 0 4 .4 0 4 .5 0 4 ,6 0

©
(M

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

7 ,6 0 o v e r

ALL W O R K E R S
B O I L E R T E N D E R S ------ ---- — ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

45
36

$
4.99
5.24

$
5.20
5.61

$
$
4.38 - 5.61
4.56- 5.61

C A R P E N T E R S * M A I N T E N A N C E — ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------— — ------ ----

139
121

6.18
6.32

5.95
6.21

5.58 - 7.12
5. 67 - 7.12

4

E L E C T R I C I A N S * M A I N T E N A N C E ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- -------— ------ —

69 3
621

6.35
6.38

6. 44
6.77

5.55- 7.29
5. 46 - 7.30

-

EN G I N E E R S * S T A T I O N A R Y ---------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------------

138
137

6.22
6*24

7.12
7.12

HE LP E R S * M A I N T E N A N C E T R A D E S -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- --------- --------

153
106

4.45
4.38

MACHINE-TOOL OPERATORS* TOOLROOM —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- — --------------

622
622

6.69
6.69

MA C H I N I S T S * M A I N T E N A N C E ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------- --- ------ ----

137
126

5.81
5.76

-

“

1
1

-

-

4
4

3
3

19
19

-

1

.

-

_

1

3
3

-

26
24

27
26

8
-

6
5

9
-

3
3

_

9

-

51
51

-

-

82
30

18
15

25
25

«
»
-

117
117

184
184

-

4
4

4
4

3
3

-

-

67
67

-

-

4
4

-

-

-

58
58

209
209

158
158

_

1
1

“

_
.

_

.

.

•

5.06- 7.14
5.06- 7.14

•
“

.
-

1
“

2
2

4. 37
4.37

4.26 - 4.77
4.14 - 4.50

*2 0
16

4
4

14
14

5
5

7.30
7.30

5.92- 7.40
5.92- 7.40

“

3

1
1

29
29

5.05- 6.77
4.92- 6.77

-

5.82
5.55

3
-

201
123
78
66

5.87
5.94
5.77
5.82

5. 94
5.86
6.00
6. 04

5.235.235.465 . 46 -

M E C H A N I C S . M A I N T E N A N C E — -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

60 3
552

6.11
6.10

6.39
6.87

4.81 - 7.30
4.65 - 7,30

-

4
4

M I L L W R I G H T S ------------ --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------- ------------

398
398

6. 53
6.53

7.12
7.12

5.55- 7.14
5.55- 7.14

.

.

P A IN TE RS * M A I N T E N A N C E --- -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

86
79

6.22
6. 28

6.11
6.77

5.45- 7.06
5.56- 7.06

-

P I P E F I T T E R S . M A I N T E N A N C E -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

404
394

6.62
6.63

7.13
7.13

5.71- 7.14
5.71- 7.14

S H E E T - M E T A L WO RK E R S * M A I N T E N A N C E —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

209
209

6.83
6.83

7.12
7.12

TO O L AN D DI E M A K E R S -----------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- --------- --------

76 9
769

6.77
6.77

7. 47
7.47

6.81
7.03
6.40
6.40

10
4
6
6

3

3
“

-

-

10
10

19
19

20
18

39
37

26
21

72
72

52
50

3
“

7
6

“

“

8
8

12
12

22
22

.
“

3
3

6
6

6
6

-

40
40

2
2

44
1

•
“

24
24

5
5

20
20

6
6

29
29

9
9

24
24

69
69

.

6
6

7
7

2
2
-

_

.
21
21

6
6

21
21

3
3

9
9

_

6
6

_

_

-

-

4
4

“

11

"

"

1
1
“

33
33
•

25
13
12
12

5
2
3
3

19
9
10
4

17
14

-

-

17
9
8
8

7
7

83
79

45
45

33
33

3
3

32
32

4

9
9

6
-

37
-

6
6

-

-

.

.

31
31

3
3

-

-

.

"

14
14

14
14

28
28

.

_

17
-

-

-

-

“

-

75
75

-

-

-

2
2

-

-

-

”

“

“

3
3

11
8

14
11

7
7

1
-

7
7

“

“

“

•

“

-

-

-

“

•

"

6
6

1
1

58
58

47
45

3
-

5
-

7.10- 7.14
7.10- 7.14

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

"

“

14
14

_

”

12
12

-

“

2
2

-

“

“

6.10- 7.48
6.10 - 7.48

-

-

-

-

*

-

1
1

5
5

23
23

25
25

4
4

57
57

25
25

-

"

_
-

“

10
6
4
4

33
33

”

52
52

_

2
2
“

“

3
3

_

_
-

* W o r k e r s w e r e distributed as follows: 4 at $ 3.30 to $ 3.40; and 16 at $ 3.70 to $ 3.80.




9
9

2
-

ME C H A N I C S . A U T O M O T I V E
(M AI NT EN AN CE ) ----------- -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------- -----------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------- ----------P U B L I C U T I L I T I E S ------------ ---

See footnotes at end of tables.

“

9
-

-

“

28
28

3
3

-

31
31

-

25
10
15
15

-

-

-

_

-

5
5

207
207

66
66

_

-

-

_
-

-

4
4

256
256

13
13

24
24

_

29
29

-

-

-

13
13

6
6

-

112
112

6
6

2
2

a

-

_
8

37
37

_

*•

250
250

5
5

162
162

•

-

10
10

426
426

_
-

_

•

•

N u m b e r o f w o r k e r s r e c e iv i n g s t r a i g h t - t i m e h o u r ly e a r n i n g s o f—

Hourly earnings3

T
1
3 .8 0 4 .0 0

i
4 .2 0

S
4 .4 0

$
4 .6 0

S
4 .8 0

S
5 .0 0

S
5 .2 0

S
5 .4 0

S
5 .6 0

5
5 .8 0

%

6 .2 0

S
6 .6 0

4 .0 0

4 .2 0

4 .4 0

4 .6 0

4 . 8Q

5 .0 0

5 .2 Q

5 .4 0

5 .6 0

5 .8 0

6 .2 0

6 .6 0

7 .0 0

19
18
1

3
-

17
16
1

26
26

39
39

-

190
190

-

22
22

-

10 2
85
17

-

-

119
114
5

-

3

4
3
1

“

”

“

-

-

18

-

3

16

26

13

10 3

85

-

-

-

190

-

22

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

171
171

342
342
-

1
1
-

-

80
67
13

61
61

67
67

33
-

-

33

«
-

_
-

$
2 .6 0

$
2 .8 0

$
3 .0 0

$
3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

2 .0 0

Occupation and industry division
workers

1--------1 -------- S
2 .0 0 2 .2 0 2 .4 0

2 .2 Q

2 .4 0

2 .6 0

2 .8 0

3 *9 0

3 .2 0

3 .4 0

3 .6 0

3 .8 0

41
6
35

5
1
4

10
-

6
-

6
-

10

4
4

6

6

36
32
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

18

$
1 .9 0

Number
Mean2

Median2

Middle range 2

and
un der

ALL WORkERS

GU AR DS ANO W A T C H M E N ---- — --------MA N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------GUARDS!
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------WATCHMEN*
MA N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

1*43 0
552
87 8

$
3 .3 2
5 .2 0
2 .1 4

$
2 .0 0
5 .0 2
2 .0 0

$
2 .0 0 4 .6 8 2 .0 0 -

$
4 .9 5
6 .1 0
2 .0 0

-

781
781

494

5 .3 2

5 .0 2

4 .8 4 -

6 .1 0

-

-

-

6

1

-

-

-

14

-

-

-

26

11

31 3
313

108
108

38
3
35
2

63
30
33
12

125
92
33
4

68
50
18
1

134
118
16

255
S3
20 2
1

60
53
7
2

135
117
18
17

54
17
37
37

13
13

-

-

136
118
18
12

94
94
_

-

75
16
59
8

-

42
-

18
-

14
14

45
37
8

26
25
1

102
97
5

66
66

58
50
8

68
60
8

58
58

18

22
14
8

-

66
62
4

43
38
5

30
12
18

145
12
133

3
3

.
-

18
18

3
3

24
9
15

30
-

105
•

8
-

-

21
21
-

30

10 5

8

-

14
4
10

40
39
1

3
3

36
36

43
43

27
27

1
1

2
2

11
9
2

6
6

15
13
2

19
18
1

3

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

1
-

3

-

-

-

1

18
17

3
3

4
4

1
-

_

_

_

_

-

-

-

-

19
19

32
32
-

16
16

2
-

•

-

-

2

-

-

14
12
2

17
13
4

75
69
6
3

273
13
26 0
256

86
54
32

160
61
99

-

15
2
13
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

69
69

2
_

_

40
6
34

-

.

-

-

63
63

15
3
12

222
222

58

4 .1 5

4 .6 7

3 .5 4 -

4 .6 7

-

JANITORS* PORTERS* AND CL E A N E R S —
MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC UT I L I T I E S ---------------

2*1 9 4
1 *2 7 5
91 9
96

3 .8 2
4 .5 0
2 .8 7
3 .9 3

3 .8 7
4 .3 1
2 .5 0
4 .2 4

2 .8 0 3 .6 4 2 .1 0 3 .0 6 -

4 .6 4
5 .6 2
3 .8 7
4 .6 4

9
9
-

-

LABORERS* M A T E RI AL H A N D L I N G -------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

89 9
714
185

4 .5 2
4 .6 3
4 .0 9

4 .3 7
4 .5 0
3 .6 3

3 .7 4 3 .8 7 2 .6 0 -

5 .6 9
5 .6 9
5 .1 3

_

.
-

ORDER FI LL ER S ------------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

436
101
33 5

4 .3 0
4 .7 4
4 .1 6

4 .5 3
4 .6 9
4 .0 4

3 .4 0 4 .2 3 3 .4 0 -

5 .1 0
5 .8 9
5 .1 0

PACKERS* SH I P P I N G -------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

425
341
84

4 .4 4
4 .8 5
2 .8 0

4 .7 8
4 .8 1
2 .4 0

3 .6 4 4 .2 4 2 .4 0 -

5 .7 1
5 .7 6
2 .9 3

RE CE IV IN G C L ER KS --------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --—
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

105
62
43

4 .0 7
4 .3 7
3 .6 5

4 .2 4
4 .5 6
3 .5 1

3 .5 1 3 .9 9 3 .1 0 -

4 .7 1
4 .8 1
3 .7 1

36
32

4 .3 5
4 .2 9

4 .2 9
4 .2 9

4 .2 4 4 .2 4 -

4 .3 8
4 .3 0

SH IPPING AND R E C E I V I N G CL E R K S -----M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------- ---- — — —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

183
146
37

4 .7 2
4 .6 8
4 .8 8

4 .6 0
4 .6 8
4 .1 8

4 .2 8 4 .3 6 3 .7 5 -

4 .9 6
4 .8 8
6 .7 5

T R UC KD RI VE RS -------------------------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -----------------PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S ---------------

1 .8 2 9
476
1 *35 3
75 9

5 .3 8
4 .9 8
5 .5 3
6 .1 9

5 .2 0
5 .1 5
5 .3 0
6 .8 0

4 .5 0 4 .5 0 4 .4 5 5 .1 2 -

6 .8 0
5 .4 2
6 .8 0
6 .8 0

TRUCKD RI VE RS . L I GH T (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS) -----------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

96
77

3 .6 4
3 .3 6

3 .8 3
3 .0 0

2 .9 3 2 *3 5 -

4 .3 4
4 .3 3

TRUCKD RI VE RS * M E D I U M (1-1/2 TO
AND IN CL UD IN G 4 TONS) ----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

392
145
24 7

4 .6 8
4 .6 7
4 .6 9

5 .1 2
5 .2 0
5 .1 2

4 .0 4 4 .1 2 4 .0 4 -

5 .2 0
5 .2 0
5 .1 2

TR UC KD RI VE RS * H E AV Y (OVER 4 TONS*
TR AILER TYPE) ---------- ---------MA N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------- ---------

487
60
427

5 .9 8
4 .8 4
6 .1 4

6 .0 0

4 .7 4
6 .8 0

5 .3 0 4 .2 3 5 .3 5 -

6 .8 1
5 .5 0
6 .8 1

SHIP PI NG C L ER KS -------------------- —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------




-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

42

_

.
-

3
3

18
12
6

_
-

7
-

7
-

_
-

-

7

7

-

44
-

7
-

13
13

5
4
1

2
-

7

3
2
1

67
67

44

3
—
3

-

2

8
7
1

14

4
-

9
9

-

-

14

4

-

“
2

-

-

7
7

6
6

4
4

21
20
1

7
7

13
13
-

30
28
2

15
10
5
4

27
11
16

72
32
40

60
38
22

224
39
18 5

-

-

-

1

9
9

1
1

-

8
8

11
11

-

-

2
2

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

-

2
2

.

_

_

_

_

3

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

12

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

_

-

.

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

-

-

_

-

_

-

-

-

-

23
23

_

-

-

14
6
8

15
15

37
6
31

9
6
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
2

14
14

1
1

3
3

_

_

_

-

23
23

_

-

-

~

_

_

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12
6
6

_
-

36
6
30

_

j

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

“

21
19

1
1

_

19
17
2

30
6
24

-

-

44
6
38

-

10
10

16
16

34
2
32

-

1

4

19
3

_

-

•
-

-

20 0
113
87

-

_

_

_

-

-

-

63
63

50
50

106
106

-

2

-

1

4

11
10
1

15
13
2

87

10
2
8

12
12

-

1
‘

-

-

87

44
44

1
-

-

-

-

“

-

_

_

-

-

_

_

-

-

-

_

-

12

-

-

-

12

15
3
12

492
-

492
492

.

Num ber o f w ork ers re c e iv in g stra igh t-tim e hou rly earnings of—

Hourly earnings3

Occupation and industry division

Number
of
workers

S
1
S
*
I
S
S
s
1
1
1
T
T
S
1
1
S
S
s
$
1.90 2. 00 2*20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00 4. 20 4. 40 4. 60 4.80 5.00 5.20 5.40 5.60 5.80 6.20 6 .6 0
and
under

1
Mean 2

Median2

Middle range 2

o

o

*
o

2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4. 00 4. 20

4 . 80 5.00 5. 20 5. 40 5.60 5.80 6.20 6.60 7,00

ALL W O R K E R S —
CONTINUED
TRUCKDRIVERS - CONTINUED
T R U C K D R I V E R S * H E A V Y COVER 4 TONS*
O T H E R T H A N T R A I L E R TYPE) -------m a n u f a c t u r i n g --- -----------------TR U C K E R S * P O W E R (FORKLIFT)
MANUFACTURING

-------- -----

u to ru A iicru ru • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------------------

See footnotes at end o f tables.




392
109

$
4. 78
4.90

$
5 . 06
5. 23

$
$
4.40- 5.06
4.50- 5.23

1*103
1*03 4

4. 83
4. 82

4.60
4. 56

3.93- 5.79
3.93- 5.81

1O
H71
138

5*02
5.02

C A9
Oo 1C
5 . 12

C 71
30 90
4.04- 5.93

-

-

-

•
-

-

-

2

2

-

—
-

-

-

2

10

115
115

9

7
-

16
16

3
3

159
31

-

-

161
161

64
64

108
108

84
84

72
72

9
9

44
44

i
1

it

1C
19

9
C
.
2

15
15

**

•

-

-

136
125

275
269

-

“

2
2

14
2

35
35

_

_

148
-

44
44

-

33

30
18

_

42

10
10

Table A-6. Average hourly earnings of maintenance, powerplant, custodial, and material movement
workers, by sex, in Dayton, Ohio, December 1974
Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

Average
(mean2 )
hourly
earnings3

M A I N T E N A N C E AN D P O W E R P L A N T
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Number
of
workers

M A I N T E N A N C E AN D P O WE RP LA NT
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN— C O NT IN UE D
$ __

M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ----- ------------

36

5. 24

M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- —

C A RP EN TE RS * M A I N T E N A N C E ------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------------

139
121

6* 18
6. 32

693
621

6* 35
6 . 38

E N GI NE ER S* S T A T I O N A R Y ---------------

138

6. 2 2
6 * 24

GUARDS!
HMNUr AV. lUKiNO —
watchmen:
manufacturing

<
f
c
•
P
6.77
6.77

H E LP ER S* M A I N T E N A N C E T R A D E S — —
M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------

153
106

4* 4 5
4*38

M A C H I N E - T O O L OP ER A T O R S * T O O L R O O M —
MANUFACTURING — — — — — — —

622
622

6* 6 9
6 * 69

---------------

GU A R D S AND W A T C H M E N — --------- ---M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G -------------- -—
— — —

—

— —

Sex, occupation, and industry division

Average
(mean2 )
hourly
earnings3

C U ST OD IA L AN D M A T E R I A L M O V E M E N T
OCCUPATIONS - ME N — CONTINUED

1*411
533
878
476
57
It ill
471

4. 05
**• 3 J
2.85

LA BO RE RS * M A T E R I A L HA N D L I N G -------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------klAUUAkli 1CA C 1UIDTN o • • • • • •___________
_____ • • • • • • • • •
N U N n A N U r A f*TI K I AID — -

886
704
1A?
io c

4. 52
4. 63
A X1
•»« SI

T R UC KD RI VE RS * L I G H T (UNDER
1-1/2 TONS) --- --------------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ----------- ---

96
77

3. 64
3 . 36

392
1AC
1H!)
247

y /Q
,
Ho O O
4» 67
4.69

N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

Afl7
HO f
oo
42 7

5 . 98
4.84
6 . 14

TR UC KD RI VE RS , H E A V Y (OVER 4 TONS,
OTHE R T H AN T R A I L E R TYPE) -------MANUF AC 1U K 1 N G — —
—— —
—
—

39 2
109

4.78
4. 90

1* 07 7
1 tOOO
1 -AA Q

A Qf,
* • oo
t
A QC

1 7A
1 lO
1 Ifl
X JO

5. 0 2
C Uc
Do f\0

567
1
1 1Q
44 8
25

3. 1 7
4.19
2. 8 9
3. 6 9

oc

O tJ
C o0 7

4 . 14

JA NI TO RS * P O RT ER S. AND C L E A N E R S —
y k i ir ATTHD TAir
ki
WANUr AC 1U K i N D • • • • — • • • • • • • • • • • •
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G — ----- --------

$
*)Q
3 • JO
4.98
c C*
6 . 19

T R U C KD RI VE RS , M E D I U M (1-1/2 TO
Akin I N tL UU lN b * TUN5;
.
..
.
ANU Turn iintiiA H t min a —
—— —— ——
M AMI I “Af*Tl |D TWft • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
E
riMNUr AC 1UK 1NO
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

3.30
5.20
2.14

1 *829
47 6
1.1Q1
1t
759

m a n u f a c t u r i n g ----------------- —
lunuyAk i icA Ct1Uidtkid • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
i
NU N M AN U r a t i K I N b

--------- ------------

T R U C KD RI VE RS * H E A V Y (OVER 4 TONS,
TDATI CD TVDPl — — — — — — —
IKAXCtK 1 Trt)
—
M Akl IP A^ Tl |D T f
l
t
—
n A riU r AC 1U K 1 N O • • • • * • • • • • • • • * • • •

M A C H IN IS TS * M A I N T E N A N C E ---- ---- --M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------------

137
126

5*81
5 . 76

ME CH A N I C S * A U T O M O T I V E
(MAINTENANCE) -----------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- -----------------N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G — -------------mini *n U T X L »TTrr
..
P U B L I C nvti I T l t b — — — — .— —

201
123
78
4/
DO

5. 87
5. 9 4
5. 77
5 . 82

Ao n r o r ti i c d c
a aiii F inTi K fk i ______ — —— — — —
*
M A N UipA C 1UinX N o n — — —___ —.—-------k f c l iAkll irATTI ID TAID • ■ • • * • • • • • • • * • •
ffkk
N U W M A N U r A C IUK1NO

Jc O
a-a
oj

ME CH AN IC S* M A I N T E N A N C E — — —
—
y a i ip s nT| tO TA1/5__________ __________
li

603
CC?
DOC

6.11
6.10

---- ----------PACK ER S* S H I P P I N G —
MANUF AC 1U K 1N U — — — —
— —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------- —

n JoJ
J
30

JO J

L.
H.Ol iTRUCKERSt P O W E R < F 0 R K L I F T > --------c no
n^nurweiu" a n o
4.45
j Apruni IQCMCKI
" MnCnvUDunWI*
"
B
m o m m a ni i f a p t i ID Thin
4.70

M I L L W R I G H T S ---------------------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ----------------------

398
398

6 . 53
6 . 53

PA IN TE RS * M A I N T E N A N C E --------------M A N U F A C T U R I N G ---- ---- ------- ----

86
79

6 . 22
6. 28

R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S --- ----- -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ----- -— — — —
N O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G ------------------

105
62
43

4.07
4. 37
3.65

PI PE FI T T E R S * M A I N T E N A N C E -----------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- ------------------

40 4
394

6 . 62
6.63

S H E E T - M E T A L W O R K ER S. M A I N T E N A N C E —
MANUFACTURING "™w****** *•***•*•

20 9
209

6. 8 3
6. 8 3

S H I P P I N G C L E R K S — — ------------— —
y AhllirATTl lDlki/1
WA N Ur AC »UK IN o — —— — —
— ————
S H I P P I N G AN D R E C E I V I N G C L E R K S -----M A N U F A C T U R I N G --------------------ainkiuAtii irAC VUi o1No c _______— --------NUNWANUr ar>Ti K t u

35
172
135
Jr

3*00
C U S T OD IA L AND M A T E R I A L M O V E M E N T
OCCUPATIONS - WOMEN

4. 33 JANITORS, PO RT E R S , AN D C L E A N E R S --a 57
y A nUIPAPTI IDA Nj • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
/
n AKII rA C 1U K Tk O
**.C f
m o m m a mi inrTiiDThin • • • • • • * • • • • • • • •
N U N N A N U r A C 1U K I N O
PU BL IC U T I L I T I E S ---- ------- --4 . 72
4.68
P nvl\C." J f DH T mPn w f t ----------m
rA C K F R S . S n i P T N
w -------------------- rm-m^r------

See footnotes at end of tables.




Number
of
workers

P U BL IC U T I L I T I E S ----------------

(07
769

C U S T O D I A L AN0 M A T E R I A L M O V E M E N T
O C C U P A T I O N S - MEN

E L EC TR IC IA NS * M A I N T E N A N C E ---------M A N U F A C T U R I N G --- -------- ---------

Average
(mean2)
hourly
earnings3

Earnings data in table A- 6 relate only to workers wh o s e sex
identification w a s provided by the establishment. Earnings data in
tables A - 4 and A - 5, on the other hand, relate to all wo rk er s in an
occupation. (See appendix A for publication criteria.)




Table A-7. Percent increases in average hourly earnings for
selected occupational groups, adjusted for employment
shifts, in Dayton, Ohio, for selected periods
Industry and occupational
group

D ecem ber 1972
to
D ecem ber 1973

D ecem ber 1973
to
D ecem ber 1974

A ll industries:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and wom en)-----------------------E lectron ic data processing (men and w om en )__ _
Industrial nurses (men and w om en )___ __________
Skilled maintenance trades (m en)_________________
Unskilled plant w orkers (m en)---------------------------

6.0
*
5.4
6.5
7.4

7.7
6.6
9.4
8.8
9.9

Manuf act uring:
O ffice c le r ic ad (men and wom en)___ ______________
E lectron ic data processin g (men and w om en )____
Industrial nurses (men and w om en )_______________
Skilled maintenance trades (m en)__________________
U nskilled plant w orkers (m en)_____________________

6.4
*
5.2
6.4
7.9

7.6
6.7
9.1
9.0
10.0

Nonmanufacturing:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and w om en)___________________
E lectron ic data processing (men and w om en )____
Industrial nurses (men and w om en )_______________
S killed maintenance trades (m en)__________________
Unskilled plant w orkers (m en)---------------------------

5.3
*
**
**
5.8

7.6
**
**
**
9.7

*
**

Data not available.
Data do not meet publication c r ite ria .

NO TE: The percent in crea ses presented in this table are based on changes in average
hourly earnings fo r establishm ents reporting the trend jobs in both the current and previous
year (matched establishm ents). They are not affected by changes in average earnings
resulting fro m employment shifts among establishments o r tu rn over of establishm ents
included in survey sam ples. The percent in crea ses, h ow ever, are s till affected by fa cto rs
other than wage in creases. H irin gs, la yo ffs, and tu rn over m ay a ffect an establishm ent
average fo r an occupation when w orkers are paid under plans providing a range of wage rates
fo r individual jobs. In periods of in creased h irin g, fo r exam ple, new em ployees en ter at the
bottom of the-range, depressing the average without a change in wage rates.
These wage trends are not linked to the wage indexes previou sly published fo r this
area because the wage indexes m easured changes in area a verages whereas these wage trends
measure changes in matched establishment averages. Other ch a ra cteris tic s of these wage
trends which d iffer fro m the discontinued indexes include (1) earnings data o f o ffice c le r ic a l
w orkers and industrial nurses are converted to an hourly b asis, (2) trend estim ates are
provided fo r nonmanufacturing establishments w here p ossible, and (3) tren d estim ates are
provided fo r electron ic data processin g jobs.
F o r a m ore detailed description of the method used to compute these wage tren ds, see
"Im provin g A rea Wage Survey In d e x e s ," Monthly L abor R ev iew , January 1973, pp. 52-57.

B. Establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions
Table B-1. Minimum entrance salaries for inexperienced typists and clerks in Dayton, Ohio, December 1974
Other in experien ced c le r ic a l w orkers

Inexperienced typists

Minimum w eekly straight-tim e s a la r y 4

A ll
schedules

Establishm ents studied__________________________________
Establishments having a specified m in im u m ______________

40

A ll
schedules

A ll
schedules

40

Nonmanufacturing

Based on standard w eekly h ou rs6 o f—

A ll
industries

Based on standard w eekly hours6 of—

A ll
industries

Manufacturing

Nonmanufacturing

Manufacturing

40

40

130

57

XXX

73

XXX

130

57

XXX

73

XXX

22

17

59

33

28

26

21

3
3
3
5
8
2
2
1
6
2
1
1
4
3

3
1
1
5
_
1
4
2
1
1
2
1

3
1
1
5
.
.
4
2
1
1
1
1

52

30

26

$ 80.00 and under $ 82.50
$ 82.50 and under $ 85.00_______ __________________________
$ 85.00 and under $ 87.50__________________________________
$ 87.50 and under $ 90.00__________________________________
$ 90.00 and under $ 92.50 _________________________________
$ 92.50 and under $ 95.00______________ ________________
$ 95.00 and under $ 97.50__________________________________
$ 97.50 and under $ 100.00 _______________________________
$ 100,00 and under $ 102.50
$ 102.50 and under $ 105.00_______________________________
$ 105.00 and under $ 107.50____________________________ __
$ 107.50 and under $ 110.00___________________ ___________
$ 110.00 and under $ 112.50_______________________________
$ 112.50 and under $ 115.00.._____________________________

3
2
2
4
8
2
1
_
3
_
1
2
5
4

3
1
_
1
5
1
_
_
1
.
_
2
3
2

3
1
_
1
5
1
_
_
1
_
_
2
2
2

_
1
2
3
3
1
1
.
2
_
1
_
•
2
2

1
.
2
2
1
1
2
.
1
_
1
2

$ 115.00
$ 120.00
$ 125.00
$ 130,00
$ 135.00
$ 140.00
$ 145,00
$ 150.00
$ 155.00

2
3

2

_
3
_
_
_
_
_

_
_
_
.
_
_

3
2

2

3

_

_
.
_
1
_

_
1
.

.
.
1
_

_
.
1
.

1
-

1
-

2
1
5
1

2
1
4
1

1
1
4
1

and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and
and

A ll
schedules

_

_
2
3
4
3
2
2
2
_
2
2

_
2
1
3
2
2
2
2
.
1
2

1
2

1
2

1
-

1
-

under $ 120.00_______________________________
under $ 125.00_______________________________
under $ 130.00_______________________________
under $ 135,00 ............. .......
....
under $ 140.00______ __________ ______________
under $ 145.00
under $ 150,00. . ...
.......
__
under $ 155.00_______________________________
o v e r __________________________________________

2
1
5
1

2
1
4
1

1
1
4
1

Establishments having no specified m in im u m ... ..................

23

11

XXX

12

XXX

39

16

XX X

23

XXX

Establishments which did not em ploy w ork ers
in this c a t e g o r y _____________ _______ _____ ________________

55

16

XXX

39

XXX

32

8

XX X

24

XXX

See footnotes at end o f tables.




_
1
_

_
1

.
_
_
_
.

.
_
.
.
.




J ^ A lW ull^ tin^^nanu fa^ tu ringjilant^o rk^r^ ^^lO O ^ercent^

W orkers on late shifts

A ll w orkers 7
Second shift

T h ird shift

Second shift

T h ird shift

Percen t of w orkers
In establishments with late shift p ro v is io n s ____

97.8

89.6

23.3

4.4

W ith no pay differen tia l fo r late shift w o r k ——__
W ith pay differen tia l fo r late shift w o rk ________
U niform cen ts-per-hou r differen tial_________
U niform percent d iffe re n tia l_________________
Other differen tia l____________________________

_
97.8
43.2
53.0
1.6

_
89.6
36.0
52.0
1.6

_
23.3
8.0
14.8
.5

_
4.4
3.8
.5
"

13.3
5.8

18.7
9.8

13.7
5.3

21.0
9.1

A verage pay d ifferen tia l
U n iform cen ts-per-hou r differential---------------U n iform percent d iffe re n tia l____________________
P ercen t of w orkers by type and
amount of pay differen tia l
U n iform cen ts-per-hou r:
5 cents---------------------------------------------------7 V2 cents------------------------------------------------8 cents---------------------------------------------------9 cents---------------------------------------------------10 cen ts-------------------------------------------------11 cen ts-------------------------------------------------12 cen ts--------------------------------------- --------- 13 cen ts-------------------- ---------- ------------------14 c en ts ------------------------------------- ------- ----15 cen ts-------------------------------------------------16 c en ts-------------------------------------------------17 cen ts -------------------------------------------------18 or 19 cen ts______________________ ______ ___
20 or 20% cen ts--------------------------------------22 or 25 cen ts________________________________
28 cen ts--------------- ---------------------------------30 cen ts-------------------------------------------------35 cen ts-------------------------------------------------40 cen ts-------------- --------- --------------------------

1.2
1.4
1.2
.8
11.7
1.2
2.8
2.2
5.7
9.9
_
.8
1.6
1.3
1.4

-

-

.2
(M
.3

-

-

2.6
1.2

2.4
.1
.2
.6
1.5
1.5
.2
.2
.4
-

-

.8
1.5
13.0
1.2
3.7
.6
2.0
1.7
5.2
1.2

-

1.4

.3
-

-

U n iform percent:
5 percent--------------- --------------------------------7 percen t------------------------------------------------7 V2 percen t_________ ______ ___________________
9 percen t____ _________________________________
10 p erc e n t----------------------------------------------15 p e rcen t_____________________________________

42.9
.9
1.4
.9
6.8
-

3.1
.9
1.1
.9
44.1
1.8

13.7
.2
.3
.3
.4
-

Other differen tial:
8 hours' pay fo r 7 V2 hours' w ork — ------------

1.6

1.6

.5

-

_
.1
1.6
.3
(8)
(8)
.1
.2
1.4
(8)
.1
.1
(8 )
.1
.4
"

O ffic e w orkers

Plant w orkers
Item
A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public u tilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

Pu blic u tilities

Percen t of w ork ers by scheduled
w eekly hours and days
A ll fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s ____________________________________
20 hours— 5 d a ys----------------------------------------------------------2 2 V2 hours— 5 d a ys--------- ----------------------------------------------32 hours— 5 d a ys---- ----------------------------------------------------33 hours— 5 d a ys______________________________________________
35 hours------------- ----- ---------- -----------------------------------5 days---------------------------- ------------------------------------ —
6 days— ------------------------------------------------------- — ----37 hours— 5 da ys______________________________________________
3 7 V2 hours— 5 da ys-------------------------------------------------------3734 hours--------------------------------------------------------------------/
4 V2 days-------------------------------------------------------------------5 days----------------------------------------------------------------------38 hours— 5 da ys______________________________________________
38 V2 hours— 5 d a ys-------------------------------------------------------38 V4 hours— 5 d a ys------------------ -----------------------------------40 hours_____________________________________ _________________
4 days_______________________________________________________
5 days------------------------------- ------------------------------------42 hours— 5 days----------------------------------------------------------42Vz hours— 5 d a ys------------------ -----------------------------------44 hours — 5 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------45 hours _____________________________________________________________________________
5 days -------------- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 V2 days ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------48 hours — 6 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------50 hours — 5 d a y s ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------52 hours — 6 V2 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------5 2 V2 hours — 5 V2 days __ --------------------------------------------------------------- —
54 ho ur 8— 6 d a y s ----------- -------------------------------------------------------------------58 hours — 6 d a y s -------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------60 hours — 5 d a y s -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

100

.

(!)
(9)
1
1
1
(9)
1
6

7

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(9 )
-

79
1
78
1
(9)
-

3
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1

1

-

79
1
78

100
100

.
3
3
(9)
10
1
1
(9)
-

2
(9)
84

100

.
5
5
6
2
1
1

-

10
-

-

-

86

90

-

-

84
-

86

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

-

3
3
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

41.4

40.0

39.6

-

-

90

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Average scheduled weekly hours
All weekly w o r k schedules ------------------------------------------------ ---------------

See footnote at end of tables.




40.9

39.7

39.8

O ffic e w orkers

Plant w orkers
Item
A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public u tilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

Public utilities

P ercen t o f w orkers
A ll fu ll-tim e w o rk e rs ______ ______________________________

100

In establishm ents not providing
paid h o lid a y s________________________________________ _________
In establishm ents provid ing
paid h o lid a y s_________________________________________________

3

-

-

-

-

97

100

100

99

100

100

10.5

11.5

9.7

10.1

11.3

9.8

3
1
3
2
2
15
1
1
18
4
3
8
38
2

9
2
12
34
11
32
-

100
100
100
100
97
97
93
93
91
74
73
55
51
48
40
2

100
100
100
100
91
91
89
89
77
44
44
32
32

( 9)

100

A v e ra g e number o f paid holidays
F o r w ork ers in establishm ents
providing h olid a y s___________________________________________
P ercen t of w ork ers by number
of paid holidays provided 1
0
2 h o lid a y s______________________________________________________
___________
3 holidays
_
_
_ _ ___________
5 h o lid a y s_______________________________ _____________________
6 h o lid a y s______________________________________________________
6 holidays plus 1 or 2 h alf days______________________________
7 h o lid a y s ______________________________________________________
7 holidays plus 1 or 2 h alf days__________________________ ____
8 h o lid a y s______________________________________________________
8 holidays plus 2 half d a y s ____________________________________
9 h o lid a y s ______________________________________________________
9 holidays plus 1 half d a y ________________________________ ____
9 holidays plus 2 half d a y s ____________________________________
10 holidays_____________________________________________________
11 holidays______ _____________________________________________
12 holidays
____
_______________ _______
13 holidays
_______________________________ _____ _________
14 holidays
__________________________________________________
15 holidays____ _________________ ___________________________

( 9)
1
8
1
7
n
5
1

15
1
1
13
3
4
6
28
1

(!)
( 9)
7
( 9)
7
1
2
( 9)
31
1
1
22
3
5
5
14

-

2
( 9)
2
( 9)
2
1
17
1
2
29
5
2
10
26

99
99
98
98
92
92
85
85
82
51
50
27
24
19
14
14

100
100
100
100
98
98
96
96
94
76
75
43
38
36
26
26

10
3
3
42
-

1
40
-

P e rcen t o f w ork ers bv total paid
h oliday tim e provided “
2
3
5
6

days o r m o r e ___________ ___________________________________
days o r m o r e ________________________________________________
days o r m o r e ________________________________________________
days o r m o r e ________________________________________________
6 V2 days or m o r e ______________________________________________
7 days o r m o r e ________________________________________________
7 V2 days or m o r e ______________________________________________
8 days o r m o r e ________________________________________________
9 days or m o r e ------------------- ------ ---------------------- --------9 V2 days o r m o r e ________________________________________ ____
10 days o r m o re
__ .
11 days o r m o re
__________________________________________
12 days o r m o re _______________________________________________
13 days o r m o re __________ _____ -_______________-____________
14 days o r m o re ______ _____________________ _______ _________
15 days_____________ ___________________________________________




97
96
96
95
87
86

79
79
73
56
56
42
39
35
29
1

-

100
100
100
100
90
90
86
86

83
42
42
40
40
-

O ffic e w orkers

Plant w orkers
It e m 1
0
A ll industries

Manuf actur ing

Public u tilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

100

100
4
77
99
99
99

100
40
72
100
100
100

99
24
53
99
99
99
16
20
98
49
55
99
14
1
6
43
3
33
8
11

100
4
76
99
99
99

100
43
83
100
100
100
3
100
72
43
100

Pu blic u tilities

P ercen t of w orkers
A ll fu ll-tim e w o r k e r s --------------

-----------------------------

New Y e a r 's Day-------------------------------------------------------------Washington's B irth d a y---------------------------------------------------Good F rida y------------------------------------------------------------------M em oria l D ay__________________________________________________
Fourth of Ju ly__________________________________________________
Labor D ay--------------------------------------------------------------------Columbus D ay__________________________________________________
Veterans Day----------------------------------------------------------------Thanksgiving Day______________________________________________
Day after Th anksgivin g---------------------- ----- ----------------------Christm as E v e _________________________________________________
Christm as D ay— ------ -------------- — --------------------------Christm as—
New Y e a r holiday p e r io d 12----- --------------------2 extra days during Christm as week— ----------------------------3 extra days during Christm as w eek---------- ---------------------New Y e a r 's E ve-------------------------------------------------------------New Y e a r 's E ve, h a lf day------------------------ ----------------------Floating holiday, 1 d a y 1 -----------------------------------------------*
Floating holiday, 2 days 13----------------------------------------------E m ployee's birthday-------------------------------------------------------

See footnotes at end of tables.




100
96
6
62
95
95
94
(9)
2
94
55
67
96
28
3
7
57
3
11
8
18

-

1
99
69
86
100
38
4
9
75
4
13
7
12

-

3
100
61
45
100
-

38
-

7
36
28

-

1
98
72
88
100
26
2
11
73
5
47
9
10

-

40
-

3
40
13

O ffice w orkers

Plant w orkers
Item
A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public u tilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

100

100

100

100

Public utilities

P ercen t o f w ork ers
100

A ll fu ll-tim e w o rk ers----------------- --------------------- ------

100

In establishm ents not provid ing
paid vacations_________________________ _____________________
In establishm ents providing
paid vacations________________________________________________
Len gth -o f-tim e paym en t--------------------------------------------P ercen ta g e p a ym en t--------------------------------------------------

1

-

3

( 9)

-

-

99
97
2

100
98
2

97
97
-

99
99
( 9)

100
100

100
100
"

6 months o f s e r v ic e :
Under 1 w e e k ___ ________ ____________________ ________
1 w e e k -----------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and under 2 w e e k s --------------------------------------

11
35
( 9)

12
42
-

32
38
"

7
61
3

66
5

40
48
-

1 year o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and voider 2 w e e k s ______________________________
2 w e e k s ___ _____________________________________________
O ver 2 and under 3 w e e k s --------------------------------

55
3
42
-

51
2
47
_

54
5
38
"

18
( 9)
81
1

14
85
1

49
51
-

2 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and voider 2 w e e k s ______________________________
2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and voider 3 w e e k s -------------------------------------3 w e e k s -------- ---------------------- ----------------------------

34
8
56
1
“

32
11
57
_

2
89
5
■

6
1
91
1
1

7
1
89
1
2

5
5
58
30

92
5
-

1
83
15

2
68
27
2

~

Amount o f paid vacation a fte r: 1
4

3 ye a rs of s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and voider 2 w e e k s ------------ ----------------------2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and voider 3 w eeks -------------------------------------3 w eeks _
-----------------------------------------------------------

1

4
7
48
39
1

4 years of s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------O ver 1 and voider 2 w e e k s ______________________________
2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and voider 3 w e e k s ______________________________
3 w e e k s ----------------------------------------------------------------

3
5
59
30
2

2
7
50
39
2

92
5
-

5 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
O ver 1 and voider 2 w e e k s ______________________________
2 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and voider 3 w e e k s ______________________________
3 w e e k s ---------------------------------------------------------------O ver 3 and voider 4 w e e k s ______________________________

1
( 9)
56
3
39
( 9)

1
47
2
50
"

10 years o f s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
2 w e e k s ___________________________ _____________________
O ver 2 and voider 3 w e e k s ______________________________
3 w e e k s __________________________________________________
O ver 3 and under 4 w e e k s ________________ _______ _____
4 weeks —________________________ _______ ____ ____________

1
9
9
46
30
4

5
12
40
39
3




-

1
1

1

1

-

100
-

100
-

-

-

-

82
15
3

66
27
6

100
-

88
5
4
-

72
1
27
( 9)

55
1
44
-

93
7
-

2
90
5
“

7
3
70
15
5

5
5
57
27
7

6
_
94

-

-

-

-

-

O ffic e w orkers

Plant w orkers
Item
A ll industries

Manufacturing

Pu blic utilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

6
2
72
15
5

“
5

Pu blic u tilities

Amount of paid vacation a fter 1 — Continued
4
12 years of s e rv ic e :
1 w e e k ------------------------------------------ ------ ---------------2 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------O ver 2 and under 3 w eek s-------------------------------------3 w eek s__________________________________________________
Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s -------------------------------------4 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------5 w eek s__________________________________________________

1
8
8
48
29
4
1

5
11
41
39
3

15 years of s e r v ic e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------2 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------3 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s -------------------------------------4 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------Over 4 and under 5 w e e k s -------------------------------------5 w eek s----------------------------------------------------------------

1
6
32
3
56
( 9)
1

“
3
26
3
67
1

20 years of se rv ic e :
1 w e e k ___________________________________________________
2 w eek s__________________________________________________
3 w eek s--------------- ---------------------------------------------Over 3 and under 4 w eek s______________________________
4 w eek s__________________________ _____________________
Over 4 and under 5 w e e k s -------------------------------------5 w eek s__________________________________________________
Over 5 and under 6 w e e k s -------------------------------------Over 6 weeks____________________________________________

1
6
7
8
41
( 9)
35
( 9)

3
3
10
39
44
1

25 years of s e rv ic e :
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------2 w eek s__________________________________________________
3 w eek s__________________________________________________
Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s -------------------------------------4 w eek s__________________________________________________
O ver 4 and under 5 w e e k s ------------------------- ---------5 weeks — ---------------- — ------ — ----------------------Over 5 and under 6 w e e k s -------------------------------------6 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------Over 6 w eeks---------------------- -------------------------------Maximum vacation available *
1 w e e k ----------------------------------------------------------------2 w eek s__________________________ _____________________
3 w eek s---------------------------------------------------------------Over 3 and under 4 w e e k s -------------------------------------4 w eek s__________________________________________________
Over 4 and under 5 w e e k s ______________________________
5 w eek s--------------------------------------------------------- -----Over 5 and under 6 w e e k s ______________________________
6 w eek s---------------------------------------------------- --------Over 6 w eeks____________________________________________

1
1
6

6
1
33
( 9)
50
0

( 9)
1

1

6
6
1
31
2

46
( 9)
5

* Estim ates o f provision s fo r 30 years of s e r v ic e a re identical.




■
2

90
5
-

3

57
28
7

-

6
94
-

1

■
3
3
1
33
58
-

1
3
3
1
30
2
53
7

■
2

68
21
5

■
3
53
1
43
-

“
1
30
2
66
-

4
85
12

-

-

2
2

77
10
5

3
13
1
60
1
22
-

~
1
4
2
54
1
38
-

4
3
83
10
-

■
2
2
14
70
5
4

3
4
( 9)
50
1
40
1

1
3
37
1
57
1

4
3
9
77
7

‘

'

•
2
2
14
70
5
4

3
4
( 9)
48
2
35
7

"
1
3
32
3
48
12

4
3
9
77
7

O ffic e w orkers

Plant w orkers
Item
A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public u tilities

A ll industries

Manufacturing

Public utilities

P erc e n t of w ork ers
A ll fu ll-tim e w o rk e rs ____________________________________

100

100

100

100

100

100

In establishm ents p rovid ing at lea st one o f the
benefits shown below 15________ ____ ____________________ _____

98

100

100

99

100

100

L ife in su ra n ce_________________________________________________
Noncontributory p la n s___________________ __________________

96
78

100
82

100
64

98
73

99
78

99
51

A ccid en ta l death and dism em berm ent insurance............. .....
Noncontributory p la n s_________________________________ ____

81
66

83
70

100
64

88
60

97
72

98
48

Sickness and accident insurance o r sick
lea ve o r both 1 _______ _______ _______________________ _________
6

93

97

95

89

96

93

Sickness and accident insurance______________ ____________
Noncontributory p la n s------------ ----- ---------- ------ -------Sick lea ve (fu ll pay and no w aiting p e r io d ).......................
Sick lea ve (p a rtia l pay o r w aiting p e rio d )....... ..................

87
73
5
4

97
82
1
-

35
31
10
66

63
48
59
7

92
75
63
n

20
11
17
74

L o n g -te rm d isa b ility insurance______________________________
N oncontribu tory p la n s _____________________________________

34
32

45
42

22
22

36
31

42
35

33
30

H o spitalization insurance_____________________________________
Non con tribu tory p la n s _____________________________________

96
77

100
86

100
94

98
66

100
80

100
90

S u rgical insurance_____________________________________________
Non con tribu tory p la n s _________ ___________________________

96
77

100
86

100
94

98
66

100
80

100
90

M ed ica l in su ra n ce_____________________________________ _______
N on con tribu tory p la n s---------------------------- -------------------

90
72

97
83

100
94

94
63

99
79

100
90

M a jo r m e d ica l in su ra n ce------------------------- ---------------------Non con tribu tory p la n s-------------------------------------- ---------

52
35

50
35

96
90

91
49

94
53

99
90

Dental in su ra n ce-----------------------------------------------------------Noncontribu tory p la n s___________________________________

36
35

47
46

21
21

23
21

39
36

8
8

R etirem en t p e n s io n ....................... ..................... .......................
N oncontribu tory p la n s ___________ _________________________

88
81

96
91

95
91

92
80

91
79

93
86

See footnotes at end o f tables.




Footnotes

A ll of these standard footnotes may not apply to this bulletin.

1 Standard hours reflect the workweek for which employees receive their regular straight-time salaries (exclusive of pay for overtime
at regular and/or premium rates), and the earnings correspond to these weekly hours.
2 The mean is computed for each job by totaling the earnings of all workers and dividing by the number of workers. The median
designates position— half of the employees surveyed receive more and half receive less than the rate shown. The middle range is defined
by two rates of pay; a fourth of the workers earn less than the lower of these rates and a fourth earn more than the higher rate.
3 Excludes premium pay for overtime and for work on weekends, holidays, and late shifts.
4 These salaries relate to formally established minimum starting (hiring) regular straight-time salaries that are paid for standard
workweeks.
5 Excludes workers in subclerical jobs such as messenger.
6 Data are presented for all standard workweeks combined, and for the most common standard workweeks reported.
7 Includes all plant workers in establishments currently operating late shifts, and establishments whose formal provisions cover late
shifts, even though the establishments were not currently operating late shifts.
8 Less than 0.05 percent.
9 Less than 0.5 percent.
1 For purposes of this study, pay for a Sunday in December, negotiated in the automobile industry, is not treated as a paid holiday.
0
1 A ll combinations of full and half days that add to the same amount are combined; for example, the proportion of workers receiving
1
a total of 9 days includes those with 9 full days and no half days, 8 full days and 2 half days, 7 full days and 4 half days, and so on.
Proportions then were cumulated.
1 A Christmas—
2
New Year holiday period is an unbroken series of holidays which includes Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's
Eve, and New Year's Day.
Such a holiday period is common in the automobile, aerospace, and farm implement industries.
1 "Floating" holidays vary from year to year according to employer or employee choice.
3
1 Includes payments other than "length of tim e," such as percentage of annual earnings or flat-sum payments, converted to an
4
equivalent time basis; for example, 2 percent of annual earnings was considered as 1 week's pay. Periods of service are chosen arbitrarily
and do not necessarily reflect individual provisions for progression; for example, changes in proportions at 10 years include changes between
5 and 10 years. Estimates are cumulative. Thus, the proportion eligible for at least 3 weeks' pay after 10 years includes those eligible for
at least 3 weeks' pay after fewer years of service.
1 Estimates listed after type of benefit are for all plans for which at least a part of the cost is borne by the employer. "Noncontributory
5
plans" include only those financed entirely by the employer. Excluded are legally required plans, such as workmen's compensation, social
security, and railroad retirement.
l° Unduplicated total of workers receiving sick leave or sickness and accident insurance shown separately below. Sick leave plans are
limited to those which definitely establish at least the minimum number of days' pay that each employee can expect. Informal sick leave
allowances determined on an individual basis are excluded.




Appendix A
A re a w age and related ben efits data are obtained by personal visits of Bureau fie ld rep resen t­
atives at 3 -y ea r in te rva ls. 1 In each of the intervening y e a rs, information on em ployment and
occupational earnings is c o llected by a combination of personal v is it and m a il questionnaire fro m
establishm ents particip atin g in the previous survey.

w ork ers may advance to b etter jobs and be replaced by new w ork ers at low er rates. Such shifts in
em ployment could decrea se an occupational average even though most establishments in an area
in crea se wages during the ye ar. Trends in earnings of occupational groups, shown in table A - 7,
are better indicators of wage trends than individual jobs within the groups.

In each of the 82 2 areas cu rren tly surveyed, data are obtained fro m represen tative estab­
lishm ents within six broad industry d ivision s: Manufacturing; transportation, communication, and other
public u tilitie s; w holesale trade; re ta il tra d e; finance, insurance, and re a l estate; and s ervices . M a jor
industry groups excluded fr o m these studies are government operations and the construction and
ex tra ctive in du stries. Establishm ents having few er than a prescrib ed number of w orkers are om itted
because of in su fficien t em ploym ent in the occupations studied. Separate tabulations are provid ed fo r
each of the broad industry division s which m eet publication crite ria .

A verag e earnings re fle c t com posite, areaw ide estim ates. Industries and establishments d iffer
in pay le v e l and job staffing, and thus contribute d ifferen tly to the estim ates fo r each job. Pay
averages may fa il to re fle c t accurately the wage d ifferen tia l among jobs in individual establishments.

Th ese surveys are conducted on a sample basis. The sampling procedures involve detailed
stra tifica tion of a ll establishm ents within the scope of an individual area survey by industry and number
of em ployees. F r o m this s tra tified universe a probability sample is selected, with each establishment
having a p redeterm in ed chance of selection . T o obtain optimum accuracy at minimum cost, a g rea ter
proportion of la rg e than sm all establishm ents is selected. When data are combined, each establishment
is w eighted according to its proba bility of selection, so that unbiased estim ates are generated. F o r
exam ple, i f one out of fou r establishm ents is selected, it is given a weight of four to represent its e lf
plus th ree others. An alternate of the same o rigin al probability is chosen in the same in d u stry-size
cla ssifica tio n if data are not available fo r the o rigin al sample m em ber. I f no suitable substitute is
a vailable, additional w eight is assigned to a sample m em ber that is sim ilar to the m issing unit.
Occupations and Earnings
Occupations selected fo r study are common to a va rie ty of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing
in du stries, and are of the follow in g types:
(1) O ffice c le ric a l; (2) professional and technical; (3)
maintenance and powerplant; and (4) custodial and m a terial movement. Occupational cla ssifica tio n is
based on a u niform set of job descriptions designed to take account of interestablishm ent variation
in duties within the same job. Occupations selected fo r study are listed and described in appendix B.
Unless oth erw ise indicated, the earnings data follow ing the job titles are fo r a ll in dustries combined.
Earnings data fo r some of the occupations listed and described, or fo r some industry divisions within
occupations, are not presen ted in the A - s e r ie s tables, because eith er (1) employment in the occupation
is too sm all to p rovid e enough data to m e rit presentation, or (2) there is p o ssib ility of disclosu re of
individual establishm ent data. Separate m en 's and wom en's earnings data are not presented when the
number of w o rk ers not iden tified by sex is 20 percent or m ore of the men o r women iden tified in an
occupation. Earnings data not shown sep arately fo r industry divisions are included in a ll industries
combined data, w here shown. L ik e w is e , data are included in the overa ll cla ssifica tio n when a sub­
cla ssifica tio n of elec tron ics technicians, s e c re ta rie s , or tru ckd rivers is not shown or inform ation to
su bclassify is not available.
Occupational em ploym ent and earnings data are shown fo r fu ll-tim e w o rk ers, i.e ., those h ired
to w ork a regu la r w eekly schedule. Earnings data exclude prem ium pay for o vertim e and fo r work on
weekends, h olidays, and late shifts. Nonproduction bonuses are excluded, but c o s t-o f-liv in g allowances
and incentive bonuses are included. W eekly hours fo r o ffice c le r ic a l and professio n a l and technical
occupations r e fe r to the standard w orkw eek (rounded to the nearest half hour) fo r which em ployees
re c e iv e regu la r stra ig h t-tim e sa la ries (ex clu sive of pay fo r o vertim e at regular and/or prem ium rates).
A vera g e w eekly earnings fo r these occupations are rounded to the nearest h alf dollar.
Th ese su rveys m easure the le v e l o f occupational earnings in an a rea at a p a rticu lar tim e.
Com parisons of individual occupational a verages over tim e may not reflect expected wage changes.
The a verages fo r individual jobs are affected by changes in wages and em ployment patterns. F o r
exam ple, proportions of w o rk ers em ployed by high- or low -w age firm s may change, o r high-wage
1 Peitonal visits were on a 2-year cycle before July 1972.
2 Included in the 82 areas are 9 studies conducted by the Bureau under contract. These areas are Austin, T e x .; Binghamton, N. Y . —P a .; Fort
Lauderdale—Hollywood and West Palm Beach—Boca Raton, F la.; Lexington—Fayette, K y .; Melbourne—Titusville—Cocoa, Fla.; Norfolk—Virginia
Beach—Portsmouth and Newport News—Hampton, Va. —N. C . ; Poughkeepsie—Kingston—Newburgh, N. Y . ; Raleigh—Durham, N .C .; and Syracuse, N. Y.
In addition, the Bureau conducts more limited area studies in approximately 70 areas at the request of the Employment Standards Administration of
the U .S . Department of Labor.




A verag e pay le v e ls fo r men and women in selected occupations should not be assumed to
re fle c t d ifferen ces in pay of the sexes within individual establishm ents. Fa cto rs which may contribute
to d ifferen ces include p rog ression within established rate ranges, since only the rates paid incumbents
are co llected , and p erform an ce of sp ecific duties within the gen eral survey job descriptions. Job
descriptions used to cla s s ify em ployees in these surveys usually are m o re generalized than those used
in individual establishm ents and allow fo r m in or d ifferen ces among establishments in specific
duties perform ed.
Occupational em ploym ent estim ates represent the total in a ll establishments within the scope
of the study and not the number actually surveyed. Because occupational structures among establish­
ments d iffe r, estim ates of occupational em ployment obtained fro m the sample of establishments studied
serve only to indicate the re la tive im portance o f the jobs studied. Th ese differen ces in occupational
structure do not affect m a teria lly the accuracy of the earnings data.
W age trends fo r selected occupational groups
The
Annual rates
span between
in crea sed at

percents o f change in table A -7 relate to wage changes between the indicated dates.
o f in crea se , w here shown, r e fle c t the amount of in crea se fo r 12 months when the tim e
surveys was other than 12 months. Annual rates are based on the assumption that wages
a constant rate between surveys.

Occupations used to compute wage trends are:
O ffice c le r ic a l (men and w om en ):
Bookkeeping-m achine o perators,
class B
C le rk s, accounting, cla sses A and B
C le rk s, file , cla sses A , B, and C
C le rk s, o rd er
C le rk s, p a yro ll
Keypunch o p era to rs, cla sses A and B
M essen gers
S ecre ta ries
Stenographers, general
Stenographers, senior
Switchboard operators
Tabulating-m achine o perators,
cla ss B
T y p ists, cla sses A and B
E lectron ic data processin g
(men and w om en):
Computer op era to rs, cla sses A , B, and C
Computer p rog ra m m ers, cla sses A , B,
and C
P ercen t changes fo r individual areas in the program

E lectron ic data processin g (men
and wom en)— Continued
Computer system s analysts, classes A,
B, and C
Industrial nurses (men and wom en):
N u rses, in du strial (re g istered )
Skilled maintenance (m en):
C arpen ters
E lec tricia n s
Machinists
M echanics
Mechanics (autom otive)
P ain ters
P ip e fitte rs
T o o l and die m akers
U nskilled plant (m en }:
Janitors, p o rte rs , and cleaners
L a b o re r s , m a te ria l handling
are computed as fo llow s:

1. Each occupation is assigned a weight based on its proportionate employment in the selected
group of occupations in the base ye ar.
2. Th ese w eights are used to compute group averages. Each occupation's average (mean)
earnings is m u ltiplied by its w eight. The products a re totaled to obtain a group average.
3. The ra tio o f group averages fo r 2 consecutive y e a rs is computed by dividing the average
fo r the current y e a r by the average fo r the e a r lie r y e a r. The resu lts— ex pressed as a percent— less 100
is the percent change.

Establishment p rac tic es and supplementary wage provision s
The B -s e r ie s tables provide inform ation on establishment p ractices and supplementary wage
provisions fo r fu ll-tim e plant and o ffic e w ork ers. "P la n t w o r k e r s " include w orking forem en and a ll
nonsupervisory w orkers (including leadmen and tra in ees) engaged in nonoffice functions. C a fe te ria
w orkers and routemen are excluded fro m manufacturing, but included in nonmanufacturing industries.
"O ffic e w o rk e rs " include w orking su pervisors and nonsu pervisory w orkers p erform in g c le r ic a l or
related functions. A dm in istra tive, execu tive, professio n a l, and p a rt-tim e em ployees are excluded.
P a rt-tim e em ployees are those h ired to w ork a schedule calling regu la rly fo r fe w e r w eekly hours than
the establishm ent's schedule fo r fu ll-tim e em ployees in the same gen era l type of w ork. The
determination is based on the em p lo y er's distinction between the two groups which may take into
account not only d ifferen ces in work schedules but differen ces in pay and benefits.
Minimum entrance sa la ries fo r o ffice w orkers relate only to the establishm ents visited . (See
table B - l . ) Because of the optimum sampling techniques used and the probability that la rg e
establishments are m o re lik ely than sm all establishm ents to have fo rm a l entrance rates above the
su bclerical le v e l, the table is m o re representative of po licies in medium and la rg e establishm ents.
Shift d ifferen tia l data are lim ited to fu ll-tim e plant w orkers in manufacturing indu stries. (See
table B -2 .) This inform ation is presented in term s of (1) establishment p o lic y 3 fo r tot ad plant w o rk er
em ployment, and (2) effe c tiv e practice fo r w orkers em ployed on the specified shift at the tim e of the
survey. In establishm ents having v a rie d d ifferen tia ls, the aumount applying to a m a jo rity is used. In
establishments having some la te-sh ift hours paid at norm al ra tes, a d ifferen tia l is record ed only i f it
applies to a m a jo rity of the shift hours. A second (evening) shift ends work at or near midnight. A
third (night) shift starts w ork at or near midnight.
The scheduled w eekly hours and days of a m a jo rity of the fir s t-s h ift w ork ers in an establish ­
ment are tabulated as applying to a ll fu ll-tim e plant or o ffice w orkers of that establishm ent. (See
table B -3 .) Scheduled w eekly hours and days are those which a m a jo rity of fu ll-tim e em ployees are
expected to w ork fo r stra ig h t-tim e or o vertim e rates.
Paid holidays; paid vacations; and health, insurance, and pension plans are trea ted sta tistica lly
as applying to a fu ll-tim e plant o r o ffice w orkers i f a m a jo rity of such w orkers are elig ib le o r may
JLl
eventually qualify fo r the p ractices listed. (See tables B-4 through B -6 .) Sums of individual item s in
tables B-2 through B -5 may not equal totals because of rounding.

The summary of vacation plans is a s ta tistica l m easure of vacation p rovision s ra th er than a
m easure of the proportion of fu ll-tim e w ork ers actually re c e iv in g sp e cific ben efits. (See table B -5 .)
P ro vis io n s apply to all plant or o ffice w ork ers in an establishm ent re g a rd le ss of length of se rv ic e .
Paym ents on other than a tim e basis are con verted to a tim e period ; fo r exam ple, 2 percent of
annual earnings are considered equivalent to 1 w eek 's pay. Only ba sic plans are included. E stim ates
exclude vacation bonuses, vacation-savings plans, and "exten ded" o r "sa b b a tica l" ben efits beyond basic
plans. Such provisions are typical in the steel, aluminum, and can industries.
Health, insurance, and pension plans fo r which the em p loy er pays at lea st a part of the cost
include those (1) underwritten by a c o m m ercia l insurance company or nonprofit organ ization, (2)
provid ed through a union fund, or (3) paid d ire c tly by the em p loyer out of cu rrent operating funds or
fro m a fund set aside fo r this purpose. (See table B -6 .) An establishm ent is con sidered to have
such a plan if the m a jo rity of em ployees are c o vered even though less than a m a jo rity participate
under the plan because em ployees are requ ired to contribute tow ard the cost. Excluded are
le g a lly required plans, such as w orkm en's com pensation, so cia l secu rity, and ra ilro a d retirem en t.
Sickness and accident insurance is lim ite d to that type of insurance under which p redeterm in ed
cash payments are made d irectly to the insured during tem p ora ry illn ess or accident disability.
Inform ation is presented fo r a ll such plans to which the em p loy er contributes. H o w ever, in New
Y o rk and New J ersey, which have enacted tem p ora ry d isa b ility insurance laws requ irin g em p loy er
contribu tion s,4 plans are included only i f the em p loy er (1) contributes m o re than is le g a lly requ ired,
or (2) provides the em ployee with benefits which exceed the requ irem en ts of the law. Tabulations of
paid sick leave plans are lim ited to formed p la n s5 which provid e fu ll pay or a proportion of the
w o r k e r 's pay during absence fro m work because o f illn ess. Separate tabulations are presented
according to (1) plans which provide fu ll pay and no w aiting period , and (2) plans which provid e eith er
p a rtia l pay or a waiting period. In addition to the presentation of proportions of w ork ers provided
sickness and accident insurance or paid sick lea ve, an unduplicated total is shown of w o rk ers who
re c e iv e eith er or both types of benefits.
Long term disability insurance plans provid e payments to to ta lly disabled em ployees upon the
expiration of their paid sick leave and/or sickness and accident insurance, or a fter a p redeterm in ed
p eriod of disability (typically 6 months).
Paym ents a re made until the end of the disa b ility, a
maximum age, or elig ib ility fo r retirem en t ben efits. F u ll o r p a rtia l payments are alm ost always
reduced by social security, w orkm en's compensation, and priva te pensions benefits payable to the
disabled em ployee.

Data on paid holidays are lim ited to holidays granted annuadly on a fo rm al b asis, which (1)
are provided fo r in w ritten fo rm , o r (2) are established by custom. (See table B -4 .) Holidays
ordin arily granted are included even though they may fa ll on a nonworkday and the w ork er is not
granted another day off. The fir s t part of the paid holidays table presents the number of whole and
half holidays actually granted. The second part combines whole and half holidays to show total holiday
tim e. Table B -4a reports the incidence of the m ost common paid holidays.

M a jo r m edical insurance plans protect em ployees fro m sickness and injury expenses beyond
the coverage of basic hospitalization, m edica l, and su rg ica l plans. T y p ic a l featu res of m a jo r m edical
plans are (1) a "dedu ctible" (e.g ., $50) paid by the insured b efore ben efits begin; (2) a coinsurance
feature requiring the insured to pay a portion (e .g ., 20 p ercen t) of certain expenses; and (3) stated
d o lla r maximum benefits (e.g ., $ 10,000 a y e a r ). M ed ica l insurance provid es com plete o r p a rtia l
payment of doctors' fees. Dental insurance usually c o vers fillin g s , extra ction s, and X -r a y s . Excluded
are plans which co ver only oral su rgery or accident damage.
R etirem en t pension plans provide
payments fo r the rem ainder of the w o rk e r's life .

3 An establishment was considered as having a policy if it met either of the following conditions: (1) Operated late shifts at the time of the
survey, or (2) had formal provisions covering late shifts. An establishment was considered as having formal provisions if it (1) had operated late
shifts during the 12 months before the survey, or (2) had provisions in written form to operate late shifts.

4 The temporary disability laws
California and Rhode Island do not require employer contributions.
® An establishment is considered
having a formal plan if it established at least the minimum number of days sick leave availabh
employee.
Such a plan n
be written; but informal sick leave allowances, determined on an individual basis, are excluded.




each

Establishments and workers within scope of survey and number studied in Dayton, Ohio,1December 1974
Number of establishments

Industry d ivision 2

Minimum
employment
in establish ­
ments in scope
o f study

W orkers in establishments
Within scope of study

Within scope
of study*

otuaiea
T o ta l4

Studied
Number

Percen t

F u ll-tim e
plant w orkers

F u ll-tim e
o ffic e w orkers

T o ta l4

A ll d iv is io n s _________________________________

_

580

130

154,087

100

97, 370

20,513

100, 705

M an u factu ring__________________________________
Nonm anu factu ring________________________________
Tran sportation , com m unication, and
other public u tilitie s 5____________________ _
W holesale t r a d e ____________________________ R eta il t r a d e ___________________________________
Finance, insurance, and re a l e s ta te _____
S ervices 8 ______________________________________

50
■

246
334

57
73

97,537
56,550

63
37

70,428
26,942

10,999
9,514

70,814
29, 891

50
50
50
50
50

37
45
149
32
71

15
11
20
6
21

9,488
4,048
27,742
5,571
9,701

6
3
18
4
6

1, 821

7,376
1,510
14,318
2, 374
4, 313

5, 344
(6)
(6)
( 7)
(6)

(M

(* )
(6)
(6)

1 The Dayton Standard M etropolitan Statistical A rea , as defined by the O ffice of Management and Budget through Febru a ry 1974, consists of G reene, M iam i, M ontgom ery, and Preb le
Counties. The "w o rk ers within scope o f study" estim ates shown in this table provide a reasonably accurate description o f the size and com position o f the labor fo rc e included in the survey.
Estim ates a re not intended, h ow ever, fo r comparison with other employment indexes to m easure em ployment trends o r le v e ls since (1) planning o f wage surveys requ ires establishment data
com piled considerably in advance of the p ayroll period studied, and (2) sm all establishm ents are excluded from the scope o f the survey.
2 The 1967 edition of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual was used to cla s s ify establishm ents by industry division .
3 Includes a ll establishm ents with total employment at or above the minimum lim itation . A ll outlets (within the a rea ) of companies in industries such as trade, finance, auto re p a ir s ervice,
and m otion picture th eaters a re considered as 1 establishment.
4 Includes execu tive, p rofe ssio n a l, pa rt-tim e, and other w orkers excluded from the separate plant and o ffic e ca tego rie s.
5 A b b revia ted to "public u tilitie s " in the A - and B -s e rie s tables. Taxicabs and serv ic e s incidental to w ater transportation w ere excluded. Dayton's tra n sit system is m unicipally owned
and th e re fo re excluded fro m the scope o f the survey.
6 Th is division is rep resen ted in estim ates fo r "a ll indu stries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the A - s e r ie s tables, and fo r "a ll in d u stries" in the B - s e r ie s tables. Separate presentation of
data is not made fo r one o r m o re o f the follow ing reasons: (1) Employment is too sm all to provide enough data to m e rit separate study, (2) the sample was not designed in itia lly to perm it
separate presentation, (3) response was insufficient or inadequate to perm it separate presentation, and (4) there is p o ssib ility of disclosu re of individual establishm ent data.
7 W ork ers from this en tire division are represented in estim ates fo r "a ll in d u stries" and "nonmanufacturing" in the A - s e r ie s tables, but from the re a l estate portion only in estim ates
fo r "a ll in d u stries" in the B - s e r ie s tables. Separate presentation of data is not made fo r one or m ore o f the reasons given in footnote 6.
8 H otels and m o tels; laundries and other personal services; business s e rv ic e s ; automobile re p a ir, rental, and parking; motion pictures; nonprofit m em bersh ip organizations (excluding
re lig io u s and ch aritable orga n ization s); and engineering and architectural s e rv ic e s .

In du strial com position in manufacturing
T w o -th ird s o f the w ork ers within scope o f the survey in the Dayton area w ere
em ployed in manufacturing fir m s .
The follow ing presents the m ajor industry groups and
specific in du stries as a percen t o f a ll manufacturing:
Industry groups

Specific industries

M ach inery, except e le c tr ic a l _ 27
E le c tr ic a l equipment and
supplies -_______________________ 24
Printin g and pu b lish in g________ 9
Rubber and p la stics products „
9
Tran sportation equipm ent_____
9

O ffice and computing
m achines______________________ 14
Household appliances__________ 13
E lec trica l industrial
apparatu s_____________________ 9
Fabricated rubber
products----------------------------- 7
M otor veh icles and
equipment_____________________ 7

Labor-m anagem ent agreem ent co verag e
The follow in g tabulation shows the percent of fu ll-tim e plant and o ffice w orkers
em ployed in establishm ents in which a union contract or contracts co vered a m a jo rity o f the
w ork ers in the re sp ective ca tego rie s, Dayton, Ohio, D ecem ber 1974:

This in form ation is based on estim ates of total employment derived from universe
m a teria ls com piled b efore actual su rvey. Proportions in various industry division s may
d iffe r from proportions based on the resu lts o f the survey as shown in the appendix table.




Plant w ork ers
A ll in d u stries_____________
M an ufactu ring____________
Public u t ilit ie s ___________

76
85
98

O ffice w orkers
12
9
77

An establishm ent is considered to have a contract co verin g a ll plant or o ffice
w ork ers i f a m a jo rity o f such w ork ers are co vered by a labor-m anagem ent agreem ent.
T h e re fo r e , a ll other plant or o ffic e w ork ers are em ployed in establishments that either do
not have labor-m anagem ent contracts in effect, or have contracts that apply to few er than
half o f their plant o r o ffic e w ork ers. Estim ates are not n ecess a rily representative of the
extent to which a ll w ork ers in the area m ay be covered by the provision s o f labor-m anagem ent
agreem ents, because sm all establishm ents are excluded and the industrial scope of the
survey is lim ited .




Appendix B. Occupational Descriptions
The p rim a ry purpose of preparing job descriptions fo r the Bureau's wage surveys is to assist its fie ld staff in cla ssifyin g into appropriate
occupations w ork ers who are em ployed under a v a rie ty of p a yro ll title s and differen t w ork arrangem ents fro m establishment to establishm ent and
fr o m area to area. This perm its the grouping of occupational wage rates representing com parable job content. Because of this em phasis on
in terestablish m ent and in terarea com parability of occupational content, the Bureau's job descriptions may d iffe r significan tly fro m those in use in
individual establishments or those prepared fo r other purposes. In applying these job descriptions, the Bureau's fie ld econom ists are instructed
to exclude w orking su pervisors; apprentices; lea rn ers; beginners; train ees; and handicapped, p a rt-tim e , tem p orary, and probationary w ork ers.

OFFICE

B IL L E R , M ACHINE

CLE RKS , ACCO UNTING

P re p a re s statem ents, b ills , and in voices on a machine other than an ordin ary or electrom a tic
ty p e w riter. May also keep record s as to billin gs or shipping charges or p erfo rm other c le r ic a l work
incidental to billin g operations. F o r wage study purposes, b ille r s , machine, are cla s s ifie d by type of
machine, as follow s:

P e r fo rm s one or m ore accounting c le r ic a l tasks such as posting to re g isters and ledgers;
recon cilin g bank accounts; verify in g the internal consistency, com pleteness, and mathematical accuracy
of accounting documents; assigning p rescrib ed accounting distribution codes; examining and verifyin g
fo r c le r ic a l accuracy variou s types of reports, lis ts , calculations, posting, etc.; or preparing simple or
assisting in preparing m ore com plicated journal vouchers. May w ork in either a manual or automated
accounting system.

B ille r , machine (billin g machine).
Uses a special billin g machine (combination typing and
adding m achine) to p rep a re b ills and in voices fro m cu stom ers' purchase o rd ers, in tern ally prepared
o rd e rs , shipping m em orandum s, etc. U sually involves application of predeterm ined discounts and
shipping charges and entry of n ecess a ry extensions, which may or may not be computed on the billin g
m achine, and totals which are au tom atically accumulated by machine. The operation usually in volves a
la rg e number of carbon copies of the b ill being prepared and is often done on a fanfold machine.
B ille r , machine (bookkeeping m ach in e). Uses a bookkeeping machine (with or without a
typ e w rite r keyboard) to p rep a re cu sto m ers' bills as part of the accounts receiva b le operation.
G en era lly in volves the simultaneous entry of figures on cu stom ers' ledger record. The machine
au tom atically accumulates fig u res on a number of vertica l columns and computes and usually prints
au tom atically the debit or cred it balances. Does not involve a knowledge of bookkeeping. W orks from
uniform and standard types of sales and cred it slips.

The w ork requ ires a knowledge of c le r ic a l methods and o ffice practices and procedures which
relates to the c le r ic a l processin g and recording of transactions and accounting information. With
experience, the w ork er typ ic a lly becom es fa m ilia r with the bookkeeping and accounting term s and
procedu res used in the assigned w ork, but is not requ ired to have a knowledge of the fo rm al principles
of bookkeeping and accounting.
Position s are cla s s ifie d into le ve ls on the basis of the follow in g definitions.
Class A. Under gen eral supervision, p erfo rm s accounting c le r ic a l operations which require
the application of experience and judgment, fo r exam ple, c le r ic a lly processing com plicated or
nonrepetitive accounting transactions, selecting among a substantial v a rie ty of prescrib ed accounting
codes and cla ssifica tio n s, or tracin g transactions though previous accounting actions to determine
source of discrepan cies. May be assisted by one or m ore class B accounting clerks.

B O O K K E E PIN G -M A C H IN E O P E R A T O R
O perates a bookkeeping machine (with or without a typ ew riter keyboard) to keep a re cord of
business transactions.
Class A . Keeps a set of record s requ iring a knowledge of and' experience in basic bookkeeping
p rin cip les, and fa m ilia r ity with the structure of the particular accounting system used. D eterm ines
p rop er record s and distribution of debit and credit items to be used in each phase of the work. May
p rep a re consolidated re p o rts, balance sheets, and other records by hand.
G lass B . K eeps a re c o rd of one or m ore phases or sections of a set of records usually
requ iring little knowledge of basic bookkeeping. Phases or sections include accounts payable, p a yroll,
cu sto m ers' accounts (not including a sim ple type of billing described under b ille r , m achine), cost
distribution, expense distribution, in ven tory control, etc. May check or assist in preparation of t r ia l
balances and p repare con trol sheets fo r the accounting department.

R evised occupational descriptions fo r switchboard operator; switchboard o p e ra to r-re ­
ceptionist; m ach in e-tool op era to r, too lro o m ; and tool and die maker are being introduced this year.
Th ey are the resu lt o f the Bureau's p o licy of period ica lly review ing area wage survey occupational
d escriptions in o rd e r to take into account technological developments and to c la rify descriptions so
that they are m o re re ad ily understood and uniform ly interpreted. Even though the re vised
descriptions re fle c t b a sica lly the same occupations as previously defined, some reporting changes
-may occur because of the re visio n s.
The new single le v e l
le v e la previo u sly defined.




description

fo r switchboard operator is the equivalent of the two

Class B . Under close supervision, follow ing detailed instructions and standardized procedures,
p erfo rm s one or m ore routine accounting c le r ic a l operations, such as posting to led g ers , cards, or
w orksheets where identification of item s and locations of postings are clea rly indicated; checking
accuracy and com pleteness of standardized and rep etitive records or accounting documents; and coding
documents using a few p rescrib ed accounting codes.
C L E R K , F IL E
F ile s , c la s s ifie s , and re trie v e s m a terial in an established filin g system. May p erform
c le r ic a l and manual tasks requ ired to maintain file s . Positions are cla ssified into le ve ls on the basis
of the follow in g definitions.
Class A . C la ss ifies and indexes file m a teria l such as correspondence, reports, technical
documents, etc., in an established filin g system containing a number of va ried subject matter files.
May also file this m aterial. May keep records of various types in conjunction with the files. May
lead a sm all group of lo w er le v e l file clerks.

L isted below are
stereotypes in the titles:

re vised

occupational

titles

introduced

this

year

to

elim inate

R evised title

F o rm e r title

D ra fter
D ra fte r -tra c e r
B o ile r tender

Draftsm an
D raftsm an -tracer
F irem a n , stationary b o iler

sex

S E C R E TA R Y— Continued
Class B . S orts, codes, and file s unclassified m a teria l by sim ple (subject m a tter) headings
or partly cla ssified m a teria l by fin er subheadings. P rep a res sim ple related index and c r o s s -re fe re n c e
aids. As requested, locates c le a rly iden tified m a terial in file s and forw ards m a teria l. May p e rfo rm
related c le r ic a l tasks requ ired to maintain and s e rv ic e file s .
Class C . P e r fo rm s routine filin g of m a teria l that has already been c la ssified or which is
ea sily cla ssified in a sim ple s e r ia l classifica tion system (e .g ., alphabetical, ch ronological, or
num erical). As requested, locates read ily available m a terial in file s and fo rw a rd s m a teria l; and may
f i l l out withdrawal charge. May p e rfo rm sim ple c le r ic a l and manual tasks re qu ired to maintain and
serv ic e files .
C L E R K , ORDER
R eceives cu stom ers' orders fo r m a teria l or m erchandise by m a il, phone, or personally.
Duties involve any combination of the fo llow in g: Quoting p rices to cu stom ers; making out an o rd er
sheet listing the item s to make up the o rd er; checking p rices and quantities o f item s on o rd er sheet;
and distributing o rd er sheets to resp ective departments to be fille d . May check with credit department
to determ ine cred it rating of custom er, acknowledge receipt of orders fro m cu stom ers, fo llow up
orders to see that they have been fille d , keep file of orders re ceived , and check shipping invoices
with origin al orders.
CLERK, PA Y R O LL
Computes wages of company em ployees and enters the n ecessary data on the p a yro ll sheets.
Duties involve: Calculating w o rk e rs ' earnings based on tim e or production records; and posting
calculated data on p a y ro ll sheet, showing inform ation such as w o rk e r's name, wdrking days, tim e,
rate, deductions fo r insurance, and total wages due. May make out paychecks and assist paym aster
in making up and distributing pay en velopes. May use a calculating machine.
KE YPU N C H O PE R A T O R
Operates a keypunch machine to re cord or v e r ify alphabetic and/or num eric data on tabulating
cards or on tape.
Positions are cla s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis of the follow in g definitions.
Class A . W ork requ ires the application of experience and judgment in selecting procedures
to be follow ed and in searching fo r, in terpreting, selecting, or coding item s to be keypunched fro m a
v a rie ty of source documents. On occasion may also p erfo rm some routine keypunch work. May train
in experienced keypunch operators.
Class B . W ork is routine and repetitive. Under close su pervision o r follow in g specific
procedures or instructions, w orks fr o m various standardized source documents which have been coded,
and follow s sp ecified procedu res which have been p rescrib ed in detail and requ ire little or no selectin g,
coding, or interpreting of data to be recorded. R efers to su pervisor problem s arisin g fro m erroneous
item s or codes o r m issing inform ation.
MESSENGER

E xclusions
Not a ll positions that are titled "s e c r e t a r y " possess the above ch a ra cteris tic s.
positions which are excluded fro m the definition are as fo llo w s:

Exam ples of

a.

Positions which do not meet the "p e r s o n a l" s e c re ta ry concept described above;

b.

Stenographers not fully trained in s e c re ta ria l type duties;

c. Stenographers
m an agerial persons;

serving

as

o ffice

assistants

to

a group

of p rofe ssio n a l, tech nical,

d. S ecretary positions in which the duties are eith er substantially m o re
stantially m ore complex and responsible than those c h a ra cterized in the definition;

or

routine or sub­

e. Assistant type positions which in volve m o re d ifficu lt or m ore responsib le technical,
adm in istrative, su pervisory, or sp ecialized c le r ic a l duties which are not typ ical of s e c re ta ria l
work.
N O T E : The te rm "corporate o ffic e r , " used in the le v e l definitions follow in g, r e fe r s to those
o fficia ls who have a significant co rporate-w ide policym aking ro le with re ga rd to m a jo r company
a ctivities.
The title "v ic e p res id e n t," though n orm a lly in dicative of this ro le , does not in a ll cases
identify such positions. V ice presidents whose p rim a ry resp o n sib ility is to act perso n a lly on individual
cases or transactions (e.g ., approve or deny individual loan or cred it actions; adm in ister individual
trust accounts; d irectly supervise a c le r ic a l sta ff) are not con sidered to be "co rp o ra te o ffic e r s " fo r
purposes of applying the follow ing le v e l d efinitions.
Class A
1. S ecretary to the chairman of the board or presiden t of a company that em ploys, in a ll,
o ver 100 but few er than 5,000 persons; or
2. S ecretary to a corporate o ffic e r (other than the chairm an of the board or p residen t) of a
company that em ploys, in all, o ver 5, 000 but fe w e r than 25, 000 p erso n s; or
3. S ecretary to the head, im m ediately below the co rp o ra te o ffic e r le v e l, of a m a jo r segment
or subsidiary of a company that em ploys, in a ll, o ver 25,000 p erso n s.
Class B
1. S ecretary to the chairman of the board or presiden t of a company that em ploys,
few er than 100 persons; or

in all,

2. S ecretary to a corporate o ffic e r (other than the chairman of the board or presid en t) of a
company that em ploys, in all, o ver 100 but fe w e r than 5,000 p erso n s; or
3. S ecretary to the head, im m ediately below the o ffic e r le v e l, o ver eith er a m a jo r c o rp o ra te­
wide functional activity (e.g ., m arketing, resea rch , operations, in du strial relatio n s, e tc .) or a m ajor
geographic o r organizational segment (e.g ., a regio n a l headquarters; a m a jo r division ) of a company
that em ploys, in all, o ver 5,000 but few er than 25,000 em p lo y ees; or

P e r fo rm s variou s routine duties such as running errands, operating m in or o ffice machines
such as sealers o r m a ile rs , opening and distributing m a il, and other m in or c le r ic a l work. Exclude
positions that requ ire operation of a m otor veh icle as a significant duty.

4. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, fa cto ry ,
o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in a ll, o ver 5,000 p erso n s; or

S EC RE TA RY

5. S ecretary to the head of a la rg e and important organ izational segment (e .g ., a middle
management supervisor of an organizational segment often involving as many as s e v e ra l hundred
person s) or a company that em ploys, in all, o ver 25,000 p erso n s.

Assigned as personal sec reta ry , n orm ally to one individual. Maintains a close and highly
responsive relationship to the day-to-day work of the su pervisor. W orks fa irly independently
receivin g a minimum o f detailed supervision and guidance. P e r fo rm s va rie d c le r ic a l and s e c re ta ria l
duties, usually including m ost of the fo llow in g:
a. R ec eives telephone ca lls, personal c a lle r s , and incoming m a il, answers routine inquires,
and routes technical in qu iries to the proper persons;
b.

E stablish es, m aintains, and re vises the su p erviso r's file s ;

c.

Maintains the su p erviso r's calendar and makes appointments as instructed;

d.

Relays m essages fro m su pervisor to subordinates;

e. R eview s correspondence, memorandum s, and reports prepared by others fo r the su per­
v is o r 's signature to assure procedu ral and typographic accuracy;
f.

P e r fo rm s stenographic and typing work.

May also p erfo rm other c le r ic a l and se c re ta ria l tasks of com parable nature and difficu lty.
The work typically requ ires knowledge of o ffice routine and understanding of the organization, p rogra m s,
and procedures related to the w ork of the su pervisor.




etc. (o r other equivalent

le v e l of

Class C
1. S ecretary to an executive or m a n a gerial person whose resp o n sib ility is not equivalent to
one of the specific le v e l situations in the definition fo r cla ss B, but whose organ izational unit
n orm ally numbers at least s ev era l dozen em ployees and is usually divided into organ izational segments
which are often, in turn, further subdivided. In some com panies, this le v e l includes a wide range of
organizational echelons; in others, only one or two; or
2. S ecretary to the head of an individual plant, fa cto ry ,
o ffic ia l) that em ploys, in all, few er than 5,000 p erso n s.

etc. (o r other equivalent le v e l of

Class D
1. S ecretary to the
about 25 or 30 persons); or

su pervisor

or head of a sm all organ izational unit

(e .g .,

fe w e r than

2. S ecretary to a nonsupervisory staff sp e cia list, p rofe ssio n a l em ployee, adm in istrative
o ffic e r , or assistant, skilled technician or expert.
(N O TE:
Many companies assign sten ograph ers,
rather than secreta ries as described above, to this le v e l of su p erviso ry or n on su pervisory w o r k e r .)

STEN O G R APH ER

T A B U L A T IN G -M A C H IN E O PE R A T O R (E le c tr ic Accounting Machine O perator)

P r im a r y duty is to take dictation using shorthand, and to transcribe the dictation. May also
type fr o m w ritten copy. M ay operate fro m a stenographic pool. May occasionally tra n scrib e fro m
vo ic e recordin gs (if p rim a ry duty is tran scrib in g from recordin gs, see Tran scribin g-M ach ine
O perator, G en eral).

Operates one o r a v a rie ty of machines such as the tabulator, calcu lator, co lla to r, in te rp reter,
so rte r, reproducing punch, etc. Excluded fro m this definition are working s u p e r v is o r s . A lso excluded
are operators of elec tron ic d igital com puters, even though they may also operate EAM equipment.

N O T E : This job is distinguished fro m that of a sec reta ry in that a s e c reta ry n orm a lly w orks
in a confidential relationship with only one m anager or executive and perform s m o re responsible and
disc retio n a ry tasks as describ ed in the sec re ta ry job definition.

Class A. P e r fo rm s com plete reporting and tabulating assignm ents including devising difficult
control panel w irin g under gen era l su pervision. A ssignm ents typ ically involve a v a rie ty of long and
com plex reports which often are irr e g u la r or n on recurrin g, requiring some planning of the nature and
sequencing of operations, and the use of a v a rie ty of machines. Is typ ic a lly involved in training new
operators in machine operations o r training lo w er le v e l operators in w iring fro m diagram s and in
the operating sequences of long and com plex reports.. Does not include positions in which w irin g
respon sib ility is lim ited to selection and insertion of p rew ired boards.

Stenographer, G en era l
Dictation in volves a n orm a l routine vocabulary.
o r p e rfo rm other r e la tiv e ly routine c le r ic a l tasks.

May maintain file s , keep sim ple re cord s,

S tenographer, Senior
Dictation in volves a v a rie d tech nical or specialized vocabulary such as in leg a l b riefs or
reports on s cie n tific resea rch . M ay also set up and maintain file s , keep re cord s, etc.
OR
P e r fo r m s stenographic duties requ iring significantly g rea ter independence and responsib ility
than stenographer, gen era l, as evidenced by the follow ing: W ork requ ires a high degree of stenographic
speed and accuracy; a thorough w orking knowledge of general business and o ffice procedure; and of
the sp e cific business operations, organ ization, p o licies, procedu res, files , w orkflow , etc. Uses this
knowledge in p erfo rm in g stenographic duties and responsible c le r ic a l tasks such as maintaining followup
file s ; assem bling m a teria l fo r re p o rts, m emorandum s, and letters ; composing sim ple letters fro m
gen era l instru ctions; reading and routing incom ing m ail; and answering routine questions, etc.
SW ITCH B O AR D O P E R A T O R
O perates a telephone sw itchboard o r console used with a private branch exchange (P B X )
system to re la y incom ing, outgoing, and in tra -system calls. May provide inform ation to c a lle rs ,
re co rd and tran sm it m essa ges , keep re co rd of calls placed and to ll charges. B esides operating a
telephone sw itchboard or co n sole, m ay also type or p erfo rm routine c le ric a l work (typing o r routine
c le r ic a l w ork m ay occupy the m a jo r portion of the w ork er's tim e, and is usually p erfo rm ed while at
the sw itchboard o r con sole). C h ief or lead operators in establishments em ploying m ore than one
operator are excluded. F o r an o pera tor who also acts as a receptionist, see Switchboard O peratorReceptionist.
SW ITCH B O AR D O P E R A T O R -R E C E P T IO N IS T
At a sin gle-p osition telephone switchboard or console, acts both as an operator— see Switch­
board O perator— and as a reception ist. R eception ist's work involves such duties as greetin g v is ito rs ;
determ ining nature of v is it o r 's business and providing appropriate information; re fe rr in g v is ito r to
appropriate person in the organ ization, o r contacting that person by telephone and arranging an
appointment; keeping a log of v is it o r s .

Position s are cla s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis of the follow in g definitions.

Glass B . P e r fo rm s w ork according to established procedures and under sp ecific instructions.
A ssignm ents typ ic a lly in volve com plete but routine and recu rrin g reports o r p a rts of la r g e r and m ore
com plex reports.
Operates m ore difficu lt tabulating or e le c tr ic a l accounting machines such as the
tabulator and calcu la tor, in addition to the sim pler machines used by class C operators. May be
requ ired to do some w irin g fro m diagram s. May train new em ployees in basic machine operations.
Class C . Under specific instructions, operates sim ple tabulating or e le c tr ic a l accounting
machines such as the s o rter, in te rp reter, reproducing punch, co lla to r, etc. Assignm ents typically
in volve portions of a w ork unit, fo r exam ple, individual sorting or collating runs, or repetitive
operations. M ay p e rfo rm sim ple w irin g fro m diagram s, and do some filin g work.
TRA N SC R IB IN G rM A C H IN E O PE R A T O R , G E N E R A L
P r im a ry duty is to tra n scrib e dictation involving a n orm al routine vocabulary from transcribin g-m ach in e record s. May also type fro m w ritten copy and do sim ple c le r ic a l work. W orkers
tra n scrib in g dictation involving a v a rie d tech nical or sp ecia lized vocabulary such as leg a l b riefs or
reports on scien tific resea rch are not included. A w ork er who takes dictation in shorthand or by
Stenotype or sim ila r machine is cla s s ifie d as a stenographer.
T Y P IS T
Uses a typ e w rite r to make copies of various m a terials or to make out b ills after calculations
have been made by another person. May include typing of sten cils, m ats, or sim ila r m a terials fo r
use in duplicating p roce sses. May do c le r ic a l w ork in volving little specia l training, such as keeping
sim ple re co rd s, filin g records and rep orts, or sorting and distributing incoming mail.
Class A . P e r fo rm s one or m o re of the fo llow in g: Typing m a teria l in final fo rm when it
involves combining m a teria l from sev era l sources; or respon sib ility fo r c o rrect spelling, syllabication,
punctuation, etc., of technical or unusual words or fo reig n language m a terial; or planning layout and
typing of com plicated sta tistica l tables to maintain uniform ity and balance in spacing. May type routine
fo rm le tte rs , varyin g details to suit circum stances.
Class B . P e r fo rm s one or m ore of the fo llow in g: Copy typing from rough or clea r drafts;
or routine typing of fo rm s , insurance p o lic ie s , etc; or setting up sim ple standard tabulations; or
copying m o re com plex tables already set up and spaced p rop erly.

PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
COM PUTER O PERATOR

C O M PU TE R O PE R A T O R — Continued

M onitors and operates the control console of a digital computer to p rocess data cccording to
operating in stru ction s, usually p rep a red by a program m er. W ork includes most of the fo llow in g:
Studies instructions to determ in e equipment setup and operations; loads equipment with requ ired
item s (tape re e ls , card s, e tc .); switches n ecessary au xiliary equipment into circu it, and starts and
operates com puter; makes adjustments to computer to c o rrect operating problem s and m eet special
conditions; re view s e r r o r s made during operation and determ ines cause or r e fe rs problem to
su p erviso r or prog ra m m er; and maintains operating records. May test and assist in co rrectin g
program .

Class B . O perates independently, or under only general direction , a computer running
program s with m ost of the follow ing ch a ra cteris tic s: M ost of the progra m s are established production
runs, typ ic a lly run on a regu la rly recu rrin g b asis; there is little or no testing of new program s
requ ired; alternate program s are provid ed in case origin a l progra m needs m ajor change or cannot be
co rre c te d within a reasonably tim e. In common e r r o r situations, diagnoses cause and takes c o rrective
action. Th is usually in volves applying previou sly program m ed c o rr e c tiv e steps, or using standard
co rrection techniques.
OR

F o r w age study purposes, com puter operators are cla ssified as follow s:
Class A . O perates independently, o r under only general direction, a computer running
program s w ith m ost o f the follow in g ch a ra cteristics: New program s are frequently tested and
introduced; scheduling requ irem en ts are o f c r itic a l importance to m inim ize downtime; the program s
are o f com plex design so that iden tification of e r r o r source often requ ires a working knowledge of the
total prog ra m , and alternate p rog ra m s m ay not be available. May give direction and guidance to
lo w e r le v e l operators.




Operates under direct supervision a computer running program s or segments of program s
with the ch a ra cteris tic s described fo r class A. May assist a higher le v e l operator by independently
p erform in g less difficu lt tasks assigned, and perform in g difficu lt tasks follow ing detailed instructions
and with frequent re view of operations perform ed.
Class C . W orks on routine program s under close su pervision. Is expected to develop working
knowledge of the com puter equipment used and ability to detect problem s involved in running routine
p rogra m s. U sually has re ce iv e d some fo rm a l training in computer operation. May assist higher le v e l
operator on com plex program s.

Converts statements of business p roblem s, typ ic a lly p repared by a system s analyst, into a
sequence of detailed instructions which are requ ired to solve the problem s by automatic data processin g
equipment. W orking fro m charts or diagram s, the prog ra m m er develops the p recise instructions which,
when entered into the computer system in coded language, cause the manipulation of data to achieve
desired results. W ork in volves most of the fo llow in g: A pplies knowledge o f com puter ca p abilities,
mathem atics, lo g ic em ployed by com puters, and p a rticu lar subject m atter in volved to analyze charts
and diagram s of the problem to be program m ed; develops sequence of p rog ra m steps; w rites detailed
flow charts to show o rd er in which data w ill be processed; converts these charts to coded instructions
fo r machine to follow ; tests and co rre c ts program s; prepares instructions fo r operating personnel
during production run; analyzes, re view s, and alters program s to in crea se operating efficien cy or
adapt to new requirem ents; maintains record s of p rogra m development and revisio n s. (NO TE: W orkers
perform in g both system s analysis and program m ing should be cla s s ifie d as system s analysts i f this is
the sk ill used to determ ine th e ir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p r im a rily responsible fo r the management o r supervision of other
electron ic data processin g em p loyees, or p rog ra m m ers p rim a rily concerned with scie n tific and/or
engineering problem s.
F o r wage study purposes, p rog ra m m ers are c la ssified as follow s:
Class A . W orks independently or under only general direction on com plex problem s which
requ ire competence in a ll phases of program m ing concepts and p ractices. W orking fro m diagram s
and charts which identify the nature of desired resu lts, m a jor processin g steps to be accom plished,
and the relationships between variou s steps of the problem solving routine; plans the fu ll range
of program m ing actions needed to e fficien tly u tilize the computer system in , achieving desired
end products.
At this le v e l, program m ing is difficu lt because computer equipment must be organ ized to
produce sev era l in te rre la ted but d ive rse products fro m numerous and d iverse data elem ents. A wide
va rie ty and extensive number of in tern al processin g actions must occur. Th is requ ires such actions as
development of common operations which can be reused, establishm ent of linkage points between
operations, adjustments to data when p rogra m requirem ents exceed com puter storage capacity, and
substantial manipulation and resequencing of data elem ents to fo rm a highly in tegrated program .
May provid e functional direction to lo w e r le v e l p rogra m m ers who are

Class A . W orks independently or under only gene rad direction on com plex problem s in volving
a ll phases of system analysis. P roblem s are com plex because of d ive rse sou rces of input data and
m u ltiple-u se requirem ents of output data. (F o r exam ple, develops an in tegrated production scheduling,
in ven tory control, cost analysis, and sales analysis re c o rd in which e v e ry item of each type is
autom atically processed through the fu ll system of record s and appropriate follow up actions are in itiated
by the com puter.) Confers with persons concerned to determ in e the data processin g problem s and
advises subject-m atter personnel on the im p lication s of new or re v is e d system s of data processin g
operations. Makes recom mendations, if needed, fo r approval of m a jo r system s installations or changes
and fo r obtaining equipment.
May provide functional direction to lo w e r le v e l system s analysts who are assigned to assist.
Class B. W orks independently or under only ge n era l direction on problem s that are re la tiv e ly
uncom plicated to analyze, plan, program , and operate. P ro b le m s are of lim ited com plexity because
sources of input data are homogeneous and the output data are clo s e ly related. (F o r exam ple, develops
system s fo r maintaining depositor accounts in a bank, maintaining accounts receiva b le in a re ta il
establishm ent, or maintaining inventory accounts in a manufacturing or w holesale establish m ent.)
C on fers with persons concerned to determ ine the data p rocessin g problem s and advises subjectm atter personnel on the im plications of the data processin g system s to be applied.
OR
W orks jon a segment of a complex data processin g schem e or system , as d escribed fo r class A.
W orks independently on routine assignm ents and re c e iv e s instruction and guidance on com plex
assignm ents. Work is review ed fo r accuracy of judgm ent, com pliance with in stru ction s, and to insure
p rop er alignment with the o v e ra ll system.
Class C. W orks under im m ediate su pervision, c a rryin g out analyses as assigned, usually
of a single activity. Assignm ents are designed to develop and expand p r a c tic a l ex perien ce in the
application of procedures and skills requ ired fo r system s analysis w ork. F o r exam ple, m ay assist a
higher le v e l systems analyst by preparing the detailed specification s requ ired by p rog ra m m ers fro m
inform ation developed by the higher le v e l analyst.

assigned to assist.

Glass B . W orks independently or under only general direction on re la tiv e ly sim ple p rogra m s,
or on sim ple segments o f com plex program s. P ro g ra m s (o r segm ents) usually process inform ation to
produce data in two or three v a rie d sequences o r form ats.
Reports and listin gs are produced by
refining, adapting, a rraying, or making m inor additions to or deletions fro m input data which are
read ily available. W hile numerous records may be p rocessed, the data have been refin ed in p rio r
actions so that the accuracy and sequencing of data can be tested by using a few routine checks.
T y p ica lly, the p rogra m deals with routine record-keeping type operations.
OR
W orks on com plex program s (as described fo r class A ) under close direction of a higher
le v e l prog ra m m er o r su pervisor. M ay assist higher le v e l p rog ra m m er by independently p erform in g
lees difficult tasks assigned, and p erform in g m o re difficu lt tasks under fa ir ly clo se direction.
M ay guide o r instruct lo w e r le v e l p rogra m m ers.
Class G. Makes p ra c tic a l applications of program m ing p ra c tic es and concepts usually learned
in fo rm a l training courses. Assignm ents are designed to develop competence in the application of
standard procedures to routine problem s. R ec eives clo se supervision on new aspects o f assignm ents;
and w ork is review ed to v e r ify its accuracy and conform ance with requ ired procedu res.
C O M PU TE R SYSTEMS A N A L Y S T , BUSINESS
Analyzes business problem s to form ulate procedu res fo r solving them by use of electron ic
data processin g equipment. D evelops a com plete description of a ll specification s needed to enable
program m ers to p repare re qu ired d igital com puter program s. W ork in volves m ost of the fo llow in g:
Analyzes su bject-m atter operations to be automated and iden tifies conditions and c r ite r ia requ ired to
achieve satisfa cto ry results; sp e cifies number and types of re co rd s, file s , and documents to be used;
outlines actions to be p erfo rm e d by personnel and computers in sufficient detail fo r presentation to
management and fo r program m ing (typically this in volves preparation of w ork and data flow charts);
coordinates the development of test problem s and participates in t r ia l runs of new and re v is e d system s;
and" recpmmends equipment changes to obtain m o re effe c tiv e o v e ra ll operations. (N O TE: W orkers
perform in g both system s analysis and program m ing should be c la s s ifie d as system s analysts i f this is
the sk ill used to determ ine th e ir pay.)
Does not include em ployees p r im a rily responsible fo r the management o r supervision of other
electron ic data p rocessin g em ployees, or system s analysts p r im a rily concerned with scien tific or
enginesxlng problem s.




F o r wage study purposes, system s analysts are c la s s ifie d as follow s:

DRAFTER
Class A. Plans the graphic presentation of com plex item s having distin ctive design featu res
that d iffe r significantly from established drafting precedents. W orks in clo se support with the design
o rigin a tor, and may recom mend m inor design changes.
A nalyzes the e ffect of each change on the
details of form , function, and positioned relationships o f components a n d parts. W o r k s with a
minimum of su pervisory assistance. Com pleted w ork is re view ed by design o rigin a tor fo r consistency
with p rio r engineering determinations. May eith er p rep a re draw ings, or d irect th eir preparation by
lo w e r le v e l drafters.
Class B . P e rfo rm s nonroutine and com plex drafting assignm ents that requ ire the application
of m ost of the standardized drawing techniques re g u la rly used. Duties typ ic a lly in volve such w ork as:
P rep a res working drawings of subassemblies with ir r e g u la r shapes, m u ltiple functions, and p re c is e
positional relationships between components; p rep a res a rch itectu ra l drawings fo r construction of a
building including detail drawings of foundations, waill section s, flo o r plans, and roof. U ses accepted
form ulas and manuals in making n ecessary computations to determ ine quantities of m a teria ls to be
used, load capacities, strengths, s tre sses, etc.
R ec e iv e s in itia l in stru ction s, requ irem en ts, and
advice fro m supervisor. Completed w ork is checked fo r tech n ical adequacy.
Class C. P rep a res detail drawings of single units or parts fo r en gin eering, construction,
manufacturing, or rep a ir purposes. Types of draw ings p repared include is o m e tr ic projection s
(depicting three dimensions in accurate scade) and sectionad view s to c la r ify positioning of components
and convey needed inform ation. Consolidates details fro m a num ber of sources and adjusts or
transposes scade as required. Suggested methods of approach, applicable precedents, and advice on
source materiads are given with in itia l assignm ents. Instructions are less com plete when assignm ents
recu r. W ork may be spot-checked during p ro g re s s .
D R A F T E R -T R A C E R
Copies plans and drawings prepa red by others by placing tra cin g cloth or paper o ver drawings
auid tracin g with pen or pencil. (Does not include tra cin g lim ite d to plans p r im a rily consisting of
straight lin es and a la rg e scale not requ iring clo se delin eation .)
AND/OR
P rep a res sim ple or repetitive drawings of ea s ily visu a liz ed item s.
during progress.

W ork is c lo s e ly su pervised

W orks on variou s types of ele c tro n ic equipment and related devices by perform in g one or a
combination of the follow in g: In stallin g, maintaining, repairin g, overhauling, troubleshooting, m odifying,
constructing, and testin g. W ork requ ires p ra c tic a l application of technical knowledge of electron ics
p rin cip les, ability to determ in e m alfunctions, and sk ill to put equipment in requ ired operating condition.

Glass B . Applies com prehensive technical knowledge to solve com plex problem s (i.e ., those
that . typ ically can be solved so lely by p rop e rly in terpreting m anufacturers' manuals or sim ilar
documents) in working on elec tro n ic equipment. W ork in volves: A fa m ilia rity with the in terrelatio n ­
ships of circu its; and judgment in determ ining work sequence and in selecting tools and testing
instrum ents, usually less com plex than those used by the class A technician.

The equipment— consisting of eith er many different kinds of circuits or m ultiple repetition of
the same kind of circu it— includes, but is not lim ited to, the following: (a) E lectron ic transm itting
and re ceivin g equipment (e .g ., ra da r, radio, television , telephone, sonar, navigational aids), (b)
d ig ita l and analog com pu ters, and (c ) in du strial and m edical measuring and controlling equipment.

R ec eives technical guidance, as requ ired, fro m su pervisor o r higher le v e l technician, and
work is re view ed fo r sp ecific com pliance with accepted practices and w ork assignments. May provide
technical guidance to lo w e r le v e l technicians.

Th is cla ssifica tio n excludes repairm en of such standard electron ic equipment as common o ffice
m achines and household radio and televis io n sets; production assem blers and te s te rs ; w orkers whose
p rim a ry duty is s ervicin g elec tro n ic test instruments; technicians who have adm inistrative or
su p erviso ry resp o n sib ility; and d r a ft e r s , d e s ig n e r s , and p r o fe s s io n a l e n g in e e rs .

C lass C . A pplies w orking technical knowledge to p e rfo rm sim ple or routine tasks in working
on electron ic equipment, follow in g detailed instructions which c o ver virtu a lly all procedures. Work
typ ic a lly in volves such tasks as: A ssistin g higher le v e l technicians by perform in g such activities as
replacing components, w irin g circu its , and taking test readings; repairin g simple electron ic equipment;
and using tools and common test instruments (e.g ., m u ltim eters, audio signal generators, tube testers,
o scillo sco p es). Is not requ ired to be fa m ilia r with the interrelationships of circuits. This knowledge,
h ow ever, may be acquired through assignments designed to in crease competence (including classroom
tra in in g) so that w o rk er can advance to higher le v e l technician.

Position s are c la s s ifie d into le v e ls on the basis of the follow ing definitions.
Class A . A pplies advanced tech nical knowledge to solve unusually com plex problem s (i.e .,
those that typ ic a lly cannot be solved s o lely by reference to manufacturers' manuals or sim ila r
documents) in w orking on e lec tro n ic equipment. Examples of such problems include location and
density of c ir c u itr y , e lec tro -m a g n etic radiation, isolating malfunctions, and frequent engineering
changes. W ork in volves: A detailed understanding of the interrelationships of circu its; ex ercisin g
independent judgment in p erfo rm in g such tasks as making circu it analyses, calculating wave fo rm s,
tra cin g relationships in signal flow ; and re gu la rly using com plex test instruments' (e.g ., dual tra ce
o s cillo sco p es, Q -m e te rs , deviation m e te rs , pulse generators).
W ork may be review ed by su pervisor (frequently an engineer or d esign er) fo r general
com pliance with accepted p ra c tic es.
M ay provide technical guidance to lo w e r le v e l technicians.

R ec eives technical guidance, as requ ired, fro m su pervisor or higher le v e l technician. Work
is typ ic a lly spot checked, but is given detailed re view when new o r advanced assignments are involved.
NURSE, IN D U S TR IA L (R e g is te re d )
A re g is te re d nurse who gives nursing s e rv ic e under general m edical direction to ill or injured
em ployees or other persons who becom e i l l or su ffer an accident on the prem ises of a fa cto ry or
other establishm ent. Duties in volve a combination of the fo llow in g: Giving fir s t aid to the ill or
injured; attending to subsequent dressing of em ployees' in ju ries; keeping records of patients treated;
preparing accident reports fo r compensation or other purposes; assisting in physical examinations and
health evaluations of applicants and em ployees; and planning and ca rryin g out program s involving health
education, accident prevention, evaluation of plant environm ent, or other activities affecting the health,
w e lfa re , and safety of a ll personnel. Nursing su pervisors or head nurses in establishments employing
m ore than one nurse are excluded.

MAINTENANCE AND POWERPLANT
B O IL E R TE N D E R

H E L P E R , M A IN TE N A N C E TRAD ES

F ir e s stationary b o ile rs to furnish the establishment in which em ployed with heat, pow er,
o r steam. Feeds fuels to fir e by hand or operates a m echanical stoker, gas, or o il burner; and
checks w a ter and safety va lves . M ay clean, o il, or assist in repairing b o ilerro o m equipment.

A ssists one or m ore w orkers in the skilled maintenance tra d es, by perform in g specific or
general duties of le s s e r sk ill, such as keeping a w ork er supplied with m aterials and tools; cleaning
working area, machine, and equipment; assisting journeyman by holding m a terials or tools; and
perform in g other unskilled tasks as directed by journeyman. The kind of work the helper is perm itted
to p erfo rm va rie s from trade to trade: In some trades the h elper is confined to supplying, lifting,
and holding m a teria ls and to o ls, and cleaning working areas; and in others he is perm itted to perform
sp ecia lized machine operations, or parts of a trade that are also perform ed by w orkers on a
fu ll-tim e basis.

C A R P E N T E R , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r fo rm s the carp en try duties n ecessary to construct and maintain in good rep a ir building
woodw ork and equipment such as bins, c rib s , counters, benches, partitions, doors, flo o rs , sta irs,
casin gs, and t r im made of wood in an establishm ent. W ork involves most of the fo llow in g: Planning
and laying out of w ork fr o m blueprints, drawings, m odels, or verb a l instructions; using a v a rie ty of
ca rp en ter's handtools, portable pow er to o ls, and standard m easuring instruments; making standard
shop computations relatin g to dim ensions of w ork; and selecting m aterials n ecessary fo r the work. In
gen era l, the w ork of the maintenance carp enter requ ires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
E L E C T R IC IA N , M A IN T E N A N C E
P e r fo rm s a v a rie ty of e le c tr ic a l trade functions such as the installation, maintenance, or
re p a ir of equipment fo r the generation , distribution, or utilization of e lec tric en ergy in an establishm ent.
W ork in volves m ost of the fo llo w in g: Installing or repairing any of a va riety of e le c tr ic a l equipment
such as gen era to rs, tra n s fo rm e rs , sw itchboards, co n trollers, circu it breakers, m otors, heating units,
conduit system s, or other tra n sm ission equipment; working fro m blueprints, drawings, layouts, or
other specification s; locatin g and diagnosing trouble in the e le c tr ic a l system or equipment; working
standard computations relatin g to load requ irem en ts of w irin g or elec trica l equipment; and using a
v a rie ty of e le c tr ic ia n 's handtools and m easuring and testing instruments. In gen eral, the work of the
maintenance elec tricia n requ ires rounded training and experience usually acquired through a fo rm a l
apprenticeship or equivalent train ing and experience.
E N G IN E E R , S T A T IO N A R Y
Operates and m aintains and m ay also supervise the operation of stationary engines and
equipment (m echanical or e le c tr ic a l) to supply the establishment in which em ployed with pow er, heat,
re frig e ra tio n , or a ir-con dition ing. W ork in volves: Operating and maintaining equipment such as
steam engines, a ir c o m p resso rs , ge n era to rs , m otors, turbines, ventilating and re frig era tin g equipment,
steam b o ile rs and b o ile r -fe d w a ter pumps; making equipment repa irs; and keeping a record of operation
o f m achinery, tem p era tu re, and fu el consumption. May also supervise these operations. Head or
ch ief engineers in establishm ents em ploying m ore than one engineer are excluded.




M A C H IN E -T O O L O PE R A T O R , TO O LRO O M
S pecia lizes in operating one or m ore than one type of machine todl (e.g ., jig b o re r, grinding
machine, engine lathe, m illin g machine) to machine m etal fo r use in making or maintaining jigs ,
fixtu res, cutting too ls, gauges, or m etal dies or molds used in shaping or form ing m etal or nonmetallic
m a teria l (e .g ., pla stic, p la ster, rubber, gla ss). W ork typ ically in v o lv e s : Planning and perform in g
difficu lt machining operations which requ ire com plicated setups or a high degree of accuracy; setting
up machine too l or tools (e .g ., in stall cutting tools and adjust guides, stops, working tables, and other
controls to handle the size of stock to be machined; determ ine proper feeds, speeds, tooling, and
operation sequence or select those p rescrib ed in drawings, blueprints, or layouts); using a va riety of
p recision m easuring instruments; making n ecessary adjustments during machining operation to achieve
requisite dimensions to v e r y close toleran ces. May be required to select proper coolants and cutting
and lubricating o ils , to recogn ize when tools need dressin g, and to dress tools. In general, the work
of a m ach in e-tool operator, too lro o m , at the sk ill le v e l called fo r in this cla ssification requires
extensive knowledge of machine-shop and too lro o m practice usually acquired through considerable
on-the-job training and experience.
F o r cross-in du stry wage study purposes, this classifica tio n does not include m achine-tool
operators, to o lro o m , em ployed in tool-a n d -die jobbing shops.
M A CH INIST, M A IN T E N A N C E
Produces replacem ent parts and new parts in making rep a irs of m etal parts of mechanical
equipment operated in an establishm ent. W ork in volves most of the fo llow in g: interpreting written
instructions and specification s; planning and laying out of w ork; using a va rie ty of m achinist's handtools
and precisio n m easuring instruments; setting up and operating standard machine tools; shaping of m etal

parts to close tole ra n c es; making standard shop computations relatin g to dimensions of w ork, toolin g,
feeds, and speeds of machining; knowledge of the w orking p rop erties of the common m etals; selecting
standard m a terials, parts, and equipment requ ired fo r this w ork; and fitting and assem bling parts into
mechanical equipment. In gen eral, the m ach in ist's w ork n orm ally requ ires a rounded training in
machine-shop p ractice usually acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training
and experience.

Paints and redecorates w alls, w oodwork, and fix tu res of an establishm ent. W ork in volves the
fo llow in g: Knowledge of surface pecu lia rities and types of paint requ ired fo r d ifferen t applications;
preparing surface fo r painting by rem oving old finish or by placing putty or f ille r in n ail holes and
in te rstices ; and applying paint with spray gun o r brush. May m ix c o lo r s , o ils, white lead, and other
paint ingredients to obtain proper color or consistency. In gen era l, the w ork of the maintenance
painter requ ires rounded training and experien ce usually acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or
equivalent training and experience.

M ECHANIC, A U TO M O TIV E (Maintenance)
P IP E F IT T E R , M A IN TEN AN C E
Repairs autom obiles, buses, m otortru cks, and tra c to rs of an establishm ent. W ork in volves
m ost o f the fo llow in g: Examining automotive equipment to diagnose source of trouble; disassem bling
equipment and p erform in g rep a irs that involve the use of such handtools as w renches, gauges, d r ills ,
o r specialized equipment in disassem bling or fitting parts; replacing broken or d efective parts fro m
stock; grinding and adjusting va lves ; reassem bling and in stallin g the variou s assem blies in the veh icle
and making n ecessary adjustments; and aligning w heels, adjusting brakes and ligh ts, or tightening body
bolts. In general, the w ork of the automotive mechanic re qu ires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.
This classifica tion does not include m echanics who rep a ir cu stom ers' veh icles in automobile
re p a ir shops.
M ECHANIC, M A IN TE N A N C E
Repairs m achinery or m echanical equipment of an establishm ent. W ork in volves m ost of the
fo llow in g: Examining machines and m echanical equipment to diagnose source of trouble; dismantling
o r partly dismantling machines and perfo rm in g repa irs that m ainly in volve the use of handtools in
scraping and fitting parts; replacing broken or defective parts with item s obtained fro m stock; ordering
the production of a replacem ent part by a machine shop or sending of the machine to a machine shop
fo r m ajor repa irs; preparin g w ritten specification s fo r m a jo r rep a irs or fo r the production of parts
o rdered from machine shops; reassem bling machines; and making all n ecess a ry adjustments fo r
operation. In gen eral, the work of a maintenance mechanic requ ires rounded training and experience
usually acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience. Excluded from
this classification are w orkers whose p rim a ry duties in volve setting up or adjusting machines.
M ILLW R IG H T
Installs new machines or heavy equipment, and dism antles and in stalls machines or heavy
equipment when changes in the plant layout are required. W ork in volves most of the fo llow in g:
Planning and laying out of the w ork; in terpreting blueprints or other specification s; using a v a rie ty of
handtools and riggin g; making standard shop computations relating to s tre sses, strength of m a teria ls ,
ajid centers of gra vity; aligning and balancing of equipment; selecting .standard too ls, equipment, and
parts to be used; and installing and maintaining in good o rd er pow er tran sm ission equipment such as
d rives and speed redu cers. In general, the m illw rig h t's w ork n orm ally requ ires a rounded training and
experience in the trade acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent training and experience.

Installs or repairs w ater, steam, gas, o r other types of pipe and pipefittin gs in an esta blish ­
ment. W ork involves most of the follow in g: Layin g out of w ork and m easuring to locate position of
pipe fro m drawings or other written sp ecification s; cutting variou s sizes of pipe to c o rre c t lengths
with ch isel and hammer or oxyacetylene torch or pipe-cutting m achines; threading pipe with stocks and
dies; bending pipe by hand-driven or p o w er-d riven m achines; assem bling pipe with couplings and
fastening pipe to hangers; making standard shop computations relatin g to p ressu re s, flow , and size of
pipe requ ired; and making standard tests to determ in e whether finished pipes m eet specification s. In
general, the work of the maintenance p ip e fitte r requ ires rounded training and experience usually
acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship or equivalent train ing and experience. W ork ers p r im a rily
engaged in installing and repairing building sanitation or heating system s are exclu ded.
S H E E T -M E T A L W ORKER, M A IN TE N AN C E
Fabricates, in stalls, and maintains in good re p a ir the sh eet-m eta l equipment and fixtures (such
as machine guards, grease pans, shelves, lo c k e rs , tanks, v e n tila to rs , chutes, ducts, m etal ro o fin g )
of an establishment. W ork involves most of the fo llow in g: Planning and laying out a ll types of sheetm etal maintenance work fro m blueprints, m odels, or other specifica tion s; setting up and operating all
available types of sh eet-m etal working m achines; using a v a rie ty of handtools in cutting, bending,
form in g, shaping, fitting, and assem bling; and in stallin g sh eet-m eta l a rticles as requ ired. In gen eral,
the w ork of the maintenance sheet-m etal w o rk e r requ ires rounded train ing and experien ce usually
acquired through a fo rm a l apprenticeship o r equivalent train ing and experience.
TO O L AND DIE M AKER
Constructs and repairs jig s , fix tu res, cutting to o ls, gauges, or m eta l dies or m olds used in
shaping or form ing m etal or n on -m etallic m a teria l (e .g ., p la stic, p la ster, rubber, gla ss). W ork
typ ically in volves: Planning and laying out w ork according to m odels, blu eprints, draw ings, or other
w ritten or oral specifications; understanding the working p ro p e rties of comm on m etals and a lloys;
selecting appropriate m a terials, tools, and p roce sses requ ired to com plete task; making n ecessary
shop computation; setting up and operating variou s machine tools and related equipment; using variou s
too l and die m aker's handtools and precision m easuring instrum ents; w orking to v e r y clo se tolera n ces;
h eat-treatin g m etal parts and finished too ls and dies to achieve requ ired qu alities; fitting and
assem bling parts to prescrib ed tolerances and allow ances. In gen era l, too l and die m a k e r's w ork
requ ires rounded training in machine-shop and too lro o m p ractice usually acquired through fo rm a l
apprenticeship or equivalent training and exp erien ce.
F o r cross-indu stry wage study pu rposes, this c la ssifica tio n does not include too l and die
m akers who (1) are em ployed in tool and die jobbing shops or (2) produce fo rgin g dies (die sin kers).

CUSTODIAL AND MATERIAL MOVEMENT
GUARD AND W AT C H M E N

L A B O R E R , M A T E R IA L HANDLING

Guard. P e r fo rm s routine police duties, eith er at fix ed post o r on tour, maintaining o rd er,
using arms or fo rc e w here n ecessary. Includes gatemen who are stationed at gate and check on
identity of em ployees and other persons en terin g.

A w orker em ployed in a w arehouse, manufacturing plant, sto re, or other establishm ent whose
duties in volve one or m ore of the follow in g: Loading and unloading variou s m a teria ls and m erchandise
on or fro m freight ca rs , trucks, or other tran sporting devices; unpacking, sh elvin g, or placing
m a terials o r merchandise in proper storage location; and tran sporting m a teria ls or m erchandise by
handtruck, car, or w heelbarrow . Longshorem en, who load and unload ships are exclu ded.

Watchman.
and ille g a l entry.

Makes rounds of prem ises p e rio d ica lly in protecting p rop erty against fir e , theft,

JA N ITO R , PO R T E R , OR C LE A N E R
Cleans and keeps in an o rd e rly condition fa cto ry working areas and w ashroom s, or prem ises
o f an office, apartment house, or co m m ercia l or other establishm ent. Duties in volve a combination of
the follow in g: Sweeping, mopping or scrubbing, and polishing flo o rs ; rem oving chips, trash, and other
riefuse; dusting equipment, furniture, o r fixtu res; polishing m etal fixtu res or trim m in gs; providing
supplies and m inor maintenance s ervices ; and cleaning la va to ries, show ers, and restro om s. W o r k e rs
who specialize in window washing are excluded.




ORDER F IL L E R
F ills shipping or tra n sfer orders fo r finished goods fro m stored m erchandise in accordance
with specifications on sales slips, cu sto m ers' o rd ers, or other instructions.
M ay, in addition to
fillin g orders and indicating item s fille d or om itted, keep re cord s of outgoing o rd ers, requ isition
additional stock or report short supplies to su p erviso r, and p e r fo rm other related duties.
P A C K E R , SHIPPING
Prepa res finished products fo r shipment or storage by placing them in shipping containers,
the specific operations perform ed being dependent upon the type, s iz e , and number of units to be
packed, the type of container em ployed, and method of shipment. W ork requ ires the placing of item s
in shipping containers and may involve one o r m o re of the fo llo w in g : Knowledge o f va rio u s item s of

stock in o rd er to v e r ify content; selection of appropriate type and size of container; in sertin g
en closu res in container; using e x c e ls io r or other m a teria l to prevent breakage or damage; closing and
sealing container; and applying labels o r entering identifying data on container. Pa ck ers who also make
wooden boxes or crates are exclu ded.

follow s:

T ru c k d riv e r (combination of sizes listed sep ara tely)
T ru c k d riv e r, light (under IV2 tons)
T ru c k d riv e r, medium (lVz to and including 4 tons)
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy (o v e r 4 tons, t r a ile r type)
T ru c k d riv e r, heavy (o v e r 4 tons, other than t r a ile r type)

S H IPPIN G AND R EC EIVIN G C L E R K
P rep a res m erchandise fo r shipment, or re c e iv e s and is responsible fo r incom ing shipments
of m erchandise or other m a teria ls . Shipping work in vo lv es: A knowledge of shipping procedu res,
p ra c tic e s , routes, available means of transportation, and rates; and preparing record s of the goods
shipped, making up b ills of lading, posting weight and shipping charges, and keeping a file of shipping
re cord s. M ay d irect o r assist in preparin g the merchandise fo r shipment. R eceivin g work in v o lv e s :
V e rify in g o r d irectin g others in v e r ify in g the co rrectn ess of shipments against b ills of lading, in voices,
o r other re cord s; checking fo r shortages and rejectin g damaged goods; routing m erchandise or
m a terials to p rop er departm ents; and maintaining n ecessary records and file s .

F o r wage study purposes, tru ck d rivers are cla s s ifie d by size and type of equipment,, as
(T r a c to r - t r a ile r should be rated on the basis of t r a ile r capacity.)

TR U C K E R , POW ER
goods

Operates a manually controlled ga so lin e- or e le c tr ic -p o w e re d truck or tra cto r to transport
and m a terials of a ll kinds about a w arehouse, manufacturing plant, or other establishment.
F o r wage study purposes, w ork ers are c la s s ifie d by type of truck, as follow s:
T ru c k er, pow er (fo rk lift)
T ru c k er, pow er (other than fo r k lift)

F o r wage study pu rposes, w ork ers are cla ssified as follow s:

W AREH O U SEM AN

R eceivin g clerk
Shipping clerk
Shipping and re ceivin g clerk
TR U C K D R IV E R
D rives a tru ck within a city o r in du strial area to transport m a terials, m erchandise, equipment,
or men between variou s types of establishm ents such as: Manufacturing plants, freigh t depots,
w arehouses, w holesale and re ta il establishm ents, or between re ta il establishments and cu stom ers'
houses or places of business. M ay also load or unload truck with or without h elp ers, make m in or
m echanical re p a irs , and keep truck in good working o rder. D river-sa lesm en and o ver-th e -ro a d
d r iv e rs are excluded.

As d irected, p erfo rm s a v a rie ty of warehousing duties which requ ire am understanding of
the establishm ent's storage plan. W ork in volves most of the fo llow in g: V erifyin g m a terials (o r
merchamdise) against re ceivin g documents, noting amd reporting discrepancies and obvious damages;
routing m a terials to p rescrib ed storage locations; storing, stacking, or pailletizing m aterials in
accordance with p rescrib ed storage methods; rearran gin g and taking inventory of stored materiads;
examining stored materiads amd reporting deterioration amd damage; rem oving m a terial from storage
and preparing it fo r shipment. May operate hand or pow er trucks in perform in g warehousing duties.
Exclude w orkers whose p rim a ry duties in volve shipping amd receivin g w ork (see shipping and
re ceivin g clerk and packer, shipping), o rd er fillin g (see o rd er f ille r ), or operating power trucks (see
tru ck er, pow er).

bulletins will be issued once every 3 years. These bulletins will contain information on establishment practices and supplementary benefits as well as earnings. In the interim years, supplements containing data on
earnings only will be issued at no additional costs to holders o f the A rea Wage bulletin. I f you wish to receive these supplements, please complete the coupons below and mail to any o f the BLS regional addresses listed on the back
cover o f this publication. No further action on your part is necessary. Each year, you will receive the supplement when it is published.

A re a W age S u rveys

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Please send a copy o f Supplement II to BLS Bulletin
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City and State

Zip Code

Available On Request—
The follow ing areas are surveyed p e r io d ica lly fo r use in adm inistering the S ervic e Contract Act of 1965.
the BLS regional o ffices shown on the back co ver.
A lam ogordo—
Las C ru ces, N. Mex.
A laska
Albany, Ga.
Albuquerque, N. Mex.
A lexan dria, La.
Alpena, Standish and Tawas C ity, Mich.
Ann A rb o r, Mich.
Atlantic City, N.J.
Augusta, Ga.—
S.C.
B a k e rsfie ld , C alif.
Baton Rouge, La.
Battle C reek , Mich.
Beaumont— o rt Arthur^-Orange, Tex.
P
B ilo x i—G u lfp o rt and
P a s c a g o u la , M is s .

B oise C ity, Idaho
B rem erton , Wash.
B rid gep ort, Norwalk and Stam ford, Conn.
Brunswick, Ga.
Burlington, Vt.— .Y.
N
Cape Cod, Mass.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Champaign—
Urbana, 111.
Charleston, S.C.
Charlotte—
Gastonia, N.C.
Cheyenne, Wyo.
C la r k s v ille , Tenn. and H opkin sville, Ky.
C olorado Springs, Colo.
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ga.—
Ala.
Columbus, M iss.
Crane, Ind.
Decatur, 1 1.
1
Des M oines, Iowa
Dothan, Ala.
Duluth— uperior, Minn.— is.
S
W
E l Pa so, Tex .
Eugene— prin gfield, O reg.
S
F a y e tte v ille , N.C.
Fitchburg— eo m in ster, M ass.
L
F o rt Smith, A rk.—
Okla.
F re d e ric k —
Hagerstown, Md.—
Chambersburg,
Pa.— artinsburg, W. Va.
M
Gadsden—
Anniston, Ala.
G oldsboro, N.C.
Grand Island—
Hastings, Nebr.
G reat F a lls , Mont.
Guam
H a rrisbu rg—
Lebanon, Pa.
Huntington—
Ashland, W. Va,—
Ky.—
Ohio
K n o x v ille , T enn.
L a red o, Tex.
Las V egas, Nev.
L im a ,

Ohio

Copies of public releases are or w ill be available at no cost w hile supplies last fro m any of
L ittle Rock—
North L ittle Rock, A rk .
Logansport— eru , Ind.
P
L orain — ly ria , Ohio
E
L o w er Eastern Shore, Md.— a.—Del.
V
Lynchburg, Va.
Macon, Ga.
Madison, W is.
M ansfield, Ohio
Marquette, Escanaba, Sault Ste. M a rie , Mich,
Me Allen— arr—
Ph
Edinburg and B row n sville—
Harlingen—
San Benito, Tex.
Medford—
Klamath F a lls—
Grants P a ss, Oreg.
M eridian, M iss.
M iddlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean C os., N.J.
M obile, Ala. and Pensacola, Fla.
Montgom ery, Ala.
N ashville—Davidson, Tenn.
New Bern—
Jacksonville, N.C.
North Dakota
Norwich—
Groton—
New London, Conn.
Orlando, Fla.
Oxnard—
Simi V alley—
Ventura, C alif.
Panama City, Fla.
P eo ria , 1 1.
1
Phoenix, A riz .
Pine Bluff, Ark.
Portsmouth, N.H.— ain e—M a s s.
M
Pueblo, Colo.
Puerto Rico
Reno, Nev.
Richland—
Kennewick— alla W alla—
W
Pendleton, Wash.—
Oreg.
R iverside—
San Bernardino— ntario, C alif.
O
Salina, Kans.
Sandusky, Ohio
.Santa B a rb a ra —Santa M a ria —L o m p o c , C a lif.
Savannah, Ga.
Selma, Ala.
Sherman—
Denison, Tex.
Shreveport, La.
Sioux F a lls, S. Dak.
Spokane, Wash.
Springfield, 1 1.
1
Springfield—
Chicopee—H olyoke, M ass.—Conn.
Stamford, Conn.
Stockton, Calif.
Tacom a, Wash.
Tampa—
St. P etersbu rg, Fla.
Topeka, Kans.
Tucson, A riz .
V a llejo — a irfield -N a p a , C alif.
F
Waco and K illeen —
Tem ple, Tex .
W aterloo-C edar F a lls , Iowa
West Texas Plains

Reports fo r the follow ing surveys conducted in the p rio r y e a r but since discontinued are also available:
Grand Fork s, N. Dak.
Sacramento, C a lif*
San Angelo, T e x * *
W ilmington, Del.—
N.J.— d.*
M

A bilen e, T e x .* *
B illin gs , M ont.*
Corpus C h ris ti, T e x *
F resn o, C a lif.*
*
**

Expanded to an area wage su rvey in fis c a l ye a r 1975.
Included in W est Texas Plains.

See inside back cover.

The fourteenth annual report on sa la ries fo r accountants, auditors, ch ief accountants, attorneys, job analysts, directors of personnel, buyers, chem ists, en gin eers, en gin eering technicians, d ra fte rs, and
c le r ic a l em ployees is available. O rder as BLS Bulletin 1837, National Survey of P ro fe ssio n a l, A d m in istra tive, Technical, and C le ric a l Pay, M arch j1974, $1.40 a copy, fr o m any of the BLS regio n a l sales
offices shown on the back co ver, or fro m the Superintendent of Documents. U.S. Government Printin g O ffic e, Washington, D.C. 20402.




Area Wage Surveys
A lis t o f the la test ava ila b le bulletins or bulletin supplements is presented below . A d irecto ry of a rea wage studies including m ore lim ited studies conducted at the request of the Employment
Standards A dm in istration o f the D epartm ent o f Labor is available on request. Bulletins m ay be purchased fro m any of the BLS region a l o ffices shown on the back co ver. Bulletin supplements may be
obtained, without cost, w here indicated, fro m BLS regional o ffices.
Bulletin number
and p r ic e *
A kron , Ohio, Dec. 1973*-----------------------------------------------Albany—
Schenectady— ro y , N. Y. , Sept. 1974 _______________
T
Albuquerque, N. M ex., M a r. 1974 2 __________________________
A llen tow n-B ethlehem -E aston , Pa .— .J ., M ay 1974 2_______
N
Anaheim-Santa Ana—Garden G ro ve, C a lif., Oct. 1974 1_____
Atlanta, Ga., M ay 1974-------------------------------------------------A ustin, T e x ., Dec. 1974 ______________________________________
B a ltim o re, M d., Aug. 1974___________________________________
B eau m on t-Port Arthur—
Orange, T e x ., M ay 1974 2__________
B illin gs , Mont., July 1974*___________________________________
Binghamton, N .Y —P a ., July 1974 ___________________________
Birm ingham , A la ., M a r. 1974—
. __________________________
B oise C ity, Idaho, N ov. 1973 2________________________________
Boston, M a ss., Aug. 1974 ____________________________________
Buffalo, N .Y ., Oct. 1974 ______ _______________________________
Burlington, V t ., Dec. 1973 * _____________________________ . ____
Canton, Ohio, M ay 1974 1 ____________________________________
Charleston, W . V a ., M a r. 1974 2_____________________________
C h arlotte, N .C ., Jan. 1974 2__________________________________
Chattanooga, Tenn.—
Ga., Sept. 1974 ________________________
Chicago, H I., M ay 1974 _____________________________________
Cincinnati, O hio-Ky.— d., Feb. 1974 1 ---------------------------In
C leveland, O h io, Sept. 1973__________________________________
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 1974______T
____________________________
Corpus C h ris ti, Tex., July 1974 * ___________________________
D allas, T e x ., Oct. 1973 2____ _______ _________________________
D a lla s -F o rt W orth, T ex ., Oct. 1974 ________________________
Davenport— ock Island— o lin e, Iowa—
R
M
111., Feb. 1974 * ____
Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 1974*_______ ,____________________________
Daytona Beach, F la ., Aug. 1974 1_________________________ —
Denver, C o lo ., Dec. 1973 2 ___________________________________
Denver—B o u ld er, C o lo .1 3____________________________________
Des M oines, Iow a, M ay 1974 2_______________________________
D etro it, M ich ., M ar. 1974____________________________________
Durham, N .C ., Dec. 1973 2 ___________________________________
F o rt Lau derdale—
Hollyw ood and W est P a lm Beach, F la .,
A p r. 1974 ------- ------------- ------------------ --------------------------F o rt W orth, T e x ., Oct. 1973 2 _______________________________
Fresn o, C a l i f . 1 3 _ _ ___________________________________________
G a in e sville, F la ., Sept. 1974*_______________________________
G reen Bay, W is., July 1974__________________________________
G reensboro— inston-Salem -H igh Point, N .C ., Aug. 1974 1
W
G re en v ille, S .C ., M ay 1974 __________________________________
H a rtfo rd , Conn. 1 3 ____________________________________________
Houston, T e x ., A p r. 1974 1 ___________________________________
H u ntsville, A la ., Feb. 1974 1_________________________________
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 1974 ________________________________
Jackson, M is s ., Jan. 1974 * __________________________________
Jackson ville, F la ., Dec. 1974 _______________________________
Kansas C ity, Mo.—
Kans., Sept. 1974------------------------------L aw ren ce— a verh ill, M ass.— .H ., June 1974 2 ---------------H
N
L ex in gton -F a yette, K y., Nov. 1974 _________________________
L ittle Rock—
North L ittle Rock, A rk ., July 1973 2 ------------Los A n g eles-L o n g Beach, C a lif., Oct. 1974--------------------Los A n geles—Long Beach and Anaheim—
Santa Ana—
Garden
G ro ve, C a lif., Oct. 1973 2___________________________________
L o u is v ille , Ky.—Ind., Nov. 1 9 7 4 *____________________________
Lubbock, T e x ., M ar. 1974 2 __________________________________
M an chester, N .H ., July 1973 2_______________________________
*
1
2
3

Prices are determined by the Government Printing Office and are subject to change.
Data on establishment practices and supplementary wage provisions are also presented.
No longer surveyed.
To be surveyed.




1795-10,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
1850-9,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
1850-6,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-23,
Suppl.
Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-27,
1795-16,
Suppl.
Suppl.
1850-3,
Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-14,
1850-14,
1850-1,
Suppl.

65 cents
Free
F re e
F re e
85 cents
F ree
F ree
F ree
F ree
75 cents
F ree
F ree
F ree
F ree
F ree
Free
80 cents
F re e
F re e
Free
$ 1.10
75 cents
F re e
F ree
75 cents
F ree
Free
65 cents
80 cents
75 cents
F re e

Suppl.
Suppl.
1795-9,

F re e
F re e
65 cents

Suppl.
Suppl.

Free
F re e

______ 1850-11,
______Suppl.
______ 1850-2,
______Suppl.

75 cents
F ree
80 cents
F re e

_________ 1795-22,
_________ 1795-13,
_________ Suppl.
_________ 1795-12,
_________ Suppl.
_________ Suppl.
_________ Suppl.
_________ Suppl.
_________ Suppl.
_________ Suppl.

85 cents
65 cents
F re e
65 cents
F ree
F ree
F ree
F ree
F ree
F ree

_________ Suppl.
_________ 1850-12,
_________ Suppl.
_________ Suppl.

F ree
80 cents
F ree
F ree

A rea

Bulletin number
and p r ic e *

Melbourne— itu s v ille —
T
Cocoa, F la ., Aug. 197 4*_______________________________________ 1850-5, 75 cents
Mem phis, Tenn,— rk.—M is s ., Nov. 1974______________________________________________ Suppl.
A
F re e
M ia m i, F la ., Oct. 1974 .—________ ___ __________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
Midland and O dessa, T e x ., Jan. 1974 2___.___________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Milwaukee, W is., M ay 1974________________________________________________ ____________ Suppl.
Free
Minneapolis—
St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 1974 ______________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Muskegon—
Muskegon H eigh ts, M ich., June1974 2______________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Nassau—
Suffolk, N .Y . 1 3 _______________________________________________ ______ __________
Newark, N.J. 1 3_________________________________________________________________________
Newark and J ersey C ity, N.J., Jan. 1974 2____________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
New Haven, Conn., Jan. 1974 2 ________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
New O rlean s, L a ., Jan. 1974 1_________ ___________ ____________________________________ 1795-15, 70 cents
New Y ork , N .Y .-N .J . 1 3 ............................................................ ........................................
New Y o rk and Nassau—
Suffolk, N .Y ., A p r. 1974 2 ____________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
V
Portsm outh, Va.— .C . 3----------------------------------------------N
Norfolk— irg in ia Beach—
N orfolk— irg in ia Beach-Portsm outh and Newport News—
V
Hampton, V a., Jan. 1974______________________________________________________________Suppl.
F re e
Northeast Pennsylvania, Aug. 1974 1___________________________________________________ 1850-8, 80 cents
Oklahoma C ity, Okla., Aug. 19741 _______ _____ _______ _______________________________ 1850-7, 80 cents
Omaha, Nebr —Iow a, Oct. 1974 *________________________________________________________ 1850-10, 80 cents
Paterson—
Clifton— a ssa ic, N .J ., June 1974 __________________________________________ Suppl.
P
F ree
Philadelphia, Pa^-N .J., Nov. 1973 1___________________________________ _______________ 1795-19, 85 cents
Phoenix, A r i z . , June 1974 2 ____________________________________________________________Suppl.
F ree
Pittsburgh, P a ., Jan. 1974 ___________________ _____ ___________________________________Suppl.
F ree
Portland, M aine, Nov. 1974____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
Portland, O re g —W ash., May 1974 1___________________________________________________ 1795-26, 85 cents
Poughkeepsie, N .Y . 1 3 __________________________________ _____________ ________________
Poughkeepsie—
Kingston—
Newburgh, N .Y ., June 1974_________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Provid ence— arw ick—
W
Pawtucket, R .I.— ass., M ay 1974 1___________________________ 1795-24, 80 cents
M
R a leigh, N .C ., Dec. 1973 * 2................................ *...................... ............................ ......... 1795-7, 65 cents
F ree
Raleigh-D urham , N.C., Feb. 1975 _____________________________________________________ Suppl.
Richmond, V a ., M ar. 1974 1____________________________________________________________ 1795-25, 80 cents
R ive rsid e—
San B ern ardin o-O n tario, C a lif., Dec. 1973 2______________________________Suppl.
F re e
R ockford , H I., June 1974 2_______________ ______________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
St. Louis, M o.—
111., M ar. 1974 ________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
Sacram ento, C a lif. 1 3 ___________ _______________________________________________________
Saginaw, M ich. 1 3 ___________________________________________ _______________ ____________
Salt Lake C ity, Utah, Nov. 1974 _______________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
San Antonio, T e x ., May 1974 1_____________________________________________ _____ _____ 1795-21, 65 cents
San D iego, C a lif., Nov. 1974 * _________________________________________________________ 1850-13, 80 cents
San F rancisco—
Oakland, C a lif., M ar. 1974 ___________________________________________ Suppl.
F re e
San Jose, C a lif., M ar. 1974____________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Savannah, Ga., M ay 1974 2______________—_________ ______________________ _____________ Suppl.
F ree
Scranton, P a ., July 1973 * 2 ___________________________________________________________ 1795-3, 55 cents
Seattle— verett, W ash., Jan. 1974 ____________________________________________________ 1795-17, 65 cents
E
Sioux F a lls , S. Dak., Dec. 1973 2 ______________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
South Bend, Ind., M a r. 1974 1__________________________________________________________ 1795-18, 65 cents
Spokane, W ash., June 1974 2 ___________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Syracuse, N .Y ., July 1 97 4*_________________________ . _________________________________ 1850-4, 80 cents
Tampa—
St. P etersb u rg , F la ., Aug. 1973 2 _____________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
T o led o , Ohio— ic h ., A p r . 1974 _________________ ______________________________________ Suppl.
M
F ree
Trenton, N .J., Sept. 1974______________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Washington, D.C.—
Md.— a ., M a r. 1974 _______________________________________________ Suppl.
V
F ree
W aterbury, Conn., M a r. 1974 2________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
W aterloo, Iow a, Nov. 1973 1 2__________________________________________________________ 1795-5, 60 cents
W ichita, Kans., A p r. 1 97 4*____________________________________________________________ 1795-20, 65 cents
F ree
W o rcester, M a ss., May 1974__________________________________________ _______________ Suppl.
Y o rk , P a ., Feb. 1974 __________________________________________________________________ Suppl.
F ree
Youngstown— arren , Ohio, Nov. 1973 2_____________________________________________ ..S u ppl.
W
F re e

POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20212

LAB 441

OFFICIAL BUSINESS
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300

THIRD CLASS MAH.

B U R E A U O F L A B O R S T A T IS T IC S R E G IO N A L O F F IC E S
Region I
1603 JFK Federal Building
Government Center
Boston, Mass. 02203
Phone: 223-6761 (Area Code 617)
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont

Region It
Suite 3400
1515 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10036
Phone: 971-5405 (Area Code 212)

Region V
9th F lo o r, 230 S. D e arb orn S t.
Chicago, III. 60604
Phone: 353-1880 (Area Code 312)
Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin

Region VI
1100 Commerce St. Rm. 6B7
Dallas, Tex. 75202
Phone: 749-3516 (Area Code 214)
Arkansas
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas




New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands

Region I II

P.O. Box 13309
Philadelphia. Pa. 19101
Phone: 597-1154 (Area Code 215)
Delaware
District of Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia

Regions VII and VIII
Federal Office Building
911 Walnut St., 15th Floor
Kansas City, Mo. 64106
Phone: 374-2481 (Area Code 816)
VII
V III
Iowa
Colorado
Kansas
Montana
Missouri
North Dakota
Nebraska
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming

Region IV
Suite 540
1371 Peachtree St. N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
Phone: 526-5418 (Area Code 404)
Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Kentucky
Mississippi
North Carolina
South Carolina
Tennessee
Regions IX and X
450 Golden Gate Ave.
Box 36017
San Francisco, Calif. 94102
Phone: 556-4678 (Area Code 415)
IX .
X
Arizona
Alaska
California
Idaho
Hawaii
Oregon
Nevada
Washington


Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63102